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Full text of "Bethany College Bulletin 1880-89"

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in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/bethanycollegeb188089beth 




3 




^^K-TALOGj;^ 




OF 




'miif^m^ 



FOR THE 



t 



THIRTY-NINTH SESSION. 



^'^O'NG JUNE .7, »8»°' 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



H 





J_J 



H 






FOR THK 



THIRTY-NINTH SESSION, 



Ending June 17, 1880. 



WITH THB 



Course of Study and pmki Annoupment 



FOR 1880-'81 



BETHANY, WEST VIRGINIA. 



1880. 



FREW & CAMPBELL, 
Steam Boor and Job Pkintkks and Blank Book Manufacturers, 

Nos. 25 and 27 Fourteenth Street, 
WHEIiLING, W. VA. 



Faculty of Bethany College, 



W. K. PENDLETON, LL. T)., Pre.iident, 

And Prof, of Sacred History, and of Philosoi>!iy and Belles Lettres. 



CHAS. LOUIS LOOS, A. M.^ 

Prof, of Languages. 



C. J. KEMPER, A. M., 

Prof, of Mathematics, Astronomy and Civil Engineering 



J. F. EASTWOOD, A. M., 

Prof, of Natural Sciences. 



B. C. HAGERMAN, A. M., 

Adjunct Prof, of Ancient Languages. 



A. SKIDMORE, B. L., 

Tutor. 



ROBERT KIDD, 

Prof, of Elocution. 



C. L. LOOS, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 

J. F. EASTWOOD, 

Curator of the Museum. 



B. C. HAGERMAN, 

Librarian. 



02448 



Board of Trustees, 



W. K. Pendleton, - - - - 
Albeut Allen, . . - - 
Joseph King, - - - - - 
Geo. H. Anderson, 
Hon. R. M. Bishop, - - - - 
Dr. J. C. Campbell, - - 

J. E. Curtis, 

James Darste, - ... 

r. moffett, 

P. S. Fall, - - - - -- 

Alex. Campbell, . . . . 

John F. Rowe, .... 

Bateman Goe, . . . . 

B. B. Groom, . . - . 

Lewis Hall, 

J. H. Jones, _ . . . 

A. E. Myers, 

J. S. Lamar, . . . . - 

Hon. J. A. Garfield, . . . 
Thomas W. Phillips, - 

J. C. New, 

Dr. J. P. Robison, 
E. G. Hall, . . . . . 
L. L. Carpenter, ... 

W. A. Belding, - - - - 

Geo. H. Parks, .... 

W. K. PENDLETON, Treasurer, 



Bethany, W. Va. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Braddock's Field, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Akron, Ohio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Winchester, Ky. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Alliance, Ohio. 
West Liberty, W.Va. 
Augusta, Georgia. 
Mentor, Ohio. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Wabash, Ind. 
Troy, New York. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 



/!;>. 



Students of Thirty-Ninth Session. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



SENIORS, 



J.* D. Crow, 
James Hammond, . 
J. W. McGarvey, Jr., 
J. R. Stevenson, 



JUNIORS 



Geo. Davidson, 
Fred. V. Loos, 
CuRRAN Palmer, 



J. L. Atkins, 
P. R. Bailey, 
J. A. Cox, . 
S. L. Darsie, 
J. J. Davidson, 
J. G. Erskine, 
H. A. Macdonald, 
H. J. NiLES, Jr., 
C. M. Oliphant, 
H. K. Pendleton, 

J. W. ROUDEBUSH, 

W. S. St. Clair, 



James Beall, 
J. T. Brant, 
F. W. Brown, 



Hartford, Ky. 
Steubenville, Ohio. 
Lexington, Ky. 
Fort Madison, Iowa. 



Beaver, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
W^llsburg, W. Va. 



S OPHOMORE S. 

Savannah, Ga. 
Beaver Dam, Ohio. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Braddock's Field, Pa. 
Beaver, Pa. 
Youngstown, Ohio. 
Kingsborough, P. E. 
Mishawawka, Ind. 
Deersville, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Eckley, Ohio. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 



FRESHMEN 



Brooke Co., W. Va. 
Berlin, Pa. 
Akron, New York. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



E. T. Campbell, 
-''M. A. Campbell, 

G. W. Freshwater, 

E. A. Jester, 

0. 0. Kemp, . 
*R. I. McKee, 
*J. Lockhart, 

L. B. Mertz, 

P. Y. Pendleton, . 

E. E. Smith, . 

A. C. Stickley, 

B. W. Williamson, 



Hopkinsville, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Fowler's P. 0., W. Va. 
Mansfield, Ohio. 
Independence, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bellaire, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Rutland, Ohio. 
Strasburg, Va. 
Logan Co., W. Va. 



*Ladies. 




CATALOGUE OF KETHANr COLLEGE. j 


SCIENTIFIC COURSE. \ 

■^>~ :• 


SENIORS. 




*I. C. Darsie, 


Braddock's Field, Pa. J 


W. H.McKlNLEY, . 


Louisville, Ky. } 


\ C. W. NORRIS, . 


Germantown, Ky. 


F. T; Smith, 


Bucyrus, Ohio. 


S. L. Van Meter, 


Lexington, Ky. 


JUNIORS. 




i C. F. Teter, 


Philippi, W. Va. [ 


s o p h:o M O R E s . 


W. H. Grove, 


Greensburg, Ky. 


^'J. M. Darsie, . . ; 


Braddock's Field, Pa. 


W. G. Garvey, 


Greenwood Lake, K}^ 


J. H Grayson, . 


Lura}^, Va. 


L. A. Lee, .... 


Bethany, W. Va, 


J. C. Uhlrich, . . . 


Wheeling, W. Va. [ 


J. W. White, 


Russellville, Ark. \ 


FRESHMEN 


, '■ 


T. H. R. Croxton, 


Lexington, Ky. \ 


J. W. Cooper, . 


Wellsburg, W. Va. } 


J. C. Cree, 


Fowler's, P. 0., W. Va. ] 


E. L. Fant, . . . . 


Flemingsburg, Ky. 


Nelson Fant, . 


Flemingsburg, Ky. { 


Perry Marteney, . 


Philippi, W. Va. } 


S. RODGERS, 


Bethany, W. Va. 


R. F. Williamson, . 


Logan County, W. Va. J 


T. P. Yager, 


Rochelle, Va. 1 


*Ladies. 

7 


-...■-.. ...-_.-......... .--.._ ''' 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANF COLLEGE. 



MINISTERIAL COURSE, 





SENIORS. 


E. P. Couch, 


Shelbyville, Tenn. * 


A. S. Dabney,' 


. Louisville, Ky, 


Thos. L. Fowler, 


Kellerby P. 0. Out., Canada. 


A. T. Fox, . 


. Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 


A. B. Griffith, 


Claysville, Pa. 


J. W. Jenkins, . 


. Brockway Centre, Mich. 


D. C. McKay, . 


Wheatly River, P. E. Island 


H. H. Nesslage, 


. New York City, N. Y. 


W. S. Priest, . 


Steubenville, Ohio, 




JUNIORS. 


C. J. Tannar, 


. Sullivan, Ohio. 


S. A. WURTS, 


Copley, Ohio. 


L. A. Malone, 


. Jacksonville, 111. 



SOPHOMORES. 

C. J. Saunders, . . Centre Village, Ohio. 



FRESHMEN 



R. B. Black, . 
Jno. Fergus, 

J. W. McCoRMICK, 

Geo. Munro, 
T. F. Prothro, . 
Daniel Scott, . 
E. M. SxMith, . 



Christ Chtirch, New Zealand. 
Dunedin, New Zealand. 
Chillicothe, Mo. 
Ridgetown, Ont., Canada. 
Griffin, Ga 

New Castle-on-Tyne, England. 
Louisa C. H., Va. 



CAT/ILOGUE OF BETH AN V COLLEGE. 



M. C. Boyd, 
M. C. Burt, . 
J. W. Couch, 
*M. Cowan, 

G. A. HUKILL, 

C. W. Jackson, 
*L. C. King, . 

*E. V. LOCKHART, 

W. W. Pendleton, 
*J. M. Purvis, . 
Wallace Rosson, 
Chester Snider, 
s. m. worthington 



ihreguijAR course. 

Wellsbiirg, W. Va. 



*Ladies. 



Mishawaka, Ind. 
Linkville, Mo. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Augusta, Ga. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Cuckoo, Va. 
Concordia Parish, La. 
Fordsville, Ky. 
Kansas Cit}^, Mo, 
Fernleaf, Ky. 



POST-GRADUATE COURSE. 

B. 0. Aylesworth, . . . Athens, 111. 



A. Skidmore, 



West Mansfield, Ohio. 




CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



1 



RECAPITULATION. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Seniors, 
Juniors, , 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen, 

Total, 



4 
3 

12 
15 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



Seniors, 
Juniors, . 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen, 



34 I Total, 



b 
1 

7 
9 

22 



MINISTERIAL COURSE. 



Seniors, 
Juniors, 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen, 



Total, 
Irregular, . 
Post Graduate, 



20 
13 

2 



Total, 





NUMBER OF STUDENTS FROM 


West Virginia, 


. 25 


P. E. Island, 


Pennsylvania, 


19 


New Zealand, 


Kentuck}^, 


.14 


Michigan, 


Ohio, . 


14 


Louisiana, . 


Virginia, 


. 5 


Arkansas, 


Missouri, . 


3 


Tennessee, . 


Georgia, 


. 3 


Iowa, , 


Indiana, 


2 


England, 


Illinois, 


. 2 




New York, 


2 


Total, . 


Canada, 


. . 2 





91 



2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

91 



10 



CATALOGUE 


OF BETHANY COLLEGE. j 


GRADUATES. 


Thirty-Ninth 


Class, June 17th, 1880. 


BACHELORS OF ARTS. 


J. D. Crow, 
James Hammond, 
J. W. McGarvey, Jr., 
J. R. Stevenson, 


Hartford, Ky. 
Steubenville, Ohio. 
Lexington, Ky. \ 
Ft. Madison, Iowa, [ 


BACHELORS OF SCIENCE. 


*L C. Darsie, 
W. H. McKinley, 

C. W. NORRIS, 

F. T. Smith, . 
S. L. Van Meter, 


Braddock's Field, Pa. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Germantown, Ky. 
Bucyrus, Ohio. ( 
Lexington, Ky. 


BACHELORS OF LETTERS. 


\ E. P. Couch, . 
A. S. Dabney, . 
Thos. L. Fowler, 
A. T. Fox, 
A. B. Griffith, 
J. W. Jenkins, . 
D. C. McKay. 
H. H. Nesslage, 
W. S. Priest, 


Shelbyville, Tenn. f 
Louisville, Ky. 
KellerbyP.O.,Ont.,Can. ! 
Mount Pleasant, Penn. 
Claysville, Penn. 
Brockway Centre, Mich. 
WheatleyRiver,P.E. Isl. \ 
New York City, N. Y. 
Steubenville, Ohio. 


MASTER 


OF ARTS IN COURSE. 


B. 0. Aylesworth, 


. Athens, Illinois. 


':= Ladies. 


11 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



WHOLE NUMBER OF GRADUATES BY STATES. 



Kentucky, 


130 


Michigan, - . - 


5 


Virginia, 


- 75 


Oregon, . - - 


2 


Ohio, 


71 


Wisconsin, 


- 2 


Missouri, 


- 58 


Arkansas, - - - 


2 


Pennsylvania, 


48 


Colorado, - - 


- 1 


West Virginia, 


- 40 


Vermont, - - - 


1 


Tennessee, 


29 


Iowa, 


- 2 


Illinois, 


- 19 


District of Columbia, - 


1 


Georgia, 


10 


Canada, - 


- 5 


Indiana, 


- 10 


Prince Edward Island, - 


4 


Maryland, 


- , - 8 


Ireland, 


1 


Mississippi, - 


8 


Mexico, - - - 


- 1 


Alabama, - 


- 7 


New Brunswick, - 


1 


Louisiana, 


6 


Nova Scotia, 


- 1 


New York, 


- 6, 


Scotland, _ - - 


1 


South Carolina, 


5 


Australia, 


- 1 


Texas, 


- 5 


Wales, - - - - 


1 


North Carolina, 


4 











Total, - 


571 


Whole number 


of Bachelors oj 


' Arts, - - - - 


486 


l( u 


ii a 


Science, 


48 


n u 


a u 


Letters, 


37 




TERMS OF ADMISSION. 




VERY candidate for admission into Bethany College must 
present to the President or Vice President satisfactory evi- 
dence of his good moral character. 

He must procure and read a copy of the laws of the Institu- 
tion, and pay the required matriculation and tuition fees. 

He will then receive permission to matriculate. 

He shall then sign his name in a book to be kept for that 
purpose by the Secretary, in which shall be stated his age. the 
name and residence of his father or guardian, under a declara- 
tion in the following words, (which shall be distinctly read to 
him before he signs his name,) viz : 

"Having carefully read the laws of Bethany College, I do hereby subscribe 
myself a student thereof. And I do hereby solemly promise, that during my 
connection with it, I will faithfully observe and obey all its rules and regula- 
tions ; and particularly that I will be diligent in study, punctual and orderly at 
recitations, strictly moral in language and conduct, respectful to the officers of 
the Institution, courteous to my fellow students ; that I will abstain from all 
kinds of gaming, from the use of intoxicating liquors ; and that I will neither 
keep nor use fire-arms, nor any other kind of deadly weapon whatever ; and, 
moreover, I do hereby solemly certify that at present I have nothing of the 
kind in my possession, or under my control." 

Students will do well to bring no fi'^e-arms or other weapons to the 
College as they will be required in all cases to give them over into the 
keeping of the Faculty. 

It is desirable that all students be present at the beginning 
of the term. And the settled policy of the Institution requires 
that immediately on their arrival, the}^ report themselves to 
the Faculty, and enter upon their prescribed course of study. 

Terms of Continued Membership. — To remain in connection with 
Bethany College it is required of every student : 

That immediately after matriculation, he select from the dif- 
ferent schools, with the advice and consent of the Faculty, a 
number of studies equivalent to three daily recitations. In some 
cases this may be too much, in others too little for the capacity 

13 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

of the student. Due allowance will always be made in such 
cases. None will be unnecessarily retarded. But any depar- 
ture from the established order of three daily recitations, must 
be made with th9 knowledge and approbation of the Faculty. 

2. — That he be diligent in study and punctual in attendance 
upon recitations, examinations, and all other College exercises. 

3. — That having entered any class, he shall not leave it with- 
out the permission of the Faculty. 

4. — That he neither introduce upon the premises, nor use 
any intoxicating beverage. 

5. — That he neither keep in his possession, nor use fire-arms, 
a dirk, bowie-knife, or any other kind of deadly weapon. 

6. — That he abstain from profanity, the desecration of the 
Lord's Day, all kinds of gaming, even for amusement, and 
whatever is inconsistent with good order, good taste and good 
morals. 

7. — That he attend public worship every Lord's Day. 

8. — That he do not leave the immediate precincts of the Col- 
lege premises during the session, without permission from the 
acting President of the Faculty. 

9. — That he carefully observe all the rules and regulations 
contained in the other articles of this Code, respecting fees, 
Societies, College property, boarding houses, et cetera. 



14 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



P^ETHANY College has three separate, complete courses, the 
(^=y Classical, the Scientific, and Ministerial, conferring re- 
spectively the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, 
and Bachelor of Letters. In addition there are three special 
courses. Engineering, Physics, and Chemistry, for which certi- 
ficates only are given. 

PREPARATORY YEAR. 

It is not in harmony with the policy of the Institution to re- 
ceive boys from a distance under fifteen years of age. But for 
the accommodation of young men who wish a higher grade of 
instruction than is furnished in the common schools, or to 
qualify themselves for admission into the Regular College Cour- 
ses, the following preparatory studies of one year have been 
added : 

First Term. — English Grammar, Arithmetic, and History of 
the United States. 

Second Term. — Algebra, English Composition, and History 
of England. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

This course embraces the following schools, viz: 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of Ancient Languages. 

3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

4. School of Natural Sciences. 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 
Economy, 

It is presumed that every student, previous to his entering 
upon the study of any of these schools, has made himself 
thoroughly acquainted with the following preparatory course : 

15 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Ancient and Modern Geography, History of the United States, 
Elements of General History, English Grammar, Arithmetic, 
Elements of Algebra, Latin Reader, Caesar's Commentaries, 
Exercises in Latin Syntax and Prosody, Greek Grammar, Greek 
Reader, and Practical Exercises in Greek Syntax and Prosody. 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

Evidences of Christianity, Moral Philosophy, and Daily Lec- 
tures on the Bible. 

Lectures on the Languages, History, and Canonicity of the 
Old and New Testament. 



2. School of Ancient Languages. 

PREPARATORY COURSE. 

First Term. — Greek — Grammar, (Goodwin,) Leighton's Greek 
Lessons. 

Latin — Grammar, (Allen and Greenough,) Arnold's First 
Latin Book, (Harkness.) 

Second Term. — Greek — Grammar, (Goodwin), Xenophon's 
Anabasis. ^ 

Latin — Csesar, Latin Composition, (Allen and Greenough.) 

COLLEGE COURSE. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — Greek — Xenophon's Anabasis continued, He- 
rodotus begun. 

Latin — Caesar's Commentaries, Latin Composition, (Allen and 
Greenough,) Roman History. 

Second Term. — Greek — Herodotus continued, three books of 
Horner's Iliad, Grecian History. 

Latin — Virgil, Sallust, Latin Composition, (Allen and Green- 
ough.) 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — (rreeA;— Homer's Iliad, Xenophon's Memorabilia 
of Socrates. 

Latin — Cicero's Orations. — Odes of Horace. 

Second Term. — Greek — Plato's Apology of Socrates, or Crito, 
Theocritus, Demosthenes, or Lysias. 

Latin — Epistles and Satires of Horace, Tacitus' Gerraania or 

Agricola. 

1& 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Greek — The CEdipus Tyrannus, Selections from 
the Lyric Poets. 

Latin — A Latin Play. 

Second Term. — Comparative study of English; Lectures on 
the Languages, Canonicity and History of the books of the Old 
and New Testament. 

SPECIAL EXAMINATIONS ON PRIVATE STUDIES. 

Sophomore Year — Intermediate Examinations — Ancient 
Geography. Final Examinations — Grecian and Roman My- 
thology. 

Junior Year. — Intermediate Examinations — Greek Litera- 
ture. Final Examinations — Roman Literature. 

All students entering into the more advanced classes^ ivho have not 
passed examinations in these Studies, ivill have to pass these examina- 
tions. 

Sh:nior Year. — First Term — Fowler's English Grammar. 

Books of Reference used during the entire College Course: 
Doederlein's or Ramshorn's Latin Synonyms, Classical Diction- 
ary, Classical Geography and Atlas. 

3. School of Mathematics and Astrononiy. 

Every Applicant for admission into this school will be exam- 
ined in the principles of Arithmetic, and in Algebra to Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree. Those not qualified to enter can 
qualify themselves by joining the Mathematical Classes of the 
preparatory year. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Algebra — From Equations of Second Degree (Ray's Second 
Part'.) 

Geometry— ^Qg\xn (Venable.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

Geometry — Completed.. 

Trigonometry — Plane and Spherical, Measurements of Heights 
and distances. (Greenleaf.) 

Analytical Geometry — (Olney.) Text Book with Instrumental 
Constructions. 

Surveying — Begun. (Davis or Gillespie.) Chain and Com- 
pass. Field work. Platting. 

17 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



THIRD YEAR. 

Survpying Completed. Theodolite. Laying Out of Lands. 

Descriptive Geometry. (Church.) 

The Differential and Integral Calculus. (Olney.) 

Application of the Calculus to Analytical Geometry. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Mechanics — Parkinson. 

Astronomy — (Snell's Olmsted.) 

This department is well supplied with instruments, Astro- 
nomical Transit, Meridian Compass, Sextant, Theodolite, Sur- 
veying Compass, &c., all of which the student is required to 
use practically. 

4. School of Natural Science. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. — Botany — (Gray.) 

- third year. 

First Term. — Chemistry. 

Geology — (Dana, New Edition.) 
Second Term. — Physics — As far as Heat. 
Zoology. 
Physiology — By Lectures. 

fourth year. 
First Term. — Physics — (Ganot, New Edition.) 



School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres, and Political Economy. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric — Quackenbos.) 

English Composition. 
Second Term. — Same. 

second year. 

First Term. — English Literature, (Coppee.) 
Second Term. — Day's Art of Discourse. 

fourth year. 

First Term. — Metaphysics— (Porter.) 
Rhetoric — (Whately.) 
Second Term. — Logic — (Whately.) 

Political Economy — (Wayland.) 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCES. 

This course embraces the following schools : ' 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

3. School of Natural Science. 

4. School of Modern Languages. 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 
Economy. 



1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

Evidences of Christianity. 

Moral Philosophy. 

Daily Lessons on the Bible. 

Introduction of the Old and New Testaments, b}^ Lectures. 

The lectures are designed to exemplify and apply the true 
principles of interpretation, and to teach and enforce the great 
facts and principles of the Scriptures. 



2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

(Applicants for Admission w^ill be examined in the principles 
of Arithmetic, and of Algebra to Equations of Second Degree. 



FIRST YEAR. 



First Term. — Algebra — Prom Equations of Second Degree. 
Second Term. — Geometry — Plane. (Venable.) 

Drawing — Geometrical Constructions. 
Lettering. 



SECOND YEAR. 



First Term. — Geometry — Solid and Spherical. 

Trigonometry — Plane and Spherical, with meas- 
urements of Heights and Distances. (Greenleaf.) 



19. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Second Teem. — Analytical Geometry. — With Instrumental Con- 
structions. (Olney.) 

Surveying — Plane, Laying out Land, &o., with 
Field Work and Mapping. fGillespie.) 

Drawing — Higher Curves, Cycloids, Epicy- 
cloids, &c. Plane Projections. 

THIKD YEAR. 

First Term. — Descriptive Geometry. 

Surveying — Leveling, Topographical Surveying with Field 
Work and Mapping. 

Road Surveying — (Gillespie.) 

Projection Drawing. 

Second Term. — Drawing — Shades, Shadows and Perspective, 
Constructions in Wood, Stone and Iron. (Warren.) 

Coloring. 

Railroad Surveying — Field Operations, Tangents, Curvatures, 
Leveling, Cross Sections, Grades, Calculations for Excavations, 
Embankments, &c., &c. 

Differential and Integral Calculus. (Olney.) 

In this 5^ear there are two daily recitations, and extra work 
in the field or at the drawing table. In the field, the work on 
railroad surveying from the use of the chain and rod to the 
level and transit, is exemplified and made practical. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Mechanics — (Parkinson.) 

Astronomy — Snell's Olmsted, with practical use of instru- 
ments, the Sextant, Astronomical Transit, Altitude, and Azi- 
muth Instruments, &c., and computations of time, latitude, 
longitude, e%c., &c. 



3. School of Natural Science. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. — Botany — (Gray.) 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Chemistry and Geology. 

Second Term. — Physics, as far as Heat. 

Zoology — (Nicholson's Manual.) 
Physiology — (Lectures.) 

20 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 
FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Physics — (Ganot, New Edition, beginning at 
Heat.) 

Practical Chemistry. 
Second Term. — 

Practical Physics. 

The Laboratories are well supplied with everything necessary 
to the successful study of Chemistry and Physics. The Profes- 
sor will give personal attention to the Student, and those suf- 
ficiently advanced will be permitted and encouraged to make 
original investigations. 

The application of the Microscope and Spectroscope to anal- 
ysis will have particular attention. 

A course in Toxicology and in Urinalysis is provided for an}^ 
wishing them, but they are not required in the regular course. 
Students not wishing to graduate in the School of Natural Sci- 
ence, can take the Practical Chemistry course, or the Practical 
Physics course alone, and,receive a Certificate of Proficiency. 



4. School of Modern Languages. 

FIRST YEAR. 

French, — Collet's Grammer, Collet's Reader, (Spier's and 
Surenne's Pronouncing Dictionary.) 

SECOND year. 

German — Woodbury's Grammar, Woodbury's Reader, Schil- 
ler's William Tell. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Examination on Private Study of Fowler's 
English Grammar. 

Second Term. — Critical Study of English, Lectures on the 
Languages, Canonicity and History of the Books of the Old and 
New Testament. 



5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres, and Political 

Economy. 

(Same as in Classical Course.) 
21 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



MINISTERIAL COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 

This course embraces the following Schools: 

1. School of Sacred Literature. 

2. School of Ancient Languages. 

3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

4. School of Natural Science. 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 
Economy. 



1. School of Sacred Literature. 
W. K. Pendleton and C. L. Loos, Professors. 

THIRD YEAR, 

First Term. — Inspiration of the Scriptures. 
Hermeneutis. 
Hebrew. 
Second Term. — Greeh Exegesis — (Select portions of the Greek 
New Testament.) 

Hebrew. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Homiletics — (With practical exercises in mak- 
ing and delivering discourses.) 
Hebrew. 
Second Term — Christian Doctrine — (As taught in the New 
Testament and traced in the history of the Church.) 

The Church— (Its foundation and development.) 
Hebreiv. 

This School embraces, besides these studies, which are pecu- 
liar to it, the full course of instruction given in the School of 
Sacred History and Moral Philosophy ; in which also Students 
in the Ministerial Course will be required to pass special exam- 
inations. 

2'Z 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 
2. School of Ancient Languages. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

THIRD YEAH. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Examinations on Private Study of Fowler's 
English Grammar. 

Second Term. — Critical Study of English. 

Lectures on the Languages, Canonicity and History of the 
Books of the Old and New Testament. 



3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

first year. 
Same as in Classical Course. 

SECOND year. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 
Second Term. — Same as in Classical Course, 
^.s^ronom^/.— (Lectures.) 



4. School of Natural Science. 
SECOND year. 
Same as in Classical Course. 

third year. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

23 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE 
FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 



5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres, and Political 

Economy. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 
Second Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 




SEVERAL COURSES. 






»E. MINISTERIAL COURSE. 

j 


• 

52: 
H 

(A 
H 


a 

EH 

■4-» 

OS 
iH 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 

English Conaposition. 


a 




Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry: — Plane and Solid. 

English Composition. 


H 







a 

EH 

OS 


a. 


Latin, Roman History. 

Greek. 

Geometry : — Spherical. 

Trigonometry: — Plane and Spherical. 

English Literature. 

Ancient Geography. 


a 

EH 
CM 


1 

i 
i 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History. 
Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 
Astronomy, by Lectures. 
Surveying. 
Art of Discourse. 
1 Grecian and Roman Mythology. 


JUNIOR. 


a 

Eh 

as 


I Latin. 
L.eveling. ! Greek. 
ng. Inspiration. 

Herraeneutics. 

Hebrew. 

Chemistry and Geology. 

Greek Literature. 


2d Term. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Greek Exegesis. 

Hebrew. 
:j Physics, Zoology, and Physiology, (Lectures.) 
jl Boman Literature 


SENIOR. 


2d Term. 1st Term. 


F English. 

L - ... 

lent. 

nal Designs 

a — 


Metaphysics and Rhetoric. 

Homilelics. 

Hebrew. 

Physics. 

Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 

Logic — Political Economy. 
Christian Doctrine. 

The Church. 1 
Critical Studv of English, 

Lectures on the Old and New Testaments. j 
Hebrew. ! 

i 






1 





CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE 
FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 



5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres, and Political 

Economy. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 
Second Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 




24 



SYNCHRONISTIC VIEW OF THE SEVERAL COURSES. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Lalin. 

Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 

English Composition. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry : Plane and Solid. 

English Composition. 



Latin, Roman History. 

Greek. 

Geometry : — Spherical. 

Trigonometry: — Plane and Spherical. 

English Literature. 

Ancient Geography. 



Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History. 

Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Surveying. 

Art of Difcourse. 

Grecian and Roman Mythology. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

Land Surveying. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Chemistry and Geology. 

Greek Literature. 



Lalin. 

Greek. 

Zoology, Physiology (Lectures. 

Physics. 

Calculus. 

Roman Literature. 



Metaphysics and Rhetoric. 

Latin. 

Greek. 

Mechanics. 

Phj'sics. 

Oriein and Grammatical Structure of Enf 



lish. 



Logic, Political Economy. 

Astronomy. 

Critical Study of English. 

Lectures on the Old and New Testaments. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



Higher Algebra. 
English Composition. 
History. 
French. 



Geometry :— Plane and Solid. 

English Composition. 

French. -i 

History. 

Drawing. 



Geometry : — Spherical. 
Trigonometry: — Plane and Spherical. 
German. 
Roman History. 
English Literature. 



Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Projection Drawing. 

German. 

Grecian History, 

Surveying. 

Art of Discourse. 



Surveying: — Laying out of Lands; Leveling 
Topographical Surveying and Drawing. 
Descriptive Geometry. 
Analytical Geometry. 
Chemistry and Geology. 



Drawing. 

Roads'and Railroads. 

Railroad — Field Operations. 

Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Zoology and Physiology (Lectures.) 

Phvsics. 



MINISTERIAL COURSE. 



Metaphysics, 
Rhetoric. 
Mechanics. 
Phy.sicp. 

Practical Chemistry. 

Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 
Astronomy. 

Logic, Political Economy. 
Critical Study of English. 
Lectures on the Old and New Testament. 
Practical Physics. 
Practical Chemistry. 

Mechanical Constructions, and Original Designs 
in Drawing. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 

English Composition. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry:— Plane and Solid, 

English Composition. 



Latin, Roman History. 

Greek. 

Geometry : — Spherical. 

Trigonometry: — Plane and Spherical. 

English Literature. 

Ancient Geography, 

Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History. 

Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Astronomy, by Lectures. 

Surveying. 

Art of Discourse. 

Grecian and Roman Mythology. 

Latin. 

Greek. 

Inspiration. 

Hermeneutics. 

Hebrew. 

Chemistry and Geology. 

Greek Literature. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

Greek Exegesis. 

Hebrew. 

Physics, Zoology, and Physiology, (Lectures.) 

Roman Literature 

Metaphysics and Rhetoric. 

Homiletics. 

Hebrew. 

Physics. 

Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 

Logic — Political Economy. 

Christian Doctrine. 

The Church. 

Critical Study of English. 

Lectures on the Old and Xew Testaments. 

Hebrew. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



SPECIAL COURSE IN ENGINEERING, 

FOR WHICH A CERTIFICATE 18 GIVEN. 

For this course no fixed time is allowed. Its object being 
special, the student need only remain during the time necessary 
to finish the studies it embraces. If prepared in Trigonometry 
and the studies preceding it, he can complete this course in a 
year or eighteen months. 

1. Land surveying, including the various methods with the 
chain, compass and theodolite. 

2. Laying out of Lands. 

3. Topographical Surveying and Drawing. 

4. Lettering and Coloring. 

5. Leveling, Profiling, Mapping. 

6. Descriptive Geometry. 

7. Geometrical Drawing, Constructions in Wood, Iron, Stone, 
&c., Shades, Shadows, and Perspective. 

8. Roads and Railroads, with field operations, running out 
tangents, laying out Curves by variuus methods, Leveling 
establishing Grades, Cross Sections, with accompan3^ing office 
work. Mapping, Profiling, and Calculation of Excavation and 
Embankment, &c. 

Special arrangements can be made by those wishing to pur- 
sue exclusively a single branch, as Land Surveying, or field 
practice in Railroad Surveying. For such a separate charge is 
made, proportioned to time employed. Certificates will be 
given indicating the branch studied, and the degree of pro- 
ficiency attained. 



25 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



TEACHERS' COURSE 



IN 



Natural Philosophy. 



PHYSICAL LABORATORY. 



A Laboratory of Physical Science has been fitted up and pro- 
vided with suitable Apparatus, and a Special Course in Exper- 
imental Philosophy for the benefit of teachers wishing such 
instruction. 

The Course embraces the verification and illustration of 
Physical Laws, and consists of — 

1. Physical Properties of Matter. 

2. Chemical Properties of Matter. 

3. Sounds and Musical Instruments. 

4. Light and Optical Instruments. 

5. Heat and Thermal Instruments. 

6. Electricity — Static. 

7. Electricity — Dynamic. 

8. Magnetism. 

9. Correlation and Conservation of Forces. 

Each Student will perform all the experiments himself, and 
keep a hand book to describe minutely the work done and the 
conditions of successful manipulation with all the instruments, 
and the explanation of all the phenomena observed. 

On completing the course, he will be examined, and if pro- 
ficient, receive a certificate upon the payment of Two Dollars. 

A fee of Twenty-five Dollars will be charged for the full 
course, uniformly in Advance. The Student will be responsi- 
ble for the apparatus he uses. 

From six to ten weeks will be needed to complete this Course. 

26 



fp 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



WORKS OF REFERENCE. 

Atkinson's Ganot, 

Lessons in Elementary Physics, - - Stewart. 

Physique, ... - - Ganot. 

First Principles of Philosophy, - - - Stillman 

Heat as a Mode of Motion, - - - Tyndall. 

Sound, . - - . _ Tyndall. 

Light and Electricity, - - - Tyndall. 

IClements of Chemistry, - - - - Miller. 

Spectrum Analysis, - - - Roscoe. 
Correlation and Conversation of Forces, 

Grove, Helmholtz, Mayer, &c. 
Davis' Manual of Magnetism, 

The Inductorium, . _ - . Noad. 

Chemistry, . . - . . Barker. 

Chemical Tables, - - - Dolbear. 




27 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



SPECIAL COURSE IN PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. 



FOR WHICH A CERTIFICATE IS GIVEN. 



1. Qualitative Analysis — The examination of a hundred solids 
and solutions to determine their composition. 

2. Mhieralogy — The determination of a hundred minerals with 
the blow-pipe. 

3. Quantitative Analysis — The determination of the amount of 
the elements, bases and acids in various compounds. 

4. Assaying — The determination of the amount of pure metal 
in the various ores of gold, silver, copper, lead, iron, &c. 

5. Pharmacy — The preparation of various medicinal agents 
and drugs — Acidimetry and Alkalimetry. 

The course in Qualitative Analysis is essential for the suc- 
cessful prosecution of any of the others and will be required. 
After that, a student may take any one, or all of the others. 
The certificate will indicate the branches studied, and the de- 
gree of proficiency attained. 

Any one qualified will be permitted and encouraged to make 
original investigations, and will be furnished with the appara- 
tus and chemicals necessary. 

The cost of Qualitative Analysis will be about twenty-four 
dollars ; for Mineralogy ten dollars. For the others, a charge 
will be made proportional to the amount of material used. 

BOOKS OF REFERENCE 

Dolbear's Tables. 

Elliott & Storer's Qualitative Analysis. 

Fresenius' Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. 

Barker's Chemistry. 

Elderhorst's Blow-pipe Analysis. 

Mitchell's Assaying. 

Parish's Pharmacy. 

28 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



POST GRADUATE COURSE. 

ELECTIVE STUDTES. 

1. Metaphysics, Political Economy, Jurisprudence, Elements 
of Criticism. 

2. Hebrew, German, French, Comparative Philology, Greek 
Literature, Roman Literature. 

3. Practical Astronomy, with use of Instruments, Railroad 
Field Operations, Geometrical Drawing. 

4. Practical Chemistry, Philosophy of Chemistry, Agricul- 
tural Chemistry. 




29 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



ELOCUTION. 

Constant attention is paid to the art of Elocution. The mem- 
bers of the Junior and Senior Classes are required to deliver 
original orations every Friday morning in the presence of the 
Faculty and all the students. These performances are rigidly 
criticised, particularly as to style of delivery, by the Faculty. 
Regular training in this art is also given by the eminent elocu- 
tionist, Prof. Robert Kidd, and the highest facilities are thus 
furnished for improvement in the art of public speaking. 



A PECULIAR FEATURE IN BETHANY COLLEGE. 

To this feature we would call special attention. 

The rule prevailing generally in Colleges, that students must 
take the whole Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, or Senior year, 
together, does not obtain in Bethany College. A student is 
allowed to enter in the several schools, at the same time, such 
classes as his attainments entitle him to. For example, if he 
is further advanced in Latin than in Greek, he is not kept 
back in the former for the sake of the latter, but may go on in 
each language in the classes for which he is fitted. So, also, 
if his attainments in the Mathematics are higher than in the 
Languages, he is not obliged to wait in the former till he has 
brought the latter abreast of it, or enter a loAver class in Mathe- 
matics or the Natural Sciences than he is entitled to, because 
of defect in other Departments. Thus a student may finish in 
one or more schools, and receive a certificate in these, (see Terms 
of Graduation,^ while he is still in lower classes in other De- 
partments. This arrangement meets the wants of many young 
men desiring to enter College. It allows a student to finish one 
school, and then gives him more tinie for other unfinished 
studies ; or he may desire only to finish in some of the schools, 
but at the same time also to prosecute, to a certain extent, his 
studies in others. 



L 



30 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

TERMS OF GRADUATION. 

DIFFERENT SCHOOLS, 

A student may graduate in any School singly. To obtain 
the degree of Graduate in any School, it is required of every 
candidate : 

1. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College, at 
least one session, and shall have studied in the College the en- 
tire Senior year of the School. 2. That within one month 
from the beginning of the session, he shall have made known 
to the Professor of the School his intention of graduating. 3. 
That he stand a satisfactory examination on all the prescribed 
studies of the School. On paying a fee of three dollars he shall 
be entitled to a Certificate of Graduation, signed by the President 
and Professor. 

DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF SCIENCES, AND 

BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 

To receive the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, 
or Bachelor of Letters, the candidate must have graduated and 
received his certificates in the several Schools embraced in the 
respective courses. He must also have faithfully observed all 
the other laws and regulations of the College. He will then 
receive the Degree and Diploma, /r^e of charge. 

A student who has received a Diploma in any course, in 
order to obtain a Diploma in any other course, shall ^aj five dol- 
lars for the additional certificate, or certificates, and ten dollars 
for the Diploma. 

The Graduates in the several courses enjoy equally all the 
privileges, rights and honors of the College. 

REGULAR master's DEGREES. 

In order to obtain the Regular Degree of Master of Arts, Master 
of Sciences, or Master of Letters, the following conditions are re- 
quired : 1. The attainment of the Degree of Bachelor in the 
course. 2. The actual attendance in the College thereafter, for 
one session at least and the study of three Elective Studies, to 
be selected by the candidate with the consent of the Faculty. 
3. An approved examination of selected studies. A fee of ten 
dollars will be charged for the Diploma. 

31 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



HONORARY MASTER'S DEGREE. 

A Bachelor of one year's standing in any one of the courses, 
may receive the Honorary Degree of Master in that course ; pro- 
vided he shall in the interval have maintained an exemplary 
character, and become distinguished in the studies relating to 
the degree. Candidates for this degree should apply to the 
President or Secretarj^ of the Faculty before the annual meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees. 

No application for the Degree of A. M. will be entertained 
unless accompanied by the/eeof $10, which will be returned, 
in case the Degree is not conferred. 



ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Students are permitted to select their own places of boarding, 
subject in all cases to the supervision of the Faculty. The 
facilities for obtaining boarding in private families have been 
much increased, and many students can be accommodated in 
this way. Every attention will be paid to the health and com- 
fort of the students. 

To accommodate students who desire to board themselves, 
arrangements have been made to supply a number ot unfur- 
nished rooms at a very moderate rent. Applications for these 
should be made at an early date, and must be accompanied b}" 
satisfactory testimonials of character. 



APPARATUS. 

The Philosophical and Chemical apparatus of the College is 
of the most elegant and approved kind. Provision is made for 
adding to it the new improvements as they may be made, so as 
to furnish the amplest facilities for thorough illustration in 
every branch of each department. 

Our Mathematical Instruments are of a ver}^ superior char- 
acter, and it is believed that but few Institutions in the West 
are as well supplied with the means of scientific illustration as 
is Be^thany College. 

LIBRARY. 

We have already laid the foundation for a new Library. We 
expect to ma'vc large additions to it during the present year, 

32 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

by purchase, and trust that all who feel an interest in our sue- { 
cess, will aid us by their contributions. 



CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. 

1st. The Natural History Cabinet contains most of the Fauna, 
Birds, and mammals of this region, with a very valuable collec- 
tion from Australia, and exchanges with other sections of the 
country. Also a fine Herbarium of native plants, with many 
rare ones from other parts of the world. 

2d. The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several 
thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all parts of 
the world, to which new contributions are constantly made. 
It has recently been enriched by several hundred specimens of 
Minerals. 

3d. The Ethnological Cabinet^ though not large, contains rare 
and valuable collections. 



DISCIPLINE. 

The Discipline of the College is in harmony with the benev- 
olent object of its founder, in establishing an institution for the 
promotion of pure Literature, and a liberal Christian education. 
Hence, no student can be permitted to remain who indulges in 
card playing, intemperance, profanity, neglect of study, or any 
other vice or impropriety. We aim, however, to govern through 
the approval of the judgment and the heart, rather than by 
force of law and authority. Hence, the discipline is parental; 
and daily moral instruction, based upon the Bible, leaves but 
little else to be done in government. We aim, to make the 
student a law unto himself. 



REPORTS. 

Monthly '' Reports '' will be addressed by the Secretary of the 
Faculty to the parent or guardian of each student, in which 
are stated his attention in class, supposed industry, proficiency 
in each of his studies, absences from lectures and recitations, 
and his general deportment, with such other information as it 
may be necessary to communicate. 

33 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



TERMS, VACATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS. 

The College Year consists of two terms, four and a half months 
each. It begins on the last Monday in September, and ends on 
the third Thursday in June. In this year there are two exam- 
inations in each class — one in February, and the final exam- 
ination in June. 

It is very desirable that applicants for Matriculation present 
themselves at the beginning of the session, that there ma}^ be 
a convenient arrangement of the classes in the various Depart- 
ments or Schools. Students, however, can enter conveniently 
at the commencement of the second term, directl}^ after the 
intermediate examination in February. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are in connection with the College two Literary Soci- 
eties. Their Halls recently destroyed by fire, have been re- 
placed by others beautifully finished and appropriately fur- 
nished. Valuable libraries have also already been received by 
the societies, through the munificence of friends, to replace 
those that were lost. 

Every facility is afforded by the authorities of the Institu- 
tion for increasing the accommodations and adding to the use- 
fulness of these valuable auxiliaries to the Institution. 



ADELPHIAN SOCIETY. 

As this Society differs in some important respects from a 
purely Literary Society, it demands a more particular notice. 

As it is a distinguishing feature of Bethany College to make 
the Bible a regular subject of study and daily examination, 
the Adelphian Societ}'' has been organized in order to promote 
and carry out, to the fullest extent, the purposes contemplated 
in the department of Bible Literature. 



34 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

The regular exercises of the Society consist — 

1st. Of recitations of portions of the Scriptures. 

2d. Reading original essays on moral and religious subjects; 
and 

3d. The delivery of Scriptural discourses, not only before the 
Society, but, on suitable occasions, in public. 

Young men preparing for the Christian Ministry, may 
derive incalculable advantages from this Society. From its 
organization, and the character and ability of its members, it 
is well fitted to facilitate the acquisition of enlarged views of 
the Bible, and the cultivation of a high standard of morality 
and religion. 

The Society has a well furnished and commodious Hall for 
its meetings. It has a well selected Library, to which it re- 
spectfully solicits contributions of works auxiliary to the study 
and comprehension of the Bible, Ecclesiastical Histor}^, Ethics, 
etc. Any such donations will be gratefully received. 



EXPENSES. 

The College year is divided into two terms, of four and a half 
months each. The usual expenses, exclusive of books, clothes, 
&c., are as follows : 

Boarding per week^ including furnished rooms and fuel, from $4 00 to 5 00 

Washing, per month, - 1 00 to 1 50 

Light extra. 

Boarding in Cluhs — now very generally adopted, about - $2 00 per week. 

Tuition, College course per term, - ------- |20 00 

" Preparatory year, per term, - ------ 15 00 

" Special course in engineering, per term, - - - - 12 00 

" Modern languages, to those not in the scientific course, per term, 5 00 
" Matriculation and contingent expense fee, per term, - - 5 00 

All students in the Scientific Course, including those receiv- 
ing gratuitous instruction, will be charged extra for the chemi- 
cals they use in the Laboratory, and a fee of $3 00 for the use 
of field instruments. Students entrusted with instruments 
will be charged for injuries resulting from carelessness. 

One-half of the expenses of the College year must be paid 
invariably in advance. 

Students entering after the commencement of the term, or 
leaving before its close, will be allowed no reduction on their 
tuition ; provided, however, that those who thus leave with the 

35 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

permission of the Faculty may return during the subsequent 
term for a period equal to the time of their absence, free of ad- 
ditional charge for tuition. 

All remittances are to be made to W. K. Pendleton, Bethan}^, 
Brooke county, W. Va., with whom also may be deposited, for 
safe keeping, the private funds of each student, free of all per- 
centage. 

The Faculty earnestly advise parents to expressly forbid Merchants 
and others from crediting their sons ivhile at College. Apart from the 
habit of extravagance ivhich this license almost unavoidably cultivates., 
there are other evils which are extremdy detrimental to student life. 
A request to any member of the Faculty to this effect ivill be promptly 
attended to. 



GRATUITOUS INSTRUCTION. 

Indigent and pious young men in any of the religious de- 
nominations, who wish to prepare for the Ministry, shall, on 
paying the matriculation fee, be admitted into any of the 
courses of Bethany College at one-half the regular rates for 
tuition. 

All applicants for this privilege will be required to present 
to the Faculty satisfactor}^ written recommendations from their 
respective congregations, and from well-known Ministers of 
the Gospel, certifying that they come under the above condi- 
tions, in such form as shall be prescribed by the Faculty. They 
shall also be required to sign a promissory note to pay the full 
charge for tuition five years after their withdrawal from the 
College, provided they do not, in the meantime, devote them- 
selves to the work of the Ministr3\ But this provision for re- 
duction of tuition shall not extend, in any case, beyond one 
session, except upon the recommendation of the Faculty, and 
the approval of the Board. 

The sons of regular Minister^ of the Gospel of all denomi- 
nations, shall be admitted to all the classes and privileges of 
the College, upon payment of matriculation fee and one-half 
the regular charges for tuition. 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be re- 
quired to give instructions in the Preparatory Classes. 



Bethany C 



ETHANY COLLEGE. 



HIS Institution is situated in Brooke county, West Vir- 
ginia, seven miles from the Ohio river, and sixteen miles 
nortli of Wheeling. It has a very liberal charter, by which all 
necessary powers are conferred, and the rights of its Alumni 
fully secured. From the peculiar organization of this Institu- 
tion, it presents important advantages to those who wish to 
secure, in addition to literary and scientific acquirements, a 
highly moral and practical education. 

The most particular attention is paid to moral instruction, 
and training. A full course of lectures is delivered every ses- 
sion upon Sacred Literature, in which the great matters of 
Piety and Humanity are elucidated and enforced by appropri- 
ate examples. These lectures, which are general, familiar and 
discursive, are entirely free from all sectarian character, and 
do not touch upon any of thQ peculiarities of particular relig- 
ious parties. They are adapted to the circumstances of the 
class, and admirably fitted to supply defects in the early edu- 
cation of youth, and so give a bias in favor of morality and 
virtue. The peculiar location of the College, too, affords the 
greatest facilities for moral culture. Being remote from any 
large town or city, and surrounded by a moral and industri- 
ous population engaged in agriculture, it is secluded from those 
haunts of dissipation, and those vicious associations so fatal to 
youth in cities. 

The location of Bethany College is also highly advantageous 
to physical health. It may be said with emphasis, that there 
is not in the United States a more healthy location. It is in 
the midst of a hilly and elevated region, where there is pure 
air, fine water and per/ed exemption from those intermittent, 
congestive and malignant fevers so prevalent in certain por- 
tions of the Western country. 

The railroad stations for Bethany are Lagrange, on the Cleve- 
land, Pittsburgh and Wheeling Railroad, and Wellsburg on the 
Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Railroad. From these 
Stations which are each seven miles distant, a daily coach runs, 
on a Macadamized road, to Bethany. 

37 



"T! 



CALENDAR. 



Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

On Tuesday and Wednesday before the third Thursday in June. 
Annual Commencement, - on the third Thursday in June. 
Session begins, _ _ _ last Monday in September. 

Christmas recess begins, _ . _ • December 17. 

Christmas recess ends, - - - - . January 3. 

First term ends, - January 28. 

Second term begins, _ _ _ _ . January 31. 

Anniversary of the Neotrophian Society, - November 6. 

Anniversary of the American Literary Institute, November 10 
Anniversary of the Adelphian Society, - December 11. 

Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, - February 22. 
Annual Exhibition of the American Literary Institute. 

Wednesday Evening before Commencement. 
Annual Exhibition of the Neotrophian Society. 

Evening of Commencement. 
Alumni Day, - - - Tuesday before Commencement 



38 



.r 



1 



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— .o.^OF-^-o, — 





9"*^- — FOR THE '^ 



FORTIETH SESSION, 




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A^ 



^^G JUNE -161^^ 







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":^+«>>M-«^^^ 




CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Officers and Students 



OF 



H 
i 





JU 



H 






FOB THE 



FORTIETH SESSION 



ENDING JUNE 16, 1881, 



WITH THE 



douf^B of ^fcudif and i^nnual i^nqouiicenieiit 



For 1881-'82. 



OPEN TO MALE AND FEMALE, ON EQUAL TERMS. 



BsrHHANY, 05EST UlI^GINIA. 



1881. 



FREW & CAMPBELL, 

^team Bong \ Jnfi ^ilintEiis an3 Blan^ Bnn| ^anni[actiii|Eiis, 



Nos. 25 AND 27 Fourteenth Street, 

WHEELING, W. VA. 



ScicnltY of SEtfrany 6cllEnB. 



>>o^^>xJt 



W. K. PENDLETON, LL. D., President, 

Prof, of Sacred History, and of Fhilosophy and Belles Lettres. 



C. J. KEMPER, A. M., 

Prof, of Mathematics, Astronomy, Modern Languages and Civil Engineering, 



J. F. EASTWOOD, A. M., 

Prof, of Natural Sciences. 



B. C. HAGERMAN, A. M., 

Prof, of Greek and Hebrew. 



JAMES LANE ALLEN, A. B., 

Prof, of Latin Language and Literature. 



PGADBMIGAL DEPAf^TMENnr. 
PROF. J. S. LOWE, A. M., 



MRS. J. S. LOWE, 

Assistant. 



ROBERT KIDD, 

Prof of Elocution. 



C. J. KEMPER, 

Secretary of tbe Faculty, 



J. P. EASTWOOD, 

Curator of tbe Museum and Librarian. 
3 



BOAI^D OP Sl^USTBBS, 



W. K. Pendleton, - - - - Bethany, W. Va. 

Albert Allen, - . - - Columbus, Ohio. 

Joseph King, - - - - - Allegheny, City Pa. 

Hon. Geo. H. Anderson, - - Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Hon. R. M. Bishop, - - - - Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Dr. J. C. Campbell, - - - Wheeling, W. Va. 

A. W. Campbell, . - - - Wheeling, W. Va. 

J. E. Curtis, . - . . Bethany, W. Va. 

James Darsie, - - . - - Braddock's Field, Pa. 

R. Moffett, - - - - - Cleveland, Ohio. 

P. S. Fall, - - - - - Nashville, Tenn. 

Alex. Campbell, - - - - Bethany, W. Va. 

John F. Rowe, - - - - - Akron, Ohio. 

Bateman Goe, - - . . Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Tom Gale, Memphis, Tenn. 

W. J. Lev^is, - - - - Pittsburgh, Pa. 

J. H. Jones, Alliance, Ohio. 

Isaac Errett, - - - - Cincinnati, Ohio. 

A. E. Myers, West Liberty, W. Va. 

A. M. Buchanan, - - - - Bethany, W. Va. 

Pres. J. A. Garfield, - - - Mentor, Ohio. 

Thomas W. Phillips, - - - New Castle, Pa. 

Hon. J. C. New, - - - . Indianapolis, Ind. 

John C. Palmer, - - - - Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Dr. J. P. Robison, . - - - Cleveland, Ohio. 

E. G. Hall, Louisville, Ky. 

Dr. D. W. Storer, - - - - Shelby, Ohio.*^ 

W. A. Belding, •- - - - Troy, New York. 

Geo. H. Parks, - - - _ Wheeling, W. Va. 

Porter S. Newmeyer - - - Connellsville, Pa. 

W. K. PENDLETON, Treasurer. 



\ 



^MDEPg m F0^¥IETP ^Eg^I0N 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



CutiRAN Palmer, . 
A. S. Dabney, . 



SEN lORS 



Brooke Co., W. Va. 
Louisville, Ky. 



JUNIORS 



J. L. Atkins, 
*M. A. Campbell, 
J. A. Cox, 
H. G. NiLES, 
H. K. Pendleton, 
W. S. St. Clair, 



Savannah, Ga. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Mishawaka, Ind. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 



SOPHOMOR ES . 



F. V. Brown, 
E. T. Campbell, 
S. L. Darsie, 
A. M. Harvuot, 
L. B. Mertz, 
P. Y. Pendleton, 
A. C. Stickley, , 
Stuart Taylor, 



Akron, N. Y. 
Hopkinsville, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Sullivan, Ohio. 
Bellaire, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Strasburg, Va. 
Kansas City, Mo, 



♦Ladies. 



n] 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



FRESH MEN. 



A. G. Baker, 
W. T. Bond, . 
*M. T. Brent, 
*Ida Darsie, 

F. M. KiMMEL, 
R. H. LiLLARD, 

^Irene Myers, 
*Emma Newcomer, . 
H. C, Wells, 

L, C. WOOLERY, 



Norristown, Ohio. 
Lawrenceburg, Ky. 
Lexington, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Somerset, Pa. 
Lawrenceburg, Ky. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Platte City, Mo. 
Antioch Mills, Ky. 



'•'•Ladies. 




CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 1 


; 

! 

■ ; 

; ;• 
■. !_ 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

• - i 




': 

I 
\ 

SENIORS. 


E. W. Mathews, 


Phillipsburg, Ohio. 


J. C. Ulrich, 


Wheeling, W, Va. 




JUNIORS. 


^Jennie Darsie, 


Bethany, W. Va, 


W. G. Garvey, 


Silver Lake, Ky. [ 


^Laura Lee, 


Bethany, W. Va. 


Strother Wells, 


Platte City, Mo. 


1- ' ( 

SOPHOMORES. 

( 


J. W. Cooper, 


Wellsburg, W. Va. 


S. Rodgers, 


Bethany, W. Va. j 


B. M. Williamson, 


Ceredo, W. Va. ( 




FRESH MEN. 


J. Beall, 


Brooke Co., W. Va. 


M. E. Boyd, 


Wellsburg, W. Va. ( 


R. C. Buchanan, 


Independence, Pa. } 


W. H. Buchanan, 


Independence, Pa. ; 


J. E. Counselman, 


Bethany, W. Va. [ 


W. P. Darr, 


CarroUton, Mo. 


J. B. Forney, . 


Bethany, W. Va. '. 


J. H. Grayson, 


Luray, Va. 


'•■Ladies. 





r 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



G. C. Hartman, 
A. W. HosiE, 
0. E. McCarty, 
R. I. McKee, 
E. H. Miller, 

J. VOLLHARDT, 

H. C. Wells, , 



Independence, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Independence, Pa. 
Independence, Pa. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Wellsburg, W. Va, 
Bethany, W. Va. 




;i; 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



MINISTERIAL COURSE. 



SEN lORS. 



C. J. Tannar, 



Sullivan, Ohio. 



JUNIORS. 



John Fergus, 
Daniel Scott, 



Dunedin, New Zealand. 
NewCastle-on-Tyne, Engl'd. 



SOPHOMORES 



J. W. McCoRMICK, 

E. M. Smith, . 



Chillicothe, Mo. 
Yancey ville, Va. 



FRESHM EN 



A. J. Magnusson, 
W. S. Payne, . 
T. F. Prothro, 



Sweden. 
Newport, Ky. 
Griffin, Ga. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



IRREGULAR COURSE. 



A. L. Adams, 
*A. M, Gale, . 
*J. M. Purvis, 
*E. M. Grissim, 

*E. V. LOCKHART, 

^A. R. Moore, 
*K. G. Newcomer, 
Chester Snider, 
R. L. Thomas, 



*Ladies. 



Wheeling, W. Va. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Concordia Parish, La. 
Lexington, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Paris, Ky. 




z' 



10 



CATALOGUE O F BETHANY COLLEGE. 



RECAPITULATION 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Total, 



26 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



Seniors, 


2 


Seniors, 


2 


Juniors, 


. 6 


Juniors, 


. 4 


Sophomores, 
Freshmen, 


8 
. 10 


Sophomores, 
Freshmen, 


3 
. 15 



Total, 



24 



ministerial course. 



Seniors, 
Juniors, 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen, 

Total, 

Irregular Course, 
Post Graduate Course, 



1 

4 
3 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS FROM 



West Virginia, 
Penns3dvania, 
Kentucky, 
Missouri, . 
Ohio, . 
Virginia, 
Georgia, 
Indiana, . 



23 
10 
11 
6 
5 
3 
2 
1 



New York, 

Louisiana, 

Tennessee, 

New Zealand, 

England, 

Sweden, 



Total, 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

67 



11 



/ ■"■ " ■'■ '" ■"■ '"' '■ " '■■ ■'■ ■ ■ "■ " ■ " ■"' '■ ■"■ ■" ■ " "" " ■" " ■ ■ " "■ ■ "■■ '"■ ■■■■ "■" ■-■-■■• ., 


gra:dua'..' ^s. 


i FOKTIETH SESSION". 


1 BACHELORS OF ARTS. 


i • 

] A. S. Dabney,- , . . Louisville, Ky. l 


I CuRRAN Palmer, . . . Brooke Co., W. Va^ 


j BACHELORS OF SCIENCE. 


E. W. Mathews, . . . Phillipsburg, Ohio. 


J. C. Ulrich, .... Wheeling, W. Va. } 


] BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 


C. J. Tannar, . . . Sullivan, Ohio. 


whole number op gradultes by states. i' 


Kentucky, . . 131 


Oregon, . . , . 2 ( 


) Virginia, ... 75 


Wisconsin, . . 2 1 


Ohio, ... 72 


Arkansas, . . . 2 \ 


i Missouri, ... 58 


Colorado, . . , 1 \ 


I Pennsylvania, . 48 


Vermont, . . . 1 } 


j West Virginia, . , 42 


Iowa, ... 2 ( 


) Tennessee, . . 29 


District of Columbia, . 1 |- 


j Illinois, ... 19 


Canada, ... 5 I' 


] Georgia, ... 10 


P. E. Island, . . . 4 [ 


) Indiana, . ^ . 10 


Ireland, ... 1 \ 


{ Maryland, . . 8 


Mexico, . . . . 1 i 


i Mississippi, . . 8 


New Brunswick, . 1 j 


! Alabama, . .7 


Nova Scotia, . . . 1 | 


{ Louisiana, . . . 6 


Scotland, ... 1 ( 


New York, . . 6 


Australia, . . .11 


South Carolina, . . 5 


Wales, . . ■ . 1 j 


Texas, ... 5 




North Carolina, . . 4 


Total, . . 575 I 


Michigan, . . 5 


;. 


i Whole number of Bachelors of Arts, ". . 488 1- 


) " " '' " Science, . . 50 f 


) " " " " Letters, . . 38 ( 


} 12 j 



©BP^MS OF pDMISSION. 



C?il 



STIt is not in harmony with the polic}^ of the Institution to 
^ receive from a distance, students under fifteen years of age ; 
but this requirement will be waived in favor of younger can- 
didates whose fitness for entrance has been well attested. 

Every candidate for matriculation will be required to furnish 
to the presiding officers, suitable testimonials of good moral 
character, and if coming from any other incorporated institu- 
tion of learning, must present a certificate of regular dismission 
therefrom. Before matriculation it is further required that 
the subjoined regulations and rules of conduct be read ; it is 
required : 

1. That all matriculates shall, as soon as possible, and with 
the approval of the secretary, select from the several schools 
a course of three daily recitations, or the equivalent thereof, 
unless, upon the request of parent or guardian, or for other 
good cause shown, excepted from this rule. 

2. That having entered any class, they shall not leave such 
without permission from the faculty. 

3. That they shall punctually attend recitations, examina- 
tions, and all other exercises of the college, and in a satisfactory 
manner, account to the proper officer for any delinquency on 
their part. 

4. That they shall at once deliver into the keeping of the 
faculty, any deadly weapon that may be in their possession, 
and shall neither keep nor use any such during their connec- 
tion with the institution. 

5. That they shall neither introduce within the precincts of 
the college, nor use elsewhere, any intoxicating beverage. 

6. That *hey shall abstain from gambling of all kinds, and 
from card3 even for amusement. 

7. That they shall not go beyond the immediate precincts of 
the college without permission from the presiding officer, nor 
leave until regularl}^ dismissed at the close of the session. 

13 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



8. That they shall not be noisy, or play in or about the col- 
lege building during the hours appointed for recitation. 

9. That they shall not trespass upon the premises of any 
person, or in any way injure the property of the institution. 

10. That they shall faithfully observe all the rules and regu- 
lations contained in the above articles of this code, respecting 
fees, society, college property, boarding houses, etc. 

It is further expected and desired, that they attend public 
worship every Lord's day, abstain from profanity, and in gen- 
eral from whatever is inconsistent with good taste, good order, 
and good morals. 

Any material infringement of the preceding regulations 
and code of discipline, may dissolve a student's connection 
with the institution. 




14 



(soui^sBs OP Study. 



^ETHANY College has three separate, complete courses, 
the Classical, the Scientific, and Ministerial, conferring 
respectively the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sci- 
ences, and Bachelor of Letters. In addition there are three 
special courses, Engineering, Physics and Chemistry, for which 
certificates only are given. Also, a thorough Academical 
Course of two years, which is, a,lso, preparatory to the Regular 
College Courses. 

All courses open to females and males equally. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

This course embraces the following schools, viz : 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of the Greek Language. 

3. School of the Latin Language. 

4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

5. School of Natural Sciences. 

6. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 
Economy. 

Students are required, before entering upon the study of any 
of these schools, to have made themselves thoroughly ac- 
quainted with the following preparatory course: Ancient 
and Modern Geography, History of the United States, Ele- 
ments of General History, English Grammar, Arithmetic, Ele- 
ments of Algebra, Latin Reader, Ciesar's Commentaries, Exer- 
cises in Latin Syntax and Prosody, Greek Grammar, Greek 
Reader, and practical Exercises in Greek Syntax and Prosody. 

1. School of Sacred History and Modern Philosophy. 

Evidences of Christianity, Moral Philosophy, and Lectures 

and Recitations on the Bible. 

Lectures on the Languages, History, and Canonicity of the 

Old and New Testament. 

15 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



2. Schools of the Latin and the Greek Language. 
PREPARATORY COURSE. 

First Term. — Greek — Grammar (Goodwin), Leighton's Greek 
Lessons. 

Latin — Grammar (Allen and Greenough), Arnold's First 
Latin Book (Harkness.) 

Second. Term. — Greek — Grammar (Gpodwin), Xenophon's 
Anabasis. 

Latin — Caesar, Latin Composition (Allen and Greenough.) 



COLLEGE COURSE. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



First Term. — Greek — Xenophon's Anabasis continued, Hero- 
dotus begun. 

Latin — Caesar's Commentaries, Latin Composition (Allen and 
Greenough,) Roman History. 

Second Term. — Greek — Herodotus continued, three books of 
Homer's Iliad, Grecian History. 

Latin — Virgil, Sallust, Latin Composition (Allen and Green- 
ough.) 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Greek — Homer's Iliad, Xenophon's Memora- 
bilia of Socrates. 

Latin — Cicero's Orations. — Odes of Horace. 

Second Term. — Greek — Plato's Apology of Socrates, or Crito, 
Theocritus, Demosthenes, or Lysias. 

Latin — Epistles and Satires of Horace, Tacitus' Germania or 
Agricola. 

senior year. 

First Term. — Greek — The Oedipus Tyrannus, Selections from 
the Lyric Poets. 

Latin — A Latin Play. 

Second Term. — Comparative study of English; Lectures on 

the Languages, Canonicity and History of the books of the Old 

and New Testament. 

16 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 
SPECIAL EXAMINATIONS ON PRIVATE STUDIES. 

Sophomore Year. — Intermediate Examinations — Ancient 
Geography. Final Examinations — Grecian and Roman My- 
thology. 

Junior Year. — Intermediate Examinations — Greek Litera- 
ture. Final Examinations— Roman Literature. 

All students entering into the more advanced classes, who have not 
passed examinations in these Studies, will have to pass these examina- 
tions. 

Senior Year. — First Term — Fowler's English Grammar. 

Books of Reference used during the entire College Course: 
Doederlein's or Ramshorn's Latin Synonyms, Classical Diction- 
ary, Classical Geography and Atlas. 



3. School of Mathematics and Astronoray. 

Every applicant for admission into this school will be exam- 
ined in the principles of Arithmetic, and in Algebra to Equa- 
tions of the Second Degree. Those not qualified to enter can 
qualify themselves by joining the Mathematical Classes of the 
preparatory year. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Algebra — From Equations of Second Degree (Ray's Second 
Part.) 

Geometry — Begun — (Venable.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

Geom.etry — Completed. 

Trigonometry — Plane and Spherical, Measurements of Heights 
and Distances. (Greenleaf.) 

Analytical Geometry — (Olney.) Text Book with Instrumental 
Constructions. 

Surveying — Begun. (Davis or Gillespie.) Chain and Com- 
pass. Field work. Platting. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Surveying — Completed. Theodolyte. Laying out of Lands. 
Descriptive Geometry. (Church.) 
The Differential and Integral Calculus. (Olney.) 
Application of the Calculus to Analytical Geometry. 

17 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE, 



FOURTH YEAR. 

Mecli anics — Park i n so ii . 

Astronomy — (Snell's Olmsted.) 

This department is well supplied with instruments, Astro- 
nomical Transit, Meridian Compass, Sextant, Theodolite, Sur- 
veying Compass, &c., all of which the student is required to 
use practically. 



4. School of Natural Science. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. — Botany (Gray.) 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Chemistry. 

Geology — (Dana, New Edition.) 
Second Term. — Physics — As far as Heat. 

Zoology. 

Physiology — By Lectures. 

fourth year. 
First Term. — Physics — (Ganot, New Edition.) 



School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres, and Political Economy. 

first year. 

First Term. — Rhetoric — (Quackenbos.) 

English Composition. 
Second Term — Same. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — English Literature (Coppee.) 
Second Term. — Day's Art of Discourse. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Metaphysics — (Porter.) 
Rhetoric — (Whately,) 
Second Term. — Logic — (Whately.) 

Political Economy — (Wayland.) 
18 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE, 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCES. 

This course embraces the following schools: 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

3. School of Natural Science. 

4. School of Modern Languages. 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 
Economy. 



1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

Evidences of Christianity. 

Moral Philosophy. 

Daily Lessons on the Bible. 

Introduction of the Old and New Testaments, by Lectures. 

The lectures are designed to exemplify and apply the true 
principles of interpretation, and to teach and enforce the great 
facts and principles of the Scriptures. 



2, School of Mathematics and Astronomy, 

(Applicants for admission will be examined in the principles 
of Arithmetic, and of Algebra to Equations of Second Degree.) 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Algebra — From Equations of Second Degree. 
Second Term. — Geometry — Plane (Venable.) 

Drawing — Geometrical Constructions. 
Lettering. 
19 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Geometry — Solid and Spherical. 

Trigonometry — Plane and Spherical, with meas- 
urements of Heights and Distances. (Greenleaf.) 

Second Term. — Analytical Geometry — With Instrumental Con- 
structions. (Olney.) 

Surveying — Plane, Laying out Land, &c., with 
Field Work and Mapping. (Gillespie.) 

Drawing — Higher Curves, Cycloids, Epicy- 
cloids, &c. Plane Projections. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Descriptive Geometry. 

Surveying — Leveling, Topographical Surveying with Field 
Work and Mapping. 
Road Surveying — (Gillespie.) 
Projection Draining. 

Second Term. — Drawing — Shades, Shadows and Perspective, 
Constructions in Wood, Stone and Iron. (Warren.) 

Coloring. 

Railroad Surveying — Field Operations, Tangents, Curvatures, 
Leveling, Cross Sections, Grades, Calculations for Excavations, 
Embankments, &c., &c. 

Differential and Integral Calculus. (Olney.) 

In this year there are two daily recitations, and extra work 
in the field or at the drawing table. In the field, the work on 
railroad surveying from the use of the chain and rod to the 
level and transit, is exemplified and made practical. 

fourth year. 

Mechanics — (Parkinson.) 

Astronomy — Snell's Olmsted, with practical use of instru- 
ments, the Sextant, Astronomical Transit, Altitude, and Azi- 
muth Instruments, &c., and computations of time, latitude, 
longitude, &c., &c. 



20 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



3. School of Natural Science. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. — Botany -~(Gr a, j.) 

THIRD year. 

First Term, — Chemistry and Geology. 
Second Term. — Physics, as far as Heat, 

Zoology — (Nicholson's Manual.) 

Physiology — (Lectures.) 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Physics — (Ganot, New Edition, beginning at 

Heat.) 

Practical Chemistry. 

Second Term. — 

Practical Physics. 

The Laboratories are well supplied with everything necessary 
to the successful study of Chemistry and Physics. The Profes- 
sor will give personal attention to the student, and those suf- 
ficiently advanced will be pei^mitted and encouraged to make 
original investigations. 

The application of the Microscope and Stereoscope to anal- 
ysis will have particular attention. 

A course in Toxicology and in Urinalysis is provided for any 
wishing them, but they are not required in the regular course. 
Students not wishing to graduate in the School of Natural Sci- 
ence, can take the Practical Chemistry course, or the Practical 
Physics course alone, and receive a certificate of Proficiency. 



4. School of Modern Languages, 

French — Joynes-Otto — Introductory French Lessons and 
Reader. 

College Series of Modern French Plays (B5cher.) 
Racine, Corneille, Moliere. 

21 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



German — Woodbury's Grammar. William Tell (Scheller.) 
Marie Stuart (Schiller.) Minna von Barnhelm (Lessing.) 

In this school students will be required to translate from the 
English into the French or German, throughout the session, at 
every recitation, until toward its close, when the exercises will 
be not quite so frequent. The translation into English will 
be kept up during the whole session at every recitation. 

SENIOR YEAR. * 

First Term. — Examination on Private Study of Fowler's 
English Grammar. 

Second Term. — Critical Study of English, Lectures on the 
Languages, Canonicity and History of the Books of the Old 
and New Testament. 



5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres, and Political 

Economy. 

(Same as in Classical Course.) 




22 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



MINISTERIAL COURSE, 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 

This course embraces the following schools : 

1. School of Sacred Literature. 

2. School of Ancient Languages. 

3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

4. School of Natural Science. 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 
Economy. 



1. School of Sacred Literature. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Inspiration of the Scriptures. 

Hermeneutis. 

Hebrew. 
Second Term. — Greek Exegesis — (Select portions of the Greek 
New Testament.) 

Hebrew. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Homiletics — (With practical exercises in mak- 
ing and delivering discourses.) 
Hebreio. 
Second Term. — Christian Doctrine — (As taught in the New 
Testament and traced in the history of the Church.) 

The Church — (Its foundation and development.) 
Hebrew. 

This school embraces, besides these studies, which are pecu- 
liar to it, the full course of instruction given in the school of 
Sacred History and Moral Philosophy; in which also students 
in the Ministerial Course will be required to pass special exam- 
inations. 

23 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE, 



2. School of Ancient Languages. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Examinations on Private Study of Fowler's 
English Grammar. 

Second Term. — Critical Study of English. 

Lectures on the Languages, Canonicity and History of the 
books of the Old and New Testament. 



3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 
Second Term.— Same as in Classical Course. 

Astronomy — (Lectures.) 



4. School of Natural Science. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

24 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 
FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 



5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political Economy 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 
Second Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 




CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



SPECIAL COURSE IN ENGINEERING, 

FOR WHICH A CERTIFICATE IS GIVEN. 

For this course no fixed time is allowed. Its object being 
special, the student need only remain during the time neces- 
sary to finish the studies it embraces. If prepared in Trigo- 
nometry, and the studies preceding it, he can complete this 
course in a year or eighteen months. 

1. Land surveying, including the various methods with the 
chain, compass and theodolite. 

2. Laying out of Lands. 

3. Topographical Surveying and Drawing. 

4. Lettering and Coloring. 

5. Leveling, Profiling, Mapping. 

6. Descriptive Geometry. 

7. Geometrical Drawing, Constructions in Wood, Iron, Stone, 
&c.. Shades, Shadows, and Perspective. 

8. Roads and Railroads, with field operations, running out 
tangents, laying out Curves by various methods. Leveling, 
establishing Grades, Cross Sections, with accompanying office 
work. Mapping, Profiling, and Calculation of Excavation and 
Embankment, &c. 

Special arrangements can be made by those wishing to pur- 
sue exclusively a single branch, as Land Surveying, or field 
practice in Railroad Surveying. For such a separate charge is 
made, proportioned to time employed. Certificates will be 
given indicating the branch studied, and the degree of pro- 
ficiency attained. 



26 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



TEACHERS' COURSE 



IN 



Natural Philosophy. 



PHYSICAL LABORATORY. 



A Laboratory of Phygical Science has been fitted up and pro- 
vided with suitable Apparatus, and a Special Course in Exper- 
imental Philosophy for the benefit of teachers wishing such 
instruction. 

The course embraces the verification and illustration of 
Physical Laws, and consists of — 

1. Physical Properties of Matter. 

2. Chemical Properties of Matter. 

3. Sounds and Musical Instruments. 

4. Light and Optical Instruments. 

5. Heat and Thermal Instruments. 

6. Electricity — Static. 

7. Electricity — Dynamic. 

8. Magnetism. 

9. Correlation and Conservation of Forces. 

' Each student will perform all the experiments himself, and 
keep a hand book to describe minutely the work done and the 
conditions of successful manipulation of all the instruments, 
and the explanation of all the phenomena observed. 

On completing the course, he will be examined, and if pro- 
ficient, receive a certificate upon the payment of Two Dollars. 

A fee of Twenty-five Dollars will be charged for the full 
course, uniformly in advance. The student will be responsi- 
ble for the apparatus he uses. 

From six to ten weeks will be needed to complete this course. 

27 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



WORKS OF REFERENCE. 

Atkinson's Ganot, - - - . 

Lessons in Elementary Physics, 

Physique, - - - - - 

First Principles of Philosophy, 

Heat as a Mode of Motion, - - - 

Sound, - - - - 

Light and Electricity, - _ . 

Elements of Chemistry, 

Spectrum Analysis, - - - - 

Correlation and Conservation of Forces, 

Grove, Helmholtz, 

Davis' Manual of Magnetism, - - - 

The Inductorium, - - - 

Chemistry, - . - - • - 

Chemical Tables, - - - . 



Stev^art. 

Ganot. 

Stillman. 

Tyndall. 

Tyndall. 

Tyndall. 

Miller. 

RoscoE. 

Mayer, &c. 

NOAD. 

Barker. 

DOLBEAR. 




28 





iVERAL COURSES. 










MflNISTERflAL COURSE. 




• 

X 
H 

t 


a 

o 

EH 

ta 

iH 




Latin. 

Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 

English Composition. 




a 

EH 
(M 


1 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry: — Plane and Solid. 

English Composition. 




i 

o 
o 

o 


a 

<u 

93 
i-t 


1 


Latin, Roman History. 

Greek. 

Geometry : — Spherical. 

Trigonometry: — Plane and Spherical, 

English Literature. 

Ancient Geography. 




a 
)^ 

(D 
EH 


i 

r 

4- 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History. 

Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Astronomy, by Lectures. 

Surveying. 

Art of Discourse. 

Grecian and Roman Mythology. 




o 

M 


a 

u 

iH 


ling., 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Inspiration. 

Hermeneutics. 

Hebrew. 

Chemistry and Geology, 

Greek Literature. 




a 

EH 




1 
1 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Greek Exegesis, 

Hebrew. 

Physics, Zoology, and Physiology, (Lectures.) 

Roman Literature. 




f3^ 
O 

M 


a 

EH 

93 
iH 


1 

DrlieVl 


Metaphysics and Rhetoric. 
Homiletics. 
Hebrew- 
Physics, 
Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 




a 

u 

&H 






1 

)esigns 


Logic — Political Economy. 

Christian Doctrine. 

The Church. 

Critical Study of English, 

Lectures on the Old and JSew Testaments. 

Hebrew. 





CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



WORKS OF REFERENCE. 



Atkinson's Ganot, - - - . 

Lessons in Elementary Physics, 
Physique, - - - - - 

First Principles of Philosophy, 

Heat as a Mode of Motion, - - - 

Sound, ------ 

Light and Electricity, - - . 

Elements of Chemistry, - - - 

Spectrum Analysis, - - - - 

Correlation and Conservation of Forces, 

Grove, Helmholtz, 
Davis' Manual of Magnetism, - - - 

The Inductorium, - - - 

Chemistry, - - - • - 

Chemical Tables, - - - . 



Stev^art. 

Ganot. 

Stillman. 

Tyndall. 

Tyndall. 

Tyndall. 

Miller. 

ROSCOE. 

Mayer, &c. 

NOAD. 

Barker. 

DOLBEAR. 




28 



SYNCHRONISTIC VIEW OF THE SEVERAL COURSES. 




i 

en 

I 




CLASSICAL COURSE. 


SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 


MINISTERIAL COURSE. 




rH 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 

English Composition. 


Higher Algebra. 
English Composition. 
History. 
French. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 

English Composition. 






Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry : Plane and Solid. 

English Composition. 


Geometry :— Plane and Solid, 

English Composition, 

French, 

History. 

Drawing. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry: — Plane and Solid. 

English Composition. 




i 


a 

u 
&^ 

43 


Latin, Eoman History. 

Greek, 

Geometry : Spherical. 

Trigonometry : Plane and Spherical, 

English Literature. 

Ancient Geography. 


Geometry :— Spherical. 
Trigonometry: — Plane and Spherical. 
German. 
Roman History. 
English Literature. 


Latin, Roman History. 

Greek. 

Geometry : — Spherical. 

Trigonometry: — Plane and Spherical, 

English Literature. 

Ancient Geography. 




a 

El 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History. 

Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Surveying. 

Art ot Discourse. 

Grecian and Roman Mythology. 


Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Projection Drawing. 

German. 

Grecian History. 

Surveying. 

Art of Discourse. 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History. 

Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Astronomy, by Lectures. 

Surveying. 

Art of Discourse. 

Grecian and Roman Mythology. 




i 
p 


a 

(D 

&^ 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Land Surveying. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Chemistry and Geology, 

Greek Literature. 


Surveying: — Laying out of Lands; Leveling, j 
Topographical Surveying and Drawing, 
Descriptive Geometry. 
Analytical Geometry. 
Chemistry and Geology. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Inspiration. 

Hermeneutics. 

Hebrew. 

Chemistry and Geology. 

Greek Literature. 




a 
s 

eg 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Zoology, Physiology (Lectures.) 

Physics, 

Calculus. 

Roman Literature. 


Drawing. 

Roads and Railroads. 

Railroad — Field Operations. 

DiflFerential and Integral Calculus. 

Zoology and Physiology (Lectures.) 

Physics. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Greek Exegesis, 

Hebrew. 

Physics, Zoology, and Physiology, (Lectures.) 

Roman Literature. 







EH 

XI 

H 


Metaphysics and Rhetoric. 

Latin. 

Greek. 

Mechanics. 

Physics. 

Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 


Metaphysics. 

Rhetoric. 

Mechanics. 

Physics. 

Practical Chemistry. 

Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 


Metaphysics and Rhetoric. 
Homiletics. 
Hebrew- 
Physics, 
Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 




<D 

■d 


Logic, Political Economy, 

Astronomy. 

Critical Study of English. 

Lectures on the Old and New Testament. 


Astronomy. 

Logic, Political Economy. 
Critical Study of English. 
Lectures on the Old and New Testament. 
Practical Physics 
Practical Chemistry. 

Mechanical Constructions, and Original Designs 
in Drawing. 


Logic— Political Economy. 

Christian Doctrine. 

The Church. 

Critical Study of English, 

Lectures on the Old and New Testaments. 

Hebrew. 





CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE, 



Special Course in Practical Chemistry. 

FOR WHICH A CERTIFICATE IS GIVEN. 

1. Qualitative Analysis — The examination of a hundred solids 
and solutions to determine their composition. 

2. Mineralogy — The determination of a hundred minerals with 
the blow-pipe. 

3. Quantitative Analysis — The determination of the amount of 
the elements, bases and acids in various compounds. 

4. Assaying — The determination of the amount of pure metal 
in the various ores of gold, silver, copper, lead, iron, &c. 

5. Pharmacy — The preparation of various medicinal agents 
and Drugs — Acidimetry and Alkalimetry. 

The course in Qualitative Analysis is essential for the suc- 
cessful prosecution of any of the others and will be requ ired. 
After that, a student may take any one, or all of the others. 
The certificate will indicate the branches studied, and the de- 
gree of proficiency attained. . 

Any one qualified will be permitted and encouraged to make 
original investigations, and will be furnished with the appar- 
atus and chemicals necessary. 

The cost of Qualitative Analysis will be about twenty-four 
dollars ; for Mineralogy, ten dollars. For the others, a charge 
will be made proportional to the amount of material used. 

BOOKS OF REFERENCE. 

Dolbear's Tables. ' 

Elliott & Storer's Qualitative Analysis. 

Fresenius' Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. 

Barker's Chemistry. 

Elderhorst's Blow-pipe Analysis. 

Mitchell's Assaying. 

Parish's Pharmacy. 

29 



■^^■^^M^^Mrt^HM^H 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEOE. 



Post Graduate Course. 

ELECTIVE STUDIES. 

1. Metaphysics, Political Economy, Jurisprudence, Elements 
of Criticism. 

2. Hebrew, German, French, Comparative Philology, Greek 
Literature, Roman Literature. 

3. Practical Astronomy, with use of Instrument, Railroad 
Field Operations, Geometrical Drawing. 

4. Practical Chemistry, Philosophy of Chemistry, Agricul- 
tural Chemistry. 




30 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. 



To accommodate students who are not sufficiently advanced 
to take the regular academic course, a preparatory course of 
one year or three terms, has been arranged as follows : 

Arithmetic, Mental and Practical— Eay. 

English Grammar — Harvey. 

Geography— Mitchell or Eclectic. 

Reading — McGuffey. 

Spelling — Written . 

Penmanship— Eclectic. Tuition, $8.00 per Term. 



REGULAR COURSE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term — Arithmetic reviewed ; Algebra, Ray I. ; English Grammar re- 
viewed ; English Analysis and Composition begun ; U. S. History ; Dictation 
Exercise and Elocution daily. 

Second Term — Arithmetic, Ray's Higher ; Algebra, Ray II. ; English Com- 
position and Word Analysis, Swinton ; U. S. History ; Elocution and Dictation 
Exercise Daily. 

Third Term — Arithmetic, Ray's Higher, completed . Algrebra, Ray II. ; 
Geometry begun ; Physical Geography, Maury ; Rhetoric, Hart ; Dictation Ex- 
ercise and Elocution daily . Tuition, $10.00 Per Term. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term — Geometry ; Rhetoric, Hart ; Elements of Physics, Norton ; 
General History, Swinton ; Book-keeping, Bryant and Stratton. 

Second Term— Geometry ; Rhetoric, completed, Hart; Physiology, Cutter; 
Science of Government, Young ; Reviews ; Book-keeping. 

Third Term — English Literature; Botany, Gray; Analysis of 50 native 
flowers; Reviews. Tuition, $10.00 Per Term. 

Students intending to enter college will be allowed to sub- 
stitute Latin and Greek for equivalent studies in this course. 

None but the most improved methods of instruction will be 
used. Subjects will be taught, not books. The aim will be 
to make the students thoroughly acquainted with the subjects 
studied. 

Students completing the course prescribed for this depart- 
ment and having passed a satisfactory examination will receive 
a certificate of graduation on the payment of the usual fee S3. 00. 

31 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE, 



ELOCUTION. 

Constant attention is paid to the art of Elocution. The mem- 
bers of the Junior and Senior Classes are required to deliver 
original orations every Friday morning in the presence of the 
Faculty and all the students. These performances are rigidly 
criticised, particularly as to the style of delivery, by the Faculty. 
Regular training in this art is also given by the eminent elocu- 
tionist. Prof. Robert Kidd, and the highest facilities are thus 
furnished for improvement in the art of public speaking. 



A PECULIAR FEATURE IN BETHANY COLLEGE. 

To this feature we would call special attention. 

The rule prevailing generally in Colleges, that students must 
take the whole Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, or Senior year, 
together, does not obtain in Bethany College. A student is 
allowed so eixter in the several schools, at the same time, such 
classes as his attainments entitle him to. For example, if he 
is further advanced in Latin than in Greek, he is not kept 
back in the former for the sake of the latter, but may go on in 
each language in the classes for which he is fitted. So, also, 
if his attainments in the Mathematics are higher than in the 
Languages, he is not obliged to wait in the former till he has 
brought the latter abreast of it, or enter a lower class in Mathe- 
matics or the Natural Sciences than he is entitled to because 
of defect in other Departments. Thus a student may finish in 
one or more schoolss, and receive a certificate in these, (see 
Terms of Graduation^) while he is still in lower classes in other 
Departments. This arrangement meets the wajats of many 
young men desiring to enter College. It allows a student to 
finish- one school, and then gives him more time for other un- 
finished studies; or he may desire only to finish in some of the 
schools, but at the same time also to prosecute, to a certain ex- 
tent, his studies in others. 

32 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



CTERMS OF GRADUATION. 

DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. 

A student may graduate in any school singly. To obtain 
the degree of Graduate in any school, it is required of every 
candidate : 

1. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College, at 
least one session, and shall have studied in the College the en- 
tire Senior year of the school. 2. That within one month 
from the beginning of the session, he shall have made known 
to the Professor of the school his intention of graduating. 3. 
That he stand a satisfactory examination on all the prescribed 
studies of the school. On paying a fee of three dollars^ he shall 
be entitled to a Certificate of Graduation^ signed by the President 
and Professor. 

DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF SCIENCES, AND 

BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 

To receive the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences 
or Bachelor of Letters, the candidate must have graduated and 
received his certificates in the several schools embraced in the 
respective courses. He must also have faithfully observed all 
the other laws and regulations of the College. He will then 
receive the Degree and Diploma /r^e of charge. 

A student who has received a Diploma in any course, in 
order to obtain a Diploma in any other course, shall ipay five dol- 
lars for the additional certificate, or certificates, and ten dollars 
for the diploma. 

The Graduates in the several courses enjoy equally all the 
privileges, rights and honors of the College. 

REGULAR master's DEGREES. 

In order to obtain the Regular Degree of Master of Arts, Master 
of Sciences, or Master of Letters, the following conditions are re- 
quired: 1. The attainment of the Degree of Bachelor in the 
course. 2. The actual attendance in the College thereafter, for 
one session at least, and the study of three Elective Studies, to 
be selected by the candidate with the consent of the Faculty. 
3. An approved examination of selected studies. A fee of ten 
dollars will be charged for the Diploma. 

33 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE, 



HONOKARY MASTER'S DEGREE, 



A Bachelor of one year's standing in any one of the courses, 
may receive the Honorary Degree of Master in that course ; pro- 
vided he shall in the interval have maintained an exemplary 
character, and become distinguished in the studies relating to 
the degree. Candidates for this degree should apply to the 
President or Secretary of the Faculty before the annual meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees. 

No application for the Degree of A. M. will be entertained un- 
less accompanied by the fee of $10, which will be returned, in 
case the Degree is not conferred. 



ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Students are permitted to select their own places of boarding, 
subject in all cases to the supervision of the Faculty. The 
facilities for obtaining boarding in private families have been 
much increased, and many students can be accommodated in 
this way. Every attention will be paid to the health and com- 
fort of the students- 

To accommodate students who desire to board themselves, 
arrangements have been made to supply a number of unfur- 
nished rooms at a very moderate rent. Applications for these 
should be made at an early date, and must be accompanied by 
satisfactory testimonials of character. 



APPARATUS. 

The Philosophical and Chemical apparatus of the College is 
of the most elegant and approved kind. Provision is made for 
adding to it the new improvements as they may be made, so as 
to furnish the amplest facilities for thorough illustration in 
every branch of each department. 

Our Mathematical Instruments are of a very superior char- 
acter, and it is believed that but few institutions in the West 
are as well supplied with the means of scientific illustration 
as is Bethany College, 



LIBRARY. 

We have already laid the foundation for a new Library. We 
expect to make large additions to it during the present year, 

34 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



by purchase, and trust that all who feel an interest in our 
success, will aid us by their contributions. 



CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. 

1st. The Natural History Cabiiut contains most of the Fauna, 
Birds, and mammals of this region, with a very valuable collec- 
tion from Australia, and exchanges with other sections of the 
country. Also a fine Herbarium of native plants, with many 
rare ones from other parts of the world. 

2d. The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several 
thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all parts of 
the world, to which new contributions are constantly made. 
It has recently been enriched by several hundred specimens of 
Minerals. 

3d. The Ethnological Cabinet^ though not large, containsfrare 
and valuable collections. 



DISCIPLINE. 

The discipline of the College is in harmony with the benev- 
olent object of its founder, in establishing|an institution for the 
promotion of pure Literature, and a liberal Christian education. 
Hence, no student can be permitted to remain who indulges in 
card playing, intemperance, profanity, neglect of study, or any 
other vice or impropriet3\ We aim, however, to govern through 
the approval of the judgment and the heart, rather than^by 
force of law and authority. Hence, the discipline is parental ; 
and daily moral instruction, based upon the Bible, leaves but 
little else to be done in government. We aim to make the 
student a law unto himself. 



REPORTS. 

Monthly " Reports " will be addressed by the Secretary of the 
Faculty to the parent or guardian of each student, in which 
are stated his attention in class, supposed industry, proficiency 
in each of his studies, absences from lectures and recitations, 
and his general deportment, with such other information as it 
may be necessary to communicate. 

35 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



TERMS, VACATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS. 

The College Year consists of two terms, four and a half 
months each. It begins on the last Monday in September, and 
ends on the third Thursday in June. In this year there are 
two examinations, in each class — one in February, and the 
final examination in June. 

It is very desirable that applicants for Matriculation present 
themselves at the beginning of the session, that there may be 
a convenient arrangement of the classes in the various Depart- 
ments or Schools. Students, however, can enter conveniently 
at the commencement of the second term, directly after the 
intermediate examination in February. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are in connection with the College, two Literary So- 
cieties. Their Halls, recently destroyed by fire, have been re- 
placed by others beautifully finished and appropriately fur- 
nished. Valuable libraries have also already been received by 
the societies, through the munificence of friends, to replace 
those that were lost. 

Every facility is afforded by the authorities of the Institu- 
tion for increasing the accommodations and adding to the use- 
fulness of these valuable auxiliaries to the Institution. 



ADELPHIAN SOCIETY. 

As this Society difiers in some important respects from a 
purely Literary Society, it demands a more particular notice. 

As it is a distinguishing feature of Bethany College to make 
the Bible a regular subject of study and daily examination, 
the Adelphian Society has been organized in order to promote 
and carry out, to the fullest extent, the purposes contemplated 
in the department of Bible Literature. 

36 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



The regular exercises of the Society consist — 

1st. Of recitations of portions of the Scriptures. 

2d. Reading original essays on moral and religious subjects ; 
and 

3d. The delivery of Scriptural discourses, not only before the 
Society, but, on suitable occasions, in public. 

Young men preparing for the Christian Ministry, may derive 
incalculable advantages from this Society. From its organiza- 
tion, and the character and ability of its members, it is well 
fitted to facilitate the acquisition of enlarged views of the Bible, 
and the cultivation of a high standard or morality and religion. 

The Society has a well furnished and commodious Hall for 
its meetings. It has a well selected Library, to which it re- 
spectfully solicits contributions of works auxiliary to the study 
and comprehension of the Bible, Ecclesiastical History, Ethics, 
etc. Any such donations will be gratefully received. 



EXPENSES. 

The College year is divided into two terms, of four and a half 
months each. The usual expenses, exclusive of books, clothes, 
&c., are as follows : 

Boarding per week, including furnislaed rooms and fuel, from $4 00 to 5 00 

Washing, per month, - - - - - - 1 00 to 1 50 

Light extra. 

Boarding in Clubs — now very generally adopted, about, - $2 00 per week. 

Tuition, College course, per term, . _ _ . _ |20 00 

" Preparatory year, per term, - _ _ _ - 15 00 

" Special course in engineering, per term, - - - 12 00 

" Modern languages, to those not in the scientific course, -per term, 5 00 
" Matriculation and contingent expense fee, per term,, - - 5 00 

All students in the Scientific Course, including those receiv- 
ing gratuitous instruction, will be charged extra for the chemi- 
cals they use in the Laboratory, and a fee of $3 00 for the use 
of field instruments. Students entrusted with instruments 
will be charged for injuries resulting from carelessness. 

One-half of the expenses of the College year must be paid 
invariably in advance. 

Students entering after the commencement of the term, or 
leaving before its close, will be allowed no reduction on their 
tuition ; provided, however, that those who thus leave with the 

37 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



permission of the Faculty may return during the subsequent 
term for a period equal to the time of their absence, free of ad- 
ditional charge for tuition. 

All remittances are to be made to W. K. Pendleton, Bethany, 
Brooke county, W. Va., with whom also may be deposited, for 
safe keeping, the private funds of each student, free of all per 
centage. 

The Faculty earnestly advise parents to expressly forbid Merchants 
and others from crediting their sons while at College. Apart from the 
habit of extravagance which this license almost unavoidably cultivates, 
there are other evils ivhich are extremely detrimental to student life. 
A request to any member of the Faculty to this effect will be promptly 
attended to. 



GRATUITOUS INSTRUCTION. 

• 

Indigent and pious young men in any of the religious de- 
nominations, who wish to prepare for the Ministry, shall, on 
paying the matriculation fee, be admitted into any of the 
courses of Bethany College at one-half the regular rates for 
tuition. 

All applicants for this privilege will be required to present 
to the Faculty satisfactory written recommendations from their 
respective congregations, and from well-known Ministers of 
the Gospel, certifying that they come under the above condi- 
tions, in such form as shall be prescribed by the Faculty. They 
shall also be required to sign a promi&sory note to pay the full 
charge fur tuition five years after their withdrawal from the 
College, provided they do not, in the meantime, devote them- 
selves to the work of the Ministry. But this provision for re- 
duction of tuition shall not extend, in any case, beyond one 
session, except upon the recommendation of the Faculty, and 
the approval of the Board. 

The sons of regular Ministers of the Gospel of all denomi- 
nations, shall be admitted to all the classes and privileges of 
the College, upon payment of matriculation fee and one-half 
the regular charges for tuition. 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be re- 
quired to give instructions in the Preparatory Classes. 

38 



Bethany C 



ETHANY L^OLLEGE. 



HIS Institution is situated in Brooke County, West Vir- 
ginia, seven miles from the Ohio river, and sixteen miles 
north of Wheeling. It has a very liberal charter, by which all 
necessary powers are conferred, and the rights of its Alumni 
fully secured. From the peculiar organization of this Institu- !• 
tion, it presents important advantages to those who wish to 
secure, in addition to literary and scientific acquirements, a 
highly moral and practical education. 

The most particular attention is paid to moral instruction, 
and training. A full coarse of lectures is delivered every ses- 
sion upon Sacred Literature, in which the great matters of 
Piety and Humanity are elucidated and enforced by appropri- 
ate examples. These lectures, which are general, familiar and ( 
discursive, are entirely free from all sectarian character, and 
do not touch upon any of the peculiarities of particular relig- i 
ious parties. The}^ are adapted to the circumstances of the 
class, and admirably fitted to supply defects in the early edu- 
cation of youth, and so give a bias in favor of morality and 
virtue. The peculiar location of the College, too, affords the 
greatest facilities for moral culture. Being remote from any 
large town or city, and surrounded by a moral and industrious 
population engaged in agriculture, it is secluded from those 
haunts of dissipation, and those vicious associations so fatal to j 
youth in cities. 

The location of Bethany College is also highly advantageous 
to physical health. It may be said with emphasis, that there 
is not in the united States a more healthy location. It is in 
the midst of a hilly and elevated region, where there is pure I 
air, fine water and perfect exemption from those intermittent, 
congestive and malignant fevers so prevalent in certain por- 
tions of the Western country. 

The railroad stations for Bethany are Lagrange, on the Cleve- 
land, Pittsburgh and Wheeling Railroad, and Wellsburg, on the 
Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Railroad. From these 
stations, which are each seven miles distant, a daily coach runs, 
on a Macadamized road, to Bethany. 

39 



CALENDAR, 



Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and 
Wednesday - - before the third Thursday in June. 
Annual Commencement, - on the third Thursday in June. 
Session begins, - - _ last Monday in September. 

Christmas recess begins, - - - - December 22. 

Christmas recess ends, - . . - January 3. 

First term ends, - - January 27. 

Second term begins, January 30. 

Anniversary of the Neotrophian Society, - November 5. 

Anniversary of the American Literary Institute, November 10. 
Anniversary of the Adelphian Society, - - December 11. 
Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, - February 22. 
Annual Exhibition of the D'Ossolian Society, 

Friday Evening before Commencement. 
Annual exhibition of the Neotrophian Society, 

Wednesday Evening before Commencement. 
Annual Exhibition of the American Literary Society, 

Evening of Commencement. 
Alumni Day, - - . Tuesday before Commencement. 



40 



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OF 





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FOR THE 



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FORTY-FIRST SESSION, 



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G JUNE ^5' 



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CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



Officers and Students 



OF 



i X X 





■ Y 


■" "■ 


"ip"- 


1 






H -J 


- 


J 


J 


_jL. . 


J 



FOR THE 



FORTY-FIRST SESSION, 



ENDING JUNE IS, 1882. 



WITH THE 



douP^e of ^tudif and ij^nnual i^nnonncement 



For 1882-'83. 



OPEN TO MALE AND FEMALE, ON EQUAL TERMS, 



Bethany, IDF^sm Uip^ginia. 



i 



FREW & CAMPBELL, 

^team BooJ; ^ JoB 5ilintEiis anfl BlanJ ^oo^ ]V[ann^actuiiE]:is, 

Nos. 25 AND 27 Fourteenth Street, 

WHEELING, W. VA. 




Jjaculty 0^ SEtt^ctny OollegB. 



W. K. PENDLETON, LL.D., President, 

Prof, of Sacred History, and of Philosophy and Belles Lettres. 



C. J. KEMPER, A.M., 

Prof, of Mathematics, Astronomy, Modern Languages and Civil Engineering. 



J. F. EASTWOOD, A.M, 

Prof, of Natural Sciences. 



B. C. HAGERMAN, A.M., 

Prof, of Greek and Hebrew. 



JAMES LANE ALLEN, A.M., 

Prof, of Latin Language and Literature, and Higher English. 



J. S. LOWE, A.M., 

Prof, of Philosophy of Rhetoric and Moral Philosophy. 



pGADBMIGAIi DBPAI^JPMBNJIi. 
PROF. J. S. LOWE, A.M., Principal 



MRS. J. S. LOWE, 

Assistant. 



C. J. KEMPER, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 



J. F. EASTWOOD, 

Curator of the Museum and Librarian. 
3 



BOAI^D OP ^I^UST^EES. 



W. K. Pendleton. - - - - 
Albert Allen, - - - - 

Joseph King, 

Hon. Geo. H. Anderson. 
Hon. R. M. Bishop, - - - - 
Dr. J. C. Campbell, . _ . 
A. W. Campbell, - - . . 
J. E. Curtis, _ - - , 

James Darsie, - - - - • 
R. Moffett. - - - - - 
P. S. Fall, ----- 
Alex. Campbell, - - - - 

John F. Rowe, 

Bateman Goe, - . - - 
Tom Gale, - . - . 
W. J. Lewis, - - 

J. H. Jones, 

Isaac Errett, - - - 

A. E. Myers, - - - - 

A. M. Buchanan, . - - - 

Thomas W. Phillips, 

Hon. J. C. New, - - - - 

John C. Palmer, - . - - 

Dr. J. P. RoBisoN, 

E. G. Hall, - - - - . 

D. W. Storer, - - - - 

Dr. W. a. Belding, - - 

Geo. H. Parks, 

Porter S. Newmeyer, - - - 

W. K. PENDLETON, Treasurer. 

4 



Bethany, W. Va, 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Braddock's Field, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio, 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Akron, Ohio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Alliance, Ohio, 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Shelby, Ohio. 
Troy, New York. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Connellsvill, Pa. 



» 1 

^tudent^ of Foi'tj-Fii'^t ^e^gion. 


ABBREVIATIONS. 


CI. — Classical Course. 


Min. — Ministerial Course. 


Sc. — Scientific Course. 


Ac. — Academical Course. 


Irr. — Irregular 


Course. '( 


D. E. Andrews, Sc. 


) 

Somerton, 0. 


J. L. Atkins, CI. 


Savannah, Ga. 


W. C. Barber, Ac. 


Precept, Neb. l 


i A. G. Baker, CI. 


Morristown, 0, | 


A. C. Barclay, Ac. 


Wheeler, Ala. ( 


J. Beall, Sc. 


Independence, Pa. 


*L. M. Billings, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


W. T. Bond, Sc. 


Lawrenceburg, Ky. 


F. V. Brown, CI. 


Akron, N. Y. ( 


H. R. Brown, Sc. 


Shelby, 0. \ 


G. L. Caldwell, Ac. 


Weilsburg, W. Va. 


*M. A. Campbell, CI. 


Bethany, W. Va. j 


W. P. Campbell, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. j 


G. A. COFFROTH, Ac. 


Somerset, Pa. ( 


A. J. COLBURN, CI. 


Somerset, Pa. 


J. A. Cox, CI. 


Weilsburg, W. Va. 


J. E. COUNSELMAN, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


J. C. Cunningham, Ac. 


East Liverpool, 0. 


W. M. Cunningham, Ac. 


Bloomington, 111. 


^Jennie Darsie, Sc. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


S. L. Darsie, CI. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


T. J. Davis, Sc. 


Baptist Valley, Va. 


F. L. Davis, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


J. F. Davis, Irr. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


*B. E. Davis, Ac. 


Bethanv, W. Va. 


F. M. DOWLING, CI. 


Marion, 0. 


A. D. DowLiNG, Min. 


Gambler, 0. ) 


♦Ladies. 
{ 5 





CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 


\ *G. Emmick, Irr. 


Elmore, 0. 


j W. H. Field, Sc. 


Platte City, Mo. 


) Jno. Fergus, Min. 


Dunedin, New Zealand, i 




Bethany, W. Va. 


j *A. M. Gale, Irr. 


Memphis, Tenn. 


j A. Gabbert, Sc. 


New Market, Mo. 


j W. G. Garvey, Sc. 


Greenwood Lake, Ky. 


\ J. H. Grayson, Sc. 


Luray, Va. 


G. T. Halbert, CI. 


Vanceburg, Ky. 


A. M. Harvuot, Sc. 


Sullivan, 0. 


E. A. Hall, Sc, 


Folks Station, 0. 


] G. C. Hartman, Sc. 


Independence, Pa. 


1 A. W. HosiE, Ac 


Bethany, W. Va. 


) R. E. Jones, Irr, 


Bethany, W. Va. 


W. F. Jones, Ac. 


Dunsford, Pa. 


F. M. KiMMEL, CI. 


Somerset, Pa. 


H. S. Lawson, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


C. H. Lauck, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


{ *Laura Lee, Sc. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


W. J. Lewis, Ac. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


R. H. LiLLARD, Sc 


Lawrenceburg, Ky. 


H. P. LoE, CL 


Bridgeport, 0. 


] C. LOHSE, Ac. 


Wheeling, W. Va. 


*D. B. Lowe, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


^ W. B. Lowe, Irr. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


) *L. A. LOCKHART, Ac 


Bethany, W. Va. 


j C. R. Maupin, Ac 


Arbuckle, W. Va. 


W. Magee, Ac 


Clinton, W. Va. 


J. McCuLLOCH, Ac 


Wheeling, W. Va. 


j W. J. McCluer, Sc. 


Bellville, 0. 


! *J. M. McCluer, Ac 


Bellville, Q. 


L. B. Mertz, CI. 


Bellaire, 0. 


E. H. Miller, Sc. 


Louisville, Ky. . 1 


Aleck McKinney, Ac 


Cleveland, 0. \ 


F, S. Moore, Ac. 


Salineville, 0. ( 


j *A. R. Moore, Sc. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


j W. H. Mooney, Sc. 


Phillipsburg, 0. 


j n. T. Myers, CL 


West Liberty, W. Va. j 


*E. G. Newcomer, CL 


Connellsville, Pa. 


j H. G. Niles, Sc. 


Mishawaka, Ind. 


* Ladies. 

6 


• -ll 



CATALOGUE OF 


BETHANY COLLEGE. ; 


C. M. Oliphant, CI. 


Deersville, 0. 


W. S. Payne, Min. 


Newport, Ky. ( 


H. K. Pendleton, CI. 


Bethany, W. Va. 




Bethany, W. Va. 


D. E. Price, Ac. 


Girard, 0. 


^M. B. Richardson, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


S. Rodgers, Sc. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


D. B. Sawtell, Sc. 


Short Creek, W. Va. 


^^E. J. Silver, Sc. 


Bethany, W. Va. j 


N. W. Shaenfeld, Sc. 


Elmore, Ohio. ( 


E. M. Smith, Min. 


Yanceyville, Va. \ 


G. K. Smith, Sc. 


Platie City, Mo. } 


W. S. St. Clair, CI. 


Wellsbur^, W. Va. I 


A. C. Stickley, Sc. 


Strasburg, Va. ( 


F. B. Walker, CI. 


Fort Wayne, Ind. 


W. S, Wells, Sc. 


Platte City, Mo. 


H. C. Wells, Sc, 


Platte City, Mo. 


S. R. Webb, Ac. 


Fairview, W. Va. } 


Jas. Withers, Ac. 


Stanford, Ky. 


A. L. Wight, Sc. 


Elmore, Ohio. ( 


A. L. White, Sc. 


Lamira, Ohio. 


J. B, Wilson, Ac. 


Wheeling, VV. Va. 


B. M. Williamson, Sc. 


Ceredo, W. Va. \ 


A. D. WiRTS, Min. 


Lockhaven, Pa. } 


L. C. WOOLERY, CI. 


Antioch Mills, Ky. 


W. H. Wolf, CI. 


Bridgeport, Ohio. { 


i *La(lie3. 

! 
\ 
1 


' 

1 


) 

'■-■— — ■ .......-.. — 


• 

I-,.... .- ....-., -....-... ..-.,-.. ! 



RECAPITULATION 



Classical Course, 
Scientific " 
Ministerial " . 
Irregular " 
Academic " . 



21 

32 

5 

5 

30 



Total, 



93 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS FROM 



West Virginia, 


36 


Indiana, 


2 


Pennsylvania, 


. 9 


Nebraska, 


. 1 


Kentucky, 


. ■ 8 


Illinois, 


1 


Missouri, . 


. 5 


New York, 


. 1 


Ohio, . 


22 


Tennessee, . 


1 


Virginia, . 


. 4 


New Zealand, . 


. 1 


Georgia, . 


1 


Alabama, 


1 




G ::^ A :d u A T ^ s . 




FORTY-FIRST SESSION. 




BACHELORS OF ARTS. 




J. L. Atkins, . . . Savannah, Ga. 




*M. A. Campbell, . . Bethany, W. Vj 


I. ; 


J. A. Cox, .... Wellsburg, W. 


Va. 


S. L. Darsie, . . . Bethany, W. V 


a. ; 


L. B. Mertz, . . . Bellaire, Ohio. 




H. K. Pendleton, . . Bethany, W. V 


a. ; 


W. S. St. Clair, . . Wellsburg, W. 


Va. 


BACHELORS OF SCIENCE. 


*Jennie Darsie, . . Bethany, W. Va. 




W. G. Garvey, . . Greenwood Lake, 


Ky. 


A. M. Harvuot, . . Sullivan, Ohio. 




W. S. Wells, . . Platte City, Mo. 




WHOLE NUMBER OF GRADUATES BY STATES. 


Kentucky, . . 132 


Oregon, 


2 


Virginia, . . 75 


Wisconsin, 


. 2 


Ohio, ... 74 


Arkansas, 


2 


) Missouri, . . 59 


Colorado, ' . 


. 1 


j Pennsylvania, . 48 


Vermont, 


1 


West Virginia, . . 48 


Iowa, 


. 2 


) Tennessee, . . 29 


District of Columbia, 


1 


Illinois, , . . 19 


Canada, 


. 5 


Georgia, . . 11 


P. E, Island, . . 


4 


Indiana, . . . 10 


Ireland, 


1 


Maryland, . .8 


Mexico, . 


1 


Mississippi, . . 8 


New Brunswick, 


. 1 


Alabama, . . 7 


Nova Scotia, 


1 


Louisiana, . . 6 


Scotland, . 


1 


New York, . . 6 


Australia, 


1 


South Carolina, . 5 


Wales, 


1 


Texas, ... 5 




;. 


North Carolina, . 4 


Total, . 


586 


Michigan, . . 5 






Whole number of Bachelors of Arts, 


495 


" " •• •Science, 


54 


" " " Letters, . 

9 


38 



^EP^MS OP 'flDMISSION. 



Qi£. 



JTLt is not in harmony with the policy of the Institution to 
(^ receive from a distance, students under fifteen years of age; 
but this requirement will be waived in favor of younger can- 
didates whose fitness for entrance has been well attested. 

Every candidate for matriculation will be required to furnish 
to the presiding officer, suitable testimonials of good moral 
character, and, if coming from any other incorporated institu- 
tion of learning, must present a certificate of regular dismission 
therefrom. Before matriculation it is further required that 
the subjoined regulations and rules of conduct be read; it is 
required : 

1. That all matriculates shall, as soon as possible, and with 
the approval of the secretary, select from the several schools 
a course of three daily recitations, or the equivalent thereof, 
unless, upon the request of parent or guardian, or for other 
good cause shown, excepted from this rule. 

2. That having entered any class, they shall not leave such 
without permission from the faculty. 

3. That they shall punctually attend recitations, examina- 
tions, and all other exercises of the college, and in a satisfactory 
manner, account to the proper officer for any delinquency on 
their part. 

4. That thej^ shall at once deliver into the keeping of the 
faculty, any deadly weapon that may be in their possession, 
and shall neither keep nor use any such during their connec- 
tion with the institution. 

5. That they shall neither introduce within the precincts of 
the college, nor use elsewhere, any intoxicating beverage. 

6. That they shall abstain from gambling of all kinds, and 
from cards even for amusement. 

7. That they shall not go beyond the immediate precincts of 
the college without permission from the presiding officer, nor 
leave until regularly dismissed at the close of the session. 

10 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



8. That they shall not be noisy, or play in or about the col- 
lege building during the hours appointed for recitation. 

9. That they shall not trespass upon the premises of any 
person, or in any way injure the property of the institution. 

10. That they shall faithfully observe all the rules and regu- 
lations contained in the above articles of this code, respecting 
fees, society, college property, boarding houses, etc. 

It is further expected and desired, that they attend public 
worship every Lord's day, abstain from profanity, and in gen- 
eral from whatever is inconsistent with good taste, good order, 
and good morals. 

Any material infringement of the preceding regulations 
and code of discipline, may dissolve a student's connection 
with the institution. 




11 



GonnsEs ci| Stnfly. 



L^ETH ANY College has three separate, complete courses, 
the Classical, the Scientific, and Ministerial, conferring 
respectively the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sci- 
ences, and Bachelor of Letters. In addition, there are three 
special courses, Engineering, Physics and Chemistry, for which 
certificates only are given. Also a thorough Academical 
Course of two years, which is, also, preparatory to the Regular 
College Courses. 

All courses open to females and males equally. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

This course embraces the following schools, viz : 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy, 

2. School of the Greek Language. 

3. School of the Latin Language. 

4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

5. School of Natural Sciences. 

6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles Let- 
tres. 



1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

Evidences of Christianity, Moral Philosophy, Bible Readings 

with recitations. 

The Languages, History, and Canonicity of the Bible. 

12 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



2. School of the Greek Language. 

FRESHMAN. YEAR. 

First Term. — Grammar, (Goodwin). Greek Lessons, (White.) 
Xenophen's Anabasis. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — Xenophen's Anabasis continued. Herodotus. 

Exercises in writing Greek. Grecian History. 

Second Term. — Herodotus continued. Homer's Iliad, three 

books. Prose composition. Grecian History 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Homer's Odyssey, three books. Xenophen's 
Memorabilia of Socrates. Prose Composition, 
(Sidgwick.) 

Second Term. — Plato's Apology of Socrates and Crito. Theoc- 
ritus, or Demosthenes. Oration on the Crown. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Sophocles. The Oedipus Tyrannus. Selections 

from the Lyric Poets. 
Second Term. — Higher study of English. 



3. School of the Latin Lang-uag-e and Literature, 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term. — Grammar, (Allen & Greenough.) First Lessons 

in Latin, (Jones.) Sanborn's Tables. 
Second Term. — Studies of the first term continued. II Book 
of the Gallic War, (A. & G.) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — Grammar continued. Caesar's Gallic War ,(A. & 
G.) Sallust's Catilinian Conspiracy, or Jugurth- 
ine War, (A. & G.) Prose Composition, (Jones.) 

Second Term. — Select Oration of Cicero, (A. & G.) Composi. 
tion continued, (Jones.) 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Prosody. Virgil's ^neid, (Frieze.) History of 
Rome, (private study — (Leighton.) Abbott's La- 
tin Prose, through English idiom. Livy, (Lin- 
coln.) 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE, 

Second Term. — Prosody. Select Odes, Epodes, Epistles and 
Satires of Horace, (Macleane.) Select Satires 
of Juvenal, (Macleane.) History and Comno- 
sition continued. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Ger mania or Agricola of Tacitus, (Allen.) Mos- 
tellaria of Plautus, (Morris.) Introduction to La- 
tin Etymology. Antiquities, (Wilkins.) Higher 
study of English, (Whitney's Life and Growth 
of Language.) 

Post Graduate Course ^ as an Elective Study for the Degree of Master of Arts. 

Urst Term. — Lucretius. Select Letters of Pliny and Cicero. 
Old Latin. Classical Etymology. 

Second Term, — Selections from Quintilian, Varro, Seneca, Sue- 
tonius. Classical Etymology. A Latin Thesis. 



1 



3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

This school embraces a course of Pure Mathematics, finishing 
with the Differential and Integral Calculus, a course in Astron- 
omy, and, superadded to this, a course in Mechanics. The 
text books in use, and the time allotted to each study, will be 
found in the following schedule : 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Algebra — From Quadratic Equations. (Ray's 2d 

Part.) 
Second Term. — Geometry — Begun. (Venable.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Geometry — Completed. 

Second Term. — Trigonometry — Plane and Spherical, with ap- 
plications of the former in the field. (Greenleaf.) 
Land Surveying — With practical applications, mapping, 

&c. (Davies.) 
Analytical Geometry — Begun. (Olney.) 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Analytical Geometry. .(Olney's General Geom- 
etry.) 

Second Term. — Differential and Integral Calculus, with appli- 
cations to questions of the General Geometry. (Olney.) 

14 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE, 



FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Mechanics. (Kemper.) 

Second Term. — Astronomy. (Snell's Olmsted.) 



4. School of Natural Science. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. — Botany. (Gray's School and Field Book.) 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Chemistry. (Steele.) 

Geology. Dana's Text-book.) 
Second Term. — Zoology. (Orton's Comparative Zoology.) 
Physiology. (Lectures.) 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Physics. (Deschanel.) 



5. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles Lettres. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric. 

English Composition. 
Second Term. — English Composition. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — English Literature. 
Second Term.— Art of Discourse. 

THIRiT YEAR. 

Second Term. — Philosophy of Rhetoric. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Intellectual Science. 
Second Term. — Logic, Political Economy. 



15 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE, 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCES. 

This course embraces the following schools : 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

3. School of Natural Science. 

4. School of Modern Languages. 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 
Economy. 



1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

Evidences of Christianity. 

Moral Philosophy. 

Bible Readings and Recitations. 

The Languages. 

History and Canonicity of the Bible. 



2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

The Scientific Course in this School embraces the same sub- 
jects that are given under the Classical Course, with the addi- 
tion of a course of Applied Mathematics, in Road and Railroad 
Engineering, Descriptive Geometry, Shades, Shadows and Per- 
spective Drawing. The following schedule will give a connected 
view of the whole. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Algebra — Prom (Quadratic Equations, (Ray.) 
Second Term. — Geometry — Bagiin, (Venable.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Geometry — Completed, (Venable.) 
Second Term. — Trigonometry — Plane and Spherical, with ap- 
plication of former in field work, (Greenleaf.) 
Land Surveying — With practical applications? 
mapping, &c., (Davie.) 
Analytical Geometry — (Olney's General Geom. 

etry.) 

16 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Analytical Geometry, Descriptive Geometry, 
Shades, Shadows and Perspective Drawing. 

Second Term. — Differential and Integral Calculus, (Olney.) 

Road and Railroad Surveying, wdth Levelling, 
Laying out Curves, Calculation of Excavations, 
Embankments, &c. 

FOURTH YEAR. 



First Term. — Mechanics, (Kemper.) 

Second Term. — Astronomy, (Snell's Olmsted.) 



3. School of Natural Science, 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. — Botany. (Gray's School and Field Book.) 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Chemistry. (Cooke's Philosophy.) 
Second Term. — Chemistry. (Cooke's Philosophy.) 

Zoology. (Orton's Comparative.) 

Physiology. (Lectures.) 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Geology. (Dana's Manual.) 

PhjT-sics. (Deschanel.) 
Second Term. — Geology. (Dana's Manual.) 

Practical Chemistry. (Laboratory.) 



4. School of Modern Languages. 

i^rencA— Joynes-Otto-Introductory French Lessons and Reader. 
College series of French Plays. (Bocher.) 
Racine, Corneille, Moliere. 
German — Cook's Otto's Grammar. 

William Tell, (Schiller.) 
Marie Stuart. " 

Minna Von Barnhelm. (Lessing.) 
In this school students will be required to translate from the 
English into the French and German throughout the session 

17 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

at every recitation, until near its close when the exercises will 
be less frequent. The translation of the languages will be 
kept up during the whole session. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Second Term. — Higher Study of English. 



4. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and Belles Lettres. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric. 

English Composition. 
Second Term.— English Composition. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — English Literature. 
Second Term. — Art of Discourse. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Second Term. — Philosophy of Rhetoric. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Intellectual Science. 
Second Term. — Logic, Political Economy. 




18 



MINISTERIAL COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 

This course embraces the following schools : 

1. School of Sacred Literature, 

2. School of Greek. 

3. School of Latin. 

4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

5. School of Natural Science. 

6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and Belles Let- 
tres. 

7. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 



1 . School of Sacred Literature. 
THIRD YEAR. 

Firs Term. — Inspiration of the Scriptures. 

Hermeneutics. 

Hebrew. 

Gospels. 
Second Term. — Greek Exegesis and Septuagint Greek. 

Hebrew. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Homiletics, with practical exercises in making 

and delivering discourses. 
Second Term. — Theology of the New Testament. 

The Church : Its Origin and Development. 



2. Scliool of Ancient Languages. 
FIRST YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

SECOND YEAR. 



Same as in Classical Course. 



■• 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



THIRD YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Second Term. — Higher Study of English. 



3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 
FIRST YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course, to which refer. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Coarse, with the addition of a short 
course of lectures on Astronomy. 



4. School of Natural Science. 
SECOND YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 



5. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and Belles Lettres. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 
Second Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 



School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 
FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term — Moral Philosophy. 

Bible Readings, with Recitations. 

Second Term. — Evidences of Christianity. 

Languages, History and Canonicity of the 

Bible. 

20 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY VOLLEQE. 



SPECIAL COURSE IN ENGINEERING, 

FOR WHICH A CERTIFICATE IS GIVEN. 

For this course no specified time is required, except as de- 
manded by previous preparations, and the time necessarily 
allotted to each branch. 

To enter upon the course a thorough knowledge of Algebra, 
Geometry and Plane Trigonometry is required. 

1. Land Surveying — Embracing all that is necessary to un- 
derstand the subject in its practical bearings with field work, 
mapping, &c. 

2. The Principles of Topographical Surveying and Drawing. 

3. Levelling, Profiling, Mapping. 

4. Descriptive Geometry, with Shades, Shadows and Perspec- 
tive. 

5. Road and Railroad Surveying — with field operations. 
For this course a separate charge is made. 

Certificates will be given indicating the branch studied 
and the degree of proficiency attained. It is very desirable 
that students'should enter with the regular classes of the Scien- 
tific course. 




21 



Special Course in Practical Chemistry. 



1. Mineralogy. — The determination of one hundred minerals 

by the blow pipe. 

2. Qualitative Analysis. — 

A. — Twenty-five substances soluble in water, contain- 
ing one acid and one base. The object of this 
course is to give the student a familiarity with 
the tables, and a thorough knowledge of the re- 
actions involved. 

B. — Twenty-five complex substances, in which attention 
is given especially to methods of separation. 

C. — Twenty-five substances for the purpose of illustrat- 
ing methods of solution. 

D. — Twenty-five complex substances of various degrees 
of solubility. Text-books — (Appleton's Qualita- 
tive Analysis, Prescott's Tables.) 

3. Quantitative Analysis. — 

This course embraces the analysis of fifty substances, 
in which both gravimetric and volumetric methods 
will, be taught. 

r Appleton's Quantitative Analysis, 
Text-books. \ Fresenin's " '' 

(. Crooke's Select methods. 
The course in Qualitative Analysis is essential to the success- 
ful prosecution of any of the others, and will be required. 
After that, a student may take any one, or all of the others. 
The certificate will indicate the branches studied, and the de- 
gree of proficiency attained. Any one qualified will be per- 
mitted and encouraged to make original investigations, and 
will be furnished with the necessary apparatus and chemicals. 
The cost of Qualitative Analysis and Mineralogy, will be 
twenty-five dollars, paid in advance, and the same for the course 
in Quantitative Analysis. 

Any student desiring special instruction in Pharmacy, can 
be accommodated, but will be required to furnish himself with 
all materials not required in the above courses. If desired, 
special instruction will also be given in Toxicology and 

Urinalysis. 

22 



CATALOGUE OF B ETHAN F COLLEGE. 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. 



REGULAR COURSE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term — Arithmetic reviewed; Algebra, Ray I.; English 
Grammar reviewed; English Analysis and Composition begun; 
U. S. History; Dictation Exercise and Elocution, daily. 

Second Term — Arithmetic, Ray's Higher; Algebra, Ray IL; 
English Composition and Word Analysis, Swinton; U. S. His- 
tory; Elocution and Dictation Exercise, daily. 

Third Term — Arithmetic, Ray's Higher, completed ; Algebra, 
Ray IL; Geometry begun; Physical Geography, Maury; Rhet- 
oric, Hart; Dictation Exercise and Elocution, daily. 

Tuition, $10.00 Per Term. 

second year. 

First Term — Geometry ; Rhetoric, Hart ; Elements of PhiCs- 
ics, Norton; General History, Swinton; Book-keeping, Bryant 
and Stratton. 

Second Term — Geometry; Rhetoric, completed. Hart; Physi- 
ology, Cutter ; Science of Government, Young; Reviews ; Book- 
keeping. 

Third Term — English Literature; Botany, Gray; Analysis 

of 50 native flowers; Reviews. 

Tuition, $10.00 Per Term. 

Students intending to enter college will be allowed to sub- 
stitute Latin and Greek for equivalent studies in this course. 

None but the most improved methods of instruction will be 
used. Subjects will be taught, not books. The aim will be 
to make the students thoroughly acquainted with the subjects 
studied 

Students completing the course prescribed for this depart- 
ment and having passed a satisfactory examination will receive 
a certificate of graduation on the payment]of the usual fee, $3.00. 

23 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



ELOCUTION. 

Constant attention is paid to the art of Elocution. The mem- 
bers or the Junior and Senior Classes are required to deliver 
original orations every Friday morning in the presence of the 
Faculty and all the students. These performances are rigidly 
criticised, particularly as to the style of delivery, by the Faculty. 
Regular training in this art is also given by the eminent elocu- 
tionist. Prof. Robert Kidd, when desired, and the highest facili- 
ties are thus furnished for improvement in the art of public 
speaking. 



A PECULIAR FEATURE IN BETHANY COLLEGE. 

To this feature we would call special attention. 

The rule prevailing generally in Colleges, that students must 
take the whole Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, or Senior year, 
together, does not obtain in Bethany College. A student is 
allowed to enter in the several shools, at the same time, such 
classes as his attainments entitle him to. For Example, if he 
is further advanced in Latin than in Greek, he is not kept 
back in the former for the sake of the latter, but may go on in 
each language in the classes for which he is fitted. So, also, 
if his attainments in the Mathematics are higher than in the 
Languages, he is not obliged to wait in the former till he has 
brought the latter abreast of it, or enter a lower class in Mathe- 
matics or the Natural Sciences than he is entitled to because 
of defect in other Departments. Thus a student may finish in 
one or more schools, and receive a certificate in these, (see 
Terms of Graduation^) while he is still in lower classes in other 
Departments. This arrangement meets the wants of many 
young men desiring to enter College. It allows a student to 
finish one school, and then gives him more time on the other un- 
finished studies ; or he may desire only to finish in some of the 
schools, but at the same time also to prosecute, to a certain ex- 
tent, his studies in others. 

24 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

TERMS OF GRADUATION. 

DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. 

A student may graduate in any school singly. To obtain the 
degree of Graduate in any school, it is required of every candi- 
date : 

1. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College, at 
least one session, and shall have studied in the College the en- 
tire Senior year of the school. 2. That within one month from 
the beginning of the session, he shall have made known to the 
Professor of the school his intention of graduating. 3. That he 
stand a satisfactory examination on all the prescribed studeis 
of the school. On paying a fee of three dollars^ he shall be enti- 
tled to a Certificate of Graduation^ signed by the President and 
Professor. 

DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF SCIENCES, AND 

BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 

To receive the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences 
or Bachelor of Letters, the candidate must have graduated and 
received his certificates in the several schools embraced in the 
respective courses. He must also have faithfully observed all 
the other laws and regulations of the College. He will then 
receive the Degree and Diploma /ree of charge. 

A student who has received a Diploma in any course, in order 
to obtain a Diploma in any other course, shall pay five dollars 
for the additional certificate, or certificates, and ten dollars for 
the Diploma. ► 

The Graduates in the several courses enjoy equally all the 
privileges, rights and honors of the College. 

REGULAR master's DEGREES. 

In order to obtain the Regular Degree of Master of Arts, Mas- 
ter of Sciences or Master of Letters, the following conditions are 
required : 1. The attainment of the Degree of Bachelor in the 
course. 2, The actual attendance in the College thereafter, for 
one session at least, and the study of three Elective studies, to 
be selected by the candidate with the consent of the Faculty. 
3. An approved examination of selected studies. A fee of ten 

dollars will be charged for the Diploma. 

25 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



HONORARY MASTER'S DEGREE, 



A Bachelor of one year's standing in any one of the courses 
may receive the Honorary Degree of Master in that course ; pro- 
vided he shall in the interval have maintained an exemplary 
character, and become distinguished in the studies relating to 
the degree. Candidates for this degree should apply to the 
President or Secretary of the Faculty before the annual meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees. 

No application for the Degree of A.M., will be entertained un- 
less accompanied by the fee of $10, which will be returned, in 
case the Degree is not conferred. 



ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Students are permitted to select their own places of boarding, 
subject in all cases to the supervision of the Faculty. The fa- 
cilities for obtaining boarding in private families have been 
much increased, and many students can be accommodated in 
this way. Every attention will be paid to the health and com- 
fort of the students. 

To accommodate students who desire to board themselves, 
arrangements have been made to supply a number of unfur- 
nished rooms at a very moderate rent. Applications for these 
should be made at an early date, and must be accompanied by 
satisfactorv testimonials of character. 



APPARATUS- 

The Philosophical and Chemical apparatus of the College is 
of the most elegant and approved kind. Provision is made for 
adding to it the new improvements as they may be made, so as 
to furnish the amplest facilities for thorough illustration in 
every branch of each department. 

Our Mathematical instruments are of a very superior charac- 
ter, and it is believed that but few institutions in the West are 
as well supplied with the means of scientific illustration as is 
Bethany College. 

LIBRARY. 

We have already laid the foundation for a new Library. We 

expect to make large additions to it during the present year, 

26 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

by purchase, and trust that all who feel an interest in our suc- 
cess, will aid us by their contributions. 



CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. 

1st. The Natural History Cabinet contains most of the Fauna, 
Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable collec- 
tion from Australia, and exchanges with other sections of the 
country. Also a fine Herbarium of native plants, with many 
rare ones from other parts of the world. 

2d. The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several 
thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils irom all parts of 
the world, to which new contributions are constantly made. 
It has recently been enriched by several hundred specimens of 
Minerals. 

3d. The Ethnological Cabinet^ though not large, contains rare 
and valuable collections. 



DISCIPLINE. 

The discipline of the College is in harmony with the benev- 
olent object of its founder, in establishing an institution for the 
promotion of pure Literature, and a liberal Christian education. 
Hence, no student can be permitted to remain who indulges in 
card playing, intemperance, profanity, neglect of study, or any 
other vice or impropriety. We aim, however, to govern through 
the approval of the judgment and the heart, rather than by 
force of law and authority. Hence, the discipline is parental; 
and daily moral instruction, based upon the Bible, leaves but 
little else to be done in government. We aim to make the 
student a law unto himself. 



REPORTS. 

Monthly "Reports" will be addressed by the Secretary of the 
Faculty to the parent or guardian of each student, in which 
are stated his attention in class, supposed industry, proficiency 
in each of his studies, absences from lectures and recitations, 
and his general deportment, with such other information as it 
may be necessary to communicate. 

27 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



TERMS, VACATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS. 

The College Year consists of two terms, four and a half 
months each. It begins on the last Monday in September, and 
ends on the third Thursday in June. In this year there are 
two examinations, in each class — one in February, and the 
final examination in June. 

It is very desirable that applicants for Matriculation present 
themselves at the beginning of the session, that there may be 
a convenient arrangement of the classes in the various Depart- 
ments or Schools. Students, however, can enter conveniently 
at the commencement of the second term, directly after the 
intermediate examination in February. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are in connection with the College, two Literary So- 
cieties. Their Halls, recently destroyed by fire, have been re- 
placed by others, beautifully finished and appropriately fur- 
nished. Valuable libraries have also already been received by 
the societies, through the munificence of friends, to replace 
those that were lost. 

Every facility is afforded by the authorities of the Institu- 
tion for increasing the accommodations and adding to the use- 
fulness of these valuable auxiliaries to the Institution. 



ADELPHIAN SOCIETY. 

As this Society differs in some important respects from a 
purely Literary Society, it demands a more particular notice. 

As it is a distinguishing feature of Bethany College to make 
the Bible a regular subject of study and daily examination, 
the Adelphian Society has been organized in order to promote 
and carry out, to the fullest extent, the purposes contemplated 
in the department of Bible Literature. 

28 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

The regular exercises of the Society consist — 

1st. Of recitations of portions of the Scriptures. 

2d, Reading original essays on moral and religious subjects; 
and 

3d. The delivery of Scriptural discourses, not only before the 
Society, but, on suitable occasions, in public. 

Young men preparing for the Christian Ministry may derive 
incalculable advantages from this Society. From its organiza- 
tion, and the character and ability of its members, it is well 
fitted to facilitate the acquisition of enlarged viev$^s of the Bible, 
and the cultivation of a high standard of morality and religion. 

The Society has a well furnished and commodious hall for its 
meetings. It has a well selected Library, to which it respect- 
fully solicits contributions of works auxiliary to the study and 
comprehension of the Bible, Ecclesiastical History, Ethics, etc. 
Any such donations will be gratefully received. 



i 



EXPENSES- 

The College year is divided into two terms, of four and a half 
months each. The usual expenses, exclusive of books, clothes, 
(fee, are as follows : 

Boarding per week, including furnished rooms and fuel, from $4 00 to 5 00 

"Washing, per month, - - - - . - 1 00 to 1 50 

Light extra. 

Boarding in Clubs, now very generally adopted, about, - 2 00 per week. 

Tuition, College course, per term, - . - . $20 00 

" Preparatory year, per term, - - - - 15 00 

" Special course in Engineering, per term, - - - 12 00 
'' Modern languages, to those not in the Scientific course, per term, 5 00 

'* Matriculation and contingent expense fee, per term,, - - 5 00 

All students in the Scientific Course, including those receiv. 
ing gratuitous instruction, will be charged extra for the chem- 
icals they use in the Laboratory, and a fee of 83 00 for the use 
of field instruments. Students entrusted with instruments 
will be charged for injuries resulting from carelessness. 

One-half of the expenses of the College year must be paid in- 
variably in advance. 

Students entering after the commencement of the term, or 
leaving before its close, will be allowed no reduction on their 
tuition ; provided, however, that those who thus leave with the 

29 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

permission of the Faculty may return during the subsequent 
term for a period equal to the time of their absence, free of ad. 
ditional charge for tuition. 

All remittances are to be made to W. K. Pendleton, Bethany, 
Brooke County, W. Va., with whom also may be deposited, for 
safe keeping, the private funds of each student, free of all per 
centage. 

The Faculty earnestly advises parents to expressly forbid Merchants 
and others from crediting their sons while at College. Apart Jrom the 
habit of extravagance which this license almost unavoidably cultivates, 
there are other evils ivhich are extremely detrimental to student life. A 
request to any member of the Faculty to this effect will be promptly at- 
tended to. 



GRATUITOUS INSTRUCTION. 

Indigent and pious young men in any of the religious denom- 
inations, who wish to prepare for the ministry, shall, on pay- 
ing the matriculation fee, be admitted into any of the courses 
of Bethany College at one-half the regular rates for tuition. 

All applicants for this privilege will be required to present 
to the Faculty satisfactory written recommendations from their 
respective congregations, and from well known ministers of 
the Gospel, certifying that they come under the above condi- 
tions, in such form as shall be prescribed by the Faculty. They 
shall also be required to sign a promissory note to pay the 
full charge for tuition five years after their withdrawal from 
the College, provided they do not, in the meantime, devote 
themselves to the work of the Ministry. But this provision for 
reduction of tuition shall not extend, in any case, beyond one 
session, except upon the recommendation of the Faculty, and the 
approval of the Board. 

The sons of regular Ministers of the Gospel of all denomina- 
tions shall be admitted to all the classes and privileges of the 
College, upon payment of matriculation fee and one-half the 
regular charges for tuition. 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be "re- 
quired to give instructions in the Preparatory Classes. 

30 




ETHANY College. 



!hIS Institution is situated in Brooke County, West Vir- 
ginia, seven miles from the Ohio river, and sixteen miles 
north of Wheeling. It has a very liberal charter, by which all 
necessary powers are conferred, and the rights of its Alumni 
fully secured. From the peculiar organization of this Institu- 
tion, it presents important advantages to those who wish to 
secure, in addition to literary and scientific acquirements, a 
highly moral and practical education. 

The most particular attention is paid to moral instruction 
and training. A full course of lectures is delivered^every ses- 
sion upon Sacred Literature, in which the great matters of 
Piety and Humanity are elucidated and enforced by appropri- 
ate examples. These lectures, which are general, familiar and 
discursive, are entirely free from all sectarian character, and 
do not touch upon any of the peculiarities of particular reli- 
gious pai ties. They are adapted to the circumstances of the 
class, and admirably fitted to supply defects in the early edu- 
cation of youth, and so give a bias in favor of morality and 
virtue. The peculiar location of the College, too, afiPords the 
greatest facilities for moral culture. Being remote from any 
large town or city, and surrounded by a moral and industrious :• 
population engaged in agriculture, it is secluded from those 
haunts of dissipation, and those vicious associations so fatal to T 
youth in cities. • 

The location of Bethany College is also highly advantageous 
to physical health. It may be said with emphasis, that there 
is not in the United States a more healthy location. It is in 
the midst of a hilly and elevated region, where there is pure 
air, fine water and perfect exemption from those intermittent, 
congestive and malignant fevers so prevalent in certain por- 
tions of the Western country. 

The railroad stations for Bethany are Lagrange, on the Cleve- 
land, Pittsburgh and Wheeling Railroad, and Wellsburg, on the 
Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Railroad. From these 
stations, which are each seven miles distant, a daily coach runs, 
on a Macadamized road, to Bethany. 

^1 



CALENDAR. 



Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and 
Wednesday - - before the third Thursday in June. 
Annual Commencement, - on the third Thursday in June. 
Session begins, - . - last Monday in September. 

Christmas i^cess begins, - - - - December 22. 

Christmas recess ends - - _ _ ^ January 3. 

First term ends, - January 26. 

Second term begins, - - - . - - January 29. 

Anniversary of the Neotrophian Society, - - November 5. 
Anniversary of the American Literary Institute, November 10. 
Anniversary of the Adelphian Society, - - December 11. 
Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, - February 22. 
Annual Exhibition of the D'Ossolian Society, 

Tuesday Evening before Commencement. 
Annual Exhibition of the American Literary Society, 

Wednesday Evening before Commencement. 
Annual Exhibition of the Neotrophian Society, 

Evening of Commencement. 
Alumni Day, _ - - Tuesday before Commencement. 



32 



S/ 



r 




U^ 




•^ 



— OF- 



'^\ 



emany 




mieae 



J 



-FOB THE- 



f:o;Rty-second session, 



€NDING 5UNE ^1, 1883. 



— «^<Vf?)^'«, 













iJ 



1 1 ^- ^^a I 

''I ^t 

1 St! 









*ii ( tf 



jns"' 



C ATALOGU E 



OF THK 



Officers and Students 



OF 




llP 11 




fi 



■01 



w^w 




i 



FOR THE 



FORTY-SECOND SESSION, 



ENDING JUNE 21, 1883. 



WITH THE 



Couple of ^hdij aijd i^qnual Announcemeiit 



For 1883-'84. 



OPEN TO MALE AND FEMALE. ON EQUAL TERMS. 



BEIPHANY, 03EST Uir^GINIA. 

1883. 



FREW, CAMPBELL & HART, 

StEam Boo^ anfl Jnli 'Riiintciis an3 l3lan^ Bnog ]V[anu^actui|ErLS, 

Nos. 2S and 27 Fourteenth Street, 

WHEELING, W. VA. 




W. K. PENDLETON, LL.D., President, 

Prof, of Sacred History, and of ]*]iilosoi)hy and Belles Lettres. 



C. J. KEMPER, A.M., 

Prof, of Mathematics, Astronomy, Modern Languages and Civil Engineering. 



J. F. EASTWOOD, A.M.; 

Prof, of Natural Sciences. 



B. C. HAGERMAN, A.M., 

Prof, of Greek and Higher English. 



W. H. WOOLERY, A.M., 

Prof, of Latin and Hebrew. 



J. S. LOWE, A.M., 

Prof, of Philosophy, of Rhetoric and Moral Philosophy 



MISS A. C. PENDLETON, 

Music. 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 
PROF. J. S. LOWE, A M., Pruw'qml. 



MRS. J. S. LOWE, 

xVssistant. 



C. J. KEMPER, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 



J. F. EASTWOOD, 

Curator of the Museum and Librarian. 



E. J. GANTZ, 

• Financial Agent. 
3 






W. K, Pendleton, 

Albert Allen. 

Joseph King, 

Hon. Geo. H. Anderson, ■ 

Hon. R. M. BIshop, 

Dr. J. C. Campbell, 

A. W. Campbell, 

J. E. Curtis, 

James Darsie, 

R. Moffett, 

P. S. Fall, - 

Alex. Campbell, 

John F. Rowe, 

Bateman Goe, 

Tom Gale, - 

W. J. Lewis, 

J. H. Jones, - 

Isaac Errett, 

A. E. Myers, 

Tmomas W. Phillips, 

Hon. J. C. New, - 

John C. Palmer, 

Dr. J. P. RoBisoN, 

E. G. Hall, 

D. W. Storer, 

Dr. W. a. Belding, 

George H. Parks, 

Porter S. Newmeyer, 

C. H. Beall, 

M. M. Cochran, 

Oliver Marshall, 

W. K, PENDLETON, 



Bethany, W. Va. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Braddock's Field, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio-. 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Akron, Ohio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Alliance, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Shelby, Ohio. 
Troy, New York. 
Chicago, 111. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va 



Treasurer. 
4 



! i ^tudent^ of the Forfti 




ABREVIATIONS 


CI. — Classical Course. 


Min. — Ministerial Course. 


He. — Scientific Course. 


Ac. — Academical Course. 


Irr. — Irreojular C'ourse. 


Mus. — Musical Course. 


1 j J. W. Abbott, Ac. 


Lawrenceburg, Ky. 


{ D. E. Andrews, Sc. 


Suramerton, Ohio. 


i ' F. P. Arthur, CI. 


Utica, N. Y. 


h J. E. Atkinson, CI. 


Clinton, Mo. 


A. G. Baker, CI. 


Morristown, Ohio. 


W. C. Barber, Min. 


Precept, Neb. 


C. H. Beall, Ac. 


Independence, Pa. 


{ *L. M. Billings, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


E. Booking, Irr. 


Wheeling, W. Va. 


C. G. Brelos, Min. 


Buffalo, N. Y. 


F. V. Brown, CI. 


Akron, N. Y. 


F. S. Brown, CI. 


Akron, N. Y. 


J. L. Calhoun, Min. 


Lockhaven. Pa. 


W. P. Campbell, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


R. M. Campbell, CI. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


E. W. Campbell, Ac. 


New Cumberland, W. Va. { 


H. L. Canfield, CI. 


Belleville, Ohio. 


L. B. Clark, CI. 


Roney's Point, W. Va. 


F. Cline, Ac. 


Shenandoah, Ohio. 


0. J. COBY, Ac 


Shiloh, Ohio. 


A. J. COLBORN, CI. 


Somerset, Pa. 


S. M. Cooper, Min. 


St. Louisville, Ohio. 


J. A. Cox, CI. 


Wellsburg, W. Va. 


W. M. Cunningham, Min. 


Bloomington, 111. 


*B. E. Davis, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


T. J. Davis, Sc. 


Baptist Valley, Va. 


J. E. De France, Ac. 


Dunsfort, Pa. 


^Ladies. 

5 







j CATALOGUE OF 


-— -— ...-...-....- ...-....., 

BETHANY COLLEGE, 


D. D. Derbyshire, Min. 


Rainer, Ohio. 


R. H. Devine, Sc. 


Wheeling, W. Va. 


*M. A. DOWLING, Sc. 


Gambier, Ohio. 




Gambier, Ohio. 


\ F. M. DoWLING, CI, 


Marion, Ohio. 


! ^^G. E. Emick, Irr. 


Elmore, Ohio. 


W. H. Field, Sc. 


Platte City, Mo. 


J. P. Findley, Min 


Mt. Vernon, Ohio, 


J. B. Forney, Sc. 


Bethany. W. Va. 


j I. N. FRYE,Min. 


Waynesburg, Pa, 


W. G. Garvey, Min. 


Betliany, W. Va, 


*A. M. Gale, Irr. 


Memphis, Tenn. 


D. S. Gay, Sc. 


Winchester, Ky. 


J. W. GOODIN, Sc. 


Nolin, Kv. 


J. H. Grayson, Sc. 


Luray, Va. 


J. W. GoRRELL, Min. 


Hebron, W. Va. 


H D. Halbert, Sc. 


Vanceburg, Ky. 


G. T. Halbert, CI. 


Vanceburg, Ky. 


E. A. Hall, Sc. 


Folks Station, Ohio. 


*W. S.Hawkins, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


*E. J. Harvuot, Sc. 


Sullivan, Ohio. 


R. W. Hill, Min. 


Magnetic Springs, Ohio. ] 


W. V. HUKILL, Sc. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


J. D. HuKILL, Sc. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


j *T. E. Johnson, Mus. 


Louisville, Ky. 


) *L. B. Jones, Ac. 


Dunsfort, Pa. 


{ D. F. Jones, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


C. H. Lauck, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


{ W. J. Lewis, Sc. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


) R. H. LiLLARD, Sc. 


Lawrenceburg, Ky. 


) L. Lindsay, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


{ J. D. Littlejohn, Sc. 


Grayson, Ky. 


j H. P. Loe,CL 


Poorman, Ohio. 


) *L. a. Lockhart, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


i *D. B. Lowe, CL 


Bethany, W. Va. 


\ C, W. Lohse, Sc. 


« Wheeling, W. Va. 


j C. S. Long, Min. 


Lockhaven, Pa. 


{ *Jennie Long, Ac. 


Lockhaven, Pa. 


J. A. Lytle, CL 


Hockingport, Ohio. 


{ A. W. Mayers, CL 


Millersburg, Ohio. . 


) Ladies. 

I 


6 [ 



CATALOGUE OF 


BETHANY COLLEGE. \ 

m 


W. P, Mansfield, Irr. 


Hopedale, Ohio. 


E. E. Manly, Min. 


Granville Centre, Ohio. 


S. T. Martin, CI. 


Cadiz, Ohio. 


J. H. Mertz, Sc. 


Bellaire, Ohio. 


*G. L. MiLEY, Irr. 


Woodstock, Va. 


A. McKlNNEY, Ac. 


Cleveland, Ohio. 


W. H. MOONEY, Sc. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


*A, R. Moore, Sc. 


Bethany, W. Va. j 


'^J. M. McCluer, Irr. 


Belleville, Ohio. [ 


W. J. McCluer, Sc. 


Belleville, Ohio. \ 


W. L. McElvy,C1. 


Howard, Ohio. 


^^0. C. MUCKLEY, Mus. 


Pierce, Ohio. 


G. W. MuCKLEY, Cl. 


Pierce, Ohio. [ 


-I. T. Myers, Cl. 


West Liberty, W. Va. 


-i^E. G. Newcomer, Cl. 


Connelsville, Pa. } 


C. M. Oliphant, Cl. 


Deersville, Ohio. [ 


W. S. Payne, Min. 


Newport, Ky. 


W. C. Payne, Cl. 


South Bend, Ind. 


P. Y. Pendleton, Cl. 


Bethany, W. Va. l 


Floyd Phillips, Cl. 


Gordonsvilie, Va. 


A. C. Philips, Cl. 


Library, Pa. 


B. F. Phillips, Ac. 


Sycamore, Pa. ( 


N. A. Phillips, Cl. 


New Castle, Pa. } 


R. R. Richardson, Sc. 


Wheeling, W. Va. 


*M. B. Richardson, Ac. 


Bethany, W. Va. 


W. D. Robertson, Cl. 


Gambler, 0. 


L. R. Rogers, Ac. 


Paris, Ky. 


S. RODGERS, Sc 


Bethany, W. Va. 


^DoRA Seaton, Sc. 


Greenup, Ky. 


D. B. Sawtelle, Sc. 


Short Creek, W. Va. 


W. S. St. Clair, Min. 


Wellsburg, W. Va. 


G. K. Smith, Sc. 


Platte Citv, Mo. } 


G. W. Smith, Sc. 


Platte City, Mo. 


C. B. Smith, Sc. 


Vicksburg, Miss. [ 


^^L. K. Smith, Cl. 


Atchison, Pa. ( 


E. M. Smith, Min. 


Yanceyville, Va. } 


Oscar Schmiedel, Cl. 


Wellsburg, W. Va. } 


A. C. Stickley, Sc. 


Strasburg, Va. ( 


W. A, Vandyke, Min. 


Hammondsville, 0. 


A. S. Taylor, CL 


Kansas Citv, Mo. ( 

j' 

V 


^•'Ladies. 




7 ,.,.„} 



CATALOGUE OF 


BETHANY COLLEGE, 


F. Warriner, CI. 


Kansas City, Mo. 


*L. J. Westlake, Sc. 


Warren, 0. 


H. C. Wells, CI. 


Platte City, Mo. 




Fairvievv, W. Va. 


W H. D. Williams, Min. 


Malta, 0. 


J. E. Wilson, Sc. 


Wheeling, W. Va. 


J. R. Wilson, Sc. 


West Liberty, W. Va. 


J. F. Wither, CI. 


Williamsville, N. Y. 


James Withers, Sc. 


Stanford, Ky. 


L. C. Woolery, CI. . 


Antioch Mills, Ky. 


F. C. Woolery, CI. 


. Antioch, Mills, Ky. • 


W. H, Wolfe, CI. 


Poorman, 0. 


F. B. Walker, CL 


Fort Wayne, Ind. 


B. M. Williamson, Sc. 


Ceredo, W. Va. 


A. D. WiRTS, Min. 


Lockhaven, Pa. 


'!^E. Wheeler, Mus. 


Collier's Station, W. Va. 


'■ ^Ladies. 






RECAPITULATION 



Classical Course, 
Scientific '' 
Ministerial " 
Irregular " 
Academic " 
Music " 



39 
36 
19 

6 
20 

3 



Total, 



123 



NUMBER OF STUDENTS FROM 



West Virginia, 

Pennsylvania, 

Kentucky, 



36 
16 
14 



Missouri, 7 



Ohio, . 
Virginia, 



33 

6 



Indiana, . . . . .2 



Nebraska, 
Illinois, . 
New York, 
Tennessee, . 
Mississippi, 




GRADUATES. 



FORTY-SECOND SESSION. 



BACHELORS OF ARTS. 



F. V. Brown, . . Akron, N. Y. 

Irene T. Myers, . . West Liberty, W. Va. 

C. M. Oliphant, . . . Deerville, 0. 

Stewart Taylor, . . Kansas City, Mo. 



BACHELORS OF SCIENCE. 

D. E. Andrews, . . . Summerton, 0. 

J. H. Grayson, . . Luray, Va. 

A. C. Stickley, . . Strasburg, Va. 

S. RoDGERS, . . . Bethany, W. Va. 



BACHELORS OF LETTERS. 

W. G. Garvey, . . . Bethany, W. Va. 

W. S. St. Clair, . . Wellsburg, W. Va. 



REGULAR DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS. 
J. A. Cox, . . . Wellsburg, W. Va. 



ACADEMIC COURSE. 

Maggie B. Richardson, . . Bethany, W. Va. 
Addie R. Moore, . . Bethany, W. Va. 

10 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



WHOLE .NUMBEU OF GRADUATES BY STATES. 



Kentucky, 


. 132 


Oregon, . 


2 


Virginia, 


77 


Wisconsin, 


. 2 


Ohio, 


. 76 


Arkansas, 


2 


Missouri, 


60 


Colorado, 


. 1 


Pennsylvania 


. 48 


Vermont, 


1 


West Virginia, 


52 


Iowa, . 


. 2 


Tennessee, 


. 29 


District of Columbia, 


1 


Illinois, 


19 


Canada, 


. 5 


Georgia, . . 


. 11 


P. E. Island, . 


4 


Indiana, 


10 


Ireland, 


. 1 


Maryland, 


8 


Mexico, . 


1 


Mississippi, . 


8 


New Brunswick, 


. 1 


Alabama, 


7 


Novo Scotia, . 


1 


Louisiana, . 


6 


Scotland, 


. 1 


New York, 


7 


Australia, 


] 


South Carolina, 


5 


Wales, 


. 1 


Texas, 

North Carolina, 


5 

4 






Total, 


596 


Michigan, 


5 






Whole number 


of Bachelor? 


B of Arts, 


499 


(( a 


u 


Science, . 


58 


C( u 


u 


Letters, 


40 




II 



(JO 



3TIT is not in harmony with the policy of the Institution to 
^ receive from a distance, students under fifteen years of age ; 
but this requirement will be waived in favor of younger can- 
didates whose fitness for entrance has been well attested. 

Everj^ candidate for matriculation will be required to furnish 
to the presiding officer, suitable testimonials of good moral 
character, and, if coming from any other incorporated institu- 
tion of learning, must present a certificate of regular dismission 
therefrom. Before matriculation it is further required that 
the subjoined regulations and rules of conduct be read ; it is 
required : 

1. That all matriculates shall, as soon as poossible, and with 
the approval of the secretary, select from the several schools 
a course of three daily recitations, or the equivalent thereof, 
unless, upon the request of parent or guardian, or for other 
good cause shown, excepted from this rule. 

2. That having entered any class, they shall not leave such 
without permission from the faculty. 

3. That they shall punctually attend recitations, examina- 
tions, and all other exercises of the college, and in a satisfactory 
manner, account to the proper officer for any delinquency on 
their part. 

] 4. That they shall at once deliver into the keeping of the 
faculty, any deadly weapon that may be in their possession, 
and shall neither keep nor use any such during their connec- 
tion with the institution. 

5. That they shall neither introduce within the precincts of 
the college, nor use elsewhere, any intoxicating beverage. 

6. That they shall abstain from gambling of all kinds, and 
from cards even for amusement. 

7. That they shall not go beyond the immediate precincts of 
the college without permission from the presiding officer, nor 
leave until regularly dismissed at the close of the session. 

12 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

8. That they shall not be noisy, or play in or about the col- 
lege building during the hours appointed for recitation. 

9. That they shall not trespass upon the premises of any 
person, or in any way injure the property ot the institution. 

10. That they shall faithfully observe all the rules and regu- 
lations contained in the above articles of this code, respecting 
fees, society, college propert}^, boarding houses, etc. 

It is further expected and desired, that they attend public 
worship every Lord's day, abstain from profanity, and in gen- 
eral from whatever is inconsistent with good taste, good order, 
and good morals. 

Any material infringement of the preceding regulations and 
code of discipline, may dissolve a student's connection with 
the institution. 




13 



fflLrtl 






^]^ETHANY COLLEGE has three separate complete courses, 
(^^ the Classical, the Scientific, and Ministerial, conferring 
respectively the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sci- 
ences, and Bachelor of Letters. In addition, there are three 
special courses, Engineering, Physics, and Chemistry, for 
which certificates only are given. Also, a thorough Academ- 
ical Course for two years, which is, also, 'preparatory to the 
Regular College Courses. 

All courses open to females and males equally, but for 
females there is a special arrangement of studies, called the 
Ladies' Course. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

This course embraces the following schools, viz : 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of the Greek Language. 

3. School of the Latin Language. 

4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

5. School of Natural Sciences. 

6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles 
Lettres. 



1. Sch-ool of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

Evidences of Christianity, Moral Philosophy, Bible Readings 
with recitations. 

The Languages, History, and Canonicity of the Bible. 

14 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

2. School of the Greek Language. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Fust Term. — Grammar, (Goodwin). Greek Lessons, (White.) 
Xenophon's Anabasis. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term, — Xenophon's Anabasis continued. Herodotus. 

Exercises in writing Greek. Grecian History. 

Second Term. — Herodotus continued. Homer's Iliad, three 

books. Prose composition. Grecian History. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term.. — Homer's Odyssey, three books. Xenophon's 
Memorabilia of Socrates. Prose Composition, 
(Sidgwick.) 

Second Term. — Plato's Apology of Socrates and Crito. Theoc- 
ritus, or Demosthenes. Oration on the Crown. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Sophocles. The Oedipus Tyrannus. Selections 

from the Lyric Poets. 
Second Term. — Higher study of English. (Whitney's Life 
and Growth of Language.) 



3. School of the Latin Language and Literature. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term. — Grammar, (Chase.) First Lessons in Latin, 

(Stuart.); 
Second Term. — Studies of the first term continued. I Book 
of the Gallic War, (A. & G.) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — Grammar continued. Caesar's Gallic War. 
Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. Prose Com- 
position, (Jones.) 

Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Composition con- 
tinued, (Jones.) 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Prosody. Virgil's JEneid, (Greenough.) His- 
tory of Rome. ' Abbott's Latin Prose, through 



English idiom. 



15 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Second Term. — Prosody. Select Odes, Epodes, Epistles and 
Satires of Horace, (Macleane.) Cicero's De Se- 
nectute, (Reid.) History and Composition 
continued. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Germania of Tacitus, compared with Caesar's 

Gallic War. 

Second Term. — Mostellaria of Plautus. Plinney's Letters. 

Antiquities, (Wilkins.) Latin Literature, 

(Crowell.) 

Post Graduate Course, as an Elective Study for the Degree of Master of ArU. 

First Term. — Lucretius. Select Letters of Cicero. Old Latin. 

Classical Etymology. 
Second Term. — Selections from Quintilian, Varro, Seneca, Sue- 
tonius. Classical Etymology. A Latin Thesis. 



3. Scliool of MattLematics and Astronomy. 
This school embraces a course of Pure Mathematics, finishing 
with the Differential and Integral Calculus, a course in Astron- 
omy, and, superadded to this, a course in Mechanics. The text 
books in use, and the time allotted to each study, will be found 
in the following schedule ; 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Algfebra — From Quadratic Equations. (Ray's 2d 

Part.) 
Second Term. — Geometry — Begun. (Venable.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Geometry — Completed. 

Second Term. — Trigonometry — Plane and Spherical, with ap- 
plications of the former in .the field. (Green- 
leaf.) Land Surveying — With practical ap- 
plications, mapping, &c. (Davies.) 
Analytical Geometry — Begun. (Olney.) 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Analytical Geometry. (Olney's General Geom- 
etry.) 
Second Term. — Differential and Integral Calculus, with appli- 
cations to questions of the General Geometry. 

(Olney.) 

16 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Mechanics. (Kemper.) 

Second Term. — Astronomy. (Snell's Olmsted.) 



4. School of Natural Science. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Physics. 
Geology. 
Second Term. — Botany. (Gray.) 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Zoology. (Orton.) 

Physiology. (Lectures.) 
Chemistry. 



5. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles Lettre; 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric. 

English Composition. 
Second Term. — English Composition. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — English Literature. 
Second Term. — Art of Discourse. 

THIRD YEAR, 

Second Term. — Philosophy of Rhetoric. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term, — Intellectual Science. 
Second Term. — Logic, Political Economy. 
3 17 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE, 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCES. 

This course embraces the following schools : 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of Ma hematics and Astronomy. 

3. School of Natural Science. 

4. School of Modern Languages. 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 
Economy. 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

Evidences of Christianity. 

Moral Philosophy. 

Bible Readings and Recitations. 

The Languages, History and Canonicity of the Bible. 



2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

The Scientific Course in this School embraces the same sub- 
jects that are given under the Classical Course, with the addi- 
tion of a course of Applied Mathematics, in Road and Railroad 
Engineering, Descriptive Geometry, Shades, Shadows and Per- 
specli ve Drawing. The following schedule will give a connected 
view of the whole. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term,. — Algebra — From Quadratic Equations, (Ray.) 
Second Term. — Geometry — Begun, (Venable.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Geometr}^ — Completed, (Venable.) 
Second Term. — Trigonometry — Plane and Spherical, w^ith ap- 
plication of former in field work, (Greenleaf.) 
Land Surveying — With practical applications, 

mapping, &c., (Davie.) 
Analytical Geometry — (Olney's General Ge- 
ometry.) 

18 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Analytical Geometry, Descriptive Geometry, 
Shades, Shadows and Perspective Drawing. 

Second Term. — Differential and Integral Calculus, (Olney). 
Road and Railroad Surveying, with Levelling, 
Laying out Curves, Calculation of Excava- 
tions, Embankments, &c. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Mechanics, (Kemper.) 

Second Term. — Astronomy, (Snell's Olmsted.) 



3. School of Natural Science, 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. — Botany. (Gray's School and Field Book.) 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Zoology. (Orton.) 

Physiology. (Lectures-.) 

Chemistry. (Cooke.) 
Second Term. — Chemistry. (Cooke.) 

Geology. (Le Conte.) 



4. ScliOOl Of Modern Languages. 

French — Joynes-Otto-Introductory French Lessons and Reader. 
College series of French Plays. (Bocher.) 
Racine, Corneille, Moliere. 
German — Cook's Otto's Grammar. 

William Tell. (Schiller.) 
Marie Stuart. 

Minna Von Barnhelm. (Lessing.) 
In this school students will be required to translate from the 
English into the French and German throughout the session 

19 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

at every recitation, until near its close when the exercises will 
be less frequent. The translation of the languages will be 
kept up during the whole session. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Second Term. — Higher Study of English. 

Languages, History and Canonicity of the 
Bible. 



4. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and Belles Lettres. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Rlietoric. 

English Composition. 
Second Term. — English Composition. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — English Literature. 
Second Term. — Art of Discourse. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Second Term. — Philosophy of Rhetoric. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Intellectual Science. 
Second Term. — Logic, Political Eci)nomy. 




20 



MINISTERIAL COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 

This course embraces the following schools. 

1. School of Sacred Literature. 

2. School of Greek. 

3. School of Latin. 

4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

5. School of Natural Science. 

6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and Belles 
Lettres. 

7. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 



1. School of Sacred Literature. 

THIRD YEAR. 

IHrst Term. — Inspiration of the Scriptures. 
Hermeneutics. 
Hebrew — Grammar, with exercises in writing 

Hebrew. 
Gospels : — Analysis, Interpretation and Dis- 
cussion. 
Second Term. — Hebrew. Select portions of the Historical 
Books of the Old Testament read. 
Structure of the Old Testament (Leathes). 
Book of Acts : Analysis, Interpretation and 
Discussion. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Homiletics, with Practical Exercises in the 
Preparation and Delivery of Discourses. 
Hebrew. — Old Testament Poetry read. 
Origin and Growth of the Psalms (Murray). 
Greek Exegesis. 
Epistle to the Ephesians. 
Topical Exegesis. 
Second Term. — Theology of the New Testament. 

The Church : Its Origin and Development. 
Hebrew. — Messianic Prophecy. 
The Higher Criticism of the Old Testament 
examined. 

21 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

2. School Of Ancient Languages. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Second Term. — Higher Study of English. 



3. Scliool of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course, to which refer. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course, with the addition of a short 
course of Lectures on Astronomy. 



4. School of Natural Science. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 



5. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and Belles Lettres. ;] \\ 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 
Second Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 



School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Moral Philosophy. 

Bible Readings, with Recitations. 
Second Term. — Evidences of Christianity. 

Languages, History and Canonicity of the ;■ 
Bible. 

22 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



LADIES' COURSE. 



PREPARATORY COURSE. 

Grammar — Harvey- 
Arithmetic — Mental and Practical — Ray. 
Geography — Mitchell or Eclectic. 
U. S. History. 
Algebra begun — Ray. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric — Hart. 

Latin Grammar (Allen and Greenough). 
Algebra, continued — From Equations of Second 
Degree TRay's Second Part.) 
Second Term. — English Composition (Quackenbos). 
Latin — Caesar. 
Latin Composition. 
Geometry, begun (Venabie). 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term,. — English Literature (Coppee). 
Latin. 

Caesar's Commentaries. 
Latin Composition. 
Roman History. 

Geometry, completed (Venabie). 
Second T^rm. — Art of Discourse (Day). 
Latin, Sallust. 
Cicero's Orations. 
Latin Composition. 
Trigonometry : — Plane and Spherical. 
Measurements of Heights and Distances 

(Greenleaf.) 
Botany (Gray). 
23 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Moral Science, Hickok (Seeley). 

Latin — Virgil — Odes and Satires of Horace. 
Chemistry (Barker). 
Physics (A. P. Gage). 
French (Joyne's Introductory Lessons). 
Reading. 
Second Term. — Philosophy of Rhetoric (Whately). 

Latin. 

Epistles and Ars Poetica of Horace. 

Tacitus' Germania or Agricola. 

French (Grammar, Racine, Moliere, Corneille.) 



SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Mental Science (Hickok). 
Latin — A Latin Play. 
German (Otto's Gramniar, Reading). 
Philology, Whitney's Life and Growth of Lan- 
guage. 
Second Term. — Logic (Whately). 

Political Economy (Wayland, Chapin). 
German (Otto's Grammar, Wm. Tell, Marie 

Stuart, Schiller). 
Lectures on the Bible. 

Students are required to take frequent exercises in composi- 
tion throughout the whole course. 




24 



illl^lfili fi^-^**^^^^'**^^ 



j>ty^<^ 



.HIS Department is under the control of Miss Cammie 
Pe^'dleton, a lady who, to a thorough education under 
the best masters, both of Vocal and Instrumental Music, adds 
fourteen years of experience and successful teaching in these 
branches. A thorough course of elementary training and drill 
in technique is obligatory upon all students in her charge. 






TERMS. 



Vocal or Instrumental (each per term) (J College Session) $25.00 

Use of Instrument two hours per day, per term, " 5.00 

" '' extra hours, per hour, . - - 2.50 




25 




FOR WHICH A CERTIFICATE IS GIVEN. 



For this course no specified time is required, except as de- 
manded by previous preparations, and the time necessarily 
allotted to each branch. 

To enter upon the course a thorough knowledge of Algebra, 
Geometry and Plane Trigonometry is required. 

1. Land Surveying — Embracing all that is necessary to un- 
derstand the subject in its practical bearings with field work, 
mapping, etc. 

2. The Principles of Topographical Surveying and Drawinp:. 

3. Levelling, Profiling, Mapping. 

4. Descriptive Geometry, with Shades, Shadows and Per- 
spective. 

5. Road and Railroad Surveying — with field operations. 
For this course a separate charge is made. 

Certificates will be given indicating the branch studied and 
the degree of proficiency attained. It is very desirable that 
students should enter with the regular classes of the Scientific 
Course. 




26 



wf^mf^^^gif^ ig ^ ii^ ^ 





L COURSES. 




>URSE. 


LADIES' COURSE. 






Rhetoric. 






Latin Grammar. 


• 

in 




Algebra Continued — From Equations of Second 




Degree. 


s 






» 






CA 
W 




English Composition. 




Latin, Caesar. 




Latin Composition. 






Geometry begun. 






English Literature. 




Latin. 


. 1 


Caesar's Commentaries. 


» 


Dherical. 


Latin Composition. 


tf 




Roman History. 







Geometry Completed. 




Art of Discourse. 






Latin, Sallust. 




Cicero's Orations. 







Latin Composition. 


(A 




Trigonometry: — Plane and Spherical. 
Measurements of Heights and Distances. 
Botany. 


fey- 




1 

1 


Moral Science, Hickok. 




Latin — Virgil — Odes and Satires of Horace. 


i 


Chemistry. 






Physics. 


, 




French. 




H 


istry. 


Reading. 


P 


i 




*^ 


Philosophy of Rhetoric. 




Latin — Epistles and Ars Poetica of Horace. 






Tacitus' Germania or Agricola. 






French (Grammar, Racine, Moliere, Corneille). 






Mental Science. 




1 


Latin — A Latin Play. 


! 


German (Otto's Grammar, Reading). 


-J i 


Philology, Whitney's Life and Growth of Lan- 


tf ' 


guage. 


■ 2 cture of English. 






H 




(A 




Logic. 

Political Economy. 

German (Otto's Grammar, Wm. Tell, Marie 




Testament. 


Stuart, Schiller). 






Lectures on the Bible. 










FOR WHICH A CERTIFICATE IS GIVEN. 



For this course no specified time is required, except as de- 
manded by previous preparations, and the time necessarily 
allotted to each branch. 

To enter upon the course a thorough knowledge of Algebra, 
Geometry and Plane Trigonometry is required. 

1. Land Surveying — Embracing all that is necessary to un- 
derstand the subject in its practical bearings with field work, 
mapping, etc. 

2. The Principles of Topographical Surveying and Drawing. 

3. Levelling, Profiling, Mapping. 

4. Descriptive Geometry, with Shades, Shadows and Per- 
spective. 

5. Road and Railroad Surveying — with field operations. 
For this course a separate charge is made. 

Certificates will be given indicating the branch studied and 
the degree of proficiency attained. It is very desirable that 
students should enter with the regular classes of the Scientific 
Course. 



^ 




26 







SYNCHRONISTIC VIEW OF THE SEVERAL COURSES. 




CLASSICAL COURSE. 


SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 


MINISTERIAL COURSE. 


LADIES' COURSE. 


s 

09 

I 


1 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 

English Composition. 


Higher Algebra. 
English Composition. 
History. 
French. 


Latin. 

Gi-eek. 

Higher Algebra. 

English Composition. 


Rhetoric. 
Latin Grammar. 

Algebra Continued— From Equations of Second 
Degree. 




Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry :— Plane and Solid. 

English Composition. 


Geometry :— Plane and Solid. 

Pinglish Composition. 

French. 

History. 

Drawing. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry: — Plane and Solid. 

English Composition. 


English Composition. 
Latin, Caesar. 
Latin Composition. 
Geometry begun. 


H 
(4 


a 





e 


Physics— Geology. 

Latin, Roman History. 

Greek. 

Geometry .-—Spherical. 

Trigonometry: — Plane and Spherical. 

English Literature. 

Ancient Geography. 


Geometry : — Spherical. 
Trigonometry : — Plane and Spherical. 
German. 
Roman History. 
English Literature. 


Physics — Geology. 

Latin, Roman History. 

Greek. 

Geometi-y : — Spherical. 

Trigonometry : — Plane and Spherical. 

English Literature. 

Ancient Geography. 


English Literature. 

Latin. 

Caesar's Commentaries. 

Latin Composition. 

Roman History. 

Geometry Completed. 


E 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History. 

Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Surveying. 

Art of Discourse. 

Grecian and Roman Mythology. 


Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Projection Drawing. 

German. » 

Grecian History. 

Surveying. 

Art of Discourse. 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History. 

Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Astronomy, by Lectures. 

Surveying. 

Art of Discourse. 

Grecian and Roman Mythology. 


Art of Discourse. 

Latin, Sallust. 

Cicero's Orations. 

Latin Composition. 

Trigonometry: — Plane and Spherical. 

Measurements of Heights and Distances. 

Botany. 


M 

z; 




Latin. 

Greek. 

Land Surveying. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Geology — Physiology — Chemistry. 

Greek Literature. 


Surveying: — Laying out of Lands; Leveling. 

Topographical Surveying and Drawing. 

Descriptive Geometry. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Geologj' — Physiology. 

Chemistry. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Inspiration. 

Hermeneutics. 

Hebrew. 

Geology — Physiology — Chemistry. 

Greek Literature — Gospels. 


Moral Science, Hickok. 

Latin — Virgil — Odes and Satires of Horace. 

Chemistry. 

Physics. 

French. 

Reading. 




Latin. 

Greek. 

Chemistry. 

Physics. 

Calculus. 

Roman Literature. 

Philosophy of Rhetoric. 


Drawing. 

Roads and Railroads. 

Railroad — Field Operations. 

Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Geology. 

Philosophy of Rhetoric. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Acts of Apostles. 

Hebrew. 

Chemistry. 

Physics. 

Roman Literature. 

Philosophy of Rhetoric. 


Philosophy of Rhetoric. 

Latin — Epistles and Ars Poetica of Horace. 

Tacitus' Germania or Agricola. 

French (Grammar, Racine, Moliere, Corneille). 


oi 



M 

U 

(A 


1 

e 
iS 

N 


Moral Science. 

Metaphysics and Rhetoric. 

Latin. 

Greek. 

Mechanics. 

Physics. 

Zoology. 

Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 


Moral Science. 
Metaphysics. 
Rhetoric. 
Mechanics. 
.Physics. 
Zoology. 

Practical Chemisty. 
Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 


Moral Science. 

Metaphysics and Rhetoric. 

Homiletics. 

Hebrew. 

Physics. 

Greek Exegesis. 

Zoology. 

Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 


Mental Science. 
Latin — A Latin Play. 
German (Otto's Grammar, Reading). 
Philology, Whitney's Life and Growth of Lan- 
guage. 


Greek. 

Latin. 

Logic, Political Economy. 

Astronomy. 

Critical Study of English. 

Lectures on the Old and New Testaments. 


Astronomy. 

Logic, Practical Economy. 
Critical Study of English. 
Lectures on the Old and New Testament. 
Practical Physics. 
Practical Chemistry, 

Mechanical Constructions, and Original Designs 
in Drawing. 


Logic — Political Economy. 

Biblical Theology. 

The Church. 

Critical Study of English. 

Lectures on the Old and New Testament. 

Hebrew. 


Logic. 

Political Economy. 

German (Otto's Grammar, Wm. Tell, Marie 

Stuart, Schiller). 
Lectures on the Bible. 





1. Mineralogy. — The determination of one hundred minerals 
by the blowpipe. 

2. Qualitative Analysis. — 
A. — Twenty-five substances soluble in water, contain- 
ing one acid and one base. The object of this 
course is to give the student a familiarity with 
the tables, and a thorough knowledge of the re- 
actions involved, 

B. — Twenty-five complex substances, in which attention 
is given especially to methods of separation. 

C. — Twenty-five substances for the purpose of illustra- 
ting methods of solution. 

D.--Twenty-five complex substances of various degrees 
of solubility. Text-books — (Appleton's Qualita- 
tive Analysis, Prescott's Tables.) 

3. Quantitative Analysis. — 

This course embraces the analysis of fifty substances, 
in which both gravimetric and volumetric methods 
will be taught. 

P ( Appleton's Quantitative Analysis, 

Text-books. \ Fresenin's " " 

(Crooke's Select methods. 
The course in Qualitative Analysis is essential to the suc- 
cessful prosecution of any of the others, and will be required. 
After that, a student may take any one, or all of the others. 
The certificate will indicate the branches studied, and the de- 
gree of proficiency attained. Any one qualified will be per. 
mitted and encouraged to make original investigations, and 
will be furnished with the necessary apparatus and chemicals. 
The cost of Qualitative Analysis and Mineralogy, will be 
twenty-five dollars, paid in advance, and the same for the 
course in Quantitative Analysis. 

Any student desiring special instruction in Pharmacy can 
be accommodated, but will be required to furnish himself with 
all materials not required in the above courses. If desired, 
special instruction will also be given in Toxicology and 
Urinalysis. 

27 



I. 



REGULAR COURSE. 



FIRST YEAR. 

First Term — Arithmetic reviewed; Algebra, Ray I.; English 
Grammar reviewed ; English Analysis and Composition begun; 
U. S. History ; Dictation Exercise and Elocution, daily. 

Second Term — Arithmetic, Ray's Higher; Algebra, Ray IL; 
English Composition and Word Analysis, Swinton ; U. S. His- 
tory; Elocution and Dictatioa Exercise, daily. 

Third Term — Arithmetic, Ray's Higher, completed; Algebra, 
Ray II.; Geometry begun; Physical Geography, Maury; Rhet- 
oric, Hart ; Dictation Exercise and Elocution, daily. 

Tuition, 110,00 Per Term. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term — Geometry ; Rhetoric, Hart ; Elements of Phys- 
ics, Norton; General History, Swinton; Booii-iieeping, Bryant 
and Stratton. 

Second Term — Geometry; Rhetoric, completed. Hart ; Physi_ 
ology, Cutter ; Science of Government, Young; Reviews; Book- 
keej^ing. 

Third Term — English Literature ; Botany, Gray ; Analysis 
of 50 native flowers; Reviews. 

Tuition, $10.00 Per Term. 

Students intending to enter college will be allowed to sub- 
stitute Latin and Greek for equivalent studies in this course. 

None but the most improved methods of instruction will be 
used. Subjects will be taught, not books. The aim will be 
to make the students thoroughly acquainted with the subjects 
studied. 

Students completing the course prescribed for this depart- 
ment and having passed a satisfactory examination will receive 
a certificate of graduation on the payment of the usual fee, $3.00. 

28 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

ELOCUTION. 

Constant attention is paid to the art of Elocution. The mem- 
bers of the Junior and Senior Classes are required to deliver 
original orations every Friday morning in the presence of the 
Faculty and all the students. These perf(5rmances are rigidly 
criticised, particularly as to the style of delivery, by the Faculty. 
Regular training in this art is also given by the eminent elocu- 
tionist, Prof. Robert Kidd, when desired, and the highest facili- 
ties are thus furnished for improvement in the art of public 
speaking. 



A PECULIAR FEATURE IH BETHANY COLLEGE. 

To this feature we would call special attention. 

The rule prevailing generally in Colleges, that students must 
take the whole Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, or Senior year, 
together, does not obtain in Bethany College. A student is 
allowed to enter in the several schools, at the same time, such 
classes as his attainments entitle him to. For example, if he 
is further advanced in Latin than in Greek, he is not kept 
back in the former for the sake of the latter, but may go on in 
each language in the classes for which he is fitted. So, also, 
if his attainments in the Mathematics are higher than in the 
Languages, he is not obliged to wait in the former till he has 
brought the latter abreast of it, or enter a lower class in Mathe- 
matics or the Natural Sciences than he is entitled to because 
of defect in other Departments. Thus a student may finish in 
one or more schools, and receive a certificate in these, (see 
Terms of Graduation^) while he is still in lower classes in other 
Departments. This arrangement meets the wants of many 
young men desiring to enter College. It allows a student to 
finish one school, and then gives him more time on the other un- 
finished studies; or he may desire only to finish in some of the 
schools, but at the same time also to prosecute, to a certain ex- 
tent his studies in others. 

Permission to take both a Junior and Senior class in any of 
the schools of the College, the same session shall be granted 
only upon condition that the average grade of the student in 
the Sophomore class shall be, not less than 87 in each school ; 

29 



'! 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

and in case the applicant lias never been a student of the 
College,- and requests such permission, that he be required to 
stand a satisfactory examination on such subjects, as in the view 
of the Professor of the School, may be deemed necessary. 



TERMS OF GRADUATION. 

DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. 

A student may graduate in any school singly. To obtain the 
degree of Graduate in any school, it is required of every can- 
didate : » 

1. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College at 
least one session, and shall have studied in the College the en- 
tire Senior year of the school. 2. That within one month from 
the beginning of the session, he shall have made known to the 
Professor of the school his intention of graduating. 3. That he 
stand a satisfactory examination on all the prescribed studies 
of the school. On paying a fee of three dollars, he shall be en- 
titled to a Certificate of Graduation, signed by the President and 
Professor. 

DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF SCIENCES, AND 

BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 

To receive the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, 
or Bachelor of Letters, the candidate must have graduated and 
received his certificates in the several schools embraced in the 
respective courses. He must also have faithfully observed all 
the other laws and regulations of the College. He will then 
receive the Degree and Diploma /r^e of charge. 

A. student who has received a Diploma in any course, in 
order to obtain a Diploma in any other course, shall pay five 
dollars for the additional certificate, or certificates, and ten d.ol- 
lars for the Diploma. 

The Graduates in the several courses enjo}'^ equally all the 
privileges, rights and honors of the College. 

REGULAR master's DEGREES. 

In order to obtain the Regular Degree of Master of Arts, Mas- 
ter of Sciences, or Master of Letters, the following conditions are 

30 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

required : 1. The iittainment of the Degree of Bo^chelor in the 
course. 2. The actual attendance in the College thereafter, for 
one session at least, and the study of three Elective studies, to 
be selected by the candidate with the consent of the Faculty. 
3. An approved examination of selected studies. A fee oi ten 
dollars will be charged for the Diploma. 

HONORARY MASTER'S DEGREE. 

A Bachelor of one year's standing in any one of the courses 
may receive the Honorary Degree of Master in that course; pro- 
: vided he shall in the interval have maintained an exemplary 
character, and become distinguished in the studies relating to 
the degree. Candidates for this degree should apply to the 
President or Secretary of the Facult}^ before the annual meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees. 

No application for the Degree of A.M., will be entertained 
unless accompanied by the/ee of ten dollars^ which will be re- 
turned in case the Degree is not conferred. 



AOCOMMODATIONS. 

Students are permitted to select their own places of boarding, 
subject in all cases to the supervision of the Faculty. The 
facilities for obtaining boarding in private families have been 
much increased, and many students can be accommodated in 
this way. Every attention will be paid to the health and com- 
fort of the students. 

To accommodate students who desire to board themselves, 
arrangemsnts have been made to supply a number of unfur- 
nished rooms at a very moderate rent. Applications for these 
should be made at an early date, and must be accompanied by 
satisfactory testimonials of character. 



LADIES' BOARDING HALL. 

A comfortable hall is provided for the accommodation of lady 
students, under the management of Mrs. G. Hawkins, as ma- 
tron. All ladies will be required to board in this Hall, except 
by special consent of the Faculty. Parents can feel assured 
that every attention will be given to the welfare of their 
daughters under the experienced care of Mrs. Hawkins. 

31 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

The Lady Principal will board in this Hall with the ladies, 
and have constant oversight of their conduct and comfort! 
Every care will be taken to cultivate their hearts and refine 
their manners. 

The rooms are neatly furnished and arranged for two per- 
sons in each room ; but ladies will be required to furnish 
towels, table napkins, lamp, und all articles of bedding, except 
the mattress. 

EXPENSES. 

Table Board, - - - - - - $ 3 00 per week 

Eooni Rent, each, - - " - - - - 20 00 per year 

Fuel and Light, j)er room, - - - - 8 00 per year 

All expenses to be paid monthly in advance. 

Applications for rooms should bo made as soon as practicable. 

For further particulars, address Mrs. G. Hawkins. 



APPARATUS. 

The Philosophical and Chemical apparatus of the College is 
of the most elegant and approved kind. Provision is made for 
adding to it the new improvements as they may be made, so as 
to furnish the amplest facilities for thorough illustration in 
every branch of each department. 

Our Mathematical instruments are of a very superior char- 
acter, and it is believed that but few institutions in the West 
are as well suppled with the means of scientific illustration as 
is Bethany College. 



LIBRARY. 

We have already laid the foundation for a new Library. We I 

expect to make large additions to it during the present year, I 

by purchase, and trust that all who feel an interest in our sue- I 

cess, will aid us by their contributions. | 

■ I 
CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. 

1st. The Natural History Cabinet contains most of the Fauna, | 
Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable collec- 
tion from Australia, and exchanges with other sections of the 
country. Also a fine Herbarium of native plants, with many 
rare ones from other parts of the world. 

32 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

2(1. The Miner illogical and Geological Cabinet contains several 
thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all parts of 
the world, to which new contributions are constantly made. 
It has recently been enriched by several hundred specimens of 
Minerals. 

3d. The Ethnological Cabinet^ though not large, contains rare 
and valuable collections. 



DISCIPLINE. 

The discipline of th<' College is in harmony with the benev- 
olent object of its founder, in establishing an institution for the 
promotion of pure Literature, and a liberal Christian education. 
Hence, no student can be permitted to remain who indulges in 
card playing, intemperance, profanity, neglect of study, or any 
other vice or impropriety. We aim, however, to govern through 
the approval of the judgment and the heart, rather than by 
force of law and authority'. Hence, the discipline is parental ; 
and daily moral instruction, based upon the Bible, leaves but 
little else to be done in government. We aim to make the 
student a law unto himself. 



REPORTS. 

Monthly '' Reports " will be addressed by the Secretary of the 
FacuUy to the parent or guardian of each student, in which 
are stated his attention in class, supposed industry, proficiency 
in each of his studies, absences from lectures and recitations, 
and his general deportment, with such other information as it 
may be necessary to communicate- 

TERMS, VAGATIOf^S AND EXAMINATIOf^S. 

The College Year consists of two terms, four and a half 
months each. It begins on the last Monday in September, and 
ends on the third Thursday in June. In this year there are 
two examinations, in each class — one in February, and the 
final examination in June. 

It is very desirable that applicants for Matriculation present 
themselves at the beginning of the session, that there may be 
a convenient arrangement of the classes in the various Depart- 
ments or Schools. Students, however, can enter conveniently 
at the commencement of the second term, directly after the 
intermediate examination in February. 
5 33 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are in connection with the College, two Literary So- 
cieties. Their Halls recently destroyed by fire, have been rc- 
]>laced by others, beautifully finished and appropriately fur- 
nished. Valuable libraries have also already been received by 
the societies, through the munificence of friends, to replace 
those that were lost. 

Every facility is afforded by the authorities of the Institu- 
tion for increasing the accommodations and adding to the use- 
fulness of these valuable auxiliaries to the Institution. 



ADELPHIAN SOCIETY. 

As this Society difiers in some important respects from a 
purely Literary Society, it demands a more particular notice. 

As it is a distinguislr'ng feature of Bethany College to make 
the Bible a regular subject of stud}^ and daily examination, 
the Adelphian Society has been organized in order to promote 
and carry out, to the fullest extent, the purposes contemplated 
in the department of Bible Literature. 

The regular exercises of the Society consist — 

1st. Of recitations of portions of the Scriptures. 

2d. Reading original essays on moral and religious subjects ; 
and 

8d, The delivery of Scriptural discourses, not only before the 
Society, but, on suitable occasions, in public. 

Young men preparing for the Christian Ministry may derive 
incalculable advantages from this Society. From its organiza- 
tion, and the character and ability of its members, it is well 
fitted to facilitate the acquisition of enlarged views of the Bible, 
and the cultivation of a high standard of morality and religion. 

The Society has a well furnished and commodious hall for its 
meetings. It has a well selected Library, to which it respect- 
fully solicits contributions of works auxiliary to the study and 
comprehension of the Bible, Ecclesiastical History, Ethics, etc. 
Any such donations w^ill be gratefully received. 

34 





1 


00 to 1 50 


2 


00 


per week. 

$20 00 

15 00 

12 00 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

EXPENSES. 

The College year is divided into tu'o terras, of four and a half 
months each. The usual expenses, exclusive of books, clothes, 
(fee, are as follows: 

Boarding per week, including furnished rooms and fuel, from $4 00 to 5 00 
Washing, per month, ----- 
Liglit extra. 

Boarding in Clubs, now very generally adopted, about. 
Tuition, College course, per tenn, 
" Preparatory year, per term, 
" Special course in Engineering, per term, 
" Modern languages, to those not in the Scientific course, per terw?, 5 00 
" Matriculation and contingent expense fee, per term, - 5 00 

All students in the Scientific Course, including thoge receiv- 
ing gratuitous instruction, will be charged extra for the chem- 
icals they use in the Laboratory, and a fee of $3 00 for the use 
of field instruments. Students entrusted with instruments 
will be charged for injuries resulting from carelessness. 

One-half of the expenses of the College year must be paid in- 
variably in advance. 

Students entering after the commencement of the term, or 
leaving before its close, will be allowed no reduction on their 
tuition ; provided, however, that those who thus leave with the 
permission of the Faculty may return during the subsequent 
term for a period equal to the time of their absence, /r^(? of ad- 
ditional charge for tuition. 

All remittances are to be made to \V. K. Pendleton, Bethany, 
Brooke County, W. Va., with whom also may be deposited, for 
safe keeping, the private funds of each student, free of all per- 
centage. 

The Faoulty earnestly advises parents to expressly forbid Mer- 
chants and others from crediting their soyis while at College. Apart 
from the habit of extravagance which this license almost unavoidably 
cultivates, there are other evils which are extremely detrimental to 
student life. A request to any member of the Faculty to this effect 
will be promptly attended to. 



GRATUITOUS INSTRUCTION. 

Indigent and pious young meii in any of the religious denom- 
inations, who wish to prepare for the ministry, shall, on pay- 



35 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

inii; the matriculation fee, be admitted into any of the courses 
of Bethany College at one half the regular rates for tuition. 

All applicants for this privilege will be required to present 
to the Faculty satisfactory written recommendations from their 
respective congregations, and from well known ministers of 
the Gospel, ct^rtifying that they come under the above condi- 
tions, in such form as shall be prescribed by the Faculty. They 
shall also be required to sign a promissory note to pay the 
fall charge for tuition five years after their withdrawal from 
the College, provided they do not, in the meaiitime, devote 
themselves to the work of the Ministry. But this provision for 
reduction of tuition shall not extend, in any case, beyond one 
session, except upon the recommendation of the Faculty, and the 
approval of the Board. 

The sons of regular Ministers of the Gospel of all denomina- 
tions .-.'hall be ndmitted to all the classes and privileges of the 
College, upon payment of matriculation fee and one-half the 
regular charges for tuition. 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be re- 
quired to give instructions in the Preparatory Classes. 




HIS Institution is situated in Brooke County, West Vir- 
ginia, seven miles from the Ohio river, and sixteen miles 
north of Wheeling. It has a very liberal charter, b}^ which all 
necessary powers are conferred, and the rights of its Alumni 
fully secured. From the peculiar organization of this Institu- 
tion, it presents important advantages to those who wish to 
secure, in addition to literary and scientific acquirements, a 
highly moral and practical education. 

The most particular attention is paid to moral instruction 
and training. A full course of lectures is delivered every ses- 
sion upon Sacred Literature, in which the great matters of 
Piety and Humanity are elucidated and enforced by appropri- 
ate examples. These lectures, which are general, familiar and 
discursive, are entirely free from all sectarian character, an^l 
do not touch upon any of the peculiarities of particular re- 
ligious parties. They are adapted to the circumstances of the 
class, and admirably fitted to supply defects in the early edu- 
cation of youth, and so give a bias in favor of moralit}^ and 
virtue. The peculiar location of the College, too, affords tlie 
greatest facilities for moral culture. Being remote from any 
large town or city, and surrounded by a moral and industrious 
population engaged in agriculture, it is secluded from those 
haunts of dissipation, and those vicious associations so fatal to 
youth in cities. 

The location of Bethany College is also highly advantageous 
to physical health. It may be said with emphasis, that there 
is not in the United States a more healthy location. It is in 
the midst of a hilly and elevated region, where there is pure 
air, fine water and perfect exemption from those intermittent, 
congestive and malignant fevers so prevalent in certain por- 
tions of the Western country. 

The railroad stations for Bethany are Lagrange, on the Cleve- 
land, Pittsburgh and Wheeling Railroad, and Welisburg, on the 
Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Railroad. From these 
stations, which are each seven miles distant, a daily coach is 
run, on a Macadamized road, to Bethany, by Wm. Rodgers, 
who will give prompt attention to any orders addre&sed to him, 
care of '^ Granite House," Welisburg, W. Va. 

37 



CALEKDAR. 



Annual meeting of the Board of Trusteep, on Tuesday and 
Wednosda}^ - - before the third Thursd;iy in June. 

Annual Commencement, - on the third Thursday in June. 

Session begins, - - - last Monday in September. 

Christmas recess begins, - - - - December 21. 

Christmas recess ends, . - . . . January 3. 

First term ends, .-...- .January 25. 

Second term begins, January 28. 

Anniversary of the Neotrophian Society, - - Novembers. 

Anniversary of the American Literary Institute, November 10. 

Anniversary of the Adelphian Society, - - December 11. 

Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, - February 22. 

Annual Exhibition of the D'Ossolian Society, 

Tuesday Evening before Commencement. 

Annual Exhibition of the Neotrophian Society, 

Evening before Commencement. 

Annual Exhibition of the American Literary Society, 

Evening of Commencement. 

Alumni Day, - . - Tuesday before Commencement. 

Class Da}^ - - - Wednesday before Commencement. 



38 



N,. _,>-. ,,-V 






a~^ "Vi^ 



Iatalogue 



-OF THE- 



Officers and Students 



-OF— 





-FOR THE- 



FORTY-THIRD SESSION, 



ENDING JUNE 19, 1884. 







'iiii 



ii; 




CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 



H 



1 



H 



H 



FOll THE 



FORTY-THIRD SESSION 



ENDING JUNE 19, 1884. 



WITH THE 



'Ourse of ^tudv Lf Wnnual Announcement 



:F'OI^ 1884-'85. 



Open to Male and Female on Equal Terms. 



BETHANY, WEST VIRGINIA. 
1884. 



FREW, CAMPBELL & HART, 

Steam Book and Job Printers aqd Blar|k Book Marjufacturers, 

Nos. 25 and 27 Fourteenth Street, 
Wheeling, W. Va. 






W. K. PENDLETON, LL.D., President 

Prof, of Sacred History, and of Philosophy and Belles Lettres. 



C. J. KEMPER, A.M., 

Prof, of Mathematics, Astronomy, Modern Languages and Civil Engineering. 



J. F. EASTWOOD, A.M., 

Prof, of Natural Sciences. 



B. C. HAGERMAN, A.M., 

Prof, of Greek and Higher English. 



W. H. WOOLERY, A.M., 

Prof, of Latin and Hebrew. 



MISS LIZZIE Y. PENDLETON, 

Teacher of Music. 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 
MISS E. E. WITMER, Principal 



W. H. WOOLERY, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 



J. F. EASTWOOD, 

Curator of the Museum and Librarian. 



A. E. MYERS, 

Treasurer, 
3 



<^s 



^-g»A^ 



^^ 



W. K. Pendleton, 

Albert Allen, 

Joseph King, 

Hon. Geo. H. Anderson, 

Hon, R. M Bishop, 

Dr. J. C. Campbell, 

A. W. Campbell, 

J. E. Curtis, 

James Darsie, 

R. Moffett, 

P. S. Fall, - 

Alex. Campbell, 

John F. Rowe, 

Bateman Goe, 

Tom Gale, 

T. EwiNG Miller, 

J. H. Jones, - 

Isaac Errett, .- 

A. E. Myers, 

Thomas W. Phillips, 

Hon. J. C. New, 

John C. Palmer, 

Dr. J. P. RoBisoN, - 

E. G. Hall, 

D. W. Storer, 

Jno. a. Brooks, - 

George Darsie, 

Porter- S. Newmeyer, 

C. H. Beall, 

M. M. Cochran, 

Oliver Marshall, 



Bethany, W. Va. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cincinnati, 0. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany,. W. Va. 
Braddock's Field, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Akron, Ohio. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Memphis, Tenn. 

Columbus, Ohio. 

Alliance, Ohio. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

West Liberty, W. Va. 

New Castle, Pa. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Louisville, Ky. 

■ Shelby, Ohio. 
Warrensburg, Mo. 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Uniontown, Pa. 

■ NewCumberl'd, W.Va 



^tudent^ of the Fo 


ft j-ThW ^e^^ion. : 


^p 

J. W. Abbott, Ky. 


A. S. Lobingier, Pa. ] 


F. P. Arthur, N. Y. 


C. W. LoHSE, W. Va. 


J. E. Atkinson, Mo. 


J. A. Lytle, 0. 


A. G. Baker, 0. 


S. T. Martin, 0. 


M. G. Baxter, 0. 


A. W. Mayers, 0. 


W. C. Barber, Neb. 


W. L. McElroy, 0. 


C. G. Brej.os, N. Y. 


S. S. McGiLL, 0. 


F. S. Brown, N. Y. 


A. McKinnie, 0. 


R. M. Campbell, W. Va. 


G. R. McVey, Mo. 


L. B. Clark, W. Va. 


J. H. Mertz, 0. 


G. G. Cochran, Pa. 


W. H. MOONEY, 0. 


A. J. Colborn, Pa. 


G. W. Muck:ley, 0. 


J. M. Cravens, Ark. 


W, J. McCluer, 0. 


J. C. Cunningham, 0. 


W. C. Payne, Ind. 


J. M. Calhoun, Pa. 


W. S. Payne, Ky. 


J. E. Counselman, W. Va. 


P. Y. Pendleton, W. Va. 


T. J. Davis, Va. 


A. B. Phillips, 0. 


F. M. DOWLING, 0. 


Floyd Phillips, Va. 


A. D. DoWLING, 0. 


A. C. Philips, Pa. 


A. A. Doane, Mass. 


N. A. Phillips, Pa. 


J. P. FiNDLEY, 0. 


J. T. Plattenburg, W. Va. 


I. N. Frye, Pa. 


0. E. Palmer, 0. 


D. S. Gay, Ky. 


W. D. Robinson, 0. 


J. W. Goodwin, Ky. 


W. M. Roe, Mo. 


J. W. GORRELL, W. Va. 


R. M. RossER, Ga. 


E. A. Hall, 0. 


0. Schmiedel, W. Va. 


G. T. Halbert, Ky. 


G. K. Smith, Mo. 


A. M. Harvuot, 0. 


G. W. Smith, Mo. 


J. D. Hukill, W. Va. 


J. B. Smith, 0. . 


E. Jackson, Miss. 


E. M. Smith, Va. 


G. W. Kemper, W. Va. 


W. M. Smith, Ky. 


E. H. Kelly, 0. 


G. B. Stacy, Va" j 


R. H. LiLLARD, Ky. 


C. Ulrich, Ala. 


L. Lindsay, W. Va. W. A. Van Dyke, 0. 

; 5 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



F. B. Walker, Ind. 
H. C. Wells, Mo. 
H. D. Williams, O. 
H. L. WiLLETT, Mich. 
J. R. Wilson, W. Va. 
J. B. Wilson, W. Va. 



L. M. Billings, W. Va. 

M. H. DOWLING, 0. 

I. N. Findley, 0. 

A. M. Gale, Tenn. 

W. S. Hawkins, W. Va. 

V. H. Jones, 0. 

L. A. LocKHART, W. Va. 

O. C. Muckley, 0. 

E. G. Newcomer, Pa. 

R. Payne, Ky. 

Total , 



J. F. WiTNER, N. Y. 

J. F. Woolery, Ky. 
L. C. Woolery, Ky. 
G. F. Wolf, 0. 
W. H. Wolf, 0. 



LADIES. 



S. L. Phillips, Pa. 

N. L. Prather, W. Va. 

A. C. Prather, W. Va. 

G. Price, 0. 

F. D. Price, 0. 

D. P. Seaton, Ky. 

V. R. Shriver, W. Va. 

L. J. Westlake, 0. 

L. J. Williamson, Idaho. 



98 



FROM THE FOLLOWING STATES 



West Virginia 19 

Pennsylvania... 9 

Kentucky 11 

Missouri 6 

Ohio 34 

Virginia 4 

Indiana 2 

Nebraska 1 

New York 4 



Tennessee ... 
Mississippi . .. 

Michigan 

Idaho 

Georgia 

Arkansas 

Massachusetts 
Alabama 




1 





) 


;.i 


THE FORTY-THIRD SESSION. 






Bachelors of Arts. 






A. G. Baker, 


• 


Ohio. 




C. G. Brelos, 


. 


New York. 




A. G. COLBORN, . 


. 


Pennsylvania. 


G. T. Halbert, 


. 


Kentucky. 




Miss E. G. Newcoivter, 


Pennsylvania. \\ 


A. M. Harvout, 


. 


Ohio. 




P. Y. Pendleton, 


. 


West Virginia, j 


F. B. Walker, 


. 


Indiana. 


{ 


J. F. Wither, 


• • • 


New York. 




F. L. Phillips, 


* 


Virginia. 




L. C. Woolery, 


. 


Kentucky. 






Bachelors of Science. 




• 


R. H. LiLLARD, 


. 


Kentucky. 


;" 


H. C. Wells, 


. 


Missouri. 




G. K. Smith, 


. . . 


Missouri. 




T. J. Davis, 


.... 


Virginia. 




W. H. MOONEY, 


. 


Ohio. 






Bachelors of Letters. 






E. M. Smith, 


• « • 


Virginia. 




W. S. Payne, 


. 


Kentucky. 


• 

514 1 


Whole number of Bachelors of Arts, . 


u u 


'' Science, . 


... 


67 \ 


U ll 


" Letters, 




44 i 


Total Alumni 


, ..... 




625 \ 




7 







c>^ 



JTLT is not in harmony with the policy of the Institution to 
:i=i receive from a distance, students under fifteen years of age ; 
but this requirement will be waived in favor of younger can- 
didates whose fitness for entrance has been well attested. 

Every candidate for matriculation wall be required to furnish 
to the presiding officer, suitable testimonials of good moral 
character, and, if coming from any other incorporated institu- 
tion of learning, must present a certificate of regular dismission 
therefrom. Before matriculation it is further required that 
the subjoined regulations and rules of conduct be read ; it is 
required : 

1. That all matriculates shall, as soon as possible, and with 
the approval of the secretary, select from the several schools 
a course of three daily recitations, or the equivalent thereof, 
unless, upon the request of parent or guardian, or for other 
good cause shown, excepted from this rule. 

2. That having entered any class, they shall not leave such 
without permission from the faculty. 

3. That they shall punctually attend recitations, examina- 
tions, and ail other exercises of the college, and in a satisfactory 
manner, account to the proper officer for any delinquency on 
their part. 

4. That they shall at once deliver into the keeping of the 
faculty, any deadly weapon that may be in their possession, 
and shall neither keep nor use any such during their connec 
tion with the institution. 

5. That they shall neither introduce within the precincts of 
the college, nor use elsewhere, any intoxicating beverage. 

6. That they shall abstain from gambling of all kinds, and 
from cards even for amusement. 

7. That they shall not go beyond the immediate precincts of 
the college without permission from the presiding officer, nor 
leave until regularly dismissed at the close of the session. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

8. That they shall not be noisy, or play in or about the col- 
lege building during the hours appointed for recitation. 

9. That they shall not trespass upon the premises of any 
person, or in any way injure the property of the institution. 

10. That they shall faithfully observe all the rules and regu- 
lations contained in the above articles of this code, respecting 
fees, society, college property, boarding houses, etc. 

It is further expected and desired, that they attend public 
worship every Lord's day, abstain from profanity, and in gen- 
eral from whatever is inconsistent with good taste, good order, 
and good morals. 

Any material infringement of the preceding regulations and 
code of discipline, may dissolve a student's connection with 
the institution. 







^ETHANY COLLEGE has three separate complete courses, 
the Classical, the Scientific, and Ministerial, conferring 
respectively the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sci- 
ences, and Bachelor of Letters. In addition, there are three 
special courses, Engineering, Physics, and Chemistry, for which 
certificates only are given. Also, a thorough Academical 
Course for two years, which is, also, preparatory to the Regular 
College Courses. 

All courses open to females and males equally, but for 
females there is a special arrangement of studies, called the 
Ladies' Course. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

This course embraces the following schools, viz : 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of the Greek Language. 

3. School of the Latin Language. 

4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

5. School of Natural Sciences. 

6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles 
Lettres. 



1 . School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

Evidences of Christianity, Moral Philosophy, Bible Readings 

with recitations. 

The Languages, History, and Canonicity of the Bible. 

10 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 
2. School of the Greek Language. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term. — Grammar, (Goodwin). Greek Lessons, (White). 
Xenophon's Anabasis. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — Xenophon's Anabasis continued. Herodotus. 

Exercises in writing Greek. Grecian History. 

Second Term. — Herodotus continued. Homer's Iliad, three 

books. Prose composition. Grecian History. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Homer's Odyssey, three books. Xenophon's 
Memorabilia of Socrates. Prose Composition, 
(Sidgwiok). 

Second Term. — Plato's Apology of Socrates and Crito. Theoc- 
ritus, or Demosthenes, Oration on the Crown. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Sophocles. The Oedipus Tyrannus. Selections 

from the Lyric Poets. 
Second Term. — Higher study of English. (Whitney's Life 
and Growth of Language.) 



3. School of Latin Language and Literature. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term. — Grammar, (Chase). First Lessons in Latin, 

(Jones or Comstock). 
Second Term. — Studies of the first term continued. I Book 
of the Gallic War. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — Grammar continued. Caesar's Gallic War. 
Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. Prose Com- 
position, (Jones). 

Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy. Composition 
continued, (Jones). 

JUNIOR TFAR. 

First Term. — Prosody. Virgil's ^neid, (Greenough). His- 
tory of Rome. Abbott's Latin Prose, through 

English Idiom. 
11 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Second Term. — Prosody. Select Odes, Epodes, Epistles and 
Satires of Horace, (Macleane.) Cicero's De 
Amicitia, (Reid.) History and Composition 
continued. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — The Agricola of Tacitus. 

Second Term. — The Andria of Terence. Pliny's Letters. 

Antiquities, (Wilkins.) — Latin Literature, 

(Bender.) Ecclesiastic Latin. 

Post Graduate Course, as an Elective Study for the Degree of Master of Arts. 
First Term. — Lucretius. Persius. Latin Inscriptions. Ro- 
man Law. 
Second Term. — Selections from QuintiMan, Seneca, Suetoniun. 
Classical Etymology. A Latin Thesis. 



3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 
This school embraces a course of Pure Mathematics, finishing 
with the Differential and Integral Calculus, a course in Astron- 
omy, and superadded to this, a course in Mechanics. The text 
books in use, and the time allotted to each study, will be found 
in the following schedule : 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Algebra — From Quadratic Equations. (Ray's 2d 

Part.) 
Second Term. — Geometry — Begun. (Venable.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Geometry — Completed. 

Second Term. — Trigonometry — Plane and Spherical, with ap- 
plications of the former in the field. (Green- 
leaf.) Land Surveying — With practical ap- 
plications, mapping, &c. (Davies.) 
Analytical Geometry — Begun. (Olney.) 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Analytical Geometry. (Olney's General Geom- 
etry.) 
Second Term. — Differential and Integral Calculus, with appli- 
cations to questions of the General Geometry. 

(Olnev.) 

12 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term^ — Mechanics. (Kemper.) 

Second Term. — Astronomy. (Snell's Olmsted.) 



4. School of Natural Science. 

SECOND YEAR. 



First Term. — Physics. 
G3oh)gy. 
Second Term. — Botany. (Gray.) 



THIRD YEAR. 



First Term. — Zoology. (Orton.) 

Phys ology. (Lf^ctures.) 
Chemistrv. 



5. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and 
Belles Lettres. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric. 

English Composition. 
Second Term. — English Composition. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — English Literature. 
Second Term. — Art of Discourse. 

THIRD YEAR- 

Second Term. — Philosophy of Rhetoric. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Intellectual Science. 

Second Term. — Logic, Political Economy. 

13 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCES. 

This course embraces the following schools : 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

3. School of Natural Science. 

4. School of Modern Languages. 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 
Economy. 



1 . School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

Evidences of Christianity. 

Moral Philosophy. 

Bible Readings and Recitations. 

The Languages, History and Canonicity of the Bible. 



2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

The Scientific Course in this School embraces the same sub- 
jects that are given under the Classical Course, with the addi- 
tion of a course of Applied Mathematics, in Road and Railroad 
Engineering, Descriptive Geometry, Shades, Shadows and Per- 
spective Drawing. The following schedule will give a con- 
nected view of the whole. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Algebra — From Quadratic Equations, (Ray.) 
Second Term. — Geometry — Begun, (Venable.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Geometrj^ — Completed, (Venable.) 
Second Term. — Trigonometry — Plane and Spherical, with ap- 
plication of former in field work,(Greenleaf.) 
Land Surveying — With practical applications, 

mapping, &c., (Davies.) 
Analytical Geometry — (Olney's General Ge- 
ometry.) 

14 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Analytical Geometry, Descriptive Geometry, 

Shades, Shadows and Perspective Drawing. 
Second Term. — Differential and Integral Calculus, (Olney.) 
Road and Railroad Surveying, with Levelling, 
Laying out Curves, Calculation of Exca- 
vations, Embankments, &c. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Mechanics, (Kemper.) 

Second Term — Astronomy, (Snell's Olmsted.) 



3. School of Natural Science. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Second Term. — Botany. (Gray's School and Field Book). 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Zoology. (Orton). 

Physiology. (Lectures). 

Chemistry. (Cooke.) 
Second Term. — Chemistry. (Cooke.) 
Geology. (Le Conte.) 



4, School of Modern Languages. 

French — Joynes-Otto-Introductory French Lessons and Reader 

College series of French Plays. (BOcher.) 

Racine, Corneille, Moliere. 

German — Cook's Otto's Grammar. 

William Tell. (Schiller.) 

Maria Stuart, " 

Minna Von Barnhelm. (Lessing.) 

In this school students will be required to translate from the 

English into the French and German throughout the session 

15 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

1 at every recitation, until near its close when the exercises will 
be less frequent. The translation of the languages will be 
kept up during the whole session. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Second Term. — Higher Study of English. 

Languages, History and Canonicity of the 
Bible. 



4. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and 

Belles Lettres. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric. 

English Composition. 
Second Term, — English Composition. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — English Literature. 
Second Term. — iVrt of Discourse. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Second Term. — Philosophy of Rhetoric. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Intellectual Science. 
Second Term. — Logic, Political Economy. 




16 



MINISTERIAL COURSE. 



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Second Term.- 



-Theology of the New Testament. 
The Church — Its Origin and Development. 
Hebrew. — Messianic Prophecy. — The Higher 
Criticism of the Old Testament examined. 
17 




CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



at every recitation, until near its close when the exercises will 
be less frequent. The translation of the languages will be 
kept up during the whole session. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Second Term. — Higher Study of English. 

Languages, History and Canonicity of the 
Bible. 



4. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and 

Belles Lettres. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric. 

English Composition. 
Second Term. — English Composition. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — English Literature. 
Second Term. — Art of Discourse. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Second Term. — Philosophy of Rhetoric. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Intellectual Science. 
Second Term. — Logic, Political Economy. 




16 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

j at everj recitation, until near its close when the exercises will 
\ be less frequent. The translation of the languages will be 



16 



MINISTERIAL COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 

This course embraces the following schools : 

1. School of Sacred Literature. 

2. School of Greek. 

3. School of Latin. 

4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

5. School of Natural Science. 

6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and Belles 
Lettres. 

7. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 



1. School of Sacred Literature. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Inspiration of the Scriptures. 
Hermeneutics. 
Hebrew — Grammar, with exercises in writing 

Hebrew. 
Gospels : — Analysis, Interpretation and Dis- 
cussion. 
-Second Term. — Hebrew. — Select portions of the Historical 
Books of the Old Testament read. Struc- 
ture of the Old Testament (Leathes). 
Book of Acts : — Analysis, Interpretation and 
Discussion. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Homiletics, with Practical Exercises in the 
Preparation and Delivery of Discourses. 
Hebrew. — Old Testament Poetry read. Origin 

and Growth of the Psalms (Murray). 
Greek Exegesis of Epistle to the Ephesians. 
Topical Exegesis. 
Second Term. — Theology of the New Testament. 

The Church — Its Origin and Development, 
Hebrew. — Messianic Prophecy. — The Higher 
Criticism of the Old Testament examined. 
3 17 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 
2. School of Ancient Languages. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Second Term. — Higher Study of English. 



3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course, to which refer. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course, with the addition of a short 
course of Lectures on Astronomy. 



4. School of Natural Science. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Same as in Classical Course. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 



5. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles Lettres. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 
Second Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 



School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 
FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Moral Philosophy. 

Bible Readings, with Recitations. 
Second Term. — Evidences of Christianity. 

Languages, History and Canonicity of the 

Bible. 

18 



Ji 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



LADIES' COURSE. 



PREPARATORY COURSE. 

Grammar — Harvey. 

Arithmetic— Mental and Practical (Ray). 

Geography — (Mitchell). 

U. S. History. 

Algebra begun — (Ray). 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric — (Hart). 

Latin Grammar (Chase). 

Algebra, continued — From Equations of Second 
Degree (Ray's Second Part). 
Second Term. — English Composition (Quackenbos). 
Latin — Caesar. 
Latin Composition. 
Geometry, begun (Venable). 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — English Literature (Coppee). 
Latin. 

Caesar's Commentaries. 
Latin Composition. 
Roman History. 

Geometry, completed (Venable). 
Second Term. — Art of Discourse (Day). 
Latin. 

Latin Composition. 
Trigonometry: — Plane and Spherical. 
Measurements' of Heights and Distances 

(Greenleaf). 
Botany (Gray). 
19 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Moral Science (Seelye). , 

Latin. 

Chemistry (Barker). 

Physics (A. P. Gage). 

French (Joyne's Introductory Lessons). 

Reading. 
Second Term. — Philosophy of Rhetoric (Whately). 

- Latin. 
French (Grammar, Racine, Moliere, Corneille). 



SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Mental Science (Hickok). 
Latin. 

German (Otto's Grammar, Reading). 
Philology (Whitney's Life and Growth of Lan- 
guage). 
Second Term. — Logic (Whately.) 

Political Economy (Wayland, Chapin). 
German (Otto's Grammar, Wm. Tell, Marie 

Stuart, Schiller). 
Lectures on the Bible. 
Students have frequent exercises in composition throughout 
the whole course. 




20 



AL COURSES. 



COURSE. 



I ^olid. 



3 nd Spherical. 



hoiogy. 



phemistry. 

els. 



fic. 



structure of English. 



^y- 



1 New Testament. 



LADIES' COURSE. 



Rhetoric. 
Latin Grammar. 

Algebra Continued — From Equations of Second 
Decree. 



English Composition: 
Latin, Caesar. 
Latin Composition. 
Geometry begun. 



English Literature. 

Latin. 

Caesar's Commentaries. 

Latin Composition. 

Roman History. 

Geometry Completed. 



Art of Discourse. 

Latin, Saliust. 

Cicero's Orations. 

Latin Composition. 

Trigonometry: — Plane and Spherical. 

Measurements of Heights and Distances. 

Botany. 



Moral Science, Hickok. 

Latin — ^Virgil — Odes and Satires of Horace, 

Chemistry. 

Physics. 

French. 

Reading. 



Philosophy of Rhetoric. 

Latin — Epistles and Ars Poetica of Horace. 

Tacitus' Germania or Agricola. 

French (Grammar, Racine, Moliere, Corneille). 



Mental Science. 

Latin — A Latin Play. 

German (Otto's Grammar, Reading). 

Philology, Whitney's Life and Growth of Lan- 



guage. 



Logic. 

Political Economy. 

German (Otto's Grammar, Wm. Tell, Marie 

Stuart, Schiller). 
Lectures on the Bible. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Moral Science (Seelye). 
Latin. 

Chemistry (Barker). 
Physics (A. P. Gage). 
French (Joyne's Introductory Lessons). 
Reading. 
Second Term. — Philosophy of Rhetoric (Whately). 
Latin. 
French (Grammar, Racine, Moliere, Corneille). 



SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Mental Science (Hickok). 
Latin. 

German (Otto's Grammar, Reading). 
Philology (Whitney's Life and Growth of Lan- ; 
guage). 
Second Term. — Logic (Whately.) 

Political Economy (Wayland, Chapin). 
German (Otto's Grammar, Wm. Tell, Marie ; 

Stuart, Schiller). 
Lectures on the Bible. 
Students have frequent exercises in composition throughout ;• 
the whole course. 




20 





SYNCHRONISTIC VIEW OF THE SEVERAL COURSES. 




CLASSICAL COURSE. 


SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 


MINISTERIAL COURSE. 


LADIES' COURSE. 


s 

1 

» 
S 


T3 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 

English Composition. 


Higher Algebra. 
English Composition. 
History. 
French. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 

English Composition. 


Rhetoric. 
Latin Grammar. 

Algebra Continued — From Equations of Second 
Degree. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry: — Plane and Solid. 

English Composition. 


Geometry :— Plane and Solid. 

English Composition 

French. 

History. 

Drawing. 


Latin. 

Greek 

Geometry : — Plane and Solid. 

English Composition. 


English Composition; 
Latin, Caesar. 
Latin Composition. 
Geometry begun. 


i 


Physics— Geology. 

Latin Eoman History. 

Greek. 

Geometry : — Spherical. 

Trigonometry : — Plane and Spherical. 

English Literature 

Ancient Geography. 


Geometry :— Spherical. 
Trigonometry : — Plane and Spherical. 
German. 
Roman History. 
English Literature. 


Physics —Geology. 

Latin, Roman History. 

Greek. 

Geometry : — Spherical. 

Trigonometry :— Plane and Spherical. 

English Literature. 

Ancient Geography. 


English Literature. 

Latin. 

Caesar's Commentaries. 

Latin Composition. 

Roman History. 

Geometry Completed. 


E 

■o 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History. 

Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Surveying. 

Art of Discourse. 

Grecian and Roman Mythology. 


Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Projection Drawing. 

German. 

Grecian History. 

Surveying. 

Art of Discourse. 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History. 

Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Astronomy, by Lectures. 

Survej'ing. 

Art of Discourse. 

Grecian and Roman Mythology. 


Art of Discourse. 

Latin, Sallust. 

Cicero's Orations. 

Latin Composition. 

Trigonometry: — Plane and Spherical. 

Measurements of Heights and Distances. 

Botany. 


pi 

2 


1- 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Land Surveying. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Geology — Physiology — Chemistry, 

Greek Literature. 


Surveying : — Laying out of Lands : Leveling 

Topographical Surveying and Drawing. 

Descriptive Geometry. 

Analytical Geometry. 

G eology— Physiology. 

Chemistry. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Inspiration. 

Hermeneutics. 

Hebrew. 

Geology — Physiology — Chemistry. 

Greek Literature— Gospels. 


Vforal Science, Hickok. 

Latin — Virgil— Odes and Satires of Horace, 

Chemistry. 

Physics. 

French. 

Reading. 


1 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Chemistry. 

Physics. 

Calculus. 

Roman Literature. 

Philosophy of Rhetoric. 


Drawing. 

Roads and Railroads. 

Railroad— Field Operations. 

Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Geology. 

Philosophy of Rhetoric. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Acts of Apostles. 

Hebrew. 

Chemistrj'. 

Physics 

Roman Literature. 

Philosophy of Rhetoric 


Philosophy of Rhetoric. 

Latin — Epistles and Ars Poetica of Horace. 

Tacitus' Germania or Agricola. 

French (Grammar, Racine, Moliei'e, Corneille). 


i 


E 


Moral Science. 

Metaphysics and Rhetoric. 

Latin. 

Greek. 

Mechanics. 

Physics. . 

Zoology. 

Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 


Moral Science. 

Metaphysics. 

Rhetoric. 

Mechanics. 

Physics. 

Zoology. 

Practical Chemistry. 

Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 


Moral Science. 

Metaphysics and Rhetoric. 

Homiletics. 

Hebrew. 

Physics. 

Greek Exegesis. 

Zoology. 

Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 


Mental Science. 
Latin — A Latin Play. 
German (Otto's Grammar, Reading). 
Philology, Whitney's Life and Growth of Lan- 
guage. 


Greek. 

Latin. 

Logic, Political Economy. 

Astronomy. 

Critical Study of English. 

Lectures on the Old and New Testaments. 


Astronomy. 

Logic, Practical Economy. 
Critical Study of English. * 
Lectures on the Old and New Testament. 
Practical Physics. 
Practical Chemistry. 

Mechanical Constructions, and Original Designs 
in Drawing. 


Logic— Political Economy. 

Bibical Theology. 

The Church. 

Critical Study of English. 

Lectures on the Old and New Testament. 

Hebrew. 


Logic. 

Political Economy. 

German (Otto's Grammar, Wm. Tell, Marie 

Stuart, Schiller). 
Lectures on the Bible. 



HIS Department is under the, control of Miss Lizzie 
Pendleton, a lady who, to a thorough education under 
the best masters, both of Vocal and Instrumental Music, adds 
several years of experience and succdssful teaching in these 
branches. A thorough course of elementary training and drill 
in technique is obligatory upon all students in her charge. 



T:B:E^:M:s. 
Vocal or Instrumental (each per term) (|^ College Session) $25.00 
Use of Instrument two hours per day, per term, '' 5.00 

" " extra hours, per hour, - - - 2.50 



SpEEial EnnrsE in EnginEErinfl, 



FOR WHICH A CERTIFICATE IS GIVEN. 



For this course no specified time is required except as de- 
manded by previous preparations, and the time necessarily 
allotted to each branch. 

To enter upon the course a thorough knowledge of Algebra, 
Geometry and Plane Trigonometry is required. 

1. Land Surveying — Embracing all that is necessary to un- 
derstand the subject in its practical bearings with field work, 
mapping, etc. 

2. The principles of Topographical Surveying and Drawing. 

3. Levelling, Profiling, Mapping. 

4. Descriptive Geometry, with Shades, Shadows and Per- 
spective. 

5. Road and Railroad Surveying — with field operations. 
For this course a separate charge is made. 

Certificates will be given indicating the branch studied and 

the degree of proficiency attained. It is very desirable that 

students should enter with the regular classes of the Scientific 

Course. 

21 




1. Mineralogy. — The determination of one hundred^ minerals 

by the blowpipe. 

2. Qualitative Analysis. — 

A. — Twenty-five substances soluble in water, containing 
one acid and one base. The object of this course 

is to give the student a familiarity with the 
tables, and a thorough knowledge of the reac- 
tions involved. 
B. — Twenty-five complex substances, in which attention 

is given especially to methods of separation. 
C. — Twenty-five substances for the purpose of illustra- 
ting methods of solution. 
D. — Twenty-five complex substances of various degrees 
of solubility. Text-books — (Appleton's Qualita- 
tive Analysis, Prescott's Tables.) 
3. — Quantitative Analysis. — 

This course embraces the analysis of fifty substances, 
in which both gravimetric and volumetric methods 
will be taught. 

r Appleton's Quantitative Analysis, 
Text-books. -< Fresenin's " " 

(^Crooke's Select methods. 

The course in Qualitative Analysis is essential to the suc- 
cessful prosecution of any of the others, and will be required. 
After that, a student may take any one, or all of the others. 
The certificate will indicate the branches studied, and the de- 
gree of proficiency attained. Any one qualified will be per- 
mitted and encouraged to make original investigations, and 
will be furnished with the necessary apparatus and chemicals. 
The cost of Qualitative Analysis and Mineralogy, will be 
twenty-five dollars, paid in advance, and the same for the 
course in Quantitative Analysis. 

Any student desiring special instruction in Pharmacy can 
be accommodated, but will be required to furnish himself with 
all materials not required in the above courses. If desired, 
special instruction will also be given in Toxicology and 

Urinalysis. 

22 



i 



REGUIiAR COURSE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term — Arithmetic reviewed; Algebra (Ray I.); Eng- 
lish Grammar reviewed; English Analysis and Composition 
begun; U. S. History; Dictation Exercise and Elocution, daily. 

Second Term — Arithmetic (Ray's Higher); Algebra (Ray II.); 
English Composition and Word Analysis (Swinton); U. S. His- 
tory; Elocution and Dictation Exercise, daily. 

Third Term — Arithmetic (Ray's Higher) completed ; Alge- 
bra (Ray IL); Geometry begun; Physical Geography (Maury); 
Rhetoric (Hart); Dictation Exercise and Elocution, daily. 

Tuition, 110.00 Per Term. 

second year. 

First Term — Geometry; Rhetoric (Hart); Element3 of Phys- 
ics (Norton); General History CSwinton); Book-keeping (Bry- 
ant and Stratton). 

Second Term — Geometry; Rhetoric completed (Hart); Physi- 
ology (Cutter); Science of Government. (Young); Reviews; 
Book-keeping. 

Third Term — English Literature ; Botany (Gray); Analysis 
of 50 native flowers; Reviews. 

Tuition, $10.00 Per Term. 

Students intending to enter college will be allowed to sub- 
stitute Latin and Greek for equivalent studies in this course. 

None but the most improved methods of instruction will be 
used. Subjects will be taught, not books. The aim will be to 
make the students thoroughly acquainted with the subjects 
studied. 

Students completing the course prescribed for this depart- 
ment and having passed a satisfactory examination will receive 
a certificate of graduation on the payment of the usual fee, $3.00. 

23 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

ELOCUTION. 

Constant attention is paid to the art of Elocution. The 
members of the Junior and Senior Classes are required to de- 
liver origirial orations every Friday morning in the presence 
of the Faculty and all the Students. These performances are 
rigidly criticised, particularly as to the style of delivery, by 
the Faculty. 



TERMS OF GRADUATION. 

DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. 

A student may graduate in any school singly. To obtain the 
degree of Graduate in any school, it is required of every can- 
didate : 

1. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College at 
least one session, and shall have studied in the College the en- 
tire Senior year of the school. 2. That within one month from 
the beginning of the session, he shall have made known to the 
Professor of the school his intention of graduating. 3. That he 
stand a satisfactory examination on all the prescribed studies 
of the school. On paying a fee of three dollars, he shall be en- 
titled to a Certificate of Graduation, signed by the President and 
Professor. 

DEGREES OF BACHELOJl OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF SCIENCES, AND 

BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 

To receive the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, 
or Bachelor of Letters, the candidate must have graduated and 
received his certificates in the several schools embraced in the 
respective courses. He must also have faithfully observed all 
the other laws and regulations of the College. He will then 
receive the Degree and Diploma /ree of charge. 

A student who has received a Diploma in any course, in 
order to obtain a Diploma in any other course, shall pay five 
dollars for the additional certificate, or certificates, and ten dol- 
lars for the Diploma. 

The Graduates in the several courses enjoy equally all the 
privileges, rights and honors of the College. 

24 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



REGULAR master's DEGREES. 

In order to obtain the Regular Degree of Master of Arts^ Mas- 
ter of Sciences, or Master of Letters, the following conditions are 
required : 1. The attainment of the Degree of Bachelor in the 
course. 2. The actual attendance in the College thereafter, for 
one session at least, and the study of three Elective studies, to 
be selected by the candidate with the consent of the Faculty. 
3. An approved examination of selected studies. A fee of ten 
dollars will be charged for the Diploma. 

HONORARY MASTER's DEGREE. 

A Bachelor of one year's standing in any one of the courses 
may receive the Honorary Degree of Master in that course; pro- 
vided he shall, in the interval, have maintained an exemplary 
character, and become distinguished in the studies relating to 
the degree. Candidates for this degree should apply to the 
President or Secretary of the Faculty before the annual meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees. 

No application for the Degree of A.M. will be entertained 
unless accompanied by the fee of ten dollars, which will be re- 
turned in case the Degree is not conferred. 



ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Students are permitted to select their own places of boarding, 
subject in all cases to the supervision of the Faculty. The 
facilities for obtaining boarding in private families have been 
much increased, and many students can be accommodated in 
this way. Every attention will be paid to the health and com- 
fort of the students. 

To accommodate students who desire to board themselves, 
arrangements have been made to supply a number of unfur- 
nished rooms at a very moderate rent. Applications for these 
should be made at an early date, and must be accompanied by 
satisfactorv testimonials of character. 



LADIES' BOARDING HALL. 

A comfortable hall is provided for the accommodation of lady 
students, under the management of Mrs. G. Hawkins, as ma- 
tron. All ladies will be required to board in this Hall, except 
4 25 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



by special conseat of the Faculty. Parents can feel assured 
that every attention will be given to the welfare of their 
daughters under the experienced care of Mrs. Hawkins. 

The Lady Principal will board in this Hall with the ladies, 
and have constant oversight of their conduct and comfort. 
Exery care will be taken to cultivate their hearts and refine 
their manners. 

The rooms are. neatly furnished and arranged for two per- 
sons in each room; but ladies will be required to furnish 
towels, table napkins, lamp, and all articles of bed(Mng, except 
the mattress. 

EXPENSES. 

Table Board, - - - - - - $8 50 per week 

Room Rent, each, - - - - - - 20 00 per year 

Fuel and Light, per room, - - - - 8 00 per year 

All expenses to be paid monthly in advance. 

Applications for rooms should be made as soon as practicable. 

For further particulars, address Mrs. G. Hawkins. 



APPARATUS. 

The Philosophical and Chemical apparatus of the College is 
of the most elegant and approved kind. Provision is made 
for adding to it new improvements as they may be made, so 
as to furnish the ampl,est facilities for thorough illustration in 
every branch of each department. 



CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. 

1st. The Natural History Cabinet contains most of the Fauna, 
Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable collec- 
tion from Australia, and exchanges v^ith other sections of the 
country. Also a fine Herbarium of native plants, with many 
rare ones from other parts of the world. 

2d. The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several 
thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all parts of 
the w^orld, to which new contributions are constantly made. 
It has recently been enriched by several hundred specimens of 
Minerals. 

3d. The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains rare 

and valuable collections. 

26 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

TERMS, VACATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS. 

' The College Year consists of two terms, four and a half 
months each. It begins on the last Monday in September, and 
ends on the third Thursday in June. In this year there are 
two examinations, in each class — one in February, and the 
final examination in June. 

It is very desirable that applicants for Matriculation present 
themselves at the beginning of the session, that there may be 
a convenient arrangement of the classes in the various Depart- 
ments or Sehools. Students, however, can enter conveniently 
at the commencement of the second term, directly after the 
intermediate examination in February. All students entering 
higher than the freshman class will be examined before being 
admitted to the class. 

Permission to take both a Junior and Senior class in any of 
the schools of the College, the same session, shall be granted 
only upon condition that the average grade of the student in 
the Sophomore class shall be, not less than 87 in each school ; 
and in case the applicant has never been a student of the 
College, and requests such permission, that he be required to 
stand a satisfactory examination on such subjects, as in the 
view of the Professor of the School, may be deemed necessary. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are in connection with the College, two Literary So- 
cieties. Their Halls recently destroyed by fire, have been re- 
placed by others, beautifully finished and appropriately fur- 
nished. Valuable libraries have also already been received by 
the societies, through the munificence of friends, to replace 
those that were lost. 

Every facility is afforded by the authorities of the Institu- 
tion for increasing the accommodations and adding to the use- 
fulness of these valuable auxiliaries to the Institution. 



27 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

EXPENSES. 

The College year is divided into two terms, of four and a half 
months each. The usual expenses, exclusive of books, clothes, 
&c., are as follows : 

Boarding per week, including furnished rooms and fuel, from S4 00 to 5 00 
Washing, per month, - - - - - - i 00 to 1 50 

Light extra. 

Boarding in Clubs, now very generally adopted, about, - 2 00 per w^eek. 

Tuition, College course, jjer term, _ _ _ _ |20 00 

" Preparatory year, per ^^Tw, - - - - 15 00 

'' Special course in Engineering, per term, - - 12 00 

" Modern Languages. to those not in the Scientific course,per term, 5 00 
" .Matriculation and contingent expense fee, per term; - 5 00 
All students in the Scientific Course, including those receiv- 
ing gratuitous instruction, will be charged extra for the chem- 
icals they use in the Laboratory, and a fee of $3 00 for the ufc 
of field instruments. Students entrusted with instruments 
will be charged for injuries resulting from carelessness. 

One-half of the expenses of the College year must be paid 
invariably in advance. 

Students entering after the commencement of the term, or 
leaving before its close, will be allowed no reduction on their 
tuition; provided, however, that those who thus leave with the 
permission of the Faculty may return during the subsequent 
term for a period equal to the time of their absence, /ree of ad- 
ditional charge for tuition. 

The Faculty earnestly advises parents to forbid Merchants and 
others from crediting their sons while at College. Apart from the habit 
of extravagance which this license almost unavoidably cultivates, there 
are other evils which are extremely detrimental to student life. A re- 
quest to any member of the Faculty to this effect will be promptly 
attended to. 



GRATUITOUS INSTRUCTION. 

Indigent and pious young men in any of the religious denom- 
inations, who wish to prepare for the ministry, shall, on pay- 
ing the matriculation fee, be admitted into any of the courses 
of Bethany College at one half the regular rates for tuition. 

All applicants for this privilege will be required to present 
to the Faculty satisfactory written recommendations from their 

. respective congregations, and from well known ministers of 

28 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

the Gospel, certifying that they come under the above condi- 
tions, in such form as shall be prescribed by the Faculty. They 
shall also be required to sign a promissory note to pay the full 
charge for tuition five years after their withdrawal from the 
College, provided they do not, in the meantime, devote them- 
selves to the work of the Ministry. But this provision for 
reduction of tuition shall not extend, in any case, beyond one 
session, except upon the recommendation of the Faculty, and 
the approval of the Board. 

The sons of regular Ministers of the Gospel of all denomina- 
tions shall be admitted to all the classes and privileges of the 
College, upon payment of matriculation fee and one-half the 
regular charges for tuition. 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be re- 
quired to give instructions in the Preparatory Classes. 




I 



29 



<^f^ ^Af?l 






HIS Institution is situated in Brooke County, West Vir- 
ginia, seven miles from the Ohio river, and sixteen miles 
north of Wheeling. It has a very liberal charter, by which all 
necessary powers are conferred, and the rights of its Alumni 
fully secured. From the peculiar organization of this Institu- 
tion, it presents important advantages to those who wish to 
secure, in addition to literary and scientific acquirements, a 
highly moral and practical education. 

The most particular attention is paid to moral instruction 
and training. A full course of lectures is delivered every ses- 
sion upon Sacred Literature, in which the great matters of 
Piety and Humanity are elucidated and enforced by appropri- 
ate examples. These lectures, which are general, familiar and 
discursive, are entirely free from all sectarian character, and 
do not touch upon any of the peculiarities of particular re- 
ligious parties. They are adapted to the circumstances of the 
class, and admirably fitted to supply defects in the early edu- 
cation of youth, and so give a bias in favor of morality and 
virtue. The peculiar location of the College, too, affords the 
greatest facilities for moral culture. Being remote from any 
large town or city, and surrounded by a moral and industrious 
population engaged in agriculture, it is secluded from those 
haunts of dissipation, and those vicious associations so fatal to 
youth in cities. 

The location of Bethany College is also highly advantageous 
to physical health. It may be said with emphasis, that there 
is not in the United States a more healthy location. It is in 
the midst of a hilly and elevated region, where there is pure 
air, fine water and perfect exemption from those intermittent, 
congestive and malignant fevers so prevalent in certain por- 
tions of the Western country. 

The railroad stations for Bethany are Lagrange, on the Cleve- 
land, Pittsburgh and Wheeling Railroad, and Wellsburg, on the 
Wheeling branch of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis 
Railroad. From these stations, which are each seven miles 
distant, a daily coach is run, on a Macadamized road, to Bethany, , 
by Wm. Rodgers, who will give prompt attention to any orders 

addressed to him, care of " Granite House," Wellsburg, W. Va. 

30 



CALENDAR. 



Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and 
Wednesday, - - before the third Thursday in June. 

Annual Commencement, - on the third Thursday in June. 

Session begins, - - - last Monday in September. 

Christmas recess begins, . - - - December 23. 

Christmas recess ends, ----- January 5. 

First term ends, - January 30. 

Second term begins, . . - . - February 2. 

Anniversary of the Neotrophian Society, - - November 5. 

Anniversary of the American Literary Institute, November 10. 

Anniversary of the Adelphian Society, - - December 11. 

Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, - February 22. 

Annual Exhibition of the D'Ossolian Society, 

Tuesday Evening before Commencement. 

Annual Exhibition of the Neotrophian Society, 

Evening of Commencement. 

Annual Exhibition of the American Literary Society, 

Evening before Commencement. 

Alumni Day, - - - Tuesday before Commencement. 

Class Day, - - - Wednesday before Commencement. 



31 



//- 



Hi. 



1 



k 




~-:^ 
^ 



J 




I 



CATALOGUE 



<»r Tii>' 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 



Bethany College, 



KOR THF 



FORTY-FOURTH SESSION 



ENDING JUNE 18. 1885. 



WITH THE 



Course of ^tudv fy Unnual Unnouncement 



'JP(D:R 1885-'86. 



Open to Male and Female on Equal Terms. 



BETHANY. WEST VIRGINIA. 

1885. 

" - - - - -- ■■■-. ~ ■ -■-■^-^. -. -- • . 



■"^^^^^^^ 



FKKW. rAMHBKLL iV HAKT. 

Steam Book and Job Printers and BlaqU Book Mar^ufacturers 

Nos. 25 and 27 Fourteenth Street. 
\Vhkki.in<.. W. Va. 



urulttj 0f PutfiHutj €aUi^0ir» 



\V. K. PENDLETON, LL.D.. I>emdent. 

Prof of Sacred ni>tory. ain! of I'l^ilo^^>^>hy an«l lielle* Lettre>. 



J. F. EASTWOOD, A.M. Ph.C, 

Prof, of Natural S-itMU'es. 



B. C. HAGERMAN, A.M. 

Prof, of <;ret'k and HightT KnKli>h. 



W. H. WOOLERY, A.M., 

Prof, of Latin and Hebrew. 



A, F. ERB, A.M., 

Prof, of Mathematics, A>trononiy and (.'ivil Kngineering. 



MISS CAMMIE PENDLETON, 

Teacher of M«Klern Languajjes and Music. 



G. W. MUCKLEY, 

Tutor in I.atin. 



H. L. WILLETT, 

Tutor in <treek. 



ACADEMICAL DEPARTMENT. 
MISS E. E. WITMER, Principal. 



B. C. HAGKRMAN, 

Chairman of the Faculty. 



W. H. WOOLERY, 

PiH:retarv. 



J. F. EASTWOOD, 

Curator of the Museum and Librarian. 

A. E. MYERS, 

Trea'-'uer. 



^u^t'5 of i^tit0tee0. 



W. K. Pendleton, 

Albkrt Ai.len, 

JoSfcPH KiN<., . 

Hon. Geo. H. Anderson, 

Hon. R. M. Bishop, 

Dr. J. C. Campbell, 

A. W. Cawpbell, 

J. E. Curtis, 

James Darsie, . 

r. moffett, 

P. S. Fall, 

Alex. Campbell, . 

John F. Rowe, . 

Bateman Goe, 

Tom Gale, 

T. E\viN(; Miller, 

J. H. Jones, 

Isaac Errett, 

A. E. Myers, 

Thomas W. Phillips, 

Hon. J. C. New, 

John C. Palmer, . 

E. J. Gantz, 

E. G. Hall, 

Henry Price, . 

J no. a. Brooks, . 

George Dars^ie, 

Porter S. Newmeyer. 

C. H. Beall, 

M. M. Cochran, . 

Oliver Marshall, 



Bethany. W. Va. 
Columbu?, Ohio. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany. W. Va. 
Salem, Ohio. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Akron, Ohio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Alliance, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Barnesville, Ohio. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Kenton, Ohio. 
Warrensburg, Mo. 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Union town, Pa. 
New Cumberrd,W.Va 



■ 



^todent? of the FortJ-Foui'lih ^egjioq. 



3EK:3H3 

Arthi'r. F. P , N. Y. Mertz. J. H.. O. 

Baxter. M. G., O. *PRirE, Flora. O. 

Brown, F. S , N. Y. *Pri«>:. Gu^sie. O. 

=^Dowl:xc;, M A , O. tPhilmp:*, X. A.. Pa. 

DowLiSi.. A. 0., O. Smith. -G. W.. Mo. 

DowMNci. F. M., O. THiRirH, Cyrus, Ala. 

tFrye, I. N.. Pa *\Vkstlake, L. J.. O. 

Gay. D. S , Ky. Wii sox. J. B., W. Va. 

McEi.RoY, \V. L., O. Woi F, \V. H , O. 1 

JUNI3RS. 
*Hamjert, Irene, Ky. Mucki.ey, G. \V., O. 

LoBiNGiER, A. S., Pa. Payne, \V. C, Ind. 

Mayers, A. W . O. Wiij.ett, H. L., Mich. 

McCltre. W. J., O. *\ViLMAMsoN, L., Idaho. 

/' S0PH0MCRE3 

HuKiLL, \Vm. v., W. Va. RossER, R. M., Ga. 

*McCLURE, M. J., O. SCHMIEDEL, O . W. Va. 

*McClure, Nettie, O. *Shriver, V. R., W. Va. 

Nance, John C, Miss. *Smith, L. K., Pa. 

Phillips, A. B., O. Stacy, G. B., Va. 

*Phillips, S. L., Pa., Van Dyke, W. A., O. 

Plattenburn, J. T., W. Va. White, A. L., O. 
*Prather, Nettie Lee, Pa. Wilson, J. R., W. Va. 

Robinson, W. D., O. Wolf, G. F., O. 

PRESHMEN. 

Cameron, T. L., 0. *Hawkin3, W., W. Va. 
Campbell, R. M., W. Va. Jobes, N. D., Pa. 

Campbell, W., W. Va. Kirk, Sherman, O. 

Cherryholmes, C. C, O. Pendleton, Kent, W. Va. 

Cochran, George, Pa. Rumble, H. H., O. 

Cummings, J. H. Ky, Scott, C. L., O. 

Curry, E. E., O. *Turner, N. F., W. Va. 
Cooper, T. A., Pa. Williams, F. A., Ga. 

Ladies. tDid not ciraduate. 



CATALOG IE OF BKTIIAXY COLLEGE. 



Students Having Studies in the Academic Department. 



Campbell, R. M., W. Va. 
Campijkll, W., W. Va. 
Cochran, Geo., Pa. 
Cooper, T. A., Pa. 
Cummins, J. H , Ky. 
Curry, E. £., 0. 
*Ha\vkins, W., W. Va. 
JoRES, N. D„ Pa. 
Kirk, Sherman, O. 



*Lockhart, a. L., W. Va. 
^McClure, N., O. 

Nance, J. C, Miss. 
'J'Prather, a. C, Pa. 
'^'Prather, N. L., Pa. 

Pendleton, Kent, W. Va. 

Pendleton, Dwight, W. Va. 
*TuRNER, N., W. Va. 



Whole Number, 63. 



FROM the following STATES : 



West Virginia 12 

Pennsylvania 11 

Kentucky 3 

Missouri 1 

Ohio 26 

Virginia 1 

Indiana 1 



New York. 2 

Mississippi.. 1 

Michigan 1 

Idaho 1 

Georgia 2 

Alabama 1 



Whole number of Bachelors of Arts, . 
'■ " *' Science, 

" *' Letters, 



514 
67 
44 



Total Alumni, 



625 



■••Ijulic."*. 




5ermS'of« Admission. 



XT is not in harmony with the policy of the Institution to 
receive from a distance, students under fifteen years of age; 
but this requirement will be waived in favor of younger can- 
didates whose fitness for entrance has been well attested. 

Every candidate for matriculation will be reijuired to furnish 
to the presiding officer, suitable testimonials of good moral 
character, and, if coming from any other incor[)orated institu- 
tion of learning, must present a certificate of regular dismission 
therefrom. Before matriculation it is further required that 
the subjoined regulations and rules of conduct be read; it is 
required : 

1. That all matriculates shall, as soon as possible, and with 
the approval of the Faculty, select from the several schools 
a course of three daily recitations, or the equivalent thereof, 
unless, upon the request of parent or guardian, or for other 
good cause shown, excepted from this rule. 

2. That having entered any class, they shall not leave such 
without permission from the Faculty. 

3. That they shall punctually attend recitations, examina- 
tions, and all other exercises of the college, and in a satisfactory 
manner, account to the proper officer for an\^ delinquency on 
their part. 

4. That they shall at once deliver into the keeping of the 
Faculty, any deadly weapon that may be in their possession, 
and shall neither keep nor use any such during their connec- 
tion with the institution. 

5. That they shall neither introduce within the precincts of 
the college, nor use elsewhere, any intoxicating beverage. |. 

6. That they shall abstain from gambling of all kinds, and 
from cards even for amusement. 

7. That they shall not go beyond the immediate precincts of 
the college without permission from the presiding officer, nor 
leave until regularly dismissed at the close of the session. 

7 



CATALOG IE OF liETHAyV COLLEGE. 

8. That they ^ho\\ not be noipy, or play in or about the col- 
lege building during the hours appointed for recitation. 

9. That they shall not trespass upon the premises of any 
person, or in any way injure the property of the institution. 

10. That they ehall faithfully observe all the rules and regu- 
lations contained in the above articles of this code, respecting 
fees, society, college property, boarding houses, etc. 

It is further expected and desired, that they attend public 
worship every Lord's day, abstain from profanity, and in gen- 
eral from whatever is inconsistent with good taste, good order, 
and good morals. 

Any material infringement of the preceding regulations and 
code of discipline, may dissolve a student's connection with 
the institution. 




( 



Qoarse* of* study. 



BETHANY COLLEGF has four separate complete courses, 
theClassical, Scientific, Ministerial, and Ladies, conferring 
respectively the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sci- 
ences, Bachelor of Letters. In addition, there are special 
courses in Engineering and Chemistry, for which certificates 
only are given. AUo, a thorough Academical Course for two 
years, which is, also, preparatory to the Regular College Courses. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREK OF BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

This course embraces the following schools, viz : 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of the Greek Language. 

3. School of the Latin Language. 

4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

5. School of Natural Sciences. 

6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles 
Lettres. 



1 . School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

Evidences of Christianity, Moral Philosophy, Bible Readings 
with recitations. 
The Languages, History, and Canonicity of the Bible. 

2. School of the Greek Lanffuage. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 
First Term. — Grammar (Goodwin). Greek Lessons (White). 
Xenophon's Anabasis. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
First Term. — Xenophon's Anabasis continued. Herodotus. 
Exercises in writing Greek. Grecian History. 
2 



^^■i*^^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Second Term.— Herodotus continued. Homer's Iliad, three 
books. Prose Composition. Grecian History. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Trrm. — Homer's Ody8sej% three books. Xenophon's 

Memorabilia of Socrates. Prose Composition 

(Sidgvvick). 

Second Term.— Plato's Apology of Socrates and Crito. The- 

ocritu-, or Demosthenes. Oration on the 

Crown. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Sophocles. The Oedipus Tyrannus. Selec- 
tions from the Lyric Poets. 
Second Term.— Higher Study of English. (Whitney's Life 
and Growth of Language). 



3. School of Latin Langruagre and Literature. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term. — Grammar (Allen «fe Greenough). First Les- 
sons in Latin (Jones or Comstock). 
Second Term. — Studies of the first term continued. Book I 

of the Gallic War. Creighton's Primer of 

Roman History. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — Grammar continued. Cajsar's Gallic War, 
Books II, III. Sallust's Conspiracy of Cati- 
line. Prose Composition (Arnold). 
Second Term. — Three Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book I or 
XXI and XXIL Composition continued 
(Arnold). Tomlinson's Questions on Latin : 
Grammar. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Prosody. Vergil's iEneid, three books (Green- 
ough). History of Rome (Leighton). Latin 
Prose Composition (Arnold's second part fin- 
ished). Latin Synonymes (Shumway). 
10 



CATALOGUE OF BETHEXY COLLEGE > 

Second Term. —Prosody. Select Odes, Epodes, Epistles and 
Satires of Horace (Macleane). Carefully 
written translations. Cicero's De Aniicitia 
(Reid). Mythology (Murray). 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term.— Tacitus' Dialogue on Orators (Chase & Stuart). 

Second Term.— Qui ntilian Book X (Frieze). Captives of 
Plautus (Harrington). Pliny's Letters. 
Antiquities (Wilkins). Latin Literature 
(Crutwell). Ecclesiastical Latin — the Vul- 
gate and Beza's Latin Testament compared. 
English derived from Latin. 

Pod Gradnate Coune^ as an Elective Study for the Degree of Mader of Arti. 

First Term. — Lucretius (Kelsey). Persius (Gildersleeve). 
Justinian's Institutes. Roman Law as basis 
of Modern Law (Morey and Hadley). 

Second Term. — Selections from Terence, Plantus, Seneca, 
Suetonius. Latin Hymns. Classical Ety- 
mology. A Latin Thesis. 



4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

This school embraces a course of Pure Mathematics, finishing 
with the Differential and Integral Calculus, a course in Astron- 
omy, and superadded to this, a course in Mechanics. The text 
book in use, and the time allotted to each study, will be found 
in the following schedule. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Algebra — From Quadratic Equations (Olney's 

Complete). 
Second Term, — Geometry (Olney). 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Geometry — Completed. 

Second Term. — Trigonometry — Plane and Spherical, with 
applications of the former in the field 
\ (Greenleaf). Land Surveying, with prac- 

i ticai applications, mapping, <&c. (Gillespie). 



CATALOGUE OF HETHASY COLLEGE, 



THIRD YEAK. 

First Term— Analytical Geometry ( 01 ney's General Geom- 
etry). } 

Second Term.— Dift'erential and Integral Calculu.s with ap- 
plications to questions of the General Geom- 
etry, at option of student (Olney). 

FOIRTH YEAR. 



First Term. — Mechanics (Peck). 

Second Term.— Astronomy (Snell's Olmsted). 



School of Natural Science. 
FIRST YEAR. 
Second Term. — Botany (Gray). 

SECOND YEAR. 
First Term.— Physiology (Martin). 

Chemistry (Cook's Physiology). 
Second^Term. — Zoology (Orton). 

Geology (LeConte). 

FOURTH YEAR. 
First Term. — Physics (Ganot). 
Second Term. — Criticism (Kame). 

Note. —Where Chemistry or Cteology are substituted for Physiolog}' and 
Zoology they may be taken in the corresponding terms of the thinl year. 



5. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and 
Belles Lettres. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term.— Rhetoric (HilPs Elements). 

English Composition. 
Second Term. — English Literature (Shaw). 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — English Literature. (Shaw.) 
Second Term. — Elements of Criticism (Kame). 



\2 



CATALOGIE OF BETHAXV COLLEGE. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Second Term. — Science of Rhetoric (Hill). 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Intellectual Science (Porter). 
Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). 

Political Economy (Walker). 




13 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCES. 

This course embraces tlie following schools: 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

3. School of Natural Science. 

4. School of Modern Languages. 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 
Economy. 



1 . School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

Evidences of Christianity. 

Moral Philosophy. 

Bible Readings and Recitations. 

The Languages, History and Canonicity of the Bible. 



2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

The Scientific Course in this School embraces the same sub- 
jects that are given under the Classical Course, with the addi- 
tion of a course of Applied Mathematics, in Road and Railroad 
Engineering, Descriptive Geometry, Shades, Shadows and Per- 
spective Drawing. The following schedule will give a con- 
nected view of the whole. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Algebra — From Quadratic Equations, (Olney.) 
Second Term. — Geometry — Begun, (Olney.) 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Geometry — Completed (Olney). 
Second Term. — Trigonometry — Plane and Spherical, with 

application of former in field work (Green- 
leaf). 
Land Surveying — With practical applica- 
tions, mapping, &c., (Gillespie). 
Analytical Geometry (Olney 's General Ge- 
ometry.) 



CATALOGUE OF BETHASY COLLEGE. 



3. School of Natural Science. 
FIRST YEAR. 
Second Term. — Botany (Gray). 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term. — Physiology (Martin). 
Second Term. — Zoiilogy (Orton). 

THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Chemistry (Cooke's Philosophy). 
Second Term. — Geology (LeConte). 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Physics (Ganot). 
Second Term. — Criticisms (Kame). 



4. School of Modern Langruagres. 

First Term.— Bocher's Otto's Grammar. 

Sauveur's Causeries avec mes Eleves. 

" Fables de La Fontaine. 

French Composition. 
Second Term. — Otto's Grammar. 

French Composition. 

Critical Study of selections from the best 
French Authors. 
15 



THIRD YEAR. 

First Term. — Analytical Geometry, Descriptive Geometry, 
Shadet«, Shadows and Perspective Drawing. 

Second Term.— Differential and Integral Calculus (Olney). 
Road an(i Railroad Surveying, with Level- 
ing, Laying out Curves, Calculations of Ex- 
cavations, Embankments, etc. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Mechanics (Peck). 

Second Term. — Astronomy (Snell's Olmsted). 



I 



\ 



c 



CATALOGUE OF BETHASY COLLEGE. 

FIRST YEAK. 

F1R8T Tkrm. — Cook's Otto's Grammar. 

Stern's Studien unci Plaudereien. 
German Composition. 
Second Tekm. — Grammar continued. 
German Composition. 
Selected German Comedies. 

SECOND YEAK. 

FiRfcT Term.— Otto's Grammar. 

German Composition. \ 

Minna von Barnhelm. 
Second Term. — German Composition. 
Wilhelm Tell. 



4. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and 

Belles Lettres. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term.— Elements of Rhetoric (Hill). 

English Composition. 
Second Ter.m. — English Literature. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First Term.— English Literature (Shaw). 
Second Term. — Elements of Criticism. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Second Term.— Science of Rhetoric (Hill). 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term.— Intellectual Science (Porter). 
Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). 

Political Economy (Walker). 



16 



MINISTERIAL COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 

This course embraces the following schools : 

1. School of Sacred Literature. 

2. School of Greek. 

3. School of Latin. 

4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

5. School of Natural Science. 

6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and Belles 
Lettres. 

7. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 



1. School of Sacred Literature. 
THIKD YEAR. 

First Term. — Inspiration of the Scriptures. I 

Hermeneutics. 

Hebrew — Grammar (Bickell), with exercises 
in writing Hebrew. One hundred verbs 
committed (Harper's Vocabularies). 
Gospels: — Analysis, Interpretation and Dis- 
cussion. 
Second Term.— Hebrew — Two hundred nouns committed 
(Harper's Vocabularies). Select portions 
of the Historical Books of the Old Testa- 
ment read. Structure of the Old Testa- 
ment (Leathes). 
Book of Acts : — Analysis, Interpretation and 
Discussion. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Homiletics, with Practical Exercises in the 
Preparation and delivery of Discourses. 
Hebrew — Old Testament Poetry read. Origin 

and Growth of the Psalms (Murray). 
Greek Exegesis of Epistle to the Ephesians. 
Topical Exegesis. 
Second Term. — Theology of the New Testament. 

The Church — Its origin and Development. 
Hebrew — Messianic Prophecy — The Higher 
Criticism of the Old Testament examined. 



' ■ 



y^ssscsr 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

2. School of Ancient Langruafires. 
FIRST YEAK. 
Same as in Classical Course. 

SECOND YEAR. 
Same as in Classical Course. 

THIRD YEAR. 
Same as in Classical Course. 

FOURTH YEAR. 
Second Term.— Higher Study of English. 



3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 
FIRST YEAR. 
Same as in Classical Course, to which refer. 

SECOND YEAR. 
Same as in Classical Course, with the additon of a short 
course of Lectures on Astronomy. 



4. School of Natural Science. 
SECOND YEAR. 
Same as in Classical Course. 

THIRD YEAR. 
Same as in Classical Course. 

FOrUTH YEAR. 
First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 



5. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles Lettres. 

FOURTH YEAR. 
First Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 
Second Term. — Same as in Classical Course. 



School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 
FOURTH YEAR. 

First Term. — Moral Philosophy. 

Bible Readings, with Recitations. 

Second Term. — Evidences of Christianity. 

Languages, History and Canon icity of the 

Bible. 

18 



CATALOGUE OF BETHAXY COLLEGE. 



LADIES' COURSE. 



PREPARATORY COURSE. 

Grammar — Whitney's Essentials. 

Arithmetic — Mental and Practical (Ray). 

Geography — (Mitchell). 

U. S. History. 

Algebra begun — (Olney). 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term.— Rhetoric— (Hill). 

Latin Grammar — (A. S: G.) 
Algebra, continued — From Equations of Second 
Degree (Olney). 
Second Term. — English Composition (Quackenbos). 

Latin — Casar. Prose Composition (Arnold). 
Geometry (Olney). 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — English Litemture (Shaw). 

Latin — Ciesar's Commentaries. Prose Compo- 
sition. 
Roman History. 
Geometry, completed (Olney). 
Second Term. — Elements of Criticism. 
Latin. 

Latin Composition. 
Trigonometry: — Plane and SphericaL 
Measurements of Heights and Distances 

(Greenleaf ). 
Botany (Gray). 
19 



•••. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHENY COLLEGE, 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Moral Science (Porter). 
Latin. 

Chemistry (Avery). 
Physics (Ganot). 

French (Joyne's Introductory Lessons). 
Reading. 
Second Term. — Science of Rhetoric (Hill). 
Latin. 

French (Grammar, Racine, Moliere, Cor- 
neille). 



SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Mental Science (Porter). 
Latin. 

German (Otto's Grammar, Reading). 
Philology (Whitney's Life and Growth of Lan- 
guage). 
Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). 

Political Economy (Wayland, Chapin). 
German (Otto's Grammar, Wm. Tell, Marie 

Stuart, Schiller.) 
Lectures on the Bible. 
Students have frequent exercises in composition throughout 
the whole course. 




I 



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^^"^"^ 


SYNCHRONISTIC VIEW OF THE SEVERAL COURSES. 


'^ 


CLASSICAL COURSC. 


SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 


MINISTERIAL COURSE. 


LADIES' COURSC. 


J I 


Latin. 

Grt«k. 

Higher Algebra. 

English Connposition. 


Higher Algebra. 
Englisli Composition. 
History. 
French. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 

English Composition. 


Rhetoric 
Latin Grammar. 

Algebra Continuetl— From Equations of Second 
Degree. 


w 1- 

i. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry :—Plnne anil Solid. 

English Composition. 


Geometry:— Plane and Solid. 

English Composition. 

French. 

History. 

Drawing. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry:— Plane and Solid. 

English Composition. 


Enjtlish Composition. 
Latin, Civsar. 
Latin Comnosition. 
Geometry begun. 


Physics— Geology. 

Latin Roman History. 

Greek. 

Geometry :— Spherical. 

Trigonometry :— Plane and Spherical. 

Engliftli Literature. 

Ancient Geography. 


Geometry :— Spherical. 
Trignometry:— Plane and Spherical. 
German. 
Roman History, 
English Literature. 


Physics — Geolosy 

Latin, Roman History. 

Greek. 

Geometrj' :— Spherical. 

Trigonometry : — Plane and Spherical. 

English Literature. 

Ancient Geography. 


English Literature. 

Latin. 

Ctesar's Commentaries. 
Latin Composition. 
Roman History. 
Geometry Completed. 


8 


T/atin. 

(ireek, (irecian History. 

Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Surveying. 

Critx^ism. 

Grecian and Roman Mythology. 


Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Projection Drawing. 

German. 

Grecian History. 

Surveying. 

Elements of Criticism. 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History. 

Botany. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Astronomy, by Lectures. 

Surveying. 

Art of Discourse. 

Grecian and Roman Mythology. 


Art of Discourse. 

Latin, Sallust. 

Cicero's Orations. 

Latin Composition. 

Trigonometry:— Plane and Spherical. 

Measurements of Heights and Distances. 

Potany. 

Moral Science. 

Latin— Virgil— Odes and Satires of Horace. 

Chemistry. 

Physics. 

French. 




I^tin. 

(ireek 

\aw\ Surveying. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Geology— Physiology— Chemistry. 

Greek Literature. 


Surveying:— Laying out of Land; Leveling. 

Topographical Surveying and Drawing. 

Descriptive Geometry. 

Analytical Geometry. 

Geology — Physiology. 

Chemistry. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Inspiration. 

Hermeneutics. 

Hebrew. 

Geology —Physiology— Chemistry. 

Greek Literature — Gospels. 


h 

5 

n 1 

h 


Latin. 

(ireek. 

Clicniistry. 

I'livsics 

Calculus 

Konmn Literature. 

Science of Khetoric. 


Drawing. 

Roads and Railroads. 

Railroad — Field Operations. 

Difl'erential and Integral Calculus. 

Geology. 

Science of Rhetoric. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Acts of Apostles. 

Hebrew. 

Chemistry. 

Physics. 

Roman Literature. 

Science of Rhetoric. 


Science of Rhetoric. 

Latin— Ei)iHtles and Ars Poetica of Horace. 

Tacitus' Germania or Agricola. 

French (Grammar, Racine, Moll iere, Cornell le.) 


Moral ."-cience. 

Metjiphysics and Rhetoric. 

Latin. 

Greek. 

Mechanics. 

Physifs. 

Zoology. 

Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 


Moral;Scieiice. 
Metaphysics. 
Rhetoric. 
Mechanics. 
Physics. 
Zoology. 

Practical Chemistry. 

Origin and Grammatical Structure of English. 
Astronomy. 

Logic, Political Economy. 
Critical Study of English. 
Lectures on the Old and New Testaments. 
Practical Physics. 
Practical Chemistry. 

Mechanical Constructions, and Original Designs 
in Drawing. 


Moral Science. 

Metaphysics and Rhetoric. 

Homilttics. 

Hebrew. 

Physics. 

Greek Exegesis. 

Zoology. 

Origin and Grammatical Structure of English, 


Mental Science. 
Latin— A I.atin Play. 
German (Otto's Grammar, Reading.) 
Philology, Whitney's Life and growth of Lan- 
guage. 


Greek. 

Utin. 

l-ogic, Political Economy. 

Astronomy. 

Critical Study of English. 

Lectures on the OKI and New Testaments. 


Logic — Political Economy. 

Biblical Theology. 

The Church. 

Critical Study of English. 

Lectures on the Old and New Testaments. 

Hebrew. 


Logic. 

Political E(»nomy. 

German (Otto's Grammar, William Tell, Marie 

Stuart, Schiller.) 
lA-ctures on the Bible. 



■r?f*c 



Masieal IDepairtment. 



YiyHIS Department is under the control of Miss Cammie 
y^^ Pendleton, a lady who, to a thorough education under 
the best masters, both of Vocal and Instrumental Music, adds 
several years of experience and successful teaching in these 
branches. A thorough course of elementary training and drill 
in technique is obligatory upon all students in her charge. 



Vocal or Instrumental (each per term) (J College Session) $25.00 

Use of Instrument two hours per day, per term, " 5.00 

'' •' extra hours, per hour, - - - 2.50 



Special Enurse nf EnninBering. 



FOR WHICH A CERTIFICATE IS GIVEN. 



For this course no specified time is required except as de- 
manded by previous preparations, and the time necessarily 
allotted to each branch. 

To enter upon the course a thorough knowledge of Algebra, 
Geometry and Plane Trigonometry is required. 

1. Land Surveying — Embracing all that is necessary to un- 
derstand the subject in its practical bearings with field work, 
mapping, &c. 

2. The principles of Topographical Surveying and Drawing. 

3. Levelling, Profiling, Mapping. 

4. Descriptive Geometry, with Shades, Shadows and Per- 
spective. 

5. Road and Railroad Surveying — with field operations. 
For this course a separate charge is made. 

Certificates will be given indicating the branch studied and 

the degree of proficiency attained. It is very desirable that 

students should enter with the regular classes of the Scientific 

Course. 

21 



Sjiftial lonrse in futiml gjitmislrg. 



1. Mineralogy. — The determination of one hundred minerals 

by the blowpipe. 

2. Qualitative Analysis. — 

A. — Twenty-five substances soluble in water, containing 
one acid and one base. The object of this course is 
to give the student a familiarity with the tables, 
and a thorough knowledge of the reactions involved. 

B. — Twenty-five complex substances, in which attention 
is given especialh^ to methods of separation. 

C. — Twenty-five substances for the purpose of illustrating 
methcKls of solution. 

D. — Twenty-five complex substances of various degrees 
of solubility. Text-books — Appleton's Qualitative 
Analysis, Prescott's Tables. 

3. QuantHative Analysis. — 

Thi(3 course embraces the analysis of fifty substances, in 
which both gravimetric and volumetric methods will 
be taught. 

{ Appleton's Quantitative Analysis. 
Text-books. ■< Fresenius's ** ** 

(Crooke's Select Methods. 

The course in Qualitative Analysis is essential to the suc- 
cessful prosecution of any of the others, and will be required. 
After that, a student may take any one, or all of the others. 
The certificate will indicate the branches studied, and the de- 
gree of proficiency attained. Any one qualified will be per- 
mitted and encouraged to make original investigations, and 
will be furnished with the necessary apparatus and chemicals. 
The cost of Qualitative Analysis and Mineralogy, will be 
twenty-five dollars, paid in advance, and the same for the 
course in Qualitative Analysis. 

Any student desiring special instruction in Pharmacy can 
be accommodated, but will be required to furnish himself with 
all materials not required in the above courses. If desired, 
special instruction will also be given in Toxicology and 
Urinalysis. 



1 



Aeaidemie^ D&partm&nl 



REGULAR COURSE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

First Term. — Arithmetic (White); Algebra (Olney's Com- 
plete); English Grammar (Whitney's Essentials); English 
Analysis* and Composition; U. S. History; Elocution and Dic- 
tation Exercij^e, daily. 

Second Term. — Arithmetic completed ; Algebra ; Geometry 
begun; Physical Geography (Maury); Rhetoric (Hill's Ele- 
ments); Dictation Exercise and Elocution, daily. 

Tuition, $10.00 per Term. 

SECOND YEAR. 

FfRST Term. — Geometry; Rhetoric (Hill); Elements of Phys- 
ics (Ganot); General History (Swinton); Book-keeping (Bry- 
ant and Stratton). 

Second Term. — Physiology (Martin); Science of Government 
(Alden); Book-keeping; English Literature ; Botany (Gray); 
Analysis of 50 native flowers; Reviews. 

Tuition, $10.00 per Term. 

Students intending to enter college will be allowed to substi- 
tute Latin and Greek for equivalent studies in this course. 

None but the most improved methods of instruction will be 
used. Subjects will be taught, not books. The aim will be to 
make the students thoroughly acquainted with the subjects 
studied. 

Students completing the course prescribed for this depart- 
ment and having passed a satisfactory examination will re- 
ceive a certificate of graduation on the payment of the usual 

fee, $3.00. 

23 



i 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

ELOCUTION. 

Constant attention is paid to the art of Elocution. The 
members of the Junior and Senior Classes are required to de- 
liver original orations every Friday morning in the presence 
of the Faculty and all the students. These performances are 
rigidly criticised, particularly as to the style of delivery, by 
the Faculty. 



TERMS OF GRADUATION. 

DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. 

A Student may graduate in any school singly. To obtain the 
degree of Graduate in any school, it is required of every can- 
didate : 

1. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College at 
least one session, and shall have studied in the College the en- 
tire senior year of the school. 2. That within one month from 
the beginning of the session, he shall have made known to the 
Professor of the school his intention of graduating. 3 That he 
stand a satisfactory examination on all the prescribed studies 
of the school. On paying a fee of three dollars, he shall be en- 
titled to a Certificate of Graduation, signed by the President and 
Professor. 

DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF SCIENCES, AND 

BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 

To receive the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, 
or Bachelor of Letters, the candidate must have graduated and 
received his certificates in the several schools embraced in the 
respective courses. He must also have faithfully observed all 
the other laws and regulations of the College. He will then 
receive the Degree and Diploma /ree of charge, 

A student who has received a Diploma in any course, in 
order to obtain a Diploma in any other course, shall pay five 
dollars for the additional certificate, or certificates, and ten dol- 
lars for the Diploma. 

The Graduates in the several courses enjoy equally all the 
privileges, rights and honors of the College. i 

j^ _ _ _ ... 21_._ _ I 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



REGULAR MASTERS DEGREES. 

In order to obtain the Regular Degree of Master of Arts, Mas- 
ter of Sciences, or Master oj Letters, the following conditions are 
required : 1. The attainment of the Degree of Bachelor in the 
course. 2. The actual attendance in the College thereafter, for 
one session at least, and the study of three Elective studies, to 
be selected by the candidate with the consent of the Faculty. 
3. An approved examination of selected studies. A fee of ten 
dollars will be charged for the Diploma. 

HONORARY MASTER'S DEGREE. 

A Bachelor of one year's standing in any one of the courses 
may receive the Honorary Degree of Master in that course ; pro- 
vided he shall, in the interval, have maintained an exemplary 
character, and become di4inguished in the studies relating to 
the degree. Candidates for this degree should apply to the 
President or Secretary of the Faculty before the annual meet- 
ing of the Board of Trustees. 

No application for the Degree of A.M. will be entertained 
unless accompanied by the fee of ten dollars, which will be re- 
turned in case the degree is not conferred. 



ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Students are permitted to select their own places of boarding, 
subject in all cases to the supervision of the Faculty. The 
facilities for obtaining boarding in private families have been 
much increased, and many students can be accommodated in 
this way. Every attention will be paid to the health and com- 
fort of the students. 

To accommodate students who desire to board themselves, 
arrangements have been made to supply a number of unfur- 
nished rooms at a very moderate rent. Applications for these 
should be made at an early date, and must be accompanied by 
satisfactory testimonials of character. 



LADIES' BOARDING HALL. 

A comfortable Hall is provided for the accommodation of lady 
students, under the management of Mrs. G. Hawkins, as ma- 
tron. All ladies will be required to board in this Hall, except 
4 25 



CATALOG IE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



by special consent of the Faculty. Parents can feel assured 
that every attention will be given to the welfare of their 
daughters under the experienced care of Mrs. Hawkins. 

The Lady Principal will board in this Hall with the ladies, 
and have constant oversight of their conduct and comfort. 
Every care will be taken to cultivate their hearts and refine 
their manners. 

The rooms are neatly furnished and arranged for two per- 
sons in each room; but ladies will be required to furnish 
towel«, table napkins, lamp, and all articles of bedding, except 
the mattress. 

EXPENSES. 

Table Board, - - - - - $3 50 per week 

Koom Rent, each, - - - - - - 20 (X) per year 

Fuel and Li^ht, per room, - - - - 8 00 per year 

All expenses to be paid monthly in advance. 

Applications for rooms should be made as soon as practicable. 

For further particulars, address Mrs. G. Hawkins. 



APPARATUS. 

The Philosophical and Chemical apparatus of the College is 
of the most elegant and approved kind. Provision is made 
for adding to it new improvements as they may be made, so 
as to furnish the amplest facilities for thorough illustration in 
every branch of each department. 



CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. 

Ist. The Natural History Cabinet contains most of the Fauaa, 
Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable collec- 
tion from Australia, and exchanges with other sections of the 
country Also a fine Herbarium of native plants, with many 
rare ones from other parts of the world. 

2d. The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several 
thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all parts of 
the world, to which new contributions are constantly made. 
It has recently been enriched by several hundred specimens of 
Minerals. 

3d. The Ethnologicai Cabinet^ though not large, contains rare 

and valuable collections. 

26 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

TERMS. VACATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS. 

The College Year consists of two terms, four and a half 
months each. It begins on the last Monday in September, and 
ends on the third Thursday in June. In this year there are 
two examinations in each claes — one in February, and the 
final examination in June. 

It is very desirable that applicants for Matriculation present 
themselves at the beginning of the ses^sion, that there may be 
a convenient arrangement of the classes in the various Depart- 
ments or Schools. Students, however, can enter conveniently 
at the commencement of the se3ond term, directly after the 
intermediate examination in February. All students entering 
higher than the Freshmen class will be examined before being 
admitted to the class. 

Permission to take both a Junior and Senior class in any of 
the schools of the College, the same session, shall be granted 
only upon condition that the average grade of the student in 
the Sophomore class shall be, not le^s than 87 in each school ; 
and in case the applicant has never been a student of the 
College, and requests such permission, that he be required to 
stand a satisfactory examination on such subjects, as in the 
view of the Professor of the School, may be deemed necessary. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are in connection with the College, two Literary So- 
cieties. Their Halls recently destroyed by fire, have been re- 
placed by others, beautifully finished and appropriately fur- 
nished. Valuable libraries have also already been received by 
the societies, through the munificence of friends, to replace 
those that were lost. 

Every facility is aflforded by the authorities of the Institu- 
tion for increasing the accommodations and adding to the use- 
fulness of these valuable auxiliaries to the institution. 



I 



27 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



EXPENSES. 

The College year is divided into two terms, of four and a 

half months each. The usual expenses, exclusive of books, 

clothes, <^'c., are as follows : 

Boanling per week, indiiding furnishe<l rooms and fuel, from $3 00 to 4 00 

Wa.«hin^, per month, lOOtolSO 

Light extra. 

Boarding in Clubs, now very generally adopted, about - 2 00 per week. 

Tuition, College course, j^rr term. $20 CO 

'* Preparatory- year, }ter term, 15 00 

'* Special course in Engineering, per term, - - - 12 00 

" Modern languages, to those not in the Srientifir course, /xy term, 5 00 
" Matriculation and continent expense fee, pt'r term - 5 00 

All students in the Scientific Course, including those receiv- 
ing gratuitous instruction, will be charged extra for the chem- 
icals they use in the Laboratory, and a fee of S3 00 for the use 
of field instruments. Students entrusted with instruments 
will be charged for injuries resulting from carelessness 

One-half of the expenses of the College year must be paid 
invariably in advance. 

Students entering after the commencement of the term, or 
leaving before its close, will be allowed no reduction on their 
tuition ; provided, however, that those who thus leave with the 
permission of the Faculty may return during the subsequent 
term for a period equal to the time of their absence, free of ad- 
dilional charge for tuition. 

Tfie Faculty earnestly advises parents to forbid Merchants and 
others from crediting their sons while at College. Apart from the habit 
of extravagance which this license almost unavoidably cultivates^ there 
are other evils which are extremely detrimental to student life. A re- 
quest to any member of the FcLculty to this effect will be promptly 
attended to. 



L^ 



GRATUITOUS INSTRUCTION. 

Indigent and pious young men in any of the religious denom- 
inations, who wish to prepare for the ministry, shall, on pay- 
ing the matriculation fee, be admitted into any of the courses l 
of Bethany College at one-half the regular rates for tuition. 

All applicants for this privilege will be required to present 
to the Faculty satisfactory written recommendations from their 
respective congregations, and from well known ministers of 

28 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

the Gospel, certifying that they come under the above condi- 
tions, in such form as shall be prescribed by the Faculty. They 
shall also be required to sign a promissory note to pay the full 
charge for tuition five years after their withdrawal from the 
College, provided they do not, in the meantime, devote them- 
selves to the work of the Ministry. But this provision for 
reduction of tuition shall not extend, in any case, beyond one 
session, except upon the recommendation of the Faculty, and 
the approval of the Board. 

The sons of regular Ministers of the Gospel of all denomina- 
tions shall be admitted to all the classes and privileges of the 
College, upon payment of matriculation fee and one-half the 
regular charges for tuition. 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be re- 
quired to give instructions in the Preparatory Classes. 




29 



Prtlian^ ^oilt^t* 



YryHIS Institution is situated in Brooke County, West Vir- 
j!-ik^ ginia, seven miles from the Ohio river, and sixteen miles 
north of Wheeling. It has a very liberal charter, by which all 
necessary powers are conferred, and the rights of its Alumni 
fully secured. From the peculiar organization of this Institu- 
tion, it presents important advantages to those who wish to 
secure, in addition to literary and scientific acquirements, a 
highly moral and practical educati(m. 

The most particular attention is paid to moral instruction 
and training. A full course of lectures is delivered every ses- 
sion upon Sacred Literature, in which the great matters of 
Piety and Humanity are elucidated and enforced by appropri- 
ate examples. These lectures, which are general, familiar and 
discursive, are entirely free from all sectarian character, and 
do not touch upon any of the peculiarities of particular re- 
ligious parties. They are adapted to the circumstances of the 
cla?2.s, and admirably fitted to supply defects in the early edu- 
cation of youth, and so give a bias in favor of morality and 
virtue. The peculiar location of the College, too, affords the 
greatest facilities for moral culture. Being remote from any 
large town or city, and surrounded by a moral and industrious 
population engaged in agriculture, it is secluded from those 
haunts of dissipation, and those vicious associations so fatal to 
youth in cities. 

The location of Bethany College is also highly advantageous 
to physical health. It may be said with emphasis, that there 
is not in the United States a more healthy location. It is in 
the midst of a hilly and elevated region, where there is pure 
air, fine water and perfect exemption from those intermittent, 
congestive and malignant fevers so prevalent in certain por- 
tions of the Western country. 

The railroad stations for Bethany are Brilliant, on the Cleve- 
land, Pittsburgh and Wheeling Railroad, and Wellsburg, on the 
Wheeling branch of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis 
Railroad. From these stations, which are each seven miles 
distant, a daily coach is run, on a Macadamized road, to Bethany, 
by Wm. Rodgers, who will give prompt attention to any orders 
addressed to him, care of "Granite House," Wellsburg, W. Va. 

30 



CALENDAR. 



Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and 
Wednesday, - - before the third Thursday in June. 

Annual Commencement, - on the third Thursday in June. 

Session begins, - - - last Monday in September. 

Christmas recess begins, December 22. 

Christmas recess ends. January 4. 

First term ends, January 29. 

Second term begins, February 1. 

Anniversary of the Neotrophian society, - - November 6. 

Anniversary of the American Literary Institute, November 10. 

Anniversary of the Adelphian Society, - - December 11. 

Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, - February 22. 

Annual Exhibition of the D^O^^solian Society, 

Tuesday Evening before Commencement. 

Annual Exhibition of the Neotrophian Society, 

Evening before Commencement. 

Annual Exhibition of the American Literary Society, 

Evening of Commencement. 

Alumni Day, • - - Afternoon of Commencement. 

Class Day, - - - Wednesday before Commencement. 



31 



I 



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p orty-pifth §es5ion, 

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sending Jane 17, 

X\X\X\X\X X^X^X^X^X^X\X^X^X^X XXX XVX XXX^X\X\XNXVX\X\XNX\X\X\X\X\X\ 



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1866 



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\\\-^^U.\^tWttS. ^S,. 'H^ttUU^. 




CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 



jrfa 





OLLE© 



FOR THE 



FORTY-FIFTH SESSION, 



■;;i 



ENDING JUNE 17, 1886. 



WITH THE 



oourse of *|Study and clnnual Wnnouncefnent 



:Fo:E^ i88e-'87. 



Open to Male and Female on Equal Terms. I 

- i 



BETHANY, WEST VIRGINIA. 



1886. 



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3;s|r fiyilii 



if 



III 



W. K. PENDLETON, LL.D., Present. 



W. H. WOOLERY, A.M., 

Prof, of Litin and Hebrew. 



MISS A. C. PENDLETOxM, 

Prof, of Modern Laniiua.iics. 



M. J. THOMPSON, A.M., 



Prof, of Natural Sciences. 



E. M. EPSTEIN, M.D., 

Prof, of the Greek Laniiuagc. 



OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, B.S., 

Prof, of Mathematics and Astronomy. 



W. H. WOOLERY, 

Chairman of tlie Faculty. 



M. J. THOMPSON 



Librarian and Curator of Musenm. 



A. E. MYERS, 

Treasurer. 



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W. K. Pendleton, 

W. P. Aylsworth, . 

Joseph King, 

Hon. Geo. H. Anderson, 

Hon. R. M. Bishop, 

Dr. J. C. Campbell, 

A. W. Campbell, . 

J. E. Curtis, 

James Darsie, 

r. moffett, 

p. S. Fall, . 

Alex. Campbell, 

John F. Rowe, 

Bateman Goe, . 

Tom Gale, 

C. B. Turner, . 
J. H. Jones, . 
Isaac Errett, . 

A. E. Myers, 
Thomas W. Phillips, 
Jabez Hall, 
John C. Palmer, 
E. J. Gantz, 
A. McLean, 
H. Price, 
John A. Brooks, 
George Darsie, . 
Porter S. Newmyer, 
C. H. Beall, 
M. M. Cochran, 
Oliver Marshall, 



U ©!££&• 



Bethany, W. Va. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Salem, Ohio. 
Cleveland, Ohio, 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Akron, Ohio, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Alliance, Ohio, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio, 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Kenton, Ohio. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Independence, Pa. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
New Cumberrd,W.Va. 



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S^tu^enfe * of * t§e * JFortp- J-iff 5) ^ ^e^^^ion. 



Addy, W. L., 
Anderson, J. R., 
Bartlett, Miss Lettie, 
Bright, H. R. 
Campbell, R. M., 
Campbell, Miss Maggie, 
Cox, Miss Annie, 
Cooper, T. A., 
Cooper, S. M., 
Cochran, G. G., 
Cochran, A. J., . 
Curry, E. E., 
Cummins, J. H., . 
Dixon, L. K., 
Davis, Miss Florence, . 
Frazier, H. C, 
gorrell, j. w., . 
Guy, G. M., . 
Guy, Miss Lilie, 
Guy, Miss Jessie, 
Hartman, Miss Daisy, . 
HosiE, Miss Pearl B., 
Hopkins, J. A., . 
Israel, Frank, 
JOBES, N. A., 
Kirk, Sherman, 
Lewis, Miss Daisy, 
Martin, S. T., 
Mayers, A. W., 
McClure, W. J., 
Mendel, Miss Nellie, . 



I 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Bellaire, Ohio. 

Cortland, Ohio. 

Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

West Liberty, W. Va. 

Claysville, Pa. 

St. Louisville, Ohio. 

Dawson, Pa. 

Dawson, Pa. 

New Lisbon, Ohio. 

Antioch Mills, Ky. 

West Liberty, W. Va. 

Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Louisville, Ky. 

Hebron, W. Va. 
Dallas, W. Va. 
Dallas, W. Va. 
Dallas, W. Va. 
Independence, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bellaire, Ohio. 
Beallsville, Ohio. 
Claysville, Pa. 
Flushing, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Cadiz, Ohio. 
Millersburg, Ohio. 
Bellaire, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 



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CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Miller, Miss Susie, 
muckley, g. w., 
muckley, e. s., 
Payne, W. C, . 
Payne, H. G., 
Plattenburg, J. T., 
Pendleton, Kent, . 
Pendleton, Dwight, 
Ramer, C. L. v., 
Reid, J. C, 
Rice, J. A., . 
Rosser, R. M., 
Rumble, H. H., 
ScHMiEDEL, Oscar, 
Scott, C. L., . 
Shriver, Miss Rene, 
Simpson, J. S., 
Strickling, James, 
Talmage, H. W., 
Wells, R. M., . 
White, A. L., 
Willett, H. L., . 
Williamson, Miss Lassie, 
Wilson, Jo. R., 
Wilson, A. J. P., 
WOOLERY, J. F., 



7a/ 



West Liberty, W. Va. 
Pierce, Ohio. 
Pierje, Ohio. 
South Bend, Ind. 
South Bend, Ind. 
Fairview, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Canal Louisville, 0. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Pierce, Ohio. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Beverly, Ohio. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Cadiz, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Howard, Ohio. 
West Union, W. Va. 
Tonawanda, N. Y. 
Beech Bottom, W. Va. 
Bethesda, Ohio, 
lona, Mich. 
Junction, Idaho. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Antioch Mills, Ky. 




i^m^uafcB * of ♦ f [W • J-oi't^^- J-iftf) * ^c^^ion. 



Bachelors of Arts. 



George W. Muckley, 
W. C. Payne, ^ . 

H. L. WiLLETT, 



Bachelors of Science. 



A. W. Mayers, 

W. J. McClurk. 

R. M. RossER, 

Oscar Schmiedkj., 

A, L. White, 

Miss Lassie Williamso.v, 

J. R. Wilson, 



Bachelor of Letters 



8. M. Cooper. 



Ohio. 

Indiana. 

Michigan, 



Ohio. 

Ohio. 

Georgia. 

West Virginia. 

Ohio. 

Idaho. 

West Virginia 



Ohio. 



Whole number of Bachelors of Arts, 

Science, 
" " Letters, . 

" " " Philosophy, 

Total Alumni, ...... 



522 

79 

47 

3 

651 



^'/Ay//'/y/y/Ay/y/A'Ay/^/^/Ay/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/yyy/y/y//'/A'y/y/y/Ay/A'y/^/y/y///y///y/A^^ 

\ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/. 

I 



/ 



_B)£TKA^y 0;oki£G£ 



/. Appeals to its friends for patronage, and presents the following advantages: 

^ 1. The healthfulness of the location. It is in the midst of an elevated 

/ region where there is pure air, fine water, and perfect exemption from 

'^^ malaria and intermittent, congestive and malignant fevers so prevalent in 

/ some parts of the country. 

^/ 2. The College has a large and commodious building and is not there- 

/ fore hampered for room either for class work or for its Societies. 

^ 3. The students are for the most part not mere hoy% but young men^ old 

/ enough to have formed their purposes and chosen their callings for life, 

;/ and they bend all their energies to make study successful. The work in 



/ the class-room is as vigorous as it can be made, and this is supplemented 

/ by exercises in the literary societies of a very high order. The aim is to 

/ turn out men as graduates who can think for themselves. 
/ 4. Bethany has a large and learned body of Alumni. Many of these 

/ have become distinguished in the editorial chair, on the bench, at the bar- 

'/ in the halls of legislation, at the professor's desk, and in the pulpit. The 

/ student is admitted to this reputation already achieved for him, as soon as 
he completes his college course, and it is worth a great deal to him. 



/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 

I 

\ 

\ RULES OF ENTRANCE. 

^ Every candidate for matriculation will be required to furnish to the pre- 
I siding officer suitable testimonials of good moral character. Before matric- 
^ ulation it is further required that the subjoined regulations and rules of 
/ conduct be read ; it is recjuired : 

/ 1. That each student shall, as soon as possible, and with the approval of 
/ the Faculty, select from the several schools a course of three daily recita^ 
^ tions, or the eqivalent thereof, unless, upon the request of parent or guar- 
dian, or for other good cause shown, he be exempted from this rule. 

2. That having entered any class, he shall not leave such without per- 
mission from the Faculty. 

3. That he shall punctually attend recitations, examinations, and all 
^ other exercises of the college, and in a satisfactory manner, account to the 
I proper officer for any delinquency on his part. 

I 4. That he shall at once deliver into the keeping of the Faculty, any 
I deadly weapon that may be in his possession, and shall neither keep nor 
I use any such during his connection with the institution. 
I 5. That he shall neither introduce within the precincts of the college, 
nor use elsewhere, any intoxicating beverage. 



I B 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE I 




6. That he shall abstain from gambling of all kinds, and from cards even | 
for amusement. | 

7. That he shall not go beyond the immediate precincts of the college | 
without permission from the presiding officer, nor leave until regularly 



!§ 



dismissed at the close of the session. | 

8. That he shall not be noisy, or play in or about the college building | 
during the hours appointed for recitation. | 

9. That he shall not trespass upon the premises of any person, or in any | 
way injure tbe property of the institution. | 

It is further expected and desired, that the students attend public wor- | 
ship every Lord's day, abstain from profanity, and in general from what- 



Any material infringement of the preceding regulations and code of dis- 
cipline may dissolve a student's connection with the institution. 

One-half the expenses of the college year must be paid at the opening of 
the first term, the other half at opening of the second term. The matric- | 
ulation fee must be paid by all, even by those who receive free tuition. I 
invariably in advance. 

Matriculation, pi 
Tuition, per terc 
;For other expenses see general information at end of Catalogue) 



i 

Matriculation, per term, . . . . . $5 00 | 

Tuition, per term, . . . . . . 20 00 | 

I 

I 
I 






'/.. 



■f/y/y/A-y/A/yAA//^/^/Ay/Ay/y/y/Ay/Ay///^/y/y/Ay/////^/^/y/^//yy/y/^/yy//^^^ 



/ — > y 



I, 



BETHANY COLLEGE has lour separate courses: the Class- 
I -^ iciil, Scientific, Ministerial, and Ladies', conferring respec- 



I 1 



p tiveiy the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, | 
I Bachelor of Letters, and Bachelor of Philosophy. 



I FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS. 



i CLASSICAL COURSE, 



This course embraces the following schools, viz : 

L School of Sa'cred History and Moral Philosophy. 



I 2. School of the Cxreek Language. 

3. School of the Latin Language. 

4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

5. School of Natural Sciences. 



I 

^ 6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles I 

I Lettres. 



I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 



I SENIOR YEAR. 

! 



Fiv^t Term.— Moral Philosophy. 
Second Term. — Evidences of Christianity. The Languages, History and;- p 



I Canonicity of the Bible (Lectures). 



I 



I II. School of the Greek Language. 

i 

P FRESHMAN YEAR. 

i Fird,l Term. — Goodwin's , Greek Grammar and White's First Lessons. / 

I Daily exercises in writing the language with the accents ;J 

I careful]}'' marked. / 

^ •> ^ 

^ Second Term. — Xenophon's_ Anabasis, Book I. Fyffe's Sliort History of / 

Greece. / 



;$ 



I I 

s CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

I I 

V ...-...-...-..-,.-..-..-■..•■-■■..■-.-■..-■-.-■ •.-•...-...■..-.. .-...-. .-■-^•. •■-■-..-...-.-•-.•■..•...■..■-..-...-..-..-..-. I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR, | 

I . I 

I First Term. — The Anabasis continued. Selections from Herodotus. Ex- ^ 

^ ercises in writing Greek. Grecian History (Cox). ^ 

s ^ 

I Second Term. — Herodotus continued. Homer's Iliad (Keep) three books. ^ 

^ Prose Composition. Grecian History: ^ 

I 



^ JUNIOR YEAR. | 



I Fird Term.— Homer's Odyssey, three books. Xenophon's Memorabilia | 
I of Socrates. Prose Composition (Sidgwick). ^ 

I Second Term. — Plato's Apology of Socrates and Crito (Wagner). Demos- | 



I ttienes' Uration on tiie Urown (U'Uogej. ^ 

I I 

^ SENIOR YEAR. | 

I FiTi^t Term. — Sophocles — Oedipus Tyrannus (White). | 

■| # ^ 

§ Second Term. — Selections from Pindar (Gildersleeve). | 

I III. School of Latin Language and Literature. | 

I ^ 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

S . . ^ 

^ First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. ^ 

^ s 

^ Daily Exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

^ Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Greenough), Book I., with thorough | 

I drill in Syntax. ^ 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I First 7'erm.— Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Ctosar's Gallic War, | 

^ Books II, III, VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. Prose | 

I Composition (Jones). ^ 

I Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition | 

I continued (Jones). | 

I I 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

^ s 

^ First Tenw. — Prosody. Virgil's .Eneid, Books I, II, IV, VI, (Green- ^ 

I ough). History of Rome (Leigh ton). Latin Synonymes s 

I (Shumway). ^ 

I Second Term. — Prosody. Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Horace | 

^ (Macleane). Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid). | 

I I 

^ SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 



I First Term. — The Germania of Tacitus (Church). | 

^ Second Term. — Cicero's Letters. Pliny's Letters. Antiquities (Vv''ilkins). | 

I Latin Literature (Bender). Lecture on Latin of Middle | 

I Ages. ^ 

lvvxxNx\xvxxvxxxxxxvxxxvvvxx\xvvxx^xxxxvvxxxvx/'x- xxxvx XX x.^xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxv I 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

I IV. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

f This school embraces a course of Pure Mathematics, finishing with the 
I Differential and Integral Calculus and a course in Astronomy. The text- 
I books in use, and the time allotted to each study, will be found in the 



I following schedule : 



^ FRESHMAN YEAR. 

I 



^ 



S 



'/. 



First Term. — Algebra— from Quadratic Equations (Olney's complete). 
Second Term. — Geometry (Olney). 



I SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

I First Term. — Geometry — Completed. 

! 

I former in the field (Greenleaf). Land Surveying, with 

I 



Second Term. — Trigonometry, Plane and Spherical, with applications of the 



practical applications, mapping, etc (Gillespie). 
I JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Analytical Geometry (Olney), 
I Secmd Term.— Differential and Integral Calculus, with applications to 



^^ questions of the General Geometry, elective (Olney). 

I SENIOR YEAR. 



Second Term. — Astronomy (Newcomb). 

(For course in Engineering see Scientific Course.) 



I V School of Natural Science. 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. 

I 

I Second Term.— Botany (Gray). 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

i 



First Term. — Physiology (Martin). 
Second Term. — Zoology (Packard). 



I 

g JUNIOR YEAR. 



I First Term. — Chemistry (Steele). 
Second Term. — Geology (LeConte). 



i SENIOR YEAR. 



^ Fir^l Term. — Physics, embracing Mechanics (Olmsted). 
Second Term.. — Phvsics. 



^ 12 ' V 




I Second Term. — English Literature. 



I To the study of the outHnes of English Literature, as furnished by the | 

I text-book, are added critical readings from the best works of represen- | 

I tative writers. | 

I I 

I JUNIOR YEAR. . | 

I I 

I First T^r/zi.— Rhetoric (Welsh). | 

I Second Term. — Rhetoric. I 

I I 

^ A-pplication of the principles of Rhetoric is made through the analysis of | 

I selections from the acknowledged masters of style in each department of | 

^ literature, and through constant practice in original composition. | 

I I 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

^ First Term. — Intellectual Science. ^ 

I Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Political Economy (Walker). Philology | 

I of the English Tongue (Earle). | 

I „„.„„..„ I 

I SCIENTIFIC COURSE. I 

I 

I FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCES. | 

I This course embraces the following schools : | 

^ I 

I 1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

^ 2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. I 



I 3. School of Natural Science. 

I 4. School of Modern Languages. 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 



I Economy. | 



§ 



I I, School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 



I First T'en^,.— Moral Philosophy. | 

s s 

I Second Term. — Evidences of Christianity. The Languages, History and | 

I Canonicity of the Bible. | 

I 13 I 



I 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

I II. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

I The Scientific Course in this school embraces the same subjects that are 
f given under the Classical Course, with the addition of a course of Applied 
I Mathematics in Road and Railroad Engineering, Descriptive Geometry, 
I Shades, Shadows and Perspective Drawing. The following schedule will 
I give a connected view of the whole 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



First Term. — Algebra — From Quadratic Equations (Olney's complete). 
Second Term. — Geometry (Olney). 



p SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



I 

I First Term. — Geometry, completed. 



Second Term. — Trigonometry, Plane and Spherical, with application of 
former in field work (Greenleaf). liand Surveying, with 
practical applications, mapping, etc. (Gillespie). 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



I First Term , — Analytical Geometry ( Olney ) , Descriptive Geometry , Shades, 

I Shadows and Perspective Drawing. 

I 

I Second Term. — Differential and Integral Calculus (Olney), Road and Rail- 

I road Surveying, with Levelling, Laying out Curves, Calcula- 

tion of Excavations, Embankments, &c. 



I SENIOR YEAR. 



Second Term. — Astronomy (Newcomb). 



As it is the intention to make practical application in the field of what is 
learned in the class-room, facilities will be furnished for beginning a course 
in Civil Engineering. An opportunity will be oftered in Sophomore and 
Junior years to study : 

1. Land Surveying — Embracing all that is necessary to understand the 

I subject in its practical bearings with field work, mapping, &c. 

^ 2. The principles of Topographical Surveying and Drawing. 

I 3. Levelling, Profiling, Mapping. 

I 4. Road and Railroad Surveying— with field operations. 

^ To enter upon the course a thorough knowledge of Algebra, Geometry 

I and Plane Trigonometry is required, 

f. For this course a separate charge is made. 

I Certificates will be given indicating the branch studied and the degree of 

^ proficiency attained. It is very desirable that students should enter with 

I the regular classes of the Scientific Course. 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

^ s 

I I 

I III. School of Natural Science. ^ 

I I 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

S ■ ■ ^ 

I First Term. — Meteorology (Lectures). | 

I I 

I Second Term. — Botany (Gray). | 

I I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I i 

^ First Term. — Physiology (Martin). | 

I I 

^ Second Term. — Zoology (Packard). | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I First Term. — Chemistry (Steele). | 



I Second Term.— Geology (LeConte). | 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

I First Ter)ti. — Phy sics embracing Mechanics (Olmstead). Laboratory work | 

I in Chemistry. | 

^ Second Term — Physics (Olmsted). | 

I The class in Botany is not organized until about April 1st. | 

s In addition to these regular courses special instruction will be given if | 

I desired, in Advanced Qualitative Analysis, Blowpipe Analysis, Assaying | 

I and Toxicology. | 

I In all these courses a fee is charged sufficient to cover the cost of the I 

^ chemicals used. In the regular course in Qualitative Analysis this amounts I 

I to eight dollars. s 

I 

I IV. School of Modern Languages. ^ 

I I 

^ JUNIOR YEAR — FRENCH. | 

I I 

I First Term. — Bocher's Otto's Grammar. | 

I Sauveur's Causeries avec mes Eleves. I 

I Sauveur's La Fontaine's Tables. § 



I Composition. 



^ Second Term. — Bocher's Otto's Grammar. | 

I Moliere's Misanthrope. | 

^ Composition. | 



I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 



I First Term — Bocher's Otto's Grammar. ^ 

I Corneille's Le Cid. Racine's Athalie. | 

|. Composition. |. 

I Second Term. — Critical study of selections from French Literature. | 

I Composition. | 

§ , 15 I 






I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

I ........................................................................................................... I 

% - I 

I JUNIOR YEAR — GERMAN. I 



„„ 

? / 

I jF'mf T^rm, — Cook's Otto's Grammar. | 

I Stern's Studien und Plaudereien, 1st Series. I 

y y 

I Composition. | 

I I 

I Second Term. — Cook's Otto's Grammar. | 

I Stern's Studien und Plaudereien, 2d Series. I 

I Van der Smissen's Grimm's Kinder-und Hausmarchen. ^ 

f Composition. ^ 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

I jPirs^ 7<?r7/z. — Cook's Otto's Grammar. | 

^ Stern's Studien und Plaudereien, 2d Series. <^ 

I Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm. Schiller's Wilhelm Tell. | 

$ ' Composition. | 

y. v. 



I I 

i Second Term. — Critical study of selections from German Literature. y 

6 * Composition. i 

^ ' I 

^ The aim of our instruction in French and German is to enable the stu- | 

y dent to speak and write these languages. The so-called " natural method " | 

y> is combined with progressive study of the grammars and of selections from | 

I the best writers, and with constant practice in composition. The classes | 

I make such progress in speaking as enables the teacher to conduct them 'f, 

I entirely without the use of English during the second year of the course. | 

I I 

^ y 

I ^ 

i y 

i y 

% % 

% ■ y 

p V. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and Belles ^, 

I Lettres. ^ 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. I 

% y 

i I 

y First Term — English Literature (Shaw;. ^ 

I "' 

^ Second Term. — English Literature. / 

g JUNIOR YEAR. /, 

I I 

I First 2m/i.— Rhetoric (Welsh). f. 

I Second Term. — Rhetoric I 

y ^ 

I I 

I SENIOR YEAR. g 

I 

^ First Term. — Intellectual Science. y, 

I I 

^ Second Term. — Logic (Jevons), Political Economy (AValker). ^ 

I Philosophy of the English Tongue (Earle). ;;; 

^yy/yyyyy///y/x/y///^/y///y///y//yx/y/y/^^ 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

I ■■■■■ ■ ■■ - ■ ■■■■■■■■■^ I 

I MINISTERIAL COURSE. | 

I FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LETTERS. | 

I This course embraces the following schools : | 

^ I 

I 1. School of Sacred Literature. | 

I 2. School of Greek. | 

I 3. School of Latin. | 

I 4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

I 5. School of Natural Science. | 

I 6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and Belles | 

I Lettres. | 

I 7. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. ' .^ 



^ •• -" ^ ' I 



Si 



I ^ 

I I. School of Sacred Literature. I 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I ^ 

I First Term. — Inspiration of the Scriptures. Hermeneutics. Hebrew — | 

I Grammar, with exercises (Harper). | 

^ ^ 

I Second Term. — Hebrew. Select portions of the Historical Books of the Old | 

I Testament read. Exegesis of Galatians (Greek Text of I 

I Westcott & Hort). | 

I I 

^ SENIOR YEAR. S 



I First Term. — Homiletics, with Practical Exercises in the Preparation of s 

I Discourses. Hebrew. — Old Testament Poetry read. Origin ^ 

I and Growth of the Psalms (Murray). Greek Exegesis of | 

I Epistle to the Romans (Chapters I-V.) | 

I ... I 
I Second Term. — The Church — Its Origin, Growth, Missionary Activity and | 

I occasion of writing the Epistles (Lectures). Hebrew. — Mes- | 

I sianic Prophecy. The Higher Criticism of the Old Testa- | 

I ment examined (Lectures). I 

I — I 

^ II. School of the Greek Language. I 

I 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. ^ 



.!^ 



I ^ First Term. — Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's Greek Lessons. ^ 

xl; Daily exercises m writing the language with the accents ^ 

N carefully marked. I 

j I Second Term.— Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. Fyffe's Short History of | 

I Greece. | 



'y/A'y/Ay/y///////y//'/x/////^////'///^///y/y//'/y/y///Ay//^^^ 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

I ...............................,.....-..............--......-,.....-...-...-.,....-.......-,^^ I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR, p 

? ^ 

g i^irsi Ter/?!. — The Anabasis continued. Selections from Herodotus. Ex- 2 

I ercises in writing Greek. Grecian History (Cox). | 

I Second Term. — Herodotus continued. Homer's Iliad (Keep) three books. | 

I Prose Composition. Grecian History. f 

^ if 

i JUNIOR YEAR. j 

I First Term. — Homer's Odyssey, three books. Xenophon's Memorabilia | 

I of Socrates. Prose Composition (Sidgwick). ^ 

I Second Term. — Plato's Apology of Socrates, and Crito (Wagner). Demos- | 

I thenes' Oration on the Crown (D'Ooge). | 

I I 

I III. School of Latin Language and Literature. I 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

I ^ 

i^-irsi T^r/Ti. —Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons, t 

''/. T^„4i„ ^^ :„„„ -: :^--„„ t:^„^i:„u 4„^„ t „^:„ ^ 



I Daily Exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

I Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Greenough), Book I, with thorough | 

I drill in Syntax. | 

^ I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. I 

^ I 

I i^irsi Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic War, | 

I Books II, III, VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. Prose | 

I Composition (Jones). | 

^ Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition ^ 



^ » contmued (Jones). ^ ; 

? ^ ' 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | ; 

% % , 

p i^irs^ Term. — Prosody. Virgil's ^Eneid, Books I, II, IV, VI, (Green- i ; 

I ough). History of Rome (Leighton). Latin Synonymes ^ 






^ 



(Shumway). | 

I 

1^ 1 

I IV. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

I I 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. I 



I J^-irs^ Term. — Algebra— from Quadratic Equations (Olney's complete). | 

^ ? 

p Second Term. — Geometry (Olney). | 

I SOPHOMORE YEAll. | 

I I 

p i^m^ Term. — Geometry — Completed. | 

^ Second Term. — Trigonometry, Plane and Spherical, with applications of the | 

I former in the field (Greenleafi. Land Surveying, with | 

I practical applications, mapping, etc. (Gillespie). | 

I * 18 I 



^ CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 



> V School of Natural Science. | 

' I 

' I 

:^ FRESHMAN YEAR. | 



^ 



s Second Term.— Botany (Grav). | 

s ^ I 

s SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

^ . I 

^ First Term. — Physiology (Martin). | 

s ' I 

;^ Second Term. — Zoology (Packard). | 

^ I 

^ JUNIOR YEAR. § 

^ I 

\ First Term. — Chemistry (Steele). | 

\ Second Term. — Geology (LeConte). | 

^ I 

>> SENIOR YEAR. ^ 

^ First Term. — Physics, (Olmsted). | 

V Second Term. — Phvsics (Olmsted). § 

^ ' I 

\ Students in the Ministerial Course do not begin the study of physics S 

^^ until the class has finished the chapter on Mechanics. I 

i - I 

^ I 

^ I 

\ VI. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and Belles | 

^ Lettres. | 

\ FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

s I 

;^ First Term. — English Literature (Shaw;. ^ 

^ Second Term. — English Literature. | 

^ I 

s SOPHOMORE YEAR. I 

^ ■ 5s 

\ ^ 

^ JUNIOR YEAR. I 

^ I 

:^ First 2erm.— Rhetoric (Welsh). | 

^ Second Term. — Rhetoric. ^ 

\ SENIOR YEAR. I 

N First Term. — Intellectual Science. | 

^ Second Term. — Logic (Jevons), Political Economy (Walker). | 

^ Philosophy of the English Tongue (Earle). | 

^ w . I 

•\XXXXXXXXiXX?iX?«iXXV>iXXX?XXXXX^^VXXN<>OCX>^^ 



CATALO&UE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 



I VII. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

I 

I SENIOR YEAR. 

i 



FiT^t Term. — Moral Philosophy. 

I Second Term. — Evidences of Christianity. The Languages, History and 
Canonicity of the Bible (Lectures). 



I COURSE FOR LADIES. 



I FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 

This course embraces the following schools : 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of the Latin Language. 

3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 
i 4. School of Natural Science. 

I 5. School of Moderrt Languages. 

I 6. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 

I Economy. 



^ I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 



I SENIOR YEAR. 



I First Term. — Moral Philosophy. 

^ Second Term. — Evidences of Christianity. The Languages, History and 
I Canonicity of the Bible. (Lectures). 



^ II. School of Latin Language and Literature. ^ 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

I First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. | 

^ Daily Exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

y y 

I Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Greenough), Book I, with thorough ^ 

f drill in Syntax. I 

^ y 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I First Term.— Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Csesar's Gallic War, | 

I Books II, III, VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. Prose | 

I Composition (Jones). | 

I 

i 20 



Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition | 
continued (Jones). | 



y 
y/^/yyy/A/yyy/jyy/y/////jyy/Ay/y^^^ 



I 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

I _ _ ^ 

^ I 

I JUNIOR YEAR. I 

I First Term.— 'Prosody. Virgil's iEaeid, Books I, II, IV, VI, (Green- § 

I ough). History of Rome (Leigh ton). Latin Synonymes | 

I (8humway). | 

I I 

I Second Term. — Prosody. Select Odes, Epodes, Epistles and cjatires of Horace | 

I (Macleane). Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid). § 

I I 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

S First Term. — The Germania of Tacitus. ,^ 

I I 

^ Second Term.— Cicero^s Letters. Pliny's Letters. Antiquities (Wilkins). | 

I Latin Literature (Bender). | 

^ III. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

I • ^ 

^ FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

^ First Term. — Algebra — From Quadratic Equations (Olney's complete). | 

I I 

^ Second Term. — Geometry (Olney). ^ 

I I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

^ First Term. — Geometry, completed. | 

^ Second Term. — Trigonometry, Plane and Spherical, (Greenleaf). J.jand | 

I Surveying, with practical applications, mapping, etc. | 

I (Gillespie), • | 

I ^ 

I IV. School of Natural Science. | 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 



I , I 

I Second Term. — Botany (Gray) ' ^ 



I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

r "" —'' 



I , First Term. — Chemistry (Steele 
Second Term — Physics (Steele). 

I V. School of Modern Languages. ^ 

I JUNIOR YEAR — FRENCH. | 

^ s 

I First Term. — Bocher's Otto's Grammar 

I Sauveur's Causeries avec mes Eleves. 

^ Sauveur's La Fontaine's Tables. I 



I 

^ Sauveur's La Fontaine's Tables. I 

s, Composition. | 

I Seeond Term. — Bocher's Otto's Grammar. | 



I Moliere's Misanthrope. 

I Composition. 



I 



I .21 I 



% 



Composition. 

-Critical stud^ 
Composition. 



■/////y/Ay/y/y/Ay/AY/y/y/y/y/yy^^^ 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. f 

y, > 

^ ..-..■•..•..■......••..-... ....... .- ..•..•■....-..-...-........-■..-...■...■..■..■..■......■.......-......■...-.....-......-.. ^ 

'/ / 

^ SENIOR YEAR. / 

I First Term — -Bocher's Otto's Grammar. ' ^ 

I Corneille's Le Cid. Racine's Athalie. 

i 

I Second Term. — Critical study of selections from French Literature. 

I 

^ JUNIOR YEAR — GERMAN. 

i 

I First Term. — Cook's Otto's Grammar. 

I • Stern's Studien und Plaudereien, 1st Series. 

I Composition, 

i 

I Second Term. — Cook's Otto's Grammar. 

I Stern's Studien und Plaudereien, 2d Series. 

I Van der Smissen's Grimm's Kinder-und Hausmarchen. 

I Composition. 

|- SENIOR YEAR. 

y First Term. — Cook's Otto's Grammar. 

I Stern's Studien und Plaudereien, 2d Series. 

^ Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm. Schiller's Wilhelm Tell. 

I Composition. 

^ Second Term. — Critical study of selections from German Literature. 

i Composition. 

I 



I VI. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and Belles 

I Lettres. 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. 

I 

I First Term. — English Literature (Shaw). 

I 

I Second Term. — English Literature. 

I JUNIOR YEAR. 

I 



I First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). 
Second Term. — Rhetoric. 



SENIOR YEAR. 

p First Term. — Intellectual Science 



Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Political Economy (Walker). Philology 
of the English Tongue (Earle). 



i 22 



•^/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y^^^ 












\ 
\ 
s 

s 
\ 
s 
s 
s 



f^\u%m^L 0£ij^.iXF'^£JN^I^ 






L 



|HIS Department is under the control of Mrs. Helene | 



I -'^1 Epstein, a lady who, to a thorough education under the | 

I best masters of Instrumental Music, adds several years of ex- | 
I . I 

I perience and successful teaching. A thorough course of ele- | 

^ . . .... '^ 

I mentary training and drill in technique is obligatory upon all | 

I students in her charge. 'I 

I • • " ■ I 

I I 

I I 

I I 

I Vocal or Instrumental, each per term (half College | 

I Session), $25 00 | 

I I 

I Use of Instrument two hours per day, per term (half | 

I College Session) 5 00 | 

I I 

I Use of Instrument extra hours, per hour. . . . 2 50 | 

I I 

I ■ I 

I I 

I 23 I 



vXXVXVVXXXXXXXX^^>«iXXXXXXX^SXXN^^OJ^iXX:XXX^>^XXN^ 



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I I 



? ^ 

^ ^ 

^ ^ 

^ ^ 

'" ^ 



|£J^J£^^^,JL Uj^fO^J^^^JIOJ^J. 



^ ,^^_^.=.JJ -^-^-^X^ -. : "JJJ ^JJ '^ ^A^JJ -J/ -^Ji ■ -^JJ -^ ^ > 






I SITUATION. I 



I »ETHANY COLLEGE is situated in the Panhandle of West ^ 



I ^^ Virginia, sixteen miles north of Wheeling. The railroad 
I stations for Bethany are Brilliant, on the Cleveland and Pitts- 
I burgh Railroad (river division), and Wellsburg, on the Wheel- p 
I ins; branch of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Rail- i 
^ road. From these stations a daily stage is run to Bethany by | 
I William Rodgers, who will give prompt attention to any orders | 

I TERMS, VACATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS. | 

I The College Year consists of two terms, four and a half | 
I months each. It begins on the last Monday in September and | 
I ends on the third Thursday in June. In this year there are | 
I two examinations in each class — one in January and the final | 
I examination in June. | 

I It is very desirable that applicants for Matriculation present | 
I themselves at the beginning of the session, that there may be | 
I a convenient arrangement of the classes in the various Depart- | 
I ments or Schools. Students, however, can enter conveniently | 
I at the commencement of the second term, February 1st, after the | 
I intermediate examination in January. | 

I J 

I TERMS FOR BOARDING. I 

I Furnished room, fuel and care of room, per week, about 60 | 

I cents. I 

I Washing, per month, $1.00 to $1.50. | 

I Table board, in a club, $1.75 to $2.50. | 



g 



I GRATUITOUS INSTRUCTION. | 

I Indigent and pious young men in any of the religious de- | 
I nominations, who wish to prepare for the ministry, shall, on | 



d 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

paying the matriculation fee, be admitted into any of the | 

I courses of Bethan^^ College at one half the regular rates of | 

^ , ., . ^ 

I tuition. ^ 

All applicants for this privilege will be required to present | 

to the Faculty satisfactory written recommendations from their | 

respective congregations, and from well known ministers of | 

the Gospel, certifying that they come under the above condi- | 

tions, in such form as shall be prescribed by the Faculty. They | 

shall also be required to sign a promissory note to pay the full | 

charge for tuition five years after their withdrawal from the | 

College, provided they do not, in the meantime, devote them- | 

selves to the work of the Ministry. But this provision for re- I 



quired to give instruction in the Preparatory Classes. 




I 

I CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. | 

I 1st. The Natural History Cabinet contains most of the Fauna, | 
I Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable coUec- | 
I tion from Australia, and exchanges with other sections of the | 
I country. Also a fine Herbarium of native plants, with many | 
I rare ones from other parts of the world. 

I 2d. The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several 
I thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all parts of 
I the world. 

3d. The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains rare 
and valuable collections. 



APPARATUS, 

The Philosophical apparatus of the Colleg-e is of the most | 

elegant and approved kinds and affords the amplest facilities | 

I for the thorough illustration of physical principles. | 

I The Chemical laboratory is fully provided with all the ap- | 

I paratus and chemicals needed in the courses offered. I 

I , 4 25 I 



■;f^///yyy/y/y/y/y/y///y/y//yy/^^^^ 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

I ELOCUTION. 

I Constant attention is paid in the language classes to the art 

I of Elocution. Besides the members of the Junior and Senior 

I Classes are required to deliver original orations every Friday 

I morning in the presence of the Faculty and all the students, 

I These exercises are rigidly criticised, particularly as to the 

I style of delivery, by the Faculty. 

I — 

I LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

I There are in connection with the College, two Literary So- 
cieties. Their Halls, recently destroyed by fire, have been re- 
placed by others, beautifully finished and appropriately fur- 
nished. Valuable libraries have also already been received by 
the societies, through the munificence of friends, to replace 
those that were lost. 

Every facility is afforded by the authorities of the Institu- 
tion for increasing the accommodations and adding to the use- 
fulness of these valuable auxiliaries to the Institution. 



P REPORTS. 



Monthly " Reports" will be addressed by the Secretary of the 

Faculty to the parent or guardian of each student, in which 

are stated his attention in class, supposed industry, proficiency 

I in each of his studies, absences from lectures and recitations, 



may be necessary to communicate. 



p and his general deportment, with such other information as it 

I 



READIIOG ROOM. 

During the year the students have maintained a Reading 
Room at small expense, and thus had access to the best poriod- 
I ical literatare in the country. 



TERMS OF GRADUATION. 



P 

g DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. 



'/. 



A student may graduate in any school singly. To obtain | 

I the degree of Graduate in any school, it is required of every | 

I candidate: | 

i 26 .. I 

y//yy/y/y/y/y/y///y///y/Ay/Ay/y/////x/y^^^ 



I 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 



1. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College at 
least one session, and shall have studied in the College the en- 
tire Senior year of the school. 2. That within one month from | 
the beginning of the session, he shall have made known to the | 
Professor of the school his intention of graduating. 3. That he | 
stand a satisfactory examination on all the prescribed studies 
of the school. He shall then be entitled to a Certificate of Gradu- 
ation free, signed by the President and Professor. 



I 

DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHET.QR OF SCIENCES, AND | 



BACHELOR OF LETTERS. ^ 



To receive the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, 
Bachelor of Letters and Bachelor of Philosophy, the candidate 
must have graduated and received his certificates in the sev- | 
eral schools embraced in the respective courses. He must also | 
have faithfully observed all the other laws and regulations of 



I 

the College. He will then receive the Degree and Diploma. | 

I 



A fee of $10 will be charged for the diploma. 

A student who has received a Diploma in any course, m | 
order to obtain a Diploma in any other course, shall take up | 
the additional certificate, or certificates, and pay ten dollars for | 
the Diploma. | 

The Graduates in the several courses enjoy equally all the | 
privileges, rights and honors of the College. 



THE MASTERS DEGREE IN COURSE. | 

I 



In order to obtain the Regular Degree of Master of Arts, the 

following conditions are required: 1. The attainment of the | 

Degree of Bachelor in the course. 2. The actual attendance in | 

the College thereafter for one session and the study of three | 

Elective studies, to be selected by the candidate with the con- | 

sent of the Faculty. 3. An approved examination of selected | 

studies. A fee of ten dollars will be charged for the Diploma. | 

, I 

HONORARY MASTER S DEGREE. | 

I 



A Bachelor of three years' standing in any one of the courses 
may receive the Honorary Degree of Master in that course : pro- 
vided he shall in the interval have maintained an exemplary 
character, and pursued studies relating to the degree. Candi- 
dates for this degree should apply to the President or Secretary 
of the Faculty before the annual meeting of the Board of | 

Trustees. | 

27 I 



-;f/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/jyy/yyyyy/y/^^^^ 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COJ.LEGE. \ 

I No application for the Degree of A.M , will be entertained 
I unless accompanied by the jee of ten dollars, which will be re- 
I turned in case the Degree is not conferred. 



I THE COLLEGIAN. 

f During the college year the students have published a 

i monthly journal entitled the Collegian. It has attained high 

I rank as a college paper, and affords excellent means for devel- 

I oping the literary talent of the students. It deserves a heart- 

I ier support on the part of the Alumni and friends of the 
college. 



ACCOMMODATIONS. 

Students are permitted to select their own places of board- 
p ing, subject in all cases to the supervision of the Faculty. 
I The facilities for obtaining boarding in private families have 
I been much increased, and many students can be accommodated 
I in this way. Every attention will be paid to the health and 
I comfort of the students. 

I To accommodate students who desire t*) board themselves, 
I arrangements have been made to supply a number of unfur- 
I nished rooms at a very moderate rent. Applications for these 

should be made at an early date, and must be accompanied by 

satisfactory testimonials of character. 



LADIES' BOARDING HALL. 

A hall provided for the accommodation of lady students has 

I been during the year under the management of Mrs. G. Haw- 

I kins, as matron. All ladies will be required to board in this 

f hall, except by special consent of the Faculty. Parents can 

I feel assured that every attention will be given to the welfare" 
I of their daughters. 

I The rooms are neatly furnished and arranged for two per- 

I sons in each room; but ladies will be required to furnish 

I towels, table napkins, lamp, and all articles of bedding, ex- | 

f cept the mattress. 

I EXPENSES. 

I Table Board, in club, . . . . About $2 00 per week 

I Room Rent, each, . . . . . . 20 00 per year 

I Fuel and Light, per room, . . . . 8 00 per year p 

I All expenses to be paid monthly in advance. | 

I Applications for rooms should be made as soon as practicable. | 

i 28 I 



I I 

I O p\ L E NI D P "'^ ^ 



I I 

$ 1886-7. I 

I I 

^ * ^ 

^ I 

^ Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and | 

I Wednesday, . . before the third Thursday in June. | 

I Annual Commencement, . on the third Thursday in June. | 

I , . ^ , ^« I 

.^ r^ • 1_ _ • „ - C* i. 1 r>f7 > 



^ Session begins, September 27. | 

s . ^ 

^ Christmas recess begins at noon, . . . December 23. | 

I Christmas recess ends, . . . . . January 3. | 

I " ^ 

^ First term ends, January 31. | 

s I 

N Second term begins, February I. | 

^ . I 

I Anniversary of the Neotrophian Society, . . November 5. | 

1 ... I 

I Anniversary of the American Literary Institute, November 10. | 

I . I 

I Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, . . February 22. | 

I Annual Exhibition of the Neotrophian Society, | 



Evening of Commencement. 



s 

\ Annual Exhibition of the American Literary Society, | 

^ Evening before Commencement. | 

s; Class Day, . . . Wednesday before Commencement. | 

!• - ! 

N • * I 

s ■ I 

s ^ 

^ 29 I 



! 







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OF THE 



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(Dffiqc;!^^ ^nG) Sf^^enf^ 



OF 



^^eth any* College, 




FOR THE 




Forty- Sixth Session, 



Ending June 16th, 



1887. 




WHEELING: 
DAILY INTELLIGENCER STEAM BOOK AND JOB PRESS. 



1887, 



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\ I 

\ CATALOGUE 

\ 

'/, OF THE ^ 

\ I 

I OFFICERS AND STUDENTS | 

f • • I 

I ■ "' I 

I I 

I I 

IBethany CollegeJ 

I I 

I I 

y FOR THE § 

I I 

I FORTY-SIXTH SESSION, | 

I ENDING JUNE 16, 1887, | 

i I 



^ WITH THE I 



Gohf^e of Sfhc)^ \nh ^nnh^t ^nr^ohnqe;ii]^nf, 



/ FOR 1887-88, I 

I ' 'I 

I Open to Male and Female on Equal Terms. I 

I I 

I I 



^ BETHANY, V/EST VIRGINIA. | 

f 1887. I 



I 

I 

I FOR 1887-\S8. 



W. H. WOOLERY, A.M., President, 

Professor of Mental Science and Hebrew. 



OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, B.S., 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. 



i A. C. PENDLETON, A.M., 

^ Professor of English Literature and Modern Languages. 

I 
I 

I - 

I FRANK M. DOWLING, A.M., 

.^ Professor of Latin Language and Literature. 

J " 

I LEWIS CASS WOOLERY, A.M.. 

I 

^ Professor of Greek Language and Literature. 

I 

I 

^ Professor (pro tempore) of Natural Sciences. 

I W. H. WooLERY, A. E. Myers, 

I 

I C. B. Turner, J. E. Curtis, 

I W. K. Pendelton, Dr J. E. Whitsett. 

I 

i 



S. RODGERS, B.S., 



A. E. Myers, Treasurer. 



I ■ I 

I FOR 1886-'87. | 

I . 

I 

f W. K. PENDLETON, President. | 

' • I 

I W. H. WOOLERY, A.M., | 

'/, Professor of Latin and Hebrew. $ 

I • I 



I MISS A. C. PENDLETON, | 

I I 

I Professor of Modern Languages. ^ 



. 



I ,. . ^..^,.^ § 



^ 



I M. J. THOMPSON, A.M., | 

I I 

^, Professor of Natural Sciences. § 

I I 



^ T^ ^.- T^x.r.rt.-r^^.x , ,r .n. § 



E. M. EPSTEIN, M.D., 

^. Professor of the Greek Language. ^ 

<■ \ 



S S 



i OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, B.S., I 

I ■ ' I 

^. Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. ^ 

f I 

I I 

I W. H. WOOLERY, | 

^ Chairman of the Faculty. | 

j 

I M. J. THOMPSON, I 

I I 

^ Librarian and Curator of the Museum. ^ 

I • I 

I I 

I A. E. MYERS, I 

I I 

^ Treasurer. ^ 

I 






B 



T 



OARD OF I RUSTEES. 



Bethany, W. Va. 
. Columbus, Ohio. 

Allegheny City, Pa. 
. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
. Hazel wood, Pa. 

Wheeling, W. Va. 
. Bethany, W. Va. 

Bethany, W. Va. 
. Cleveland Ohio. 

Frankfort, Kentucky. 
. Bethany, W. Va, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Wellsburg, W. Va. 
. Alliance, Ohio. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
. West Liberty, W. Va. 

New Castle, Pa. 
. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Wellsburg, W. Va. 
. Indianapolis, Ind. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
. Kenton, Ohio. 

Bethany, W. Va. 
. Frankfort, Kentucky. 

Connellsville, Pa. 
. Independence, Pa. 

Uniontown, Pa. 

. New Cumberland, W. Va. | 

I 



W. K. Pendleton, 

W. P. Aylesworth, . 

Joseph King, 

Hon. Geo. H, Anderson, 

Hon. R. M. Bishop, 

H K. Pendleton, 

A. W. Campbell, . 

J. E. Curtis, 

Dr. J. E. Whitsett, 

R. MOFFETT, 

P. S. Fall, . 
Alex. Campbell, 
Charles Shields, 
Bateman Goe, . 
Geo. T. Oliver, 
C. B. Turner, 
J. H. Jones, 
Isaac Errett, 
A. E. Myers, . 
Thomas W. Phillips, . 
Dr. Roger Williams, 
John C. Palmer, . 
E. J. Gantz, 
A. McLean, . 
H. Price, . 
w. h. woolery, . 
George Darsie, 
Porter S. Newmyer, . 
C. H. Beall, . 
M. M. Cochran, . 
Oliver Marshall, . 



1 



I 

1 



Si'liG)enf3 of ft]e PGi^fy-Si>ift] 8^33*1017. 



Addy, W. L., 
Anderson, J. R., 
Bartlett, Miss L., 
Beam, James, 
Berry, C. S., 
Black, Edward R., 
Campbell, R. M., . 
Campbell, William, 
Campbell, Ewing, 
Cameron, L. J., 
Chapman, Miss Rachel 
Cox, Miss Anna, . 
Cass, E, B., 

Chapline, Miss Bessie, 
Chapman, Lewis A., 
Curry, Edwin, 
Dixon, L. R., 
Donaldson, James S., . 

FRAZIEtl, H. E., 

Gorrell, J. W., 
Guy, G. M., 
Guy, Miss Jessie G.. 
Guy, Miss Lillie M . 
Harris, Alfred, . 
Hervey, J. M., 
Hopkins, J. A., 
Hammond, L. H., 
Irwin, C. H., 
Israel, F. S., . 
Israel, R. S., 
Jones, Thomas A , 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Bellaire, Ohio. 
Cortland, Ohio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Howard, Ohio. 
Rockweod, Ontario. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va, 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Millersburg, Ohio. 
Atchison, Pa. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
Iberia, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Black Creek, Ohio. 
New Lisbon, Ohio. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
Richmond, Mo. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Hebron, W. Va. 
Dallas, W. Va. 
Dallas, VV. Va. 
Dallas, W. Va. 
Glen Easton, W. Va. 
Bloomington, Ohio. 
Bellaire, Ohio. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
North Bend, Pa. 
Beallsville, Ohio. 
Morristown, Ohio. 
Pine Grove, Ky. 



>c^i^i^xx^:^^^^x^^xx^^^ixxxx^ix^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Kirk, Sherman, , 
Lazear, H. G., . 
Lewis, Miss Daisy, 
LovETT, E. 0.5 . 
Martin, S. T., 
Mendel, Miss Nellie, 
Moore, M., 
Muckley, E. S., 
Myers, Miss Irene T., 
Neill, Miss Susie, 
Oram, W. G., . 
Oram, Miss Zinnia, 
Phillips, A. B , 
Pounds, J. E., 
Ramer, C. L. v., 
Rice, J. A., . 
Reid, J. C, 
Rumble, H. H., 
Shriver, Miss V. R., 
Simpson, J. S., 
Strickling, J. H., 
Strickling, F. E., 
Stewart, D. W., 
Talmage, H. W., . 
White, Miss Hattie, 
Wilson, A. J. P., . 
Wirgman, G. H., 
Wright, Miss Mattie, 
Woolery, J. F., 



Flushing, Ohio. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Shreve, Ohio. 
Cadiz, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Beallsville, Ohio. 
Pierce, Ohio. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
New Lisbon, Ohio. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
WelLsburg, W. Va. 
Pugh, Ohio. 
Fredericktown, Ohio. 
Canal Louisville, Ohio. 
Pierce, Ohio, 
Mount Sterling, Ohio. 
Newark, Mo. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Howard, Ohio. 
West Union, W. Va. 
West Union, W, Va. 
Glen Easton, W. Va, 
Tonawanda, N, Y. 
Canton, Ohio, 
Wheeling, W, Va, 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va, 
Antioch Mills, Ky. 



v>«*X^*XN>\>\>XXN;X^O«C^>JX^'i^'*X^ii^iX^i^^ 



Gf^(i)^(^fe^ of fhe PGfi'>^-Si)^fi] Se^^ior^, 



J. C. Reid, . . . . Kentucky, 



Edwin Curry, . . . Ohio, 

S. T. Martin, . . . Ohio. 



hoi 


e number of Batchelors of Arts, 


o25 


ic 


.w .1 


Science, . 


79 


a 


U i(. 


Letters, 


49 


u 


u u 


Philosophy, 


4 



BATCHELORS OF ARTS. i 



S5 

I 
Thomas A. Jones. . , Kentucky, | 

I 

J. F. WooLERY, . . . Kentucky. | 

- ■ i 

1 

BATCHELORS OF LETTERS. | 

■ s 

S; 

I 

'Si 

\ 

s . 



BATCHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. I 

Miss V. R. Shriver, . . West Virginia. 




I I 



;^ 



§i 



Bethany College 



^ deal to him. 






^ 



\ 



I i 



^ Appeals to its friends for patronage, and presents the following ad- ^ 

I vantages : ^ 

I 1. The heal thf Illness of the location. It is in the midst of an ele- ^ 

§ ^ 

I vated region where there is pure air, fine water, and perfect exemption ^ 

I ^ 

I from malaria and intermittent, congestive and malignant fevers so ^ 

s . " ^ 

I prevalent in some parts of the countrv. ^ 

s ' ^ 

I 2. The College has a large and commodious building and is not | 

I therefore hampered for room either for class work or for its societies. y 

3. The students are for the most part not mere hoy% but young men, | 



5^ 

I 

I old enough to have formed their purposes and chosen their callings for p 

I life, and they bend all their energies to make study successful. The | 

I work in the class-room is as vigorous as it can be made, and this is sup- | 

^ ■ 

I plemented by exercises in the literary societies of a very high order. | 

^ y 

I The aim is to turn out men as graduates who can think for themselves. | 
I 4. Bethany has a large and learned body of Alumni. Many of | 

% fhpsp hflvp hppnmfi distlnaiiishprl in thp pditorinl nhm'r. on thp bpnp.h. at 5 



these have become distinguished in the editorial chair, on the bench, at g 
the bar, in the halls of legislation, at the professor's desk, and in the- ^ 



I . 

I hi., a. soon as he completes his college course, and it is worth a great ^ 



pulpit. The student is admitted to this reputation already achieved for | 



s %. 



I r 



I „ I 



I RULES OF ENTRANCE. | 

I '^ 

I Every candidate for matriculation will be required to furnish to the 

I presiding officer suitable testimonials of good moral character. Before 

\ matriculation it is further required that the subjoined regulations and | 

I rules of conduct be read ; it is required : | 

I 1. That each student shall, as soon as possible, and with the appro- | 

I val of the Faculty, select from the several schools a course of three daily | 

^ ^ 

I recitations, or the equivalent thereof, unless, upon the request of parent ^ 

I or guardian, or for other good cause shown, he be exempted from this i 

\ ^ 

I rule. . g 

I 2. That having entered any class, he shall not leave such without | 

s • ^ 

I permission from the Faculty. 



i 



\ 

I 8 ^ I 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 9 | 

I ' I 

I S. That he shall punctually attend recitations, examinations, and | 

I all other exercises of the college, and in a satisfactory manner, account to | 

I the proper officer for any delinquency on his part. | 

I 4. That he shall at once deliver into the keeping of the Faculty any | 

I deadly weapon that may be in his possession, and shall neither keep nor | 

I use any such dnring his connection with the institution. | 

^ 5. That he shall neither introduce within the precincts of the col- | 

^ ' . I 

I lege, nor use elsewhere, any intoxicating beverage. | 

y % 

I 6. That he shall abstain from gambling of all kinds, and from cards § 

y ^ 

I even for amusement. S 

y I 

I 7. That he shall not go beyond the immediate precincts of the § 

y I 

I college without permission from the presiding officer, nor leave until | 

y \ 

I regularly dismissed at the close of the session. | 

I 8. That he shall not be noisy, or play in or about the college build- | 

^ ^ 

I ing during the hours appointed for recitation. | 

I 9. That he shall not trespass upon the premises of any person, or in | 

I any way injure the property of the institution. | 

I It is further expected and desired, that the students attend public | 

I worship every Lord's day, abstain from profanity, and in general from | 

I whatever is inconsistent with good taste, good order, and good morals. | 

^ . . , . , . , ^ ,-, ■,. T . , -, - ^ 



Any material infringement of the preceding regulations and code of ^ 

y ^ 

I discipline may dissolve a student's connection with the institution. | 

I One-half the expenses of the college year must be paid at the open- | 

^ ing of the first term, the other half at the opening of the second term. ^ 

^ The matriculation fee must be paid by all, even by those who receive ^ 

^ . . . ^ 

^ free tuition, invariably in advance. % 

I I 

I Matriculation, per term, . . . . n $ 5 00 ^ 

I Tuition, per term, . . . . . 20 00 I 

y \ 

I (For other expenses see general information at end of Catalogue.) ^ 

I I 



8 . I 



. 



I ■ \ 

^y/^^yyyyy/yyyyy///^/y/y/^/y/y/y/y^^^ 



I I 

I Course OF Study. • | 

^ yj 

\ ^ 

I 

I Scientific, Ministerial, and Ladies', conferring respectively f 

I the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, | 

s I 

I Bachelor of Letters, and Bachelor of Philosophy. | 

I " ^ 

\ ? 

$ ? 

\ y 



Bethany College has four separate courses: The Classical, 



I CLASSICAL COURSE. I 

I 

I FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS. ^ 

I . I 

I This course embraces the following schools, viz : | 

I L School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 



^ 2. School of the Greek Lanejuage, ^ 

I ^ ^ I 

^ 3. School of the Latin Languasfe. I 

^ f 

I 4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

I 5. School of Natural Sciences. | 

^ ' ' f 

I 6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles ^ 

I "I 

I Lettres. p 

I — 

' ■ 1 

^ I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

I Fir^i Term. — Moral Philosophy. | 

I . ? 

I Second Term. — Evidences of Christianity. The Languages, History and'| 

I Canonicity of the Bible (Lectures). i 

I . I 

I II. School of the Greek Language. ^ 

I • I 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

I I 

I First Term. — Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's First Lessons. | 

I Daily exercises in writing the language with the accents | 

I carefully marked. | 

I Second Term. — Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. Fyflfe's Short History of | 

^ Greece. | 

10 I 



Si 10 ^ 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 11 ^ 

{ ■■•■ ■ - - - ■•^- --I 

i SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

i First Term. — The Anabasis coctinued. Selections from Herodotus. Ex- | 

I ercises in writing Greek. Grecian History (Cox). s 

I Second Term. — Herodotus continued. Homer's Iliad (Keep) three books. ^ 

^ Prose Composition. Grecian History. | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I 

I Firf^t Term. — Homer's Odyssey, three books. Xenophon's Memorabilia | 

I of Socrates. Prose Composition (Sidgwick). | 

f Second Term.— Plato's Apology of Socrates and Crito (Wagner). Demos- | 

i thenes' Oration on the Crown (D'Ooge). | 

I I 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I _. _ „..„.. „ ,.. I 



^ First Term. — Sophocles — Oedipus Tyrannus (White). | 

I Second Term. — Selections from Pindar (Gildersleeve). | 



I 

I • — I 

I III. School of Latin Language and Literature. | 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

I First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. | 

^ Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

' Second Term. — Csesar's Gallic War (Greenough). Book L, with thorougli | 



^ drill in Syntax. S 

I I 



I SOPHOMORE YEAR. S 

I I 

^ First Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Cesar's Gallic War. | 

I Books II, III, YI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. Prose | 

^ Composition (Jones). | 

^ Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition | 

I continued (Jones). | 



g JUNIOR YEAR. ^ 

i % 

I First Term. — Prosody. Virgil's ^Eneid, Broks I, II, IV, VI, (Greenough). Is 

I History of Rome (Leighton). Latin Synonymes (Shum way). | 

I Second Term. — Prosody. Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Horace | 

^ (Macleane). Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid). | 

I I 



SENIOR YEAR. § 



. 



! 



^ First Term. — The Germania of Tacitus (Church). 

I Second Term. — Cicero's Letters. Pliny's Letters. Antiquities (Wilkins) 
I Latin Literature (Bender). Lectures on Latin of Middle | 

i Ages. I 

^yy.^///y/M/yyy/y/jyy/y///y///y/y/^^^^ 



I ■ • I 

I 12 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. \ 

* ■■■■ ■ ■■ ■■■ ■■■ ■■■■■■■■ 1 



I IV. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

I I 

This school embraces a course of Pure Mathematics, finishing with § 

p the Differential and Intregral Calculus and a .Course in Astronomy. The | 

I text-books in use, and the time allotted to each study, will be found in | 

f the following schedule : | 

I ^ 

i FRESHMAN YEAR. ^ 

I 

f First Term. — Algebra — from Quadratic Equations (Olney's complete). | 

I Second Term. — Geometry (Olney). | 

^ SOPHOMORE YEAR. I 



ij 

i 



^ 



y.. 



First Term. — Analytical Geometry (Olney). 



I First Term, — Mechanics (Kemper) 



I First Term. — Geometry — Completed. Plane Trigonometry (Greenleaf). | 
I Second 2 erm. — Spherical Trigonometry. Land Surveying, including field- | 
I work, mapping, etc. (Gillespie). | 



„.„„„. i 






i^ § 



I 

I Second Term. — Differential and Integral Calculus, with applications to | 



p questions of the General Geometry, elective (Olney). ^ 

i I 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 






I Second Term. — Astronomy (Newcorab and Hold en). 

^ I 



!§ 



I ... I 



I V. School of Natural Science. | 

I 

i SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I 1' 



First Term. — Physiology (Martin). 
Second Term.. — Zoology (Packard). Botany (Gray). 



^ JUNIOR YEAR. ' | 

^ First Term. — Chemistry (Steele). | 

P s 

^ Second Term. — Geology (LeConte). I 

I . »„,«.v.„. I 

I I 

I First Term. — Physics, embracing Mechanics (Olmsted). | 

I Second Term. — Physics. | :, 

^ k 



I 

CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 13 | 



VI. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles 

Lettres. I 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



This course embraces the following schools : 

• 1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

3. School of Natural Sciences. 

4. School'of Modern Languages. 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Polit- 
ical Economy. 



First Term. — English Literature (Shaw). 
Second Term. — English Literature. 

To the study of the outlines of English Literature, as furnished by 

the text-book, are added critical readings from the best works of repre- | 

sentative writers. | 

JUNIOR YEAR. | 

First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). | 

Second Term. — Rhetoric. | 

Application of the principles of Rhetoric is made through the analy- | 

I 



sis of selections from the acknowledged masters of style in each depart 
ment of literature, and through constant practice in original composition. | 



First Term. — Intellectual Science, Cognitive Powers (McOosh). History ^ 

of Philosophy. Especial attention paid to Physiological | 

Psychology. | 

Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Political Economy (Walker). Philology | 

of the English Tongue (Earle). 



SCIEHTIFIC COURSE. I 



FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCES. § 

1 



I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 



;§ 



SENIOR YEAR. | 

I 



First Term. — Moral Philosophy. | 



!^ 



I Second Term. — Evidences of Christianity, The Languages, History and^ ^ 
^ Canonicity of the Bible. | 



I 14 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

i 



$ II. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

I 



Applied Mathematics in Road and Railroad Engineering, Descriptive 
Geometry, Shades, Shadows and Perspective Drawing. The following 
schedule will give a connected view of the whole : 



The Scientific Course in this school embraces the same subjects that 

^ are given under the Classical Course, with the addition of a course of 

I 

P FRESHMAN YEAR. 

I 

I First Term. — Algebra — From Quadratic Equations (Olney's complete). 

I Second Term. — Geometry (Olnev). 

I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

I 

^ First Term. — Geometry, completed. Plane Trigonometry (Greenleaf). 

^ Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry. Land Surveying, including field- 

I work, mapping, etc. (Gillespie j. 



I JUNIOR YEAR. 

I 



I First Term. — Analytical Geometry (Olney), Descriptive Geometry, Shades, 

^ Shadows and Perspective Drawing. 

^ Second Term. — Differential and Integral Calculus (Olney), Road and Rail- 

I road Surveying, with Levelling, Laying out Curves, Calcu- 

^ lation of Excavations, Embankments, &c. (Gillespie, 

I Henck's Field Book). 



p 

P SENIOR YEAR. 

I 

^ a course in Civil Engineering. An opportunity will be offered in Sopho- 

i 



First Term. — Mechanics (Kemper). 
Second Term. — Astronomy (Newcomb and Holden). 

As it is the intention to make practical application in the field of 
what is learned in the class-room, facilities will be furnished for beginning 



more and Junior years to study : 
p 1. Land Surveying — Embracing all that is necessary to understand 

the subject in its practical bearings with field-work, mapping, etc. 

2. The principles of Topographical Surveying and Drawing. 

3. Levelling, Profiling, Mapping. 

4. Road and Railroad Surve3dng— with field operations. • 
To enter upon the course a thorough knowledge of Algebra, Geome- 
try and Plane Trigonometry is required. 

Certificates will be given indicating the branch studied and the degree 
"of proficiency attained. It is very desriable that students should enter 
with the regular classes of the Scientific Course. 



^ 



Kyy///y/x/jf/Ay/x/y/////y///y/y^^^^ 



First Term. — Physiology (Martin). 
Second Term. — Zoology (Packard). Botany (Gray). 



First Term. — Chemistry (Steele). 
I Second Term. — Geology (LeConte). 



I CA TALOG UE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 15 | 

I i 

% III. School of Natural Science. | 

I • i 

\ SOPHOMORE YEAR. g 

I ^ 

S JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I ' 

I 



'/,. 



I 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I- • i 

I jPirs^ Tgrm.— Physics embracing Mechanics (Olmstead). Laboratory work | 

I in Chemistry. ^ 

^ I 

I Second Term. — Physics. (Olmsted). f 

I The class in Botany is not organized until about April 1st. | 

I In addition to these regular courses special instruction will be given ^ 



§ if desired, m Advanced Qualitative Analysis, Blowpipe Analysis, Assay- f 

I ' ^ 

^ ing and Toxicology. ^ 

§ In all these courses a fee is charged sufficient to cover the cost of the ^ 

^ chemicals used. In the regular course in Qualitative Analvsis this ^ 

I 

s 
s 
\ 

I IV. School of Ancient Languages. I 

I JUNIOR YEAR — FRENCH. | 

I I 

^ First Term. — Bocher's Otto's Grammar. ^ 
Sauveur's Causeries avec mes Eleves. | 



I . ,„ . . 

chemicals used. In the regular course in Qualitative Analysis this 
amounts to eight dollars. . ^ 

I 



Sauveur's La Fontaine's Tables. f 

Composition. | 

Second Term. — Bocher's Otto's Grammar. | 

\ Moliere's Misanthrope. ^ 

Composition. | 

SENIOR YEAR. | 

I 

First Term. — Bocher's Otto's Grammar. | 

Corneille's Le Cid. Racine's Athalie. I 

Composition. ^ 

I Second Term. — Critical study of selections from French Literature. I 

^ Composition. | 

N . ■ i 



I 16 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



I 

I JUNIOR YEAR— GERMAN. 

I 



First Term.— Cook's Otto's Grammar. 
I Stern's Studien und Plaudereien, 1st Series. 

I Composition. 

I Second Term.— Cook's Otto's Grammar. 

I Stern's Studien, und Plauderein, 2d Series. 

I Van der Smissen's Grimm's Kinder-und Hausmarchen. 

I Composition. 



;? 



^ 



§ 



iS 



Fij^st Term. — Cook's Otto's Grammar. 



I SENIOR YEAR. 

I 

I Stern's Studien und Plaudereien, 2d Series. 

I Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm. Schiller's Wilhelm Tell. 

I Composition. 



I Second Term. — Critical study of selections from German Literature. 
Composition. 



I 

I The aim of our instruction in French and German is to enable the 



I student to speak and write these languages as well as read them. The 

I so-called "natural method" is combined with progressive study of the 

I grammars and of selections from the best writers, and with constant prac- 

I tice in composition. The classes make such progress in speaking as ena- 

I bles the teacher to conduct them entirely without the use of English 

I during the second year of the course. 



^ V. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles 
I Liettres. 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. 



First Term. — English Literature (Shaw). 
Second Term. — English Literature. 



§ JUNIOR YEAR. 

I First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). 



Second 2>rm.-- Rhetoric. 

SENIOR YEAR. 



|v First Term. — Intellectual Science. Cognitive Powers (McCosh). His- | 

^ tory of Philosophy. Especial attention paid to the re- f 

I cent advances in Physiological Psychology. | i 

I Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Political Economy (Walker). ^ 
I Philosophy of the English Tongue (Earle). 



i 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 17 I 

I ■ ■■■• ^- ■■ • ■■•■■■■■ --I 

I MIHISTERIAL COURSE. I 

I 

^ FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LETTERS. | 

I 

f This course embraces the following schools: | 

I 1. School of Sacred Literature. I 

I 2. School of Greek. I 

i ^1 

I 3. School of Latin. ' § 

I I 

I 4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. • | 



I 5. School of Natural Science. I 

y % 

I 6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy, and Belles | 

^- - ■■ I 

8 



Letters. 

7. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 



f I 

i I. School of Sacred Literature. § 

I I 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I I 
I First Term. — Inspiration of the Scriptures. Textual Criticism (Warfield). | 

I Hermeneutics. Hebrew — Grammar, with exercises (Harper). | 

I N 

I Second Term. — Hebrew. Select portions of the Historical Books of the Old | 

I Testament read. Exegesis of Galatians (Greek Text of | 

I Westcott&Hort.) | 

i % 

y, \ 

5 SFNTOR VT^AR. S 



8 



I First Term. — Homiletics, with Pi-actical Exercises in the Preparation of | 

I Discourses. Hebrew — Old Testament Poetry read. Origin | 

I and Growth of the Psalms (Murray). Greek Exegesis of | 

I Epistle to the Romans, Chapters I-V. | 

I Second Term. — The Church — Its Origin, Growth, Missionary Activity and | 

I occasion of writing the Epistles (Lectures). Hebrew — Mes- | 

^ sianic Prophecy. The Higher Criticism of the Old Testa- | 

i ment examined (Lectures). | 

i 



f I 

!g II. School of the G-reek Language. | 

i ■ 

\i FRESHMAN YEAR. § 

I I 

I First Term. — Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's Greek Lessons. ^ 



m Daily exercises in writing the language with the accents | 

carefully marked. ^ 

Second Term. — Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. Fyffe's Short History of | 

Greece. I 

3 I 



I 18 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

I •••■•■•■— ■—■••■ •— ■■■•■■.■■.■■■.•■■ ■■-■■■■■■. ^ 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

i I 

I i^m< Term. — The Anabasis continued Selections from Herodotus. Ex- | 

^ ercises in writing Greek. Greek History (Cox). | 

I Second Term. — Herodotus continued. Homer's Iliad (Keep) three books. | 

I ' Prose Composition. Grecian History. | 

I • I 

^ JUNIOR YEAR. | 

^ I 



^ First Term. — Homer's Odyssey, three books. Xenophon's Memorabilia | 

I . of Socrates. Prose Composition (Sedgwick). | 

I Second Term.— Plato's Apology of Socrates, and Crito (Wagner). Demos- | 

I thenes' Oration on the Crown (D'Ooge). | 

"~ '• i 

g III. School of Latin Language and Literature. § 

4 . I 

i FRESHMAN YEAR. ^ 

i I 

I First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. | 



r 



Daily Exercises in Writing English into Latin. 




First Term. — Algebra— from Quadratic Equations (Olney's complete). ^ 

p Second Term. — Geometry (Olney). | 



^ SOPHOMORE YEAR. '^ 



I First Term. — Geometry — Completed. Plane Trigonometry, 

I Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry, including field work, (Greenleaf). | 

I land surveying, mapping, etc. (Gillespie). | 

i ■ ' I 

^ SENIOR YEAR. I 

i Second Term. — Astronomy (Lectures). ^ 



W/y/y/y/^y/y/y/y/y/y///y///y///y^^^ 



/ CA TALOG UE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 19 | 

;; ' I 

^ V. School of Natural Science. | 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I I 

I First Term. — Physiology (Martin). Botany (Gray). | 

I ^ 

I Second Term-. — Zoology (Packard). | 

I I 

^ JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I -I 

I First Term. — Chemistry (Steele). ^ 

i 



Second Term. — Geology (LeConte). 



SENIOR YEAR. ^ 

I I 

I First Term. — Physics (Olmsted). ^ 

I Second Term. — Physics (Olmsted). | 



^ Students in the Ministerial Course do not begin the study of physics | 

I until the class has finished the chapter on Mechanics. | 

I I 



^ 



^ 8 



g i 



I Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). 
I Philosophy of t 



I VI. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles | 
I Lettres. | 

I I 



I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

I 



I First Term. — English Literature (Shaw 

I § 

I Second Term. — English Literature. s 



I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 



^ First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). | 



I Second Term. — Rhetoric. | 

$ s 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

i I 

I First Term. — Intellectual Science. (Same as Classical Course.) I 

I 



Political Economy (Walker). 
the English Tongue (Earle). 



I 20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

1 1 

I VII. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

^ First Term. — Moral Philosophy. | 

I Second Term. — Evidences of Christianity. The Languages, History and | 

I Canonicity of the Bible (Lectures). | 

I - . I 

I ■ COURSE FOR LADIES. | 

I I 

I FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. | 

I . I 

I This course embraces the following schools : I 

! 

"^ 2. School of the Latin Language. | 



I 1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. I 

I - - . , 



3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

I 4. School of Natural Sciences. I 

$ I 

i 5. School of Modern Lan^uao-es. §; 



I 6. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Polit- | 

I ical Economy. | 

i ' ■ 5^ 

a ■ ^ 

I I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

I ^ I 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

I i^irsf Term. — Moral Philosophy. | 

^ I 

^ Second Term. — Evidences of Christianity. The Languages, History and ^ 

I Canonicity of the Bible (Lectures.) | 

I — I 

I II. School of the Latin Language and Literature. | 

I I 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. I 

i I 

g i^irsf Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. ^ 

I Daily Exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

I Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Greenough), Book I, with thorough | 

I drill in Syntax. ^ 

i I 

i SOPHOMORE YEAR. § 

i ' I 

I First Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Csesar's Gallic War, | 

I Books II, III, VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. Prose | 

p Composition (Jones). | 

I Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Li vy, Book XXI. Composition | 

I continued (Jones). | 

^//y///y////y//y//yy/yyy/y/y//^^^^ 



\ ■ I 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 21 | 

I I 

I ....................................................... -......-...-..........■^^^^ I 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

I i^iVsf Term.— Prosody. Virgil's ^neid, Books I, II, IV, VI (Green- | 

I ough). History of Rome (Leighton). Latin Synonyms | 

I (Shumway). ■ | 

^ ^ 

I Second Term. — Prosody. Select Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Hor- | 

I ace (Macleane). Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid'>. f 

I I 

^ SENIOR YEAR. ^ 

I $ 

§ First Term. — The Germania of Tacitus. ^ 

I Second Term. — Cicero's Letters. Pliny's Letters. Antiquities (Wilkins). | 

I Latin Literature (Bender). ^ 

I — i 

I ^ 

I III. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. § 

I ^ 

^ FRESHMAN YEAR. ^ 

I I 

I First Term. — Algebra — from Quadratic Equations (Olney's complete). ^ 

S ■ " ' y 

^ Second Term. — Geometry (Olney). ^ 

I • ' I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I . . i 

\ First TVrm.— Geometry — Completed. Plane Trigonometry. ;^ 

"^ ■ ^ 

\ Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry (Greenleaf). Land Surveying, in- ^ 

I eluding fieldwork, mapping, etc. (Gillespie). ^ 

!■ - I 

^ IV. School of Natural Science. f 

^ i 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. ^ 

^ -■ ■ I 

I . JUNIOR YEAR. | 



I Second Term. — Botany (Gray). 



I I 

I First Term. — Chemistry (Steele). ■ g 



I Second Term. — Physics (Steele). 

I 

^ V. School of Modern Languages. | 

I . . . i 



I i 



% JUNIOR YEAR — FRENCH. ^ 



y 



$ y 

X y 

I First Term. — Bocher's Otto's Grammar. | 

I Sauveur's Causeries avec mes Eleves. . ^ 

s Sauveur's La Fontaine's Tables. | ' 

§ Composition. | 

I Second Term. — Bocher's Otto's Grammar. / 

I Moliere's Misanthrope. ^ 

I Composition. / 

i 




I 22 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. $ 

N ? 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

I First Term.— Bocher's Otto's Grammar. ^ 

^ Corneille's Le Cid. Racine's Athalie. I 

I Composition. ^ 



- -- - - - ■ - 



I Second Term. — Critical study of selections from French Literature. 



Composition 



I Second Term. — English Literature. 



^ Composition. ^ 



I JUNIOR YEAR— GERMAN. | 

I i 

^ First Term. — Cook's Otto's Grammar. g 

I stern's Studien und Plaudereien, 1st Series. I 

I Composition. f 

^ Second Term. — Cook's Otto's Grammar. ^ 

I Stern's Studien, und Plaudereien, 2d Series. I 

I Van der Smissen's Grimm's Kinder-und Hausmarchen. ^ 

^ riniTmnsif inn ^. 



I I 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I i 

\ First Term, — Cook's Otto's Grammar. ^ 

s y 

I stern's Studien und Plaudereien, 2d Series. | 

I Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm. Schiller's Wilhelm Tell. ^ 

^ Composition. ^ 



^ Second Term — Critical study of selections from German Literature. ^ 

I Composition. i 

I VI. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles | 

I Lettres. i 

I • i 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

I i^irsi Term. — English Literature (Shaw). | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 



I First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). P 

I Second Term. — Rhetoric. , * f 

k ^ 

I SENIOR YEAR. . | 



§ -- ^ 



First Term. — Intellectual Science, same as in Classical course. | 

I Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Political Economy (Walker). Philology 



- i 

I of the English Tongue (Earle). | 

I i 

I i 

I I 



General Information. t 

I I 

^ SITUATION. I 

I ^nETHANY COLLEGE is situated in the Panhandle of West I 



s 



I /L/ Virginia, sixteen miles north of Wheeling. The railroad | 

stations for Bethany are Brilliant, on the Cleveland and Pitts- | 

burgh Railroad (river division), and Wellsburg, on the Wheel- | 

I ing branch of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Rail- | 

I road. From these stations a daily stage is run to Bethany by | 

I William Rodgers, who will give prompt attention to any orders | 

I addressed to him, Wellsburg, W. Va. | 

I TERMS, VACATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS. | 

I ^ 

^ The College Year consists of two terms, four and a half | 

I months each. It begins on the last Monday in September and | 

I ends on the third Thursday in June. In this year there are | 

I two examinations in each class — one in January and the final | 

I examination in June. ■» ^ 

I It is very desirable that applicants for Matriculation present | 

I themselves at the beginning of the session, that there may be | 

I a convenient arrangement of the classes in the various Depart- | 

I ments or Schools. Students, however, can enter conveniently 



I at the commencement of the second term, February 1st, after | 

I the intermediate examination in January. | 

I NECESSARY EXPENSES. | 

I Tuition for forty weeks at ^.00, - - 40 00 | 

I Matriculation fee, for coal, janitor, &c., - 10 00 | 

I Furnished room, with care of room, fuel, - 25 00 | 

I Table board, forty weeks, at Sl,75, - - 70 00 | 

I Washing, 10 00 I 

— I 

I $155 00 I 

I GRATUITIOUS INSTRUCTION. I 

s ^ 

I Indigent and pious young men in any of the religious de- | 

I nominations, who wish to prepare for the ministry, shall, on | 

I paying the matriculation fee, be admitted into any of the | 

I courses at Bethany College at one half the regular rates of |- 

I tuition. I 

^ I 



I -I 

^ 24 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

^ I 

I All applicants for this privilege will be required to present | 

I to the Faculty satisfactory written recommendations from their | 

I respective congregations, and from well known ministers of | 

I the gospel, certifying that they come under the above condi- | 

I tions, in such form as shall be prescribed by the Faculty. They | 

I shall also be required to sign a promissorv note to pay the full | 

I charge for tuition five years from their withdrawal from the. | 

I College, provided they do not, in the meantime, devote them- | 

I selves to the work of the Ministry. But this provision for re- | 

I duction of tuition shall not extend, in any case, beyond one | 

f session, except upon the recommendation of the Facult}^, and | 



^ the approval of the Board. ^ 

I The sons of regular Ministers of the Gospel of all denoraina- | 

' ■ I 



I tions shall be admitted to all the classes -and privileges of the | 
I College, upon payment of matriculation fee and one-half the 
I regular charges for tuition. 



,- - i 

I All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition ma}^ be re- | 

i i 

I CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. | 

1st. The Natural History Cabinet contains most of the Fauna "^ 



9 . . . 

I quired to give instruction in the Primary Classes. 



s 



I Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable coUec- 

I tion from Australia, and exchanges with other sections of the >^ 

f country. Also a fine Herbarium of native plants, with many | 

I rare ones from other parts of the world. | 



I 2d. The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several | 
I thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all parts of 



^ the world. | 



' "■--■-• - 



I 3d. The Ethnological Cabinet^ though not large, contains rare 
I and valuable collections. '| 



APPARATUS. I 



I , ,, ^ 



I The Philosophical apparatus of the College is of the most | 



p elegant and approved kinds and affords the amplest facilities | 

I for the thorough illustration of physical principles. | 

I The Chemical laboratory is fully provided with all the ap- | 

I paratus and chemicals needed in the courses ofiered. | 
I -I 

ELOCUTION. I 

i I 

I Constant attention is paid in the language classes to the art | 

I of Elocution. Besides the members of the Junior and Senior | 



^. 



I 

CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 25 | 

^■■■•^•■^^■•^■•^-■^■■••■■■■■•■^■•■•■■•^■■■^•■^■■•■■- ■■•■••- I 

I Classes are required to deliver original orations every Friday | 

I morning in the presence of the Faculty and all the students. | 

I These exercises are rigidly criticised, particularly as to the | 

style of delivery, by the Faculty. | 

I 
LITERARY SOCIETIES. | 

I 
There are in connection with the College, two Literary So- | 

cieties. Their Halls, recently destroyed by fire, have been re- | 



placed by others, beautifully finished and appropriately fur 
I nished. Valuable libraries have also already been received by | 
I the societies, through the munificence of friends, to replace | 
I those that were lost. 

I Every facility is afforded by the authorities of the Institu- 
I tion for increasing the accommodations and adding to the use- 
fulness of these valuable auxiliaries to the Institution. 



REPORTS. ., I 



Monthly "Reports " will be addressed by the Secretary of the | 
I Faculty to the parent or guardian of each student, in which | 
I are stated his attention in class, supposed industry, proficiency | 
I in each of his studies, absence from lectures and recitations, | 
\ and his general deportment, with such other information as it | 
I may be necessary to communicate. | 



% 



READING ROOM. i 



I During the year the students have maintained a Reading | 

I Room at small expense, and thus had access to the best period- | 

. I ical literature in the country. | 



TERMS OF GRADUa\TION 



DIFFERENTSCHOOLS. ^ 



A student may graduate in any school singly. To obtain | 

I the degree of Graduate in any school, it is required of every | 

>| candidate: • ■ I 

I 1. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College at | 

'I least one session, and shall have studied in the College the | 

j| entire Senior year of the school. 2. That within one month | 

ll from the beginning of the session, he shall have made known | 

I to the professor of the school his intention of graduating. 3. I 



I 26 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

\ That he stand a satisfactory examination on all the prescribed | 

I studies of the school. He shall then be entitled to a Certi-ficate | 

I of Graduation free, sio;ned by the President and Professor. | 

^ I 



I DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF SCIENCES, AND J 
I BACHELOR OF LETTERS. | 



To receive the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, 

I Bachelor of Letters and Bachelor of Philosophy, the candidate 

I must have graduated and received his certificates in the several | 

I schools embraced in the respective courses. He must also have I 

I faithfully observed all the other laws and regulations of the ^. 

\ College. He will then receive the Degree and Diploma. A fee f 

\ often dollars will be charged for the diploma. Five dollars to | 



2 



^ •■■ 



I ministerial students. | 



I A student who has received a diploma in any course, in order | 
I to obtain a diploma in any other course, shall take up the addi- 
I tional certificate or certificates and pay ten dollars for the diploma. 
The graduates in the several courses enjoy equally all the 



s ^w^ .,,'1^^^., ^;^u+o, .^^A u^,^^v.^ ^^+1^^ n^ii^^^ % 



% privileges, rights and honors of the College. ^ 



^ J^xx ,x*vy^v.^, XX^XX^^ ^XXVA xxv^xxv^x^ wx vxxv^ ^v^xxv.^w. ^ 

% THE master's DEGREE IN COURSE. | 

\ V 

I In order to obtain the Regular Degree of Master of Arts, the | 

I . . - ~ » . . 



following conditions are required : 1. The attainment of the f 
I Degree of Bachelor in the course. 2. The actual attendance in ^ 



the College thereafter for one session and the study of three | 
I Elective studies, to be selected by the candidate with the con- j 
I sent of the Faculty. 3. An approved examination of selected | 

studies. A fee of ten dollars will be charged for the diploma. 



HONORARY MASTER'S DEGREE. | 



^ A Bachelor of three years' standing in any one of the courses ^ 



I may receive the Honorary Degree of Master in that course; pro- | 
I vided he shall in the interval have maintained an exemplary | 



vided he shall in the interval have maintained an exemplary 
character, and pursued studies relating to the degree. Candi- | 
I dates for this degree should apply to the President or Secretary | 
I of the Faculty before the annual meeting of the Board of j 
I Trustees. | 

I No application for the degree of A.M. will be entertained | \ 
\ unless accompanied by the fee of ten dollars, which will be re- | 

I urned in case the degree is not conferred. | i 

^ t I 



^ 



I I 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 27 | 

/ % 

'i '" " ' " ' '" ^ 

I THE COLLEGIAN. | 

I I 

I During the college year the students have published a | 

I monthly journal entitled The Collegian. It has attained high | 

I rank as a college paper, and affords excellent means for devel- | 

I oping the literary talent of the students. It deserves a heartier | 

I support on the part of the Alumni and friends of the college. | 

I ACCOMMODATIONS. I 

I I 

I Students are permitted to select their own places of boarding, | 

/ subject in all cases to the supervision of the Faculty. The | 

/ facilities for obtaining boarding in private families have been | 

^ much increased, and many students can be accommodated in | 

^ this way. Every attention will be paid to the health and | 

^ comfort of the students. * I 

;: To accommodate students who desire to board themselves, | 

/ arrangements have been made to supply a number of unfur- | 

/ nished rooms at a very moderate rent. Application for these | 

/ should be made at an early date, and must be accompanied by | 

/ satisfactory testimonials of character. | 

i ■ 1 

I 

I 

1 1 



I I 

\ ' \ 






I I 

I I 

I I 



I 

I 28 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 






CALENDAR 



p FOR 1887-88. ^ 

% ^ 

I Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and | 

I Wednesday, . . before the third Thursday in June | 

^ ■ ^ ^ 

I Annual Commencement, . on the third Thursday in June | 

^ I 

I Session begins, .... September 26 | 

i 



I Christmas recess begins at noon, . . December 22 | 

I Christmas recess ends, . . . January 3 | 

I First term ends, . . . . January 31 | 



I Second term begins, . , . February 1 | 

I Anniversary of Neotrophian Society, . . November 5 | 

I Anniversary of the American Literarv Institute, November 10 | 

I Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, . February 22 | 

I Annual Exhibition of the Neotrophian Society, | 



Evening of Commencement 



i ^ 

I Annual Exhibition of the American Literary Society, | 

I Evening before Commencement | 

I Class Day, . . Wednesday before Commencement | 

^ - ^ 



. 



5 Si 



i ■ t 






s 



^y/y/yyy/y/y/y///y//yy/y/y///y//^////^^^^ 




FICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 



BeTHftNY-CoLteGe 



FOR TUE 



^^ <«&. .^.^ ^)' 01^ 0® . 



h IS 



i 



ENDING JUNE 21, 1888. 



WHEELING. 

DAILY INTELLIGENCER STEAM BOOK AND JOB PRESS. 
1888. 



i 



I 



■y/y/y/y/A-^Yy/y//yy/y/y/y/^/y/^y/Ay/y/y/yy//y/^^^ 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS f 



OF 



Bethany CollegeJ 



FOR THE 



FORTY-SEVENTH SESSION, I 

ENDING JUNE 21, 1888, 



WITH THE 



FOR 1888-89. 

Open to Male and Female on Equal Terms. 



BETHANY, WEST VIRGINIA, ^ 



v///y/y///y/y/y/y'//'//////'/x/y///y/////y///y/x///y^^^^ 



\ 



I 
I 




W. H. WOOLERY, A.M., LL.D., President. 

Professor of Mental Science and Hebrew. 



A. C. PENDLETON, A.M., 

Professor of English Literature and Modern Languages. 



OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy. 



FRANK M. DOWLING, A.M., 

Professor of Latin Language and Literature. 



LEWIS CASS WOOLERY, A.M., 

Professor of Greek Language and Literature. 



S. RODGERS, B.S., 

Professor (pro tempore) of Natural Sciences. 



MISS IDA CURTIS, 

Teacher of Painting. 



MISS FLORA PRICE, 

Teacher of Music. 



W. H. WooLERY, A. E. Myers, 

C. B. Turner, J. E. Curtis, 

W. K. Pendleton, Dr. J. E. Whitsett, 

A. C. Pendleton. 

A. E. Myers, Treasurer. * 



'^^SS!!SI>SfS!!S$S!SSiSS^^ 



I 

I 



B 



T 



OARD OF I RUSTEES. 



W. K. Pendleton, 

j. w. mulholland, 

w. f. cowden, 

Hon. Geo. H. Anderson, 

Hon. R. M. Bishop, 

H. K. Pendleton, 

A. W. Campbell, . 

J. E. Curtis, 

Dr. J. E. Whitsett, 

R. Moffett, 

P. S. Fall, . 

Alex. Campbell, 

Charles Shields, 

L. Bacon, 

Gfo. T. Oliver, 

C. B. Turner, 

J. H. Jones, 

Isaac Errett, 

A. E. Myers, . 

Thomas W. Phillips, 

Dr. Roger Williams, 

John C. Palmer, 

E. J. Gantz, 

A. McLean, . . 

H. Price, . 

George Darsie, 

Porter S. Newmyer, . 

C. H. Beall, 

M. M. Cochran, 

Oliver Marshall, 



Bethany, W. Va. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Hazelwood, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Alliance, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
West Liberty, W. Va. ' 
New Castle, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Kenton, Ohio. 
Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Independence, Pa. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 



7 \ 



I i 

5 ' ^/y 







Addy, C. D., 
Addy, W. L., 
Bartlett, M. L., . 
Barclay, J. J., , 
Beam, J. K., 
Bell, A. S., 
Berry, P. A., 
Biggs, R. H., 
Black, G. 0., 
Black, E. R., 
Blair, T. L., 
Burgan, F. T., 
Cameron, L. J. . 
Campbell, J. E., . 
Campbell, R. M., 
Campbell, W. P., \ 
Chapline, Bessie, 
counselman, j". e., 
Cox, Anna L., . 
Curtis, E, R., 

DOAK, P., 

dunwiddie, w. a., 
Freeman, T. S. K., 
Gans, H. B., 
Gans, N. F., 
George, T., . 
Gorrell, J. W., 
Guy, G. M., 
Haley, H. A., . 
Harris, Alfred, . 
Harris, Allen, 
Harris, S. J., 
Herbert, F. S., 
Hervey, J. M., 
Hill, C. A., 

Hopkins, J. A., 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Courtland, Ohio. 

Wheeler, Ala. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

West Liberty, W. Va. 

Howard, Ohio. 

Gambler, Ohio. 

Rockwood, Ontario, Canada. 

Rockwood, Ontario, Canada. | 

Waynesburg, Pa. 

Kammerer, Pa. 

Millersburg, Ohio, 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Bethany, W.Va. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Bethany, W, Va. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

West Union, W. Va. 

Philipsburg, Pa. 

, Nova Scotia. 

Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 
Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Hebron, W. Va. 
Leon, Kansas. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Glen Easton, W. Va. 
St. Louisville, 0. 
Kennon, Ohio. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Bloomingdale, Ohio. 
Milton Center, Ohio. 

Bellaire, Ohio. 



y/yy/^/y///y/x/y/y/y///y/y/y///y^^^^ 



<^////y/Ay/Ay/^y/^y/^///////////y//yy///y^^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Hopple, R. B , 
huktll, j. w., 

HUKILL, C , . 

Hupp, A. L., 
Hupp, J. H., 
Israel. C. E., . 
Israel, F. S., 
Israel, R. S., . 
Jenkins, B. A., 
Kinney, E. S., . 
Kirk, Sherman, 
Lane, R. 0., 
Lauck, F. H., 
Lazear, H. G., . 
Lewis, D., . 
Livsey, J. H., . 
Lovett, E. 0., 
Mason, G. E., . 
Matthews, W., 
Mendel, N. C, . 
Mercer, L. L, 
Miller, E. O., . 
Miller, J. H., 
Miller, M. E., 
Moore, J. B., 
Moore, M., 
McCoy, C. F., 
McCrory, H„ . 
McGiLL, S. S., 
Neill, S., 
Oram, W. G., 
Oram, Z., 
Parsons, H. C, 
Paul, F. E., 
Payne, R. C, 
Phillips, A. B., 
Phipps, H. D., 
Phipps, O. G., . 
Phipps, O. H., 
Pounds, J. E., . 



Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Beallsville, Ohio. 
Beallsville, Ohio. 
Morristown, Ohio. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Mt. Healthy, Ohio. 
Flushing, Ohio. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Shreve, Ohio. 
Atwater, Ohio. 
Brilliant, C^hio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Portage, Ohio. 
Rocky Fork, Ohio. 
Rocky Fork, Ohio. 
Rocky Fork, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Beallsville, Ohio. 
Dunbarton, Ohio. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
New Lisbon, Ohio. 
Wellsburg, W Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Tonawanda, N Y. 
Hopedaie, Ohio. 
South Bend, Ind. 
Barnesville, Ohio 
Paris, Texas. 
Paris, Texas. 
Paris, Texas. 
Fredericktown, Ohio, 



^/y/y/y/yyjr/jr/x/jr/jT/y//^^^ 



<f/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/y/^/y/y/yyy/y//yy/y/y/y/^^^ 

I 6 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 



Rogers, W. F., 
Rumble, H. H., 
Saville, M. a., 
Shriver, K. J., 
Shrontz. Fred., 
Silver, E. I., . 
Simpson, J. S., 
Smith, J. B., 
Stockett, B. M., . 
Strickling, J. H., 
Talmage, H. W., . 
Taylor, A. H., . 
Titus, J, L., 
Von Lunen, M. B., 
Wallace, A. R., . 
Warnock, G. S., 
Warren, W. R., 
Wells, M. D., . 
White, J. L,, 
White, H. R., . 
Wilson, A. J. P., . 
Williamson, J. M., 
Wolfe, E., . 
Wolfe, F., 
Wolfe, L., . 
Woodward, J. F., 
Wright, W. J., 
Yauger. F. a., 

Number of students, 104. 



Railings, Ky. 
La Belle, Mo, 
Barnesville, Ohio. 
Bethany, W, Va. 
Washington, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Howard, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Moundsville, W. Va. 
West Union, W. Va. 
Tonawanda, N. Y 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Coon Island, Pa. 
Johnstown, Pa. 
Marion, Kansas. 
Elvria, Ohio. 
Higginsville, Mo. 
West Liberty, W. Vy. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Canton, Ohio. 
Wheeling, W, Va. 
Bethany, W Va. 
Short Creek, W. Va. 
Short Creek, W. Va 
Short Creek, W. Va. 
Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 
Sharon, Pa. 
Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 



1 
I 



yN\^<^iXXXXX^<^>iX^O«'«i<VXN^^>^XX-^Oi^Oi>^X^ 



iMifMltS 



BACHELORS OF ARTS. 

Kirk, Sherman, Ohio. 

McCoy, C. F., Ohio. 

Rumble, H. H., Missouri. 



BACHELORS OF LETTERS. 




GORRELL, J. W., . . . 


West Virginia 


Guy, G. M., 


Kansas. 


Hervey, J. M., 


Ohio. 


Phillips, A. B., 


Ohio. 


Pounds, J. E., 


Ohio. 



BACHELORS OF SCIENCE. 
Bartlett, Miss M. L., . 
Campbell, R. M., . . . . , 

Israel, F. S., 

White, J. L., 



Ohio. 

West Virginia. 
Ohio. 
Kentucky. 



BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 
White, Miss H. R., . . . . Ohio. 



Whole number of Bachelors of Arts. 
" " " Science, 



u 



Letters, . 
Philosophy 



Total Alumni, 



528 

83 

54 

5 

670 



^/////^/x/x/y///x/y/////y/////x///^^^ 



\ Bethany College 1 

! 

I Appeals to its friends for patronage, and presents the following advantages : | 

^ 1. The healthfulness of the location. It is in the midst of an elevated i 

y . ^ 

I region where there is pure air, fine water, and perfect exemption from mal- ^ 

I aria and intermittent, congestive and maligant fevers so prevalent in some ^ 

I parts of the country. | 

I 2. The College has a large and commodious building and is not there- i 

i fore hampered for room either for class work or for its societies. | 

/ ^ 

I 3. The students are for the most part not mere hoy% but young men^ | 

^ old enough to have formed their purposes and chosen their callings for life, | 

^ and they bend all their energies to make study successful. The work in the % 

^ ^ 

I class-room is as vigorous as it can be made, and this is supplemented by ex- ^ 

^ ercises in the literary societies of a very high order. The aim is to turn p 

I out men as graduates who can think for themselves. | 

I 4. Bethany has a large and learned body of Alumni. Many of these | 

^ ^ 

^ have become distinguished in the editorial chair, on the bench, at the bar, ^ 

I in the halls of legislation, at the professor's djpsk, and in the pulpit. The ^ 

^ student is admitted to this reputation already achieved for him, as soon as ^ 

I he completes his college course, and it is worth a great deal to him. ^ 



I I 

I I 



y. 



5i ;;? 



I RULES OF ENTRANCE. | 

I • I 

I ■ . I 

I Every candidate for matriculation will be required to furnish to the | 

I presiding officer suitable testimonials of good moral character. Before | 

I matriculation it is further required that the subjoined regulations and rules | 

I of conduct be read ; it is required : | 

I 1. That each student shall, as soon as possible, and ,with the approval | 

>^ . . ^ 

I of the Faculty, select from the several schools a course of three daily recita- | 

I tions, or the equivalent thereof, unless, upon the request of parent or | 

I guardian, or for other good cause shown, he be exempted from this rule. | 

I 2. That having entered any class, he shall not leave such without per- / 



:y. 
y. 

I 

]j mission from the Faculty. / 



\ ^ 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 9 I 

I 3. That he shall punctually attend recitations, examinations and all ^ 

I other exercises of the college, and m a satisfactory manner, account to the ^ 

s ^ 

I proper officer for any delinquency on his part. ^ 

I 4. That he shall at once deliver into the keeping of the Faculty any ^ 

^ ^ 

I deadly weapon that may be in his possession, and shall neither keep nor g 

^ use any such during his connection with the institution. | 

I 5. That he shall neither introduce within the precincts of the college $ 

s ^ 

I nor use elsewhere, any intoxicating beverage. | 

I 6. That he shall abstain from gambling of all kinds, and from cards | 

I even for amusement. | 

I y 

^ 7. That he shall not go beyond the immediate precincts of the college | 

I without permission from the presiding officer, nor leave until regularly dis- | 



^ missed at the close of the session. | 

^ 8. That he shall not be noisy, or play in or about the college building | 

^ during the hours appointed for recitation. ^ 

I 9. That he shall not trespass upon premises of any person, or in any | 

I way injure the property of the institution. | 

I It is further expected and desired, that the students attend public | 

I worship every Lord's day, abstain from profanity, and in general from what- | 

I ever is inconsistent with good taste, good order, and good morals. | 

^ ^ 

I Any material infringement of the preceding regulations and code of | 

I discipline may dissolve a student's connection with the institution. f 

I One-half the expenses of the college year must be paid at the opening f 



I of the first term, the other half at the opening of the second term. The 

I matriculation fee must be paid by all, even by those who receive free tuition, 

I invariably in advance. p 

^ Matriculation, per term, $ 5 00 P 

I Tuition, per term, 20 00 | 

I (For other expenses see general information at end of Catalogue.) 



I i 



i '- 



% 



Course of Study, 



Bethany College has four separate courses : The Classical, 
Scientific, Ministerial and Ladies', conferring respectively the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, Bachelor of | 
Letters, and Bachelor of Philosophy. 



I CLASSICAL COURSE. 

I FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

This course embraces the following schools, viz : 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of the Greek Language. 

3. School of the Latin Language. 

4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 
I 5. School of Natural Sciences. 

6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles 
Lettres. 



I I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 



^ In this School the Evidences, History and Languages of the Bible are 

I taught. Moral Philosophy is drawn from the Bible itself. Every student 
^ in the college studies the English Bible during the Sophomore and Junior 
I years. A thorough study is made of the Jewish Law , and recent researches 5 
I in Egypt and Assyria bearing on the Bible history are pointed out. In the" 
I Junior year the historical books of the New Testament with the purpose of 



^. 



I each Epistle are carefully studied. 



% 



11. School of the Greek Language. 



g FRESHMAN YEAR. 

I Fir^t Term. — Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's First Lessons. 

I Daily exercises in writing the language with the accents 

I carefully marked. 

i Second rerm.— Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. .Fyffe's Short History of 

I Greece. 

I 



SENIOR YEAR. 



III. School of Latin Language and Literature. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 11 | 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

First Term.— The Anabasis continued. Lucian's Dialogues. Exercises f 

in writing Greek. Grecian History (Cox). | 

Second Term. — Thucydides. Homer's Iliad (Keep), three books. Prose | 

Composition ( Jones). Grecian History. 



i^ 



JUNIOR YEAR. | 



First Term. — Pindar (Gildersleeve). Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socra- | 

tes, Prose Composition (Sidgwick). | 

Second Term. — Plato's Apology and Crito (Wagner). Demosthenes' Ora- | 

tion on the Crown (D'Ooge). New Testament Greek once | 

per week. | 



First Term. — Sophocles— Oedipus Tyrannus (White), or Antigone. ^ 

Second Term. — Greek of Church Fathers. Lectures on Greek Civilization. | 

I 



First lerm. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. ^ 

Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

Second Term. — Csesar's Gallic War (Greenough). Book L, with thorough | 

drill in Svntax. i 



First Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic War, | 

Books 11. , III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catilirie. Prose f 

Composition (Jones). | 

Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition | 

continued (Jones). | 

I 

' JUNIOR YEAR. | 



First Term.— Prosody. Vergil's ^neid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- f, 
ough). History of Rome (Leighton). Latin Synonymes ^ 
(Shumway). 
Second Term.— Prosody. Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Horace p 
(Macleane). Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid). 



I 

SENIOR YEAR. "f 

i 



First Term. — The Germania of Tacitus (Church). | 

Second Term — Cicero's Letters. Phny's Letters. Antiquities (Wilkins). 'i 

Latin Literature (Bender). Lectures on Latin of Middle | 
Ages. 






I 12 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

^ . . ? 

I IV. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

^ I 

I This school embraces a course of Pure Mathematics, finishing with ^ 

I the Difierential and Integral Calculus and a course in Astronomy. The ^ 

I text-books in use, and the time allotted to each study, will be found in ^ 

I the following schedule : ^ 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

\ First Term. — Algebra — from Quadratic Equations (Olney's complete). | 



^ Second Term. — Geometry (Olney). ^ 

I ' i 

§ SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I I 



I First Term. — Geometry — Completed. Plane Trigonometry (Greenleaf). ^ 

s ^" 

I Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry. Land Surveying, including field 



s work, mapping, etc., (Gillespie). % 

I ■ I 



I JUNIOR YEAR. | 



I First Term. — Analytical Geometry (Olney). | 

I Second Term. — Differential and Integral Calculus, with applications to | 

I questions of the General Geometry, elective (Olney). | 

I Those who do not take Calculus will take Hallam's Constitutional I 

I History of England. | 



....™ ,.... I 



§ SENIOR YEAR, g 

I 



First Term. — Mechanics (Kemper). 
Second Term. — Astronomy (Newcomb and Hoi den). 



S J.'t/"JS{/ J.Vt'1/t. i.TJ.CUll£lllHJO ^ J-VCiJ-lJpCi y . ^ 

'" •" "- ■"■■-■ I 



% ^^ 



' 



I ^ 

I V. School of Natural Science. | 

^ I 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. I 



\ y 

\ y 



I First Term.— Physiology (Martin). 



s 



I Second Term. — Zoology (Orton). Botany (Gray). | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. I 

I I 



First Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). i 

I Second Term. — Geology (Winchell's Geological Studies). 



I 

I SENIOR YEAR. i 

\ y 

\ ^ 

\ First Term. — Physics (Avery). ^ 

I Second lerm. — Physics. / 

I ^ 



I 



^///y/^/y/y/y/X/X/y/y/y/Ay/y/y/y//'/^^^^ 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 13 I 

I ■ ■■•■■■• ■ ■■• •■ I 

I VI. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles | 
^ Lettres. ^ 



§ 



^. 



I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I ' _. ._..._ i 



^ y 

I Rhetoric (Welsh) ; twice weekly. English Literature (Shaw) ; three | 

I times weekly. Rhetoric and English Literature, recite on alternate days. | 

Application of the principles of Rhetoric is made through the analysis of | 



i 

I acknowledged masters of style, and through constant practice in original | 
I composition. To the outlines of English Literature, as furnished by the 



text book, are added miscellaneous selections illustrating the progress of 




S 



§ 



« i 



;^ 5 



I SCIENTIFIC COURSE. I 

I I 

I FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCES. | 

I This course embraces the following schools : | 

I I 

I 1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

I 2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

I 3. School of Natural Sciences. | 

I 4. School of Modern Languages. | 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Politi- 



I cal Economy. I 



I 

I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

I i 

I Evidences, History, and Languages of the Bible. Moral Philosophy — | 

I scientific basis discussed and then Moral Philosophy drawn from the Bible. | 

I Old Testament studied during Sophomore year, and the New Testament in | 

I the Junior. ^ 

I i 



I 14 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. \ 

I ■■ ■■ - ■ - ! 

I II. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. i 

I i 

I The Scientific Course in this school embraces the same subjects that | 

I are given under the Classical Course with the addition of a course of ^ 

I • ^ 

I Applied Mathematics in Road and Railroad Engineering, Descriptive | 

I Geometry, Shades, Shadows and Perspective Drawing. The following ^ 

I schedule will give a connected view of the whole : 

I ^ 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. 



To enter upon the course a thorough knowledge of Algebra, Geome- 
try and Plane Trigonometry is required. 



I Fir^t Term. — Algebra — From Quadratic Equations (Olney's complete). | 

I Second Term. — Geometry (Olney). | 

I I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I i 

\ First Term.— Geometry, completed. Plane Trigonometry (Greenleaf). | 

I Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry. Land Surveying, including field- | 

I work, mapping, etc. (Gillespie). | 

I I 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I i 

\ First Term. — Analytical Geometry (Olney), Descriptive Geometry, Shades, | 

I * Shadows and Perspective Drawing. | 

^ ^ 

I Second Term. — DiflPerential and Integral Calculus (Olney), Road and Rail- | 

I road Surveying, with Leveling, Laying out Curves, Calcu | 

I lation of Excavations, Embankments, &c. (Gillespie, f 

I Henck's Field Book). I 

^ ' ^ 

I SENIOR YEAR. I 

I First Term. — Mechanics (Kemper). • | 

I Second Term. — Astronomy (Newcomb and Holden). | 

^ As it is the intention to make practical application in the field of what ^ 

^ • '^ 

I is learned in the class-room, facilities will be furnished for beginnmg a ^ 

I course in Civil Engineering. An opportunity will be offered in Sopho- ^- 

I more and Junior years to study : 



i 

I 1. Land Surveying — Embracing all that is necessary to understand ^ 

s ^ 

I the subject in its practical bearings with field work, mapping, etc. ^ 

I 2. The principles of Topographical Surveying and Drawing. | 

I 3. Levelling, Profiling, Mapping. f 

I 4. Road and Railroad Surveying — with field operations. I 

.^ Tn pnf.pr nnnn thp omirsp n thnrnno-h knnw^lpHo-p nf Alapbra. Gpome- y 



I Certificates will be given indicating the branch studied and the degree / 

I of proficiency attained. It is very desirable that the students should enter / 
I with the regular classes of the Scientific Course. / 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 15 | 

III. School of Natural Science. I 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I 
First Term.— Physiology (Martin). | 

Second Term.— Zoology (Orton). Botany (Gray). | 

i 



JUNIOR YEAR. ^ 



First Term. — Chemistry (Remsen), 
Second Term. — Geology (Winchell's Geological Studies) 



SENIOR YEAR. ^ 



First Term.. — Physics (xivery and Deschanel). Laboratory work in | 

Chemistry. | 

Second Term.— Physics. Deschanel on Electricity and Heat. | 

Physics. — In Physics the instruction comprises one whole year's work | 

I of five (5) hours a week. Avery's Elements of Physics will be the text | 

I book used till the close of the first term, and Deschanel's Natural Philoso- ^ 

'^ / 

^ phy till the close of the second term. Numerous problems are solved by | 

I the student illustrating the practical applications of the theories and laws | 

^ mentioned in the text. Reference Books : Atkinson's Ganot, Daniell, Tyn- | 

I dall, Helmholtz and Meyer. f 

I Chemistry. — In Chemistry the course comprises daily instruction in | 

I Remsen's Principles of Chemistry. Special instruction upon General / 

I Chemistry, Doctrine of Atoms, Laws of Combination, Character of Ele- | 

I ments, metallic and non metallic, of Compounds, organic and inorganic, | 

I and the solving of problems. | 

I „ Analytical Chemistry. — In Analytical Chemistry the student enters / 

I the Laboratory at the first of the year and continues in the preliminary ^ 

I work for six weeks, working not less than two hours a day. The prelim- i 

I inary work comprises the committing to memory all the analytical schemes ^ 

I and the writing of all the reactions involved therein. Each student shall ^ 

I pass a satisfactory examination before entering upon his work which shall | 

I continue till the close of the term. This course is especially adapted for | 



I those who expect to study medicine and is more extensive than is given in ^ 

I most medical schools. Special instruction will be given in Oxidation if de- | 

I sired, and a thorough explanation of equations involved therein. The | 

I cost of the Laboratory course will depend upon the prudence and economy -^ 

I of the student. A deposit of ten (10) dollars must be made by each stu- $ 

I dent before entering the Laboratory. Text-book : Prescott's and Douglas's I 

I Qualitative Analysis. Reference Books : Fresenius, Fowne, Miller's Chem- | 

I ical Physics, Roscoe and Remsen's Theoretical Chemistry. ^ 

I Physiology, Hygiene and Sanitary Science. — These studies are | 

I illustrated with an excellent skeleton, manikin and numerous fresh speci- $ 

I mens. Sanitary Science receives careful attention. Text-book : Martin. | 

^ T>^£ "r> i_~ . T\_ii J r^ J ^ 



Reference Books : Dalton and Carpenter. ^ 

I I 



if. 






y/y/y/x/y/yyy/y/y-/Ay/^/y/y/A/y/x/^/y'/x/^/y/yyx^^^ 

\ I 

I 16 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

I . . I 



s 



of the principles of human biology; second, to teach him to observe, com- 



Exercises in Grammar and Composition. 



Oral Practice, with one of Marlitt's Romances 



I I 

I Geology. — In Geology each student will be required to collect and | 

I label correctly all the minerals in the immediate vicinity. A course in | 

I Blowpipe Analysis will be offered to advanced students, and is recom- | 

I mended to all who desire a reliable knowledge of minerals. Text book : | 

I Winchell's Geological Studies. Reference Books : Lyell and Le Conte. | 

I Zoology. — In Zoology we aim first, to give the student a knowledge | 



I pare and classify for hirnself the forms of animal life about him. The ^ 

I collections of the Museum are excellently adapted for purposes of teach | 

I ing. Text-book : Orton's Comparative Zoology. | 

I Botany. — Botany begins April first and continues till the close of the | 

I session. Recitations daily. After a thorough knowledge of the text is | 

I had, the student is taught how to analyze common plants and to deter- | 

I mine their species. Each student is required to analyze, press and mount | 

I on paper twenty -five specimens at the close of the work. Text-book, Gray. | 

I I 

I IV. School of Modern Languages. | 

I FRENCH. — FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 

I FIRST YEAR. I 

I I 

^ Bocher's Otto's Grammar. | 

s ^ 

I Oral Practice, with selected readings. ^ 

^ Prose Composition. | 

s ^ 

I SECOND YEAR. | 

I Oral Practice, with Hugo's Buy Bias; Saint Beuve's Causeries du Lundi; \ 

^ Saintsbury's Primer of French Literature. \ 

I Reading at sight. | 



^ I 

I GERMAN. — FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. I 

I FIRST YEAR. | 

$ ■ ,-. ^ 

I Meisner's Grammar. i^ 

I Oral Practice, with Van der Smissen's Grimm's Mdrchen; Masius' | 

I Lesebuch, Part II. | 

I Prose Composition. | 

^ I 

I SECOND YEAR. | 

I Schiller's Wilhelm Tell | 

^ Oral T-*T'cir>ti/-»ci tuti'Ht nrto r\f TVTavliff'c! T?r>»YiQnr>oa ^ 



I Reading at sight. | 

I 



Exercises in Grammar and Composition. | 

I The aim of our instruction in French and German is to enable the ^ 

I student to speak and write these languages as well as read them. The | 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). Enghsh Literature (Shaw 
Second Term. — Rhetoric. Enghsh Literature. 



MimSTERIAL COURSE, 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 17 I 

I 

so-called "natural method" is combined with progressive study of the | 

grammars and of selections from the best writers, and with constant prac- | 

tice in composition. The classes m ake such progress in speaking as ena- | 

I bles the teacher to conduct them entirely without the use of English | 

during the second year of the course. | 

I 

V. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles | 

Lettres. I 

I 



SENIOR YEAR. § 

t 



First Term. — Metaphysics (McCosh and Bowne). History of Philosophy 

(Tennemann). Especial attention paid to the recent ad- | 
vances in Physiological Psychology. | 

Second Term.— Logic (Jevons). Consti tution of United States, and Political | 
Economy (Walker). | 



8 



FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LETTERS. § 



This course embraces the following schools: | 

1. School of Sacred Literature. I 

2. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

3. School of Greek. | 

4. School of Latin. | 

5. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

6. School of Natural Science. 

7. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles 
Lettres. 



- I 

I. School of Sacred Literature. | 

It is the purpose to make the classes in the Classical and the Minis- | 

terial courses the same in the languages, mathematics and sciences up to | 

the junior year and then the major work of the ministerial student is in | 

g studies more distinctively biblical, while the minor work is carried on in I 

I 3 I 



I 18 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. i 



I ^ 

I Latin, Mathematics, English Literature and the sciences. The work em- ^ 

I braces the following subjects : | 

I 1. Inspiration of the Scriptures (Manly). | 

I 2. Practical work in the preparation of sermons and criticism of | 

^ outlines. I 



% 

I 3. The Church : its origin, growth in officers and doctrine, and its f 

I missionary activity in ancient and modern times. | 

I 4. Pastoral work : Lecture on Administration of the Ordinances. f 

^ ^ Oricrin nf Rf. Paul's T^lniHtlpsi rnnnvl-iPorA onH TTmxreon ^ ^ 



5. Origin of St. Paul's Epistles (Conybeare and Howson). 



I 

6. Church History (Fisher). Especial attention will be paid to the ^ 

I history of the church till the Council of Nice, A. D. 325, The Rise and I 

\ Growth of the Papacy to A. D. 1073, The Reformation, and the Reasons | 

I of our own movement. I 

I 7. Rules of interpretation. Greek Exegesis of Romans and Ephe- t 

\ sians (Westcott and Hort's text). As helps the student will use Buttmann's | 

I Grammar of New Testament Greek, Thayer's Lexicon, and Hudson's | 

I Concordance. The aim will be to put the student in possession of such | 

I helps and methods as will lead to independent study. | 

I 8. Hebrew Grammar, with exercises in writing English into Hebrew, | 

I The course (two years) embraces such selections from history, prophecy | 

I and poetry of the Old Testament as will give the student a good reading | 

I knowledge of Hebrew. Delitzsch's Hebrew New Testament will be used. 'I 

I The Higher Criticism of the Old Testament as represented by Delitzsch, | 

I Graf, Kuenen, Wellhausen and others will be examined. | 

I — I 

I i 

\ II. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

"* $ 

\ One year of Study is devoted to each the Old Testament and the New. | 



The Revised Version is used. While studying the Old Testament careful 

I attention is bestowed on the Jewish Law, Messianic Prophecy, Poetry, | 

I Types and their fulfillment, and the bearing of modern discoveries in | 

I Assyria, Babylonia, and Egypt, on biblical history. In studying the New | 



^ Testament proper attention is given to biblical geography, Palestine Ex- J^ 
I ploration, Parties among the Jews in the time of Christ, manners and cus- | 
I toms, etc., in order that the student may easily understand the text of his "* 



^ English Bible. The aim is to make students as familiar with sacred history f 
I as they are with the history of their own country. | 

I 
I 



I III. School of the Greek Language. | 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. i 

I - - -- - - " : 

^ f> .7 m_ -yj- T J~ A 1 :^ "D^^l- T Tr',,^^^'^ 01^^«^ XT4r,+^^,r ^i '//. 



First Term. — Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's Greek Lessons. ^ 
I Daily exercises in writing the language with the accents 

carefully marked. 
^ Second Term.— Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. Eyffe's Short History of | 
I ' Greece. | 



% ^ 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 19 | 

I f 

k i 

\ V 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I . i 

\ First Term. — The Anabasis continued. Lucian's Dialogues. Exercises ^ 

I in writing Greek. Greek History (Cox). | 

I Second Term. — Thucydides. Homer's Iliad (Keep), three books. Prose | 

I Composition (Jones). Grecian History. | 

^ ^ 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I First Term. — Pindar (Gildersleeve). Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socra- | 



% tes. Prose Composition (Sidgwick). 

I Second Term. — Plato's Apology of Socrates, and Crito (Wagner). Demos- 



« 



I thenes's Oration on the Crown (D'Ooge). New Testament | 

I Greek once per week. | 

I I 

I ' P 

^ IV. School of Latin Language and Literature. | 

1 i 

% FRESHMAN YEAR. 8 

I i 

\ First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. | 

I Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

I Second Term. — Ca?sar's Gallic War (Greenough), Book I., with thorough | 

S' drill in Syntax. | 

I I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. ^ 

I i 

I First lerm. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic War, p 

I Books II., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catihne. Prose | 

I Composition (Jones). f 

I Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition | 

I continued (Jones). | 

I i 

% JUNIOR YEAR. f 

I i 

I First Term. — Prosody. Vergil's ^neid. Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- | 

^ ough.) History of Rome (Leighton.) Latin Synonyms | 

! ~ - " I 

I V. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

I I 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. ^ 

I . y 

I First Term. — Algebra— from Quadratic Equations (Olney's complete). | 

I Second Term. — Geometry (Olney). | 

I I 

^ SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 



I First Term — Geometry — Completed. Plane Trigonometry. 

I Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry, including field-work (Greenleaf), | 

I Land Surveying, Mapping, etc. (Gillespie). | 

I i 



<^x/x///y/////y/y/y///y/y///y/^^^ 

I 20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

I I 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

s ^ 

^ Second Term.— Astronomy (Lectures.) I 

— 

I V. School of Natural Sciences. | 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I First Term. — Physiology C Martin). Botany (Gray). | 

I Second Term.— Zoology (Orton). | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

^ ' I 

I First Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). | 



^ Second Term. — Geology (Winchell's Geological Studies). 

I 



I ^ 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I First Term. — Physics (Avery). | 

I Second Term. — Physics (Avery). | 

I VI. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles | 
I Lettres 



^ 



I JUNIOR YEAR. * | 



^ 



I JUNIOR YEAR. * | 

I First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature (Shaw). | 

I Second Term. — Rhetoric. English Literature. | 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I First Term. — Metaphysics (McCosh and Bowne). History of Philosophy | 

I (Tennemann). |' 

I Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Constitution of United States, and Political | 



Economy (Walker). 



$ §• 

' 



§ ^ 



I COURSE FOR LADIES. | 

I I 

I FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. | 

I This course embraces the following schools: | 

I 1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

I 2. School of the Latin Language. | 

I 3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

I 4. School of Natural Sciences. | 

I 5. School of Modern Languages. | 



I 6. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Polit- | 

I ical Economy. 



s --- I 

I I 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 21 I 

1 I 

^ I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. i 

I ^ 

f (Same as in Classical Course). | 

I II. School of the Latin Language and Literature. | 

i ^ 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

p i^irsi 2>rm. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. | 

I Daily Exercises in writing English into Latin. ^ 

I Second Term. — Csesar's Gallic War (Greenongh), Book I, with thorough | 

^ drill in Syntax. | 

i SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

^ y 

y y 

I i^irsi Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. C?esar's Gallic War, ^ 

I Books II, III, VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. Prose | 

I Composition (Jones). | 

I Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition | 

^ continued (Jones). f 

I JUNIOR YEAR. I 

y y 

f i^irsi Term. — Prosody. Virgil's ^neid, Books I, II, IV, VI (Greenough). ^ 

I History of Rome (Leighton). Latin Synonyms (Shumway). | 

I Second Term. — Prosody. Select Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Hor- | 

f ace (Macleane). Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid). | 

y y 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

I i^irsi Term. — The Germania of Tacitus. I 

^ ^ , _ ^. , ^ .. _,. . ^ .. ^. 



^ Second Term. — Cicero's Letters. Pliny's Letters. Antiquities (Wilkins) 

I Latin Literature (Bender). | 

I III. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

y y 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. p 

y 

f ii^irs^ Term. — Geometry — Completed. Plane Trigonometry. 



^ First Term. — Algebra — from Quadratic Equations (Olney's complete.) 
I Second Term. — Geometry (Olney). 



^ Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry (Greenleaf ). 



SENIOR YEAR. 



I 



I Second Term. — Astronomy (Lectures). 



y \ 

I 22 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

> •..--..■..■■..■...•...•..•-..■...•..■-..--..-...-..--..-•..........■..-..■-.■-..--..•..-..-..••..-...■..■•.....-...■-. .-^ V 

^ - ^ 

I IV. School of Natural Science. I 

i \ 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I Second Term. — Botany (Gray). | 

^ JUNIOR YEAR. ' | 

y \ 

I First Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). | 

I Second Term. — Physics. | 

i I 

- 



I V. School of Modern Languages. | 



I FRENCH. — FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 



I FIRST YEAR. | 

y N 

I Bocher's Otto's Grammar. | 

I Oral Practice, with selected readings. | 

^ Prose Composition. | 

I I 



I SECOND YEAR. • | 

I Oral Practice, with Hugo's Ruy Bias; Saint Beuve's Causeries du Lundi; \ 

I Saintsbury's Primer of French Literature. \ 

I Reading at sight. | 

I Exercises in Grammar and Composition. | 

I GERMAN. — FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 

I FIRST YEAR. | 

^ Meisner's Grammar. | 

I Oral Practice, with Van der Smissen's Grimm's Marchen ; Masius' | i 

i Lesehuch, Part II. | 

y % 

^ Prose Composition. ^ 

I I 

I SECOND YEAR. | 

I Schiller's Wilhelm Tell. | 

I Oral Practice, with one of Marlitt's Romances. I 

y % 

I Reading at sight. ^ 

Exercises in Grammar and Composition. | 



f — 

^ VI. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles | 

I Lettres. I 

I 

g JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

I First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature. ^ 

I Second Term. — Rhetoric. English Literature. I 

i I 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

I First Term. — Metaphysics (McCosh and Bowne). History of Philosophy ^ 

I (Tennemann). | 

I Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Constitution of the United States. Political | 

I Economy (Walker). | 



^//yy/yyy/y/y/y///////j/y/y/y/y^^^^ 

I , I 

I General Ineormation. 

I ^ I 

I 

^ ci-ri I A-riOM ^ 



I SITUATION. i 

I P 

I -^n ETHANY COLLEGE is situated in the Panhandle of | 

I ZL/ West Virginia, sixteen miles north of Wheeling. The | 

I railroad stations for Bethany are Brilliant, on the Cleveland | 

I and Pittsburgh Railroad (river division), and Wellsburg, on | 

I the Wheeling branch of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. | 

I Louis Railway. From these stations a daily stage is run to ^ 

I Bethany by William Rodgers, who will give prompt attention | 

I to any orders addressed to him, Wellsburg, W. Va., or address | 

I W. Cowans, Bethany, W. Va. | 

I • ^ 

I TERMS, VACATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS. | 

I I 

I The College Year consists of two terms, four and a half | 

I months each. It begins on the last Monday in September and | 

I ends on the third Thursday in June. In this year there are | 

I two examinations in each class — one in January and the final | 

I examination in June. I 

\ It is very desirable that applicants for Matriculation present | 

I themselves at the beginning of the session, that there may be | 

I a convenient arrangement of the classes in the various Depart- | 



I ments or Schools. Students, however, can enter conveniently 
at the commencement of the second term, 
the intermediate examination in January. 



i i 



I NECESSARY EXPENSES. I 

I Tuition for forty weeks at $1.00, - - $40.00 | 

I Matriculation fee, for coal, janitor, etc., - 10,00 | 



Furnished room, with care of room, fuel, etc. - 25.00 | 

I Table board, forty weeks, at $2.00, - - 80.00 | 

I Washing, 10.00 | 

^ ^ 

I $165.00 i 

I GRATUITOUS INSTRUCTION. i 

\ Indigent and pious young men in any of the religious | 

I denominations, who wish to prepare for the ministry, shall, on | 

Wy/^/y/^/^/y/////x/y/y/////yyy/yyy/^^^ 



I 24 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. i 

^ ' ' ' " ' ' ' ' ' ' ' " " "' "' "■"■'"• "■ ■--■----■-•■----•-•■------■ I 

I paying the matriculation fee, be admitted into any of the j 
I courses at Bethany College at one-half the regular rates of | 
I tuition. I 

I All applicants for this privilege will be required to present i 
I to the Faculty satisfactory written recommendations from their | 
I respective congregations, and from well known ministers of | 
I the gospel, certifying that they come under the above condi- | 
I tions, in such form as shall be prescribed by the Faculty. They | 
I shall also be required to sign a promissory note to pay the full | 
I charge for tuition five years from their withdrawal from the | 
I (!!ollege, provided they do not, in the meantime, devote them- | 
I selves to the work of the Ministry. But this provision for | 
I reduction of tuition shall not extend, in any case, beyond one | 
I session, except upon the recommendation of the Faculty, and | 
I the approval of the Board. | 

I The sons of regular Ministers of the Gospel of all denomina- | 
I tions shall be admitted to all classes and privileges of the i 
I College, upon payment of matriculation fee and one-half the | 
I regular charges for tuition. f 

I All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be | 
I required to give instruction in the Primary Classes. 



I CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. I 

I 

tion from Australia, and exchanges with other sections of the ^ 



1st. The Natural History Cabinet contains most of the Fauna, | 
Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable coUec- | 



I country. Also a fine Herbarium of native plants, with many ^ 
I rare ones from other parts of the world. ^ 

2d. The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several | 
thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all parts of | 



I the world. | 

I The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains rare and | 



^^ valuable collections. | 

I APPARATUS. I 



I The Philosophical apparatus of t4ie College is of the most ^ 
I elegant and approved kinds and affords the amplest facilities / 



I for the thorough illustration of physical principles. I 

I The Chemical laboratory is fully provided with all the appa- / 

I ratus and chemicals needed in the courses offered. ^ 

^ '^ 



I I 

" CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 25 | 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. | 

. I 

There are in connection with the College, two Literary | 

I Societies. Their Halls, recently destroyed by fire, have been | 

replaced by others, beautifully finished and appropriately fur- | 

I nished. Valuable libraries have also been received by the | 

societies, through the munificence of friends, to replace those | 

that were lost. | 

Every facility is afforded by the authorities of the Instiiu- | 

tion for increasing the accommodations and adding to the use- | 

fulness of these valuable auxiliaries to the Institution. $ 

I 

REPORTS. i 

i 



Monthly Reports will be addressed by the Secretary of the 
Faculty to the parent or guardian of each student, in which 
I are stated his attention in class, supposed industry, proficiency 
in each of his studies, absence from lectures and recitations, 
and his general deportment, with such other information as it 
may be necessary to communicate. | 



READING ROOM. ♦ | 



During the year the students have maintained a Reading | 
Room at small expense, and thus had access to the best period- | 
ical literature in the country. f 



I 

TERMS OF GRADUATION. | 

DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. $ 



I A student may graduate in any school singly. To obtain | 

I the degree of Graduate in any school, it is required of every | 

I candidate : | 

I 1. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College at | 

I least one session, and shall have studied in the College the | 

I entire Senior year of the school. 2. That within one month | 

I from the beginning of the session, he shall have made known | 

I to the professor of the school his intention of graduating. 3. | 

I That he stand a satisfactory examination on all the prescribed | 



I studies of the school. He shall then be entitled to a Certificate | 
I of Graduation free, signed bv the President and Professor. | 

I 4 I 



I 26 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

I I 

I DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF SCIENCES, AND | 

§ ^ 

I BACHELOR OF LETTERS. | 

I To receive the Beg^ree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, \ 

I Bachelor of Letters and Bachelor of Philosophy, the candidate I 

I must have graduated and received his certificates in the several | 

I schools embraced in the respective courses. He must also have $ 

I faithfully observed all the other laws and regulations of the $ 

I College. He will then receive the Degree and Diploma. A fee $ 

I of t^n dollars will be charged for the diploma. Five dollars to | 

I ministerial students. | 

I A student who has received a diploma in any course, in order | 

I to obtain a diploma in any other course, shall take up the addi- | 

I tionalcertificateor certificates and pay ((en do/Zars for the diploma. | 

I The graduates in the several courses enjoy equally all the f 

I privileges, rights and honors of the College. f 

I i 

I THE master's DEGREE IN COURSE. | 

^ In order to obtain the Regular Degree of Master of Arts, the | 



I following conditions are required : 1. The attainment of the | 
^ Degree of Bachelor in the course. 2. The actual attendance in f 



I the College thelreafter for one session and the study of three p 

I Elective studies, to be selected by the candidate with the con- | 

I sent of the Faculty. 3. An approved examination of selected | 

I studies. A fee of ten dollars will be charged for the diploma. | 

I HONORARY MASTER'S DEGREE. | 

I A Bachelor of three years' standing in any one of the courses | 

I may receive the Honorary Degree of Master in that course ; pro- | 

I ' 

, . . ... , ._.,. ..._^_. .._.. . 



vided he shall in the interval have maintained an exemplary | 

character, and pursued studies relating to the degree. Candi- | 

dates for this degree should apply to the President or Secretary | 

I of the Faculty before the annual meeting of the Board of | 



I Trustees. | 

I No application for the degree of A.M. will be entertained | 

I unless accompanied by the fee of ten dollars, which will be re- | 

I turned in case the fee is not conferred. f 

I i 

I THE COLLEGIAN I 

I i 

I During the college year the students have published a | 

I monthly journal entitled The Collegian. It has attained high ; 

I i 






2 n A T A T nn.Tj 17 nw t^ttttj at^v nm t t^htt 97 ^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 27 | 






I rank as a college paper, and affords excellent means for devel- 
oping the literary talent of the students. It deserves a heartier 
P support on the part of the Alumni and friends of the college. 



I ACCOMMODATIONS. 

I . ' I 

I Students are permitted to select their own places of boarding, | 

I subject in all cases to the supervision of the Faculty. The | 

I facilities for obtaining boarding in private families have been | 

I much increased, and many students can be accommodated in | 

I this way. Every attention will be paid to the health and | 

I comfort of the students, I 

I To accommodate students who desire to board themselves, | 

I arrangements have been made to supply a number of unfur- | 

I nished rooms at a very moderate rent. Application for these | 

I should be made at an early date, and must be accompanied by | 

I satisfactory testimonials of character. | 

I I 

i ^ I 



I 28 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



CALENDAR 

FOR 1888-89. 



I Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and 
I Wednesday, . . before the third Thursday in June 

I Annual Commencement, . on the third Thursday in June 

I Session begins, .... September 24 

I Christmas recess begins at noon, . . December 21 

I Christmas recess ends, .... January 4 

I First term ends, ..... January 31 

I Second term begins, .... February 1 

I Anniversary of Neotrophian Society, . , November 5 

I 

I Anniversary of the American Literarv Institute, November 10 

I Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, . February 22 

I Annual Exhibition of the Neotrophian Society, 

I Evening before Commencement 

I Annual Exhibition of the American Literary Society, 

I Evening of Commencement 

I 

I Class Day, , . Wednesday before Commencement 



I 



I 



12? ;^^ ^s^b ^^ ^^^b ;li^ cs^5? ^ 






CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 




ethany # (College, 



FOR THE 






Ending June 20, 1889. 



WHEELING: 

DAILY INTELLIGENCER STEAM BOOK AND JOB PRESS. 



1889. 




^ 



^©xS^<SKS>^©^<S><S>•:3^iS><S^iS>^S><S>^S>^S>^S^iS^<©^^S^■iS>^S>^S><©^^S^JS> 






W. H. WOOLERY, A.M., LL.D., President, 

Professor of Mental Science and Hebrew. 



A. C. PENDLETON, A.M., ' 

Professor of English Literature and Modern Languages. 



OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics, Astronomy and Civil Engineering. 



FRANK M. BOWLING, A.M., 

Professor of Latin Language and Literature, Rhetoric and Philology. 



LEWIS CASS WOOLERY, A.M., 

Professor of Greek Language and Literature and Political Economy. 



S. ROGERS, B.S., 

Professor of Natural Sciences. 



SHERMAN KIRK, 

Adjunct Professor. 



MISS FLORA D. PRICE, 

Teacher of Music. 



MISS ELEANOR TURNER, 

Teacher of Drawing and Painting. 



I 



y^y//y////y/y/y/x///j//yA'y^^^ 



im. 




m 






^35 



^^/////////x/y///x///y//y/yy^^^^ 



.^ 



CATALOGUE 



I r" ATA C^CW tr I 



I 

I OF THE P 

I OFFICERS AND STUDENTS j 

I " i 

(Bethany College,! 



FOK THE 



5^ ^ 

I I 



I FORTY-EIGHTH SESSION, 



I ENDING JUNE 20, 1889. | 

I i 



I WITH THE 2 

I i 

I f 

^ I 



FOR 1889-90. 



I Open to Male and Female on Equal Terms. | 

1 - I 



■ 

I BETHANY, WEST YIRGINIA. | 

I 1889. I 



I i 



I 



I 



iifi if Ifrislfi 



W. K. Pendleton, 

j. w. mulholland, 

w. f. cowden, . 

Hon. Geo. H. Anderson, 

Hon. R. M. Bishop, . 

H, K. Pendleton, 

A. W. Campbell, 

J. E. Curtis, . ■ . 

Dr. J. E. Whitsett, 

R. MOFFETT, 

P. S. Fall, 
Alex. Campbell, . 
Charles Shields, 
L. Bacon, . . 

Geo. T. Oliver, 
C. B. Turner, 
J. H. Jones, 
Russell Errett, 
Wt C. Lyne, 
Thomas W. Phillips, 
Dr. Roger Williams, 
John C. Palmer, . 
E. J. Gantz, 
A. McLean, 
R. S. Latimer, 
George Darsie, 
L M. Ridge, 
C. H. Beall, 
M. M. Cochran, 
Oliver Marshall, 



Bethany, W. Va. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Hazel wood. Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Alliance, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Independence, Pa. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W.Va. 



^•xx>i:N*i^iXX^>ixx^^xx?^?^x^^XNSX^<^^x^^^iXXx^^xx^ 



'\'//yy/jyy//yjyy/y///////y///y/y/y^^^ 

I I 



OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, A.M , 



^ 



% 



I i 



I W. H. WOOLERY, A.M., LL.D., President, | 

^ And Professor of Mental Science and Hebrew. | 

I i 

I J. M. TRIBLE, Vice President, I 

^ And Professor of New Testament Literature. 2 

^ % 

I I 

I A. C. PENDLETON, A.M., I 

I i 

^ Professor of English Literature and Modern Languages. ^ 



I 

^ Professor of Mathematics, Astronomy, and Civil Engineering. | 

I i 

I FRANK M. DOVVLTNG, A.M., I 

I I 

^ Professor of Latin Language and Literature, Rhetoric, and Philology. ^ 

\ . 

I LEWIS CASS WOOLERY, A.M., | 

I I 

I Professor of Greek Language and Literature, and Political Economy. ^ 

I - I 

I HUNTER PENDLETON. A.M., Ph. D., I 

I 'I 

§ Professor of Natural Sciences. ^. 

I - I 

I MISS ELEANOR TURNER, I 

I I 

^ Teacher of Drawing and Painting. ^ 

I — j 

I TEACHER OP MUSIC (TO BE SUPPLIED). | 



«SNS!^^?«tf\;?^OS>«C?i^?«*XXX^S\^OiXi?®iX?®^ 



ALEX. CAMPBELL. 
W. K. PENDLETON. 
J. E. CURTIS. 



i in 



ill 



C. H BEALL. 
C. B. TURNER. 



J. C, PALMER, Treasurer. 



A. C. PENDLETON, 
Librarian and Skcretary op the Board of Trustees. 



P. M. DOWLING, Secretary of thk Faculty. 



HUNTER PENDLETON, Curator of the Museum. 



S. M. cooper, Financfal Agent. 
H. H. RUMBLE, Associate Agent. 



y^<f/y/y/y/x/j///y///////////y/^^^^ 



—^^^^^^^^^^ 



% 



Addy, W. L., 
Addy, C. D., 

Barclay, J. J., 
Beam, A. R., 
Beam, J. K., 
Bell, A. S., 
Berry, P. A., 
Bentley, W. p., 
Black, E. R., 
Black, G. 0., 
Brinton, C. S., 
Baker, Clara, . 

Chapman, F, C, 
Clark, E. S., 
Cox, Anna L., 
Critchfield, C. v., 
Camp, Emma, . 
Camp, George, 
Clay, W. P., . 
Cutler, R. A., 
Campbell, Alice, 
Cunningham, J. E., 
Chapline, Bessie, 
Curtis, Rossie, . 
Campbell, Wm., 
Campbell, J. E.. 
Craig, J. H., 
Cameron, L. J.,j 
Craft, Kate, . 
Cooper, Dora, 

Dyer, Nellie R., 
DoAK, Franklin, 
Davis, C. B., . 



L 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Wheeler's Station, Ala. 
Latrobe, Pa. 
Piotsburgh, Pa. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
Howard, Ohio. 
Wilmington, Ohio. 
Ontario, Canada. 
Ontario, Canada. 
Camp Hill, Pa. 
Union Station, Ohio. 

Holliday's Cove, W. Va. 
Falmouth, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 
Marion, Ohio. 
Marion, Ohio. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Richmond, Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
New Lisbon, Ohio. 
Millersburg, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
St. Louisville, Ohio. 

PittsbuTgh, Pa. 
West Union, W. Va. 
Jeromeville, W. Va. 



i 6 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 



Darsie, George, Jr., 
Dehner, Carl, 

Freeman, T. S. K., 
Ferrall, B. S., 
FiNDLEY, J. A., . 

Gans, Nellie, . 
Gordon, Mrs. E. W., 
Gillespie, Barnes, 
Gans, H. B., 
Gordon, E. W., 

Harris, Sallie J., 
Harris, Allan, 
Harris, Alfred, 
Hedgepeth, Victor, 
Hoffman, W. 0., 
Hill, C. A., 
Hopkins, J. A., . 
Hankins, Geo. R., . 
Hoover, H. W., . 
Hopple, Richard B., 
Hukill, J. W., . 
Haley, Harry, 
Hupp, John, 
Haep, W. a., . 

Israel, R. S., 

Johnson, A. S., 
Jenkins, B. A., . 

Kinney, Ellie, 
Kreidler, Chas. M., 
Keene, C. M., . 
Kelley, p. Beatrice, 



California, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

Nova Scoiia. 
Angola, Ind. 

Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Tazewell C. H., Va. 
Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Kennon, Ohio. 
St. Louisville, Ohio. 
Glen Easton, W. Va. 
Union City, Ind. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Milton Center, Ohio. 
Bellaire, Ohio. 
Massillon, Ohio. 
Selkirk, Ont., Canada. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Logansport, Ind. 

Morristown, Ohio. 

Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Mt. Healthy, Ohio. 
W. Beaver Creek,' Md. 
Allegan, Mich. 
Portland, Ohio. 



Ijvsey, J. H. . 
LOVETT, E. 0., 
LowRY, Chas. E., 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Shreve, Ohio. 
Gibson City, Illinois. 



YAy///y/y/y///y///Ay/y/A<////y/^^^ 



^/y/////^///y/y//y//x///////Ay/x/^^^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



7 ^ 



Lewis, Daisy E., 
Lyon, Emma A., 

McGiLL, S. S., . . 
Miller, E. 0., 
Miller, Frank, 
Miller, J. H., 
Miller, Minnie, 
Mendel, Nellie C, 
Mendel, Mamie K., 
Mason, Grace E., . 

MUCKLEY, E. S., 

Mercer, L. L, 
Moore, Melancthon, . 
Moore, J. B., . 
McCrory, Harry, 

NicHOL, Anna M., . 
NiCHOL, Jennie, 

Oram, W. G., . 
Oram, Zinnia, 
Owingh, C. C, 

Phillips, A. C, . 
Phillips, N. W., 
Phillips, Ettie L , 
Phipps, 0. H., 
Phipps, O. G.. . 
Phipps, H. D., 
Prewitt, Edward, 
Pendleton, Dwight L., 



Bethany, W. Va. 
Washington, Pa. 

Bethany, W. Va. 
Rocky Fork, Ohio. 
Rocky Fork, Ohio. 
Rocky Fork, Ohio. 
Rocky Fork, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Bowling Green, Ohio. 
Beallsville, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Connellsville, Pa. 

Washington, Pa. 
Washington, Pa. 

Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Holliday's Cove, W. Va. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Library, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Paris, Texas. 
Paris, Texas. 
Paris, Texas. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Eustis, Florida. 



rodgers, a. e., 

Scott, Raymond G., 
Scott, Oreon E., 
Shrontz, Cora B,, 
Shrontz, Ella, 
SwiTZER, Wm. a.. 
Swart, W. M., 
Silver, Ettie, 



Coon Island, Pa. 

McClellandtown, Pa. 
McClellandtown, Pa. 
Lone Pine, Pa. 
Lone Pine, Pa, 
Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 
Lone Pine, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 



^■XXXNS^?««««««^>»iXXN^»i>iX^^N^^X^iXN:?»CX^^ 



^XXXNS\^\^>iX^>iXXXXX>NiXXXXXXX>i>iN^>i^^ 



I 8 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE, 



Shriver, K. J., . 
Smith, J. B., . 
Shrontz, W. p., 
Stewart, Guelph, 
Strickling, J. H., 

Taylor, A. H., 
Talmage, H. W., 
Taylor, Jennie, 
Taylor, Ella, . 
Taylor, C. W., 

WOOLERY, KiRBY S-, . 

Woolery, J. F., 
Warnock, J. S., . 
Wright, Sophie C , 

WiNBIGLER, W. W., 

Welbourne, 0. C, 
Wells, Daisy M., 
Wilson, Allen, 

Wright, W.J 

Warren, W. R., 
White, W. B., . . . 
Will, H. G., , . 
Wayman, J. E., . 
Wilson, A. J. P., 

ViVION, LOULA, . . 

Zeigler, Clarence, 

Number of Students, 



Bethany, W. Va. 
Smithfield, Ohio. 
Washington, Pa. 
Ontario, Canada. 
West Union, W. Va. 

Wheeling, W. Va. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Derby, Ohio. 
Mt. Sterling, Ohio. 
Derby, Ohio. 

Antioch Mills, Ky. 
Antioch Mills, Ky. 
Elyria, Ohio. 
Buthany, Ohio. 
Lake Fork, Ohio. 
Union City, Ind. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
Emporia Kansas. 
Sharon, Pa. 
Higginsville, Mo. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Glade, Pa. 

Glen Easton, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

Higginsville, Mo. 

Baltimore, Md. 

129, 



^^^vxxxx?«xxxxxxx^^i«^ix^J^ixx^:?«li^s^»»««^^^ 






^ 



S 



I BACHELORS OF ARTS. | 

I I 

I Warren, W. R., . . . Missouri. I 

I ? 

I Mendel, Nellie C. . . . West Virginia. | 

I Strickling, J. H., . . . West Virginia. | 

I I 

I BACHELORS OF LETTERS. J 



I Black, E. R., . . . . Canada. ^ 

I Talmage, H. W., . . . Pennsvlv;mia. i 

i 



% Hopkins, J. A., . . . Ohio. 

I Philips, A. C, . . . Pennsylvania. ^ 

I Freeman, T. S. K., ' . . . Nova Scotia. | 



I BACHELORS OF SCIENCE. | 

I ^ 

I Wilson, A. J. P., . . West Virginia. | 

I Camfron, L. J., . . . . Ohio. | 

I Addy, W. L., . . Pennsylvania. I 

I Bell, A. S., . . . . West Virginia. $ 

I " BACHELORS OF PHILOSOPHY. I 

I I 

I Cox, Anna L., . . . West Virginia. | 



I Lewis, Daisy E., . . . West Virginia. | 



I MASTERS OF ARTS. f 



I Woolery, J. F., . . . Kentucky. f 

I Freeman, T. S. K., . . . Nova Scotia. | 



I $ 

I Whole number Bachelors of Arts, . . 531 | 

5s CL LL LL n _• OCT % 



U U 



S; 4( U (( 



I ' ^ 



Science, . . 87 | 

Letters, . 59 



I 

I '' " " Philosophy, . 7 | 

I ^ 



I Tatal Alumni, ' .... 684 5, 

I 2 I 

^////y/yy/y/y/z/Ay/y/y/y/^/y/Ay/y/y^^^ 



I I 



% 



^ i 

I I 

I Appeals to its friends for patronage, and presents the following advantages : | 

I ]. The healthfulness of the location. It is in the midst of an elevated | 

I region where there is pure air, fine water, and perfect exemption from mal- | 

I aria and intermittent, congestive and malignant fevers so prevalent in some | 

I parts of the country. ^ 

I 2. The College has a large and commodious building, and is not there- | 

s ^ 

I fore hampered for room, either for class work or for its societies. | 

I 3. The students are for the most part not mere hoy^, but young men, | 

I old enough to have formed their purposes and chosen their callings for life, | 

I and they bend all their energies to make study successful. The work in | 

I the class room is as vigorous as it can be made, and this is supplemented | 

I by exercises in the literary societies of a very high order. The aim is to | 

I turn out men as graduates who can think for themselves. | 

I 4. Bethany has a large and learned body of Alumni. Many of these | 

I have become distinguished in the editorial chair, on the bench, at the bar | 

\ in the halls of legislation, at the professor's desk, and in the pulpit. The | 

I student is admitted to this reputation already achieved for him, as soon as | 

I he completes his college course, and it is worth a great deal to him. 



I 

s % 






RULES OF ENTRANCE. ' i 



JS 



^ Students desiring to enter any class in the College must first give evi- | 

I dence of their being prepared for the work of that class. Any student | 

I found to be working at a disadvantage to himself, through inadequate | 

I preparation for the class to which he has been admitted, will be advised to | 

I enter lower. | 



1^ 

I Every candidate for matriculation will be required to furnish to the | 

I presiding officer suitable testimonials of good moral character. Before p 

I matriculation it is further required that the subjoined regulations and rules | 

^ of conduct be read ; it is required : p 

I 1. That each student shall, as soon as possible, and with the approval | 

^'y/////y/y/y////y////y/jr////^^^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 11 I 



of the Faculty, select from the several schools a course of three daily recita- 



I 

I tions, or the equivalent thereof, unless, upon the request of parent or 

I guardian, or for other good cause shown, he be exempted from this rule. 
I 2. That having entered any class, he shall not leave such without per- 

^ mission from, the Faculty. | 

I 3. That he shall punctually attend recitations, examinations and all | 

I other exercises of the College, and in a satisfactory manner, account to the | 

^ proper officer for any delinquincy on his part. | 

I 4. That he shall at once deliver into the keeping of the Faculty any | 

I y 

^ deadly weapon that may be in his possession, and shall neither keep nor | 

I use any such during his connection with the institution. | 

I 5. That he shall neither introduce within the precincts of the College | 

^ nor use elsewhere, any intoxicating beverage. | 

^ 6. That he shall abstain from gambling of all kinds. | 

I ^ 

^ 7. That he shall not go beyond the immediate precincts of the College p 

^ without permission from some member of the Faculty, nor leave until reg- | 

^ ularly dismissed at the close of the session. | 

^ ^ 

I 8. That he shall not be noisy, or play in or about the College building | 



during the hours appointed for recitation. 



I 9. That he shall not trespass upon premises of any person, or in any | 

I way injure the property of the institution. | 

I It is further expected and desired that the students attend public wor- | 



ship every Lord's day, abstain from profanity, and in general from what 



discipline may dissolve a student's connection with the institution. 

One-half the expenses of the College year must be paid at the opening 
of the first term, the other half at the opening of the second term. The 



1^ 

I ever is inconsistent with good taste, good order and good morals. ^ 

I Any material infringement of the preceding regulations and code of ^ 

^ Hispinlinft mnv Hissolvfi a. stn^lpnt's fonnpp.tion with thft institution. | 



\ of the first term, the other half at the opening of the second term. The | 

I matriculation fee must be paid by all, even by those who receive free tui- | 

I tion, invariably in advance. | 

I .^ 

I I 

I I 

I I 

I I 

I I 



I 12 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

I ................................ ................................... ....... I 



^ 



s - ^ 



Bethany College has four separate courses: The Classical, 

I Scientific, Ministerial and Ladies', conferring respectively the | 

I degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, Bachelor of I 

I Letters, and Bachelor of Philosophy. | 

^ 1^ 







s 



I CLASSICAL COURSE. . $ 

k If 

I FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS. | 

^ . -9 

I This course embraces the following schools, viz: I 

I 1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 



\ O G^V./^r^l n.^ fV.« riv,^^!. Fo^^,-.^^^ ^ 



2. School of the Greek Language. 
I 3. School of the Latin Language and Literature. | 

I 4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

I 5. School of Natural Science. I 

I 6. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles \ 



I Lettres. 

% I 



I I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. g 

I In this School the Evidences, History and Languages of the Bible are | 

I taught. Moral Philosophy is drawn from the Bible itself. Every student ^ 
I in the College studies the English Bible during the Sophomore and Junior | 
I years. A thorough study is made of the Jewish Law, and recent researches | 
I in Egypt and Assyria bearing on the Bible history are pointed out. In the | 
I Junior year the historical books of the New Testament with the purpose | 
I of each Epistle are carefully studied. ^ 

I — i 

I II. School of the Greek Language. I 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

> y 

I Fvni Term. — Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's First Lessons. ^ 

I Daily exercises in writing the language with the accents | 

I carefully marked. ^ 

I Second Term. — Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. Fyflfe's Short History of | 

I Greece. ^ 

I I 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 13 I 

•■•■■■•■■-■■■■■■■•■•■•■•■-■■■■■■■■■••■■■■■•■■■■--■•■■--•■■■-■-^ 

I I 

^ SOPHOMORE YEAR. g 

I i 

I i^tVs^ Term. — The Anabasis continued. Lucian's Dialogues. Exercises f 

I in writing Greek. Grecian History (Cox). | 

I Second Term. — Thucydides. Homer's Iliad (Keep), three books. Prose | 

I Composition (Jones). Grecian History. * | 

I , JUNIOR YEAR. ^ 

I ' $ 

I First Term. — Pindar (Gildersleeve). Xenophon's Memorabiha of Socra f 

I tes. Prose Composition (Sidgwick). f 

^ Second Term. — Plato's Apology and Crito (Wagner). Demosthenes Ora- | 



tion on the Crown (D'Ooge). New Testament Greek once 



I per week. | 

I $ 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 



I First Term. — Sophocles — Oildipus Tyrannus (White), or Antigone. | 

I Second Term. — Greek of Church Fathers. Lectures on Greek Civilization. | 

1 - I 



I LATIN. 



I The Instruction in this department has four distinct ends in view. ^ 

I First. In the Freshman and Sophomore years the aim is to give a | 

I thorough knowledge of forms and syntax. From the beginning the study | 

I of the grammar is accompanied with exercises in translating English into f 

I Latin and Latin into English. The translations of the texts used in these ^ 

I two years is conducted in such a way as to rivet in the mind the principles | 

^^ of Latin Grammar. I 

^ / 

I Second. Junior and Senior years are devoted to a general study of | 

I Roman Literature At the end of the course a text book by Bender is | 

I used. Constant attention is called to the style of writers, the philosophies ^ 

^ _. .,_..,^ , ., i 



I of their day, the political condition out of which the literature sprang 
I The students are required to prepare and read criticisms and theses on such | 





I themes as will awaken interest and stimulate to original, independent 

^ research. | 

I Third. From a grammatical point of view the Latin language in com- ^ 

I parison with all other European languages has been termed a "perfectly | 

I organized type." It is the best source of general, fundamental, compre | 

I hensive linguistic principles. This position of the Latin language is turned | 

I to good account in throwing light upon our own. The instruction given | 

I throughout the course is summed up at the close in a series of lectures on | 

I 'Comparative Latin**and English Grammar." | 

I Fourth. The recitations are so conducted as to make them an aid to | 



English Composition and Ehetoric. Students are frequently required to ^ 

I hand in on paper and write on the board the translation of the text. The | 

I paragraphing, punctuation, diction and arrangement of the English is crit- | 

I icised by students and teacher. | 

I I 



I 14 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

I--- ■ - ■ ■■ ■■ 

I III. School of Latin Language and Literature. | 

I I 

P FRESHMAN YEAR. | 



First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. | 

^ Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

I Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Greenough). Book I., with thorough | 

I drill in Syntax. | 

I I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. • | 

I ^ 

^ First Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic War, | 

I Books IL, III., VT. Sallust'sConspiiacyof Cataline. Prose | 

^ Composition (Jones). | 

I Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition | 

i continued (Jones). I 

I ^ 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

^ First Term.— Prosody. Virgil's ^neid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- | 

I ough). History of Rome (Leighton). Latin Synonyms | 



(Shumway). 



I Second Term, — Prosody. Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Horace | 

I (Macleane). Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid). | 

I SENIOR YEAR. I 

^ First Term. — The Ger mania of Tacitus (Church). 



I Second Term. — Cicero's Letters. Pliny's Letters. Antiquities (Wilkins). | 
^ Latin Literature (Bender). Lectures on Latin of Middle | 

Ages. I 



g 

3 § 



9 ^ 

2 S 



IV. School of Matiiematics and Astronomy. 

p This school embraces a course of Pure and Applied Mathematics as | 

I given in the following schedule. The text books used are indicated in the | 
I parenthesis. | 

FRESHMAN YEAR. | 



I 1 

I First Term. — Algebra — from Quadratic Equations (Olney's complete). | 



^ Second Term. — Plane Geometry (Olney). 






S SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

^ First Term. — Solid Geometry (Olney). Plane Trigonometry (Oliver, Wait | 

I & Jones). I 

I Second Term — Spherical Trigonometry (0. W. J.). Land Surveying (Gil- | 

i lespie). I 

g JUNIOR YEAR. | 

y % 

I First Term. — General Geometry, Differential Calculus (Olney). | 

I Second Term.. — Integral Calculus. Calculus applied to General Geometry | 

I 



s 



(Olney). 



iS 



I The Calculus is optional in this course. | 



^/////y/y/xz/yAy/y/AY/A^/yx/x/^^^ 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 15 | 

I I 

^ SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

^ First Term. — Mechanics (Kemper). | 

I Second Term. — Astronomy (Young), | 

I V. School of Natural Science. | 

I I 

S SOPHOMORE YEAR. S 

I I 

I First Term. — Physiology (Martin). | 

I Second Term. — Zoology (Orton). Botany (Gray). | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 



I First Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). 

Second Temi. — Geology Winchell s Geological Studies. 



I ...»„„. I 

I I 

|. First Term. — Physics (Avery). ^ 

I Second Term.— Physics. | 

I - ■ i 

I VI. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and | 

I Belles Lettres. I 

I I 

I Rhetoric and English Literature, recite on alternate days. Application | 

^ of the principles of Rhetoric is made through the analysis of acknowledged | 

I masters of style, and through constant practice in original composition. | 

I To the outlines of English Literature, as furnished by the text book, are | 

I added miscellaneous selections illustrating the progress of the language and | 

I literature from the tenth century to the present. In teaching history the | 

I method is not to commit to memory isolated facts, but to bring out the con- | 

I nection of events showing the progress of civilization. | 

JUNIOR YEAR. I 



I I 

I First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature (Meiklejohn). | 

I Second Term. — The same. | 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

I First Term. — Metaphysics (McCosh and Bowne). History of Philosophy | 

I (Tennemann). Especial attention paid to Physiological | 

I Psychology. | 

I Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Constitution of United States. Political | 

I Economy (Walker), Philology (French). History of Civ- | 

I ilization (Guizot). | 

I I 

'^/x/////x/x/////x/y///x/x/x/x/y/x/^^^ 



lie CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

I SCIEMTIFIC COURSE. | 

^ • y 

I FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCES. i 

I This course embraces the followinsr schools: * I 



I 1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. ^ 



I - : 5 

I 3. School of Natural Sciences. I 



2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 



I 4. School of Modern Languages. | 



cal Economy. 



I 5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Politi- p 






I I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

^ Evidences, History and Languages of the Bible. Moral Philosophy — ^ 

I scientific basis discussed and then Moral Philosophy drawn from the Bible. | 

I Old Testament studied during Sophomore year, and the New Testament in | 

I the Junior. | 

§ 2 

§ 2 

\ II. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

\ y 

% In the Scientific Course this school embraces, besides the subjects given ^ 

^ • i.1 j: T 1 ^z xu„ /-.!___• _i r\ ^1 i„j- „i; t^„„„„' 5 



I In the Scientific Course this school embraces, besides the subjects given | 

I in the corresponding school of the Classical Course, the study of Descrip- | 

I tive Geometry and Eoads and Railroads. | 

^ I 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

I "/ 

\ Complete). ^ 

I Sewnd Term.— Plane Geometry (Olney). | 



First Term. — Algebra, beginning with Quadratic Equations (Olney's ^ 






S SOPHOMORE YEAR. g 

I First Term. — Solid Geometry (Olney). Plane Trigonometry (Oliver, Wait | 

I & Jones). I 

I Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry (0. W.J.) . Land Surveying, includ- | 

I ing Leveling (Gillespie). ^ 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

S / 

>S Wirsi Tprm — rrAnPral rrPnmpfrv T)ifTiprpnfial nalpnlna /TilriPV^ T)pQnrir»_ ^ 



I i^mf Term. — General Geometry, Differential Calculus (Olney). Descrip- | 

tive Geometry (Waldo). | 

Second Term. — Integral Calculus, Solution of Problems in General Geome- | 

try with the aid of the Infinitessimal Calculus (Olney), | 

Roads and Railroads (Gillespie). | 



I 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

\ First jTerm.— Mechanics (Kemper). . | 

I Second Term. — Astronomy (Young). ^ 

I ^ 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 17. | 

I ■■-■•■■■•■■•■•-■■-••••■■•■-•--■•■■■■■•■■•••- j 

^ Any one wishing to enter a class in Applied Mathematics must first be | 

I come familiar with those branches of pure "Mathematics upon which the | 

I applied depends for its principles. The courses are so arranged that no | 

I student, pursuing them in the order indicated and with the thoroughness | 

I required, will encounter serious diflSculty. | 

I In Land Surveying and in Roads and Eailroads special attention is | 

I given to field work and mapping. Students in the latter class will be re- | 

I quired to lay out curves, make the calculations for excavations and embank- | 

I ments, for transportation of earth, etc., from examples occurring in their | 

own field work. i 



% 



i 



III. School of Natural Sciences. | 

I I 

5 SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 



I First Term. — Physiology (Martin) 

I Second Term. — Zoology (Orton). B 

I ^ 

I JUNIOR YEAR. g 

I First Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). ^ 



I Second Term. — Zoology (Orton). Botany (Gray). p 

I I 



2 



^ Second Term. — Geology (Winchell's Geological Studies). 

I ^ 

§ SENIOR YEAR. | 



I istry. I 

I Second Term. — Physics. Deschanel on Electricity and Heat. | 

I Physics. — In Physics the instruction comprises one whole year's work | 

I of five (5) hours a week. Avery's Elements of Physics will be the text | 

^ book used till the close of the first term, and Descbanel's Natural Philoso- | 

I phy till the close of the second term. Numerous problems are solved by | 

I the student illustrating the practical applications of the theories and laws | 

I mentioned in the text. Reference books : Atkinson's Ganot, Daniell, Tyn- | 

I dall, Helmholtz and Meyer. | 

I Chemistry. — In Chemistry the course comprises daily instruction in $ 

I Remsen's Principles of Chemistry. Special instruction upon General | 

I Chemistry, Doctrine of Atoms, Laws of Combination, Character of Ele- | 

I ments, metallic and non-metallic, of Compounds, organic and inorganic, | 

I and the solving of problems. ^ 

I Analytical Chemistry. — In Analytical Chemistry the student enters | 

I the Laboratory at the first of the year and continues in the preliminary ^ 

I work for six weeks, working not less than two hours a day. The prelim- | 

I inary work comprises the committing to memory all the analytical schemes ^ 

I and the writing of all the reactions involved therein. Each student shall | 

I pass a satisfactory examination before entering upon his work, which shall ^ 

I continue till the close of the term. This course is especially adapted for | 

I those who expect to study medicine, and is more extensive than is given in | 

I most medical schools. Special instruction will be given in Oxidation if de | 

I 3 I 



I 18 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. k 

I I 

I sired, and a thorough explanation of equations involved therein. The ^ 

I cost of the Laboratory course will depend upon the prudence and economy | 

f of the student. A deposit of ten (10) dollars must be made by each student ^ 

I before entering the Laboratory. Text-book: Prescott's and Douglas's | 

I Qualitative Analysis. Reference Books : Fresenius, Fowne, Miller's Chem- | 

I leal Physics, Roscoe and Remsen's Theoretical Chemistry. | 

I Physiology, Hygiene and Sanitary Science. — These studies are ^ 

I illustrated with an excellent skeleton, manikin and numerous fresh speci- | 

f mens. Sanitary Science receives careful attention. Text-book : Martin. ^ 

I Reference Books: Dalton and Carpenter. | 

I Geology. — In Geology each student will be required to collect and | 

I label correctly all the minerals in the immediate vicinity. A course in | 

f Blowpipe Analysis will be offered to advanced students, and is recom- | 

I mended to all who desire a reliable knowledge of minerals. Text-book : | 

I Winchell's Geological Studies. Reference Books : Lyell and Le Conte. | 

I Zoology. — In Zoology we aim first, to give the student a knowledge of .^ 

I the principles of human biology; second, to teach him to observe, com" | 

f pare and classify for himself the forms of animal life about him. The col- | 

I lections of the Museum are excellently adapted for purposes of teaching | 

I Text-book : Orton's Comparative Zoology. | 

I Botany. — Botany begins April first and continues till the close of the | 

I session. Recitations daily. After a thorough knowledge of the text is had, | 

I the student is taught how to analyze common plants and to determine | 

I their species. Each student is required to analyze, press and mount on | 

I paper twenty-five specimens at the close of the work. Text-book : Gray. | 

I . - i 

$ IV. School of Modern Languages. | 

$ The aim of our instruction in French and German is to enable the | 

I student to speak and write these languages as well as read them. The | 

I so-called * natural method" is combined with progressive study of the | 

I grammars and of selections from the best writers, and with constant prac- | 

I tice in composition. The classes make such progress in speaking as ena- | 

I bles the teacher to conduct them entirely without the use of English dur- | 

I ing the second year of the course. | 

I FRENCH — FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 



^ 



^ 



I FIRST YEAR. | 

$ k 

^ Bocher's Otto's Grammar. | 

I Oral Practice, with selected readings. | 

I Prose Composition. | 

I SECOND YEAR. | 

f s 

^ Oral Practice, with Hugo's Ruy Bias; Saint Beuve's Causeries du Lundi; | 

f Saintsbury's Primer of French Literature. | 

I Reading at sight. | 

I Exercises in Grammar and Composition. | 



^/y/y/////yyy/y/y////////yy/////y^^^ 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 19 | 

I ' ' ^ 

I GERMAN — FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 

§ ^ 

^ FIRST YEAR. | 

^ Meisner's Grammar. | 
I Oral Practice, with Van der Smissen's Grimm's Marchen; Masius' f 
Lesebuch, Part II. 



8 



Oral Practice, with one of Marlitt's Romances. 



§ SENIOR YEAR. 



8 



s 4. School of Latin. 



^ Prose Composition. | 



I SECOND YEAR. | 

I Schiller's Wilhelm Tell. I 



^ , „. P 

^ Reading at sight. | 

I V. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles | 

I Lettres. | 

I I 

^ JUNIOR YEAR. I 



I First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature (Meiklejohn). 5 



I Second Year. — Rhetoric. English Literature. | 



I jPirsi Term. — Metaphysics (McCash and Bowne). History of Philosophy | 

I (Tennemann). Especial attention paid to the recent ad | 

I vances in Physiological Psychology. | 

I Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Constitution of United States and Political | 

I Economy (Walker). Philology (French). History of Civil- | 

I ization (Guizot). | 

I - ! 

I MINISTERIAL COURSE. I 



2; 



I FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LETTERS. i 

I . ^ 

^ This course embraces the foUowine^ schools: i 



I This course embraces the following schools: | 

I 1. School of Sacred Literature. | 

I ^ 

I 2. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

I 3. School of Greek. I 

I ■ ^ 



I 5. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. ^ 

I 6. School of Natural Science. | 

I y 

I 7 School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Bel Us | 

I Lettres. | 

I ■ I 



■i>f///y/y/y/y/y/x/y/y///y/y/A^^^ 

\ ^ 

I 20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

I I 

I I. School of Sacred Literature. $ 

k $ 

I It is the purpose to make the classes in the Classical and the Minis- | 

I terial courses the same in the languages, mathematics and sciences up to f 

I the junior year and then the major work of the ministerial student is in ^ 

I studies more distinctively biblical, while the minor work is carried on in ^ 

I Latin, Mathematics, English Literature and the Sciences. The work em- | 

I braces the following subjects : '" 



1. Inspiration of the Scriptures (Manly). 



s 



I 2. Practical work in the preparation of sermons and criticism of out- ^ 

I lines. I 

I 3. The Church : its origin, growth in officers and doctrine, and its mis- | 

I sionary activity in ancient and modern times. | 

I 4. Pastoral work: Lecture on Administration of the Ordinances. ^ 

I 5. Origin of St. Paul's Epistles (Conybeare and Howson). | 

I 6. Church History (Fisher). Especial attention will be paid to the | 

I history of the church till the Council of Nice, A. D. 325, The Rise and ^ 

I Growth of the Papacy to A. D. 1073, The Reformation, and the Reasons f 

I of our own movement. ^ 

I ^ 

^ 7. Rules of interpretation. Greek Exegesis of Romans and Ephesians | 

I (Westcott and Hort's text). As helps the student will use Buttmann's | 

Grammar of New Testament Greek. Thayer's Lexicon, and Hudson's Con 



s 



I cordance. The aim will be to put the student in possession of such helps p 

^ and methods as will lead to independent study. | 

I 8. Hebrew Grammar, with exercises in writing English into Hebrew. | 

I The course (two years) embraces such selections from History, prophecy f 

I and poetry of the Old Testament as will give the student a good reading | 

I knowledge of Hebrew. Delitzsch's Hebrew New Testament will be used. | 

I The Higher Criticism of the Old Testament as represented by Delitzsch, | 

s ^ 

I Graf, Kuenen, Wellhausen and others will be examined. ^ 



*§ 5 

I i 

I I 

I IL School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

I One year of study is devoted to each the Old Testament and the New. ^ 

I The Revised Version is used. While studying the Old Testament careful | 

I attention is bestowed on the Jewish Law, Messianic Prophecy, Poetry, f 

I Types and their fulfillment, and the bearing of modern discoveries in As- | 

I Syria, Babylonia and Egypt on biblical history. In studying the New Tes- | 

I tament proper attention is given to biblical geography, Palestine Explora- | 

I tion. Parties among the Jews in the time of Christ, manners and customs, | 

I etc., in order that the student may easily understand the text of his English ^ 

I Bible. The aim is to make students as familiar with sacred history as they ^ 

I are with the history of their own country. ^ 

I y ^ y I 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 21 | 



I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 



., First Term.— Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's Greek Lessons. | 



Daily exercises in writing the language, with the accents | 

^ carefully marked. | 

I Second Term. — Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. FyfFe's Short History of ^ 

I Greece. | 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

N P 

I First Term. — The Anabasis continued. Lucian's Dialogues. Exercises | 

^ in writing Greek. Greek History (Cox). ^ 

I Second Term.— Thucydides. Homer's Iliad (Keep), three books. Prose f 

I Composition (Jones). Grecian History. | 

s ' P 

I JUNIOR YEAR. I 

^ ? 

^ First Term. — Pindar (Gildersleeve). Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socra- | 

I tes. Prose Composition (Sidgwick). | 

I Second Term. — Plato's Apology of Socrates, and Crito (Wagner). Demos- | 

^ thenes's Oration oj^. the Crown (D'Oofe). New Testament f 

I Greek once per week. | 

§ > 

$ ^ 



I IV. School of Latin Language and Literature. | 

I I 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. S 



^ First Term,. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. | 

I Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

^ Second Term.— Caesar's Gallic War (Greenough), Book I., with thorough | 

^ drill in Syntax. ^ 

I 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



^ I 

I First Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic War, | 

I Books II., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Cataline. Prose | 

I Composition (Jones). | 

^ Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition ^ 

I continued (Jones). | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. I 

I I 

I First Term.— Prosody. Virgil's ^neid. Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- p 

I ough.) History of Rome (Leighton). Latin Synonyms | 

I ' (Shumway). I 

§ 9 

I V. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. g 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

I i 

I First Term. — Algebra, beginning with Quadratic Equations (Olney's com- p 

I plete. I 



I Second Term. — Geometry, Plane (Olney). , ^ 

I, „„„„„„„„.,„„„. . I 



I I 

I 22 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 



\ VI. School of Natural Sciences. 



^ 



5; 

i • SOPHOMORE YEAR. g 



I First Term. — Geometry, Solid (Olney). Plane Trigonometry (Oliver, Wait | 

I & Jones); | 

I Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry (O. W. J.); Land Surveying. | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 






1^ Second Term. — Astronomy (Lectures). g 



^ SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I i 

^ i^'mf r^rm. — Physiology (Martinj. Botany (Gray). | 

I ^ 



I Second Term, — Zoology (Orton). 

I JUNIOR YEAR. p 

I First Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). | 

I Second Term. — Geology (Winchel's Geological Studies). | 

I I 

I SENIOR YEAR. g 

I I 

^ First Term. — Physics (Avery). | 

I Second Term. — Physics (Avery). | 

I — ! 

I VII. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and p 

I Belles Lettres. | 

I i 

§ JUNIOR YEAR. | 

^ V 

\ First Term. — Rhetoric (Walsh). English Literature (Shaw), | 

I Second Term. — Rhetoric. English Literature. I 

I I 

^ SENIOR YEAR. i 



I First Term. — Metaphysics (McCosh and Bowne). History of Philosophy ^ 

I (Tennemann). | 

I Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Constitution of United States, and Political | 

I Economy (Walker). Philology. | 

I — I 

I COURSE FOR LADLES. | 

h FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. g 

I This course embraces the following schools: J 

I 1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. ^ 

I 2. School of the Latin Language. | 

I 3. School of MathenQatics and Astronomy. | 

I 4. School of Natural Sciences. | 



I _. ,..,, 



.!^ 



5. School of Modern Languages. 

6. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Letters and Politi- 



^ 



s cat JbiConomy. g 

I 



\ CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 23 I 

I .....-...-.......-..-.......-..■..............-...■......-...-...-......--..--..-......-.......■......-...^^ I 

I I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

I I 

I (Same as in Classical Course.) ^ 



I I 

I II. School of the Latin Language and Literature. | 

I I 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

I I 

I First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Les- ^ 



^ sons. Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. ^ 

I Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Greenough), Book I, with thorough | 




I First Term. — Geometry, Solid (Olney). Plane Trigonometry (Oliver, | 
I Wait & Jones). | 



. 



^ Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry (0. W. J.) 

I 

I SENIOR 

I Second Term. — Astronomy (Lectures). 



2 



^ SENIOR YEAR. P 






I 24 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

I IV. School of Natural Science. I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR . | 



I SOPHOMORE YEAR . | 

I Second Term.— Botany (Gray). | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

^ • ^ 

First Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). | 



I Second Term. — Physics. 





I V. School of Modern Languages. | 

I FRENCH — FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 

^ I 

I FIRST YEAR. | 

I Bocher's Otto's Grammar. | 

^ Oral Practice, with selected readings. | 



I Prose Composition. | 



SECOND YEAR. | 

I I 

I Oral Practice, with Hugo's i^M?/-B^as; Saint Beuve's CaKsmesdwiMndi; ^ 

I Saintsbury's Primer of French Literature. | 

I Reading at sight. | 

I Exercises in Grammar and Composition. | 

^ I 

I GERMAN — FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 

I FIRST YEAR. | 

I Meisner's Grammar. ^ 

I Oral Practice, with Van der Smissen's Grimm's Marchen; Massius' | 

I Lesebuch, Part II. ^ 

I Prose composition. | 

I SECOND YEAR. . | 

I Schiller's Wilhelm Tell. ' I 
I Oral Practice, with one of Marlitt's Romances. 

Reading at sight. 

Exercises in Grammar and Composition. 




I First Term. — Metaphysics (McCosh and Bo wne). History of Philosophy | 

I (Tennemann). | 

I Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Constitution of the United States. Polit- | 

I ical Economy (Walker). Philology (French). History of | 

I Civilization (Guizot). | 

I I 



= 


JDURSES. 




- ■■ - ■-- 1 
LADIES' COURSE. 


< 

w 

W 
O 

o 
o 


1 


Latin. 

Higher Algebra. 

French. 




Latin. 

G eometry — P lane. 

French. 

Primary Rhetoric. 




French. 

Physiology. 

Latin. 

German. 

Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry — Plane. 




Zoology. Botany. 

Latin. 

German. 

Trigonometry — Spherical. 

Botany. 

French. 


1 
O 

P 
1-5 




Latin. 

Chemistry. 

German. 

Rhetoric. English Liteiature. 




Roman History. 

German. 

Latin. 

Geology. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


SENIOR. 


^. 


Moral Science. 

Mental Science. 

History of Philosophy. 

Latin. 

Physics. 

Bible. 


tures). 


Astronomy (by Lectures). 

Logic. 

Comparative Latin and English (Lectures). 

Political Economy, 

Philology. 

Bible. 



I 24 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

I IV. School of Natural Science. | 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR . | 

I Second Term.— Botany (Gray). | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 



S 



^ First Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). i^ 

I Second Term. — Physics. | 

I I 

I V. School of Modern Languages. I 

I FRENCH — FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 

^ I 

I FIRST YEAR. ^ 

s I 

I Bocher's Otto's Grammar. | 

I Oral Practice, with selected readings. | 

I Prose Composition. | 

I I 

§ SECOND YEAR. S 

I ^ 

^ • Oral Practice, with Hugo's Ruy Bias; Saint Beuve's Causeriesdu Lundi; | 

I Saintsbury's Primer of French Literature. | 

I Reading at sight. | 

I Exercises in Grammar and Composition. ^ 

I I 

I GERMAN — FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 

I FIRST YEAR. | 

I Meisner's Grammar. ^ 

I Oral Practice, with Van der Smissen's Grimm's Marchen; Massius' | 

I Lesebuch, Part II. I 

$ § 

^ Prose composition. | 

I SECOND YEAR. • | 

I Schiller's Wilhelm Tell ' I 



I Oral Practice, with one of Marlitt's Romances. | 

I Reading at sight. | 

I Exercises in Grammar and Composition. | 

I I 

I VI. School of Mental and Political Philosophy and Belles | 

I Lettres. I 

I I 

^ JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I ^ 

I First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature. | 

I Second Term. — Rhetoric. English I^iterature. | 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I s 

I First Term. — Metaphysics (McCosh and Bo wne). History of Philosophy | 

I (Tennemann). | 



I Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Constitution of the United States. Polit- | 
I ical Economy (Walker). Philology (French). History of | 



Civilization (Guizot). 



L_„:zzz:^^^^^^^^^^^ 







SYNCHRONISTIC VIEW OF THE SEVERAL COURSES. 








CLASSICAL COURSE. 


SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 


MINISTERIAL COURSE. 




LADIES' COURSE. 




1 


M 
u 


Latin. 


Higher Algebra. 


Latin. 


Latin. 






1 


i- 


Greek. 


History. 


Greek. 


Higher Algebra. 






< 

r/j 


2 

OS 


Higher Algebra 


French. 


Higher Algebra. 


French. 






Latin. 


Geometry- Plane. 


Latin. 


Latin. 






X 


t- 


Greek. 


French. 


(ireek. 


G eometr v— P lane. 








?-, 


Geometry— Plane. 


History. 


Geometry — Plane. 


French. 








8 


Primary Rhetoric. 


Primary Rhetoric. 


Primary Rhetoric. 


Primary Rhetoric. 






Physiology. 


French. 


Physiology. 


French. 








w 


Latin. 


Geometry — Solid. 


Latin. 


Physiology. 










Greek. 


Trigonometry — Plane. 


Greek. 


Latin. 










(ieometry— Solid. 


German. 


Geometry — Solid. 


German. 






f4 

OS 

o 
o 


b 


Trigonometry— Plane. 


Physiology. 


Trigonometry — Plane. 


Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry — Plane. 






Latin. 


French. 


Latin. 


Zoology. Botany. 






n 


S 


Greek, Grecian Historx. 


Botany. 


Greek, Grecian History. 


Latin. 






fc 




Botanv. 


Zoology. 


Botany. 


German. 






o 


H 


Zoolofiy. 


Trigonometry — Spherical. 


Zoology. 


Trigonometry— Spherical. 










Trigonometry— Splierical. 


German. 


Spherical Trigonometry. 


Botany. 








O 
O 


Survoyinsr. 


Surveying. 


Astronomy (by Lectures). 


French. 








w 


Grecian Mythology. 




Surveying. 








- 


-=- 






Grecian Mythology. 








Latin. 


German. 


Latin. 


Latin. 








f. 


Greek. 


Surveying — Laying Out of Lands ; Leveling. 


Greek. 


Chemistry. 








M 


(ieneral (ieometry. 


Descriptive Geometry. 


Inspiration. 


German. 










DiHerential Calculus. 


Geometry— General. 


Hermeneutics. 


Rhetoric. English Liteiature. 








P. 


Chemi.stry. 


Differential Calculus. 


Hebrew. 










U, 


Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Chemistry. 


Chemistry. 








o 
p 

1-5 






Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Rhetoric. English Literature. 








^ 


Latin. Roman History 


German. 


Latin. Roman History. 


Roman History. 








a 


Greek. 


Roads and Railroads. 


Greek. 


German. 










Geology. 


Integral Calculus. General Geometry. 


Acts of Apostles. 


Latin. 










Integral Calculus. 


Geology. 


Hebrew. 


Geology. 








o 


Calculus applied to General Geometry. 


Rhetorics English Literature. 


Geology. 


Rhetoric. English Literature. 








« 


Rhetoric. English Literature. 
















Moral Science. Bible. 


Moral Science. 


Moral Science. Bible. 


Moral Science. 








S 


Metaphysics. History of Philosophy. 


Metaphysics. History of Philosophy. 


Metaphysics. History of Philosophy. 


Mental Science. 








w 


Latin. 


Mechanics. 


Homiletics. 


History of Philosophy. 








H 


Greek. 


Physics. 


Hebrew. 


Latin. 








b-: 


Mechanics. 


Practical Chemistry. 


Church History. 


Physics. 






o 
w 

CO 




Physics. 


Bible. 


Physics. 


Bible. 












Greek Exegesis. 










Greek. Bible. 


A stronomv- Bible. 


Bible. 


Astronomy (by Lectures). 








a 


Roman Literature. Philology. History. 


Logic — Political Economy. 


Logic — Political Economy. Philology. i 


Logic. 








t^ 


Comparative Latin and English (Lectures). 


History — Bible. 


Comparative Latin and English (Lectures). 


Comparative Latin and English (Lectures). 








n 


Logic— Political Economy. 


Practical Physics. 


Biblical Theology. 


Political Economy, 








o 


Astronomy. 


Practical Chemistry. 


Church History. 


Philology. 








H 


Bible. 




Hebrew. 
Pastoral Theology. 


Bible. 







I 
I 



i^/y/x/x/y/y/y///x///x/y/y///yyy^ 



8 



ra 



the intermediate examination in January. 



$40 00 


10 00 


25 00 


80 00 


10 00 



Indigent and pious young men in any of the religious de- 
nominations, who wish to prepare for the ministry, shall, on 






I 
1 I 

I SITUATION. i 

i 



ETHANY COLLEGE is situated in the Panhandle of I 



I |i)) West Virginia, sixteen miles north of Wheeling. The | 

I railroad stations for Bethany are Brilliant, on the Cleveland | 

I and Pittsburgh Railroad (river division), and Wellsburg, on | 

I the Wheeling branch of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. | 



Louis Railway. From these stations a daily stage is run to | 
I Bethany by N. Moore, who will give prompt attention to any | 

* ■ •— - - --"--j 

i 



^ Bethany by N. Moore, who will give prompt attention to any ^ 

I orders addressed to him, Wellsburg, W. Va., or address W. | 

I Cowans, Bethany, W. Va. 

I TERMS, VACATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS. I 

I . I 

I The College Year consists of two terms, four and a half ^ 

\ months each. It begins on the last Monday in September and | 

I ends on the third Thursday in June. In this year there are | 

I two examinations in each class — one in January and the final | 

I examination in June. | 

I It is very desirable that applicants for Matriculation present | 

I themselves at the beginning of the session, that there may be | 

I a convenient arrangement of the classes in the various Depart- | 

I ments or Schools. Students, however, can enter conveniently ^ 

I at the commencement of the second term, February 1st, after ^ 



§ LUtJ liittJiiiieuiad/tJ eJi-aiiiiuauiuii lu jtiiiutiry. ^ 

I NECESSARY EXPENSES. I 



I Tuition for forty weeks at $1.00 per week, S40 00 \ 

Matriculation fee, for coal, janitor, etc., . 
I Furnished room, with care of room, fuel, etc., . , 25 00 | 
I Table board, forty weeks, at $2.00, 
I Washing, 



s $165 00 i 

I , . , ^ 



I GRATUITOUS INSTRUCTION. I 

I X... ... .... ... . . ... ....... . % 

\ nominations, who wish to nrenare for the ministrv. shall, on I 

I paying the matriculation fee, be admitted into any of the P 
^4 ^ 



i^/y/y/y/////y///y//yy/x/y///^^^^ 



§ 



% 



I 26 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. i 

!-■■■ ■ ■■ ■■■ ■■■■-( 

I courses at Bethany College at one-half the regular rates of | 



I tuition. I 

All applicants for this privilege will be required to present 



1st. The Natural History Cabinet contains most of the Fauna, 
Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable coUec- 



country. Also a fine Herbarium of native plants, with many 
rare ones from other parts of the world. 
I 2d. The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several 
thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all parts of 



the world. 



I to the Faculty satisfactory written recommendations from their | 
I respective congregations, and from well known ministers of | 
I the gospel, certifying that they come under the above condi- | 



tions, in such form as shall be prescribed by the Faculty. They | 

shall also be required to sign a promissory note to pay the full $ 

charge for tuition five years from their withdraw^al from the I 

I College, provided they do not, in the meantime, devote them- | 

I selves to the work of the ministry. But this provision for | 

I reduction of tuition shall not extend, in any case, beyond one | 

I session, except upon the recommendation of the Faculty, and | 

I the approval of the Board. | 

I The sons of regular ministers of the gospel of all denomina- | 

tions shall be admitted to all classes and privileges of the | 

College, upon payment of matriculation fee and one-half the f 

regular charges for tuition. | 
^ All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be 



\ required to give instruction in the primary classes. | 

I CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. I 

I . _. -. „. , . . . . „ - _ t 



I 

tion from Australia, and exchanges with other sections of the 






S Thp Ti]th'r)nlnnirn]. fJahinpf. hhnncrh not laro-ft. p.ontfl.ins rare^. and | 

I 



^ The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains rare and -^ 

s> " ^ 

I valuable collections. ^ 

I APPARATUS. I 

I ^ 

I The Philosophical apparatus of the College is of the most | 



^ 



elegant and approved kinds and affords the amplest facilities 

I for the thorough illustration of physical principles. p 

I The Chemical laboratory is fully provided with all the appa- | 

I ratus and chemicals needed in the courses offered. | 

I I 

I LITERARY SOCIETIES. $ 

I There are in connection with the College three societies de- | 

I I 



^/y/yyy/^///y/yy////////y/j/M^^^^ 

I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 27 | 

I-- ■■ ■■■■■ ■■ :: ■■■■ ! 

I voted to the cultivation of literary composition and oratory : ^ 
I The Ossolian (ladies), Neotrophian and American Literary Institute. | 



I meetings. It has a well selected Libary, to which it respect- 
fully solicits contributions of works auxiliary to the study and 

§ comprehension of the Bible, Ecclesiastical History, Ethics, etc. 
Any such donations will be gratefully received. 



This department, confined hitherto to piano and voice cul- 



ADELPHIAN SOCIETY. | 



I As this society differs in some important respects from a | 

I purely Literary Society, it demands a more particular notice. | 

I As it is a distinguishing feature of Bethany College to make | 

I the Bible a regular subject of study and daily examination, | 

I the Adelphian Society has been organized in order to promote f 

I and carry out, to the fullest extent the purposes contemplated | 

I in the department of Bible Literature. f 

I The regular exercises of the Society consist — | 

I 1st. Of recitations of portions of the Scriptures. | 

I 2d. Reading original essays on moral and religious subjects; | 

I and I 

I 3d. The delivery of Scriptural discourses, not only before the | 

I Society, but, on suitable occasions, in public. | 

I Young men preparing for the Christian Ministry may derive | 

I incalculable advantages from this Society, From its organiza- | 

I tion. and the character and abilitv of its members, it is well I 



tion, and the character and ability of its members, it is well 
fitted to facilitate the acquisition of enlarged views of the Bible, I 
and the cultivation of a high standard of morality and religion. | 



I 

I The Society has a well furnished and commodious hall for its p 

^ -. . "' ^ i 

I fully solicits contributions of works auxiliary to the study and | 



I DRAWING AND PAINTING. | 



I This department is under the control of Miss Eleanor Tur- | 



I ner, an accomplished artist. Lessons are given in oil, water- | 

I colors, free-hand drawing, and in the various branches of decor- | 

I ative art. ^ 

I I 



I MUSIC. I 

s . ... ^ . ' . . . . .' . i 



I ture, will be enlarged so as to include the violin and drill in ^ 
I chorus singing. Voice culture is of great and growing import- | 



I ance, especially for ministerial students, and it is hoped that | 
I all will avail themselves of the excellent opportunities offered. | 
I Arrangements for this department have not been entirely com- f 



I 28 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

^ -..-..- .-. -..-..-. -..-..-..- .-..-..-..-.-..-..-..-.-..-..-..•..-...■..-..■...■..-..-..-.-.-..-..-..-..-..-..■. .-.-... ^ 

\ ^ 

I pleted. Announcements will appear later. Information may | 

I also be obtained by correspondence. | 

I REPORTS. I 

I \ 

I That the parent or guardian may know what studies the | 

I student is pursuing and his standing in each, at the close of | 

I the first month and at the end of each term, the secretary of I 

I the Faculty will furnish a report. If at any other time the | 

I work or conduct of the student is unsatisfactory, the same will 



^ to the professor of the school his intention of graduating. 3. 

I That he stand a satisfactory examination on all the prescribed 

I studies of the school. He shall then be entitled to a Ceri 

I 0/ Graduation free, signed by the President and Professor. 



I be promptly reported by personal letter. | 



From time to time Miss Pendleton will give informal talks i 

\ to the young ladies on such subjects as pertain to moral and | 

I social culture. I 

\ I 

I PREPARATORY CLASSES. | 



I .... . . . ^ 



\ There will be, in addition to the regular chairs, instruction 

I in English Grammar, Arithmetic and beginning Algebra. | 

I Provision has been made for teachers in book-keeping and | 

I short-halid, should there be a demand for these studies. | 

\ y 

\ TERMS OF GRADUATION. | 

I i 

I DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. | 

\ A student may graduate in any school singly. To obtain | 

^ the degree of Graduate in any school, it is required of every | 



I candidate : | 

I 1. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College at | 

I least one session, and shall have studied in the College the | 

I entire Senior year of the school. 2. That within one month | 

I from the beginning of the session, he shall have made known | 

i ^ "--^^^ ^ " -^ "^ ^^^ ^- "• i 

^ - - i 

\ studies of the school. He shall then be entitled to a Certificate | 

I DEGREES OF BACHELOR OP ARTS, BACHELOR OF SCIENCES, BACH- | 

$ V 

I ELOR OF LETTERS AND BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. | 

I To receive the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences. | 

I Bachelor of Letters and Bachelor of Philosophy, the candidate | 

I must have graduated and received his certificates in the several | 

I schools embraced in the respective courses. He must also have | 

I ' 



faithfully observed all the other laws and regulations of the | 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 29 | 

I ^ 

I College. He will then receive the Degree and Diploma. A fee | 

of ten dollars will be charged for the Diploma. Five dollars to | 

i 



I 

I ministerial students. ^ 



A student who has received a Diploma in any course, in order | 

to obtain a Diploma in an}^ other course, shall take up the ad- | 

ditional certificate or certificates and pay ten dollars for the | 

Diploma. | 

I The graduates in the several courses enjoy equally all the | 

I privileges, rights and honors of the College. | 

I THE master's degree IN COURSE. | 

I I 

I In order to obtain the Regular Degree of Master of Arts, the | 

I following conditions are required: 1. The attainment of the | 

I Degree of Bachelor in the course. 2. The actual attendance in | 

I the College thereafter for one session and the study of three | 

I Elective studies, to be selected by the candidate with the con- | 

I sent of the Faculty. 3. An approved examination of selected | 

I studies. A fee of ten dollars will be charged for the Diploma. | 

s ^ y 

I HONORARY MASTER'S DEGREE. | 



$! A 7-)..-l.7 r ^.^ 5_i._._J: -•- _i? XI- - 2 



I A Bachelor of three years' standing in any one of the courses ^ 
I may receive the Honorary Degree of Master in that course; pro- ^ 
I vided he shall in the interval have maintained an exemplary | 



I character, and pursued studies relating to the degree. Candi- | 

I dates for this degree should apply to the President or Secretary | 

I of the Faculty before the annual meeting of the Board of | 

I Trustees. | 

I No application for the degree of A.M. will be entertained | 

I unless accompanied by the fee of ten dollars, which will be re- | 



I turned in case the fee is not conferred. | 

5 _ S 



s SPECIAL COURSE IN ENGINEERING. | 

s ^ 

I FOR WHICH A CERTIFICATE IS GIVEN. g 

I For this course no specified time is required, except as de- | 

I manded by previous preparations, and the time necessarily al- | 

I loted to each branch. | 

N y 

\ To enter upon the course a thorough knowledge of Algebra, | 

I Geometry and Plane Trigonometry is required. | 

I 1. Land Surveying — Embracing all that is necessary to un- | 

I derstand the subject in its practical bearings with field work, | 

I mapping, etc. | 



V \ 

I 30 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

I ^. ^..v> X .xwv^xi^xv.^ V.X a.v,^^5xc*p^xxv..*x K^V^XV^JXlXg «,WVA a^x«,»»xxig. ^ 



i 

I 2. The Principles of Topographical Surveying and Drawing. 

3, Leveling, Profiling, Mapping. 

4. Descriptive Geometry, with Shades, Shadows and Perspec 
I tive. I 



p 4. uescriptive u-eometry, witn btiaaes, Shadows and Ferspec- | 

I tive. 

I 5. Road and Railroad Surveying — with field operations. | 

^ T-V^rf-v /-J^Ny-vi'My^i-* y-w+ -l-v ■*« i^ ■f-» y^ 1 <-\ ■*-^ y-kTT- *-» T- 4- ^~* 1 i^ yM-J I T" t n ■«■▼ i-\ "W ^t i^ i^ r» 1 ** r» ]r\. t j-\ 4- V\ t-% 4- ^ 



I Certificates will be given indicating the branch studied and | 
I the degree of proficiency attained. It is very desirable that | 



P students should enter with the regular classes of the Scientific | 

I Course. I 

$ I 

I THE COLLEGIAN. I 

I 



During the college year the students publish a monthly 
journal entitled The Collegian. It has attained high rank as a | 
college paper, and affords excellent means for developing the 



I . X X , X .. ^ 

I literary talent of the students. It deserves a hearty support on | 



I the part of the Alumni and friends of the college. | 

I ^ 

$ ACCOMMODATIONS. | 

I. .-. .. .. . 



Students are permitted to select their own places of board 

p ing, subject in all cases to the supervision of the Faculty. The | 

I facilities for obtaining boarding in private families have been | 

P much increased, and many students can be accommodated in | 



this way. Every attention will be paid to the health and com- 

I fort of the students. I 

I To accommodate students who desire to board themselves, | 

^ arrangements have been made to supply a number of anfur- | 

I nished rooms at a very moderate rent. Application for these | 

I should be made at an early date, and must be accompanied by | 



i satisfactory testimonials of character. ^ 

I 

I PENDLETON HEIGHTS. | 

^ I 

P The residence of President Pendleton, known as Pendleton | 

I Heights, has recently been purchased by the Board of Trustees | 

I of Bethany College for a Ladies' Boarding Hall. The purchase | 

I includes fourteen acres of ground ; the house is heated with I 

I steam, and is fitted up with every modern comfort and con- | 

I venience. This commodious and beautiful home is so well | 

^ > 

^ known to the thousands of friends who have visited Bethany, | 

^ - . ... . "^ ' ^ 



I and have been at some time guests within its hospitable walls, | 
I that no detailed account of its especial fitness for the purpose | 



i 

I to which it is now appropriated can be necessary here. No | 

wjyy///y/y/y/y///y/y/y/y/yyy/^^^^ 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 31 f 

V .<"^<■s<•^*'S<»^.l'^.'^«'^.''<.^'<»/<k/■^<"krf"krf■v<"Vl("<.<"^l<"^<"S«'^«'^.f'^.>'<»^•b*•w/"w<"^l/•w^•kl*■^>"Vrf"^i^'^d'^.'^.f^.("^.<«.>'b/■'li/'<»/ !5 

^ . . y 

I pains will be spared to malie it, in the best sense of the word, | 

I a home for our girls, in which such safeguards will be thrown | 

I about them as will give them, as nearly as practicable, the | 

I same protection they would have in their own homes. Each | 

I young lady will be expected to bring with her sheets, pillow- | 

I cases, towels, napkins, napkin-ring, fork, teaspoon and lamp. | 

I Those desiring further information, or wishing to secure rooms, f 



I will address Miss A. C. Pendleton, Bethany, W. Va. 



I ■ I 

I I 

I 

I ^ f 



8 %. 






S - % 



\ ^ 

% V 



8 



I 32 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

I 

I I 



CALENDAR I 



I FOR 1889-90. I 



I ^ 



§ i 



I ^ 

I Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on | 

I Tuesday and Wednesday, before the third Thursday in June | 

I Annual Commencement, . on the third Thursday in June | 

I Session begins, . ..... September 30 | 

I Christmas recess begins at noon, . . December 20 | 

I Christmas recess ends, . . . . . . January 6 | 

I First term ends, ...... January 31 | 

I Second term begins, , February 1 | 

I Anniversary of Netrophian Society, . . November 5 | 

I Anniversary of the American Literary Institute, November 10 | 

I Joint Celebration of the Literary Societies, . February 22 | 

I Annual Exhibition of the American'Xiterary Institute, | 

I Evening before Commencement | 

I Annual Exhibition of the Neotrophian Literary Society, | 

I Evening of Commencement | 

I Class Day, . . . Wednesday before Commencement | 

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