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Full text of "Bethany College Bulletin 1890-99"

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BURSAR'S 
OFFICE 










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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/bethanycollegeb189099beth 



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9: 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 







ethany (College, 



FOR THE 



l^opty-J^ii)tl| #^essioi) 



Ending June 19, 1890. -~ 



WHEELING: 

DAILY INTELLIGENCER STEAM BOOK AND JOB PRESS. 



1890. 







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/ 

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I fTorms of fieqaesfs. | 

I \ 

/ .^- _ ^ 

I 

| / j^z;^ arcrf bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, | 

I I 

| Bethany, West Virginia, the sain of. „ | 

^ / 

| thousand dollars, to be safely invested by them as an | 

I I 

| endowment, the interest only of which is to be used for 

I 

| the support of the college. 

I s 

I ■ • 

I 

1 

| Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of \ 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, \ f 



% thousand dollars, to be applied, at their discretion, for 

I X 

| the general purposes of the college. ','• 

\- ==! 

i 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, 
I Bethany, West Virginia^ the sum of. 

i 

/ thousand dollars, to be safely invested by them and the 

I 

% interest only applied, at their discretion, to aid deserving 



I 

'■/, students in any course in the college. 

1 



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Catalogue j 

! 

| OF THE I 

I 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



I 

I I 

i " 1 

!RpTHANVrnnpr '1 



Bethany College. 
! $ 

$ FOR THE 2 

I ! 

Forty-ninth Session, ending June 19, 1890, f 

! J 

f 

I COURSE OF STUDY & ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT I 
I FOR 1890-'91. I 

! - I 



I OPEN TO MALES AND FEMALES ON EQUAL TERMS. I 

I I 



« g 



I BETHANY. WEST VIRGINIA. 2 

— 

I 1890. I 

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4 



A. McLean, . 
W. K. Pendleton, 

J. W. MULHOLLAND, 
| W. F. RlCHARDSON, 

I Hon. Geo. H. Anderson, 
| Hon. R. M. Bishop, . 
I H. K. Pendleton, . 
I A. W. Campbell, 
' J. E. Curtis, 
Dr. J. E. Whitsett, . 

P. MOFFETT, 

P. S. Fall, 
| Alex. Campbell, 
Charles Shields, 
Judge L. Bacon, 
Geo. T. Oliver, . 
C. B. Turner, 
J. H. Jones, 

PUSSELL ERRETT, 

W. C. Lyne, 
Thomas W. Phillips, 
Dr. Poger Williams, 
John C. Palmer, 
J. J. Barclay, 
! R, S. Latimer, 
George Darsie, . 
Dr. I. M. Ridge, 
S. M. Cooper, 
M. M. Cochran, 
Oliver Marshall, 



% 



Bethany, W. Ya. 
Eustis, Fla. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Hazelwood, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Ya. 
Perryopolis, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Bethany, W. Ya. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Ya. 
Alliance, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
ISTew Castle, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Ya. 
Wheeler, Ala. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Ya. 



\ 

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1 Will 







ARCHIBALD McLEAN, A.M., President, 



And Professor of Biblical Literature. 



| W. K. PENDLETON, LL.D., 



HUNTER PENDLETON, A.M., Ph.D., 



F. P. TRENCH, 






I 



^ And Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Church History. ^ 

1 — I 

J. M. TRIBLE, A.M., Vice-President, 



« § 



S 7-7 * 

$ . § 

| President Emeritus. ^ 

1 A. C. PENDLETON, A.M., 1 

^ Professor of English Literature and Modern Languages. | 

I 







I OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, A.M., 1 

I Professor of Mathematics, Astronomy and Civil Engineering. | 

| | 

FRANK M. DOWLINO, A.M., 

^ Professor of Latin Language and Literature, Rhetoric, and Philology. ^ 

| | 

LEWIS CASS WOOLERY, A.M., 

^ Professor of Greek Language and Literature. § 



1 I 



I - ~ ■ ^ 



| Professor of Natural Sciences. ^ 






1 Mrs. J. M. TRIBLE, | 

^ Teacher of Drawing and Painting. ^ 

I 






I 

^ Professor of Music. 

I 

J. B. SMITH, 



^ 7 § 

§ Adjunct Professor. ^ 






fy'/s/s/s/s/s///jys/s///s/s//^^^ 



ARCHIBALD McLEAN. 



J. M. TREBLE. 



C. B. TURNER, 
J. E. CURTIS. 



ALEX. CAMPBELL. 



J. C. PALMER, Treasurer. 



A. C. PENDLETON, 
Librarian and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 



F. M. DOWLING, Secretary of the Faculty. 



OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, Bursor. 



S. M. COOPER, Financial Agent. 



HUNTER PENDLETON, Curator of the Museum. 



«iX\>i\^^^\\\^\\XXXXXXX\\^\\^\X\s^^^^ 



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Bentley, W. P., 
Camp, Emma, 
Chapline, Bessie, 

\ Cutler, R. A. 

| Ferrall, B. S., 

| Harris, Alfred, . 

| Israel, R. S., 

| Lovett, E. 0., 

| Lowry, Charles E., 

| McDiarmid, Belle M., 

| McGill, S. S., . 

| Mercer, L. I., 

I Moore, Melancthon, 



Muckley, E. S., 
Oram, Zinnia, 
Smith, James B. ; 
Taylor, A. H., 
Warnock, G. S., 
White, W. B., 



Black, George O., 
Butler, E. J., . 
Grans, Harry B., 
Gans, Nellie, . 
| Hanna, W. C, , 
| Harp, W. A. . 
| Hedgepeth, D. V.. 
| Hoover, H. W., 
1 Hukill, W. V., , 
I Jenkins, B. A., 
| Jopson, C. W.. 



Kelly, Beatrice Medill 
Kreidler, Charles M., 



SENIORS. 

. Wilmington, Ohio. 

Marion, Ohio. 
. Bethany, W. Va. 

Richmond, Va. 
. Findlay, Ohio. 

Glen Easton, W. Va. 
. Morristown, Ohio. 

Shreve, Ohio. 
. Gibson City, 111. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
. Uhrichsville, Ohio. 

Bowling Green, Ohio. 
. Beallsville, Ohio. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
. Wellsburg, W. Ya. 

Smithfield, Ohio. 
. Wheeling, W. Ya. 

Elyria, Ohio. 
. Mt. Sterling, Ky. 

JUN IORS. 

Rockwood, Ont., Can. 
. Tully, N. Y. 

Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 
. Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 

Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 
. Logansport, Ind. 

Union City, Ind. 
. Selkirk, Ont., Can. 

Bethany, W. Ya. 
. Kansas City, Mo. 

Nicholas, Cal. 
. Portland, O. 



Beaver Creek, Md. 



4a«o*xxxxxNSixx*ixxx>ixxs*x>ix^ 



02388 



1 6 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 1 

a 8 



McGavran, John G., 
McWane, J. R., 
Oram, W. G., 
Shrontz, W. Fred, 
Wells, M. Daisy, 
Wright, W. J., . 



Bucks, 0. 
Wytheville, Ya. 
Wellsburg, W. Ya. 
Washington, Pa. 
West Liberty, W. Ya. 
Sharon, Pa. 



SOPHOMORES 



Addy, C. D., . 

Barclay, J. J., 
| Berry, P. A., . 

Camp, George T., 

Chatley, M. E., 

Clark, Ernest S., 

Counselman, J. E., . 

Critchfield, Charles Y., 

Darsie, George, 
| Davis, C. B., 
| Findley, J. A., 
| Garrison, A. 0., . 
| Gillespie, Barnes, . 
' Gordon, E. W., . 

Gray, Alex C, 

Hankins, George R., . 

Keene, C. M., . 
| Lyon, Emma, 
| Miller, J. EL, . 
| Pendleton, D. L., 
| Philips, Ettie L., . 
| Phipps, H. D., . 
| Prewitt, E. R., 
| Reid, W. H., 
| Rodgers, A. E., 
| Scott, Oreon E., 
| Shriver, Knowles K., 
| Sweitzer, W. A., 
| Wagaman, S. M., . 



Pittsburg, Pa. 
Wheeler Station, Ala. 
Howard, Ohio. 
Marion, Ohio. 
New Galilee, Pa. 
Falmouth, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Ya. 
Mt. Yernon, O. 
California, Pa. 
Jeromeville, Ohio, 
Monroe Mills, Ohio. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Tazewell C. H., Ya. 
Braddock, Pa. 
Komoka, Ont., Can. 
Massillon, Ohio. 
Allegan, Mich. 
Washington, Pa. 
Rocky Fork, Ohio. 
Eustis, Fla. 
Surgeon's Hall, Pa. 
Paris, Tex. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Coon Island, Pa. 
McClellandtown, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Ya. 
Mt. Yernon, Ohio. 
Beaver Creek, Md. 



Ms/sy/ysys/Ay/s//ys/syjys/AW^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Will, Horace GL, 
Winbigler, W. W., 
Woolery, Kirby S., 



Glade, Pa. 

Lake Fork, Ohio. 

Antiock Mills, Ky. 



FRESHMEN 



I Allen, H. W., 

ty Alexander, H. B., . 

'■ Baldwin, Mary E., 

Brenneman, Emor, 

Cameron, Elizabeth K., 

Campbell, Alice, 

Campbell, Archie, 

Campbell, C. S., 

Campbell, J. E., 

Campbell, Lanra E., 

Campbell, Louise B., . 

Campbell, William P., 

Chapman, A. L., 
| Chapman, F. A., 

Chapman, W. C, 

Craft, Katie, . 

Craig, J. H., 

Creighton, A. B., 

Clark, Maurice, 

Cleveland, E. C, 
1 Cook, Maude L., 
I Cunningham, Nell, 
| Dally, J. P., . . 
I Danford, M. V., 
| Dehner, Carl, 
| Doak, Franklin, 
| Dorman, E. H., 
| Dowling, Clarence, 
| Findlay, L. H., 
| Fox, E. L., 



| Fox, William S. 

I 



Gloe, Bateman H., 
p Goodpaster, J. H., 



Memphis, Tenn. 
Beaver Falls, Pa. 
Bethel, Conn. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Millersburg, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Tedrow, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Beaver Falls, Pa. 
Sullivan, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Dunsfort, Pa. 
Holliday's Cove, W. Va. 
Higginsville, Mo. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
New Lisbon, Ohio. 
Malvern, Ohio. 
Carrollton, Mo. 
Havelandsville, Ky. 
Somerset, Pa. 
Somerset, Pa. 
Centerburg, Ohio. 
Pilcher, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
West Union, W. Va. 
Carthage, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Monroe Mills, Ohio. 
Somerset, Pa. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 



'/sw/ysys/sy/y/y/y///y//M^^^ 



I \ 



' 8 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. \ $ 



Green, J. O., 
Groom, W. T., 

Hankins, Lottie, 
Harding, Leon K., 

I Hays, C. T., 
Henderson, G. V., . 
Hnbbell, William, 
Huffman, F. B., 
Hughes, John, 
Hunter, Delia, 
Hupp, John H., . 
Irelan, Geo. M., , . 

| Jobes, J. B., 
Jobes, Maggie, 
Johnston, George C, 

I Jones, K. B., . 
Kurtz, James L., 
Lauck, Fred H., 
Longdon, F. J., . 

| Lovett, Guy D., 
McCarty, S. O., . 
McCrory, Harry, 
McCune, J. F., . 
Mendel, Mamie K., 
Moore, Sue, 
Moore, Zwinglius, 
Muckley, O.K, . 
Muckley, 0. P., 

| New, Burt, . 

| Perry, E. L., . 

| Pollock, J. A., . 
Phipps, 0. G., 
Sanborn, Mary A., 
Scott, M. M., . 
Sharritt, J., 
Smith, W. F., 

| Strickling, F. E., 

| Tarr, Y. E., . . 



Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Covington, Ky. 
Massillon, Ohio. 
Winchester, Ky. 
New London, Mo. 
Richmond, Mo. 
Richmond, Mo. 
Forest Hill, Mich. 
Richmond, Mo. 
Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Ya. 
Bowling Green, Ohio. 
Claysville, Pa. 
Claysville, Pa. 
Hattonia, Ohio. 
Dunsfort, Pa. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Ya. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Shreve, Ohio. 
Eagle Lake, Tex. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Braddock, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Ya. 
Proctor, W. Ya. 
Beallsville, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Yernon, Ind. 
Homer, N. Y. 
Wheeling, W. Ya. 
Paris, Tex. 
Loudonville, Ohio. 
McClellandtown, Pa. 
Angola, Ind. 
Boyd, Ky. 

West Union, W. Ya. 
Brilliant, Ohio. 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 9 | 

! Z 



\u 



Ullom, Thomas P., 
Yodrey, W. H., . 
Wayman, J. E. W., . 
White, Clara L., . 
Wilfley, Earle A., 
Williamson, Minnie A.. 
Zeigler, Clarence, 



Antioch, Ohio. 
East Liverpool, Ohio. 
Glen Easton, W. Ya. 
Lamira, Ohio. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Buflalo, N. V. 
Baltimore, Md. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



I Billings, Laura J., 
Creighton, Belle, 
Daly, John, . 
Hayes, Emily H., 
Hester, E. L., 

| Moore, Addie, . 

I Moser, Josie, 

| Paull, Anna, 

| Pritchard, Celia, 
Rannells, L. Ettie, 
Shrontz, Cora, . 
Stephens, J. D., 
Stewart, E. H., . 
Tener, May F. E., 

| Tener, Sarah B., 



Seniors, . 
J uniors, 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen, 

Special, 



Total, 



Bethany, W. Ya. 
Malvern, Ohio. 
Wilkesbarre, Pa. 
Clarence, N". Y. 
Mansfield, Ya. 
Bethany, W. Ya. 
Mt. Healthy, Ohio. 
Hopedale, Ohio. 
Sullivan, Ohio. 
Wilmington, Ohio. 
Lone Pine, Pa. 
Orton, Out., Can. 
Ontario, Can. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



SUM MARY. 



19 

19 
33 
78 
15 



164 I 



■<s , ^^^x^x**xxx^*x**^sx^*x^^ 



1 



10 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



liliiifs J| jr irii-mi| g)isswi 



BACHELORS OF ARTS. 



I Bentley, W. P., . 
| Ferrall, B. S., 
1 Lovett, E. O., . 

Lowry, C. E., 

McDiarmid, Belle M.. 



Warnoek, Gr.' S., 



Ohio. 

Ohio. 

Ohio. 

Illinois. 

Ohio. 

Ohio. 



BACHELORS OF LETTERS. 



| Cutler, R. A., 

| Harris, Alfred, 

| McGill, S. S., 

| Mercer, L. I., 

| Moore, M., . 

| Muckley, E. S., 

I Smith, J. B., . 



BACHELORS OF SCIENCE. 



| Israel, R. S., . 
| Taylor, A. H., 
| White, W. B., 



Virginia. 
West Virginia- 
Ohio. 
Ohio. 
Ohio. 
Ohio. 
Ohio. 



Ohio. 

West Virginia. 

Kentucky. 



BACHELORS OF PHILOSOPHY. 



| Camp, Emma, 
Chapline, Bessie, 



Oram, Zinnia, 



Ohio. 

West Virginia. 

West Virginia. 



Whole number Bachelors of Arts, . 
Whole number Bachelors of Science, . 
Whole number Bachelors of Letters, 
Whole number Bachelors of Philosophy. 



537 
94 
62 
10 j 



Total Alumni and Alumnae. 



703 



^//>///>//sy//AA/'///ys/s//////>//sys/A//s//ys////,*^^^ 



,'/////• /y//y//sys//y/y///ys//y/y/ys/sy/////y//^^^ 

CATALOGUE OF BETE ANY COLLEGE. 11 ^ 

I _ _ | 

5 \ 

fjhUUI'3£ Pi' 1IIIII1U $ 



4 \ 

Bethany College has four separate courses: The CI as- « 

| sical, Scientific, Ministerial and Ladies', conferring respect- j 

| ively the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, | 

| Bachelor of Letters and Bachelor of Philosophy. 

I 1 

I CLASSICAL COURSE. 1 

^ N 

6 FOR THE DEGREE OP BACHELOR OP ARTS- § 

I . 1 

| This course embraces the following schools, viz: 



| 2. School of the Greek Language. 

3. School of the Latin Language and Literature. 

| 4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

| 5. School of Natural Science. 



6. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy, ! 

| and Belles Lettres. I 

I " I 

I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 



In this School the Evidences, History and Languages of the Bible are | 

| taught. Moral Philosophy is drawn from the Bible itself. Every student n 

| in the College studies the English Bible during the Sophomore and Junior ^ 

y, years. A thorough study is made of the Jewish Law, and recent researches ^ 

| in Egypt and Assyria bearing on the Bible history are pointed out. In the s 

p Junior year the historical books of the New Testament, with the purpose | 
^ of each Epistle, are carefully studied. 

I ■ ' I 

| II. School of the Greek Language. 

^ • I 

| FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

? First Term— Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's First Lessons. ^ 

Daily exercises in writing the language, with the accents s 

| carefully marked. | 

| Second Term— Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. Kelsey. ^ 



f/sy//s//ys/////s//y/y//AY//y//sysy//M///^^^^ 

| 12 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. I 

I I 

| jPirsi Term.— The Anabasis, Books II., III., IV. Sight Selections. Gre- i 

cian Historv (Cox). Greek Prose Composition (Jones). t 

I " i 

p Second Term. — Homer's Iliad (Keep), Books I., II., III. Prose Composi- | 

| tion (Jones). Grecian History. | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. I 

I I 

> First Term. — Pinder (Gildersleeve). Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates gj 

| (Bobbins). Prose Composition (Allenson). Lucian's Dia- | 

logues (Williams). | 

| Second Term. — Plato's Apology and Crito (Wagner). Demosthenes' Ora- f 

| tion on the Crown (D'Ooge). | 



SENIOR YEAR. 



| First Term. — Sophocles — (Edipus Tyrannus (White). Thucydides, Books % 
| VI., VII. (Lamberton). | 

^ Second Term. — Lectures on Greek Civilization. New Testament, Greek. 



LATI N 



I P 

The Instruction in this department has four distinct ends in view. ^ 

| First. In the Freshman and Sophomore years the aim is to give a ^ 

thorough knowledge of forms and syntax. From the beginning the study | 



* of the grammar is accompanied with exercises in translating English into 

| Latin and Latin into English. The translations of the texts used in these | 

| two years is conducted in such a way as to rivet in the mind the principles ^ 

y\ of Latin Grammar. ^ 

| Second. Junior and Senior years are devoted to a general study of ^ 

| Roman Literature. At the end of the course a text book by Bender is t 

| used. Constant attention is called to the style of writers, the philosophies of ^ 

| their day, the political condition out of which the literature sprang. The | 

| students are required to prepare and read criticisms and theses on such ^ 

| themes as will awaken interest and stimulate to original, independent | 

t research. ^ 

Third. From a grammatical point of view the Latin language in com- | 

^ parison with all other European languages has been termed a "perfectly ^ 

| organized type." It is the best source of general, fundamental, compre | 

| hensive linguistic principles. This position of the Latin language is turned | 

| to good account in throwing light upon our own. The instruction given | 

| throughout the course is summed up at the close in a series of lectures on | 

y, "Comparative Latin and English Grammar." | 

| Fourth. The recitations are so conducted as to make them an aid to | 

| English Composition and Rhetoric. Students are frequently required to | 

| hand in on paper and write on the board the translation of the text. The / 

| paragraphing, punctuation, diction and arrangement of the English is | 

^ criticised by student and teacher. | 

^ % 



^XX^X^X^*X<XXSOOO*XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX\\X\X\\\X\XXX\XX\XXXX\\\X\\\\XXX\XXXX 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 13 $ 

k t 

$ — __ . 6 

I III. School of Latin Language and Literature. 

1 FRESHMAN YEAR. I 

|. | 

| First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. ^ 

| Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

I 

| drill in Syntax. ^ 

| SOPHOMORE YEAR. f 

i . . . I 

^ First Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic War, / 



| Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Greenough). Book I., with thorough 



Books II., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Cataline. Prose | 



I 

^ Composition (Jones). g 

| Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero, Livy, Book XXI, Composition / 
| continued (Jones). ^ 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

s First Term. — Prosody. Virgil's iEneid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- | 
| ough). History of Rome (Allen). f 

| Second Term. — Prosody. Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Horace f 
| (Lincoln). Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid). | 

I SENIOR YEAR. I 

I I 

| First Term. — The Germania of Tacitus (Church). | 

Second Term. — Cicero's Letters. Pliny's Letters. Antiquities (Wilkins). ^ 
Latin Literature (Bender). Lectures on Latin of Middle % 
Ages. 

I IV. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 1 



1 

I 



This school embraces a course of Pure and Applied Mathematics as | 
given in the following schedule. The text books used are indicated in the | 



| Second Term. — Plane Geometry (Olney). ^ 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. I 

\ First Term.— Solid Geometry (Olney). Plane Trigonometry (Oliver, Wait % 

| & Jones). | 

s Second Term.— Spherical Trigonometry (O. W. J.). Land Surveying (Gil- | 

lespie). | 

^ First Term. — General Geometrv. Diffprrnitinl Calm-ilns ('Olnpv^ i. 



JUNIOR YEAR. g 

First Term.— General Geometry, Differential Calculus (Olney). 
i Second Term. — Integral Calculus. Calo.nlns armlipd to Gpnpml fW»mo+™ / 

I 

| Calculus is elective in this course. ^ 



Second Term.— Integral Calculus. Calculus applied to General Geometry 
(Olney). 



'.\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\^VW 

I 14 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

1 — — . 1 



1 SENIOR YEAR. g 

' . . „ , . 



/ i^V.si Term. — Mechanics (Kemper). | 

I I 

'$ Second Term. — Astronomy (Young). ^ 



/ 



/. 



I - I 

I v " Sch ° o1 of Natural science - J 

| SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

$ First Term. — Physiology (Martin). | 

£ Second Term. — Zoology (Orton). Botany (Wood). | 

| JUNIOR YEAR. f 

I . ? 

^ i^mi Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). | 

^ Second Term. — Geology (Winchell's Geological Studies). | 

I SENIOR YEAR. I 

^ .Firsf Term.— Physics (Avery). | 

^ Second Term. — Physics. ^ 

I — 

^ VI. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy | 

| and Belles Lettres. f 

I I 

| Rhetoric and English Literature, recite on alternate days. Application | 

^ of the principles of Rhetoric is made through the analysis of acknowledged | 

^ masters of style, and through constant practice in original composition. To ^ 

| the outlines of English Literature, as furnished by the text book, are added i 

/ miscellaneous selections illustrating the progress of the language and litera- | 

| ture from the tenth century to the present. In teaching history the method * 

Z, is not to commit to memory isolated facts, but to bring out the connection % 

% of events showing the progress of civilization. | 

| JUNIOR YEAR. I 

I I 

| First Term.— Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature (Meiklejohn). | 

/■ 4 

£ Second Term. — The same. p 

I SENIOR YEAR. I 

I I 

i inrs£ T^rm. — Metaphysics (McOosh and Bowne). History of Philosophy | 

(Tennemann). Especial attention paid to Physiological | 

| Psychology. | 

| Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Moral Philosophy (Robinson). Constitu- § 

| tion of United States. Political Economy (Walker). Phi- $ 

lology (Trench). History of Civilization (Guizot). Christian | 

| Evidences. $ 

$ I 

W///// / / / /y//^///////////////////////// / ^^^^^ 



I 



Political Economy. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



1 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 15 | 

f I 

I SCIENTIFIC COURSE. I 

2 FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCES. § 

^ This course embraces the following schools: | 

i \ 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

| 3. School of Natural Sciences. | 
4. School of Modern Languages. 



4. School of Modern Languages. 



-> -T-. -i • , • t -rx ^ 



5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and | 



^ x oiiueai JLconoiiiy. ^ 

I I 

/, \ 

4 I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

I I 
Evidences, History and Languages of the Bible. Moral Philosophy — ^ 

6 • l • r> 1 • 1 • 1 Til HIT 1 T"»l •!_-._.__ 1. ..__ .1. (• 11 . ti'n N 



^ scientific basis discussed and then Moral Philosophy drawn from the Bible. | 
/ Old Testament studied during Sophomore year, and the New Testament in ^ 
'% the Junior. | 



2 § 



I II. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

I | 

| In the Scientific Course this school embraces, besides the subjects s 

/ given in the corresponding school of the Classical Course, the study of ^ 

^ Descriptive Geometry and Roads and Railroads. | 

^. T?T? XPGTJTVT A XT V17 A 13 ^ 



/ First Term. — Algebra, beginning with Quadratic Equations (Olney s ^ 

I Complete). | 

| Second Term. — Plane Geometry (Olney). | 

i SOPHOMORE YEAR. 1 

/ I 

/, First Term. — Solid Geometry (Olney). Plane Trigonometry (Oliver, Wait ^ 

| & Jones). | 



£ Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry (0. W. J.) Land Surveying, in- | 

^ eluding Leveling (Gillespie). I 

$ JUNIOR YEAR. | 

^ First Term. — General Geometry, Differential Calculus (Olney). Descrip- | 

| tive Geometry (Waldo). | 

^ ^ 

| Second Term. — Integral Calculus, Solution of Problems in General Geometry ^ 

^ with the aid of the Infinitesimal Calculus (Olney). Roads | 

| and Railroads (Gillespie). | 



I 



% SENIOR YEAR. 



| First Term. — Mechanics (Kemper). 
| Second Term. — Astronomy (Young). 
I. 



£xXXNSiXXX>i>iXXXXX>iXX>i?*XXXXXX^^ 



I 16 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

\~ : : S 

Any one wishing to enter a class in Applied Mathematics must first be- | 

', come familiar with those branches of pare Mathematics upon which the | 

A applied depends for its principles. The courses are so arranged that no | 

/ student, pursuing them in the order indicated and with the thoroughness | 

| required, will encounter serious difficulty. | 

| In Land Surveying and in Roads and Railroads special attention is | 

* given to field work and mapping. Students in the latter class will be re- | 

'/ quired to lav out curves, make the calculations for excavations and embank- ^ 

*; ments, for transportation of earth, etc., from examples occurring in their | 

p own field work. ^ 

| 1 

i I 

| III. School of Natural Sciences. | 

y ■ X 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I s 

^ First Term. — Physiology (Martin). | 

| Second Term — Zoology (Orton). Botany (Wood). | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. 1 

v X 

| I 

'% First Term. — Chemistry ( Remsen). Chemical Laboratory. | 

/, Rt>r<~>Yiil Term. — frAnlne-v fWinfhpll's (Trpnlno-ifnl Sfnrlips'l ^ 



Second Term. — Geology (Winchell's Geological Studies) 



IV. School of Modern Languages. 



yj, ucw/w jci/h. uwwgj ^ »»muJCJio uwiugiwi «iuuicoj. s 

| SENIOR YEAR. 1 

v, X 

y X 

| First Term. — Phvsics (Avery). ^ 

v X 

/ Second Term. — Phvsics (Avery). | 

I I 



i The aim of our instruction in French and German is to enable the | 

student to speak and write these languages as well as read them. The so | 



I 

f called "natural method'' is combined with progressive study of the gram- $ 



% mars and of selections from the best writers, and with constant practice in ^ 



| composition. The classes make such progress in speaking as enables the | 

| teacher to conduct them entirely without the use of English during the | 

$ second year of the course. | 

I FRENCH— FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. I 

1 



V X 

I Edgren's Grammar. Part I. ^ 

v X 

fy Oral Practice, with selected readings. ^ 

| SECOND YEAR. | 

v X 

h Edgren's Grammar. Part II. | 

v X 

| Reading at Sight. Oral Practice, with selected readings. | 

v ... ^ 

| Exercises in Grammar and Composition. | 

{y/s/s/ss////////////s/s/s//ysy^^ 



| CATALOGUE OF BETE ANY COLLEGE. 17 I 

§ , , § 

I GERMAN— FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. I 

1 FIRST YEAR. | 

| Meissner's Grammar. Part I. | 



I Oral Practice, with selected readings. ^ 



| SECOND YEAR. | 

I ^ 

| Meissner's Grammar. Part II. | 

| Oral Practice, with selected readings, | 

§ ^ 

| Reading at sight. ^ 

| Exercises in Grammar and Composition. | 

| I 
| V. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy and | 

I Belles Lettres. 1 






§ § 



1 JUNIOR YEAR. | 

| I 

| First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature (Meiklejohn). | 

| Second Term. — English Literature. | 

I s 

1 SENIOR YEAR. I 

1 ^ 

| First Term. — Metaphysics (McCosh and Bowne). History of Philosophy | 

| (Tennemann).. Especial attention paid to the recent ad- | 

| vances in Physiological Psychology. | 

I Second Term. — Logic ( Jevons). Constitution of United States and Political § 

Economy (Walker). Philology (Trench). History of Civili- s 

| zation (Guizot). Christian Evidences. v | 

^ I 

I ' ■ 1 

| MINISTERIAL COURSE. 1 



| FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LETTERS. | 

| This course embraces the following schools : | 

^ ~ -. n -r-^.- -. -w- S> 



i « 

I " "■■■ - -— 1 - 1 - ^ 



^ •< W /~* \r\ r\ /~\ I /^\ t l-c t k h n n I I— I t n 4- r\ t» tt n v\ /^J I lr\y-i4- v»t irk s\ 



| 1. School of Biblical Introduction. 

2. School of Biblical Languages. 

3. School of Biblical History and Doctrine. 
1 4. School of Church History. | 
| 5. School of Homiletics. | 
| 6. School of Greek. | 
| 7. School of Latin. 1 

8. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

I 9. School of Natural Science. I 
| , 10. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy 1 

| and Belles Lettres. I 

So « 



% 18 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

■ 

| 1. School of Biblical Introduction. g 

I I 

It is the purpose to make the classes in the Classical and the Minis- | 

| terial courses the same in the languages, mathematics and sciences up to | 

| the Junior year and then the major work of the ministerial student is in | 

| studies more distinctly biblical, while the minor work is carried on" in | 

| Latin, Mathematics, English Literature and the Sciences. The work em- | 

| braces the following subjects : | 

I TT ...,..,. ., T • ,. ™ . ,. „ ., I 



Scriptures. In all these instructions the Bible is taken as the main text 
book. New Testament Doctrine includes a detailed study of the Teachings 



the Gospels, Acts and Epistles. 



Hermeneutics and Inspiration, Christian Evidences, | 



^V,XXXX^ U ™x^ ~^^ ^XX^XX^^X*, -'™«" X.VIU C U^ ^ 

| Canonics, Biblical Geography and Archseology. 



— 



\ , _ L „. i 

I 1 

| In the Junior year the Septuagint version will be read largely as pre- ^ 

| paratory to the study of the New Testament Greek. | 

The Senior class will have Greek Exegesis throughout both terms. All | 
| students in this course are required to take Hebrew for at least one year. | 

1 - ! 

3. School of Biblical History and Doctrine. | 



P I 

3. School of Biblical History and Doctrine. | 

^ Old Testament History, embracing the Primeval, Patriarchal, Mosaic | 

| and Prophetic Periods, will be taught. Besides the Bible itself, McLear's ^ 

| Class-book of Old Testament History will be used as a text book. As | 

^ works of reference, Geikie, Stanley, Milman and Ewald are recommended | 

| In New Testament History the course embraces the interval between the | 

^ Old and New Testaments, an Outline Life of Christ, an Outline History of | 

| the Apostolic Church, a Short Life of Paul. The history in the Gospels | 

^ and Acts, and the historical allusions in the Epistles will be carefully ^ 

| studied McLear's Class-Book of New Testament History, Robinson's | 

^ Harmony, Stalker's Life of Christ, and Stalker's Life of St. Paul will be used | 

| as text books; Geikie, Farrar, Andrews and Edersheim on the Life of | 

| Christ ; Farrar, Conybeare and Howson, and Presensee on the Life of Paul | 

| and the Apostolic Church are recommended as works of reference. | 

I I 

In the department of Biblical Doctrine the study of the Old Testament | 

| embraces the Beginnings of Revelation in the Primeval and Patriarchal | 

| Ages, the Covenants, the Mosaic Institution and its Doctrines and Ordi- | 

* nances, the Teachings of Prophecy, and the Wisdom Literature of the old | 



L _ _ _, 

^ of Christ in their order, an examination of the several types of Apostolic | 
| teaching and Exegetical and Expository studies of passages selected from | 

I ' 

Sy////////y/////////y/ys//y//s^^^^ 










CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 19 i 

I I 



I 4. School of Church History. 

I . . ' I 

| Great importance is attached to Church History. Especial attention ^ 

| is paid to the history of the Church till the Council of Nice A. D. 325, the s 

| Rise and Growth of the Papacy to A. D. 1073, the Reformation and Recent | 

| Reformatory Movements. This is supplemented by a course of Lectures ^ 

| on Christian Doctrine, embracing a special study of the great Doctrinal ^ 

| Epochs in the history of the Church. Fisher's History of the Christian | 

| Church is used as a text book, while Neander, Mosheim and Schaff are ^ 

| recommended as works of reference. 

! - ! 

§ 5. School of Homiletics. 



1 

| Students are not only taught the principles, but are drilled thoroughly ^ 

| in the preparation and delivery of sermons, and are given detailed instruc- | 

| tions in the practical duties of the Christian ministry. Phelps' Theory of | 

| Preaching and Blaikie's for the Work of the Ministry are used as text books, s 

1 1 



III. School of the Greek Language. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 



| ... - ..... _ . . ! 





^ First Term. — Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's Greek Lessons. | 

| Daily exercise in writing the language, with the accents ^ 

^ carefully marked. I 

I I 

| Second Term. — Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. Fyffe's Short History of ^ 

| Greece. | 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. 1 

| First Term. — The Anabasis continued. Lucian's Dialogues. Exercises | 

| in writing Greek. Greek History (Cox). | 

| Second Term. — Thucydides. Homer's Iliad (Keep), three books. Prose | 

| Composition (Jones). Grecian History. | 

| JUNIOR YEAR. | 



First Term. — Pindar (Gildersleeve). Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates | 
(Robbins). Prose composition (Sidgwick). 



I • - • 1 

| Second Term. — Plato's Apology of Socrates and Crito (Wagner). Demos- | 

thenes' Oration on the Crown (D'Oofe). Septuagint. 

I I 

| SENIOR Y\EAR. | 

| First Term.— New Testament Greek. | 

| Second Term.— New Testament Greek. 1 

1 I 



s § 

I 20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. % 

1 1 

I IV. School of Latin Language and Literature. p 

I I 

| FRESHMAN YEAR. i 

I / 
JFtrsJ Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. | 

Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. 




| V. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. p 

I I 

| FRESHMAN YEAR. i 

1 i 
\ First Term.— Algebra, beginning with quadratic Equations (Olney's com- | 

| Plete). | 

| Second Term. — Geometry, Plane (Olney). | 

1 SOPHOMORE. I 

I I 
^ First Term.— Geometry, Solid (Olney). Plane Trigonometry (Oliver, Wait | 

| & Jones). | 

| Second Term.— Spherical Trigonometry (O. W. J.) ; Land Surveying. 

I i. 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

^ Second Term. — Astronomy (Lectures). ^ 

— 

| VI. School of Natural Sciences. | 

First Term. — Physiology (Martin). Botany (Wood) 



S SOPHOMORE YEAR. £ 

-- - ■■ - - - - % 



^ Second Term. — Zoology (Orton). 

1 P 

1 JUNIOR YEAR. % 

I I 

^ First Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). ^ 

| Second Term. — Geology (Winchell's Geological Studies). | 

1 SENIOR YEAR. I 

1 i 

§ First Term. — Physics (Avery). ^ 

| I 

W/////////^//////////////////yy//////^^^^ 






I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 21 | 

| | 

^ VII. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy i 

| and Belles Lettres. i 



| JUNIOR YEAR. I 

| I 

| First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature (Shaw). | 

| Second Term. — Rhetoric. English Literature. | 

I SENIOR YEAR. I 

1 -- • ■- -- ■ • 



First Term. — Metaphysics (McCosh and Bowne). History of Philosophy | 
p (Tennemann). | 



p Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Moral Philosophy (Robinson). Constitu- ^ 

| tion of United States, and Political Economy (Walker). | 

I Philology. I 

I 

| COUHSE FOB LADIES. I 

I I 

S FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 2 

I ' . . I 

| This course embraces the following schools: | 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of the Latin Language. 

3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

| 4. School of Natural Sciences. 

v 4 



8. School ot MathpmntiV'S and Astronnmv. | 



5. School ot Modern Languages. 

6. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and 



p o. scnooi oi lvioaern languages. ^ 



Political Economy. 



« ■ - .--7 ,; I 

2 



| I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

| (Same as in Classical Course). p 



......... .. — ...... 



I II. School of the Latin Language and Literature. | 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

I I 

| i*Vrs£ Tmn. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar, with Jones's First Les- | 

g sons. Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. ^ 

| Second Term.— Csesar's Gallic War (Greenough), Book 1, with thorough | 

| drill in Syntax 



| 

~ 

| SOPHOMORE YEAR. f 

I 



y 

First Term.— Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Cgesar's Gallic War, | 
Books II, III, VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Cataline. Prose $ 
Composition (Jones). | 

/a y 

p Second Term.— Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition | 
| continued (Jones). | 



t % 

| 22 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

i % 

| | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. 1 

i 1 

| JYrsf Term. — Prosody. Virgil's iEneid, Books I, II, IV, VI, (Greenough). ^ 

| History of Rome (Allen). | 

/ Second Term,. — Prosody. Select Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Hor- | 

p ace (Lincoln). Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid). | 



! — i 

| III. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

I I 

| FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

| First Term. — Algebra, beginning with Quadratic Equations (Olney). | 

t Second Term. — Geometry, Plane (Olney). I 

| | 

& SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 



First Term. — Geometry, Solid (Olney). Plane Trigonometry (Oliver 
Wait & Jones). 



\ 

SENIOR YEAR. | 

1 



^ Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry (O. W. J.) | 

& 

| SENIOR 

% 

| Second Term. — Astronomy (Lectures). 
v. 



% Second Term. — Geology 



Oral Practice, with selected readings. 



| IV. School of Natural Science. I 

I I 

| SOPHOMORE YEAR. 1 

^ First Term. — Physiology. | 

| Second Term. — Botany (Wood). Zoology. 



I 1 

| JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I I 

p First Term. — Chemistry (Rem sen). | 

1 



I SENIOR YEAR. I 



V. School of Modern Languages. | 



^ First Term. — Physics. ^ 

\ ' — I 

| FRENCH— FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 

i 1 

i FIRST YEAR. | 

I 



| Edgren's Grammar. Part I. ^ 



yrsysy/y/y/ysy/y/ysysysy/ysy/y/ysy/y/ysy/^^^ 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 23 I 

$ , % 

I SECOND YEAR. 

I I 

p Edgren's Grammar. Part II. f 

Reading at sight. Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

| Exercises in Grammar and Composition. | 

I GERMAN— FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 

^ ' ^ 

I FIRST YEAR. I 



/ 



/ 







^ Meissner's Grammar. Part I. | 

| Oral Practice, with selected readings. | 

| SECOND YEAR. 

I Meissner's Grammar. Part II. | 

| Oral Practice, with selected readings. | 



i Reading at sight. 



Exercises in Grammar and Composition. 



| VI. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy / 
I and Belles Lettres. | 



% JUNIOR YEAR. | 



I 

| i^rs£ Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature. 



| Second Term. — Rhetoric. English Literature. | 

^ I 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

6 - ^ 






| i^mi Term. — Metaphysics (McCosh and Bowne). History of Philosophy ^ 



(Tenneman). History. | 

Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Constitution of the United States. Political | 

Economy (Walker). Philology (Trench). History of Civ- / 

ilization (Guizot). Christian Evidences. ^ 

I ^ 

I I 

4 VM/^ %. 









% 4 



b/////y/y/ys////y///////y/////^^^^ 



I 24 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

1 

mil il if Jlistt* 



I — 1 

This department has made a decided step forward during | 

* l 



This department has made a decided step forward during 

| the session iust closed. Music is an art about which few I 
^ ... . . ^ 

| people of this age are willing to be thought entirely ignorant, ; 

| and in which America has progressed wonderfully during 

| the past twenty -five years. The establishment of large 



N 



^ jf-*-^-"- — ^ ' ~ — — 7 — — — ~ „ ^ — ^, ^^ ^ 

| hold this most beautiful Art has on the American people. 

Bethany College offers to its students a rare opportunity | 
| for Music study at a low cost. Private piano and voice | 
| lessons, two each week, from a competent and experienced | 
| teacher, are given at a cost of $40 per college session, or f 25 | 



I for a single term of 20 weeks. Private pupils also have the | 

I privilege of admission to the chorus class free, and to the | 

| Tonic Sol-fa and reading class at one-half the regular price. | 

1 The latter class was formed during; the session of '89-90, 1 

| and the Tonic Sol-fa system of music reading used for the | 

| first half, staff reading for the second half of the term. In | 

| all probability, the Tonic Sol-fa will be the system in use in | 

1 America for chorus and church music in the near future. | 

| Its simplicity, admirable arrangement, and the gratifying | 

| results achieved by its use in a short time, peculiarly com- | 

| mend it to the American mind, naturally so impatient of | 

| results. It is being introduced into all our large cities, and | 

| receives everywhere the most unequivocal endorsements by | 

| leading musicians. | 

| In the piano department the most careful attention is paid | 

| to the formation of a good technique, a mastery of finger, | 

| wrist and arm motions, according to the principles of Dr. | 

^/sy//s////ysy/y///y/y///y/ys^^^^ 



JRSES. 



LADIES' COURSE. 



Latin. 

Higher Algebra. 

French. 

•Bible. 



?y- 



Latin. 

Geometry — Plane. 

French. 

Primary Rhetoric. 



French. 

Physiology. 

Latin. 

German. 

Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry — Plane. 

Zoology. Botany. 

Latin. 

German. 

Trigonometry — Spherical. 

French. 



Latin. 

Chemistry. 

German. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 



Roman History. 

German. 

Latin. 

Geology. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 



Metaplrysics. History of Philosophy. 

History. 

Physics. 



ilology. 
iristian 



L N. T. 



Astronomy (by Lectures). 

Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 

Philology. 

History. 

Christian Evidences. 



I 24 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

| | 

I ,„,,.■ 1 

I — I 



This department has made a decided step forward during | 




| the past twenty-five years. The establishment of large | 
| conservatories, the formation of the National Association of I 
| Music Teachers, and its outgrowth the American College of | 
I Musicians, the multiplication of Singing Societies all over | 
I the country, and the great attention paid to Music in all our | 
| progressive schools and churches, demonstrate what a firm | 
| hold this most beautiful Art has on the American people. 
| Bethany College offers to its students a rare opportunity | 
| for Music study at a low cost. Private piano and voice | 
| lessons, two each week, from a competent and experienced | 
| teacher, are given at a cost of $40 per college session, or $25 | 
| for a single term of 20 weeks. Private pupils also have the | 
| privilege of admission to the chorus class free, and to the | 
| Tonic Sol-fa and reading class at one-half the regular price. | 
The latter class was formed during the session of '89-90, | 
and the Tonic Sol-fa system of music reading used for the | 
first half, staff reading for the second half of the term. In | 
all probability, the Tonic Sol-fa will be the system in use in | 




..aturally so impatient , 
| results. It is being introduced into all our large cities, and | 
| receives everywhere the most uu equivocal endorsements by 



| leading musicians. | 

| In the piano department the most careful attention is paid | 

| to the formation of a good technique, a mastery of finger, | 

| wrist and arm motions, according to the principles of Dr. | 



SYNCHRONISTIC VIEW OF THE SEVERAL COURSES. 




CLASSICAL COURSE. 


SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 


MINISTERIAL COURSE. 


LADIES' COURSE. 


< 

i s 

M 
go 
W 
« 


a 
« 

H 

oo 

OS 


Latin. 
Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 
*Bible. 


Higher Algebra. 
Latin. 
French. 
*P-ible. 


Latin. 
Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 
*Bible. 


Latin. 

Higher Algebra. 

French. 

*Bible. 


a 
w 
w 

H 

ft 

o 
o 
w 

00 


Latin. 
Greek. 

Geometry — Plane. 
Primary Rhetoric. 


G eometry — Plan e. 

French. 

Latin. 

Primary Rhetoric. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Geom etry — Plan e. 

Primary Rhetoric. 


Latin. 

Geometry — Plane. 

French. 

Primary Rhetoric. 


! « 

! S 

1 o 

a 

! Ph 
o 

CO 

O 

p 

l-B 


a 

« 

H 
00 

« 
E 


Physiology. 

Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry — Solid- Trigonometry — Plane. 


French. 

Geometry— Solid. Trigonometry — Plane. 

German. 

Physiology. 


Physiology. 

Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry — Plane. 


French. 

Physiology. 

Latin. 

German. 

Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry— Plane. 


a 

K 
Eh 

o 
& 
o 
u 

H 

DO 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History, Grecian Mythology. 

Zoology. Botany. 

Trigonometry — Spherical. Surveying. 


French. 

Zoology. Botany. 

Trigonometry — Spherical. Surveying. 

German. 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History, Grecian Mythology. 

Zoology. Botany. 

Spherical Trigonometry. Surveying. 


Zoology. Botany. 

Latin. 

German. 

Trigonometry — Spherical. 

French. 


a 

K 
H 

00 

M 


Latin. 

Greek. 

General Geometry. Differential Calculus. 

Chemistry. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


German. 

Descriptive Geometry. 

Geometry— General. Differential Calculus. 

Chemistry. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

0. T. History. 

Hebrew. 

Chemistry. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Latin. 

Chemistry. 

German. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


a 

M 
W 



z 
o 
o 

w 

OO 


Latin. Roman History. 

Greek. 

Geology. 

Integral Calculus, Calculus applied to General 

Rhetoric. English Literature. [Geometry. 


German. 

Roads and Railroads. 

Integral Calculus. General Geometry. 

Geology. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Latin. Roman History. 
Greek. 

N. T. History. Septuagint. 

Hebrew. 

Geology. 


Roman History. 

German. 

Latin. 

Geology. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


O 

CO 


a 
« 

W 

Eh 

Eh 
00 

« 

s 


Metaphysics. History of Philosophy. 

Latin. 

Greek. 

Mechanics. 

Physics. 


Metaphysics. History of Philosophy. 

Mechanics. 

Physics. 


Metaphysics. History of Philosophy. 

Hebrew. 

Church History. 

Physics. 

Greek Exegesis. 0. T. Doctrine. 


Metaphysics. History of Philosophy. 

History. 

Physics. 


M 
H 

Eh 



o 
o 

H 

00 


Greek. 

Roman Literature. Philology. History. 

Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 

Astronomy. 

Christian Evidences. 


Astronomy. 

Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 

History. Philology. 

Physics. 

Christian Evidences. 


Logic. Moral Science- Political Economy. Philology. 
Homiletics. Hermeneutics. Inspiration. Christian 

Evidences. 
Hebrew. 

Astronomy (Lectures). 
Lectures on History of Christian Doctrine. N. T. 

Doctrine. 


Astronomy (by Lectures). 

Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 

Philology. 

History. 

Christian Evidences. 



* See Page 34. 



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CATALOGUE OF BETBAJSY COLLEGE. 25 

^ . ^ 

I William Mason's "Touch and Technic." Selections from 
I the standard technical studies of Cramer, Plaidy, Lcesehorn, ! 
I Eeller, etc., are used, and the taste of the pupil formed for i 
I the best music. Worthy American composition*.., of which I 
I so many are now being produced, are also constantly used, j 

In roice training, great attention is paid to a corred and 
: tasteful singing of songs in the English language, while by 
I no means ignoring the classic German and Italian songs. A 
| fine quality oftone, exact evenness of scale, good enuncia- j 
I tion, and flexibility and ease in 1 h<- use of the rocal organs, g 
: are all thai can be accomplished by any method, whether it 
| is called Italian. French or German. The traditions of the 1 
\ Italian school with the new light which we owe to modern I 
: scientific research and investigation, but above all, common 

ense in the application, is, after all. the uearesl approach to : 
I a description of what is understood bythemusic department : 
I of Bethany of the much abused term, Vocal method. 

Monthly recitals with explanatory remarks are given in 
: Chapel Hall in which musie students are expected to take 
I part. 

Lectures on musical subjects will be given from time to • 
\ time hy the Professor. 

A Harmony class, meel ing once a week, is also a feature- 
I of musical instruction, and a Musical History class will be 
I founded the coming session, which all music pupils are ex- n 
s pected to attend. 

Several musical periodicals {Etude, Art Journal and Bos- I 
I ton Musical Herald) can be found in the library, and the 
I student is thus kept familiar with what \< #oing- on in the : 

^ • I 1 1 s 



I musical world. 

Piano practice costs $10.00 per session for two hours' daily j 

I practice. Lxtra hours at proportionate rates. \ 

s \ 

\ N 

S \ 

^ I 

J 

4 ^ 

.\.\\X\\W\\\\\\\NW\N\\\N\WNNN\\\\.\NWW\"\\W > < AWWWWWWWs 



X $ 

I 26 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

i ! 

I 1 

! 

8 tlffL .. i» . f . .. . f 



l __ 

. i 

Since Bethany lias become a school for the higher educa- | 
1 tion of women as well as men there has been a decided and I 



| tion of women as well as men there has been a decided and , 

* " " " ! 



| growing demand for an art department. For several years 

| capable art teachers have been connected with the College. 

| The art department is now in charge of Mrs. J. M. Trible p 

| who brings to the position superior talents and experience. | 

| There is an interesting and enthusiastic art class and the in- | 

| terest and proficiency of this department promises to keep | 

| pace with the growth of the College in other directions. | 

| Thorough instruction is given in perspective drawing, por- | 




| rare opportunities for sketching from nature. It is the pur- | 



| pose and policy of the College to foster the love and study j 
| of art continually. | 



1 I 

! I 

1 I 



i I 

i 

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I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 27 $ 

S 






/ 



/ 



,§iin 



i i 

I I 

I I 

A few men every year are not able to take the full course, | 

| yet need some preparation for the work of the ministry. ^ 

I For their sake the following course, lasting two years, has | 

I been arranged: f 

I P 

^ FIRST YEAR. | 



z 1 

First Term. — Old Testament History, Church History 

| English Literature, Special Expository Studies in the New j 

I Testament. 



Second Term. — New Testament History, Homiletics, Her- 



Moral Science, Political Economy. 

A certificate will be given in this course, but no degree. 



* m m ## . . . v 

| meneutics, Inspiration, Christian Evidences, English Liter- | 



^ ature. i 

$j . _ /a 



2 SECOND YEAR. | 

i 






First Term. — Old Testament Doctrine, General History, ^ 






^ Mental Science, History of Philosophy. I 

| Second Term. — New Testament Doctrine, General His- I 
v . ^ 

| tory, Lectures on the History of Christian Doctrine, Logic, | 

I" 



| A FOUR YEARS' COURSE OF BIBLE STUDY FOR ALL f 
i ^ 



THE STUDENTS. | 

| It has been determined that every student entering the | 

| College shall take a course in the study of the Bible. In | 

| the Freshman year an outline of Bible History, embracing | 

| the Old and New Testaments, in which Geography, Biogra- f 

| phy, Archaeology, and all the great facts recorded therein, p 

| will be studied. In the Sophomore year there will be a | 

| somewhat close and critical study of the Old Testament. | 

| In the Junior year there will be a similar study of the New ^ 

I ■ I 

/ <f/sys//y/y///ys//////ys//^^^^ 



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N 



| 28 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

s s 



| Testament. In the Senior year there will be special studies | 



S • -r -. ^ i T • i m>r ,,i * , -^ , s 



^ in Job, Psalms, Isaiah, Matthew, Acts, Romans, or such | 

| other books as may be selected. The English Bible will be ] 

| used as the text-book. Such helps as may be needed will | 

| be suggested by the teacher. | 

1 " 1 

1 SPECIAL COURSE IN ENGINEERING, 1 



! 



^ FOR WHICH A CERTIFICATE IS GIVEN. 



For this course no specified time is required, except as | 

| demanded by previous preparation, and the time necessarily | 

| allotted to each branch. | 

To enter upon the course a thorough knowledge of Alge- | 



bra, Geometry and Plane Trigonometry is required. 
| 1. Land Surveying — Embracing all that is necessary to | 



understand the subject in its practical bearings with | 

| field work, mapping, etc. | 

| 2. Leveling, Profiling, Mapping. | 

^ . . I 

3. The Principles of Topographical Surveying and Draw- | 

1 iug- 1 

I I 

| 4. Descriptive Geometry, with Shades, Shadows and Per- | 

I spective. 1 

I . I 



5. Poad and Railroad Surveying — with field operations. | 

Certificates will be given indicating the branch studied | 

| and the degree of proficiency attained. It is very desirable | 

1 that students should enter with the regular classes of the I 

| Scientific Course. | 

1 1 



I PREPARATORY CLASSES. | 

I • 1 

There will be in addition to the regular chairs, instruction | 

| in English Grammar, Arithmetic and beginning Algebra. 

Provision has been made for teachers in book keeping | 

| and short-hand, should there be a demand for these | 

1 studies. | 

%yysy/ys//ys/s/s//yAy//y/yAY//^^^^ 



**/s//////y/ysy///ysysys///sy^^^ 

CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 29 f 

I 



MISSIONS. 



P .... p 

| A course of lectures on Missions will be given before the | 

whole school. This course will cover as fully as practicable f 

! all the more important points in the theory, history and f 

. . _ ■ . _ . _ y. 



practice of Christian Missions. The matter is equally im- | 
^ portant to those who are preparing for w r ork at home and | 
| for those who prepare to go abroad. The Missionary A.sso- | 
| ciation of the College holds stated meetings to hear reports * 
% and original letters from former students and others in the | 
| various mission fields, to pray for the increased success of i 
| missionary labor, to discuss questions connected with the f 
* missionary work, and, in general, to cultivate an intelligent / 
y personal interest in the great enterprise of evangelizing the | 
/ world. During the past year addresses have been delivered | 
| by the secretaries of the different mission boards and by \ 
' others deeply interested in this cause. A large number of | 
^ students are prepared to go out when the Lord opens the way. ^ 

I % 

| RELIGIOUS EXERCISES. I 



p RELIGIOUS EXERCISES. f 

^ y 

y v 

The daily morning devotions are held in the college | 

| chapel at eight o'clock. | 

Daily and weekly meetings for prayer and song and ex- | 

| hortation are maintained by the students. | 

| Pulpit worthy of its splendid traditions. Prof. J. M. Trible f 
| is the regular preacher. Other members of the Faculty speak | 



The college authorities are anxious to make the Bethany | 



is the regular preacher. Other members of the Faculty speak 
I occasionally. During the year a number of eminent men f 
I are invited to spend a Lord's Day in Bethany. The church 
f seeks to contribute to the piety of every student. 



y y 

Y Y 

I CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. f 

I „.. ... ™.„, _ _ _ ™ „ f 

-■-.--- ■-. ■ f 

uable collection from Australia, and exchanges with other | 



1st. The Natural History Cabinet contains most of the 
p Fauna, Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very val- 



| sections of the country. Also a fine Herbarium of native | 
^ plants, with many rare ones from other parts of the world. 






i 30 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 



8 



« § 



I 

| 2d. 27ie Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains sev- | 

| eral thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all | 

| ,- . 

The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains rare I 



devoted to the cultivation of literary composition and ora- 
tory : The Ossolian (ladies), Neotrophian and American 
Literary Institute. 



| ADELPHIAN SOCIETY. 



parts of the world 

The Ethnologica 
i and valuahle collections. I 

! 

APPARiTUS - . | 

The Philosophical apparatus of the College is of the most | 
| elegant and approved kinds and affords the amplest facilities | 
| for the thorough illustration of physical principles. 

The Chemical laboratory is fully provided with all the | 
I apparatus and chemicals needed in the courses offered. | 

I 1 

I I 

i LIBRARY AND READING ROOM 



i _.....--:::•-"■":.::' ::::-.. ^\ 



^ This is a commodious apartment, 30 by 38 feet, well | 

lighted, and supplied with the best papers and magazines of 

; the day. It is known to many that our library has twice l 

| suffered heavy losses by fire ; it is at present well equipped | 



| with encyclopaedias and other works of reference, and con- | 

| tains beside some two thousand volumes in miscellaneous I 

| literature. Liberal gifts in books have been made by friends | 

| during the past year; such donations are earnestly solicited | 

f and will be at all times gratefully acknowledged. | 



i, LITERARY SOCIETIES. | 

I ... I 

There are in connection with the College three societies | 



| As this society differs in some important respects from a | 

| purely Literary Society, it demands a more particular notice. 1 

| As it is a distinguishing feature of Bethany College to | 

| make the Bible a regular subject of study and daily exam- | 

| ination, the Adelphian Society has been organized in order | 

I I 

ty//y///ys/s/jrs/s/sys/s/sys/^^^^ 



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CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 31 | 

1 I 

1 I 

: to promote and carry out, to the fullest extent, the purposes | 



2d. Reading original essays on moral and religious sub- | 



| contemplated in the department of Bible Literature. 

The regular exercises of the Society consist — 

I 1st. Of recitations of portions of the Scriptures. | 

I iects; and 1 

1 I 

3d. The delivery of Scriptural discourses, not only before | 

the Society, but, on suitable occasions, in public. 

Young men preparing for the Christian Ministry may | 

| derive incalculable advantages from this Society. From its | 

| organization, and the character and ability of its members, | 



| it is well fitted to facilitate the acquisition of enlarged views | 

| of the Bible, and the cultivation of a high standard of | 

| morality and religion. | 
The Society has a well-furnished and commodious hall | 

| for its meetings. It has a well-selected Library, to which | 

| it respectfully solicits contributions of works auxiliary to | 

| the study and comprehension of the Bible, Ecclesiastical | 

| History, Ethics, etc. Any such donations will be gratefully | 



o 



candidate 

1. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College 



, received. 

I I 

| TERMS OF GRADUATION. | 

1 1 

| DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. ^ 

I I 

I . . I 

A student may graduate in any school singly. To obtain | 

| the degree of Graduate in any school, it is required of every | 



o 



« at least one session, and shall have studied in the College | 
| the entire Senior year of the school. 2. That within one | 

!S . 1 c ,ti •• n , i • i ini ^ 



| month from the beginning of the session, he shall have | 
| made known to the professor of the school his intention of 



. graduating. 3. That he stand a satisfactory examination 
| on all the prescribed studies of the school. He shall then | 



| be entitled to a Certificate of Graduation free, signed by the | 
| President and Professor. I 



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1 „„ "„„„ „„ „.„„„.„„ „„„„„„ I 



S 32 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 1 






I DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF SCIENCES, BACH- 



% 



| ELOR OF LETTERS AND BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 

y y 



To receive the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of | 

| Sciences, Bachelor of Letters and Bachelor of Philosophy, the $ 

| candidate must have graduated and received his certificates | 

y • • v 

| in the several schools embraced in the respective courses. | 

* He must also have faithfully observed all the other laws and \ 

| regulations of the College. He will then receive a Degree | 

p and Diploma. A fee of ten dollars will be charged for the | 

| Diploma. Five dollars to ministerial students. 



2 ' . _ . . . 2 



A student who has received a Diploma in any course, in p 
order to obtain a Diploma in any other course, shall take | 
up the additional certificate or certificates and pay ten dollars | 



| for the Diploma. | 



| The graduates in the several courses enjoy equally all the f 
| privileges, rights and honors of the College. | 

^ V 

y y 

V V 

FINAL RANK AND GRADUATING HONORS. 
I I 

A record is kept of the daily recitations. At the end of | 
p the month each Professor prepares a report of the work of | 
| his classes. Absences from class or from chapel exercises, | 
| without cause, lower a student's grade. Recitations will ^ 
| begin on the third day of the term. Absences will count | 
| from that day. Absences during the first two weeks count | 
I twice as much as they do afterwards. A record is kept of f 



| each examination ; the examinations are taken into account | 



| in making out the average for the year. | 

The final rank of the graduating class is computed by f 



^ combining the averages for the several years. Students whose | 
I combined averages are ninety-three per cent will be enrolled | 
| in the Honor List, and this distinction will be noted in the | 

r ■■ ; 



Diploma by the words Cum Laude. An average of ninety- | 

four per cent entitles a student to Magna Gum Laude ; an $ 

average of over ninety-five per cent to Summa Cam Laude. | 

The name of no student will appear in the Honor List who f 

has not been a student in the College for at least two years. | 

In the award of honors regard is had to the conduct of the | 

y /////yyy///yyvyv/////y/ysy/y//M^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 33 1 

| student during his course, and any student who has incurred | 

| serious discipline may be debarred from the rank to which § 
I otherwise his scholarship would have entitled him. 

1 I 

| THE MASTER'S DEGREE IN COURSE. | 

In order to obtain the Regular Degree of Master of Arts, | 

| the following conditions are required : 1. The attainment of | 

| the Degree of Bachelor in the course. 2. The actual attend- | 

| ance in the College thereafter for one session and the study | 

| of three Elective studies, to be selected by the candidate § 

| with the consent of the Faculty. 3. An approved examina- | 

tion of selected studies. A fee of ten dollars will be charged | 



I 

I for the Diploma. 1 

1 

| HONORARY MASTER'S DEGREE. | 

I I 



A Bachelor of three years' standing in any one of the | 
courses may receive the Honorary Degree of Master in that | 
course ; provided he shall in the interval have maintained | 



1 . 

| an exemplary character, and pursued studies relating to the | 

| degree. Candidates for this degree should apply to the | 

| President or Secretary of the Faculty before the annual s 

| meeting of the Board of Trustees. | 



No application for the degree of A. M. will be entertained | 
unless accompanied by the fee of ten dollars, which will be | 

I 



| returned in case the degree is not conferred. 



1 § 

I THE COLLEGIAN. 1 

I 1 

During the college year the students publish a monthly | 

| journal entitled The Collegian. It has attained high rank | 

| as a college paper, and affords excellent means for develop- | 

| ing the literary talent of the students. It deserves a | 

| hearty support on the part of the Alumni and friends of | 

the college. 



I 

| the college. | 



1 I 



I PHYSICAL CULTURE. | 



I PHYSICAL CULTURE. | 

I . • ^ 

| Bethany, besides being a school of mind and morals, offers | 

| s ome superior facilities for physical culture. Students are | 

| not shut up to climbing the College hill or promenading the | 

1 5 I 



^X^XXXXXXX^XXX^^XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX^XXX^X^SXX^^ 

S N 

I 34 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

I I 

N , N 

» - - ~ — - § 



I corridor for exercise. For open air sports there is a base- | 

ball ground adjacent to the College building; also tennis | 

courts near by, and the College encourages an interest in | 

| these excellent recreations. In their season opportunities | 

| for skating and sledding are frequent. A Gymnasium, | 

| fitted up with the most approved apparatus, is provided. | 

| During the year a competent teacher drills the students | 

| thoroughly in the various exercises and awakens an en- | 

| thusiasm among them in gymnastic sports. The gymnasium | 

| promises great results in the better health and consequently | 

| better work of the students. It is desired that every student | 

| of the College will spend at least twenty minutes each day in | 

| the gymnasium. Hours are set apart for the daily use of | 



s 



' the gymnasium by the young lady students, and it is ex- | 



| pected that they will make as free use of the gymnasium | 

I" 



facilities as the male students. With such variety of recrea- | 

! tions, no student can lack that diversion and exercise so | 

indispensable to the enjoyment of college life and success in | 

college work. 



^ college work. | 

| PENDLETON HEIGHTS. | 

| One year ago the late residence of President Pendleton | 

! 

| The house is fitted up with every modern comfort and con- | 



| became the property of the college, to be made a Ladies' 

| Boarding Hall ; it was newly furnished throughout, and at 

| the opening of the session was filled to its utmost capacity. 

^ 'nV>r\ Kaiida tci -t-i -i"i-r\r\ nri titct i -f-ri AtTAT>Tr t^-> r\ r\ /~iv»r-> nrwY\ Tr\v>\- onrl /-./"vn ^ 



| venience ; the rooms are large, and well lighted and venti- 

| lated; it stands on the upper slope of the college hill, the 

| spacious and beautiful grounds adjoining the campus. The 

I family of the Vice President reside here, and under the genial | 

I care and Christian influence of Prof, and Mrs. Trible it is I 

| made in the best sense of the word, a home for our | 

| gn4s. | 

Each young lady is expected to bring with her sheets, | 

| pillow cases, towels, napkins, napkin ring, fork, teaspoon | 

| and lamp. Those desiring further information will address | 

| Prof. J. M. Trible, Bethany, W. Va. | 

1 I 

»V^^y//^y////z////////////////^/////^^^^ 



■*v//ys/s/sy//s//ysysys///s/s/s/^^^ 

| CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 35 | 

!— 

| THE NEW DORMITORY. p 

The Trustees confidently expect that a fine Dormitory for / 
^ males will be ready for occupancy by the time the next ses- * 
| sion opens. This building will accommodate about sixty t 
% students. It will have a kitchen, a large dining hall, bath- | 
2 rooms, and other modern conveniences. 

| | 

| PROJECTED RAILROAD. | 

Those interested in Bethany College's success will no f 



% 



| doubt be glad to learn that Bethany has a good prospect of / 
| a railroad. The projected Pittsburgh, Canonsburg and State / 
| Line railroad is located through Bethany. This road, its ^ 
authorities assure us, will be under contract before the end | 






I „ " : 7 : ' . "V . ... ' i 



| of the summer. It will give Bethany connection with the ^ 



| main line of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, Ohio Biver % 

| railroad, Wheeling and Lake Erie railroad and Cleveland | 

| and Pittsburgh railroad (river division) at Wheeling; with | 

| Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis at Wellsburg (on the | 

| Wheeling branch), and with all the railroads that enter | 

Pittsburgh. This new railroad will give Bethany College ^ 



I. 



| an enviable location, situated as it is about mid-wav between fy 



I the trunk lines of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad and the I 
I Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis railroad. Bethany | 
| College would warmly welcome men who might move to ^ 
I Bethanv, because oi the accommodations furnished by this b 
| new railroad, to educate their children, while they them- | 
| selves are engaged in business in the cities to which the road | 
| will ffive easy access. I 

I _^_ ^ i 



The college will complete her fiftieth session in June, f 

| 1891. It is proposed to hold a Jubilee in Commencement | 

| Week. Committees have been appointed to prepare a pro- | 

| gramme and to make all arrangements necessary. All the | 

| graduates and students will be invited to attend. Provision | 



will be made for the entertainment of all who may come. | 
I % 



.//////s/sys/s/sys/s/sysy/ysy/^^^ 

| 36 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

| | 

I ENTRANCE AND EXAMINATIONS. 1 

| I 

The College year consists of two terms, four and a half | 



months each. It begins on the fourth (22d) Monday in Sep- 
tember and ends on the third Thursday in June. In this year 



N 




'$. may be a convenient arrangement of classes in the various | 
| Departments or Schools. Students, however, can enter con- | 
% veniently at the commencement of the second term, February 
1st, after the Intermediate examination in January. 



; ±sx, arcer xne mtermeaiaxe exammauon in January. | 

| NECESSARY EXPENSES. | 



| Tuition for forty weeks at $1.00 per week, . . $40 00 | 

i, Matriculation fee, for coal, janitor, etc., . . . 10 00 | 

^ Furnished room, with care of room, fuel, etc., . . 25 00 | 

| Table board, forty weeks, at $2.00, . . . 80 00 | 

I Washing, 10 00 | 

I I 

I $165 00 1 

The matriculation fee and tuition must be paid at the ^ 

| beginning of each term. | 

| REDUCED TUITION. ■ 1 

I 1 

| Indigent and pious young men in any of the religious | 

| denominations, who wish to prepare for the ministry, shall, | 

| on paying the matriculation fee, be admitted into any of | 

| the courses at Bethany College at one-half the regular rates | 

| of tuition. All applicants for this privilege will be required | 

| to present to the Faculty satisfactory written recommenda- | 

| tions from their respective congregations, and from well | 

| known ministers of the gospel, certifying that they come | 

| under the foregoing conditions, in such form as shall be | 

| prescribed by the Faculty. They shall also be required to | 

| sign a promissory note to pay the full charge for tuition five | 

| years from their withdrawal from the College, provided they | 

I ' 1 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 37 I 

I J 

$ do not, in the meantime, devote themselves to the work of I 

/' . Y 

p the ministry. But this provision for reduction of tuition f 

| shall not extend, in any case, beyond oue session, except | 

| upon the recommendation of the Faculty, and the approval I 

I of the Board. | 

The sons of regular ministers of the gospel of all denom- ^ 



\, 



p inations shall be admitted to all classes and privileges of the | 

j* College, upon payment of matriculation fee and one-half | 

| the regular charges for tuition. | 

l ; I 



SITUATION. I 



— — ■ 1 



y 



^ Virginia, sixteen miles north of Wheeling. The railroad ^ 

| stations for Bethany are Brilliant, on the Cleveland and | 

| Pittsburgh Railroad (river division), and Wellsburg, on the | 

| Wheeling branch of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. | 

^ Louis Railway. From these stations a stage is run to Bethany £ 

| twice every day by E\ Moore, who will give prompt atten- | 

| tion to any orders addressed to him, Bethany, W. Va.; or 

I address W. P. Cowans, Bethany. W. Ya. 



i : 

I 

Bethany College appeals to its friends for patronage, | 



CONCLUSION. 



% 



| and presents the following advantages : | 

I ^ 

1. The healthfulness of the location. It is in the midst § 

I of an elevated region, where there is pure air, good water, f 

| and perfect exemption from malaria and intermittent, con- | 

| gestive and malignant fevers, so prevalent in some parts of I 

| the country. I 

2. The College has a large and commodious building, | 
| and is not therefore hampered for room, either for class * 
| work or for its societies. • | 

3. The students are for the most part not mere boys, but % 
% young men and young women, old enough to have formed § 
\ their purposes and chosen their callings for life, and they / 

& Y 

i/ys/s/s/s//ysys///s//y/ys///sy/ys/s^^^^ 



| 38 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

I I 

I I 

| bend all their energies to make study successful. The work | 



in the class-room is as vigorous as it can be made, and this $ 
p is supplemented by exercises in the literary societies of a ^ 
f, very high order. The aim is to turn out such graduates | 



as can think for themselves. 

I . I 

4. Bethany has a large and learned body of Alumni. | 

| Many of these have become distinguished in the editorial | 

| chair, on the bench, at the bar, in the halls of legislation, at | 

| the professor's desk and in the pulpit. The student is ad- | 

| mitted to this reputation already achieved for him, as soon f 

| as he completes his college course, and it is worth a great | 

^ deal to him. I 



I 1 

I I 

I 
• i 

! 

i I 

vsysy/ys//ysy/y//////sysy/ys//////y/^^^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 39 1 

| 






o 



I 1 






I 



s 



tSumma Cum Laude, 



Cum Laude 



\ 



! _ r , 1 



1 I 



1 

§ Sii.m.mn. (him I ,n:url.p % 



| numma uum juauae, % 

1 1 

I E. 0. LOVETT. | 

! - 1 

| Magna Cum Laude. % 

1 1 

C. E. LOWRY, | 

1 A. H. TAYLOR. 1 



I — i 



1 

| Miss BESSIE CHAPLIKE, I 

| J. B. SMITH, | 

| W. B. WHITE, | 

1 ALFRED HARRIS, 1 



I W. P. BENTLEY, I 

1 E. S. MUCKLEY. 1 

1 1 

1 I 

I I 

! I 



■S////y/yAY//ysys////y///ys/s/^^^ 

I 40 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

! 1 

1 

! 1 

I ! 

I CALENDAR | 

P • ^ 

I FOR 1890-91. I 

I . ! 

| Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday 

and Wednesday, before the third Thursday in June | 
| Annual Commencement, - on the third Thursday in June 1 
I Session begins, - September 22 | 

| Christmas recess begins at 1 p. m., - - December 19 | 

^ • ^ 

| Christmas recess ends, - - - - - January 5 | 

i X 

I First term ends, ----- January 31 | 

I . I 

| Second term begins, ----- February 1 | 

| Anniversary of Neotrophian Society, - November 5 I 

^ I 

| Anniversary of American Literary Institute, November 10 | 

I . ... I 

| Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, February 22 | 

//. TV _ i ji ~r\ rp ,1 l, „i?« r*\ „ , .J. ^ 



| Field Day, - Tuesday before Commencement | 

| 1 

| Class Day - Wednesday before Commencement | 

l l 



I i 



I 1 



I 

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CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 






Alumni and Alumnae 



J. W. Earle, S. C. Thos. W, Whitaker, Va. 

B. F. Williams, Ky. 



OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

I 

FIRST CLASS, JULY 4, 1844. | 

(third session.)* I 



Robert T. Bryan, Ky. J. S. Fall, Ky. | 

John A. Dearborn, Ky. William Ferrel, Va. 

J. C. Stone, Ky. I 



SECOND CLASS, JULY 4, 1845. ^ 



1 

William Baxter, Pa. T. C. McKeever, Pa. 

J. W. Brown, Tenn. Walter C. Whitaker, Ky. 

Andrew Campbell, Tenn. William W. Whitaker, Ky. 

Hiram Christopher, Ky. John II. Williams. Ky. | 

John 0. Ewing, Tenn. James A. Young, Ky. | 

| 
THIRD CLASS, JULY 4, 1846. | 

Elijah C. Bryan, Ky. Henry S. Pearce, Md. 

Daniel B. Bryan, Ky. Daniel Runyon, Ky. 

J. W. C. Bryant, 0. Thomas T. Singleton, Ky. 

Elias J. Earle, S. C. Thomas J. Smith, Ky. 

Richard Lemmon, Md. J. R. Saltonstall, 111. | 

C. L. Loos, 0. C. F. Uhlrich, Va. I 

W. W. McKenney, Va. Benjamin P. Wheeler, Ind. | 

T. J. Mellish, Pa. Richard M. Webb, Ky. | 



? v 

'$ FOURTH CLASS, JULY 3, 1847. g 

^ - 7 

Thomas N. Arnold, Ky. Robert Graham, Pa. 

A. R. Benton, N. Y. J. D. Harris, Ky. % 

R. D. Boykin, Ala. E. L. Lashbrook, Ky. I 

$ * % 

John Bryson, Pa. J. H. Pendleton, Va. f 

J.,N. Carpenter, Va. John Poston, Ky. 



"Bethany College opened its first session November, 1841. % 

6 I 

v ////s////y/y///y/y//s/s/s/s/sys/s/s//y/y///y/y/y//^^^ 



/. 



I 44 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

\ $ 

^ FIFTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1848. | 

John H. Armstrong, Va. Hardin B. Littlepage, Va. 

| John A. Black, Ky. Alexander Proctor, Mo. 

Samuel T. Boykin, Ala. Thomas L. Ricks, Ala. 

| C. A . Caroland, St. John, N. B. B. R. Sulgrove, Ind. I 

Henry M. Fowlkes, Va. John T. Whitelaw, Tenn. 

| John Lindsey, 111. Evan D. Williams, Ky. | 

I I 

^ SIXTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1849. | 

^ y 

1 Charles Carlton, N. Y. M. E. Lard, Mo. I 

Andrew Chapman, Pa. J. H. Neville, 111. | 

| T. D. Gore, Mo. J. D. Pickett, Ky. | 

1 . Colby A. Smith, Ky. | 

| SEVENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1850. V y 

1 I 

| Randolph Ballinger, Ky. Samuel Doughertv, Mo. f 

Joseph Bledsoe, Mo. Henry Henderson, Scotland. / 

A. C. JBryant, 0. James McCariher, Pa. 

| J. W. Butler, III. J. W. McGarvey, Mo. f 

J. W. Carter, Va. Thomas Munnell, Va. 

1 W. W. Smith, Tenn. I 

1 | 

EIGHTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1851. ^ 



v 



/ 



Kirkland Baxter, Pa. J. J. Louthan, Mo. 

| E. T. Bush, Tenn. N. W. Miller, Mo. 

I Edgar Crews, Mo. John C. New, Ind. < 

| I 

| J. M. Ewing, Mo. George Plattenburg, Va. ^ 

Amaziah Hull, Pa. Thomas M. Redd, Ky. 

J. F. Lauck, Va. B. D. T. Standeford, Ky. 

| George Lemmon, Md. A. G. Thomas, Ga. 

1 i 

| NINTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1852. £ 

| I 

Joseph Baldwin, Pa. S. G. Earle, S. C 

Moses Bennett, Ky. J. W. Ewing, Tenn. 

| Alex. Campbell, Jr., Va. R. Faurot, la. ' 

A. W. Campbell, Va. W. P. Hudgens, Va. 

Augustus Campbell, Va. J. T. T. Hundley, Va. 

T. F. Campbell, La. Joseph T. Johnson, Mo. 

J. W. Clanton, Miss. J. B. McLure, Va, 

1 S. W. Coleman, Ky. A. E. Mvers, Tenn. | 

1*1 

Y/s///s/s///////////////sy//sy/y/////y//s/////sys^^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 45 I 
» 



NINTH CLASS 

T. M. Neal, La. 
J. C. Palmer, Va. 
F. H. Risley, 0. 
W. C. Rogers, Ky. 



CONTINUED. 

J. R. Tait, 0. 
E. S. Tener, Ireland. 
J. M. Watson, Mo. 
R. H. Whitaker, Va. 



TENTH CLASS, JULY 3, 1853. 



R. H. Bennett, Miss. 
W. W. Bond, Tenn. 
Hanson Boring, Va. 
J. R. Challen, 0. 
W. S. Giltner, Ky. 
E. A. Guess, O. 
T. J. Harbert, Tenn. 



R. L. Henley, Va. 
P. H. Jones, Va. 
W. D. Moffitt, Til. 
R. H. Prewitt, Ky. 
0. B. Ross, Tenn. 
J. P. Smith, Ky. 
W. B. Smith, Ky. 
W. B. Wynne, Va. 



ELEVENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1854. 



0. A. Burgess, 111. 
W. P. Craig, N. C. 
John T. Dye, Ky. 
Alex. Ellett, Va. 
B. Y. Gross, Mo. 
John Harnitt, Pa. 
J. M. Henley, Va. 
J. S. Lamar, Ga. 



L. H. Lane, Ky. 
J. H. McKay, Ky. 
J. J. Perry, Va. 
W. C. Piper, Ky. 
J. F. Rowe, O. 
John Shackleford, Ky. 
Geo. B. Sherman, Vt. 
W. M. Thrasher, Ind. 
R. V. Wall, Miss. 



TWELFTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1855. 



F. W. Allen, Mo. 
W. E. Armstrong, Ky 
S. S. Bassett, Mo. 
W. S. Billups, Va. 
W. C. Brown, N. 0. 
I. N. Carman, O. 
J. B. Davis, Ky. 
J. W. Davis, Ky. 
Ezra Harnitt, Pa. 



J. W. Horner, D. C. 
Joseph King, Ohio. 
W. H. Lillard, Ky. 
R. M. Mersick, Ky. 
C. L. Randolph, Ala. 
W. H. Robinson, Mo. 
J. C. C. Thornton, Mo. 
J. M. Walton, Tenn. 
R.L. Ware, Va. 



THIRTEENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1856. 

B. H. Allen, Mo. James Atkins, Ga. 

Geo. Anderson, Ind. J. M. Barnes, Ala. 



WW >»N««iNa*N3NO«{iXS®»®»iX!ji^ 



^^OOO^XNSX^i^iXVXXXXX^X^X^XX^ 



I 46 



CATALOGUE OF BETE ANY COLLEGE. 



THIRTEENTH CLASS 

W. 0. Boone, Mo. 
J. A. Brooks, Ky. 
J. H. Bryan, Ky. 
J. M. Childs, Tenn. 
J. B. Dow, Va. 
I. L. Elliott, Tenn. 
W. A. Hall, Tenn. 
J. C. Howell, Mo. 
J. H. Hundley, Ala. 
B. W. Johnson, 111. 
A. M. Lay, Mo. 



-CONTINUED. 

S. McBride, 0. 
J. A. Meng, Mo. 
J. Pollock, Ya. 
L. Pyron, Ga. 
J. T. Riley, Mo. 
W. E. Rogers, Ky. 
L. L. Rowland, Ore. 
W. S. Russell, Mo. 
J. B. Scearce, Ky. 
R. W. Selden, Ya. . 
R. .F. Turner, Ya. 



J. H. Underwood, 111. 



FOURTEENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1857. 



E. B. Challener, Ya. 
J. W. Crockett, Ky. 
L. A. Cutler, Ya. 
William Dew. Va. 
R. S. Dulin, Ky. 
J. M. Dunning, Mo. 
H. C. Durett, Ky. 

A. Elliott, Mo. 

I. B. Grubbs, Ky. 
W. T. Haley, Ore. 

B. F. Harvey, Mo. 

T. W. H. Hedden, Ky. 
E. H. Irvine, Mo. 



FIFTEENTH CLASS, 



T. Y. Berry, Va. 
J. G. Bramham, Ya. 
C. F. Coleman, Va. 
A. F. Dabney, Va. 
H. S. Earl, 111. 
J. W. Goss, Va. 
A. S. Hale, Pa. 
H. H. Haley, Mo. 
Jephthah Hobbs, 111. 
S. C. Humphrey, 111. 



D. L. Irvine, Mo. 
G. A: Jones, 0. 
N. M. Laws, 111. 
P. Lucas, Mo. 

M. W. Miller, Mo. 
J. W. Mosby, Mo. 

F. H. Pendleton, Va. 
C. W. Sewell, Tenn. 

E. R. Sims, Va. 

A. M. Summers, Mo. 
I. D. Stone, Ky. 
P. H. Taylor, Ky. 

G. W. Turner, Mo. 

JULY 2., 1858, 

J. M. Larue, Ky. 
J. C. Miller, Ind. 
C. C. Moore, Ky, 
W. T. Moore, Ky. 
M. T. Moye, N. C. 
H. Pangburn, O. 
N. P. Peeler, Mo. 
G. W. Riley, Ky. 
J. J. Rogers, Ky. 
R. A. Spurr, Ky. 



t/ys//ys/s//y/ysy/y/ys/s//ys/s^^^^^ 



g^*^>^^^xxs*x^ixv^*xx^sVscXN^vxx^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



47 ^ 



FIFTEENTH CLASS— CONTINUED. 



J. Z. Taylor, Pa. 
H. Turner, Ky. 



T. H. Wynne, Va. 
D. T. Yates, Miss. 



SIXTEENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1859. 



R. H. Alfred, S. C. 
J. R. B. Best, S. C. 
M. M. Burke, Miss. 
T. H. Collins, Miss. 

C. F. Crenshaw, Ga. 
N. R. Dale, Ky. 

A. L. Darnall, Ky. 
Wm. Dudley Davis, Va. 
W. S. Frank, Ky. 
Phillip Galley, Pa. 

D. M. Grandfield, Mo. 
W. S. Hawkins, Tenn. 
J. Helm, Ky. 

J. W. Hopper, Ky. 
C. W. Hubbard, Va. 
William Hunt, 0. 



J. H. Johnson, Ky. 
R. H. Johnson, 111. 
J. S. Larue, Ky. 
0. L. Matthews, Va. 
M. B. M'Keever, Pa. 
R. H. Miller, La. 
Robert Moffett, 111. 
D. F. Patterson, Pa. 
Peter Perrine, Pa. 
J. Davis Reid, Ky, 
Warren T. Rogers, Ky. 
B. H. Smith, Mo. 
A. W. Thomson, Ky. 
Matt. Turney, Ky. 
Hiram Warinner, Mo. 
George W. Watts, Mo. 



SEVENTEENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1860. 



R. 0. Baker, Va. 
T. V. Bryant, Mo. 
G. S. Bryant, Mo. 
W. C. Fenley, Ky. 
A. E. Higgason, Va. 
J. A. Holton, Ky. 
W. B. Hough, Va. 
J. C. Johnson, Va. 
J. W. Lucas, Ky. 
Waller Overton, Ky. 
F. H. Overton, Ky. 



R. L. Parrish, Va. 

E. T. Porter, Ky. 

H. D. Ring, Mo. 

J. H. Rogers, Mo. 

C. Shackleford, Ky. 

A. H. Shropshire, Ky. 

Eugene Tarr, Va. 

W. T. Thurmond, Mo. 

C. M. B. Thurmond, Mo. 

J. W. Tompkins, Ky. 

C. L. Woolfolk, Va, 



EIGHTEENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1861 



E. C. Anderson, Va. 
E. Frazier, Ky. 



R. A. Hester, Ky. 
J. J. Perrine, Ky. 
N. F. Smith, Ky. 



&/s/////s/////s//:Y//y/y//////s/^^^ 



S 2 



\ 



/ 



| 48 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. $ 

s i 

X 1 



| NINETEENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1862. 

W. O. Clough, Va. J. L. Hunt, 0. | 



Thomas T. Holton, Ky. T. W. Mulhern, Va. 

1 K. J. Weatherlv, Miss. I 

1 " I 

% TWENTIETH CLASS, JULY 4, 1863. g 

J. R. Darnall, Va. H. T. F. Linn, Mo. 

I L. R. Gault, Ky. W. H. Nave, Mo, I 

| TWENTY-FIRST CLASS, JULY 2, 1864. / 

S / 



I J. H. Carter, Va. D. P. Newcomer, Md. & 

\ / 

A. L. Carvajal, Mexico. J. D. Riley, Ky. 

| S. S. Moore, Ky. Austin Tavlor, Ky. i 

| TWENTY-SECOND CLASS, JULY 4, 1865. 

S ■ ? 

J. L. Pinkerton, Ky. W. C. Dawson, Mo. 

J. P. Player, Tenn. Jabez Hall, W. Va. 

| William Hukill, Jr., W. Va. 



I 

TWENTY-THIRD CLASS, JUNE 28, 1866. / 

Jonn M. Bass, Jr., Tenn. H. Price, Mo. 

sfc wr t> tx;™!^,- r\ i\/r t c+^r,*™ "P.-. t. 



M. R, Freshwater, W. Va. J. S. Ross, Ohio. 

W. B. Higby, O. M. L. Streator, Pa. 

I J. B. Johnson, 111. W. D. Swaim, Ohio. . I 

E. Lowrey, W. Va. Robert Wason, Md. 

John O. Lea, Tenn. J. T. Wilkerson, Ky. 

D. Wilson, W. Va. 



? 1 

| TWENTY-FOURTH CLASS, JUNE 20, 1867. ^ 

I ^ 

I J. L. Allen, Jr., W. Va. F. Houston, Mo. 

I v 

| R. L. Armistead, Tenn. A. Jones, W. Va. 

I v. 

\ J. F. Berry, Wis. H. McDiarmid, Canada West. | 

| L. S. Brown, Pa. W. R. Moore, Ky. 



TWENTY-FIFTH CLASS, JUNE 18, I868. f 

B. L. Coleman, Ky. J. H. Dodd, W. Va. 

R. Courtney, O. B. B. Ferguson, Mo. 

J. W. Crenshaw, Va. Wm. O. Foley, Ind. 

Geo. Crow, W. Va. B. T. Jones, Ohio. 

I J. L. Darsie, Pa. Wm. P. Neale, W. Va. f 

I 9 

| Geo. Darsie, Pa. Geo. P. Nelson, Ky. & 

! 

r/y/y/y/y//////////// //////////, sy/'M 



sfs s / ////s//s/s///s/s/YY/s/s/s/s//ys//y///y/^^^^ 

\ V 

X CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 49 | 



\ — 2 

I I 

5 TWENTY-FIFTH CLASS— CONTINUED. i 

Geo. T. Oliver, Pa. Wm. H. Schell, Pa. 

I S. C. Robison, 0. J. M. Streator, Pa. I 

I si 

| TWENTY-SIXTH CLASS, JUNE 17, 1869. 

Frank W. Allen, W. Va. 0. Goodrich, Ohio. 

Wm. P. Aylesworth, 111. A. T. Gunnell, Mo. 

1 L. Bacon, Mo; J. A. Harding, Ky. | 

T. B. Bird, 0. C. L. Loos, Jr., W. Va. f 

W. S. Bullard, Va. W. K. McAlister, Jr., Tenn. 

J. B. Crenshaw, Va. J. I. Nelson, Mo. | 



B. S. Dean, Wis. C. E. Shriver, Pa. 

G. T. Douglass, W. Va. J. A. Williams, 0. 

R. C. Wilson, W. Va. I 

TWENTY-SEVENTH CLASS, JUNE 16, 1870. | 

| I 

J. G. Anderson, Va. F. H. Merger, Tenn. % 

W. S. Atkinson, O. H. N. Mertz, O. 

1 W. C. Gans, 0. B. W. Peterson, W. Va. | 

John G. Hawley, Mieh. W. H. Spencer, Ky. 

B. H. Hay den, Mich. R. W. Thomas, Texas. 

H. W. List, W. Va. G. N. Tillman, Tenn. 

W. C. Lyne, Va. A. B. Wells, Ky. | 

I ' V 

TWENTY-EIGHTH CLASS, JUNE 15, 1871. P 

I I 

B. T. Blanpied, O. R. H. Marling, Tenn. | 

D. W. Clendenin, Can. A. M. Merriman, Mich. 

E. L. Crenshaw, Va. L. K. Murton, Can. p 
G. C. Curtis, W. Va. F. D. Power, Va. 

W. B. Dillard, Va. J. R. Reese, Mich. f 

| G. J. Ellis, 0. J. C. Rosborough, Miss. | 

W. S. Errett, O. A. C. Smith, Ga. % 

G . M. Kemp, 0. E. G. Smith, W. Va. 

| R. T. Walker, Va. I 

I % 

TWENTY-NINTH CLASS, JUNE 20, 1872. 

E. D. Barclay, Can. C. T. Henley, Va. I 

James Burrier, 0. Charles Knight, Ky. ^ 

C. W. Franzheim, W. Va. F. M. Oglebay, W. Va. 
L. S. Gibson, W. Va. D. S. Sowers, Pa. 

T. A. Harvey, Pa. D. D. Vorhees, O. | 

I R. H. Wynne, Va. I 

I 



I 50 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 



THIRTIETH CLASS, 

J. N. Adams, Tenn. 

Alcinous Baker, O. 

J. A. Beatie, 0. 

W. C. Buchanan, W. Va. 

J. B. Clark, Ky. 

W. K. Curtis, W. Va. 

J. D. Davis, Penn. 

J. E. Dunn, Va. 

M. P. Gallaher, 0. 

R. S. Groves, O. 

Fred Hoffman, O. 

J. W. Huey, Tenn. 



JUNE 19, 1873/ 

S. A. Lacock, Pa. 
H. S. Lobingier, Pa. 
G. W. McCoard, Pa. 
J. F. Merriman, Mo. 

F. P. McNeil, W. Va. 
Charles Mills, Pa. 

J. A. Moninger, Pa. 
J. H. Nesslage, N. Y. 

G. W. Ralston, Pa. 

E. D. Shreve, O. 
L. H. Stine, Ills. 

F. P. St. Clair, W. Va. 



THIRTY-FIRST CLASS, JUNE 18, 1874. 



W. S. Garvey, Ky. 

C. P. Garvey, Ky. 

D. M. Harris, O. 
Alex Kuhn, W. Va. 

A. McLean, P. E. Island. 
N. McLeaod, P. E. Island. 
J. D. Maxwell, O. 



M. J. Maxwell, 0. 
A. J. Moye, N. C 
S. C. Rockwell, Pa. 
J. H. Sallee, Ky. 
Geo. T. Smith, Ind. 
W. B. Thomson, 0. 
Roger Williams, Pa. 



THIRTY-SECOND CLASS. JUNE 18, IS75. 



D. S. Borland, O. 

C. T. Carlton, Texas. 
M. M. Cochran, Pa. 
W. A. Davidson, Pa. 
J. T. Gauo, Ky. 

E. J. Gantz, N. Y. 

S. B. Knowles, Nova Scotia. 
J. A. Myers, W. Va. 



I. J. Spencer, 0. 
J. M. Trible, Va. 
W. A. Watkins, Pa. 
L. W. Welsh, Md. 
E. T. Williams; 0. 
A. B. Williams, O. 
J. J. Williams, Ky. 
J. T. Wilson, Va. 



E. V. Zollars, 0. 

THIRTY-THIRD CLASS, JUNE 15, 1876. 

G. W. Burns, O. B. C. Hagerman, Ky. 

A. F. Erb, N. Y. F. C. McMillin, O. 

N. C. Criswell, W. Va. G. W. McCord, W. Va. 

T. C. Gabler, Pa. C. S. Morrison, O. 

C. W. Gano, Tex. E. C. Myers, W. Va. 



sys/s/s//sy/s,y/r^/syxsyysy/^^ 



r7/s/////////sy//j's/s//yAy/////s/s^^^ 

I 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



51 



THIRTY-THIRD CLASS— CONTINUED. 



W. F. Parker, Mo. 

F. W. Pattie, Tex. 

J. S. Rodgers, W. Va. 

W. M. Eichardson, W. Va. 

Charles Shields, Pa. 



E. F. Taylor, Ind. 

F. S. Trimble, Md. 
W. H. Woolery, Ky. 

G. L.Wharton, 111. 
W. B. Young, Ala. 



R. P. Young, La. 
THIRTY-FOURTH CLASS, JUNE 21, 1877. 



T. V. Barclay, Ky. 
S. W. Brown, 0. 
T. H. Capp, Australia. 
E. W. Dallas, O. 
M. J. Hartley, 0. 
C. P. Hendershot, 0. 
E. B. Hook, Ga. 
Alex. Holt, Mo. 
C. P. Kemper, W. Va. 
J. R. Lamar, Ga. 



P. J. Lamar, Ga. 
Harry McFarland, Pa. 
A. J. Mercer, 0. 
W. H. Scott, O. 
E. G. Sebree, Jr., Ky. 
R. T. Walker, Jr., Tex. 
G. E. Walk, Tenn. 
G. S. Walton, La. 
W. G. Walton, La. 
S. A. Walton, Ky. 



THIRTY-FIFTH CLASS, JUNE 20, 1878. 



John Ambler, la. 
C. L. Brown, W. Va. 
George Byrne, W. Va. 
W. N. Curtis, W. Va. 
Carroll Ghent, 0. 
S. D. Goff, Ky. 
M. J. Goodwin, Ky. 
H. W. Grigsby, Pa. 
W.H.Hayden, O. 
0. S. Marshall, W. Va. 



D. A. Quick, W.Va. 

C. L. Sallee, Ky. 
J. H. Shinn, Ark. 
G. W. Shinn, Ark. 
Alonzo Skidmore, O. 
B. L. Smith, Ind. 

J. W. Tate, Mo. 

D. O. Thomas, Wales. 
N. P. Van Meter, Ky. 
C T. Vinson, Ky. 



THIRTY-SIXTH CLASS, JUNE 19, 1879. 



A. G. Bauer, 0. 
D. W. Daugherty, O. 
C. H. Garvey, Ky. 
J. W. Gist, W. Va. 
C. W. Harvey, Md. 
W. S. Hoye, Va. 
Asbury Hull, Ga. 



C. A. Kleeberger, O. 
S. P. Lazear, W. Va. 
0. A. Lyon, 0. 
Levi Marshall, 0. 
W. C Meaux, Ky. 
C. D. Painter, Ky. 
P. M. Pritchard, O. 



t//y/y/y/y/y//s///s///s///Av/s/s/s^^^^ 



■p/s/s/s/s/j/s/s/s/s/s//y//s///s/^^^ 

I 52 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 



I THIRTY-SIXTH CLASS-CONTINUED. | 

$ I 

T. C. Eobinson, Ky. L. A. Thomas, Jr., Ky. } 

| W. Rist, Col. M. J. I. Thomson, 0. ^ 

W. W. Stephenson, Ky. W. C. Wade, Va. 

R. W. Stephenson, P. E. Isl. C. P. Winbigler, O. 

I J. F. Winn, Ky. | 



1 



THIRTY-SEVENTH CLASS, JUNE 17, 1880. 



B. 0. Aylesworth, 111. J. W. Jenkins, Mich. 

| J. D. Crow, Ky. J. W. McGarvey, Jr., Ky. 

E. P. Couch. Tenn. W. H. McKinley, Ky. 

| A. S. Dabney, Ky. D. C. McKay, P. E. Island. | 

| Ida C. Darsie, Pa. H. H. Nesslage, N. Y. 

| A. T. Fox, Pa. C. W. Norris, Ky. | 

I T. L. Fowler, Canada. W. S. Priest, 0. 



I A. B. Griffith, Pa. F. T. Smith, 0. | 

I "I 

| James Hammond, 0. J. R. Stevenson, la. ^ 

| S. L. Van Meter, Ky. | 

THIRTY-EIGHTH CLASS, JUNE 16, 1881. 

E. W. Mathews, 0. C. J. Tanner, O. 

I Curran Palmer, W. Va. J. C. Ulrich, W. Va. 1 

%' I 

THIRTY-NINTH CLASS, JUNE 15, 1882. 

| J. L. Atkins, Ga. W. G. Garvey, Ky. | 

Mary A. Campbell, W. Va. A. M. Harvuot, 0. 

| J. A. Cox, W. Va. L. B. Mertz, 0. | 

| Jennie Darsie, Pa. H. K. Pendleton, W. Va. | 

S. L. Darsie, W. Va. W. S. St, Clair, W. Va. 

I W. S. Wells, Mo. 1 

I 1 

g FORTIETH CLASS, JUNE 22, 1883. & 

| D. E. Andrews, O. C. M. Oliphant, O. 

F. V. Brown, N. Y. S, Rodgers, W. Va. 
J. H. Grayson, Va. A. C. Strickley, Va. 
Irene T. Myers, W. Va. Stewart Taylor, Mo. 

FORTY-FIRST CLASS, JUNE 20, 1884. | 

I I 

| A. G. Baker, 0. G. T. Halbert, Ky. | 

C. G. Brelos, N. Y. R. H. Lillard Ky. 

| A. J. Colborn, Pa. W. H. Mooney, O. | 

| T. J. Davis, Va. Emma G. Newcomer, Pa. | 
t/sys/s/s/s/s/s/s/s/jy/M^^ 



\\\\\\\\\\\X\\\WA\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\v 

| CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 53 | 

I lit 

r 

I FORTY-FIRST CLASS— CONTINUED. | 

W. S. Payne, Ky. G. K. Smith, Mo. 

P. Y. Pendleton, Pa. F. B. Walker, Ind. 

| F. L. Phillips, Ya. H. C. Wells, Mo. | 

| E. M. Smith, Va. J. F. Witmer, N. Y. | 

| L. C Woolery,Ky. | 

^ I 

| FORTY-SECOND CLASS, JUNE 18, 1885. | 

F. P. Arthur, N. Y. W. L. McElroy, 0. 

| M. G. Baxter, 0. Flora Price, O. | 

F. S. Frown, N. Y. Gussie Price, 0. 

A. D. Dowling, Ohio. G. W. Smith, Mo. 

F. M. Dowling, 0. Cyrus Ulrich, O. 

| D. S. Gay, Ky. Laura Westlake, O. | 

J. H. Mertz, 0. J. B. Wilson, W. Va. | 

1 W. H. Wolf, O. | 

1 ' I 

| FORTY-THIRD CLASS, JUNE 17, 1886. | 

s I 

| S. M. Cooper, 0. R. M. Rosser, Ga. | 

| A. W. Mayers, O. Oscar Schmiedel, W. Va. | 

G. W. Muckley, O. A. L. White, O. 

1 W. J. McLure, 0. H. L. Willett, Mich. | 

| W. C. Payne, Ind. Lassie Williamson, Idaho. | 

1 J. R. Wilson, W. Va. . 1 

1 FORTY-FOURTH CLASS, JUNE 16, 1887. I 

I I 

| E. E. Curry, 0. J. C. Reid, Ry. 

| T. A. Jones, Ky. Viginti R. Shriver, W. Va. | 

S. T. Martin, 0. J. F. Woolery, Ky. 

I I 

| FORTY-FIFTH CLASS, JUNE 21, 1888, ^ 

| M. L. Bartlett, 0. Sherman Kirk, 0. | 

R. M. Campbell, W. Va. C. F. McCoy, 0. 

J. W. Gorrell, W. Va. A. B. Phillips, 0. 

| G. M. Guy, Kan. J. E. Pounds, 0. | 

| J. M. Hervey, 0. H. H. Rumble, Mo. | 



F. S. Israel, 0. H R. White, 0. 

1 J. L. White, Ky. 

1 - ■ I 

FORTY-SIXTH CLASS, JUNE 20. 1889. | 

| W.L. Addy, Pa. E.R. Black, Canada. | 

1 A. S. Bell, W. Va. L. J. Cameron, O. | 



| 54 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY CQLLEGE. 






FORTY-SIXTH CLASS— CONTINUED. 



Anna L. Cox, W. Va. 
T. S. Freeman, Nova Scotia. 
J. A. Hopkins, Ohio. 
Daisy E. Lewis, W. Va. 
Nellie 0, Mendel, W. Va. 



A. C. Phillips, Pa. 

J. H. Strickling, W. Va. 

H. W. Talinage, Pa. 

W. K. Warren, Mo. 

A. J, P. Wilson, W. Va. 



FORTY-SEVENTH CLASS, JUNE 19, I890. 

Belle M. McDiarmid, 0. 
S. S. McGill, 0. 
L. I. Mercer, 0. 
Melancthon Moore, 0. 
E. S. Muckley, 0. 
Zinnia Oram, W. Va. 



W. P. Bentley, 0. 
Emily M. Camp, O. 
Bessie Chapline, W. Va 
R. A. Cutler, Va. 
J3. S. Ferrall, 0. 
Alfred Harris, W. Va. 
R. S. Israel, O. 
E. O. Lovett, 0. 
C. E. Lowry, 111. 



J. B. Smith, 0. 
A. H. Taylor, W. Va. 
G. S. Warnock, 0. 
W. B. White, Ky. 



WHOLE NUMBER OF GRADUATES BY STATES. 

Kentucky, 

Ohio, . 

Virginia, 

West Virginia, . 

Missouri, 

Pennsylvania, 

Tennessee, 

Illinois, 

Indiana, . 

Georgia, 

New York, 

Maryland, . 

Mississippi, 

Alabama, . 

Canada, 

Louisiana, . 

Michigan, 

South Carolina, . 

Texas, . ".. 



142 


North Carolina, . 


4 


117 


Prince Edward Island, 


. 4 


81 


Oregon, 


2 


69 


Wisconsin, 


. 2 


63 


Nova Scotia, 


2 


53 


Arkansas, 


. 2 


29 


Iowa, .... 


2 


20 


Colorado, 


. 1 


14 


Vermont, 


1 


12 


District of Columbia, 


. 1 


11 


Kansas, 


1 


8 


Ireland, . • . 


. 1 


8 


Idaho, 


1 


7 


Mexico, . 


. 1 


6 


New Brunswick, 


1 


6 


Scotland, . , 


. 1 


6 


Australia, . 


1 


5 


Wales, 


. 1 


5 







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^Hi> WM <$M£> ^£ ^>> 3^8 <si 

C £@|)V s^%. '^jg"^ 97rts Q $5&y &^g% Q c<5 




CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 




ethany (College, 



FOR THE 



• Taftietty m Session • 



Ending June 18, 1891. 



WHEELING : 

DAILY INTELLIGENCER STEAM BOOK AND JOB PRINT. 



1891. 



§5S 38^8 ctggjj ^ti£P c^§§5«» ffi^ t<-®&D 

^ c-^% '<%&>& ^yy^ c g@§v jg^fe <r c§^) 







I {Torms of fieqaesls. 1 

1 — 1 

! 

4. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, • 

I Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of, | 

I ' I 

| thousand dollars, to be safely invested by them as an endowment, | 

I I 

| jAe interest only of which is to be used for the support of the | 

I 

| College. 



r 

i - i 

I ^ ! 

1 I 

J give and. bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, $ 

I " I 

| Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of p 

| thousand dollars, to be applied, at their discretion, for the gen- | 

I ... ' .^r-^l 1 



| eral purposes of the College. 



1 " ■ ' " : I 



I I 



I- .—-J 

1 1 



J g^e and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, f 

| Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of. 

| 

| thousand dollars, to be safely invested by them and the interest | 

I I 

| o?% applied, at their discretion, to aid deserving students in any | 

I I 

| course in the College. | 

J — -' — 1 




3 



hi 

w 

(39: 



■^////y///ys/Ay/s/s/s//////ys//y^^^ 

I I ATA t r^r^i TC I 



Catalogue 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



I 

2 OF THE 6 

1 

i I 

I " ! 

! Bethany College I 

% V 

% FOR THE y. 

j 1 

Fiftieth Session, ending June 18, 1891. 

I I 

I I 

^ WITH THE ^ 

I I 

I COURSE of STUDY & ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT f 

I I 

I FOR 1891-'92. I 

5 ? 

6 HPCM to mai v;q A\ir» CCMAI cc r^M cmui TGDMQ ^ 



OPEN TO MALES AND FEMALES ON EQUAL TERMS. f 






P I 

I ■ I 



P P 



BETHANY, WEST VIRGINIA. | 



t 1RQ1 ^. 



1891. g 



P P 

I I 



' / y/y/y/y/ys//y/y///y/y/ys//y/ys//y^^^ 



| A. McLean, . 
I W. K. Pendleton, 

I J. W. MuLHOLLAND, 
W. F. RlCHARDSON, . 

Hon. Geo. H. Anderson, 
Hon. R. M. Bishop, . 

| H. K. Pendleton, 

I A. W. Campbell, 

I J. E. Curtis, 

I Dr. J. E. Whitsett, 

| R. MOFFETT, 

I *P. S. Fall, . 

Alex. Campbell, 

Charles Shields, . 

Judge L. Bacon, 

George T. Oliver, 

C. B. Turner . 

J. H. Jones, 

Russell Errett, 

W. C. Lyne, 

Thomas W. Phillips, 

Dr. Roger Williams, . 

John C. Palmer, 

J. J. Barclay, 

R. S. Latimer, 
| George Darsie, 

Dr. I. M. Ridge, 

S. M. Cooper, 

M. M. Cochran, 

Oliver Marshall, 



'•'-Deceased. 



Bethany, W. Va. 
Eustis, Fla. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Ya. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Perryopolis, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Alliance, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Wheeler, Ala. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 



s 



i 



$/s////y*y////ys//ys/Ay/AY//y//AY/sy/ys/sys^^^^^ 



I I 

I 

$ A T^ ATTTTl A-TTAH/TTTTIA-VT A TV ,T T^» 



ARCHIBALD McLEAN, A. M., President, 

J. M. TRIBLE, A.M., Vice-President, | 

5 And Professor of Biblical Literature. ^ 

I — 

| W. K. PENDLETON, LL.D., 1 

1 1 

^ President Emeritus. ^ 

1 A. C. PENDLETON, A.M., 1 

1 1 

§ Professor of English Literature and Modern Languages. § 

Professor of Mathematics, Astronomy and Civil Engineering. ^ 

! — I 

FRANK M. DOWLINO, A.M., | 

^ Professor of Latin Language and Literature. § 

! — I 

LEWIS CASS WOOLERY, A.M., 

§ Professor of Greek Language and Literature. $ 

I I 



| B. T. BLANPIED, A.M., | 

^ Professor of Natural Sciences. § 

I 1 



I 1 

1 Mrs. J. M. TRIBLE, 1 

^ Teacher of Drawing and Painting. ^ 

| EDWIN R. SNYDER, | 

| Professor of Music. ^ 

J. B. SMITH, | 

^ Adjunct Professor. | 

I 1 






ARCHIBALD McLEAN. 



J. M. TRIBLE. 



C. B. TURNER, 
J. E. CURTIS, 



ALEX. CAMPBELL. 



J. C. PALMER, Treasurer. 



A. C. PENDLETON, 

Librarian and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 



F. M. DOWLINGr, Secretary of the Faculty. 



| 



B. T. BLANPIED, Curator of the Museum. 



OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, Bursar. 



! 



S. M. COOPER, Financial Agent. 



^'//////y/ys/sysy//s//y/ysy//*^^^^ 



s 



Black, Geo. 0., 
! Butler, E. J., 
| Fox, Evangeline, . 
| Gordon, E. W., 
| Harp, W. A., 
| Hedgepeth, D. E. V., 
| Hoover, H. W., 
I Jenkins, B. A., 
| Kelley, Beatrice M., 
| Kreidler, C. M., 
: McGavran, J. G., 
McWane, J. R., 
Oram, W. G., 
Schrontz, W. E., 
Wells, Daisy M., . 
Wright, W. J., 



Aldrich, I. K, 
Blackwell, H. F., 
| Camp, G. T., 
Campbell, Louise, 
Chatley, M. E., 
Clarke, Ernest S., 
Darsie, George, 
| Davis, C. B., 
I Garrison, A. 0., 
Garrison, W. E., 
Gillespie, Barnes, 
Groom, W. T., 
Hanna, W. H., 
| Jopson, C. W , 
| Lyon, Emma, 
| Miller, J. H., . 
Etta, 



SENIORS. 

Rockwood, Ontario. 
. Tully, N. Y. 

Columbus, 0. 
. Braddock, Pa. 

Logansport, Ind. 

Union City, Ind. 

Selkirk, Ontario. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Steubenville, 0. 
. Beaver Creek, Md. 

Bucks, O. 
. Wytheville, Va. 

Wellsburg, W. Ya. 
. Washington, Pa. 

West Liberty, W. Ya. 
. Sharon, Pa. 

J U NIORS. 

Angola, Ind. 
. Lexington, Mo. 

Marion, 0. 
. Sullivan, 0. 

New Galilee, Pa. 
. Falmouth, Ky. 

Unio utown,*Pa. 
. Jeromeville, 0. 

St. Louis, Mo. 
. St. Louis, Mo. 

Tazewell C. H., Ya. 

Covington, Ky. 

Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 
. JSTicolaus, Cal. 

Washington, Pa. 
. Rocky Fork, 0. 

Wilmington, 0. 



| Rannells, L 

r//y/ys//ys//yAY////ysy/////ysys//y//s/s/^^ 






I 6 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



I 

| Scott, 0. E., 

I Scott, R. G., 

; Shupe,May, 



McClellancltown, Pa. 
McClellandtown, Pa. 
Columbus, 0. 
Lake Fork, 0. 



Winbigler, W. W., 

SOPHOM ORES. 

. Tappahannock, Va. 

Bethel, Conn. 
. Wellsville, 0. 



Bagby, Richard, 
Baldwin, Mary E., 
Brenneman, R. E., 
Cameron, Elizabeth K., 

\ Chapman, A. L., 

| Chapman, F. A., . 

| Childs, May C, 

| Craig, J. H., 

| Creighton, Allen B., 

| Danford, M. V., 

| Dodd, W. Q., . 

I Evans, H. 0., 

| Gray, Nomer, 

| Hankins, B. L., 
v 

| Harris, Allen, 

| Henderson, G. V., 
I Johnson, G. C, 
| Kershner, B. L., 
I Lovett, G. D., . 
| Mendel, Mamie K., 
; Perry, E. L., 

Prewitt, W. C, 

Reid, W. H., . 

Sanborn, Mary, 

Wayman, J. E. W., . 

Whistler, J. E. J., 

Williamson, Minnie A., 



Millersburg, 0. 
Jonley, Pa. 

Holliday s Cove, W. Va. 
Greensburg, Ind. 
New Lisbon, 0. 
Malvern, O. 
Pilcher, 0. 

New Philadelphia, O. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Trenton, N. J. 
Massillon, 0. 
St. Louisville, 0. 
Richmond, Mo. 
Hattonia, 0. 
Clearspring, Md. 
Shreve, 0. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Homer, N. Y. 
Winchester, Ky. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Loudonville, 0. 
Glen Easton, W. Va. 
Newark, Del. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



FRESH MEN 



Addy, F. K, 
| Alexander, H. B. 
| Allen, H. W., 
| Allison, D. K., . 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Beaver Falls, Pa. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Dayton, 0. 



I 



I 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



7 



I Arnold, J. E., ... 

| Arthur, W. D., 

^ Barnes, Robert, 

| Barnes, R. G., 

| Billingsley, W. H., . 

| Bonar, G. W., ... 

| Bone, A. R., . . . 

I Bowman, Ina W.. 

I Brandenburg, W. H., 

^ Brown, Laura, 

| Campbell, Alice, 

| Campbell, Archie, 

% Cave, P. A., 

Christopher, Marion, 

Craft, Kate, 

i Davidson, G-. E., 

'/, Davis, Bertha D., 

i . 

^ Dorman. E. H., 

| Dowling, Clarence, 

I Fortier, Grace, 

| Gans, W. L., 

| Greeve, J. 0., 

I Grove, R. K., 

| Hall, W. F,, 

I Hickman, B. T., 

I Hostetter, B. W., . 

| Hundley, J. T. T., . 

| Ice, D. M., . 

| Ingram, G. D., . 

| Irelan, G. M., ... 

| Israel, C. E., . . . 

| Israel, J. H., 

y 

| Israel, Lizzie C, 

I Jinnett, W. R., 

| Johnston, W. G., 

| Jones, C. E., ... 

| Joyce, J. A., 

| Kimmell, I. W., 

| Kulp, W. M., . 

^<VXXXXXVXXXXX>iX>iXXX>*^iX^ 



Ashland, 0. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
California, Pa. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
Greensburg, Ind. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Dayton, 0. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Louisa C. H., Va. 
Warrensburg, Mo. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
East Liverpool, 0. 
Cincinnati, 0. 
Carthage, 0. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Buffalo, K Y. ' 
Dayton, O. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Shanersville, 0. 
Dunnsville, Va. 
Mannington, W. Va. 
Wellsville, 0. 
Portage, 0. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
North Carolina. 
Sinking Creek, Va. 
Greensburg, Pa. 
Paola, Kansas. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Cincinnati, O. 



| 8 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

^ . , ^ 

x _____ j 

i. 4 



| Lantz, O. E., 

| Lockhart, Mary, 

\ Longdon, F. J., Jr., 

| Luttenberger, J. G. M.. 

| Maxwell, 0. H., . 

| McCarty, S. 0., 

| MeMillen, H. B., . 

I Merry man, J. E., 

| Moore, Zuinglius, . 

| Muckley, O. K., 

| Muckley, 0. P., . 

| Neill, R. P., 

I Patton, R. M., 

| Perry, G. L., 

| Phillips, T. G., 

| Phipps, 0. G., 

| Plattenburg, Geo. II., 

| Porter, Anna May, 

^ Pritchard, C. W., 

| Pritcbard, G. R., 

| Reeves, W. E., 

| Reynolds, H. G., 

| Robertson, J. R., . 

| Robinson, T. L., 

| Sapp, F. B., 

| Scott, M. M., . 

| Sharritt, Belle, 

| Sharritt, J. L., 
Sparks, R. A., 
Stewart, I). H., 

i Tener,H.C, 
Thompson, E. D., 
Ulrich, Claudia M., 
Van Horn, Walter, . 
Vodrey, Harry, 



% White, Clara L., 
I Wilfley, E, A., 



Piedmont, 0. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Independence, Mo. 
Eagle Lake, Tex. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Beallsville, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
New Lisbon, 0. 
Somerset, Pa. 
Homer, N. Y. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Paris, Tex. 
Dover, Mo. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
New Lisbon, 0. 
New Lisbon, 0. 
Burlington, Kan. 
Stamping Ground, Ky. 
Rensselaer, Mo. 
Belton, Mo. 
Gladesville, W. Va. 
McClellandtown, W. Va. 
Angola, Ind. 
Angola, Ind. 
Richmond, Ky. 
Ontario. 

Bethany, W. Va. 
Antioch, 0. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Warren, 0. 
East Liverpool, 0. 
Lamira, 0. 
Kansas City, Mo. 



i///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// 



,'//////////X///Xy'/y'/X////X/XX/X////X//Xy'//////X/////////////'/'//rX>'///XX////; 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



9 



SPECI A L 

Billings, Laura, 

Chapman, Minna, 

Campbell, Laura A , 

Creighton, Belle, 

Dimond, Jessie, 

Dowling, Alia, 

Fox, Grace, . 

Gordon, Laura, 

Hayes, Emily H., . 

Hundley, Gazelle, 
| Johnson, A. S., 
| Johnson, Laura, 

Lauck, Bessie, 

McCrory, Harry, 

Moore, Ada, 

Moser, Josie, 

Neill, Helen, ' . 

Scott, Goldie, 

Scott, Odessa, 

Scott, Ola, 

Scott, Zona, > . 

Sheets, Laura, . 
| Stephens, J. D. } 
| Stockdale, Margaret, 

! 



Taber, Grace A., 
Taylor, Bessie, 
Taylor, Ida, 
Tener, Sarah B., 
Woolery, Mattie, 



STU DENTS. 

Bethany, W. Va. 
. Holliday's Cove, W. Va. 

Norfolk, Va. 
. Malvern, 0. 

Bethany, W. Va. 
. Bethany, W. Va. 

Columbus, O. 
. Braddock, Pa. 

Clarence, BT. Y. 

Dunnsville, Va. 

Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
. Hattonia, 0. 

Bethany, W. Va. 
. Connellsville, Pa. 

Bethany, W. Va. 
. Mt. Healthy, 0. 

New Lisbon, O. 
. McClellandtown, Pa. 

McClellandtown, Pa. 
. McClellandtown, Pa. 

McClellandtown, Pa. 
. "Wellsville, O. 

Orton, Ontario. 
. California, Pa. 

Buffalo, H". Y. 
. Wheeling, W. Va. 

Wheeling, W. Va. 
. Bethany, W. Va. 

Bethany, W. Va. 



RESIDENT GRADUATES. 



| Cutler, E, A., 
f Pounds, J. E., 



Richmond, Va. 
Canton, O. 



4>iXXXX^XX>iXXXXXX<KXXX^OiXX^^ 



/ 



i 10 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

\ 

| SUM MARY. % 

I Seniors, . . . . . 16 I 

| Juniors, . . . . . . 21 | 

y % 

'/ Sophomores, . . . . . 27 I 

7 7 

| Freshmen, . . . . . . 80 f 

| Special, ... ... 29 | 

I Post Graduates, . . . . . . 2 | 

^ i. 



I Total, ..... 175 | 



y 7 



y 7 

? y 



? 2 

^ ^ 

^ 2 






y y 

y ? 



? V, 

y y 

y y 



y y 






7 >! 



I I 

? . y 

y y 

y y 

y f 

yf/s//////y////Ay/s/sysy/ys//y////s//^^^^ 



^>>>iXXSi>iXXXXXXXXX^Vv«>iXNS*>iXXXXX^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



11 



Black, G. 0., 

Butler, E. J., 

Gordon, E. W. 

Harp, W. A., 

Hedgepeth, D. E. V., 
| Hoover, H. W., 
| Jenkins, B. A., 

Kreidler, C. M., 

McGavran, J. G., . 

McWane, J. R., 
| Oram, W. G., 

Schrontz, W. F., 

Wright, W. J., 



BACHELORS OF ARTS. 

Canada. 



New York. 

Pennsylvania. 

Indiana. 

Indiana. 

Canada. 

Missouri. 

Maryland. 

Ohio. 

Virginia. 

West Virginia. 

Pennsylvania. 

Pennsylvania. 



BACHELORS OF LETTERS. 

Fox, Evangeline, .... Ohio. 
Kelley, Beatrice M., . . . Ohio. 
Wells, Daisy M., 



West Virginia. 



i 

>r/s/s/sys///AY/sy/ys/sys/A'S/s/s^^^ 



| 12 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 4 





/ 



/ 



9. 



of Letters. 






g 



I 

Bethany College has four separate courses : The Class- | 

| ical, Scientific, Ministerial and Literary, conferring the de- | 

| grees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences and Bachelor | 



I CLASSICAL COUESE. I 

I I 

| FOR THE DEGREE OP BACHELOR OF ARTS. g 

v . ■ ■ . i 

| This course embraces the following schools, viz : 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

| 2. School of the Greek Language. | 

3. School of the Latin Language and Literature. 

4. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 



| 5. School of Natural Science. I 

^ 6. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy, £ 

| and Belles Lettres. I 

i — 



I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. g 

I 
In this School the Evidences, History and Languages of the Bible are ^ 

taught. Moral Philosophy is drawn from the Bible itself. Every student ^ 

| in the College studies the English Bible during the Sophomore and Junior ^ 



years. A thorough study is made of the Jewish Law, and recent researches y 



*y in Egypt and Assyria bearing on the Bible history are pointed out. In the 

^ T- • . - -. .Li _ !_• J__-' -1 1 1 _ -J! -L-L - XT m__i... _„i. .'J.1- -Ll_ - Y 



Junior year the historical books of the New Testament, with the purpose y 



| of each Epistle, are carefully studied. 

I — 1 

4 II. School of the Greek Languages. | 

| FRESHMAN YEAR | 

% I 

^ 2» -irsi Term. — Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's First Lessons. / 

| Daily exercises in writing the language, with the accents * 

| carefully marked. ^ 

| Second Term. — Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. Kelsey. | 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 13 | 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. I 

| | 

| First Term. — The Anabasis, Books II,, III., IV. Sight Selections. Gre- I 

cian History (Cox). Greek Prose Composition (Jones). 

| Second Term. — Homer's Iliad (Keep), Books I., II., III. Prose Composi- ^ 

| tion (Jones). Grecian History. | 

I I 

| JUNIOR YEAR. | 

p First Term. — Pindar (Gildersleeve). Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates | 

(Robbins). Prose Composition (Allenson). Lucian's Dia- | 

$ logues (Williams). | 

| Second Term. — Plato's Apology and Crito (Wagner). Demosthenes' Oration | 

$ on the Crown (D'Ooge). | 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

$ | 

^ First Term. — Sophocles— QEdipus Tyrannus (White). Thucydides, Books | 

| VI., VII. (Lamberton). | 

'<, Second Term. — Lectures on Greek Civilization. New Testament Greek. ^ 





1 



LATIN. | 

v s 

The Instruction in this department has four distinct ends in view : | 

i First. In the Freshman and Sophomore years the aim is to give a thor- | 

', ough knowledge of forms and syntax. From the beginning the study of | 

| the grammar is accompanied with exercises in translating English into | 

^ Latin and Latin into English. The translations of the texts used in these ^ 

| two years is conducted in such a way as to rivet in the mind the principles | 

^ of Latin Grammar. | 

| Second. Junior and Senior years are devoted to a general study of Roman | 

<j Literature. At the end of the course a text- book by Bender is used. Con- | 

t stant attention is called to the style of writers, the philosophies of their | 

% day, the political condition out of which the literature sprang. The stu- | 

i dents are required to prepare and read criticisms and theses on such themes | 

| as will awaken interest and stimulate to original, independent research. | 

Third. From a grammatical point of view the Latin language in compar- | 

^ ison with all other European languages has been termed a 'perfectly organ- \ 

| ized type." It is the best source of general, fundamental, comprehensive | 

| linguistic principles. This position of the Latin language is turned to good | 

| account in throwing light upon our own. The instruction given through- | 

| out the course is summed up at the close in a series of lectures on " Com ^ 

| parative Latin and English Grammar." | 

p Fourth. The recitations are so conducted as to make them an aid to s 

| English Composition and Rhetoric. Students are frequently required to | 

hand in on paper and writi 

paragraphing, punctuation 

cized by students and teacher. 



| hand in on paper and write on the board the translation of the text. The | 
| paragraphing, punctuation, diction and arrangement of the English is criti- | 

I 

<\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\X\\\\\\\\^\\\\\\\\\\\\\\A^\\X\\\\\\\^^^ 



X -.A I 

^ 14 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 1 



•1 



§ -I 



| | 

s ----------- a 



I III. School of LatinfLanguage and Literature. | 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

| First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. ^ 



V 



o 



S 



First Term. — Algebra — from Quadradic Equations (Olney's complete.) 



N 



^ Daily exercise in writing English into Latin. ^ 



| Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Greenough). Book I., with thorough | 
drill in Syntax. | 



1 SOPHOMORE YEAR. 1 

| First Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Csesar's Gallic War, | 

Books II., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. Prose | 

| Composition (Jones). | 

| Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition | 

| continued (Jones). | 

1 JUNIOR YEAR. I 



| First Term.— Prosody. Virgil's iEneid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- | 

| ough). History of Rome (Allen). | 

| Second Term.— Prosody. Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Horace | 

| (Lincoln). Cicero's DeAmicitia (Reid). | 

1 SENIOR YEAR. 1 

| First Term. — The Germania of Tacitus (Church). | 

| Second Term. — Cicero's Letters. Pliny's Letters. Antiquities (Wilkins\ | 

| Latin Literature (Bender). Lectures on Latin of Middle | 

| Ages. | 



§ s 

s § 



S« 



| IV. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

I I 

| This school embraces a course of Pure and Applied Mathematics as given | 

| in the following schedule. The text-books used are indicated in paren- | 

| thesis : | 

| FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

1 

| Second Term. — Plane Geometry (Olney). - ^ 



I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

| First Term. — Solid Geometry (Olney). Plane Trigonometry (Oliver, Wait | 

| & Jones). | 

| Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry (O. W. J.) Land Surveying (Gilles- | 



pie). _ _ | 



c 



JUNIOR YEAR. | 

| First Term. — General Geometry, Differential Calculus (Olney). ^ 

| Second Term. —Integral Calculus. Calculus applied to General Geometry | 

| (Olney). ' | 

| Calculus is elective in this course. | 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

.^ tt . m Tl/r 1 • / ~wr \ ^ 



s First Term. —Mechanics (Kemper). | 

| Second Term. — Astronomy (Young). | 

$/////s/s//yAf/y////s/sy////s/s/s//ys/s/s/Av//y///^^^ 



^/ / / / / / s s/s//ysys/s/sy/ys//ys//yA>s/Ar/s///s/s/s///s//ys^^^ 

\ | 

\ CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 15 * 

\ | 

V. School of Natural Science. I 

1 SOPHOMORE YEAR | 

| First Term. — Physiology (Martin). ^ 

| Second Term. — Zoology (Orton). Botpny (Gray). | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. I 

s P 

| First Term. — Physics (Avery). $ 



§ J v ■" 

| Second Term. — Chemistry (Remsen 



1 SENIOR YEAR. $ 

| Second Term. — Geology (Le Conte's Compend). I 

— 

| VI. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy | 

I and Belles Lettres. I 

I ? 

Rhetoric and English Literature, recite on alternate days. Application of >■ 

| the principles of Rhetoric is made through the analysis of acknowledged | 

! masters of style, and through constant practice in original composition. To | 

^ the outlines of English Literature, as furnished by the text-book, are added | 

| miscellaneous selections illustrating the progress of the language and liter- | 

| ature from the tenth century to the present. In teaching history the | 

| method is not to commit to memory isolated facts, but to bring out the con- | 

| nection of events showing the progress of civilization. | 

1 JUNIOR YEAR. I 

> m* i m t->u„a :„/tit„i„v,\ T7 i:~u t :± i. £ 



1 SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

s 



1 JUNIOR YEAR. I 

I I 

^ First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature. | 

| Second Term. — The same. | 

I SENIOR YEAR. f 

S ttv i rr> -\it~i. i : — /-d — i. j t> — ~\ t.j:„± „£ r>v.:i 1 v. 



\ First Term. — Metaphysics (Porter and Bowne). History of Philosophy | 

(Tennemann) . Especial attention paid to Physiological Psy- | 

chology. | 

| Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Moral Philosophy (Robinson). Constitu- | 
tion of United States. Political Economy (Ely). Phi 
lology (Trench). History of Civilization (Guizot). Christian 



^ Evidences. 



^ FOR THE DEGREE OP BACHELOR OF SCIENCES. g 

^ I 

| This course embraces the following schools : 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

| 2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. f 

% 3. School of Natural Sciences. I 

| 4. School of Modern Languages. ^ 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Polit- | 

ical Hiconomy. 



ical Economy. 



v \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\v: 

I 1 

§ 16 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

• 

| I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. fc 

| I 

^ Evidences, History and Languages of the Bible. Moral Philosophy — ^ 

^ _■_•_;•«- 1 ■ .1- J .__.! ,.1 Tl/r___-l T-.1 -1 !.„ Jl i- ,1 -T.-1 1 ^ 



s 



I scientific basis discussed and then Moral Philosophy drawn from the Bible. 

^ Ci^r\ Tckatcimcknt «fnrlif»rl rlnrincr SnnVinmnrp vf»<ir <anrl f.Vic ~N"pto TVcfamcmt in 



Old Testament studied during Sophomore year, and the New Testament in | 

^ the Junior. | 

I I 

I I 

| II. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. I 

| I 

^ In the Scientific Course this school embraces, besides the subjects given ^ 

| in the corresponding school of the Classical Course, the study of Descriptive | 

| Geometry and Roads and Railroads. | 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. 1 

^ First Term. — Algebra, beginning with Quadratic Equations (Olney's Com- | 

| Plete. | 

§ Second Term. — Plane Geometry (Olney). | 

^ s 

1 SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

| I 

| First Term. — Solid Geometry (Olney). Plane Trigonometry (Oliver, Wait | 

| & Jones). | 

| Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry (0. W. J.) Land Surveying, includ- | 

| ing Leveling (Gillespie). | 

1 JUNIOR YEAR. | 

| 1 

| First Term. — General Geometry, Differential Calculus (Olney). Descrip- | 

| tive Geometry (Waldo). | 

| Second Term. — Integral Calculus, Solution of Problems in General Geometry | 

with the aid of the Infinitesimal Calculus (Olney). Roads | 

^ and Railroads (Gillespie). ^ 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 

s' I 

n First Term — Mechanics (Kemper). | 

| Second Term. — Astronomy (Young). | 

Any one wishing to enter a class in Applied Mathematics must first be- | 

s come familiar with those branches of pure Mathematics upon which the | 

| applied depends for its principles. The courses are so arranged that no | 

s student, pursuing them in the order indicated and with the thoroughness | 

| required, will encounter serious difficulty. | 

In Land Surveying and in Roads and Railroads special attention is given | 

| to field work and mapping. Students in the latter class will be required to | 

| lay out curves, make the calculations for excavations and embankments, for | 

| transportation of earth, etc., from examples occurring in their own field | 

s work. | 

1 | 

I I 

III. School of Natural Sciences. | 

I 1 

1 SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

s ' ^ 

s First Term. — Physiology (Martin). | 

s Second Term. — Zoology (Orton). Botany (Wood). | 



N 



N 



y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y yy y y y y y/y/y/y/s///y/s/y/y/V/y/y/s^ 



,'///SSS//SS/S/S/S/S/S/S,S/ SS/// S/S/S/S/S/S/S/S/S/S/S'SS//SS///////////////////S S/S/////S///// 

! CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 17 § 

\ — — I 



SECOND YEAR. 



V. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy 

and Belles Lettres. 



;; JUNIOR YEAR. | 





/ First Tenn. — Physics (Avery). / 

^ Second Term. — Chemistry (Rerasen). | 

/ SENIOR YEAR. | 



JFirs< Term. — Chemistry (Laboratory). 
Second Term. — Geology (Le Conte's Compend). | 



IV. School of Modern Languages, 

The aim of our instruction in French and German is to enable the stu- • 



dent to speak and write these languages as well as read them. The so-called j 
"natural method" is combined with progressive study of the grammars and 



of selections from the best writers and with constant practice in composi- % 



tion. The classes make such progress in speaking as enables the teacher to 
conduct them entirely without the use of English during the second year of £ 

the course. | 

FRENCH— FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 

| 
FIRST YEAR. t 



Edgren's Grammar. Part I. | 

Oral Practice, with selected readings. | 



I 

Edgren's Grammar. Part II. | 

Reading at Sight. Oral Practice, with selected readings. | 

Exercises in Grammar and Composition. | 

GERMAN— FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. I 



FIRST YEAR. ' 

% 

Meissner's Grammar. Part I. | 

Oral Practice, with selected readings. 



SECOND YEAR. / 



I 

Meissner's Grammar. Part II. £ 

Oral Practice, with selected readings. / 

Reading at sight. | 

Exercises in Grammar and Composition. / 



JUNIOR YEAR. i 

First Term.— Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature. / 



Second Term. — English Literature. 



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I 18 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

I SENIOR YEAR. | 



/ 



« 



Firs£ Tferm. — Metaphysics (Porter and Bowne). History of Philosophy 



(Tennemann). Especial attention paid to the recent ad- 



Hermeneutics and Inspiration, Christian Evidences. 
Canonics, Biblical Geography and Archaeology. 



/ 






Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Constitution of United States and Political 
f Economy (Walker). Philology (Trench). History of Civil i- | 

zation (Guizot). Christian Evidences. 



| " • I 

I MINISTERIAL COURSE. I 

I . I 

| This course embraces the following schools : | 

I 1. School of Biblical Introduction. I 

| 2. School of Biblical Languages. | 

3. School of Biblical History and Doctrine. 

| 4. School of Church History. | 

| 5. School of Homiletics. | 

| 6. School of Greek. I 

I 7. School of Latin. | 

8. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 



I 9. School of Natural Science. f 

10. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy 
and Belles Lett res. I 



'/ ■ j. ./ 2 



6 1. School of Biblical Instruction. f 



It is the purpose to make the classes in the Classical and the Ministe- ^ 
rial courses the same in the languages, mathematics and sciences up to the 



/, Junior year and then the major work of the ministerial student is in studies 
^ more distinctively biblical, while the minor work is carried on in Latin, 



Mathematics, English Literature and the Sciences. The work embraces the g 
p following subjects : 



/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 



I 2. Biblical Languages. f 

In the Junior year the Septuagint version will be read largely as pre- ^ 



/ 



/ paratory to the study of the New Testament Greek. / 



/ 



/ The Senior class will have Greek Exegesis throughout both terms. All | 

/ students in this course are required to take Hebrew for at least one year. 



A\\\^\\\\\^\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\V 

I 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



19 







3. School of Biblical History and Doctrine. 

Old Testament History, embracing the Primeval, Patriarchal, Mosaic 
and Prophetic Periods, will be taught. Besides^the Bible itself, McLear's 
Class-book of Old Testament History will be used as a text book. As works 
of reference, Geikie, Stanley, Milman and Ewald are recommended. In 
New Testament History the course embraces the interval between the< Old 
and New Testaments, an Outline Life of Christ, &n Outline History of the 
Apostolic Church, a Short Life of Paul. The history of the Gospels and 
Acts, and the historical allusions in the Epistles will be carefully studied. 
McLear's Class-book of New Testament History, Robinson's Harmony, 
Stalker's Life of Christ, and Stalker's Life of St. Paul will be used as text- 
books ; Geikie, Farrar, Andrews, and Edersheim on the Life of Christ ; 
Farrar, Conybeare and Howson, and Presensse on the Life of Paul and the 
Apostolic Church are recommended as works of reference. 

In the department of Biblical Doctrine the study of the Old Testament 
embraces the Beginnings of Revelation in the Primeval and Patriarchal 
Ages, the Covenants, the Mosaic Institution and its Doctrines and Ordi- 
nances, the Teachings of Prophecy, and the Wisdom Literature of the old 
Scriptures. In all these instructions the Bible is taken as the main text- 
book. New Testament Doctrine includes a detailed study of the Teachings 
of Christ in their order, an examination of the several types of Apostolic 
teaching and Exegetical and Expository studies of passages selected from 
the Gospels, Acts and Epistles. 



4. School of Church History. 

Great importance is attached to Church History. Especial attention is 
paid to the history of the church till the Council of Nice, A. D. 325 the 
Rise and Growth of the Papacy to A. D. 1073, the Reformation, and Recent 
Reformatory Movements. This is supplemented by a course of Lectures 
on Christian Doctrine, embracing a special study of the great Doctrinal 
Epochs in the history of the Church. Fisher's History of the Christian 
Church is used as a textbook, while Neander, Mosheim and Schaff are 
recommended as works of reference. 



5. School of Homiletics. 

Students are not only taught the principles, but are drilled thoroughly 
in the preparation and delivery of sermons, and are given detailed instruc- 
tions in the practical duties of the Christian ministry. Phelps' Theory of 
Preaching and Blaikie's For the Work of the Ministry are used as text-books. 



III. 



School of the Greek Language. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 



First Term. — Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's Greek Lessons. 
Daily exercises in writing the language, with the accents 
carefully marked. 



1 

I 

/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 

\ 

\ 

\ 

/ 
/ 
/ 

\ 

i 

f 

/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 

', 

', 

i 

\ 

\ 

I 

/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 

\ 



A\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\X\\\\\X\\\\X\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\vx\\\\\\xx\V 



I 20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

^ s 




(Robbins). Prose Composition (Sidgwick). | 

| Second Term. — Plato's Apology of Socrates and Orito (Wagner). Demos- | 
fc thenes' Oration on the Crown (D'Oofe). Septuagint. | 

| SENIOR YEAR. | 

| First Term. — New Testament Greek. | 

| Second Term. — New Testament Greek. | 



IV. School of Latin Language and Literature. 

| First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. 

^ Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. 

| Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Greenough). Book I., with thorough 

| drill in Syntax. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic War, 



! 

1 

| Books I., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. Prose ^ 

| Composition (Jones). | 

| Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Composition continued (Jones). | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. I 

s I 

| First Term. — Prosody. Virgil's iEneid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- | 

| ough). History of Rome (Allen). | 

i — 1 

| V. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. ^ 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

I . . I 

$: JPirst Tprrn — Alcrphra. hpofinnino- wit.h Onnrlrnfir 1 Ennflb'nns /Olnpv's mm. N 



First Term. — Algebra, beginning with Quadratic Equations (Olney's com- , 

| plete). | 

| Second lerm. — Geometry, Plane (Olney). | 

1 SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

^ I 

| First Term. — Geometry, Solid (Olney). Plane Trigonometry (Oliver, Wait ^ 

| & Jones). | 

| Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry (O. W. J.) Land Surveying. 

I SENIOR YEAR. 1 

§ I 

| Second Term. — Astronomy (Lectures ) ^ 

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CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 21 I 

| § 

^ s 

I VI. School of Natural Sciences. | 

I ^ 

| SOPHOMORE YEAR 1 

I ^ 

| First Term. — Physiology (Martin). Botany (Wood.) | 

; i 

| JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I 1 

^ First Term. — Physics (Avery; ^ 

| Second Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). | 



V 

\ Second Term. — Zoology (Orton). 



N 



s 



SENIOR YEAR. I 

I I 

vj Second Term. — Geology (Le Conte's Compend). ^ 





1 § 

^ VII. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy | 

| and Belles Lettres. | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 



| First Term. — Rhetoric (Walsh). English Literature (Shaw). ^ 

| Second Term. — Rhetoric. English Literature. ^ 

1 

| First Term. — Metaphysics (Porter and Bowne). History of Philosophy I 
Tennemann). 



| SENIOR YEAR. § 

I • I 

| First Term. — Metaphysics (Porter and Bowne). History of Philosophy | 

| Tennemann). ^ 

| Second Term —Logic (Jevons). Moral Philosophy (Robinson). Constitu- | 

| tion of United States and Political Economy (Ely). Phi- I 

1 lology. | 

I 



1 LITERARY COURSE. 1 

| This course embraces the following schools : | 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

| 2. School of the Latin Language. | 

3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

4. School of Natural Sciences. 

5. School of Modern Languages. | 

6. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and | 
1 Political Economy. I 

! - 1 

I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

| (Same as in Classical Course). | 



I 22 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

| II. School of the Latin Language and Literature. | 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

| . | 

s Fust Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar, with Jones's First Les- ^ 

| sons. Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. § 

I Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Greenough). Book I., with thorough | 

| drill in Syntax. | 

1 I 

| SOPBOMORE YEAR. | 

I I 

| First Term. — Grammar with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic War, | 

| Books II., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. Prose | 

| Composition (Jones). | 

| Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition | 

| continued (Jones). | 

1 JUNIOR YEAR, | 

| I 

| First Term.— Prosody. Virgil's .Eneid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- | 

^ ough). History of Rome (Allen). | 

| Second Term. — Prosody. Select Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Hor | 

| ace (Lincoln), Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid.) | 

I III. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

1 FRESHMAN YEAR. I 
First Term. — Algebra, beginning with Quadratic Equations v 01ney.j 



| Second Term.— Geometry, Plane (Olney). | 

1 SOPHOMORE YEAR. 1 

I I 

| First Term. — Geometry, Solid (Olney). Plane Trigonometry (Oliver, Wait | 

| & Jones). I 

I Second Term.— Spherical Trigonometry (O. W. J.) | 

I SENIOR YEAR. I 

| | 

I Second Term.— Astronomy (Lectures). | 

I I 



1 | 

I IV. School of Natural Sciences. | 



8 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 



| First Term.— Physiology. | 

| Second Term.— Botany (Wood). Zoology. | 

1 ■ ' 



1 JUNIOR YEAR. | 



| Hirst Term.— Physics (Avery). 
| Second Term. — Geology. 



| Second Term.— Geology. | 



r//ys/s//y/y/y/y//s//yjys////yj^^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



23 



First Term. — Physics. 
Second Term. — Geology 



SENIOR YEAR. 



Le Conte's Compend). 



V. School of Modern Languages. 

FRENCH- FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. 

FIRST .YEAR. 

Edgren's Grammar. Part I. 

Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Edgren's Grammar. Part II. 

Reading at sight. Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

Exercises in Grammar and Composition. 

GERMAN— FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Meissner's Grammar. Part I. 

Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Meissner's Grammar. Part II. 

Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

Reading at sight. 

Exercises in Grammar and Composition. ♦ 



VI 



School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy 
and Belles Lettres. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature. 
Second Term. — Rhetoric. English Literature. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First 



Term. — Metaphysics (Porter and Bowne) 
(Tennemann). History. 
Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). 
Economy (Ely) 
zation (Guizot). 



History of Philosophy 



Constitution of the United States. Political 
Philology (Trench). History of Civili- 
Chr.'stian Evidences. 



XX>'X/XX////y/XX/X><XXXXy///////X/y'y'//////y'//XX////X//X///////X/////X///X/X> 



;y//y/ys/s///Ayys//y/y/ys//y/^^^ 

% t 

* 24 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

V, 4 

g , . % 



', 



I 31CIII0I 01 JERBSU. I 

$ | 

S ■ " 9 

| . I 

This department was organized to meet the growing de- | 
| mand for a musical education. Its objects are : (1.) To fur- | 
| nish instruction in the popular branches of musical study; | 
| (2.) To combine music with the regular work in the College, | 
| and (3) to train teachers. 

Piano, Organ, Voice Culture, Harmony and Sight Singing | 
| are taught. In each of these a carefully graded course of f 
! study has been prepared. Pupils may enroll for music only, I 



> ^ j. j~ — — j- ^ --- j -j y 

| but it is earnestly recommended that they pay attention to * 

| such branches as English Literature, Rhetoric, Modern | 

| Languages and History, if not indeed to take the regular | 

| college course where it can be afforded. | 



f- COURSE OF STUDY. | 

| PIANO-FORTE — FIRST GRADE. I 

I . . I 

Simple still hand exercises : easy scale and arpeggio work ; | 



| and wrist movement. 

| Studies selected from Kohler, Czerny, Loeschhorn, Emery, 



% 



Simple still hand exercises : easy scale and arpeggio work ; % 
\ strict attention to touch, position of hand and arm, lingers | 

I 
I 

| Mathews and others. I 

Easy pieces from Lichner, Kullak, Spindler Emery, etc. f 

| SECOND GRADE. I 

I . • I 

Studies selected from Krause, Heller, Duvernoy, etc. / 

i 



| Touch and Technique, Major and Minor Scales and Arpeg- 
| gios, simple movements. Sonatinas from Clementi, Kuh- / 



| Ian, etc. | 

Solo compositions selected from Reinecke, Hunten Ley- ^ 

I bach, Schumann, etc. I 

I THIRD GRADE. 



/ 



| . . P 

| Touch and Technique continued; Scales and Arpeggios | 
| in moderate tempo. Czerny's Studies in Velocity, Octave ^ 

Y//////////////////////////////////////X////////////////////////////////////' 



L COURSES. 



OURSE. 



aetry — Plane. 



cian Mythology, 
irveying. 



e. 



lilosophy. 



rine. 



il Economy. Philology 
Inspiration. Chris 



jtian Doctrine. N. T 



LADIES' COURSE. 



Latin. 

Higher Algebra. 
French. 
*Bible. 



Latin. 

Geometry — Plane. 

French. 

Primary Rhetoric. 



French. 

Physiology. 

Latin. German. 

Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry— Plane. 



Zoology. Botany. 
Latin. German. 
Trigonometry — Spherical. 
French. 



Latin. 

Physics. 

German. 

Rhetoric. 

English Literature. 



Roman History. 

German. 

Latin. 

Chemistry. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 



Metaphysics. 

History of Philosophy. 

History. 

N. T History. 



Astronomy (by Lectures). 

Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 

Philology. 

History. 

Geology. 

Christian Evidences. 



i 24 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. f 

% . s 

% • $ 

I f|ct§§l if Jlistt. | 

% — $ 

This department was organized to meet the growing de- | 

| mand for a musical education. Its objects are : (1.) To fur- | 

; nish instruction in the popular branches of musical study; | 



| (2.) To combine music with the regular work in the College, | 

| and (3) to train teachers. | 

Piano, Organ, Voice Culture, Harmony and Sight Singing f 

I are taught. In each of these a carefully graded course of f 

^ study has been prepared. Pupils may enroll for music only, s, 

| but it is earnestly recommended that they pay attention to | 

| such branches as English Literature, Rhetoric, Modern | 

^ Languages and History, if not indeed to take the regular | 

| college course where it can be afforded. | 

^ ^ 

f- COURSE OF STUDY. f 

| PIANO-FORTE — FIRST GRADE. I 

I I 

Simple still hand exercises : easy scale and arpeggio work ; * 

| strict attention to touch, position of hand and arm, ringers / 

| and wrist movement. | 



Studies selected from Kohler, Czeruy, Loeschhorn, Emery, ^ 

1 ' 



bach, Schumann, etc. 



Mathews and others. | 

Easy pieces from Lichner, Kullak, Spindler Emery, etc. f 

I SECOND GRADE. I 

| . I 

Studies selected from Krause, Heller, Duvernoy, etc. ^ 

^ Touch and Technique, Major and Minor Scales and Arpeg- / 

| gios, simple movements. Sonatinas from Clementi, Kuh- * 

| Ian, etc. | 

Solo compositions selected from Reinecke, Hunten Ley- ^ 



g THIRD GRADE. g 

| Touch and Technique continued; Scales and Arpeggios ', 
| in moderate tempo. Czerny's Studies in Velocity, Octave ^ 

^/////////////////////////////////////////A////////////////////////////////////' 



SYNCHRONISTIC VIEW OF THE SEVERAL COURSES. 






CLASSICAL COURSE. 


SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 


MINISTERIAL COURSE. 


LADIES' COURSE. 


W 

GO 

w 


a 

H 
H 

H 

0) 

2 
5 

K 

H 
H 


55 
O 
O 
W 


Latin. 
Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 
*Bible. 


Higher Algebra. 
Latin. 
French. 
*Bible. 


Latin. 
Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 
*Bible. 


Latin. 

Higher Algebra. 
French. 
*Bible. 


Latin. 
Greek. 

Geometry— Plane. 
Primary Rhetoric. 


Geometry — Plane. 

French. 

Latin. 

Primary Rhetoric. 


Latin. 
Greek. 

Geometry — Plane. 
Primary Rhetoric. 


Latin. 

Geometry— Plane. 
French. 
Primary Rhetoric. 


« 
o 
g 

o 

° 


8 
Pi 
H 

EH 

H 

m 

PS 

E 

E 
PS 
H 
H 

Q 
Z 

o 
o 

63 
m 


Physiology. 

Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry — Plane. 


French. 

Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry — Plane. 

German. 

Physiology. 


Physiology. 

Latin. 

G reek. 

Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry — Plane. 


French. 

Physiology. 

Latin. German. 

Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry— Plane. 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History, Grecian Mythology. 

Zoology- Botany. 

Trigonometry — Spherical. Surveying. 


French. 

Zoology. Botany. 

Trigonometry — Spherical. Surveying. 

German. 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History, Grecian Mythology. 

Zoology. Botany. 

Spherical Trigonometry. Surveying. 


Zoology. Botany. 
Latin. German. 
Trigonometry — Spherical . 
French. 


O 

1 >-> 


S 

PC 

Ed 
H 

E- 
cc 
M 

E 

S 
PS 

w 
E< 

B 

z 
o 
o 

H 

CO 


Latin. 

Greek 

General Geometry. Differential Calculus. 

Physics. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


German. 

Descriptive Geometry. 

Geometry — General. Differential Calculus. 

Physics. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Latin. 

Greek 

0. T. History. Hebrew. 

Physics. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Latin. 

Physics. 

German. 

Rhetoric. 

English Literature. 


Latin. Roman History. 

Greek. 

Chemistry. 

Integral C»lcuius, Calculus applied to General 

Rhetoric. English Literature. [Geometry. 


German. 

Roads and Railroads. 

Integral Calculus. General Geometry. 

Chemistry. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Latin. Roman History. 

Greek. 

N. T. History. Septuagint. 

Hebrew. 

Chemistry. 


Roman History. 

German. 

Latin. 

Chemistry. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


i 


a 
es 
« 

H 
ID 
K 

s 

cc 
a 

H 
Q 
z 
o 
o 
& 

OS 


Metaphysics. History of Philosophy. 

Latin. 

Greek. 

Mechanics. 


Metaphysics. 

History of Philosophy. 

Mechanics. 

Chemistry. 


Metaphysics. History of Philosophy. 

Hebrew. 

Church History. 

Greek Exegesis. 0. T. Doctrine. 


Metaphysics. 

History of Philosophy. 

History. 

N. T. History. 


Greek. 

Roman Literature. Philology. History. 

Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 

Astronomy. 

Christian Evidences. 

Geology. 


Astronomy, 

Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 

History. Philology. 

Geology. 

Christian Evidences. 


Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. Philology. 

Homiletics. Hermeneutics. Inspiration. Chris- 
tian Evidences. 

Hebrew. Geology. 

Astronomy (Lectures). 

Lectures on History of Christian Doctrine. N. T 
Doctrine. 


Astronomy (by Lectures). 

Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 

Philology. 

History. 

Geology. 

Christian Evidences. 



gee Page 19. 



■;f//ys/s//y/ys////ys/s//ys/sys/^^^ 

| CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 25 | 

\ I 

p Studies, thirty selected studies from Heller, ops. 45, 46 and 47. / 

^ Solo compositions from Henselt, Leybach, Mendelssohn, | 

| Schubert, etc. | 

I FOURTH GRADE. | 



Daily practice in Technique. Further development of scale 
| and arpeggio work. Studies selected from Cramer, Tausig, 
| Bach, Schmitt and others. 

Beethoven's easy sonatas, Mendelssohn's songs without | 
| words and compositions selected from Weber, Schumann, f 
I Schubert, Jensen, Gade, etc. | 

| FIFTH GRADE. | 

Daily practice in Technique, and Scale and Arpeggio work. | 

| Tausig's Daily Studies, Book II. ; Clement! ; Gradus ad f 

| Parnamon; Moscheles op. 70 ; Kullak's Octave Studies ; Son- I 

J atas by Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert. Studies from | 

I Chopin. | 

Solo compositions from Heller, Chopin, Mendelssohn, | 

I Raff, etc. | 

VOCAL CULTURE. | 

| FIRST GRADE. | 

Management of Breath ; Tone Placing; Dictation Work ; | 



l Sustained Tones ; Solfeggio and Scale Work Studies from \ 



| Bonaldi and Concone. I 

I SECOND GRADE. I 

P ... . i % 

Tone Placing; Dictation Work ; Slow Trill ; Studies from | 

| Marchesi, Panof ka, Concone, etc. Phrasing, English and | 

| Italian Songs. | 

| THIRD GRADE. I 

? . . . I 

Tone Placing and Dictation Work continued. Studies | 

^ from Lamperti, Bordogui, Vaecai, etc. The Trill continued, | 

| with other embellishments added — part songs. | 

Selections from Gounod, Yerdi, Donizetti, etc. 

I FOURTH GRADE. | 

English and Italian Opera : Sacred Style ; Part Songs. | 

| Selections from Bellini, Rossini, Weber, Sullivan, etc. I 

The course in Harmony covers two years and embraces | 

| such works as Emery's Elements of Harmony, Johnson's | 

| New Method and Richter's complete work. | 

In Sight Singing the "Normal Method," as used in the f 

4 i 






I I 

I 26 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

| 

I I 

| Boston Public Schools with great success, is the course ^ 

* ... ^ 

| adopted, while the pupil is given a comprehension of the I 

f Tonic-sol-fa and National Systems. Teachers in this branch | 

| are in great demand in our public schools. Students who f 

| expect to teach school can acquaint themselves with the % 

| principles of vocal music and teach successfully. The course / 

| covers one year, for which a fee of $6.00 per half session or f 

| $10 for the entire session is charged. | 

I GENERAL INFORMATION. I 

I I 



/. 



Pupils may enter the School of Music at any time, but are 



/ 



I not received for less than one-half session or for the unex- | 



\ pired portion of the half session during which they enter. 

No lessons will be given except on presentation of a receipt f 
'$ from the Bursar of the College showing all bills due the I 



| School of Music paid to the end of the half session. | 



Tuition will not be refunded for absence or withdrawal, % 

| except in extreme cases of prolonged severe illness, in which f 

| case a credit will be given on future tuition. | 

Lost lessons occasioned by temporary absences are not £ 

I made up. f 

^ Pupils will confer with the Director before arranging to | 

| appear on'public program. • 

I " ^ 

| EXPENSES. I 

\ . I 

| Two half-hour lessons per week, $50 per session, or $25 ^ 

| per half session. | 

Use of piano for practice, one hour daily, $10 per session, / 

| or $5 per half session. 

| Use of Practice Clavier thirty minutes daily, $6.00 per ses- | 

| sion, or $3.00 per half session. I 

| Use of Technicon twenty minutes daily, $3.00 per session, % 

| or $2.00 per half session. | 

The tuition for Sight Singing is elsewhere named. \| 

The above tuition rates do not include instruction during | 

/ holiday vacation. / 

I Further information concerning the School of Music may ^ 

| be obtained by addressing the President of the College or ^ 

* the Director of Music. ^ 



1 f 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 27 I 

I I 



I . . . ■ 



^ .._ . % 



I SITUATION. | 

PETHANY COLLEGE is situated in the Panhandle of | 

West Virginia, sixteen miles north of Wheeling. The | 

| railroad stations for Bethany are Brilliant, on the Cleveland | 

\ and Pittsburgh Railroad (river division), and Wellsburg, on ^ 
I the Wheeling branch of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. 
| Louis Railway. From these stations a stage is run to Beth- 




TERMS, VACATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS. 

| The College Year consists of two terms, four and a half | 

| months each. It begins on the fourth (28th) Monday in Sep- p 

I tember and ends on the third Thursday in June. In this I 

\ year there are two examinations in each class — one in Jan- | 

| uary and the final examination in June. | 
It is very desirable that applicants for Matriculation pre- f 

« sent themselves at the beginning of the session, that there '' 



I , • , " r n., ., . ,, g 



may be a convenient arrangement of the classes in the various 

| Departments or Schools. Students, however, can enter con- $ 

| veniently at the commencement of the second term, Feb- f 



| ruary 1st, after the Intermediate examination in January- 

1 NECESSARY EXPENSES. I 

1 $ 

I Tuition for forty weeks at $1.00 per week, . . $ 40 00 $ 

| Matriculation fee, for coal, janitor, etc., . . 10 00 | 

| Furnished room, with care of room, fuel, etc., . 25 00 $ 

| Table board, forty weeks, at $2.00, . . . 80 00 | 

| Washing, 10 00 f 



§ I 



1 $165 00 I 

The matriculation fee and tuition must be paid at the be- f 

| ginning of each term. | 

\\\^\\\\\^\^\X\\\\\\\\\\A\\\\^\\^^^ 



I 28 CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

1 * 



1 REDUCED TUITION. I 

Young men in any of the religious denominations, who | 

| wish to prepare for the ministry, may, on paying thematrie- | 



| ulation fee, be admitted into any of the courses at Bethany | 

| College at one-half the regular rates of tuition. | 

I All applicants for this privilege will be required to present | 

| to the Faculty satisfactory written recommendations from | 

| their respective congregations, and from well-known minis- 1 

| ters of the gospel, certifying that they come under the fore- | 

| going conditions, in such form as shall be prescribed by the | 

| Faculty. They shall also be required to sign a promissory | 

| note to pay the full charge for tuition five years from their | 

I withdrawal from the College, provided they do not, in the | 

| meantime, devote themselves to the work of the ministry. | 

| But this provision for reduction of tuition shall not extend, | 

| in any case, beyond one session, except upon the recommen- | 
| dation of the Faculty, and the approval of the Board. 

| The sons of regular ministers of the gospel of all denom- | 

| inations shall be admitted to all classes and privileges of the I 

| College upon payment of matriculation fee and one-half the | 

| regular charges for tuition. | 

| All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be | 
| required to give instruction in the primary classes. 

| CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. | 

| The Natural History Cabinet contains some of the | 

| Fauna, Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very val- | 

| uable collection from Australia, and exchanges with other | 

| sections of the country. Also a fine Herbarium of native | 

| plants, with many rare ones from other parts of the world. | 

The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains sev- | 

1 eral thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all | 

| parts of the world. | 

The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains rare | 

I and valuable collections. 1 

I APPARATUS. 1 

The Philosophical apparatus of the College affords the 
amplest facilities for the thorough illustration of physical 
principles. 



1 The Philosophical apparatus of the College affords the I 
| amplest facilities for the thorough illustration of physical | 
| principles. | 






C 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 29 | 



The Chemical laboratory is provided with all the apparatus 
and chemicals needed in the courses offered. 1 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. I 

1 



There are in connection with the College three societies 
devoted to the cultivation of literary composition and oratory: 
The Ossolian (ladies) Neotrophian and American Literary In- 
stitute. 



Provision has been made for teachers in book-keeping and 
short-hand, should there be a demand for these studies. 



DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. 

A student may graduate in any school singly. To obtain 



ADELPHIAN SOCIETY. 1 



As this society differs in some important respects from a 
purely Literary Society, it demands a more particular notice. 

As it is a distinguishing feature of Bethany College to 

make the Bible a regular subject of study and daily exam- 

| ination, the Adelphian Society has been organized in order 

to promote and carry out, to the fullest extent, the purposes 

contemplated in the department of Bible Literature. 

The regular exercises of the Society consist — 

First — Of recitations of portions of the Scriptures. | 

Second — Reading original essays on moral and religious 
subjects; and 

Third — The delivery of Scriptural discourses, not only be- 
fore the Society, but, on suitable occasions, in public. 

Young men preparing for the Christian Ministry may | 
derive incalculable advantages from this Society. From its 
organization, and the character and ability of its members, 
it is well fitted to facilitate the acquisition of enlarged views 
of the Bible, and the cultivation of a high standard of 
morality and religion. 



PREPARATORY CLASSES. | 

There will be, in addition to the regular chairs, instruc- | 
tion in English Grammar, Arithmetic and beginning Alge- | 
bra. | 

. ! 

TERMS OF GRADUATION. | 



1 



1- "" — 1 

| the degree of Graduate in any school, it is required of every | 
1 candidate : 1 

1. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College ? 



| at least one session, and shall have studied in the College | 
| the entire Senior year of the school. 2. That within one | 

^ ,ir» .-it •• n ,i ' -i 1-itt -i S 



month from the beginning of the session, he shall have made | 

| known to the professor of the school his intention of gradu- | 

| ating. 3. That he stand a satisfactory examination on all | 

I the prescribed studies of the school. | 

I DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF SCIENCES, AND | 

| BACHELOR OF LETTERS. I 

| • To receive the Degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of | 

| Sciences sindBachelor of Letters, the candidate must have | 

| graduated and received his certificates in the several schools | 

| embraced in the respective courses. He must also have | 

| faithfully observed all the other laws and regulations of the | 

| College. He will then receive a Degree and Diploma. A | 

| fee of ten dollars will be charged for the Diploma. Five | 

I dollars to ministerial students. | 



| A student who has received a Diploma in any course, in | 

| order to obtain a Diploma in any other course, shall take up | 

| the additional certificate or certificates and pay ten dollars | 

I for the Diploma. I 

I The graduates in the several courses enjoy equally all the | 



s privileges, rigiiLs jmiu iiunors ui me v^uiiegu. ^ 

^ , | 

^ THE MASTER S DEGREE IN COURSE. 1 



In order to obtain the liegular Degree of Master of Arts, 



| the following conditions are required: 1. The attainment of | 



the Degree of Bachelor in the course. 2. The actual attend 

| ance in the College thereafter for one session and the study | 

| of three Elective studies, to be selected by the candidate | 

| with the consent of the Faculty. 3. An approved examina- | 

| tion of selected studies. A fee of ten dollars will be charged | 

| for the Diploma. | 

| ^ 

| HONORARY MASTER'S DEGREE. | 

I I 

A Bachelor of three years' standing in any one of the | 
| courses may receive the Honorary Degree of Master in that | 

p/s/sy///y////sys//yjiy//y/^^^ 



% \ 

i CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 31 | 

I I 

I 7 . . ; ; 1 

/ course ; provided he shall in the interval have maintained | 

f an exemplary character, and pursued studies relating to the I 

| degree. Candidates for this degree should apply to the I 

| President or Secretary of the Faculty before the annual | 

| meeting of the Board of Trustees. | 

No application for the degree of A.M. will be entertained | 

I unless accompanied bv the fee of ten dollars, which will be | 

I returned in case the degree is not conferred. | 

SPECIAL COURSE IN ENGINEERING, | 

y \ 

i FOR WHICH A CERTIFCATE IS GIVEN. | 

v \ 

For this course no specified time is required, except as | 
| demanded by previous preparation, and the time necessarily | 
i allotted to each branch. | 

V \ 

To enter upon the course a thorough knowledge of Alge- 



| bra, Geometry and Plane Trigonometry is required. 

1. Land Surveying — Embracing all that is necessary to | 
| understand the subject in its practical bearings with field | 
i work. mai)i)inff. etc. ' I 



work, mapping, etc. 



| 2. Leveling, Profiling, Mapping. | 

3. The Principles of Topographical Surveying and Draw- | 

4. Descriptive Geometry, with Shades, Shadows and Per- | 

% ^ ^ 

I spective. | 

5. Road and Railroad Surveying — with field operations. | 
Certificates will be given indicating the branch studied | 

| and the degree of proficiency attained. It is very desirable | 
| that students should enter with the regular classes of the | 
| Scientific Course. I 

1 I 

| THE COLLEGIAN. I 

? I 

During the college year the students publish a monthly | 

| journal entitled The Collegian. It has attained high rank as | 

| a college paper, and affords excellent means for developing | 

! the literary talent of the students. It deserves a hearty sup- 



port on the part of the Alumni and friends of the College. | 

I I 

| ACCOMMODATIONS. I 

I • • , 1 

Students are permitted to select their own places of board- | 

f/s/sys//ys///s//ys/s//ys<s/sy//^^^ 



I 32 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

i I 



/ 



I ing, subject in all cases to the supervision of the Faculty. 
| The facilities for obtaining boarding in private families have 
been much increased, and many students can be ac^ommo- 



these should be made at an early date, and mnst be accom- 
panied by satisfactory testimonials of character. 



| utation, and will be conducted in harmony with the most 
improved methods of cultivation for voice and gesture. The 



so-called study of elocution too often means only a labored 
effort to recite a few selections which call for the highest 



% dated in this way. Every attention will be paid to the | 
1 health and comfort of the students. | 



i To accommodate students who desire to board themselves, 

4 arrangements have been made to supply a number of unfur- $ 

| nished rooms at a very moderate rent. Application for | 

4>. fViPSA shrmlrl l^p mn.flp a.t. an on.rlv r\n.+.& anrl must. no ownm. % 







| Willetts. A course of equal excellence will be offered for | 

| the coming session. \ 

I I 

| SCHOOL OF ORATORY. I 

I 



There will be an opportunity, at a moderate charge, for | 
public and private lessons in elocution. This department f 
will be in the hands of an instructor of experience and rep- 




| acquired, which belong to dramatic representative 

on the other hand, a right use of the voice is essential even | 

to health ; an easy command of the motions of the body is f 

| essential to free play of the intellect; and both are indispen- | 

| sable to a harmonious and graceful manhood and woman- | 

| hood. To cultivate these, with a taste for what -is best in I 

i I 



*v/y////s//ys/s//yA'Ay/s//ysy//s/s^^^ 



| CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 33 g 

< : g 

letters, is the united aim of the departments of Literature, f 

i 



Rhetoric and Elocution. 

Each student is required, during his senior and junior 
years, to prepare and deliver several orations upon assigned 
suhjects. These orations are public, and are subject to gen- | 
eral criticism from the Faculty. 



I 

THE SCHOOL OF ART. I 

i 



Since Bethany has become a school for the higher educa 
tion of women as well as men there has been a decided and i 
growing demand for an art department. For several years | 
capable art teachers have been connected with the College. | 
The art department is now in charge of Mrs. J. M. Trible, 
who brings to the position superior talents and experience. 
There is an interesting and enthusiastic art class, and the f 
interest and proficiency of this department promises to keep | 
pace with the growth of the College in other directions. I 
Thorough instruction is given in perspective drawing, por \ 
trait and landscape painting, in oil, crayon, water colors, | 
India ink and all the branches of art. Situated in one of | 
the most beautiful landscapes in America, Bethany affords | 
rare opportunities for sketching from nature. It is the pur- f 
pose and policy of the College to foster the love and study f 
of art continually. | 



ENGLISH MINISTERIAL COURSE. I 



A few men every year are not able to take the full course, | 
yet need some preparation for the work of the ministry. | 
for their sake the following course, lasting two years, has ^ 
been arranged : 

FIRST YEAR. 



First Term. — Old Testament History, Church History, Eng 
lish Literature, Special Expository Studies in the New Test 
ament. 1 

Second Term — New Testament History, Homiletics, Her- 
meneutics, Inspiration, Christian Evidences, English Litera- 



. 

| ture. | 

i 5 i 

;A\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\X\\\V\\\\X\\\X\\\\\\\\X\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\^^^ 



1 34 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

| I 

2 SECOND YEAR. 2 

p M>6'£ Term. — Old Testament Doctrine. General History, i 

| Mental Science, History of Philosophy. | 

Second Term,. — New Testament Doctrine, General History, f 

| Lectures on the History of Christian Doctrine, Logic, Moral | 

| Science, Political Economy. | 

A certificate will be given in this course, but no degree. 

| A FOUR YEARS' COURSE OF BIBLE STUDY FOR ALL | 

I THE STUDENTS. I 

I . I 

It has been determined that every student entering the f 



| College shall take a course in the study of the Bible In the | 

| Freshman year an outline of Bible History, embracing the | 

| Old and New Testaments, in which Geography, Biography, | 

| Archaeology, and all the Great Facts recorded therein, will f 

^ ^ 

| be studied. In the Sophomore year there will be a some- | 

| what close and critical study of the Old Testament. In the | 

| Junior year there will be a similar study of the New Testa- f 

| ment. In the Senior year there will be special studies in f 

| Job, Psalms, Isaiah, Matthew, Acts, Romans, or such other ^ 

| books as may be selected. The English Bible will be used 

| as the text-book. Such helps as may be needed will be sug 

| gested by the teacher 



I MISSIONS. I 

| ' I 

| A course of lectures on Missions will be given before the | 






I A course of lectures on Missions will be given before the f 

| whole school. This course will cover as fully as practicable | 

| all the more important points in the Theory, History and | 

| Practice of Christian Missions. The matter is equally im- | 

| portant to those who are preparing for work at home and | 

| for those who prepare to go abroad. The Missionary Asso- $ 

| ciation of the College hold stated meetings to hear reports § 

$ and original letters from former students and others in the $ 

I various mission fields, to pray for the increased success of | 

| missionary labor, to discuss questions connected with the | 

I mission work, and, in general, to cultivate an intelligent per- * 

| sonal interest in the great enterprise of evangelizing the ^ 

| world. During the past year addresses have been delivered ', 

| by the secretaries of the different mission boards and by ^ 



•AVX^\\\\XV\\\V\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\' 

y % 

| CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 35 | 

| : | 

• s 

I others deeply interested in this cause. A large number of | 
', students are prepared to go out when the Lord opens the | 

I way. 1 

RELIGIOUS EXERCISES. | 

The daily morning devotions are held in the College Chapel | 

i ~, , i 

/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 

i ° r ' -:- V. . V-" % 

| Pulpit worthy of its splendid traditions Prof. J. M. Trible | 



| at eight o'clock. 

Daily and weekly meetings for prayer and song and exhor- 
tation are maintained by the students. 

The College authorities are anxious to make the Bethany 



/ is the regular preacher. Other members of the Faculty | 

| speak occasionally During the year a number of eminent | 

| men are invited to spend a Lord's Day in Bethany The | 

| church seeks to contribute to the piety of every student. 

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. I 

% . N 

This is a commodious apartment, 80 by 38 feet, well light- | 



p ed, and supplied with the best papers and magazines of the f 



| day. It is known to many that our library has twice suffered 

I heavy losses by fire ; it is at present well equipped with ency- | 

/ clopeedias and other works of reference, and contains beside I 

I some two thousand volumes in miscellaneous literature. | 

| Liberal gifts in books have been made by friends during the | 

| past year ; such donations are earnestly solicited and will be | 

| at all times gratefully acknowledged | 

I DISCIPLINE. 1 

I 

Ntnrlpnts fl.rp p.Ynpp.t.pfl t.n p.nnHn p.t thpmsp I vps a.s crpnt.lp.mp.n . § 



Students are expected to conduct themselves as gentlemen. ; 



7 % 

I The College does not lay down specific and minute regula- | 
I tions ; at the same time it hopes that each one will be a law | 



tions ; at the same time it hopes that each one will be a law 
p to himself, and that he will do nothing inconsistent with 1 
| good order, good taste, and good morals. Should any one | 
| act otherwise the Faculty will take note of the offence at | 
I once and deal with the offender as the best interests of all | 
| concerned may require. In like manner the ladies are ex- | 
| pected to act in strict accord with the principles of propriety | 
I and honor. I 

Each student is required to select from the several schools | 
| a course of at least three daily recitations, or the equivalent | 



O^XXXXXXX\X\XXXX\XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX\\XXXXX\X\XX^XXXXXXXiXXX<xX^O*Xi 

X X 

1 36 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

i — — ! 

I thereof. The reason of this requirement is this : If a student | 

| is not doing full work he is interfering with some one else. | 

| Upon the request of parent or guardian, however, or for | 

| other good reasons, he may be exempted from this rule. | 

| Any student who fails to attend his classes regularly, or to ^ 

| manifest an interest in his work, will be promptly sent home. | 

| The College is vastly better off without those who cumber | 

| the ground. Good students must not be kept back by those | 

| who lack either aptitude or application. I 

1 FINAL RANK AND GRADUATING HONORS. 

I . ... I 

| A record is kept of the daily recitatations At the end | 

| of the month each Professor prepares a report of the work | 

| of his classes. Absences from class or from chapel exercises, | 

| without cause, lower a student's grade. Recitations will be- | 

| gin on the third day of the term. Absences will count from | 

| that day. Absences during the first two weeks of the ses- | 

* sion and during the week before and the week after the : 



s 



| wards. A record is kept of each examination ; the exam- | 

| inations are taken into account in making out the average | 

| for the year. . | 
The final rank of the graduating class is computed by com- | 

| bining the averages for the several years. Students whose | 

| combined averages are ninety-three per cent will be enrolled | 

| in the Honor List, and this distinction will be noted in the | 

| diploma by the words Cum Laude. An average of ninety- | 

| four per cent entitles a student to Magna Gum Laude; an | 

| average of over ninety-five per cent to Summa Cum Laude. \ 

| The name of no student will appear in the Honor List who | 

| has not been a student in the College for at least two years. | 

| In the award of honors regard is had to the conduct of the | 

| student during his course, and any student who has incurred | 

| serious discipline may be debarred from the rank to which | 

| otherwise his scholarship would have entitled him. 

x! ^ 

I PHYSICAL CULTURE. I 

> I 

Bethany, besides being a school of mind and morals, offers | 



I -. ... - . i 

| some superior facilities for physical culture. Students are | 

r/sy///////y/ysy/y/y/y/y///ys^^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 37 | 

1 



not shut up to climbing the College hill or promenading the 
corridor tor exercise. For open air sports there is a base- j 
ball ground convenient to the College building; also tennis | 
courts near by, and the College encourages an interest in | 
these excellent recreations. In their season opportunities | 
for skating and sledding are frequent. A Gymnasium, fitted I 
up with the most approved apparatus, is provided. During | 
the year a competent teacher drilled the students thoroughly 
in the various exercises and awakened an enthusiasm among 
them in gymnastic sports. The gymnasium promises great 
results in the better health and consequently better work of 
the students. It is desired that every student of the College 
will spend at least twenty minutes each day in the gymna- 
sium. Hours are set apart for the daily use of the gymna- 
sium by the young lady students, and it is expected that they 
will make as free use of the gymnasium facilities as the male 
students. With such variety of recreations, no student can 
lack that diversion and exercise so indispensable to the enjoy- 
ment of college life and success in college work. 



PENDLETON HEIGHTS. 1 



Pendleton Heights, the former residence of President Pen | 
dleton, now the property of the College, has been used for | 
the past two years as a Boarding Home for young ladies. | 
The place is beautiful, both for situation and structure, and | 
meets well the needs of the young lady pupils. Under the | 
management of Professor and Mrs. Trible the aim is to make | 
it a home in fact as well as in name. The moral and spirit- | 
ual, as well as the intellectual interests of the girls are | 
constantly kept in view. It is sought to inspire the | 
young ladies with the highest ideals and to promote | 
their growth in character as well as in mind. Honor | 
and truth are the main principles regarded in the gov- | 
eminent of the Home. We trust our girls to the utmost ? | 
always assuming that they desire to do right and always | 
relying on sympathy and confidence rather than on rigid | 
rules to preserve the peace and order of the household. This | 
confidence is rarely disappointed. Grirls who have begun to | 



?*ys/s/sy/ys///sys////ysys/s/s/s/^^^ 



'X&s/s//ys/jyAr/s/jy//AP/?//ys/s^^^ 

I 88 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

| | 

^ ... ? 

| take life in earnest do not need much discipline. Others | 

| are not advised to come to Bethany. | 

| Rooms rent at the Heights at an average of $50 per ses- f 

| sion of forty weeks. That is about $1.25 a week. Most f 

| of the rooms are arranged to accommodate two persons, | 

| in which case of course the rent is divided equally between | 

| them. | 

y • ' 

Board is placed at $3.00 a week, and care is taken to pro- p 
| vide the young ladies with a sufficiency of wholesome and | 
| palatable food and to allow them a reasonable freedom oi f 
| the house in all respects. Each young lady is expected to | 
| bring sheets, pillow-cases, towels, napkins, napkin ring, fork, | 
| teaspoon and lamp. Oil is furnished at twenty cents a | 
| month. I 

% . . . y 

Fuller information may be had on addressing Prof. J. M. I 
| Trible, Bethany, W. Ya. 

| PHILLIPS HALL. I 

Phillips Hall, the handsome gift of Thomas W. Phillips, f 

| of New Castle, Pa., is now ready for occupancy. It is a f 

| large and commodious building, well adapted to the wants | 

| of young men, with capacity to accommodate sixty roomers | 

| and dining-room capacity for one hundred boarders. The | 

| rooms are nicely carpeted and well furnished with new and | 

| substantial hardwood furniture. It is heated throughout by | 

| steam, has hot and cold water on each floor, and supplied | 

| with bath-rooms in basement. The building is situated on I 

y, r 9 

| the College hill, only a few steps from the College building, I 
| which renders it convenient for the student to study in his y 
| own room between class hours. ^ 

Each roomer is expected to furnish table napkins and \ 
| ring, lamp, oil, towels and soap. | 

The rent of each room furnished and cared for is fifty \ 
| dollars per College year, twenty-five dollars for each of its 




beginning 
| oil tax is a mere trifle, three to five cents per week. A de- 
| posit of five dollars is required of each roomer as guarantee 

^////////////////^///^/^/^^^ 



£/s/s//y/ys/s//ysy/ys/s/s/sys//ys/s/s/s//ysy/y///^^^^ 

CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 39 ^ 

I 



| for preservation of room and furniture, which is refunded 

| when the room is vacated, if everything is found in proper 
condition. 

The spacious parlors are always open to the students. It % 
is the constant endeavor of Prof, and Mrs. Woolery to make 
the Hall as homelike as possible and to surround the stu_ 
dents with such influences and associations only as will tend 

1 to ennoble and refine them. 

| For further information, or to secure a room, address 

I Prof. L. C. Woolery, Bethany, W. Va. 

ENTRANCE AND EXAMINATIONS. 



Students desiring to enter any class must give evidence of 
their being prepared for the work of that class. Any one 
found to be working at a disadvantage to himself, through 
inadequate preparation tor the class to which he has been ^ 
J admitted, will be required to enter lower. 



whose examination grade falls below sixty-five. 




1 

Special examinations will be held at the close of each term. ^ 

" 1 



^/s/s/s//y/ysys/s/sy/ys//ys//ys//////y/ysy/^^^ 



% 40 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

I 



\ 



& 



1 
1 



No portion of a student'^ college fees is refunded on ac- 
count of withdrawal from the College, unless the withdrawal 



be rendered necessary by ill health 



$ s 



I In order to contribute to the welfare of all concerned, the 

| following regulations have been adopted. The Faculty most 

| earnestly request the co-operation of parents and guardians ; 

| in their enforcement : | 

§ NUMBER OF STUDIES. | 

| A student must have at least three studies, unless upon | 

| the written request of parent or guardian, or for good cause I 

| shown, the Faculty shall allow him to take a less number. 

I | 

I ABSENCE FROM RECITATIONS. | 



| A student is not permitted to absent himself from any | 
| recitation or examination without valid excuse, nor from the | 
College without special leave from the Faculty. 



1 WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE. | 

55 ISTn nnrtion of a, styndpnt,',« poIIpcp. fp.p.s is rp.fnndpd on no- h 



| count of withdrawal from the College, unless the withdrawal | 

s \\a von r\ ovorl napaasaru Yixr ill noalth ^ 



SI 



§ " " § 



s 



§ § 



fc MONTHLY REPORTS. | 

1 ' | 

I At the end of each month a report is sent by the Faculty | 

| to the parent or guardian of each student, in which are | 

| stated his grades and absences from recitations and examin- | 

| ations, together with such other information as to the stu- | 

| dent's progress and conduct as it may be deemed proper to | 

| communicate, or as the parent or guardian may especially | 

| request. The object of such reports is to incite the student to | 

I diligence by eliciting the commendation and encouragement | 

I of his friends, and to restrain him from idleness and disor- 1 

1 I 



/ % 

/ CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 41 | 



der, or to urge him to amendment by their admonition and 
advice. The usefulness of the reports greatly depends upon 
trie prompt and judicious attention they receive from those 
to whom they are addressed. Parents and guardians there- 
fore cannot be too earnest or prompt in communicating such 
| advice or encouragement as the monthly reports may sug- 
gest. 

CONDUCT. 



The laws of the College require from every student deco- | 
rous, sober and upright conduct as long as he remains a | 
member of the College, whether he be within the precincts | 
or not. They strictly forbid drunkenness, gaming, disso- 




The 1'aculty wish to urge parents and guardians not to 

allow students to contract debts to any large amount. Such | 

funds as are necessary ought to be promptly furnished. It | 

should be borne in mind that too much money is likely to lead | 

| to drinking, to gambling, and to other bad habits. No stu 




\ \ 

% 42 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

$ • N 

| of that class. Any student found to be working at a disad- | 

I vantage to himself, through inadequate preparation for the | 

| class to which he has been admitted, will be advised to enter | 

| lower. | 
Each student shall, as soon as possible, and with the | 



| approval ol the Faculty, select from the several schools a | 

| course of three daily recitations, or the equivalent thereof, I 
§ . -. ^ 

| unless, upon the request of the parent or guardian, or for | 

| other good causes shown, he be exempted from this rule. 



| One-half the expenses of the College year must be paid 
| at the opening of the first term, the other half at the open- | 

| ing of the second term. The matriculation and tuition | 

| fees must be paid invariably in advance. Before entering | 

| class a student will be required to show his matriculation | 

I i 1 

| card. | 

« § 

« s 

$ • $ 

§ § 

« s 

I I 

I I 

I I 

I V 1 

I I 

1 * 1 

I 1 

1 



! 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 43 | 



Appeals to its friends for patronage, and presents the fol- 
lowing advantages : 



deal to him. 



1. There is no saloon within seven miles of the place. 

2. Expenses are low. With simple tastes and habits, one 
; can live as cheaply in Bethany as in any place on the conti- 
nent. The College tees are less than half those charged in | 
Eastern colleges. | 

3. The College has a large and commodious building, | 
and is not therefore hampered for room, either for class work \ 
or for its societies. | 

4. The healthfulness of the location. It is in the midst | 
of an elevated region, where there is pure air, good water, | 
and perfect exemption from malaria and intermittent, con- | 
gestive and malignant fevers, so prevalent in some parts of f 
the country. | 

5. Bethany has a large and learned body of Alumni. I 
Many of these have become distinguished in the editorial | 
chair, on the bench, at the bar, in the halls of legislation, at | 
the professor's desk and in the pulpit. The student is ad- $ 
mitted to this reputation already achieved for him, as soon | 
as he completes his college course, and it is worth a great f 



6. The character of the instruction. The students are ^ 

taught to prize truth above rubies, and to seek for it as for | 

^ hidden treasures. They are urged to hold fast to all that f 

| has been proved, and at the same time to keep their minds f 

| open to all new truth, whether it be found on Christian or $ 

f on Pagan ground. They are taught to call no man master. $ 

Wordsworth says : " Liberty has two voices, one of the $ 



| mountain and one of the sea ' ; There is an air of freedom % 
| in the magnificent hills that stand around Bethany. 

r//ys/s//y//s/s/s/s/s/w//////////y///y/ysy/ys/s/s//ys^^^ •£ 



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| 44 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. f 

I - ■ ■ ■ — f 

/ 
/ 

/ 



7. 27?,e Bethany Pulpit. The pulpit has been a feature in I 
| Bethany from the first. Such men as Alexander Campbell, 
| W. K. Pendleton, Robert Richardson, C. L. Loos and W.H. \ 
I Woolery have preached regularly. J. M. Trible, the present £ 
| preacher, is a worthy successor of those already named, p 
| Other members of the Faculty speak occasionally. 

8. Literary Societies. Of Bethany, Prof. Radford said : £ 
| " Here is one College at least which is not permitting oratory | 
| to become a lost art. The traditions of the place are all ^ 
| against such ignoble decadence. Some of our colleges and / 
| universities are coming to neglect or even disparage oratory • 
| as a mere accomplishment, and to the silly notion has some- | 
| what afflicted the pulpit and the bar. The very air of Beth- | 

| any fosters eloquence." | 

^ ^ 

| 9. Quality has ever been the first consideration with Bethany, f 

| It is true that the attendance for the past session was larger | 

| than ever before, and for the coming session it promises to | 

| be much larger yet. Still it is but truth to say that Bethany \ 

| hardly aspires to be a great school, as some count greatness — J 

| great in the number of names on its register. It rather | 

| rejoices to be enrolled among the small colleges of our coun- f 

| try. The small college has played a great part in American f 

| education and history. It is more than doubtful that so | 

| good results would have come if our colleges had been fewer | 

| and larger. The university has its mission, 'but it will not | 

| be well for our generation if it is made to supplant the col- | 

| lege, or if our colleges all aspire to be universities. The | 

| ambition of magnitude so common to our colleges is not | 

| altogether a matter of congratulation. A college is to be | 

| judged more by the character than the number of its stu- | 

^ dents. Mammoth schools, like other mammoth concerns, % 

| may serve well for advertising ends, but they are likely to | 

| turn out a large proportion of men who, however they may | 

| count in the catalogue, count for very little in the world's | 

i work. | 

| 10. Bethany College has a great environment. The sur- | 
| rounding country is one of extraordinary natural beauty. I 

| Where can be found a fairer scene than that which opens ^ 

I I 



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^ V 

CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 45 | 

1 



to us as we stand on the steps or walk the corridor of the | 
college building? Noble hills, which do not rush abruptly 
to their really mountainous height, but rise to it by gentle 
gradations which give them a rounded and finished aspect 
and besides makes them green pastures to their very sum- f 
mits through all the seasons; valleys fair and fragrant, | 
through which the shadowy waters of " old Buffalo " wander | 
riverward forever — but why try to describe in cold type that | 
which only poet's or painter's power can portray? Who | 
that has seen can ever forget this picturesque and per- | 
feet landscape? "The veriest clod that ever vegetated' 3 
could not contemplate these scenes continually without some | 
elevation and enlargement of mind. Rarely does nature | 
bestow on any one spot so various charms with so lavish | 
hand. Added to these natural attractions are the traditions | 
and associations which linger about the place. The memory 
of those great souls who lived and labored at Bethany is 
kept green among us. Their ashes rest amid these fruitful 
and peaceful hills. Their ideas and aims still hover in the 
air. The very atmosphere of such a place is an education 
in itself. 



11. Bethany and the Ministry. From its foundation, the | 
College has attracted those who desire to prepare themselves | 
for gospel ministry. So true is this, that it is sometimes | 
supposed to be chiefly, if not wholly, a school for students | 
for the ministry. It is, in fact, much more than this : it is a f 
college in the full sense, educating men not for one calling f 
only, but for all the vocations of life. It has eminent alumni % 
in all the professions. It is, however, eminently a school for | 
the training of preachers. Robert MofFett said once that \ 
there seems to be. something in the air at Bethany which in- ^ 

| clines men to preach. So far as our knowledge goes, no one | 
ever came to Bethany with the intention of devoting his | 
life to the ministry and changed that intention after coming f 
here, while it is a thing of frequent occurrence that one who f 
comes with his mind set on some other profession resolves | 
after being in the College awhile to give himself to the work | 

: of the ministry. No particular pressure is brought to bear \ 






y///ysys/sy//s/sy/ys//y/y///y///y/y////s////y////s^^^ 

I I 

| 46 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 



| ... . . P 

2 to this end. It is in the air; all the associations and influ- ? 

'/, ences of the place are favorable to the ministry. Bethany | 

I exalts the ministerial office. A ministerial student is held I 

/ . . . . / 

/ in at least equal honor with any other, while his intimate | 



^ association with other students of the College and his instruc- 
| tion in the same classes and studies with the rest corrects all 
| tendency to clerical caste. Bethany aims to make young 



/ 



/ 



« 



/ 



/ 




= men, first of all, students and scholars. Before entering / 



| upon the strictly ministerial studies, the student is drilled in I 

I the classical and disciplinary studies as are other students. % 

/ The design of this is to bring them to a degree of maturity £ 

i and independence of mind before beginning the special min- \ 

| isterial studies. The propriety of this is obvious. 

1 ' I 



p i 

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CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 



47 



CALENDAR 

TOR 1891-92. 



Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday 

and Wednesday, before the third Thursday in June. 
Annual Commencement, . on the third Thursday in June. 



Session begins, ..... 

Christmas recess begins at 1 p. m., 
: Christmas recess ends, .... 

First term ends, ..... 

Second term begins, .... 

Anniversary of Neotrophian Society, . 

Anniversary of American Literary Institute, November 10 
| Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, February 22 



September 21 

December 23 

January 5 

January 31 

. February 1 

November 5 



Field Day, 
Class Day, 



Tuesday before Commencement 
Wednesday before Commencement 



■s//y/ys/s/////s/s/s//ysys/sy/yAY/s//ys///^^^ 



s*///s////y/ys////y///y/ysy//s/^^^ 



/ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 49 | 

1 ^ I 

\ 

/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
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/ 

| 

OP BETHANY COLLEGE. I 
| 

FIRST CLASS, JULY 4, 1844. 

(THIRD SESSION.)* | 

Robert T. Bryan, Ky. J. S. Fall, Ky. ^ 



Alumni and Aulmn^e 



/ 



John A. Dearborn, Ky. William Ferrel, Va. 

J. 0. Stone, Ky. / 

I 

SECOND CLASS, JULY 4, 1845. / 

William Baxter, Pa. T. C. McKeever, Pa. 

J. W. Brown, Tenn. Walter C. Whitaker, Ky. 

Andrew Campbell, Tenn, William W. Whitaker, Ky. | 

Hiram Christopher, Ky. John H. Williams, Ky. ^ 

4 



John 0. Ewing, Tenn. James A. Young, Ky. 

THIRD CLASS, JULY 4, 1846, 



/ 

/ 
/ 

I 

Elijah C. Bryan, Ky. Henry S. Pearce, Md. / 

Daniel B. Bryan, Ky. Daniel Runyon, Ky. / 

J. W. C. Bryant, 0. Thomas T. Singleton, Ky. 

Elias J. Earle, S. C. Thomas J. Smith, Kv. / 

Richard Lemmon, Md. J. R. Saltonstall, 111. 

C. L. Loos, O. C. F. Uhlrich, Va. f 

W. W. McKenney, Va. Benjamin P. Wheeler, Ind. 

T. J. Mellish, Pa. Richard M. Webb, Ky. f 

I 

FOURTH CLASS, JULY 3, 1847. | 

Thomas N. Arnold, Ky. Robert Graham, Pa. 

A. R. Benton, N. Y. J. D. Harris, Ky. 

R. D. Boy kin, Ala. E. L. Lashbrook, Kv. ^ 

John Bryson, Pa. J. H. Pendleton, Va. ^ 

J. N. Carpenter, Va. John Poston, Ky. ^ 

J. W. Earle, S. C. Thomas W. Whitaker, Va. f 

B. F. Williams, Ky. 

/ 

* Bethany College opened its first session November, 1841. / 



| 50 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

I FIFTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1848. | 

I I 

^ John H. Armstrong, Va. Hardin B. Littlepage, Va. | 

^ I 

| John A. Black, Ky. Alexander Procter, Mo. ^ 

Samuel T. Boy kin, Ala. Thomas L. Ricks, Ala. 

| C. A. Caroland,St. John, N. B. B. R. Sulgrove, Ind. 



Henry M. Fowlkes, Va. John T. Whitelaw, Tenn. 

1 John Lindsev, 111. Evan D. Williams, Kv. | 

| SIXTH CLASS. JULY 4, 1849. | 



| Charles Carlton, N. Y. M. E. Lard, Mo. | 

?5> i^J^m^nrvmnT, D n T TJ" "XT ,-^ 1 1 ,-w Til § 



| Andrew Chapman, Pa. J, H. Neville, 111. | 

| T. D. Gore, Mo. J. D. Pickett. Ky. | 

1 Colby A. Smith, Ky. 1 

| SEVENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1850. § 

| Randolph Ballinger, Ky. Samuel Dougherty, Mo. 

| Joseph Bledsoe, Mo. Henry Henderson, Scotland. 

| A. C. Brj'ant, 0. James McCariher, Pa. | 

J. W. Butler, 111. J. W. McGarvey, Mo. | 

J. W. Carter, Va. Thomas Munnell, Va. | 

I W. W. Smith, lenn. I 

1 I 

I EIGHTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1851. | 

| Kirkland Baxter, Pa. J. J. Louthan, Mo. | 

I E. T. Bush, Tenn. N. W. Miller, Mo. | 

| Edgar Crews, Mo. John C. New, Ind. | 

| J. M. Ewing, Mo. George Plattenburg. Va | 

Amaziah Hull, Pa. Thomas M. Redd, Ky. 

J. F. Lauck, Va. B. D. T. Standeford, Ky. | 

| George Lemmon, Md. A. G. Thomas, Ga. | 

| I 

| NINTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1852. | 

Joseph Baldwin, Pa. S. G. Earle, S. C. 

Moses Bennett, Ky. J. W. Ewing, Tenn. | 

Alex. Campbell, Jr., Va. R. Faurot. la. | 

A. W. Campbell, Va. W. P. Hudgens, Va. 

Augustus Campbell, Va. J. T. T. Hundley, Va. 

T. F. Campbell, La. Joseph T. Johnson, Mo. 

J. W. Clanton, Miss. J. B. McLure, Va. 

S. W. Coleman, Ky. A. E. Myers, Tenn. 

| T. M. Neal, La J R. Tait, 0. | 

| J. C. Palmer, Va. E. S. Tener, Ireland. | 



| CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 51 | 
^ § 



NINTH CLASS-CONTINUED. 



F. H. Risley, O. 
W. C. Rogers, Ky. 



J. M. Watson, Mo. 
R. H. Whitaker, Va. 



TENTH CLASS, JULY 3, 1853. 

R. H. Bennett, Miss. R. L. Henley, Va. 



W. W. Bond, Tenn. 
Hanson Boring, Va. 
J. R. Challen, O. 
W. S. Giltner. Ky. 
E. A. Guess, 0. 
T. J. Harbert, Tenn. 



P. H. Jones, Va. 
W. D. Moffitt, 111. 
R. H. Prewitt, Ky. 
C. B. Ross, Tenn. 
J. P. Smith, Ky. 
W. B. Smith, Ky. 
W. B. Wynne, Va. 



ELEVENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1854, 



O. A. Burgess, 111. 
W. P. Craig, N. C. 
John T. Dye, Ky. 
Alex. Ellett, Va. 
B. Y. Gross, Mo. 
John Harnitt, Pa. 
J. M. Henley, Va. 
J. S. Lamar, Ga. 



L. H. Lane, Ky. 
J. H. McKay, Ky. 
J. J. Perry, Va. 
W. C. Piper, Ky. 
J. F. Rowe, O. 
John Shackleford, Ky. 
Geo. B. Sherman, Vt. 
W. M. Thrasher, Ind. 
R. V. Wall, Miss. 



TWELFTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1855. 



F. W. Allen, Mo. 
W. E. Armstrong, Ky. 
S, S. Bassett, Mo. 
W. S. Billups, Va. 
W. C. Brown, N. C. 
I. N. Carman, O. 
J. B. Davis, Ky. 
J. W. Davis, Ky. 
Ezra Harnitt, Pa. 



J. W. Horner, D. O. 
Joseph King, O. 
W. H. Lillard, Ky. 
R. M. Messick, Ky. 
C. L. Randolph, Ala. 
W. H. Robinson, Mo. 
J. C. C. Thornton, Mo. 
J. M. Walton, Tenn. 
R. L. Ware, Va. 



THIRTEENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1856. 

B. H. Allen, Mo. B. W. Johnson, 111. 

Geo. Anderson, Ind. A. M. Lay, Mo. 

James Atkins, Ga. S. McBride, O. 

J. M. Barnes, Ala. J. A. Meng, Mo. 

W. C. Boone, Mo. J. Pollock, Va. 



>, 



s/AV/sys/AY/s/y/sysy/y/yAY/SM^^ 



;*£XXXXXXXXX^XXXXXXXX*^XXVXXXX^iS*XVXX*^X^X<XXXX^^ 

/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 



52 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



THIRTEENTH CLASS— CONTINUED. 



J. A. Brooks, Ky. 
J. H. Bryan, Ky. 
J. M. Childs, Tenn. 
J. B. Dow, Va. 
I. L. Elliott Tenn. 
W. A. Hall, Tenn. 
J. C. Howell, Mo. 
J. H. Hundley, Ala. 



L. Pyron, Ga. 
J. T. Riley, Mo. 
W. E. Rogers, Ky. 
L. L. Rowland, Ore. 
W. S. Russell, Mo. 
J. B. Scearce, Ky. 
R. W. Selden, Va. 
R. F. Turner, Va. 



J. H. Underwood, Ills. 



FOURTEENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1857. 



E. B. Challener, Va. 
J. W. Crockett, Ky. 
L. A. Cutler, Va. 
William Dew, Va. 
R. S. Dulin, Ky. 
J. M. Dunning, Mo. 
H. C. Durett, Ky. 

A. Elliott, Mo. 

I. B. Grubbs, Ky. 
W. T. Haley, Ore. 

B. F. Harvey, Mo. 

T. W. H. Hedden, Ky. 
E. H. Irvine, Mo. 



D. L. Irvine, Mo. 
G. A. Jones, 0. 
N. M. Laws, 111. 
P. Lucas, Mo. 

M. W. Miller, Mo. 
J. W. Mosby, Mo. 

F. H. Pendleton, Va. 
C. W. Sewell, Tenn. 

E. R. Sims, Va. 

A. M. Summers, Mo. 
I. D. Stone, Ky. 
P. H. Taylor, Ky. 

G. W. Turner, Mo. 



FIFTEENTH CLASS, JULY 2 3 1858. 



T. V. Berry, Va. 
J. G. Bramham, Va. 
C. F. Coleman, Va. 
A. F. Dabney, Va. 
H. S. Earl, 111. 
J. W. Goss, Va. 
A. S. Hale, Pa- 
H. H. Haley, Mo. 
Jephtbah Hobbs, 111. 
S. C. Humphrey, 111. 
J. M. Larue, Ky. 
J. C. Miller, Ind. 



C. C. Moore, Ky. 
W. T. Moore, Ky. 
M. T. Moye, N. C. 
H. Pangburn, 0. 
N. P. Peeler, Mo. 
G. W. Riley, Ky. 
J. J. Rogers, Ky. 
R. A. Spurr, Ky. 
J. Z. Taylor, Pa. 
H Turner, Ky. 

T. H. Wynne, Va. 

D. T. Yates, Miss. 



8 



£sVX^X^XX^VX>XSCX>XXXX*OCX*0*XSXX^XS*X^^ 



fiAT ATnnri? r\T? DT7rrir*\nr nm t urn? PvQ ^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



§ 



SIXTEENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1859. 



R. H. Alfred, S. C. 
J. R. B. Best, S. C. 
M. M. Burke, Miss. 
T. H. Collins, Miss. 

C. F. Crenshaw, Ga. 
N. R. Dale, Ky. 

A. L. Darnall, Ky. 
Wm. Dudley Davis, Va. 
W. S. Frank, Ky. 
Philip Galley, Pa. 

D. M. Grandfield, Mo 
W. S. Hawkins, Tenn. 
J. Helm, Ky. 

J. W. Hopper, Ky. 
C. W. Hubbard, Va. 
William Hunt, 0. 



J. H. Johnson, Ky. 
R. H. Johnson, 111. 
J. S. Larue, Ky. 
0. L. Matthews, Ky. 
M. B. McKeever, Pa. 
R. H. Miller, La. 
Robert Moffett, 111. 
D. F. Patterson, Pa. 
Peter Perrine, Pa. 
J. Davis Keid, Ky. 
Warren T. Rogers, Ky. 
B. H. Smith, Mo. 
A. W. Thomson, Ky. 
Matt. Turney, Ky. 
Hiram Warinner, Mo. 
George W. Watts, Mo. 



SEVENTEENTH CLASS, JULY 4, I860. 



R. O. Baker, Va. 
T. V. Bryant, Mo. 
G. S. Bryant, Mo. 
W. C. Fenley, Ky. 
A. E. Higgason, Va. 
J. A. Holton, Ky. 
W. B. Hough, Va. 
J. C. Johnson, Va. 
J. W. Lucas, Ky. 
Waller Overton, Ky. 
F. H. Overton, Ky. 



R. L. Parrish, Va. 
E. T. Porter, Ky. 
H. D. Ring, Mo. 
J. H. Rogers, Mo. 
C. Shackleford, Ky. 
A. H. Shropshire, Ky. 
Eugene Tarr, Va. 
W. T. Thurmond, Mo. 
C. M. B. Thurmond, Mo. 
J. W. Tompkins, Ky. 
C. L. Woolfolk, Va. 



EIGHTEENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1861. 

E. C. Anderson, Va. R. A. Hester, Ky. 

E. Frazier, Ky. J. J. Perrine, Ky. 

N. F Smith, Ky. 



NINETEENTH CLASS, JULY 4, 1862. 

W. O. Clough, Va. J. L. Hunt, 0. 

Thomas T. Holton, Ky. T. W. Mulhern, Va. 

R. J. Weatherly, Miss. 



<«\\V\^\^^^^\^V\\^\^^i^\\A\>^ 



;/sys/s/s//y/ys/s//////ys/sy/ys////ys^^^ 

| 54 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

/ _ ^ 

I TWENTIETH CLASS, JULY 4, 1863. | 







J. R. Darnall, Va. H. T. F. Linn, Mo. 



I L. R. Gault, Ky. W. H. Nave, Mo. § 

? g 

| TWENTY-FIRST CLASS. JULY 2, 1864. ^ 



V, 



I J. H. Carter, Va. D. P. Newcomer, Md. 

g g 

A. L. Carvajal, Mexico. J. D. Riley, Ky. 

S. S. Moore, Ky. Austin Taylor, Ky. 

£ • I 

| TWENTY-SECOND CLASS, JULY 4, 1865, ^ 

J. L. Pinkerton, Ky. W. C. Dawson, Mo. 

J. P. Player, Tenn. Jabez Hall, W. Va. 

I William Hukill, Jr., W. Va. I 

% I 

| TWENTY-THIRD CLASS., JUNE 28, 1866. ^ 

$ g 

p JohnM. Bass, Jr., Tenn. H. Price, Mo. 

I M. R. Freshwater, W. Va. J. S. Ross, O. I 



p W. B. Higby, 0. M. L. Streator, Pa. | 

I J. B. Johnson, 111. W. D. Swaim, 0. I 

p E. Lowrey, W. Va. Robert Wason, Md. 

John O. Lea, Tenn. J. T. Wilkerson, Ky. 

1 D. Wilson, W. Va. I 

2 ^ 



$ TWENTY-FOURTH CLASS, JUNE 20, 1867. g 

I J. L. Allen, Jr., W. Va. F. Houston, Mo. i 

v g 

| R. L. Armistead, Tenn. J. Jones, W. Va. 

| J. F. Berry, Wis. H. McDiarmid, Canada West. \ 

I L. S. Brown, Pa. W. R. Moore, Ky. I 



^ TWENTY-FIFTH CLASS, JUNE 18, 1868. 

B. L. Coleman, Ky. William O. Foley, Ind. 

| R. Courtney, O. B. T. Jones, 0. 

I J. W. Crenshaw, Va. William P. Neale, W. Va. 

^ George Crow, W. Va. George P. Nelson, Ky. 

I J. L. Darsie, Pa. George T. Oliver, Pa. I 

| George Darsie, Pa. S. C. Robison, O. ^ 

I J. H. Dodd, W. Va. William H. Schell, Pa. 

B. B Ferguson, Mo. J. M. Streator, Pa. 

| TWENTY-SIXTH CLASS, JUNE 17, 1869. ^ 

| Frank W. Allen, W. Va. O. Goodrich, O. 

Wm. P. Aylesworth, 111. A. T. Gunnell, Mo. 

fy//z//y/s/s////y//s/s//ys/s/s//y/ys/^^^ 



\ CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 55 I 



TWENTY-SIXTH CLASS— Continued. 



! 

L. Bacon, Mo. J. A. Harding, Ky. | 

T. B. Bird, 0. C. L. Loos, Jr., W. Va. | 
W. S. Bullard, Va. W. K. McAlister, Jr., Tenn. I 

J. B. Crenshaw, Va. J. I. Nelson, Mo. | 

B. S. Dean, Wis. C. E. Shriver, Pa. | 
G. T. Douglass, W. Va. ' J. A. Williams, 0. 

R. C. Wilson, W. Va. I 

TWENTY-SEVENTH CLASS. JUNE 16, 1870. ^ 

J. G. Anderson, Va. F. H. Merger, Tenn. | 
W. S. Atkinson, 0. H. N. Mertz, 0. 

W. C. Gans, O. B. W. Peterson, W. Va. | 

John G. Hawley, Mich. W. H. Spencer, Ky. | 



TWENTY-EIGHTH CLASS, JUNE 15, 1871. 



B. H. Hayden Mich. R. W. Thomas, Texas. 

H. W. List, W. Va. G. N. Tillman, Tenn. I 



W. C. Lyne, Va. A. B. Wells, Ky. I 



B. T. Blanpied, 0. R. H. Marling. Tenn. | 

D. W. Clendenin, Can. A. M. Merriman, Mich, 

E. L. Crenshaw, Va. L. K. Murton, Can, | 

I 



G. C. Curtis, W. Va. F. D. Power, Va. | 

W. B. Dillard, Va. J. R. Reese, Mich. | 

G. J. Ellis, O. J. C. Rosborough, Miss. | 

W. S. Errett, O. A. C. Smith, Ga. | 

G. M. Kemp,0. E. J. Smith, W. Va. | 

R. T. Walker, Va. | 






TWENTY-NINTH CLASS, JUNE 20, 1872, ^ 

E. D. Barclay, Can. C. T. Henley, Va. | 



James Burrier, 0. Charles Knight, Ky. ^ 

C. W. Franzheim, W, Va. F. M. Oglebay, W. Va. 



/ 



L. S. Gibson, W. Va. D. S. Sowers, Pa. f 



/ 



T. A. Harvey, Pa. D. D. Vorhees, O. p 

R. H. Wynne, Va. | 

I 



THIRTIETH CLASS, JUNE 19, 1873. | 

1 i 

J. N. Adams, Tenn. S. A. Lacock, Pa. ^ 

Alcinous Baker, 0. H. S. Lobingier, Pa. | 

I J. A. Beattie, p. G. W. McCoard Pa. I 

1 I 

?/s/sys//ys/sy/y/y/y/y/y//s/s///s^^^ 



^/sys//yAY//y/ys/s/s/s//ys/Ay^^^ 

| S 

| 56 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

: 



THIRTIETH CLASS— Continued. 



W. C. Buchanan, W. Va. 

J. B. Clark, Ky. 

W. K. Curtis, W. Va. 

J. D. Davis, Penn. 

J. E. Dunn, Va. 

M. P. Gallaher, O. 

R. S. Groves, O. 

Fred. Hoffman, 0. 

J. W. Huey, Tenn. 



J. F. Merriman, Mo. 
F. P. McNeil, W. Va. 
Charles Mills, Pa. 
J. A. Moninger, Pa. 
J. H. Nesslage, N. Y. 
*G. W. Ralston, Pa. 

E. D. Shreve, 0. 
L. H. Stine, Ills. 

F. P. St Clair, W. Va. 



THIRTY-FIRST CLASS. JUNE 18, 1874. 

M. J. Maxwell, O. 
A. J. Moye, N. C. 
S. C. Rockwell, Pa. 



W. S. Garvey, Ky. 

C. P. Garvey, Ky. 

D, M. Harris, 0. 
Alex. Kuhn, W. Va. 

A. McLean, P. E. Island. 
N. McLeod, P. E. Island. 
J. D. Maxwell, O. 



J. H. Sallee, Ky. 
George T. Smith, Ind. 
W. B. Thomson, 0. 
Roger Williams, Pa. 



THIRTY SECOND CLASS, JUNE 18, 1875. 



D. S. Borland, 0. 

C. T. Carlton, Texas. 
M. M. Cochran, Pa. 
W. A. Davidson, Pa. 
J.T. Gano,Ky. 

E. J. Gantz, N. Y. 

T. B. Knowles, Nova Scotia. 
J. A. Myers, W. Va. 



I. J. Spencer, 0. 
J. M. Trible, Va. 
W. A. Watkins, Pa. 
L. W. Welsh, Md. 
E. T. Williams, O. 
A. B. Williams, 0. 
J. J. Williams, Ky. 
J. T. Wilson, Va. 



E. V. Zollars, O. 



THIRTY-THIRD CLASS, JUNE 15, 1876. 



G. W. Burns, O. 
A. F. Erb, N. Y. 
N. C. Criswell, W. Va. 
T. C. Gabler, Pa. 
C. W. Gano, Texas. 
W. F. Parker, Mo. 
F. W. Pattie, Tex. 
J. S. Rodgers, W. Va. 



i 

$/jys/s//y/ys/s/s//y/ys///AY/s/s//^^^^^ 



B. C. Hagerman, Ky. 

F. C. McMillin, O. 

G. W. McCord, W. Va. 

C. S. Morrison, 0. 
E. C. Myers, W. Va. 

E. F. Taylor, Ind. 

F. S. Trimble, Md. 
W. H. Woolery, Ky. 



&NS*XX>iXXXXXXS*XXX^VX^XXXXXXXXXXXA<XX^^X^XXXX^XX^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



57 



THIRTY-THIRD CLASS-Continued. 

W. M. Richardson, W. Va. G. L. Wharton, 111. 

Charles Shields, Pa. W. B. Young, Ala. 

R. P. Young, La. 

THIRTY-FOURTH CLASS, JUNE 21, 1877. 



T. V. Barclay, Ky. 
S. W. Brown, O. 
T. H. Capp, Australia. 
E. W. Dallas, O. 
M. J. Hartley, 0. 
C. P. Hendershot, 0. 
E. B. Hook, Ga. 
Alex. Holt, Mo. 
C. P. Kemper, W. Va. 
J. R. Lamar, Ga. 



P. J. Lamar, Ga. 
Harry McFarland, Pa. 
A. J. Mercer, O. 
W. H. Scott, O. 
E. G. Sebree, Jr., Ky. 
R. T. Walker, Jr., Tex. 
G. E. Walk, Tenn. 
G. S. Walton, La. 
W. G. Walton, La. 
S. A. Walton, Ky. 



THIRTY-FIFTH CLASS, JUNE 20, 1878. 



John Ambler, la. 
C. L. Brown, W. Va. 
George Byrne, W. Va. 
W. N. Curtis, W. Va. 
Carroll Ghent, O. 
S. D. Goff, Ky. 
M. J. Goodwin, Ky. 
H. W. Grigsby, Pa. 
W. H. Hayden, 0. 
0. S. Marshall, W. Va. 



/ 



/ 



D. A. Quick, W. Va. 

C. L. Sallee, Ky. 
J. H. Shinn, Ark. 
G. W. Shinn, Ark. 
Alonzo Skidmore, O. 

B. L. Smith, Ind. 
J. W. Tate, Mo. 

D. 0. Thomas, Wales. 
N. P. Van Meter, Ky. 

C. T. Vinson, Ky. 



THIRTY-SIXTH CLASS, JUNE 19, 1879. 



A. G. Bauer, O. 
D. W. Daugherty, 0. 
C. H. Garvey, Ky. 
J. W. Gist, W. Va. 
C. W. Harvey, Md. 
W. S. Hoye, Va. 
Asbury Hull, Ga. 
C. A. Kleeberger, 0. 
S. P. Lazear, W. Va. 
O. A. Lyon, O. 
Levi Marshall, 0. 



W. C. Meaux, Ky. 
C. D. Painter, Ky. 
P. M. Pritchard, O. 
T. C. Robinson, Ky. 
W. Rist, Col. 
W. W. Stephenson, Ky. 
R. W. Stephenson, P. E. Isl. 
L. A. Thomas, Jr., Ky. 
M. J. I. Thomson, 0. 
W. C. Wade, Va. 
C. P. Winbigler, O. 
J. F. Winn, Ky. 



| 

\s/s/s/s/s//ys/s/sys//ys//y/y/ys//y/y/ys//y//s//^^^^ 



,XX^XXX^X^X^0*XXX^XXXXXXXX>XXXX<\3*XSXXXX*0*XX^ 
1 



S ..« § 



| 58 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



I- ^ . __ 

§ THIRTY-SEVENTH CLASS, JUNE 17, 1880. ^ 

N $ 

B. 0. Aylesworth, 111. J. W. Jenkins, Mich. 

| J. D. Crow, Ky. J. W. McGarvey, Jr., Ky. 

E. P. Couch, Tenn. W. H. McKinley, Ky. 

| A. S. Dabney, Ky. D. C. McKay, P. E. Island. 

| Ida C. Darsey, Pa. H. H. Nesslage, N. Y. 

| A. T. Fox, Pa. . C. W. Norris, Ky. 

T. L. Fowler, Canada. W. S. Priest, 0. 

1 A. B. Griffith, Pa. F. T. Smith, 0. | 

| James Hammond, 0, J. E. Stevenson, la. | 

| S. L. Van Meter, Ky. | 

| THIRTY-EIGHTH CLASS, JUNE 16, 1881. | 



E. W. Mathews, O. C. J. Tanner, 0. 

Curran Palmer, W. Va. J. C. Ulrich, W. Va. 

§ THIRTY-NINTH CLASS, JUNE 15, 1882. S 

$ § 

| J. L. Atkins, Ga, W. G. Garvey, Ky. | 

Mary A. Campbell, W. Va. A. M. Harvuot, O. 

I J. A. Cox, W. Va. L. B. Mertz, 0. 1 

| Jennie Darsie, Pa. H. K. Pendleton, W. Va. | 

| S. L. Darsie, W. Va. W. S. St. Clair, W. Va. 

| S. W. Wells. | 

| FORTIETH CLASS, JUNE 22, 188^. 3 | 

| D. E. Andrews, 0. C. M. Oliphant, O. | 

I F. V. Brown, N. Y. S. Rodgers, W. Va. I 

| J. H. Grayson, Va. A. C. Strickley, Va. 

Irene T. Myers, W. Va. Stewart Taylor, Mo. 

| FORTY-FIRST CLASS, JUNE 20, 1884. | 

I A. G. Baker, O. W. S. Payne, Ky. | 

| C. G. Brelos, N. Y. P. Y. Pendleton, Pa. 

| A.J. Colborn, Pa. F. L. Phillips, Va. | 



| T. J. Davis, Va. E. M. Smith, Va. | 

G. T. Halbert, Ky. G. K. Smith, Mo. 

| R. H. Lillard, Ky. F. B. Walker, Ind. | 

W. H. Mooney, O. H. C. Wells, Mo. 

1 Emma G. Newcomer, Pa. J. F. Witmer, N. Y. I 

§ T r\ TIT" 1 T7"„ > 



L. C. Woolery, Ky. | 

| FORTY-SECOND CLASS, JUNE 18, 1885. s 

F. P. Arthur, N. Y, W. L. McElroy, 0. 

M. G. Baxter, O. Flora Price, 0. | 



\ % 

| CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 59 i 

\ 1 

| FORTY-SECOND CLASS -Continued. 2 

F. S. Brown, N. Y. Gussie Price, O. 

A. D. Dowling,0. G. W. Smith, Mo. | 

F. M. Dowling, 0. Cyrus Ulrich, O. | 
D. S. Gay, Ky. Laura Westlake, 0. 

J. H. Mertz, 0. J. B. Wilson, W. Va. f 

W. H. Wolf, 0, | 

I 



FORTY-THIRD CLASS. JUNE 17, 1886. | 

S. M. Cooper, 0. R. M. Rosser, Ga. | 

A. W. Mayers. 0. Oscar Schmiedel, W. Va. | 

G. W. Muckley, 0. A. L. White, O. 

W. J. McLure, 0. H. L. Willett, Mich. I 

W. C. Payne, Ind. Lassie Williamson, Idaho. | 

J. R. Wilson, W. Va. I 

I 

FORTY-FOURTH CLASS, JUNE 16, 1887. g 

E. E. Curry, 0. J. C. Reid, Ky. | 

T. A. Jones, Ky. Viginti R. Shriver, W. Va. f 

S. T. Martin, 0. J. F. Woolery, Ky. | 

I 

FORTY-FIFTH CLASS, JUNE 21, 1888. | 

I 



M. L. Bartlett, 0. Sherman Kirk, 0. | 

R. M. Campbell, W. Va. C. F. McCoy, 0. 

J. W. Gorrell, W. Va. A. B. Phillips, O. 



/ 



G. M. Guy, Kansas. J. E. Pounds, 0. | 



/ 



J. M. Hervey, 0. H. H. Rumble, Mo. f 



F. S. Israel, 0. H. R. White, 0. f 



/ 



J. L. White, Ky. | 



FORTY-SIXTH CLASS, JUNE 20, 1889. g 

W. L. Addy, Pa. Daisy E. Lewis, W. Va. | 



A. S. Bell, W. Va. Nellie C. Mendel, W. Va. | 

y 
E. R. Black, Canada. A. C. Phillips, Pa. 

L. J. Cameron, 0. J. H. Strickling, W. Va. | 

Anna L. Cox, W. Va. H. W. Talmage, Pa. 

T. S. Freeman, Nova Scotia. W. R. Warren, Mo. 



J. A. Hopkins, Ohio. A. J. P. Wilson, W. Va. | 



FORTY-SEVENTH CLASS, JUNE 19, 1890. | 



/ 



W. P. Bentley, 0. Belle M. McDiarmid, 0. 

Emily M. CJamp, 0. S. S. McGill, 0. 

Bessie Chapline, W. Va. L. I. Mercer, O. 



I 

>ysysysy/y/ysy/y/ysysy/ysysy/ysy/ysysy/ysy/ysysy/ysysy/ysys^^^ 



| 60 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 



FORTY-SEVENTH CLASS— CONTINUED. 

R. A. Cutler, Va. Melancthon Moore, 0. 

B. S. Ferrall, 0. E. S. Muckley, O. 

Alfred Harris, W. Va. Zinnia Oram, W. Va. 



R. S. Israel, O. 
E. O. Lovett, 0. 
C. E. Lowry, 111. 



J. B. Smith, 0. 

A. H. Taylor, W. Va. 

G. S. Warnock, 0< 
W. B. White, Ky. 



FORTY-EIGHTH CLASS. JUNE 18, 1891. 
Geo. 0. Black, Ont. 
E. J. Butler, N. Y. 
Evangeline Fox, Ohio. 
E. W. Gordon, Pa. 
W. A. Harp, Ind. 
D. V. Hedgepeth, Ind. 
H. W. Hoover, Ont. 
B. A. Jenkins, Mo. 






-iM 



Beatrice M. Kelly, Ohio. 
C. M. Kreidler,-Jfek #**^W*| 
J. G. McGarran, Ohio. cj A 

J. R. McWane,^u^^^t |* 
W. G. Oram, W. Va. 



W. Fred. Shrontz, Pa. 
Daisy M. Wells, W. Va. 
W. J. Wright, Pa. 



WHOLE NUMBER OF GRADUATES BY STATES. 

Kentucky, 

Ohio, --. - 

Virginia, - 

West Virginia, - 

Missouri, 

Pennsylvania, 

Tennessee, 

Illinois, - 

Indiana, 

Georgia, - - 

New York, 

Maryland, - 

Mississippi, 

Alabama, - - - 

Canada, 

Louisiana, - 

Michigan, 

South Carolina, - 

Texas, - 



142 


North Carolina, 


4 


123 


Prince Edward Island, 


- 4 


83 


Oregon, ... 


2 


73 


Wisconsin, - 


- 2 


65 


Nova Scotia, 


2 


58 


Arkansas, - 


- 2 


29 


Iowa, 


2 


20 


Colorado, - 


- 1 


18 


Vermont, 


1 


12 


District of Columbia, - 


- 1 


13 


Kansas, ■ 


1 


10 


Ireland, 


- 1 


8 


Idaho, ... 


1 


7 


Mexico, - 


- 1 


10 


New Brunswick, 


1 


6 


Scotland, - 


- 1 


6 


Australia, 


1 


5 


Wales, 


- 1 


5 


Total, - 


- 722 



W///////////////////////^^^^^^ 



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f 












CATALOGUE 



OF.THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



•OF 



Bethany College, 



FOR THE 



FIFTY=FIRST SESSION, 



Ending June 16th, 1892. 



WHEELING : 
Daily Intelligencer Steam Book and Job Print. 

1892. 






¥) 



c c^==^ c c^==^ ^=1^ ^ — g?> cr ?l EEEEF |? > ^ 






fTorms of Beqciesis. 



2 A x % 



I give and begueath to the Trustees of Bethany College. 



t - - — - - § 



* Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of 



* thousand dollars, to be safely invested by them as an endowment, 

<, the interest only of which is to be used for the support of the 

I I 



College. 



<. i 



! ! 



I S 



| eral purposes of the College. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, 

I $ 

p Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of '-J 

I 1 

i thousand dollars, to be applied, at their discretion, for the gen- 

I . ; , U ", ■ 1 

( \ 

l I 

I I 

1 give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, \ 

I Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of V 

I ' • I 

| thousand dollars, to be safely invested by them and the interest 

I onto/ applied, at their discretion, to aid deserving students in any 

I 1 1 

V • 7 77 S 

| course in the college. 

/ \ 

/ \ 

g • • \ 

I i 



,//s/s//y/y/ys//y/////ys/sysys//^^^^^ 

I i 



I CATALOGUE 

I OF THE § 

1 i 



I OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 

| OF | 

i 




Bethany * College, 



| FOR THE 

I I 

I I 

I Fifty=First Session, Ending June 16, 1892, p 

I I 

I WITH THE I 



I Course of Studv and Annual Announcement 

1 



Course of Study and Annual Announcement 

For i892='93. 



1 1 



2 a 



? i 

% __ . 1 

y 1 

OPEN TO MALES AND FEMALES ON EQUAL TERMS. I 

? 1 

I ■ 1 



BETHANY, WEST VIRGINIA. 1 



I 

I 1892. I 



» r 



i 



Is 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Board of Trustees. 



i 

1 A. McLean, 



| W. K. Pendleton, 

| J. W. MULHOLLAND, - 

I John Campbell, 

| Hon. Geo. H. Anderson, 

| Hon. R. M. Bishop, 

| H. K. Pendleton, 

| A. W. Campbell, - 

| J. E. Curtis, 

| Dr. J. E. Whitsett, 

I R. MOFFETT, 

F. D. Power, 

Alex. Campbell, 

Charles Shields, 
| Judge L. Bacon, 
| George T. Oliver, 
| C. B. Turner, - 



| J. H. Jones 

s 



I Russell Errett, 

| W. C. Lyne, - 

| Thomas W. Phillips, 

| Dr. Roger Williams. 

| John C. Palmer, 

| J. J. Barclay, 

| R. S. Latimer, 

| George Darsie, 

| Dr. I. M. Ridge, 

| S. M. Cooper, 



M. M. Cochran, 
Oliver Marshall, 
C. B. Scott, 



Bethany, W. Va. 
Eustis, Fla. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
St. Thomas, Ontario. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Perryopolis, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Washington, D. C. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Alliance, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Wheeler Station, Ala. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 



s 



K'^w^^w^^x^^^^>^^^ 



I CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 3 | 

I I 

§ s 

I _ . _ _ 1 



And Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Church History. 



Drawing and Painting. 



v N 



I r^ u_. _* -o^. >„ § 



Faculty of i89i='p2. 



I 1 

HUGH MCDIARM1D, A.M., PRESIDENT, 



8 



| W. K. PENDLETON, LL.D., f 

| President Emeritus. | 

1 A. C. PENDLETON, A.M., | 

I I 

| Professor of Modern Languages and Literature. | 

1 



S § 



I OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, A.M., | 

| Professor of Mathematics, Astronomy and Civil Engineering. | 



c 



| FRANK M. DOWLING, A.M., 

S Prnfp<;Qnr nf I fltin I ano-nao-A anH I itprotnrp ^ 



^ Professor of Latin Language and Literature. | 

Si $ 

ix Pl-n-faccAK r\-f (Irakis I o r* m i *-i n- a /-i ri A T H-/ii-n4-i-i^n ^ 



1 LEWIS CASS WOOLERY, A.M., 

| Professor of Greek Language and Literature. | 

| | 

I B. T. BLANPIED, A.M., I 

I I 

| Professor of Natural Sciences. | 

s $ 



MRS. BESSIE C. TRIBLE, I 



s 



I EDWIN R. SNYDER, 1 



I 

~ ' | 

| Director of Music. I 



1 EPHRAIM M. EPSTEIN, 1 

Professor of Hebrew Language and Literature. | 

| R H WYNNP 



R. H. WYNNE, I 

Adjunct Professor. § 

1 I 



a $ 

I 4 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

^ s 

s S 

« x" 

g a 

a s 

1 § 

! 

I = I 

| HUGH McDIARMID, A.M., PRESIDENT, 

| And Professor of Mental and Moral Science'and Church History. 



Faculty of i892='93. 



I W. K. PENDLETON, LL.D., 1 

V 'Si 

| President Emeritus. ^ 

I 1 

I A. C. PENDLETON, A.M., 1 

I Professor of Modern, Languages and Literature. | 

| OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, A.M., | 

Professor of Mathematics, Astronomy and Civil Engineering. 

I | 

LEWIS CASS WOOLERY, A.M., | 

| Professor of Greek Language and Literature. | 

| B. T. BLANPIED,A,M., | 

| Professor^of Natural Sciences. | 

1 1 

| Professor of Biblical Literature. | 

— ~~ 

| * : | 

| Professor of Latin Language and Literature. | 



I R. H. WYNNE. 



I H. L. WILLETT, A.M„ 1 

V, X 

| Non-Resident Professor of Hebrew Language and Literature. | 



| MRS. BESSIE C. TRIBLE, | 

I Drawing and Painting. | 



1 

EUGENE FEUCHTINGER, | 

1 Director of Music. | 

k. n. VV I 1N1NC. I 

I Adjunct Professor. | 

| -To be filled. | 



| CATALOGUE OE BETHANY COLLEGE. 5 | 



s 1 



I 

§ r^ A • /~* • A A § 



Executive Committee. 



s s 

ui ir:u \Ar-niAP\Ain ai ryamhcd pamddcf i | 

c: pi idtic r" d crnTT | 

$ A C* DCMHI CTHM D T DI AMDICH ^ 



HUGH McDIARMID, ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, 
J. E. CURTIS, C. B. SCOTT, 

A. C. PENDLETON, B. T. BLANPIED. 



§ _ _ _ s 



1 J. C. PALMER, Treasurer. 1 

_ 



I 1 

| MISS A. C. PENDLETON, 1 

I I 

| Librarian and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. | 

§ ^ 

$ s 

I I 

I B. T. BLANPIED, 1 

| I 

I Curator of the Museum and Secretary of the Faculty. | 







s ^ 

OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, BURSAR. 

^ , X 

X X 

X X 

1 



1 



! : : 



■$'////s/s//////ys/s/////s^^^ 



(5 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Students of the Fifty=First Session. 



SENIORS. 



I Aldrich, I. N., 
| Blackwell, H. F., 
| Chatley, M. E., . 
| Clarke, Ernest S., 
| Cox, Anna L., 
| Darsie, George, 
\ Davis, C. B., 
| Gans, H. B., . 
| Gillespie, Barnes, 
Groom, W. T., 
Hanna, W. H., 
Jopson, C. W., 
Lyon, Emma, 
| Miller, J. H., . 
Rannells, L. Etta, 
Scott, Oreon E., 
Scott, R. G., 
Shupe, May, 
Winbigler, W. W., 



JUNIORS. 



Bagby, Richard, 
P Brenneman, R. E., . 
| Cameron, Elizabeth K., 
| Chapman, A. L., 
| Childs, Mae C, 
| Craig, J, H., . 
| Critchfield, C. V., 

Danford, M. V., 

Dimond, Miriam E., 

Dodd, W. G„ 

Evans, H. O., 

Fox, Grace, 



! 

V/S/Sy/yS/sys/syAV/Sy/y^^^ 



Angola, Ind. 
Lexington, Mo. 
New Galilee, Pa. 
Falmouth, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Jeromeville, O. 
Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 
Tazewell C. H. Va. 
Covington, Ky. 
Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 
Nicolaus, Cal. 
Washington, Pa. 
Rocky Fork, O. 
Wilmington, O. 
McClellandtown, Pa. 
McClellandtown, Pa. 
Columbus, O. 
Lake Fork, O. 

Tappahannock, Va. 
Wellsville, O. 
Millersburg, O. 
Donley, Pa. 
Greensburg, Ind. 
New Lisbon, O. 
Mt. Vernon, O. 
Pilcher, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
New Philadelphia, O. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Columbus, O. 



I 

i 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



i 



| Hundley, J. T. T., 

| Israel, C. E., 

| Johnson, G. C, 

| Kershner, B. L., 

| Lovett, G. D., . 

| Perry, E. L., . 

| Plattenburg, Charles H., 

| Prewitt, W. C., 

| Shupe, Anna, 



| Allen, H. W., . 

| Arnold, J. E., 

| Billingsley, W. H., 

| Bone, A. R., 
Bowman, Ina W., 
Brandenburg, W. H., 
Campbell, Alice, 
Campbell, W. P., 

; Cave, P. A., 
Creighton, Allen B., 
Cunningham, W. D., 
Davidson, G. E., 
Davis, Bertha D., 

| Fortier, Grace. 
Israel, Lizzie C, 
Jones, C. E., 
Joyce, J. A., 
Kimmell, I. W., 
Miller, Minnie, 
Mendel, Mamie K., 
Moody, Archer N., 
McWane, R. C, 
Moore, Zwinglius, 
Muckley, O. K., 
Muckley, O. P., . 
Patton, R. M., 
Pritchard, C. W,, 
Reeves, W. E., 



Dunnsville, Va. 
Beallsville, O. 
Hattonia, O. 
Clearspring, Md. 
Shreve, O. 
Homer, N. Y. 
Dover, Mo. 
Winchester, Ky. 
Bellaire, O. 



SOPHOHORES. 



St. Louis, Mo. 
Ashland, O. 
California, Pa. 
Greensburg, Ind. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Dayton, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Louisa C. H., Va. 
Malvern, O. 
Dawson, Pa. 
East Liverpool, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Beallsville, O. 
Greensburg, Pa. 
Paola, Kansas. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Rocky Fork, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Chatham Centre, O. 
Graham, Va. 
Beallsville, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Somerset, Pa. 
New Lisbon, O, 
Burlington, Kansas. 



L^________J 



8 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



* Robertson, J. R., 
I Scott, M. M., . 
| Sparks, R. A., 
I Van Horn, Walter, 
| Vodrey, Harry, 
| White, Clara L. 
\ Wilfley, E. A., . 
| Wilson, Allen, 

! 



I Addleman, R. M., 

| Addy, F, K., . 

| Alderman, A. G., 

| Anderson, J. C, 

i Appleton, Margaret, 

| Avery, Mattie G., 

| Barclay, Julian T., 

I Bonar, G. W., 

| Boyer, R. M., 

% Brown, Laura, 



2 Buckley, Harry, 

| Campbell, Archie, 

| Cartwright, J. M., 

| Chandler, Berta M., 

| Chapman, Minna, 



| Craft, Kate, 



| Craft, Harry B., . 
I Darsie, Catharine. 



I Darsie, Burns, 
Dowling, Clarence, 



Rensselaer, Mo. 
McClellandtown, Pa. 
Richmond, Ky. 
Warren, O. 
East Liverpool, O. 
Lamira, O. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Salida, Col. 



FRESHMEN. 



Echols, Clarence, 

Evans. G. O., 

Fackler, B., .... 

| Farrar, Bessie B., . 
| Ferguson, W. O., 
| Folks, William F. . . . 
| Forner, T. J., 
| Gans, W. L., . 
I Gardner, John A., 



Clarksville, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Larking, Kansas. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Dayton, O. 
Frankfort, Ind. 
Wheeler Station, Ala 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
Laurel Hill, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
East Liverpool, O. 
Newport News, Va. 
Holiday's Cove, W. Va. f 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Prairie Depot, O. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Shelby, O. 
Richmond, Va. 
Terre Haute, Ind. 
Washington, D. C. 
Wellsville, O. 
Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 
East Liverpool, O. 



•,f/sy/yA7/sy/y/ys/sys/s/s/j^^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



a 

| Harvout, Shirley E., 

| Hickman, B. J., 

| Hoge, Pearl, 

| Hutchings, J. C, 

| Israel, J. H., 

1 Jinnett, W. R., . 

^ Jobes, Margaret, 

| Johnson, Laura, 

| Johnson, Philip, 

| Johnson, Zilla, 

^ Johnson, R. O., 

| Keltch, Henry F., 

| Laughlin, Lester, 

| Lea, Frank T., 

| Lewis, T. S., 

| Lockhart, Mollie, 

| Leek, N. S., 

| Madden, Milton B., 

| McCarty, S. O., 

| McClelland, T.C., 

| McDiarmid, Errett, 

| Merryman, J. E., 

| Meyer, Louise, 

| Miller, C. F., 

| Morris, Ada, 

| Morris, J. C, 

| Neill, R. P., 

| Newcomer, L. O., 

I Phillips, T. G., 

| Pritchard, G. R., . 

I Pritchard, W. R., 

| Robertson, J. F, . 

| Sadler, Eva, 

| Sapp, F. B., 

| Shriver, Eva, 

| Stewart, J. W., . 

| Swain, P. S., 

| Tarr, Frank, 

| Taylor, Bessie D., 



-f 



Sullivan, O. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Cameron, W. Va. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Beallsville, O. 
Dudley, N. C. 
Claysville, Pa. 
Hattonia, O. 
Lanesville, Va. 
Hattonia, O. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Conaway, W. Va. 
East Liverpool, O. 
Ashton, Md. 
Washington, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bryan, Ind. 
Topeka, Kansas. 
Eagle Lake, Texas. 
New Somerset, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Keyres, W. Va. 
Shelby, O. 
Shelby, O. 
New Lisbon, O. 
Dawson, Pa. 
New Castle, Pa. 
New Lisbon, O. 
New Philadelphia, O. 
Rensselaer, Mo. 
Point Marion, Pa. 
Gladesville, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Pleasant Valley, W. Va. | 
Falmouth, N. C. 
Vanderbilt, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Va. f 



I 



', 



'- 



10 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Townsend, H. L., 
Whitacre, O. T., 
White, J. J., 
Willett, A. F., . 
Williams, J. F., 



Billings, Laura, 
Campbell, Louise, 
Cowles, E. M., 
Dimond, Jessie A., 
Dowling, Alia, 
Egolf, H. M., 
Grove, Altha, . 
Hemphill, Mary, . 
Johnson, W. G., 
Lewis, Allie, 
Lewis, Mary, . 
Mercer, Herma, 
Moore, Ada, 
Oram, Zinnia, 
Orr, Edna, 
Scott, Mrs. C. B., 
Scott, Zona L., 
Scott, Goldie M., . 
Scott, Ola D., . 
Stockdale, Margaret, 
Taylor, Ida, 
Tener, Sarah B, . 
Thompson, Minnie E., 
Woolery, Mattie, 
Woolery, Annie, 

Seniors, 

Juniors, 

Sophomores, 

Freshmen, 

Special, 

Total. 



Angola, Ind. 
Trombley, O. 
Washington, Pa. 
Ionia, Mich. 
Barnesville, O. 
SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Bethany, W. Va. 



SUMMARY. 



Sullivan, O. 
Bedford, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Prairie Depot, O. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Goshen Bridge, Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Sinking Creek, Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Wauseon, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
East Liverpool, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
California, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
East Livorpool, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 



19 
21 

36 

73 
25 

174 



! 

1 

I 
I 

'A 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



11 



Graduates of the Fifty = First Session. 



BACHELORS OF ART5. 



| Aldrich, I. N., 

| Blackwell, H. F., 

| Chatley, M. E., 

| Clarke, Ernest S., 

| Cox, Anna L., 

| Darsie, George, 

| Davis, C. B., - 

| Gillespie, Barnes, 

| Groom, W. T., 

| Hanna, W. H., 

| Jopson, C. W., 



| Miller, J. H., 



I Scott, O. E., - 

| Scott, R. G., 

1 Winbigler, W. W., 



Angola, Ind. 
Lexington, Mo. 
New Galilee, Pa. 
Falmouth, Ky. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Jeromeville, O. 
Tazewell C. H., Va. 
Covington, Ky. 
Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 
Nicolaus, Cal. 
Rocky Fork, O. 
McClellandtown, Pa. 
McClellandtown, Pa. 
Lake Fork, O. 



1 Gans, H. B., 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

- Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 



BACHELORS OF PHILOSOPHY. 



| Lyon, Emma, 



| Rannells, L. Etta, 



| Shupe, May, 



Washington, Pa. 
Wilmington, O. 
Columbus, O. 



^«*XXS*XXXXXXXNSO*>iXXXNSSa*XX^^ 






I 12 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Course of Study. 



Bethany COLLEGE has four separate courses : The Classi- 
cal and Ministerial leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts ; the 
Scientific to Bachelor of Sciences and the Ladies' Course to 
Bachelor of Philosophy. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



FOR THE DEGREE OF THE BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

This course embraces the following schools, viz : 



School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 
School of the Greek Language. 
School of the Latin Language and Literature. 
School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 
School of Natural Science. 

School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy and 
Belles Lettres. 



I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

In this School the Evidences, History and Languages of the Bible are 
taught. Moral Philosophy is drawn from the Bible itself. Every student 
in the College studies the English Bible during the Sophomore and Junior 
years. A thorough study is made of the Jewish Law, and recent researches 
in Egypt and Assyria bearing on the Bible History are pointed out. In the 
Junior year the historical books of the New Testament, with the purpose of 
each Epistle, are carefully studied. 



II. 



First Term. 



Second Term.- 



School of the Greek Language. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

-Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's First Lessons. 
Daily exercises in writing the language, with the accent 
carefully Marked. 
-Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. Kelsey. 



SxVNSiW^N3*XNS*XXXXSS>««*XXSO^ 



§ 



g CATALOGUE OE BETHANY COLLEGE. 13 | 

i __ — _ s 



VI., VII. (Lamberton). 



Latin. 



I SOPHOMORE YEAR. f 

| I 

| jFmJ Term. — The Anabasis, Books II., III., IV. Sight Selections. Gre- p 

| cian History (Cox). Greek Prose Composition (Jones). | 

| Second Term.— Homer's Iliad (Keep), Books I., II., and III. Prose Compo- f 

sition (Jones). Grecian History. | 



JUNIOR YEAR. I 

I 

| First Term. — Pindar (Gildersleeve). Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates p 

f (Robbins). Prose Composition (Allenson). Lucian's Dia- | 

f logues (Williams). f 

p Second Term. — Plato's Apology and Crito (Wagner). Demosthenes' Ora- | 

| tion on the Crown (D'Ooge). | 

I I 

S CCMIHD VC A D <5 



| SENIOR YEAR. $ 

$ $ 

| First Term. — Sophocles — OEdipus Tyrannus (White). Thucydides, Books | 

I 

| Second Term. — Lectures on Greek Civilization. New Testament Greek. 1 

I - 1 



| The Instruction in this department has four distinct ends in view : 

First in the Freshman and Sophomore years the aim is to give a thorough | 

6 knowledge of forms and syntax. From the beginning the study of the g 

& grammar is accompanied with exercises in translating English into Latin | 

I and Latin into English. The translations of the texts used in these two | 

| years is conducted in such a way as to rivet in the mind the principles of | 

| Latin Grammar. | 

Second. Junior and Senior years are devoted to a general study of | 

| Roman Literature. At the end of the course a text-book by Bender is used. | 

| Constant attention is called to the style of writers, the philosophies of their | 

| day, the political condition out of which the literature sprang. The students | 

| are required to prepare and read criticisms and theses on such themes as will | 
| awaken interest and stimulate to original, independent research. 

Third. From a grammatical point of view the Latin language in | 

| comparison with all other European languages has been termed a "perfectly | 

^ :__ j j ■>■> ij.-j_i_.i_ _j_ . r i n j j__i „_i ^ 



| organized type." It is the best source of general, fundamental, comprehen 

| sive linguistic principles. This position of the Latin language is turned to | 

| good account in throwing light upon our own. The instruction given | 

| throughout the course is summed up at close in a series of lectures on | 

| "Comparative Latin and English Grammar." | 

Fourth. The recitations are so conducted as to make them an aid to | 

| English Composition and Rhetoric. Students are frequently required to i 

| hand in on paper and write on the board the translation of the text. The I 

| paragraphing, punctuation, diction and arrangement of the English is criti- | 

^ cized by students and teacher. % 

I 

/ "s/s/sys/s//y//sy///y/yyys/^^^ 



| 14 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

1 

| III. School of Latin Language and Literature. 

| FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

| First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. | 
Daily exercise in writing English into Latin. 

i 



Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Greenough). Book I., with thorough | 



Drill in Syntax. 



1 SOPHOMORE YEAR. 1 

s I 

| First Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic | 

| War, Books II., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. | 

| Prose Composition (Jones). | 

| Second Term.— Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition | 

| continued (Jones). | 

I I 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

| First Term.— Prosody. Virgil's >£neid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- | 

| ough). History of Rome (Allen). | 

| Second Term. — Prosody. Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Horace | 

| (Lincoln). Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid). | 

1 

SENIOR YEAR. | 

First Term. — The Germania of Tacitus (Church) | 

| Second Term. — Cicero's Letters. Pliny's Letters. Antiquities (Wilkins). | 

Latin Literature (Bender). Lectures on Latin of Middle | 

I Ages. I 

I I 

| IV. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

This school embraces a course of Pure and Applied Mathematics as given | 

| in the following schedule. The text-books used are indicated in parenthe- | 

| sis: (See p. 16). | 

| FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

^ First Term.— Plane Geometry (Wentworth). | 

I Second Term. —Geometry. Trigonometry (Oliver, Wait and Jones). | 

1 SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

| First Term. — Higher Algebra (Wentworth). | 

' Second Term,. — I .anrl Snrvpvincr f Gillp^nie^L | 



Second Term. — Land Surveying (Gillespie) 

| JUNIOR YEAR. 

| First Term. — General Geometry, Differential Calculus (Olney). | 

| Second Term. — Integral Calculus. Calculus applied to General Geometry | 

| (Olney). | 

| Calculus is elective in this course. | 



1 SENIOR YEAR. 1 

I I 

| First Term. — Mechanics (Kemper). ^ 

| Second Term. — Astronomy (Young). | 

I I 



^NS*NS*XXXXXXX**XXNS*X*0*XXXXX*^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



15 I 



First Term 
Second Term. 



V. School of Natural Science. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
-Physiology (Martin). 



Zoology (Orton). Botany (Gray). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

-Physics (Avery). 
Chemistry (Remsen). 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Second Term. — Geology (Le Conte's Compend). 



First Term 
Second Term. 



VI. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy 

and Belles Lettres. 

Rhetoric and English literature, recite on alternate days. Application of 
the principles of Rhetoric is made through the analysis of acknowledged mas- 
ters of style, and through constant practice in original composition. To the 
outlines of English literature as furnished by the text-book, are added miscel- 
laneous selections illustrating the progress of the language and literature from 
the tenth century to the present. In teaching history the method is not to 
commit to memory isolated facts, but to bring out the connection of events 
showing the progress ot civilization. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric (Welch). English Literature. 
Second Term. — The same. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
First Term. — Metaphysics (Porter and Bowne). History of Philosophy 
(Tennemann). Especial attention paid to Physiological Psy- 
chology. 
Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Moral Philosophy (Robinson). Consti- 
tution of United States. Political Economy (Ely). Philol- 
ogy (Trench). History of Civilization (Guizot). Christian 
Evidences. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

FOR-THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

This course embraces the following schools : 



School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 
School of Mathematics and Astronomy . 
School of Natural Sciences. 
School of Modern Languages. 

School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 
Economy. 



^////f^f/f/f/f^^^ 



■s//ysys/s/y/sys/s/s//ys/jy/ys^^^ 

i 16 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 



I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

Evidences, History and Languages of the Bible. Moral Philosophy — 
scientific basis discussed and then Moral Philosophy drawn from the Bible. 
Old Testament studies during Sophomore year, and the New Testament in 
the Junior. 



II. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

In the Scientific Course the school embraces, besides the subjects given 
in the corresponding school of the Classical Course, the study of Descrip- 
tive Geometry and Roads and Railroads. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term.- — Plane Geometry. 
Second Term. — Geometry (Wentworth). Trigonometry (O. W. J.). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. — Higher Algebra (Wentworth). 
Second Term. — Land Surveying, including Leveling (Gillespie). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — General'Geometry, Differential Calculus (Olney). Descrip- 
tive Geometry (Waldo). 
Second Term. — Integral Calculus, Solution of Problems in General Geometry 
with the aid of the Infinitesimal Calcuhis (Olney). Roads 
and Railroads (Gillespie). 

SENIOR YEAR. 



First Term. — Mechanics (Kemper). 
Second Term. — Astronomy (Young). 

Any one wishing to enter a class in Applied Mathematics must first be- 
p come familiar with those branches of pure Mathematics upon which the 
| applied depends for its principles. The courses are so arranged that no 
student, pursuing them in the order indicated and with the thoroughness 
required, will encounter serious difficulty. 

In Land Surveying and in Roads and Railroads special attention is given 
to field work and mapping. Students in the latter class will be required to 
lay out curves, make the calculations for excavations and embankments, 
for transportation of earth, etc., from examples occurring in their own field 
work. 

To enter the Freshman class in Mathematics, the applicant must be famil- 
iar with the rules and methods of treatment of Quadratic Equations, Pro- 



| gressions, Variations and Logarithms. When sufficient evidence of pre- 

| paration cannot be given, an examination will be required on the subject as 

| presented in Wentworth's School Algebra. 

I I 



t,S/sy/y/yA//s//y/y/y/ysys/s//y/ys////y///y^^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



17 



Provision has recently been made for._the purchase of additional field | 
* instruments and the fitting up^of a drawing room with convenient desks and | 
/ other appliances. A small fee, to be paid before entering the class, is | 
$ charged for the use of the instruments and drawing room, in Descriptive 
I Geometry $2.00, in Surveying and in Roads and Railroads $3.00 each. 



III. School of Natural Science. 

First Term. — Philosophy (Martin). 
Second Term. — Zoology (Orton). Botany (Gray). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Physics (Avery). 
Second Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). 

SENIOR YEAR. 
First Term. — Chemistry (Laboratory). 



% Second Term. — Geology (Le Conte's Compend 



IV. School of Modern Languages. 

The aim of our instruction in French and German is to enable the stu 
dent to speak and write these languages as well as read them. The so- 
called "natural method" is combined with progressive study of the gram- 
mars and of selections from the best writers and with constant practice in 
I composition. The classes make such progress in speaking as enables the 
/ teacher to conduct them entirely without the use of English during the sec- 
^ ond year of the course. 

FRENCH— FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. 

FIRST YEAR. 
Edgren's Grammar. Part I. 
Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Edgren's Grammar. Part II. 

Reading at Sight. Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

Exercises in Grammar and Composition. 



GERMAN— FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Meissner's Grammar. Part I. 

Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Meissner's Grammar. Part II. 

Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

Reading at sight. 

Exercises in Grammar and Composition. 



^////////////^//^//////////////^^^^ 



% 

18 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



V. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy 

and Belles Lettres. 



P JUNIOR YEAR. 

| First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature. 

| Second Term. — English Literature. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
First Term.— Metaphysics (Porter and Bowne). History of Philosophy 
(Tennemann). Especial attention paid to the recent ad- 
vances in Physiological Psychology. 
Second Term.— Logic (Jevons). Constitution of United States and Political 
Economy (Walker). Philology (Trench). History of Civili- 
zation (Guizot). Christian Evidences. 



MINISTERIAL COURSE. 

This course embraces the following schools : 



i 

2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 

10 



1. School of Biblical Instruction. 

It is the purpose to make the classes in the Classical and the Ministe- 
p rial courses the same in the languages, mathematics and sciences up to the 
| Junior year and then the major work of the ministerial student is in studies 



Mathematics, English Literature and the Sciences. The work embraces 
the following subjects : 

Hermeneutics and Inspiration, Christian Evidences, Canon- 
ics, Biblical Geography and Archaeology. 



2. Biblical Languages. 

In the Junior year the Septuagint version will be read largely as pre- 
paratory to the study of the New Testament Greek. 

The Senior class will have Greek Exegesis throughout both terms. All 
students in this course are required to take Hebrew for at least one year. 



School of Biblical Introduction. 
School of Biblical Languages. 
School of Biblical History and Doctrine. 
School of Church History. 
School of Homiletics. 
School of Greek. 
School of Latin. 

School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 
School of Natural Science. 

School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy and | 
Belles Lettres. ■ 



i 

! 

i more distinctively biblical, while the minor work is carried on in Latin, | 

I 



I and Prophetic Periods, will be taught. Besides the Bible itself, McLear's , 

| Class-book of Old Testament History will be used as a text-book. As works | 

^ of reference, Geikie, Stanley, Milman and Ewald are recommended. In | 

| New Testament History the course embraces the interval between the Old | 

I and the New Testaments, an outline Life of Christ, an Outline History of | 

| the Apostolic Church, a Short Life of Paul. The History of the Gospels | 

^ and Acts, and the historic allusions in the Epistles will be carefully studied. | 

I McLear's Class-book of New Testament History, Robinson's Harmony, | 

| Stalker's Life of Christ, and Stalker's Life of St. Paul will be used as text- | 

| books; Geikie, Farrar, Andrews, and Edersheim on the Life of Christ; | 

| Farrar, Conybeare and Howson, and Presensse on the Life of Paul and the | 

^ Apostolic Church are recommended as works of reference. | 

In the department of Biblical Doctrine the study of the Old Testament | 

| embraces the Beginnings of Revelation in the Primeval and Patriarchal Ages, | 

| the Covenants, the Mosaic Institution and its Doctrines and Ordinances, | 

| the Teachings of Prophecy, and the Wisdom Literature of the old Scriptures. | 

| In all these instructions the Bible is taken as the main text-book. New | 

| Testament Doctrine includes a detailed study of the Teachings of Christ in | 



8 



| their order, an examination of the several types of Apostolic teaching and | 

| Exegetical and Expository studies of passages selected from the Gospels, | 

| Acts and Epistles. | 

I 

4. School of Church History. | 

Great importance is attached to Church History. Especial attention is | 

| paid to the history of the church till the Council of Nice A.D. 325, the Rise | 

I and Growth of the Papacy to A.D. 1073, the Reformation, and Recent Re- I 

I formatory Movements. This is supplemented by a course of Lectures on | 

I Christian Doctrine, embracing a special study of the great Doctrinal Epochs I 

I in the history of the Church. Fisher's History of the Christian Church is | 

I used as a text-book, while Neander, Mosheim and Schaff are recommended I 

I as works of reference. | 



I 5. School of Homiletics. I 







Students are not only taught the. principles, but are drilled thoroughly | 

I in the preparation and delivery of sermons, and are given detailed instruc- | 

I tions in the practical duties of the Christian Ministry. Phelps' theory of | 

I Preaching and Blaikie's For the Work of the Ministry are used as text- | 

I books. I 

I 

III School of the Greek Language. 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

I First Term.— Goodwin'slGreek Grammar and While's Greek Lessons. 1 

Dailyi; exercises, in writing the language, with the accents | 

I carefully marked. | 

I Second Term.— Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. Fyffe's Short History of | 

I Greece. I 



I I 

I 20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. ^ 

1 \ 

\ SOPHOMORE YEAR. i 

I I 

First Term. — The Anabasis continued. Lucian's Dialogues. Exercises g 

| in writing Greek. Greek History (Cox). ^ 

| Second Term. — Thucydides. Homer's Iliad (Keep), three books. Prose f, 

| Composition (Jones). Grecian History. ■ | 

1 - JUNIOR YEAR. I 

s ? 

First Term. — Pindar (Gildersleeve). Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates | 

I (Robbins). Prose Composition (Sidgwick). | 

§ Second Term. — Plato's Apology of Socrates and Crito (Wagner). Demos- g 



\ thenes' Oration on the Crown (D'Oofe). Septuagint. ^ 

1 SENIOR YEAR. f 

I First Term. — New Testament Greek. > | 

| Second Term. — New Testament Greek. ^ 

I IV. School of Latin Language and Literature. 



§ - - v. 



| First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons, i 

| Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

| Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic .War, (Greenough's). Book I., with thorough | 

| drill in Syntax. | 

| SOPHOMORE YEAR. ,' | 

| First Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic f. 

War, Books I., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Cataline. | 

| Prose Composition (Jones). f 

| Second Term.— Select Orations of Cicero. Composition ^continued (Jones). 1 

| JUNIOR YEAR. | 

| First Term. — Prosody. Virgil's >£neid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- | 

| ough). History of Rome (Allen). | 

| I 

1 

I 



V. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

| FRESHMAN YEAR.— (See p. 16). | 

^ First Term. — Plane Geometry. $ 



\ Second Term. — Solid Geometry. Trigonometry. | 

| SOPHOMORE YEAR. f 

| Second Term.— Land Surveying. Optional. p 

1 SENIOR YEAR. I 

% Second Term.— Astronomy (Lectures). p 

h £ 

| VI. School of Natural Sciences. I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. f 

\ First Term. — Physiology (Martin). Botany (Gray). | 

Second Term. — Zoology (Orton). I 

I 



o 



&XN>VXXXXXXX^XXN3iXXX>iXXNS^^ 



g 







. COURSES. 


;ourse. 


LADIES' COURSE. 




Latin. 
Geometry. 
French. 
*Bible. 


•metry. 


Latin. 

Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry. 

French. 

Primary Rhetoric. 




French. 
Physiology. 
Latin. German. 
tHigher Algebra. 


-ecian Mythology. 


Zoology. Botany. 
Latin. German. 
Trigonometry— Spherical. 
French. 


ire. 


Latin. 

Physics. 

German. 

Rhetoric. 

English Literature. 


• 


Roman History. 

German. 

Latin. 

Chemistry. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


hilosophy. 
>ctrine. 


Metaphysics. 

History of Philosophy. 

History. 

N. T. History. 


al Economy. Philology. 
Inspiration. Chris- 

stian Doctrine. N. T. 


Astronomy (by Lectures). 

Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 

Philology. 

History. 

Geology. 

Christian Evidences. 







^XXX*^X^*XX<XSXXSXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXSXX^VX^XX^XX^ 

* 20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

1 I 

| SOPHOMORE YEAR. I 

First Term.— The Anabasis continued. Lucian's Dialogues. Exercises p 

| in writing Greek. Greek History (Cox). ^ 

| Second Term. — Thucydides. Homer's Iliad (Keep), three books. Prose p 

| Composition (Jones). Grecian History. > $ 

1 - JUNIOR YEAR. | 

| First Term. — Pindar (Gildersleeve). Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates g 



Prose Composition (Jones). 



Second Term. — Land Surveying. Optional. 

SENIOR 

I Second Term. — Astronomy (Lectures). 



(Robbins). Prose Composition (Sidgwick) 



8 



^ Second Term. — Plato's Apology of Socrates and Crito (Wagner). Demos- | 

| thenes' Oration on the Crown (D'Oofe). Septuagint. | 

> y^ 

1 SENIOR YEAR. I 

s y 

| .Frnf Term. — New Testament Greek. > ^ 

s Second Term. — New Testament Greek. g 

1 ^ 



\ IV. School of Latin Language and Literature. p 

| First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. 6 

s y 

| Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. 

| Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War, (Greenough's). Book I., with thorough p 

| drill in Syntax. | 

> y 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. .' i 



| First Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic p 
War, Books I., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Cataline. I 



| Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Composition ^continued (Jones). ^ 

1 JUNIOR YEAR. I 

^ ... ^ 



| First Term. — Prosody. Virgil's >£neid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- | 

| ough). History of Rome (Allen). | 

\ « y 

\ y 

| V. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

s y 

| FRESHMAN YEAR.— (See p. 16). | 

^ First Term. — Plane Geometry. f 

1 Second Term. —Solid Geometry. Trigonometry. | 

| SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

1 SENIOR YEAR. 



1 

I 



§ ? 

n y 

| VI. School of Natural Sciences. $ 

s y 

| SOPHOMORE YEAR. f 

^ y 

| First Term. — Physiology (Martin). Botany (Gray). | 

| Second Term. — Zoology (Orton). $ 

I £ 

s y 



SYNCHRONISTIC VIEW OF THE SEVERAL COURSES. 




CLASSICAL COURSE. 


SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 


MINISTERIAL COURSE. 


LADIES' COURSE. 


z 

< 

% 

X 
(/) 

UJ 

as 
u_ 

ui 

a 


s 



Q_ 




a 

t! 

M 


•A 
3 

w 

t- 

« 

E- 




Latin. 
Greek. 

Plane Geometry. 
*Bible. 


Geometry. 
Latin. 
French. 
*Bible. 


Latin. 
Greek. 
Geometry. 
*Bible. 


Latin. 
Geometry. 
French. 
*Bible. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry— Solid. Trigonometry. 

Primary Rhetoric. 


Geometry— Solid. Trigonometry. 

French. 

Latin. 

Primary Rhetoric. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry. 

Primary Rhetoric. 


Latin. 

Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry. 

French. 

Primary Rhetoric. 


Physiology. 
Latin. 
Greek. 
tHigher Algebra. 


French. 
tHigher Algebra. 
German. 
Physiology. 


Physiology. 
Latin. 
Greek. 
tHigher Algebra. 


French. 
Physiology. 
Latin. German. 
tHigher Algebra. 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History, Grecian Mythology. 

Zoology. Botany. 

Surveying. 


French. 

Zoology. Botany. 

Surveying. 

German. 


Latin. 

Greek, Grecian History, Grecian Mythology. 

Zoology. Botany. 

Surveying. 


Zoology. Botany. 
Latin. German. 
Trigonometry — Spherical. 
French. 


OS 


z 

D 


M 

S 

'A 

O 


Latin. 

Greek. 

General Geometry. Differential Calculus. 

Physics. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


German. 

Descriptive Geometry. 

Geometry — General. Differential Calculus. 

Physics. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Latin. 

Greek. 

O. T. History. Hebrew. 

Physics. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Latin. 

Physics. 

German. 

Rhetoric. 

English Literature. 


Latin. Roman History. 

Greek. 

Chemistry. 

Integral Calculus, Calculus applied to General 

Rhetoric. English Literature. [Geometry. 


German. 

Roads and Railroads. 

Integral Calculus. General Geometry. 

Chemistry. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Latin. Roman History. 

Greek. 

N. T. History. Septuagint. 

Hebrew. 

Chemistry. 


Roman History. 

German. 

Latin. 

Chemistry. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 





u 
H 

E 
3 

H 

a 




Metaphysics. History of Philosophy. 

Latin. 

Greek. 

Mechanics. 


Metaphysics. 

History of Philosophy. 

Mechanics. 

Chemistry. 


Metaphysics. History of Philosophy. 

Hebrew. 

Church History. 

Greek Exegesis. O. T. Doctrine. 


Metaphysics. 

History of Philosophy. 

History. 

N. T. History. 


Greek. 

Roman Literature. Philology. History. 

Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 

Astronomy. 

Christian Evidences. 

Geology. 


Astronomy. 

Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 

History. Philology. 

Geology. 

Christian Evidences. 


Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. Philology. 

Homiletics. Hermeneutics. Inspiration. Chris- 
tian Evidences. 

Hebrew. Geology. 

Astronomy (Lectures). 

Lectures on History of Christian Doctrine. N. T. 
Doctrine. 


Astronomy (by Lectures). 

Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 

Philology. 

History. 

Geology. 

Christian Evidences. 



: 'See Page 18. tSophomore Mathematics will be according to Catalogue of Fifty-first Session. 



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% \ 

CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 21 | 



■ | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

I ^ 

p First Term. — Physics (Avery). | 

i Second Term. —Chemistry (Remsen). | 

v \ 

I SENIOR YEAR. 1 

* s 

Second Term. — Geology (Le Conte's Compend. | 



VII. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy | 

and Belles Lettres. I 



LITERARY COURSE. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric (Walsh). English Literature (Shaw). 
Second Term. — Rhetoric. English Literature. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Metaphysics (Porter and Bowne). History of Philosophy | 

(Tennemann). | 

Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Moral Philosophy (Robinson). Constitu- I 

tion of United States and Political Economy (Ely). Philo. | 

logy. | 

1 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LETTERS. | 

This course embraces the following schools: 

1. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of Latin Language. | 

3. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

4. School of Natural Sciences. 
K. School of Modern Languages. I 
6. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Politi- 
cal Economy. 



I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

I 

(Same as in Classical Course). | 



II. School of Latin Language and Literature. ^ 

FRESHMAN YEAR. I 

First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar, with Jones's First Les- | 

sons. Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

I Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Greenough), Book I., with thorough | 

I drill in Syntax. | 

S'/s/s/s////ys//y///ysy///ys/s/s///s/s^^^ 



v/s/////sy/ys///syAy/////s/s/s/s^^^ 

\ \ 

I 22 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

§ s 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. 1 

| First Term. — Grammar with Tomlinson's Questions. Cassar's Gallic | 



| War, Books II., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. | 

| Prose Composition (Jones). ^ 

I Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition | 



I 

| JUNIOR YEAR. | 



^ continued (Jones). 



\ 



First Term. — Prosody. Virgil's ^neid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- ^ 

I ough). History of Rome (Allen). | 

| Second Term. — Prosody. Select Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Hor- | 
| ace (Lincoln). Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid). 

$ $ 

8 S 

| IN. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

| FRESHMAN YEAR.— (See p. 16). | 

| First Term. — Plane Geometry. | 

| Second Term. — Solid Geometry. Trigonometry. | 

I 



| SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

| First Term. — Geometry, Solid (Olney). Plane Trigonometry (Oliver, | 

| Wait & Jones). | 

| Second Term. — Spherical Trigonometry (Oliver, Wait and Jones.) | 



I 



I SENIOR YEAR. 



s 



| Second Term. — Astronomy (Lectures). | 



I 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

! 



1 IV. School of Natural Science. 

| 

1 SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

.^ 

First Term. — Physiology. 
| Second Term. — Botany (Gray). Zoology. 

1 JUNIOR YEAR. 

| First Term. — Physics (Avery). 

| Second Term. — Geology. | 

| SENIOR YEAR. | 

1 First Term. — Physics. | 

| Second Term.— Geology (Le Conte's Compend). | 

I | 

| I 
V. School of Modern Languages. 

| FRENCH-FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 



I FIRST YEAR. i 

| Edgren's Grammar. Part I. | 

| Oral Practice, with selected readings. 



| Edgren's Grammar. Part I. | 

1 § 



6. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



23 



SECOND YEAR. 

Edgren's Grammar. Part II. 

Reading at Sight. Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

Exercises in Grammar and Composition. 

GERMAN— FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. 
FIRST YEAR. 

Meissner's Grammar. Part I. 

Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Meissner's Grammar. Part II. 

Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

Reading at Sight. 

Exercises in Grammar and Composition. 



IV. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy 

and Belles Lettres. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric (Welsh). English Literature. 

English Literature. | 



| Second Term 



-Rhetoric 



SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Metaphysics (Porter and Bowne). History ot Philosophy 
(Tennemann). History. 
Second Term.— Logic (Jevons). Constitution of ■the United States. Politi- 
cal Economy (Ely). Philology (Trench). History of Civili- 
zation (Guizot). Christian Evidences. 




^///*/s/s////ys/sw 



^XXiXXXX^XXXlX^^XX^XXXSXXSXXXXXXXXX^X^XXXXXXXXXXXX 

% 24 CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE, % 

I | 



I - I 

| Commercial Department. 

I • I 

^ Consisting of Book-keeping, Telegraphy, Stenography, and | 

^ Type-Writing. | 

| BOOK=KEEPINU. I 

Duff's System is taught, and it includes Rail-Road, and Com- % 

| mercial departments ; also Banking in all its branches ; in fact a f 
I thorough course is given in every department of this study. 

V % 

1 TERMS. I 

I | 
| For full course as above, complete, including Life [Mem- 

| bership, ------- $40 00 | 

I Commercial course alone 2; 00 1 



I Books and blanks - $4 zo to 8 w I 

I i 



', 



TELEGRAPHY. f 

This branch is directly under the supervision of an experi- | 
I enced Telegrapher, and one who is capable of imparting instruc- | 
p tion from actual experience, in every department of this branch. / 
I Besides we have a main line extending over eight miles through | 
I the country doing away with the usual objections/ that no one | 
I can learn telegraphy on a short circuit. 

I I 

I TERHS. I 

v %■ 

I The tuition in this department, including Life membership, | 

I when completed, either in Bethany, or in any office on our cir- 'i 

I cuit, is $40 00. I 

I STENOGRAPHY. % 

v y 

Stenography, (Graham's System) is one of the leading re- ^ 

I quirements of the aspirant to the many positions among the % 

I office forces of the business world to-day, and permit us to add / 

I that the business activities of to-day seek those who are compe- % 

I tent in this line when in need of office assistants. No business * 

I education is complete without this acquirement. % 

I Tuition, for Six Months, including Text Book. - $25 00 I 

I By the Month, (per month), (Text Book, extra $2 00). 5 00 I 



xxxxx^ocxxxxsxxxxxxxxxxxsxx^x^x^ 



■/f///s//ys//y/ys//y/y/y/y/ys//y/ys//y///ysM^ 

CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 25 \ 

'- k 

/ /■ 

/ • /■ 

1 

/ 
/ 
/ 

| 

I 

! 

/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 

! 



TYPE=WRITING. 

This is also a requirement that will always be demanded of 
the applicant, when in search of any position in the Business or 
Professional fields of labor. Tuition, per month, $5 00. 

All the above are taught in this College, and there are none of 
them but what are essential to the success of the enterprising 
young lady or gentleman of business or professional inclinations. 
Write for information advising us which department you prefer, 
and we will gladly furnish information. 

Address COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT, BETHANY COLLEGE, 

Bethany, W. Wa. 




/ s/s//ysysys/Av/s//ysy/ysys/s/Ay/s//y//s/s/^^^ 



8 



\ 26 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. g 

\ V 

\ $ 

\ v 

I 



V 2 



IMiicrir'al Ft una fir *-*-i/a*-i4- fy. 



Musical Department. 



| i-mo.vu. uv|y«iuiivni. 



IS 



8 $ 

I i 

The aim and object of the Musical Department of the college | 

I is to give due recognition to the aesthetic faculties in general | 

| culture, and to aid in the symmetrical education of those whose | 

| lives shall be devoted to the arts. | 

| Music will not be taught as an ornamental branch, but as an i 

| art, as a part of a complete education. It has been placed upon l 

| an equality with other studies in the curriculum, and a regular § 

| and complete course of study in the science of music is provided, § 

| leading to graduation. Teachers' certificates will be granted to | 

| those completing the entire course in theory and history and such l 

| part of an instrumental or vocal course as shall thoroughly pre- l 

| pare the student for teaching. Candidates for graduation must | 

| have spent at least one year in our institution, and must com- | 

| plete the prescribed course, including the work in theory and | 

| history. f 

l DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION. I 

| I. — Course in Piano. | 



% 7 

\ II. — Course in Voice Culture. i 

% III. — Harmony and Composition. | 
IV. — History, Musical Aesthetics and Laws of Acoustics. 

| PIANO. I 

| The methods used here are those used by the leading con- | 

| servatories of Europe and America. Each pupil will be treated | 

| individually, as the case may demand. The study is directed | 



o 



\ toward the acquisition of a sure, clean and artistic technique to | 

| expression and phrasing and to intelligent interpretation. With | 

| these objects in view, only compositions by good composers will | 

| be taught. Especial attention will be paid to performance in | 

| public, to the playing at sight and from memory. | 



! 

| of the pupil. The object will be to train the pupil for either | 
I church or concert and stage. In connection with this a sight | 



I VOICE CULTURE. I 

\ The training of the individual voice is of the first interest here. | 
| The method selected will be varied according to the special needs | 



/ 



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1 ;r///s/s/sy/ysy/y/ys////y/y/y^^^ 



| CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 27 I 

1 I 

2 . . § 



§ 

1 — ' -I 



| singing and reading class will be established. The Choral Class | 

| t which all pupils of the college having suitable voices are ad 

f mitted for a nominal fee, meets once a week, preparing standard | 

| choruses, which are given from time to time publicly at the | 

| regular recitals. This class also studies an oratario or opera to | 

| be produced at the close of the year. | 

| THEORY. - | 

The theoretical department includes Harmony, Composition, | 

| Analysis, Phrasing, Interpretation, History, Aesthetics, Litera- | 

| ture, Laws of Sound, etc., etc. | 

I GENERAL INFORMATION. 1 

V \ 

i. Students may enter at any time, but are not enrolled for | 

| less than one-half session. | 



2. All tuition is payable in advance, no lessons will be given | 
| except on presentation of a receipt from the Bursar of the Col- | 
f lege, showing all tuition paid to the end of the half session. 

3. No student is permitted to take part in any public musical | 
I performance without the consent of the Director. 

I FREE ADVANTAGES. | 

I I. — Recitals of the Department. | 

I II. — Lectures by the Director. | 

I III. — Sight singing and choral class. | 

I IV. — The College library. | 

I EXPENSES. I 

Piano or vocal, two lessons per week, each : 

I Per session, $45 00 | 

I Per half session, 25 00 i 

Theory, including Harmony, Composition, History, Aesthetics, I 
I Acoustics, etc., one lesson per week, in classes: | 

I Per session, - - $10 00 | 

I Per half session, 6 00 | 

Choral and sight singing class, once per week : 

I Per session, $6 00 1 

I Per half session, 3 50 | 

Use of piano one hour for daily practice : | 

I Per session, $o 00 I 

1 I 

$ Per half session, 15 00 | 

1 I 

The above tuition rates do not include instruction during holi- i 

I day vacation. | 



g 28 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

i ! 

I General Information. I 

I I 

I SITUATION. I 

I Bethany College is situated in the Panhandle of West Virginia, | 

\ sixteen miles north of Wheeling. The railroad stations for I 
4. 



| Bethany are Brilliant, on the Cleveland and Pittsburgh Railroad | 

| (river division), and Wellsburg, on the Wheeling branch of the | 

* Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Railway. From these | 

| stations stages are run to Bethany four times every day by N. /. 

| Moore and J. E. Curtis, who will giv£ prompt attention to any | 

| orders addressed to them, Bethany, W. Va., or address W. P. | 

\ Cowans, Bethany, W. Va. I 

TERMS, VACATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS. 

The College Year consists of two terms, four and a half months | 
% each. It begins on the third (19th) Monday in September and | 
I ends on the third Thursday in June. In this year there are two | 
I examinations in each class — one in January and the final exam- 1 
I ination in June. | 

I It is very desirable that applicants for Matriculation present | 
I themselves at the beginning of the session, that there may be a | 
I convenient arrangement of the classes in the various Departments | 
I or Schools. Students, however, can enter conveniently at the | 
I commencement of the second term, February 1st, after the In- | 
I termediate examination in January. | 

I REGULAR EXPENSES. I 

I Tuition for forty weeks at $1.00 per week, - - $ 40 00 | 

I Matriculation fee, for coal, janitor, etc., - - - 10 00 | 

I Furnished room, with care of room, fuel, etc., - 25 00 | 

I Table board, for the session, . - - - - 100 00 | 

I Washing, 10 00 I 

i 1 

I #185 00 1 

I Board may be had IN CLUBS at about $2.00 a week. | 

I The matriculation fee and tuition MUST be paid at the begin- * 
I ning of each term. | 



I 

CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 29 | 



REDUCED TUITION. 1 

Young men in any of the religious denominations, who wish to | 

prepare for the ministry, may, on paying the matriculation fee, | 

be admitted into any of the courses at Bethany College at one- | 

half the regular rates of tuition. | 

All applicants for this privilege will be required to present to | 

the Faculty satisfactory written recommendations from their re- | 

spective congregations, and from well-known ministers of the | 

gospel, certifying that they come under the foregoing conditions, | 

in such form as shall be prescribed by the Faculty. They shall | 

also be required to sign a promissory note to pay the full charge | 

for tuition five years from their withdrawal from the College, | 

provided they do not, in the meantime, devote themselves to the | 

work of the ministry. But this provision for reduction of tuition | 

shall not extend, in any case, beyond one session, except upon | 
the recommendation of the Faculty, and the approval of the Board. 

The children of regular ministers of the gospel of all denomina- 
tions shall be admitted to all classes and privileges of the College 

upon payment of matriculation fee and one-half the regular | 

charges of tuition. | 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be re- | 

quired to give instruction in the primary classes. | 

CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. I 

The Natural History Cabinet contains some of the | 
Fauna, Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable 
collection from Australia, and exchanges with other sections of 
the country. Also a fine Herbarium of native plants, with many 
rare ones from other parts of the world. 

The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains 

several thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all 
parts of the world. 

The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains 1 



1 

i rare and valuable collections. | 



p APPARATUS. | 

The Philosophical apparatus of the College affords facilities | 

| for the illustration of physical principles. | 

The Chemical laboratory is provided with apparatus and | 

I chemicals for illustration in the courses offered. | 

I 

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s/s///s////ysysys/s//y///y////s/^^^^ 



I 30 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 



si <? 







I LITERARY SOCIETIES. 1 

I ^ I 

| There are in connection with the College three societies devo- I 

\ ted to the cultivation of literary composition and oratory : THE | 

| OSSOLIAN (ladies), NEOTROPHIAN and AMERICAN LITERARY I 

I Institute. 1 

I ADELPHIAN SOCIETY. | 



§ 1 



N 



| Literary Society, it demands more particular notice. | 

As it is a distinguishing feature of Bethany College to make | 

| the Bible a regular subject of study and daily examination, the | 

| Adelphian Society has been organized in order to promote and | 

| carry out, to the fullest extent, the purposes contemplated in the 1 

| department of Bible Literature. | 

| The regular exercises of the Society consist — | 

First — Of recitations of portions of the Scriptures. 

| SECOND — Reading original essays on moral and religious sub- 1 

| jects ; and | 

| THIRD — The delivery of Scriptural discourses, not only before | 

| the Society, but, on suitable occasions, in public. | 

Young men in preparing for the Christian Ministry may derive | 

| incalculable advantages from this Society. From its organization, | 

| and the character and ability of its members, it is well fitted to | 

| facilitate the acquisition of enlarged views of the Bible, and the | 
| cultivation of a high standard of morality and religion. 

1 PREPARATORY CLASSES. 1 

There will be, in addition to the regular chairs, instruction in | 

| English Grammar, Arithmetic and beginning Algebra. 

Provision has been made for teachers in book-keeping and | 



short-hand. 



I TERMS OF GRADUATION. | 

I DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. | 

§ . . ... ^ ..... s 



A student may graduate in any school singly. To obtain the | 
| degree GRADUATE in any school, it is required of every candidate: 1 

i. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College at 1 
| least one session, and shall have studied in the College the en- | 
| tire Senior year of the school. 2. That within one month from 1 
| the beginning of the session, he shall have made known to the | 
| professor of the school his intention of graduating. 3. That he | 
1 I 



| CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 31 | 

! 1 

I stand a satisfactory examination on all the prescribed studies of | 
| the school. | 

l D.CKB.S OP B.CPLOP OP «TS, B.O„ EL OP OP SCBNCBS, | 

1 AND BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 1 

1 
| To receive the Degree of BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF I 

| Sciences and Bachelor of Philosophy, the candidate must | 

| have graduated and received his certificates in the several schools | 

| embraced in the respective COURSES. He must also have faith- 1 

| fully observed all the other laws and regulations of the College. | 

| He will then receive a Degree and Diploma. A fee of ten dollars i 

| will be charged for the Diploma. Five dollars to ministerial | 

; students. I 



o 



A student who has received a Diploma in any course, in order to | 

| obtain a Diploma in any other course, shall take up the additional I 

| certificate or certificates and pay TEN DOLLARS for the Diploma. | 

The graduates in the several courses enjoy equally all the | 
| privileges, rights and honors of the College. 



! 

THE MASTER'S DEGREE IN COURSE. | 

I 



In order to obtain the Regular Degree of MASTER OF ARTS, | 
the following conditions are required : i. The attainment of the I 



Degree of BACHELOR in the course. 2. The actual attendance ^ 

in the College thereafter for one session and the study of three | 

Elective studies, to be selected by the candidate with the consent | 

of the Faculty. 3. An approved examination of selected studies. | 
A fee of TEN DOLLARS will be charged for the Diploma. 



1 

HONORARY MASTER'S DEGREE. | 

! 



A BACHELOR of three years' standing in any one of the courses 

may receive the HONORARY DEGREE OF MASTER in that course : 1 

provided he shall in the interval have maintained an exemplary | 

character, and pursued studies relating to the degree. Candi- | 

dates for this degree should apply to the President or Secretary | 

of the Faculty before the annual meeting of the Board of | 

I Trustees. | 

No application for the degree of A.M. will be entertained un- | 

I less accompanied by the fee of TEN DOLLARS, which will be re- | 

I turned in case the degree is not conferred. | 

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\ I 

'i 32 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 1 

1 | 

SPECIAL COURSE IN ENGINEERING, 

I ^ 
FOR WHICH A CERTIFICATE IS GIVEN. 

For this course no specified time is required, except as de- | 

| manded by previous preparation, and the time necessarily allot- | 

1 ted to each branch. | 

To enter upon the course a thorough knowledge of Algebra, | 

', Geometry and Plane Trigonometry is required. | 

i. Land Surveying — Embracing all that is necessary to un- | 

^ derstand the subject in its practical bearings with field work, | 

| mapping, etc. | 

^ 2. Leveling, Profiling, Mapping. | 

3. The Principles of Topographical Surveying and Drawing. | 

4. Descriptive Geometry, with Shades, Shadows and Per- | 

2 spective. | 

5. Road and Railroad Surveying — with field operations. 

t Certificates will be given indicating the branch studied and the | 

^ degree of proficiency attained. It is very desirable that students | 

t should enter with the regular classes of the Scientific Course. | 

I l I 

I THE COLLEGIAN. 1 



o 



N 



| During the college year the students publish a monthly jour- | 
^ nal entitled THE COLLEGIAN. It has attained high rank as a | 



I 

g college paper, and affords excellent means for developing the | 

| literary talent of the students. It deserves a hearty support on | 

| the part of the Alumni and friends of the College. | 

• I 



ACCOMMODATIONS. I 



'j 



.^ . — ... — . . ~ . „ 



Students are permitted to select their own places of boarding, | 

\ subject in all cases to the supervision of the Faculty. The facili- | 

I ties for obtaining boarding in private families have been much | 

| increased, and many students can be accommodated in this way. | 

I Every attention will be paid to the health and comfort of the | 

» ^ 

I students. | 

I To accommodate students who desire to board themselves, * 

y ^ 

I arrangements have been made to supply a number of unfurnish- ^ 

| ed rooms at a very moderate rent. Application for these should | 

^ be made at an early date, and must be accompanied by satisfac- * 

I tory testimonials of character. | 



> / ?r/s/jss/s///s/s/jy/yjysys/s/s//y^^^^ 

I i 

| CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 33 | 

'y I 

| | 

I SCHOOL OF ORATORY. | 

There will be an opportunity, at a moderate charge, for public ^ 

| and private lessons in elocution. This department will be in the | 

| hands of an instructor of experience and reputation, and will be | 

| conducted in harmony with the most improved methods of culti" | 

| vation for voice and gesture, The so-called study of elocution | 

| too often means only a labored effort to recite a few selections | 

| which call for the highest degree of passionate expression. This | 

| is not only of no value to the student, but is in so far pernicious | 

| as that it is to begin with what should only be attempted as the | 

| crowning work of elocutionary training, and might well, in most | 

| cases, be omitted altogether. The result is a tiresome failure, | 

| and a noble art is brought into disrepute. Few find practical use | 

| in life for these finishing touches, however well acquired, which | 



| belong to dramatic representation ; while, on the other hand, a | 
| right use of the voice is essential even to health ; an easy com- I 



| mand of the motions of the body is essential to free play of | 

I the intellect ; and both are indispensable to a harmonious and | 

| graceful manhood and womanhood. To cultivate these, with i 

I a taste for what is best in letters, is the united aim of the depart- 1 

? I 

| ments of Literature, Rhetoric and Elocution. % 

Each student is required, during his senior and junior years, | 

| to prepare and deliver several orations upon assigned subjects, f 

| These orations are public, and are subject to general criticism 1 

| from the Faculty. | 

I THE SCHOOL OF ART. I 

Since Bethany has become a school for the higher education % 

| of women as well as men there has been a decided and growing | 

| demand for an art department. For several years capable art 1 

| teachers have been connected with the College. The art de- | 

v y 

6 mrfmpnt iq no\x/ in rhfirrrp nf )\Ar< Rpq^iV> f^ Trihlp> u;hn hrinrrQ t. 



| partment is now in charge of Mrs. Bessie C. Trible, who brings | 

| to the position superior talents and experience. There is an in- | 

| teresting and enthusiastic art class, and the interest and pro- | 

| ficiency of this department promises to keep pace with the 1 

^ m-r»\n/+h nf +hf=> r^rJl^rrA in rvfhp>r Hir^r+irmc rhnrmirrh in^trnrtinn <? 



growth of the College in other directions. Thorough instruction | 
is given in perspective drawing, portrait and landscape painting, 
in oil, crayon, water colors, India ink and all the branches of art. 



I 

| Situated in one of the most beautiful landscapes in America, | 

| Bethany affords rare opportunities for sketching from nature. It 1 

| 5 " | 

y //ys/s/sys//////y/y////s//y^^^ 



| 34 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. f 

j I 

| is the purpose and policy of the College to foster the love and § 

| study of art continually. | 

I ENGLISH MINISTERIAL COURSE. 

| I 

| A few men every year are not able to take the full course, yet p 

| need some preparation for the work of the ministry; for their ^ 

I sake the following course, lasting two years, has been arranged : I 

I I 

| FIRST YEAR. | 

FIRST TERM.— Old Testament History, Church History, Eng- | 

| lish Literature, Special Expository Studies in the New Testament. | 

| SECOND TERM. — New Testament History, Homiletics, Her- f 

^ I 

| meneutics, Inspiration, Christian Evidences, English Literature. | 

I I 

| • SECOND YEAR. i 

I I 

I FIRST TERM. — Old Testament Doctrine, General History, g 

| Mental Science, History of Philosophy. f 

SECOND TERM. — New Testament Doctrine, General History, I 

| Lectures on the History of Christian Doctrine, Logic, Moral % 

| Science, Political Economy. f 

A certificate will be given in this course, but no degree. 

I A FOUR YEARS' COURSE OF BIBLE STUDY FOR ALL % 

1 THE STUDENTS. f 

| It has been determined that every student entering the College | 

| shall take a course in the study of the Bible. In the Freshman ^ 

I I 

| year an outline of Bible History, embracing the Old and New | 

| Testaments, in which Geography, Biography, Archaeology and | 

I all the Great Facts recorded therein, will be studied. In the | 

| Sophomore year there will be a somewhat close and critical | 

| study of the Old Testament. In the Junior year there will be a | 

| similar study of the New Testament. In the Senior year there | 

| will be special studies in Job, Psalms, Isaiah, Matthew, Acts, | 

| Romans, or such other books as may be selected. The English | 

| Bible will be used as the text-book. Such helps as may be | 

I needed will be suggested by the teacher. | 

I . I 

| MISSIONS. | 

^ A course of lectures on Missions will be given before the whole | 

P v 

| school. This course will cover as fully as practicable all the | 

| more important points in the Theory, History and Practice of | 



I I 

| CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 35 | 

\ 1 



| Christian Missions. The matter is equally important to those | 

I who are preparing for work at home and for those who prepare | 

^ to go abroad. The Missionary Association of the College hold | 

^ • §! 

I stated meetings to hear renort.s and original letters from former s 



stated meetings to hear reports and original letters from former 
| students and others in the various mission fields, to pray for the 
| increased success of missionary labor, to discuss questions con- 




pi at eight o'clock. 

Daily and weekly meetings for prayer and song and exhor- 
i tation are maintained by the students. 

| The College authorities are anxious to make the Bethany | 

| Pulpit worthy of its splendid traditions. The regular preacher | 

| is a member of the Faculty, other members speak occasionally, | 

| and during the year a number of eminent men are invited to | 

| spend a Lord's Day in Bethany. The church seeks to contribute | 

| to the piety of every student. | 



| THE PHILLIPS LOAN FUND OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 1 

I ^ 

This is a fund the purpose of which is to assist students pre- | 

| paring for the Ministry in their education, and is loaned to such | 

| students at the discretion of a committee of the Faculty. | 

This generous contribution is, it is hoped, but the nucleus of a | 

| fund that wiil be indefinitely increased for this beneficent pur- | 

pose. The good that must result from such a provision is in- | 



i calculable. 1 

Applicants for assistance from this fund will address President | 

I McDiarmid. I 

Courses of lectures addressed to the ministerial students, but | 

| open to all, have been delivered during the past session by R. T. | 

I Matthews, H. L. Wiliettand Miss Jessie H. Brown. Each course I 

p consisted of five lectures. During the coming session similar | 

| courses will be given by F. D. Power, A. B. Philputt, Z. T. | 

| I 



■'/s/////s///s///////s//y//sy/ysy/////s/s//ys//y/////y/y/^^^ 

| ■ | 

I 86 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

I 



| Sweeney, B. B. Tyler, J. Z. Tyler, H. L. Willett. Besides the 1 

| above, lecture courses under the management of the Students' i 

I Lecture Association are given each term, to which season tickets 1 

I § 

| are sold at $1.25, and where such men have been heard as J. | 

I n^ Wi++ Millar P.nl HpnrfTP W R^iin P)r A A WiIIp-H-q Tsttipq I 



De Witt Miller, Col. George W. Bain, Dr. A. A. Willetts, James { 
I Lane Allen, Mrs. Mary A. Livermore, Professor De Mott, etc. 



LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

I I 

This is a commodious apartment, 30 by 38 feet, well lighted, | 

I and supplied with the best papers and magazines of the day. It | 

I is known to many that our library has twice suffered heavy | 

I losses by fire ; it is at present well equipped with encyclopaedias | 

I and other works of reference, and contains besides some two | 

I thousand volumes in miscellaneous literature. Liberal gifts in | 

I books have been made by friends during the past year ; such | 

I donations are earnestly solicited and will be at all times grate- | 

I fully acknowledged. | 

1 DISCIPLINE. 1 

I 

Students are expected to conduct themselves as gentlemen. | 

I The College does not lay down specific and minute regulations ; | 

1 at the same time it hopes that each one will be a law to himself, | 

I and that he will do nothing inconsistent with good order, good | 

i taste, and good morals. Should any one act otherwise the 1 

I Faculty will take note of the offence at once and deal with the | 

I offender as the best interests of all concerned may require. In | 

1 like manner the ladies are expected to act in strict accord with | 
I s 

I the principles of propriety and honor. | 



Each student is required to select from the several schools | 

I a course of at least three daily recitations, or the equivalent | 

I thereof. The reason of this requirement is this : If a student is 1 

I not doing full work he is interfering with some one else. Upon 1 

I the request of parent or guardian, however, or for other good i 

I reasons, he may be exempted from this rule. Any student who | 

i fails to attend his classes regularly or to manifest an interest in | 

I his work, will be promptly sent home. The College is vastly 1 

I better off without those who cumber the ground. Good students I 

I must not be kept back by those who lack either aptitude or 1 

i application. ^ 

$s / s /// s//y/ys/sysy/ys///s^^^ 



^ I 

| CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 37 | 

FINAL RANK AND GRADUATING HONORS. 

A record is kept of the daily recitations. At the end of the | 

| month each Professor prepares a report of the work of his classes. | 

| Absences from class or from chapel exercises, without cause, | 

| lower a student's grade. Recitations will begin on the third day 1 

| of the term. Absences will count from that day. Absences during | 

I the first two weeks of the session and during the week before | 

I and the week after the Christmas holidays count twice as much | 
^ 1 

| as they do afterwards. A record is kept of each examination ; | 

I the examinations are taken into account in making out the | 

| average for the year. | 

The final rank of the graduating class is computed by combin- | 

| ing the averages for the several years. Students whose com- | 

| bined averages are ninety-three per cent will be enrolled in the | 

| Honor List, and this distinction will be noted in the diploma by 1 

| the words CUM LAUDE. An average of ninety-four per cent | 

| entitles a student to MAGNA CUM LAUDE ; an average of over | 

| ninety-five per cent to SliMMA CUM LAUDE. The name of no | 

| student will appear in the Honor List who has not been a student | 

! in the College for at least two years. In the award of honors | 

| regard is had to the conduct of the student during his course, and | 

; any student who has incurred serious discipline may be debarred 1 

| from the rank to which otherwise his scholarship would have | 

I entitled him. | 

1 PHYSICAL CULTURE. 1 

I I 

Bethany, besides being a school of mind and morals, offers | 



| some superior facilities for physical culture. Students are not | 

| shut up to climbing the College hill or promenading the corridor | 

| for exercise. For open air sports there is a base ball ground § 

| convenient to the College building; also tennis courts near by, 1 

I and the College encourages an interest in these excellent recre- | 

| ations. In their season opportunities for skating and sledding 1 

| are frequent. A GYMNASIUM, fitted up with the most approved i 

i apparatus, is provided. During the year a competent teacher 1 

| drilled the students thoroughly in the various exercises and | 

| awakened an enthusiasm among them in gymnastic sports. The § 

| gymnasium promises great results in the better health and con- 1 

| sequently better work of the students. It is desired that every 

I student of the College will spend at least TWENTY MINUTES each 



- ■ ! 

1 1 



{///////////S///S//////////////y///y/////////^^^ 

I I 

| 38 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

! 1 

| day in the gymnasium. Hours are set apart for the daily use of | 

| the gymnasium by the young lady students, and it is ex- | 

I pected that they will make as free use of the gymnasium facili- | 

| ties as the male students. With such variety of recreations, no | 
I 



s student can lack that diversion and exercise so indispensable to | 

^ j-i : j. „r ^„n a i:x~ j „ • „„n i. ^ 



| the enjoyment of college life and success in college work. 

1 LADIES' BOARDING HALL. 1 

| 1 

| Phillips Hall, the handsome gift of Thomas W. Phillips, of | 

| New Castle, Pa., is a large and commodious building, well | 

| adapted to the wants of young ladies, with capacity to accommo- | 

| date sixty roomers and dining-room capacity for one hundred | 

| boarders. The rooms are nicely carpeted and well-furnished | 

| with new and substantial hardwood furniture. It is heated 1 

| throughout by steam, has hot and cold water on each floor, and sup- | 

| plied with bath-rooms in basement. The building is situated on | 

| the College hill, only a few steps from the College building, | 

| which renders it convenient for the students to study in their | 

| own rooms between class hours. I 

| Board is placed at $3.00 a week, and care is taken to provide | 

I the young ladies with a sufficiency of wholesome and palatable | 

I food and to allow them a reasonable freedom of the house in all | 

I respects. Each young lady is expected to bring sheets, pillow- | 

I cases, towels, napkins, napkin ring, fork, teaspoon and lamp. | 

I Oil is furnished at twenty cents a month. 

The rooms rent from $60 to $75 a session when occupied by | 
I two ; at $50 if occupied by one alone. | 

A deposit of five dollars is required of each roomer as guaran- | 
I tee for. preservation of the room and furniture, which is refunded | 
I when the room is vacated, if everything is found in proper con- | 



dition. Under the management of Mrs. Triblethe aim is to make § 
I this place a home in fact as well as in name. The moral and | 
I spiritual, as well as the intellectual interests of the girls are con- | 
I stantly kept in view. It is sought to inspire the young ladies | 
I with the highest ideals and to promote their growth in character 1 
I as well as in mind. HONOR and TRUTH are the main principles | 
I regarded in the government of the Home. We trust our girls to | 
I the utmost, always assuming that they desire to do right and al- | 
I ways relying on sympathy and confidence rather than on rigid | 
I rules to preserve the peace and order of the household. This | 



'*/s/s//ys//ys/s/s/s/jy//s///Aw^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



39 



confidence is rarely disappointed. Girls who have begun to take 
life in earnest do not need much discipline. Others are not ad- 
vised to come to Bethany. 

It is not expected that young ladies in attendance as students of 
the College will board elsewhere in the village, unless under ex- 
pressed approval of their parents or guardians with concurrence 
| of the College Faculty. 

Further information may be had on addressing Mrs. Bessie C. 

Trible. 

ENTRANCE AND EXAMINATIONS. 

Students desiring to enter any class must give evidence of 
their being prepared for the work of that class. Any one found 
to be working at a disadvantage to himself, through inadequate 
preparation for the class to which he has been admitted, will be 
1 required to enter lower. 

Special examinations will be held at the close of each term. 
; No student will be allowed to enter the next higher class whose 
examination grade falls below sixty-five. 




I 



i 40 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



a 



% 



$ . s 



s 



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| | 

| Regulations. f 

\ In order to contribute to the welfare of all concerned, the g 



| following regulations have been adopted. The Faculty most | 
| earnestly request the co-operation of parents and guardians in 



I 

| their enforcement : | 

| NUMBER OF STUDIES. f 

A student must have at least THREE studies, unless upon the | 

| 

I the Faculty shall allow him to take a less number. 



written request of parent or guardian, or for good cause shown, 



ABSENCE FROM RECITATIONS. | 

1 
| A student is not permitted to absent himself from any recita- I 

tion or examination without valid excuse, nor from the College 1 

without special leave from the Faculty. I 



WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE. | 

| No portion of the student's college fees is refunded on account ^ 



of withdrawal from the College, unless the withdrawal be ren- ] 
dered necessary by ill-health 






MONTHLY REPORTS. | 



At the end of each month a report is sent by the Faculty to 1 
| the parent or guardian of each student, in which are stated his | 
| grades and absences from recitations and examinations, together I 



§ r .- ,.,,,.,, ... „ _ 2 



with such other information as to the student's progress and con- | 

| duct as it may be deemed proper to communicate, or as the par- I 

| ent or guardian may especially request. The object of such re- | 

| ports is to incite the student to diligence by elicting the commen- i 

| dation and encouragement of his friends, and to restrain him 1 

| from idleness and disorder, or to urge him to amendment by their | 

| admonition and advice. The usefulness of the reports greatly I 

| depends upon the prompt and judicious attention they receive 1 

| from those to whom they are addressed. Parents and guardians ^ 

| therefore cannot be too earnest or prompt in communicating such | 

| advice or encouragement as the monthly reports may suggest. 



& CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 41 * 



| CONDUCT. | 

The laws of the College require from every student decorus, | 

| sober and upright conduct as long as he remains a member of | 

| the College, whether he be within the precincts or not. They % 

| strictly forbid drunkenness, gaming, dissoluteness, swearing, % 

| habits of expense, and the introduction of wine or other intoxi- % 

| eating drinks into the town or College. They require a proper | 

I observance of the Lord's day. They forbid the use or possession f 

I of pistols or other weapons, and the introduction of them into ^ 

I the College precincts. | 

^ ^ 

I EXCLUSION OF A STUDENT FROM THE COLLEGE. I 

I I 

If in the opinion of the Faculty any student is not fulfilling the f 

| purposes for which he ought to have come to the College, and is | 

| not likely to fulfill them, either from habitual delinquency in % 

I any of his classes or from habitual idleness, or from any i 

| other bad habit, the Faculty may require him to withdraw from I 

| the College, after informing him of the objections to his conduct p 

| and affording him an opportunity of explanation and defense. 



PROHIBITION OF CREDIT. 



The Faculty wish to urge parents and guardians not to allow 

students to contract debts to any large amount. Such funds as 1 

are necessary ought to be promptly furnished. It should be | 

borne in mind that too much money is likely to lead to drinking, | 

to gambling, and to other bad habits. No student need spend f 

| over three hundred dollars a year ; the majority of the students % 

spend much less than this sum. | 

One-half the expenses of the College year must be paid at f 

| the opening of the first term, the other half at the opening of the | 

| second term. The matriculation and tuition fee must be paid | 

invariably in advance. Before entering class a student will be i 

required to show his matriculation card. THOSE HOLDING | 

SCHOLARSHIPS WILL BE REQUIRED TO PRESENT THE SCHOLAR- | 

SHIP IN ORDER TO RECEIVE CREDIT FOR THE SAME. I 



3 



6 | 

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% \ 

i 42 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

% ____ \ 

7 S 



Bethany College 



I advantages : I 



Appeals to its friends for patronage, and presents the following | 



V \ 

i . There is no saloon within seven miles of the place- | 

2. EXPENSES ARE LOW, With simple tastes and habits, one | 

| can live as cheaply in Bethany as in any place on the continent. | 

| The College fees are less than half those charged in Eastern | 

| colleges. | 



3, The College has a large and commodious building, and is | 

| not therefore hampered for room, either for class work or for its | 

| societies. | 

i ^„„ _.,__ „_ _ __, ljL : _ : - ,,. I 



4. The healthfulness of the location. It is in the I 

I midst of an elevated region, where there is pure air, good water, | 

I and perfect exemption from malaria and intermittent, congestive | 

I and malignant fevers, so prevalent in some parts of the country. | 

I 5. Bethany has a large and learned body of Alumni. 1 

y \ 

I Many of these have become distinguished in the editorial chair, | 

I on the bench, at the bar, in the halls of legislation, at the pro- | 

I fessor's desk and in the pulpit. The student is admitted to this | 

I reputation already achieved for him, as soon as he completes his | 

I college course, and it is worth a great deal to him. | 

I 6. THE CHARACTER OF THE INSTRUCTION. The students are 1 

I taught to prize truth above rubies, and to seek for it as for hid- I 

y \ 

I den treasures. They are urged to hold fast to all that has been | 

I proved, and at the same time to keep their minds open to all | 

I new truth, whether it be found on Christian or on Pagan ground. | 

I They are taught to call no man master. Wordsworth says : | 

I ''Liberty has two voices, one of the mountain and one of the | 

I sea." There is an air of freedom in the magnificent hills that I 

I stand around Bethanv. I 



I stand around Bethany. 

7. THE BETHANY PULPIT. The pulpit has been a feature in i 

I Bethany from the first. Such men as Alexander Campbell, W. | 

I K. Pendleton, Robert Richardson, C. L. Loos, W. H. Woolery, I 

I J. M. Trible and F. M. Dowling have preached regularly. It | 

I will still be filled from the Faculty. I 

v/////s//y/y///ysy///y/y/y/y/^^^^ 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 43 | 



■ 



8. LITERARY SOCIETIES. Of Bethany, Prof. Radford said: I 
"Here is one College at least which is not permitting oratory to | 
become a lost art. The traditions of the place are all against | 
such ignoble decadence. Some of our colleges and universities | 
are coming to neglect or even disparage oratory as a mere ac- | 
complishment, and the silly notion has somewhat afflicted the | 
pulpit and the bar. The very air at Bethany fosters eloquence." | 

9. Quality has ever been the first consideration with | 
BETHANY. It is true that the attendance for the past session | 
was larger than ever before, and for the coming session it prom- | 
ises to be much larger yet. Still it is but truth to say that | 
Bethany hardly aspires to be a great school, as some count great- | 
ness — great in the number of names on its register. It rather | 
rejoices to be enrolled among the small colleges of our country. | 
The small college has played a great part in American educa- | 
tion and history. It is more than doubtful that so good results | 
would have come if our colleges had been fewer and larger. The | 
university has its mission, but it will not be well for our genera- | 

I tion if it is made to supplant the college, or if our colleges all | 
aspire to be universities. The ambition of magnitude so common | 
to our colleges is not altogether a matter of congratulation. A | 
college is to be judged more by the character than the number of | 
its students. Mammoth schools, like other mammoth concerns, | 
may serve well for advertising ends, but they are likely to turn | 
out a large proportion of men who, however they may count in | 
the catalogue, count for very little in the world's work. 

10. Bethany College has a great environment. The | 
surrounding country is one of extraordinary natural beauty. | 

Where can be found a fairer scene than that which opens to | 
us as we stand on the steps or walk the corridor of the college | 
building ? Noble hills, which do not rush abruptly to their really | 
mountainous height, but rise to it by gentle gradations which | 
give them a rounded and finished aspect and besides makes them | 
green pastures to their very summits through all the seasons; | 
valleys fair and fragrant, through which the shadowy waters of | 
"old Buffalo" wander riverward forever — but why try to des- | 
I cribe in cold type that which only poet's or painter's power can | 
portray ? Who that has seen can ever forget this picturesque | 
and perfect landscape ? " The veriest clod that ever vegetated" | 
could not contemplate these scenes continually without some | 



\ 44 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 



4 



| elevation and enlargement of mind. Rarely does nature bestow | 

| on any one spot so various charms with so lavish hand. Added f 

1 to these natural attractions are the traditions and associations f 

1 which linger about the place. The memory of those great souls | 

| who lived and labored at Bethany is kept green among us. | 

| Their ashes rest amid these fruitful and peaceful hills. Their | 

| ideas and aims still hover in the air. The very atmosphere of | 

| such a place is an education in itself. | 

I ii. Bethany and the Ministry. From its foundation, the | 

| College has attracted those who desire to prepare themselves for | 

| gospel ministry. So true is this, that it is sometimes supposed | 

| to be chiefly, if not wholly, a school for students for the ministry. | 

| It is, in fact, much more than this: it is a college in the full i 

\ sense, educating men not for one calling only, but for all the vo- i 

| cations of life. It has eminent alumni in all the professions. It i 

| is, however, eminently a school for the training of preachers. 1 

| Robert Moffett said once that there seems to be something in the | 

| air at Bethany which inclines men to preach. So far as our | 

| knowledge goes, no one ever came to Bethany with the inten- | 

| tion of devoting his life to the ministry and changed that in- | 

| tention after coming here, while it is a thing of frequent occur. | 

1 rence that one who comes with his mind set on some other | 

I profession resolves after being in the College awhile to give f 

| himself to the work of the ministry. No particular pressure is I 

1 brought to bear to this end. It is in the air ; all the associations 1 

is. -O ' 'A 

| and influences of the place are favorable to the ministry. 1 

| Bethany exalts the ministerial office. A ministerial student is | 

| held in at least equal honor with any other, while his intimate | 

| association with other students of the College and his instruc- § 

1 tion in the same classes and studies with the rest corrects all I 

| tendency to clerical caste. Bethany aims to make young men, 1 

| first of all, students and scholars. Before entering upon the i 

| strictly ministerial studies, the student is drilled in the classical | 

| and disciplinary studies as are other students. The design of | 

| this is to bring them to a degree of maturity and independence | 

| of mind before beginning the special ministerial studies. The | 

| propriety of this is obvious. | 

\ v 

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\ 4 

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x>///////////s/s/s///S///J'S^^^ 

1 | 

1 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 45 ^ 



% 



CALENDAR. 

For i8o2='o3. 



| Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and | 

| Wednesday, before the third Thursday in June. | 

| Annual Commencement, - on the third Thursday in June. | 



| Session begins, 



| Christmas recess begins at i P.M., 



| Christmas recess ends, 

I First term ends, 

| Second term begins, 

I 



| Anniversary of Neotrophian Society, - 

8 

| Anniversary of American Literary Institute, 

| Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, 

| 

| Field Day, 



September 19 I 

I 
December 22 | 

I 
- January 4 | 

% 

January 31 | 

I 
February 1 | 

November K I 

I 
November 10 | 

I 
February 22 | 



I Class Day, 



Tuesday before Commencement | 
Wednesday before Commencement | 



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S/S///////S/J/S/S/////S///S^^^^ 

I I 

I 46 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

1 Honor List. 1 



s 



I CLASSICAL COURSE. I 

| Summa Cum Laude. | 



OREON E. SCOTT, | 

C. W. JOPSON, I 

1 RAYMOND G. SCOTT. 1 

I 1 

| Magna Cum Laude. \ 

| HORACE F. BLACKWELL, | 

1 



ERNEST S. CLARKE. | 



Cum Laude. 
BARNES GILLESPIE. 






LADIES' COURSE. | 

| Summa Cum Laude. | 

1 MAY E. SHUPE, | 

L. ETTA RANNELLS. 1 



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CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 



BETHANY COLLEGE 



FOR THE 



FIFTY=SECOND SESSION, 



Ending June 15, 1893, 



WHEELING : 
Daily Intelligencer Steam Book and Job Print. 

1893. 

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I I 

I Forms of Bequests. j 

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1 ga?e a??e£ bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, % 

I I 

| Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of | 

I | 

| thousand dollars, to be safely invested by them as an endowment, | 

I ■ I 

| £Ae interest only of which is to be used for the support of the % 

i " . I 

I College. \ 

I I 

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| JT ^'ye aw^ bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, | 

I I 

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| Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of 

| thousand dollars, to be applied, at their discretion, for the gen- f 

| era£ purposes of the College. 



f % 

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7 #zv<? and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College | 

| Bethany, West Virginia, the sum. of | 

I I 

| thousand dollars, to be safely invested by them, and the interest | 

I I 

I or^i/ applied, at their discretion, to aid deserving students in any | 

I I 

| course in the College. | 

I g* 

| - $ 

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1 1 







w/s//ys///jy//s/s///s////y/ysy^^^ 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE | 

! 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF 



Bethany* College, 



FOR THE | 



Fifty=5econd Session, Ending June 15, 1893, 



WITH THE 



Course of Study and Annual Announcement | 

! 

For i8 9 3='94. I 



OPEN TO MALES AND FEMALES ON EQUAL TERMS. | 



! 

BETHANY, WEST VIRGINIA. I 

I 

1893. I 

r //y/y//////s/Ay//y/y//At//s/s/s/s/s^^^ 



'i 



if//ys/s///s//y////////s////y//^^^ 

I 2 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

I 
I 

/ 
/ 

/ 

| 
% 

! 

/ 

\ 

| 
I 

\ 



Board of Trustees. 



A. McLean, . 

W. K. Pendleton, 

J. W. Mulholland, 

John Campbell, 

Hon. Geo. H. Anderson, 

Judge John A. Campbell, 

H. K. Pendleton, . 

A. W. Campbell, 

J. E. Curtis, 

Dr. J, E. Whitsett, . 

R. Moffett, . 

F. D. Power, 

Alex. Campbell, . 

Charles Shields, 

Judge L. Bacon, . 

George T. Oliver, 

J. H, Jones, 

Russell Errett, . 

W. C. Lyne, 

Thomas W. Phillips, 

Dr. Roger Williams, 

John C, Palmer, 

J, J, Barclay,, 

R. S. Latimer, . 

George Darsie, 

Dr. I. M. Ridge, 

S. M. Cooper, 

M. M. Cochran, 

Oliver Marshall, . 

C. B. Scott, 



Bethany, W. Va, 
Eustis, Fla. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
St. Thomas, Ontario. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Perryopolis, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Washington, D. C. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Alliance, Ohio, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Wheeler Station, Ala. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 



y 'j 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 3 ^ 

1 

1 
1 



Faculty of 1892=93. 



HUGH MCDIARMID, A.M., PRESIDENT, 



H. L. WILLETT, A.M., 

Non-Resident Professor of Hebrew Language and Literature. 



EUGENE FEUCHTINGER, 



8 



And Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Church History. | 

sS 



W. K. PENDLETON, LL.D., | 

President Emeritus. I 



A. C. PENDLETON, A.M., | 



s 



Professor of Modern Languages and Literature. ^ 



OSCAR SCHM1EDEL, A.M., | 

Professor of Mathematics, Astronomy and Civil Engineering. 



I 

LEWIS CASS WOOLERY, A.M., | 

Professor of Greek Language and Literature. ,| 

I 

B. T. BLANPIED, A.M., | 

Professor of Natural Sciences. | 

* 1 

^ 

Professor of Biblical Literature. | 





W. R. WARREN, A.B., | 



Professor of Latin Language and Literature. | 



MRS. BESSIE C. TRIBLE, | 

Drawing and Painting. | 

Director of Music. • | 





R. H. WYNNE, 

Adjunct Professor. 
*To be filled. 



c 



.\A\\\\\\\\\\V\\^A\\\\\^\\\^\\\\\\^A\\^^^ 



I 4 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

| _ | 



j Faculty of 1893=94. 

I I 

I I 

HUGH McDIARMID, A.M., PRESIDENT, 

% fa 

And Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Church History. 

I I 

I W. K. PENDLETON, LL.D., 

t President Emeritus. I 



Professor of Natural Science. 



I A. C. PENDLETON, A.M., | 

% fa 

fa Professor of Modern Languages and Literature. 

I • $ 

fa 9 

\ OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics, Astronomy and Civil Engineering. 



2 2 

I B. T. BLANPIED, A.M., $ 



I R. H. WYNNE, A.M., 

I Professor of Rhetoric, English Literature and Hebrew. 

— I 

I GEORGE SHEPHARD ELLIS, A.B., | 

fa % 

fa Professor of Latin Language and Literature. 

— 1 

I S. M. JEFFERSON, A.M., 

^ fa 

% Professor of Biblical Literature. i 

I — I 

| GEORGE W. BOTSFORD, A.M., PH.D., 

I Professor of Greek Language and Literature. 

I Professor of Drawing and Painting. 



1 

I P 

1 EUGENE FEUCHT1NGER, A.M., 

I Director of Music. 



v/y/yAY//////y/ys/s/s/s/AV/s/^^^^ 

CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 5 I 



Executive Committee. 



HUGH McDIARMID, ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, 
J. E CURTIS, A. C. PENDLETON, 



S. M, JEFFERSON. | 

— 1 



J. C. PALMER, TREASURER. 



MISS A. C. PENDLETON, | 

Librarian and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 



B. T. BLANPIED, p 



/ 



Curator of the Museum and Secretary of the Faculty. I 



OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, BURSAR. % 



J. T. T. HUNDLEY, Financial Agent. 



y. 



/. 



i 

y/s//ys/s//y/y/////y/////ys/s/s/s//ys//y//s/^^^ 



S 6 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 



r 



Students of the Fifty=Second Session. 



RESIDENT GRADUATES. 



Miller, J. H., 
Oram, W. G., 



SENIORS. 



Bagby, Richard, 
Cameron, Elizabeth K., 
Chapman, A. L., 
Childs, Mae E., 
Collins, T, H., 
Craig, J. H., 
Critchfield, C. V., 
Danford, M. V., 
Dimond, Miriam E., 
Dodd, W. G., 
Fox, Grace, 
Hundley, J. T. T., . 
Israel, C. E., 
Kershner, B. L., 
Lovett, G. D., 
Perry, E. L., 
Plattenburg, Charles H., 
Prewitt, W.C., 
Robertson, J. R., 
Shupe, Anna, 
Woolery, K. S., 



JUNIORS. 



Allen, H. W., 
Anderson, J. C, 
Arnold, J. E., 
Billingsley, W. H., 
Bowman, Ina, 
Brandenberg, W. H., 



Rock Fork, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

Tappahannock, Va. 
Millersburg, O 
Donley, Pa. 
Greensburg, Ind. 
Colyer, Ky. 
New Lisbon, O. 
Mt. Vernon, O. 
Pilcher, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
New Philadelphia, O. 
Columbus, O. 
Dunnsville, Va. 
Beallsville, O. 
Clearspring, Md. 
Shreve, O. 
Homer, N. Y. 
Dover, Mo. 
Winchester, Ky. 
Rensselaer, Mo. 
Bellaire, O. 
Antioch Mills, Ky. 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Ashland, O. 
California, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Dayton, O. 



§y//y/y/////ys//ys/sy///y/y//jl^^^^ 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



7 



Buckley, Harry, 
Campbell, Alice, 
Chapmen, F. A., 
Creighton, Allen B., 
Craft, Katherine, 
Cunningham, W. D., 
Darsie, Charles, 
Farrar, Bessie B., . 
Fortier, Grace, 
Gunlack, S. S., 
Israel, Lizzie C, 
Israel, John H., 
Jones, C. E., . 
McGrew, Grace, 
Miller, Minnie, . 
Mendel, Mamie K., 
Moore, Zwinglius, 
Prewitt, H. M., 
Patton, R. M., . 
Pritchard, C. W., . 
Reeves, W. E., 
Scott, M. M., 
Sparks, R. A., . 
Stockdale, Margaret, 
Townsend, H. L., 
Van Horn, Walter, 
Vodrey, Harry, 
Wayman, J. E. W., 
White, Clara L., 
Wilfley, E. A., 
Wilson, Allen, . 
Vivian, Loula, 



Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Holliday's Cove, W. Va. 
Malvern, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Dawson, Pa. 
Versailles, Ky. 
Richmond, Va. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Lexington, Mo. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Greensburg, Pa. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Rocky Fork, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Beallsville, O. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
Somerset, Pa. 
New Lisbon, O. 
Burlington, Kansas. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Richmond, Ky. 
California, Pa. 
Angola, Ind. 
Warren, O. 
East Liverpool, O. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Lamira, O. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Salida, Colorado. 
Higginsville, Mo. 



SOPHOflORES. 



Addleman, R. M., 
Appleton, Margaret, 
Barclay, Julian T., 
Campbell, Argyle, 
Campbell, Archie, 
Cartwright, J. M., 



Clarksville, Pa. 
Dayton, O. 
Wheeler Station, Ala. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
East Liverpool, O. 



:X*iX>iXX^*>iX^XXXXNS>0O*X>i>*XX^<>>*VX^^ 



I 8 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

4 I 



Chapman, W. C, 
Charlton, W. G., 
Darsie, Catharine, 
Darsie, Burns, 
Echols, Clarence, 
Forner, T. J., 
Gans, W. L., . 
Hickman, B. T., 
Jinnett, W. R., 
Jobes, Margaret, 
Johnson, R. O., 
Johnson, Philip, 
Lewis, T. S., 
Lanier, Fortune, 
Lanier, Damon, 
Madden, Milton B., 
McDiarmid, Errett, 
Merryman, J. E., 
Mertz, H. G., . 
Meyer, Louise, 
Morris, Ada, 
Morris, J. C, 
Newcomer, L. O., 
Pritchard, G. R., 
Perry, G. L., . 
Sapp, F. B., 
Taylor, Bessie, 
White, J. J., 
Williams, J. F., 



FRESHMEN. 

Auxter, Gertrude E., . Elmore, O. 

Bonar, Robert, Jr., . . West Liberty, W. Va. 

Bamber, Robert J., . Flanagan, 111. 

Brown, Laura, . . . Bethany, W. Va. 

Canby, J. A., . . Soho, W. Va. 

Chapman, Myra, . . Higginsville, Mo. 

Crisp, Greenville, . . Higginsville, Mo. 

Chapline, A. R., . . Bethany, W. Va. 

Clopper, E. M., . . St. Louis, Mo. 



Higginsville, Mo. 
Mapleton, Ontario. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Wellsville, O. 
Morris Cross Roads, Pa. § 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Dudley, N. C. 
Claysville, Pa. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Lanesville, Va. 
Washington, Pa. 
West Point, Ga. 
West Point, Ga. 
Topeka, Kansas. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Steubenville, O. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Shelby, O. 
Shelby, O. 
Dawson, Pa. 
New Lisbon, O. 
Homer, N. Y. 
Gladesville, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Washington, Pa. 
Barnesville, O. 



/ /s//ys/s//ys//y///y/ys/s//^^^^^ 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



9 



Davis, Clemons H., 
Frew, Gertrude, 
Gise, Robert, . 
Glascock, Maggie, . 
Guy, Hugh, 
Gans, Catherine L., 
Glascock, R. C., 
Harris, E. C., 
Hart, Everest, . 
Heatherington, J. A., 
Hundley, Maury, 
Hopkins, G. E., 
Hull, J. D., 
Ice, A. E,, . 
Israel, George, 
Keltch, Henry F., . 
Lea, Frank T., . 
Lutton, Robert C., . 
Merryman, R. H., 
Miller, C. F,, 
Moss, J. A., 
Moore, Luther, 
Meng, W. D., . 
Moore, C. R., 
McDiarmid, Ethel, 
McDiarmid, Norman 
Powell, W. E., . 
Picton, T. G., 
Ramp, Lida, 
Robertson, M. F. B., 
Robertson, J. F., 
Stewart, J. F., 
Shives, J. L., . 
Seiple, W. H., 
Saum, H. C., 
Savage, G. L., 
Schreiman, Ferdinand,. 
Shriver, Eva, 
Stewart, J. W., 
VanHorn, E. B., 



Hartwell, O. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Massilon, O. 
New London, Mo. 
Leon, Kansas. 
Morris Cross Roads, Pa. | 
Rensselaer, Mo, 
Flushing, O. 
Williamsport, Pa, 
Bellaire, O. 
Dunnsville, Va. 
Bellaire, O. 
Mansfield, O. 
Belvoir, Kansas. 
Mt. Vernon, O. 
Conoway, W. Va. 
Ashton, Md. 
Cincinnati, O. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Keyser, W. Va. 
Newport News, Va. 
Beallsville, O. 
Lexington, Mo. 
Proctor, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Hampton, Va. 
Plymouth, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Rensselaer, Mo. 
Rensselaer, Mo. 
Union City, Ind. 
Pawpaw, W. Va. 
Plymouth, Pa. 
Saumsville, Va. 
Youngstown, O. 
Alma, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Pleasant Valley, W. Va. | 
Warren, O. 



I 



>////s///s////ys//y/y/y/ys//ys/A's/s//ys/s/s/sy///y///y//s//y//s//y//^^^ 

\ 



10 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Willett, L. G., . 
Willett, A. F., 
Wilson, E. Jay, 
Warren, J. M., 
Whitsett, J. W., 
Yarborough, W. T., 



Ionia, Mich. 
Ionia, Mich. 
Dublin, Ind. 
Higginsville, Mo. 
Perryopolis, Pa. 
Richmond, Va. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Blane, Myrtle, . 
Berger, Goldie, 
Biesecker, Mrs. Mary, 
Billings, Laura, 
Chapman, Ella', 
Campbell, Shedrick, 
Craddock, Jennie, 
Dimond, Jessie, 
Dill, Ora, 
Griffith, Maggie, 
Hasselkus, Mamie, 
Justice, A. E., 
Lewis, Mary, . 
Moore, Ada, 
Muckley, O. P., 
Muckley, O. K., . 
Oram, Lila, 
Perry, Mrs. E. L., . 
Sadler, Eva, 
Scott, Goldie, 
Sims, Bessie, 
Tener, Sarah B., 
Trabue, Glenn, 
Woolery, Mrs. Linnie K 
Wynne, Edmund, 



Petersburg, 111. 
Canton, O. 
Somerset, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Higginsville, Mo. 
Montague Bridge, P. E. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany,' W. Va. 
Greenfield, Ind. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
Elmore, O. 
Modest Town, Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Homer, N. Y. 
Point Marion, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Clarington, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Hannibal, Mo. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 



Miller, J. H., 



RESIDENT GRADUATE. 

Rocky Fork, O. 



SUMflARY. 



Seniors, . 
Juniors, 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen, 
Special, . 
Post Graduates, 

Total, . 



21 

38 

37 

54 

25 
2 

177 



y/y/ysy//s///////AY////y/y///ysys/sys/AY////////y/^^^ 



y/yy//////////sys/s/s//yS//y//^ 

CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 11 | 



Graduates of the Fifty =second Session. 



flASTER OF ARTS. 



Miller, J. H., . . Ohio. | 

Oram, W. G., . . . West Virginia. I 



BACHELORS OF ARTS. I 

I 

Bagby, Richard, . . Virginia. | 

Chapman, A. L., . . Pennsylvania. | 

Collins, T. H., . . Kentucky. | 

Craig, J. H., . . . Ohio. | 

Critchfield, C. V., . . Ohio. | 

Dodd, W. G., . . . Ohio. | 

Hundley, J. T. T., . . Virginia. | 

Kershner, B. L., . . Maryland. | 

Lovett, G. D., . . Ohio. | 

Perry, E. L., . . . New York. | 

Plattenburg, C. H., . Missouri. | 

Prewitt, W. C, . . Kentucky. | 

Robertson, J. R., . Missouri. | 

Woolery, K. S., . . Kentucky. | 



BACHELORS OF SCIENCE. § 

Danford, M. V., . . Ohio. | 

Dimond, Miriam E., . West Virginia. I 

Israel, C. E., . . West Virginia. | 



BACHELORS OF PHILOSOPHY. | 

1 
Cameron, Elizabeth K., . Ohio. | 

Childs, Mae E., . . Indiana. | 

Fox, Grace, . . . Ohio. | 

Shupe, Anna, . . Ohio. f 



y////yy////////////^///z//z//////////^^^ 



I I 

I 12 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

! 1 

I Course of Study. 

i 

I BETHANY COLLEGE has four separate courses : The Classi- j 
| cal and Ministerial leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts; the j 
| Scientific to Bachelor of Science and the Literary Course to > 
| Bachelor of Philosophy. 

l C^cTTcOUKSB. 

1 FOR THE DEGREE OF THE BACHELOR OF ARTS. | 

I I 

| This course embraces the following schools, viz : 



1 
2 

3 

I A 



5 
I 6 



School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 



! 

School of the Greek Language and Literture. 

I 



School of the Latin Language and Literature. 
School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 



1 

School of Natural Science. | 

I 



kj. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy and > 
1 Belles Lettres. 1 



1 I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

> I 

| In this School the Evidences, History and Languages of the Bible are ^ 



| taught. Moral Philosophy is drawn from the Bible itself. Every student ^ 
| in the College studies the English Bible during the Sophomore and Junior I 
| years. In the Junior year the historical books of the New Testament, with 



in the College studies the English Bible during the Sophomore and Junior 

^ the purpose of each Epistle, are carefully studied. ^ 

I I 

$ * 

I § 

I II. School of the Greek Language. | 

> I 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

| First Term.— Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's First Lessons. | 

| Daily exercises in writing the language, with the accent | 

| carefully marked. | 

| Second Term. — Xenophon's Anabasis, Book i. Kelsey. | 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. 1 

| First Term. — The Anabasis, Books II., III., IV. Sight Selections. Gre- ■ 

cian History (Cox). Greek Prose Composition (Jones). | 



| Second Term. — Homer's Iliad (Keep), Books I., II., and III. Prose Compo- | 
| sition (Jones). Grecian History. | 

I I 



5 8 



N 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 18 | 



JUNIOR YEAR. I 

First Term — Pindar (Gildersleeve). Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates | 

(Robbins). Prose Composition (Allenson). Lucian's Dia- | 

logues (Williams). | 

Second Term.— Plato's Apology and Crito (Wagner). Demosthenes' Ora- | 

tion on the Crown (D'Ooge). | 

SENIOR YEAR. 
First Term. — Sophocles — OEdipusTyrannus (White). Thucydides, Books 



VI., VII. (Lamberton). | 

Second Term.— Lectures on Greek Civilization. New Testament Greek. | 

! 



Latin. 



The instruction in this department has four distinct ends in view : | 

First. In the Freshman and Sophomore years the aim is to give a thorough | 

knowledge of forms and syntax. From the beginning the study of the | 

grammar is accompanied with exercises in translating English into Latin | 

and Latin into English. The translations of the texts used in these two | 



s 



years is conducted in such a way as to fasten in the mind the principles of ^ 
Latin Grammar. | 

1 



Second. Junior and Senior years are devoted to a general study of ^ 
Roman Literature. At the end of the course a text-book by Bender is used. | 
Constant attention is called to the style of writers, the philosophies of their | 
day, the political condition out of which the literature sprang. The students | 
are required to prepare and read criticisms and theses on such themes as will | 
awaken interest and stimulate to original, independent research. | 

Third. From a grammatical point of view the Latin language, in com- | 
parison with all other European languages, has been termed a "perfectly | 
organized type." It is the best source of general, fundamental, comprehen- | 
sive linguistic principles. This position of the Latin language is turned to | 
good account in throwing light upon our own. The instruction given | 
throughout the course is summed up at close in a series of lectures on | 
"Comparative Latin and English Grammar." | 

Fourth. The recitations are so conducted as to make them an aid to | 
English Composition and Rhetoric. Students are frequently required to | 
hand in on paper and write on the board the translation of the text. The | 
paragraphing, punctuation, diction and arrangement of the English is criti- 
cised by students andlteacher. 



S 



III. School of Latin Language and Literature. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. | 

First Term.— Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. | 

Daily exercise in writing English into Latin. | 

Second Term.— Csesar's Gallic War (Harper and Tolman). Book I., with | 

thorough Drill inSyntax. 



8 



X %. 

X 1 A X 

I 14 CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

§ S 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. I 

| First Term.— Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic | 

| War, Books II., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. | 

| Prose Composition (Jones). | 

| Second Term.— Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition I 



continued (Jones). | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. I 

| First Term.— Prosody. Virgil's ^Eneid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- | 

| ough). History of Rome (Allen). 

| Second Term.— Prosody. Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Horace | 

| (Lincoln). Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid). | 

| SENIOR YEAR. | 

^ Cvi -v» <-»•/ 'J Si M/m I V\ /-i ( „ r\ v t-»-i nmn a+ I n/*iliif> /i hnf^-kl M 



| First Term. — The Germ an ia of Tacitus (Church). ^ 



| Second Term.— Cicero's Letters. Pliny's Letters. Antiquities (Wilkins). 
| Latin Literature (Bender). Lectures on Latin of Middle | 



o 



Ages 
$ $ 

| IV. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

^ This school embraces a course of Pure and Applied Mathematics as given | 

| in the following schedule. The text books used are indicated in parenthe- | 

| sis: (See p. 16.) | 

1 FRESHMAN YEAR 

| First Term. — Plane Geometry (Wentworth.) 



| Second Term.— Geometry. Trigonometry (Wentworth). 

| SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

| First Term. — Higher Algebra (Wentworth). | 

I Second Term.— Land Surveying (Gillespie). 

| JUNIOR YEAR. 

| ? First Term. — General Geometry, Differential Calculus (Olney). 

| Second Term. — Integral Calculus. Calculus applied to General Geometry | 

| (Olney). | 

1 Calculus is elective in this course. | 

I I 

| SENIOR YEAR. 

I First Term. — Mechanics (Kemper). 
| Second Term. — Astronomy (Young). 



| V. School of Natural Science. 

| A fee of $10.00 to cover the expense of chemicals and apparatus used, to ^ 
| be paid before entering the class, is charged to all students taking practical | 



chemistry. 



A course in Quantitative Analysis and Assaying has been arranged, open | 
| only to those who have taken the previous Laboratory work. An additional 
| fee of $5.00 is charged to those taking this course. 



■'//s:y//y/ys//ys//y//s/s/s//y/ys^^^ 

15 I 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



The Theoretical Chemistry of all the schools will be taught by lectures, 
upon which the students must pass a thorough examination. Remsen's 
Chemistry is recommended as a book of reference. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Botany (Gray). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Physiology (Brand). 
Zoology (Orton). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Term. — Physics (Appleton). 
Second Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Second Term. — Geology (Le Conte's Compend). 



First Term. 
Second Term. 



VI. School of 



Mental, Mora! and Political Philosophy 
and Belles Lettres. 



First Term 
Second Term 



JUNIOR YEAR. 
Welch). English Literature, 



Rhetoric 
The same. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
First Term.— Metaphysics (Hill). 
Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Moral Philosophy (Robinson). Constitu- 
tion of United States. Political Economy (Ely). Philol- 
ogy (Trench). History of Civilization (Guizot). Christian 
Evidences (Fisher). 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

. FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 
This course embraces the following schools : 

i. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 

2. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

3. School of Natural Sciences. 

4. School of Modern Languages. 

5. School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 

Economy. 



Rhetoric and English literature recite on alternate days. Application of 
the principles of Rhetoric is made through the analysis of acknowledged 
masters of style, and through constant practice in original composition. To 
the outlines of English literature as furnished by the text-book, are added | 
miscellaneous selections illustrating the progress of the language and litera- 
ture from the tenth century to the present. In teaching history the method 
is not to commit to memory isolated facts, but to bring out the connection of 
events showing the progress of civilization. 






«//////////////////////////;//////,/y////y/////y/////^^^^ 



V V 

1 16 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

2 ■ ■ . % 

I I, School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. | 

fy Evidences, History and Languages of the Bible. Moral Philosophy— | 

| Scientific basis discussed and then Moral Philosophy drawn from the Bible, i 

| Old Testament studies during Sophomore year, and the New Testament in | 

| the Junior. | 

% % 

V ? 

| II. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. | 

i I 

I In the Scientific Course the school embraces, besides the subjects given | 
| in the corresponding school of the Classical Course, the study of Descrip- | 
| tive Geometry and Roads and Railroads. | 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. 1 

^ JFm£ Term. — Plane Geometry. | 

| Second Term.— Geometry (Wentworth). — Trigonometry (Wentworth). 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. 1 

* First Term. — Higher Algebra (Wentworth). | 

$ Second Term. — Land Surveying, including Leveling (Gillespie). 

I JUNIOR YEAR. I 

v I 

g ^trrf Term. — General Geometry, Differential Calculus (Olney). Descrip- | 



tive Geometry (Waldo). | 

| Second Term. — Integral Calculus, Solution of Problems in General Geometry i 

with the aid of the Infinitesimal Calculus (Olney). Roads | 

| and Railroads (Gillespie). | 

| SENIOR YEAR. I 

p #m< Term. — Mechanics (Kemper). | 

| Second Term. — Astronomy (Young). ^ 

| Any one wishing to enter a class in Applied Mathematics must first become | 

% familiar with those branches of pure Mathematics upon which the applied | 

| depends for its principles. The courses are so arranged that no student, 1 



| pursuing them in the order indicated and with the thoroughness required, | 

| will encounter serious difficulty. f 

| In Land Surveying and in Roads and Railroads special attention is given | 

-| to field work and mapping. Students in the latter class will be required to | 

$ lay out curves, make the calculations for excavations and embankments, | 

| for transportation of earth, make plates, tracings and blue prints, practice | 

| the use of the pantagraph and planimeter in general, become familiar with | 

| the methods both of field and office work. 

To enter the Freshman class in Mathematics, the applicant must be j 

| familiar with the rules and methods of treatment of Quadratic Equations, | 

| Progressions, Variations and Logarithms. When sufficient evidence of pre- | 

| paration cannot be given, an examination will be required on the subject as | 

| presented in Wentworth's School Algebra. | 

| A small fee, to be paid before entering the class, is charged for the use of % 

| the instruments and drawing room, in Descriptive Geometry $2.00, in Sur- | 

I veying and in Roads and Railroads $3.00 each. f 

/ /y/y/ys////ys/Ay/AY//yAY////y//A'^^ 



I 

! 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



17 



Botany (Gray), 



III. School of Natural Science. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



First Term.- 
Second Term.- 



Physology (Brand). 
-Zoology (Orton). 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



First Term.- Physics (Appleton). 
Second Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Chemistry (Laboratory). 
Second Term. — Geology (Le Conte's Compend). 



ond year of the course. 

FRENCH— FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. 
FIRST YEAR. 

Edgren's Grammar. Part I. 

Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Edgren's Grammar. Part II. 

Reading at Sight. Oral Practice, with selected readings. 

Exercises in Grammar and Composition. 

GERMAN— FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. 
FIRST YEAR. 



Meissner's Grammar. Part I. 
Oral Practice, with select readings. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Meissner's Grammar. Part II. 

Oral Practice, with select readings. 

Reading at sight. 

Exercises in Grammar and Composition. 



IV. School of Modern Languages. 

The aim of our instruction in French and German is to enable the student 
to speak and write these languages as well as read them. The so-called 

"natural method" is combined with progressive study of the grammars f 

and of selections from the best writers and with constant practice in com- | 

position. The classes make such progress in speaking as enables the | 

teacher to conduct them entirely without the use of English during the sec- | 

| 

1 



1 

1 

I 

\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\X\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\XV 



\N^*>iX>^XXXXX>>^XWiSX^^ 



18 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



| V. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy 

and Belles Lettres. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Rhetoric (Welch). English Literature.' 
Second Term. — English Literature. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Metaphysics (Hill). 
Second Term. — Logic (Jevons). Constitution of United States and Political 
Economy (Walker). Philology (Trench). History of Civili. 
zation (Guizot). Christian Evidences (Fisher). 



MINISTERIAL COURSE. 

This course embraces the following schools : 
School of Biblical Introduction. 
School of Biblical Languages. 
School of Biblical History and Doctrine. 
School of Church History. 
School of Homiletics. 
School of Greek. 
School of Latin. 

School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 
School of Natural Science. 

School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy and 
Belles Lettres. 



i 

2 

3 

4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

9 

10 



'. School of Biblical Introduction. 



It is the purpose to make the classes in the Classical and the Ministerial | 



courses the same in the languages, mathematics and sciences up to the 
Junior year and then the major work of the ministerial student is in studies | 
more distinctively biblical, while the minor work is carried on in Latin, | 
Mathematics, English Literature and the Sciences. The work embraces the 

| following subjects : 

| Hermeneutics and Inspiration, Christian Evidences, Cannonics, 

| Biblical Geography and Archaeology. 



2. Biblical Languages. 

In the Junior year the Septuagint version will be read largely as prepara- 
tory to the study of the New Testament Greek. 

The Senior class will have Greek Exegesis throughout both terms. All 
students in this course are required to take Hebrew for at least one year. 






N 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 19 | 



Students are not only taught the principles, but are drilled thoroughly in 
the preparation and delivery of sermons, and are given detailed instructions 



3. School of Biblical History and Doctrine. 



Old Testament History embracing the Primeval, Patriarchal, Mosaic and | 

Prophetic Periods, will be taught. Besides the Bible itself, McLear's Class- | 

book of Old Testament History will be used as a text-book. As works of | 

reference, Geikie, Stanley, Milman and Ewald are recommended. In New | 

Testament History the course embraces the interval between the Old and | 

the New Testaments, an outline Life of Christ, an Outline History of the | 

Apostolic Church, a Short Life of Paul. The History of the Gospels and | 

Acts, and the historic allusions in the Epistles will be carefully studied. | 

McLear's Class-book of New Testament History, Robinson's Harmony, | 

Stalker's Life of Christ, and Stalker's Life of St. Paul will be used as text | 

books; Geikie, Farrar, Andrews, and Edersheim on the Life of Christ; | 

Farrar, Conybeare and Howson, and Presensse on the Life of Paul and the | 

Apostolic Church are recommended as works of reference. | 

In the department of Biblical Doctrine the study of the Old Testament | 

embraces the Beginnings of Revelation in the Primeval and Patriarchal | 

Ages, the Covenants, the Mosaic Institution and its Doctrines and Ordi- | 

nances, the Teachings of Prophecy, and the Wisdom Literature of the old | 

Scriptures. In all these instructions the Bible is taken as the main text- | 

book. New Testament Doctrine includes a detailed study of the Teachings | 

of Christ in their order, an examination of the several types of Apostolic | 

teaching and Exegetical and Expository studies of passages selected from | 

the Gospels, Acts and Epistles. | 

— I 

4 School of Church History. | 

Great importance is attached to Church History. Especial attention is | 

paid to the history of the church till the Council of Nice A. D. 325, the Rise | 

and Growth of the Papacy to A. D. 1073, the Reformation, and Recent | 

Reformatory Movements. This is supplemented by a course of Lectures on | 

Christian boctrine, embracing a special studvof the great Doctrinal Epochs I 

in the history of the Church. Fisher's History of the Christian Church is | 

used as a text-book, while Neander, Mosheim and Schaff are recommended | 

as works of reference. | 

1 

5. School of Homiletics. I 

! 

in the practical duties of the Christian Ministry. Phelps's Theory of | 

Preaching and Blaikie's For the Work of the Ministry are used as text- | 

books. I 

I 



1 






I 20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. § 

I 1 

| III. School of the Greek Language. 

1 FRESHMAN YEAR.. 1 

| First Term.— Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's Greek Lessons. | 

| Daily exercises in writing the language, with the accents ^ 

| carefully marked. | 

| Second Term. — Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. Fyffe's Short History of | 

| Greece. 

1 SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

I I 

| First Term. — The Anabasis continued Lucian's Dialogues. Exercises in | 

| writing Greek. Greek History (Cox). | 

| Second Term. — Thucydides. Homer's Iliad (Keep), three books. Prose | 



| Composition (Jones). Grecian History. | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. I 

| | 

^ First Term. — Pindar (Gildersleeve). Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates | 

I (Robbins). Prose Composition (Sidgwick). | 

| Second Term. — Plato's Apology of Socrates and Crito (Wagner). Demos- | 

I thenes' Oration on the Crown (D'Oofe). Septuagint. 

1 SENIOR YEAR. | 

| First Term. — New Testament Greek. | 

| Second Term.— New Testament Greek. ^ 

§ s 



o 



| IV. School of Latin Language and Literature. I 

I I 

I First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. | 

| Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

| Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Harper and Tolman), Book I., with | 

| thorough drill in Syntax. | 

^ ^ 

| SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 

^ ^ 

| First Term- Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic | 

| War, Books 1., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Caliline. | 

| Prose Composition (Jones). | 

| Second Term.r— Select Orations of Cicero. Composition continued (Jones). | 



I JUNIOR YEAR. 



| First Term.— Prosody. Virgil's ^Eneid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- | 

| ough). History of Rome (Allen). | 

§ $ 

s . s 

V. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

1 FRESHMAN YEAR.— (Seep. 16). | 



o 



I First Term. — Plane Geometry. | 

| Second Term. — Solid Geometry. Trigonometry. | 







L COURSES. 


BOURSE. 


LITERARY COURSE. 




Latin. 

Geometry — Plane. 
French. 
*Bible. 


ometry. 


Latin. 

Geometry- Solid. Trigonometry. 

French. 

Primary Rhetoric. 

Botany. 




French. 
Physiology. 
Latin. German. 


irecian Mythology. 


Zoology. 

Latin. German. 

Trigonometry — Spherical. 

French. 




Latin. 
Physics. 
German. 
Rhetoric 


t. 


Roman History. 
German. 
Latin. 
Chemistry. 


philosophy. 

octrine. 
are. 


Metaphysics. 

History of Philosophy. 

History. 

N. T. History. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 

1 


:al Economy. Philology. 
;. Inspiration. Chris- 

istian Doctrine. N. T. 
ure. 


Astronomy (by Lectures.) 

Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 

Philology. 

History. 

Geology. 

Christian Evidences. 

Rhetoric. English Literature. 







ONS*XS>^XSXX\VX<KXXX^CXxX~^XXXXXXXXXSXXXX^^ 

l J 

§ 20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 1 

1 J 

| III. School of the Greek Language. | 



1 FRESHMAN YEAR. 

I 1 

| First Term.— Goodwin's Greek Grammar and White's Greek Lessons. ^ 

^ Daily exercises in writing the language, with the accents | 

| carefully marked. | 

| Second Term.— Xenophon's Anabasis, Book I. Fyffe's Short History of | 

| Greece. | 

| SOPHOMORE YEAR. I 

^j First Term. — The Anabasis continued Lucian's Dialogues. Exercises in | 

| writing Greek. Greek History (Cox). | 

| Second Term. — Thucydides. Homer's Iliad (Keep), three books. Prose | 

| Composition (Jones). Grecian History. | 

I JUNIOR YEAR. 1 

I I 

| First Term. — Pindar (Gildersleeve). Xenophon's Memorabilia of Socrates | 

1 (Robbins). Prose Composition (Sidgwick). 

| Second Term. — Plato's Apology of Socrates and Crito (Wagner). Demos- | 

I thenes' Oration on the Crown (D'Oofe). Septuagint. 

I SENIOR YEAR. I 



^ First Term. — New Testament Greek. | 

| Second Term. — New Testament Greek. ^ 

s s 

s s 

| IV. School of Latin Language and Literature. 

I First Term. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons. | 

| Daily exercises in writing English into Latin. | 

| Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Harper and Tolman), Book I., with | 

| thorough drill in Syntax. | 



I 



§ S 



I SOPHOMORE YEAR. | 



1 1 

| First Term.- Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic | 

| War, Books 1., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. | 

| Prose Composition (Jones). | 

| Second Term.r— Select Orations of Cicero. Composition continued (Jones). | 

^ N 

I JUNIOR YEAR. I 

I I 

| First Term.— Prosody. Virgil's yEneid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- | 

| ough). History of Rome (Allen). | 

$ $ 



| V. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

| FRESHMAN YEAR.— (Seep. 16). 1 

I 
First Term. — Plane Geometry. | 



^ Second Term. — Solid Geometry. Trigonometry. 

I i 

£<<^XX>NSVXSXXXX^XX*0«*X<>SVX^^ 







SYNCHRONISTIC VIEW OF THE SEVERAL COURSES. 




CLASSICAL COURSE. 


SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 


MINISTERIAL COURSE. 


LITERARY COURSE. 




Latin. 


Geometry— Plane. 


Latin. 


Latin. 






H 




Latin. 


Greek. 


Geometry— Plane. 






H 


Plane Geometry. 


French. 


Geometry — Plane. 


French. 




< 

X 


r 


*Bible. 


*Bible. 


*Bible. 


* Bible. 






Geometry — Solid. Trigonometry. 


Latin. 


Latin. 


■ 


w 


g 


( ireek. 


French. 


Greek. 


Geometry - Solid. Trigonometry. 




0! 


P 


( Jeometry - Solid. Trigonometry. 


Latin. 


Geometry— Solid. Trigonometry. 


French. 






/, 


Primary Rhetoric. 


Primary Rhetoric. 


Primary Rhetoric. 


Primary Rhetoric. 








Botany. 


Botany. 


Botany. 


Botany. 




Physiology. 


French. 


Physiology. 


French. 








Latin. 


Higher Algebra. 


Latin. 


Physiology. 
Latin. German. 




ui 






German. 


Greek. 





S 


I 




Higher Algebra. 


Physiology. 








Latin. 


French. 


Latin. 


Zoology. 




0. 


to 


H 


Greek, Grecian History, Grecian Mythology. 


Zoology. 


Greek, Grecian History, Grecian Mythology. 


Latin. German. 






Zoology. 


Surveying. 


Zoology. 


Trigonometry— Spherical. 






c 
w 


Surveying. 


German. 


Surveying — Optional. 


French. 




Latin. 


German. 


Latin. 


Latin. 






a 


Greek. 


Descriptive Geometry. 


Greek. 


Physics. 






H 


General Geometry. Differential Calculus. 


Geometry — General. Differential Calculus. 


O. T. History. Hebrew. 


German. 






" 


Physics. 


Physics. 


Physics. 


Rhetoric 






Z 

2 


~ 


Rhetoric. English Literature. 










S 


Latin. Roman History. 


German. 


Latin. Roman History. 


Roman History. 






■ H 


Greek. 


Roads and Railroads. 


Greek. 


German. 








Chemistry. 


Integral Calculus. General Geometry. 


N. T. History. Septuagint. 


Latin. 






O 


Integral Calculus, Calculus applied to General 


Chemistry. Laboratory. 


Hebrew. 


Chemistry. 








Rhetoric. English Literature. [Geometry. 




Chemistry. 






Metaphysics. History of Philosophy. 


Metaphysics. 


Metaphysics. History of Philosophy. 


Metaphysics. 






h 


Latin. 


History of Philosophy. 


Hebrew. 


History of Philosophy. 






F- 


Greek. 


Mechanics. 


Church History. 


History. 






- 


Mechanics. 


Chemistry. 


Greek Exegesis. O. T. Doctrine. 


N. T. History. 




a: 







Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Rhetoric. English Literature. 




Greek. 


Astronomy. 


Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. Philology. 


Astronomy (by Lectures.) 




LU 




Roman Literature. Philology. History. 


Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 


Homiletics. Hermeneutics. Inspiration. Chris- 


Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 




If) 


s 


Logic. Moral Science. Political Economy. 


History. Philology. 


tian Evidences. 


Philology. 








Astronomy. 


Geology. 


Hebrew. Geology. 


History. 






/. 


Christian Evidences. 


Christian Evidences. 


Astronomy (Lectures). 


Geology. 








Geology. 


Rhetoric. English Literature. 


Lectures on History of Christian Doctrine. N. T. 
Doctrine. 


Christian Evidences. 
Rhetoric. English Literature. 




- - -_ 








Rhetoric. English Literature. 







'See Page 18. 



\ % 

CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 21 | 



Second Term. 



Second Term. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

-Land Surveying. Optional. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Astronomy (Lectures). 



VI. 



School of Natural Sciences. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



First Term. — Physiology (Brand). Botany (Gray). 
Second Term. — Zoology (Orton). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. — Physics (Appleton). 
Second Term. — Chemistry (Rem sen). 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Second Term. — Geology (Le Conte's Compend). 



VII. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy 

and Belles Lettres. 



First Term.- 
Second Term.- 



First Term. 



Second Term. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

•Rhetoric (Welch). English Literature (Shaw] 
-Rhetoric. English Literature. 



SENIOR YEAR. 

(Porter and Bowne! 



History of Philosophy 



Metaphysics 
(Tannemann). 

-Logic (Jevons^. Moral Philosophy (Robinson). Constitu- 
tion of United States and Political Economy (Ely). Phil- 
ology. 



LITERARY COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. 
This course embraces the following schools: 



School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. 
School of Latin Language. 
School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 
School of Natural Sciences. 
School of Modern Languages. 

School of Mental Philosophy, Belles Lettres and Political 
Economy. 



v/s//y/y/ysy/y/y/y/y//s//ys//////ys^^^ 



I 22 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. f 

g — . £ 

I . ._ . . . _ ... . _. .. . I 



^ I. School of Sacred History and Moral Philosophy. g 



c 



/ 



| (Same as in Classical Course). | 

g 9 

I II. School of Latin Language and Literature. I 

I FRESHMAN YEAR. | 



/ 



g i'mJ 7mn. — Allen and Greenough's Grammar with Jones's First Lessons, k 
| Daily exercise in writing English into Latin. | 

| Second Term. — Caesar's Gallic War (Harper and Tolman). Book I., with | 



thorough Drill in Syntax. 

I SOPHOMORE YEAR. I 

^ . I 

| First Term. — Grammar, with Tomlinson's Questions. Caesar's Gallic | 

War, Books II., III., VI. Sallust's Conspiracy of Catiline. | 

| Prose Composition (Jones). | 

| Second Term. — Select Orations of Cicero. Livy, Book XXI. Composition f 

| continued (Jones). I 

I JUNIOR YEAR. | 

i I 

I Firsi Term.— Prosody. Virgil's yEneid, Books I., II., IV., VI. (Green- ^ 

| ough). History of Rome (Allen). | 

^ Second Term. — Prosody. Odes, Epodes, Epistles and Satires of Horace | 

$ (Lincoln). Cicero's De Amicitia (Reid). | 

^ v 

% % 

v ? 

I III. School of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

| FRESHMAN YEAR.-(See p. 16). § 

^ First Term. — Plane Geometry. | 

| Second Term. — Solid Geometry. Trigonometry. f 

I SENIOR YEAR. I 

| Second Term. — Astronomy (Lectures). ^ 

I ^ 

$ ? 

1 IV. School of Natural Science. i 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. f 

| JP'irs^ Term.— Physiology ( Brand ^ 



S 



Second Term. — Botany (Gray). Zoology (Orton) 






I JUNIOR YEAR. 

I I 

| i^rsZ Term. — Physics (Appleton). | 

| Second Term. — Chemistry (Remsen). | 

^ • ^ 

| SENIOR YEAR. I 

| Second Term. — Geology (Le Conte's Compend). | 

i I 



t £ 

y y 

| CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 23 | 

3 . i 

y I 

V. School of Modern Languages. § 

I FRENCH— FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. | 

? ^ 

| FIRST YEAR. I 

| Edgren's Grammar. Part I. | 

| Oral Practice, with selected readings. f 

| Edgren's Grammar. Part II. | 

| Reading at Sight. Oral Practice, with selected readings. ^ 

| Exercises in Grammar and Composition. | 



SECOND YEAR. 



| GERMAN-FIVE HOURS WEEKLY. f 

I FIRST YEAR. I 

| Meissner's Grammar. Part I. ■ | 

/ y 

| Oral Practice, with selected readings. | 

i SECOND YEAR. | 

| Meissner's Grammar. Part II. | 

| Oral Practice, with selected readings. p 

| Reading at Sight. | 

| Exercises in Grammar and Composition. | 

| \ 

| | 

/ VI. School of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy / 

| and Belles Lettres. | 

| JUNIOR YEAR. f 

| .Firs< Term. — Rhetoric (Welch). English Literature. | 

^ Second Term. — Rhetoric. English Literature. | 

I I 



I SENIOR YEAR 

| P 

| i^Ys£ 7Vm. — Metaphysics (Porter and Bowne). History of Philosophy | 

| (Tennemann). History. | 

| Second Werm— Logic (Jevons). Constitution of United States. Political ^ 

■ Economy (Ely). Philology (Trench). History of Civiliza- f 

% tion (Guizot). Christian Evidences. | 

y v 

i 



y i 

vysy/y/y/y//A'///y/y///y//s//////y///y///y//s//^^^ 



i 24 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 






5 ? 



4 4 



Commercial Department. 

I I 

5 $ 

I | 

Consisting of Book-keeping, Telegraphy, Stenography, and | 
| Type-writing. | 

I BOOK=KEEPING. I 

| Duff's System is taught, and it includes Rail-Road, and Com- | 
| mercial departments ; also Banking in all its branches ; in fact a | 
I thorough course is given in every department of this study. 

| TERMS. | 

| For full course as above, complete, including Life Mem- 

| bership, - $40 00 I 



I Commercial course alone 2500I 

I Books and blanks $4 50 to 8 50 I 

I TELEGRAPHY. I 

I I 

I This branch is directly under the supervision of an experi- | 

I enced Telegrapher, and one who is capable of imparting instruc- | 

I tion from actual experience, in every department of this branch. 1 

I Besides we have a main line extending over eight miles through | 

I the country, doing away with the usual objections, that no one | 

I can learn telegraphy on a short circuit. 

I TERHS. I 

I The tuition in this department, including Life membership, | 
I when completed, either in Bethany or in any office on our cir- f 
I cuit, is $40 00. 
i STENOGRAPHY. 

$ Z 

% Stenography, (Graham's System) is one of the leading re- | . 

I quirements of the aspirant to the many positions among the | 

I office forces of the business world to-day, and permit us to add £ 
% f 

I that the business activities of to-day seek those who are compe- | 

I tent in this line when in need of office assistants. No business | 

I education is complete without this acquirement. | 

I Tuition, for Six Months, including Text-Book, - - $2$ co | 

I By the Month, (per month), (Text-Book, extra $2 00), 5 00 | 

I I 

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CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 25 ^ 

I 

— _ ^ 

TYPE=WRITINQ. | 

This is also a requirement that will always be demanded of | 

the applicant when in search of any position in the Business or | 
Professional fields of labor. Tuition, per month, $5 00. 

All the above are taught in this College, and there are none of | 

them but what are essential to the success of the enterprising | 

young lady or gentleman of business or professional inclinations. | 

Write for information, advising us which department you prefer, | 
and we will gladly furnish information. Address: 

Commercial Department, Bethany College, 

Bethany, W. Va. 




! 

w/ys//ys/s/s/s/sy////sy/y/y//A'///y//^^^ 



| I 

| 26 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

! 1 



i i 

1 Musical Department. 

! 

I The aim and object of the Musical Department of the College | 
| is to give due recognition to the aesthetic faculties in general | 
| culture, and to aid in the symmetrical education of those whose | 

^ lives shall be devoted to the arts. I 

I ^ 

| Music will not be taught as an ornamental branch, but as an | 

| art, as a part of a complete education. It has been placed upon | 

| an equality with other studies in the curriculum, and a regular | 

| and complete course of study in the science of music is provided, | 

| leading to graduation. Teachers' certificates will be granted to | 

| those completing the entire course in theory and history and such | 

| part of an instrumental or vocal course as shall thoroughly pre- | 

| pare the student for teaching. Candidates for graduation must | 

| have spent at least one year in our institution, and must com- | 

| plete the prescribed course, including the work in theory and | 

| history. | 

| DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION. 

1 1 

| I. — Course in Piano. I 

I I 

I II. — Course in Voice Culture. s 



<? 



N 



1 III. — Harmony and Composition. 

IV. — History, Musical Aesthetics and Laws of Acoustics. 

1 PIANO. 1 

| The methods used here are those used by the leading con- | 

| servatories of Europe and America. Each pupil will be treated | 

| individually, as the case may demand. The study is directed 1 

| toward the acquisition of a sure, clean and artistic technique to I 

| expression and phrasing and to intelligent interpretation. With | 

> ^ 

^ these objects in view, only compositions by good composers will | 

| be taught. Especial attention will be paid to performance in | 

| public, to the playing at sight and from memory. | 

| VOICE CULTURE. 1 



^ The training of the individual voice is of the first interest here. | 
I The method selected will be varied according to the special needs | 
| of the pupil. The object will be to train the pupil for either | 



y/s/s///////s/////s/s////////y//////////^^^^ 

% 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



27 | 



church, teaching, concert or stage. In connection with this a | 

sight singing and reading class will be established. The Choral | 

Class, to which all pupils of the College having suitable voices | 

are admitted for a nominal fee, meets once a week, preparing | 

standard choruses, which are given from time to time publicly at | 

the regular recitals. This class also studies an oratorio or opera | 

to be produced at the close of the year. | 

THEORY. | 

The theoretical department includes Harmony, Composition, | 

Analysis, Phrasing, Interpretation, History, Aesthetics, Litera- | 

ture, Laws of Sound, etc., etc. I 

GENERAL INFORMATION. I 

i. Students may enter at any time, but are not enrolled for | 

less than one-half session. | 

2. All tuition is payable in advance, no lessons will be given f 

except on presentation of a receipt from the Bursar of the Col- | 



3. No student is permitted to take part in any public musical 



FREE ADVANTAGES. 



y 

lege, showing all tuition paid to the end of the half session, | 

f 

performance without the consent of the Director. | 

4. Choral and Sight Singing Class once a week. 



I. Recitals of the Department. | 

II. — Lectures by the Director. I 

III. — Sight Singing and Choral Class. ^ 

IV. — The College Library. | 

EXPENSES. I 

Piano or Vocal, two lessons per week, each : I 

Per session, $5500! 

Per half session, 27 50 | 

Use of piano one hour and a half for daily practice : 

Per session, $10 00 | 

Per half session, 5 00 f 

Students in the Musical Department wishing to take studies | 
in any of the prescribed courses can do so by paying $10 00 for | 
each branch taken. | 

The above tuition rates do not include instruction during holi- | 
day vacation. | 

s/s/s/s/s/s/sy//s/s//ys///s//ys/^^^^ 



\*///S///S///S/////S///S/S/S^^^ 

X X 

I 28 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

| 1 



N 






General Information. 



s 






| Bethany College is situated in the Panhandle of West Virginia, | 

| sixteen miles north of Wheeling. The railroad stations for | 

I Bethany are Brilliant, on the Cleveland and Pittsburgh Railroad | 

| (river division), and Wellsburg, on the Wheeling branch of the | 

| Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Railway. From these | 

| stations stages are run to Bethany four times every day by M. | 

I Shaler and J. E. Curtis, who will give prompt attention to any | 

| orders addressed to them, Bethany, W. Va., or address W. P. 1 

| Cowans, Bethany, W. Va. I 

I 



TERMS, VACATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS. 

The College Year consists of two terms, four and a half months i 



| each. It begins on the third (i8th) Monday in September and | 

| ends on the third Thursday in June. In this year there are two I 

| examinations in each class — one in January and the final exam- | 

| ination in June. | 

It is very desirable that applicants for Matriculation present | 

| themselves at the beginning of the session, that there may Le a | 

| convenient arrangement of the classes in the various Depart- | 

| ments or Schools. Students, however, can enter conveniently | 

I at the commencement of the second term, February ist, after I 

§ ■ I 

fc the intermediate examination in January. | 

I REGULAR EXPENSES. 1 

I I 

1 Tuition for forty weeks at $ i oo per week, - - $40 00 | 

I Matriculation fee, for coal, janitor, etc., - - - 10 00 I 

1 Furnished room, with care of room, fuel, etc., - - 2; 00 I 

1 Table board, for the session, 100 00 | 

I s 

I Washing, 10 00 | 

I $185 00 I 

Board may be had IN CLUBS at about $2 00 a week. 



The matriculation fee and tuition MUST be paid at the begin- | 
| ning of each term. | 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 29 | 

1 



REDUCED TUITION. 1 

Young men in any of the religious denominations, who wish to | 

prepare for the ministry, may, on paying the matriculation fee, | 

be admitted into any of the courses at Bethany College at one- | 

half the regular rates of tuition. | 

All applicants for this privilege will be required to present to | 

the Faculty satisfactory written recommendations from their | 

respective congregations, and from well-known ministers of the | 

gospel, certifying that they come under the foregoing conditions, | 

in such form as shall be prescribed by the Faculty. They shall | 

also be required to sign a promissory note to pay the full charge | 

for tuition five years from their withdrawal from the College, | 

provided they do not, in the meantime, devote themselves to the | 

work of the ministry. But this provision for reduction of tuition | 

shall not extend, in any case, beyond one session, except upon | 

the recommendation of the Faculty, and the approval of the | 

Board. 1 

The children of regular ministers of the gospel, of all denomi- | 

nations, shall be admitted to all classes and privileges of the | 

College upon payment of the matriculation fee and one-half the | 

regular charges of tuition. | 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be re- | 

quired to give instruction in the primary classes. | 

CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. | 

The Natural History Cabinet contains some of the Fauna, 1 

Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable collec- | 

tion from Australia, and exchanges with other sections of the | 

country. Also a fine Herbarium of native plants, with many | 

rare ones from other parts of the world, | 

The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains 1 

several thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all | 

parts of the world. | 

The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains rare | 

and valuable collections. | 

APPARATUS. | 

The Philosophical apparatus of the College affords facilities | 

for the illustration of physical principles. | 

The Chemical laboratory is provided with apparatus and | 

chemicals for illustration in the courses offered. I 

I 



"fty///////////s//y///y/////y//^^^^ 

I ^ 

I 30 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE, ^ 

| LITERARY SOCIETIES. f 

There are in connection with the College three societies de- p 

| voted to the cultivation of literary composiiion and oratory: THE p 



: OSSOLIAN (ladies), NEOTROPHIAN and AMERICAN LITERARY ' 



^ Institute. 



I ADELPHIAN SOCIETY. I 

As this society differs in some important respects from a purely § 
| Literary Society, it demands more particular notice. 

As it is a distinguishing feature of Bethany College to make \ 
| the Bible a regular subject of study and daily examination, the | 
| Adelphian Society has been organized in order to promote and I 
| carry out, to the fullest extent, the purposes contemplated in the | 
| department of Bible Literature. | 

| The regular exercises of the Society consist — | 

| FIRST — Of recitations of portions of the Scripture. 
| SECOND — Reading original essays on moral and religious sub- 1 
I jects ; and | 

| THIRD — The delivery of Scriptural discourses, not only before | 
| the Society, but, on suitable occasions, in public. ^ 

I Young men in preparing for the Christian Ministry may derive I 
| incalculable advantages from this Society. From its organiza- | 
| tion, and the character and ability of its members, it is well fitted | 
| to facilitate the acquisition of enlarged views of the Bible, and | 
I the cultivation of a high standard of morality and religion. 



PREPARATORY CLASSES. 



I i 

| There will be, in addition to the regular chairs, instruction in | 
| English Grammar, Arithmetic and beginning Algebra. 

Provision has been made for teachers in book-keeping and 1 

| short-hand. | 

I TERMS OF GRADUATION. f 

| DIFFERENT SCHOOLS. f 

A student may graduate in any school singly. To obtain the f 

| degree GRADUATE in any school, it is required of every candidate: 1 

i. That he shall have been a student of Bethany College at | 

| least one session, and shall have studied in the College the entire | 

• Senior year of the school. 2. That within one month from the | 



i beginning of the session, he shall have made known to the | 

'/s/sy/ys/s/s/s/sy/ys///////^^^ 

I 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 31 | 



"> 



professor of the school his intention of graduating. 3. That he | 
stand a satisfactory examination on all the prescribed studies of | 
the school. I 



HONORARY MASTER'S DEGREE. 



% 



DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF SCIENCES, § 



AND BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY. § 



/ 



To receive the Degree of BACHELOR OF ARTS, BACHELOR OF | 
! Sciences and Bachelor of Philosophy, the candidate must I 
have graduated and received his certificates in the several schools i 
embraced in the respective COURSES. He must also have faith- ^ 
fully observed all the other laws and regulations of the College. | 
He will then receive a degree and a diploma. A fee of ten dollars | 
will be charged for the Diploma. Five dollars to ministerial | 
students. | 

A student who has received a Diploma in any course, in order | 
to obtain a diploma in any other course, shall take up the | 
additional certificate or certificates and pay TEN DOLLARS for the | 
Diploma. \ 

The graduates in the several courses enjoy equally all the | 
privileges, rights and honors of the College. | 

THE MASTER'S DEGREE IN COURSE. I 

In order to obtain the Regular Degree of MASTER OF ARTS, % 

the following conditions are required: 1. The attainment of the f 

Degree of BACHELOR in the course. 2. The actual attendance f 

in the College thereafter for one session and the study of three | 

Elective studies, to be selected by the candidate with the consent | 

of the Faculty. 3. An approved examination of selected studies. | 
A fee of TEN DOLLARS will be charged for the Diploma. 



/ 



A BACHELOR of three years' standing in any one of the courses | 
\ may receive the HONORARY DEGREE OF MASTER in that course: i 
\ provided he shall in the interval have maintained an exemplary | 
\ character, and pursued studies relating to the degree. Candi- & 
\ dates for this degree should apply to the President or Secretary | 
\ of the Faculty before the annual meeting of the Board of I 

I y 

'<, Trustees. i 

No application for the degree of A.M. will be entertained | 

\ unless accompanied by the fee of TEN DOLLARS, which will be \ 

\ re.turned in case the degree is not conferred. I 



I 32 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

| | 

1 SPECIAL COURSE IN ENGINEERING, 

1 

| FOR WHICH A CERTIFICATE IS GIVEN. 1 

1 I 

| For this course no specified time is required, except as de- | 

| manded by previous preparation, and the time necessarily allot- | 

| ted to each branch. I 

I To enter upon the course a thorough knowledge of Algebra, | 

| Geometry and Plane Trigonometry is required. 

i. Land Surveying — Embracing all that is necessary to un- | 

| derstand the subject in its practical bearings with field work, I 

| mapping, etc. 

§ 2. Leveling, Profiling, Mapping. I 

| 3. The Principles of Topographical Surveying and Drawing. | 

4. Descriptive Geometry, with Shades, Shadows and Per- | 
I spective. | 

5. Road and Railroad Surveying — with field operations. 
Certificates will be given indicating the branch studied and the 1 

| degree of proficiency attained. It is very desirable that students | 
| should enter with the regular classes of the Scientific Course. 

THE COLLEGIAN. | 



During the college year the students publish a monthly jour- | 

| nal entitled THE COLLEGIAN. It has attained high rank as a | 

| college paper, and affords excellent means for developing the | 

| literary talent of the students. It deserves a hearty support on | 

| the part of the Alumni and friends of the College. 

I 1 

1 ACCOMMODATIONS. I 

I I 

| Students are permitted to select their own places of boarding, | 

| subject in all cases to the supervision of the Faculty. The facili- | 

| ties for obtaining boarding in private families have been much | 

| increased, and many students can be accommodated in this way. § 

| Every attention will be paid to the health and comfort of the | 

1 students. I 

| To accommodate students who desire to board themselves, | 
s I 

| arrangements have been made to supply a number of unfurnished | 

| rooms at a very moderate rent. Application for these should be | 

| made at an early date, and must be accompanied by satisfactory | 

| testimonials of character. | 

I I 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 33 i 

I 



SCHOOL OF ORATORY. p 

There will be an opportunity, at a moderate charge, for public | 

and private lessons in elocution. This department will be in the | 

hands of an instructor of experience and reputation, and will be | 

conducted in harmony with the most improved methods of culti- | 

vation for voice and gesture. The so-called study of elocution | 

too often means only a labored effort to recite a few selections ^ 

which call for the highest degree of passionate expression. This | 

is not only of no value to the student, but is in so far pernicious | 

as that it is to begin with what should only be attempted as the | 

crowning work of elocutionary training, and might well, in most | 

cases, be omitted altogether. The result is a tiresome failure, | 

and a noble art is brought into disrepute. Few find practical use | 

in life for these finishing touches, however well acquired, which % 

belong to dramatic representation ; while, on the other hand, a ^ 

right use of the voice is essential even to health ; an easy com- | 

mand of the motions of the body is essential to free play of the | 

intellect ; and both are indispensable to a harmonious and grace- | 

ful manhood and womanhood. To cultivate these, with a taste | 

for what is best in letters, is the united aim of the departments | 

of Literature, Rhetoric and Elocution. | 

Each student is required, during his senior and junior years, % 

to prepare and deliver several orations upon assigned subjects, | 

These orations are public, and are subject to general criticism | 

from the Faculty. | 

I 

THE SCHOOL OF ART. i 

Since Bethany has become a school for the higher education ^ 

of women as well as men there has been a decided and growing | 

demand for an art department. For several years capable art | 

teachers have been connected with the College. The art depart- | 

ment is now in charge of Mrs, Bessie C. Trible, who brings to p 

the position superior talents and experience. There is an inter- | 

esting and enthusiastic art class, and the interest and proficiency p 

of this department promises to keep pace with the growth of the ^ 

College in other directions. Thorough instruction is given in | 

perspective drawing, portrait and landscape painting, in oil, | 

crayon, water colors, India ink and all the branches of art. | 

Situated in one of the most beautiful landscapes in America, | 

5 | 






| 34 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



/. 



g 



4 _ — i 



5 A 



Bethany affords rare opportunities for sketching from nature. It | 

p is the purpose and policy of the College to foster the love and | 

t, study of art continually. | 
| TERMS — $18 a term, two lessons a week. 

I ENGLISH MINISTERIAL COURSE. 

| A few men every year are not able to take the full course, yet \ 

| need some preparation for the work of the ministry ; for their I 

| sake the following course, lasting two years, has been arranged : | 

I ' I 

i FIRST YEAR. | 

I I 

p FIRST TERM. — Old Testament History, Church History, Eng- | 

| lish Literature, Special Expository Studies in the New Testament. | 

% SECOND TERM. — New Testament History, Homiletics, Her- f 

| meneutics, Inspiration, Christian Evidences, English Literature. | 

| SECOND YEAR. | 

FIRST TERM.— Old Testament Doctrine, General History, | 
| Mental Science, History of Philosophy. 

| SECOND TERM. — New Testament Doctrine, General History, | 

| Lectures on the History of Christian Doctrine, Logic, Moral | 

I Science, Political Economy. | 
I A certificate will be given in this course, but no degree. 

| A FOUR YEARS' COURSE OF BIBLE STUDY FOR ALL | 
I THE STUDENTS. I 

i ^ $ 

1 It has been determined that every student entering the College ' 



| shall take a course in the study of the Bible. In the Freshman \ 
I year an outline of Bible History, embracing the Old and New 1 

I 



I Testaments, in which Geography, Biography, Archaeology and 

| all the great facts recorded therein, will be studied. In the ] 

| Sophomore year there will be a somewhat close and critical f 

| study of the Old Testament. In the Junior year there will be a | 

| similar study of the New Testament. In the Senior year there | 

| will be special studies in Job, Psalms, Isaiah, Matthew, Acts, | 

| Romans, or such other books as may be selected. The English | 

| Bible will be used as the text-book. Such helps as may be \ 
| needed will be suggested by the teacher. 

1 MISSIONS. | 

I A course of lectures on Missions will be given before the whole | 

I school. This course will cover as fully as practicable all the | 

4/s/sy///y///y//AY/////sy//sy///y^^^ 



I 

CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 35 | 

1 

more important points in the Theory, History and Practice of | 
Christian Missions. The matter is equally important to those | 
who are preparing for work at home and for those who prepare | 
to go abroad. The Missionary Association of the College hold | 
stated meetings to hear reports and original letters from former | 
students and others in the various mission fields, to pray for the | 
increased success of missionary labor, to discuss questions con- | 
nected with the mission work, and, in general, to cultivate an | 
intelligent personal interest in the great enterprise of evangelizing | 
the world. During the past year addresses have been delivered | 
by the secretaries of the different mission boards and by others | 
deeply interested in this cause. A large number of students are | 
prepared to go out when the Lord opens the way. | 

RELIGIOUS EXERCISES. 1 

at eight o'clock. | 

Daily and weekly meetings for prayer and for song and exhor- | 

tation are maintained by the students, | 

The College authorities are anxious to make the College | 

pulpit worthy of its splendid traditions. The regular preacher | 

is a member of the Faculty, other members speak occasionally, | 

and during the year a number of eminent men are invited to | 

spend a Lord's Day in Bethany. The church seeks to contribute | 

to the piety of every student. | 

THE PHILLIPS LOAN FUND OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

This is a fund the purpose of which is to assist students pre- | 

paring for the Ministry in their education, and is loaned to such | 

students at the discretion of a committee of the Faculty. I 

This generous contribution is, it is hoped, but the nucleus of a | 

fund that will be indefinitely increased for this beneficent pur- | 

pose. The good that must result from such a provision is in- | 

calculable. I 

Applicants for assistance from this fund will address President | 

McDiarmid. | 

Courses of lectures addressed to the ministerial students, but I 

open to all, have been delivered during the past session by J. Z. | 

Tyler, H. L.Willett and S, M. Jefferson. Each course consisted | 

of five lectures. During the coming session similar courses | 



The daily morning devotions are held in the College Chapel 



% I 

I 36 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

I . 



" 



I * 



| will be given by F. D. Power, A. B. Philputt, Z. T. Swee- | 

| ney, B. B. Tyler and others. Besides the above, lecture courses f 

| under the management of the Students' Lecture Association | 

| are given each term, to which season tickets are sold at $1.25, | 

I and where such men have been heard as J. De Witt Miller, I 

I Col. George W. Bain, Dr. A. A. Willetts, James Lane Allen, | 
Mrs. Mary A. Livermore, Professor De Mott, etc. 






I LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

I This is a commodious apartment, 30 by 38 feet, well lighted, | 

I and supplied with the best papers and magazines of the day. It | 

I is known to many that our library has twice suffered heavy $ 

$ losses by fire ; it is at present well equipped with encyclopaedias | 

I and other works of reference, and contains besides some two | 

I thousand volumes in miscellaneous literature. Liberal gifts in | 

I books have been made by friends during the past year ; such p 
donations are earnestly solicited and will be at all times grate- | 



% 

I fully acknowledged. | 

I DISCIPLINE. I 



I I 



I Students are expected to conduct themselves as gentlemen, f 
The College does not lay down specific and minute regulations ; | 



I at the same time it hopes that each one will be a law to himself, | 

$ % 

I and that he will do nothing inconsistent with good order, good p 

^ taste and good morals. Should any one act otherwise the | 

I Faculty will take note of the offence at once and deal with the | 

| offender as the best interests of all concerned may require. In | 

I like manner the ladies are expected to act in strict accord with | 

4. ..... r- . , - , % 



\ the principles of propriety and honor. 



^ Each student is required to select from the several schools a 



I course of at least three daily recitations, or the equivalent thereof, p 

| The reason of this requirement is this : If a student is not doing | 

I full work he is interfering with someone else. Upon the request | 

I of parent or guardian, however, or for other good reasons, he | 

; may be exempt from this rule. Any student who fails to attend | 

his classes regularly or to manifest an interest in his work, will | 

be promptly sent home. The College is vastly better off with- | 



■ 

v ~ % 

out those who cumber the ground. Good students must not be § 

\ 

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out those who cumber the ground. Good students must n 
kept back by those who lack either aptitude or application. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 37 I 





FINAL RANK AND GRADUATING HONORS. I 

A record is kept of the daily recitations. At the end of the | 

month each Professor prepares a report of the work of his classes. | 

Absences from class or from chapel exercises, without cause, | 

lower a student's grade. Recitations will begin on the third day | 

of the term. Absences will count from that day. Absences | 

during the first two weeks of the session and during the week | 

before and the week after the Christmas holidays count twice as | 

much as they do afterwards. A record is kept of each exami- | 

nation ; the examinations are taken into ac ;ount in making out | 

the average for the year. | 

The final rank of the graduating class is computed by combin- | 

ing the averages for the several years. Students whose com- | 

bined averages are ninety-three per cent will be enrolled in the | 

Honor List, and this distinction will be noted in the diploma by | 

the words CUM LAUDE. An average of ninety-four per cent | 

entitles a student to MAGNA CUM LAUDE ; an average of 1 

ninety-five per cent to SUMMA CUM LAUDE. The name of no | 

student will appear in the Honor List who has not been a student | 

in the College for at least two years. In the award of honors | 

regard is had to the conduct of the student during his course, and | 

any student who has incurred serious discipline may be debarred | 

from the rank to which otherwise his scholarship would have s 

entitled him. I 

PHYSICAL CULTURE. | 

Bethany, besides being a school of mind and morals, offers | 

some superior facilities for physical culture. Students are not | 

shut up to climbing the College hill or promenading the corridor | 

for exercise. For open air sports there is a base ball ground | 

convenient to the College building; also tennis courts near by, | 

and the College encourages an interest in these excellent recre- | 

ations. In their season opportunities for skating and sledding | 

are frequent. A GYMNASIUM, fitted up with the most approved | 

apparatus, is provided. During the year a competent teacher | 

drilled the students thoroughly in the various exercises and | 

awakened an enthusiasm among them in gymnastic sports. The | 

gymnasium promises great results in the better health and con- | 

sequently better work of the students. It is desired that every | 

student of the College will spend at least TWENTY MINUTES each | 

| 



| I 

^ 38 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 



1 ' 1 

| day in the gymnasium. Hours are set apart for the daily use of | 

1 the gymnasium by the young lady students, and it is expected | 

I that they will make as free use of the gymnasium facilities | 

| as the male students. With such variety of recreations, no I 

| student can lack that diversion and exercise so indispensable to | 

| the enjoyment of college life and success in college work. 

^ _ I 



1 LADIES' BOARDING HALL. 1 

Phillips Hall, the handsome gift of Thomas W. Phillips, of | 

| New Castle, Pa., is a large and commodious building, well | 

| adapted to the wants of young ladies, with capacity to accom- i 

| modate sixty roomers and dining-room capacity for one hundred | 

| boarders. The rooms are nicely carpeted and well furnished | 

I with new and substantial hard wood furniture. It is heated | 

| throughout by steam, has hot and cold water on each floor and | 

| supplied with bath-rooms in basement. The building is situated | 

^ on the College Hill, only a few steps from the College building, | 

| which renders it convenient for the students to study in their | 

I own rooms between class hours. I 

Board is placed at $3.00 a week, and care is taken to provide | 

I the young ladies with a sufficiency of wholesome and palatable | 

I food and to allow them a reasonable freedom of the house in all | 

I respects. Each young lady is expected to bring sheets, pillow- | 

I cases, towels, napkins, napkin ring, fork, teaspoon and lamp. | 

I Oil is furnished at twenty cents a month. | 

I The rooms rent from $60 to $75 a session when occupied by | 

I two; at $50 if occupied by one alone. | 

A deposit of five dollars is required of each roomer as guaran- | 

I tee for preservation of the room and furniture, which is refunded | 

s when the room is vacated if everything is found in proper con- | 

I dition. Under the management of Mrs. Hawkins the aim is to | 

I make this place a home in fact as well as in name. The moral and | 

I spiritual, as well as the intellectual interests of the girls are con- | 

I stantly kept in view. It is sought to inspire the young ladies | 

I with the highest ideals and to promote their growth in character | 

I as well as in mind. HONOR and TRUTH are the main principles | 

1 regarded in the government of the Home. We trust, our girls to 1 

I the utmost, always assuming that they desire to do right and | 

I always relying on sympathy and confidence rather than on rigid | 

I rules to preserve the peace and order of the household. This | 

^ ^ 



'///sy///ys//y/ysys//ys/sys/s^^^^^ 

§ 
CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 39 | 



confidence is rarely disappointed. Girls who have begun to take | 

life in earnest do not need much discipline. Others are not ad- | 

vised to come to Bethany. | 

It is not expected that young ladies in attendance as students % 

of the College will board elsewhere in the village, unless under | 

expressed approval of their parents or guardians with concur- | 

rence of the College Faculty. | 

Further information may be had on addressing Mrs. Georgiana | 

Hawkins. | 



ENTRANCE AND EXAMINATIONS. 



Students desiring to enter any class must give evidence of | 
their being prepared for the work of that class. Students enter- f 



ing from other institutions must bring certificates of the amount | 

and kind of work done. If these are satisfactory to the Faculty, | 
they will be admitted without examination ; otherwise they must 
pass a satisfactory examination in those studies previously taken 

by the class they wish to enter. Any one found to be working | 

at a disadvantage to himself, through inadequate preparation for | 

the class to which he has been admitted, will be required to enter | 



lower. | 



/ 



Special examinations will be held at the close of each term. ', 



/, 



No student will be allowed to enter the next higher class whose | 
examination grade falls below sixty-five. 




i 

'vsy/y//sy/ys////y/y/y/y/y///y/////y/ys^^^ 



<^s/s//ysys//y/y/ys/sysy/y^^^ 

\ \ 

% 40 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 



§ . . . § 

s s 



s 



I • I 

I Regulations. 

^ I 

I _ .. ...... . I 



I In order to contribute to the welfare of all concerned, the | 
| following regulations have been adopted. The Faculty most | 
| earnestly request the co-operation of parents and guardians in | 



| their enforcement : | 

I NUMBER OF STUDIES. 1 

A student must have at least THREE studies, unless upon the | 

| written request of parent or guardian, or for good cause shown, | 
| the Faculty shall allow him to take a less number. 

| ABSENCE FROM RECITATIONS. | 

| A student is not permitted to absent himself from any recita- | 

| tion or examination without valid excuse, nor from the College | 

s I 

| without special leave from the Faculty. | 

I WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE. 1 

No portion of the student's college fees is refunded on account | 

| of withdrawal from the College, unless the withdrawal be ren- | 

| dered necessary by ill-health. | 

| MONTHLY REPORTS. | 

I I 

| At the end of each month a report is sent by the Faculty to | 

| the parent or guardian of each student, in which are stated his | 

| grades and absences from recitations and examinations, together | 

| with such other information as to the student's progress and | 

| conduct as it may be deemed proper to communicate, or as the | 

| parent or guardian may especially request. The object of such | 

| reports is to incite the students to diligence by eliciting the | 

| commendation and encouragement of his friends, and to restrain | 

| him from idleness and disorder, or to urge him to amendment by | 

| their admonition and advice. The usefulness of the reports | 

| greatly depends upon the prompt and judicious attention they | 

| receive from those to whom they are addressed. Parents and | 

| guardians therefore cannot be too earnest or prompt in commu- | 

| nicating such advice or encouragement as the monthly reports | 

| may suggest. | 

^ ^ 



'///s///AY///sys/AY//ys/A'/y/y/////ys////y//^^^ 

4. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 41 f 

v. 



CONDUCT. 

The laws of the College require from every student decorous, 



sober and upright conduct as long as he remains a member of | 

the College, whether he be within the. precincts or not. They | 

strictly forbid drunkenness, gaming, dissoluteness, swearing, | 

habits of expense and the introduction of wine or other intoxi- | 

eating drinks into the town or College. They require a proper | 

observance of the Lord's Day. They forbid the use or posses- | 

sion of pistols or other weapons and the introduction of them | 

into the College precincts. f 

EXCLUSION OF A STUDENT FROM THE COLLEGE. f 

If in the opinion of the Faculty any student is not fulfilling ^ 

the purposes for which he ought to have come to the College, f 

and is not likely to fulfill them, either from habitual delinquency | 

in any of his classes or from habitual idleness, or from any other | 

bad habit, the Faculty may require him to withdraw from the | 
College, after informing him of the objections to his conduct and 
affording him an opportunity of explanation and defense. 



PROHIBITION OF CREDIT. 

The Faculty wish to urge parents and guardians not to allow ^ 
students to contract debts to any large amount. Such funds as | 
are necessary ought to be promptly furnished. It should be | 
borne in mind that too much money is likely to lead to drinking, | 
to gambling, and to other bad habits. No student need spend | 
over three hundred dollars a year ; the majority of the students | 
spend much less than this sum. | 

One-half the expenses of the College year must be paid at | 
the opening of the first term, the other half at the opening of the | 
second term. The matriculation and tuition fee must be paid | 
invariably in advance. Before entering clas^ a student will be 
required to show his matriculation card. THOSE HOLDING 
SCHOLARSHIPS WILL BE REQUIRED TO PRESENT THE SCHOLAR- 



SHIP IN ORDER TO RECEIVE CREDIT FOR THE SAME. $ 

! 



v'//y/y/y/ys/s//y//Ay/j/s//y/y//s/^^^ 



, 42 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. g 

I 1 

I 



« 



Bethany College 



| Appeals to its friends for patronage, and presents the following 
I advantages : 



i. There is no saloon within seven miles of the place. 

2. EXPENSES ARE LOW. With simple tastes and habits one 
| can live as cheaply in Bethany as in anyplace on the continent. 
I The College fees are less than half those charged in Eastern 
| colleges. 

3. The College has a large and commodious building, and is 
I not therefore hampered for room, either for class work or for its 
I societies. 

I 4. The HEALTHFULNESS of THE LOCATION. It is in the 
I midst of an elevated region, where there is pure air, good water, 
I and perfect exemption from malaria and intermittent, congestive 
I and malignant fevers, so prevalent in some parts of the country. 
I k. Bethany has a large and learned body of Alumni. 
I Many of these have become distinguished in the editorial chair, 
I on the bench, at the bar, in the halls of legislation, at the pro- 
| fessor's desk and in the pulpit. The student is admitted to this 
^ reputation already achieved for him, as soon as he completes his 
^ college course, and it is worth a great deal to him. 
I 6. The character of the instruction. The students 
I are taught to prize truth above rubies, and to seek for it as for 
I hidden treasures. They are urged to hold fast to all that has 
^ been proved, and at the same time to keep their minds open to 
i all new truth, whether it be found on Christian or on Pagan 
I ground. They are taught to call no man master. Wordsworth 
I says: " Liberty has two voices, one of the mountain and one 
I of the sea." There is an air of freedom in the magnificent hills 

that stand around Bethany. 

7. THE BETHANY PULPIT. The pulpit has been a feature in I 

Bethany from the first. Such men as Alexander Campbell, W. | 
I K. Pendleton, Robert Richardson, C. L. Loos, W. H. Woolery, | 
1 J. M. Trible and F. M. Dowling have preached regularly. It f 
^ will still be filled from the Faculty. 

t7//s///s//ys/s///s/sy/y/ysys////ys/s///^^^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 43 | 

I 

8. Literary Societies. Of Bethany, Prof. Radford said: | 
" Here is one College at least which is not permitting oratory to | 
become a lost art. The traditions of the place are all against | 
such ignoble decadence. Some of our colleges and universities | 
are coming to neglect or even disparage oratory as a mere ac- | 
complishment, and the silly notion has somewhat afflicted the | 
pulpit and the bar. The very air at Bethany fosters eloquence." | 

9. Quality has ever been the first consideration with | 
BETHANY. It is true that the attendance for the past session | 
was larger than ever before, and for the coming session it prom- | 
ises to be much larger yet. Still it is but truth to say that | 
Bethany hardly aspires to be a great school, as some count great- | 
ness — great in the number of names on its register. It rather | 
rejoices to be enrolled among the small colleges of our country. | 
The small college has played a great part in American education | 
and history. It is more than doubtful that so good results would | 
have come if our colleges had been fewer and larger. The uni- | 
versify has its mission, but it will not be well for our generation | 
if it is made to supplant the college, or if our colleges all aspire | 
to be universities. The ambition of magnitude so common to | 
our colleges is not altogether a matter of congratulation. A | 
college is to be judged more by the character than the number | 
of its students. Mammoth schools, like other mammoth concerns, | 
may serve well for advertising ends, but they are likely to turn | 
out a large proportion of men who, however they may count in | 
the catalogue, count for very little in the world's work. 

10. Bethany College has a great environment. The | 
surrounding country is one of extraordinary natural beauty. 

Where can be found a fairer scene than that which opens to | 
us as we stand on the steps or walk the corridor of the college | 
building ? Noble hills, which do not rush abruptly to their really | 
mountainous height, but rise to it by gentle gradations which | 
give them a rounded and finished aspect and besides make them | 
green pastures to their very summits through all the seasons ; | 
valleys fair and fragrant, through which the shadowy waters of | 
' ' old Buffalo ' ' wander riverward forever — but why try to describe | 
in cold type that which only poet's or painter's power can por- | 
tray ? Who that has seen can ever forget this picturesque and | 
perfect landscape'? "The veriest clod that ever vegetated" | 
could not contemplate these scenes continually without some | 

^\AAA\V\\\\\\\\\\\\^\\\\A\\\\\^^ 



///////s///////s/////////s///s//////////y////Ay/AV/Ay^ 

I ^ 

I 44 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. | 

; 

I ^ 

| elevation and enlargement of mind. Rarely does nature bestow | 
| on any one spot so various charms with so lavish hand. Added f 
i to these natural attractions are the traditions and associations | 

l — — ——-.... 



| which linger about the place. The memory of those great souls 

| who lived and labored at Bethany is kept green among us. ; 

| Their ashes rest amid these fruitful and peaceful hills. Their I 

| ideas and aims still hover in the air. The very atmosphere of 1 
| such a place is an education in itself. 

n. Bethany and the Ministry. From its foundation, the | 

^ College has attracted those who desire to prepare themselves for 1 

| gospel ministry. So true is this, that it is sometimes supposed | 

| to be chiefly, if not wholly, a school for students for the ministry, i 

| It is, in fact, much more than this : it is a college in the full | 

| sense, educating men not for one calling only, but for all the voca- | 

| tions of life. It has eminent alumni in all the professions. It is, | 
p however, eminently a school for the training of preachers. 



Robert Moffett said once that there seems to be something in the | 



| air at Bethany which inclines men to preach. So far as our | 

| knowledge goes, no one ever came to Bethany with the inten- | 

| tioh of devoting his life to the ministry and changed that inten- | 

| tion after coming here, while it is a thing of frequent occurrence | 

| that one who comes with his mind set on some other profession | 

I resolves after being in the College awhile to give himself to the | 

!< work of the ministry. No particular pressure is brought to bear I 

| to this end. It is in the air ; all the associations and influences | 

| of the place are favorable to the ministry. Bethany exalts the | 

| ministerial office. A ministerial student is held in at least equal | 

| honor with any other, while his intimate association with other | 

| students of the College and his instruction in the same classes | 

| and studies with the rest corrects all tendency to clerical taste. | 

| Bethany aims to make young men, first of all, students and | 

I scholars. Before entering upon the strictly ministerial studies, | 

I the student is drilled in the classical and disciplinary studies as | 

| are other students. The design of this is to bring them to a de- I 

p gree of maturity and independence of mind before beginning the i 
| special ministerial studies. The propriety of this is obvious. 

I ! 

? V, 

? V, 

i • I 

i I 



>*K*O*>0*?'*$*>i?OO0*X**X$*X>**^X$*X>i^ 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



45 



CALENDAR. 

For i8o3='o4. 



J 



Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and 

Wednesday, before the third Thursday in June | 
Annual Commencement, . . on the third Thursday in June | 
Session begins, ..... 
Christmas recess begins at i P. M., . 
Christmas recess ends, 
First term ends, ..... 
Second term begins, . . . - . 
Anniversary of Neotrophian Society, 
Anniversary of American Literary Institute, 
Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, 
| Field Day, . 



September 18 1 

1 
December 21 | 

* • I 
January 3 | 

January 31 | 

February 1 | 

I 
November ; | 

I 
November 10 s 

I 
February 22 | 



§ Class Day, 



. Tuesday before Commencement | 
Wednesday before Commencement | 



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:atalogue 



OF 





ETHANY 
COLLEGE . . . 



FOR THE 



FIFTY-THIR6 session, 



Ending June 21, 1894. 



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THE H. IV. ROKKER PRINTING HOUSE, SPRINGFIELD, ILL 



porms of Bequests. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, 

Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of 

thousand dollars, to he safely invested by them as an endow- 
ment, the interest only of which is to be used for the support 
of the College. 

I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, 

Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of 

thousand dollars, to be applied, at their discretion, for the 
general purposes of the College. 

/ give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College A 

Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of 

thousand dollars, to be safely invested by them, and the interest 
only applied, at their discretion, to aid deserving students in 
any course in the College. 



CATALOGUE 



OF 



Bethany College 



FOR THE 



Fifty-Third Session, Ending June 21, 1894, 



WITH THE 



Course of Study and Annual Announcement 



FOR !894-'95. 



OPEN TO YOUNG MEN AND YOUNG WOMEN ON EQUAL TERMS. 



BETHANY, WEST VIRGINIA 

1894. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Board of Trustees. 



A. McLean, 

W. K. Pendleton, 

j. w. mulholland, . 

John Campbell, 

Hon. Geo. H. Anderson, 

Judge John A. Campbell, 

H. K. Pendleton, 

A. W. Campbell, 

J. E. Curtis, 

Dr. J. E. Whitsett, 

R. Moffett, 

F. D. Power, . 

Alex. Campbell, 

Charles Shields, . 

Judge L. Bacon, 

George T. Oliver. 

J. H. Jones, 

Russell Errett, 

W. C. Lyne, 

Thomas W. Phillips, 

Dr. Roger Williams, 

John C. Palmer, 

J. J. Barclay, 

R. S. Latimer, 

George Darsie, 

Dr.- I. M. Ridge, 

S. M. Cooper, 

M. M. Cochran, . . 

Oliver Marshall, 

C. B. Scott, 



Bethany, W. Va. 
Eustis, Fla. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
St. Thomas, Ontario. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Perryopolis, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Washington, D. C. ' 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Alliance, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W Va. 
Tangier, Morocco. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 



Executive Committee. 



HUGH McDIARMID, 
S. M. JEFFERSON, 



A. C. PENDLETON 

R. H. WYNNE, 



J. E. CURTIS. 

J. C. PALMER, Treasurer. 

MISS A. C. PENDLETON, 
Librarian and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 

B. T. BLANPIED, 
Curator of the Museum and Secretary of the Faculty. 



S. M. JEFFERSON, Bursar. 
J. T. T. HUNDLEY, Financial Agent. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 3 



Faculty of I894-'95. 



HUGH McDIARMID, A. M., President, 

And Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Church History. 



W. K. PENDLETON, LL. D., 

President Emeritus. 



A. C. PENDLETON, A. M., 

Professor of Modern Languages, Rhetoric and English Literature. 



OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics, Astronomy and Civil Engineering. 



B. T. BLANPIED, A. M., 

Professor of Natural Science. 



R. H. WYNNE, A. M., 
Professor of Hebrew. 



S. M. JEFFERSON, A. M., 

Professor of Biblical Literature. 



GEORGE W. BOTSFORD, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Greek Language, History and Literature. 



Professor of Latin Language, History and Literature. 



MRS. BESSIE C. TRIBLE, 

Professor of Drawing and Painting. 



EUGENE FEUCHTINGER, A. M., 

Director of Music. 



>To be filled. 



B. BROWN, Jr., 
Instructor in Elocution and Oratory 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Students of the Fifty-Third Session. 



SENIORS 



Allen, H. W., 
Anderson, J. C, 
Billingsley, W. H., . 
Bowman, Ina, 
Brandenburg, W. H., 
Buckley, Harry, . 
Chapman, F. A., 
Creighton, Allen B., 
Cunningham, W. D., 
Darsie, Charles, . 
Farrar, Bessie B., 
Fortier, Grace, 
Hickman, B. T., 
Jinnett, W. R., . 
Johnson, G. C, 
Jones, C. E., 
McGrew, Grace, 
Meyer, Louise J., 
Mendel, Mamie K., 
Miller, Minnie, 
Moore, Zuinglius, 
Pre witt, H. M., 
Patton, R. M., 
Pritchard, C. W., 
Reeves, W. E., 
Scott, M. M., 
Townsend, H. L., 
Vodrey, Harry, 
Wayman, J. E. W., 
Wilfley, Earle, . 
Wilson, Allen, 
Woolery, Linnie K., 

Appleton, Margaret, 
Auxter, Gertrude E., 
Barclay, Julian T., . 
Campbell, Argyle, — 
Chapman, W. C, 



JUNIOKS 



St. Louis, Mo. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
California, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Dayton, O. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Holliday's Cove, W. Va. 
Malvern, O. 
Dawson, Pa. 
Versailles, Ky. 
Richmond, Va. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Dudley, N. C. 
Hattonia, O. 
Greensburg, Pa. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Rocky Fork, O. 
Beallsville, O. 
Mt. Sterling, Ky. 
-Somerset, Pa. 
New Lisbon, O. 
Burlington, Kansas. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Angola, Ind. 
East Liverpool, O. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Salida, Colorado. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

Dayton, O. 
Elmore, O. 
Tangier, Morocco. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Higginsville, Mo. 



1 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



5 



Charlton, W. G., 
Darsie, Burns, — 
Darsie, Clyde, —r— 

Forner, T. J., 

Gans, W. L., T~ 
Groves. Pearl, 
Jobes, Margaret, *- 
Johnson, Philip, — 
Joyce, J. A., 
Kimmell, Ira W.. * 
Lewis, T. S., 
Madden, Milton B., 
McDiarmid, Errett, 
Merryman, J. E., 
Mertz, H. G., 

Morris, Ada, * 

Morris, J. C, — r~ 
.Sapp, F. B., .- 
Taylor, Bessie, -r— 
Williams, J. F., 



Mapleton, Ontario. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Versailles, Ky. 
Wellsville. O. 
Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 
Hamilton, O. 
Claysville, Pa. 
Lanesville, Va. 
Chicago, 111. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Washington, Pa. 
Topeka, Kansas. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Steubenville, O. 
Shelby, O. 
Shelby, O. 
Gladesville, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Barnsville, O. 



SOPHOMORES. 



Bamber, Robert J., 
Bonar, Robert, Jr., 
Brown, B., Jr., 
Canby, J. A., 
Clopper, E. !N., 
Davis, Clemons H., 
Echols, Clarence, 
Folks, W. F., 
Frew, Gertrude, 
Gilmore, George, 
Gise, Robert, 
Guy, Hugh, 
Hadsall, J. C, 
Harris, E. C, 
Hart, Everest, 
Hedrick, Glenn, . 
Hundley, Maury, 
Hull, J. D., 
Ice, A. E., 
Johnson, Zilla, 
Keltch, Henry F., 
Lutton, Robert C, 
McClure, S., . 
McDiarmid, Ethel, 
Merryman, R. H., 






Flanagan, 111. 
West Liberty, W. Va. 
Willshire, O. 
Soho, W. Va. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Hartwell, O. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Washington, D. C. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Massillon, O. 
Leon, Kansas. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Flushing, O. 
W r illiamsport, Pa. 
Sweet Springs, Mo., 
Dunnsville, Va. 
Mansfield, O. 
Belvoir, Kansas. 
Hattonia. O. 
Conoway, W. Va. 
Cincinnati, O. 
McKeesport, Pa. 
Bethany, W, Va. 
St. Louis, Mo. 






6 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Moore, Luther, 
Moore, C. R., 
Moss, J. A., 
Picton, T. G., 
Powell, W. E., . 
Robertson, M. F. B., 
Robertson, J. F., 
Saum, H. C, 
Stewart, J. W., . 
Stewart, J. F., 
♦ Stickley, Ethel, . 
Wallace, H. W., 
Willett, L. G., . . 
Yarborough, W. T., 



Beallsville, O. 
Proctor, W. Va. 
Newport News, Ya. 
Plymouth, Pa. 
Hampton, Va. 
Rensselaer, Mo. 
Rensselaer. Mo. 
Saumsville, Va. 
Pleasant Valley, W. Va. 
Union City, Ind. 
Woodstock, Va. 
Steubenville, O. 
Ionia, Mich. 
Richmond. Va. 



FRESHMEN. 



Banting, Emma, 
Boyer, S. M., 
Cameron, A. M., 
Chapman, A. C, 
Chapman, fCora. 
Cobb, George A., 
Crawford, E. E., 
Crisp, G. T., 
Davis, Charles T., 
Dimond, Sarah E., 
Eagon, Elmer, E., . 
Ferrall, Emma, . 
Hostetter, V. G., 
Hundley, Proctor, 
Mansell, W. B., 
Martin, K. W., . 
McDiarmid, Norman, 
Mendel, D. G., . 
Miller, H. N., 
Miller, Mary B., 
Moorehouse, R. J., . 
Perkins, A. L , 
Ralston, Catharine, 
Rice, L. G., 
Ricks, R. L., 
Sala, J. P., 
Scott, Goldie, M., . 
Scott, OlaD., 
Scott, Zona L., 
Shull, C. E., 
Snider, Martin A., . 



Elmore, O. 

Woodstock, Va. 

Millersburg, O. 

Donley, Pa. 

Donley, Pa. 

Ashland, Iowa. 

P. E. I. 

Higginsville, Mo. 

Sidney, 111. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Quaker City, O. 

New Lisbon, O. 

Minerva, O. 

Dunnsville, Va. 

Bellaire, O. 

Sullivan, Ind. 

Bethany W, Va. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Amity, Pa. 

Elmore, O. 

New Cumberland, W. Va. 

Alledonia, O. 

West Alexandria, Pa. 

Richmond, Ky. 

Worden, 111. 

Minerva, O. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Rich Valley, Ind. 

Kokomo. Ind. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Spear, M. S., 
Titus, C. B., 
Trible, John M., 
Turner, W. D., 
Ward, David, 
Watson, J. E., 
Whitaker, O. T.. 
Wilhelm, Harry, 
Wynne, Edmund, 



Glen Easton, Pa. 
Harper, Kansas. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Moundsville, W. Va. 
Kokomo, Ind. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Trombley, O. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Bealle, A., 
Berger, Goldie, 
Biesecker, Mrs. May, 
Brashear, Fannie, 
Brice, Etta, . 
Brown, Laura, 
Chapman, Ella, 
Charlton, V. K., 
Dawson, P. C, 
Dimond, Jessie A., 
Fickeisen, Ada B.. 
Fickeisen, A. G., 
Fickeisen, Eleanor. 
Hassellkus, Mamie, 
Hupp. John, . 
Jefferson, Mrs. S. M 
Johnson, Mattie, 
Joyce. Mattie, 
Justice, A. E., 
Kinosita, George G.. 
Lewis, Mary, 
Lewis. Alia, 
Mast, Bertha, 
Mclntyre, Sallie. 
Ohotsuka, Frank, 
Oram, Etta, 
Oram, Lila, 
Porter, May, 
Shriver, Eva, 
Tilcock, H., 
Vogel, Daisy, 
Ward, Anna, 
Whitmore, Maud. 
Wright. Sue, 



Uniontown, Pa. 
Canton, O. 
Somerset, Pa. 
New Haven, Pa. 
Dayton, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Higginsville, Mo. 
Mapleton, Ontario. 
Rudy, Ark. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Elmore, O. 
Bethany, W. Va, 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Hattonia, O. 
Chicago, 111. 
Dutch Fork, Pa. 
Akita, Japan. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Millersburg, O. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Japan. 

Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Australia. 
Somerset, Pa. 
Kokomo, Ind. 
Topeka, Kansas. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 






8 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Graduates of the Fifty-Third Session 



BACHELORS OF ARTS. 

Allen, H. W., .... Missouri. 

Anderson, J. C, . . West Virginia. 

Brandenburg, W. H., . . . Ohio. 

Buckley, Harry, . . . West Virginia. 

Cunningham, W. D., . . Pennsylvania. 

Darsie, Charles, . . . Kentucky. 

Farrar, Bessie B., . . . Virginia. 

Jinnett, W. K., North Carolina. 

Johnson, G. C, . . . . Ohio. 

Moore, Z., . . . . Ohio. 

Patton, R. M, . . . . Pennsylvania. 

Reeves, W. E., . . . Kansas. 

Scott, M. M., . . . . West Virginia. 

Townsend, H. L., . . . Indiana. 

Vodrey, H. W., . . . . Ohio. 

Wayman, J. E. W., . . West Virginia. 

Wilfley, Earle, .... Missouri. 

Wilson, Allen, . . . Pennsylvania. 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE. 

Chapman, F. A., . . . West Virginia. 

Creighton, A. B., . . . Ohio. 

Prewitt, H. M., . . . . Kentucky. 

Pritchard, C. W., . . Ohio. 

BACHELORS OF PHILOSOPHY. 

Bowman, Ina. .... West Virginia. 

Fortier, Grace, . . . Michigan. 

Hickman, B. T., ... Kansas. 

Jones, C. E., . . . . Pennsylvania. 

McGrew, Grace, .... Pennsylvania. 

Mendel, Mamie K., . . \ West Virginia. 

Meyer, Louise J., . . . West Virginia. 

Miller, Minnie, . . . Ohio. 

BACHELOR OF 3IUSIC. 

Woolery, Linnie K., . . . West Virginia. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



9 



HONOR LIST. 

Cum Laude. 

Scott, M. M. 
Mendel, M. K. 
Meyer, L. J. 
Farrar, B. B. 

Magna Cum Laude. 

Johnson, G. C. 
Miller, Minnie. 

Summa Cum Laude. 

Townsend, H. L. 
Wayman, J. E. W. 






SUMMARY 



Seniors, 

Juniors, 

Sophomores, 

Freshmen, 

Special, 



32 

25 
39 
40 
34 



Total, 



170 



10 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Courses of Study. 



Bethany College has four separate courses : The Classical and 

the Ministerial, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts ; the 

Scientific, to Bachelor of Science ; and the Literaiy, to Bachelor of 
Letters. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

This course embraces the following studies : Greek Language, His- 
tory and Literature ; Latin Language, History and Literature ; 
Mathematics and Astronomy ; Natural Science ; Mental and Moral 
Science, Political Economy and Belles Letters. 



Department of the Greek Language, History and Literature* 

Freshman Year. 

First Term— -Greek Primer (Frost). First Greek Reader (Moss), and 
Greek Grammar (Goodwin). 
Second Term — Xenophon's Anabasis (Harper and Wallace). Greek Prose 
Composition (Woodruff). 

Sophomore Yeah. 

First Term — Xenophon's Anabasis and Prose Composition. Studies in 
Syntax and Systematic Analysis of Forms. 
Second Term — Select Orations of Lysias (Bristol). Studies in Greek 
Public and, Private Life. 

Junior Year. 

First Term — Select Orations of Lysias. Grecian History (Fyffe). 
Isocrates (Felton). 
Second Term— Homer's Odyssey (Perrin). Studies in Greek Literary 
Style. 

Senior Year. 

First Term — Plato's Apology and Crito (Dyer). History of Greek Phi- 
losophy. Sophocles, GSdipus Tyrannus. 
Second Term— Primer of Greek Literature (Jebb). Development of the 
Athenian Constitution (Botsford). 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 11 



Department of the Latin Language, History and Literature. 

Freshman Yeah. 

First Term— The Beginner's Latin Book (Collar and Daniell). 
Second Term — The Beginner's Latin Book. Caesar. 

Sophomore Y t ear. 

First Term — Cassar. Latin Grammar (Allen and Greenough). Prose 
Composition (Daniell). 
Second Term— Select Orations of Cicero. Prose Composition. 

Junior Year. 

First Term — Virgil (Greenough). Classical Mythology. 
Second Term— Odes of Horace. Studies in Latin Prosody and Literary 
Style. 

Senior Year. 

First Term — Germania of Tacitus. Studies in Primitive Aryan History. 
Second Term— Development of the Roman Constitution (Tighe). Ro- 
man History (Allen). 



Department of Mathematics and Astronomy. 

This embraces a course of Pure and Applied Mathematics as- 
given in the following schedule. The text books used are indicated in 
parentheses. 

. Freshman Year. 

First Term — Plane Geometry (Wentworth). 
Second Term — Geometry. Trigonometry (Wentworth, Jones' Tables). 

Sophomore Year. 

'First Term — Higher Algebra (Wentworth). 
Second Term — Land Surveying (Gillespie). 

Junior Year. 

First Term— General Geometry, Differential Calculus (Olney). 
Second Term — Integral Calculus. Calculus applied to General Geometry 
(Olney). 
Calculus is elective in this course. 

Senior Year. 

First Term — Mechanics (Kemper). 
Second Term — Astronomy (Young). 



12 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Any one wishing to enter a class in applied Mathematics must first 
become familiar with those branches of pure Mathematics upon which 
the applied depends for its principles. The courses are so arranged 
that ho student, pursuing them in the order indicated and with the 
thoroughness required, will encounter serious difficulty. 

In Land Surveying and in Roads and Railroads special attention is 
given to field work and mapping. Students in the latter class will be 
required to lay out curves, and make calculations for excavations, em- 
bankments and transportation of earth, to make plots, tracings and 
blue prints, to practice the use of the pantagraph and planimeter, 
and in general to become familiar with the methods of both field and 
office work. 

To enter the Freshman class in Mathematics, the applicant must be 
familiar with the rules and methods of treatment of Quadratic Equa- 
tions, Progressions, Variations and Logarithms. When sufficient evi- 
dence of preparation cannot be given, an examination will be required 
on the subject as presented in Wentworth's School Algebra. 

A small fee, to be paid before entering the class, is charged for the 
use of the instruments and drawing room: in Descriptive Geometry 
$2.00, in Surveying and in Roads and Railroads $3.00 each. 



Department of Natural Science. 

Freshman Year. 

Second Term — Botany (Gray). 

Sophomore Year. 

First Term — Physiology (Brand). 
Second Term — Zoology (Orton). 

Junior Year. 

First Term — Physics (Appleton). 
Second Term — Chemistry (Remsen). 

Senior Year. 

Second Term— Geology (Le Conte's Compend). 

A fee of $10.00 to cover the expense of chemicals and apparatus used, 
to be paid before entering the class, is charged to all students taking 
practical chemistry. 

A course in Quantitative Analysis and Assaying has been arranged, 
open only to those who have taken the previous Laboratory work. An 
additional fee of $5.00 is charged to those taking this course. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 13 



Department of Mental and Moral Science, Political Econ- 
omy and Belles Letters. 

Senior Year. 

First Term — Mental Science (Hill). History of Philosophy. Rhetoric 

(Welsh). 

Second Term— Logic (Jevons). Moral Science (Robinson). Political 
Economy (Ely). Christian Evidences (Fisher). English 
Literature, (Meiklejohn's English Language, Part 10). 
See Classical Course in the Synoptical View. 






SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science. 

This course embraces the following studies: Latin, same as the 
Freshman Year of the Classical Course ; Mathematics and Astronomy, 
same as the Classical Course, with the addition, in the Junior Year, of 
Descriptive Geometry (Church, Waldo), and of Roads and Railroads 
(Gillespie, Henck's Field Book), and of Calculus required; Natural Sci- 
ences, same as the Classical Course, with the addition of Chemistry 
(Laboratory) first term, Senior Year ; Mental and Moral Science, Po- 
litical Economy and Belles Lettres, same as the Classical Course : and 
the Modern Languages, as follows : 

Department of Modern Languages. 

FRENCH— Five Hours Weekly. 

Feeshman Year. 

Minimum French Grammar and Reader (Joynes). 
French Fairy Tales (Joynes). 
Materials for French Composition (Grandgent). 
Champfleury's Le Violon de Faeence (Bevenot). 
Moliere's Misanthrope (Joynes). 

Sophomore Year. 

Minimum French Grammar and Reader (Joynes). 

Materials for French Composition (Grandgent). 

Practice by the class in off-hand translating from sight-reading aloud. 

Hugo's Hernani (Matzke). 

Pailleron's Le;Monde ou l'on s'ennuie (Pendleton). 

Oral Practice throughout. 



14 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

GERMAN— Five Hours Weekly. 
Sophomore Year. 

Joynes-Meissner's German Grammar. Part I. 
Joynes' German Reader. 

Selections from German Novelettes (Bernhardt). 
Oral Practice and Composition. 

Junior Year. 

Joynes-Meissner's German Grammar. Part II. 
Schiller's Wilhelm Tell (Deering). 
Mariitt's Amtmanns Magd. 

Composition and practice in speaking, and in off-hand translatinj 
from sight-reading aloud, by the class. 
See Scientific Course, in Synoptical View. 



MINISTERIAL COURSE. 

This course, as fully exhibited in the Synoptical View, embraces 
most of the studies of the Classical Course, and includes, besides, the 
studies of the Departments of Biblical Languages, Biblical Litera- 
ture, and Church History, as exhibited below. 

Department of Biblical Languages. 

HEBREW. 

Junior Year. 

First Term — Hebrew Method and Manual (Harper). 
Second Term— Elements of Hebrew (Harper). 

Senior Year. 

First Term— Selections from O. T., Etymology and Syntax. 
Second Term— Selections from O. T., Etymology and Syntax 

GREEK. 

Senior Year. 

Second Term— New Testament Greek (Simcox). 

Department of Biblical Literature. 

Sophomore Year. 

First Term— Introduction to the Old Testament (Wright). 
■Second Term— Introduction to the New Testament (Dods). 

Junior Year. 

First Term — Biblical Hermeneutics (Terry). 

Biblical Exegesis (Galatians, Stevens). 
■Second Term— New Testament Theology (Adeney). 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 15 



Senior Year. 

First Term— Systematic Theology (Stearns). 
Second Term— Homiletics (Phelps). 

Pastoral Theology (Hoppin). 

The instruction in this department recognizes and appreciates the 
facts and truths both of Natural Theology and of Ethnic Theology, but 
devotes itself mainly to the exposition and applications of Biblical 
Theology. The controlling purpose is to lead the student to an accu- 
rate and complete knowledge of the Sacred Scriptures themselves, re- 
garded especially as the faithful record of the progressive self-revela- 
tions of God, in history, as the God of Redemption. 

The particular studies pursued in this department call for no com- 
ment here; but it may be well to state that Biblical Introduction, as 
here taught, includes the general facts and principles of Biblical 
Canonics and of Biblical Criticism, as well as the more specific matters 
of the authorship, the time and place of writing, the purpose, the plan, 
the contents, and the style of the several books. 

Department of Church History. 

Great importance is attached to Church History. Especial attention 
is paid to the history of the church till the Council of Nice A. D. 325, 
the Rise and Growth of the Papacy to A. D. 1073, the Reformation, 
and Recent Reformatory Movements. This is supplemented by a 
course of Lectures on Christian Doctrine, embracing a special study of 
the great Doctrinal Epochs in the history of the Church. Fisher's 
History of the Christian Church is used as a text-book, while Neander, 
Mosheim and Schaff are recommended as works of reference. 






LITERARY COURSE. 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Letters. 

This course embraces the following studies : Latin Language, His- 
tory, and Literature, same as the Classical Course; Mathematics, same 
as Freshman Year of the Classical Course, and Lectures on Astronomy 
in Senior Year; Natural Sciences, same as the Classical Course; Mod- 
ern Languages, same as the Scientific Course : Mental and Moral Sci- 
ence, Political Economy and Cburch History; Rhetoric and English 
Literature, and Biblical Introduction. 

See Literary Course, in Synoptical View. 






PREPARATORY CLASSES. 

In addition to the regular courses, instruction is given in English 
Grammar, Arithmetic and Elementary Algebra, in preparation for the 
Freshman Year. 



16 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Department of Music. 



The aim and object of this Department of the college is to give 
due recognition to the aesthetic faculties in general culture, and to aid 
in the symmetrical education of those whose lives shall be devoted 
to the Arts. 

Music is not taught as an ornamental branch, but as an art — as a 
part of a complete education. It is placed upon an equality with 
other studies in the curriculum, and a regular and complete course of 
study in the science of music is provided, leading to graduation. 
Teachers' certificates are granted to those completing the entire course 
in theory and history, and such part of an instrumental or vocal course 
as thoroughly prepares the student for teaching. Candidates for 
graduation must have spent at least one year in our institution, and 
must complete the prescribed course, including the work in theory 
and history. 

DEPARTMENT OF INSTRUCTION. 

I. — Course in Piano. 
II. — Course in Voice Culture. 
III. — Harmony in Composition. 
IV. — History. Musical ^Esthetics and Laws of Acoustics. 

PIANO. 

The methods used here, are those used by the leading conservatories 
of Europe and America. Each pupil is treated individually, as the 
case may demand. The study is directed toward the acquisition of a 
sure, clean and artistic technique, to expression and phrasing, and to 
intelligent interpretation. With these objects in view, only composi- 
tions by good composers are taught. Especial attention is paid to 
performance in public, and to the playing at sight and from memory. 

VOICE CULTURE. 

The training of the individual voice is of the first interest here. 
The method selected is varied according to the special needs of the 
pupil. The object is to train the pupil for either church, teaching, 
concert or stage. In connection with this, there is a sight singing and 
reading class. The Choral Class, to which all pupils of the college 
having suitable voices are admitted for a nominal fee, meets once a 
week, preparing standard choruses, which are given from time to time 
publicly at the regular recitals. This class also 11 studies an oratorio or 
opera, to be produced at the close of the year. 



CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 17 



THEORY. 

The theoretical department includes Harmony, Composition, Analy- 
sis, Phrasing, Interpretation, History, Aesthetics, Literature, Laws 
of Sound, etc., etc. 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 

1. Students may enter at any time, but are not enrolled for less 
than one-half session. 

2. All tuition is payable in advance ; no lessons will be given except 
on presentation of a receipt from the Bursar of the college, showing 
all tuition paid to the end of the half session. 

3. No student is permitted to take part in any public musical per- 
formance without the consent of the Director. 

• 4. Choral and Sight Singing Class once a week. 

FREE ADVANTAGES. 

I. — Recitals of the Department. 
II.— Lectures by the Director. 
III.— Sight Singing and Choral Class. 
IV. — The College Library. 

EXPENSES. 

Piano or Vocal, two lessons per week, each : 

Per session, $55 00 

Per half session, 27 50 

Use of piano one hour and a half for daily practice : 

Per session, $10 00 

Per half session, 5 00 

Students in this Department wishing to take studies in any of the 
prescribed courses, can do so by paying $10 for each branch taken. 

The above tuition rates do not include instruction during holiday 
vacation. 



18 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Department of Art. 



The Art Department is in charge of Mrs. Bessie C. Trible, who 
brings to the position superior talents and experience. There is an 
interesting and enthusiastic art class, and the interest and proficiency 
of this department promises to keep pace with the growth of the col- 
lege in other directions. Thorough instruction is given in free-hand 
drawing, china painting, portrait and landscape painting in oil, crayon, 
water colors and India ink. Situated in one of the most beautiful land- 
scapes in America, Bethany affords rare opportunities for sketching 
from nature. It is the purpose and policy of the college to foster the 
love and study of art continually. 

Terms — $18 a term, two lessons a week. 



Department of Elocution and Oratory. 



The design of this department is to cultivate a taste for pure litera- 
ture, to elevate the standard of expression, and to qualify students for 
public reading and speaking. 

There are two regular courses of study, the Artistic, requiring two 
years ; and the Practical, condensed from the Artistic, and requiring 
but one year. 

The work in the regular courses is supplemented by lectures on such 
subjects as "Mental and Moral Conditions Affecting the Voice;'' 
"The Use of the Will in Elocutionary Work:" "Nervousness and 
Stage Fright ;" "Personal Magnetism," and other topics of interest to 
the student of elocution and oratory. 

Every Friday afternoon is devoted entirely to the interest of those 
taking a regular course of study, and to those only. The time is spent 
in preparing recitations, correcting essays, delivering orations, etc. 
Monthly recitals are given in Chapel Hall. Lessons are one hour 
each : recitations daily. 

TUITION. 

Tuition is as follows, payable invariably in advance : 

CLASS INSTRUCTION. 

Either course, per month (20 lessons), - - - $ 5 00 
" " per year, (38 weeks), - 40 00 

PRIVATE INSTRUCTION. 

Single lesson, one hour, - $ 1 00 

Term of ten one hour lessons, . . . 8 qO 

Term of twenty one hour lessons, - - - - 15 00 
For further particulars, address 

B. BROWN, Jr., Director. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 19 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

There are, in connection with the college, four societies devoted to 
the cultivation of literary composition and oratory: the Ossolian, the 
Neotrophian, the American and the Adelphian. The Ossolian is dis- 
tinctively for ladies, and the Adelphian for ministerial students. 

STUDENTS' LECTURE ASSOCIATION. 

A course of popular lectures is given each year under the auspices of 
this association, affording the students the benefit of some of the best 
platform talent of the country. 

THE COLLEGIAN. 

During the college year the students publish a monthly journal en- 
titled The Collegian. It has attained high rank as a college paper, 
and affords excellent means for developing the literary talent of the 
students. It deserves a hearty support on the part of the Alumni and 
friends of the college. 

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM. 

This is a commodious apartment, 30 by 38 feet, well lighted, and sup- 
plied with the best papers and magazines of the day. It is known to 
many that our library has twice suffered heavy losses by fire; it is at 
present well equipped with encyclopedias and other works of reference, 
and contains besides some two thousand volumes of miscellaneous 
literature. Liberal gifts in books have been made by friends from time 
to time ; such donations are earnestly solicited and will be at all times 
gratefully acknowledged. 

CABINETS AND MUSEUMS. 

The Natural History Cabinet contains some of the Fauna, 
Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable collection from 
Australia, and exchanges with other sections of the country. Also a 
fine Herbarium of native plants, with many rare ones from other parts 
of the world. 

The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several 
thousand specimens of Minerals and fossils from all parts of the world. 

The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains rare and 
valuable collections. 

APPARATUS. 

The philosophical apparatus of the college affords facilities for the 
illustration of physical principles. 

The chemical laboratory is provided with apparatus and chemicals 
for illustration in the courses offered. 



20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



PHILLIPS HALL. 

Phillips Hall, the handsome gift of Thomas W. Phillips, of New 
Castle, Pa., is a large and commodious building, well adapted to the 
wants of young ladies, with capacity to accommodate sixty roomers and 
dining-room capacity for one hundred boarders. The rooms are nicely 
carpeted, and well furnished with new and substantial hard wood fur- 
niture. It is heated throughout by steam, has hot and cold water on 
each floor, and is supplied with bath rooms in basement. The building 
is situated on the College Hill, only a few steps from the college build- 
ing, which renders it convenient for the students to study in their 
own rooms between class hours. 

Under the management of Mrs. Hawkins, the aim is to make this 
place a home in fact as well as in name. The moral and spiritual, as 
well as the intellectual interests of the girls, are constantly kept in 
view. It is sought to inspire the young ladies with the highest ideals 
and to promote their growth in character as well as in mind. Honor 
and truth are the main principles regarded in the government of the 
home. We trust our girls to the utmost, always assuming that they 
desire to do right, and always relying on sympathy and confidence 
rather than on rigid rules to preserve the peace and order of the'house- 
hold. This confidence is rarely disappointed. Girls who have begun 
to take life in earnest do not need much discipline. Others are not ad- 
vised to come to Bethany. 

It is not expected that young ladies in attendance as students of the 
college will board elsewhere in the village, unless under expressed ap- 
proval of their parents or guardians with concurrence of the college 
faculty. 

Further information may be had by addressing Mrs. Georgiana 
T. Hawkins. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 21 



General Information. 



Bethany College is situated in the Panhandle of West Virginia, six- 
teen miles north of Wheeling. The railroad stations for Bethany are 
Briliant, on the Cleveland and Pittsburgh Railroad (river division), 
and Wellsburg, on the Wheeling branch of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati 
and St. Louis Railway. From these stations stages are run to Bethany 
■every day, except Sunday. For special conveyance, address W. P. 
Cowans, Moore Bros., or J. M. Davis, Bethany, W. Ya. 

ENTRANCE AND EXAMINATIONS. 

4 

The college year consists of two terms, four and a half months each. 
It begins on the fourth (24th) Monday in September, and ends on the 
third Thursday in June. In this year there are two examinations in 
each class — one in January, and the final examination in June. 

It is very desirable that applicants for matriculation present them- 
selves at the beginning of the session, that there may be a convenient 
arrangement of the classes in the various departments or schools. 
Students, however, can enter conveniently at the commencement of 
the second term, February 1st, after the intermediate examination in 
January. 

Students desiring to enter any class, must give evidence of their being 
prepared for the work of that class. Students entering from other insti- 
tutions, must bring certificates of the amount and kind of work done. 
If these are satisfactory to the Faculty, they will be admitted without 
examination ; otherwise they must pass a satisfactory examination in 
those studies previously taken by the class they wish to enter. Any 
one found to be working at a disadvantage to himself, through inade- 
quate preparation for the class to which he has been admitted, will be 
required to enter lower. 

Special examinations will be held at the close of each term. No 
•student will be allowed to enter the next higher class whose average 
.grade falls below sixty-rive. 

REGULAR EXPENSES. 

Tuition, for session (forty weeks), - 

Matriculation fee, for coal, janitor, etc., 
Furnished room, with care of room, fuel, etc., - 
Table board for the session, ----- 
Washing, ---------- 



$40 00 


10 


00 


30 


00 


100 


00 


10 


00 



$19!) 00 






22 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Unfurnished rooms may be obtained, if desired, and board may be 
had in clubs at about $2.00 a week. 

The matriculation fee and tuition must be paid at the beginning of 
each term. 

EXPENSES AT PHILLIPS HALL. 

Board is placed at $3.00 a week, and care is taken* to provide the 
young ladies with a sufficiency of wholesome and palatable food, and to 
allow them a reasonable freedom of the house in all respects. Each 
young lady is expected to bring sheets, pillow cases, towels, napkins, 
napkin ring, fork, teaspoon and lamp. Oil is furnished at twenty cents 
a month. The rooms rent from $60 to S70 a session when occupied by 
two : at $50 when occupied by one alone. A deposit of five dollars is 
required of each roomer as guarantee for preservation of the room and 
furniture, which is refunded when the room is vacated if everything is 
found in proper condition. 

REDUCED TUITION. 

Young men in any of the religious denominations, who wish to pre- 
pare for the ministry, may, on paying the matriculation fee, be admitted 
into any of the courses at Bethany College at one-half the regular rates 
of tuition. 

All applicants for this privilege will be required to present to the 
faculty satisfactory written recommendations from their respective- 
congregations, and from well known ministers of the gospel, certifying 
that they come under the foregoing conditions, in such form as shall be 
prescribed by the faculty. They shall also be required to sign a promis- 
sory note to pay the full charge for tuition five years from their with- 
drawal from the college, provided they do not, in the meantime, devote 
themselves to the work of the ministry. But this provision for reduc- 
tion of tuition shall not extend, in any case, beyond one session, except 
upon the recommendation of the faculty, and the approval of the 
board. 

The children of regular ministers of the gospel, of all denominations, 
shall be admitted to all classes and privileges of the college upon pay- 
ment of the matriculation fee and one-half the regular charges of 
tuition. 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be required to 
give instruction in the primary classes. 

Every student using a scholarship must, when matriculating, present 
it, or a copy of it, to the Bursar. 

DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS. 

To receive the degre of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, or 
Bachelor of Letters, the candidate must have completed the course 
leading to the desired degree. He must also have observed all the 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 23 



other laws and regulations of the college. He then receives the degree 
and a diploma. For the diploma ten dollars is charged ; Ave dollars 
to ministerial students. 

A record is kept of the daily recitations. At the end of the month 
each professor prepares a report of the work of his classes. Absences 
from class or from chapel exercises, without cause, lower a student's 
grade. A record is kept of each examination ; the examinations are 
taken into account in making out the average for the year. 

The final rank of the graduating class is computed by combining the 
averages for the several years. Students whose combined averages are 
ninety-three per cent, will be enrolled in the Honor List, and this dis- 
tinction will be noted in the diploma by the words Cum Laude. An 
average of ninety-four per cent entitles a student to Magna Cum Laude; 
an average of ninety-five per cent to Summa Cum Laude. The name 
of no student will appear in the Honor List who has not been a student 
in th.e college for at least two years. In the award of honors regard is 
had to the conduct of the student during his course, and any student 
who has incurred serious discipline may be debarred from the rank to 
which otherwise his scholarship would have entitled him. 

In order to obtain the degree of Master of Arts, the following con- 
ditions are required: 1. The attainment of the degree of Bachelor 
in the course. 2. The actual attendance in the college thereafter for 
one session, and the completion of three elective studies to be selected by 
the candidate with the consent of the faculty. 3. An approved ex- 
amination of selected studies. A fee of ten dollars will be charged 
for the diploma. 

A Bachelor of three years' standing in any one of the courses may 
receive the Honorary Degree of Master in that course : provided he 
shall, in the interval, have maintained an exemplary character, and 
pursued studies relating to the degree. -Candidates for this degree 
should apply to the President or Secretary of the faculty before the 
annual meeting of the Board of Trustees. 

No application for the degree of A.M. will be entertained unless 
accompanied by the fee of ten dollars, which will be returned in case 
the degree is not conferred. 

THE PHILLIPS LOAN FUND OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

This is to aid students who are preparing for the ministry, and is 
loaned to such students at the discretion of a committee of the faculty. 

This generous contribution is, it is hoped, but the nucleus of a fund 
that will be indefinitely increased for this beneficent purpose. The 
good that must result from such a provision is incalculable. 

Applicants for assistance from this fund will address Professor S. M. 
Jefferson. 



24 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

The daily morning devotions are held in the college chapel at eight 
o'clock. 

Daily and weekly meetings for prayer and for song and exhortation, 
are maintained by the students. 

The college authorities are anxious to make the college pulpit worthy 
of its splendid traditions. 'The regular preacher is a member of the 
faculty ; other members speak occasionally, and during the year a 
number of eminent men are invited to spend a Lord's Day in Bethany. 
The church seeks to contribute to the piety of every student. 

The Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. have each a large and active 
membership among the students, and are doing good work. A number 
of the students are enrolled in the Volunteer Band. 

MISSIONS. 

A course of lectures on Missions is given before the whole school. 
This course will cover, as fully as practicable, all the more important 
points in the Theory, History and Practice of Christian Missions. The 
matter is equally important to those who are preparing for work at 
home, and for those who prepare to go abroad. The Missionary Asso- 
ciation of the college holds stated meetings to hear reports and original 
letters from former students and others in the various mission fields, 
to pray for the increased success of missionary labor, to discuss ques- 
tions connected with the mission work, and, in general, to cultivate an 
intelligent personal interest in the great enterprise of evangelizing the 
world. 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE, 25 



Regulations. 



In order to contribute to the welfare of all concerned, the following 
regulations have been adopted. The faculty most earnestly requests 
the cooperation of parents and guardians in their enforcement. 

NUMBER OF STUDIES. 

A student must have at least three daily studies, unless, upon the 
written request of parent or guardian, or for good cause shown, the 
faculty shall allow him to take a less number. 

ABSENCE FROM RECITATIONS 

A student is not permitted to absent himself from any recitation or 
examination without valid excuse, nor from the college without special 
leave from the President. Any student who fails to attend his classes 
regularly or to manifest an interest in his work, will be dismissed. The 
college is vastly better off without those who cumber the ground. 
Good students must not be kept back by those who lack either aptitude 
or application. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE. 

No portion of the student's college fees is refunded on account of 
withdrawal from the college, unless the withdrawal be rendered neces- 
sary by ill-health . 

MONTHLY REPORTS. 

« 

At the end of each month a report is sent by the faculty to the parent 
or guardian of each student, stating grades and absences from recita- 
tions and examinations, together with such other information respect- 
ing the student's progress and conduct, as may be deemed proper to 
communicate, or as the parent or guardian may especially request. 
The object of such reports is to incite the student to diligence by the 
commendation and encouragement of his friends, and to restrain him 
from idleness and disorder by their admonition and advice. The use- 
fulness of the reports greatly depends upon the prompt and judicious 
attention they receive from those to whom they are addressed. Par- 
ents and guardians therefore cannot be too earnest or prompt in com- 
municating such advice or encouragement as the monthly reports may 
suggest. 



2(> CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



CONDUCT. 

Young men are expected to conduct themselves as gentlemen. The 
college does not lay down specific and minute regulations ; at the same 
time it hopes that each one will be a law to himselt, and that he will 
do nothing inconsistent with good order, good taste and good morals. 
Should any one act otherwise, the faculty will take note of the offence 
at once, and deal with the offender as the best interests of all con- 
cerned may require. In like manner the ladies are expected to act in 
strict accord with the principles of propriety and honor. 

The laws of the college require from every student decorous, sober 
and upright conduct as long as he remains a member of the college, 
whether he be within the precincts or not. They strictly forbid 
drunkenness, gaming, dissoluteness, swearing, habits of expense, and 
the introduction of wine or other intoxicating drinks into the town or 
college precincts. They require a proper observance of the Lord's Day. 
They forbid the use or possession of pistols or other weapons, and the 
introduction of them into the college precincts. Any violation of these 
Regulations may lead to dismissal or expulsion from the college. 

PROHIBITION OF CREDIT. 

The Faculty wish to urge parents or guardians not to allow students 
to contract debts to any large amount. Such funds as are necessary 
ought to be promptly furnished. It should be borne in mind that too 
much money is likely to lead to drinking, to gambling, and to other 
bad habits. No student need spend over three hundred dollars a year : 
the majority of the students spend much less than this sum. 

One-half of the expenses of the college year must be paid at the 
opening of the first term, the other half at the opening of the second 
term. The matriculation and tuition fees must be paid invariably in 
advance. Before entering class, a student will be required to show Ms ma- 
triculation card. 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 27 



Bethany College 

Appeals to its Friends for Patronage, and Presents 
the Following Advantages: 



1. There is no saloon within seven miles of the place. 

2. Expenses are low. With simple tastes and habits one can live 
as cheaply in Bethany as in any place on the continent. The college 
fees are less than half those charged in Eastern colleges. 

3. The college has a large and commodious building, and is not 
therefore hampered for room, either for class work or for its societies. 

4. The healthfulness of the location. It is in the midst of an 
elevated region, where there is pure air, good water, and perfect ex- 
emption from malaria and intermittent, congestive and malignant 
fevers, so prevalent in some parts of the country. 

5. Bethany has a large and learned body of Alumni. Many 
of these have become distinguished in the editorial chair, on the bench, 
at the bar, in the halls of legislation, at the professor's desk and in the 
pulpit. The student is admitted to this reputation already achieved 
for him, as soon as he completes his college course, and it is worth a 
great deal to him. 

6. The character of the Instruction. The students are taught 
to prize truth above rubies, and to seek for it as for hidden treasures. 
They are urged to hold fast to all that has been proved, and at the 
same time to keep their minds open to all new truth, whether it be 
found on Christian or on Pagan ground. They are taught to call no 
man master. Wordsworth says: "Liberty has two voices, one of the 
mountain and one of the sea." There is an air of freedom in the mag- 
nificent hills that stand around Bethany. 

7. The Bethany Pulpit. The pulpit is filled by a member of the 
faculty. 

8. Literary Societies. Of Bethany, Prof. Radford said: "Here 
is one college, at least, which is not permitting oratory to become a 
lost art. The traditions of the place are all against such ignoble deca- 
dence. Some of our colleges and universities are coming to neglect or 
even disparage oratory as a mere accomplishment, and the silly notion 
has somewhat afflicted the pulpit and the bar. The very air at Bethany 
fosters eloquence." 

9. Quality has ever been the first consideration with 
Bethany. It is but truth to say that Bethany hardly aspires to be a 
great school, as some count greatness — great in the number of names 



28 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



on its register. It rather rejoices to be enrolled among the small col- 
leges of our country. The small college has played a great part in 
American education and history. It is more than doubtful that so 
good results would have come if our colleges had been fewer and 
larger. The university has its mission, but it will not be well for our 
generation if it is made to supplant the college, or if our colleges all 
aspire to be universities. The ambition of magnitude so common to 
our colleges, is not altogether a matter of congratulation. A college 
is to be judged more by the character than the number of its students. 
Mammoth schools, like other mammoth concerns, may serve well for 
advertising ends, but they are likely to turn out a large proportion of 
men who, however they may count in the catalogue, count for very 
little in the world's work. 

10. Environment. The surrounding country is one of extraordinary 
natural beauty. Where can be found a fairer scene than that which 
opens to us as we stand on the steps or walk the corridor of the college 
Duilding? Noble hills, which do not rush abruptly to their really 
mountainous height, but rise to it by gentle gradations which give 
them a rounded and finished aspect, and, besides, make them green 
pastures to their very summits through all the seasons; valleys fair 
and fragrant, through which the shadowy waters of "old Buffalo" 
wander riverward forever — but why try to describe in cold type that 
which only poet's or painter's power can portray ? Who that has seen 
can ever forget this picturesque and perfect landscape? "The veriest 
clod that ever vegetated" could not contemplate these scenes continu- 
ally without some elevation and enlargement of mind. Rarely does 
nature bestow on any one spot so various charms with so lavish hand. 
Added to these natural attractions are the traditions and associations 
which linger about the place. The memory of those great souls who 
lived and labored at Bethany, is kept green among us. Their ashes 
rest amid these fruitful and peaceful hills. Their ideas and aims still 
hover in the air. The very atmosphere of such a place is an education 
in itself. 

11. Bethany and the Ministry. From its foundation, the col- 
lege has attracted those who desire to prepare themselves for gospel 
ministry. So true is this, that it is sometimes supposed to be chiefly, 
if not wholly, a school for students for the ministry. It is, in fact, 
much more than this : it is a college in the full sense, educating men 
not for one calling only, but for all the vocations of life. It has emi- 
nent alumni in all the professions. It is, however, eminently a school 
for the training of preachers. Robert Moffett said once that there 
seems to be something in the air at Bethany which inclines men to 
preach. So far as our knowledge goes, no one ever came to Bethany 
with the intention of devoting his life to the ministry, and changed 
that intention after coming here, while it is a thing of frequent occur- 
rence that one who comes with his mind set on some other profession, 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 29 



resolves, after being in the college awhile, to give himself to the work 
of the ministry. Bethany exalts the ministerial office. A ministerial 
student is held in at least equal honor with any other, while his inti- 
mate association with other students of the college, and his instruc- 
tion in the same classes and studies with the rest, corrects all tendency 
to clericalisms. Bethany aims to make young men, first of all, stu- 
dents and scholars. Before entering upon the strictly ministerial 
studies, the student is drilled in the classical and disciplinary studies 
as are other students. The design of this is to bring them to a degree 
of maturity and independence of mind before beginning the special 
ministerial studies. The propriety of this is obvious. 



30 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Calendar for 1894- , 95. 



Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday 

and Wednesday before the third Thursday in June. 

Annual Commencement, - - on the third Thursday in June. 

Session begins, - - - September 24. 

Christmas recess begins at 1 P. M., - - - - December 21. 

Christmas recess ends, ------- January 5. 

First term ends, --------- January 31. 

Second term begins, - -. - - February 1. 

Anniversary of Neotrophian Society, - - - - November 5. 

Anniversary of American Literary Institute, - - November 10. 

Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, - - February 22. 

Field Day, Tuesday before Commencement. 

Class Day, ----- Wednesday before Commencement. 







ERAL STUDIES. 


STERIAL COtl USE. 


LITERARY COURSE. 


mel it. 
imposition. 


Latin. 

French. 

Plane Geometry. 

English Composition. 


netry. 
3try. 
imposition. ' 


Latin. 

French. 

Solid Geometry. 

Trigonometry. 

English Composition. 

Botany. 


on to the Old Testament, 


Latin. 

French. 

German. 

Physiology. 
Zoology. 


on to the New Testament. 

i 


Latin. 
French. 
German. 
Zoology. 


• ■ 

ermeneutics. 
cegesis. 


Latin. 

Introduction to the Old Testament. 

German. 

Physics. 


iinent Theology. 


Latin. 

Introduction to the New Testament. 

German. 

Chemistry. 


1 

i Theology. 
story. 

ence. 
Philosophy. 


Latin. 

Church History. 
Rhetoric. 
Mental Science. 
History of Philosophy. 


heology. 
(lectures), 
al Science, 
conomy. 
Evidences. 

terature. 

. 


Latin. 

Astronomy (lectures). 

Logic, Moral Science. 

Political Economy. 

Christian Evidences. 

Geology. 

English Literature. 







30 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Calendar for 1894- , 95. 



Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday 

and Wednesday before the third Thursday in June. 

Annual Commencement, - - on the third Thursday in June. 

Session begins, --------- September 24. 

Christmas recess begins at 1 P. M., - December 21. 

Christmas recess ends, ------- January 5. 

First term ends, - January 31. 

Second term begins, - - - February 1. 

Anniversary of Neotrophian Society, - - - - November 5. 

Anniversary of American Literary Institute, - - November 10. 

Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, - - February 22. 

Field Day, Tuesday before Commencement. 

Class Day, ----- Wednesday before Commencement. 



SYNOPTICAL VIEW OF THE SEVERAL STUDIES. 



CLASSICAL COURSE. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

Plane Geometry. 

English Composition 1 . 



Latin. 

Creek. 

Solid Geometry. 

Trigonometry. 

English Composition. 

Botany. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

Higher Algebra. 

Physiology. 

Zoology. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

Surveying. 

Zoology. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

General Geometry. 

Differential Calculus. 

Physics. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

Integral Calculus. 

Chemistry. 



Latin. 

Greek. . 

Mechanics. 

Rhetoric. 

Mental Science. 

History of Philosophy. 



SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 



Latin. 

French. 

Plane Geometry. 

English Composition. 



Latin. 

French: 

Solid Geometry. 

Trigonometry. 

English Composition. 

Botanv. 



German. 
French. 

Higher Algebra. 
Physiology. 
Zoology. 



German. 
French. 

Surveying- 
Zoology. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

Astronomy. 

Logic, Moral Science. 

Political Economy. 

Christian Evidences. 

Geology. 

English Literature. 



German. 

Descriptive Geometry. 
General Geometry. 
Differential Calculus. 
Physics. 



German. 

Roads and Railroads. 

Integral Calculus. 

Chemistry. 



Chemistry (Laboratory 
Mechanics. 
Rhetoric. 
Mental Science. 
History of Philosophy. 



Astronomy. 

Logic, Moral Science. 

Political Economy. 

Christian Evidences. 

Geology. 

English Literature. 



MINISTERIAL COURSE. 



LITERARY COURSE. 



Latin. 
Greek. 
Plane Geomel ry. 

English Composition. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

Solid Geometry. 

Trigonometry. 

English Composition. 

Botany. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

Introduction to the Old Testament 

Physiology. 

Zoology. 



Latin. 

French. 

Plane Geometry. 

English Composition. 



Latin. 

French. 

Solid Geometry. 

Trigonometry. 

English Composition. 

Botany. 



Latin. 

French. 

German. 

Physiology. 
Zoology. 



Latin. 

Greek. 

Introduction to the New Testament. 

Zoology. 



Hebrew. 

Greek. 

Biblical Hermeneutics. 

Biblical Exegesis. 

Physics. 



Hebrew. 

Greek. 

New Testament Theology. 

Chemistry. 



Hebrew. 

Systematic Theology. 
Church History. 
Rhetoric. 
Mental Science. 
History of Philosophy, 



Homiletics. 

Pastoral Theology. 

Astronomy (lectures). 

Logic, Moral Science. 

Political Economy. 

Christian Evidences. 

Geology. 

English Literature. 



Latin. 
French. 
German. 
Zoology. 



Latin. 

Introduction to the Old Testament. 

German. 

Physics. 



Latin. 

Introduction to the New Testament 

German. 

Chemistry. 



Latin. 

Church History. 

Rhetoric. 

Mental Science. 

History of Philosophy. 



Latin. 

Astronomy (lectures). 

Logic, Moral Science. 

Political Economy. 

Christian Evidences. 

Geology. 

English Literature. _ 























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ReRMS 0F Bequests 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany Col- 
lege, Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of.. 

thousand dollars, to be safely invested by them as an en- 
dowment, only the interest of which is to be used for 
the support of the College. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany Col- 
lege, Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of 

thousand dollars, to be applied, at their discretion, for 
the general purposes of the College. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany Col- 
lege, Bethany. West Virginia, the sum of... 

thousand dollars, to be safely invested by them, and 
only the interest applied, at their discretion, to aid 
deserving students in any course in the College. 



> .Tft 



MMMMMftUMMBMMM 



C&T&IiOQUE 



OF 



Bet^Wy College 



FOR THE 



Fifty-Fourth Session, Ending June 20, 1 895, 



WITH THE 



Courses of Study and Annual Announcement 



For i8o5='o6. 



OPEN TO YOUIG MEN UNO YOUNG WOMEN ON EQUAL TERMS. 



Bethany, West Virginia. 



Union City, Ind. 
D. F. Harrison, Printer. 






** 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Board of Trustees. 



A. McLean, 

W. K. Pendleton, 

J. W. MuLHOLLAND, 

John Campbell, 

Hon. Geo. H. Anderson, 

Judge John A. Campbell, 

H. K. Pendleton, . - 

A. W. Campbell. 

J. E. Cl'RTIS. 

Dr. J. E. Whitsitt, 

R. MoFFETT, 

F. D. Power, 

Alex. Campbell, 

Charles Shields, 

Judge L. Bacon, 

George T. Oliver, - 

J. H. Jones, 

Russel Errett, 

W. C. Lyne, 

Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, 

Dr. Roger Williams, 

John C. Palmer, 

J. J. Barclay, 

R. S. Latimer, 

George Darsie, - 

Dr. I. M. Ridge, 

S. M.' Cooper, 
M. M. Cochran, 
Oliver Marshall, 
C B. Scott, - 



Cincinnati, Ohio. „ 
Eustis, Fla. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
St. Thomas, Ontario. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Ya. 
Wellsburg, W. Ya. 
Perryopolis, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Washington, D. C. 
Bethany, W. Ya. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Alliance, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Tangier, Morocco. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Frankfort, Kentucky, 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Ya. 
Bethany, W. Ya. 



Executive Committee. 

HUGH McDIARMID, A. C. PENDLETON, 

S. M. JEFFERSON, R. H, WYNNE, 

J. E. CURTIS. 

J. C. PALMER, Treasurer. 

MISS A. C. PENDLETON, 

Librarian, and Secretary op the Board of Trustees. 

B T. BLANPIED, 

Curator of the Museum, and Secretary of the Faculty. 



S. M. JEFFERSON, Bursar. 






■MMHB 



CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 



The Faculty. 



HUGH McDIARMID, A. M., President, 
And Professor of Mental, Moral and Political Science, and of Church 

History. 

W. K. PENDLETON, LL. D., 
President Emeritus. 

A. C. PENDLETON, A. M., 

Professor of French and German, and of English Literature. 

OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics, Astronomy, and Civil Engineering. 

B. T. BLANPIED, A. M., 

Professor of Natural Science. 

R. H. WYNNE, A. M., 

Professor of Hebrew and of Modern History. 

S. M. JEFFERSON, A. M., 
Professor of Biblical Literature and Doctrine, and of New Testament 

Greek. 

GEORGE W. BOTSFORD, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Greek. 

B. C. BONDUR&NT A. B. 

Professor of Latin. 

MRS. BESSIE C. TRIBLE, 
Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

EUGENE FEUCHTINGER, A. M., 

Director of Music. 

BENJAMIN BROWN, Jr., 
Professor of Elocution and Oratory. 



6 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Departments of Instruction. 



Department of Greek. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term — Beginner's Greek Book (White). Greek Grammar 
(Goodwin). 
Second Term — Xenophon's Anabasis (Harper and Wallace). Greek Prose 
Composition (Woodruff). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term — Xenophon's Anabasis and prose composition. Studies in 
Syntax and Systematic Analysis of forms. 
Second Term — Homer's Iliad (Se}nxiour). Studies in Greek Mythology 
and Primitive Greek Life. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Demosthenes' de Corona (D'Ooge). Studies in the life and 
times of Demosthenes. Advanced Greek Prose Com- 
position. 
Second Term— Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus (White). 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Second Term — Paul's Epistle to the Romans and the First Epistle of John, 
with the use of Green's Hand-book of the Grammar of 
the Greek Testament. 



Department of Latin. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term — The Beginner's Latin Book (Collar and Daniell). 
Second Term — The Beginner's Latin Book. Ctesar. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term — Caesar. Latin Grammar (Allen and Greenough). Prose 
Composition (Daniell). 
Second Term — Select Orations of Cicero. Prose Composition. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Virgil (Greenough). Classical Mythology. 
Second Term — Odes of Horace. Studies in Latin Prosody and Literary 
Style. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Germania of Tacitus. Studies in Primitive Aryan Histoiy. 
Development of the Roman Constitution (Tighe). 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Department of Hebrew. 



.JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Hebrew Method and Manual (Harper). 
Second Term — Elements of Hebrew (Harper). 



SENIOR YEAR 



First Term— Selections from 0. T., Etymology and Syntax. 
Second Term — Selections fiom 0. T., Etymology and Syntax. 



Department of French and German. 

FRENCH. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Minimum French Grammar and Reader (Joynes). 
French Fairy Tales (Joynes). 
Materials for French Composition (Grandgent). 
Champfleury's LeViolon de Faeence (Bevenot). 
Moliere's Misanthrope (Joynes). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Minimum French Grammar and Reader (Joynes). 
Materials for French Composition (Grandgent). 
Practice by the class in off-hand translating from sight-reading 
aloud. 

Hugo's Hernani (Matzke). 

Pailleron's Le Monde oul'on s'ennuie (Pendleton). 

Oral Practice throughout. 

GERMAN. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

Joynes-Meissner's German Grammar. Part I. 
Joynes' German Reader. 

Selections from German Noveletten (Bernhardt). 
Oral Practice and Composition. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Joynes-Meissner's German Grammar. Part II. 
Schiller's Wilhelm Tell (Deering). 
Marlitt's Amtmanns Magd. 

Composition and practice in speaking, and in off-hand translating 
from sight-reading aloud, by the class. 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Department of English and of History. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Higher English Grammar. (Bain). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Second Term. — Rhetoric. 

•JUNIOR YEAR. 

Modern History. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term — English Literature. 
Second Term — Church History (Fisher). 

Church History is supplimented hy lectures on recent reformatory 
movements, especially the Origin, Principles and History of the Disciples. 



Department of Biblical Literature and Doctrine. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term — Old Testament Literature. 
Second Term — New Testament Literature. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Biblical Hermeneutics and Biblical Exegesis. 
Second Term — Biblical Doctrine. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Biblical Doctrine. 
Second Term — Homiletics and Church Polity. 

The instruction in this department recognizes and appreciates the 
facts and truths both of Natural Theology and of Ethnic Theology, but 
devotes itself mainly to the exposition and applications of Biblical The- 
ology. The controlling purpose is to lead the student to an accurate and 
complete knowledge of the Sacred Scriptures themselves, regarded 
especially as the faithful record of the progressive self-reveJations of God, 
in history, as the God of Redemption. 

The particular studies pursued in this department call for no com- 
ment here; but it may be well to state that Biblical Literature, as here 
taught, includes the general facts and principles of Biblical Canonics and 
of Biblical Criticism, as well as the more specific matters of the = author- 
ship, the time and place of writing, the purpose, the plan, the contents, 
and the stvle of the several books. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. I 

Department of Mental, Mora! and Political Science. 

S ENIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Mental Science (Hill). 
Second Term — Logic (Jevons). Moral Science (Robinson)- Political 
Economy (Elv). Christian Evidences (Fisher). 



Department of Natural Science. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Second Term — Botany (Gray's School and Field Book). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term — Physiology (Brand). 
Second Term— Zoology (Orton). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Physics (Appleton). 
Second Term — Chemistry (Remsen).' 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Second Term — Geology (LeConte's Compend). 

A fee of $10 to cover expense of chemicals and apparatus used, 
to be paid before entering the class, is charged to all students taking 
practical chemistry. 

There is an elective course in Quantitative Analysis and Assaying 
for those who have taken the previous Laboratory work. An additional 
fee of $5 is charged to those taking this course. 



Department of Mathematics, Astronomy and Civil Engineering. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term — Plane Geometry ( Wentworth ).• 
Second Term — Geometry. Trigonometry (Wentworth, Jones' Tables). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term — Pligher Algebra (Wentworth). 
Second Term — Land Surveying (Gillespie). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term — General Geometry, Differential Calculus (Olney). 
Second Term — Integral Calculus. Calculus applied to General Geometry 
(Olney). 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Mechanics (Kemper). 
Second Term — Astronomy (Young). 



10 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Any one wishing to enter a class in applied Mathematics must first 
become familiar with those branches of pure Mathematics upon which 
the applied depends for its principles. The courses are so arranged that 
no student, pursuing them in the order indicated and with the thorough- 
ness required, encounters serious difficulty. 

In Land Surveying and in Roads and Railroads, special attention 
is given to field work and mapping. Students in the latter class are re- 
quired to lay out curves, and make calculations for excavations, em- 
bankments and transportation of earth, to make plots, tracings and blue 
prints, to practice the use of the pantagraph and planimeter, and in gen- 
eral to become familiar with methods of both field and office work. 

To enter the Freshman class in Mathematics, the applicant must 
be familiar with the rules and methods of treatment of Quadratic Equa- 
tions, Progressions, Variations and Logarithms. When sufficient evi- 
dence of preparation cannot be given, an examination is required on the 
subject as presented in Wentworth's School Algebra. 

A small fee, to be paid before entering the class, is charged for the 
use of the instruments and drawing room : in Descriptive Geometry $2, 
in Surveying and in Roads and Railroads $3 each. 




CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE, 11 



Department of AQusie. 



Recognizing the intellectual and spiritual value of a complete course 
in the Art of Music, Bethany College follows the example of other cele* 
orated institutions at home and abroad, by making the study of Music 
one of the elective courses of the college, and admits the same as a sub- 
stitute for one of the studies in the Classical, Scientific, Literary or Min- 
isterial course. 

The object of the Music Department is to prepare students for an 
active, artistic career, either in concert, church, school or on the stage. 

To educate teachers, who shall be masters of knowledge and un- 
derstanding in the correct and systematic training of those entrusted to 
their care. 

To give solid, artistic foundation, graceful and brilliant execution to 
those fortunate ones who, free from material cares, follow art for art's 
sake, and who either in the circle of a cultured home, or as leaders in 
society, diffuse pleasure and happiness around them. 



Branches of Instruction. 

The Department of Music consists of four principal courses. 

T. Piano or Organ. III. Orchestra (violin &c). 

II. Voice Culture. IV. Theory. 

Beside these, there are two special courses, one for ministerial stu- 
dents and singing evangelists, in classes of four students. 

The other is a course in Guitar, Mandolin, Banjo, etc. 

PIANO OR ORGAN. 

All Piano students must attend the classes in Harmony and 
Theory. Teacher's Certificate will be given to those completing our Three 
Years' Course. Diploma of Graduation and Degree of Bachelor of Music 
to those completing the entire Four Years' Course. Any candidate for 
Teacher's Certificate or Diploma of Graduation must have studied at 
least one year in our college. 

VOICE CULTURE. 

All Voice students must attend the classes in Harmony and Theory. 
Teacher's Certificates will be given to those completing the Course 



12 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



of Two Years. Members of this class must be able to play accompani- 
ments. Diploma of graduation will be given to those completing the 
Course of Three Years. Degree of Bachelor of Music will be given to 
those taking a Postgraduate Course of One Year. 

ORCHESTRA (VIOLIN, ETC.) 

All Violin students must attend classes in Harmony and Theory. 

Diploma of Graduation will be given to those completing the 
Course of Three Years. Degree of Bachelor of Music to those taking a 
Postgraduate Course of One Year. 

HARMONY AND THEORY. 

This Course includes Two Year's studv of Harmony and Two Year's 
of Musical Forms, Aesthetics, Laws of Sound, History, etc. 
It is taught in classes meeting once a week. 



Terms of Tuition. 

Comparing our terms with those of other institutions, it is well to 
bear in mind that we mean by "Term" four and one-half mo?iths, and 
not, as is customary, only ten weeks. Remembering this, it will be seen 
at a glance that our terms of Tuition are only about one-half of those of other 
institutions of like celebrity. Bethany College is an endowed institution. 
Its entire income is devoted to the instruction of students. 



PIANO OR ORGAN. 

Two Private Lessons per week. 

First and Second Years 

Third and Fourth Years - 

. VOICE CULTURE. 

Two Private Lessons per week. 
First Year ------ 

Second and Third Years - - - - 



per Term, $28 00 
38 00 



per Term, $28 00 

38 00 



SPECIAL COURSE FOR MINISTERIAL STUDENTS. 

Two Lessons per week, in Classes of Four. 
First and Second Years - - - per Term, $10 00 

VIOLIN. 



Two Private Lessons per week, 
First and Second Years - 

Third Year - 



per Term, $28 00 
38 00 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 13 



GUITAR, MANDOLIN, BANJO, ETC. 

One Private Lesson per week. 
Per Term - - - - - - - - $15 00 

CHORAL CLASS. 

Free to Music Students, 
One Lesson a week ----- per Term, $ 2 50 

HARMONY AND THEORY. 

One Class Lesson a week - per Term, $ 5 00 

CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Teacher's Certificate - - - - - - $5 00 

Diploma of Graduation - - - - - 10 00 

RENT OF PIANOS. 

Use of Piano one hour and a half, for daily practice, per Term, $ 5 00 



Students in the Department of Music wishing to take studies in any 
other Department of Instruction in the College may do so by paying $5 
per Term for each study taken. 

The above tuition fees do not include instruction during holiday 
vacation. 

There is a special catalogue of the Music Department, which will 
be sent upon application, free of charge, by the Director, Prof. 
Eugene Feuchtinger, Bethany, W. Va. This catalogue gives detailed 
description of each branch of study, the compositions, composers, and 
technical material to be studied. It gives the advantages, rules, reg- 
ulations, special privileges, etc. 



14 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Department of Kvt. 



The Art Department is in charge of Mrs. Bessie C. Trible, who 
brings to the position superior talents and experience. Thorough in- 
struction is given in Free-hand Drawing, China Painting, Portrait and 
Landscape Painting in Oil, Crayon, Water Colors, and India Ink. Situated 
in one of the most beautiful landscapes in America, Bethany affords rare 
opportunities for sketching from nature. It is the purpose and policy of 
the college to foster the love and study of art continually. 

FIRST YEAR. 

This consists in the drawing of straight and curved lines, circles, 
squares and other simple forms in outline, until the muscles of the hand 
have learned to obey the will. This is continued with simple drawings 
executed in the modern' method, until the use of charcoal and crayon is 
thoroughly understood. The student then takes up Cast drawing, which 
is progressive, beginning with the features in different positions and 
leading gradually to the full head, feet, hands, etc., until the full length 
figure is reached. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Cast drawing continued. 

Crayon, Pastel, Drawing from Nature. Water Colors. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Pastel, Water Colors, Drawing from Nature continued. 

Oil Colors, Portraiture. 

All art students have the privilege of attending the lectures of Prof. 
Feuchtinger, on The Nature and Meaning of the Beautiful, Architec- 
ture, Painting, Poetry and Music. 



Tuition. 

Class Lessons, - per Term, $18 00 

Private Lessons, ------ each, 1 00 



CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 15 



Department of Elocution and Oratory. 



The design of this department is to cultivate a taste for pure litera- 
ture, to elevate the standard of expression, and to qualify students for 
public reading and speaking. 

There are two regular courses of study : the Artistic, requiring two 
years, and the Practical, condensed from the Artistic, and requiring but 
one year. 

The work in the regular courses is supplemented by lectures on 
such subjects as, Mental and Moral Conditions Affecting the Voice, 
The Use of the Will in Elocutionary Work, Nervousness and Stage 
Fright, Personal Maguetistn, and other topics of interest to the stu- 
dent of elocution and orator} 7 . 

Every Friday afternoon is devoted entirely to the interests of those 
taking private lessons, and to those only. The time is spent in preparing 
recitations, correcting essays, delivering orations, etc. Monthly recitals 
are given in Chapel Hall. Lessons are one hour each ; recitations daily. 



Tuition. 



CLASS INSTRUCTION. 



Either course, - per month (20 lessons), $ 3 00 

" per year (38 weeks), 20 00 



PRIVATE INSTRUCTION. 



Single lesson, one hour, - - - - - $ 1 00 

Term of ten one-hour lessons, - - - - - 8 00 

Term of twenty one-hour lessons, - - - - 15 00 



16 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Department of Physical Education. 



Believing that the true principles and methods of education re- 
quire proper and proportionate consideration to be given to both mind 
and body, Bethany College, in connection with her other departments of 
instruction, also furnishes and fosters a department of Physical Education. 
This is under the special charge of Mr. H. S. Ingram, a competent and 
experienced Physical Director. There is a commodious g3^mnasiura, well 
equipped with the best modern apparatus and appliances for physical de- 
velopment and culture, such as horizontal bars, parallel bars, ladders, 
climbing ropes, chest weights, dumb-bells, wands, indian clubs, striking 
bag, basket ball, etc. Within the College Campus, there are ample ath- 
letic grounds, well laid out for base ball, foot ball and other athletic 
games ; also fine tennis courts, croquet grounds, etc. 

Thus superior advantages and inducements are afforded for both 
indoor and outdoor exercise and recreation for both ladies and gentle- 
men. At the beginning of the school year, the Physical Director gives 
each student so desiring, a physical examination, and special advice re- 
specting the best course of exercises to pursue. Every afternoon during 
the session, Mr. Ingram conducts classes in calisthenics, gymnastics, or 
other athletic exercises, and gives practical instruction, respecting the 
principles to be regarded in preserving health and in improving the gen- 
eral physical condition. 

For examination and instruction by the Physical Director, with the 
use of the gymnasium, the fee is five dollars per year. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 17 



Courses of Study. 



Bethany College has four regular courses : The Classical and the 
Ministerial, each leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts; the Scientific 
to Bachelor of Science ; and the Literary, to Bachelor of Letters. For the 
studies required in each of the courses see the Synoptical View, page 3£, 
and the several Departments of Instruction, pages 6 to 10. 

In addition to the regular courses, instruction is given in English 
Grammar, Arithmetic and Elementary Algebra, in preparation for the 
Freshman Year. 



Library and Reading Room. 

This is a commodious apartment, 30 by 38 feet, well lighted, and 
supplied with the best papers and magazines of the day. It is known by 
many that our library has twice suffered heavy losses by fire; it is at 
present well equipped with encyclopedias and other works of reference, 
and contains, besides, about two thousand volumes of miscellaneous 
literature. Liberal gifts in books have been made by friends from time 
to time; such donations are earnestly solicited, and will be at all times 
gratefully acknowledged. 



Cabinets and Huseums. 

The Natural History Cabinet contains some of the Fauna, Birds and 
Mammals of this region, with a very valuable collection from Australia, 
and exchanges from other sections of the country ; also a fine Herbarium 
of native plants, with many rare ones from other parts of the world. 

The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several thousand 
specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all parts of the world. 

The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains rare and valu- 
able collections. 

The Philosophical Apparatus affords facilities for the illustration of 
physical principles. 

The Chemical Laboratory is provided with apparatus and chemicals 
for illustration in the courses offered. 



18 CATATOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Literary Societies. • 

There are, in connection with the college, four societies devoted to 
the cultivation of literary composition and oratory : the Ossolian, the 
Neotrophian, the American and the Adelphian, The Ossolian is distinct- 
ively for ladies, and the Adeiphian for ministerial students. 



Students Lecture Association. 

A course of popular lectures is sriveneach year under the auspices of 
this association, affording the students the benefit of some of the best 
platform talent of the country. 



The Collegian. 

During the college year the students publish a monthly journal, en- 
titled The Collegian, which may be used as an excellent means for develop- 
ing literary talent. 

Religious Services. 

The daily morning devotions are held in the college chapel at eight 
o'clock. 

Daily and weekly meetings for prayer and for song and exhortation 
are maintained by the students. 

The college authorities are anxious to make the college pulpit 
worthy of its splendid traditions. The regular preacher is a member of 
the faculty ; other members speak occasionally, and during the year a 
number of eminent men are invited to spend a Lord's Day in Bethany. 
The church seeks to contribute to the piety of every student. 

The Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. C. A. and the Y. P. S. C. E. have each 
a large and active membership among the students, and are doing good 
work. A number of the students are enrolled in the Volunteer Band. 



Missions. 



A course of lectures on Missions is given before the whole school 
This course covers as fully as practicable all the more important 
points in the Theory, History and Practice of Christian Missions. The 
matter is equally important to those who are preparing for work at home, 
and for those who prepare to go abroad. The Missionary Association of 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 19 



the college holds stated meetings to hear reports and original letters from 
former students and others in the various mission fields, to pray for the 
increased success of missionary labor, to discuss questions connected 
with the mission work, and, in general, to cultivate an intelligent 
personal interest in the great enterprise of evangelizing the world. 



Ext ranee and Examinations. 

The college year consists of two terms, four and a half months each. 
It begins on the third Monday in September, and ends on the second 
Thursday in June. 

Students desiring to enter any class, must give evidence of their 
being prepared for the work of that class. Students entering from other 
institutions, must bring certificates of the amount and kind of work done. 
If these are satisfactory to the Faculty the students are admitted without 
examination ; otherwise they must pass a satisfactory examination in 
those studies previously taken by the class they wish to enter. Any 
student found to be working at a disadvantage to himself, through inade- 
quate preparation for the class to which he has been admitted, will be 
required to enter lower. No student whose average grade falls below 
seventy-five in any class, will be allowed to enter the next higher class. 




20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Degrees and Diplomas. 



To receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science or 
Bachelor of Letters, the candidate must have completed all the studies 
required (or their full equivalents) in the course leading to the desired de- 
gree, with an actual attendance in the college during at least the Senior 
year. 

Students who have attended the college during the Junior and 
Senior years and whose final grade, computed as the average of all their 
monthly and examination grades during these years, is ninety-three per 
cent., are enrolled on the Honor List, and this distinction is noted in the 
diploma by the words Cum Laude. A final grade of ninety-four per 
cent, is noted b\> Magna Cum Laude, one of ninety-five per cent, by 
Summa Cum Laude. In the awarding of honors, however, regard is had 
to the conduct of the student during his course, and any student who has 
incurred serious discipline may be debarred from the honor to which 
otherwise his scholarship would have entitled him. 

In order to obtain the degree of Master of Arts, the candidate must 
first receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts, be thereafter in actual attend- 
ance in the college for one session, and complete, with an approved ex- 
amination in each, three studies to be selected by him with the consent of 
the Faculty. 

The Honorary Degree of Master in any one of the courses may be 
conferred on a Bachelor of three years standing in that course, provided 
he has, during the interval, pursued studies relating to the degree and 
has maintained an exemplary character. 

The fee for any diploma is ten dollars ; except for a Bachelor's di- 
ploma to Ministerial students, which is five dollars. No application for ( 
the degree of Master is entertained unless accompanied by the fee of ten 
dollars, which is returned if the degree is not conferred. 



CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 21 



Expenses. 



Young men can procure hoard and rooms (either furnished or un- 
furnished) in Bethany at about the same prices, according to quality, as 
the prevailing cost of corresponding accommodations in other college com- 
munities. . The best rooms in the village, furnished and cared for, with 
fuel, etc., can be had for the entire session by two students at a cost to 
each of from thirty to thirty-five dollars. The best board can be had for 
from two dollars and fifty cents to three dollars a week. Good board can 
be had for two dollars a week. In clubs it may be made to cost still 
less. The following tabular statement may be taken as a fair average of 
the necessary expenses of a young man for the entire session, or college 
year. 
Tuition - - - - - - $ 40 00 

Matriculation - - - - - 10 00 

Furnished Room - - - - - 30 00 

Board, 38 weeks at $2.50 per week - - - ' 95 00 



Total - - - - - - - - 175 00 



Expenses at Phillips Hall. 

Young ladies residing as students at Phillips Hall are given furnished 
rooms (heated and lighted) and board, for three dollars a week. Care is 
taken to provide the young ladies a sufficiency of wholesome, palatable 
food, and to allow them a reasonable freedom of the house in all respects 
Each young lady is expected to bring sheets, pillow cases, towels, nap- 
kins, napkin ring, knife, fork, teaspoon and lamp. Of course each young- 
lady is charged also the regular Tuition and Matriculation fee-s of the 
college. 

Phillips Hall, the handsome gift of the Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, 
of New Castle, Pa., is a large and commodious building, well adapted to 
the wants of young ladies. The rooms are nicely carpeted and well 
furnished. The Hall is heated throughout by steam, has hot and cold 
water on each floor, and is supplied with bath rooms. The building is sit- 
uated on College Hill, only a few steps from the college building, which 
renders it convenient for the students to study in their own rooms be- 
tween class hours. 



22 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Mrs. Georgina Hawkins, the experienced and popular matron, de- 
votes herself entirely to the welfare of the young ladies and endeavors 
to make this place a home in fact as well as in name. The moral and 
spiritual, as well as the intellectual interests of the young ladies are con- 
stantly kept in view. It is sought to inspire them with the highest ideals, 
and to promote their growth in character as well as in mind. Honor and 
truth are the main principles regarded in the government of the home ; 
and sympathy and confidence rather than rigid rules are relied on to 
preserve the peace and order of the household. This confidence is 
rarely disappointed. Young Ladies who have begun to take life in 
earnest do not need much discipline. Others are not advised to come 
to Bethany, 

It is not expected that young ladies in attendance as students of 
the college will board elsewhere in the village, unless under the ex- 
pressed approval of their parents or guardians, with the concurrence of 
the college Faculty. 

Reduced Tuition. 

Young men in any of the religious denominations, who wish to pre- 
pare for the ministry, may, on paying the matriculation fee, be admitted 
into any of the courses at Bethany College atone-half the regular rates of 
tuition. 

All applicants for this privilege are required to present to the Fac- 
ulty satisfactory written recommendations from their respective congrega- 
tions, and from well known ministers of the gospel, certifying that they 
come under the foregoing conditions. 

Children of regular ministers of the gospel, of all denominations, 
are admitted to all classes and privileges of the college upon payment of 
the matriculation fee and one-half the regular tuition. 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be required 
to give instruction in the primary classes. 



Phillips Lioan pund. 



A few years ago the Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, of New Castle, Pa., 
generously donated to the trustees the sum of five thousand dollars t<> be 
loaned to students in Bethany College who are preparing for the ministry. 
The original fund as thus constituted has since been considerably in- 
creased by other generous gifts and by accrued interest. Aid from this 
fund may be obtained by ministerial students, on complying with the 
conditions of the loan. 



'CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE, 



Regulations. 



In order to contribute to the welfare of all concerned, the follow- 
ing regulations have been adopted. The Faculty most earnestly requests 
the co-operation of parents and guardians in their enforcement. 

Fees. — One-half of the expenses of the college year must be paid at 
the opening of the first term, the other half at the opening of the second 
term. The matriculation and tuition fees must be paid invariably in ad- 
vance. Before entering class, a student is required to show his matriculation 
•card. Every student using a scholarship must, when matriculating, pre- 
sent it, or a copy of it, to the Bursar, 

No portion of the student's college fees is refunded on account of 
withdrawal from the college, unless the withdrawal be rendered neces 1 - 
sary by ill health. 

Number of Studies. — A student must have at least thre^e daily 
studies, unless, upon the written request of parent or guardian, or for 
good cause shown, the Faculty shall allow him to take a less number. 

Absences. — A student is not permitted to absent himself from any 
recitation or examination without valid excuse, nor from the college 
without special leave from the President. Any student who fails to 
attend his classes regularly or to manifest an interest in his work, is 
dismissed. The college is vastly better off without those who cumber 
the ground. Good students must not be kept back by those who lack 
either aptitude or application. 

Reports. — At the end of each term (or oftener if requested) a report 
is sent by the Faculty to the parent or guardian of each student, stating 
grades and absences from recitations and examinations, together with 
such other information respecting the student's progress and conduct 
as may be deemed proper to communicate or as the parent or guardian 
may especially request. The object of such reports is to incite the 
student to diligence by the commendation and encouragement of his 
friends, and to restrain him from idleness and disorder by their admoni- 
tion and advice. The usefulness of the reports greatly depends 
upon the prompt and judicious attention they receive from those to whom 
they are addressed. Parents and guardians therefore cannot be too 
earnest or prompt in communicating such advice or encouragement as 
these reports may suggest. 

Conduct. — Young men are expected to conduct themselves as gen- 
tlemen. The college does not lay down specific and minute regulations; 



24 CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE, 



at the same time it hopes that each one will be a law to himself, and 
that he will do nothing inconsistent with good order, good taste or good 
morals. Should any one act otherwise, the Faculty will take note of the 
offence at once, and deal with the offender as the best interests of all 
concerned may require. In like manner the young ladies are expected 
to act in strict accord with the principles of propriety and honor. 

The laws of the college require from every student decorous, sober 
and upright conduct as long as he remains a member of the college, 
whether he be within the precincts or not. They strictly forbid drunk- 
enness, gaming, dissoluteness, swearing, habits of expense, and the 
introduction of wine or other intoxicating drinks into town or college 
precincts. They require a proper observance of the Lord's Day. They 
forbid the use or possession of pistols or other weapons, and the intro- 
duction of them into the college precincts. Any violation of these 
.Regulations may lead to dismissal or expulsion from the college. 

Prohibition of credit. — The Faculty wish to urge parents and guard- 
ians not to allow students to contract debts to any large amount. Such 
funds as are necessary ought to be promptly furnished. It should be 
borne in mind that too much money is likely to lead to drinking, gam- 
bling, and other bad habits. No student need spend over three 
hundred dollars a year ; the majority of the students spend much less 
than this sum. 




CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 25 



General Information. 



Location. — Bethany College is situated in the Panhandle of West 
Virginia, sixteen miies north of wheeling. The railroad stations for 
Bethany are Briliant, on the Cleveland and Pittsburgh Railroad (river 
division), and Wellsburg, on the Wheeling branch of the Pittsburg, Cin- 
cinnatti, Chicago and St. Louis Railway. From these stations stages are 
run to Bethany every day, except Sunday. For special conveyance, 
address W. P. Cowans, Moore Bros., or J. M. Davis, Bethany, W. Va. 

Healthfullness. — Bethany is in the midst of an elevated region, 
where there is pure air, good water, and almost perfect exemption from 
malaria and intermittent, congestive and malignant fevers, so prevalent 
in some parts of the country. 

Environment. — The surrounding country is one of extraordinary 
natural beauty. Where can be found a fairer scene than that which 
opens to us as we stand on the steps or walk the corridor of the college 
building? Noble hills, which do not rush abruptly to their really moun- 
tainous height, but rise to it by gentle gradations which give them a 
rounded and finished aspect, and, besides, make them green pastures to 
their very summits through all the seasons; valleys fair and fragrant, 
through which the shadowy waters of "Old Buffalo" wander riverward 
forever — but why try to describe in cold type that which only poet's or 
painter's power can portray? Who that has seen Can ever forget this 
picturesque and perfect landscape? "The veriest clod that ever vege- 
tated" could not contemplate these scenes continually without some 
elevation and enlargement of mind. Rarely does nature bestow on any 
one spot so various charms with so lavish hand. Added to these natural 
attractions are the traditions and associations which linger about the 
place. The memory of those great souls who lived and labored at Beth- 
any, is kept green among us. Their ashes rest amid these fruitful and 
peaceful hills. Their ideas and aims stiU hover in the air. The very 
atmosphere of such a place is an education in itself. 

Aims. — It is but the truth to say that Bethany hardly aspires to be 
a great school, as some count greatness — great in the number of names 
on its register. It rather rejoices to be enrolled among the small colleges 
of our country. The small college has played a great part in American 
education and history. Is is more than doubtful that so good results 
would have come if our colleges had been fewer and larger. The univer- 
sity has its mission, but it will not be well for our generation if it be made 



f(> CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGER 



to supplant the college, or if our colleges all aspire to be universities?. 
The ambition of magnitude so common to our colleges, is not altogether 
a matter of congratulation. A college is to be judged more by the char- 
acter than the number of its students. Mammoth schools, like other 
mammoth concerns, may serve well for advertising ends, but they are 
likely to turn out a large proportion of men who, however they may count 
in the catalogue, count for very little in the world's work. 

Bethany and the ministry. — From its foundation, the college has at- 
tracted those who desire to prepare themselves for gospel ministry. So 
true is this, that it is sometimes supposed to be chiefly, if not wholly, a 
school for students for the ministry. It is, in fact, much more than this- 
it is a college in the full sense, educating men not for one calling only,, 
but for' all tire vocations of life. It has eminent alumni in all the profes- 
sions. It is, however, eminently a school for the training of preachers. 
So far as our knowledge goes, no one ever came to Bethany with the in- 
tention of devoting his life to the ministry, and changed that intention 
after coming here, while it is a thing of frequent occurrence that one who 
comes with his mind set on some other profession, resolves, after being 
in the college awhile, to give himself to the work of the ministry. Beth- 
any exalts the ministerial office. A ministerial student is held in at least 
equal honor with any other, while his intimate association with other 
students of the college, and his instruction in the same classes and studies 
with the rest, corrects all tendency to clericalisms.. Bethany aims to 
make young men, first of all, students and scholars. Before entering: 
upon the strictly ministerial studies, the student is drilled in the classical 
and disciplinary studies as are other students. The design of this is to 
bring him to a degree of maturity and independence of mind before be- 
ginning the special ministerial studies. The propriety of this is obvious. 




CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Students of the FiftyHpouFth Session. 



Seniors, 



Appleton, Margaret L. 
Cameron, A. M. 
Campbell, Argyle 
Chapman, W. C. 
Darsie, Burns 
Darsie, Clyde 
Forner, T. J, 
Gans, W. L 
Groves, Pearl A. 
Hedrick, Glenn 
Jobes, Margaret A. - 
Johnson, Philip - 
Kimmell, Ira W. 
Lewis, T. S. 
Madden, M. B. 
McDiarmid,E. W. 
Morris, Ada Jane 
Morris, J. C. 
Newcomer, L. O. 
Sapp, F. B. - 
Taylor, Bessie D. 
Turner, W. D. 
Williams. H. 0. 



Bamber, R. J. 
Canby, J. A. 
Crawford, E. E. 
Frew, Gertrude, 
Gilmore, Geo. W. 
Groom, C. A. 
Harris, E. C. 
Hart, E. H. 
Hull, J. D, 
Ice, A. E. 
Joyce, J. A. 
Lutton, R. C. 
McClure, S. Q. A. 
McDiarmid, Ethel 
McWane, R. C. - 
Merryman, R. H. 
Mortimer, C. F. 
Picton, T. G. 
Powell, W. E. 
Pritchard, Geo. R. 



Juniors. 



Dayton, Ohio. 
Millersburgh; Ohio. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Higginsville, Mo. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Versailles, Kv. 
Wellsville, O." 
Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 
Hamilton, Ohio. 
Sweet Springs, Mo. 
Claysville, Pa. 
Lanesville, Va. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Washington, Pa. 
Topeka, Kansas. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Shelby,* Ohio. 
Shelby, Ohio. 
Dawson, Pa. 
Gladesville, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Moundsville, W. Va. 
Columbus,, Ohio. 



Flanagan, 111. 
Soho, W. Va. 
Prince Edward Island. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Connellsville, Pa. 
Covington, Ky. 
Flushing, Ohio. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Mansfield, Ohio. 
Belvoir, Kan. 
Chicago, 111. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
McKeesport, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Graham, Va. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Litchfield, 111. 
Plymouth, Pa. 
Hampton, Va. 
New Lisbon, Ohio. 



28 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Rice, L. G. 
Saum, H. C. - 
Stewart, J. F. 
Stewart, J. W. 
White, J. J. 
Willett, A. F. 
Willett, L. G. 
Wijliams, J. F. 
Yarbrough, W. T. 



Acoam, H. M. 
Baldridge, C. J. 
Boyer, S. M. 
Brown, B. Jr. 
Clopper, E. T. - 
Dimond, Sarah E. 
Eagon, E. E. 
Hadsall, J. C. 
Hostetter, V. G. - 
Mansell, W. B. 
McDiarmid, N. L. 
Mendel, D. G. 
Moorhouse, R. J. 
Perkins, A. L. 
Sala, J. P. 
Scott, Goldie M. 
Scott, Ola D. 
Scott, Zona L. 
Stewart, G. B. 
Titus, C. B. 
Tolar, J. R. 
Trible, J. M. 
Ward, D. P. 
Watson, C. M. 
Watson, H. A. 
Westwood, Nan E. 
Whitacre, 0. T. 
Wynne, Edmund 



Bates, Z. E. - 
Bebout, D. R. 
Biddle, F. M. 
Campbell, Emma B. 
Chapline, A. R. 
Chenault, C. T. - 
Davis, C. T. 
Folks, Newton 
Hamilton, B. E. 
Hill, H. G. 
Holmes, Arthur 
Horn, E. C. 
Ingram, H. S. 
Johnson, Bertha L. 
Karns, J. H. - 



Sophomores. 



Freshmen. 



Richmond, Ky. 
Saumsville, Va. 
Union City, Ind. 
Pleasant Valley, W. Va. 
Bellaire, Ohio. 
Ionia, Mich. 
Ionia, Mich. 
Barnesville, Ohio. 
Richmond, Va. 



Bedford, Ind. 
Covington, Ky. 
Woodstock, Va. 
Willshire, Ohio. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Quaker City, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Minerva, Ohio. 
Bellaire, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 
Alledonia, Ohio. 
Minerva, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Union City, Indiana. 
Harper, Kas. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Kokomo, Ind. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Martin's Ferry, 0. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Tromley, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 



Nortonville, Kan. 

Hebron, Ohio. 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 

New Cumberland, W. Va 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Richmond, Ky. 

Sidney, 111. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

Union City, Ind. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bethany, W. Va. 

Quincy, 111. 

San Antonio, Texas. 

Madison, Ohio. 



CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 



29 



Mathews, Minnie M. 
Mercer, E. H. 
Miller, H. N. 
Mondy, William 
Moninger, H. H. 
Nightinga le, H. E. 
Otsuka, Frank 
Place, A. W. - 
Ricks, R. L. 
Spear, M. S. - 
Stickley, A. M. - 
Stickley, M. E. 
Stickley, W. M. - 
Thompson, F. A. 
Tilcock, H. 
Wells, Oscar - 
Wells, S. R. 
White, O. G. - 
Yeagley, Rella 



Berger, Goldie 
Berger, W. K. 
Botsford, Mrs. G. W. 
Brandon, Ella C. 
Brenneman, J. B. 
Brown, Laura 
Carey, Joseph 
Burrell, J. A. 
Chapman, Ella V. 
Crissinger, L. E. 
DeFrance, J. E. - 
Dimond, Jessie A. 
Ferrall, Emma 
Fickeison, A. G. 
Folks, Mattie Joyce 
Guise, Anna R. 
Gise, R. P. 
Hemphill, Ha 
Hupp, John 
Ingram, Sattie 
Madden, Mrs. M. B. 
Mast, Bertha V. 
Parsons, Blanche 
Price, F. D. 
Ralston, Catherine 
Robertson, J. F. 
Shaw, Mary A. 
Shriver, Eva - 
Stickley, Ethel E. 
Strain, Ruth - 
Taylor, Ida H. - 
Thompson, Lillian C. 
Troy, F. A. 
troy, F. W. - 



Cameron, W. Va. 
Ducat, Ohio. 
Lone Pine, Pa. 
Golden, Kan. 
Strabane, Pa. 
Bedford, Ind. 
Japan. 

Rudolph, Ohio. 
Portland, Oregon. 
Cameron, W. Va. 
Strasburgh, Va. 
Woodstock, Va. 
Woodstock, Va. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Australia. 
Platte City, Mo. 
Platte City, Mo. 
Hebron, Ohio. 
Johnstown, Pa. 



Special Students. 



Canton, Ohio. 
Canton, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
East LiverpooJ, Ohio. 
Rocky Fork, Ohio. 
Higginsville, Mo. 
Malvern, Ohio. 
Dunsfort, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
New Lisbon, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. V a . 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Massillon, Ohio . 
Bethanv, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Quincy, 111. 
Topeka, Kan. 
Millersburgh, Ohio. 
Charleroi, Pa. 
Kenton, Ohio. 
West Alexander, Pa. 
Rensalaer, Mo. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W T . Va. 
Woodstock, Va. 
Colliers, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Massillon, Ohio. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



30 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Vogel, Daisy 
Whitacre, E. 0. 
Whitsitt, J. W. 



Somerset, Pa. 
Troniley, Ohio. 
Perryopolis, Pa. 



Summary. 



Seniors, 
Juniors, 
Sophomores, 
Freshmen, 
Specials, - 

Total 



23 
29 
28 
34 
37 



151 



Calendar fop 1895h'96. 



Annual meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday 

and Wednesday before the third Thursday in June 
Annual Commencement, - on the third Thursday in June 

Session begins, ______ September 23 

Christmas recess begins, ----- December 21 

Christmas recess ends, _____ Januarj' 3 

First term ends, ------ January 31 

Second term begins. ------ February 1 

Anniversary of Neotrophian Society, - - - November 5 

Anniversary of American Literarv Institute, - - November 10 

Joint celebration of the Literary Societies, - - February 22 

Field Day, - _ _ _ Tuesday before Commencement 

Class Day, - - - Wednesday before Commencement 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



31 



Graduates of the pifty^pouPth Session. 



Williams, H, 0, 



Chapman, W. C. 
• Darsie. Clyde 

Gans, W. L. - 

Johnson, Philip 

Madden, M. B. 

McDiarmid, E. W. 

Newcomer, L. 0. 

Sapp, F. B. 
> Turner, W. D. 



Campbell, Argyle - 
Forner, T. J. 
. Morris, J. C. 



Appleton, Margaret L. 
Cameron, A. M. 
Darsie, Burns 
Groves, Pearl A. 
Jobes, Margaret A.. - 
Kimmel, L. W, - 
Lewis, T. S. - 
Morris, Ada J. 
Taylor, Bessie D. 



Gise, R. P. 
Stickley, Ethel E. 
Taylor, Bessie D. 



Plaster of Arts, 



Bachelors of Arts. 



Bachelors of Science. 



Bachelors of Letters. 



Bachelors of flusic. 



flusic Teacher's Certificate. 



Folks, Mattie Joyce 
Vogel, Daisy M. 



Berger, Goldie E. 
Ralston, Catherine E. 



Graduates in Art. 



Ohio. 



Missouri. 
Kentucky. 
Pennsylvania. 
Virginia. 
Kansas. 
West Virginia. 
Pennsylvania. 
West Virginia. 
West Virginia, 



West 
Ohio. 
Ohio. 



Vi 



lrginia. 



Certificate in Chemistry. 



Brenneman, J. B. 



Ohio. 

Ohio. 

Pennsvlvania. 

Ohio. 

Pennsylvania* 

Pennsylvania. 

Pennsylvania. 

Ohio. 

West Virginia. 



Ohio. 
Virginia. 
West Virginia. 



Kansas. 
Pennsvlvania. 



Ohio. 
Pennsylvania. 



West Virginia. 



32. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGEV 





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APIT0L . blFE . 0SS0CIATI0N, 



jrraiM^riEL^ ill. 



Fraternal Beneficiary Plan, with Ample Safety Fund. 



JAMES W. JEFFERSON, President. 
S. M.JEFFERSON, Vice Pres. O. E. FANCHER. Secretary. 

B. R. HIERONYMUS, Treas. DR. V. T. LINDSAY, Chf. Md. Ex. 



RELIABLE INSURANCE AT REASONABLE COST. 



f i >HE RATES in the First Division are based on Present Cost, 
^"^i payable either monthly or annually, and are low enough to be 
within the reach of any industrious man. 
10 The rates in the Safety Fund Division are based on 

tested mortuary tables, with sufficient added to create an ample Safety 
Fund. The early payments in this Division will be larger, but 
because of the profits from lapses, the actual cost, will be smaller to per- 
sistent members than in the First Division. 

The Board of Trustees of Bethany College appointed Pres. H. 
McDiarmid, Russell Errett, S. M. Cooper, and A. McLean a Committee to 
examine the plans of the Association. The Committee, after being ad- 
vised by men learned in the science of insurance, and after such inves- 
tigation as thoroughly satisfied them of the superior merits of the plans 
of the Capitol Life Association, unanimously approved the same, and 
authorized and instructed President McDiarmid to execute a contract 
on behalf of Bethany College with President Jefferson. In pursuance 
of such instruction, President McDiarmid has entered into a contract 
with the Association which it is believed will greatly benefit Bethany 
College, and furnish reliable insurance at reasonable cost to those who 
need it. 

COMPETENT STATE MANAGERS AND LOCAL ORGANIZERS WANTED. 



For particulars address JAHES W. JEFFERSON, Pres., 

Springfield, Ills. 






/ <t 1?'f l> 



Bethany College. 



CATALOGUE 



or 



BETHANY COLLEGE 



TOR THE 



riPTY-riPTH SESSION, 



ENDING JUNE lo, 1596, 



WITH TME 

Courses of Study and Annual Announcement 



TOR lo96-'97. 



OPEN TO YOUNG HEN AND YOUNG WOMEN ON 

EQUAL TERMS. 



I5ETHANY, WEST VIRGINIA. 



WHEELING: 

DAILY INTELLIGENCER BOOK AND JOB PRESS. 

1896. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Board of Trustees. 



A. McLean, . 

W. K. PENDLETON, 

J. W. MULHOLLAND, 

JOHN CAMPBELL, 

HON. GEO. H. ANDERSON, . 

JUDGE JOHN A. CAMPBELL, 

H. K. PENDLETON, . 

A. W. Campbell, 
j. E. CURTIS, 
DR. J. E. WHITSITT, 
R. MOFFETT, . 
F. D. POWER, 

Alex. Campbell, . 
Charles Shields, 
Wm. H. Graham, 
George T. Oliver, 

j. H. JONES, . 

Russell errett, 

W. C. LYNE, . 

hon. thomas w. phillips, 
Dr. Roger Williams, 
john c. palmer, 
j. j. barclay, 
george darsie, 
dr. i. m. ridge, 
S. M. Cooper, . 
m. m. cochran, 
Oliver Marshall, 
C. B. Scott, . 



Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Eustis, Fla. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
St. Thomas, Ontario. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

New Cumberland, W. Va. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Perryopolis, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Washington, D. C. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Pittsburg,' Pa. 
Alliance, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Tangier, Morocco. 
Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 



Executive Committee* 



JUDGE JOHN A. CAMPBELL. 



J. E. CURTIS. 



A. C. PENDLETON. 



OLIVER MARSHALL. 



R. H. WYNNE. 



J. C. PALMER, Treasurer. 

MISS A. C. PENDLETON, 
Librarian, and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 



B. T. BLANPIED, 
Curator of the Museum and Secretary of the Faculty. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



The Faculty* 



A. C. McKEEVER, CHANCELLOR. 

* HUGH McDIARMID, A. M., PRESIDENT, 
And Professor of Mental, Moral and Political Science. 

W. K. PENDLETON, LL. D., 
President Emeritus. 

A. C. PENDLETON, A. M., 
Professor of French and German. 

OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

J. N. DODD, A.M., 
Professor of Mathematics, '95-'96. 

B. T. BLANPIED, A. M., 

Professor of Natural Science. 

R. H. WYNNE, A. M., 
Professor of Hebrew and of History. 

* S. M. JEFFERSON, A. M., 
Professor of Biblioa 1 Literature and Doctrine, and of New Testament Greek. 

B. C. HAGERMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Greek. 

* HENRY S. SCHE^L, A. M., 
Professor of Greek. 

B. C. BONDURANT, A. B., 

Professor of Latin. 

EUGENE FEUCHTINGER, A. M.. 
Director of Music. 

MISS CLARA SHEPARD, 
Professor of Stringed Instruments. 

MRS. BESSIE C. TRIBLE, 
Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

BENJAMIN BROWN, Jr., 

Professor of Elocution and Oratory. 
* Resigned 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Origin and Purpose of Bethany College* 



The establishment of an institution of learning, differing in some 
essential respects from any in existence, had long been a favorite 
scheme with Alexander Campbell. When he was fifty years old he 
formulated and published in the "Millennial Harbinger" the plan of 
such an institution as he had in contemplation. He said: "Imag- 
ining that I possess some views and attainments which I can in this 
way render permanently useful to this community and posterity, I 
feel in duty bound to offer this project to the consideration of all 
friends of literature, morality and unsectarian Bible Christianity." 
He proposed to give the rest of his life to its establishment and super- 
vision, provided only that his brethren — the rich and opulent espe- 
cially, and those who had children to educate — would take a strong 
hold of it, and determine to build up an establishment that might be 
made to themselves, their children, and many others a lasting and 
comprehensive blessing. 

Two very simple and yet very important convictions were cher- 
ished by Alexander Campbell in founding Bethany College. In 
these two convictions, in fact, the college has had its origin, and by 
these it has been supported and conducted through the more than 
half- century of its history. The first is that the Bible is the basis of 
all true culture, the foundation of all knowledge. In the corner- 
stone of the college building is laid, underneath books of literature, 
history, science, magazines and periodicals, not a confession or a 
creed, not the "Christian Baptist" or the "Millennial Harbinger," but 
a plain Bible. This is the pillar and support of all. And it was the 
deep rooted belief of the founder and the first friends of the college, 
that no education is worthy of the name which leaves the student ig- 
norant of the Bible. What Alexander Campbell believed so implic- 
itly and proclaimed so boldly in the middle of the present century, is 
just now beginning to be apparent to the leaders of education gen- 
erally, as we are nearing the end of it. Indeed, it is only beginning 
to be appreciated now. Until quite recent years, the great majority 
of colleges and a multitude of theological seminaries had no place in 
their course for any practical study of the Bible. 

The other conviction cherished just as sacredly in the founding of 
Bethany is that thorough education is essential to an efficient minis- 



CATALOGUE OE BETHANY COLLEGE. 7 

try of the gospel. In this conviction, without doubt, is the most re- 
markable growth of the Disciples in a large degree explained. The 
ministry of the Disciples has been, to a great extent, an educated min- 
istry. That this is true is surely due in no small part to the fifty years' 
work of Bethany College. It was never the aim of the college to en- 
dow the student with a stock of ideas or a system of thought, but to 
make mind, to increase the capacity for sound and scholarly study, for 
clear, accurate and independent thinking, and, withal, to educate con- 
science, will and heart, as well as intellect. The one great teacher, 
honored supremely in our college is Christ; the one text book the New 
Testament; the one great aim in all our training is to make men 
know Christ, that they may make Him known to the world. In this 
aim the college began. To this it steadfastly adheres. 

The charter was procured from the legislature of Virginia in 1840, 
by John C. Campbell, of Wheeling. Bethany was chosen as the site, 
and the first session of the college began in the autumn of 1841. 

Bethany is situated in the Panhandle of West Virginia, sixteen 
miles north of Wheeling, and seven miles east of Wellsburg, on the 
Wheeling branch of the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 
Railway. (From Wellsburg stages are run to Bethany every day, 
except Sunday. For special conveyance, address W. P. Cowans, 
Moore Bros., or J. M. Davis, Bethany, W. Va.) 

Bethany is in the midst of an elevated region, where there is pure 
air, good water, and almost perfect exemption from malaria and inter- 
mittent, congestive and malignant fevers, so prevalent in some parts 
of the country. 

The surrounding country is one of extraordinary natural beauty. 
Where can be found a fairer scene than that which opens to us as we 
stand on the steps or walk the corridor of the college 
building? Noble hills which do not rush abruptly to their 
really mountainous height, but rise to it by gentle gra- 
dations which give them a rounded and finished aspect, 
and, besides, make them green pastures to their very summits 
through all the seasons; valleys fair and fragrant, through which the 
shadowy waters of "Old Buffalo" wander riverward forever.. Rarely 
does nature bestow on any one spot so various charms with so lavish 
a hand. Added to these natural attractions are the traditions and as- 
sociations which linger about the place. The memory of those great 
souls who lived and labored at Bethany, is kept green among us. Their 
ashes rest amid these fruitful and peaceful hills. Their aims and ideas 
still hover in the air. The very atmosphere of such a place is an edu- 
cation in itself. 



O CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

It is but truth to say that Bethany hardly aspires to be a great 
school, as some count greatness — great in the number of names on its 
register. It rather rejoices to be enrolled among the small colleges 
of our country. The small college has played a great part in Ameri- 
can education and history. It is more than doubtful that so good re- 
sults would have come if our colleges had been fewer and larger. The 
university has its mission, but it will not be well for our generation if 
it be made to supplant the college or if our colleges all aspire to be 
universities. The ambition of magnitude so common to our colleges, 
is not altogether a matter of congratulation. A college is to be judged 
more by the character than the number of its students. Mammoth 
schools, like other mammoth concerns, may serve well for advertising 
ends, but they are likely to turn out a large proportion of men who, 
however they may count in the catalogue, count for very little in the 
world's work. 

From its foundation the college has attracted those who desire to 
prepare themselves for gospel ministry. So true is this, that it is 
sometimes supposed to be chiefly, if not wholly a school for students 
for the ministry. It is, in fact, much more than this : it is a college in 
the full sense, educating men not for one calling only, but for all the 
vocations of life. It has eminent alumni in all the professions. It is, 
however, eminently a school for the training of preachers. So far as 
our knowledge goes, no one ever came to Bethany with the intention 
of devoting his life to the ministry and changed that intention after 
coming here, while it is a thing of frequent occurence that one who 
comes with his mind set on some other profession, resolves, after be- 
ing in the college awhile, to give himself to the work of the ministry. 
Bethany exalts the ministerial office. A ministerial student is held in 
at least equal honor with any other, while his intimate association with 
other students of the college, and his instruction in the same classes 
and studies with the rest, corrects all tendency to clericalisms. Beth- 
any aims to make young men, first of all, students and scholars. Be- 
fore entering upon the strictly ministerial studies, the student is drilled 
in the classical and disciplinary studies as are other students. The 
design of this is to bring him to a degree of maturity and independ- 
ence of mind before beginning the special ministerial studies. The 
propriety of this is obvious. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 9 



Courses of Study* 



Bethany College offers four regular courses of study: The Class- 
ical Course and the Ministerial Course, each leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts ; the Scientific Course, leading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science, and the Literary Course, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Letters. 

For students not sufficiently advanced to enter the Freshman class 
of these college courses, the necessary preparation will be given in a 
Preparatory year of daily recitations in English Grammar, Latin, Al- 
gebra and General History. 

In English Grammar, attention will be given to the definitions, 
classification and forms of the parts of speech; and to the inflection of 
nouns and verbs, with explanations of the meanings of moods and 
tenses. Special emphasis will be laid on the classification, analysis 
and parsing of sentences. Text-book, Reed & Kellogg's English 
Grammar. 

In Latin a thorough knowledge of the Declensions and Conjuga- 
tions and of the most important rules of Syntax, with the ability to 
read at sight an easy passage taken from Caesar or Cornelius Nepos, 
will be required for admission to the Freshman class. Instruction in 
the Preparatory year is intended to enable the student to meet these 
requirements. Tuell and Fowler's First Book in Latin will be stud- 
ied, and at least one book of Caesar's Gallic wars. 

In Algebra besides thorough drill in the fundamental rules, prom- 
inence is given to radical expressions, quadratic equations, ratio and 
proportion, progression and logarithms. Text-book, Wentworth's 
School Algebra. 

In general History outlines are given of the history of the Eastern 
nations — India, China, Egypt, Chaldea, Assyria, Babylonia, Phoeni- 
cia and Persia — together with Greece and Rome down to the fall of 
the Roman Empire in the West, A. D. 476. Mediaeval History from 
476 to the discovery of America, 1492. Modern History from 1492 
to the present time. The facts will be presented in their relations to 
the arts, commerce, government and civilization of mankind, and the 
contributions made by each nation to the life and progress of the race 
will be considered. Text-book, Myers' General History. 

The required studies for each of the regular college courses are pre- 
sented in the Synoptical View of the Several Courses, and are de- 
scribed in detail in the several Departments of Instruction following: 



10 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



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CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 13 

Departments of Instruction* 



Department of Greek* 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

The course in Greek extends through four years, the latter half of 
the Senior year being given up to the study of New Testament Greek. 

One year's work in Latin is required for admission to this depart- 
ment. 

It is purposed to begin the reading of consecutive Greek prose as 
soon as practicable. A careful study of common forms and construc- 
tions, the translation of short sentences and selections from Greek 
into English and from English into Greek is followed by reading the 
first book of Xenophon's Anabasis. Analysis of forms is constantly 
employed and the acquiring of a general vocabulary insisted upon. 

Text-Books : — Gleason and Atherton's First Greek Book ; Kelsey's 
Anabasis. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Xenophon's Symposium. Selections from Herodotus and three 
books of Homer's Iliad are read. 

Composition based on the prose previously translated in class runs 
through the first half-year. In connection with Homer mythology is 
taken up. The times and customs of the periods covered in transla- 
tion are noted. Careful examination of all forms and constructions 
continues through the year. Attention is called to the variety of form 
and dialect in the Iliad. The verse is read metrically. 

Text-Books: — Winan's Symposium, Johnson's Herodotus, Sey- 
mour's Iliad, Guerber's Myths of Greece and Rome. Students 
should also have Liddell & Scott's Lexicon, a Classical Atlas and a 
Dictionary of Antiquities. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Demosthenes Philippics or the De Corona. Plato's Apology and 
Crito, and Lucian's Timon are read. 

An accurate knowledge of forms and syntax is required. 

A study of the times and conditions of the subjects read is made. 

Some time is devoted to Greek History and special themes are as- 
signed for individual research. 

Text-Books: — Tyler's Philippics, Dyer's Apology and Crito, Will- 
iam's Lucian, Penneli's Ancient Greece or Fyffe's History of Greece. 



14 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

During the first half-year Sophocles' Antigone and Aristophanes' 
Birds are read. 

A close study of the Greek drama is made. The meter is studied 
and portions of the verse read metrically. 

The development of Comedy is examined and its political bearing 
discussed. Considerable time is also devoted to the study of Greek 
Literature. 

The rest of the year is spent in studying New Testament Greek. 
Peculiar forms and idiomatic expressions are carefully examined, 
comparison being constantly made with standard Attic Greek. The 
gospels are studied on the basis of Mark and the Pauline epistles on 
the basis of Galatians. Especial emphasis is laid on the form, struc- 
ture and usage of the language rather than on exegesis. However, 
where form or syntax affects the meaning of a passage, an exposition 
of the text is given. 

Text-Books:- — D'Ooge's Antigone, Felton's Birds, J ebb's Greek 
Literature; and Westcott & Hort's Greek New Testament, Green's 
Handbook of New Testament Greek. 



Department of Latin* 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

During the first term, the Freshman class will read one book of 
Caesar's Gallic War and two of Cicero's Orations against Cataline. 
During the second term, one of Cicero's Orations and Sallust's Jugur- 
thine War will be read. The class will practice reading Latin aloud, 
and an accurate pronunciation, according to the Roman Method, with 
a careful observance of the quantity of vowels, will be insisted upon 
from the start. Especial attention will be paid to the Forms in order 
to fix them permanently in the student's mind, and the Syntax will be 
studied with constant reference to the grammar. 

One recitation a week will be devoted to the translation of English 
into Latin. 

Text-Books: — Bennett's Latin Grammar; Allen and Greenough's 
or Kelsey's Caesar; Allen and Greenough's or Kelsey's Cicero; Her- 
berman's Sallust; Daniell's Exercises in Latin Composition. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

In the first term the twenty-first book of Livy and one book of Vir- 
gil's Aeneid and in the second term three books of the Aeneid and the 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 15 

Odes of Horace will be read by the Sophomore Class. Syntax, pro- 
sody, the usage of the poets contrasted with that of the prose writers 
and so much of Mythology as is necessary for the proper understand- 
ing of Virgil and Horace, will receive careful attention. Roman 
History is studied, and weekly exercises in Prose Composition are 
continued throughout the session. 

Text-Books: — Bennett's Grammar; Greenough and Peck's Livy: 
Greenough and Kittridge's Virgil ; Smith's Odes and Epodes of Hor- 
ace; Allen's History of the Roman People; Miller's Prose Composi- 
tion. Lewis's Elementary Latin Dictionary or Harper's Latin Dic- 
tionary is recommended. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

This class will read during the first term Cicero's De Senectute and 
De Amicitia, and during the second term the Germania and Agricola 
of Tacitus. A part of the time will be given to the study of Roman Lit- 
erature. Weekly exercises in Prose Composition will be required. 

Text-Books: — Bennett's Grammar; Kelsey's edition of the De 
Senectute and De Amicitia; Allen's Tacitus; Wilkin's Primer of Ro- 
man Literature; Miller's Prose Composition. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

This class will study Roman Satire in its great masters, Horace 
and Juvenal. In the second term Roman Comedy will be studied in 
the Captivi of Plautus. The Life and Customs of the Romans will also 
be considered. 

Text-Books: — Kirkland's Satires and Epistles of Horace; Mac- 
leane's Juvenal; Lindsay's edition of the Captivi of Plautus; Wilkin's 
Roman Antiquities. 



Department of Hebrew. 

in this age of Biblical criticism the need of a knowledge of Hebrew 
is more generally felt and recognized and there is a growing interest 
!;»ken in the study of the language. The course extends through the 
J imior and Senior years. . 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Genesis i-viii is read; the general principles of the gram- 
mar; special attention is given to the forms of words; the acqui- 
sition of a vocabulary ; the translation of English into Hebrew ; some 
of the important principles of syntax ; reading of selections from Old 
Testament. 



16 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

A critical study of selections from the historic, poetic 
and prophetic books of the Hebrew Bible; review of the gram- 
mar; the principles of syntax; the principles of Hebrew poetry. 

Text-Books: — Harper's Elements of Hebrew, Harper's Method 
and Manual; Harper's Hebrew Syntax, Hebrew Bible, Lexicon. 



Department of French and German* 

The course in French will extend from the beginning of the Fresh- 
man to the second term of the Sophomore year; the course in German 
from the second term of the Sophomore to the end of the Senior year. 
Students who desire to begin these studies must possess an accurate 
knowledge of the elements of English grammar, and those desiring to 
enter later in the course must offer the work assigned for the preced- 
ing terms, or an equivalent. The aims of the instruction are good 
pronunciation, ready use of regular and irregular inflections, and the 
acquisition of a useful vocabulary. Special attention will be given to 
reading at sight; oral practice and writing from dictation will begin 
early in the course and continue throughout. Selections for read- 
ing are made with a view to acquainting the student, as far as time 
admits, with the masterpieces of French and German literature, and 
the political, social and literary characteristics of the author's time are 
therefore considered in the work. In every translation the idiomatic 
accuracy of the English used is taken into account. Scientific read- 
ings are included, that the student may acquire the special vocabula- 
ries needed for scientific research. The classes meet five times a 
week. 

French* 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term: — Minimum French Grammar and Reader (Joynes); 
Preparatory French Reader (Super). 

Second Term: — Pailleron's Le Monde on Ton s'ennuie (Pendle- 
ton); Racine's Athalie (Joynes); French Composition (Grandgent); 
Minimum Grammar continued. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term: — Victor Hugo's La Chute, from Les Miserables 
(Huss); Scientific French readings (Bowen); French Composition 
(Grandgent) ; Minimum, or Otto's French Grammar for reference. 



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CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 19 

German* 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Second Term: — Joynes-Meissner's German Grammar; Grimm's 
Marchen (Van der Smissen). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term: — Von Hillern's Holier als die Kirche (Clary); Frei- 
tag's Die Journalisten (Joy); Joynes-Meissner's Grammar. 

Second Term : — Schiller's Maria Stuart (Joynes) ; Scheffel's Ekke- 
hard (Wenckebach); Colloquial German (Branson); Joynes-Meiss- 
ner's Grammar continued. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term: — Lessing's Nathan der Weise (Primer); Scientific 
German Readings (Hodges) ; Colloquial German and Prose Compo- 
sitions. ; ' 'j 

Second Term: — Goethe's Faust (Thomas); German Lyrics; Col- 
loquial German and Prose Composition; Joynes-Meissner's German 
Grammar for reference. 



Department of English and History* 
English* 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

A careful study of the principles of Rhetoric and, in order that the 
student may acquire the habit of putting these principles into practice, 
by the use of good English, frequent exercises in composition will oc- 
cupy the time of both the Freshman and Sophomore classes. 

The Freshman Class will study so much of Rhetoric as concerns 
the use of Capitals, Punctuation, Paragraphing and the qualities of a 
good English style. One composition a month will be required of 
each member. In order to cultivate in the student a taste for the best 
literature, a certain amount of parallel reading will be assigned at the 
beginning of the session. Recitations once a week. 

Text-Book — Clark's Rhetoric. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
This class will continue the study of Rhetoric, taking up the discus- 
sion of Figures, and of the different kinds of Composition, including 
the general principles of Versification. Some time will be spent in 



20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

the critical analysis of selected specimens of English prose and also 
in the study of words. Three compositions a term will be required. 

Text-Books: — Clark's Rhetoric; Genung's Rhetorical Analysis; 
Trench on the Study of Words. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

During this year will be studied critically representa- 
tive English authors of each period up to the nineteenth century. 
Attention will be given to the relations of writers to one another and 
to the times in which they lived, also the characteristics of each peri- 
od. Parallel readings will be assigned, on which papers will be pre- 
pared by the students and discussed in class. Recitations twice a 
week. 

Text-Book: — Painter's Introduction to English Literature. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

During the first half-year the nineteenth century period of Eng- 
lish Literature will be studied. The lives of the important writers of 
this epoch will be considered individually and reciprocally. Selec- 
tions from their best writings will be carefully examined and analyzed. 
A knowledge of the figures and allusions will be required. The bear- 
ing of the works of writers of this period on the history and literary 
culture of their time will be discussed. Parallel readings will be as- 
signed for the preparation of papers on special themes for class dis- 
cussion. 

During the last half-year students will make a study of American 
Literature. A general survey of the subject will be taken, but Emer- 
son, Hawthorne, Lowell, Longfellow, Holmes, Bryant, Poe and 
Whittier will receive special attention. The work will proceed on 
much the same plan as that of the preceding term. One carefully 
prepared essay on an assigned subject will be required each term. 

Text-Books: — Painter's Introduction to English Literature; Haw- 
thorne and Lemmon's American Literature. 

History* 

SENIOR YEAR. 
Recitations three times a week, during the First Term of 
the Senior Year are given in Church History, giving special attention 
to the Apostolic and Reformation periods of church history, and sup- 
plemented by lectures on recent reformatory movements, especially 
the Origin, Principles and Growth of the Disciples. 

Text-Books: — Meyer's General History; Fisher's Church History. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 21 

Department of Natural Sciences* 

Physiology, Zoology and Botany* 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

During the Freshman year about twelve weeks will be devoted to 
each of these sciences in the order named. Recitations daily. 

In Physiology aside from the usual text-book work in Anatomy 
and Physiology, special attention is paid to Hygiene, or the art of pre- 
serving health. 

Text-Book: — "Physiology and Hygiene," by Brands. 

In Zoology beginning with the lowest and simplest forms of ani- 
mal life, the student is by scientific methods brought to the study of 
the higher and more complex, and in the diversity of form led to see 
the oneness of plan. 

Text-Book: — "Comparative Zoology," by James Orton, latest edi- 
tion. 

In the study of Botany each student is required, in addition to the 
text-book work of the recitation room, to collect and analyze, accu- 
rately naming Order, Genus and Species, and scientifically arrange 
a collection of at least fifty specimens of the more common plants — in 
other words, make an Herbarium — thus practically applying, so far 
as classification is concerned, what has been learned from the text- 
book. 

Text-Book: — Gray's School and Field Botany, latest edition. 

Physics and Chemistry* 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

The course in Physics occupies eighteen weeks of the first part of 
the Junior Year, with five recitations per week. 

A thorough knowledge of Mathematics, at least so far as to in- 
clude Trigonometry, is indispensable to the proper pursuance of 
this course. 

Beginning with matter and motion, and their laws, the student is 
brought to the practical application of these laws in the different forms 
of matter, solids, liquids and gases, and to the philosophy of ma- 
chinery. When these have been mastered, the different forms of en- * 

ergy, heat, light, sound and electricity are studied and discussed with 
special reference to their practical application in the recent discoveries 
and inventions in this science. 

Text-Book: — "Appleton's School Physics." 



22 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Chemistry* 

Chemistry occupies the last eighteen weeks of the Junior year, with 
five recitations per week, and is conducted on the plan suggested by 
the author of the text-book used, viz. : — first, the systematic study of 
the phenomena, and then the connection between these phenomena 
and the theories. The apparatus and laboratory of this department 
are used with this end in view. 

Text-Book: — "Introduction to the Study of Chemistry," by Ira 
Remsen, latest edition. 

Geology* 

SENIOR YEAR. 

The study of Geology occupies fourteen weeks of the last term of 
the Senior year, five recitations per week. 

The plan pursued is, first, the study of the agencies now at work in 
producing structure, or Dynamical Geology; second, structural Ge- 
ology; last, Historical Geology. As an aid to this study, the college 
has a collection of minerals and geological specimens well suited for 
illustration. 

Text-Book: — "Compend of Geology," by Le Conte. 

Analytical Chemistry* 

SENIOR YEAR. 

This course is required only of those Seniors who take the Scien- 
tific Course, though open to any student prepared, by having taken 
the course in Chemistry of the Junior year. It consists of five weekly 
recitations, of two hours each, during the first eighteen weeks of the 
Senior year in Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. 

In the Qualitative work the student first studies the reactions of the 
more common bases and acids, by dealing with known substances, 
and then he is given mixed compounds of, to him, unknown composi- 
tion, to determine the different metals and acids which compose it. 
Not only is the student taught methods of analysis, but the reasons 
for the methods. 

Each student is required to keep neat and carefully prepared notes 
of all phenomena observed by him, during these determinations, 
which are inspected and corrected by the instructor. 

In Quantitative Analysis only those who have satisfactorily com- 
pleted the first part of the course (Qualitative Analysis) will be al- 
lowed to undertake this work. The student is first required to deter- 
mine the per cent of the metals and acids in some of the pure salts, 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 23 

and when he has acquired accuracy in manipulation and understands 
the reasons for the methods employed, he is given salts and ores of un- 
known per cents for determination. 

A fee of Ten Dollars is charged to each student in Qualitative 
Analysis, and an additional fee of Five Dollars to those taking the 
Quantitative work. 

In all classes in Natural Sciences monthly examinations are re- 
quired. 



Department of Mathematics* 

For a thorough mastery of the subject and the power of dealing 
successfully with original problems in elementary as well as in the 
more advanced mathematics, not a mere acquaintance but complete 
familiarity with a wide range of truths already discovered, is necessa- 
ry. Hence much stress is laid upon fixing important formulae and 
theorems in the memory of the student. That it does not follow 
from this that the study of mathematics is conducted simply for the 
exercise of the memory goes without saying. Strictest reasoning 
is insisted on everywhere in the course. Promotion is not made un- 
less the candidate is ready for the advanced work as evinced by his 
daily recitations and a written examination. 

To enter the Freshman class a knowledge of Algebra to Quadratic 
Equations, including Proportion and Logarithms, is required. Those 
not thus prepared must become members of the preparatory class, 
which meets five times a week throughout the year. Wentworth's 
School Algebra is used as text-book. 

Any one wishing to enter a class in applied Mathematics must first 
become familiar with those branches of pure Mathematics upon 
which the applied depends for its principles. The courses are so ar- 
ranged that no student, pursuing them in the order indicated and 
with the thoroughness required, encounters serious difficulty. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term: — Plane Geometry (Wentworth). 
Second Term: — Solid Geometry and Trigonometry (Wentworth, 
Jones' Tables). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term: — Higher Algebra (Wentworth). 

Second Term: — Analytical Geometry (Olney), and Mechanics 
(Kemper). 



24 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term: — Analytical Geometry and Differential Calculus (Ol- 
ney); Mechanics (Kemper). 

Second Term : — Land Surveying (Gillespie). 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term: — Integral Calculus (Olney) ; Astronomy (Young). 
Second Term : — Descriptive Geometry (Church and Waldo). 
The order of the above is subject to possible change in 'g6 J ()j. 



Department Biblical Literature and Doctrine. 

During the Sophomore year, students in all the regular college 
courses are required to give three recitations a week in Old and New 
Testament Literature, and ministerial Sophomores are required to 
give in addition two recitations a week in more technical biblical 
study. The study of the Old and New Testament Literature consid- 
ers the Bible both in its unity as the record of a progressive Divine 
revelation, and also in its diversity as made up of many widely differ- 
ent though vitally related books. The authorship, the time and place 
of writing, the purpose, the plan, the contents and the style of each of 
the several books are studied. These books are also studied in their 
biblical groupings as Historical, Poetical, Prophetical, Epistolary, 
etc. Biblical Study, technically so called, deals with the aims, prin- 
ciples and methods of biblical study, and is here made to include 
Canonics, Textual Criticism, Hermeneutics, and Biblical Geography 
and Archaeology. 

During the Junior year instruction is given daily to ministerial 
students in New Testament Doctrine. This doctrine is presented 
not only in its several distinct types, as the teaching of Jesus, of 
Peter, of Paul, of John, etc., but also in the essential harmony of all 
these types. 

In the Senior year instruction is given in Church History, in Hom- 
iletics, in Church Polity and in Christian Ethics. 

Text-Books: — In this department the Bible is taken as the main 
text-book, but the following books are also used and recommended 
as valuable helps: In the Sophomore year Maclear's Class-books 
of Old and New Testament History, and Briggs' Biblical Study. 
Junior year: — Adeny's New Testament Theology, Stevens' Pauline 
Theology and Stevens' Johannine Theology. Senior year: — Fisher's 
Church History, Broadus' Preparation and Delivery of Sermons, 
Robinson's Principles and Practice of Morality. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 25 

Department of Mental, Moral and Political Science* 

In Psychology much stress is placed upon the careful definition 
of words in the interest of clear thinking. An appeal is constantly 
made to the testimony of consciousness against plausible specula- 
tions that are not in harmony with such testimony. The testimony 
of consciousness to the freedom of the will is an illustration. But 
more than all else, the dual nature of man is emphasized and the in- 
efficiency of modern physiological psychology to account for the 
phenomena of mind is shown. 

Text-Book: — Hill's Mental Science. 

In Moral Science much attention is given to the various existing 
theories concerning the supreme motive in human conduct and the 
true ground of moral obligation. An effort is made to show that the 
various theories are not so much opposed to each other as might be 
supposed. 

Text-Book: — Robinson's Principles and Practice of Morality. 
In Logic both the deductive and inductive methods are taught. 
Special drill is given in the work of detecting fallacies and in point- 
ing out the exact nature of the fallacy in each instance. 
Text-Book: — Jevons' Logic. 

Instruction is given three times a week during the Junior year 
(also to ministerial Sophomores) in Political Science, which is made 
to include American Government, as well as Economics. One term 
is given to each of these subjects, in the order named. 

Instruction in American History is intended to set forth the facts 
and principles which underlie the government of the United States 
and to give the student a knowledge of such facts as every citizen 
of this country should possess. 

Attention will be given to the following: The national govern- 
ment; the government of the colonies; the formation of the Union; 
nature and sources of the constitution; composition and organization 
of the two houses of Congress; the government of the states and their 
relations to the Union. 

Text-Book : — The American Government, by B. A. Hinsdale. 
The study of Economics embraces the principles of Political 
Economy. Its development, private and public. Under private 
economics will be considered production, transfer, distribution and 
consumption of goods. Public Economics deals with the rela- 
tions of the state and private enterprise, expenditure and revenues. 
Text-Book: — Ely's Outlines of Economics. 



26 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Department of Music. 

Recognizing the intellectual and spiritual value of a complete 
course in the Art of Music, Bethany College follows the example of 
other celebrated institutions at home and abroad, by making the 
study of Music one of the elective courses of the college, and admits 
the same as a substitute for one of the studies in the Classical, Scien- 
tific, Literary or Ministerial course. 

The object of the Music Department is to prepare students for an 
active, artistic career, either in concert, church, school or on the stage. 

To educate teachers, who shall be masters of knowledge and under- 
standing in the correct and systematic training of those entrusted to 
their care. 

To give solid, artistic foundation, graceful and brilliant execution 
to those fortunate ones who, free from material cares, follow art for 
art's sake, and who, either in the circle of a cultured home, or as lead- 
ers in society, diffuse pleasure and happiness around them. 



Branches of Instruction* 

The Department of Music consists of four principal courses. 
I. Piano or Organ. III. Orchestra (violin, &c.) 

II. Voice Culture. IV. Theory. 

Besides these there are two special courses, one for ministerial stu- 
dents and singing evangelists, in classes of four students. 
The other is a course in Guitar, Mandolin or Banjo, etc. 

PIANO OR ORGAN. 

All Piano students must attend the classes in Harmony and Theory. 
Teacher's Certificate will be given to those completing our Three 
Years' course. Diploma of Graduation and Degree of Bachelor of 
Music to those completing the entire Four Years' course. Any can- 
didate for Teacher's Certificate or Diploma of Graduation must have 
studied at least one year in our college. 

VOICE CULTURE. 

All voice students must attend the classes in Harmony and Theory. 

Teachers' Certificates will be given to those completing the course 
of Two Years. Members of this class must be able to play accompa- 
niments. Diploma of graduation will be given to those completing 
the course of three years. Degree of Bachelor of Music will be given 
to those taking a Postgraduate course of one year. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 27 

ORCHESTRA (VIOLIN, ETC.) 

All violin students must attend classes in Harmony and Theory. 

Diploma of Graduation will be given to those completing the 
course of three years. Degree of Bachelor of Music to those taking 
a Postgraduate course of one year. 

HARMONY AND THEORY. 

This course includes two years' study of Harmony and two years' 
of Musical Forms, Aesthetics, Laws of Sound, History, etc. 
It is taught in classes meeting once a week. 



Terms of Tuition* 

Comparing our terms with those of other institutions, it is well to 
bear in mind that we mean by "Term" four and one-half months, and 
not, as is customary, only ten weeks. Remembering this, it will be 
seen at a glance that our terms of tuition are only about one-half of 
those of other institutions of like celebrity. Bethany College is an 
endowed institution. Its entire income is devoted to the instruction 
of students. 

PIANO OR ORGAN. 

Two Private Lessons per week. 
First and Second Years ? ' - per Term, $28 00 

Third and Fourth Years ----- per Term, 38 00 

VOICE CULTURE. 

Two Private Lessons per week. 
First Year --_____ p er Term, $28 00 

Second and Third Years - per Term, 38 00 

SPECIAL COURSE FOR MINISTERIAL STUDENTS. 

Two Lessons per week, in Classes of Four. 
First and Second Years - -per Term, $10 00 

VIOLIN. 

Two Private Lessons per week. 
First and Second Years - - - - per Term, $28 00 
Third Year _-_.__ - - per Term, 38 00 

GUITAR, MANDOLIN, BANJO, ETC. 

One Private Lesson per week. 
Per Term - - - - - - - $1500 



28 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

CHORAL CLASS. 

Free to Music Students. 
One Lesson a week ------ per Term, $ 2 50 

HARMONY AND THEORY. 

One Class Lesson a week ----- per Term, $ 5 00 

CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Teacher's Certificate - - - - - - - $ 5 00 

Diploma of Graduation - - - - - - 10 00 

RENT OF PIANOS. 
Use of Piano one hour and a half, for daily practice, per Term, $ 5 00 



Students in the Department of Music wishing to take studies in any 
other department of instruction in the College may do so by paying $5 
per Term for each study taken. 

The above tuition fees do not include instruction during holiday 
vacation. 

There is a special catalogue of the Music Department, which will 
be sent upon application, free of charge, by the Director, Prof. 
Eugene Feuchtinger, Bethany, W. Va. This catalogue gives de- 
tailed description of each branch of study, the compositions, compos- 
ers, and technical material to be studied. It gives the advantages, 
rules, regulations, special privileges, etc. 



Department of Art 

The Art Department is in charge of Mrs. Bessie C. Trible, who 
brings to the position superior talents and experience. Thorough 
instruction is given in Free-Hand Drawing, China Painting, Por- 
trait and Landscape Painting in Oil, Crayon, Water Colors, and In- 
dia Ink. Situated in one of the most beautiful landscapes in America, 
Bethany affords rare opportunities for sketching from nature. It is 
the purpose and policy of the college to foster the love and study of 
art continually. 

FIRST YEAR. 

This consists in the drawing of straight and curved lines, circles, 
squares and other simple forms in outline, until the muscles of the 
hand have learned to obey the will. This is continued with simple 
drawings executed in the modern method, until the use of charcoal 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 29 

and crayon is thoroughly understood. The student then takes up 
Cast Drawing, which is progressive, beginning with the features in 
different positions and leading gradually to the full head, feet, hands, 
etc., until the full length figure is reached. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Cast drawing continued. 

Crayon, Pastel, Drawing from Nature, Water Colors. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Pastel, Water Colors, Drawing from Nature continued. 

Oil colors, Portraiture. 

All art students have the privilege of attending the lectures of Prof. 
Feuchtinger on the Nature and Meaning of the Beautiful, Architec- 
ture, Painting, Poetry, and Music. 



Tuition* 



Class Lessons ------ per Term, $18 oo 

Private Lessons - each, I oo 



Department of Elocution and Oratory* 

The design of this department is to cultivate a taste for pure litera- 
ture, to elevate the standard of expression and to qualify students 
for public reading and speaking. 

The regular course in Oratory extends one full college year, is com- 
pact, systematic and practical ; but for those who for any reason do 
not care to take the regular course of study the following special 
courses are arranged : — 

Deep Breathing, Voice Development, Stage Deportment; Psycho- 
Physical Culture; Bible and Hymn Reading; Advanced Reading 
and Oratory; Gesture and Pantomime; Dramatic Attitudes; Facial 
Expression and Impersonation. Also a lecture course of ten lessons 
on Thought Analysis and Philosophy of Expression. 

The work in the regular course is supplemented by lectures on such 
subjects as Mental and Moral Conditions Affecting the Voice, The 
Will in Elocutionary Work, Personal Magnetism and other topics of 
interest to the student of elocution and oratory. Many special ad- 
vantages are afforded in this department, rates of tuition very mod- 
erate. For particulars address the Director, B. Brown, Jr. 



30 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Gymnasium. 

Believing that the true principles and methods of education re- 
quire proper and proportionate consideration to be given to both 
mind and body, Bethany College, in connection with her other de- 
partments of instruction, also fosters physical culture. There is a 
commodious gymnasium, well equipped with the best modern appa- 
ratus and appliances for physical development and culture, such as 
horizontal bars, parallel bars, ladders, climbing ropes, chest weights, 
dumb-bells, wands, indian clubs, striking bag, basket ball, etc. With- 
in the College Campus, there are ample athletic grounds, well laid out 
for base ball, foot ball and other athletic games ; also fine tennis courts, 
croquet grounds, etc. Thus superior advantages and inducements 
are afforded for both ladies and gentlemen. Hours are set apart for 
the daily use of the gymnasium by the young lady students, and it is 
expected that they will make as free use of the gymnasium facilities as 
do the male students. With such variety of recreations, no student can 
lack that diversion and exercise so indispensable to the enjoyment of 
college life and success in college work. 



Library and Reading Room* 

This is a commodious apartment, 30 by 38 feet, well lighted, and 
supplied with the best papers and magazines of the day. It is known 
by many that our library has twice suffered heavy losses by fire; it is 
at present well equipped with encyclopedias and other books of refer- 
ence, and contains, besides, about two thousand volumes of miscella- 
neous literature. Liberal gifts in books have been made by friends 
from time to time ; such donations are earnestly solicited, and will at 
all times be gratefully acknowledged. 



Cabinets and Museums. 

The Natural History Cabinet contains some of the Fauna, Birds 
and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable collection from 
Australia, and exchanges from other sections of the country; also a 
fine Herbarium of native plants, with many rare ones from other parts 
of the world. 

The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several thou- 
sand specimens of Minerals and Fossils irom all parts of the world. 

The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains rare and val- 
uable colections. 



o 



> 

in 




CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 66 

The Philosophical Apparatus affords facilities for the illustration of 
physical principles. 

The Chemical Laboratory is provided with apparatus and chemi- 
cals for illustration in the courses offered. 



Literary Societies* 

There are in connection with the college four societies devoted to 
the cultivation of literary composition and oratory: The Ossolian, 
the Neotrophian, the American and the Adelphian. The Ossolian is 
distinctively for ladies and the Adelphian for ministerial students. As 
the Adelphian Society differs in some important respects from a pure- 
ly literary society, it demands more particular notice. As it is a dis- 
tinguishing feature of Bethany College to make the Bible a regular 
subject of study and daily examination, the Adelphian Society has 
been organized in order to promote and carry out to the fullest extent 
the purposes contemplated in the department of Bible Literature. The 
regular exercises of the society consist of recitations of portions of 
the Scriptures; reading original essays on moral and religious sub- 
jects, and the delivery of Scriptural discourses, not only before the 
society, but on suitable occasions in public. 

Young men in preparing for the Christian ministry may derive 
incalculable advantages from this society. From its organization, 
and the character and ability of its members, it is well fitted to facili- 
tate the acquisition of enlarged views of the Bible, and the cultiva- 
tion of a high standard of morality and religion. 



L &ii VJCI^^V^*^ WX "1V.U,11 V ""^ iV ' ii fc. J 



Students Lecture Association* 

A course of popular lectures is given each year under the auspices 
of this association, affording the students the benefit of some of the 
best platform talent of the country. 



The Collegian* 

During the college year the students publish a monthly journal, en- 
titled The Collegian, which may be used as an excellent means for 
developing literary talent. 



Religious Services* 

The daily morning devotions are held in the college chapel at eight 
o'clock. 



34 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Daily and weekly meetings for prayer and song and exhortation 
are maintained by the students. 

• The college authorities are anxious to make the college pulpit 
worthy of its splendid traditions. The regular preacher is a member 
of the faculty; other members speak occasionally, and during the year 
a number of eminent men are invited to spend a Lord's Day in Beth- 
any. The church seeks to contribute to the piety of every student. 

The Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. C. A. and the Y. P. S. C. E. have each a 
large and active membership among the students, and are doing good 
work. A number of students are enrolled in the Volunteer Band. 



Missions* 

A course of lectures on Missions is given before the whole school. 
This course covers as fully as practicable all the more important 
points in the Theory, History and Practice of Christian Missions. 
The matter is equaly important to those who are preparing for work 
at home, and for those who prepare to go abroad. The Missionary 
Association of the college holds stated meetings to hear reports and 
original letters from former students and others in the various mission 
fields, to pray for the increased success of missionary labor, to discuss 
questions conected with the mission work, and, in general, to culti- 
vate an intelligent personal interest in the great enterprise of evangel- 
izing the world. 



Degrees and Diplomas* 

To receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science or 
Bachelor of Letters, the candidate must have completed all the studies 
required (or their full equivalents) in the course leading to the desired 
degree, with an actual attendance in the college during at least the 
Senior year. 

Students who have attended the college during the Junior and Sen- 
ior years and whose final grade, computed as the average of all their 
monthly and examination grades during these years is ninety-three 
per cent are enrolled on the Honor List, and this distinction is noted 
in the diploma by the words Cum Laude. A final grade of ninety- 
four per cent is noted by Magna Cum Laude, one of ninety-five per 
cent by Summa Cum Laude. In the awarding of honors, however, re- 
gard is had to the conduct of the student during his course, and any 
student who has incurred serious discipline may be debarred from the 
honor to which otherwise his scholarship would have entitled him. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE 35 

In order to obtain the degree of Master of Arts, the candidate must 
first receive the degree of Bachlor of Arts, be thereafter in actual at- 
tendance in the college for one session, and complete, with an ap- 
proved examination in each, three studies to be selected by him with 
the consent of the Faculty. 

The honorary degree of Master in any one of the courses may be 
conferred on a Bachelor of three years' standing in that course, pro- 
vided he has, during the interval, pursued studies relating to the de- 
gree and has maintained an exemplary character. 

The fee for any diploma is ten dollars; except for a Bachelor's di- 
ploma to Ministerial students, which is five dollars. No application 
for the degree of Master is entertained unless accompanied' by the fee 
of ten dollars, which is returned if the degree is not conferred. 



Expenses* 

Young men can procure board and rooms (either furnished or un- 
furnished) in Bethany at about the same prices, according to quality, 
as the prevailing cost of corresponding accommodations in other col- 
lege communities. The best rooms in the village, furnished and 
cared for, with fuel, etc., can be had for the entire session by two stu- 
dents at a cost to each of from thirty to thirty-five dolars. The best 
board can be had for from two dollars and fifty cents to three dollars a 
week. In clubs it may be made to cost still less. The following tabu- 
lar statement may be taken as a fair average of the necessary ex- 
penses of a young man for the entire session, or college year : 
Tuition -- - - - - - - - -$4000 

Matriculation - - - - - - - - 10 00 

Furnished Room - - - - - - - - 30 00 

Board, 38 weeks at $2.50 per week - - 95 00 



Total ---------- $175 00 



Expenses Phillips HalL 

Young ladies residing as students at Phillips Hall are given fur- 
nished rooms (heated and lighted) and board, for three dollars and fif- 
ty cents a week. Care is taken to provide the young ladies a suffi- 
ciency of wholesome, palatable food and to allow them a reasonable 
freedom of the house in all respects. Each young lady is expected to 
bring sheets, pillow cases, towels, napkins, napkin ring, knife, fork, 



36 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

teaspoon and lamp. Of course each young lady is charged also the 
regular Tuition and Matriculation fees of the college. 

Phillips Hall, the handsome gift of the Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, 
of New Castle, Pa., is a large and commodious building, well adapted 
to the wants of young ladies. The rooms are nicely carpeted and well 
furnished. The hall is heated throughout by steam, has hot and cold 
water on each floor, and is supplied with bath rooms. The building 
is situated on College Hill, only a few steps from the college building, 
which renders it convenient for the students to study in their own 
rooms between class hours. 

A lady principal has charge of Phillips Hall, devotes herself to the 
welfare of the young ladies and endeavors to make this place a home 
in fact as well as in name. The moral and spiritual, as well as the in- 
tellectual interests of the young ladies are constantly kept in view. 
It is sought to inspire them with the highest ideals, and to promote 
their growth in character as well as in mind. Honor and truth are 
the main principles regarded in the government of the home; and 
sympathy and confidence rather than rigid rules are relied on to pre- 
serve the peace and order of the household. This confidence is rarely 
disappointed. Young ladies who have begun to take life in earnest 
do not ned much discipline. Others are not advised to come to 
Bethany. 

It is not expected that young ladies in attendance as students will 
board elsewhere in the village, unless under the expressed approval of 
their parents or guardians, with the concurrence of the college faculty. 



Reduced Tuition* 

Young men in any of the religious denominations, who wish to pre- 
pare for the ministry, may, on paying the matriculation fee, be ad- 
mitted into any of the courses at Bethany College at one-half the reg- 
ular rates of tuition. 

All applicants for this privilege are required to present to the Facul- 
ty satisfactory written recommendations from their respective con- 
gregations, and from well known ministers of the gospel, certifying 
that they come under the foregoing conditions. 

Children of regular ministers of the gospel, of all denominations, 
are admitted to all classes and privileges of the college upon payment 
of the matriculation fee and one-half the regular tuition.. 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be required 
to give instruction in the primary classes. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 39 

Phillips Loan Fund 

A few years ago the Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, of New Castle, Pa,, 
generously donated to the trustees the sum of five thousand dollars 
to be loaned to students in Bethany College who are preparing for the 
ministry. The original fund as thus constituted has since been consid- 
erably increased by other generous gifts and by accrued interest. Aid 
from this fund may be obtained by ministerial students, on comply- 
ing with the conditions of the loan. 



Regulations* 

In order to contribute to the welfare of all concerned, the following 
regulations have been adopted. The Faculty most earnestly requests 
the co-operation of parents and guardians in their enforcement. 

Fees : — One-half of the expenses of the college year must be paid at 
the opening of the first term, the other half at the opening of the sec- 
ond term. The matriculation and tuition fees must be paid invariably 
in advance. Before entering class, a student is required to show his 
matriculation card. Every student using a scholarship must, when 
matriculating, present it, or a copy of it, to the Bursar. 

No portion of the student's college fees is refunded on account of 
withdrawal from the college, unless the withdrawal be rendered neces- 
sary by ill health. 

Number of Studies: — A student must have at least three daily 
studies, unless, upon the written request of parent or guardian, or for 
good cause shown, the Faculty shall allow him a less number. 

Absences : — A student is not permitted to absent himself from any 
recitation or examination without valid excuse, nor from the college 
without special leave from the president. Any student who fails to 
attend his classes regularly or to manifest an interest in his work, is 
dismissed. The college is vastly better off without those who cumber 
the ground. Good students must not be kept back by those who lack 
either aptitude or application. 

Reports : — At the end of each term for oftener, if requested,) a re- 
port is sent by the Faculty to the parent or guardian of each student, 
stating grades and absences from recitations and examinations, to- 
gether with such other information respecting the student's progress 
and conduct as may be deemed proper to communicate, or as the pa- 
rent or guardian may especially request. The object of such reports 
is to incite the student to diligence by the commendation and en- 
couragement of his friends, and to restrain him from idleness and dis- 



40 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

order by their admonition and advice. The usefulness of the reports 
greatly depends upon the prompt and judicious attention they re- 
ceive from those to whom they are addressed. Parents and guardi- 
ans therefore cannot be too earnest or prompt in comunicating such 
advice or encouragement as these reports may suggest. 

Conduct: — Young men are expected to conduct themselves as gen- 
tlemen. The college does not lay down specific and minute regula- 
tions; at the same time it hopes that each one will be a law to himself, 
and that he will do nothing inconsistent with good order, good taste, 
or good morals. Should anyone act otherwise, the Faculty will take 
note of the offense at once and deal with the offender as the best inter- 
ests of all concerned may require. In like maner the young ladies are 
expected to act in strict accord with the principles of propriety and 
honor. 

The laws of the college require from every student decorous, sober 
and upright conduct as long as he remains a member of the college, 
whether he be within the precincts or not. They strictly forbid 
drunkenness, gaming, dissoluteness, swearing, habits of expense, 
and the introduction of wine or other intoxicating drinks into town or 
college precincts. They require a proper observance of the Lord's 
Day. They forbid the use or possession of pistols or other weapons, 
and the introduction of them into the college precincts. Any viola- 
tion of these Regulations may lead to dismissal or expulsion from the 
college. 

Prohibition of Credit: — The Faculty wish to urge parents and 
guardians not to allow students to contract debts to any large amount 
Such funds as are necessary ought to be promptly furnished. It 
should be borne in mind that too much money is likely to lead to 
drinking, gambling, and other bad habits. No student need spend 
over three hundred dollars a year; the majority of the students spend 
much less than this sum. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



41 



Graduates of the Fifty-fifth Session* 





Masters of Arts. 


Bamber, R. J., 


Illinois. 


Johnson, Philip, . 


Virginia. 


McDiarmid, E. W., 


West Virginia. 




Bachelors of Arts* 


Bamber, R. J., 


Illinois. 


Canby, J. A., 


West Virginia. 


Crawford, E. E., . 


Prince Edward Island 


Gilmore, George W, 


Pennsylvania. 


Harris, E. C, 


Ohio. 


Hart, E. H.' . 


Pennsylvania. 


Hull, J. D., 


Ohio. 


Lutton, R. C, 


. Ohio. 


McConnell, W. T., 


Illinois. 


Picton, T. G., 


Pennsylvania. 


Saum, H. C. 


Virginia. 


Stewart, J. W., 


West Virginia. 


White, J. J., 


Ohio. 


Willett, A. F., 


Michigan. 


Willett, L. G., 


Michigan. 


Williams, J. F., 


. Ohio. 




Bachelors of Science* 


Merryman, R. H., 


Missouri. 


Stewart, J. F., 


Indiana. 




Bachelors of Letters* 


Frew, Gertrude, . 


West Virginia. 


Groom, C. A., 


Kentucky. 


Merryman, J. E., 


Missouri. 


Mortimer, C. F., 


Illinois. 



42 



CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Chapman, Ella V., 
Ferrall, Emma, 
Frew, Gertrude, . 
Vogel, Daisy M., 



Bachelors of Music* 

Missouri. 
. Ohio. 

West Virginia. 
Pennsylvania. 



Students of the Fifty-fifth Session* 



Bamber, R. J., 
Johnson, Philip, . 
McDiarmid, E. W., 



Post-Graduates* 

Flanigan, 111. 



Seniors* 



Bamber, R. J., cla., 
Canby, J. A., min., . 
Crawford, E. E., min., 
Frew, Gertrude, lit., . 
Gilmore, George W., mi 
Groom, C. A., lit., 
Harris, E. C, min., 
Hart, E. H., min., 
Hull, J. D., min., 
Lutton, R. C, min., . 
McConnell, W. T., min., 
Merryman, J. E., lit., 
Merryman, R. H., sci., 
Mortimer, C. F., lit., . 
Picton, T. G., min., 
Saum, H. C, min., 
Stewart, J. F., sci., 
Stewart, J. W., min., 
White, J. J., cla., 
Willett, A. F., cla., . 
Willett, L. G., cla., 
Williams, J. F., min., 

Baldridge, C. J., lit., 
Brown, B., Jr., cla., . 



n. 



Juniors* 



Lanebville, Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

Flanigan, 111. 
Soho, W. Va. 
P. E. I. 

Wheeling, W. Va. 
Connellsville Pa. 
Covington, Ky. 
Flushing, Ohio. 
Williamsport, Pa. 
Mansfield, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Hoopeston, 111. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Litchfield, 111. 
Plymouth, Pa. 
Saumsville, Va. 
Union City, Ind. 
Pleasant Valley, W. Va. 
Bellaire, Ohio. 
Ionia, Mich. 
Ionia, Mich. 
Barnesville, Ohio. 



Covington, Ky. 
Willshire, Ohio. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



43 



Clopper, E. N., sci., 
Dimond, Sarah, E., lit., 
Eagon, E. E., cla., 
Hill, Harry G., min., . 
Hostetter, V. G., min., 
Ice, A. E., min,, 
Mansell, W. B., min., 
McDiarmid, Ethel, lit., 
McDiarmid, N. L., cia., 
Moorhouse, R. J., cla., 
Ralston, Katherine, lit., 
Sala, J. P., min., 
Scott, Goldie M., lit., 
Scott, Ola D., lit., 
Scott, Zona L., lit., 
Stewart, G. B., cla. . 
Titus, C. B,, min., 
Tolar, J. R., min., 
Trible, J. M., cla., 
Ward, D. P., min., . 
Watson, C. M., min., 
Watson, H. A., sci., . 
Westwood, Nan E., lit., 
Whitacre, O. T., sci., 
Wynne, Edmund, cla., 

Bates, Z. E., min., 
Bebout, D. R., min., 
Biddle, F. M., min., . 
Campbell, Emma B., lit., 
Chapline, A. R., sci,, 
Chapman, A. C, sci., 
Green, W. H., cla., . 
Huffman, F. B., min., 
Ingram, Sattie E., lit., 
Ingram, H. S., min., 
Miller, H. N., min., . 
Moninger, H. H., min., 
Otsuka, Naotaro, min., 
Place, A. W., cla., 
Preston, C. M., cla., 



St. Louis, Mo. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Quaker City, Ohio. 
Union City, Pa. 
Minerva, Ohio. 
Belvoir, Kansas. 
Bellaire, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 
West Alexander, Pa. 
Minerva, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Union City, Ind. 
Harper, Kansas. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Kokomo, Ind. 
Allegheny City, Pa. 
Martin's Ferry, Ohio. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Tromley, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 



Sophomores* 



Nortonville, Kansas. 
Hebron, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Donley, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Forrest, Mich. 
Quincy, 111. 
Quincy, 111. 
Lone Pine, Pa. 
Strabane, Pa. 
Itsuhara, Japan. 
Rudolph, Ohio. 
Woodbury, Tenn. 



44 



CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Preston, J. W., cla., 
Stickley, W. M., sci., 
Stickley, M. E., cla., 
Weiker, L. L., cla., . 
Wells, Oscar, sci., 
White, O. G., min., 
Yeagley, Rella, lit., 

Carmack, J. L., sci., 
Colyer, Robert P., cla., . 
Crisp, G. T., cla., 
Curtis, Eugene H., cla., . 
Echols, Clarence O., cla., 
Fisher, W. L., min., 
French, A. R., min., 
Hodge, F. A., min., 
Hostetler, Bowman, min., 
Hunter, Clara J., lit., 
Koozer, Nellie, lit., 
McFarland, Maud, sci., 
McGregor, Homer T., cla., 
Mondy, William, min., 
Mong, George L., cla., 
Murray, W. P. S., min., . 
Roberts, Lillian W., cla., 
Sommerville, Macaulay, cla 
Stuart, D. E., min., . 
Tilock, H., min., . 
White, T. J., min., 



Woodbury, Tenn. 
Woodstock, Va. 
Woodstock, Va. 
Shreve, Ohio. 
Platte City, Mo. 
Hebron, Ohio. 
Johnstown, Pa. 

Freshmen. 

. Platte City, Mo. 

Butler, Mo. 

Higginsvilie, Mo. 

Bethany, W. Va. 
. Wheeling, W. Va. 

New London, Mo. 

Belle Vernon, Pa. 

Rochester, N. Y. 
. Bethany, W. Vr. 

Fowler's, W. Va. 

Somerset, Pa. 

Loydsville, Ohio. 
. Wheeling, W. Va. 

Golden, Kansas. 

Minerva, Ohio. 

Braddalbau, W. P. E. 

Moundsville, W. Va. 

Bethany, W. Va, 
. Victoria, W. P. E. I. 

Queensland, Australia. 



Rudolph, Ohio. 

Special Students. 

Alexander, C. W., . . Wheeling, W. Va. 

Baldridge, Lillian Emma, . . Covington, Ky. 

Berger, Goldie, mus., . . Canton, Ohio. 

Berger, William R., mus., . . Canton, Ohio. 

Carroll, Myra, mus., . . Beham, Pa. 

Chapman, Ella V., mus., . . Higginsville, Mo. 

Chapman, Cora, . . . Donley, Pa. 

Cooper, Grace, . . . Monongahela, Pa. 

Ely, Margaret, . . . Walnut Hill, Va. 

Ferrall, Emma, mus., . . New Lisbon, Ohio. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



45 



Gittens, Fannie, mus., 
Groves, Pearl A., 
Howells, Eleanor P., 
Kuhn, Eugene, 
Long, W. M., 
McDiarmid, Belle M., 
Prosser, H. C., 
Robertson, J. F., 
Scott, M. H., 
Shaw, Mary A., 
Swaney, Estella, mus., 
Taylor, Ida Harden, . 
Thomas, I. Dillwyn, mus., 
Vogel, Daisy M., mus., 
Whitacre, Eletha, 
Welsh, Jessie M., mus., 
Whitsett, John, . 
Wright, Sue Marsh, . 



Allegheny, Pa. 
Hamilton, Ohio. 
Elm Grove, W. Va. 
Everson, W. Va. 
Howard, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Rensselaer, Mo. 
Morris Cross Roads, Pa. 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Plymouth, Pa. 
Somerset, Pa. 
Tromley, Ohio. 
Chrisman, 111. 
Perryopolis, Pa. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 




46 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Calendar* 

For J896-97, 



Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and 

Wednesday, before the third Thursday in June 
Annual Commencement, . . on the third Thursday in June 
Session begins, ....... September 21 

Christmas recess begins begins at 1 P.M. . . December 24 
Christmas recess ends, ...... January 3 

First term ends, January 31 

Second terms begins ...... February 1 

Anniversary of Neotrophian Literary Society, . November 5 

Anniversary of American Literary Institute, . . November 10 
Joint Celebration of the Literary Societies, . February 22 

Anniversary of Ossolian Literary Society, . . March 18 

Baccalaureate Sermon, . . Sunday before Commencement 
Field Day, .... Tuesday before Commencement 

Class Day, . . . Wednesday before Commencement 

Annual Exhibition of Ossolian Literary Society, 8 P.M., June 15, 1896 
Annual Exhibition of American Literary Institute, 8 .PM., 

June 16, 1896 
Vocal and Instrumental Concert, and Rossini's oratorio, 

Stabat Mater, by the Music Department, 8 P.M., June 17, 1896 
Annual Exhibition of Neotrophian Literary Society, 8 P.M., 

June 18, 1896 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 47 



Forms of Bequests* 



1 give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, Bethany 

West Virginia, the sum of thousand dollars, to be 

safely invested by them as an endowment, only the interest of 
which is to be used for the support of the College. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, Bethany, 

West Virginia, the sum of thousand dollars, to be ap 

plied, at their discretion, for the general purposes of the College. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethaay College, Bethany, 

West Virginia, the sum of thousand dollars, to be 

safely invested by them, and only the interest applied, at their dis- 
cretion, to aid deserving students in any course in the College. 



r 



Bethany College 



Catalogue mi* 



CATALOGUE 



Bethany - College** 



FOR THE 



^FIFTY-SIXTH SESSION^ 



ENDING JUNE 17, 1897, 



WITH THE 



dourses of otudy and Annual Announcement 



FOR 1897 AND 1898. 









OPEN TO YOUNG MEN AND YOUNG WOMEN 
ON EQUAL TERMS. 



BETHANY, WEST VIRGINIA. 



WHEELING : 

The West Virginia Printing Co. 

1897. 



CALENDAR. 



\ 897. 



Baccalaureate Sermon Sunday, June 13 

Annual Exhibition of Ossolian Literary Society. . Monday, June 14 
.Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees 

Tuesday and Wednesday, June 15 and 16 

Field Day . Tuesday, June 15 

-Class Day Wednesday, June 16 

Annual Exhibition of Neotrophian Literary Society . 

Tuesday, June 15 

Vocal and Instrumental Concert, by the Music Department 

. Wednesday, June 16 
Annual Exhibition of American Literary Institute . 

Thursday, June 17 

Annual Commencement Thursday, June 17. 

Session begins Monday, September 20 

Anniversary of Neotrophian Literary Society . . November 5 
Anniversary of American Literary Institute . . .November 10 
Christmas recess begins at 1 P. M. . . Wednesday, December 22 

1898. 

Christmas recess ends January 3 

First term ends ........ January 28 

Second term begins January 29 

Joint Celebration of the Literary Societies . . . February 22 
Anniversary of Ossolian Literary Society .... March 18 

Baccalaureate Sermon. ..... Sunday, June 12 

Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees, on ... . 

Tuesday and Wednesday, June 14 and 15 

Annual Commencement Thursday, June 16 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



B. C. HAGERMAN, President (Ex officio) Bethany, W. Va. 
W. K. PENDLETON, Eustis, Fla. 



A. McLEAN, 

J. W. MULHOLLAND, . 
JOHN CAMPBELL, . 
HON. GEO. H. ANDERSON, 
JUDGE JNO. A. CAMPBELL, 
A. W. CAMPBELL, 

J. E. CUR™^ 

DR. J. E. WHITSITT, 

R. MOFFETT, 

F. D. POWER, .... 

ALEX. CAMPBELL, . 

CHARLES SHIELDS, 

WM. H. GRAHAM, 

GEORGE T. OLIVER, 

J. H. JONES, 

RUSSELL ERRETT, 

W. C. LYNE, .... 

HON. THOS. W. PHILLIPS, 

DR. ROGER WILLIAMS, . 

JOHN C. PALMER, . 

J. J. BARCLAY, . 

GEORGE DARSIE, . 

DR. I. M. RIDGE, 

S. M. COOPER, .... 

M. M. COCHRAN, 

OLIVER MARSHALL, . 



Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
St. Thomas, Ontario. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Perryopolis, Pa. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Washington, D. C. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Alliance, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Frankfort, Kentucky. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 



C. B. SCOTT, Bethany, W. Va. 

J. F. MERRYMAN, St. Louis, Mo. 

J. W. KNIGHT, . . . . . . Tromley, Ohio. 

CAMPBELL JOBES, Claysville, Pa, 

Z. T. VINSON, Huntington, W. Va. 

W. R. ERRETT, . Pittsburg. 



Executive Committee. 



MARK M. COCHRAN. 
WILLIAM H. GRAHAM. 



THOMAS W. PHILLIPS. 
GEORGE H. ANDERSON. 



GEORGE T. OLIVER. 

MISS A. C. PENDLETON. 
Librarian, and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 

B. T. BLANPIED, 
Bursar and Secretary of the Faculty. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



THE FACULTY. 



B. C. HAGERMAN, A. M., President, 

And Professor of Hermeneutics, Homiletics, and of New Testament 

Greek. 

A. C. McKEEVER, A. M., Chancellor. 

W. K. PENDLETON, LL. D., 

President Emeritus. 

A. C. PENDLETON, A. M., 

Professor of French and German. 

OSCAR fCHMIEDEL, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

B. T. BLANPIED, Ph. D., 

Professor of Natural Science. 

R. H. WYNNE, A. M., 
Professor of Hebrew and of History. 

B. C. BONDURANT, A. B., 

Professor of Latin. 

HENRY S. GREEN, A. B., 

Professor of Greek, 

And Instructor in Mental and Moral Science. 



Professor of Biblical Literature and Doctrine. 

C. D. ANDERSON, Lady Principal, 
Professor of English. 

EUGENE FEUCHTINGER, A. M., 

Director of Music. 

MISS CLARA SHEPARD, 

Professor of Stringed Instruments. 

MRS. BESSIE C. TRIBLE, 
Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

BENJAMIN BROWN, Jr., 
Professor of Elocution and Oratory. 



"To be appointed. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Origin and Purpose of Bethany College* 



The establishment of an institution of learning, differing 
in some essential respects from any in existence, had long 
been a favorite scheme with Alexander Campbell. When 
he was fifty years old he formulated and published in the 
"Millennial Harbinger" the plan of such an institution as he 
had in contemplation. He said: "Imagining that I possess 
some views and attainments which I can in this way render 
permanently useful to this community and posterity, I feel 
in duty bound to offer this project to the consideration of all 
friends of literature, morality and unsectarian Bible Chris- 
tianity." He proposed to give the rest of his life to its es- 
tablishment and supervision, provided only that his breth- 
ren — the rich and opulent especially, and those who had 
children to educate — would take a strong hold of it, and de- 
termine to build up an establishment that might be made to 
themselves, their children, and many others a lasting and 
comprehensive blessing. 

Two very simple and yet very important convictions were 
cherished by Alexander Campbell in founding Bethany Col- 
lege. In these two convictions, in fact, the college has had 
its origin, and by these it has been supported and conducted 
through the more than half-century of its history. The first 
is that the Bible is the basis of all true culture, the founda- 
tion of all knowledge. In the corner-stone of the college 
building is laid, underneath books of literature, history, 
science, magazines and periodicals, not a confession or a 
creed, not the "Christian Baptist" or the "Millennial Har- 
binger," but a plain Bible. This is the pillar and support 
of all. And it was the deep-rooted belief of the founder and 
the first friends of the college, that no education is worthy 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



of the name which leaves the student ignorant of the Bible. 
What Alexander Campbell believed so implicitly and pro- 
claimed so boldly in the middle of the present century , is 
just now beginning to be apparent to the leaders of educa- 
tion generally, as we are nearing the end of it. Indeed, it 
is only beginning to be appreciated now. Until quite re- 
cent years, the great majority of colleges and a multitude of 
theological seminaries had no place in their course for any 
practical study of the Bible. 

The other conviction cherished just as sacredly in the 
founding of Bethany is that thorough education is essential 
to an efficient ministry of the gospel. In this conviction, 
without doubt, is the most remarkable growth of the Disci- 
ples in a large degree explained. The ministry of the Disci- 
ples has been, to a great extent, an educated ministry. 
That this is true is surely due in no small part to the fifty 
years' work of Bethany College. It was never the aim of 
the college to endow the student with a stock of ideas or a 
system of thought, but to make mind, to increase the capac- 
ity for sound and scholarly study, for clear, accurate and in- 
dependent thinking, and, withal, to educate conscience, will 
and heart, as w r ell as intellect. The one great teacher, hon- 
ored supremely in our college is Christ; the one text-book, 
the New Testament; the one great aim in all our training is 
to make men know Christ, that they may make Him known 
to the world. In this aim the college began. To this it 
steadfastly adheres. 

The charter was procured from the legislature of Vir- 
ginia in 1840, by John C. Campbell, of Wheeling. Bethany 
was chosen as the site, and the first session of the college 
began in the autumn of 1841. 

Bethany is situated in the Panhandle of West Virginia, 
sixteen miles north of Wheeling, and seven miles east of 
Wellsburg, on the Wheeling branch of the Pittsburg, Cin- 
cinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railway. (From Wellsburg 
stages are run to Bethany every day, except Sunday. For 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 9 



special conveyance, address Moore Bros., or J. M. Davis, 
Bethany, W. Va.) 

Bethany is in the midst of an elevated region, where there 
is pure air, good water, and almost perfect exemption from 
malaria and intermittent, congestive and malignant fevers, 
so prevalent in some parts of the country. 

The surrounding country is one of extraordinary natural 
beauty. Where can be found a fairer scene than that 
which opens to us as we stand on the steps or walk the corri- 
der of the college building? Noble hills which do not rush 
abruptly to their really mountainous height, but rise to it 
by gentle gradations which give them a rounded and fin- 
ished aspect, and, besides, make them green pastures to 
their very summits through all the seasons; valleys fair and 
fragrant, through which the shadowy waters of "Old Buf- 
falo" wander riverward forever. Rarely does nature be- 
stow on any one spot so various charms with so lavish a 
hand. Added to these natural attractions are the tradi- 
tions and associations which linger about the place. The 
memory of those great souls who lived and labored at Beth- 
any, is kept green among us. Their ashes rest amid these 
fruitful and peaceful hills. Their aims and ideas still hover 
in the air. The very atmosphere of such a place is an edu- 
cation in itself. 

It is but truth to say that Bethany hardly aspires to be a 
great school, as some count greatness — great in the number 
of names on its register. It rather rejoices to be enrolled 
among the small colleges of our country. The small col- 
lege has played a great part in American education and his- 
tory. It is more than doubtful that so good results would 
have come if our colleges had been fewer and larger. The 
university has its mission, but it will not be well for our gen- 
eration if it be made to supplant the college or if our col- 
leges all aspire to be universities. The ambition of magni- 
tude so common to our colleges, is not altogether a matter 
of congratulation. A college is to be judged more by the 



10 CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 

character than the number of its students. Mammoth 
schools, like other mammoth concerns, may serve well for 
advertising ends, but they are likely to turn out a large pro- 
portion of men who, however they may count in the cata- 
logue, count for very little in the world's work. 

From its foundation the college has attracted those who 
desire to prepare themselves for gospel ministry. So true 
is this, that it is sometimes supposed to be chiefly, if not 
wholly a school for students for the ministry. It is, in fact, 
much more than this : it is a college in the full sense, educat- 
ing men not for one calling only, but for all the vocations of 
life. It has eminent alumni in all the professions. It is, 
however, eminently a school for the training of preachers. 
So far as our knowledge goes, no one ever came to Bethany 
with the intention of devoting his life to the ministry and 
changed that intention after coming here, while it is a thing 
of frequent occurrence that one who conies with his mind 
set on some other profession, resolves, after being in the col- 
lege awhile, to give himself to the work of the ministry. 
Bethany exalts the ministerial office. A ministerial stu- 
dent is held in at least equal honor with any other, while 
his intimate association with other students of the college, 
and his instruction in the same classes and studies with the 
rest, corrects all tendency to clericalisms. Bethany aims 
to make young men, first of all, students and scholars. Be- 
fore entering upon the strictly ministerial studies, the stu- 
dent is drilled in the classical and disciplinary studies as are 
other students. The design of this is to bring him to a de- 
gree of maturity and independence of mind before begin- 
ning the special ministerial studies. The propriety of this 
is obvious. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE- 1 1 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



Bethany College offers four regular courses of study: The 
Classical Course and the Ministerial Course ,each leading to 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts; the Scientific Course, lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science, and the Literary 
Course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Letters. 

For students not sufficiently advanced to enter the Fresh- 
man class of these college courses, the necessary prepara- 
tion will be given in a Preparatory year of daily recitations 
in Englisr Grammar, Latin, Algebra and General History. 

In English Grammar, attention will be given to the defi- 
nitions, classification and forms of the parts of speech; and 
to the inflection of nouns and verbs, with explanations of 
the meanings of moods and tenses. Special emphasis will 
be laid on the classification, analysis and parsing of sen- 
tences. Text-book, Reed & Kellogg's English Grammar. 

In Latin a thorough knowledge of the Declensions and 
Conjugations and of the most important rules of Syntax, 
with the ability to read at sight an easy passage taken from 
Caesar or Cornelius Nepos, will be required for admission 
to the Freshman class. Instruction in the Preparatory 
year is intended to enable the student to meet these require- 
ments. Tuell and Fowler's First Book in Latin will be 
studied, and at least one book of Caesar's Gallic wars. 

In Algebra besides thorough drill in the fundamental 
rules, prominence is given to radical expressions, quadratic 
equations, ratio and proportion, progression and logarithms. 
Text-book, Wentworth's School Algebra. 

In general History outlines are given of the history of the 



12 CATALOGUE OB 1 BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Eastern nations — India, China, Egypt, Chaldea, Assyria, 
Babylonia, Phoenicia and Persia — together with Greece 
and Rome down to the fall of the Roman Empire in the 
West, A. D. 476. Modern History from 1492 to the present 
time. The facts will be presented in their relations to the 
arts, commerce, government and civilization of mankind, 
?nd the contributions made by each nation to the life and 
progress of the race will be considered. Text-book, Myers' 
General History. 

The required studies for each of the regular courses are 
presented in the Synoptical View of the Several Courses, 
find are described in detail in the several departments of In- 
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CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 15 



Departments of Instruction* 



DEPARTMENT OF GREEK. 



FRESHMAN YEAR, 



The course in Greek extends through four years, the lat- 
ter half of the Senior year being given up to the study of 
New Testament Greek. 

One year's work in Latin is required for admission in this 
department.* 

Pupils begin the reading and writing of Greek with the 
very first lesson. The inductive method is used and every 
effort is made to develop the power and the habit of inde- 
pendent study. The common forms and constructions of 
the language, together with a considerable vocabulary are 
acquired in course of reading the first book of the Anabasis. 
Daily exercises in translating English into Greek. Text- 
books: — Harper and Castle's Inductive Greek Primer, Har- 
per and Wallace's Anabasis, Goodwin's Grammar. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Xenophon's Anabasis, three books. Selections from He- 
rodotus and three books of Homer's Iliad are read. 

Composition based on the prose previously translated in 
class runs through the first half-year. In connection with 
Homer mythology is taken up. The times and customs of 

*At ihe enl ranee examinations in September, 1898, candidates for the Freshman class 
will be examined also on the first book of Xenophon's Anabasis and the common forms 
and constructions of the lang-ua^e. 



16 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



the periods covered in translation are noted. Careful ex- 
amination of all forms and constructions continues through 
the year. Attention is called to the variety of form and dia- 
lect of the Iliad. The verse is read metrically. 

Text-books: — Harper and Wallace's Anabasis, Seymour's 
Iliad, Guerber's Myths of Greece and Rome. Students 
should also have Liddell and Scott's Lexicon, a Classical 
Atlas and a Dictionary of Antiquities. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Demosthenes' Philippics or the De Corona. Plato's Apol- 
ogy and Crito are read. 

An accurate knowledge of forms and syntax is required. 

A study of the times and conditions of the subjects read 
is made. 

Some time is devoted to Greek History and special themes 
are assigned for individual research. 

Text-books: — Dyer's Apology and Crito, Pennell's An- 
cient Greece or Fyffe's History of Greece. D'Ooge's Demos- 
thenes on the Crown. 

SENIOR YEAR. 



During the first half-year Aeschylus' Prometheus and 
Aristophanes' Clouds are read. 

A close study of the Greek drama is made. The meter is 
studied and portions of the verse read metrically. 

The development of Comedy is examined and its political 
bearing discussed. Considerable time is also devoted to 
the study of Greek Literature. 

The rest of the year is spent in studying New Testament 
Greek. Peculiar forms and idiomatic expressions are care- 
fully examined, comparisons being constantly made with 
standard Attic Greek. The gospels are studied on the ba- 
sis of Mark and the Pauline epistles on the basis of Gala- 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 19 

tians. Especial emphasis is laid on the form, structure and 
usage of the language rather than on exegesis. However, 
where form or syntax affects the meaning of a passage, an 
exposition of the text is given. 

Text-books: — Humphrey's Clouds, Allen's Prometheus, 
Jebb's Greek Literature; and Westcott & Hort's Greek New 
Testament, Green's Handbook of New Testament Greek. 



DEPARTMENT OF LATIN. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

During the first term, the Freshman class will read one 
book of Caesar's Gallic War and two of Cicero's Orations 
against Catiline. During the second term, one of Cicero's 
Orations and Sallust's Jugurthine War will be read. The 
class will practice reading Latin aloud, and an accurate 
pronunciation, according to the Roman Method, with a 
careful observance of the quantity of vowels, will be in- 
sisted upon from the start. Especial attention will be paid 
to the Forms in order to fix them permanently in the stu- 
dent's mind, and the Syntax will be studied with constant 
reference to the grammar. 

Cue recitation a week will be devoted to the translation of 
English into Latin. 

Text-books: — Bennett's Latin Grammar; Allen and 
Greenough's or Kelsey's Caesar; Allen and Greenough's or 
Kelsey's Cicero; Herberman's Sallust; Daniell's Exercises 
in Latin Composition. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

In the first term the twenty-first book of Livy and one 
book of Virgil's Aeneid and in the second term three books 
of the Aeneid and the Odes of Horace will be read by the 



20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Sophomore Class. Syntax, prosody, the usage of the poets 
contrasted with that of the prose writers and so much of 
Mythology as is necessary for the proper understanding of 
Virgil and Horace, will receive careful attention. Roman 
History is studied, and weekly exercises in Prose Composi- 
tion are continued throughout the session. 

Text-books: — Bennett's Grammar; Greenough and Peck's 
Livy; Greenough and Kittridge's Virgil; Smith's Odes and 
Epodes of Horace; Allen's History of the Roman People; 
Miller's Prose Composition. Lewis' Elementary Latin Dic- 
tionary or Harper's Latin Dictionary is recommended. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

This class will read during the first term Cicero's De Se- 
nectute and De Amicitia, and during the second term the 
Germania and Agricola of Tacitus. A part of the time will 
be given to the study of Roman Literature. Weekly exer- 
cises in Prose Composition will be required. 

Text-books: — Bennett's Grammar; Kelsey's edition of the 
De Senectute and De Amicitia; Allen's Tacitus; Wilkins' 
Primer of Roman Literature; Miller's Prose Composition. 

SENIOR YEAR. 



This class wil study Roman Satire in its great masters, 
Horace and Juvenal. In the second term Roman Comedy 
will be studied in the Captivi of Plautus. The Life and Cus 
toms of Romans will also be considered. 

Text-books: — Kirkland's Satires and Epistles of Horace; 
Macleane's Juvenal; Lindsay's edition of the Captivi of 
Plautus; Wilkin's Roman Antiquities. 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 21 



DEPARTMENT OF HEBREW. 



In this age of Biblical criticism the need of a knowledge 
of Hebrew is more generally felt and recognized and there 
is a growing interest taken in the study of the language. 
The course extends through the Junior and Senior years. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Genesis i-viii is read; the general principles of the gram- 
mar; special attention is given to the forms of words; the ac- 
quisition of a vocabulary; the translation of English into 
Hebrew; some of the important principles of syntax; read- 
ing of selections from Old Testament. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

A critical study of selections from the historic, poetic and 
prophetic books of the Hebrew Bible; review of the gram- 
mar; the principles of syntax; the principles of Hebrew po- 
etry. 

Text-books: — Harper's Elements of Hebrew, Harper's 
Method and Manual; Harper's Hebrew Syntax, Hebrew Bi- 
ble, Lexicon. 



DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH AND GERMAN. 



The course in French will extend from the beginning of 
the Freshman to the second term of the Sophomore year; 
the course in German from the second term of the Sopho- 
more to the end of the Senior year. Students who desire to 



22 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

begin these studies must possess an accurate knowledge of 
the elements of English grammar, and those desiring to en- 
ter later in the course must offer the work assigned for the 
preceding terms, or an equivalent. The aims of the instruc- 
tion are good pronunciation, ready use of regular and irreg- 
ular inflections, and the acquisition of a useful vocabulary. 
Special attention will be given to reading at sight ; oral prac- 
tice and writing from dictation will begin early in the 
course and continue throughout. Selections for reading 
are made with a view to acquainting the student, as far as 
time admits, with the masterpieces of French and German 
literature, and the political, social and literary character- 
istics of the author's time are therefore considered in the 
work. In every translation the idiomatic accuracy of the 
English used is taken into account. Scientific readings are 
included, that the student may acquire the special vocabu- 
lary needed for scientific research. The classes meet five 
times a week. 



French. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term: — Minimum French Grammar and Reader 
(Joynes); Preparatory French Reader (Super). 

Second Term: — Pailleron's Le Monde ou l'on s'ennuie 
(Pendleton) ; Racine's Athalie (Joynes) ; French Composition 
?'Graudgent); Minimum Grammar continued. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term: — Victor Hugo's La Chute, from Les Misera- 
bles (Huss); Scientific French readings (Bowen); French 
Composition (Grandgent); Minimum, or Otto's French 
Grammar for reference. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 23 

German, 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

} 
Second Term: — Joynes-Meissner's German Grammar; 

Grimm's Marchen (Van der Smissen). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

I 
First Term : — Von Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche (Clary) ; 

Freitag's Die Journalisten (Toy); Joynes-Meissner's Gram- 
mar. 

Second Term: — Goethe's Faust (Thomas); German Ly- 
rics; Colloquial German and Prose Composition; Joynes- 
Meissner's German Grammar for reference. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND HISTORY. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



A careful study of the principles of Rhetoric and, in order 
that the student may acquire the habit of putting these 
principles into practice, by the use of good English, fre- 
quent exercises in composition will occupy the time of both 
the Freshman and Sophomore classes. 

The Freshman Class will study so much of Rhetoric as 
concerns the use of Capitals, Punctuation, Paragraphing 
and the qualities of a good English style. Three compo- 
sitions a term will be required of each member. In order to 
cultivate in the student a taste for the best literature, a cer- 
tain amount of parallel reading will be assigned at the be- 
ginning of the session. Recitations once a week. 

Text-book — Kellogg' s Rhetoric. 



24 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

This class will continue the study of Rhetoric, taking up 
the discussion of Figures, and of the different kinds of Com- 
position, including the general principles of Versification. 
Some time will be spent in the critical analysis of selected 
s})ecimens of English prose and also in the study of words. 
Three compositions a term will be required. 

Text-Books: — Genung's Practical Rhetoric; G-enung's 
Rhetorical Analysis; Trench on the Study of Words. 

JUNIOR YEAR, 

During this year will be studied critically representative 
English authors of each period up to the nineteenth centu- 
ry. Attention will be given to the relations of writers to 
one another and to the times in which they lived, also the 
characteristics of each period. Parallel readings will be 
assigned, on which papers will be prepared by the students 
and discussed in class. Recitations twice a week. 

Text-book : — Painter's Introduction to English Literature. 

SENIOR YEAR. 



During the first half-year the nineteenth century period 
of English literature will be studied. The lives of the im- 
portant writers of this epoch will be considered individual- 
ly and reciprocally. Selections from their best writings 
will be carefully examined and analyzed. A knowledge of 
the figures and allusions will be required. The bearing of 
the works of the writers of this period on the history and lit- 
erarv culture of their time will be discussed. Parallel read- 
ings will be assigned for the preparation of papers on spe- 
cial themes for class discussion. 

During the last half-year students will make a study of 
American Literature. A general survey of the subject will 
be taken, but Emerson. Hawthorne, Lowell, Longfellow, 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 25 

Holmes, Bryant, Poe and Whittier will receive attention. 
The work will proceed on much the same plan as that of the 
preceding term. One carefully prepared essay on an as- 
signed subject will be required each term. 

Text-books: — Painter's Introduction to En^li^h Litera- 
ture; Painter's Introduction to American Literature. 

History* 
SENIOR YEAR. 

Recitations three times a week, during the First Term of 
the Senior Year are given in Church History, giving special 
attention to the Apostolic and Reformation periods of 
church history, and supplemented by lectures on recent re- 
formatory movements, especially the Origin, Principles and 
Growth of the Disciples. 

Text-books: — Meyer's General History; Fisher's Church 
History. 



DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCES. 

Physiology, Zoology and Botany. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

During the Freshman year about twelve weeks will be de- 
voted to each of these sciences in the order named. Recita- 
tions daily. 

In Physiology aside from the usual text-book work in 
Anatomy and Physiology, special attention is paid to Hy- 
giene. 

Text-book: — "Physiology and Hygiene," by Brands. 

In Zoology beginning with the lowest and simplest forms 
of animal life, the student is brought to the study of the 



26 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLFGE. 

higher and more complex, and in the diversity of form led to 
see the oneness of plan. 

Text-book: — "Comparative Zoology/' by James Orton, 
latest edition. 

In the study of Botany each student is required, in addi- 
tion to the text-book work of the recitation room, to collect 
and analyze, accurately naming Order, Genus and Species, 
and scientifically arrange a collection of at least fifty speci- 
mens of the more common plants, thus practically applying, 
so far as classification is concerned, what has been learned 
from the text-book. 

Text-book: — Gray's School and Field Botany, latest edi- 
tion. 

Physics and Chemistr y* 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

The course in Physics occupies eighteen weeks of the first 
part of the Junior Year, with five recitations per week. 

A thorough knowledge of Mathematics, at least so far as 
to include Trigonometry, is indispensable to the proper pur- 
suance of this course. 

Beginning with matter and motion, and their laws, the 
student is brought to the practical application of these laws 
in the different forms of matter, solids, liquids and gases, 
and to the philosophy of machinery. When these have been 
mastered, the different forms of energy, heat, light, sound 
and electricity are studied and discussed with special ref- 
erence to their practical application in the recent discov- 
eries and inventions in this science. 

Text-book : — "Appleton's School Physics." 

Chemistry* 

Chemistry occupies the last eighteen weeks of the Junior 
year, with five recitations per week, and is conducted on the 
plan suggested by the author of the text-book used, viz. : — 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 27 



first the systematic study of the phenomena, and then the 
connection between these phenomena and the theories. The 
apparatus and laboratory of this department are used with 
this end in view. 

Text-book: — "Introduction to the Study of Chemistry," 
by Ira Remsen, latest edition. 

Geology. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

The study of Geology occupies fourteen weeks of the last 
term of the Senior year, five recitations per week. 

The plan pursued is, first, the study of the agencies now 
at work in producing structure, or Dynamical Geology; sec- 
ond, structural Geology; last, Historical Geology. As an 
aid to this study, the college has a collection of minerals and 
geological specimens well suited for illustration. 

Text-book: — "Compend of Geology," by Le Conte. 

Analytical Chemistry* 
SENIOR YEAR. 

This course is required only of those Seniors who take the 
Scientific Course, though open to any student prepared, by 
having taken the course in Chemistry of the Junior year. 
It consists of five weekly recitations, of two hours each, dur- 
ing the first eighteen weeks of the Senior year in Qualitative 
and Quantitative Analysis. 

In the Qualitative work the student first studies the re- 
actions of the more common bases and acids, by dealing 
with known substances, and then he is given mixed com- 
pounds of, to him, unknown composition, to determine the 
different metals and acids which compose it. Not only is 
the student taught methods of analysis, but the reasons for 
the methods. 

Each student is required to keep neat and carefully pre- 
pared notes of all phenomena observed by him, during these 



28 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

determinations, which are inspected and corrected by the in- 
structor. 

In Quantitative Analysis only those who have satisfac- 
torily completed the first part of the course (Qualitaive 
Analysis) will be allowed to undertake this work. The stu- 
dent is first required to determine the per cent, of the met- 
als and acids in some of the pure salts, and when he has ac- 
quired accuracy in manipulation and understands the rea- 
sons for the methods employed, he is given salts and ores of 
unknown per cents' for determination. 

A fee of Ten Dollars is charged to each student in Quali- 
tative Analysis, and an additional fee of Five Dollars to 
those taking the Quantitative work. 

In all classes in Natural Sciences monthly examinations 
are required. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS. 

For a thorough mastery of the subject and the power of 
dealing successfully with original problems in elementary 
as well as in the more advanced mathematics, not a mere ac- 
quaintance but complete familiarity with a wide range of 
truths is necessary. Hence much stress is laid upon fixing 
important formulae and theorems in the memory of the stu- 
dent. Strictest reasoning is insisted on everywhere in the 
course. Promotion is not made unless the candidate is 
ready for the advanced work as evinced by his daily recita- 
tions and a written examination. 

To enter the Freshman class a knowledge of Algebra to 
Quadratic Equations, including Proportion and Loga- 
rithms, is required. Those not thus prepared must become 
members of the preparatory class, which meets five times 
a week throughout the year. Wentworth's School Algebra 
is used as text-book. 

Any one wishing to enter a class in applied Mathematics 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 29 



must first become familiar with those branches of pure 
Mathematics upon which the applied depends for its prin- 
ciples. The courses are so arranged that no student, pur- 
suing them in the order indicated and with the thorough- 
ness required, encounters serious difficulty. A small fee, 
to be paid before entering the class, is charged for the use 
of the instruments and drawing room; in Descriptive Geom- 
etry $2.00, in Surveying and in Koads and Railroads, $3.00 
each. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term: — Plane Geometry (Wentworth). 
Second Term: — Solid Geometry and Trigonometry 
(Wentworth, Jones' Tables). 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term:— Higher Algebra (Wentworth). 
Second Term: — Land Surveying (Gillespie). 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term: — Analytic Geometry and Differential Calcu- 
lus. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term: — Mechanics (Kemper). 
Second Term: — Astronomy (Young). 



DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE 

AND DOCTRINE. 

During the Sophomore year, students in all the regular 
college courses are required to give three recitations a week 
in Old and New Testament Literature, and ministerial Soph- 
omores are required to give in addition two recitations a 
week in more technical biblical study. The study of the 



30 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Old and New Testament Literature considers the Bible both 
in its unity as the record of a progressive Divine revelation, 
and also in its diversity as made up of many widely differ- 
ent though vitally related books. The authorship, the time 
and place of writing, the purpose, the plan, the contents and 
the style of each of the several books are studied. These 
books are also studied in their biblical groupings as Histor- 
ical, Poetical, Prophetical, Epistolary, etc. Biblical study, 
technically so called, deals with the aims, principles and 
methods of biblical study, and is here made to include Can- 
onics, Textual Criticism, Hermeneutics, and Biblical Geog- 
raphy and Archaeology. 

During the Junior year instruction is given daily to min- 
isterial students in New Testament Doctrine. This doc- 
trine is presented not only in its several distinct types, as 
the teaching of Jesus, of Peter, of Paul, of John, etc., but 
also in the essential harmony of all these types. 

In the Senior year instruction is given in Church History, 
in Homiletics, in Church Polity, and in Christian Ethics. 

Text-books : — In this department the Bible is taken as the 
main text-book, but the following books are also used and 
recommended as valuable helps: In the Sophomore year 
Maclear's Class-books of Old and New Testament History, 
and Briggs' Biblical Study. Junior year: — Adeny's New 
Testament Theology, Stevens' Pauline Theology and Ste- 
vens' Johannine Theology. Senior year: — Fisher's Chruch 
History, Broadus' Preparation and Delivery of Sermons, 
Robinson's Principles and Practice of Morality. 



DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL, MORAL AND 
POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

In this department, during the first half of the year, ! a 
course of lectures will be given, designed to present in an 
elementary and summary way the principal philosophical 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 33 

problems. An outline sketch of the history and develop- 
ment of philosophical thought will be given in connection 
with the course in Psychology. 

Text-book : — Ladd's Psychology. 

In Moral Science much attention is given to the various 
existing theories concerning the supreme motive in human 
conduct and the true ground of moral obligation. An 
effort is made to show that the various theories are not so 
much opposed to each other as might be supposed. 

Text-book: — Porter's Elements of Moral Science. 

In Logic both the deductive and inductive methods are 
taught. Special drill is given in the work of detecting fal- 
lacies and in pointing out the exact nature of the fallacy in 
each instance. 

Text-book : — Jevons' Logic. 

Instruction is given three times a week during the Junior 
year (also to ministerial Sophomores) in Political Science, 
which is made to include American Government, as well as 
Economics. One term is given to each of these subjects, in 
the order named. 

Instruction in American History is intended to set forth 
the facts and principles which underlie the government of 
the Ignited States and to give the student a knowledge of 
such facts as every citizen of this country should possess. 

Attention will be given to the following: The national 
government ; the government of the colonies ; the formation 
of the Union; nature and sources of the constitution; com- 
position and organization of the two houses of Congress; 
the government of the states and their relations to the 
Union. 

Text-book :— The American Government, by B. A. Hins- 
dale. 

The study of Economics embraces the principles of Polit- 
ical Economy. Its development, private and public. Un- 
der private economics will be considered production, trans- 
fer, distribution and consumption of goods. Public Econo- 



34 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

mics deals with the relations of the state and private enter- 
prise, expenditure and revenues. 

Text-book: — Ely's Outlines of Economics. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 

Recognizing the intellectual and spiritual value of a com- 
plete course in the Art of Music, Bethany College follows 
the example of other celebrated institutions at home and 
abroad, by making the study of Music one of the elective 
courses of the college, and admits the same as a substitute 
for one of the studies in the Classical, Scientific, Literary or 
Ministerial course, subject to the approval of the Faculty. 

Students in the Department of Music are required to pur- 
sue at least one study in some other department of the col- 
lege. 

The object of the Music Department is to prepare stu- 
dents for an active, artistic career, either in concert, church, 
school or on the stage. 

To educate teachers, who shall be masters of knowledge 
and understanding in the correct and systematic training of 
those entrusted to their care. 

To give solid, artistic foundation, graceful and brilliant 
execution to those fortunate ones who, free from material 
cares, follow art for art's sake, and who, either in the circle 
of a cultured home, or as leaders in society, diffuse pleasure 
and happiness around them. 

Branches of Instruction* 

Piano-Forte; Organ; String Instruments: — Violin, Man- 
dolin, Guitar, etc. ; Reed and Brass Instruments. 

Voice Culture: — Solo Singing; Chorus Singing. 

Ensemble Playing. 

Theory of Music, embracing: Harmony, Counterpoint, 
Composition, Laws of Sound and Acoustics. 

History of Music, 

Biography of the great Musicians. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 87 

PIANO OR ORGAN. 

All Piano students must attend the classes in Harmony 
and Theory. Teacher's Certificate will be given to those 
completing our Three Year's course. Diploma of Gradua- 
tion and degree of Bachelor of Music to those completing 
the entire Four Year's course. Any candidate for Teach- 
er's Certificate or Diploma of Graduation must have stu- 
died at least one year in our college. 

VOICE CULTURE. 

All voice students must attend the classes in Harmony 
and Theory. 

Teachers' Certificates will be given to those completing 
the course of Two Years. Members of this class must be 
able to play accompaniments. Diploma of graduation and 
degree of Bachelor of Music will be given to those complet- 
ing the course of three years. 

ORCHESTRA (VIOLIN, ETC.) 

All Violin students must attend classes in Harmony and 
Theory. 

Diploma of Graduation and degree of Bachelor of Music 
will be given to those completing the course of three years. 

HARMONY AND THEORY. 

This course includes two years' study of Harmony and 
two years' of Musical Forms, Aesthetics, Laws of Sound, 
History, etc. 

It is taught in classes meeting once a week. 

Terms of Tuition. 

PAYA JLE IN ADVANCE. 

The school year of the Music Department consists of two 
terms of 18 weeks each. Private lessons with teachers are 
30 minutes each, twice a week. Private lessons with the 



38 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Director are 20 minutes each, twice a week. All class les- 
sons are of an hour's duration, either with the teachers or 
with the Director, and twice a week, except Harmony and 
Theory, which are once every week. 

For specification of studies send for special Music Cata- 
logue to Director Eugene Feuchtinger, Bethany, W. Va. 

PIANO OR ORGAN. 

Two private lessons each week. 

I and II year, each term $25.00 

III and IV year, each term 35.00 

IN CLASSES OF FOUR STUDENTS. 

Two lessons a week, of one hour each. 

I and II year, each term $20.00 

III and IV year, each term 30.00 

Ensemble playing, free. 

VOICE. 

All instruction in Voice is given by the Director. 
Two private lessons each week. 

I year, each term $30.00 

II and III year, each term 35.00 

In classes of four students, two lessons a week, one hour 

each. 

I year, each term $25.00 

II and III year, each term 30.00 

Chorus singing, free. 
Lectures on Hygiene of Vocal and Respiratory Organs, 
and Anatomy of Chest and Larynx, free. 

NOTICE! 

There will be a course of three months on the develop- 
ment of artistic voice. This course is intended to cover the 
complete course of Voice Development. Daily lessons of 
15 minutes each will be given. 

This course is of the utmost importance to all; every per- 



CATALOrUTTC OF BETHANY fOLT.EOE. 



39 



son between the ages of fifteen and seventy can take this 
course, and with average ability become a good singer. 

Send for special circular regarding and explaining this 
course. 

It is the shortest, cheapest and most effective course that 
can be offered. 

VIOLIN, MANDOLIN, GUITAR, ETC. 



two lessons 



Two private lessons each week. 
I and II year, each term 
III year, each term 
In classes of four students, 
I and II year, each term 
III year, each term 

One private lesson a week 
I and II year, each term 
III year, each term 

Ensemble playing, free 

CHORAL CLASS. 
Free to Music Students. 
One Lesson a week 



$25.00 

30.00 

of one hour each. 

. $15.00 

20.00 

. $15.00 
20.00 



per Term, $3 00 



HARMONY AND THEORY. 

One Class Lesson a week .... per Term, $ 5 00 

CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Teacher's Certificate $ 5 00 

Diploma of Graduation 10 00 

RENT OF PIANO. 

Use of Piano or practice Clavier, one hour and a half, for 
daily practice, per Term, $5.00. 

Students in the Department of Music taking studies in 
any other department of instruction in the College, pay $5 
per Term for each study taken. 



40 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

There is a special catalogue of the Music Department, 
which will be sent upon application,, free of charge, by the 
Director, Prof. Eugene Feuchtinger, Bethany, W. Va. 
This catalogue gives detailed description of each branch of 
study, the compositions, composers, and technical material 
to be studied. It gives the advantages, rules, regulations, 
special privileges, etc. 



Department of Art. 

The Art Department is in charge of Mrs. Bessie C. Trible, 
who brings to the position superior talents and experience. 
Thorough instruction is given in Free-Hand Drawing, Chi- 
na Painting, Portrait and Landscape Painting in Oil, 
Crayon, Water Colors, and India Ink. Situated in one of 
the most beautiful landscapes in America, Bethany affords 
rare opportunities for sketching from nature. It is the 
purpose and policy of the college to foster the love and 
study of art continually. 

FIRST YEAR. 

This consists in the drawing of straight and curved lines, 
circles, squares and other simple forms in outline, until the 
muscles of the hand have learned to obey the will. This is 
continued with simple drawings executed in the modern 
method, until the use of charcoal and crayon is thoroughly 
understood. The student then takes up Cast Drawings, 
which is progressive, beginning with the features in differ- 
ent positions and leading gradually to the full head, feet, 
hands, etc., until the whole length figure is reached. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Cast drawing continued. 

Crayon, Pastel, Drawing from Nature, Water Colors. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 41 

THIRD YEAR. 

Pastel, Water Colors, Drawing from Nature continued. 

Oil Colors, Portraiture. 

All art students have the privilege of attending the lec- 
tures of Prof. Feuchtinger on the Nature and Meaning of 
the Beautiful, Architecture, Painting, Poetry, and Music. 



Tuition* 



Class Lessons per Term. $18 00 

Private Lessons each 1 00 



Department of Elocution and Oratory* 

The design of this department is to cultivate a taste for 
pure literature, to elevate the standard of expression and 
to (jualify students for public reading and speaking. 

The regular course in Oratory extends one full college 
year, is compact, systematic and practical; but for those 
who for any reason do not care to take the regular course of 
study the following special courses are arranged: — 

Deep Breathing, Voice Development, Stage Deportment; 
Psycho-Physical Culture; Bible and Hymn Reading; Ad- 
vanced Reading and Oratory; Gesture and Pantomime; 
Dramatic Attitudes; Facial Expression and Impersonation. 
Also a lecture course of ten lessons on Thought Analysis 
and Philosophy of Expression. 

The work in the regular course is supplemented by lec- 
tures on such subjects as Mental and Moral Conditions Af- 
fecting the Voice, The Will in Elocutionary Work, Personal 
Magnetism and other topics of interest to the student of el- 
ocution and oratory. Many special advantages are afford- 
ed in this department, rates of tuition very moderate. For 
particulars address the Director, B. Brown, Jr. 



42 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Gymnasium, 

Believing that the true principles and methods of educa- 
tion require proper and proportionate consideration to be 
given to both mind and body, Bethany College, in connec- 
tion with her other departments of instruction, also fosters 
physical culture. There is a commodious gymnasium, well 
equipped with the best modern apparatus and appliances for 
physical development and culture, such as horizontal bars, 
parallel bars, ladders, climbing ropes, chest weights, dumb- 
bells, wands, indian clubs, striking bag, basket ball, etc. 
Within the College Campus, there are ample athletic 
grounds, well laid out for base ball, foot ball and other ath- 
letic games; also fine tennis courts, croquet grounds, etc. 
Thus superior advantages and inducements are afforded for 
both ladies and gentlemen. Hours are set apart for the 
daily use of the gymnasium by the young lady students, and 
it is expected that they will make as free use iof the gym- 
nasium facilities as do the male students. With such va- 
riety of recreations, no student can lack that diversion and 
exercise so indispensable to the enjoyment of college life 
and success in college work. 



Library and Reading; Room. 

This is a commodious apartment, 30 by 38 feet, well light- 
ed and supplied with the best papers and magazines of the 
day. It is known by many that our library has twice suf- 
fered heavy losses by fire; it is at present well equipped 
with encyclopedias and other books of reference, and con- 
tains, besides, about two thousand volumes of miscellane- 
ous literature. Liberal gifts in books have been made by 
friends from time to time; such donations are earnestly so- 
licited, and will at all times be gratefully acknowledged:. 

A reading-room fee of one dollar is required from each 
student in the college to provide a fund for the supply of 
current literature. 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 43 



Cabinets and Museums* 

The Natural History Cabinet contains some of the Fauna, 
Birds and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable col- 
lection from Australia, and exchanges from other sections 
of the country; also a fine Herbarium of native plants, with 
many rare ones from other parts of the world. 

The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains 
several thousand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all 
parts of the World. 

The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains 
rare and valuable collections. 

The Philosophical Apparatus affords facilities for the 
illustration of physical principles. 

The Chemical Laboratory is provided with apparatus 
and chemicals for illustration in the courses offered. 



Literary Societies* 

There are in connection with the college four societies 
devoted to the cultivation of literary composition and ora- 
tory: The Ossolian, the Neotrophian, the American and the 
Adelphian. The Ossolian is distinctively for ladies and the 
Adelphian for ministerial students. As the Adelphian So- 
ciety differs in some important respects from a purely liter- 
ary society, it demands more particular notice. As it is a 
distinguishing feature of Bethany College to make the Bi- 
ble a regular subject of study and daily examination, the 
Adelphian Society has been organized in order to promote 
and carry out to the fullest extent the purposes contem- 
plated in the department of Bible Literature. The regu- 
lar exercises of the society consist of recitations of portions 
of the Scriptures; reading original essays on moral and re- 
ligious subjects, and the delivery of Scriptural discourses, 
not only before the society, but on suitable occasions in pub- 
lic. 






44 CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Young men in preparing for the Christian ministry may 
derive incalculable advantages from this society. From its 
organization, and the character and ability of its members, 
It is well fitted to facilitate the acquisition of enlarged 
views of the Bible, and the cultivation of a high standard of 
morality and religion. 



Students Lecture Association* 

A course of popular lectures is given each year under the 
auspices of this association, affording the students the ben- 
efit of some of the best platform talent of the country. 



The Collegian* 

During the college year the students publish a monthly 
journal, entitled The Collegian, which may be used as an 
excellent means for developing literary talent. 



Religious Services* 

The daily morning devotions are held in the college 
chapel at eight o'clock. 

Daily and weekly meetings for prayer and song and ex- 
hortation are maintained by the students. 

The college authorities are anxious to make the college 
pulpit worthy of its splendid traditions. The regular 
preacher is a member of the faculty; other members speak 
occasionally, and during the year a number of eminent men 
are invited to spend a Lord's Day in Bethany. The church 
seeks to contribute to the piety of every student. 

The Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. C. A. and the Y. P. S. C. E. have 
each a large and active membership among the students,, 
and are doing good work. A number of students are en- 
rolled in the Volunteer Band. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 45 

Missions. 

A course of lectures on Missions is given before the whole 
school. This course covers as fully as practicable all the 
more important points in the Theory, History and Practice 
of Christian Missions. The matter is equally important to 
those who are preparing for work at home, and for those 
who prepare to go abroad. The Missionary Association of 
the college holds stated meetings to hear reports and origi- 
nal letters from former students and others in the various 
mission fields, to pray for the increased success of mission- 
ary labor, to discuss questions connected with the mission 
work, and, in general, to cultivate an intelligent personal in- 
terest in the great enterprise of evangelizing the world. 



Degrees and Diplomas. 

To receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science or Bachelor of Letters, the candidate must have 
completed all the studies required (or their full equivalents) 
in the course leading to the desired degree, with an actual 
attendance in the college during at least the Senior year. 

Students who have attended the college during the Jun- 
ior and Senior years and whose final grade, computed as the 
average of all their monthly and examination grades during 
these years is ninety-three per cent, are enrolled on the 
Honor List, and this distinction is noted in the -diploma by 
the words Cum Laude. A final grade of ninety-four per 
cent is noted by Magna Cum Laude, one of ninety-five per 
cent by Summa Cum Laude. In the awarding of honors, 
however, regard is had to the conduct of the student during 
his course, and any student who has incurred serious disci- 
pline may be debarred from the honor to which otherwise 
his scholarship would have entitled him. 

In order to obtain the degree of Master of Arts, the can- 
didate must first receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts, be 



46 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



thereafter in actual attendance in the college for one ses- 
sion, and complete, with an approved examination in each, 
three studies to be selected by him with the consent of the 
Faculty. 

The honorary degree of Master in any one of the courses 
may be conferred on a Bachelor of three years' standing in 
that course, provided he has, during the interval, pursued 
studies relating to the degree and has maintained an ex- 
emplary character. 

The fee for any diploma is ten dollars; except for a Bach- 
elor's diploma to Ministerial students, which is five dollars. 
No application for the degree of Master is entertained un- 
less accompanied by the fee of ten dollars, which is re- 
turned if the degree is not conferred. 



Expenses* 

Young men can procure board and rooms either (fur- 
nished or un-furnished) in Bethany at about the same prices, 
according to quality, as the prevailing cost of corresponding 
accommodations in other college communities. The best 
rooms in the village, furnished and cared for, with fuel, etc., 
can be had for the entire session by two students at a cost 
to each of from thirty to thirty-five dollars. The best 
board can be had for from two dollars and fifty cents to 
three dollars a week. In clubs it may be made to cost still 
less. The following tabular statement may be taken as a 
fair average of the necessary expenses of a young man for 
the entire session, or college year : 

Tuition ... $ 40 00 

Matriculation 10 00 

Furnished Room 30 00 

Board, 38 weeks at $2.50 per week .... 95 00 

Reading Room Fee 1 00 

Total $176 Ofi 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 47 



Expenses Phillips Hall. 

Young ladies residing as students at Phillips Hall are 
given furnished rooms (heated and lighted) and board, for 
three dollars and fifty cents a week. Care is taken to pro- 
vide the young ladies a sufficiency of wholesome, palatable 
food and to allow them a reasonable freedom of the house in 
all respects. Each young lady is expected to bring sheets, 
pillow cases, towels, napkins, napkin ring, knife, fork, tea- 
spoon and lamp. Of course each young lady is charged also 
the regular Tuition and Matriculation fees of the college. 

Phillips Hall, the handsome gift of the Hon. Thomas W. 
Phillips, of New Castle, Pa., is a large and commodious 
building, well adapted to the wants of young ladies. The 
rooms are nicely carpeted and well furnished. The hall is 
heated throughout by steam, has hot and cold water , on 
each floor, and is supplied with bath rooms. The building 
is situated on College Hill, only a (few steps from the college 
building, which renders it convenient for the students to 
study in their own rooms between class hours. 

A lady principal has charge of Phillips Hall, devotes her- 
self to the welfare of the young ladies and endeavors to 
make this place a home in fact as well as in name. The 
moral and spiritual, as well as the intellectual interests of 
the young ladies are constantly kept in view. It is sought 
to inspire them with the highest ideals, and to promote 
their growth in character as well as in mind. Honor and 
truth are the main principles regarded in the government 
of the home; and sympathy and confidence rather than rigid 
rules are relied on to preserve the peace and order of the 
household. This confidence is rarely disappointed. Young 
ladies who have begun to take life in earnest do not need 
much discipline. Others are not advised to come to Beth- 
any. 

It is not expected that young ladies in attendance as stu- 
dents will board elsewhere in the village, unless under the 
expressed approval of their parents or guardians, with the 
concurrence of the college faculty. 



48 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Reduced Tuition* 

Young men in any of the religious denominations, who 
wish to prepare for the ministry, may, on paying the matric- 
ulation fee, be admitted into any of the courses at Bethany 
College at one-half the regular rates of tuition. 

All applicants for this privilege are required to present 
to the Faculty satisfactory written recommendations from 
their respective congregations, and from well known minis- 
ters of the gospel, certifying that they come under the fore- 
going conditions. 

Children of regular ministers of the gospel, of all denom- 
inations, are admitted to all classes and privileges of the col- 
lege upon payment of the matriculation fee and one-half the 
regular tuition. 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be 
required to give instruction in the primary classes. 



Phillips Loan Fund. 

A few years ago the Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, of New 
Castle, Pa., generously donated to the trustees the sum of 
five thousand dollars to be loaned to students in Bethany 
who are preparing for the ministry. The original fund as 
thus constituted has since been considerably increased by 
other generous gifts and by accrued interest. Aid from 
this fund may be obtained by ministerial students, on com- 
plying with the conditions of the loan. 



Regulations. 

In order to contribute to the welfare of all concerned, the 
following regulations have been adopted. The Faculty 
most earnestly requests the co-operation of parents and 
guardians in their enforcement. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 49 

Fees: — One -half of the expenses of the college year must 
be paid at the opening of the first term, the other half at the 
opening of the second term. The matriculation and tuition 
lees must be paid invariably in advance. Before entering 
class, a student is required to show his matriculation card. 
Every student using a scholarship niust, when matriculat- 
ing, present it, or a copy of it, to the Bursar. 

No portion of the student's fees is refunded on account of 
withdrawal from college, unless the withdrawal be ren- 
dered necessary by ill health. 

Number of Studies : — A student must have at least three 
daily studies, unless, upon the written request of parent or 
guardian, or for good cause shown, the Faculty shall allow 
him a less number. 

Absences: — A student is not permitted to absent himself 
from any recitation or examination without valid excuse, 
nor from the college without special leave from the Presi- 
dent. Any student who fails to attend his classes regularly 
or to manliest an interest in his work, is dismissed. The 
college is vastly better off without those who cumber the 
ground. Good students must not be kept back by those 
who lack either aptitude or application. 

Reports: — At the end of each term (or oftener, if request- 
ed) a report is sent by the Faculty to the parent or guardian 
of each student, stating grades and absences from recitations 
and examinations, together with such other information re- 
specting the student's progress and conduct as may be 
deemed proper to communicate, or as the parent or guar- 
dian may especially request. The object of such reports is 
to incite the student to diligence by the commendation and 
encouragement of his friends, and to restrain him from idle- 
ness and disorder by their admonition and advice. The use- 
fulness of the reports greatly depends upon the prompt and 
judicious attention they receive from those to whom they 
are addressed. Parents and guardians therefore cannot be 






50 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

too earnest or prompt in communicating such advice or en- 
couragement as these reports may suggest. 

Conduct: — Young men are expected to conduct them- 
selves as gentlemen. The college does not lay down specific 
and minute regulations; at the same time it hopes that each 
one will be a law to himself, and that he will do nothing in- 
consistent with good order, good taste, or good morals. 
Should anyone act otherwise, the Faculty will take note of 
the offense at once and deal with the offender as the best in- 
interests of all concerned may require. In like manner the 
young ladies are expected to* act in strict accord with the 
principles of propriety and: honor. 

The laws of the cblfege require from every student decor- 
ous, sotfler and upright conduct as long as he remains a 
member of the college, whether he be within the precincts 
or not. They strictly forbid drunkenness, gaming, disso- 
luteness, swearing, habits of expense, and the introduction 
of wine or other intoxicating drinks into town or college 
precincts. They require a proper observance of the Lord's 
Day. They forbid the use or possession of pistols or other 
weapons, and the introduction of them into the college pre- 
cincts. Any violation of these Regulations may lead to dis- 
missal or expulsion from the college. 

Prohibition of Credit: — The Faculty wish to urge parents 
and guardians not to allow students to contract debts to any 
large amount. Such funds as are necessary ought to be 
promptly furnished. It should be borne in mind that too 
much money is likely to lead to drinking, gambling, and 
other bad habits. No student need spend over three hun- 
dred dollars a year; the majority of the students spend 
much less than this sum. 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 51 



Graduates of the Fifty-Sixth Session. 



• 



"v 



BACHELORS OF ARTS. 

Brown, B., Jr West Virginia. 

Hill, Harry G Indiana. v 

Hostetter, V. G ......Ohio. 

Huffman, F. B ...Michigan. 

Ice, A. E Kansas. 

Mansell, W. B Ohio. (S-v 

McDiarmid, Normal L .".Ohio. * n 

Sala, John P Ohio, ^^M^ 

Stewart, George B Indiana. (fyi£ 

Tolar, John R New York. / '> 

Trible, J. M ...West Virginia. 

Watson, C. M .. Pennsylvania, yil^i 

Weiker, L. L CLMPX. .».' ^ Ohio. 

Wynne, Edmund West Virginia. 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE. , 

Clopper, E. N Missouri. *- ^ V W^A 

Preston, C. M Tennessee. ^Jb^oJct r 

BACHELORS OF LETTERS. 

'( Baldridge, C. J Kentucky. ;L/ 

Barclay, J. jt West Virginia, lb ^t KsCi 

Dimond, Sara E " West Virginia* 

McDiarmid, Ethel Ohio. / :. 

Scott, Goldie... ... West Virginia. $., ■ W 

Scott, Ola West Virginia. I 

Scott, Zona West Virginia. 

BACHELORS OF MUSIC. 

Gittens, Fannie.. . .J^, ^AAyhsTttb*. . . . Pennsylvania. |/^(^ /fi 'i ri \ 

Stumpf, Violet .1 Pennsylvania. Jh^^^xiA/ut-fU- 

Thomas, T. D Pennsylvania. 

Whitacre, O. T Ohio./ 

Yeagley, Rella... Pennsylvania. 



Honors of the Fifty-fifth Session. 



SUMMA CUM LAUDE. 

E. E. Crawford Prince Edward Island. 

MAGNA CUM LAUDE. 
T. G. Picton Pennsylvania. 



52 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



CUM LAUDE. 

R. J. Bamber Illinois. 

J. A. Canby West Virginia. 

Gertrude Frew West Virginia. 

J. W. Stewart West Virginia. 



Students of the Fifty-sixth Session* 



POST GRADUATE. 

Crawford, E. E Prince Edward Island. 

SENIORS, 

Baldridge, C. J., 1 Covington, Ky. 

Barclay, J. J., 1 Bethany, W. Va. 

Brown, B., Jr., c Bethany, W. Va. 

Clopper, E. N., s St. Louis, Mo. 

Dimond, Sara E., 1 Bethany, W. Va. 

Hill, Harry G., m Union City, Ind. 

Hostetter, V. G., m Minerva, Ohio. 

Huffman, P. B. , m Forrest, Mich. 

Ice, A. E., m Belvoir, Kansas. 

Man&ell, Walter B., m Bellaire, Ohio. 

Preston, C. M., s Woodbury, Tennessee. 

Sala, John P., m Minerva, Ohio. 

Scott, Goldie, 1 Bethany, W. Va. 

Scott, Ola, 1 Bethany, W. Va. 

Scott, Zona, 1 Bethany, W. Va. 

Stewart, Geo. B.,-c Union City, Ind. 

Tolar, John R., m Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Trible, J. M., c Bethany, W. Va. 

Watson, C. M., m Allegheny City, Pa. 

Watson, H. A., 1 Martin's Ferry, Ohio. 

Weiker, L. L., c Shreve, Ohio. 

Wynne, Edmund, c Bethany, W. Va. 

JUNIORS. 

Acoam, H. W., m Bedford, Ind. 

Banting, Emma, 1 Elmore, Ohio. ., 

Bates, Z. E., m Bethany, W. Va. 

Bebout, D. R Hebron, Ohio. 

Biddle, F. M., m Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Chapman, A. C, s Donley, Pa. 

Moninger, Herbert, m Strabane, Pa. 

Miller, H. N Lone Pine, Pa. 

Otsuka, F. N., m Itsuhara, Japan. 

Place. A. W., c Rudolph, Ohio. 

S'tickley, M. E., c Woodstock, Va. 

Wells, Oscar, s Platte City, Mo. 

White, O. G., m ....Hebron, Ohio. 

SOPHOMORES. 

Colyer, R. P., 1 Butler, Mo. 

Curtis, E. H., Jr., 1 .Bethany, W. Va. 

Fisher, W. L., m. ,,.,.., h^W London, Mo. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 53 



Ingram, H. S., c Quincy, 111. 

Mast, Bessie, 1 Millersburg, Ohio. 

McFarland, Maude, 1 Bethany, W. Va. 

Mong, Geo. L., m Minerva, Ohio. 

Morris, Pearl, 1 Shelby, Ohio. 

Moser, Grace, 1 Mt. Healthy, Ohio. 

Murray, W. P. A., m Bradalbane, P. E. I. 

Roberts, Lillian, c Moundsville, W. "Va. 

Roberts, Meta, 1 Moundsville, W. Va. 

Sommerville, T. B. M., c Bethany, W. Va. 

Stuart, D. E., m Victoria, West P. E. I. 

Taylor, Ida Harden Bethany, W. Va. 

White, T. J., m Allegheny City, Pa. 

FRESHMEN. 

Alexander, R. R., c Minerva, Ohio. 

Allen, Eva W., 1 Lock No. Four, Pa. 

Blackburn, Inez, 1 £ Bellaire, Ohio. 

Bowman, Harry, c Pleasant Grove, Ohio. 

Carman, W. C, c Bethany, W. Va. 

Chambers, Mamie, 1 Elm Grove, W. Va. 

Charnock, Mary, c Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Cochran, P. B., c Uniontown, Pa. 

Cooper, Grace, 1 Monongahela, Pa. 

Cowgill, Chas. C, m Hagerstown, Md. 

Doak, A. A., m Bethany, W. "Va. 

Duncan, Donald D., c Pittsburg, Pa. 

Fields, W. H., m Lock No. Four, Pa. 

Gordon, Fred., m Steubenville, Ohio. 

Gray, Chester, 1 Steubenville, Ohio. 

Green, Robert R., c Bethany, W. "Va. 

Hagerman, Virginia C, 1 Bethany, W. Va. 

Hill, W. C, m Union City, Ind. 

Hodge, F. A., m Rochester, N. Y. 

Martin, J. E., m Bedford, Ind. 

Mason, Guy M., c Norfolk, W. Va. 

Miley, C. LeR., c Woodstock, Va. 

Miller, V. H., m Hagerstown, Md. 

Nicholson, E. C, mi Rochester, N. Y. 

Pattee, Sherley, c Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Seybold, Genevieve, 1 Wheeling, W. Va. 

Sutton, F. F., m Bethany, W. Va. 

Swaney, Jessie, 1 Bethany, W. Va. 

Wills, Earle, 1 Keokuk, Iowa. 

Woodbury, J. E., c Union City, Ind. 

Zeigler, Edward, m Hagerstown, Md. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Baldridge, Lillian, Mus Covington, Ky. 

Barth, R. C, Mus Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Burnett, V. G New London, Mo. 

Craft, Katharine, Art Bethany, W. Va. 

Chapline, A. R Bethany, W. Va. 

Duffy, Claude W Washington, Pa. 

Gittens, Fannie, Mus Pittsburg, Pa. 

Hagerman, Mrs. B. C, Mus Bethany, W. Va. 

Hedges, Mrs. John, Mus Bethany, W. Va. 

Hedges, Everett, Mus Bethany, W. Va. 



54 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Hedges, Kenner, Mus Bethany, W. Va. 

Hosie, Pearl Bethany, "W*. Va. 

Huffman, Mrs. F. B., Art Forrest, Mich. 

Ingram, A. P Quincy, 111. 

Jones, Fred., Mus Bethany, "W. "Va. 

Kuhn, Eugene Everson, Pa. 

Lauck, Bessie, Mus Bethany, W. "Va. 

Matthews, W. N Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Miller, Pearl, Mus Tromley, Ohio. 

Nelson, Loula, Mus. & Art Bellaire, Ohio. 

Phillips, Delia V., Mus Rocklick, W. Va. 

Sommerville, Emma, Art Bethany, W. Va. 

Stumpf, Violet, Mus Indiana, Pa. 

Swaney, Blaine Bethany, W. Va. 

Swaney, Estella, Mus Bethany, W. Va. 

Swaney, Mary M., Art Bethany, W. Va. 

Thomas, T. D., Mus Plymouth, Pa. 

Trible, Susie, Art * Bethany, W. Va. 

Wells, Lena, Mus Bethany, W. Va. 

Whitacre, Eletha, Mus Tromley, Ohio. 

Whitacre, O. T., Mus Tromley, Ohio. 

Yeagley, Rella, Mus Johnstown, Pa. 

Yost, Edith, Mus Colerain, Ohio. 









CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 55 



FORMS OF BEQUESTS. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, 

Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of thousand 

dollars, to be safely invested by them as an endowment, only 
the interest of which is to be used for the support of the Col- 
lege. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, 

Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of thousand 

dollars, to applied, at their discretion, for the general pur- 
poses of the College. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, 

Bethany, West Virginia, the sum of thousand 

dollars, to be safely invested by them, and only the interest 
applied, at their discretion, to aid deserving students in any 
course in the College. 



Bethany College. 



595. 



•: 696. : 



it>r~ ; 



CATALOGUE 



...or... 



BETHANY COLLEGE 



TOR THE 



EIETY-5EVENTH SESSION, 

ENDING JUNE 16, 1595. 
WiTH THE 

Courses or Study and Annual Announcement 

TOR l595-'99. 



OPEN TO YOUNG MEN AND YOUNG WOMEN ON 
EQUAL TERMS. 



BET HANY, WEST VIRGINIA. 



WHEELING: 

Daily intelligencer book and .job press. 

1595. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE 



Calendar* 



1898. 

Baccalaureate Sermon, .... Sunday, June 12 

Annual Exhibition of Ossolian Literary Society, Monday, June 13 

Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and 

Wednesday, June 14 and 15 

Field Day, ...... Tuesday, June 14 

Class Day, .... . . Wednesday, June 15 

Annual Exhibition of American Literary Institute, Tuesday, June 14 

Vocal and Instrumental Concert, by the Music Department, 

Wednesday, June 15 

Annual Exhibition of Neotrophian Literary Society, 

Thursday, June 16 
Annual Commencement, .... Thursday, June 16 

SUMMER VACATION. 

Session begins, .... Monday, September 19 

Anniversary of Neotrophian Literary Society, . . November 5 
Anniversary of American Literary Institute, . . November 10 
Christmas Recess begins at 1 P. M., . Friday, December 23 

1899. 

Christmas Recess ends, . . . Tuesday, January 3 

First Term ends, . . , . . January 27 

Second Term begins, January 28 

Joint Celebration of the Literary Societies, . . February 22 

Anniversary of Ossolian Literary Society, . . March 18 

Baccalaureate Sermon, .... Sunday, June 11 

Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and 

Wednesday, June 13 and 14 

Annual Commencement, . Thursday, June 15 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLESE. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



B. C. HAGERMA'N, President (Ex officio) 

w. k. pendleton, 

a. Mclean 

j. w. mulholland, 

hon. george h. anderson, . 

judge john a. campbell, . 

a. w. campbell, 

j. e. curtis 

r. moffett, 

P. D. POWER, 

ALEX. CAMPBELL,, 

CHARLES SHIELDS, 

WILLIAM! H. GRAHAM, 

GEORGE T. OLIVER, 

RUSSELL ERRETT, . 

W. C. LYNE, 

HON. THOS. W. PHILLIPS, 

DR. ROGER WILLIAMS, 

JOHN C. PALMER, 

J. J. BARCLAY, . 

GEORGE DARSIE, 

DR. I. M. RIDGE, 

S. M. COOPER, 

M. M. COCHRAN. 

OLIVER MARSHALL, 

C. B. SCOTT, 

J. P. MEiRRYMAN, 

J. W. KNIGHT, . 

CAMPBELL JOBES, 

Z. T. VINSON, . 

W. R. ERRETT, 



Bethany, W. Va. 

Eustis, Florida. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Washington, D. C. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Cincinnati, O'hio. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
New Castle, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Frankfort, Ky. 
Kansas City, M'o. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
New Cumberland, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Tromley, Ohio. 
Claysville, Pa. 
Huntington, W. Va. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



Executive Committee. 



MARK M. COCHRAN. 
WILLIAM H. GRAHAM. 



THOMAS W. PHILLIPS. 
GEORGE H. ANDERSON. 



GEORGE T. OLIVER. 



MISS A. C. PENDLETON, 
Librarian, and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 

B. T. BLANPIEiD, 
Bursar and Secretary of the Faculty. 



6 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



THE FACULTY. 



B. C. HAGERMAN, A. M., President, 
And Professor of New Testament Greek. 

W. K. PENDLETON, LL. D., 
President Emeritus. 

A. O. PENDLETON, A, M., 
Professor of French and German. 

OSCAR SCHMIEDEL. A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

B. T. BLANPIED, Ph. D., 

Professor of Natural Science. 

R. H. WYNNE, A. M., 
Professor of Hebrew and of History. 

B. C. BONDURANT, A. B., 

Professor of Latin. 

HENRY S. GREEN, A. B., 
Professor of Greek, and Instructor in Mental and Moral Science. 

J. C. KEITH, A. M., 
Professor of Biblical Literature and Doctrine. 

KATE C. KERR, Lady Principal, 
Professor of English and Elocution. 

JEAN MOOS, 
Director of Music. 

MISS CLARA SHEPARD, 

Professor of Stringed Instruments 1 . 

MRS. BESSIE C. TRIBLE, 
Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

F. E. WYNNE., 
Instructor in Latin and Mathematics. 






CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Origin and Purpose of Bethany College* 



The establishment of an institution of learning, differing in some 
essential respects from any in existence, had long been a favorite 
scheme with Alexander Campbell. When he was fifty years old he 
formulated and published in the "Millennial Harbinger" the plan of 
such an institution as he had in contemplation. He said: "Imagining 
that I possess some views and attainments which I can in this way 
render permanently useful to this community and posterity, I feel in 
duty bound to offer this project to the consideration of all friends of 
literature, morality and unsectarian Bible Christianity." He pro- 
posed to give the rest of his life to its establishment and supervision, 
provided only that his brethren — the rich and opulent especially, and 
those who had children to> educate — would take a strong hold of it, 
and determine to build up an establishment that might be made to 
themselves, their children, and many others, a lasting and compre- 
hensive blessing. 

Two very simple and yet very important convictions were cherished 
by Alexander Campbell in founding Bethany College. In these two 
convictions, in fact, the college has had its origin, and by these it 
has been supported and conducted through the more than half- 
century of its history. The first is that the Bible is the basis of all 
true culture, the foundation of all knowledge. In the corner-stone of 
the college building is laid, underneath books of literature, history, 
science, magazines and periodicals, not a confession or a creed, not 
the "Christian Baptist" or the "Millennial Harbinger," but a plain 
Bible. This is the pillar and support of all. And it was the deep- 
rooted belief of the founder and the first friends of the college, that no 
education is worthy of the name which leaves the student ignorant of 
the Bible. What Alexander Campbell believed so implicitly and 
proclaimed so boldly in the middle of the present century is just now 
beginning to be apparent to the leaders of education generally, as we 
are nearing the end of it. Indeed, it is only beginning to be appreci- 
ated now. Until quite recent years, the great majority of colleges and 
a multitude of theological seminaries had no place in their course for 
any practical study of the Bible. 



8 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

The other conviction cherished just as sacredly in the founding of 
Bethany is that thorough education is essential to an efficient ministry 
of the gospel. In this conviction, without doubt, is the most remark- 
able growth of the Disciples in a large degree explained. The minis- 
try of the Disciples has been, to a great extent, an educated ministry. 
That this is true is surely due in no small part to the fifty years' work 
of Bethany College. It was never the aim of the college to endow the 
student with a stock of ideas or a system of thought, but to make 
mind, to increase the capacity for sound and scholarly study, for clear, 
accurate and independent thinking, and, withal, to educate conscience, 
will and heart, as well as intellect. The one great teacher, honored 
supremely in our college, is Christ; 'the one text-book, the New Testa- 
ment; the one great aim in all our training is to make men know 
Christ that they may make Him known to the world. In this aim the 
college began. To this it steadfastly adheres. 

The charter was procured from the Legislature of Virginia in 1840 
by John C. Campbell, of Wheeling. Bethany was chosen as the site, 
and the first session of the college began in the autumn of 1841. 

Bethany is situated in the Pan-Handle of West Virginia, sixteen 
miles north of Wheeling, and seven miles east of Wellsburg, on the 
Wheeling branch of the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 
Railway. (From Wellsburg stages are run to Bethany every day, 
except Sunday. For special conveyance, address Moore Bros., or 
Wells & Gibson, Bethany, W. Va.) 

Bethany is in the midst of an elevated region, where there is pure 
air, good water, and almost perfect exemption from malaria and 
intermittent, congestive and malignant fevers, so prevalent in some 
parts of the country. 

The surrounding country is one of extraordinary natural beauty. 
Where can be found a fairer scene than that which opens to us as we 
stand on the steps or walk the corridor of the college building? 
Noble hills which do not rush abruptly to their really mountainous 
height, but rise to it by gentle gradations which give them a rounded 
and finished aspect, and, besides, make them green pastures to their 
very summits through all the seasons; valleys fair and fragrant, 
through which the shadowy waters of "Old Buffalo" wander river- 
ward forever. Rarely does nature bestow on any one spot so various 
charms with so lavish a hand. Added to these natural attractions are 
the traditions and associations which linger about the place. The 
memory of those great souls who lived and labored at Bethany, is 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 9 

kept green among us. Their ashes rest amid these fruitful and peace- 
ful hills. Their aims and ideas still hover in the air. The very atmo- 
sphere of such a place is an education in itself. 

It is but truth to say that Bethany hardly aspires to be a great 
school, as some count greatness — great in the number of names on its 
register. It rather rejoices to be enrolled among the small colleges of 
our country. The small college has played a great part in American 
education and history. It is more than doubtful that so good results 
would have come if our colleges had been fewer and larger. The 
university has its mission, but it will not be well for our generation if it 
be made to supplant the college or if our colleges all aspire to be 
universities. The ambition of magnitude so common to our colleges, 
is not altogether a matter of congratulation. A college is to be judged 
more by the character than the number of its students. Mammoth 
schools, like other mammoth concerns, may serve well for advertising 
ends, but they are likely to turn out a large proportion of men who, 
however they may count in the catalogue, count for very little in the 
world's work. 

From its foundation the college has attracted those who desire to 
prepare themselves for gospel ministry. So true is this, that it is 
sometimes supposed to be chiefly, if not wholly, a school for students 
for the ministry. It is, in fact, much more than this : it is a college in 
the full sense, educating men not for one calling only, but for all the 
vocations of life. It has eminent alumni in all the professions. It is, 
however, eminently a school for the training of preachers. So far as 
our knowledge goes, no one ever came to Bethany with the intention 
of devoting his life to the ministry and changed that intention after 
coming here, while it is a thing of frequent occurrence that one who 
comes with his mind set on some other profession, resolves, after 
being in the college awhile, to give himself to the work of the ministry. 
Bethany exalts the ministerial office. A ministerial student is held in 
at least equal honor with any other, while his intimate association with 
other students of the college, and his instruction in the same classes 
and studies with the rest, corrects all tendency to clericalisms. Beth- 
any aims to make young men, first of all, students and scholars. Be- 
fore entering upon the strictly ministerial studies, the student is drilled 
in the classical and disciplinary studies as are other students. The 
design of this is to bring him to a degree of maturity and independence 
of mind before beginning the special ministerial studies. The pro- 
priety of this is obvious. 



10 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Courses of Study* 

Bethany College offers four regular courses of study: The Classical 
Course and the Ministerial Course, each leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts; the Scientific Course, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science, and the Literary Course, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Letter?. 

For students not sufficiently advanced to enter the Freshman class 
of these college courses, the necessary preparation will be given in 
two preparatory years. The studies of these preparatory years are a? 
follows : 

JUNIOR PREPARATORY. 
Latin Lessons, Tuell and Fowler; English Grammar, Reed and 
Kellogg; Algebra, Wentworth's School Algebra; Applied Physiology 
(advanced), Overton; History of the United States. 

SENIOR PREPARATORY. 

Latin, four books of Caesar and two orations of Cicero; Greek, 
Harper and Castle's Inductive Primer; Algebra and Plane Geometry, 
Wentworth; English Composition and Rhetoric, Kellogg; General 
History, Meyers. 

The required studies for each of the regular courses are presented 
in the Synoptical View of the several Courses, and are described in 
detail in the several departments of instruction following: 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



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14 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Departments of Instruction* 



Department of Greek. 
PREPARATORY YEAR. 
In the work of the preparatory year pupils begin the reading and 
writing of Greek with the very first lesson. The inductive method is 
used and every effort is made to develop the power and the habit of 
independent study. The common forms and constructions of the 
language, together with a considerable vocabulary are acquired in 
course of reading the first book of the Anabasis. Daily exercises 
in translating English into Greek. Text-books: — Harper and Cas- 
tle's Inductive Greek Primer, Goodwin's Grammar. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Xenophon's Anabasis, three books. Selections from Herodotus 
and three books of Homer's Iliad are read. 

Composition based on the prose previously translated in class runs 
through the first half-year. In connection with Homer, mythology is 
taken up. The times and customs of the periods covered in transla- 
tion are noted. Careful examination of all forms and constructions 
continues through the year. Attention is called to the variety of form 
and dialect of the Iliad. The verse is read metrically. 

Text-books: — Harper and Wallace's Anabasis, Seymour's Iliad, 
Guerber's Myths of Greece and Rome. Students should also have 
Liddell and Scott's Lexicon, a Classical Atlas and a Dictionary of 
Antiquities. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Demosthenes' Philippics or the De Corona. Plato's Apology and 
Crito are read. 

An accurate knowledge of forms and syntax is required. 

A study of the times and conditions of the subjects read is made. 

Some time is devoted to Greek History and special themes are 
assigned for individual research. 

Text-books : — Dyer's Apology and Crito, Pennell's Ancient Greece 
or Fyffe's History of Greece. D'Ooge's Demosthenes on the Crown. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

During the first half-year Aeschylus' Prometheus and Aristophanes' 
Clouds are read. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 15 

A close study of the Greek drama is made. The meter is studied 
and portions of the verse read metrically. 

The development of Comedy is examined and its political bearing 
discussed. Considerable time is also devoted to the study of Greek 
Literature. 

The second half-year is devoted to reading- one of the Tragedies of 
Sophocles and extracts from Thucydides, accompanied by further 
study of Greek History. 

Text-books: — Humphrey's Cloud's, Allen's Prometheus, Jebb's 
Greek Literature. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

The Seniors in the Ministerial Course, and other members of the 
Senior Class who take Greek as an elective, spend the first half-year 
in studying New Testament Greek. Peculiar forms and idiomatic 
expressions are carefully examined, comparisons being constantly 
made with standard Attic Greek. The Gospels are studied on the 
basis of Mark and the Pauline epistles on the basis of Galatians. Es- 
pecial emphasis is laid on the form, structure and usage of the lan- 
guage rather than on exegesis. However, where form or syntax af- 
fects the meaning of a passage, an exposition of the text is given. 

The second half-year (elective) is devoted to a study of lyric poetry 
with readings from the Odes of Pindar. 

Text-books : — Westcott and Hort's Greek New Testament, Green's 
Handbook of New Testament Greek, Seymour's Selected Odes of 
Pindar. 

Department of Latin. 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class in Latin will be 
examined on four books of Caesar and two orations of Cicero, or 
their equivalents. A fair knowledge of the forms and syntax, and 
the ability to translate an easy paragraph based on one of the authors 
named, from English into Latin will be necessary to pass the entrance 
examination. Some knowledge of Roman History will also be found 
helpful. Instruction in the Preparatory years is intended to meet 
these requirements. The text-books for these years will be Tuell and 
Fowler's First Book in Latin, Allen and Greenough's or Kelsey's 
editions of Caesar and Cicero, Daniell's Exercises in Latin Composi- 
tion and Bennett's Grammar. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
In the first term Cicero's Pro Archia and three books of Virgil's 



16 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Aeneid and in the second term one book of the Aeneid and the Odes 
of Horace will be read by the Freshman Class. Syntax, prosody, the 
usage of the poets contrasted with that of the prose writers and so 
much of mythology as is necessary for the proper understanding of 
Virgil and Horace, will receive careful attention. Roman History is 
studied, and weekly exercises in Prose Composition are continued 
throughout the session. 

Text-books: — Bennett's Grammar; Allen and Greenough's or Kel- 
sey's Cicero; Greenough and Kittridge's Virgil; Smith's Odes and 
Epodes of Horace; Allen's History of the Roman People; Daniell's 
Prose Composition. Lewis' Elementary Latin Dictionary or Har- 
per's Latin Dictionary is recommended. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

This class will read during the first term Cicero's De Senectute and 
De Amicitia, and during the second term the Germania and Agricola 
of Tacitus. A part of the time will be given to' the study of Roman 
Literature. Weekly exercises in Prose Composition will be required. , 

Text-books: — Bennett's Grammar; Kelsey's edition of the De Se- 
nectute and De Amicitia; Allen's Tacitus; Wilkins' Primer of Roman 
Literature; Miller's Prose Composition. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

This class will study Roman Satire in its great masters, Horace and 
Juvenal. In the second term Roman Comedy will be studied in the 
Captivi of Plautus. The Life and Customs of the Romans will also 
be considered. 

Text-books: — Kirkland's Satires and Epistles of Horace; Mac- 
leane's Juvenal; Lindsay's edition of the Captivi of Plautus; Wilkin's 
Roman Antiquities. 

SENIOR YEAR. 
The Senior Class will read selected plays of Plautus and Terence. 
A thorough study of the syntax of these plays will be made. Consid- 
erable time will be spent in reading Cicero, Caesar and Nepos at sight. 
Any recognized edition of these authors will be satisfactory. 

Department of Hebrew 

In this age of Biblical criticism the need of a. knowledge of He- 
brew is more generally felt and recognized and there is a growing 
interest taken in the study of the language. The course extends 
through the Junior and Senior year. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 17 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Genesis i-viii is read; the general principles of the grammar; spe- 
cial attention is given to the forms of words ; the acquisition of a vo- 
cabulary; the translation of English into Hebrew; some of the impor- 
tant principles of syntax ; reading of selections from Old Testament. 
Recitations daily. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

A critical study of selections from the historic, poetic and prophetic 
books of the Hebrew Bible; review of the grammar; the principles of 
syntax ; the principles of Hebrew poetry. 

Text-books: — Harper's Elements of Hebrew, Harper's Method 
and Manual; Harper's Hebrew Syntax, Hebrew Bible, Lexicon. 
Recitations daily. 



Department of French and German* 

Students who desire to begin these languages must possess an accu- 
rate knowledge of the elements of English grammar, and those desir- 
ing to enter later in the course must offer the work assigned for the 
preceding terms, or an equivalent. The aims of the instruction are 
good pronunciation, ready use of regular and irregular inflections, 
and the acquisition of a useful vocabulary. Special attention will be 
given to reading at sight ; oral practice and writing from dictation will 
begin early in the course and continue throughout. Selections for 
reading are made with a view to acquainting the student, as far as time 
admits, with the masterpieces of French and German literature, and 
the political, social and literary characteristics of the author's time are 
therefore considered in the work. In every translation, the idiomatic 
accuracy of the English used is taken into account. Scientific read- 
ings are included, that the student may acquire the special vocabulary 
needed for scientific research. The classes meet five times a week. 



French. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term — Minimum French Grammar (Joynes); Preparatory 
French Reader (Super). Daily drill in verb forms. 

Second Term — Halevy's L'Abbe Constantin (Logie); Victor 
Hugo's Ruy Bias (Garner); French Composition (Grandgent); Min- 
imum French Grammar continued. 



18 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term — Scientific French readings (Bowen) ; Racine's Athalie 
(Joynes); French composition and oral practice ; Minimum, or Otto's, 
French Grammar for reference. 

Second Term — French Lyrics (Bowen); Pailleron's Le Monde ou 
Ton s'ennui (Pendleton). Recitations from French literature. 

There will be monthly examinations upon such private reading as 
may be assigned. 



German. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Term — Joynes-Meissner's, German Grammar; Grimm's 
Marchen (Van der Smissen) ; Hoher als die Kirche (Clary). 

Second Term — Lessing's Minna von Barn'helm (Primer); Schef- 
fel's Ekkehard (Wenckebach); Colloquial German (Bronson); Joynes- 
Meissner's Grammar continued. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Scientific German readings (Hodges); Colloquial 
German and Prose composition; Schiller's Maria Stuart (Joynes). 

Second Term — German Lyrics ana Ballads (Hatfield); Colloquial 
German and prose composition ; Freytag's Soil und Haben. 

There will be monthly examinations upon such private reading as 
may be assigned. 



Department of English and History. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

A careful study of the principles of Rhetoric and, in order that the 
student may acquire the habit of putting these principles into practice 
by the use of good English, frequent exercises in composition will 
occupy the time of both the Freshman and Sophomore classes. 

Three compositions a term will be required of each member. In 
order to cultivate in the student a taste for the best literature, a certain 
amount of parallel reading will be assigned at the beginning of the 
session. 

Text-book: — Genung's Practical Rhetoric. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
This class will continue the study of Rhetoric, taking up the discus- 
sion of Figures, and of the different kinds of Composition, including 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 19 

the general principles of Versification. Some time will be spent in the 
critical analysis of selected specimens of English prose and also in the 
study of words. Three compositions a term will be required. 

Text-books:— Genung's Practical Rhetoric; Genung's Rhetorical 
Analysis ; Trench on the Study of Words. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

During this year will be studied critically representative English 
authors of each period up to the nineteenth century. Attention will 
be given to the relations of writers to one another and to the times in 
which they lived; also the characteristics of each period. Parallel 
readings will be assigned, on which papers will be prepared by the 
students and discussed in class. Recitations twice a week. 

Text-book : — Painter's Introduction to English Literature. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

During the first half-year the nineteenth century period of English 
Literature will be studied. The lives of the important writers of this 
epoch will be considered individually and reciprocally. Selections 
from their best writings will be carefully examined and analyzed. A 
knowledge of the figures and allusions will be required. The bearing 
of the works of the writers of this period on the history and literary 
culture of their time will be discussed. Parallel readings will be 
assigned for the preparation of papers on special themes for class dis- 
cussion. 

During the last half-year students will make a study of American 
Literature. A general survey of the subject will be taken, but Emer- 
son, Hawthorne, Lowell, Longfellow, Holmes, Bryant, Poe and 
Whittier will receive attention. The work will proceed on much the 
same plan as that of the preceding term. One carefully prepared 
essay on an assigned subject will be required each term. 

Text-books : — Painter's Introduction to English Literature ; Paint- 
er's Introduction to American Literature. 



History. 

Students entering college are expected to have a knowledge of the 
History of the United States, and also some acquaintance with Gen- 
eral History, both Ancient and Modern. For those who have not 
had instruction in these subjects, provision has been made in the pre- 
paratory classes. 



20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

For Ministerial students, recitations three times a week, during the 
Sophomore year are given in Church History, giving special attention 
to the Apostolic and Reformation periods of church history, and sup- 
plemented by lectures on recent reformatory movements, especially 
the origin, principles and growth of the Disciples. 

Text-books — Meyer's General History; Fisher's Church History. 

Students in the Literary Course will devote five hours a week to the 
study of the History of Modern Europe. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Students in the Classical and Literary Courses will study Green's 
Short History of the English People. 



Department of Natural Sciences* 
Zoology and Botany. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

During the Freshman year about eighteen weeks will be devoted to 
each of these sciences in the order named. Three recitations a week. 

In Zoology, beginning with the lowest and simplest forms of ani- 
mal life, the student is brought to the study of the higher and more 
complex, and in the diversity of form led to see the oneness of plan. 

Text-book — "Comparative Zoology," by James Orton, latest edi- 
tion. 

In the study of Botany each student is required, in addition to the 
text-book work of the recitation room, to collect and analyze, accu- 
rately naming Order, Genus and Species, and scientifically arrange a 
collection of at least fifty specimens of the more common plants, thus 
practically applying, so far as classification is concerned, what has 
been learned from the text-book. 

Text-book — Gray's School and Field Botany, latest edition. 



Physics. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

The course in Physics occupies the entire Sophomore Year, with 
three recitations per week. 

A thorough knowledge of Mathematics, at least so far as to include 
Trigonometry, is indispensable to the proper pursuit of this course. 

Beginning with matter and motion, and their laws, the student is 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 21 

brought to the practical application of these laws in the different forms 
of matter, solids, liquids and gases, and to the philosophy of machin- 
ery. When these have been mastered, the different forms of energy, 
heat, light, sound and electricity are studied and discussed with special 
reference to their practical application in the recent discoveries and 
inventions in this science. 

Text-book: — Appleton's School Physics. 



Chemistry. 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

Chemistry occupies the first eighteen weeks of the Junior year, with 
five recitations per week, and is conducted on the plan suggested by 
the author of the text-book used, viz : — first, the systematic study of 
the phenomena; and then, the connection between these phenomena 
and the theories. The apparatus and laboratory of this department are 
used with this end in view. 

Text-book: — "Introduction to the Study of Chemistry," by Ira 
Remsen, latest edition. 



Analytical Chemistry. 

This course is required only of those Juniors who take the Scientific 
Course, though open to any student prepared by having taken the 
course in Chemistry of the first term of the Junior year. It consists 
of five weekly recitations, of two hours each, during the last eighteen 
weeks of the Junior year in Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. 

In the Qualitative work the student first studies the reactions of the 
more common bases and ac'ds, by dealing with known substances, 
and then he is given mixed compounds of, to him, unknown compo- 
sition, to determine the different metals and acids which compose it. 
Not only is the student taught methods of analysis, but the reasons 
for the methods. 

Each student is required to keep neat and carefully prepared notes 
of all phenomena observed by him, during these determinations, 
which are inspected and corrected by the instructor. 

In Quantitative Analysis only those who have satisfactorily com- 
pleted the first part of the course (Qualitative Analysis) will be allowed 
to undertake this work. The student is first required to determine the 
per cent, of the metals and acids in some of the pure salts, and when he 
has acquired accuracy in manipulation and understands the reasons 
for the methods employed, he is given salts and ores of unknown per 



22 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

cents for determination. 

A fee of Ten Dollars is charged to each student in Qualitative 
Analysis, and an additional fee of Five Dollars to those taking the 
Quantitative work. 



Geology. 
SENIOR YEAR. 

The study of Geology occupies fourteen weeks of the last term of 
the Senior year, five recitations per week. 

The plan pursued is, first, the study of the agencies now at work in 
producing structure, or Dynamical Geology; second, structural Geol- 
ogy; last, Historical Geology. As an aid to this study, the college 
has a collection of minerals and geological specimens well suited for 
illustration. 

Text-book:— "Compend of Geology," by Le Conte. 

In all classes in Natural Sciences monthly examinations are re- 
quired. 



Department of Mathematics* 

To enter the Ereshman class a knowledge of Algebra to Quadratic 
Equations, including Proportion and Logarithms, is required. Those 
not thus prepared must become members of the preparatory class, 
which meets five times a week throughout the year. Wentworth's 
School Algebra is used as text-book. 

Any one wishing to enter a class in applied Mathematics must first 
become familiar with those branches of pure Mathematics upon which 
the applied depends for its principles. The courses are so arranged 
that no student, pursuing them in the order indicated and with the 
thoroaghness required, encounters serious difficulty A small fee, to 
be paid before entering the class, is charged for the use of the instru- 
ments and drawing room; in Descriptive Geometry, $2.00; in Survey- 
ing and in Roads and Railroads, $3.00 each. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term — Plane Geometry (Wentworth.) 

Second Term — Solid Geometry and Trigonometry (Wentworth, 
Jones' Tables.) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term — Higher Algebra (Wentworth.) 
Second Term — Land Surveying (Gillespie.) 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE 23 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
First Term — Analytic Geometry and Differential Calculus. 
Second Term — Integral Calculus with applications to Geometry. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Mechanics (Kemper.) 
Second Term — Astronomy. 



Department of Biblical Literature and Doctrine. 

During Sophomore year, students in the ministerial course devote 
three hours a week to the study of Church History and two hours to 
studies in Acts and Corinthians. 

During the first half of Junior year, students in all the regular col- 
lege courses are required to give three recitations a week in Old and 
New Testament Literature. This study considers the Bible both in its 
unity as the record of a. progressive Divine revelation, and also in its 
diversity as made up of many widely different though vitally related 
books. The authorship, the time and place of writing, the purpose, 
the plan, the contents and the style of each of the several books are 
studied. These books are also studied in their biblical groupings as 
Historical, Poetical, Prophetical, Epistolary, etc. 

Biblical study, technically so called, deals with the aims, principles 
and methods of biblical study, and is here made to include Canonics, 
Textual Criticism, Hermeneutics, and Biblical Geography and Arch- 
aeology. 

During the second term of the Junior year instruction is given daily 
to ministerial students in Hermeneutics. 

In the Senior year instruction is given in New Testament Doctrine. 
This doctrine is presented not only in its several distinct types, as the 
teaching of Jesus, of Peter, of Paul, of John, etc., but also in the essen- 
tial harmony of all these types. 

The second term is devoted to Homiletics, Church Polity, and 
Christian Evidences. 

Text-books — In this department the Bible is taken as the main text- 
book, but the following books are also used and recommended as 
valuable helps: Maclear's Class-books of Old and New Testament 
History, Studies in Matthew, Acts, I Corinthians, II Corinthians, Ro- 
mans, Adeny's New Testament Theology, Stevens' Pauline Theology 



24 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

and Stevens' Johannine Theology, Fisher's Church History, Broadus' 
Preparation and Delivery of Sermons, Robinson's Principles and 
Practice of Morality, Topics. 



Department of Mental, Moral and Political Science* 

In this department, during the first half of the year, a course of lec- 
tures will be given, designed to present in an elementary and summary 
way the principal philosophical problems. An outline sketch of the 
history and development of philosophical thought will be given in 
connection with the course in Psychology. 

Text-books: — James' Psychology, Ladd's Psychology, descriptive 
and explanatory. 

In Moral Science much attention is given to the various existing 
theories concerning the supreme motive in human conduct and the 
true ground of moral obligation. An eftort is made to show that the 
various theories are not so much opposed to each other as might be 
supposed. 

Text-book: — Porter's Elements of Moral Science. 

In Logic both the deductive and inductive methods are taught. 
Special drill is given in the work of detecting fallacies and in pointing 
out tne exact nature of the fallacy in each instance. 

Text-book — Jevons' Logic. 

Instruction is given three times a week during 'he Junior year in 
Political Science, which is made to include American Government, as 
well as Economics. One term is given to each of these subjects, in 
the order named. 

Instruction in American Government is intended to set forth the 
facts and principles which underlie the government of the United 
States and to give the student a knowledge of such facts as every citi- 
zen of this country should possess. 

Attention will be given to the following: The national govern- 
ment; the government of the colonies; the formation of the Union; 
nature and sources of the constitution ; composition and organization 
of the two houses of Congress ; the government of the states and their 
relations to the Union. 

Text-book: — The American Government, by B. A. Hinsdale. 

The study of Economics embraces the principles of Political Econ- 
omy. Its development, private and puolic. Under private econo- 
mics will be considered production, trcnsier, distribution and con- 
sumption of goods. Public Economics deals with the relations of the 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 25 

state and private enterprise, expenditure and revenues. 

Text-book: — Ely's Outlines of Economics. 

A course in Sociology is offered as an elective to members of the 
Senior class and Post Graduates. 

Text-book: — Small and Vincent's Introduction to the study of 
Society. 



Department of Music* 

Recognizing the intellectual and spiritual value of a complete course 
in the Art of Music, Bethany College follows the example of other in- 
stitutions at home and abroad, by making the study of Musical Theory 
one of the elective courses of the college, and admits the same as a 
substitute for one of the elective studies in the Classical, Scientific, 
Literary or Ministerial course, subject to the approval of the Faculty. 

Students in the Department of Music are required to pursue at 
least one study in some other department of the college. 

The object of the Music Department is to prepare students for an 
active, artistic career, either in concert, church, school or on the stage. 

To educate teachers, who shall be masters of knowledge, and under- 
stand the correct and systematic training of those entrusted to their 
care. 

To give solid, artistic foundation, graceful and brilliant execution to 
those fortunate ones who, free from material cares, follow art for art's 
sake, and who, either in the circle of a cultured home, or as leaders 
in society, diffuse pleasure and happiness around them. 



Branches of Instruction. 

Piano-forte; Organ; String Instruments: — Violin, Mandolin, Gui- 
tar, etc. 

Voice Culture: — Solo Singing; Chorus Singing. 

Ensemble Playing. 

Theory of Music, embracing : Harmony, Composition and History 
of Music. 

PIANO OR ORGAN. 

All Piano students must attend the classes in Harmony and Theory. 
Teacher's Certificate will be given to those completing our Three 
Year's course. Diploma of Graduation and degree of Bachelor of 
Music will be awarded to those who have completed the entire Four 
Years' course and the Three Years' course in Theory. Any candi- 
date for Teacher's Certificate or Diploma of Graduation must have 
studied at least one year in our college. 



26 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



VOICE CULTURE. ' 

All voice students must attend the classes in Harmony and Theory. 

Teachers' Certificates will be given to those completing the course 
of Two Years. Applicants for this certificate must be able to play ac- 
companiments. Diploma of graduation and degree of Bachelor of 
Music will be given to those completing the course of three years and 

the course in theory. 

ORCHESTRA (VIOLIN, ETC.) 

All Violin students must attend classes in Harmony and Theory. 
Diploma of Graduation and degree of Bachelor of Music will be 
given to those completing the course of three years. 

HARMONY AND THEORY. 

This course includes two years' study of Harmony and one year of 
Musical Forrn and History of Music. This course is obligatory for 
all who desire to receive a diploma in any of the other courses. 

The work in Theory embraces two weekly recitations of one hour 
each. 



Terms of Tuition. 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE 

The school year of the Music Department consists of two terms of 
1 8 weeks each. Private lessons are 30 minutes each, twice a week. 
All class lessons are of an hour's duration. 

For specifications of study send for special Music Circular. 

Apply to Director Jean Moos, Bethany, W. Va. 

PIANO OR ORGAN. 

Two private lessons each week. 

I and II year, each term $28.00 

III and IV year, each term 38.00 

IN CLASSES OF FOUR STUDENTS. 

Two lessons a week, of one hour each. 

I and II year, each term ' . . . $20.00 

III and IV year, each term 30.00 

Ensemble playing, free. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 27 

VOICE. 

Two private lessons each week. 

I year, each term $28.00 

II and III year, each term 38.00 

In classes of four students, two lessons a week, one hour each. 
I year, each term $25.00 

II and III year, each term 30.00 

Chorus singing, free. 
Lectures on Hygiene of Vocal and Respiratory Organs, and Anat- 
omy of Chest and Larynx, free. 

VIOLIN, MANDOLIN, GUITAR, ETC. 
Two private lessons each week. 
I and II year, each term $28.00 

III year, each term 38.00 

In classes of four students, two lessons of one hour each. 

I and II year, each term $15.00 

III year, each term 20.00 

One private lesson a week. 

I and II year, each term $15.00 

III year, each term 20.00 

Ensemble playing, free. 

HARMONY AND THEORY. 
Two Class Lessons a week of one hour each, per term . $10.00 

CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Teacher's Certificate $ 5.00 

Diploma of Graduation 10.00 

RENT OF PIANO. 

Use of Piano or practice Clavier, one hour and a half, for daily 
practice, per term, $5.00. 

Students in the Department of Music taking studies in any other 
department of instruction in the College, pay $5 per term for each 
study taken. 

There is a special circular of the Music Department which will be 
sent upon application, free of charge, by the Director, Prof. Jean 
Moos, Bethany, W. Va.. This circular gives detailed description of 
each branch of study, the compositions, composers, and technical ma- 
terial to be studied. It gives the advantages, rules, regulations, 
special privileges, etc. 



28 CATALOGUE OE BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Department of Art 

The Art Department is in the hands of Mrs. Bessie C. Trible, of the 
Cincinnati Art Academy, Who brings to the position superior talents, 
the results of training under the best masters, and a ripe experience. 
Thorough instruction will be given in Free-Hand Drawing in char- 
coal and crayon, and in Flower, Portrait and Landscape Painting in 
Oil, Water Colors and India Ink. Situated in one of the most beau- 
tiful landscapes in America, Bethany affords rare opportunities for 
sketching from nature. It is the purpose and policy of the college to 
foster the love and study of art continually. 

FIRST YEAR. 

This consists in the drawing of straight and curved lines, circles, 
squares and other simple forms in outline, until the muscles of the 
hand have learned to obey the will. This is continued with simple 
drawings executed in the modern method, until the use of charcoal 
and crayon is thoroughly understood. The student then takes up 
Cast Drawing, which is progressive, beginning with the features in 
different positions and leading gradually to the full head, feet, hands, 
etc., until the whole length figure is readied. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Cast drawing continued. 

Crayon, Pastel, Drawing from Nature, Water Colors. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Pastel, Water Colors, Drawing from Nature continued. 

Oil Colors, Portraiture. 

Porcelain Painting in over-glaze colors is made a specialty. This 
will include the preparation of designs, their application to the ware, 
and firing — for which a kiln will be provided in the College building. 
All firing will be done there, so that students may become familiar with 
its use. 

Instruction is given also in figure and miniature painting on porce- 
lain 



Tuition. 



Class Lessons, per term $18.00 

Private Lessons, each ......... 1.00 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE 29 

Department of Elocution and Oratory, 

The design of this department is to cultivate a taste for pure litera- 
ture, to elevate the standard of expression and to qualify students for 
public reading and speaking. 

The regular course in Oratory extends one full college year, is com- 
pact, systematic and practical; but for those who for any reason do not 
care to take the regular course of study, the following special courses 
are arranged: 

Deep Breathing, Voice Development, Stage Deportment; Psycho- 
Physical Culture; Bible and Hymn Reading; Advanced Reading and 
Oratory; Gesture and Pantomime; Dramatic Attitudes; Facial Ex- 
pression and Impersonation. Also a lecture course of ten lessons on 
Thought Analysis and Philosophy of Expression. 

The work in the regular course is supplemented by lectures on such 
subjects as Mental and Moral Conditions Affecting the Voice, The 
Will in Elocutionary Work, Personal Magnetism and other topics of 
interest to the student of elocution and oratory. Many special ad- 
vantages are afforded in this department, rates of tuition very mod- 
erate. For particulars address the Director, Mrs. Kate C. Kerr. 



Gymnasium. 

Believing that the true principles and methods of education re- 
quire proper and proportionate consideration to be given to both mind 
and body, Bethany College, in connection with her other departments 
of instruction, also fosters physical culture. There is a commodious 
gymnasium, well equipped with the best modern apparatus and appli- 
ances for physical development and culture, such as horizontal bars, 
parallel bars, ladders, climbing ropes, chest weights, dumb-bells, 
wands, indian clubs, striking bag, basket ball, etc. Within the Col- 
lege Campus there are ample athletic grounds, well laid out for base 
ball, foot ball and other athletic games; also fine tennis courts, cro- 
quet grounds, etc. Thus superior advantages and inducements are 
afforded for both ladies and gentlemen. Hours are set apart for the 
daily use of the gymnasium by the young lady students, and it is ex- 
pected that they will make as free use of the gymnasium facilities as 
do the male students. With such variety of recreations, no student 
can lack that diversion and exercise so indispensable to the enjoyment 
of college life and success in college work. 



30 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Library and Reading Room, 

This is a commodious apartment, 30 by 38 feet, well lighted and 
supplied with the best papers and magazines of the day. It is known 
by many that our library has twice suffered heavy losses by fire ; it is at 
present well equipped with encyclopaedias and other books of refer- 
ence, and contains, besides, about two thousand volumes of miscella- 
neous literature. Liberal gifts in books 'have been made by friends 
from time to time; such donations are earnestly solicited, and will at 
all times be gratefully acknowledged. 

A reading-room fee of one dollar is required from each student in 
the college to provide a fund for the supply of current literature. 



Cabinets and Museums* 

The Natural History Cabinet contains some of the Fauna, Birds and 
Mammals of this region, with a very valuable collection from Aus- 
tralia and exchanges from other sections of the country; also a fine 
Herbarium of native plants, with many rare ones from other parts oi 
the world. 

The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several thou- 
sand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all parts of the world. 

The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains rare and 
valuable collections. 

The Philosophical Apparatus affords facilities for the illustration of 
physical principles. 

The Chemical Laboratory is provided with apparatus and chemicals 
for illustration in the courses offered. 



Literary Societies. 

There are in connection with the College four societies devoted to 
the cultivation of literary composition and oratory: The Ossolian, the 
Neotrophian, the American and the Adelphian. The Ossolian is dis- 
tinctively for ladies and the Adelphian for ministerial students. As 
the Adelphian Society differs in some important respects from a 
purely literary society, it demands more particular notice. As it is 
a distinguishing feature of Bethany College to make the Bible a reg- 
ular subject of study and daily examination, the Adelphian Society 
was organized in order to promote and carry out to the fullest extent 
the purposes contemplated in the department of Bible Literature. The 
regular exercises of the society consist of recitations of portions of the 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 33 

Scriptures; reading original essays on moral and religious subjects, 
and the delivery of Scriptural discourses, not only before the society, 
but on suitable occasions in public. 

Young men in preparing for the Christian ministry may derive in- 
calculable advantages from this society. From its organization, and 
the character and ability of its members, it is well fitted to facilitate the 
acquisition of enlarged views of the Bible, and the cultivation of a high 
standard of morality and religion. 



Students Lecture Association. 

A course of popular lectures is given each year under the auspices 
of this association, affording the students the benefit of some of the 
best platform talent of the country. 



The Collegian. 

During the college year the students publish a monthly journal en- 
titled The Collegian, which may be used as an excellent means of de- 
veloping literary talent. 

Religious Services. 

The daily morning devotions are held in the college chapel at eight 
o'clock. 

Daily and weekly meetings for prayer and song and exhortation 
are maintained by the students. 

The college authorities are anxious to make the college pulpit 
worthy of its splendid traditions. The regular preacher is a member 
of the Faculty; other members speak occasionally, and during the 
year a number of eminent men are invited to spend a Lord's Day in 
Bethany. The church seeks to contribute to the piety of every stu- 
dent. 

The Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. C. A. and the Y. P. S. C. E. have each a 
large and a^ive membership among the students, and are doing 
good worK. A number of students are enrolled in the Volunteer 
Band. 



Missions. 

A course of lectures on Missions is given before the whole school. 
This course covers as fully as practicable all the more important points 
in the Theory, History and Practice of Christian Missions. The 



34 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

matter is equally important to those who are preparing for work at 
home, and for those who prepare to go abroad. The Missionary As- 
sociation of the College holds stated meetings to hear reports and 
original letters from former students and others in the various mission 
fields, to pray for the increased success of missionary labor, to discuss 
questions connected with the mission work, and, in general, to cul- 
tivate an intelligent personal interest in the great enterprise of evan- 
gelizing the world. 



Lectures Before the College* 

The interesting and instructive courses upon other specially select- 
ed themes, which have been contributed by many of our most promi- 
nent lecturers, as A. McLean, R. T. Matthews, F. D. Power, H. L. 
Willett, George Darsie, C. S. Lucas, S. M. Jefferson, Mrs. Jessie 
Brown Pounds and others, and which are also so timed that all stu- 
dents of the College may attend them, will be continued. 



Degrees and Diplomas. 

To receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science or 
Bachelor of Letters, the candidate must have completed all the 
studies required (or their full equivalents) in the course leading to the 
desired degree, with an actual attendance in the college during at 
least the Senior year. 

Students who have attended the college during the Junior and 
Senior years, and whose final grade, computed as the average of all 
their monthly and examination grades during these years is ninety- 
three per cent, are enrolled on the Honor List, and this distinction is 
noted in the diploma by the words Cum Laude. A final grade of 
ninety-four per cent is noted by Magna Cum Laude, one of ninety- 
five per cent by Summa Cum Laude. In the awarding of honors, 
however, regard is had to the conduct of the student during his course, 
and any student who has incurred serious discipline may be debarred 
from the honor to which otherwise his scholarship would have entitled 
him. 

In order to obtain the degree of Master of Arts, the candidate must 
first receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts, be thereafter in actual 
attendance in the college for one session, and complete, with an 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 35 

approved examination in each, three studies to be selected by him with 
the consent of the Faculty. 

The honorary degree of Master in any one of the courses may be 
conferred on a Bachelor of three years' standing in that course, pro- 
vided he has, during the interval, pursued studies relating to the de- 
gree and has maintained an exemplary character. 

The fee for any diploma is ten dollars; except for a Bachelor's 
diploma to Ministerial students, which is five dollars. No application 
for the degree of Master is entertained unless accompanied by the fee 
of ten dollars, which is returned if the degree is not conferred. 



Expenses* 

Young men can procure board and rooms (either furnished or 
unfurnished) in Bethany at about the same prices, according to 
quality, as the prevailing cost of corresponding accommodations in 
other college communities. The best rooms in the village, furnished 
and cared for, with fuel, etc., can be had for the entire session by two 
students at a cost to each of from thirty to thirty-five dollars. The 
best board can be had for from two dollars and fifty cents to three dol- 
lars a week. In clubs it may be made to cost still less. The following 
tabular statement may be taken as a fair average of the necessary ex- 
penses of a young man for the entire session, or college year: 

Tuition $ 40 00 

Matriculation 10 00 

Furnished Room 30 00 

Board, 38 weeks at $2.50 per week 95 00 

Reading Room Fee . . . I 00 

Total . $176 00 



Expenses Phillips Hall. 

Young ladies residing as students at Phillips Hall are given fur- 
nished rooms (heated and lighted) and board, for three dollars and 
fifty cents a week. Care is taken to provide the young ladies a suffi- 
ciency of w T holesome, palatable food and to allow 'hem a reasonable 
freedom of the house in all respects. Each young lady is expected to 
bring sheets, pillow cases, towels, napkins, napkin ring, knife, fork, 
tea-spoon and lamp. Of course each young lady is charged also the 



36 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

regular Tuition and Matriculation fees of the college. A deposit of 
five dollars is required of each as guarantee for preservation of the 
room and furniture, which is refunded when the room is vacated, 
if everything is found in proper condition. 

Phillips Hall, the handsome gift of the Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, 
of New Castle, Pa., is a large and commodious building, well adapted 
to the wants of young ladies. The hall is heated throughout by steam, 
has hot and cold water on each floor, and is supplied with bath rooms. 
The building is situated on College Hill, only a few steps from the 
college building, which renders it convenient for the students to study 
in their own rooms between class hours. 

A lady principal has charge of Phillips Hall, devotes herself to the 
welfare of the young ladies and endeavors to make this place a home 
in fact as well as in name. The moral and spiritual, as well as the 
intellectual interests of the young ladies are constantly kept in view. 
It is sought to inspire them with the highest ideals, and to promote 
their growth in character as well as in mind. Honor and truth are the 
main principles regarded in the government of the home; and sympa- 
thy and confidence rather than rigid rules are relied on to preserve the 
peace and order of the household. This confidence is rarely disap- 
pointed. Young ladies who have begun to take life in earnest do not 
need much discipline. Others are not advised to come to Bethany. 

It is not expected that young ladies in attendance as students will 
board elsewhere in the village, unless under the expressed approval of 
their parents or guardians, with the concurrence of the college faculty. 



Reduced Tuition. 

Young men in any of the religious denominations, who wish to pre- 
pare for the ministry, may, on paying the matriculation fee, be ad- 
mitted into any of the courses at Bethany College at one-half the reg- 
ular rates of tuition. 

All applicants for this privilege are required to present to the Fac- 
ulty satisfactory written recommendations from their respective con- 
gregations, and from well known ministers of the gospel, certifying 
that they come under the foregoing conditions. 

Children of regular ministers of the gospel, of all denominations, 
are admitted to all classes and privileges of the college upon payment 
of the matriculation fee and one-half the regular tuition. 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be required to 
give instruction in the primary classes. 



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CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 39 

Phillips Loan Fund. 

A few years ago the Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, of New Castle, Pa., 
generously donated to the trustees the sum of five thousand dollars 
to be loaned to students in Bethany who are preparing for the min- 
istry. The original fund as thus constituted has since been consider- 
ably increased by other generous gifts and by accrued interest. Aid 
from this fund may be obtained by ministerial students, on complying 
with the conditions of the loan. 



Regulations. 

In order to contribute to the welfare of all concerned, the following 
regulations have been adopted. The Faculty most earnestly re- 
quests the co-operation of parents and guardians in their enforcement. 

Fees — One-half of the expenses of the college year must be paid at 
the opening of the first term, the other half at the opening of the 
second term. The matriculation and tuition fees must be paid inva- 
riably in advance. Before entering class, a student is required to 
show his matriculation card. Every student using a scholarship must, 
when matriculating, present it, or a copy of it, to the Bursar. 

No portion of the student's fees is refunded on account of with- 
drawal from college, unless the withdrawal be rendered necessary by 
ill health. 

Number of Studies — A student must have at least three daily 
studies, unless, upon the written request of parent or guardian, or for 
good cause shown, the Faculty shall allow him a less number. 

Absences — A student is not permitted to absent himself from any 
recitation or examination without valid excuse, nor from the college 
without special leave from the President. Any student who fails to 
attend his classes regularly or to manifest an interest in his work, is 
dismissed. The college is vastly better off without those who cumber 
the ground. Good students must not be kept back by those who lack 
either aptitude or application. 

Reports — At the end of each term (or oftener, if requested) a report 
is sent by the Faculty to the parent or guardian of each student, stat- 
ing grades and absences from recitations and examinations, together 
with such other information respecting the student's progress and 
conduct as may be deemed proper to communicate, or as the parent 
or guardian may especially request. The object of such reports is to 



40 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



incite the student to diligence by the commendation and encourage- 
ment of his friends, and to restrain him from idleness and disorder by 
their admonition and advice. The usefulness of the reports greatly 
depends upon the prompt and judicious attention they receive from 
those to whom they are addressed. Parents and guardians therefore 
cannot be too earnest or prompt in communicating such advice or en- 
couragement as these reports may suggest. 

Conduct — Young men are expected to conduct themselves as gen- 
tlemen. The college does not lay down specific and minute regula- 
tions; at the same time it hopes that each one will be a law to himself, 
and that he will do nothing inconsistent with good order, good taste, 
or good morals. Should anyone act otherwise, the Faculty will take 
note of the offense at once and deal with the offender as the best in- 
terests of all concerned may require. In like manner the young 
ladies are expected to act in strict accord with the principles of pro- 
priety and honor. 

The laws of the college require from every student decorous, sober 
and upright conduct as long as he remains a member of the college, 
whether he be within the precincts or not. They strictly forbid 
drunkenness, gaming, dissoluteness, swearing, habits of expense, and 
the introduction of wine or other intoxicating drinks into town or col- 
lege precincts. They require a proper observance of the Lord's 
Day. They forbid the use or possession of pistols or other weapons, 
and the introduction of them into the college precincts. Any 
violation of these Regulations may lead to dismissal or expulsion from 
the college. 

Prohibition of Credit — The Faculty wish to> urge parents and 
guardians not to allow students to contract debts to any large amount. 
Such funds as are necessary ought to be promptly furnished. It 
should be borne in mind that too much money is likely to> lead to 
drinking, gambling, and other bad habits. No student need spend 
over three hundred dollars a year; the majority of the students spend 
much less than this sum. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 41 

Graduates of the Fifty-seventh Session* 

Bachelors of Arts. 

Acoam, H. W., ..... '. Indiana. 

Barclay, J. T., .... . . Alabama. 

Bates, Z. E., . . Pennsylvania 

Bebout^D. R., Ohio. 

Biddle, F. M., Ohio. 

Moninger, Herbert, ..... Pennsylvania. 

Miller, H. N., . Pennsylvania. 

Place, A. W., Ohio. 

White, O. G., Ohio. 

Bachelor of Science. 

Chapman, A. C, . . . . . Pennsylvania. 

Bachelor of Letters. 

Stickley, M. E., . . . . . . Virginia. 

Bachelor of Music. 

Lauck, Bessie, . . . . . . West Virginia. 



Honors of the Fifty-sixth Session. 

Summa cum laude- 

B. Brown, Jr., .... . . West Virginia. 

Magna cum laude. 

Sarah E. Dimond., ..... West Virginia. 

F.- E.Wynne, ...... . . West Virginia. 

Cum laude. 

Walter B. Mansel, Ohio. 

John R. Tolar, Jr., New York. 



Students of the Fifty-seventh Session, 

Post-Graduates. 

F. B. Huffman, A. B., ... . Forrest, Mich. 

John R. Tolar, A. B., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



42 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



J. M. Trible, A. B., 
F. E. Wynne, A. B., 



Acoam, H. W., m. 
Barclay, J. T., c. 
Bates, Z. E., m. 
Bebout, D. R., m., . 
Biddle, F. M., m. 
Chapman, A. C, s. 
Moninger, Herbert, m. 
Miller, H. N., m. . 
Place, A. W., m. . 
Stickley, M. K, 1. .. 
White, O. G., m. 



Charnock, Mary, c. 
Fisher, W. L., m. 
Hodge, F. A., m. 
McFarland, Maude, 1. 
Morris, Pearl, 1. 
Murray, W. P. A., m., 
Otsuka, F. N., m. 
Roberts, Lillian, c. . 
Sommerville, T. B. M., c. 
White, T. J., m. 

Alexander, R. R., c. 
Cochran, P. B., c. . 
Cooper, Grace, 1. 
Gordon, F. M., m. 
Mason, Guy M., c. 
Prunsche, F. J., c. 
Stuart, D. E., m. 
Witmer, J. C, c. 



Seniors* 



Juniors* 



Sophomores. 



Freshmen* 



Cowgill, Charles C, m. 
Fields, W. H., m, . 



Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 



Bedford, Ind. 
Wheeler Sta., Ala. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Hebron, O. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Donley, Pa. 
Strabane, Pa. 
Lone Pine, Pa. 
Rudolph, Ohio. 
Woodstock, Va. 
Hebron, Ohio. 



Wellsburg, W. Va. 
London, Mo. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Shelby, Ohio. 
Bradalbane, P. E. L 
Itsuhara, Japan. 
Moundsville,W.Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Ducat, Ohio. 

Minerva, O. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Monongahela, Pa. 
Steubenville, O. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Victoria, W. P. E. I 
Beaver Cr., Md. 



Hagerstown, Md. 
Lock No. 4, Pa. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



43 



Green, Robert R., c, 
Israel, A. G., s. 
Martin, J. E., m. 
Miller, V. H., m., . 
Strickler, R. F., m. 
Waddle, G. A., c. . 
Woolery, Annie B., c. 



Preparatory* 



Allen, Edith, 
Barger, F. D., 
Buckingham, Violet, 
Cooper, Daisy S. . 
Duncan, D. D., . 
Green, J. F., . 
Hagerman, Mary Virginia, 
Johnston, A. C., 
Kent, Walter W., 
Martin, A. G., . 
McBroom, Anna M., . 
McClelland, M. B., . 
Miller, Mary, . 
Nicholson, E. C, 
Riggle, W. S., . . 

Shrontz, J. F., 
Stevenson, R. O., 
Swaney, George, 
Taylor, J. J., * . 
Thatcher, H. B., 
Walton, Linda, 
Wills, Earle, 



Special Students* 



Allen, Eva W., . 
Biddle, Irma, . 
Billings, Laura 
Blackburn, Inez B., 
Carroll, Myra, 
Chambers, Mamie, 
Colburn, Louise, 



Bethany, W. Va. 
Morristown, O. 
Bedford, Ind. 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Smithfield, O. 
Brilliant, Ohio. 
Flushing, O. 



Woodbury, Conn. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Hillsboro, Ohio. 
Monongahela, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
St. Louis, Mich. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Independence, Pa. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Bedford, Ind. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Lone Pine, Pa. 
Lone Pine, Pa. 
Burgettstown, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Glencoe, Ky. 
Miller, W. Va. 
Rice Depot, Va. 
Keokuk, Iowa. 



Lock No, 4, Pa. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bellaire, Ohio. 
Beham, W. Va. 
Elm Grove, W. Va. 
Somerset, Pa. 



44 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Cooper, Jay J., Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Criswell, Pearl B., Moundsville, W.V& 

Curtis, E. H., Jr., Bethany, W. Va. 

Hagerman, Mrs. B. C, . . . . Bethany, W. Va. 

Jones, C. E., Bethany, W. Va. 

Lauck, Bessie, .... . Bethany, W. Va. 

Langfit, Ada, Eagle Mills, W.Va. 

Matthews, Carrie, .... . Wellsburg, W. Va. 

Moore, Goldie A., Wheeling, W. Va. 

Moore, J. B., Bethany, W. Va. 

Moos, Mrs. J. C, Bethany, W. Va. 

Scott, Goldie A., . Bethany, W. Va. 

Seybold, Genevieve C, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Stewart, Helen M., .... . Parkersburg,W.Va. 

Swaney, Jessie, ..... . Bethany, W. Va. 

Taylor, Ida Harden, ..... Pittsburg, Pa. 

Vogel, Virginia, ..... . Somerset, Pa. 

White, Mrs. T. J, Ducat, O. 




CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 45 



Forms of Bequests* 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, Bethany, 

Wes; Virginia, the sum of thousand dollars, 

to be safely invested by them as an endowment, only the interest of 
which is to be used for the support of the College. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, Bethany, 

West Virginia, the sum of thousand dollars, 

to be applied, at their discretion, for the general purposes of the 



College. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, Bethany, 

West Virginia, the sum of thousand dollars, 

to be safely invested by them, and only the interest to be applied, at 
their discretion, to aid deserving students in any course in the College. 



r 




/ r? 




^^-^ 



Bethany College* 



♦ ♦♦♦■©V ^♦♦♦^ 



£> 



CATALOGUE 



•OF. 



Bethany College, 



....FOR THE.... 



FIFTY-EIGHTH SESSION, 



ENDING JUNE 15, 1899, 

....WITH THE.... 

.i 

Courses of Study and Annual Announcement 



FOR 1899-1900. 



OPEN TO YOUNG MEN AND YOUNG WOMEN 
ON EQUAL TERMS. 



BETHANY, WEST YA. 



WHEELING: 

DAILY INTELLIGENCER STEAM JOB PRESS. 



1899. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Calendar* 



1899. 

Baccalaureate Sermon, Sunday, June 1 1 

Annual Exhibition of Ossolian Literary Society, Monday, June 12 

Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and 

Wednesday, June 13 and 14. 

Field Day, Tuesday, June 13 

Joint Annual Exhibition of American Literary Institute and 

of Neotrophian Literary Society, Tuesday, June 13 

Class Day, Wednesday, June 14 

Annual Commencement, Thursday, June 15 

SUMMER VACATION. 

Session begins, Monday, September 18 

Anniversary of Neotrophian Literary Society, November 5 

Anniversary of American Literary Institute, November 10 

Christmas Recess begins at 1 p. m., Friday, December 22 

1900. 

Christmas Recess ends, Tuesday, January 2 

First Term ends, January 26 

Second Term begins, January 27 

Joint Celebration of the Literary Societies, February 22 

Anniversary of Ossolian Literary Society, March 18 

Baccalaureate Sermon, Sunday, June 17 

Annual Meeting of the Board of Trustees, on Tuesday and 

Wednesday, June 19 and 20 

Annual Commencement, Thursday, June 21 



CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



J. M. KERSEY, President (Ex officio) . . Bethany, W. Va. 

W. K. PENDLETON, LL. D Eustis, Pla. 

A. McLEAN, LL. D., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

J. W. MULHOLLAND Philadelphia, Pa. 

HON. GEORGE H. ANDERSON, . . . Pittsburg, Pa. 

JUDGE JOHN A. CAMPBELL, .... New Cumberland, W. Va. 

J. E. CURTIS Wellsburg, W. Va. 

ROBERT MOFPETT, Cleveland, Ohio. 

P. D. POWER, LL. D. . . . . . . Washington, D. C. 

ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, . . . . . Bethany, W. Va. 

CHARLES SHIELDS Allegheny, Pa. 

HON. WILLIAM H. GRAHAM, .... Allegheny, Pa. 

W. C. LYNE, Pittsburg, Pa. 

HON. THOMAS W. PHILLIPS, .... New Castle, Pa. 

ROGER WILLIAMS, M. D Pittsburg, Pa. 

JOHN C. PALMER Wellsburg, W. Va. 

J. J. BARCLAY, LL. D., Bethany, W. Va. 

ISAAC M. RIDGE, M. D Kansas City, Mo. 

HON. OLIVER S. MARSHALL New Cumberland, W. Va. 

C. B. SCOTT, Bethany, W. Va. 

J. F. MERRYMAN, St. Louis, Mo. 

J. W. KNIGHT, Trombley, Ohio. 

CAMPBELL JOBES Claysville, Pa. 

Z. T. VINSON Huntington, W. Va. 

W. R. ERRETT, Pittsburg, Pa. 

JUDGE E. B. ROSSER . Atlanta, Ga. 

A. L. WHITE, ........ Wheeling, W. Va. 

Executive Committee. 

WILLIAM H. GRAHAM, GEORGE H. ANDERSON, 

W. C. LYNE, THOMAS W. PHILLIPS, 

W. R. ERRETT. 

MISS A. C. PENDLETON, 
Librarian, and Secretary of the Board of Trustees. 

R. H. WYNNE, 
Bursar. 

, , JOHN MUNRO, 

Curator of the Museum. 



CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 



THE FACULTY. 



J. M. KERSEY, 
President. 

W. K. PENDLETON, LL. D., 
President Emeritus. 

A. C. PENDLETON, A. M., 
Professor of French and German. 

OSCAR SCHMIEDEL, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

R. H. WYNNE, A. M., 
Professor of Hebrew and History. 

B. C. BONDURANT, A. B.,* . 

Professor of Latin. 

HENRY S. GREEN, A. B., 
Professor of Greek. 

GEORGE MUNRO, A. B., 

Professor of Biblical Literature and Doctrine, and Instructor in M'.;:tal and 

Moral Science. 

JOHN MUNRO, A. B., 
Professor of Natural Science. 

H. NEWTON MILLER, A. M., 
Professor of English and Elocution. 

JEAN MOOS, 
Director of Music. 

MRS. JEAN MOOS, 
Assistant in Music. 

! t 



Professor of Stringed Instruments. 

MISS BERTHA DUNBAR, 
Professor of Drawing and Painting. 

MRS. GEORGE MUNRO, 
Lady Principal. 

DRUSILLA JOHNSON, 
Instructor in :*atin. 



♦Absent on leave. 
[To be appointed. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Origin and Purpose of Bethany College* 



The establishment of an institution of learning, differing in some 
essential respects from any in existence, had long been a favorite 
scheme with Alexander Campbell. When he was fifty years old he 
formulated and published in the "Millenial Harbinger" the plan of 
such an institution as he had in contemplation. He said: ''Imagining 
that I possess some views and attainments which I can in this way 
render permanently useful to this community and posterity, I feel in 
duty bound to offer this project to the consideration of all friends of 
literature, morality and unsectarian Bible Christianity." He pro- 
posed to give the rest of his life to its establishment and supervision, 
provided only that his brethren — the rich and opulent especially, and 
those who had children to educate — would take a strong hold of it, 
and determine to build up an establishment that might be made to 
themselves, their children, and many others, a lasting and compre- 
hensive blessing. 

Two very simple and yet very important convictions were cherished 
by Alexander Campbell in founding Bethany College. In these two 
convictions, in fact, the college has had its origin, and by these it 
has been supported and conducted through the more than half- 
century of its history. The first is that the Bible is the basis of all 
true culture, the foundation of all knowledge. In the corner-stone of 
the college building is laid, underneath books of literature, history, 
science, magazines and periodicals, not a confessioni or a creed, not 
the "Christian Baptist" or the "Millenial Harbinger," but a plain 
Bible. This is the pillar and support of all. And it was the deep- 
rooted belief of the founder and tihe first friends of the college, that no 
education is worthy of the name which leaves the student ignorant of 
the Bible. W'hat Alexander Campbell believed so implicitly and 
proclaimed so boldly in the middle of the present century is just now 
beginning to be apparent to the leaders of education generally, as we 
are nearing the end of it. Indeed, it is only beginning to be appreci- 
ated now. Until quite recent years, the great majority of colleges and 
a multitude of theological seminaries had no place in their course for 
any practical study of the Bible. 



8 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE 

The other conviction cherished just as sacredly in the founding of 
Bethany is that thorough education is essential to an efficient ministry 
of the gospel. In this conviction, without doubt, is the most remark- 
able growth of the Disciples of Christ in a large degree explained. 
The ministry of the Disciples has been, to a great extent, an educated 
ministry. That this is true is surely due in no small part to the fifty 
years' work of Bethany College. It was never the aim of the college 
to endow the student with a stock of ideas or a system of thought, 
but to make mind, to increase the capacity for sound and scholarly 
study, for clear, accurate and independent thinking, and withal, to ed- 
ucate conscience, will and heart, as well as intellect. The one great 
teacher, honored supremely in our college, is Christ; the one text- 
book, the New Testament ; the one great aim in all our training is to 
make men know Christ that they may make Him known to the world. 
In this aim the college began. To this it steadfastly adheres. 
• The charter was procured from the Legislature of Virginia in 184^ 
by John C. Campbell, of Wheeling. Bethany was chosen as the site, 
and the first session of the college began in the autumn of 1841. 

Bethany is situated in the Pan-Handle of West Virginia, sixteen 
miles north of Wheeling and seven miles east of Wellsburg, on the 
Wheeling branch of the Pittsburg, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 
Railway. (From Wellsburg stages are run to Bethany twice every 
day, except Sunday. For special' conveyance, address Moore Bros., 
or John Gibson, Bethany, W. Va.) 

Bethany is in the midst of an elevated 1 region, where there is pure 
air, good water, and almost perfect exemption from malaria and 
intermittent, congestive and malignant fevers, so prevalent in some 
parts of the country. 

The surrounding country is one of extraordinary natural beauty. 
Where can be found a fairer scene than that which opens to us as we 
stand on the steps or walk the corridor of the college building? 
Noble hills which do not rush abruptly to their really mountainous 
height, but rise to it by gentle gradations which give them a rounded 
and finished aspect, and, besides, make them green pastures to their 
very summits through all the seasons; valleys fair and fragrant, 
through which the shadowy waters of "Old Buffalo" wander river- 
ward forever. Rarely does nature bestow on any one spot so various 
charms with so lavish a hand. Added to these natural attractions are 
the traditions and associations which linger about the place. The 
memory of those great souls who lived and labored at Bethany is 
kept green among us. Their ashes rest amid these fruitful and peace- 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 9 

ful hills. Their aims and ideas still hover in the air. The very atmo- 
sphere of such a place is an education in itself. 

It is but truth to say that Bethany hardly aspires to be a great 
school, as some count greatness — great in the number of names on its 
register. It rather rejoices to be enrolled among the small colleges of 
our country. The small college has played a great part in American 
education and history. It is more than doubtful that so good results 
would have come if our colleges had been fewer and larger. The 
university has its mission, but it will not be well for our generation if it 
be made to supplant the college, or if our colleges all aspire to be 
universities. The ambition of magnitude so 1 common to our colleges, 
is not altogether a matter of congratulation. A college is to be judged 
moie by the character than the number of its students. Mammoth 
schools, like other mammoth concerns, may serve well for advertising 
ends, but they are likely to turn out a large proportion of men who, 
however they may count in the catalogue, count for very little in the 
world's work. 

From its foundation the college has attracted those who desire to 
prepare themselves for gospel ministry. So true is this, that it is 
sometimes supposed to> be chiefly, if not wholly, a school for students 
for the ministry. It is, in fact, much more than this: it is a college in 
the full sense, educating men not for one calling only, but for all the 
vocations of life. It has eminent alumni in all the professions. It is, 
however, eminently a school for the training of preachers. So far as 
our knowledge goes, no one ever came to Bethany with the intention 
of devoting his life to the ministry and changed that intention after 
coming here, while it is a thing of frequent occurrence that one who 
comes with his mind set on some other profession, resolves, after 
being in the college awhile, to give himself to the work of the ministry. 
Bethany exalts the ministerial office. A ministerial student is held in 
at least equal honor with any other, while his intimate association wi.h 
other students of the college, and his instruction in the same classes 
and studies with the rest, correct all tendency to clericalisms. Beth- 
any aims to make young men, first of all, students and scholars. Be- 
fore entering upon the strictly ministerial studies, the student is drilled 
in the classical and disciplinary studies as are other students. The 
design of this is to< bring him to a degree of maturity and independ- 
ence of mind before beginning the special ministerial studies. The 
propriety of this is obvious. 



10 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Courses of Study* 



Bethany College offers four regular courses of study: The Classical 
Course and' the Ministerial Course, each leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts; the Scientific Course, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science, and the Literary Course, leading to* the degree 
of Bachelor of Letters. 

For students not sufficiently advanced to enter the Freshman class 
of these college courses, the necessary preparation will be given in 
two preparatory years. The studies of these preparatory years are as 
follows: 

JUNIOR PREPARATORY. 

Latin Lessons, Tuell and Fowler; English Grammar, Reed and 
Kellogg; Algebra, Wentworth's School Algebra; Applied Physiology 
(advanced), Overton; History of the United States. 

SENIOR PREPARATORY. 

Latin, four books of Caesar and two orations of Cicero; Greek, 
Harper and Castle's Inductive Primer; English Composition and 
Rhetoric, Kellogg; General History, Meyers. 

The required studies for each of the regular courses are presented 
in the Synoptical View of the several Courses, and are described in 
detail in the several departments of instruction following: 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



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14 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Departments of Instruction* 

Department of Greek* 

PREPARATORY YEAR. 

In the work of the preparatory year pupils begin the reading and 
writing of Greek with the very first lesson. The inductive method is 
used and every effort is made to' develop the power and the habit of 
independent study. The common forms and constructions of the 
language, together with a considerable vocabulary are acquired in 
course of reading the first book of the Anabasis. Daily exercises 
in translating English into Greek. Text-Books: — Harper and Cas- 
tle's Inductive Greek Primer, Goodwin's Grammar. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 

Xenophon's Anabasis, three books. Selections from Herodotus 
and three books of Homer's Iliad are read. 

Composition based on the prose previously translated in class runs 
through the first half year. In connection with Homer, mythology is 
taken up. The times and customs of the periods covered in trasla- 
tion are noted. Careful examination of all forms and constructions 
continues through the year. Attention is called to the variety of form 
and dialect of the Iliad. The verse is read metrically. 

Text-books: — Harper and Wallace's Anabasis, Seymour's Iliad, 
Guerber's Myths of Greece and Rome. Students should also have 
Liddell and Scott's Lexicon, a Classical Atlas and a Dictionary of 
Antiquities. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

Demosthenes' Philippics or the De Corona. Plato's Apology and 
Crito are read. 

An accurate knowledge of forms and syntax is required. 

A study of the times and conditions of the subjects read is made. 

Some time is devoted to Greek History and special themes are 
assigned for individual research. 

Text-books : — Dyer's Apology and Crito, Pennell's Ancient Greece 
or Fyffe's History of Greece. D'Ooge's Demosthenes on the Crown. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
During the first half-year Aeschylus' Prometheus and Aristopha- 
nes' Clouds are read. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 15 

A close study of the Greek drama is made. The meter is studied 
and portions of the verse read metrically. 

The development of Comedy is examined and its political bearing 
discussed. Considerable time is also devoted to the study of Greek 
Literature. 

The second half-year is devoted to reading one of the Tragedies of 
Sophocles and extracts from Thucydides, accompanied by further 
study of Greek History. 

Text-books: — Humphrey's Clouds, Allen's Prometheus, Jebb's 
Greek Literature. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

The Seniors in the Ministerial Course, and other members of the 
Senior Class who take Greek as an elective, spend the first half-year 
in studying New Testament Greek. Peculiar forms and idiomatic 
expressions are carefully examined, comparison's being constantly 
made with standard Attic Greek. The Gospels are studied on the 
basis of Mark and the Pauline epistles on the basis of Galatians. " Es- 
pecial emphasis is laid on the form, structure and usage of the lan- 
guage rather than on exegesis. However, where form or syntax af- 
fects the meaning of a passage, an exposition of the text is given. 

The second half-year (elective) is devoted to a study of lyric poetry 
with readings from the Odes of Pindar. 

Text-books: — Westeott and Hort's Greek New Testament, Green's 
Handbook of New Testament Greek, Seymour's Selected Odes of 
Pindar. ; 

Department of Latin. 

Candidates for admission to the Freshman Class in Latin will be 
examined on four books of Caesar and two orations of Cicero, or 
their equivalents. A fair knowledge of the forms and syntax, and 
the ability to translate an easy paragraph based on one of the authors 
named, from English into Latin will be necessary to pass the entrance 
exmination. Some knowledge of Roman History will also be found 
helpful. Instruction in the Preparatory years is intended to meet 
these requirements. The text-books for these years will be Tuell and 
Fowler's First Book in Latin, Allen and Greenough's or Kelsey's 
editions of Caesar and Cicero, Daniell's Exercises in Latin Composi- 
tion and Bennett's Grammar. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
In the first term Cicero's Pro Archia and three books of Virgil's 



16 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Aeneid and in) the second term one book of the Aeneid and the Odes 
of Horace will be read by the Freshman Class. Syntax, prosody, the 
usage of the poets contrasted with that of the prose writers and so 
much of mythology as is necessary for the proper understanding of 
Virgil and Horace, will receive careful attention. Roman History is 
studied, and weekly exercises in Prose Composition are continued 
throughout the session. 

Text-books: — Bennett's Grammar; Allen and Greenough's or Kel- 
sey's Cicero; Greenough and Kittridge's Virgil; Smith's Odes and 
Epodes of Horace; Allen's History of the Roman People; DanieH's 
Prose Composition. Lewis' Elementary Latin Dictionary or Har- 
per's Latin Dictionary is recommended. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

This class will read during the first term Cicero's De Senectute and 
De Amicitia, and during the second term the Germania and Agricola 
of Tacitus. A part of the time will be given to the study of Roman 
Literature. Weekly exercises in Prose Composition will be required. 

Text-books: — Bennett's Grammar; Kelsey's edition of the De Se- 
nectute and De Amicitia; Allen's Tacitus; Wilkin's Primer of Roman 
Literature ; Miller's Prose Composition. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

This class will study Roman Satire in its great masters, Horace and 
Juvenal. In the second term- Roman Comedy will be studied in the 
Captivi of Plautus. The Life and Customs of the Romans will also 
be considered. 

Text-books: — Kirkland's Satires and Epistles of Horace; Mac- 
leane's Juvenal; Lindsay's edition of the Captivi of Plautus; Wilkin's 
Roman Antiquities. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

The Senior Class whTread selected plays of Plautus and Terence. 
A thorough study of the syntax of these plays will be made. Consid- 
erable time will be spent in reading Cicero, Caesar and Nepos at sight. 
Any recognized edition of these authors will be satisfactory. 

Department of Hebrew. 

In this age of Biblical criticism the need of a knowledge of Hebrew 
is more generally felt and recognized and there is a growing interest 
taken in the study of the language. The course extends through the 
Junior and Senior year. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 17 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
Genesis i-viii is read; the general principles of the grammar; spe- 
cial attention is given to the forms of words ; the acquisition of a vo- 
cabulary; the translation of English into Hebrew; some of the impor- 
tant principles of syntax; reading of selections from Old Testament. 
Recitations daily. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

A critical study of selections from the historic, poetic and prophetic 
books of the Hebrew Bible; review of the grammar; the principles of 
syntax ; the principles of Hebrew poetry. 

Text-books : — Harper's Elements of Hebrew, Harper's Method and 
Manual; Harper's Hebrew Syntax, Hebrew Bible, Lexicon. Reci- 
tations daily. 



Department of French and German, 

Students who desire to begin these languages must possess an accu- 
rate knowledge of the elements of English grammar, and those desir- 
ing to enter later in the course must offer the work assigned for the 
preceding terms, or an equivalent. The aims of the instruction are 
good pronunciation, ready use of regular and irregular inflections, 
and the acquisition of a useful vocabulary. Special attention will be 
given to reading at sight; oral practice and writing from dictation will 
begin early in the course and continue throughout. Selections for 
reading are made with a view to acquainting the student, as far as time 
admits, with the masterpieces of French and German literature, and 
the political, social and literary characteristics of the author's time are 
therefore considered in the work. In every translation, the idiomatic 
accuracy of the English used is taken into account. Scientific read- 
ings are included, that the student may acquire the special vocabulary 
needed for scientific research. The classes meet five times a week. 



French. 
FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term — Minimum French Grammar (Joynes); Preparatory 
French Reader (Super). Daily drill in verb forms. 

Second Term — Halevy's L'Abbe Constantin' (Logie); Victor 
Hugo's Ruy Bias (Garner) ; French Composition (Grandgent) ; Min- 
imum French Grammar continued. 



18 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term — Scientific French readings (Bowen) ; Racine's Athalie 
(Joynes) ; French composition and oral practice ; Minimum, or Otto's 
French Grammar for reference. 

Second Term — French Lyrics (Bowen) ; Pailleron's Le Monde ou 
Ton s'ennui (Pendleton). Recitations from French literature. 

There will be monthly examinations upon such private reading as 
may be assigned. 



German. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Joynes-Meissner's German Grammar; Grimm's 
Marchen (Van der Smissen); Holier als die Kirche (Clary). 

Second Term — Lessing's Minna von Barnhelm (Primer) ; Schef- 
fel's Ekkehard (Wenckebach); Colloquial German (Bronson); 
Joynes-Meissner's Grammar continued. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Scientific German readings; (Hodges); Colloquial 
German and prose composition; Schiller's Maria Stuart (Joynes). 

Second Term — German Lyrics and Ballads (Hatfield); Colloquial 
German and prose composition; Freytag's Soil und Haben. 

There will be monthly examinations upon such private reading as 
may be assigned. 



l & j 



Department of English and History* 

FRESHIMAN YEAR. 

A careful study of the principles of Rhetoric and, in order that the 
student may acquire the habit of putting these principles into practice 
by the use of good English, frequent exercises in composition will 
occupy the time of both the Freshman and Sophomore classes. 

Three compositions a term will be required of each member. In 
order to cultivate in the student a taste for the best literature, a certain 
amount of parallel reading will be assigned at the beginning of the 
session. 

Text-books: — Genung's Practical Rhetoric. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
This class will continue the study of Rhetoric, taking up the discus- 
sion of Figures, and of the different kinds of Composition, including 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 19 

the general principles of Versification. Some time will be spent in the 
critical analysis of selected specimens of English prose and also in the 
study of words. Three compositions a term will be required. 

Text-books: — Genung's Practical Rhetoric; Genung's Rhetorical 
Analysis ; Trench on the Study of Words. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

During this year will be studied critically representative English 
authors of each period up to the nineteenth century. Attention will 
be given to the relations of writers to one another and to the times in 
which they lived; also the characteristics of each period. Parallel 
readings will be assigned, on which papers will be prepared by the 
students and discussed in class. Recitations twice a week. 

Text-book : — Painter's Introduction to English Literature. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

During the first half-year the nineteenth century period of English 
Literature will be studied. The lives of the important writers of this 
epoch will be considered individually and reciprocally. Selections 
fiom their best writings will be carefully examined and analyzed. A 
knowledge of the figures and allusions will be required. The bearing 
of the works of the writers of this period on the history and literary 
culture of their time will be discussed. Parallel readings will be 
assigned for the preparation of papers on special themes for class dis- 
cussion. 

During the last half-year students will make a study of American 
Literature. A general survey of the subject will be taken, but Emer- 
son, Hawthorne, Lowell, Longfellow, Holmes, Bryant, Poe and 
Whittier will receive attention. The work will proceed on much the 
same plan as that of the preceding term. One carefully prepared 
essay on an assigned subject will be required each term. 

Text-books: — Painter's Introduction to English Literature; Paint- 
er's Introduction to American Literature. 



History* 

Students entering college are expected to have a knowledge of the 
History of the United States, and also some acquaintance with Gen- 
eral History, both Ancient and Modern. For those who have not 
had instruction in these subjects, provision has been made in the pre- 
paratory classes. 



20 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

For Ministerial students, recitations five times a week, during the 
first term of the Senior year, are given in Church History, giving spe- 
cial attention to the Apostolic and Reformation periods of church 
history, and supplemented by lectures on recent reformatory move- 
ments, especially the origin, principles and growth of the Disciples. 

Text-books: — Meyer's General History; Fisher's Church History. 

Students in the Literary Course will devote five hours a week to the 
study of the History of Modern Europe. 

Student's in the Classical and Literary Courses will study Green's 
Short History of the English People. 



Department of Natural Sciences* 

Zoology and Botany. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

During the Sophomore year about eighteen weeks will be devoted 
to each one of these sciences in the order named. Three recitations 
a week. 

In Zoology, beginning with the lowest and simplest forms of animal 
life, the student is brought to 1 the study of the higher and more com- 
plex, and in the diversity of form led to see the oneness of plan. 

Text-book: — "Comparative Zoology," by James Orton, latest edi- 
tion. 

In the study of Botany each student is required, in addition to tht 
text-book work of the recitation room, to collect and analyze, accu- 
rately naming Order, Genus and Species, and scientifically arrange a 
collection of at least fifty specimens of the more common plants, thus 
practically applying, so far as classification is concerned, what has 
been learned from the text-book. 

Text-books: — Gray's School and Field Botany, latest edition. 



Physics. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 
The course in Physics occupies the first term of the Junior year. 
A thorough knowledge of Mathematics, at least so far as to include 
Trigonometry, is indispensable to the proper pursuit of this course. 
Beginning with matter and motion, and their laws, the student is 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 21 

brought to the practical application of these laws in the different forms 
of matter, solids, liquids and gases, and to the philosophy of machin- 
ery. When these have been mastered, the different forms of energy, 
heat, light, sound and electricity are studied and discussed with special 
reference to their practical application in the recent discoveries and 
inventions in this science. 

Text-book : — Appleton's School Physics. 



Chemistry* 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Chemistry occupies the first eighteen weeks of the Junior year, with 
five recitations per week, and is conducted on the plan suggested by 
the author of the text-book used, viz: — first, the systematic study of 
the phenomena; and then, the connection between these phenomena 
and the theories. The apparatus and laboratory of this department 
are used with this end in view. 

Text-book: — "Introduction to- the Study of Chemistry," by Ira 
Remsen, latest edition. 



Analytical Chemistry* 

This course is required only of those Juniors who take the Scientific 
Course, though open to* any student prepared by having taken the 
course in Chemistry of the first term of the Junior year. It consists 
of five weekly recitations, of two hours 1 each, during the last eighteen 
weeks of the Junior year in Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis. 

In the Qualitative work the student first studies the reactions of the 
more common bases and acids, by dealing with known substances, 
and then he is given mixed compounds of, to him, unknown compo- 
sition, to determine the different metals and acids which compose it. 
Not only is the student taught methods of analysis, but the reasons 
for the methods. ( 

Each student is required to keep neat and carefully prepared notes 
of all phenomena observed by him, during these determinations, 
which are inspected and corrected by the instructor. 

In Quantitative Analysis 1 only those who have satisfactorily com- 
pleted the first part of the course (Qualitative Analysis) will be allowed 
to undertake this work. The student is first required to determine the 
per cent of the metal's and acids in some of the pure salts, and when he 
has acquired accuracy in manipulation and understands the reasons 
for the methods employed, he is given salts and ores of unknown per 
cents for determination. 



22 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

A fee of Ten Dollars is charged to each student in Qualitative 
Analysis, and an additional fee of Five Dollars to those taking the 
Quantitative work. 



Geology. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

The study of Geology occupies fourteen weeks pf the last term of 
the Senior Year, five recitations per week. 

The plan pursued is, first, the study of the agencies now at work in 
producing structure, or Dynamical Geology ; second, structural Geol- 
ogy; last, Historical Geology. As an aid to this study, the college 
has a collection of minerals and geological specimens well suited for 
illustration. 

Text-book: — "Compend of Geology," by Le Conte. 

In all classes in Natural Sciences monthly examinations are re- 
quired. 



Department of Mathematics. 

To enter the Freshman class a knowledge of Algebra to Quadratic 
Equations, including Proportion and Logarithms, is required. Those 
not thus prepared must become members of the preparatory class, 
which meets five times a week throughout the year. Wentworth's 
School Algebra is used as text-book. 

Any one wishing tx> enter a class in applied Mathematics must first 
become familiar with those branches of pure Mathematics upon which 
the applied depends for its principles. The courses are so arranged 
that no student, pursuing them in the order indicated and with the 
thoroughness required, encounters serious difficulty. A fee of $3.00 
to be paid before entering the class in Surveying is charged for the 
use of instruments and drawing room. 

: FRESHMAN YEAR. 

First Term — Plane Geometry (Wentworth). 

Second Term — Solid Geometry and Trigonometry (Wentworth, 
Jones' Tables). 1 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term — Higher Algebra (Wentworth). 
Second Term — Land Surveying (Gillespie). 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 2$ 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Analytic Geometry and Differential Calculus. 
Second Term — Integral Calculus with applications to Geometry. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

First Term — Mechanics (Kemper). 
Second Term — Astronomy. 



Department of Biblical Literature and Doctrine* 

During the Freshman year, students in all the regular college 
courses are required to give three recitations a week in Old and 
New Testament Literature, and ministerial Sophomores are required 
to give two recitations a week in more technical Biblical study. The 
study of the Old and New Testament Literature considers the Bible 
both in its unity as the record of a progressive Divine revelation, and 
also in its diversity as made up of many widely different though vitally 
related books. The authorship, the time and place of writing, the 
purpose, the plan, the contents and the style of each of the several 
books are studied. These books are also regarded in their Biblical 
groupings as Historical, Poetical, Prophetical, Epistolary, etc. 

During the Sophomore year instruction is given three times a week 
to ministerial students in Homiletics. It is believed that before 
young men are encouraged to preach they should study "The Prepa- 
ration and Delivery of Sermons." In the second term of the Junior 
year ministerial students give five recitations a week to Hermeneutics. 

In the first term of the Senior year ministerial students devote their 
time to Church History, and in 1 the second term 1 they take up Christ- 
ian Evidences and New Testament Doctrine. 

Text-books: — In this department the Revised Version of the Bible 
is the main text-book, but the following books are also used and rec- 
ommended as valuable helps: Broadus' Preparation 1 and Delivery of 
Sermons; Terry's Biblical Hermeneutics; Fisher's Church History; 
Fisher's Manual of Christian Evidences; Stevens' Pauline Theology 
and Stevens' Johannine Theology. 



Department of Mental, Moral and Political Science* 

In! this department, during the first half of the year, a course of lec- 
tures will be given, designed to present in an elementary and sum- 
mary way the principal philosophical problems. An outline sketch 



24 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

of the history and development of philosophical thought will be given 
in connection with the course in Psychology. 

Text-books: — James' Psychology, Ladd's Psychology, descriptive 
and explanatory. 

In Moral Science much attention is given to the various existing 
theories concerning the supreme motive in human conduct and the 
true ground of moral obligation. An effort is made to show that the 
various theories are not so much opposed to' each other as might be 
supposed. 

Text-book: — Porter's Elements of Moral Science. 

la Logic both the deductive and inductive methods are taught. 
Special drill is given.in the work of detecting fallacies and in pointing 
out the exact nature of the fallacy in each instance. 

Text-book: — Jevons' Logic. 

Instruction is given three times a week during the Junior year in 
Political Science, which is made to include American Government, as 
well as Economics. One term is given to each of these subjects in 
the order named. , 

Instruction in American Government is intended to set forth the 
facts and principles which underlie the government of the United 
States and to give the student a knowledge of such facts as every citi- 
zen of this country should possess. 

Attention will be given to the following: The national govern- 
ment; the government of the colonies; the formation of the Union; 
nature and sources of the Constitution ; composition and organization 
of the two houses of Congress; the government of the states and their 
relations to the Union. 

Text-book: — The American Government, by B. A. Hinsdale. 

The study of Economics embraces the principles of Political Econ- 
omy. Its development, private and public. Under private Econo- 
mics will be considered production, transfer, distribution and con- 
sumption of goods. Public Economics deals with the relations of the 
state and private enterprise, expenditure and revenues. 

Text-book : — Ely's Outlines of Economics. 

A course in Sociology is offered as an elective to' members of the 
Senior class and Post Graduates. 

Text-book: — Small and Vincent's Introduction to the study of 
Society. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 25 

Department of Music. 

Recognizing the intellectual and spiritual value of a complete 
course in the Art of Music, Bethany College follows the example of 
other institutions at home and abroad by making the study of Musical 
Theory one of the elective courses of the college, and admits the same 
as a substitute for one of the elective studies in the Classical, Scientific, 
Literary or Ministerial course, subject to the approval of the Faculty. 

Students in the Department of Music are required to pursue at 
least one study in some other department of the college. 

The object of the Music Department is to prepare students for an 
active, artistic career, either in concert, church, school or on the stage. 

To educate teachers, who shall be masters of knowledge, and 
understand the correct and systematic training of those entrusted to 
their care. 

To give solid, artistic foundation, graceful and brilliant execution 
to those fortunate ones who, free from material cares, follow art for 
art's sake, and who, either in the circle of a cultured home, or as 
leaders in society, diffuse pleasure and happiness around them. 



Branches of Instruction* 

Piano-forte; Organ; String Instruments: — Violin,. Mandolin, Gui- 
tar, etc. ; ! ; , 

Voice Culture: — Solo Singing; Chorus Singing. 

Ensemble Playing. 

Theory of Music, embracing: Harmony, Composition and History 
jf Music. 

PIANO OR ORGAN. 

All Violin students must attend classes in Harmony and Theory. 

Teacher's Certificate will be given to those completing our Three 
Years' course. Diploma of Graduation and degree of Bachelor of 
Music will be awarded to those who 'have completed the entire Four 
Years' course and the Three Years' course in Theory. Any candi- 
date for Teacher's Certificate or Diploma of Graduation must have 
studied at least one year in our college. 

VOICE CULTURE. 

All voice students must attend the classes in Harmony and Theory. 

Teachers' Certificates will be given to those completing the course 
of Two Years. Applicants for this certificate must be able to play ac- 
companiments. Diploma of graduation and degree of Bachelor of 



26 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Music will be given to those completing the course of three years and 
the course in theory. 

ORCHESTRA (VIOLIN, ETC.) 
All Violin students must attend classes in Harmony and Theory. 
Diploma of Graduation and degree of Bachelor of Music will be 
given to those completing the course of three years. 

HARMONY AND THEORY. 

This course includes two years' study of Harmony and one year of 
Musical Form and History of Music. This course is obligatory for 
all who desire to receive a diploma in any of the other courses. 

The work in Theory embraces two weekly recitations of one hour 
each. 



Terms of Tuition. 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

The school year of the Music Department consists of two terms of 
1 8 weeks each. Private lessons are 30 minutes each, twice a week. 
All class lessons are of an hour's duration. 

For specifications of study send for special Music Circular. 

Apply to Director Jean Moos, Bethany, W. Va. 

PIANO OR ORGAN. 
Two> private lessons each week. 
I and II year, each term ...... $28.00 

III and IV year, each term ...... 38.00 

IN CLASSES OF FOUR STUDENTS. 
Two* lessons a week, of one hour each. 
I and II year, each term ...... $20.00 

III and IV year, each term ...... 30.00 

Ensemble playing, free. 

VOICE. 
Two private lessons each week. 
I year, each term ....... $28.00 

II and III year, each term . . . . . . 38.00 

In classes of four students, two lessons a week, one hour each. 
I year, each term . . . . . . . $25.00 

II and III year, each term ...... 30.00 

Chorus singing, free. 
Lectures on Hygiene of Vocal and Respiratory Organs, and Anat- 
omy of Chest and Larynx, free. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 27 

VIOLIN, MANDOLIN, GUITAR, ETC. 

Two private lessons each week. 

I and II year, each term ...... $28.00 

III year, each term' ....... 38.00 

In classes of four students, two lessons of one hour each. 

I and II year, each term . . . . . . $15.00 

III year, each term ....... 20.00 

One private lesson a week. 

I and II year, each term ...... $15.00 

III year, each term ....... 20.00 

Ensemble playing, free. 

HARMONY AND THEORY. 
Two class lessons a week of one hour each, per term . $10.00 

CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 

Teacher's Certificate .......$ 5.00 

Diploma of Graduation ...... 10.00 

RENT OF PIANO. 

Use of Piano or Practice Clavier, one hour and a half, for daily 
practice, per term, $5.00. 

Students in the Department of Music taking studies in any other 
department of instruction in the College, pay $5 per term for each 
study taken. 

There is a special circular of the Music Department which will be 
sent upon application, free of charge, by the Director, Prof. Jean 
Moos, Bethany, W. Va. This circular gives detailed description of 
each branch of study, the compositions, composers, and technical ma- 
terial to be studied. It gives the advantages, rules, regulations, 
special privileges, etc. 



Department of Art* 

In the Art Department thorough instruction will be given in Free- 
Hand Drawing in charcoal and crayon, and in Flower, Portrait and 
Landscape Painting in Oil, Water Colors and India Ink. Situated in 
one of the most beautiful landscapes in America, Bethany affords rare 
opportunities for sketching from nature. It is the purpose and policy 
of the college to foster the love and study of art continually. 

FIRST YEAR. 

This consists in the drawing of straight and curved lines, circles, 
squares and other simple forms in outline, until the muscles of the 



28 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

hand have learned to obey the will. This is continued with simple 
drawings executed in the modern method, until the use of charcoal 
and crayon is thoroughly understood. The student then takes up 
Cast Drawing, which is progressive, beginning with the features in 
different positions and leading gradually to the full head, feet, hands, 
etc., until the whole length figure is reached. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Cast drawing continued. 

Crayon, Pastel, Drawing from Nature, Water Colors. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Pastel, Water Colors, Drawing from Nature continued. 

Oil Colors, Portraiture. 

Porcelain Painting in over-glaze colors is made a specialty. This 
will include the preparation of designs, their application to the ware, 
and firing — for which a kiln Will be provided in the College building. 
All firing will be done there, so that students may become familiar 
with its use. 

Instruction is given also in figure and miniature painting on porce- 
lain. 

Tuition. 

Class Lessons, per term ...... $18.00 

Private Lessons, each . . . . . 1.00 



Department of Elocution and Oratory ♦ 

The design of this department is to cultivate a taste for pure litera- 
ture, to elevate the standard of expression and to qualify students for 
public reading and speaking. 

The regular course in Oratory extends one full college, year, is 
compact, systematic and practical; but for those who for any reason 
do not care to take the regular course of study, the following special 
courses are arranged: 

Deep Breathing, Voice Development, Stage Deportment; Psycho- 
Physical Culture; Bible and Hymn Reading; Advanced Reading and 
Oratory; Gesture and Pantomime; Dramatic Attitudes; Facial Ex- 
pression and Impersonation. Also a lecture course of ten lessons on 
Thought Analysis and Philosophy of Expression. 

The work in the regular course is supplemented by lectures on such 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 29 

subjects as Mental and Moral conditions affecting the Voice, The 
Will in Elocutionary Work, Personal Magnetism and other topics oi 
interest to the student of elocution and oratory. Many special ad- 
vantages are afforded in this department, rates of tuition very mod^ 
eiate. For particulars address the Director. 



Gymnasium. 

Believing that the true principles and methods of education re- 
quire proper and proportionate consideration to be given to both 
mind and body, Bethany College, in connection with her other de- 
partments of instruction, also* fosters physical culture. There is a 
commodious gymnasium, equipped with modern apparatus and appli- 
ances for physical development and culture, such as horizontal bars, 
parallel bars, ladders, climbing ropes, chest weights, dumb-bells, 
wands, indian clubs, striking bag, basket ball, etc. Within the Col- 
lege Campus there are ample athletic grounds well laid out for base 
ball, foot ball and other athletic games; also fine tennis courts, cro- 
quet grounds-, etc. Thus superior advantages and inducements are 
afforded for both ladies and gentlemen. Hours are set apart for the 
daily use of the gymnasium by the young lady students, and it is ex- 
pected that they wil make as free use of the gymnasium facilities as 
do the male students. W 7 ith such variety of recreations, no student 
C£n lack that diversion and exercise so indispensable to the enjoy- 
ment of college life and success in college work. 



Library and Reading Room. 

This is a commodious apartment, 30 by 38 feet, well lighted and 
supplied with the best papers and magazines of the day. It is known 
by many that our library has twice suffered heavy losses by fire ; it is 
at present well equipped with encyclopaedias and other books of ref- 
erence, and contains, besides, about two thousand volumes of miscel- 
laneous literature. Liberal gifts in books have been made by friends 
from time to time ; such donations are earnestly solicited, and will at 
all times be gratefully acknowledged. 

A reading-room fee of one dollar is required from each student in 
the college to provide a fund for the supply of current literature. 



Cabinets and Museums, 

The Natural History Cabinet contains some of the Fauna, Birds 
and Mammals of this region, with a very valuable collection from 
Australia and exchanges from other sections of the country; also a 



30 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

fine Herbarium of native plants, with many rare ones from other parts 
of the world. 

The Mineralogical and Geological Cabinet contains several thou- 
sand specimens of Minerals and Fossils from all parts of the world. 

The Ethnological Cabinet, though not large, contains rare and 
valuable collections. 

The Philosophical Apparatus affords facilities for the illustration of 
physical principles. 

The Chemical Laboratory is provided with apparatus and chemicals 
for illustration in the courses offered. 



Literary Societies. 

There are in connection with the College four societies devoted to 
the cultivation of literary composition and oratory : The Ossolian, the 
Neotrophian, the American and the Adelphian. The Ossolian is dis- 
tinctively for ladies and the Adelphian for ministerial students. As 
the Adelphian Society differs in some important respects from a 
purely literary society, it demands more particular notice. As it is a 
distinguishing feature of Bethany College to make the Bible a reg- 
ular subject of study and daily examination, the Adelphian Society 
was organized in order to promote and carry out to the fullest extent 
the purposes contemplated in the department of Bible Literature. 
The regular exercises of the society consist of recitations of portions 
of the Scriptures ; reading original essays on moral and religious sub- 
jects, and the delivery of Scriptural discourses, not only before the 
society, but on suitable occasions in public. 

Young men in preparing for the Christian ministry may derive in- 
calculable advantages from this society. From its organization, and 
the character and ability of its members, it is well fitted to facilitate the 
acquisition of enlarged views of the Bible, and the cultivation of a 
high standard of morality and religion. 



Students hectare Association. 

A course of poular lectures is given each year under the auspices 
of this association, affording the students the benefit of some of the 
best platform talent of the country. 



The Collegian. 

During the college year the students publish a monthly journal en- 
titled The Collegian, which may be used as an excellent means of de- 
veloping literary talent. 



Decoration Day Exercises. 

BY THE 




bf ^tttXKUB 



1 



OF THE 






he and <Jne &my. 

Chapel Hall, Saturday Eve, May 30th., '90. 
B. C. Bor\durant, Presiding Officer. 



In vocation, - 



Song,- "America," 



Prof. IT. S. SchelL 
Audience. 



Oration,- 



Violin Solo,- 



rati on, - 



Vocal Solo,- 



J. W. Preston, Tenn. 
"The Lost Cause." 

Miss Clara Shepard, 



J. F. Williams, Ohio. 



Our Union. 



Oration,- 



Miss Ella Chapman, 
J. Preston Clarke, Va. 



"A Monument's Message." 



Yocal Solo,- 
Oration,- 



O. T. Whitacro 



J. D. Hull, Ohio. 



The Nation's Preserver. 



USHERS. 

FWs'o Swar\ey, Por\r\a. 
/"Viss /^cFarlar^d, Or\io. 
t\. E. Stickley, Va. 
V. G. Hostetter, Or\io. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 31 

Religious Services. 

The daily morning devotions are held in the college chapel at eight 
o'clock. ' 

Weekly meetings for prayer and song and exhortation are main- 
tained by the students. 

The college authorities are anxious to make the college pulpit 
worthy of its splendid traditions. The regular preacher is a member 
of the Faculty; other members speak occasionally, and during the 
year a number of eminent men are invited to spend a Lord's Day in 
Bethany. The church seeks to contribute to the piety of every stu- 
dent. ' ; I ; ' I ! 

The Y. M. C. A., the Y. W. C. A. and the Y. P. S. C. E. have each a 
large and active membership among the students, and are dloing 
good work. A number of students are enrolled in the Volunteer 
Band. 



Missions. 

A course of lectures on Missions is given before the whole school. 
This* course covers as fully as practicable all the more important 
points in the Theory, History and Practice of Christian Missions. The 
matter is equally important to those who are preparing for work at 
home, and for those who prepare to go abroad. The Missionary As- 
sociation of the College holds stated meetings to hear reports and 
original letters from former students and others in the various mission 
fields, to pray for the increased success of missionary labor, to discuss 
questions connected with the mission work, and, in general, to cul- 
tivate an intelligent personal interest in the great enterprise of evan- 
gelizing the world. 



Lectures Before the College. 

The interesting and instructive courses upon other specially select- 
ed themes which have been contributed by many of our most promi- 
nent lecturers, as A. McLean, R. T. Mathews, F. D. Power, H. L. 
Willett, George Darsie, C. S. Lucas, S. M. Jefferson, Mrs. Jessie 
Brown Pounds and others and which are also- so timed that all stu- 
dents of the College may attend them, will be continued. 



Degrees and Diplomas. 

To receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science or 
Bachelor of Letters, the candidate must have completed all the 
studies required (or their full equivalents) in the course leading to the 



32 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

desired degree, with an actual attendance in the college during at 
least the Senior year. 

Students who have attended the college during the Junior and 
Senior years, and whose final grade, computed as the average of all 
their monthly and examination grades during these years is ninety- 
tiiree per cent, are enrolled 1 on the Honor List, and this distinction is 
noted in the diploma by the words Cum Laude. A final grade of 
ninety-four per cent is noted by Magna Cum Laude, one of ninety- 
five per cent by Summa Cum Laude. In the awarding of honors, 
however, regard is had to the conduct of the student during his course, 
and any student who has incurred serious 'discipline may be debarred 
from the honor to which otherwise his scholarship would have entitled 
him. 

In order to obtain the degree of Master of Arts, the candidate must 
first receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts, be thereafter in actual 
attendance in the college for one session, and complete, with an 
approved examination in each, three studies to be selected by him 
with the consent of the Faculty. 

The honorary degree of Master in any one of the courses may be 
conferred on a Bachelor of three years' standing in that course, pro- 
vided he has, during the interval, pursued studies relating to the de- 
gree and has maintained an exemplary character. 

The fee for any diploma is ten dollars ; except for a Bachelor's di- 
ploma to Ministerial students, which is five dollars. No application for 
the degree of Master is entertained unless accompanied by the fee of 
ten dollars, which is returned if the degree is not conferred. 



Expenses, 

Young men can procure board and rooms (either furnished or 
unfurnished) in Bethany at about the same prices, according to qual- 
ity, as the prevailing cost of corresponding accommodations in other 
college communities. The best rooms in the village, furnished and 
cared for, with fuel, etc., can be had for the entire session by two 
students at a cost to each of from thirty to thirty-five dollars. The 
best board can be had for from two dollars and fifty cents to three 
dollars a week. In clubs it may be made to> cost still less. Some 
students reduce their expenses very much more by boarding them- 
selves. Such young men are none the less respected by their fellow- 
students. It will be understood that incidental expenses vary with 
the habits and circumstances of students. The following tabular 



CATALOGUE OP BETHANY COLLEGE. 33 

statement may be taken as a fair average of the necessary expenses of 
a young man for the entire session, or college year: 

Tuition ....... 

Matriculation ...... 

Furnished Room 

Board, 38 weeks at $2.50 per week 

Reading Room Fee ..... 

Washing, say . 

Total $191 00 



$ 


40 


00 




10 


00 




30 


00 




95 


00 




1 


00 




15 


00 



Expenses Phillips Hall. 

Young ladies residing as students at Phillips Hall are given fur- 
nished rooms (heated and lighted) and board, for three dollars and 
fifty cents a week. Care is taken to provide the young ladies a suffi- 
ciency of wholesome, palatable food and to allow them a reasonable 
freedom of the house in all respects. Each young lady is expected 
to bring sheets, pillow cases, towels, napkins, napkin ring, knife, fork, 
tea-spoon and lamp. Of course each young lady is charged also the 
regular Tuition and Matriculation fees of the college. A deposit of 
five dollars is required of each as guarantee for preservation of the 
room and furniture, which is refunded when the room is vacated, if 
everything is found in proper condition. 

Phillips Hall, the handsome gift of the Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, 
of New Castle, Pa., is a large and commodious building, well adapted 
to the wants of young ladies. The hall is heated throughout by steam, 
and is supplied with bath rooms. The building is situated on College 
Hill, only a few steps from the college building, which renders it 
convenient for the students to study in their own rooms between class 
hours. ■: 

A lady principal has charge of Phillips Hall, devotes herself to* the 
welfare of the young ladies and endeavors to make this place a home 
in fact as well as in name. The moral and spiritual, as well as the 
intellectual interests of the young ladies are constantly kept in view. 
It is sought to inspire them with the highest ideals, and to promote 
their growth in character as well as in mind. Honor and truth are 
the main principles regarded in the government of. the home; and 
sympathy and confidence rather than rigid rules are relied on to pre- 
serve the peace and order of the household. This confidence is rarely 
disappointed. Young ladies who have begun to take life in earnest 



34 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

co not need much discipline. Others are not advised to come to 
Bethany. 

It is not expected that young ladies in attendance as students will 
board elsewhere in the village, unless under the expressed approval of 
their parents or guardians, with the concurrence of the college faculty. 



Reduced Tuition. 

Young men in any of the religious denominations, who wish to pre- 
pare for the ministry, may, on paying the matriculation fee, be ad- 
mitted into any of the courses at Bethany College at one-half the reg- 
ular rates of tuition. 

All applicants for this privilege are required to present to the Fac- 
ulty satisfactory written recommendations from their respective con- 
gregations, and from well known ministers of the gospel, certifying 
that they come under the foregoing conditions. 

Children of regular ministers of the gospel, of all denominations, 
are admitted to all classes and privileges of the college upon payment 
of the matriculation fee and one-half the regular tuition. 

All students admitted at reduced rates of tuition may be required to 
give instruction in the primary classes. 



Phillips Loan Fund* 

A few years ago, the Hon. Thomas W. Phillips, of New Castle, Pa., 
generously donated to the trustees the sum of five thousand dollars 
to be loaned to students in Bethany who are preparing for the minis- 
try. The original fund as thus constituted has since been considera- 
bly increased by other generous gifts and by accrued interest. Aid 
from this fund may be obtained by ministerial students, on complying 
with the conditions of the loan. 



Regulations* 

In order to contribute to the welfare of all concerned, the following 
regulations have been adopted. The Faculty most earnestly requests 
the co-operation of parents and guardians in their enforcement. 

Fees — One- ( half of the expenses of the college year must be paid at 
the opening of the first term, the other half at the opening of the sec- 
ond term. The matriculation and tuition fees must be paid invariably 
in advance. Before entering class, a student is required to show his 
matriculation card. Every student using a scholarship, must, when 
matriculating, present it, or a copy of it, to the Bursar. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 35 

No portion of the student's fees is refunded on account of with- 
drawal from college, unless the withdrawal be rendered necessary by 
ill health. 

Number of Studies — A student must have at least three daily 
studies, unless, upon the written request of parent or guardian, or for 
good cause s'hown, the Faculty shall allow him a less number. 

Absences — A student is not permitted to absent himself from any 
recitation or examination without a valid excuse, "nor from the college 
without special leave from the President. Any student who fails to 
attenld his classes regularly or to manifest an interest in his work, is 
dismissed. The college is vastly better off without those who cumber 
the ground. Good students must not be kept back by those who lack 
either aptitude or application. 

Reports — At the end of each term (or oftener, if requested) a report 
is sent by the Faculty to the parent or guardian of each student, stat- 
ing grades and absences from recitations and examinations, together 
with such other information respecting the student's progress and 
conduct as may be deemed proper to communicate, or as the parent 
or guardian may especially request. The object of such reports is to 
incite the student to> diligence by the commendation and encourage- 
ment of his friends, and to restrain him from idleness and disorder by 
their admonition and advice. The usefulness of the reports greatly 
depends upon the prompt and judicious attention they receive from 
those to whom they are addressed. Parents and guardians therefore 
cannot be too earnest or prompt in communicating such advice or 
encouragement as these reports may suggest. 

Conduct — Young men are expected to conduct themselves as gen- 
tlemen. The college does not lay down specific and minute regula- 
tions; at the same time it hopes that each one will be a law to* himself, 
and that he will do nothing inconsistent with good order, good taste, 
01 good morals. Should anyone act otherwise, the Faculty will take 
note of the offense at once and deal with the offender as the best in- 
terests of all concerned may require. In like manner the young 
ladies are expected to act in strict accord with the principles of pro- 
priety and honor. 

The laws of the college require from every student decorous, sober 
and upright conduct as long as he remains a member of the college, 
whether he be within the precincts or not. They strictly forbid 
drunkenness, gaming, dissoluteness, swearing, habits of expense, and 
the introduction of wine or other intoxicating drinks into town or col- 
lege precincts. They require a proper observance of the Lord's 



36 . CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 

Day. They forbid the use or possession of pistols or other weapons, 
and the introduction of them into the college precincts. Any viola- 
tion of these Regulations may lead to dismissal or expulsion from the 
college. 

Piohibtion of Credit — The Faculty wish to urge parents and guar- 
dians not to allow students to contract debts to any large amount. 
Such funds as are ^necessary ought to be promptly furnished. It 
should be borne in mind that too much money is likely to lead to 
drinking, gambling, and other bad habits. No student need spend 
over three hundred dollars a year; the majority of the students spend 
much less than this sum. 



miw 



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O 

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w 

O 
2 

IS 

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o 

PC 
H 




CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 37 

Graduates of the Fifty-eighth Session* 



MASTER OF ARTS. 

Miller, Henry Newton .... Pennsylvania. 

BACHELORS OF ARTS. 

Charnock, Mary E. C. . . . . West Virginia. 

Fisher, William Loren, .... Missouri. 

Murray, Wellington P. S., ... Prince Edward Isla 

Otsuka, Frank Naotaro, .... Japan. 

Roberts, Lillian Ashford, . . . West Virginia. 

White, Thomas James, .... Ohio. 

BACHELORS OF LETTERS. 

Morris, Harrietta Pearl, .... Ohio. 

S'ommerville, T. B. Macaulay, . . . West Virginia. 

BACHELORS OF MUSIC. 

Carroll, Myra, ..... Pennsylvania. 

Mathews, Carrie Brownlee, . . . West Virginia. 

Scott, Goldie Mabel, .... West Virginia. 

Taylor, Ida Harden), .... West Virginia. 



HONORS OF THE FIFTY-EIGHTH SESSION. 
SUMMA CUM LAUDE. 

Lillian Ashford Roberts . . . . West Virginia. 

MAGNA CUM LAUDE. 

Mary E. C. Charnock .... West Virginia. 



Graduates of the Fifty-seventh Session, 

(NOT REPORTED IN CATALOGUE OF 1898.) 

MASTERS OF ARTS. 

Huffman, F. B., . . . . Michigan. 

Trible, J. M., West Virginia. 

Wynne, F. E., ..... West Virginia. 

BACHELOR OF LETTERS. 

Watson, H. A., Ohio. 



HONORS OF THE FIFTY-SEVENTH SESSION. 
MAGNA CUM LAUDE. 

Julian T. Barclay, . . . . . Alabama. 

Francis M. Biddle, Ohio. 

CUM LAUDE. 

Herbert H. Moninger, . . . , • Pennsylvania. 



38 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



Students of the Fifty-eighth Session* 



Allen, Edith, 1. 
Banker, M. A., m. 
Campbell, Jeannette O., spec. 
Carroll, Myra, mus. 
Charnock, Jennie M., 1. 
Charnock, Mary E. C, c. 
Cochran, P. B., c. 
Colborn, Louise, mus. 
Cooper, Daisy, 1. 
Cooper, Grace, 1. 
Cowgill, Charles C, m. 
Cresswell, Phena, prep. 
Erskine, W. PL, prep. 
Fields, W. H., m. . 
Fisher, W. L., m. 
Gordon, A. T., prep. 
Gordon, F. M., m.. 
Green, J. F., m. 
Green, Robert, c. 
Henderson, May, mus. 
Israel, A. G., s. 
Johnson, Drusilla, c. 
Kent, W. W., m. 
Kilpatrick, Mary, prep. 
Kimmell, Clara L., mus. 
Langfitt, Ada H., mus. 
Long. W. M., m. 
Marshall, John, c. 
Martin, A. G., prep. 
Martin, J. E., m. 
Mason, G. M., c. 
Mathews, Carrie, mus. 
McBroom, Anna 
Miller, H. N., p. g. . 



Woodbury, Ct. 
Toronto, Ohio. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Beham, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Uniontown, Pa. 
Somerset, Pa. 
Monongahela, Pa. 
Monongahela, Pa. 
Hagerstown, Md. 
Spruce, Pa. 
Mt. Oliver, Pa. 
Lock No. 4, Pa. 
New London, Mo.! 
Steubenville, Ohio. 
Steubenville, Ohio. 
St. Louis, Mich. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Portland, Me. 
Morrisrown, Ohio. 
Tariff, Ohio. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Kinston, N. C. 
Somerset, Pa. 
Eagle Mills, W. Va 
Colliers, W. Va. 
New Cumberland, W. Va 
Bedford, Ind, 
Bedford, Ind. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Lcne Pine, Pa. 



CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE. 



39 



Miller, V. H., m. . 
Moessner, E. D., prep. 
Morris, H. Pearl, 1. 
Murray, W. P. S., m. 
Nicholson, E. C, m. 
Oldham, W. H., prep. 
Otsuka, Frank N., m. 
Prunsche, Frank J., m. 
Roberts, Lillian A., c. 
Scott, Leora H., mus. 
Scott, Goldie M., mus. . 
Seybold, Genevieve C, mus. 
Shrontz, J. Fred., c. 
Smith, Charles E., m. 
Smith, Virginia, Mus. 
Sommerville, Macaulay, 1. 
S trickier, R. F., m. 
Stottlemyer, F. L., m. 
Swaney, Jessie D., 1. 
Taylor, Ida H., mus. 
Taylor, J. J., m. 
Tebbs, Louia C, m. 
Vogel, Virginia, mus. 
Waddle, G. A., c. . 
Walton, M. Linda, 1. 
Wenz, Frank R. 
White, T. J., m. 
Wills, E. Y., 1. 
Woolery, Anna B., c. 



Hagerstown, Md. 
Stan/dish, Mich. 
Shelby, Ohio'. 
Bradalbane, P. E. I. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Newark, Ohio. 
Ttsuhara, Japan. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Moundsville, W. Va. 
Somerset, Pa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Lone Pine, Pa. 
Fxira, Iowa. 
Exira, Iowa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Smithfield, Ohio. 
Beaver Creek, Md. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Bethany, W. Va. 
Lexington, Ky. 
Harrison, Ohio. 
Somerset, Pa. 
Brilliant, Ohio. 
Rice, Va. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Allegheny, Pa. 
Keokuk, Iowa. 
Bethany, W. Va. 



40 CATALOGUE OF BETHANY COLLEGE 



Forms of Bequests* 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, Bethany, 

West Virginia, the sum of thousand dollars, 

to be safely invested by them as an endowment, only the interest of 
which is to be used for the support of the College. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, Bethany, 

West Virginia, the sum of thousand dollars, 

to be applied, at their discretion, for the general purposes of the 



College. 



I give and bequeath to the Trustees of Bethany College, Bethany, 

West Virginia, the sum of thousand dollars, 

to be safely invested by them, and only the interest to be applied, at 
their discretion, to aid deserving students in any course in the College. 






irt&i 



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