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Full text of "Bethany College Bulletin 1972-76"

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Bethany College Bulletin I 9 7 2 - 19 7 3/ Beiliihy; West Virginia 



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on 100% recycled paper. 



BETHANY 

COLLEGE BULLETIN 



1972-1973 



BETHANY COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Vol. LXV September 1972 No. 8 

Second class postage paid at Bethany, W. Va., 26032. Published 
every month except July by Bethany College, Bethany, W. Va. 



College 
Calendar 

1972-73 



FIRST SEMESTER 



Septemb 


er 


2-4 


Sat.-Mon 


2 


Sat. 


5 


Tue. 


fi 


Wed. 


9 


Sat. 


1 4 


Thur. 


19 


Tue. 



30 


Sat. 


October 




14 


Sat. 


26 


Thur. 5:00 p. m 


27 


Fri. 


30 


Mon. 8:00 a. m 


Novembi 


it 


13-21 


Mon. -Tue. 


21 


Tue. 


21 


Tue. 5:00 p.m. 


27 


Mon. 8:00 a. m 


Decembi 


?r 


8 


Fri. 5:00 p.m. 


18-22 


Mon. -Fri. 


22 


Fri. 



Orientation and Evaluation for new 
students 
Faculty Seminar 
Registration 

Classes begin for all students 
Modern Language Achievement Test 
Formal Convocation 
Last day for re-adjustment of sched- 
ule without academic and financial 
penalty; last day to add a course; 
and last day for Credit-No Credit. 
Parents' Day 



Homecoming 

Mid-Term Weekend break begins 
Mid-Term Grades are called 
Mid-Term Weekend break ends 



Registration for Second Semester 

1972-73 

Undergraduate Record Examination 

Thanksgiving Recess begins 

Thanksgiving Recess ends 



Reading Period begins for Seniors 
Senior Comprehensive Exams 
Last Day of First Semester 



1973 

January 

3-30 



SECOND SEMESTER 
29-30 Mon.-Tue. 
31 Wed. 



February 

1 Thur. 

8 Thur. 

14 Wed. 



March 




1 


Thur. 


23 


Fri. 


23 


Fri. 5:00 p.m. 


April 




2 


Mon. 8:00 a. m 


12 


Thur. 


16-25 


Mon. -Wed. 


19 


Thur. 


21 


Sat. 


May 




4 


Fri. 5:00 p.m. 


11-13 


Fri. -Sun. 


13 


Sun. 


14-19 


Mon. -Sat. 


22 


Tue. 


24 


Thur. 


25 


Fri. 


26 


Sat. 


27 


Sun. 



JANUARY TERM 

Four Week Session 



Faculty & Departmental Seminar 
Registration and Orientation for 
New Students 



Classes begin for all students 
Formal Convocation 
Last day for re-adjustment of sched- 
ule without academic and financial 
penalty; last day to add a course; 
and last day for Credit-No Credit. 



Founders' Day 

Mid-Semester grades are called 

Spring Recess begins 



Spring Recess ends 

Undergraduate Record Examination 

Registration for First Semester 

1973-74 

Honors Day 

Modern Language Achievement Test 

Reading Periods begins for Seniors 

Spring Festival — Parents' Weekend 

Mothers' Day 

Senior Comprehensive Exams 

Last day of second semester 

Faculty meeting 

Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees 

Alumni Day and Baccalaureate 

132nd Annual Commencement 



Table of Contents 



A Student's Choice 5 

Bethany Profile 17 

College Life 25 

Admission 41 

Expenses and Financial Aid 45 

Academic Program 55 

Course Descriptions 69 

The Directories 135 

Index 158 



BETHANY 




A STUDENTS CHOICE 




Bethany. 

A worldly citadel of learning and a tree- 
lined country town. 





Bethany. 

A college and a community interacting. 
Making it a very special place to live and to 
earn. 

Snuggled in the rolling foothills of the Alle- 
gheny Mountains, Bethany offers all of the 
scenic beauty that is to be found anywhere. 

You notice it immediately. More trees than 
people. More wilderness than reinforced 
concrete. More trails than highways. More 
hills than buildings. 



o 




If ever there was a place to go camping or 
hiking, it is Bethany. The campus sits amidst 
1,600 acres of college-owned West Virginia 
timberland. 

About 300 acres are developed. Academic 
buildings, residence halls, administrative of- 
fices, recreational facilities — all of the things 
that make a college. 

The surrounding 1,300 acres remain much 
as they were when Bethany was founded 131 
years ago. Green. Vibrant. Only nature has 
changed them. 

Bethany is a melting pot for students and 
faculty coming from 30 states and 15 foreign 
countries. They bring excitment and sophisti- 
cation to a picturesque mountain village. 




70 



The intimate relationship of Bethany, the 
town, and Bethany, the college, allows for 
an interaction of students and faculty that is 
unmatched elsewhere. 

Often what's started in the classroom is 
finished outside it. Insight often comes in 
that informal, after-class meeting between 
professor and student that is so much a part 
of a Bethany education. Faculty homes, fra- 
ternity and sorority houses, dorm lounges, 
one of the local pubs — these too are Bethany 
classrooms. 





// 




Life at Bethany means first-hand acquaint- 
ance with many of the famous personalities 
of our time. Senator Paul McCloskey, Julian 
Bond, Jack Anderson, and John Kenneth 
Galbraith were here last year. Before them 
were Ralph Nader, Dick Gregory, George 
McGovern, and many more, including our 
last three Presidents — John F. Kennedy, Lyn- 
don B. Johnson, and Richard M. Nixon. 

Entertainment is first-rate: renowned pia- 
nist Lorin Hollander playing with the first- 
chair members of the Pittsburgh Symphony 
Orchestra, Chicago, the Black Light Theater 
of Prague, the Fifth Dimension, the Pitts- 
burgh Ballet, Sha-Na-Na, Yes, Lighthouse, 
and so many more. 



72 



Eight to ten student dramas, involving 
nearly a third of the campus community ev- 
ery year, are performed in Bethany's modern 
Wailes Theatre. The male chorus, choir, band, 
and special student jazz and chamber music 
groups offer many concerts. 

At Bethany there really is the opportunity 
for a chemist to act in a play, for a writer to 
play intercollegiate soccer, for an artist to 
work with computers, for a sociologist to live 
on a farm, for a psychologist to tour with the 
choir, for a philosopher to edit the campus 
literary magazine. 





At Bethany your academic program will be 
far different from that of your friends at other 
colleges. A new curriculum for the decade of 
the seventies insures this. If you choose, you'll 
be given the opportunity to develop your 
own academic program. You'll find that 
much of your work demands involvement 
with the non-academic world and with cul- 
tures other than your own. 

Bethany's special January term — a free 
month between semesters — allows for fasci- 
nating travel and work-study courses. Each 
January several student groups, under the 
guidance of one or two faculty members, 
spend three to four weeks in such countries 
as England, India, Spain, and France, examin- 
ing another culture first-hand. 



13 



WW 







14 

Located as it is, just 40 miies southwest of 
Pittsburgh, Bethany is just an hour away from 
the nation's third largest corporate business 
headquarters. Many Bethany students have 
taken advantage of the opportunity to work 
full-time for a month with such firms as U.S. 
Steel and PPG Industries and with such world- 
wide advertising and public relations firms as 
Marstelier, Inc., and Ketchum, McLeod and 
Grove. 





The Steel City is also a readily available 
entertainment center, with such attractions 
as the Heinz Hall for the Performing Arts, 
Three Rivers Stadium for professional sport- 
ing events, and Syria Mosque for top-name 
musical groups. 

Famous Oglebay Park, just 12 miles south 
of Bethany, is a complete recreational center 
— golf courses, tennis courts, ski slopes, rid- 
ing stables, museums, nature trails, boating 
facilities, and more. The nearby Towngate 
Theatre offers some of the finest drama in the 
area. 

And Bethany has it all — first-run movies, 
drama, outstanding guest speakers, in-depth 
conferences on current issues, sports facil- 
ities, well-equipped learning and research 
centers, and, most importantly, a top-notch 
faculty — many who are experts in their field. 



75 




It's a very special way of life at Bethany. 
Come to visit us before you decide which 
college to attend. It's the best way to see how 
Bethany differs from the large university and 
other small colleges. 



76 



BETHANY 




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RICHMOND 



BETHANY PROFILE 



77 




HISTORY 

Bethany was established as a private educational 
foundation, chartered under the laws of then undi- 
vided Commonwealth of Virginia on March 2, 1840, 
more than two decades before West Virginia became 
a state. The charter was written by Alexander Camp- 
bell, a celebrated debater, Christian reformer, and 
educator, who also provided land for the campus and 
$15,000 toward the first building which architecturally 
reflected Campbell's college-day remembrances of 
the University of Glasgow in Scotland. 

Since its inception, Bethany has remained a four- 
year private college affiliated with the Christian 
Church (Disciples of Christ). This religious body, 
which Campbell helped to found, continues to sup- 
port and encourage Bethany, but it exercises no sec- 
tarian control. 



LOCATION 

Bethany is located in the northern panhandle of West 
Virginia, a narrow tip of land between Ohio and 
Pennsylvania. This specal location in the rolling foot- 
hills of the Allegheny Mountains puts Bethany near 
several large cities. To the northeast just 40 miles 
away, is the major urban and cultural center of Pitts- 
burgh. Fifteen miles to the southwest is Wheeling, 
W.Va., the dominant northern city in the state and 
the location of Oglebay Park, one of the nation's 
best-known summer and winter resorts. 



ACCREDITATION AND MEMBERSHIPS 

■ North Central Association of Colleges and Secon- 

dary Schools 

■ Association of American Colleges 

■ American Council on Education 

■ College Entrance Examination Board 

■ American Association of Colleges for Teacher Edu- 

cation 

■ National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 

Education 

■ Board of Higher Education of the Christian Church 

(Disciples of Christ) 

■ Women graduates are eligible for membership in 

the American Association of University Women. 

ENROLLMENT 

Each year Bethany students — approximately 600 men 
and 550 women - - represent 30 states and 15 foreign 
countries. The majority come from Pennsylvania, New 
Jersey, New York, Ohio, Connecticut, and West Vir- 
ginia. Nearly 90 per cent of the student body is from 
out-of-state. About one-half are affiliated with the 
12 national fraternities and sororities on campus. With 
approximately 80 full and part-time faculty members, 
the student/faculty ratio is about 14 to 1. 

CURRICULUM 

In December 1971 a new curriculum was adopted for 
Bethany students. Called the Bethany Plan, this cur- 
riculum is being implemented for the first time this 
fall. The Plan provides not only for a classroom-based 
program but for an experience-based program as well. 
It is a recognition that the classroom is not the only 
place for meaningful education. 

The Plan provides for a close student-faculty rela- 
tionship. In consultation with his advisor, the student 
is asked to design or to help plan an educational pro- 
gram to satisfy his personal goals. It encourages him 




to develop his own special course of study. Chapter 
six discusses this curriculum in detail. 

GOALS 

The educational program is designed to help each 
Bethany student realize seven goals: 

1) to discover how to acquire, evaluate, and use 
knowledge 

2) to master the skills of communication 

3) to cooperate and collaborate with others in study, 
analysis, and formulation of solutions to problems 

4) to understand contemporary issues and events 

5) to analyze personal values, to perceive and to deal 
sympathetically with the values of others, and to 
be open to the continued evaluation of both 

6) to make progress toward the selection of and the 
preparation for a vocation 

7) to integrate the varied experiences of life and to 
see the relationship of the college experience to 
future development as a responsible citizen. 



79 




EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES 

Substantial resources are invested in the education of 
Bethany students. The gross assets of the College on 
June 30, 1971, totaled $22,982,974. Facilities and 
equipment at book value were $12,376,473, with a 
replacement value of approximately $25,000,000. 
The market value of the endowment fund was 
$10,891,150. 

Bethany College is both rich in heritage and facili- 
ties because of the generosity of its many benefactors 
including the Cochran family, the Phillips family, Hal- 
ford Morlan, the David Steinman family, the Benedum 
Foundation, the Kresge Foundation, the United States 
Department of Health, Education, and Welfare and 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development, 
and countless others who believe in a Bethany edu- 
cation. 

More than 30 academic, administrative, and resi- 
dential buildings dot Bethany's campus. 



Pendleton Heights (1841) was built during the col- 
lege's first year by W.K. Pendleton, a member of the 
first faculty and second president of the College. To- 
day it serves as home for Bethany's 13th president, 
Cecil H. Underwood, former governor of West Vir- 
ginia. 

Old Main (1858) is the central unit of Bethany's 
academic buildings. Its tower dominates the campus 
and is the chief architectural feature noted as one 
approaches the College. Old Main has been declared 
a national landmark. 

Commencement Hall (1872) provides the setting 
for convocations, concerts, lectures, dramatic presen- 
tations, and other gatherings. Studios and classrooms 
for the art department occupy the ground floor of 
this building. 

Cramblet Hall (1905) was constructed through a gift 
from Andrew Carnegie. Originally the library, it was 
remodeled in 1961 to house Bethany's administrative 
offices. It is named in honor of two presidents of the 
college, Thomas E. Cramblet and his son, Wilbur. 

Oglebay Hall (1912) accommodates the psychology 
and biology departments and special research labora- 
tories. 

Irvin Gymnasium (1919) serves as the women's 
physical education center. It contains a modern dance 
studio. 

Renner Union-Bethany House (1948) is the student 
union. Here are found the campus radio station, the 
college bookstore, bowling lanes, a student photo- 
graphic darkroom, music listening rooms, a spacious 
lounge, and the offices of the Admission Director. The 
alumni joined in 1969 wth the R.R. Renner family of 
Cleveland to remodel this facility completely. 



20 



BETHANY 



1. Pendleton Heights (President's Home) 

2. Old Main 

3. Commencement Holl 

4. Oglebay Holl 

5. Steinman Fine Arts Center 

Woiles Theater 

6. Irvin Gymnasium 

7. Richardson Hall o( Science 

Weimer Lecture Holl 

8. Phillips Memorial Library 

9. Morion Hall 
10. Harlan Hall 

Phillips Holl 
12. Cromblet Holl 



Scale: 1" = 100' 



I 3. Cochran Hoi 

14. Benedum Commons 

15. Bethany House-Renner Union 

Bookstore 

16. Infirmary 

17. McEachern Holl 

18. McLean Hall 

19. Bethany Memorial Church 

20. Campbell Hall 

21. Buildings & Grounds 

22. Heoting Plant 

23. Knight Notatorium 

24. Alumni Field House 

25. Rine Field 



26. Gresham House 

27. Millsop Leadership Center 

28. Highlond Hearth 

29. Faculty Apartments 

30. Clark House (ATa) 

31. Hogerman House (*KT) 

32. McDiarmid House (riB*) 

33. Goodnight House (SAE) 

34. Woolery House 
35-40. Parkinson Place 

Residence Halls 

41. Weimer Nature Trail 

42. Amphitheater 




27 




22 




Alumni Field House (1948) provides physical edu- 
cation facilities for men and is used for concerts and 
commencements. Adjacent to the field house are 
football and baseball fields, tennis courts, and a 
quarter-mile track. 

Richardson Hall of Science (1964) provides facilities 
for the chemistry, physics, and math departments and 
houses the computer center. It is named for Bethany's 
first science professor. 

John J. Knight Natatorium (1967) contains a six-lane 
25-yard heated pool, used in the physical education 
program and for intercollegiate competition. Four 
tennis courts are located next to the natatorium. 

Benedum Commons (1969) is the modern, air- 
conditioned dining facility for all Bethany students. 
In addition to the main dining room, the building 
houses a snack bar, lounge facilities for parents and 
other guests, and several small dining rooms for spe- 
cial student and faculty events. 

The David and Irene Steinman Fine Arts Center 

(1969) houses the education, English, music, and 
theatre departments. A fully-equipped theatre occu- 
pies the centermost portion of this building. A work- 
shop adjacent to the theatre provides opportunities 




for scenic design. The music department consists of 
teaching studios, studio-classrooms, a general rehear- 
sal room for the larger choral and instrumental 
groups, and individual practice rooms. 

The Thomas E. Millsop Leadership Center (1972) 

houses offices, seminar rooms, exhibition areas, and 
a 123-seat circular conference room for continuing 
education activities. This center, to be fully opera- 
tional this fall, will offer a regular series of confer- 
ences, seminars, and workshops for education, busi- 
ness and professional groups. It is a memorial to the 
former president and chairman of the National Steel 
Corporation. 

Gresham House (1972) is the Millsop Center's ad- 
joining guest facilitiy, which provides 41 spacious 
rooms for overnight accommodations for visitors 
coming to the College. It is named for Dr. Perry E. 
Gresham, Bethany's twelfth president. 



23 



RESIDENCE HALLS 

Harlan, Morlan, Phillips, and Campbell are the largest 
dormitories on the Bethany campus. Since 1966, 
Bethany has moved toward small, self-governing liv- 
ing units, each accommodating approximately 32 stu- 
dents and containing social and recreational facilities. 
This year six small residence units have been con- 
structed on the wooded west slope of the campus. 
These units, called Parkinson Place Residence Halls, 
house fraternities, sororities, and independent men 
and women. 







PHILLIPS MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

The T.W. Phillips Memorial Library, built in 1961, 
contains more than 112,000 volumes of books, re- 
cordings, and bound periodicals. Supplementary col- 
lections include microforms, pamphlet files, selected 
government documents, and a circulating art print 
collection. The library receives 526 periodical titles 
as well as local, area, national, and foreign news- 
papers. 

The staff of three professional librarians and their 
clerical assistants are readily available to assist with 
any information or reference need. The library is 
open 93 hours a week. After 11 p.m. a study lounge 
is open until 2 a.m. every day during the fall and 
spring semesters. 

Through membership in the Pittsburgh Regional 
Library Center, the research collections and reference 
services of the colleges, universities, and special li- 
braries of the nearby Pittsburgh area are available to 
Bethany faculty and students. A similar interlibrary 
program exists among West Virginia's colleges and 
universities. Materials can also be obtained on loan 
from other libraries across the country for faculty and 
honors students. 

Many personal libraries and collections have been 
received from alumni and friends of the College. The 
Campbell Room contains books, periodicals, letters, 
paintings, photographs, and museum pieces related 
to Bethany's first president, Alexander Campbell, his 
Bethany associates, and his family. It is an important 
research collection not only for the history of the 
College and the religious movement that Campbell 
founded but also for regional and intellectual history 
of the nineteenth century. 



24 



BETHANY 




COLLEGE LIFE 



25 



At Bethany, education is more than hours, credits, 
courses, and examinations. It is a total experience of 
living and learning. Bethany has about as many activi- 
ties as many schools 10 times its size. The problem is 
not getting into things, but in choosing activities 
wisely and learning to say "No" to things that will not 
be as beneficial. 

Bethany assumes the mature and responsible citi- 
zenship of its students. The College believes that the 
capacity to handle the obligations of freedom is en- 
larged when as much liberty as possible is granted in 
the ordering of college life. 

Bethany students accept major responsibility for 
their behavior. There is no regimentation and students 
must make their own decisions about life-styles. So- 
called "freaks" and "straights" coexist with little 
strain, if not mutual respect. College officials inter- 
vene when the rights and privileges of some are 
threatened by the actions of others. Usually such 
problems are resolved in a Dean's office, student 
court, or at College Council. 

Students not only have much personal freedom, 
but working together with faculty and administrators, 
they share in deciding Bethany's destiny. Someone 
once said that "things are decided at Bethany as if it 
were a continuous town meeting." Doors are always 
open and discussion is continuous. There is such a 
sense of ownership by both those who learn and 
those who teach that the term "Bethanian" has come 
to mean a special sense of pride. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Student responsibility in self government has been 
strengthened in recent years. The Student Board of 
Governors, with representatives from all residence 
groups, manages a substantial budget and appropri- 
ates funds for many diverse student activities. Repre- 
sentatives are appointed to many faculty committees 
including those concerned with curricula, cultural 
programs, schedules, athletics, religious life, inter- 
national education, and the library. 

Residence halls form the primary political groups 
for self government. Fraternities, sororities, and house 
associations accommodate all upperclassmen in small 
self-governed units with responsibility for conduct; 
cultural, academic, and social programming; and care 
of the facilities. Shortly after arrival, freshman also 
organize dorm councils and send representatives to 
student government. 

Student government usually refers disciplinary 
problems to one of the student judiciary organiza- 
tions. House councils in each of the residence units 
serve the judicial function for problems that occur in 
the houses or residence halls. The Bethany College 
Student Court acts as a court of appeals for other 
student judicial groups and hears cases referred to it 
by the faculty and administration. Only the President 
of the College can hear appeals of Student Court 
decisions. 

STUDENT REGULATIONS 

A complete description of the regulations pertaining 
to housing, telephones, dining rooms, health services, 
motor vehicles, use of alcoholic beverages and drugs, 
eligibility requirements, and other areas of student 



26 



life are contained in the Student Handbook which is 
distributed just prior to registration. Applicants for 
admission should know the following in advance: 

1) With the exception of commuters (students living 
with parents and married students), all students 
are required to live in College residences or fra- 
ternity or sorority houses unless excused by the 
Dean of Students. 

2) All students except commuters as described above 
are required to board in College dining halls un- 
less excused by the Dean of Students. No refunds 
are granted for meals missed. 

3) Freshmen are not permitted to bring automobiles 
to Bethany. 

4) All new students are required to send a record of 
a recent and thorough physical examination by 
their family physician. 

Applicants who have questions about the regula- 
tions are invited to write to the Dean of Students. 

RESIDENCE LIFE 

Bethany is a leader in small, self-governed housing. 
In recent years when other colleges were building the 
large institutional-type dorms, Bethany was develop- 
ing home-like, 32-bed residence units, most of which 
are situated in wooded areas overlooking the main 
campus. Seventeen of the College's 21 residences are 
of this type. 

These self-governed houses constitute the primary 
social groups on campus, i.e., fraternities, sororities, 
and independent-house associations. Each associa- 
tion or fraternal group is responsible for arranging 
cultural, recreational, and social experiences for its 
members. Each residence group decides for itself its 
own internal discipline. Houses are also responsible 
for organizing day-to-day house-keeping chores and 
each works closely with the College in developing a 
decor that suits the group living style. 



Freshmen live in the larger dorms, but are granted 
most of the same freedoms and responsibilities of the 
upperclassmen. Head residents and student resident 
assistants give a great deal of leadership and counsel 
the first semester, but by the second semester fresh- 
men are more on their own. Whenever possible, 
freshmen are housed to facilitate the special fresh- 
men year seminar program. 

"X I 




The seven fraternities and five sororities at Bethany 
are nationally affiliated and constitute approximately 
50 per cent of the student body. Interfraternity Coun- 
cil and Panhellenic Council, composed of representa- 
tives from each of the fraternities and sororities, act 
as the coordinating agencies in fraternal affairs and 
activities. 

The fraternal organizations represented at Bethany 
are: Alpha Sigma Phi, Beta Theta Pi, Delta Tau Delta, 
Kappa Alpha, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Phi Kappa Tau, 
and Sigma Nu. The sororities represented are: Alpha 
Xi Delta, Kappa Delta, Pi Beta Phi, Phi Mu, and Zeta 
Tau Alpha. 



27 





SOCIAL LIFE 

Campus social life centers in the residence units: 
fraternities, sororities, and the independent-house 
associations. As on most coeducational campuses, 
much of the social life is casual. It may be a coffee 
date at Renner Union or an evening at one of the 
local pubs. Others may bowl or swim, and any night 
of the week friends study together at the library or at 
a dorm lounge. 

Organized parties usually occur on weekends. Be- 
cause Bethany is not a college that is vacated week- 
ends, there is always something to do on campus. 
Athletics, theatre, films, concerts of many kinds, and 
coffee-house programs, fill many weekends. 

The Entertainment Committee of Renner Union 
brings interesting concerts to the campus. Last year 
the Committee brought Walt Harper and his orches- 
tra for Homecoming and Leo Kottke and Fanny for 
spring weekend. Other groups to appear during the 
year were Punch, Charlie Byrd Quintet, Lighthouse, 
McKendree Spring, Yes, Chicago, Josh White, Jr., 
Livingston Taylor, and Jon Pousette Dart. All programs 
are budgeted by the student union through student- 
union funds. 



28 



CULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

Faculty and students working together on the Cultural 
Activities Committee provide a wide variety of cult- 
ural events each year. A series of conferences on such 
topics as Sexuality, Bangla-Desh, Aggression and Vio- 
lence in American Society, and Latin America stirred 
much discussion on campus last year. Prominent auth- 
orities led the discussions in each area. Besides con- 
ferences, such speakers as Senator Paul McCloskey, 
Julian Bond, John Kenneth Galbraith and journalists 
Jack Anderson and John Seigenthaler visited the 
campus last year. 

Musically, the cultural program presented the Pitts- 
burgh Symphony Chamber Orchestra, the Caldwell 
String Quartet, violinist Nina McGowan, and pianist 
and artist-in-residence Oliver Manning. The Oratorio 
Choir presented its annual performance of Handel's 
Messiah. The Cultural Activities Committee also 
brought to campus The Black Light Theatre of Prague 
and the Oglebay Player's production of Long Day's 
Journey Into Night. 

Renner Union exhibited six visiting art shows during 
the year in addition to numerous student and faculty 
shows. Wolfgang Flor, a wood sculptor, brought his 
show to Bethany and set-up a working studio for a 
week at Renner Union. 

In addition to the regular Friday and Saturday-night 
film schedule, there were numerous foreign films and 
experimental art films shown during the year. 




THEATRE 

Drama is an important co-curricular activity at 
Bethany. Nearly one-third of the last senior class par- 
ticipated in some production while at Bethany. Often 
acting, directing, playwriting, and producing are cor- 
related with courses in the Department of Theatre; 
however, non-theatre majors have every opportunity 
to participate. 

Most of the productions at Bethany are staged in 
the new Wailes Theatre in the Steinman Fine Arts 
Center. The theatre seats 300 and has a fully equipped 
workshop. Most productions are given three or four 
times. Last year's productions included Tiny Alice; Oh 
Dad, Poor Dad; The Skin of Our Teeth; The Three 
Sisters; The Fantasticks; One Flew Over the Cuckoo's 
Nest; Anything Goes; and The Canterbury Tales. 

Students playing a certain number of major and 
minor roles or participating in the technical and busi- 
ness aspects of play production are eligible for mem- 
bership in the national drama honorary, Alpha Psi 
Omega. 



29 




MUSIC 

There is a wide choice of musical groups on campus 
in both the vocal and instrumental fields. 

The Concert Choir, with approximately 50 mixed 
voices, performs on campus and goes on tour each 
spring. The repertoire consists primarily of rather 
difficult and serious sacred and secular works of 
many periods. There is opportunity within the choir 
for the formation of smaller ensembles to cultivate 
special types of repertoire, such as madrigals. The 
choir also cooperates with the theatre department in 
the production of a musical each year. 

The Male Chorus consists of 36 voices. The reper- 
toire is varied, with emphasis on serious works. When 
practicable, there is a spring tour. 

Members of the Concert Choir, the Male Chorus, 
and others in the community form the Oratorio 
Chorus which annually presents Handel's Messiah. 

The College Band performs at most football and 
basketball games, and for special occasions through- 
out the year. Band members attend an instrumental 
seminar each fall before the opening of school. 

The Brass Choir appears in formal convocations 
and in concerts. It is open to qualified players by 
audition as vacancies occur. 

Chamber Music is provided by woodwind quintets, 
string quartets, and smaller ensembles that develop 
annually and are open to all who play orchestral in- 
struments. 

There is an opportunity for proficient orchestral 
musicians, especially string players, to play in the 
Wheeling Symphony. To be admitted into this orches- 
tra one must audition with the Sympho n y's director. 



30 



PUBLICATIONS AND RADIO 

College publications include a campus newspaper, 
The Bethany Tower; a yearbook, The Bethanian; an 
orientation guidebook, The Student Handbook; and 
a literary journal, The Harbinger. The publications 
and the campus radio station, WVBC-FM, are under 
the supervision of the Board of Communications, 
whose chairman is the student body president. The 
Board includes the student editors and business man- 
agers of all publications, general manager and pro- 
gram director of the radio station, and seven members 
of the faculty and administration. The English and 
communications departments provide professional 
guidance. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS, 
INTRAMURALS, AND RECREATION 

Intercollegiate athletics for men are considered an in- 
tegral part of the College program. They furnish those 
students who possess a high degree of skill in a vari- 
ety of physical activities an opportunity to compete 
with students from other institutions with similar 
standards. 

Intercollegiate activities at Bethany include foot- 
ball, basketball, baseball, track, tennis, golf, cross 
country, wrestling, soccer, and swimming. Member- 
ship is held in the Presidents' Athletic Conference 
(PAC), which also includes the following schools: 
Allegheny, Carnegie-Mellon, Thiel, and Washington 
and Jefferson in Western Pennsylvania; and Hiram, 
Case-Western Reserve, and John Carroll in Ohio. 
Bethany is also a member of the NCAA and the NAIA. 

Because women are showing increasing interest in 
intercollegiate athletics not only in women's pro- 
grams but also as participants in varsity sports, the 
athletic directors at PAC schools are exploring the 
possibilities for more women's competition in the 
future. 






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31 




Healthful athletic recreation is provided for the en- 
tire student body by an intramural program which 
includes a complete schedule of sports: for men — 
cross country, football, volleyball, basketball, swim- 
ming, wrestling, bowling, softball, handball, golf, 
track, and tennis; and for women — basketball, vol- 
leyball, tennis, field hockey, speedball, swimming, 
archery, and dance. The Director of Intramural Ath- 
letics supervises the program. 

Bethany encourages students to develop skills in 
recreational activities that may be continued through 
life. In addition to the usual team sports, staff instruc- 
tion is available in archery, badminton, horseback 
riding, swimming, golf, tennis, camping techniques, 
jogging, body mechanics, bowling, dancing, and 
gymnastics. 

There are many opportunities available for students 
who wish to pursue recreational interests. The 1,600 
acres of College land provide a natural setting for hik- 
ing and nature study. Ski slopes and riding stables are 
available at nearby Oglebay Park. Local farmers are 
often willing to board horses. An 18-hole golf course 
is located six miles from campus. 



STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES 

All students entering Bethany for the first time are 
required to submit a completed physical examination 
form before registration. After arrival, the College 
health service is maintained by student fees, and all 
students are entitled to infirmary privileges as in- 
patients and as out-patients. 

The Bethany infirmary is well-equipped to assist the 
physicians and nurses who care, on 24-hour call, for 
student illnesses and injuries which occur during the 
academic year. Medical service is not available at the 
infirmary during vacations and recess periods. Stu- 
dents who suffer serious illnesses and accidents are 
usually treated at the Wheeling Hospital, located 15 
miles from the town of Bethany which maintains am- 
bulance service for emergencies. Medical and surgical 
specialists are called as needed for consultation with 
College physicians. 

The College physicians have regular office hours 
each weekday morning during the school year for 
free consultation. In case of an emergency operation, 
when the parents cannot be reached, the Dean of 
Students, upon the recommendation of the College 
physician, assumes the responsibility of giving per- 
mission for operations. 

For $15 per semester the College makes available 
to its students medical, surgical, and hospitalization 
insurance. All students are automatically included in 
the coverage from September 1 to August 31 and are 
charged accordingly unless the appropriate waiver is 
forwarded to the Business Office. Expenses for out- 
side consultation and treatment are the responsibility 
of the student in all cases when not covered by insur- 
ance. 



32 




RELIGIOUS LIFE 

A wide variety of religious backgrounds is repre- 
sented in the student body and faculty. While par- 
ticipation in religious concerns is entirely voluntary, 
there are substantial opportunities for religious ex- 
ploration and participation on the campus. 

Many of the students at Bethany College find in 
the Bethany Memorial Church an opportunity for 
expression of their religious faith. The minister of 
this church, who is also the College Chaplain, is avail- 
able to students for counseling and advice on per- 
sonal and religious matters. 

The Bishop of the Wheeling Diocese of the Roman 
Catholic Church provides a chaplain for Catholic stu- 
dents. He is available on a weekly schedule for coun- 
seling, in addition to the celebration of the Mass each 
Sunday. 

The Jewish Fellowship meets every other week for 
worship and study at the Bethany Memorial Church. 
Jewish congregations in Steubenville and Wheeling 
sponsor the group and entertain Jewish students for 
the high holidays. 



ADVISING AND COUNSELING 

The advising and counseling of students are impor- 
tant segments of the Bethany educational program. 
The programs are designed to provide resources 
which will help each student with academic, per- 
sonal, spiritual, social, and vocational situations. 

Bethany College recognizes the need to provide 
its entering students an introduction to their work in 
new surroundings and therefore requires freshmen 
to come to the campus several days before the formal 
registration of other students. Orientation and evalu- 
ation days are planned not only to introduce the 
students to the College but also to introduce the 
College to the students. 

From the beginning of his college career, each 
student is assigned a faculty advisor. Through the 
new Bethany Plan curriculum, this advisor will come 
into weekly seminar contact with his advisees. Thus, 
he will have ample opportunity to observe student 
strengths and weaknesses in an academic situation 
as well as in more relaxed and informal counseling 
situations. 

After a student makes the choice of a major field 
of concentration, he is then assigned to a faculty 
advisor in his chosen department. The advisor helps 
the student plan an academic program consistent 
with the aims and obligations of that department in 
a liberal arts education, and a program which is in 
keeping with the student's abilities, aptitudes, and 
aspirations. 

The chief officer in charge of student advising and 
counseling, student welfare, and coordination of all 
student personnel administration is the Dean of Stu- 
dents. Members of his staff are available for help in 
all major areas of guidance, including post graduate 
and career planning. 



33 



Bethany College believes that a liberal education 
provides men and women with a most adequate 
preparation to meet the demands of our society. In 
a broad, carefully planned, liberal arts program, Beth- 
any students can also select specialized courses or 
fields of concentration which will prepare them for 
admission to graduate and professional schools, or 
for entrance into careers immediately following grad- 
uation. Through the Practica Programs each student 
will plan an internship to assist in the development 
of vocational goals. 

FRESHMEN ADVISORS 

Mr. Allen, Mr. Buckelew, Mrs. Carty, Mr. Draper, Mr. 
Folk, Mr. Frye, Mr. G. Garrison, Mr. K. Garrison, Mr. 
Grimes, Mr. Halt, Mr. Judy, Mr. Kenney, Mr. Lester, 
Mrs. Lorr, Mr. Lozier, Miss Mathison, Miss McGuffie, 
Mr. Mitch, Mr. R. Myers, Mr. O'Leary, Mr. Peirce, Mr. 
Rader, Mr. Stebbins, Mr. Tempest-Mogg, Mr. Ward. 

FOR FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION (Senior Advisors) 



ART 

BIOLOGY 

CHEMISTRY 

COMMUNICATIONS 

ECONOMICS 

EDUCATION 

ENGLISH 

FINE ARTS 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

MATHEMATICS 

MUSIC 

PHILOSOPHY 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PHYSICS 

PSYCHOLOGY 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

SOCIOLOGY 

THEATRE 



Mr. Kornowski 
Mr. Larson 
Mr. Draper 
Mr. Carty 
Mr. Halt 
Mr. Spence 
Miss McGuffie 
Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
Mrs. Cayard 
Mr. Young 
Mr. Tye 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
Mr. Myers 
Mr. Goin 
Mr. Croston 
Mr. Peirce 
Mr. Kenney 
Mr. K. Garrison 
Mr. Judy 




FOR CAREER INTERESTS 

DENTISTRY 

ENGINEERING 

LAW 

MEDICINE 

MINISTRY 

NURSING 

RADIO 

DRAMA 

RECREATIONAL LEADERSHIP 

SOCIAL WORK 

TEACHING 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 

FOR SPECIAL SERVICES 

UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS AND 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

MINISTERIAL TRAINING AWARDS 

SELECTIVE SERVICE 

VOCATIONAL INFORMATION AND 

GUIDANCE 

SOCIAL AND RECREATIONAL 

ACTIVITIES 



Mr. Draper 

Mr. Croston 

Mr. Young 

Mr. Draper, Mr. Larson 

Mr. Kenney 

Mr. Draper 

Mr. Garvin 

Mr. Judy 

Mr. Goin 

Mr. K. Garrison 

Mr. Spence 

Mr. Larson 



Mr. Sandercox 
Mr. Lozier 
Mr. R. Myers 

Mr. Sandercox 
Mr. Frye, Mr. Kurey 
Mr. Cunningham 

Miss Nicholson 



34 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL STUDY 

Bethany offers pre-professional training in a variety 
of fields. A large percentage of students select courses 
to qualify them for entrance into professional schools. 
The faculty advisors consult professional universities 
so that specific requirements of the school selected 
are met. 

PRE-MEDICINE 

Students desiring to prepare for the study of medi- 
cine will find instruction and facilities which will 
satisfy the entrance requirements for the best medi- 
cal schools. It is recommended that the students 
planning to study medicine should have broad basic 
training in courses of general education, including 
a foreign language, literature, philosophy, and social 
science in addition to the courses in chemistry, bi- 
ology, and physics stipulated by the American Medi- 
cal Association. 

PRE-LAW 

Most law schools require no specific undergraduate 
courses for entrance but expect a broad training in 
the social sciences, humanities, and logic. Law schools 
recommend, however, that pre-law students take 
basic courses in history, political science, economics, 
sociology, psychology, English composition, and 
speech. 

PRE-ENGINEERING 

Training in the sciences and humanities provides a 
good foundation for pre-engineering students, some 
of whom desire to transfer to an engineering school 
after carefully following the requirements of the engi- 
neering school they wish to enter. 

By cooperative arrangement with Columbia Uni- 
versity, Bethany offers the first three years of a five- 
year course and arranges for the qualified student 



to transfer to the Columbia School of Engineering 
for the last two years of undergraduate training. Upon 
completion of the five-year program, degrees from 
both institutions are granted. 

PRE-DENTISTRY 

Admission requirements to dental schools stipulate 
at least two years of pre-professional training. It is 
recommended that the pre-dental student follow to 
a large extent the pre-medical program. 

PROFESSIONAL CHEMISTRY 
A thorough preparation for professional chemistry 
and a background in the liberal arts at Bethany con- 
forms to the American Chemical Society standards. 
Independent study introduces the student to the 
principles of research which aids in any contemplated 
graduate or industrial work following graduation. 




35 



PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

Students who plan to enter church vocations are 
expected to complete their preparation in seminaries 
and graduate schools of religion after graduating 
from Bethany. Their undergraduate studies, therefore, 
are primarily liberal arts. Students elect courses which 
provide necessary pre-seminary studies in the natural 
and social sciences, the arts and humanities, and 
religion. 

PRE-NURSING 

Increasing opportunities are open to college-trained 
women in the fields of public health and civilian and 
military professional nursing. Bethany sponsors a co- 
operative program in nursing with approved schools 
of nursing. Three years of study and a minimum of 
96 semester hours including four hours of physical 
education comprise the work at Bethany. After com- 
pletion of work at a collegiate school of nursing, 
Bethany's baccalaureate degree is then awarded at 
the same time the nursing degree is conferred. 




ACHIEVEMENT RECOGNITION 

Bethany encourages superior achievement in scholar- 
ship and outstanding leadership in student affairs by 
public recognition at Commencement, on Honors 
Day, and on other suitable occasions. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Students who have done academic work of unusual 
merit are graduated with honors: Summa Cum Laude, 
Magna Cum Laude, or Cum Laude. The awarding of 
honors is determined upon the basis of total quality 
points earned, standing in the Senior Comprehensive 
Examination, and the recommendation of the stu- 
dent's advisor. 

Students who do unusually well on the Senior 
Comprehensive Examination are listed at graduation 
as having "Passed With Distinction." 

SEMESTER HONORS LIST 

At the end of each semester, students who have rated 
high in academic attainment are designated as "Stu- 
dents Distinguished in Scholarship." Often called 
The Dean's List, this distinction is determined by 
the Honors Committee. 

SENIOR FELLOWSHIPS 

Certain members of the junior class may be desig- 
nated as Senior Fellows for the following year. The 
selection is made from students who have demon- 
strated unusual excellence in their field of concen- 
tration and who, by character and ability, can do 
special work in a department as an assistant in in- 
struction or research. No more than 10 senior fellow- 
ships are awarded in any one year. The selection 
of Senior Fellows is made by the Honors Committee 
from the nominations of department chairmen. 



36 




HONOR SOCIETIES 

A number of honor societies have been established 
at Bethany through the years to recognize academic 
achievement and campus leadership. 

Gamma Sigma Kappa is the scholastic society 
founded at Bethany in 1932. Students maintaining a 
scholarship index of 3.25 for four consecutive semes- 
ters, provided that in no semester their scholarship 
index falls below an average of 3.00, are, upon recom- 
mendation by the faculty Honors Committee, eligible 
for membership. 

Bethany Kalon is a junior and senior society estab- 
lished in 1948 to give recognition to students of high 
character who have demonstrated competent and 
unselfish leadership in student activities and have 
been constructive citizens of the college community. 
Selection is made by the members of the society with 
the advice and approval of the Honors Committee. 

West Virginia Delta Chapter of Pi Gamma Mu is a 
social studies society. Students maintaining a high 
scholarship index in 20 semester hours of social stud- 
ies are eligible for membership. 



Alpha Phi Chapter of Beta Beta Beta is a society for 
students of the biological sciences. Its purpose is to 
stimulate sound scholarship, to promote the dissemi- 
nation of scientific truth, and to encourage investiga- 
tion into the life sciences. 

Gamma Upsilon Chapter of Lambda lota Tau is an 
international society whose purpose is to encourage 
and reward scholastic excellence in the study of lit- 
erature. Membership is limited to students enrolled 
in at least their fifth college semester, who are in the 
upper 35 per cent of their class in cumulative grade- 
point average, who have completed a minimum of 
12 semester hours of literature courses with at least 
a 3.0 grade-point average in them and in all prereq- 
uisite courses, and who have presented a scholarly, 
critical, or creative paper which has been accepted 
by the Chapter. Lambda lota Tau is a member of the 
Association of College Honor Societies. 

Tau Chapter of Omicron Delta Epsilon, national 
honor society in economics, was established at Beth- 
any in 1960. Membership is limited to students of at 
least junior standing, who have completed 12 or more 
semester hours of courses in economics with an aver- 
age of 3.25 or higher, and whose grade average in all 
courses is at least 3.0. 

Beta Gamma of Alpha Psi Omega is a national rec- 
ognition society in dramatics. Students qualify by 
faithful work in playing major and minor roles or 
working with technical or business aspects of theatre. 

Mu Epsilon Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta was estab- 
lished at Bethany in 1967 to recognize excellence in 
the study of history. Its membership is limited to those 
students who have completed at least 12 hours of his- 
tory with an average of 3.0 or higher and with at least 
a 3.0 average in two-thirds of all other studies. Mem- 
bers must also rank in the upper 35 per cent of their 
class. 



37 



The Bethany Chapter of Pi Delta Epsilon, a national 
recognition society in journalism, was reactivated in 
1967. The purpose of the society is to advocate jour- 
nalism, to foster the mutual welfare of student pub- 
lications, and to reward the journalist for his efforts, 
service, and accomplishments. 

AWARDS 

The Oreon E. Scott Award is made each year to the 
graduating senior who has achieved the highest aca- 
demic record over the four-year period. The donor of 
this award was a long-time Bethany trustee and a 
graduate of the Class of 1892. 

The Anna Ruth Bourne Award stimulates scholar- 
ship among the women's social groups. A silver cup, 
provided by an anonymous donor in honor of the 
former distinguished chairman of the English depart- 
ment, is awarded to the recognized women's group 
whose active membership earns the highest scholar- 
ship standing each semester. The group winning the 
cup for four semesters is presented with a smaller 
replica as a permanent trophy. 

The W. Kirk Woolery Award encourages scholar- 
ship among the men's social groups. This silver cup, 
donated by friends of the late Dr. Woolery, a former 
Dean and Provost of the College, is held by the 
recognized men's social group or housing organiza- 
tion whose membership (active membership only 
in the case of fraternities) earns the highest scholar- 
ship standing each semester. Any group winning the 
cup for four semesters is presented with a smaller 
replica as a permanent trophy. 

The Beta Beta Beta Award, established by an an- 
onymous donor, is presented annually to the senior 
biology major who has attained the highest academic 
rank in this field of concentration. 

The Florence Hoagland Memorial Award, given by 
a graduate of the Class of 1944, is presented each 







year to the outstanding senior English major. The 
award honors the memory of the late Miss Hoagland 
who was for many years Professor of English at 
Bethany. 

The Christine Burleson Memorial Award in English, 
given by a graduate of the Class of 1936, is presented 
each year to a senior English major who has attained 
excellence in this field of concentration. The award 
honors the memory of the late Miss Burleson who 
was Professor of English and Dean of Women from 
1932 to 1936. 

The Pendleton Awards, named in honor of Miss A. 
Campbellina Pendleton, Professor of Language and 
Literature at Bethany from 1884 to 1909, are pre- 
sented annually to the outstanding junior and sopho- 
more concentrating in English. The awards are given 
by Dwight B. MacCormack, Jr., of the Class of 1956, 
in memory of his grandmother, Dr. T. Marion 
MacCormack. 






38 



The E. E. Roberts Distinguished Prize In Campus 
Journalism is awarded annually to an outstanding 
student who excels in work on a student publication, 
in academic work in the communications depart- 
ment, or both. 

The Garrison Prize is presented in recognition of 
outstanding achievement in one or more areas of 
philosophy. The award honors the memory of the 
late Dr. Winfred E. Garrison, graduate of the Class of 
1892, whose humane concerns and scholarly achieve- 
ments contributed significantly to the area of higher 
education, history, and philosophy. 

The Outstanding Junior Woman Award is provided 
by the Pittsburgh Bethany College Club, comprising 
the Bethany alumnae of Pittsburgh. This award is 
based on qualities of leadership, character, conduct, 
and scholarship. The club has placed a suitable plaque 
in Phillips Hall on which the names of the winners 
are engraved. In addition, an individual gift is made 
each year to the person designated. 

The Vira I. Heinz Award is granted each year to 
the junior woman who has distinguished herself by 
leadership, character, conduct, and scholarship and 
whose proposal for foreign travel most significantly 
supplements her educational objectives. This $1,500 
award for summer travel is provided by the fund 
of Vira I. Heinz, recipient of the honorary Doctor of 
Religious Education degree in 1969. 

The W. F. Kennedy Prize is given each year to the 
outstanding young man in the juniorclass. This award, 
established by W. F. Kennedy of Wheeling, West Vir- 
ginia, is awarded on the basis of the student's con- 
tribution to the college community life through 
leadership in activities, personal character, and 
scholarship. 




The Pearl Mahaffey Prize, awarded each year to the 
outstanding senior major in languages, was estab- 
lished by Mrs. Walter M. Haushalter and other former 
students of Bethany's Emeritus Professor of Foreign 
Languages. The prize honors Miss Mahaffey, a faculty 
member from 1908-1949 and a Trustee of the College 
at the time of her death in 1971. 

The Shirley Morris Memorial Award was established 
by Theta Chapter of Zeta Tau Alpha in memory of 
Shirley Morris, a loyal member and past president of 
the Chapter. It is given annually to the outstanding 
student in the field of modern languages. Selection 
is made by Bethany's foreign languages department. 

The J.S.V. Allen Memorial is a fund established by 
the family and friends of Professor Allen to provide 
for an annual award to the outstanding physics stu- 
dent at Bethany. 



;<> 




The Frank Alfred Chapman Memorial is a fund es- 
tablished by Dr. Stanton Crawford to provide for an 
annual award to the outstanding Bethany history stu- 
dent. Preference is given to students of American 
History and the Ohio Valley. 

The Osborne Booth Prize In Religion is given each 
year to the student who excels in the field of Relig- 
ious Studies. The late Osborne Booth was T. W. Phil- 
lips Professor of Old Testament when he retired in 
1964 after 35 years of teaching at Bethany. 

The Francis O. Carfer Prize is given each year to 
the senior who, in the judgment of the Honors Com- 
mittee, has made the most outstanding contribution 
to the College during his undergraduate years. Mr. 
Carfer, a Trustee of Bethany College for 29 years, was 
a graduate of the Class of 1909. Recipients of the 
award must display sound academic accomplish- 
ments and characteristics of loyalty, service, and de- 
votion to Bethany. 



The Senior Award In Chemistry, given by an anon- 
ymous donor, is granted to the senior concentrating 
in chemistry who has achieved the highest cumula- 
tive average in his major field, including the record 
made on the Senior Comprehensive Examination. 

The Psychology Society Award is presented annu- 
ally to the senior majoring in psychology who has 
maintained the highest academic average in his stud- 
ies in the department. 

The Pi Delta Epsilon National Award of Merit is 
presented to an upperclass writer or editor for sig- 
nificant contributions to campus student publications. 

The WVBC-FM Senior Award For Radio is given to 
the senior who for four years has shown dedication, 
loyalty, leadership, talent, and creativity to VVVBC's 
operations. 

The WVBC-FM Talent Award is presented to the 
individual member of the WVBC staff who has offered 
the outstanding continuous radio programming for 
the school term. 



40 



BETHANY 




ADMISSION 



41 




Bethany accepts applications for admission from 
qualified candidates. Admission is based upon a care- 
ful review of all the credentials presented by the 
candidate. The Committee on Admission accepts 
those it considers best qualified among those apply- 
ing. In no case does the meeting of minimum stand- 
ards assure admission. 

Application for admission to the freshman class 
should be made to the Director of Admission as 
early as possible in the year in which the candidate 
seeks admission, preferably before the completion of 
the first half of his final preparatory year. Decisions 
of the Committee on Admission are mailed beginning 
in October and throughout the year as completed 
applications are received. The accepted student then 
may reserve a space in the new class by writing a 
letter of acceptance and by returning a housing card 
and a registration deposit. Further discussion of this 
deposit may be found on page 46. 

The College seeks students who have prepared 
themselves for a liberal-arts curriculum by taking at 
least 15 units of college-preparatory work. Although 
the College does not prescribe how these units be 
distributed, it expects a minimum of four years of 
English and the usual sequences in mathematics, sci- 
ence, foreign languages, and social studies. For stu- 
dents who have developed individual curricula or 
are involved in experimental honors programs, the 
committee makes special evaluation. 



42 




The process of application should also include a 
request for college counselors to furnish a transcript 
of completed work, a personal profile of the appli- 
cant, and College Entrance Examination Board Scho- 
lastic Aptitude Test scores. On the application form 
the College requests the name and address of two 
persons who are well acquainted with the applicant 
and who are willing to furnish an estimation of his 
qualifications. The applicant may also wish to pro- 
vide any other supporting documents that he be- 
lieves will help in the process of admission, i.e., 
poetry, plays, short stories, music, artwork, photog- 
raphy, and journalistic writings. 

In addition, Bethany College strongly suggests that 
an interview with an admission officer be scheduled, 
in many instances accomplished in a nearby city 
when it coincides with the Admission Office travel 
schedule. Annual hotel interviews are held in New 
York, Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, Cleveland, 
and Pittsburgh. The ideal situation, however, is an 
interview on campus, allowing sufficient time for 
a comprehensive tour. During campus visits plans 
should be made to observe classes and to speak and 
dine with students and faculty who are eager to meet 
with prospective candidates. 




The Admission Office is open Monday through 
Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. throughout the year. 
While the College is in session, the office is also 
open Saturday mornings. Appointments may be made 
by calling 304-829-7611 or writing the Admission 
Office, Bethany College, Bethany, West Virginia 
26032. Travel brochures will then be sent, detailing 
travel routes and suggesting comfortable overnight 
accommodations within minutes of the campus. 



43 



TRANSFERS 

Transfer students are welcomed at Bethany. Proce- 
dures for transferring to the College are similar to 
those for freshmen, except that the interview is re- 
quired. Any student in good standing at a fully ac- 
credited institution of higher education is eligible 
for acceptance. A majority of students accepted as 
transfers have above average grades and are seeking a 
campus life unlike that which they have experienced. 
Grades of "C" or better are accepted along with 
course work in which credit (on a credit/no credit 
basis) or pass (in a pass/fail system) has been received. 
If requested, course work from other institutions will 
be reviewed by Bethany's Registrar prior to making 
application. 

JUNIOR COLLEGE GRADUATES 

Bethany has attempted to make the entrance of 
junior college graduates as uncomplicated as pos- 
sible. Any student who has received or will receive 
an Associate in Arts or Associate in Science Degree 
and finds Bethany's curriculum suited to his educa- 
tional goals is encouraged to apply. All materials 
necessary for acceptance should be forwarded to 
the College early in the semester, prior to the term 
the student plans to enroll. 

Holders of the A.A./A.S. Degree who are accepted 
at Bethany as Junior College Degree Candidates re- 
ceive two years (minimum of 60 hours) credit, enter 
as juniors, and receive all the rights and privileges of 
upperclassmen. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

The College is eager to review the applications of stu- 
dents from other countries. Approximately 15 coun- 
tries are represented on campus each semester. 



Students from non-English-speaking countries are 
required to submit Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores or 
a score from the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) for entrance. 

Students from foreign countries are asked to supply 
funds for financing their education. Though the Col- 
lege is willing to review a request for scholarship, 
funds are limited. 

EARLY ADMISSION 

Some students complete their secondary school grad- 
uation requirements a year early and decide to pursue 
college admission after their junior year. For those 
students who have demonstrated maturity and show 
evidence of a strong academic background, Bethany 
offers a program for early admission. For this type of 
admission the usual admissions procedures must be 
followed. A personal interview on campus as well as 
a discussion with the student's college counselor by 
an admission officer is also required. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

Students may receive advanced placement and/or 
credit from any department in the College through a 
testing program. The faculty recently elected to grant 
any student credit by examination without taking the 
course. Arrangements may be made by consulting 
with department chairmen and the Director of 
Testing. 

Credit may be received or courses waived as a re- 
sult of high scores on the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board Testing Program for Advanced Placement. 
Such credit, however, is a departmental matter and 
also requires consultation with department chairmen 
upon matriculation. 



44 



BETHANY 




45 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 



Bethany College is a non-profit institution. Tuition, 
fees, and other general charges paid by the student 
cover less than three-fourths of the College's instruc- 
tional and operational expenses. The remainder 
comes from income from endowment funds and from 
gifts and contributions. Bethany continues to keep the 
costs required from the student as low as possible. 



No reduction is made in student accounts for 
course changes made after the first two weeks of the 
semester. The College is required to collect a three 
per cent West Virginia sales tax on published charges 
for room, board, linen, and parking permits. Bethany 
reserves the right to change, without advance notice, 
the price for room, board, linen, and health insurance. 



COMPREHENSIVE CHARGES 

Comprehensive charges of approximately $3,470 for 
a year at Bethany include the following: 

Tuition and Fees $2,160 

Room 495 

Board 625 

Student Board of Governors 65 

Bethany House-Benedum Commons 50 

Linen 40 

Health Insurance 32 



While a general charge is stated for Tuition and 
Fees, this fee may be divided into $1,660 for tuition 
and $500 for the following activities and services: 
athletics, health service, library, lectures, plays, con- 
certs, publications, student activities, and laboratory 
services with the exception of music and art. 

The Bethany House-Benedum Commons Fee is 
charged to all registered students and covers the oper- 
ation and maintenance costs of the student union. 



WITHDRAWALS AND REFUNDS 

After registration, there is no refund of room charges 
or fees. A student voluntarily withdrawing or with- 
drawing because of illness during the course of the 
semester will be charged 10 per cent of tuition 
charges for each week of attendance or part thereof. 
There is no refund of tuition after the tenth week of 
attendance. There is no refund in the event that a 
student is dismissed or asked to withdraw during the 
course of the semester. Board refund is prorated, 
based upon food costs only. Special fees are not 
refundable. 

A student wishing to withdraw from Bethany must 
file written notice with the Dean of Students to qual- 
ify for refund of deposit and adjustment of other 
charges. 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION FEES 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A non-refundable $10 fee is required at the time 
of formal application. 



46 




APPLICATION FOR READMISSION 
Students previously enrolled in Bethany College who 
wish to return for additional work must file an Appli- 
cation for Readmission with the Admission Office. 
A $5 fee is required at the time such application 
is made. 

REGISTRATION DEPOSIT 

Upon acceptance for admission or readmission, a 
$100 registration deposit is required of all students in 
accordance with instructions provided in the accep- 
tance letter. This deposit is refunded following grad- 
uation. 

Students not being graduated may have the de- 
posit refunded after the last term of their attendance 
if written notice is given to the Business Office prior 
to the advance enrollment date for the next regular 
term. Such students may be readmitted by approval 
of the Dean of Students and the Business Manager. 

MATRICULATION FEE 

A $20 fee, payable once by every new student, cov- 
ers, in part, the cost of orientation and evaluation 
procedures for new students. 



ART FEES 

Art 242 $10 

Art 301 $10 

Art 304 $20 

Art 305 $10 

Art 401 $10 

Art 404 $20 

Art 481 $15 

Art 482 $15 

MUSIC FEES 

Private lessons, two weekly ... .$115 per semester 

Private lesson, one weekly $65 per semester 

Organ Practice, one hour daily . . $33 per semester 

Instrument Rental $9 per semester 

Piano Practice, one hour daily .... $9 per semester 
Voice Practice, one or two 

hours daily $9 per semester 

FEES FOR OVERSEAS PROGRAMS 

England: $1,679 per semester for air fare, tuition 
and fees, room and board, and activity 
fees while in England. 

Madrid: 1st semester — $1,080 for air fare, tuition 

and fees, and transportation from the 
airport to the university. 
2nd semester — $540 (in addition to first 
semester fee). 

Sorbonne: 1st semester — $1,080 for air fare, tuition 
and fees, and transportation from the 
airport to the university. 
2nd semester — $540 (in addition to first 
semester fee). 



47 



OTHER SPECIAL FEES 

Education 443: off-campus student teaching 

(per semester) $1 ,080 

(includes tuition, fees, and weekend board 
privileges in the Bethany dining hall) 

Each academic hour when less than 13 $83 

Freshmen: each academic hour in excess of 

16 hours $60 

Upperclassmen: each academic hour in 

excess of 18 hours $60 

Auditing a course, per semester hour $60 

(A student is not charged if he is paying 
regular tuition and fees and the total pro- 
gram, including the audit, does not ex- 
ceed 18 hours.) 

Comprehensive Examination $25 

Graduation Fee $20 

Special guidance and advisory service 

(pre-college) $10 to $25 

Special examinations in any department $10 

Special placement or achievement tests in 

any department $5 

Key deposit for dormitories (refunded 

if key is returned) $5 

Infirmary charge per day $4 

(after the first three clays each semester) 

Late registration (per day) $3 

BREAKAGE DEPOSITS 

Chemistry and physics breakage deposits are covered 
by a $5 breakage card which the student purchases 
each semester for every laboratory course in which 
he is enrolled. In the event breakage exceeds $5, an 
additional $5-breakage card must be purchased. Un- 
used portions are refunded at the end of each aca- 
demic year. A $5 fee is charged those taking Biology 
343. 



PAYMENT OF STUDENT ACCOUNTS 

At registration an invoice is prepared for each stu- 
dent, listing all charges due for the following se- 
mester. Payments are due in accordance with the 
following schedule: 

First Semester 

By August 15 a payment of $1,200 

(Balance on account due October 15) 

Second Semester 

By January 15 a payment of $1,200 

(Balance on account due March 15) 

Scholarships and loans may be applied as credit 
against August or January initial payment require- 
ments. If after application of scholarships and/or 
loans, the balance is less than $1,200, the full balance 
is due and payable by August 15 for the first semester 
and January 15 for the second semester. All special 
student accounts for which total semester charges 
are $1,200 or less are payable in full by registration. 

Students will not be permitted to register if the 
initial payment requirements for each semester are 
not met, and they may be denied College privileges 
if subsequent payments are not completed as sched- 
uled. These requirements are in addition to the reg- 
istration deposit. Checks or drafts should be made 
payable to Bethany College. 

An account service fee of two per cent per month 
will be charged on balances outstanding on all stu- 
dent accounts as of October 15 for the first semester 
and March 15 for the second semester. This fee will 
be entered on all accounts the day following the 
above dates and at 30-day intervals thereafter for a 
period not to exceed 90 days. Students may not take 
final examinations, receive academic credit, or obtain 
transcripts until satisfactory arrangements are made 
to cover financial obligations. 



48 



STUDENT DRAWING ACCOUNT 

The Business Office provides a limited banking ser- 
vice whereby students may deposit funds and draw 
on them as required. Students or their parents may 
make deposits to this recommended student drawing 
account which avoids the necessity of keeping on 
hand any substantial amount of money. All checks 
for this account must be made payable to the Bethany 
College Student Drawing Account. 

MONTHLY PAYMENT PLANS 

Bethany has made arrangements with the Insured 
Tuition Payment Plan, and Education Funds, Inc., 
whereby student accounts may be paid on a monthly 
basis during the year. Arrangements to use any of 
these plans should be made prior to the registration 
period. Information concerning these may be ob- 
tained by writing to the Business Office, and contract 
forms may be obtained by writing to the Insured 
Tuition Payment Plan, 6 Saint James Ave., Boston, 
Mass., 92116; and to Education Funds, Inc., 36 S. 
Wabash, Chicago, III., 60603. Contracts are to be 
completed by the parent or guardian of the student 
through direct negotiation with the payment plan 
offices indicated. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Bethany College believes that funding of a student's 
education is primarily a family responsibility. How- 
ever, financial assistance is available to those students 
whose resources will not fund a Bethany education 
and yet sincerely desire to attend. 

All of the College's financial assistance programs 
are awarded through careful evaluation of the Par- 
ents' Confidential Statement (PCS), available through 
the college counseling offices of the student's high 
school. Designation of Bethany College as an appro- 
priate institution to receive the processed information 




and indication of application for financial assistance 
on the admission application are the only procedures 
necessary to apply for financial aid. 

Because of the large number of applications for 
financial aid, assignment of funds is made according 
to the date requests are processed. The earlier a stu- 
dent completes all admission materials and submits 
the PCS, the more funds there are available. 

A financial-aid applicant whose need for assistance 
has been verified by the College Scholarship Service 
will have his need met through a variety of financial 
aids, including scholarships, loans, and College em- 
ployment. The student has the option of accepting 
any or all of the aid offered. An interview with an 
officer of the College once the offer of assistance has 
been made can help to explain any problems. The 
Admission Office or the Office of Financial Assistance 
helps to arrange these interviews. 



49 




QUALIFICATIONS FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Bethany recognizes promise and intellectual attain- 
ment by awarding a number of scholarships. These 
awards vary in value and are available to a limited 
number of entering students. Most scholarships are 
awarded to freshmen on a four-year basis but are 
continued from year to year only if the recipient has 
met the following conditions: 

1) A satisfactory scholarship index 

2) Satisfactory conduct as a student 

3) Worthwhile contributions to the college program 

4) Constructive citizenship in the college community 

5) Payment of student accounts as scheduled. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

All awards are made by the Faculty Committee on 
Scholarship and Financial Aid in accordance with the 
requirements of the particular fund. 



Patrick A. and Elizabeth Berry Scholarship Fund — established by 
Miss Sara Cameron to assist students from Ohio. 

Bethany Women's Club — established by the Bethany Women's 
Club to assist needy and worthy students. 

Bison Club — provided by Bethany alumni with principal interest 
in intercollegiate athletics. 

Donald L. Boyd Memorial — established by family and friends in 
memory of Donald L. Boyd, member of the Class of 1921 and 
long-time Trustee of the College. 

jean A. Boyd Scholarship — established by bequest from donor. 

Thomas ]. Boyd — established by Thomas J. Boyd, member of 

the Class of 1940. 
Mr. and Mrs. Earl B. Brink Scholarship — awarded to worthy and 

eligible students. 

Isaac Brown Scholarship — used to aid in part of the tuition 
charge. 

Argyle Campbell Memorial — established by family and friends 
of Mr. Campbell to assist worthy and needy students. 

Chapman Scholarship — established by Stanton C. Crawford, 
Bethany 1918, former Chancellor of the University of Pitts- 
burgh, to honor a pioneer frontier family. 

Charnock Family Scholarship — established by Miss Ethel Char- 
nock, member of the Class of 1912, to assist students at the 
sophomore level or above. 

The Class of 7969 Scholarship Endowment — provided as a schol- 
arship grant to begin with the 1984-85 college year. First pref- 
erence will be given to descendants of the Class of 1969. 

Class of 1970 Scholarship Endowment — provided as a scholar- 
ship grant to begin with the 1985-86 college year. First prefer- 
ence will be given to descendants of the Class of 1970. 

M. M. Cochran Scholarship — established to cover a part of the 
tuition charge. 

Nelson Evans Cook Endowed Scholarship — created to memorial- 
ize an outstanding metallurgist by providing scholarship assis- 
tance for chemistry students. 

Irene O. Darnall Scholarship — established by Irene O. Darnall 
to assist needy and worthy students. 

Marion and Frank Dunn Scholarship — established by Frank K. 
Dunn, former Assistant to the President of Bethany College, 
to assist worthy and eligible students. 

Ekas-Evans Scholarship Endowment — established by Dr. and 
Mrs. Ward Ekas of Rochester, New York, whose daughter, 
Elizabeth Ellen Ekas, was a member of the Class of 1957. 

Newton W. and Bessie Evans Scholarship — established by Mr. 
Newton W. Evans, former Bursar and Treasurer of Bethany 
College, to assist worthy students. 



50 



Samuel George Memorial Scholarship — established by bequest 
from the donor to provide one-fourth tuition scholarships to 
all graduates of Brooke (West Virginia) High School who qual- 
ify for admission. Additional scholarship aid is provided Brooke 
students on the basis of individual needs. 

Creensburg Area Scholarship — established anonymously in 1953 
to assist students of ability and need from the Greensburg, 
Pennsylvania, area. 

Aleece C. Gresham Scholarship — presented as assistance to out- 
standing students in the field of music. 

Perry and Aleece Gresham Scholarship — established by Dr. and 
Mrs. Perry E. Gresham to assist worthy and eligible students. 
Special consideration is given to young people interested in 
music or philosophy. 

Gampbell Allen Harlan Scholarship — established by Mr. Camp- 
bell Allen Harlan, former Bethany College Trustee from Detroit, 
Michigan, to assist students of unusual ability in the fine arts. 

Florence M. Hoagland Memorial Scholarship — established for 
needy and worthy students by Miss Frances Cables of New 
Hampshire in memory of Florence M. Hoagland, Head of the 
Department of English and Advisor for Women at Bethany 
from 1936 to 1946. 

Ida M. Irvin Scholarship — awarded to a senior student. 

Flora Isenberg Scholarship — given to provide assistance for stu- 
dents of the liberal arts and sciences. 

Albert C. Israel Scholarship — used to apply to tuition of a de- 
scendant of Albert C. Israel. 

John H. and Ida H. King Scholarship — awarded to students under 
terms approved by Trustees of the College in accordance with 
the will of the donors. 

Forrest H. Kirkpatrick Scholarship — established by Dr. Kirkpat- 
rick, member of the Class of 1927, to be used to help students 
who are sons or daughters of alumni. 

The Emma A. Lyon Scholarship — given to memorialize a pioneer 
Christian missionary to China. This endowment was initiated 
by a gift from Mrs. Mary M. Farm of Hawaii. 

Gharles L. and Rose Melenyzer Scholarship — established by Dr. 
Charles Melenyzer, member of the National Board of Fellows 
of Bethany College, to be used to assist worthy young people 
who attend Bethany. First consideration will be given to the 
young people of the Monongahela Valley. 

H. I. Morlan Fund — established by Halford J. Morlan to assist 
needy and worthy students. 

William Kimbrough Pendleton Scholarship — established, to assist 
students from West Virginia, by Clarinda Pendleton Lamar in 
memory of her father, William Kimbrough Pendleton, member 



of the first faculty and second president of the College (1866- 

1889). 
Hayes Picklesimer Scholarship — established in 1969 by the West 

Virginia Emulation Endowment Trust to provide scholarship 

and aid to residents of West Virginia. 
Eli and Lee Rabb Scholarship — used as scholarship assistance for 

students from the Upper Ohio Valley. 
Reader's Digest Foundation — established by the Reader's Digest 

Foundation to assist worthy and needy students. 
The Herbert and Marguerite Rech Scholarship — used to assist 

needy and eligible students. 
Edwin K. Resseger, jr. Memorial Scholarship — provided by Mr. 

and Mrs. Kenneth Resseger of the Class of 1933. 
The James Derrick Reynolds Memorial Scholarship — established 

by parents and friends of a young man who lost his life in 

Viet Nam. 
E. E. Roberts Scholarship Endowment — created in memory of 

Professor E. E. Roberts who taught journalism at Bethany Col- 
lege from 1928-1960. 
The Richard L. Schanck Scholarship — established by friends in 

memory of Dr. Schanck, Professor of Sociology at Bethany 

College from 1952-1964. 

Elizabeth M. Shrontz Scholarship — established by bequest from 
the estate of Elizabeth Shrontz from Washington, Pennsylvania. 

Adelaide E. and Arthur C. 5t/7e/ Endowment — established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur C. Stifel of Wheeling, West Virginia. 

Peter Tarr Heritage Endowment — established by Geneva Tarr 
Elliott, member of the Class of 1927. This fund provides schol- 
arship assistance to students in memory of the Tarr family's 
association with Bethany College since the days of its founding. 

Stewart King Tweedy Memorial Scholarship — established by Mr. 
and Mrs. H. L. Tweedy and friends in memory of their son, 
member of the Class of 1964, who was killed in Viet Nam. 

William H. Vodrey Scholarship — established by Mr. William H. 
Vodrey, a member of the Class of 1894, to assist students from 
the East Liverpool, Ohio, area. 

The Gampbell-Hagerman-Watson Memorial — established by a 
bequest from the estate of Mrs. Virginia Hagerman Watson, a 
member of the Class of 1904, to provide support for foreign 
exchange students. 

Arthur A. Wells, jr., Scholarship — established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur A. Wells in memory of their son, a member of the Class 
of 1947, to assist students of social studies and humanities. 

G. A. Willett Scholarship — established to cover part of the tui- 
tion charge. The student receiving this scholarship is to be 
nominated by a member of the Willett family. 



51 



DESIGNATED SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following scholarship funds have been estab- 
lished at Bethany College to assist students preparing 
for a church-related vocation: 

Florence Abercrombie Scholarship — established by a bequest 
from the estate of Florence Abercrombie. 

Ada P. Bennett Memorial — established by O. E. Bennett, a mem- 
ber of the Class of 1925, and family and friends. 

Lotta A. Calkins — established by a bequest from the estate of 
Lotta A. Calkins. 

Thomas Richard Deming Scholarship — established by friends, 
family, and members of the First Christian Church, Charleston, 

West Virginia. 

A. Dale Fiers Ministerial Athletic Scholarship — established by Dr. 
Fiers, Trustee of Bethany College and member of the Class of 
1929, to recognize and encourage the scholastic and athletic 
skill of an outstanding upperclassman. 

Jennie I. Hayes Scholarship — -established by Jennie I. Hayes, a 
member of the Class of 1904. 

Harry L. Ice Timothy Ministerial Endowment — established by 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Lee of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, hon- 
oring Dr. and Mrs. Ice in recognition of Dr. Ice's productive 
and untiring work in establishing and building the "Timothy 
Ministerial Training Program.'' 

Isaac Mills Scholarship — provided to cover part of the tuition 
charge of a ministerial student. 

Herbert Moninger Scholarship — established in memory of Mr. 
Herbert Moninger, a graduate of the Class of 1898. 

The Parsons Memorial Timothy Fund — established by the Heights 
Christian Church, Shaker Heights, Ohio, and other friends in 
memory of Dorothy and Waymon Parsons for dedicated lead- 
ership to this church and the Brotherhood of Christian 
Churches (Disciples of Christ). 

Perry Scholarship Fund — established in memory of Professor 
and Mrs. E. Lee Perry. Professor Perry was a member of the 
Class of 1893, Professor of Latin at the College from 1908 to 
1939, and Professor Emeritus from 1939 ( o 1948. 

Sala Family Memorial Fund — established by Dr. John R. Sala, 
Class of 1926, former Dean of the Faculty at Bethany College. 

Minnie W. Schaefer Awards — awarded to students preparing for 
definite Christian Service. 







4 



52 





Oreon E. Scott Foundation Scholarships — granted by the Trus- 
tees of the Oreon E. Scott Foundation to provide assistance for 
students in their junior and senior years. 

Edith and Chester A. Sillars Scholarship — -established by Chester 
A. Sillars, former Director of Church Relations at Bethany 
College. 

Charles C. Smith Scholarship — established by family and friends 
in memory of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Smith whose dedicated lives 
were spent in service to the Christian Ministry. 

/. T. Smith Awards — established by M. J. T. Smith, friend of 
Bethany from Memphis, Tennessee. 

John E. Sugden, jr. Fund — granted to assist in the form of either 
loans or grants. 

Harriett Mortimore Toomey Music Scholarship — established by 
John C. Toomey and friends to assist students in musical 
education. 

Robert S. and Marie /. Tuck Scholarship — established by mem- 
bers of the Central Christian Church, Wooster, Ohio, where the 
Tucks served for 44 years. Mr. and Mrs. Tuck were members of 
the Classes of 1922 and 21 respectively at Bethany College. 

Hollis L. Turley Scholarship — established by a bequest from the 
estate of Hollis L. Turley, Bethany 1925 and former Trustee. 

Vinson Memorial Fund — established by Z. T. Vinson, Class of 
1878, through the Central Christian Church, Huntington, West 
Virginia. 

Raymond E. and Eunice M. Weed Scholarship — established by 
Dr. Raymond Weed, former curator of the Campbell Mansion. 

josiah N. and Wilminia S. Wilson Scholarship — established by 
Josiah N. Wilson to assist students preparing for the Christian 
Ministry. 




53 




The following scholarship funds have been estab- 
lished to assist students at Bethany College from 
backgrounds of the Christian Church (Disciples of 
Christ): 



The Fannie M. Bennett Endowed National Campbell Scholarship 
— established by a gift from the estate of Fannie Bennett who 
was a member of the Class of 1926. 

The Ben and Leona Brown Scholarship — established by Mrs. 
Leona Brown of Washington, Pennsylvania, in memory of her 
husband. 

lessie M. and Frank P. Fiess Endowed National Campbell Scholar- 
ship — established by Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Fiess whose 
daughters, June Fiess Shackelford and Emma Lee Fiess Baldwin, 
were members of the Classes of 1941 and 1944 respectively. 

The V. J. Hopkins and Mary L. Hopkins Scholarship — operated 
under the principles of the National Campbell Scholarship 
program. 

National Campbell Scholarship — established in memory and 
honor of Alexander Campbell. Awards are in recognition of 
Christian service and academic accomplishment to develop 
able and dedicated lay leadership in the Christian Church. 



LOAN FUNDS 

The following endowed loan funds have been estab- 
lished to assist students under the general supervision 
of the Faculty Committee on Student Aid: 

The William C. and Carrie E. Bunyan Student Aid Fund — estab- 
lished by a bequest from the estate of the late Mrs. Bunyan of 
Brockway, Pennsylvania. 

The Merit and Marguerite May Student Loan Fund — established 
by Mr. and Mrs. Meril May of Garrettsville, Ohio. 

/. West Mitchell Endowed Medical Loan Fund — provided to 
assist pre-medical undergraduates of Bethany College and 
graduates of Bethany College enrolled in accredited medical 
schools. 

Phillips Loan Fund — established in 1890 by Thomas W. Phillips, 
Sr., of New Castle, Pennsylvania. 



54 



BETHANY 








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55 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 




THE BETHANY PLAN 

Students differ in ability, motivation, tastes, aspira- 
tions, and modes of learning. No one program will 
serve the diverse needs of our students. However, 
some structure is necessary to give guidance to stu- 
dents by providing various teaching and learning 
methods. 

The Bethany Plan attempts to integrate a four-year 
liberal arts education which provides a vast degree 
of freedom in designing individual programs yet gives 
enough structure to insure depth, breadth, and inte- 
gration of knowledge. 

The Bethany Plan provides many learning oppor- 
tunities both on and off campus. The Plan involves 
a classroom-based program in which students attend 
interdisciplinary lecture courses, participate in small 
seminar groups, initiate and present independent 
studies, perform laboratory research, write papers, 
and utilize library materials. 

The Bethany Plan also includes an experience- 
based program, a group of four practica which en- 
courage students to become involved in the world of 
work, to exercise responsible citizenship, to develop 
physical and recreational skills, and to experience 
living in a culture different from their own. These 
learning opportunities are not random experiences. 
They are carefully planned by the student and his 
advisor. The student must continually justify his de- 
cisions and examine his academic and field experi- 
ences in relationship to his vocational and personal 
goals. 



56 



THE ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

The Bethany calendar consists of two 15-week semes- 
ters and a four-week voluntary interim session in 
January: The fall semester — September to before 
Christmas; the spring semester — February until the 
end of May; and the January Term — a voluntary 
session which students may elect to use for intensive 
study on campus or for off-campus field work. 

Some courses are offered over the 15-week term; 
others, for eight weeks. This division provides addi- 
tional flexibility for students to do off-campus study 
and internships. 




'A 




57 




THE ACADEMIC ADVISOR 

The relationship between the student and his advisor 
is the cornerstone of a Bethany education. The stu- 
dent and his advisor work closely together in devel- 
oping appropriate classroom and experience-based 
programs. If not during private meetings, each fresh- 
man will see his advisor two times a week the first 
semester to discuss work in the freshman seminar. 
Usually during the sophomore year, the student 
selects a major field of concentration, thus transfer- 
ring to an advisor associated with his major area of 
interest. 



58 



THE COMMITTEE ON ACADEMIC REVIEW 

The Committee on Academic Review is a faculty- 
student committee which evaluates student requests 
for exceptions to the regular academic policies and 
regulations. Student requests are submitted in writing 
and should include the advisor's recommendation. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The Bachelor of Arts degree will be conferred upon 
the student who completes the following: 

1) 128 semester hours with a minimum cumulative 
gradepoint average of 2.0 

2) a freshman seminar 

3) a freshman interdisciplinary lecture course 

4) the distribution requirement 

5) a field of concentration 

6) writing qualification examinations 

7) a senior project 

8) the comprehensive examination in the major 
field 

9) the practicum requirement 

10) the residence requirement 

11) attendance at the commencement exercise. 
The degree of Bachelor of Science may be con- 
ferred upon a student who completes the Bachelor 
of Arts requirements and who chooses to major in 
any one of the following departments: biology, chem- 
istry, mathematics, physics, or psychology. 

THE FRESHMAN STUDIES PROGRAM* 

1) Freshman Seminar: All entering freshmen will en- 
roll in a freshman seminar during the fall semester 
of the freshman year. The professor directing the 
seminar will also serve as the student's advisor. 

2) Freshman Interdisciplinary Course: Freshmen will 
elect a freshman interdisciplinary course either 
in the fall or spring term of the freshman year. 



*See Freshman Studies 
this program. 



pp. 69-71, for descriptions of the courses offered in 



THE DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENT 

To insure breadth of knowledge among its graduates, 
Bethany requires a demonstration of competence in 
a variety of disciplines. 

Every student must elect at least 12 hours from 
each of the three following divisions: 
Social Sciences 
Communications 101, 402; Economics; Education 

201, 202, 301; History; Political Science; and Sociol- 
ogy. 

Physical and Life Sciences 

Biology; Chemistry; General Science 101, 102, 201, 

202, 209, 210; Geology; Physics; and Psychology. 
Humanities 

Art; Fine Arts; Foreign Languages; Literature; Music; 
Philosophy; Religious Studies; Speech; and Theatre. 
Not more than four hours may be earned in applied 
fine arts courses. 

Any student may be exempted from the distribu- 
tion requirement in any one of the three divisions 
through successful completion of the Undergraduate 
Record Examination by the end of the sophomore 
year with a score equal to or surpassing the national 
norm. 

All students are required to pass Religious Studies 
100. Generally, this course is taken in the freshman 
or sophomore year. This course may be used to fulfill 
part of the distribution requirement in humanities. 

FIELD OF CONCENTRATION 

The field of concentration may be either departmen- 
tal or faculty-student initiated. The following guide- 
lines specifically exclude any language requirements 
necessary for professional certification or for admis- 
sion to a graduate program. 

A departmental field consists of a minimum of 24 
credit hours (excluding the senior project) and a max- 



59 




imum of 48 hours within the department. No more 
than 24 hours from related disciplines may be re- 
quired by a department. 

The faculty-sponsored or student-initiated field, 
which may cut across departmental lines, may be 
developed. This field of concentration requires the 



approval of the Committee on Special Fields of Con- 
centration. Such fields consist of a minimum of 24 
hours (excluding the senior project) and a maximum 
of 72 hours. No more than 48 hours in any one de- 
partment will be counted toward graduation. 

WRITING QUALIFICATION 
EXAMINATIONS 

All students must maintain a high level of proficiency 
in writing skills, demonstrated in a series of Writing 
Qualification Tests. Each student must take four tests 
in the following sequence: The initial Writing Quali- 
fication Test when he enters Bethany, and one during 
the freshman, sophomore, and junior years. Satisfac- 
tory performance on the junior W.Q.T. is required for 
graduation. To assist in developing and maintaining 
skills in composition, two non-credit expository 
courses are offered by the English department. 

SENIOR PROJECT 

Every student must produce a project which repre- 
sents his best efforts and meets the standards of his 
field of concentration. The project will be received 
and evaluated during the final semester of the stu- 
dent's senior year. Two to eight hours of credit will 
be given after the final evaluation and approval of 
the project. Scheduling of the project is at the dis- 
cretion of the department or the student's advisory 
committee. 

The project will be evaluated by at least one per- 
son in the field of concentration other than his ad- 
visors) and one member of a department other than 
his own. The final evaluation will be in consultation 
with the student. In the faculty-sponsored or student- 
initiated field of concentration, one of the readers 
must be outside the student's advisory committee. 
The project will be made available to the college 
community. 



60 



THE SENIOR COMPREHENSIVE 
EXAMINATION 

Each student must pass the Senior Comprehensive 
Examination. All requirements in the field of concen- 
tration must be met before the examination may be 
taken. 

The examination consists of two parts, written and 
oral. In some departments, sections of the Under- 
graduate Record Examination may also be considered 
part of or pre-requisite to the Senior Comprehensive. 




The examination will be given twice yearly, in Jan- 
uary and in May. The oral part of the examination 
will be scheduled by the Registrar as soon as practi- 
cable after the written, but in no case more than two 
weeks later. 

A student who has completed all the requirements 
in his field of concentration and has planned or is 
engaged in a Senior Project of major proportions (i.e., 
equivalent to four hours or more) may take the exam- 
ination in January with the consent of his advisor(s). 
If a student fails the examination in January, he may 
take it again in May, and he will be advised to reduce 
the scope of his Senior Project. 

A student who has not completed all the require- 
ments in his field of concentration or whose Senior 
Project will be equivalent to two hours will take the 
examination in May. 

Students in departments which consider sections 
of the Undergraduate Record Examination as part of 
the Senior Comprehensive Examination will take the 
URE immediately preceding their written and oral 
examinations. 

A student who fails the examination may take it at 
any time it is regularly given within the following 12 
months. If he fails a second time, he may petition the 
faculty for a re-examination during the following 
year. No student may take the examination more 
than three times. 

THE PRACTICUM PROGRAM 

Each student must complete four practicums in which 
he actualizes the goals of the College. These prac- 
ticums are 1) a vocationally related internship, 2) an 
intercultural living experience, 3) citizenship, and 4) 
health, physical education, and recreation. 

Each practicum should be a self-examination of the 
use of theory in practice; a demonstration that lib- 
eral studies are relevant to personal development and 



67 



to the fulfillment of obligations as a responsible citi- 
zen. Each practicum proposal must have the approval 
of a faculty member — usually the student's advisor 
— and meet the guidelines established for each prac- 
ticum by the Faculty Committee on Practicums. 

In each practicum the demonstration that one has 
had the experience or training is not sufficient. The 
student must demonstrate to his faculty advisor that 
he has examined that experience in relation to his 
total life and educational program. 

THE RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

Four years are usually required to satisfy the course 
and residence requirements for the baccalaureate de- 
gree. Students of superior ability may complete the 
requirements in less time. As a rule, the senior year 
or the last two semesters are to be spent in residence 
at the College. However, students who have had one 
full year of residence previous to their senior year, 
and who apply for and are approved by the Com- 
mittee on Academic Review for off-campus study 
programs during their senior year, are permitted to 
count that work toward graduation requirements. 

INDEPENDENT STUDIES 

Each department in the College offers Independent 
Study for those students who have demonstrated the 
ability to work individually on some special area of 
interest not covered by course work. The student se- 
lects an area of study, subject to the approval of the 
chairman of the department, after which he com- 
pletes an Application for Independent Study in the 
Registrar's Office before the start of that semester. 

JANUARY TERM 

The January Term is a voluntary interim session which 
provides new and stimulating learning experiences to 
supplement the College academic program by means 
of innovative instructional methods, student-initiated 




«*«^ 



courses, and travel programs. During January a stu- 
dent may earn two or four credit hours toward grad- 
uation. For additional information, consult with the 
January Term Director. 

SUMMER TERMS 

There are two five-week summer terms and two 
three-week summer terms. Most summer school 
courses are taught as seminars, tutorials, or indepen- 
dent studies. For additional information, consult with 
the Director of the Summer School Program. 






62 



COMBINATION COURSES 

The faculty has approved special arrangements under 
which students who have completed three years of 
work at the College may transfer to specifically ap- 
proved institutions for engineering or nursing train- 
ing and be eligible for graduation at Bethany upon 
satisfactory completion of their training at the coop- 
erating institution. 

THE MILLSOP LEADERSHIP CENTER 
Bethany's Thomas E. Millsop Leadership Center for 
Continuing Education is being used for the first time 
this fall. A variety of programs brings students into 
dialogues with leaders in every area of thought — so- 
cial, political, economic, religious, academic, and cul- 
tural. Gresham House, adjoining the Center, provides 
overnight accommodations for parents and program 
participants. 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 3-2 PLAN 
By special arrangement with the School of Engineer- 
ing at Columbia University, Bethany offers the first 
three years of a five-year course for engineering stu- 
dents and arranges for the participating student to 
transfer to Columbia for the last two years. Upon 
completion of this five-year program the student re- 
ceives a bachelor's degree from Bethany College and 
from Columbia University. 

WASHINGTON SEMESTER 
Arrangements have been made for one or two ad- 
vanced students in history, political science, eco- 
nomics or sociology to pursue studies in these fields 
under the direction of the American University in 
Washington, D.C. A student participating in this plan 
takes six to nine hours in regular academic work and 
six to nine hours in the study of government super- 
vised by Bethany College and American University. 



Participants in the program must be recommended 
by the program advisor and have the approval of the 
Dean of the Faculty. 

UNITED NATIONS SEMESTER 
Bethany students may participate in a program at the 
United Nations in New York City. One or two stu- 
dents are chosen each year. 

Students participating in this program take six 
hours of work in United Nations study — half, in a 
seminar course which meets regularly with people 
associated with the U.N.; the other half, in writing a 
research project on a topic chosen by each student. 

Students are also allowed to take six to nine hours 
of regular academic work at Drew University, Madi- 
son, New Jersey. Participants in the program must be 
recommended by the Campus Coordinator for the 
U.N. Semester, the student's advisor, and the Dean 
of the Faculty. 

OVERSEAS STUDY PROGRAMS 

Under approved supervision and direction qualified 
students may secure credit for formal work com- 
pleted in foreign colleges and universities. To be eli- 
gible for study abroad, the student must have the 
approval of the International Education Committee. 

JUNIOR YEAR AT THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MADRID OR THE SORBONNE 

Under special arrangements with the University of 
Madrid and the Sorbonne, qualified Bethany students 
may matriculate for a semester or a full year of study 
at these universities. 

OXFORD SEMESTER 

During the 1972 fall term, approximately 15 students 
are studying British literature, history, and culture 
with a Bethany professor in Oxford, England. These 



63 




students are matriculated as full-time students at 
at Bethany College but will have the opportunity to 
live and study in Britain. 

TUBINGEN STUDY PROGRAM 
Qualified students are given an opportunity to do in- 
tensive study in the German language and to work 
out an individualized program at the University of 
Tubingen, Germany. An adjunct member of the Beth- 
any faculty serves as mentor. 

REGIONAL COUNCIL FOR 
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 
Bethany College is a member of the Regional Coun- 
cil for International Education, founded in 1959 as 
a unique cooperative effort to strengthen the inter- 



national phases of education. The Council, composed 
of more than 30 colleges and universities in Pennsyl- 
vania, West Virginia, and Ohio, sponsors continuing 
faculty enrichment programs, exchange lectureships, 
visiting scholars from abroad who spend substantial 
periods on member college campuses, and an under- 
graduate study-year abroad in the social sciences in 
Basel, Switzerland, and in the humanities in Verona, 
Italy. 

STUDY YEAR IN BASEL, SWITZERLAND 
The Basel center emphasizes work in the area of mod- 
ern European history and international affairs. Classes 
are conducted at the Regional Council Study Center 
by an instructional staff drawn primarily from the 
nearby University of Basel, with a few Americans act- 
ing as administrators. Although these classes are 
taught in English, all students live with Swiss families, 
as proficiency in German is one aim of the program. 

STUDY YEAR IN VERONA, ITALY 
The Verona center concentrates on the areas of his- 
tory, the arts, and literature. Courses are conducted 
in English, but all students live with Veronese fam- 
ilies, as proficiency in Italian is one goal of the pro- 
gram. The program is administered by Americans, 
with an instructional staff drawn from the University 
of Verona and other institutions. There is no language 
prerequisite for either the Verona or Basel program. 

SCANDINAVIAN SEMINAR 
After an intensive study of the native language in a 
Scandinavian country, students enroll in a higher in- 
stitution as fully matriculated students in that country. 

INDIA EXCHANGE PROGRAM 
Each year a Bethany student is selected to receive a 
scholarship covering room, board, tuition, and spend- 
ing money at either St. Xaviers College or Elphinston 



64 



College in Bombay. The student selected must pay his 
transportation costs plus a nominal servicing cost to 
Bethany College. Bethany also provides a scholarship 
for an Indian student who is selected by the Lions 
Club of Versova (Bombay) India. 

SEMESTER IN COPENHAGEN PROGRAM 
Bethany College maintains a working relationship 
with the Washburn University Semester Program in 
Copenhagen, Denmark, conducted in English by Dan- 
ish instructors, providing a selection of courses in 
European and Scandinavian history, politics, social 
structure, and the arts. Two places in the program are 
reserved each year for Bethany students. 

OTHER OVERSEAS PROGRAMS 
There are many additional overseas programs in 
which Bethany students have participated. These in- 
clude: 

1) Beaver College Semester at the City College of 
London (England) 

2) Fairleigh-Dickinson University Semester at Wrox- 
ton College (England) 

3) Brandeis University Semester at Hiat Institute (Is- 
rael) 

4) Michigan State University AMLEC Foreign Lan- 
guage Centers throughout Europe 

5) Chapman College World Campus Afloat 

6) The University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

The Director of International Education Programs 
provides interested students with information con- 
cerning programs which have been examined and 
approved. 

COURSE LOAD 

A normal semester load is 16 hours. However, a stu- 
dent may elect activities courses (music, chorus, band, 
physical education) up to two hours with no addi- 



tional fee charge. For example, a student could elect 
a one-hour activity course, two one-hour activity 
courses, or a two-hour activity course. Thus, the max- 
imum academic course load is 16 hours plus two 
hours of activities courses. Permission to take addi- 
tional courses must be obtained from the Dean of the 
Faculty. Fees will be charged for any such approved 
courses. Applications for excess hours are available 
in the Registrar's office. A full-time student is defined 
as any student enrolled in at least 12 hours in that 
semester. 

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE 

During the first 10 class days of each semester, a stu- 
dent, with the approval of his advisor, may drop or 
add any course. No classes may be added after this 
time. With proper approval, a student may drop a 
course anytime before the final. 

CLASS ABSENCE POLICY 

Students are expected to attend all class and appro- 
priate laboratory meetings of a course and to partici- 
pate in all outside activities that are a part of the 
course. 

It is the responsibility of individual instructors to 
record attendance and to evaluate its importance in 
determination of course grades. Accordingly, each 
instructor prepares at the beginning of each semester 
a written statement explaining his attendance policy 
and his consideration of unexcused absences, make- 
up for excused absences, and related matters, which 
are in force for the whole semester. The instructor 
files this statement in the library and with the Dean 
of the Faculty. At the first class meeting, he distributes 
it to the class. 

The Dean of Students grants excused absences in 
the event of serious personal or family emergencies 
or authorized College events. The Dean of Students 



65 




files these excused absences with the Registrar who 
issues reports to the faculty. Names of students who 
are seriously jeopardizing their academic progress by 
class absence are given to the Dean of Students, who 
initiates counseling with the student. Instructors may 
drop students with a WF (withdrawn failing) if ab- 
sences are continued after consultation. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable dismissal is granted to any student in 
good standing who may desire to withdraw from the 
College if he has satisfied his advisor and a respon- 
sible officer of the College that there is a good reason 
to justify such action. Students asking to withdraw 
should present a written request to the Dean of Stu- 
dents along with a statement of approval from parent 
or guardian. The recommendation of the Dean of Stu- 
dents is next presented to the Business Manager and 
then to the Registrar for final record. No withdrawal 
is considered complete until this procedure has been 
carried out. 



SPECIAL EXAMINATIONS 

A student justifiably absent from a final examination 
or a test given in connection with regular class work 
is permitted to take a special test without payment of 
fees with the consent of the instructor and approval 
of the Dean of the Faculty. For any other examination 
a fee must be paid at the Business Office before the 
examination is taken, and the proper receipt must be 
presented to the instructor at the time of the exami- 
nation. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Letter grades given and their equivalents in quality 
points are: 



A 


4.00 


A- 


3.75 


B + 


3.25 


B 


3.00 


B- 


2.75 


C + 


2.25 



C 


2.00 


c- 


1.75 


D + 


1.25 


D 


1.00 


D- 


.75 


F 


.00 



Students are required to take at least 100 hours of 
letter-graded work. 

Grades mean: A, Excellent; B, Good; C, Satisfactory; 
D, Inferior; F, Failure. 

Other report abbreviations and their meanings are: 

Cr. Credit. No quality points. 

NCr. No-Credit. No quality points or academic pen- 
alty. 

F. Failure. No quality points; denotes work that 
is unsatisfactory. 

Con. Conditional. The student's work in the course 
is complete but somewhat deficient in quality. 
The instructor may permit this student to be 
re-examined; or, in case the course continues 
into the following semester, it may be removed 
if the student makes a grade of C or better. No 



()(', 



grade higher than D is allowed when condition 
is removed. Not more than one semester is 
granted for removal. Con. is an F until removed. 

Inc. Incomplete. Incomplete work is a result of sick- 
ness or some other justifiable reason. An in- 
complete must be removed by the end of the 
fourth week in the following semester, unless 
an extension of time is granted by the Dean of 
the Faculty. It is not possible for a student to 
remove an incomplete after 1 2 months. 

W. Withdrawn. No penalty. 

WF. Withdrawn failing. No quality points; indicates 
a course dropped with permission after the 
fifth week of the semester, with the student 
failing at the time of withdrawal. A grade of 
WF has the same effect on the student's grade- 
point average as an F. 

Any student who carries 12 hours of letter-graded 
academic work may elect to take additional work on 
a Credit-No Credit basis in courses which are not 
used for the field of concentration or the distribution 
requirement. 

A report of the scholastic standing of students is 
received at the Office of the Registrar at mid-semester 
in addition to the final semester reports. These re- 
ports are sent to the faculty advisor and to parents or 
guardian of each student. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

The classification of students is determined accord- 
ing to the following plan. For sophomore rank a stu- 
dent must have at least 25 hours of academic credit 
and 43 quality points. Admission to full junior stand- 
ing is conditioned upon the student having at least 
60 hours of academic credit and 108 quality points; 
and he must have passed the Sophomore Compre- 
hensive Examination. For senior class rank the student 




must have at least 94 hours of academic credit and 
188 quality points. 

No student is considered a candidate for the bac- 
calaureate degree until he has been granted senior 
classification, until he has filed an application to take 
the Senior Comprehensive Examination in his field of 
concentration, and until he has filed an application 
for a degree. 

PROBATION 

The term "on probation" is applied to students who 
are allowed to continue at Bethany after having failed 
to meet the standards expected by the faculty and 
administration. Students may be placed on probation 
for any of the following causes: 

1) Unsatisfactory scholastic record. The following 
academic bases will be used to determine proba- 
tion each semester: Freshmen must achieve at least 
1.7, Sophomores 1.8, and Juniors and Seniors 2.0. 

2) Unsatisfactory class attendance during the semes- 
ter or preceding semester. 

3) Unsatisfactory conduct at any time. 



67 





Probation is intended to be a warning to the stu- 
dent and to his parents or guardians that his record 
is unsatisfactory and that unless significant improve- 
ment is made he will be asked to withdraw from the 
College. At the end of a semester on probation the 
student's total record is reviewed. His continued en- 
rollment depends upon the trend of academic per- 
formance. The Committee on Academic Review may 
dismiss any student if the student is not likely to meet 
the requirements for graduation in the usual period 
of four years. An extension of the four-year period is 
granted only when there are extenuating circum- 
stances. 

Students on probation may be declared ineligible 
for participation in athletic or other student activities. 
While on probation, a student is not eligible to re- 
ceive any grant from College scholarship or loan 
funds. 



TRANSCRIPT OF RECORDS 

Students wishing transcripts of records in order to 
transfer to other schools or for other purposes should 
make application to the Registrar's Office at least one 
week before the transcript is needed. Transcripts are 
issued only at the request of the student, and official 
transcripts are sent directly to the college or univer- 
sity stipulated by the student. One transcript is fur- 
nished to each student without charge; for each 
additional transcript a fee of $1.50 is charged. When 
three or more transcripts are ordered at the same 
time, the first transcript is $1.50, whereas the others 
cost $.75 each. Fees must accompany the request. All 
financial obligations to the College must be paid be- 
fore a transcript is issued. 

CHANGES IN REGULATIONS 

The College reserves the right to amend the regula- 
tions covering the granting of degrees, the courses of 
study, and the conduct of students. Membership in 
Bethany College and the receiving of its degrees are 
privileges, not rights. The College reserves the right, 
and the students concedes to the College the right, to 
require the withdrawal of any student at any time. 

INVALIDATION OF CREDITS 

Courses completed at Bethany College or elsewhere, 
more than 10 calendar years before the date of pro- 
posed graduation, are not accepted for credit toward 
graduation. All candidates are expected to comply 
with degree requirements in effect at the time of 
acceptance of the degree application. With the ap- 
proval of the Committee on Academic Review and 
the payment of the required fee, the candidate may 
take examinations, as administered by the various de- 
partments, for courses included in the current curric- 
ulum, to re-instate academic credit that may have 
been declared invalid because of date. 



65 



BETHANY 




69 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Freshman Studies 

100 Interdisciplinary Lecture 4 hours 

The interdisciplinary lecture is an issue-centered course in which 
the interrelationship of discrete areas of human knowledge is 
emphasized. In each section a particular topic is examined by 
means of the methods and insights of the various traditional 
disciplines, but in all sections the focus is on the synthesis and 
integration of the material presented. 

Sec. 1 Nazism and the Crisis of German Faith 

After a study of the historical, philosophical, and political roots 
of German National Socialism, the course surveys the major 
tenets of Adolph Hitler and analyzes the impact of Nazism 
upon various phases of German culture (the arts, sports, edu- 
cation, home and family, the church, etc.). The student is as- 
sisted in relating the specific issues raised by Nazism to more 
general human questions concerning the meaning of suffering, 
ethical decisionmaking, personal commitment, and integrity. 
(Richard Kenney) Offered Fall 7972. 

Sec. 2 The New Religion of Technocracy 

The western world may be witnessing the emergence of a 
new religious government founded upon the belief that tech- 
nical experts are best suited to the governing of large popula- 
tions. Technocracy, as a religious force, may incorporate and 
transcend virtually all of the known disciplines. This course 
will examine those features of technocracy which are clearly 
evident in today's world and will explore their possible con- 
sequences for the future. (Stanley Becker) Offered Fall 7972 
and Spring 7973. 



Sec. 3 Prospero and Caliban: A Study of the Black Man and 
the American Dream 

This course will be an examination of the relationship between 
the Black and White cultures in America. Both primary sources 
(government documents, slave narratives, sermons, and folk 
materials) and literary reflections (essays, novels, and poems) 
will serve to document the clash of cultures in America and 
the development of an Afro-American culture. (Larry Crimes) 
Offered Spring 1973. 

111 Freshman Seminar 4 hours 

In the Freshman Seminar a small group of freshmen pursue with 
their faculty advisor an area of mutual interest. Each section 
focuses on a specific topic, providing each student with the 
opportunity to broaden and deepen his knowledge of the sub- 
ject and to develop his ability to present his ideas with clarity 
and cogency, both in speech and in writing, through discussions 
and special oral and written projects. 

Sec. 1 Comparative Life-Styles 

This seminar focuses on how men in various societies live and 
on the problems they face. It is an examination of the differ- 
ing social, economic, and political systems which have been 
developed by man and the environments in which he has 
developed them. The attempt will be made to analyze, explain, 
and predict man's behavior in societies of varying complexity. 
(Brenden D. Tempest-Mogg) 

Sec. 2 The Next Twenty Years: Disaster or Renewal? 
Will the next twenty years bring disaster to much of the world, 
or can the human and natural environments be renewed? This 
seminar examines various responses to the uncertainty of liv- 



70 



ing in modern society, including the rural commune, other 
ecological experiments, and political activity or non-activity. 
(Karl C. Garrison, jr.) 

Sec. 3 Through 2000 

What will and what will not change between 1972 and 2000? 
This course is an examination of varying forecasts and predic- 
tions which have been made concerning science and tech- 
nology, economics, ecology, and society for the remainder of 
the century and of the possible impact of various changes on 
life and culture. (7. Trevor Peirce) 

Sec. 4 Riches + Freedom = Insanity? 

This seminar is an examination of the condition of man in the 
U.S.A. Now that many people have freedom from want and a 
great deal of leisure, what have they to look forward to? Insan- 
ity; violence; destruction; holocaust; boredom; creativity; a 
better world; resurrection? (Charles E. Halt) 

Sec. 5 Mountaineers and Crabgrass 

This seminar is a study of the life of the Appalachian Moun- 
taineer through which each student will attempt to understand 
better his own cultural heritage. Each student will devote par- 
ticular attention to that aspect of life which he is most inter- 
ested in learning about in detail. (Larry Frye) 

Sec. 6 Election 72 

This seminar is a study of the 1972 national election. The stu- 
dents will analyze the election mechanism, review the 1968 
election, work in the 1972 election, predict the results of the 
1972 election, and then analyze its outcome. Finally the Amer- 
ican electoral system will be evaluated. (John W. Lozier) 

Sec. 7 Learning Politics by Politicking 

This seminar will focus on learning, applying, and evaluating 
the basic techniques of the modern political campaign at the 
local level. Each student will spend at least one-half day per 
week working in a planned political campaign. He will study 
population, analyze issues, and plan, organize, and evaluate 
a campaign. The course will conclude with a personal and 
ethical evaluation of the experience. (Hiram j. Lester) 

Sec. 8 A Study of Peace 

This course is a study of the meaning of the word peace and 
of the relationships among violence, non-violence, and peace 
in the Bible, Ghandi, and Martin Luther King. Also considered 
are the political and religious aspects of the modern peace 
movement and the roles of students and the church in decid- 
ing questions of war and peace, (jerry Folk) 

Sec. 9 Debating Public Policy Issues 

This course will consider the recent and current national col- 
legiate debate resolutions. Students will study debate theory, 



conduct library research, prepare briefs, and engage in formal 
debates. (Ronald A. Ward) 

Sec. 10 Straight and Crooked Thinking 

This seminar is an examination of the language of the written 
and electronic media (newspapers, films, radio, and T.V.) and 
of its impact on the public. Included will be critical analysis of 
verbal "tricks" and techniques of separating fact from opinion. 
"Truth in advertising" and the credibility gap between pro- 
ducer and consumer will be considered. (Marjorie T. Carty) 

Sec. 11 The Scientific Attitude 

This course is an introduction to scientific thought processes 
and analyses. The principles of empiricism, determinism, and 
parsimony will be examined. The processes of drawing con- 
clusions from data will be studied. (M. Cynthia Lorr) 

Sec. 12 Sensitivity to the Natural World 

This seminar is an introduction to the natural world based 
upon the observation of plants and animals in their natural 
settings. All sessions will be held outdoors at Bethany and at 
several nearby sites. (Albert R. Buckelew, jr.) 

Sec. 13 Environmental Problems in Today's Society 

This seminar is an examination of current environmental prob- 
lems. The effects of urbanization, population growth, techno- 
logical development, and energy production will be discussed, 
with emphasis on the technological, economic, and legal reali- 
ties. (Richard Stebbins) 

Sec. 14 Energy for Everybody 

The flow of energy, energy resources, and the economic geog- 
raphy of energy will be considered in this seminar. The course 
will stress man's uses of energy, with the student examining 
the utilization of energy by differing cultures, the economic, 
social, and environmental problems resulting from the growing 
need for energy, and decision-making in the production of 
power. (John Daniel Draper) 

Sec. 15 Concepts and Consequences: Man, God, and Freedom 
in Science Fiction 

Fiction is a form of entertainment, but it can also enable us to 
"see" better ourselves and our world. This seminar is an ex- 
ploration, through Science Fiction, of the possibilities of the 
present and future by examining the concepts of man, society, 
world-view, hope-fate, and God, and understanding the in- 
fluence of the consequences of these concepts upon our own 
realities. (Robert E. Myers) 

Sec. 16 King Arthur: Past and Present 

For centuries the legends of King Arthur have fascinated writ- 



77 



ers of poetry, drama, and fiction. This seminar is an examina- 
tion of the ways in which such British and American authors as 
Malory, Tennyson, Mark Twain, C. S. Lewis, and T. H. White 
have used the legend in their works. (Helen Louise McCuffie) 

Sec. 17 Greek Myth and Modern Drama 

This course is a comparison of Greek myth as treated by the 
ancient dramatists and by dramatists of the twentieth century. 
The social and psychological influences on each dramatist will 
be considered, and the contribution of each dramatist to the 
development of the myth will be assessed. (Steve Rader) 

Sec. 18 Modern Drama: the Static and the Dynamic 

Life as absurdity, life as stasis, life as a trap, life as a repetition 
of the past, and life as a social struggle: these diverse outlooks 
are held by modern dramatists. This seminar will examine the 
origins and patterns of dramatic expression from the late nine- 
teenth century to the present. Emphasis will be placed upon 
the literary and performance values of the modern plays. 
(David J. Judy) 

Sec. 19 A World of Nightmare: America in the Contemporary 
Novel 

Among the important American writers of the last decade are 
a group of novelists whose vision of America is a vision of a 
nightmare — a world of irrationality, a world of meaningless- 
ness, a world of terror. This seminar is an examination of 
America as presented by some of these novelists, including 
John Hawkes, Kurt Vonnegut, James Dickey, Jerzy Kosinski, 
John Barth, and Thomas Pynchon. (Anthony L. Mitch) 

Sec. 20 Human Reality in Experimental Fiction 

This seminar is an expedition to capture the Look and the 
Voice of Human Reality. The equipment is the anti-novels of 
John Barth, Donald Barthelme, Gunter Grass, John Hawkes, 
Jerzy Kosinski, Alain Robbe-Grillet, and Nathalie Sarraute. 
(Gary L. Garrison) 

Sec. 21 The Politics of Poetry 

This seminar is a study of language as a basic structure of 
meaning in society. The poet's exploitation of language, his 
capacity to shape this vehicle of social reality, and his ability 
to create new structures of meaning will be examined through 
a study of poetry, prose, and the electronic media. Special em- 
phasis will be placed on the "poetry" of the 1972 presidential 
campaign. (Larry E. Crimes) 

Sec. 22 Man in Community (You and I) 

This seminar is a study of the ways in which people interact. 
Diverse community groupings (primitive tribes, social organi- 
zations, political jurisdictions, kibbutzim, therapy groups, 
families, etc.) will provide the experiences for the study. The 



seminar itself may become the chief laboratory group. 
(William B. Allen) 

Sec. 23 Understanding Ourselves and Others 

The purpose of this seminar is for the student to achieve an 
awareness of how and why he behaves as he does and how he 
influences and is influenced by others. (Margaret Mathison) 

Sec. 24 Introduction to Yourself 

This seminar is an inquiry into the purpose and potential of 
the individual. Through the analysis and discussion of his read- 
ings the student will endeavor to cultivate an understanding of 
the qualities necessary for self-esteem and success as a student 
and as a citizen in modern society. (Harold O'Leary) 

Sec. 25 East Meets West: India Comes to the USA 

This seminar is a survey of the major ways in which Hinduism 
and Buddhism have influenced American culture and religion 
during the past decade. The course examines why, where, and 
how this influence has been potent. Students will develop pos- 
sible forms of a "new American religion" based on both Indian 
and Biblical forms. (Richard B. Kenney) 




72 




Art 



students to be evaluated along with other work once 
a year. Prerequisites must be observed unless the 
student can show evidence of equivalent disciplines. 
The Bethany College Art Department reserves the 
right to retain permanently one work from each stu- 
dent in each class. Other works may be held tem- 
porarily for use in specific exhibitions and will be 
available to owners no later than one year after the 
lending date. 

Art 200 Design Studio 4 hours 

Basic course work in the theories and practice of two- and three- 
dimensional design; study of the elements and materials in rela- 
tion to design potentials with practical application. 

Art 205 Drawing I 4 hours 

Concentrated activity in academic drawing using a variety of 

drawing media. Primary emphasis will be placed on still life, 
landscape, and the human form. 



AIMS 

To provide a balanced background for students who 
wish to pursue a career and/or advanced study in 
Art; to prepare students for teaching or supervising 
art on either the elementary or secondary level; to 
combine Art with academic studies as a broad basis 
for liberal education on the college level; and to pro- 
vide an atmosphere in which the student is encour- 
aged to acquire standards for the evaluation, practice 
and appreciation, and application of the plastic arts. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 

CONCENTRATION 

The minimum requirement for a major in Art is forty 

semester hours including Design Studio, Drawing I 

and II, Painting I, Sculpture I, Senior Project, and 

Senior Seminar. At least ten credit hours must be in 

art history courses. A sketch book is required of all 



Art 210 Ceramics I 4 hours 

Studio experiences in forming, firing, and glazing pottery, includ- 
ing ceramic sculpture. Individual projects according to student's 
ability. 

Art 305 Drawing II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by the 
student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Draw- 
ing I. 

Art 310 Ceramics II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by 
the student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Ce- 
ramics I. 

Art 315 Painting I 4 hours 

Creative exploration into the techniques of watercolor, acrylics, 
oil, and mixed media. Basic preparation of materials, framing, 
and matting will be included. Prerequisite: Design Studio or 
consent of head of department. 



73 



Art 320 Sculpture I 4 hours 

Creative expression in three-dimensional forms. Students will 
work with materials that are readily available and easily handled, 
such as wood, wire, plaster, and clay. Prerequisite: Design Stu- 
dio or consent oi head of department. 

Art 325 Graphics I 4 hours 

An introduction of print-making processes emphasizing creative 
expression through such techniques as relief, intaglio, piano- 
graphic, and serigraphy. Prerequisite: Drawing I or consent of 
head of department. 

Art 340 Art Activities in the 

Elementary School 2 hours 

A study of the theories and goals of art education in the elemen- 
tary school with emphasis on the child's growth and development 
through art. Exploration of art techniques will be included. 



Art 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Art 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 

Begins during the second semester of the junior year. 

Art History 

The following courses are surveys, intended to introduce stu- 
dents to a variety of artistic achievements, and to discuss selected 
artists, their methods, media, and contributions, against the con- 
text of their time. The continuity of artistic development will be 
stressed. 

Art 351 Art History I The Ancient World 2 hours 
Beginning with an introduction to paleolithic art, this half-term 
course will concentrate on the art of the Ancient Near East, 
Egypt, Classic Greece, and Rome. Alternate years: Fall 1972-73 
1st eight weeks. 



Art 415 Painting II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by the 
student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Paint- 
ing I. 

Art 420 Sculpture II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by the 
student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Sculp- 
ture I. 

Art 425 Graphics II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by the 
student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Graph- 
ics I. 

Art 478 Senior Seminar in Art 2 hours 

Required of all students concentrating in the field. A survey of 
Art for review and interpretation of the particular problems of 
this field. 

Art 480 Teaching of Art in the 

Secondary School 4 hours 

Problems in the teaching and administration of art programs. 



Art 352 Art History II 

Medieval and Renaissance Art 2 hours 

This course will cover Early Christian and Byzantine art, the 
architectual achievements of the Middle Ages, and the advanced 
painting styles of the Italian and Northern Renaissance. Alter- 
nate years: Fall 1972-73 2nd eight weeks. 



Art 353 Art History III 

Western Art from 1500 to 1800 



2 hours 



The course concentrates on the increasing momentum achieved 
by artistic experimentations in painting, architecture, and sculp- 
ture, progressing from the High Renaissance, Mannerism, and 
Baroque, through Rococo and Neo-Classicism. The contributions 
of such significant artists as Michelangelo, Bernini, Velasquez, 
Rubens, and J.L. David will be discussed. Alternate years: Spring 
1972-73 1st eight weeks. 

Art 354 Art History IV Western Art from 

1800 to the Present 2 hours 

This course will cover such important schools and movements 
as Romanticism, the English landscape school, Impressionism, 
Cubism, Art Nouveau, and Surrealism. Painting, sculpture, and 
architecture will be treated. Alternate years: Spring 1972-73 2nd 
eight weeks. 



74 



Art 355 Art History V Asian Art History 2 hours 

An introduction to the arts of China, Japan, and India, with 
some reference to Islamic art. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Art 356 Art History VI U. S. Art 2 hours 

A survey of the development of the arts in the U. S. from Colo- 
nial times to the present, with emphasis upon the evolution of 
style in architecture, sculpture, and painting. Alternate years: 
1973-74. 



Art 358 Art History VII 

Art History Seminar 2 hours 

A seminar course dealing with specific aspects of the history of 
art for individual investigation, which will also include methods 
of research. Topics for study will be chosen by the students 
with the approval of the instructor. The course involves spe- 
cialized and selected readings in the field and individual and 
group discussions. Prerequisite: 4 or more semester hours of 
art history. Alternate years 1973-74. 



Biology 




AIMS 

To acquaint the student with the living world around 
him and with basic life processes; to demonstrate the 
scientific methods as an approach to problem solv- 
ing; to cultivate an appreciation of research; to de- 
velop laboratory skill in various types of work in 
biology; to train students as teachers of biology and 
for certain professional work related to this field, and 
to help man find and appreciate his role in the natural 
environment. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of 32 semester hours in the Department 
of Biology including the Senior Project, and a mini- 
mum of 12 semester hours in chemistry, at least 6 of 
which are organic chemistry. Six hours of physics is 
also required. German or French is recommended 
for those students going on to graduate school. A 
semester of calculus is also strongly recommended. 

Students who plan to teach or become professional 
biologists should elect the following sequence of 
courses: Biology 201, 228, 303, 326, 338, 343, 365, 
367, 425, 442, and 490. 

Students preparing for work in medicine, dentistry, 
nursing or as laboratory technicians should elect the 
following sequence of courses: Biology 201, 303, 343, 
367, 442, and 490. 

The sequence of courses is subject to approval of 
the Department Chairman. 



75 



Biol. 100-110 Topics in General Biology 

Biology majors may elect up to 8 hours of these topics to be 
considered toward the required number of hours for the Field 
of Concentration. Biology 105, First Aid as Related to the Prin- 
ciples of Biology, may not be counted for the college distribu- 
tion requirement. 

Biol. 100 Organ Systems of Vertebrates 2 hours 

An examination of the fundamental structures of mammals — 
including man — and their functions. Systems: skeletal, in- 
tegument, digestive, circulatory, urogenital, and nervous. Lab- 
oratories will utilize the fetal pig and frog for dissection, com- 
paring them to human systems. Alternate years: Fall 1972-73 
1st eight weeks. 

Biol. 101 Animal Diversity 2 hours 

An examination of the animal kingdom with emphasis placed 
on the adaptation of the organism. Various systems will be 
studied as to possible methods of evolving through adaptation. 
Topics to be covered are food getting, locomotion, repro- 
duction, breathing, circulation, waste removal, and control of 
the organism. Laboratories will use various organisms each 
week to observe the various adaptation. Alternate years: Fall 
1972-73 2nd eight weeks. 

Biol. 102 Horticultural Science 2 hours 

To examine the scientific concepts on which horticulture is 
based. The plant, being the basis of all horticultural activities, 
will be the main emphasis. Topics to be covered are classifica- 
tion of horticultural plants, structures and functions of the 
various parts of the plants, control of the plant environment, 
plant growth, and mechanisms of propagation. Most of the 
laboratory work will be done in the greenhouse since this 
course will be offered in February and March. Alternate years: 
Spring 1972-73 1st eight weeks. 

Biol. 103 Conservation of Natural Resources 2 hours 

A study of the rational use of natural resources. Emphasis will 
be placed on the study of current legislation on local, state 
and federal levels. Topics to be studied are soil (physical prob- 
lems and human problems), water (water cycle, industrial pur- 
poses, agricultural, recreational), atmosphere, biological 
resources (forests, grasslands, animals, fisheries), minerals, 
metals, non-metals, and recreation. Laboratories will consist 
of field trips and work in the laboratory. Alternate years: 
Spring 1972-73 2nd eight weeks. 

Biol. 104 A Survey of the Plant Kingdom 2 hours 

The major areas of study will focus on the Algae, Fungi, and 
Bryophytes. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolution 



of the plant kingdom. 
eight weeks. 



Alternate years: Spring 1973-74 1st 



Biol. 105 First Aid as Related to the 

Principles of Biology 2 hours 

Major emphasis will be placed on the biological principles that 
are utilized in the standard and advanced first aid courses of 
the American Red Cross. Red Cross certificates may be earned 
by those passing the examination. Opportunity for instructors 
certificates will be presented as an option at the end of the 
course. 

Credit for this course will not be counted toward the college 
distribution requirement. Not offered in 1972-73. 



Biol. 167 Introduction to Mammalian 
Anatomy and Physiology 



4 hours 



Mammalian anatomy as exemplified in the cat. Discussion and 
study of the functioning of the tissues and organ systems of the 
human body. Laboratory study of the anatomy of the cat, and 
human physiology. Discussions, demonstrations, and individual 
laboratory work. Not open to biology majors. 



Biol. 169 



Introduction to 
Computer Science 



2 hours 



An introduction to computer programming and computer de- 
sign. Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in 
solving problems encountered in biology. 

Biol. 201 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 4 hours 
Comparative anatomy of the representative forms of vertebrates; 
laboratory study of the comparative anatomy of the shark, other 
lower vertebrates, and the cat. 

Biol. 210 Evolution 2 hours 

The evidence for the theories of evolution with special attention 
to the modern synthesis of genetics and ecological factors. Pre- 
requisite: An elementary course in biology or permission of the 
instructor. Offered Spring 1973-74 1st eight weeks. 

Biol. 228 Field Botany 2 hours 

An introduction to the taxonomy of vascular plants with em- 
phasis on the local flora, including the techniques of herbarium 
science. Offered in 1973-74. 



76 



Biol. 230-S Methods in Environmental 
Education 



2 hours 



An introduction to the materials and methods of environmental 
science for elementary and junior high school teachers, and 
camp leaders. Basic techniques in field biology and man's re- 
lationship to the natural world are emphasized. Part of the 
course is conducted at a mountain camp. Summer session only. 



Biol. 231 Ornithology 

Anatomy, behavior and identification of birds. 
1973-74. 



2 hours 

Offered Spring 



Biol. 303 General Genetics 4 hours 

A synthesis of basic principles and modern molecular theory. 
Facility with simple mathematics is highly desirable. 

Biol. 326 Ecology 4 hours 

A study of the general principles of bioecology of plants and 
animals. Considerable time will be spent in one field. Special 
emphasis will be placed on field study of several communities. 



Biol. 330-S 330-J Urban Ecology 



2 hours 



This course encompasses major areas of environmental quality 
management. Water pollution, air pollution, solid-wastes dis- 
posal, noise pollution and housing regulations are the major 
areas that are covered. In addition to the classroom experience 
there are several field trips to local areas of environmental 
interest. Summer session and January term only. 

Biol. 338 Advanced Botany 4 hours 

The morphology of the vascular plants together with a study of 
the fundamental life processes of plants; growth, irritability, 
nutrition, metabolism, and hormonal control. 

Biol. 343 Bacteriology 4 hours 

Morphology and physiology of bacteria; principles of laboratory 
technique; cultural characteristics and environment influences 
on bacterial growth. 

Biol. 365 Invertebrate Zoology 4 hours 

The invertebrate animals including phylogeny and morphology. 



A laboratory study of representative forms of invertebrates will 
be made. Offered in 1973-74. 

Biol. 367 Cell Physiology and Biochemistry 4 hours 

An introduction to the structural organization of cells and the 
important aspects of cell physiology in the light of modern bio- 
chemistry and biophysics. 



Biol. 399-400 Junior Seminar 



1 hour each 



Biol. 425 Animal Physiology 4 hours 

Structure and functions of the human body; the mechanism of 
bodily movements, responses, reactions, and various physio- 
logical states. Offered in 1973-74. 

Biol. 440 Histology 2 hours 

Structure of the cell and its modification into various tissues. 

Biol. 441 Microtechniques 2 hours 

The theory and practice of general histological techniques. 

Biol. 442 Vertebrate Embryology 4 hours 

Development of the tissues and organs in vertebrates; embryos 
of chick and pig studied in the laboratory. 

Biol. 451 Special Area Studies 2 or 4 hours 

When adequately trained faculty and sufficient student demand 
arises, the Department will organize and offer courses in a 
special area not covered in regular course offerings. Not offered 
in 1972-73. 



Biol. 477-478 Senior Seminar 



1 hour each 



Biol. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical and Life 
Sciences 4 hours 

(See General Sciences 480) 

Biol. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Biol. 490 Senior Project 8 hours 

The Senior Project will start the first semester of the junior year 
and be completed in the spring semester of the senior year. 



77 



Chemistry 



AIMS 

To contribute to the student's general knowledge, his 
understanding of the nature of the physical world 
and his understanding of the place of chemistry in 
industrial and business life; to provide experience in 
the scientific method of reasoning; and to provide 
students concentrating in this field with a thorough 
and practical education in chemistry which may be 
useful in industrial, technical and graduate work. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of 38 hours in this Department including 
Chemistry 101, 102, 210, 301, 302, 439, 440 and the 
Senior Project (Chem. 490). Mathematics 201, 202, 
also 203 or 350; Physics 101, 102; German or French 
through the 102 level plus two hours in translation 
of the respective language. The sequence of courses 
is subject to the approval of the Department Chair- 
man. All courses in chemistry as well as the indicated 
courses in mathematics and physics must be taken 
for a letter grade. 

A course of study designed to conform to the 
American Chemical Society standards is required for 
those students who plan to become professional 
chemists or plan to enter graduate work in chemistry. 
Under this plan, in addition to the mathematics and 
physics requirements listed above, a total of 11 
chemistry courses must be taken. In addition to the 
above mentioned chemistry courses these required 
courses must include Chemistry 450 and 454. German 
must be elected as the foreign language. Additional 
courses in mathematics are strongly recommended. 
In addition to the German, a year of French is strongly 



recommended for those students planning to do 
graduate work. Among the electives, at least 4 
courses, exclusive of English and modern languages, 
are required in the humanities. 

The entering freshman who is interested in chem- 
istry should be sure to select Chemistry 101 and 
mathematics at the appropriate level. Programs for 
subsequent semesters must be decided in conference 
with the faculty advisor for chemistry. 

Chem. 101 General Chemistry and 

Inorganic Qualitative Analysis 4 hours 

A study of theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry. The 
laboratory work is primarily a study of the principles and prac- 
tice of a systematic qualitative scheme of analysis for the cations 
and anions. Prerequisites: two units of mathematics or concur- 
rently with Math 103. Three lectures and three hours oi labora- 
tory per week. 

Chem. 102 General Chemistry 4 hours 

A continuation of the lecture portion of Chemistry 101. The 
laboratory work consists of selected experiments in basic chem- 
ical principles and quantitative procedures. Three lectures and 
three hours of laboratory per week. 



Chem. 169 Introduction to 

Computer Science 



2 hours 



An introduction to computer programming and computer design. 
Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in solving 
problems encountered in chemistry. 

Chem. 210 Quantitative Analysis 4 hours 

An introduction to the theory and practice of volumetric, gravi- 
metric and colorimetric techniques. Prerequisites: Chem. 101, 
102 or permission of the instructor. Two lectures and six hours 
of laboratory per week. 

Chem. 301-302 Organic Chemistry 4 hours each 
An introduction to the study of the organic compounds of car- 
bon, both aliphatic and aromatic, involving a considerable 



78 



amount of the electronic mechanisms of organic reactions. The 
laboratory work consists largely of organic preparations. Pre- 
requisites: Chem. 101, 102. Three lectures and three hours of 
laboratory per week. 

Chem. 439-440 Physical Chemistry 4 hours each 
A study of theoretical chemistry including the following topics: 
gaseous state, atomic and molecular forces, crystalline state, 
physical properties and molecular structure, thermochemistry, 
thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, phase diagrams, chemical 
kinetics, conductance, electromotive force, ionic equilibria. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 301-302; Physics 101-102 and Mathematics 
203 or 350; or permission of the instructor. Three lectures and 
three hours of laboratory per week. 

Chem. 442 Advanced Organic 

Preparations 2 hours 

Organic syntheses, individually assigned, of an advanced nature. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 301-302. Six hours of laboratory per week. 

Chem. 450 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 hours 

The chemistry of certain elements and their compounds is stud- 
ied and interpreted on the basis of modern theories of atomic 
and molecular structure. A necessary foundation in quantum 
mechanics is also presented. Prerequisite: Chem. 439. Four 
hours of lecture per week. 

Chem. 454 Analytical Chemistry 4 hours 

The theory and practice of analytical chemistry with emphasis 
on instrumental methods of analysis. Prerequisites: Chem. 210, 
Chem. 439-440. Chem. 440 may be taken concurrently. Two 
lectures and six hours of laboratory per week. 

Chem. 460 Advanced Organic Chemistry 4 hours 

The study of selected advanced topics in organic chemistry in- 
cluding reaction mechanisms. Laboratory will be introduced, 
where appropriate, and will stress the use of instrumentation. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 301-302. Four hours of lecture per week, 
or three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. 

Chem. 462 Physical Organic Chemistry 2 hours 
The study of the theories and techniques relating structure and 



properties of organic compounds. Prerequisites: Chem. 301-302; 
Chem. 439-440; or permission of the instructor. Two hours of 
lecture per week. 

Chem. 473-474 Advanced Physical 

Chemistry 2 hours each 

Selected topics of an advanced nature in the area of Physical 
Chemistry. Prerequisites: Chemistry 439-440. Two hours of lec- 
ture per week. 

Chem. 477-478 Seminar in Chemistry 1 hour each 

Presentation of current research topics by students, faculty, and 
visiting lecturers. 

Chem. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical & Life 
Sciences 4 hours 

(See General Sciences 480) 



Chem. 487-488 Independent 
Study 



2 or 4 hours each 





79 



Chem. 490 Senior Project 4-8 hours 

During the junior year the chemistry major will be introduced 
to the methods of employing the chemical literature, will select 
a topic for advanced investigation and will make a literature 
search of background material as a basis for an in-depth study 
in this area. There will be one class meeting each week for both 
semesters. Following this preliminary work, an investigation of 
a significant topic in chemistry will be made by each student 
under the direction of a faculty member in the Department. 
This work will culminate in a written and oral report at the end 
of the senior year. 



Comm. 101 Introduction to Mass 

Communications 4 hours 

History and functions of mass communications. Role of news- 
papers, magazines, radio, television, books, movies, feature syn- 
dicates, wire services and adjunct agencies in modern society. 

Comm. 201 Reporting 4 hours 

Theory and techniques of writing news stories for print and 
electronic media, syndicates and wire services. Lab practice in 
writing objective, interpretative and editorial articles. 



Communications 

AIMS 

The objectives of the Department of Communica- 
tions are to help students integrate oral and written 
forms of communication; to encourage the develop- 
ment of logical thought processes across disciplines; 
and to aid students in the development of a personal 
theory of communication. They are designed to pro- 
vide theoretical and practical preparation for stu- 
dents desiring to do radio, television, newspaper, 
magazine, book publishing assignments, free lance 
writing, public relations or advertising counseling, 
direction of high school, college or industrial publi- 
cations, or teaching of speech and journalism. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

Communications 101, 201, 202, 203, 375, 403, 435-6, 
and a Senior Project (Comm. 490). Normally students 
would take 101 in first year, 201-202 in second year, 
and 375, 403, and 435-6 in third or fourth years dur- 
ing regular semesters, the January term, or summer 
sessions. Twelve hours in English are also required 
and proficiency in reading a foreign language. Rec- 
ommended for potential graduate students: Statistics. 



Comm. 202 Copy Editing and Layout 4 hours 

Principles and practice in editing copy for publication; includes 
typography, layout, and design of letterpress and offset news- 
papers. 

Comm. 203 Interpersonal Communication: 

Speech 4 hours 

Relationship of oral and non-verbal communication and thought. 
Stress on performance in speech and in creative listening. Analysis 
and delivery of speeches. Individual evaluations of performance. 

Comm. 205 Advanced Interpersonal 

Communication: Speech 2 hours 

Speeches and oral interpretation specially adapted to individual 
student needs and interests. Debate. Creative dialogue. Com- 
mittee meetings. 

Comm. 206 Features 4 hours 

Role of human interest approach in writings for print and elec- 
tronic media, advertising and public relations media. Practice 
in writing short and longer process, profile, personal experience, 
collective and think pieces for professional journals and mass 
audience media. 

Comm. 301 Principles of Advertising 4 hours 

Study of history, philosophies, principles of advertising, media, 
markets, merchandising. Role and evaluation of advertising. Stress 
on copy writing and layout. Lectures, lab. 



80 



Comm. 302 Principles of Public Relations 4 hours 

Contributions and criticisms of public relations. History, philoso- 
phies, trends, principles. Case studies of institutional programs. 
Preparation of a creative project, such as a trade journal. Theory 
and lab. 



Comm. 402 Public Opinion 4 hours 

Nature, significance, and principles of public opinion. Relation- 
ship of politics, culture, media and other basic institutions to 
public opinion. Project in content analysis. Participation in a 
public opinion poll in the Upper Ohio Valley. 



Comm. 335 School Publications 2 hours 

A practical course in which class members will do reporting, 
editing and layout work for the Bethany Tower. Editorial and 
design problems of college yearbook and literary journals will 
also be considered, with the Bethanian and Harbinger serving 
as examination pieces. (Credit-No Credit) 



Comm. 403 Reading and Research in the 

Foreign Press 2 or 4 hours 

Selected readings, content analysis and other research in peri- 
odicals of one foreign language area. Prerequisite: Proficiency 
in reading a foreign language. Generally a junior or senior course. 



Comm. 375 Introduction to Radio and 

Television 4 hours 

History, trends, contributions and criticisms and challenges of the 
electronic media in American Culture. 



Comm. 376 Educational and Public 

Broadcasting 2 hours 

Lecture and lab course utilizing the facilities of WVBC-FM to 
present the history, goals, and trends of public broadcasting. 
To encourage and assist students in preparing creative formats 
for the programming of documentaries, interviews, historical 
dramas, investigative and interpretative news coverage and cul- 
tural events. (Credit-No Credit) 



Comm. 435-6 Internship in Mass 

Communications: 

Practicum 2 hours each 

On-the-job experience in the print or electronic media or ad- 
junct agencies through intern positions at tri-state area radio 
and television stations, advertising agencies, and public rela- 
tions/promotion departments of agencies or industrial, govern- 
ment, or non-profit firms. First or second semester internships 
require that the student set aside one day a week to devote to 
his work position. Students will work five days a week on such 
intern programs during the January or summer sessions. Pre- 
requisites: Comm. 201 and 202 for all assignments; also 375 for 
electronic media; 301 for advertising position; and 302 for public 
relations work. 



Comm. 377 The Performing Arts in 

Radio and Television 2 hours 

A studio course utilizing specific exercises designed to develop 
individual style in camera and microphone techniques. Useful 
to all students of the performing arts as well as those desiring 
a career in radio and/or TV announcing, acting, and singing. 



Comm. 401 History of Journalism 4 hours 

History of newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and books 
in the U. S., Europe, Asia, Latin America and Africa. Role of press 
in developed and developing nations. Alternate years: 1973-74. 



Comm. 480 Methods and Materials of 

Teaching Communications 2 hours 

Subjects will include the methods and materials of teaching com- 
munications, photo-journalism, and specialized reporting. 



Comm. 487-488 Independent 

Study 2 or 4 hours each 



Comm. 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 



Economics and Business 



AIMS 

The aims of the Economics and Business Department 
are to help students understand how man's struggle 
to provide tor his needs and wants in a world of 
limited resources is related to all of man's problems: 
personal, social, political and spiritual; to provide 
knowledge of utilization of economic tools of analy- 
sis; and to direct students in the application of 
economic princples to the problems of society. The 
courses offered serve as a basis for work in business, 
government, specialized journalism, law, environ- 
mental planning and graduate study. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

Including the Senior Seminar and/or Senior Project a 
minimum of 28 hours in the Department is required. 
The following are the core courses: Econ. 200, 265 
(freshman-sophomore years), Econ. 301, 302 (junior 
year), Econ. 401, 477, 490 (senior year). Requirements 
outside the Department: Statistics 381 and Calculus 
201 by the beginning of the junior year. A student 
must attain a grade of at least "C" in Econ. 200 or 
have the approval of the Department Chairman be- 
fore he may enter the field of Economics. 



Economics 151 Personal Finance I 2 hours 

The basic objectives of this course are to develop an under- 
standing of the concepts needed for intelligent consumer de- 
cision making. The course will concentrate on budget policies, 
borrowing, installment buying, marketing techniques, and con- 
sumer purchases in the area of food, clothing, automobiles and 
housing. 



P ^3 



87 




Economics 152 Personal Finance II 2 hours 

Emphasis will be placed on estate building concentrating on 

social insurance, personal insurance, pension programs, invest- 
ment markets and legal aspects of wills. 

Economics 151 and 152 — Special note: This is a service course 
for personal use and cannot be used to satisfy requirements for 
a Field of Concentration nor can it be used as a general distribu- 
tion requirement in economics and business for the social sci- 
ence division. 

Economics 169 Introduction to 

Computer Sciences 2 hours 

Designed to help the student understand the use of a computer 
as a tool in applying economic analysis and business knowledge. 
Computer terminals are used with "Computer Basic" to give 
introductory know-how. 



82 



Economics 200 Principles of Economics 4 hours 

An introduction to the inevitable problems which are associated 
with scarcity. Alternative methods of settling economic questions 
are discussed, with special emphasis placed on the functioning 
of the market system. Pricing, output determination, monopoly 
power, wage controls and price fixing are all discussed in relation 
to contemporary issues. The student is also introduced to prob- 
lems of money and banking, growth, the labor movement, and 
business operations. Students will read broadly from non- 
technical literature as well as use conventional text materials. 
This course is a prerequisite for all other economic courses 
with the exception of Economics 151. 

Economics 204 Contemporary 

Economic Issues 2 hours 

This is a practical follow-up to the basic principles course and 
allows majors and non-majors to pursue aspects of basic eco- 
nomics further through application to current problems. Topics 
such as Appalachian poverty, water and air pollution, urban 
renewal, tax reforms, inflation, etc. will be studied. Each stu- 
dent's topic must be approved by the supervising instructor. 
Prerequisite: Economics 200. 



manufacturing costs through budgeting; flow of funds; tax con- 
siderations in business decisions, etc. 

Economics 301-302 Intermediate 

Economic Theory 4 hours each 

An advanced survey of the elements of economic theory pri- 
marily for students concentrating in Economics. First semester: 
resource allocation, price determination, output determination, 
and income distribution under various market conditions. Second 
semester: a study of national income and employment deter- 
mination, inflation growth and economic stability, interwoven 
with mathematical analysis & model building. 

These courses are designed to introduce the student to the 
techniques of differential and integral calculus, linear equations, 
matrix algebra, and statistics as applied to the above analysis. 
Prerequisites: Economics 200, Statistics 381, and Calculus 201 . 

Economics 320 Principles of Marketing 4 hours 

The marketing function of the manufacturer, wholesaler, jobber, 
retailer, mail-order house, chain store and other marketing insti- 
tutions; cost of distribution; problems of marketing management 
and planning; modern trends in marketing will all be discussed. 



Economics 205 Contemporary 

Economic Studies 2 hours 

A special study on a major problem with either a case study and/ 
or field study reported on, either in a paper or oral presentation, 
or both. Each student's study must be approved by the super- 
vising instructor. Prerequisite: Economics 200. 

Economics 265 Principles of Accounting 4 hours 

An introduction to basic accounting and business concepts; 
principles of recording business transactions; cash record and 
control; periodic adjustments of transaction data; financial state- 
ment presentation; payroll accounting; accounting and reporting 
principles of partnerships; corporations, branches, and depart- 
ments. 

Economics 266 Principles of Accounting 4 hours 

Basic cost accounting principles including job cost and process 
cost systems; interpretation of financial statements; control of 



Economics 321 Management 



4 hours 



Sources, types, and uses of economic information in business 
and industry, development of the management point of view, 
use of related disciplines in problem analysis and decision mak- 
ing. Prerequisite: Economics 200. 

Economics 324 Business Finance 4 hours 

The study of the corporate organization and the planning of 
financial requirements. An intensive look at cash flow, budgeting, 
capital decisions, internal financing, and corporate reorganization. 

Economics 333 Labor 4 hours 

A general course in labor economics with an emphasis on trade 
unionism; history and objectives of organized labor; employ- 
ment and wage theory; managerial labor policies, collective bar- 
gaining; current social, economic, and political aspects of labor 
management relations; labor law; and case studies utilizing out- 
side consultants. Prerequisite: Economics 200. 



83 



Economics 334 International Trade 4 hours 

The principles of international trade and finance and their appli- 
cation to the modern world; the theory of comparative advan- 
tage; exchange rates, monetary standards, tariffs, quotas, and 
commercial policy; capital movements; aid to less developed 
countries; geographic origin and direction of trade routes and 
products. Prerequisite: Economics 200. 

Economics 399 junior Seminar 2 hours 

The creative ability of the students and faculty together will 
determine the varied content of the Junior Seminar. It is intended 
as an opportunity for discovery in areas of economics which 
may be of special interest, current importance or vital need to 
majors or those in fields related to economics or business. 



Economics 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 

Devoted to a review of economics as a discipline today. Its 
function and place in the modern world with particular attention 
to political economy of the day. Also personal guidance with 
basic research on the Senior Seminar paper or paper topics. 
{Note: A student may elect to do a major Senior Project (Econ. 
490) evaluated at 4-8 hours credit in lieu of Senior Seminar and 
two credit Senior Project.) 



Economics 487-488 Independent 

Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Only by approval of the supervising instructor and the Chairman 
of the Economics Department. 



Economics 401 Money, Banking, and 

Fiscal Policy 4 hours 

A study of the various money markets; the operation of com- 
mercial banks, Federal Reserve System, and the Treasury Depart- 
ment including an analysis of tax revenues, expenditures and 
debt financing. Prerequisites: Economics 200, 265. 



Economics 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 

Preparation for the final oral reports on Senior Projects and the 
presentations. Some time will also be devoted to basic review 
of outlines for senior comprehensives. 



Economics 441 Economic Thought 2 hours 

Outstanding writers and ideas beginning with Adam Smith are 
explored for the basic ideas which underlie capitalism, socialism 
and communism as theories. No prerequisite. 



Education 



Economics 442 Comparative Economic 

Systems 2 hours 

Basic approaches to economic theories as applied in such actual 
systems in the Soviet Union, Scandinavian countries, Great Brit- 
ain, and the United States will be examined. Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 200 or Economics 441. 

Economics 443 Contemporary 

Economic Thought 2 hours 

A study of contemporary challenges to conventional economic 
wisdom and basic disagreements within conventional economic 
thought. Prerequisite: Economics 200 or permission of the in- 
structor. May be taken concurrently with either Economics 441 
or Economics 442. 



AIMS 

To provide, in conjunction with other academic de- 
partments, balanced programs of preparation for ele- 
mentary and secondary teaching based on a thorough 
background in the liberal arts; to emphasize sound 
principles of effective teaching based on research in 
human development and learning: to prepare pros- 
pective teachers to utilize newly developed curricula, 
methods, and materials being adopted by progressive 
schools; to stimulate thinking about problems in edu- 
cation; to prepare students to continue their study 
in graduate school if they so desire. 



84 



REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHER 
EDUCATION 

A student preparing for elementary or secondary 
school teaching must plan to complete: (1) the dis- 
tribution requirements for graduation described on 
page 58, (2) a selection of courses providing appro- 
priate background for teaching in a particular subject 
area, and (3) a sequence program of professional 
education courses and experiences designed to give 
a broad understanding of concepts and skills in teach- 
ing. Bethany College is accredited for both elemen- 
tary and secondary teacher preparation by the 
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Edu- 
cation (NCATE) and is included in the Interstate Com- 
pact Certification Reciprocity System. 




To become eligible for teacher certification, stu- 
dents must complete a college and state-approved 
program in all three of the areas named in the pre- 
ceding paragraph. It is the student's responsibility 
to seek appropriate counseling promptly, preferably 
early in his freshman year and to become familiar 
with all of the above requirements applicable to him. 

The Department recognizes abilities which a stu- 
dent may have already established in a given subject 
matter area through previous training and experience 
and assists him in planning his program accordingly. 
Waivers or advanced standing granted by the College 
are noted on official transcripts so that courses from 
which a student is exempted may be applied toward 
certification requirements. 

Leadership of children and youth groups, e.g., sum- 
mer camp, scouts, church school, playground super- 
vision, etc., are strongly recommended for students 
planning to teach. 

Students enrolling for courses involving observa- 
tion and teaching in schools must abide by dress and 
appearance standards of any school to which they 
may be assigned. 

It is strongly recommended that students take at least 
12-18 hours in a subject matter field so that they may 
be employable in a middle school. Course selection 
and sequence are subject to approval by the advisor. 

A period of observation and participation in a 
school is to be planned in cooperation with the Edu- 
cation Department staff preceding student teaching, 
normally during the January Term of the student's 
junior year. This practicum may be planned to meet 
the college requirement for Internship Practicum 
and/or Intercultural Practicum. 



85 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



The following program meets the College general distribution requirements as well as those for a major in 
Education. The required education courses cannot be taken Credit-No Credit. 



FIRST SEMESTER 


CREDIT 




SECOND SEMESTER 


CREDIT 


Freshman 










*Biol., Phy. Sci. or Psych. 


4 




*Biol., Phy. Sci. or Psych. 


4 


**Fine Arts or Phil. 


4 




** Engl ish. Fine Arts or Phil. 


4 


Religion 100 


4 




Interdisciplinary Lee. Course 


4 


Freshman Seminar 


4 




Electives 


4 


Sophomore 










Ed. 201 Human Devel. and Learning 


4 




Ed. 202 Human Devel. and Learning 


4 


History 201 


4 




Ed. 242 Intro. Ed. Policy and Problems 


2 


*Bio!., Phy. Sci. or Psych. 


4 




Hist. 202 


4 


Electives 


4 




Math. 226 

* Biol ., Phy. Sci. or Psych. 
Electives 


4 
4 
4 


Junior 










P.E. 227 Pers. & Com. Health 


2 




***Art 340 Art Activ. in Elem. 


2 


Ed. 345 Teach. Math, in Elem. Area 


4 




Ed. 346 Read. Lang. Arts 


4 


***Art 340 Art Activ. in Elem. 


2 




Ed. 348 Prof. Practicum 


2 


Pol. Sci., Soc, Econ., or Geography 


4 




Music 340 (101 competence required) 


2 


Electives 


4 




Electives 


6 


Senior 










Professional Block 










Ed. (Psych.) 333 Ed. Psych. 


2 




**Eng., Fine Arts or Phil, (any course) 


4 


Ed. 401 Hist. & Phil. 


2 




Ed. 490 Senior Project 


2-8 


Ed. 443 Obs. & Dir. Tchg. 


8 




Electives 


10 


Ed. 447 Soc. Stud. & Sci. 


4 








NO OTHER COURSES PERMITTED 










•One course in each is required. Chemistry or Physics will count as 


Phy. Sci. 






"2 courses in English and one in either Fine Arts or Ph 


ilosophy are 


required. 






•"Offered both semesters. In second semester student may continue 


into Art 480. 







86 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Students preparing to teach in secondary schools are expected to follow the sequence of required education 
courses listed below. The required education courses cannot be taken Credit-No Credit. 



FIRST SEMESTER 


CREDIT 


SECOND SEMESTER 


CREDIT 


Freshman 

(Psych. 101 Gen. Psych.— prereq. for Ed. 333) 


4 








Sophomore 






Ed. 202 Human Develop. & Learning II 


4 


Junior 

Ed. 349 Observation and Participation in 

Secondary Schools (not offered in 72-73) 


2 




Ed. (or other) 480 Methods and Materials 

in Teach.* 
Several weekly meetings with Ed. Dept. 
to be arranged 


2-4 






Ed. 


JAN. TERM 
350-J Jan. Exper 


No-Credit 






Ul 

Ed. 433-J Work Study 


2 


Senior 

Professional Block 
Ed. (Psych.) 333 Educational Psychology 
Ed. 403 History & Philosophy of Education 
Ed. 428 Principles and Techniques of 

Secondary Education 
Ed. 475 Observation and Directed 
Teaching, Secondary 


2 

4 

4 
6 




Ed. (or other) 490 Senior Project 


2-8 


NO OTHER COURSES PERMITTED 










*Some departments may offer these courses only in alternate 


years. 


Mathematics 480 is first semester. 





General distribution requirements for graduation and 
requirements of the student's field of concentration 
must be added. He should seek counseling from both 
the Chairman of the Education Department and the 
Chairman of his Field of Concentration. With this 
knowledge, his academic advisor can direct him 
through an approved program of subject specializa- 
tion required for teacher certification. Programs de- 
signed for regular departmental majors may need 
some modification to meet such requirements. Proto- 
types of the various interdepartmental secondary 



teacher education programs will be approved by the 
Committee on Fields of Concentration, so that stu- 
dents need not seek such approval individually. 

Any additional courses in education or other areas 
can be elected to meet certification requirements of 
a particular state or individual needs and interests. 

Course selections and sequences in the secondary 
education area are subject to approval by the Depart- 
ment of Education. The student's total preparation 
must be approved by this Department and the Chair- 
man of his major academic department. 



87 



ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION 

Students interested in preparing to teach are urged to 
consult a member of the Education Department indi- 
vidually as soon as possible for counseling with re- 
spect to prospects for employment in the various 
teaching fields, course requirements, state certifica- 
tion requirements, etc. 

During the second semester of the sophomore 
year, and after the student has enrolled in at least 
one education course, written application for admis- 
sion to the elementary or secondary teacher educa- 




tion program should be submitted to the Department 
of Education on forms obtained from the Department. 

Applications are appraised by the Teacher Educa- 
tion Review Committee with respect to academic 
achievement, emotional and physical fitness, person- 
ality traits, and other factors the Committee consid- 
ers essential to a teaching career. The Committee 
may: (1) recommend full or conditional approval; 
(2) suggest programs to overcome certain deficien- 
cies, or, in some cases, (3) recommend that the stu- 
dent not prepare for teaching. 

A "C" average must be attained in all academic 
work and in all professional education courses for 
admission. All Committee recommendations for ap- 
proval are based on this condition. 

The Committee may review a student's qualifica- 
tions at any time and issue appropriate recommenda- 
tions. The general qualifications of all students are 
reviewed at the time they apply for student teaching. 

PROFESSIONAL BLOCK 

Each student pursuing a curriculum in teacher edu- 
cation will take a designed group of professional 
courses, including student teaching, during the first 
semester of the senior year. This is designated as 
the Professional Block. Requirements for admission 
to the Block are as follows: 

Prerequisites for admission to teacher education and 
Elementary Education: Psychology 101 and Education 
201, 202, 242, 345, 346, and 348; for Secondary: Psy- 
chology 101, Education 202, 350-J, and 480, and in 
one or more subject specializations an adequate 
background for student teaching as approved by the 
academic department(s) concerned. Prerequisites 
cannot be deferred until after the professional block 
or taken at another institution without written per- 
mission from the Department of Education. 



88 



Scholarship requirements — By state law, a student in 
Elementary Education must have not less than a "C" 
average in all college work and a "C" average in pro- 
fessional (Education) courses taken prior to the time 
he is admitted to the Block; a student in Secondary 
Education must have not less than a "C" average in 
all college work, a "C" average in his field of con- 
centration and a "C" average in professional (Edu- 
cation) courses, including methods courses offered 
by other departments, taken prior to the Block. 

Application for Student Teaching — Students are re- 
quired to make application for student teaching dur- 
ing the second semester of the junior year, on forms 
provided by the Education Department. This appli- 
cation requests the recommendation of the student's 
Senior Education Department Advisor, if Elementary, 
and his academic Department Chairman or Advisor, 
if Secondary, and requires the approval of the Chair- 
man of the Department of Education. Applications 
will not be approved for students not previously ad- 
mitted to teacher education, as explained above. 

Community-based Professional Block — Student 
teaching and course work comprising the Block will 
be conducted for the entire first semester of the 
senior year at off campus centers for elementary (and 
probably beginning in 1973-74 for secondary) to pro- 
vide the most effective field experience possible. Stu- 
dents enrolled will generally live in the community 
where the center is located. The College will assist 
in locating housing if desired, and with other details 
of the arrangement. 

Students will not be permitted to schedule courses 
in conflict with the Block during the semester they 
are enrolled in it, or carry extra-curricular activities 
which will interfere with the requirements imposed 



by the Block. Arrangements can usually be made for 
practice and participation in varsity sports. Any ex- 
ceptions to the above must be approved by the chair- 
men of the departments concerned and by the Dean 
of the Faculty. Students should not register for other 
than the prescribed Professional Block courses with- 
out written permission from the Department of 
Education. 



CERTIFICATION 

Near the end of his senior year, each student should 
initiate application procedures for certification in the 
state where he expects to teach. 

All applications require the Education Department 
Chairman's recommendation. To be recommended, 
a student must meet — in addition to certification re- 
quirements of the state for which he is applying — 
the following qualifications: (1) successful student 
teaching experience; (2) completion of an approved 
teacher education program; (3) completion of the 
National Teacher Examinations during the senior 
year, as arranged by the Education Department; (4) 
eligibility for graduation; and (5) evidence of per- 
sonal traits and character conducive to success as a 
teacher. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

Ed. 201 Human Development and 

Learning I 4 hours 

Individual and group development from infancy to adolescence. 
Observation and first hand contacts with children are included. 
Educational programs are considered in terms of the total child 
development. Freshmen not admitted. 



89 



Ed. 202 Human Development and 

Learning II 4 hours 

Individual and group development from adolescence through 
the young adult periods. Applications are made in relation to 
learning theory, self understanding and preparation for working 
with young people. Freshmen not admitted. 

Ed. 242 Introduction to Education 

Policy and Problems 2 hours 

Basic course in education dealing with goals, new approaches 
and practices at all levels of education. Student should have 
background in human development and learning at some level. 

Ed. 333 Educational Psychology 2 hours 

See Psychology 333. The application of principles of psychology 
to the school situation. Prerequisite: Psych. 101 

Ed. 338 Psychological and Educational 

Tests and Measurements 2 hours 

See Psychology 338. The course will deal mainly with group 
testing, with attention to the construction and use of standard- 
ized and of ad hoc tests. The necessary correlation techniques 
will be included. Recommended especially for students in sec- 
ondary education. Prerequisite: Psych. 101 

Ed. 342 Children's Literature in the 

Elementary School 2 hours 

Includes background of the history of literature for children; 
familiarity with established and current literature in this area; 
critical analysis skills; methods and techniques of using literature; 
work with children. Students expected to demonstrate compe- 
tence in appropriate audio-visual aids (see Ed. 365). 

Ed. 344 Teaching Skills Laboratory Non-Credit 

Study and practice of specific teaching skills using films, manuals, 
microteaching and TV. Skills include verbal and non-verbal re- 
sponses, questioning, reinforcement, recognizing attendant be- 
havior, non-verbal cues, set induction, stimulus variation, closure, 
and presentation skills including lecturing, use of examples, 
planned repetition, and completeness of communication. Stu- 
dents concurrently enrolled in elementary or secondary methods 



courses or student teaching may participate in units prescribed 
by their instructors, or as desired within limitations of facilities 
and supervision. 

Ed. 345 Teaching Mathematics in 

Elementary Area 4 hours 

Emphasis on arithmetical skills, including the understanding of 
fundamental processes; comparison of different philosophies in 
teaching arithmetic; elements of modern mathematics; practical 
application of arithmetical skills at all levels of the curriculum. 
Students expected to demonstrate competence in appropriate 
audio-visual aids (see Ed. 365). Classroom experience in public 
schools. Prerequisite: Mathematics 226 or consent of instructor. 

Ed. 346 Teaching Reading and Other Language 

Arts in the Elementary Area 4 hours 

Teaching the skills of reading, listening, speaking and writing as 
they relate to the total curriculum throughout the elementary 
program. Strong emphasis on teaching of reading and the inte- 
gration of the related areas in language arts. Students expected 
to demonstrate competence in appropriate audio-visual aids 
(see Ed. 365). 

Ed. 348 Professional Practicum 2 hours 

Professional practices, certification and employment procedures, 
record keeping, inservice and continuing education, especially 
as pertinent to student teaching and problems of the beginning 
teacher. 

Ed. 349 Observation and Participation 

in Secondary Schools 2 hours 

Regularly scheduled observation and limited teaching activities 
in secondary schools. Seminar for direction and evaluation of 
observation experiences and study of related problems in con- 
temporary education. Not offered in 1972-73. 

Ed. 350-J January Observation 

Experience Non-credit 

Guided observation and limited participation in teaching or ad- 
ministrative duties in elementary or secondary schools, usually 
during the January Term of the junior year. Arrangements must 
be cleared through the Education Department. 



90 



Ed. 365 Audio-Visual Education 2 hours 

Laboratory experiences in producing hand-made, color-lift, ther- 
mal, and overlay transparencies, regular and thermal spirit and 
mimeo masters, plastic embeddings; tape recordings, dry mount- 
ings, and photo-copy slides; operation of 16 mm, 8 mm, film- 
strip, slide, opaque, and overhead projectors, dry-mounting press, 
teaching machine, tape recorder, thermal copier, TV equipment 
and lettering aids. Theory for selection and effective utilization 
of various media. Students concurrently enrolled in elementary 
or secondary school observation, student teaching, or methods 
courses may complete experiences prescribed by their instruc- 
tors, or as desired within limitations of facilities and supervision. 
Those wanting credit must enroll for Ed. 365, complete all 
required laboratory projects and other course requirements. Stu- 
dents not in teacher education admitted with instructor's consent. 



Ed. 401 History and Philosophy 

of Education 2 or 4 hours 

Development of modern education in social, historical, and 
philosophical perspective, emphasizing backgrounds of present 
practices, current problems and issues. Current practice is ana- 
lyzed in terms of philosophic rationale and applications are 
made to the school situation. Students in elementary should 
register for 2 sem. hrs.; those in secondary for 4 sem. hrs. 



Ed. 428 Principles and Techniques of 
Secondary Education 



4 hours 



Aims, functions and curriculum organization of secondary 
schools. Basic methods, materials and techniques, including eval- 
uation, applicable to modern teaching in middle, junior high, and 
senior high schools, integrated with observation and student 
teaching in schools. Certification and employment procedures, 
professional practices, and continuing education. 

Ed. 443 Observation and Directed 

Teaching in Elementary Education 8 hours 
Observation and full-time student teaching at both primary and 
intermediate levels from September until Christmas to include a 
minimum of 200 clock hours of direct teaching. Concurrent en- 
rollment in Ed. 401, 443, and 447 only. Prerequisites: See Pro- 
fessional Block on page 85. 



Ed. 447 Teaching Social Studies and 

Science in Elementary Area 4 hours 

An understanding of the concepts of the social studies and sci- 
ences approached through various methods, including unit study, 
inquiry, experimentation, and the process approach. Practical 
application in school situation. 

Ed. 452 Education of Exceptional 

Children 2 or 4 hours 

Identifying exceptional children, understanding their situation 
and behavior, working with them as learners and group mem- 
bers, and directing their handling of themselves as members of 
society. Seminar discussions, readings, and application of inte- 
grated knowledge in work with children. Those taking the course 
for full credit will, in addition to the above stated activities, do 
a practicum during which they work in one of several area school 
programs for exceptional children. This practicum will be worked 
out with the guidance of the instructor. Prerequisite: Ed. 443 or 
consent of instructor. Not offered in 1973-74. 

Ed. 475 Observation and Directed 

Teaching in Secondary Education 6 hours 

Directed full-time observation and student teaching in secondary 
schools with partial assignments in lower schools if appropriate; 
to include a minimum of 90 clock hours actual teaching. Seminar 
required throughout the semester. Students must make applica- 
tion for student teaching prior to advance registration. Other 
courses or activities which might interfere with student teaching 
should be avoided. Concurrent enrollment in Ed. 403 and 428. 
Prerequisites: See Professional Block on page 86. 

Ed. 480 Methods and Materials in 

Teaching 2 or 4 hours 

See courses numbered 480 offered by various departments, i.e. 
Art, Biology, Chemistry, Communications, English, Foreign Lan- 
guages, General Sciences, Mathematics, Music, Physical Educa- 
tion, Psychology, Physics, and Social Science (also see auxiliary 
methods courses, i.e. Art 340, Music 340-341, and Physical Edu- 
cation 470, required in some programs). Includes observation and 
participation in secondary schools. Experiences in production 
and utilization of appropriate A-V materials and equipment avail- 
able in A-V laboratory (see Ed. 365). Study and application of 



97 



specific teaching skills available in teaching skills laboratory (see 
Ed. 344). 

Ed. 487-488 Independent Study in 

Education 2 or 4 hours each 



English 



Ed. 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 




AIMS 

To teach students to write effectively; to provide 
them with a knowledge of major literary works; to 
provide them with standards for the intelligent crit- 
icism of literature. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

1. Concentration in English requires a minimum of 
32 hours in the Department, exclusive of the Se- 
nior Project. The following courses are required: 
300, 325-326, 341-342, 350, 490. In addition to 
these 24 hours, each student will elect courses or 
independent study which will extend his knowl- 
edge of one or two areas of literature, provide 
background for his Senior Project and part of his 
Senior Comprehensive Examination, and prepare 
him for further study or a career. The program of 
a student preparing for the law or another pro- 
fession will thus be different from that of a stu- 
dent preparing for a career as a professional writer 
and from that of a student preparing for graduate 
study in English or for secondary school teaching. 

2. At least twelve hours in another department must 
also be included in the field of concentration. 
These courses should be related either to the stu- 
dent's area of special interest in English or to his 
vocational plans. 

3. Each student will take the Comprehensive Exami- 
nation in English. The examination consists of three 
parts: the Undergraduate Record Examination in 
Literature, an essay examination, and an oral exam- 



92 



ination. Approximately half of the essay examina- 
tion will be individualized for each student, being 
based on his area of special interest. 

4. A student will not be accepted for concentration 
in English later than the beginning of his fifth 
semester unless he has completed English 300 and 
either English 325-326 or English 341-342. 

5. Students concentrating in English are expected to 
attain a minimum grade of "C" in all courses in the 
Department. All courses in the field of concentra- 
tion must be taken for a letter grade. 

WRITING QUALIFICATION TESTS 

The annual Writing Qualification Tests are adminis- 
tered by the Department. Each student is required to 
take a series of four Writing Qualification Tests in the 
following sequence: the Initial Writing Qualification 
Test when he enters Bethany, and one during his 
Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior years. Satisfactory 
performance on the Junior Writing Qualification Test 
is required for graduation. 

To assist students in developing and maintaining 
their skills in composition, the Department offers two 
expository writing courses, described below. 



Eng. 110 Expository Writing I 



Non-credit 



Training and practice in writing of clear expository prose. Each 
student will write at least seven essays using traditional rhetorical 
principles. The course also includes instruction in methods of 
library research. Recommended for students whose performance 
on either the Initial or the Freshman Writing Qualification Test 
is unsatisfactory. Open only to Freshmen and Sophomores. 
Ottered each semester. 

Eng. 210 Expository Writing II Non-credit 

Training and practice in the writing of clear expository prose. 
Similar in method and content to English 110, but not open to 
Freshmen and Sophomores. Recommended for Juniors whose 
performance on the Sophomore Writing Qualification Test is 



unsatisfactory. Required for Seniors whose performance on the 
junior Writing Qualification Test is unsatisfactory. Not offered 
in 1972-73. 

Eng. 220 Research Paper Writing 2 hours 

An introduction to the writing of library research papers. Instruc- 
tion in topic selection, library resources, the research process, the 
rhetoric of research paper writing, documentation, and the 
mechanics of format. Each student will write at least two research 
papers. Prerequisite: demonstrated proficiency in expository 
writing. Offered each semester. 



Eng. 230 Advanced Writing 



2 hours 



Intensive practice in the writing of expository or imaginative 
prose, with emphasis upon the achievement of literary excel- 
lence. Individual assignments and frequent conferences. The 
course is offered twice each semester. Enrollment is limited to 
twelve, with preference given to Juniors and Seniors. May be 
repeated for credit with consent of the chairman of the depart- 
ment. Prerequisites: demonstrated proficiency in expository writ- 
ing and consent of the instructor. 

Eng. 240 Myths and Legends 2 hours 

A study of Biblical, classical, European, and British myths and 
legends and their use in Western literature. 

Eng. 251-254 Literature of the 

Western World 2 hours each 

A chronological study of Western literary masterpieces, chiefly 
in translation. 251: Greek and Roman Classicism. 252: The Mid- 
dle Ages. 253: Renaissance and Neo-Classicism. 254: Modern. 

Eng. 261 The British Novel 4 hours 

The development of the British novel from the 18th century until 
the present. Offered alternately with English 262. Offered in 
Fall 1972-73. 

Eng. 262 The American Novel 4 hours 

The development of the American novel from the 19th century 
until the present. Offered alternately with English 261. Offered 
in Fall 1973-74. 



93 



Eng. 270 Shakespeare 4 hours 

Rapid reading of the major plays, with emphasis upon Shake- 
speare's themes, motifs, language, and characterization. 

Eng. 300 Preface to Literary Studies 2 hours 

An introduction to the principles and practice of literary analysis. 
Close reading and explication of poetry and prose. The prepara- 
tion of critical essays. Required for concentration in English. 

Eng. 325-326 British Literature 4 hours each 

The development of British literature from the beginning to the 
present. First semester: from Beowulf to the end of the 18th 
century. Second semester: the 19th and 20th centuries. In the 
fall of 1972, if enrollment warrants, both 325 and 326 will be 
taught in Oxford, England. In the spring of 1973, 326 will be 
taught on the Bethany campus. Required for concentration in 
English. 

Eng. 341-342 American Literature 4 hours each 

The development of American literature from the Colonial Period 
to the present, with emphasis upon the writers of the 19th and 
20th centuries. Required for concentration in English. 



and the amount of credit offered for each seminar 
will vary from semester to semester. When the topic 
is different, the seminar may be repeated for credit. 
Each seminar is offered at least once annually. 

ENG. 400-409 Studies in Literary Themes and Motifs 

A seminar for the study of a single theme or motif in literary 
works in English or in translation. 

Eng. 400 Cosmic Warfare 4 hours 

Imaginative presentations of the struggle between good and 
evil. Reading will include selections from the work of John 
Milton, J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, and Charles Williams. 
Offered in Fall 1972-73. 

Eng. 401 The Quest for the Promised Land 4 hours 

The student will make a study of the quest tradition and the 
Jadaeo-Christian promise motif as reflected in Western litera- 
ture. Patterns of the quest will be established through readings 
in Homer, Dante and the Grail poet. The evolution of the 
promise motif in Biblical literature (especially Genesis, Isaiah, 
and Revelation) will also be studied. Special attention will be 
given to the impact of this tradition on the writings of T. S. 
Eliot and James Joyce. (Can be taken for credit as Religious 
Studies 321). Offered in Fall 1972-73. 



Eng. 350 Literary Criticism 



4 hours 



Study of the value and function of criticism and its development 
from Aristotle to the present. Methods and materials of literary 
research and scholarship. The preparation of critical and schol- 
arly papers. Prerequisites: Eng. 300 and either Eng. 325-326 or 
Eng. 341-342. Required for concentration in English. 

Eng. 470 Development of Modern English 4 hours 
History of the English language from Anglo-Saxon to Modern 
English, with emphasis upon the structure and vocabulary of the 
latter. Required for students preparing to teach secondary school 
English. 



ADVANCED SEMINARS 

Courses numbered 400 through 450 are seminars for 
the study of special literary topics or areas. Topics 



ENG. 410-419 Studies in Literary Genres 

A seminar for the study of a single literary genre, or mode, such 
as the epic, tragedy, satire, or biography. 

Eng. 410 Biography and Autobiography 4 hours 

An examination of the problems of writing biography and the 
solutions of some major biographers. The relationship between 
biography and autobiography. Reading will include selections 
from the work of Pepys, Walton, Boswell, Johnson, Franklin, 
Strachey, and several modern biographers. Offered in Spring 
1972-73. 



ENG. 420-429 Studies in Major Authors 

A seminar for the study of one or more major American, British, 
or European authors. 

Eng. 420 Major Women Novelists 4 hours 

Reading will be based on selections from the work of Jane 
Austen, the Bronte sisters, George Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Willa 
Cather, Edith Wharton, and others. Offered in Fall 1972-73. 



94 



ENG. 430-439 Studies in the Twentieth Century 

A seminar for the study of English, American, or foreign literature 
of the present century. 

Eng. 430 Contemporary Poetry 4 hours 

Reading will include selections from the work of Robert Lowell, 
Richard Wilbur, James Dickey, Sylvia Plath, Gwendolyn Brooks, 
Ted Hughes, and others. Offered in Spring 1972-73. 



ENG. 440-449 Studies in Literary Periods 

A seminar for the study of a limited period of time in British 
literature. Prerequisite: English 325-326. 

Eng. 440 Renaissance 4 hours 

Reading will include selections from the work of Spenser, 
Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson, Sidney, Hooker, Donne, and 
others. Offered in Spring 1972-73. 

ENG. 450-459 Studies in American Literature 

A seminar for the study of a special topic in American literature. 
Prerequisite: English 341-342. 

Eng. 450 American Romanticism 4 hours 

Reading will include selections from the works of Poe, Haw- 
thorne, Melville, Whitman and other writers of the 19th 
century. Offered in Fall 1972-73. 

Eng. 451 American Realism 4 hours 

A study of realism in the writing of late 19th century American 
writers including James, Howells, and Twain. Offered in 
Spring 1972-73. 

Eng. 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 

Reading, criticism and research designed to review and correlate 
a student's work in other courses in the Department. Prerequi- 
sites: Eng. 300, 325-326, 341-342, 350 and one advanced seminar. 

Eng. 480 Methods of Teaching English 2 hours 

Study of methods and materials used in teaching English. Re- 
quired for students preparing to teach secondary school English. 

Eng. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Individual study in any area of English in which the student is in- 
terested and in which he is qualified and prepared to work 
independently. Independent study is offered only in areas not 



included in other courses in the Department. Prerequisites: 
demonstrated proficiency in expository writing; adequate prepa- 
ration to undertake the study as determined by the instructor; 
consent of the Chairman of the Department. 

Eng. 490 Senior Project 2 or 4 hours 

Generally, the Senior Project in English will consist of a major 
critical paper on a topic developed from at least one of the 
student's elective advanced seminars in the Department. During 
his junior year, the student should determine his area of interest 
and make a preliminary investigation of it after consulting his 
supervisor, who will be the member of the staff best qualified 
to assist him. Reading and research should continue during the 
student's senior year, and much of his final semester should be 
devoted to preparation of the paper. Occasionally, and under 
extraordinary circumstances, the Senior Project may take other 
forms. A student who wishes to undertake an unusual Senior 
Project must consult with the Chairman of the Department no 
later than the beginning of his fourth semester. Credit for the 
Senior Project is not included in the total number of hours 
required for concentration in English. 



Fine Arts 



AIMS 

The Department of Fine Arts is not a separate faculty; 
it draws upon the faculties and curricula of the De- 
partments of Art, Communications, Music, Philoso- 
phy, and Theatre. Its aims are to give expression to 
the aesthetic unity of the various forms and modes 
of art, and to permit students to pursue a non- 
professional interest in these fields. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 

CONCENTRATION 

All students concentrating in Fine Arts must take 

Fine Arts 201-202; Art 200; Theatre 401; Music 101 

or Music 111; Philosophy 368; and Fine Arts 477 and 



95 



a Senior Project (490). In addition, at least six courses 
must be elected from at least two of the following 
categories, with an emphasis (four courses) in one 
of the categories. 

1. Art: advanced art studio and art history courses 

2. Music: music theory and music literature courses 

3. Communications: basic speech courses 

4. Theatre: advanced theatre courses 

Students electing this Field of Concentration would 
normally be expected to participate in performance 
and practice activities provided through extracurricu- 
lar programs, especially in their area of emphasis. 

Students primarily interested in Art or Music should 
also consult the sections of this catalogue dealing 
with Fields of Concentration in those Departments. 



Fine Arts 201-202 Introduction to 

the Arts 4 hours each 

An introduction to the elements of the graphic and plastic arts 
and music and to the organization of these elements in works of 
art through the examination of representative master works of 
Western art from all ages. Consideration is also given to aes- 
thetic functions and values. The sequence is chronological, the 
first semester extending to mid-18th century, the second, from 
that point to the present. 



Fine Arts 477 Seminar 2 hours 

A survey review of the Fine Arts area concentrating upon the 
student's field of emphasis, largely in preparation for the senior 
comprehensive examination. Required of all seniors in the Fine 
Arts field. 



Fine Arts 490 Senior Project 2 hours 

An independent, student-initiated project which may be in the 
nature of either research or creative work. 



Foreign Languages 

AIMS 

To familiarize students with the language, literature 
and culture of the French, German and Spanish speak- 
ing peoples; to prepare students to be teachers, trans- 
lators, or representatives in foreign service; to pro- 
vide training in reading for students who are inter- 
ested in scientific or historical research requiring 
knowledge of a foreign language; to help travelers 
to foreign countries acquire basic conversation skills. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION IN FRENCH, GERMAN, 

OR SPANISH 

A minimum of 26 credit-hours in the language (not 
including French 101-102, German 101-102, or Span- 
ish 101-102) with 20 hours of courses above the inter- 
mediate level, Foreign Language 425, and a Senior 
Project. 

A reading knowledge of a foreign language other 
than the one chosen as the Field of Concentration is 
recommended. Every student should spend a mini- 
mum of one semester studying in a country where 
his major foreign language is spoken. Students ex- 
pecting to teach a foreign language must complete 
Foreign Language 480. 



FRENCH 

Fr. 101-102 Basic French 4 hours each 

Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation and composition. 
Emphasis on audio-oral approach to develop basic skills of com- 
prehension, speaking, writing, and reading. Two half-hour labo- 
ratories per week in addition to four hours classroom work. 
Course is intended primarily for students who have no acquaint- 
ance with the language. 



96 



Fr. 110 French for Travelers 2 hours 

Spoken, everyday French designed to aid American visitors to 
French-speaking countries. Offered each Spring, 2nd eight 
weeks. 

Fr. 151 French-English Translation 2 hours 

A rapid course in translation designed to prepare students to 

read in French in their various Fields of Concentration. Text 
books may vary with each student. 

Fr. 152 French-English Translation 2 hours 

A continuation of Fr. 151. Prerequisite: Fr. 151 or equivalent. 

Fr. 200 Intermediate French 4 hours 

Grammar review, reading, speaking, writing. An introduction to 
great works of French literature. Two half-hour laboratories per 
week in addition to four hours classroom work. Prerequisite: 
Fr. 102 or equivalent. Offered each Fall. 



Fr. 300 Advanced Conversation and 
Composition 



4 hours 



Conversation, dictation, and composition. Special attention to 
current publications and present day events. A feature of this 
course is participation in the weekly meeting of the French Club 
at the dinner hour. Prerequisite: Fr. 200 or equivalent. 

Fr. 310 Highlights of French Literature 4 hours 

Survey of French literature from the early periods to the present. 
Readings in French from an anthology. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of French. Fr. 300 recom- 
mended. 

Fr. 311 Masterpieces of French Literature 

(in English) 2 hours 

Highlights of French literature, from the Song of Roland to Sartre, 
as it seeks to examine the human condition. Readings and dis- 
cussion in English. 

Fr. 401 The Age of Classicism 4 hours 

A literary study of seventeenth century France, including plays 
of Corneille, Racine, and Moliere. Readings in Descartes, Pascal, 



La Fontaine, and others. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: A 
good reading knowledge of French. Fr. 310 recommended. Alter- 
nate years: Fall 1972-73. 

Fr. 402 The Enlightenment 4 hours 

France's Age of Reason is examined through works by Voltaire, 
Montesquieu, Marivaux, Diderot, Rousseau, and others. Con- 
ducted in French. Prerequisite: A good reading knowledge of 
French. Fr. 310 recommended. Alternate years: Spring 1972-73. 

Fr. 403 From Romanticism to Symbolism 4 hours 

A critical study of representative authors of each major literary 
movement of the 19th century: romanticism, realism, naturalism, 
symbolism. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: A good reading 
knowledge of French. Fr. 310 recommended. Alternate years: Fall 
1973-74. 

Fr. 404 Literature of Modern France 4 hours 

A critical study of major authors of 20th century French litera- 
ture, from Apollinaire to Robbe-Grillet. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite: A good reading knowledge of French. Fr. 310 or 403 
recommended. Alternate years: Spring 1973-74. 

Fr. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours each 



Fr. 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 



GERMAN 

German 101-102 Basic German 4 hours each 

Fundamentals of pronunciation, grammar, and reading. Emphasis 
on audio-oral approach to develop basic skills of comprehension, 
speaking, reading and writing. Two half-hour periods of labora- 
tory work in addition to four hours classroom work per week. 
Primarily for students who have no acquaintance with the lan- 
guage. 

German 200 Intermediate German 4 hours 

Grammar review, reading, speaking, writing. Introduction to 
great works of literature. Two half-hour periods of laboratory 
work in addition to four hours classroom work per week. Pre- 
requisite: German 101-102 or equivalent. 



97 



German 110 Speaking German (German 

for Travelers) 2 hours 

An 8-week, intensive course in conversational German intended 
for students who plan to travel in Germany. Little or no back- 
ground in German is required. 

German 300 Life in Germany (German 
Conversation and 
Composition) 4 hours 

Discussion of German culture, customs, history, geography, art, 
music. Special attention to present-day events. Brief oral and 
written reports. Participation in the German Club activities is 
encouraged. Prerequisite: German 200 or equivalent. 



German 327 Highlights of German Literature 

to the Death of Goethe 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Great authors and works of German lit- 
erature from the beginnings to approximately 1832. Conducted 
in German. Prerequisite: Cerman 200 or equivalent. Alternate 
years: 1973-74. 

German 329 Highlights of German Literature 

after the Death of Goethe. 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Great authors and works of German 
literature from approximately 1832 to the present. Conducted in 
German. Prerequisite: Cerman 200 or equivalent. Alternate 
years: 1973-74. 



German 304 Translating German (German 

for Scientists) 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Selected texts from scientific journals. 
Prerequisite: Cerman 101-102 or equivalent. Alternate years: 
1972-73. 

German 306 Reading German (German 

Short Stories) 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Selected contemporary short stories. 
Emphasis on reading for enjoyment. Prerequisite: Cerman 200. 
Alternate years: 1973-74. 

German 308 The German Drama from Lessing 

to Brecht (in English) 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Great dramas from the period of Enlight- 
enment to the Present read and discussed in English. German 
reading knowledge desirable, but not required. Alternate years: 
1972-73. 

German 310 German Novel and Novelle from 

Goethe to Grass (in English) 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Great novels and long short stories from 
the classical period to the present read and discussed in English. 
German reading knowledge desirable, but not required. Alter- 
nate years: 1973-74. 



German 334 Readings in Modern German 

Religious Thinkers 4 hours 

Students in this course will read and discuss early, untranslated 
writings of Paul Till ich, especially those written while he was 
active in the Religious Socialism Movement. Prerequisite: Cer- 
man 200 or equivalent. (May be taken for credit as Religious 
Studies 334). 

German 401 Classical Theater: 

Goethe and Schiller 2 hours 

An eight-week course. One outstanding drama by each of the 
two outstanding German authors read and discussed in German. 
Prerequisite: Cerman 327 or permission of instructor. Alternate 
years: Fall 1972-73 1st eight weeks. 

German 403 Modern Theater: Brecht 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Plays by Brecht read and discussed in 
German. Prerequisite: Cerman 327 or 329 or permission of in- 
structor. Alternate years: Fall 1972-73 2nd eight weeks. 

German 404 Giants of the 20th Century 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Selected works by Rilke, Kafka, Mann, 
Hesse, Brecht read and discussed in German. Prerequisite: Ger- 
man 327 or 329 or permission of instructor. Alternate years: 
1972-73. 



98 



German 406 Contemporary German 

Writers and War 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Stories, novels, and plays by present-day 
writers such as Borchert, Boll, Grass read and discussed in Ger- 
man. Prerequisite: German 327 or 329 or permission of instruc- 
tor. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

German 487-488 Independent 

Study 2 or 4 hours each 



German 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 



SPANISH 

Span. 101-102 Basic Spanish 4 hours 

Fundamentals of pronunciation, grammar, reading and composi- 
tion. Emphasis on audio-oral approach to develop basic skills of 
comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Two one-half 
laboratory sessions per week in addition to four hours of class- 
room work. Course is intended primarily for students who have 
no acquaintance with the language. 

Span. 110 Speaking Spanish (Spanish 

for Travelers) 4 hours 

Spoken, everyday conversation intended for students who plan 
to travel in Spain or Latin America. Little or no background in 
Spanish is required. 



Span. 200 Intermediate Spanish 



4 hours 



Grammar review, speaking, writing and introduction to great 
works of literature. Two one-half hour laboratory sessions per 
week in addition to four hours of classroom work. Prerequisite: 
Spanish 101-102 or equivalent. 

Span. 301 Spanish American Modernism 2 hours 

A survey of Latin America's Modernist movement. Presentation 
and discussion of outstanding poets of this period. Conducted 
in Spanish. Students enrolled in this course are expected to at- 
tend weekly meetings of the Spanish Club at the dinner hour. 
Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Alternate years: Fall 1972-73 
1st eight weeks. 




Span. 302 Spanish American Vanguard 

Poetry 2 hours 

A survey of Vanguard poets in Latin America. Presentation and 
discussion of their literary achievements compared to European 
ones. Conducted in Spanish. Students enrolled in this course 
are expected to attend weekly meetings of the Spanish Club at 
the dinner hour. Prerequisite: Span. 201 or equivalent. Alternate 
years: Fall 1972-73 2nd eight weeks. 

Span. 303 Spanish American Myths 2 hours 

Discussion based on literary themes, the life and culture of Span- 
ish America. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Span. 200 or 
equivalent. Alternate years: Spring 1972-73 1st eight weeks. 

Span. 304 Spanish American Romanticism 2 hours 
Literary study of the novel of the period and the Gauchesca lit- 
erature. Conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equiv- 
alent. Alternate years: Spring 1972-73 2nd eight weeks. 



99 



Span. 305 20th Century Spanish 

American Novel 2 hours 

Study of early twentieth century classical novels. Conducted in 
Spanish. Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Alternate years: 
Fall 1973-74 1st eight weeks. 



Span. 402 Literature of Spain: 19th 

Century Realists 2 hours 

The regional novel of customs. Psychological, social and thesis 
novels of the last half of the 19th Century. Alternate years: 
Fall 1972-73 2nd eight weeks. 



Span. 306 20th Century Spanish 

American Theater 2 hours 

Study of twentieth century outstanding plays. Conducted in 
Spanish. Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Alternate years: 
Fall 1973-74 2nd eight weeks. 



Span. 403 Literature of Spain: 

The Generation of '98 2 hours 

Works of the novelists and philosophers who searched the rea- 
sons for Spain's decline at the end of the 19th Century. Alter- 
nate years: Spring 1972-73 1st eight weeks. 



Span. 307 Short Story in Spanish America 2 hours 
A survey of the short story of the twentieth century. Conducted 
in Spanish. Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Alternate 
years: Spring 1973-74 1st eight weeks. 

Span. 308 Contemporary Writers of 

Spanish America 2 hours 

A survey of contemporary novelists. Conducted in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Alternate years: Spring 
1973-74 2nd eight weeks. 

Span. 310 Spanish America Civilization 

(in English) 4 hours 

The development of Latin America from the pre-Columbus era 
to the present day in art, music, drama, history and literature. 
Each student will do research on a specific project which he will 
select in consultation with the instructor. Offered in Spring 
1973-74. 

Span. 311 Spanish Civilization (in English) 4 hours 
Spain's influence on the history, art, music, drama, literature and 
science of the world. Each student will do research on a specific 
project which he will select in consultation with the instructor. 
Offered in Spring 1972-73. 

Span. 401 Literature of Spain: 19th 

Century Romantics 2 hours 

Poetry, plays and legends from the first half of the 19th Century. 
Alternate years: Fall 1972-73 1st eight weeks. 



Span. 404 Literature of Spain: 

The Generation of '27 2 hours 

Writers who reflect the pessimism of the first half of the twen- 
tieth century. Alternate years: Spring 1972-73 2nd eight weeks. 

Span. 405 Literature of Spain: 

The Golden Age 2 hours 

The poetry and drama of Lope de Vega, Calderon de la Barca 
and other writers of the 16th and 17th Centuries. The picaresque 
novel. The Don Juan theme. Alternate years: Fall 1973-74 1st 
eight weeks. 

Span. 406 Literature of Spain: Don Quixote 2 hours 
Cervantes' masterpiece which presents the contrast of idealism 
and imagination versus realism and practicality in a great novel. 
Alternate years: Fall 1973-74 2nd eight weeks. 



Span. 487-488 



Independent 
Study 



Span. 490 Senior Project 



2 or 4 hours each 



2-8 hours 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Foreign Language 425 Introduction to Linguistic 

Development of 
Languages 4 hours 

An introduction to diachronic and synchronic linguistics. The 
development of English, French, German, and Spanish from the 



100 



Indo-European to modern times. Emphasis on current develop- 
ments. Required of all majors in the Department. Open to other 
students with permission of the Chairman of the Department. 
Alternate years: Fall 1972-73. 



Foreign Language 480 



Methods and Materials 
in Teaching Foreign 
Languages 4 hours 

Methods, teaching materials, lesson planning, extracurricular 
activities necessary for the teacher of French, German, or Spanish 
as a foreign language. Observation of classroom situations. Spe- 
cial emphasis on language laboratory techniques. Alternate 
years: Spring 1972-73. 

Foreign Language 487-488 Independent Study in 

European 
Languages 2 or 4 hours 



such as the history of science, are excellent supple- 
ments to the college programs of science majors. In 
addition special courses are offered for those who 
are interested in the teaching of science at the sec- 
ondary school level. 



G.S. 101 Natural Philosophy 



4 hours 



An examination of the physical universe and man's place in it 
through an emphasis upon the ways in which the physical sci- 
ences have altered and are now altering man's understanding 
of the universe. (Formerly Physical Science 101). 

G.S. 102 Physical Science 4 hours 

A survey of the field of chemistry with appropriate laboratory 
work. This course may be used to satisfy the science require- 
ment. Open to freshmen. Students planning to complete a field 
of concentration in chemistry or physics should not enroll in 
this course. 



GREEK 

Students wishing to study Greek language and litera- 
ture should enroll in Foreign Language 487-488. 



G.S. 201 Astronomy 



4 hours 



A non-technical course in descriptive astronomy and cosmology, 
including such topics as the solar system, stars, galactic systems, 
telescopy, rocketry, and space travel. Alternate years: 1972-73. 



LATIN 

Students wishing to study Latin language and litera- 
ture should enroll in Foreign Language 487-488. 



G.S. 202 Physical and Cultural Geography 4 hours 

A study of the physical processes tending to alter the climate 
and surface features of the earth and their consequent effects 
upon human populations. Alternate years: 1972-73. 



General Sciences 

While not of departmental status offering a field of 
concentration, the division of General Sciences pro- 
vides a number of programs, many of which are 
interdisciplinary in nature, designed principally for 
non-science majors. Some of these courses, however, 



G.S. 209 History and Philosophy of Science 4 hours 
A study of some of the major ideas conceived by Western man 
in attempting to comprehend and describe the natural world. 
(May be taken for credit as Philosophy 349). Prerequisite: one 
year of college level science or consent of the instructor. Alter- 
nate years: Fall 1973-74. 

G.S. 210 Science, Technology and Society 4 hours 

An historical examination of the effects of scientific and tech- 
nological innovations upon various societies, emphasis being 
placed upon technology and science of the Western world since 



707 



1850. (May be taken for credit as Sociology 310). 
years: Spring 1973-74. 



Alternate 



G.S. 480 Methods and Materials in Teaching 

Physical and Life Sciences 4 hours 

The aims and methods of teaching the physical and life sciences 
in the secondary schools. Special attention will be given to teach- 
ing general laboratory procedures and techniques of teaching. 
Each of the departments in physical and life sciences will partici- 
pate in the program. Prerequisites: 76 hours in one of the phys- 
ical or life sciences or permission of the instructor. 



G.S. 487-488 



Independent 
Study 



2 or 4 hours each 



G.S. 501 -S Introductory Physical Science for 

General Science Teachers 5 hours 

Based on new materials developed by Educational Services, Inc., 
for the Junior High School. Experimental procedures of the IPS 
syllabus will be studied. Thirteen and one half hours of labora- 
tory work, 1372 hours of class discussion, and appropriate home- 
work assignments per week for six weeks. Open only to ac- 
credited teachers at the secondary school level. Graduate credit 
available. Summer session only. 

G.S. 577-S Seminar in Teaching Introductory 

Physical Science 1 hour 

Aspects of teaching IPS in Junior High Schools; course planning; 
methods and materials; audio-visual aids; evaluation and testing; 
other topics growing out of the work of the Institute or sug- 
gested by participants. One 90-minute period per week for 6 
weeks. Open only to accredited teachers at the secondary 
school level. Graduate credit available. Summer session only. 

GEOGRAPHY 

(See General Science 202 and Social Science 302) 

HEURISTICS 

Heuristics 301-302 2 hours each 

The investigation and discovery of methodologies of problem- 
solving within a broad spectrum of academic disciplines and 
pragmatic pursuits. Not open to freshmen. 




History and 
Political Science 



AIMS 

To present the origin and development of institutions 
and ideas; to point out the great traditions that are 
molding our thought and action today; and to gain 
a better perspective of our political, economic, cul- 
tural, and social life. The courses in Political Science 
are intended to acquaint the student with political in- 
stitutions and political problems in the United States 
and the world today. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION IN HISTORY 
Twelve hours in European and World History, includ- 
ing History 301-302, twelve hours in American 
History, six to eight hours in Political Science, and 
History and Political Science 477-478, and a Senior 



702 



Project. Two to four hours should be selected from 
the area of African, Asian, or Latin American History. 
Students are encouraged to select a related field from 
one of the other social sciences, the humanities, or 
some other clearly related area of study. Students 
anticipating graduate or professional training should 
anticipate possible requirements in the areas of for- 
eign language, statistics, accounting, or computer 
technology. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
AND HISTORY 

Students selecting a field of concentration in this area 
are required to take Political Science 225, 327, 328, 
and History 201, 202, 301, and 302. Ten to twelve 
hours should be elected from Political Science 339, 
341, 465, and History 466. A Senior Project must be 
completed. The following courses may also be in- 
cluded as part of the Field of Concentration: History 
371, 372, 426. Students are encouraged to select a 
related field from one of the other social sciences, the 
humanities, or some other clearly related area of 
study. Students anticipating graduate or professional 
training should anticipate possible requirements in 
the areas of foreign language, statistics, accounting, 
or computer technology. 



Hist. 209 History and Philosophy of Science 4 hours 

See General Sciences 209. (Cannot be counted for social sciences 
distribution requirement). 



Hist. 297-298 Special Studies in History 2 or 4 hours 

A course designed to allow students to study under professors 
and other competent foreign visitors who are on the Bethany 
campus on a short term basis. Depending upon the instructor 
at the time, the course may deal with either the history or recent 
developments in areas such as Africa, Asia, Latin America, Eastern 
Europe, etc. 

Hist. 301-302 Modern European 

History 4 hours each 

A survey of European civilization from the sixteenth century to 
1945. Second semester begins with 1815. 

Hist. 303 Modern Economic History 

and Development 2 hours 

A study of the development of modern industrial economics. 
Emphasis will be placed on nineteenth and twentieth century 
United States development and economic history. Attention will 
also be paid to the problems of the underdeveloped economies 
of the twentieth century. Alternate years: 1972-73. 

Hist. 325 British History to the 

Eighteenth Century 4 hours 

Political, economic, intellectual, social and cultural topics will be 
discussed. The British before 1066 as an emerging primitive peo- 
ple, medieval Britain, sixteenth century protest and national iden- 
tity, and the nature of seventeenth century revolution will be 
considered. 



EUROPEAN AND WORLD HISTORY 

Hist. 100 Development of World 

Civilization 4 hours 

The development of political, social and cultural institutions from 
ancient times to the twentieth century, especially as they con- 
tribute to an understanding of our civilization. Assignments deal- 
ing with Asia, Africa and Latin America will be included. 



Hist. 326 British History Since 

the Seventeenth Century 4 hours 

British history in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth cen- 
turies will be included. Political, economic, intellectual, social 
and cultural matters will be discussed. Pre-modern peasantry, the 
British attitude towards the American Revolution, the "greatest 
good of the greatest number," imperialism, the twentieth cen- 
tury Establishment, and post 1945 Britain will be considered. 



703 



Hist. 351 Ancient Near East Civilization 4 hours 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the historical 
development of life, culture, and religions of Mesopotamia, Egypt 
and the Syro-Phoenician coast including international relations 
from Pre-history to Alexander the Great. (May be taken for credit 
as Religious Studies 351). 

Hist. 368 History of Russia 4 hours 

A survey of Russian civilization with emphasis on the period 
since 1917. Alternate years: 1972-73. 

Hist, or Pol. Sci. 371 History and Politics of 

Africa and the 
Middle East 4 hours 

A survey of the area. The effect of geography, tribal development 
and the European impact on the present problems of the area 
will be studied. Developments since World War II will be empha- 
sized. 

Hist, or Pol. Sci. 372 History, Culture and 

Politics of Asia 4 hours 

A survey of the history, civilization and recent developments in 
South, East and Southeast Asia. 

Hist. 427 Ancient Civilization 4 hours 

A history of the Near East, Greece, and Rome to the fourth cen- 
tury A.D. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Hist. 428 The Dying Roman Empire and 

the Middle Ages 4 hours 

Following a brief resume of the Roman Empire at the time of its 
greatest grandeur, the course will deal with the decline of ancient 
civilization, the Byzantine and Islamic cultures, and especially 
the development of Western Europe to the fourteenth century. 
Alternate years: 1972-73. 

Hist, or Pol. Sci. 466 British Constitutional 

History 4 hours 

A history of British constitutional and legal developments from 
the medieval period through the twentieth century. Alternate 
years: 1973-74. 



Hist. 468 Revolution and Reaction in 

Modern History 4 hours 

A comparative study of the Puritan, American, French and Russian 
revolutions. Emphasis will be placed on the origins and charac- 
teristics of revolution, the roles of revolutionary figures, and the 
nature of reactions to revolutions. Alternate years: 1973-74. 



AMERICAN HISTORY 

Hist. 201-202 United States History 4 hours each 
The political, economic and social growth of America. First 
semester covers the period of exploration to 1865; second se- 
mester covers from 1865 to the present day. 



Hist. 225 West Virginia History, 

Government and Geography 



2 hours 



The history of the western section of Virginia to the Civil War 
and the history and government of West Virginia to the present 
day. The physical, political and social geography of the state will 
be included. 

Hist. 341 Development of the 

American Nation 4 hours 

A history of the United States from 1816 to 1850. This course 
considers the growth of American nationalism following the War 
of 1812; the rise of Jacksonian Democracy and the effects of that 
movement through the Polk administration. Alternate years: 
1972-73. 

Hist. 342 Age of Big Business 4 hours 

The political, social, and economic history of the United States 
from 1865 to 1914. Emphasis is placed on the growth of indus- 
trialism during this period and the resulting attempts at social 
reform. Alternate years: 1972-73. 

Hist. 344 Civil War and Reconstruction 4 hours 
A study of the coming of the American Civil War and the period 
of Reconstruction to the year 1877. Attention is devoted to the 
evolution of the slavery controversy, the constitutional question 
of nullification and secession, the development of Southern na- 
tionalism, an analysis of Civil War causation, the campaigns of 



704 



the war, and objectives and programs of Presidential and of Con- 
gressional Reconstruction. Prerequisite: Hist. 201 or its equiv- 
alent. Alternate-years: 1972-73. 



forces involved in the government of the United States at the 
national, state and local level. Special emphasis will be placed 
on the federal system and federal-state relationships. 



Hist. 423 Contemporary United 

States History 4 hours 

A study of the political, economic, diplomatic and social his- 
tory of the United States since 1933. Alternate years: 1973-74. 



Pol. Sci. 327 History of Political Thought 4 hours 

A survey of the political theories of the Western world. A special 
effort is made to relate the principal themes in political thought 
to contemporary politics. 



Hist, or Pol. Sci. 425 History of 

Latin America 2 hours 

A brief introduction to the history of pre-Columbian, Colonial, 
and Republican history of Latin America. Alternate years: 
1972-73. 



Pol. Sci. 328 Comparative Government 4 hours 

A comparative study of governments of the major powers of 
Europe, including Great Britain, France, the German Federal Re- 
public and the Soviet Union. A study of comparative political 
institutions throughout the world is included. 



Hist, or Pol. Sci. 426 Introduction to 

Latin America 2 hours 

A study of the geography, politics, social composition, economic 
structure, and problems of modern Latin America. Alternate 
years: 1972-73. 

Hist, and Pol. Sci. 477 junior Seminar 2 hours 

A study of the major works of the ancient, medieval, and modern 
European historians and political scientists; with emphasis on 
the various schools and methods of interpretation. 

Hist, and Pol. Sci. 478 Junior Seminar 2 hours 

A study of the major works of United States historians and polit- 
ical scientists; with emphasis on the various schools and methods 
of interpretation. 

Hist. 487-488 Independent Study 

in History 2 or 4 hours each 

Hist, and Pol. Sci. 490 Senior Project 2-6 hours 

Begins first semester of the senior year. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Pol. Sci. 225 American Government 4 hours 

An introduction to the chief political institutions and social 



Pol. Sci. 339 American Political Parties 2 hours 

A study of major and minor political parties in the United States. 
Attention is given to the history, structure, functions, tactics 
and financing of political parties in our democratic system, as 
well as a brief look at foreign party systems and at major Amer- 
ican interest groups. Political Science 225 or History 201-202 
are recommended for background in the field. 

Pol. Sci. 341 American Foreign Policy 4 hours 

A study of the historical development of American foreign policy 
and its important contemporary trends. The course emphasizes 
an analysis of the United States' major commitments in the years 
since World War II. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Pol. Sci. 378 Philosophy of Social 

Issues and Politics 4 hours 

This is a philosophical study of the principles involved in the 
realms of political philosophy and presupposed by many social 
issues. (May be taken for credit as Philosophy 378). Does not 
meet Social Science Distribution Requirement. Alternate years: 
1972-73. 

Pol. Sci. or Hist. 465 Constitutional Law 4 hours 

A study of the judicial elaboration and interpretation of the U.S. 
Constitution. A case study approach to the historical develop- 
ment of American constitutional principles. Political Science 225 



w r , 



or History 201-202 recommended for background in the field. 
Alternate years: 1972-73. 

Hist, and Pol. Sci. 477 Junior Seminar 2 hours 

A study of the major works of the ancient, medieval, and modern 
European historians and political scientists; with emphasis on the 
various schools and methods of interpretation. 

Hist, and Pol. Sci. 478 Junior Seminar 2 hours 

A study of the major works of United States historians and polit- 
ical scientists; with emphasis on the various schools and methods 
of interpretation. 

Pol. Sci. 487-488 Independent Study in 

Political Science 2 or 4 hours each 



Mathematics 



Hist, and Pol. Sci. 490 Senior Project 

Begins first semester of the senior year. 



2-6 hours 




AIMS 

To provide the general student with a knowledge of 
the foundations of mathematics; to give the prospec- 
tive teacher an understanding and appreciation of 
the fundamental ideas of elementary mathematics; 
to provide a tool for the technical student; and to 
give the prospective graduate student a foundation 
for later study and research. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION IN MATHEMATICS 
A minimum of 32 hours in the Department, includ- 
ing Mathematics 201, 202, 203, and at least 16 ad- 
vanced hours which must include Mathematics 353, 
401, 402, and a Senior Project (Math. 490). Students 
interested in mathematics as a teaching subject 
should elect Mathematics 326 and 354. Students inter- 
ested in science and engineering should elect Mathe- 
matics 350 and 452. Students interested in economics 
should elect Mathematics 169, 325, and 382. Students 
interested in graduate school mathematics should 
elect Mathematics 301-302, and 403. Two courses in 
the Department should be taken in the senior year. 
Sequence of courses subject to approval of the Senior 
Advisor. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF CONCEN- 
TRATION IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS 
Option I (Physics and/or Chemistry). A minimum of 
36 hours with at least 20 hours in the Department of 
Mathematics which must include Mathematics 201, 
202, 203, 350, and 452, and a Senior Project (490), and 
16 hours in the Department of Physics and/or 
Chemistry which should include Physics 201-202 and 
Chemistry 439-440. Recommended courses include 



706 



Mathematics 401-402, Physics 303, 305, 322 and/or 
Chemistry 473-474. Sequence of courses subject to 
approval of the Senior Advisor. 

Option II (Economics). A minimum of 36 hours 
with at least 20 hours in the Department of Mathe- 
matics which must include Mathematics 201, 202, 
203, 328, 381, and a Senior Project (Math. 490), 16 
hours in the Department of Economics which must 
include Economics 301-302. Recommended courses 
include Mathematics 169, 252, 325, and/or 382 and 
Economics 265-266. Sequence of courses subject to 
approval of the Senior Advisor. 

Option III (Computer Science). A minimum of 36 
hours with at least 24 hours in the Department of 
Mathematics which must include Mathematics 169, 
201, 202, 203, 353, 354, 382, and a Senior Project 
(Math. 490), and 12 hours in a related field subject to 
the approval of the Senior Advisor. Recommended 
courses include Mathematics 325, 401, 402, and Eco- 
nomics 266, and Physics 269. Sequence of courses 
subject to approval of the Senior Advisor. 

Math. 103 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 hours 

Basic mathematics for Freshmen entering with three years or less 
of high school mathematics, for students whose background is 
insufficient for the calculus course and for students who need 
mathematics as a foundation for study in the social or biological 
sciences, general physical science, education, or business. The 
course includes set theory, linear and quadratic equations and 
inequalities, graphs of functions, remainder and factor theorems, 
equations involving radicals, ratio and proportion, basic trigo- 
nometry, logarithms, compound interest and annuities, permu- 
tations and combinations, probability, mathematical induction, 
binomial and normal distribution, topics in statistics. 

Math. 169 Introduction to 

Computer Science 2 hours 

An introduction to computer programming and computer design. 
Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in solving 
problems encountered in mathematics. 



Math. 201 Calculus I 4 hours 

Technique of differentiation and integration with applications. 
Functions and their graphs including the conic sections, maxima 
and minima, rate problems. Area between two curves, length 
of a line, volume and surface area. Moments centroids, theorems 
of Pappus, hydrostatic pressure and work. Transcendental func- 
tions and elementary differential equations. 

Math. 202 Calculus II 4 hours 

Methods of integration including integration by parts, partial 
fractions, substitutions, trigonometric functions, improper inte- 
grals and numerical methods. Determinants and linear equations, 
tangents and normals, Newton's method, second degree curves 
and curve fitting. Polar coordinates and graphs, areas and angles 
of intersection in polar coordinates, hyperbolic functions, the 
hanging cable, vectors and parametric equations, curvature and 
normal vectors, velocity and acceleration. 

Math. 203 Calculus III 4 hours 

Intermediate calculus with emphasis on vector notation and 
functions of several variables. Scalar and vector products, space 
coordinates and space curves, quadric surfaces. Partial differenti- 
ation and applications, directional derivative and gradient. Multi- 
ple integrals with physical applications, polar and cylindrical 
coordinates, expansion of functions and tests for convergence. 
Taylor's theorem, Fourier series, indeterminate forms, and an 
introduction to the complex variable. 

Math. 226 Mathematics for Teachers 4 hours 

A study of the fundamental principles and concepts of arith- 
metic. A course designed to acquaint students with the basic 
mathematics necessary for teaching in the elementary field. 



Math. 243 Descriptive Geometry 



2 hours 



Principles of projections, metric and non-metric problems, plane 
sections and developments, intersections of surfaces, construc- 
tion of perspective drawings. This course achieves an effective 
correlation between descriptive and analytic geometry by pre- 
senting both the graphic and the algebraic methods. Alternate 
years: 1972-73. 

Math. 244 Plane Surveying 2 hours 

Care and use of surveying instruments; field problems; compu- 



707 



tation and mapping. One hour class and four hours field work 
each week. 



703. Economics 200. This course does not carry credit toward a 
major in mathematics. Alternate years: 1972-73. 



Math. 252 Finite Mathematics 2 hours 

Introduction to concepts occurring in modern mathematics. Sym- 
bolic logic and truth tables, set theory, vectors and matrix theory, 
binomial theorem and probability theory, linear programming 
and game theory. This course includes a review of algebra and 
is designed especially for the non-science student. Prerequisite: 
Math. 103 or Math. 226. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Math. 301 Real Analysis 4 hours 

Standard material on the real numbers, sets and functions, se- 
quences, continuity, topology of real line, Cantor set and Cantor 
function and special type of extension problem. This course helps 
to bridge the gap between computational and rigorous mathe- 
matics. Prerequisite: Math. 202. 



Math. 302 Complex Variables 4 hours 

Complex numbers, elementary functions, analytic functions, con- 
tour integration, Taylor and Laurent series, conformal mapping, 
boundary value problems, Laplacian equations. Prerequisite: 
Math. 203. Alternate years: 1973-74. 



Math. 325 Numerical Analysis 4 hours 

Numerical methods for integration, differential equations, matrix 
inversion, estimation of characteristic roots. Prerequisite: Math. 
769 and 202. 



Math. 341 Vector Analysis 



2 hours 



Math. 326 



Introduction to 
Modern Geometry 



4 hours 



Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries; an introduction to 
synthetic projective geometry; the concept of limit and infinity; 
geometrical constructions, recent developments and theorems. 
Prerequisite: Math 201-202. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Math. 328 Mathematics of 

Finance and Investment 2 hours 

The operation of interest and annuities; amortization of debts 
and sinking funds; valuation of bonds; the experience table and 
calculation of premiums for life insurance. Prerequisite: Math. 



Elementary operations, scalar and vector products, gradient, op- 
erator differentiation formulas, divergence and curl, integration, 
line integral, work and potential, surface integrals, reciprocal 
systems, general coordinates, applications. Prerequisite: Math. 
201-202. This course does not carry credit toward a major in 
mathematics. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Math. 350 Differential Equations 4 hours 

Methods of solution of ordinary differential equations and appli- 
cations to the physical sciences. Frobenius' and Picard's methods 
for power series solutions, Laplace transforms, numerical, bound- 
ary value problems, Fouries series, partial differential equations, 
the Laplacian equations and applications to heat conduction and 
vibration. Prerequisite: Math. 202. 

Math. 353 Modern Abstract Algebra 4 hours 

Rings, integral domains and fields, Peano axioms, real and com- 
plex numbers, polynomial rings, partial fractions, properties of 
groups, Coset's and Lagrange's theorem, vector spaces, systems 
of linear equations, matrices and determinants, algebra of mat- 
rices, linear transformations. Prerequisite: Math. 301. 

Math. 354 Linear Algebra 4 hours 

Linear systems, matrices, vectors, linear transformation, unitary 
geometry with characteristic values. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Math. 381 Statistical Methods 4 hours 

Introductory statistical analysis including frequency distribution 
and graphic presentation of data, measures of central tendency, 
relative positions in a distribution, variability, the normal curve 
and its applications, correlation and regression, probability and 
statistical inference, testing differences between means, intro- 
duction to analysis of variance. 

Math. 382 Mathematical Statistics 4 hours 

Introduction to probability, basic distribution theory, limit the- 
orems, mathematical expectation, probability densities, random 
variables, sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, 



708 



tests of hypotheses, regression and correlation, analysis of vari- 
ance. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Math 401-402 Advanced Calculus 4 hours each 

Theory of the derivative and the definite integral, partial differ- 
entiation and its applications, Green's and Stokes' theorems, 
power series, Fourier series, vector notation, complex variable. 
Prerequisite: Math. 301. 



Math. 403 Topology 



4 hours 



Point-set topology, topological spaces, connectedness, compact- 
ness, continuity, separation axioms, countability axioms, metric 
spaces, product spaces. Prerequisite: Math. 301 . 

Math. 452 Applied Mathematics 4 hours 

Applications of ordinary and partial differential equations to 
problems in physics, chemistry and electricity; vibrating string 
and heat flow problems; vector calculus and applications. Pre- 
requisite: Math. 350. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Math. 477-478 Seminar in 

Mathematics 2 hours each 

Special reports prepared and presented by the students under 
supervision. The work of the second semester will help prepare 
the student for the comprehensive examination. Required of 
all students concentrating in mathematics. Open only to seniors. 



Math. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Mathematics 



4 hours 



Approved methods in teaching mathematics at the secondary 
level; class period activities of the teacher; procedures and 
devices in teaching; organization of materials, testing, aims, and 
modern trends. Open only to sophomores and juniors who 
expect to teach. 

Math. 487-488 Independent Study in 

Mathematics 2 or 4 hours each 




Music 



Math. 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 



AIMS 

To promote the understanding and appreciation of 
music of generally recognized excellence; to relate 
that music to the cultural conditions of respective 
periods; to provide an integrated study of music the- 
ory, history, literature and performance; to provide 
the college community with stylistically sound per- 
formances of good works; and to provide for the 
thorough training of musicians at the pre-professional 
level. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD 
OF CONCENTRATION IN 
MUSIC LITERATURE 

Students may elect a Field of Concentration in music 
literature or in music education. Requirements for 
concentration in music literature are Music 111, 112, 
303, 327, 343, three courses in the 201 through 204 
music literature sequence, and 10 hours in applied 
music of which a maximum of four hours may be in 
ensemble, Music 478, and Senior Project. 



709 



REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD 
OF CONCENTRATION IN 
MUSIC EDUCATION 

Students electing a field of concentration in music 
education and seeking certification as teachers in any 
state must fulfill the requirements for certification in 
West Virginia which amounts to 50 hours in music — 
two hours more than may be counted toward an A.B. 
degree. The requirements are Music 111, 112, 303, 
327, 343, 422, 439, Fine Arts 201 or 202, Music 121 
through 124, four hours of piano (or proficiency ex- 
amination), two hours of voice, six hours of concen- 
tration in voice or any one instrument and two hours 
in ensemble, Music 478, and Senior Project. Also re- 
quired, but counting as professional education are 
Music 340-341, 480, and student teaching. 



LITERATURE AND THEORY OF MUSIC 

Music 101-102 Introduction to Music 

as an Art and Science 2 hours each 

The elements of tonal relationships, simple rhythms, intervals, 
melodies in both major and minor modes, recognition of the 
sights and sounds of the orchestral instruments, historical sig- 
nificance of form, the voice; designed to give the student the 
ability to recognize, reproduce and record simple melodic and 
rhythmic patterns. 

Music 111 Theory I 4 hours 

Rudiments of music structure and basic disciplines of chord 
connection and harmonization of simple melodies. Emphasis on 
identifying sounds by hearing and writing. Alternate years: Fall 
1972-73. 

Music 112 Theory II 4 hours 

Techniques of figured bass, modulation, controlled dissonance 
and further use of chromatically altered chords. Continued em- 



phasis on hearing through dictation, sight-singing and keyboard 
exercises. Alternate years: Spring 1972-73. 



Music 201 The Romantic Period 4 hours 

A general listener's approach to the music, instrumental and 
vocal, of composers from Schubert, Chopin, Schumann and 
Mendelssohn through Liszt, Berlioz, Verdi, Wagner, Brahms, 
Tschaikowsky and other 19th century composers. Alternate 
years: 1973-74. 

Music 202 The 20th Century 

Musical Styles 4 hours 

Jazz and serious music of the 20th century from a general listen- 
er's approach. Investigation into New Orleans and Chicago styles, 
Swing, Bop, Progressive and Rock; the Impressionists, Schonberg, 
Bartok, Hindemith, and other significant serious composers, in- 
cluding electronic, aleatory and experimental music. 

Music 203 Music of the Baroque Period 4 hours 

A general listener's approach to music in various media from 
Monteverdi to circa 1750 with considerable emphasis on Bach 
and Handel. Alternate years: 1972-73. 

Music 204 The Classical Period 4 hours 

A general listener's approach to the music, instrumental and 
vocal, of the late 18th and early 19th centuries heavily con- 
centrated upon Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert. Alter- 
nate years: 1972-73. 



Music 303 Theory III 



4 hours 



Comprehensive extension of Theory II. Intensive study of stylistic 
elements of Classical and Baroque periods. Introduction to char- 
acteristics of later harmonic styles. Continued emphasis on aural 
and keyboard skills. Alternate years: Fall 1973-74. 

Music 327 Music History 4 hours 

The historical significance of the main periods and types of 
music. Requires some technical background. Alternate years: 
1973-74. 



770 

Music 340-341 Methods and Materials of 
Teaching Music in the 
Elementary Schools 2 hours each 

Consideration of the aims and values of elementary school 
music with opportunities to develop teaching techniques, and 
to become familiar with the standard materials. 



Music 343 Counterpoint 



2 hours 



Basic principles of writing two, three, and four-voice counter- 
point, and their application in the smaller forms of composition. 
Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Music 344 Orchestration 2 hours 

A course in arranging music for various types of instrumental 
ensembles. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Music 422 Instrumental Conducting 2 hours 

The technique of the baton and the different problems to be 
met in conducting orchestra and band; the introduction to score 
reading; an opportunity for experience through the conducting 
of the college instrumental groups. Open only to advanced 
students. Alternate years: 1972-73. 

Music 439 Choral Conducting 2 hours 

The technique of the baton and the different problems to be 
met in conducting chorus; the introduction to score reading; 
an opportunity for experience through the conducting of the 
college choral groups. Open only to advanced students. Alter- 
nate years: 1972-73. 

Music 478 Senior Seminar 2 hours 

Survey and review of the field of music; its history, theory and 
literature. Required of all students concentrating in the field of 
music. 

Music 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Music in 
Secondary Schools 4 hours 

Analysis of music offered in senior and junior high schools 
throughout the United States. Consideration of problems, ob- 
jectives and materials in teaching vocal and instrumental music, 



theory and appreciation courses in secondary schools. Oppor- 
tunities for developing practical teaching projects. 



Music 487-488 



Independent 
Study 



2 or 4 hours each 



Music 490 Senior Project 2 or 4 hours 

An independent, student-initiated project which may be research, 
creative work or performance. 



APPLIED MUSIC 

(Courses in applied music may be repeated for credit.) 

Music 119 Class Instruction in 

Percussion Instruments 1 hour 

Class instruction in the basic techniques of percussion instru- 
ments. This course is designed to acquaint the student with 
the snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, tympani, mallet instruments, 
and the reading and scoring of percussion notation. Alternate 

years: 1972-73. 

Music 121-122 Class Strings 1 hour each 

Class instruction in the basic techniques of stringed instruments. 
Required of all students with a concentration in Music Educa- 
tion. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Music 123 Class Instruction in 

Brass Instruments 1 hour 

Required of all students with a concentration in Music Education 
Alternate years: 1972-73. 

Music 124 Class Instruction in 

Woodwind Instruments 1 hour 

Required of all students with a concentration in Music Education. 
Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Music 125-126 Concert Choir 1 hour each 

The preparation for concert performance of standard literature, 
both sacred and secular. Membership limited; enrollment by 
audition. 



777 



Music 127-128 Male Chorus 1 hour each 

The study and performance of concert repertoire for male voices. 
Membership limited; enrollment by audition. 

Music 129-130 Class Instruction in 

the Guitar 1 hour each 

This course is a basic introduction to the guitar which teaches 
techniques and music theory simultaneously. It begins with easy 
chords and progresses logically through various keys using songs 
suitable and interesting to today's student. Class participation 
and parallel listening is provided by the use of cassettes. Students 
will provide their own guitars. Limited to 15 students. 

Music 131-132 Brass Choir 1 hour per year 

The study and performance of baroque and contemporary music 
tor brass instruments. Enrollment by audition. 

Music 133-134 Band 1 hour each 

An ensemble of wind and percussion instruments which plays 
for festive and athletic events of the college. Enrollment by 
approval of the director. 

Music 135-136 Chamber Music 1 hour per year 

Study and occasional performance of the standard chamber 
literature — quartets, trios, other works suited to the instru- 
mentalists available. Admission by audition. 

Music 137-138 Stage Band 1 hour per year 

The study and performance of arrangements for the large jazz 
band. The course is designed to develop in the students an 
appreciation tor the musical styles of Glen Miller, Woody 
Herman, Stan Kenton, and others. Membership will be limited 
by audition and approval of the instructor. 



fine musical performance. Private lessons. Enrollment by per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Music 145-146 Strings 1-2 hours each 

Private lessons in violin, viola, cello or bass. Course open to 
beginners as well as to student with previous training. Enrollment 
by permission of the instructor. 

Music 147-148 Voice 1-2 hours each 

Vocal technique, theory and literature. Open to all students who 
have adequate native ability with or without previous vocal 
training. Private lessons. Enrollment by permission of the in- 
structor. 

Music 149-150 Wind Instruments 1-2 hours each 

Private lessons in basic brass and woodwind instruments. Open 

to beginners as well as to students with previous training. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Music 301-302 Advanced Organ 1-2 hours each 

Open only to students who can demonstrate satisfactorily their 
ability to play compositions equivalent in difficulty to the follow- 
ing: Bach — G minor Fugue (The Little); D minor Toccata and 
Fugue; or Widor — Toccata from Symphony V. Private lessons. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Music 305-306 Advanced Piano 1-2 hours each 

Open only to more advanced students who can demonstrate 
satisfactorily their ability to perform compositions equivalent in 
difficulty to the following: Beethoven Op. 27 No. 2; Bach — 
Preludes and Fugues Nos. 2 and 21 (Vol. I). Students will be ex- 
pected to perform in public recitals from time to time. Private 
lessons. Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 



Music 141-142 Organ 1-2 hours each 

Technique, theory and literature of the organ. Open to all stu- 
dents who have had some training in either piano or organ. 
Private lessons. Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Music 143-144 Piano 1-2 hours each 

Literature and technique of piano playing designed to develop 
in the students a discriminating appreciation of fine music and 



Music 307-308 Advanced Strings 1-2 hours each 

Open only to students who are able to play satisfactorily music 
equivalent in difficulty to the Kreutzer Etudes and DeBeriot 
Concertos for violin. Public performance required. Private les- 
sons. Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Music 309-310 Advanced Voice 1-2 hours each 

Open only to students who have completed four semesters of 



772 



voice study, can read at sight, have adequate use of at least one 
modern foreign language, and can demonstrate the ability to 
perform numbers equivalent in difficulty to standard operatic 
and lieder literature. Public performance required. Private les- 
sons. Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 



Philosophy 




Hi? . 



AIMS 

To enable the student to discover and develop sound 
bases for interpreting self and society through a care- 
ful examination of his beliefs, actions and claims to 
knowledge; to assist the student in becoming aware 
of the nature and status of philosophical problems, 
commitments, ideologies and models that serve as 
the foundation of human life; and to provide the stu- 
dent who expects to pursue graduate studies in Phi- 
losophy with a sound basis in the major areas of his 
field. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

Concentration in Philosophy is not limited to those 
who are professionally interested in the field, that is, 
those who plan for graduate work or a teaching ca- 
reer in Philosophy. For several persons Philosophy 
may hold some promise as one way to approach a 
liberal education; it may be an important related 
field; or, it may serve as an area of intensive study, 
wide in scope, that prepares one well for graduate 
work in another field. 

Concentration in Philosophy requires satisfactory 
completion of a minimum of 24 hours plus a Senior 
Project, and a Senior Comprehensive Examination. 
The 24 hour minimum consists of: 226, 323, 325, 326, 
425, and 426. The Senior Project (2-8 hours) will be 
received and evaluated in the final semester of the 
student's academic program. 

The Department is open to discussion of special 
fields of concentration that may include Philosophy 
as a significant part of the student's program. 

The student who is considering graduate work 
should be aware that many good graduate programs 



773 



in Philosophy require a reading knowledge of French 
and German. 

Phil. 201 Introduction to Philosophy 4 hours 

A survey of basic areas of philosophical concern, including prob- 
lems of knowledge, person, world, philosophy and knowledge 
of God, and value systems. Student involvement in the basic 
issues of philosophy, as well as student participation in the 
process of philosophical thinking, are course goals. 

Phil. 226 Ethics 4 hours 

Several major ethical theories will be examined; e.g., egoism, 
hedonism, utilitarianism, self-realization, duty-ethics. Students 
will seek to determine precisely what such theories involve and 
whether commitment to such theories is acceptable in light of 
their logical consequences. 

Phil. 323 Basic Logic 4 hours 

Mastery of the fundamental principles of logic is important for 
anyone who wishes to use and recognize sound reasoning and 
valid arguments. There is a difference between emotional inten- 
sity and validity, between verbal disputes and conclusions that 
follow (logically) from premises. Recognition of the bases of 
these differences and development of the very practical abilities 
to recognize, construct, and analyze various forms of argument 
and detect logical errors (fallacies) are important objectives of 
this course. 

Phil. 325 History of Philosophy: 

Ancient and Medieval 4 hours 

Western philosophical thought from the Seventh Century B.C. 
to the close of the medieval period. A study of ancient and 
medieval philosophers and their analysis of problems and solu- 
tions. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Phil. 326 History of Philosophy: Modern 4 hours 

Western philosophical thought from the Renaissance through 
the Eighteenth Century. The rise of the new critical spirit and 
the Empirical and Rationalist traditions will be included. Alter- 
nate years: 1973-74. 



Phil. 329 Nineteenth Century Philosophies 4 hours 

Selected reading and examination of significant philosophies and 
philosophers between the era of Kant and that called the con- 
temporary era. Both Idealist and Empirical traditions will be 
examined. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Phil. 335-J Philosophy and Science Fiction 4 hours 

Selected readings in science fiction will be used as a basis for 
exploring the concepts of individuality, loneliness and value. 
The stretched concepts in science fiction may provide a new 
light in which to examine not only extrapolated fantasies, but 
also the realities of our present concepts, their grounds and 
implications, their value and our valuational activities and com- 
mitments. Offered in January term only. 

Phil. 336-J Towards a System of 

Personal Knowledge 4 hours 

Course is concerned with building a foundation for the con- 
struction of a system of personal knowledge. The focus is upon 
the idea of a foundation and the idea of a system — the founda- 
tion being the function and content of concepts relating to per- 
sonal knowledge and the system being the arrangement and 
ordering-principles of those concepts. Offered in January term 
only. 

Phil. 349 History and Philosophy of Science 4 hours 
A study of some of the major ideas conceived by Western man 
in attempting to comprehend and describe the natural world. 
(May be taken for credit as General Sciences 209). Prerequisite: 
one year of college level science or consent of the instructor. 
Alternate years: Fall 1973-74. 



Phil. 363 Philosophy of Religion 



4 hours 



An inquiry into the general subject of religion from a philosophi- 
cal point of view. Religious experience, faith and knowledge, 
certainty and nature of deity, religious feeling and confidence, 
the language of religious commitment, types of meaning in- 
volved, and the possibility of discovery, are examples of the 
kinds of topics and areas that may be investigated. Classical and 
contemporary approaches will be studied. (May be taken for 
credit as Religious Studies 322). Alternate years: 1972-73. 



774 



Phil. 368 Aesthetics 4 hours 

Selected readings and certain theories of aesthetics will be ex- 
amined. The nature of aesthetic experience, its relation to other 
valuing activities and experience, as well as its place in art 
production, appreciation, and creativity will be studied. Alter- 
nate years: 1972-73. 

Phil. 375 Philosophy of Man 

and Culture 4 hours 

This is a philosophical study of man in social and cultural re- 
lations, one aspect of Philosophical Anthropology. Emphasis is 
placed on the relevance of analysis of (studies and theories of) 
civilization, culture, and society for a philosophical understand- 
ing of man. (May be taken for credit as Sociology 375). Alternate 
years: 1973-74. 

Phil. 378 Philosophy of Social Issues 

and Politics 4 hours 

This is a philosophical study of the principles involved in the 
realms of political philosophy and presupposed by many social 
issues. (May be taken for credit as Political Science 378 or Soci- 
ology 378.) Does not meet Social Science Distribution Require- 
ment. Alternate years: 7972-7973. 

Phil. 425 Phenomenology and 

Existentialism 4 hours 

Either historical or critical (or a combined) emphasis will be 
given to a study of selected works by philosophers who represent 
main areas and ideas in the Twentieth Century speculative tra- 
dition. Influential areas include: Systematic tendencies; Pheno- 
menology; and Existentialism. Alternate years: 1972-73. 

Phil. 426 Positivism and Analysis 4 hours 

Either historical or critical (or a combined) emphasis will be 
given to a study of selected works by philosophers who represent 
main areas and ideas in the Twentieth Century analytic tradition. 
Influential areas include: Realism; Logical Analysis; Positivism; 
and Conceptual Elucidation. Alternate years: 1972-73. 

Phil. 428 American Philosophy 4 hours 

A study of significant stages in the development of philosophical 




ideas in the United States. This includes identification and ex- 
amination of representative men, movements, and issues, and 
the contemporary rediscovery of American Philosophy. Alter- 
nate years: 1973-74. 

Phil. 467-468 Seminar in 

Philosophy 2 or 4 hours each 

Intensive examination of the perspective of one great Western 
or non-Western philosopher, or one major problem or related 
group of problems, or of one major tendency. Permission of 
the instructor is required. 1972-73 topic: "Studies in Ancient 
Philosophy — Plato." 

Phil. 477-478 Senior Seminar 2 hours each 

This seminar will seldom consist of a general review of all areas 
of Philosophy; the topic or particular area of study will be 
chosen as a result of student and faculty conferences. Student 
ability, interest, and need will be important factors. Conferences 
with and approval of the Chairman of the Department are re- 
quired before enrollment. 

Phil. 487-488 Independent Study in 

Philosophy 2 or 4 hours each 



Phil. 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 



Physical Education 
and Health 



AIMS 

To promote the physical well being of the student; 
to provide opportunities for students to participate in 
and secure a reasonable degree of proficiency in rec- 
reational activities; to train our majors for profes- 
sional opportunities in Physical Education, Health 
Education, and Recreation both in educational and 
community situations. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL STUDENTS 
FOR GRADUATION 

All students graduating from Bethany College must 
satisfy the health, physical education and recreation 
practicum. The Department recognizes the impor- 
tance of teaching lasting carry-over physical skills and 
encourages you to satisfy this requirement by taking 
P.E. 101-102, 201-202. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 

CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of 30 hours in the Department which 

must include the following courses: P.E. 227, 263, 

426, 443, 470, 475, 480, and the Senior Project (P.E. 

490), and 8 hours in biology which must include Biol. 

100, 101, and 167. 

P.E. 101-102 Freshman Orientation and 

Physical Education 1 hour each 

The techniques and rules of a variety of pnysical activities. An 
activity course. 

P.E. 169-170 Folk Dancing 1 hour each 

Folk dancing from many countries. English and American coun- 



try dances during the first semester and European dances during 
the second semester. An activity course. 

P.E. 201-202 Sophomore Physical 

Education 1 hour each 

The student has a choice of a variety of physical activities. 

P.E. 227 Personal and Community 

Health 2 or 4 hours 

Fundamental knowledge of personal and community health 
matters pertaining to the social group; communicable diseases; 
vital statistics; legal and social regulations. 

P.E. 263 Gymnastics 4 hours 

A comprehensive study of the proper techniques of teaching 
various gymnastic activities including trampoline, horse ropes, 
parallel bars, balance beams, and tumbling and stunts. 

P.E. 267 Theory and Practice of Team Sports 2 hours 

Intensive study and practice methods in the most popular sea- 
sonal team sports, e.g. football, soccer, and volleyball. Fall 
Semester. 

P.E. 268 Theory and Practice of Team Sports 2 hours 

Intensive study and practice methods in the most popular sea- 
son team sports, e.g. basketball, and softball. Spring Semester. 



P.E. 299 Aquatics 



4 hours 



An extensive program in methods and instruction in all aspects 
of aquatics including life saving, water safety, coaching of swim- 
ming and diving, underwater activities, and pool management. 

P.E. 301 Dance 4 hours 

The study of folk, social and modern dance-teaching techniques 
and methods to be used in all levels of the educational system. 

P.E. 305 Principles of Coaching 4 hours 

Philosophy of coaching and technical preparation for coaching. 



I Jf-1 



P.E. 309 Intramural Sports 



2 hours 



Organization, administration and objectives of the intramural 
program of athletics. 



P.E. 310 Adapted Physical Education 



2 hours 



Variations of the normal types of the human organism at differ- 
ent age levels; therapeutic measures, especially those which 
refer to the correction of mechanical defects. 

P.E. 330 Recreation Leadership 4 hours 

The philosophy of American recreation and community organi- 
zation for leisure time activities. Recreational activities, practice 
in the leadership of games, informal dramatics, rhythmics, camp 
craft, and playground activities, with a two hour laboratory for 
hand crafts. 

P.E. 340 Prevention and Care of Injuries 2 hours 

Common hazards of play and athletics. Preventive measures and 
treatment of injuries. Red Cross First Aid Certificate may be 
earned by those who pass the examination. 

P.E. 360 Test and Measurements 2 hours 

Methods used in evaluating outcomes of the physical education 
program. 

P.E. 426 Kinesiology and Physiology of 

Muscular Activity 4 hours 

The structure and function of the human body and their relation- 
ship to bodily exercise patterns. 

P.E. 439 Theory and Practice of 

Individual Sports 2 hours 

Intensive study and practice methods in the most popular sea- 
sonal individual sports, e.g. archery and badminton. Fall 
semester. 

P.E. 440 Theory and Practice of 

Individual Sports 2 hours 

Intensive study and practice methods in the most popular sea- 
sonal individual sports, e.g. bowling, golf, and tennis. Spring 
semester. 




P.E. 443 Principles and Foundations of 

Physical Education 4 hours 

Principles and fundamental foundations basic to a program of 
physical education in the modern educational system. 

P.E. 470 Teaching of Health and 

Family Education 4 hours 

Opportunities to study health and sex problems, activities, and 
methods of teaching the school child. 

P.E. 475 Organization and Administration 

of Physical Education and Athletics 4 hours 
Administrative construction of proper relationships and proce- 
dures in physical education and athletics. 

P.E. 480 Seminar and Methods in Teaching 

Physical Education 4 hours 

A survey of the field and current methods, materials, and tech- 
niques pertinent to teaching physical education. 

P.E. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours each 



P.E. 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 



777 



Physics 



AIMS 

1. To provide the student with an orderly presenta- 
tion of the current body of knowledge expressing 
the physicist's concepts of the physical universe. 

2. To provide opportunities for the student to apply 
acquired knowledge in a limited and controlled 
manner. 

3. To provide the student with guidance directed 
toward a future in a technical field or toward the 
pursuit of an advanced degree in physics. 

4. To provide interdisciplinary experiences amongst 
the sciences and humanities in order to facilitate 
the broadest possible base upon which an indi- 
vidual can function in society. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of thirty-six hours in the Department, in- 
cluding Physics 101-102, 201-202, 300, 301-302, 303, 
305, plus the Senior Project (Physics 490). Integral 
and differential calculus are required as prerequisites 
for Physics 201-202, 301-302. Physics 101 and 102 or 
both may be waived upon demonstration of compe- 
tence in general physics. 

A reading knowledge of German and French is 
recommended for students expecting to do graduate 
work. Mathematics and Chemistry are strongly rec- 
ommended as related fields. Sequence of courses is 
subject to approval of the Chairman of the Depart- 
ment. 

A combined plan with Columbia University is avail- 
able to pre-engineering students. Special programs 
are offered in cooperation with the Department of 
Education to students interested in the teaching of 
science. 



Physics 101-102 General Physics 4 hours each 

First semester: mechanics, heat and wave motion. Second semes- 
ter: electricity, magnetism, light and an introduction to atomic 
and nuclear physics. This course is a prerequisite to all advanced 
physics courses unless otherwise specified. Recommended for 
freshmen. The level of competence achieved in this course will 
be adequate for the needs of most chemists, biologists and 
mathematicians. 

Physics 103 Problems in Physics 2 hours 

A continued study of problems on the level of those encountered 
in General Physics. Recommended for physics majors and stu- 
dents desiring a higher level of competence in problem-solving. 

Physics 169 Introduction to Computer 

Science 2 hours 

An introduction to computer programming and computer design. 
Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in solving 
problems encountered in various fields of specialization. 

Physics 201-202 Intermediate Physics 6 hours each 
Mechanics, electricity and advanced wave motion. Prerequi- 
sites: General Physics as well as differential and integral calculus. 

Physics 203-204 Intermediate Physics 

(Special) 4 hours 

A special offering to facilitate the transition to the new curricu- 
lum. It covers a portion of Intermediate Physics which the stu- 
dent has not taken in the old scheme. Specifically offered for 
those students who have completed the Mechanics section of 
the course in the previous year. Prerequisite: General Physics, 
Mechanics. Offered only during 1972-73. 

Physics 221 Electronics I 4 hours 

Introduction to electronic circuits and their elements with an 
emphasis upon transistor circuitry. This course may be taken by 
students with a minimum of preparation in the sciences. 

Physics 222 Electronics II 4 hours 

Continuation of Electronics I with emphasis upon theory and 
design of electronic circuitry. Prerequisites: General Physics and 



7 78 



Electronics I or permission of Department Chairman. Offered 
Spring 1973-74. 

Physics 269 Advanced Computer Science 2 hours 

An in-depth study of the functions of computing machines in- 
cluding a study of several high level languages, several machine 
oriented languages, and practical considerations for the installa- 
tion and use of computing machines. 

Physics 300 Advanced Physics I 4 hours 

A general, semi-mathematical presentation of topics of interest 
in atomic, nuclear, and solid state physics. Presentation suitable 
for those who have had only General Physics but who are inter- 
ested in more advanced topics in these areas, and who are not 
physics majors. 

Physics 301 Advanced Physics II 2 hours 

Offered concurrently with Advanced Physics I for the benefit 
of physics majors. This course will fill in the detail in mathe- 
matics and concepts which will be omitted for the Advanced 
Physics I portion. 

Physics 302 Advanced Physics III 6 hours 

A continuation of 301 intended primarily for the physics major 
and advanced student in science. The subject matter will be a 
concise mathematical description of the fields generally known 
as atomic, nuclear, and solid state physics. 

Physics 303 Thermophysics 2 hours 

Temperature, calorimetry, expansion phenomena, conductivity, 
change of phase and radiation; thermodynamics and statistical 
theory. Prerequisites: General Physics and Mathematics 201-202. 
Offered Fall 1973-74. 



Physics 305 Geometrical and 
Physical Optics 



2 hours 



Theories of light; reflection, refraction, dispersion, interference 
diffraction, polarization, spectroscopy; optical instruments, laser 
and maser. Prerequisites: General Physics and Mathematics 
201-202. Offered Fall 1972-73. 




Physics 322 Spectroscopic Analysis 2 hours 

A practical course in photography and analysis of spectra in- 
cluding: study of flame and arc spectra; use of grating and 
prism spectrographs, comparator, densitometer and conversion 
technique; applications of spectral analysis. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of Department Chairman. Offered biennially. 

Physics 477 Seminar in Physics 2 hours 

A survey of physics for review and correlation of various fields 
within the discipline. Prerequisite: Permission of Department 
Chairman. 

Physics 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical and 
Life Sciences 4 hours 

(See General Sciences 480) 



Physics 487-488 Independent 
Study 



2 or 4 hours each 



Physics 490 Senior Project 2-6 hours 

Research problems in theoretical or experimental physics. Ex- 
perimental physics is offered in such areas as: vacuum systems, 
machine tool operation, electron systems, spectroscopy, electron 
microscopy, microwave propagation, nuclear radiation and com- 
puter science. Theoretical physics projects are unlimited in 
scope and are arranged through consultation with the student's 
faculty advisor. 



719 



Psychology 



Psychology 101 General Psychology I 



4 hours 



AIMS 

The Department assists the student in gaining a basic 
knowledge of psychology as the experimental science 
of man's behavior; in developing social awareness 
and social adjustment through an understanding of 
the fundamental similarities and differences among 
men; in promoting both original and critical think- 
ing; in giving background preparation for professions 
which deal with individual and group behavior; in 
encouraging students to enter the field, whether in 
teaching, research, or applied psychology. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

Concentration in psychology requires a minimum of 
thirty hours in the Department, including Psychology 
101, 102, 103, 303, 311, 312, 399, 477, and a Senior 
Project (Psych. 490). Additionally, at least six hours 
of work must be completed in biology courses stress- 
ing animal anatomy, physiology, or genetics (Psych. 
335 may be counted for two hours of this require- 
ment). 

No student will be recommended for graduate 
school who has not had a year of mathematics and 
some training in programming and use of the com- 
puter. The student is reminded that most graduate 
schools require a reading knowledge of one or two 
foreign languages, most usually French, German, or 
Spanish. 

Psychology 101 is prerequisite to all other courses 
in the Department unless specifically exempted in a 
course description. 



An introduction to the general field of psychology, including 
learning, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior, and psy- 
chological testing. A prerequisite to other courses in the depart- 
ment. Full semester course with three lectures and one lab 
each week. 



Psychology 102 General Psychology II 



2 hours 



A continuation of Psychology 101, covering the physiological 
bases of behavior, sensation, perception, cognition, and social 
behavior. A half-semester course with 4 lectures per week. 

Psychology 103 Quantitative Methods in 

Psychology 2 hours 

An introduction to the basic problems and techniques of mea- 
surement in psychology together with basic statistical techniques 
used in psychological research. Highly recommended for those 
planning to take upper-division courses in psychology, and re- 
quired of all majors. A half-semester course with two lectures 
and two labs each week. 

Psychology 169 Introduction to Computer 

Science 2 hours 

An introduction to computer programming and computer de- 
sign. Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in 
solving problems encountered in psychology. 

Psychology 180-189 Special Topics in Psychology 

Seminar-courses in this category will take up special topics of 
mutual concern to the staff and students. These courses do 
not count towards the major in psychology, but, in some cases, 
and with the permission of the instructor, psychology majors 
may take a 180-series course for credit in Psych. 380, with the 
understanding that they will be evaluated by advanced stand- 
ards. Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent registration in Psy- 
chology 101 . 

Psychology 181 Patterns of Sexual Behavior 2 hours 

In this course a comparative analysis of sexual behavior and 
attitudes will be made drawing upon animal, anthropological, 
and contemporary literature on the topic. Two two-hour meet 
ings weekly. Offered Spring 1972-73 2nd eight weeks. 



120 



Psychology 303 Experimental Design 



2 hours 



This course examines the basic logic of experiments, various 
types of research designs,, and evaluates these designs in terms 
of their underlying utilities. A half-semester course with two 
lectures and two labs each week. Prerequisite: Psychology 103. 

Psychology 311 Experimental Psychology I 4 hours 

In this course the student is encouraged to become conversant 
with the basic factual and theoretical content of experimental 
psychology at an intermediate level, and to engage in experi- 
mental work in these areas: learning, perceptual-motor skills, 
and motivation. A full semester course with two lectures and 
two laboratories each week. Prerequisite: Psychology 303, either 
previously or concurrently. 

Psychology 312 Experimental Psychology II 4 hours 

This is a continuation of Psychology 311. The content areas cov- 
ered include sensation, perception, and cognitive processes. A 
full semester course with two lectures and two labs each week. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 311 . 

Psychology 315 Modification of Behavior 2 hours 

This course has two main aims: first, to help the student learn 
systematically to analyze behavior in terms of the S-R-Reinforce- 
ment principles as developed by men such as Skinner and Wolpe; 
second, to help the student develop skills in the application of 
these principles to the modification of behavior in practical 
situations. Examples of these latter arise in the areas of behavior 
disorder, child-rearing, the work situation, and habit change. 
A half-semester course, with three lectures and one laboratory 
each week. 

Psychology 325 Personality: Normal and 

Abnormal 4 hours 

This course deals with theories of the development of normal 
and of abnormal personality patterns. A full semester course 
with three lectures and one lab per week. 

Psychology 326 Experimental Social 

Psychology 4 hours 

The study of the development of the self as influenced by the 
learning of symbolic interaction with members of primary and 



secondary groups. Includes discussion of factors in socialization, 
attitude structure and change, psycholinguistics and communica- 
tion, person perception, dyadic interaction, and group dynamics. 
A full semester course with three lectures and one lab each week. 
(May be taken for credit as Sociology 312). Prerequisite: Psy- 
chology 101 if course is to be counted as psychology. 



Psychology 335 Biological Bases of 

Behavior 2 hours 

This course examines the neural and biochemical substracts of 
the more important aspects of organismic behavior. It is recom- 
mended that students have some background in relevant, college- 
level biology. A half-semester course with three hours of lecture 
and one lab per week. 



Psychology 333 Educational Psychology 2 hours 

A study of the application of psychological principles to the field 
of education. Included will be the areas of learning, transfer of 
training, individual differences, motivation, and behavior modi- 
fication as they apply to education. A half-semester course with 
four hours of lecture per week. 



Psychology 338 Psychological and 

Educational Tests and 
Measurements 2 hours 

The course will deal mainly with group testing, with attention to 
the construction and use of standardized and of ad hoc tests. 
The necessary correlational techniques will be included. A half- 
semester course with three lectures and one lab per week. (May 
be taken for credit as Education 338). 



Psychology 355 Applied Psychology 
of Interpersonal and 
Organizational Processes 4 hours 

An academic and experiential approach to interpersonal pro- 
cesses and group, or organizational functioning. It is hoped that 
students will develop cognitive and personal skills that will be 
useful to them in both areas. A full semester course. Two lectures 
and two labs per week. 



727 



Psychology 380-389 Advanced Topics in 

Psychology 

Seminar-courses in this area will take up special topics of mutual 
concern to the start and students. Open only to majors in the 
Department, but, in some cases, and with the permission of the 
instructor, non-majors may take a Psychology 380 series course 
for credit in the Psychology 180 series. 

Psychology 381 Effects of Aversive Stimulation 2 hours 

This special course will examine the experimental literature on 
aversive stimulation, covering such topics as conflict, punish- 
ment, learned helplessness, and masochism. Two two-hour 
meetings per week. Offered Spring 1972-73 1st eight weeks. 

Psychology 399 Junior Seminar in 

Psychology 2 hours 

The primary purpose of this seminar is to give students a chance 
to engage in the thinking, discussion, and background reading 
necessary for intelligently selecting and planning a high quality 
Senior Project. Although one staff member will be in charge of 
the seminar, the full faculty of the department will be present at 
at least one meeting each month. One two-hour meeting each 
week of the semester. 



Psychology 415 Systematic Psychology 4 hours 

An examination of the systematic positions and theories that have 
been important in the history of psychology, as well as a brief 
review of the philosophical bases underlying these positions. A 
full semester course with three lectures and one lab per week. 



Psychology 477 Senior Seminar in 

General Psychology 2 hours 

This seminar, to be held during the last half of the fall semester, 
is designed to help students review the field of their major at an 
advanced level. This review should be useful as preparation for 
the comprehensive examination, and it should also alert students 
to areas needing further, subsequent study for the exam. A half- 
semester course meeting twice a week for two hours. 

Psychology 480 Methods and Materials 

for Teaching Psychology 4 hours 
Study of the methods and materials used in teaching psychology 



in the secondary school. The course will have a systematic and 
experimental emphasis. Prerequisite: 76 hours in psychology, 
including Psychology 101-102. 

Psychology 487-488 Independent 

Study 2 or 4 hours each 



Psychology 490 Senior Project 

I I I 



2-8 hours 




Religious Studies 

AIMS 

The Department of Religious Studies desires to con- 
tinue the historic interest of the College in the intel- 
lectual, spiritual, and social development of the 
community. Students are encouraged to join in the 
exploration of thought and research in the field of 
religious studies. Biblical studies form the central core 
of the Departmental offerings. In addition, each stu- 
dent also examines the relationship between religion 
and culture (both ancient and modern). The personal 
integration of knowledge and faith for an under- 
standing and appreciation of value systems is a con- 
scious goal of the Department. 



722 



The aims of the Department are future-oriented. 
Rather than teaching a particular point of view, the 
Department seeks to assist the student in learning 
how to acquire, evaluate, and use religious knowl- 
edge. Each course is consciously designed to enhance 
the student's efforts to interrelate his varied aca- 
demic, social and personal experiences. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 

CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of 24 hours (excluding R.S. 100) in the 

Department, a Senior Project, and the successful 

completion of the senior comprehensive examination 

constitute the stated requirements of the Department 

of Religious Studies. 

The Comprehensive Examination in Religious Stu- 
dies emphasizes Biblical Studies, Early Christianity, 
and Contemporary Religious Thought and Culture. 

Students electing the field of Religious Studies are 
strongly urged to develop a proficiency in one or 
more of the following: German, French, Greek, Latin, 
or Hebrew. They are also urged to spend at least one 
semester in study abroad. 

(Enrollment in the courses marked with an asterisk has R.S. 700 as 
a prerequisite and also requires the consent of the instructor). 



R.S. 100 judaeo-Christian Heritage 
and Contemporary Living 



4 hours 



Participants in this course study the Judeao-Christian heritage 
with the aim of understanding how Biblical writers reflect on the 
basic human and social problems which continue to trouble 
contemporary man. They do this in a triple context: (1) the clas- 
sical Biblical tradition, (2) the liberal arts tradition of Bethany 
College, and (3) contemporary questions. Offered each semester. 

R.S. 300-309 Studies in the Old Testament 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics covering the his- 
tory, literature, and theology related to the Old Testament. 



TOPICS FOR SPRING, 1973: 

*R.S. 300 Old Testament Literature and Thought 4 hours 

The student will study the development of Israelite religion 
and its institutions, the history of the various types of Old 
Testament literature, and the thought and theological motifs of 
Old Testament writers. He will be assisted in acquiring a devel- 
opmental understanding of Old Testament religion and an 
appreciation of its continuing value in understanding man and 
his institutions. 

R.S. 302 The Wisdom Literature 2 hours 

The student will read critically and appreciatively the literature 
of the Old Testament wisdom school (Proverbs, Job, Ecclesi- 
astes). He will be assisted in class and by parallel contemporary 
readings to understand the ways that the wisdom school sought 
to understand man, his meaning and destiny, his social rela- 
tionships and responsibilities, and the meaning of history. 
Offered 1st eight weeks. 



R.S. 310-319 Studies in the New Testament 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics covering the his- 
tory, literature, and theology related to the New Testament. 

TOPICS FOR AUTUMN, 1972: 

*R.S. 311 Studies in the Gospels 4 hours 

The student will be assisted in developing the means to dis- 
cern the message of different gospel writers. While concentrat- 
ing on the Gospel of Mark, the course will equip the student to 
do basic exegetical work in any of the four canonical gospels. 
Students in this course will sharpen their own abilities to 
utilize the various historical and literary methods that grow out 
of the study of gospel texts. 

R.S. 313 The Revelation of St. John 2 hours 

The student will be assisted in developing a facility to under- 
stand the message of the Revelation of St. John and other apo- 
calyptic materials. The class will read Jewish and early Christian 
apocalypses, explore the history of apocalyptic imagery and 
literary relationships, seek to discover the backgrounds and the 
causes of the rise of the apocalyptic movement, and try to 
understand the continuing message of apocalyptic writers. 

TOPICS FOR SPRING, 1973: 

R.S. 312 The Pauline School 4 hours 

The student will be assisted in developing an understanding of 
the Apostle Paul as a man, his thought, his place in early Chris- 
tianity, the thoughts of his disciples, and his opponents (both 
among his contemporaries and his successors). 



723 



R.S. 320-329 Studies in Religion and Culture 

Courses in this area deal with special topics in the relationship 
between religious faith and human culture. 

TOPIC FOR AUTUMN, 1972: 

R.S. 321 The Quest and the Promised Land 4 hours 

The student will make a study of the quest tradition and the 
Juclaeo-Christian promise motif as reflected in Western litera- 
ture. Patterns of the quest will be established through readings 
in Homer, Dante and the Grail poet. The evolution of the 
promise motif in Biblical literature (especially Genesis, Isaiah, 
and Revelation) will also be studied. Special attention will be 
given to the impact of this tradition on the writings of T. S. 
Eliot and James Joyce. (May be taken for credit as Eng. 401). 

TOPICS FOR SPRING, 1973: 

R.S. 320 Myth and Meaning in Religion 2 hours 

The students will pursue questions concerning the origin, 
development, and function of religion. Readings from M. 
Eliade, J. Campbell, and C. Levi-Strauss will focus on the struc- 
ture and dynamics of religious meanings, especially as these 
are reflected in myth, symbol, and ritual. Offered 2nd eight 
weeks. 



R.S. 322 Sociology of Religion 

(May be taken for credit as Soc. 355). 

R.S. 323 Social and Religious Movements 

(May be taken for credit as Soc. 354). 



4 hours 



4 hours 



R.S. 330-339 Studies in Contemporary 
Religious Thought 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics related to the 
intellectual formulation of religious faith. 

TOPICS FOR SPRING, 1973: 

*R.S. 330 Trends in Contemporary 

Religious Thought 4 hours 

This course will discuss some of the ideas of the Death of God 
theologians (T. Altizer, W. Hamilton), basic concepts of the 
Theology of Hope movement (J. Moltmann, J. Metz) and cer- 
tain aspects of the Celebrational Theology of Harvey Cox (i.e. 
Feast of Fools). 

R.S. 332 Philosophy of Religion 4 hours 

An inquiry into the general subject of religion from a philo- 
sophical point of view. Religious experience, faith and knowl- 
edge, certainty and nature of deity, religious feeling and 
confidence, the language of religious commitment, types of 



meaning involved, and the possibility of discovery, are exam- 
ples of the kinds of topics and areas that may be investigated. 
Classical and contemporary approaches will be studied. (May 
be taken for credit as Philosophy 363). 

R.S. 334 Readings in Modern German 

Religious Thinkers 4 hours 

Students in this course will read and discuss early, untranslated 
writings of Paul Tillich, especially those written while he was 
active in the Religious Socialism Movement. (May be taken for 
credit as German 334). Prerequisite: German 201 or equiva- 
lent. 



R.S. 340-349 Studies in Far Eastern Religions 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics relating to the 
History of Religions in East Asia. 

TOPIC FOR JANUARY, 1973: 

R.S. 341 Hinduism-Buddhism 4 hours 

The student will explore the chief features of Hinduism and 
Buddhism. The course begins with an examination of the his- 
tory, rituals and ethics of Hinduism. Special readings focus on 
the Upanishads and Bhagavad-Gita. The student will then sur- 
vey the life and teachings of the Buddha and Buddhism's devel- 
opment into its Theravada and Mahayana forms (including 
Zen). 

R.S. 350-359 Studies in Near Eastern Religions 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics relating to the 
History of Religions in West Asia. 

TOPIC FOR AUTUMN, 1972: 

R.S. 351 Ancient Near Eastern Civilization 4 hours 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the histori- 
cal development of life, culture, and religions of Mesopotamia, 
Egypt and the Syro-Phoenician coast, including international 
relations from Pre-history to Alexander the Great. (May be 
taken for credit as Hist. 351). 

TOPIC FOR JANUARY, 1973: 

R.S. 350-J ludaeo-Christian Sources of Western 

Civilization 4 hours 

A month of travel and study in Palestine and Greece. Lectures 
and seminars will trace historical and religious influences in 
the development of the Judaeo-Christian heritage of the West. 
Resources of the universities and colleges of the Holy Land will 
be utilized in this study. Summary papers are required for 
credit. This course when supplemented by an independent 



724 



study in Bethany religious traditions may be used to meet the 
basic religious heritage course requirement of the College. 

TOPIC FOR SPRING, 1973: 

R.S. 352 Islam 4 hours 

The study of Islam is intended to introduce English-speaking 
students to the life of the Prophet, the Qur'an, the development 
of religious thought, and the expansion and divisions of Islam. 



R.S. 360-369 Studies in American Religion 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics relating to Amer- 
ican religious phenomena. 

TOPICS FOR SPRING, 1973: 

R.S. 360 American Civil Religion 4 hours 

An elaborate and well-institutionalized American civil religion 
actually exists alongside of and clearly differentiated from the 
churches of America. This thesis by Robert Bellah will be thor- 
oughly explored and criticized by the students of this course. 
They will be especially concerned with the religious dimension 
of the understanding of America, its history and the "American 
Way of Life." The beliefs, symbols, rituals, and martyrs of this 
religion will be analyzed according to their historical develop- 
ment. (May be taken for credit as Soc. 361). 

R.S. 362 American Judaism 2 hours 

A descriptive study of contemporary American Judaism and its 
roots. The course emphasizes the life-cycle customs of Judaism. 
Jewish holidays are studied in the context of Jewish history. 
The course seeks to develop a broader understanding of the 
modern Jewish community in the United States. 



R.S. 370-379 Studies in the History of Christianity 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics relating to the 
historical developments of Christianty. 

TOPIC FOR SPRING, 1973: 
R.S. 372 Gnosticism 

Students in this course will read and discuss the basic gnostic 
writings now extant. They will explore the history of gnostic 
imagery, various theories on the origin of gnosticism, and the 
anti-gnostic critiques of the movement(s). The course will assist 
the students in evaluating the relationships between gnosti- 
cism, heterodox Judaism, the New Testament, early Christianity, 
and the thought world of the Graeco-Roman Near East. Of- 
fered 1st eight weeks. 



R.S. 380-389 Practical Studies in 

Religion 2 or 4 hours 

Since any educated man should learn from any experience in 
life, a vocational or any other practicum in religion, as such, will 
not be given academic credit. To receive academic credit in con- 
nection with a practicum in religion, the student should give 
prior evidence that he has or will arrange a supplementary edu- 
cational program (either instructional or supervised independent 
study), which will increase his knowledge or skills beyond those 
of other educated men who have the same practical experience. 
Credit will be based on the evaluation of the successful comple- 
tion of that program of study. 

R.S. 487-488 Independent Study in 

Religious Studies 2 or 4 hours each 



R.S. 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 




725 



Social Sciences 

Social Sciences is a grouping of courses only. It is not 
a separate Department in the College. 



Soc. Sci. 302 World Geography 



4 hours 



A study of the physical, social, and political geographic factors 
of the world today. Recent changes in Europe, Asia, and Africa 
will be discussed. 



Soc. Sci. 320 Cultural Backgrounds of 
British Literature 



8 hours 



A survey of British history from the Celtic times to the present. 
Major political developments such as the development of parlia- 
mentary government and the constitution will be taken into 
account, but major emphasis will be placed on extra-political 
matters such as the development of the English language, music, 
art, architecture, drama, the English church, education, and do- 
mestic life. The aim of the course is to show how these devel- 
opments are related to English literature, and every effort will be 
made to take advantage of the locale to visit museums, castles, 
cathedrals, universities, Parliament, theatres and concert halls. 
The course will be taught in Oxford with an enrollment limited 
to 15. (See also English 325-326 concurrent offering). 



Soc. Sci. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Social Studies 



2 hours 



Nature, objectives, and curricula of social studies in junior and 
senior high schools. Concepts and methods of approach to be 
emphasized. Methods, techniques, teaching aids, and other re- 
sources. Resource units, lesson plans, evaluation, teaching read- 
ing and study skills. 



Sociology 



AIMS 

The Department of Sociology seeks to facilitate for 
students a creative engagement between sociological 
and experiential learning; to introduce students to 
topics of current interest as these might be inter- 
preted within a sociological framework; to provide 
skills necessary for graduate work in sociology or 
other fields; to prepare students for public service 
positions such as secondary school teaching, envi- 
ronmental/population task forces, community needs, 
nursing, etc. The Department also seeks to provide 
a field of concentration that may be utilized as an 
avenue toward career-exploration for new career and 
life-style possibilities. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR 

FIELD OF CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of 24 hours, including Sociology 100, 
200, 201, 202, 209 plus the Senior Project (Soc. 490). 
The minimum of 24 hours must be taken in Sociology 
(excluding cross-listed courses). 

Usual Sequence for Majoring in Sociology: 

1. Sociological Perspectives (Soc. 100). 

2. Sociology 200 spring term of sophomore or junior 
year, simultaneously with Sociology 209. 

3. Sociology 201 and 202 (four hours total) fall term 
after 200 and 209. 

4. Additional courses among the following: Contem- 
porary Sociological Issues courses, Special Topics 
in Sociology courses, anthropology courses, social 
work, independent study, or mutually approved 
interdisciplinary activity. 

5. Senior Project and Comprehensives. 



726 



Flexibility Within the Major: 

1. A student may plan to concentrate in sociology 
with the expressed intention of doing graduate 
study at a later date. A program will be designed 
to meet that need and to take into consideration 
any courses needed in related areas if the student 
expects to do graduate work in a field other than 
sociology. 

2. Students not anticipating graduate training may 
develop a course of study, taken together with 
practicums, that will prepare them for careers of 
public service. 

3. Students may choose to use sociology as a means 
of exploring future vocations and new life-styles 
through direct observation and in-the-field in- 
volvement. This choice involves preparation for, 
and the experience of, a fall term off-campus. 
This experience may be an extension of one or 
more of the experience-based practicums (citizen- 
ship or vocation). Students interested in taking this 
option should enroll in 200 and 209 the spring 
term preceding the off-campus experience. The 
off-campus semester will be awarded both field 
work credit and credit as independent study. 



to the present. Generally taken concurrently with Sociology 209. 
Offered Spring semester. 



Soc. 201 Theory and Research 



2 hours 



An extension of 200, concentrating on the use of theory in rela- 
tion to student projects, proposals and student-initiated issues. 
Prerequisite: Soc. 200. Offered Fall semester, 1st eight weeks. 



Soc. 202 Applied Theory 2 hours 

A further extension of 200, centered around further development 
of independent student projects. Prerequisites: Soc. 200 and 
201. Offered Fall semester, 2nd eight weeks. 



Soc. 209 Research Methods in 

Social Relations 4 hours 

This is an exploration in methods of social relations which the 
student should attempt to integrate with 200, his own alternative 
program, or a later process in his program. Offered Spring 
semester. 

Soc. 310 Science, Technology, and Society 4 hours 

An historical examination of the effects of scientific and tech- 
nological innovations upon various societies, emphasis on tech- 
nology and science in the Western world since 1850. (May be 
taken for credit as General Sciences 210). Alternate years: 
1973-74. 



Soc. 100 Sociological Perspectives 



Students are introduced to basic concepts and methods in soci- 
ology as instruments for the assimilation and evaluation of day- 
to-day experiences and as perspectives from which they may 
expand their interests and awareness in other areas of study. 

Soc. 169 Introduction to Computer Science 2 hours 

An introduction to computer programming and computer design. 
Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in solving 
problems encountered in sociology. 

Soc. 200 Sociological Theory 4 hours 

An introduction to social thought, with primary emphasis upon 
sociological perspectives as these have developed from Durkheim 



4 hours Soc. 312 Experimental Social Psychology 4 hours 



The study of the development of the self as influenced by the 
learning of symbolic interaction with members of primary and 
secondary groups. Discussion of factors in socialization, attitude 
structure and change, psycholinguistics and communication, per- 
son perception, dyadic interaction, and group dynamics. (May be 
taken for credit as Psychology 326). Prerequisite: Psychology 
101 if course is to be counted as psychology. 

Soc. 350-365 Special Topics in Sociology 

Open to the general college, unless otherwise indicated. One or 
more of these courses are offered each term in this category as 
the interests and needs of students and faculty determine them. 
Topics will vary each year. 



727 



TOPICS FOR FALL, 1972 

Soc. 350 Family and Contemporary Society 4 hours 

This course concerns kinship and family, patterns of stability, 
and questions relating to the family's future, especially in de- 
veloped societies. 

Soc. 351 Issues in Delinquency 2 hours 

A survey of sociological perspectives on problems of delin- 
quency. Offered 1st eight weeks. 

Soc. 352 Minority Relations 2 hours 

Problems of cultural and ethnic minorities in contemporary 
society, especially the United States. Offered 2nd eight weeks. 

Soc. 353 Social Stratification 4 hours 

Examination of class and status in traditional and modern 
societies. 

Soc. 360 Youth and Social Change 4 hours 

A study of the relationships between the location of youth and 
the emergence of youth cultures and movements, especially in 
contemporary societies. 




TOPICS FOR SPRING, 1973 

Soc. 354 Social Movements 4 hours 

This course discusses the conditions under which social and 
religious movements tend to arise, where they tend to stabilize, 
and how they influence social change. (May be taken for credit 
as Religious Studies 323). 

Soc. 355 Sociology of Religion 4 hours 

This course discusses social perspectives of religious phenom- 
ena, especially enthusiasm and charisma, and their relationship 
to the issues of meaning, stability, and change. (May be taken 
for credit as Religious Studies 322). 

Soc. 356 Third World Development 2 hours 

A general survey of those social issues and dilemmas most 
crucial for economically underdeveloped nations. Offered 1st 
eight weeks. 

Soc. 357 Social Change in a Developing Society 2 hours 

This course will focus upon an examination of development 
issues in one selected underdeveloped nation. Offered 2nd 
eight weeks. 

Soc. 358 Post-Industrial Societies 2 hours 

A survey of social issues and dilemmas most crucial to the 
future of developed societies. Such issues as nationalism, iden- 



tity, future shock, and future resources will be included in this 
survey. Offered 1st eight weeks. 

Soc. 359 Social Change in a Post-Industrial Society 2 hours 
An examination of those issues noted in Soc. 358 in a specific 
post-industrial society (other than the U.S.). Soc. 358 is not a 
prerequisite. Offered 2nd eight weeks. 

Soc. 361 American Civil Religion 4 hours 

An elaborate and well-institutionalized American civil religion 
actually exists alongside of and clearly differentiated from the 
churches of America. This thesis by Robert Bellah will be thor- 
oughly explored and criticized by the students of this course. 
They will be especially concerned with the religious dimension 
of the understanding of America, its history and the "American 
Way of Life." The beliefs, symbols, rituals, and martyrs of this 
religion will be analyzed according to their historical develop- 
ment. (May be taken for credit as Religious Studies 360). 

Soc. 375 Philosophy of Man and Culture 4 hours 
This is a philosophical study of man in social and cultural rela- 
tions, one aspect of Philosophical Anthropology. Emphasis is 
placed on the relevance of analysis of (studies and theories of) 
civilization, culture, and society for a philosophical understand- 
ing of man. (May be taken for credit as Philosophy 375). 



128 



Soc. 378 Philosophy of Social Issues and 

Politics 4 hours 

This is a philosophical study of the principles involved in the 
realms of political philosophy and presupposed by many social 
issues. (May be taken for credit as Philosophy 378). 



Soc. 400 Field Work in Sociology 



2-6 hours 



This course is available to students in the Future Vocations pro- 
gram and related programs. 



Soc. 477 Senior Seminar 



2 hours 



Soc. 487-488 Independent Study in 

Sociology 2 or 4 hours each 

Studies may be planned as extensions of, or separate from, exist- 
ing Departmental offerings. 

Soc. 490 Senior Project and Seminar 2-8 hours 

A seminar for students approaching completion of their majors 
and projects. The course is designed to help students evaluate 
their activities in sociology and to integrate their educational 
experiences. This seminar is led as a joint staff endeavor fall and 
spring semesters. 



ANTHROPOLOGY 

Soc. 326 Cultural Anthropology 4 hours 

A general survey of cultural systems with emphasis upon culture 
as related to economic activity, kinship, political organization, 
art, religion, and magic. This course may be credited toward a 
major in sociology beyond the minimum 24 hours. Prerequisite: 
Soc. 100 or permission of the instructor. 



SOCIAL WORK 

Soc. 150 Contemporary Social Work 4 hours 

This course will explore contemporary theories of social work 
and discuss service possibilities in the United States. This course 
may be credited toward a major in sociology beyond the mini- 
mum of 24 hours. Prerequisite: Soc. 700 or permission of the 
instructor. 



Theatre 



AIMS 

To provide students with an opportunity to study 
dramatic literature and important related literary 
forms; to provide students with a working knowledge 
of theatre techniques, including acting, directing, 
stage crafts and oral interpretation; and to acquaint 
students with the history of theatre and the evolution 
of drama movements in various stages of develop- 
ment so that they will be equipped for graduate 
school in theatre, for work in professional or com- 
munity theatre, or for positions in the teaching of 
the dramatic arts. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

Each student is required to complete a minimum of 
32 hours in the Theatre and English Departments. 
The following courses are required: English 230, 251- 
254, 270, 410-419 (any one course primarily drama 
or theatre), Theatre 401 or 402, 404, 405, 451-454 
(any 2), 477, and a Senior Project (490). Recom- 
mended courses: Two other English courses, Com- 
munications oral interpretation courses, Philosophy 
368 and Theatre 403 and 406. 

For those desiring to be certified to teach Theatre 
in secondary schools, a major in English with a spe- 
cialty in Theatre is mandatory for the teaching of 
Theatre; English 480 is therefore also required for 
certification. (Also see English Department for the 
possibility of Theatre specialization under Require- 
ments 1 and 2 for Field of Concentration). 



Theatre 230 Advanced Writing 



2 hours 



Extensive practice in playwriting with an emphasis upon achieve- 
ment of literary excellence. Individual assignments and frequent 



729 



conferences. The course is offered only one-half semester under 
the English Department. Enrollment is limited to twelve, with 
preference to juniors and seniors. May be repeated for credit 
with consent of the Chairman of the English Department. (May 
be taken for credit as English 230). Prerequisite: Demonstration of 
proficiency and consent of instructor. 

Theatre 251-254 Literature of the 

Western World 2 hours each 

A chronological study of Western literary masterpieces, chiefly 
in translation. 251: Creek and Roman Classicism. 252: The Mid- 
dle Ages. 253: Renaissance and Neo-Classicism. 254: Modern. 
(May be taken for credit as English 251-254). 



Theatre 270 Shakespeare 



4 hours 



A survey of the major plays, with emphasis on Shakespeare's 
themes, motifs, language and characterization. (May be taken for 
credit as English 270). 

Theatre 401 History of Theatre from 

Its Inception 4 hours 

A study of the development of dramatic literature with emphasis 
on both the history of theatres and dramas from the periods. 




Theatre 402 History of Theatre from the 
Post Renaissance to the 
Twentieth Century 4 hours 

Also a study of the stages of dramatic literature and theatre as 
noted in Theatre 401. No prerequisites, but Theatre 401 is rec- 
ommended. 



Theatre 403 Beginning Acting 4 hours 

Movement, various styles, improvisations, projections of char- 
acter, and speech technique. 



Theatre 404 Advanced Acting 



2 or 4 hours 



Scene study as a unit of theatrical form. Scenes from various 
periods to be directed and performed. Focus on interaction be- 
tween characters. Prerequisite: Theatre 403. 

Theatre 405 Beginning Direction 2 or 4 hours 

Fundamentals of staging: blocking, movement, stage business, 
tempo, script analyses, casting, and rehearsal planning. 

Theatre 406 Advanced Direction 4 hours 

The direction of specific scenes from various periods of theatre. 
Prerequisite: Theatre 405. 

Theatre 410-419 Studies in Literary 

Genres 2 or 4 hours 

A seminar for the study of a single literary genre, or mode, such 
as the epic, tragedy, satire, or biography. (May be taken for credit 
as English 410-419). 

Theatre 451-454 Stage Craft 2 hours each 

451: Set Construction. 452: Light Design. 453: Make-up. 454: 
Costume. 

Theatre 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 

Reading, criticism, and research designed to review and correlate 
a student's work in other courses in the Departments. Prerequi- 
sites: All required courses in the Departments and at least one 
advanced seminar. 

The comprehensive examination is based upon three parts: 
(1) a jury of drama specialization, (2) a written comprehensive, 



/ !() 



and (3) an oral examination. (Undergraduate Record Examination 
in English will be recommended for those who have taken a 
majority of the English 300 courses). 

Theatre 480 Methods of Teaching English 

and Theatre 2 hours 

Study of methods and materials used in teaching English and 
Theatre. (May be taken for credit as English 480). Required for 
students preparing to teach secondary school English and/or 
Theatre. 



Practica 



Theatre 487-488 



Independent 
Study 



2 or 4 hours each 



Individual study in any area of Theatre or English in which the 
student is interested and in which he is qualified and prepared 
to work independently. Independent study is offered only in areas 
not included in other courses in the Departments. Prerequisites: 
Demonstrated proficiency in expository writing, adequate prepa- 
ration to undertake the study as determined by the instructor, 
and consent of the Chairman of the Department. 

Theatre 490 Senior Project 2 or 4 hours 

A project in acting or directing involving either acting a major 
role or directing a major play and defending same in a written 
thesis. Must be arranged with the Department a year in advance. 
Open only to senior Theatre majors. 




GENERAL STATEMENT 

Each student will complete four practica in which 
he actualizes in behavior the goals of the College. 
One practicum is required in each of four areas: 1) a 
vocationally related internship, 2) an intercultural liv- 
ing experience, 3) citizenship, 4) health, physical edu- 
cation and recreation. 

Each of these practica should be a self examination 
of the use of theory in practice; a demonstration that 
liberal studies are relevant to personal development 
and to fulfillment of obligations as a responsible citi- 
zen. Each practicum proposal must have the approval 
of a member of the faculty, usually the student's 
advisor, and meet the following guidelines. 

In each practicum the demonstration that one has 
had the experience or training is not sufficient. The 
student must demonstrate to his faculty advisor that 
he has examined that experience in relation to his 
total life and educational program. 

Specifically each of the practica must meet the 
following criteria: 

1. It should be a new and/or challenging experience 
for the student. 

2. It should be planned ahead so that adequate prep- 
aration can be made for its fulfillment. 

3. It should entail a regimen of activity and involve- 
ment relatively equivalent to four weeks of full 
time activity. 

4. It will, when properly completed and evaluated, 
satisfy the general College requirement for the 
practicum in that area. Although the practicum 
experience may be done in conjunction with an 



737 



academic credit activity, it will carry no academic 
credit per se. 

ANSWERS TO YOUR QUESTIONS 
ABOUT THE PRACTICA 

1. Why does the new Bethany Plan call for practica 
requirements? 

Because the liberal studies which are pursued at 
Bethany College should be made relevant to the 
personal development of each student and to 
the fulfillment of his obligations as a responsible 
citizen. 

2. Don't most students already have a lot of prac- 
tical experiences? 

Many students probably already have experiences 
in each of the areas covered by the practica but 
by having experiences in each area it will help to 
broaden the educational experience of each stu- 
dent. The practica requirement is designed to be 
more than a busy work requirement. It is not 
enough that the student simply have the experi- 
ence. He should do more than just participate; 
he should become actively involved. He should 
also evaluate these experiences in light of his own 
educational goals. 

3. Will academic credit be given for the practica? 
No. The completion and self-evaluation of each 
of the four practica will simply satisfy a Bethany 
College graduation requirement. If academic de- 
partments wish to incorporate a practicum expe- 
rience into a regular part of their academic credit 
granting program, that is the prerogative of the 
individual departments. For example, the Educa- 
tion Department may wish to incorporate the 
specific requirements for the practicum dealing 
with vocations into its regular student teaching 
program. If an academic department wishes to 



develop an academic program in conjunction 
with a practicum experience, it would need to 
gain approval for the granting of credit in the 
usual way it does for any academic credit grant- 
ing program it offers. 

4. How much time should I devote to the perfor- 
mance of each practicum? 

It should entail approximately the relative equiv- 
alent of four weeks of full time activity. Although 
this would be roughly equivalent to 160 hours 
of activity, this is simply a generalized norm. 
Actually the activity might be spread over a se- 
mester, a summer, a year, or in some cases over 
more than a year. The four weeks of activity 
serves simply as a general guide. 

5. Why do I have to fill out that application and 
evaluation form for each practica? 
Because we feel that it is important for you to 
examine each of these experiences in terms of 
your total academic career and educational goals. 
We feel that a self examination by each student 
of each of these activities is an integral and vital 
aspect of the activity itself. 

6. What if I don't get anything out of doing some 
of the practica? 

The fact that you had the experience and have 
critically evaluated it is the important thing. For 
example, if as the result of a vocational practicum 
you decide you don't like that particular voca- 
tion, a self appraisal of this may be of great value 
to you in planning your future. 

7. Why do the practica have to be new experiences? 
I already play tennis regularly, why won't that 
count? 

The idea of a Bethany education is to broaden 
your horizons. All Bethany students obviously can 
do many things already. By attending Bethany 



732 



you should learn to do more things and new 
things. 

8. Where the practicum proposal calls for the signa- 
ture of the advisor, what happens if I change my 
advisor? 

Once the practicum has been approved, that fills 
your requirement, no matter which faculty mem- 
ber signed it. For the purposes of the practicum, 
the advisor may be your regular faculty advisor, 
a member of the faculty who is supervising the 
practicum experience, the Chairman of your De- 
partment, etc. Normally it would probably be 
your faculty advisor, as under the new Bethany 
Plan, it is anticipated that you will be working 
closer with your advisor. 

9. What is a vocational practicum? 

A vocational practicum entails doing something 
for which a person normally is paid a salary for 
regular employment. This would exclude student 
assistantships and other types of non-vocational 
jobs. (We assume no student would want a per- 
manent job as a student assistant, or even as a 
school newspaper editor). Campus organizations 
and activities would not count as a vocational 
practicum because the student is still working as 
part of the campus and as a student. For example, 
work on the Tower would not count for a voca- 
tional practicum but work on a commercial news- 
paper, if it meets the other requirements for the 
practicum, would count. 
10. Must a vocational practicum be related to my 
major or to what I plan to do after I graduate? 
Not necessarily in either case. This is a chance to 
find out what you might like to do after gradu- 
ation. It is as useful for you to learn what you 
might like to do as a vocation as it is to find out 
what you realize you don't like. Naturally most 



students will probaby select a vocational experi- 
ence in connection with their major and planned 
life's work. 

11. What is a citizenship practicum? 

A citizenship practicum entails becoming in- 
volved in a sustained way with the general needs 
and responsibilities of society and the evaluation 
by each student of that participation. This may be 
accomplished either on or off campus. Off cam- 
pus type activities may include such things as 
participating in political campaigns or in pro- 
viding socially responsible services. On campus 
activities may include involvement as a campus- 
wide or organizational officer or responsible citi- 
zen. It is important to keep in mind the general 
requirements for practica, especially the amount 
of time required, the necessary involvement and 
self evaluation. 

12. What is a health, physical education and recre- 
ation practicum? 

This practicum entails the performance of a regi- 
men of activity in one of these three areas. Many 
students may wish to take a course offered by the 
Physical Education Department; participate in the 
activity portions of that course; and then go 
through the practicum evaluation to satisfy the 
practicum requirement. 

13. Do I have to take a course to satisfy this practicum 
requirement? 

No. This is only a possibility. If you wish to under- 
take an activity on your own, that is fine. It is 
important that in performing this practicum a stu- 
dent has or learns enough to make the practicum 
a meaningful experience. It is not enough to 
spend the required amount of time just hitting 
a ball without knowing the proper techniques 
involved in the activity. 



733 



14. What is an intercultural practicum? 

It means that you experience another culture. 
This could be an American Indian culture, Appa- 
lachian culture, the Ghetto culture as well as a 
culture in a more distant part of the world such 
as Europe, Africa or Asia. The idea behind all the 
practica is involvement, not just observation. It 
is up to the student to show how his experience 
fulfills the requirements for the practicum. For 
example, touring Europe with Americans and 
staying in tourist hotels with other Americans 
obviously would not qualify. Likewise, a student 
from New Jersey living in Bethany would not 
qualify per se. In either case what would be 
needed would be a regimen of activity in which 
the student would become involved with that 
culture, as set out in the general requirements 
for the practicum. 

15. Won't it cost me a lot of extra money to do these 
practica? 

Not necessarily, unless you select programs which 
would cost money. Although students are en- 
couraged to have off-campus experiences, many 
of the practica may be accomplished on campus. 
In practica where you would most likely decide 
to go off campus, such as the vocational and 
intercultural ones, you might well earn money 
for doing them, or in conjunction with doing 
them, or on the side while doing them. 

16. Can one activity accomplish more than one 
practicum? 

This is possible, but each practicum must be pro- 
posed and evaluated separately in terms of the 
accomplishment of the specific objectives for 
each practicum. 



17. Why hasn't the Practica Committee just set up a 
list of tasks which can be done to satisfy the 
practica requirements? 

As this is one of the more innovative and creative 
parts of the new Bethany Plan there is a desire 
not to stifle student creativity by limiting those 
kinds of activities he may do. The very act of 
students and their advisors discussing plans for 
the fulfilling of the practica requirements in terms 
of the general guidelines is part of the iearning ex- 
perience. In case of questions or disagreements, 
the sub-committee dealing with each practicum 
will serve as a resource board and arbiter. 

18. What is the role of the sub-committee dealing 
with each practicum? 

It will basically attempt to assure that there is a 
standard level of accomplishment within its field 
of practicum involvement. If a student and his ad- 
visor have questions about particular practicum 
programs, they may request advice from the sub- 
committee. It will probably automatically ap- 
prove proposals as submitted by a student with 
the approval of his advisor and will reject only 
those which clearly do not meet the stated guide- 
lines. It will also serve as an appeals board if 
there are disagreements between the student and 
his advisor regarding practica. 

19. What is the role of the Director of Practica? 
He along with the Practica Committee serves as a 
final arbiter in questions dealt with by the four 
sub-committees. It is his role to help faculty and 
students in developing practica programs. He 
helps to create new programs and experiences, 
makes sure we are using all available resources 
and gives assistance where required in maintain- 
ing the quality of existing practica programs. 



734 



BETHANY 




THE DIRECTORIES 

1972-1973 



735 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Officers of the Board 

PERRY E. GRESHAM, Chairman 
CECIL H. UNDERWOOD, President 
JOHN A. GRAHAM, Treasurer 
CHARLES D. BELL, Secretary 

Members of the Board 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1973 

GEORGE J. BARTHOLD, Miners & Mechanics Savings & Trust Co., 
124 North Fourth Street, Steubenville, Ohio 

ALTON W. BEHM, M.D., 112 South Street, Chardon, Ohio 

COURTNEY BURTON, Oglebay-Norton Company, 1200 Hanna 
Building, Cleveland, Ohio 

PHILIP K. HERR, Pittsburgh National Bank, P.O. Box 340777, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania 

RODNEY B. HURL, M.D., 211 Stocksdale Drive, Marysville, Ohio 

THOMAS PHILLIPS JOHNSON, 1500 Oliver Building, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania 

WILLIAM L. MILLER, JR., Board of Higher Education of the 
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 222 South Downey Ave- 
nue, Indianapolis, Indiana 

WILLIAM F. PORTER, Globe Refractories, Inc., P.O. Box D, 
Newell, West Virginia 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1974 

ROY S. ADKINS, 99 Heller Way, Upper Montclair, New Jersey 

VERNON R. ALDEN, The Boston Company, Inc., One Boston 
Place, Boston, Massachusetts 

CHARLES D. BELL, 67 Seventh Street, Wellsburg, West Virginia 



736 



A. DALE FIERS, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 222 South 
Downey Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana 

HAMILTON C. FORMAN, 1524 Coral Ridge Drive, Fort Lauder- 
dale, Florida 

PERRY E. CRESHAM, Bethany, West Virginia 

tC. ALLEN HARLAN, 24000 Telegraph Road, Southfield, Michigan 

R. R. RENNER, M.D., 1259 Oakridge Drive, Cleveland, Ohio 

ROBERT C. WETENHALL, McConnell & Wetenhall & Co., Inc., 375 
Park Avenue, New York, New York 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1975 

JOHN E. COSTELLO, 418 Washington Avenue, Charleroi, Penn- 
sylvania 

SIDNEY S. GOOD, JR., L.S. Good & Company, 1141 Market Street, 
Wheeling, West Virginia 

MICHAEL J. KASARDA, 208 Farmers & Merchants National Bank 
Bldg., Bellaire, Ohio 

EUGENE MILLER, New York Stock Exchange, 11 Wall Street, New 
York, New York 

JUNIUS T. MOORE, P.O. Box 753, Charleston, West Virginia 

G. OGDEN NUTTING, 12 Park Road, Wheeling, West Virginia 

MALCOLM W. RUSH, SR., 3096 Orchard Road, Cuyahoga Falls, 
Ohio 

FRANK L. WEIGAND, JR., 855 Academy Place, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania 

Faculty Representative to the Board 

RICHARD B. KENNEY, Bethany, West Virginia (June, 1973). 

Honorary Trustees 

MERRITT J. DAVIS, 200 Sycamore Street, Wellsburg, West Virginia 

MRS. WALTER M. HAUSHALTER, Apt. B0209, Thomas Wynne 
Apartments, Wynnewood, Pennsylvania 

ROBERT D. HURL, 56 Harriett Drive, Shelby, Ohio 

CHARLES H. MANION, Apartment 6-F, Fort Steuben Hotel, Steu- 
benville, Ohio 

J. PARK McMULLEN, 10th and Franklin Avenue, Wellsburg, West 
Virginia 

CHARLES E. PALMER, Union National Bank of Pittsburgh, 301 
Fifth Avenue, McKeesport, Pennsylvania 

tDeceased 



MAYNARD L. PATTON, 35 Cliffview Avenue, Fort Thomas, Ken- 
tucky 

D. ERVIN SHEETS, 1125 Singing Wood Court, Apt. 3, Walnut 
Creek, California 

AUSTIN V. WOOD, Wheeling News Publishing Company, 1500 
Main Street, Wheeling, West Virginia 

Committees of the Board of Trustees 

EXECUTIVE (Elected) 

Michael J. Kasarda, Chairman; John E. Costello, A. Dale Fiers, 

Thomas Phillips Johnson, William F. Porter, Frank L. Weigand, 

(Charles D. Bell, Ex-Officio). 
FINANCE, BUDGET AND AUDIT (Elected by Executive Committee) 

Michael J. Kasarda, Malcolm W. Rush, Sr., (Charles D. Bell, John 

A. Graham, Ex-Officio). 
INVESTMENT (Elected) 

Philip K. Herr, Thomas Phillips Johnson, Eugene Miller, Frank L. 

Weigand, (John A. Graham, Ex-Officio). 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Alton W. Behm, John E. Costello, Michael J. Kasarda. 
CHURCH RELATIONS 

George J. Barthold, Hamilton C. Forman, Frank L. Wiegand. 
COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES 

John E. Costello, Hamilton C. Forman, Philip K. Herr, Michael J. 

Kasarda, William F. Porter. 
DEVELOPMENT CAMPAIGN COMMITTEES 

Development Fund: Roy S. Adkins, Courtney Burton, Philip 

K. Herr, Malcom W. Rush, Sr. 

Wills and Annuities: Richard R. Renner, Chairman; John E. 

Costello, Frank L. Wiegand. 
LONG RANGE PLANNING 

Malcolm W. Rush, Sr., Vernon R. Alden, Robert C. Wetenhall, 

Frank L. Wiegand, Jr. 
NOMINATING 

Charles D. Bell, Chairman; R. R. Renner, A. Dale Fiers. 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Malcolm W. Rush, Sr., Eugene Miller. 
STUDENT-FACULTY-ALUMNI RELATIONS 

Michael J. Kasarda, Chairman; A. Dale Fiers, John E. Costello, 

William F. Porter. 



NATIONAL BOARD OF FELLOWS 

DRAPER ALLEN, Detroit, Michigan 
MONE ANATHAN, JR., Steubenville, Ohio 
JOHN F. BAXTER, Gainesville, Florida 
LOUIS BERKMAN, Steubenville, Ohio 



737 



THOMAS M. BLOCH, Wheeling, West Virginia 

J. CALEB BOGCS, Washington, D.C. 

GEORGE E. CARTER, Cleveland, Ohio 

THOMAS C. CLARK, Washington, D.C. 

IAMES F. COMSTOCK, Richwood, West Virginia 

DAVID B. DALZELL, Moundsville, West Virginia 

ALBERT V. DIX, Martins Ferry, Ohio 

ARTHUR EICHELKRAUT, Wheeling, West Virginia 

WARD L. EKAS, Rochester, New York 

ROBERT W. FERGUSON, Wheeling, West Virginia 

DELMAR S. HARDER, Detroit, Michigan 

BROOKS HAYS, Washington, D.C. 

WAYNE L. HAYS, Washington, D.C. 

ROBERT HAZLETT, Wheeling, West Virginia 

ARTHUR S. HOLDEN, Painesville, Ohio 

DAVID B. HOLDEN, Wheeling, West Virginia 

GORDON HUTCHINSON, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

WILBUR S. JONES, Wheeling, West Virginia 

FORREST H. KIRKPATRICK, Wheeling, West Virginia 

ARTHUR J. KOBACKER, Brilliant, Ohio 

T. W. LIPPERT, Sea Gert, New Jersey 

WILIAM J. MAIER, JR., Charleston, West Virginia 

A. F. MARSHAL, JR., Wheeling, West Virginia 

MERIL A. MAY, Garrettsville, Ohio 

CECIL G. McVAY, Greensburg, Pennsylvania 

CHARLES L. MELENYZER, Charleroi, Pennsylvania 

WILLIAM MONTAGNA, Portland, Oregon 

ARCH A. MOORE, JR., Charleston, West Virginia 

A. R. MORGAN, Palm Springs, California and Seattle, Washington 

ROBERT M. MORRIS, Boca Raton, Florida 

SETH C. MORROW, Delray Beach, Florida 

C. WILLIAM O'NEILL, Columbus, Ohio 

WALTER PATENGE, Lansing, Michigan 

JAMES O. PEARSON, Wheeling, West Virginia 

JOHN PHILLIPS, Wheeling, West Virginia 

FRANK B. RACKLEY, Washington, Pennsylvania 

JENNINGS RANDOLPH, Washington, D.C. 

JOHN G. REDLINE, JR., Detroit, Michigan 

ARCHIBALD H. ROWAN, Fort Worth, Texas 

W. ARTHUR RUSH, North Hollywood, California 

ARTHUR M. SCOTT, Wheeling, West Virginia 

RAYMOND K. SHELINE, Tallahassee, Florida 

HULETT C. SMITH, Charleston, West Virginia 

ELVIS STAHR, JR., New York, New York 

ELEANOR STEBER, New York, New York 

GEORGE STEVENSON, Parkersburg, West Virginia 

A. KARL SUMMERS, Coolville, Ohio 

GEORGE M. SUTTON, Norman, Oklahoma 

ARTHUR A. WELLS, Newell, West Virginia 



DAVID A. WERBLIN, New York, New York 
BROOKS E. WIGG1NTON, Wheeling, West Virginia 
C. E. WOLF, New Martinsville, West Virginia 
ALFRED E. WRIGHT, JR., Uniontown, Pennsylvania 



BOARD OF VISITORS 

ROBERT C. DIX, Bellaire, Ohio 
ROBERT W. EWING, JR., Wheeling, West Virginia 
CARLYLE D. FARNSWORTH, Wheeling, West Virginia 
LAURANCE GOOD, Wheeling, West Virginia 
GORDON B. GUENTHER, Wheeling, West Virginia 
D. MILTON GUTMAN, JR., Wheeling, West Virginia 
ROBERT C. HAZLETT, JR., Wheeling, West Virginia 
JOSEPH I. STEELE, Wheeling, West Virginia 
THOMAS W. TUCKER, Wheeling, West Virginia 
GEORGE S. WEAVER, JR., Wheeling, West Virginia 




738 



ADMINISTRATION 

CECIL H. UNDERWOOD, President 

BARRIE RICHARDSON, Vice President and Dean of the Faculty 
JOSEPH M. KUREY, Registrar 
RUTH L. MARTIN, Assistant to the Registrar 
LARRY J. FRYE, Head Librarian 
WILLIAM J. GARVIN, JR., Supervisor of Audio-Visual Activities 

and Director of Radio Station 
ROBERT C. GOIN, Director of Athletics 
ANTHONY L. MITCH, Director of January Term 
KENNETH E. MILLER, Director of Practicums 

ROBERT A. SANDERCOX, Wee President and Dean of Students 
JOHN S. CUNNINGHAM, Associate Dean of Students and 

Coordinator of Counseling Services 
DARLINE B. NICHOLSON, Associate Dean of Students and 

Director of Renner Union 
RICHARD L. NEWCOMER, Assistant Dean of Students for 

Residence Hall Programs 
MARGARET MATHISON, Counselor 
WALTER M. BORTZ, Director of Admission 
ROBERT E. GORMAN, European Admission Officer 
JANET HILL, Admission Counselor 
JOHN DAVID MacLAREN, Admission Counselor 
NANCY AULT, Administrative Assistant in Placement 



RUTH L. MAIN, Coordinator of Financial Aid 

BASIL P. PAPADIMITRIOUS, M.D., College Physician 

NICK POULOS, M.D., College Physician 

CATHERINE SPRINGER, R.N., Supervisor of Infirmary 

JOANNE SYKES, R.N., College Nurse 

FLORA M. DeMARK, R.N., College Nurse 

ANGELA ROUSH, College Nurse 

WILLIAM B. ALLEN, College Chaplain 

FR. JOHN V. DIBACCO, Catholic Chaplain 

JOHN A. GRAHAM, Treasurer and Business Manager 
THEODORE BUNNELL, Assistant Business Manager 
JOHN HOFFMAN, Assistant Business Manager 
SHIRLEY JACOB, Assistant Treasurer and Accountant 
GLENN COX, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 
LYNN E. QUEEN, Director of Data Processing 
PAUL E. WHITE, Manager of College Stores 
ROBERT CONAWAY, Chief Engineer 
JACK S. LEONARD, Director of Dining Service 
JEAN SCHWERTFEGER, Supervisor of Mailroom 

BURTON B. THURSTON, Provost for External Affairs 
JOHN GERALD PATTERSON, Director of Development 
CHARLES R. ALDRICH, Director of Public Information and 

Publications 
MEREDITH NORMENT, Director of Alumni Relations and 

Deferred Giving 




/ •,') 



THE FACULTY 

CECIL H. UNDERWOOD, President of the College. (1972). 

A.B., Salem College; A.M., West Virginia University; LL.D., 
Marietta College; LL.D., Bethany College; LL.D., West Virginia 
University; LL.D., West Virginia Institute of Technology; D.H., 
Salem College; Dr. P.A., West Virginia Wesleyan College; LL.D., 
Concord College; LL.D., West Virginia State College; Litt.D., 
Western New England College. 

BARRIE RICHARDSON, Vice President and Dean of the Faculty. 
(1958-1959-1962). 
B.A., Carleton College; M.B.A., D.B.A., Indiana University; Uni- 
versity of Colorado. 

ROBERT A. SANDERCOX, Vice President and Dean of Students. 
(1957). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.Div., Yale University; University of 
Buffalo; West Virginia University. 



Emeriti 

WILBUR HAVERFIELD CRAMBLET, President Emeritus (1917-1952) 
and Distinguished Service Professor of Mathematics Emeritus. 
(1965-1969). 
A.B., A.M., Bethany College; A.M., Ph.D., Yale University; LL.D., 
University of Pittsburgh, D.D., Drake University, LL.D., Culver- 
Stockton College; Litt.D., Texas Christian University. 

ANDREW LEITCH, Sarah B. Cochran Professor of Psychology 
Emeritus. (1920-1956). 
A.B., A.M., Butler College; B.D., Ph.D., Yale University; D.D. 
Butler University; Columbia University; University of Chicago; 
University of Pennsylvania; Harvard University. 

FORREST HUNTER KIRKPATRICK, Dean of Students Emeritus 
(1927-1951) and Adjunct Professor of Economics. (1970). 
A.B., Bethany College; A.M., and Prof. Dipl., Columbia Univer- 
sity; University of Pittsburgh; University of London; LL.D., 
Bethany College; LL.D., College of Steubenville; LL.D., Drury 
College. 

JOHN J. KNIGHT, Distinguished Professor of Physical Education 
Emeritus. (1930-1970). 
A.B., West Virginia Wesleyan College; A.M., Ohio State Uni- 
versity; University of Michigan. 

BENJAMIN CHANDLER SHAW, George T. Oliver Distinguished 
Professor of History and Political Science Emeritus. (1935). 
A.B., Rollins College; A.M., Ph.D., University of North Carolina; 
American Academy in Rome; Royal University, Perugia, Italy. 



EARL D. McKENZIE, Professor of Foreign Languages and Chairman 
of the Department Emeritus. (1937-1972). 
A.B., Brown University; A.M., Columbia University; M. Litt., 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; University of Frankfurt am 
Main; Yale University; University of Paris. 

H. DONALD DAWSON, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry 
Emeritus. (1939-1944) (1963-1970). 
B.S., Denison University; M.Sc, Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

MARGARET ROBERTS WOODS, Associate Professor of Foreign 
Languages Emeritus. (1943-1961). 
A.B., Wellesley College; A.M., Pennsylvania State University; 
Middlebury College; Columbia University; Colorado College; 
University of Besancon; University of San Luis Potosi. 

WINIFRED WEBSTER, Dean of Women and Instructor in English 
Emeritus. (1952-1960). 
A.B., University of North Dakota; A.M., Columbia University. 

PERRY EPLER GRESHAM, President Emeritus. (1953-1972). 

A.B., B.D., Texas Christian University; LL.D., Texas Christian 
University; Litt.D., Culver Stockton College; L.H.D., Chapman 
College; Ed.D., Transylvania College; University of Chicago; 
Columbia University; Litt.D., University of Cincinnati; Ed.D., 
Findlay College; Ped.D., Youngstown University. 

DANIEL SOMMER ROBINSON, Professor of Philosophy Emeritus. 
(1954-1958). 
A.B., Butler College; A.M., Yale University; Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity; Litt.D., Marietta College; University of Breslau. 

WILBERT SCOTT RAY, Distinguished Professor of Psychology 
Emeritus. (1956). 
A.B., Washington and Jefferson College; A.M., Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin. 

HSIOH-REN WEI, Distinguished Professor of Physics and Public 
Affairs Emeritus. (1963-19721. 
B.A., University of Nanking; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 



Professors 

HELEN LOUISE McGUFFIE, Professor of English and Chairman of 
the Department. (1947). 
A.B., Bethany College; A.M., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., 
Columbia University. 

JOHN DANIEL DRAPER, Professor of Chemistry and Chairman of 
the Department. (1951). 
B.S., Franklin and Marshall College; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land; Michigan State University. 



740 




JAMES W. CARTY, JR., Professor of Communications and Chair- 
man of the Department. (1959). 
A.B., Culver-Stockton; B.D., University of Chicago; M.S., North- 
western University; University of Oklahoma; George Peabody 
College; Scaritt College; Saltillo (Mexico) State Teachers Col- 
lege; Diploma from National University of Nicaragua; Diploma 
University of San Carlos; Ohio University. 

JOHN A. SPENCE, Professor of Education and Chairman of the 
Department. (1961). 
B.S. in Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

CHARLES E. HALT, Professor of Economics and Chairman of the 
Department. (1969). 
B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State 
University; Ph.D., Syracuse University; University of Pittsburgh. 

JOHN TREVOR PEIRCE, Professor of Psychology and Chairman of 
the Department. (1969). 
B.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., University of California. 

BURTON B. THURSTON, Professor of Middle Eastern Studies. 
(1970). 
B. Th., Northwest Christian College; A.B., Transylvania Univer- 
sity; B.D., Butler School of Religion; M.A., Butler University; 
Th.D., Harvard University; University of Chicago; New York 
University; University of Tubingen. 

"Leave of Absence 



Associate Professors 

BRADFORD TYE, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Chair- 
man of the Department. (1943). 
B.S., Alma White College; M.S., New York University; Rutgers 
University; Columbia University; University of Pittsburgh. 

GEORGE K. HAUPTFUEHRER, Associate Professor of Music and 
Chairman of the Department. (1945). 
A.B., B.M., Friends University; A.M., University of Kansas; Pitts- 
burgh Musical Institute; Juilliard School of Music; Indiana Uni- 
versity. 

S. ELIZABETH REED, Associate Professor of Physical Education. 
(1945). 
A.B., Muskingum College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin; New York University; University of Wyo- 
ming; University of Southern California; University of Michigan. 

WILLIAM LEWIS YOUNG, Associate Professor of History and Po- 
litical Science and Chairman of the Department. (1950). 
A.B., Bethany College; A.M., Ohio State University; Columbia 
University. 

MARGARET MATHISON, Associate Professor of Education. (1951). 
A.B., M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh; University of Southern 
California; Pennsylvania State University; Ohio State University. 

JOHN RAYMOND TAYLOR, Associate Professor of English. (1955). 
A.B., Bethany College; M.A., Princeton University; University 
of Akron; University of Kansas; University of Birmingham, 
England; University of Edinburgh. 

ROBERT GARNER GOIN, Associate Professor of Physical Educa- 
tion and Chairman of the Department. (1960). 
A.B., Bethany College; M.S., West Virginia University. 

RICHARD BRUCE KENNEY, Associate Professor of Religious 
Studies and Chairman of the Department. (1964). 
A.B., Washington University; B.D., M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; 
Basel University; McGill University; University of Tubingen. 

GARY E. LARSON, Associate Professor of Biology and Chairman 
of the Department. (1964). 
B.S., M.S., New York State University, Albany; Ph.D., Rutgers 
University; Albany Medical College. 

ROBERT EDWARD MYERS, Associate Professor of Philosophy 
and Chairman of the Department. (1964). 
A.B., Bethany College; B.D., Texas Christian University; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University. 

**CARL L. SCHWEINFURTH, Associate Professor of History and 
Political Science and Director of International Education Pro- 
grams. (1964). 
B.S., University of Oregon; M.A., University of Florida; Ph.D., 
Southern Illinois University; Haile Selassie University. 



141 



HIRAM J. LESTER, Associate Professor of Religious Studies. (1965). 
A.B., B.D., Phillips University; M.A., Yale University; Johnson 
Bible College. 

'JOHN U. DAVIS, Associate Professor of Education. (1966). 
A.B., Bethany College; M.A., Columbia University; Ed.D., Co- 
lumbia University. 

WILLIAM R. CLARK, Associate Professor of Chemistry. (1967). 
B.S., Haverford College; M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., 
Georgetown University; Rutgers University. 

ARTHUR R. KIRKPATRICK, Associate Professor of History and Po- 
litical Science. (1967). 
A.A., Trenton Junior College; B.S.Ed., NE Missouri State Teach- 
ers College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

STANLEY L. BECKER, Associate Professor of General Science and 
Director of Special Interdisciplinary Projects. (1968). 
B.S., New York State College of Forestry; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin. 



Assistant Professors 

JAMES EDWARD ALLISON, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
(1964). 
B.S., Bethany College; M.A., West Virginia University. 

ALBERT R. DeVAUL, Assistant Professor of Music. (1964). 

A.B., West Liberty State College; M.M., West Virginia Univer- 
sity; Carnegie-Mellon University. 

JOHN WILLIAM LOZIER, Assistant Professor of History and For- 
eign Student Advisor. (1964). 
A.B., University of Colorado; A.M., Ohio State University. 

*JOHN D. DAVIS, Assistant Professor of Economics. (1965). 

A.B., American International College; A.M., University of Con- 
necticut. 

THEODORE R. KIMPTON, Assistant Professor of Foreign Lan- 
guages and Director of the Summer School. (1965). 
B.S., United States Military Academy; A.M., University of Mary- 
land; Catholic University; Laval University. 

•JAMES J. SAWTELL, Assistant Professor of Biology. (1966). 
B.A., Lake Forest College; M.A., Western Michigan University; 
Rutgers University. 

DAVID J. JUDY, Assistant Professor of English and Acting Chair- 
man of the Department of Theatre. (1967). 
B.A., Denison University; M.A., Western Reserve; University of 
Mexico; University of West Virginia. 

'Sabbatical 



MICKAY MILLER, Assistant Professor of Psychology. (1967). 
B.S., West Virginia University; M.S., University of North Caro- 
lina. 

ANTHONY L. MITCH, Assistant Professor of English and Director 
of the January Term. (1967). / 

A.B., Cornell University; M.A., St. John's University; New York 
University. 

JOHN S. PERRINE, II, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. (1967). 
B.A., M.A., West Virginia University. 

WESLEY J. WAGNER, Assistant Professor of Art. (1967). 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; Barnes Foundation. 

E. DONALD AULT, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 
(1968). 
B.A., West Liberty State College; M.A., Marshall University. 

WALTER L. KORNOWSKI, Assistant Professor of Art and Chair- 
man of the Department. (1968). 
B.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology; M.S., State Univer- 
sity College of Buffalo. 

ALBERT R. BUCKELEW, JR., Assistant Professor of Biology. (1969). 
B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University; Ph.D., University of New 
Hampshire. 

ROY P. CROSTON, Assistant Professor of Physics and Chairman 
of the Department. (1969). 
B.S., Bethany College; M.S., Ph.D., West Virginia University. 

DOROTHY HUESTIS, Assistant Professor of Education. (1969). 
A.B., M.A., Indiana University. 

RICHARD G. STEBBINS, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. (1969) 
B.A., Wesleyan University; Ph.D., Texas A&M. 

LEONORA B. CAYARD, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
and Chairman of the Department. (1970). 
Ph.D., Marburg University; Yale University; Howard University. 

JOHN I. DAELEY, Assistant Professor of History. (1970). 

B.A., University of Alberta; M.A., University of Western On- 
tario; Ph.D., University of London. 

KARL C. GARRISON, JR., Assistant Professor of Sociology and 
Chairman of the Department. (1970). 
A.B., University of Georgia; B.D., Philadelphia Divinity School; 
M.A., Ph.D., Duke University; Oregon State University; Univer- 
sity of the South. 



742 



LARRY E. GRIMES, Assistant Professor of English. (1970). 
B.A., Bethany College; B.D., Yale Divinity School; Emory Uni- 
versity. 

RONALD A. WARD, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. (1970). 
B.S., Eastern Nazarene College; Ph.D., Florida State University; 
Georgetown University. 

M. CYNTHIA LORR, Assistant Professor of Psychology. (1971). 
B.A., Louisiana State; M.A., University of Iowa. 

JERRY FOLK, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies. (1972). 
B.A., Capital University; B.D., Wartburg Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., University of Tubingen; Oxford University. 

DAVID LIDEN, Assistant Professor of History. (1972). 
A.B., Union College; M.A., University of Massachusetts; Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

OLIVER MANNING, Assistant Professor of Music. (1972). 

B.M., Louisiana State University; M.M., Cincinnati College- 
Conservatory of Music. 

PAUL J. NYDEN, Assistant Professor of Sociology. (1972). 
A.B., Columbia College; Columbia University. 

BRENDEN D. TEMPEST-MOGG, Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
(1972). 
B.A., University of New South Wales; M.A., University of Essex; 
University of Oxford. 

Instructors 

SUSAN WORTHEN HANNA, Instructor in Health and Physical 
Education. (1957). 
A.B., Bethany College; Marjorie Webster School of Physical 
Education. 

MARJORIE TUFTS CARTY, Instructor in Foreign Languages. (1965). 
Ph.B., University of Chicago; Clark University, State Teachers 
College, Saltillo, Mexico; University of Nicaragua; Bethany 
College; West Virginia University. 

W. RANDOLPH COOEY, Instructor in Economics. (1966). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., West Virginia University. 

**ROBERT RILEY, Instructor in Health and Physical Education. 
(1967). 
A.B., Bethany College; West Virginia University. 

J. RICARDO PASTOR, Instructor in Foreign Languages. (1968). 
B.A., State Teachers College of Bolivia; M.A., West Virginia Uni- 
versity; Diploma, University of Bordeaux, France; Bethany Col- 
lege; University of Wisconsin. 

DAVID T. SEIDMAN, Instructor in Physics. (1968). 
B.S., Bethany College; M.S., Purdue University. 




ALBERT C. APPLIN, II, Instructor in Health and Physical Educa- 
tion. (1969). 
B.A., Marietta College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University; 
U.S. Naval Academy. 

LARRY J. FRYE, Instructor in Library Science and Head Librarian. 
(1969). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.L.S., Rutgers University. 

PATRICIA J. JERSEY, Instructor in Library Science and Assistant 
Librarian for Public Services. (1970). 
B.S., West Virginia University; M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh. 

BLAINE CARPENTER, Instructor in Biology. (1971). 

B.S., West Virginia Wesleyan College; M.S., Marshall Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati. 

GARY L. GARRISON, Instructor in Philosophy. (1971). 

B.A., University of South Florida; Long Beach City College; 
Florida Southern College; University of Cincinnati. 

PAULINE R. NELSON, Instructor in Foreign Languages. (1971). 
B.A., Upsala College; M.A., University of Pittsburgh. 

"Leave of Absence 



743 




NANCY SANDERCOX, Instructor in Library Science and Assistant 
Librarian. (1971). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh. 

DAVID W. SAUER, Instructor in Physical Education. (1971). 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.Ed., Kent State University. 

HAROLD G. O'LEARY, Instructor in Communications. (1972). 
West Liberty State College. 

STEPHEN M. RADER, Instructor in Theatre. (1972). 
A.B., Marietta College; M.A., Ohio University. 

NORMAN DiCLEMENTE, Visiting Instructor in Education. (1972). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.S., University of Pittsburgh. 



Distinguished Lecturers and Consultants 

C. WILLIAM O'NEILL, Distinguished Lecturer in Public Affairs. 
(1959). 
A.B., Marietta College; LL.B., Ohio State; LL.D., Defiance Col- 
lege; LL.D., Ohio University; LL.D., Miami University (Ohio); 
LL.D., College of Steubenville; LL.D., West Virginia University; 
LH.D., Marietta College; LL.D., Heidelberg College; LL.D., Wil- 
berforce University. 

DON GILLIS, Consultant in Music. (1963). 

A.B., B.Mus., Dr. Mus., Texas Christian University; M.Mus., 
North Texas Teachers College. 

Adjunct Faculty 

NINA GOEHRING McGOWAN, Part-time Instructor in Music. 
(1966). 
B.M., M.M., University of Michigan. 



ROBYN R. COLE, Part-time Instructor in English. (1968). 

B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., University of Georgia; Ohio 
University. 

WILLIAM J. GARVIN, JR., Part-time Instructor in Communications. 
(1969). 
B.S., W_st Virginia University. 

LEONARD A. HELMAN, Lecturer in Religious Studies. (1969). 
B.S., Trinity College; B.H.L., M.H.L., Hebrew Union College; 
Hartford Seminary Foundation. 

WILLIAM B. ALLEN, Chaplain of the College. (1970). 
B.A., Bethany College; B.D., Yale Divinity School. 

CHARLES R. ALDRICH, Adjunct Instructor in Communications 
and Director of Public Information and Publications. (1971). 
A.B., University of Michigan; M.S., Ohio University. 

HELEN PIERCE ELBIN, Part-time Instructor in Music. (1971). 
A.B., Bethany College. 

MARGARET A. GARRISON, Adjunct Instructor in Education. 
(1971). 
B.A., University of South Florida; Carson-Newman College; 
University of Cincinnati. 

ERIN M. RENN, Part-time Instructor in Art. (1971). 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University. 

S. SCOTT BARTCHY, Adjunct Assistant Professor in Religious 
Studies. (1972). 
B.A., Milligan College; Th.D., Harvard University. 

ARLENE M. WARD, Part-time Instructor in Physical Education. 
(1972). 
B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.Ed., University of Pitts- 
burgh. 



Committees of the Faculty and Staff 



ACADEMIC REVIEW 

Mr. Richardson, Chairman; Mr. Allison, Mr. Hauptfuehrer, Miss 

Mathison, Mr. Myers, Mr. Sandercox. Ex-officio: Mr. Kurey. 

Student members: Kevin Davis and Carol Means. 
ADMISSION 

Mr. Kenney, Chairman; Mr. Carpenter, Mr. Halt, Mr. Judy, 

Miss McGuffie, Mr. Sandercox, Mr. Stebbins. Ex-ofticio: Mr. 

Bortz. 
ART COLLECTION 

Mr. Kornowski, Chairman; Mrs. Lorr, Mr. Manning, Mr. K. 

Miller, Mr. Wagner, Mr. Young. Ex-officio: Mr. Frye. Student 

member: Richard Vulgamore. 



144 



ATHLETICS 

Mr. Stebbins, Chairman; Miss Jersey, Mr. M. Miller, Miss Reed, 
Mr. Sandercox, Mr. Seidman. Ex-offico: Mr. Goin. Student 
members: Christine Cook and Stephen Vitchner. 

COLLEGE UNION ADVISORY 

Mr. Sandercox, Chairman; Mr. Carpenter, Mr. Graham, Mr. 
Manning, Mr. K. Miller, Miss Nicholson. Student members: 
Michael Calabria, Mary-Helen Van Dyke, and Guy Weik. 

COLLEGE UNION PROGRAM BOARD 

Guy Weik, Chairman; John Denslow, Diane McVey, Alex 
Riebe, Robert Stack, Mary-Helen Van Dyke. Miss Nicholson, 
Administrative Secretary. 

COMPUTER ADVISORY 

Mr. Croston, Chairman; Mr. Cooey, Mr. Graham, Mr. Kurey, 
Mr. Larson, Mrs. Lorr, Mr. Perrine, Mr. Ward. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

Mr. Thurston, Chairman; Mr. Croston, Mr. Graham, Mr. Grimes, 
Mr. Kurey, Mr. Patterson, Mr. Richardson, Mr. Schweinfurth, 
Mr. Spence. 

CULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

Mr. DeVaul, Chairman; Mr. K. Garrison, Mr. Grimes, Mr. 
Hauptfuehrer, Miss Jersey, Mr. M. Miller, Mr. O'Leary, Mr. 
Young. Ex-officio: Miss Nicholson and Mr. Sandercox. Student 
members: Cathy Howard, Joan Simonetti, and Diane Wolfarth. 

CURRICULUM 

Mr. Richardson, Chairman; Mr. Draper, Mr. Lester, Miss Mathi- 
son, Mr. Mitch, Mr. Peirce. Student members: Kaybeth Lohman 
and Stephen Ratcliffe. 

FACULTY PERSONNEL 

Mr. Allison, Mr. Frye, Mr. Kenney, Miss McGuffie, Mr. Young. 

FACULTY WELFARE 

(3 years) Miss McGuffie and Mr. Halt; (2 years) Mrs. Carty and 
Mr. R. Kirkpatrick; (1 year) Mr. Becker and Mr. Mitch. 

GANS AWARD 

Mr. Ray, Chairman; Mr. Croston, Mr. Draper, Mr. Larson, Mr. 
Tye. 

HONORS 

Mr. Myers, Chairman; Mr. Clark, Mr. Grimes, Mr. Kenney, 
Mr. M. Miller, Mr. Richardson, Mr. Sandercox, Mr. Young. 

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

Mrs. Cayard, Chairman; Mr. Bortz, Mrs. Carty, Mrs. Huestis, 
Mr. Lozier, Mr. Pastor, Mr. Schweinfurth. Ex-officio: Mr. Kurey 
and Mr. Richardson. Student members: ]oe Boachie-Agyeman, 
Bonnie Kittle, and Barbara Schneider. 

JANUARY TERM 

Mr. Buckelew, Chairman; Mr. Cunningham, Mr. G. Garrison, 
Mr. Halt, Mr. Lester, Miss Nelson, Mr. Perrine. Ex-officio: Mr. 
Mitch and Mr. Richardson. Student members: Kathleen Barrett, 
Judy Belt, Frederick Borg, Kathleen Downey, and Margaret 
Keating. 



LIBRARY 

Mr. R. Kirkpatrick, Chairman; Mr. Becker, Mrs. Carty, Mr. 
Daeley, Mr. DeVaul, Miss McGuffie, Mr. Pastor, Mr. Young. 
Ex-officio: Mr. Frye, Miss Jersey and Mrs. Sandercox. Student 
members: James Brockhardt and Robinsue Frohboese. 

ORIENTATION 

Mr. Cunningham, Chairman; Mr. G. Garrison, Miss Mathison, 
Mr. Mitch, Mr. O'Leary, Mr. Peirce. Student members: Michael 
Calabria, Robinsue Frohboese, and Joan Simonetti. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Mr. Allen, Chairman; Mr. K. Garrison, Mr. Grimes, Rabbi 
Helman, Mr. Kenney, Mr. Sandercox, Father Seidel, Mr. Sauer, 
Mr. Taylor. Student members: Steven Blum, Kevin Davis, and 
Marc Harshman. 

SCHEDULE AND CALENDAR 

Mr. Kurey, Chairman; Mr. Goin, Mr. Kimpton, Mr. R. Kirkpat- 
rick, Miss Nelson, Mr. Taylor. Student members: Susan Atkin- 
son, Kerry Jones, and Beverlee Sullivan. 

SCHOLARSHIP AND FINANCIAL AID 

Mr. Sandercox, Chairman; Mr. Bortz, Mr. Cooey, Mr. DeVaul, 
Mr. Graham, Miss Reed, Mr. Richardson. 

SPECIAL FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

Mr. Becker, Chairman; Mr. Grimes, Mr. Halt. Student members: 
Richard Vulgamore and Diane Wolfarth. 

TEACHER EDUCATION ADVISORY 

Mr. R. Kirkpatrick, Chairman; Mr. Ault, Mrs. Lorr, Mr. Spence, 
Mr. Ward. Student members: John Bossange and Linda Serrill. 

TEACHER EDUCATION REVIEW 

Mr. Spence, Chairman; Mr. Allison, Mr. Cunningham, Mrs. 
Hanna, Mrs. Huestis, Mr. Judy, Mr. Richardson, Mr. Sauer. 

TESTING 

Mr. Spence, Chairman; Mr. Applin, Mr. Cooey, Mr. Cunning- 
ham, Mrs. Huestis, Mr. Kurey, Mr. Stebbins, Mr. Thurston. 
Student members: Kathleen Barrett and John Warrick. 

BOARD OF COMMUNICATIONS 

Mr. Carty, Secretary; Mr. Aldrich, Mr. Garvin, Mr. Graham, Mr. 
Judy, Mr. Patterson, Mr. Ward. Student members: Michael 
Calabria, Chairman; Editors and Business Managers of publica- 
tions, and General Manager and Program Director of the Radio 
Station. 

COLLEGE COUNCIL 

Mr. Sandercox and Michael Calabria, Co-chairmen; Mr. Allison, 
Mr. Carty, Mr. Draper, Mr. Frye, Mr. K. Garrison, Mr. Goin, 
Mr. Graham, Mr. Hauptfuehrer, Mr. Kenney, Mr. Larson, Miss 
McGuffie, Miss Nicholson, Mr. Patterson, Mr. Peirce, Mr. 
Richardson, Mr. Spence, Mr. Thurston, Mr. Young. Student 
members: Presidents of Fraternities, Sororities, and House 
Associations. 



745 



STUDENT BODY 1971-72 



ABBOTT, SUZANNE Q. 
Norwalk, Conn. 

ABRAHAM, A. JACK, III 
Wheeling, VV. Va. 

ABRAHAM, MICHAEL A. 
Munhall, Pa. 

ABRAMOVIC, RHONDA K. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

ADAMS, EVAN W. 
Westboro, Mass. 

ADAMS, TERRI JO 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

ADAMS, TIMOTHY 
Williamsville, N.Y. 

ADAMS, WILLIAM DAVID 
Carlisle, Pa. 

ADDY, SUSAN JANE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

AGIN, IDA JEAN 
St. Clairsville, Ohio 

ALEXANDER, JOHN R. 
Snyder, N.Y. 

ALI, JOHN 
Corning, N.Y. 

ALLEN, BETSY B. 
Levittown, N.Y. 

ALLEN, JOYCE L. 
Alexandria, Va. 

ALLISON, LEE JORDAN 
Chappaqua, N.Y. 

ALPIZAR, O. JOHN 
Key West, Fla. 

AMATO, VINCENT M. 
Wellsville. Ohio 

AMRHEIN, David A. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

ANDERSON, C. J. 
Hagerstown, Md. 

ANDERSON, KAREN LEE 
Belle Vernon, Pa. 

ANDERSON, WENDY JANE 
Westfield, N.J. 

ANDY, CHRISTINE L. 
Washington, Pa. 

ANDY, PAUL 
Washington, Pa. 

APESOS, THOMAS W. 
Steubenville, Ohio 



APPELL, LUCILLE M. 
Monroeville, Pa. 

ARMINGTON, LYNDA E. 
Willoughby, Ohio 

ARMS, LAINE A. 
Hollidaysburg, Pa. 

ARMSTRONG, PAMELA G. 
Youngstown, N.Y. 

ARNAUD, GWEN E. 
Dallas, Pa. 

ARNAUD, STEPHEN K. 
Dallas, Pa. 
ARTAVIA, MARIA 
San Jose, Costa Rica 

ATKINSON, SUSAN JANE 
Irwin, Pa. 

ATWATER, JAMES B. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

AUSTIN, TERRI LOU 
Chappaqua, N.Y. 

BABCOCK, RONALD NEAL 
Bethany, W. Va. 

BACHMANN, NANCY LOIS 
Millington, N.J. 

BACHNER, LOUIS J. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BADOLATO, CHRISTINE M. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BAILIE, TERRY ANN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BAKER, KAREN BETH 
Dresher, Pa. 

BAKER, LARRY DENNIS 
Bentleyville, Pa. 

BALY, MELANIE A. 
Weirton, W. Va. 

BANES, BARBARA JULE 
McKeesport, Pa. 

BARILLA, PETER L. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

BARKER, KATHLEEN A. 

Wayne, N.J. 

BARNES, MICHAEL C. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

BARNETT, KAREN A. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

BARRETT, JOSEPH P. 
Richwood, W. Va. 



BARRETT, KATHLEEN M. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

BARRY, BARBARA F. 
Berkeley Heights, N.J. 

BARTHOLOMEW, TRACY, I 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BARTKO, MELANIE SUSAN 
Monroeville, Pa. 

BARTLETT, JULIA M. 
Ridgewood, N.J. 

BARTOW, STEVEN G. 
Glen Ridge, N.J. 

BASCIANI, KATHLEEN D. 
Toughkenamon, Pa. 

BASKOT, TERRY MARIE 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

BASTACKY, DAVID H. 
Munhall, Pa. 

BAWUAH, KOJO F. 
Kumasi, Ghana 

BAXTER, MERYNDA LEE 
Dover, N.J. 

BAZLEY, SHARON ANN 
Orange, Conn. 

BEATTY, ANN MORROW 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BEBOUT, REBECCA J. 
Washington, Pa. 

BECHTOLD, STEPHEN J. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BECKER, SAUNDRA 
Bethany, W. Va. 

BELL, KIM CLINTON 
Washington, Pa. 

BELL, LESLIE ALLYN 
Riverhead, N.Y. 

BELL, ROBERT H. 
Natrona Heights, Pa. 

BELLISSIMO, JOHN J. 
Monroeville, Pa. 

BELT, JUDITH ANNE 
Lexington, Mass. 

BENESH, GARY LEE 
Bellaire, Ohio 

BENNETT, KAREN 
Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

BENNETT, SUSAN JANE 
Malverne, N.Y. 

BERGMAN, PAUL J. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



BERKEY, TRUDY LYNN 
Washington, Pa. 

BERNARDA, BRUCE A. 
Meriden, Conn. 

BIEBER, MAUREEN LIN 
Kensington, Md. 

BLACK, DONALD R. 
Denver, Colo. 

BLACK, GEORGE M. 
New Martinsville, W. Va. 

BLACKBURN, ROBIN I. 
Port Washington, N.Y. 

BLAIR, LYNN MARY 
New York, N.Y. 

BLINN, CHARLES R. 
West Hartford, Conn. 

BLOCKSIDGE, DONNA M. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BLOODGOOD, CHERYL ANN 
Rockville, Md. 

BLUM, STEVEN MARK 
White Plains, N.Y. 

BOACHIE-AGYEMAN, JOE 
Kumasi, Ghana 

BOADA, ERIC S. 
Oakdale, L.I., N.Y. 

BOBBITT, CURTIS WAYNE 
Muncie, Ind. 

BODDY, SANDRA E. 
Glen Ridge, N.J. 

BOEHM, SUZANNE M. 
Rockville, Md. 

BOLAND, JERRY D. 
Cumberland, Md. 

BOND, CAROLYN ANN 
Cedar Grove, N.J. 

BONGIORNI, RAYMOND V. 
Chula Vista, Calif. 

BOOS, LAUREL JENINE 
Buffalo, N.Y. 

BOOSINGER, DIANE L. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BOOTH, DOUGLAS ALAN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BORG, FREDERICK H. 

Naugatuck, Conn. 

BORREBACH, JEAN M. 
Monroeville, Pa. 

BOSEE, JOHN K., IV 
Old Greenwich, Conn. 



746 



BOSSANGE, JOHN P. 
Wellesley, Mass. 

BOUGIE, JANE M. 
Clinton, Conn. 

BOVE, PEGGY ANN 
North Andover, Mass. 

BOWERS, CLIFFORD J. 
W. Mifflin, Pa. 

BOWERS, JACK EDWARD 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

BOWMAN, BONNIE LILA 
Beckley, W. Va. 

BRADLEY, J. MICHAEL 
Dallas, Tex. 

BRADY, MICHAEL V. 
E. Paterson, N.J. 

BRADY, SUZANNE JEANNE 
Glen Ridge, N.J. 

BRANDON, DEMREY G. 
Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

BRAVMAN, BARBARA 
Passaic, N.J. 

BREEN, PATRICIA A. 
Westport, Conn. 

BRINKMAN, JAMES A. 
Carlstadt, N.J. 

BRINKWORTH, CHRISTINE 
Media, Pa. 

BROCKARDT, JAMES W. 
Princeton Junction, N.J. 

BRODERICK, CHERYL ANN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BROWDER, PATRICIA 
Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

BROWN, CHRISTINE A. 
Selinsgrove, Pa. 

BROWN, JOHN G. 
Charleston, S.C. 

BROWNFIELD, JAMES H. 
Centerville, Va. 

BRUNSON, JAMES A. 
Pittsford, N.Y. 

BUCKELEW, SUSAN 
Bethany, W. Va. 

BUCKLEY, JUDITH LYNN 
Akron, Ohio 

BUCKLIN, HARRIS H., Ill 
Wilton, Conn. 

BUDZAK, KATHLEEN SUE 
Cheswick, Pa. 



BURGESS, JOHN M. 
Rosemont, Pa. 

BURGY, LARRY JAMES 
Barnesville, Ohio 

BURKE, SUSAN T. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BURNS, PAMELA L. 

Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich. 

BURTON, LESLIE ANN 
Danbury, Conn. 

BUSH, JERRY L. 
Curryville, Pa. 

BYRD, RONALD D. 
Millersville, Md. 

CAHILL, BONNIE F. 
Butler, Pa. 

CAHILL, DENNIS V. 
Maplewood, N.J. 

CAHILL, MARTHA JO 
Butler, Pa. 

CALABRIA, MICHAEL J. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

CAMERA, CAROL ANN 
Upper Nyack, N.Y. 

CAMPAGNA, SHIRLEY W. 
Clementon, N.J. 

CAMPBELL, JAN K. 
Marion, Ind. 

CAMPSEY, LYNN L. 
Claysville, Pa. 

CANNON, SANDRA LEE 
Sayville, N.Y. 

CAPUTO, RONALD L. 
Moorestown, N.J. 

CARLIN, MARSHA A. 
Grand Island, N.Y. 

CARLSON, PAUL C. 
Waquoit, Mass. 

CARPETA, CHARLES W. 
Finleyville, Pa. 

CARR, ROSE M. 
Canton, Ohio 

CARROLL, SUZANNE TERES 
Alexandria, Va. 

CARUSO, ROBERT L. 
Monroeville, Pa. 

CARY, JOSEPH D. 
Washington, Pa. 

CASE, NANCY ELYSE 
Metuchen, N.J. 



CASEY, MARK W. 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

CASEY, TIMOTHY W. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

CASPER, RALPH A. 
Washington, Pa. 

CASSANO, MARGARET K. 
Mt. Kisco, N.Y. 

CASTRO, WILLIAM 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

CASUCCIO, GARY S. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

CELO, GARY VINCENT 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CERAR, DAVID JAMES 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CERNE, MARGARET L. 
Herminie, Pa. 

CHAMBERS, CHARLOTTE 
Bethany, W. Va. 

CHAVEZ, LIONEL A. 
Hialeah, Fla. 

CHAVEZ, VANCE S. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

CHEK, PAUL J. 
Weirton, W. Va. 

CHERNENKO, GARY CRAIG 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

CHESHURE, ROBERT J. 
Charleroi, Pa. 

CHEWNING, PAUL B. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

CHIESA, JOHN ARNOLD 
Blairsville, Pa. 

CHIU, PAULINE PO-LIN 
Hong Kong 

CHRISTY, FRANK P. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CHURCHILL, LYNN ANN 
Shaker Heights, Ohio 

CHUTE, SUSAN LEE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CIPOLETTI, CYNTHIA K. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

CIRIPOMPA, A. CHRIS 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

CIRIPOMPA, JANET MAY 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

CLAY, REBECCA LOUISE 
Washington, D.C. 



CLAYTON, JAMES R. 
Bricktown, N.J. 

CLEFFI, SHARYN D. 
Long Branch, N.J. 

CLINE, DAVID P. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CLISBY, DIANNE I. 
Merion Station, Pa. 

COBB, DON KENT, JR. 
Olmsted Falls, Ohio 

COBB, SHARON LEE 
Lebanon, N.J. 

COCUMELLI, STEPHEN A. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

COFFEY, SCOTT 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

COGER, CYNTHIA H. 
Marion, Ohio 

COGER, RAYMOND H. 
Ridgewood, N.J. 

COKER, JOHN 

Ebute Metta Lagos, Nigeria 

COLEMAN, EMILY M. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

COLEMAN, J. SCOTT 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

COLEMAN, PEGGY S. 
Mammoth, W. Va. 

COLLINSON, WILLIAM 
Cranston, R.I. 

CONAWAY, RODNEY LEE 
Painesville, Ohio 

CONCILUS, WILLIAM M. 
Pittsburgh/Pa. 

CONKLIN, KATHY 
Chester, W. Va. 

CONKLIN, WILLIAM KIM 
Chester, W. Va. 

CONLEY, TERYL LEE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CONNERS, JILL SUSAN 
Hempstead, N.Y. 

CONNOLLY, LARKIN P. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CON SOLO, CAROLYN T. 
South Euclid, Ohio 

COOK, CHRISTINE L. 
Charleroi, Pa. 

COOK, MARTHA F. 
Falls Church, Va. 



747 



COONEY, CHRISTINE E. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

COOPER, DAVID A., JR. 
Tariffville, Conn. 

CORCORAN, JUDITH S. 
Glen Ridge, N.J. 

CORREALE, DOROTHY A. 
Bethpage, N.Y. 

COSTANTINO, JOSEPH P. 
Hillcrest Hgts., Md. 

COSTANZO, GREGORY R. 
Grand Island, N.Y. 

COSTELLO, ELIZABETH A. 
Upper Montclair, N.J. 

COULLING, KAREN ANN 
Wheelir^g, W. Va. 

COULTER, SCOTT E. 
Newton, N.J. 

COUSIN, MICHAEL JAY 
Hightstown, N.J. 

COVEY, PATRICIA ANN 

Summit, N.J 

COWDEN, DAVID A. 
McDonald, Pa. 

COWELL, MARY K. 
Monongahela, Pa. 

COX, JEFFREY A. 
Bethel Park, Pa. 

COX, SHERYL LEE 
Steubenville, Ohio 

CRAIG, JANICE A. 
Berkeley Heights, N.J. 

CRAIG, MARTHA L. 
Carnegie, Pa. 

CRAIG, TERRY ANN 
Canonsburg, Pa. 

CRAMBLET, ALICE LOUISE 
Bethany, W. Va. 

CRAMBLET, LAURA L 
Bethany, W. Va. 

CRAMMER, RICHARD D. 
Wall Township, N.J. 

CRAY, JOHN R. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CREAMER, JANICE L. 
Wayne, N.J. 

CREPS, EARL G. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CRIMMINS, NANCY A. 
Charleston, W. Va. 



CRISANTI, DIANE A. 
Lock Haven, Pa. 

CROUSHORE, GRETCHEN 
Crantord, N.J. 

CRUSE, WILLIAM F., JR. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

CYPHERS, BARBARA DIANE 
Westerville, Ohio 

DAELEY, JOHN I. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

DA1LER, DAVID MARK 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

DAILER, JAMES M. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

DALEK, JOHN STANLEY 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

DARTLEY, LAWRENCE C. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

DASIKA, RAMA 
Kendall Park, N.J. 

DAUB, NANCY McKEE 
Monroeville, Pa. 

DAVENPORT, PAUL A. 
Hopedale, Ohio 

DAVIN, DALE DONALD 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DAVIS, JAMES WILLIAM 
Weirton, W. Va. 

DAVIS, JEAN CAROL 
New Milford, N.J. 

DAVIS, JOHN W. 
Columbia, Md. 

DAVIS, KEVIN WILLIAM 
Painesville, Ohio 

DAVIS, LINDA A. 
Sharon, Pa. 

DAVIS, MARIANNE 
Bethany, W. Va. 

DAVIS, SUSAN 
Bethany, W. Va. 

DAWSON, PAMELA J. 
New York, N.Y. 

DEAN, JOSEPH W. 
Island Heights, N.J. 

DEARTH, CARL W. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

DEASY, JOHN ALLEN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DEBARTOLO, SAVERIO F. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



DEBLASIS, JOHN F. 
Bellaire, Ohio 

DECK, KRISTEN ANN 
Scotia, N.Y. 

DEMATATIS, ANNA M. 
Washington, D.C. 

DENISAR, LESLIE D. 
Newburgh, N.Y. 

DENNIS, WILLIAM E. 
Williamsburg, Ohio 

DENNY, HERBERT T. H. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DENSLOW, JOHN A. 
Chalfont, Pa. 

DENTON, KATHRYN E. 
Cheshire, Conn. 

DESANTIS, CARLOS H. 
Woodbine, N.J. 

DEVENS, TIMOTHY F. 
Sewickley, Pa. 

DEVLIN, BARBARA RUTH 
Wexford, Pa. 

DEWITT, SCOTT L. 
Washington, Pa. 

DIBBA, DEMBO A. 

Bathurst Gambia, West Africa 

DICESARE, MARGARITA R. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

DIEHL, BARBARA L. 
Arlington, Va. 

DIXON, MICHAEL S. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DOHERTY, RICHARD J. 

Hatboro, Pa. 

DOLAN, WILLIAM J. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

DOLCE, DONNA M. 
Fredonia, N.Y. 

DONALDSON, MARILYN V. 
Canonsburg, Pa. 

DONEY, WILLIAM P. 
Jeannette, Pa. 

DONISH, WILLIAM H. 
Rochester, N.Y. 

DONOVAN, THOMAS K. 
Short Hills, N.J. 

DOUGLASS, DELPHINE A. 
San Antonio, Tex. 

DOW, JOLAINE S. 
North Plainfield, N.J. 



DOWNEY, KATHLEEN A. 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

DOWNS, JOHN WILLIAM 
Mathews, Va. 

DOYLE, KATHY ANNE 
Hempstead, N.Y. 

DRAPER, DAVID M. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

DRAPER, JOHN D., JR. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

DREWRY, SYDNEY L. 
Newark, Del. 

DUCOEUR, RAYMOND R. 
Wilmerding, Pa. 

DUDMAN, SHERRI A. 
Rochester, N.Y. 

DUFF, JAMES A., JR. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

DUMBAUGH, W. JACK 
Weirton, W. Va. 

DUNCAN, DAVID JOHN 
Big Prairie, Ohio 

DUPRE, BEVAN LOREE 
Hamden, Conn. 

DYE, E. LAWRENCE 
Bemus Point, N.Y. 

EARNEST, ELDON G. 
Cameron, W. Va. 

EDENS, PATRICIA ANNE 
Sayville, N.Y. 

EDOGUN, SOLOMON 
Lagos, Nigeria 

EHONWA, ERNEST 
New York, N.Y. 

EHREREICH, KAREN S 
Glassport, Pa. 

EL ABD, ISMAIL H. 
Washington, D.C. 

ELDER, JEANNE CAROL 
Monroeville, Pa. 

ELDER, WILLIAM D. 
Allison Park, Pa. 

ELLIS, SUZANNE R. 
McKeesport, Pa. 

ELLSWORTH, JOHN B. 
Milford, Conn. 

EMCH, THOMAS WILLIAM 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

ENFIELD, KERRY L. 
Stoystown, Pa. 



148 



ENTWISLE, THOMAS B. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

ERB, DAVID ANDREW 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

ERBE, PETER D. 
Stony Brook, N.Y. 

EVERETT, WILLIAM M. 
Thorofare, N.J. 

FALZARANO, ROBERT M. 
Whippany, N.J. 

FARROW, CAROL ANN 
Westfield, N.J. 

FAVREAU, WAYNE D. 
Waterford, N.Y. 

FEDAK, MARK ALAN 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

FELDMAN, BRUCE JUDD 
McKeesport, Pa. 

FERGUSON, CATHERINE A. 

Duxbury, Mass. 

FERKOL, DAVID R. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

FERRARIS, PATRICIA A. 
Ridgewood, N.J. 

FERRY, CHRISTINE V. 
Mingo Junction, Ohio 

FEYCHE, GABRIELLE U. 
McMurray, Pa. 

FILBERT, RAYMOND C. 
McKeesport, Pa. 

FIORENTINO, LAWRENCE D. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

FISCHER, GEORGE T. 
Claysville, Pa. 

FISHER, DENISE M. 
W. Mifflin, Pa. 

FISHER, ERIC S. 
Monroeville, Pa. 

FISHER, RICHARD E. 
Chelmsford, Mass. 

FLANAGAN, ELIZABETH A. 
Belle Vernon, Pa. 

FLANAGAN, THOMAS 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

FLEISCHER, ALAN N. 
Valley Stream, N.Y. 

FLOOD, RORY ANN 
Goldens Bridge, N.Y. 

FLYNN, JAMES ALAN 
Manasquan, N.J. 



FOLEY, EILEEN MARIE 
W. Caldwell, N.J. 

FORD, EDWARD E. 
Follansbee, W. Va. 

FORD, GLENDA F. 
Buffalo, N.Y. 

FORD, PATRICK J. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

FORMAN, SUSAN L. 
Butler, Pa. 

FORNEY, PAULA IRENE 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 

FORTUNA, CHARLES W. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

FOSTER, RUSSELL G. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

FOX, RANDOLPH W. 
Canton, Ohio 

FRANZOLINO, JON MARIO 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

FRAZIER, RODERICK L. 
Washington, D.C. 

FREEDMAN, GARY S. 
Washington, D.C. 

FREW, KEITH S. 
Monongahela, Pa. 

FRIBERG, MARILYN D. 
Turnersville, N.J. 

FRIDAY, CAROL SUSAN 
Chatham, N.J. 

FRIEBE, JAMES CHESTER 
Steubenville, Ohio 

FRIEDMAN, DARA BETH 
New York, N.Y. 

FRIESELL, LEE F. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

FRIESELL, PETER B. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

FRIESELL, SUSAN S. 
Edgewood, Pa. 

FROHBOESE, ROBINSUE 
Short Hills, N.J. 

FROME, WILLIAM C. 
Alexandria, Va. 

FULTON, ARTHUR S. 
Washington, Pa. 

FUNK, ROBERT C. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

FURLONG, GARY P. 
Syosset, N.Y. 



GAITSKILL, LISA A. 
Franklin Lakes, N.J. 

GALLOWAY, DONALD W. 
Glassport, Pa. 

GARDNER, CHARLENE B. 
Arlington, Va. 

GARDNER, RONALD C. 
Chatham, N.J. 

GARRETT, BETTY JANE 
Steubenville, Ohio 

GARRISON, JANICE M. 
Houston, Tex. 

GARRISON, MARGARET A. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

GARTH, STEVEN R. 
Tonawanda, N.Y. 

GAST, JERRY A. 

Summit, N.J. 

GATES, JOHN KENNEDY 
Uniontown, Pa. 

GEFERT, THADDEUS J. 
Dravosburg, Pa. 

GEIER, DOUGLAS R. 
Rochester, N.Y. 

GELLER, MARILYN SUE 
South Orange, N.J. 

GERBERDING, ELLYN J. 
S. Glastonbury, Conn. 

GERKE, RACHEL M. 
Uniontown, Pa. 

GEYER, DAVID L., JR. 
Scarsdale, N.Y. 

GIBBONEY, SUSAN M. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

GILL, BRIAN B. 
Bridgeville, Pa. 

GILL, SUKHINDER 
Bethany, W. Va. 

GIVNER, BLAINE D. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

GLASER, RITA M. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

GLASS, CLARA MAURI NE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

GLAUSER, MARY JANE 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

GODISH, JAMES EDWARD 
Burgettstown, Pa. 

GODWIN, JOHN EDSON 
Buckhannon, W. Va. 



GOLASKI, BARBARA A. 
Washington, Pa. 

GOLDBECK, BARBARA R. 
Whitemarsh, Pa. 

GOLDBERG, RONNA 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

GOLDSTEIN, DANIEL B. 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 

GOLDTHORPE, ELIZABETH 
Upper Saddle River, N.J. 

GOMEZ, RICHARD G. 
Whippany, N.J. 

GOODLIN, GARY R. 
Ligonier, Pa. 

GOODRICH, JANE C. 
Nutley, N.J. 

GOODWIN, JANET ARCHER 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

GOODWIN, NANCY JEAN 
Lebanon, N.J. 

GORDON, EDWIN W., IV 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

GORDON, ROBERT A. 
Westfield, N.J. 

GORE, ROBYN G. 
Coraopolis, Pa. 

GORENFLO, KAYE K. 
Warren, Pa. 

GRAHAM, LINDA 
Bethany, W. Va. 

GRANT, BARBARA LYNN 
Demarest, N.J. 

GRAY, PAMELA ANN 
Bridgeville, Pa. 

GRECO, DEBORAH K. 
Weirton, W. Va. 

GREEN, LAURA L. 
Weirton, W. Va. 

GREEN, RICHARD S. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

GRIFFITH, SCOTT E. 
Darien, Conn. 

GRIMES, CAROL D. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

GROETZINGER, STEPHEN H. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

GUIST, G. GORDON, JR. 
Wanamassa, N.J. 

GUIST, ROBIN BROWN 
Fair Lawn, N.J. 



749 



GUNDLING, GEORGE T. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

GUNDLING, VAL G. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

GUNSOREK, RICHARD P 
Adena, Ohio 

HAFFNER, RAYMOND P. 
Beallsville, Ohio 

HAINS, DEBORAH ANN 
Livingston, N.J. 

HALEY, BYRON JULES, JR. 
Glenn Ferris, W. Va. 

HALFORD, CYNTHIA SCOTT 
Valley Forge, Pa. 

HALL, KATHI LEE 
West Islip, N.Y. 

HALLMARK, ENID ANN 
Mendham, N.J. 

HAMILTON, JAY A. 
Lewisville, Ohio 

HAMMLER, VICTORIA M. 

Newton, N.J. 

HAMPTON, IVAN J. 
Bovard, Pa. 

HANSON, JIM M. 
Short Hills, N.J. 

HARDY, SUSAN LEIGH 
Bellevue, Pa. 

HARE, SARAH ELLEN 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

HARPER, BEVERLY J. 
Ridley Park, Pa. 

HARPER, JOHN WESLEY 
Ridley Park, Pa. 

HARPER, MARTHA J. 
Ridley Park, Pa. 

HARRIS, DONNA JEAN 
Burgettstown, Pa. 

HARRY, DANIEL GIBSON 
Hubbard, Ohio 

HARSHMAN, W. MARC 
Union City, Ind. 

HART, RAYMOND H. 
Rochester, N.Y. 

HARTENSTEIN, NEIL T. 
Martins Ferry, Ohio 

HARTLEY, ROBERT DENNIS 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

HARVIN, PHILLIP T. 
Brilliant, Ohio 



HAST, ALAN RICHARD 
Carnegie, Pa. 

HATCH, PAULA MARIE 
Ridgewood, N.J. 

HATHEWAY, LYNN 
Stamford, Conn. 

HAUPTFUEHRER, ERIKA 
Bethany, W. Va. 

HAUPTFUEHRER, SARA E. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

HAUSMAN, MARGARET R. 
Hanover, Pa. 

HAWKINS, DARLEYNE E. 
Deer Park, N.Y. 

HAYDAR, CHARLES E. 
Toronto, Ont., Can. 

HEALD, ROBERT T., JR. 
New Canaan, Conn. 

HEALD, WENDY POE 
New Canaan, Conn. 

HEANEY, REGINA M. 
Willingboro, N.J. 

HEARD, JANET MARIE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

HEATON, ANDREA L. 
Weirton, W. Va. 

HEATON, MICHFLE M. 
Weirton, W. Va. 

HE1LMAN, NANCY LEE 
Weirton, W. Va. 

HEISLER, JUDY JOY 
Wayne, N.J. 

HELMICK, CHRIS A. 
Verona, Pa. 

HENDRICKS, BARBARA E. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

HENLY, MARIANNE 
Havertown, Pa. 

HENSE, MARY ELLEN 
Upper St. Clair, Pa. 

HERMSMEIER, JANET C. 
Falls Church, Va. 

HEWSTON, JAMES B. 
Braddock, Pa. 

HEZLEP, DONALD REA 
Monroeville, Pa. 

HICKS, MARK WAYNE 
Weirton, W. Va. 

HILDEBRAND, MAUREEN 
Washington, Pa. 



HILE, THOMAS EDWIN 
Indiana, Pa. 

HILL, MELVIN RICHARD 
Lexington, S.C. 

HILL, NANCY LEE 
Troy, Ohio 

HIMMEL, WENDY LEE 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

HOAGLAND, KATHRINE 
Delmar, N.Y. 

HOCKENSMITH, RICHARD D. 
Erie, Pa. 

HOCKMAN, DEBRA ANN 
Carnegie, Pa. 

HODGSON, WILLIAM C. 
Mamaroneck, N.Y. 

HOFFACKER, DENNIS R. 
Perry, Ohio 

HOFFMANN, PAUL E. 
Floral Park, N.Y. 

HOLENKA, MARK J. 
Shadyside, Ohio 

HOLLINGER, DOUGLAS D. 
Pittsford, N.Y. 

HOLL'MANN, CHERYL R. 
Glenshaw, Pa. 

HOLLOWELL, CATHERINE L. 
Vienna, W. Va. 

HOLT, KEMPER LEE 
Bethesda, Md. 

HOMAN, DIANNE C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

HOOGLAND, BARBARA J. 
Ridgewood, N.J. 

HORNYAK, KATHLEEN A. 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

HORST, CATHERINE C. 
Ashtabula, Ohio 

HOSTICKA, ERIC ALAN 
Clearwater Beach, Fla. 

HOUK, DIANA S. 
Valley Cottage, N.Y. 

HOUPERT, RICHARD F. 
Clinton, Conn. 

HOWARD, ANNA CATHY 
Flintstone, Md. 

HOWARD, BLAISE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

HOWARD, RICHARD ERIC 
Flintstone, Md. 



HOWLING, JUDITH ANN 
Wayne, N.J. 

HUBACHER, EDWARD E. 
White Plains, N.Y. 

HUBBARD, CYNTHIA 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

HUBBARD, JONATHAN P. 
Woodbridge, Conn. 

HUDAK, JEANNE 
Medford, N.Y. 

HUDSON, RICHARD A. 
Newark, Del. 

HUGHES, OWEN JOSEPH 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

HUMES, THOMAS C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

HUNT, DEBRA JOAN 
Berkeley Heights, N.J. 

HURLEY, JOHN VINCENT 
Blauvelt, N.Y. 

HUSK, BERNICE S. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

HUSTLER, NANCY J. 
Wilmington, Del. 

HUTCHESON, FLETCHER, JR. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 

IREY, MELANIE FAYE 
Monongahela, Pa. 

IRION, MARTHA T. 
Upper Montclair, N.J. 

IRVINE, MARGARET J. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

IRWIN, CAROL ANN 
Follansbee, W. Va. 

ISIKOFF, JERRY GORDON 
Atlanta, Ga. 

IVES, GARY WILSON 
Bethany, W. Va. 

JACKSON, ALLYN F. 
East Quogue, N.Y. 

JACOBS, JOHN W. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

JACUNSKI, JUDITH JOY 
Riverhead, N.Y. 

JAMES, ANN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

JAMIESON, WENDY J. 
Pennington, N.J. 

JAMROZ, SHEILA ANN 
Ridgewood, N.J. 



750 



JANCOSKO, JOSEPH G. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

JANIK, CAROL JEAN 
Monroeville, Pa. 

JANOCHA, KAREN LEE 
Carnegie, Pa. 

JANTZ, STEVEN T. 
Yorktown Hgts., N.Y. 

JEFFERS, THOMAS E. 
New Martinsville, W. Va. 

JENKINS, JOHN W. 
Hampden, Mass. 

JEROME, ROBERT COLEMAN 
Arlington, Va. 

JIMENEZ, DANIEL 
Key West, Fla. 

JIRAK, ROBERT LOUIS 

Chambersburg, Pa. 

JOBKO, LAWRENCE JOHN 
Br.dgeport, Ohio 

JOHASKY, THOMAS K. 
Lower Burrell, Pa. 

JOHNSON, DORSEY JAY 
Wayne, Pa. 

JOHNSON, DOUGLAS H. 
Hudson, Ohio 

JOHNSON, FREDERICK A. 
McLean, Va. 

JOHNSON, JOYCE ANN 
Ocean City, N.J. 

JOHNSON, ROBERT J., JR. 
Latrobe, Pa. 

JOHNSON, VICTOR L. 
Moorestown, N.J. 

JOLLIFFE, DAVID A. 
New Martinsville, W. Va. 

JONES, KERRY DWANE 
Carmichaels, Pa. 

JONES, SUSAN E. 
Mentor, Ohio 

KAISER, DIANE MARIE 
Cranford, N.J. 

KAISER, DONNA M. 
Hammondsport, N.Y. 

KAISER, JANE L. 
Marion, Ohio 

KANE, WILLIAM J., JR. 
Carnegie, Pa. 

KANERVA, JEAN F. 
Scotch Plains, N.J. 



KANZLER, CHRISTINE A. 
Cranford, N.J. 

KAPRAL, JOHN MICHAEL 
W. Bellaire, Ohio 

KARRAS, KATHLEEN M. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

KARRAS, NICK JAMES 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

KAUFMANN, CYNTHIA S. 
Plainfield, N.J. 

KAUFMANN, SUSAN M. 
Cherry Hill, N.J. 

KEATING, MARGARET 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

KEATING, TIMOTHY F. 
Snyder, N.Y. 

KEENAN, JAN MARIE 
Bethel Park, Pa. 

KEENE, KAREN L. 
North Salem, N.Y. 

KEESLER, MAUREEN J. 
Valley Cottage, N.Y. 

KELLER, LYNN SUZANNE 
Chatham Twp., N.J. 

KEPNER, LINDA H. 
Altoona, Pa. 

KERN, KIM LEE 
Charleston, W. Va. 

KIEFER, NEIL GEORGE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

KING, LUCY C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

KING, ROBERT L. 
Maplewood, N.J. 

KINGBERG, GEOFF S. 
Norwalk, Conn. 

KIRKPATRICK, HOLLY E. 
Snyder, N.Y. 

KIVETT, MICHAEL S. 
Monrovia, Ind. 

KLAWANS, JILL C. 
Annandale, Va. 

KLINE, ELIZABETH S. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

KLINEC, MICHAEL J. 
Bellaire, Ohio 

KLOTZ, R. KEVIN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

KOCHAKJI, DANIEL J. 
Bergenfield, N.J. 



KOENIG, STEPHANIE H. 
Villanova, Pa. 

KOGER, LYNDA SUE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

KOHL, PAUL ALBERT 
Tonawanda, N.Y. 

KOHLER, SHIRLEY E. 
Weston, Conn. 

KOLANKO, WILLIAM 
Weirton, W. Va. 

KONYUD, LINDA MAE 
Solon, Ohio 

KORYDA, BARBARA A. 
McLean, Va. 

KOSLOW, ELLEN B. 
Shaker Heights, Ohio 

KOSTECKI, WALTER A. 

Halifax, Mass. 

KOSZALKA, GEORGE W. 
North Springfield, Va. 

KOTIN, LESLIE G. 
Manhasset, N.Y. 

KOVACIC, NICHOLAS F. 
Forest Heights, Md. 

KOWALO, ANDREW, JR. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

KRAMER, SARALEE 
Florham Park, N.J. 

KREIGER, AMY CLAIRE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

KRESAN, CATHY LYNN 
Stamford, Conn. 

KRUMBACH, CARL ADAM 
Ridgewood, N.J. 

KUBICK, CHRISTINE M. 
Tenafly, N.J. 

KUHNS, THOMAS E. 
Latrobe, Pa. 

KUKELSKI, JAN M. 
E. Hanover, N.J. 

KULPA, THOMAS R. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

KUNIAK, MICHAEL P. 
Tarentum, Pa. 

KUNKLE, ROBERT 
Canonsburg, Pa. 

KUNKLER, SUSAN L. 
Westfield, N.J. 

KURSTIN, GARY A. 
Washington, D.C. 



KURZ, FRIEDRICH 
Rechbergstr, West Germany 

KUSHNER, GREGORY G. 
Creighton, Pa. 

KWEDERAS, CYNTHIE L. 
Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. 

LABRADA, PATRICK G. 
Key West, Fla. 

LAGER, KEVIN ROBERT 
Syosset, N.Y. 

LAKE, RODNEY HAL 
Newark, Ohio 

LAMBERT, JONATHAN M. 
McKeesport, Pa. 

LAMMERT, LINDA ANNE 
Shaker Heights, Ohio 

LAMONE, BRUCE PATRICK 

Wellsburg, W. Va. 

LANCASTER, SARAH B. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

LANGFITT, KENNETH G. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

LAPIN, JEFFRY MARK 
Fair Haven, N.J. 

LAUFER, RACHEL 
Norwalk, Conn. 

LAWLESS, DEBORAH J. 
Riverhead, N.Y. 

LEFEBVRE, GERALD 

Springfield, Mass. 

LEIBSON, LAWRENCE A. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

LEITER, MARGERY ANN 

Summit, N.J. 

LEMEZIS, SUSAN A. 
Wallingford, Pa. 

LENHART, RICHARD A. 
Cambridge, Ohio 

LENT, LINDA JO 
Monroeville, Pa. 

LEO, ANTHONY JAMES 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

LESIAK, S. DEAN 
Steubenville, Ohio 

LESLIE, RALPH EDWARD 
Silver Spring, Md. 

LEVANDOSKI, CAROL M. 
Southampton, N.Y. 

LEVITSKE, DIANE NADINE 
Library, Pa. 



757 



LEWIS, ELISSA MARY 
Bethany, W. Va. 

LEWIS, SHELDON S. 
Forest Hills, N.Y. 

LI WIS, WILLIAM JOHN 
Snyder, N.Y. 

LEWKOWICZ, MAF.Y E. 
Harrison, N.Y. 

LICHTER, ROBERT B 
Mt. Lebanon, Pa. 

LIPINSKI, LOUIS PAUL 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

LISBY, DONALD JAY 
Proctor, W. Va. 

LIVINGSTON, JON HOWARD 
Grand Island, N.Y. 

LOCKLIN, BETTY JEAN 
Alexandria, Va. 

LOFFREDO, PASCO F. 
Providence, R.I. 

LOHEYDE, GERALD LEE 
Verona, Pa. 

LOHMAN, KATHERINE E. 
Dailas, Tex. 

LOWE, JAMIE S. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

LUDLUM, PATRICIA ANN 
Nutley, N.J. 

LUNGER, JANET LYNN 
Lafayette Hill, Pa. 

LYDIC, JAMES RUSSELL 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

LYNCH, SUSAN M. 
Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 

LYONS, JOHN W. 
Carrollton, Ohio 

LYONS, ROBERT P. 
Weirton, W. Va. 

MACARTHUR, LYNN M. 
Lyndhurst, Ohio 

MACFARLANE, ELLEN C. 
Mt. Kisco, N.Y. 

MACKAY, ELLEN SEIBERT 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MACLAREN, JOHN DAVID 
West Hempstead, N.Y. 

MAES, JOHN EDMOND 
Wyckoff, N.J. 

pMAGGI, JAMES V. 
Eighty Four, Pa. 



MACINN, CHARLES E., Ill 
Glen Ridge, N.J. 

MAHER, CHARLES J. 
Fort Myers, Fla. 

MAHER, WILLIAM T. 
Manchester, Conn. 

MAIN, RUTH 
Bethany, W. Va. 

MAJORS, JOHN A. 
Belle Vernon, Pa. 

MALINKY, CREGGORY A. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

MALONEY, THOMAS JOYCE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MARINOFF, J. MARTIN, JR. 
Alexandria, Va. 

MARION, JOE JAY 
River Vale, N.J. 

MARITT, CECILE ANNE 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

MARKOS, MANUEL M. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

MARKOS, PAUL 
Short Creek, W. Va. 

MARONE, MARY KATHLEEN 
Butler, Pa. 

MARQUER, YVONNE M. 
Canonsburg, Pa. 

MARSHALL, RICHARD, JR. 
Webster Groves, Mo. 

MARTIN, DAN BRADLEY 
Waukesha, Wis. 

MARTIN, JAMES M. 
Munhall, Pa. 

MARTIN, ROBERT D. 
Bluefield, W. Va. 

MASLER, ELIZABETH ANNE 
Meriden, Conn. 

MASSOL, ROBERT W. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MATARAZZO, GUY W. 
Monroeville, Pa. 

MATHEWS, DOUGLAS C. 
Vienna, Va. 

MATTES, PHILIP V. 
Scranton, Pa. 

MATTHEWS, JANE ELLA 
Ashtabula, Ohio 

MATTHEWS, ROBERT F. 
New Straitsville, Ohio 



MAURO, BARBARA BLAIR 
Moorestown, N.J. 

MAVROMAT1S, GEORGIANNE 
Steubenville, Ohio 

MAY, ALLEN ERNEST 
Steubenville, Ohio 

MAY, CHRISTINE J. 
Potomac, Md. 

MAYERNICK, JOSEPH W. 
Burgettstown, Pa. 

MAZZA, RALPH A., JR. 
Vanderbilt, Pa. 

MAZZETTI, CLIFFORD J. 
Lincoln Park, N.J. 

MCARTHUR, GAIL E. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MCCABE, BRENDA L. 
Long Branch, N.J. 

MCCARTHY, EUGENE E. 
Chester, Conn. 

MCCARTHY, LINDA LEE 
Shrewsbury, Mass. 

MCCLURE, BEVERLY ANN 
Stamford, Conn. 

MCCORD, JAMES R. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

MCCRACKEN, JOAN M. 
New Canaan, Conn. 

MCCUTCHEON, E. ANN 
Fair Haven, N.J. 

MCDONALD, C. EDGAR 
Bethany, W. Va. 

MCDONOUGH, ROSEMARY A. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MCDOWELL, ALAN JAMES 
Lyndhurst, Ohio 

MCELROY, DAVID W. 
Verona, Pa. 

MCGOLDRICK, LOIS E. 
Wayne, N.J. 

MCGOVERN, KATHRYN L. 
Indiana, Pa. 

MCGOWAN, MICHAEL E. 
Asheville, N.C. 

MCGUIRE, JEFFREY C. 
Marion, Ohio 

MCGUIRE, LAURIE ELLEN 
Branford, Conn. 

MCKAY, DEWEY ROBERT 
Brilliant, Ohio 



MCKEE, ELIZABETH DEE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MCKEE, FRANCES JANE 
Avella, Pa. 

MCKEE, JOSEPH V., Ill 
Greenwich, Conn. 

MCKEE, WILLIAM TIM 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MCKINLEY, STEVEN E. 
APO, New York 

MCKOWN, DOUGLAS G. 
Clarence, N.Y. 

MCMAHON, CHRISTIE J. 
Speedway, Ind. 

MCMULLAN, MARY A. 
Bethel Park, Pa. 

MCNAMARA, WILLIAM E. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

MCNEILL, JERRI LYNN 
Arlington, Va. 

MCPHILLIPS, COLLEEN M. 
E. Hanover, N.J. 

MCVEY, DIANE LEE 
Cranford, N.J. 

MCVICKER, STEPHEN E. 
Orange, Conn. 

MEANS, CAROL ANN 
Weirton, W. Va. 

MEESS, DIANE CAROL 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MEGIN, PATRICIA ANN 
South Meriden, Conn. 

MELLACI, JOHN JAMES 
Rumson, N.J. 

MELSON, MARK ALAN 
Cherry Hill, N.J. 

MENTEN, MARY ANN 
Oakmont, Pa. 

MERRILL, NANCY A. 
Pompton Lakes, N.J. 

MICHALSKI, ROSE MARY 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MICKITS, SUSAN ALLISON 
Shelby, Ohio 

MIDDLETON, THOMAS KIM 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MIDLER, CECILE MARIE 
Avella, Pa. 

MILESTONE, SUZANNE V. 
Pepper Pike, Ohio 



752 



MILLER, BRENDA JEAN 
Marion, Ohio 

MILLER, DAVID R. 
Antwerp, Ohio 

MILLER, DOUGLAS A. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

MILLER, JAMES S. 
Library, Pa. 

MILLER, JOHN C, JR. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MILLER, LYNNE 
Coraopolis, Pa. 

MILLER, METTA M. 
Bellaire, Ohio 

MILLER, SUSAN L. 
Oakmont, Pa. 

MILLMAN, PAUL ROBERT 
Jamaica Hills, N.Y. 

MINDO, DENISE LOUISE 
Morris Plains, N.J. 

MINEO, GREGORY R. 
Trumbull, Conn. 

MINEO, SARA MARIE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MINTEER, RICHARD P. 
Claysville, Pa. 

MITCHELL, JOSEPH, JR. 
New Kensington, Pa. 

MITRUSKI, JOHN G. 
Clairton, Pa. 

MIZE, ROBERT STAN 
Key West, Fla. 

MIZER, MARK WAYNE 
Newcomerstown, Ohio 

MOHR, DONNA LYNN 
Hightstown, N.J. 

MOHR, MARTHA MAY 
Oxford, Pa. 

MOLBROUCH, BARRY LEE 
Bethany, W. Va. 

MOLINOWSKI, DANIEL E. 
Margate City, N.J. 

MONTGOMERY, KAY 
Amlin, Ohio 

MORE, PATRICIA A. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MOREN, HELEN 
Bethany, W. Va. 

MORGAN, NANCY BETH 
Corbin City, N.J. 



MORRIS, C. DOUGLAS 
Punxsutawney, Pa. 

MORRIS, LINDA ANN 
Cedar Grove, N.J. 

MORRIS, WILLIAM JOHN 
Annandale, Va. 

MORRISON, JO ANN A. 
Burgettstown, Pa. 

MORRISSEY, KEVIN M. 
Bayside, N.Y. 

MOSIER, ELIZABETH J. 
Sewickley, Pa. 

MOSLEY, MARK R. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MOTT, DEBORAH SUSAN 
Metuchen, N.J. 

MOTT, JEFFREY CARTER 
Metuchen, N.J. 

MOVIC, J. EDWARD 
McKeesport, Pa. 

MOYLE, JIM HARRY 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

MROCZKOWSKI, W. B. 
Canton, Ohio 

MULDER, JON GERARD 
Rochester, N.Y. 

MULLEN, BARRY ROBERT 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MULLOOLY, CHARLES H. 
Avella, Pa. 

MULLOOLY, REBECCA I. 
Avella, Pa. 

MUNN, GREGORY EARL 
Cleveland, Ohio 

MUNN, MELISSA JANE 
Rockville, Md. 

MURPHY, MARK F. 
Elmira, N.Y. 

MURPHY, MICHAEL F. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

MURPHY, PENNY LEIGH 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

MURRAY, BARBARA S. 
East Paterson, N.J. 

MYERS, DEBORAH KAY 
Ambler, Pa. 

MYERS, GERALD R. 
Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

NAKAMURA, MITSUTAKA 
Osaka, Japan 



NARAMORE, BRUCE E. 
Liverpool, N.Y. 

NAU, KONRAD CHARLES 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

NEE, CONSTANCE C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

NEELY. DIANNE LOUISE 
Latrobe, Pa. 

NELSON, CHARLES A. 
Patchogue, L.I., N.Y. 

NELSON, STEPHEN TYLER 
Ridgewood, N.J. 

NEUBAUER, SUSAN BETH 
Adams, N.Y. 

NEUMAN, FREDERICK G. 
Allison Park, Pa. 

NEUMANN, FREDERICA A. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

NEUREITHER, KENNETH 
Valley Stream, N.Y. 

NEWMAN, JEAN C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

NEWSOM, MARYANNE 
Speedway, Ind. 

NEWTON, G. WILLIAM 
Latrobe, Pa. 

NICHOLAS, KEITH A. 
Colonia, N.J. 

NICHOLSON, DAVID W. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

NICHOLSON, MARK J. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

NIELSEN, DENISE E. 
East Meadow, N.Y. 

NOBLE, JEFFREY E. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

NOGAY, VALERIE M. 
Weirton, W. Va. 

NOLA, WILLIAM TOM 
McKeesport, Pa. 

NORDSTROM, ALEX L. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

NOSCHESE, JAMES C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

NOWLIN, LESLIE A. 
Meriden, Conn. 

OBRIEN, PATRICIA LYNN 
Ligonier, Pa. 

OBRIEN, MOLLIE G. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 



OCONNOR, JAMES M. 
Bay Shore, N.Y. 

ODOHERTY, J. PATRICIA 
Weirton, W. Va. 

OHARA, DEBBIE ANNE 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

OLNEY, DUNCAN R. 
North Haven, Conn. 

OLSEN, RICHARD W. 
Douglaston, N.Y. 

ONEILL, TIMOTHY E. 
W. Lafayette, Ohio 

ORR, K. ROBERT 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

OSMIANSKI, MICHAEL L. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

OTT, ELIZABETH ANN 
Yorktown Heights, N.Y. 

OTT, WILLIAM DAVID 
Murrysville, Pa. 

OTTO, STEVEN LYNN 
Boonsboro, Md. 

OVERTON, GEORGE W. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

PAGE, JAMES F. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

PAGE, RICHARD ALLEN 
Bethany, W. Va. 

PAGLIALUNGA, JOAN D. 
Lafferty, Ohio 

PALERMO, LAUREN J. 
Linden, N.J. 

PAMMER, JOHN F. 
Thornwood, N.Y. 

PAOLO, JOSEPH A. 
Weirton, W. Va. 

PARK, NANCY HANCOX 
Butler, Pa. 

PARKIN, ELIZABETH S. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

PARKS, ANDREW MITCHELL 
Arlington, Va. 

PASSALLO, PATRICIA A. 
South Euclid, Ohio 

PASTERIS, ROBERT J. 
Springfield, Mass. 

PASTOR, JUNE BRUNO 
Bethany, W. Va. 

PAULL, STEPHEN B. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 



753 



PAVAN, DENNIS JAMES 
McMurray, Pa. 

PEARSON, RICHARD E. 
Penfield, N.Y. 

PECK, ROBERT U. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

PEISER, P. CLARE 
Rockville. Md. 

PETERS, MARSHA LYNN 
Washington, Pa. 

PETERSON, DENNIS IRA 
Steubenville, Ohio 

PETERSON, ERLE THOMAS 
Steubenville, Ohio 

PETRO, STEPHEN CRAIG 
Verona, N.J. 

PHILLIMORE, DOROTHY 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

PHILLIPS, CHARLES P. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

PIDGEON, MARGARET H. 
Wilmington, Ohio 

PINION. MICHAEL S. 
Morgantown, W. Va. 

PINSKER, PHILIP S. 
Washington, Pa. 

PITTMAN, MARY A. 
Kenmore, N.Y. 

POCOCK, WILLIAM EARL 
Uhrichsville, Ohio 

POLITE, WENDY KAREN 
Exton, Pa. 

POLLIARD, NANCY J. 
Duncansville, Pa. 

POPE, JOHN ROBERT, JR. 
Toronto, Ohio 

PORTER, DANIEL E. 
Weirton, W. Va. 

POUND, HELEN E. 
Columbus, Ohio 

POZEL, CYNTHIA LEE 
Kendall Park, N.J. 

PRESCOTT, NANCY L. 
Silver Spring, Md. 

PRESENT, RANDALL L. 
Jamestown, N.Y. 

PREUSS, KENNETH HANS 
Wayne, N.J. 

PROCTOR, ELIZABETH ANN 
Summit, N.J. 



PROSSER, PETER J. 
North Tonawanda, N.Y. 

PRZYBOCKI, JANET LEE 
Greensburg, Pa. 

PUSTERLA, THOMAS E. 
Old Tappan, N.J. 

PUTNAM, CAROLYN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

QUEEN, LINDA 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

QUICKE, CAROLYN G. 
Pasadena, Md. 

QUINLAN, JOHN J. 
Upper Nyack, N.Y. 

QUINLAN, LAURA B. 
Glen Ridge, N.J. 

RADAKOVICH, BARBARA A. 
Manor, Pa. 

RADAKOVICH, ROBERT 
Steubenville, Ohio 

RADAKOVICH, SAMUEL, JR. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

RAGLE, JANET LOUISE 
Hudson, Ohio 

RAGNI, LAREVA ONDINE 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

RAHL, CRAIG THOMAS 
Hackettstown, N.J. 

RAND, RICHARD TIMOTHY 
Darien, Conn. 

RASH1D, SIKANDER 

Arlington, Mass. 

RATCLIFFE, CHRISTOPHER 
Triadelphia, W. Va. 

RATCLIFFE, STEPHEN D. 
New Martinsville, W. Va. 

RAUSCHER, CARL R. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

RAY, JANICE ELAINE 
New Kensington, Pa. 

RAYMOND, CHERYL ANN 
Wilbraham, Mass. 

REARDON, PATRICK A. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

REBEFIN, CAROLINE L. 
New York, N.Y. 

REDMAN, TIMOTHY C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

REICHHOLD, BETH ANN 
Monroeville, Pa. 



KEMELY, DANIEL LEE 
Painesville, Ohio 

RENNER, CLIFFORD 
Poland, Ohio 

RENSON, DEBBIE SUSAN 
Belle Mead, N.J. 

RESCINITI, LAURA D. 
Washington, Pa. 

RICE, RICHARD S. 
St. Clairsville, Ohio 

RICHARDS, THOMAS R. 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

RIEBE, ALEX L, JR. 
New Castle, Del. 

RIEMER, MARK EDWARD 
Bristol, Conn. 

RIGO, BETTY JANE 
Avella, Pa. 

RILEY, CAROLYN JEAN 
Westwood, N.J. 

RILEY, LINDA SUE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

RIPPE, CLAUDIA FULLER 
Garden City, N.Y. 

RITZ, WILLIAM JOSEPH 
Delmar, N.Y. 

ROBBINS, WILLIAM M. 
Delanco, N.J. 

ROBERTS, ANNE S. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

ROBERTS, GLENN 
Burgettstown, Pa. 

ROBISON, BRADENA S. 
Beaver, Pa. 

ROBISON, WAYNE WM. 
Norwood, Mass. 

ROBSON, MARK DOUGLAS 
Shadyside, Ohio 

ROCHE, EVA MARIA 
Falls Churrh, Va. 

ROCK, CRAIG VINCENT 
Toronto, Ohio 

RODDY, JANICE M. 
Rochester, Pa. 

ROGERS, SHARON 
Shaker Heights, Ohio 

ROHRBACK, CATHY R. 
College Park, Md. 

ROLLINS, VERONICA LEE 
Manorville, N.Y. 



RONEY, MARY J. 
Finleyville, Pa. 

ROONAN, RANDALL KEITH 
New Shrewsbury, N.J. 

ROSS, RICHARD JOHN 
Marietta, Ohio 

ROTH, LINDA LEE 
Lewiston, N.Y. 

ROWE, BLAKE M. 
Akron, Ohio 

ROWINSKI, PAUL 
Wayne, N.J. 

RUBALCAVA, ALFRED 
Steubenville, Ohio 

RUE, HOWARD S., Ill 
Wayne, Pa. 

RUNKEL, RICHARD 
Weirton, W. Va. 

RUSS, LINDA MARY 
Greensburg, Pa. 

RUSSELL, LESLIE S. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

RUTTER, WILLIAM HARRY 
Munhall, Pa. 

RYAN, CHERYL MAXINE 
LaGrange, Ohio 

RYAN, JANE RUTH 
North Haven, Conn. 

SABINE, KATHLEEN ANN 
Bernardsville, N.J. 

SACCO, VINCENT S. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

SACKETT, RONALD TY 
Waynesville, Ohio 

SADLER, DOUGLAS P. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

SADLER, LARRY L. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

SAGE, SUSAN AUDREY 
Westwood, N.J. 

SAMPSON, JERRY W. 
Delphos, Ohio 

SANDERS, THOMAS B. 
Vandergritt, Pa. 

SANDIN, PAUL JAMES 
Niles, Ohio 

SANDMEYER, SUE ANN 
McKeesport, Pa. 

SANTORI, NORMAN JOSEPH 
Belle Vernon, Pa. 



754 



SAPORITO, ROBERT O. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SAPUTA, CYNTHIA 

Nutley, N.J. 

SAUNDERS, BARBARA J. 
Hamburg, N.Y. 

SAWYER, CLARK T. 
Beaver, Pa. 

SAXTON, NANCY JO 
Bemus Point, N.Y. 

SCALESE, MARY ANN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SCHABER, DOUGLAS C. 
Warwood, W. Va. 

SCHETKY, ROBERT L. 
Hellam, Pa. 

SCHIEB, JOHN PATRICK 
Bridgeville, Pa. 

SCHIEB, THOMAS ALLEN 
Bridgeville, Pa. 

SCHLOTTMAN, JAMES 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SCHMIDT, ROBERT J. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SCHMITT, JAMES H. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

SCHMITT, JOSEPH PAUL 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SCHNEIDER, BARBARA L. 
farrytown, N.Y. 

SCHNEIDER, DAVID L. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SCHOERGER, JILL L. 
Cranford, N.J. 

SCHOFF, KENNETH J. 
Cheshire, Conn. 

SCHULER, TRUDE LU 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

SCHULTZ, SUSAN I. 
Stamford, Conn. 

SCOTT, ARLYN LOLITA 
Rome, Ga. 

SCOTT, RAYMOND G. 
Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 

SELSOR, MYRA C. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

SELWYN, DOUGLAS MARK 
Bethesda, Md. 

SEREVICZ, VIRGINIA M. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 



SERGIO, MARK ANDREW 
Brewster, N.Y. 

SERRILL, LINDA JEAN 
Des Moines, Iowa 

SESTO, LARRY 
Steubenville, Ohio 

SHAAYA, RALPH N. 
Tehran, Iran 

SHAKELY, MARIAN E. 
Beaver, Pa. 

SHAULIS, ALAN RAY 
Boswell, Pa. 

SHEAFFER, LEE RICHARD 
Delmar, N.Y. 

SHEHAB, PEGGY LOU 
New Kensington, Pa. 

SHELLEY, DEBRA JEAN 
Findlay, Ohio 

SHEPEARD, GEORGE ROY 
Kensington, Md. 

SHEPHERD, CHARLES E. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

SHERRARD, ELIZABETH D. 
Johnstown, Pa. 

SHILLING, G. RANDALL 
Youngstown, Ohio 

SHIPLEY, CARL 
Weirton, W. Va. 

SHIPLEY, VIRGINIA D. 
Youngstown, Ohio 

SHOMO, CHARLES G. 
Bethel Park, Pa. 

SHRATTER, ELLIS TAPER 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SHRINER, VIRGINIA M. 
Goldensbridge, N.Y. 

SHUMARD, CRAIG A. 
Downingtown, Pa. 

SHUPLOCK, WAYNE M. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SHUTTER, MARION T. 
Rector, Pa. 

SHUTTER, MICHAEL R. 
Ligonier, Pa. 

SICONOLFI, RICHARD M. 
Rochester, N.Y. 

SIENNICK, JON ROBERT 
Ballwin, Mo. 

SILVER, PAULA 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 



SIMONETTI, JOAN E. 
Old Bridge, N.J. 

SIMPSON, BRUCE C. 
Williamsville, N.Y. 

SIMS, DAVID S. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

SINGH, KARTAR 
Bethany, W. Va. 

SINGLETON, WILLIAM P. 
Annandale, Va. 

SIVETZ, CARRIE ANN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SKINNER, M. BARBARA 
Coraopolis, Pa. 

SKRABAK, THOMAS W. 
Bellaire, Ohio 

SLATER, JAMES RICHARD 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SLEIME, GEORGE LOUIS 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

SMEDLEY, LESLIE C. 
Weirton, W. Va. 

SMITH, CHRISTOPHER 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SMITH, DONNA LEE 
Peekskill, N.Y. 

SMITH, KATHLEEN JO 
Massillon, Ohio 

SMITH, SALLI JO 
Bethel Park, Pa. 

SMITH, SUZANNA D. 
Haworth, N.J. 

SMITH, WAYNE ROGERS 
Cheshire, Conn. 

SMYTH, SUSAN BELL 
New Milford, N.J. 

SNIDER, DENNIS LYNN 
Rayland, Ohio 

SOLARI, ROBERT A. 
Norwalk, Conn. 

SOLY, PAUL W. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

SOLY, RICHARD G. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

SOMMER, CHARLES A. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SOMPLATSKY, W. JAMES 
Bethany, W. Va. 

SORENSON, RICHARD J. 
Kingston, N.Y. 



SOUTER, JOHN L. 
Glen Ridge, N.J. 

SPANG, TIMOTHY J. 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

SPARKS, DEAN MICHAEL 
Columbus, Ohio 

SPARR, JILL ELAINE 
Steubenville, Ohio 

SPILLER, RALPH D. 
Stamford, Conn. 

STACK, ROBERT T. 
Pleasant Hills, Pa. 

STALEY, JOETTE SUE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

STALNAKER, LAURA J. 
Charleston, W. Va. 

STAPLEY, SUSAN JEAN 
Metuchen, N.J. 

STARZINSKI, KATHLEEN B. 
Brook Haven, Pa. 

STATHERS, RAY WILLIAM 
Alma, W. Va. 

STEBBINS, KATHERINE L. 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

STEBBINS, PATRICIA 
Bethany, W. Va. 

STEELE, KEITH R. 
Clairton, Pa. 

STEIMER, MERL EDWARD 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

STEIN, PAUL JOHN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

STERN, KARAL HELMA 
University Heights, Ohio 

STETLER, RICHARD H. 
Stoystown, Pa. 

STETSON, LINDA CAROL 
Summit, N.J. 

STETTINIUS, WILLIAM 
Virginia Beach, Va. 

STEVENSON, MARK PHILIP 
Washington, Pa. 

STEWART, DANIEL J. 
Spencer, W. Va. 

STEWART, SCOTT EDWARD 
Bay Village, Ohio 

STEWART, SUSAN CAROL 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

ST. MARIE, MICHAEL G. 
Gates Mills, Ohio 



755 



5TOBART, THOMAS S. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

STOCKFORD, LYNN E. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

STOKES, BEARNICE LEE 

Peekskill, N.Y. 

STOLZ, GREGORY ALAN 
Bellaire, Ohio 

STOLZ, JEFFREY LYNN 
Bellaire, Ohio 

STRAUSS, ELLEN J. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

STRAUSS, TRESA MARIE 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

STREMLAU, SUSAN HALL 
Meriden, Conn. 

STREULI, CHERYL J. 
Old Tappan, N.J. 

STROHMEYER, JOHN A. 
Norfolk, Va. 

STRONG, RALPH EDWARD 
Shadyside, Ohio 

STRUKEL, NANCY M. 
Westvvood, N.J. 

STULGA, JOHN ERNEST 
West Homestead, Pa. 

STULL, ROBERT ESTON 
Shadyside, Ohio 

SULLIVAN, BEVERLEE A. 
Devon, Pa. 

SULLIVAN. PAULA T. 
Savannah, Ga. 

SWANK, RUSSELL C, III 
Lower Burrell Pa. 

SWEER, NANCY E. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SWEETENBERG, F. DOUGLAS 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

SWICKARD, DANIEL F. 
Toronto, Ohio 

SWINDLER, KENNETH W. 
Warren, Ohio 

SYMONS, SARA HELEN 
Middleburg, Va. 

TABACHNECK, ARTHUR S. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

TABBAH, RAWI A. 
Beirut, Lebanon 

TACKE, LANCE PHILLIP 
Ligonier, Pa. 



TALCOTT, CAROL ANN 
Painesville, Ohio 

TALIAFERRO, BRUCE K. 
Burton, Ohio 

TANSEY, LUANN 
Marlboro, N.J. 

TARDIF, RICHARD G. 
Pittsford, N.Y. 

TARSHIS, JOE JAY 
Demarest, N.J. 

TAYLOR, STEVEN THOMAS 
Cameron, W. Va. 

TEITELL, ERNEST F. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

THALMAN, NANCY JEAN 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

THOMAS, JUDY LEE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

THOMAS, PATRICIA D. 
Westernport, Md. 

THOMPSON, DEBRA L. 
Parkersburg, W. Va. 

THOMPSON, RANDY J. 
Holloway, Ohio 

THOMSEN, PETER B. 
Fairport, N.Y. 

THURLOW, THOMAS MOORE 
West Caldwell, N.J. 

THURSTON, B. BRADFORD 
Bethany, W. Va. 

TILLIS, RONALD W. 
Atlanta, Ga. 

TOMKINSON, G. NEALE 
Montreal, Que., Can. 

TOMLINSON, RANDALL C. 
Kirkwood, Mo. 

TOMPKINS, RICHARD W. 
Newburgh, N.Y. 

TOOHEY, PHILIP R., JR. 
Greenwich, Conn. 

TOOHILL, DONALD B. 
McLean, Va. 

TOOHILL, VIBEKE ANN 
McLean, Va. 

TORETTI, MARGARET ANN 
Monongahela, Pa. 

TORMEY, JANIS LEIGH 
Riverhead, N.Y. 

TORRANCE, DONNA T. 
Rye, N.Y. 



TOTH, PATRICIA M. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

TOTTY, PATRICIA E. 
Nashville, Tenn. 

TRAYER, SANDRA KAY 
Port Washington, N.Y. 

TREFREY, SUSAN B. 
Rowayton, Conn. 

TREVOR, ANNE KNOX 
Chatham, N.). 

TRIOLA, STEPHANIE ANNE 
Franklin, Pa. 

TROUT, MARY E. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

TROYAN, GARY MATTHEW 
Parma Heights, Ohio 

TRUAX, ROBERTA JO 
Langeloth, Pa. 

TUREK, JOYCE ELOISE 
Youngstown, Ohio 

TURK, JOHN RANDALL 
McDonald, Pa. 

TYSON, DEBBIE MERLE 
Margate, N.J. 

TYSSOWSKI, JUDY M. 
Baltimore, Md. 

UBER, PAMELA JEAN 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

ULRICH, ELIZABETH C. 

Summit, N.J. 

VALENTINE, JOANNE R. 
Bethel Park, Pa. 

VANDINE, MELINDA SUE 
Steubenville, Ohio 

VANDYKE, MARY-HELEN 
Neenah, Wis. 

VANNATTA, SUSAN 
Summit, N.J. 

VANPELT, KAREN INEZ 
Westt'ield, N.J. 

VARDA, JOHN ALLEN 
Spencer, W. Va. 

VARGA, CONSTANCE LYNNE 
Harrison City, Pa. 

VARTERESSIAN, JEANNE E. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

VAUGHN, THOMAS L. 
Medford, N.Y. 

VELKOFF, JEREMY R. 
Narberth, Pa. 



VILLANI, RONALD G. 
Bndgeville, Pa. 

VINCENT, PETER JOHN 
Glendale, W. Va. 

VINCENT, ROBERT W. 
Medford Lakes, N.J. 

VINCENZO, DANIEL J. 
Verona, Pa. 

VIOLINO, PETER E. 

Buffalo, N.Y. 

VITCHNER, STEPHEN M. 
Til tonsvi He, Ohio 

VOGELEY, SUSAN E. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

VOGLER, TERRANCE 

Wheeling, W. Va. 

VOGT, DANIEL MARSH 
Steubenville, Ohio 

VON DER SCHMIDT, G. 
Bergenfield, N.J. 

VULGAMORE, RICHARD M. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

WAITE, KRISTINE L. 
Springfield, Mass. 

WALDEN, WILLIAM K. 
Bethany, W. Va. 

WALKER, G. WILLIAM 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

WALTERS, PAMELA SUE 
Michigan City, Ind. 

WARD, PATRICK J. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

WARNER, GEORGE H., II 
Glen Ridge, N.J. 

WARRICK, JOHN C. 
Washington, Pa. 

WASCOVICH, CRAIG 
Atlanta, Ga. 

WASIELEWSKI, THEODORE 
Baldwin, Md. 

WATKINS, EDWARD JOHN 
Elmhurst Queens, N.Y. 

WATSON, BETH CONGDON 
Florham Park, N.J. 

WATSON, JANETTE K. 
New Stanton, Pa. 

WATTERS, CONSTANCE J. 
McDonald, Pa. 

WAY, BARBARA ROSE 
Colliers, W. Va. 



756 



WEAVER, ROGER LEE 
Laurelville, Ohio 

WEAVER, SUSAN FRANCES 
Bethel Park, Pa. 

WEBB, MARTHA JANE 
Atlanta, Ga. 

WEDO, CARLA B. 
Hanover, N.J. 

WEIGEL, SUSAN LINN 
Allison Park, Pa. 

WEIK, GUY HENRY 
Lakeside, Conn. 

WEINGARTEN, GERALYN P. 
Hopatcong, N.J. 

WEISBERGER, LEE HERMAN 
Steubenville, Ohio 

WEISS, JEFFREY PAUL 
Orangeburg, N.Y. 

WELD, BRENDA JOYCE 
Steubenville, Ohio 

WELLS, ANNE MARIE 
Berwyn, Pa. 

WELLS, ELIZABETH A. 
Alexandria, Va. 

WELLS, SUSAN JEANNE 
Miami, Fla. 

WEPPLER, SARAH WITTE 
Westport, Conn. 

WERNER, DONALD 
Bethany, W. Va. 

WERNICK, CARY 
Cliffside Park, N.J. 



WEST, DONALD DALE 
Vienna, W. Va. 

WEST, SANDRA LYNN 
St. Marys, W. Va. 

WHEELER, SUSAN MARIE 
Scotch Plains, N.J. 

WHIPKEY, ROBERT M. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WHITE, CAROLYN MARIE 
Harrington Park, N.J. 

WHITE, LINDA M. 
Follansbee, W. Va. 

WHITE, SANDIA J. 
Marietta, Ohio 

WICKETT, BARBARA JEAN 
Green Brook, N.J. 

WIEGAND, MARGARET H. 
East Liverpool, Ohio 

WILCOX, CHARLOTTE L. 
Monroeville, Pa. 

WILHITE, MARGARET L. 
Monroeville, Pa. 

WILKINSON, SARA D. 
Conshohocken, Pa. 

WILLIAMS, ELIZABETH I. 
Chester, W. Va. 

WILLIAMS, JONATHAN W. 
Dalton, Pa. 

WILLIAMS, KATHY F. 
Munhall, Pa. 



WILLIAMS, SUSAN HESS 
North Canton, Ohio 

WILLIAMSON, DALE ADEN 
St. Albans, W. Va. 

WILSON, JOHN SCOTT 
Newtown Square, Pa. 

WILSON, WILLIAM G. 
Aquebogue, N.Y. 

WINANS, CHRISTINE H. 
Mountainside, N.J. 

WINEKE, LAWRENCE E., Ill 
Baltimore, Md. 

WINGERT, BEVERLY RUTH 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WINGERT, GREGORY KENT 
Scottdale, Pa. 

WINOW1CH, NANCY ELLEN 
Charleston, W. Va. 

WINTON, ALLEN G. 
Wilmington, Del. 

WIRTH, NEAL 
College Park, Md. 

WOLFARTH, ADA DIANE 
Canton, Ohio 

WOLFSON, WILLIAM S. 
St. Clairsville, Ohio 

WOOD, AUSTIN VORHES 
Wheeling, W. Va. 

WOODRUFF, BENJAMIN A. 
Charleston, W. Va. 



WOODRUFF, JOHN P. 
Charleston, W. Va. 

WOOLLEY, KAREN C. 
Ocean, N.J. 

WORK, NANCY E. 
Phillipsburg, N.J. 

WORSFOLD, JAMES R. 
Westport, Conn. 

WORSFOLD, JOHN E., Ill 
Bel Air, Md. 

WRIGHT, CLIFFORD F. 
Bethlehem, Pa. 

WRIGHT, PATRICIA P. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WUDARSKY, MARIANNE 
Weirton, W. Va. 

WUNDERLICH, CHARLES A. 
McKeesport, Pa. 

YOUNG, MICHAEL W. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 

ZATULOVE, ARLENE S. 
Convent Station, N.J. 

ZEIDLER, RICHARD D. 
Patchogue, N.Y. 

ZELLMAN, LANE T. 
W. St. Paul, Minn. 

ZERBE, STEPHEN J. 
Ridgewood, N.J. 

ZIMSKY, JOHN JOSEPH 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 




STUDENT STATISTICAL DATA 

(Academic Year 1971-72) 



Enrollment by Classes 



757 



Men 

Seniors 121 

Juniors 131 

Sophomores 168 

Freshmen 191 

Unclassified 2 

Total "613 



Full-Time 




Part-Time 






Women 


Men 




Women 


Total 


82 


1 







204 


104 







(i 


235 


156 










324 


183 


(l 




(I 


374 


1 


4 




16 


23 


526 


5 




16 


1160 



Enrollment by States and Foreign Countries 



Alabama 1 

California 2 

CANADA 2 

Colorado 1 

Connecticut 50 

COSTA RICA 1 

Delaware 5 

EGYPT 1 

Florida 10 

GAMBIA 1 

Georgia 5 

GHANA 2 

GREAT BRITAIN 2 

HONG KONG 1 

INDIA 2 

Indiana 9 

IRAN 1 

IAPAN 1 

LEBANON 1 

MALAYSIA 1 

Maryland 30 

Massachusetts 14 



Michigan 1 

Minnesota 3 

Missouri 1 

Nebraska 1 

New Jersey 163 

New York 124 

NIGERIA 3 

North Carolina 1 

Ohio 138 

PAKISTAN 1 

Pennsylvania 368 

Rhode Island 2 

South Carolina 2 

TANZANIA 1 

Tennessee 2 

Texas 4 

Virginia 28 

Washington, D. C 5 

WEST GERMANY 1 

West Virginia 166 

Wisconsin 2 

TOTAL 1160 



758 



Index 



A 

A Student's Choice 5 

Academic Advisor 57 

Academic Program 55 

Accreditation and Member- 
ships, Bethany College ... 18 

Administrative Officers 138 

Admission 41 

Admission Office Hours . . 42 

Advanced Placement .... 43 

Application for Admission 41 
Application for 

Readmission 46 

Early Admission 43 

Foreign Students 43 

High School Preparation.. 41 

Interviews 42 

Junior College Graduates. 43 

Transfer Students 43 

Advisors 33 

Career Interests 33 

Freshmen 33 

Senior 33 

Special Services 33 

Alumni Field House 22 

American History, Courses in 103 
Anthropology, Courses in ..128 
Applied Music, Courses in . .110 

Art, Courses in 72 

Art History, Courses in 73 

Assets of College, Value of . . 19 

Astronomy 100 

Athletics 30 

Awards 37 

B 

Band 29 

Benedum Commons 22 

Bethany House 19 

Bethany Plan 55 



Bethany Profile 17 

Biology, Courses in 74 

Board, Cost of 45 

Board of Communications.. 30 

Board of Fellows 136 

Board of Trustees 135 

Board of Visitors 187 

Buildings 19 

C 

Calendar 2, 56 

Campbell Hall 23 

Certification, Elementary and 

Secondary Education .... 88 

Chamber Music 29 

Change of Schedule 64 

Changes in Regulations 67 

Chemistry, Courses in 77 

Chemistry, Professional 

Preparation for 34 

Choir, Brass 29 

Choir, Concert 29 

Chorus, Male 29 

Chorus, Oratorio 29 

Class Absence Policy 64 

Classification of Students ... 66 

College Life 25 

Columbia University 3-2 Plan 62 

Combination Courses 62 

Commencement Hall 19 

Committee on Academic 

Review 58 

Committee on Admission. . . 41 
Committees, Board of 

Trustees 136 

Committees, Faculty 

and Staff 143 

Communications, Courses in 79 

Comprehensive Charges ... 45 

Contents, Table of 3 



Counseling 32 

Course Descriptions 69 

Course Load 64 

Cramblet Hall 19 

Cultural Activities 28 

Cultural Activities 

Committee 28 

Curriculum 18 

D 

Dean of Faculty 139 

Dean of Students 139 

Dentistry 34 

Designated Scholarships ... 51 

Directories 135 

Distinguished Lecturers 

and Consultants 143 

Distribution Requirement . . 58 
Drawing Account, Student.. 48 

E 

Economics and Business, 

Courses in 81 

Education, Courses in 83 

Elementary Education 85 

Endowment fund, Value of. . 19 

Engineering 34 

English 91 

Enrollment 18 

European and World History 102 

F 

Facilities and Equipment, 

Value of 19 

Faculty, List of 139 

Fees 46 

Admission 45 

Art 46 

Board 45 

Breakage 47 

Matriculation 46 



Music 46 

Overseas Programs 46 

Readmission 46 

Registration Deposit 46 

Room 45 

Special 47 

Tuition 45 

Field of Concentration 58 

Financial Aid 48 

Financial Assistance, 

Office of 48 

Fine Arts, Courses in 94 

Foreign Language, 

Courses in 99 

Foreign Languages 95 

Foreign Students, 

Admission of 43 

Fraternities 26 

French, Courses in 95 

Freshman Seminar 58 

Freshmen Studies Program 69 

G 

General Scholarships 49 

General Sciences, Courses in 100 

Geography, Courses in 101 

German, Courses in 96 

Goals, Bethany College .... 18 

Government, Student 25 

Grading System 65 

Graduation Honors 35 

Graduation Requirements . . 58 

Greek, Courses in 100 

Gresham House 22 

H 

Harlan Hall 23 

Health Services 31 

Heuristics 101 



759 



History, Bethany College ... 17 Map of the Campus 20 

History and Political Science, McEachern Hall 

Courses in 101 Refer to Campus Map 

Honor Societies 36 McLean Hall 

Honors List 35 Refer to Campus Map 

Housing 26 Medicine 34 

Millsop Leadership Center . . 22 



I 

Independent Studies 61 

India Exchange Program ... 63 

Infirmary 31 

Interdisciplinary Lecture ... 69 



Monthly Payment Plans .... 48 

Morlan Hall 23 

Music, Courses in 108 

Musical Organizations 29 

N 



Intramurals 30 |\| urs j n g 35 

Invalidation of Credits 67 

IPS Courses, Graduate Level. 101 O 

Irvin Gymnasium 19 Oglebay Hall 19 

Old Mam 19 



) 



i.l 



lanuary Term 

Junior College Graduates, 

Admission of 43 

junior Year at the 

University of Madrid or 

the Sorbonne 62 



Overseas Study Programs ... 62 
Oxford Semester Program . . 62 



Parents' Confidential 

Statement 48 

Pendleton Heights 19 

Phillips Hall 23 

Phillips Memorial Library ... 23 

Philosophy, Courses in ....112 

Physical Education and 

. , ,_ -, n n Health, Courses in 115 

Latin, Courses in 100 ' 

. ? A Physics, Courses in 11/ 

Law 34 ' . ' 

Po htica Science, Courses in. 104 



Knight Natatorium 22 



Library 23 

Literature and Theory of 

Music, Courses in 109 

Loan Funds 53 

Location, Bethany College . . 17 

M 

Mathematics, Courses in . . .105 
Map of the Area 16 



Practica, Questions 

Answered 131 

Practicum Program, 

Described 60,130 

Pre-Professional Studies .... 34 
Professional Chemistry ... 34 

Pre-Dentistry 34 

Pre-Engineering 34 



Pre-Law 34 

Pre-Medicine 34 

Pre-Nursing 35 

Pre-Theological 35 

President 138 

Probation 66 

Professional Block 87 

Provost for External Affairs. .138 

Psychology, Courses in 119 

Publications, Student 30 

R 

Radio Station 30 

Refunds 45 

Regional Council for 

International Education . . 63 

Registration Deposit 46 

Regulations, Student 25 

Religious Life 32 

Religious Studies, 

Courses in 121 

Renner Union 19 

Residence Life 26 

Residence Halls 23 

Residence Requirements ... 61 
Richardson Hall of Science . 22 
Room and Board, Cost of. . . 45 
Roster of Students 145 

S 

Scandinavian Seminar 63 

Scholarships, Named 49 

Scholarships, Qualifications 

for 49 

Secondary Education 86 

Semester in Copenhagen 

Program 64 

Senior Comprehensive 

Examination 60 

Senior Fellowships 35 



Senior Project 59 

Social Life 27 

Social Sciences, Courses in. .125 
Social Work, Courses in ... .128 

Sociology, Courses in 125 

Sororities 26 

Spanish, Courses in 98 

Special Examinations 65 

Steinman Fine Arts Center . . 22 
Student Accounts, 

Payment of 47 

Student Statistical Data .... 15 
Study Year in Basel, 

Switzerland 63 

Study Year in Verona, Italy. . 63 
Summer Terms 61 

T 
Teacher Education, 

Admission to 87 

Teacher Education 

Requirements 84 

Theatre, Courses in 128 

Theatrical Productions 28 

Transfer Students, 

Admission of 43 

Transcript of Records 67 

Treasurer 138 

Tubingen Study Program ... 63 

Tuition, Cost of 45 

U 

United Nations Semester ... 62 

W 

Washington Semester 62 

Withdrawals 45, 65 

Writing Qualification 

Examinations 59,92 

WVBC-FM 30 



760 




BETHANY COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Bethany, West Virginia 26032 
Return Postage Guaranteed 



Second Class Postage 
Paid at Bethany, W. Va. 



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on 100% recycled paper. 



BETHANY 

COLLEGE BULLETIN 



1973-1974 



BETHANY COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Vol. LXVI September 1973 No. 3 

Second class postage paid at Bethany, W. Va., 26032. Published 
five times a year in November, March, )une, August, and Septem- 
ber by Bethany College, Bethany, W. Va. 



College 
Calendar 



1973-74 



FIRST SEMESTER 


Septem 


ber 


1-3 


Sat.-Mon 


4 


Tue. 


5 


Wed. 


13 


Thur. 


18 


Tue. 



October 

6 Sat. 

20 Sat. 

26 Fri. 

November 

12-20 Mon.-Tue. 

20 Tue., 5 p.m. 
26 Mon., 8 a.m. 

December 

21 Fri. 

January 
2-2') 

28-29 Mon.-Tue. 



Orientation and evaluation for new 
students 
Registration 

Classes begin for all students 
Formal Convocation 
Last day for re-adjustment of sched- 
ule without academic and financial 
penalty; last day to add a course; 
and last day for credit-no credit. 



Homecoming 
Parents' Day 
Mid-term grades called 



Registration lor second semester 
Thanksgiving recess begins 
Thanksgiving recess ends 



Last day of first semester 



January Term Session 
Senior Comprehensive Exams 



SECOND SEMESTER 




January 




30 Wed. 


Registration 


31 Thur. 


Classes begin for all studen 


February 




7 Thur. 


Formal Convocation 


13 Wed. 


Last day for re-adjustment o 



March 




7 


Thur. 


22 


Fri. 


22 


Fri., 5 p.m. 


April 




1 


Mon., 8 a.m 


18 


Thur. 



22-30 Mon.-Tue. 



May 




3 


Fri., 5 p.m. 


10-12 


Fri. -Sun. 


13-18 


Mem. -Sat. 


18 


Sat. 


21 


Tue. 


23 


Thur. 


24 


Fri. 


24 


Fri., 8 p.m. 


25 


Sat., 10 a.m 



ule without academic and financial 
penalty; last day to add a course; 
and last day for credit-no credit. 



Founders' Day 
Mid-term grades called 
Spring recess begins 

Spring recess ends 

Honors Day 

Registration for first semester 
1974-75 

Reading period begins for seniors 

Spring Festival — Parents' Weekend 

Senior Comprehensive Exams 

Alumni Day 

Last day of second semester 

Final faculty meeting 

Board of Trustees meeting 

Baccalaureate 

Commencement 



Table of Contents 



A Student's Choice 5 

Bethany Profile 17 

College Life 25 

Admission 41 

Expenses and Financial Aid 45 

Academic Program 55 

Course Descriptions 69 

The Directories 137 

Index 162 



BETHANY 




A STUDENTS CHOICE 




Bethany. 

A worldly citadel of learning and a tree 
lined country town. 





Bethany. 

A college and a community interacting. 
Making it a very special place to live and to 
earn. 

Snuggled in the rolling foothills of the Alle- 
gheny Mountains, Bethany offers all of the 
scenic beauty that is to be found anywhere. 

You notice it immediately. More trees than 
people. More wilderness than reinforced 
concrete. More trails than highways. More 
hills than buildings. 




If ever there was a place to go camping or 
hiking, it is Bethany. The campus sits amidst 
1,600 acres of college-owned West Virginia 
timberland. 

About 300 acres are developed. Academic 
buildings, residence halls, administrative of- 
fices, recreational facilities — all of the things 
that make a college. 

The surrounding 1,300 acres remain much 
as they were when Bethany was founded 132 
years ago. Green. Vibrant. Only nature has 
changed them. 

Bethany is a melting pot for students and 
faculty coming from 30 states and 15 foreign 
countries. They bring excitment and sophisti- 
cation to a picturesque mountain village. 




$5"^ 
**••»•< 




ID 



The intimate relationship of Bethany, the 
town, and Bethany, the college, allows for 
an interaction of students and faculty that is 
unmatched elsewhere. 

Often what's started in the classroom is 
finished outside it. Insight often comes in 
that informal, after-class meeting between 
professor and student that is so much a part 
of a Bethany education. Faculty homes, fra- 
ternity and sorority houses, dorm lounges, 
one of the local pubs — these too are Bethany 
classrooms. 



j 








&£i 


5 









II 




Life at Bethany means first-hand acquaint- 
ance with many of the famous personalities 
of our time. Cong. Paul McCloskey, Julian 
Bond, Jack Anderson, and John Kenneth 
Galbraith were here recently. Before them 
were Ralph Nader, Dick Gregory, George 
McGovern, and many more, including our 
last three Presidents — John F. Kennedy, Lyn- 
don B. Johnson, and Richard M. Nixon. 

Entertainment is first-rate: renowned pia- 
nist Lorin Hollander playing with the first- 
chair members of the Pittsburgh Symphony 
Orchestra, Chicago, the Black Light Theater 
of Prague, the Fifth Dimension, the Pitts- 
burgh Ballet, Sha-Na-Na, Harry Chapin, Yes, 
John Prine, and so many more. 



12 



Eight to ten student dramas, involving 
nearly a third of the campus community ev- 
ery year, are performed in Bethany's modern 
Wailes Theatre. The male chorus, choir, band, 
and special student jazz and chamber music 
groups offer many concerts. 

At Bethany there really is the opportunity 
for a chemist to act in a play, for a writer to 
play intercollegiate soccer, for an artist to 
work with computers, for a sociologist to live 
on a farm, for a psychologist to tour with the 
choir, for a philosopher to edit the campus 
literary magazine. 





At Bethany your academic program will be 
far different from that of your friends at other 
colleges. A new curriculum for the decade of 
the seventies insures this. If you choose, you'll 
be given the opportunity to develop your 
own academic program. You'll find that 
much of your work demands involvement 
with the non-academic world and with cul- 
tures other than your own. 

Bethany's special January term — a free 
month between semesters- -allows for fasci- 
nating travel and work-study courses. Each 
January several student groups, under the 
guidance of one or two faculty members, 
spend three to four weeks in such countries 
as England, India, Spain, and France, examin- 
ing another culture first-hand. 






73 










14 



Located as it is, just 40 miles southwest of 
Pittsburgh, Bethany is just an hour away from 
the nation's third largest corporate business 
headquarters. Many Bethany students have 
taken advantage of the opportunity to work 
full-time for a month with such firms as U.S. 
Steel and PPG Industries and with such world- 
wide advertising and public relations firms as 
Marsteller, Inc., and Ketchum, McLeod and 
Grove. 





The Steel City is also a readily available 
entertainment center, with such attractions 
as the Heinz Hall for the Performing Arts, 
Three Rivers Stadium for professional sport- 
ing events, and Syria Mosque for top-name 
musical groups. 

Famous Oglebay Park, just 12 miles south 
of Bethany, is a complete recreational center 
-golf courses, tennis courts, ski slopes, rid- 
ing stables, museums, nature trails, boating 
facilities, and more. The nearby Towngate 
Theatre offers some of the finest drama in the 
area. 

And Bethany has it all - - first-run movies, 
drama, outstanding guest speakers, in-depth 
conferences on current issues, sports facil- 
ities, well-equipped learning and research 
centers, and, most importantly, a top-notch 
faculty - - many who are experts in their field. 




t's a very special way of life at Bethany. 
Come to visit us before you decide which 
college to attend. It's the best way to see how 
Bethany differs from the large university and 



other small colleges. 



76 



BETHANY 




BETHANY PROFILE 



77 




HISTORY 

Bethany was established as a private educational 
foundation, chartered under the laws of then undi- 
vided Commonwealth of Virginia on March 2, 1840, 
more than two decades before West Virginia became 
a state. The charter was written by Alexander Camp- 
bell, a celebrated debater, Christian reformer, and 
educator, who also provided land for the campus and 
$15,000 toward the first building which architecturally 
reflected Campbell's college-day remembrances of 
the University of Glasgow in Scotland. 

Since its inception, Bethany has remained a four- 
year private college affiliated with the Christian 
Church (Disciples of Christ). This religious body, 
which Campbell helped to found, continues to sup- 
port and encourage Bethany, but it exercises no sec- 
tarian control. 



LOCATION 

Bethany is located in the northern panhandle of West 
Virginia, a narrow tip of land between Ohio and 
Pennsylvania. This specal location in the rolling foot- 
hills of the Allegheny Mountains puts Bethany near 
several large cities. To the northeast just 40 miles 
away, is the major urban and cultural center of Pitts- 
burgh. Fifteen miles to the southwest is Wheeling, 
W.Va., the dominant northern city in the state and 
the location of Oglebay Park, one of the nation's 
best-known summer and winter resorts. 



18 



ACCREDITATION AND MEMBERSHIPS 

■ North Central Association of Colleges and Secon- 

dary Schools 

■ Association of American Colleges 

■ American Council on Education 

■ College Entrance Examination Board 

■ American Association of Colleges for Teacher Edu- 

cation 

■ National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 

Education 

■ Board of Higher Education of the Christian Church 

(Disciples of Christ) 

■ Women graduates are eligible for membership in 

the American Association of University Women. 

ENROLLMENT 

Each year Bethany students — approximately 600 men 
and 550 women — represent 30 states and 15 foreign 
countries. The majority come from Pennsylvania, New 
Jersey, New York, Ohio, Connecticut, and West Vir- 
ginia. Nearly 90 per cent of the student body is from 
out-of-state. About one-half are affiliated with the 
12 national fraternities and sororities on campus. With 
approximately 80 full and part-time faculty members, 
the student/faculty ratio is about 14 to 1. 

CURRICULUM 

In December 1971 a new curriculum was adopted for 
Bethany students. Called the Bethany Plan, it provides 
not only for a classroom-based program but for an 
experience-based program as well. It is a recognition 
that the classroom is not the only place for meaning- 
ful education. 

The Plan provides for a close student-faculty rela- 
tionship. In consultation with his advisor, the student 
is asked to design or to help plan an educational pro- 
gram to satisfy his personal goals. It encourages him 




to develop his own special course of study. Chapter 
six discusses this curriculum in detail. 

GOALS 

The educational program is designed to help each 
Bethany student realize seven goals: 

1) to discover how to acquire, evaluate, and use 
knowledge 

2) to master the skills of communication 

3) to cooperate and collaborate with others in study, 
analysis, and formulation of solutions to problems 

4) to understand contemporary issues and events 

5) to analyze personal values, to perceive and to deal 
sympathetically with the values of others, and to 
be open to the continued evaluation of both 

6) to make progress toward the selection of and the 
preparation for a vocation 

7) to integrate the varied experiences of life and to 
see the relationship of the college experience to 
future development as a responsible citizen. 



79 



IP - 

1 ! ■ 




EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES 

Substantial resources are invested in the education of 
Bethany students. The gross assets of the College on 
)une 30, 1972, totaled $24,717,749. Facilities and 
equipment at book value were $13,524,096, with a 
replacement value of approximately $26,000,000. 
The market value of the endowment fund was 
$11,440,038. 

Bethany College is rich in both heritage and facili- 
ties because of the generosity of its many benefactors 
including the Cochran family, the Phillips family, Hal- 
ford Morlan, the R. R. Renner family, the David Stein- 
man family, the Benedum Foundation, the Kresge 
Foundation, the United States Department of Health, 
Education, and Welfare and the Department of Hous- 
ing and Urban Development, and countless others 
who believe in a Bethany education. 

More than 30 academic, administrative, and resi- 
dential buildings dot Bethany's campus. 



Pendleton Heights (1841) was built during the col- 
lege's first year by W.K. Pendleton, a member of the 
first faculty and second president of the College. To- 
day it serves as home for Bethany's 13th president, 
Cecil H. Underwood, former governor of West Vir- 
ginia. 

Old Main (1858) is the central unit of Bethany's 
academic buildings. Its tower dominates the campus 
and is the chief architectural feature noted as one 
approaches the College. Old Main has been declared 
a national landmark. 

Commencement Hall (1872) provides the setting 
for convocations, concerts, lectures, dramatic presen- 
tations, and other gatherings. Studios and classrooms 
for the art department occupy the ground floor of 
this building. It was remodeled in 1924. 

Cramblet Hall (1905) was constructed through a gift 
from Andrew Carnegie. Originally the library, it was 
remodeled in 1961 to house Bethany's administrative 
offices. It is named in honor of two presidents of the 
college, Thomas E. Cramblet and his son, Wilbur. 

Oglebay Hall (1912) accommodates the psychology 
and biology departments and special research labora- 
tories. 

Irvin Gymnasium (1919) serves as the women's 
physical education center. It contains a modern dance 
studio. 

Renner Union-Bethany House (1948) is the student 
union. Here are found the campus radio station, the 
college bookstore, bowling lanes, a student photo- 
graphic darkroom, music listening rooms, a spacious 
lounge, and the offices of the Admission Director. The 
alumni joined in 1969 wth the R.R. Renner family of 
Cleveland to remodel this facility completely. 






BETHANY 



1. 


Pendleton Heights (President's Home) 


13. 


Cochran Hall 


2. 


Old Main 


14. 


Benedum Commons 


3. 


Commencement Hall 


15. 


Bethany House-Renner Union 


4. 


Oglebay Hall 




Bookstore 


5. 


Steinman Fine Arts Center 


16. 


Infirmary 




Wailes Theater 


17. 


McEachern Hall 


6. 


Irvin Gymnasium 


18. 


McLean Hall 


7. 


Richardson Hall of Science 


19. 


Bethany Memorial Church 




Weimer Lecture Hall 


20. 


Campbell Hall 


8. 


Phillips Memorial Library 


21. 


Buildings & Grounds 


9. 


Morion Hall 


22. 


Heating Plant 


10. 


Harlan Hall 


23. 


Knight Natatorium 


1 1. 


Phillips Hall 


24. 


Alumni Field House 


12. 


Cramblet Hall 


25. 


Rine Field 



26. Gresham House 

27. Millsop Leadership Center 

28. Highland Hearth 

29. Faculty Apartments 

30. Clark House (ATA) 



Scale: I" - 100' 








21 



22 




Alumni Field House (1948) provides physical edu- 
cation facilities for men and is used for concerts and 
commencements. Adjacent to the field house are 
football and baseball fields, tennis courts, and a 
quarter-mile track. 

Richardson Hall of Science (1964) provides facilities 
for the chemistry, physics, and math departments and 
houses the computer center. It is named for Bethany's 
first science professor. 

John J. Knight Natatorium (1967) contains a six-lane 
25-yard heated pool, used in the physical education 
program and for intercollegiate competition. Four 
tennis courts are located next to the natatorium. 

Benedum Commons (1969) is the modern, air- 
conditioned dining facility for all Bethany students. 
In addition to the main dining room, the building 
houses a snack bar, lounge facilities for parents and 
other guests, and several small dining rooms for spe- 
cial student and faculty events. 

The David and Irene Steinman Fine Arts Center 

(1969) houses the education, English, music, and 
theatre departments. A fully-equipped theatre occu- 
pies the centermost portion of this building. A work- 
shop adjacent to the theatre provides opportunities 




for scenic design. The music department consists of 
teaching studios, studio-classrooms, a general rehear- 
sal room for the larger choral and instrumental 
groups, and individual practice rooms. 

The Thomas E. Millsop Leadership Center (1972) 

houses offices, seminar rooms, exhibition areas, and 
a 123-seat circular conference room for continuing 
education activities. This center offers a regular series 
of conferences, seminars, and workshops for educa- 
tion, business and professional groups. It is a me- 
morial to the former president and chairman of the 
National Steel Corporation. 

Gresham House (1972) is the Millsop Center's ad- 
joining guest facility, which provides 41 spacious 
rooms for overnight accommodations for visitors 
coming to the College. It is named for Dr. Perry E. 
Gresham, Bethany's twelfth president. 



23 



RESIDENCE HALLS 

Harlan, Morlan, Phillips, and Campbell are the largest 
dormitories on the Bethany campus. Since 1966, 
Bethany has moved toward small, self-governing liv- 
ing units, each accommodating approximately 32 stu- 
dents and containing social and recreational facilities. 
This year six small residence units have been con- 
structed on the wooded west slope of the campus. 
These units, called Parkinson Place Residence Halls, 
house fraternities, sororities, and independent men 
and women. 




PHILLIPS MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

The T.W. Phillips Memorial Library, built in 1961, 
contains more than 116,000 volumes of books, re- 
cordings, and bound periodicals. Supplementary col- 
lections include microforms, pamphlet files, selected 
government documents, and a circulating art print 
collection. The library receives 621 periodical titles 
as well as local, area, national, and foreign news- 
papers. 

The staff of three professional librarians and their 
clerical assistants are readily available to assist with 
any information or reference need. The library is 
open 95 hours a week. After 11 p.m. a study lounge 
is open until 2 a.m. every day during the fall and 
spring semesters. 

Through membership in the Pittsburgh Regional 
Library Center, the research collections and reference 
services of the colleges, universities, and special li- 
braries of the nearby Pittsburgh area are available to 
Bethany faculty and students. A similar interlibrary 
program exists among West Virginia's colleges and 
universities. Materials can also be obtained on loan 
from other libraries across the country for faculty and 
honors students. 

Many personal libraries and collections have been 
received from alumni and friends of the College. The 
Campbell Room contains books, periodicals, letters, 
paintings, photographs, and museum pieces related 
to Bethany's first president, Alexander Campbell, his 
Bethany associates, and his family. It is an important 
research collection not only for the history of the 
College and the religious movement that Campbell 
founded but also for regional and intellectual history 
of the nineteenth century. 



24 



BETHANY 




COLLEGE LIFE 



25 



At Bethany, education is more than hours, credits, 
courses, and examinations. It is a total experience of 
living and learning. Bethany has about as many activi- 
ties as many schools 10 times its size. The problem is 
not getting into things, but in choosing activities 
wisely and learning to say "No" to things that will not 
be as beneficial. 

Bethany assumes the mature and responsible citi- 
zenship of its students. The College believes that the 
capacity to handle the obligations of freedom is en- 
larged when as much liberty as possible is granted in 
the ordering of college life. 

Bethany students accept major responsibility for 
their behavior. There is no regimentation and students 
must make their own decisions about life-styles. So- 
called "freaks" and "straights" coexist with little 
strain, if not mutual respect. College officials inter- 
vene when the rights and privileges of some are 
threatened by the actions of others. Usually such 
problems are resolved in a Dean's office, student 
court, or at College Council. 

Students not only have much personal freedom, 
but working together with faculty and administrators, 
they share in deciding Bethany's destiny. Someone 
once said that "things are decided at Bethany as if it 
were a continuous town meeting." Doors are always 
open and discussion is continuous. There is such a 
sense of ownership by both those who learn and 
those who teach that the term "Bethanian" has come 
to mean a special sense of pride. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Student responsibility in self government has been 
strengthened in recent years. The Student Board of 
Governors, with representatives from all residence 
groups, manages a substantial budget and appropri- 
ates funds for many diverse student activities. Repre- 
sentatives are appointed to many faculty committees 
including those concerned with curricula, cultural 
programs, schedules, athletics, religious life, inter- 
national education, and the library. 

Residence halls form the primary political groups 
for self government. Fraternities, sororities, and house 
associations accommodate all upperclassmen in small 
self-governed units with responsibility for conduct; 
cultural, academic, and social programming; and care 
of the facilities. Shortly after arrival, freshman also 
organize dorm councils and send representatives to 
student government. 

Student government usually refers disciplinary 
problems to one of the student judiciary organiza- 
tions. House councils in each of the residence units 
serve the judicial function for problems that occur in 
the houses or residence halls. The Bethany College 
Student Court acts as a court of appeals for other 
student judicial groups and hears cases referred to it 
by the faculty and administration. Only the President 
of the College can hear appeals of Student Court 
decisions. 

STUDENT REGULATIONS 

A complete description of the regulations pertaining 
to housing, telephones, dining rooms, health services, 
motor vehicles, use of alcoholic beverages and drugs, 
eligibility requirements, and other areas of student 



26 



life are contained in the Student Directory which is 
distributed just prior to registration. Applicants for 
admission should know the following in advance: 

1) With the exception of commuters (i.e., married 
students or students living with parents) all stu- 
dents are required to live in College residence 
halls or fraternity or sorority houses unless ex- 
cused by the Dean of Students. 

2) All students, except commuters as described 
above, are required to board in the College din- 
ing hall unless excused by the Dean of Students. 
No refunds are granted for meals missed. 

3) Freshmen are not permitted to bring automobiles 
to Bethany. 

4) All new students are required to send a record of 
a recent and thorough physical examination by 
their family physician. 

Applicants who have questions about the regula- 
tions are invited to write to the Dean of Students. 

RESIDENCE LIFE 

Bethany is a leader in small, self-governed housing. 
In recent years when other colleges were building the 
large institutional-type dorms, Bethany was develop- 
ing home-like, 32-bed residence units, most of which 
are situated in wooded areas overlooking the main 
campus. Seventeen of the College's 21 residences are 
of this type. 

These self-governed houses constitute the primary 
social groups on campus, i.e., fraternities, sororities, 
and independent-house associations. Each associa- 
tion or fraternal group is responsible for arranging 
cultural, recreational, and social experiences for its 
members. Each residence group decides for itself its 
own internal discipline. Houses are also responsible 
for organizing day-to-day house-keeping chores and 
each works closely with the College in developing a 
decor that suits the group living style. 



Freshmen live in the larger dorms, but are granted 
most of the same freedoms and responsibilities of the 
upperclassmen. Head residents and student resident 
assistants give a great deal of leadership and counsel 
the first semester, but by the second semester fresh- 
men are more on their own. Whenever possible, 
freshmen are housed to facilitate the special fresh- 
men year seminar program. 




The seven fraternities and five sororities at Bethany 
are nationally affiliated and constitute approximately 
50 per cent of the student body. Interfraternity Coun- 
cil and Panhellenic Council, composed of representa- 
tives from each of the fraternities and sororities, act 
as the coordinating agencies in fraternal affairs and 
activities. 

The fraternal organizations represented at Bethany 
are: Alpha Sigma Phi, Beta Theta Pi, Delta Tau Delta, 
Kappa Alpha, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Phi Kappa Tau, 
and Sigma Nu. The sororities represented are: Alpha 
Xi Delta, Kappa Delta, Pi Beta Phi, Phi Mu, and Zeta 
Tau Alpha. 



27 





SOCIAL LIFE 

Campus social life centers in the residence units: 
fraternities, sororities, and the independent-house 
associations. As on most coeducational campuses, 
much of the social life is casual. It may be a coffee 
date at Renner Union or an evening at one of the 
local pubs. Others may bowl or swim, and any night 
of the week friends study together at the library or at 
a dorm lounge. 

Organized parties usually occur on weekends. Be- 
cause Bethany is not a college that is vacated week- 
ends, there is always something to do on campus. 
Athletics, theatre, films, concerts of many kinds, and 
coffee-house programs, fill many weekends. 

The Entertainment Committee of Renner Union 
brings interesting concerts to the campus. Last year 
the Committee brought Lester Lanin and his Orches- 
tra for Homecoming and Matthew and Peter and the 
Eagles for spring weekend. Other entertainers to ap- 
pear during the year were: comedian Pat Paulsen, 
John Hartford, Earl Scruggs, Preservation Hall lazz 
Band, Harry Chapin, John Prine, Kool and the Gang, 
and Your Father's Mustache. Maxwell's Coffee House 
featured Robin Williams, Margaret MacArthur, West 
Virginia Grass, Michael Cooney, Tracy and Eloise 
Schwartz, and Alan dinger. All programs are bud- 
geted by the student union through student-union 
funds. 



28 



CULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

Faculty and students working together on the Cultural 
Activities Committee provide a wide variety of cul- 
tural events each year. A series of conferences on such 
topics as human sexuality, ecology, aggression and 
violence in American society, and Latin America 
stirred much discussion last year. Prominent author- 
ities led the discussions in each area. Besides con- 
ferences, speakers like Pat Paulsen, Ellen Frankfurt, 
Eve Leoff, Richard Goldstein, Jose Moreno, and Jona- 
than Kozol visited the campus last year. 

Musically, the cultural program presented the Pitts- 
burgh Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Pittsburgh Bal- 
let Theatre, violinist Nina McGowan, and pianist 
and artist-in-residence Oliver Manning. The Oratorio 
Choir presented its annual performance of Handel's 
Messiah. The Cultural Activities Committee also 
brought to campus The Black Light Theatre of Prague 
and the Oglebay Player's production of Long Day's 
Journey Into Night. 

Renner Union exhibited numerous visiting art 
shows including those of Mary Ann Peet and Arthur 
Howard Winer. Student and faculty shows were ex- 
hibited throughout the year. 

In addition to the regular Friday and Saturday-night 
film schedule, there were numerous foreign films and 
experimental art films shown during the year. 




THEATRE 

Drama is an important co-curricular activity at 
Bethany. Nearly one-third of the last senior class 
participated in a production while at Bethany. Often 
acting, directing, playwriting, and producing are cor- 
related with courses in the theatre department; how- 
ever, non-theatre majors have every opportunity to 
participate. 

Most of the productions at Bethany are staged in 
the new Wailes Theatre in the Steinman Fine Arts 
Center. The theatre seats 300 and has a fully equipped 
workshop. Most productions are given three or four 
times. Last year's productions included The Investiga- 
tion; Twelfth Night; No Exit; Celebration; Knicker- 
bocker Holiday; and five one-act plays: The Intruder; 
The Stranger; The Twelve Pound Look; Box and Cox; 
and Abortion. 

Students playing a certain number of major and 
minor roles or participating in the technical and busi- 
ness aspects of play production are eligible for mem- 
bership in the national drama honorary, Alpha Psi 
Omega. 



29 




MUSIC 

There is a wide choice of musical groups on campus 
in both the vocal and instrumental fields. 

The Concert Choir, with approximately 50 mixed 
voices, performs on campus and goes on tour each 
spring. The repertoire consists primarily of rather 
difficult and serious sacred and secular works of 
many periods. There is opportunity within the choir 
for the formation of smaller ensembles to cultivate 
special types of repertoire, such as madrigals. The 
choir also cooperates with the theatre department in 
the production of a musical each year. 

The Male Chorus consists of 36 voices. The reper- 
toire is varied, with emphasis on serious works. When 
practicable, there is a spring tour. 

Members of the Concert Choir, the Male Chorus, 
and others in the community form the Oratorio 
Chorus which annually presents Handel's Messiah. 

The College Band performs at most football and 
basketball games, and for special occasions through- 
out the year. Band members attend an instrumental 
seminar each fall before the opening of school. 

The Brass Choir appears in formal convocations 
and in concerts. It is open to qualified players by 
audition as vacancies occur. 

Chamber Music is provided by woodwind quintets, 
string quartets, and smaller ensembles that develop 
annually and are open to all who play orchestral in- 
struments. 

There is an opportunity for proficient orchestral 
musicians, especially string players, to play in the 
Wheeling Symphony. To be admitted into this orches- 
tra one must audition with the Symphony's director. 



•;<> 



PUBLICATIONS AND RADIO 

College publications include a campus newspaper, 
The Bethany Tower; a yearbook, The Bethanian; an 
orientation guidebook, The Student Directory; and 
a literary journal, The Harbinger. The publications 
and the campus radio station, WVBC-FM, are under 
the supervision of the Board of Communications, 
whose chairman is the student body president. The 
Board includes the student editors and business man- 
agers of all publications, general manager and pro- 
gram director of the radio station, and members of 
the faculty and administration. The English and 
communications departments provide professional 
guidance. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS, 
INTRAMURALS, AND RECREATION 

Intercollegiate athletics for men and women are con- 
sidered an integral part of the College program. They 
furnish those students who possess a high degree of 
skill in a variety of physical activities an opportunity 
to compete with students from other institutions with 
similar standards. 

Intercollegiate activities at Bethany include foot- 
ball, basketball, baseball, track, tennis, golf, cross 
country, wrestling, soccer, and swimming. Lacrosse 
is played on a club basis. Membership is held in the 
Presidents' Athletic Conference (PAC), which also 
includes the following schools: Allegheny, Carnegie- 
Mellon, Thiel, and Washington and Jefferson in West- 
ern Pennsylvania; and Hiram, Case-Western Reserve, 
and John Carroll in Ohio. Bethany is also a member 
of the NCAA and the NAIA. 

Because women are showing increasing interest in 
intercollegiate athletics, not only in women's pro- 
grams but also as participants in varsity sports, the 




2 a* '-•'.-.• 



31 




athletic directors at PAC schools are exploring the 
possibilities for more women's competition in the 
future. 

Healthful athletic recreation is provided for the en- 
tire student body by an intramural program which 
includes a complete schedule of sports: for men — 
cross country, football, volleyball, basketball, swim- 
ming, wrestling, bowling, softball, handball, golf, 
track, and tennis; and for women — basketball, vol- 
leyball, tennis, field hockey, speedball, swimming, 
archery, and dance. The Director of Intramural Ath- 
letics supervises the program. 

Bethany encourages students to develop skills in 
recreational activities that may be continued through 
life. In addition to the usual team sports, staff instruc- 
tion is available in archery, badminton, horseback 
riding, swimming, golf, tennis, camping techniques, 
jogging, body mechanics, bowling, dancing, and 
gymnastics. 

There are many opportunities available for students 
who wish to pursue recreational interests. The 1,600 
acres of College land provide a natural setting for hik- 
ing and nature study. Ski slopes and riding stables are 
available at nearby Oglebay Park. The nearby Dutch 
Fork Hunt Club invites Bethany students to go fox 
hunting from September through February of each 
year. Local farmers are often willing to board horses. 
An 18-hole golf course is located six miles from 
campus. 



STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES 

All students entering Bethany for the first time are 
required to submit a completed physical examination 
form before registration. After arrival, the College 
health service is maintained by student fees, and all 
students are entitled to infirmary privileges as in- 
patients and as out-patients. 

The Bethany infirmary is well-equipped to assist the 
physicians and nurses who care, on 24-hour call, for 
student illnesses and injuries which occur during the 
academic year. Medical service is not available at the 
infirmary during vacations and recess periods. Stu- 
dents who suffer serious illnesses and accidents are 
usually treated at the Wheeling Hospital, located 15 
miles from the town of Bethany which maintains am- 
bulance service for emergencies. Medical and surgical 
specialists are called as needed for consultation with 
College physicians. 

The College physicians have regular office hours 
each weekday morning during the school year for 
free consultation. In case of an emergency operation, 
when the parents cannot be reached, the Dean of 
Students, upon the recommendation of the College 
physician, assumes the responsibility of giving per- 
mission for operations. 

For $18 per semester the College makes available 
to its students medical, surgical, and hospitalization 
insurance. All students are automatically included in 
the coverage from September 1 to August 31 and are 
charged accordingly unless the appropriate waiver is 
forwarded to the Business Office. Expenses for out- 
side consultation and treatment are the responsibility 
of the student in all cases when not covered by insur- 
ance. 



32 




RELIGIOUS LIFE 

A wide variety of religious backgrounds is repre- 
sented in the student body and faculty. While par- 
ticipation in religious concerns is entirely voluntary, 
there are substantial opportunities for religious ex- 
ploration and participation on the campus. 

Many of the students at Bethany College find in 
the Bethany Memorial Church an opportunity for 
expression of their religious faith. The minister of 
this church, who is also the College Chaplain, is avail- 
able to students for counseling and advice on per- 
sonal and religious matters. 

The Bishop of the Wheeling Diocese of the Roman 
Catholic Church provides a chaplain for Catholic stu- 
dents. He is available on a weekly schedule for coun- 
seling, in addition to the celebration of the Mass each 
Sunday and on Holy Days. 

The Jewish Fellowship meets every other week for 
worship and study at the Bethany Memorial Church. 
Jewish congregations in Steubenville and Wheeling 
sponsor the group and entertain Jewish students for 
the high holidays. 



ADVISING AND COUNSELING 

The advising and counseling of students are impor- 
tant segments of the Bethany educational program. 
The programs are designed to provide resources 
which will help each student with academic, per- 
sonal, spiritual, social, and vocational situations. 

Bethany College recognizes the need to provide 
its entering students an introduction to their work in 
new surroundings and therefore requires freshmen 
to come to the campus several days before the formal 
registration of other students. Orientation and evalu- 
ation days are planned not only to introduce the 
students to the College but also to introduce the 
College to the students. 

From the beginning of his collegiate career, each 
student is assigned a faculty advisor. Through the 
new Bethany Plan curriculum, this advisor will come 
into weekly seminar contact with his advisees. Thus, 
he will have ample opportunity to observe student 
strengths and weaknesses in an academic situation 
as well as in more relaxed and informal counseling 
situations. 

After a student makes the choice of a major field 
of concentration, he is then assigned to a faculty 
advisor in his chosen department. The advisor helps 
the student plan an academic program consistent 
with the aims and obligations of that department in 
a liberal arts education, and a program which is in 
keeping with the student's abilities, aptitudes, and 
aspirations. 

The chief officer in charge of student advising and 
counseling, student welfare, and coordination of all 
student personnel administration is the Dean of Stu- 
dents. Members of his staff are available for help in 
all major areas of guidance, including post graduate 
and career planning. 



33 



Bethany College believes that a liberal education 
provides men and women with a most adequate 
preparation to meet the demands of our society. In 
a broad, carefully planned, liberal arts program, Beth- 
any students can also select specialized courses or 
fields of concentration which will prepare them for 
admission to graduate and professional schools, or 
for entrance into careers immediately following grad- 
uation. Through the Practicum Programs each student 
will plan an internship to assist in the development 
of vocational goals. 

FRESHMAN ADVISORS 

Mr. Allen, Mr. Applin, Mr. Buckelew, Mr. Carpenter, 
Mrs. Carty, Mrs. Cayard, Mr. J. U. Davis, Mr. Draper, 
Mr. Folk, Mr. G. Garrison, Mr. Grimes, Mr. Halt, Mr. 
Lester, Mr. Liden, Mrs. Lorr, Mr. Lozier, Miss Mathi- 
son, Mr. Miller, Mr. Myers, Miss Nelson, Mr. O'Leary, 
Mr. Peirce, Mrs. N. Sandercox, Mr. R. Sandercox, and 
Mr. Thurston. 

FOR FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION (Senior Advisors) 



ART 

BIOLOGY 

CHEMISTRY 

COMMUNICATIONS 

ECONOMICS 

EDUCATION 

ENGLISH 

FINE ARTS 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

MATHEMATICS 

MUSIC 

PHILOSOPHY 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PHYSICS 

PSYCHOLOGY 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

SOCIOLOGY 

THEATRE 



Mr. Kornowski 
Mr. Larson 
Mr. Draper 
Mr. Carty 
Mr. Halt 
Mr. Spence 
Miss McGuffie 
Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
Mrs. Cayard 
Mr. Young 
Mr. Allison 
Mr. Hauptfuehrer 
Mr. Myers 
Mr. Coin 
Mr. Hudnall 
Mr. Peirce 
Mr. Kenney 
Mr. Hagopian 
Mr. Judy 




FOR CAREER INTERESTS 

DENTISTRY 

ENGINEERING 

LAW 

MEDICINE 

MINISTRY 

NURSING 

RADIO 

DRAMA 

RECREATIONAL LEADERSHIP 

SOCIAL WORK 

TEACHING 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 

FOR SPECIAL SERVICES 

UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS AND 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

MINISTERIAL TRAINING AWARDS 

SELECTIVE SERVICE 

VOCATIONAL INFORMATION AND 

GUIDANCE 

SOCIAL AND RECREATIONAL 

ACTIVITIES 



Mr. Draper 

Mr. Hudnall 

Mr. Young 

Mr. Draper, Mr. Larson 

Mr. Kenney 

Mr. Draper 

Mr. Humes 

Mr. Judy 

Mr. Goin 

Mr. Hagopian 

Mr. Spence 

Mr. Larson 



Mr. Sandercox 
Mr. Lozier 
Mr. Myers 

Mr. Sandercox 
Mr. Frye, Mr. Kurey 
Mr. Cunningham 

Miss Nicholson 



34 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL STUDY 

Bethany offers pre-professional training in a variety 
of fields. A large percentage of students select courses 
to qualify them for entrance into professional schools. 
The faculty advisors consult professional universities 
so that specific requirements of the school selected 
are met. 

PRE-MEDICINE 

Sfudents desiring to prepare for the study of medi- 
cine will find instruction and facilities which will 
satisfy the entrance requirements for the best medi- 
cal schools. It is recommended that the students 
planning to study medicine should have broad basic 
training in courses of general education, including 
a foreign language, literature, philosophy, and social 
science in addition to the courses in chemistry, bi- 
ology, and physics stipulated by the American Medi- 
cal Association. 

PRE-LAW 

Most law schools require no specific undergraduate 
courses for entrance but expect a broad training in 
the social sciences, humanities, and logic. Law schools 
recommend, however, that pre-law students take 
basic courses in history, political science, economics, 
sociology, psychology, English composition, and 
speech. 

PRE-ENGINEERING 

Training in the sciences and humanities provides a 
good foundation for pre-engineering students, some 
of whom desire to transfer to an engineering school 
after carefully following the requirements of the engi- 
neering school they wish to enter. 

By cooperative arrangement with Columbia Uni- 
versity School of Engineering and with Georgia Insti- 
tute of Technology, Bethany offers the first three 



years of a five-year course and arranges for the quali- 
fied student to transfer to one of these engineering 
schools for the last two years of undergraduate train- 
ing. Upon completion of the five-year program, de- 
grees from both institutions are granted. 

PRE-DENTISTRY 

Admission requirements to dental schools stipulate 
at least two years of pre-professional training. It is 
recommended that the pre-dental student follow to 
a large extent the pre-medical program. 

PROFESSIONAL CHEMISTRY 
A thorough preparation for professional chemistry 
and a background in the liberal arts at Bethany con- 
forms to the American Chemical Society standards. 
Independent study introduces the student to the 
principles of research which aids in any contemplated 
graduate or industrial work following graduation. 




35 



PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

Students who plan to enter church vocations are 
expected to complete their preparation in seminaries 
and graduate schools of religion after graduating 
from Bethany. Their undergraduate studies, therefore, 
are primarily liberal arts. Students elect courses which 
provide necessary pre-seminary studies in the natural 
and social sciences, the arts and humanities, and 
religion. 

PRE-NURSING 

Increasing opportunities are open to college-trained 
women in the fields of public health and civilian and 
military professional nursing. Bethany sponsors a co- 
operative program in nursing with approved schools 
of nursing. Three years of study and a minimum of 
96 semester hours including four hours of physical 
education comprise the work at Bethany. After com- 
pletion of work at a collegiate school of nursing, 
Bethany's baccalaureate degree is then awarded at 
the same time the nursing degree is conferred. 




ACHIEVEMENT RECOGNITION 

Bethany encourages superior achievement in scholar- 
ship and outstanding leadership in student affairs by 
public recognition at Commencement, on Honors 
Day, and on other suitable occasions. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Students who have done academic work of unusual 
merit are graduated with honors: Summa Cum Laude, 
Magna Cum Laude, or Cum Laude. The awarding of 
honors is determined upon the basis of total quality 
points earned, standing in the Senior Comprehensive 
Examination, and the recommendation of the stu- 
dent's advisor. 

Students who do unusually well on the Senior 
Comprehensive Examination are listed at graduation 
as having "Passed With Distinction." 

SEMESTER HONORS LIST 

At the end of each semester, students who have rated 
high in academic attainment are designated as "Stu- 
dents Distinguished in Scholarship." Often called 
The Dean's List, this distinction is determined by 
the Honors Committee. 

SENIOR FELLOWSHIPS 

Certain members of the junior class may be desig- 
nated as Senior Fellows for the following year. The 
selection is made from students who have demon- 
strated unusual excellence in their field of concen- 
tration and who, by character and ability, can do 
special work in a department as an assistant in in- 
struction or research. No more than 12 full-year 
senior fellowships (or the equivalent) are awarded in 
any one year; no more than one full-year appoint- 
ment (or the equivalent) will be made in any one de- 
partment. The selection of Senior Fellows is made by 
the Honors Committee from the nominations of de- 
partment chairmen. 



36 




HONOR SOCIETIES 

A number of honor societies have been established 
at Bethany through the years to recognize academic 
achievement and campus leadership. 

Gamma Sigma Kappa is the scholastic society 
founded at Bethany in 1932. Students maintaining a 
scholarship index of 3.25 for four consecutive semes- 
ters, provided that in no semester their scholarship 
index falls below an average of 3.00, are, upon recom- 
mendation by the faculty Honors Committee, eligible 
for membership. 

Bethany Kalon is a junior and senior society estab- 
lished in 1948 to give recognition to students of high 
character who have demonstrated competent and 
unselfish leadership in student activities and have 
been constructive citizens of the college community. 
Selection is made by the members of the society with 
the advice and approval of the Honors Committee. 

West Virginia Delta Chapter of Pi Gamma Mu is a 
social studies society. Students maintaining a high 
scholarship index in 20 semester hours of social stud- 
ies are eligible for membership. 



Alpha Phi Chapter of Beta Beta Beta is a society for 
students of the biological sciences. Its purpose is to 
stimulate sound scholarship, to promote the dissemi- 
nation of scientific truth, and to encourage investiga- 
tion into the life sciences. 

Gamma Upsilon Chapter of Lambda lota Tau is an 
international society whose purpose is to encourage 
and reward scholastic excellence in the study of lit- 
erature. Membership is limited to students enrolled 
in at least their fifth college semester, who are in the 
upper 35 per cent of their class in cumulative grade- 
point average, who have completed a minimum of 
12 semester hours of literature courses with at least 
a 3.0 grade-point average in them and in all prereq- 
uisite courses, and who have presented a scholarly, 
critical, or creative paper which has been accepted 
by the Chapter. Lambda lota Tau is a member of the 
Association of College Honor Societies. 

Tau Chapter of Omicron Delta Epsilon, national 
honor society in economics, was established at Beth- 
any in 1960. Membership is limited to students of at 
least junior standing, who have completed 12 or more 
semester hours of courses in economics with an aver- 
age of 3.25 or higher, and whose grade average in all 
courses is at least 3.0. 

Beta Gamma of Alpha Psi Omega is a national rec- 
ognition society in dramatics. Students qualify by 
faithful work in playing major and minor roles or 
working with technical or business aspects of theatre. 

Mu Epsilon Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta was estab- 
lished at Bethany in 1967 to recognize excellence in 
the study of history. Its membership is limited to those 
students who have completed at least 12 hours of his- 
tory with an average of 3.0 or higher and with at least 
a 3.0 average in two-thirds of all other studies. Mem- 
bers must also rank in the upper 35 per cent of their 
class. 



37 



The Bethany Chapter of Pi Delta Epsilon, a national 
recognition society in journalism, was reactivated in 
1967. The purpose of the society is to advocate jour- 
nalism, to foster the mutual welfare of student pub- 
lications, and to reward the journalist for his efforts, 
service, and accomplishments. 

AWARDS 

The Oreon E. Scott Award is made each year to the 
graduating senior who has achieved the highest aca- 
demic record over the four-year period. The donor of 
this award was a long-time Bethany trustee and a 
graduate of the Class of 1892. 

The Anna Ruth Bourne Award stimulates scholar- 
ship among the women's social groups. A silver cup, 
provided by an anonymous donor in honor of the 
former distinguished chairman of the English depart- 
ment, is awarded to the recognized women's group 
whose active membership earns the highest scholar- 
ship standing each semester. The group winning the 
cup for four semesters is presented with a smaller 
replica as a permanent trophy. 

The W. Kirk Woolery Award encourages scholar- 
ship among the men's social groups. This silver cup, 
donated by friends of the late Dr. Woolery, a former 
Dean and Provost of the College, is held by the 
recognized men's social group or housing organiza- 
tion whose membership (active membership only 
in the case of fraternities) earns the highest scholar- 
ship standing each semester. Any group winning the 
cup for four semesters is presented with a smaller 
replica as a permanent trophy. 

The Beta Beta Beta Award, established by an an- 
onymous donor, is presented annually to the senior 
biology major who has attained the highest academic 
rank in this field of concentration. 

The Florence Hoagland Memorial Award, given by 
a graduate of the Class of 1944, is presented each 




year to the outstanding senior English major. The 
award honors the memory of the late Miss Hoagland 
who was for many years Professor of English at 
Bethany. 

The Christine Burleson Memorial Award in English, 
given by a graduate of the Class of 1936, is presented 
each year to a senior English major who has attained 
excellence in this field of concentration. The award 
honors the memory of the late Miss Burleson who 
was Professor of English and Dean of Women from 
1932 to 1936. 

The Pendleton Awards, named in honor of Miss A. 
Campbellina Pendleton, Professor of Language and 
Literature at Bethany from 1884 to 1909, are pre- 
sented annually to the outstanding junior and sopho- 
more concentrating in English. The awards are given 
by Dwight B. MacCormack, Jr., of the Class of 1956, 
in memory of his grandmother, Dr. T. Marion 
MacCormack. 



38 



The E. E. Roberts Distinguished Prize In Campus 
Journalism is awarded annually to an outstanding 
student who excels in work on a student publication, 
in academic work in the communications depart- 
ment, or both. 

The Garrison Prize is presented in recognition of 
outstanding achievement in one or more areas of 
philosophy. The award honors the memory of the 
late Dr. Winfred E. Garrison, graduate of the Class of 
1892, whose humane concerns and scholarly achieve- 
ments contributed significantly to the area of higher 
education, history, and philosophy. 

The Outstanding Junior Woman Award is provided 
by the Pittsburgh Bethany College Club, comprising 
the Bethany alumnae of Pittsburgh. This award is 
based on qualities of leadership, character, conduct, 
and scholarship. The club has placed a suitable plaque 
in Phillips Hall on which the names of the winners 
are engraved. In addition, an individual gift is made 
each year to the person designated. 

The Vira I. Heinz Award is granted each year to 
the junior woman who has distinguished herself by 
leadership, character, conduct, and scholarship and 
whose proposal for foreign travel most significantly 
supplements her educational objectives. This $1,500 
award for summer travel is provided by the fund 
of Vira !. Heinz, recipient of the honorary Doctor of 
Religious Education degree in 1969. 

The W. F. Kennedy Prize is given each year to the 
outstanding young man in the juniorclass. Thisaward, 
established by W. F. Kennedy of Wheeling, West Vir- 
ginia, is awarded on the basis of the student's con- 
tribution to the college community life through 
leadership in activities, personal character, and 
scholarship. 




The Pearl Mahaffey Prize, awarded each year to the 
outstanding senior major in languages, was estab- 
lished by Mrs. Walter M. Haushalter and other former 
students of Bethany's Emeritus Professor of Foreign 
Languages. The prize honors Miss Mahaffey, a faculty 
member from 1908-1949 and a Trustee of the College 
at the time of her death in 1971. 

The Shirley Morris Memorial Award was established 
by Theta Chapter of Zeta Tau Alpha in memory of 
Shirley Morris, a loyal member and past president of 
the Chapter. It is given annually to the outstanding 
student in the field of modern languages. Selection 
is made by Bethany's foreign languages department. 

The J.S.V. Allen Memorial is a fund established by 
the family and friends of Professor Allen to provide 
for an annual award to the outstanding physics stu- 
dent at Bethany. 



39 




The Frank Alfred Chapman Memorial is a fund es- 
tablished by Dr. Stanton Crawford to provide for an 
annual award to the outstanding Bethany history stu- 
dent. Preference is given to students of American 
History and the Ohio Valley. 

The Osborne Booth Prize In Religion is given each 
year to the student who excels in the field of Relig- 
ious Studies. The late Osborne Booth was T. W. Phil- 
lips Professor of Old Testament when he retired in 
1964 after 35 years of teaching at Bethany. 

The Francis O. Carfer Prize is given each year to 
the senior who, in the judgment of the Honors Com- 
mittee, has made the most outstanding contribution 
to the College during his undergraduate years. Mr. 
Carfer, a Trustee of Bethany College for 29 years, was 
a graduate of the Class of 1909. Recipients of the 
award must display sound academic accomplish- 
ments and characteristics of loyalty, service, and de- 
votion to Bethany. 



The Senior Award In Chemistry, given by an anon- 
ymous donor, is granted to the senior concentrating 
in chemistry who has achieved the highest cumula- 
tive average in his major field, including the record 
made on the Senior Comprehensive Examination. 

The Psychology Society Award is presented annu- 
ally to the senior majoring in psychology who has 
maintained the highest academic average in his stud- 
ies in the department. 

The Pi Delta Epsilon National Award of Merit is 
presented to an upperclass writer or editor for sig- 
nificant contributions to campus student publications. 

The WVBC-FM Senior Award For Radio is given to 
the senior who for four years has shown dedication, 
loyalty, leadership, talent, and creativity to WVBC's 
operations. 

The WVBC-FM Talent Award is presented to the 
individual member of the WVBC staff who has offered 
the outstanding continuous radio programming for 
the school term. 



40 



BETHANY 




ADMISSION 



41 




Bethany accepts applications for admission from 
qualified candidates. Admission is based upon a care- 
ful review of all the credentials presented by the 
candidate. The Committee on Admission accepts 
those it considers best qualified among those apply- 
ing. In no case does the meeting of minimum stand- 
ards assure admission. 

Application for admission to the freshman class 
should be made to the Director of Admission as 
early as possible in the year in which the candidate 
seeks admission, preferably before the completion of 
the first half of his final preparatory year. Decisions 
of the Committee on Admission are mailed beginning 
in October and throughout the year as completed 
applications are received. The accepted student then 
may reserve a space in the new class by writing a 
letter of acceptance and by returning a housing card 
and a registration deposit. Further discussion of this 
deposit may be found on page 46. 

The College seeks students who have prepared 
themselves for a liberal-arts curriculum by taking at 
least 15 units of college-preparatory work. Although 
the College does not prescribe how these units be 
distributed, it expects a minimum of four years of 
English and the usual sequences in mathematics, sci- 
ence, foreign languages, and social studies. For stu- 
dents who have developed individual curricula or 
are involved in experimental honors programs, the 
committee makes special evaluation. 



42 




The process of application should also include a 
request for college counselors to furnish a transcript 
of completed work, a personal profile of the appli- 
cant, and College Entrance Examination Board Scho- 
lastic Aptitude Test scores. On the application form 
the College requests the name and address of two 
persons who are well acquainted with the applicant 
and who are willing to furnish an estimation of his 
qualifications. The applicant may also wish to pro- 
vide any other supporting documents that he be- 
lieves will help in the process of admission, i.e., 
poetry, plays, short stories, music, artwork, photog- 
raphy, and journalistic writings. 

In addition, Bethany College strongly suggests that 
an interview with an admission officer be scheduled, 
in many instances accomplished in a nearby city 
when it coincides with the Admission Office travel 
schedule. Annual hotel interviews are held in New 
York, Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, Cleveland, 
and Pittsburgh. The ideal situation, however, is an 
interview on campus, allowing sufficient time for 
a comprehensive tour. During campus visits plans 
should be made to observe classes and to speak and 
dine with students and faculty. They are eager to 
meet with prospective candidates. 




The Admission Office is open Monday through 
Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. throughout the year. 
While the College is in session, the office is also 
open Saturday mornings. Appointments may be made 
by calling 304-829-7611 or writing the Admission 
Office, Bethany College, Bethany, West Virginia 
26032. A travel brochure will then be sent, detailing 
travel routes and the comfortable overnight accom- 
modations available at Bethany's Gresham House. 



43 



TRANSFERS 

Transfer students are welcomed at Bethany. Proce- 
dures for transferring to the College are similar to 
those for freshmen, except that the interview is re- 
quired. Any student in good standing at a fully ac- 
credited institution of higher education is eligible 
for acceptance. A majority of students accepted as 
transfers have above average grades and are seeking a 
campus life unlike that which they have experienced. 
Grades of "C" or better are accepted along with 
course work in which credit (on a credit/no credit 
basis) or pass (in a pass/fail system) has been received. 
If requested, course work from other institutions will 
be reviewed by Bethany's Registrar prior to making 
application. 

JUNIOR COLLEGE GRADUATES 

Bethany has attempted to make the entrance of 
junior college graduates as uncomplicated as pos- 
sible. Any student who has received or will receive 
an Associate in Arts or Associate in Science Degree 
and finds Bethany's curriculum suited to his educa- 
tional goals is encouraged to apply. All materials 
necessary for acceptance should be forwarded to 
the College early in the semester, prior to the term 
the student plans to enroll. 

Holders of the A.A./A.S. Degree who are accepted 
at Bethany as Junior College Degree Candidates re- 
ceive two years (minimum of 60 hours) credit, enter 
as juniors, and receive all the rights and privileges of 
upperclassmen. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

The College is eager to review the applications of stu- 
dents from other countries. Approximately 15 coun- 
tries are represented on campus each semester. 



Students from non-English-speaking countries are 
required to submit Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores or 
a score from the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) for entrance. 

Students from foreign countries are asked to supply 
funds for financing their education. Though the Col- 
lege is willing to review a request for scholarship, 
funds are limited. 

EARLY ADMISSION 

Some students complete their secondary school grad- 
uation requirements a year early and decide to pursue 
college admission after their junior year. For those 
students who have demonstrated maturity and show 
evidence of a strong academic background, Bethany 
offers a program for early admission. For this type of 
admission the usual admissions procedures must be 
followed. A personal interview on campus as well as 
a discussion with the student's college counselor by 
an admission officer is also required. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

Students may receive advanced placement and/or 
credit from any department in the College through a 
testing program. The faculty recently elected to grant 
any student credit by examination without taking the 
course. Arrangements may be made by consulting 
with department chairmen and the Director of 
Testing. 

Credit may be received or courses waived as a re- 
sult of high scores on the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board Testing Program for Advanced Placement. 
Such credit, however, is a departmental matter and 
also requires consultation with department chairmen 
upon matriculation. 



44 



BETHANY 




45 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 



Bethany College is a non-profit institution. Tuition, 
fees, and other general charges paid by the student 
cover less than three-fourths of the College's instruc- 
tional and operational expenses. The remainder 
comes from income from endowment funds and from 
gifts and contributions. Bethany continues to keep the 
costs required from the student as low as possible. 



No reduction is made in student accounts for 
course changes made after the first two weeks of the 
semester. The College is required to collect a three 
per cent West Virginia sales tax on published charges 
for room, board, linen, and parking permits. Bethany 
reserves the right to change, without advance notice, 
the price for room, board, linen, and health insurance. 



COMPREHENSIVE CHARGES 

Comprehensive charges of approximately $3,720 for 
a year at Bethany include the following: 

Tuition and Fees $2,360 

Room 495 

Board 675 

Student Board of Governors 65 

Bethany House-Benedum Commons 50 

Linen 40 

Health Insurance 35 



While a general charge is stated for Tuition and 
Fees, this fee may be divided into $1,860 for tuition 
and $500 for the following activities and services: 
athletics, health service, library, lectures, plays, con- 
certs, publications, student activities, and laboratory 
services with the exception of music and art. 

The Bethany House-Benedum Commons Fee is 
charged to all registered students and covers the oper- 
ation and maintenance costs of the student union. 



WITHDRAWALS AND REFUNDS 

After registration, there is no refund of room charges 
or fees. A student voluntarily withdrawing or with- 
drawing because of illness during the course of the 
semester will be charged 10 per cent of tuition 
charges for each week of attendance or part thereof. 
There is no refund of tuition after the tenth week of 
attendance. There is no refund in the event that a 
student is dismissed or asked to withdraw during the 
course of the semester. Board refund is prorated, 
based upon food costs only. Special fees are not 
refundable. 

A student wishing to withdraw from Bethany must 
file written notice with the Dean of Students to qual- 
ify for refund of deposit and adjustment of other 
charges. 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION FEES 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A non-refundable $10 fee is required at the time 
of formal application. 



46 




ART FEES 

Art 200 $10 

Art 210 $10 

Art 310 $10 

Art 320 $20 

Art 325 $15 

Art 420 . $20 

Art 425 $15 



APPLICATION FOR READMISSION 

Students previously enrolled in Bethany College who 
wish to return for additional work must file an Appli- 
cation for Readmission with the Registrar's Office. 
A $5 fee is required at the time such application 
is made. 

REGISTRATION DEPOSIT 

Upon acceptance for admission or readmission, a 
$100 registration deposit is required of all students. 
Once this deposit is paid it is not refunded until after 
graduation or until a Bethany College student com- 
pletes the following procedure: 

Students not being graduated may have the de- 
posit refunded after the last term of their attendance 
if written notice is given to the Business Office prior 
to the advance enrollment date for the next regular 
term. Such students may be readmitted by approval 
of the Dean of Students and the Business Manager. 

MATRICULATION FEE 

A $20 fee, payable once by every new student, cov- 
ers, in part, the cost of orientation and evaluation 
procedures for new students. 



MUSIC FEES 

Private lessons, two weekly . . . .$115 per semester 

Private lesson, one weekly $65 per semester 

Organ Practice, one hour daily . . $33 per semester 

Instrument Rental $9 per semester 

Piano Practice, one hour daily ... .$9 per semester 
Voice Practice, one or two 

hours daily $9 per semester 

FEES FOR OVERSEAS PROGRAMS 

England: $1,847 per semester for tuition and fees, 
room and board, and activity fees while 
in England. 

Madrid: 1st semester — $1,180 for air fare, tuition 

and fees, and transportation from the 
airport to the university. 

2nd semester — $590 (in addition to first 
semester fee). 

Sorbonne: 1st semester — $1,180 for air fare, tuition 
and fees, and transportation from the 
airport to the university. 

2nd semester — $590 (in addition to first 
semester fee). 



47 



OTHER SPECIAL FEES 

Education 443: off-campus student teaching 

(per semester) $1,180 

(includes tuition, fees, and weekend board 
privileges in the Bethany dining hall) 

Education 475 $72 

Each academic hour when less than 13 $90 

Freshmen and sophomores: each academic 

hour in excess of 16 hours $65 

Juniors and seniors: each academic hour in 

excess of 18 hours $65 

Auditing a course, per semester hour $65 

(A student is not charged if he is paying 
regular tuition and fees and the total pro- 
gram, including the audit, does not ex- 
ceed 18 hours.) 

Comprehensive Examination $25 

Graduation Fee $20 

Special guidance and advisory service 

(pre-college) $10 to $25 

Special examinations in any department $10 

Special placement or achievement tests in 

any department $5 

Key deposit for dormitories (refunded 

if key is returned) $5 

Infirmary charge per day $4 

(after the first three days each semester) 

Late registration (per day) $3 

BREAKAGE DEPOSITS 

Chemistry and physics breakage deposits are covered 
by a $5 breakage card which the student purchases 
each semester for every laboratory course in which 
he is enrolled. In the event breakage exceeds $5, an 
additional $5 breakage card must be purchased. Un- 
used portions are refunded at the end of each aca- 
demic year. 



PAYMENT OF STUDENT ACCOUNTS 

At registration an invoice is prepared for each stu- 
dent, listing all charges due for the following se- 
mester. Payments are due in accordance with the 
following schedule: 

First Semester 

By August 15 a payment of $1,200 

(Balance on account due October 15) 

Second Semester 

By January 15 a payment of $1,200 

(Balance on account due March 15) 

Scholarships and loans may be applied as credit 
against August or January initial payment require- 
ments. If after application of scholarships and/or 
loans, the balance is less than $1,200, the full balance 
is due and payable by August 15 for the first semester 
and January 15 for the second semester. All special 
student accounts for which total semester charges 
are $1,200 or less are payable in full by registration. 

Students will not be permitted to register if the 
initial payment requirements for each semester are 
not met, and they may be denied College privileges 
if subsequent payments are not completed as sched- 
uled. These requirements are in addition to the reg- 
istration deposit. Checks or drafts should be made 
payable to Bethany College. 

An account service fee of two per cent per month 
will be charged on balances outstanding on all stu- 
dent accounts as of October 15 for the first semester 
and March 15 for the second semester. This fee will 
be entered on all accounts the day following the 
above dates and at 30-day intervals thereafter for a 
period not to exceed 90 days. Students may not take 
final examinations, receive academic credit, or obtain 
transcripts until satisfactory arrangements are made 
to cover financial obligations. 



48 



STUDENT DRAWING ACCOUNT 

The Business Office provides a limited banking ser- 
vice whereby students may deposit funds and draw 
on them as required. Students or their parents may 
make deposits to this recommended student drawing 
account which avoids the necessity of keeping on 
hand any substantial amount of money. All checks 
tor this account must be made payable to the Bethany 
College Student Drawing Account. 

MONTHLY PAYMENT PLANS 

Bethany has made arrangements with the Insured 
Tuition Payment Plan whereby student accounts may 
be paid on a monthly basis during the year. Arrange- 
ments to use this plan should be made prior to the 
registration period. Information may be obtained by 
writing to the Business Office, and contract forms 
may be obtained by writing to the Insured Tuition 
Payment Plan, 6 Saint James Ave., Boston, Mass., 
92116. Contracts are to be completed by the parent 
or guardian of the student through direct negotiation 
with the payment plan office. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Bethany College believes that funding of a student's 
education is primarily a family responsibility. How- 
ever, financial assistance is available to those students 
whose resources will not fund a Bethany education 
and yet sincerely desire to attend. 

All of the College's financial assistance programs 
are awarded through careful evaluation of the Par- 
ents' Confidential Statement (PCS), available through 
the college counseling offices of the student's high 
school. Designation of Bethany College as an appro- 
priate institution to receive the processed information 
and indication of application for financial assistance 
on the admission application are the only procedures 
necessary to apply for financial aid. 




Because of the large number of applications for 
financial aid, assignment of funds is made according 
to the date requests are processed. The earlier a stu- 
dent completes all admission materials and submits 
the PCS, the more funds there are available. 

A financial-aid applicant whose need for assistance 
has been verified by the College Scholarship Service 
will have his need met through a variety of financial 
aids, including scholarships, loans, and College em- 
ployment. The student has the option of accepting 
any or all of the aid offered. An interview with an 
officer of the College once the offer of assistance has 
been made can help to explain any problems. The 
Admission Office or the Office of Financial Assistance 
helps to arrange these interviews. 



49 




QUALIFICATIONS FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Bethany recognizes promise and intellectual attain- 
ment by awarding a number of scholarships. These 
awards vary in value and are available to a limited 
number of entering students. Most scholarships are 
awarded to freshmen on a four-year basis but are 
continued from year to year, as needed, only if the 
recipient has met the following conditions: 

1) A satisfactory scholarship index 

2) Satisfactory conduct as a student 

3) Worthwhile contributions to the college program 

4) Constructive citizenship in the college community 

5) Payment of student accounts as scheduled. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

All awards are made by the Faculty Committee on 
Scholarship and Financial Aid in accordance with the 
requirements of the particular fund. 



Patrick A. and Elizabeth Berry Scholarship Fund — -established by 
Miss Sara Cameron to assist students from Ohio. 

Bethany Women's Club — established by the Bethany Women's 
Club to assist needy and worthy students. 

Bison Club — provided by Bethany alumni with principal interest 
in intercollegiate athletics. 

Stanley F. Bittner Scholarships — established by a graduate of the 
Class of 1916 to provide general financial assistance. 

Donald L. Boyd Memorial — established by family and friends in 
memory of Donald L. Boyd, member of the Class of 1921 and 
long-time Trustee of the College. 

lean A. Boyd Scholarship — established by bequest from donor. 

Thomas ]. Boyd — established by Thomas J. Boyd, member of 
the Class of 1940. 

Jonsie Brink Scholarship — awarded to worthy and eligible 
students. 

Isaac Brown Scholarship — used to aid in part of the tuition 
charge. 

Calder Scholarship Endowment — established preferably for male 
students from the New England area majoring in one of the 
natural or life sciences. 

Argyle Campbell Memorial — established by family and friends 
of Mr. Campbell to assist worthy and needy students. 

Chapman Scholarship — established by Stanton C. Crawford, 
Bethany 1918, former Chancellor of the University of Pitts- 
burgh, to honor a pioneer frontier family. 

Charnock Family Scholarship — established by Miss Ethel Char- 
nock, member of the Class of 1912, to assist students at the 
sophomore level or above. 

The Class of 7969 Scholarship Endowment — provided as a schol- 
arship grant to begin with the 1984-85 college year. First pref- 
erence will be given to descendants of the Class of 1969. 

Class of 1970 Scholarship Endowment — provided as a scholar- 
ship grant to begin with the 1985-86 college year. First prefer- 
ence will be given to descendants of the Class of 1970. 

M. M. Cochran Scholarship — established to cover a part of the 
tuition charge. 

Irene O. Darnall Scholarship — established by Irene O. Darnall 
to assist needy and worthy students. 

Marion and Frank Dunn Scholarship — established by Frank K. 
Dunn, former Assistant to the President of Bethany College, 
to assist worthy and eligible students. 

East Side Christian Church ol Denver, Colorado Scholarship En- 
dowment — given to provide modest matching funds lor a 
student at Bethany College. 



50 



Ekas-Evans Scholarship Endowment — established by Dr. and 
Mrs. Ward Ekas of Rochester, New York, whose daughter, 
Elizabeth Ellen Ekas, was a member of the Class of 1957. 

Newton W. and Bessie Evans Scholarship — established by Mr. 
Newton W. Evans, former Bursar and Treasurer of Bethany 
College, to assist worthy students. 

Samuel George Memorial Scholarship — established by bequest 
from the donor to provide one-fourth tuition scholarships to 
all graduates of Brooke (West Virginia) High School who qual- 
ify for admission. Additional scholarship aid is provided Brooke 
students on the basis of individual needs. 

Greensburg Area Scholarship — established anonymously in 1953 
to assist students of ability and need from the Greensburg, 
Pennsylvania, area. 

Aleece C. Gresham Scholarship — presented as assistance to out- 
standing students in the field of music. 

Perry and Aleece Gresham Scholarship — established by Dr. and 
Mrs. Perry E. Gresham to assist worthy and eligible students. 
Special consideration is given to young people interested in 
music or philosophy. 

Campbell Allen Harlan Scholarship — established by Mr. Camp- 
bell Allen Harlan, former Bethany College Trustee from Detroit, 
Michigan, to assist students of unusual ability in the fine arts. 

Florence M. Hoagland Memorial Scholarship — established for 
needy and worthy students by Miss Frances Cables of New 
Hampshire in memory of Florence M. Hoagland, Head of the 
Department of English and Advisor for Women at Bethany 
from 1936 to 1946. 

Ida M. Irvin Scholarship — awarded to a senior student. 

Flora Isenberg Scholarship — given to provide assistance for stu- 
dents of the liberal arts and sciences. 

Albert G. Israel Scholarship — used to apply to tuition of a de- 
scendant of Albert C. Israel. 

John H. and Ida H. King Scholarship — awarded to students under 
terms approved by Trustees of the College in accordance with 
the will of the donors. 

Forrest H. Kirkpatrick Scholarship — established by Dr. Kirkpat- 
rick, member of the Class of 1927, to be used to help students 
who are sons or daughters of alumni. 

The Emma A. Lyon Scholarship — given to memorialize a pioneer 
Christian missionary to China. This endowment was initiated 
by a gift from Mrs. Mary M. Farm of Hawaii. 

Gharles L. and Rose Melenyzer Scholarship — established by Dr. 
Charles Melenyzer, member of the National Board of Fellows 
of Bethany College, to be used to assist worthy young people 



who attend Bethany. First consideration will be given to the 

young people of the Monongahela Valley. 
H. I. Morlan Fund — established by Halford J. Morlan to assist 

needy and worthy students. 
William Kimbrough Pendleton Scholarship — established, to assist 

students from West Virginia, by Clarinda Pendleton Lamar in 

memory of her father, William Kimbrough Pendleton, member 

of the first faculty and second president of the College (1866- 

1889). 
Ralph E. Pryor Memorial Scholarship Endowment — established 

by family and friends of Judge Pryor, a member of the Class of 

1942, with preference for students from the First Judicial 

Circuit of West Virginia. 
Eli and Lee Rabb Scholarship — used as scholarship assistance for 

students from the Upper Ohio Valley. 
Reader's Digest Foundation — established by the Reader's Digest 

Foundation to assist worthy and needy students. 

The Herbert and Marguerite Rech Scholarship — used to assist 
needy and eligible students. 

Edwin K. Resseger, Jr. Memorial Scholarship — provided by Mr. 
and Mrs. Kenneth Resseger of the Class of 1933. 

The James Derrick Reynolds Memorial Scholarship — established 
by parents and friends of a young man who lost his life in 
Viet Nam. 

E. E. Roberts Scholarship Endowment — created in memory of 
Professor E. E. Roberts who taught journalism at Bethany Col- 
lege from 1928-1960. 

Richard B. Scandrett, jr., Scholarships — established for the pur- 
pose of furthering international education and understanding. 

The Richard L. Schanck Scholarship — established by friends in 
memory of Dr. Schanck, Professor of Sociology at Bethany 
College from 1952-1964. 

Elizabeth M. Shrontz Scholarship — established by bequest from 
the estate of Elizabeth Shrontz from Washington, Pennsylvania. 

Adelaide E. and Arthur G. Stifel Endowment — established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur C. Stifel of Wheeling, West Virginia. 

Peter Tarr Heritage Endowment — established by Geneva Tarr 
Elliott, member of the Class of 1927. This fund provides schol- 
arship assistance to students in memory of the Tarr family's 
association with Bethany College since the days of its founding. 

Stewart King Tweedy Memorial Scholarship — established by Mr. 
and Mrs. H. L. Tweedy and friends in memory of their son, 
member of the Class of 1964, who was killed in Viet Nam. 

William H. Vodrey Scholarship — established by Mr. William H. 
Vodrey, a member of the Class of 1894, to assist students from 
the East Liverpool, Ohio, area. 



51 



Nannine Clay Wallis Scholarship Endowment — given to provide 
financial assistance for students, preferably from Kentucky, en- 
rolled at Bethany. 

The Campbell-Hagerman-Watson Memorial — established by a 
bequest from the estate of Mrs. Virginia Hagerman Watson, a 
member of the Class of 1904, to provide support for foreign 
exchange students. 

Arthur A. Wells, jr., Scholarship — established by Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur A. Wells in memory of their son, a member of the Class 
of 1947, to assist students of social studies and humanities. 

C. A. Willett Scholarship — established to cover part of the tui- 
tion charge. The student receiving this scholarship is to be 
nominated by a member of the Willett family. 

DESIGNATED SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following scholarship funds have been estab- 
lished at Bethany College to assist students preparing 
for a church-related vocation: 

Florence Abercrombie Scholarship — established by a bequest 
from the estate of Florence Abercrombie. 

Ada P. Bennett Memorial — established by O. E. Bennett, a mem- 
ber of the Class of 1925, and family and friends. 

Osborne Booth Scholarship — named after a long-time member 
of the Bethany faculty to provide financial assistance for stu- 
dents preparing for the ministry. 

Lotta A. Calkins — established by a bequest from the estate of 

Lotta A. Calkins. 
Thomas Richard Deming Scholarship — established by friends, 

family, and members of the First Christian Church, Charleston, 

West Virginia. 

Jennie I. Hayes Scholarship — established by Jennie I. Hayes, a 
member of the Class of 1904. 

Harry L. Ice Timothy Ministerial Endowment — established by 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Lee of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, hon- 
oring Dr. and Mrs. Ice in recognition of Dr. Ice's productive 
and untiring work in establishing and building the "Timothy 
Ministerial Training Program." 

William H. McKinney Scholarship Endowment Fund — estab- 
lished by family and friends in memory of a Bethany graduate 
of the Class of 1923 to provide assistance for students preparing 
for church vocations. 

Isaac Mills Scholarship — provided to cover part of the tuition 
charge of a ministerial student. 

Herbert Moninger Scholarship — established in memory of Mr. 
Herbert Moninger, a graduate of the Class of 1898. 








%r tl HI ■ !&. : 

4f\ Tp- IlllnL'i." 

• IbBBJ » >3 IiSTBB»^ 




52 



The Parsons Memorial Timothy Fund — established by the Heights 
Christian Church, Shaker Heights, Ohio, and other friends in 
memory of Dorothy and Waymon Parsons for dedicated lead- 
ership to this church and the Brotherhood of Christian 
Churches (Disciples of Christ). 

E . I. Penhorwood Scholarships — named after a Bethany graduate 
of the Class of 1918 to provide assistance for students prepar- 
ing for the ministry. 

Perry Scholarship Fund — established in memory of Professor 
and Mrs. E. Lee Perry. Professor Perry was a member of the 
Class of 1893, Professor of Latin at the College from 1908 to 
1939, and Professor Emeritus from 1939 to 1948. 

Richmond Avenue Christian Church of Buffalo Scholarship — es- 
tablished for students enrolled at Bethany from western New 
York and preferably of Disciple background. 

5a/a Family Memorial Fund — established by Dr. John R. Sala, 
Class of 1926, former Dean of the Faculty at Bethany College. 

Minnie W. Schaefer Awards — awarded to students preparing for 
definite Christian Service. 

Edith and Chester A. Sillars Scholarship — established by Chester 
A. Sillars, former Director of Church Relations at Bethany 
College. 

Charles C. Smith Scholarship — established by family and friends 
in memory of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Smith whose dedicated lives 
were spent in service to the Christian Ministry. 

/. 7. Smith Awards — established by M. J. T. Smith, friend of 
Bethany from Memphis, Tennessee. 

John f . Sugden, jr. Fund — granted to assist in the form of either 
loans or grants. 

Harriett Mortimore Toomey Music Scholarship — established by 
John C. Toomey and friends to assist students in musical 
education. 

Robert S. and Marie j. Tuck Scholarship — established by mem- 
bers of the Central Christian Church, Wooster, Ohio, where the 
Tucks served for 44 years. Mr. and Mrs. Tuck were members of 
the Classes of 1922 and 21 respectively at Bethany College. 

Hollis L. Turley Scholarship — established by a bequest from the 
estate of Hollis L. Turley, Bethany 1925 and former Trustee. 

V/nson Memorial Fund — established by Z. T. Vinson, Class of 
1878, through the Central Christian Church, Huntington, West 
Virginia. 

Raymond E. and Eunice M. Weed Scholarship — established by 
Dr. Raymond Weed, former curator of the Campbell Mansion. 

josiah N. and Wilminia S. Wilson Scholarship — established by 
Josiah N. Wilson to assist students preparing for the Christian 
Ministry. 



The following scholarship funds have been estab- 
lished to assist students at Bethany College from 
backgrounds of the Christian Church (Disciples of 
Christ): 

The Fannie M. Bennett Endowed National Campbell Scholarship 
— established by a gift from the estate of Fannie Bennett who 
was a member of the Class of 1926. 

The Ben and Leona Brown Scholarship — established by Mrs. 
Leona Brown of Washington, Pennsylvania, in memory of her 
husband. 

lessie M. and Frank P. Fiess Endowed National Campbell Scholar- 
ship — established by Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Fiess whose 
daughters, June Fiess Shackelford and Emma Lee Fiess Baldwin, 
were members of the Classes of 1941 and 1944 respectively. 

The V. j. Hopkins and Mary L. Hopkins Scholarship — operated 
under the principles of the National Campbell Scholarship 
program. 

National Campbell Scholarship — established in memory and 
honor of Alexander Campbell. Awards are in recognition of 
Christian service and academic accomplishment to develop 
able and dedicated lay leadership in the Christian Church. 



SUSTAINED AWARDS 

A limited number of financial grants are available 
to Bethany students from the following sustained 
programs: 

Automatic Retailers of America, Inc., Slater School and College 
Services Scholarship — awarded on an annual basis to a stu- 
dent waiter or waitress selected by the Faculty Committee on 
Scholarship and Financial Aid and the ARA management. 

H. L. Berkman Foundation — provides an award for one or 
more students residing in the Upper Ohio Valley. 

Bowling Green Area Scholarship — established by a graduate of 
the Class of 1923 to assist Bethany students from the Bowling 
Green, Ohio, area. 

Robert M. and Katie W. Campbell Scholarships — awarded on a 
yearly basis to students preparing for vocations related to the 
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). 

A. Dale Fiers Ministerial Athletic Scholarship — awarded on an 
annual basis to recognize and encourage the scholastic and 
athletic skill of an outstanding upperclassman preparing for 
the Christian ministry. 



53 




Rowan Memorial Scholarships — awarded annually to students 
recognized by the college administration for good citizenship 
and participation in college affairs. 

Oreon E. Scott Foundation Scholarships — awarded by the trust- 
ees of the Oreon E. Scott Foundation to provide assistance for 
students in their junior and senior years. 

West Virginia Consumer Finance Association — provides an 
award for a student selected by the Faculty Committee on 
Scholarship and Financial Aid. 

EXTERNAL TRUST SCHOLARSHIPS 

Through trust funds established in major banking 
houses, the following scholarship awards are avail- 
able: 

Nelson Evans Cook Scholarship — created to memorialize an out- 
standing metallurgist by providing financial assistance for 
chemistry students. 

Catherine Craves Scholarship Award — given to a Bethany stu- 
dent from Wheeling, W. Va., in accordance with an educational 
trust fund established in the Pittsburgh National Bank. 

Hayes Picklesimer Scholarship — established by The West Vir- 
ginia Emulation Endowment Trust to provide scholarship help 
for residents of West Virginia. 

William A. Stanley Scholarship — established by an outstanding 
West Virginia churchman who had lengthy careers in both edu- 
cation and business. 

Peter T. Whitaker Scholarships — awarded in memory of a young 
graduate who found at Bethany the kind of education he 
sought. 

LOAN FUNDS 

The following endowed loan funds have been estab- 
lished to assist students under the general supervision 
of the Faculty Committee on Student Aid: 

The William C. and Carrie E. Bunyan Student Aid Fund — estab- 
lished by a bequest from the estate of the late Mrs. Bunyan of 
Brockway, Pennsylvania. 

The Meril and Marguerite May Student Loan Fund — established 
by Mr. and Mrs. Meril May of Garrettsville, Ohio. 

j. West Mitchell Endowed Medical Loan Fund — provided to 
assist pre-medical undergraduates of Bethany College and 
graduates of Bethany College enrolled in accredited medical 
schools. 

Phillips Loan Fund — established in 1890 by Thomas W. Phillips, 
Sr., of New Castle, Pennsylvania. 



54 



BETHANY 




55 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 




THE BETHANY PLAN 

Students differ in ability, motivation, tastes, aspira- 
tions, and modes of learning. No one program will 
serve the diverse needs of our students. However, 
some structure is necessary to give guidance to stu- 
dents by providing various teaching and learning 
methods. 

The Bethany Plan attempts to integrate a four-year 
liberal arts education which provides a vast degree 
of freedom in designing individual programs yet gives 
enough structure to insure depth, breadth, and inte- 
gration of knowledge. 

The Bethany Plan provides many learning oppor- 
tunities both on and off campus. The Plan involves 
a classroom-based program in which students attend 
interdisciplinary lecture courses, participate in small 
seminar groups, initiate and present independent 
studies, perform laboratory research, write papers, 
and utilize library materials. 

The Bethany Plan also includes an experience- 
based program, a group of four practicums which en- 
courage students to become involved in the world of 
work, to exercise responsible citizenship, to develop 
physical and recreational skills, and to experience 
living in a culture different from their own. These 
learning opportunities are not random experiences. 
They are carefully planned by the student and his 
advisor. The student must continually justify his de- 
cisions and examine his academic and field experi- 
ences in relationship to his vocational and personal 
goals. 



56 



THE ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

The Bethany calendar consists of two 15-week semes- 
ters and a four-week voluntary interim session in 
January: The fall semester — September to before 
Christmas; the spring semester— February until the 
end of May; and the January Term — a voluntary 
session which students may elect to use for intensive 
study on campus or for off-campus field work. 

Some courses are offered over the full 15 weeks; 
others, for eight weeks. This division provides addi- 
tional flexibility for students to do off-campus study 
and internships. 





57 





THE ACADEMIC ADVISOR 

The relationship between the student and his advisor 
is the cornerstone of a Bethany education. The stu- 
dent and his advisor work closely together in devel- 
oping appropriate classroom and experience-based 
programs. If not during private meetings, each fresh- 
man will see his advisor two times a week the first 
semester to discuss work in the freshman seminar. 
Usually during the sophomore year, the student 
selects a major field of concentration, thus transfer- 
ring to an advisor associated with his major area of 
interest. 

THE ACADEMIC REVIEW COMMITTEE 

The faculty members who sit on the academic review 
committee evaluate student requests for exceptions 
to the regular academic policies and regulations. 
Student requests are submitted in writing and should 
include the advisor's recommendation. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The Bachelor of Arts degree will be conferred upon 
the student who completes the following: 
1) 128 semester hours with a minimum cumulative 
gradepoint average of 2.0 



58 



2) a freshman seminar 

3) a freshman interdisciplinary lecture course 

4) the distribution requirement 

5) a field of concentration 

6) four writing qualification examinations 

7) a senior project 

8) the comprehensive examination in the major 
field 

9) the practicum requirement 

10) the residence requirement 

11) attendance at the commencement exercise. 
The degree of Bachelor of Science may be con- 
ferred upon a student who completes the Bachelor 
of Arts requirements and who chooses to major in 
any one of the following departments: biology, chem- 
istry, mathematics, physics, or psychology. 

THE FRESHMAN STUDIES PROGRAM* 

1) Freshman Seminar: All entering freshmen will en- 
roll in a freshman seminar during the fall semester 
of the freshman year. The professor directing the 
seminar will also serve as the student's advisor. 

2) Freshman Interdisciplinary Course: Freshmen will 
elect a freshman interdisciplinary course either 
in the fall or spring semester of the freshman year. 

THE DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENT 

To insure breadth of knowledge among its graduates, 
Bethany requires a demonstration of competence in 
a variety of disciplines. 

Every student must elect at least 12 hours from 
each of the three following divisions: 
Social Sciences 

Communications 101, 402; Economics; Education 
201, 202, 401; History; Political Science; Sociology; 
and Anthropology. 

•See rn-shman Studies, pp. 69-71, for destriplions <>l Ihe courses offered in 
this program. 



Physical and Life Sciences 

Biology; Chemistry; General Science 101, 102, 201, 
202, 209, 210; Geology; Mathematics; Physics; and 
Psychology. 

Humanities 

Art; Fine Arts; Foreign Languages; Literature; Music; 
Philosophy; Religious Studies; Speech; and Theatre. 
Not more than four hours may be earned in applied 
fine arts courses. 

All courses taken to satisfy distribution and field 
of concentration requirements must be taken on a 
graded basis. 

Any student may be exempted from the distribu- 
tion requirement in any one of the three divisions 
through successful completion of the Undergraduate 
Record Examination by the end of the sophomore 
year with a score equal to or surpassing the national 
norm. 

All students are required to pass Religious Studies 
100. Generally, this course is taken in the freshman 
or sophomore year. This course may be used to fulfill 
part of the distribution requirement in humanities. 

FIELD OF CONCENTRATION 

The field of concentration may be either departmen- 
tal or faculty-student initiated. The following guide- 
lines specifically exclude any language requirements 
necessary for professional certification or for admis- 
sion to a graduate program. 

A departmental field consists of a minimum of 24 
credit hours (excluding the senior project) and a max- 
imum of 48 hours within the department. No more 
than 24 hours from related disciplines may be re- 
quired by a department. 

The faculty-sponsored or student-initiated field, 
which may cut across departmental lines, may be 
developed. This field of concentration requires the 



59 




approval of the Committee on Special Fields of Con- 
centration. Such fields consist of a minimum of 24 
hours (excluding the senior project) and a maximum 
of 72 hours. No more than 48 hours in any one de- 
partment will be counted toward graduation. 

WRITING QUALIFICATION 
EXAMINATIONS 

All students must maintain a high level of proficiency 
in writing skills, demonstrated in a series of Writing 
Qualification Tests. Each student must take four tests 
in the following sequence: the Initial Writing Quali- 
fication Test when he enters Bethany, and one during 
the freshman, sophomore, and junior years. Satisfac- 
tory performance on the Junior W.Q.T. is required for 
graduation. To assist in developing and maintaining 
skills in composition, several courses in expository 
writing are offered by the English department. 

SENIOR PROJECT 

Every student must produce a project which repre- 
sents his best efforts and meets the standards of his 



field of concentration. The project will be received 
and evaluated during the final semester of the stu- 
dent's senior year. Two to eight hours of credit will 
be given after the final evaluation and approval of 
the project. Scheduling of the project is at the dis- 
cretion of the department or the student's advisory 
committee. 

The project will be evaluated by at least one per- 
son in the field of concentration other than his ad- 
visors) and one member of a department other than 
his own. The final evaluation will be in consultation 
with the student. In the faculty-sponsored or student- 
initiated field of concentration, one of the readers 
must be outside the student's advisory committee. 
The project will be made available to the college 
community. 

THE SENIOR COMPREHENSIVE 
EXAMINATION 

Each student must pass the Senior Comprehensive 
Examination. All requirements in the field of concen- 
tration must be met before the examination may be 
taken. 

The examination consists of two parts, written and 
oral. In some departments, sections of the Under- 
graduate Record Examination may also be considered 
part of or pre-requisite to the Senior Comprehensive. 

The examination will be given twice yearly, in Jan- 
uary and in May. The oral part of the examination 
will be scheduled by the Registrar as soon as practi- 
cable after the written, but in no case more than two 
weeks later. 

A student who has completed all the requirements 
in his field of concentration and has planned or is 
engaged in a Senior Project of major proportions (i.e., 
equivalent to four hours or more) may take the exam- 
ination in January with the consent of his advisor(s). 



60 



If a student fails the examination in January, he may 
take it again in May, and he will be advised to reduce 
the scope of his Senior Project. 

A student who has not completed all the require- 
ments in his field of concentration or whose Senior 
Project will be equivalent to two hours will take the 
examination in May. 

Students in departments which consider sections 
of the Undergraduate Record Examination as part of 
the Senior Comprehensive Examination will take the 
URE immediately preceding their written and oral 
examinations. 




A student who fails the examination may take it at 
any time it is regularly given within the following 12 
months. If he fails a second time, he may petition the 
faculty for a re-examination during the following 
year. No student may take the examination more 
than three times. 

THE PRACTICUM PROGRAM 

The Practicum Program is a progressive effort to make 
a student's academic studies more relevant to the 
world around him. The practicums are practical ex- 
periences encompassing values Bethany believes to 
be essential to a complete education. 

Each student will complete four practicums at 
some time during his four years in which he actual- 
izes the goals of the College. These four practicums 
are (1) an example of responsible citizenship (2) an 
awareness and involvement in health, physical edu- 
cation, and recreation (3) an intercultural living ex- 
perience and (4) a vocationally oriented internship. 

Each practicum experience should be a self-exami- 
nation of the use of theory in practice; a demonstra- 
tion that liberal studies are relevant to personal 
development and to the fulfillment of obligations as 
a responsible citizen. 

With the assistance of the student's advisor and 
the Director of Practicums the student will develop 
practicum proposals. These proposals must have the 
approval of a faculty member and meet the guide- 
lines established for each practicum by the Practicum 
Committee. At the completion of each practicum 
experience the student will complete an evaluation. 

The student's development of meaningful practi- 
cum experiences is an important part of the Bethany 
Plan, and the College is committed to providing com- 
petent counseling and assistance to the students. 

Further information concerning the Practicum Pro- 



67 



gram may be obtained by contacting the Director of 
Practicums. 

THE RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

Four years are usually required to satisfy the course 
and residence requirements for the baccalaureate de- 
gree. Students of superior ability may complete the 
requirements in less time. As a rule, the senior year 
or the last two semesters are to be spent in residence 
at the College. However, students who have had one 
full year of residence previous to their senior year, 
and who apply for and are approved by the Com- 
mittee on Academic Review for off-campus study 
programs during their senior year, are permitted to 
count that work toward graduation requirements. 

INDEPENDENT STUDIES 

Each department in the College offers Independent 
Study for those students who have demonstrated the 
ability to work individually on some special area of 
interest. The student selects an area of study, subject 
to the approval of the chairman of the department, 
after which he completes an Application for Inde- 
pendent Study in the Registrar's Office before the 
start of that semester. 

JANUARY TERM 

The January Term is a voluntary interim session which 
provides new and stimulating learning experiences to 
supplement the College academic program by means 
of innovative instructional methods, student-initiated 
courses, and travel programs. During January a stu- 
dent may earn two or four credit hours toward grad- 
uation. For additional information, consult with the 
January Term Director. 

SUMMER TERMS 

There are two five-week summer terms and two 
three-week summer terms. Most summer school 




,,*«*"""■ 



courses are taught as seminars, tutorials, or indepen- 
dent studies. For additional information, consult with 
the Director of the Summer School Program. 

COMBINATION COURSES 

The faculty has approved special arrangements under 
which students who have completed three years of 
work at the College may transfer to specifically ap- 
proved institutions for engineering or nursing train- 
ing and be eligible for graduation at Bethany upon 



62 



satisfactory completion of their training at the coop- 
erating institution. 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 3-2 PLAN 
By special arrangement with the School of Engineer- 
ing at Columbia University, Bethany offers the first 
three years of a five-year course for engineering stu- 
dents and arranges for the participating students to 
transfer to Columbia for the last two years. Upon 
completion of this five-year program the student re- 
ceives a bachelor's degree from Bethany College and 
from Columbia University. 

GEORGIA TECH 3-2 PLAN 

In cooperation with the Georgia Institute of Tech- 
nology, Bethany offers the first three years of a five- 
year course for engineering students and arranges for 
the participating students to transfer to Georgia Tech 
for the last two years. Upon completion of this five- 
year program the student receives a bachelor's de- 
gree from Bethany College and from Georgia Tech. 
In the case of highly qualified students the Georgia 
Tech degree may be at the master's level. 

WASHINGTON SEMESTER 
Arrangements have been made for one or two ad- 
vanced students in history, political science, eco- 
nomics or sociology to pursue studies in these fields 
under the direction of the American University in 
Washington, D.C. A student participating in this plan 
takes six to nine hours in regular academic work and 
six to nine hours in the study of government super- 
vised by Bethany College and American University. 
Participants in the program must be recommended 
by the program advisor and have the approval of the 
Dean of the Faculty. 



UNITED NATIONS SEMESTER 
Bethany students may participate in a program at the 
United Nations in New York City. One or two stu- 
dents are chosen each year. 

Students participating in this program take six 
hours of work in United Nations study- — half, in a 
seminar course which meets regularly with people 
associated with the U.N.; the other half, in writing a 
research project on a topic chosen by each student. 

Students are also allowed to take six to nine hours 
of regular academic work at Drew University, Madi- 
son, New Jersey. Participants in the program must be 
recommended by the Campus Coordinator for the 
U.N. Semester, the student's advisor, and the Dean 
of the Faculty. 

OVERSEAS STUDY PROGRAMS 

Under approved supervision and direction qualified 
students may secure credit for formal work com- 
pleted in foreign colleges and universities. To be eli- 
gible for study abroad, the student must have the 
approval of the International Education Committee. 

JUNIOR YEAR AT THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MADRID OR THE SORBONNE 

Under special arrangements with the University of 
Madrid and the Sorbonne, qualified Bethany students 
may matriculate for a semester or a full year of study 
at these universities. 

OXFORD SEMESTER 

During the 1973 fall semester, approximately 15 stu- 
dents are studying British literature, history, and cul- 
ture with a Bethany professor in Oxford, England. 
These students are matriculated as full-time students 
at Bethany College but they live and study in Britain. 



63 




TUBINGEN STUDY PROGRAM 

Qualified students are given an opportunity to do in- 
tensive study in the German language and to work 
out an individualized program at the University of 
Tubingen, Germany. An adjunct member of the Beth- 
any faculty serves as mentor. 

REGIONAL COUNCIL FOR 
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 
Bethany College is a member of the Regional Coun- 
cil for International Education, founded in 1959 as 
a unique cooperative effort to strengthen the inter- 
national phases of education. The Council, composed 
of more than 30 colleges and universities in Pennsyl- 
vania, West Virginia, and Ohio, sponsors continuing 



faculty enrichment programs, exchange lectureships, 
visiting scholars from abroad who spend substantial 
periods on member college campuses, and an under- 
graduate study-year abroad in the social sciences in 
Basel, Switzerland, and in the humanities in Verona, 
Italy. 

STUDY YEAR IN BASEL, SWITZERLAND 
The Basel center emphasizes work in the area of mod- 
ern European history and international affairs. Classes 
are conducted at the Regional Council Study Center 
by an instructional staff drawn primarily from the 
nearby University of Basel, with a few Americans act- 
ing as administrators. Although these classes are 
taught in English, all students live with Swiss families, 
as proficiency in German is one aim of the program. 

STUDY YEAR IN VERONA, ITALY 
The Verona center concentrates on the areas of his- 
tory, the arts, and literature. Courses are conducted 
in English, but all students live with Veronese fam- 
ilies, as proficiency in Italian is one goal of the pro- 
gram. The program is administered by Americans, 
with an instructional staff drawn from the University 
of Verona and other institutions. There is no language 
prerequisite for either the Verona or Basel program. 

SCANDINAVIAN SEMINAR 
After an intensive study of the native language in a 
Scandinavian country, students enroll in a higher in- 
stitution as fully matriculated students in that country. 

INDIA EXCHANGE PROGRAM 
Each year a Bethany student is selected to receive a 
scholarship covering room, board, tuition, and spend- 
ing money at either St. Xaviers College or Elphinston 
College in Bombay. The student selected must pay his 
transportation costs plus a nominal servicing cost to 
Bethany College. Bethany also provides a scholarship 



64 



for an Indian student who is selected by the Lions 
Club of Versova (Bombay) India. 

SEMESTER IN COPENHAGEN PROGRAM 
Bethany College maintains a working relationship 
with the Washburn University Semester Program in 
Copenhagen, Denmark, conducted in English by Dan- 
ish instructors, providing a selection of courses in 
European and Scandinavian history, politics, social 
structure, and the arts. Two places in the program are 
reserved each year for Bethany students. 

OTHER OVERSEAS PROGRAMS 
There are many additional overseas programs in 
which Bethany students have participated. These in- 
clude: 

1) Beaver College Semester at the City College of 
London (England) 

2) Fairleigh-Dickinson University Semester at Wrox- 
ton College (England) 

3) Brandeis University Semester at Hiat Institute (Is- 
rael) 

4) Michigan State University AMLEC Foreign Lan- 
guage Centers throughout Europe 

5) Chapman College World Campus Afloat 

6) The University of Glasgow, Scotland. 

The Director of International Education Programs 
provides interested students with information con- 
cerning programs which have been examined and 
approved. 

COURSE LOAD 

A normal semester load is 16 hours. However, a stu- 
dent may elect activities courses (music, chorus, band, 
physical education) up to two hours with no addi- 
tional fee charge. For example, a student could elect 
a one-hour activity course, two one-hour activity 



courses, or a two-hour activity course. Thus, the max- 
imum academic course load is 16 hours plus two 
hours of activities courses. Permission to take addi- 
tional courses must be obtained from the Dean of the 
Faculty. Fees will be charged for any such approved 
courses. Applications for excess hours are available 
in the Registrar's office. A full-time student is defined 
as any student enrolled in at least 12 hours in that 
semester. 

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE 

During the first 10 class days of each semester, a stu- 
dent, with the approval of his advisor, may drop or 
add any course. No classes may be added after this 
time. With proper approval, a student may drop a 
course anytime before the final. 

CLASS ABSENCE POLICY 

Students are expected to attend all class and appro- 
priate laboratory meetings of a course and to partici- 
pate in all outside activities that are a part of the 
course. 

It is the responsibility of individual instructors to 
record attendance and to evaluate its importance in 
determination of course grades. Accordingly, each 
instructor prepares at the beginning of each semester 
a written statement explaining his attendance policy 
and his consideration of unexcused absences, make- 
up for excused absences, and related matters, which 
are in force for the whole semester. The instructor 
files this statement in the library and with the Dean 
of the Faculty. At the first class meeting, he distributes 
it to the class. 

The Dean of Students grants excused absences in 
the event of serious personal or family emergencies 
or authorized College events. The Dean of Students 



65 




files these excused absences with the Registrar who 
issues reports to the faculty. Names of students who 
are seriously jeopardizing their academic progress by 
class absence are given to the Dean of Students, who 
initiates counseling with the student. Instructors may 
drop students with a WF (withdrawn failing) if ab- 
sences are continued after consultation. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable dismissal is granted to any student in 
good standing who may desire to withdraw from the 
College if he has satisfied his advisor and a respon- 
sible officer of the College that there is a good reason 
to justify such action. Students asking to withdraw 
should present a written request to the Dean of Stu- 
dents along with a statement of approval from parent 
or guardian. The recommendation of the Dean of Stu- 
dents is next presented to the Business Manager and 
then to the Registrar for final record. No withdrawal 
is considered complete until this procedure has been 
carried out. 



SPECIAL EXAMINATIONS 

A student justifiably absent from a final examination 
or a test given in connection with regular class work 
is permitted to take a special test without payment of 
fees with the consent of the instructor and approval 
of the Dean of the Faculty. For any other examination 
a fee must be paid at the Business Office before the 
examination is taken, and the proper receipt must be 
presented to the instructor at the time of the exami- 
nation. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Letter grades given and their equivalents in quality 
points are: 



A 


4.00 


A- 


3.75 


B + 


3.25 


B 


3.00 


B- 


2.75 


C + 


2.25 



C 


2.00 


c- 


1.75 


D + 


1.25 


D 


1.00 


D- 


.75 


F 


.00 



Students are required to take at least 100 hours of 
letter-graded work. 

Grades mean: A, Excellent; B, Good; C, Satisfactory; 
D, Inferior; F, Failure. 

Other report abbreviations and their meanings are: 

Cr. Credit. No quality points. 

NCr. No-Credit. No quality points or academic pen- 
alty. 

F. Failure. No quality points; denotes work that 
is unsatisfactory. 

Inc. Incomplete. Incomplete work is a result of sick- 
ness or some other justifiable reason. An in- 
complete must be removed by the end of the 
fourth week in the following semester, unless 



66 



an extension of time is granted by the Dean of 
the Faculty. It is not possible for a student to 
remove an incomplete after 12 months. 

W. Withdrawn. No penalty. 

WF. Withdrawn failing. No quality points; indicates 
a course dropped with permission after the 
fifth week of the semester, with the student 
failing at the time of withdrawal. A grade of 
WF has the same effect on the student's grade- 
point average as an F. 

Any student who carries 12 hours of letter-graded 
academic work may elect to take additional work on 
a Credit-No Credit basis in courses which are not 
used for the field of concentration or the distribution 
requirement. 

A report of the scholastic standing of students is 
received at the Office of the Registrar at mid-semester 
in addition to the final semester reports. These re- 
ports are sent to the faculty advisor and to parents or 
guardian of each student. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

The classification of students is determined accord- 
ing to the following plan. For sophomore rank a stu- 
dent must have at least 25 hours of academic credit. 
Admission to full junior standing is conditioned upon 
the student having at least 60 hours of academic 
credit. For senior class rank the student must have at 
least 94 hours of academic credit. 

No student is considered a candidate for the bac- 
calaureate degree until he has been granted senior 
classification, until he has filed an application to take 
the Senior Comprehensive Examination in his field of 
concentration, and until he has filed an application 
for a degree. 




PROBATION 

The term "on probation" is applied to students who 
are allowed to continue at Bethany after having failed 
to meet the standards expected by the faculty and 
administration. Students may be placed on probation 
for any of the following causes: 

1) Unsatisfactory scholastic record. The following 
academic bases will be used to determine proba- 
tion each semester: Freshmen must achieve at least 
1.7, Sophomores 1.8, and Juniors and Seniors 2.0. 

2) Unsatisfactory class attendance during the semes- 
ter or preceding semester. 



67 




3) Unsatisfactory conduct at any time. 

Probation is intended to be a warning to the stu- 
dent and to his parents or guardians that his record 
is unsatisfactory and that unless significant improve- 
ment is made he will be asked to withdraw from the 
College. At the end of a semester on probation the 
student's total record is reviewed. His continued en- 
rollment depends upon the trend of academic per- 
formance. The Committee on Academic Review may 
dismiss any student if the student is not likely to meet 
the requirements for graduation in the usual period 
of four years. An extension of the four-year period is 
granted only when there are extenuating circum- 
stances. 

While on probation, a student is not eligible to re- 
ceive any grants from College scholarship or loan 
funds. 



TRANSCRIPT OF RECORDS 

Students wishing transcripts of records in order to 
transfer to other schools or for other purposes should 
make application to the Registrar's Office at least one 
week before the transcript is needed. Transcripts are 
issued only at the request of the student, and official 
transcripts are sent directly to the college or univer- 
sity stipulated by the student. One transcript is fur- 
nished to each student without charge; for each 
additional transcript a fee of $1.00 is charged. When 
three or more transcripts are ordered at the same 
time, the first transcript is $1.00, whereas the others 
cost $.50 each. Fees must accompany the request. All 
financial obligations to the College must be paid be- 
fore a transcript is issued. 

CHANGES IN REGULATIONS 

The College reserves the right to amend the regula- 
tions covering the granting of degrees, the courses of 
study, and the conduct of students. Membership in 
Bethany College and the receiving of its degrees are 
privileges, not rights. The College reserves the right, 
and the students concedes to the College the right, to 
require the withdrawal of any student at any time. 

INVALIDATION OF CREDITS 

Courses completed at Bethany College or elsewhere, 
more than 10 calendar years before the date of pro- 
posed graduation, are not accepted for credit toward 
graduation. All candidates are expected to comply 
with degree requirements in effect at the time of 
acceptance of the degree application. With the ap- 
proval of the Committee on Academic Review and 
the payment of the required fee, the candidate may 
take examinations, as administered by the various de- 
partments, for courses included in the current curric- 
ulum, to re-instate academic credit that may have 
been declared invalid because of date. 



68 



BETHANY 




69 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Freshman Studies 

Interdisciplinary Lecture 100 4 hours 

The interdisciplinary lecture is an issue-centered course in which 
the interrelationship of discrete areas of human knowledge is 
emphasized. In each section a particular topic is examined by 
means of the methods and insights of the various traditional 
disciplines, but in all sections the focus is on the synthesis and 
integration of the material presented. 

Sec. 1 Nazism, Hitler, and the Crises of Life 

This course surveys the major tenets of Adolph Hitler and 
analyzes the historical, philosophical, and political roots of 
German National Socialism. Lectures and movies demonstrate 
how Nazism affected various phases of German culture and 
life (the arts, sports, education, home, the church, etc.). The 
student is assisted in relating the specific issues raised by 
Nazism to more general human questions concerning the 
meaning of suffering, ethical decisionmaking, personal com- 
mitment and integrity, and the uses of power. (Richard Kenney) 
Offered Fall 1973. 

Sec. 2 The Leaning Tower of Babble 

Do we have improved communications? This course deals 
with the effects which are being produced in American culture 
as a consequence of the rapid increase in the" variety and 
quantity of information. Students will study and challenge 
the McLuhan thesis: "improved communications will make a 
better world." Students will examine several modes of com- 
munication: television, radio, records, tapes, books, magazines, 
newspapers, film, and transportation as they attempt to relate 
various fields of knowledge to this basic question. (Stanley 
Becker) Offered Fall 1973. 

Sec. 3 The Black Man and the American Dream 

This course will be an examination of the relationship between 
the Black and White cultures in America. Both primary sources 
(government documents, slave narratives, sermons, and folk 
materials) and literary reflections (essays, novels, and poems) 
will serve to document the clash of cultures in America and 



the development of an Afro-American culture. (Larry Grimes) 
Offered Spring 1974. 

Sec. 4 The Almost Chosen People: Mission and Destiny in 
American Culture 

Since the first English settlements, Americans have believed 
that they and their nation had a unique mission or destiny in 
the world. This conviction of a special national purpose per- 
vades every aspect of American culture and affects the ways in 
which Americans understand themselves, their history, their 
institutions, and the world. Yet this sense of unique mission 
and the accompanying national self-understanding is now in 
the middle of a significant crisis. This course will study the 
evolution of that sense of a special national destiny (sometimes 
called American Civil Religion or the American Faith) as it 
manifests itself in American art, music, literature, history, 
speeches, and holidays, seeking thereby to understand better 
the present crisis. (Hiram Lester) Offered Spring 1974. 



Interdisciplinary Senior Project 490 



2-8 hours 



Freshman Seminar 111 4 hours 

In the Freshman Seminar a small group of freshmen pursue with 
their faculty advisor an area of mutual interest. Each section 
focuses on a specific topic, providing each student with the 
opportunity to broaden and deepen his knowledge of the sub- 
ject and to develop his ability to present his ideas with clarity 
and cogency, both in speech and in writing, through discussions 
and special oral and written projects. 

Sec. A Sensitivity to the Natural World 

This seminar will seek to develop an introduction to the natural 
world by observation of plants and animals in their natural 
setting. Most sessions will be held outdoors, with several field 
trips to important natural sites. (Albert R. Buckelew, jr.) 

Sec. B Ecologist or Ecofaddist? 

This seminar will critically evaluate the differences between 
an ecologist and an ecofaddist. As a result of this evaluation, 
the student should be able to approach our environmental 



70 



problems from a rational, rather than an alarmist, point of 
view. (C. Blaine Carpenter) 

Sec. C Medical Practice in Ancient and Modern Times 

This seminar will consider to varying degrees the history of 
medical practice from the time of the medicine man, through 
folk medicine and surgery. Time will be devoted to the bio- 
graphical study of certain physicians as well as to current prob- 
lems of health care for all citizens. (John Daniel Draper) 

Sec. D The Scientific Attitude 

This seminar is concerned with a scientific analysis of readings 
on a variety of topics, such as ESP, psycho-therapy, and human 
social behavior. The attitudes of empiricism, determinism, and 
parsimony are stressed, as well as the process of drawing 
legitimate conclusions from evidence. Consideration of the 
nature of science is included. (Cynthia Lorr) 

Sec. E Straight and Crooked Thinking 

This seminar is an examination of the language of the written 
and electronic media (newspapers, films, radio, and T.V.). The 
students will develop techniques for separating fact from 
fiction, for analyzing visual and verbal "tricks," and for dealing 
with special problems of the consumer in today's society. 
(Marjorie T. Carty) 

Sec. F. The Middle East Today 

This seminar will be primarily concerned with obtaining an 
understanding of the general background of the forces at work 
in the Middle East today. Emphasis will be placed on the infor- 
mation currently available in contemporary media. 

(Burton B. Thurston) 

Sec. G Sport and Society 

This seminar will study the impact which sports have had on 
society since the turn of the century. It will examine the role 
of sports in society, particularly the social and economic 
aspects at all levels, and will provide possible directions for the 
future. (Albert C. Applin) 

Sec. H History of the Bethany Area 

This seminar will seek to develop the skills of the historian's 
craft by learning how one discovers primary materials and how 
one reconstructs the life and events of a particular period. As a 
model, the students will study the life of the local area prior to 
1863, using the available artifacts and writings of that period. 

(John Lozier) 

Sec. I Bethany, West Virginia, 26032 

This seminar will look at Bethany, West Virginia, from the per- 
spective of the newcomer. What are the historical factors that 
bear on the contemporary scene? Is geography and ecology 



important in understanding this town? What of her people? 
Where do they come from? What do they do? How do they 
think? This is a study of small-town America, an exercise in 
sensitivity for people who move from place-to-place. 

(Robert Sandercox) 

Sec. J Mountain Life and People — Prospects 

This seminar will explore the Appalachian Mountain region 
with the intellectual tools of all the social sciences. Students 
will work with the interrelationships among the geography, 
demographic patterns, value systems, and economics. Field 
work will be included. (John U. Davis) 

Sec. K Native American Religions 

This seminar will be a cooperative venture in which the partici- 
pants explore the chief features of several native American 
religions (i.e., religions of the American Indians) from a variety 
of periods and cultural settings. It will include at least one 
wilderness experience and several field trips. The ultimate aims 
are to understand native American culture better and to per- 
ceive as precisely as possible what that culture(s) says to a 
Christian culture which occupies the same terrain. 

(Hiram J. Lester) 

Sec. L Man in Community (You and I) 

This seminar is a study of the ways in which people interact. 
Diverse community groupings (primitive tribes, social organi- 
zations, political jurisdictions, kibbutzim, therapy groups, fam- 
ilies, etc.) will provide the experiences for the study. The 
seminar itself may become the chief laboratory group. 

(William B. Allen) 

Sec. M Communes and Utopias 

This seminar will survey the literature dealing with man's 
search for the ideal society (utopia), with special emphasis 
on contemporary communes. (Mickay D. Miller) 

Sec. N The Woman Emerges 

Our century has witnessed the arrival of women onto the 
French literary scene. This seminar will examine translated 
works of Colette, Nathalie Sarraute, Marguerite Duras, Francoise 
Sagan, and Simone de Beauvoir, who, in seeking to define their 
condition as women, add a new dimension to our understand- 
ing of the human condition. Men, as well as women, are 
encouraged to enroll. (Pauline R. Nelson) 

Sec. O Introduction to Yourself 

This seminar is an inquiry into the purpose and potential of 
the individual. Through the analysis and discussion of his read- 
ings, the student will endeavor to cultivate an understanding of 
the qualities necessary for self-esteem and success as a student 
and as a citizen in modern society. (Harold O'Leary) 



71 



Sec. P The Two Souls of Man: A Study of Hermann Hesse and 
Our Times 

This seminar will discuss the animal and spiritual side of man 
as described in contemporary German literature, especially by 
Hermann Hesse, and as evidenced in German culture, as well 
as perhaps in ourselves. (Leonora Cayard) 

Sec. Q The Limits and Frontiers of Man 

This seminar is concerned with illuminating the existential sit- 
uation of man: throwing light upon the lines between the 
problematic and the mysterious, the actual and the imaginary, 
the visible and the invisible. It is a search for meaning along 
the edge and at the heart of human existence. 

(Gary L. Garrison) 

Sec. R The Tough Guy Hero 

"Tough guy" students will shoot the rapids of the Youghio- 
gheny River, review television programs (Mannix, et.al.), read 
Spillane and Hammet, Hemingway, Mailer, and Dickey, and 
watch Humphrey Bogart films. The students will explore the 
origins of the "tough guy" hero, trace his development as both 
"pop-pulp" hero and accepted literary type, and make judg- 
ments about his place in art and society today. (Larry Crimes) 

Sec. S Man, God, and Freedom in Science Fiction: Concepts 
and Consequences 

Fiction is a form of entertainment, but it can also enable us to 
"see" better ourselves and our world. This seminar is an explo- 
ration, through science fiction, of the possibilities of the pres- 
ent and future by examining the concepts of man, society, 
world-view, hope-fate, and God, and understanding the influ- 
ence of the consquences of these concepts upon our own 
realities. (Robert Myers) 

Sec. T Introduction to Peace Studies 

This seminar is a study of the meaning of the word peace and 
of the relationships among violence, non-violence, and peace 
in the Bible, Ghandi, and Martin Luther King. Also considered 
are the political and religious aspects of the modern peace 
movement and the roles of students and the church in deciding 
questions of war and peace. (jerry Folk) 

Sec. U Whither America: The Future of American Politics 

An exploration into the prophesies hidden within contempor- 
ary political phenomena: the energy crisis; labor union reforms; 
urban growth and decay; corporate responsibility; the politics 
of race, age, and sex; isolationism; and rural poverty. Ulti- 
mately the student should develop a systematic orientation to 
the study of politics by searching for persistent patterns and 
the men behind what at first appear to be disparate political 




events, thereby understanding more clearly his or her personal 
relationship to the issues and their resolution. (David Liden) 

Sec. V Riches + Freedom = Guess What? 

Students will seek to examine and evaluate in historical and 
world terms the material status of the middle class American 
family. They will also strive for the development of concepts 
surrounding the word freedom and such related words as 
liberty and license. Finally, students will make a survey of what 
it is that man does with a position of relative economic secur- 
ity accompanied by numerous options for personal pursuits. 
This includes a range of responses from mental aberration to 
great personal achievement. (Charles E. Halt) 

Sec. W Through 2000 

What will and what will not change between 1973 and 2000? 
This seminar is an examination of varying forecasts and pre- 
dictions that have been made concerning science, technology, 
economics, ecology, and society for the remainder of the 
century, together with an evaluation of the impact various 
changes may have on our life, culture, and careers. 

(J. Trevor Peirce) 

Sec. X Understanding Ourselves and Others 

The purpose of this seminar is for the student to achieve an 
awareness of how and why he behaves as he does and how 
he influences and is influenced by others. (Margaret Mathison) 

Sec. Y Seek and Ye Shall Find 

This seminar explores the various ways of acquiring informa- 
tion. It will be open-ended, following the information interests 
of the students. It aims at discovering, utilizing, and evaluating 
sources of information in all areas. (Nancy Sandercox) 



72 










Art 



students to be evaluated along with other work once 
a year. Prerequisites must be observed unless the 
student can show evidence of equivalent disciplines. 
The Bethany College Art Department reserves the 
right to retain permanently one work from each stu- 
dent in each class. Other works may be held tem- 
porarily for use in specific exhibitions and will be 
available to owners no later than one year after the 
lending date. 

Art 200 Design Studio 4 hours 

Basic course work in the theories and practice of two- and three- 
dimensional design; study of the elements and materials in rela- 
tion to design potentials with practical application. 

Art 205 Drawing I 4 hours 

Concentrated activity in academic drawing using a variety of 

drawing media. Primary emphasis will be placed on still life, 
landscape, and the human form. 



AIMS 

To provide a balanced background for students who 
wish to pursue a career and/or advanced study in 
Art; to prepare students for teaching or supervising 
art on either the elementary or secondary level; to 
combine Art with academic studies as a broad basis 
for liberal education on the college level; and to pro- 
vide an atmosphere in which the student is encour- 
aged to acquire standards for the evaluation, practice 
and appreciation, and application of the plastic arts. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 

CONCENTRATION 

The minimum requirement for a major in Art is forty 

semester hours including Design Studio, Drawing I 

and II, Painting I, Sculpture I, Senior Project, and 

Senior Seminar. At least ten credit hours must be in 

art history courses. A sketch book is required of all 



Art 210 Ceramics I 4 hours 

Studio experiences in forming, firing, and glazing pottery, includ- 
ing ceramic sculpture. Individual projects according to student's 
ability. Fall semester only. 

Art 305 Drawing II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by the 
student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Draw- 
ing I. 

Art 310 Ceramics II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by 
the student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Ce- 
ramics I. Fall semester only. 

Art 315 Painting I 4 hours 

Creative exploration into the techniques of watercolor, acrylics, 
oil, and mixed media. Basic preparation of materials, framing, 
and matting will be included. Prerequisite: Design Studio or 
consent of head of department. 



73 



Art 320 Sculpture I 4 hours 

Creative expression in three-dimensional forms. Students will 
work with materials that are readily available and easily handled, 
such as wood, wire, plaster, and clay. Prerequisite: Design Stu- 
dio or consent oi head of department. Spring semester only. 

Art 325 Graphics I 4 hours 

An introduction of print-making processes emphasizing creative 
expression through such techniques as relief, intaglio, piano- 
graphic, and serigraphy. Prerequisite: Drawing I or consent of 
head of department. Fall semester only. 

Art 340 Art Activities in the 

Elementary School 2 hours 

A study of the theories and goals of art education in the elemen- 
tary school with emphasis on the child's growth and development 
through art. Exploration of art techniques will be included. 

Art 415 Painting II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by the 
student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Paint- 
ing I. 

Art 420 Sculpture II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by the 
student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Sculp- 
ture I. Spring semester only. 

Art 425 Graphics II 4 hours 

-\dvanced problems in media and subject matter selected by the 
student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Graph- 
ics I. Fall semester only. 

Art 478 Senior Seminar in Art 2 hours 

Required of all students concentrating in the field. A survey of 
Art for review and interpretation of the particular problems of 
this field. 

Art 480 Teaching of Art in the 

Secondary School 4 hours 

Problems in the teaching and administration of art programs. 
Spring semester only. 



Art 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Art 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 

Begins during the second semester of the junior year. 



Art History 

The following courses are surveys, intended to introduce stu- 
dents to a variety of artistic achievements, and to discuss selected 
artists, their methods, media, and contributions, against the con- 
text of their time. The continuity of artistic development will be 
stressed. 

Art 351 Art History I The Ancient World 2 hours 

Beginning with an introduction to paleolithic art, this half-term 
course will concentrate on the art of the Ancient Near East, 
Egypt, Classic Greece, and Rome. Alternate years: Fall 1974-75 
1st eight weeks. 

Art 352 Art History II 

Medieval and Renaissance Art 2 hours 

This course will cover Early Christian and Byzantine art, the 
architectual achievements of the Middle Ages, and the advanced 
painting styles of the Italian and Northern Renaissance. Alter- 
nate years: Fall 1974-75 2nd. eight weeks. 

Art 353 Art History III 

Western Art from 1500 to 1800 2 hours 

The course concentrates on the increasing momentum achieved 
by artistic experimentations in painting, architecture, and sculp- 
ture, progressing from the High Renaissance, Mannerism, and 
Baroque, through Rococo and Neo-Classicism. The contributions 
of such significant artists as Michelangelo, Bernini, Velasquez, 
Rubens, and J.L. David will be discussed. Alternate years: Spring 
1974-75 1st eight weeks. 



Art 354 Art History IV Western Art from 
1800 to the Present 



2 hours 



This course will cover such important schools and movements 
as Romanticism, the English landscape school, Impressionism, 
Cubism, Art Nouveau, and Surrealism. Painting, sculpture, and 
architecture will be treated. Alternate years Spring 1974-75 2nd 
eight weeks. 



74 



Art 355 Art History V Asian Art History 2 hours 

An introduction to the arts of China, Japan, and India, with 
some reference to Islamic art. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Art 356 Art History VI U. S. Art 2 hours 

A survey of the development of the arts in the U. S. from Colo- 
nial times to the present, with emphasis upon the evolution of 
style in architecture, sculpture, and painting. Alternate years: 
1973-74. 

Art 358 Art History VII 

Art History Seminar 2 hours 

A seminar course dealing with specific aspects of the history of 
art for individual investigation, which will also include methods 
of research. Topics for study will be chosen by the students 
with the approval of the instructor. The course involves spe- 
cialized and selected readings in the field and individual and 
group discussions. Prerequisite: 4 or more semester hours of 
art history. Alternate years 1973-74. 



Biology 




AIMS 

To acquaint the student with the living world around 
him and with basic life processes; to demonstrate the 
scientific methods as an approach to problem solv- 
ing; to cultivate an appreciation of research; to de- 
velop laboratory skill in various types of work in 
biology; to train students as teachers of biology and 
for certain professional work related to this field, and 
to help man find and appreciate his role in the natural 
environment. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of 32 semester hours in the Department 
of Biology including the Senior Project, and a mini- 
mum of 12 semester hours in chemistry, at least 6 of 
which are organic chemistry. Six hours of physics is 
also required. German or French is recommended 
for those students going on to graduate school. A 
semester of calculus is also strongly recommended. 

Students who plan to teach or become professional 
biologists should elect the following sequence of 
courses: Biology 201, 228, 303, 326, 338, 343, 365, 
367, 425, 442, and 490. 

Students preparing for work in medicine, dentistry, 
nursing or as laboratory technicians should elect the 
following sequence of courses: Biology 201, 303, 343, 
367, 442, and 490. 

The sequence of courses is subject to approval of 
the Department Chairman. 



75 



Biol. 100-110 Topics in General Biology 

Biology majors may elect up to 8 hours of these topics to be 
considered toward the required number of hours for the Field 
of Concentration. Biology 105, First Aid as Related to the Prin- 
ciples of Biology, may not be counted for the college distribu- 
tion requirement. 

Biol. 100 Organ Systems of Vertebrates 2 hours 

An examination of the fundamental structures of mammals — 
including man — and their functions. Systems: skeletal, in- 
tegument, digestive, circulatory, urogenital, and nervous. Lab- 
oratories will utilize the fetal pig and frog for dissection, com- 
paring them to human systems. Alternate years: Fall 1972-73 
1st eight weeks. 

Biol. 101 Animal Diversity 2 hours 

An examination of the animal kingdom with emphasis placed 
on the adaptation of the organism. Various systems will be 
studied as to possible methods of evolving through adaptation. 
Topics to be covered are food getting, locomotion, repro- 
duction, breathing, circulation, waste removal, and control of 
the organism. Laboratories will use various organisms each 
week to observe the various adaptation. Alternate years: Fall 
1972-73 2nd eight weeks. 

Biol. 102 Horticultural Science 2 hours 

To examine the scientific concepts on which horticulture is 
based. The plant, being the basis of all horticultural activities, 
will be the main emphasis. Topics to be covered are classifica- 
tion of horticultural plants, structures and functions of the 
various parts of the plants, control of the plant environment, 
plant growth, and mechanisms of propagation. Most of the 
laboratory work will be done in the greenhouse since this 
course will be offered in February and March. Alternate years: 
Spring 1972-73 1st eight weeks. 

Biol. 103 Conservation of Natural Resources 2 hours 

A study of the rational use of natural resources. Emphasis will 
be placed on the study of current legislation on local, state 
and federal levels. Topics to be studied are soil (physical prob- 
lems and human problems), water (water cycle, industrial pur- 
poses, agricultural, recreational), atmosphere, biological 
resources (forests, grasslands, animals, fisheries), minerals, 
metals, non-metals, and recreation. Laboratories will consist 
of field trips and work in the laboratory. Alternate years: 
Spring 1972-73 2nd eight weeks. 

Biol. 104 A Survey of the Plant Kingdom 2 hours 

The major areas of study will focus on the Algae, Fungi, and 
Bryophytes. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolution 



of the plant kingdom. 
eight weeks. 



Alternate years: Spring 1973-74 1st 



Biol. 105 First Aid as Related to the 

Principles of Biology 2 hours 

Major emphasis will be placed on the biological principles that 
are utilized in the standard and advanced first aid courses of 
the American Red Cross. Red Cross certificates may be earned 
by those passing the examination. Opportunity for instructors 
certificates will be presented as an option at the end of the 
course. 

Credit for this course will not be counted toward the college 
distribution requirement. Not offered in 1972-73. 



Biol. 167 Introduction to Mammalian 
Anatomy and Physiology 



4 hours 



Mammalian anatomy as exemplified in the cat. Discussion and 
study of the functioning of the tissues and organ systems of the 
human body. Laboratory study of the anatomy of the cat, and 
human physiology. Discussions, demonstrations, and individual 
laboratory work. Not open to biology majors. 



Biol. 169 Introduction to 

Computer Science 



2 hours 



An introduction to computer programming and computer de- 
sign. Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in 
solving problems encountered in biology. 

Biol. 201 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 4 hours 
Comparative anatomy of the representative forms of vertebrates; 
laboratory study of the comparative anatomy of the shark, other 
lower vertebrates, and the cat. 

Biol. 210 Evolution 2 hours 

The evidence for the theories of evolution with special attention 
to the modern synthesis of genetics and ecological factors. Pre- 
requisite: An elementary course in biology or permission of the 
instructor. Offered Spring 1973-74 1st eight weeks. 

Biol. 228 Field Botany 2 hours 

An introduction to the taxonomy of vascular plants with em- 
phasis on the local flora, including the techniques of herbarium 
science. Offered in 1973-74. 



76 



science for elementary and junior high school teachers, and 
camp leaders. Basic techniques in field biology and man's re- 
lationship to the natural world are emphasized. Part of the 
course is conducted at a mountain camp. Summer session only. 



Biol. 231 Ornithology 

Anatomy, behavior and identification of birds. 



Biol. 303 General Genetics 4 hours 

A synthesis of basic principles and modern molecular theory. 
Facility with simple mathematics is highly desirable. 



Biol. 326 Ecology 



4 hours 



A study of the general principles of bioecology of plants and 
animals. Considerable time will be spent in one field. Special 
emphasis will be placed on field study of several communities. 

Biol. 330-S 330-J Urban Ecology 2 hours 

This course encompasses major areas of environmental quality 
management. Water pollution, air pollution, solid-wastes dis- 
posal, noise pollution and housing regulations are the major 
areas that are covered. In addition to the classroom experience 
there are several field trips to local areas of environmental 
interest. Summer session and January term only. 

Biol. 338 Advanced Botany 4 hours 

The morphology of the vascular plants together with a study of 
the fundamental life processes of plants; growth, irritability, 
nutrition, metabolism, and hormonal control. Offered Spring 

7975. 

Biol. 343 Microbiology 4 hours 

Morphology and physiology of micro-organisms; principles of 
laboratory technique; cultural characteristics and environment 
influences on microbial growth. 



Biol. 365 Invertebrate Zoology 



4 hours 



The invertebrate animals including phylogeny and morphology. 
A laboratory study of representative forms of invertebrates will 
be made. 



Biol. 367 Cell Physiology and Biochemistry 4 hours 
An introduction to the structural organization of cells and the 
important aspects of cell physiology in the light of modern bio- 
chemistry and biophysics. 



2 hours Biol. 399-400 Junior Seminar 



1 hour each 



Biol. 425 Animal Physiology 4 hours 

Structure and functions of the human body; the mechanism of 
bodily movements, responses, reactions, and various physio- 
logical states. 

Biol. 428-j Tropical Ecology 4 hours 

The study of plant and animal ecological relationships in a trop- 
ical zone (Virgin Islands, Puerto Rican rain forest, and the Florida 
Everglades). January term only. 



Biol. 440 Histology-Microtechniques 



4 hours 



Structure of the cell, its modification into various tissues and the 
practice of general histological techniques. 

Biol. 442 Vertebrate Embryology 4 hours 

Development of the tissues and organs in vertebrates; embryos 
of chick and pig studied in the laboratory. 

Biol. 451 Special Area Studies 2 or 4 hours 

When adequately trained faculty and sufficient student demand 
arises, the Department will organize and offer courses in a 
special area not covered in regular course offerings. 



Biol. 477-478 Senior Seminar 

Biol. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical and Life 
Sciences 

(See General Sciences 480). 



1 hour each 



4 hours 



Biol. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Biol. 490 Senior Project 8 hours 

The Senior Project will start the first semester of the junior year 
and be completed in the spring semester of the senior year. 



77 



Chemistry 



AIMS 

To contribute to the student's general knowledge, his 
understanding of the nature of the physical world 
and his understanding of the place of chemistry in 
industrial and business life; to provide experience in 
the scientific method of reasoning; and to provide 
students concentrating in this field with a thorough 
and practical education in chemistry which may be 
useful in industrial, technical and graduate work. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of 36 hours in this Department exclusive 
of the Senior Project (Chem. 490). The distribution 
must include Chemistry 101, 102, 104, 211, 212, 222, 
224, 323, 324, 411, 414, 421 plus four hours of elec- 
tives and at least four hours of senior project; Mathe- 
matics 201, 202, also 203 or 350; Physics 101, 102; 
German or French through the 102 level plus two 
hours in translation of the respective language. The 
sequence of courses is subject to the approval of the 
Department Chairman. All courses in chemistry as 
well as the indicated courses in mathematics and 
physics must be taken for a letter grade. 

A course of study designed to conform to the 
American Chemical Society standards is required for 
those students who plan to become professional 
chemists or plan to enter graduate work in chemistry. 
Under this plan, in addition to the mathematics and 
physics requirements listed above, a total of 11 
chemistry courses must be taken. In addition to the 
above mentioned chemistry courses these required 
courses must include Chemistry 321 and 402. German 
must be elected as the foreign language. Additional 



courses in mathematics are strongly recommended. 
In addition to the German, a yearof French is strongly 
recommended for those students planning to do 
graduate work. Among the electives, at least 4 
courses, exclusive of English and modern languages, 
are required in the humanities. 

The entering freshman who is interested in chem- 
istry should be sure to select Chemistry 101 and 
mathematics at the appropriate level. Programs for 
subsequent semesters must be decided in conference 
with the faculty advisor for chemistry. 



Chem. 101 General Chemistry and 

Inorganic Qualitative Analysis 4 hours 
A study of theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry. The 
laboratory work is primarily a study of the principles and prac- 
tice of a systematic qualitative scheme of analysis for the cations 
and anions. Prerequisites: two units of mathematics or concur- 
rently with Math 103. Three lectures and three hours of labora- 
tory per week. 



Chem. 102 General Chemistry 2 hours 

A continuation of the lecture portion of Chemistry 101. The 
laboratory work consists of selected experiments in basic chem- 
ical principles and quantitative procedures. Prerequisite: Chem. 
101 . Offered Spring semester 1st eight weeks. 



Chem. 104 Solution Equilibria 2 hours 

A study of solubility and acid-base phenomena in aqueous and 
non-aqueous systems, with appropriate laboratory work. Pre- 
requisites: Chem. 707, 702. Offered Spring semester 2nd eight 
weeks. 



Chem. 169 Introduction to 

Computer Science 2 hours 

An introduction to computer programming and computer design 
Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in solving 
problems encountered in chemistry. 



78 



Chem. 211-212 Organic Chemistry 4 hours each 
An introduction to the study of the organic compounds of car- 
bon, both aliphatic and aromatic, involving a considerable 
amount of the electronic mechanisms of organic reactions. The 
laboratory work consists largely of organic preparations. Pre- 
requisites: Chem. 101, 102, 104. Three lectures and three hours 
of laboratory per week. 

Chem. 222 Chemical Thermodynamics 2 hours 

An introduction to the concepts and experimental techniques of 
classical thermodynamics, with special emphasis on the concepts 
of enthalpy, entropy, and free energy. Prerequisites: Chem. 
104; Math 203 or 350 or permission of the instructor. Offered 
Spring semester 1st eight weeks. 



Chem. 224 Introduction to Chemical 
Spectroscopy 



2 hours 



A study of the different energy states of atoms and molecules; 
the statistical principles governing the distribution of particles 
within these states; and the transitions between states. Prere- 
quisites: Chem. 104; Math 203 or 350 or permission of the in- 
structor. Offered Spring semester 2nd eight weeks. 

Chem. 311 Bonding and Symmetry in 

Organic Chemistry 2 hours 

An introduction to group theory and simple molecular orbital 
calculations as they apply to organic chemistry and to the spectra 
of organic compounds. Emphasis wil be placed on problem 
solving and structural determinations from spectroscopic data. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 212; Chem. 224 or permission of the instruc- 
tor. Offered Fall semester 2nd eight weeks. 

Chem. 314 Introduction to Biochemistry 2 hours 

A study of the chemistry of some of the more important biolog- 
ical processes, with emphasis on reaction mechanisms and 
methods of elucidation. Prerequisite: Chem. 212. Offered Spring 
semester 2nd eight weeks. 

Chem. 321 Application of Spectroscopy to 

Chemical Systems 2 hours 

Applications of spectroscopic theory to chemical systems, with 
emphasis on chemical analysis Prerequisite: Chem. 224. Of- 
fered Fall semester 1st eight weeks. 



Chem. 323 Kinetics and Solutions 2 hours 

The study of rate processes, especially in the liquid phase. Pre- 
requisite: Chem. 222. Offered Fall semester 2nd eight weeks. 



Chem. 324 Electrochemistry 



4 hours 



A study of oxidation-reduction and phenomena associated with 
solutions of electrolytes, application of these principles includ- 
ing classical electrochemical analysis, and the measurement of 
basic physical parameters. Prerequisite: Chem. 222. 

Chem. 402 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 hours 

The chemistry of certain elements and their compounds will be 
studied and interpreted on the basis of modern theories of 
atomic and molecular structure. The necessary foundation in 
quantum mechanics will be reviewed. Perequisites: Chem. 222, 
224. 

Chem. 411 Physical Organic Chemistry 2 hours 
The study of the theories and techniques relating structure and 
properties or organic compounds. Prerequisites: Chem. 212; 
Chem. 222 or permission of the instructor. Offered Fall semester 
1st eight weeks. 




79 



Chem. 414 Advanced Organic Chemistry 2 hours 
The study of selected advanced topics in organic chemistry in- 
cluding reaction mechanisms. Laboratory will be introduced, 
where appropriate, and will stress the use of instrumentation. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 212; Chem. 222 or permission of the in- 
structor. Offered Spring semester '1st eight weeks. 

Chem. 421 Chemistry of the 

Condensed Phases 2 hours 

A study of special problems associated with the liquid and solid 
states. Prerequisite: Chem. 222. Offered Fall semester 1st eight 
weeks. 

Chem. 430 Special Topics 2 hours each 

A series of three courses devoted to the consideration of ad- 
vanced topics and areas of special interest in the fields of Inor- 
ganic Chemistry (430-A), Organic Chemistry (430-B), and Physical 
Chemistry (430-C). Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

Chem. 477-478 Seminar in Chemistry 1 or 2 hours 
Presentation of current research topics by students, faculty, and 
visiting lecturers. 

Chem. 480 Methods and Materials in 

Teaching Physical & Life 

Sciences 4 hours 

(See General Sciences 480). 



Chem. 487-488 Independent 
Study 



2 or 4 hours each 



Chem. 490 Senior Project 4-8 hours 

During the junior year the chemistry major will be introduced 
to the methods of employing the chemical literature, will select 
a topic for advanced investigation and will make a literature 
search of background material as a basis for an in-depth study 
in this area. There will be one class meeting each week for both 
semesters. Following this preliminary work, an investigation of 
a significant topic in chemistry will be made by each student 
under the direction of a faculty member in the Department. 
This work will culminate in a written and oral report at the end 
of the senior year. 



Communications 

AIMS 

The objectives of the Department of Communica- 
tions are to help students integrate oral and written 
forms of communication; to encourage the develop- 
ment of logical thought processes across disciplines; 
and to aid students in the development of a personal 
theory of communication. They are designed to pro- 
vide theoretical and practical preparation for stu- 
dents desiring to do radio, television, newspaper, 
magazine, book publishing assignments, free lance 
writing, public relations or advertising counseling, 
direction of high school, college or industrial publi- 
cations, or teaching of speech and journalism. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

Communications 101, 201, 202, 203, 375, 403, 435-6, 
and a Senior Project (Comm. 490). Normally students 
would take 101 in first year, 201-202 in second year, 
and 375, 403, and 435-6 in third or fourth years dur- 
ing regular semesters, the January term, or summer 
sessions. Twelve hours in English are also required 
and proficiency in reading a foreign language. Rec- 
ommended courses: Graphics I and II, Marketing, and 
Statistics. 

Comm. 101 Introduction to Mass 

Communications 4 hours 

History and functions of mass communications. Role of news- 
papers, magazines, radio, television, books, movies, feature syn- 
dicates, wire services and adjunct agencies in modern society. 

Comm. 201 Reporting 4 hours 

Theory and techniques of writing news stories for print and 
electronic media, syndicates and wire services. Lab practice in 
writing objective, interpretative and editorial articles. 



80 







Comm. 202 Copy Editing and Layout 4 hours 

Principles and practice in editing copy for publication; includes 
typography, layout, and design of letterpress and offset news- 
papers. 



Comm. 203 Interpersonal Communication: 

Speech 4 hours 

Relationship of oral and non-verbal communication and thought. 
Stress on performance in speech and in creative listening. Analysis 
and delivery of speeches. Individual evaluations of performance 



Comm. 204 Theories of Public Speaking 2 hours 

An exploration of the complexities of communication. Beginning 
with a study of various models of communication, the course 
then focuses on the psychological dynamics of individual parti- 
cipants in a communicative art. Interpersonal contacts are ex- 
plored through a study of both verbal and non-verbal interaction. 
The influence of communication on the socio-cultural system 
will represent a substantial portion of the course. 



Comm. 205 Advanced Interpersonal 

Communication: Speech 2 hours 

Speeches and oral interpretation specially adapted to individual 
student needs and interests. Debate. Creative dialogue. Com- 
mittee meetings. 



Comm. 206 Features 4 hours 

Role of human interest approach in writings for print and elec- 
tronic media, advertising and public relations media. Practice 
in writing short and longer process, profile, personal experience, 
collective and think pieces for professional journals and mass 
audience media. 



Comm. 207-208 Argumentation and 

Debate 2 hours 

Principles and processes of reasoned discourse and their appli- 
cation to current affairs and controversial public issues. 



81 



Comm. 301 Principles of Advertising 4 hours 

Study of history, philosophies, principles of advertising, media, 
markets, merchandising. Role and evaluation of advertising. Stress 
on copy writing and layout. Lectures, lab. 



Comm. 302 Principles of Public Relations 4 hours 

Contributions and criticisms of public relations. History, philoso- 
phies, trends, principles. Case studies of institutional programs. 
Preparation of a creative project, such as a trade journal. Theory 
and lab. 



Comm. 335 School Publications 2 hours 

A practical course in which class members will do reporting, 
editing and layout work for the Bethany Tower. Editorial and 
design problems of college yearbook and literary journals will 
also be considered, with the Bethanian and Harbinger serving 
as examination pieces. (Credit-No Credit) 



Comm. 375 Introduction to Radio and 

Television 4 hours 

History, trends, contributions and criticisms and challenges of the 
electronic media in American Culture. 



Comm. 376 Educational and Public 

Broadcasting 2 hours 

Lecture and lab course utilizing the facilities of WVBC-FM to 
present the history, goals, and trends of public broadcasting. 
To encourage and assist students in preparing creative formats 
for the programming of documentaries, interviews, historical 
dramas, investigative and interpretative news coverage and cul- 
tural events. 



Comm. 377 The Performing Arts in 

Radio and Television 2 hours 

A studio course utilizing specific exercises designed to develop 
individual style in camera and microphone techniques. Useful 
to all students of the performing arts as well as those desiring 
a career in radio and/or TV announcing, acting, and singing. 



Comm. 401 History of journalism 4 hours 

History of newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and books 
in the U. S., Europe, Asia, Latin America and Africa. Role of press 
in developed and developing nations. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Comm. 402 Public Opinion 4 hours 

Nature, significance, and principles of public opinion. Relation- 
ship of politics, culture, media and other basic institutions to 
public opinion. Project in content analysis. Participation in a 
public opinion poll in the Upper Ohio Valley. 

Comm. 403 Reading and Research in the 

Foreign Press 2 or 4 hours 

Selected readings, content analysis and other research in peri- 
odicals of one foreign language area. Prerequisite: Proficiency 
in reading a foreign language. Generally a junior or senior course. 

Comm. 435-436 Internship in Mass 
Communications: 
Practicum 2 hours each 

On-the-job experience in the print or electronic media or ad- 
junct agencies through intern positions at tri-state area radio 
and television stations, advertising agencies, and public rela- 
tions/promotion departments of agencies or industrial, govern- 
ment, or non-profit firms. First or second semester internships 
require that the student set aside one day a week to devote to 
his work position. Students will work five days a week on such 
intern programs during the January or summer sessions. Pre- 
requisites: Comm. 201 and 202 for all assignments; also 375 for 
electronic media; 301 for advertising position; and 302 for public 
relations work. 

Comm. 480 Methods and Materials of 

Teaching Communications 2 hours 

Subjects will include the methods and materials of teaching com- 
munications, photo-journalism, and specialized reporting. 

Comm. 487-488 Independent 

Study 2 or 4 hours each 



Comm. 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 



82 



Economics and Business 



Economics 152 Personal Finance II 2 hours 

Emphasis will be placed on estate building concentrating on 
social insurance, personal insurance, pension programs, invest- 
ment markets and legal aspects of wills. 



AIMS 

The aims of the Economics and Business Department 
are to help students understand how man's struggle 
to provide for his needs and wants in a world of 
limited resources is related to all of man's problems: 
personal, social, political and spiritual; to provide 
knowledge of utilization of economic tools of analy- 
sis; and to direct students in the application of 
economic principles to the problems of society. The 
courses offered serve as a basis for work in business, 
government, specialized journalism, law, environ- 
mental planning and graduate study. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

Including the Senior Seminar and/or Senior Project a 
minimum of 28 hours in the Department is required. 
The following are the core courses: Econ. 200, 265 
(freshman-sophomore years), Econ. 301, 302 (junior 
year), Econ. 401, 477, 490 (senior year). Requirements 
outside the Department: Statistics 381 and Calculus 
201 by the beginning of the junior year. A student 
must attain a grade of at least "C" in Econ. 200 or 
have the approval of the Department Chairman be- 
fore he may enter the field of Economics. 

Economics 151 Personal Finance I 2 hours 

The basic objectives of this course are to develop an under- 
standing of the concepts needed for intelligent consumer de- 
cision making. The course will concentrate on budget policies, 
borrowing, installment buying, marketing techniques, and con- 
sumer purchases in the area of food, clothing, automobiles and 
housing. 



Economics 151 and 152 — Special note: This is a service course 
for personal use and cannot be used to satisfy requirements for 
a Field of Concentration nor can it be used as a general distribu- 
tion requirement in economics and business for the social sci- 
ence division. 



Economics 169 Introduction to 

Computer Science 2 hours 

Designed to help the student understand the use of a computer 
as a tool in applying economic analysis and business knowledge. 
Computer terminals are used with "Computer Basic" to give 
introductory know-how. 

Economics 200 Principles of Economics 4 hours 
An introduction to the inevitable problems which are associated 
with scarcity. Alternative methods of settling economic questions 
are discussed, with special emphasis placed on the functioning 
of the market system. Pricing, output determination, monopoly 
power, wage controls and price fixing are all discussed in relation 
to contemporary issues. The student is also introduced to prob- 
lems of money and banking, growth, the labor movement, and 
business operations. Students will read broadly from non- 
technical literature as well as use conventional text materials. 
This course is a prerequisite for all other economic courses 
with the exception of Economics 151. 



Economics 204 Contemporary 

Economic Issues 2 hours 

This is a practical follow-up to the basic principles course and 
allows majors and non-majors to pursue aspects of basic eco- 
nomics further through application to current problems. Topics 
such as Appalachian poverty, water and air pollution, urban 
renewal, tax reforms, inflation, etc. will be studied. Each stu- 
dent's topic must be approved by the supervising instructor. 
Prerequisite: Economics 200. 



83 



Economics 205 Contemporary 

Economic Studies 2 hours 

A special study on a major problem with either a case study and/ 
or field study reported on, either in a paper or oral presentation, 
or both. Each student's study must be approved by the super- 
vising instructor. Prerequisite: Economics 200. 

Economics 265 Principles of Accounting 4 hours 

An introduction to basic accounting and business concepts; 
principles of recording business transactions; cash record and 
control; periodic adjustments of transaction data; financial state- 
ment presentation; payroll accounting; accounting and reporting 
principles of partnerships; corporations, branches, and depart- 
ments. 



Economics 266 Principles of Accounting 4 hours 

Basic cost accounting principles including job cost and process 
cost systems; interpretation of financial statements; control of 
manufacturing costs through budgeting; flow of funds; tax con- 
siderations in business decisions, etc. 



Economics 301-302 Intermediate 

Economic Theory 4 hours each 

An advanced survey of the elements of economic theory pri- 
marily for students concentrating in Economics. First semester: 
resource allocation, price determination, output determination, 
and income distribution under various market conditions. Second 
semester: a study of national income and employment deter- 
mination, inflation growth and economic stability, interwoven 
with mathematical analysis & model building. 

These courses are designed to introduce the student to the 
techniques of differential and integral calculus, linear equations, 
matrix algebra, and statistics as applied to the above analysis. 
Prerequisites: Economics 200, Statistics 381, and Calculus 201. 



Economics 320 Principles of Marketing 4 hours 

The marketing function of the manufacturer, wholesaler, jobber, 
retailer, mail-order house, chain store and other marketing insti- 
tutions; cost of distribution; problems of marketing management 
and planning; modern trends in marketing will all be discussed. 




84 



Economics 321 Business Administration 2 hours 

Organization and structure of the business enterprise system, 
functions and activities, interaction with government and society, 
administration and objectives. 

Economics 322 Management 4 hours 

Sources, types, and uses of economic information in business 
and industry, development of the management point of view, 
use of related disciplines in problem analysis and decision mak- 
ing. Prerequisite: Economics 200. 

Economics 324 Business Finance 4 hours 

The study of the corporate organization and the planning of 
financial requirements. An intensive look at cash flow, budgeting, 
capital decisions, internal financing, and corporate reorganization. 

Economics 333 Labor 4 hours 

A general course in labor economics with an emphasis on trade 
unionism; history and objectives of organized labor; employ- 
ment and wage theory; managerial labor policies, collective bar- 
gaining; current social, economic, and political aspects of labor 
management relations; labor law; and case studies utilizing out- 
side consultants. Prerequisite: Economics 200. 

Economics 334 International Trade 4 hours 

The principles of international trade and finance and their appli- 
cation to the modern world; the theory of comparative advan- 
tage; exchange rates, monetary standards, tariffs, quotas, and 
commercial policy; capital movements; aid to less developed 
countries; geographic origin and direction of trade routes and 
products. Prerequisite: Economics 200. 

Economics 399 Junior Seminar 2 hours 

The creative ability of the students and faculty together will 
determine the varied content of the Junior Seminar. It is intended 
as an opportunity for discovery in areas of economics which 
may be of special interest, current importance or vital need to 
majors or those in fields related to economics or business. 

Economics 401 Money, Banking, and 

Fiscal Policy 4 hours 

A study of the various money markets; the operation of com- 
mercial banks, Federal Reserve System, and the Treasury Depart- 



ment including an analysis of tax revenues, expenditures and 
debt financing. Prerequisites: Economics 200, 265. 

Economics 441 Economic Thought 2 hours 

Outstanding writers and ideas beginning with Adam Smith are 
explored for the basic ideas which underlie capitalism, socialism 
and communism as theories. No prerequisite. 



Economics 442 



Comparative Economic 
Systems 



2 hours 



Basic approaches to economic theories as applied in such actual 
systems in the Soviet Union, Scandinavian countries, Great Brit- 
ain, and the United States will be examined. Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 200 or Economics 441 . 

Economics 443 Contemporary 

Economic Thought 2 hours 

A study of contemporary challenges to conventional economic 
wisdom and basic disagreements within conventional economic 
thought. Prerequisite: Economics 200 or permission of the in- 
structor. May be taken concurrently with either Economics 441 
or Economics 442. 

Economics 477-478 Senior Seminar 2 hours 

Devoted to a review of economics as a discipline today. Its 
function and place in the modern world with particular attention 
to political economy of the day. Also personal guidance with 
basic research on the Senior Seminar paper or paper topics. 
(Note: A student may elect to do a major Senior Project (Econ. 
490) evaluated at 4-8 hours credit in lieu of Senior Seminar and 
two-credit Senior Project.) 

Economics 487-488 Independent 

Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Only by approval of the supervising instructor and the Chairman 
of the Economics Department. 

Economics 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 

Preparation for the final oral reports on Senior Projects and the 
presentations. Some time will also be devoted to basic review 
of outlines for senior comprehensives. 



85 



Education 



AIMS 

To provide, in conjunction with other academic de- 
partments, balanced programs of preparation for ele- 
mentary and secondary teaching; to emphasize sound 
principles of effective teaching based on research in 
human development and learning; to prepare pros- 
pective teachers to utilize newly developed curricula, 
methods, and materials being adopted by progressive 
schools; to stimulate thinking about problems in edu- 
cation; to prepare students to continue their study 
in graduate school if they so desire. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHER 
EDUCATION 

A student preparing for elementary or secondary 
school teaching must plan to complete: (1) the re- 
quirements for graduation described on page 57, 
(2) a selection of courses providing appropriate back- 
ground for teaching in a particular field or subject 
area, and (3) a sequence of professional education 
courses and experiences designed to give a broad 
understanding of concepts and skills in teaching. 
Bethany College is accredited for both elementary 
and secondary teacher preparation by the National 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 
(NCATE) and is included in the interstate compact 
for reciprocity in certification. 

To become eligible for teacher certification, stu- 
dents must complete a college and state-approved 
program in all three of the areas named in the pre- 
ceding paragraph. It is the student's responsibility 
to seek appropriate counseling promptly, preferably 



early in his freshman year and to become familiar 
with all of the above requirements applicable to him. 

The Department recognizes abilities which a stu- 
dent may have already established in a given subject 
matter area through previous training and experience 
and assists him in planning his program accordingly 
Waivers or advanced standing granted by the College 
are noted on official transcripts so that courses from 
which a student is exempted may be applied toward 
certification requirements. 

Leadership of children and youth groups, e.g., sum- 
mer camp, scouts, church school, playground super- 
vision, etc., are strongly recommended for students 
planning to teach. 

A period of observation and participation of at 
least ten days in a school at the appropriate level is an 
important and integral part of the education curric- 
ulum. Most students find it convenient and most 
meaningful to undertake this experience during the 
January Term of their junior year, although some wish 
to explore the suitability of a teaching career by doing 
it earlier. To initiate such experience students should 
meet with the Director of Practicums who will work 
in cooperation with the Education Department. Defi- 
nite arrangements should be made at least one month 
prior to the planned observation dates. 

Students enrolling for courses involving observa- 
tion and teaching in schools must abide by dress and 
appearance standards of any school to which they 
may be assigned. 

The accompanying tables include required edu- 
cation courses for elementary and secondary educa- 
tion. Additional courses in education or other areas 
may be elected to meet teacher certification require- 
ments of particular states or individual needs and 
interests. 



86 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Following is a planned program to meet College graduation requirements and those in Elementary Education. 
Required education courses cannot be taken Credit-No Credit. 



FIRST SEMESTER 
Freshman 

'Freshman Seminar 
Relig. and/or I nterdiscipl. Lect. Crs. 
Bio., Phys. Sci., Psych., or Math. 
Fine Arts, Eng., or Philos. (Humanities) 



CREDIT 

4 

4 
4 
4 



SECOND SEMESTER CREDIT 

Interdiscipl. Lect. Crs. and/or Relig. 4 

Bio., Phys. Sci., Psych., or Math. 4 

Eng., Fine Arts, or Philos. (Humanities) 4 

Electives 4 



Sophomore 

*Ed. 201 Human Devel. and Learning I 
Amer. Hist. (Departmental 

offerings for selection) 
Bio., Phys. Sci., Psych., or Math. 
Electives 



4 
4 

4 



*Ed. 202 Human Devel. and Learning II 4 

*Ed. 242 Prin. & Curric. of Elem. & Mid. Schl. 2 

Amer. Hist, (selection) 4 

Bio., Phys. Sci., Psych., or Math. 4 

* Math. 226 Math for Teachers 2 



Junior 

"Ed. 345 Methods & Content in 

Elem. & Mid. Schl. I (emphasis on Math.) 4 

Pol. Sci., Soc, or Econ. 4 

Electives 8 



k Ed. 346 Methods & Content in 

Elem. & Mid. Schl. II 

(emphasis on Read. & Lang. Arts) 
Ed. 348 Prof. Practicum 
Pol. Sci., Econ., or Geog. 
Electives 



4 
2 
4 
6 



Senior 

Professional Block 
*Ed. (Psych.) 333 Ed. Psych. 
*Ed. 401 Hist, and Philos. of Ed. 
*Ed. 443 Obs. and Directed Teaching 
*Ed. 447 Methods & Content in 
Elem. &Mid. Schl. Ill 
(emphasis on Sci. & Soc. Stud.) 
NO OTHER COURSES PERMITTED 



2 
2 
8 



*Ed. 490 Senior Project 2-8 

Eng., Fine Arts, or Philos. (Humanities) 4 

Electives 4-10 



•To be taken in semester indicated to provide continuity to the program. Others recommended in semester indicated, although flexibility allowed. 
Usually 12-24 hours in a subject matter field is needed for employment in middle schools. 
School observation and participation experience (see p. 85) to be completed prior to Professional Block. 
Course selection and sequence subject to approval by student's advisor. 



87 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Students preparing to teach in junior and senior high schools are expected to follow the sequence of required 
education courses listed below. General distribution and other requirements for graduation, and those for the 
student's field of concentration must be added. The required education courses cannot be taken Credit-No 
Credit. 



FIRST SEMESTER 




CREDIT 


SECOND SEMESTER CREDIT 


Freshman 










Psych. 100 Gen. Psych, (prereq. for Ed. 333) 




4 






Sophomore 






Ed. 


202 Human Develop. & Learning II 4 
(Application for Teacher 
Education due May 15) 


Junior 






Ed. 


(or other) 480 Methods 


Ed. 349 Participation in Secondary Schools 




2 




and Materials in Teaching* 2-4 


(Copy of current semester schedule 








Meetings scheduled by Ed. Dept. as needed 


to Ed. Dept. by Sept. 7) 








(Copy of current semester schedule 

to Ed. Dept. by Feb. 8) 

(Application for Student Teaching due March 15) 


Senior 










Professional Block 










Ed. (Psych.) 333 Educational Psychology 




2 




(Application for National 


Ed. 401 History & Philosophy of Education 




4 




Tchr. Exam, due March 11) 


Ed. 428 Principles and Techniques of 










Secondary Education 




4 






Ed. 475 Observation and Directed 










Teaching, Secondary 




6 






'Some departments offer these courses only first semester or in alternate years. 




School observation and participation experience (see p 


85) 


to be com 


Dieted prior to Professional Block. 


Course selections and sequences are subject to approval 


by the Department 


of Education. The student's total preparation program must be 


approved by this Department and the Chairman of his 


ma 


ior academic department. 



Students in secondary education should ask both 
the Education Department Chairman and their field 
of concentration advisor for guidance concerning 
plans for teacher preparation, to be sure they follow 
patterns which will qualify them for teacher certifi- 
cation and maximize employability. Subject-matter 
specialization is especially important and may vary 
considerably from state to state. Programs designed 



for non-teacher-education majors will probably need 
to be modified in most cases. 

Each student's total preparation must be approved 
by the Department of Education, the Chairman of 
his major department, and — if he prepares to teach 
in more than one subject field — the Chairman of 
any other department concerned. 



88 



ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION 

Students interested in preparing to teach are urged to 
consult a member of the Education Department indi- 
vidually as soon as possible for counseling with re- 
spect to prospects for employment in the various 
teaching fields, course requirements, state certifica- 
tion requirements, etc. 

During the second semester of the sophomore 
year, and after the student has enrolled in at least 
one education course, written application for admis- 
sion to the elementary or secondary teacher educa- 
tion program should be submitted to the Department 




of Education on forms obtained from the Department. 

Applications are appraised by the Teacher Educa- 
tion Review Committee with respect to academic 
achievement, emotional and physical fitness, person- 
ality traits, and other factors the Committee consid- 
ers essential to a teaching career. The Committee 
may: (1) recommend full or conditional approval; 
(2) suggest programs to overcome certain deficien- 
cies, or, in some cases, (3) recommend that the stu- 
dent not prepare for teaching. 

A "C" average must be attained in all academic 
work and in all professional education courses for 
admission. All Committee recommendations for ap- 
proval are based on this condition. 

The Committee may review a student's qualifica- 
tions at any time and issue appropriate recommenda- 
tions. The general qualifications of all students are 
reviewed at the time they apply for student teaching. 

PROFESSIONAL BLOCK 

Each student pursuing a curriculum in teacher edu- 
cation will take a designed group of professional 
courses, including student teaching, during the first 
semester of the senior year. This is designated as 
the Professional Block. Requirements for admission 
to the Block are as follows: 

Prerequisites for admission to teacher education and 
for Elementary Education: Psychology 100 and Edu- 
cation 201, 202, 242, 345, 346, 348, and observation 
experience; for Secondary: Psychology 100, Educa- 
tion 202, 349, 480, observation experience, and ade- 
quate background for student teaching in one or 
more subject fields as approved by the academic 
department(s) concerned. Prerequisites cannot be de- 
ferred until after the Professional Block or taken at 
another institution without written permission from 
the Department of Education. 



89 



Scholarship requirements — By state law, a student in 
Elementary Education must have not less than a "C" 
average in all college work and a "C" average in pro- 
fessional (Education) courses taken prior to the time 
he is admitted to the Block; a student in Secondary 
Education must have not less than a "C" average in 
all college work, a "C" average in his field of con- 
centration and a "C" average in professional (Edu- 
cation) courses, including methods courses offered 
by other departments, taken prior to the Block. 

Application for Student Teaching — Students are re- 
quired to make application for student teaching dur- 
ing the second semester of the junior year, on forms 
provided by the Education Department. This appli- 
cation requests the recommendation of the student's 
Senior Education Department Advisor, if Elementary, 
and his academic Department Chairman or Advisor, 
if Secondary, and requires the approval of the Chair- 
man of the Department of Education. Applications 
will not be approved for students not previously ad- 
mitted to teacher education, as explained above. 

Community-based Professional Block — Student 
teaching and course work comprising the Block will 
be conducted for the entire first semester of the 
senior year at off campus centers for elementary (and 
possibly for secondary) to provide the most effective 
field experience. Students enrolled may need to live 
in the community where the center is located. The 
College will assist in locating housing if desired, and 
with other details of the arrangement. 

Students will not be permitted to schedule courses 
in conflict with the Block during the semester they 
are enrolled in it, or carry extra-curricular activities 
which will interfere with the requirements imposed 
by the Block. Arrangements can usually be made for 
practice and participation in varsity sports. Any ex- 



ceptions to the above must be approved by the chair- 
men of the departments concerned and by the Dean 
of the Faculty. Students should not register for other 
than the prescribed Professional Block courses with- 
out written permission from the Department of 
Education. 

CERTIFICATION 

Near the end of his senior year, each student should 
initiate application procedures for certification in the 
state where he expects to teach. 

All applications require the Education Department 
Chairman's recommendation. To be recommended, 
a student must meet — in addition to certification re- 
quirements of the state for which he is applying — 
the following qualifications: (1) successful student 
teaching experience; (2) completion of an approved 
teacher education program; (3) completion of the 
National Teacher Examinations during the senior 
year, as arranged by the Education Department; (4) 
eligibility for graduation; and (5) evidence of per- 
sonal traits and character conducive to success as a 
teacher. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

Ed. 201 Human Development and 

Learning I 4 hours 

Individual and group development from infancy to adolescence. 
Observation and first hand contacts with children are included. 
Educational programs are considered in terms of the total child 
development. Freshmen not admitted. 

Ed. 202 Human Development and 

Learning II 4 hours 

Individual and group development from adolescence through 
the young adult periods. Applications are made in relation to 



90 



learning theory, self understanding and preparation for working 
with young people. Freshmen not admitted. 



Ed. 240 Exploring Education 2 hours 

An overview of innovations and problems confronting today's 
educators at all levels. 



Ed. 242 Principles and Curriculum of 

Elementary and Middle School 2 hours 

Teaching and learning principles which affect planning for the 
education of the child from early childhood through the various 
levels in the elementary and middle school programs. Planning 
with children, parents, paraprofessionals, fellow teachers and 
specialists; teaching in the classroom and the community; organ- 
izing appropriate activities and materials; and reporting the 
child's progress to parents. 

Ed. 333 Educational Psychology 2 hours 

See Psychology 333. The application of principles of psychology 
to the school situation. Prerequisite: Psychology 100. 

Ed. 338 Psychological and Educational 

Tests and Measurements 2 hours 

See Psychology 338. The course will deal mainly with group 
testing, with attention to the construction and use of standard- 
ized and ad hoc tests. The necessary correlation techniques 
will be included. Recommended especially for students in sec- 
ondary education. Prerequisite: Psychology TOO. 

Ed. 342 Children's Literature in the 

Elementary and Middle School 2 hours 

Includes background of the history of literature for children; 
familiarity with established and current literature in this area; 
critical analysis skills; methods and techniques of using literature; 
work with children. Students expected to demonstrate compe- 
tence in appropriate audio-visual aids (see Ed. 365). 



Ed. 344 Teaching Skills Laboratory 



Non-Credit 



havior, non-verbal cues, set induction, stimulus variation, closure, 
and presentation skills including lecturing, use of examples, 
planned repetition, and completeness of communication. Stu- 
dents concurrently enrolled in elementary or secondary methods 
courses or student teaching may participate in units prescribed 
by their instructors, or as desired within limitations of facilities 
and supervision. 

Ed. 345 Methods and Content in 

Elementary and Middle School I 4 hours 
Emphasis on arithmetical skills, including the understanding of 
fundamental processes; comparison of different philosophies in 
teaching arithmetic; elements of modern mathematics; practical 
application of arithmetical skills at all levels of the curriculum. 
Students expected to demonstrate competence in appropriate 
audio-visual aids (see Ed. 365). Classroom experience in public 
schools. Prerequisite: Mathematics 225 or consent of instructor. 



Ed. 346 Methods and Content in 

Elementary and Middle School II 



4 hours 



Study and practice of specific teaching skills using films, manuals, 
microteaching and TV. Skills include verbal and non-verbal re- 
sponses, questioning, reinforcement, recognizing attendant be- 



Emphasis on teaching the skills of reading, listening, speaking and 
writing as they relate to the total curriculum. Strong emphasis on 
teaching of reading and the integration of the related areas in 
language arts. Students expected to demonstrate competence in 
appropriate audio-visual aids (see Ed. 365). Classroom experience 
in public schools. 

Ed. 348 Professional Practicum 2 hours 

Preparation of the prospective student teacher for his role as 
observer and participant in the classroom. 

Ed. 349 Participation in Secondary Schools 2 hours 
Regularly scheduled observation and limited teaching activities 
in secondary schools. Seminar for direction and evaluation of 
observation experiences and study of related problems. 

Ed. 365 Audio-Visual Education 2 hours 

Laboratory experiences in producing hand-made, color-lift, ther- 
mal, and overlay transparencies, regular and thermal spirit and 
mimeo masters, plastic embeddings; tape recordings, dry mount- 
ings, and photo-copy slides; operation of 16 mm, 8 mm, film- 



91 



strip, slide, opaque, and overhead projectors, dry-mounting press, 
teaching machine, tape recorder, thermal copier, TV equipment 
and lettering aids. Theory for selection and effective utilization 
of various media. Students concurrently enrolled in elementary 
or secondary school observation, student teaching, or methods 
courses may complete experiences prescribed by their instruc- 
tors, or as desired within limitations of facilities and supervision. 
Those wanting credit must enroll for Ed. 365, complete all 
required laboratory projects and other course requirements. Stu- 
dents not in teacher education admitted with instructor's consent. 



Ed. 401 History and Philosophy 

of Education 2 or 4 hours 

Development of modern education in social, historical, and 
philosophical perspective, emphasizing backgrounds of present 
practices, current problems and issues. Current practice is ana- 
lyzed in terms of philosophic rationale and applications are 
made to the school situation. Students in elementary should 
register for two semester hours; those in secondary for four 
semester hours. 



Ed. 428 Principles and Techniques of 
Secondary Education 



Aims, functions and curriculum organization of secondary 
schools. Basic methods, materials and techniques, including eval- 
uation, applicable to modern teaching in middle, junior high, and 
senior high schools, integrated with observation and student 
teaching in schools. Certification and employment procedures, 
professional practices, and continuing education. 



Ed. 443 Observation and Directed 

Teaching in Elementary Education 8 hours 

Observation and full-time student teaching at both primary and 
intermediate levels from September until Christmas to include a 
minimum of 200 clock hours of direct teaching. Concurrent en- 
rollment in Ed. 333, 401, and 447 only. Prerequisites: See Pro- 
fessional Block on page 88. 



Ed. 447 Methods and Content in 

Elementary and Middle School III 4 hours 
An understanding of the concepts of the social studies and sci- 
ences approached through various methods, including unit study, 
inquiry, experimentation, and the process approach. Practical 
application in school situation. 



4 hours .,". 




92 



Ed. 452 Education of Exceptional 

Children 2 or 4 hours 

Identifying exceptional children, especially with learning disabil- 
ities, understanding their situation and behavior, working with 
them as learners and group members, and directing their handling 
of themselves as members of society. Seminar discussions, read- 
ings, and application of integrated knowledge in work with 
children. Those taking the course for full credit will, in addition 
to the above stated activities, do a practicum during which they 
work in one of several area school programs for exceptional chil- 
dren. This practicum will be worked out with the guidance of the 
instructor. Prerequisite: Ed. 443 or 475 or permission of in- 
structor. 

Ed. 475 Observation and Directed 

Teaching in Secondary Education 6 hours 
Directed full-time observation and student teaching in secondary 
schools with partial assignments in lower schools if appropriate; 
to include a minimum of 90 clock hours actual teaching. Seminar 
required throughout the semester. Students must make applica- 
tion for student teaching prior to advance registration. Other 
courses or activities which might interfere with student teaching 
should be avoided. Concurrent enrollment in Ed. 401 and 428. 
Prerequisites: See Professional Block on page 88 

Ed. 480 Methods and Materials in 

Teaching 2 or 4 hours 

See courses numbered 480 offered by various departments, i.e. 
Art, Biology, Chemistry, Communications, English, Foreign Lan- 
guages, General Sciences, Mathematics, Music, Physical Educa- 
tion, Psychology, Physics, and Social Science (also see auxiliary 
methods courses, i.e. Art 340, Music 340-341, and Physical Edu- 
cation 480, required in some programs). Includes observation and 
participation in secondary schools. Experiences in production 
and utilization of appropriate A-V materials and equipment avail- 
able in A-V laboratory (see Ed. 365). Study and application of 
specific teaching skills available in teaching skills laboratory (see 
Ed. 344). 

Ed. 487-488 Independent Study in 

Education 2 or 4 hours each 



English 



Ed. 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 



AIMS 

To teach students to write effectively; to provide 
them with a knowledge of major literary works; to 
provide them with standards for the intelligent crit- 
icism of literature. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

1. Concentration in English requires a minimum of 
32 hours in the Department, exclusive of the Se- 
nior Project (Eng. 490). The following courses are 
required: 300, 325-326, 341-342, 350, 477-478. In 
addition to these 24 hours, each student will elect 
courses or independent study which will extend 
his knowledge of one or two areas of literature, 
provide background for his Senior Project and part 
of his Senior Comprehensive Examination, and 
prepare him for further study or a career. The pro- 
gram of a student preparing for the law or another 
profession will thus be different from that of a stu- 
dent preparing for a career as a professional writer 
and from that of a student preparing for graduate 
study in English or for secondary school teaching. 

2. At least twelve hours in another department must 
also be included in the field of concentration. 
These courses should be related either to the stu- 
dent's area of special interest in English or to his 
vocational plans. 

3. Each student will take the Comprehensive Exami- 
nation in English. The examination consists of three 
parts: the Undergraduate Record Examination in 



93 



Literature, an essay examination, and an oral exam- 
ination. Approximately half of the essay examina- 
tion will be individualized for each student, being 
based on his area of special interest. 

4. A student will not be accepted for concentration 
in English later than the beginning of his fifth 
semester unless he has completed English 300 and 
either English 325-326 or English 341-342. 

5. Students concentrating in English are expected to 
attain a minimum grade of "C" in all courses in the 
Department. All courses in the field of concentra- 
tion must be taken for a letter grade. 



Eng. 120 Expository Writing II 



Non-credit 



Training and practice in writing clear and effective expository 
prose, with emphasis upon the needs of individual students. Re- 
quired of all students whose performance on the fourth (junior) 
Writing Qualification Test is not satisfactory. Offered each semes- 
ter. 



Eng. 130 Honors Freshman English 2 hours 

A writing course for freshmen of superior ability and accomplish- 
ment. Introduction to the principles of critical reading and writ- 
ing. Intensive practice in writing both expository and imaginative 
prose, with emphasis upon the achievement of clarity and ac- 
curacy. Enrollment by invitation only. Offered Fall 1973-74. 



WRITING QUALIFICATION TESTS 

The annual Writing Qualification Tests are adminis- 
tered by the Department. Each student is required to 
take a series of four Writing Qualification Tests in the 
following sequence: the Initial Writing Qualification 
Test when he enters Bethany, and one during his 
Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior years. Satisfactory 
performance on the Junior Writing Qualification Test 
is required for graduation. 

To assist students in developing and maintaining 
their skills in composition, the Department offers 
several expository writing courses. 



Eng. 100 College Composition 2 hours 

Training and practice in writing clear and effective expository 
prose. Each student will write at least seven essays using tradi- 
tional rhetorical principles. The course also includes instruction 
in methods of library research. May not be taken on a CR/NCR 
basis. Offered each semester. 



Eng. 110 Expository Writing I Non-credit 

The course is identical with English 100, but carries no academic 
credit. Neither letter grades nor CR/NCR grades are assigned or 
recorded. Offered each semester. 



Eng. 150-159 Freshman Seminar in 

Literature 2 hours 

Introductory seminars for the study of special topics in modern 
literature. Each seminar is offered for a half-semester only. May 
be used to satisfy distribution requirements in Humanities and 
departmental requirements for concentration in English. 

Eng. 150 The Novels of Thomas Wolfe: Fiction and Fact 

An examination of the relationship between Wolfe's novels and 
his life. Students will read Look Homeward Angel, Of Time and 
the River, The Web and the Rock, and You Can't Co Home 
Again. They will also read biographical and critical material 
about Wolfe and selections from his letters. Offered Fall 
1973-74. 

Eng. 151 Short Fiction 

An examination of several short novels by American, English, 
and European writers. Novellas by Dostoievsky, Tolstoi, Conrad, 
Kafka, Flannery O'Connor, and Bellow are included. Offered 
Fall 1973-74. 

Eng. 152 The Fiction of William Golding 

An examination of major themes in the work of William Gold- 
ing. Students will read The Spire, Free Fall, Lord of the Flies, 
and others. Offered Spring 1973-74. 

Eng. 153 Modern Russian Fiction 

An examination of the work of several Russian writers of 
novels and short stories. Students will read selections from the 
work of Dostoievsky, Tolstoi, Solzhenitsyn, and others. Of- 
fered Spring 1973-74. 



94 



Eng. 154 The New Poetry 

The student will explicate, compare, and contrast the lyrics of 
popular song writers and the works of contemporary poets. 
Lyrics and poems by the Beatles, Robert Lowell, Bob Dylan, 
Leonard Cohen, Sylvia Plath, Don L. Lee, and Carole King will 
be among those examined. Offered Spring 1973-74. 

Eng. 155 King Arthur: Past and Present 

An examination of the ways in which English and American 
poets and novelists have used the legend of King Arthur. Stu- 
dents will read selections from Malory's Morte D'Arthur, Tenny- 
son's Idylls of the King, Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King 
Arthur's Court, and T. H. White's The Once and Future King. 
Not offered 1973-74. 



Eng. 200 Research Paper Writing 



2 hours 



An introduction to the writing of library research papers. Instruc- 
tion in topic selection, library resources, the research process, the 
rhetoric of research paper writing, documentation, and the 
mechanics of format. Each student will write at least two research 
papers. Prerequisite: demonstrated proficiency in expository 
writing. Offered Fall 1973-74. 



Eng. 201 Advanced Expository Writing 2 hours 

Intensive practice in writing expository prose, with emphasis 
upon the achievement of literary excellence. The course is offered 
twice each year. Enrollment is limited to fifteen with preference 
given to juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: demonstrated pro- 
ficiency in expository writing. 



Eng. 202 Imaginative Writing 



2 hours 



Intensive practice in writing fiction, poetry, or plays, with em- 
phasis upon the achievement of literary excellence. Individual 
assignments and frequent conferences. Enrollment limited to 
fifteen, with preference given to juniors and seniors. Prereq- 
uisites: demonstrated proficiency in expository writing and con- 
sent of the instructor. Offered Fall 1973-74. 



Eng. 240 Myths and Legends 



2 hours 



A study of Biblical, classical, European, and British myths and 
legends and their use in Western literature. Offered Spring 
1973-74. 



Eng. 245 French Literature in Translation 2 hours 

Highlights of French literature, from the Song of Roland to Sartre, 
as it seeks to examine the human condition. Readings and dis- 
cussion in English. (May be taken for credit as French 311). Of- 
fered Spring 1973-74. 




95 



Eng. 251-254 Literature of the 

Western World 2 hours each 

A chronological study of Western literary masterpieces, chiefly 
in translation. 251: Greek and Roman Classicism. 252: The Mid- 
dle Ages. 253: Renaissance and Neo-Classicism. 254: Modern. 



Eng. 261-262 The British Novel 2 hours each 

The development of the British novel from the 18th century until 
the present. 261: Defoe through Dickens. 262: Hardy to the pres- 
ent. Offered Fall 1973-74 



Eng. 263-264 The American Novel 2 hours each 
The development of the American novel from the 19th century 
until the present. 263: The beginnings through World War I. 
264: The 1920s to the present. Offered Spring 1973-74. 



Eng. 270 Shakespeare 4 hours 

Rapid reading of the major plays, with emphasis upon Shake- 
speare's themes, motifs, language, and characterization. 



Eng. 350 Literary Criticism: History 2 hours 

Chronological study of the development of literary criticism from 
Aristotle to the present. Students will read selections from the 
work of major critics and compare and contrast their principles 
and methods. Prerequisites: Eng. 300 and either Eng. 325-326 
or Eng. 341-342. Required for concentration in English. Offered 
Spring 1973-74. 

Eng. 351 Literary Criticism: 

Theory and Practice 2 hours 

Study of the value and function of literary criticism, particularly 
during the present century. Practical criticism of poetry and 
prose, with emphasis upon the development of critical points of 
view and the preparation of critical essays. Recommended for 
students who plan to attend graduate school. Prerequisite: Eng. 
351. Offered Spring 1973-74. 

Eng. 370 Development of Modern English 4 hours 

History of the English language from Anglo-Saxon to Modern 
English, with emphasis upon the structure and vocabulary of the 
latter. Required for students preparing to teach secondary school 
English. 



Eng. 300 Preface to Literary Studies 



2 hours 



An introduction to the principles and practice of literary analysis. 
Close reading and explication of poetry and prose. The prepara- 
tion of critical essays. Required for concentration in English. 



Eng. 325-326 British Literature 4 hours each 

The development of British literature from the beginning to the 
present. First semester: from Beowulf to the end of the 18th 
century. Second semester: the 19th and 20th centuries. In the 
fall of 1973, if enrollment warrants, 325 will be taught in Oxford, 
England. In the spring of 1974, 326 will be taught on the Bethany 
campus. Required for concentration in English. 



Eng. 341-342 American Literature 4 hours each 

The development of American literature from the Colonial Period 
to the present, with emphasis upon the writers of the 19th and 
20th centuries. Required for concentration in English. 



ADVANCED SEMINARS 

Courses numbered 400 through 450 are seminars for 
the study of special literary topics or areas. Topics 
and the amount of credit offered for each seminar 
will vary from semester to semester. When the topic 
is different, the seminar may be repeated for credit. 

Eng. 400-409 Studies in Literary Themes and Motifs 

A seminar for the study of a single theme or motif in literary 
works in English or in translation. 

Eng. 400 Cosmic Warfare 2 hours 

Examination of some modern fictional presentations of the 
struggle between good and evil. Reading will include selections 
from the work of John Milton, J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, and 
Charles Williams. Prerequisite: Eng. 422. Offered Spring 1973- 
74. 



96 



Eng. 402 The Making of an American Apocalypse 4 hours 

The student will examine sermons, scripture, letters, and novels 
that chronicle the development of the American dream and 
its gradual transformation into an American nightmare. Special 
emphasis will be placed on the emergence of this pattern in 
the American novel. The student will read, among others, 
novels by Melville, Alger, Dreiser, West, Bellow, Brautigan, 
and Pyncheon. (May be taken for credit as Religious Studies 
325.) Offered Fall 1973-74. 

Eng. 410-419 Studies in Literary Genres 

A seminar for the study of a single literary genre, or mode, such 
as the epic, tragedy, satire, or biography. 

Eng. 411 British Drama 4 hours 

Development of British drama from the beginning until the 
present. If enrollment warrants, the seminar will be offered in 
Oxford, England, concurrently with English 325 and Social 
Studies 320. Offered Fall 1973-74. 

Eng. 412 Satire 2 hours 

An examination of the aims and methods of some of the great 
British writers of satire, chiefly those of the Restoration and 
eighteenth century. Students will read selections from the 
work of Butler, Dryden, Swift, Pope, Gay, and others. Offered 
Spring 1973-74. 

Eng. 420-429 Studies in Major Authors 

A seminar for the study of one or more major American, British, 
or European authors. 

Eng. 421 John Donne and the Metaphysical Poets 2 hours 

An examination of themes, structure, and imagery in the work 
ol John Donne and several other poets of the seventeenth cen- 
tury, including George Herbert, Henry Vaughan, and Richard 
Crashaw. Offered Fall 1973-74. 

Eng. 422 Milton 2 hours 

An examination of the ma|or poetry and some of the prose of 
|ohn Milton. Reading will include Comus, Paradise Lost, Para- 
dise Regained, and Samson Agonistes. Offered Fall 1973-74. 

Eng. 430-439 Studies in the Twentieth Century 

A seminar for the study of English, American, or foreign literature 

of the present century. Not offered 1973-74. 

Eng. 440-449 Studies in Literary Periods 

A seminar for the study of a limited period of time in British 
literature. Prerequisite: English 325-326. 



Eng. 441 The Romantic Period 4 hours 

An examination of some of the major prose and poetry of the 
Romantic period in England. Reading will include selections 
from the work of Wordsworth, Keats, Byron, Hazlitt, Lamb, and 
others. Prerequisite: Eng. 325-326. Not Offered 1973-74. 

Eng. 442 The Age of Johnson 4 hours 

Study of the major prose, poetry, and drama of the mid- 
eighteenth century, with emphasis upon the work of Samuel 
Johnson and the members of his circle, including James Bos- 
well, Oliver Goldsmith, and others. Prerequisite: Eng. 325- 
326. Offered Spring 1973-74. 

Eng. 450-459 Studies in American Literature 

A seminar for the study of a special topic in American literature 
Prerequisite: English 341-342. 

Eng. 452 Twentieth Century Renaissance 4 hours 

Study of the important experimental writers of the 1920's, in- 
cluding Stein, Pound, Eliot, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Cummings, 
and O'Neill. Prerequisite: Eng. 341-342. Offered Spring 
1973-74. 



Eng. 477-478 Senior Seminar and 

Tutorial 2 hours each 

Reading and research designed to review and organize a stu- 
dent's knowledge of his field of concentration. Half of the stu- 
dent's time will be devoted to seminar work: he will meet 
weekly with other seniors and the Chairman of the Department. 
The remainder of his time in the course will be spent in indi- 
vidual weekly or bi-weekly conferences with the supervisor of 
his special area in literature. Prerequisites: Eng. 300, 325-326, 
341-342, 350, and at least one advanced seminar. 

Eng. 480 Methods of Teaching English 2 hours 

The teaching of high school composition and literature. Literary 
analysis, systems of grammar, and reading improvement. 

Eng. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Individual study in any area of English for which the student 
is qualified. Independent study is offered only in areas not 
included in other courses in the Department. Prerequisites: 
demonstrated proficiency in expository writing; adequate prepa- 
ration to undertake the study as determined by the instructor; 
consent of the Chairman of the Department. 



97 



Eng. 490 Senior Project 2 or 4 hours 

Generally, the Senior Project in English will consist of a major 
critical paper on a topic developed from at least one of the 
student's elective advanced seminars in the Department. During 
his junior year, the student should determine his area of interest 
and make a preliminary investigation of it after consulting his 
supervisor, who will be the member of the staff best qualified 
to assist him. Reading and research should continue during the 
student's senior year, and much of his final semester should be 
devoted to preparation of the paper. Occasionally, and under 
extraordinary circumstances, the Senior Project may take other 
forms. A student who wishes to undertake an unusual Senior 
Project must consult with the Chairman of the Department no 
later than the beginning of his fourth semester. Credit for the 
Senior Project is not included in the total number of hours 
required for concentration in English. 



Fine Arts 



AIMS 

The Department of Fine Arts is not a separate faculty; 
it draws upon the faculties and curricula of the De- 
partments of Art, Communications, Music, Philoso- 
phy, and Theatre. Its aims are to give expression to 
the aesthetic unity of the various forms and modes 
of art, and to permit students to pursue a non- 
professional interest in these fields. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

All students concentrating in Fine Arts must take 
Fine Arts 201-202; Art 200; Theatre 401; Music 101 
or Music 111 ; Philosophy 368; and Fine Arts 477 and 




* 



a 



\*Wy 







98 



a Senior Project (490). In addition, at least six courses 
must be elected from at least two of the following 
categories, with an emphasis (four courses) in one 
of the categories. 

1. Art: advanced art studio and art history courses 

2. Music: music theory and music literature courses 

3. Communications: basic speech courses 

4. Theatre: advanced theatre courses 

Students electing this Field of Concentration would 
normally be expected to participate in performance 
and practice activities provided through extracurricu- 
lar programs, especially in their area of emphasis. 

Students primarily interested in Art or Music should 
also consult the sections of this catalogue dealing 
with Fields of Concentration in those Departments. 

Fine Arts 201-202 Introduction to 

the Arts 4 hours each 

An introduction to the elements of the graphic and plastic arts 
and music and to the organization of these elements in works of 
art through the examination of representative master works of 
Western art from all ages. Consideration is also given to aes- 
thetic functions and values. The sequence is chronological, the 
first semester extending to mid-18th century, the second, from 
that point to the present. 

Fine Arts 477 Seminar 2 hours 

A survey review of the Fine Arts area concentrating upon the 
student's field of emphasis, largely in preparation for the senior 
comprehensive examination. Required of all seniors in the Fine 
Arts field. 



Foreign Languages 



Fine Arts 487-488 Independent Study 



2-4 hours 



Fine Arts 490 Senior Project 2 hours 

An independent, student-initiated project which may be in the 
nature of either research or creative work. 



AIMS 

To familiarize students with the language, literature 
and culture of the French, German and Spanish speak- 
ing peoples; to prepare students to be teachers, trans- 
lators, or representatives in foreign service; to pro- 
vide training in reading for students who are inter- 
ested in scientific or historical research requiring 
knowledge of a foreign language; to help travelers 
to foreign countries acquire basic conversation skills. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION IN FRENCH, GERMAN, 
OR SPANISH 

A minimum of 24 credit-hours in the target language 
not including French 101-102, German 101-102, or 
Spanish 101-102) plus Foreign Language 425, and a 
Senior Project. 

A reading knowledge of a foreign language other 
than the one chosen as the Field of Concentration is 
recommended. Every student should spend a mini- 
mum of one semester studying in a country where 
his major foreign language is spoken. Students ex- 
pecting to teach a foreign language must complete 
Foreign Language 480. 

FRENCH 

Fr. 101-102 Basic French 4 hours each 

Fundamentals of grammar, pronunciation and composition. 
Emphasis on audio-oral approach to develop basic skills of com- 
prehension, speaking, writing, and reading. Two half-hour labo- 
ratories per week in addition to four hours classroom work. 
Course is intended primarily for students who have no acquaint- 
ance with the language. 



<)<) 



Fr. 110 French for Travelers 2 hours 

Spoken, everyday French designed to aid American visitors to 
French-speaking countries. 

Fr. 151 French-English Translation 2 hours 

A rapid course in translation designed to prepare students to 

read in French in their various Fields of Concentration. Text 
books may vary with each student. 

Fr. 152 French-English Translation 2 hours 

A continuation of Fr. 151. Prerequisite: Fr. 151 or equivalent. 

Fr. 200 Intermediate French 4 hours 

Grammar review, reading, speaking, writing. An introduction to 
great works of French literature. Two half-hour laboratories per 
week in addition to four hours classroom work. Prerequisite: 
Fr. 102 or equivalent. Ottered each Fall. 



Fr. 300 Advanced Conversation 
and Composition 



4 hours 



French and American life styles are compared through discus- 
sions, skits, and compositions designed to improve the student's 
communication skills in French. A feature of this course is partic- 
ipation in the weekly meeting of the French Club at the dinner 
hour. Prerequisite: Fr. 200 or equivalent. 

Fr. 311 Masterpieces of French Literature 

(in English) 2 hours 

Highlights of French literature from Voltaire to Sartre, as it seeks 
to examine the human condition. Readings and discussion in 
English. (May be taken for credit as English 245). 

Fr. 350 Highlights of French Literature 4 hours 

Survey of French literature from the early periods to the present 
Readings in French from an anthology. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite: A reading knowledge of French. Fr. 300 recom- 
mended. 

Fr. 401 The Age of Classicism 4 hours 

A literary study of seventeenth century France, including plays 
of Corneille, Racine, and Moliere. Readings in Descartes, Pascal, 



La Fontaine, and others. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: A 
good reading knowledge of French. Fr. 350 recommended. Alter- 
nate years: Fall 1973-74. 

Fr. 402 The Enlightenment 4 hours 

France's Age of Reason is examined through works by Voltaire, 
Montesquieu, Marivaux, Diderot, Rousseau, and others. Con- 
ducted in French. Prerequisite: A good reading knowledge of 
French. Fr. 350 recommended. Alternate years: Spring 1974-75. 

Fr. 403 From Romanticism to Symbolism 4 hours 

A critical study of representative authors of each major literary 
movement of the 19th century: romanticism, realism, naturalism, 
symbolism. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: A good reading 
knowledge of French. Fr. 350 recommended. Alternate years: 
Fall 1973-74. 



Fr. 404 Literature of Modern France 4 hours 

A critical study of major authors of 20th century French litera- 
ture, from Apollinaire to Robbe-Grillet. Conducted in French. 
Prerequisite: A good reading knowledge of French. Fr. 350 or 403 
recommended. Alternate years: Spring 1973-74. 

Fr. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours each 



Fr. 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 



GERMAN 

German 101-102 Basic German 4 hours each 

Fundamentals of pronunciation, grammar, and reading. Emphasis 
on audio-oral approach to develop basic skills of comprehension, 
speaking, reading and writing. Two half-hour periods of labora- 
tory work in addition to four hours classroom work per week. 
Primarily for students who have no acquaintance with the lan- 
guage. 

German 110 Speaking German (German 

for Travelers) 2 hours 

An eight-week, intensive course in conversational German in- 
tended for students who plan to travel in Germany. Little or no 
background in German is required. 



700 




German 200 Intermediate German 4 hours 

Grammar review, reading, speaking, writing. Introduction to 
great works of literature. Two half-hour periods of laboratory 
work in addition to four hours classroom work per week. Pre- 
requisite: German 101-102 or equivalent. 

German 204 Translating German (German 

for Scientists) 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Selected texts from scientific journals. 
Prerequisite: German 101-102 or equivalent. Not offered in 

1973-74. 



German 300 



Life in Germany (German 
Conversation and 
Composition) 



4 hours 



Discussion of German culture, customs, history, geography, art, 
music. Special attention to present-day events. Brief oral and 
written reports. Participation in the German Club activities is 
encouraged. Prerequisite: German 200 or equivalent. 



German 306 Reading German (German 

Short Stories) 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Selected contemporary short stories. 
Emphasis on reading for enjoyment. Prerequisite: German 200 
Alternate years: 1973-74. 

German 334 Readings in Modern German 

Religious Thinkers 2 hours 

Students in this course will read and discuss sections from the 
writings of twentieth century German theologians. Prerequisite: 
German 200 or equivalent. (May be taken for credit as Religious 
Studies 334). 

German 350 Highlights of German 

Literature 4 hours 

Great authors and works of German literature from the beginning 
to the present. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: German 
200 or equivalent. Alternate years: Fall 1973-74. 

German 401 Classical Theater: 

Goethe and Schiller 2 hours 

An eight-week course. One outstanding drama by each of the 
two outstanding German authors read and discussed in German. 
Prerequisite: German 350 or permission of instructor. Alternate 
years: Spring 1973-74. 

German 403 Modern Theater: Brecht 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Plays by Brecht read and discussed in 
German. Prerequisite: German 350 or permission of instructor. 
Alternate years: Spring 1973-74. 

German 404 Giants of the 20th Century 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Selected works by Rilke, Kafka, Mann, 
Hesse, and Brecht, read and discussed in German. Prerequisite: 
German 350 or permission of instructor. Alternate years: Spring 
1974-75. 

German 406 Contemporary German 

Writers and War 2 hours 

An eight-week course. Stories and plays by present-day writers, 
such as Borchert, Boll, and Grass, read and discussed in German. 
Prerequisite: German 350 or permission of instuctor. Alternate 
years: Fall 1973-74. 



707 



German 487-488 Independent 

Study 2 or 4 hours each 



German 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 



SPANISH 

Span. 101-102 Basic Spanish 4 hours each 

Fundamentals of pronunciation, grammar, reading and composi- 
tion. Emphasis on audio-oral approach to develop basic skills of 
comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Two one-half hour 
laboratory sessions per week in addition to four hours of class- 
room work. Course is intended primarily for students who have 
no acquaintance with the language. 

Span. 110 Speaking Spanish (Spanish 

for Travelers) 2 hours 

Spoken, everyday conversation intended for students who plan 
to travel in Spain or Latin America. Little or no background in 
Spanish is required. Ottered Spring semester, 1st eight weeks. 



Span. 200 Intermediate Spanish 



4 hours 



Grammar review, speaking, writing and introduction to great 
works of literature. Two one-half hour laboratory sessions per 
week in addition to four hours of classroom work. Prerequisite: 
Spanish 101-102 or equivalent. Offered Fall semester. 

Span. 301 Spanish-American Myths 2 hours 

Discussion based on the literary themes and life and culture of 
Spanish America. Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Offered 
Fall 1974-75, 1st eight weeks. 

Span. 302 Spanish-American Romanticism 2 hours 

Study of the period novel and the Gauchesca literature. Prereq- 
uisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Offered Fall 1974-75, 2nd eight 
weeks. 

Span. 303 Literature of Spain: 

19th Century Romantics 2 hours 

Poetry, plays, and legends from the first half of the nineteenth 
century. Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Offered Fall 
1973-74, 1st eight weeks. 



Span. 304 Literature of Spain: 
19th Century Realists 



2 hours 



The regional novel of customs. Psychological, social, and thesis 
novels of the last half of the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: 
Span. 200 or equivalent. Offered Fall 1973-74, 2nd eight weeks. 

Span. 305 Short Story in Spanish America 2 hours 

Study of twentieth century short stories. Prerequisite: Span. 200 
or equivalent. 



Span. 306 20th Century Spanish 
American Theater 

Study of twentieth century outstanding plays. 
Span. 200 or equivalent. 



2 hours 
Prerequisite: 



Span. 307 Literature of Spain: 

The Picaresque Novel 2 hours 

A study of early Spanish fiction which deals with rogues and 
vagabonds, describing the customs and life of the times. Pre- 
requisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Offered Fall 1974-75, 1st eight 
weeks. 

Span. 308 Literature of Spain: Don Quixote 2 hours 
Cervantes' masterpiece which presents the contrast of idealism 
and imagination versus realism and practicality in a great novel. 
Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Offered Fall 1974-75, 2nd 
eight weeks. 

Span. 310 Spanish America Civilization 

(in English) 2 hours 

The development of Latin America from the pre-Columbus era 
to the present day in art, music, drama, history and literature. 
Each student will do research on a specific project which he will 
select in consultation with the instructor. Offered Spring 1974- 
75, 2nd eight weeks. 

Span. 311 Spanish Civilization (in English) 4 hours 
Spain's influence on the history, art, music, drama, literature and 
science of the world. Each student will do research on a specific 
project which he will select in consultation with the instructor. 
Offered Spring 1974-75. 



702 



Span. 401 Spanish American Modernism 2 hours 
A survey of Latin America's Modernist movement. Presentation 
and discussion of outstanding poets of this period. Prerequisite: 
Span. 200 or equivalent. Offered Fall 1974-75, 1st eight weeks. 

Span. 402 Spanish American 

Vanguard Poetry 2 hours 

A survey of Vanguard poets in Latin America. Presentation and 
discussion of their literary achievements compared to Europeans. 
Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Offered Fall 1974-75, 2nd 
eight weeks. 






Span. 403 Literature of Spain : 

The Generation of '98 2 hours 

Works of the novelists and philosophers who searched the rea- 
sons for Spain's decline at the end of the nineteenth century. 
Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Offered Spring 1974-75, 
1st eight weeks. 

Span. 404 Literature of Spain: 

The Generation of '27 and After 2 hours 
Writers who reflect the pessimism of the first half of the twen- 
tieth century. Prerequisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Offered 
Spring 1974-75, 2nd eight weeks. 

Span. 405 20th Century Spanish 

American Novel 2 hours 

Study of regional novels of the early twentieth century. Pre- 
requisite: Span. 200 or equivalent. Offered Spring 1974-75, 1st 
eight weeks. 

Span. 406 Contemporary Writers of 

Spanish America 2 hours 

A survey of contemporary novelists. Prerequisite: Span. 200 or 
equivalent. Offered Spring 1974-75, 2nd eight weeks. 



Span. 487-488 Independent 
Study 

Span. 490 Senior Project 



2 or 4 hours each 



2-8 hours 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

Foreign Language 301 Hellenistic Greek I 4 hours 

Introduction to the grammar of the Greek language in the Hel- 
lenistic Age. Primary emphasis will be on the structure of the 
Greek of the New Testament. Offered Fall 1973-74. 

Foreign Language 302 Hellenistic Greek II 4 hours 
This is a continuation of Foreign Language 301, with greater em- 
phasis upon syntax and reading of the Greek New Testament. 



In: 



Foreign Language 324 Camus and 

Christianity 2 hours 

The student will read some of the major novels, plays, and essays 
of Albert Camus (in English) in order to gain an understanding of 
Camus' ideas and concerns. The course will focus upon Camus' 
challenges to Christianity and ways in which the contemporary 
Christian might respond to them and incorporate certain of them 
into his own views of human life. (May be taken for credit as 
Religious Studies 324). 

Foreign Language 425 Introduction to Linguistic 

Development of 
Languages 4 hours 

An introduction to diachronic and synchronic linguistics. The 
development of English, French, German, and Spanish from the 
Indo-European to modern times. Emphasis on current develop- 
ments. Required of all majors in the Department. Open to other 
students with permission of the Chairman of the Department. 



Foreign Language 480 



Methods and Materials 
in Teaching Foreign 
Languages 4 hours 

Methods, teaching materials, lesson planning, extracurricular 
activities necessary for the teacher of French, German, or Spanish 
as a foreign language. Observation of classroom situations. Spe- 
cial emphasis on language laboratory techniques. 

Foreign Language 487-488 Independent Study in 

European 
Languages 2 or 4 hours 

GREEK 

Students wishing to study Greek language and litera- 
ture should enroll in Foreign Language 487-488. 

LATIN 

Students wishing to study Latin ianguage and litera- 
ture should enroll in Foreign Language 487-488. 



General Sciences 

While not of departmental status offering a field of 
concentration, the division of General Sciences pro- 
vides a number of programs, many of which are 
interdisciplinary in nature, designed principally for 
non-science majors. Some of these courses, however, 
such as the history of science, are excellent supple- 
ments to the college programs of science majors. In 
addition special courses are offered for those who 
are interested in the teaching of science at the sec- 
ondary school level. 

G.S. 101 Natural Philosophy 4 hours 

An examination of the physical universe and man's place in it 
through an emphasis upon the ways in which the physical sci- 
ences have altered and are now altering man's understanding 
of the universe. (Formerly Physical Science 101). 

G.S. 102 Physical Science 4 hours 

A survey of the field of chemistry with appropriate laboratory 
work. Open to freshmen. Students planning to complete a field 
of concentration in chemistry or physics should not enroll in 
this course. 



G.S. 201 Astronomy 



4 hours 



A non-technical course in descriptive astronomy and cosmology, 
including such topics as the solar system, stars, galactic systems, 
telescopy, rocketry, and space travel. Alternate years: 1974-75. 

G.S. 202 Physical and Cultural Geography 4 hours 

A study of the physical processes tending to alter the climate 
and surface features of the earth and their consequent effects 
upon human populations. Alternate years: 1974-75. 

G.S. 209 History and Philosophy of Science 4 hours 
A study of some of the major ideas conceived by Western man 
in attempting to comprehend and describe the natural world. 
(May be taken for credit as Philosophy 349). Prerequisite: one 
year of college level science or permission of the instructor. 
Alternate years: Fall 1973-74. 



704 



G.S. 210 Science, Technology, and Society 4 hours 
An historical examination of the effects of scientific and tech- 
nological innovations upon various societies, emphasis being 
placed upon technology and science of the Western world since 
1850. (May be taken for credit as Sociology 310). Alternate 
years: Spring 1973-74. 

G.S. 480 Methods and Materials in Teaching 

Physical and Life Sciences 4 hours 

The aims and methods of teaching the physical and life sciences 
in the secondary schools. Special attention will be given to teach- 
ing general laboratory procedures and techniques of teaching. 
Each of the departments in physical and life sciences will partici- 
pate in the program. Prerequisites: 76 hours in one of the phys- 
ical or life sciences or permission of the instructor. 



G.S. 487-488 



Independent 
Study 



2 or 4 hours each 



G.S. 501 -S Introductory Physical Science 

for Science Teachers 6 hours 

Thirteen hours of laboratory and 13 hours of home-desk-labora- 
tory discussion sessions weekly for six weeks, plus supplementary 
instruction and seminars, to familiarize participants with ma- 
terials and methods developed for the IPS junior high school 
science course by Educational Services, Inc. Includes practical as- 
pects of teaching IPS, evaluation and testing, construction and 
use of apropriate A-V's, and individual computer assisted instruc- 
tion in basic mathematics and physics as needed. Offered only 
as summer institute for experienced teachers selected for the 
program. 

GEOGRAPHY 

(See General Science 202 and Social Science 302). 

HEURISTICS 

Heuristics 301-302 2 hours each 

The investigation and discovery of methodologies of problem- 
solving within a broad spectrum of academic disciplines and 
pragmatic pursuits. Not open to freshmen. 



History and 
Political Science 

AIMS 

To present the origin and development of institutions 
and ideas; to point out the great traditions that are 
molding our thought and action today; and to gain 
a better perspective of our political, economic, cul- 
tural, and social life. The courses in Political Science 
are intended to acquaint the student with political in- 
stitutions and political problems in the United States 
and the world today. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION IN HISTORY 
Twelve hours in European History, including History 
301-302, twelve hours in American History, including 
History 201-202, six to eight hours in Political Science, 
two to four hours in either African or Asian or Latin 
American History, History and Political Science 477- 
478, and a Senior Project. Students are encouraged 
to select a related field from one of the other social 
sciences, the humanities, or some other clearly re- 
lated area of study. Students expecting to attend 
graduate or professional schools should anticipate 
possible requirements in the areas of foreign lan- 
guage, statistics, accounting, or computer technology. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 
AND HISTORY 

Students selecting a field of concentration in this 
area are required to take Political Science 225, 328, 
and 357 I and II; and History 201-202, 301-302. Ten 
to twelve hours should be elected from Political Sci- 



705 



ence 339, 341, 371, 372, 465, and 466. A Senior Proj- 
ect and the Junior Seminar, History and Political 
Science 477-478, must be completed. The following 
courses may also be included as part of the field of 
concentration: History and Political Science 381, 382, 
392, 425, and 426. Students are encouraged to select 
a related field from one of the other social sciences, 
the humanities, or some other clearly related area 
of study. Students expecting to attend graduate or 
professional schools should anticipate possible re- 
quirements in the areas of foreign language, statistics, 
accounting, or computer technology. 

EUROPEAN AND WORLD HISTORY 

Hist. 100 Development of World 

Civilization 4 hours 

The development of political, social and cultural institutions from 
ancient times to the twentieth century, especially as they con- 




tribute to an understanding of our civilization. Assignments deal- 
ing with Asia, Africa and Latin America will be included. 

Hist. 209 History and Philosophy of Science 4 hours 
See General Sciences 209. (Cannot be counted for social sciences 
distribution requirement). 

Hist. 297-298 Special Studies in History 2 or 4 hours 
A course designed to permit students to study with various mem- 
bers of the faculty in the Department or with visiting instructors 
or other competent foreign visitors. 

Hist. 301-302 Modern European 

History 4 hours each 

A survey of European civilization from the sixteenth century to 
1945. Second semester begins with 1815. 

Hist. 303 Modern Economic History 

and Development 2 hours 

A study of the development of modern industrial economics. 
Emphasis will be placed on nineteenth and twentieth century 
United States development and economic history. Attention will 
also be paid to the problems of the underdeveloped economies 
of the twentieth century. Alternate years: 1974-75. 



Hist. 325 British History to the 
Eighteenth Century 



4 hours 



Political, economic, intellectual, social and cultural topics will be 
discussed. The British before 1066 as an emerging primitive peo- 
ple, medieval Britain, sixteenth century protest and national iden- 
tity, and the nature of seventeenth century revolution will be 
considered. 

Hist. 326 British History Since 

the Seventeenth Century 4 hours 

British history in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth cen- 
turies will be included. Political, economic, intellectual, social 
and cultural matters will be discussed. Pre-modern peasantry, the 
British attitude towards the American Revolution, the "greatest 
good of the greatest number," imperialism, the twentieth cen- 
tury establishment, and post 1945 Britain will be considered. 



706 



Hist. 353 Hellenistic Civilization 

(See Religious Studies 353). 



4 hours 



Hist, or Pol. Sci. 381 History of the Middle 

East and North Africa 2 hours 

Historical survey of the rise of the Islamic empires from the time 
of the Prophet, including the Caliphates, the classical period of 
Islam, and the Ottoman rule to the end of World War II. 

Hist, or Pol. Sci. 382 Cultural Life in the 

Middle East and 
North Africa 2 hours 

A study of the cultural developments and impact of Islamic civi- 
lization, including religion, art, literature, philosophy, and law. 

Hist, or Pol. Sci. 392 History, Culture, and 

Politics of Asia 4 hours 

The political evolution of Asia in the twentieth century, with 
particular emphasis on the politics of Japan, India, and the Peo- 
ple's Republic of China following World War II. 

Hist. 427 Ancient Civilization 4 hours 

A history of the Near East, Greece, and Rome to the fourth cen- 
tury A.D. 



AMERICAN HISTORY 

Hist. 201-202 United States History 4 hours each 
The political, economic and social growth of America. First 
semester covers the period of exploration to 1865; second se- 
mester covers from 1865 to the present day. 

Hist. 225 West Virginia History, 

Government, and Geography 2 hours 

The history of the western section of Virginia to the Civil War 
and the history and government of West Virginia to the present 
day. The physical, political and social geography of the state will 
be included. 

Hist. 341 Development of the 

American Nation 4 hours 

A history of the United States from 1816 to 1850. This course 
considers the growth of American nationalism following the War 
of 1812; the rise of Jacksonian Democracy and the effects of that 
movement through the Polk administration. Alternate years: 
1974-75. 

Hist. 342 Age of Big Business 4 hours 

The political, social, and economic history of the United States 
from 1865 to 1914. Emphasis is placed on the growth of indus- 
trialism during this period and the resulting attempts at social 
reform. 



Hist. 428 The Dying Roman Empire and 

the Middle Ages 4 hours 

Following a brief resume of the Roman Empire at the time of its 
greatest grandeur, the course will deal with the decline of ancient 
civilization, the Byzantine and Islamic cultures, and especially 
the development of Western Europe to the fourteenth century. 
Alternate years: 1974-75. 

Hist, or Pol. Sci. 466 British Constitutional 

History 4 hours 

A history of British constitutional and legal developments from 
the medieval period through the twentieth century. Alternate 
years: 1974-75. 



Hist. 344 Civil War and Reconstruction 4 hours 
A study of the coming of the American Civil War and the period 
of Reconstruction to the year 1877. Attention is devoted to the 
evolution of the slavery controversy, the constitutional questions 
of nullification and secession, the development of Southern na- 
tionalism, an analysis of Civil War causation, the campaigns of 
the war, and objectives and programs of Presidential and Con- 
gressional Reconstruction. Prerequisite: Hist. 201 or its equiv- 
alent. 

Hist. 423 Contemporary United 

States History 4 hours 

A study of the political, economic, diplomatic and social his- 
tory of the United States since 1933. 



707 



Hist, or Pol. Sci. 425 History of 

Latin America 2 hours 

A brief introduction to the history of pre-Columbian, Colonial, 
and Republican history of Latin America. 

Hist, or Pol. Sci. 426 Introduction to 

Latin America 2 hours 

A study of the geography, politics, social composition, economic 
structure, and problems of modern Latin America. 

Hist, and Pol. Sci. 477 Junior Seminar 2 hours 

A study of the major works of the ancient, medieval, and modern 
European historians and political scientists, with emphasis on 
the various schools and methods of interpretation. 

Hist, and Pol. Sci. 478 Junior Seminar 2 hours 

A study of the major works of United States historians and polit- 
ical scientists, with emphasis on the various schools and methods 
of interpretation. 

Hist. 487-488 Independent Study 

in History 2 or 4 hours each 



Hist, and Pol. Sci. 490 Senior Project 

Begins first semester of the senior year. 



2-6 hours 



Pol. Sci. 328 Comparative Government 4 hours 
A survey of the major approaches to the study of political sys- 
tems, with attention to similarities and differences. Focus will 
center on political parties, governmental institutions, ideologies, 
elites, interest groups, and political culture. The material will 
involve specific case studies of representative countries in West- 
ern and Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union, Asia, Africa, Latin 
America, and the Middle East. 

Pol. Sci. 339 American Political Parties 2 hours 

A study of major and minor political parties in the United States. 
Attention is given to the history, structure, functions, tactics, and 
financing of political parties in a democratic system, as well as 
a brief look at foreign party systems and major American political 
interest groups. Political Science 225 or History 201-202 are rec- 
ommended for background in the field. 

Pol. Sci. 341 United States Foreign Policy 4 hours 

An examination of the personalities, assumptions, and mechanics 
behind the making of United States foreign policy since World 
War II. The material will provide a framework for analyzing and 
evaluating various interpretations of national security and subse- 
quent international commitments. Reference will be made to 
particular examples of foreign policies, such as The Truman Doc- 
trine, Korea, Vietnam, and Sino-American and United States- 
Soviet relations. Prerequisite: Pol. Sci. 225 or permission of the 
instructor. Alternate Years: 1974-75. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Pol. Sci. 225 American Government 4 hours 

An introduction to the chief political institutions and social 
forces involved in the government of the United States at the 
national level. Special emphasis will be placed on the federal 
system and federal-state relationships. 

Pol. Sci. 226 State and Local Government 2 hours 

A studv of the government and politics of states and local po- 
litical subdivisions. Attention is given to the federal-state rela- 
tionship, interstate relationships, and relationships between state 
and local governments, as well as to the structure, organization, 
functions, and problems of state and local governments. 



Pol. Sci. 357 



History of Political 
Philosophy I 



2 hours 



A survey of the major literature in the evolution of political 
philosophy from the classical period to the renaissance, with an 
attempt to gain perspective on both the Eastern and Western 
traditions. A special effort is made to relate the principal con- 
cepts in political philosophy, such as justice, freedom, equality, 
etc., to contemporary politics. 

Pol. Sci. 358 History of Political 

Philosophy II 2 hours 

A continuation of Pol. Sci. 357. The period included is from the 
renaissance through the work of Karl Marx. 



108 



Pol. Sci. 371 Modern Political Ideologies I 2 hours 

A survey and analysis of the literature of prevalent twentieth 
century ideologies, including communism and socialism. Pre- 
requisite: Pol. Sci. 327 or permission of the instructor. 

Pol. Sci. 372 Modem Political Ideologies II 2 hours 
A survey and analysis of the literature of prevalent twentieth 
century ideologies, including fascism, anarchism, and democ- 
racy. Prerequisite: Pol. Sci. 327 or permission of the instructor. 

Pol. Sci. 378 Philosophy of Social 

Issues and Politics 4 hours 

This is a philosophical study of the principles involved in the 
realms of political philosophy and presupposed by many social 
issues. (May be taken for credit as Philosophy 378). Does not 
meet Social Science Distribution Requirement. Alternate years: 
1974-75. 

Pol. Sci. or Hist. 465 Constitutional Law 4 hours 
A study of the judicial elaboration and interpretation of the U.S. 
Constitution. A case study approach to the historical develop- 
ment of American constitutional principles. Political Science 225 
or History 201-202 recommended for background in the field. 

Hist, and Pol. Sci. 477 junior Seminar 2 hours 

A study of the major works of the ancient, medieval, and modern 
European historians and political scientists, with emphasis on the 
various schools and methods of interpretation. 

Hist, and Pol. Sci. 478 Junior Seminar 2 hours 

A study of the major works of United States historians and polit- 
ical scientists, with emphasis on the various schools and methods 
of interpretation. 



Mathematics 



Pol. Sci. 487-488 



Independent Study in 

Political Science 2 or 4 hours each 



Hist, and Pol. Sci. 490 Senior Project 

Begins first semester of the senior year. 



2-6 hours 



AIMS 

To provide the general student with a knowledge of 
the foundations of mathematics; to give the prospec- 
tive teacher an understanding and appreciation of 
the fundamental ideas of elementary mathematics; 
to provide a tool for the technical student; and to 
give the prospective graduate student a foundation 
for later study and research. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION IN MATHEMATICS 
A minimum of forty hours in the Department which 
must include the following core program: 201, 202, 
203, 301, 353, 354, and Senior Project (Math. 490). In 
addition each student must select one of the follow- 
ing core programs and complete the requirements 
within that area: 

Pre-Graduate 325 or 382, 401 , 402, and 478. 

Pre-Teaching 169, 326, 381, 478, and 480. 

Computer Science: 1 69, 325, 401 , and 402. 

In every case the sequence of courses is subject to the 
approval of the senior advisor. 

Math. 103 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 hours 

Designed to prepare the student to take calculus. The course 
includes a study of sets and operations, real numbers, equations, 
functions, graphs, exponents, exponential functions, trigonomet- 
ric functions, complex numbers, polynomial functions, logarith- 
mic functions, and systems of equations. 

Math. 152 Finite Mathematics 4 hours 

Intended primarily for students of the biological or social sci- 
ences. It is also recommended for students desiring a liberal arts 



709 



acquaintance with mathematics. It is not a precalculus course. 
Concepts studied include logic, set theory, matrices, probability 
theory, linear programming, and game theory. 



Math. 169 Introduction to 

Computer Science 2 hours 

An introduction to computer programming and computer design. 
Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in solving 
problems encountered in mathematics. 

Math. 201 Calculus I 4 hours 

The real number system, equations of a line, study of the circle 
and parabola, functions, limits, and continuity. Techniques of 
differentiation and integration applied to maximum and mini- 
mum problems and to related rates. Prerequisite: VU years of 
high school math or Math. 103 or permission of the instructor. 

Math. 202 Calculus II 4 hours 

Area between two curves, volumes of revolution, moments, cen- 
troids, hydrostatic pressure, and work. Integration and differen- 
tiation of transcendental functions. Methods of integration in- 
cluding integration by parts, partial fractions, and trigonometric 
substitution. Polar coordinates and graphs, area, and angles of 
intersection in polar coordinates. Prerequisite: Math. 201 or ad- 
vanced placement. 



Math. 203 Calculus III 4 hours 

Intermediate calculus with emphasis on vector methods and 
functions of several variables. Scalar and vector products. Partial 
differentiation and applications, directional derivative and gradi- 
ent. Multiple integrals with physical applications. Expansion of 
functions, L'Hospital rule, sequences, and series. Prerequisite: 
Math. 202. 



Math. 225-226 Mathematics for 

Elementary Teachers 2 hours each 

The first course is a study of the fundamental principles and 
concepts of arithmetic. The second is a study of intuitive geom- 
etry. 




Math. 301 Real Analysis 4 hours 

Standard material on the real numbers, sets and functions, se- 
quences, continuity, topology of real line, Cantor set and Cantor 
function and special type of extension problem. This course helps 
to bridge the gap between computational and rigorous mathe- 
matics. Prerequisite: Math. 202. 



Math. 302 Complex Variables 



4 hours 



Complex numbers, elementary functions, analytic functions, con- 
tour integration, Taylor and Laurent series, conformal mapping, 
boundary value problems, Laplacian equations. Prerequisite: 
Math. 203. 



770 



Math. 325 Numerical Analysis 4 hours 

Numerical methods in evaluating integrals and differential equa- 
tions. Techniques in finding the roots of polynomials and solving 
systems of linear equations and matrix manipulation. Basic and 
Fortran languages will be used to apply the above methods. 

Math. 326 Introduction to 

Modern Geometry 4 hours 

Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries; an introduction to 
synthetic projective geometry; the concept of limit and infinity; 
geometrical constructions, recent developments and theorems. 
Prerequisite: Math 201-202. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Math. 350 Differential Equations 4 hours 

Methods of solution of ordinary differential equations and appli- 
cations to the physical sciences. Frobenius' and Picard's methods 
for power series solutions, Laplace transforms, numerical, bound- 
ary value problems, Fouries series, partial differential equations, 
the Laplacian equations and applications to heat conduction and 
vibration. Prerequisite: Math. 202. 



Math. 353 Modern Abstract Algebra 



4 hours 



Groups, rings, integral domains, fields, and vector spaces. 

Math. 354 Linear Algebra 4 hours 

Geometric vectors, matrices and linear equations, real vector 
spaces, linear transformations and matrices, and inner product 
spaces. 

Math. 381 Statistical Methods 4 hours 

Introductory statistical analysis including frequency distribution 
and graphic presentation of data, measures of central tendency, 
relative positions in a distribution, variability, the normal curve 
and its applications, correlation and regression, probability and 
statistical inference, testing differences between means, intro- 
duction to analysis of variance. 

Math. 382 Mathematical Statistics 4 hours 

Introduction to probability, basic distribution theory, limit the- 
orems, mathematical expectation, probability densities, random 



variables, sampling distributions, point and interval estimation, 
tests of hypotheses, regression and correlation, analysis of vari- 
ance. Prerequisite: Math 202 or permission of the instructor. 



Math. 401-402 Advanced Calculus 



4 hours each 



Rigorous study of the real number system, limits, continuity, and 
the derivative. Theory of definite and indefinite integrals, partial 
derivatives, series, sequences, and functions of several variables. 
Prerequisite: Math. 301 or permission of instructor. 



Math. 403 Topology 4 hours 

Point-set topology, topological spaces, connectedness, compact- 
ness, continuity, separation axioms, countability axioms, metric 
spaces, product spaces. Prerequisite: Math. 202. 



Math. 452 Applied Mathematics 4 hours 

Applications of ordinary and partial differential equations to 
problems in physics, chemistry and electricity; vibrating string 
and heat flow problems; vector calculus and applications. Pre- 
requisite: Math. 350. 



Math. 478 Seminar in Mathematics 2 hours 

Each seminar will investigate topics of current interest to mathe- 
maticians such as combinatorics, graph theory, non-standard 
analysis, and category theory. 

Math. 480 Methods and Materials in 

Teaching Mathematics 4 hours 

Approved methods in teaching mathematics at the secondary 
level; class period activities of the teacher; procedures and 
devices in teaching; organization of materials, testing, aims, and 
modern trends. 



Math. 487-488 Independent Study in 

Mathematics 2 or 4 hours each 



Math. 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 



777 




Music 



AIMS 

To promote the understanding and appreciation of 
music of generally recognized excellence; to relate 
that music to the cultural conditions of respective 
periods; to provide an integrated study of music the- 
ory, history, literature and performance; to provide 
the college community with stylistically sound per- 
formances of good works; and to provide for the 
thorough training of musicians at the pre-professional 
level. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD 

OF CONCENTRATION IN 

MUSIC LITERATURE 

Students may elect a Field of Concentration in music 

literature or in music education. Requirements for 

concentration in music literature are Music 111, 112, 



303, 327, 343, three courses in the 201 through 204 
music literature sequence, and 10 hours in applied 
music of which a maximum of four hours may be in 
ensemble, Music 478, and Senior Project. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD 
OF CONCENTRATION IN 
MUSIC EDUCATION 

Students electing a field of concentration in music 
education and seeking certification as teachers in any 
state must fulfill the requirements for certification in 
West Virginia which amounts to 50 hours in music — 
two hours more than may be counted toward an A.B. 
degree. The requirements are Music 111, 112, 303, 
327, 343, 422, 439, Fine Arts 201 or 202, Music 121 
through 124, four hours of piano (or proficiency ex- 
amination), two hours of voice, six hours of concen- 
tration in voice or any one instrument, and two hours 
in ensemble, Music 478, and Senior Project. Also re- 
quired, but counting as professional education, are 
Music 340-341, 480, and student teaching. 



LITERATURE AND THEORY OF MUSIC 

Music 101-102 Introduction to Music 

as an Art and Science 2 hours each 
The elements of tonal relationships, simple rhythms, intervals, 
melodies in both major and minor modes, recognition of the 
sights and sounds of the orchestral instruments, historical sig- 
nificance of form, the voice; designed to give the student the 
ability to recognize, reproduce and record simple melodic and 
rhythmic patterns. Music 101 is a prerequisite for Music 102. 



Music 111 Theory I 



4 hours 



Rudiments of music structure and basic disciplines of chord 
connection and harmonization of simple melodies. Emphasis on 
identifying sounds by hearing and writing. Alternate years: 
Spring 1973-74. 



772 



Music 112 Theory II 4 hours 

Techniques of figured bass, modulation, controlled dissonance 
and further use of chromatically altered chords. Continued em- 
phasis on hearing through dictation, sight-singing and keyboard 
exercises. Alternate years: Fall 1974-75. 



Music 201 The Romantic Period 4 hours 

A general listener's approach to the music, instrumental and 
vocal, of composers from Schubert, Chopin, Schumann and 
Mendelssohn through Liszt, Berlioz, Verdi, Wagner, Brahms, 
Tschaikowsky and other nineteenth century composers. Alter- 
nate years: 1973-74. 



Music 202 Twentieth Century Music 



2 hours 




A general listener's approach to music in various media from the 
Impressionists through Stravinsky, the Schonberg School, Bartok, 
Hindemith, the American, Soviet, and other significant compos- 
ers, including electronic, aleatory, and experimental music. Al- 
ternate years: 1974-75. 

Music 203 Music of the Baroque Period 4 hours 

A general listener's approach to music in various media from 
Monteverdi to circa 1750 with considerable emphasis on Bach 
and Handel. Alternate years: 1974-75. 

Music 204 The Classical Period 4 hours 

A general listener's approach to the music, instrumental and 
vocal, of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries heav- 
ily concentrated upon Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and Schubert. 
Alternate years: 1974-75. 

Music 205 Jazz 2 hours 

A general listener's approach to the history of jazz from its 
African, Cuban, and American Negro origins through Ragtime, 
the New Orleans, Kansas City, and Chicago styles, Swing, Bop, 
Progressive, Rock, and other jazz styles. 

Music 303 Theory III 4 hours 

Comprehensive extension of Theory II. Intensive study of stylistic 
elements of Classical and Baroque periods. Introduction to char- 
acteristics of later harmonic styles. Continued emphasis on aural 
and keyboard skills. Alternate years: Fall 1973-74. 

Music 327 Music History 4 hours 

The historical significance of the main periods and types of 
music. Requires some technical background. Alternate years: 
1973-74. 



773 



Music 340-341 Methods and Materials of 
Teaching Music in the 
Elementary Schools 2 hours each 

Consideration of the aims and values of elementary school 
music with opportunities to develop teaching techniques, and 
to become familiar with the standard materials. 



Music 487-488 



Music 343 Counterpoint 



2 hours 



Basic principles of writing two, three, and four-voice counter- 
point, and their application in the smaller forms of composition. 
Alternate years: 1973-74. 



Music 344 Orchestration 



2 hours 



A course in arranging music for various types of instrumental 
ensembles. Alternate years: 1974-75. 

Music 422 Instrumental Conducting 2 hours 

The technique of the baton and the different problems to be 
met in conducting orchestra and band; the introduction to score 
reading; an opportunity for experience through the conducting 
of the college instrumental groups. Open only to advanced 
students. Alternate years: 1974-75. 

Music 439 Choral Conducting 2 hours 

The technique of the baton and the different problems to be 
met in conducting chorus; the introduction to score reading; 
an opportunity for experience through the conducting of the 
college choral groups. Open only to advanced students. Alter- 
nate years: 1974-75. 

Music 478 Senior Seminar 2 hours 

Survey and review of the field of music; its history, theory and 
literature. Required of all students concentrating in the field of 
music. 

Music 480 Methods and Materials in 

Teaching Music in 

Secondary Schools 4 hours 

Analysis of music offered in senior and junior high schools 
throughout the United States. Consideration of problems, ob- 
jectives and materials in teaching vocal and instrumental music, 
theory and appreciation courses in secondary schools. Oppor- 
tunities for developing practical teaching projects. 



Independent 
Study 



2 or 4 hours each 



Music 490 Senior Project 2 or 4 hours 

An independent, student-initiated project which may be research, 
creative work or performance. 



APPLIED MUSIC 

(Courses in applied music may be repeated for credit). 

Music 119 Class Instruction in 

Percussion Instruments 1 hour 

Class instruction in the basic techniques of percussion instru- 
ments. This course is designed to acquaint the student with 
the snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, tympani, mallet instruments, 
and the reading and scoring of percussion notation. Alternate 
years: 1974-75. 

Music 121-122 Class Strings 1 hour each 

Class instruction in the basic techniques of stringed instruments. 
Required of all students with a concentration in Music Educa- 
tion. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Music 123 Class Instruction in 

Brass Instruments 1 hour 

Required of all students concentra;ing in Music Education. 
Alternate years: 1974-75. 



Music 124 Class Instruction in 

Woodwind Instruments 

Required of all students concentrating in Music 
Alternate years: 1973-74. 



1 hour 

Education. 



Music 125-126 Concert Choir 1 hour each 

The preparation for concert performance of standard literature, 
both sacred and secular. Membership limited; enrollment by 
audition. 

Music 127-128 Male Chorus 1 hour each 

The study and performance of concert repertoire for male voices. 
Membership limited; enrollment by audition. 



774 



Music 129 Class Instruction in the Guitar 1 hour 
An introduction to the guitar, teaching techniques and music 
theory simultaneously. Begins with easy chords and progresses 
logically through various keys using songs suitable and interest- 
ing to today's student. Class participation and parallel listening 
is provided by the use of cassettes. Students will provide their 
own guitars. Limited to 15 students. 

Music 131-132 Brass Choir 1 hour each 

The study and performance of baroque and contemporary music 
for brass instruments. Enrollment by audition. 

Music 133-134 Band 1 hour each 

An ensemble of wind and percussion instruments which plays 
for festive and athletic events of the college. Enrollment by 
approval of the director. 

Music 135-136 Chamber Music 1 hour per year 

Study and occasional performance of the standard chamber 
literature — quartets, trios, and other works suited to the instru- 
mentalists available. Admission by audition. 

Music 137-138 Stage Band 1 hour each 

The study and performance of arrangements for the large jazz 
band. The course is designed to develop an appreciation for the 
musical styles of Glen Miller, Woody Herman, Stan Kenton, and 
others. Membership will be limited by audition and approval of 
the instructor. 

Music 141-142 Organ 1-2 hours each 

Technique, theory and literature of the organ. Open to all stu- 
dents who have had some training in either piano or organ. 
Private lessons. Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 

Music 143-144 Piano 1-2 hours each 

Literature and technique of piano playing designed to develop 
a discriminating appreciation of fine music and fine musical 
performance. Private lessons. Enrollment by permission of the 
instructor. 

Music 145-146 Strings 1-2 hours each 

Private lessons in violin, viola, cello, or bass. Course open to 
beginners as well as to students with previous training. Enroll- 
ment by permission of the instructor. 



Music 147-148 Voice 1-2 hours each 

Vocal technique, theory and literature. Open to all students who 
have adequate native ability, with or without previous vocal 
training. Private lessons. Enrollment by permission of the in- 
structor. 



Music 149-150 Wind Instruments 1-2 hours each 
Private lessons in basic brass and woodwind instruments. Open 
to beginners as well as to students with previous training. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 



Music 301-302 Advanced Organ 1-2 hours each 
Open only to students who can demonstrate satisfactorily their 
ability to play compositions equivalent in difficulty to the follow- 
ing: Bach — G minor Fugue (The Little); D minor Toccata and 
Fugue; or Widor — Toccata from Symphony V. Private lessons. 
Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 



Music 305-306 Advanced Piano 1-2 hours each 

Open only to more advanced students who can demonstrate 
satisfactorily their ability to perform compositions equivalent in 
difficulty to the following: Beethoven Op. 27 No. 2; Bach — 
Preludes and Fugues Nos. 2 and 21 (Vol. I). Students will be ex- 
pected to perform in public recitals from time to time. Private 
lessons. Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 



Music 307-308 Advanced Strings 1-2 hours each 
Open only to students who are able to play satisfactorily music 
equivalent in difficulty to the Kreutzer Etudes and DeBeriot 
Concertos for violin. Public performance required. Private les- 
sons. Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 



Music 309-310 Advanced Voice 1-2 hours each 

Open only to students who have completed four semesters of 
voice study, can read at sight, have adequate use of at least one 
modern foreign language, and can demonstrate the ability to 
perform numbers equivalent in difficulty to standard operatic 
and lieder literature. Public performance required. Private les- 
sons. Enrollment by permission of the instructor. 



775 



Philosophy 



AIMS 

To enable the student to discover and develop sound 
bases for interpreting self and society through a care- 
ful examination of his beliefs, actions and claims to 
knowledge; to assist the student in becoming aware 
of the nature and status of philosophical problems, 
commitments, ideologies and models that serve as 
the foundation of human life; and to provide the stu- 
dent who expects to pursue graduate studies in Phi- 
losophy with a sound basis in the major areas of his 
field. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

Concentration in Philosophy is not limited to those 
who are professionally interested in the field, that is, 
those who plan for graduate work or a teaching ca- 
reer in Philosophy. For several persons Philosophy 
may hold some promise as one way to approach a 
liberal education; it may be an important related 
field; or, it may serve as an area of intensive study, 
wide in scope, that prepares one well for graduate 
work in another field. 

Concentration in Philosophy requires satisfactory 
completion of a minimum of 24 hours plus a Senior 
Project, and a Senior Comprehensive Examination. 
The 24-hour minimum consists of: 226, 323, 325, 326, 
425, and 426. The Senior Project (2-8 hours) will be 
received and evaluated in the final semester of the 
student's academic program. 

The Department is open to discussion of special 
fields of concentration that may include Philosophy 
as a significant part of the student's program. 




776 



The student who is considering graduate work 
should be aware that many good graduate programs 
in Philosophy require a reading knowledge of French 
and German. 

Phil. 201 Introduction to Philosophy 4 hours 

A survey of basic areas of philosophical concern, including prob- 
lems of knowledge, person, world, philosophy and knowledge 
of Cod, and value systems. Student involvement in the basic 
issues of philosophy, as well as student participation in the 
process of philosophical thinking, are course goals. 

Phil. 226 Ethics 4 hours 

Several major ethical theories will be examined; e.g., egoism, 
hedonism, utilitarianism, self-realization, duty-ethics. Students 
will seek to determine precisely what such theories involve and 
whether commitment to such theories is acceptable in light of 
their logical consequences. 

Phil. 323 Basic Logic 4 hours 

Mastery of the fundamental principles of logic is important for 
anyone who wishes to use and recognize sound reasoning and 
valid arguments. There is a difference between emotional inten- 
sity and validity, between verbal disputes and conclusions that 
follow (logically) from premises. Recognition of the bases of 
these differences and development of the very practical abilities 
to recognize, construct, and analyze various forms of argument 
and detect logical errors (fallacies) are important objectives of 
this course. 

Phil. 325 History of Philosophy: 

Ancient and Medieval 4 hours 

Western philosophical thought from the Seventh Century B.C. 
to the close of the medieval period. A study of ancient and 
medieval philosophers and their analysis of problems and solu- 
tions. Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Phil. 326 History of Philosophy: Modern 4 hours 
Western philosophical thought from the Renaissance through 
the Eighteenth Century. The rise of the new critical spirit and 
the Empirical and Rationalist traditions will be included. Alter- 
nate years: 1973-74. 



Phil. 329 Nineteenth Century Philosophies 4 hours 

Selected reading and examination of significant philosophies and 
philosophers between the era of Kant and the contemporary 
era. Both Idealist and Empirical traditions will be examined. 
Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Phil. 334-j Philosophy, Psychoanalysis, and 

Contemporary Psychologies 4 hours 

A critical examination of Freud's general psychology theory and 
the modifications and reinterpretations it has undergone as a 
result of recent developments in philosophy. The goal is to de- 
rive a logical geography of personality and a structure of human 
experience. The focus is upon certain assumptions and basic 
principles which guarantee the meaningfulness of psychological 
explanation and upon certain methods and concepts and their 
place within a conceptual system. Offered January term only. 

Phil. 335-J Social Realities and 

Science Fiction 4 hours 

Selected readings in science fiction and non-fiction will be used 
as a basis for examining such social and personal concepts as 
social structures, social responsibility, individuality, loneliness, 
and value. The magnification of these concepts provided by so- 
cial critics and by science fiction may yield a new perspective 
from which to examine not only extrapolated fantasies, but also 
the realities in our present concepts, their grounds and implica- 
tions, their value, and our valuational activities and commit- 
ments. Offered January term only. 

Phil. 336-J Towards a System of 

Personal Knowledge 4 hours 

Course is concerned with building a foundation for the con- 
struction of a system of personal knowledge. The focus is upon 
the idea of a foundation and the idea of a system — the founda- 
tion being the function and content of concepts relating to per- 
sonal knowledge and the system being the arrangement and 
ordering-principles of those concepts. Offered January term 
only. 

Phil. 349 History and Philosophy of Science 4 hours 
A study of some of the major ideas conceived by Western man 
in attempting to comprehend and describe the natural world. 



777 



(May be taken tor credit as General Sciences 209). Prerequisite: 
one year of college level science or consent of the instructor. 
Alternate years: Fall 1973-74. 



main areas and ideas in the twentieth century speculative tra- 
dition. Influential areas include: systematic tendencies; phenom- 
enology; and existentialism. Alternate years: 1974-75. 



Phil. 363 Philosophy of Religion 



4 hours 



An inquiry into the general subject of religion from a philosophi- 
cal point of view. Religious experience, faith and knowledge, 
certainty and nature of deity, religious feeling and confidence, 
the language of religious commitment, types of meaning in- 
volved, and the possibility of discovery, are examples of the 
kinds of topics and areas that may be investigated. Classical and 
contemporary approaches will be studied. Alternate years: 
1974-75. 

Phil. 368 Aesthetics 4 hours 

Selected readings and certain theories of aesthetics will be ex- 
amined. The nature of aesthetic experience, its relation to other 
valuing activities and experience, as well as its place in art 
production, appreciation, and creativity will be studied. Alter- 
nate years: 1974-75. 

Phil. 375 Philosophy of Man 

and Culture 4 hours 

A philosophical study of man in social and cultural relations, 
one aspect of philosophical anthropology. Emphasis is placed on 
the relevance of analysis of civilization, culture, and society for 
a philosophical understanding of man. (May be taken for credit 
as Sociology 375). Alternate years: 1973-74. 

Phil. 378 Philosophy of Social Issues 

and Politics 4 hours 

A philosophical study of the principles involved in the realms 
of political philosophy and presupposed by many social issues. 
(May be taken for credit as Political Science 378 or Sociology 
378). Does not meet Social Science Distribution Requirement. 
Alternate years: 1974-75. 

Phil. 425 Phenomenology and 

Existentialism 4 hours 

Either historical or critical (or a combined) emphasis will be 
given to a study of selected works by philosophers who represent 



Phil. 426 Positivism and Analysis 4 hours 

Either historical or critical (or a combined) emphasis will be 
given to a study of selected works by philosophers who represent 
main areas and ideas in the twentieth century analytic tradition. 
Influential areas include: realism; logical analysis; positivism; 
and conceptual elucidation. Alternate years: 1974-75. 

Phil. 428 American Philosophy 4 hours 

A study of significant stages in the development of philosophical 
ideas in the United States. This includes identification and ex- 
amination of representative men, movements, and issues, and 
the contemporary rediscovery of American Philosophy. Alter- 
nate years: 1973-74. 



Phil. 467-468 



Seminar in 
Philosophy 



2 or 4 hours each 



Intensive examination of the perspective of one great Western 
or non-Western philosopher, or one major problem or related 
group of problems, or of one major tendency. Permission of 
the instructor is required. Topics for Fall 1973-74: "Eastern 
Thought: Mystery and Metaphysics" and "The Professions and 
Philosophy." Topics for Spring 1973-74: "Existence: the Structure 
of Being" and "Studies in Ancient Philosophy — Plato." 

Phil. 477-478 Senior Seminar 2 hours each 

This seminar will seldom consist of a general review of all areas 
of Philosophy; the topic or particular area of study will be 
chosen as a result of student and faculty conferences. Student 
ability, interest, and need will be important factors. Conferences 
with and approval of the Chairman of the Department are re- 
quired before enrollment. 

Phil. 487-488 Independent Study in 

Philosophy 2 or 4 hours each 



Phil. 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 



778 



Physical Education 
and Health 

AIMS 

To promote the physical well being of the student; 
to provide opportunities for students to participate in 
and secure a reasonable degree of proficiency in rec- 
reational activities; to train our majors for profes- 
sional opportunities in Physical Education, Health 
Education, and Recreation both in educational and 
community situations. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL STUDENTS 
FOR GRADUATION 

All students graduating from Bethany College must 
satisfy the health, physical education and recreation 
practicum. The Department recognizes the impor- 
tance of teaching lasting carry-over physical skills and 
encourages you to satisfy this requirement by taking 
P.E. 101-102, 201-202. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of 30 hours in the Department which 
must include the following courses: P.E. 227, 262, 
263, 426, 443, 470, 471, 475, 480, the Senior Project 
(P.E. 490), and eight hours in biology which must in- 
clude Biol. 100 and 101. It is recommended that Biol. 
167 fill the remaining four hours. 

P.E. 101-102 Freshman Orientation and 

Physical Education 1 hour each 

The techniques and rules of a variety of physical activities. An 
activity course. 




P.E. 169-170 Folk Dancing 



1 hour each 



Folk dancing from many countries. English and American coun- 
try dances during the first semester and European dances during 
the second semester. An activity course. 

P.E. 201-202 Sophomore Physical 

Education 1 hour each 

The student has a choice of a variety of physical activities. 

P.E. 227 Personal and Community 

Health 4 hours 

Fundamental knowledge of personal and community health 
matters pertaining to the social group, communicable diseases, 
vital statistics, and legal and social regulations. 

P.E. 262 Gymnastics I 2 hours 

Introduction and instruction in the use of favorite pieces of gym 
apparatus. 

P.E. 263 Gymnastics II 2 hours 

Methods and procedures in teaching gymnastics at the various 
educational levels. 



P.E. 105 First Aid 

(See Biology 105). 



2 hours P.E. 267 Theory and Practice of Team Sports 2 hours 

Intensive study and practice methods in the most popular sea- 



779 




sonal team sports, e.g. football, soccer, and volleyball. Fall 
Semester. 

P.E. 268 Theory and Practice of Team Sports 2 hours 
Intensive study and practice methods in the most popular sea- 
sonal team sports, e.g. basketball, and softball. Spring Semester. 

P.E. 280 Teaching Elementary 

Physical Education 2 hours 

A basic course in teaching physical education at the elementary 
level. A study of this age group's physical, motor, social, and 
emotional development, plus activities that will contribute to 
proper physical development. 



P.E. 298 Aquatics I 



2 hours 



Life saving and water safety. Instruction in life saving techniques, 
such as strokes used, defensive tactics, carries, releases, and 
resuscitation. Satisfactory completion of the course leads to the 
American Red Cross Certificate in Service Life Saving. 



P.E. 299 Aquatics II 



2 hours 



Instruction in methods of teaching aquatic skills, including swim- 
ming strokes, diving, and advanced life saving. Also theory on 
pool management. Satisfactory completion of the course leads 
to certification as an American Red Cross Water Safety Instructor. 



P.E. 300 Introduction to Recreation 2 hours 

Basic course work in theory of recreation and its future role in 
increased leisure. Also recreation as a profession. 

P.E. 301 Dance 4 hours 

The study of folk, social and modern dance-teaching techniques 
and methods to be used in all levels of the educational system. 

P.E. 305 Principles of Coaching 4 hours 

Philosophy of coaching and technical preparation for coaching. 

P.E. 309 Intramural Sports 2 hours 

Organization, administration and objectives of the intramural 
program of athletics. 

P.E. 310 Adapted Physical Education 2 hours 

Variations of the normal types of the human organism at differ- 
ent age levels; therapeutic measures, especially those which 
refer to the correction of mechanical defects. 

P.E. 340 Prevention and Care of Injuries 2 hours 

Common hazards of play and athletics. Preventive measures and 
treatment of injuries. Red Cross First Aid Certificate may be 
earned by those who pass the examination. 

P.E. 360 Test and Measurements 2 hours 

Methods used in evaluating outcomes of the physical education 
program. 

P.E. 390 Recreation Leadership 4 hours 

The philosophy of American recreation and community organi- 
zation for leisure time activities. Recreational activities, practice 
in the leadership of games, informal dramatics, rhythmics, camp 
craft, and playground activities, with a two-hour laboratory for 
handcrafts. 

P.E. 426 Kinesiology and Physiology of 

Muscular Activity 4 hours 

The structure and function of the human body and their relation- 
ship to bodily exercise patterns. 



720 



P.E. 439 Theory and Practice of 

Individual Sports 2 hours 

Intensive study and practice methods in the most popular sea- 
sonal individual sports, e.g. archery and badminton. Fall 
semester. 

P.E. 440 Theory and Practice of 

Individual Sports 2 hours 

Intensive study and practice methods in the most popular sea- 
sonal individual sports, e.g. bowling, golf, and tennis. Spring 
semester. 

P.E. 443 Principles and Foundations of Health 

and Physical Education 4 hours 

Principles and fundamental foundations basic to a program of 
health and physical education in the modern educational system. 

P.E. 470 Contemporary Problems in Health 2 hours 

A study of current health problems, including mental health, 
nutrition, accidents, physical fitness, and drug education. 

P.E. 471 Planned Family and Sex Education 2 hours 
Methods and techniques of teaching sex education in the edu- 
cational system, including such topics as dating, marriage ad- 
justments, pregnancy and the reproductive systems, family plan- 
ning and fertility control, and divorce. 

P.E. 475 Organization and Administration 
of Health, Physical Education, 
and Athletics 4 hours 

Administrative construction of proper relationships and proce- 
dures in health, physical education, and athletics. 

P.E. 480 Seminar and Methods in Teaching 

Health and Physical Education 4 hours 

A survey of the field and current methods, materials, and tech- 
niques pertinent to teaching health and physical education. 

P.E. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours each 

P.E. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



Physics 



AIMS 

1. To provide the student with an orderly presenta- 
tion of the current body of knowledge expressing 
the physicist's concepts of the physical universe. 

2. To provide opportunities for the student to apply 
acquired knowledge in a limited and controlled 
manner. 

3. To provide the student with guidance directed 
toward a future in a technical field or toward the 
pursuit of an advanced degree in physics. 

4. To provide interdisciplinary experiences among 
the sciences and humanities in order to facilitate 
the broadest possible base upon which an indi- 
vidual can function in society. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of thirty-six hours in the Department, in- 
cluding Physics 101-102, 201-202, 300, 301-302, 303, 
305, plus the Senior Project (Physics 490). Integral 
and differential calculus are required as prerequisites 
for Physics 201-202, 301-302. Physics 101 and 102 or 
both may be waived upon demonstration of compe- 
tence in general physics. 

A reading knowledge of German and French is 
recommended for students expecting to do graduate 
work. Mathematics and Chemistry are strongly rec- 
ommended as related fields. Sequence of courses is 
subject to approval of the Chairman of the Depart- 
ment. 

A combined plan with Columbia University is avail- 
able to pre-engineering students. Special programs 
are offered in cooperation with the Department of 
Education to students interested in the teaching of 
science. 



727 



Physics 101-102 General Physics 4 hours each 

First semester: mechanics, heat and wave motion. Second semes- 
ter: electricity, magnetism, light and an introduction to atomic 
and nuclear physics. This course is a prerequisite to all advanced 
physics courses unless otherwise specified. Recommended for 
freshmen. The level of competence achieved in this course will 
be adequate for the needs of most chemists, biologists and 
mathematicians. 

Physics 103-104 Problems in Physics 1 hour each 
A continued study of problems on the level of those encountered 
in General Physics. Recommended for physics majors and stu- 
dents desiring a higher level of competence in problem-solving. 

Physics 169 Introduction to Computer 

Science 2 hours 

An introduction to computer programming and computer design. 
Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in solving 
problems encountered in various fields of specialization. 



Physics 201-202 Intermediate Physics 6 hours each 

Mechanics, electricity and advanced wave motion. Prerequi- 
sites: General Physics as well as differential and integral calculus. 




oriented languages, and practical considerations for the installa- 
tion and use of computing machines. 



Physics 300 Advanced Physics I 



4 hours 



A general, semi-mathematical presentation of topics of interest 
in atomic, nuclear, and solid state physics. Presentation suitable 
for those who have had only General Physics but who are inter- 
ested in more advanced topics in these areas, and who are not 
physics majors. 



Physics 221 Electronics I 4 hours 

Introduction to electronic circuits and their elements with an 
emphasis upon transistor circuitry. This course may be taken by 
students with a minimum of preparation in the sciences. 

Physics 222 Electronics II 4 hours 

Continuation of Electronics I with emphasis upon theory and 
design of electronic circuitry. Prerequisites: General Physics and 
Electronics I or permission of Department Chairman. Offered 
Spring 1973-74. 

Physics 269 Advanced Computer Science 2 hours 
An in-depth study of the functions of computing machines in- 
cluding a study of several high level languages, several machine 



Physics 301 Advanced Physics II 2 hours 

Offered concurrently with Advanced Physics I for the benefit 
of physics majors. This course fills in the detail in mathematics 
and concepts which are omitted for the Advanced Physics I 
portion. 

Physics 302 Advanced Physics III 6 hours 

A continuation of 301 intended primarily for the physics major 
and advanced student in science. The subject matter is a concise 
mathematical description of the fields generally known as atomic, 
nuclear, and solid state physics. 

Physics 303 Thermophysics 4 hours 

Temperature, calorimetry, expansion phenomena, conductivity, 



722 



change of phase and radiation, thermodynamics and statistical 
theory. Prerequisites: General Physics and Mathematics 201-202. 
Offered Fall 1973-74. 



Psychology 



Physics 305 Geometrical and 

Physical Optics 2 hours 

Theories of light; reflection, refraction, dispersion, interference 
diffraction, polarization, spectroscopy; optical instruments, laser 
and maser. Prerequisites: General Physics and Mathematics 
201-202. Offered Fall 1974-75. 

Physics 322 Spectroscopic Analysis 2 hours 

A practical course in photography and analysis of spectra in- 
cluding: study of flame and arc spectra; use of grating and 
prism spectrographs, comparator, densitometer and conversion 
technique; applications of spectral analysis. Prerequisite: Permis- 
sion of Department Chairman. 

Physics 477 Seminar in Physics 2 hours 

A survey of physics for review and correlation of various fields 
within the discipline. Prerequisite: Permission of Department 
Chairman. 



Physics 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical and 
Life Sciences 4 hours 

(See General Sciences 480). 



Physics 487-488 Independent 
Study 



2 or 4 hours each 



Physics 490 Senior Project 2-6 hours 

Research problems in theoretical or experimental physics. Ex- 
perimental physics is offered in such areas as: vacuum systems, 
machine tool operation, electron systems, spectroscopy, electron 
microscopy, microwave propagation, nuclear radiation and com- 
puter science. Theoretical physics projects are unlimited in 
scope and are arranged through consultation with the student's 
faculty advisor. 



AIMS 

The Department assists the student in gaining a basic 
knowledge of psychology as the experimental science 
of man's behavior; in developing social awareness 
and social adjustment through an understanding of 
the fundamental similarities and differences among 
men; in promoting both original and critical think- 
ing; in giving background preparation for professions 
which deal with individual and group behavior; in 
encouraging students to enter the field, whether in 
teaching, research, or applied psychology. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 

CONCENTRATION 

Concentration in psychology requires a minimum of 
thirty hours in the Department, including Psychology 
100, 103, 303, 311, 312, 399, 477, and a Senior Project 
(Psych. 490). Six hours are also required in natural 
science. Two of these must either be in physiological 
psychology (Psych. 335) or in biology courses stress- 
ing animal biology, physiology, or genetics. The re- 
maining four hours may be in similar biology courses, 
physics, or chemistry (including General Science 102). 

No student will be recommended for graduate 
school who has not had a year of mathematics and 
some training in programming and use of the com- 
puter. The student is reminded that most graduate 
schools require a reading knowledge of one or two 
foreign languages, most usually French, German, or 
Spanish. 

Psychology 100 or its equivalent is prerequisite to 
all other courses in the Department unless specific- 
ally exempted in a course description. 



723 



Psychology 100 General Psychology 4 hours 

An introduction to the general field of psychology, including 
learning, motivation, sensation, perception, cognition, personal- 
ity, abnormal behavior, testing, physiological psychology, and 
social psychology. This course will follow a modified individual- 
ized-learning format wherein each student may progress at his 
own rate, taking quizzes on the various sections of the course 
when he is readv. Grading will be based on the number of sec- 
tions mastered plus the number of points that the student has 
accumulated in course-related activities. A full-semester course. 
Three class meetings and one required lab each week. 



Psychology 103 Quantitative Methods in 

Psychology 2 hours 

An introduction to the basic problems and techniques of mea- 
surement in psychology together with basic statistical techniques 
used in psychological research. Highly recommended for those 
planning to take upper-division courses in psychology, and re- 
quired of all ma|ors. A half-semester course. Two lectures and 
two labs each week. 



Psychology 303 Design and Analysis 

of Experiments 2 hours 

This course examines the basic logic of experiments, various 
types of research designs, and evaluates these designs in terms 
of their underlying utilities. A half-semester course. Prerequi- 
site: Psychology 703. Two lectures and two labs each week. 

Psychology 311 Experimental Psychology I 4 hours 
In this course the student is encouraged to become conversant 
with the basic factual and theoretical content of experimental 
psychology at an intermediate level, and to engage in experi- 
mental work in the areas of sensation, perception, and cognitive 
processes. A full-semester course. Prerequisite: Psychology 303. 
Two lectures and two labs each week. 

Psychology 312 Experimental Psychology II 4 hours 
A continuation of Psychology 311, covering the areas of learning, 
perceptual-motor skills, and motivation. A full-semester course. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 303. Two lectures and two labs each 
week. 



Psychology 169 Introduction to Computer 

Science 2 hours 

An introduction to computer programming and computer de- 
sign. Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in 
solving problems encountered in psychology. 



Psychology 180-189 Special Topics in Psychology 

Seminar-courses in this category will take up special topics of 
mutual concern to the staff and students. These courses do 
not count towards the major in psychology, but, in some cases, 
and with the permission of the instructor, psychology majors 
may take a 180-series course for credit in Psych. 380, with the 
understanding that they will be evaluated by advanced stand- 
ards. Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent registration in Psy- 
chology 100 or its equivalent. 



Psychology 315 Modification of Behavior 2 hours 

This course has two main aims: first, to help the student learn 
systematically to analyze behavior in terms of the S-R-Reinforce- 
ment principles as developed by men such as Skinner and Wolpe; 
second, to help the student develop skills in the application of 
these principles to the modification of behavior in practical 
situations. Examples of these latter arise in the areas of behavior 
disorder, child-rearing, the work situation, and habit change. 
A half-semester course. Three lectures and one lab each week. 

Psychology 324 Personality and Adjustment 4 hours 
Topics include theories of personality and research-based psy- 
chological principles useful in understanding behavior. This 
course would be helpful to the potential parent, nurse, doctor, 
social worker, child-care worker, etc. A full-semester course. 
Three lectures and one lab each week. 



Psychology 183 Animal Behavior 2 hours 

An introduction to the comparative study of behavior. The 
emphasis will be on unlearned and "instinctive" behavior pat- 
terns. A wide variety of species and classes of behavior will be 
discussed. Offered Spring 1973-74 2nd eight weeks. 



Psychology 325 Behavior Disorder and 

Treatment 4 hours 

Designed to help the student gain both a theoretical and prac- 
tically useful perspective on what has traditionally been called 



124 




abnormal behavior. The class will first study the traditional psy- 
chiatric diagnostic categories as well as recent evidence ques- 
tioning the reliability and usefulness of this approach. Alternative 
models, including the behavioral ones, will be examined. Finally, 
the class will examine the institutional structure our society has 
created to deal with, and/or help, the individual who engages in 
socially aberrant behavior. The course should prove particularly 
useful to the student planning to go into one of the "helping" 
professions. A full-semester course. Three lectures and one lab 
each week. 

Psychology 326 Experimental Social 

Psychology 4 hours 

Aspects of social behavior and specific social issues are examined 
within the context of theory and experimental research. Topics 
include social factors in the development of morals; cooperation 
and competition; aggression; racial and social-class differences 
in personality, motivation, and language; attitudes and attitude 
change; authoritarianism and obedience; interpersonal and group 
processes (affiliation, attraction, perception, conformity, and 
leadership); and discussion of drug and sex issues. A full-semester 
course. Three lectures and one lab each week. 



Psychology 333 Educational Psychology 2 hours 

A study of the application of psychological principles to the field 
of education. Included will be the areas of learning, transfer of 
training, individual differences, motivation, and behavior modi- 
fication as they apply to education. A half-semester course. 
Prerequisite: Four hours of general psychology. Five hours of 
lecture each week. 

Psychology 335 Biological Bases of 

Behavior 2 hours 

This course examines the neural and biochemical substrates of 
the more important aspects of organismic behavior. It is recom- 
mended that students have some background in relevant, college- 
level biology. A half-semester course. Three hours of lecture 
and one lab each week. 

Psychology 338 Psychological and 

Educational Tests and 
Measurements 2 hours 

The course will deal mainly with group testing, with attention to 
the construction and use of standardized and ad hoc tests. 
The necessary correlational techniques will be included. A half- 
semester course. (May be taken for credit as Education 338). 
Three lectures and one lab each week. 

Psychology 355 Applied Psychology 

of Interpersonal and 

Organizational Processes 4 hours 
An academic and experiential approach to interpersonal pro- 
cesses and group or organizational functioning. It is hoped that 
students will develop cognitive and personal skills that will be 
useful to them in both areas. A full-semester course. Two lec- 
tures and two labs each week. 

Psychology 380-389 Advanced Topics in 

Psychology 

Seminar-courses in this area will take up special topics of mutual 
concern to the staff and students. Open only to majors in the 
Department, but in some cases, and with the permission of the 
instructor, non-majors may take a Psychology 380 series course 
for credit in the Psychology 180 series. 



725 



Psychology 382 Psychology of Language 2 hours 

The most extraordinary and significant learning accomplished 
by the human is unquestionably his learning of language. This 
course will take the psychological perspective in examining 
both theoretical and practical issues in the individual's devel- 
opment of linguistic skills. A half-semester course. 

Psychology 399 Junior Seminar in 

Psychology 2 hours 

The primary purpose of this seminar is to give students a chance 
to engage in the thinking, discussion, and background reading 
necessary for intelligently selecting and planning a high quality 
Senior Project. Although one staff member will be in charge of 
the seminar, the full faculty of the department will be present at 
at least one meeting each month. One two-hour meeting each 
I of the semester. 

Psychology 415 Systematic Psychology 4 hours 

An examination of the systematic positions and theories that have 
been important in the history of psychology, as well as a brief 
review of the philosophical bases underlying these positions. A 
full-semester course. Three lectures and one lab each week. 

Psychology 477 Senior Seminar in 

General Psychology 2 hours 

This seminar, to be held during the last half of the fall semester, 
is designed to help students review the field of their major at an 
advanced level. This review should be useful as preparation for 
the comprehensive examination, and it should also alert students 
to areas needing further, subsequent study for the exam. 
One two-hour meeting each week. 

Psychology 480 Methods and Materials 

in Teaching Psychology 4 hours 
Study of the methods and materials used in teaching psychology 
m the secondary school. The course will have a systematic and 
experimental emphasis. Prerequisite: 76 hours in psychology. 



Psychology 487-488 Independent 

Study 

Psychology 490 Senior Project 



2 or A hours each 



2-8 hours 



Religious Studies 

AIMS 

The Department of Religious Studies desires to con- 
tinue the historic interest of the College in the intel- 
lectual, spiritual, and social development of the 
community. Students are encouraged to join in the 
exploration of thought and research in the field of 
religious studies. Biblical studies form the central core 
of the Departmental offerings. In addition, each stu- 
dent also examines the relationship between religion 
and culture (both ancient and modern). The personal 
integration of knowledge and faith for an under- 
standing and appreciation of value systems is a con- 
scious goal of the Department. 

The aims of the Department are future-oriented. 
Rather than teaching a particular point of view, the 
Department seeks to assist the student in learning 
how to acquire, evaluate, and use religious knowl- 
edge. Each course is consciously designed to enhance 
the student's efforts to interrelate his varied aca- 
demic, social and personal experiences. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of 24 hours (excluding R.S. 100) in the 
Department, a Senior Project, and the successful 
completion of the senior comprehensive examination 
constitute the stated requirements of the Department 
of Religious Studies. 

The Comprehensive Examination in Religious Stu- 
dies emphasizes Biblical Studies, Early Christianity, 
and Contemporary Religious Thought and Culture. 

Students electing the field of Religious Studies are 
strongly urged to develop a proficiency in one or 
more of the following: German, French, Greek, Latin, 



726 




or Hebrew. They are also urged to spend at least one 
semester in study abroad. 

(Enrollment in the courses marked with an asterisk has R.S. TOO as 
a prerequisite and also requires the consent of the instructor). 

R.S. 100 Judaeo-Christian Heritage 

and Contemporary Living 4 hours 

Participants in this course study the Judeao-Christian heritage 
with the aim of understanding how Biblical writers reflect on the 
basic human and social problems which continue to trouble 
contemporary man. They do this in a triple context: (1) the clas- 
sical Biblical tradition, (2) the liberal arts tradition of Bethany 
College, and (3) contemporary questions. Offered each semester. 

R.S. 300-309 Studies in the Old Testament 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics covering the his- 
tory, literature, and theology related to the Old Testament. 

TOPICS FOR SPRING 1974: 

R.S. 304 The Message and Mission of the Prophets 2 hours 
The student will read critically and appreciatively selected 
writings of the classical prophets of ancient Israel (Amos, 
Hosea, Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel). He will be assisted in 
developing an understanding of the major ideas of the prophets 
and the relationship of these ideas to the issues facing both 
ancient and modern men. 



*R.S. 306 Form and Function of Prophetic Literature 2 hours 
The student will study some of the various ways in which Bib- 
lical scholarship has interpreted the Old Testament prophetic 
literature in terms of modern critical methods. The class will 
also deal with issues involved in the theological understanding 
of the prophets. 

R.S. 310-319 Studies in the New Testament 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics covering the his- 
tory, literature, and theology related to the New Testament. 

TOPIC FOR FALL 1973: 

*R.S. 311 Studies in the Gospels 4 hours 

The student will be assisted in developing the means to dis- 
cern the message of different gospel writers. While concentrat- 
ing on the Gospel of Mark, the course will equip the student to 
do basic exegetical work in any of the four canonical gospels. 
Students in this course will sharpen their own abilities to 
utilize the various historical and literary methods that grow out 
of the study of gospel texts. 

TOPIC FOR SPRING 1974: 

R.S. 314 The Gospel of John 2 hours 

The student will study in depth the Fourth Gospel as an impor- 
tant document in the History of Religions, as a special literary 
form and composite, as a witness to the historical Jesus, and 
as a continuing witness to faith and to the meaning of human 
existence. Offered 2nd eight weeks. 

R.S. 320-329 Studies in Religion and Culture 

Courses in this area deal with special topics in the relationship 
between religious faith and human culture. 

TOPICS FOR FALL 1973: 

R.S. 325 The Making of an American Apocalypse 4 hours 
The student will examine sermons, speeches, scripture, letters, 
and novels that chronicle the development of the American 
dream and its gradual transformation into an American night- 
mare. Special emphasis will be placed on the emergence of 
this pattern in the American novel. The student will read, 
among others, novels by Melville, Alger, Dreiser, West, Bellow, 
Brautigan, and Pyncheon. (May be taken for credit as Eng. 402). 

R.S. 327 Witchcraft and Religion 2 hours 

The student will examine examples of the resurgence of inter- 
est in witchcraft in the twentieth century. Readings will focus 
on various theories concerning the nature and origin of both 



727 



white and black witchcraft. The course will assist the student 
in developing his own theory concerning the relationship be- 
tween witchcraft, the occult, and modern man's religious quest. 
Offered 2nd eight weeks. 



TOPICS FOR SPRING 1974: 
R.S. 322 Sociology of Religion 

(May be taken for credit as Soc. 355). 

R.S. 323 Social and Religious Movements 

(May be taken for credit as Soc. 354). 



4 hours 
4 hours 



R.S. 324 Camus and Christianity 2 hours 

The student will read some of the major novels, plays, and 
essays of Albert Camus (in English) in order to gain an under- 
standing of Camus' ideas and concerns. The course will focus 
upon Camus' challenges to Christianity and ways in which the 
contemporary Christian might respond to them and incorpo- 
rate certain of them into his own views of human life. (May be 
taken for credit as Foreign Language 324). Offered 1st eight 
weeks. 



TOPIC FOR SPRING 1974: 

R.S. 342 The Religions of China: Confucianism and 

Taoism 2 hours 

The student will explore the chief features of Confucianism 
and Taoism. The course begins with a consideration of the 
most ancient features of Chinese religion and will focus then 
on a careful reading (in translation) of Confucius' Analects 
and Lao Tzu's Tao-te ching. Offered 2nd eight weeks. 



R.S. 350-359 Studies in Near Eastern Religions 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics relating to the 
History of Religions in West Asia. 



TOPIC FOR FALL 1973: 

R.S. 353 Hellenistic Civilization 4 hours 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the 
Graeco-Roman Oriental world based on a survey of social and 
cultural developments from Alexander the Great to Julius 
Caesar. (May be taken for credit as History 353). 



R.S. 330-339 Studies in Contemporary 
Religious Thought 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics related to the 
intellectual formulation of religious faith. 

TOPICS FOR SPRING 1974: 

R.S. 334 Readings in Modern German Religious 

Thinkers 2 hours 

Students in this course will read and discuss sections from the 
writings of twentieth century German theologians. (May be 
taken for credit as German 334). Prerequisite: German 200 
or equivalent. 

*R.S. 336 Twentieth Century Protestant Thought 4 hours 

The participants in this course will discuss the thought of Karl 
Barth, Reinhold Niebuhr, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and Paul Tillich. 
Themes will include the rediscovery of the authority of the 
Bible and its prophetic function in society (Barth and Bon- 
hoeffer), the relationship between Christ and Culture (Tillich), 
and between Christ and Power Politics (Niebuhr). 



TOPIC FOR JANUARY 1974: 

R.S. 350-J Judaeo-Christian Sources of Western 

Civilization 4 hours 

A month of travel and study in Palestine and Greece. Lectures 
and seminars will trace historical and religious influences in 
the development of the Judaeo-Christian heritage of the West. 
Resources of the universities and colleges of the Holy Land will 
be utilized in this study. Summary papers are required for 
credit. This course when supplemented by an independent 
study in Bethany religious traditions may be used to meet the 
basic religious heritage course requirement of the College. 

TOPIC FOR SPRING 1974: 

R.S. 354 The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Qumran 

Community 2 hours 

Through a study of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the student will seek 
to understand why the Qumran community took such a radical 
stand in the struggle between Judaism and Hellenism. He will 
be aided in discovering the significance of these materials for 
Biblical studies. Offered 1st eight weeks. 



R.S. 340-349 Studies in Far Eastern Religions 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics relating to the 
History of Religions in East Asia. 



R.S. 360-369 Studies in American Religion 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics relating to Amer- 
ican religious phenomena. 



728 



TOPICS FOR SPRING 1974: 

R.S. 362 American Judaism 2 hours 

A descriptive study of contemporary American Judaism and its 
roots. The course emphasizes the life-cycle customs of Judaism. 
Jewish holidays are studied in the context of Jewish history. 
The course seeks to develop a broader understanding of the 
modern Jewish community in the United States. 

R.S. 364 Native American Religions 2 hours 

The student will explore the chief features of several native 
American religions (i.e., religions of American Indians), seeking 
to ascertain what those cultures may say to a Christian culture 
which occupies the same terrain. The course includes a wilder- 
ness weekend and several field trips. Offered 2nd eight weeks. 

R.S. 370-379 Studies in the History of Christianity 

Courses in this area will deal with special topics relating to the 
historical developments of Christianty. 

TOPIC FOR FALL1973: 

R.S. 371 The German Church Crisis (1933-45) 2 hours 

Students will analyze the confrontation between Nazism and 
the churches of Germany. The varieties both of the Nazi ap- 
proach to Christianity and the Christians' reaction to Hitlerism 
will be explored. The course will relate this specific incident 
in church history to more general questions concerning the 
relationship between Christians and the state. 

R.S. 380-389 Practical Studies in 

Religion 2 or 4 hours 

Since any educated man should learn from any experience in 
life, a vocational or any other practicum in religion, as such, will 
not be given academic credit. To receive academic credit in con- 
nection with a practicum in religion, the student should give 
prior evidence that he has or will arrange a supplementary edu- 
cational program (either instructional or supervised independent 
study), which will increase his knowledge or skills beyond those 
of other educated men who have the same practical experience 
Credit will be based on the evaluation of the successful comple- 
tion of that program of study. 

TOPIC FOR FALL 1973: 

R.S. 381 Church Leadership Practicum 2 hours 

The student will be assisted in developing an understanding 
of the theory and practice of public worship, preaching, and 
church program planning. 



TOPIC FOR SPRING 1974: 

R.S. 380 Introduction to Peace Studies 2 hours 

Some colleges and universities in the country are introducing 
departments of peace studies, enabling students interested in 
peace to major in the subject or to do graduate study in it. 
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the sorts 
of material he or she would be dealing with in a peace studies 
major. Themes will include biological, psychological, and 
sociological theories of aggression and conflict resolution 
techniques. An individual or group project will be encouraged. 
(May be taken for credit as Soc. 365). Offered 1st eight weeks. 

R.S. 487-488 Independent Study in 

Religious Studies 2 or 4 hours each 



R.S. 490 Senior Project 



2-8 hours 




729 



Social Sciences 

Social Sciences is a grouping of courses only. It is not 
a separate department of the College. Students who 
participate in such programs as the American Uni- 
versity Washington Semester, the Drew University 
United Nations Semester, and other similar off- 
campus programs may receive credit in this area. 



Sociology 



Soc. Sci. 302 World Geography 



2 hours 



A study of the physical, social, and political geographic factors 
of the world today. Recent changes in Europe, Asia, and Africa 
will be discussed. 



Soc. Sci. 311 Spanish 

Civilization (in English) 

(See Spanish 311). 



4 hours 



Soc. Sci. 320 Cultural Backgrounds of 

British Literature 4 hours 

A survey of British history from the Celtic times to the present. 
Major political developments such as the development of parlia- 
mentary government and the constitution will be taken into 
account, but major emphasis will be placed on extra-political 
matters such as the development of the English language, music, 
art, architecture, drama, the English church, education, and do- 
mestic life. The aim of the course is to show how these devel- 
opments are related to English literature, and every effort will be 
made to take advantage of the locale to visit museums, castles, 
cathedrals, universities, Parliament, theatres and concert halls. 
The course will be taught in Oxford with an enrollment limited 
to 15. 

Soc. Sci. 480 Methods and Materials in 

Teaching Social Studies 2 hours 

Nature, objectives, and curricula of social studies in junior and 
senior high schools. Concepts and methods of approach to be 
emphasized. Methods, techniques, teaching aids, and other re- 
sources. Resource units, lesson plans, evaluation, teaching read- 
ing and study skills. 



AIMS 

The Department of Sociology seeks to facilitate for 
students a creative engagement between sociological 
and experiential learning; to introduce students to 
topics of current interest as these might be inter- 
preted within a sociological framework; to provide 
skills necessary for graduate work in sociology or 
other fields; to prepare students for public service 
positions such as secondary school teaching, envi- 
ronmental/population task forces, community needs, 
nursing, etc. The Department also seeks to provide 
a field of concentration that may be utilized as an 
avenue for exploring new career and life-style possi- 
bilities. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR 

FIELD OF CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of 24 hours, including Sociology 100, 
200, 201, 202, 209 plus the Senior Project (Soc. 490). 
The minimum of 24 hours must be taken in Sociology 
(excluding cross-listed courses). 

Usual Sequence for Majoring in Sociology: 

1. Sociological Perspectives (Soc. 100). 

2. Sociology 200 spring term of sophomore or junior 
year, simultaneously with Sociology 209. 

3. Sociology 201 and 202 (four hours total) fall term 
after 200 and 209. 

4. Additional courses among the following: Contem- 
porary Sociological Issues courses, Special Topics 
in Sociology courses, anthropology courses, social 
work, independent study, or mutually approved 
interdisciplinary activity. 

5. Senior Project and Comprehensives. 



730 



Flexibility Within the Major: 

1. A student may plan to concentrate in sociology 
with the expressed intention of doing graduate 
study at a later date. A program will be designed 
to meet that need and to take into consideration 
any courses needed in related areas if the student 
expects to do graduate work in a field other than 
sociology. 

2. Students not anticipating graduate training may 
develop a course of study, taken together with 
practicums, that will prepare them for careers of 
public service. 

3. Students may choose to use sociology as a means 
of exploring future vocations and new life-styles 
through direct observation and in-the-field in- 
volvement. This choice involves preparation for, 
and the experience of, a fall term off-campus. 
This experience may be an extension of one or 
more of the experience-based practicums (citizen- 
ship or vocation). Students interested in taking this 
option should enroll in 200 and 209 the spring 
term preceding the off-campus experience. The 
off-campus semester will be awarded both field 
work credit and credit as independent study. 

Soc. 100 Sociological Perspectives 4 hours 

Students are introduced to basic concepts and methods in soci- 
ology ?.s instruments for the assimilation and evaluation of day- 
to-day experiences and as perspectives from which they may 
expand their interests and awareness in other areas of study. 
Offered fall and spring semesters. 

Soc. 169 Introduction to Computer Science 2 hours 

An introduction to computer programming and computer design. 
Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in solving 
problems encountered in sociology. 

Soc. 200 Sociological Theory 4 hours 

An introduction to social thought, with primary emphasis upon 



sociological perspectives as these have developed from Durkheim 
to the present. Generally taken concurrently with Sociology 209. 
Offered Spring semester. 



Soc. 201 Theory and Research 



2 hours 



An extension of 200, concentrating on the use of theory in rela- 
tion to student projects, proposals and student-initiated issues. 
Prerequisite: Soc. 200. Offered Fall semester, 1st eight weeks. 

Soc. 202 Applied Theory 2 hours 

A further extension of 200, centered around further development 
of independent student projects. Prerequisites: Soc. 200 and 
201. Offered Fall semester, 2nd eight weeks. 




737 



Soc. 209 Research Methods in 

Social Relations 4 hours 

This is an exploration in methods of social relations which the 
student should attempt to integrate with 200, his own alternative 
program, or a later process in his program. Offered Spring 
semester. 

Soc. 310 Science, Technology, and Society 4 hours 
An historical examination of the effects of scientific and tech- 
nological innovations upon various societies, with emphasis on 
technology and science in the Western world since 1850. (May 
be taken for credit as General Sciences 210). Alternate years: 
1973-74. 



Soc. 312 Experimental Social Psychology 4 hours 
The study of the development of the self as influenced by the 
learning of symbolic interaction with members of primary and 
secondary groups. Discussion of factors in socialization, attitude 
structure and change, psycholinguistics and communication, per- 
son perception, dyadic interaction, and group dynamics. (May be 
taken for credit as Psychology 326). Prerequisite: Psychology 
100 if course is to be counted as psychology. Sociology 100 and 
Psychology 100 if course is to be counted as sociology. 



Soc. 350-365 Special Topics in Sociology 

Open to the general college, unless otherwise indicated. One or 
more of these courses are offered each term as the interests 
and needs of students and faculty determine them. Topics vary 
each year. 

TOPICS FOR FALL 1973 

Soc. 350 Family and Contemporary Society 4 hours 

This course concerns kinship and family, patterns of stability, 
and questions relating to the family's future, especially in de- 
veloped societies. 

Soc. 351 Issues in Criminology and Deviant Behavior 4 hours 
A survey of sociological perspectives on problems of delin- 
quency. 

Soc. 352 Minority Relations 4 hours 

Problems of cultural and ethnic minorities in contemporary 
society, especially the United States. 




Soc. 353 The Contemporary City 2 hours 

Urbanization as a social process and urban problems. The 
significance of cities in modern life. Assimilation in the urban 
setting. Offered 1st eight weeks. 

Soc. 359 Individuality and Community 2 hours 

An exploration of the historic tension between individuality 
and community in American society, and its consequences for 
our personal and corporate lives. Data will be gathered through 
reading, autobiographical inquiry, observations, interviews, etc. 
Offered 2nd eight weeks. 

Soc. 360 Youth and Social Change 4 hours 

A study of the relationships between the location of youth and 
the emergence of youth cultures and movements, especially in 
contemporary societies. 

TOPICS FOR SPRING 1974: 

Soc. 354 Social and Religious Movements 4 hours 

This course discusses the conditions under which social and 
religious movements tend to arise, where they tend to stabilize, 
and how they influence social change. (May be taken for credit 
as Religious Studies 323). 

Soc. 355 Sociology of Religion 4 hours 

This course discusses social perspectives of religious phenom- 



132 



ena, especially enthusiasm and charisma, and their relationship 
to the issues of meaning, stability, and change. (May be taken 
for credit as Religious Studies 322). 

Soc. 356 Third World Development 2 hours 

A general survey of those social issues and dilemmas most 
crucial for economically underdeveloped nations. Offered 1st 
eight weeks. 



Soc. 400 Field Work in Sociology 2-6 hours 

This course is available to students in the future vocations pro- 
gram and related programs. 



Soc. 477 Senior Seminar 



2 hours 



Soc. 358 Post-Industrial Societies 2 hours 

A survey of social issues and dilemmas most crucial to the 
future of developed societies. Such issues as nationalism, iden- 
tity, and present and future resources will be included in this 
survey. Offered 2nd eight weeks. 



Soc. 487-488 Independent Study in 

Sociology 2 or 4 hours each 

Studies may be planned as extensions of, or separate from, exist- 
ing Departmental offerings. 



Soc. 359 Social Change in a Post-Industrial Society 2 hours 
An examination of those issues noted in Soc. 358 in a specific 
post-industrial society (other than the U.S.). Soc. 358 is not a 
prerequisite. Offered 2nd eight weeks. 

Soc. 365 Introduction to Peace Studies 2 hours 

Some colleges and universities in the country are introducing 
departments of peace studies, enabling students interested in 
peace to major in the subject or to do graduate work in it. This 
course is designed to familiarize the student with the sorts of 
material he or she would be dealing with in a peace studies 
major. Themes will include biological, psychological, and so- 
ciological theories of aggression and conflict resolution tech- 
niques. An individual or group project will be encouraged. 
(May be taken for credit as Religious Studies 380). 



Soc. 375 Philosophy of Man and Culture 4 hours 

A philosophical study of man in social and cultural relations, 
one aspect of philosophical anthropology. Emphasis is placed on 
the relevance of analysis of civilization, culture, and society for 
a philosophical understanding of man. (May be taken for credit 
as Philosophy 375). 



Soc. 378 Philosophy of Social Issues and 

Politics 4 hours 

A philosophical study of the principles involved in the realms 
of political philosophy and presupposed by many social issues. 
(May be taken for credit as Philosophy 378). 



Soc. 490 Senior Project and Seminar 2-8 hours 

A seminar for students approaching completion of their majors 
and projects. The course is designed to help students evaluate 
their activities in sociology and to integrate their educational 
experiences. This seminar is led as a joint staff endeavor fall and 
spring semesters. 



ANTHROPOLOGY 

Soc. 326 Cultural Anthropology 



4 hours 



A general survey of cultural systems with emphasis upon culture 
as related to economic activity, kinship, political organization, 
art, religion, and magic. This course may be credited toward a 
major in sociology beyond the minimum 24 hours. Prerequisite: 
Soc. 100 or permission of the instructor. Offered fall and spring 
semesters. 



SOCIAL WORK 

Soc. 150 Contemporary Social Work 4 hours 

This course will explore contemporary theories of social work 
and discuss service possibilities in the United States. This course 
may be credited toward a major in sociology beyond the mini- 
mum of 24 hours. Prerequisite: Soc. 100 or permission of the 
instructor. 






733 




Theatre 



AIMS 

To provide students with an opportunity to study 
dramatic literature and important related literary 
forms; to provide students with a working knowledge 
of theatre techniques, including acting, directing, 
stage crafts and oral interpretation; and to acquaint 
students with the history of theatre and the evolution 
of drama movements in various stages of develop- 
ment so that they will be equipped for graduate 
school in theatre, for work in professional or com- 
munity theatre, or for positions in the teaching of 
the dramatic arts. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

Each student is required to complete a minimum of 
32 hours in the Theatre and English Departments. 
The following courses are required: English 251-254, 
270, 410-419 (any one course primarily drama or 
theatre), Theatre 202, 401 or 402, 404, 405, 451-454 
(any two), 477, and a Senior Project (Theatre 490). 
Recommended courses: two other English courses, 
communications oral interpretation courses, Philoso- 
phy 368, and Theatre 403, 406. 

For those desiring to be certified to teach theatre 
in secondary schools, a major in English with a spe- 
cialty in theatre is mandatory for the teaching of 
theatre; English 480 is therefore also required for 
certification. (Also see English Department for the 
possibility of theatre specialization under Require- 
ments 1 and 2 for field of concentration). 



134 




Theatre 202 Playwriting 2 hours 

Extensive practice in playwriting with an emphasis upon achieve- 
ment of literary excellence. Individual assignments and frequent 
conferences. The course is offered only one-half semester under 
the English or Theatre Departments. Enrollment is limited to 12, 
with preference to juniors and seniors. May be repeated for 
credit with consent of the Chairman of the English or Theatre 
Departments. (May be taken for credit as English 202). Prerequi- 
site: Demonstration of proficiency and consent of instructor. 
Not offered 1973-74. 



Theatre 203 Interpersonal 

Communication: Speech 

(See Communications 203). 



Theatre 205 



Advanced Interpersonal 
Communication: Speech 



4 hours 



2 hours 



(See Communications 205). 



Theatre 251 -254 Literature of the 

Western World 2 hours each 

A chronological study of Western literary masterpieces, chiefly 
in translation. 251: Greek and Roman Classicism. 252: The Mid- 
dle Ages. 253: Renaissance and Neo-Classicism. 254: Modern. 
(May be taken for credit as English 251-254). 



Theatre 270 Shakespeare 4 hours 

A survey of the major plays, with emphasis on Shakespeare's 
themes, motifs, language and characterization. (May be taken for 
credit as English 270). 

Theatre 401 History of Theatre from 

Its Inception 4 hours 

A study of the development of dramatic literature with emphasis 
on both the history of theatres and dramas from the periods. 

Theatre 402 History of Theatre from the 

Post Renaissance to the 

Twentieth Century 4 hours 

Also a study of the stages of dramatic literature and theatre as 
noted in Theatre 401. No prerequisites, but Theatre 401 is rec- 
ommended. 

Theatre 403 Beginning Acting 4 hours 

Movement, various styles, improvisations, projections of char- 
acter, and speech technique. 

Theatre 404 Advanced Acting 2 or 4 hours 

Scene study as a unit of theatrical form. Scenes from various 
periods to be directed and performed. Focus on interaction be- 
tween characters. Prerequisite: Theatre 403. 

Theatre 405 Beginning Direction 2 or 4 hours 

Fundamentals of staging: blocking, movement, stage business, 
tempo, script analyses, casting, and rehearsal planning. 

Theatre 406 Advanced Direction 4 hours 

The direction of specific scenes from various periods of theatre. 
Prerequisite: Theatre 405. 

Theatre 410-419 Studies in Literary 

Genres 2 or 4 hours 

A seminar for the study of a single literary genre, or mode, such 
as the epic, tragedy, satire, or biography. (May be taken for credit 
as English 410-419). 



735 



Theatre 451 Fundamentals of Set 

Construction 2 hours 

Offered each half oi the tall semester. 

Theatre 452 Fundamentals of 

Theatre Lighting 2 hours 

Offered each half of the fall semester. 

Theatre 453 Fundamentals of Costume 

Design and Construction 2 hours 

Offered Spring 1973-74, 1st eight weeks. 

Theatre 454 Fundamentals of Stage 

Make-Up 2 hours 

Offered Spring 1973-74, 2nd eight weeks. 

Theatre 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 

Reading, criticism, and research designed to review and correlate 
a student's work in other courses in the Departments. Prerequi- 
sites: All required courses in the Departments and at least one 
advanced seminar. 

The comprehensive examination is based upon three parts: 
(1) a jury of drama specialization, (2) a written comprehensive, 
and (3) an oral examination. (Undergraduate Record Examination 
in English will be recommended for those who have taken a 
majority of the English 300 courses. Undergraduate Record Exam- 
ination will be required for those who have concentrated upon 
theatre). 



Theatre 480 



Methods of Teaching English 
and Theatre 



2 hours 



Study of methods and materials used in teaching English and 
theatre. The teaching of high school composition and literature. 
Literary analysis, systems of grammar, and reading improvement. 
(May be taken for credit as English 480). 

Theatre 487-488 Independent 

Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Individual study in any area of theatre or English in which the 
student is interested and in which he is qualified and prepared 
to work independently. Independent study is offered only in areas 
not included in other courses in the Departments. Prerequisites: 



Demonstrated proficiency in expository writing, adequate prepa- 
ration to undertake the study as determined by the instructor, 
and consent of the Chairman of the Department. 

Theatre 490 Senior Project 2 or 4 hours 

A project in acting, directing or design, involving either acting a 
major role or directing a major play and defending same in a 
written thesis. Must be arranged with the Department a year in 
advance. Open only to senior theatre majors. 




136 



BETHANY 




THE DIRECTORIES 

1973-1974 



737 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
Officers of the Board 

PERRY E. GRESHAM, Chairman 
CECIL H. UNDERWOOD, President 
JOHN A. GRAHAM, Treasurer 
CHARLES D. BELL, Secretary 

Members of the Board 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1974 

ROY S. ADKINS, 99 Heller Way, Upper Montclair, New Jersey 

VERNON R. ALDEN, The Boston Company, Inc., One Boston 
Place, Boston, Massachusetts 

CHARLES D. BELL, 67 Seventh Street, Wellsburg, West Virginia 

A. DALE FIERS, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 222 South 
Downey Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana 

HAMILTON C. FORMAN, 1524 Coral Ridge Drive, Fort Lauder- 
dale, Florida 

PERRY E. GRESHAM, Bethany, West Virginia 

R. R. RENNER, M.D., 1259 Oakridge Drive, Cleveland, Ohio 

ROBERT C. WETENHALL, McConnell & Wetenhall & Co., Inc., 375 
Park Avenue, New York, New York 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1975 

JOHN E. COSTELLO, 418 Washington Avenue, Charleroi, Penn- 
sylvania 

SIDNEY S. GOOD, JR., L.S. Good & Company, 1141 Market Street, 
Wheeling, West Virginia 

MICHAEL J. KASARDA, 208 Farmers & Merchants National Bank 
Bldg., Bellaire, Ohio 



138 




EUGENE MILLER, New York Stock Exchange, 11 Wall Street, New 
York, New York 

JUNIUS T. MOORE, P.O. Box 753, Charleston, West Virginia 

C. OCDEN NUTTING, The Ogden Newspapers, Inc., 1500 Main 
St., Wheeling, West Virginia 

MALCOLM W. RUSH, SR., 3096 Orchard Road, Cuyahoga Falls, 
Ohio 

FRANK L. WIEGAND, JR., 855 Academy Place, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania 

TERM EXPIRES JUNE, 1976 

ALTON W. BEHM, M.D., 112 South Street, Chardon, Ohio 

COURTNEY BURTON, Oglebay-Norton Company, 1200 Hanna 

Building, Cleveland, Ohio 
RODNEY B. HURL, M.D., 211 Stocksdale Drive, Marysville, Ohio 
THOMAS PHILLIPS JOHNSON, 1500 Oliver Building, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania 
WILLIAM L. MILLER, JR., Board of Higher Education of the 
Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 119 North Jefferson, 
St. Louis, Missouri 
PAUL A. NORTON, Pinecroft Road, Greenwich, Connecticut 
WILLIAM F. PORTER, Globe Refractories, Inc., P.O. Box D, 

Newell, West Virginia 
MRS. JOSEPHINE S. WICKERHAM, 217 Conestoga Road, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania 



Faculty Representative to the Board 

RICHARD B. KENNEY, Bethany, West Virginia (June, 1974). 

Honorary Trustees 

MERRITT J. DAVIS, 200 Sycamore Street, Welisburg, West Virginia 
MRS. WALTER M. HAUSHALTER, Apt. B-209, Thomas Wynne 
Apartments, Wynnewood, Pennsylvania 

ROBERT D. HURL, 56 Harriett Drive, Shelby, Ohio 

CHARLES H. MANION, Apartment 6-F, Fort Steuben Hotel, Steu- 
benville, Ohio 

J. PARK McMULLEN, 10th and Franklin Avenue, Welisburg, West 
Virginia 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 11 Colonial Drive, McKeesport, Pennsyl- 
vania 

MAYNARD L. PATTON, 35 Cliffview Avenue, Fort Thomas, Ken- 
tucky 

D. ERVIN SHEETS, 1125 Singing Wood Court, Apt. 3, Walnut 
Creek, California 

AUSTIN V. WOOD, Wheeling News Publishing Company, 1500 
Main Street, Wheeling, West Virginia 

Committees of the Board of Trustees 

EXECUTIVE (Elected) 

Michael J. Kasarda, Chairman; Charles D. Bell, John E. Costello, 
A. Dale Fiers, Perry E. Gresham, Thomas Phillips Johnson, 
William F. Porter, Frank L. Wiegand, Jr. 

FINANCE, BUDGET and AUDIT (Elected by Executive Committee) 
John E. Costello, Michael J. Kasarda, G. Ogden Nutting, Mal- 
colm W. Rush, (Charles D. Bell, John A. Graham, Ex-officio) 

INVESTMENT (Elected) 

Frank L. Wiegand, Jr., Chairman; Thomas Phillips Johnson, Eugene 

Miller, Paul A. Norton (John A. Graham, Perry E. Gresham, 

Ex-Officio) 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Malcolm W. Rush, Chairman; Roy S. Adkins, Alton W. Behm, 
John E. Costello, R. R. Renner 

CHURCH RELATIONS 

William L. Miller, Jr., Chairman; A. Dale Fiers, Hamilton C. 
Forman, Junius T. Moore 

COMMITTEE ON COMMITTEES 

Maynard L. Patton, Chairman; John E. Costello, Michael J. 
Kasarda 



739 



DEVELOPMENT 

Rodney Hurl, Chairman; Vernon R. Alden, Courtney Burton, 
Hamilton C. Forman, Sidney S. Good, Jr., Junius T. Moore, 
Maynard L. Patton, Robert C. Wetenhall, Frank L. Wiegand, Jr. 

LONG RANGE PLANNING 
John E. Costello, Chairman; Vernon R. Alden, A. Dale Fiers, 
Sidney S. Good, Jr., Rodney Hurl, William L. Miller, Jr., R. R. 
Renner 

NOMINATING 

William F. Porter, Chairman; Charles D. Bell, A. Dale Fiers, 
Rodney Hurl, R. R. Renner 

PUBLIC RELATIONS 

G. Ogden Nutting, Chairman; Courtney Burton, Eugene Miller, 
William L.Miller, Jr. 

STUDENT-FACULTY-ALUMNI RELATIONS 

Charles D. Bell, Chairman; Alton W. Behm, Rodney Hurl, Mal- 
colm W. Rush 



NATIONAL BOARD OF FELLOWS 

DRAPER ALLEN, Detroit, Michigan 

MONE ANATHAN, JR., Steubenville, Ohio 

JOHN F. BAXTER, Gainesville, Florida 

LOUIS BERKMAN, Steubenville, Ohio 

THOMAS M. BLOCH, Wheeling, West Virginia 

J. CALEB BOGGS, Wilmington, Delaware 

GEORGE E. CARTER, Gates Mills, Ohio 

THOMAS C. CLARK, Washington, D.C. 

JAMES F. COMSTOCK, Richwood, West Virginia 

ALBERT V. DIX, Martins Ferry, Ohio 

ARTHUR EICHELKRAUT, Wheeling, West Virginia 

WARD L EKAS, Rochester, New York 

ROBERT W. FERGUSON, Wheeling, West Virginia 

DELMAR S. HARDER, Detroit, Michigan 

BROOKS HAYS, Washington, D.C. 

WAYNE L. HAYS, Washington, D.C. 

ROBERT HAZLETT, Wheeling, West Virginia 

ARTHUR S. HOLDEN, Painesville, Ohio 

GORDON HUTCHINSON, Chattanooga, Tennessee 

WILBUR S. JONES, Wheeling, West Virginia 

FORREST H. KIRKPATRICK, Wheeling, West Virginia 

ARTHUR J. KOBACKER, Brilliant, Ohio 

T. W. LIPPERT, Sea Gert, New Jersey 

WILLIAM J. MAIER, JR., Charleston, West Virginia 

A. F. MARSHAL, JR., Wheeling, West Virginia 

MERIL A. MAY, Garrettsville, Ohio 

CECIL G. McVAY, Greensburg, Pennsylvania 



CHARLES L. MELENYZER, Charleroi, Pennsylvania 

WILLIAM MONTAGNA, Portland, Oregon 

ARCH A. MOORE, JR., Charleston, West Virginia 

A. R. MORGAN, Palm Springs, California and Seattle, Washington 

ROBERT M. MORRIS, Boca Raton, Florida 

SETH C. MORROW, Delray Beach, Florida 

C. WILLIAM O'NEILL, Columbus, Ohio 

WALTER PATENGE, Lansing, Michigan 

JAMES O. PEARSON, Wheeling, West Virginia 

JOHN PHILLIPS, Wheeling, West Virginia 

FRANK B. RACKLEY, Washington, Pennsylvania 

JENNINGS RANDOLPH, Washington, D.C. 

JOHN G. REDLINE, JR., Detroit, Michigan 

ARCHIBALD H. ROWAN, Fort Worth, Texas 

W. ARTHUR RUSH, North Hollywood, California 

ARTHUR M. SCOTT, Wheeling, West Virginia 

RAYMOND K. SHELINE, Tallahassee, Florida 




740 



HULETT C. SMITH, Charleston, West Virginia 
ELVIS STAHR, JR., New York, New York 
ELEANOR STEBER, New York, New York 
GEORGE STEVENSON, Parkersburg, West Virginia 
A. KARL SUMMERS, Coolville, Ohio 
GEORGE M. SUTTON, Norman, Oklahoma 
ARTHUR A. WELLS, Newell, West Virginia 
DAVID A. WERBLIN, New York, New York 
BROOKS E. WIGGINTON, Wheeling, West Virginia 
C. E. WOLF, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
ALFRED E. WRIGHT, JR., Uniontown, Pennsylvania 



BOARD OF VISITORS 

ROBERT C. DIX, Bellaire, Ohio 
ROBERT W. EWING, JR., Wheeling, West Virginia 
CARLYLE D. FARNSWORTH, Wheeling, West Virginia 
LAURANCE GOOD, Wheeling, West Virginia 
GORDON B. GUENTHER, Wheeling, West Virginia 
D. MILTON GUTMAN, JR., Wheeling, West Virginia 
ROBERT C. HAZLETT, JR., Wheeling, West Virginia 
JOSEPH I. STEELE, Wheeling, West Virginia 
THOMAS W. TUCKER, Wheeling, West Virginia 
GEORGE S. WEAVER, JR., Wheeling, West Virginia 




ADMINISTRATION 

CECIL H. UNDERWOOD, President 

JOHN S. CALLEBS, Vice President and Dean of the Faculty 

JOSEPH M. KUREY, Registrar 

RUTH L. MARTIN, Assistant to the Registrar 

LARRY J. FRYE, Head Librarian 

WILLIAM J. GARVIN, JR., Director of Audio-Visual Activities 

ROBERT G. GOIN, Director of Athletics 

JOHN D. DAVIS, Director of January Term 

KENNETH E. MILLER, Director of Practicums 

HIRAM J. LESTER, Director of Freshman Studies 

ROBERT A. SANDERCOX, Vice President and Dean of Students 
JOHN S. CUNNINGHAM, Associate Dean of Students and 

Coordinator of Counseling Services 
DARLINE B. NICHOLSON, Associate Dean of Students and 

Director of Renner Union 
RICHARD L. NEWCOMER, Assistant Dean of Students for 

Residence Hall Programs 
MARGARET MATHISON, Counselor 
WALTER M. BORTZ, Director of Admission 
PATRICIA A. PASSALLO, Admission Counselor 
JOHN DAVID MacLAREN, Admission Counselor 
NANCY AULT, Administrative Assistant in Placement 
RUTH L. MAIN, Coordinator of Financial Aid 
BASIL P. PAPADIMITRIOUS, M.D., Co//ege Physician 
NICK POULOS, M.D., Co//ege Physician 
JOANNE SYKES, R.N., Supervisor of Infirmary 
CATHERINE SPRINGER, R.N., College Nurse 
FLORA M. DeMARK, R.N., Co//ege Nurse 
ANGELA ROUSH, College Nurse 
WILLIAM B. ALLEN, Co//ege Chaplain 
FR. JOHN V. DIBACCO, Catholic Chaplain 

JOHN A. GRAHAM, Treasurer and Business Manager 
THEODORE BUNNELL, Assistant Business Manager 
JOHN HOFFMAN, Assistant Business Manager 
SHIRLEY JACOB, Assistant Treasurer and Accountant 
GLENN COX, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 
LYNN E. QUEEN, Director of Data Processing 
PAUL E. WHITE, Manager of College Stores 
ROBERT CONAWAY, Chief Engineer 
JACK S. LEONARD, Director of Dining Service 
JEAN SCHWERTFEGER, Supervisor of Mailroom 

BURTON B. THURSTON, Provost for External Affairs 
JOHN GERALD PATTERSON, Director of Development 
CHARLES R. ALDRICH, Director of Public Information and 

Publications 
MEREDITH NORMENT, Director of Alumni Relations and 

Deferred Giving 



747 



THE FACULTY 

CECIL H. UNDERWOOD, President of the College. (1972). 

B.A., Salem College; M.A., West Virginia University; LL.D., 
Marietta College; LL.D., Bethany College; LL.D., West Virginia 
University; LL.D., West Virginia Institute of Technology; D.H., 
Salem College; Dr. P. A., West Virginia Wesleyan College; LL.D., 
Concord College; LL.D., West Virginia State College; Litt.D., 
Western New England College. 

JOHN S. CALLEBS, Vice President and Dean of the Faculty. (1973). 
B.A., M.A., West Virginia University; Ed.D., University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro. 

ROBERT A. SANDERCOX, Vice President and Dean of Students. 
(1957). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.Div., Yale University; University of 
Buffalo; West Virginia University. 



Emeriti 

WILBUR HAVERFIELD CRAMBLET, President Emeritus (1917-1952) 
and Distinguished Professor of Mathematics Emeritus. (1965- 
1969). 
B.A., M.A., Bethany College; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; LL.D., 
University of Pittsburgh, D.D., Drake University, LL.D., Culver- 
Stockton College; Litt.D., Texas Christian University. 



ANDREW LEITCH, Sarah B. Cochran Professor of Psychology 
Emeritus. (1920-1956). 
B.A., M.A., Butler College; B.D., Ph.D., Yale University; D.D. 
Butler University; Columbia University; University of Chicago; 
University of Pennsylvania; Harvard University. 

FORREST HUNTER KIRKPATRICK, Dean of Students Emeritus 
(1927-1941) and Adjunct Professor of Economics. (1970). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., and Prof. Dipl., Columbia Univer- 
sity; University of Pittsburgh; University of London; LL.D., 
Bethany College; LL.D., College of Steubenville; LL.D., Drury 
College. 

JOHN J. KNIGHT, Distinguished Professor of Physical Education 
Emeritus. (1930-1970). 
B.A., West Virginia Wesleyan College; M.A., Ohio State Uni- 
versity; University of Michigan. 

BENJAMIN CHANDLER SHAW, George 7. Oliver Distinguished 
Professor of History and Political Science Emeritus. (1935). 
B.A., Rollins College; M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina; 
American Academy in Rome; Royal University, Perugia, Italy. 

EARL D. McKENZIE, Professor of Foreign Languages and Chairman 
of the Department Emeritus. (1937-1972). 
B.A., Brown University; M.A., Columbia University; M. Litt., 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; University of Frankfurt am 
Main; Yale University; University of Paris. 

H. DONALD DAWSON, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry 
Emeritus. (1939-1944) (1963-1970). 
B.S., Denison University; M.Sc, Ph.D., Ohio State University. 




742 




BRADFORD TYE, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Chair- 
man oi the Department Emeritus. (1943-1973). 
B.S., Alma White College; M.S., New York University; Rutgers 
University; Columbia University; University of Pittsburgh. 

MARGARET ROBERTS WOODS, Associate Professor of Foreign 
Languages Emeritus. (1943-1961). 
B.A., Wellesley College; M.A., Pennsylvania State University; 
Middlebury College; Columbia University; Colorado College; 
University of Besancon; University of San Luis Potosi. 

WINIFRED WEBSTER, Dean of Women and Instructor in English 
Emeritus. (1952-1960). 
I!. A., University of North Dakota; M.A., Columbia University. 

PERRY EPLER GRESHAM, President Emeritus. (1953-1972). 

B.A., B.D., Texas Christian University; LL.D., Texas Christian 
University; Litt.D., Culver Stockton College; L.H.D., Chapman 
College; Ed.D., Transylvania College; University of Chicago; 
Columbia University; Litt.D., University of Cincinnati; Ed.D., 
Findlay College; Ped.D., Youngstovvn University. 

DANIEL SOMMER ROBINSON, Professor of Philosophy Emeritus. 
(1954-1958). 
B.A., Butler College; M.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Harvard Uni- 
versity; Litt.D., Marietta College; University of Breslau. 



WILBERT SCOTT RAY, Distinguished Professor of Psychology 
Emeritus. (1956). 
B.A., Washington and Jefferson College; M.A., Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin. 

HSIOH-REN WEI, Distinguished Professor of Physics and Public 
Affairs Emeritus. (1963-1972). 
B.A., University of Nanking; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 



Professors 

HELEN LOUISE McGUFFIE, Professor of English and Chairman of 
the Department. (1947). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., 
Columbia University. 

JOHN DANIEL DRAPER, Professor oi Chemistry and Chairman of 
the Department. (1951). 
B.S., Franklin and Marshall College; Ph.D., University of Mary- 
land; Michigan State University. 

*JAMES W. CARTY, |R., Professor of Communications and Chair- 
man of the Department. (1959). 
B.A., Culver-Stockton; B.D., University of Chicago; M.S., North- 
western University; University of Oklahoma; George Peabody 
College; Scaritt College; Sal til lo (Mexico) State Teachers Col- 
lege; Diploma from National University of Nicaragua; Diploma 
from University of San Carlos; Ohio University. 

JOHN A. SPENCE, Professor of Education and Chairman of the 
Department. (1961). 
B.S. in Ed., M.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

CHARLES E. HALT, Professor of Economics and Chairman of the 
Department. (1969). 
B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State 
University; Ph.D., Syracuse University; University of Pittsburgh. 

JOHN TREVOR PEIRCE, Professor of Psychology and Chairman of 
the Department. (1969). 
B.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., University of California. 

BURTON B. THURSTON, Professor oi Middle Eastern Studies. 
(1970). 
B. Th., Northwest Christian College; B.A., Transylvania Univer- 
sity; B.D., Butler School of Religion; M.A., Butler University; 
Th.D., Harvard University; University of Chicago; New York 
University; University of Tubingen. 



143 



Associate Professors 

GEORGE K. HAUPTFUEHRER, Associate Professor of Music and 
Chairman of the Department. (1945). 
B.A., B.M., Friends University; M.A., University of Kansas; Pitts- 
burgh Musical Institute; Juilliard School of Music; Indiana Uni- 
versity. 

S. ELIZABETH REED, Associate Professor of Physical Education. 
(1945). 
B.A., Muskingum College; M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin; New York University; University of Wyo- 
ming; University of Southern California; University of Michigan. 

•\\ ILLIAM LEWIS YOUNG, Associate Professor of History and Po- 
litical Science and Chairman of the Department. (1950). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., Ohio State University; Columbia 
University. 

MARGARET MATHISON, Associate Professor of Education. (1951). 
B.A.. M.Litt., University of Pittsburgh; University of Southern 
California; Pennsylvania State University; Ohio State University. 

JOHN RAYMOND TAYLOR, Associate Professor of English. (1955). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., Princeton University; University 
of Akron; University of Kansas; University of Birmingham, 
England; University of Edinburgh. 

ROBERT GARNER GOIN, Associate Professor of Physical Educa- 
tion and Chairman of the Department. (1960). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.S., West Virginia University. 

RICHARD BRUCE KENNEY, Associate Professor of Religious 
Studies and Chairman of the Department. (1964). 
B.A., Washington University; B.D., M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; 
Basel University; McGill University; University of Tubingen. 

GARY E. LARSON, Associate Professor of Biology and Chairman 
of the Department. (1964). 
B.S., M.S., New York State University, Albany; Ph.D., Rutgers 
University; Albany Medical College. 

ROBERT EDWARD MYERS, Associate Professor of Philosophy 
and Chairman of the Department. (1964). 
B.A., Bethany College; B.D., Texas Christian University; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University. 

HIRAM J. LESTER, Associate Professor of Religious Studies and 
Director of Freshman Studies. (1965). B.A., B.D., Phillips Univer- 
sity; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; Johnson Bible College. 

JOHN U. DAVIS, Associate Professor of Education. (1966). 

B.A., Bethany College; M.A., Columbia University; Ed.D., Co- 
lumbia University. 

'Sabbatical 




ARTHUR R. KIRKPATRICK, Associate Professor of History and Po- 
litical Science. (1967). 
A. A., Trenton Junior College; B.S.Ed., NE Missouri State Teach- 
ers College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

STANLEY L. BECKER, Associate Professor of General Science and 
Director of Special Interdisciplinary Projects. (1968). 
B.S., New York State College of Forestry; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin. 



Assistant Professors 

JAMES EDWARD ALLISON, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
and Chairman of the Department. (1964). 
B.S., Bethany College; M.A., West Virginia University. 

♦ALBERT R. DeVAUL, Assistant Professor of Music. (1964). 

B.A., West Liberty State College; M.M., West Virginia Univer- 
sity; Carnegie-Mellon University. 

JOHN WILLIAM LOZIER, Assistant Professor of History and For- 
eign Student Advisor. (1964). 
B.A., University of Colorado; M.A., Ohio State University. 

JOHN D. DAVIS, Assistant Professor of Economics and Director 
of January Term. (1965). 
B.A., American International College; M.A., University of Con- 
necticut. 



744 



THEODORE R. KIMPTON, Assistant Professor of Foreign Lan- 
guages and Director of the Summer School. (1965). 
B.S., United States Military Academy; M.A., University of Mary- 
land; Catholic University; Laval University. 

JAMES J. SAWTELL, Assistant Professor of Biology. (1966). 

B.A., Lake Forest College; M.A., Western Michigan University; 
Rutgers University. 

'DAVID ). JUDY, Assistant Professor of English and Acting Chair- 
man of the Department of Theatre. (1967). 
B.A., Denison University; M.A., Western Reserve; University of 
Mexico; West Virginia University- 

MICKAY MILLER, Assistant Professor of Psychology. (1967). 
B.S., West Virginia University; M.S., University of North Caro- 
lina. 

'ANTHONY L. MITCH, Assistant Professor of English. (1967). 
B.A., Cornell University; M.A., St. John's University; New York 
University. 

*JOHN S. PER~RINE, II, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. (1967). 
B.A., M.A., West Virginia University. 

WESLEY J. WAGNER, Assistant Professor of Art. (1967). 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; Barnes Foundation 

E. DONALD AULT, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 
(1968). 
B.A., West Liberty State College; M.A., Marshall University. 

WALTER L. KORNOWSKI, Assistant Professor of Art and Chair- 
man of the Department. (1968). 
B.F.A., Rochester Institute of Technology; M.S., State Univer- 
sity College of Buffalo. 

ALBERT R. BUCKELEW, JR., Assistant Professor of Biology. (1969). 
B.S., Fairleigh Dickinson University; Ph.D., University of New 
Hampshire. 

DOROTHY HUESTIS, Assistant Professor of Education. (1969). 
B.A., M.A., Indiana University. 

RICHARD G. STEBBINS, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. (1969) 
B.A., Wesleyan University; Ph.D., Texas A&M. 

LEONORA B. CAYARD, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
and Chairman of the Department. (1970). 
Ph.D., Marburg University; Yale University; Howard University. 

•Sabbatical 




LARRY E. CRIMES, Assistant Professor of English. (1970). 

B.A., Bethany College; B.D., Yale Divinity School; Emory Uni- 
versity. 

RONALD A. WARD, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. (1970). 
B.S., Eastern Nazarene College; Ph.D., Florida State University; 
Georgetown University. 

C. BLAINE CARPENTER, Assistant Professor of Biology. (1971). 
B.S., West Virginia Wesleyan College; M.S., Marshall Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati. 

M. CYNTHIA LORR, Assistant Professor of Psychology. (1971). 
B.A., Louisiana State; M.A., University of Iowa. 

JERRY FOLK, Assistant Professor of Religious Studies. (1972). 
B.A., Capital University; B.D., Wartburg Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., University of Tubingen; Oxford University. 

RALPH V. HAGOPIAN, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Act- 
ing Chairman of the Department. (1972). 
B.A., Harvard University; B.D., Yale University; University of 
Pittsburgh. 



145 




DAVID LIDEN, Assistant Professor of Political Science. (1972). 
B.A., Union College; M.A., University of Massachusetts; Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

OLIVER MANNING, Assistant Professor of Music. (1972). 

B.M., Louisiana State University; M.M., Cincinnati College- 
Conservatory of Music. 

MILTON R. SMITH, JR., Assistant Professor of Chemistry. (1972). 
B.S., Sul Ross State University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University. 



R. ). Q. ADAMS, Assistant Professor of History and Political 
Science. (1973). 
B.S., Indiana University; M.A., Valparaiso University; Univer- 
sity of California. 

JOHN M. ATKINS, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. (1973). 
B.S., Marshall University; M.A., West Virginia University; Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh; University of Michigan. 

WILLIAM R. HUDNALL, Assistant Professor of Physics and Acting 
Chairman of the Department. (1973). 

B.S., Wheeling College; M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University. 
CHRISTINE JOBSON, Assistant Professor of English. (1973). 

B.A., Spalding College; M.A., Ph.D., St. Louis University. 

MARTHA B. LAMBERTS, Assistant Professor of Sociology. (1973). 
B.A., Grand Valley State College; M.A., Ph.D., Western Mich- 
igan University. 



Instructors 

SUSAN WORTHEN HANNA, Instructor in Health and Physical 
Education. (1957). 
B.A., Bethany College; Marjorie Webster School of Physical 
Education. 

♦MARJORIE TUFTS CARTY, Instructor in Foreign Languages. 
(1965). 
Ph.B., University of Chicago; Clark University, State Teachers 
College, Saltillo, Mexico; University of Nicaragua; Bethany 
College; West Virginia University. 

•W. RANDOLPH COOEY, Instructor in Economics. (1966). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.A., West Virginia University. 

ROBERT RILEY, Instructor in Health and Physical Education. 
(1967). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.S., West Virginia University. 

J. RICARDO PASTOR, Instructor in Foreign Languages. (1968). 
B.A., State Teachers College of Bolivia; M.A., West Virginia Uni- 
versity; Diploma, University of Bordeaux, France; Bethany Col- 
lege; University of Wisconsin. 

ALBERT C. APPLIN, II, Instructor in Health and Physical Educa- 
tion. (1969). 
B.A., Marietta College; M.S., Pennsylvania State University; 
U.S Naval Academy 

LARRY J. FRYE, Instructor in Library Science and Head Librarian. 
(1969). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.L.S., Rutgers University. 
PATRICIA J. JERSEY, Instructor in Library Science and Assistant 
Librarian for Public Services. (1970). 
B.S., West Virginia University; M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh. 



746 



GARY L. GARRISON, Instructor in Philosophy. (1971). 

B.A., University of South Florida; Long Beach City College; 
Florida Southern College; University of Cincinnati. 

PAULINE R. NELSON, Instructor in Foreign Languages. (1971). 
B.A., Upsala College; M.A., University of Pittsburgh. 

NANCY SANDERCOX, Instructor in Library Science and Assistant 
Librarian. (1971). 
B.A., Bethany College; M.L.S., University of Pittsburgh. 

DAVID W. SAUER, Instructor in Physical Education. (1971). 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.Ed., Kent State University. 

HAROLD G. O'LEARY, Instructor in Communications. (1972). 
West Liberty State College. 

STEPHEN M. RADER, Instructor in Theatre. (1972). 
B.A., Marietta College; M.A., Ohio University. 

JAMES J. HUMES, Instructor in Communications and Director of 
the Radio Station. (1973). 
B.A., Geneva College; M.A., West Virginia University. 

THOMAS P. THOMPSON, Instructor in Sociology. (1973). 
B.A., Fairmont State College; M.S., West Virginia University. 

Distinguished Lecturers and Consultants 

C. WILLIAM O'NEILL, Distinguished Lecturer in Public Affairs. 
(1959). 
B.A., Marietta College; LL.B., Ohio State; LL.D., Defiance Col- 
lege; LL.D., Ohio University; LL.D., Miami University (Ohio); 
LL.D., College of Steubenville; LL.D., West Virginia University; 
LH.D., Marietta College; LL.D., Heidelberg College; LL.D., Wil- 
berforce University. 

DON GILLIS, Consultant in Music. (T963). 

B.A., B.Mus., Dr. Mus., Texas Christian University; M.Mus., 
North Texas Teachers College. 

Adjunct Faculty 

CARL L. SCHWEINFURTH, Ad/unct Associate Professor of History 
and Political Science. (1964). 
B.S., University of Oregon; M.A., University of Florida; Ph.D., 
Southern Illinois University; Haile Selassie University. 

NINA GOEHRING McGOWAN, Part-time Instructor in Music. 
(1966). 
B.M., M.M., University of Michigan. 

ROBYN R. COLE, Part-time Instructor in English. (1968). 

B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., University of Georgia; Ohio 
University. 



WILLIAM J. GARVIN, JR., Adjunct Instructor in Communications. 
(1969). 
B.S., West Virginia University. 

LEONARD A. HELMAN, Lecturer in Religious Studies. (1969). 
B.S., Trinity College; B.H.L., M.H.L., Hebrew Union College; 
Hartford Seminary Foundation. 

WILLIAM B. ALLEN, Chaplain of the College. (1970). 

B.A., Bethany College; B.D., Yale Divinity School. 
CHARLES R. ALDRICH, Adjunct Instructor in Communications 
and Director of Public Information and Publications. (1971). 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.S., Ohio University. 

HELEN PIERCE ELBIN, Part-time Instructor in Music. (1971). 
B.A., Bethany College. 

MARGARET A. GARRISON, Adjunct Instructor in Education. 
(1971). 

B.A., University of South Florida; Carson-Newman College; 

University of Cincinnati. 
ERIN M. RENN, Part-time Instructor in Art. (1971). 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Florida State University. 

S. SCOTT BARTCHY, Adjunct Assistant Professor in Religious 
Studies. (1972). 

B.A., Milligan College; S.T.B., Th.D., Harvard University. 
JOHN S. CHRISTIE, Adjunct Instructor in Biology. (1973). 

B.S., Maryville College; M.S., Southern Illinois University. 

CHRISTINE LIDEN JONES, Adjunct Instructor in Sociology. (1973). 
B.A., University of Michigan. 

Committees of the Faculty and Staff 

ACADEMIC REVIEW 

Dean of Faculty, Chairman; Mr. Hauptfuehrer, Miss Mathison, 
Mr. Myers, Mr. Sandercox, Mr. Sawtell. Ex-officio: Mr. Kurey. 
Student members: K. C. Nau, Al Riebe. 

ADMISSION 

Mr. Kenney, Chairman; Mr. Carpenter, Mr. Halt, Mr. Judy, Miss 
McGuffie, Mr. Sandercox, Mr. Stebbins. Ex-officio: Mr. Bortz. 

ART COLLECTION 

Mr. Kornowski, Chairman; Mr. DeVaul, Miss Jersey, Mr. Man- 
ning, Mr. Wagner. Ex-officio: Mr. Frye. Student member: Dick 
Vulgamore. 

ATHLETICS 

Mr. Stebbins, Chairman; Mr. Aldrich, Miss Jersey, Mr. New- 
comer, Miss Reed. Ex-officio: Mr. Goin. Student members: 
Mark Coen, Diane McVey. 

COLLEGE UNION ADVISORY 

Mr. Sandercox, Chairman; Mr. Graham, Mr. Liden, Mr. Man- 
ning, Miss Nicholson, Mr. Wagner. Student members: Tim 
Stack, Sarah Weppler, Guy Weik. 



747 



COLLEGE UNION PROGRAM BOARD 

Guy Weik, Chairman; Mark Casey, Stephen Cramer, Jeff Lapin, 
Diane McVey, Alex Riebe, Sarah VVeppler. Miss Nicholson, 
Administrative Secretary. 

COMPUTER ADVISORY 

Mr. Larson, Chairman; Mr. ). D. Davis, Mr. J. U. Davis, Mr. 
Graham, Mr. Hudnall, Mr. Kurey, Mr. Queen, Mr. Smith. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

Mr. Patterson, Chairman; Mr. Garvin, Mr. Graham, Mr. Hag- 
opian, Mr. Larson, Mr. Nicholson, Mr. Norment, Dean of Fa- 
culty. 

CULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

Mr. Judy, Chairman; Mr. DeVaul, Mr. Folk, Mr. Grimes, Mr. 
Hauptfuehrer, Mr. Liden, Mr. K. Miller, Mr. O'Leary, Mr. Young. 
Ex-oh'icio: Miss Nicholson and Mr. Sandercox. Student mem- 
bers: Paul Chewning, Mary Ellen Lewkowicz, Joan Simonetti. 

CURRICULUM 

Dean of Faculty, Chairman; Mr. Draper, Mr. Lester, Miss 
Wathison, Mr. Mitch, Mr. Peirce. Student members: Joan 
Simonetti, Cathy Thomas. 

FACULTY PERSONNEL 

Mr. Allison, Mr. John D. Davis, Mr. Frye, Mr. Kenney, Miss 

McGuffie. 
FACULTY WELFARE 

(3 years) Mr. Frye and Mr. Stebbins; (2 years) Miss McGuffie 

and Mr. Halt; (1 year) Mrs. Carty and Mr. R. Kirkpatrick. 

GANS AWARD 

Mr. Ray, Chairman; Mr. Draper, Mr. Hudnall, Mr. Larson, Mr. 

M. Miller. 
HONORS 

Mr. Myers, Chairman; Mr. Draper, Mr. Grimes, Mr. Kenney, 

Mr. M. Miller, Mr. Sandercox, Dean of Faculty. 

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 
Mrs. Cayard, Chairman; Mr. Bortz, Mrs. Carty, Mrs. Huestis, 
Mr. Liden, Mr. Lozier, Miss Nelson, Mr. Thurston. Ex-ofiicio: 
Mr. Kurey. Student members: Janet Banks, John Coker, Jo- 
hanna Riess. 

JANUARY TERM 

Mr. Buckelew, Chairman; Mr. Cunningham, Mr. G. Garrison, 
Mr. Goin, Mr. K. Miller, Mr. Mitch, Miss Nelson, Mr. O'Leary, 
Mr. Smith. Student members: Judy Belt, Ruth Dodson, Kathy 
Downey, John Strohmeyer, Nancy Thalman, 

LIBRARY 

Mr. R. Kirkpatrick, Chairman; Mr. Becker, Mrs. Carty, Miss 
McGuffie, Mr. Pastor, Mr. Ward, Mr. Young. Ex-ofiicio: Mr. 
Frye, Miss Jersey, Mrs. Sandercox. Student members: Bill 
Dolan, Chris Ferry. 




^M 




148 



ORIENTATION 

Mr. Cunningham, Chairman; Mr. ). U. Davis, Mr. Lester, Miss 
Mathison, Mr. O'Leary, Mr. Peirce, Mr. Sauer. Student mem- 
bers: Frank Christy, Tim Stack, Kathy Starzinski. 

PRACTICUMS 

Mr. Allison, Chairman; Mrs. Cayard, Mr. Coin, Mr. Sandercox, 
Mr. Stebbins. Ex-officio: Mr. K. Miller. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 
Mr. Allen, Chairman; Father DiBacco, Mr. Folk, Rabbi Helman, 
Mr. Sandercox, Mr. Sauer, Mr. Taylor. Student members: Tim 
Adams, Janet Ingram, Gail McArthur. 

SCHEDULE AND CALENDAR 

Mr. Kurey, Chairman; Mr. Hagopian, Mr. Kimpton, Mr. R. 
Kirkpatrick, Mr. Lester, Miss Nelson, Mr. Newcomer, Mr. 
Taylor. Student members: Kaybeth Lohman, Beverlee Sullivan, 
Sara Symons. 

SCHOLARSHIP AND FINANCIAL AID 

Mr. Sandercox, Chairman; Mr. Bortz, Mr. Carpenter, Mr. 
DeVaul, Mr. Graham, Miss Reed, Mr. Taylor. 

SPECIAL FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION 

Mr. Grimes, Chairman; Mr. Becker, Mr. J. U. Davis, Mr. Hago- 
pian, Mr. Lester. Student members: Diana Houk, Cindy Seed- 
house. 



TEACHER EDUCATION ADVISORY 

Mr. R. Kirkpatrick, Chairman; Mr. Ault, Mrs. Lorr, Mr. Kornow- 
ski, Mr. Spence, Mr. Ward. Student members: Barbara Devlin, 
Guy Weik. 

TEACHER EDUCATION REVIEW 

Mr. Spence, Chairman; Mr. Cunningham, Mrs. Hanna, Mrs. 
Huestis, Mr. Riley, Dean of Faculty. 

TESTING 

Mr. Spence, Chairman; Mr. Applin, Mr. Cunningham, Mr. J. D. 
Davis, Mr. Kurey, Mrs. Lorr, Mr. M. Miller, Mr. Thurston. Stu- 
dent members: Sherry Becker, Pat Breen. 

BOARD OF COMMUNICATIONS 

Mr. Carty, Secretary; Mr. Aldrich, Mr. Graham, Mr. Humes, Mr. 
Judy, Mr. Patterson, Mr. Ward. Student members: Tim Stack, 
Chairman; Editors and Business Managers of Publications. 

COLLEGE COUNCIL 

Mr. Sandercox and Tim Stack, Co-chairmen; Mr. Allison, 
Mr. Carty, Mr. Draper, Mr. Frye, Mr. Goin, Mr. Graham, Mr. 
Hauptfuehrer, Mr. Kenney, Mr. Kurey, Mr. Larson, Mr. K. Miller, 
Mr. Myers, Miss Nicholson, Mr. Nicholson, Mr. Peirce, Mr. 
Spence, Mr. Thurston, Mr. Young, Dean of Faculty. Student 
members: Presidents of Fraternities, Sororities, and House 
Associations. 



■•-:-.■•" 




STUDENT BODY, 1972-73 



ABBOTT, SUZANNE Q. 
Norwalk, Conn. 

ABELS, EDWARD C. 
Boonlon, N.J. 

ABRAHAM, A. JACK, III 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

ABRAHAM, MICHAEL A. 
Munhall, Pa. 

ABRAMOVIC, RHONDA K. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
ADAMS, EVAN W. 
Westboro, Mass. 

ADAMS, HEATHER S. 
Birmingham, Mich. 

ADAMS, TERRI JO 
West Mifflin, Pa. 
ADAMS, TIMOTHY 
Williamsville, N.Y. 
ADAMS, WILLIAM DAVID 
Carlisle, Pa. 
ADDY, SUSAN JANE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
ALDERMAN, LAURIE 
Mendham, N.J. 
ALEXANDER. JOHN R. 
Snyder, N.Y. 

ALI, JOHN 
Corning, N.Y. 
ALLEN, BETSY B. 
Levittown, N.Y. 

ALLEN, JOYCE L. 
Alexandria, Va. 

ALLISON, LEE JORDAN 
Matthews, N.C. 
ALPIZAR, JOHN O. 
Key West, Fla. 
AL-ROUDHAN, FAISAL 
State of Kuwait 
ALTMAN, W. MICHAEL 
Indiana, Pa. 

AMBROSE, JOSEPH E., JR 
Hatfield, Pa. 
ANDERSON, C. J. 
Hagerstown, Md. 

ANDERSON, JOHN A. 
Charleston, W.Va. 

ANDERSON, KAREN LEE 
Belle Vernon, Pa. 

ANDREWS, DAVID B 
Ho-Ho-Kus, N.J. 



ANDREWS, JEFFREY K. 
Ho-Ho-Kus, N.J. 
APESOS, THOMAS W. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

ARMS, LAINE A. 
Delmar, N.Y. 

ARMSTRONG, PAMELA G. 
Youngstown, N.Y. 

ARNAUD, GWEN E. 
Dallas, Pa. 

ARNAUD, STEPHEN K. 
Dallas, Pa. 

ARRINGTON, GLENN S. 
Glen Arm, Md. 

ATWATER, WILLIAM E. 
Brookfield Center, Conn. 

AVEDISIAN, STEVEN 
Manhasset, N.Y. 

AVONDOGLIO, DAVID A. 
North Caldwell, N.J. 

BACHMANN, NANCY LOIS 
Millington, N.J. 

BACHNER, LOUIS J. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BADOLATO, CHRISTINE M. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BADZEK, MICHAEL F. 
Morgantown, W.Va. 

BAILIE, TERRY ANN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BAKER, KAREN BETH 
Dresher, Pa. 

BAKER, LARRY DENNIS 
Bentleyville, Pa. 

BAKER, MICHAEL 
Elida, Ohio 

BANES, BARBARA JULE 
McKeesport, Pa. 

BANK, SUSAN RAE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BANKS, JANET L. 
Fairfield, Conn. 

BARILLA, PETER L. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

BARKER, KATHLEEN A. 
Wayne, N.J. 

BARLOCK, JOSEPH R. 
South Windsor, Conn 

BARLOW, DAVID S. 

Baltimore, Md. 



l-l'l 



BARNES, MICHAEL C. 
Martins Ferry, Ohio 

BARRETT, JOSEPH P. 
Richwood, W.Va. 
BARRETT, KATHLEEN M. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

BARRY, BARBARA F. 
Berkeley Heights, N.J. 

BARTHOLOMEW, TRACY II 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BARTKO, MELANIE SUSAN 
Monroeville, Pa. 

BARTLETT, JULIA M. 
Ridgewood, N.J. 
BARTOW, STEVEN G. 
Glen Ridge, N.J. 
BASCIANI, KATHLEEN D. 
Toughkenamon, Pa. 

BASKOT, TERRY MARIE 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

BASTACKY, DAVID H. 
Munhall, Pa. 

BAXTER, DEBRA ANNE 
Dover, N.J. 

BAXTER, MERYNDA LEE 
Dover, N.J. 

BAZLEY, SHARON ANN 
Orange, Conn. 

BEATTY, ANN MORROW 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BEAVER, THOMAS 
Lancaster, Pa. 

BECHTOLD, STEPHEN J. 
Annandale, Va. 

BECKER, SHERRY L. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

BELL, JILL ANN 
Cherry Hill, N.J. 

BELL, KIM CLINTON 
Washington, Pa. 

BELL, LESLIE ALLYN 
Riverhead, N.Y. 
BELL, ROBERT H. 
Natrona Heights, Pa. 

BELT, JUDITH ANNE 
Lexington, Mass. 

BEMESDERFER, )OY 
McKeesport, Pa. 

BENESH, GARY LEE 
Bellaire, Ohio 
BERGMAN, PAUL J. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BERKEY, TRUDY LYNN 
Washington, Pa. 



BETLEM, MARK DENNIS 
Rochester, N.Y. 

BILICA, MICHAEL D. 
Bridgeport, Ohio 

BINA, DEBRA J. 
Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 

BLACK, GEORGE M. 
New Martinsville, W.Va. 

BLACKBURN, ROBIN I. 

Port Washington, N.Y. 
BLAIR, LYNN MARY 
New York, N.Y. 

BLASHFORD, DONALD J. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BLINN, CHARLES R. 
West Hartford, Conn. 
BLUM, STEVEN MARK 
Ashtabula, Ohio 
BOACHIE-AGYEMAN, JOE 
Kumasi, Ghana 

BOADA, ERIC S. 
Oakdale, L.I., N.Y. 

BOGARAD, SHARON N. 
Weirton, W.Va. 

BOLAND, JERRY D. 
Cumberland, Md. 

BOLDT, NANCY A. 
Ossining, N.Y. 

BONAR, MARK D. 
Shadyside, Ohio 

BOND, CAROLYN ANN 
Cedar Grove, N.J. 

BOOS, LAUREL JENINE 
Buffalo, N.Y. 

BOOTH, DOUGLAS ALAN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BOOTH, HARRY A. 
Elkins, W.Va. 

BORG, FREDERICK H. 
Naugatuck, Conn. 

BORRELLI, PAULA M. 
Canonsburg, Pa. 

BOSEE, JOHN K., IV 
Old Greenwich, Conn. 

BOSSANGE, JOHN P. 
Wellesley, Mass. 

BOSTWICK, JANE E. 
Chardon, Ohio 

BOUGIE, JANE M. 
Clinton, Conn. 

BOVE, PEGGY ANN 
North Andover, Mass. 

BOWERS, CLIFFORD J. 
West Mifflin, Pa. 



150 



BOWERS, JACK EDWARD 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

BOWMAN, BONNIE LILA 
Beckley, W.Va. 

BRADLEY, J. MICHAEL 
Dallas, Tex. 
BRADLEY, PEYTON S. 
Newtown Square, Pa. 

BRADY, MICHAEL V. 
E. Paterson, N.J. 

BRANDLE, JILL DIANE 
Madison, N.J. 

BRANDON, DEMREY C. 
Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

BRASKO, ROBERT J. 
Coraopolis, Pa. 

BRAVMAN, BARBARA 
Passaic, N.J. 

BRECKENRIDGE, C. SCOTT 
Belle Vernon, Pa. 
BREEN, PATRICIA A. 
Westport, Conn. 
BREY, MARYANN C. 
Gladstone, N.J. 

BRINKER, MICHAEL A. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BRINKMAN, JAMES A. 
Carlstadt, N.J. 

BRINKWORTH, CHRISTINE 
Media, Pa. 

BROCKARDT, JAMES W. 
Princeton Junction, N.J. 

BROWDER, PATRICIA 
Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

BUCKLEY, BERNARD M. 
Lawrence, Mass. 

BUCKLEY, JUDITH LYNN 
Akron, Ohio 

BUCKLIN, HARRIS H., Ill 
Wilton, Conn. 

BUCKWALTER, KENDRICK 
Paoli, Pa. 

BUNK, JOANNE RUTH 
Warren, Pa. 

BURACCHIO, JUDY M. 
Follansbee, W.Va. 

BURAKOWSKI, STEVEN E. 
Glen Ridge, N.J. 

BURKE, DEBORAH H. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BURKE, SUSAN T. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BURNETT, WILLIAM A. 
Allison Park, Pa. 



BURNS, EMILY J. 
Short Hills, N.J. 

BURNS, PAMELA L. 

Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich. 

BURTON, LESLIE ANN 
Danbury, Conn. 

BUSH, JERRY L. 
Curryville, Pa. 

BYRD, RONALD D. 

Millersville, Md. 

CAHILL, BONNIE F. 
Butler, Pa. 

CAHILL, DENNIS V. 
Maplewood, N.J. 

CAHILL, MARTHA JO 
Butler, Pa. 

CAIRNS, ALAN O. 
Portland, Ore. 

CAIRNS, DOUGLAS R. 
Portland, Ore. 

CALABRIA, MICHAEL J. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

CALFEE, MARK EMBREE 
Cleveland, Ohio 

CALLEJAS, BETSY J. 
Fairfax, Va. 

CAMPAGNA, SHIRLEY W. 
Clementon, N.J. 

CAMPSEY, LYNN L. 
Claysville, Pa. 

CANFIELD, A. HOWELL 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

CANFIELD, ROBERT M. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

CANOVALI, DEBRA C. 
Wayne, N.J. 

CAPUTO, JOSEPH A. 
Budd Lake, N.J. 

CAPUTO, RONALD L. 
Moorestown, N.J. 

CAREY, LIZABETH C. 
Follansbee, W.Va. 

CARLSON, PAUL C. 
Waquoit, Mass. 

CARR, ROSE M. 
Canton, Ohio 

CARTER, ROBERT L. 
New Martinsville, W.Va. 

CASE, NANCY ELYSE 
Metuchen, N.J. 

CASEY, MARK W. 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

CASPER, RALPH A. 
Washington, Pa. 



CASTRO, WILLIAM 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

CASUCCIO, GARY S. 
Steubenville, Ohio 

CAWLEY, JAMES P. 
Columbia Station, Ohio 

CELO, GARY VINCENT 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CERAR, DAVID JAMES 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CERNE, MARGARET L. 
Herminie, Pa. 

CHARLEY, REBECCA 
Greensburg, Pa. 

CHAVEZ, JINNY L. 
Bethany, W.Va. 

CHAVEZ, LIONEL A. 
Hialeah, Fla. 

CHAVEZ, VANCE S. 
Bethany, W.Va. 

CHERNENKO, GARY CRAIG 
Wellsburg, W.Va. 

CHESHURE, ROBERT J. 
Charleroi, Pa. 

CHEWNING, PAUL B. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

CHIESA, JOHN ARNOLD 
Blairsville, Pa. 

CHILCOAT, EDWARD A. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CHRISTY, FRANK P. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CHURCHILL, LYNN ANN 
Shaker Heights, Ohio 

CIGLIANO, WILLIAM V. 
Cos Cob, Conn. 

CIOCCA, ALEXANDER J. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CIRIPOMPA, A. CHRIS 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

CLANCY, RICHARD G. 
Yorktown Heights, N.Y. 

CLAY, REBECCA LOUISE 
Washington, D.C. 

CLAYTON, JAMES R. 
Bricktown, N.J. 

CLINE, DAVID P. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CLISBY, DIANNE I. 
Merion Station, Pa. 

COBB, SHARON LEE 
Lebanon, N.J. 

COFFEY, SCOTT 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



COHEN, MARK N. 
Lawrence, Mass. 

COKER, JOHN 

Ebute Metta Lagos, Nigeria 

COLE, PAUL RALPH 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

COLEMAN, EMILY M. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

COLEMAN, J. SCOTT 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

COLLINS, KATHI F. 
Peekskill, N.Y. 

COLLINS, LYNN K. 
Medina, N.Y. 

COLLINSON, JOHN 
Cranston, R.I. 

COLLINSON, WILLIAM 
Cranston, R.I. 

CONAWAY, RODNEY LEE 
Painesville, Ohio 

CONCILUS, WILLIAM M. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
CONKLIN, KATHY 
Chester, W.Va. 

CONKLIN, WILLIAM KIM 
Chester, W.Va. 

CONLEY, TERYL LEE 

Birmingham, Ala. 

CONNERS, JILL SUSAN 
Hempstead, N.Y. 

CONSOLO, CAROLYN T. 
South Euclid, Ohio 

COOK, CHRISTINE L. 
Charleroi, Pa. 

COOK, MARGARET A. 
Silver Spring, Md. 

COOK, WILLIAM JAMES 
Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

COOKE, MARGARET J. 
Summit, N.J. 

CORCORAN, JUDITH S. 
Glen Ridge, N.J. 

CORE, SHEILA ANNE 
Morgantown, W.Va. 

CORTES', DAVID 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

COSTELLO, ELIZABETH A. 
Upper Montclair, N.J. 

COULLING, KAREN ANN 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

COULTER, SCOTT E. 

Newton, N.J. 

COVEY, PATRICIA ANN 
Summit, N.J. 



757 



COVVDEN, DAVID A. 
McDonald, Pa. 

COWELL. MARY K. 
Monongahela, Pa. 

COX, CAROLE JAYNE 
Bethany, VV.Va. 

COX, SHERYL LEE 
Steubenville, Ohio 

CRAIG, JANICE A. 
Berkeley Heights, N.J. 

CRAIG, MARTHA L. 
Carnegie, Pa. 

CRAMBLET, ALICE LOUISE 
Bethany, VV.Va. 

CRAMER, STEPHEN ). 
Painesville, Ohio 
CRASSVVELLER, PAMELA A. 
Stamford, Conn. 

CREAMER, JANICE L. 
Wayne, N.J. 

CREPS, EARL G. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

CRIMMINS, NANCY A. 
Charleston, VV.Va. 

CRISANTI, DIANE A. 
Lock Haven, Pa. 

CROSS, K. ANDREW 
Weslover, VV.Va. 

CRUSE, WILLIAM E., JR. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

CULLEN, GERALD T. 
Hamburg, N.Y. 

CULP, IULIANNE 
Dallas, Pa 

DAILER, DAVID MARK 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

DAILER, IAMES M. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

DALEK, JOHN STANLEY 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

DAMELSON, CYNTHIA 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DARTLEY, LAWRENCE C. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

DARWIN, WILSON B. 
Wilmington, Del. 

DAVENPORT, PAUL A. 
Hopedale, Ohio 

DAVIDSON, RICHARD A. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DAVIN, DALE DONALD 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DAVIS. JAMES WILLIAM 
Weirton, W.Va. 



DAVIS, JEAN CAROL 
New Milford, N.J. 

DAVIS, JOHN D. 
Morgantown, W.Va. 

DAVIS, KEVIN WILLIAM 
Painesville, Ohio 
DAYTON, A. SHEA, III 
Summit, N.J. 
DEAN, JOSEPH W. 
Island Heights, N.|. 
DEASY, JOHN ALLEN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DEBLASIS, JOHN F. 
Bellaire, Ohio 

DECICCIO, ROBERT E. 

Methuen, Mass. 

DECK, KRISTEN ANN 
Scotia, N.Y. 

DEMOPOULOS, LAMPROS 
Zacharo Olympias, Greece 
DENISAR, LESLIE D. 
Newburgh, N.Y. 

DENNIS, WILLIAM E. 
Williamsburg, Ohio 

DENSLOW, JOHN A. 
Challont, Pa. 

DESANTIS, CARLOS H. 
Woodbine, N.J. 

DEVINNE, CHARLES D. 
Fairport, N.Y. 
DEVLIN, BARBARA RUTH 
Wexford, Pa. 
DEWITT, SCOTT L. 
Washington, Pa. 
DIBBA, DEMBO A. 
Bathurst, Gambia 

DICESARE, MARGARITA R. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

DICKERSON, ANDREW 
Triadelphia, W.Va. 

DICLEMENTE, DONNA C. 
Bethany, W.Va. 

DIGHT, CHARLES T. 
Wellsburg, VV.Va. 

DIMARCO, JEANA B. 
Cheltenham, Pa. 

DODSON, RUTH A. 
Corpus Christi, Tex. 
DOHERTY, RICHARD J. 
Hatboro, Pa. 

DOLAN, WILLIAM J., JR. 

Wheeling, W.Va. 

DOLCE. DONNA M. 
Fredonia, N.Y. 



DOLINICH, JEANNE 
Bethany, W.Va. 

DONALDSON, MARILYN V. 
Canonsburg, Pa. 

DONEY, WILLIAM P. 
Jeannette, Pa. 

DOUGLAS, CHARLES 

Armonk, N.Y. 

DOW, JOLAINE S. 
North Plainfield, N.J. 

DOWNEY, KATHLEEN A. 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

DOWNS, JOHN WILLIAM 
Mathews, Va. 

DRAPER, DAVID M. 
Bethany, W.Va. 
DRAPER, JOHN 
Bethany, W.Va. 

DREWRY, SYDNEY L. 
Newark, Del. 

DUCOEUR, RAYMOND R. 
Wilmerding, Pa. 

DUDA, VALERIE ANN 
Brilliant, Ohio 

DUDLEY, KAREN E. 
Milton, W.Va. 

DUMBAUGH, W. JACK 
Weirton, W.Va. 

DUPRE, BEVAN LOREE 
Hamden, Conn. 

EARLEY, MARYJO A 
Yardley, Pa. 

EARNEST, ELDON G. 
Cameron, VV.Va. 

EDENS, PATRICIA ANNE 
Sayville, N.Y. 
EDOGUN, SOLOMON 
Lagos, Nigeria 
EHONWA, ERNEST 
Benin-City, Nigeria 
EHRENREICH, KAREN S. 
Glassport, Pa. 

EKPO, UDO 

Washington, D.C. 

EL ABD, ISMAIL H. 
Washington, D.C. 

ELDER, ROBERT EARL 
Allison Park, Pa. 

ELDER, WILLIAM D. 
Allison Park, Pa. 

ELLIS, SUZANNE R. 
M( Keesport, Pa. 

ELLSWORTH, JOHN B. 
Miliord, Conn. 



EMCH, THOMAS WILLIAM 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

EMEICH, M. JEAN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

EMERY, BENJAMIN H. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
EMMONS, CYNTHIA JEAN 
Erie, Pa. 

ERB, DAVID ANDREW 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

ERBE, PETER D. 
Stony Brook, N.Y. 

ERICH, SUSAN 
Akron, Ohio 

EVANS, JAMES M. 
Elmira, N.Y. 

EVERETT, WILLIAM M. 
Thorofare, N.J. 

EYSTER, SCOTT 
Fredencktown, Ohio 

FAKHRE, JOSEPH 
Bethany, VV.Va. 

FALZARANO. ROBERT M. 
Whippany, N.J. 

FANTAU. LISA M. 
Wayne, N.J. 
FARROW, CAROL ANN 
Westfield, N.J. 
FEDAK, MARK ALAN 
Wellsburg, W.Va. 

FEENER, DONALD MARK 

North Salem, N.Y. 

FELDMAN, BRUCE JUDD 
McKeesport, Pa. 

FELLER, STEVEN A. 
Bronx, N.Y. 

FERGUSON, CATHERINE A. 
Duxbury, Mass. 

FERRY, CHRISTINE V. 
Mingo Junction, Ohio 

FILBERT, RAYMOND C. 
McKeesport, Pa. 

FIORENTINO, LAWRENCE D. 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

FISCHER. GEORGE T 
Claysvi lie. Pa. 

FISHER, ANNE E. 
Chelmsford, Mass. 
FISHER, DENISE M. 
West Mifflin, Pa. 
FISHER. RICHARD E. 
Chelmsford, Mass. 
FLANAGAN, ELIZABETH A. 
Belle Vernon, Pa. 



752 



FLANAGAN, THOMAS 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

FLATLEY, PATRICK M. 
Weirton, W.Va. 

FLOOD, RORY ANN 
Coldens Bridge, N.Y. 
FOLEY, EILEEN MARIE 
West Caldwell, N.J. 
FOLEY, RICHARD A. 
Allison Park, Pa. 

FONTANY, VICKI R. 
Wellsburg, W.Va. 

FORD, CLENDA F. 
Buffalo, N.Y. 

FORD, PATRICK J. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
FORMAN, SUSAN L. 
Butler, Pa. 

FORTIER, SUSAN M. 
Horseheads, N.Y. 

FOUNTOULAKIS, STAVRO 
Kontomari Chania, Crete 

FOX, RANDOLPH W. 
Canton, Ohio 

FRALEY, FREDERICK 
Annapolis, Md. 

FRANZOLINO, JON MARIO 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio 
FREW, KEITH S. 
Monongahela, Pa. 
FRIBERG, MARILYN D. 
Turnersville, N.J. 

FRIDAY, CAROL SUSAN 
Chatham, N.J. 

FRIEBE, JAMES CHESTER 
Steubenville, Ohio 

FRIEDMAN, LISA M. 
Melville, N.Y. 

FRIESELL, PETER B. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

FRITZ, DONALD L. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

FRITZ, MELISSA M. 
Somerville, N.J. 

FROHBOESE, ROBINSUE 
Short Hills, N.J. 

FROME, WILLIAM C. 
Alexandria, Va. 

FUHRER, GAYLE M. 
Oakmont, Pa. 

FUNK, ROBERT C. 
Wellsburg, W.Va. 

FURLONG, GARY P. 
Syosset, N.Y. 



GALLOWAY, DONALD W. 
Glassport, Pa. 
GARDNER, CHARLENE B. 
Arlington, Va. 

GARDNER, RONALD C. 

Chatham, N.J. 

GARGLE, BENJAMIN 
Studio City, Calif. 
GARRETT, BETTY JANE 
Steubenville, Ohio 
GARRISON, JANICE M. 
Houston, Tex. 

GARTH, STEVEN R. 
Tonawanda, N.Y. 

CAST, JERRY A. 
Summit, N.J. 

GEFERT, THADDEUS J. 
Dravosburg, Pa. 

GELLER, MARILYN SUE 
South Orange, N.J. 

CENOVESE, KAREN S. 
Mahopac, N.Y. 

GENSHEIMER, DOROTHY A. 
Hamburg, NJ. 

GERBERDING, ELLYN J. 
S. Glastonbury, Conn. 

GERKE, RACHEL M. 
Uniontown, Pa. 

GEYER, DAVID L., JR. 
Scarsdale, N.Y. 

GIBSON, ROY L, III 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

GILL, BRIAN B. 
Bridgeville, Pa. 

GILL, SUKHINDER 
Bethany, W.Va. 

GINTHER, M. PAULA 
Bridgeport, Ohio 

GIRAUD, MICHELLE L. 
Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 

GIVNER, BLAINE D. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

GLASER, RITA M. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

GODISH, JAMES EDWARD 
Burgettstown, Pa. 

GOETTMAN, PHILIP C, JR. 
Mars, Pa. 

GOLASKI, BARBARA A. 
Washington, Pa. 

GOLBEY, SETH BRIAN 
Stamford, Conn. 

GOLDBERG, MERRI N. 
Yorktown Heights, N.Y. 



GOLDBERG, RONNA 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

GOLDSTEIN, DANIEL B. 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 

GOMEZ, RICHARD G. 

Whippany, N.J. 

GOOD, CHRISTINE L. 
Altoona, Pa. 

GOODLIN, GARY R 
Ligonier, Pa. 

GOOLSBY, KARLYN C. 
Jakarta, Indonesia 

GORDON, EDWIN W., IV 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
GORDON, ROBERT A. 
Westfield, N.J. 
CRAMMEN, ROBERT P. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

GRANT, BARBARA LYNN 
Demarest, N.J. 

GREEN, RICHARD S. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

GROETZINGER, STEPHEN H. 

Charlotte, N.C. 

GUERIN, RICHARD A. 
Huntingdon, Pa. 

GUNDLING, GEORGE T. 
Wellsburg, W.Va. 

GUNDLING, VAL G. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

GUNSOREK, RICHARD P. 
Adena, Ohio 

HAINS, DEBORAH ANN 
Livingston, N.J. 

HALFORD, CYNTHIA SCOTT 
Valley Forge, Pa. 
HALL, KATHI LEE 
West Islip, N.Y. 

HALLMARK, ENID ANN 
Mendham, N.J. 

HAMMLER, VICTORIA M. 
Andover, N.J. 

HAMPTON, IVAN |. 
Bovard, Pa. 

HANRAHAN, PATRICIA A. 
Wheaton, Md. 

HANSEN, LORI CATHERINE 
Smithtown, N.Y. 

HANSON, JIM M. 
Short Hills, N.J. 
HARDY, SUSAN LEIGH 
Bellevue, Pa. 
HARPER, BEVERLY J. 
Ridley Park, Pa. 



HARPER, HOLLY K. 
Medford Lakes, N.J. 
HARPER, MARTHA J. 
Ridley Park, Pa. 

HARRIS, DONNA JEAN 
Burgettstown, Pa. 

HARRY, DANIEL GIBSON 
Hubbard, Ohio 
HARSHMAN, W. MARC 
Union City, Ind. 

HART, RAYMOND H. 
Rochester, N.Y. 

HARTMAN, JOHN D. 
Monroeville, Pa. 

HARVIN, PHILLIP T. 
Brilliant, Ohio 

HAST, ALAN RICHARD 
Carnegie, Pa. 

HATCH, PAULA MARIE 
Canton, Mass. 

HATHEWAY, LYNN 
Stamford, Conn. 

HAUPTFUEHRER, ERIKA 
Bethany, W.Va. 

HAUPTFUEHRER, SARA E. 
Bethany, W.Va. 

HAUSMAN, MARGARET R. 
Hanover, Pa. 

HAWKINS, DARLEYNE E. 
Deer Park, N.Y. 

HAYDAR, CHARLES E. 
Toronto, Canada 

HAYNES, WILLIAM, JR. 
Toronto, Ohio 
HEALD, ROBERT T., |R. 
New Canaan, Conn. 

HEANEY, REGINA M. 
Willingboro, N.J. 
HEARD, JANET MARIE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

HEATON, ANDREA L. 
Weirton, W.Va. 

HEILMAN, NANCY LEE 
Weirton, W.Va. 

HEISLEY, LINDA S. 
LeMoyne, Pa. 

HELMICK, CHRIS A. 
Verona, Pa. 

HENDERSHOT, LINDA J. 
Dover, N.J. 

HENDRICKS, BARBARA E. 
Jordan, N.Y. 

HENLY, MARIANNE 
Havertown, Pa. 



753 



HENSE, MARY ELLEN 
Upper St. Clair, Pa. 

HERMSMEIER, JANET C. 
Falls Church, Va. 

HESSKE, CONSTANCE A. 
Sleubenville, Ohio 
HEZLEP, DONALD REA 
Monroeville, Pa. 

HICKS, MARK WAYNE 
Weirton, VV.Va. 

HILE, THOMAS EDWIN 
Indiana, Pa. 

HILL. ERIC HOUSTON 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

HILL. E. RONALD, JR. 
Martins Ferry, Ohio 

HILL. MELVIN RICHARD 
Columbia, S.C. 
HILL, NANCY LEE 
Troy, Ohio 

HILL, VICTORIA LYNN 
Ster, VV.Va. 

HIMES, JAY DENIS 
Harnsburg, Pa. 

HIMMEL, WENDY LEE 
Cincinnati, O. 

HOAGLAND, JAMES R. 
Delmar, N.Y. 

HOAGLAND, KATHERINE 
Delmar, N.Y. 

HOCKMAN, DEBRA ANN 
Carnegie, Pa. 

HODGSON, WILLIAM C. 
Mamaroneck, N.Y. 

HOFFMANN, PAUL E. 
Floral Park, N.Y. 

HOLCOMB, AUDREY C 
Perryopolis, Pa. 

HOLENKA, MARK J. 
Shadyside, Ohio 

HOLLINGER, DOUGLAS D. 
Pittst'ord, N.Y. 

HOLLMANN, CHERYL R. 
Glenshaw, Pa. 

HOLLOWELL, CATHERINE L. 
Vienna, VV.Va. 

HOLT, JOHN B. 
Petersburg, Va. 

HOMAN, DIANNE C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

HORNYAK, KATHLEEN A. 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

HOUK, DIANA S. 
Valley Cottage, N.Y. 



HOUPERT, RICHARD F. 
Clinton, Conn. 

HOVAN, KERRY L. 
Munhall, Pa. 

HOWARD, ANNA CATHY 
Flintstone, Md. 

HOWARD, BLAISE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

HOWARD, RICHARD ERIC 
Flintstone, Md. 

HOWELL, CARLA A. 
Orono, Maine 

HUDSON, RICHARD A. 
Newark, Del. 

HUGHES, OWEN JOSEPH 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

HUMES, THOMAS C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

HUMPHREY, M. LYNN 
Morgantown, W.Va. 

HUNT, DEBRA JOAN 
Berkeley Heights, N.J. 
HUNT, KAREN SUE 
Akron, Ohio 

HUNTER, CURTIS C, III 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

HURLEY, JOHN V., JR. 
Blauvelt, N.Y. 

HUSK, BERNICE S. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

HUTCHESON, FLETCHER, JR. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 

ILY, FRANCIS P. 
Turtle Creek, Pa. 

INGRAM, JANET C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

INSKEEP, ETHEL J. 
Rockville, Md. 

IREY, MELANIE FAYE 
Monongahela, Pa. 

IRION, MARTHA T. 
Upper Montclair, N.J. 

IRVINE, MARGARET J. 
Steubenville, Ohio 
IRWIN, CAROL ANN 
Follansbee, W.Va. 
ISAACSON, WILLIAM 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

ISENBERG, ONDINE M. 
Glen Cove, N.Y. 

IVES, GARY WILSON 
Bethany, W.Va. 

IZAK, MICHAEL J. 
Wayne, Pa. 



JACKSON, ALLYN F. 
East Quogue, N.Y. 

JACUNSKI, IUDITH JOY 
Riverhead, N.Y. 

JANISZEWSKI, MICHAEL 
Monroeville, Pa. 

JANOCHA, KAREN LEE 
Carnegie, Pa. 
JEFFCOAT, JOHN L. 
Irwin, Pa. 
JEFFERS, TOM 
New Martinsville, W.Va. 
IENKINSON, SUSAN E. 
Rochester, N.Y. 

JEROME, ROBERT COLEMAN 
Arlington, Va. 

JIRAK, ROBERT LOUIS 
Chambersburg, Pa. 

JIVIDEN, DAVID A. 
Newell, W.Va. 

JOBKO, LAWRENCE JOHN 
Bridgeport, Ohio 

JOHN, GARY WILLIAM 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

JOHNSON, DORSEY JAY 

Wayne, Pa. 

JOHNSON, DOUGLAS H. 
Hudson, Ohio 

JOHNSON, FREDERICK A. 
McLean, Va. 

JOHNSON, JOYCE ANN 
Ocean City, N.J. 

JOHNSON, ROBERT J., JR. 

Latrobe, Pa. 
IOHNSON. SUSAN 
Rochester, N.Y. 

JOHNSON, VICTOR L. 
Morrestown, N.J. 

JOHNSTON, HENRY S. 
Verona, Pa. 

JOLLIFFE, DAVID A. 
New Martinsville, W.Va. 
JOLLY, JEFFERY J. 
Bloomingdale, Ohio 

JONES, DIANNE M. 
Briarcliff Manor, N.Y. 
JONES, KERRY DWANE 
Carmichaels, Pa. 

JONES, SUSAN E. 
Mentor, Ohio 

JONES, THOMAS E. 
New Martinsville, W.Va. 

JORDAN, RONALD R. 
Peekskill, N.Y. 



JOYCE, JAMES T., JR. 
Youngstown, Ohio 

K\( ZOROWSKI, T. F., Ill 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

KAISER, DIANE MARIE 
Cranford, N.J. 

KAISER, DONNA M. 
Hammondsport, N.Y. 

KAISER, JANE L. 
Marion, Ohio 

KALUGER, CHARLES R. 
Shadyside, Ohio 

KANE, WILLIAM J., JR. 
Carnegie, Pa. 

KANZLER, CHRISTINE A. 
Cranford, N.J. 
KAPLEN, RUTH 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

KAPPEL, GARY HERBERT 
New Martinsville, W.Va. 
KAPRAL, JOHN MICHAEL 
Bellaire, Ohio 
KARRAS, NICK JAMES 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

KASPARIAN, EILEEN E. 
Yorktown Heights, N.Y. 

KATCHMAR, ELIZABETH A. 
Churchville, Md. 

KAUFMANN, SUSAN M. 
Cherry Hill, N.J. 

KAYWORTH, PETER G. 
Boca Raton, Fla. 

KEATING, MARGARET 
Harnsburg, Pa. 

KEATING, TIMOTHY F. 
Snyder, N.Y. 

KELLER, LYNN SUZANNE 
Chatham Township, N.J. 
KELLY, LYNN Y. 
Tampa, Fla. 
KENDI, KATHY T. 
Whitney, Pa. 

KLNDRICK, PETER JOHN 
Fair Haven, N.J. 

KENNEDY, WILLIAM |. 
Bellaire, Ohio 
KENNEN, E. WILLIAM, JR. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

KERN, KIM LEE 

Charleston, W.Va. 

KIEFER, NEIL GEORGE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

KIMMEL, WENDY L. 
Islamorada, Fla. 



754 



KING, JANE LINDSAY 
Cleveland, Ohio 

KING, LUCY C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

KING, MARY E. 
Wayne, N,). 

KING, ROBERT L. 
Maplewood, N.J. 
KIRKPATRICK, HOLLY E. 
Snyder, N.Y. 

KITTLE, BONNIE LEE 
Glen Ridge, N.J. 

KLINEC, MICHAEL J. 
Bellaire, Ohio 

KNOWLES, LAURA A. 
North Caldwell, N.J. 

KOCHAKJI, DANIEL J. 
Latham, N.Y. 

KOENIG, STEPHANIE H. 
Villanova, Pa. 

KOFFENBERGER, BARBIE J. 
Newark, Del. 

KOHL, PAUL ALBERT 
Tonawanda, N.Y. 

KOLANKO, WILLIAM 
Weirton, W.Va. 

KOPOLOVICH, DAVID M. 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

KORT, MICHAEL LARRY 
Erie, Pa. 

KOTIN, LESLIE G. 
Manhasset, N.Y. 

KOUFFMAN, CAROL R. 
East Hampton, N.Y. 

KOVALIK, CONSTANCE M. 
Latrobe, Pa. 

KOVVALO, ANDREW, JR. 
Wellsburg, W.Va. 
KOZULLA, RANDY E. 
Willowick, Ohio 

KRESAN, CATHY LYNN 
Stamford, Conn. 
KUREY, CAROL 
Bethany, W.Va. 

KRIEVER, RICHARD W. 
vorth, Pa. 

KRONTIRIS, GREGORY G. 
Windham. Ohio 

KRUMBACH, CARL ADAM 

Ridgewood, N.J. 

KUBICK, CHRISTINE M. 
Tenafly, N.J. 

KUHNS, THOMAS E. 
Latrobe, Pa. 



KUNIAK, MICHAEL P. 
Tarentum, Pa. 

KUNKLE, ROBERT D. 
Canonsburg, Pa. 

KUNKLER, SUSAN L. 
Westfield, N.J. 

KURZ, FRIEDRICH 
Stuttgart, West Germany 
KUSHNER, GREGORY G. 
Creighton, Pa. 
KUZMA, JACQUELINE LEE 
Follansbee, W.Va. 

KWEDERAS, CYNTHIE L. 
Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. 

LABRADA, PATRICK G. 
Key West, Fla. 

LAKE, RODNEY HAL 
Newark, Ohio 

LAMBERT, ANDREW B. 
McKeesport, Pa. 

LANAHAN, JOHN T. 
Washington, D.C. 

LANCASTER, SARAH B. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

LANCFITT, KENNETH G. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

LAPIN, JEFFRY MARK 
Fair Haven, N.J. 

LARAMIE, MARK W. 
Park Ridge, N.J. 

LAUFER, RACHEL 
Norwalk, Conn. 

LAWLESS, DEBORAH J. 
Riverhead, N.Y. 

LEACH, PAMELA ANNE 
Darien, Conn. 

LEHNER, PAUL E. 
Greenwich, Conn. 

LEIBSON, LAWRENCE A. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

LEITER, MARGERY ANN 
Summit, N.J. 

LEMAITRE, DANIEL T. 
Woodbury, Conn. 

LEMEZIS, SUSAN A. 
Walhngford, Pa. 
LENHART, RICHARD A. 
Cambridge, Ohio 

LENT, LINDA JO 
Monroeville, Pa. 

LEON, GLORIA 
Deer Park, L.I., N.Y. 

LEONARD, AMY DUSTIN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



LEONG, BETTY 
Des Moines, Iowa 

LESIAK, S. DEAN 
Steubenville, Ohio 

LESLIE, RALPH EDWARD 
Silver Spring, Md. 

LESNETT, MARK R. 
Upper St. Clair, Pa. 

LESTER, ANN 
Bethany, W.Va. 

LEVIN, KIM E. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

LEVITSKE, DIANE NADINE 
Library, Pa. 

LEVY, H. GREGORY 
Newburgh, N.Y. 

LEWIS, DEBRA ANN 
Morris, Conn. 

LEWIS, ELISSA MARY 
Bethany, W.Va. 

LEWIS, SHELDON S. 
Forest Hills, N.Y. 

LEWIS, WILLIAM JOHN 
Snyder, N.Y. 

LEWKOWICZ, MARY E. 
Harrison, N.Y. 

LIEB, SUSAN C. 
Warren, N.J. 

LIES, MICHAEL 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

LIESE, KATHARINE A. 
Auburndale, Fla. 

LIMPERT, JUDITH ANN 
Bridgeport, W.Va. 

LIPINSKI, LOUIS PAUL 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

LISBY, DONALD JAY 
Proctor, W.Va. 

LISOTTO, WILLIAM 
Verona, Pa. 

LIVINGSTON, JON HOWARD 
Grand Island, N.Y. 

LOCKLIN, BETTY JEAN 
Alexandria, Va. 
LODGE, JEAN WOODSON 
New Castle, Del. 
LOHMAN. KATHERINE E. 
Dallas, Tex. 
LOVEJOY, WILLIAM E. 
Hudson, Ohio 

LOWE, JAMIE S. 
Bethany, W.Va. 

LOWENGARD, JONATHAN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



LUNGER, JANET LYNN 
Lafayette Hill, Pa. 
LUPFER, PETER EDWARD 
Metuchen, N.J. 

LUTZ, JAMES A. 
Oakmont, Pa. 

LYON, K. BRYNOLF 
Rushville, Ind. 
LYONS, JOHN W. 
Carrollton, Ohio 

MACARTHUR, LYNN M. 
Lyndhurst, Ohio 

MACDOUGALL, RONALD J. 
Levittown, N.Y. 

MACFARLANE, ELLEN C. 
Brewster, N.Y. 

MACKAY, ELLEN SEIBERT 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MACLAREN, ADA DIANE 
Canton, Ohio 

MACLEOD, BRUCE K. 
Snyder, N.Y. 

MADDEN, J. THOMAS 
Moundsville, W.Va. 

MAES, JOHN EDMOND 
Wyckoff, N.J. 

MAGGI, MAUREEN K. 
Eighty-Four, Pa. 
MAGYAR, PAMELA ROSE 
Shadyside, Ohio 
MAHER, CHARLES J. 
Fort Myers, Fla. 
MAHONEY, LINDA A. 
Media, Pa. 

MAIN, RUTH 
Bethany, W.Va. 
MALINKY, GREGGORY A. 
Wellsburg, W.Va. 
MANSO, ALFRED P. 
Moundsville, W.Va. 

MANYPENNY, JOHN R. 
Newell, W.Va. 

MAPLETOFT, CAROL A 
Chatham, N.J. 

MARITT, CECILE ANNE 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

MARKOS, PAUL 
Short Creek, W.Va. 

MARONE, MARY KATHLEEN 
Butler, Pa. 

MARSHALL, RICHARD, JR. 
Webster Groves, Mo. 

MARTIN, CHRISTOPHER 
Huntington, W.Va. 



755 



M-VRTIN, DAN BRADLEY 
Waukesha, Wis. 

MARTIN, JAMES M. 
Munhall, Pa. 

MARTIN, ROBERT D. 
Bluefield, W.Va. 

MARTY, JOHN ALBERT 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MASHBERC, MARC DEAN 
Livingston, N.J. 

MASON, R. GREGORY 
Charleston, W.Va. 

MATHIEU, MARIORIE A 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

MUTES. PHILIP V. 
Dalton, Pa. 

MATTHEWS, JANE ELLA 
Ashtabula, Ohio 

MATTHEWS, ROBERT F. 
New Straitsville, Ohio 
MAVROMATIS, GEORGIANNE 
Steubenville, Ohio 
MAY, ALLEN ERNEST 
Steubenville, Ohio 

MAY, CHRISTINE J. 
Potomac, Md. 

MAZZA, RALPH A., JR. 
Vanderbilt, Pa. 

MAZZA, Melanie C. 
Vanderbilt, Pa. 

MAZZA, MICHELE C. 
Vanderbilt, Pa. 

MAZZETTI, CLIFFORD J. 
Lincoln Park, N.J. 

McARTHUR, GAIL E. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

McCABE, BRENDA L. 
Long Branch, N.J. 

McCarthy, linda lee 

Shrewsbury, Mass. 

McCLURE, BEVERLY ANN 
Stamford, Conn. 

McCORD, JAMES R. 
Wellsburg, W.Va. 

Mccracken, joan m. 

New Canaan, Conn. 

McCRUM, SCOTT I. 
Allison Park, Pa. 

McCUTCHEON, E. ANN 
Fair Haven, N.J. 

Mcdonough, rosemary a. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Mcdowell, alan james 

Lyndhurst, Ohio 



McFADDEN, CYNTHIA L. 
Charleston, S.C. 

McFARLAND, LINDA L. 
Cabimas Zulia, Venezuela 

McGOLDRICK, LOIS E. 

Wayne, N.J. 

McGOWAN, MICHAEL E. 
Asheville, N.C. 

McGUIRE, LAURIE ELLEN 
Branford, Conn. 

McKAY, DEWEY ROBERT 
Brilliant, Ohio 

McKEE, ELIZABETH DEE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

McKEE, FRANCES JANE 
Avella, Pa. 

McKEE, JOSEPH" V., Ill 
Greenwich, Conn. 

McKEE, KIRK J. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

McKINLEY, STEVEN E. 
APO, New York 
McMULLAN, MARY A. 
Bethel Park, Pa. 

McNAMARA, WILLIAM E. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

McNEILL, JERRI LYNN 
Arlington, Va. 

McPHILLIPS, COLLEEN 
East Hanover, N.J. 

McVEY, DIANE LEE 
Cranford, N.J. 
McVICKER, STEPHEN E. 
Orange, Conn. 

MEANS, CAROL ANN 
Weirton, W.Va. 

MECA, GINA 
Bethany, W.Va. 

MEESS, DIANE CAROL 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MEGIN, PATRICIA ANN 
South Meriden, Conn. 

MEHALOV, SUSAN ANN 
Glenshaw, Pa. 

MELROY, PETER B. 
Madison, N.J. 

MENTEN, MARY ANN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MERRILL, NANCY A. 
Pompton Lakes, N.J. 

MICHALSKI, ROSE MARY 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MICKITS, SUSAN ALLISON 
Shelby, Ohio 



MIDDLETON, THOMAS KIM 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MIDLER, CECILE MARIE 
Avella, Pa. 

MILESTONE, SUZANNE V. 
Pepper Pike, Ohio 

MILLER, BRENDA JEAN 
Marion, Ohio 

MILLER, DAVID R. 
Antwerp, Ohio 

MILLER, JAMES S. 
Library, Pa. 

MILLER, JOHN C, JR. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MILLER, LYNNE 
Coraopolis, Pa. 

MILLER, METTA MICHELLE 
Bethany, W.Va. 

MILLER, SUSAN L. 
Oakmont, Pa. 

MILLER, THOMAS K. 
Gibsonia, Pa. 

MILLMAN, PAUL ROBERT 
Jamaica Hills, N.Y. 

MINEO, GREGORY R. 
Trumbull, Conn. 

MINEO, SARA MARIE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MINTEER, RICHARD P. 
Claysville, Pa. 

MITCHELL, CHERYL RUTH 
Lincoln Park, N.J. 

MITCHELL, JOSEPH, JR. 
New Kensington, Pa. 

MITRUSKI, JOHN C. 
Clairton, Pa. 

MIZE, ROBERT STAN 
Key West, Fla. 

MIZER, MARK WAYNE 
Newcomerstown, Ohio 

MOHR, DONNA LYNN 
Hightstown, N.J. 

MOLBROUCH, BARRY LEE 
Bethany, W.Va. 

MOLINOWSKI, DANIEL E. 
Margate City, N.J. 

MOLNAR, WILLIAM J., JR. 
Valencia, Pa. 

MONTE, BONNIE J. 
Stamford, Conn. 

MONTGOMERY, KAY 
Amlin, Ohio 

MOORE, PATRICIA S. 
Latrobe, Pa. 



MORE, PATRICIA A. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MOREHOUSE, MARGARET A. 
Chappaqua, N.Y. 
MOREN, HELEN 
Bethany, W.Va. 

MORRIS, C. DOUGLAS 
Punxsutawney, Pa. 

MORRIS, LINDA ANN 
Cedar Grove, N.J. 

MORRIS, WILLIAM JOHN 
Annandale, Va. 

MORRISSEY, KEVIN M. 
Bayside, N.Y. 

MOTT, DEBORAH SUSAN 
Metuchen, N.J. 

MOVIC, J. EDWARD 
McKeesport, Pa. 

MOYLE, JIM HARRY 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

MROCZKOWSKI, W. B. 
Canton, Ohio 

MULDER, JON GERARD 
Rochester, N.Y. 

MULLEN, BARRY ROBERT 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MULLINS, ANITA J. 
Harts, W.Va. 

MULLOOLY, CHARLES H. 
Avella, Pa. 

MULSTON, MARK W. 
Milford, Conn. 

MUNN, GREGORY EARL 
Newbury, Ohio 

MUNN, MELISSA JANE 
Rockville, Md. 
MURPHY, JEANNINE L. 
Great Lakes, III. 
MURPHY, MARK F. 
Elmira, N.Y. 

MURRAY, BARBARA S. 
East Paterson, N.J. 

MURRAY, DAVID B. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

MYERS, DONNA E. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

NAKAMURA, MITSUTAKA 
Kita-Ku Osaka, Japan 

NARAMORE, BRUCE E. 
Liverpool, N.Y. 

NAU, KONRAD CHARLES 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

NEFT, DIANE FRANCES 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



156 



NEIHEISEL, JAMES R. 
Leetonia, Ohio 

NEIL, THOMAS S., Ill 
Belle Vernon, Pa. 

NELSON, CHARLES A. 
Bethany, W.Va. 

NELSON, STEPHEN TYLER 
Ridgewood, N.|. 

NEPOLA, NANCY SUSAN 
Darien, Conn. 

NEUMANN, FREDERICA 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

NEWICK, BETH L. 
Florhan Park, N.J. 

NEWMAN, JEAN C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

NEWSOM, MARYANNE 
Speedway, Ind. 

NEWTON, C. WILLIAM 
Latrobe, Pa. 
NICHOLSON, MARK J. 
Steubenville, Ohio 
NICKLAS, SARALYN N. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

NOBLE, ELIZABETH 
Annapolis, Md. 

NOBLE, JEFFREY E. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

NOLA, WILLIAM TOM 
McKeesport, Pa. 

NORDSTROM, ALEX L. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

NORTON, ROSANNE A. 
Jamestown, N.Y. 

NOSCHESE, JAMES C. 
Carnegie, Pa. 
NOVAK, GARY M. 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

NOVENA, A. MICHAEL 
Shadyside, Ohio 

OAKES, TONI D. 
Fanwood, N.J. 

O'BRIEN, PATRICIA LYNN 
Ligonier, Pa. 

OCEPEK, JO ANN 
McDonald, Pa. 

O'CONNOR, JAMES M. 
Bay Shore, N.Y. 

O'CONNOR, M. SCOTT 
Lawrence, Mass. 
O'DOHERTY, J. PATRICIA 
Weirton, W.Va. 

O'HARA, DEBBIE ANNE 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



OLNEY, DUNCAN R. 
North Haven, Conn. 

OLSEN, RICHARD W. 
Mattituck, N.Y. 

OLTMER, CELESTE A. 
New Milford, N.J. 

ONI, CLAUDIS 
Bethany, W.Va. 

ORR, K. ROBERT 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

OTT, ELIZABETH ANN 
Yorktown Heights, N.Y. 
OTTO, STEVEN LYNN 
Boonsboro, Md. 
OTTOSON, FREDERICK C. 
Shadyside, Ohio 
OVERTON, GEORGE W. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

PAGE, JAMES F. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

PAGLIALUNGA, JOAN D. 
Lafferty, Ohio 

PALERMO, LAUREN J. 
Linden, N.J. 

PAMMER, JOHN F. 
Thornwood, N.Y. 

PAOLO, JOSEPH A 
Weirton, W.Va. 

PARKIN, ELIZABETH S. 
Charleston, W.Va. 

PASEK, ANITA V. 
Newington, Conn. 

PASSALLO, PATRICIA A. 
South Euclid, Ohio 

PASTOR, JUNE BRUNO 
Bethany, W.Va. 

PAULL, STEPHEN B. 
Wellsburg, W.Va. 

PAVAN, DENNIS JAMES 
Burgettstown, Pa. 

PAWLOSKI, STANLEY J. 
Bellaire, Ohio 

PEARSON, RICHARD E. 
Penfield, N.Y. 

PECK, ROBERT U. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

PENN, A. JAYE 
Wellsville, Ohio 
PERTLACA, DIANE 
Stewartsville, Ohio 

PETERS, MARSHA LYNN 
Washington, Pa. 
PETERSON, ELLIOTT L. 
Baton Rouge, La. 



PETERSON, ERLE THOMAS 
Steubenville, Ohio 

PHILLIPS, CHARLES P. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

PICKENS, KAREN SUE 
Institute, W.Va. 

PIDGEON, MARGARET H. 
Wilmington, Ohio 

PIERNICK, MELISSA J. 
Caracas, Venezuela 
PIERSON, SALLY ANNE 
Watchung, N.J. 

PINION, MICHAEL S. 
Morgantown, W.Va. 

PINSKER, PHILIP S. 
Washington, Pa. 

PITTENGER, SANDRA LEE 
Mountainside, N.J. 

PITTMAN, MARY A. 
Kenmore, N.Y. 

PLANSOEN, CAROLYN J. 
West Caldwell, N.J. 

PLATZER, VICTORIA L. 
Miami Beach, Fla. 

PLUMMER, RONALD JAY 
East Liverpool, Ohio 
POCOCK, WILLIAM EARL 
Uhrichsville, Ohio 
POLLARD, JOSEPH H., JR. 
Upper Marlboro, Md. 

POLLIARD, NANCY J. 
Duncansville, Pa. 

POMERANTZ, NINA EVE 
Westport, Conn. 

POPE, JOHN ROBERT, JR. 
Toronto, Ohio 

POUND, HELEN E. 
Columbus, Ohio 

POZEL, CYNTHIA LEE 
Kingsport, Tenn. 

PRESCOTT, NANCY L. 
Silver Spring, Md. 

PRESENT, RANDALL L. 
Jamestown, N.Y. 

PREUSS, KENNETH HANS 

Wayne, N.J. 

PRIDMORE, SUSAN LYNN 

Export, Pa. 

PROCTOR, ELIZABETH ANN 

Summit, N.J. 

PRZYBOCKI, JANET LEE 
Greensburg, Pa. 

PULEO, LAUREL ELAINE 
Trappe, Pa. 



PULFER, WILLIAM J. 
Bethany, W.Va. 
PUSTERLA, THOMAS E. 
Old Tappan, N.J. 

PUTNAM, CAROLYN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

QUERRY, ROBERT A. 
Johnstown, Pa. 

QUINLAN, JOHN J., JR. 
Upper Nyack, N.Y. 

QUINN, DANIEL F. 
Eastchester, N.Y. 

RADAKOVICH, BARBARA A 
Manor, Pa. 

RADAKOVICH, ROBERT 
Steubenville, Ohio 

RAGLE, JANET LOUISE 
Hudson, Ohio 

RAGNI, LAREVA ONDINE 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

RAHL, CRAIG THOMAS 
Hackettstown, N.J. 

RAITHEL, JEFFREY A. 
Hannibal, Mo. 

RALSTON, L. SCOTT 
Cuba, N.Y. 

RAND, RICHARD TIMOTHY 
Darien, Conn. 

RATCLIFFE, STEPHEN D. 
New Martinsville, W.Va. 

RAUSCHER, CARL R , JR. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 
RAVELLA, FRANK J. 
Wilmerding, Pa. 

RAY, JANICE ELAINE 
New Kensington, Pa. 

RAYMOND, CHERYL ANN 
Wilbraham, Mass. 

REAM, JERRY S. 
Johnstown, Pa. 

REBEHN, CAROLINE L. 
New York, N.Y. 

REBER, MARK ALBERT 
Atlanta, Ga. 

REDMAN, TIMOTHY C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

REEVES, LINDA SUSAN 
Westport, Conn. 

REMELY, DANIEL LEE 
Painesville, Ohio 

RENSON, DEBBIE SUSAN 
Belle Mead, N.J. 
RESCINITI, LAURA D. 
Washington, Pa. 



REYNOLDS. BRUCE A. 
Riverside, Conn. 

RICE. RICHARD S. 
St. Clairsville, Ohio 
RIEBE. ALEX L.. JR. 
New Castle, Del. 

RIESS, JOHANNA 
Hackensack, N.J. 

RILEY, CAROLYN JEAN 
Westwood, N.J. 

RILEY, LINDA SUE 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

RILEY, MAUREEN ANN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

RIPPE, CLAUDIA FULLER 
Garden City, N.Y. 

RITZ, WILLIAM JOSEPH 
Delmar, N.Y. 

ROBERTS, E. JEAN 
Burgettstown, Pa. 

ROBISON, BRADENA S. 
Beaver, Pa. 

ROCHE, EVA MARIA 
Falls Church, Va. 
ROCK. CRAIG VINCENT 
Toronto, Ohio 

RODDY, JANICE M 
Rochester, Pa. 

ROGERS, DRUSILLA ANN 
Fmdlay, Ohio 

ROGERS, SHARON 
Shaker Heights, Ohio 

ROHRBACK, CATHY R. 
College Park, Md. 
ROLLINS, VERONICA LEE 

Manorville, N.Y. 
RONEY, MARY |. 
Finleyville, Pa. 

ROONAN, RANDALL KEITH 
New Shrewsbury, N.J. 

ROSELLA, JOHN F. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
ROSS. RICHARD JOHN 
Marietta, Ohio 

ROTH, LINDA LEE 
Lewiston, N.Y. 

ROUSE, CHRISTINE 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

ROWE, BLAKE M. 
Akron, Ohio 

ROWSICK, DANIEL J. 
McMurray, Pa. 

RUE, HOWARD S.. Ill 
Wayne, Pa. 



RUSS, LINDA MARY 
Greensburg, Pa. 

RUTA, CHRISTOPHER C. 
Oakland, N.J. 

RUTTER, WILLIAM HARRY 
Munhall, Pa. 

RYAN, CHERYL MAXINE 
LaGrange, Ohio 
RYAN, JANE RUTH 
North Haven, Conn. 
RYAN, M. KATHLEEN 
Baltimore, Md. 

RYDER, RICHARD N. 
Shadyside, Ohio 

SACCO, VINCENT S. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

SACKETT, RONALD TY 
Waynesville, Ohio 

SADLER, DOUGLAS P. 
Wellsburg, W.Va. 

SADLER, LARRY L. 
Wellsburg, W.Va. 

SAMPSON, JERRY W. 
Delphos, Ohio 
SAMPSON, THOMAS A. 
Mercer, Pa. 

SAPORITO, ROBERT O. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SARRACINO, LISA 
Burgettstown, Pa. 

SAUNDERS, BARBARA J. 
Hamburg, N.Y. 

SAWYER, CLARK T. 
Beaver, Pa. 

SAXTON, NANCY JO 
Bemus Point, N.Y. 

SCALESE, MARY ANN 
Verona, Pa. 

SCHETKY, ROBERT L. 
Hellam, Pa. 

SCHIEB, JOHN PATRICK 
Bridgeville, Pa. 

SCHIEB, THOMAS ALLEN 
Bridgeville, Pa. 
SCHMIDT, ROBERT J 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SCHMITT, JAMES H. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

SCHMITT, JOSEPH PAUL 
Pittsburgh. Pa. 

SCHNEIDER. BARBARA L. 
Tarrytown, N.Y. 

SCHNEIDER, DAVID L. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



157 



SCHOFF, KENNETH J. 
Cheshire, Conn. 

SCHULER, TRUDE LU 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

SCHULTZ, TIMOTHY R. 
Gibsonia, Pa. 
SCOTT, ARLYN LOLITA 
Rome, Ga. 

SCOTT, RAYMOND G. 
Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

SEEDHOUSE, CYNTHIA 
Lakewood, Ohio 
SEKELIK, STEPHEN G. 
Carnegie, Pa. 

SELSOR, MYRA C. 
Philadelphia. Pa. 

SELWYN, DOUGLAS MARK 
Bethesda, Md. 
SEREVICZ, VIRGINIA 
Wellsburg, W.Va. 

SERGIO, MARK ANDREW 
Brewster, N.Y. 

SERRILL, LINDA JEAN 
Des Moines, Iowa 
SHAAYA, RALPH N. 
Tehran, Iran 

SHAKELY, MARIAN E. 
Beaver, Pa. 

SHAYKA, GREGORY A. 
Denville, N.J. 

SHEAFFER, CHRISTINE 
Bethany, W.Va. 

SHEAFFER, LEE RICHARD 
Delmar, N.Y. 

SHEEHAN, BRADLEY C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SHELLEY, DEBRA JEAN 
Findlay, Ohio 
SHEPEARD, GEORGE ROY 
Newport News, Va. 
SHERRARD, ELIZABETH D. 
Johnstown, Pa. 

SHILLING, G. RANDALL 
Youngslown, Ohio 

SHIPLEY, VIRGINIA D. 
Youngstown, Ohio 

SHOAF, JAMES MURRAY 
Washington, Pa. 

SHOMO. CHARLES G. 
Bethel Park, Pa. 

SHOPLAND, MARK D. 
West Sand Lake, N.Y. 

SHRATTER. ELLIS TAPER 
Pittsburgh. Pa 



SHRINER, VIRGINIA M 
Goldensbridge, N.Y. 

SHRIVER, EDWIN G. 
Warren, Ohio 

SHUMARD, CRAIG A. 
Downingtown, Pa. 

SHUPLOCK, WAYNE M. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SHUTLER, MARY 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

SIEMON, PATRICIA D. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SIMONETTI, JOAN E. 
Highland Park, N.J. 

SIMPSON, BRUCE C. 
Williamsville, N.Y. 

SIMS, DAVID S. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

SINGH, KARTAR 
Pontian Johore, Malaysia 

SINGLETON, BARBARA 
Annandale, Va. 
SINGLETON, WILLIAM P. 
Annandale, Va. 

SIVETZ, CARRIE ANN 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SKODA, MARC MICHEAL 
Roseland, N.J. 

SKOFIELD, SUSAN 
Charleston, W.Va. 

SKRABAK, THOMAS W. 
Bellaire, Ohio 
SMITH, ABIGAIL ALLEN 
West Orange, N.J. 

SMITH, CHRISTOPHER 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SMITH, DONNA LEE 
Peekskill, N.Y. 
SMITH, DOROTHY H 
Bethany, W.Va. 

SMITH, HOWARD C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SMITH, KATHLEEN JO 
Massillon, Ohio 

SMITH, SALLI JO 
Bethel Park, Pa. 

SMITH, STEPHANIE \ 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

SMITH, SUZANNA D. 
Haworth, N J. 
SMITH. WAYNE ROGERS 
Cheshire, Conn. 
ssiui R, DENNIS LYNN 
Rayland. Ohio 



758 



SNITCER, JAMES H. 
Beaver, Pa. 

SNYDER, RICKEY L. 
McDonald, Pa. 
SOLARI, ROBERT A. 
Norwalk, Conn. 

SOLY, PAUL W. 
Bethany, W.Va, 

SOLY, RICHARD C, 
Bethany, W.Va. 

SOMMER, CHARLES A. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
SORENSON, RICHARD J. 
Kingston, N.Y. 

SOUTER, JOHN L. 
Glen Ridge. N.J. 

SPACEK, SHARON E. 
Cheshire, Conn. 

SPANG, TIMOTHY J. 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

SPARKS, DEAN MICHAEL 
Battle Creek, Mich. 

SPARKS, SUSAN N. 
Adams, N.Y. 

SPARR, JILL ELAINE 
Steubenville, Ohio 
SPILLER, RALPH D. 
Stamford, Conn. 

SPINNER, AMY ELLEN 
North Caldwell, N.J. 

SPRINGER, ROY F. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

STABILE, EUGENE C. 
Mingo Jet., Ohio 

STACK, ROBERT T. 
nt Hills, Pa. 

STALNAKER, LAURA J. 
Charleston, W.Va. 

STAPLEY, SUSAN JEAN 
Metuchen, N.J. 

STARZINSKI, KATHLEEN B. 
Brook Haven, Pa. 

STATHERS, RAY WILLIAM 
Alma, W.Va. 

STI BBINS, KATHERINE L. 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

STEBBINS, PATRICIA 
Bethany, W.Va. 

STEELE, KEITH R. 
Clairton, Pa. 

STEFL, KURT B, 
Natrona Heights, Pa. 

STERN, HOWARD BRUCE 
Greensburg, Pa. 



STERN, KARAL HELMA 
University Heights, Ohio 

STERN, MICHAEL A. 
Great Neck, N.Y. 

STETSON, LINDA CAROL 
Summit, N.|. 

STETTINIUS, WILLIAM 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
STEVENS, CAROL LOUISE 
Westport, Conn. 

STEVENSON, MARK PHILIP 
Washington, Pa. 

STEWART, DANIEL |. 
Spencer, W.Va. 

STEWART, SCOTT EDWARD 
Bay Village, Ohio 

STEWART, SUSAN CAROL 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

STIMAC, VICTORIA ANN 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

STOCKWELL, ROBERT 
Ridgewood, N.J. 
STOLZ, GREGORY ALAN 
Bellaire, Ohio 
STOLZ, JEFFREY LYNN 
Bellaire, Ohio 

STONER, LINDA ANN 
Imperial, Pa. 

STREULI, CHERYL J. 
Old Tappan, N.J. 

STROHMEYER, JOHN A. 
Norfolk, Va. 

STRONG, RALPH EDWARD 
Shadyside, Ohio 

STULBERG, MARCIA S. 
Williamsville, N.Y. 
STULGA, JOHN ERNEST 
West Homestead, Pa. 

SULLIVAN, BEVERLEE A. 
Devon, Pa. 

SULLIVAN, MICHAEL J. 
Armonk, N.Y. 

SULLIVAN, PAULA T. 
Savannah, Ga. 

SUMMERVILLE, DAVID L. 
Claysville, Pa. 

SWANK, ELLEN STRAUSS 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

SWEER, NANCY E. 
Seven Hills, Ohio 

SWEETENBERG, F. DOUGLAS 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

SWINDLER, KENNETH W. 
Warren, Ohio 



SWOFFORD, PAUL O. 
Orlando, Fla. 

SYMONS, SARA HELEN 
Middleburg, Va. 

SZUNYOG, CARMINA 
Avella, Pa. 

TABACHNECK, ARTHUR S. 
Bethany, W.Va. 

TALCOTT, CAROL ANN 
Painesville, Ohio 

TALIAFERRO, BRUCE K. 
Burton, Ohio 

TANSEY, LUANN 
Marlboro, N.J. 

TARDIF, RICHARD G. 
Pittsford, N.Y. 

TARSHIS, JOE JAY 
Demarest, N.J. 

TAYLOR, DIANE M. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

TEITELL, ERNEST F. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

THALMAN, NANCY JEAN 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

THOMAS, CATHERINE 
Aliquippa, Pa. 

THOMPSON, RANDY J. 
Holloway, Ohio 

THOMSEN, PETER B. 
Fairport, N.Y. 
THORNTON, JAMES W. 
Allison Park, Pa. 

THURSTON, B. BRADFORD 
Bethany, W.Va. 

TIFFANY, ELIZABETH S. 
Port Clinton, Ohio 

TOMKINSON, G. NEALE 
Sarasota, Fla. 

TOMKINSON, W. MARLICE 
Montreal, Canada 
TOMLINSON, RANDALL C. 
Kirkwood, Mo. 

TOMPKINS, RICHARD W. 
Newburgh, N.Y. 

TOOHEY, PHILIP R., JR. 
Greenwich, Conn. 

TOOHILL, VIBEKE ANN 
McLean, Va. 

TORETTI, MARGARET ANN 
Monongahela, Pa. 

TORMEY, JANIS LEIGH 
Riverhead, N.Y. 
TOTH, PATRICIA M. 
Cleveland, Ohio 



TOUT, ROBERT B. 
Tiltonsville, Ohio 

TRAYER, SANDRA KAY 
Port Washington, N.Y. 

TREFREY, SUSAN B. 
Rowayton, Conn. 

TREVOR, ANNE KNOX 
Chatham, N.J. 

TREZISE, GLEN F. 
Freehold, N.J. 

TRIOLA, STEPHANIE ANNE 
Franklin, Pa. 

TROUT, MARY E. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

TROYAN, GARY MATTHEW 
Parma Heights, Ohio 

TRUAX, ROBERTA JO 
Langeloth, Pa. 

TUREK, JOYCE ELOISE 
Youngstown, Ohio 

TURK, JOHN RANDALL 
McDonald, Pa. 

TURLEY, ELIZABETH A. 
Katonah, N.Y. 

TWEEDLEY, PATRICK J. 
Lake Hopatcong, N.J. 
TYNAN, STEVEN JAMES 
Dix Hills, N.Y. 
TYSON, DEBBIE MERLE 
Margate, N.J. 
TYSSOWSKI, JUDY M. 
Baltimore, Md. 
UBER, PAMELA JEAN 
Wheeling, W.Va. 
URBACH, ERICH J. 
Villanova, Pa. 
VALENTINE, JOANNE R. 
Bethel Park, Pa. 

VALENTINO, LEILA M. 
Watertown, Conn. 

VANDINE, MELINDA SUE 
Steubenville, Ohio 
VANDYKE, MARY-HELEN 
Neenah, Wise. 
VANNELLE, DAN J. 
Shadyside, Ohio 
VARGA, CONSTANCE LYNNE 
Harrison City, Pa. 
VAUGHN, THOMAS L. 
Medford, N.Y. 
VELKOFF, JEREMY R. 
Narberth, Pa. 

VERGARI, JOHN A. 
Mohegan Lake, N.Y. 



VIEWEC, MARK EDWARD 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

VILLANI, RONALD C. 
Bridgevi lie. Pa. 

VINCENT, PETER JOHN 
Clendale, W.Va. 
VINCENT, ROBERT W. 
Medford Lakes, N.J. 

VINCENZO, DANIEL ). 
Verona, Pa. 

VIOLA, GARY THOMAS 
Morgan town, W.Va. 

VIOLINO, PETER E. 
Buffalo, N.Y. 

VITCHNER, STEPHEN M. 
Tiltonsville, Ohio 

VOCELEY, SUSAN E. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

VOCT, SHERRY L. 
Acton, Mass. 

VON DER SCHMIDT, C. 

Bergenfield, N.J. 
VONHOFEN, ANN WAY 
Coraopolis, Pa. 

VULCAMORE, RICHARD M. 
Bethany, W.Va. 

U-\DSWORTH, CLIFFORD 
Snyder, N.Y. 

WAITE, KRISTINE L. 
Springfield, Mass. 

WALKER, C. WILLIAM 
West Mifflin, Pa. 

WALL, GEORGE L. 
Donora, Pa. 

WALTERS, PAMELA SUE 
Michigan City, Ind. 

WARCO, MICHAEL J. 
Washington, Pa. 

WARD, PATRICK ). 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
WARREN, MARY E. 
Litchfield, Conn. 
WATKINS, EDWARD JOHN 
Queens, N.Y. 
WATSON, NEIL STEWART 
Steubenville, Ohio 

WATTERS, CONSTANCE J. 
McDonald, Pa. 

WAYNE, BARBARA E. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 



WEAVER, ROCER LEE 
Laurelville, Ohio 

WEAVER, SUSAN FRANCES 
Bethel Park, Pa. 

WEBB, MARTHA JANE 
Atlanta, Ga. 

WEDO, CARLA B. 
Hanover, N.J. 

WEICEL, SUSAN LINN 
Allison Park, Pa. 

WEIK, GUY HENRY 
Lakeside, Conn. 

WEIK, JEFFREY KASPER 
Lakeside, Conn. 

WEIR1CH, EVANNE E. 
York Haven, Pa. 

WEISBERGER, LEE HERMAN 
Steubenville, Ohio 

WEISEL, LINNETTE ANN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

WEISS, JEFFREY PAUL 
Orangeburg, N.Y. 

WEISSBART, C. JEFFREY 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WELD, BRENDA JOYCE 
Steubenville, Ohio 

WELLS, ANNE MARIE 
Bervvyn, Pa. 

WELLS, ELIZABETH A. 
Alexandria, Va. 

WELLS, SUSAN JEANNE 
Miami, Fla. 

WEPPLER, SARAH WITTE 
Westport, Conn. 

WERNICK, CARY 
Cliffside Park, N.J. 
WERNER, DEBRA LEE 
Collegeville, Pa. 
WEST, DONALD DALE 
Erie, Pa. 

WETZEL, ERNEST A. 
Mendham, N.J. 

WHEELER, SUSAN MARIE 
Scotch Plains, N.J. 

WHITE, CAROLYN M. 
Harrington Park, N.J. 

WHITE, SANDIA J. 
Marietta, Ohio 

WIEFERICH, JOAN CAROL 
Bethesda, Md. 



759 



WILBURN, SUSANNA JO 
Portsmouth, Ohio 

WILCOX, CHARLOTTE L. 
Monroeville, Pa. 
WILHITE, MARGARET L. 
Monroeville, Pa. 

WILKINSON, ROBYN L. 
Gaithersburg, Md. 

WILKINSON, SARA D. 
Conshohocken, Pa. 

WILLIAMS, ELIZABETH I. 
Chester, W.Va. 

WILLIAMS, JONATHAN W. 
Dalton, Pa. 

WILLIAMS, KATHY F. 
Munhall, Pa. 

WILLIAMS, ROBERT A. 
Worthington, Ohio 

WILLIAMS, SUSAN HESS 
North Canton, Ohio 

WILLIAMS. WENDY L. 
Cherry Hill, N.J. 

WILLIAMSON, DALE ADEN 
St. Albans, W.Va. 

WILLIAMSON, WILLIE J. 
Estill, Ky. 

WILSON, CHARLES O., Ill 
Herminie, Pa. 
WILSON, WILLIAM G. 

Aquebogue, N.Y. 
WINANS, CHRISTINE H. 
Mountainside, N.J. 

WINEKE, LAWRENCE E., Ill 
Baltimore, Md. 

WINGERT, BEVERLY RUTH 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WINGERT, GREGORY KENT 
Scottdale, Pa. 

WINOWICH, NANCY ELLEN 
Charleston, W.Va. 

WINTON, ALLEN G. 
Wilmington, Del. 

WIRTH, DOUGLAS LEE 
Toronto, Ohio 

WIRTH, NEAL 
College Park, Md. 

WIZBA, ALBERT J. 
Shadyside, Ohio 

WOELFLE, NANCY A. 
West Wayne, N.J. 



WOLFSON, WILLIAM S. 
St. Clairsville, Ohio 

WOOD, AUSTIN VORHES 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

WOODRUFF, JOHN P. 
Charleston, W.Va. 

WOODS, DAVID P. 
Wheeling, W.Va. 

WOOLLEY, KAREN C. 
Ocean, N.J. 

WORK, NANCY E. 
Phillipsburg, N.J. 

WORSFOLD, JAMES R. 
Westport, Conn. 
WORSFOLD, JOHN E., Ill 
Bel Air, Md. 

WRIGHT, DAVID F. 
Gibsonia, Pa. 

WRIGHT, DAVID MONROE 
Buffalo, N.Y. 

WRIGHT, PATRICIA P. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

WRIGHT, VALERIE A. 
Columbia, Md. 

WUDARSKY, MARIANNE 
Weirton, W.Va. 

WUNDERLICH, CHARLES A. 
McKeesport, Pa. 

YARUSSI, DENISE A. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

YOUNG, MICHAEL JOHN 
Avalon, N.J. 

YOUNG, MICHAEL W. 
Wellsburg, W.Va. 

YUSI, DIANE J. 
Greenwich, Conn. 

ZATULOVE, ARLENE S. 
Convent Station, N.J. 

ZELLER, JAN CARROW 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
ZERBE, STEPHEN ). 
Ridgewood, N.J. 

ZIMSKY, JOHN JOSEPH 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

ZINAICH, PETER J. 
Adena, Ohio 

ZINN, STANFORD W. 
Baltimore, Md. 



760 



STUDENT STATISTICAL DATA 1972-1973 



Enrollment by Classes 

Men 

Seniors 127 

Juniors 133 

Sophomores 172 

Freshmen 198 

Unclassified 

Total 630 



Full-Time 



Women 

106 
116 
149 
161 
_0 

532 



Part-Time 



Men 






1 



Women 






21 

15 



Total 

233 
249 
321 
359 
16 



1178 



Enrollment by States and Foreign Countries 

Alabama 2 

California 5 

CANADA 2 

CHINA 1 

Connecticut 59 

Delaware 7 

EGYPT 1 

Florida 14 

GAMBIA 1 

Georgia 3 

GHANA 1 

GREAT BRITAIN 2 

GREECE 2 

Illinois 1 

INDIA 1 

Indiana 6 

Iowa 1 

IRAN 1 

JAPAN 1 

Kentucky 2 

KUWAIT 1 

LEBANON 1 

Louisiana 1 

MALAYSIA 1 

Maine 1 



Maryland 31 

Massachusetts 17 

Michigan 2 

Minnesota 1 

Missouri 3 

New Jersey 1 54 

New York 1 38 

NIGERIA 5 

North Carolina 3 

Ohio 151 

Oklahoma 1 

Oregon 1 

Pennsylvania 367 

Rhode Island 2 

South Carolina 2 

TANZANIA 1 

Tennessee 1 

Texas 4 

VENEZUELA 1 

Virginia 20 

Washington, D.C 2 

WEST GERMANY 1 

West Virginia 150 

Wisconsin 2 

TOTAL 1178 



767 




■■■I 



■•_*- ' 



i^> _ji, 






162 



Index 



A 

Academic Advisor 57 

Academic Program 55 

Accreditation and Member- 
ships, Bethany Colege .... 18 

Administrative Officers 140 

Admission 41 

Admission Office Hours . . 42 

Advanced Placement .... 43 

Application for Admission 41 
Application for 

Readmission 46 

Early Admission 43 

Foreign Students 43 

High School Preparation . . 41 

Interviews 42 

Junior College Graduates . 43 

Transfer Students 43 

Advisors 33 

Career Interests 33 

Freshmen 33 

Senior 33 

Special Services 33 

Alumni Field House 22 

American History, Courses in 106 
Anthropology, Courses in . . .132 
Applied Music, Courses in . .113 

Art, Courses in 72 

Art History, Courses in 73 

Assets of College, Value of . . 19 

Astronomy 103 

Athletics 30 

Awards 37 

B 

Band 29 

Benedum Commons 22 

Bethany House 19 

Bethany Plan 55 

Bethany Profile 17 



Biology, Courses in 74 

Board, Cost of 45 

Board of Communications . . 30 

Board of Fellows 139 

Board of Trustees 137 

Board of Visitors 140 

Buildings 19 

C 

Calendar 2, 56 

Campbell Hall 23 

Certification, Elementary and 

Secondary Education 89 

Chamber Music 29 

Change of Schedule 64 

Changes in Regulations 67 

Chemistry, Courses in 77 

Chemistry, Professional 

Preparation for 34 

Choir, Brass 29 

Choir, Concert 29 

Chorus, Male 29 

Chorus, Oratorio 29 

Class Absence Policy 64 

Classification of Students ... 66 

College Life 25 

Columbia University 3-2 Plan 62 

Combination Courses 61 

Commencement Hall 19 

Committee on Academic 

Review 57 

Committee on Admission .. . 41 
Committees, Board of 

Trustees 138 

Committees, Faculty 

and Staff 146 

Communications, Courses in 79 

Comprehensive Changes ... 45 

Contents, Table of 3 

Counseling 32 



Courses Descriptions 69 

Course Load 64 

Cramblet Hall 19 

Cultural Activities 28 

Cultural Activities Committee 28 
Curriculum 18 

D 

Dean of Faculty 141 

Dean of Students 141 

Dentistry 34 

Designated Scholarships . ... . 51 

Directories 137 

Distinguished Lecturers 

and Consultants 146 

Distribution Requirement . . 58 
Drawing Account, Student . . 48 

E 

Economics and Business, 

Courses in 82 

Education, Courses in 85 

Elementary Education 86 

Endowment Fund, Value of . . 19 

Engineering 34 

English 92 

Enrollment 18 

European and World History 105 
External Trust Scholarships.. 53 

F 

Facilities and Equipment, 

Value of 19 

Faculty, List of 141 

Fees 45 

Admission 45 

Art 46 

Board 45 

Breakage 47 

Matriculation 46 

Music 46 



Overseas Programs 46 

Readmission 46 

Registration Deposit 46 

Room 45 

Special 47 

Tuition 45 

Field of Concentration 58 

Financial Aid 48 

Financial Assistance, 

Office of 48 

Fine Arts, Courses in 97 

Foreign Language, 

Courses in 102 

Foreign Languages 98 

Foreign Students, 

Admission of 43 

Fraternities 26 

French, Courses in 98 

Freshman Interdisciplinary 

Lecture Course 58, 69 

Freshman Seminar 58, 69 

Freshman Studies Program 58, 69 

G 

General Scholarships 49 

General Sciences, Courses in 103 

Geography, Courses in 104 

Georgia Tech 3-2 Plan 62 

German, Courses in 99 

Goals, Bethany College 18 

Government, Student 25 

Grading System 65 

Graduation Honors 35 

Graduation Requirements . . 57 

Greek, Courses in 103 

Gresham House 22 

H 

Harlan Hall 23 

Health Services 31 



7 63 



Heuristics 104 

History, Bethany College ... 17 
History and Political Science, 

Courses in 104 

Honor Societies 36 

Honors List 35 

Housing 26 

! 

Independent Studies 61 

India Exchange Program .... 63 

Infirmary 31 

Interdisciplinary Lecture .... 69 
Interdisciplinary Senior 

Project 69 

Intramurals 30 

Invalidation of Credits 67 

IPS Course, Graduate Level. .104 

Irvin Gymnasium 19 

J 

lanuary Term 61 

junior College Graduates, 

Admission of 43 

junior Year at the University 

of Madrid or Sorbonne ... 62 

K 

Knight Natatorium 22 

L 

Latin, Courses in 103 

Law 34 

Library 23 

Literature and Theory of 

Music, Courses in 111 

Loan Funds 53 

Location, Bethany College . . 17 



M 

Mathematics, Courses in. . . .108 

Map of the Area 16 

Map of the Campus 20, 21 

McEachern Hall 

Refer to Campus Map 

McLean Hall 

Refer to Campus Map 

Medicine 34 

Millsop Leadership Center . . 22 
Monthly Payment Plans .... 48 

Morlan Hall 23 

Music, Courses in 111 

Musical Organizations 29 

N 
Nursing 35 

O 

Oglebay Hall 19 

Old Main 19 

Overseas Study Programs ... 62 

Oxford Semester Program . . 62 

P 

Parents' Confidential 

Statement 48 

Pendleton Heights 19 

Phillips Hall 23 

Phillips Memorial Library ... 23 
Philosophy, Courses in ....115 
Physical Education and 

Health, Courses in 118 

Physics, Courses in 120 

Political Science, Courses in. 107 

Practicum Program 60 

Pre-Professional Studies .... 34 
Professional Chemistry ... 34 

Pre-Dentistry 34 

Pre-Engineermg 34 

Pre-Law 34 



Pre-Medicine 34 

Pre-Nursing 35 

Pre-Theological 35 

President 141 

Probation 66 

Professional Block 88 

Provost for External Affairs . .140 

Psychology, Courses in 122 

Publications, Student 30 

R 

Radio Station 30 

Refunds 45 

Regional Council for 

International Education... 63 

Registration Deposit 46 

Regulations, Student 25 

Religious Life 32 

Religious Studies, 

Courses in 125 

Renner Union 19 

Residence Life 26 

Residence Halls 23 

Residence Requirement .... 61 

Richardson Hall of Science. . 22 

Room and Board, Cost of . . . 45 

Roster of Students 149 

S 

Scandinavian Seminar 63 

Scholarships, Named 49 

Scholarships, Qualifications 

for 49 

Secondary Education 87 

Semester in Copenhagen 

Program 64 

Senior Comprehensive 

Examination 59 

Senior Fellowships 35 



Senior Project 59 

Social Life 27 

Social Sciences, Courses in. .129 
Social Work, Courses in . . . .132 

Sociology, Courses in 129 

Sororities 26 

Spanish, Courses in 101 

Special Examinations 65 

Steinman Fine Arts Center . . 22 
Student Accounts, 

Payment of 47 

Student Statistical Data 160 

Study Year in Basel, 

Switzerland 63 

Study Year in Verona, Italy. . 63 

Summer Terms 61 

Sustained Awards 52 

T 
Teacher Education, 

Admission to 88 

Teacher Education 

Requirements 85 

Theatre, Courses in 133 

Theatrical Productions 28 

Transfer Students, 

Admission of 43 

Transcript of Records 67 

Treasurer 140 

Tubingen Study Program ... 63 

Tuition, Cost of 45 

U 
United Nations Semester ... 62 

W 

Washington Semester 62 

Withdrawals 45, 65 

Writing Qualification 

Examinations 59,93 

WVBC-FM 30 



7 64 




M> 



The lawhead press. Inc. 
Athens, Ohio 



BETHANY COLLEGE BULLETIN p^L^w.T, 

Bethany, West Virginia 26032 
Return Postage Guaranteed 



m 



*J» 






974*1975 




m**m 



f;i T p^?* 






BETHANY 

COLLEGE BULLETIN 



1974-1975 



BETHANY COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Vol. LXVII August 1974 No. 3 

Second class postage paid at Bethany, West Virginia, 26032. Pub- 
lished five times a year in November, March, June, August, and 
September by Bethany College, Bethany, West Virginia. 



College 
Calendar 



1974-75 



SECOND SEMESTER 
February 



FIRST SEMESTER 
August-September 

31-2 Sat.-Mon. 



4 
12 
17 



Tues. 

Wed. 

Thurs. 

Tues. 



October 






5 


Sat. 




19 


Sat. 




26 


Sat. 




November 




3 


Sun. 




9 


Sat. 




18-26 


Mon.- 


Tues. 


26 


Tues. 


5 p.m 


December 




2 


Mon. 


, 8 a.m. 


17 


Tues. 




18-20 


Wed. 


-Fri. 


JANUARY TERM 


January 






6-31 






29-30 


Wed. 


-Thurs. 



Orientation and evaluation for new 
students 

Registration and Diagnostic Writing 
Test for all new students 
Classes begin for all students 
Formal Convocation 
Last day for re-adjustment of sched- 
ules without academic and financial 
penalty; last dav to add a course; 
and last day for credit-no credit. 

Homecoming 

Parents' Day 

Mid-term grades called and final 

exam day for first-half semester 

two-hour courses 

Writing Qualification Tests 
Board of Trustees' Meeting 
Registration for second semester 
Thanksgiving vacation begins 

Thanksgiving vacation ends 
Last day of first semester 
Final exam period 



January Term Classes 
Senior Comprehensive Exams 



1 
3 



Sat. 
Mon. 



4 Tues. 

13 Thurs. 

17 Mon. 



March 




6 


Thurs. 


26 


Wed. 


26 


Wed., 5 p.m. 


April 




3 


Thurs., 8 a.m 


6 


Sun. 


17 


Thurs. 


21-29 


Mon.-Tues. 


May 




2 


Fri., 5 p.m. 


4 


Sun. 


9-11 


Fri.-Sun. 


12-17 


Mon. -Sat. 


17 


Sat. 


20 


Tues. 


21-23 


Wed.-Fri. 


22 


Thurs., 1 p.m 


23 


Fri. 


23 


Fri., 8 p.m. 


24 


Sat., 10 a.m. 



Faculty meeting 

Registration and Diagnostic Writing 
Test for all new students 
Classes begin for all students 
Formal Convocation 
Last day for re-adjustment of sched- 
ules without academic and financial 
penalty; last day to add a course; 
and last day for credit-no credit. 

Founders' Day 

Mid-term grades called and final 

exam day for first-half semester 

two-hour courses 

Spring vacation begins 

Spring vacation ends 

Writing Qualifications Tests 

Honors Day 

Registration for first semester 

1975-76 

Reading period begins for seniors 

Writing Qualification Tests 

Spring Festival and Parents' 

Weekend 

Senior Comprehensive Exams 

Alumni Day 

Last day of second semester 

Final exam period 

Final faculty meeting 

Board of Trustees' Meeting 

Baccalaureate 

Commencement 



Table of Contents 



A Student's Choice 5 

Bethany Profile 17 

College Life 25 

Admission 41 

Expenses and Financial Aid 45 

Academic Program 55 

Course Descriptions 69 

The Directories 139 

Index 166 



<5> 



This catalog has been printed 
on 100% recycled paper. 



BETHANY 




A STUDENTS CHOICE 




Bethany. 
A college and a community. 




Bethany. 

A worldly citadel of learning and a tree- 
lined country town. 



1 




■ 


:»iv> 


- 


J? ^m j 




^ 1 






Bethany. 

A college and a community interacting. 
Making it a very special place to live and to 
learn. 

Snuggled in the rolling foothills of the Alle- 
gheny Mountains, Bethany offers all of the 
scenic beauty that is to be found anywhere. 

You notice it immediately. More trees than 
people. More wilderness than reinforced 
concrete. More trails than highways. More 
hills than buildings. 



8 




If ever there was a place to go camping or 
hiking, it is Bethany. The campus sits amidst 
1,600 acres of college-owned West Virginia 
timberland. 

About 300 acres are developed. Academic 
buildings, residence halls, administrative of- 
fices, recreational facilities — all of the things 
that make a college. 

The surrounding 1,300 acres remain much 
as they were when Bethany was founded 134 
years ago. Green. Vibrant. Only nature has 
changed them. 

Bethany is a melting pot for students and 
faculty coming from 30 states and 15 foreign 
countries. They bring excitment and sophisti- 
cation to a picturesque mountain village. 




70 



The intimate relationship of Bethany, the 
town, and Bethany, the college, allows for 
an interaction of students and faculty that is 
virtually unmatched elsewhere. 

Often what's started in the classroom is 
finished outside it. Insight often comes in 
that informal, after-class meeting between 
professor and student that is so much a part 
of a Bethany education. Faculty homes, fra- 
ternity and sorority houses, dorm lounges, 
one of the local pubs — these too are Bethany 
classrooms. 





s 



77 




Life at Bethany means first-hand acquaint- 
ance with many of the famous personalities 
of our time. Julian Bond, Jack Anderson, Art 
Buchwald, and John Kenneth Galbraith were 
here recently. Before them were Ralph Nader, 
Dick Gregory, George McGovern, and many 
more, including our last three Presidents — 
John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, and 
Richard M. Nixon. 

Entertainment is first-rate: Stan Kenton and 
his orchestra, the first-chair members of the 
Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Chicago, 
the Black Light Theater of Prague, the Fifth 
Dimension, Jose Greco, the Pittsburgh Ballet, 
Sha-Na-Na, Harry Chapin, Yes, John Prine, 
Billy Joel, and so many more. 



12 



Eight to ten student dramas, involving 
nearly a third of the campus community ev- 
ery year, are performed in Bethany's modern 
Wailes Theatre. The male chorus, choir, band, 
and special student jazz and chamber music 
groups offer many concerts. 

At Bethany there really is the opportunity 
for a chemist to act in a play, for a writer to 
play intercollegiate soccer, for an artist to 
work with computers, for a sociologist to live 
on a farm, for a psychologist to tour with the 
choir, for a philosopher to edit the campus 
literary magazine. 





At Bethany your academic program will be 
far different from that of your friends at other 
colleges. A new curriculum for the decade of 
the seventies insures this. If you choose, you'll 
be given the opportunity to develop your 
own academic program. You'll find that 
much of your work demands involvement 
with the non-academic world and with cul- 
tures other than your own. 

Bethany's special January term — a free 
month between semesters — allows for fasci- 
nating travel and work-study courses. Each 
January several student groups, under the 
guidance of one or two faculty members, 
spend three to four weeks in such countries 
as England, India, Spain, and France, examin- 
ing another culture first-hand. 



73 




14 



Located as it is, just 40 miles southwest of 
Pittsburgh, Bethany is just an hour away from 
the nation's third largest corporate business 
headquarters. Many Bethany students have 
taken advantage of the opportunity to work 
full-time for a month with such firms as U.S. 
Steel and PPG Industries and with such world- 
wide advertising and public relations firms as 
Marsteller, Inc., and Ketchum, McLeod and 
Grove. 





The Steel City is also a readily available 
entertainment center, with such attractions 
as the Heinz Hall for the Performing Arts, 
Three Rivers Stadium for professional sport- 
ing events, and Syria Mosque for top-name 
musical groups. 

Famous Oglebay Park, just 12 miles south 
of Bethany, is a complete recreational center 
— golf courses, tennis courts, ski slopes, rid- 
ing stables, museums, nature trails, boating 
facilities, and more. The nearby Towngate 
Theatre offers some of the finest drama in the 
area. 

And Bethany has it all — first-run movies, 
drama, outstanding guest speakers, in-depth 
conferences on current issues, sports facil- 
ities, well-equipped learning and research 
centers, and, most importantly, a top-notch 
faculty — many who are experts in their field. 



75 




It's a very special way of life at Bethany. 
Come to visit us before you decide which 
college to attend. It's the best way to see how 
Bethany differs from the large university and 
other small colleges. 



76 



BETHANY 



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U.S. 6 



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Washington 



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MD. 



l CHARLESTON! 



eg 



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VIRGINIA 



I LOUISVILLE TLEXINGTON 

KENTUCKY 



RICHMOND 



BETHANY PROFILE 



17 




HISTORY 

Bethany was established as a private educational 
foundation, chartered under the laws of then undi- 
vided Commonwealth of Virginia on March 2, 1840, 
more than two decades before West Virginia became 
a state. The charter was written by Alexander Camp- 
bell, a celebrated debater, Christian reformer, and 
educator, who also provided land for the campus and 
$15,000 toward the first building which architecturally 
reflected Campbell's college-day remembrances of 
the University of Glasgow in Scotland. 

Since its inception, Bethany has remained a four- 
year private college affiliated with the Christian 
Church (Disciples of Christ). This religious body, 
which Campbell helped to found, continues to sup- 
port and encourage Bethany, but it exercises no sec- 
tarian control. 



LOCATION 

Bethany is located in the northern panhandle of West 
Virginia, a narrow tip of land between Ohio and 
Pennsylvania. This special location in the rolling foot- 
hills of the Allegheny Mountains puts Bethany near 
several large cities. To the northeast just 40 miles 
away, is the major urban and cultural center of Pitts- 
burgh. Fifteen miles to the southwest is Wheeling, 
W.Va., the dominant northern city in the state and 
the location of Oglebay Park, one of the nation's 
best-known summer and winter resorts. 



78 



ACCREDITATION AND MEMBERSHIPS 

■ North Central Association of Colleges and Secon- 

dary Schools 

■ Association of American Colleges 

■ American Council on Education 

■ College Entrance Examination Board 

■ American Association of Colleges for Teacher Edu- 

cation 

■ National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 

Education 

■ Board of Higher Education of the Christian Church 

(Disciples of Christ) 

■ Women graduates are eligible for membership in 

the American Association of University Women. 

ENROLLMENT 

Each year Bethany students — approximately 600 men 
and 550 women — represent 30 states and 15 foreign 
countries. The majority come from Pennsylvania, New 
Jersey, New York, Ohio, Connecticut, and West Vir- 
ginia. Nearly 90 per cent of the student body is from 
out-of-state. About one-half are affiliated with the 
12 national fraternities and sororities on campus. With 
approximately 80 full and part-time faculty members, 
the student/faculty ratio is about 14 to 1. 

CURRICULUM 

In December 1971 a new curriculum was adopted for 
Bethany students. Called the Bethany Plan, it provides 
not only for a classroom-based program but for an 
experience-based program as well. It is a recognition 
that the classroom is not the only place for meaning- 
ful education. 

The Plan provides for a close student-faculty rela- 
tionship. In consultation with a faculty advisor, the 
student is asked to design or to help plan an educa- 
tional program to satisfy his or her personal goals. It 




encourages students to develop their own special 
course of study. Chapter six discusses this curriculum 
in detail. 

GOALS 

The educational program is designed to help each 
Bethany student realize seven goals: 

1) to discover how to acquire, evaluate, and use 
knowledge 

2) to master the skills of communication 

3) to cooperate and collaborate with others in study, 
analysis, and formulation of solutions to problems 

4) to understand contemporary issues and events 

5) to analyze personal values, to perceive and to deal 
sympathetically with the values of others, and to 
be open to the continued evaluation of both 

6) to make progress toward the selection of and the 
preparation for a vocation 

7) to integrate the varied experiences of life and to 

see the relationship of the college experience to 
future development as a responsible citizen. 



19 




EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES 

Substantial resources are invested in the education of 
Bethany students. The gross assets of the College on 
June 30, 1973, totaled $24,493,668. Facilities and 
equipment at book value were $12,925,538, with a 
replacement value of approximately $26,000,000. 
The market value of the endowment fund was 
$11,504,968. 

Bethany College is rich in both heritage and facili- 
ties because of the generosity of its many benefactors 
including the Cochran family, the Phillips family, Hal- 
ford Morlan, the R. R. Renner family, the David Stein- 
man family, the Benedum Foundation, the Kresge 
Foundation, the United States Department of Health, 
Education, and Welfare and the Department of Hous- 
ing and Urban Development, and countless others 
who believe in a Bethany education. 

More than 30 academic, administrative, and resi- 
dential buildings dot Bethany's campus. 



Pendleton Heights (1841) was built during the col- 
lege's first year by W.K. Pendleton, a member of the 
first faculty and second president of the College. To- 
day it serves as home for Bethany's 13th president, 
Cecil H. Underwood, former governor of West Vir- 
ginia. 

Old Main (1858) is the central unit of Bethany's 
academic buildings. Its tower dominates the campus 
and is the chief architectural feature noted as one 
approaches the College. Old Main has been declared 
a national landmark. 

Commencement Hall (1872) provides the setting 
for convocations, concerts, lectures, dramatic presen- 
tations, and other gatherings. Studios and classrooms 
for the art department occupy the ground floor of 
this building. It was remodeled in 1924. 

Cramblet Hall (1905) was constructed through a gift 
from Andrew Carnegie. Originally the library, it was 
remodeled in 1961 to house Bethany's administrative 
offices. It is named in honor of two presidents of the 
college, Thomas E. Cramblet and his son, Wilbur. 

Oglebay Hall (1912) accommodates the psychology 
and biology departments and special research labora- 
tories. 

Irvin Gymnasium (1919) serves as the women's 
physical education center. It contains a modern dance 
studio. 

Renner Union-Bethany House (1948) is the student 
union. Here are found the campus radio station, the 
college bookstore, bowling lanes, a student photo- 
graphic darkroom, music listening rooms, a spacious 
lounge, and the offices of the Admission Director. The 
alumni joined in 1969 wth the R.R. Renner family of 
Cleveland to remodel this facility completely. 



BETHANY 



2 

3 

4 
5 

6 
7 

8 

9 

10 

II 

12 



Pendleton Heights (President's Home) 

Old Main 

Commencement Hal 

Oglebay Hall 

Steinman Fine Arts Center 

Wailes Theater 
Irvin Gymnasium 
Richardson Hall of Science 

Weimer Lecture Hall 
Phillips Memorial Library 
Morlan Hall 
Harlan Hall 
Phillips Hall 
Cramblet Hal 



13. Cochran Hall 

14. Benedum Commons 

15. Bethany House- Renner Union 
Bookstore 



26. Gresham House 

Millsop Leadership Cer 
Highland Hearth 
Faculty Apartments 



Seal 



e: 



= 100' 








21 



22 




Alumni Field House (1948) provides physical edu- 
cation facilities for men and is used for concerts and 
commencements. Adjacent to the field house are 
football and baseball fields, tennis courts, and a 
quarter-mile track. 

Richardson Hall of Science (1964) provides facilities 
for the chemistry, physics, and math departments and 
houses the computer center. It is named for Bethany's 
first science professor. 

John j. Knight Natatorium (1967) contains a six-lane 
25-yard heated pool, used in the physical education 
program and for intercollegiate competition. Four 
tennis courts are located next to the natatorium. 

Benedum Commons (1969) is the modern, air- 
conditioned dining facility for all Bethany students. 
In addition to the main dining room, the building 
houses a snack bar, lounge facilities for parents and 
other guests, and several small dining rooms for spe- 
cial student and faculty events. 

The David and Irene Steinman Fine Arts Center 

(1969) houses the education, English, music, and 
theatre departments. A fully-equipped theatre occu- 
pies the centermost portion of this building. A work- 
shop adjacent to the theatre provides opportunities 




for scenic design. The music department consists of 
teaching studios, studio-classrooms, a general rehear- 
sal room for the larger choral and instrumental 
groups, and individual practice rooms. 

The Thomas E. Millsop Leadership Center (1972) 
houses offices, seminar rooms, exhibition areas, and 
a 123-seat circular conference room for continuing 
education activities. This center offers a regular series 
of conferences, seminars, and workshops for educa- 
tion, business and professional groups. It is a me- 
morial to the former president and chairman of the 
National Steel Corporation. 

Gresham House (1972) is the Millsop Center's ad- 
joining guest facility, which provides 41 spacious 
rooms for overnight accommodations for visitors 
coming to the College. It is named for Dr. Perry E. 
Gresham, Bethany's twelfth president. 



23 



RESIDENCE HALLS 



PHILLIPS MEMORIAL LIBRARY 



Harlan, Morlan, Phillips, and Campbell are the largest 
dormitories on the Bethany campus. Since 1966, 
Bethany has moved toward small, self-governing liv- 
ing units, each accommodating approximately 32 stu- 
dents and containing social and recreational facilities. 
Recently six small residence units were constructed 
on the wooded west slope of the campus. These units, 
called Parkinson Place Residence Halls, house frater- 
nities, sororities, and independent men and women. 




The T.W. Phillips Memorial Library, built in 1961, 
contains more than 120,000 volumes of books, re- 
cordings, and bound periodicals. Supplementary col- 
lections include microforms, pamphlet files, selected 
government documents, and a circulating art print 
collection. The library receives 621 periodical titles 
plus area, national, and foreign newspapers. 

The staff of three professional librarians and their 
clerical assistants are readily available to assist with 
any information or reference need. The library is 
open 95 hours a week. 

Through membership in the Pittsburgh Regional 
Library Center, the research collections and reference 
services of the colleges, universities, and special li- 
braries of the nearby Pittsburgh area are available to 
Bethany faculty and students. A similar interlibrary 
program exists among West Virginia's colleges and 
universities. Materials can also be obtained on loan 
from other libraries across the country for faculty and 
honors students. 

Many personal libraries and collections have been 
received from alumni and friends of the College. 

The library has on loan one of the finest private 
ornithological book collections in America. Foremost 
in the collection is John J. Audubon's elephant folio, 
Birds of North America, which includes many of his 
original manuscripts. 

The Campbell Room contains books, periodicals, 
letters, paintings, photographs, and museum pieces 
related to Bethany's first president, Alexander 
Campbell, his Bethany associates, and his family. It is 
an important research collection not only for the 
history of the College and the religious movement 
that Campbell founded but also for regional and 
intellectual history of the nineteenth century. 



24 



BETHANY 




COLLEGE LIFE 



25 



At Bethany, education is more than hours, credits, 
courses, and examinations. It is a total experience of 
living and learning. Bethany has about as many activi- 
ties as many schools 10 times its size. The problem is 
not getting into things, but in choosing activities 
wisely and learning to say "No" to things that will not 
be as beneficial. 

Bethany assumes the mature and responsible citi- 
zenship of its students. The College believes that the 
capacity to handle the obligations of freedom is en- 
larged when as much liberty as possible is granted in 
the ordering of college life. 

Bethany students accept major responsibility for 
their behavior. There is no regimentation and students 
must make their own decisions about life-styles. So- 
called "freaks" and "straights" coexist with little 
strain, if not mutual respect. College officials inter- 
vene when the rights and privileges of some are 
threatened by the actions of others. Usually such 
problems are resolved in a Dean's office, student 
court, or at College Council. 

Students not only have much personal freedom, 
but working together with faculty and administrators, 
they share in deciding Bethany's destiny. Someone 
once said that "things are decided at Bethany as if it 
were a continuous town meeting." Doors are always 
open and discussion is continuous. There is such a 
sense of ownership by both those who learn and 
those who teach that the term "Bethanian" has come 
to mean a special sense of pride. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Student responsibility in self government has been 
strengthened in recent years. The Student Board of 
Governors, with representatives from all residence 
groups, manages a substantial budget and appropri- 
ates funds for many diverse student activities. Repre- 
sentatives are appointed to many faculty committees 
including those concerned with curricula, cultural 
programs, schedules, athletics, religious life, inter- 
national education, and the library. 

Residence halls form the primary political groups 
for self government. Fraternities, sororities, and house 
associations accommodate all upperclassmen in small 
self-governed units with responsibility for conduct; 
cultural, academic, and social programming; and care 
of the facilities. Shortly after arrival, freshmen also 
organize dorm councils and send representatives to 
student government. 

Student government usually refers disciplinary 
problems to one of the student judiciary organiza- 
tions. House councils in each of the residence units 
serve the judicial function for problems that occur in 
the houses or residence halls. The Bethany College 
Student Court acts as a court of appeals for other 
student judicial groups and hears cases referred to it 
by the faculty and administration. Only the President 
of the College can hear appeals of Student Court 
decisions. 

STUDENT REGULATIONS 

A complete description of the regulations pertaining 
to housing, telephones, dining rooms, health services, 
motor vehicles, use of alcoholic beverages and drugs, 
eligibility requirements, and other areas of student 



26 



life are contained in the Student Directory which is 
distributed just prior to registration. Applicants for 
admission should know the following in advance: 

1) With the exception of commuters (i.e., married 
students or students living with parents) all stu- 
dents are required to live in College residence 
halls or fraternity or sorority houses unless ex- 
cused by the Dean of Students. 

2) All students, except commuters as described 
above, are required to board in the College din- 
ing hall unless excused by the Dean of Students. 
No refunds are granted for meals missed. 

3) Freshmen are not permitted to bring automobiles 
to Bethany. 

4) All new students are required to send a record of 
a recent and thorough physical examination by 
their family physician. 

Applicants who have questions about the regula- 
tions are invited to write to the Dean of Students. 

RESIDENCE LIFE 

Bethany is a leader in small, self-governed housing. 
In recent years when other colleges were building the 
large institutional-type dorms, Bethany was develop- 
ing home-like, 32-bed residence units, most of which 
are situated in wooded areas overlooking the main 
campus. Seventeen of the College's 21 residences are 
of this type. 

These self-governed houses constitute the primary 
social groups on campus, i.e., fraternities, sororities, 
and independent-house associations. Each associa- 
tion or fraternal group is responsible for arranging 
cultural, recreational, and social experiences for its 
members. Each residence group decides for itself its 
own internal discipline. Houses are also responsible 
for organizing day-to-day house-keeping chores and 
each works closely with the College in developing a 
decor that suits the group living style. 



Freshmen live in the larger dorms, but are granted 
most of the same freedoms and responsibilities of the 
upperclassmen. Head residents and student resident 
assistants give a great deal of leadership and counsel 
the first semester, but by the second semester fresh- 
men are more on their own. Whenever possible, 
freshmen are housed to facilitate the special fresh- 
man-year seminar program. 

I/I 




The seven fraternities and five sororities at Bethany 
are nationally affiliated and constitute approximately 
50 per cent of the student body. Interfraternity Coun- 
cil and Panhellenic Council, composed of representa- 
tives from each of the fraternities and sororities, act 
as the coordinating agencies in fraternal affairs and 
activities. 

The fraternal organizations represented at Bethany 
are: Alpha Sigma Phi, Beta Theta Pi, Delta Tau Delta, 
Kappa Alpha, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Phi Kappa Tau, 
and Sigma Nu. The sororities represented are: Alpha 
Xi Delta, Kappa Delta, Pi Beta Phi, Phi Mu, and Zeta 
Tau Alpha. 



27 





SOCIAL LIFE 

Campus social life centers in the residence units: 
fraternities, sororities, and the independent-house 
associations. As on most coeducational campuses, 
much of the social life is casual. It may be a coffee 
date at Renner Union or an evening at one of the 
local pubs. Others may bowl or swim, and any night 
of the week friends study together at the library or at 
a dorm lounge. 

Organized parties usually occur on weekends. Be- 
cause Bethany is not a college that is vacated week- 
ends, there is always something to do on campus. 
Athletics, theatre, films, concerts of many kinds, and 
coffee-house programs, fill many weekends. 

The Entertainment Committee of Renner Student 
Union brings interesting concerts to the campus. Last 
year the Committee brought Lester Lanin and his Or- 
chestra for Homecoming and Henry Gross and Larry 
Coryell and the Eleventh House for spring weekend. 
Other entertainers to appear during the year were: 
columnist Art Buchwald, New Riders of the Purple 
Sage, Billy Joel, Harry Chapin, Dorothea Joyce, New 
York Rock Ensemble, and Blue Oyster Cult. Maxwell's 
Coffee House featured Marshall Dodge, the Bottle 
Hill String Band, Robin Williams, Margaret MacArthur 
and Larry Groce, West Virginia artist-in-residence. All 
programs are budgeted by the student union through 
student-union funds. 



i 



28 





CULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

Faculty and students working together on the Cultural 
Activities Committee provide a wide variety of cul- 
tural events each year. A series of conferences on 
such topics as human sexuality, career planning, trans- 
actional analysis, and politics stirred much interest 
last year. Prominent authorities led the discussions in 
each area. Besides conferences, such speakers as Art 
Buchwald, Betty Shabazz, Anthony Herbert, and Jose 
Moreno visited Bethany last year. 

Musically, the cultural program presented the Pitts- 
burgh Symphony Chamber Orchestra, Trinidad Steel 
Band, violinist Nina McGowan, and pianist and artist- 
in-residence Oliver Manning. The Oratorio Choir pre- 
sented its annual performance of Handel's Messiah. 
The Cultural Activities Committee also brought to 
campus Jose Greco and his dance company, ESP- 
expert Gil Eagles, Stan Kenton and his orchestra, and 
the Mac Frampton Trio. 

Numerous art shows, including the annual Bethany 
Fall Exhibition, were displayed in Renner Union 
Lounge. Student and faculty shows were exhibited 
throughout the year. 



In addition to the regular Friday and Saturday-night 
film schedule, there were numerous foreign films and 
experimental art films shown during the year. 

THEATRE 

Drama is an important co-curricular activity at 
Bethany. Nearly one-third of the last senior class 
participated in a production while at Bethany. Often 
acting, directing, playwriting, and producing are cor- 
related with courses in the theatre department; how- 
ever, non-theatre majors have every opportunity to 
participate. 

Most of the productions at Bethany are staged in 
Wailes Theatre of the Steinman Fine Arts Center. The 
theatre seats 300 and has a fully equipped workshop. 
Most plays are given three or four times. Last year's 
productions included The Crucible; Private Lives; 
The Importance of Being Earnest; The Bacche; The 
Tragedy of Tragedies or The Life and Death of Tom 
Thumb the Great; and Brigadoon. 

Students playing a certain number of major and 
minor roles or participating in the technical and busi- 



29 




ness aspects of play production are eligible for mem- 
bership in the national drama honorary, Alpha Psi 
Omega. 

MUSIC 

There is a wide choice of musical groups on campus 
in both the vocal and instrumental fields. 

The Concert Choir, with approximately 50 mixed 
voices, performs on campus and goes on tour each 
spring. The repertoire consists primarily of rather 
difficult and serious sacred and secular works of 
many periods. There is opportunity within the choir 
for the formation of smaller ensembles to cultivate 
special types of repertoire, such as madrigals. The 
choir also cooperates with the theatre department in 
the production of a musical each year. 

The Male Chorus consists of 36 voices. The reper- 
toire is varied, with emphasis on serious works. When 
practicable, there is a spring tour. 

Members of the Concert Choir, the Male Chorus, 
and others in the community form the Oratorio 
Chorus which annually presents Handel's Messiah. 

The College Band performs at most football and 
basketball games, and for special occasions through- 
out the year. Band members attend an instrumental 
seminar each fall before the opening of school. 

The Brass Choir appears in formal convocations 
and in concerts. It is open to qualified players by 
audition as vacancies occur. 

Chamber Music is provided by woodwind quintets, 
string quartets, and smaller ensembles that develop 
annually and are open to all who play orchestral in- 
struments. 

There is an opportunity for proficient orchestral 
musicians, especially string players, to play in the 
Wheeling Symphony. To be admitted into this orches- 
tra one must audition with the Symphony's director. 



30 



PUBLICATIONS AND RADIO 

College publications include a campus newspaper, 
The Bethany Tower; a yearbook, The Bethanian; an 
orientation guidebook, The Student Directory; and 
a literary journal, The Harbinger. The publications 
and the campus radio station, WVBC-FM, are under 
the supervision of the Board of Communications, 
whose chairman is the student body president. The 
Board includes the student editors and business man- 
agers of ail publications, general manager and pro- 
gram director of the radio station, and members of 
the faculty and administration. The English and 
communications departments provide professional 
guidance. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS, 
INTRAMURALS, AND RECREATION 

Intercollegiate athletics for men and women are con- 
sidered an integral part of the College program. They 
furnish those students who possess a high degree of 
skill in a variety of physical activities an opportunity 
to compete with students from other institutions with 
similar standards. 

Intercollegiate activities at Bethany include foot- 
ball, basketball, baseball, track, tennis, golf, cross 
country, wrestling, soccer, and swimming. Lacrosse 
is played on a club basis. Membership is held in the 
Presidents' Athletic Conference (PAC), which also 
includes the following schools: Allegheny, Carnegie- 
Mellon, Thiel, and Washington and Jefferson in West- 
ern Pennsylvania; and Hiram, Case-Western Reserve, 
and John Carroll in Ohio. Bethany is also a member 
of the NCAA and the NAIA. 

Because women are showing increasing interest in 
intercollegiate athletics, not only in women's pro- 
grams but also as participants in varsity sports, the 




31 





athletic directors at PAC schools are exploring the 
possibilities for more women's competition in the 
future. 

Healthful athletic recreation is provided for the en- 
tire student body by an intramural program which 
includes a complete schedule of sports: for men — 
cross country, football, volleyball, basketball, swim- 
ming, wrestling, bowling, softball, handball, golf, 
track, and tennis; and for women — basketball, vol- 
leyball, tennis, field hockey, speedball, swimming, 
archery, and dance. The Director of Intramural Ath- 
letics supervises the program. 

Bethany encourages students to develop skills in 
recreational activities that may be continued through 
life. In addition to the usual team sports, staff instruc- 
tion is available in archery, badminton, horseback 
riding, swimming, golf, tennis, camping techniques, 
jogging, body mechanics, bowling, dancing, and 
gymnastics. 

There are many opportunities available for students 
who wish to pursue recreational interests. The 1,600 
acres of College land provide a natural setting for hik- 
ing and nature study. Ski slopes and riding stables are 
available at nearby Oglebay Park. The nearby Dutch 
Fork Hunt Club invites Bethany students to go fox 
hunting from September through February of each 
year. Local farmers are often willing to board horses. 
An 18-hole golf course is located six miles from 
campus. 



STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES 

All students entering Bethany for the first time are 
required to submit a completed physical examination 
form before registration. After arrival, the College 
health service is maintained by student fees, and all 
students are entitled to infirmary privileges as in- 
patients and as out-patients. 

The Bethany infirmary is well-equipped to assist the 
physicians and nurses who care, on 24-hour call, for 
student illnesses and injuries which occur during the 
academic year. Medical service is not available at the 
infirmary during vacations and recess periods. Stu- 
dents who suffer serious illnesses and accidents are 
usually treated at the Wheeling Hospital, located 15 
miles from the town of Bethany which maintains am- 
bulance service for emergencies. Medical and surgical 
specialists are called as needed for consultation with 
College physicians. 

The College physicians have regular office hours 
each weekday morning during the school year for 
free consultation. In case of an emergency operation, 
when the parents cannot be reached, the Dean of 
Students, upon the recommendation of the College 
physician, assumes the responsibility of giving per- 
mission for operations. 

For $18 per semester the College makes available 
to its students medical, surgical, and hospitalization 
insurance. All students are automatically included in 
the coverage from September 1 to August 31 and are 
charged accordingly unless the appropriate waiver is 
forwarded to the Business Office. Expenses for out- 
side consultation and treatment are the responsibility 
of the student in all cases when not covered by insur- 
ance. 



32 




RELIGIOUS LIFE 

A wide variety of religious backgrounds is repre- 
sented in the student body and faculty. While par- 
ticipation in religious concerns is entirely voluntary, 
there are substantial opportunities for religious ex- 
ploration and participation on the campus. 

Many of the students at Bethany College find in 
the Bethany Memorial Church an opportunity for 
expression of their religious faith. The minister of 
this church, who is also the College Chaplain, is avail- 
able to students for counseling and advice on per- 
sonal and religious matters. 

The Bishop of the Wheeling Diocese of the Roman 
Catholic Church provides a chaplain for Catholic stu- 
dents. He is available on a weekly schedule for coun- 
seling, in addition to the celebration of the Mass each 
Sunday and on Holy Days. 

The Jewish Fellowship meets every other week for 
worship and study at the Bethany Memorial Church. 
Jewish congregations in Steubenville and Wheeling 
sponsor the group and entertain Jewish students for 
the high holidays. 



ADVISING AND COUNSELING 

The advising and counseling of students are impor- 
tant aspects of the Bethany educational program. 
The programs are designed to provide resources 
which will help each student with academic, per- 
sonal, spiritual, social, and vocational situations. 

Bethany College recognizes the need to provide its 
entering students with an introduction to their work in 
new surroundings and therefore requires freshmen 
to come to the campus several days before the formal 
registration of other students. Orientation and evalu- 
ation days are planned not only to introduce the 
students to the College but also to introduce the 
College to the students. 

From the beginning of their collegiate career, stu- 
dents are assigned a faculty advisor. Through the 
new Bethany Plan curriculum, these advisors come 
into weekly seminar contact with their advisees. Thus, 
they have ample opportunity to observe student 
strengths and weaknesses in an academic situation 
as well as in more relaxed and informal counseling 
situations. 

After students choose a major field of concentra- 
tion, they are then assigned to a faculty advisor in their 
chosen department. The advisor helps the student 
plan an academic program consistent with the aims 
and obligations of that department in a liberal arts 
education, and a program which is in keeping with 
the student's abilities, aptitudes, and aspirations. 

The chief officer in charge of student advising and 
counseling, student welfare, and coordination of all 
student personnel administration is the Dean of Stu- 
dents. Members of his staff are available for help in 
all major areas of guidance, including post graduate 
and career planning. 



33 



Bethany College believes that a liberal education 
provides men and women with a most adequate 
preparation to meet the demands of our society. In 
a broad, carefully planned, liberal arts program, Beth- 
any students can also select specialized courses or 
fields of concentration which will prepare them for 
admission to graduate and professional schools, or 
for entrance into careers immediately following grad- 
uation. Through the Practicum Programs each student 
will plan an internship to assist in the development 
of vocational goals. 

FRESHMAN ADVISORS 

Mr. Allen, Mr. Allison, Mr. Buckelew, Mr. Carpenter, 
Mrs. Cayard, Mr. Draper, Mr. Folk, Mr. Frye, Mr. 
Grimes, Mr. Halt, Mr. Hudnall, Mr. Kenney, Mrs. 
Lamberts, Mr. Lester, Mr. Lozier, Mr. O'Leary, Mr. 
Peirce, Mrs. N. Sandercox, Mr. R. Sandercox, Mr. 
Smith, Mr. Stebbins, Mr. T. Thompson. 

FOR FIELDS OF CONCENTRATION (Senior Advisors) 

ART Mr. Kornowski 

BIOLOGY Mr. Larson 



CHEMISTRY 

COMMUNICATIONS 

ECONOMICS 

EDUCATION 

ENGLISH 

FINE ARTS 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

MATHEMATICS 

MUSIC 

PHILOSOPHY 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PHYSICS 

PSYCHOLOGY 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

SOCIOLOGY 

THEATRE 



Mr. Draper 
Mr. Carry 
Mr. Halt 
Mr. Spence 

Mr. Mitch 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 

Mrs. Cayard 

Mr. Young 

Mr. Allison 

Mr. Hauptfuehrer 

Mr. Myers 

Mr. Goin 

Mr. Hudnall 

Mr. Peirce 

Mr. Kenney 

Mr. Hagopian 

Mr. Judy 




FOR CAREER INTERESTS 

DENTISTRY 

ENGINEERING 

LAW 

MEDICINE 

MINISTRY 

NURSING 

RADIO 

DRAMA 

RECREATIONAL LEADERSHIP 

SOCIAL WORK 

TEACHING 

VETERINARY MEDICINE 

FOR SPECIAL SERVICES 

UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS AND 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

MINISTERIAL TRAINING AWARDS 

SELECTIVE SERVICE 

VOCATIONAL INFORMATION AND 

GUIDANCE 

SOCIAL AND RECREATIONAL 

ACTIVITIES 



Mr. Draper 

Mr. Hudnall 

Mr. Young 

Mr. Draper, Mr. Larson 

Mr. Kenney 

Mr. Draper 

Mr. Humes 

Mr. Judy 

Mr. Goin 

Mr. Hagopian 

Mr. Spence 

Mr. Larson 



Mr. Sandercox 
Mr. Lozier 

Mr. Myers 

Mr. Sandercox 
Mr. Frye, Mr. Kurey 
Mr. Cunningham 

Miss Nicholson 



34 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL STUDY 

Bethany offers pre-professional training in a variety 
of fields. A large percentage of students select courses 
to qualify them for entrance into professional schools. 
The faculty advisors consult professional universities 
so that specific requirements of the school selected 
are met. 

PRE-MEDICINE 

Students desiring to prepare for the study of medi- 
cine will find instruction and facilities which will 
satisfy the entrance requirements for the best medi- 
cal schools. It is recommended that the students 
planning to study medicine should have broad basic 
training in courses of general education, including 
a foreign language, literature, philosophy, and social 
science in addition to the courses in chemistry, bi- 
ology, and physics stipulated by the American Medi- 
cal Association. 

PRE-LAW 

Most law schools require no specific undergraduate 
courses for entrance but expect a broad training in 
the social sciences, humanities, and logic. Law schools 
recommend, however, that pre-law students take 
basic courses in history, political science, economics, 
sociology, psychology, English composition, and 
speech. 

PRE-ENGINEERING 

Training in the sciences and humanities provides a 
good foundation for pre-engineering students, some 
of whom desire to transfer to an engineering school 
after carefully following the requirements of the engi- 
neering school they wish to enter. 

By cooperative arrangement with Columbia Uni- 
versity School of Engineering and with Georgia Insti- 
tute of Technology, Bethany offers the first three 



years of a five-year course and arranges for the quali- 
fied student to transfer to one of these engineering 
schools for the last two years of undergraduate train- 
ing. Upon completion of the five-year program, de- 
grees from both institutions are granted. 

PRE-DENTISTRY 

Admission requirements to dental schools stipulate 
at least two years of pre-professional training. It is 
recommended that the pre-dental student follow to 
a large extent the pre-medical program. 

PROFESSIONAL CHEMISTRY 

A thorough preparation for professional chemistry 
and a background in the liberal arts at Bethany con- 
forms to the American Chemical Society standards. 
Independent study introduces the student to the 
principles of research which aids in any contemplated 
graduate or industrial work following graduation. 




35 



PRE-THEOLOGICAL 

Students who plan to enter church vocations are 
expected to complete their preparation in seminaries 
and graduate schools of religion after graduating 
from Bethany. Their undergraduate studies, therefore, 
are primarily liberal arts. Students elect courses which 
provide necessary pre-seminary studies in the natural 
and social sciences, the arts and humanities, and 
religion. 



ACHIEVEMENT RECOGNITION 

Bethany encourages superior achievement in scholar- 
ship and outstanding leadership in student affairs by 
public recognition at Commencement, on Honors 
Day, and on other suitable occasions. 

GRADUATION HONORS 

Students who have done academic work of unusual 
merit are graduated with honors: Summa Cum Laude, 
Magna Cum Laude, or Cum Laude. The awarding of 
honors is determined upon the basis of total quality 
points earned, standing in the Senior Comprehensive 
Examination, and the recommendation of the stu- 
dent's advisor. 

Students who do unusually well on the Senior 
Comprehensive Examination are listed at graduation 
as having "Passed With Distinction." 

SEMESTER HONORS LIST 

At the end of each semester, students who have rated 
high in academic attainment are designated as "Stu- 
dents Distinguished in Scholarship." Often called 
The Dean's List, this distinction is determined by 
the Honors Committee. 




. 






SENIOR FELLOWSHIPS 

Certain members of the junior class may be desig- 
nated as Senior Fellows for the following year. The 
selection is made from students who have demon- 
strated unusual excellence in their field of concen- 
tration and who, by character and ability, can do 
special work in a department or area as an assistant 
in instruction or research. Usually no more than 12 
full-year senior fellowships and one senior fellowship 
at-large (or the equivalents) are awarded in any one 
year; usually no more than one full-year appointment 
(or the equivalent) will be made in any one depart- 
ment or area. The title of Senior-fellow-at-large is 
provided primarily, but not exclusively, for capable 
students involved in interdisciplinary programs; 
students in other fields of concentration may be 
nominated for this category. The selection of Senior 
Fellows is made by the faculty Honors Committee 
from the nominations usually presented by depart- 
ment chairmen. 



36 




HONOR SOCIETIES 

A number of honor societies have been established 
at Bethany through the years to recognize academic 
achievement and campus leadership. 

Gamma Sigma Kappa is a scholastic society founded 
at Bethany in 1932. Students who have achieved a 
cumulative scholarship index of at least 3.50 (over 
at least four consecutive semesters) may, upon recom- 
mendation by the faculty Honors Committee, be con- 
sidered for membership; usually, however, not more 
than 10 per cent of any class will be recommended. 

Bethany Kalon is a junior and senior society estab- 
lished in 1948 to give recognition to students of high 
character who have demonstrated competent and 
unselfish leadership in student activities and have 
been constructive citizens of the college community. 
Selection is made by the members of the society with 
the advice and approval of the Honors Committee. 

West Virginia Delta Chapter of Pi Gamma Mu is a 
social studies society. Students maintaining a high 
scholarship index in 20 semester hours of social stud- 
ies are eligible for membership. 

Alpha Phi Chapter of Beta Beta Beta is a society for 



students of the biological sciences. Its purpose is to 
stimulate sound scholarship, to promote the dissemi- 
nation of scientific truth, and to encourage investiga- 
tion into the life sciences. 

Gamma Upsilon Chapter of Lambda lota Tau is an 
international society whose purpose is to encourage 
and reward scholastic excellence in the study of lit- 
erature. Membership is limited to students enrolled 
in at least their fifth college semester, who are in the 
upper 35 per cent of their class in cumulative grade- 
point average, who have completed a minimum of 
12 semester hours of literature courses with at least 
a 3.0 grade-point average in them and in all prereq- 
uisite courses, and who have presented a scholarly, 
critical, or creative paper which has been accepted 
by the Chapter. Lambda lota Tau is a member of the 
Association of College Honor Societies. 

Alpha Chapter of Omicron Delta Epsilon, interna- 
tional honor society in economics, was established 
in 1960. Membership is limited to students who have 
completed a minimum of 16 semester hours of eco- 
nomics, which must include either Economics 301 
or 302, and who have achieved both a departmental 
and overall grade point average of 3.0 or better. 

Beta Gamma Chapter of Alpha Psi Omega is a 
national recognition society in dramatics. Students 
qualify by faithful work in playing major and minor 
roles or working with technical or business aspects 
of theatre. 

Mu Epsilon Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta was estab- 
lished at Bethany in 1967 to recognize excellence in 
the study of history. Its membership is limited to those 
students who have completed at least 12 hours of his- 
tory with an average of 3.0 or higher and with at least 
a 3.0 average in two-thirds of all other studies. Mem- 
bers must also rank in the upper 35 per cent of their 
class. 



37 



The Bethany Chapter of Pi Delta Epsilon, a national 

recognition society in journalism, is designed to stim- 
ulate interest in journalism, foster the mutual welfare 
of student publications, and reward journalists for 
their efforts, service, and accomplishments. 

Kappa Xi Chapter of Sigma Delta Pi, national honor 
society in Spanish, rewards scholastic excellence in 
the study of Spanish language, literature, and culture, 
and the furtherance of friendly relations between 
Hispanic and English-speaking countries. Members 
must rank in the upper 35 per cent of their class. 

AWARDS 

The Oreon E. Scott Award is made each year to the 
graduating senior who has achieved the highest aca- 
demic record over the four-year period. The donor of 
this award was a long-time Bethany trustee and a 
graduate of the Class of 1892. 

The Anna Ruth Bourne Award stimulates scholar- 
ship among the women's social groups. A silver cup, 
provided by an anonymous donor in honor of the 
former distinguished chairman of the English depart- 
ment, is awarded to the recognized women's group 
whose active membership earns the highest scholar- 
ship standing each semester. The group winning the 
cup for four semesters is presented with a smaller 
replica as a permanent trophy. 

The W. Kirk Woolery Award encourages scholar- 
ship among the men's social groups. This silver cup, 
donated by friends of the late Dr. Woolery, a former 
Dean and Provost of the College, is held by the 
recognized men's social group or housing organiza- 
tion whose membership (active membership only 
in the case of fraternities) earns the highest scholar- 
ship standing each semester. Any group winning the 
cup for four semesters is presented with a smaller 
replica as a permanent trophy. 




The Beta Beta Beta Award, established by an an- 
onymous donor, is presented annually to the senior 
biology major who has attained the highest academic 
rank in this field of concentration. 

The Florence Hoagland Memorial Award, given by 
a graduate of the Class of 1944, is presented each 
year to the outstanding senior English major. The 
award honors the memory of the late Miss Hoagland 
who was for many years Professor of English at 
Bethany. 

The Christine Burleson Memorial Award in English, 
given by a graduate of the Class of 1936, is presented 
each year to a senior English major who has attained 
excellence in this field of concentration. The award 
honors the memory of the late Miss Burleson who 
was Professor of English and Dean of Women from 
1932 to 1936. 

The Pendleton Awards, named in honor of Miss A. 
Campbellina Pendleton, Professor of Language and 
Literature at Bethany from 1884 to 1909, are pre- 
sented annually to the outstanding junior and sopho- 
more concentrating in English. The awards are given 
by Dwight B. MacCormack, Jr., of the Class of 1956, 
in memory of his grandmother, Dr. T. Marion 
MacCormack. 



38 



The E. E. Roberts Distinguished Prize In Campus 
Journalism is awarded annually to an outstanding 
student who excels in work on a student publication, 
in academic work in the communications depart- 
ment, or both. 

The Garrison Prize is presented in recognition of 
outstanding achievement in one or more areas of 
philosophy. The award honors the memory of the 
late Dr. Winfred E. Garrison, graduate of the Class of 
1892, whose humane concerns and scholarly achieve- 
ments contributed significantly to the area of higher 
education, history, and philosophy. 

The Outstanding Junior Woman Award is provided 
by the Pittsburgh Bethany College Club, comprising 
the Bethany alumnae of Pittsburgh. This award is 
based on qualities of leadership, character, conduct, 
and scholarship. The club has placed a suitable plaque 
in Phillips Hall on which the names of the winners 
are engraved. In addition, an individual gift is made 
each year to the recipient. 

The Vira I. Heinz Award is granted each year to 
the junior woman who has distinguished herself by 
leadership, character, conduct, and scholarship and 
whose proposal for foreign travel most significantly 
supplements her educational objectives. This $1,500 
award for summer travel is provided by the fund 
of Vira I. Heinz, recipient of the honorary Doctor of 
Religious Education degree from Bethany in 1969. 

The W. F. Kennedy Prize is given each year to the 
outstanding young man in the junior class. This award, 
established by W. F. Kennedy of Wheeling, West Vir- 
ginia, is awarded on the basis of the student's con- 
tribution to the college community life through 
leadership in activities, personal character, and 
scholarship. 




The Pearl Mahaffey Prize, awarded each year to the 
outstanding senior major in languages, was estab- 
lished by Mrs. Walter M. Haushalter and other former 
students of Bethany's Emeritus Professor of Foreign 
Languages. The prize honors Miss Mahaffey, a faculty 
member from 1908-1949 and a trustee of the College 
at the time of her death in 1971. 

The Shirley Morris Memorial Award was established 
by Theta Chapter of Zeta Tau Alpha in memory of 
Shirley Morris, a loyal member and past president of 
the Chapter. It is given annually to the outstanding 
student in the field of modern languages. Selection 
is made by Bethany's foreign languages department. 

The J.S.V. Allen Memorial is a fund established by 
the family and friends of Professor Allen to provide 
for an annual award to the outstanding physics stu- 
dent at Bethany. 



39 




The Frank Alfred Chapman Memorial is a fund es- 
tablished by Dr. Stanton Crawford to provide for an 
annual award to the outstanding Bethany history stu- 
dent. Preference is given to students of American 
History and the Ohio Valley. 

The Osborne Booth Prize In Religion is given each 
year to the student who excels in the field of Relig- 
ious Studies. The late Osborne Booth was T. W. Phil- 
lips Professor of Old Testament when he retired in 
1964 after 35 years of teaching at Bethany. 

The Francis O. Carfer Prize is given each year to 
the senior who, in the judgment of the Honors Com- 
mittee, has made the most outstanding contribution 
to the College during his or her undergraduate years. 
Mr. Carfer, a trustee of Bethany College for 29 years, 
was a graduate of the Class of 1909. Recipients of the 
award must display sound academic accomplish- 
ments and characteristics of loyalty, service, and de- 
votion to Bethany. 



The Senior Award In Chemistry, given by an anon- 
ymous donor, is granted to the senior concentrating 
in chemistry who has achieved the highest cumulative 
average in his or her major field, including the record 
made on the Senior Comprehensive Examination. 

The Psychology Society Award is presented annu- 
ally to the senior majoring in psychology who has 
maintained the highest academic average in his or her 
studies in the department. 

The Pi Delta Epsilon National Award of Merit is 
presented to an upperclass writer or editor for sig- 
nificant contributions to campus student publications. 

The WVBC-FM Senior Award For Radio is given to 
the senior who for four years has shown dedication, 
loyalty, leadership, talent, and creativity to VVVBC's 
operations. 

The WVBC-FM Talent Award is presented to the 
individual member of the WVBC staff who has offered 
the most outstanding continuous radio programming 
for the school term. 



40 



BETHANY 




ADMISSION 



47 




Bethany accepts applications for admission from 
qualified candidates. Admission is based upon a care- 
ful review of all the credentials presented by the 
candidate. The Committee on Admission accepts 
those it considers best qualified among those apply- 
ing. In no case does the meeting of minimum stand- 
ards assure admission. 

Application for admission to the freshman class 
should be made to the Director of Admission as 
early as possible in the year in which the candidate 
seeks admission, preferably before the completion of 
the first half of his or her final preparatory year. De- 
cisions of the Committee on Admission are mailed 
beginning in October and throughout the year as 
completed applications are received. The accepted 
student then may reserve a space in the new class by 
writing a letter of acceptance and by returning a 
housing card and registration deposit. Further dis- 
cussion of this deposit may be found on page 46. 

The College seeks students who have prepared 
themselves for a liberal-arts curriculum by taking at 
least 15 units of college-preparatory work. Although 
the College does not prescribe how these units be 
distributed, it expects a minimum of four years of 
English and the usual sequences in mathematics, sci- 
ence, foreign languages, and social studies. For stu- 
dents who have developed individual curricula or 
are involved in experimental honors programs, the 
committee makes special evaluation. 



42 




1 "'* EKiff I 




The process of application should also include a 
request for college counselors to furnish a transcript 
of completed work, a personal profile of the appli- 
cant, and either the College Entrance Examination 
Board Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores or the 
American College Testing (ACT) scores. On the appli- 
cation form the College requests the names and ad- 
dresses of two persons who are well acquainted with 
the applicant and who are willing to furnish an esti- 
mation of his or her qualifications. The applicant may 
also wish to provide any other supporting documents 
that might be of help in the process of admission, i.e., 
poetry, plays, short stories, music, artwork, photog- 
raphy, and journalistic writings. 

In addition, Bethany College strongly suggests that 
an interview with an admission officer be scheduled, 
in many instances accomplished in a nearby city 
when it coincides with the Admission Office travel 
schedule. Annual hotel interviews are held in New 
York, Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, Cleveland, 
and Pittsburgh. The ideal situation, however, is an 
interview on campus, allowing sufficient time for 
a comprehensive tour. During campus visits plans 
should be made to observe classes and to speak and 
dine with students and faculty. They are eager to 
meet with prospective candidates. 



The Admission Office is open Monday through 
Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Saturday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; 
and Sunday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., throughout the year. 
Appointments may be made by calling 304-829-7611 
or writing the Admission Office, Bethany College, 
Bethany, West Virginia 26032. A travel brochure will 
then be sent, detailing travel routes and the comfort- 
able overnight accommodations available at Beth- 
any's Gresham House. 



43 



TRANSFERS 

Transfer students are welcomed at Bethany. Proce- 
dures for transferring to the College are similar to 
those for freshmen, except that the interview is re- 
quired. Any student in good standing at a fully ac- 
credited institution of higher education is eligible 
for acceptance. A majority of students accepted as 
transfers have above average grades and are seeking a 
campus life unlike that which they have experienced. 
Grades of "C" or better are accepted along with 
course work in which credit (on a credit/no credit 
basis) or pass (in a pass/fail system) has been received. 
If requested, course work from other institutions will 
be reviewed by Bethany's Registrar prior to making 
application. 

JUNIOR COLLEGE GRADUATES 

Bethany has attempted to make the entrance of 
junior college graduates as uncomplicated as pos- 
sible. Any student who has received or will receive 
an Associate in Arts or Associate in Science Degree 
and finds Bethany's curriculum suited to his educa- 
tional goals is encouraged to apply. All materials 
necessary for acceptance should be forwarded to 
the College early in the semester, prior to the term 
in which the student plans to enroll. 

Holders of the A.A./A.S. Degree who are accepted 
at Bethany as Junior College Degree Candidates re- 
ceive two years (minimum of 60 hours) credit, enter 
as juniors, and receive all the rights and privileges of 
upperclassmen. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

The College is eager to review the applications of stu- 
dents from other countries. Approximately 15 coun- 
tries are represented on campus each semester. 



Students from non-English-speaking countries are 
required to submit Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores or 
a score from the Test of English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) for entrance. 

Students from foreign countries are asked to supply 
funds for financing their education. Though the Col- 
lege is willing to review a request for scholarship, 
funds are limited. 

EARLY ADMISSION 

Some students complete their secondary school grad- 
uation requirements a year early and decide to pursue 
college admission after their junior year. For those 
students who have demonstrated maturity and show 
evidence of a strong academic background, Bethany 
offers a program for early admission. For this type of 
admission the usual admission procedures must be 
followed. A personal interview on campus as well as 
a discussion with the student's college counselor by 
an admission officer is also required. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

Students may receive advanced placement and/or 
credit from any department in the College through a 
testing program. The faculty recently elected to grant 
any student credit by examination without taking the 
course. Arrangements may be made by consulting 
with department chairmen and the Director of 
Testing. 

Credit may be received or courses waived as a re- 
sult of high scores on the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board Testing Program for Advanced Placement. 
Such credit, however, is a departmental matter and 
also requires consultation with department chairmen 
upon matriculation. 



44 



BETHANY 




45 



EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL AID 



Bethany College is a non-profit institution. Tuition, 
fees, and other general charges paid by the student 
cover less than three-fourths of the College's instruc- 
tional and operational expenses. The remainder 
comes from income from endowment funds and from 
gifts and contributions. Bethany continues to keep the 
costs required from the student as low as possible. 



No reduction is made in student accounts for 
course changes made after the first two weeks of the 
semester. The College is required to collect a three 
per cent West Virginia sales tax on published charges 
for room, board, linen, and parking permits. Bethany 
reserves the right to change, without advance notice, 
the price for room, board, linen, and health insurance. 



COMPREHENSIVE CHARGES 

Comprehensive charges of approximately $3,960 for 
a year at Bethany include the following: 

Tuition and Fees $2,600 

Room 495 

Board 675 

Student Board of Governors 65 

Bethany House-Benedum Commons 50 

Linen 40 

Health Insurance 35 



While a general charge is stated for Tuition and 
Fees, this fee may be divided into $2,100 for tuition 
and $500 for the following activities and services: 
athletics, health service, library, lectures, plays, con- 
certs, publications, student activities, and laboratory 
services with the exception of music and art. 

The Bethany House-Benedum Commons Fee is 
charged to all registered students and covers the oper- 
ation and maintenance costs of the student union. 



WITHDRAWALS AND REFUNDS 

After registration, there is no refund of room charges 
or fees. A student voluntarily withdrawing or with- 
drawing because of illness during the course of the 
semester will be charged 10 per cent of tuition 
charges for each week of attendance or part thereof. 
There is no refund of tuition after the tenth week of 
attendance. There is no refund in the event that a 
student is dismissed or asked to withdraw during the 
course of the semester. Board refund is prorated, 
based upon food costs only. Special fees are not 
refundable. 

A student wishing to withdraw from Bethany must 
file written notice with the Dean of Students to qual- 
ify for refund of deposit and adjustment of other 
charges. 

ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION FEES 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

A non-refundable $10 fee is required at the time 
of formal application. 




APPLICATION FOR READMISSION 

Students previously enrolled in Bethany College who 
wish to return for additional work must file an Appli- 
cation for Readmission with the Registrar's Office. 
A $5 fee is required at the time such application 
is made. 

REGISTRATION DEPOSIT 

Upon acceptance for admission or readmission, a 
$100 registration deposit is required of all students. 
Once this deposit is paid it is not refunded until after 
graduation or until a Bethany College student com- 
pletes the following procedure: 

Students not being graduated may have the de- 
posit refunded after the last term of their attendance 
if written notice is given to the Business Office prior 
to the advance enrollment date for the next regular 
term. Such students may be readmitted by approval 
of the Dean of Students and the Business Manager. 

MATRICULATION FEE 

A $20 fee, payable once by every new student, cov- 
ers, in part, the cost of orientation and evaluation 
procedures for new students. 



ART FEES 

Art 200 $10 

Art 210 $10 

Art 310 $10 

Art 320 $20 

Art 325 $15 

Art 420 $20 

Art 425 $15 

MUSIC FEES 

Private lessons, two weekly . . . .$115 per semester 

Private lesson, one weekly $65 per semester 

Organ Practice, one hour daily . .$33 per semester 

Instrument Rental $9 per semester 

Piano Practice, one hour daily ... . $9 per semester 
Voice Practice, one or two 

hours daily $9 per semester 

FEES FOR OVERSEAS PROGRAMS 

England: $2,000 per semester for tuition and fees, 
room and board, and activity fees while 
in England. 

Madrid: 1st semester — $1,300 for air fare, tuition 

and fees, and transportation from the 
airport to the university. 
2nd semester — $710 (in addition to first 
semester fee). 

Sorbonne: 1st semester — $1,300 for air fare, tuition 
and fees, and transportation from the 
airport to the university. 
2nd semester — $710 (in addition to first 
semester fee). 



47 



OTHER SPECIAL FEES 

Education 443: off-campus student teaching 

(per semester) $1,300 

(includes tuition, fees, and weekend board 
privileges in the Bethany dining hall) 

Education 475 $72 

Each academic hour when less than 13 $100 

Freshmen, sophomores, and juniors: each 

academic hour in excess of 16 hours $72 

Seniors: each academic hour in 

excess of 18 hours $72 

Auditing a course, per semester hour $72 

(A student is not charged if he is paying 
regular tuition and fees and the total pro- 
gram, including the audit, does not ex- 
ceed 18 hours.) 

Comprehensive Examination $25 

Graduation Fee $20 

Special guidance and advisory service 

(pre-college) $10 to $25 

Special examinations in any department $10 

Special placement or achievement tests in 

any department $5 

Key deposit for dormitories (refunded 

if key is returned) $5 

Infirmary charge per day $5 

(after the first three days each semester) 

Late registration (per day) $3 

BREAKAGE DEPOSITS 

Chemistry and physics breakage deposits are covered 
by a $5 breakage card which the student purchases 
each semester for every laboratory course in which 
he or she is enrolled. In the event breakage exceeds 
$5, an additional $5 breakage card must be purchased. 
Unused portions are refunded at the end of each 
academic year. 



PAYMENT OF STUDENT ACCOUNTS 

At registration an invoice is prepared for each stu- 
dent, listing all charges due for the following se- 
mester. Payments are due in accordance with the 
following schedule: 

First Semester 

By August 15 a payment of $1,200 

(Balance on account due October 15) 

Second Semester 

By January 15 a payment of $1,200 

(Balance on account due March 15) 

Scholarships and loans may be applied as credit 
against August or January initial payment require- 
ments. If after application of scholarships and/or 
loans, the balance is less than $1,200, the full balance 
is due and payable by August 15 for the first semester 
and January 15 for the second semester. All special 
student accounts for which total semester charges 
are $1,200 or less are payable in full by registration. 

Students will not be permitted to register if the 
initial payment requirements for each semester are 
not met, and they may be denied College privileges 
if subsequent payments are not completed as sched- 
uled. These requirements are in addition to the reg- 
istration deposit. Checks or drafts should be made 
payable to Bethany College. 

An account service fee of two per cent per month 
will be charged on balances outstanding on all stu- 
dent accounts as of October 15 for the first semester 
and March 15 for the second semester. This fee will 
be entered on all accounts the day following the 
above dates and at 30-day intervals thereafter for a 
period not to exceed 90 days. Students may not take 
final examinations, receive academic credit, or obtain 
transcripts until satisfactory arrangements are made 
to cover financial obligations. 



48 



STUDENT DRAWING ACCOUNT 

The Business Office provides a limited banking ser- 
vice whereby students may deposit funds and draw 
on them as required. Students or their parents may 
make deposits to this recommended student drawing 
account which avoids the necessity of keeping on 
hand any substantial amount of money. All checks 
for this account must be made payable to the Bethany 
College Student Drawing Account. 

MONTHLY PAYMENT PLANS 

Bethany has made arrangements with the Insured 
Tuition Payment Plan whereby student accounts may 
be paid on a monthly basis during the year. Arrange- 
ments to use this plan should be made prior to the 
registration period. Information may be obtained by 
writing to the Business Office, and contract forms 
may be obtained by writing to the Insured Tuition 
Payment Plan, 6 Saint James Ave., Boston, Mass., 
92116. Contracts are to be completed by the parent 
or guardian of the student through direct negotiation 
with the payment plan office. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Bethany College believes that funding of a student's 
education is primarily a family responsibility. How- 
ever, financial assistance is available to those students 
whose resources will not fund a Bethany education 
and yet sincerely desire to attend. 

All of the College's financial assistance programs 
are awarded through careful evaluation of the Par- 
ents' Confidential Statement (PCS), available through 
the college counseling offices of the student's high 
school. Designation of Bethany College as an appro- 
priate institution to receive the processed information 
and indication of application for financial assistance 
on the admission application are the only procedures 
necessary to apply for financial aid. 




Because of the large number of applications for 
financial aid, assignment of funds is made according 
to the date requests are processed. The earlier a stu- 
dent completes all admission materials and submits 
the PCS, the more funds there are available. 

A financial-aid applicant whose need for assistance 
has been verified by the College Scholarship Service 
will have his or her need met through a variety of 
financial aids, including scholarships, loans, and Col- 
lege employment. The student has the option of ac- 
cepting any or all of the aid offered. An interview with 
an officer of the College once the offer of assistance 
has been made can help to explain any problems. The 
Admission Office or the Office of Financial Assistance 
helps to arrange these interviews. 



49 




QUALIFICATIONS FOR SCHOLARSHIPS 

Bethany recognizes promise and intellectual attain- 
ment by awarding a number of scholarships. These 
awards vary in value and are available to a limited 
number of entering students. Most scholarships are 
awarded to freshmen on a four-year basis but are 
continued from year to year, as needed, only if the 
recipient has met the following conditions: 

1) A satisfactory scholarship index 

2) Satisfactory conduct as a student 

3) Worthwhile contributions to the college program 

4) Constructive citizenship in the college community 

5) Payment of student accounts as scheduled. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

All awards are made by the Faculty Committee on 
Scholarship and Financial Aid in accordance with the 
requirements of the particular fund. 



Patrick A. and Elizabeth Berry Scholarship Fund — established by 
Miss Sara Cameron to assist students from Ohio. 

Bethany Women's Club — established by the Bethany Women's 
Club to assist needy and worthy students. 

Bison Club - — provided by Bethany alumni with principal interest 
in intercollegiate athletics. 

Stanley F. Bittner Scholarships — established by a graduate of the 
Class of 1916 to provide general financial assistance. 

Donald L. Boyd Memorial — established by family and friends in 
memory of Donald L. Boyd, member of the Class of 1921 and 
long-time Trustee of the College. 

jean A. Boyd Scholarship — established by bequest from donor. 

Thomas ). Boyd — established by Thomas J. Boyd, member of 

the Class of 1940. 
jonsie Brink Scholarship — awarded to worthy and eligible 

students. 
Isaac Brown Scholarship — used to aid in part of the tuition 

charge. 
Calder Scholarship Endowment — established preferably for male 

students from the New England area majoring in one of the 

natural or life sciences. 
Argyle Campbell Memorial — established by family and friends 

of Mr. Campbell to assist worthy and needy students. 

Chapman Scholarship — established by Stanton C. Crawford, 
Bethany 1918, former Chancellor of the University of Pitts- 
burgh, to honor a pioneer frontier family. 

Charnock Family Scholarship — established by Miss Ethel Char- 
nock, member of the Class of 1912, to assist students at the 
sophomore level or above. 

The Class of 7969 Scholarship Endowment — provided as a schol- 
arship grant to begin with the 1984-85 college year. First pref- 
erence will be given to descendants of the Class of 1969. 

C/ass of 1970 Scholarship Endowment — provided as a scholar- 
ship grant to begin with the 1985-86 college year. First prefer- 
ence will be given to descendants of the Class of 1970. 

M. M. Cochran Scholarship — established to cover a part of the 
tuition charge. 

Irene O. Darnall Scholarship — established by Irene O. Darnall 
to assist needy and worthy students. 

Marion and Frank Dunn Scholarship — established by Frank K. 
Dunn, former Assistant to the President of Bethany College, 
to assist worthy and eligible students. 

fast Side Christian Church of Denver, Colorado Scholarship En- 
dowment — given to provide modest matching funds for a 
student at Bethany College. 



50 



Ekas-Evans Scholarship Endowment — established by Dr. and 
Mrs. Ward Ekas of Rochester, New York, whose daughter, 
Elizabeth Ellen Ekas, was a member of the Class of 1957. 

Newton W. and Bessie Evans Scholarship — established by Mr. 
Newton W. Evans, former Bursar and Treasurer of Bethany 
College, to assist worthy students. 

joe A. Funk II Scholarship — established by Bethany alumni and 
friends of the Funk family in memory of a young man who 
lost his life in Viet Nam. 

Samuel Ceorge Memorial Scholarship — established by bequest 
from the donor to provide one-fourth tuition scholarships to 
all graduates of Brooke (West Virginia) High School who qual- 
ify for admission. Additional scholarship aid is provided Brooke 
students on the basis of individual needs. 

Creensburg Area Scholarship — established anonymously in 1953 
to assist students of ability and need from the Creensburg, 
Pennsylvania, area. 

Aleece C. Cresham Scholarship — presented as assistance to out- 
standing students in the field of music. 

Perry and Aleece Cresham Scholarship — established by Dr. and 
Mrs. Perry E. Gresham to assist worthy and eligible students. 
Special consideration is given to young people interested in 
music or philosophy. 

Campbell Allen Harlan Scholarship — established by Mr. Camp- 
bell Allen Harlan, former Bethany College Trustee from Detroit, 
Michigan, to assist students of unusual ability in the fine arts. 

Florence M. Hoagland Memorial Scholarship — established for 
needy and worthy students by Miss Frances Cables of New 
Hampshire in memory of Florence M. Hoagland, Head of the 
Department of English and Advisor for Women at Bethany 
from 1936 to 1946. 

Ida M. Irvin Scholarship — awarded to a senior student. 
Flora Isenberg Scholarship — given to provide assistance for stu- 
dents of the liberal arts and sciences. 

Albert C. Israel Scholarship — used to apply to tuition of a de- 
scendant of Albert C. Israel. 

John H. and Ida H. King Scholarship — awarded to students under 
terms approved by Trustees of the College in accordance with 
the will of the donors. 

Forrest H. Kirkpatrick Scholarship — established by Dr. Kirkpat- 
nck, member of the Class of 1927, to be used to help students 
who are sons or daughters of alumni. Dr. Kirkpatrick was a 
Bethany professor and dean for many years. 

The Emma A. Lyon Scholarship — given to memorialize a pioneer 
Christian missionary to China. This endowment was initiated 
by a gift from Mrs. Mary M. Farm of Hawaii. 



Maude Schultz Lytle Scholarship — established by friends and 
family in memory of a graduate in the Class of 1915. 

Charles L. and Rose Melenyzer Scholarship — established by Dr. 
Charles Melenyzer, member of the National Board of Fellows 
of Bethany College, to be used to assist worthy young people 
who attend Bethany. First consideration will be given to the 
young people of the Monongahela Valley. 

H. j. Morlan Fund — established by Halford J. Morlan to assist 
needy and worthy students. 

William Kimbrough Pendleton Scholarship — established, to assist 
students from West Virginia, by Clarinda Pendleton Lamar in 
memory of her father, William Kimbrough Pendleton, member 
of the first faculty and second president of the College (1866- 
1889). 

Ralph E. Pryor Memorial Scholarship Endowment — established 
by family and friends of Judge Pryor, a member of the Class of 
1942, with preference for students from the First Judicial 
Circuit of West Virginia. 

Eli and Lee Rabb Scholarship — used as scholarship assistance for 
students from the Upper Ohio Valley. 

Reader's Digest Foundation — established by the Reader's Digest 
Foundation to assist worthy and needy students. 

The Herbert and Marguerite Rech Scholarship — used to assist 
needy and eligible students. 

Edwin K. Resseger, jr. Memorial Scholarship — provided by Mr. 
and Mrs. Kenneth Resseger of the Class of 1933. 

The James Derrick Reynolds Memorial Scholarship — established 
by parents and friends of a young man who lost his life in 
Viet Nam. 

E. E. Roberts Scholarship Endowment — created in memory of 
Professor E. E. Roberts who taught journalism at Bethany Col- 
lege from 1928-1960. 

Richard B. Scandrett, jr., Scholarships — established for the pur- 
pose of furthering international education and understanding. 

The Richard L. Schanck Scholarship — established by friends in 
memory of Dr. Schanck, Professor of Sociology at Bethany 
College from 1952-1964. 

Elizabeth M. Shrontz Scholarship — established by bequest from 
the estate of Elizabeth Shrontz from Washington, Pennsylvania. 

Richard H. Slavin, jr., Memorial — in memory of a graduate of 
the Class of 1950 who served as a Bethany faculty member 
from 1956-63. 

Adelaide E. and Arthur C. Stifel Endowment — established by Mr. 
and Mrs. Arthur C. Stifel of Wheeling, West Virginia. 



51 



Peter Tarr Heritage Endowment — established by Geneva Tarr 
Elliott, member of the Class of 1927. This fund provides schol- 
arship assistance to students in memory of the Tarr family's 
association with Bethany College since the days of its founding. 

Russell I. Todd Scholarship — a general scholarship endowment 
with preference for students planning to enter a health associ- 
ated career. 

Stewart King Tweedy Memorial Scholarship — established by Mr. 
and Mrs. H. L. Tweedy and friends in memory of their son, 
member of the Class of 1964, who was killed in Viet Nam. 

William H. Vodrey Scholarship — established by Mr. William H. 
Vodrey, a member of the Class of 1894, to assist students from 
the East Liverpool, Ohio, area. 

Nannine Clay Wallis Scholarship Endowment — given to provide 
financial assistance for students, preferably from Kentucky, en- 
rolled at Bethany. 

The Campbell-Hagerman-Watson Memorial — established by a 
bequest from the estate of Mrs. Virginia Hagerman Watson, a 
member of the Class of 1904, to provide support for foreign 
exchange students. 

C. A. Willett Scholarship — established to cover part of the tui- 
tion charge. The student receiving this scholarship is to be 
nominated by a member of the Willett family. 

DESIGNATED SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following scholarship funds have been estab- 
lished at Bethany College to assist students preparing 
for a church-related vocation: 

Florence Abercrombie Scholarship — established by a bequest 
from the estate of Florence Abercrombie. 

Ada P. Bennett Memorial — established by O. E. Bennett, a mem- 
ber of the Class of 1925, and family and friends. 

Osborne Booth Scholarship — named after a long-time member 
of the Bethany faculty to provide financial assistance for stu- 
dents preparing for the ministry. 

Lotta A. Calkins — established by a bequest from the estate of 
Lotta A. Calkins. 

Thomas Richard Deming Scholarship — established by friends, 
family, and members of the First Christian Church, Charleston, 
West Virginia. 

Fairhill Manor Christian Church Timothy Scholarship — estab- 
lished by the Washington, Pennsylvania, congregation. 

Jennie I. Hayes Scholarship — established by Jennie I. Hayes, a 
member of the Class of 1904. 




Harry L. Ice Timothy Ministerial Endowment — established by 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Lee of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, hon- 
oring Dr. and Mrs. Ice in recognition of Dr. Ice's productive 
and untiring work in establishing and building the "Timothy 
Ministerial Training Program." 

William H. McKinney Scholarship Endowment Fund — estab- 
lished by family and friends in memory of a Bethany graduate 
of the Class of 1923 to provide assistance for students preparing 
for church vocations. 

Isaac Mills Scholarship — -provided to cover part of the tuition 
charge of a ministerial student. 

Herbert Moninger Scholarship — established in memory of Mr. 
Herbert Moninger, a graduate of the Class of 1898. 

Edward S. Moreland Scholarship — provided by members of the 
Walnut Hills Christian Church, Cincinnati, Ohio, and friends 
of an outstanding Disciple leader who was graduated from 
Bethany College in 1927. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arch R. Morgan Scholarship — was established by 
these friends of Bethany College from Seattle, Washington. 



52 



The Parsons Memorial Timothy Fund — established by the Heights 
Christian Church, Shaker Heights, Ohio, and other friends in 
memory of Dorothy and Waymon Parsons for dedicated lead- 
ership to this church and the Brotherhood of Christian 
Churches (Disciples of Christ). 

f . /. Penhorwood Scholarships — named after a Bethany graduate 
of the Class of 1918 to provide assistance for students prepar- 
ing for the ministry. 

Perry Scholarship Fund — established in memory of Professor 
and Mrs. E. Lee Perry. Professor Perry was a member of the 
Class of 1893, Professor of Latin at the College from 1908 to 
1939, and Professor Emeritus from 1939 to 1948. 

Richmond Avenue Christian Church oi Buffalo Scholarship — es- 
tablished for students enrolled at Bethany from western New 
York and preferably of Disciple background. 

Sala Family Memorial Fund — established by Dr. John R. Sala, 
Class of 1926, former Dean of the Faculty at Bethany College. 

Minnie W. Schaefer Awards — awarded to students preparing for 
definite Christian Service. 

Edith and Chester A. Sillars Scholarship — established by Chester 
A. Sillars, former Director of Church Relations at Bethany 
College. 

Charles C. Smith Scholarship — established by family and friends 
in memory of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Smith whose dedicated lives 
were spent in service to the Christian Ministry. 

/. T. Smith Awards- — established by M. J. T. Smith, friend of 
Bethany from Memphis, Tennessee. 

John E. Sugden, Jr. Fund — granted to assist in the form of either 
loans or grants. 

Harriett Mortimore Toomey Music Scholarship — established by 
John C. Toomey and friends to assist students in musical 
education. 

Robert S. and Mane /. Tuck Scholarship — established by mem- 
bers of the Central Christian Church, Wooster, Ohio, where the 
Tucks served for 44 years. Mr. and Mrs. Tuck were members of 
the Classes of 1922 and 21 respectively at Bethany College. 

Fiollis L. Turley Scholarship — established by a bequest from the 
estate of Mollis L. Turley, Bethany 1925 and former Trustee. 

Vinson Memorial Fund — established by Z. T. Vinson, Class of 
1878, through the Central Christian Church, Huntington, West 
Virginia. 

Raymond E. and Eunice M. Weed Scholarship — established by 
Dr. Raymond Weed, former curator of the Campbell Mansion. 

losiah N. and Wilminia S. Wilson Scholarship — established by 
Josiah N. Wilson to assist students preparing for the Christian 

Ministry. 



The following scholarship funds have been estab- 
lished to assist students at Bethany College from 
backgrounds of the Christian Church (Disciples of 
Christ): 

The Fannie M. Bennett Endowed National Campbell Scholarship 
— established by a gift from the estate of Fannie Bennett who 
was a member of the Class of 1926. 

The Ben and Leona Brown Scholarship — established by Mrs. 
Leona Brown of Washington, Pennsylvania, in memory of her 
husband. 

Jessie M. and Frank P. Fiess Endowed National Campbell Scholar- 
ship — established by Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Fiess whose 
daughters, June Fiess Shackelford and Emma Lee Fiess Baldwin, 
were members of the Classes of 1941 and 1944 respectively. 

The V. J. Hopkins and Mary L. Hopkins Scholarship — operated 
under the principles of the National Campbell Scholarship 
program. 

National Campbell Scholarship — established in memory and 
honor of Alexander Campbell. Awards are in recognition of 
Christian service and academic accomplishment to develop 
able and dedicated lay leadership in the Christian Church. 

SUSTAINED AWARDS 

A limited number of financial grants are available 

to Bethany students from the following sustained 

programs: 

Automatic Retailers of America, Inc., Slater School and College 
Services Scholarship — awarded on an annual basis to a stu- 
dent waiter or waitress selected by the Faculty Committee on 
Scholarship and Financial Aid and the ARA management. 

H. L. Berkman Foundation — provides an award for one or 
more students residing in the Upper Ohio Valley. 

Bowling Creen Area Scholarship — established by a graduate of 

the Class of 1923 to assist Bethany students from the Bowling 

Green, Ohio, area. 
Robert M. and Katie W. Campbell Scholarships — awarded on a 

yearly basis to students preparing for vocations related to the 

Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). 

A. Dale Fiers Ministerial Athletic Scholarship — awarded on an 
annual basis to recognize and encourage the scholastic and 
athletic skill of an outstanding upperclassman preparing for 
the Christian ministry. 

Rowan Memorial Scholarships — awarded annually to students 
recognized by the college administration for good citizenship 
and participation in college affairs. 



53 




Oreon E. Scott Foundation Scholarships — awarded by the trust- 
ees of the Oreon E. Scott Foundation to provide assistance for 
students in their junior and senior years. 

West Virginia Consumer Finance Association — provides an 
award for a student selected by the Faculty Committee on 
Scholarship and Financial Aid. 

EXTERNAL TRUST SCHOLARSHIPS 

Through trust funds established in major banking 
houses, the following scholarship awards are avail- 
able: 

Nelson Evans Cook Scholarship — created to memorialize an out- 
standing metallurgist by providing financial assistance for 
chemistry students. 

Catherine Craves Scholarship Award — given to a Bethany stu- 
dent from Wheeling, W. Va., in accordance with an educational 
trust fund established in the Pittsburgh National Bank. 

Hayes Picklesimer Scholarship — established by The West Vir- 
ginia Emulation Endowment Trust to provide scholarship help 
for residents of West Virginia. 

William A. Stanley Scholarship — established by an outstanding 
West Virginia churchman who had lengthy careers in both edu- 
cation and business. 

Peter T. Whitaker Scholarships — created by a young graduate 
who found at Bethany the kind of education he sought. 

LOAN FUNDS 

The following endowed loan funds have been estab- 
lished to assist students under the general supervision 
of the Faculty Committee on Student Aid: 

The William C. and Carrie E. Bunyan Student Aid Fund — estab- 
lished by a bequest from the estate of the late Mrs. Bunyan of 
Brockway, Pennsylvania. 

The Meril and Marguerite May Student Loan Fund — established 
by Mr. and Mrs. Meril May of Garrettsville, Ohio. 

/. West Mitchell Endowed Medical Loan Fund — provided to 
assist pre-medical undergraduates of Bethany College and 
graduates of Bethany College enrolled in accredited medical 
schools. 

Phillips Loan Fund — established in 1890 by Thomas W. Phillips, 
Sr., of New Castle, Pennsylvania. 

Ethel E. Sivon Student Loan Fund — established by family and 
friends and members of the First Christian Church of Ravenna, 
Ohio. 



54 



BETHANY 








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55 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 




THE BETHANY PLAN 

Students differ in ability, motivation, tastes, aspira- 
tions, and modes of learning. No one program will 
serve the diverse needs of our students. However, 
some structure is necessary to give guidance to stu- 
dents by providing various teaching and learning 
methods. 

The Bethany Plan attempts to integrate a four-year 
liberal arts education which provides a vast degree 
of freedom in designing individual programs yet gives 
enough structure to insure depth, breadth, and inte- 
gration of knowledge. 

The Bethany Plan provides many learning oppor- 
tunities both on and off campus. The Plan involves 
a classroom-based program in which students attend 
interdisciplinary lecture courses, participate in small 
seminar groups, initiate and present independent 
studies, perform laboratory research, write papers, 
and utilize library materials. 

The Bethany Plan also includes an experience- 
based program, a group of four practicums which en- 
courages students to become involved in the world of 
work, to exercise responsible citizenship, to develop 
physical and recreational skills, and to experience 
living in a culture different from their own. These 
learning opportunities are not random experiences. 
They are carefully planned by the student and his or 
her advisor. Students must continually justify their de- 
cisions and examine their academic and field experi- 
ences in relationship to their vocational and personal 
goals. 



56 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

The Bethany calendar consists of two 15-week semes- 
ters and a four-week voluntary interim session in 
January: The fall semester — September to before 
Christmas; the spring semester — February until the 
end of May; and the January Term — a voluntary 
session which students may elect to use for intensive 
study on campus or for off-campus field work. 

Some courses are offered over the full 15 weeks; 
others, for the first or second-half of the semester. 
This division provides additional flexibility for stu- 
dents to do off-campus study and internships. 





57 





ACADEMIC ADVISOR 

The student/advisor relationship is the cornerstone 
of a Bethany education. The student and his or her 
advisor work closely together in developing appropri- 
ate classroom and experience-based programs. If not 
during private meetings, freshmen will see their ad- 
visor two times a week the first semester to discuss 
work in the freshman seminar. 

Usually during the sophomore year, students select 
a major field of concentration, thus transferring to an 
advisor associated with their major area of interest. 

ACADEMIC REVIEW COMMITTEE 

The faculty members who sit on the academic review 
committee evaluate student requests for exceptions 
to the regular academic policies and regulations. 
Student requests are submitted in writing and should 
include the advisor's recommendation. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The Bachelor of Arts degree will be conferred upon 
the student who completes the following: 
1) 128 semester hours with a minimum cumulative 
gradepoint average of 2.0 



58 



2) a freshman seminar 

3) a freshman interdisciplinary lecture course 

4) the distribution requirement 

5) afield of concentration 

6) demonstrated proficiency in expository writing 

7) a senior project 

8) the comprehensive examination in the major 
field 

9) the practicum requirement 

10) the residence requirement 

11) attendance at the commencement exercise. 
The degree of Bachelor of Science may be con- 
ferred upon a student who completes the Bachelor 
of Arts requirements and who chooses to major in 
any one of the following departments: biology, chem- 
istry, mathematics, physics, or psychology. 

FRESHMAN STUDIES PROGRAM 

Freshman Seminar: All entering freshmen will en- 
roll in a freshman seminar during the fall semester of 
the freshman year. The professor directing the sem- 
inar will also serve as the student's advisor. 

Freshman Interdisciplinary Course: Freshmen will 
elect a freshman interdisciplinary course either in the 
fall or spring semester of the freshman year. 

For descriptions of the courses offered in this pro- 
gram see pages 69-71 . 

DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENT 

To insure breadth of knowledge among its graduates, 
Bethany requires a demonstration of competence in 
a variety of disciplines. 

Every student must elect at least 12 hours from 
each of the three following divisions: 
Social Sciences 

Communications 101, 402; Economics; Education 
201, 202, 401; History; Political Science; Social Sci- 
ence; and Sociology. 



Physical and Life Sciences 

Biology; Chemistry; General Science 101, 102, 201, 
202, 209, 210; Geology; Mathematics; Physics; and 
Psychology. 

Humanities 

Art; Comm. 203; Fine Arts; Foreign Languages; Litera- 
ture; Music; Philosophy; Religious Studies; and The- 
atre. Not more than four hours may be earned in 
applied fine arts courses. 

All courses taken to satisfy distribution and field 
of concentration requirements must be taken on a 
graded basis. 

Any student may be exempted from the distribu- 
tion requirement in any one of the three divisions 
through successful completion of the Undergraduate 
Record Examination by the end of the sophomore 
year with a score equal to or surpassing the national 
norm. 

All students are required to pass Religious Studies 
100. Generally, this course is taken in the freshman 
or sophomore year. This course may be used to fulfill 
part of the distribution requirement in humanities. 

FIELD OF CONCENTRATION 

The field of concentration may be either departmen- 
tal or faculty-student initiated. The following guide- 
lines specifically exclude any language requirements 
necessary for professional certification or for admis- 
sion to a graduate program. 

A departmental field consists of a minimum of 24 
credit hours (excluding the senior project) and a max- 
imum of 48 hours within the department. No more 
than 24 hours from related disciplines may be re- 
quired by a department. 

The faculty-sponsored or student-initiated field, 
which may cut across departmental lines, may be 
developed. This interdisciplinary field of concentra- 



59 




tion requires the approval of the Committee on Inter- 
disciplinary Study. Such fields consist of a minimum 
of 24 hours (excluding the senior project) and a maxi- 
mum of 72 hours. No more than 48 hours in any one 
department will be counted toward graduation. The 
Interdisciplinary Studies Program is described on 
pages 109-110. 

WRITING PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENT 

Students must achieve and maintain a high level 
of proficiency in expository writing. When entering 
Bethany, students will take the Diagnostic Writing 
Test. The results will enable them to determine the 
level of proficiency they have reached at the begin- 
ning of their college career. Thereafter, they must 
demonstrate that they have maintained or improved 
their proficiency by taking annual Writing Qualifica- 
tion Tests, courses in writing, or a combination of 
Tests and courses. 

The Writing Qualification Tests are taken in the 
following sequence: the First during the freshman 
year, the Second during the sophomore year, and the 
Third during the junior year. Students will not be 



required to take a Writing Qualification Test during 
any year in which they demonstrate their proficiency 
by achieving a grade of C+ or better in English 100, 
130, 200, or 201. 

The Department of English will certify that stu- 
dents have satisfied the writing proficiency require- 
ment for graduation when they have demonstrated 
proficiency in one of the following ways: 

1. By achieving an above average grade on both 
the First and Second Writing Qualification Tests 
(or in courses taken in place of these Tests). A 
student whose proficiency is certified in this 
way is not required to take the Third Writing 
Qualification Test. 

2. By achieving an above average grade on the 
Third Writing Qualification Test (or in a course 
taken instead of the Test). 

Students who have not satisfied the writing profi- 
ciency requirement before the beginning of their se- 
nior year must enroll in English 120 (a non-graded, 
non-credit course in expository writing) before they 
may attempt to demonstrate their proficiency by tak- 
ing another Writing Qualification Test. 

Additional information concerning the Writing 
Qualification Tests and courses in writing may be 
found on page 93. 

SENIOR PROJECT 

Every student must produce a project which repre- 
sents his or her best efforts and meets the standards 
of his or her field of concentration. The project will 
be received and evaluated during the final semester 
of the student's senior year. Two to eight hours of 
credit will be given after the final evaluation and ap- 
proval of the project. Scheduling of the project is at 
the discretion of the department or the student's 
advisory committee. 

The project will be evaluated by at least one person 



60 



in the field of concentration other than the student's 
advisor(s) and one member of a department other 
than the student's own. The final evaluation will 
be in consultation with the student. In the faculty- 
sponsored or student-initiated field of concentration, 
one of the readers must be outside the student's ad- 
visory committee. The project will be made available 
to the college community. 

SENIOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

Each student must pass the Senior Comprehensive 
Examination. All requirements in the field of concen- 
tration must be met before the examination may be 
taken. 




The examination consists of two parts, written and 
oral. In some departments, sections of the Under- 
graduate Record Examination may also be considered 
part of or pre-requisite to the Senior Comprehensive. 

The examination will be given twice yearly, in Jan- 
uary and in May. The oral part of the examination 
will be scheduled by the Registrar as soon as practi- 
cable after the written, but in no case more than two 
weeks later. 

Students who have completed all the requirements 
in their field of concentration and have planned or 
are engaged in a Senior Project of major proportions 
(i.e., equivalent to four hours or more) may take the 
examination in January with the consent of their ad- 
visors). Students failing the examination in January 
may take it again in May, and they will be advised to 
reduce the scope of their Senior Project. 

A student who has not completed all the require- 
ments in his or her field of concentration or whose 
Senior Project will be equivalent to two hours will 
take the examination in May. 

Students in departments which consider sections 
of the Undergraduate Record Examination as part of 
the Senior Comprehensive Examination will take the 
URE immediately preceding their written and oral 
examinations. 

Students who fail the examination may take it at 
any time it is regularly given within the following 12 
months. If they fail a second time, they may petition 
the faculty for a re-examination during the following 
year. No student may take the examination more 
than three times. 

PRACTICUM PROGRAM 

The Practicum Program is a progressive effort to make 
a student's academic studies more relevant to the 
everyday world. The practicums are practical ex- 
periences encompassing values Bethany believes to 



67 



be essential to a complete education. 

Students will complete four practicums at some 
time during their Bethany education in which they 
actualize the goals of the College. These four prac- 
ticums are (1) an example of responsible citizenship 
(2) an awareness and involvement in health, physical 
education, and recreation (3) an intercultural living 
experience and (4) a vocationally oriented internship. 

Each practicum experience should be a self-exami- 
nation of the use of theory in practice; a demonstra- 
tion that liberal studies are relevant to personal 
development and to the fulfillment of obligations as 
a responsible citizen. 

With the assistance of the student's advisor and 
the Director of Practicums the student will develop 
practicum proposals. These proposals must have the 
approval of a faculty member and meet the guide- 
lines established for each practicum by the Practicum 
Committee. At the completion of each practicum 
experience the student will complete an evaluation. 

The student's development of meaningful practi- 
cum experiences is an important part of the Bethany 
Plan, and the College is committed to providing com- 
petent counseling and assistance to the students. 

Further information concerning the Practicum Pro- 
gram may be obtained by contacting the Director of 
Practicums. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

Four years are usually required to satisfy the course 
and residence requirements for the baccalaureate de- 
gree. Students of superior ability may complete the 
requirements in less time. As a rule, the senior year 
or the last two semesters are to be spent in residence 
at the College. However, students who have had one 
full year of residence previous to their senior year, 
and who apply for and are approved by the Com- 
mittee on Academic Review for off-campus study 




C5'H 



programs during their senior year, are permitted to 
count that work toward graduation requirements. 

INDEPENDENT STUDIES 

Each department in the College offers Independent 
Study for those students who have demonstrated the 
ability to work individually on some special area of 
interest. The student selects an area of study, subject 
to the approval of the chairman of the department, 
after which he or she completes an Application for 



62 



Independent Study in the Registrar's Office before 
the start of that semester. 

JANUARY TERM 

The January Term provides opportunities for students 
to supplement and extend the learning experiences 
available during the traditional academic year. In 
January, students may participate in experimental 
courses, study single topics intensively, travel and 
study in various parts of the world, undertake an 
independent study, or fulfill a practicum. 

During January, course offerings at other colleges 
across the country, including many foreign and do- 
mestic travel programs, are open to Bethany students 
through an exchange program. 

Participation in the January Term is entirely volun- 
tary. 

SUMMER TERMS 

There are two five-week summer terms and a 12- 
week independent study period. Most summer school 
courses are taught as seminars, tutorials, or indepen- 
dent studies. For additional information, consult with 
the Director of the Summer School Program. 

COOPERATIVE U.S. STUDY PROGRAMS 

ACADEMIC COMMON MARKET 
Bethany is a member of the Academic Common Mar- 
ket, an interstate agreement among southern states 
for sharing academic programs. This agreement al- 
lows Bethany students, who qualify for admission, to 
apply for enrollment in 80 graduate degree programs 
in other common market states on an in-state tuition 
basis. This program is sponsored by the Southern 
Regional Education Board. Further information con- 
cerning the Academic Common Market may be ob- 
tained by contacting the Director of Placement. 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 3-2 PLAN 
By special arrangement with the School of Engineer- 
ing at Columbia University, Bethany offers the first 
three years of a five-year course for engineering stu- 
dents and arranges for the participating students to 
transfer to Columbia for the last two years. Upon 
completion of this five-year program the student re- 
ceives a bachelor's degree from Bethany College and 
from Columbia University. 

GEORGIA TECH 3-2 PLAN 

In cooperation with the Georgia Institute of Tech- 
nology, Bethany offers the first three years of a five- 
year course for engineering students and arranges for 
the participating students to transfer to Georgia Tech 
for the last two years. Upon completion of this five- 
year program the student receives a bachelor's de- 
gree from Bethany College and from Georgia Tech. 
In the case of highly qualified students the Georgia 
Tech degree may be at the master's level. 

WASHINGTON SEMESTER 
Arrangements have been made for one or two ad- 
vanced students in history, political science, eco- 
nomics or sociology to pursue studies in these fields 
under the direction of the American University in 
Washington, D.C. A student participating in this plan 
takes six to nine hours in regular academic work and 
six to nine hours in the study of government super- 
vised by Bethany College and American University. 
Participants in the program must be recommended 
by the program advisor and have the approval of the 
Dean of the Faculty. 

UNITED NATIONS SEMESTER 
Bethany students may participate in a program at the 
United Nations in New York City. One or two stu- 
dents are chosen each year. 






63 




Students participating in this program take six 
hours of work in United Nations study — half, in a 
seminar course which meets regularly with people 
associated with the U.N.; the other half, in writing a 
research project on a topic chosen by each student. 

Students are also allowed to take six to nine hours 
of regular academic work at Drew University, Madi- 
son, New Jersey. Participants in the program must be 
recommended by the Campus Coordinator for the 
U.N. Semester, the student's advisor, and the Dean 
of the Faculty. 

OVERSEAS STUDY PROGRAMS 

Under approved supervision and direction qualified 
students may secure credit for formal work com- 
pleted in foreign colleges and universities. To be eli- 



gible for study abroad, the student must have the 
approval of the International Education Committee. 

MADRID STUDY PROGRAM 

Under special arrangement with the University of 
Madrid, qualified Bethany students may enroll for a 
semester or a full year of study at the University. 

OXFORD SEMESTER 

Each fall semester approximately 15 students study 
British literature, history, and culture with a Bethany 
professor in Oxford, England. These students are ma- 
triculated as full-time students at Bethany College but 
they live and study in Britain. 

PARIS STUDY PROGRAM 

Under special arrangement with the Sorbonne, quali- 
fied Bethany students may enroll as full-time students 
for a semester or a year in its Cours de Langue et de 
Civilisation Francaise. Bethany's official representa- 
tive in Paris serves as counselor to Bethany students 
during their stay at the Sorbonne. 

TUBINGEN STUDY PROGRAM 
Qualified students are given an opportunity to do in- 
tensive study in the German language and to work 
out an individualized program at the University of 
Tubingen, Germany. An adjunct member of the Beth- 
any faculty serves as mentor. 

REGIONAL COUNCIL FOR 
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

Bethany College is a member of the Regional Coun- 
cil for International Education, founded in 1959 as 
a unique cooperative effort to strengthen the inter- 
national phases of education. The Council, composed 
of more than 30 colleges and universities in Pennsyl- 
vania, West Virginia, and Ohio, sponsors continuing 
faculty enrichment programs, exchange lectureships, 



64 



visiting scholars from abroad who spend substantial 
periods on member college campuses, and an under- 
graduate study-year abroad in the social sciences in 
Basel, Switzerland. 

STUDY YEAR IN BASEL, SWITZERLAND 
The Basel center emphasizes work in the area of mod- 
ern European history and international affairs. Classes 
are conducted at the Regional Council Study Center 
by an instructional staff drawn primarily from the 
nearby University of Basel, with a few Americans act- 
ing as administrators. Although these classes are 
taught in English, all students live with Swiss families, 
as proficiency in German is one aim of the program. 

SCANDINAVIAN SEMINAR 
After an intensive study of the native language in a 
Scandinavian country, students enroll in a higher in- 
stitution as fully matriculated students in that country. 

SEMESTER IN COPENHAGEN 
Bethany College maintains a working relationship 
with the Washburn University Semester Program in 
Copenhagen, Denmark, conducted in English by Dan- 
ish instructors, providing a selection of courses in 
European and Scandinavian history, politics, social 
structure, and the arts. Two places in the program are 
reserved each year for Bethany students. 

OTHER OVERSEAS PROGRAMS 
There are many additional overseas programs in 
which Bethany students have participated. These in- 
clude: 

1) Beaver College Semester at the City College of 
London (England) 

2) Fairleigh-Dickinson University Semester at Wrox- 
ton College (England) 

3) Brandeis University Semester at Hiat Institute (Is- 
rael) 



4) Michigan State University AMLEC Foreign Lan- 
guage Centers throughout Europe 

5) Chapman College World Campus Afloat 

6) The University of Glasgow, Scotland 

7) Central College (Pella, Iowa) International Studies 
Program in Austria, England, Spain, Mexico, or 
France. 

The Coordinator of International Education Pro- 
grams provides interested students with information 
concerning programs which have been examined and 
approved. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Believing that education is a life-long process, 
Bethany College has instituted a non-degree, non- 
traditional program of continuing education within 
the framework of the liberal arts tradition of the Col- 
lege. The Thomas E. Millsop Leadership Center for 
Continuing Education serves as the physical setting 
for the vast majority of instructional activities in this 
program. 

Continuing Education Units (CEUs) are awarded 
(one for every 10 contact hours) to participants in the 
program. The Registrar's Office maintains a continu- 
ing education transcript for each participant. 

Most continuing education programs at Bethany 
comprise intensive, short-term, residential seminars, 
institutes, and workshops which are aimed at assist- 
ing people of all ages and backgrounds to deal with 
the complexities of modern living. 

A large percentage of the offerings are developed 
by Bethany's faculty and staff while others are con- 
ducted by a broad spectrum of business, industrial, 
educational, professional, and church organizations 
which bring their students and educational formats 
to the Millsop Leadership Center. 



65 




COURSE LOAD 

A normal semester load is 16 hours. However, a stu- 
dent may elect activities courses (music, chorus, band, 
physical education) up to two hours with no addi- 
tional fee charge. For example, a student could elect 
a one-hour activity course, two one-hour activity 
courses, or a two-hour activity course. Thus, the max- 
imum academic course load is 16 hours plus two 
hours of activities courses. Permission to take addi- 
tional courses must be obtained from the Dean of the 
Faculty. Fees will be charged for any such approved 
courses. Applications for excess hours are available 
in the Registrar's office. A full-time student is defined 
as any student enrolled in at least 12 hours in that 
semester. 

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE 

During the first 10 class days of each semester, a stu- 
dent, with the approval of his advisor, may drop or 
add any course. No classes may be added after this 
time. With proper approval, a student may drop a 
course anytime before the final. 



CLASS ABSENCE POLICY 

Students are expected to attend all class and appro- 
priate laboratory meetings of a course and to partici- 
pate in all outside activities that are a part of the 
course. 

It is the responsibility of individual instructors to 
record attendance and to evaluate its importance in 
determination of course grades. Accordingly, instruc- 
tors prepare at the beginning of each semester a 
written statement explaining their attendance policy 
and their consideration of unexcused absences, 
make-up for excused absences, and related matters, 
which are in force for the whole semester. The in- 
structor files this statement in the library and with 
the Dean of the Faculty. At the first class meeting, it is 
to be distributed to the class. 

The Dean of Students grants excused absences in 
the event of serious personal or family emergencies 
or authorized College events. The Dean of Students 
files these excused absences with the Registrar who 
issues reports to the faculty. Names of students who 
are seriously jeopardizing their academic progress by 
class absence are given to the Dean of Students, who 
initiates counseling with the student. Instructors may 
drop students with a WF (withdrawn failing) if ab- 
sences are continued after consultation. 

WITHDRAWAL 

An honorable dismissal is granted to students in good 
standing who may desire to withdraw from the Col- 
lege if they have satisfied their advisor and a respon- 
sible officer of the College that there is a good reason 
to justify such action. Students asking to withdraw 
should present a written request to the Dean of Stu- 
dents along with a statement of approval from parent 
or guardian. The recommendation of the Dean of Stu- 



66 



dents is next presented to the Business Manager and 
then to the Registrar for final record. No withdrawal 
is considered complete until this procedure has been 
carried out. 

SPECIAL EXAMINATIONS 

A student justifiably absent from a final examination 
or a test given in connection with regular class work 
is permitted to take a special test without payment of 
fees with the consent of the instructor and approval 
of the Dean of the Faculty. For any other examination 
a fee must be paid at the Business Office before the 
examination is taken, and the proper receipt must be 
presented to the instructor at the time of the exami- 
nation. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Letter grades given and their equivalents in quality 

points are: 

A 4.00 C 2.00 

A- 3.75 C- 1.75 

B+ 3.25 D+ 1.25 

B 3.00 D 1.00 

B- 2.75 D- .75 

C+ 2.25 F .00 

Students are required to take at least 100 hours of 
letter-graded work. 

Grades mean: A, Excellent; B, Good; C, Satisfactory; 

D, Inferior; F, Failure. 
Other report abbreviations and their meanings are: 
Cr. Credit. No quality points. 

NCr. No-Credit. No quality points or academic pen- 
alty. 

F. Failure. No quality points; denotes work that 
is unsatisfactory. 

Inc. Incomplete. Incomplete work is a result of sick- 
ness or some other justifiable reason. An in- 



complete must be removed by the end of the 
fourth week in the following semester, unless 
an extension of time is granted by the Dean of 
the Faculty. It is not possible for a student to 
remove an incomplete after 12 months. 
W. Withdrawn. No penalty. 

WF. Withdrawn failing. No quality points; indicates 
a course dropped with permission after the 
fifth week of the semester, with the student 
failing at the time of withdrawal. A grade of 
WF has the same effect on the student's grade- 
point average as an F. 
Any student who carries 12 hours of letter-graded 
academic work may elect to take additional work on 
a Credit-No Credit basis in courses which are not 
used for the field of concentration or the distribution 
requirement. 

A report of the scholastic standing of students is 
received at the Office of the Registrar at mid-semester 
in addition to the final semester reports. These re- 
ports are sent to the faculty advisor and to parents or 
guardian of each student. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

The classification of students is determined accord- 
ing to the following plan. For sophomore rank a stu- 
dent must have at least 25 hours of academic credit. 
Admission to full junior standing is conditioned upon 
the student having at least 60 hours of academic 
credit. For senior ciass rank the student must have at 
least 94 hours of academic credit. 

Students are not considered candidates for the bac- 
calaureate degree until they have been granted senior 
classification, until they have filed an application to 
take the Senior Comprehensive Examination in their 
field of concentration, and until they have filed an 
application for a degree. 



67 



PROBATION 

The term "on probation" is applied to students who 
are allowed to continue at Bethany after having failed 
to meet the standards expected by the faculty and 
administration. Students may be placed on probation 
for any of the following causes: 

1) Unsatisfactory scholastic record. The following 
academic bases will be used to determine proba- 
tion each semester: Freshmen must achieve at least 
1.7, Sophomores 1.8, and Juniors and Seniors 2.0. 

2) Unsatisfactory class attendance during the semes- 
ter or preceding semester. 

3) Unsatisfactory conduct at any time. 

Probation is intended to be a warning to students 
(and to their parents or guardians) that their record is 
unsatisfactory and that unless significant improve- 
ment is made they will be asked to withdraw from the 
College. At the end of a semester on probation the 
student's total record is reviewed. His or her con- 
tinued enrollment depends upon the trend of aca- 
demic performance. The Committee on Academic 
Review may dismiss any student if the student is not 
likely to meet the requirements for graduation in the 
usual period of four years. An extension of the four- 
year period is granted only when there are extenu- 
ating circumstances. 

While on probation, a student is not eligible to re- 
ceive any grants from College scholarship or loan 
funds. 



TRANSCRIPT OF RECORDS 

Students wishing transcripts of records in order to 
transfer to other schools or for other purposes should 
make application to the Registrar's Office at least one 
week before the transcript is needed. Transcripts are 
issued only at the request of the student, and official 
transcripts are sent directly to the college or univer- 
sity stipulated by the student. One transcript is fur- 
nished to each student without charge; for each 
additional transcript a fee of $1.00 is charged. When 
three or more transcripts are ordered at the same 
time, the first transcript is $1.00, whereas the others 
cost $.50 each. Fees must accompany the request. All 
financial obligations to the College must be paid be- 
fore a transcript is issued. 

CHANGES IN REGULATIONS 

The College reserves the right to amend the regula- 
tions covering the granting of degrees, the courses of 
study, and the conduct of students. Membership in 
Bethany College and the receiving of its degrees are 
privileges, not rights. The College reserves the right 
(and the student concedes to the College the right) to 
require the withdrawal of any student at any time. 

INVALIDATION OF CREDITS 

Courses completed at Bethany College or elsewhere, 
more than 10 calendar years before the date of pro- 
posed graduation, are not accepted for credit toward 
graduation. All candidates are expected to comply 
with degree requirements in effect at the time of 
acceptance of the degree application. With the ap- 
proval of the Committee on Academic Review and 
the payment of the required fee, the candidate may 
take examinations, as administered by the various de- 
partments, for courses included in the current curric- 
ulum, to reinstate academic credit that may have 
been declared invalid because of date. 



68 



BETHANY 






69 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Interdisciplinary Lecture 100 4 hours 

The interdisciplinary lecture is an issue-centered course in which 
the interrelationship of discrete areas of human knowledge is 
emphasized. In each section a particular topic is examined by 
means of the methods and insights of the various traditional 
disciplines, but in all sections the focus is on the synthesis and 
integration of the material presented. 



Sec. I The Captain America Complex: Mission and Destiny 
in American Culture 

Since the first English settlements, Americans have believed 
that they and their nation had a unique mission or destiny in 
the world. This conviction of a special national purpose per- 
vades every aspect of American culture and affects the ways 
in which Americans understand themselves, their history, their 
institutions, and the world. Yet this sense of unique mission 
and the accompanying national self-understanding is now in 
the middle of a significant crisis. This course will study the 
evolution of that sense of a special national destiny (sometimes 
called American Civil Religion or the American Faith) as it 
manifests itself in American art, music, literature, history, 
speeches, and holidays, seeking thereby to understand better 
the present crisis. (Hiram Lester) Offered Fall 1974 



Sec. 2 Sport, Athletics, and Society 

A studv of sport and athletics as they relate to society. People 
have become more involved in games and sport because of 
the increase in leisure time, a desire to escape reality, a chance 
to engage in make-believe combat, a chance to identify with 
a successful group, and for many other reasons. People have 
become so involved that these games now occupy an impor- 
tant role in society, with prime media coverage, multi-million 
dollar contracts, a cast of superheroes, and an existence nearly 
free of federal control. All of this has come about without a 
close look into the meaning or direction of sport. Using a 
multi-discipline approach, this lecture series takes a close look 
at the impact sport has had on the economy, social structure, 
education, politics, and religion of America. The question 
remains: Can sport withstand such a look? (AC. Applin) 
Offered Fall 7974 



Sec. 3 The Consecration and the Gleam: The Romantic and 
His Universe 

The course will first explore several modes of Romanticism - 
the concerns with nature, individualism, the past, the com- 
mon man, and the supernatural — primarily as reflected in 
selected specimens of early nineteenth century English litera- 
ture. It will then demonstrate how these modes are dealt 
with in music, painting, architecture, and perhaps politics, 
history, and religion. The last third of the course will deal with 
aspects of Romanticism in American culture, particularly study- 
ing the rejection and the survival of Romantic ideas in the 
twentieth century. (John R. Taylor) Offered Spring 1975 

Sec. 4 The Leaning Tower of Babble 

This course deals with some effects produced in American 
society as a consequence of the rapid increase in the variety 
and quantity of available information. Students will examine 
and challenge the contemporary thesis that improved com- 
munications promotes understanding between individuals and 
among groups. Emphasis is placed upon what is being com- 
municated through such means as television, music, and film. 
(Stanley L. Becker) Offered Spring 1975 

Freshman Seminar 111 4 hours 

In this seminar, freshmen and their faculty advisor explore an 
area of mutual interest. Each section focuses on a specific topic, 
providing students with the opportunity to broaden and deepen 
their knowledge of the subject and to develop their ability to 
present ideas with clarity and cogency, both in speech and in 
writing, through discussions and special oral and written projects. 

Sec. A Bethany, West Virginia 26032 

This seminar will look at Bethany from the perspective of the 
newcomer. What are the historical factors that bear on the 
contemporary scene? Is geography and ecology important in 
understanding this town? What of her people — where do they 
come from, what do they do, how do they think? This is a 
study in small-town America, an exercise in sensitivity for 
people who move from place- to place. (Robert A. Sandercox) 

Sec. B Mountaineers and Crabgrass 

Students will be asked to examine and thereby come to under- 
stand their own cultural heritage as they study the life of the 
Southern Appalachian mountaineer. (Larry j. Frye) 



70 



Sec. C The Population Mushroom: Everyone's Toadstool 

If you spend five minutes reading this description, 625 people 
will be born into the world. Within an hour 200,000 people 
will be added to the world population. A child born today, 
living 70 years, would experience a quadrupling of world 
population in his or her lifetime. This seminar will discuss the 
causes and implications for human life. (Thomas P. Thomp- 
son) 

Sec. D Crime and Punishment 

A study of legal systems, penal systems, and penal reforms, 
along with their justifications. The seminar will seek inter- 
personal exchanges between the students and prison inmates, 
policemen, judges, and attorneys. (John W. Lozier) 

Sec. E Life or Death — Ethics and Options 

A consideration of the religious and ethical issues involved in 
the modern bio-medical field. On what basis do we make 
decisions concerning abortion, sterilization, artificial repro- 
duction, organ transplants, experiments with human subjects, 
mercy killing, and behavior modification? Who decides who 
dies, and why? (Richard B. Kenney) 

Sec. F Gun Control and Gun Control Legislation 

This seminar will consider the historical and political aspects 
and the implications of firearms controls in the United States. 
Topics to be covered will include the tradition and history of 
controls, the intent of the Constitution, assassinations and 
attempted assassinations of political figures, the role of sports- 
men and their arguments on this problem, the relation of the 
problem to crime in America, and the viewpoint of the "aver- 
age citizen." Considerable time will be given to the discussion 
of modern attempts to control guns by legislation. In this con- 
nection, the role of the National Rifle Association and other 
powerful lobbies will be studied. The problem will also be 
examined in relation to the approaches in other countries, 
notably in England and Scandinavia. (Milton R. Smith) 

Sec. G The Politics and Philosophy of Non-Violent Action 

This seminar will consider the philosophy and practice of non- 
violence in the lives and work of Jesus, Gandhi, and Martin 
Luther King. It will also look at non-violence as represented 
by such contemporary leaders as Cesar Chavez and Danilo 
Dolci. In addition to non-violence as a philosophy and a 
politic, it will be considered as a life style. (Jerry Folk) 

Sec. H The Tough Guy Hero 

"Tough guy" students will shoot the rapids of the Youghio- 
gheny River, read Camus, Hammlet, Chandler, Hemingway, 
Cain, Mailer, and Dickey, and watch selected tough guy films. 



Students will explore the origin of the tough guy hero, trace 
his development as both "pop-pulp" hero and as accepted 
literary type, and make judgments about his place in art and 
society today. Particular attention will be paid to America's 
unique "gun metal" existentialism. (Larry Crimes) 

Sec. I The Two Souls of Man: A Study of Hermann Hesse and 
His Works 

This seminar will try to discover the different sides of man as 
described in Hermann Hesse's works and as perhaps evidenced 
in ourselves. By discussing these different sides, seminar mem- 
bers may come to understand and accept themselves more 
maturely, and make decisions that affect their education and 
future life. (Leonora B. Cayard) 

Sec. | Life Styles Through Biography 

Biographical studies of influential persons can help students 
to gain understanding of their own values. A vital part of the 
college experience is growth toward answering the question: 
"How shall I live?" An examination of how others have lived 
or are living should provide insight into one's own life style. 
(Nancy Sandercox) 

Sec. K Science for Mystery Lovers 

Students will sample the bizzare, the mysterious, the unex- 
plained, and the unaccepted in the various sciences as a 
means of developing personal capabilities of imagination, 
rational thought, and research familiarity. Diverse subjects will 
be treated such as planarian (flatworm) learning, plant com- 
munication, the Bermuda Triangle, and ESP. (Martha B. Lam- 
berts) 

Sec. L Medical Practice in Ancient and Modern Times 

A consideration of the history of medical practice from the 
the time of the medicine man through folk medicine and 
early scientific discoveries, to modern medicine and surgery. 
Time will be devoted to the biographical study of certain 
physicians as well as to current problems of health care for 
all citizens. (J. Daniel Draper) 

Sec. M Is There Intelligent Life In The Universe? 

An examination of the size and structure of the universe, 
stellar evolution, and the possible origin of our own and other 
solar systems. Participants will define what is meant by life and 
discuss the physical, chemical, and biological conditions nec- 
essary to kindle the flame of life and to feed the fires of 
evolution. The seminar will explore the possibilities of finding 
life on other planets throughout the universe. If life does 
exist elsewhere in the universe, what are the modes of com- 
munication most likely to lead to beneficial contact with 



77 




extraterrestial civilizations? Possible historical evidence for 
contact with extraterrestial beings will be examined. (Richard 
C. Stebbins) 

Sec. N Is There Intelligent Life In The Universe? 

Like Sec. M, this seminar will examine the size and structure 
of the universe, stellar evolution, and the possible origin of 
our own and other solar systems. Participants will define what 
is meant by life and discuss the physical, chemical, and bio- 
logical conditions necessary to kindle the flame of life and to 
feed the fires of evolution. The seminar will explore the pos- 
sibilities of finding life on other planets throughout the uni- 
verse. If life does exist elsewhere in the universe, what are the 
modes of communication most likely to lead to beneficial 
contact with extraterrestial civilizations? Possible historical 
evidence for contact with extraterrestial beings will be exam- 
ined. (William R. Hudnall) 

Sec. O Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness 

A look into a basic objective of the United States, involving 
the quality of life, the kinds of liberty and/or lack of it, and the 
means by which people attempt to make life meaningful or 
"pursue happiness." This will involve a full utilization of library 
resources and interview and questionnaire techniques to bring 
about an improved ability to find out and analyze what hvs 
been done with these rights claimed for Americans in the 
Declaration of Independence. (Charles E. Halt) 

Sec. P Leaders and Leadership 

Some of us seek leadership; all of us, at some times in our 
lives, find it thrust upon us. This seminar will examine various 



types of leaders and leadership. Students will study the in- 
sights provided by the social sciences, and perhaps most 
importantly, will use roleplaying, simulation, and the process 
of the class to help each prepare more effectively to assume 
the leader role in college and later years. (7. Trevor Peirce) 

Sec. Q Man In Community (You and I) 

A study of the ways in which people interact. Diverse com- 
munity groupings (primitive tribes, social organizations, polit- 
ical jurisdictions, kibbutzim, therapy groups, families, etc.) 
will provide the experiences for the study. The seminar itself 
may become the chief laboratory group. (William B. Allen) 

Sec. R Introduction to Yourself 

An inquiry into the purpose and potential of the individual. 
Through the analysis and discussion of their readings, students 
will endeavor to cultivate an understanding of the qualities 
necessary for self-esteem and success as a student and as a 
citizen in modern society. (Harold O'Leary) 

Sec. S Ecologist or Ecofaddist? 

A critical evaluation of the differences between an ecologist 
and an ecofaddist. As a result of this evaluation, the student 
should be able to approach our environmental problems from 
a rational rather than an alarmist point of view. (C. Blaine 
Carpenter) 

Sec. T Sensitivity to the Natural World 

An introduction to the natural world through observation of 
plants and animals in their natural setting. Most sessions will 
be held outdoors, with several field trips to important natural 
sites. (A.R. Buckelew, jr.) 

Sec. U How You Play the Game — Whether You Win or Lose! 

A study of how competition has, is, and will effect the lives of 
the seminar participants. The seminar will include considera- 
tion of both positive and negative aspects of competition. 
Participants will be placed in actual competitive situations 
(with and without their knowledge) in order to study the 
effects of competition, (lames E. Allison) 

Sec. V Learning Politics by Politicking 

This seminar will focus on learning, applying, and evaluating 
the basic techniques of the modern political campaign at the 
local level. The instructor is the Democratic candidate for the 
West Virginia State Senate. Students will spend about one day 
a week working in the political campaign. They will study 
population, analyze issues, and plan, organize, and evaluate 
the campaign. The course will conclude with a personal and 
ethical evaluation of the experience. (Hiram /. Lester) 



72 




Art 

AIMS 

To provide a balanced background for students who 
wish to pursue a career and/or advanced study in 
Art or Graphic Design; to prepare students for teach- 
ing or supervising art on either the elementary or 
secondary level; to combine Art with academic 
studies as a broad basis for liberal education on the 
college level; and to provide an atmosphere in which 
the student is encouraged to acquire standards for 
the evaluation, practice and appreciation, and appli- 
cation of the plastic arts. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

The minimum requirement for a major in Art is forty 
semester hours including Design Studio, Drawing I, 
Painting I, Sculpture I, Senior Project, and Senior 



Seminar. At least ten credit hours must be in art his- 
tory courses. A sketch book is required of all students 
to be evaluated along with other work once a year. 
Prerequisites must be observed unless the student 
can show evidence of equivalent disciplines. 

The Bethany College Art Department reserves the 
right to retain permanently one work from each stu- 
dent in each class. Other works may be held tem- 
porarily for use in specific exhibitions and will be 
available to owners no later than one year after the 
lending date. 

Art 200 Design Studio 4 hours 

Basic course work in the theories and practice of two- and three- 
dimensional design; study of the elements and materials in rela- 
tion to design potentials with practical application. Prerequisite 
for all art majors. 

Art 205 Drawing I 4 hours 

Concentrated activity in academic drawing using a variety of 
drawing media. Primary emphasis will be placed on still life, 
landscape, and the human form. Prerequisite: Art 200 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 

Art 210 Ceramics l 4 hours 

Studio experiences in forming, firing, and glazing pottery, includ- 
ing ceramic sculpture. Individual projects according to student's 
ability. Fall semester only. 

Art 305 Drawing II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by the 
student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Art 205. 

Art 310 Ceramics II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by 
the student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Art 
210. Fall semester only. 



73 



Art 315 Painting I 4 hours 

Creative exploration into the techniques of watercolor, acrylics, 
oil, and mixed media. Basic preparation of materials, framing, 
and matting will be included. Prerequisite: Art 200 or permis- 
sion o/ the instructor. 

Art 320 Sculpture I 4 hours 

Creative expression in three-dimensional forms. Students will 
work with materials that are readily available and easily handled, 
such as wood, wire, plaster, and clay. Prerequisite: Art 200 or 
permission of the instructor. Spring semester only. 

Art 325 Graphics I 4 hours 

An introduction of print-making processes emphasizing creative 
expression through such techniques as relief, intaglio, piano- 
graphic, serigraphy. Prerequisite: Art 205 or permission of the 
instructor. Fall semester only. 

Art 340 Art Activities in the 

Elementary School 2 hours 

A study of the theories and goals of art education in the elemen- 
tary school with emphasis on the child's growth and development 
through art. Exploration of art techniques will be included. First 
halt of fall and spring semesters. 

Art 415 Painting II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by the 
student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Art 315. 

Art 420 Sculpture II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by the 
student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Art 320. 
Spring semester only. 

Art 425 Graphics II 4 hours 

Advanced problems in media and subject matter selected by the 
student with the advice of the instructor. Prerequisite: Art 325. 
Fall semester only. 

Art 478 Senior Seminar in Art 2 hours 

Required of all students concentrating in the field. A survey of 
Art for review and interpretation of the particular problems of 
this field. Fall semester only. 



Art 480 Teaching of Art in the 

Secondary School 4 hours 

Problems in the teaching and administration of art programs. 
Spring semester only. 

Art 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Art 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 

Begins during the second semester of the junior year. 



Graphic Design 

The following courses provide students interested in communi- 
cations, graphics, and advertising with background pertinent to 
the field. An interdisciplinary program can be developed be- 
tween the Art Department and the Communications Department. 
See department chairmen for requirements. 

Art 303 Lettering and Layout 4 hours 

An introduction to calligraphy, typography, letter forms, and lay- 
out, with emphasis on design, legibility, and creative practice. 
Prerequisite: Art 200 or permission of the instructor. 



Art 304 Design Applications 



4 hours 



Emphasis on problem solving experiences as related to visual 
communications. The mechanics and psychology of two- 
dimensional and three-dimensional design are explored as a 
foundation for graphic design. Prerequisites: Art 200, 205, or 
permission of the instructor. 



Art 405 Illustration 



4 hours 



Advance problems in advertising, book, and magazine illustra- 
tion, with emphasis on procedures necessary to pictorial expres- 
sion of ideas. Prerequisites: Art 200, 205, or permission of the 
instructor. 

Art 406 Graphic Communications 

Design Studio 4 hours 

Emphasis on professional procedures, structure, communication 
functions, and processes as applied to areas of graphic design in 
practical applications. Prerequisites: Art 303, 304, 405, or per- 
mission of the instructor. 



74 



Art History 



The following courses are surveys, intended to introduce stu- 
dents to a variety of artistic achievements, and to discuss selected 
artists, their methods, media, and contributions, against the con- 
text of their time. The continuity of artistic development will be 
stressed. 

Art 351 Art History l The Ancient World 2 hours 

Beginning with an introduction to paleolithic art, this half-term 
course will concentrate on the art of the Ancient Near East, 
Egypt, Classic Greece, and Rome. Alternate years: Fall 1974-75, 
first half of the semester. 

Art 352 Art History II 

Medieval and Renaissance Art 2 hours 

This course will cover Early Christian and Byzantine art, the 
architectual achievements of the Middle Ages, and the advanced 
painting styles of the Italian and Northern Renaissance. Alter- 
nate years: Fall 1974-75, second half of the semester. 

Art 353 Art History III 

Western Art from 1 500 to 1 800 2 hou rs 

The course concentrates on the increasing momentum achieved 
by artistic experimentations in painting, architecture, and sculp- 
ture, progressing from the High Renaissance, Mannerism, and 
Baroque, through Rococo and Neo-CIassicism. The contributions 
of such significant artists as Michelangelo, Bernini, Velasquez, 
Rubens, and J.L. David will be discussed. Alternate years: Spring 
1974-75, first half of the semester. 

Art 354 Art History IV Western Art from 

1800 to the Present 2 hours 

This course will cover such important schools and movements 
as Romanticism, the English landscape school, Impressionism, 
Cubism, Art Nouveau, and Surrealism. Painting, sculpture, and 
architecture will be treated. Alternate years: Spring 1974-75, 
second half of the semester. 

Art 355 Art History V Asian Art History 2 hours 

An introduction to the arts of China, Japan, and India, with 
some reference to Islamic art. Alternate years: Fall 1975-76, sec- 
ond half of the semester. 



Art 356 Art History VI U. S. Art 2 hours 

A survey of the development of the arts in the U. S. from Colo- 
nial times to the present, with emphasis upon the evolution of 
style in architecture, sculpture, and painting. Alternate years: 
Fall 1975-76, first half of the semester. 

Art 358 Art History VII 

Art History Seminar 4 hours 

A seminar course dealing with specific aspects of the history of 
art for individual investigation, which will also include methods 
of research. Topics for study will be chosen by the students 
with the approval of the instructor. The course involves spe- 
cialized and selected readings in the field and individual and 
group discussions. Prerequisite: 4 or more semester hours of 
art history. Alternate years: Spring 1975-76. 




75 



Biology 



AIMS 

To acquaint students with the living world around 
them and with basic life processes; to demonstrate 
the scientific methods as an approach to problem 
solving; to cultivate an appreciation of research; to 
develop laboratory skill in various types of work in 
biology; to train students as teachers of biology and 
for certain professional work related to this field, and 
to help students find and appreciate their role in the 
natural environment. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of 32 semester hours in the Department 
of Biology including the Senior Project, and a mini- 
mum of 12 semester hours in chemistry, at least 6 of 
which are organic chemistry. Six hours of physics is 
also required. German or French is recommended 
for those students going on to graduate school. A 
semester of calculus is also strongly recommended. 

Students who plan to teach or become professional 
biologists should consider the following courses: 
Biol. 100, 101, 102, 104, 201, 228, 303, 326, 338, 343, 
365, 367, 425, 442, and 490. 

Students preparing for work in medicine, dentistry, 
or as laboratory technicians should consider the fol- 
lowing courses: Biol. 100, 101, 105, 201, 303, 343, 367, 
442, and 490. 

Students majoring in biology who wish to spe- 
cialize in paramedic training should take the follow- 
ing courses: Biol. 100, 101, 105, 201, 205, 305, 425, 
and 490. 

The sequence of courses is subject to approval of 
the Department Chairman. 



Biol. 100-110 Topics in General Biology 

Biology majors may elect up to 8 hours of these topics to be 
considered toward the required number of hours for the Field 
of Concentration. Biology 105, First Aid as Related to the Prin- 
ciples of Biology, may not be counted for the college distribu- 
tion requirement. 

Biol. 100 Organ Systems of Vertebrates 2 hours 

An examination of the fundamental structures of mammals — 
including man — and their functions. Systems: skeletal, in- 
tegument, digestive, circulatory, urogenital, and nervous. Lab- 
oratories will utilize the fetal pig and frog for dissection, com- 
paring them to human systems. 

Biol. 101 Animal Diversity 2 hours 

An examination of the animal kingdom with emphasis placed 
on the adaptation of the organism. Various systems will be 
studied as to possible methods of evolving through adaptation. 
Topics to be covered are food getting, locomotion, repro- 
duction, breathing, circulation, waste removal, and control of 
the organism. Laboratories will use various organisms each 
week to observe the various adaptation. 

Biol. 102 Horticultural Science 2 hours 

An examination of the scientific concepts on which horticul- 
ture is based. The plant, being the basis of all horticultural 
activities, will be the main emphasis. Topics to be covered are 
classification of horticultural plants, structures and functions 
of the various parts of the plants, control of the plant environ- 
ment, plant growth, and mechanisms of propagation. Most of 
the laboratory work will be done in the greenhouse. 

Biol. 103 Conservation of Natural Resources 2 hours 

A study of the rational use of natural resources. Emphasis will 
be placed on the study of current legislation on local, state 
and federal levels. Topics to be studied are soil (physical prob- 
lems and human problems), water (water cycle, industrial pur- 
poses, agricultural, recreational), atmosphere, biological 
resources (forests, grasslands, animals, fisheries), minerals, 
metals, non-metals, and recreation. Laboratories will consist 
of field trips and work in the laboratory. 

Biol. 104 A Survey of the Plant Kingdom 2 hours 

The major areas of study will focus on the Algae, Fungi, and 
Bryophytes. Special emphasis will be placed on the evolution 
of the plant kingdom. 



76 



Biol. 105 First Aid as Related to the 

Principles of Biology 2 hours 

Major emphasis will be placed on the biological principles that 
are utilized in the standard and advanced first aid courses of 
the American Red Cross. Red Cross certificates may be earned 
by those passing the examination. Opportunity for instructors 
certificates will be presented as an option at the end of the 
course. Credit for this course will not be counted toward the 
college distribution requirement. 



Biol. 167 Introduction to Mammalian 
Anatomy and Physiology 



4 hours 



Mammalian anatomy as exemplified in the cat. Discussion and 
study of the functioning of the tissues and organ systems of the 
human body. Laboratory study of the anatomy of the cat, and 
human physiology. Discussions, demonstrations, and individual 
laboratory work. Not open to biology majors. 

Biol. 169 Introduction to 

Computer Science 2 hours 

An introduction to computer programming and computer de- 
sign. Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in 
solving problems encountered in biology. 

Biol. 201 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 4 hours 

Comparative anatomy of the representative forms of vertebrates; 
laboratory study of the comparative anatomy of the shark, other 
lower vertebrates, and the cat. 

Biol. 205 Emergency Medical Training 4 hours 

The medical, communication, transportation records and report 
instructions required to be certified by the West Virginia Depart- 
ment of Health as an emergency medical technician. 

Biol. 210 Evolution 2 hours 

The evidence for the theories of evolution with special attention 
to the modern synthesis of genetics and ecological factors. Pre- 
requisite: An elementary course in biology or permission of the 
instructor. 

Biol. 228 Field Botany 2 hours 

An introduction to the taxonomy of vascular plants with em- 
phasis on the local flora, including the techniques of herbarium 
science. 



Biol. 230-S Methods in Environmental 

Education 2 hours 

An introduction to the materials and methods of environmental 
science for elementary and junior high school teachers, and 
camp leaders. Basic techniques in field biology and man's re- 
lationship to the natural world are emphasized. Part of the 
course is conducted at a mountain camp. Summer session only. 

Biol. 231 Ornithology 2 hours 

Anatomy, behavior and identification of birds. 

Biol. 303 General Genetics 4 hours 

A synthesis of basic principles and modern molecular theory. 
Facility with simple mathematics is highly desirable. 

Biol. 305 Mobile Intensive Care 4 hours 

A synthesis of anatomical and physiological concepts, providing 
the necessary knowledge and skills to administer medications, 
IV's, venipuncture, ECG, and other activities pertaining to para- 
medic procedures in West Virginia. Prerequisites: Biol. 105, 205, 
(167, 201 , or 425), or permission of the instructor. 

Biol. 326 Ecology 4 hours 

A study of the general principles of bioecology of plants and 
animals. Considerable time will be spent in one field. Special 
emphasis will be placed on field study of several communities. 

Biol. 330-S 330-J Urban Ecology 2 hours 

This course encompasses major areas of environmental quality 
management. Water pollution, air pollution, solid-wastes dis- 
posal, noise pollution and housing regulations are the major 
areas that are covered. In addition to the classroom experience 
there are several field trips to local areas of environmental 
interest. Summer session and January term only. 

Biol. 338 Advanced Botany 4 hours 

The morphology of the vascular plants together with a study of 
the fundamental life processes of plants; growth, irritability, 
nutrition, metabolism, and hormonal control. Offered Spring 
1974-75. 

Biol. 343 Microbiology 4 hours 

Morphology and physiology of micro-organisms; principles of 
laboratory technique; cultural characteristics and environment 
influences on microbial growth. 



77 



Biol. 365 Invertebrate Zoology 4 hours 

The invertebrate animals including phylogeny and morphology. 
A laboratory study of representative forms of invertebrates will 
be made. 

Biol. 425 Animal Physiology 4 hours 

Structure and functions of the human body; the mechanism of 
bodily movements, responses, reactions, and various physio- 
logical states. 

Biol. 428-J Tropical Ecology 4 hours 

The study of plant and animal ecological relationships in a trop- 
ical zone (Virgin Islands, Puerto Rican rain forest, and the Florida 
Everglades). January term only. 

Biol. 440 Histology-Microtechniques 4 hours 

Structure of the cell, its modification into various tissues and the 
practice of general histological techniques. 

Biol. 442 Vertebrate Embryology 4 hours 

Development of the tissues and organs in vertebrates; embryos 
of chick and pig studied in the laboratory. 

Biol. 451 Special Area Studies 2 or 4 hours 

When adequately trained faculty and sufficient student demand 
arises, the Department will organize and offer courses in a 
special area not covered in regular course offerings. 

Biol. 467 Cell Physiology and Biochemistry 4 hours 

An introduction to the structural organization of cells and the 
important aspects of cell physiology in the light of modern bio- 
chemistry and biophysics. Prerequisite: Chem. 211-212 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Biol. 477-478 Senior Seminar 

Biol. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical and Life 



Chemistry 



1 hour each 



Sciences 

(See General Science 480). 



4 hours 



Biol. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Biol. 490 Senior Project 4-8 hours 

The Senior Project will start the first semester of the junior year 
and be completed in the spring semester of the senior year. 



AIMS 

To contribute to the student's general knowledge and 
understanding of the nature of the physical world 
and his or her understanding of the place of chemis- 
try in industrial and business life; to provide expe- 
rience in the scientific method of reasoning; and to 
provide students concentrating in this field with a 
thorough and practical education in chemistry which 
may be useful in industrial, technical and graduate 
work. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

A minimum of 36 hours in this Department exclusive 
of the Senior Project (Chem. 490). The distribution 
must include Chemistry 101, 102, 104, 211, 212, 222, 
224, 323, 324, 411, 414, 421 plus four hours of elec- 
tives and at least four hours of senior project; Mathe- 
matics 201, 202, also 203 or 350 and 402; Physics 201, 
202; German or French through the 102 level plus 
two hours in translation of the respective language. 
The sequence of courses is subject to the approval of 
the Department Chairman. All courses in chemistry as 
well as the indicated courses in mathematics and 
physics must be taken for a letter grade. 

A course of study designed to conform to the 
American Chemical Society standards is required for 
those students who plan to become professional 
chemists or plan to enter graduate work in chemistry. 
Under this plan, in addition to the mathematics and 
physics requirements listed above, a total of 11 
chemistry courses must be taken. In addition to the 



78 



above mentioned chemistry courses these required 
courses must include Chemistry 321 and 402. German 
must be elected as the foreign language. Additional 
courses in mathematics are strongly recommended. 
In addition to the German, a year of French is strongly 
recommended for those students planning to do 
graduate work. Among the electives, at least 4 
courses, exclusive of English and modern languages, 
are required in the humanities. 

The entering freshman who is interested in chem- 
istry should be sure to select Chemistry 101 and 
mathematics at the appropriate level. Programs for 
subsequent semesters must be decided in conference 
with the faculty advisor for chemistry. 

Chem. 101 General Chemistry and 

Inorganic Qualitative Analysis 4 hours 

A study of theoretical and descriptive inorganic chemistry. The 
laboratory work is primarily a study of the principles and prac- 
tice of a systematic qualitative scheme of analysis for the cations 
and anions. Prerequisites: two units of mathematics or concur- 
rently with Math 103. Three lectures and three hours of labora- 
tory per week. 

Chem. 102 General Chemistry 2 hours 

A continuation of the lecture portion of Chemistry 101. The 
laboratory work consists of selected experiments in basic chem- 
ical principles and quantitative procedures. Prerequisite: Chem. 
101 . Offered first half of the spring semester. 

Chem. 104 Solution Equilibria 2 hours 

A study of solubility and acid-base phenomena in aqueous and 
non-aqueous systems, with appropriate laboratory work. Pre- 
requisites: Chem. 101, 102. Offered second half of the spring 
semester. 



Chem. 169 



Introduction to 
Computer Science 



2 hours 



An introduction to computer programming and computer design. 
Emphasis is placed upon utilization of the computer in solving 
problems encountered in chemistry. 



Chem. 211-212 Organic Chemistry 4 hours each 
An introduction to the study of the organic compounds of car- 
bon, both aliphatic and aromatic, involving a considerable 
amount of the electronic mechanisms of organic reactions. The 
laboratory work consists largely of organic preparations. Pre- 
requisites: Chem. 101 , 102, 104. Three lectures and three hours 
of laboratory per week. 

Chem. 222 Chemical Thermodynamics 2 hours 

An introduction to the concepts and experimental techniques of 
classical thermodynamics, with special emphasis on the concepts 
of enthalpy, entropy, and free energy. Prerequisites: Chem. 
104; Math 203 or 350 or permission of the instructor. Offered 
first half of the spring semester. 



Chem. 224 Introduction to Chemical 
Spectroscopy 



2 hours 



A study of the different energy states of atoms and molecules; 
the statistical principles governing the distribution of particles 
within these states; and the transitions between states. Prere- 
quisites: Chem. 104; Math 203 or 350 or permission of the in- 
structor. Offered second half of the spring semester. 

Chem. 311 Bonding and Symmetry in 

Organic Chemistry 2 hours 

An introduction to group theory and simple molecular orbital 
calculations as they apply to organic chemistry and to the spectra 
of organic compounds. Emphasis wil be placed on problem 
solving and structural determinations from spectroscopic data. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 212; Chem. 224 or permission of the instruc- 
tor. Offered second half of the fall semester. 

Chem. 314 Introduction to Biochemistry 2 hours 

A study of the chemistry of some of the more important biolog- 
ical processes, with emphasis on reaction mechanisms and 
methods of elucidation. Prerequisite: Chem. 212. Offered sec- 
ond half of the spring semester. 

Chem. 321 Application of Spectroscopy to 

Chemical Systems 2 hours 

Applications of spectroscopic theory to chemical systems, with 
emphasis on chemical analysis. Prerequisite: Chem. 224. Of- 
fered first half of the fall semester. 



79 



Chem. 323 Kinetics and Solutions 2 hours 

The study of rate processes, especially in the liquid phase. Pre- 
requisite: Chem. 222. Offered second half of the fall semester. 

Chem. 324 Electrochemistry 4 hours 

A study of oxidation-reduction and phenomena associated with 
solutions of electrolytes, application of these principles includ- 
ing classical electrochemical analysis, and the measurement of 
basic physical parameters. Prerequisite: Chem. 222. 

Chem. 402 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4 hours 

The chemistry of certain elements and their compounds will be 
studied and interpreted on the basis of modern theories of 
atomic and molecular structure. The necessary foundation in 
quantum mechanics will be reviewed. Perequisites: Chem. 222, 
224. 

Chem. 411 Physical Organic Chemistry 2 hours 

The study of the theories and techniques relating structure and 
properties or organic compounds. Prerequisites: Chem. 212; 
Chem. 222 or permission of the instructor. Offered first half of 
the fall semester. 

Chem. 414 Advanced Organic Chemistry 2 hours 

The study of selected advanced topics in organic chemistry in- 
cluding reaction mechanisms. Laboratory will be introduced, 
where appropriate, and will stress the use of instrumentation. 
Prerequisites: Chem. 212; Chem. 222 or permission of the in- 
structor. Offered first half of the spring semester. 

Chem. 421 Chemistry of the 

Condensed Phases 2 hours 

A study of special problems associated with the liquid and solid 
states. Prerequisite: Chem. 222. Offered first half of the fall 
semester. 

Chem. 430 Special Topics 2 hours each 

A series of three courses devoted to the consideration of ad- 
vanced topics and areas of special interest in the fields of Inor- 
ganic Chemistry (430-A), Organic Chemistry (430-B), and Physical 
Chemistry (430-C). Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 




Chem. 477-478 Seminar in Chemistry 1 or 2 hours 

Presentation of current research topics by students, faculty, and 
visiting lecturers. 

Chem. 480 Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Physical & Life 
Sciences 4 hours 

(See General Science 480). 

Chem. 487-488 Independent 

Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Chem. 490 Senior Project 4-8 hours 

During the junior year the chemistry major will be introduced 
to the methods of employing the chemical literature, will select 
a topic for advanced investigation and will make a literature 
search of background material as a basis for an in-depth study 
in this area. There will be one class meeting each week for both 
semesters. Following this preliminary work, an investigation of 
a significant topic in chemistry will be made by each student 
under the direction of a faculty member in the Department. 
This work will culminate in a written and oral report at the end 
of the senior year. 



80 



Communications 



AIMS 

The objectives of the Department of Communica- 
tions are to help students integrate oral and written 
forms of communication; to encourage the develop- 
ment of logical thought processes across disciplines; 
and to aid students in the development of a personal 
theory of communication. They are designed to pro- 
vide theoretical and practical preparation for stu- 
dents desiring to do radio, television, newspaper, 
magazine, or book-publishing assignments; free lance 
writing; public relations or advertising counseling; 
direction of high school, college or industrial publi- 
cations; or teaching of speech and journalism. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

Communications 101, 201, 202, 203, 206, 375, 403, 
435 or 436, and a Senior Project. Normally students 
would take 101 in first year, 201-202 in second year, 
and 375, 403, and 435 or 436 in third or fourth years 
during regular semesters, the January term, or sum- 
mer sessions. Twelve hours in English are also re- 
quired and proficiency in reading a foreign language. 
Recommended courses are marketing, statistics, and 
a three-course sequence in communications design: 
Art 200, 303, and 304. For those with additional in- 
terest in the design field, Art 405 and 406 may also 
be taken. 

Comm. 101 Introduction to Mass 

Communications 4 hours 

History and functions of mass communications. Role of news- 
papers, magazines, radio, television, books, movies, feature syn- 
dicates, wire services and adjunct agencies in modern society. 



Comm. 201 Reporting 



4 hours 



Theory and techniques of writing news stories for print and 
electronic media, syndicates and wire services. Lab practice in 
writing objective, interpretative and editorial articles. 

Comm. 202 Copy Editing and Layout 4 hours 

Principles and practice in editing copy for publication; includes 
typography, layout, and design of letterpress and offset news- 
papers. Prerequisite: Comm. 201. 

Comm. 203 Interpersonal Communication: 

Speech 4 hours 

Relationship of oral and non-verbal communication and thought. 
Stress on performance in speech and in creative listening. Analysis 
and delivery of speeches. Individual evaluations of performance. 
(May be taken for credit as Theatre 203). 

Comm. 204 Theories of Public Speaking 2 hours 

An exploration of the complexities of communication. Beginning 
with a study of various models of communication, the course 
then focuses on the psychological dynamics of individual parti- 
cipants in a communicative art. Interpersonal contacts are ex- 
plored through a study of both verbal and non-verbal interaction. 
The influence of communication on the socio-cultural system 
will represent a substantial portion of the course. 

Comm. 205 Advanced Interpersonal 

Communication: Speech 2 hours 

Speeches and oral interpretation specially adapted to individual 
student needs and interests. Debate. Creative dialogue. Com- 
mittee meetings. (May be taken for credit as Theatre 205). 

Comm. 206 Features 4 hours 

Role of human interest approach in writings for print and elec- 
tronic media, advertising and public relations media. Practice 
in writing short and longer process, profile, personal experience, 
collective and think pieces for professional journals and mass 
audience media. 

Comm. 207-208 Argumentation and 

Debate 2 hours each 

Principles and processes of reasoned discourse and their appli- 
cation to current affairs and controversial public issues. 






81 



Comm. 301 Principles of Advertising 4 hours 

Study of history, philosophies, principles of advertising, media, 
markets, merchandising. Role and evaluation of advertising. Stress 
on copy writing and layout. Lectures, lab. 

Comm. 302 Principles of Public Relations 4 hours 

Contributions and criticisms of public relations. History, philoso- 
phies, trends, principles. Case studies of institutional programs. 
Preparation of a creative project, such as a trade journal. Theory 
and lab. 

Comm. 335 School Publications 2 hours 

A practical course in which class members will do reporting, 
editing and layout work for the Bethany Tower. Editorial and 
design problems of college yearbook and literary journals will 
also be considered, with the Bethanian and Harbinger serving 
as examination pieces. (Credit-No Credit) 

Comm. 375 Introduction to Radio and 

Television 4 hours 

History, trends, contributions and criticisms and challenges of the 
electronic media in American Culture. 

Comm. 376 Educational and Public 

Broadcasting 2 hours 

Lecture and lab course utilizing the facilities of WVBC-FM to 
present the history, goals, and trends of public broadcasting. 
To encourage and assist students in preparing creative formats 
for the programming of documentaries, interviews, historical 
dramas, investigative and interpretative news coverage and cul- 
tural events. 

Comm. 377 The Performing Arts in 

Radio and Television 2 hours 

A studio course utilizing specific exercises designed to develop 
individual style in camera and micropnone techniques. Useful 
to all students of the performing arts as well as those desiring 
a career in radio and/or TV announcing, acting, and singing. 

Comm. 378 Radio Production 4 hours 

A lecture-demonstration-laboratory course designed to acquaint 
the student with tools, elements, and techniques of radio produc- 
tion. Classes will be held in the radio station's production studio. 
Prerequisites: Comm. 101 and 375. 



Comm. 379 Cable Television: Theory 



2 hours 



A basic lecture-discussion course in history, theory, standards, 
programming, and governmental regulations of the cable tele- 
vision industry. 

Comm. 380 Cable Television: 

Production Techniques 2 hours 

A demonstration-laboratory course designed to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the tools, elements, and techniques of cable television 
production. Students will serve as cameramen, floor managers, 
and audio-video switchers. 




82 



Comm. 401 History of Journalism 4 hours 

History of newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and books 
in the U. S., Europe, Asia, Latin America and Africa. Role of press 
in developed and developing nations. Alternate years: 7975-76. 

Comm. 402 Public Opinion 4 hours 

Nature, significance, and principles of public opinion. Relation- 
ship of politics, culture, media and other basic institutions to 
public opinion. Project in content analysis. Participation in a 
public opinion poll in the Upper Ohio Valley. 

Comm. 403 Reading and Research in the 

Foreign Press 2 or 4 hours 

Selected readings, content analysis and other research in peri- 
odicals of one foreign language. (May be taken for credit as 
Foreign Language 403). Prerequisite: Proficiency in reading a 
foreign language. Generally a junior or senior course. Offered 
Spring 1974-75. 

Comm. 435-436 Internship in Mass 

Communications 2 hours each 

On-the-job experience in the print or electronic media or ad- 
junct agencies through intern positions at tri-state area radio 
and television stations, advertising agencies, and public rela- 
tions/promotion departments of agencies or industrial, govern- 
ment, or non-profit firms. First or second semester internships 
require that the student set aside one day a week to devote to 
his work position. Students will work five days a week on such 
intern programs during the January or summer sessions. Pre- 
requisites: Comm. 201 and 202 for all assignments; also 375 for 
electronic media; 301 for advertising position; and 302 for public 
relations work. 

Comm. 480 Methods and Materials of 

Teaching Communications 2 hours 

Subjects will include the methods and materials of teaching com- 
munications, photo-journalism, and specialized reporting. 



Comm. 487-488 Independent 
Study 

Comm. 490 Senior Project 



2 or 4 hours each 
2-8 hours 



Economics and Business 



AIMS 

The aims of the Economics and Business Department 
are to help students understand how man's struggle 
to provide for his needs and wants in a world of 
limited resources is related to all of man's problems: 
personal, social, political and spiritual; to provide 
knowledge of utilization of economic tools of analy- 
sis; and to direct students in the application of 
economic principles to the problems of society. The 
courses offered serve as a basis for work in business, 
government, specialized journalism, law, environ- 
mental planning and graduate study. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

Including the Senior Seminar and Senior Project, a 
minimum of 28 hours in the Department is required. 
The following are the core courses: Economics 201, 
202, 265 (freshman -sophomore years); Economics 
301, 302, 324 or 401 (junior year); and Economics 
477, 490 (senior year). Requirements outside the 
Department: Math 201 and 281 by the beginning of 
the junior year. Any student wishing to enter the field 
of Economics and Business must have attained grades 
of "C" or better in Economics 201 and 202 (or 200 
prior to 1974-75) or have the approval of the Depart- 
ment Chairman. A combination major in mathe- 
matics and economics may be taken. See either the 
chairman of the Mathematics or Economics Depart- 
ment for details. 



83 



Economics 151 Personal Finance 4 hours 

The objectives of this course are to develop an understanding of 
the concepts needed for intelligent consumer decision-making. 
The course will concentrate on budget policies, borrowing, in- 
stallment buying, marketing techniques, and consumer purchases 
in the area of food, clothing, automobiles, housing, social insur- 
ance, personal insurance, pension programs, investment markets, 
and estate building. (Does not count toward the Social Science 
Distribution Requirement). 

Economics 169 Introduction to 

Computer Science 2 hours 

Designed to help the student understand the use of a computer 
as a tool in applying economic analysis and business knowledge. 
Computer terminals are used with "Computer Basic" to give 
introductory know-how. 

Economics 201-202 Principles of 

Economics 4 hours each 

Introduces the development of economic principles concerned 
with man's problems in dealing with scarcity. Alternative meth- 
ods of settling economic questions are discussed, with special 
emphasis on the market function. Pricing, output determination, 
monopoly power, national income accounting, wage controls, 
and price fixing are discussed in relation to contemporary issues. 
Also covered are problems of money and banking, growth, agri- 
culture, the labor movement, and business operations. Students 
will read broadly from non-technical literature as well as using 
conventional text materials. These courses are prerequisites for 
all other economics courses except Economics 151. 

Economics 265 Principles of Accounting 4 hours 

An introduction to basic accounting and business concepts; 
principles of recording business transactions; cash record and 
control; periodic adjustments of transaction data; financial state- 
ment presentation; payroll accounting; accounting and reporting 
principles of partnerships, corporations, branches, and depart- 
ments. 

Economics 266 Principles of Accounting 4 hours 
Basic cost accounting principles including job cost and process 
cost systems; interpretation of financial statements; control of 
manufacturing costs through budgeting; flow of funds; and tax 
considerations in business decisions. Prerequisite: Economics 
265. 



Economics 301-302 Intermediate 

Economic Theory 4 hours each 

An advanced survey of the elements of economic theory pri- 
marily for students concentrating in Economics. First semester: 
resource allocation, price determination, output determination, 
and income distribution under various market conditions. Second 
semester: a study of national income and employment deter- 
mination, inflation growth and economic stability, interwoven 
with mathematical analysis and model building. 

These courses are designed to introduce the student to the 
techniques of differential and integral calculus, linear equations, 
matrix algebra, and statistics as applied to the above analysis. 
Prerequisites: Economics 202, Statistics 381 , and Calculus 201. 

Economics 320 Principles of Marketing 4 hours 

The marketing function of the manufacturer, wholesaler, jobber, 
retailer, mail-order house, chain store and other marketing insti- 
tutions; cost of distribution; problems of marketing management 
and planning; and modern trends in marketing will be discussed. 

Economics 321 Business Administration 2 hours 

Introduction to business and the enterprise system; organization, 
management, resources, operations; interaction with government 
and society. 



Economics 322 Management 



4 hours 



Intensive study of the management process; use of related dis- 
ciplines; decision-making and managerial action. Prerequisites: 
Economics 201 , 202. 

Economics 324 Business Finance 4 hours 

The study of the corporate organization and the planning of 
financial requirements. An intensive look at cash flow, budgeting, 
capital decisions, internal financing, and corporate reorganization. 
Prerequisite: Economics 201. 

Economics 333 Labor 4 hours 

A general course in labor economics with an emphasis on trade 
unionism; history and objectives of organized labor; employ- 
ment and wage theory; managerial labor policies, collective bar- 
gaining; current social, economic, and political aspects of labor 
management relations; labor law; and case studies utilizing out- 
side consultants. Prerequisites: Economics 201 , 202. 



84 



Economics 334 International Trade 4 hours 

The principles of international trade and finance and their appli- 
cation to the modern world; the theory of comparative advan- 
tage; exchange rates, monetary standards, tariffs, quotas, and 
commercial policy; capital movements; aid to less developed 
countries; geographic origin and direction of trade routes and 
products. Prerequisites: Economics 201, 202. 

Economics 399 Junior Seminar 2 or 4 hours 

The interests and creative abilities of students and faculty to- 
gether will determine the content of the Junior Seminar. It is in- 
tended to fill special needs and interests. Past experiences suggest 
such topics as: Business Law, The Modern Left and the Changing 
Establishment, Economic Development, and Does Government 
Regulate Business? Students are invited to develop topics of 
interest. 

Economics 401 Money, Banking, and 

Fiscal Policy 4 hours 

A study of the various money markets; the operation of com- 
mercial banks, Federal Reserve System, and the Treasury Depart- 
ment including an analysis of tax revenues, expenditures and 
debt financing. Prerequisites: Economics 201, 265. 

Economics 477 Senior Seminar 2 hours 

Devoted to a review of economics as a discipline, with attention 
to the political economy of the present. Also some personal 
guidance in preparation for Economics 490. 

Economics 487-488 Independent 

Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Only by approval of the supervising instructor and the Chairman 
of the Economics Department. 

Economics 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 

Preparations for the final report on Senior Projects and the pre- 
sentations. Some time will be devoted to basic review for the 
senior comprehensives. The topic for this project must be se- 
lected before the conclusion of the junior year and approved by 
the Chairman of the Economics Department. 




Education 



85 



AIMS 

To provide, in conjunction with other academic de- 
partments, balanced programs of preparation for ele- 
mentary and secondary teaching; to emphasize sound 
principles of effective teaching based on research in 
human development and learning; to prepare pros- 
pective teachers to utilize newly developed curricula, 
methods, and materials being adopted by progressive 
schools; to stimulate thinking about problems in edu- 
cation; to prepare students to continue their study 
in graduate school if they so desire. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHER 
EDUCATION 

A student preparing for elementary or secondary 
school teaching must plan to complete: (1) the re- 
quirements for graduation described on pages 57-58, 
(2) a selection of courses providing appropriate back- 
ground for teaching in a particular field or subject 
area, and (3) a sequence of professional education 
courses and experiences designed to give a broad 
understanding of concepts and skills in teaching. 
Bethany College is accredited for both elementary 
and secondary teacher preparation by the National 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 
(NCATE) and is included in the interstate compact 
for reciprocity in certification. 

To become eligible for teacher certification, the 
student must complete a college and state-approved 
program in all three of the areas named in the pre- 
ceding paragraph. It is the student's responsibility 
to seek appropriate counseling promptly, preferably 
early in the freshman year, and to become familiar 
with all of the above requirements. 



The Department recognizes abilities which stu- 
dents may have already established in a given subject 
matter area through previous training and experience 
and assists them in planning their program accord- 
ingly. Waivers or advanced standing granted by the 
College are noted on official transcripts so that 
courses from which a student is exempted may be 
applied toward certification requirements. 

Leadership of children and youth groups, e.g., sum- 
mer camp, scouts, church school, playground super- 
vision, etc., are strongly recommended for students 
planning to teach. 

A period of observation and participation of at 
least ten days in a school at the appropriate level is an 
important and integral part of the education curric- 
ulum. Most students find it convenient and most 
meaningful to undertake this experience during the 
January Term of their junior year, although some wish 
to explore the suitability of a teaching career by doing 
it earlier. To initiate such experience students should 
meet with the Director of Practicums who will work 
in cooperation with the Education Department. Defi- 
nite arrangements should be made at least one month 
prior to the planned observation dates. 

Students enrolling for courses involving observa- 
tion and teaching in schools must abide by dress and 
appearance standards of any school to which they 
may be assigned. 

The following tables include required education 
courses for elementary and secondary education. Ad- 
ditional courses in education or other areas may be 
elected to meet teacher certification requirements of 
particular states or individual needs and interests. 



86 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 

Students preparing to teach in elementary and middle schools will follow the sequence of required education 
courses listed below. Required courses cannot be taken Credit-No Credit. 



FIRST SEMESTER 


CREDIT 


SECOND SEMESTER CREDIT 


Freshman 




- 


None 




None 


Sophomore 




Ed. 202 Human Development and Learning II 4 


Ed. 201 Human Development and 




Ed. 242 Principles and Curriculum of 


Learning I 


4 


Elementary and Middle School 2 
Math 225 Math for Elementary Teachers 2 
(Application for Teacher Education due April 15) 


Junior 




Ed. 346 Methods and Content in Elementary 


Ed. 345 Methods and Content in Elementary 




and Middle School II (emphasis on Reading 


and Middle School I (emphasis on Math) 


4 


and Language Arts) 4 
Ed. 348 Professional Practicum 2 
(Application for Student Teaching due March 14) 


Senior 




Ed. 490 Senior Project 2-8 


Professional Block 




(Application for National Teachers Examination 


Ed. (Psych.) 333 Educational Psychology 


2 


due March 10) 


Ed. 401 History and Philosophy of Education 


2 




Ed. 443 Observation and Directed Teaching 


8 




Ed. 447 Methods and Content in Elementary 






and Middle School III (emphasis on 






Science and Social Studies) 


4 




NO OTHER COURSES PERMITTED 






School observation and participation experience 


(see page 85) to be 


completed prior to Professional Block. 



Students considering preparation for elementary or 
middle school teaching should consult a member of 
the education staff as well as their own advisor in the 
freshman year. 

Students are advised to select: a course in Amer- 
ican history to satisfy part of the social science re- 
quirement; a course in biology, general science (or 
physics or chemistry), and Psychology 100 to meet 



the requirement in physical and life sciences; and a 
course in literature as part of the fine arts require- 
ment. 

Each student is responsible for planning a program 
to meet the specific requirements of the state he or 
she chooses. These vary widely. The program should 
be planned in consultation with the Education 
Department. 



87 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Students preparing to teach in junior and senior high schools are expected to follow the sequence of required 
education courses listed below. General distribution and other requirements for graduation, and those for the 
student's field of concentration, must be added. The required education courses cannot be taken Credit-No 
Credit. 



FIRST SEMESTER 


CREDIT 


SECOND SEMESTER CREDIT 


Freshman 




No 


ne 


Psych. 100 General Psychology 


4 








(prerequisite for Ed. 333) 








Sophomore 




Ed. 


202 Human Development and Learning II 4 


None 








(Application for Teacher 
Education due May 15) 


Junior 






Ed 


(or other) 480 Methods 


Ed. 349 


Participation in Secondary Schools 

(Copy of current semester schedule 
to Ed. Dept. by Sept. 6) 


2 




and Materials in Teaching* 2-4 

Meetings scheduled by Ed. Dept. as needed 

(Copy of current semester schedule 

to Ed. Dept. by Feb. 8) 

(Application for Student Teaching due March 14) 


Senior 










Pre 


ifessional Block 








Ed. (Psych.) 333 Educational Psychology 


2 




(Application for National 


Ed. 401 


History and Philosophy of Education 


4 




Teacher Examination due March 10) 


Ed. 428 


Principles and Techniques of 
Secondary Education 


4 






Ed. 475 


Observation and Directed 
Teaching, Secondary 


6 






*Some 


departments offer these courses only first semester or in alternate years. 


School observation and participation experience 


(see p. 85) 


to be 


completed prior to Professional Block. 



Students in secondary education should ask both 
the Education Department Chairman and their field 
of concentration advisor for guidance concerning 
plans for teacher preparation, to be sure they follow 
patterns which will qualify them for teacher certifi- 
cation and maximize employability. Subject-matter 
specialization is especially important and may vary 
considerably from state to state. Programs designed 



for non-teacher-education majors will probably need 
to be modified in most cases. 

Each student's total preparation must be approved 
by the Department of Education, the Chairman of 
his or her major department, and — if he or she pre- 
pares to teach in more than one subject field — the 
Chairman of any other department concerned. 



88 



ADMISSION TO TEACHER EDUCATION 

Students interested in preparing to teach are urged to 
consult a member of the Education Department indi- 
vidually as soon as possible for counseling with re- 
spect to prospects for employment in the various 
teaching fields, course requirements, state certifica- 
tion requirements, etc. 

During the second semester of the sophomore 
year, and after the student has enrolled in at least 
one education course, written application for admis- 
sion to the elementary or secondary teacher educa- 
tion program should be submitted to the Department 




of Education on forms obtained from the Department. 

Applications are appraised by the Teacher Educa- 
tion Review Committee with respect to academic 
achievement, emotional and physical fitness, person- 
ality traits, and other factors the Committee consid- 
ers essential to a teaching career. The Committee 
may: (1) recommend full or conditional approval; 
(2) suggest programs to overcome certain deficien- 
cies, or, in some cases, (3) recommend that the stu- 
dent not prepare for teaching. 

A "C" average must be attained in all academic 
work and in all professional education courses for 
admission. All Committee recommendations for ap- 
proval are based on this condition. 

The Committee may review a student's qualifica- 
tions at any time and issue appropriate recommenda- 
tions. The general qualifications of all students are 
reviewed at the time they apply for student teaching. 

PROFESSIONAL BLOCK 

Each student pursuing a curriculum in teacher edu- 
cation will take a designed group of professional 
courses, including student teaching, during the first 
semester of the senior year. This is designated as 
the Professional Block. Requirements for admission 
to the Block are as follows: 

Prerequisites — Admission to teacher education and 
for Elementary Education: Psychology 100 and Edu- 
cation 201, 202, 242, 345, 346, 348, and observation 
experience; for Secondary: Psychology 100, Educa- 
tion 202, 349, 480, observation experience, and ade- 
quate background for student teaching in one or 
more subject fields as approved by the academic 
department(s) concerned. Prerequisites cannot be de- 
ferred until after the Professional Block or taken at 
another institution without written permission from 
the Department of Education. 



89 



Scholarship requirements — By state law, a student in 
Elementary Education must have not less than a "C" 
average in all college work and a "C" average in pro- 
fessional (Education) courses taken prior to the time 
he or she is admitted to the Block; a student in Secon- 
dary Education must have not less than a "C" average 
in all college work, a "C" average in his field of con- 
centration and a "C" average in professional (Edu- 
cation) courses, including methods courses offered 
by other departments, taken prior to the Block. 

Application for Student Teaching — Students are re- 
quired to make application for student teaching dur- 
ing the second semester of the junior year, on forms 
provided by the Education Department. This appli- 
cation requests the recommendation of the student's 
Senior Education Department Advisor, if Elementary, 
and his academic Department Chairman or Advisor, 
if Secondary, and requires the approval of the Chair- 
man of the Department of Education. Applications 
will not be approved for students not previously ad- 
mitted to teacher education, as explained above. 

Community-based Professional Block — Student 
teaching and course work comprising the Block will 
be conducted for the entire first semester of the 
senior year at off campus centers for elementary (and 
possibly for secondary) to provide the most effective 
field experience. Students enrolled may need to live 
in the community where the center is located. The 
College will assist in locating housing if desired, and 
with other details of the arrangement. 

Students will not be permitted to schedule courses 
in conflict with the Block during the semester they 
are enrolled in it, or carry extra-curricular activities 
which will interfere with the requirements imposed 
by the Block. Arrangements can usually be made for 
practice and participation in varsity sports. Any ex- 



ceptions to the above must be approved by the chair- 
men of the departments concerned and by the Dean 
of the Faculty. Students should not register for other 
than the prescribed Professional Block courses with- 
out written permission from the Department of 
Education. 



CERTIFICATION 

Near the end of the senior year, each student should 
initiate application procedures for certification in the 
state where he or she expects to teach. 

All applications require the Education Department 
Chairman's recommendation. To be recommended, 
a student must meet — in addition to certification re- 
quirements of the state for which he or she is apply- 
ing — the following qualifications: (1) successful 
student teaching experience; (2) completion of an 
approved teacher education program; (3) comple- 
tion of the National Teacher Examinations during the 
senior year, as arranged by the Education Depart- 
ment; (4) eligibility for graduation; and (5) evidence 
of personal traits and character conducive to success 
as a teacher. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 

Ed. 201 Human Development and 

Learning I 4 hours 

Individual and group development from infancy to adolescence. 
Observation and first hand contacts with children are included. 
Educational programs are considered in terms of the total child 
development. Freshmen not admitted. 



90 



Ed. 202 Human Development and 

Learning II 4 hours 

Individual and group development from adolescence through 
the young adult periods. Applications are made in relation to 
learning theory, self understanding and preparation for working 
with young people. Freshmen not admitted. 



Ed. 210 Sociology of Education 

(See Sociology 306). 



4 hours 



Ed. 240 Exploring Education 2 hours 

Overview of education and teaching at all levels in light of con- 
troversies regarding aims, curricula, school policies and prac- 
tices, and teacher preparation. Field trips to exemplary schools. 
Familiarization with college teacher education and state certi- 
fication requirements. 

Ed. 242 Principles and Curriculum of 

Elementary and Middle School 2 hours 

An introductory course in which students explore the goals of 
education and their implementation. The role of the teacher and 
professional concerns while applying the concepts of human 
development. 



Ed. 333 Educational Psychology 

(See Psychology 333). 



2 hours 



Ed. 338 Psychological and Educational 

Tests and Measurements 2 hours 

See Psychology 338. The course will deal mainly with group 
testing, with attention to the construction and use of standard- 
ized and ad hoc tests. The necessary correlation techniques 
will be included. Recommended especially for students in sec- 
ondary education. Prerequisite: Psychology 100. 

Ed. 342 Children's Literature in the 

Elementary and Middle School 2 hours 

Includes background of the history of literature for children; 
familiarity with established and current literature in this area; 
critical analysis skills; methods and techniques of using literature; 
work with children. Students expected to demonstrate compe- 
tence in appropriate audio-visual aids (see Ed. 365). 



Ed. 344 Teaching Skills Laboratory Non-Credit 

Study and practice of specific teaching skills using films, manuals, 
microteaching and TV. Skills include verbal and non-verbal re- 
sponses, questioning, reinforcement, recognizing attendant be- 
havior, non-verbal cues, set induction, stimulus variation, closure, 
and presentation skills including lecturing, use of examples, 
planned repetition, and completeness of communication. Stu- 
dents concurrently enrolled in elementary or secondary methods 
courses or student teaching may participate in units prescribed 
by their instructors, or as desired within limitations of facilities 
and supervision. 

Ed. 345 Methods and Content in 

Elementary and Middle School I 4 hours 

Emphasis on arithmetical skills, including the understanding of 
fundamental processes; comparison of different philosophies in 
teaching arithmetic; elements of modern mathematics; practical 
application of arithmetical skills at all levels of the curriculum. 
Students expected to demonstrate competence in appropriate 
audio-visual aids (see Ed. 365). Classroom experience in public 
schools. Prerequisite: Math. 225 or permission of the instructor. 



Ed. 346 Methods and Content in 

Elementary and Middle School II 



4 hours 



Emphasis on teaching the skills of reading, listening, speaking and 
writing as they relate to the total curriculum. Strong emphasis on 
teaching of reading and the integration of the related areas in 
language arts. Students expected to demonstrate competence in 
appropriate audio-visual aids (see Ed. 365). Classroom experience 
in public schools. 

Ed. 348 Professional Practicum 2 hours 

Preparation of the prospective student teacher for his or her 
role as observer and participant in the classroom. 

Ed. 349 Participation in Secondary Schools 2 hours 

Regularly scheduled observation and limited teaching activities 
in secondary schools. Seminar for direction and evaluation of 
observation experiences and study of related problems. 






91 



Ed. 365 Audio-Visual Education 2 hours 

Laboratory experiences in producing hand-made, color-lift, ther- 
mal, and overlay transparencies, regular and thermal spirit and 
mimeo masters, plastic embeddings; tape recordings, dry mount- 
ings, and photo-copy slides; operation of 16 mm, 8 mm, film- 
strip, slide, opaque, and overhead projectors, dry-mounting press, 
teaching machine, tape recorder, thermal copier, TV equipment 
and lettering aids. Theory for selection and effective utilization 
of various media. Students concurrently enrolled in elementary 
or secondary school observation, student teaching, or methods 
courses may complete experiences prescribed by their instruc- 
tors, or as desired within limitations of facilities and supervision. 
Those wanting credit must enroll for Ed. 365, complete all 
required laboratory projects and other course requirements. Stu- 
dents not in teacher education admitted with permission of the 
instructor. 



History and Philosophy 
of Education 



Ed. 401 

2 or 4 hours 

Development of modern education in social, historical, and 
philosophical perspective, emphasizing backgrounds of present 
practices, current problems and issues. Current practice is ana- 
lyzed in terms of philosophic rationale and applications are 
made to the school situation. Students in elementary should 
register for two semester hours; those in secondary for four 
semester hours. 



Ed. 428 Principles and Techniques of 
Secondary Education 



4 hours 



Aims, functions and curriculum organization of secondary 
schools. Basic methods, materials and techniques, including eval- 
uation, applicable to modern teaching in middle, junior high, and 
senior high schools, integrated with observation and student 
teaching in schools. Certification and employment procedures, 
professional practices, and continuing education. 

Ed. 443 Observation and Directed 

Teaching in Elementary Education 8 hours 

Observation and full-time student teaching at both primary and 
intermediate levels from September until Christmas to include a 
minimum of 200 clock hours of direct teaching. Concurrent en- 
rollment in Ed. 333, 401, and 447 only. Prerequisites: See Pro- 
fessional Block on page 88. 



Ed. 447 Methods and Content in 

Elementary and Middle School III 4 hours 

An understanding of the concepts of the social studies and sci- 
ences approached through various methods, including unit study, 
inquiry, experimentation, and the process approach. Practical 
application in school situation. 




92 



Ed. 452 Education of Exceptional 
Children Emphasizing 
Learning Disabilities 2 or 4 hours 

Identifying exceptional children, especially with learning disabil- 
ities, understanding their situation and behavior, working with 
them as learners and group members, and directing their handling 
of themselves as members of society. Seminar discussions, read- 
ings, and application of integrated knowledge in work with 
children. Those taking the course for full credit will, in addition 
to the above stated activities, do a practicum during which they 
work in one of several area school programs for exceptional chil- 
dren. This practicum will be worked out with the guidance of the 
instructor. Prerequisite: Ed. 443 or 475 or permission of the 
instructor. Alternate years: Spring 1974-75. 

Ed. 475 Observation and Directed 

Teaching in Secondary Education 6 hours 

Directed full-time observation and student teaching in secondary 
schools with partial assignments in lower schools if appropriate; 
to include a minimum of 90 clock hours actual teaching. Seminar 
required throughout the semester. Students must make applica- 
tion for student teaching prior to advance registration. Other 
courses or activities which might interfere with student teaching 
should be avoided. Concurrent enrollment in Ed. 401 and 428. 
Prerequisites: See Professional Block on page 88. 

Ed. 480 Methods and Materials in 

Teaching 2 or 4 hours 

See courses numbered 480 offered by various departments, i.e. 
Art, Biology, Chemistry, Communications, English, Foreign Lan- 
guages, General Science, Mathematics, Music, Physical Educa- 
tion, Physics, Psychology, Social Science, and Theatre (also see 
auxiliary methods courses, i.e. Art 340, Music 340-341, and Physi- 
cal Education 280, required in some programs). Includes obser- 
vation and participation in secondary schools. Experiences in 
production and utilization of appropriate A-V materials and 
equipment available in A-V laboratory (see Ed. 365). Study and 
application of specific teaching skills available in teaching skills 
laboratory (see Ed. 344). 

Ed. 487-488 Independent Study 2 or 4 hours each 

Ed. 490 Senior Project 2-8 hours 



English 



AIMS 

To teach students to write effectively; to provide 
them with a knowledge of major literary works; to 
provide them with standards for the intelligent crit- 
icism of literature. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 

1. Concentration in English requires a minimum of 
32 hours in the Department, exclusive of the Se- 
nior Project (Eng. 490). The following courses are 
required: 300, 325-326, 341-342, and 477-478. In 
addition to these 24 hours, students will elect 
courses or independent study which will extend 
their knowledge of one or two areas of literature, 
provide background for their Senior Project and 
part of their Senior Comprehensive Examination, 
and prepare them for further study or a career. The 
program of a student preparing for the law or an- 
other profession will thus be different from that of 
a student preparing for a career as a professional 
writer and from that of a student preparing for 
graduate study in English or for secondary school 
teaching. Students planning to attend graduate or 
professional schools should prepare to meet for- 
eign language reading requirements. 

2. At least twelve hours in another department must 
also be included in the field of concentration. 
These courses should be related either to the stu- 
dent's area of special interest in English or to his 
or her vocational plans. 



93 



3. Each student will take the Comprehensive Exami- 
nation in English. The examination consists of three 
parts: the Undergraduate Record Examination in 
Literature, an essay examination, and an oral exam- 
ination. Approximately half of the essay examina- 
tion will be individualized for each student, being 
based on his or her area of special interest. 

4. Students will not be accepted for concentration 
in English later than the beginning of their fifth 
semester unless they have completed English 300 
and either English 325-326 or English 341-342. 

5. Students concentrating in English are expected to 
attain a minimum grade of "C" in all courses in the 
Department. All courses in the field of concentra- 
tion must be taken for a letter grade. 



WRITING PROFICIENCY PROGRAM 

The Writing Proficiency Program is administered by 
the Department. Students should complete the pro- 
gram and meet the writing proficiency requirement 
for graduation before the beginning of their senior 
year. Details of the requirement may be found on 
page 59. 

Writing Tests are given according to the following 
schedule: 

September Diagnostic Test: All entering 
students 

November Writing Qualification Test: 
Juniors and transfer students 
who entered in September 

February Diagnostic Test: All students 

entering in February 



April Writing Qualification Test: 

Juniors and transfer students 
who entered in February 

May Writing Qualification Test: 

Freshmen and Sophomores 

Expository writing courses which may also be used 
to meet the writing proficiency requirement or to 
prepare for the Writing Qualification Tests are 
described below. 

Eng. 100 College Composition 2 hours 

Training and practice in writing clear and effective expository 
prose. Each student will write at least seven essays using tradi- 
tional rhetorical principles. The course also includes instruction 
in methods of library research. May not be taken on a CR/NCR 
basis. Offered each semester. 

Eng. 110 Expository Writing I Non-credit 

The course is identical with English 100, but carries no academic 
credit. Neither letter grades nor CR/NCR grades are assigned or 
recorded. Offered each semester. 



Eng. 120 Expository Writing II 



Non-credit 



Training and practice in writing clear and effective expository 
prose, with emphasis upon the needs of individual students. Re- 
quired of all students whose performance on the Third (junior) 
Writing Qualification Test is not satisfactory. Offered each semes- 
ter. 

Eng. 130 Honors Freshman English 2 hours 

A writing course for freshmen of superior ability and accomplish- 
ment. Introduction to the principles of critical reading and writ- 
ing. Intensive practice in writing both expository and imaginative 
prose, with emphasis upon the achievement of clarity and ac- 
curacy. Enrollment by invitation only. 

Eng. 150-159 Freshman Colloquium in 

Literature 2 hours each 

Introductory courses for the discussion of special topics in liter- 
ature. Each colloquium is offered for a half-semester only. May 
be used to satisfy distribution requirements in Humanities and 
departmental requirements for concentration in English. 



94 



Eng. 150 The Novels of Thomas Wolfe: Fiction and Fact 

An examination of the relationship between Wolfe's novels and 
his life. Students will read Look Homeward Angel, Of Time and 
the River, biographical and critical material about Wolfe, and 
selections from his letters. Not offered 1974-75. 

Eng. 151 Short Fiction 

An examination of several short novels by American, English, 
and European writers. Students will read novellas by Tolstoi, 
Conrad, Kafka, Flannery O'Connor, and others. Not offered 

1974-75. 

Eng. 152 The Fiction of William Golding 

An examination of major themes in the work of William Gold- 
ing. Students will read The Spire, Free Fall, Lord of the Flies, 
and others. Offered Spring 1974-75. 

Eng. 153 Russian Fiction 

An examination of the work of several Russian writers of 
novels and short stories. Students will read selections from the 
work of Dostoievsky, Tolstoi, Solzhenitsyn, and others. Of- 
fered Spring 1974-75. 

Eng. 154 The New Poetry 

The student will explicate, compare, and contrast the lyrics of 
popular song writers and the works of contemporary poets. 
Lyrics and poems by the Beatles, Robert Lowell, Bob Dylan, 
Leonard Cohen, Sylvia Plath, Don L. Lee, and Carole King will 
be among those examined. Offered Spring 1974-75. 

Eng. 155 King Arthur: Past and Present 

An examination of the ways in which English and American 
poets and novelists have used the legend of King Arthur. Stu- 
dents will read selections from Malory's Morte D' Arthur, Tenny- 
son's Idylls of the King, Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King 
Arthur's Court, and T. H. White's The Once and Future King. 
Offered Fall 1974-75. 

Eng. 156 Contemporary American Short Stories 

A study of the stort stories of selected contemporary American 
writers, such as Barth, Barthelme, Donleavy, Roth, and Vonne- 
gut. Not offered 1974-75. 

Eng. 157 Southern Fiction 

A study of the novels and short stories of selected writers from 
the southern United States, including William Faulkner, Carson 
McCullers, Flannery O'Connor, and Eudora Welty. Offered 
Fall 1974-75. 

Eng. 158 Modern Drama 

A study of plays written by British, European, and American 
dramatists of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Stu- 
dents will read selected works of Chekhov, Wilde, Shaw, 
Brecht, Pirandello, O'Neill, lonesco, Albee, and others. Of- 
fered Spring 1974-75. 



Eng. 200 Research Paper Writing 2 hours 

An introduction to the writing of library research papers. Instruc- 
tion in topic selection, library resources, the research process, the 
rhetoric of research paper writing, documentation, and the 
mechanics of format. Each student will write at least two research 
papers. Prerequisite: English 100 or its equivalent. Offered Fall 
1974-75. 



Eng. 201 Advanced Expository Writing 



2 hours 



Intensive practice in writing expository prose, with emphasis 
upon the achievement of literary excellence. The course is offered 
twice each year. Enrollment is limited to fifteen with preference 
given to juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: English 100 or its 
equivalent. Offered Spring 1974-75. 

Eng. 202 Imaginative Writing 2 hours 

Intensive practice in writing fiction, poetry, or plays, with em- 
phasis upon the achievement of literary excellence. Individual 
assignments and frequent conferences. Enrollment limited to 
fifteen, with preference given to juniors and seniors. (May be 
taken for credit as Theatre 202). Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. Offered Fall 1974-75. 

Eng. 240 Myths and Legends 2 hours 

A study of Biblical, classical, European, and British myths and 
legends and their use in Western literature. Not offered 1974-75. 

Eng. 245 Masterpieces of French 

Literature (in English) 2 hours 

Highlights of French literature, from Voltaire to Sartre, as it seeks 
to examine the human condition. Readings and discussion in 
English. (May be taken for credit as French 311). Alternate years: 
Spring 1975-76. 

Eng. 251-254 Literature of the 

Western World 2 hours each 

A chronological study of Western literary masterpieces, chiefly 
in translation. 251: Greek and Roman Classicism. 252: The Mid- 
dle Ages. 253: Renaissance and Neo-Classicism. 254: Modern. 

Eng. 261-262 The British Novel 2 hours each 

The development of the British novel from the eighteenth cen- 
tury until the present. 261: Defoe through Dickens. 262: Hardy 
to the present. In the fall of 1974, if enrollment warrants, both 
courses will be taught in Oxford, England. 



95 



Eng. 263-264 The American Novel 2 hours each 
The development of the American novel from the nineteenth 
century until the present. 263: The beginnings through World 
War I. 264: The 1920s to the present. Offered Spring 1974-75. 

Eng. 270 Shakespeare 4 hours 

Rapid reading of the major plays, with emphasis upon Shake- 
speare's themes, motifs, language, and characterization. In the 
fall of 1974, if enrollment warrants, the course will be taught in 
Oxford, England. It will also be offered in Bethany in the spring 
of 1975. (May be taken for credit as Theatre 270). 

Eng. 300 Preface to Literary Studies 4 hours 

An introduction to the principles and practice of literary analysis. 
Close reading and explication of poetry and prose. The prepara- 
tion of critical essays. Required for concentration in English. 

Eng. 325-326 British Literature 4 hours each 

The development of British literature from the beginning to the 
present. First semester: from Beowulf to the end of the eighteenth 
century. Second semester: the nineteenth and twentieth cen- 
turies. Required for concentration in English. 

Eng. 341-342 American Literature 4 hours each 

The development of American literature from the Colonial Period 
to the present, with emphasis upon the writers of the nineteenth 
and twentieth centuries. Required for concentration in English. 



Eng. 350 Literary Criticism: History 



Chronological study of the development of literary criticism from 
Aristotle to the present. Students will read selections from the 
work of major critics and compare and contrast their principles 
and methods. Recommended for English majors who plan to at- 
tend graduate school. Prerequisites: Eng. 300 and either Eng. 
325-326 or Eng. 341-342. Offered Spring 1974-75. 



Eng. 351 Literary Criticism: 
Theory and Practice 



2 hours 



Study of the value and function of literary criticism, particularly 
during the present century. Practical criticism of poetry and 
prose, with emphasis upon the development of critical points of 
view and the preparation of critical essays. Recommended for 
English majors who plan to attend graduate school. Prereq- 
uisite: Eng. 351. 




Eng. 370 Development of Modern English 4 hours 

History of the English language from Anglo-Saxon to Modern 
English, with emphasis upon the structure and vocabulary of the 
latter. Required for students preparing to teach secondary school 
English. Offered Spring 1974-75. 



2 hours ADVANCED SEMINARS 



Courses numbered 400 through 450 are seminars for 
the study of special literary topics or areas. Topics 
and the amount of credit offered for each seminar 
will vary from semester to semester. When the topic 
is different, the seminar may be repeated for credit. 

Eng. 400-409 Studies in Literary Themes and Motifs 

A seminar for the study of a single theme or motif in literary 
works in English or in translation. 

Eng. 400 Cosmic Warfare 4 hours 

Examination of some modern fictional presentations of the 
struggle between good and evil. Reading will include selections 
from the work of John Milton, J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, and 

Charles Williams. Not offered 1974-75. 



96 



Eng. 402 The Making of an American Apocalypse 4 hours 
The student will examine sermons, scripture, letters, and novels 
that chronicle the development of the American dream and 
its gradual transformation into an American nightmare. Special 
emphasis will be placed on the emergence of this pattern in 
the American novel. The student will read, among others, 
novels by Melville, Alger, Dreiser, West, Bellow, Brautigan, 
and Pyncheon. 

Eng. 410-419 Studies in Literary Genres 

A seminar for the study of a single literary genre, or mode, such 
as the epic, tragedy, satire, or biography. (May be taken for 
credit as Theatre 410-419). 

Eng. 411 British Drama 4 hours 

Development of British drama from the beginning until the 
present. If enrollment warrants, the seminar will be offered in 
Oxford, England, concurrently with English 325 and Social 
Science 320. Not offered 1974-75. 

Eng. 412 Satire 2 hours 

An examination of the aims and methods of some of the great 
British writers of satire, chiefly those of the Restoration and 
eighteenth century. Students will read selections from the 
work of Butler, Dryden, Swift, Pope, Gay, and others. Not of- 
fered 1974-75. 

Eng. 413 The Short Story 2 hours 

A study of the short story as literary form. Readings are se- 
lected from the works of such authors as Poe, James, Chekhov, 
Kafka, Heming