(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Bethany union cook book; comp"



^51 






P=?7 



3 



^&&-i 

v^^^, 



-->-^' 



C2sa 







HTHANnMC5N 








COHfRIGHT DEPOSIT. 



THE 

BETHANY UNION 

COOK BOOK 




COMPILED BY 

THE WOMAN'S SOCIETY 

0/ BETHANY UNION CHURCH 

WEST 103rd and SOUTH WOOD ST. 

CHICAGO 






<iy^^ 



Copyright, 1912, 
by 

Martm H. Kendig. 



OCU330a89 



"Go little book. God send thee good 
passage. And especially let this be thy 
prayer, unto them all that thee will read 
or hear; it'hcre thou art ztrong, after 
their help to call, thee to correct, in any 
part or all." 



FOREWORD 



"I wish I did know how Mrs. B. makes her marmalade. 
I never had any quite as nice." "And did you e\'er taste 
preser\-es as appetizing as Mrs. L's?" "What delicious 
roasts they always have at Mrs. G's." Who has ever 
sat as guest at any table here and has not heard such 
remarks as these? And herein lies the origin and the 
purpose of this book. It offers itself as a medium of ex- 
change for ideas in cooking. It seeks to bring together 
the best tested and the most thoroughly approved meth- 
ods of preparing — 

Bread, rolls, roasts, puddings, pies, 
The things on which poor man relies, — 

and to put them in form easily accessible to all. 

Practically e\ery household in the neighborhood has 
assisted in one way or another in the making of this 
book and grateful acknowledgment is hereby made to 
each contributor. 

Its ])reparation has extended acquaintance and be- 
gotten a spirit of friendliness and co-operation which it 
is hoped that the book itself may serve to continue and 
enlarge. 



As a neighborhood document, the careful reader may 
find in it material for man}^ an interesting observation. 
He might note how the problem of the high cost of liv- 
ing is being met. Or he will find cause for reflection in 
the fact that there should be forthcoming so many 
recipes of cakes, luncheon-dishes and preserves. But 
these matters we leave to the curious reader. 

It is enough that it offers ample suggestion and direc- 
tion whereby to prepare a most tempting, satisfying 
table. He who turns to these pages will be moved as 
was the ancient prophet at the bidding of the angel to 
rise, and to eat and drink. And if, having done so, he 
may not be able, as was the prophet, to go in the 
strength thereof for forty days, he shall, at least, be 
made strong to do the day's work well. Therefore, 

We bid thee go thy way. 
To be received by all ; with words to say 
To oldest housewife as to youngest bride. 
So journey much, and far and wide, 

Scattering abroad these secrets of delight 
To tastes fastidious and epicurean appetite. 
To daily meal some apt suggestion lend 
And all will hail thee as a friend. 

C. M. 



COOKS 

A cook is a genius who is able to combine the con- 
tents of a meat market and a grocery store in such a man- 
ner as to tempt a man to overeat himself whether he is 
hungry or not. 

Cooking is the greatest profession in the world. There 
are upwards of 25,000,000 cooks in this country alone and 
a number of them are good cooks. The difiference be- 
tween a good cook and a bad cook is greater than the 
difference between Heaven and the warmer latitudes. 

A good cook can take an old shoe, a little salt and 
some culinary debris of various sorts and make a soup 
from them which would cause a republican to forget last 
November's election and sing for joy. A bad cook can 
take a cross section of a sweet and toothsome young 
cow and anneal it so successfully that the hungry diner 
will eat his napkin instead. 

Cooks, like violinists, are born, not made. Some wom- 
en can mix fourteen ingredients by guess and bake them 
until they have finished a story and produce a master- 
piece which will make the eater weep for joy. Other 
women cook with a pair of apothecary's scales and a 
stop-watch and produce only woe and dyspepsia. 

Cooking is a duty of woman and eating the. result is 
a duty of man. The more duty the sadder the world. 
But cooking can also be made a pastime, an accomplish- 
ment, an art and an inspiration in which cases eating 
the results soon becomes a dissipation. 

On cooking depends the happiness of matrimony. 
Love usually lasts as long as digestion. Good cooking 
cements a famih?- unbreakably together while bad cook- 



ing drives it howling to the lunch counter and the di- 
vorce court. 

In spite of all these things nobody pays much atten- 
tion to cooking. We spend millions in this country 
teaching our girls to write in a neat round hand which 
will be out of style as soon as the new copy books come 
in. But we spend very little in teaching them how to 
take a pint of flour and treat it with beneficent results. 

Education cannot produce kitchen geniuses, but it 
can mitigate the amateur cook to a wonderful degree. 
In these days of conservation the American stomach ap- 
pears to have been overlooked. Until medical science 
is able to install new digestive equipments at a small 
expense the American stomach ought to be conserved 
with jealous care for the benefit of the American dis- 
position. George Fitch. 



TABLE of CONTENTS 



/ unll tell yoit the begiimini^s and if it please your lady- 
ships, you may see the end. — Shakespeare. 

1. P.read 9-22 

2. Soup 27- 30 

3. ]*k[eats and Fish 35- 51 

4. \'egetal)les 55- 63 

5. Salads 67- 76 

6. Desserts 81-115 

Pies. 

Hot Puddings. 
Cold Desserts. 
Frozen Desserts. 

7. Beverages 119-121 

8. Cakes and Cookies 125-153 

9. Luncheon Dishes 157-169 

10. Canning- and Preserving 173-188 

11. Sauces and Relishes 193-204 

12. Confections 209-215 

13. -Miscellaneous 217 



The number of recipes collected far exceeded the 
number allowed by the stern linotype man. Many of 
them were duplicates and therefore had to be omitted. 
All of the recipes have been filed, and will from time to 
time be printed in The Reminder if requested 



BETHANY UXION COOK BOOK 



Breadf 



Back of the loaf is the siiozvy Hour, 

And back of the Hour is the mill, 
And back of the null are the wheat and the shoiver, 

And iJic sun and the Father's will. 

— Maltbie IV. Babcock. 

White bread is produced from a mixture of yeast, flour, 
and some liquid. The latter may be scalded milk, pure 
water, or a mixture of the two. The yeast produces a 
gas, carbon dioxide, as it grows and feeds in the dough, 
and this gas is held prisoner as it accumulates, thus rais- 
ing the dough. The conditions for the proper growth of 
this yeast fungus are moisture, even temperature (prefer- 
hably at 86 degrees Fahrenheit), food and air. The sugar 
added to the dough enables the yeast to start its growth 
easily ; then it attacks some of the starch, and later the 
gluten, or nitrogenous material. Hence the more quickly 
the risings are accomplished the better. With proper 
blending of the materials two risings are sufiicient. The 
flrst kneading should mix the yeast thoroughly through 
the mass. The second kneading should break up the 
gas bubbles and distribute the small bubbles resulting 
evenly through the dough, and the bread will not be full 
of holes if the next rising is not too prolonged. 

Kneading. — Curve the fingers backward in kneading 
and knead with the palm. Turn the ball of dough one- 
quarter way round and fold it over with every push. 
Knead for about twenty minutes (or until the dough no 
longer sticks to the hands or bowl), is full of blisters and 
is smooth. A soft dough makes a tender bread, hence 
guard against too stiff a dough. 

Baking. — An oven-thermometer is a great convenience. 
The temperature for baking should be from 270 degrees 
to 350 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the size of loaves. 



10 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



The loaves should weigh one and a half pounds. I"'or 
the first fifteen minutes the loaves should continue to rise, 
then they should begin to turn brown and grow browner 
for the next twenty minutes. Now the heat should be 
reduced and continue the baking for fifteen minutes. 
When the bread leaves the side of the pan the bread is 
done. Remove it from the pan and rub it over with 
melted butter, if a soft crust is desired. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

One and one-half cups graham flour, one and one-half 
cups corn meal, one and one-half teaspoons soda, one tea- 
spoon salt, three-fourths cup molasses, one pint sour 
milk. Sift dry ingredients, then add molasses and milk. 
Steam from one to three hours, according to size of mold 
used. Mrs. J. M. Johnson. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

Two cups sour milk, three level teaspoons soda, one- 
half cup molasses, one-half cup corn syrup, one cup yel- 
low cornmeal, one cup graham flour, one cup rye flour, 
one teaspoon salt, one cup raisins (seeded). Steam two 
hours in covered cans. Mrs. J. C. Ellis. 

BROWN BREAD. 

Two cups sour milk, one level teaspoon soda, three- 
fourths cup molasses, two cups graham flour, one cup 
white flour, one cup corn meal, one teaspoon baking 
powder, one teaspoon salt, one cup raisins. Bake one 
hour in slow oven. Mrs. Frank White. 

BRAN BREAD— HEALTH BREAD. 

One quart of refined bran, one pint of white flour, one 
pint of buttermilk, one half cup of baking molasses, one 
teaspoon salt, one teaspoon shortening, one teaspoon 
soda dissolved in a little molasses. Beat all together, 
put in two small tins and bake in a steady oven one 
hour. Mrs. John Fisher. 



BETHANY UXIOX COOK BOOK 11 



BRAN BREAD. 

One quart flour, two quarts bran, salt to taste, one 
quart of sour milk or buttermilk, four teaspoons of bak- 
ing soda dissolved in milk, one cup molasses. Bake very 
slowly one hour and a half. Mrs. H. J.vhx. 

BRAN BREAD. 

Two cups of bran, two cups of flour, two cups of 
sour milk, one cup of brown sugar, .one cup of chopped 
raisins, one teaspoon of soda, one half teaspoon of salt. 
Bake in moderate oven one hour. Will make two small 
loaves. Mrs. W. H. Fleming. 

CORN BREAD. 

One egg, one cup of flour, one cup of cornmeal, one 
cup of milk, one tablespoon of butter, two teaspoons of 
baking powder, a pinch of salt, one tablespoon sugar. 
Sift flour, baking powder and cornmeal together. Bake 
in a quick oven from twenty to thirty minutes. 

Mrs. H. Philips. 

GOLDEN CORN CAKE. 

Three-fourths cup yellow corn meal, one and one- 
fourth cups flour, one-fourth cup sugar, four level tea- 
spoons baking powder, one-half teaspoon salt, one cup 
milk, one egg, one tablespoon melted butter. Mix dry 
ingredients, add milk and egg well beaten and butter. 
Pour into shallow pan and bake twenty minutes in hot 
oven. Mrs. Arthur D. Heffron. 

MARYLAND SPOON CORN BREAD. 

One quart milk in double boiler, four large kitchen 
spoons corn meal. Cook for five minutes after it boils, 
stirring often. Let cool and cut up a couple of times 
while cooling. Add three eggs well beaten, two table- 



12 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



spoons of white tiour, one small spoon of salt, one table- 
spoon of butter. Pour into a baker, bake in good oven 
thirty-five minutes. Send to table at once in dish as 
baked. Fine accompaniment to roasts. 

Mrs. G. S. Bannister. 

ENGLISH RAISIN BREAD. 

Two cups flour, four teaspoons baking powder, two 
teaspoons shortening, one-half cup sugar, one-half cup 
raisins, one-half cup currants, nutmeg grated, one egg, 
one-half cup milk. Mix dry ingredients, cut the shorten- 
ing in this, add fruit, beat whole egg and add milk to it. 
Combine the two mixtures as in baking powder biscuit. 
Put in greased pan and bake in moderate oven forty 
to forty-five minutes. Mrs. G. B. Van Dort. 

QUICK GRAHAM BREAD. 

One cup white flour, two cups graham flour sifted 
together, one-third cup sugar, one teaspoon salt, three 
teaspoons baking powder, two cups milk. Pour in a 
greased loaf pan and bake in a moderate oven three- 
fourths of an hour. Raisins or nuts are often added. 

Mrs. Wm. H. Roberts. 

NUT BREAD. 

Three and one-lialf cups sifted flour, one cup chopped 
nuts, one full cup sugar, one teaspoon salt, four tea- 
spoons baking powder, one egg beaten with one cup of 
milk. Mix flour, salt and baking powder by sifting to- 
gether, add sugar and nuts, then egg and milk. Set to 
rise twenty minutes in bread pans. Bake very slowly 
three-quarters of an hour. Carrie Zorterman. 

NUT BREAD. 

Sift together four cups of flour, one scant cup sugar, 
one teaspoon of salt, four teaspoons of baking powder. 
Add one cup of chopped English walnuts, one egg, one 



BE I HAN)' UXION COOK BOOK 13 



and one-fourth cups milk. Alix thoroughly and place in 
greased tin. Let stand one-half hour before baking in a 
moderate oven for one hour. Makes very nice sand- 
wiches, buttered and sliced thin. Mrs. A. Guthrie. 

NUT LOAF. 

Two cups graham Hour, one cup white flour, three 
round teaspoons baking powder, one teaspoon salt, one 
cup sugar, one cup chopped English walnuts, one beaten 
egg, one cup sweet milk. Mix dry ingredients thor- 
oughly ; add milk and egg beaten well ; put in greased 
pan and bake thirty to sixty minutes according to size 
of loaf. Mrs. T. H. Morrison. 

OATMEAL BREAD. 

Two and one-half cups of water, one cup of oatmeal, 
three tablespoons of sugar, one tablespoon of shortening, 
one tablespoon of salt. Let the mixture boil for five 
minutes. When cool put in the yeast. Let rise. When 
light, stir the sponge stiff w^ith white flour. Put in the 
bread tins. Let rise again, then bake. This recipe makes 
two loaves of bread. Mrs. Harriet O. Newm.\n. 

OATMEAL BREAD. 

Three cups of rolled oats, one teaspoon salt, one table- 
spoon of lard, one-third cup molasses, two-thirds cu]) 
brown sugar, one cake of yeast, three cups boiling water. 
Mix yeast with one cup of water. Mix ingredients, then 
pour over three cups of boiling water, let cool, then add 
yeast. Stir in enough white flour to make a stiff dough. 
Let rise same as white bread and bake. 

Mrs. Geo. McNeil. 

SALT RISING BREAD. 

Scald one-third cup cornmeal with one pint milk just 
brought to boiling point. Cover closely and let stand 
over night. In the morning add one quart warm water. 



14 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



one teaspoon salt, one tablespoon sugar, flour enough to 
make stiff batter. Beat thoroughly and keep warm until 
light ; add a little warm water, one tablespoon salt, one 
tablespoon sugar, one tablespoon lard, enough flour to 
make moderately stifle dough. Knead ten minutes, mold 
into loaves and put into greased pans. Keep in warm 
place until double its size. Bake in moderate oven one 
hour, increasing heat the last twenty minutes. 

Mrs. E. Harpole. 

SCOTCH SHORT BREAD. 

One pound butter, one pound and three-quarters of 
flour, four ounces of rice flour, one-half pound of fine 
granulated sugar. Work all together into a smooth 
dough. Divide into number of cakes required. Pinch 
around the edge with forefinger and thumb. Prickle on 
top and bake in a mocferate oven till a light brown. If 
the butter used is salt, wash it well in water before 
using. Mrs. John Fisher. 

WHEAT BREAD. 

Nine cups flour, sifted, two tablespoons salt, three large 
iron spoons sugar. Sift together. Lard, size of walnut, 
one quart of milk or lukewarm water, two cakes yeast 
dissolved in a little of the water. Mix soft batter, set to 
rise. When risen mix thoroughly, add two cups sifted 
flour and knead to stiff dough. Let rise. When risen 
make into loaves and then bake three-quarters of an hour. 

Mrs. MaWhinney. 

WHEAT BREAD. 

One pint milk, almost to the boiling point, one pint of 
water of same temperature, one heaping tablespoon 
sugar, one tablespoon salt, a piece of shortening (butter 
and lard the size of an egg), one and one-half cakes com- 
pressed yeast. Mix together the hot milk, hot water, 
sugar, salt and shortening and while this is cooling have 
the yeast in a cup of warm water and by the time the 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 15 



yeast has begun to foam the other ingredients will be 
cool enough to mix with the yeast. Then add enough 
flour to mold down rather stiff. Put to rise, which usu- 
ally takes about five hours, then shape into loaves and 
let rise again in the tins ready to bake. 

Mrs. H. O. Day. 

WHOLE WHEAT BROWN BREAD. 

Two cups fine whole wheat flour, one cup coarse 
whole wheat flour, one cup white flour, three-fourths cup 
molasses, two cups sour milk, one-half teaspoon salt, 
one teaspoon soda dissolved in a little water. Mix the 
flour well before adding the liquid. Be sure that the 
bread is well mixed. Bake in a slow oven for one hour. 
It will burn very easilw Mrs. Grant Smith. 



BISCUITS AND MUFFINS 



BAKING POWDER BISCUITS. 

Two cups sifted flour, two tablespoons lard or butter, 
one-half teaspoon salt, two teaspoons baking powder. 
Enough milk for soft dough. Mix and sift dry ingredi- 
ents. Rub in lard. Add milk. Mix and toss on board. 
Roll and cut with biscuit cutter. Bake in hot oven. 

May M. Ellis. 

BISCUITS FOR TWO. 

One small cup of flour, sifted with two rounding tea- 
spoons of baking powder and one-half teaspoon of salt. 
Rub in a lump of butter the size of a walnut and use 
enough sw^eet milk to make a soft dough, soft enough to 
stir with a spoon. Lay on floured board and knead 
thoroughly. Place in a buttered tin and bake immedi- 
ately. Mrs. Wilbur Hicks. 



16 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



CORNISH BISCUITS. 

One quart flour, two teaspoons baking powder, one 
teaspoon salt, one-half cup sugar, one large tablespoon 
butter, two eggs, beaten, caraway seeds, one cup floured 
raisins, one cup currants, milk to make soft enough to 
handle. Pat out on bread board into a sheet. Cut with 
small biscuit cutter. Bake quickly. When almost done, 
butter top. Mrs. C. L. Hays. 

CURRANT BISCUIT. 

Two eggs, one-half cup sugar, two heaping tablespoons 
lard, one cup sweet milk, a little salt, three and one-half 
cups flour, three teaspoons baking powder, one cup cur- 
rants. Roll out one-half inch thick and cut in biscuit 
shape. Mrs. J. R. MacGregor. 

SPANISH BUN. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup water, 
one and one-half cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder, 
one and one-half teaspoons cinnamon, two eggs. Beat 
together sugar, butter, eggs; add water, then flour with 
baking powder and cinnamon sifted with it. 

Mrs. J. H. Burdett. 

TEA BISCUITS. 

Three cups flour, three heaping teaspoons baking 
])owder, three teaspoons sugar, one-half teaspoon salt, 
one egg, two cups milk. Cut and put into pans. Bake 
in oven ten minutes. Jean McGilp. 

SWEET BREAD BISCUITS. 

After mixing a batch of bread dough, cut off a piece of 
the dough (the size of an ordinary loaf of bread). Spread 
this on the board, take two tablespoons of lard and one- 
half cup sugar and work it into the dough, adding flour 
until of the right consistency. Set aside to rise until 



BETHANY' UNION COOK BOOK 17 



light, then form into biscuits, letting the biscuits rise 
again. Bake about twenty minutes in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. Charles Gierman. 

HUNGARIAN ROLLS. 

One and one-half quarts flour, one pint milk, one yeast 
cake, one-half cup sugar, two tablespoons melted butter, 
one beaten egg. a little flavoring if desired, tablespoon 
salt. Dissolve yeast in little lukewarm water. Warm 
the milk, add yeast and sugar, butter, egg and flour and 
beat as long as you can with wooden spoon-. Let rise till 
light and form in small rolls. Let rise and bake twenty 
minutes. Suzanne Gieszer. 

BLUEBERRY MUFFINS. 

Two eggs, one-half cup butter and one-half cup sugar 
creamed together, two-thirds cup milk, one and one-half 
cups blueberries in flour. (If canned, drain and have as 
dry as possible.) One heaping teaspoon baking powder, 
one and three-fourths cups flour, one-half teaspoon 
(scant) salt. Put together like a cake, adding blueberries 
last. These make a nice dessert by using the juice for a 
sauce. Mrs. Oscar L. McMurry. 

BLUEBERRY MUFFINS. 

Two tablespoons of butter, one-half cup of sugar, one 
egg, three-fourths cup of milk, two and one-half cups of 
flour, two and one-half teaspoons baking powder, one- 
fourth teaspoon salt, one cup of blueberries. Mix as cake 
and add blueberries just before turning into buttered 
muffin tins. Mrs. O. A. Keeler. 

BRAN MUFFINS OR HEALTH MUFFINS. 

Two cups bran, one cup white flour, one-third cup mo- 
lasses, one and one-half cups milk, one egg, two table- 
spoons melted butter, one-half teaspoon salt, one tea- 
spoon soda mixed with white flour. Nuts or raisins 
added if desired. Mrs. James E. Armstrong. 



18 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



CORN MEAL CAKE OR MUFFINS. 

One cup flour, one cup corn meal, three teaspoons 
baking powder, one cup milk, one tablespoon sugar, one 
tablespoon butter, two eggs, beaten separately. Bake 
twenty-five minutes. Use same rule for muffins or gra- 
ham gems, using all white flour for muffins and graham 
flour instead of corn meal for gems, and bake same 
length of time in muffin tms. Mrs. B. H. Atwood. 

SQUASH MUFFINS. 

One-half cup strained squash, one cup milk, one egg, 
two tablespoons sugar, two tablespoons butter, one tea- 
spoon cream tartar, one-half teaspoon soda, quarter tea- 
spoon salt and two and one-half cups flour. 

Mrs. George McGregor Murray. 

WHEAT GEMS. 

One cup of milk, one-half cup of sugar, one-fourth cup 
of butter, two cups of flour, sifted, two eggs, two tea- 
spoons baking powder sifted in the flour. Cream butter, 
sugar and eggs together, then add milk and flour gradu- 
ally. Mrs. E. L. Roberts. 

BREAKFAST PUFFS. 

One and one-half cups flour, two rounding teaspoons 
baking powder, one tablespoon sugar, one-fourth tea- 
spoon salt, one cup milk, one egg, one tablespoon melted 
butter. Sift dry ingredients into a bowl, beat the egg 
and add it to the milk, stir this into the dry mixture ; 
beat, add the butter and beat again until smooth. Fill 
buttered gem pan about two-thirds full of mixture and 
bake for about fifteen minutes in hot oven. 

Mrs. John McKinlay. 

BREAKFAST MUFFINS. 

One cup of flour, one teaspoon sugar, one teaspoon 
bakin-g powder, one egg, one-fourth cup of milk, one 
tablespoon of butter, one-fourth teaspoon salt, scant 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 19 



measure. Sift the dry ingredients together, beat the egg 
and add the milk, last of all add the melted butter to the 
batter and whip it in well. Drop in greased muffin tin, 
bake in a hot oven until a golden brown. Will make 
six muffins. Mary C. Cabery. 

WHOLE WHEAT MUFFINS. 

One Ggg, one teaspoon salt, one cup sour milk, one- 
half teaspoon soda, two tablespoons molasses, one-half 
cup flour, one and one-fourth cups whole wheat. 

Mrs. T. D. Gregg. 



COFFEE CAKES. 



COFFEE CAKE— GERMAN. 

One egg, one cup of sugar, one tablespoon of butter, 
one cup of milk, two cups of flour, one-half teaspoon of 
salt, two teaspoons of baking powder. Flavor with nut- 
meg. Bake in sheet. Before placing in oven sprinkle 
sugar, cinnamon and bits of butter over the top. 

Mrs. M. H. Kendig. 

COFFEE CAKE— GERMAN. 

One pint milk, one-half cup sugar, one pint flour, one- 
half tablespoon salt, one yeast cake, one egg, flour to 
stiffen. Set sponge with milk, flour and yeast. When 
light add sugar, salt and egg and flour enough for dough 
not quite as stifif as bread. Then work in one cup of 
melted shortening, let rise till light, roll out three-fourths 
of an inch thick and put in tins. When light brush Avith 
melted butter and sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon. 

Mrs. B. F. Wegner. 



20 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



COFFEE CAKE— GERMAN. 

To four quarts of flour add one pint of milk lukewarm 
and two small cakes of yeast. When raised make a stifif 
dough ; take four eggs, two cups of sugar, two cups but- 
ter and a tablespoon salt and beat well. Add raisins to 
suit and three ounces shelled almonds. Then let it rise 
once more and put in tins and bake. 

Mrs. John DeRudder. 

FINNISH BREAD. 

One cup raisins, one cup sugar, one teaspoon carda- 
mon seed, two cups milk, two cu]js warm water, two 
eggs beaten, one-half cup butter melted, one tablespoon 
salt, nine cups flour, one yeast cake ; mix raisins, sugar, 
cardamon seed first, then other ingredients at night, into 
a stiff loaf; in the morning mix again into a loaf, allow 
to rise, then mold into loaves or rolls, set to rise once 
more; brush over with butter and sugar, bake. Bread 
with sugar, butter and eggs in requires longer to rise. 
Will make four loaves. Mrs. A. E. Morrison. 

GERMAN APPLE CAKE. 

One pint flour, two teaspoons baking powder, one-half 
teaspoon salt ; add two tablespoons butter, one beaten 
egg and milk to make thick batter. Spread one inch deep 
in greased shallow pan. Spread sliced apples on top 
and sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon. 

Mrs. J. O. Buck. 

SALLY LUNN. 

Cream two tablespoons granulated sugar with one of 
butter. Add slowly one pint of milk and the beaten 
yolks of two eggs, two teaspoons baking powder and 
flour to make stifif batter. Then thin with the whites of 
the eggs beaten to a froth. Bake in gem pans in a quick 
oven. Serve hot with butter. Mrs. Wm. Ve.\r. 



BETHANY UXION COOK BOOK 21 



SALLY LUNN. 

One cui) sugar, one-half cup butter, stir well and add 
two eggs, one and three-fourths cups sweet milk, suffi- 
cient Hour to make a batter as thick as a cake, three tea- 
spoons baking powder. Bake in pie tins. 

Mrs. R. D. Flood. 

CORN GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Chop tine one cup of fresh or canned corn, having it 
as fine as it can be made. Into this stir a cup of hot 
milk, a tablespoon each of sugar and melted butter, two 
saltspoons of salt, a cup of flour sifted twice with a tea- 
spoon of baking powder, and last of all two well beaten 
eggs. Beat hard and bake on a griddle. 

Mrs. a. J. Goes. 

POTATO PANCAKES. 

Peel and grate six large potatoes, add to the grated 
vegetable a saltspoon of salt, half teaspoon of baking 
soda and three eggs beaten light. When well blended 
add enough fiour to make a good batter and fry on a 
heated griddle. Mrs. Wm. Vear. 

RAISED BUCKWHEAT PANCAKES. 

Take four cups of buckwheat flour to one of wheat 
with a teaspoon of salt, make batter with warm water 
and dissolve one-half or three-quarters of a cake of yeast 
and mix with it, set it to rise at night ; in the morning 
stir in one-half teaspoon of baking soda with milk to 
make the correct thickness. This process can be re- 
peated for some time by mixing it over at night. 

Mrs. J. E. Coventry. 

WAFFLES. 

One and one-half pints flour (scant), two teaspoons 
baking powder, one-half teaspoon salt. Sift these into 
mixing bowl. One pint milk, two tablespoons butter, 



22 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



three eggs, separate whites and yolks and beat, add 
yolks to milk, add melted butter, stir carefully into flour, 
fold in beaten whites. Bake in waffle iron. 

Mrs. Robert Bebb. 

WAFFLES. 

Two eggs, one and one-half pints sour milk, one tea- 
spoon soda, two tablespoons corn meal, two tablespoons 
butter, one tablespoon sugar, one-half teaspoon salt, flour 
to make thin batter. Beat eggs, add sour milk and 'soda; 
melt the butter and add it with the sugar, cornmeal and 
salt. Add flour until stifif as thin cake batter. 

Mrs. a. H. Estep. 



Best Results in 
COOKING 

ARE OBTAINED BY USING 

Bowman Dairy Co. 



Perfectly Pasteurized 

MILK 
PURE CREAM 
BUTTER 



Phone Washington Heights 511 

1348-1358 West 103rd Street 

CHICAGO 



24 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 25 



26 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UXIUK COOK BOOK 27 



»oups 



It is not strength, but art, obtains the prize. 

—Pope. 



ASPARAGUS CREAM SOUP. 

One quart soup stock, one can asparagus tips ; simmer 
together two hours, strain, season and thicken with two 
tablespoons flour ; add pinch soda and one scant cup hot 
milk for each person to be served. Tablespoon whipped 
cream in each bowl. Mrs. H. N. Tolles. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

One cup of celery cut in small pieces, one cup diced pota- 
toes (raw), one-fourth onion medium sized, butter size of 
an egg, one cup milk, one cup cream, little thickening, salt 
and pepper. Cook celery, potatoes and onion in water 
enough to cover until tender. Mash and add a little of 
water in which vegetables were boiled, then add milk, cream, 
thickening, butter and seasoning. Strain and stir in a little 
chopped parsely. Mrs. A. George. 

CELERY SOUP. 

One cup celery cut fine, two cups boiling water, one pint 
milk, one slice onion, two tablespoons butter, three level 
tablespoons flour, salt and pepper to taste. Pour boiling- 
water on celery, cook until tender. Place onion in milk and 
scald. Add melted butter and flour, cook until creamy, 
stirring constantly. Add celery and water, salt and pepper. 

Mrs. Osc.\r McMurry. 



28 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



NEW ENGLAND CLAM CHOWDER. 
(With Canned Clams). 
Dice a small piece of salt pork and fry with about two 
tablespoons chopped onion (or fry onion in butter if pre- 
ferred). Add four or five potatoes sliced thin, salt, cover 
with hot water and boil until soft. Add one can Scarboro 
Beach Clams and about a quart of milk. Bring just to a 
boil. Add piece of butter and, just before serving", five or 
six National Biscuit Company's Brown Baked Butter Crack- 
ers, which have been split and dipped in cold water. If 
you cannot get these crackers do not put in any other kind. 

Mrs. Karleen F. Nash. 

CREAM OF CORN SOUP. 

One quart of milk, one can corn, one small onion sliced, 
three tablespoons butter, two tablespooons flour, yolks of 
two eggs, salt and pepper to taste. In double boiler put 
corn, milk and onion, cook fifteen minutes, strain. Blend 
butter and flour, add, cook fifteen minutes and add yolks 
of eggs last. Serve in bouillon cups with whipped cream 
and a few kernels of popped corn. 

Mrs. J. S. Woodward. 

FISH SOUP. 

Two cups soup stock, one scant cup fine crumbs, one gen- 
erous cup fish, freed of bones, fat and skin and minced. 
One cup boiling milk, one egg beaten light, pepper and salt 
to taste. Skim the stock carefully, heat it to boiling, add 
the minced fish, the pepper and salt and let simmer. Heat 
the milk in a double boiler ; when hot pour it upon the beaten 
tgg, mix well, and add with the crumbs to the hot stock, 
and serve. If no stock is available, use one cup hot water 
and two cups milk. When eggs are scarce, the egg may be 
omitted and a tablespoon of flour rolled in one of butter may 
be substituted. This soup may be varied by adding a cup- 
ful of diced potatoes and a tablespoon of minced parsley or 
onion or a bay leaf or sweet herbs. 

Mrs. Isaac Greenacre. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 29 



OYSTER SOUP. 

One pint oysters, liquor from one pint of oysters plus 
enough milk to make one and one half quarts, six table- 
spoons tlour, four to six tablespoons butter, salt and pepper. 
Wash and carefully pick over oysters. Strain liquor 
through cheese cloth and add to scalded milk. Make white 
sauce, add oysters and cook, stirring constantly until 
oysters are plump and edges begin to curl. 

Bessie McCumber. 

OYSTER STEW. 

One pint oysters, one quart scalded milk, one-fourth cup 
butter, one-half tablespoon salt, one-eighth teaspoon pepper. 
Wash and carefully pick over oysters. Strain liquor through 
cheese cloth. Heat liquor to boiling point, add oysters and 
cook until oysters are plump and edges begin to curl. Add 
scalded milk, butter, salt and pepper. Serve with oyster 
crackers. Mrs. Wm. McCumber. 

SPLIT PEA SOUP. 

One cup dried split peas, two and one-half quarts cold 
water, one pint milk, one-half onion, three tablespoons but- 
ter, two tablespoons flour, one and one-half teaspoons salt, 
one-eighth teaspoon pepper, two inch cube fat salt pork. 
Pick over peas and soak several hours, drain. Add cold 
water, pork, and onion. Simmer three or four hours or 
until soft ; rub through a sieve. Add butter and flour 
cooked together, salt and pepper. Dilute with milk, adding 
more if necessary. Amy Howe. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Four large potatoes, four cups of milk, one onion, three 
teaspoons of butter, three teaspoons of flour, salt, pepper 
and parsley to taste. Wash and pare potatoes. Boil until 
tender, drain and mash through sieve. Melt butter and 



30 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 

add dry ingredients, mix and add to potatoes, stirring in 
milk gradually. Heat all together and serve. 

Jean C. Movvat. 

CLEAR TOMATO SOUP. 

Part One. One pint tomatoes, one pint water, one small 
onion, one bay leaf, six cloves. Part Two. One teaspoon 
sugar, two teaspoons cornstarch, one teaspoon salt, one- 
fourth teaspoon pepper, two tablespoons butter. Boil part 
one twenty minutes, strain and put back in kettle, add corn- 
starch mixed with water. Add butter and seasoning. 

Bessie McCumbek. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

One quart water, one quart tomatoes, one quart milk, one 
tablespoon butter, one tablespoon cornstarch, a little parsley, 
three whole cloves, one sliced onion, one teaspoon sugar, 
one-half teaspoon soda, pepper to suit taste. Boil water, 
tomatoes, onion, cloves, sugar and parsley together for fif- 
teen minutes. Add soda and strain. Thicken the milk with 
corstarch, add butter and tomatoes and do not boil. 

Mrs. J. H. Kistner. 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 

One-third cup carrot, one-half cup celery, one-half onion, 
one quart water, one-third cup turnip, one and one-half 
cups potatoes (raw), one-half tablespoon chopped parsley, 
five tablespoons butter. Cut all fine, then measure. Cook 
vegetables, except potatoes, ten minutes in four tablespoons 
butter, stirring constantly. Add potatoes, cover and cook 
two minutes. Add water and boil one hour. Then add 
rest of butter and parsley. Season and serve. 

Mrs. Benj. Manierre. 



This 
Hand 
Can 
Do the 
Work 




Many uses and full 
Directions on Large 
Sifter-Can - 10c 



Old Dutch 
Cleanser 



32 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 33 



34 BETH ANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 35 



Meats 



Some hae meat and canna eat 
And some wad eat that want it, 
But ive hae ineat and zve can eat, 
Sae let the Lord be thankit. 



MEATS 



-Burns. 



BEEF CUTLETS. 

Two pounds of round steak not less than one inch thick 
or more, three good sized onions, one ripe tomato or one 
tablespoon of chili sauce. Rub steak all over with flour, 
cut into cutlets; meanwhile slice onions and put into frying 
pan with sweet drippings to brown. When done, remove 
into stewpan. Put cutlets into frying pan and brown both 
sides. When done put this into stewpan. Pour hot water 
into frying pan, stir and bring to a boil and pour over 
cutlets, add a little salt, pepper and cloves. Simmer until 
lender. Mrs. John FiSher. 

BEEF LOAF. 

Three pounds round steak (ground), one package Uneeda 
biscuits, one tablespoon salt, one teaspoon pepper, season 
with sage to taste, one half dozen onions, one pint milk, two 
eggs. Bake in oven one and one-half hours. 

Jean McGilp. 

BEEF LOAF. 

One and one-half pounds round steak, one-half pound 
pork (salt pork will do), one cup bread crumbs, one-half 
cup sweet milk, one teaspoon chopped onion, two eggs, salt 



36 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



and pepper to taste. A little parsley also improves it. 
Grind meat and bread crumbs. Beat eggs slightly, add 
milk, mix all thoroughly and shape into a roll. Grease pan 
and when placed in oven add boiling water enough to keep 
moist. When in half hour pour one-half can tomatoes over 
top and baste with juice. Bake one hour. 

Mrs. Oscar L. McMurry. 

ROAST BEEF. 

Wipe, put on a rack in dripping pan skin side down, rub 
over with salt, and dredge meat and pan with flour. Place 
in a hot oven that the surface may be quickly seared, thus 
preventing escape of inner juices. After flour in pan is 
browned, reduce heat and baste with fat which has tried 
out ; if meat is quite lean it may be necessary to put trim- 
mings of fat in pan. Baste every ten minutes. If this 
rule is followed meat will be found more juicy. When meat 
is about half done turn it over and dredge with flour that 
skin side may be uppermost for final browning. If there 
is danger of flour burning in pan, add a small quantity of 
water. 

TIME TABLE FOR ROASTING BEEF. 

Sirloin or rib, rare, weight five pounds, one hour, five 
minutes. 

Sirloin or rib, well done, weight five pounds, one hour, 
twenty minutes. 

Sirloin or rib, rare, weight five pounds, one hour, thirty 
minutes. 

Sirloin or rib, well done, weight ten pounds, one hour, 
fifty minutes. 

GRAVY from ROAST BEEF. 

Leave four teaspoons of fat in pan, add four tablespoons 
flour and stir until well browned. The flour, dredged and 
browned in pan, should give additional color to gravy. Add 
gradually one and one-half cups boiling water. Cook five 
minutes, season with salt and pepper, and strain. If flour 
should burn in pan, gravy will be full of black particles. 

Mrs. V. G. Trueblood. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 37 



BONELESS BIRDS. 

Two pounds round steak, strips of bacon, little onion, salt 
and pepper. Roll up and stick together with tooth picks. 
Roll well in flour, salt and pepper a little. Have ready hot 
butter in skillet, brown well, cover with boiling water. Cook 
slowly one and one-half hours. Serve hot. 

Mrs. Nelle T. Howard. 

CHICKEN BLANQUETTE. 

Meat from one chicken cut in pieces, one cup chicken 
stock, one cup milk, four level teaspoons butter, four level 
tablespoons flour, one level tablespoon lemon juice, yolks 
two eggs, speck of paprika and one teaspoon salt. Make 
sauce, add seasoning and eggs, cook a moment and pour 
over chicken. Mrs. J. H. Burdett. 

CHICKEN EN CASSEROLE. 

Two and one-half pounds chicken cut in pieces as for 
stewing, one tin mushrooms, one carrot, one onion, one 
tablespoon chopped parsley, one teaspoon salt, one-half tea- 
spoon pepper, one tablespoon flour, two cups boiling water, 
one stalk celery, half cup butter. Clean and dress chicken 
and either stew or steam until tender. Melt the butter in a 
frying pan, add all the vegetables chopped fine, cook five 
minutes and then add the flour. Add all the seasonings to 
the hot water, pour into the frying pan and let it cook five 
minutes. Put the chicken in a casserole, dredge with flour, 
dust with salt and pepper and pour the contents of the frying 
pan over it. Place it in the oven and cook until the chicken 
is thoroughly browned, about one and one-half hours, in 
an oven of medium heat. Remove from the oven, cover 
the dish and serve in the casserole. 

Mrs. William G. Kress. 

CHICKEN IN CASSEROLE OR PATTY SHELLS. 

Two cups of cooked chicken cut in cubes, one-half cup of 
small French mushrooms, one-half dozen very tiny onions 



38 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



which have been boiled in two waters, one dozen steamed 
potato balls, one cup boiled celery cut small and drained. 
Cover all thisi with cream sauce made of half rich chicken 
stock and cream. Lastly add shredded pimentoes. 

Mrs. John Hellweg. 

CREAMED CHICKEN. 

Eight pounds chicken, stewed, cooled and cut fine. Make 
a sauce of the following: ingredients and mix with the 
chicken ; one quart sweet milk, one cup sweet cream, three- 
fourths cup butter, three-fourths cup flour, juice of one 
large lemon (added the last thing) one can mushrooms. 
Cover with cracker crumbs and bake twenty minutes. Will 
serve twenty-five persons. Mrs. W. H. Adkinson. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Prepare two chickens for stewing. Season and cook un- 
til tender. Pour off liquid and let stand until cool enough 
to remove all bones and skin. Place meat in a baking dish, 
add one can mushrooms, one teacup peas, one teacup small 
potatoes, balls or cubes, and one-half teacup button onions, 
all of which, with the exception of mushrooms, must be 
previously cooked and seasoned. Then pour over all the 
liquid slightly thickened and cover with a crust made of 
rich biscuit dough. Bake twenty minutes. 

Mrs. Benj. M.\nierre. 

CHILI CON CARNE. 

This can be made after having Hamburg steak. Take 
three balls, cover with water and gravy left over, cook 
until tender, then add one chopped green pepper, one onion, 
one can red kidney beans, salt and pepper to taste, and one 
pint tomatoes. Cook slowly one half hour. Enough for 
four or five people. Mrs. Edwin Bebb. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 39 



GERMAN CHOP SUEY. 

Two pounds Hamburger, fried to a nice brown, three 
onions, one stalk celery cut up in small pieces, one can 
tomatoes, salt and pepper to taste. Boil one hour, add 
noodles about fifteen minutes before serving. 

Mrs. D. J. Roberts. 

CREOLE STEAK. 

One pound chopped round steak, one half cup tomato 
pulp, one-half cup bread crumbs, yolk of one egg, one 
teaspoon salt, one half teaspoon pepper. Bake (in covered 
pan) in moderate oven one-half hour. Uncover and take 
twenty minutes to brown. Serve with tomato sauce. The 
mould may be lined with rice and the whole steamed. 

Mary Howe. 

CROQUETTES. 

Take any kind of meat or fowl chopped very fine. To 
this add a drawn butter made with one cup of milk, small 
piece of butter, tablespoon flour, season to taste, then mix 
all well and put in cool place until stiff. Shape and dip in 
egg, then breadcrumbs, and fry in hot fat. 

Mrs. Krapp. 

ENGLISH ROAST DUCK. 

Select a young, fat duck. The lower part of the legs and 
webbing of the feet should be soft. Singe and draw the 
duck in the same manner as a chicken. Wipe it inside and 
out with a damp cloth. Weigh. Fill with potato or bread 
stufifing. Truss in the same manner as a chicken. Place on 
a rack in a baking pan, cover the breast with slices of 
bacon, and put one-half cup water and one-half teaspoon 
salt in the pan. Bake in a hot oven, allowing twenty min- 
utes for every pound and twenty minutes over. Serve with 
giblet sauce. Mrs. John Roland Robertson. 



40 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BAKED HAM. 

Take a slice of raw ham cut one and one-half inches 
thick from near center of ham. Flour on both sides, put 
in pan and pour around it cooked tomatoes to equal depth 
of ham. Bake very slowly at least two and one-half hours. 

Mrs. E. R. Linn. 

BAKED HAM. 

A slice of ham about three-fourths of an inch thick, par- 
boil, cut ofif fat and put (fat) through grinder; spread on 
the ham and cover all with brown sugar. Core apples and 
season with sugar and spice, put in pan with ham, and a 
few tablespoons of water and bake all in very slow oven 
for fifty minutes. Put a cover over the ham to keep it from 
browning too quickly — not covering the apples, however. 

Mrs. Ray McKee. 

BAKED HAM. 

Between six and eight pounds of ham, one pint of milk, 
one pint of water, one-half cup brown sugar, six whole 
cloves. Let ham stand in cold water over night, covered, 
if it is to be used for six; or seven o'clock dinner, take out 
of water in morning, wipe dry and set away where it will 
be kept cool. When ready to bake put ham in double 
roaster, mix the pint of milk and pint of water together, 
add sugar, pour all over ham, add cloves and bake three 
and one-half to four hours in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. W. G. Kress. 

BOILED HAM. 

Soak several hours or over night in cold water to cover. 
Wash thoroughly, trim ofif hard skin near end of bone, put 
in kettle, cover with cold water, heat tcx boiling point and 
cook slowly until tender. (Ham twelve to fourteen pounds 
requires four to five hours). Remove kettle from range and 
set aside, that ham may partially cool, then take from 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 41 



water, remove outside skin, sprinkle with sugar and sifted 
cracker crumbs, and stick with cloves one-half inch apart. 
Bake one hour in a slow oven, basting with drippings. 
Serve cold, thinly sliced. Alice Howe. 

HAMBURGER WITH RICE. 

Take a pound of Hamburger and one-half cup of washed 
rice. Mix together with seasoning and mould into balls. 
Take one-half can tomatoes, heat and strain as for soup, 
put into kettles and drop the meat balls in, cover and cook 
half an hour. Mrs. W. H. Fleming. 

IRISH STEW— MUTTON. 

Cut remains of cold roast mutton in medium pieces (bone 
too). Put in pot with some of hquor meat was roasted 
in (no water), four onions sliced, four carrots and three 
turnips cut small, and one can tomatoes. Cover and cook 
for three fourths of an hour, stirring often. Then add six 
or eight large potatoes (whole) and hot water to cover 
them. Cook until tender. Thicken gravy with flour and 
water and serve at once. Mrs. C. L. Hays. 

BRAISED LIVER WITH CARROTS. 

Parboil the liver, cut in inch squares, make a brown sauce, 
put into it a cup of stewed and diced carrots. Season to 
taste. Add liver, place in casserole and cook in slow oven 
for two hours. Mrs. Grant Smith. 

LIVER, MEXICAN STYLE. 

One pound liver, two medium sized tomatoes, two medium 
sized onions, two sweet peppers minced, several slices of 
bacon. Parboil the slices of liver, roll in flour ; arrange 
in the bottom of a baking dish a layer of sliced onions, 
upon this the tomatoes sliced, and the minced peppers ; 
upon this bed place the liver, the slices of bacon on top. 
Bake an hour in a moderate oven. Marjorie Lyon. 



42 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



MEAT LOAF. 

Two pounds round steak and one pound lean fresh pork 
ground fine, one cup cooked tomatoes, three eggs, one cup 
cracker crumbs, three green sweet peppers (from which the 
seeds and white membranes have been removed) chopped 
fine, salt to taste. Form into a loaf, press hard into a paper 
lined pan. Bake slowly for one-half hour and rapidly for 
fifteen minutes. Pour off liquor and) make gravy to pour 
about the loaf when turned out. 

Mrs. R. H. Valentine. 

SOUTHERN MEAT LOAF. 

One pound iHamburg steak, one-half pound (&ausage 
meat, one small onion chopped fine, two eggs, three slices 
stale bread, first soaked in hot water and squeezed dry, 
then chopped (or cracker crumbs), one tablespoon flour, 
pinch pepper and salt, one can corn. Mix all well together 
and bake about forty minutes or until nicely browned in 
individual bread pan which has been well buttered. 

Mrs. J. F. Ott. 

MEAT PUDDING. 

Mix one pound chopped cooked meat, three ounces fat 
pork cooked and chopped, one tablespoon powdered herbs, 
one-fourth cup capers, one cucumber pickle chopped fine, 
four beaten eggs, salt and pepper to taste. Pack into 
round buttered dish and steam one-half hour. When cold 
turn from mold and serve sliced thin with green vegetable 
salad. Slices of hard boiled eggs may be pressed against 
the sides of mold before meat is put into it. 

This dish is particularly good, made of roast mutton and 
served hot, surrounded with buttered string beans, and a 
rich, well flavored brown sauce, in a dish apart. 

Bessie McCumber. 

MEAT ROLL. 

One pound plain round steak, one pound chopped beef. 
Mix the chopped beef with two chopped sweet peppers, 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 43 



one onion, ten olives cut from the seeds, salt and pepper. 
Chop all together and roll up in the round steak, tie, and 
cover with one can tomatoes and four onions, season and 
bake slowly two hours. Mrs. T. S. McCord. 

NORWEGIAN BIRDS. 

One pound round steak, one-half pound pork sausage, one 
onion. Chop onion and mix with sausage. Cut steak in 
small pieces and pound until thin and flat. Wrap each piece 
aroimd a spoonful of the pork mixture, skewer, brown in 
fat, pour over boiling water to cover and simmer about two 
hours. Serve with thick gravy. Mrs. H. T. Baker. 

STUFFED PEPPERS. 

Six green peppers. Mix one cup uncooked rice, three- 
fourths cup chopped meat, salt, pepper, allspice and one 
egg. Remove seeds and parboil peppers about five minutes, 
stuff with meat and rice mixture. Boil in tomato sauce 
about two hours (slow boiling). 

Tomato Sauce — Boil and strain tomatoes, two table- 
spoons lard and two tablespoons flour, salt to taste. Let 
brown and cook up with tomato juice. Put peppers in and 
boil. Be careful not to burn. Suzanne Gieszer. 

PAPRIKA SCHNITZEL. 

Dip one and one-half pound veal cutlet in flour or cracker 
crumbs and fry in butter. While this is frying peel and 
slice six large onions, and when meat is done put the onions 
into the same pan and fry a nice brown. Put two large 
tablespoons flour into the onions and mix thoroughly, then 
make gravy with milk. When the gravy is thoroughly 
cooked, mix paprika into it until it is a little peppery. Pour 
over meat and serve. Mrs. T. S. McCord. 

SAUSAGE ROLLS. 

Have some puff paste, have some minced beef seasoned 
with pepper and salt. Roll paste to about half an inch, then 



44 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 

with a cutter cut five inches square, as many as required. 
Put two ounces of minced beef on square, brush edges with 
egg, roll them up from the one side and press down, brush 
over top with egg and bake in a quick oven from twelve 
to fifteen minutes. Mrs. John Fisher. 

SPANISH CHOPPED MEAT. 

One pint of any cold meat chopped, one cup bread 
crumbs, one cup water, cold, one large pepper, one large 
onion, one large cup tomatoes. Put all through grinder, 
but keep in separate lots. In a round baking tin or dish 
put a layer of meat, then breadcrumbs, pepper, onion, to- 
matoes, salt and pepper, and so on until all materials have 
been used ; dot with small pieces of butter, pour on cup of 
cold water and bake three-fourths of an hour. While bak- 
ing, with a fork work away from sides of pan towards cen- 
ter so water will reach all parts of tin. This meat, when 
cold, makes very good filling for sandwiches. 

Mrs. William G. Kress. 



ROUND STEAK. 

Round steak three and one-half inches thick. Pound with 
edge of plate until tender. While pounding fill with flour, 
pepper and salt (bread crumbs if desired), cover over with 
onions, apples and green peppers cut fine. Roast two hours. 

Mrs. R. D. Flood. 

SMOTHERED STEAK. 

Place one and one-half pound flank or round steak in 
casserole or granite pan, season ; add a thick layer of 
chopped onions and one pimento or a portion of sweet pep- 
per. Pour over all one-half can tomatoes. Cover closely 
and bake in oven one hour or until steak is tender. Un- 
cover and brown the last half hour if desired. 

Mrs. Wilford M. Keener. 



BElllAXV UXJON COOK BOOK 45 



SMOTHERED STEAK. 

One and one-half pounds steak, five or six medium 
sized onions, one cup water. Slice onions and put a 
layer in spider, then the steak, another layer of onions 
on top and a few dashes of pepper. Cover closely, but 
watch it, and if water boils away add more hot water. 
When onions are done the meat will be tender. Lay on 
hot platter. Take two tablespoons of corn starch mixed 
smoothly in cold water, add one-half teaspoonful of salt, 
stir it in the gravy and pour over steak. 

Mrs. John H. Kistner. 

SWISS STEAK. 

One slice of round steak cut one inch thick, flour, salt, 
pepper. Method. — Place meat on a board and sprinkle 
thickly with flour. Pound the flour into the steak with 
the edge of a plate until all is pounded in. Sprinkle on 
more flour and pound, repeating this until meat will hold 
no more. Turn the steak and pound flour as directed 
above. Heat a skillet smoking hot. Put in beef fat 
and place the steak in the pan. When both sides are 
seared over, pour hot water on the meat until it nearly 
covers it. Cook slowly from one to three hours, time 
depending upon the thickness of the steak. Season, serve 
on a hot platter with gravy over the meat. 

^ Mary Howe. 



TENDERLOIN STEAK AND MUSHROOMS. 

Tenderloin steaks an inch thick, cut in as many pieces 
as you like. Lay in well buttered dripping pan not 
touching each other, add one cup boiling water, and 
cook in oven thirty minutes, basting often. Ten minutes 
before serving remove from oven, season with salt and 
pepper, and lay a very small slice of onion and thin slice 
of tomato over each steak. Pour a little melted butter 
over all and return to oven. Heat a can of French mush- 



46 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



rooms in their own liquor, drain, and place on pieces of 
steak, also drippings. Garnish with parsley. 

Mrs. John Hellweg. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 

Cold cooked veal, freed of all skin, gristle and bone. 
Measure one and one-half cups packed solid and chopped 
fine. Make a stiff white sauce as follows : two table- 
spoons butter melted, when bubbling add two table- 
spoons cornstarch. Stir until smooth and cook two min- 
utes. Add one cup milk and cook until smooth. Add 
another small cup of milk gradually, keeping stiff. Add 
the sauce to the meat with one teaspoon salt, one tea- 
spoon celery salt, one heaping teaspoon chopped parsley, 
two teaspoons lemon juice, few drops onion juice, and 
little white pepper. Mix well and spread out to cool. 
When cool shape into balls and roll in bread crumbs, 
then shape into croquettes. Roll in one beaten egg with 
one tablespoon of water added. Roll in crumbs again. 
Fry in basket in kettle of hot lard. Dry on brown paper. 

Mrs. C. L. Hays. 

VEAL CUTLETS, BREADED. 

Dip cutlets in egg, then cracker crumbs, and brown 
well in either butter or Crisco. When thoroughly 
browned pour in enough milk to cover, put into oven to 
bake slowly for three-fourths of an hour. Once tried 
you will never cook them any other way. 

Mrs. W. J. McDonald. 

VEAL LOAF. 

Three pounds veal chopped, uncooked, two pounds 
boiled ham, chopped, six eggs boiled hard and chopped, 
catsup, salt, pepper and butter. Put a layer of the veal 
in a bread pan, season with salt, pepper and butter and 
catsup, then a layer of ham, and over this a layer of the 
chopped eggs. Repeat until pan is full. Bake in a mod- 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 47 



erate oven about two hours, then cool under a weight. 
This amount makes three layers of veal and two of ham 
and eggs in an ordinary bread pan. 

Mrs. Arthur D. Heffron. 

DUMPLINGS. 

To one cup of flour, one heaping teaspoon of salt, sift 
several times, add sweet milk enough to make a soft 
dough. Drop into boiling water or soup and boil twenty 
minutes without removing cover. Mrs. A. Kruse. 

DUMPLINGS FOR CHILDREN. 

Two and one-half cups milk, a pinch of salt, butter 
size of one-half egg. Bring this to a boil. Then stir in 
enough flour to make a stifif batter. It is better to cook 
this in a double boiler. Let this cool, not cold, and stir 
in yolks of four eggs ; last, the beaten whites. Can be 
dropped in boiling soup, etc. 

MARROW DUMPLINGS FOR SOUP. 

One-quarter cup beef marrow, one egg, one saltspoon 
salt, cracker crumbs. Mash the marrow, add the egg and 
salt and stir well. Stir in enough cracker crumbs to roll 
into little balls. Drop into broth and boil five minutes. 

Mrs. B. F. Wegner. 

POTATO DUMPLINGS. 

Two medium sized potatoes, one-half teaspoon butter, 
salt, one teaspoon sugar, mace and nutmeg, two eggs, 
flour. Mash potatoes while warm, add butter, a pinch 
of salt, sugar, a little mace or nutmeg. Beat yolks and 
whites separately and mix with potatoes. Add enough 
flour to make a stiff batter and boil for five minutes. 
Drop one-half teaspoonful at a time into the soup and 
boil. Lillian Bargquist. 



48 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



STUFFING FOR TURKEY OR GOOSE. 

One pint stale bread crumbs, one teaspoon powdered 
sage, half teaspoon salt, fourth teaspoon pepper, one table- 
spoon melted butter, half cup warmed milk and one well 
beaten egg. 

For Goose Stuffing. — Two onions, size of an egg, to be 
boiled and mashed, and added' to stuffing. 

Mrs. Gardner Greenleaf. 

TURKEY DRESSING. 

Rub thoroughly together in a deep dish one quart 
bread crumbs and one large tablespoon butter. Mix 
with these one tablespoon mixed herbs, rubbed fine, 
heaping teaspoon salt, and one-half as much pepper. 
Chop together and add to the crumbs twelve nice mush- 
rooms, either fresh or canned, and twelve nicely drained 
oysters. Add also a well-beaten egg. Aloisten whole 
with Varm water, enough to make it stick together — 
try a pint, adding it slowly. Mushrooms and oysters 
may be omitted. Mrs. Gardner Greenleaf. 



FISH 



CREAMED CODFISH. 

Three-fourths pound dried codfish, two level table- 
spoons of butter, two level tablespoons of flour, one and 
one-half cups of milk, dash of pepper, salt if needed. 
Shred codfish and put on in cold water. T.et come to a 
boil and drain. Pour on sauce and cook three minutes. 

Jean C. Mowat. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 49 



FINNAN HADDIE. 

Pour boiling water over the fish from the teakettle, 
take it out of the water, lay it on a baking pan, brush 
over with butter and pepper and bake in a hot oven 
about eight or ten minutes. Mrs. Geo. D. Young. 

BAKED HALIBUT STUFFED WITH OYSTERS. 

Secure two nice halibut steaks of the same size, wash 
and dry them. Make a dressing of a cupful of bread 
crumbs, tablespoon of butter, one tgg and about a dozen 
oysters, or less if desired, and salt to taste. Place one 
steak in the baking pan, place on this the stuffing and 
cover with the other steak. Bake about thirty minutes, 
keeping the pan covered for the first twenty minutes. 
Serve on a hot platter with garnish of sliced lemon. 

LOBSTER NEWBURG. 

One and one-half cups of cream, few dashes of pepper, 
one-fourth teaspoon salt, one and one-half tablespoons 
butter, three yolks of egg, one and one-half cups lob- 
ster diced. Cook the butter, salt and pepper a few min- 
utes in a saucepan or blazer. Remove from fire, add the 
yolks beaten with the cream. Stir carefully and serve 
with toast or crackers. Add mushrooms if desired. 

Mrs. W. D. Gordon. 

SALMON CHOPS. 

Take one large can of salmon, remove bones and cut 
up fine. Make very thick cream sauce, using two-thirds 
pint milk, and add to salmon. Put three shredded wheat 
biscuits through meat grinder and add to the above ; 
salt and pepper to taste. Make into shapes like chops 
and take pieces of macaroni about four inches long and 
put one in each chop to represent the bone, then dip 
in egg and roll in cracker crumbs. Fry in deep fat. 

Mrs. O. W. Johnson. 



50 BETHANY UXION COOK BOOK 



ESCALLOPED SALMON. 

One can salnioix, one-half cup butter, two cups milk, 
two eggs, one tablespoon flour, one cup cracker crumbs, 
salt and pepper. Alelt the butter in the milk ; when 
boiling thicken with the flour previously mixed to a 
paste with milk, and add the well beaten eggs. Butter 
a baking dish and fill with layers of salmon, crumbs and 
dressing, seasoning to taste. Bake in moderate oven one- 
half hour. Mrs. H. E. Stroup. 



SALMON LOAF. 

One can of salmon, six crackers rolled fine, one table- 
spoon of melted butter, one-half cup of milk, one beaten 
egg, salt and pepper to taste. Mix well together, shape 
into a loaf and place in the upper part of double boiler 
without water, and steam for an hour, or cook thus in 
fireless cooker for two hours. ]\Irs. J. C. Arnold. 



SALMON LOAF WITH TOMATO SAUCE. 

One can salmon, pour ofif liquor, pick out bones and 
skin and mix smoothly. Add four teaspoons melted but- 
ter. One-half cup fine rolled crackers, and season with 
pepper and salt and a little grated onion. Beat three 
eggs thoroughly and add to mixture. Steam in a round 
can one hour and a quarter. Always tie a cloth on the 
under side of the cover of the steamer to absorb the 
beads of water. When ready to use lay the roll on a 
platter. Garnish with parsley and serve in slices with 
tomato sauce. 

Tomato Sauce. — Boil one pint of canned tomatoes 
with one cup of water and several slices of onion. Cook 
ten or fifteen minutes. Rub through a sieve. Blend a 
large tablespoon butter with flour in a frying pan, add 
tomato juice and make a cream-like sauce and serve hot. 

Mrs. R. H. Valentine. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 51 



AN EGG SAUCE TO SERVE WITH BAKED FISH. 

Take one cupful of water in which the fish has been 
boiled, rub together one tablespoon of butter, two table- 
spoons of flour and the beaten yolk of one egg; pour on 
this the water from the fish, stirring it until smooth ; 
add a little salt and pepper and let it boil five minutes, 
stirring all the time. Have ready three hard boiled eggs 
and one tablespoon of parsley chopped fine and stir these 
into the sauce after it is taken from the fire. 



START THE DAY RIGHT 

WITH A BREAKFAST OF 

QUAKER OATS 



Don't forget that you can obtain the choicest cuts of 

BEEF, LAMB, VEAL AND PORK 

ALSO FRESH DRESSED POULTRY AT ALL TIMES AT 

GOETZ ^ SONS' MARKET 

Phone Washington Heights 31 1302 West 103rd Street 



S. BROUWER 

AGENT 

Grand Central Hand Laundry 

219 West 110th Place 

Phone West Pullman 6513 



Phones Morgan Park 22 and 28 






KISKADDON 


^ 


BURKE 


GROCERIES and 


MEATS 


Morgan and Commercial Avenues 


MORGAN PARK 




ILLINOIS 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK S3 



54 BETH.4NY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 55 



V egetables 



]'oit kin talk 'boat your neiv-fashioned dishes and high- 
falutin' vittles; but ivhen you come right dozvn to it, there 
ain't no better eatin' than a dish o' baked beans. 

— Eugene Field. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 

One quart navy beans, three-fourths pound fat salt 
pork, one tablespoon salt, one tablespoon molasses, one 
tablespoon sugar, one teaspoon mustard. Soak beans 
over night in cold water, in the morning drain, add fresh 
water, parboil until skins burst. Place pork in beans, 
then the rest of ingredients, pour over this one quart hot 
water. Cover and bake six or eight hours. Uncover 
the last hour to let beans brown. 

Mrs. George McNeil. 

DRESSING FOR BEETS. 

One-half cup vinegar, one-half cup hot water, salt, 
sugar, pepper to taste, small piece of butter. Let boil 
five minutes. Thicken with one tablespoon of flour and 
pour over beets. Mrs. John McKeever. 

BAKED CABBAGE. 

Four-pound head cabbage, one-third cup butter, one- 
third cup flour, one-half teaspoon vinegar, two teaspoons 
salt, paprika. Cut cabbage coarsely and parboil forty- 
five minutes in salted water; drain; put in baking dish 
in alternating layers with sauce made as follows : Blend 
flour and butter in pan, add boiling water until of proper 
consistency, season with vinegar, salt and paprika. If 
cabbages are small they may be boiled whole or simply 
scored across the top. Mrs. Edwin Bebb. 



56 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 

ESCALLOPED CABBAGE WITH TOMATO. 

To Boil Cabbage. (Avoiding Odor). 

Cut cabbage into quarters, cut away hard mid rib 
and wash thoroughly. Place a few pieces at a time, so 
as not to reduce the temperature, into a large kettle of 
rapidly boiling salted water. Allow to boil rapidly and 
uncovered until tender, frequently pushing cabbage under 
water. Drain and season. Place alternate layers of 
cooled cabbage and tomato sauce in a baking dish, cover 
with buttered crumbs and bake until crumbs are brown. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 

(Quantity for Small Head of Cabbage.) 

Two to four tablespoons butter, four tablespoons flour, 
one-half teaspoon salt, one-eighth teaspoon pepper, two 
cups sifted tomato pulp. Proceed as for white sauce. 

Bessie McCumber. 

RED CABBAGE. 

To a small head of red cabbage which has been cut 
as for slaw, prepare a dressing of one good sized onion, 
large tablespoon of bacon drippings, one cup of water, 
one-half cup of vinegar. Add cabbage, season with salt 
and pepper to suit the taste, cook in fireless cooker over 
night, or five hours will do ; on gas on slow flame about 
two hours. Before serving thicken with browned flour 
a level tablespoon full. Mrs. J. G. Feldes. 

CAULIFLOWER ESCALLOPED WITH CHEESE. 

Remove leaves and stalk from cauliflower, separate into 
flowerets and soak thirty minutes in cold water to cover. 
Cook twenty minutes or until soft in boiling water 
salted. Drain and serve at once. For a cooked cauli- 
flower of medium size make one and one-half cups white 
sauce as follows : 

Sauce. — Three tablespoons flour, three tablespoons 
butter, one-half teaspoon salt, pepper, one and one-half 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 57 



cups milk, one-half cup grated cheese. Dissolve one- 
half cup cheese in sauce and pour over cauliflower placed 
in a buttered baking dish, sprinkle whole thickly with 
buttered crumbs and place in hot oven to brown crumbs. 

CARROTS AND PEAS. 

Wash and scrape ofif the skins from young carrots, cut 
into dice of uniform size and let stand in cold water for 
half an hour. Shell enough green peas to make the same 
quantity as you have of the carrots and put into cold 
water (canned peas may be used). Drain both vege- 
tables, mix, put into a sauce pan, cover with salted boil- 
ing water and cook until tender. Drain, pour white 
sauce over them and serve. Mrs. R. H. Valentine. 

SWISS CHARD. 

Carefully pick over, wash in several waters. When 
young and tender put in a stew pan, allow to heat grad- 
ually and boil twenty-five minutes, or until tender, in 
its own juices. Old chard should have the white mid- 
rib removed, cook in boiling salted water and drain thor- 
oughly. Chop fine, reheat and season with butter, salt 
and pepper. Serve with hard boiled eggs, vinegar and 
olive oil. Alice Howe. 

ESCALLOPED CORN. 

One can corn, one-half package Uneeda biscuits broken 
fine, one pint milk, four tablespoons butter, salt and 
pepper to taste. Mix all ingredients, adding butter in 
small lumps. Place in buttered baking dish and bake in 
moderate oven twenty minutes. ]\Irs. Wm. McCumber. 

CORN OYSTERS. 

To one can of corn add the yolks of three eggs and 
three or four grated crackers. Fold in the stiffly beaten 
whites of eggs and fry in equal quantities of butter and 
lard on a griddle, using a teaspoon to drop the batter. 
Serve immediately. Mrs. Harry Daugherty. 



58 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



CORN PUDDING. 

One can corn or two cups grated corn, one cup milk, 
four soda crackers rolled fine, one €:gg; season with salt, 
pepper and butter. Mix ingredients in the order and bake 
slowly forty-five minutes. Lillian D. Barquist. 

KOHL-RABI. 

Wash and pare kohl-rabi, cut in slices or quarters, 
and cook in boiling salted water until soft. Drain, mash 
and season with butter, salt and pepper. 

Alice Howe. 

LENTEN LOAF. 

Two cups of mashed seasoned beans, one cup of 
chopped English walnuts, one-half cup of thin cream, a 
saltspoon of fine sage, and one-half cup of fine bread 
crumbs. Mix and press in an oiled tin and bake until 
brown. Mrs. J. C. Arnold. 

LENTILS. 

One pint lentils, two level tablespoons flour, three level 
tablespoons butter, two level tablespoons vinegar. Wash 
lentils very thoroughly and soak over night. Drain and 
cover with fresh water, boil slowly until tender — about 
two hours. One-half hour before serving add flour 
blended with butter, vinegar, one teaspoon salt, one-half 
saltspoon paprika. Variety may be given by the addi- 
tion of either minced onion, catsup, curry powder, ground 
pimentoes or scalded frankfurt sausages. 

Mrs. Edwin Bebb. 

CURRIED LENTILS. 

Soak a half pint of red lentils in water for three or 
four hours. Drain ofif water, put in saucepan one ounce 
of butter and one onion sliced thin, cook until a nice 
brown ; add lentils and one pint boiling water. Simmer 



BliTILlX)' iX/UX COOK BOOK 59 



one hour. Then add juice of one-half lemon, one dessert- 
spoon curry powder, salt and pepper. Cook ten min- 
utes longer and serve with boiled rice. 

Mrs. J. H. Ostr.vnder. 

BUTTERED ONIONS. 

Peel small onions, under running water to avoid efifect 
on eyes and cook until tender in boiling water, chang- 
ing the water once during cooking. Coat with melted 
butter, roll in fine crumbs and brown in oven on dish in 
which they are to be served. Bessie McCumber. 

PEA TIMBALES. 

Two-thirds can peas, two eggs, two tablespoons but- 
ter, one teaspoon salt, one-eighth teaspoon pepper, cay- 
enne, one-half teaspoon onion juice. Drain and rinse 
the peas, rub through a strainer ; add the melted butter, 
the well beaten eggs and the seasonings. Turn into but- 
tered moulds set in pan of hot water. Bake until firm, 
about twenty minutes. Serve with white sauce in which 
the other one-third can peas are put in whole. 

STUFFED GREEN PEPPERS. 

Six sweet peppers, four medium sized tomatoes, one 
medium sized onion, one cup boiled rice. Season with 
a little butter, salt, pepper and sugar to taste. Remove 
seeds from peppers, then parboil in cold water a few 
minutes. Cook tomatoes, onion and seasoning about 
one-half hour, add cooked rice. Fill peppers and bake in 
buttered stew^ pan. Add small amount of water to keep 
from burning. Bake one-half hour. This amount will 
fill six large peppers. Cracker crumbs or cold chopped 
meat may be used in place of rice. 

Mrs. Cuthbert Corlett. 

POTATOES AU GRATIN. 

Four level tablespoons butter, four level tablespoons 
flour, two cups milk, one-half teaspoon salt, a few grains 



60 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



pepper. Melt butter, add flour and seasonings, pour on 
milk and stir until smooth. Add two-thirds cup grated 
cheese. Pour over three and one-half cups cold boiled 
potatoes cut in dice and placed in buttered baking dish. 
Sprinkle one-third cup grated cheese over top and bake 
until brown. Mrs. W. H. Sanders. 

BAKED POTATOES WITH CHEESE. 

Four large potatoes, two cups grated cheese, two cups 
medium white sauce. Scoop out baked potatoes from 
skin. Arrange a layer in baking dish, add layer of 
grated cheese. Cover with medium white sauce and con- 
tinue in this way until dish is filled. Place in hot oven 
and bake until brown on top. 

CREAMED POTATOES. 

Reheat two cups cold boiled potatoes, cut in dice, in 
one and one-fourth cups of white sauce. 

Mrs. Arthur J. Cole. 

ESCALLOPED POTATOES. 

Six medium sized potatoes, three cups medium white 
sauce. Slice potatoes very thinly, salt and pepper each 
layer. Pour white sauce over potatoes in buttered baking 
dish. Put cover on dish and bake in moderate oven 
three-fourths to one hour. When nearly done remove 
the cover so that potatoes may become brown. 

FRENCH FRIED POTATOES. 

Wash and pare small potatoes, cut in eighths length- 
wise and soak one hour in cold water. Dry between 
towels and fry in deep fat. Drain on brown paper and 
sprinkle with salt. Care must be taken that fat is not 
too hot. as potatoes must be cooked as well as browned. 

Mrs. Arthur J. Cole. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 61 



STUFFED POTATOES. 

Select potatoes of even size. Cut a thin slice from one 
end that they may stand firm and place in the oven to 
bake. As soon as done, w^ith sharp scissors cut a lid 
from the upper end and scoop out the potatoes into a 
hot bowl, keeping the skin w^hole. Beat the potatoes un- 
til light with two teaspoons of cream, a teaspoon of but- 
ter and the beaten white of one tgg. Salt to taste. Fill 
the skins with the mixture, heaping it high on top. Set 
carefully on end and return to the oven for ten minutes 
to heat. Serve on a platter with sprigs of parsley. 

Mrs. Geo. E. Holmes. 

New potatoes may be cooked mealy enough to mash 
acceptably by being repeatedly put on in cold water and 
allowed to come to a boil. As soon as the water boils, 
put it off and begin again with cold. It does not take 
as much longer than simply boiling as one might think, 
except in case of very large quantity. Mashed potatoes 
are lighter if moistened with hot water than with cold milk. 

Mrs. Isaac Greenacre. 

SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Cook potatoes until soft. Season with salt, pepper and 
butter. Mix well. Mold, into any shape desired and roll 
m cracker crumbs and egg. Drop in boiling grease and 
cook until brown. Mrs. Mary Tweedale. 

STUFFED SWEET POTATOES. 

Bake six medium sized sweet potatoes ; cut lengthwise 
and scoop out inside. Mash, season and fold in beaten 
white of one egg. Refill skins and bake five minutes in 
hot oven. 

SPINACH AND EGGS. 

To one pint of cooked spinach chopped fine together 
with a small onion add a scant tablespoon of browned 
flour and a heaping spoonful of meat drippings or butter. 



62 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



Add enough of the liquid in which spinach was cooked 
to mix smooth. Season with salt and pepper to taste 
and cook ingredients for a few minutes. Arrange on a 
low flat dish with fried eggs enough to cover vegetable. 

Mrs. J. G. Feldes. 

SPINACH IN CROUSTADES. 

Wash spinach in abundance of water, changing water 
frequently and thoroughly removing grit. Cook closely 
covered in water that clings to leaves. Turn over once 
in a while to prevent burning. When tender, chop, sea- 
son with salt and pepper and let cook, uncovered, to 
absorb liquid containing valuable salts. Serve in crous- 
tades, mixed with chopped hard boiled eggs and gar- 
nished with slices of white and yolk pressed through 
sieve. 

To Make Croustades. — Cut the crumb of a stale 
loaf into diamonds, squares or circles, or crust may 
be removed and the loaf used entire. Dip all except upper 
surface of outside into melted butter and toast on hot 
pan to a delicate brown. Remove crumbs and fill with 
spinach. 

Note. — Croustades may also be used for creamed 
chicken or oysters, or for any dish that is usually served 
on toast. 

FRIED SUMMER SQUASH.. 

Select young, tender summer squash and wash clean. 
Have ready hot butter in a skillet, slice the squash in 
this, salt, cover up tight and fry, stirring frequently until 
done. Mrs. Geo. D. Young. 

ESCALLOPED TOMATOES AND ONIONS. 

Peel half a dozen small onions, slice them thin and 
saute in butter or oil without browning them. Peel and 
slice as many ripe tomatoes, butter a baking dish, put in 
a layer of the tomatoes, season with salt and pepper, 
cover with bread crumbs, then add a layer of onions ; con- 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 63 



tinue in this order, having the last layer crumbs, and 
bake one-half hour to forty-five minutes in a moderate 
oven. Cold cooked onions and canned tomatoes may be 
used for this dish. Mrs. John T. Edw.vrds. 




A Perfect Home 

Needs A 

Perfect Roof 

A good kome is first of all a good sKelter from tne 
inclemencies of tne weatner. 

And, before a kome can be a good snelter, it must 
nave a good roof. 

Witnout a satisfactory roof, even tne most costly 
nome will prove a failure as a snelter. 

Asbestoid Shingles 
make a perfect roof 

Asbestoid Sbingles ar^ tbe only prepared snmgles 
on tbe market today guaranteed to give perfect service 
for years. 

Xbey make an ideal roofing for suburban bome, 
bungalo\vs or any building on wbicb a wbite, fire- 
resisting, classy and economical roof is desired. 

MANUFACTURED AND GUARANTEED BY 

Sail Mountain Asbestos Mfg. Co. 

Chicago :: New York :: Scranton 

FOR SALE BY REPUTABLE DEALERS EVERYWHERE 



BETHANY UNION COOK ROOK 65 



66 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETH AN)' UNION COOK BOOK 67 



Saladf 



Let my heart staiid still a moment and this mystery 
explore. — Poe. 

BANANA SALAD. 

Split a banana lengthwise and lay on a lettuce leaf, 
cover with chopped sweet peppers and put mayonnaise 
dressing on top, with chopped nuts on top for dressing. 
After making a regular boiled dressing, take three table- 
spoons of the dressing and add one-half pint of whipped 
cream. Mrs. T. S. McCord. 

BANANA SALAD. 

Cut bananas lengthwise, roll in a mayonnaise dress- 
ing and sprinkle with chopped nuts. Serve on lettuce 
leaves. This is simple and very good. 

Mrs. George P. Ellis. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

One-half cup finely chopped cabbage, one-half cup 
finely cut celery, one-half cup white grapes cut in two 
and seeded, one-half cup shredded lettuce, one-half cup 
or less of chopped walnut meats. Throw lightly together 
and allow to chill. Add salad dressing the last thing 
before serving. Mrs. J. M. Lammedee. 

CHEESE SALAD. 

One Blue Label cheese, one stalk celery, six Brazil 
nuts and one green pepper. Cut fine, mix all together 
with mayonnaise dressing and serve on lettuce leaf. 

Mrs. W. H. Fleming. 



68 BETH. IN V UNION COOK BOOK 



COTTAGE CHEESE SALAD. 

Arrange crisp lettuce leaves on a salad dish. Cover 
them. Break into pieces two balls of cottage cheese. 
Cut a cup of beets (previously boiled until tender) into 
dice and strewn these over the cheese. Cover with two 
tablespoons salad dressing. 

Mrs. Alexander George. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

r 

To one cup diced chicken add one cup celery cut in 
small pieces, cabbage, peas and nuts to taste. Mix with 
good salad dressing. Mrs. J. G. Skinner. 

EGG SALAD. 

Boil six eggs hard and cut into quarters lengthwise. 
Sprinkle with salt and pepper and lay among crisp let- 
tuce leaves. Pour a mayonnaise dressing over all. 

Mrs. R. H. V.'\lentine. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

One cup apples, one cup oranges, one cup bananas, one 
cup white grapes stoned and skinned, one cup pineapple, 
one cup English walnuts broken. Cut fruit in generous 
pieces, serve on head lettuce with the following: 

Salad Dressing. — Yolks of four eggs, one tea- 
spoon salt, one-half teaspoon mustard, one-half cup vin- 
egar, five tablespoons melted butter. Stir well together 
and cook in double boiler, stirring until it begins to 
thicken. When ready to serve add one pint of whipped 
cream. Mrs. Franklyn Hobbs. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

r- 

One cup Malaga grapes, one cup English walnuts, one 
cup celery cut in short pieces, three oranges, three ba- 
nanas. Skin grapes and set on ice while preparing rest. 
Break walnuts in small pieces, slice the peeled oranges 



BETHANY UXION COOK BOOK 69 



and bananas. Line a salad bowl with crisp lettuce. Mix 
the ingredients by tossing up lightly. Squeeze over 
them the juice of a lemon and heap with mayonnaise 
dressing. Mrs. James F. Hosic. 

HAWAIIAN DELIGHT. 

Cut pineapple in pieces and arrange in circle, till center 
with red raspberries or pitted sweet cherries and dot 
with cream cheese. Serve with cream mayonnaise. 

KNICKERBOCKER SALAD. 

Head lettuce, oranges in lobes, California grapes in 
halves, with dressing as follows : 

Thousand Island Dressing. — Alayonnaise dressing with 
the follow^ing ingredients added : Green peppers and 
pimentoes chopped fine and a little chili sauce. 

Mrs. H. O. Day. 

MARGUERITE SALAD. 

Hard boiled eggs divided into one-eighths lengthwise. 
Separate the yolks from the whites and arrange the 
whites on lettuce to represent a marguerite. Mix yolks 
with salad dressing and drop in the center of whites. 

Mary Isabel Mow at. 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 

ORANGE SALAD. 

Peel four oranges, remove the white skin and sepa- 
rate into sections. Arrange on bed of head lettuce and 
serve with French dressing. In making the dressing 
omit the onion juice. 

Salad Dressing. — One saltspoon salt, one-half salt- 
spoon pepper, three tablespoons oil, one tablespoon tar- 
ragon vinegar, one-fourth teaspoon onion juice. Mix in 
the order given, adding the oil slowly. 

Mrs. H. C. Horstman. 



70 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



RED PEPPERS AND CAULIFLOWER SALAD. 

Remove seeds from five scarlet peppers and fill with 
boiled cauliflower, broken into flowerets, and boiled car- 
rots cut in tiny dice. Use French or thin mayonnaisse 
dressing. Dot the top of peppers with the carrot and put 
on very crisp lettuce leaves. Nelle T. Howard. 

SPANISH PEPPER SALAD. 

Dissolve one-half box gelatine in one-half cup cold 
water and one-half cup vinegar, add one-half cup sugar, 
juice one lemon, one scant teaspoon salt, one cup boiling 
water; mix with six canned pimentoes cut up fine, two 
cups celery cut fine and one cup shelled chopped pecans. 
Mould small and serve on lettuce leaf with dressing. 
This serves twelve. 

Dressing. — One teaspoon dry mustard, yolks two eggs, 
two tablespoons olive oil, three tablespoons vinegar, salt 
and pepper. 

PINEAPPLE SALAD. 

On a lettuce leaf put a slice of pineapple, on this a 
slice of tomato, then another slice of pineapple. Use 
either cooked or mayonnaise dressing and sprinkle with 
chopped nut meats. Mrs. Ray McKee. 

PINEAPPLE SALAD. 

Arrange a slice of canned pineapple on lettuce leaves. 
For six people take one cake of cream cheese and mix 
with chopped English walnut meats, and season with a 
little salt and red pepper. This will be quite thick, so 
thin with a little cream. Take a tablespoon and arrange 
on the slice of pineapple and serve with a French dress- 
ing. Pears may be used in the same way, using chopped 
almonds or English walnuts. Mrs. C. W. Humphrey. 

POINSETTIA SALAD. 

Lay a slice of Hawaiian pineapple on a lettuce leaf, 
heat a knife and spread cream or Neufchatel cheese over 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 71 



the pineapple ; arrange strips of pimento like the petals 
of poinsettia over the cheese, heap mayonnaise in the 
center and put a stuffed olive on top. 

Mrs. T. S. McCord. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Eight large potatoes, boiled in skins, chilled in ice box, 
diced and salted ; two large cucumbers and two small 
onions chopped very fine. Mix with potatoes, let stand 
one hour and then add the following dressing: 

Dressing. — Three eggs, one cup vinegar, one heaped 
teaspoon dry mustard, one pinch salt, one tablespoon 
sugar, two tablespoons melted butter, one lemon, one cup 
whipped cream. Put mustard, salt, a little cayenne pep- 
per and sugar into cup and make smooth with a little 
cold water; add enough water to make cup half full, add 
this to vinegar, heat but do not boil. Beat eggs and do 
not let them stand after beating, pour the hot fluid over 
them, very slowly, stirring rapidly to prevent curdling. 
Add butter and lemon juice. When cold add one cup 
whipped cream. Let completed salad stand in covered 
dish in ice box two or three hours before serving. 

Mrs. H. a. Parker. 

TOMATO ASPIC SALAD. 

Cook together one can tomatoes, one carrot, one stalk 
celery and one onion. Strain through a cheese cloth and 
add a teaspoon sugar and a saltspoon each of salt and 
white pepper or paprika. Pour over a half box gelatine 
which has soaked in a cup of cold water. Pour, when 
cooled, into individual molds and serve on lettuce leaves 
with a teaspoon of mayonnaise and an English walnut on 
top of each mold. Mrs. J. C. Arnold. 

STUFFED TOMATOES. 

Select small, firm tomatoes, one for each person. Care- 
fully remove the top and scoop out the pulp. Prepare 
celery, apples, bananas and hard boiled eggs to have an 



72 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



equal portion of each. The amount of each will depend 
upon the number of cases to be filled. Mix these to- 
gether with salad dressing, refill the tomato shells, and 
serve on lettuce leaves. Miss Portwood. 

STUFFED TOMATO SALAD. 

Dissolve one package lemon Jello in one pint boiling 
water. Peel one tomato for each mold, remove core 
and fill with chopped cucumbers or chopped cabbage, 
celery and walnut meats. Place tomatoes filled side 
down in molds and pour over the cooled Jello. Serve 
on lettuce with mayonnaise or any good salad dressing. 

Mrs. Jambs J. Versluis. 

VEGETABLE SALAD. 

One can Spanish red peppers, one-half small head cab- 
bage, one stalk celery, four tomatoes, one cucumber ; cut 
all fine, add one-half can peas, one package lemon Jello 
made with three-fourths pint water. When cool add 
vegetables and set in molds. Serve on lettuce leaves 
with mayonnaise. Mrs. W. J. McDon.xld. 

VEGETABLE SALAD. 

Five beets, four carrots, one stalk celery, one small 
onion. Cook beets and carrots separately until tender, 
then cut into dice; cut celery and onion fine and mix 
all together, adding one-half cup of chopped walnuts if 
desired. Dash of salt and pepper. 

Dressing. — Two , eggs, three-fourths cup sugar, 
creamed together; one heaping tablespoon flour and one 
tablespoon mustard stirred smooth with water; one cup 
A'inegar, one cup water, piece butter size of a walnut. 
Boil in double boiler until thick. Thin with sweet cream. 
Pour this over vegetables. Mrs. John Olson. 

WALDORF SALAD. 

One cup sour apples, one cup celery, one tablespoon 
lemon juice, one-half cup walnut meats broken in pieces. 



BETHANY UXION COOK BOOK 73 



Cut apples in thin slices, cut celery in small pieces. Mix 
with mayonnaise or boiled dressing. 

Mrs. I. G. Daly. 

WINTER SALAD. 

One cup canned peas, two to four tablespoons chopped 
onion, four tablespoons pickles, four tablespoons chopped 
cheese, four hard cooked eggs chopped. Save yolks of 
two eggs for top. 

Cream Salad Dressing. — One teaspoon mustard, few 
grains cayenne, one teaspoon salt, one teaspoon melted 
butter, two teaspoons Hour, yolk of one egg, one and 
one-half teaspoons powdered sugar, one-third cup hot 
vinegar, one-half cup heavy cream. Mix dry ingredients, 
add butter, egg and vinegar slowly, cook over boiling 
water, stirring constantly until mixture thickens, cool and 
add to heavy cream beaten until stiflf. 

Mrs. Henry Flasher. 



SALAD DRESSING 



BOILED DRESSING. 

One egg, beaten, one tablespoon of sugar, one-fourth 
teaspoon of salt, one-half teaspoon of ground mustard. 
Beat together thoroughly, add one small cup of weak 
vinegar. Boil until it thickens, stirring constantly. 

Mrs. H. C. Horstman. 

SALAD DRESSING— COOKED. 

One teaspoon mustard, one teaspoon salt, one teaspoon 
flour, five teaspoons sugar, three eggs (yolks) five table- 
spoons vinegar, two tablespoons melted butter or olive 
oil. Cook in double boiler and thin with cream. For a 
fruit salad it is better to whip the cream. 

Mrs. Frank White. 



74 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



SOUR CREAM SALAD DRESSING. 

Two eggs, one cup sour cream, one-half cup vinegar, 
two tablespoons sugar, one tablespoon cornstarch, one- 
half teaspoon mustard, salt, one heaping tablespoon but- 
ter. Beat the eggs lightly, add the remaining ingredients 
except the butter. Cook in a double boiler until moder- 
ately thick, stirring constantly. Beat in the butter after 
taking from fire. If kept in a cool place the dressing 
will keep for weeks and may be thinned if it becomes too 
thick by adding cream. Mrs. R. G. Lawry. 

FRUIT SALAD DRESSING. 

One-half cup sugar, one cup vinegar; if strong weaken 
with one-fourth cup water. Let come to a boil. In a 
smooth bowl put yolks of four eggs beaten very light, 
one tablespoon cornstarch, one-half teaspoon salt, one- 
half teaspoon white pepper, added to eggs well beaten in. 
Pour on this mixture the boiling vinegar very slowly. 
Return to double boiler and boil until thick, stirring all 
the time. Take from fire, add butter size of an egg, well 
beaten in. When you wish to use, dilute with cream to 
proper consistency. Mrs. Eunice C. James. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Four eggs, well beaten, one-third cup sugar, two even 
teaspoons mustard dissolved in cold water, one teaspoon 
cornstarch, one teaspoon butter, fifteen tablespoons vin- 
egar first heated, then add to other ingredients. Cook 
over boiling water or over very low blaze until thick and 
beat until smooth. Add salt as dressing is used, also 
thin with a little cream. This quantity makes one pint. 

Mrs. J. M. Lammedee. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

To four well beaten eggs add ten tablespoons vinegar, 
twelve teaspoons sugar, one teaspoon salt, one scant tea- 
spoon of mustard, butter size of an egg. Stir all to- 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 75 



gether until it begins to thicken, take from fire and then 
cool. Thin with sweet or sour cream to desired con- 
sistency. Mrs. John McKeever. 

FRENCH DRESSING. 

This is a plain salad oil dressing made with merely the 
oil, lemon juice and seasoning. Put one-fourth teaspoon 
mustard, one-fourth teaspoon red pepper, one-half tea- 
spoon salt in a bowl. Rub well together these dry in- 
gredients. Then add slowly four tablespoons cold olive 
oil. Beat this well together and then add the juice of 
half a lemon, stirring constantly. This should be about 
as thick as cream and is a useful dressing for a plain 
lettuce salad or any kind of vegetable salad. 

MAYONNAISE. 

Yolks of two eggs, one teaspoon salt, one-fourth tea- 
spoon mustard, one-fourth teaspoon paprika, two table- 
spoons vinegar, juice of half a lemon, one cup olive oil. 
The eggs and oil should be cold before putting together. 
Put the yolks of eggs and a little salt together in a 
bowl, beat a little, add the oil drop by drop, beating con- 
stantly. Stir in the mustard, paprika and remaining salt 
before it thickens very much. After about half the oil 
is in the dressing will become quite stifif, then add lemon 
juice little by little, then more oil, then the vinegar. 
The success depends on carefully putting together. The 
egg and oil will not thicken if they are warm, or if put 
together hastily. Betty Hill. 

MAYONNAISE SALAD DRESSING. 

Yolks of four eggs, well beaten. One slightly rounded 
teaspoon salt. One slightly rounded teaspoon sugar, 
one pint olive oil, three tablespoons white wine vinegar, 
three tablespoons lemon juice. Add the acid and the 
oil alternately to the eggs, beginning with the acid a 
few drops at a time. A Dover tgg beater may be used 
after the dressing is well started, but do not let it stand 



76 BETH ANY UNION COOK BOOK 



unnecessarily in the dressing on account of the tin. If 
the eggs are well beaten and ingredients cold the dress- 
ing is not apt to curdle. The quality is improved by 
much vigorous beating even beyond that needed to pre- 
vent curdling;. This makes a large quantity, enough for 
a whole chicken. Larolink aIarouardt. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

One-half cup olive oil, five tablespoons vinegar, one- 
half teaspoon powdered sugar, one-half small onion finely 
chopped, one tablespoon parsley finely chopped, one 
tablespoon green pepper finely chopped, pinch salt. Put 
all in a Mason jar and let stand on ice, then shake and 
mix well. ' Rhoda L. Roberts. 

GOLDEN SALAD DRESSING— FOR FRUIT 
SALADS. 

Two eggs, one-fourth cup sugar, one-fourth cup lemon 
juice, one-fourth cup orange or pineapple juice. Cook 
until thickened in a double boiler. Mrs. R. G. Lawry. 

SALAD DRESSING WITHOUT EGGS. 

Two tablespoons prepared mustard, four tablespoons 
vinegar, two tablespoons sugar, one-half teaspoon salt, 
butter size of walnut, one cup sweet or sour cream. 
Cook over water until thick. 

Mrs. Harry Dougherty. 




California 
Fruits and 
Asparagus 

The Brand You 
Can Trust 

•ALWAYS ASK FOR LIBBY'S" 



W M"' 




MARQUARDl BROS. 




DEALERS IN 


Fancy 


Groceries, Meats, Poultry 




Fish and Vegetables 




All Goods Delivered Free 


Phone 19 Was 


hington Heights :: 10124 Vincennes Road 



Phone 408 Wash 


ington Heights Estimates Given 


F. 


J. GRAHAM 


Painting 


and Decorating Contractor 




10164 Wood Street, Tracy 


WINDOW SHADES FURNISHED PKlVorrrv 
ON APPLICATION \^lll\^d.^U 



A. McSKIMMING 

Dry Goods, Men's Furnishings, Notions, Fancy Goods 
The Store Opp. Depot, Morgan Park 

TELEPHONE 713 



78 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 79 



80 BETH. IN Y UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UXIOX COOK BOOK 81 



Desserts 



PIES. 



What iiioisfciis the lip and what brightens the eye, 
What calls back the past like the rich piinipki)i pie? 

— IV hit tier. 

PIE CRUST. 

The one, two, three rule makes just enough for one 
pie — one cup flour, two tablespoons lard, three table- 
spoons water, also a pinch of salt and baking powder. 
Never fails. Mrs. C. H. Primm. 

PIE CRUST HINT. 

To make flak}- pie crust, add the white of an egg to 
every cup of lard. Mrs. H. Philips. 

AMBER PIE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, one cup raisins, one 
cup sour milk, two tablespoons vinegar, tw^o tablespoons 
flour, one tablespoon melted butter, one teaspoon cinna- 
mon, cloves and nutmeg, yolks of four eggs, whites of 
three for tops. Makes two pies. 

Mrs. W. R. :\I.anock. 

APPLE PIE. 

Line pie tin with good, rich crust. In this crust mix 
together two-thirds cup sugar and a heaping tablespoon 
flour; over this place two layers of thinly sliced apples, 
sprinkle top with one-third cup sugar and a little flour, 
then add a teacup cream, a few small pieces butter and 
grate nutmeg over top. If preferred use two-thirds cup 
water instead of cream. Mrs. C. H. Primm. 



82 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BOSTON CREAM PIE. 

One cup sugar, two cups flour, one-half cup butter, 
two teaspoons baking powder, add last whites of three 
eggs beaten stiff. Bake in sheet form or layer. 

Filling for Pie. — Three yolks, three-fourths cup sugar, 
three level tablespoons flour. Mix. Scald one pint milk 
and add hot, stir in and cook. Spread over pie. 

Top Dressing.— One-half pint whipped cream, two 
tablespoons sugar, one spoon vanilla last. Put this on 
top. Very good. Mrs. J. W. Casey. 

BUTTER SCOTCH PIE. 

One cup brown sugar, one cup sweet milk, one-fourth 
cup butter, two eggs, two tablespoons flour. Beat yolks 
of eggs, add sugar and flour with a little cold milk. 
Cook in double boiler. Add pinch of salt. Bake shell 
as for lemon cream pie. Beat whites of eggs with little 
sugar. Pour mixture (when thick enough) into shell, 
pour meringue on top and brown slightly. 

Mrs. W. J. Folk. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

Seven-eighths cup sugar, two tablespoons cornstarch, 
one-fourth teaspoon salt, two squares Baker's chocolate, 
one cup milk, yolk of one egg, one teaspoon vanilla. 
Mix dry ingredients, add milk and egg, cook until thick, 
add vanilla. Cool slightly before putting into crust, pre- 
viously baked. Cover with meringue and return to oven 
to bake meringue. May McCumber. 

BURNT CREAM PIE. 

Yolks of four eggs, two cups brown sugar, three- 
fourths cup butter, one pint milk, one large tablespoon 
cornstarch dissolved in one cup milk, one tablespoon 
vanilla. Pour custard into skillet of caramelized sugar, 
stir until smooth ; pour into two baked crusts. 

Mrs. E. R. Linn. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 83 



FRENCH CREAM PIE. 

One cup sugar, one cup sour cream, one cup seeded 
raisins chopped fine, one egg; beat all together and bake 
with two crusts. Mrs. C H. Primm. 

PEACH CREAM PIE. 

Line a deep pie pan with a rich paste; peel, halve and 
stone peaches enough to fill pan. Mix two tablespoons 
flour with one cup of sugar and sprinkle over the 
peaches; fill the pan with sweet cream; bake until done. 
Canned peaches will do if fresh ones are not obtainable. 

Mrs. p. W. Dorn. 

CUSTARD PIE. 

One pint milk, three eggs, three tablespoons sugar, 
one tablespoon flour, one teaspoon vanilla, pinch salt, 
a little nutmeg. Scald milk and let cool. Beat whites 
of eggs stifif, to which add beaten yolks, then sugar 
and flour previously mixed together. Then add milk, 
flavoring, salt and nutmeg. Beat all ingredients well 
together and bake in a slow oven thirty minutes. 

Mrs. JaiMes Booth. 

GRAPE PIE. 

Two cups grapes seeded, one cup sugar, one egg, one 
teaspoon flour, a pinch cinnamon if desired. Enough 
for one pie. Mrs. J. O'Connor. 

LEMON PIE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, one lemon, two eggs, one 
tablespoon flour, one and one-half tablespoons corn- 
starch, one cup boiling water, butter size of walnut. 
Dissolve cornstarch in little cold water, pour boiling 
water over it; beat yolks of eggs, butter, sugar, flour and 
juice and grated rind of lemon together, cook until 



84 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



thick, then turn in crust already baked. Beat whites of 
eggs with teaspoon sugar and spread on top. Place in 
oven till light brown. Mrs. Emma McAllister. 

LEMON CREAM PIE FILLING. 

Grated rind and juice one lemon, one tablespoon corn- 
starch and one cup granulated sugar mixed together. 
Add one cup of boiling water and let boil a few mo- 
ments, stirring all of the time ; add one-half tablespoon 
butter just before removing from the fire. When slightly 
cool add the yolks of three eggs well beaten. Pour into 
the paste which has been previously baked. Beat whites 
to a stifif froth, add a tablespoon of sugar, return to oven 
and brown. Mrs. Gardner Greenleaf. 

LEMON CREAM PIE. 

Yolks of two eggs, one-half cup water, one cup sugar, 
juice and grated rind of one lemon, one tablespoon corn- 
starch. Mix together and let come to a boil. Beat the 
whites of two eggs and add a little sugar and spread 
over pie. Put in oven to brown. Mrs. Geo. P. Ellis. 

MINCE MEAT. 

Chop fine one peck green tomatoes. Put on about two 
tablespoons salt and let drain one hour. Put them in a 
preserving kettle with one-half peck chopped apples, five 
pounds brown sugar, two cups boiled cider. Cook until 
clear. Then add one pound seeded raisins, one pound 
currants, two tablespoons cinnamon, one allspice, one 
cloves, eight nutmeg, one-half pound citron. Bring all 
to boil and seal in glass jars. Mrs. H. Max. 

ENGLISH MINCE MEAT. 

Two pounds or five cUps cooked and chopped meat 
(four pounds raw meat), one pound chopped suet, two 
pounds raisins, one pound sultana raisins, two pounds 
currants, one pound citron, one pound light brown sugar, 



BETH ANY UNION COOK BOOK 85 



one pound granulated .^ugar, four pounds apples (green- 
ing), juice and grated rind of two lemons, juice and 
grated rind of two oranges, one tablespoon salt, one-half 
teaspoon ground cloves, one-fourth teaspoon ground 
mace, one teaspoon ground cinnamon, one grated nut- 
meg, one quart boiled cider, one quart fruit juice. Mix 
ingredients in order given, except the grated l&mon and 
orange rind and spices. Cook in a porcelain kettle until 
the mixture boils and the apples are transparent. When 
cool add the spices and orange and lemon rinds. 

Mrs. John Roland Robertson. 

SUMMER MINCE PIE. 

One cup raisins chopped fine, two cups water, two cups 
sugar, one-half cup vinegar (or lemon juice), butter the 
size of an egg, eight crackers rolled not too fine, one 
teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon nutmeg, one teaspoon 
allspice. Cook well together before filling pastry to bake. 

Mrs. J. C. Arnold. 

MOCK CHERRY PIE. 

One cup cranberries cut in halves, one-half cup raisins, 
c>ne tablespoon flour, one cup sugar, two teaspoons va- 
nilla, one cup boiling water. This makes one pie. 

Mrs. Wm. Ve.\r. 

NUT PIE. 

One cup powdered sugar, one large cup quartered wal- 
nuts, one large cup dates sliced, two eggs, two table- 
spoons flour, one teaspoon baking powder. Mix flour, 
baking powder, dates and nuts ; beat eggs separately, 
first add to sugar yolks, then whites; add flour, baking 
powder, nuts and dates ; bake in buttered pie tin in a 
slow oven one-half hour. Serve with whipped cream. 

M.\RTORIE L.XWRENCE. 



86 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



PUMPKIN PIE. 

One cup pumpkin, one cup sugar, one cup milk, one 
tablespoon flour, pinch of salt, one teaspoon cinnamon, 
one-half teaspoon cloves, one-fourth teaspoon ginger, 
two eggs. Stir well together and bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. Fr.'Xnklyn Hobbs. 

CRUSTLESS PUMPKIN PIE. 

Cover the inside of a deep pie plate thickly and evenly 
with butter; then sprinkle on as much flour as will 
adhere on sides and bottom. Put m your prepared 
pumpkin custard and bake. Mrs. A. J. Goes. 

PUMPKIN CUSTARD PIE. 

One-half pint pumpkin, one egg, one-half teaspoon 
cinnamon, one-fourth teaspoon ginger, one cup sugar, 
two tablespoons flour. Put all into one pint hot milk 
with butter the size of an egg and a little salt. Line 
pie tin with inch crust and bake slowly from three- 
fourths to one hour. Mrs. C. L. S.^nford. 

RAISIN PIE. 

One quart water to a package of seedless raisins. Boil 
five minutes, take from fire and add three tablespoons 
flour or teacup bread crumbs moistened with one-half 
cup water; one tablespoon butter, one-half teaspoon cin- 
namon, one-half teaspoon cloves, two tablespoons vine- 
gar, one and one-half cups sugar. Grate little nutmeg 
on top. Mrs. J. J. Bickel. 

RHUBARB PIE. 

One cup rhubarb, cut up, yolks two eggs, one table- 
spoon flour, one cup sugar, lump of butter. Bake with 
a few strips crust across the top. When done make 
meringue of whites of eggs and brown in oven. 

Mrs. Geo. D. Young. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 87 



SWEET POTATO CUSTARD PIE. 

One medium sized sweet potato, one-third cup butter, 
one-half cup sugar, rind of a lemon and one tablespoon 
juice, teaspoon vanilla and one tablespoon cinnamon, 
one-half cup milk, yolks of three eggs. Bake slowly in 
one crust until custard is set. After pie is taken from 
oven, let cool and cover with currant jelly. Whites are 
beaten very stifif with a little sugar, spread over pie and 
brown in oven. Mrs. W. D. Gorjx)n. 

TYLER PUDDING PIE. 

One-third teacup butter, one and one-half tablespoons 
brown sugar ; beat to a cream. Two eggs, one and one- 
half cups new milk, vanilla to taste. Bake as custard pie. 

Mrs. H. T. Baker. 



TARTS 



BANBERRY TARTS. 

The grated rind and juice of one lemon, one cup sugar, 
one cracker rolled fine, one cup seeded raisins chopped. 
Mix with one tablespoon water and bake in tarts with 
flaky crust. Mr.s. Wm. Vear. 

BANBERRY TARTS. 

One cup seeded raisins, one cup chopped walnuts, one 
G:gg, one teacup sugar, juice one lemon. Beat the ^gg, 
add sugar, lemon juice, nuts and raisins. Have a good, 
rich piecrust ready and roll out as for pie. Cut into ob- 
long shapes about three inches by three and a half and 
place one heaping teaspoon fruit mixture on one-half 
of the piecrust, fold over the other half, press edges to- 
gether and bake in a hot oven. Mrs. W. J. Stebbins. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



CHEESE CAKE (POTATO). 

Two cups mashed potatoes, one-half cup cream, four 
eggs, one-fourth cup currants, one-half cup butter, one- 
half cup sugar. Mash the butter, eggs and cream with 
the potatoes, hot, stir until scalding hot, remove and 
stir in the currants, washed and picked, and sugar. Use 
it to fill patty pans lined with the paste and bake in hot 
oven eight to ten minutes. Mrs. Wm. Ve.\r. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 

(To be served with salads.) 

One cup sifted flour, one cup grated rich American 
cheese, one rounded tablespoon of butter, pinch of cay- 
enne. Crumble butter and flour together, add cheese 
and cayenne. IMoisten with enough ice water to roll 
out like pastry. Roll very thick on floured board and 
cut into strips one-eighth of an inch wide and six inches 
long. Bake ten minutes in hot oven or until pale brown. 

Mrs. Wm. Ve.\r. 

LEMON CREAM. 

Beat one egg with one cup of sugar, add the juice of 
one lemon and two tablespoons cold water. Cook over 
hot water and stir constantly until mixture thickens. 
Use for filling little shells or for spreading thinly be- 
tween sandwiches. Mrs. James Long. 

LEMON CHEESECAKE FILLING. 

(For Tarts— Will Keep.) 

One pound lump sugar, yolks of six eg^s. whites of 
four eggs, well beaten, juice of four good lemons, rinds 
of two lemons grated and one-fourth pound butter. Set 
on a slow fire and keep stirring until it thickens and looks 
clear. Mrs. E. E. Kitchen. 



BETHANY UXIOX COOK BOOK 89 



SHORT CAKE 



APRICOT SHORT CAKE. 

Two cups Hour, four teaspoons baking powder, one- 
lialf teaspoon salt, two teaspoons sugar, three-fourths 
cup milk, three tablespoons butter. Mix dry ingredients, 
sift twice, work in butter by cutting with two silver 
knives and add milk gradually. Toss on floured board. 
Pat or roll out, cut in individual cakes, spread with one 
tablespoon melted butter and bake in a hot oven twelve 
minutes. 

Apricots. — Wash one-half pound dried apricots and 
soak over night in two cups water, x^dd one cup sugar 
to juice of apricots poured ofif, boil five minutes, add 
to fruit and let cool. Save the best pieces for the top of 
the short cake. The remainder may be put through a 
colander. Split short cake, place soft fruit between lay- 
ers, place whole fruit on top and add whipped cream. 

Alice Howe. 



PEACH SHORT CAKE. 

One pint tlour, one tablespoon lard, two teaspoons 
baking powder and water to make a nice dough. When 
baked, open and cover with peaches peeled and mashed 
fine with sugar. Mrs. James Long. 



STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

One pint flour, two teaspoons baking powder, two tea- 
spoons sugar, pinch salt. Sift all together, then work 
in heaping tablespoon shortening. Stir in milk to stifT 
batter. Smooth over top with flour. 

Mrs. G. R. Moore. 



90 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



HOT PUDDINGS. 



DATE DESSERT. 

One cup chopped dates, one cup granulated sugar, one 
cup walnut meats, three eggs beaten separately, one 
heaping teaspoon baking powder. Chop dates in a heap- 
ing tablespoon of flour, add sugar, nuts, whites of eggs 
beaten stiff, yolks beaten, and lastly the baking powder. 
Turn mixture into a buttered pan and bake in a slow 
oven about forty minutes. Cut in squares, serve with 
whipped cream with a candied cherry on top. 

Mrs. S. W. McCune. 

APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Make a rich biscuit dough, roll thin ; chop apples fine, 
spread on dough, grate nutmeg over apples and roll up 
like jelly roll. One and one-half cups of sugar, one cup 
of water, add a little butter, put in baking pan, let boil. 
Cut dough in pieces about one and one-half inches 
thick, set on end in syrup and bake. • 

Mrs. C. H. Primm. 

BAKED APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Pare and core small tart apples, roll in sugar, fill cavity 
with quince or apple jelly; make rich biscuit dough, roll 
thin, cut square and fold around apples. Bake rather 
slowly. Serve with hard sauce or any good pudding 
sauce. Mrs. Jas. J. Versluis. 

CHERRY DUMPLINGS. 

Make rich baking powder biscuit dough. Roll thin, 
cut round, put spoonful of cherries in center and pinch 
dough together. In bottom of baking dish mix well one 
cup sugar and one teaspoon cornstarch. Put dumplings 
well apart and bits of butter on each dumpling. Add 



BETHANY UXION COOK BOOK 91 



boiling water to cover well and bake in hot oven. Serve 
with sauce left in dish, adding a few more cherries. 

Mrs. F. C. Ames. 

ALMOND CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

Boil two pieces sweet chocolate in one pint milk. 
When dissolved, pour over half pint bread crumbs. Add 
two well beaten eggs, one cup sugar, grated nutmeg (a 
little will do), one-half cup stoned raisins, one-half cup 
almonds (cut not too fine). Steam or bake one hour 
and serve with cream. Mrs. J. F. Ott. 

BLUEBERRY PUDDING. 

Two rounding tablespoons sugar, scant one-fourth cup 
butter, one egg, three-fourths cup sweet milk, two cups 
flour, three teaspoons baking powder, one-half teaspoon 
salt, one pint fresh blueberries. Cream butter and sugar, 
add egg well beaten, sift flour, baking powder and salt 
together, add milk and flour alternately. Add blueber- 
ries (no juice or water) rolled in flour. Bake in mod- 
erate oven in shallow pan. 

Sauce. — One-half cup butter, one cup powdered sugar, 
white of one egg unbeaten, nutmeg flavor. Sift sugar, 
mix all together and stir or beat until it is nice and 
creamy. Add flavor. Mrs. C. D. Coventry. 

BROWN PUDDING. 

One-fourth cup butter, one-fourth cup sugar, one-half 
cup New Orleans molasses, one-half cup raisins, one- 
half cup sweet milk, one egg, one teaspoon each of 
cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon and one-half teaspoon soda, 
one and one-half cups flour, pinch of salt. Mix ingredi- 
ents, put into a buttered pan and steam one hour. Serve 
with lemon or vanilla sauce. 

BROWN BETTY. 

In a w^ell buttered baking dish place a layer of sliced 
apples, sprinkle with sugar, then a layer of bread crumbs ; 



92 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



put several good sized pieces of butter on the bread 
crumbs ; then apples, sugar, crumbs and butter again ; 
pour on enough water to start the apples cooking. The 
amount of water and sugar depends on the apples. Eng- 
lish walnuts, chopped and sprinkled on the top, are a 
nice addition. Eat with sugar and cream. 

Mrs. S. M. Murdock. 

CARROT PUDDING. 

Two cups grated carrots (raw), one cup grated potato 
(raw), two cups flour, two cups sugar, one cup raisins, 
one cup currants, one cup suet, one cup citron, orange 
and lemon peel, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon salt. 
Chop carrots, potatoes, currants, peel and one-half rais- 
ins. Steam about five hours. Serve with lemon sauce. 

Mrs. James Long. 

CARROT PUDDING. 

One cup grated raw potatoes, one cup grated raw car- 
rots, one cup brown sugar, one cup powdered suet, one- 
half teaspoon salt, one and one-half cups raisins, one 
and one-half cups currants, one and one-half cups flour, 
one teaspoon soda. Mix ingredients and steam from 
three to four hours. Serve with lemon sauce. 

Alid.'V Christi.\n. 

CHERRY PUDDING. 

Stew and seed one quart cherries. Make a batter of 
one and one-half cups Hour sifted with one teaspoonful 
baking powder and a little salt. Add one beaten egg 
and one-half cup milk. Flavor. Drop by spoonfuls over 
stewed cherries. Cover the vessel well and cook for 
twenty minutes. Mrs. T. J. Champion. 

CHOCOLATE MARSHMALLOW PUDDING. 

Soak one pint of bread crumbs in one quart new milk, 
add three tablespoons cocoa, one well beaten egg and one 



BETH ANY [L\IO.\ COOK BOOK 93 



cup sugar. Pour in individual pudding dishes and bake 
forty minutes. Have ready pint of whipped cream sweet- 
ened and flavored, fold in one-half pound of fresh marsh- 
mallows cut in small pieces. Heap high on the pudding 
just before serving. Mrs. J. H. Hellweg. 

CORN MEAL PUDDING. 

Three level tablespoons of corn meal cooked in one 
and one-half cups of milk and water, equal proportions 
or not, as convenient, add one pint or more of milk to 
which three well beaten eggs and nine tablespoons of 
sugar and saltspoon of salt have been added ; stir in one 
cup of currants or raisins and bake in a medium slow 
oven like a custard. When nearly set sprinkle the top 
with sugar and cinnamon and return to oven and finish. 
Do not let boil or whey. Good hot or cold. 

Mrs. G. S. B.^nnistek. 

COTTAGE PUDDING 

One cup sugar, half cup butter, one egg, a generous 
half cup of water, two cups flour, one and one-half tea- 
spoons baking powder, flavor to taste. Rake twenty 
minutes. 

Sauce. — One cup sugar, two tablespoons flour, scant 
half cup of butter. Stir all together, add boiling water 
to make the consistency of thick cream. Add the juice 
of one lemon or one tablespoon vinegar. Eat warm. 

Taking out one cup of this batter and grating into it 
one square of chocolate makes a very nice marble cake 
— then again, add a cup of raisins or currants and it 
makes a nice tea cake. Mrs. J. J. Bickel. 

DATE PUDDING. 

One cup chopped nuts, one cup chopped dates, two 
eggs, one tablespoon flour, one teaspoon baking powder. 
Bake one-half hour. Serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. George H. Hume. 



94 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



DATE PUDDING. 

Two eggs beaten slightly, one cup chopped nuts, one 
cup chopped dates, three tablespoons bread crumbs, one 
cup sugar, two teaspoons baking powder. Mix and bake 
thirty minutes in slow oven. Mrs. J. R. Henderson. 

DATE PUDDING. 

One cup sugar, two eggs, one-half cup milk, one cup 
chopped walnuts, one cup chopped dates, one table- 
spoon flour, one teaspoon baking powder. Bake slowly 
thirty minutes. ' Mrs. J. Hean. 

FIG PUDDING. 

One cup beef suet, two cups stale bread crumbs, one 
cup milk, one cup brown sugar, one cup flour, one- 
half pound figs chopped fine, two teaspoons baking pow- 
der, two eggs. Chop suet and work with hands until 
creamy, then add figs. Soak bread crumbs in milk, add 
eggs well beaten, sugar and a little salt. Combine mix- 
tures and turn into a buttered mold. Steam three hours. 

Sauce. — Two cups powdered sugar, one-half cup but- 
ter creamed, one teaspoon vanilla, one-half cup sweet 
cream. Mrs. Fred Graham. 

FIG PUDDING. 

Beat two eggs light, add one cup of milk and one cup 
sugar, two cups flour sifted with one-fourth teaspoon of 
salt and one rounded teaspoon baking powder. Beat 
these together until smooth. Add three tablespoons 
melted butter and one-half pound of choice dried figs, 
which have been washed in warm water and soaked over 
night in cold water, wiped and chopped fine. Mix well, 
pour into a buttered pudding dish and steam for two 
hours. Serve with hard sauce. Mrs. J. H. Madigan. 

FRUIT PUDDING. 

Two-thirds cup sugar, two tablespoons butter, two- 
thirds cup milk, flour to make batter, vanilla. Heat in 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 95 



suitable pan any fruit with juice. When boiling pour 
this batter into it and bake. Serve with cream or sauce. 

Mrs. DiMiTT. 

FRUIT PUDDING. 

One cup chopped suet, one cup bread crumbs, one cup 
sugar, one cup raisins, one cup flour, one cup sour milk, 
one teaspoon soda. Steam two hours. Serve with a 
lemon sauce. Mrs. A. J. Goes. 

FRUIT PUDDING. 

Stew one-half pound of prunes until tender, remove 
seeds, then put back on stove with four apples pared and 
sliced, then add small cup raisins and one cup sugar 
and cook until apples are soft. Thicken with two table- 
spoons cornstarch and pour into dish. Let stand until 
cold. Serve with whipped cream. Mrs. S. J. Cur nick. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

Two and one-half cups graham flour, one cup raisins, 
one cup currants, one-half cup citron, one egg, one- 
fourth cup butter, one cup sugar, one cup New Orleans 
molasses, one-half teaspoon soda, one cup sour cream. 
Stir to a stiff batter and steam three hours. Serve with 
whipped cream or sugar sauce. Mrs. Wilson. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

Two-thirds cup molasses, one and one-third cups sour 
milk, one cup graham flour, one cup white flour, one 
large cup raisins, one teaspoon soda, one small cup 
chopped suet. Steam two hours, then set in oven a few 
minutes to dry oflf. 

Sauce for Same. — Cream one-half cup butter with one 
cup light brown sugar. Stir in one well beaten egg. 
Simmer for a few minutes over slow fire, stirring con- 
stantly ; then add jelly or fruit juice and a little grated 
nutmeg. Mrs. Gex)RGe Moore. 



96 BETH. IN)' UNION COOK BOOK 



GRAPE NUTS AND APPLE PUDDING. 

One cup grape nuts, two cups chopped apples, one- 
half cup granulated sugar, one-half cup raisins, two table- 
spoons butter, one saltspoon cinnamon, one saltspoon 
cloves, one saltspoon allspice. Butter quart baking-dish 
and put in layer of apples, then one of grape nuts and 
a few raisins. Dot with butter and sprinkle on sugar 
in which spices have been mixed. Repeat till full. Bake 
in moderate oven about half hour. Serve hot with hard 
sauce made with butter and confectioner's sugar flavored 
with vanilla. Good. Mrs. Walter F. Heinemann. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

One quart milk, one-fourth teaspoon salt, butter size 
of walnut, one-half cup corn meal, one-half cup molasses, 
one-half cup sugar, one-half teaspoon ginger, two eggs. 
Process for Indian Pudding : Place milk over small fire, 
add salt and butter and stir in corn meal ; allow mixture 
to boil, remove from fire and cool ; add sugar, molasses, 
ginger and eggs, reserving the white of one for frosting. 
Bake in moderate oven one hour. Cover with frosting 
slightly sweetened and replace in oven. When frosting 
is a light brown it is ready to serve. 

Mrs. T. H. Beckwith. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

One-half pound bread crumbs, one-half pc^und brown 
sugar, six ounces suet, peel and juice of one lemon, and 
one egg. Mix well. Steam three hours. 

Mrs. S. J. CuRJNTiCK. 

MAPLE PUDDING. 

Three cups water, two cups brown sugar, three table- 
spoons cornstarch. When sugar and water are almost 
boiling, add cornstarch dissolved in one^ cup of cold 
water. Boil until clear. Serve with cream and chopped 
nuts. Mrs. F. E. Ford. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 97 



PARADISE PUDDING. 

Cream together a piece of butter the size of an egg, 
one and one-half cups (scant) sugar, add the well beaten 
yolks of four eggs, two cups bread crumbs, four cups 
of sweet milk. Put all into a deep dish and bake until 
it is pretty well set. Over this put a layer of stewed 
fruit (apples), beat up the whites of the eggs very stiff 
with a little sugar, spread over the top and put in the 
oven to let color slii^htly. Mks. John Imsiier. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

One pound beef suet, one pound raisins, one pound 
currants, one-half pound brown sugar, one-half pound 
bread crumbs, one-half pound lemon peel, one-half pound 
flour, six eggs, one cup milk, nutmeg and cloves. Can 
be cooked in stone jar set in boiling water for ten hours. 

Mrs. S. J- CuRNicK. 

ENGLISH CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING. 

One-half pound raisins, one-half pound' currants, one- 
fourth pound sultana raisins, one-fourth pound mixed 
peel, one-eighth pound almonds, one-fourth pound flour, 
one-half pound bread crumbs, one-half pound suet, one- 
half pound sugar, six eggs, one-half pint cider, small 
teaspoon of salt, one and one-half teaspoons of allspice 
(scant). Prepare fruit. Chop raisins; use currants and 
sultana raisins whole ; cut peel in small strips ; cut nuts ; 
add flour, grated bread crumbs, suet chopped fine and 
sugar. Add seasoning, eggs beaten, cider last. Mix in- 
gredients well and put in buttered basins. Tie cloth 
over top of basin, place in boiling water and keep boiling 
constantly for five hours. Replenish with boiling water 
when needed. This pudding improves with keeping. 
Steam about one hour when ready to serve. Serve with 
hard or any favorite pudding sauce. 

Mrs. Cut h BERT Corlett. 



98 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



RICE PUDDING. 

Four cups milk, one-third cup rice, one-half teaspoon 
salt, one-third cup sugar, grated rind one-half lemon. 
Wash rice, mix ingredients and pour into buttered pud- 
ding dish ; bake three hours in a very slow oven, stirring 
three times during the first hour of baking. 

RICE PUDDING. 

One quart milk, one cup rice, one-half cup raisins (a 
little salt if desired). Wash rice and add to the milk 
and raisins. Then steam one and one-half hours. Yolks 
of two eggs, four tablespoons sugar. Beat these care- 
fully together, then beat them into steamed rice. Spread 
the beaten whites over the top and brown. A layer of 
jelly spread between the rice and whites of eggs makes 
a nice variation in the pudding. Mrs. James F. Hosic. 

SPONGE PUDDING. 

One-fourth cup sugar, one-fourth cup butter, one-half 
cup flour, five eggs, one pint boiled milk. ]\Iix sugar 
and flour, wet with a little cold milk and stir into boiling 
milk. Cook until it thickens and is smooth. Add butter 
and when well mixed stir it into the well beaten yolks. 
Add the whites beaten stiff, a little salt, and flavoring 
extract to taste. Bake in a shallow dish set in a pan of 
hot water about thirty minutes in a moderate oven, 
until perfectly set and brown. Serve with creamy sauce. 

Creamy Sauce. — Cream a heaping tablespoon of butter 
with half a cup of sugar, add a little cream and mix 
smooth over hot water. Mrs. B. F. Corev. 

STEAMED PUDDING. 

One-half cup brown sugar, one-half cup molasses, one 
cup sweet milk, one-half cup butter, one teaspoon soda, 
two cups raisins, one-half cup nuts, one tgg, two and 
one-fourth cups flour, spices. Steam two and one-half 
hours. Can be steamed over when ready to serve. 

Mrs. W. R. Manock. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 99 



STEAMED PUDDING. 

One cup currants, one cup raisins, one cup chopped 
suet, one cup sugar, one cup rolled cracker crumbs, 
three eggs well beaten, one teaspoon allspice, one-half 
teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon cinnamon, two tablespoons 
tlour, pinch salt, one-fourth teaspoon soda dissolved in 
one-fourth cup warm water and let cool. Milk enough 
to make a soft batter. Add soda last, steam three or 
four hours. Make any sauce to serve with it. 

Mrs. H. T. B.\ker. 

STEAMED BERRY PUDDING. 

One cup sugar, two cups flour, one cup milk, two cups 
berries, two teaspoons baking powder. Steam two 
hours. Mrs. J.\mes T. Gillespie. 

ECONOMY STEAMED PUDDING. 

One cup grated Irish potatoes, one cup grated carrots, 
one cup chopped suet, one cup currants, one cup raisins, 
one cup brown sugar, two cups flour, one tablespoon 
baking soda, a small spoonful salt, spice to taste. Some 
housewives may think that too much soda is prescribed, 
but there is no mistake in the amount named. Mix 
well and cook in a steamer for three hours. This pud- 
ding will keep for a long time and may be heated over 
and over. Mrs. L. E. Be.mman. 

STEAMED FRUIT AND SUET PUDDING. 

Two and one-half cups flour, one teaspoon soda, one- 
half teaspoon salt, one-half saltspoon cinnamon, one-half 
saltspoon nutmeg, one cup chopped suet or two-thirds 
cup of butter, one cup chopped raisins or currants, one 
cup water or milk, one cup molasses. Sift the soda, salt 
and spice into the flour, rub in the suet and add the 
raisins. ]\Iix milk and molasses and stir into the dry 
mixture. Steam in a buttered pudding mold three hours. 
Serve with foamv sauce. If water and butter be used, 



100 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



three cups of flour will be required, as these thicken 
less than milk and suet. Sometimes steamed in small 
stone cups. Mrs. S. F. Curnick. 

SUET PUDDING. 

One cup molasses, one cup suet chopped fine, one cup 
raisins, two cups flour, one-half cup boiling water in 
which dissolve one-half teaspoon soda and a pinch of 
salt. Season with nutmeg and cinnamon. Steam for 
two hours. Serve with a hard sauce. 

Mrs. Charles B. Schermerhorn. 

SUET PUDDING. 

Three cups of flour, three teaspoons baking powder. 
one cup suet (shaved), rub into flour, add one cup sugar, 
small one-half teaspoon salt. Stir enough milk in to 
make a stiff batter, then stir in one cup raisins and steam 
from one to one and one-half hours. 

Sauce. — Blend together flour and butter. Pour boil- 
ing water on and cook until right thickness ; then add 
sugar, salt and nutmeg to taste. Mrs. C. M. Cl.'\rk. 

SUET PUDDING. 

One cup molasses, one cup suet chopped fine, one cup 
sour milk, one cup sugar, three and one-half cups flour, 
one spoon soda, one cup raisins and currants. Steam 
three hours and serve with liquid sauce. 

Mrs. Wm. Roach. 

SWEDISH PUDDING. 

One-half cup molasses, one-half cup sweet milk, one- 
half cup raisins or dates stoned and washed but left 
whole, one egg, one cup of flour, two tablespoons of 
melted butter, one-half teaspoon of soda mixed with 
flour. Steam in cups or molds thirty minutes and serve 
with following sauce : 

Sauce. — One-half cup brown (light) sugar, two small 
tablespoons flour, one-half cup butter, one-fourth tea- 
spoon grated nutmeg and enough boiling water to make 
it creamv. Mrs. William G. Kress. 



BETH AN y UXION COOK BOOK 101 



TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Soak in cold water for one hour, one cup tapioca. Put 
in double boiler with one quart milk and steam until 
thoroughly done, take from fire and add a tablespoonful 
butter and the yolks of six eggs, one small cup sugar, 
one pint milk. Stir butter in hot tapioca, stir sugar and 
milk together, add one teaspoon vanilla, stir into pud- 
ding, then pour into buttered baking-dish. Bake in oven 
within another dish of hot water to avoid boiling until 
custard sets. Add whites beaten stiff and brown lightly. 
If rice is used instead of tapioca, add raisins. 

Mrs. R. D. Flood. 

THANKSGIVING PUDDING— FOOD FOR THE 
GODS. 

One pound English walnuts, one-half pound dates, two 
cups sugar, six eggs (beaten separately), seven table- 
spoons cracker crumbs, two teaspoons baking powder. 
Chop the nuts and cut dates (not too fine). Put the 
baking powder in the cracker crumbs and mix with nuts 
and dates. Add the yolks of the eggs and lastly the 
whites. Bake slowly about thirty-five minutes in pans 
lined with buttered paper. Have batter about one inch 
thick in pans. Remove paper as soon as pudding comes 
from the oven. Cut in squares and serve with whipped 
cream, sweetened and flavored. This recipe should be 
made a day or two before serving and will serve sixteen. 

Mrs. C. W. J.\ck. 

SNOWBALLS. 

Cream together one-third cup of butter and half cup 
sugar. Sift half cup of flour with half cup of cornstarch 
and two teaspoons of baking powder. Add this to the 
creamed butter and sugar, mix carefully with two-thirds 
cup of milk and the beaten whites of three eggs. Pour 
into small well buttered cups, having these about two- 
thirds full, and steam for thirty minutes. Turn out and 
roll in powdered sugar. Serve with fruit sauce. 

Mrs. I. G. Daly. 



102 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



LEMON SOUFFLE. 

Yolks of four eggs, grated rind and juice one lemon, 
one cup sugar, whites of four eggs. Beat yolks, add 
sugar very gradually and continue beating, then add the 
lemon. Have w^hites beaten very light and fold in to 
batter. Turn all into buttered pudding dish and set in 
pan of hot water and bake thirty to forty-five minutes. 
Serve with or without sauce. 

Mrs. James E. Armstrong. 

PRUNE SOUFFLE. 

One-half pound prunes, whites of five eggs, six table- 
spoons granulated sugar. Soak the prunes in cold water 
to cover for six hours, then stew until tender, drain and 
chop fine. Add the sugar and beat to a paste. Beat the 
whites of eggs until stiff, add to the prune paste and 
bake about half an hour in a hot oven. Serve at once 
with whipped cream. Mrs. J. W. Bradford. 



PUDDING SAUCES 



BROWN SUGAR SAUCE. 

One cup brown sugar, one tablespoon butter, one 
tablespoon cornstarch, one-half cup boiling water. Cook 
until it begins to thicken, then add a few nuts and 
raisins. Nice to serve with puddings or cake. 

Mrs. W. R. Manock. 



HOT CHOCOLATE SAUCE. 

Put one tablespoon butter in granite pan, add one 
and one-half squares unsweetened chocolate, stir and 
melt together. Add one cup sugar, speck of salt and 
one-third cup boiling water. Boil twelve or fifteen min- 
utes till like thick syrup. Flavor with one-half teaspoon 
vanilla. Mrs. Roscof. Barrett. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 103 



HARD SAUCE. 

One-half cup butter, one cup powdered sugar, white 
one egg, unbeaten, nutmeg flavor. Sift sugar if lumpy, 
mix all together in a bowl and stir or beat until it is nice 
and creamy. Add flavor. Mrs. C. D. Coventry. 

HARD SAUCE. 

One-half cup butter, one cup powdered sugar, vanilla 
to flavor, one teaspoon hot water. Cream butter, add 
sugar by teaspoonful and beat until light and creamy. 
Excellent with apple dumplings or plum pudding. 

Mrs. Geo. D. Young. 

PUDDING SAUCE. 

Beat the white of an egg to a stiff froth, add to it one- 
half cup powdered sugar; drop in the yolk and beat 
thoroughly. Add three tablespoons cream and flavor 
with vanilla. Make just before using. Excellent for 
steamed or toasted stale cake. M'-vS. Benj. Manierre. 



COLD DESSERTS 



APRICOT BAVARIAN CREAM. 

One and one-half tablespoons granulated gelatine, one- 
fourth cup cold water, one-half cup sugar, juice one-half 
lemon, one cup apricot juice or puree, two cups whipping 
cream. Soften the gelatine in the cold water and dis- 
solve by setting the dish over hot water. Add sugar 
and when dissolved add lemon juice. Strain into apricot 
juice, set in cold water and stir until the mixture begins 
to harden. Add the whipped cream and turn into a 
mould. Mrs. G. B. Van Dort. 



104 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BANANA DESSERT. 

Slice four bananas and squeeze juice of large lemon 
over them; add one-half cup sugar, one gill ice water; 
stand on ice for thirty minutes. Serve in individual 
glasses, heaped high with sweetened whipped cream and 
crushed walnuts. Mrs. J. H. Hellweg. 

BLANC MANGE (IRISH MOSS). 

One-third cup Irish Moss, four cups milk, one-fourth 
teaspoon salt, one and one-half teaspoons vanilla. Soak 
moss fifteen minutes in cold water to cover, drain, pick 
over and add to milk ; cook in double boiler thirty min- 
utes ; the milk will seem but little thicker than when 
put on to cook, but if cooked longer blanc mange will be 
too stifif. Add salt, strain, flavor, re-strain and fill in- 
dividual moulds previously dipped in cold water. Serve 
with sliced bananas, oranges, jelly or cream and sugar. 

Mrs. E. G. Howe. 

CARAMEL PUDDING. 

Two heaping teaspoons of cornstarch, two cups light 
brown sugar, two cups water, one cup chopped walnuts. 
Boil the sugar with the water until thoroughly dissolved. 
Dissolve the cornstarch in a little water and add to mix- 
ture. Pour in molds and serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. F. N. Olmsted. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

Melt one-half cup of butter in a cup of hot water. 
While boiling, beat in one cup of flour. Take from fire 
and when cool stir in three eggs, one at a time, without 
first beating them. Drop mixture by spoonfuls on tins 
and bake well in a moderate oven. Fill with whipped 
cream or soft custard. M.\y M. Ellis. 

APPLE CUSTARD. 

One pint milk, two eggs, four tablespoons sugar, six 
apples, whites of two eggs. Beat two eggs, add sugar 



BETHANY US ION COOK BOOK 105 



and milk and cook as boiled custard. Bake six medium 
apples and put through colander, add the beaten whites 
of two eggs. Sweeten to taste, put over the custard, then 
put drops of jelly over this. Mrs. A. H. Estep. 

CARAMEL CUSTARD. 

One quart milk, one-half cup white sugar, one cup 
brown sugar, one or two tablespoons cornstarch, two 
eggs, one pinch salt, one teaspoon vanilla. Place milk, 
white sugar and salt in double boiler over fire ; beat eggs, 
not separated, in a large bowl ; wet cornstarch with a 
little cold milk. Turn scalding milk on eggs, return to 
fire, stir in cornstarch until it thickens, (until it coats 
spoon). Add scorched sugar. Take from fire, add vanilla 
when cool. 

To Make Caramel. — Place brown sugar in tin or 
iron pan, put over fire, stir till thoroughly scorched but 
not burned. ^ Mrs. C. O. Howe. 

MAPLE CUSTARD. 

One pint milk, two eggs (beaten separately), one table- 
spoon carnstarch. Put yolks in with milk and cook in 
double boiler, then add one cup brown sugar melted and 
stir into hot custard. Put beaten whites in after custard 
is cold. Serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. H. L. Blackburn. 

ORANGE CUSTARD. 

Six oranges with sugar sprinkled over them ; let stand 
twenty minutes ; one quart of milk brought to boiling 
point ; two tablespoons cornstarch ; two eggs, whites 
beaten separately and saved for frosting. Beat yolks, add 
four tablespoons sugar and a little salt. Add cornstarch 
and tgg to hot milk and cook till it thickens. Allow to 
cool and then flavor with vanilla. Pour over the oranges. 
Beat whites of eggs, add three tablespoons powdered 
sugar and cover the pudding. Mrs. T. D. Gregg. 



106 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



DAINTY APPLES. 

Two cups sugar, two cups water, pink coloring, apples. 
Boil the sugar and water, add the coloring. Pare and 
core apples and boil till done. Mrs. B. F. Wegner. 

DELICATE PUDDING. 

Individual Proportions. — One teaspoon gelatine, one 
tablespoon cold water, two tablespoons boiling water, 
two tablespoons sugar, one teaspoon lemon juice, white 
of one egg. 

Full Rule. — One-fourth box Knox's gelatine, one- 
fourth cup cold water, one cup boiling water, one cup 
sugar, one-fourth cup lemon juice, whites of three eggs 
beaten stifif. Soak the gelatine in cold water ten minutes, 
add boiling water, sugar and fruit juice, strain and cool ; 
when beginning to thicken add whites of eggs and beat 
with Dover beater until the mixture is almost firm. Pour 
into molds and chill. Sar.\h E. Griswold. 

EASY DESSERT. 

One-half pint bottle of cream, whipped stifif, one dozen 
marshmallows, cut in small pieces, one half dozen maca- 
roons dry and rolled fine. Mrs. J. R. Henderson. 

FLOATING ISLAND. 

One pint milk, four eggs, one-fourth cup sugar, pinch 
salt, one and one-half teaspoons vanilla. Heat milk in 
double boiler, beat yolks, add sugar and salt to yolks and 
beat until light. Pour hot milk on egg slowly and beat 
continuously, put back in double boiler and let cook until 
thickness of cream, stirring constantly; add flavoring. 
Beat whites of eggs, add one-fourth cup sugar and one- 
fourth teaspoon vanilla flavoring. Put whites on custard 
while hot. Mrs. C. D. Coventry. 

GRAPE CHARLOTTE. 

Soak one-third box gelatine in one-third cup cold 
water, dissolve in one-third cup boiling water; strain; 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 107 



add one cup grape juice and two-thirds cup powdered 
sugar. Have a Hat circular dish, two to three inches 
deep on ice. Pour mixture in this, when cool and begin- 
ning to thicken, add one and one-half cups of whipped 
cream, stir lightly, pour into mold lined with almond 
macaroons. V'ery good. Mrs. E. Harpole. 

GRAPE DESSERT. 

Two cups grape juice, one cup water, one cup sugar, 
scant teaspoon of cinnamon. Thicken with two table- 
spoons of cornstarch, cool, and serve with cream or 
milk. Mrs. George P. Ellis. 

MACAROON DESSERT. 

One-half pound almond macaroons broken into quar- 
ters, one-fourth pound pecan nut meats broken small, 
one bottle cream whipped. Mix all together and chill. 
This will serve eight persons. Mrs. H. O. Day. 

MARSHMALLOW PUDDING. 

Let one tablespoon Knox's granulated gelatine soak in 
one-half cup cold water for five minutes ; place in pan of 
hot water. Beat the whites of two eggs stiff and fold in 
two-thirds of a cup of sugar. Add one-half cup of hot 
water to gelatine and add to egg. Beat till stiff, divide 
and add pink coloring matter (found in Knox's package) 
and candied cherries to half, and whole pecans to the re- 
maining half, and turn into mold. Serve with cream or 
whipped cream. This makes enough for six persons. 

P)EssiE McCumiber. 

NUT PUFFS. 

White of one egg beaten light, three-fourths cup 
powdered sugar, one cup chopped nuts, one-half tea- 
spoon vanilla. Drop in buttered pans. 

Mr.s. W. B. Smith. 



108 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



ORANGE CREAM. 

Heat half a cupful each of orange juice and cream, 
beat the yolks of two eggs with one-half a cupful of 
sugar and cook in the first mixture over hot water until 
thickened. Add one-fourth of a package of gelatine (one 
tablespoon) softened in one-fourth of a cupful of cold 
water, and strain into a cupful and a half of cream. 
Turn into a mold. Serve icy cold. 

Mrs. R. L. Blount. 

ORANGE SNOW. 

Squeeze sufficient oranges to fill a cup two-thirds full. 
Add one-third cupful of lemon juice, and, after sweeten- 
ing to taste, put into a saucepan with one pint of water. 
When it reaches the boiling point, stir in two tablespoons 
of corn starch moistened with cold water. Cook about 
ten minutes, then stir in quickly the stiffly beaten whites 
of three eggs. Stir over the fire a minute or two and 
then pour into a wet mold. 

Mrs. John T. Edwards. 

PINEAPPLE FLUFF. 

One large can of grated pineapple, drain juice into pan 
and heat with half a package of Knox's gelatine. Let 
cool and mix with pulp. Whip one bottle of cream and 
mix with pineapple. Set aside to harden and serve in 
sherbet glasses. Mrs. W. H. Fleming. 

PINEAPPLE SPONGE. 

One-half box gelatine, one cup sugar, one-half cup 
cold water, one-half cup boiling water, one pint whipping 
cream, one can grated pineapple. Soak gelatine in cold 
water until soft, then dissolve in boiling water. Stew 
one can grated pineapple with one cup sugar for ten 
minutes. Cool and add the cream after whipping it. 

Mrs. Lester Lee. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 109 



POLENTA PUDDING. 

One (|uart milk, one cnp (xcllow or white) corn meal, 
two eggs beaten light, small half teaspoon salt, one cup 
sugar, three teaspoons almond fla\-oring. Cook till stiff 
enough to put in mold. 

Sauce. ^ — Take fruit juice (cherry or raspberry), thicken 
with cornstarch to the consistency of cream. Add salt 
to taste. Serve all cold. Mrs. C. jNI. Clark. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

One tablespoon of Knox's gelatine, dissolved in one- 
fourth cup of hot water, whites of four eggs beaten very 
stiff. \Alien gelatine is nearly solid beat in the eggs. 
Lemon to taste. 

Sauce for Same.- — Yolks of four eggs. Beat into them 
one-half cup sugar, add one pint of milk and cook in 
double-boiler. When cold, flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. J. M. Braddock. 

STRAWBERRY WHIP. 

One and one-third cup strawd:)erries, one cup powdered 
sugar, white of one egg. Put ingredients in bowl and 
beat from tw^enty to thirty minutes, or until stiff'. Pile 
lightly on dish, chill, surround with lady fingers and 
serve with boiled custard. 

Raspberries and other fruits may be prepared in same 
way. Lii.r.iAx D. Bargqulst. 

STRAWBERRY WHIP. 

To one cup powdered sugar add one cup canned straw- 
berries (strain juice off) and white of one egg. Beat 
stiff with Dover beater. Xut meats may be added. .Any 
fruit may be substituted in ])lace of straw^berries. 

Mrs. T. B. Thompson. 



no BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



TAPIOCA CHERRY PUDDING. 

One-half cup Minute tapicoa, one pint boiling water. 
Cook until clear and pour over sugared cherries when 
cool. Serve cold with cream. 

Mrs. George D. Young. 

TAPIOCA CREAM. 

Cook in a double boiler for fifteen minutes one quart 
hot milk, two heaping tablespoons Minute tapioca and a 
little salt, stirring frequently. Then add the beaten yolks 
of two eggs and one-half cup sugar. Let all this cook 
until it begins to thicken. Pour into a dish and whip in 
the beaten whites of the eggs until no white is to be 
seen. Add any flavoring desired. It is delicious, poured 
when cold, over any fresh fruit as strawberries, rasp- 
berries, peaches or oranges. Mrs. James Long. 

TAPIOCA PINEAPPLE PUDDING. 

One cup tapioca, one-half cup water, one-half pint 
grated pineapple, one cup sugar, juice of one lemon, 
whites of three eggs, one-fourth teaspoon cream of 
tartar. Soak the tapioca over night in plenty of water ; 
cook tapioca with one-half cup water, pineapple, sugar 
and lemon juice until clear. Remove from stove and 
add the whites of eggs (well beaten) with the cream of 
tartar. When cool serve with whipped cream. 



FROZEN DESSERTS 



BISQUE. 



One quart of whipping cream, one cup of sugar, one 
pint of ripe peaches. Whip the cream until very stiff, 
add sugar and peaches. Place in a mold, wrap piece 
of oiled paper around the lid to keep salt from penetrat- 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 111 



ing, pack in crushed ice (or snow) using three-fourths 
more ice than salt. Cover with blanket and let stand 
four hours. Mrs. \V. J. Stebbins. 

MAPLE BISQUE. 

One and one-half quarts rich cream. Beat in cream, 
whip until a little stifif, add a syrup made of one pint 
maple syrup with the yolks of five eggs well beaten and 
cooked together until slightly thick and let become cold ; 
then add the stiftly beaten whites of five eggs to which 
a pinch of salt has been added. Pour into a freezer and 
freeze as ice cream, ^^'hen partly frozen remove cover 
and add to cream one cup of English walnut meats, one- 
half pound candied cherries chopped fine. Replace cover 
and finish freezing. Let stand packed for several hours 
to season if possible. Mrs., G. S. B.annister. 

FIG PUDDING. 

Eight figs, one pint of whipped cream, three table- 
spoons sugar. Steam figs until soft, chop fine, add the 
cream and sugar, pack in a mold with salt and ice and 
let stand four hours. Stir every fifteen minutes for the 
first half hour. Mrs. W. F. Bl.ackford. 

FROZEN APRICOT. 

One can apricots, one and one-half cups sugar, one and 
one-half cups cream. Drain apricots. To the syrup add 
enough water to make four cups and cook with sugar for 
five minutes. Strain, add apricots pressed,through sieve, 
cool and freeze. When frozen to a soft mush, add cream, 
whipped, and continue freezing until quite stifif. Peeled 
apricots are preferable. Mrs. John McKinl.w. 

LEMON ICE. 

One pint milk, one quart cream, three cups sugar. 
Chill cream and milk after adding sugar, then add the 
juice of six lemons, one-half cup of ground pineapple and 
freeze. Mary Shaner. 



112 BETH.l.W UA'ION COOK BOOK 



PINEAPPLE ICE. 

Four cups water, four cups sugar, one teaspoon gela- 
tine, one-fourth cup cold water, juice five lemons, one 
can pineapple. Make a syrup by boiling ten minutes, 
add the hydrated gelatine; cool, add lemon juice and 
strain. Add grated or chopped pineapple and freeze. 

Mrs. G. B. Van Dort. 

RASPBERRY AND CURRANT ICE. 

Three cups water, two cups sugar, two cups raspberry 
juice, one and one-third cups currant juice, one teaspoon 
gelatine. Soften gelatine in two tablespoons cold water. 
Make a syrup of sugar and water. Add raspberries and 
currants mashed and squeezed through double cheese 
cloth. Strain and freeze. Mrs. G. B. Van Dort. 

ICE CREAM. 

Make a custard (cooking over water) of one pint of 
milk, two eggs, one cup of sugar. After it has cooled 
add one quart of cream or cream and milk mixed. With 
this foundation one may have any kind of cream de- 
sired. Six fresh peaches put through a fruit press may 
be added, one-half cup granulated sugar melted slowly 
and browned slightly, with one-half pound ground Eng- 
lish walnuts, makes a delicious caramel nut ice cream. 
Candied cherries and nuts are a splendid addition to 
vanilla ice cream. Amount, two quarts. 

Mrs. W. H. Adkinson. 

CARAMEL ICE CREAM. 

Heat one quart of milk in double boiler. Mix thor- 
oughly one-half cup of flour and one cup of granulated 
sugar. Stir into the milk before it becomes too hot. 
When it thickens, stand it aside to cool ; then add three 
eggs beaten till light. Brown one and one-half cups of 
granulated sugar in a skillet, stirring just enough to 
prevent its burning. When melted, pour into the custard, 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 113 

beating hard while pouring. When cool, add one quart 
of cream, flavor with vanilla and then freeze. 

Mks. Thomas R. Beman. 

PLAIN ICE CREAM. 

This make a good plain cream to which fruit juices, 
nuts, chopped cherries and other combinations may be 
added. One quart milk, one half pint cream, one and 
one-half cups sugar, one junket tablet. Add the crushed 
tablet to the milk when it is luke warm. Then add the 
sugar and cream ; when the sugar has melted, freeze. If 
you wish to add strawberries or peaches, cover the fruit 
with some of the sugar, cover and let stand one hour. 
Then mash well and press through a coarse piece of 
cheese cloth. Add this to the cream and milk mixture. 

Mrs. John Lavvrie. 

PLUM PUDDING ICE CREAM. 

Make a rich chocolate cream of one quart cream, one 
cup sugar, one teaspoon vanilla, half cup grated sweet 
chocolate. Strain, and before it cools add cup each of 
chopped raisins, chopped nuts, chopped figs, stirring the 
whole until cold; then freeze it. When it is frozen, mix 
in one-half cup brandy in which a teaspoon of cinnamon 
and half teaspoon of cloves have been soaked. Pack 
solidly in square tins. To serve, cut in slices and put 
tablespoon whipped cream on each piece. 

Mrs. J. H. Hellweg. 

VANILLA ICE CREAM. 

One quart thin cream, three-fourths cup sugar, one 
teaspoon vanilla. Mix ingredients and freeze. 

Ai,iDA E. Christian. 

APRICOT MOUSSE. 

One and one-half cups whipping cream, one cup apri- 
cot pulp and juice, one-half cup sugar. Cook sugar and 



114 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



pulp until quite thick and let cool. Beat the cream until 
very stiff, then fold the fruit pulp into the cream. Pack 
in a mold or ice cream freezer can and let freeze about 
three hours. Mrs. C. Roy Kindt. 

MAPLE MOUSSE. 

One cup rich maple syrup, one pint cream, yolks of 
four eggs, white of one egg. Heat syrup to boiling point, 
pour slowly on yolks, cook in double boiler until thick. 
Let it cool and add cream and whites and freeze. 

Mrs. W. J. ToLLERTON. 

NESSELRODE PUDDING. 

I 
One pint shelled almonds, one pint cream, one pint 
canned pineapple, one-half pound French candied fruit, 
one tablespoon vanilla extract, one pint water, one pint 
sugar, yolks of ten eggs. Blanch nuts and pound in 
mortar to paste. Boil sugar, water and juice from pine- 
apple twenty minutes. Beat yolks of eggs and stir into 
the syrup. Put pan in sauce pan of boiling water and 
beat mixture with egg beater until it thickens. Take off 
and place in basin of cold water and beat for ten minutes. 
Mix almonds with cream and run all through a sieve. 
Add the candied fruit and pineapple cut fine. Mix this 
with the cooked mixture. Add the flavor and one-half 
teaspoon salt. Freeze the same as ice cream. 

Mrs. William W. Green, 

Bay City, Tex. 

ANGEL PARFAIT. 

Boil three-fourths cup of sugar and one-third cup of 
water until a soft ball is formed in cold water. Pour in 
a fine stream upon the whites of two eggs beaten stiff. 
Beat occasionally until cool, then fold in two bottles of 
cream, whipped stiff. Flavor with one teaspoon vanilla. 
Line mold with wax paper and put in the mixture to 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 115 



overflow, cover with wax paper and tie on lid. Bury in 
equal parts of salt and ice. Stand three or four hours. 
If mold holds more, add extra white of egg. 

Mrs. H. T. Baker. 

MAPLE PARFAIT. 

Five egg yolks, one cup of maple syrup, one-half pint 
of whipped cream. Beat eggs thoroughly, add the syrup 
and cook in double boiler until thick, stirring constantly. 
Add whipped cream when cool and put on ice. 

Mrs. O. a. Keeler. 

APRICOT SHERBET. 

One cup of pulp from dried apricots cooked until 
tender, the juice of three oranges and three lemons, two 
cups of sugar boiled with one quart of water for about 
ten minutes. Soak a teaspoon of gelatin in a little cold 
water for a few minutes, add to the hot syrup; then add 
the fruit and strain through a fine sieve. Cool and freeze, 
being careful to use three parts ice to one part salt. If 
you start the freezing slowly, gradually getting faster, 
this will be just like ice cream. 

Mrs. Paul E. Brown. 

PEACH SHERBET. 

One quart of yellow peaches put through a sieve, one 
cup of orange juice or four large oranges, juice of one 
lemon, one and three-fourths pounds of sugar and one 
quart of cold water. Boil until a little thick, strain and 
put with fruit juices. Freeze a little, then add one cup 
of cream with a little sugar. Will make fifteen or twenty 
glasses. Mrs. W. R. Manock. 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET. 

Grate two pineapples and mix with two quarts of 
water and a pint of sugar, add the juice of two lemons 
and the beaten whites of four eggs. Place in a freezer 
and freeze. Mrs. J. Niemann. 



m^ \Il want you to want 
vA/ us to supply your table 
wants for we have what you 
want when you want it, 

Fleming Bros. 

Tracy Grocery and Market 

Phone Washington Heights 10 



The Shelmire Toggery Shop 
Don't Forget the Number 

Phone Morgan Park 1207 

2103 Morgan Avenue 
IN THE HEART o/ TRACY 

KEENER'S DRUG SHOP 

1832 West 103rd Street 
CHICAGO 

PHONE WASHINGTON HEIGHTS 7 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 117 



118 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UXION COOK BOOK 119 



Beverages 



In social hours indulge the soul, 

Where mirth and temperance mix the howl. 

— Samuel Johnson. 

BOILED COFFEE. 

One-half cup ground coffee, one egg, one cup cold water, 
six cups boiling water. Do not use tin coffee pot. Wash 
Q.^g, break, and beat slightly, dilute with one-half the cold 
water, add crushed shell and mix with coffee. Turn into 
coffee pot, pour on boiling water, and stir thoroughly. Boil 
three minutes. If not boiled, coffee is cloudy ; if boiled too 
long, too much tannic acid is developed. Add remaining 
cold water, which perfects clearing. . Cold water being 
heavier than hot water sinks to the bottom, carrying grounds 
with it. Let simmer for ten minutes, but do not allow cof- 
fee to boil. 

CAFE AU LAIT. 

Pour equal proportions of scalded milk and boiled coffee 
into cups. 

EGG LEMONADE. 

Beat one tgg, add two tablespoons lemon juice, beat again, 
add two tablespoons sugar, mix well ; add one cup milk or 
water. Pour into glasses one-third full of chopped ice. 

EGG NOG. 

One tgg, one teaspoon sugar, a little salt,, one teaspoon 
flavoring, one cup cream. Beat white until stiff, add cream 
and flavoring. Beat yolks, add sugar and salt and mix all 
together. Mrs. Geo. D. Young. 



120 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



ENGLISH TEA. 

Scald out the teapot, put in the tea, using one small tea- 
spoon of Ceylon tea for each cup. Pour on boiling water 
and let stand three minutes. 

FRUIT LEMONADE. 

Three lemons, one orange (sliced), juice of one orange, 
one and one-half cups sugar. Maraschino cherries, one for 
each glass, three quarts water. Mrs. C. B. Goes. 

FRUIT PUNCH. 

Three dozen lemons, two dozen oranges, one large bot- 
tle non-alcoholic Maraschino cherries and liquid, two cans 
Hawaiian pineapple (diced) and liquid, four pounds granu- 
lated sugar made into a syrup and cooled. While syrup 
is yet warm add grated rinds of one dozen oranges and of 
one dozen lemons. Mint. Make twelve hours before using. 
Add water to taste. This makes sufficient for one hun- 
dred persons. Mrs. Gardner Greenle.\f. 

GINGERADE. 

One quart water, one cup sugar, one-quarter ounce white 
ginger root, juice of three oranges and one lemon. Allow 
the water and sugar to come to a boil, add the ginger root 
broken into bits and boil twenty minutes. Remove from 
stove, add fruit juice, strain and cool. Dilute to suit taste 
Serve with shaved ice. Gertrude Corlett. 

GRAPE JUICE. 

Wash and pulp grapes. Boil pulp only long enough to 
loosen seeds ; then put through colander. Add skins to 
juice resulting and boil mixture until skins are tender, using 
no water. Strain through jelly bags repeatedly until clear. 
Add one cup sugar to four cups juice, bring to boiling point, 
and bottle. All the rinsings from utensils and jelly bags 
should be carefully saved for marmalade or spiced grapes. 

Mrs. H. a. Parker. 



BETHANY UX/OX COOK BOOK 121 



LENOX PUNCH. 

Two cups water, three-fourths cui) su^ar, two-thirds cup 
currant jelly, one cup orang'e juice, one-half cup lemon 
juice, two bottles ginger ale. Make a syrup by boiling 
sug"ar and water. Add jelly and as soon as dissolved add a 
piece of ice; then add fruit juice and ginger ale, color red, 
freeze to a mush, serve in glasses, and insert in each glass a 
small sprig of holly with berries. An English Christmas 
beverage. Mrs. John Roland Robertson. 

MINT TEA. 

Steep the tea as for iced tea and while hot drop in four 
or five stalks of mint and let remain about fifteen minutes. 
Strain and dilute. To one pitcher of tea add juice of two 
lemons and sweeten to taste. Serve with cracked ice. 

Mrs. J. H. Hellweg. 

MULLED CIDER. 

Heat one quart of cider with six cloves, twelve allspice, 
a stick of cinnamon broken in bits and one-quarter nutmeg 
broken in pieces. If the cider is too tart add sugar; if too 
sweet add lemon juice. Mrs. Edwin Bebij. 

SPANISH CHOCOLATE. 

Cook two squares grated Baker's chocolate, one-half cup 
water, one-half cup sugar, one-eighth teaspoon salt to a 
paste, stirring constantly. Add one pint milk, one-third at 
a time, and stir until the whole has boiled. Add two well 
beaten eggs, stirring in very quickly or beating with Dover 
beater. Bessie McCumrer. 

STRAWBERRY PUNCH. 

}ilix together two quarts strawberries mashed soft; three 
quarts cold water and the juice of two lemons. Stand in a 
cool place for four hours, strain and add to the liquid a 
pound and a half granulated sugar. When the sugar is dis- 
solved, strain again and set in a cold place until wanted. 
Serve in tumblers with crushed ice. 



Call and inspect our displays in all departments 
We assure you a cordial welcome 

BARNARD'S NEW SEED STORE 

Large, Roomy, Well-Lighted, Easy oi Access 

Experienced attendants to suggest and advise 

Seeds for Garden and Farm 

Fresh, careruUy selectea stocks or all leading 
varieties. General catalogue or Seeds, BuIds, 
SnruDs and Garden Tools, puolisned eacn year 
m January. A copy is yours for tne asking. 

Bulbs lor Fall Planting 

Xne most reliable growers in iTolland con- 
tribute to our supplies. We can make special 
price on import orders placed in advance during 
tne summer months. Bulb catalogue publisned 
in September. 

Lawn Grass Mixtures 

For general purposes -we recommena our Perpetual 
Green Lawn Grass Seed as containing tne grass seeds 
adapted ror tne making or a permanent lawn witn 
ordinary sous and conditions. We nave special mix- 
tures ror sandy soil, sunny or shady places. Soav either 
in spring or autumn. 

Poultry Feed and Supplies 

We carry a very complete line and deliver to all 
parts or the city. Special Catalog on application. 

THE W. W. BARNARD CO. 

SEEDSMEN 
231-235 W. Madison St., Chicago 

Between 5th Ave. and Franklin St. 

Long Distance Telephone Franklin 635 Private Exchange in ail Departments 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK \2i 



124 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 125 



Cakes and Cookies 



The discovery of a new dish does more for the happiness 
of i)ia}ikiiid than the discovery of a new star. 

— Brillat-Savarin. 



ANGEL FOOD. 

One cup flonr, one cup granulated sugar, half cup pul- 
verized or confectioner's sugar, one level teaspoon cream 
tartar. Pass these ingredients through sieve five times. 
Beat whites of twelve perfectly fresh egg^s with pinch of 
salt added, sift in and fold under dry ingredients ; add tea- 
spoon vanilla. Bake forty-five minutes in slow oven. In- 
vert pan and let partially cool before removing from pan. 

Mrs. Edwin Bebb. 

ANGEL CAKE, MOCK. 

Sift seven times oi^e cup flour, one cup sugar, one-fourth 
saltspoon salt, three level teaspoons of baking powder. Add 
to this one cup milk heated to boiling point, with one tea- 
spoon vanilla. Beat thoroughly, then fold in the stiffly 
beaten whites of two eggs. Bake in an ungreased pan in 
a moderate oven for about forty minutes. Ice when cold. 
This is delicious. Mrs. D. J. Beeby. 

BLUEBERRY CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, three eggs, three cups 
flour (scant), one cup milk, one-half teaspoon salt, two 
teaspoons cream of tartar and one teaspoon of soda, or 
three teaspoons of baking powder, two cups of blueberries. 
Bake in biscuit or muflin pans. Mrs. Frank White. 



126 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 

BURNT SUGAR CAKE. 
(Three Layers). 

Cream one-half cup butter and one and one-half cups 
sugar, add one-half teaspoon salt, yolks of two eggs, one 
cup cold water (caramel, made by burning one half cup 
sugar till smoking brown and adding one-half cup hot 
water), three cups fiour (sifted twice) and six level tea- 
spoons baking powder. Bake in layers in hot oven with 
slight decreasing temperature, twenty minutes. 

Frosting — Burn four tablei^poons sugar and add to 
boiled frosting. Bessie McCumber. 

BURNT SUGAR CAKE. 

Heat one cup of sugar in an iron frying pan over hot 
fire until black, pour in from, side one cup water ; one and 
one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, three eggs well 
beaten, one cup water, one teaspoon vanilla, two table- 
spoons of burnt sugar, two cups of flour, two level tea- 
spoons baking powder. 

Icing — Two cups powdered sugar, one tablespoon burnt 
sugar, enough milk to make right consistency. 

Mrs. G. a. Hutchinson. 

CARAMEL CAKE, POTATO. 

Cream two-thirds cup butter with two cups granulated" 
sugar, one cup mashed potatoes rubbed through colander, 
four well beaten eggs, two-thirds cup sweet milk, two cups 
flour and three teaspoons baking powder sifted together 
several times, two ounces melted chocolate, one cup English 
walnuts chopped, one cup seeded raisins, one small teaspoon 
each cinnamon and cloves, one small grated nutmeg. Bake 
in loaf tin, covered first fifteen minutes with brown paper; 
bake slowly fifty to sixty minutes. Do not move the cake 
while it is in oven. Mrs. John Wilkinson. 

CARAMEL CAKE, SPANISH. 

Two cups sugar, one-half cup butter, three eggs (saving 
white of one egg for icing), one cup milk, two cups flour, 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 127 



two teaspoons baking powder, one teaspoon cinnamon, one- 
half teaspoon vanilla, hake in three layers. 

Icing — One cup hrown sugar, four tablespoons cream 
or rich milk, small piece butter. Boil fifteen minutes, then 
beat in white of one egg beaten to a stifif froth, add vanilla 
flavoring. Sprinkle with chopped walnuts. 

Mrs. John Olson. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Two squares chocolate, one-half cup milk, yolk of one 
egg, boiled together ; add one cup sugar, one tablespoon 
butter, one-half cup sour cream, one teaspoon soda, two 
cups flour, one teaspoon vanilla. Bake in layers. 

Frosting — One and one-half squares chocolate, yolk 
of one egg, a little vanilla, one-half teaspoon melted butter. 
Melt and stir in confectioner's sugar until right consistency 
to spread. Mrs. Tom Church. 

CREAM CAKE, CHEAP. 

One cup sugar, one egg, one tablespoon butter, one cup 
sweet milk, two cups flour, two heaping teaspoons baking 
powder, flavor to taste. Divide in three parts and bake in 
layer cake pans. 

Filling — Beat one egg and one-half cup sugar to- 
gether, then add one full tablespoon flour wet with a little 
sweet milk. Stir this mixture into one cup (scant) boiling 
milk until thick. Flavor and when cool spread between 
cakes. Mrs. E. Rightmire. 

CREAM CAKE, FRENCH. 

Three eggs, one cup sugar, tw^o tablespoons cold water, 
one and one-half cups flour, one teaspoon baking powder. 
Beat eggs and sugar thoroughly, add cold water, sift in 
flour and baking powder, stirring all the time in one direc- 
tion. Bake in two thin cakes, split them while hot and 
fill with cream prepared in the following manner: One 
pint sweet milk, two tablespoons corn starch, one egg, one- 
half cup sugar, butter size of an egg, flavoring. Mix corn- 



128 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



starch with milk, egg beaten light, sugar, cook in double 
boiler and while hot stir in butter and flavoring and spread 
between layers. Sprinkle top with powdered sugar. 

Mrs. S. a. Poyer. 

CREAM CAKE, COCOA. 

One-half cup butter, one and one-fourth cups sugar, 
three eggs, three-fourths cup milk, one-half teaspoon va- 
nilla, one and one-half cups flour, five tablespoons cocoa, 
two even teaspoons baking powder, a little salt. Cream 
butter and sugar, add beaten yolks and vanilla, sift flour, 
cocoa, baking powder and salt, add alternately with milk, 
and stiffly beaten whites last. Bake in loaf or layers. 

Mrs. T- H. Kistner. 

DEVIL'S FOOD, CAKE. 

Two cups brown sugar, two eggs, one-half cup butter, 
one-half cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda, one square Bak- 
er's chocolate dissolved in one cup boiling water, two cups 
flour (level), one half teaspoon baking powder. Cream 
sugar and butter, then add eggs, sour milk, flour, baking 
powder and soda sifted together; last of all add chocolate 
dissolved in boiling water. Use boiled frosting. 

Mrs. Geo. P. Ellis. 

DEVIL'S FOOD LOAF CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, four eggs, two cups sugar, one cup 
milk, two and one-third cups flour, four level teaspoons 
baking powder, two squares bitter chocolate, teaspoon va- 
nilla. Beat butter to a cream, gradually beat in one cup 
sugar, beat yolks of four eggs light, beat in other cup 
sugar, then beat into butter and sugar ; add alternately one 
cup milk and the flour sifted with four teaspoons baking 
powder. Add melted chocolate and vanilla and lastly the 
beaten whites^ of four eggs. Bake in sheet for thirty min- 
utes. Mrs. S. a. Foyer. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 129 



FRUIT CAKE, INEXPENSIVE. 

One cup light brown sugar, scant half cup shortening, 
one cup sour milk. Dissolve one rounding teaspoon soda 
in a little hot water and add to sour milk. One and one- 
half cups flour, one teaspoon ground cinnamon, one-half tea- 
spoon each of cloves and allspice. Add raisins, currants 
and citron rolled in a little flour. Bake in a slow oven. 
Flavor is much improved by adding preserved orange peel. 

Mrs. J. H. Husted. 

FRUIT CAKE, INEXPENSIVE. 

One pound raisins, one pound currants, one pound brown 
sugar, two heaping tablespoons lard, one tablespoon soda, 
one quart boiling water. Set these ingredients on stove 
and let them reach boiling point. When mixture is cool 
add one egg, four heaping cups flour, two teaspoons each 
of allspice, cinnamon and cloves, one tablespoon salt. Bake 
slowly about two hours. Mrs. A. W. Zimmerman. 

FRUIT CAKE, QUICK. 

Three cups flour sifted with three teaspoons baking pow- 
der, one cup brown sugar, one cup molasses, one-half cup 
butter, three eggs ; when well beaten add one-half teaspoon 
cloves, one-half teaspoon cinnamon and nutmeg, one cuj) 
stoned raisins, one cup dates cut in fine pieces, one cup nut 
meats and a little citron. Bake in slow oven. 

LuciLE Braddock. 

GINGER BREAD, SOFT. 

One-half cup sugar, one tablespoon butter, one cup mo- 
lasses, two eggs, one-half cup milk, two cups flour, one 
teaspoon baking power for sweet milk, or one teaspoon 
soda for sour milk, scant one-half teaspoon cloves, heap- 
ing one-half teaspoon ginger. Mrs. J. J. Bickel. 

GINGER BREAD, SOFT. 

One-fourth cup sugar, one-half cup molasses, one-fourth 
cup of butter, one-half teaspoon each of cinnamon and 



130 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



cloves, one-fourth teaspoon ginger, one teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in one-half cup hot water, one and one-fourth cups 
of flour, one egg beaten, to be added the last thing. 

Mrs. Wm. H. Roberts. 



LITTLE CAKES 



CUP CAKES. 

One-half cup butter, three-fourths cup sweet milk, one 
cup sugar, two eggs, one and one-half cups flour, two tea- 
spoons baking powder, one teaspoon vanilla. 

Mrs. a. Kruse. 

CAKES, HERMITS OR NUT. 

One large cup sugar, one-half cup butter, two-thirds 
cup milk, three eggs, one cup nuts, cut fine, one cup raisins 
(seeded, cut in half and floured), two cups flour, one-half 
teaspoon soda (in milk), one teaspoon cream of tartar (in 
flour) one-half nutmeg, salt to taste. Drop from spoon in 
buttered pan. Mrs. Wm. Vear. 

MOCHA CAKES. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, two eggs, one-half 
cup sweet milk, two small cups flour, three teaspoons bak- 
ing powder. Bake in a moderate oven. 

Icing — Two cups pulverized sugar, two tablespoons but- 
ter (warm the butter and mix well with the sugar), one 
teaspoon of vanilla, one tablespoon boiling water. Make 
the thickness of icing. Add half a pound of blanched 
almonds, browned and chopped fine. Cut the cake in small 
squares, ice all over and roll into the chopped nuts. 

Mrs. a. C. McPherson, 
Toronto, Canada. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 131 



SCOTCH FRUIT CAKES. 

One pound currants, one apple cut in small pieces, two 
tablespoons water, let simmer on stove slowly; one cup 
sugar, one-fourth teaspoon allspice, butter size of a wal- 
nut. Pastry. — Two cups flour, one pinch salt, one level 
teaspoon baking powder, two tablespoons lard. Roll pastry 
thin, put one layer in dripping pan, then put filling in one- 
half inch thick, another layer of pastry on top. Bake 
three-quarters of an hour. Cut in squares. 

Jean McGilp. 

CAKIES. 

One and one-half cups sugar, two rounding cups flour, 
one teaspoon baking powder, one cup milk, two tablespoons 
butter, one teaspoon flavoring, one cup raisins. Beat but- 
ter and sugar to cream, add milk, flour and raisins, and 
beat vigorously; add salt, flavoring and baking powder; 
mix well, put into muffin tins and bake in a moderate oven 
about thirty minutes. Mrs. H. A. Pajrker. 

WALNUT SQUARES. 

Two cups brown sugar, three eggs, two cups ground 
walnuts, one cup bread flour, one teaspoon vanilla, pinch 
of salt, one-fourth teaspoon soda. Bake in a square shallow 
tin and when cold cut in squares and cover with frosting. 

Mrs. W. H. Green. 



LAYER CAKES 



BARGER CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, two eggs, two-thirds 
cups milk, two cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder. 
Cream butter and sugar, beat in the eggs, add milk and 



132 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



lastly sifted flour with baking- powder. Flavor with va- 
nilla. Bake in layers. 

Filling" For Same — One heaj^ing tablespoon butter in 
which stir powdered sugar until thick. Add two table- 
spoons cream. AIr.s. G. R. Moore. 

DARK CHOCOLATE LAYER CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup sour 
milk, one teaspoon soda, two heaping cups flour, one-half 
cake bitter chocolate dissolved in three-fourths cup hot 
water, two eggs, one teaspoon vanilla. This will make three 
layers. Put together with white boiled icing.- 

T'ettv Hill. 

JARQUETTE CAKE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, one-fourth cup butter, 
scant cup milk, two eggs,- two cups flour, two heaping tea- 
spoons baking powder, one teaspoon vanilla. Bake in lay- 
ers. Good with any filling. Cream sugar and butter, add 
milk gradually, then well beaten eggs, flour with baking 
powder mixed, flavoring. AIrs. J. S. Woodw.\rd. 

STRIPED CAKE. 

Two cups sugar, three eggs, two-thirds cup butter, one 
cup sweet milk, three cups flour, one large teaspoon baking 
powder. P>ake two layers of this, then add to remainder 
one cup chopped raisins, one tablespoon molasses, one-half 
teaspoon each of cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg, a little 
more flour, l^ake in layers and alternate with light part, 
spreading icing between. Mr.s. E. Harpole. 

SUPERIOR LAYER CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, three eggs, two cups 
flour, two teaspoons baking powder, one-half cup milk, 
flavor to taste. Cream sugar and butter ; beat yolks and 
put in ; add milk, then the beaten whites and lastly the 
flour and baking powder sifted three times. Bake in quick 
oven. This makes three large layers. 

Mrs. T- P- Moeller. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 133 



THREE-LAYER CAKE WITHOUT AN EGG. 

Cream one-halt cup hiilter (lard) with one and one-half 
cups sus^ar. Ponr in one and one-third cups of milk and 
heat until sugar is dissolved. Stir in gradually three cups 
of tlour. sifted with two heaping teaspoons haking powder 
and one tahlespoon cornstarch. Beat to a stiff batter and 
bake in three portions. May be put together with jelly or 
icing. Mrs. A. C. Mowat. 



LOAF CAKES 



BIRTHDAY CAKE. 

One and one-half cups granulated sugar, one-half cup 
butter, three eggs, three-fourths cup milk, two and one-half 
cups sifted flour into which has been stirred a heaping tea- 
spoon baking powder, one teaspoon vanilla. Cream butter 
and sugar, add the milk and vanilla to the yolks of the 
eggs well beaten. Add this liquid mixture alternately with 
the flour and baking powder to the creamed butter and 
sugar. Beat well, then fold in the whites of the eggs beaten 
to a froth. Divide the batter into thirds, to one portion 
add three heaping teaspoons of Baker's Cocoa (dry), to 
another portion add a little pink fruit coloring (until the 
desired shade) and leave the third portion plain. Put into 
a buttered cake pan by spoonfuls, alternating colors. Bake 
in a slow oven for one hour. ( Be careful not to use too 
much pink coloring, as baking deepens the color, and a 
delicate shade makes a much prettier cake). 

Dorothy Eddington. 

CHILDREN'S CAKE. 

One-third cup butter, one cuj:) sugar, two eggs (beaten 
separately), one and one-half cups pastry flour, two and 
one-half level teaspoons baking powder, one-half cup 
milk. Cream butter and sugar, add the yolks of eggs 



134 BETHANY . UNION COOK BOOK 



beaten well, add flour into which baking powder has been 
sifted, add milk ; flavor with orange and vanilla. 

Mrs. H. L. Wallace. 

COLONIAL CAKE. 

One and one-half cups flour, one cup butter, salt, one 
cup eggs, one and one-half cups powdered sugar, one 
scant teaspoon baking powder. Beat butter, flour and 
baking powder to a cream ; beat eggs and sugar very- 
light. Put all together and beat smooth. Flavor. 

Mrs. C. L. Hays. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, two cups sugar, three-fourths cup 
milk, three cups of fine pastry flour, three small tea- 
spoons baking powder, whites of six eggs. Mix in the 
order given. Bake in a shallow pan in a quick oven 
about twenty minutes. Mrs. E. L. Roberts. 

FRENCH LOAF CAKE. 

Two cups white sugar, one cup butter, one cup sweet 
milk, three eggs beaten separately, two teaspoons cream 
tartar, one soda, three cups flour. 

Mrs. Geo. M. Murray. 

GRAHAM CRACKER CAKE. 

Cream together one large tablespoon butter and three- 
fourths cup sugar, three eggs, one-half cup milk, twenty- 
one crackers rolled fine, one teaspoon baking powder, a 
handful of broken walnut meats. Bake in long, shallow 
tin, and when baked sprinkle with powdered sugar. 

Mrs. W. F. Nehf. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

Cream together one cup sugar and one-half cup of 
butter, add one-half cup milk, two cups flour, two tea- 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 135 



spoons baking powder sifted with flour; lastly fold in the 
stiffly beaten whites of three eggs. 

Icing. — Yolks of three eggs beaten light, one and 
three-fourths cups confectioner's sugar, two teaspoons 
vanilla, one tablespoon sweet cream, one teaspoon vine- 
gar. Beat well for twenty minutes, then spread. 

Mrs. W. F. Nehf. 

LOAF CAKE, BLACK WALNUT. 

Cream one cup sugar, one-half cup butter, two tgg 
yolks, one-half cup milk, one and one-half cups flour, 
two level teaspoons baking powder. Mix all together 
and add chopped nuts, about one cup. Lastly add whites 
of eggs beaten stifif. Frost and sprinkle with nuts. 

Mrs. Joseph J. Miller. 

LOAF COCOANUT CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, three cups flour, one 
cup milk, whites of four eggs, one and one-half teaspoons 
baking powder sifted in the flour, one cup grated cocoa- 
nut stirred in the last thing. - Mrs. Curnick. 

LOAF CAKE, WHITE. 

Three-fourths cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup 
sweet milk, three cups fine pastry flour, three rounding 
teaspoons baking powder, eight whites of eggs. Cream 
butter and sugar until very light, then add the milk ; 
sift flour with baking powder three times and add alter- 
nately with the whites of the eggs which have been 
beaten very stifT. Mrs. A. J. Goes. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

White Part.— Four eggs, one cup of white sugar, half 
a cup of butter, half a cup of sweet milk, two teaspoons 
baking powder, one teaspoon of vanilla and two and one- 
half cups of sifted flour. 



136 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



Dark Part. — Mix one-third of the mixture with two 
tablespoons cocoa, drop a spoonful of each kind alter- 
nately. Try to drop it so that the cake shall be well 
streaked through, giving it the appearance of marble. 

Mrs. J. Niemann. 

NUT CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, one and one-half cups sugar, 
three eggs, two level cups sifted flour, two and one-half 
teaspoons baking powder, three-fourths cup milk, one 
cup broken nut meats. Cream butter and sugar, add 
beaten yolks of eggs, then flour and milk alternately, 
the baking powder sifted into the flour, then the beaten 
whites of the eggs and nut meats. P^lavor with orange 
and vanilla mixed. Mrs. H. L. Wallace. 

NUT CAKE. 

One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, 
three-fourths cup milk, two cups flour, wdiites of four 
eggs, tw^o teaspoons of baking powder, one cup nuts 
chop]^ed fine. Mrs. A. H. Whitley. 

ONE EGG CAKE. 

Scant cup and a half granulated sugar, scant half cup 
of butter, one Qgg thoroughly beaten, one cup of sweet 
milk, two and one-half cups sifted flour, two and one- 
half level teaspoons of baking powder in the flour. Sift 
the flour and baking powder together two or three times. 
One teas])oon of any desired flavoring. Beat very thor- 
oughly. Xice for either loaf or layer cake. 

AIrS. J. TI. H LISTED. 

SOUR CREAM CAKE. 

Two well beaten eggs, pinch oi salt, one cup sugar, 
one teaspoon vanilla, one cup sour cream, two cups flour, 
one-half teaspoon soda. This can be baked in loaf or in 
gem irons. A nice spice cake can be made by adding 
one cup raisins, one teaspoon each, cloves and cinnamon. 

Mrs. Arthur J. Cole. 



BETHANY UX/OX COOK HOOK 137 



SOUR CREAM CAKE. 

One cup sour cream, one cup sugar, two eggs, one 
pinch salt, one-half level teaspoon baking soda, one 
rounding teaspoon baking powder, one teaspoon lemon 
or \anilla, one and one-fourth cups Hour, one-fourth cup 
cornstarch. Sift flour, cornstarch, salt, soda and baking 
powder three times. This makes two good sized layers 
or fourteen cup cakes. Mrs. H. E. Gunn. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

One cup granulated sugar, four eggs, one cup flour, 
one teaspoon lemon extract. Beat whites stiff, beat in 
the sugar, then yolks, fold in the flour, add extract. 

Mrs. E. W. Bennett. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Six eggs, beat for thirty minutes, add one cuj) of sugar, 
one cup of flour, one teaspoon lemon flavoring. Bake 
forty-five minutes. Don't disturb oven while cake is 
baking. Mrs. J. Booth. 

SPONGE LOAF CAKE. 

Ingredients: Four eggs, one cup sifted fine grained 
granulated sugar, one cup sifted pastry flour, four table- 
spoons hot water, one teaspoon cream of tartar, one-half 
teaspoon almond extract (or any desired flavoring), a 
pinch of salt. 

Method. — Sift flour and sugar five times before measur- 
ing, separate the eggs, putting the whites in large bowl, 
add salt and whip to a froth. Add cream of tartar 
and whip until stift' ; now with a spoon, beat the yolks 
until light. Add half of the sugar and beat four minutes, 
add other sugar to whites and beat four minutes, then 
add flavoring and water to yolks and beat two minutes. 
Now with whip combine the yolks and white, beating 
the former into the wdiites. slowly whipping until all is a 
fluft'y mass, then sift flour over and fold in. Put in mold 



138 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 

and bake forty minutes — first ten to twenty minutes 
heat should be moderate, then heat can be increased. 

Mrs. James E. Meehan. 

SPONGE CAKE, QUICK. 

Three eggs, one and one-half cups sugar, two cups 
flour, two teaspoons baking powder, one-half cup cold 
water, one-half teaspoon vanilla, one-half teaspoon lemon, 
a pinch of salt. Beat sugar and yolks until they cream, 
add water and flour, sift flour three times; beat white of 
eggs stifif, add baking powder to the whites and stir into 
batter. Bake in three layers. Secret of the cake is in 
beating it thoroughly. Mrs. F. N. Olmsted. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

One cup sugar (sift the sugar), one cup flour, two 
eggs, two teaspoons baking powder, one-third cup boil- 
ing water, flavoring. Put the water in last and bake 
slowly. Mrs. Harriet Q. Newman. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

Whites of eleven eggs and yolks of six, one and one- 
half cups granulated sugar, one cup flour, one teaspoon 
cream of tartar, one teaspoon orange or vanilla extract. 
Beat the whites stiff and gradually beat in the sugar; 
beat the yolks separately and gradually add to the whites 
sugar and flavoring, stir in the flour, mix quickly and 
well. Bake fifty minutes in a slow oven in an angel cake 
tin. Sift flour before measuring. 

Mrs. Walter Ladd. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

AVhites of seven eggs, yolks of five, one-third teaspoon 
cream of tartar, one and one-fourth cups sugar, one-half 
teaspoon vanilla extract, one cup flour. Beat whites of 
eggs to a stifif froth, add cream of tartar to whites and 
beat in. then beat in the susrar. Then add the beaten 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 139 



yolks and vanilla extract and when well beaten fold in 
a cup of flour sifted three times. Bake for about thirty 
minutes in an ungreased cake pan or grease only the 
bottom of any large pan and cut cake out when cold. 
Bake in slow oven. Mrs. J. P. Moeller. 



SPICED CAKES 



APPLE SAUCE CAKE, SPICED. 

One and one-half cups apple sauce, one-half cup butter 
or lard, one cup sugar, one cup raisins, two teaspoons 
soda dissolved in two tablespoons hot water, two and 
one-half cups flour, spices. Mrs. R. McGinnis. 

APPLE SAUCE CAKE, SPICED. 

One and one-half cups warm apple sauce (sweetened 
as for table use), one-half cup butter, one cup granulated 
sugar, two and one-half cups flour, one cup raisins or 
dates, one cup nut meats, one teaspoon Baker's cocoa, 
one-half teaspoon cloves, one heaping teaspoon cinna- 
mon, one-half teaspoon salt, three level teaspoons soda 
sifted into flour. (If hidden from "men-folks'' will keep 
indefinitely). Mrs. Mary G. Young. 

CHRISTMAS CAKE. 

Two cups butter (part drippings), two cups sugar, 
four eggs, three-fourths cup cream, one-half cup syrup, 
two tablespoons coffee, two cups raisins, two cups cur- 
rants, one cup dates, one-fourth pound almonds, one- 
fourth pound peel, (one-eighth lemon, one-eighth citron), 
two teaspoons cinnamon, one nutmeg, one tablespoon lemon, 
one teaspoon soda, five and one-half cups flour. It 
should be stiff enough to hold the spoon. Bake in a loaf 
for three hours. Mrs. W. B. Smith. 



140 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



DATE CAKE. 

One-half cup shortening, one cup brown sugar, yolks 
of three eggs, one-half scant cup molasses, fill with sour 
cream, one teaspoon soda, spices, all kinds, one teaspoon, 
two cups flour, one pound dates cut fine, one-fourth 
pound walnut meats cut. Mix in order given. 

Mrs. C. L. Hays. 

DELICIOUS DARK CAKE. 

One cup brown sugar, one cup butter, one cup mo- 
lasses, one teaspoon soda, four eggs, one cup milk 
(sweet), three cups flour, one teaspoon cinnamon, one- 
half teaspoon cloves, one-half teaspoon nutmeg, one tea- 
spoon cocoa, one cup nuts, one-half pound raisins. Cream 
butter and sugar, add molasses and soda, well beaten 
eggs, milk, spices, flour, lastly, nuts and raisins. Uake in 
slow oven one hour. Makes large cake. 

Mrs. F. W. Dimitt. 

DOUGH CAKE. 

One cup bread dough, one cup sugar, one &gg, one-half 
cup shortening, three tablespoons sour milk, one-fourth 
teaspoon each, cinnamon, allspice, cloves, nutmeg, salt, 
one-half teaspoon soda, two-thirds cup flour, one-half cup 
chopped raisins. Mrs. John McKeex'ep. 

EGOLESS CAKE. 

One cup of sour crea'm, one cup of sugar, one cup of 
raisins, one and one-half cups of flour, one-half teaspoon 
soda, one-half teaspoon of cinnamon, one-half teaspoon 
cloves, pinch of salt. Bake in loaf half hour. 

Mrs. H. Philips. 

FEDERAL CAKE. 

Two cups light brown sugar, one-half cup butter, one 
cup sour milk, yolks of five eggs, two cups flour, one 
teaspoon soda, one pound raisins, one pound English 
walnuts (before cracked), nutmeg and cinnamon to taste. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 141 



Frosting for Same. — Beat white of one tgg stifif, put 
one cup granulated sugar in one-half cup water, boil till 
it hairs, beat into egg slowly and beat together. Flavor 
to taste. Mrs. G. R. Moore. 

JAM CAKE. 

One cup sugar, butter, size of an egg. three eggs, one 
cup jam, one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, 
one teaspoon nutmeg, one teaspoon soda, one cup sour 
milk. Hour. Mrs. E. C. Garrity. 

KING EDWARD CAKE. 

One cup powdered sugar, one-half cup butter, two 
eggs, one-half cup sour milk, one and one-half cups flour, 
one teaspoon cinnamon, one-half teaspoon nutmeg, one 
teaspoon soda, one-half cup raisins. 

Mrs. W. B. Smith. 

MOLASSES CAKE. 

One cup brow^n sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half 
cup molasses, two cups flour, one cup sour milk, two 
well beaten eggs, two teaspoons soda, one teaspoon cinna- 
mon, one-fourth teaspoon clo\es, one-third teaspoon salt. 

INTrs. Clyde ATcGee. 

POOR MAN'S CAKE. 

One cup molasses, one-half cup beef dripping, or lard 
filled with hot water, one teaspoon soda dissolved in one- 
fourth cup hot water, one heaping teaspoon ginger, one 
teaspoon cinnamon, one-third teaspoon cloves (may be 
omitted), flour to thicken as for ordinary cake batter. 
One cup of raisins i- a de^^irable additicMi. 

Mrs. M.\ry G. Young. 

PORK FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound of dry, solid, fat salt pork chopped fine. 
Pour over it one pint of boiling water; add two tea- 



142 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



spoons soda, two cups sugar, one cup molasses, one 
pound seeded raisins, one pound currants, one-half pound 
citron chopped fine, one cup chopped nuts, one-half glass 
cofifee, one teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon ginger, two 
teaspoons cinnamon, one grated nutmeg, four even cups 
sifted flour. After thoroughly mixing, have a large 
dripping pan lined with buttered paper and bake two 
hours in a moderate oven. Will keep indefinitely. 

Mrs. H. G. Van Ostrand. 

PORK CAKE. 

One pound fresh fat pork chopped as fine as can be ; 
pour over the pork one cup boiling water, then add one 
cup brown sugar, one pound currants, one cup molasses, 
one pound raisins, one teaspoon soda dissolved in hot 
water, one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, one 
egg, four cups flour. Bake two hours in long shallow 
basting pan. Mrs. J. W. Casey. 

PRUNE CAKE. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup lard, two eggs, reserve 
one white for icing, one teaspoon grated nutmeg, one 
teaspoon cinnamon, three-fourths teaspoon allspice, one- 
half teaspoon cloves, two cups flour, one cup boiled 
prunes cut small, one cup sour milk, three-fourths tea- 
spoon soda dissolved in warm water. 

Mrs. Walter Ladd. 

SPICE CAKE. 

One-half cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup 
molasses, one-half cup milk, one teaspoon soda, one tea- 
spoon cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon all- 
spice, two eggs, one cup raisins, flour. Cream butter and 
add sugar gradually. Add well beaten eggs, milk and 
molasses. Mix and sift dry ingredients and stir into the 
first mixture, using enough flour to make as stiff as soft 
ginger bread. Alida E. Christian. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 143 



SPICE CAKE. 

One cup brown sugar, one-half cup molasses, one tea- 
spoon soda, three and one-half cups Hour, one teaspoon 
cinnamon, one cup thick sour cream, one teaspoon all- 
spice, one pound raisins. Seed and chop the raisins ; 
dissolve the soda in a tablespoon of boiling water, add it 
to the molasses, then add the cream, sugar and flour, beat 
thoroughly, add spices and raisins. Bake one hour. 

Mrs. E. Harpole. 



SPICE CAKE. 

One cup brown sugar, one egg, butter, size of an egg, 
one cup sour milk, one teaspoon soda, one-half teaspoon 
cinnamon, one-half teaspoon cloves, little salt, two cups 
flour, one-fourth cup of raisins. 

Mrs. Wm. H. Roberts. 



SPICE CAKES, DROP. 

One-half cup butter, two-thirds cup sugar, two-thirds 
cup milk, two eggs, enough flour so the track of the stir- 
ring spoon is not entirely lost in the batter; then add 
one teaspoon cinnamon, one-half teaspoon cloves, one- 
half teaspoon allspice, one-fourth teaspoon (scant) mace, 
one-fourth nutmeg, two-thirds cup currants. Two tea- 
spoons baking powder. Bake in quick oven twenty 
minutes. Mrs. J. J. Bickel. 



GOOD INEXPENSIVE SPICE CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup cold 
water, three eggs, three cups flour, three teaspoons bak- 
ing powder, two tablespoons ground cinnamon, one-half 
grated nutmeg, one scant teaspoon ground cloves. This 
makes two large layers. Put together with boiled choco- 
late icing. Mrs. C. L. Sanford. 



144 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



FILLINGS, FROSTINGS AND ICINGS 



CAKE FILLING. 

One cup sugar, one cup chopped nuts, figs, raisins or 
dates, enough sweet or sour cream to moisten well; boil 
until it thickens, about fi\e minutes. Stir until cold. 

Mrs. H. a. Parker. 

CARAMEL FILLING. 

One cup brown sugar, two-thirds cup sweet cream, 
small piece of butter. Boil until it thickens in cold water. 
Flavor with vanilla and beat until it begins to thicken. 

Mrs. H. M.\,\. 

ICE CREAM FILLING. 

Cream together two cups of pulverized sugar and 
three-fourths cup butter. Beat the whites of two eggs 
thoroughly and mix all together. Add vanilla and spread 
quite thickly between layers. C-VRRii': Krapp. 

ORANGE FILLING. 

One orange, three-fourths cup white sugar, small piece 
of butter, two teaspoons cornstarch, one cup hot water. 

Mrs. W. B. Smith. 

RAISIN FILLING FOR CAKE. 

One-half package seeded raisins (ground), one cup 
water, one cup sugar, juice one-half lemon, one table- 
spoon corn .'^tarch. Boil all until thick. 

]\Tks. J. O'Connor. 

WALNUT CAKE FILLING. 

One cup granulated sugar, one-half cup sour cream, 
one-half cup chopped walnut meats, lump of butter, size 
of a walnut. Boil until thick enough to spread. Vanilla. 

Mrs. H. O. Day. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 145 



FROSTING. 

Two cups confectioner's sugar, butter, size of an egg. 
Cream. Add beaten whites of two eggs and flavoring. 

Mrs. James Long. 

BOILED FROSTING. 

One and one-fourtb cups white sugar, three-fourths 
cup water. Boil slowly until it forms a soft ball in water 
or until the thermometer reaches 231°. In very damp 
weather boil a little longer. Pour into the beaten white 
of one egg slowly so as not to heat the egg too much. 
It is a good plan to put in a tablespoonful at a time, 
beating it in well. Add one-half teaspoon vanilla. 

A^iRGiNiA Hill. 

CARAMEL FROSTING. 

One cup sugar, light brown, one-half cup milk, one tea- 
spoon flour, one \exe\ tablespoon butter. Boil over quick 
fire about fifteen minutes, stirring constantly. When 
nearly done add butter, and beat until ready to spread. 

Mrs. James Booth. 

LEMON FROSTING. 

Juice of one lemon, powdered sugar, yolk of an egg. 
To the juice of one lemon add powdered sugar until of 
right consistency to spread. Add beaten yolk of egg. 
Chopped nut meats may be added if desired. In this 
case less sugar is needed. L. Bargouist. 

NEVER FAIL FROSTING. 

Whites of two eggs beaten, one cup sugar, one des- 
sertspoon of water. Stir together and put in double 
boiler. Have water boiling. Beat with egg beater 
slowly but constantly until frosting hangs from beater 
without dropping. Remove from boiler, flavor and 
spread on cake. Mrs. C. L. Hays. 



146 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



UNCOOKED FROSTING. 

Two cups pulverized sugar, four teaspoons cocoa, one 
teaspoon vanilla, four tablespoons boiling water, two 
tablespoons melted butter. Beat well and spread. 

Mrs. Frank White. 



COOKIES AND DOUGHNUTS 



ANISE SEED COOKIES. 

Five eggs, two cups sugar, one teaspoon anise seed, 
flour. Put sugar and eggs in saucepan, put on the stove 
and heat until lukewarm, take off and beat until cold, 
add seed and flour thick enough to drop from spoon. 
Drop from teaspoon on tins and let stand over night or 
all day. Then bake in moderate oven. 

Mr.s. Evert Rich. 

BOSTON COOKIES. 

One cup brown sugar, three-fourths cup butter, two 
eggs, two cups flour, one-half teaspoon cloves, one-half 
teaspoon cinnamon, ten cents worth chopped walnuts, 
one cup raisins, one teaspoon soda dissolved in a little 
hot water. Butter the pan and drop. 

Mrs. W. B. Smith. 

BROWN SUGAR COOKIES. 

One cup brown sugar, one-half cup butter, one egg, 
one teaspoon soda dissolved in one tablespoon hot water, 
flour to make soft dough. 

Icing. — One cup of brown sugar, one-half cup water, 
lump of butter, boiled and poured over the white of one 
egg. Mrs. W. R. Manock. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 147 



BROWN SUGAR COOKIES. 

One heaping cup butter, one and one-half cups brown 
sugar, two eggs, beaten separately, three tablespoons 
sour milk or cream, one small teaspoon soda dissolved 
in hot water. As little flour as will make them stiflf 
enough to roll. Mrs. E. L. Roberts. 

BROWNIES. 

One cup butter, one cup pulverized sugar, three eggs, 
one cup molasses, two and five-eighths cups flour, two 
and one-fourth cups pecan nuts. Cream butter and 
sugar, add eggs well beaten, then molasses, flour and 
nuts, mix well and drop from spoon, about two inches 
apart. Bake twenty minutes. Mrs. S. A. Poyer. 

COCOANUT KISSES. 

Beat the whites of three eggs to a stiff froth, put in 
double boiler with one cup white sugar and cook three 
minutes, stirring constantly. Mix together two cups 
cocoanut (grated), one tablespoon corn starch, one tea- 
spoon vanilla, add to eggs and mix well — drop a tea- 
spoonful on buttered pans -an inch apart and bake in a 
moderate oven until a golden brown. 

Mrs. Geo. M. Murray. 

DATE COOKIES. 

One cup butter, one cup brown sugar, one teaspoon 
soda dissolved in one-half cup hot water, two and one- 
half cups oatmeal, two and one-half cups flour. Roll this 
in a sheet and cut in squares. 

Filling for Cookies. — One pound dates, one cup sugar, 
one and one-half cups hot water. Boil fifteen minutes. 

Mrs. H. Max. 

FRUIT COOKIES. 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, two-thirds butter- 
milk or sour cream, three eggs, one heaping teaspoon 



148 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



soda, one teaspoon cinnamon, one-half teaspoon cloves, 
lemon extract, one cup hickory nut meats, one cup 
raisins, stir in enough flour to drop. 

Mrs. p. J. Bryan. 

GINGER DROP COOKIES. 

One cup brown sugar, three eggs, one cup molasses, 
one cup lard or butter, one tablespoon ginger, one large 
teaspoon soda, one cup boiling water, five cups flour. 

Mrs. a. Kruse. 

GINGER COOKIES, SOFT. 

One cup sugar, one cup molasses, one-half cup butter, 
one-half cup lard, one-half cup cold water, two eggs, 
three teaspoons soda, ginger and cinnamon, flour for soft 
dough. Stir as little as possible. Miss Marsh. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

Two cups molasses, one-half cup sugar, one cup lard, 
five tablespoons boiling water, two teaspoons soda, two 
teaspoons ginger or more, pinch red pepper. Mix stiflf; 
roll thin. AIrs. Will Davis. 

GOOD COOKIES. 

Four cups flour, two cups sugar, one cup lard or butter, 
one €:gg, one cup raisins, three-fourths cup sour milk, 
one-half teaspoon soda, a little nutmeg. 

Mrs. J. R. MacGregor. 

HERMIT COOKIES. 

Three eggs, one and one-half cups sugar, one cup but- 
ter, one cup chopped raisins, one teaspoon cinnamon, one 
teaspoon soda, flour enough to roll out thin. 

Mrs. Wm. H. Roberts. 



A Message to the Cook 

HOR four aecades we nave been catering" 
to tne needs or tne cook. Our service 
and our v^ares nave generally producea 
satisfaction. Our experience enables us to speak 
witn some authority on tne subject or groceries. 
We nave tne following recommendations to make: 

Durkasco Products 

in bottles, packages and cans 

White Bear Brand Coffee 

Steel Cut 

Lakeside Brand Peas 
Paris Sugar Corn 

1 Ke above named articles are only a few of 
tbose represented in our complete line of staple 
and fancy groceries. We make a specialty of 
fresK fruits and vegetables, wnile tbey are in 
season, and wnen tney are not, we can supply 
tbe best possible substitute in a canned article. 



The Washington Heights Grocery 

WILLIAM YEAR. Proprietor 

1255-57 West 103rd Steeet 

Phone WasKington Heights 533 



ISO BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



MOLASSES COOKIES. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup lard, 
two eggs, one cup molasses, three teaspoons soda in 
three tablespoons hot water, one teaspoon ginger, one 
teaspoon cinnamon, flour to mix soft. 

Mrs. George Hume. 

OATMEAL COOKIES. 

Beat three eggs withoi^t separating the whites and 
yolks. Beat in one-half cup of sugar, one tablespoon of 
softened butter and one-haif teaspoon of vanilla extract. 
Mix together in a bowl four or five minutes, two and 
one-half cups oatmeal, one level teaspoon baking pcnvder. 
one-half teaspoon salt, then stir the dry into the liquid 
ingredients. Drop by teaspoonfuls into buttered baking 
pans, giving the little piles of mixture a round shape. 
Bake in moderate oven. Mrs. John Lawrie. 

OATMEAL COOKIES. 

One tablespoon butter, one cup sugar, two eggs, two 
and one-half cups oatmeal, one teaspoon vanilla, one tea- 
spoon salt, two small teaspoons baking powder. Cream 
butter and sugar, add rest in order given. Drop very 
small portions on greased tins. Mrs. Schermerhorn. 

OATMEAL COOKIES. 

Three-fourths cup butter, two eggs, two cups sugar, 
one-half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon cinnamon, two cups 
flour, one teaspoon soda sifted with flour, two cups oat- 
meal, one-half pound chopped raisins. This dough is 
very stiff. Mix with hands and bake in small thin cook- 
ies, not allowing to touch. This recipe makes about six 
dozeYi cookies that keep well. 

Mrs. William McCumber. 

OATMEAL LACE COOKIES. 

Two eggs well beaten, one cup sugar, one teaspoon 
melted butter, one and one-half cups rolled oats, a pinch 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 151 

of salt, one teaspoon baking powder. Mix thoroughly 
and set aside for an hour before baking. Drop in but- 
tered tins the size of a hickory nut. 

Mrs. Henry Wieukr. 

PEANUT COOKIES. 

One-third glass butter, two-thirds glass sugar, one tgg, 
three tablespoons milk, one glass ground peanuts, one 
glass flour, two teaspoons baking powder, one-fourth 
teaspoon salt. Drop from teaspoon on buttered tins. 

Mrs. H. X. Tolles. 

ROCKS. 

Scant cup warm butter, one and one-half cups sugar, 
three eggs, one teaspoon baking powder, one teaspoon 
soda dissolved in three tablespoons water,, one-half tea- 
spoon cinnamon, one-half cup currant;^, one-half cup 
raisins, three-fourths cup nut meats, three cups flour. 
Fine recipe. Mrs. E. Kr.vpp. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

Two cups granulated sugar, one cup shortening, one 
cup sour milk, one teaspoonful soda dissolved in the 
milk, two large eggs, flour enough to make a very soft 
dough, one teaspoon baking powder in flour. Flavor to 
taste. Mrs. Wilford M. Keener. 

SURPRISE COOKIES. 

Mix two cups sugar with one cup of butter or lard (or 
the two mixed), add two beaten eggs, one-half cup of 
milk (sw'eet or sour), in which one level teaspoonful 
soda has been dissolved, two cups flour and two of raw 
oatmeal or rolled oats. Add one-half teaspoon salt, one- 
half teaspoon nutmeg and almond extract to suit the 
taste. For tiie date paste filling, stone and cut fine one- 
half pound dates, and cook with one-half cup sugar and 
one-half cup water to a smooth paste. After the cooky 



152 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



dough has been rolled thin and cut into small cookies, 
spread the paste by the teaspoon on each, cover with 
another cooky, pinch the edges together and bake in a 
moderate oven. Mrs. J, C. Arnold. 

SPANISH BUN. 

Two eggs, well beaten, two cups brown sugar, two 
cups sifted flour, one cup shortening, one cup sour milk, 
one teaspoon each of cinnamon, nvitmeg. soda, cloves. 
Bake in hot o\en. Mrs. J. R. M.\cGregor. 

FRIED CAKES. 

One cup sugar, two cups sour milk, two eggs, ginger 
and nutmeg, six tablespoons melted lard, one teaspoon 
soda, one-fourth teaspoon salt, flour to mix soft. Add 
melted lard to sugar and then the beaten eggs, and beat 
together thoroughly. Add sour milk in which the soda 
has been dissolved, then add the flour, salt and spices. 
After adding the flour, stir as little as possible. Fry in 
hot fat. Mrs. F. C. Ames. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Two eggs, one cup sugar, one cup shortening, one cup 
sour milk, one teaspoon soda, spices to taste, flour. 
Cream shortening (butter and lard) and sugar, add 
beaten eggs, then milk and soda. Add spices and flour 
to make a soft dough and fry in very hot fat. 

Mrs. a. H. Estep. 

EXTRA GOOD RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 

Take a good, big cup bread sponge. Scald a pint new 
milk into which put two-thirds cup of shortening (half 
lard and half butter). When cool enough, make a batter 
and stir into the bread sponge and let it rise. Plan to 
stir this up at noon and it is light enough by bedtime 
to add two cups of granulated sugar, four eggs beaten 
separately, one teaspoon ground cinnamon and one of 



BETHANY UXION COOK BOOK 153 



lemon extract, and mix into a loaf about as stiff as bis- 
cuit. In the morning make into small balls and let them 
rise. When light, fry in hot fat for five or six minutes. 

MRS. FAXON'S DOUGHNUTS. 

Three eggs, one cup sugar, one cup sweet milk, three 
and one-half cups flour, two full teaspoons baking pow- 
der, one-half nutmeg, one-fourth teaspoon cinnamon, 
one-fourth teaspoon salt, one tablespoon melted butter. 
Beat eggs thoroughly, add sugar, stir until creamy, then 
milk and melted butter, flour, spices and salt. Roll out 
rather thin, cut and fry in deep hot lard. Roll in pulver- 
ized sugar before serving. Mrs. J. S. Woodward. 

POTATO DOUGHNUTS. 

One cup mashed potatoes, two cups sugar, three table- 
spoons melted butter, one cup sweet niilk, two eggs, five 
cups flour, four teaspoons baking powder, flavor to taste. 
Put sugar in potatoes while hot and beat well. 

Mrs. D. J. Beeby. 

JUMBLES. 

One and one-half cups white sugar, three-fourths cup 
butter, three eggs, three tablespoons sweet milk, two tea- 
spoons baking powder. ^\ix with sufficient flour to roll, 
sprinkle with sugar, cut and bake. 



QUALITY h ECONOMY 

You will always Profit by Trading at the 

LONG WOOD 

GROCERY & MARKET 

B. W I B B E L S M A N N. Proprietor 

Fruit, Vegetables, Choice Meats 
Table Luxuries, Etc. 

1759 West Ninety-Fifth Street 

Phone Longwood 26 and 27 





"THE BEST 


LAUNDRY SERVICE 


POSSIBLE " 






M 


unger s 


Drexel 


Laun 


d 


ry 




3905-11 


L a n g 1 e y 


A V e n u 


e 






PHONE DOUGLAS 642 






W. 


W. GARRATT, Agt. :: 


10562 Wood St 


reet 



E 


. H. AULWURM 


GROCERY AND MARKET 




10198 Winston Avenue 




Washington Heights 


Phone 18 W 


ishington Heights 



BETH.IXY UXION COOK BOOK 155 



156 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 157 



Luncneon Dishes 



"The king and queen did eat thereof, 
The noblemen beside. 
And zvhat they did not eat that night 
The queen next morning fried." 



CHEESE CARROTS. 

Use luncheon cheese which is a deep yellow color, 
form in shape of tiny carrots, putting a small sprig of 
parsely in tlie top of each. Nelle T. Howard. 

CHEESE SOUFFLE. 

]\Ielt two level tablespoons of butter in a saucepan, add 
two level tablespoons cornstarch and one level tablespoon 
flour, one-quarter teaspoon salt and a little paprika, add 
three-quarters cup of milk, stir and cook until smooth. 
Remove from fire, add the beaten yolks of three eggs and 
three-fourths cup of grated cheese. Beat the mixture 
until smooth and cooled a little, then fold in the stiffly 
beaten whites of eggs, pour in a buttered baking dish, 
set in a pan of hot water and bake in a moderate oven 
thirty minutes. Serve at once. 

Mrs. Harry Daugherty. 

CHEESE SOUFFLE. 

]\Iix one cup of milk, one-half cup of bread crumbs, 
yolks of three eggs well beaten, one cup of grated cheese. 
Stir over fire until well blended ; cool. Then add the 
whites of the eggs beaten stiff. Rake twenty minutes 
either in one dish or more daintily in ramekins. Serve 
as soon as done. Mrs. W. J. Folk. 



158 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



CHEESE SOUFFLE. 

Cook one tablespoon of flour in two tablespoons of 
butter until smooth, add one-half cup of hot milk, one 
teaspoon salt, and stir in one cup grated cheese and add 
beaten yolks of three eggs. When cool, add well beaten 
whites of eggs and bake in moderate oven in buttered 
dish. Serve as soon as contents are light brown and 
nicely pufifed. Mrs. J. M. Lammedee. 

CROQUETTES, RICE. 

Two cups tomatoes, one-half cup rice (uncooked), one 
onion minced and browned in a tablespoon of butter or 
drippings, one-half bay leaf, one-half teaspoon minced 
parsley. Turn tomatoes into onion and cook few minutes, 
adding salt and pepper. Put rice in double boiler and 
add tomato mixture. Cook about one and one-half hours. 
Add boiling water or stock, if not moist enough. When 
ofif stove add one tgg and grated cheese if cared for. 
Make into croquettes, roll in bread crumbs and fry in 
fat half depth of croquettes. Serve with tomato sauce. 

Mrs. R. L. Blount. 

EGGS, FLORENTINE. 

One tablespoon of butter, one medium sized onion, one 
tablespoon flour, one cup stock, four boiled eggs, salt 
and pepper to taste. Melt butter in sauce pan. add the 
onion sliced. When brown, add one tablespoon flour and 
when bubbling add the stock. To this add the boiled 
eggs sliced. This can be varied by adding bits of meat 
left over, and the size of the dish increased. 

Mrs. Frank R. Lyon. 

EGGS, HOT DEVILED. 

Cook eggs hard, remove shells, cut in half lengthwise, 
take out yolk and season highly by blending with salt, 
pepper, mustard and vinegar. Replace in whites, set in 
baking dish and pour over all a medium white sauce in 



BET! I ANY TjyJON COOK BOOK 159 



which chopped hard eggs have been mixed, in the pro- 
portion of two eggs to one cup of sauce. Cover with 
buttered crumbs and bake until brown on top. 

Buttered Crumbs — Dry stale bread in oven, roll, sift 
and mix with one-fourth its volume melted butter. 

Bessie McCumber. 

EGGS (NUN'S TOAST). 

One cup of milk, tablespoon of butter, one-fourth tea- 
spoon salt and a dash of red pepper. When this comes 
to a boil stir into it a tablespoon of flour dissolved in a 
little milk. When of cream-like thickness add five hard 
boiled eggs, minced, garnish with parsley and serve on 
slices of toast. 

GOULASH, HUNGARIAN. 

Put one-half pound kidney beans to soak over night. 
In the morning put on to cook in the same water, add- 
ing to it as you find necessary. When beans are en- 
tirely soft, add two good sized potatoes diced, one hand- 
ful macaroni, one pint tomatoes and three slices of ba- 
con or its equivalent. Season with salt and pepper to 
taste. Cook over slow fire. Mrs. George Moore. 

GRAPES A LA NIEGE. 

Select white or pink California grapes. Wash and 
dry and cut in small clusters, one for each guest. Whip 
the white of an egg until stiff. Dip the grapes in beaten 
egg. Sprinkle thoroughly with powdered sugar, using 
a fiour sifter. Set on ice to harden. Serve on grape 
leaves if possible, or lace paper doilies, as first course 
for luncheon. Maraschino is not necessary, but it im- 
proves the flavor. Nelle T. Howard. 

LOAF FOR LUNCHEON. 

Six cold boiled eggs chopped, one-half pound cold 
boiled ham. Soften eggs with cream, put in layers and 



160 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



pack in granite pan. Let stand till firm, slice and serve 
on lettuce with salad dressing. Mrs. C. L. Hays. 

LOAF, WALNUT. 

One-half cup chopped walnut meats to two cups 
bread crumbs, part rye, corn meal or graham is good, 
one-half teaspoon salt, dash of cayenne, thyme and sage 
to taste. Mix well. Pour over one cupful or more of 
boiling water to make consistency of ordinary dressing. 
Mix. Add one raw Qgg, one-half tablespoon butter, stir 
thoroughly, press into buttered pan and bake until brown 
— about three-quarters of an hour- — serve with olive 
sauce. 

Olive Sauce. — Blend two tablespoons each of butter 
and browned flour, pour on boiling water to make 
smooth sauce ; before taking up add one tablespoon vin- 
egar, eight olives, minced, salt and paprika to taste. Dill 
pickles make a palatable substitute for olives. 

Mrs. Edwin Rebb. 

MACARONI AND OYSTERS BAKED. 

Take half a pound of macaroni, boil until tender; butter 
the bottom of baking dish, put in layer of macaroni, then 
layer of oysters, sprinkle with salt, pepper and small 
bit of butter; then add more macaroni and oysters and 
continue to alternate until the dish is full. Cover top 
layer with cracker crumbs, dotted with bits of butter. 
Pour over enough milk to come to top. Bake from one- 
lialf to three-quarters of an hour. 

ATrs. Rf)nF.uirK Stex'kns. 

MACARONI WITH TOMATOES. 

Boil macaroni or spaghetti, when tender place a layer 
of it in baking dish and grate cheese over it, seasoning 
each layer. Then cream butter and flour in spider and 
pour into one pint tomatoes strained ; let come to a boil 
and pour this mixture over the macaroni and cheese 
and set in oven to brown. Mrs. George Moore. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 161 



MARGUERITES. 

The white of one tgg partly beaten, two tablespoons 
sugar, one-half cupful chopped walnuts. Stir all to- 
gether and spread on wafers or long narrow crackers. 
Bake to a light brown. Mrs. A. R. Simpson. 

MEAT, SWEDISH JELLY. 

Cook one veal shank with water to cover, one onion, 
one carrot, piece of celery, salt and pepper to taste. 
Cook until meat drops from bone. Pick meat fine, strain 
liquor and boil until reduced to one pint. Wet mould 
and pour in mixture, set in cool place to stiffen, turn out 
and garnish as desired. Mrs. S. M. Murdock. 

NOODLES, GERMAN. 

Four eggs — whole, four tablespoons of milk, and as 
much flour as the milk and eggs require. Salt. Put 
flour in a bowl, make a hollow in the center, put in the 
eggs and milk, beat thoroughly to a light dough, place 
on a bread board, knead gradually, adding flour till the 
dough is smooth and stifT — the more kneading the bet- 
ter the noodles. Cut into four parts, roll each out as 
thin as possible, leave to dry enough so they can be rolled 
and cut into fine strips about one-eighth of an inch wide; 
toss them to open them out and leave to dry. Cook in 
boiling water, to which salt has been added, one-quar- 
ter of an hour, drain, put in a dish, pour over it bread 
crumbs browned in plenty of butter. For eight or ten 
persons. Mrs. C. B. Goes. 

OMELET. 

One egg, one-eighth teaspoon salt, one-third table- 
spoon butter, one tablespoon hot water, pepper; or four 
eggs, one-half teaspoon salt, one tablespoon butter, four 
tablespoons hot water, speck cayenne. Separate yolks 
from whites. Beat yolks until thick and lemon colored; 
add salt, pepper and hot water, beat whites stiff and 



162 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



dry, cut and fold into yolks until they have taken up 
the mixture. Pour evenly into hot, buttered omelet pan 
and place on warm range until well puffed and delicately 
browned underneath, then place pan on center grate of 
oven and finish cooking. Fold and turn out on hot 
platter. This may be served with a thin white sauce. 

Sarah E. Griswold. 

OMELET, FOAMY. 

Four eggs, four tablespoons milk or water, four tea- 
spoons butter, one-half teaspoon salt, pepper. Method. — 
Separate yolks from whites and beat until thick, add 
liquid and pepper and mix well. Beat whites stiff, add- 
ing salt while beating. Place pan over fire and melt 
butter. Cut whites into yolks. Pour into pan, cook 
slowly until set and browned slightly. Fold and turn 
out on hot platter. 

Variations on Omelet. — Savory additions : Mush- 
rooms, oysters, chopped meat, fish or fowl, herbs, grated 
cheese, etc. Sweet additions : Jelly, fresh or preserved 
fruits, sugar, honey, nuts, etc. These various additions 
can be mixed with beaten yolk, cut into beaten whites, 
or spread on omelet before folding. 

Bessie McCumber. 

OMELET, CHEESE. 

Two eggs, one cup bread crumbs, one cup milk, cheese. 
Soak the bread crumbs in the milk, add the beaten yolks, 
grated cheese and seasoning, and lastly the beaten 
whites. Bake about twenty minutes. 

Mrs. Frank R. Lyon. 

OMELET, RICE. 

One cup hot cooked rice, one-half cup milk, one table- 
spoon salt and a little pepper, one tablespoon melted but- 
ter, four eggs slightly beaten. Combine and fold as 
plain omelet. Mrs. Henry S. Crane. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 163 



SALMON OMELET. 

Drain the juice or oil from a can of salmon and empty 
the contents into a dish. Beat two eggs and mix into 
the salmon. Fry in butter over a slow tire for ten min- 
utes. Turn one-half the salmon over the other half and 
remove carefully from the frying pan and place on a plat- 
ter. The omelet should now have the shape of a fish. 
Garnish with parsley or lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. T. H. Beckwith. 

OMELET. SPANISH. 

Four eggs, beat yolks and whites separately, add one 
large tablespoon of milk to yolks, pepper and salt to 
taste, fold in beaten whites. 

Spanish Filling for Above. — Before making omelet, 
cook for one-half hour two large tomatoes, one small 
onion chopped fine, one small green pepper chopped, 
salt, pepper and sugar to taste and a dash of cayenne. 
A small amount of canned peas or mushrooms may be 
added. Serve immediately. 

Mrs. Cuthbert Corlett. 

OYSTERS, ESCALLOPED. 

One quart oysters, three cups bread crumbs, one-half 
crackers may be used, one cup melted butter, four table- 
spoons milk or cream, eight tablespoons liquor of oys- 
ters. Mix butter and crumbs. Put layer of crumbs, then 
oysters, add one-half of milk and liquor, salt and pepper. 
Repeat, adding crumbs last. Never make more than two 
layers of oysters, for the middle layer will be underdone. 

Bessie McCumber. 

OYSTERS (LITTLE PIGS IN BLANKETS). 

Season large oysters with salt and pepper. Cut fat 
bacon in very thin slices. Wrap one oyster in each slice 
and fasten with toothpicks. Heat frying pan and put 
in little pigs, cook five minutes or long enough to crisp 



164 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



the bacon. Place on slices of toast cut small and serve 
immediately. Garnish with parsley. Nice for lunch or 
tea. Mrs. J. H. Madigan. 

OYSTER COCKTAIL. 

Pack the bottom of a champagne glass with shaved ice 
and lay on it six small oysters. Make a dressing of 
one tablespoon of tomato catsup, one of lemon juice, one 
of Worcestershire sauce, two dashes of Tabasco, pinch 
of salt and a teaspoon of grated horseradish. On top 
float a few cubes of crisp, white celery. 

OYSTERS FRIED. 

Wipe the oysters perfectly dry. Beat an egg and mix 
with it a tablespoon of cream. Have fine cracker crumbs 
seasoned with salt, pepper and a little grated nutmeg. 
Dip the oysters first in the crumbs, then in the beaten 
egg, then roll thoroughly in the crumbs again. Lay flat 
on a plate, not touching each other, and set away two 
or three hours that they may dry. Have deep lard boil- 
ing, lay the oysters in a frying basket not close enough 
to touch and plunge them into the boiling fat from three 
to five minutes. Drain on a paper laid near the oven 
door. Serve very hot, garnished with sliced lemon and 
parsley. Serve with them celery salad. 

OYSTER PATTIES. 

Cover the outside of patty tins with pufT paste and 
bake inverted. Cut the tops to fit and bake on a flat 
tin ; allow to cool before filling. Make a cream sauce, 
season with salt and cayenne, add the strained juice of 
the oysters and beaten egg yolks, put in the oysters 
and allow them to heat through. Fill the patty shells, 
put on the covers and put in the oven until piping hot. 

OYSTER RAMEKINS. 

Cut rounds of bread to fit into the bottom of the rame- 
kins, toast them nicely, spread with butter and put them 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 165 



into the ramekins ; fill the dishes with oysters and season 
with salt and pepper and bits of butter. Place in a bak- 
ing dish half full of water, cover with another pan and 
bake until the oysters are plump, which will be about 
ten minutes. Have ready some hot catsup and add a 
teaspoon to each cup and serve. 

OYSTERS IN CHAFING DISH. 

Put two tablespoons of butter, one saltspoon white 
pepper, one teaspoon salt in chafing dish. When this is 
hot add (ine pint of oysters, cover and shake pan occa- 
sionally until oysters are plump, then add enough cream 
to make one cup of liquid. Serve hot on toast or crisp 
crackers. Mrs. John Hellweg. 

POTATOES EN SUPRIE. 

Fill timbales (or any individual mold) with mashed 
potatoes, scoop out centers, fill with chopped boiled ham 
mixed with white sauce. Cover with potato and brown 
in oven. Serve with tomato sauce. 

RAREBIT, NUT AND RICE. 

Melt one tablespoon butter in saucepan, add one table- 
spoon flour and mix thoroughly, then add one cup milk 
gradually. When smooth, put in one-half cup cheese 
cut in small pieces and stir until melted; add one-half 
cup cooked rice, and one-third cup chopped nuts. Season 
with salt and pepper. When well blended serve on hot 
buttered toast. Mrs. J. C. Arnold. 

RAREBIT, WELSH. 

One cup cheese diced, six tablespoons cream or milk, 
one saltspoon mustard, one saltspoon salt, pepper, yolks 
of two eggs, three teaspoons butter. Cook in chafing 
dish until well mixed. Serve on toast or crackers. 

Mrs. W. D. Gordon. 



166 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



RAREBIT, WELSH. 

One-half pound American cheese, two eggs, speck cay- 
enne, one tablespoon butter, one-half teaspoon salt, one 
teaspoon mustard, one-half cup milk or cream. Break 
cheese in small pieces, put with other ingredients into 
double boiler. Stir until cheese melts. Serve immedi- 
ately on crisp slices of toast or crackers. Will serve 
about six. Mrs. Cuthbert Corlett. 

RAREBIT A LA METHODIST. 

Melt one teaspoon butter in a chafing dish, stir in 
one teaspoon cornstarch, add one-half cup milk or thin 
cream, cook two minutes. Then add one-half pound 
cheese cut in small pieces, stir until melted. Season with 
one-third teaspoon salt, one-third teaspoon mustard, add 
small amount vinegar to suit taste. Sprinkle with cay- 
enne pepper. Serve on hot toast. 

Mrs. James Long. 

RICE AND CHEESE EN CASSEROLE. 

Boil enough rice in double boiler to fill baking dish or 
casserole. When done, spread a layer in bottom of 
casserole and cover with a layer of grated cheese, then 
another layer of rice and another of cheese. Continue 
this until the dish is full. Cover the top with cheese 
and enough milk to moisten it well. Season to taste. 
Bake in a moderate oven until brown on top, which will 
be about one-half hour. Mrs. Paul E. Brown. 

RICE AND EGGS, CHINESE. 

One cup rice, six eggs, two tablespoons butter, two 
tablespoons flour, one cup milk, two tablespoons cheese, 
one can pimento, one-fourth teaspoon salt. Melt two 
tablespoons butter, add two tablespoons flour and when 
blended add one cup milk and two tablespoons melted 
cheese. Pour this white sauce over one cup boiled rice 
and heap the hard boiled eggs cut in quarters in the center 
of dish. Garnish with pimento cut in strips. 

Mrs. H. a. Seward. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 167 



RICE, SPANISH. 

One pound round steak (ground), three dessertspoons 
uncooked rice, one-half can tomatoes, one small green 
pepper, salt to taste. Mix all together, cover and cook 
over slow fire for one hour; stir frequently. 

Mrs. H. G. Van Ostrand. 

SALMON CHEESE. 

One can salmon, four eggs, six soda crackers, one cup 
milk and a little butter. Season to taste. Cook in double 
boiler two hours. Pour into a mould. To be eaten cold, 
sliced. Mrs. Wm. H. Brown. 

SALMON AND PEAS. 

One can salmon, remove skin and bones, rich cream 
sauce. Drain a can of peas and add to sauce after heat- 
ing well. Cook a few minutes and pour over salmon. 

Mrs. C. L. Hays. 

SALMON TURBOT. 

One pint milk, scant teacup flour, two heaping table- 
spoons butter. Take one-half of milk for dissolving flour. 
After the above ingredients are cooked, let cool and then 
add two well beaten eggs. Alternate this mixture with 
layers of salmon. Buttered bread crumbs on top layer. 
Bake in oven one-half hour. 

Mrs. George Lawrence. 

SARDINES, CURRIED. 

Drain sardines from oil. Make paste of one table- 
spoon butter, one-fourth teaspoon mustard, one teaspoon 
curry powder in lemon juice and spread over sardines 
thickly. Heat tablespoon butter, lay in sardines and grill 
for a moment until heated. Serve on toast with little 
parsley. Mrs. James Long. 



168 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



SANDWICHES, TOASTED CHEESE. 

Spread thin slices of bread with butter and then with 
cream cheese. Make into sandwiches, trimming the 
crusts and cutting in two to form dainty oblong shapes. 
Place in hot oven until toasted a delicate brown, or toast 
on broiler in gas oven. These are very good served with 
afternoon tea. Mrs. John McKinlay. 

SANDWICHES. 

Mint sandwiches are tasty for supper or afternoon tea. 
Mince the leaves from one or two bunches, season with 
oil, vinegar, salt and paprika, and spread between slices 
of bread and butter. 

Brown bread cut into thin slices and spread with straw- 
berry jam or peach marmalade, and covered with a layer 
of cream cheese, makes novel and delicious luncheon 
sandwiches. 

SANDWICHES, VEAL AND HAM. 

A slice of ham and a veal cutlet both cut thick. Put 
cutlet in a pan and cover with a bread dressing, moist- 
ened and seasoned with salt, pepper and paprika. Lay 
slice of ham on top and put in oven to roast. Baste as 
for any ordinary roast. Mrs. W. H. Fleming. 

SPAGHETTI WITH TOMATO. 

One-half pound spaghetti, one-half can tomatoes, four 
slices bacon, one small onion, one saltspoon paprika, one 
teaspoon salt, four tablespoons grated cheese, cracker 
crumbs. Boil spaghetti with paprika. At same time boil 
tomatoes with salt and strain out seeds. Put bacon and 
onion through food chopper and fry brown. Add tomato 
and spaghetti and heat through. Then pour all in a 
baking dish, cover with cracker crumbs and cheese and 
bake until brown. Mrs. Walter F. Heinemanx. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 169 



TOMATOES AND RICE, 

One can tomatoes, one cup rice, two tablespoons 
cheese, salt. L5oil the rice and add the tomatoes and grate 
tlie cheese over the top. Bake twenty minutes. 

Mrs. H. a. Sewakd. 



WHITE SAUCES 



THIN WHITE SAUCE. 

One and one-half tablespoons butter, one tablespoon 
flour, one cup scalded milk, one-fourth teaspoon salt, one- 
eighth teaspoon pepper. Put butter in saucepan, stir un- 
til melted, add flour mixed with seasoning, and stir until 
thoroughly blended. Add milk, one-third at a time, and 
stir until the wliole has boiled from one to two minutes. 

MEDIUM WHITE SAUCE. 

Tw^o tablespoons butter, two tablespoons flour, one cup 
scalded milk, one-fourth teaspoon salt, one-eighth tea- 
spoon pepper. Follow directions for thin white sauce. 

THICK WHITE SAUCE. 

Two to four tablespoons butter, four tablespoons flour, 
one cup scalded milk, one-fourth teaspoon salt, one- 
eighth teaspoon pepper. Follow directions for thin white 
sauce. Mrs. E. Kr.app. 




Marinello Household 
Necessities 

ARE 

9yLarinelio 9yfotor Cream — For protecting tne skin 
trom excessive neat, cold or oust. 

j^arinello Geranium Jelly — For keeping tne nands 
sort ana smooth. 

y^arinello 'Powaet As an adjunct to tke Motor 

Cream, preventing tan, sun-burn or roughness. 

]y[arinello Soa^ — Xhe kind that cleanses the skin 
■without irritating the cuticle. Neutral in reaction and 
popular with every memher or the ramily, rrom the 
hahy up. 

All of these preparations may he ohtainea 

from any jViarinello Snop or 

from the 9^ain Office 

Suite 1110—14 W. Washington St. 
CHICAGO ILLINOIS 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 171 



172 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 173 



anning and Preserving 



"Here is fruit for an epicure meet, 
Canned and pickled and smothered in sweet; 
The zvealth of sninnier's yellow prime, 
To cheer the dearth of winter's rime." 

CANNING. 
Fruit. 

I'ruit should be preserved when in season, when 
cheapest and best and not over-ripe. 

Utensils. 

Glass jars are best. They should be litted with 
screw covers and new rubber bands. Fruit should be 
cooked in granite, earthenware or porcelain-lined ket- 
tles, and silver, wooden or granite spoons should be 
used. If cooked in tin or ironware poisonous sub- 
stances are formed. 

Steps in Canning. 

1. Test. — Pour water into jars and invert them to 
see if air-tight; if not, do not use. 

2. Wash jars and lids thoroughly. 

3. Fill with cold water and set them in a kettle and 
surround with cold water. Heat gradually to the boil- 
ing point and boil 5-15 minutes. Remove from the 
water, empty (do not dry with towel) and fill with fruit 
while hot. 

4. Boil covers for 5 minutes. Dip rubber bands in 
hot water, but do not let them stand. 

5. After can is filled run the blade of a silver knife 
down the sides of the jar to remove air bubbles. Re- 
fill if necessary, but be sure every part of the jar is 
filled entirely with liquid or fruit. 



174 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 

General Proportions for Syrup in Canning. 

Allow one cup sugar to one cup water for syrup 
for small berries; one-half cup sugar to one cup water 
for large fruit. Put sugar and water together over 
the fire and bring to boiling point. Add a small amount 
of the fruit and simmer until tender. Pack closely in 
a hot fruit jar and pour over the boiling hot syrup, 
filling the jar to the top rim. Then follow the general 
rules for canning. Mary Howe. 

CANNING SMALL FRUIT. 

Small fruits, such as cherries, strawberries, raspber- 
ries, etc., keep shape and color better when canned if 
they are cleaned (pitted or hulled), sprinkled with the 
sugar which is to sweeten them and allowed to stand 
some hours or over night. The syrup which forms from 
the juice and sugar is drained into the preserving kettle 
and brought to a hard boil before the fruit is added. If 
there is not enough syrup to cover the fruit, sufficient 
boiling water may be added. 

Mrs. Isaac Greenacre. 

APPLE SAUCE. 

Those who like apple sauce in which the pieces remain 
whole should use sweet apples and put them to cook in 
boiling water in which has been dissolved enough sugar 
to sweeten the sauce. Those preferring a smooth sauce 
with no lumps should use sour apples and put them to 
cook in cold water, not adding the sugar until the apples 
are soft. When paring apples for sauce or pies, if the 
fruit is thoroughly washed, and decayed or wormy por- 
tions rejected, the parings and cores may be well boiled 
to furnish juice which makes a very good jelly by itself 
or may be used with other fruits, which give deeper 
color and variety of flavor. Duchess apples are particu- 
larly good for jelly. The best grades of commercial 
jelly are made in this way with apple basis. The eyes 
and parings of pineapples when boiled yield a juice 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 175 



which may be used for jelly, or when used to cook apples 
it makes a very well flavored sauce. 

Mrs. Isaac Green acre. 

GRAPE JUICE. 

Wash and stem nine quarts grapes. Add three pints 
water, bring to a boil, strain through bag, put on the fire, 
adding four cups sugar, and when juice is boiling hot 
bottle and cork immediately. Seal with paraffin or seal- 
ing wax. This is enough for one dozen pint bottles. 

Mrs. Mary Tweedale. 



JELLY MAKING 



To succeed in making any kind of jelly, one must first 
understand the main principles that underlie the process. 
An example of the process may be given by a recipe for 
currant jelly. 

CURRANT JELLY. 

Wash the currants in cold water, put them on to cook 
in. an enameled kettle with enough water to prevent burn- 
ing, one cup water to four quarts fruit. Cook fruit 
slowly, constantly stirring with wooden spoon. It will 
take from thirty minutes to an hour to extract the juice. 
Remove fruit from the kettle and put into a cheese cloth 
jelly bag to drain. After the juice is pretty well drained 
(do not squeeze the bag) return pulp to the stove, cover 
with water and cook a second time (about half an hour). 
Stir and cook slowly as before, then strain again, mixing 
this juice with the first. Measure the juice carefully 
by cups. To each cup of juice measure three-fourths cup 
sugar. Put the juice (not more than ten cups at a time) 
on to cook. Put the dry sugar in a pan in the oven to 
heat; when the juice comes to the boiling point let it 
boil steadily for ten minutes, then add the hot sugar and 



176 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 

boil ten minutes mure. Watch for the jelly test; that is, 
when the jelly sheets oft' the spoon, or drops off in jelly 
form, instead of as a liquid. This is usually after the 
twenty minutes' boiling. Then pour jelly into clean 
glasses, filling nearly to the top. The glasses will not 
break if standing on a moist cloth. It is a help to pour 
the jelly through a funnel and also avoids breaking 
glasses. After the jelly is set and perfectly cold, cover 
with hot parafftne and set the tin cover over. 

This recipe for jelly was given me about twenty years 
ago by an experienced housewife and has been almost 
never failing. Occasionally too much water has been 
added and the juice has had to cook longer than twenty 
minutes. Again, the fruit has been too ripe and there- 
tore not acidic enough for good jelly. 

Not long ago I came across a very interesting pam- 
phlet on jelly making by Dr. Goldthwaite, of the House- 
hold Science Department of the University of Illinois. 
She gives practically the same directions and very care- 
fully explains the scientific reasons for the same, sum- 
marized as follows: 

1st. Pectin is the fundamental jelly-making substance 
of fruit juice. It is like starch in chemical constituency, 
not like gelatine. Pectin is extracted from fruit by cook- 
ing. Sometimes it is not found in raw fruits at all. 
Raw apples, raw grapes, raw quince have very little 
pectin, but cooking produces it in large quantities. One 
may test the juice for pectin after it is extracted from 
the pulp by the following method : 

Put one or two tablespoons of juice in a glass. Add an 
equal amount of alcohol. If pectin is present, a gelati- 
nous mass will appear in the liquid which may be gath- 
ered up with a spoon. 

2nd. The amount of sugar must be in the right pro- 
])ortion to the pectin in the juice. The most common 
cause of failure is too much sugar. Therefore one mav 
test the juice for pectin, if at all uncertain, and if found 
in small quantities, try a sample of juice with three- 
fourths amount of sugar or exen less and see if a good 
jelly will result. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 177 



Either beet or cane sugar may be used in making jelly. 

Good jellies cannot be made from all juices by rule-o'- 
thumb. Jelly making as practiced in the home is an art 
— an art founded on scientific principles. It consists in 
so controlling conditions by means of sugar (and acid), 
and by boiling, as to cause the pectin to "set" in a con- 
tinuous mass throughout the volume allotted to it. 

The white inner skins of oranges and of lemons are 
prolific sources of pectin. Hence genuine jellies from 
these fruits may be made. The pectin from these skins 
may also be used for strengthening other fruit juices. 

Mrs. CD. Hill. 

Other jellies may be made as follows: 

GRAPE JELLY. 

Use grapes that are not quite ripe, take the grapes 
from the stems, wash carefully, then cook the fruit and 
use the same process as described above. 

APPLE JELLY. 

Crab apples for jelly should be washed and cut in 
pieces, using the core as w^ell as the apple, as there is 
considerable pectin in the core. Add a little more water 
in cooking than for currant and grape. 

Quince, pears, peaches and sweet apples contain pectin 
in sufficient quantities to jell if too much sugar is 
avoided, or if some acid juice like that of sour apples is 
combined with it. 

Blueberries make very excellent jelly. 

Raspberries, strawberries and cherries can be used for 
jelly-making with a little experimenting to get the right 
amount of sugar. 

ORANGE AND LEMON JELLIES. 

Remove the yellow outer skin of oranges or lemons. 
Take the white inner skin, put it through the meat chop- 
per, soak it over night in suf^cient water to cover. Put 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



on the stove and cook slowly tor a couple of hours and 
strain. Add the juice of the fruit and then measure 
juice and sugar, allowing about three-fourths cup sugar 
to each cup of juice, and make into jelly. 

1 he white skins of lemons and oranges may be used 
as a basis in the making of other jelly. Rhubarb juice 
added to the extract makes a very hnely flavored jelly. 

iViKs. CD. Hill. 

CRANBERRY AND QUINCE JELLY. 

Four quinces, three quarts cranberries, sugar. Quar- 
ter quinces and remove seeds, cover with water and par- 
tially cook, then add cranberries ; when soft strain, meas- 
ure juice, add three cups sugar to four cups juice. 

Mrs. J. G. Skinnei:. 



MARMALADES 



CHRISTMAS CRANBERRY MARMALADE. 

Wash three quarts of cranberries, barely cover with 
water and cook until tender. Press through a sieve, add 
to this juice and pulp six pounds of warm sugar, two 
pounds of seeded and chopped raisins and four large, 
clean oranges. The oranges should be minced fine, using 
skin and pulp, but the seeds must be picked out. Cook 
until thick and turn into glass jars. The orange skins 
must be cooked until tender. While cooking watch care- 
fully that it does not burn. Stir often. 

Mrs. Fred Graham. 

CURRANT MARMALADE. 

Five pounds ripe currants (five boxes), five pounds 
sugar, two pounds raisins (seeded), four oranges. Put 
peeling in cold water, boil slowly to remove bitter taste 
and until tender. Chop fine. Squeeze oranges and add 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 179 



to the juice the sugar, currants and raisins chopped fine, 
then orange peel. Boil twenty minutes. 

Mrs. S. W. McCune. 

GRAPE FRUIT MARMALADE (BITTER). 

Four grape fruits scrubbed severely. Cut in halves, 
remove seeds, squeeze out juice, saving juice and seeds 
in separate earthen dishes, covering the seeds with water. 
The thick skins must be put through the meat grinder, 
then put into a large vessel and three quarts of water 
added to each fruit. Let all stand twenty-four hours. 
Strain out the ground skins and throw away the water. 
Put skins into fresh water, one quart to each fruit, and 
boil until soft like mush, then pour over it the juice 
saved from yesterday and the water in which the seeds 
were soaked. Add one and one-half pounds granulated 
sugar for each large fruit. Use wide shallow dish for 
boiling down. Stir constantly and boil till skins are 
transparent and it is showing a jelly sign. Never at- 
tempt more than four fruits at one time. 

Mrs. H. a. Parker. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Eight oranges, two lemons, two grape fruits. Slice 
oranges and lemons with peel on. Use only the pulp 
of grape fruit. Add one and one-half times as much 
water as fruit, cook one and one-half hours. Let stand 
over night. Again measure, using one and one-half 
times as much sugar as fruit. Cook forty-five to sixty 
minutes. Put in glasses. This is delicious. 

Mrs. Roscoe B.xrrett. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Twelve oranges sliced thin. To each pound add three- 
fourths quart water. Let stand over night. Boil forty- 
five minutes. Third day weigh and when boiling add 
one and one-half pounds granulated sugar to each pound 



180 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 

of the mixture. Boil until thickened. Just before taking 
from the fire add juice of four lemons. 

Mrs. Edwin Bebb. 

RHUBARB MARMALADE. 

Three pounds of rhubarb, three pounds of sugar, one- 
half pound of figs, two or three small oranges. Grate 
rind of oranges, squeeze out the pulp; cut figs and rhu- 
barb in small pieces. Mix all together with sugar and 
let stand over night. In morning cook about thirty 
minutes. Mrs. J. J. Bickel. 



PRESERVES AND JAMS 



TOMATO PRESERVES. 

Scald and peel carefully small tomatoes, not too ripe, 
yellow pear-shaped ones are best. Add an equal amount 
of sugar by weight, let lie over night, then pour oft" all 
juice into a preserving kettle and boil until it is a thick 
syrup. Add tomatoes and boil carefully until they look 
transparent. A piece of ginger root or one lemon to a 
pound of fruit, sliced thin and cooked with the fruit, may 
be added. Mrs. Gardner Gkeenleaf. 

GREEN TOMATO JAM. 

One peck green tomatoes sliced, six pounds granulated 
sugar, three lemons sliced but not peeled, enough ginger 
root to give taste. Boil until rather thick and trans- 
parent. Mrs. E. Rightmire. 

RIPE TOMATO SALAD. 

One peck tomatoes, two cups brown sugar, one-half 
cup salt, one cup chopped celery, one cup chopped onion. 
one cup horseradish, one-half cup celery seed, one-half 
cup mustard seed, vinegar enough to more than cover. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 181 



Slice tomatoes in jar, mix other ingredients together and 
pour over tomatoes ; cover with a heavy cloth. This 
will keep one year. Good with cold meat. 

Mrs. Booth. 

RHUBARB JAM. 

Wash, not peel, cut in inch pieces ; to each pound fruit 
allow one pound sugar. Put them alternately in a deep 
dish with two ounces ginger root to ten pounds fruit. 
Let stand twenty-four hours. Pour the liquid into the 
preserving kettle and boil briskly one-half hour, add the 
rhubarb and boil one-half hour. Let stand on back of 
stove another half hour. Mrs. J. H. Madig.'\n. 

RHUBARB AND PINEAPPLE JAM. 

One cup pineapple cut fine, six cups rhubarb, seven 
cups sugar, one lemon or orange, rind and juice, two 
tablespoons chopped almonds. Stew fruit ten minutes, 
without water, stirring gently. Add sugar, let cool half 
an hour before filling glasses, then seal. 

Mrs. a. C. Mowat. 



CONSERVES 



ATTIBORO CONSERVE. 

Quarter, pare, core and chop fine sour apples to the 
quantity of ten cups. Put in kettle, add ten cups sugar, 
the rind of two lemons shaved thin and two pieces gin- 
ger root two inches long. Bring gradually to the boiling 
point and let simmer until the mixture is almost trans- 
parent, which will take from two to two and one-half 
hours. Store in jelly glasses or crock. Good for after- 
noon teas. Mary Halliwell Patten. 



182 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



CRANBERRY CONSERVE. 

One quart cranberries, half a pound English walnut 
meats, one large orange, three cups sugar, a quarter of a 
pound raisins, one and one-third cups water. Put cran- 
berries in a saucepan with half the water and boil until 
the skins break. Rub through a strainer, add the re- 
maining water, sugar, raisins, nuts broken in small 
pieces and the orange pulp, finely cut. Bring slowly to 
the boiling point, allow to cook gently for half an hour, 
put in small molds and chill. i\Irs. I. G. Daly. 

GRAPE CONSERVE. 

One (eight pounds) basket of grapes, two pounds 
seeded raisins, two oranges, four lemons, one pound 
walnuts (or one-half pound shelled). Pulp grapes to 
remove seeds ; chop skins ; chop raisins ; grate orange 
skins, cut pulp in fine pieces ; grate lemon skins and add 
juice. Cook with five pounds sugar twenty minutes or 
more. Put in chopped nuts just before taking from fire. 

Mrs. W. W. Jones. 

PINEAPPLE AND APRICOT CONSERVE. 

Five pounds apricots peeled and pitted, three and one- 
half pounds sugar, two pineapples, cut, mix with same 
amount sugar. Put in large vessel apricots, sugar and 
then the pineapple. Let stand over night and in morn- 
ing cook one hour. Mrs. Joseph J. Miller. 

PLUM CONSERVE. 

Two pounds large blue California plums. Do not pare 
but cut in quarters and remove pits. Two and one- 
quarter pounds sugar. Cook one-half hour and add one- 
half pound seeded raisins thoroughly washed in warm 
water ; two oranges, taking out membrane. Remove the 
thick white from rind and cut in thin straws with scis- 
sors. Cook until the consistency of jam and put in 
glasses. Mrs. Marks. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 183 



RHUBARB CONSERVE. 

Two quarts sugar, two quarts rhubarb chopped fine, one 
pound raisins, one-half pound English walnuts (shelled), 
rind and juice of four oranges. Cook from twenty min- 
utes to half hour. Mrs. C. L. Sanford. 



CANNING VEGETABLES IN THE HOME 



INTRODUCTION. 

Most of what the writer has learned about canning 
vegetables was taken from Farmer's Bulletin No. 359 
issued bv the U. S. Department of Agriculture, May, 
1910. 

The writer will not go into the scientific side of home 
canning as this bulletin has done, but will tell as simply 
as possible what has been learned from her own expe- 
rience. 

When one reads that the sterilizing or canning means 
boiling the jars one hour a day for three days, it sounds 
hard and like much work. Once the vegetables are pre- 
pared and in the cans, the boiling is a very easy matter, 
as the boiler is simply left packed full just as it is until 
after the final sterilizing on the third day. The cans are 
lifted out of the boiler and put aside on the kitchen table 
for the testing, which will be told later. 

Many have canned tomatoes, but the most nutritious 
and delicately flavored vegetables such as lima beans, 
Swiss chard, string beans, asparagus, corn and peas a,re 
never attempted, and many of these vegetables are 
wasted every year in the gardens. 

Do not go into canning vegetables too deeply at first. 
Experiment with a few jars early in the season and see 
if they keep well. 



184 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



No housewife who has on hand during the winter a 
supply of home-canned vegetables, ready to serve on ten 
minutes' notice, will ever regret the trouble or difficulty 
experienced in learning. 

KIND OF JAR. 

The writer uses the Economy Jar. These require no 
rubber rings, but are fitted with a metal top, lacquered 
on both sides and having a groove around the lower edge. 
A clamp holds the top in place during sterilization and 
is not removed until the jars have had their final boiling 
and become cool. 

CONTAINER FOR STERILIZING. 

The writer uses a clothes boiler with a false bottom made 
of coarse wire netting- cut to fit it. A false bottom is ab- 
solutely necessary, as the jars will break if set flat upon the 
bottom of the boiler. Use straw or excelsior to pack be- 
tween the jars to keep them from touching one another. 

STERILIZING ONE JAR AT A TIME. 

Especially to the woman living in the suburbs with 
her small garden the "knowing how" to can vegetables 
is a piece of good fortune. Very often the vegetables 
ripen so fast she is at a loss to know just what to do 
with them. If there is just a pint of peas or beans left 
over after one has prepared enough for a meal, that 
means a jar for next winter. For just such occasions 
as this, I have a tin pail fitted with a tight cover. In 
this, place a flat iron stand and place the jar on that; 
put in three or four inches of water and sterilize. After 
the first boiling is done, which must be at once, of course, 
the finishing can be done at odd times. Put the pail 
on just after breakfast. Remember in sterilizing the jars 
must boil one hour, not simmer. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 185 

SELECTION AND PREPARATION OF VEGE- 
TABLES. 

The hrst step in successful canning is the selection 
and preparation of the vegetables. 

Never attempt to can any vegetable that has matured 
and commenced to harden or one that has begun to 
decay. As a general rule, young vegetables are superior 
in flavor and texture to the more mature ones. This is 
especially true of string beans, okra and asparagus. 

Do canning in a w^ell swept, well dusted room. This 
will tend to reduce the number of spores floating about 
and lessen the chances of inoculation. 

Following, are given directions for canning some of 
the more common vegetables, but the housewife can 
add to these at will. The principle of sterilization is 
the same for all meats, fruits and vegetables. 

CORN. 

Contrary to the general opinion, corn is one of the 
easiest vegetables to can. The United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture has shown that the amount of sugar 
in the sweet varieties diminishes very rapidly after the 
ear i? pulled from the stalk ; therefore, in order to re- 
tain the original sweetness and flavor it is necessary to 
can corn very soon after it is pulled — within an hour 
if possible. Select the ears with full grains before they 
have begun to harden, as this is the period of greatest 
sugar content. Husk them and brush the silks ofT with 
a stiflf brush. Shear off the grains with a sharp knife 
and pack the jar full. Add salt to taste, usually about a 
teaspoonful to the quart is sulificient, and fill up the jar 
to the top with cold water. Put on the top and one 
clamp only. 

Place the false bottom in the boiler and put in as 
manv jars as the boiler will conveniently hold. Don't 
try to crowd them. Leave space between them. Pour 
in about three inches of cold water, or just enough to 
form steam and to prevent the boiler from going dry 



186 BETHANY. UNION COOK BOOK 



during the boiling. It is not necessary to have the water 
up to the neck of the jars, as the steam will do the 
cooking. Put the cover on the boiler and set it on the 
stove. Bring the water to a boil and keep it boiling 
for one hour. At the end of that time remove the cover 
of the boiler and allow the steam to escape. Do not 
remove the clamps from the jars. Repeat the boiling 
for one hour for two more days, making in all three 
hours' boiling. In removing the jars from the boiler, if 
it is done while they are still hot, be careful not to expose 
them to a draft of cold air, as a sudden change in tem- 
perature is likely to crack them. 

TESTING. 

After the sterilization is complete, the jars may be set 
aside for a day or two and then tested. This is done 
by removing the clamp and picking up the jars by the 
top. If there has been the least bit of decomposition, 
or if sterilization has not been complete, the top will 
come off. This is because the pressure on the top has 
been relieved by the gas formed by the bacteria. In 
this case it is always best to empty out the corn and 
fill up the jar with a fresh supply. 

If the top does not come off, one may be reasonably 
sure that the corn is keeping. Corn is often subject to 
the attack of anaerobic bacteria. The spores of these 
are sometimes very hard to kill and remain alive even 
after boiling for one hour. In case any jars spoil, in- 
crease the time of boiling to an hour and a half. 

PEAS. 

It is almost as difficult to keep peas as corn, and direc- 
tions must be followed very carefully. Shell and wash 
peas and pack in jars, fill up with cold water, add tea- 
spoon salt to quart jar, put on the cover and clamp 
and sterilize for one hour on each of three successive 
days, as directed under "Corn." 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 187 



STRING BEANS. 

Select young and tender beans, string them and pack 
firmly in the jars, cover with cold water, add a teaspoon 
salt for each quart jar and proceed as directed under 
"Corn.'' 

BEETS. 

Wash the young beets, cut off the tops and cook one 
hour. Take off the skins and pack into jars. Cover 
with cold water and sterilize in the manner previously 
described. 

EGG PLANT. 

Pare the egg plant, cut in thin slices and drop in boil- 
ing water for fifteen minutes. Drain off the water and 
pack the slices in the jar. Cover with cold water and 
sterilize as directed under "Corn." 

SWISS CHARD. 

Cook the chard just enough to pack in the jars and 
sterilize as directed. 

I have found this vegetable very satisfactory when 
canned for winter use, as it retains all of its delicate 
flavor. 

LIMA BEANS. 

Lima beans may be canned just as peas are. It is 
better to can them as soon as possible after gathering, 
as they lose their flavor. 

TOMATOES. 

Cook the tomatoes enough to break them up, put in 
the jars and sterilize for one hour only. 

CORN ON THE COB. 

Corn on the cob mav be canned as any other vege- 
table. Prepare the corn, pack in the jars, cover with 
cold water and sterilize for one hour for three days. 



188 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



PUMPKIN. 

Peel the pumpkin and cut in small pieces and steam 
until tender. Pack it while hot in the jars with a little 
water and sterilize as directed before. 

If any woman trying this method of canning gets as 
much satisfaction out of her cans of good things as the 
writer has done, she will feel repaid in every way for 
all the trouble she has taken. 

Mrs. Geo. D. Young. 



W A L D E N 

GROCERY and MARKET 

Offers full value for American dollars. Good things 
to eat in large varieties, at fair prices, right in the com- 
munity where you live. Patronize home industry. 
WE DISTRIBUTE 

The Richlieii "Brand of Pure Foods 

FROM THE RELIABLE HOUSE OF SPRAGUE, WARNER & CO. 

Buy Eclipse Butter — it's the best. We carry only the 
best Meats and Poultry obtainable. Give us a trial 
and be convinced. ::::::: 

C. A. WENNERSTRAND 

1744 West Ninety-Ninth Street 
Telephones Long wood 33 and 34 



Ti 


rees 


• 

, Shrubs anc^ Fl 


owers 




GROWN AND FOR 


SALE 


BY 




c. 


W. MARSON 


^ SON 


Ni 


n t y - 


Fifth and W 


o d 


Streets 




T e 


lephone Long> 


V o d 


70 2 



Wh 


ite 


R 


i bbon 


Extracts 






S U P P L I i<: D 


B Y 




MRS 


. ABBOTT 




7436 


E 


g g 1 e s t o n 


Avenue 




P H O N 


E 


WENT W O R 


T H 5 6 2 3 


C h i 


c a g 





• • 


Illinois 



190 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UXION COOK BOOK 191 



192 BETHANY UXION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 193 



Sauces and Relishes 



CATSUP, TOMATO. 

Twenty-four tomatoes, one teaspoon whole cloves, 
two small green peppers, four onions. Let the above 
ingredients boil. Then strain, adding one-half teaspoon 
allspice, one-half teaspoon cinnamon, three level table- 
spoons salt, two cups sugar, one teaspoon mustard, 
and three cups vinegar. Cook slowly two hours and a 
half. Mrs. Clyde McGee. 

CATSUP, SHARP. 

One and one-half bushels ripe tomatoes, two ounces 
whole pepper, two ounces whole allspice, two pieces 
stick cinnamon, three or four pieces ginger root crushed. 
Put whole spices in a cloth bag, boil about an hour and 
a half. One-half hour before bottling put in two cups 
sugar, two cups salt, two ounces ground mtistard, one 
tablespoon cinnamon, one tablespoon cloves, one table- 
spoon allspice, one tablespoon pepper, two tablespoons 
red pepper, one quart vinegar. Make a batter of the 
ground spices with the vinegar. Mrs. J. DeRudder. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

Take twenty-two large ripe tomatoes, four ripe or 
three green peppers, two onions, two tablespoons salt, 
six tablespoons sugar, one tablespoon cinnamon, three 
cups vinegar. Peel tomatoes and onions, chop them 
separately very fine, add the peppers chopped with the 
other ingredients and boil four hours. Four quarts of 
canned tomatoes may be used instead of the ripe ones. 
Just before it is done it is well to taste it to see if it is 
sweet enough. This recipe makes four pints. 

Mrs. F. E. Gr.-\ssly. 



194 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



CHILI SAUCE. 

One peck ripe tomatoes, twelve large onions, four red 
peppers, chop medium fine and add four tablespoons 
salt, twenty tablespoons light brown sugar, ten cups 
vinegar. Put all together in kettle and boil down 
slowly to about half. Mrs. E. Rightmire. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

Twelve large, ripe tomatoes, one cup sugar, three cups 
vinegar, one green pepper finely chopped, three small 
onions, two teaspoons cinnamon, two scant tablespoons 
salt. Cook until thick. Mrs. C. Roy Kindt. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

Thirty tomatoes, twelve onions, six peppers (three red 
and three green). Onions and peppers chopped fine, add 
to tomatoes and cook an hour ; then add one and one- 
half tablespoons of salt, one and one-half cups vinegar, 
one and one-half cups sugar or sweeten to taste, one 
and one-half teaspoons cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, 
one teaspoon allspice, one-fourth teaspoon ginger. Cook 
an hour longer, or until thick. Mrs. Ernest Kratp. 

CHUTNEY SAUCE. 

Four quarts vinegar, three cups brown sugar, four 
green peppers, six onions, sixteen apples, four quarts 
tomatoes, one-half pound raisins, three tablespoons salt. 
Chop peppers, onions, apples; pare tomatoes, add to vin- 
egar, then add three tablespoons cinnamon, three of all- 
spice, one and one-half cloves. Cook slowly and steadily 
until thick, about two hours. Mrs. Elwood G. Ladd. 

CORN RELISH. 

One dozen green corn cut from the cob, one dozen 
green peppers, three red peppers (remove the seeds), 
two quarts red tomatoes, four yellow cucumbers 
chopped, one quart chopped onions (small), one quart 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 195 



vinegar, two pounds sugar, one-half cup salt, one ounce 
celery seed, one ounce mustard seed, one-half ounce 
turmeric powder. Chop all together and cook forty min- 
utes. Mrs. R. McGinnis. 

CORN RELISH. 

Twenty ears corn, two large green peppers, four large 
onions, two heads celery. Boil corn ten minutes; run 
other things through food chopper. Boil in one quart 
vinegar. 

Two cups sugar, one-half cup flour, two ounces mus- 
tard, one-half teaspoon turmeric powder, one-half cup 
salt, one quart vinegar. Boil till it thickens. Mix. with 
other ingredients and boil for half an hour. 

Mrs. Rob. Warfield. 

CORN RELISH. 

One dozen ears sweet corn, one head cabbage chopped 
fine, one-fourth pound Colman's mustard, two quarts 
cider vinegar, one tablespoon salt, two tablespoons cel- 
ery seed, one cup sugar. Cook three-fourths of an hour. 

Mrs. G. a. Hutchinson. 

CORN RELISH. 

Twenty ears of corn cut off, six onions, one dozen 
peppers, one-half green and one-half red, one large head 
cabbage, two pounds brown sugar, one-half cup salt, one 
teaspoonful mustard, two tablespoons white mustard 
seed, two tablespoons celery seed, two quarts cider vine- 
gar. Chop and boil one-half hour. Mrs. J. B. Burdett. 

CRANBERRY SAUCE. 

Four cups or one quart cranberries, two cups sugar, 
one cup boiling water. Cook ten minutes without stir- 
ring. Mrs. James E. Armstrong. 



196 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



GRAPE RELISH. 

Four pounds grapes. Separate skin, pulp and remove 
seeds. Four cups sugar, one large or two small oranges, 
peeling, cut in cubes, one pound raisins. Cook all to- 
gether ten minutes after it boils. Mrs. S. W. A^LcCune. 

GREELY SAUCE. 

Twelve large ripe tomatoes, two large onions, two 
green peppers, two cups sugar, two cups vinegar, one 
and one-half tablespoons salt, one teaspoon cinnamon. 
Boil two hours. Mrs. A. M. Cl.'VRk. 

KANSAS RELISH. 

Three quarts green tomatoes, one quart sweet pickles, 
one quart white onions cut fine, six bunches celery cut 
fine, five cups vinegar, three cups sugar, one-half cup 
flour, one tablespoon turmeric. Put in the flour and 
mix well together. Put vinegar in kettle, add sugar. 
Dissolve flour and turmeric in a few spoons water, add 
slowly to the vinegar. Now add vegetables and let 
come to a boil. Mary Sh.^ner. 

SWEET PEPPER RELISH. 

One-half dozen red peppers, one-half dozen green pep- 
pers, sixteen large onions, one and one-half cups white 
sugar, one and one-half pints vinegar, two tablespoons 
salt, seeds of four of the peppers. Chop peppers and 
onions fine and cover with boiling water. Let stand 
fifteen minutes, drain and add vinegar, sugar and salt, 
which have been brought to a boil together. Cook five 
minutes and either bottle or can. Mrs. Roscoe B.^rrett. 

TABLE MUSTARD. 

Put three large teaspoons ground mustard in a bowl. 
Pour on enough warm water to make stifif paste, rub 
smooth, add one-half cup vinegar, beat two eggs and 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 197 



add to mixture. I'ut bowl iu boiling water till mixture 
thickens, add piece of butter size of an egg and stir until 
dissolved. Mks. Geo. M. Murray. 

TOMATO RELISH. 

Two dozen tomatoes, ripe, eight small onions, one 
tablespoon cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon 
allspice, one teaspoon celery seed, one-fourth teaspoon 
red pepper, one teaspoon salt, two cups vinegar, one cup 
sugar. Boil slowly until quite thick. 

Mrs. [ohn He>an. 



PICKLES 



BEAN PICKLES. 

One peck butter beans, cut small and boil in salt water 
one-half hour. Drain, make a sauce of four pints vine- 
gar, three pounds brown sugar, let come to boil and add 
one cup flour, one cup mustard, two tablespoons tur- 
meric, two tablespoons celery seed. Mix all in cold water 
and add to boiling vinegar and sugar. 

Mrs. Wm. H. Brown. 

BEANS, SWEET PICKLED WAX. 

Take fresh yellow wax beans and wash nicely, boil 
until nearly done in salt water, then drain and cool. 
Boil white vinegar with sugar to taste, add stick cinna- 
mon, let it cool, then pour over beans. If desired sharp, 
add a piece of small red pepper. Put in stone crocks. 

Mrs. DeRudder. 

PICKLES, BEET. 

Use small red beets, boil till tender, skin. Slice the 
larger ones. Put in Mason jars, leaving two-inch space 



198 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



at top. Fill with boiling syrup made in proportion of 
one pint cider vinegar to three pounds light brown sugar, 
containing a few whole cloves and sticks of cinnamon. 
Let cans stand fifteen minutes until beets are heated. 
Pour syrup off, heat quickly and return to beets in the 
cans. Fasten tops as usual. Do not puncture skins of 
uncooked beets. Mrs. Parker. 

RED CABBAGE PICKLE. 

Take one large head of red cabbage, cut up very fine, 
then use two cups of salt and add to the cabbage. Let 
it stand in the salt thirty-six hours and mix well every 
day. Then drain off well, then cook cider vinegar with 
sugar, whole cinnamon, whole allspice, pepper and cloves, 
about an ounce, and put in a bag. Boil all together, 
then pour over cabbage boiling hot. Do this three times 
in five days. Mrs. J. DeRudder. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

One dozen cucumbers, three onions, one-half cup olive 
oil, one-half cup white mustard seed, one-half cup black 
mustard seed, one tablespoon celery seed. Slice the cu- 
cumbers and onions. Cover with salt and let stand three 
hours. Drain, add olive oil and other ingredients, pack 
in glass jars and cover with vinegar, then seal. 

Mrs. H. a. Seward. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

One dozen cucumbers, one dozen small onions, one 
quart vinegar, one tablespoon ground mustard, one cup 
brown sugar, one tablespoon mustard seed, one-half 
tablespoon celery seed, two red mango peppers, salt and 
stand over night. Mix sugar, mustard, vinegar and boil. 
Put in other ingredients and boil up. 

Mrs. Joseph J. Miller. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 199 



CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Six hundred small cucumbers. Make a brine that will 
bear up an tgg- Let them stand in this forty-eight 
hours. Take enough vinegar to cover them, heat to 
nearly boiling, set oft' and let stand twenty-four hours. 
Afterward put on new vinegar, three pounds brown 
sugar, handful each of mustard seed, cloves, stick cin- 
namon, three green peppers, teaspoon celery seed, a few 
pieces of ginger root. When done add a handful of 
green grapes and a little horseradish. 

Mrs. E. Harpole. 

PICKLED YELLOW CUCUMBERS OR GORGONS. 

Peel and scoop out seeds, cut them in pieces and wash. 
Put in slightly salted boiling water for a few moments 
and spread on clean cloths to drain over night. Then 
put one cupful of sugar, one cupful of white vinegar and 
whole cloves, cinnamon bark and mustard seed to season 
and let boil about five minutes. Let cucumbers boil m 
this until tender, put them in fruit jars and seal. Ar- 
range the pickling liquid according to the amount of 
cucumbers you have. Mrs. Geo. D. Young. 

MIXED PICKLES. 

One pint large pickles (sour), one pint small pickles 
(sweet), one pint small onions, one pint large onions 
sliced, two heads (medium) cauliflower, two green pep- 
pers, one-half gallon vinegar, two ounces ground mus- 
tard, three cups granulated sugar, two tablespoons tur- 
meric (drugstore), one cup flour. Mix onions, cauli- 
flower, peppers and pickles. Scald in salt water. Drain. 
Use one pint of vinegar to make paste of the flour, mus- 
tard and turmeric. Scald three pints vinegar, add sugar 
and paste, stirring briskly. Add vegetables, scald again 
and can. Mrs. H. E. Stroup. 

MIXED PICKLES. 

One quart cucumbers, one quart green or wax beans, 
one quart small white onions, one quart green tomatoes. 



200 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



Cut in small pieces one large head caulitiuvver or two 
small ones, i^et each vegetable stand over night in 
individual pans of salt water. Put two quarts of vine- 
gar and one quart water on to boil in the morning, take 
the vegetables out of salt water and cook in vinegar 
and water one at a time until they can be pricked with 
silver fork. Put in a stone jar, then pour the vinegar 
that was used to boil them in over the contents. Let 
stand two days. Drain and put in bottles, adding celery 
seed, whole black pepper and whole little red peppers to 
taste. If desired, celery may be added to vegetables 
at this time. Pour fresh boiling white vinegar, sweet- 
ened with three pounds of sugar to two quarts of vine- 
gar over contents in bottles. Mrs. Tweedale. 

MUSTARD PICKLES. 

One quart onions, one quart small cucumbers, one 
quart green onions, one quart yellow string beans, two 
heads cauliflower, two red peppers. Soak cucumbers 
and tomatoes over night in hot brine, cook onions, beans 
and cauliflower ten minutes. Then pour dressing over. 
Two tablespoons Colman's mustard, two cups sugar, one 
tablespoon turmeric and one quart vinegar. 

Mrs. M. p. Luthek. 

OLIVE OIL PICKLES (WITH ONIONS). 

One peck cucumbers, two ounces mustard seed, one 
ounce celery seed, four large onions, one-half pint best 
olive oil. Slice but do not peel cucumbers ; let stand in 
salt three hours, drain and rinse. Put cucumbers in 
jars in layers, sprinkle each layer with mixed seed, 
chopped onion and two tablespoons of olive oil. When 
jar is filled put over top what is left of seed, onions and 
olive oil and fill jar with cold vinegar. Cover jar with 
cloth and plate to keep pickles under vinegar. Keep in 
a cool place. They are ready for use in a few days. 

Mrs. Garrity. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 201 



OLIVE OIL PICKLES. 

Tliirt}- cucumber pickles not too small, one scant cup 
black mustard seed, one scant cup yellow mustard seed, 
one cup olive oil, one scant cup salt, one scant quart best 
cider vinegar. Slice pickles and put in large jar till 
mixed. Add mustard seed, salt and oil ; mix well and 
put in jars. Don't pack too tight. Fill in with the 
vinegar. Mrs. Rob. Warfield. 

PICKLED PEACHES. 

One quart vinegar, one cup water, one ounce stick cin- 
namon, one-half ounce whole cloves, one-half ounce 
ground cinnamon, four pounds sugar, about seven pounds 
peaches. Rub fuzz of peaches and stick in one or two 
cloves and small piece of cinnamon. Boil vinegar, 
sugar and several small bags of above spices, taste syrup 
and when heavy and sweet enough put in peaches (as 
many as you can conveniently manage) ; when peaches 
become soft enough to pierce easily, put in fruit jars 
and fill up with syrup. Before filling jars cook juice 
until a heavy syrup so it will make drip off spoon like 
jelly. If you run short of juice make a little more so as 
to have enough to fill up jars. Mrs. F. E. Crassly. 

BAKED PEAR PICKLES. 

Seven pounds of pears peeled and halved, five pounds 
of sugar, one quart of cider vinegar, whole cinnamon 
and cloves to taste (one to two ounces of each) placed 
in cloth bags. Place in a two-gallon stone jar and bake 
until tender. They may be kept in same jar all winter. 

Mrs. Sanders. 

SWEET PICKLED PEACHES OR PLUMS. 

If peaches are used, wipe them well to remove the fur. 
Plums should be pricked in several places to keep them 
from cracking. For eight pounds fruit take four pounds 
sugar, one quart vinegar, two ounces each of stick cin- 



202 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



namon and whole cloves. Boil vinegar, sugar and spices 
together ten minutes, add peaches, being careful not to 
let them boil until soft. Put in stone jar. In a day or 
two pour ofif the vinegar and scald again. 

Mrs. D. J. Beeby. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLES. 

One-half peck green tomatoes, one-half peck onions, 
six green peppers, one cup salt. Slice onions, peppers 
and tomatoes together in layers, sprinkling salt between 
each layer. T.et stand over night. Next day rinse thor- 
oughly in several waters. When well rinsed add two 
pounds brown sugar, three quarts vinegar or enough to 
cover mixture, one-fourth pound mustard seed, two table- 
spoons whole cloves, one-third cup broken ginger root, 
cme-half cup stick cinnamon broken. Boil all together 
about fifteen minutes or until clear. Put in two-gallon 
stone jar. Mrs. Moore. 

WATERMELON PICKLES. 

Prepare the rinds and put them into weak vinegar and 
water for twelve hours. Then boil them till clear in the 
same water, drain well and prepare : to one pint of 
vinegar, one pound of sugar, spices to taste in a bag 
and stick cinnamon. Put rinds into jars and pour this 
mixture o\'er them while hot. Boil vinegar and spices 
tliorough'y before pouring on rinds. Mrs. A. C. Mowat. 

CHOW CHOW. 

One gallon small pickles, one gallon cauliflower, two 
nuarts small onions, two quarts green beans, one gallon 
best white vinegar, two cups sugar, one cup ground mus- 
tard, two tablespoons flour, two tablespoons butter, three 
red peppers. Mustard, flour, butter and vinegar must be 
cooked well and then poured over. Mrs. H. Max. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 203 



CHOW CHOW. 

One quart large cucumbers cut in small pieces, one 
quart small cucumbers whole, one quart large onions 
cut up, one quart small onions whole,, large head of 
cauliflower cut fine, six strong green peppers put into 
separate dishes, covered with weak brine, let stand over 
night, drain. Two cups sugar, one-half gallon best vin- 
egar, one-fourth pound white mustard seed, one-half 
ounce celery seed. Let come to a boil. Make a paste of 
two-thirds cup of flour, one-fourth pound mustard, one- 
half ounce turmeric. Put this in slowly, stir quickly and 
let boil. Mrs. Wm. H. Brown. 

PICCALILLI. 

Two large or three small heads of cabbage, two dozen 
mango peppers (red or green), ten medium sized onions. 
Run all through chopper and chop fine. Put in sack and 
let drain all night. Three pints vinegar, one quart brown 
sugar well mixed with vegetables, after putting in two 
tablespoons each of white mustard and celery seed. Heat 
thoroughly and pack in jars. Mes. A. W. Zimmerma.v. 

PICCALILLL 

One peck green tomatoes, eight onions. Chop fine, 
sprinkle with salt and let stand over night, then drain. 
Add four green peppers, one red pepper, chopped fine. 
Take one quart vinegar, one pint water and let come to 
a boil. Then put pickles in boiling vinegar and let come 
to a boil ; then drain through muslin bag over night. 
Next morning take fresh vinegar, enough to cover, add- 
ing one cup vinegar, one teaspoon cinnamon and one tea- 
spoon mace. Put in stone jar. ^Irs. Tweedale. 

SAUER KRAUT. 

Forty pounds cabbage heads, one and one-half pounds 
salt. Trim coarse leaves and hard cores from heads. 
Shred finely, pack in layers with sprinkling of salt, tamp- 



204 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 

ing each layer thoroughly. Cover with large cabbage 
leaves, then a cloth and weighted plate. Put in warm 
place for three weeks to aid fermenting process. This 
amount should fill a four-gallon jar. 



THE CALUMET TRUST 
and SAVINGS BANK 

IS THE BANK FOR THE PEOPLE o/THIS VICINITY 

LET US PATRONIZE 
HOME ENTERPRISES 

The Calumet Trust ^ Savings Bank 

Morgan Park :: Chicago, III. 



6 and 7% 
First Farm Mortgages 

Payment guaranteed by us, Wm. H. Brown Com- 
pany, can be purchased at our office, Second floor, 
5 North La Salle Street, Chicago. 

We collect both principal and interest and remit 
our customers Free of Charge. 

See MR. BROWN 

10324 Longwood Drive 



J. D. BARNES 

T)rugs and Chemicals, Fine Toilet 
Goods, Stationery, Chocolates and 
Good Cigars. Delbridge-Smith Co, V 
Homeopathic "E^emedies a Specialty, 

MORGAN PARK :: ILLINOIS 



206 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 207 



208 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 209 



Confections 



A perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets where no crude sur- 
feit reigned. Milton. 

BUTTER SCOTCH CANDY. 

Melt one tablespoon butter in sauce pan, greasing sides 
well to prevent scorching; add two cups brown sugar, 
enough water to moisten, a little flavoring and few drops 
lemon juice or vinegar. Boil until when tried in cold 
water mixture becomes brittle. 

Mrs. Alex.\nder George. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

Two squares chocolate, two tablespoons molasses, 
one-half cup sweet milk, one pound brown sugar, butter, 
size of an tgg, one teaspoon vanilla. Put in a granite 
sauce pan,* heat slowly and stir until dissolved. Then 
boil until it hardens quickly in cold water. Turn into 
greased pans and mark when partly cool. 

Mrs. H. C. Hortsman. 

OPERA CARAMELS. 

Three cups granulated sugar, one cup of milk, butter, 
size of a walnut, one-quarter teaspoon cream of tartar, 
pinch of salt. Boil until it forms a soft ball in cold water, 
stirring only until dissolved but not after it boils. Pour 
on platter previously dipped in cold water. When cold 
dig (not stir) with silver knife until it sugars. Work 
in one teaspoonful flavoring, form into balls and decorate 
with nut meats. Mrs. Harry Daughterty. 



210 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 

To each cup granulated sugar use one-half cup water. 
Boil until a little dropped in cold water hardens (do not 
stir while on the stove). Remove from stove and let 
stand until partially cooled. Beat with a spoon until it 
can be worked with the hands (the longer it is worked 
the better the fondant will be). Then roll into small 
balls, using the palms of the hands and then dip in bitter 
chocolate previously melted. It is best to melt the 
chocolate in the oven to avoid burning it. When the 
candy has been dipped place on waxed paper and set 
in cool place to harden. Nellie Tweedale. 

COCOANUT DROPS. 

To one grated cocoanut add half its weight of sugar 
and the white of one ^gg, beaten to a stiff froth. IMix 
thoroughly and drop on buttered white paper or tin 
sheets. Bake fifteen minutes. Nellie Tweedale. 

CREAM PATTIES. 

Two cups granulated sugar, two tablespoons glucose, 
six tablespoons water. • Boil exactly three minutes and 
stir constantly. Pour on platter and beat well until cold. 
This quantity may be divided into three parts and 
flavored differently. It may be used immediately or kept 
for future use. When patties are to be made, heat desired 
quantity in double boiler, flavor to taste and drop from 
spoon on oiled paper. Ruth Curnick. 

DAISY CANDY. 

Six cups granulated sugar, three cups cream, two cups 
golden drip syrup, two tablespoons glucose, one pound 
English walnuts. Stir while cooking to the consistency 
of dough. Remove from fire and stir as long as possible, 
then pound into a bread tin. When cold pack in air tight 
can. Improves with age. Mrs. H. A. Parker. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 211 



FONDANT— WHITE. 

Two cups sugar, one-half cup boiling water, one-eighth 
teaspoon cream tartar, level measurements. Put ingredi- 
ents into pan, stir, put on range and heat gradually to 
boiling point and boil without stirring until, when tried 
in cold water, a soft ball forms. Pour on to a buttered 
plate and let stand a few minutes to cool but not long 
enough to grow hard about the edges, and work with 
wooden spoon until white and creamy. When fondant 
begins to form lumps, knead with hands until perfectly 
creamy. Pack in bowl and cover with oil paper. Let 
stand twenty-four hours after which flavor. It may be 
colored and shaped as desired. Florence Long. 

FRUIT LOAF. 

Two pounds sugar, two pounds almonds, one pound 
seeded raisins, one-half pound figs, one-fourth pound 
citron, one teacup water, butter, size of an tgg, one table- 
spoon vanilla. Chop fruit and nuts very fine. Cook 
sugar and water until it threads, take from the fire, add 
butter, vanilla, fruit and nuts. Stir until the mass is 
formed, knead well on a sugared board and wrap in a 
damp napkin. Do not disturb for twenty-four hours, 
then slice thin. This makes five pounds of sweetmeat. 

Mrs. a. J- Goes. 

DIVINITY FUDGE. 

Boil three cups sugar, one cup corn syrup, one-half cup 
water, until when dropped in cold water the mixture will 
become brittle. Pour over the beaten whites of three 
eggs and beat rapidly. As it thickens add one teaspoon 
vanilla and one cup chopped nuts. Pour on greased plate 
and cut in squares. Mrs. C. E. Cook. 

MAPLE FUDGE. 

Two cups white sugar, one cup light brown sugar, one- 
half cup water, butter, size of an egg. Boil until it forms 



212 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 

soft ball in water. Beat until cool. Put a little cream in 
it if boiled too much. Nuts may be added. 

Ruth Curnick. 

MAPLE FUDGE. 

Two cups brown sugar, enough cream to moisten 
sugar, one-half tablespoon butter, one-half cup chopped 
walnuts, vanilla to flavor. Cook until soft ball forms in 
water. Beat until consistency of fudge and pour into 
buttered pan. Add nuts last. Gertrude Corlett. 

VASSAR FUDGE. 

One ounce chocolate, two cups sugar, one cup milk, 
cream, butter, the size of a walnut. Boil until it hardens 
in cold water. Stir briskly. Pour into shallow tins well 
buttered and mark in squares. 

NUTS GLACE. 

Dip any nut meats into a syrup of one and one-fourth 
cups granulated sugar, one-half cup boiling water, pinch 
of cream of tartar. When syrup changes color a little 
and hardens in water, place in a pan of cold water. If 
the syrup hardens, place in a pan of hot water. Dip nuts, 
lift out with a spoon and lay on waxed paper. 

Nellie Tweedale. 

ICE CREAM CANDY. 

Three cups granulated sugar, one cup corn syrup, one 
cup water, whites of three eggs, one cup English walnuts 
or assorted nut meats, vanilla. Boil sugar, syrup and 
water until it forms a very hard ball in cold water. 
Flavor and pour in beaten whites of eggs. Beat until 
light and hard. Add nuts just before it hardens. 
Candied cherries and raisins may be added. 

Nelle T. Howard. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 213 



MAPLE CREAM CANDY. 

One and one-half cups maple sugar, one cup sweet 
cream, butter, size of a walnut. Boil until it makes a 
soft ball when dropped in cold water. Remove and beat 
until creamy enough to handle. Mould into small round 
pieces and press English walnuts in the center. 

Nellie Tweedale. 

MARSHMALLOWS. 

Two level tablespoons gelatine dissolved in six table- 
spoons cold water, two level cups white sugar boiled in 
water until it threads three or four inches. Pour into 
gelatine and beat to a stifif froth. Flavor with vanilla 
to suit taste. Pour into pans about three-fourths of an 
inch thick. When hard, lay on powdered sugar board 
and rub until dry. Cut into one inch squares and roll 
in powdered sugar. Florence Long. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

One quart best molasses, one cup brown sugar, one 
tablespoon butter. Boil over slow fire and stir to keep 
from burning. Boil until it becomes brittle when 
dropped into cold water. Before removing from the 
stove add one teaspoon soda and stir well. Pour into 
buttered pan. When cool enough to handle, flour hands 
and pull. Nellie Tweedale. 

NOUGAT. 

Five cups granulated sugar, one cup corn syrup, one 
cup water, boil until it balls. Pour one cup of this over 
beaten whites of three eggs. Boil remainder until it 
hairs. Then beat all together until stifif. Then add one 
cup chopped nuts. Nellie Tweedale. 

OPERA CREAMS. 

Three cups granulated sugar, one cup cream or one cup 
milk and one tablespoon butter, a few grains salt, one- 



214 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



fourth teaspoon cream of tartar, one cup English walnut 
meats cut up, one teaspoon vanilla. Mix above ingredi- 
ents except nuts and flavoring, until well dissolved and 
boil slowly until a little dropped in cold water forms a 
soft ball. Remove any grains which may form around 
the edge of the dish with a little cloth wrapped around a 
fork. Pour on a shallow platter and let stand until per- 
fectly cold, without stirring. Then beat with a knife as 
long as possible. Add nuts and flavoring and knead as 
you would dough. The consistency of the mixture will 
change rather suddenly and get very stiff. As soon as 
it begins to stiffen stop beating it and knead. Form into 
a sheet about one-half inch thick on paraffine paper. 
When cool mark into squares. Dorothy Eddington. 

ORANGE STRAWS. 

Scrub oranges with clean brush, cut peel with scissors 
into straws. Put on fire in cold water, let come to a 
boil, drain, repeat process. Third time let boil two 
minutes. Drain, weigh, make syrup, allowing a little 
more sugar than you have peel by weight ; boil syrup to 
spin a thread ; put in straws, boil until straws are clear. 
Lift out with perforated spoon into platter of granulated 
sugar. Roll thoroughly, cool, put away in jars. 

Mrs. Edwin Bebb. 

PATIENCE CANDY. 

Two cups sugar, one cup milk, butter, size of a walnut, 
one-half cup walnut meats. Take one-half cup sugar and 
melt by putting in sauce pan over fire without any water. 
Stir constantly. Add rest of sugar, milk and butter, 
which has been heated, to melted sugar. Cook until it 
forms a soft ball when put in cold water. Let cool, add 
nuts and beat. Mrs. O. W. Johnson. 

TURKISH PASTE. 

Four pounds granulated sugar, two pounds glucose, 
one and one-half pounds almonds, two eggs (whites). 



BETHANY UNfOX COOK BOOK 215 



llavoring. Dissolve sugar in water, add glucose and boil 
till it forms a ball in water, beat till quite creamy, add 
whites of eggs (beaten) and beat again. When it gets 
too hard to beat, add nuts and flavor, ])our into a pan 
lined with buttered paper. Let stand o\'er night, then 
remove from pan. Mrs. Em.m.v McAllister. 

PEANUT BRITTLE. 

One pound granulated sugar, one quart peanuts. Put 
sugar in a perfectly smooth granite sauce pan. Use a 
very low flame, stir constantly until all the sugar is 
formed into a syrup. Syrup should be a light amber 
color. Stir into the syrup the chopped peanuts and pour 
into a buttered plate. Alida E. Christian. 

PRALINES. 

One and seven-eighths cups powdered sugar, one cup 
maple syrup, one-half cup cream, two cups hickory nuts 
or pecan meats cut in pieces. Boil the first three ingredi- 
ents until when tried in cold water a soft ball may be 
formed. Remove from fire and beat until a creamy con- 
sistency ; add the nuts and drop from the tip of a spoon in 
small piles on a buttered paper. Nellie Tweed.^le. 

PENOCHA. 

One and one-half cups brow^n sugar, one tablespoon 
butter, two-thirds cup milk, one-third cup nut meats, one 
teaspoon vanilla. Boil, then add nuts and vanilla. Beat 
until creamy and stifif. Nelle T. Howard. 

LEMON TAFFY. 

One pound granulated sugar, one-half pint water, one- 
third teaspoon cream of tartar. Boil until it hairs or 
until brittle in water. Pour into shallow buttered pan 
and when cool enough to handle add one-third teaspoon 
tartaric acid, one-third teaspoon lemon extract. \Vork 
this in until evenly distributed and no more, as it will 
tend to destroy the transparency of the candy. 

Nellie Tweedale. 



216 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 217 



Miscellaneous 



"Eve} \1 lung odd, dizzy and queer, 
All that was left was tumbled in here." 

QUANTITY OF FOOD TO SERVE THIRTY 
PEOPLE. 

One pound coffee to eight and a half quarts water. 

One pound butter, for bread only. 

Five pies cut in six pieces each. 

One and a half pounds cream cheese. 

Five half-pint bottles cream. 

Five dozen rolls and two loaves bread. 

For baked potatoes : thirty or more large ones. 

For escalloped potatoes : three quarts milk, half pound 
butter, and one peck potatoes. 

For creamed potatoes : two quarts milk to each peck 
potatoes. 

Five cans corn or other vegetable. 

Five average-size round layer cakes. 

For cold-slaw : tw^o medium-size cabbages. 

For stew : ten pounds beef. 

For creamed chicken : three four-pound chickens. 
— Committee Sunday School Teachers' Dinners. 



A PERFECT BAKING POWDER. 

Eight ounces cream of tartar, one ounce tartaric acid, 
five ounces bicarbonate of soda, ten heaping tablespoons 
corn starch. Sift all together six times. 

Mrs. Minnie Kmne. 



WHien making fruit cake or Christmas pudding add a 
cup of stewed prunes and one half cup juice. 

Mrs. T. B. Thompson. 



218 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



Add sugar to cold milk when making blanc mange. It 
lessens the danger of the milk sticking and burning. 



Thicken gravies with corn starch when in a hurry. It 
is cooked in less time than flour. 



One cup of butter is about eighteen cubic inches. 



Baking powder biscuit dough should be as moist as it 
is possible to mould it. 



One-fourth cup of dry rice equals one cup of cooked 
rice. 



Carmelized sugar dissolved in a little water gives a 
rich tint to some soups. 



An emergency coat hanger when you are away from 
home is easily made by tightly rolling a newspaper, 
tying it securely in the middle with heavy cord and 
finishing with a cord loop to attach it to a convenient 
hook or nail. 



When using Chinese lanterns for decorative purposes, 
put a few handfuls of sand in the bowl-shaped bottom 
around the candle. This will keep the lanterns from 
swaying and also tend to prevent their catching fire. 



BETHANY UXIOX COOK HOOK 



219 



Tatl 



es 



TABLE OF MEASURE. 

A speck } 

4 saltspoons 

3 teaspoons 

16 tablespoons 

2 gills 

1 wine glass } 

2 tablespoons butter 

2 tablespoons granulated sugar 

4 cups sifted pastry tlour 

3V5 cups sifted flour 

6 tablespoons sifted flour 

2 cups granulated sugar 

2 cups butter 

2 cups chopped meat, packed 

2 cups rice 

1 cup corn meal 6 

1 cup stemmed raisins 6 

1 cup cleaned currants 6 

1 cup stale bread crumbs ? 

10 eggs, average size 1 

14 oz. bottle extract 12 



saltspoon 

teaspoon 

tablespoon 

cup 

cup 

gill 

ounce 

ounce 

pound 

pound 

ounce 

pound 

pound 

pound 

pound 

ounces 

ounces 

ounces 

ounces 

pound 

teaspoons 



TABLE OF PROPORTIONS. 

1 quart of flour requires. .1^?, cup of butter, or butter 

and lard mixed for pastry 

1 quart of flour requires.. 4 tablespoons of butter for 

biscuit 

1 quart of flour requires.. 6 tablespoons of butter for 

shortcake 

1 quart of flour requires. .1 cup of butter for cup cake? 

1 quart of flour requires. .1 level teaspoon of salt 



220 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



1 quart of flour requires. .4 teaspoons of baking powder 

1 quart of flour requires..! pint of liquid for batters 

1 measure of liquid to. . . .3 measures flour for bread 

1 teaspoon of soda to 1 pint of sour milk 

1 teaspoon of soda to 1 cup of molasses 

1 teaspoon of salt to 1 pound of meat 



TIME FOR BAKING. 

Loaf Bread 45 to 60 minutes 

Rolls and Biscuit 10 to 20 minutes 

Graham Gems 30 minutes 

Gingerbread 20 to 30 minutes 

Sponge Cake 45 to 60 minutes 

Plain Cake 30 to 40 minutes 

Fruit Cake 2 to 3 hours 

Cookies 10 to 1 5 minutes 

Bread Pudding 1 hour 

Rice and Tapioca 1 hour 

Indian Pudding 2 to 3 hours 

Steamed Pudding 1 to 3 hours 

Steamed Brown Bread 3 hours 

Custards 1 5 to 20 minutes 

Pies ' 30 to 45 minutes 

Plum Pudding 2 to 3 hours 



TIME FOR VEGETABLES. 

Greens — Dandelions 1^ hours 

Spinach 25 to 30 minutes 

String Beans 1 to 2 hours 

Green Peas 20 to 30 minutes 

Beets 1 to 3 hours 

Turnips 1 to 3 hours 

Squash 1 hour 

Potatoes, boiled 20 to 30 minutes 

Potatoes, baked 1 hour 

Corn 20 minutes 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 221 

Carrots ^ to 1 hour 

Asparagus 15 to 25 minutes 

Cabbage 1 to 3 hours 



TIME FOR BROILING. 

Steak, 1 inch thick 4 to 6 minutes 

Steak, 1^ inch thick 8 to 15 minutes 

Fish, small and thin •. 5 to 8 minutes 

Fish, thick 15 to 25 minutes 

Chickens - 20 to 30 minutes 



TIME FOR MEATS. 

Beef, underdone, per pound 9 to 10 minutes 

Beef, fillet of 20 to 40 minutes 

Mutton, leg, per pound 10 to 12 minutes 

Mutton, stuffed shoulder, per pound. . . . 18 minutes 

Veal, loin of, plain, per pound 15 to 18 minutes 

Veal, stuffed, per pound 20 minutes 

Pork, spare rib, per pound 15 to 20 minutes 

Pork, loin or shoulder, per pound 20 to 30 minutes 

Liver, baked or braised 1 to 1^ hours 

Corned Beef, per pound 25 to 30 minutes 

Boiled (simmered) Beef, per pound. .. .20 to 30 minutes 
Ham, per lb., after water begins to boil.. 15 to 20 minutes 

Bacon, per pound 15 minutes 

Chickens, baked, three to four pounds.. 1 to 2 hours 

Turkey, ten pounds 3 hours 

Goose, eight pounds ; . . 3 hours 

Duck, tame 40 to 60 minutes 

Duck, wild 30 to 40 minutes 

Grouse, Pigeons, and other large birds. .30 minutes 

Small birds 10 to 15 minutes 

Venison, per pound 15 minutes 

Fish, long and thin, six to eight pounds. . 1 hour 

Fish, thick, six to eight pounds 1 ^ to 2 hours 

Fish, small 25 to 30 minutes 



222 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



OVEN TEMPERATURES. 

The following' is from Bulletin of the American School 
of Home Economies. 

Enteral Keep at 

Roast Meats 480° F. 350° F. . 

Fish 425° F. 350° F. 

Bread 440° F. 400° F. 

Popovers 480° F. 450° F. 

Cookies, Puff Paste 480° F. 450° F. 

Quick Doughs 480° F. 480° F. 

Ginger Bread and Molasses Mixture 380° F. 380° F. 

Plain Cake 380° F. 380° F. 

Sponge Cake 350° F. 340° F. 

Baked Custard 350° F. Higher in water 

These temperatures are for gas ovens, with thermom- 
eter through the top. An oven door "thermostat" should 
register from 50° to 70° less. Few of these are accurate 
in their readings, but after being tested a few times they 
are useful in obtaining desired temperatures thereafter. 

THICKENING AGENTS. 

The common thickening agents are flour, corn starch, 
rice flour, potato flour, arrow root, eggs ; also gelatin, sea 
moss, junket for milk, and pectin of unripe fruits stiffen 
liquids on cooling. 

Proportions. 

One level tablespoon of flour will thicken one cup of 
liquid for soups. 

Two level tablespoons of flour will thicken one cup of 
drippings or other liquid for gravies and sauces. 

Five level tablespoons of brozvned flour will thicken one 
cup of liquid for gravy. 

The thickening power of corn starch is about twice 
that of flour. 

Four level tablespoons of corn starch will stiffen about 
one pint of liquid, as in corn starch pudding. 



BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 223 

Two good sized eggs to one pint of milk make a 
custard — one egg to a cup of soft custard or baked cup 
custard ; three eggs to a pint of milk for a large mold 
custard. 

One level tablespoon of granulated gelatin will stiffen 
about one pint of liquid, if cooled on ice. 



224 BETHANY UNION COOK BOOK 



A TRIBUTE. 

'Hr^O the sons, husbands and fathers who 
■'- have kept house, swept and dusted, 
scrubbed and scoured, made the beds, dena- 
tured the coffee, "hacked the taters," and lived 
on delicatessen generally ; while the ladies of 
the Woman's Society, in great travail of soul, 
have ensconced themselves in improvised sanc- 
tums and divulged their own secrets of cook- 
ery, clipped, pasted and, in short, devised and 
adorned this contribution to The Happy 
Home. G. S. 



DEC 23 1912 



Dickinson s Feeds 

-Z^. TRIUMPH of POULTRY FEEDING 

Crescent Chick Feed 

A COMPLETE GRAl 

Colonial Developing Feed 

AN INTER 
CHICKS 

Globe Egg Mash 

A HIGH PROTEIN FEED FOR WINTER 
LAYERS. A SURE EGG PRODUCER 

Globe Scratch Feed 

A BALANCED GRAIN RATION POULTRY 
FEED FOR GROWN FOWLS 



A COMPLETE GRAIN RATION FOR CHICKS 



AN INTERMEDIATE FEED FOR GROWING 
CHICKS 




ELEVEN YEARS OF PROVEN SUCCESS 
INSIST UPON THESE BRANDS 

MANUFACTURED BY 

The Albert Dickinson Co. 

CHICAGO ILLINOIS 

FOR SALE BY 

C D. MEYER 1343 W. 103rd St . Washington Heights 

H. M. NICHOLS 6^ CO Morgan Park 

FLEMING BROS. .... 1933 W. 103rd St.. Tracy 

B VAN DER MEER 403 W 103rd St.. Fernwood 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



014 485 284 9 «