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U-f aUITBHONIAN IHSTITDTIOXJ 

i4 rfte T I . .c. .■/ 
BUREAU O^ETHNOLOGY: J. W. POWELL, DIBECTOB 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES 



JAMES CONSTANTINE PILLING 




WASHINGTON 

aOTBBNMENT PBINTIKG OFFICE 
1801 



'Sms: 



Q 



V. 1^ 



I 



PREFACE. 



As stated in the prefatory remarks to one of the earlier issaes of the series of bib- 
liographies of which this yolnme forms the fifth number, the writer undertook a 
nomber of years ago the compilation of a work to be published by the Bureau of 
Ethnology, which was to embrace within a single volnme an authors' catalogue of all 
the material relating to the native North American languages. With this purpose 
in view he visited the principal public and private libraries of the United States, 
Canada, and northern Mexico, carried on an extensive correspondence with librarians, 
miosionariefl, and others interested in the subject, and examined such authorities, 
printed and manuscript, as were accessible. The results of these researches were 
embodied in a work entitled <' Proof-sheets of a Bibliography of the Languages of 
the North American Indians, " the full title and description of which will be found 
on page 403 herewith. The amount of material obtained was so much greater than 
was anticipated that the volume proved cumbersome, and it was concluded to change 
the style of pnblication and to issue a series of bibliographies each relating to one of 
the more prominent groups of our native languages. Consequently but few of the 
"Proof-sheets'' were distributed, and these were confined to persons who it was 
thought were in a position to aid in the preparation of the new series. New jour- 
oeys were nndertaken, the national libraries of England, France, and a few of the 
larger private collections in both of these countries were consulted, many of the 
libraries of this country and Canada were rev^isited, other correspondents were 
enlisted, much additional material was acquired, and the pnblication of the separate 
bibliographies was begun. 

Of this series four numbers have been published, relating respectively, in order of 
pnblication, to the Eskimanan, Sionan, Iroquoian, and Muskogeau families; this, the 
Algonqnian, is the fifth, and the next in contemplation includes the languages belong- 
log to the Athapascan stock. 

wThe Algonqnian speaking peoples covered a greater extent of country, perhaps, 
than those of any other of the linguistic stocks of North America, stretching from 
Labrador to the Rocky Mountains, and from the Churchill River of Hudson Bay to 
Pamlico Sound in North Carolina ; and the literature of their languages is by far the 
greatest in extent of any of the stocks north of Mexico, being equaled, if at all, by 
only one sooth of that line, namely, the Nahuatl. Probably every language of the 
family is on record, and of the more prominent, extensive record has been made. In 
two, the Massachusetts and the Cree, the whole bible has been printed, the former, 
by the way, being the first bible printed upon this continent. In two others, the 
Chippewa and the Micmac, nearly the whole of the scriptures has been printed, and 
portions thereof have appeared in a number of others. In the Abnaki, Blackfoot, 
Chippewa, Cree, Delaware, Micmac, and Nipissing, rather extensive dictionaries have 
been printed, and of the Abnaki, Nipissing, Blackfoot, Chippewa, Illinois, Massachu- 
setts, Montagnais, and Pottawotorai, there are manuscript dictionaries in existence. 
Of grammars, we have in print the Abnaki, Blackfoot, Chippewa, Cree, Massachu- 
setts, Micmac, and Nipissing, and in manuscript, the Illinois, Meuoraonee, Montag- 
nais, and Pottawotomi. In nearly every language of the family, prayer-books, hymn- 
books, tracts, and scriptural texts have appeared, and several of them are represented 
by school-books of various kinds, i. e., primers, spellers, and readers; and in one of 
them, the Chippewa, there was printed in 1840 a geography for beginners. 

166103 



i 



IV PREFACE. 

The present yolame embraces 2,245 titolar entries, of whioh 1.9*26 relate to printed 
books and articles, and 319 to manasoripts. Of these, 2,014 have been seen and de- 
scribed by the compiler — 1,850 of the prints and 164 of the manasoripts, leaving as 
derived from outside sources 231 — 76 of the prints and 155 manuscripts. Of those 
unseen by the writer, titles and descriptions of probably one-half have been received 
from persons who have actually seen the works and described them for him. 

In addition to these there are given 130 full titles of printed covers, second and 
third volumes, etc., all of which with one exception have been seen and described 
by the compiler; while in the notes mention is made of 243 printed and manuscript 
works, 146 of which have been seen and 97 derived from other (mostly printed) 
sources. 

So far as possible, during the proof-reading of this volume comparison has been 
made direct with the respective works. For this purpose, besides his own books, the 
writer has had access to those in the libraries of Congress, the Bureau of Ethnology, 
the Smithsonian Institution, Maj. J. W. Powell, and several other private collections 
in the city of Washington. Mr. Wilberfnrce Eames has compared the titles of works 
contained in his own library and in the Lenox, and frequent recourse has been had to 
the various librarians throughout the country for tracings, photographs, etc. The 
result is that of the 2,014 works described de visu, comparison of proof has been made 
direct with the original sources in the case of 1,711. In this later reading, collations 
and descriptions have been entered into more fully than had previously been done, 
and capital letters treated with more severity. 

Endeavor has been made to acknowledge throughout the work the obligations 
under which the writer has placed himself in the preparation of this material. To a 
number, however, he is under a greater indebtedness than could be properly men- 
tioned in the body of the work. This is notably true of Mr. Wilberforco Eames, who 
has contributed not only his constant aid and advice in bibliographic matters, in 
which he is so well versed, but who has also furnished almost bodily a number of 
special articles included within these pages — those relating to the publications of the 
Apostle Eliot, the Indiane primer, Ly kins, Mather, Maybe w*. Meeker, Piersou, Qninney, 
Rawson, Sergeant, and Simerwell, besides many new titles, biographic material, etc. 
From the Rev. J. E. Jones, of St. Mary's College, Montreal, much information has 
been received concerning the earlier missionaries of Canada ; the Reverend Fathers 
Beandet and Hamel of the Laval University, Quebec, have been especially kind in 
giving information concerning the printed and manuscript material contained in the 
library of that institution and in that of the archiepiscopal residence at Quebec. Sim- 
ilar kindnesses have been shown me bj- Prof. A. F. Chamberlain, now of Clark Univer- 
sity, Worcester, Massachusetts, but formerly of Toronto, Canada. 

To the Director of the Bureau, M^. J. W. Powell, I am under lasting obligations 
for his constant aid and advice and for the opportunity of pursuing my work under 
the most advantageous circumstances. 

As was the case in the previous numbers of the series, my constant assistant haa 
been Mr. P. C. Warman, and upon him has fallen much of the detail and minutiis in- 
separable from such a work. 

Washington, D. C, June 1, 1891. 




INTRODUCTION. 



In the compilation of this catalogne the aim has been to inclade everything, printed 
or in manoscripty relating to the Algonqaian lauguages — books, pamphlets, articles 
in magazines, tracts, serials, etc., and snch reviews and annonncemeuts of publica- 
tions as seemed worthy of notice. 

The dictionary plan has been followed to its extreme limit, the subject and tribal 
indexes, references to libraries, etc., being included in one alphabetic series. Tbe 
primary arrangement is alphabetic by authors, translators of works into the native 
languages being treated as authore. Uuder each author the arrangement is, first, by 
printed works, and, second, by manuscripts, each group being given chronologically; 
and in the case of printed books each work is followed through its various editions 
befoie the next in chronologic order is taken up. 

Anonymously printed works are entered under the name of the author when known, 
and under the first word of the title, not an article or preposition, when not known. 
A cross-reference is given from the first words of anonymous titles when entered under 
ao author, and from the first words of all titles in the Indian languages, whether 
anonymous or not. Manuscripts are entered under the author when known, under 
the dialect to which they refer when the author is not kuown. 

Each author's name, with his title, etc., is entered in full but once, 1. e., in its 
alphabetic order. Every other mention of him is by surname and initials only, except 
iu those rare cases when two persons of tlio same surname have also the same initials. 

All titular matter, including cross-references thereto, is in brevier, all collations, 
descriptions, notes, and index matter in nonpareil. 

In detailing contents and in adding notes respecting contents, the spelling of proper 
names used in the particular work itself has been followed, and so far as possible the 
language of the respective writers is given. In the index entries of tribal names the 
compiler has adopted that spelling which seemed to him the best. 

As a general rule initial capitals have been used in titular matter in only two cases: 
first, for proper names, and, second, when the word actually appears on the title- 
page with an initial capital and with the remainder iu small capitals or lower-case 
letters. In giving titles in the Oerman language the capitals iu the case of all sub- 
stantives have been respected. 

When titles are given of works not seen by the compiler thn fact is stated, or the 
entry is followed by an asteris];: within curves, and in either case the authcrity is 
usually given. 

The material contained in the "Addenda" has been entered in the chronologic 
index at the end of the work, but is not included in the tribal and subject indexes 
throughout the volume. 

V 



INDEX OF LANGUAGES. 



Page. 
Abbitibi: SeeCree. 

Abnaki 3 

Aoadiao 4 

Algonqoian 7 

Arapaho 16 

Atoina 17 

Blaokfoot 49 

Blood Indians : See Blaokfoot. 

Brotherton 62 

Cahokia : See Illinois. 
Caniba: See Abnaki. 

Cheyenne 86 

Chippewa ti6 

Cree 96 

Delaware 107 

Esopns: SeeMansee. 

Etchemin 185 

Fall Indians: SeeAtsina. 
Fox Indians : See Sao and Fox. 
Gaspesian: SeeMicmac. 
Groe Ventre : See Atsina. 

Hndson Bay 243 

Illinois 250 

Kaskaskia 274 

Kikapoo 277 

Knistenean: See Cree. 
Lenap^: See Delaware. 
Lenni Lenap6 : See Delaware. 

Lfong Island 315 

Hahioan : See Mohegan. 

Maliseet 334 

Manhattan 337 

Hareschit : See Maliseet. 

Hascontin 337 

Massachusetts 341 

Melicete : See Maliseet. 

Menomonee 356 

Miami 358 

Micmao :}59 

Minsi : See Munsee. 

Mississagna 361 

Mohegan 363 

Monsey : See Mnnsee. 

MoDtagnais 364 

Montauk 364 

Moonsee: See Mnnsee. 

Moose: See Cree. 

Moosonee: See Chippewa. 

Moantaineer: See Mootagnais. 

Mnnsee :... 369 

VII 



i 



YIII INDEX OF LANGUAGES. 

Nantio: See Narra^ansett. 

Nanticoke :Vil 

Narragansett 371 

Natic : See MamachaHetta. 

Naagatuck 372 

Nehethawa 372 

New England 373 

New Jersey 373 

New Sweden : See Delaware. 

New York 373 

Nipissing 374 

Norridgewock 375 

Ojibwa: See Chippewa. 
Ojipwe: See Chippewa. 
Old Algonkin : See Algonqoian. 
Openaogo : See Paasamaqaoddy. 

Ottawa 381 

Pampticough 386 

Pamankey 386 

Passamaqooddy 387 

Pennsylvania 392 

Penobscot 392 

Peoria 392 

Peqnot 392 

Piankashaw 394 

Piegao : See Blaokfoot ; also Satsika. 
Plymouth Indians: See Massachusetts. 

Pottawotomi 405 

Powhatan 406 

Quiripi 417 

Qnoddy: See Passamaquoddy. 

Rhode Island 435 

Sac and Fox 440 

Sahkey : See Sac and Fox. 

St. Francis Indians: See Abnaki. 

St. John Indians: See Abnaki. 

Sankikani 448 

Satsika 442 

Sauk : See Sac and Fox. 
Sanltenx : See Chippewa. 

Savanna 443 

Shawnee 460 

Sheshtapoosh 468 

Sheyenne : See Cheyenne. 
Shingwank: See Chippewa. 

Skoffie 467 

Soto : See Chippewa 

Souriquois 475 

Stockbridge: See Mohegan. 
Tamarois : See Illinois. 
Tarratiue: See Abnaki. 
Twightwee : See Miami. 
Unami: See Delaware. 

Unqnachog 502 

Virginia 513 

Wapnnoc 580 

Wea 523 



LIST OF FACSIMILES. 



To face page 

1. Title-pa^e of Campanias's Latheri Catechismus 65 

2. Title-page of Campaniiis's Vocabalariam Barbaro-virgineoruin 64 

3. Title-page of Danforth*8 Oreatest Sinners 10:i 

4. Title-page of Danforth'8 Woful Effects 102 

r.. Page842-43of Danforth's Woful Effects 104 

G. Title-page of Donck's Nie a vv-Nederlant 115 

7. Title-page of a copy of Donck^s Nieuvv-Ne^lerlant in the Library of Con- 

gress 114 

8. Title-page of Eliot's Primer of 1669 l'?8 

9. Title-page, etc., of Eliot's Primer of 1687? P^ 

lU. Eliot's Christian Covenanting Confession of Wt-f 1311 

1 1. Eliot's Christian Covenanting Confession of 167-? VHi 

12. English title-page of Eliot's New Testament of 1661 132 

13. Indian title-page of Eliot's New Testamen t of 1661 139 

14. Indian title-page of Eliot's New Testament of 1661 138 

15. English title-page of Eliot's whole Bible of 1663 139 

16. Indian title-page of Eliot's whole Bible of 1663 147 

17. First page of Eliot's Metrical Psalms of ir)<>3 149 

18. First psLgeof Eliot's Leaf of Rules of 1663 148 

19. Title-pageof Eliot's New Testament of 1680 152 

20. Title-page of Eliot's whole Bible of 16a'» 153 

21. First page of Eliot's Metrical Psalms of 1685 155 

22. First page of Eliot's Leaf of Rules of 1685 154 

23. Title-pageof Eliot's Baxter's Call 170 

24. Title-page of Eliot's Bayly's Practice of Piety of 1665 170 

25. Title-page of Eliot's Bayly's Practice of Piety of 1685 171 

26. Title-pageof Eliot's Indian Grammar of 1666 172 

27. Title-page, etc., of Eliot's Logick Primer 173 

^ 28. Title-page of Eliot and Rawson's Shepard's Sincere Convert 174 

29. Evans's Cree Syllabary 187 

30. Title-page of A Further Accompt 197 

31. First page of Grube's Delaware Hymn Book 213 

32. First page of The Hatchets 223 

33. Title-pages of the Indiane Primer of 1720 251 

34. Pages 19, 19 of the Indiane Primer of 1720 250 

35. Pages 19, 19 of the Indiane Primer of 173-? 252 

36. Title-page of Kander's Catechism, etc 275 

37. Title-page of La Brosse's Prayer Book of 1767 281 

38. First page of La Brosse's Primer 280 

39. Title-page of Lacombe's Prayer Book of 1880 283 

40. Lacombe's Cree Calendar of 1882 (reduced) 284 

41. Cree Syllabary from Lacombe's Prayer Book of 1886 285 

42. Title-page of Lahontan's Nou veaux Voyages 288 

43. Title-page of Lahontan's M^moires 288 

44. Title-pageof Lahontan's Sapl^ment 288 

IX 



X LIST OF FAC-8IMILES. 

To face page 

45. Title-page of LahontaD's Noaveaaz Voyages 289 

46. Title-page of Lahontan's M^^moires 288 

47. Title-page of Lahontan's Noaveaux Voyages 289 

48. Title-page of Lahontan's M^moires 290 

49. LorcPn Prayer in Micmac hieroglyphs (from Le Clercq) 305 

50. Title-page of Mason's Cree Bihle 339 

5L Title-page of Mason's Cree New Testament of 1862 338 

52. Title-pages of Mather's Epistle of 1700 342 

53. Pages 1, 1 of Mather's Epistle of 1700 342 

.'•»4. Title-pages of Mather's Epistle of 1706 342 

55. Pages 1, 1 of Mather's Family Religion 343 

56. Title-page of Mather's India Christiana 345 

57. Pages 52, 52 of Mather's India Christiana 344 

58. Title-pages of Mayhew's Discourse 347 

59. Title-pages of Mayhew's Massachoset Psalter .348 

60. Title-page of Pierson's Some Helps of 1658 (Lenox copy ) 397 

61. Pages 4-5 of Pierson's Some Helps of 1658 936 

62. Title-page of Pierson's Some Helps of 1658 (British Museum copy ) 397 

68. Title-page of Pierson's Some Helps of 1659 400 

64. Pages 25-26 of Pierson's Some Helps of 1659 401 

65. Title-page (reduced) of the Present State of New England of 1675 407 

66. Title-page (reduced) of the Present State of New England of 1676 406 

67. Title-page of Quinney's Assembly's Catechism 415 

68. First page of Quinney's Assembly's Catechism 414 

69. First page of Qainoey and Anpaamut's Assembly's Shorter CatechiHm 416 

70. Title-page of Rand's First Beading Book 420 

71. Title-page of Rand's Acts of the Apostles 421 

72. Title-page of Rawson's Spiritual MUk 431 

73. Title-pages of Rawson's Confession of Faith 431 

74. First page of Sergeant's Morning Prayer 455 

75. First page of Sergeant's Prayer before Sermon 454 

76. Title-pageof Smith's Map of Virginia 470 

77. Title-page (reduced) of Smith's History of Virginia of 1624 471 

78. Title-page (reduced) of Smith's History of Virginia of 1()26 470 

79. Cree Syllabary from Thibaul t's Prayer Book of 1866 486 

80. Title-pageof Roger Williams's Key .V26 

81. Title-page of Wood's New England's Prospect of 1634 .534 

82. Title-pageof Zeisberger's Essay 544 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



By James 0. Pillino. 



[Ad Mteriak within panntheoM indicates that the oompiler haa seen no oopy of the work referred to.] 



A. 



A. BS. D. Q. For anonymoas titles be- 
ginning with these letters, see next word 
of title. 

A. N. D. de Lorette [Nipissing]. See 
Cnoq (J. A.) 

Ahbitihl. SeeOree. 

Abert (LieuU James William). Report | 
of I the Secretary of War, | commnni- 
oating, I in answer to a resolution of 
the Senate, | a | report and map | of | 
the examination of New Mexico, | made 
by I Lieutenant J. W. Abert, | of the 
topographical corps. | 

Washington : | 1848. 

Printed cover as above, no inside title, text 
pp. 1-132, map. 24 plates, 8^. Forms Senate 
document no. 23, 80th Congress, 1st session. 

Numerals 1>100 of the Cheyenne, p. ll.->Vo* 
oabnlary (125 words) of the Cheyenne, pp. 12-14. 
—Contains also a brief general discussion of the 
Cheyenne language. 

* * Saturday, September 5 f 1846] . As my room 
was full of Cheyennes, I took the opportunity 
to obtain some knowledge of the genius and 
structure of their language. I found the En* 
gllsh alphabet sufficient to represent all the 
sounds they utter, and at once set myself to 
construct a vocabulary of their language. I 
had the assistance of one of the best interpret- 
ers in the country." 

Oopiet ten: Ctoologioal Survey, Powell, 
Trumbull. 

The Field oopy, catalogue no. 6, uncut, sold 
for 60 cents; the Brinley copy, catalogue no. 
4714, for 30 cents. 

— Report of Lieut. J. W. Abert, of his 
examination of New Mexico, in the 
years 1846-^47. 

In Emory (W. H.), Notes of a military re< 
eonnoisdance, pp. 417-518 Washington, 1848, 8<>. 

Numerals, general discussion, and vocabu- 
lary of the Cheyenne, pp. 427-480. 

ALO 1 



Abert (J. W.) — Continned. 

Extracts from the vocabulary are given in 
Qallatin (A), Hale's Indians of Northwest 
America (American Ethn'ol. Soc. Trans.voL2), 
pp. cxiv, cxv. New York, 1848, 9f>, 

Comments on this article will be found in 
Jomard (E. F.), Langne des Indiens Chey- 
ennes, pp. 384-386, Paris, 1846, B^. 

James William Abert, soldier, bom in Mount 
Holly, N. J., November 18, 1820, was graduated 
at West Point in 1842. After service in the 
infantry ho was transferred to the topographical 
engineers, and was engaged on the survey of 
the northern lakes in 18l3-'44. He then served 
on the expedition to New Mexico. * * * 
During the civil war he served on the stafib of 
General Patterson and Greneral Banks in the 
Virginia campaign. He was severely injured 
at Frederick, Md., in f862, and subsequently 
served on General Gillmore's staffs having 
attained the rank of m^Jor in 1863. He resigned 
on June 25, 1864.— Ajiplston's Oycilop. Am. Biog. 

Abinodjiiagomasinaiganiwan. [Chippe- 
wa]. See Baraga (F.) 

Abinoji | akitibajimoain. | In theOJibwa 
language. | [Design.] | 

Boston: | printed for the American 
board of coniDiissioners | for foreign 
missions, by Crocker &, Brewster. | 
1840. 

Title as above on cover, firontispiece 1 1. in* 
side title as above (verso a map of the globe) 1 1. 
text entirely in the OJibwa language except a 
few English headings and the geographic names 
(of which Ojlbwa equivalents are given) pp. 
5-139, 12°. Geography for beginners, taken 
principally from the Peter Parley series. 

CopieM teen : American Board of Commission- 
ers, Boston Athenieom, Eames, Harvard. 

Abnaki. [Hymns in the Abuaki Iau« 
guage.] 

No title-page or heading; 8 unnumbered 11. 
printed on one side only, 16^. 

1 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Abnaki — Continaed. 

Two of the hymns hav^e as a heading the En> 
gUsh word "Resolve": the othen are headed 
C. M., Short M., See. Tboy appear to be rough- 
ly printed, avthuugh intended for proof-sheets. 
Copies teen: Powell. 

Abnaki fBook of prayers, etc., in the 
Mareschit (orMaliseet) and Caniba dia- 
lects of the Abnaki language.] 

Manuscript, pp. 1-78 and 2 11. long 18^, be- 
longing to Dr. J. Hammond TrambuU, Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

It contains Pridre du Matin en Mariohit, 
Cantiqne, Pridre du Soir en Caniba, Pri&re 
avant la Confession, Interrogation pour la Con- 
fession, Pridro avant (et apr^] la Communion, 
Cat6chisme, Mani&re de Baptiser, etc 

This manuscript fonuerly belonged to Mr. 
George Brinley, of Hartford. It is entered in 
the sale catalogue of his books under no. 56M, 
whence the foUowing note is taken : 

"Written by some French missionary to the 
Abnakis. It is complete and well preserved, 
though its pages bear traces of long and fre- 
quent use. It fonuerly belonged to Dr. John 
Pickering, to whom it was presented by Bishop 
(and Cardinal) Cheverus. 

"The mission for which this manual was 
compiled included Indians of at least two 
tribes, the Canibas, of whose principal dialect 
Basics has given us a vocabulary, and the Et- 
chemins and Mareschites, on and near the St. 
John's Biver. * We read in tiie relations of the 
Jesuits, that the Canibas, the Etchemins, and 
other Indians of different tribes lived together 
in one village,* under the instruction of the 
missionary Fathers (Maurault, Hist, des Abe- 
nakis, 9); and it is not improbable that this 
manual contains translations made early in the 
17th century, and preserved in manuscript cop- 
ies by successive missionaries." 

The manuscript sold for 18.80. 

Abnaki [Manuscripta in the Abnaki 
language.] (*) 

Under several authors in this bibliography 
will be found titles and descriptions of Abnaki 
manuscripts preserved at the Boman Catholic 
mission of Pierreville, Canada, copied from Gill 
(C), Notes sur de vieux manuscrits abenakis 
(9.0.). In addition to those which he places 
under the names of their respective authors he 
adds a general note as follows : " There are oth- 
er manuscripts in Abnaki belonging to fitmilies 
in the village— books of piety containing 
prayers, psalms, chants, etc" 

Abnaki Pri^res | des sanvages abna- 
kis de St.Frangois. 

Manuscript. 33 unnumbered pp. 12°, belonging 
to Dr. J. Hammond Trumbull, Hartford. Conn. 
It formerly belonged to Mr. George Brinley, of 
Hartford, and is titled under no. 5005 of the 
■ale catalogue of his books, fh>m which the fol- 
lowing note is taken: 

" The writing resembles that of the preced- 



Abniki — Continued. 

ing volume [Abnaki Book of prayers] and is 
probably by the same hand, but it shows that 
the writer has become more familiar both 
with the language and with the pen. The 
character used by the French missionaries for 
ott or English to (8) is employed, and the nasals 
are marked as in Rasles's Dictionary, by ii. In 
addition to the prayers contained in the earlier 
manual, it has the Litanies of the Virgin, and 
of the Holy Name of Jesus, the Psalms and 
Antiphons for Vespers, and the hymns ' Lucia 
Creator' and * Veni Creator." 
The manuscript sold for $6.75. 

Abnaki RaciuesAbnaquises, ouplnt^t, 
Dictionnaire abanaquis-fran^ais. 

Manuscript, anon^'mous and undated, pp. 
1-130, sm. 40, in the library of Laval University, 
Quebec. Pp. 38-08 are missing and the laat 
numbered page is blank; the first and last 
leaves are much damaged. The writing is legi- 
ble. 

The first four pages of the text contain the 
theory of the composition of words in the Ab- 
naki language. 

Partially copied as foDows : 

Abnaki Racines Abanaquises. 

Manuscript, anonymous and undated, 15 un- 
numbered pp. (the 12th and 15th of which are 
blank), in the library of Laval University, Que- 
bec. It is an essay toward a French-Abnaki 
dictionary, and is the beginning of a copy of the 
manuscript titled next above. 

Abnaki [Register of baptisms, confir- 
mationSy marriages, and deaths at the 
mission of the Sagnenay and of Lac St. 
Jean.] 

Manuscript, 65 unnumbered 11. oblong 4<'. 
The first leaf, what would be the third, and one 
or more at the end, are lacking. In the library 
of Laval University, Quebec 

Contains many proper names of the Abnaki 
Indians. 

Abnaki [Religions instruction s, chants, 
and meditations in the Abnaki lan- 
guage.] 

Manuscript, 11. 1-190 (of which 11. 111-121, 
161-163 are blank), sm. 8<>, in the library of 
Laval University, Quebec. Well written and 
bound in calf 

At the beginning is this heading: Modus ex- 
oipiendarnm barbarorum confessionum. It con- 
tains the explanation of the commandments of 
God, chief prayers, hymns, and prayers of the 
church, instmotions, and meditations. 

Abnaki [Religions songs, with notes. ] 
Manuscript, pp. 1-590 (with blank pages here 
and tiiere numbered with the others), A^, in the 
library of the archbishopric of Quebec. With- 
out title, name, or date ; very legible ; bound 
in* boards covered with gray doth. 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



Abnaki. [Songs, poems, etc.] (*) 

Manuscripts in posMssion of Mr. Charles G. 
Leland, who writes me as follows conoeming 
them: 

" I would with pleasure send yon an acooont 
of my collections in Wabanaki lore, but nnfor- 
tnnately they are packed away in London, and 
it woold he impodsible for me to obtain them 
nntil I'retom, which will not be before next 
spring or snmmer. If not too late I will then 
attend to it. 

"My collection embraces songs, poems, tales, 
recipes, in short, Indian folk>lore of a very 
Taried kind. Being an old folk-lorist, I formed 
the idea of patting questions of an extremely 
raried nature on all kinds of topics. Mrs. 
Brown informs me that it would be impossible 
now to make such a collection, so many of the 
old people who knew this lore having died."— 
Letter qf Dee. 11, 18SSi. 

"In my London manuscripts there are sev- 
eral important Indian texts, e.g., a transcript of 
thewampum records of the Passamaqnoddies, 
texts of songs, etc. I can not recall them 
now."— Letter ef Jan. 7. 1889. 

See "Brown (Mrs. W.W.); also Mitchell (L.) 

Abnaki: 

Bible, Mark See WsokhUain (P. P.) 

Bible history Vetromile (E.) 

Calendar Vetromile (E.) 

Catechism Abnaki. 

Catechism Vetromile (E.) 

Dictionary Abnaki. 

Dictionary Aub6ry (J.) 

Dictionary Lesueur ( F. E ) 

Dictionary Mathevet (J. C.) 

Dictionary Nnd6nans ( J. B.) 

Dictionary Basics (S.) 

Dictionary Vetromile (E.) 

General discussion BaUlie*Grohman(W. 

A.) 

General discussion Court de Gebelin 

(A. de). 

General discussion Demillier ( L. E.) 

General discussion Lausbert (C. F.) 

Geographic names American Society. 

Geographic names Ballard (B.) 

Geographic names Boyd (S. G.) 

Geographic names Farmer's. 

Geographic names Greenleaf (M.) 

Geographic names Hanson (J. W.) 

Geographic names Hind (H. Y. ) 

Geographic names Hubbard (L. L.) 

Geographic names Jones (N. W.) 

Geographic namea Laurent (J.) 

Geographic names Maurault (J*. A.) 

G eographic names Potter (C. E. ) 

Geographic names Rand (S. T.) 

Geographic names Thorean (H. D.) 

Geographic names True (N. T. ) 

Geographic names Vassal (H.) 

Geographic names Warren (H. P.) 

Geographic names Willis ( W.) 

Grammar Laurent (J.) 

Grammatic comments Hale (H.) 

Orammatlo comments Lincoln (X.) 



Abnaki — Continaed. 
Grammatic comments See Prince (J.D.) 
Grammatic treatise O'Brien (M. C.) 

Grammatic treatise Vetromile (B.) 

Hymn book Anb6ry (J.) 

Hymns Abnaki. 

Hymns Allgemeine. 

Hymns Doublet de Boisthi- 

banlt (F.J.) 

Hymns Garin(A. M.) 

Hymns Hanson (J. W.) 

Hjrmus Heriot (G.) 

Hymns Kipp (W. H.) 

Hymns La Harpe (J. F. de). 

Hymns Basics (S.) 

Hymns Itomagn6 (J. B.) 

Hymns Sobron(P. C.) 

Hymns Vetromile (E.) 

Letter Vetromile (E.) 

Lord's prayer Drake (S. G.) 

Lord 's prayer Shea (J. G. ) 

Lord's prayer T^-umbnll (J. H.) 

Lord'A prayer Williamson ( W. D.) 

Lord's prayer Youth's. 

Numerals Bagster (J.) 

Numerals T'rince (J. D.) 

Numerals Rand (S. T.) 

Numerals Sewall (R. E.) 

Numerals Trumbull (J. H.) 

Numerals Williamson (W.D.) 

Personal names Abnaki. 

Personal names Barratt (J.) 

Phrasee Bagster (J.) 

Prayer book Aub6ry (J.) 

Prayer book Romagn6 (J. B.) 

Prayer book Vetromile (E.) 

Prayers Abnaki. 

Prayers Crespieul (F. X.) 

Prayers Demillier (Jj^.) 

Prayers LaflAche (L. F. B.) 

Prayer.-) Mathevet (J. C.) 

Primer Romagn6 (J. B.) 

Sermons Lesueur (F. E.) 

Sermons Mathevet (J. C.) 

Sermons Virot (C. F.) 

Song book Vetromile (E.) 

Songs Abnaki. 

Songs Beade(J.) 

Text Abnaki. 

Text Bigot (P. V.) 

Text Merlet (L.) 

Text Vetromile (E.) 

Vocabulary Allen (W.) 

Vocabulary Bagster (J.) 

VocabuUry Balbi (A.) 

Vocabulary Barton (B. S.) 

Vocabulary Campbell (J.) 

Vocabulary Delafleld (J.) and 

Lakey (J.) 

Vocabulary Demillier (L. jE.) 

Vocabulary Edwards (J.) 

Vocabulary Gallatin ( A .) 

Vocabulary Holmes (A.) and 

Noyes (T.) 

Vocabulary Kidder (F.) 

Vocabulary Laurent (J.) 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Abnaki — Cod tinned. 

YocabulAry See Hauraalt (J. A.) 



VocabulAry 


Pickering (J.) 


Vocabulary 


Rosier (J.) 


Vocabulary 


Scherer (J. B.) 


Vocabulary 


Thorean (H.D.) 


Vocabulary 


Williamson (W.D.) 


Vocabulary 


WiUU (W. ) 


Vocabulary 


Wilson (E.F.) 


Words 


Brown (W. W.) 


Worda 


Chase (P. S.) 


Words 


Drake (S. 6.) 


Words 


Fitch (A.) 


Words 


Oatschet (A.S.) 


Words 


Grasserie (R. de la). 


Words 


6ray(A.)andTrum- 




ball (J. H.) 


Words 


Latham (B.O.) 


Words 


Mcintosh (J.) 


Words 


Petitot(E.F.S.J.) 


r^g^ da cat^chismc 


i * * Saateaz. 



See Lacombe (A.) 

Acadian: 

Vocabulary See Barton (B. S.) 
Vocabulary Prichard <J. C.) 

Words Smet (P. J. de). 

Account of the cnstoms and manners of 
the Micmakis and Maricheets savage 
natious. See Maillard (A. S. ) 
Adani (Lacien). Esquisse d'une gram- 
luaire compar6e de.la langne dee Chip- 
peways et de la langue des Crees. 

In Congrto Int des Am^ricanistes, Compte 
rendu, first session, vol. 2, pp. 88-148, Kancy A 
Paris, 1875. SP. (Bureau of Ethnology.) 

Issaed separately as follows : 
B^quisse | d*une | grammaire com- 
part I des dialeotes | Cree et Chippe- 
way I par Lncien Adam | [Vignette] | 

Paris I Maisonnenve et C^, libraires 
^diteurs | 15, qaai Voltaire, 15 | M- 
DCCCLXXVI[1876] 

Half-title ven»o blank 1 1. title verso print- 
ers 1 1. text pp. 1-61. 8^. 

Based upon tho dictionaries and in'ammars of 
Fathers Lacombe (1874) and Baraj^ (1850). 

Copies §f.en : Astor, Brinton, British Museum. 

Some copies retain the original pagination. 
(Astor.) 

Leclero, 1878 catalogue, no. 2149, prices a 
copy 2 fr. 

— -« Exanien grammatical compart de 
seize laugaes am^i'icaiaes. 

In Congr^ Int. des Am6ricanistes, Compte 
rendu, itecond sensloo, vol. 2, pp. 16 -244, Luxem- 
boorg Sc Paris, 1878, 8^. (Bureau of Ethnology, 
Congress.) 

The fire folding sheets at the end contain a 
numbor of Tocabularies, among them tbeMonta- 
gnals. Chippewav, and Cri. 
Issued SAparatelv as folloirs : 
Examen grammatical compartf | de | 



Adam (L.)— Continued, 
seize languesam^ricaines | par | Lncien 
Adam | Conseiller Ilia Courde Nancy. | 

Paris I Maisonneuve et C^^, Sditeurs, 
I 25, Qoai Voltaire, 25 | 1878 

Half-title verso " extrait du "etc. 1 1. title as 
above verso blank 1 L text pp. 5-88, six folding 
tobies. 8o. 

Copies Meen: Astor, Boston Public, Congress, 
Gkitschet, PowelL 

Tritbner, 1882 catalogue, p. 8, prices a copy 
6f. ; Leclerc, 1887, p. 8, 15 f^. ; ICaisonneave, 
1888. p. 42, 15 fr. 

Adama (Franklin George). Phonetio 
representation of Indian languages. 

In the Weekly Capital, Topeka, Kans., Ko- 
vember 20, 1879. (Powell.) 

A paper read by Mr. Adams, seoretory of the 
Kansas Historical Society, before the Kansas 
Academy of Science, November 7, 1879. 

ConUina a "Key to the Ottawa alphabet,** 
from Meeker (J.), Ottowa first book. 

Adama (Nehemiah). The life | of | John 
Eliot : I with an account | of the early 
missionary efforts | among I the Indians 
of New England, i By Nehemiah Adams, 
I pastor of Essex street church, Boston. 
I Written for the Massachusetts 8ab- 
bath School Society, and | approved by 
the Committee of Publication. | 

Boston: | Massachusetts Sabbath 
School Society, | Depository, No. 13 
Cornhill. | 1847. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. advertisement 1 L 
text pp. 7-278. appendix pp. 279-324, 12°. 

A specimen of " gracious expression " in the 
Natick language (fh>m Eliot), with English 
translation, p. 95. 

Copiet teen: Congress. 

Adama (William). Terms of relation- 
ship of the I>elawar« (Opuhnarke), col- 
lected by Lewis H. Morgan from Will- 
iam Adams, a Delaware. 

In Morgan (L. H.), Systems of consanguinity 
and utUoity of the human family, pp. 273-381, 
lines 62, Washington, 1871, 4°. 

Adelung(Johaon Christoph)[and Vater 
(J. S.)] Mithridat^s | oder | allgemeine 
I Sprachenkunde | mit | dem Vater 
ITuser als Sprachprobe | in bey nahe | 
fUnfhundert Sprachen und Muudarten, 
I von I Johann Christoph Adelung, | 
Churftlrstl. Sachsischen Hofrath und 
Ober Bibliothekar. | [Two lines quo- 
tation.] I Er8ter[-Vierter] Theil. | 

Berlin, | inderVossischen Buchhand- 
lung, 1 IH06[-I''l7]. 

4 vols, (vol 8 in three parts). 9P, 



ALQONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



Adelong (J. C. ) and Vater ( J. S. ) — Con- 
tiDued. 

Vol. 3, pt. 3, oontains the following AJgonqaian 
lingnistio material : 

Algonkin grammat'tc oomments, pp. 404-410, 
412-413; prayer, p.4ir(fh>iii Hervaa); songs, p. 
411 (from Donne): rocabalaries, pp. 264, 343-340, 
416-417 (from Lahontan, Birton, Long, and 
Mackenzie). 

Bint or Blood Indians grammatio oomments, 
pp. 25 1-360. 

Chippewa grammatic comments, pp. 401-410; 
text, with interlinear translation, p. 414 (from 
. Long); Tocabolaries, pp.254, 343-340, 416-410 
<from Carver, Bandry de Losidres, and Long). ' 

Delaware grammatic oomments, pp. 300-372; 
Lord's prayer, pp. 872-373 (from Zeisberger); 
Tocabalariea, pp. 843-340, 374-370 (from Buttlar 
and Barton). 

Fall Indians grammatic comments, pp. 251- 
256; ^ocabnlary, p. 254 (from Umfreville). 

niioois vocabulary, pp. 303-301. 

Kikapoo rocabnlary, p. 303 (from Barton). 

Knlstenanx grammatic comments, pp.404- 
410; Topabnlariea, pp. 264 (from Mackenzie), 
843-346, and 418-410 (from JCackensle). 

Mesalaaoger Yocabnlaries, pp. 343-344, 415- 
416 (from Barton). 

Miami grammatic comments, pp. 353-364 ; 
Tocabnlariea, pp. 843-340, 303-304 (from Volney 
and Barton). 

Micmac Lord's prayer, p. 401 (from La Croze); 
text, p. 402 ; rocabnlary, pp. 403-404. 

Minsi Tocabolaries, pp. 343-345 and (from Bar- 
ton) pp. 874-376. 

Mohegan grammatic comments, pp. 394-^90 ; 
Lord's prayer, p. 400 (from Edwards); vocabo- 
laries, pp. 348-846, 403-404 (from Barton and 
Long). 

Mountaineer Tocabolary, pp. 418-419. 

Narraganset grammatic comments, pp. 370- 
879; Tocabolaries, pp. 343-340 and (from Wil- 
liams) 387-889. 

Natiok grammatic comments, pp. 379-387; 
Lord's prayer, pp. 886-380 (from Eliot): Tocabo- 
lariee, pp. 348-346 and (from Eliot) 387-389. 

Kehethewa grammatic comments, pp. 408-409. 
Tocabolaries, pp. 254 and (from UmfroTille) 418- 
419. 

New England text, p. 401 ; Tocabolaries, pp. 
848-344 and (from Wood) 887-389. 

New Sweeden grammatic comments, pp. 309- 
872 ; text, p. 873 (ftx>m Campanios); Tocabola- 
ries, pp. 348-346 and (from Campanios) 374-370. 

Paegaa grammatic comments, pp. 251-250. 

Pampticoogh Tooabolary, pp. 345, 360-362 
<frora LawBon and Brickell). 

Penobscot Tocabolaries, pp. 343-344 and 
(from Barton) 402-404. 

Pennsylranien Tooabolary, pp. 387-389. 

Piankashaw Tocabnlary, pp.344, 860-362 (from 
Barton). 

Poitawatameh Tocabolaries, pp. 343-346 and 
(from Barton) 860-362. 



Adelung (J. C.) and Vater (J. S.)— Con- 
tinued. 

Sankikanis Tocabolaries, pp. 343-344 and 
(from Laet) 374-376. 

ScbwarzfUssigeor Blackfoot grammatic com- 
ments, pp. 251-250; TOcabnlary, p. 254 (from 
Umf-^TlUe). 

ShawaoDO grammatic comments, pp. 354-358; 
Lord's prayer (three Torsions), pp. 358-359 (from 
Charaberlayne, Buttlar, Am. Moseom), Tocab- 
olaries, pp. 343-340 and (from Gibson and 
Bnttlar) 300-362. 

Skoffievocabolary, pp. 418-419. 

Soariqools Tooabolary, pp. 403-404 (from Les> 
carbot). 

Vlrginlen Tocabolary, pp. 387-389 (from Bar- 
ton). 

Copiet teen: Astor, Bancroft, British Mu- 
seum, Bureau of Ethnology, Congress, Eames, 
Trumbull, WatkinsoD. 

Priced by Trnbner (1856), no. 603, 11. 16«. Sold 
at the Fischer sole, no. 17, for 11.; another copy, 
no. 2042, for 16«. At the Field sale, uo. 16, it 
brought $11.85; at the Squler sale, ua 9, 95. 
Leclerc (187S) prices It, no. 2042, 50 fr. At the 
Plnart sale, no. 1322, It sold for 25 fr. and at the 
Murphy sale, no. 24, a half-calf, marble-edged 
copy brought $4. 

Adlachemudlgniohkek meianlakwey 

[Abuaki]. See Vetromile (E.) 
Ahiamihewintuhangan [Abnaki]. See 

Vetromile (E.) 
Aiamie kushkoshkntn [Montagnais]. See 

Durocher (F.) 
Aiamie-naboweiKrlnan | nahinawema- 
gakin | [Crucifix] | 

Mouiang [ Montreal ]y | takkwabikioh- 
kote L. Perranlt | endatoh. \ 1844. 

Title Torso blank 1 1. text entirely in the 
Niplssing language pp. 3-7, 16°. 
Contains prayArs, a brief catechism, etc. 
Copies seen : LaTal, Shea. 

Aiamie Nikainotiiuaa. 

No tltle-pafce, heading only: text pp. 1-30. 
180. Hymns enth-ely in the Abbitlbl dialect of 
the Cree language, with the exception of the 
titles, which are in French. 

Copies seen : Sames. 

Aiamie tipadjimoSin [Nipissing]. See 

Mathevet (J. C.) 
Aiamieu kukuetsbimitnn [Montagnais]. 

See Durocher (F.) 
Aiamieu knshknshkntu [Montagnais]. 

See Durocher (F.) 
Alden (Rev. Timothy). Aboriginal ety- 
mology. 

In The Olden Time. toL 1, pp. 325-329, Pitts* 
burg, 1840, 2 Tols. 8^. (Congress.) 

Contains the etymology of a number of Al- 
gonquian words. 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Alden (T.)— Continaed. 

Reprinted in: The Olden Time, Cincinnati, 
1876, 2 vols. tP. (CongreM.) 

This article appeared originally in the Alle- 
ghany Magazine, published by Alden. (*) 

Alexander (Sir James Edward) . L' Aoa- 
die ; I or, I seven years' explorations | 
in I British America. | By | Sir James 
£. Alexander, K. L. S., <& K. St. J., | 
on the staff of H. E. the commander 
of the forces in Canada. | In two vol- 
umes. I Vol. I[-IIJ. I 

LfOndon: | Henry Colbnm, publish- 
er: I Great Marlborough str^det. | 
1849. 

2 vols. : frontispiece 1 1. title 1 L dedication 
▼erso blank 1 1. preface pp. r-vi, illustrations 
▼erso blank 1 L contents pp. ix-xvi, text pp. 
1-345; frontispiece 11. title 1 1. contents pp. iii- 
▼iU, text pp. 1-326, 12°. 

Lord's prayer in the Micmac langaage, toI. 
2, p. 825; in the Milicete language, p. 326. 

Copies teen : Boston Athen»uni, Congress. 

According to Sabin's Dictionary, no. 733, this 
work was reissued London, 1858, 2 vols, post 
8o. 

Alexander (John Henry). A dictionary 

of the language of the Lenni Lenap^i 

or Delaware Indians. (*) 

Manuscript, 4^, mentioned in the Memoir of 
John H. AlexMider, by William Pinkney, read 
before the Maryland Historical Society, May 
2, 1867. 

Alger (Abby Langdon). A collection of 
words and phrases taken from the Pas- 
samaqnoddy tongue. By Ahby Lang- 
don Alger. 

In American Philosoph. Soc. Proo. voL 22, 
pp. 240-255, Philadelphia, 1885, 8o. 

Issued separately also, without title, headed 
as above, repaged 1-15. (Pilling, Powell.) 

Mr. W. F. Ganong, Cambridge, Mass.. writes 
me: "I hare a pasteboard pamphlet-cover in 
which, with a copy of Barratt*s 'Indian of 
New England,' there is a copy of Miss Abby 
L. Alger's ' Words and phrases from the Pas* 
samaqnoddy,* with a number of additions and 
notes in writing made by her— about 33 in 
all." 

Algonquian. [ Algonquian-French gram- 
mar.] 

Manuscript, 5011. 10^, Algonquian and French, 
in the library of Mi^. J. W. Powell, Washing' 
ton, D. C. ; found several years ago among the 
papers of John Porteus, an early Indian trader 
in the Mohawk Yalley. It consists of declen> 
sions and coivlagations in nearly equal parts, the 
latter beginning near the middle of the book, 
with heading : Coi\Jngations de qnelqnes verbes 
Alkonkins &. Nipissings. 



Algonquian. [Algonquian-Frenoh vo- 
cabulary. ] 

Manuscript, 11. 1-59 (incomplete), in theBibll* 
oth^que Nationale, Paris, where it is entered nn> 
der no. 16 in catalogue no. 327. There is no title- 
page and no indication t>f author or date. It is 
closely and finely though not distinctly written, 
averaging 57 lines to the page, in two columns, 
Algonquian and French, the writing covering 
a little more than half the width of the page. 
It is arranged alphabetically by Algobquian 
words and ends in the letter T. The character 8 
is used throughout the manuscript for the sound 
of ou or to. 

Algonquian. CatechismeAlgonkin. (*) 
Manuscript, 140 pp 4^, preserved at the Mis- 
sion of Lac des Deux Montagues (Oka), Canada, 
and used by the Sisters in teaching the children 
of the school at that mission. It is said to be a 
copy only, made, they assert, about fifty years 
ago. Besides the catechism it contains many 
psalms and hymns. 

During the autumn of 1882, while on a visit 
to the mission of Lac des Deux Montagues, I 
had the pleasure, through the courtesy of Pdre 
Leclaire, then missionary at that place, of in- 
specting a number of linguistic manuscripts, 
composed for the most part by former mission- 
aries at the Lake, titles of which will bo found 
in their proper places in thifi bibliography. In 
addition to these, I have been furnished by the 
late Mrs. ErminnieA. Smith, an employee of the 
Bureau of Ethnology, who spent some time at 
that mission engaged in the preparation of a 
grammar and dictionary of the various Iroquoian 
languages, with a list of others, of the existence 
of which I was not aware at the time of my 
visit ; of those which are anonymoun, the title 
of one is given a bove and others below. The 
descriptions are by Mrs. Smith, aide<l 'by Pdre 
Leclaire. 

On a more recent visit (June. 1889), I was 
shown by the Abb6 Cuoq what purported to be 
all the Algonquian manuscripts belonging to 
the library of the mission ; some of these were 
additional to those seen on my first sojourn at 
the lake, but I was unable to identify any of 
those here entered anonymously. 

Algonquian. Catechisrae Algonquin. (*) 
Manuscript, 12°, written by a Jesuit mission- 
ary ; in the archives of the Catholic church at 
the mission of Lac des Deux Montagues (Olia), 
Canada. 

Algonquian. Dictionnaire Algonquin- 
Fran^ais de Pan 1661. (•) 

Manuscript, sm. 4°, preserved in the ar- 
chives of the Catholic church at the mission of 
Lac des Deux Montagues (Oka), Canada. 

This work has passed through the hands of 
M. Mathevet, a former missionary at th)s 
place, as one clearly sees by an inspection of 
the cover, which is entirely covered with short 
notes in Algouquian, written by this mission- 
ary ; besides these he has made many additions 
throughout the dictionary. 



ALQONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



Algonqnian — ContiDaed. 

Other Additions and oorreotions hure been 
made by the hand of another miaaionary, whose 
name is not known, but from whom we have a 
large number of Algonqnian mannacripts. To 
this author belong the six pages which end the 
work. 

These writers were evidently very capable 
men, and already &r advanoed in the knowl- 
edge of the language. 

Algonqnian. Dictionnaire Fran^ais-Al- 

gonqain. 1662 f (*) 

Manuacript preserved in the archives of the 
Catholic church at the mission of Lac des Deux 
Montagues (Oka), Canada. It is incomplete, be- 
ginning with the letter B and ending with the 
letter T. Mice have partially destroyed it, but 
the remainder is in a readable state. The author 
was a Jesuit missionary. 

Algonqnian. Dictionnaire Fran^ais-Al- 

gODqain. 1669. (*) 

Manuscript preserved in the archives of the 
Catholic church at the mission of Lac des Deux 
Montagues (Oka), Canada. It is in bad condi- 
tion, leaves torn, etc 

Algonqnian. Dictionnaire Frangais-Al- 
gonqain. (*) 

Manuscript in the archives of the Catholic 
church at Oka, Canada. Written by one of the 
Jesuit fathers, who has also left a large book of 
instructions. 

Algonqnian. [Discoarse on Purgatory, 
and a part of Genesis, in the Algon- 
qnian language. 1662 f] (*) 
Manuscript, 99 11. preserved in the archives 
of the Catholic church at the mission of Lac des 
I>eux Montagues (Oka), Canada. It is written 
In abridged Latin and Algonqnian and is the 
work of the same Jesuit father who compiled 
the French- Algonqnian dictionary, titled above 
under the date of 1602 f 

The two dictionaries dated 16G2? and 1669, 
and the Discourse, have been corrected and aug- 
mented by a Jesuit father who wrote in 1669 
and who had a good knowledge of the language, 
as is attested by the fact that he wrote upon the 
roots of the Algonkin. 

Algonqnian. Grammaire, petit cat^- 
chisme, pri^res et cantiqnes. (*) 

Manuscript in the archives of the Catholic 
church, Oka, C^ada. It is a large octavo vol- 
nme, written by a Jesuit, and appears to be 
quite ancient. 

Algonqnian. Instructions snr les sym- 
boles en langne Algonquin. 1669. (*) 

Manuscript preserved in the archives of the 
Catholic church at the mission of Lac des Deux 
Montagues (Oka), Canada. 

The two manuscripts last titled are the work 
of the Jesuit father spoken of above as being 
well versed in the language. 



Algonqnian. Liber baptisatorum a Pa- 
tribns Societatis Jesu in residentia seu 
rednctione Sancti Joseph! valgo Sillery. 

Manuscript, 82 11. of which the first four only 
are numbered, 4°. It is the register of bap- 
tisms and confirmations of the Indians made at 
Sillery and Three Rivers from 1637 to 1690. 
It contains the names of the Indians baptised 
and those of their parents. 

Preserved in the Basllique Notre-Dame of 
Quebea 
Algonqnian. [Prayers, etc., in the Al- 
gonqnian language.] 

Manuscript, I p. 1. pp. 1-160, 8 unnumbered IL 
12°, in possession of the compiler of this bibli- 
ography, presented by the pastor of the Catho- 
lic church at the mission of Lac des Deux Mon- 
tagues (Oka), Canada. It is bbund in leather, 
fairly written, and well preserved. 

Pri^re avaut le Cat6ohisme, p. 1.— Actes de 
remerciment, de contrition, p. 1, d'offrande, 
de foi, p. 2, de cliarit^, p. 3.— Pater noster, p. 3.— 
Ave Maria, Credo, p. 4.— Conflteor, p. 6.~ Les 
commandements de Dieu, et de T^glise, p. 
7.— Pridres k Tange gardien, St Joseph, St. 
Michel, St. patron, & tons les sts., Tangelus, 
pp. 8-11. — P. 12, blank.— Cat6ohisme, pp. 13- 
35.— Actes, pp. 35-43.— Messe de la ste. Vierge, 
introit, pp. 45-47.— Psaumes, pp. 47-54.- Messe 
desmorts.introit, etc., pp. 54-64. — Cantiques,pp. 
64-87. — Les litanies de la ste. Vierge, pp. 87-96. 
— Hymne des anges, etc., pp. 06-148.— Acte de 
conformity k la volont^ de Dieu, pp. 149-150. — 
Hymnes, pp. 150-160. — 8 unnumbered 11. at end. 

Algonqnian : 

Bible passages See Brisbin (J. S.) 

Bible passages Reade (J.) 

Bibliographic American Board. 

Bibliographic American Philo- 
sophical Society. 

Bibliographic Bartlett (J. R.) 

Bibliographic Brinton (D. Q.) 

Bibliographic Catalogue. 

Bibliographic Clarke (R.) A co. 

Bibliographic De Schweinltz (E.) 

Bibliographic Dexter (H. M.) 

Bibliographic Dufoss6 (B.) 

Bibliographic Field (T. W.) 

Bibliographic Finottl (J. M.) 

Bibliographic Gill (C.) 

Bibliographic Harrisse (H.) 

Bibliographic Laurie (T.) 

Bibliographic Leclerc(C.) 

Bibliographic Lenox (J.) 

Bibliographic Ludewig (H. E.) 

Bibliographic McLean (J.) 

Bibliographic Micmac. 

Bibliographic Muller (F.) 

Bibli graphic Murphy (H.C.) 

Bibliographic Kash (£. W.) 

Bibliographic O'Callaghan (E. B.) 

Bibliographic Paine <N.) 

Bibliographic Pick (D.) 

Bibliographic Pickering (J.) 

Bibliographic Pott (A. F.) 



8 



KIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Algonquian — Con tiiiaed . 

Bibliographio See Qaaritch (B.) 

BibliofH'apbio Reichelt (G. T.) 

Bibliogrftphio Sabin (J.) 

Bibliographio SMteville (J.) and 

Shea (J. G.) 

Biblioj^raphio Schoolcraft (H.B.) 

Bibliographic Stargardt (J. A.) 

Bibliographic Steiger (E.) 

Bibliographic StevenB (H.) 

Bibliographic Thomas (I.) 

Bibliographic Triibner & co. 

Bibliographio Trambnll (J. H.) 

Bibliographio Vater(J.S.) 

Bibliographic Winsor (J.) 

Catechism * Algonqnian 

Catechism James (T.) 

Catechism Laure (P.) 

Catechism White (A.) 

Dictionary Algonqaian. 

Dictionary Andr6 (L.) 

Dictionary Caoq (J. A.) 

Dictionary Lahontan (A. L. ) 

Dictionary Schoolcraft (H. B.) 

Dictionary Tbavenet (— ) 

Dictionary White ( A. ) 

Etymologies Alden (T.) 

General discussion Bancroft (G.) 

General discassion Beverley (R.) 

General discussion Borsari (F.) 

General discassion Bradford (A. W.) 

General discassion Campanius Holm 

(T.) 

General disitassion Cass (L.) 

General discuKsion Charleroix (P. F. X.) 

General discassion Chateaubriand (F. 

A. de). 

General discussion Cuoq (J. A.) 

General discassion Elliott ( A. H.) 

General discussion Featherman (A.) 

General discussion GilU (F. S.) 

General discussion Haines (E. M.) 

General discussion Hale (H.) 

General discussion Hayden (F. V.) 

Greneral discussion Jefferys (T.) 

General discussion Le Hir ( A. M.) 

General discussion Mcintosh (J.) 

General discussion Marcoux (J.) 

General discussion M&ller (F.) 

General discussion Newcomb (H.) 

General discussion Pickering (J.) 

General discussion Priest (J.) 

General discussion Rawle (W.) 

General discussion Schoolcraft (H B.) 

General discussion Teza (E.) 

General discussion Trumbull (J. H.) 

General discussion Worsley (I.) 

Geographic names Ballard (B.) 

Geographic names Beckwith (H. W.) 

Geographic names Benson (E.) 

Geographic names Boyd (S. G.) 

Geographic names Chapin (A. G.) 

Geographic names Denton (D.) 

Geographic names Dryasdust 

Geographic names Dunne (J.) 

Geographic names Errett (B.) 



Algonquian — Continued. 

Geographic names See Field (T. W.) 

Geographic names Ganong ( W. F.) 

Geographic names Haines (E. M. ) 

Geographic names Henderson ( J. G.) 

Geographic names Hough (D.) 

Geographic names Lugriii (C. H.) 

Geographic names Mombert (J. I.) 

Geographic names Schoolcraft (H. B.) 

Geographic names True ( K. T. ) 

Geographic names Trumbull (J. H.) 

Geographic names Wheeler (C. H.) 

Geographic names Winthrop (J.) 

Grammar Algonquian. 

Grammar Cnoq (J. A.) 

Grammar Duponceau (P. S.) 

Grammar Gay (R. M.) 

Grammar Guichart de Kersl* 

dent(V.F.) 

Grammar Knox (J.) 

Grammar MUller (F.) 

Grammar Nicolas (L.) 

Grammar White (A.) 

Grammatic comments Adelung (J.C.) and 

Vater(J.S.) 

Grammatic comments Featherman (A.) 

Gnunmatic comments Gibbs (G.) 

Grammatic comments Heriot (G.) 

Grammatic comments Reland (H.) 

Grammatic comments Ruttenber (E. M.) 

Grammatic comments Trumbull (J. H.) 

Grammatic treatise Cuoq (J. A.) 

Grammatic treatise Tesa (E.) 

Grammatic treatise Trumbull (J. H.) 

Hymns Allgemeine. 

Hymns Cuoq (J. A.) 

Hymns Garin (A.M.) 

Hymns Heriot (G.) 

Hymns Kipp (W. H.) 

Hjrmns La Harpe (J. F. de) . 

Hymns Rasles (S.) 

Legends Squier (E.G.) 

Lord's prayer Bergholts (G. F.) 

Lord's prayer Hensel (G.) 

Lord's prayer Smet (P. J. de). 

Lord's prayer (treatise) Trumbull (J. H.) 

Numerals Beauregard (O.) 

Numerals Classical. 

Numerals . Ellis (R.) 

Numerals Frits (J. F.) and 

Schultse (B.) 

Numerals Heriot (G.) 

Numerals Hervas (L.) 

Numerals James (£.) 

Numerals Lescarbot (M.) 

Numerals Long (J.) 

NumeraU Pott(A. F.) 

Numerals Riidiger (J. C.) 

Numerals Schoolcraft (H.B.) 

Numerals Steams (W. A.) 

Numerals Trumbull (J. H.) 

Personal names Blanchard (R.) 

Phrases Beauregard (O.) 

Prayer book Lanre (P.) 

Prayers Algonquian. 

Prayert Crespieul (F. X.) 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



Algonqnian — 

Prmyera 
PreflxM 
Proper sftmes 
Proper names 
BeUtioiMhipe 
Songs 
Songs 
Songs. . 
Text 
Text 

Tribsl names 
Tribal names 
Tribsl names 
Tribal names 
Tocabolary 

Vocabnlary 

Yocabolary 

Yocabolary 

Vocabnlary 

Tocabolary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabnlary 

Vocabnlary 

Words 

Words 

Words 

Words 

Words 

Words 

Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 

Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 



Continned. 

See Laa^che (L. F.) 
Garin (A. M.) 
BookweU(E.F.) 
Toner (J. M.) 
Oppert (G.) 
Algonquian 
Bnnne (J.) 
Haines (B.M.) 
Algonqnian. 
TmmbnlKJ.H.) 
Barratt (J.) 
Brice (W. A.) 
GUailan (J. A.) 
Schoolcraft (U.R.) 
Adelun^ (J. C.) and 

Vater (J.S.) 
Algonqnian. 
Allen (W.) 
Barton (B.S.) 
CampaninsHolm(T.) 
CourtdeGebelin(A.) 
Edwards (J.) 
Gallatin (A.) 
GUU(F.S.) 
Haines (E. H.) 
Heckewelder (J. G.) 
Hensel (G.) 
Heriot (G.) 
Herras (L.) 
Holden (A. W.) 
Jaoqnemin (— ) 
Falm (P.) 
Knox (J.) 
Latham (R. G.) 
Long (J.) 
Mackensie (A.) 
O'Callaghan (E. B.) 
Preston (T. R.) 
Bhode Island. 
Snttenber (E. ll.) 
Schoolcraft (H. R.) 
Vincent (E. H. J.) 
Williamson (W.D.) 
Bartlett (J. R.) 
Beauregard (0.) 
Beverley (R.) 
Brinton (D. G.) 
Chamberlain (A. F.) 
Chamberlay ne (J . ) 

and Wilkins (D.) 
Charencey (H. de). 
Chase(P.£.) 
Crane (W. W.) 
Dndley (P.) 
EUiott(A.M.) 
Frits (J. F.) and 

Schultze (B.) 
Gatschet (A. S.) 
Grasserie (R.de la). 
Latham (R G.) 
Lewis (R. B.) 
London (A.) 
McDonneD (W.)l 
Hoor (E.) 
Kantel (A.) 



Algonqnian 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 



Continned. 

See Perez (J.) 

Schomburgk (R.H.) 
Simon (B. A.) 
Smith (E.) 
Vttter (J, S.) 
Woodward (A.) 



Allen (William). An | American | bio- 
graphical aud historical | dictionarji | 
containing an account of the | lives, 
characters, and writings | of the | most 
eminent persons in North America from 
its first settlement, | and a summary of 
the I history of the several colonies | 
and of the | United States. | By William 
Allen, D. D., | President of Bowdoin 
College; | Fellow of the [&o. two 
lines.] I [Quotation, one line.] | Second 
edition. | 

Boston : | published by William Hyde 
& Co. I M DCCC XXXII [1832]. 

Title 1 1. prefiMe pp. iii-riii, text pp. 1-800, 
8«. 

A few words of the Msssachnsetts Indian 
language (from Wood's New England's Pros- 
pect), pp. 700-791. 

Oopiet Been: Astor, British Mnsenm, Con- 
gross, Massachusetts Historical Society, Shea. 

The first edition Cambridge, 1800 (Boston 
Athen»nm, Congress), contains no linguistics. 

The I American | biographical dio- 

tionary : | containing an acoonnt of the | 
lives, characters, aud writings | of the 
I Most Eminent Persons Deceased in 
Nort'i America, | from its first settle- 
ment. I By I William Allen, D.D., | late 
president of Bowdoin College, l&ot 
four lines.] | [Quotation, one line.] | 
Third edition. | 

Boston : | published by John P. Jew- 
ett and Company. | Cleveland, Ohio : | 
Henry P. B. Jewett. | M. DCCC. LVII 
[1857]. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. preDtoe to the first 
edition pp. iii-v, preface to the second edition 
pp. vi-vii, preface to the third edition pp. viii-ix, 
text pp. 1-896, index pp. 897-905, large 8^. 

Linguistics as in etlltion of 1832, p. 879. 

Oopiei seen : Astor, Boston Athenieam, Brit- 
ish Museum, Eomes, Massachusetts Historical 
Society. 

Wunnissoo, | or the | Vale of Hoosa- 

tunnuk, | a poem, with notes. | By 
William Allen, D.D., | A member [dt^c. 
four lines]. | 

Boston : | published by John P. Jew- 
ett and company. | Cleveland, Ohio : 
Jewett, Prootor & Wortbiogton. | New 



10 



BIBLIOGRAPHT OF THE 



Allen ( W. ) ~ Continaed. 
York : Sheldon, Blakeinan & company. 
|M.DCCC.LVI[1856]. | 

FroDtlspiece 1 1. title 1 1. prefmcepp. 3-4, sec* 
ond preface pp. 9-12, content« pp. 13-U, dedica- 
tion pp. 1&-18, half-tiUe verso blank 1 1. text pp. 
21-163, half-title verso blank 1 L notes pp. 167- 
237, 120. 

An account of Indian langaages, pp. 174- 
192, contains a short vooabnlary of the Mo< 
began, Norridgeirook, St Francis, Penobscot, 
Miami, Shawanese, Algonkfn, Delaware, Men- 
see, Chippeway, Massachusetts, Passama- 
quoddy, Micmac, Skoffie, Pottawatamah, Knis- 
teneaux, Natiok, Narragansett, Mountaineer, 
Messisagna, Minsi, and Nanticoke, pp. 179-181; 
remarks on the structure of the Mohegan lan- 
guage, with three lists of Mohegan words (from 
John Lyon Gardiner, an Indian woman named 
Sarah May weep, and from Sarah Lunnan Hunt- 
ington), pp. 188-191 : a short vocabulary of the 
Plymouth Indians, p. 191 ; a short vocabulary 
of the Powhattan and the Pampticoc, p. 192. — 
"Of the Mohegan language, ' including a vo- 
cabulary ^f 150 words, pp. 232-236. 

Copiet seen : Congress, Dunbar. 

Allgemeine Historie | der Reisen za 
Wasser und Lande ; | oder | Sammlang 

I aller | Reisebescbreibungen, | welche 
bis itzo I iu verschiedeuen Sprachen 
von alien Yolkern heransgegeben wor- 
den, I and einen voUstandigen Begriff 
von der neuern Erdbeschreibuug | and 
Ge8cbicbt« macben ; | Worinnen der 
wirklicbe Znstand aller Nationen vor- 
gestellet, and das | MerkwUrdigste, 
Kiitzlicbste und Wabrbafbigste in | Ea- 
ropa, Asia, Africa and America, | in Anse- 
. bang ibrer verscbiedenen Beicbe and 
Lander; deren Lage, Grosze, Qrenzen, | 
Eintbeilungen, Himmelsgegenden, Erd- 
reicbs, Friicbte, Tbiere, Fliisse, Seen, 
Gebiirge, | groszen and kleinen Stadt«, 
Hafen, GebUade, | u. s. w. | wie aucb 
der Bitten and Gebrancbe, der Ein- 
wobner, ibrer Religion, Regierangsart, 

I Kiinste and Wissenscbaften, Hand- 
lang and Maviafacturen, | entbalten 
ist ; I Mit notbigen Landkarten | nacb 
den neaesten and ricbtigsten astrono- 
miscben Wabmebmungen and man- 
cberley | Abbildungen der Stadte, Ktis- 
ten, Aa8sicbten,Tbiere,Gewacbse, Klei- 
dnngen, | and anderer dergleicben 
Merkwtirdigkeiten, verseben ; | Darcb 
eine Gesellscbaft gelebrter Manner im 
Engliscben znsamraen getiagen, | and 
aas demselben ins Dentsobe ilbersetzet. 

I Erster [-ein and zwanzigster and letz* 



Allgemeine — Continaed. 
ter] Band. | Mit Konigl. Poln. und 
Cbnrf. Sacbs. allergnadigster Freybeit.l 

Leipzig, bey Arkstee and Merkas. 
1747 r-l774]. 

21 vols. 4°. In most of the volumes the sec- 
ond line of the title reads : " der Reisen so 
Wasser und zn Lande.*' The work is baaed on 
Astley's Col ection of Voyages, and Prevost's 
Histoire 66n6rale des Voyages. 

Numerals 1-100 and vocabulary of the New 
York Indians T Delaware J (from Laetj, voLlO^ 
p. 605. — Vocabulary of the language of Hud- 
son's Bay [Montagnaisl, voL 16, pp. 658-659.— 
Von der Sprache, der Regierung and Reliflrion 
der Wilden, vol. 17, pp. 19-35, contains, on p. 22; 
the hymn**0 Salutaris hostia" in Abenaki 
Algonquin, Huron, and Illinois (ftt>m Rasles.) 

Copies teen: Astor, Boston Public, British 
Museum, Congress. 

Allouez {Phre Clande). [Prayers, in- 
structions, and a catecbism, in the Illin- 
ois language.] 

Colophon : Fait par le P. CI. Allouez, 
pour le P^re Marquette. [1673-1675?] (•) 
Manuscript, 1 p. 1. pp. 1-185, 16°, belonging to 
Snrgeon-Mi^or Hubert Neilson, Kingston, 'Can- 
ada. I am indebted to the Abb4 Sasseviile, Ste. 
Foye, Canada, for an extended description of the 
work, which I summarize as follows: On p. 1 
is the heading Preccs Hinicae, followed by the 
formula for the sign of the cross ; and this by 
the Acte de foi de la presence de Dieu. — Acte 
d'adoration, p. 2. — Acte de foi, p. 8. — Acte 
d*esi>erance, p. 4.— Acte d'amour, p. 5. — Acte 
de remerciments, pp. 6-7.— [Acte de] demande, 
p. 8. — [Acte de] o£fi'ande, p. 9. — Acte de con- 
trition, p. 10. — Au commencement de la messe, 
pp. 11-18.— Pater and credo, pp. 19-22.— 
Prayers, pp. 22-26.— Litanies and prayers, pp. 
27-36.— Pour la petite conronne,pp.37-38.— Pp. 
39-40 are taken up with the ten command* 
ments, without heading.— Litany [du Saint nom 
de J^sus], pp. 41-44. — Asperges me, pp. 45-47.— 
Pp. 48-51 are occupied with hymns.— A canticle 
"Sur malheureuse creature' of 45 stansas ex- 
tends from p. 52 to p. 66. This canticle is in the 
form of a dialogue between Ood and a fallen 
soul, and in the original French is well known 
and much used in Canada. — Another canticle, 
"Pour les bienheureux," pp. 67-71.— Pp. 72-93 
(p. 86 missing) are blank.— Instmctio pro mori- 
bundis non babtizatis, pp. 94-103.— Pp. 104-137 
are blank. — Cat-echisme (preceded by a prayer 
headed Invocation), pp. 130-176.— Pp. 177-184 
blank. On p. 185 is the colophon above. 

Pdre Allouez was missionary in the region of 
Lake Superior and Lake Michig^an in the year 
1665, and numbered among his neophytes a vil« 
lage of Illinois Indians, to whom he preached 
in their own language. 

. Pdre Marquette was sent to this region some> 
where about 1068-70, and in May, 1673, started 
with Jolliet for the Mississippi River. He re- 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



11 



Allouez (C.) — Continaed. 

tamed in NoYomber, 1674, «id foimded the mis* 
aion of KoekMldM. On retarning from this mis- 
sion he died on the shore of Lake Miohigmi May 
19, 1675. It is probable that it was aboat this 
time the manoscript above described was writ- 
ten. 

Since ftimishin|( me with the description of 
this and another manuscript— by P^re Antoine 
Silry (g. v.), also belonging to Snrgeon-M^jor 
Neilson— the Abb6 Sasseville's very fuU and 
detailed description of them, in French, has 
been translated into English and published in a 
pamphlet edited by Mr. George M.Faircbild, 
Jr., with a supplementary letter by Dr. J. O. 
Shea, printed in New York in 1887 and issued 
in an edition of 100 copies. In this pamphlet 
(p. 10) the Abb^ says: "We can reasonably in- 
fer that this manuscript was remitted to Pdre 
Jacqnes Marquette by P^reCl. Allofiez. either 
in the month of May, 1673, or in November, 
1674." 

See Sasssidlle (J.) and Shea (J. G.) 

Alnambay Almanac. See Vetromile ( E. ) 

Alnambay-ouli awikhigan [Penobscot 
and Passamaqaoddy]. See Romagn^ 
(J. B.) 

Alnambay all awikhigan [ Abnaki ]. See 
Vetromile (E.) 

Alphabet | Mikmaqne. | [Picture.] | 

Qaebec: | imprim^ par C.Le Francois, 
I rue Laval, No. 9, | 1817. 

Title within fancy border verso blank 1 1. 
text entirely in Mikmaqne pp. 3--39, 24<'. 

Alphabet, words of one, two, and three sylla* 
bles, primer lessons, etc. pp. ^12.— The creed, 
conflteor, acts of faith, hope, love, contrition, 
prayers, etc. for the nse of Roman Catholics, 
pp. 13-30. 

The character 8, apostrophes, macrons, pri- 
mary and secondary accents, etc. are used 
throughout. 

Oapiet teen: Boston Athenseum, British Mu- 
seum, Laval, Shea. 
Alphabet, Ottawa. See Adams (F. G.) 

Amsrican Antiquarian Society: These words fol- 
lowing a title or inclosed within parentheses 
irfter a note indicate that a copy of the work re- 
ferred to has been seen by the compiler in the 
library of that society, Worcester, Mass. 

Amsrfcan Bible Society: These words following 
a title or within parentheses after a note indi- 
oate that a copy of the work referred to has been 
■eoi by the compiler in the library of that in- 
ttltntion, New York City. 

Amerioan Bible Society. 1776. Centen- 
nial exhibition. 1676. | Specimen ver- 
tea I from versions in different | lan- 
guages and dialects | in which the | 
holy scriptnres ' have been printed and 
eircnlated by the | American bible so- 
eiety | and the | British and foreign 



^kmerican Bible Society — Continned. 
bible society. | [Picture and one line 
quotation.] | 

New York : | American bible society, 
! instituted in the year MDCCCXVI. | 
1876. 

Title verso picture etc. 1 1. text pp. 3-47, ad' 
vertisement p. 48, 16^. 

St. John iii, 16, in the Cree, p. 36 ; in Mali- 
sect, p. 37 ; in Ojibwa and in Delaware, p. 38. 

Oopiet teen : American Bible Society, Pilling, 
Powell Trumbull. 

Editions, similar except in date, appeared in 
1879 (Powell) and in 1884 (Pilling). 

Specimen verses | from versions in 

different | languages and dialects | in 
which the | Holy Scriptures | have been 
printed and circulated by the | Ameri- 
can bible society | and the { British and 
foreign bible society. | [Picture of bible 
and one liue quotation.] | Second edi- 
tion, enlarged. | « 

New York: | American bible society, 
I instituted in the year MDCCCXVI. | 
1885. 

Title verso note 1 1. text pp. 3-60, index pp. 
61-63, advertisement p. 64, 16°. 

St John, iii, 16, in Cree (Roman and syllabic), 
Micmao, and MaUseet, p. 47; Ojibwa, p. 48; 
Delaware, p. 49. 

Oopietteen: Powell. 

There is an edition, otherwise as above, dated 
1888. (Pilling.) 

Issued also with title as above and, in addi- 
tion, the following, which encircles the border 
of the title-page: Souvenir of the world's in- 
dastrial and cotton | centennial exposition. | 
Bureau of Education : Department of the In- 
terior. I New Orleans, 1885. (Powell.) 

Muestras de versfculos | tomados de 

las versiones en diferentes | lenguas y 
dialectos | eu que las | sagradas escri- 
turas I ban sido impressas y puestas en 
circulacion por la | Sociedad bfblica 
americana | y la | Sociedad bfblica in- 
glesa y extranjera. | [Design and one 
line quotation. J | 

Nueva York: | Sociedad bfblica ame- 
ricana. I Fundada en el AQo de 1816. | 
1889. 

Title as above verso a picture etc. 1 1. text pp. 
3-50, historical and other ob.«ervat(ons pp. 51- 
60, index pp. 61-63. picture and description p. 
64.16^. 

St John iii, 16, in Cree fRoman and syllabic), 
Micmac, Maliseet, and Ojibwa, pp. 46-48.-1 
John ii, 3, in Delaware, p. 40. 

Oopietteen: Pilling. 

American Board. Books in the languages 
of the North-American Indians. 



12 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



American Board — Continaed. 

In Miasionary Herald, voL 32, pp. 268-209; 
Boston, 1837, 8°. (PUling.) 

A oatalogne of the books, trmots, etc. whiofa 
had been prepared and printed, under the pat- 
ronage of the American Board of Commission- 
era for Foreiirn Missions, in the langnages of 
the several Indian tribes among which the 
missions of the board had be^^n established; 
it embraces a number in Ojibwa, Ottawa, and 
Abemaquis. 

American Board of Commissioners : These words 
following a title or within parentheses after a 
note indicate that a copy of the work referred 
to has been seen by the compiler in the library 
of the American Board of Commissioners for 
Foreign Missions, Boston, MabS. 

American Museara. The | American 
museaiu | or | repository | of aDcient 
and nioderu fugitive pieces, | prose aad 
poetical. | For Janaary, 1787. | [Two 
lines quotation.] | Volume I [-XII]. | 
Nnmbe^. | 

Philadelphia: | prioted by Mathew 
Carey. | M. DCC. LXXXVII [-M. DCC. 
XCn]. [1787-1792.] 

12 vols. 9P. Edited by Mathew Carey. 

Lord's prayer in theShawaneselanguage, vol. 
6, p. 318. 

Edwards (J.), Observations on the language 
of the Muhhekaneew Indians, voL 5, pp. 21-25, 
141-144. 

" This magaslne was commenced by Mathew 
Carey, and continaed with marked ability for 
six years. The twelve volumes contain a 
greater mass of interesting and valuable lit- 
erary and historical matter than is to be found 
in any of our early American magazines. 
Many pieces, though fugitive when written, 
are now of a permanent value as documentary 
history, and might be sought in vain elsewhere. 
Among the contributors were many of the most 
eminent writers of the time. The original lists 
of subscribers accompany the work." — Bartlett. 

Copies ieen: Astor, Br*^sh Museum, Con- 
gress, Massachusetts Historical Society, Wat- 
kinson. Yale. 

At the Murphy sale, catalogue no. 53, a set 
sold for $21; Clarke St co., 1886 catalogue, 
no. 58, price a set $13. 

I have seen a second edition of vols. 1 (1787) 
and 2 (1789), and a third edition of vol. 1 (1790), 
all in the Library of Cooffress, with titles dif> 
fering slightly from the original edition. 
American Philosophical Society: These words 
following a title or included within par- 
entheses after a note indicate that a copy of 
the work referred to has been seen by the com- 
piler in the library of that society, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

American Philosophical Society. Cata- 
logue of mauuscript works on the In- 
dians and their laagnages, presented 



American Philosophical Society — Cent, 
to the American philosophical society 
or deposited in their library. 

In American Philosoph. So.:. Trans, of the 
Hist, and Lit. Committee, vol. 1, pp. xlvii-1, 
Philadelphia, 1819, 8o. (Bureau of Ethnology.) 

Some of the works mentioned are in Algon* 
quian languages. 

Reprinted in Buchanan (J.), Sketches of the 
history, manners, and customs of the North 
American Indians, pp. 307-310, London, 1824, 8^; 
also in the reprint of the same, vol. 2, pp. 79-82^ 
New York, 1824. 18^. 

American Society. The | first annual 
report | of the | American society | for 
promoting the civilization and general 
improvement of the | Indian tribes in 
the United States. | Communicated to 
the society, in the city of Washington, 
with the I documents in the appendix, 
at their meeting, Feb. 6, 1824. | 

New-Haven : | printed for the society, 
by S. Converse. | 1824. 

Printed cover differing slightly fh>m above, 
title as above verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3-74, er- 
rata I p. verso blank, 8*^. 

Lord's prayer in the language of the Eastern 
Indians (Micmac), with interlinear English 
translation, p. 63. — A brief vocabulary of the 
Chippewa (from McCulloh), p. 55. 

Greenleaf (M.) Indian names of streams, 
islands, etc. on the Penobscot and St. John 
rivers in Haine, pp. 4^-53. 

Madison (— ) Brief vocabulary of the Chip- 
pewa, p. 57. 

Beanme (C.) Vocabulary of the Chippewa, 
pp. 5<V-57. 

Saltonstall (G.) Lord's prayer in the language 
of the M'lheegau and Peqiiot Indians, p. 64. 

Copieageen: British Museum, Earaes, Powell, 
Trumbull. 

At the Field sale, uq. 1084, an uncut copy 
sold for $2.13. 
American Trac Society : These words following 
a title or within parentheses after a note indi- 
cate that a copy of the work referred to has 
been seen by the compiler in the library of that 
institution, New York City. 

Anamie-muzinaignn [ Chippewa] r See 

0'Meara(F. A.) 

Anamihanon [Menomonee]. SeeZephy- 
rin-Engelhardt (C.A.) 

Andr6 (Per^ Louis). Collectio | Sequens 
est conscripta | h P. Ludovico Andr^, 
qui I fuit silvicolarum Montauorum | 
Missionarius ad ann. M. D. C. XC III. | 
Alia mannscripta ejnsd. scil. Cate- 
I chismus, rudimentum, et exhor- | tati« 
onesy servantur in archiv. | Tadussa- 
kensi [Tadoossac], sub No 



ALGONQUIAN LANQUAOES. 



13 



Andr6 (L. ) — Con tinned. 

Maniuoript ; above title (or n^her note) yerso 
ftnt 1. recto blank, text in the Ottawa langoage 
25 nnnambered U. 19P (0 z 4^ inches). 

At the top of the second leaf is the heading: 
Preoeptes phrases et mots de la langae Aigon- 
quine ontaonoise pour on missionnaire noaveao. 
Following the Tocabalary are 28 remarks in 
Latin, headed respectively Kota 1, Nota 2, etc. 
Composed by and in the handwriting of 
FMher Andr6. On the recto of the 23d 1. is the 
remark "et P. CUadins Alices, qui circiter 30 
annoa versatas est cum sylvestribos dixit mibi 

* * V Father Allonez died at the Ottawa 
mission August 27, 1688. He arrived in the 
country as missionary in 1658. 

[ ] dictionnaire Algonqain [l(>88f] 

ICannscript; no title, heading as above; 406 
unnumbered 11. am.S° (7| x4i inches). Paged 
on the rectos of the leaves in a modem hand in 
pencil 1, 3, 6, 7, 0. eto. Legibly written, on both 
sides the leaves, 38 lines to the page. Bound 
roughly in deerskin, with strings of the same 
material to serve as clasps. 

The first three 11. contain explanatory remarks 
in French; then follows 1 blank I.; then begins 
A, II m'a donni unliure d lire, followed by the 
Algonquian equivalent. The French words are 
written in the middle of the page as headings, 
the Algonquian equivalent underneath, many 
of which run entirely across the page. 

Compiled by and in the handwriting of Father 
Andr6 ; probably about 1688. 

To give an idea of the magnitude of the lin- 
guistic labor performed by some of the mission- 
aries to the Indians, as well as to convey some 
impression of the character of the older manu- 
scripts, I insert the preface to Father Andr6*s 
dictionary: 

Adnertissement. 

1. II est diflScile de faire un diotionnaire en 
qnelque langue que oe soit de cellos dont i'ay 
qnelque connoiesance, fsans] qu'on [ne] dise 
sonoent le mesme mot, soit par raport [soit k 
(Muise du rapport] qn'ont les choses en elles 
mesmes les nnes enn^ les antres, soit que le 
fran^ois ayant plusienrs mots sinonimes le 
mesme mot algonqnin revient pour les signifler. 

2. Pour faire ce dictionnaire, ie mesuisserui 
des plus grands dictionnaires fran^ois, dont i'ay 
mis les mote en algonqnin; mais corame ie 
n'anois pas d'algonquins que ie peusse con- 
talter i'ay consults le dictionnaire ontaouois. 

8. Quand 4 la flu d'un mot il y a "out,** cela 
nent dire [que] ce mot est propre aux onta- 
ouois. 

4. Les algonqnins n'ont pas d7. et les on- 
taouois n'ont pas dV. Quelque fois le mot est 
oommun aux algonquins et aux outaouois. Cha- 
enn y mettant cequi est propre de sa langue. 

6. Tons ceux qui uoudront bien apprendre 
la langue doiuent tascher d'auoir nne personne 
d'esprit, et la bien r6compenser, pour iuy lire 
lea mots, et Iuy. faire dire ce qn'ils signiflent, 
aAnque s*explicant oomme il dit diners mote, et 



■Andr6 (L.) — Continued. 
' que celuy qui ueut apprendre se fasse Torellle, 
et qu'il estudie k parler comme eux. 

6. Bien que Ton soit certain d'nn mot il ne 
faut laisser de le lire k vostre maistre ; souneut 
il dirA les mots sinonimes que Ton marquera. 

7. On fera bien de mettre par esciit oeqne 
Ton ueut dire aux sauuages, et de le leur lire, et 
bien qu'on scache ce qu*on ueut leur dire il ne 
nuira point k la question, paroe que les sau- 
uages admirent que leliure parle comme nous et 
que nous puissions mettre sur le papier ce que 
nous disons, ce qu'ils ne scauroient faire. 

8. Quand i'ay mis la premiere personne ie 
mete un 3. pour dire 1h troisiesme personne et 
dans rexplication ie n'explique que la premiere 
X>er8onne. 

9. II faut se gesner k apprendre les mdimens 
autrement on ne parlera iamais bien, et on aura 
de la peine k entendre bien les sauuages. 

10. Rarement les fi'an9ois parlent cor recto- 

ment. 

11. Les enfans apprennent faoilement les Ian- 

gnes en se diuertissant, et sans estude, mais un 
missionnaire qui est un pen Ag^ an» de la peine 
oh un enfant n'en anroit i>oint. Combien en 
uoyons nous qui an sortir de lenrs classes par- 
lent aussi facilement on latin qu'en frau^ois, k 
plus forte raisen un missionnaire apprendra 
auec peine la langue des sauuages qui a beau- 
coup moins de rapport k la langue fran^oise que 
la langue fran^oise n'en a auec la latino. 

12. Quelque fois quand ie n'ay pas bien toint 
les lettrea ie mets un petit traict affin qu'on les 
ioiguent. 

13. Comme ie n'escris pas bien on se trom- 
pera souuent, c'est pour qnoy il ne faut rien ap- 
prendre qu'on ne I'ait leu k celuy des sauuages 
qu'on a x>our maistre. 

14. Je marque les longues en mettant un ac- 
cent sur la syllabe longne. 

15. Pour bien apprendre k prononcer il ne 
fisut pas dire aux sauuages le mot, mais il faut 
qu'ils le disent, car si nous leurdites: " Appel- 
lez-nous cela nne pierre [f]" ils ecus diront 
souneut oni, sans comprendre ce que uous uou« 
lez apprendre d'eux. 

16. II est bon d'auoir tousiours dans sa poche 
un escritoire on un crayon et des tablottes pour 
marquertout ce que nous pourroz attrapper do 
ce qu'ilsdisent etapr^s uous proposerex k vostre 
maistre ce que uous auez oul et marqu6. 

17. II y a des vcrbes nobles et ignobles ; ie mets 
le nerbe ignoble le premier, et puis le noble 
parabr6uiation. Parexemple: nitiberindan, ie 
gonueme C'la. n. [i. e. noble] ma proniliberi- 
ma, ie gonueme u. g. un homme. 

18. Quand ie mete *'n. g." cela ueut dire 
"par exemple," tiei^ gratia en latin. 

19. Quand ilyaund Ala marge, cela ueut 
dire que ie double de ce mot. 

20. Parfois nne lettre n'est pas bien form6e, 
pour lore la 3' personne oonsid6r6e seruira A 
corriger la premiere, on an contraise [sic] par 
la troisiesme on corrigera la premiere. 

21. Soonent il fandra deviner; le nerbe pr^ 



14 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



JLndr6 (L.) — Continned. 

c^dant ayant le commenoemeDt de la signifloa* 
Uon de celny qai sait. 

22. Souaent au lieu de ou ie ne meta que O 
par oubli. Lea aaonages n'ont i»as an u comme 
lea fran9oi8. 

23. n est bon de faire longae on bri^ae la 
ayllabe p^nulti^me selon qa'elleest [i. e., as the 
case may be], poar ne pas ohoqaer ToreiUe des 
saaasges. La p^naltidme lougue a an accent 
aiga V. g.' ; cells qui n'a point d'aooent est 
bri^ae. Quelqaefois ie mets Taocent ". 

24. Agftming, an bord de 9a; agdming, aa 
bold do U. 

25. Ainsi qae noas aaons des mots de nos arts 
que les sauoages n'ont point, de mesme its en 
ont que nous n'auons pas; c'est pour qaoyil 
«st bon de marqner ceax qa'ils ont propres, a. g. 
aor le canot. 

20. Qaand il y a on I; et an 17 Tan sar Faatre, 
«ela veat dire qne Ton et I'autre se disent. Le 
mesme se doit entendre de P et de B. 

27. Qaand i*ay manqa6 quelque lettre ie la 
mets aa-dessas da mot oil elle doit estre ins^r^e. 

28. II faadroit an dictionnaire qui oommen^a 
par I'algonqnin, ce qai seroit commode pour 
chercher lea mots; mais il faat da temps et da 
papier en abondanoe poar ranger bien les mota 
algonqnins ainsi que i'ay tasoh6 de faire auz 
mots ontaouois. 

29. Qaand ie mets I'accent sar la demidre da 
aerbe cela aeat dire quMl faut le mettre snr la 
p6naltidme de la seconde personne. 

30. Sonaent ie suppose que le mot est signifl^ 
par celny qui commence. 

31. II faat prendre garde k ne pas se tromper 
^nand par inadvertance ie mets on mot on des 
ayllabes oataonoises ou papinachioises car les 
trois langaes tantost oonuiennent et tantost ne 
oonuiennent pas. 

82. Qaand ie ne mets point de firanfois apr6s 
I'algonqain o'est signs que ie [ne] s^ay pas 
la signification. 

33. Dans toutes les langaes il y a des mots 
ainonymes formellement ou 6qaiualement, ce 
^ui fait qne le mesme aerbe est plasiears fois 
r6p4t6. 

34. Tantost ie commence par le mnt sanuage, 
tantost par le mot fhm^ois sans qne cela porte 
consequence. 

35. Sonaent ayant mis le aerbe, ie ne mets 
7>aa la signification au premier qui sait. 

36. I'ay oabli6 quelqaefois k mettre le Aran- 
•^ois 4 des phrases. 

87. I'escris comme les sanuages prononcent 
et il faut s'estndier 4 prononcer comme euz. 

38. n ne faat permettre k personne de lire 
dans ce dictionnaire de pear que quelqn'un ne 
lise ce qui est nilain comme fit X., qui estant 
au service d*un pdre amassa tons les mots des* 
honestes qni estoient dans son dictionnaire et 
s'en seruit pour dire des ailainies auz flUes et 
les desbancher. 

89. En plasiears endroits ie'parle selon les 
saausges et leors salet^s que ie ne fais que 
toucher; c'est k ceux qui se serairont de ce 
•dictionnaire k prendre garde k cela. 



Andr6 (L.) — Continued. 

40. Le papier n'estant par des meillenrs en 
plnsieurs endroits donnera de la peine. Le 
remMe sera d'auoir quelque personne qui 
scache bien la langue qu'on puisse consulter. 

41. Kipoukooan kitonpouagen, tu uioles la 
paiz, est la fa9on de parler des sauuages qai 
font la paiz en chantant le calumet, et ainsi en 
diners endroits je parle selon la fa9on de parler 
des sanuages. 

42. Quand il y a une lettre sur Tantre a. g. Ie 
P sur le B, le n sur r, cela aeut dire que le mot 
se prononce diuersemeut selon les nations. 

43. Ie mets souuent le uerbe 4 la 3* personne 
et ie mets la signification k la premiere, je fais 
cela [par] inadnertance. 

[Homilies in the Montagnais lan- 
guage.] 

Manuscript, lacking title-page or first leaf, 49 
unnumbered 11. sm. SP (7z4i inches). The hand- 
writing is fairly regular and distinct. The first 
8 II. are in parallel columns, Montagnais and 
French; the remainder alternate French on 
versos, Montagnais on rectos. The versos of 11. 
47, 18, and 49 are blank. The work seems to be 
incomplete. 

These three manuscripts of Father Andr6 1 
had the pleasure of seeing in the hands of the 
Abbe F6rard, in the summer of 1882, at the 
Sault au Recollet, Island of Montreal. In 
June, 1889, I saw them again in possession of 
Bev. A. E. Jones, of St. Mary's College, Mont- 
real, in the library of which institution they 
will probably remain. 

Through the kindness of the latter gentle- 
man, who famished me the copy of the above 
preface, I am also in receipt of an eztended bio- 
graphic sketch of P^re Andr6, compiled by him 
with much labor from printed and manuscript 
sources— a sketch too long and elaborate for 
these pages, but which should find place in 
some more suitable work. I regret my inability 
to use it as a whole, but mast content myself 
with the following eztracts : 

Father Loais And^ was bom in 1623, and 
previous to his coming to New France had en- 
tered the Society of Jesus as a member of the 
province of Toulouse. As a Canadian mission- 
ary he was within the Jurisdi'^tion of the prov- 
ince of France. He reached America on the 
7th of June, 1009, and in a short time was sent 
to the western missions, where Claude Allouez, 
Jacques Marquette, and Claude Dablon, to- 
gether with the coadjutor — brother Louis le 
Boesme, were already toiling in the Master's 
vineyard. 

On the 20th of May, 1070, Alloues, leaving the 
neighborhood of the Bay, had set out for the 
Sault, and ftom him we ascertain the fact that 
Father Andr6 had already reached that post 
with Father Dmillettes, who had Journeyed 
with him. 

On the 28th of August, Father Andr6 set out 
for the Mission of Mississagn^ (Wide-month- 
river), on the northern shore of Lake Hnron. 
He arrived there three days after. As soon as 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



15 



Andr6 (L.) — Continaed. 
(he exercises of the mission were ended, he pro- 
ceeded to Oalehitchionftn, an island in the same 
lake lying opposite £kaent8ton (Manitonlln), 
where he remained twelve days. After sojonm- 
ing on the latter island, continuing unremit- 
tingly his apostolic labors in spite of famine, he 
finally reached Lake Nipissing, and there spent 
three months iostructing the 8tlsk8agami 
(those-at-the- farthest-lake) . 

As the ice broke up he returned to EkaentS- 
toD, and for three weeks he preached to the 
Amik8^, or Beaver nation, who had taken up 
their abode on the island. Provisions were now 
more plentiful as the hunt of the orlgnal had 
proved sncceMfoI, and God gave him, as he 
says, wherewith to "couler doucement la fin de 
rhyver. " This to all appearances was towards 
tiie end of the winter 1670-1671. 

The summer months of 1671, Father Andr6 
passed at the Bale des Puants. We next And 
him at Michilimakinao, where he spent part 
of the winter with the Etionnontatehronnon 
Huroiis and other Indians who had returned 
there as exiles to their old habitation. 

On the 16th of December, 1671, be set out to 
return to Qreen Bay. After a tedious and per- 
Uons Journey, owing especially to the ice, he 
reached his destination and occnpied the re- 
mainder of the winter Journeying from village 
to village and evangelizing the tribes settled in 
the neighborhood. 

Father Andr^ was stationed at Green Bay in 

1672, and I might say permanently. He had 
for his companion Father AUouez. 

On the 15th of February, the first day of lent. 
1678, he repaired to the village of Oussouamig- 
oung, where his labors were crowned with suc- 
cess. But, owing to a promise he had made 
Fatiier Alloues, he relunctantly left his neo- 
phytes, on the 6th of March, to return to the 
residence at the Bay. Here day after day, from 
morning to sundown, the Indians flocked to his 
cabin to be instructed in the Christian faith. 
On the 24th of March the Indians struck their 
tents intending to camp nearer the month of the 
river, and on the day following Father Allouez 
returned fh>m a mission to the Outagamie, or 
Foxes, thus leaving Father Andr6 at liberty to 
go on his own annual eight days* retreat, which 
time he spent in seclusion, prayer, and medita- 
tion. 

Towards the end of April of this same year, 

1673, Father Andr6 undertook a mission to the 
Maloumtnes or FoUea-Avoines, but he does not 
specify what length of time he spent among 
them. 

In the following year, 1674, he returned to 
the mission of Ona^satinoun [tic], ani premises 
by saying that it was his third visit On the 
16th of November, the river of the FoUes- 
Avoines or Maloumines being completely frozen 
over, he was prevented from following the In- 
dian bands to the extremity of Cape Illmols, and 
saw himself in the necessity of patiently await- 
ing their return at the end of January, 1675. 

Father Andr6, throughout 1677, continued 



Andr6 (L.) — Continued. 

working assiduously among the Indians of the 
Bay, and regenerated by baptism one hundred 
catechumens. 

From 1678 to 1681 we find him still at Green 
Bay ; in 1782 at Michilimakinao. In 1683 he was 
with the Indians at Kiskakin. This was the 
last year of liis missionary labor in the West. 

He was now in his sixtieth year, and was re- 
called to Quebec, no doubt with the intention 
of affording him a Lttle rest after many years 
of hardship and apostolic toiL He was then 
named professor of philosophy in the Jesuits' 
College, at Quebec, a post he occupied in 1684 
and 1685. And, though venerable in years, he 
did not think it beneath him to accept an ap- 
pointment as professor in the lower forms of 
Quebec College. This duty he fulfilled from 
1686 to 1600. But his superiors no doubt had 
an ulterior object in view in this appointment. 
It was, we may presume, to afford him an ap- 
portunity and leisure of turning to account for 
the benefit of future missionaries his thorough 
knowledge of the Algonquin language. His 
Algonquin dictionary bears no date, but the 
compendium fsee CoUectio, tirst Andr6 title 
above], written, to all external appearance, 
about the same time, furnishes us with acluft. 

Claude Allouez landeh the 11th of July, 
1658, and died the 27th of August, 1689, giving 
an interval of thirty-one years between his ar- 
rival and his death, so that the compendium 
was not certainly written before 1688, though 
it might have been written after, as Father Al- 
louez died after about thirty year^ of mission- 
ary life. 

Besides the dictionary and the collection of 
precepts, etc., there were other of his works 
which survived him but which I have not yet 
been able to discover. We are informed of this 
by the following inscription in a strange hand 
written on the inside of the pai>er cover of the 
compendium: 

"CoUectio sequens est conscripta a P. Ludo- 
vico Andre, qui fuitSilvicolarum Montanorom, 
. missionarius ad ann. M. D. C. XCIII. 

* 'Alia manuscripta ejusd. soil. Catechismus, 
rudimentum, et exhortationes servantur in 
Archiv. Tadussakensi, sub No. ..." 

The archives of Tadoussac have long since 
disappeared. 

In 1691 Andr6wa9 again on the missions; this 
time at St Francis Xavier (Chicoutimi) and 
Lake St. Peter. This was in the lower Algon- 
quin mission. 

In 1692 he was still in the Montagnais mis- 
sion, with the Papinacheois and at Chicoutimi. 
In 1693 and 1694 we find him back amidst civili- 
zation and stationed at Montreal. 

From 1696 to 1699, inclusive, he is not men- 
tioned in the catalogues, save in the erroneous 
statement at the end of 1696: "Obiit P. Andr6 
Cadomis (at Caen). 20 Apr., 1696." This cer- 
tainly referred to some other F. Andr6, for we 
shall see by the sequel that the sturdy veteran 
was not ready yet to shake off his mortal coil. 
He appears again in 1700; where he was in the 



16 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Andr6 ( L* ) — Con tinned. 

meantime I hare not been able to discover. 
Eren the "Mlsc^llaneomm Liber" and the old 
refrister preserved at Quebec are silent on the 
matter, bot both, onfortnnalely, are incom- 
plete. 

This year hia name is marked on tiie cata- 
logne among those of the community of Quebec 
College. Though now in his 77th year he still 
bore the title of " missionary," which, under 
the circumbtances, could only mean resident 
missionary ai Quebec for such of tiie Algon- 
quin Indians who might come up or down to 
barter at the old capital of the colony. 

It wan in 1703 that the title of "senex," was 
added to that of missionary, and it became evi- 
dent that his waning strength would never 
admit of his again leaving the sheltering walls 
of Quebec College. In 1705 his title of mis- 
sionary was dropped from the catalogues and 
the significant suffix of" senex " alone remained. 
He was indeed a veteran now and entitled to a 
well*eamed but to him a distasteful repose. It 
was not, however, until ten years later, on the 
19th September, 1715, that he was called to his 
eternal reward, at the ripe old age of 92. 

The following is an extract ftom a circular 
dfcted November 1, 1715, sent by his superior, 
as was customary on those occasions, to the 
other houses of the Order: 

"We have recently lost, in the person of 
Father Louis Andr6, a miMsionary labourer 
loaded down even more with the weight of merit 
than that of years. It is now over forty -five 
years since he devoted himself to the conver- 
sion of the Indiana, and it may be Justly said 
that in so painful and laborious a vocation be 
accomplished all the duties of an excellent mis- 
sionary. There is no doubt but that it was 
with natural repugnance he adopted the Indian 
mode of life, and that he underwent many hard- 
ships in the long and weary Joumeyings in 
which he accompanied his Indians. These 
never diMheartened him, for he reckoned 
fittigue as naught when there was a question 
of God*s glory or the salvation of souls. He ' < 
laboured on the mission until he had nearly 
attained his eightieth year, and if at any mo- 
ment of his life he was called upon to do vio- 
lence to himself in the practice of obedience, it 
was when his superiors, touched at the sight of 
bis many infirmities and the soflVring insep- 
arable from missionary labor he must needs 
have endured at so advanced an age, put a stop 
to his departure and retained him at Quebec" 

Aniohinabek amisinahikaniwa [Otta- 
wa]. See Dejean (A.) 

Anonda owawindamagewinan [Otta- 
wa]. See Sifferath (N. L.) 

Anthony (Rev, Albert Seqaqkind). See 
Bxinton (D. O.) 

See Bxinton (D. G.) and Anthony 

(A. 8.) 



Arapaho: 

Animal names See 

Geographic names 

Grammatic comments 

Numerals 

Numerals 

Proper names 

Proper names 

Tribal names 

Yocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 



Hayden (F. V.) 
Hayden (F. V.) 
Hayden (F.V.) 
Haines (£. H.) 
Pott (A. F.) 
Blackmore (W.) 
Jackson ( W. H.) 
Hayden (F. V.) 
Buschmann (J.C.E.) 
Campbell (J.) 
Gallatin (A.) 
Haines (B. M.) 
Hayden (F. V.) 
Latham (R.G.) 
Morgan (L. H.) 
P^ieken(F.J.) 



Amaud {P^re Charlee). [List of names 
of places in the Montaguais language.] 

In Annals of the propagation of the faith, 
June, 1880. (*) 

Keprinted in Vassal (H.), List of names, etc 
in Canada, Com. Indian Afialrs, Ann. Rep. for 
1884, pp. 29-31, Ottowa, 1885, 9P. (Geological 
Survey, Pilling.) 

lather Amaud^s list comprises about fifty 
names, maoy of them with literal translation. 

[ ] Tshistekiigan | tshe | apastats 

ilnats. ! 1887 kie 1888. | tMenatstagan. | 
T.Tshiligushimnn. ! P. Petstatagant. | 

Uuapistokoiats [Quebec]. A. Cot^ et 
C«« I lb87. 

Printed cover as above, title as above verso 
alphabet I L text pp. a-20, 10°. 

Prayers (sign of the cross, pater, ave, credo, 
confiteor, etc.) in the Montagnais language, 
divided into syllables for easy reading, pp. 
8-7.— Calendar for 1887-8. with namesof months, 
feast, and Cast days, etc pp. 8-20. 

Copies teen: Pilling. 

My copy has interlined, a French translation 
of all the Indian words, and a mss. vocabulary 
of the Montagnais of nearly 50 wordu. 

[ ] Tshistekiigan | tshe | apatstats 

iruuts I 1889 kie 1890. ' t Menatetagau. { 
T. Tshiligusbinium. | P. Petstatagant. | 

UapishtikneiatslQnebec]akuniguano 
I Nte £tat A. Cot^ et C^ \ 1889. 

Printed cover as above, title as above verso 
alphabet 1 L text pp. 3-22, le^. 

Prayers (sign of the cross, pater, ave, credo, 
confiteor, etc.) in the Montagnais language, 
divided into syllables for easy reading, pp. 3-0. — 
Calendar 1880-1890, with names of feast and 
fast days, etc. pp. 10-22. 

Copiee teen: Pilling. 

[Priiuer lessons in the Montagnais 

language. 

A. Cot^ et C^. Quebec, 1889.] 
Twelve chMts, large type, probably for 
school-ioom use. When at Quebec, in June, 
If^, these lessons were going through the 



▲LGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



17 



Amand (C.) — Continaed. 
press, and I seoored a set on roagh paper— 
practically proof-sheets. 
Oopieatmn: Pilling. 

See Dorocher (F. ) 

Ashqnabe (James). SeeBigoanoe (C.) 
and others. 



(Friedrich Wilhelm). Nachrioh- 
ten I fiber | die frftheren Elnwoliner | 
Toa I Nordamerica | and ihre | Denk- 
m&Iery | gesammelt von | Friedrioh Wil- 
helm Assail, | Berghanptmann des 
Staates PennsylYanien. | Heraasgege- 
ben I mit einem Vorbe'richte | von | 
Franz Joseph Hone, | ord. Prof, der 
Geschichte and Statistik za Heidel- 
berg. I Mit einem Atlas von 12 Steinta- 
feln. I 

Heidelberg. | Angnst Oszwalds Uni- 
TeiBit&tft=Bnohhandlung. | 1827. 

Pp. i-xYi, 1-ieO. 11 folding plates. 89. 

Wortsammlimg ans der Spracbe der Scha- 
wanesen, pp. loa-107. 

Sabin's Dictionary, na 2225, bajb the work is 
" almost a literal translation of voLl of the 
ArohflMk^g^ Americana." 

Oopiei M€n: Astor, British Mnseom, Con- 



At theSqoier sale, no. 41, a half-morocco copy 
sold for $2.29, and at the Bainirez sale a copy, 
na 953, was bought by Qoaritch for 12f. 

Aaaembly's shorter catechism [Massa- 
chosetts]. See ZUiot (J.) 

Aasembly's shorter catechism [Mohe< 
akonnak]. See Quinney (J.) 

JUsikinack (F.) The Odahwah Indian 
language. By F. Assikinack, a warrior 
of the Odahwahs. 

In Canadian Joamal, vol. 3, new series, pp. 
481-485, Toronto, 1858, 8°. (Congress.) 

Contains a general discussion, and a nomber 
of examples in the Odahwah. 

— ^ Remarks on the paper headed "The 
Odahwah Indian language," published 
in the Canadian Journal for November, 
1858. By F. Assikinack. Read before 
the Canadian Institute, 14th January, 
1860. 

In Canadian Inst. Proc. new series, vol. 5, 
pp. 182-186, Toronco, 1860, 89. (Congress.) 

Supplementary to paper by the same author 
in vol. 3. 

Astor: This word following a title or within pa- 
rentheses lifter a note indicates that a copy 
of the work referred to has been seen by the 
oompiler in the Astor Library, New York City. 

AJLG 2 



Atsina: 

Grammatio com- 
ments 
Numerals 
Vocabulary 
Yocabnlary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 



See Adelung (J. C.) and 
Vat«r(J.S.) 
Pott(A.F.) 
Fish (L. E.) 
Gallatin (A.) 
Maximilian (A. P.) 
UmfreviUe (E.) 
Willis (W.) 



Attend the House of God.— Tanisin Owi- 
giwaming awi Kije Manito. 

No tiUe-page, heading only ; text 2 pp. 12<'. 
Tract in the Chipi>ewa language. 
Oopietseen: Congress. 

At water (Caleb). Remarks i made on 
a I toar to Prairie da Chien ; | thence 
to I Washington City, | in | 1829. | By 
Caleb Atwater, | late commissioner em- 
ployed by the United States to | negoti- 
ate with the Indians of the upper | Mis- 
sissippi, for the pnrchase of min- | eral 
country; and author of | Western An- 
tiquities. I 

Columbus, (O.) I Published by Isaao 
N. Whiting. | 1831. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. contents pp. iii-iv, 
preface pp. v-vii, text pp. 1-296, 12^. 

Comments upon the Chippewa language, pp. 

Copies teen : Astor, Boston Athenaeum, Bos- 
ton Public, British Museum, Congress, Dunbar, 
Eames, Watkinson. 

Priced by TrUbner, 1856, no. 658, 5t. ; another 
copy. no. 1901, 4». M. The Fischer copy, cata* 
logne no. 2790, sold for 2«. ; the Field copy, 
catalogue no. 65, for $4.25; the Brinley copy, 
catalogue no. 5358, for $1.50 ; the Murphy copy, 
catalogue no. 124*, for 75 cents. 

Remarks | made on a | tour to Prairie 

du Chien; | thence to | Washington 
City, I in | 18:^9. | By Caleb Atwater. | 

Columbus, (O.) I Printed by Jenkins 
and Glover, High-street. | 1831. 

Title verso copjnight 1 1, contents pp. iii-iv, 
preface pp. v-vii, text pp. 1-296, 12°. 

Linguistics as indicated under previous title. 

Ckqnee 9een: Bureau of Ethnology. 

The I Indiansof the northwest, | their 

I manners, customs, &c. &c, \ or | re- 
marks I made on a tour to Prairie dn 
Chien and | thence to Washington City 
in 1829, I by Caleb Atwater, | Commis- 
sioner employed by the United States, 
to ne- I gotiate with the Indians of the 
Upper I Mississippi, for the purchase of 
I the mineral country, &,c. \. 

Columbus, I Ohio. [1831.] 
Title verso copyright 1 1. contents pp. iii-lv. 
preface pp. v-vi, text pp. 1-296, ISP, 



18 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Atv7ater (C.) — Contiuued. 

Lini;aiHticfi an iodicatf^d uniler previous title. 
Copies teen: Boaton Public, Ckingress. 

The Indians of the uorth west, tlieir 

I maners [ate], customs, &c. &c, \ or | 
remarks | made on a tour to Prairie dn 
Chieii and | thence to Washington City 
iu 1829, I by Caleb At water, | commis- 
sioner employed by the United States, 
to ne- I gotiate with the Indians of the 
Upper I Mississippi, for the parchase 
of the I mineral conntry, &c. | 

Columbus: | 1850. 

Title verso copyri ht (1831) 1 L contents pp. 
iii-lv. preface (dated November, 1831) pp. v-vii, 
text pp. 1-296, 120. 

LiDgulstics, as in editions of 1831, pp. 7S-84. 

Copies seen: Congress, Massachusetts His- 
torical Society. 

The I writings | of | Caleb Atwater. I 

Columbns. | Published by the author. 
I Printed by Scott and Wright. | 1833. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. dedication verso 
blank 1 L preface pp. 5-7, contents p. 8, XL text 
pp. 9-40S, 8«. 

This work is made np of two articles : "A de- 
scription of the antiquities discovered in the 
western country, originally communicated to 
the American Antiquarian Society, by Caleb 
Atwater " (pp. 0-165) ; and " Remarks made on a 
tour to Prairie du Chien, thence to Washing- 
ton City, in 1829 " (pp. 167-408). The latter con- 
tains remarks upon and a few examples of the 
Qjibeway, Winnebagog, Sionx, and Osage. 

Copies seen : British Museum, Congress, Har- 
vard. 

Aub^ry {Ph-e Joseph). Dictionnaire 
Franyois-Abnaquis, par le Fhre Joseph 
Anb<$ry, Jdsuite. (*) 

Manuscript, 540 unnumbered pp. 4<3 ; the old 
and worn out binding recently replaced by a new 
one. Preserved in the archives of the Roman 
Catholic mission at Piorreville, Canada, and de- 
scribed by Judge Charles Gill in his Notes sur 
do vieux raanuscrits abenakis (g.v.), from which 
the following account is taken : 

" On the first page below the title is written 
*ce qui y est 6crite en une autre 6critnre quo 
celle de I'auteur n'est point abnaqnis, c'est de 
Talgonquin que le R. P. de la Chasse y a 6crit 
de sa main, Tautenr de ce dictionnaire n'y 
aticune part.' There are in fact a great nnraber 
of Algonriuin words added, either interlined or 
following the Abnaquis word as space per- 
mitted. The second page is filled with ' Quel- 
ques notes ' by the author, in which he refers to 
a ' petit dictionnaire des racines,' and a 'Rudi- 
ment Abnaquis ' Then follows the dictionary, 
commencing with the word abandonner and 
terminating with the wonl zone on page 5M. On 
the last half of this page is found a statement in 
Ab6nakis signed : Josp^"!* A. d Soc. Jesn. Arsi- 



Aub6ry(J.) — Continued. 

kanteg8k dari 18 angusti, anui 1715. editio 2da 
haec est. 

"This dictionary is a work which has 
required immense labor and a benediotine 
patience, and as much can be said of the Ab- 
naquis- French dictionary mention -d below, 
though it does nol appear to be so complete. 

"The sign of a cross, still iu use among tiie 
Jesuits, it seems, is found at the top of each 
page of the dictionary. As the Latin words 
below the signature indicate, this copy is a sec- 
ond edition ; nothing is known of the first. "Sur 
is there found among the manuscripts of the 
St. Francis mission the ' Rudiment Abnaquis ' of 
which Father Aub6ry speaks in his ' Quelques 
notes.' But th^re are two copies of a * diction- 
nairedesraolnes' [see Nndtfnans (J. 6.)], which 
has probably had for a basis the little dictionary 
of roots made by Father Aub6ry which has not 
reached us, unless he means thereby the Abe- 
nakis- French dictionary next mentioned. The 
Abb6 Joseph Maurault, the author of the his- 
tory of the Abdnakis, who was the last mission- 
ary at St. Francis acquainted with the lan- 
guage of these Indians, undertook, I have often 
been told, to make a grammar of that language, 
as well as an Ab^uaquis-French dictionary, but I 
do not think he ever finished them ; at least he 
had nothing printed." 

[Dictionnaire Abnaquis-Fran^ois.] ( * ) 

Manuscript, 927 pp. double columns (many 
pages blank), 4^, preserved at the Roman Cath- 
olic mission of Pierreville, Canada, and de- 
scribed by Judge Gill in his Notes sur devieax 
manuscrits abenakis (9. v.), as follows: 

' * No title or preliminary matter and ends with- 
out signature or date, but in the hand wilting 
of Father Anbury. The manner in which the 
blank spaces are disposed indicates that the 
anther left them for the purpose of inserting 
other words as opportunity should present or 
his studies suggest. It begins with ' a flga- 
rative de la 3e pers.' and ends with *z8slAiSi^ 
6tendu sur ledos, zSskS-esin, il est ainsi concha.' 
There are added words in an ancient hand- 
writing, and also some notes in the hand of the 
Abbe Maurault, the latter indicating the ety* 
mology of the names of places. The work is in 
character like the preceding, and has required 
much labor by the author. It is paged, but the 
little cross mentioned m the French- Abnaquis 
dictionary is not found in it. Sometimes the 
signification of the Indian word is indicated in 
Latin without giving the French word." 

Maurault's Histoiru des Abenakis, p. viii, 
speaks, of "iin vooabulaire ab6nakU, fait vers 
1712, p.i.rle P.Joseph Aub^r^'," which is, per- 
hapi*, one of the above. 

[ ] Chant Liturgique [en langue ab€- 

nakise]. (•) 

Manuscript, 577 pp. (lacking pp. 2-9, 30-42), 
4°, preserved at the Roman Catholic mission at 
Pierreville, Canada, and described by Judge 
Oill in his Notes sur de vieux manuscrits ab6' 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAOES. 



19 



Anbury (J.) — Continned. 

nakis (7. v.), as follows: At the beginning is a 
complete index in Latin. The work is in the 
handwriting of Father Anbury and contains 
all the litnrgio ohaut, gradual and vesperal, 
annotated with Latin text and translation in 
Ab^nakis, besides various chants, songs, hymns, 
prayers, special prayers before and after com- 
monion, etc., the whole in Ab6nakis. Besides 
the annotation of the plain chant, there are airs 
4>f songs, the music of which is annotated. 
They aie not extraordinary melodies, but their 
antique rhythm is not without a certain charm. 
Sereral of the songs have not the music, but 
the airs, borrowed from ditties, like the old 
song of Marseilles, are indicated at the head. 
Thus, on page 291 there is a duet for the com- 
munion to the air: *AhI vonsdirai-JeMaman,' 
and elsewhere three other songs, the first of 
which, entitled: 'Desiderium animse possidendi 
Jesum in ccdlo,'is to the air: * Jardins que la 
nature et Tart/ etc., the second to the air: ' Je 
me briile I'oBil au fond d'nn puits, and the third 
to the air: ' Bacchus, c^est toi que Jo chante.' 

** The binding is in very bad condition ; sev- 
«ral leaves are detached and others missing en- 
tirely, while some pages are in a different hand- 
writing, evidently recopied to replace others too 
much worn for farther use.'* 

La addition to the three manoscripts de* 
•cribed above, there are others, according to 
Judge Oili. belonging to families in the village 
—books of piety, containing prayers, poems, 
ohnnts, nnd songs, copied or extracted from 
the larger work of Father Aab6ry. 

[ ] T88i Paiibattatn | Meanidi Keasit 

8i8a8akkainighiDn8 Arenaiibe. 

Manuscripts, in the Abnaki language, in the 
Ubrary of the archbishopric of Quebec. The 
above title forms the first heading to the col- 
lection, which is in sm. 9P, bound in gray 
leather. The following are the headings to the 
respective papers: 

[ ] De necessitate | Religionis am- 

plecteudsB | samma capita. 

Manuscript, in the Abnaki language, in the 
library of the archbishopric of Quebec ; 1 1 un- 
numbered 11. on the recto of the first of which 
is the above title, the verso blank. Two blank 
U. precede the title-page and one follows the 
text; sm. dP. 

£ ] Panbattami-nisSi- | xedoangan | 

8t«i kido'atigau. 

Mannsoript, in the Abnaki language, in the 
library of the archbishopric of Quebec; 46 
nnnnmbered 11. sm. 6P. 

I J Tanni erekmegSak | mete8ren8 

aagonimet, | aari ntatt8ermet | pan- 
battaminn8imegne | 8ebet6i teber8ta- 

1188. 

Manuscript in the Abnaki language in the 11- 
brary of the archbishopric of Quebec. The first 
leaf has heading as above, verso blank ; the text 



Anbury (J.)— Continued. 

consists of four parts of « unnumbered 11. each, 
each part numbered — 1 at the end of the first, 
2 at the beginning of the second, etc.; 4 blank 
ILatend; sm.8o. 

[— ] De Confessione. 

Manuscript in the Abnaki language in the li- 
brary of the archbishopric of Quebec; U. 1-32. sm. 
9P. There is no title, the heading abovn appear- 
ing at the head of each page of text. With the ex- 
ception of 1. 30 it is written on both sides. The 
manuscript ends on the recto of 1. 31 in the mid- 
dle of the page with the heading De Sacisfac- 
tione. which iodicates, probably, that the man- 
uscript was unfinished. The last three pages are 
bhmk. 

[ ] Funeaedit dari aranmkit | anstar- 

akkazezitsik | gdag8et6im8rank aasite- 
8ak. 

Manuscript in the Abnaki language in the It- 
brary of the archbishopric of Quebec; 8 un> 
numbered 11. followed by 4 blank 11. The text 
consists of religious songs written in pale ink 
and nearly undecipherable. 

Father Joseph Aub^ry was bom In France 
March 10, 1674. and entered the Society of Jesus 
September 8, 1600. He came to Q^nada in 1604, 
before completing his theological course, was 
ordained at Quebec September 21, 1609, and was 
employed on the Abnaki missions. He accom> 
panie<l Father Bigot to the misMion at Penta- 
goet, Acadia, where he lived a few years. In 
1709 he was ordered to St Francis, and remained 
at that mission until his death, which occurred 
in 1756. He was buried in the first church of 
the Abnakisat St Francis, and is the only mis- 
sionary who has been interred at that place. 

Father Anbury was well versed in the Ab- 
naki language. Ho wrote much, and nearly* 
always in that language. By arduous and per- 
severing lalK>r during 46 years he formed a con- 
siderable collection of valuable manuscripts. 
As these were deposited in the church, with the 
registers of the mission, they were unfortunate- 
ly destroyed in 1750 in the incendiary burning 
of that church. Of all these there hsve been 
preserved only an Abnaki vocabulary and a large 
paper book containing many hymns, motets, 
psalms, and songs; at the time of the fire they 
were in the hands of Father Virot. This vo- 
cabulary contains a great number of very valu- 
able notes, which have served us much for the 
history of the Abna kis.—lfaurau{t 

Auer (Alois). Outside title: Sprachen- 
halle. I 

N. B. Die erste Abtheilnng, das Vat^r 
Unser in 606 Spracben nnd Mandarten, 
entbalt den Adelang'schen Mithridates 
samnit 86 von mir beigef Ugten Vater- 
Unser-Formeln, in getrenen Abdrncke 
nach den | Quellen, nnd zwar in tabel- 
larischer Aufstellnng, nm alle Mangel 



20 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE ALGONQUIAX LANGUAGES. 



Auer (A.) — Continued, 
nnd Fehler der Originalien deatlicher 
EQ veranschaalichen, and dadorch die 
Verbesseranfi; za erzielen. | 

Die zweite Abtheilung, das Vater 
Uuser in 206 Sprachen and Mundarten, 
enthalt die von mir neaerdings gesam- 
melten yerbesserten Vater-Unser in den 
Volkern eigenthttmlichen SchriftzUgen 
mit der | betreffenden Anasprache and 
wSrtlichen Uebersetznng. | A. Aner. 

Firtt engraved title: Das | Vater TTnser. 

Second engraved tide : Das | Vater TJnaer | in 
mehr als 200 Spracben and Mondarten | mit | 
Orif]:inaltyi>en. 

[Wien: 1844-1847.] 

Oatside title reverse a short description 1 
■heet, 17 other sheets printed on one side only 
in portfol io. oblonK folio. Part I, dated 1844, has 
the caption: Das Vater-Unser in mehr als sechs- 
handert Sprachen and Mandarteo, typome^ 
trische aafgestellt. Part II, dated 1847, has the 
caption ; Das Vater*noser in 208 Sprachen and 
Handarten, neaerdini^s gesammell and anf* 
gestellt von A. Aaer. Zweite Abtheilnng. Hit 
55versohiedenen den Volkern eigenthflmliohen 
Sohriftsiigen abgedruokt. 

Contains the Lord's prayer in the following 
langaagps : Part I : Shawanno, nos. 595, 590, 697; 
Delaware, no. 598; Natick, no. 699; Mohegan, 
no. 600 ; Hiomao, no. 601 ; Part II : Odsohibwa, 
nos. 200, 20L 

Cfopes teen: Astor, British Moseam, Con- 
gress, Harvard. 

Sabin's Dictionary, no. 67438, gives brief title 
of an edition : Vienna e Typographia Imp. 1851, 
royal 8®. 

Authorities : 

See American Board. 

American Philosophical Society. 

Bartlett (J. R.) 

Briuton (D. Q.) 

Catalogne. 

Clark (R.) & oo. 

De Schweioitz (B.) 

Dexter (H. H.) 

Dafoss6 (E.) 

Field (T. W.) 

FinotU (J. M.) 

Gill (C.) 

Harrisse (H.) 

Laare (P.) 

Banrie (T.) 

Leclerc (C.) 

Lenox (J.) 



Authorities — Continued. 
See Lndewig (H. S.) 
McLean (J.) 
Micmac. 
MaUer (F.) 
Harphy (H. C.) 
Kash (E. W.) 
0'CaIlaghan(B.B.) 
Paine (N.) 
Pick (B.) 
Pickering (J.) 
Pott (A. p.) 
Qaaritch (B.) 
Reiohelt (G. T.) 
Sabin (J.) 

Sasseville (J.) and Shea <J.O.) 
Schoolcraft (H. R.) 
Storgardt (J. A.) 
Steiger (E.) 
Sievens (H.) 
Thomas (I.) 
Triibner &. co. 
Trumball (J. H.) 
Vater (J. S.) 
Wlnsor (J.) 

[Ayer (Rev, Frederic).] OJipue | spell* 
ing book. 

Colophon : Utica: | William Williftms, 
book printer, 60 Genesee street. | 1832. 

No title-page, heading only; text pp. 1-12, 19>. 

Primer lessons, pp. 1-8.— Catechism, pp.lO-> 
12.— Hymn, p. 12. 

Copies eeen: Powell. 

Rev. Frederick Ayer was bom in Old 
Stock bridge, Mass., in 1803. His father, Rev. 
Oliver Ayer, removed to central New York 
when the subject of this sketch was three yeaim 
old. At an early age Mr. Ayer commenced ta 
study for the ministry, bat ill health compelled 
him to abandon the idea, and he engaged in 
bnsineas in Utica and other places. While 
there, in 1820, be was sent by the A. B. C. F. IC 
as a teacher in amission school atHackinao. 
Next summer (1830) he went to Lake Saperior 
and spent some time in the family of Lymaa 
Warren, teaching and stadying the Ojibwa 
language. Tbe following year he spent sS 
Sandy Lake with the late William A. Aitkin, 
where he opened a school, said to be the first in 
Minnesota. In 1832 he returned to La Pointe, 
where he wrote a spelling book for OJibwa 
children, which he went to Utica that winter to 
publish.— if tnn. Hiet. Soc. OoU. vol, 1, p, 86^ 
foot-note. 

Ayumehawe mussmahikun [Cree]. See 
Hunter (J.). 



B. 



Baoon (Oliyer N.) A | history of Na- ' 
tick, I from its | first settlement in 1651 
I to the I present time ; | with | notices 
of the first white families, | and also 
an aocoant of the centennial celehra- 
tion, Oct. 16, I 1851, Rev. Mr. Hnnt's 
address at the consecration | of Dell 
Park Cemetery, d^c, du}., Ac. \ By Oli- 
ver N. Baoon, | attorney at law. | 

Boston : | Damrell & Moore, printers, 
I 16 Devonshire Street. | 1856. 

Title 1 L dedication Teno blaok 1 1. preCftce 
pp. 3-4. contenie pp. 5-6, text pp. 7-255, index 
pp. 257-261, plates, S°. 

Lord's prayer in Natiok, fh>in Eliot's bible, 
p. 56. 

Copies tetn: Congress, Barnes. 

Badln (Bev, Stephen Theodore). Lettre 
de M. Badin atn^, missionaire chez les 
Poutonatomis. 

In Annalee de la propagation dela foi, vol. 6, 
pp. 165-177. Paris, 1833, 8^. The letter is dated 
from "Near*Niles, oomt6 de Berrien, Micbi|{an- 
Territory, 12 decembre 1831." 

Contains the Lord's prayer in Pontouatomi, 
with interlinear Latin tranitlation, pp. 176-177. 

Stephen Theodore Badin, clergyman, born 
in Orleans, France, in 1768, died in Cincinnati in 
1863. He was sent for three years to the CoI« 
lege Montagu In Paris, where he acquired a 
tboroagh classical training, and entered the Sol- 
pieian Seminary at Tours in 1789, with the ob- 
Jeot of becoming a priest, lie immigrated to 
the United States in 1792, and was ordained by 
Bishop Carroll in the old cathedral of Baltimore 
Id 1793, being the first priest ordained in the 
United States. He was appointed to do mia- 
aionary work in Kentucky, which, at that pe^ 
riod, formed a part of the diocese of Baltimore. 
Father Badin was for about three years the only 
priest in Kentucky. In 1797 Bishop Carroll ap- 
pointed him Ticar*genera] and sent him au as- 
sistant, who died the following year. lu 1803 
be published his "Principles of Catholics," 
the first Catholic work printed in the West 
From 1830 to 1836 he was connected with the 
Pottawattamie Indians on St. Joseph's River, 
Indiana. He was successful not only in con- 
verting them to Christianity, but in forming 
them to the habits of civilized life. He estab- 
lished schools among them, and in a few years 
all the young people of the tribe had learned to 
read English. The last three years of Father 
Badin's life were spent in Cincinnati as the 
guest of Archbishop FarceU.—AppUton't Oy- 
elop. <^ Am. Biog. 

[BagBtar (Jonathan), editor, ] The Bible 
of Every Land. | A history of | the sa- 
ored Boriptnres | in every language and 



Bagster (J. ) — Continued, 
dialect | into which translations have 
been made : | illustrated with I specimen 
portions in nati ve characters ; | Series 
of Alphabets; | coloured ethnographical 
maps, I tables, indexes, etc. | Dedicated 
by permission to his grace the arch- 
bishop of Canterbury. | [Vignette and 
one line quotation.] | 

London : | Samuel Bagster and sons, 
I 15, Paternoster row; | warehouse for 
bibles, new testaments, prayer books, 
lexicons, grammars, concordances, | 
and psalters, in ancient and modem 
languages. [ 1848-1851. ] 

Second title : The Bible of every Land ; | or, | 
a history, critical and philological, | of all the 
versions of the sacred scriptures, | in every 
language and dialect into which | translations 
have been made; | with | Bpecimen portions in 
their own characters: | including, likewise, | 
the history of the original texts of scripture, | 
and intelligence illustrative of the distribution 
and I results of each version: | with particular 
reference to the operations of the British and 
Foreign Bible Society, and kindred instito- 
tions, I as well as those of the missionary and 
other societies thronghout the world. | Dedicated 
by permission to his Grace the Archbishop of 
Canterbury. | [Vignette.] | 

London: | Samuel Bagster and sons, | 15, Pa- 
ternoster row ; warehouse for bibles, new tes« 
taments, prayer books, lexicons, grammars, con- 
oordances, and psalters. | in ancient and modern 
languages. | [Quotation, one line.] [1848-1851.] 

Halftitle verso blank 1 1. first title verso 
blank 1 1. second title verso blank 1 1. dedioa* 
tlou verso blank 1 1. contents 1 I. prefatory re- 
marks (dated September, 1848) 1 1. "a list" etc. 
1 1. alphabetic list etc. 1 1. half-title "fac simile 
specimens" 1 1. fao simile plates (i-xi) 11 li. ex- 
pository index pp. xvii-lxiv, alphabetic list 
etc. 4 11. text pp. 1-406, supplements pp. 1-4, 
2 11. pp. 1-12, list of the languages etc. 1 1. list 
of missionary stations in India 2 11. maps, 4^. 

St John i, 1-U. in Virginian, p. 365; in Mas- 
sachusetts, p. 366. — St John i, 1-10, in Dela- 
ware,p. 368.— Mattliewiii, ia-17,iaCree,p.368.— 
St. John i, 1-14, iu OJibwa, p. 370 ; in Chippewa, 
P.37L 

Copies seen: American Bible Society, Astor, 
Boston Atheuipum, Lenox. 

The only copy I have seen having the second 
title is that in the Astor Library, which is col- 
lated above. The other copies dilTer somewhat 
in collation, and the prefatory remarks are 
dated from London, 15 PatemoHtcr Row, 1851. 

[ ] The Bible of Every Land. | A his- 
tory of I the sacred scriptures | in every 

21 



22 



BIBLIOQBAPHY OP THE 



BagBter (J.) — Continned. 
langaage and dialect , into whicli trans* 
lations have been made: | illastrated 
by I specimen portions in native char- 
acters; I Series of Alphabets; | colonred 
ethnographical maps, | tables, indexes, 
etc. I New edition, enlarged and en- 
riched. I [Design and one line quota- 
tion.] I 

London : | Samnel Bagster and sons : 
I at the warehouse for bibles, new tes- 
taments, church services, prayer books, 
lexicons, grammars, | concordances, and 
psalters, in ancient and modern lan- 
guages ; I 15, Paternoster row. [ 18(50. ] 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1 
1. contents 1 1. prefktory remarks to the second 
edition (dat«d from London, 1860) 1 1. "a list' 
etc. 1 1. alphabetic list etc. 1 L remarks on the 
maps 8 11. the alphabets 1 1. a key 1 1. alphabets 
pp. 1-32, alphabetic list etc. 1 1. half title verso 
blank 1 1. text pp. 1-475, colophon p. [478J, class- 
ification of languages 211. maps, 4°. 

St. John i, 1-14, in Virginian, p. 444 ; in Mas- 
sacbnsetta, p. 445. — St. Johni, 1-10, in Delaware, 
p. 447.— St. Matthew iii, 13-17, in Cree, p. 448.— 
St John i, 1-10, in Cree (Roman characters), p. 
449; in Cree (syllabic characters), p. 449.— St. 
John i, 1-14, in Chippeway, p. 450 ; in OJibwa, p. 
453 ; in Micinac (phonetic characters), p. 4.'>4. 

Ck>pie*seen: Boston Pnblic, Congress, Eames. 

[Baierlein {Rtv. Edward R.)] Okikinoadi 
•mezinaigau. | I. b. | spelling and read- 
ing book I in the | Chippeway lan- 
guage; I Containing Scripture Histories 
of the Old and New Testament | with 
an addition of a few Hymns. | 

Detroit: | Daily Tribune book and Job 
print. I No. 34 Woodward Avenue. | 
1852. 

Title verso blank 1 L text in Chippeway 
pp. 3-144, 16°. 

[Part I.J Primer and vocabulary, pp. 3-44.— 
Part II. Beading book. pp. 45-123.— Hymns 
and prayers (with German headings) inclad- 
ing the Lord's prayer, ton commandments, 
apostles' creed. Lather's morning and evening 
prayers, and a prayer for redemption throngh 
Jesus Christ (all from Lather's catecliism). 
pp. 124-144. 

Dr. Trumbnll has kindly furnished me the 
name of the author of this work and the fol- 
lowing information concerning its preparation: 

The dialect is that of the Chippeways of 
central and southern Michigan, in the vicinity 
of the mission stations establi bed by the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church in 1845 and 1847, 
in Saginaw and Oratiot counties, under the 
superintendence of the Rev. A. Craemer (now 
director of the Lutheran Seminar3% at Spring- 
field, m.), who opened the first mission school 



Baierlein (E. R.) — Continued. 

at Prankenmuth (Saginaw County), on the 
banks of Cass River, in 18i5. In 1S47 he was 
joined by the Rev. Edward R. Baierlein, and a 
second mission station was established on Pine 
River, at Bethany, now in Gratiot County, in 
1848 or 18i9. Mr. Baierlein was sent out by 
the Evangelical Lutheran Missionary Society at 
Dresden. A year earlier he bad been oidained 
as a missionary to the East Indies, but was de< 
tained at home by sickness, and on his recovery 
was assigned to another field, in America, at 
an assistant to Mr. Craemer. In 1848 or 1849 
he removed from Frankenmuth to a new station 
at Shlngwakonsking, now Bethany, on Pine 
River. Here, in 1851, he was Joined by the 
Rev. E. G. H. Miessler, as an assistant, and 
here, with the help of an interpreter, he wrote 
his " Spelling and Reading Book." In 1853 Mr. 
Baierlein was recalled by the Dresden board of 
missions to go to the East Indies, where he 
served until about 1887. Ho now (1689) lives 
In Dresden, a missionary emeritus, and he has 
recently published some reminiscences of hia 
earlier mission life, with the title: ** Im Urwald* 
bei den rothen Indiauern." 

Copies seen: Pilling, Trumbull. 
Leclerc, 1807 catalogue, no. 1095, priced a 
copy 11 fr. 

Baillie-Grohman (William A.) Camps 
in the Rockies. | Being a narrative of 
life on the frontier, and | sport in the 
Rocky Mountains, with an account | of 
the cattle ranches of the West. | By | 
Wm. A. Baillie-Grohman, | K. C. E. H. 
I author of [&;c. three lines.] | With 
illustrations, and an original map based 
on the most recent | U. S. Government 
survey. | 

London : | Sampson Low, Marston^ 
Searle, &. Rivington, | Crown buildings, 
188 Fleet street. | 1882. | (All rights re- 
served.) 

Half-title verso blank 1 I. title verso copy- 
right 1 1. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-viii, 
text pp. 1-395, appendix pp. 397-431, list of au- 
ibors p. 432, index pp. 433-438, map, 8^. 

Remarks on Indian languages, with a few 
examples of the Eastern or Atlantic regions 
(mostly from Trumbull), pp. 2^2-285. 

Copies teen: Boston Public. 

Clarke 6i. co. 1886 catalogue, no. 5341, priced 
a «opy $1.75. 

An American edition from the same plates as 
follows : 

Camps in the Rockies. | Being a nar- 
rative of life on the frontier, and | sport 
in the Rocky Mountains, with an ac- 
count I of the cattle ranches of the West 
I by I Wm. A. Baillie-Grobman, | K. C. 
£. H., I author of [&c. three lines.] | 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



23 



Baillie-Grohman (W. A.) — Continued. 
With ac original map based on the most 
recent U. S. Government survey. | 

New York | Charles Scribner's sons | 
743 and 7^ Broadway | 1882 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso copy- 
right 1 L preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-viii, 
text pi>. 1-395, api>endix pp. 397-431, list of au- 
thors p. 432, index pp. 433-438, map. 129, 

Linguistict as under previous title, pp. 282- 
286. 

OopiM 9€en : British Museum, Conin^ss. 

Priced by Clarke. &. oo. 1886 catalogue, no. 
5341, $1.2&. 

Batrd (Henry 8.) Indian tribes, chiefs 
and treaties. 

In Historical Magazine, flrstseries. vol. 8, pp. 
178-179, Netr York, 1884, sm. 4°. An extract 
from a paper read before the Chicago Histori- 
cal Society. 

Karnes of Menomonee chiefs Tvith English 
synonyms. 

Henry 8. Baird was bom in Dublin, Ireland, 
May 18, 1800, and was brought to America when 
four years of age ; studied law in Pennsylvania 
and Ohio ; was president of the first legislative 
council of the Territory of WiscouAin, 1836; 
subsequently attorney-general, a member of 
the first constitutional convention, president of 
his village board and mayor of Green Bay, and 
for many years a vice-president of the State 
Historical Society. He died April 30, 1875. 

Baker (Theodor). tfber die Musik | der 
I nordamerikanischen Wilden | von | 
Theodor Baker. | [Design.] | 

Leipzig. I Drnck nnd Verlag von 
Breitkopf & Hartel. | 18-^2. 

Printed cover as above, title as above verso 
blank 1 I. preface pp. iii-iv, contents 1 l.text 
pp. 1-81, table p. 82. plates, 8^. 

A song in the Cheyenne language, words and 
music, p. 70. — Chippewa songs, words and mu- 
sic, p. 71. — Same in the language of the Brother- 
ton Indians, p. 75. 

Copies seen: Boston Athenseum, Brinton, 
Doraey, Geological Survey, PUling. 

tlber die Musik | der | nordameri- 
kanischen Wilden. | Eine Abhandlung 
I znr I Erlangung der Doctorwiirde | 
an der | Universitat Leipzig | von | 
Theodor Baker. | 

Leipzig, I Druck von Breitkopf &, 
Hiirte]. | 1882. 

Title verso blank 1 1, preface pp. iii-iv. con- 
tents and eirata 1 1. text pp. 1-82, vita 1 1. plates, 
8o. 

Linguistic contents as under previous title. 

Copies seen: Lenox. 

Balbi (Adrien). Atlas | ethnographiqne 
du globe, I on | classification des peu- 
ples I anciens et modemes | d'apr^ 



Balbi (A.) — Continued, 
leurs laugues, | pr^c^d^ | d'un disconrs 
snr rntilit€ et ^importance de F^tude 
des langues appliqu^ h plusieurs 
branches des connaissances bnmaines ; 
d'nn apergu | surlesmoyensgraphiqnes 
employ^ par les diff<6reus penples de la 
terre; d'un coup-d'odil sur Phistoire | de 
la langne slave, et sur la marche pro- 
gressive de la civilisation | et de la lit- 
tdrature en Riissiu, | avec environ sept 
cents vocabulaircs des prinoipanx idi- 
omes connuH, | et suivi | du tableau 
physique, moral et politique | des cinq 
parties du monde, | DMi^ k 8. M. TEm- 
perenr Alexandre; | par Adrien Balbi, | 
ancieu protesseur de geographic, de 
physique et de math^matiques, | mem- 
bre correspondant de PAth^n^e de Tr^ 
vise, etc. etc. | [Design.] | 

A Paris, | Chez Rey et Gravier, 11- 
braires, Qnai des Augustins, N** 55. | 
M.DCCC.XXVI [1826]. | Imprim^ chez 
Paul Renouard, Rue Garenci^re, N<* 5. 
F.-S.-G. 

Half-title 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. dedication 
2 11. table synoptiqtie 1 1. text plates i-xli (sin- 
gle and double), table plates xili-xlvi, additions 
plates xlvii-xllx, errata 1 p. folio. 

Plato xxxiv, "Langues do la region alI6- 
gbanique et dos lact*,'' embraces the following 
languages : Famille Lennappe(Chippaways-Dol- 
aware ou Algouquino-Mohegane), Sawanou, 
Saki-Ottogami, Menomone, Miami -Illinoi, 
Parapticough, Leunapeou Delaware, Sankikani, 
Narragauset, Massachuset ou Natick, Pawhat- 
tau, Mohegan-Abcnaqui, Etcbemine, Gaspes- 
leu ou Micmak, Algonquino-Chippaway, Knis- 
tenaux, and SkofficSketapushoish.— Plate xli, 
** Tableau poly^lotte des langues Am6ricaines,'* 
contains a vocabulary of 26 words of the above- 
named Algonquiun languages. 

Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Con- 
gress, Powell, Watkinson. 



— Introduction | ii { Patlas ethno- 
graphiqne I du globe, I con tenant | nn 
discours sur Tutilit^ et Pimportance de 
IVtude des langues | appliqu6e k plu- 
sieurs branches des connaissances bn- 
maines ; I un aper^u | sur les moyens 
graphiques employ<Ss par les ditf^rens 
peuples de la terre; | des observations 
sur la classification des idiomes | ddcrits 
dans Patlas ; | un coup-d'osil sur Phis- 
toire de la langne slave | et sur la 
marche progressive de la civilisation et 
de la litt^ratnre | en Russie, | i\6(\\6 \ k 
S. M. P£mperour Alexandre, | par Adrien 



24 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Balbi (A.) — Continned. 
Balbi, jancieuprofesseardeg^graphie, 
de physique et de math^matiques, | 
membre correspondant de I'Ath^n^e de 
Tr^vise, etc., etc. | Tome premier. | 
CDesign.] | 

A Paris, | chez Key et Oravier, Li- 
brairesy | Qaai des Augustins, N° 55. | 
M.DCCC.XXVI [1826]. 

Half-title 1 L title yerao blank 1 L dedication 
pp. v-yii, discouro pr^liminaire pp. iz-cxliii, 
text pp. 1-383, additions pp. 3A5-390, tableau pp. 
881-415. errata p. 416, B°. Vol. 1 all that was pub- 
liabed. 

Obaerrationa snr la famille cbipaway-dela- 
ware, ou algonquinn-mobegane, pp. 812-313; 
mobegan • abenaqai, le gaApesien, le pianka- 
•hawe, le pottawatameb, lea crees, le saki, et le 
m^nomdne, p. 314. 

Copies 9$€n: A stor, Boston Atbenseam, Brit- 
ish Museam, Congress, Watkinson. 

The Atlas and Introdnotion together priced 
by Leclero, 1878, no. 2044, 30 fr. At the Murphy 
sale, no. 136*, they brought $3.50. 

Ballard {Rev. Edward). Indian mode of 
applying names. By Rev. Edward Ball- 
ard, A. M., Rector of St. PaaPs Chorch, 
Brunswick, Maine. 

In New Hampshire Hist Soc. Coll. vol. 8, pp. 
446-452, Concord, 1866, 9P. 

Indian names (39) connected with the valley 
of the Merrimack, with me«iings in English, 
pp. 451-452. 

«^— Geographical names on the coast of 
Maine. By Rev. Edward Ballard, Sect. 
of the State Hist. Soc^* 

In Coast Survey Ann. Kept. 1868, pp. 243- 
269, Washington, 1871. i<*. 

A list of more than 100 names, many of them 
of native origin, with meanings and etymologies. 

"An attempt at an examination of the geo- 
graphical nomenclature of the coast of Maine, 
for the purpose of furnishing a list of the names 
of Indian origin, with their proper authority." 

Issued separately as follows ; 

— United States Coast Survey. | Geo- 
graphical names I on the coast of Maine. 
I By I Rev. Edward Ballard, | Secretary 
of the Maine Historical Society. | From 
the Coast Survey report for 1868. 

[Washington, D. C. Government 
printing office. 1871.] 

Printed cover with half-title as above, half- 
title as above verso blank 1 1. text (with date of 
Brunswick, Me., July, 1869) pp. 3-19, 4^. 

Copies seen : Harvard, Tnimbull. 
Bancroft : This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy 
of the work referred to has been seen by the 
compiler in the library of Mr. H. H. Bancroft, 
San Francisco, CaL 



Bancroft (George). A | history | of the | 
United States, | from the discovery of 
the American continent | to the present 
time. I By George Bancroft. | Vol. I 
[-X]. I 

Boston: | published by Charles 
Bo wen. | London : | R. J. Eennett. | 
18.34 [-1874]. 

10 vols. 8° 

Synopsis on linguistic basis of the Ameri- 
can nations east of the Mississippi, voL 2, 

pp. 237-253 General remarks on the Indian 

languages, their synthetic character, origin, 
etc. pp. 254-265. 

Copies seen : Boston Public, Congresa, Lenoi; 
Watkiuson. 

There have been many editions of this work, 
and of different volumes of the work, portions 
of it appearing under other titles. The last 
revised edition of the whole work ia in six 
volumes, New York, 1884-1885. (Congress.) 

[Baraga (jRer. Frederic).] Otawa | Ana- 
mie-Misiuaigan. | [Two lines quotation 
in Otawa.] | 

Wawiyatanong [Detroit]: | Geo. L. 
Whitney, ogimisinakisan manda misi- 
naigan. | 1832. 

Title verso blank 1 1. one leaf missing, text 
entirely in Otawa pp. 5-205, index in Otawa 
(numbered even on recto, odd on verso) pp. 
206-207, sq. 24o. 

Prayers, litanies, etc. pp. 5-62.— Hymns, 
pp. 63-146.~Cateohlsm, pp. 147-205. 

Copies seen : Boston Athenieum. 

A later edition as follows: 

[ ] Otawa I Anamie-Misinaigan, | 

gwaiakossing anamiewin ejitwadjig, | 
mi sa I Catholique-enamiadjig | gewa- 
bandangig. | 

Paris, I (France, Europe) ] E.-J.Bailly 
ogimisinakisan manda misinaigan. | 
1837. 

Translation: Otawa i praying-book, | that- 
wbicb-itt-rigbt religion tbey-who-profess, | that 
is I Catbolic-praying-ouos | tbey-sball-read. 

Half- title (Otawa anamie-misinaigan) verso 
frontispiece 1 1, title verso blank 1 1. approba« 
tion of Fr6d6ric R6s6. Bishop of Detroit (in 
French and English) verso blank 1 1 preface 
(signed Nin Fr6d6ric Baraga) verso blank 1 L 
text in the Otawa language pp. 1-295, index in 
Otawa pp. 297-300, 16°. 

Prayers, litanies, etc. pp. 1-76. — Hymns 
(many of them with French headings), pp. 77- 
185. ^Catechism, pp. 187-295. 

Copies seen: Boston Atbenieam. Pilling, 
Shea, Trumbull, Wisconsin Historical Society. 

For an edition of the prayer book in the 
Otchipwe language, of the same date, with 



ALGONQUIAN LANOUAQES. 



25 



(P.) — Contiuaed. 
nearly similar title, and fh>m the same plates, 
see the last title on this page. 

Leclero, 1M7, no. 1111, sold a copy for 21 fr.; 
priced in his 1878 oataloi^e, no. 2381, 35 tr. ; 
the PInart copy, catalogue no. 70, was bought 
by Qoaritoh for 16 fr. 

A later edition as follows: 

[ ] Otawa I anamie-mUinai^an, | 

gwaiakossinganamiewin <6jitwadjig, | 
mi sa I Catbolique-enaaiiadjig | gewa- 
bandaugig. | [Design.] | 

Detroit, | Eugene T. Smith, | ogimi- 
sinakisan manda misinaigan. | 1842. 

Title*page verso blank 1 1. preface (signed 
Kin Fr6d6rio Baraga) reno blank 1 1. text in 
ttie Otawa language (with occasional headings 
in Latin and French) pp. 1-293. 1(P. 

Prayers, litanies, etc. pp. 1-78.— Hymns 
(many of them with French headings), pp. 77- 
185.— Catechism, pp. 187-203. 

The edition of 1842 agrees page for page and 
line for line, nearly, with the edition of 1837 as 
fisrasp. 288; so closely indeed in blurred and 
dropped type and other minor defects that it 
ironld appear, were it not for the occasional 
differences in line endings, to be from the same 
plates. The title-pages and prefaces are totally 
nnliko in type and arrangement, and from p. 280 
to the end the work is in different type and 
totally different in page and line arrangement. 

Copies teen: Boston Athenceom. 

A later edition as follows: 

[ ] Katolik I anamie-misinaigan. | 

Avec Approbation r£vdqae | Pierre 
Paul Lefevre. | Troisi^me-^dition, cor- 
rig^ et angment^e. | 

Detroit, | Wawiiatanong : | Bagg & 
Harmon, ogi-missinakisanawa | man- 
dan misinaigan. | 1846. 

Title yerso blank 1 1. preface (signed Kin 
Frederic Baraga) p. 3, text in the Otawa lan- 
guage pp. 4-256, 180. 

Prayers, litanies, etc. pp. 4-M (pp. 8-11 in 
doable columns Otawa and French). — Hymns 
(many with French headings), pp. 67-170. — 
Catechism (headed Jesus od^itwawin, kate- 
chim ejinikadeg), pp ] 71-215.— Lo chemindela 
oroix, pp. 246-254.— Le rosarie, pp. 254-256. 

Copies sefn: Boston Athenaeum. 

I have seen au isnue of the concluding por- 
tion of this little work with half-title (which is 
lacking in the only copy of the larger work 
I have seen, but which, perhaps, never accom- 
panied it, as there is no break in thu pagination 
thereof) as follows : 

[ ] Jesus od ijitwawin, | katechim. 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 171-245, 
IBP. 

It will be noticed that the half-title above 
differs slightly fh)m the heading to the cate- 
chism in the larger work ; the heading to the 



Baraga (F.) — Continued. 

text in this separate agrees with the heading in 
the larger work. 

Copies seen : Boston Atheneum. 

For a Chippewa version of this catechism see 
the same author's Katolik Anamie*Masinaigan— 
the first title on p. 26 of this bibliography. 

A later edition of the prayer hookas follows: 

[ ] Katolik I Otawa | Anamie-Misinai- 

gan. I [Picture of two angels bowed 
before the cross.] | Fifth edition. | 
[Scroll.] I 
Cinciunati, 1855. | Joseph A. Hemann 

gi-misiuakisan mauda | misinaigan. 
Title verso blank 1 1. religious picture (un- 
der which is Frederic Baraga, Kitchi-mekate* 
wikwanaie) verso blank 1 1. preface (un- 
signed) verso blank 1 1. text (with occasional 
headings in French, but otherwise entirely in 
the Otawa languas^e) pp. 8-357, index in Otawa 

1 1. wide 16<^. Pp. 251-258 are wrongly num- 
bered 1-8. 

Prayers, litanies, etc. pp. 8-01.— Chemin de 
lacroix. pp. 02-110.— Hymns, pp. 120-240.— Cat- 
echism, pp. 251-357. 

Copies seen : Yale. 

[ ] Katolik I auaimie- misinaigan | 

wetawawissiug. | [Design.] | 

Cincinnati, O. | Joseph A. Hemann o 
gi-misinakisan manda misinaigan. | 
1858. 

Pp. 1-240, 160. In the Otawa langnagei 

Copies seen: F6rard. 

[ ] Otcbipwe I Anamie-Masinaigan, | 

gwaiakossing anamiewin ejitwacyig, | 
mi sa I Catholiqne-euamiadjig | gewa- 
bandaiigig. | 

Paris, I (France, Europe) | E.J. BaU- 
ly ogimasiuakisan inandan masinai- 
gan. I 18.37. 

Translation : Otcbipwe | praying-book, | that- 
which-is-right religion they-who-profess | that 
is I Cathollc-praying-ones | they-sball-read. 

Halftitle (Otcbipwe | anamie-masinalgan) 
verso frontispiece I L title verso blank 1 1. ap- 
probation of Fr6d6ric R6s6, Bishop of Detroit 
(in French and English) verso blank 1 L prefa- 
tory remarks signed by Father Baraga 1 1. text 
in Otcbipwe pp. 1-205, index in Otcbipwe pp. 
207-300, 16°. 

Prayers, litanies, etc. pp. 1-76.— Hymns 
(many of them with French headings), pp.77- 
185.— Catechirtm, pp. 187-205. 

This work is printed from the same plates as 
the Otawa prayer book of the same date (nee last 
title on p. 24), and agrees with it paj;e for page 
and line for line except in the differences made 
necessary by the dialectic changes from the 
Otawa to the Otcbipwe. 

In Dr. Trumbull's copy of this work, pur- 
chased at the Finotti sale, there is on the fly leaf 



26 



BIBLIOOBAPHY OP THE 



Bara£^ (F. ) — Continaed. 

A tranaUtioD (given above) of the title-page by 
the Rev. E. Jacker, prefaced with the remark 
that "the title is not in very good atyle; the 
writer [Bishop Baraga] at that time was yet a 
beginner." 

The same note, sabatantially, appears in the 
oopy in the Library of Congress, which oopy 
bears the bosineaa card of Maisounenve, of 
Paris. 

Copies ieen: Congress, Trambnll. 

Priced by Triibner Sl co. 1856 catalogue, no. 
688, 6«. 

A later edition as follows : 

[ ] KatoHk I ADamie-MaslQaigan | 

wetchipwewissing. | [Desigo.] | 

New Yorl:, Cincinuati, aud St. Louis. 
I Benziger brothers, | Printers to the 
Holy Apostolic See. [ 1874. ] 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1, text in 
the Chippewa language with headings in 
French pp. 3-320, index in Chippewa pp. 321- 
822,16°. 

Prayers, litaniea, etc. pp. 1-74.— Le chemin 
de la croix, pp. 75-104.— Prayers, pp. 105-112.— 
Hymns, pp. 113-228. — Jesus od yitwawin f cate- 
ohismi, pp. 229-320. 

Copies teen: Pilling, Powell. 

See Baraga (F.) and Weikamp (J.B.) for 
another issue of this Chippewa version with an 
appendix. 

For another version of the catechism in 
Chippewa see Gafron (J.) 

[ ] Abinodjiiag | omasiuaiganiwaD. | 

Buffalo: | press of Oliver G. Steele. 
I 1837. 

Title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 3-8, 18P. Primer 
lessons in the Chippewa language. • 

Primer lessons, pp. 3-8.— Poor lea maltres et 
mattresses d'6oole, p. 8. 

The closing instructions, in French, end with 
the remark that it woald be well to have the 
children shown all the proper names which are 
found in [Baraga*sJ "Jesus Obimadisiwin." 
Copies seen : Boston Atheneam. 
Reprinted as follows: 

[ ] Abinodjiiag | omasinaiganiwan. | 

Detroit : | Bagg &, Harmon, printers. 
11845. 

Title p. 1, text in the Chippewa language pp. 
2-8,320. 

Primer lessons, pp. 2-6. — A prayer, pp. 6-8. — 
Kne-Manito od angwamitagosiwinan [the ten 
ooramandment«], p. R. 

The first few pages contain the same matter, 
differently arranged, as those of the edition of 
1837. 

Copies seen: Boston AthensBum. 

£ ] Jesus I obimadisiwin | oma aking, 

I gwaiakossing anamiewin ejitwa^jig, 
I mi sa I Catholiqae-enamiadjig | ge- 
wabandangig. | 



Baraga (F.) — Continaed. 

Paris, I (France, Europe.) | E. J. 
Bailly ogimasinakisan mandan masinai- 
gan. I 1837. 

HalfitiUe (Jesus ; obimadisiwin | oma aking) 
verso picture of the crucifixion with five lines 
of Chipi>ewa beneath 1 1. title as above verso 
blank 1 L approbation in French and English 
(signed t Frederick R6s6, Bishop of Detroit, 
and dated from Detroit, Michigan, oct. the 20, 
1836) verso blank 1 L preface in Chippewa 
(signed Nin Fr6d6ric Baraga) 1 L map of the 
Holy Land folding leaC text entirely in Chip- 
pewa pp. 1-204, index in Chippewa pp. 205-208, 
index evangeliomm in Latin pp. 209-211 (sigs. 
1-18*), 160. 

Life of Jesus Christ, in the Chippewa lan- 
guage. 
Copies seen: A stor, Pilling. 
The same work in Ottawa as follows : 



I 



] Jesus I obimadisiwin | ajonda 

akiug, I gwaiakossing anamiewin ejit- 
wadjig, I mi sa I Catbolique-enamiad- 
jig I gewabandangig. | 

Paris, (France, Europe.) | E.-J. Bail- 
ly ogimisinakisan manda misinaigan. | 
1837. 

Half-title (Jesus | obimadisiwin | ajonda 
aking) verso picture of the crucifixion with five 
lines of Ottawa beneath 1 1. title as above verso 
blank 1 1. approbation in French and English 
(signed tFre<lerick R6s6, Bishop of Detroit, and 
dated from Detroit, Michigan, oct. the 20, 1836> 
verso blank 1 1. preface in Ottawa ( signed Nin 
Fr6d6ric I^raga) 1 1. map of the Holy Land fold- 
ing leaf, text entirely in Ottawa pp. 1-204, in- 
dex in Ottawa pp. 205-208, index evangelioram 
in Latin pp. 209-211 (sigs. a-r*). 1&>. 

Life of Jesus in the Ottawa language. 

This work runs page for page nearly like the 
Chippewa version above described, the only dif- 
ferences being those rendered neceiwary by 
dialectic changes. I am inclined to think they 
were printed from the same plates. 

Copies seen : Boston Athenicum, Pilling. 

— Gete Dibadjimowiij, Gaie Jesus, Obi- 
madisiwin oma Aking. 
LaibacU 1837. Detroit 1837. (•) 

Bible extracts, life of Christ, epistles and 
gospels, in the Chippewa langua<:e. 

Title from Shea's Catholic Missions, which 
says there was a sccona edition in 1846. 



[■ 



J Katolik I gagikwe-masinaigan. 

Aveo Approbation de Monseignear 
PEvdque | Pierre Paul Lefevre. | 

Detroit, | Wawiiatanong: | M. Gei- 
ger, ogi-masinakisan | mandan masinai- 
gan. I 1846. 

Title verso blank 1 1. preface (signed Nin 
Frederic Baraga) verso blank 1 L text entirely 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



27 



(P.) — Continued, 
in the Chippewa Ungnage pp. 5-258, index 1 L 

CoDsiato of sermona preached by Father 



[ 



t 



Oopietteen: Pilling, Shea, Yal«, £amea, 

]Ka'olik I Gagilcwe-Masinaigan. | 

IDosign.] I 

Cincinnati, O. | Joseph A. Hemann 
o gi-masinakisan mandan masinaigan. 
I 1858. 

Title verao blank 1 L text (sermons) entirely 
in the Chippewa language pp. 3-215, index in 
Chippewa pp. 217-220, index in Latin pp. 221- 
284,12°. 

A manusoript note on the fly-leaf of Dr. 
Trambull'a copy, written by Father Finotti (at 
the bale of whose library it was bought by Dr. 
TrutubuU), reads as follows: "Contains the 
epistles and gospels for Sundays and holy days. 
It is a short history of the old and new testa- 
ment. First edition printed in Paris, 1837. 
Eev. E. Jacker, July 14, '74." 

Copies teen: F6rard. Pilling, Tmmbnll. 

] Katolik I enamiad | o nanagata- 

wcndainowinan. | Avec Approbation de 
Monseigoeur TEv^qiio | Pierre Paul Le- 
fevre. | 

Wawhatanong, | (Detroit.) | Jabez 
Fox o gi-iuasinakisan | mandan masinai- 
gan. I 1850. 

Title verso blank 1 1. preface (signed by 
Frederic Baraga) 1 \. text (Catholic Christian 
meditations) entirely in the Chippewa language 
pp. 1-712, index in Chippewa 1 1. sq. IfP. 

Copies seen: Boston Athenseum, Pilling, 

At the Field sale, catalogue no. 1177, a copy 
brongbt $2. 

Shea's Catholic Missions mentions an edition 
of 1819, which is probably an error. 

— A I theoretical and practical | gram- 
mar I of the I Otchipwe lauguage, | the 
language spoken by the Chippewa In- 
dians; which is I also spoken by the 
Algonquin, Otawa, and | Potawatami 
Indians, | with little difference. | For 
the use of missionaries | and other per- 
sons living among the Indians | Of the 
above named tribes. | By the Rev. 
Frederick Baraga^ | Missionary at 
L'Anse, Lake Superior. | 
Detroit: | Jabez Fox, printer. | 1850. 

Title 1 1. preface pp. 3-4, text pp. 5-672, in- 
dex pp. 573-576, sq. 16^. 

Copies seen: American Antiquarian Society, 
Boston AthensBam, Eames, Massachusetts His. 
topical Society, Trumball. 

Sabin's Dictionary no. 3248 gives 1851 as the 
date, and Shea's Catholic Missions, 1814. 



Baraga (F.) — Continued. 

— A I dictionary | of the | Otchipwe 
language, | explained in English. | This 
language is spoken by | the Chippewa 
Indians, | as also by | theOtawas, Pota- 
watamis and Algonquins, | with little 
ditference. | For the use of | missiona- 
ries, I and other persons living among 
the above mentioned | Indians. | By the 
Rev. Frederic Baraga, | Roman Catho- 
lic Missionary among the Otchipwo In- 
dians. I 

Cincinnati, 1853. | Printed for Jos. A. 
Hemann, | Publisher of the **Wahr- 

heitsfreund." 

Title verso blank 1 1. preface (tnclnding ab- 
breviations used) pp. iii-vii, half-title 1 1. text- 
pp. 3-659, errata pp. 661-662, sq. 16^. 

Part 1 Otchipwe-Englisb, pp. 3-420.— Part 2 
English Otchipwe. pp. 423-659. 

Copies seen: Congress, Eames. Powell, Trum- 
bull 

A grammar | and | dictionary | of 

the I Otchipwe language, | By R. R. 
Bishop Baraga. | A new edition, by a- 
missionary of the oblates [Abb6 La-^ 
combe]. | [Four lines quotation.] | 

Montreal: | Beauchemin & Valois, 
Publishers, | 256 and 258, St. Paul 

Street. | 1879 

Printed cover as above, half-title verso blank 
1 1, motto verso blank 1 L title to grammar 1 1. 
preface pp. vii-viii, "remarks on this second 
edition ** pp. ix-xi, text of the grammar pp. 
1-422, a large folded table containing "a gen- 
era) synopsis of the Otchipwe verb"; half- 
title to the dictionary part I vorso blank 
1 1. title verso blank 1 I. notice verso blank 
1 1. '' remarks on the new edition of the English 
Otchipwe dictionary " pp. 1-3, some rules etc. 
pp. 4-5, text pp. 7-301 ; printed cover to the dio- 
tiuuary part II, half-title verso blank 1 1. title 
vorso blank 1 L preface pp. v-viii, text pp. 1-422, 
sm. 8^. Each of the three parts has its own 
title-page, for which see below. 

Copies seen: Brint'On, Congress, Dunbar,. 
Eames, Pilling, Powell, Trumbull. 

Hiersemann, Leipsic, 1889, and Biaisonneuve, 
Paris, 1889, mention an edition Montreal 1882, 
the former pricing it 21 M. and the latter 25 fir. 

A theoretical and practical | gram- 
mar I of the I Otchipwe language | for 
the use of | Missionaries and other per- 
sons living among the Indians ( By R. 
R. Bishop Baraga. | A second edition, 
by a missionary of the oblates. | 

Montreal : | Beauchemin & Valois,. 
Booksellers and Printers | 256 and 258^ 
St. Paul Street. | 1878 



28 



BIBUOORAPHY OF T fE 



Baraga (F.) — Continned. 

Half-title verso bUmk 1 L title m above verao 
blank 1 1. preface pp. vii-viii, "remarks on this 
second edition " pp. ix-zi, text pp. 1-422, sm. 99. 

Copiet ieen: Brinton, Congr^w, Dunbar, 
Eames, Pilling, Powell, Trnmball. 

— ^ A dictionary | ofth* | Otcbip we lan- 
guage, I explained in English. | Part I. 
I Euglish-Otchipwe. | By R. R. Bishop 
Baraga. | A. new edition, by a mission- 
ary of the oblates. | [Four lines qnota- 
tion.] I 

Montreal: | Beanchemin •& Valois, 
Publishers, | 256 and 258, St. Paul Street. 
I 1878 

Half-title yerso blank 1 1. title ab above verso 
blank 1 1. notice verso blank 1 L "remarks on 
the new edition of the Englisb-Otchipwe dic- 
tionary " pp. 1-3, ** some rules " etc. pp. 4-5, text 
in double columns pp.^ 7-301, sm. 8*^. 

OopUt teen: Brinton, Congress, Donbai, 
Eames, Pilling, Powell, TrnmbulL 

A dictionary | of the | Otchip we lan- 
guage, I explained in English. | Part II. 
I Otchipwe-English. | By R. R. Bishop 
Baraga. | A new edition, by & mission- 
ary of the oblates. | [Four lines quota- 
tion.] I 

Montreal: | Beauchemin &, Valois, 
Publishers, | 256 and 258, St. Paul Street. 
11880 

Printed cover as above (dated 1881), half-title 
Terse blank 1 1. title as above verso blank 1 1. 
preface pp. v-viii, text in doable columns pp. 
1-422, sm. 8°. 

Copies teen: Brinton, Congress, Dunbar, 
Eames, Pilling, Powell, Trumbull. 

Kitchi-mekatewikwanaie | Frederic 

Baraga, | o masinaigan, i ge-wabanda- 
mowad | Kakina anishinabeg enamiad- 

jig- I 
Cincinnati: | Printed at Catholic 

Telegraph Book & Job Office. | Gash- 

kadino-gisiss, 1853. 

Printed cover as above verso blank, no inside 
title, text entirely in the Chippewa language 
pp. 1-10, 120. 

An episcopal letter addressed to the Indians 
•of the Lake Superior region. At the top of thu 
first page of text is th« bishop's seal, followed 
by the words "Frederic Baraga, Kitcbi-me- 
katewik-wauaie." 

I have nowhere seen mention of this work, 
and the only copy I know of is that belong- 
ing to myself, presented to me by the Rev. John 
Gafron, Bayfield, Wisconsin. I have had a few 
photographic fac-similes of it made, copies of 
which are in possession of Mr. Gafron, Mi^or 
Powell, Mr. Eames, Or. Shea, and myaelt 



Baraga (F.) — Continued. 

[ ] Kagige | debwewinan, | kaginig 

ge-takwendang | Katolik enamiad. | 

[Device.] | 
Cincinnati, 1855. | Joseph A. Hemann 

o gi-masinakisan mandan | masinaigan. 

Title verso blank 1 1. prefatory 1 1. text en> 
tirely in the Chippewa language pp. 7-334, index 
3 pp. sq. Id^). 

Eternal truths always to be remembered by 
a Catholic christian. 

Oopiet teen : Congress, Pilling, Shea, Tram- 
bull. Eames. 

Reprinted in Verwyst (C. A.), Mikana g^i- 
gong enamog. 

(. ] Otchipwe I kikinoamadi-masinai- 

gans. 

No title-page, heading only ; text 8 pp. sq. 10^. 

Ojibwa school-little- book. A reprint, ordered 
by Kev. Ignatius Tomazin, St. Paul, Minn. 

Copiet eeen : Pilling, Shea, TrnmbulL 

The origiual iMlition by Baraga is said to have 
been pubUshed in 1853 (*). 

Reprinted in Verwyst (C. A.), Mikana gyi- 
gong enamog. 

[Vocabulary of the Chippewa lan- 
guage. J 

Manuscript, 4 pp. folio, written on " Circular 
Ko. 1" of the American Ethnological Society. 
Contains about 180 words. In possession of Dr. 
J. G. Shea, Elizabeth, N. J. 

and Belcourt (G. A.). [Prospectus 

of a] Dictionary | of the | O^jibway or 
Sauteux language | compiled by | R. H. 
Baraga and Rev. 6. Belcourt | A new 
Edition enlarged by Rev. Father La- 
combe, O. M. I. I [Seven lines qaota- 
tion.] I [Pictureof an Indian.] | 

Montreal | Beanchemin & Valois^ 
Booksellers and Printers | 256 and 258 
St. Paul Street. | 1877 

Half-title verso blank I L title as above verso 
blank 1 1. preface pp. 1-2, preface [from the] 
manuscript of Rev. G. Belcourt pp. 3-5, [pre- 
face] from Bishop Baraga p. 5, *' our plan" pp. 
6-7, alphabetical conveuttons etc. pp. 8-10, die* 
tionary (A-Action) En2li8h-Odjibway2 11. dic- 
tionary (A-Abino4jinvrin) Odjib way English 2 
11. sm. 4°. 

In the preface Father Lacombe states that 
the new dictionary will be compiled from the 
work of Binhop Baraga, ** which we will com* 
plete with the excellent and learned manuscript 
of the R«v. Mr. Belcourt. * * After several 
years of study and practice he f Belcourt] pat in 
order his numerous scieotiflc researches on that 
langnaze [Sauteux], which he had made and 
adopted as his own. and a very voluminous man- 
uscript was the result." 

See Belcourt (G. A.) 

Oopiet teen: Powell, Shea, TnunbolL 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



2» 



Baraga (F.) and Belcourt(G. A.) — Cont. 

[Prospectus of] The | O^ibway 

fi^ammar, | compiled by | R. R. Baraga 
and Rev. G. Belconrt | [Five lines quo- 
tation.] I [Design.] | 

Montreal | Beauchemin & Valois, 
Booksellers and Printers | 256 and 258 
St. Paul Street. | 1877 * 

Title reverae blank 1 1. text pp. 1-14, em. 4o. 

Kadiments of the Saateaz luiguage, hy Rev. 
O. Belconrt, pp. 1-li. 

"In reprinting the grammar of Bishop Ba- 
raga, we intend to abridge it a little, principally 
by redacing the examples, but at the same time 
we will manage it so that the student will find 
all the rules and explanations." 

Copisiseen: PowelL 

and "Weikamp (J. B.) Katolik | 

Anamie-Masinaigan. | A | Catholic 
prayerbook and catechism | in th^ | 
Otcbipwe-Indian language. | By | Rt. 
Rev. Bishop F. Baraga, D. D., | with | 
An Appendix of the Mass and Vespers 
in I Latin ; and Prayers in the Ottawa- 
I Indian Language, | by Rev. John B. 
Weikamp, | Tert. O. S. F. | 

New York &, Cincinnati : | Benziger 
brothers, | Printers to the Holy-Apos- 
tolic See. [1874.] 

Frontispiese 1 I. title verso blank 1 1. text 
in Otchipwe pp. 8-320, index pp. 321-322, ap- 
pendix by Father Weikamp pp. 323-346, 1V>. 

The Latin occupies pp. 323-336, the Ottawa 
pp. 827-346. 

Ch^piet teen : Shea, Trumbull. 

See Baraga (F.) for title of an edition of this 
work minus the appendix. 

Frederick Baraga, R. C. bishop, bom in 
Treffen, Carniola, 20 June, 1797; died in Mar- 
quette, Mich., 10 Jan., 1868. His family, a 
younger branch of the house of Hapsburfc, 
was the most distinguished in Illyria. He 
began his studies in the college of Leibac, the 
capital of his native province, whore ho learned 
to speak French, Italian, and German fluently, 
in addition to the ordinary branches. At the ' 
end of his course he went to Vienna to study 
law, and after graduation, in 1821, determined 
to devote himself to the priesthood. He en- 
tered the eclesiastical seminary of Leibac and 
was ordained in 1823. He exercised his min- 
istry for the next seyen years in Carniola, and, 
in the interval of his missionary duties, com- 
jMsed works of devotion in the Sclavonic 
dialect for the people. The present improved 
oundition of this l«ignage is chiefly attributed 
to the efforts of Father Baraga. Having de- 
termined on spending his life among the Indians 
of the United States, he transferred his estates 
to his brothers, reserving to himself an annuity 
of $300, and arrived in New York in December, 
18S0. He spent some months in Ohio studying 



Baraga (F.) — Continued. 

English and the Ottawa dialect, and set out in 
May for Arbre Crocbe, a village of Ottawa 
Indians on the peninsula of Michigan. The 
inhabitants, although they had relapsed inta 
barbarism, retained some traditions of the 
Jesuits of the seventeenth century and received 
Father Baraga with welcome, and, under bis 
guidance, the community entered upon the 
public practice of a christian life. In a little 
more than a year he built a church and two- 
schools and had an Indian congregation of more' 
than 700. Ho next «ixtende<l his labors as far 
as the Castor Islands and beyond Lake Mich- 
igan, erecting several churches as well as 
schools iu Green Bay and St. Joseph's. 

In 1832 he published at Detroit a prayer and 
hymn book in the Ottawa language, the first of 
a remarkable series of works in the Indian dia- 
lects, which have been found very useful by 
philologists. He visited Grand River in the 
spring of 1833 and baptised more than 100 of 
the natives, but his efforts were counteracted 
by the white liquor-dealers and the Indiana 
whom they had demoralized. His enemies peti- 
tioned the Government for his removal, and, 
although he was sustained by the governor of 
Michigan, he was forced to seek other fielda 

He began bis labors among the Chippewas at 
Lapointe in 1835, and continued them success- 
fully for eighteen yeais. His success was 
mainly owing to the assistance he received 
from the Leopoldine society in his native 
country. 

He next visited the Indians of Fond du Lao, 
70 miles from Lapointe, and the Indians of Bad 
River, seventeen miles to the south, both of 
whom led a roving life. During the winter of 
1836-'37 lie traveled six miles every day to in- 
struct them, on their return to their wigwams, 
until he had them all ready to receive baptism* 
During this period he also wrote the ''OJibway 
Prayer- and Hymn-Book and Catechism," the 
"Extracts of the History of the Old and New 
Testaments, with the Gosx)els of the Year,"^ 
in the same dialect; '*The History, Character, 
Manners, and Customs of the North American 
Indians," in German, and a devotional work 
for his countrs'men in Sclavonic. He went to 
Europe in 1837 to collect money for his mission, 
and was so successful that he was also enabled 
to have his Indian books printed in Paris. On 
his return to the United States he was able, 
with the means in hand, to conduct his opera- 
tions more systematically. 

In 1843,. as the missions he had established 
no longer needed his personal supervision, he 
resolved to make the "Ance,"an old trading- 
post of the American Fur Company, between 
Puinte Abbaye and Keweenau Point, the center 
of his labors. The Indians here were steeped 
in idolatry and intemperance. But, though 
threats were made against his life, ho succeeded 
in converting some of their medicine men, and 
this was followed by the c<)nver8ion of many 
others. He built a church and parsonage^ 



30 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Baraga (F.) — Con tinned. 

erected thirty hoases for biscoDverts, and par- 
chased a larj^e tract of land, on which he located 
them. In 1850 all the Indiana had hecome 
ohristlAns, and so prosperoos that nnmeroas 
families came to settle on the Ance. Here he 
wroto his grammar and dictionary of the 
Otchipwe (Chippeway) language (183l-'53),per« 
haps the most important contribution to Indian 
philology made hitherto. The demand for his 
Indian books in the United States and Canada 
contributed materially to his resources and en- 
abled him to increase still further the village 
on the Ance. 

The discovery of the copper mines on the 
npper peninsula of Michigan in 1845 added to 
Father Baraga's difficulties. A large mining 
population from all parts of the world was 
scattered among his Indian villages, and he 
found it necessary to obtaiu more priests. For 
this purpose, as well as to secure the publica- 
tion of his works, he went to Cincinnati in 1853, 
where he lectured on the mining resources of 
the upper peninsula and on the harvest that 
was open for missionary zeal there. In Novem- 
ber of the same year he was made vicar apos- 
tolic of upper Michigan. 

In 1854 he went to Europe to proonre mis- 
sionaries, and retured with twelve priests. He 
also introduced the brothers and sisters of Saint 
Francis and intmsted them with the education 
of the Indians. 

In 1858 Saut St. Mary was erected into an 
episcopal see, and Dr. Baraga was appointed 
its bishop in the following year. The s<*e 
having been transferred to Marquette fn 1865, 
he was created bishop of Marquette and Saut 
St. Mary. His health began to fail, but his 
brethren could not prevail on him to moderate 
his austerities or slacken his labors. He slept 
on the ground and of ton walked fortv miles a 
day on snow-shoes when visiting his Indians. 
He was stricken with apoplexy while in 
attendance on the Council of Baltimore in 18G6, 
and returned to his diocese broken in health, 
but continued to perform his ministerial duties 
till a few days before his death. — Appleton's 
Cyclop, of A m. Biog. 

Barber (John Warner). Historical col- 
lections, I being a | general collection 
of interesting facts, traditions, | bio- 
graphical sketches, anecdotes, &c., | 
relating to the | history and antiqnitles 
I of I every town in Massachnsetts, | 
with I geographical descriptions. | Il- 
lustrated by 200 Engravings. | By John 
Warner Barber, | author of Connecti- 
cut historical collections, Elements of 
general his- | tory, etc. | [Seal of the 
state.] I 

Worcester: | Published by Dorr, 
Rowland & Co. | 1839 



Barber (J. W.) — Continued. 

Frontispiece 1 L title verso copyright 1 1. pref- 
ace pp. iii-iv. contents and index pp. v-viii, 
text pp. {MS24, map, 8^. 

Lord's prayer in the Natick Indian language 
(from Eliot's bible), with interlinear English 
translation, p. 417. 

Copiea teen : Congress, Watkinson. 

Historical collections, | being a | 

general collection of interesting facts, 
traditions, | biographical sketches, an- 
ecdotes, &c., I relating to the | history 
and antiquities | of. | every town in 
Massachusetts, | with | geographical 
descriptions. | Illustrated by 200 en- 
gravings. I By John Warner Barber, | 
author of Connecticut historical collec- 
tions, Elements of general his- | tory, 
etc. I [Seal of the state.] | 

Worcester: | published by Dorr, 
Rowland <& co. | 1841. 

Frontispiece 1 L title verso copyright 1 L 
preface pp. iii-iv, contents pp. v-viii, text pp. 
iMt32, map and plates, &^. 

Lord's prayer in the Natick language, p. 417. 

Copiet teen: Boston Public, Watkinson, 
Yale. 

Historical collections, | being a | 

general collection of interesting facts, 
traditions, | biographical sketches, an- 
ecdotes, &c., I relating to the | history 
and antiquities | of | every town in 
Massachusetts, | with I geographical 
descriptions. | Illustrated by 200 En- 
gravings. I By John Warner Barber, | 
author of Connecticut historical collec- 
tions, Elements of general his- | tory, 
etc. I [Seal of the state.] | 

Worcester: | published by Warren 
Lazell. I 1844. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright I L 
preface pp. iii-iv, contents and index pp. v- 
viii, text pp. 9-624, map, plates, 8°. 

Lord's prayer in the Natick language, p. 417. 

Copiea teen: Boston Athenaeum, Congress, 
Massachusetts Historical Society. 

Sabin'tt Dictionary, no. 3319, mentions an 
edition of 1848. 



— The I History and Antiquities | of 
New England, | New York, New Jersey, 
I and I Pennsylvania. | Embracing the 
following subjects, viz : | Discoveries 
and Settlements — Indian History — In- 
dian, French, and | Revolutionary 
Wars — Religious History— Biographic- 
al Sketches | — Anecdotes, Traditions, 
Remarkable and Unaccountable | Oc- 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



31 



Barber (J. W.) — Continaed. 
cnrrencee — with a Great Variety of 

* Carioas and | Interesting Relics of An- 
tiquity I niastrated by namerons en- 
gravings. I Collected and compiled 
ftom anthentic sources, | By John War- 
ner Barber ; | Member of the Connecti- 
cut Historical Society, author of the 
Connecticut | and Massachusetts His- 
torical Collections, &^c. | 

Hartford. | Published by Allen S. 
Stillman & Co. | 1843. (") 

Pp. i-viii, ]MQ4, map, plates, 8^. 

Penn (W.), Letter, containing specimens of 
Indian words, pp. 636-540. 

Title from Mr. Wilberforoe Eamee. 

According to Sabin's Dictionary, no. 3322, 
there is an edition Worcester, 1840. This 
probably does not contain Penn's letter, becaase 
the following edition does not: Worcester: | 
published by Dorr, Howland Sc co. 1 1841. Pp. 
i-viU, 9-576, fP. (British Moseam, Congress.) 

The I History and Antiquities | of | 

New England, | New York, New Jersey, 
I and I Pennsylvania. | Embracing the 
following subjects, viz: | Discoveries 
and Settlements — Indian History — In- 
dian, French, and | Revolutionary 
Wars — Beligious History — Biographic- 
al Sketches | — ^Anecdotes, Traditions, 
Remarkable and Unaccountable | Oc- 
currences — with a Great Variety of 
Curious and | Interesting Relics of An- 
tiquity I Illustrated by numerous en- 
gravings. I Third edition. | Collected 
and compiled from authentic sources, | 
By John Warner Barber; | Member of 
the Connecticut Historical Society, 
author of the Connecticut | and Massa^ 
chusetts Historical Collections, 6lc. | 

Hartford: | Published by H. S. Par- 
sons. I 1847. (*) 

Pp. I-viii, »-«24, go. 

Penn's letter, etc. as above, pp. 53ft-5i0. 
Title from Mr. Wilberforce Eames. 
According to Sabin's Dictionary, no. 3322, 
there was an edition Hartford, 1846. 

The I History and Antiquities | of | 

New England, | New York, New Jersey, 
I and I Pennsylvania. | Embracing the 
following subjects, viz : | Discoveries 
and Settlements — Indian History — 
Indian, French, and | Revolutionary 
Ware — ReligiousHistory — Biographical 
Sketches | — Anecdotes, Traditions, Re- 
markable and Unaccountable | Occur- 
rences—with a great variety of curious 



Barber (J. W.) — Continaed. 
and 1 interesting relics of antiquity | 
Illustrated by numerous engravings. | 
Collected and compiled from authentic 
sources, | By John Warner Barber; | 
Member of the Connecticut Historical 
Society, Author of the Connecticut | 
and Massachusetts Historical Collec- 
tions, &c. I 

Portland : | Published by William C. 
Lord. I 1848. (*) 

Pp. I-viii, 9-624, plate, 8°. 

Penn's letter, etc. as above, pp. 536-540. 

Title from Mr. Wilberforce Eames. 

The I History and Antiquities | of | New 

England, | New York, New Jersey, | and | 
Pennsylvania. | Embracing the follow- 
ing subjects, viz : | Discoveries and Set- 
tlement's — Indian History — Indian, 
French, and | Revolutionary Wars — Re- 
ligious History — Biographical Sketches 
I — Anecdotes, Traditions, Remarkable 
and Unaccountable | Occurrences — with 
a Great Variety of Curious and | Inter- 
esting Relics of Antiquity | Illustrated 
by numerous engravings. | Collected 
and compiled from authentic sources, | 
By John Warner Barber ; | Member of 
the Connecticut Historical Society, au- 
thor of the Connecticut I and Massachu- 
setts Historical Collections, &c. | 
Third Edition. | 

Hartford : | Allyn S. Stillman &, Son 

I 1856. 
Pp. i-viii. 9-624, 8o. 

Penn's letter, etc. as above, pp. 536-540. 
Copies teen: Astor. 

Priced by Clarke Sc oo. 1886 oatalogne, no. 
2819, $3. 

and How^e (H.) Historical collec- 
tions I of the I state of New Jersey ; | 

I containing | a general collection of 
the most interesting facts, traditions, | 
biographical sketches, anecdotes, etc. | 
relating to its | history and antiquities, 

I with I geographical descriptions of 
every township in the state. | Illus- 
trated by 120 Engravings. | By Jobn W. 
Barber, | author of Connecticut and 
Massachusetts historical collections, 
etc. I and j Henry Howe, | author of 
*^The memoirs of eminent American 
nitichauics,'' etc. | [Arms of the state of 
New Jersey.] | [Design.] | 

Now York : | Published for the 
authors, | by S. Tnttle, 194 Chatham- 
square. I 1844. 



32 



BIBLIOGRAPHT OF THE 



Barber (J. W.) and Howe (H.)— Cont'd. 

TiUe verso copyright 1 L prefaoe pp. 3-4, in- 
dex etc. pp. &~8, text pp. 9-512, 8<'. 

Short vocabaUry of the New Jersey Indians, 
pp. 52-53. 

Gk>rdon (T.), Indian names with their sig- 
nification, ** commnnicated for this work by 
Thomas Gordon, Esq., of Trenton," p. 512. 

Copies teen: Boston Athenmnm, Congress, 
Watkinson. 

— HiBtorioal collections | of the 

I state of New Jersey ; | containiog | a 
general collection of the most interest- 
ing facts, traditions, | biographical 
sketches, anecdotes, etc. | relating to 
its I history and antiquities, | with | 
geographical descriptions of every 
township in the state. | Ilinstrated by 
120 Engravings. | By John W. Barber, | 
author of Connecticnt and Massachu- 
setts historical collections, etc. | and | 
Henry Howe, | author of " The memoirs 
of eminent American mechanics,'' etc. | 
[Arms of the state of New Jersey.] | 

New York: | published for the au- 
thors, I by 8. Tuttle, 194 Chatham- 
square. I 1845. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. preface, index, etc 
pp. 3-^ text pp. »-612, 8o. 

Lingnistics as onder edition of 1844, pp. 52- 
53,512. 

Oapietteen: Boston Athenienm, Boston Pub- 
Uo. 

At the Menzies sale, catalogne no. 119, a copy 
brought $5.25. 

Some copies with tiUe and Imprint other> 
wise as above are dated 1840. (Congress.) 

— 1 Historical collections | of the | 

state of New Jersey ; | containing | a 
general collection of the most interest- 
ing facts, traditions, | biographical 
sketches, anecdotes, etc. | relating to 
its I history and antiquities, | with | 
geographical descriptions of every 
township in the state. | Illustrated by 
120 Engravings. ( By John W. Barber, | 
author of Connecticut and Massachu- 
setts historical collections, etc. | and | 
Henry Howe, | author of " The mem- 
oirs of eminent American mechanics,'' 
etc. I [Arms of the state of New Jer- 
sey.] I 

Newark, N. J. : | Published by Benja- 
min Olds, I for Justus H. Bradley. | 
New Haven, Ct. : J. W. Barber. [1852.] 

Pp. 1-518, 80. Agrees perfectly in pp. 1-512 
with edition of 1845. 



Barber (J. W. ) and Howe (H. ) — Cont'd. 

Lingnistics as under previous titles. 
Copies teen: British Maseum. 
According to Sabin*s Dictionary, 00.8330, 
there is an edition Newark. 1867. 

— Historical collections | of | New 

Jersey : | Past and Present : | contain- 
ing I a general collection of the most 
interesting facts, I traditions, biograph- 
ical sketches, anecdotes, etc., | relating 
to the I history and antiquities, | with | 
geographical descriptions of all the im> 
portant | places in the state, | and the 
state census of all the towns in | 1865. | 
Illustrated by numerous Engravings. | 
By John W. Barber, | author of several 
historical works, etc. | assist-ed by | 
Henry Howe, | author of the "Memoirs 
of Eminent American Mechanics," etc. 
[Arms of the state of New Jersey.] | 

New Haven, Conn. | published by sub* 
scription, by John W. Barber. | 1868. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. preface 1 1. list of 
townships etc. pp. 5-6, index pp. 6-8, text pp. 
0-543. 8o. 

Lingnistics as nnder titles above, pp. 53, 518. 

Copies teen: Ciongress. 

Barker {Rev. Francis). See Meeker (J.) 
and Barker (F.)r 

[Barnard {Rev. Alonzo).] Inin | tib^ji- 
mouinvn | gaozbibiomagoutgin | igio 
abiuojirg | iniu | kekinoamagengin. | 

Oberlin : | 1849. 

Literal translation : Stories written for th» 
children by their teacher. 

Title as above within fancy border verso 
blank 1 1. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-viii, 
text entirely in the Ojibwa language pp. 9-104^ 
24°. 

" This little book is a translation fh>m the- 
Englinh |in large part from McGuffey's second 
reader] into the Ojibwa langaage, with the ez» 
oeption of the accompanying verses, and a few 
of the stories." — Preface. 

Copies teen: Pilling. 

[Elementary Ojibwa grammar. 

Omeua, Michigan, 1878.] 

No title page, heading only ; text pp. 1-S, 18^^ 

Pronouns, pp. 1-3- — A d v e r b s , pp. &-5.— ^ 
Nouns, pp. 5-8. 

Concerning this little work Mr. Barnard 
writes me as follows: In 1878 at Omena I com> 
menced the second time to get out an element- 
ary Ojibway grammar, acopy of which I inclose. 
I abandoned the project for want of means to 
continue; also want of suitable type to mak» 
it easy of acquisition to learners. 

I Copittseen: Pilling, Powell, Eames. 



ALOONQUIAN LANOUAOE8. 



33 



Barnard (A.) — Con tinned. 
[ ] Hymns | in the | Ojibway | lan- 
guage : I 

Published by | Alonzo Barnard, | 
Omena, Mich. | L1876.] 

Printed oover u abore, title as abo^e verso 
blank 1 L text pp. 1-20, index 1 QDnnmbered 
p. 320. 

Some of the hymns were translated by 
Joseph Oreensky. 

Oopiea seen: Powell, Pilling. 

-^— Hymns. | In the | OJibMra language. | 
Compiled | and | published by { rev. A. 
Barnard. | 

Omena,Mich. | 1883. 

Tifcleas above Terso blank 1 L text entirely 
in QJibwa pp. 1-53, index of first lines pp. 5i- 
56. 180. 

Copies usn: Pilling. 

An incomplete English index, in pencil, is 
fastened in the back of my copy. 

I have — from Mr. Barnnrd — a loose, red sheet 
of paper on which is printed the first hyrau 
(seven stansas) in this collection, preceded by 
the equivalent English (headed "The heavenly 
world") in a parallel colamn. 

Rev. Alonzo Barnard was bom June 2, 
1817, in Pern, Bennington Co., Vt. At seven- 
teen years of age he went to Ohio, and was 
ednoiUed at Oberlin. He entered the mission 
field in 1843, at Red Lake, Minn. In 1846 he 
waa at Cass Lake, and in 1853 at St. Joseph 
(now Walhalla), Pembina County, where lie 
the remains of her who shared his labors. In 
1854 the wife of his fellow laborer, the late Rev. 
D. B. Spencer, was maidered by the Sionx. 
From 1846 to 1855 Mr. Barnard labored nnder 
the auspices of the American Missionary Asso- 
ciation. In the spring of the latter year he 
was compelled to abandon the work at St 
Joseph and take refuge in a railroad settlement 
within the present limits of Manitoba. Two 
or more years were spent with the Indians 
about Lake Winnipeg nnder the Bishop of 
Rupert's Land, and in 1863 he removed to Ben- 
sonia, Mich., where he has since rt^sideil. After 
laboring five years among the Indians about 
Qrand Traverse Bay, under the auspices of the 
Preabyterian Home Missionary Society, he was 
obliged to resign in consequence of a partial 
deafness, and he is now a retired member of the 
Orand Rapids Presbytery. 

Barratt (Dr. Joseph). Key | to the | In- 
dian language |of { New-Enyland IHc'], 
in the | Etchemin, or Passamaquoddy 
language, | Spoken in Maine and St. 
Johns New-Brunswick. | Derived and 
written from the Indian (Nicola Ten- 
esles.) I By | Joseph Barratt, M. D. | 
Member of several Learned Societies. | 
No. 1. I 
Middletown, Conn. | 1650. 
ALG 3 



Barratt (J.) — Continued. 

Title verso advertisement 1 1. text pp. 3-8, SP. 

Conversations in Etchemin, p. 3.— Seasons, p. 
3.— Time, p. 3. — Cardinal numbers, p. 4. — Ordi* 
nal numbers, p. 4.— Relationships, pp. 4-5. — 
Parts of the body, p. 5.— Colours, p. 5 —Birds, 
and parts thereof P- 5. — Animals, p. 6. — Tume< 
hegn Itomahawlcl, an Indian hatchet, p. 6.— 
Coi\f ugation of the verb tumetamun, to cut, pp. 
8-7.— Compendium of Indian grammar, p. 8. 

No. 1 is all that was published. In his ad- 
vertisement the author says: "Should a small 
number of this tract meet with a ready sale, 
other numbers may, perhaps, follow so soon as 
they can be prepared. Oar manuscript gram* 
mar of this language, will serve to unfold the 
structure of all the dialects of New- En gland.'* 

Copies seen: Congress. Massachusetts His- 
torical Society, Pilling, Trumbull, Wisconsin 
Historical Society. 

In some copies the line of the title "Mem- 
ber of several Learned Societies" is set in 
smaller type and the last word is misspelled 
"Societies." (Congress.) 

Issued with change of title a? follows : 

[ ] Key I to the | Indian language ; of | 

New-Euyland L^]» i i^ ^'^^ I Etchemin, 
or Passamaquoddy language, | Spoken 
in Maine and St. Johns New-Brunswick. 
I Derived from | Nicola Tenesles. | 
Written from the Indian's mouth, | By 
a Citizen of Middletown, Conn., for 
the benefit of this Indian. | No. 1. | 

Middletown, Conn. [C. H. Pelton, 
printer. ] | 1850. 

Cover title as above, inside title as above with 
"advertisement" on verso 1 1, text pp. 3-8, 8^. 

Copies seen: Eames. 

Reprinted in "Copway's American Indians," 
no. 12 (♦). 

Indian propnetors | of | Mattebeseck, 

I and their descendants, | whose names 
appear in the town records, | from 1673 
to 1749. I By Joseph Barratt, M. D. | 

Colophon : Middletown, (Connecti- 
cut.) IH50. I C. H. Pelton, printer. 

No title-page, heading only ; text pp. 1-4, B9, 
English signification of some tribal and 

proper names, and " Note on the word Manito* 

ese [God].'* 

Copies seen : Congress. Trumbull. 

The Indian | of | New-England, | 

and the | north-eastern provinces; | A 
Sketch of the Life of an Indian Hunter, 
Ancient Traditions re- | lating to the | 
Etchemin tribe, | their modes of life, 
fishing, hunting, «&c. : | with | vocabu- 
laries I in the | Indian and English, | 
giving the names of the | animals, 
birds, and fish : | The most complete thai 



34 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Barratt (J.) — Continaed. 
iia8 beeu giyen for Ne^-England, in 
the I Languages of the | Etcheniin and 
Micmacs. | These are now the only In- 
dian Tribes to the North-East, the form- 
er inhabitants | of New-England, that 
have preserved their language entire, 
being the oldest | and purest Indian 
spoken in the Eastern States. | Derived 
from the> Indian (Nicola Tenesles,) | by 
Joseph Barratt M. D., | Member of sev- 
eral Learned Societies. | Id^This Book 
is the only work of its kind to be had. 
Itcontains | the Elements of the Indian 
'Tongue, and mnch that is new to the 
J reading pnblic; especially the names 
by which the Red Men of | the forest, 
designated the natural objects before 
them. I 

Middletown, Connecticut: | Charles 
H. Pelton, printer. | 1851. | Price 25 
Cents. 

Title veno " to the reader " (dated Septem- 
ber 18, 1851) 1 1. text pp. 3-24, 8^ 

Names for the animaU in Indian [Etchemin 
and Micruac], pp. 11-15.— Key to the Indian 
language of New England, pp. 15-23, includes: 
vocabulary of the Etchemin, pp. 15-17 ; parts 
of the human body [Etchemin and Micmac], p. 
18; compendium of Indian grammar, pp. 20-23. 

Oopies §een: Congress, Dunbar, Massachu- 
setts Historical Society, Powell. 

Trilbner <Se co. 1856 catalogue, no. 672. priced 
a copy 2t., at the Fisher sale, catalogne nos. 
2098. 2099, sold for 3«. 6d and 2t. dd. respect- 
ively; the Murphy copy, half morocco, cata- 
logue no. 911, brought $4.25 ; priced by Trilbner 
Slco. 1882.P.54, 3«. 6d. 

An edition with title slightly differing as fol- 
lows: 

[ ] The Indian | of | New-England, | 

and the | north-eastern provinces; | A 
Sketch of the Life of an Indian Hunt«r, 
Ancient Traditions re- | lating to the | 
Etchemin tribe, | their modes of life, 
fishing, hunting, «&c. : | with | vocabu- 
laries I in the | Indian and English, | 
giving the names of the | animals, 
birds, and fish : | The most complete 
that has been given for New-England, 
in the | Languages of the | Etchemin 
and Micmacs. | These are now the only 
Indian Tribes to the North- East, the 
former inhabitants | of New-England, 
that have preserved their language en- 
tire, being the oldest | and purest In- 
dian spoken in the Eastern States. | 
Derived from | Nicola Tenesles. | By a 



Barratt (J.) — Continued, 
citizen of Middletown, Conn. | 
Book is the only work of its kind to be 
had. It contains | the Elements of the 
Indian Tongue, and much that is new 
to the I reading public ; especially the 
names by which the Red Men of | the 
forest, designated the natural objects 
before them. | 

Middletown, Connecticut : | Charles 
H. Pelton, printer. | 1851. | Price 25 
Cents. 

Printed cover with half-title, title as above 
verso " to the reader" (dated Sept. 18. 1861) 1 L 
text pp. 3-24. 80 . 

Oopies teen : Brinton, British Museum, Con> 
gress, Barnes, PUliug, Trumbull. 

In some copies, that portion of the title be> 
ginning with the word "Derived" and ending 
with the word "Conn." has been covered with 
a printed slip bearing the words ** By | Joseph 
Barratt, M. D. | Member of Several Learned 
Societies." (Congress.) 

At the Field sale, catalogue na 08, a copy sold 
for $4.50: priced by Littlefleld of Boston, No- 
rember, 1887, catalogue no. 342, $1.50. 

A third edition as follows : 

The Indian | of | New-England, | 

and the | north-eastern provinces ; | A 
Sketch of the Life of an Indian Hnnter, 
Ancient Traditions, re- 1 lating to the | 
Etchemin tribe, | their modes of life, 
fishing, hunting, d^c. : | with | Tocaba- 
laries | in the | Indian and English, | 
giving the names of the | animals, 
birds, and fish : | The most complete 
that has been given for New-England, 
in the | Languages of the | Etchemin 
and Micmacs. | These are now the only 
Indian Tribes to the North-East, the 
former inhabitants | of New-England, 
that have preserved their language en- 
tire, being the oldest | and purest In- 
dian spoken in the Eastern States. | 
Derived from the Indian (Nicola Ten- 
esles,) I by Joseph Barratt, M. D., | 
Member of several Learned Societies. | 
E^This Book is the only work of its 
kind to be had. It contains | the Ele- 
ments of the Indian Tongue, and mnch 
that is new to the | reading pnblic; 
especially the names by which the Red 
Men of I the forest, designated the nat- 
ural objects before them. 

Middletown, Connecticut : | Charles 
H. Pelton, printer. | 1851. 

Title verso " to the reader " (dated OotoberS, 
1851. and giving "Notice to the third edition") 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



35 



Barratt (J. ) — Continued. 
1 1. text pp. 1-24, 8®. Followed by the Key (pp. 
1-8) and Indian Proprietors (pp. 1-4), 9. o. above. 
CfopuM »een : Congress, TmmbalL 

Bartlett (John Rassell). Bibliotheca 
Americana | A | Catalogne of Books | 
relating;; to | North and Sonth America 
I in the library of | John Carter Brown 
I of Providence, B. I. | Part I.— 1493 
to 1600 I With Notes | by | John Russell 
Bartlett | [Coat of arms] | 
Providence | 1865 

2 p. U. pp. 1-79, royal 80. Contains 302 titles. 
Fifty copies printed. 

Copies seen: Brown, Lenox, Massachusetts 
Historical Society. 

Reprinted with many additional titles and 
more oopiona notes as follows : 

Bibliotheca Americana | A | Cata- 

Ioj;;ae of Books | relating to | North and 
Sonth America | in the library of the 
late I John Carter Brown | of Provi- 
dence, B. I. I Part I.— 1482 to 1601 | 
With Notes | by | John RusseU Bart- 
lett I [Coat of arms] | 

Providence | lb75 

Title verso note and printers 1 1. preface pp. 
iii-vi, lists of title-pages, woodcuts, etc. pp. 
rii-iz, text pp. 1-503, additions pp. 504-511, in- 
dex pp. 513-826, royal 8^. Contains 600 titles, 
68 CMS>simile8 of title pages, maps, and por- 
traits, and 50 woodcats of vignettes and print- 
ers* devices. One hundred copies printed. 

Copies seen: Brown, Congress, Barnes, Lenox. 

Isaued also with title-page as follows : 

— Bibliographical notices | of rare and 
cnrions books relating to | America | 
printed in the XV'^ and XVI*»» centu- 
ries I (1482-1601) I in the library of the 
late I John Carter Brown | of Provi- 
dence, B. I. I By I John Russell Bart- 
lett I [Coat of arms] | 

Providence | Printed for Private Dis- 
tribntion I 1875 



Title verso note and printers 1 1, preface pp. 
iil-vi, list of title-pages, maps, and portraits 
pp. Tii-ix, text pp. 1-511, index pp. 513-526, royal 
8^. Contains 600 titles. Seventy copies printed — 
fifty imp. octavo, twenty small folio. 

Copies seen: Brown, Bureau of Ethnology, 
Lenox, Maasachusetts Historical Society. 



— Bibliotheca Americana | A | Cata- 
logne of Books I relating to | North and 
Sonth America | in the library of | John 
Carter Brown | of Providence, R. I. | 
Part n.— 1601 to 1700 | With Notes i by 
John Bnssell Bartlett i [Coat of arms] | 
ProTidenoe | 1866 



Bartlett (J. R.) — Continued. 

Title verso note and printers 1 L preface 
verso blank 1 1. text pp. 5-220, index pp. 221- 
249, supplement pp. 251-261 , royal 8°. Contains 
1160 titles. Fifty copies printed. 

Copies seen : Brown, Congress, Lenox, Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society. 

Reprinted with many additional titles and 
more copious notes as follows : 

Bibliotheca Americana | A | Cata- 
logue of Books I relating to | North and 
South America | in the library of the 
late I John Carter Brown | of Provi- 
uece, R. I. | Part II.— 1600 to 1700 | 
Second edition | With Notes | by | John 
Russell Bartlett | [Coat of arms] | 

Providence | 1882 

Title verso note and printers 1 1. preface pp. 
iii-v, list of fac-similes etc. 8 pp. text pp. 1- 
598, addenda pp. 590-602, indexes pp. 603-647, 
royal 8^. Contains 1642 titles, 74 fac-siroiles of 
title-pages, and 30 portraits, vignettes, and 
printers' devices. One hundred copies printed. 

Copies seen : Brown, Congress, Eames, Lenox, 
Massachnsetts Historical Society. 

Issued also with title-page as follows: 

Bibliographical notices | of rare and 

curious books reiatiug to | America | 
printed in the seventeenth century | 
(1600-1700) I in the library of the late | 
John Carter Brown | of Providence, 
R. I. I by I John Russell Bartlett | 
[Coat of arms] | 

Providence | Printed for Private Dis- 
tribution I 1882. 

Title verso note and printers 1 1, preface pp. 
iii-v, list of fac-similes 3 pp. text pp. 1-602, in* 
dexes pp. 603-647, royal 8°. Contains 74 fac- 
similes of title-pages, 39 portraits, vignettes, 
and printers' devices. Twenty-five copies 
printed. 

Copies seen: Brown, Bureau of Ethnology. 

Bibliotheca Americana | A | Cata- 
logue of Books I relating to | North and 
South America | in the library of | John 
Carter Brown | of Providence R. I. | 
Part III.— 1701 to 1800 | Vol. I[-II]. | 
With Notes | by | John Russell Bart- 
lett I [Coat of arms] | 

Providence | 1870 [-1871] 

2 vols. : printed cover, title verso note and 
printers 1 I. preface pp. iii-iv, text pp. 1-446; 
title verso note and printers 1 1, text pp. 1-464, 
index pp. 465-554, royal 8^. The two parts con* 
tain 4173 titles, hut no illustrations. Fifty 
copies printed. 

Copies seen: Brown, Congress, Bamea, 
Lenox. Massachnsetts Historical Society. 

The catalogue of the Carter-Brown library is 
one of the moat elaborate and expensive ev«r 



i 



36 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Bartlett (J. B.) — Continued. 

issued. Mr.Menzies' set of the 4 vols. 188^-06- 
7&-71, bound in half red levant morocoo, sold in 
1876 for $289; Mr. O'Callaghan's set of 4 vols. 
1875-82-70-71, in cloth, sold in 1882 for $104 ; 
Mr. Marphy's set in 1884 for #124. 

''— Dictionary | of | Americanisms : | a 
glossary of words and phrases | usually 
regarded as peculiar to | the United 
States. I By | John Bussell Bartlett. | 
Fourth edition, | greatly improved 
and enlarged. | 

Boston : | Little, Brown, and com- 
pany. I 1877. 

Title verso oopyright 1 L preface pp. iii-xix, 
introduction pp. xxi-xlvi, half>title 1 L text pp. 
1-813, 8^. In the title of some copies the last 
word of the foarth lineismiaspelled ** phrase." 

Indian words, including some Algonquian, 
passim. 

Copiet teen: Congress, Eames, Trumbull, 
Watkinson. 

The first edition, New York, 1848 (Congress), 
does not contain the Indian words. The second 
edition, Boston, Little, Brown Sc Co.— London, 
Triibner & Co., 1859, pp. xxxii, 524, 8^ (British 
Museum), with title otherwise substantially as 
the above, contains a considerable number of 
Indian words, but not so many as the fourth 
and last The third edition was merely another 
issue of the second. (British Museum.) 

There are (German editions. Qorinohem, 1854, 
and Leipzig, 1860 (British Museum), which con- 
tain no linguistics. 

Clarke & co. 1886 catalogue, no. 95, title an 
edition Boston, 1884, 813 pp., which is priced $4. 

[ ] Catalogue | of the | magnificent 

library | of the late | Hon. Henry C. 
Murphy, | of | Brooklyn, Long Island, | 
consistiug almost wholly of | Americana 

I or I books relating to America. | The 
whole to be sold by auction, | at the | 
Clinton Hallsalesrooms, | on | Monday, 
March 3d, 1884, and the following days. 

I Two sessions daily, at 2.30 o'clock, and 
7.30 p. m. I 

Qeo. A. Leavitt &, co.. Auctioneers. | 
New York, 1884. | Orders to Purchase 
executed by the Auctioneers, Free of 
Charge. 

Printed cover with half-title, title verso 
notice 1 1. advertisement 1 1. preface pp. v-viii, 
text pp. 1-434, addenda pp. 1-9, %^. Compiled 
by the late Hon. John R. Bartlett. 

Contains titles of works in various Algon- 
quian dialects. 

Copies §eem Congress, Bames, Pilling. 

Barton (Benjamin Smith). New views) 
of the I origin | of the | tribes and na- 
tions I ol I America. | By Bei^amin 



Barton (B. S.) — Continued. 
Smith Barton, M. D. | correspondent- 
member [«&c. ten lines]. | 

Philadelphia: | printed, for the au- 
thor, I by John Bioren. | 1797. 

Pp. i-xii, i-oix, l-«3, 2P. 

Comparative vocabulary of 54 words of a 
number of Indian languages, including the 
Lenni-LonnApe, or Dela wares (from Zeisber- 
ger's Essay and Heckewelder), Chippewa (from 
Hecke welder. Carver, Long), Minsi (from Heck- 
ewelder), Acadians, Hahicanni. Shawnees (from 
Gibson), Pottawatameh, Miami (from Cols- 
worthy), Messisaugers, Kikkapoos (from Tur- 
ner), Piankashaws (from Turner), Algonkin 
(from Lahontan). Penobscot and St. Johns 
(fh>m Little), Sankikaniand Pamptioough (from 
Lawoon), pp. 1-80. 

Oopift teen : Boston Athenaeum, British Ifn* 
seum. Congress. 

At the Field sale, no. 106, a hslf-morocco, 
uncut copy, brought $3; at the Brinley sale, no» 
63&0, "a half-calf, large, fine copy," brought 
$0; the Murphy copy, no. 183, half -calf, brought 
$5.50. 

Reviewed and extracts given in The Port 
Folio, vol 7, pp. 507-526 , Philadelphia and New 
York, 1811, 8o. (Congress.) 

Second edition, corrected and enlarged, as 
follows : 

New views | of the | origin | of the 

I tribes and nations | of | America. | 
By Benjamin Smith Barton, M. D. | cor- 
respondent-member l&o. ten lines.] | 

Philadelphia : | printed, for the an* 
thor, I by John Bioren. | 1798. 

Title as above reverse blank 1 1. "The Sec- 
ond Edition, corrected and greatly enlarged.— 
Copy- right secured," recto blank 1 1. dedica- 
tion pp. iii-vii, preface pp. viii-xxvi, errata etc 
pp. xxvii-xxviii, preliminary discourse pp. 
i-clx, comparative vocabularies pp. 1-133, ap- 
I)endixpp.l-32,8o. 

In addition to the vocabularies given in tbe 
previous edition, this insne contains the follow- 
ing: Natick (fh)m Eliot). Virginia (from Smith), 
Pennsylvania (from Penn), and Illinois (fh>m 
Henu' pin). 

Copiet teen: Astor, British Museum, Con- 
gress, Eames, Wisconsin Uibtoiical Society. 

A copy at the Field sale, no. 107, brought $8; 
Leclerc, 1878, no. 809, prices an uncut copy 
40 fr. ; at the Murphy sale, no. 184, a half-mo- 
rocco copy brought $0.50. 

Hints on the etymology of certain 

English words, and on their affinity to 

words in the languages of different 

European and American (Indian) na-^ 

tions, in a letter from Dr. Barton to Dr. 

Thomas Beddoes. 

In American Philosoph. Soc Trans. voL 8». 
pp. 145-158, Philadelphia, 1804, 4o. 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAQES. 



37 



Barton (B. S.) — Contiuaed. 

Examplea in Delaware. Pamptioough, Saaki- 
kani, Miami, Piankashaw, Narragansett, Nau- 
ticoke, MohiMUi, and Chippewa. 

[ ] Some acooant of the different 8pe- 

cies and Tarieties of native American, 
or Indian dogs. By the Editor. 

In the Philadelphia Med. and Phys. Jonr. voL 
1, pt 2, pp. 3-31, Philadelphia, 1805, 8^. (Con- 
grefta.) 

Kamea for dogs in varions North and South 
American dialeota, among them the Delaware, 
Kantikoke, Mahican, Monsee, Chippewa, Mes- 
•iaanger, Ottawa, Penobscot, Natio, Narragan- 
set, Miami, Pottawatameh, Shawnee, and 
Kaskaskia. 

Benjamin Smith Barton, physician, born in 
LancaMter, Pa., February 10. 1766; died in PhiU- 
delphia, Pa., Deoember 19, 1815. After a oonrse 
of general studies nnder Dr. Andrews, at York, 
Pa., he followed the instmotions given at the 
Philadelphia College, now TTniversity of Penn- 
sylvania. Then daring 1786-'88 he studied 
medicine and the natural sciences in Edinburgh 
and London, and received his medical degree 
from the University of OSttingen, Qermany. 
On his retom he settled in Philadelphia, where 
he soon acquired an extensive and lucrative 
practice. In 1789 he waa appointed professor 
of natural history and botany, and in 1795 of 
materia medica in the college of Philadelphia. 
In 1813 he succeeded Dr. Benjamin Bush as 
professor of the theory and practice of medicine 
in the University of Pennsylvania. He was 
elected president of the Philadelphia Medical 
Society in 1809, and was some time vice-presi- 
dent of the American Philosophical Society, 
and also a member of many other American 
and European societies. He contributed nn* 
merons papers to the "Transactions of the 
American Philosophical Society," and to the 
"Medical and Physical Jonmal," which was 
published by him. His most important works 
are: "Observations on Some Parts of Natural 
History" (London, 1787) ; "New Views on the 
Origin of the Tribes of America" (1797) ; "Ele- 
ments of Botany," Philadelphia, 1803. 2d ed., 2 
vols., 1812-'U; an edition of Cullen*s "Materia 
Medica;" "Eulogy on Dr. Priestley;" "Dis- 
course on the Principal Desiderata of Natural 
History" (Philadelphia, 1807); and "Collections 
toward a Materia Medica of the United States" 
(3d ed., Philadelphia, ISIO). —AppUton'» OyOop. 
t^ Am. Bioff. 

Bartsch (Heinrich). [Collection of 361 
specimens of the Lord's prayer in 130 
languages and dialects.] (*) 

Manuscript, 2 vols. 4°. Preserved in the 
Baths-Bibliothek, at Konigsberg, Germany. 

Contains the Lord's prayer In Gaspesian or 
Micmac. furnished by La Croze(— ), and which 
is printed in Adelung's Mithridates, voL 3, part 
3, p. 404. 

Heinrich Bartsch. at first secretary of the 
Old Town of Ednigsberg, and sinoe 1724 regis* 



Bartsch (H.) — Continaed. 

trator of the town archives, was born there in 
1667 and died in 1728. To what extent he was 
related to the Gottfried Bartsch mentioned by 
Andr. Miiller, 1 know not; his father, also Hein- 
rich, was vice-burgomaater of Konigsberg. Our 
Heinrich, as far back as 1717, was engaged in 
the scheme of publishing a more copious collec- 
tion than that of Chamborlayne, and hence 
spared no diligenco in gathering all kinds of 
formulto yet noprintcd in all sorts of languages 
and dialects. Ho did not, however, live to see 
it completed, but bequeathed his collection of 
manuscripts to the library of the council of his 
native town, where it is still extant Having 
received, through the kindness of Mr. D. Wald, 
a list of all the copies it contains, I am enabled 
to give a detailed account of it. The whole 
consists of two volumes in 4to, nearly all loose 
leaves with inserted original letters by Bayer, 
la Crose, and others. The languages are ar> 
ranged alphabetically. The first part contains 
228 formula in 69 languages and dialects, the 
second 133 formulsD in 61 languages and dia> 
lects, making together 361 formula. To Judge 
by these figures, the collection would haye 
turned out to be, therefore, the richest and most 
complete. But as the author gathered not only 
translations but also poetic transcripts, and of 
translations not only all various translations in 
one and the same language but all the difierent 
copies of one and the same translations, how- 
ever faulty, much has to be deducted to obtidn 
its real value, and there remains possibly little 
more than may be found in Chamborlayne. As 
the author possessed a decided inclination to- 
wards the fantastic, as appears from his life, 
this is not surprising. It is possible, however, 
that if he had be«n permitted to undertake the 
publication, he would have omitted much. Stih 
it is impossible not to admire the industry with 
which he gathered all printed fonuulce ft*om a 
number of writings, some of them rare. Of un- 
printed ones I have found only one, that of the 
Gaspesians or Miomacs in Canada, communi- 
cated to him by la Croze, and which I shall util- 
ize in its place. See his life in Acta Boruss., part 
2, p. 923.—A<Ulung'i MithridaUt, voL 1, pp. 666- 
667. 

Bastian (Philips Wilhelm Adolf.) Eth- 
nologie nnd vergleichende Linguistik. 

In Zeitschrift fur Ethnologic, voL 4 (1872), pp. 
137-162, 211-231, Berlin [n. d.J, 89. 

Contains examples in and grammatio com- 
ments upon a number of American languages, 
among them the Mohegan and Massachusetts, 
pp. 211, 220; the Delaware and the Cree, p. 226. 

Bates (Henry Walton). Stanford's | com- 
pendium of geography and travel | 
based on Hellw^akUs * Die Erde nnd ihre 
Volker' I Central America | the West In- 
dies I and I South America | Edited and 
extended | By H. W. Bates, | assistant- 
secretary of the Royal geographical so- 



38 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Bates (H. W.) — Continaed. 
ciety; | aathor of 'The nataralist oa 
the river Amazons' | With | ethnologi- 
cal appendix by A. H. Keaue, B. A. | 
Maps and illastrations | 

London | Edward Stanford, 55, Char- 
ing cross, 8. W. I 1878 

Half-title verso blank 1 L frontispiece 1 1. title 
verso blank 1 1. preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. 
vii-xvi, list of illastrations pp. xvii-zviii, list of 
maps p. zix, text pp. 1-561, index pp. 663-571, 
maps, 8^. 

EeanefA. H.), Appendix : Ethnography and 
philology of America, pp. 443-561. 

Copies wen : British Maseam, Congress, Geo- 
logical Survey, National Hnsenm. 

— Stanford's | Compendinm of geogra- 
phy and travel | based on Hellwald's 
'Die Erde and ihre Volker' | Central 
America | the West Indies | and | Sonth 
America j Edited and extended | By H. 
W. Bates, | Author of [&c. two lines.] 
I With I ethnological appendix by A. 
H. Keane, M. A. J. | Maps and illustra- 
tions I Second and revised edition. | 

London | Edward Stanford, 55, Char- 
ing cross, S. W. I 1882. 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1 
L preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-xvi, list of il- 
lastrations pp. xvii-xviii, list of maps p. xix, text 
pp. l-441,appendix pp. 44^-561, index pp. 563-571, 
maps,8o. 

Linguistics as under previous title, pp.443-561. 

Oopietteen: British Moseam. Harvard. 

^— Stanford's | Compendium of geogra- 
phy and travel | based ou Hellwald's 
'Die Erde and ihre Yolker' | Central 
America | the West Indies | and South 
America | Edited and extended | By H. 
W. Bates, | assistant-secretary [&c. 
two lines.] | With | ethnological ap- 
pendix by A. H. Keane, M. A. I. | Maps 
and illustrations | Third edition | 

London f Edward Stanford, 55, Char- 
ing cross, S. W. I 1885 

Collation and contents as in second edition, 
title and description of which are given above. 

Copies §een: Geological Survey. 

BCaudry] D[e Lozi^res (Louis Nar- 
cisse).] Voyage | k la Louisiane, | et 
sur le continent | de TAm^rique | sep- 
tentrionale, | fait dans les anuses 1794 
4 1798; I Contenant un Tableau his- 
toriqae de la Louisiane, | des observa- 
tions sur son climat, ses riches pro- 
ductions, I le caract^re et le nom des 
Sauvages; desremarqnes | iniportantes 
SOT la navigation ; des principes d'ad- 



Baudry de Lozlires (L. N.) — Cont'd, 
minis- | tration, de legislation et de 
gouvernementpropres&cette I Colonic, 
etc. etc. I Par B^*» D*^». | Orn^ d'une 
belle carte. | [Three lines quotation.] | 

Paris, I Dentu, Imprimeur-Libraire, 
Palais du Tribunat, | galeries de bois, 
no. 240. I An XI.-1802. 

Pp. i-viii, I-S82. map, 8°. 

Vocabulary of the Chipooais, pp. 853-362. 

Copies seen: Astor, Qritish Moseam, Con- 
gress, Dnnbar, Harvard. 

A copy at the Fischer sale, catalogne no. 983, 
sold for 2«. ; the Field copy, catalogne no. 114, 
for $1.75 ; the Brinley copy, catalogue no. 4392, 
for $5 ; the Murphy copy, catalogue no. 711, for 
$1.50; Clarke A, co. 1886 catalogue, no. 2266^ 
prices an uncut paper copy $3. 

Baxter {Rev. Joseph). Journal of the 
Rev. Joseph Baxter, of Medfield, mis* 
sionary to the Eastern Indians in 1717, 
(Communicated by the Rev. Ellas Na- 
Bon.) 

In New England historical and genealogical 
register, vol. 21, p. 45-60, Boston, 1867, 8<>. 

Contains a "brief vocabulary of the Indian 
language," a few words, and the numerals 
1-1000 of the Abnaki Indians at the mouth of 
the Kennebec, pp. 69^-60. 

Issued separately as follows : 

''— Journal of several visits | to the | 
Indians on the Kennebec River, | By 
the Rev. Joseph Baxter, | Of Medfield » 
Mass. I 1717. 1 With notes, | by the Rev. 
Elias Nasou. | Reprinted from the N. E. 
Hist, and Genealogical Register for 
January, 1867. | 

Boston : David Clapp & Son, print- 
ers . . 334 Washington st. | 18b7. 

Printed cover with half-title, title verso blank 
1 1. text pp. 3-18, 8o. 

A brief vocabulary of the [Abnaki] Indiao 
language (three phrases, four words, and numer* 
als 1-1000) pp. 17-18. 

Copies seen: Boston Public, Congress, Tram- 
bull, Wisoonsin Historical Society. 

Bayles (Richard Mather). Historical 
and descriptive | sketches | of | Suffolk 
county, I and its | towns, villages, ham- 
lets, scenery, institu- | tions and im- 
portant enterprises ; | with a | Histori- 
cal Outline of Long Island, | from ita 
first settlement by Europeans. | By 
Richard M. Bayles. | 

Port Jefferson, L. I. | published by 
the author. | 1874. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. preface pp.v-vi^ 
index pp. vii-xii, text pp. 13-424, a short history 
of Lakeland by Dr. Bdgar F. Peck pp. 1-14, ad- 
vertisements 14 IL 12^. 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



39 



Bayles (R. M.) — Continaed. 

liontaak vocabulary (fh>m Qardiner, in Silas 
Wood's Lonj; Island) pp. 63-64. 

Oop%€» seen : Boston Athenemn, Congress. 

Baylies (Francis). The original of local 
and other | names | A | letter | from | 
Hon Francis Baylies | of Tannton 
Mass I to I Hon P[hinea8] W Leland | 
of Fall River Mass I . 

Brooklyn N Y | 1879 

Half-title Terso blank 1 1. title as above verso 
blank 1 1. text IL 1-24, printed on one side of 
loose sheets, 129 form on A<^ paper. The half- 
title is : ** Elxevir Clnb Series, No. 1." and in the 
left lower comer of that paii^e is the note: 
"Thirty copies, Ko. ." The letter is dated 
" Taunton, March 2, 1840." 

This publication was made by Mr. Paul L. 
Ford, of Brooklyn, firom the original manuscript 
in his father's possession. 

Remarks on and meanings of Indian names, 
mostly Ma^sachasetts, passim. 

OopUt seen : Eames, Pilling. 

Beaoh (William Wallace). The | Indian 
miscellany; | containing | Papers on the 
History y Antiquities, Arts, Languages, | 
Religions, Traditions and Superstitions 
I of I the American aborigines; | with | 
Descriptions of their Domestic Life, 
Manners, Customs, | Traits, Amuse- 
ments and Exploits; | travels and ad- 
ventures in the Indian country; I Inci- 
dents of Border Warfare; Missionary 
Relations, etc. | Edited by W. W. 
Beach. | 

Albany : | J. Munsell, 82 State street. 
11877. 

Title verso blank 1 L dedication verso blank 
1 L advertisement verso blank 1 L contents pp. 
Tii-viii, text pp. iM77, errata 1 p. index pp. 479- 
400, 80. 

Sqnitr (E. G.), Historical and mythological 
traditions of the Algonqnins, pp. 9-42. 

Oo|Hee«een : Astor, Brinton, British Museum, 
Congress, Eames, Geological Survey, Massachu- 
setts Historical Society, Wisconsin Historical 
Society. 

Priced by Leclero, 1878 catalogue, no. 26S3, 20 
tr.i the Murphy copy, no. 197, brought $1.25; 
priced by Clarke Sc co. 1880 catalogue, no. 6271, 
13.50; and by Littlefield, Nov. 1387, no. 50, $4. 

Beaulieu ( Paul ) . See Hoffman ( W. J . ) 

See O'Meara (F. A.) 

Beanregard (Ollivier). Anthropologic 
et philologie ; parM. O. Beanregard. 

In SQci6t6 d'anthropologie de Paris, BnlL 
voL 0, 8d ser. pp. 220-249, Paris, 1886, 8^. 

Words, phrases, and numerals in the Ian- 
gnages of the North American Indians, princi* 
pally Algonquian and Iroquoian (from Cuoq 
and De Smet), pp. 220-38L 



Beckwith (H. W.) Indian names of 
water courses in the State of Indiana. 
By H. W. Beckwith, Esq., Danville, Il- 
linois. 

In Indiana, Department of geology and nat- 
ural history, twelfth annual report, L882,pp. 
89-43. Indianapolis, 1883, 8^. Includes : 

Hough (D.). [Map of Indiana, giving] In- 
dian names of lakes, rivers, towns, forts, &c., 
also tribal districts and tribes, folding sheet 
facing p. 42. 

Copieegeen: Powell. 

Noticed and partly reprinted in The Ameri* 
CMi Naturalist for January, 1884, p. 101. 

[Belcoiirt (lUv. Oeorge Antoine)]. An- 
amihe-masiuahigan. j Jesus ot ijittw&- 
win I gaye | anamihe-nakamnnan | 
takObihikatewau. | Mih' ejittwawad | 
Ketolik-ananiihudjik. | 

Kebekong [Quebec] dtenang: | Fre- 
chette Masinahiganikk'ewiniu i endad. I 
Ihiw pipdn — 1839— Kaakko nikit Jesus. 

Title-page verso blank 1 I. usage de certaines 
lettres pp. iii-iv, preface (signed Niu G. A. Bel- 
court) page V. text (with the exception o^ a few 
headings in French and Latin entirely' in Chip- 
pewa) pp. 1-209. 16°. 

Primer lessons, pp. 1-4. — Xnraerals 1-1000, p. 
4.— Prayers, etc. pp. 5-19.— Catei'hism, pp. 19- 
106.— Prayers for mass, pp. 107-131. — Hymns, 
pp. 133-209. 

Copies seen: Boston Athenffium, British Mu* 
seum. 

[ ] Anamihe-masinahigan. | Jesus ot 

ijittw&win | gayel anamihe-nakamunaa | 
takdbihikatewan. | Mik' ejittw&wad | 
Ketolik-anamiha<ljik. | Nittam andjibi- 
higan. | 

Kebekong [Quebec] dtenang: | Cot^ 
etCie. Masinahiganikkewininiendad. | 
Ihiw pipdn— 1(^59 — ka akko nikit Jesus. 

TiUe-paice verso blank 1 1. usage de certaines 
lettres pp. iii-iv, preface (signed Nin 6. A. Bel' 
court, Mekkateokonayewiyan) pp. v-vi, text in 
the Chippewa language pp. 1-209, 18*^. 

Copies seen: Eames, Laval, Pilling, Powell. 

Priced by Dufoss6, 1887, catalogue no. 24531, 
10 fr. 

[ ] Principes | de la langue des sau- 

vages I appel^ Sauteux. | [Picture of 
a church.] | 

Quebec : | de I'imprimerie de | Fre- 
chette & Cie., I imprimeurs-libraires, n^ 

8, rue Lamontagne. | 1839. 

Title-page verso blank 1 1. introduction pp. 
iii-iv, remarks verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-146, 
120. 

Copies seen: Boston Atheneum, Congress, 
Dunbar, Eames, Laval, Massac hnsetU Histor- 
ical Society. 



40 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Belcoiirt (6. A.) — Contiaaed. 

Leclerc, 1878 catalogue, no. 2152, priced a copy 
60 n-.; at the Pinart aale, catalogue oo. 92, Qua- 
ritch bought acopy forSO fr. ; DnfoM6. 1887. cat- 
alogue no. 24580. charges 20 fr. ; aod GagnoD, of 
Quebec, in 1889, no. 52 of catalogue no. 12, $4. 

Departmeut of Hudson Bay : ad- 
dressed to his Excellency, Alex. Ram- 
sey, president of the Minnesota Hist. 
Society. By Rev. G. A. Beloonrt: trans- 
lated from the French by Mrs. Letitia 
May. 

In Minnesota Hist Soo. Annals, no. 4, pp. 
lft-32, Saint Paul, 1853, 8°. ( Boston PubUc. ) 

Contains a number of Saolteur terms passim. 

Reprinted as follows : 

— Departmeut of Hudson's Bay. By 
Rev. G. A. Belcourt. 

In Minnesota Hist. Soc. Coll. voL 1, pp. 207- 
344, St Paul, 1872, 80. (Congress.) 

— [Prospectos of a] Dictionnaire | 
fhin^ais-santeux. | On | odjibway. | 
Par I le Rev. G. Belcourt. | [Design.] | 

Montreal | 1877. 

Title verso blank 11.3 other IL 8^. 

It contains a few words in A, one in D, and 
one in F. It was prepared by the Abb6 La- 
oombe, who informs me, under date of June 16, 
1886, that the work has not been published. He 
adds: "It is a large manuscript, neatly written 
on one side of the sheet only, in French and 
Sauteux, and is now in the hands of Archbishop 
Tach6, of Manitoba." 

Copies seen: PoweU, Trumbull. 

According toCuoq's Jngement erron6, p. 110, 
an Algonkin dictionary by Belcourt was an* 
nounced for publication in Paris in 1870, but it 
has not appeared. 

■■ See Baraga (F.) and Belcourt 

(G.A.) 

Gioorge Antoine Belcourt was bom on the 
Bay of Febr«« or St Antoine. district of Three 
Rivers, Lower Canada, in 1803. His father, a 
mechanic, placed his son at the college of Nico- 
let, whore he passed through his classes with 
success and afterwards embraced the eocleslaA- 
tioal state. He was made a priest in 1827, and 
In 1830 was selected by the Bishop of Proven- 
cher to go into the north country and labor 
solely in christianizing the savage. Arriving 
at Red River, June 19, 1831, he applied himself 
with ardor to the study of the Saulteur lan- 
guage. He discovered the principles of the 
language, which he arranged and caused to be 
printed in 1839; also a book of piety in this 
tongue. He composed a dictionary which would 
form a large quarto, but which, for want of 
encouragement, has never been printed. This 
dictionary, French and Saulteur, gives the ety- 
mology of each word, and the composite parti- 
cles, which throws much light upon the knowl- 
edge of this language, and enables one to seize 



Belcourt (G. A.) — Continued. 

the genius of it— a thing so essential to him 
who desires to understand the people in generaL 
He traveled, formed missions, boilt ch^[>els, 
etc., in many places over a space fh>m east to 
west of 1.000 miles, and passed each winter at 
his mission of Saint Psul on the Asainiboine 
River. In 1833, by his personal influence he 
quelled a disturbance Muong the half-breeds 
which threaten^ to become serious, in grati- 
tude for which Qovemor Simpson added 50 
pounds sterling to a like sum which the Hnd> 
son Bay Company gave every year to the Cath- 
olic clergy, which they still receive yeariy. 
About 1849, owing to some trouble with the 
Hudson Bay Company's oflScers, he left the 
mission at Red River and accepted one at Pem- 
bina.— Annals Minn. His. Soe. 

Belden {Lieut. George P.). Belden, the 
wliite chief; | or, | twelve years { among 
the I wild Indians of the plains. | From 
the diaries and manuscripts | of | George 
P. Belden, | The Adventurous White 
Chief, Soldier, Hunter, Trapper, and 
Guide. I Edited by | Gen. James S. Bris- 
bin,U.S.A. | 

Cincinnati and New York : | C. F. 
Vent. I Chicago : J. 8. Goodman & co. 
Philadelphia: A. H. Hubbard. | St. 
Louis: F. A. Hutchinson & co. | San 
Francisco: A. L. Bancrofts co. | 1870. 
Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright 1 L 
publishers' preface pp. iii-iv, contents pp. 5-13, 
list of illustrations pp. xv-zvi, half-title verso 
blank 1 1. text pp. 19-511, supplement pp. 613- 
513, 8o. 

OJibwa war song (from Schoolcraft), p.48.— 
Names of the months in Indian, pp. 288-290. 

Copies seen : Congress, Powell. 

Sold at the Field sale, catalogue no. 125*. for 
$2.25. 

There are editions of 1871 (Powell) and 1872 
(Astor) with titles similar to above except in 
date. 

Bellair ( F. ) See O'Meara (F. A.) 

BeUas ( Lieut. Henry H. ) Words, phrases^ 
and sentences in the Cheyenne lan- 
guage. 

Manuscript, pp. 1-108, 4°, in the library of 
the Bureau of Ethnology; collected at the Chey* 
enne Agency, Indian Territory, and Red Cloud 
Agency, Nebraska, during 1875, 1876, and 1877, 
and recorded in a copy of Powell's Introdnction 
to the study of Indian languages, first edition. 
The schedules are not well filled, though all 
have some entries. The additional pages, 106- 
108, contain collections of parts of speech: 
a^ectives, pronouns, adverbs, prepositioBS, and 
conjunctions. 

Bellefeuille {Ph-e Charles de). [Ser- 
mons in the Nipissing dialect of the 
Algonquian language.] 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



41 



BellefeuiUe (C. de) — Continued. 

Manasoript, 91 IL (of which, interspersed 
amoDK the written leaves, 5 are blank ones) 4°, in 
the archives of the mission at Lac des Deux 
Montagues (Oka), Canada. 

On the recto of the llrst leaf, in modem hand* 
writing, is the heading I. Prones, followed by 
a list of the sermons, as follows : 

Abr6g6 de la foL Confession. 

P6ch6. Comm onion. 

Sacrements. Ordre. 

Commandements. Marriage. 

La pri^re. Condaite dans la maladie. 

BaptAme. Extreme onction. 

Confirmation. 

The manuscript is boand, well preserved, 
and very legible. 

B^llenger {AbbS Joseph-Marie). Jos. 
M. Bellenger, Ptre Miss<^ | Ristigoaohe 
1 9 octobre 1816. | Kegi abchidlk 
K'nixkamind | Archevdch^ de Quebec. 

Manuscript, U9 annumbered 11. sm. 4°, in the 
Micmac language; in the library of the arch- 
bishopric of Quebec. The title above is on the 
recto of the first leaf; Just above it we read: 
Donn6 k TEv^ue de Qn6bec de 16 sept 1837, 
J. £. d. Q. Cahier mikroake [tie] ; and below : 
Ce cahier sppartient k M. Jos. M. Bellenger, 
pt~, with a reference to the above gift Its con- 
tents are as follows; 

Sermon for every Sunday, 1 p.— The great ser- 
mon, 19 pp. — Instructions on the day of Sunday, 
S pp., followed by explanations, 12 pp.— The 
tables of the law, 12 pp. — Song to the air " Vous 
qui voyex couler mes larmes,'* 1 p. Below this 
is the note "Ce cantique paralt avoir souffert 
XK>ur la mesure ; mais tel qu*il est, les sauvages le 
mdnent snr I'air. La diction en est-elle purel 
Je ne puis I'assurer : Je I'ai copi6 d'apr^ri lenr 
diction.'*— Gloss, 2 pp. — Sentences and detached 
words taken from an old work of M. Mail lard, 
French-Micmac. 19 pp.— Bxamination for con- 
fession ; then continuation of the old work (or 
rather the beginning); note by the author: 
" Cettepartie traitede quelques regies de gram- 
roaire, et donne en avaut [tie] quelques mor- 
ceanxde coojugaisons," 20 pp.— Credo, gloss, 
grammatical remarks continued, 12 pp. at the 
end of which we read: "Icifinitce quej'aipu 
ramasser demote, phrases, et coAJugaisons dans 
le vieux cahier de M. Maillard. J'ai 6t^ sou- 
vent oblig6 d'y supplier bien des terminaisons 
de mots, et des mots entiers. Aut«nt que Je le 
pouvais, Je n'y ai pas manqu6. Ces notes sont 
excellentes, et on pent en tirer bon p.irti pour 
achever, si non continuer la grammaire mik- 
maque.Deo adjuvante." — Grammatical stu'Mes 
continued, 3 pp — Song to the air "O Tangnste 
sacrement," 1 p.— Notes on some obscure points 
in expression on the subject of the teaching of 
the Micmac catechism, 1 p. —Extract from a let- 
ter written by Mr. Bellenger to Mr. De^Jardins, 
V. G., 15 mars 1818, 2 pp.— Grammatical studies 
continued. 14 pp.— Grammatical notes on the ex- 
«rdMof the oonfetsion, 38 pp. ; note by Mr. Bel- 



Bellenger (J. M.) — Continued. 

longer: "J'ai travaill6Jusqu'ici surnn cahier de 
M. M. [Mr. Maillard]. Com me son cahier ne 
vapas plus loin,J'arr6te mes notes grammati- 
cales." — Detached sentences for use for instruc- 
tions and reprimands in confession (text and 
French translation facing: a few parts are 
translated in Latin), 24 pp.— Another examina- 
tion (text and French or Latin translation), 21 
pp. — Ritual, exhortations for administering the 
sacraments to the Micmac Indians, for baptism 
(text and French tnuistation), 8 pp.— For the 
"saint viatique," 2 pp.— For extreme unction, 4 
pp.— For marriage, 8 pp.— Micmac- French gloss, 
2 pp. — Instruction on the confession and grun- 
matio notes, 10 pp.— Stanzas on the acts of faith, 
hope, and charity, 1 p.— Grammatio notes and 
translation of some Micmac words, 2 pp. 

The manuscript is bound in parchment and 
is well preserved, though the insects have at- 
tacked the cover and some of the leaves, and a 
few of the leaves are detached. 

The following is an extract of the above: 

Rituel I Micmar.k | [1]816. 

Manuscript, 2 IL pp. 1-106, 12°, in the Miomao 
language, In the archbishopric of Quebec. On 
the first leaf is the title above, verso blank, fol> 
lowed by 1 blank 1. and on the recto of the next 
loaf a more modern title reading as follows: 

Le I veni mecnm | d'nn Mission naire Mik- | 
makque. | Jos. M Bellenger Pr6tre | mission- 
naire des Sausages | des Ristigonohe. | 2 nud 
1817. 

This is followed by the text, which is an ex- 
tract from the manuscript titled next above, 
and the contents are as follows: Catechism, pp. 
1-41. — Prayers before and after confession, pp. 
41-44. — Prayers before and after communion, 
PP.4&-52. — Prayers for morning and evening, 
pp. 52-75.— Sermon fur every Sunday, pp. 75- 
77. — Administration of baptism, pp. 78-87. — 
Administration of marriage, pp. 88-94.— St Via- 
tique, pp. 05-98.— Extreme unction, pp. 98-106. 

See Maillard (A. S.) 

Beltrami (Giacoiuo Costantino). La d^- 
couverte | des | sources | da | Missis- 
sippi I et de I la riviere Sanglante. | 
Description | Da Coars entier da Mis- 
sissippi, I Qui n'^tait connu, que parti- 
ellement; et d'une grande partie de | 
celuide la riviere Sanglante, presque | 
enti^rement inconnue; ainsi que du | 
coars entier de I'Ohio. | Aper9ns His- 
toriques, des Endroits les plus int^res- 
sans, I qu'ony rencontre. | Observations 
critico-pbiiosophiques, | Snr les McBurs, 
la Religion, les Superstitions, les Cos- 
tumes, les Armes, | les ChasseS) la 
Gaerre, la Paix, le D^nombrement, 
rOrigine, &c. «&o. | deplusienrs nations 
indiennes. i Parallele | De ces Pen pies 
aveo oenx de TAntiquit^, dn Moyen Age, 



42 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Beltrami (G. C.) — Con tinned, 
et du I Moderoe. | Coap-d'oeil, | sur lea 
Compaguies Nord-onest, et de la Baie 
d'Hndson, | ainsi qne snr la colonie 
Selkirk. | Prenvea evidentes, | Qne le 
Mississippi est la premiere Riviere du 
Monde. | Par J. C. Beltrami, | Membre 
de plnsienrs Acaddmies. j 

Nouvelle-Orleans: , Imprimdpar Benj. 
Levy, No. 86, Rue Royale. | 1824. 

Title verso copyright 1 I. errata inserted 
>er80 blank 1 1. dedication pp. iii-v, note verso 
blank 1 L text pp. 1-327, table verso p. 327, 8°. 

Les mois des Cypawais, p. 150. 

Oopie* ieen: Boston Athennam, British Ma- 
seam, Congress, Harvard. 

At the Andrade sale, a copy, catalogue no. 
1923, sold for 1 Thaler 12 Ngr. ; at the Field sale, 
no. 128, half-calf; for $2.25 ; Leclerc. 1878, no. 812, 
pnoas it 30 tr. -, the Brinley copy, catalogue 
na 4452, brought $2.25. 

Beviewed by Schoolcraft (H. R.) in North 
American Bevievr, voL 27, pp. 80-114, Boston, 
1828,80. 

— A I pilgrimage | in | Enrope and 
America, | leading to | tbe discovery | 
of I tbe sources of the Mississippi | and 
Bloody river ; | with a description of | 
tbe whole conrse of tbe former, | and of 

I tbe Ohio. I By J. C. Beltrami, Esq. | 
formerly judge of a royal court in tbe 
ex-kingdom of Italy. | In two volnmes. 

I Vol. I[-II]. I 

London: | printed for Hunt and 
Clarke, | York street, Co vent garden. | 
1828. 

2 vols.: title verso printers 1 1. dedication 
pp. iii-xziii, preface pp. xrv-lxiv, extract etc. 
pp. Ixv-lxxvi, text pp. 1-472; title verso blank 
1 1. text pp. 1-545, maps, plates, portrait, 8°. 

The names of the months in Chippewa, vol. 
2, pp. 274-275. 

Copies seen : British Mosenm, Congress, Don- 
bar, Harvard, t.enox. 

Stevens's Nuggets, no. 242, prices a copy 
10*. 6(2. ; at the Field sale, catalogue no. 120, a 
copy brought $3.50 ; the Brinley copy, catalogue 
DO. 4453, brought $8; the liurphy copy, cata- 
logue no. 212, 13.50. 

BenBon (Egbert). Memoir, | read be- 
fore I tbe Historical Society | of tbe | 
state of New York, | 31st December, 
1816; I by Egbert Benson. | [Three 
lines quotation.] | 

New York: | printed byT. & W. Mer- 
cein, I No. 93 Gold-Street. | 1817. 

Title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 8-72, SP. 
Indian names in New Netherland (Algon* 
qoian and Iroqnoian), pp. 5-17. 



Benson (E.) — Con tinned. 

Copies seen : Astor, Boston AthenaBom, Brit* 
ish Huseom 

At the Field sale a copy, no. 132. sold for $4; 
at the Menzies sale, no. 151, " half calf, nncnt, 
one of a few copies enriched with namorons and 
lengthy notes, upon separate leaves, in the an. 
thor's handwriting," $6; at the liurphy sale, a 
copy, no. 220, brought $2. 

The Mnrphy sale catalogue, no. 219, tiUea 
an edition Jamaica, 1816, which is a mistake, I 
think. 

Sabin's dictionary, no. 4743. titles an edition 
with the imprint, New Yorlt: Printed by Will- 
iam A. Mercein. 1817. (Harvard*). 

Memoir, | read before | the historic- 
al society | of the | state of New-York^ 
I December 31, 1816. | By Egbert Ben- 
son. I [Two lines quotation.] | Second 
edition — with notes. | 
Jamaica : | Henry C. Sleight, printer. 
I 1825. 
Pp. 1-127, reverse of p. 127 " Correctlona," 12o. 
Indian names as above, pp. 7-20. 
Copies seen: British Museum, Congress, 
Lenox. 

The Field copy, no. 133, brought $5. 

— Memoir read before the Historical 
Society of the State of New York, De- 
cember 31, 1816. By Egbert Benson. 
[Two lines quotation. ] (Reprinted from 
a copy, with tbe author's last correc- 
tions. ) 

In New York Hist Soc. Coll. second aeries, 
vol. 2, pp. 77-148, New York. 1840, 8°. 

Issued separately as follows : 

Memoir, | read before | tbe Historic- 
al Society | of the | State of New York, 
I December 31, 1816. | By Egbert Ben- 
son. I [Two lines quotation.] | {He- 
printed from a copy, with the Author's 
last corrections. ) | 

New York: | Bartlett & Welford, | 
No. 7 Astor House. | 1848. 

Pp. 1-72, 8°. 

Indian names, pp. 4-13. 

Copies seen: Congress. 

Bent (George). [Cheyenne personal 
names, with meanings. 1888.] 

Manuscript, 1 page foolscap, in the library 
of the Bureau of Ethnology. 

Bergholtz (Gustaf Fredrik). Tbe Lord's 
Prayer | in tbe | Principal Languages^ 
Dialects and | Versions of tbe World, | 
printed in | Type and Vernaculars of 
tbe I Different Nations, | compiled and 
published by | G. F. Bere^holtz. | 
Chicago, Illinois, | 1884. 

Pp. 1-200. 120. 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



43 



Bergholtz (G. F.) — Continaed. 

The Lord's prayer in Algonkin (firom Cao^, 
p. 15: in Eastern Cree (srllabiocharactero, from 
Horden), p. 39; Western Cree (Roman, from 
Hojiter), p. 40; Delaware (from Campanios), 
p. 47; Delaware ( from Zeisberger), p. 48; Illinois 
(from Bodoni), p. 95; Maliseet (from Rand;, p. 
118; Massachusetts (from Eliot), p. 124; Me* 
nomoni (from Bondnel), p. 126; Micmac (from 
Rand), p. 127; OJibwa, p. 138; Ottawa (from 
Meeker and Barker), p. 140; Potawatomi (from 
Lykins), p. 146; Blackfoot (from De Smet), 
p. 168. 
Cktpieitetn: Congress. 

Bergxnann (Gastay yon). Das Gebeth 
des Herm | oder | YateransereaniiD- 
lang I in handert zwey und fUnfzig 
Sprachen. | Heraasgegebeii | von | 
Gostav yon Bergmaon | Prediger za 
Raieo in Livland. | [Design.] | 

Gedmokt zu Kuien 1789. 

Title and 6 other p. 11. pp. 1-58, 4 U. ICP. 

Lord's prayer in Virginian, p. 55. 

Copies teen: British Mosenm. 

[Beverley (Robert). ] The 1 history | and | 
Present State | of | Virginia, | in Fonr 
Parts. I I. The History of the First Set- 
tlement I of Virginia, and the Govern- 
ment there- | of, to the present Time. | 
11. The Natural Productions and Con- 
veni- I encies of the Country, suited to 
Trade | and Improvement. | III. The 
Native Indians, their Religion, Laws, | 
and Customs, in War and Peace. | IV. 
The Present State of the Country, as 
to I the Polity of the Government, and 
the I Improvements of the Land. | By a 
Native and Inhabitant of the Place. | 

London: | Printed for R. Parker, at 
the Unicorn, under the Piazza's | of the 
Royal Exchange. MDCCV [1705]. 

Engraved title-pa^ire recto hlank 1 1. printed 
title as ahove verso blank 1 I. dedication 2 11. 
prefiioe 811. text pp. 1-104, 1-40, 1-64, 1-83, table 
pp. 1-16, 2 IL 160. 

"Of the learning and languages of the 
Indians," pp. 23-24, contains general remarks 
concerning the Algonkine.— A few aboriginal 
terms passim. 

Copies eeen: Boston Athensenm, Congress, 
Massachusetts Historical Society. 

Priced in Stevens's Nuggets, no. 264, IL Is.; 
the Brinley copy, catalogue no. 8719, brought 
$10; the Murphy copy, catalogue no. 241, $7; 
priced by Ellis & Scrutton, London, 1886, 3L 15«. 

[ ] Histoire | de la | Virginie; | con- 
tenant, I I. L'Histoire du premier £- 
tablissement dans la Vir- | ginie, «& de 
sonGonvemement Jnsques-^-present. i 
II. Les Productions naturelles & les 



Beverley (R. ) — Continued. 
Commodit^s | du Pais, avant que lea 
Anglois y n^gociassent, «& | Pam^lioras- 
sent. III. La Religion, les Loix, & \ 
les CoCitumes des Indiens Naturels, tant 
dans la | Guerre, que dans la Paix. 
IV. L'Etat present dn | Pais, tant & 
regard de la Police, que de PAme- | 
lioration du Pais. | Par un Auteur natif 
& habitant dn Pais. | Traduitede TAn- 
glois. I Enrichiede Figures. | [Device.] | 

Imprim^ ^ Orleans, & se vend | a 
Paris, I Chez Pierre Ribou, proche les 
An- I gustins, h la descente du Pont- 
neuf, I k rimage Saint LoUis. | M.DCC- 
VII [1707]. I Aveo Aprobation, & Pri- 
vilege du Roy. 

Engraved tUU: Histoire | de la | Yirginie | 
[Picture of a ship.] | 

A Paris | Chez Pierre Ribou, snr le quay | 
des grands Augustins, a T Image | S^ Louis. 

Engraved title 1 1. printed title as abov» 
verso blank 1 1. preface 5 pp. text pp. 1-416^ 
folded p. 417. table approbation and privilege- 
9 U. plates, 16<>. 

Du savoir & da langage des Indiens, pp. 
250-252. 

Copies seen: Boston AthensBum. Congress, 
Lenox. 

Leclerc, 1867 catalogue, no. 160, priced a copy 
8 ft*. 25c. ; and in 1878, no. 818, 20 fc. 

[ J Histoire | de la | Virginie, | con- 
tenant I I. L'Histiire du premier E ta- 
blissement dans la Vir- | ginie, & d» 
son Gouvemement jusques ^ present. | 
II. Les productions naturelles «& lea 
commoditez | du Pais, avant que [l]e8- 
Anglois ynegoci assent, «& | I'am^lioras* 
sent. III. La Religion, les Loix, &, \ 
les Coutumes des Indiens Naturels, tant 
dans la | Guerre, que dans la Paix. 
IV. L'Etat present du | Pats, tant ^ 
regard de la Police, que de FAme- | 
lioration du Pais. | Par un Auteur natif 
& habitant dn Pais. | Traduite de 1' An- 
glois. { Enrichiede Figures. | [Device.] | 

A Amsterdam, | Chez Thomas Lom- 
brail, Marchand | Libraire dans Id 
Beurs-straat. | MDCCVII [1707]. 

Engraved title 1 L printed title as above 1 L 
2 other p. 11. text pp. 1-432, 1 folded L table 8 11. 
plates, \9r*. 

Du savoir Sc du langage des Indiens, pp. 
258-260. 

Copies seen: Congress, Lenox, TrumbulL 

Priced in Sievens's Nuggets, no. 266, \2s. 6d. ; 
by Leclerc, 1878, no. 819, 20 fr. ; the Brinley 
copy, catalogue no. 3721, sold for $5.50; Little^ 
field, of Boston, in his catalogue for Nov. 1888^ 
no. 620, holds it at |4* 



44 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Beverley (R.) — Continaed. 

I J Histoire | de la | Virginie, | con- 

teuaat | L'Histoire de son Establisse- 
menty de son Go a- | vememeut d'apr6- 
sent, ses Productions, la | Religion, lea 
Loix & les Codtames des In- | diens 
Naturels, tant dans la Gnerre qne dans | 
la Paix, & V6t&t present da Pays ii 
regard I de la Police & de TAgricul- 
tare. | Par D. S. Natif & habitant du 
Pays. I Tradait de I'Anglols <& enrichio 
de figures. | [Device.] | 

A Amsterdam, | Chez Claude Jordan, 
Libraire, vis-^yisdn Lombart, prochc 
la Ville de Lion. | M.DCC.XII [1712]. 

Engraved title 1 1. printed title aa above 
Temo blank 1 1. preface 2 IL text pp. 1-433, 
table 8 11. 16<^. 

Da savoir & da langage des Indiena, pp. 
258-260. 

OopUtieen: Congreaa. 

Priced by Leclerc, 1878 catalogue, no. 820, 
20 fr. 

[ ] Relation | Historiqne | de la | Vir- 
ginie, I contenant | L'Histoire de son 
Etablissement, & de son j Gouverne- 
ment ; ses Productions, la Re- | ligion, 
les Lois «& les Costumes des In- | diens 
Naturels, tant dans ia Gnerre que i dans 
la Paix, &. I'^tat dn Pays ii regard | de 
la Police & de V Agriculture, Jusqn'^ | 
present. I Par D. S. Natif «& habitant du 
Pais. I Traduit de PAnglois & enrichie 
des figures. | [Design.] | 

A Amsterdam, | Chez J. F. Bernard, 
pr^s de la Bourse. | M. DCC. XVIII 
[1718]. 

Engraved title : HiBtolre | de la | Virgin ie. | 

A Amsterdam | Chez Thomas Lom brail | 

Engraved title 1 1. printed title verso blank 
1 L preface 2 11. text pp. 1-433. table 8 II. 16o. 

Du savoir & da langage des Indiens, pp. 
258-260. 

Copies teen: Astor, Boston Public. British 
Haseam. 

At the Brinley sale, catalogae no. 3720, a oopy 
brought $2.50. 

£ ] The I history | of | Virginia, | In 

Four Parts. | I. The History of the 
First Settlement | of Virginia and the 
Government there- | of, to the Year 
1706. I II. The natural Productions and 
Convenien- | cies of the Country, suited 
to Trade and | Improvement. | III. The 
Native Indians, their Religion, Laws, | 
and Customs, in War and Peace. | IV. 
The present State of the Country, as 
to I the Polity of the Govemmeat, and 



Beverley (R.) — Continued, 
the I Improvements of the Land, the 
10^^ of I June 1720. | By a Native and 
Inhabitant of the Place. | The Second 
Edition revised and enlarg'd by the 
Author. I 

London : | Printed for B. and S. Tooke 
in Fleetstreet; F. Fayram | and J. 
Clarke at the Royal- Exchange, and T. 
Bicker- \ ton in Pater-Noster Row, 1722. 

Engraved title recto blank 1 1. printed title 
as above verso blank 1 1. -preface 3 11. text pp. 
1-284, table 12 11. book notices 2 11. plates. 8o. 

Linguistics as under previous titles, pp. 
160-161. 

Copiee teen: British Museam, Congraas, 
Watkinson. 

Priced in Stevens's Koggets, no. 965, IL U. ; 
at the Field sale, catalogue no. 141, a oopy 
brought $8; at the Menzies sale, catalogue no. 
163, "half crimson levant morocoo. gilt top, ele> 
gant copy, " $17.50; at the Sqnier sale, no. 88, $8; 
the Brinley copy, catalogue no. 8722, $6 60; at the 
Hurphy sale, two copies (catalogue bos. 242 
and 2839), $7.50 and #7; Quaritch, no. U760, prioed 
a copy "very fine, totally uncut," 10{. lOi. and 
under no. 2M87. 21. 10«. 

[ ] The I history | of | Virginia, | In 

Four Parts. | I. The History of the 
First Settlement | of Virginia, and the 
Government thereof, ] to the Tear 1706. | 
II. The natural Productions and Con- 
venien- I cies of the Country, salted to 
Trade and | Improvement. | III. The 
Native Indians, their Religion, Laws, | 
and Customs, in War and Peace. | IV. 
The present State of the Country, as 
to I the Polity of the Government, and 
the I Improvements of the Land, the 
W^ of I June 1720. | By a Native and 
Inhabitant of the Place. | The Second 
Edition revised and enlarg'd by the 
Author. I 

Loudon : | Printed for F. Fayram and 
J. Clarke at the Royal- | Exchange, and 
T. Bickertou in Pater-Noster-Row, 1722. 

Engraved title: The history | and | present 
sUte I of I Virginia. | By R: B: gent: | 8. 
Gribelin scalps: 

Engraved title recto blank 1 1. printed title 
verso blank 1 1. preface 3 11. text pp. 1-284. table 
12 11. book notices 2 11. plates, 8^^. 

Of the learning and languages of the Indians, 
pp. 160, 101. 

Copxet $een : Lenox. 

The I History of Virginia, | in Four 

Parts. I I. The history of the first set- 
tlement of Virginia, and the Gov- | ern- 
ment thereof, to the year 1706. | II. The 
natural productions and conyenienoee 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



45 



Beverley (R.) — Continued, 
of the coantry, suited | to trade and im- 
provement. I III. The native Indians, 
their religion, laws and customs, in war 
and peace. | IV. The present state of 
the country, as to the polity of the 
gov- i ernment and the improvements of 
the land the 10th of June | 1720. | By 
Bohert Beverley. | A native and inhab- 
itant of the place. | Reprinted from the 
anther's second revised edition, Lon- 
don, 1722. I With an introduction | By 
Charles Campbell, | Author of the Co- 
lonial History of Virginia. | 
J. W. Randolph, | 121 Main Street, 

Richmond, Virginia. | 1855. 

Engraved title recto blank 1 1. printed title 
as above verao blank 1 1. pp. i-xz, text pp. 1- 
2M,8o. 

Lingnistios as under previons titles. 

Copies §un: Boston Athenieam, British Ma* 
seam. 
Bible: 
Whole bible Cree See Mason (W.) 

Whole bibie Massachusetts EUot(J.) 
Old test, (pt.) Cree 
Old test. Cree 

Pentateuch Chippewa 
Genesis (pt) Chippewa 



Genesis (pt) Chippewa 
Genesis Chippewa 



Genesis 
Genesis 
Genesis 
Genesis 



Cree 

Cree 

Massachusetts 

Micmao 



Genesis (pt) Pottawotomi 
Exodus Micmao 



Psalms 
Psalms 
Psalms 
Psalms 
Psalms 



Chippewa 

Cree 

Massachusetts 

Massachusetts 

Micmac 



Psalms (pt) Mohegan 
Psalms (pt.) Mohegan 
Psalms (pt.) Mohegan 
Minor proph- Chippewa 
ets 



New test. 
New test. 
New test 
New test. 
New test 
New test 
New test 
New test 

Gospels 
Gospels 
Gosi>els 
Gospels 
Gospels 



Chippewa 

Chippewa 

Chippewa 

Cree 

Cree 

Cree 

Massachusetts 

Ottawa 

Chippewa 

Chippewa 

Cree 

Menomonee 

Ifenomonee 



Horden (J.) 
Mason (W.) 
O'Meara (F. A) 
Evans (T.) and 

Jones (P.) 
James (E.) 
Jones (P.) 
Sinclair (J.) 
Steinhauer (H.) 
Eliot (J.) 
Rand (S.T.) 
Wlkr. 

Rand (S.T.) 
O'Meara (F. AO 
Horden (J.) 
Eliot (J.) 
Mayhew (E.) 
Rand (S. T.) 
Edwards (J.) 
Morse (J.) 
Sergeant (J.) 
McDonald (R.) 

Blatchford (H.) 

James (E.) 
O'Meara (F. A,) 
Horden (J.) ■ 
Lacombe (A.) 
Mason (W.) 
Eliot (J.) 
Meeker (J.) and 

Barker (F.) 
Cameron (J. D.) 
O'Meara (F. A) 
Horden (J.) 
Krake (B.) 
ZephyrinEngel- 
tuundt (C. A.) 



Bible — Continued. 
Gospels Micmao 

Matthew Blaokfoot 
Matthew Chippewa 

Matthew (pt )Chippewa 
Matthew Chippewa 



Matthew 
Matthew 
Matthew 
Matthew 
Matthew 
Matthew 

Mark 

Mark 
Mark 
Luke 

Lake 
Luke 
John (pt) 

John 
John 
John 
John 
John 
John 

Acts 

Acts 
Acts 

Acts 
Acts 
Epistles 
Epistles 

Romans 
Romans 
Corinthians 

I, II 
Galatians 
Galatians 
Epheaians 

(pt) 
Ephesians 
EpheMiaas 
Ephesians 
PhiUppiaos 
Philippians 
Colossiaas 
Colossiaos 
T hessalo- 

nians i, il 
T h essalo- 

nians i, ii 
Timothy I, il 
Timothy I, II 
Titus 
Titus 
Philemon 



Cree 

Cree 

Massachusetts 

Micmac 

Pottawotomi 

Shawnee 

Abnaki 

Cree 

Micmao 

Chippewa 

Cree 

Micmao 

Chippewa 

Cree 

Cree 

Maliseet 

Massachusetts 

Micmac 

Ottawa 

Chippewa 

Cree 
Delaware 

Micmac 
Pottawotomi 
Menomonee 
Menomonee 

Cree 

Micmao 

Micmao 

Cree 

Micmac 

Chippewa 

Cree 

Cree 

Micmac 

Cree 

Micmao 

Cree 

Micmac 

Cree 

Micmao 

Cree 

Micmao 

Cree 

Micmao 

Cree 



See Rand (S. T.) 
Tims (J. W.) 
Horden (J.) and 

Sanders (J.) 
Jones (P.) 
Jones (P.) and 

Jones (J.) 
Gospel. 
Hunter (J.) 
Eliot (J.) 
Rand (S. T.) 
Lykins (J.) 
Lykins (J. ) and 

Chute (J. A.) 
Wtokhilaln (P. 

P.) 
Hunter (J.) 
Rand (S. T.) 
Hall (S.) and 

Cop way (G.) 
Hunter (J.) 
Rand (S. T.) 
Jones (J.) and 

Jones (P.) 
Hanter (J.) 
Mason (W.) 
Rand (S. T.) 
Mayhew (E.) 
Rand (S. T.) 
Meeker (J.) and 

Barker (F.) 
Hall (S.) and 

Copway (G.) 
Hanter (J.) 
Luckenbaob 

(A.) 
Rand (S. T.) 
Lykins (J.) 
Krake (B.) 
Zepliyrin Engel^ 

hardt (C. A.> 
Hunter (J.) 
Rand (S.T.) 
Rand (S. T.) 

Hanter J.) 
Rand (S. T.> 
James (E.) 

Hanter (J.> 
Mason (W.) 
Rand (S.T.) 
Hanter (J.) 
Rand (S.T.) 
Hanter (T.) 
Rand (S. T.> 
Hunter (J.) 

Rand (S. T.) 

Hunter (J.) 
Rand (S. T.) 
Hunter (J.) 
Rand (S. T.) 
Hunter (J.) 



46 



BIBLIOQEAPHT OF THE 



Bible — Continaed. 




Bible passages- 


Philemon 


Micmac 


See Rand (S.T.) 


Maliseet 


Hebrews 


Micmao 


Rand (S. T.) 


Massachusetts 


Jam 68 


Chippewa 


Omajibiigeoi- 


Massachusetts 






nvn. 


Massachusetts 


Jam 08 


Cree 


Mason (W.) 


Massachusetts 


James 


Micmac 


Rand (S. T.) 


Massachusetts 


Peter i,ii 


Cree 


Hnnter (J.) 


Massachusetts 


Peter li 


Cree 


Mason (W.) 


Massachusetts 


Peter i, ii 


Micmac 


Rand (S. T.) 


Massachusetts 


John i-ill 


Chippewa 


Omajibiigoui- 


Massachusetts 






nvn. 


Massachusetts 


John I 


Cree 


Hnnter (Jean). 


Massachusetts 


John I 


Cree 


Mason (W.) 


Massachusetts 


John i-ni 


Delaware 


Dencke (C. F.) 




John i-iu 


Micmao 


Rand (S. T.) 


Micmao 


Jade 


Micmac 


Rand(S.T.) 


Micmac 


Revelation 


Micmao 


Rand (S. T.) 


Micmao 


Bible and 


gospel history in Saalteax. 


Micmac 
Micmac 


See Horden (J.) 




Mohegan 



Bible and gospel history in the Moose 
dialect. See Horden (J.) 

Sible history: 
Abnaki 
Chippewa 
Chippewa 
Chippewa 



Cree 

Delaware 

Delaware 

Delaware 

Delaware 

Maliseet 
Menoraonee 
Menomonoo 
Nipissing 

Bible of every land. 

Bible passages : 
Algonquiao 
Algonquian 
Chippewa 
Chippewa 
Chippewa 
Chippewa 
Chippewa 
Chippewa 
Chippewa 
Chippewa 
Chippewa 
Cree 
Cree 
Cree 
Cree 
Cree 
Cree 

Delaware 
Delaware 
Delaware 
Maliseet 
Maliseet 
MiUiseet 



See Yetromile (E.> 
Horden (J.) 
Verwyst (C.) 
yogt(C.)audGafh>n 

(J.) 
Horden (J.) 
Grube (B. A.) 
Roth (J.) 
Zeisberger (D.) 
Zeisberger (D.) and 

Blanchard (I.D.) 
Rand (S. T.) 
Derenthal (O.) 
Krake (B.) 
Mathevet (J.C.) 

See Bagster (J.) 

See Brisbin (J. S.) 
Reade (J.) 
American Bible Soc 
Bag8t«r (J.) 
Bible Society. 
British and Foreign. 
Church 
Enew. 

Gilbert&Rivington. 
Schoolcraft (H. R.) 
Wilson (E.F.) 
American Bible Soc. 
Bagster (J.) 
Bible Society. 
British and Foreign. 
Church. 

Gilbert Sc Ri vington . 
American Bible Soc. 
Bagster (J.) 
Bible Society. 
American Bible Soc. 
Bible Society. 
British and Foreign. 



See Gilberts Rirington. 
Bagster (J.) 
Dearborn (H. A. 8.) 
Eliot (W.H.) 
Everhardt (J.) 
Goodrich (S. G.) 
Hood (G.) 
Laurie (T.) 
Present. 
Records. 
Reland (H.) 
Schoolcraft (H. R.) 
Smith (J. J.) and 

Watson (J. F.) 
American Bible Soo. 
Bagster (J.) 
Bible Society. 
British and Foreign. 
GUbert&RiTington. 
Hodgson (A.) 

Bible Society. Specimen verses | in 164 
I Languages and Dialects | in which 
the I holy scriptures ' have been printed 
and circnlated by the | Bible society. 
I [Design and one line quotation.] | 

Bible house, | Comer Walnat and 
Seventh Streets, Philadelphia [1876?] 

Printed cover with title as above, text pp. 3- 
3ft, index pp. 40-41. historical sketches etc pp. 
42-46 and cover, 18°. 

St. John iii, 16, in Cree (Roman) and Cree 
(syllabic characters), p. 36; Maliseet, p. 37; 
Ojibwa, p. 38.— I John ii, 2, in Delaware, p. 88. 

Copies Meen : Eames, Pilling, Powell. 

Specimen verses | in 215 | languages 

and dialects ' in which the | holy scrip- 
tures I have been printed and circulated 
by tbe | Bible society. | [Design and 
oue line quotation.] | 

Bible house, | corner Walnut and 
Seveuth streets, i Philadelphia. | Craig, 
Finley & co., prs. 1020 Arch St., Philada. 

[1878?] 

Printed covers (title as above on the front 
one), contents pp. 1-2, text pp. 3-48, 19^. 

St. John, iii, 16, in Eastern Cree (syllabic), p. 
26; Western Cree (Roman), Ojibwa in two ver. 
sious, one wrongly entitled " Chippewyan, or 
Tinue." Maliseet, p. 27; Micmac, p. 28. 
Oopietteen: PowelL 

Some copies have slightly variant title 
(Earaes) ; others have the title printed m a dif- 
ferent type, and omit the line beginning with 
the word "Craig." (Eames, Powell.) 
Bible stories : 

Chippewa See D«16age ^F. R.) 

Chippewa Dougherty (P.) and 

Rodd (D.) 
Chippewa Kishemanito. 

Delaware Dencke (C. F.) 

Delaware Lnckenbaoh (A.) 



ALGONQUIAN LANOUAGBS. 



47 



Bibliotheoa americana. See Bartlett 
(J.E.) 

Bibliotheoa americana. See Leolero ( C. ) 

Biblioth^ne Nationale : These words following a 
title or within parentheses after a note indicate 
that a copy of the work has been seen by the 
compiler in the National Library, Paris, France. 

Biedermann (Woldemar, Freiherr von). 
Zar vergleichenden Geschichte der 
poetUoheii Formen. (*) 

In Zeitschrtft f iir Vergleiohen de Litterator- 
geschichte and Renaissance* Li tterator, neue 
Folge, vol. 1, pp. 41fr-440, Berlin, 1889, 8*^ 

Shawnee sacrificial song, p. 422. 

Title from Prof. A. F. Chamberlain, Toronto. 

Bigcanoe {Chief Charles) and others. [A 
letter in the Ojibway language.] 

In The Indian, vol. 1 (no. 4), p. 44, Hagers- 
Tille, Ont Karch 3, 1886, 4^. 

Addressed to the editor and signed " Chief 
Chas. Bigcanoc, Jas. Ashqaabe, Noah Snake, 
Oeo. McCne, Sr.*' 

Biglow (WiUiam). History | of | the 
town of Naticky Mass. | from the days 
of I the apostolic Eliot, | mdcl, | to the 
present time, | mdcccxxx | By William 
Biglow. I 

Boston : | published by Marsh, Capen, 
& Lyon. I M DCCC XXX [1830]. 

Title verso advertisement 1 L text pp. 3-87, 
•rrata 1 p. 8^. Some copies contain a map. 

Extracts from the town records, 1713-1716, in 
the Natick langnage, pp. 26-27.— Title-page of 
Eliot's bible and Lord's prayer in the Natick 
language, with interlinear English translation, 
pp. 48-50. 

Chpies Been: Astor, Boston Athenspom, Brit- 
ish Moseam, Congress, Barnes, Trumbull. 

Bigot (Phe Vincent) Scripta R» P*« Vin- 
centii | Bigot Ubanakkaoram | in Deo 
Patris et Pastoris. 

Manuscript, in the Abnaki language, in the 
library of the archbishopric of Quebec. It 
consists of ten parts of about 30 11. each, bound 
together in deer-skio. the last or tenth part 
being bound as the first in the volume. It con- 
tains prayers in Abnaki on the rectos, the 
opposite versos containing a French transla- 
tion. These prayers are the acts of adoration 
and faith, the mystery of the trinity, the incar- 
nation, acts of hope, love, contrition, etc. which 
extend to p. 10. Pp. 11-38 are occupied with a 
paraphrase of certain passages of the new 
testament. 

The manuscript has, in the first eight parts, 
A dual pagination. The author seems to have 
written (at first, on the rectoa only) his conver- 
sation on divers passages of the new testa- 
inentf from the conception of the Holy Virgin, 
p. 1, to p. 106, where ends the development of the 
last subject, announced at p. 187 in these terms: 



Bigot (V.) — Continaed. 

"La vie de la Ste. Vierge, aprds I'ascension de 
son fils, sa mort, les actions de la mort des 
ap/^tres, aprds la mesme ascension de J6sus.'* 
This page, 196, which is the last of the eighth 
part, ends with "A. M. D. et B.y. M. G. Sep- 
timo Jannatli 1686." 

A second pagination commences on the verse 
facing the first leaf of the regular pagination 
with the number 175, and with the following 
title: "Suite du 14«*«di8COurs de Jesn cruci- 
flzo." The matter which preceded this "suite" 
is lacking in the manuscript. The eight parts 
contain instructions on the new testament and 
on a few of the more remarkable points of the 
old. 

The last part of the volume, which is the ninth, 
treats of particular Hubjects, and bears a special 
pagination from 1 to 23, besides 3 blank leaves 
at the end. Instruction sur la confession, pp. 
1-6.— Instruction Aur la communion, p. 7.— 
M^thodo pour entendre lesconfeasions, pp. 7-23. 
The Abnaki text is on the recto of these leaves; 
on the verso, facing, is found a translation, 
sometimes Latin, sometimes French; it is 
broken off at the 14th leaf. The versos of the 
leaves following are blank. 

BiU. 50tb Congress, | 1st Session. | S. 
2523. I [Four lines.] | A. bill | To ratify 
and confirm an agreement with the 
Chippewa Indians of I the White Earth, 
Leech Lake, Cass Lake, Lake Winne- 
bagosh- I ish, and White Oak Point 
Reservations, and the Gnll Kiver | band, 
I in the State of Minnesota. 

[Washington, D. C. Qovemment 
printing office. 1888.] 

No title-page, beading as above; text pp. 
1-29, large 9P. 

Signatures of chiefd and headmen of the 
above-named bands of Chippewas, pp. 12-28. 

Copies teen: Pilling, PowelL 

BilL 50th Congress, | 1st Session. | H. R. 
1956. I [Nine lines.] | A bill | To ratify 
and confirm an agreement with the Gros 
Ventres, Piegan, | Blood, Blackfeet, and 
River Crow Indians in Montana. 

[Washington, D. C. Government 
printing office. 1888.] 

Ko title-page, heading as above; text pp. 
1-42, 1 1. lirge 8©. 

Names, with English equivalents, of the 
chiefs, headmen, and principal men of the 
above peoples; the Piegan, Blood, and Blackfeet 
occur on pp. 34-41. 

Copieaeen: Bureau of Ethnology, Pilling, 
Powell. 

Also printed with the necessary changes in 
heading, and with a section added on p. 42, 
as "50th Congress. 1st Session, S. 1824. (Pilling, 
Powell.) Also printed as ''H.R. 1956. In the 
Senate of the United Stotes, March 12, 1888. ' * 



48 



BIBLIOGRAPHT OF THE 



Bill- Continned. 

An act to ratify " etc (Pilling.) And again, as 
the same, witli sliglit additions to tlie heading 
and a final section added, making pp. 1-43. 
(Pining.) 
In all these the proper names are the same. 

BilL 50th CoDgress, | Ist Seesion. | S. 
2522. I [Four lines.] | A biU | To ratify 
and confirm an agreement with the Bed 
Lake Band of | Chippewa Indians in 
the State of Minnesota. 

[Washington, D. C. Government 
printing office. 1888. ] 

Notitle-page.headingasahove; text pp. 1-15, 
large 8^. 

Signatures of chiefs and headmen of the Bed 
Lake hand of Chippewas, pp. 11-13. 

Copies ieen: Pilling. 

Bingham (A. ) Oj ib wa | spelling book : | ac- 
cording to the | improved orthography { 
of] Dr. Edwin James. | By A. Bingham, 
I missionary to the Baptist board of 
foreign missions | at Sanlt St. Marie, 
Michigan Territory. | 

Albany: | printed by Packard and Van 
Bentbuysen. | 1825. 

Title 1 1. text pp. 3-12, 16°. 

An evening hymn, p. 12. 

The only copy I have seen is that in the 
library of the late Sir Thomas Phillips, Chelten- 
ham, England. 

Blackbird (Andrew Jackson). History 
I of the I Ottawa aud Chippewa In- 
dians I of Michigan ; | a grammar of 
their langaage, | and personal and 
family history of the anthor, | By An- 
drew J. Blackbird, | Late U. 8. Inter- 
preter, Harbor Springs, Emmet Co., 
Mich. I 

Ypsilanti, Mich. : | the Ypsilantian 
job printing house. | 18F7. 

Cover tiUe : Price One Dollar. | History | of 
the I Ottawa and Chippewa | Indians of Michi* 
gan, I and grammer of their language | hy A. J. 
Blackbird. | (Maikete-be-nessy, son of the Ot- 
tawa Chief, Mack-a-dc-pe-nessy). 

Printed cover, title verso copyright 1 L intro- 
dnction 1 1. preface verso acknowledgment 1 1. 
text pp. 7-128, sq. 16o. 

The ten corainandraents, creed, and Lord's 
prayer, pp. 105-106— Grammar of the Ottawa 
and Chippewa langaage, pp. 107-119.— Vocabu- 
laries (words, phrases, and sentences), pp. 120- 
128. 

Copies eeen : Eames, Pilling, PowelL 

I have seen a prospectus of this work headed 
"The YpsQantian, TpsUantl. Mich. Thursday, 
Feb.9, 1888" (probably reprinted from that period- 
ical), which gives examples of nonns, pronouns, 



BUokbird (A. J.) — Continued. 

andcoi^ugationsof ▼erhsfh>mthegramnuur. In 
it is the statement that " nearly the whole work 
of editing the author's mauuscript has been done 
as a work of benevolence by Mrs. O. W. Owen 
of this city, excepting a portion of the grammar, 
done during her illness by the senior editor of 
the Ypsilantian.*' 

The closing paragraph of the work itself 
is as follows: " Note. Except some oondensa* 
tion and arrangement in the grammar, this work 
is printed almost rerbatim ay written by th» 
author. — Editor. " 

Andrew J. Blackbird, the author of this Uttl» 
book, is an educated Indian, son of the Ottawa 
chief. His Indian name is Maok-aw-de-be-nessy 
(Black Hawk), but he generally goes by the 
name of " Blackbird," taken from the interpre- 
tation of the French " I'oiseau noir." Mr. Black* 
bird's wife is an educated and intelligent whit* 
woman of English descent, and they have four 
children. He is a friend of the white people aa 
well as of his own p€M)ple. Brought up as an In- 
dian, with no opportunity for learning during 
his boyhood, when he came to think for himself, 
he started out blindly for an education, without 
any means but his brains and his hands. 

He was loyal to the government during the 
rebellion in the United States, for which cause 
he met much opposition by designing white 
people who had full sway among the Indians, 
and who tried to mislead them and cause them 
to be disloyal; and he broke up one or two 
rebellious councils amongst his people during 
the progress of the rebellion. 

^Vhen Hon. D. C. Leach, of Traverse City, 
Mich., was Indian agent, Mr. Blackbird waa- 
appointed United States interpreter, and con- 
tinued in this office with other subsequent 
agents of the department for many years. Be- 
fore he was fairly out of this office he was ap- 
pointed postmanter of Little Traverse, now 
Harbor Springs, Mich., and faithfully dis- 
charged hisdutiesas such for over eleven yeara 
with but very little salary. — Introduction, 
Blackfoot : 

Bible, Genesis (pt) See Tims (J. W.) 
Bible. Matthew Tims (J. W.) 

Bible stories Tims (J. W,) 

Catechism Lacombe (A.) 

Dictionary Lacombe (A.) 

Dictionary McLean (J.) 

Dictionary Tims (J. W.) 

General discussion Our. 
Gentes Legal (E.) 

Gentes Morgan (L. H.> 

Geographic names Morgan (L. H.> 

Grammar Lanning (CM.) 

Grammar McLean (J.) 

Grammar Tims (J. W.) 

Grammatic comments Adelung (J. O.) and 

Vater (J. S.) 
Grammatic comments Hay den (F. V.) 
Grammatic comments Wilson (B. F.) 
Grammatic treatise Legal (E.) 



ALOONQUIAN LANOUAOES. 



49 



Blaokfoot — Continued. 

Hymnfl See Lacombe (A.) 

Hymns Prando (P. P.) 

Hymns Tims (J. W.) 

Legends Legal (B.) 

Letter Crowfoot. 

Lord's prayer Bergholtz (G. F.) 

Lord's prayer HoLean (J.) 

Lord's prayer Marietti (P.) 

Lord's prayer Shea (J. 6.) 

Lord's prayer Smet (P. J. de). 

Lord's prayer Tmmboll (J. H.) 

Lord's prayer Youth's. 

Kumerals ' Latham (B. G.) 

Kamerals Maximilian (A. P.) 

Personal names Bill. 

Prayer book Tims (J. W.) 

Prayers Lacombe (A.) 

Proi>er names Brinton (D. G.) 

Proper names Catlin (G.) 

Proper names Chamberlain (A. F.) 

Proper names Hogrid};e (G.) 

Proper names Morris (A..) 

Proper names Petitot (E. F. S. J.) 

Proper names Stanley (J. M.) 

Relationships Morgan (L. H.) 

Songs Petitot (£. F. S. J. ) 

Songs Smet (P. J. de). 
Ten commandments Petitot (E. F. S. J.) 

Text Legal (E.) 

Text McLean (J.) 

Yocabalary Adelang (J. C.) and 

Vater (J.S.) 

Tocabnlary Baschmann (J.C.B.) 

Yocabnlary Campbell (J.) 

Vocabulary Catlin (G.) 

Vocabulary Cooper (J. G.) 

Vocabalary Denig ( B. F. ) 

Yocabnlary Franklin (J.) 

Vocabalary Gallatin (A.) 

Yocabnlary Haines (E. M.) 

Yocabalary Hale (H.) 

Vocabalary Hay den (F. V.) 

Yocabalary Honse (J.) 

Vocabulary Lacombe (A.) and 

Legal (E.) 

Vocabalary Lanning (C. M.) 

Vocabalary Latham (R G.) 

Vocabalary Legal (E.) 

Yocabalary Maximilian (A P.) 

Yocabalary Moncro vi e (J. B. ) 

Vocabalary Morgan (L. H.) 

Yocabalary PallisMer (J.) 

Yocabalary Smet (P. J. de). 

Yocabalary Sallivan (J. W.) 

Vocabalary Um f re ville (E. ) 

Yocabalary Willis (WO 

Yocabalaiy Wilson (E. F.) 

Words Baschmann (J.C.B.) 

Words Chase (P. B.) 

Words Frost (J.) 

Words Latham (K.G.) 

Words Mogridge (G.) 

Words Petitot (B. F. 8. J.) 
See also Satsika. 

ALO 4 



Black Hawk. Life | of | Ma-ka-tai-me- 
she-kia-kiak | or | Black Hawk, | em- 
braoing the | tradition of his nation — 
Indian wars in which he has | been en- 
gaged — canse of joining the British in 
their | late war with America, and its 
history— de- | soription of the Kock- 
River village — man- | ners and cus- 
toms — encroachments by | the whites, 
contrary to trea- | ty — removal from his 
I village in 1831. | With an | account of 
the canse and general history | of the 
I late war, | his | surrender and con- 
finement at Jefferson Barracks, | and | 
travels through the United States. | 
Dictated by himself. | J. B. Patterson, 
of Rock Island, III. Editor and Pro- 
prietor. I 

Boston : | Published by Theodore Ab- 
bott. I 1834. 

Portrait 1 1. title verso copyright 1 1. certifl- 
cate of interpreter verso blank 1 1. dedication 
i^he Sac langnage pp. 5-6, dedication in Eng. 
lisn pp. 7-8, advertisement pp. 9-11, text pp. 
1»-155, 12°. 

" Ne-ka-na-wen. Ma-ne-se-no oke-mant wap- 
pi ma-quai," Dedication to Brigadier General 
H. Atkinson, in the Sac language, iivith Eng* 
lish trAnslation, pp. 5-S. 

Oopieaieen: Congress. 

According to Sabin's Dictionary, no.5<S75, 
the first edition is Cincinnati, 1833. 

Life I of I Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak 

I or I Black Hawk, | embracing the | 
tradition of his nation — Indian wars 
in which he has | been engaged — canse 
of joining the British in their | late 
war with America, and its history— de- | 
scription of the Rock-River village- 
man - I ners and customs — encroach- 
ments by I the whites, contrary to trea- 

I ty — removal from his | village in 
1831. 1 With an | account of the cause 
and general history | of the | late war, 

I his I surrender and confinement at 
Jefferson Barracks, | and | travels 
through the United States. | Dictated 
by himself. | J. B. Patterson, of Rock 
Island, 111. Editor and Proprietor. | 
Boston : | Russell, Odiome & Metcalf. 

I New York : Monson Bancroft. —Phil- 
adelphia: Marshall, Clark & co.— 

I Baltimore: Jos. Jewett. — Mobile: 
Sidney Smith. | 1834. 

Collation and lingnistics as in edition titled 
next ahove. 



50 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Black Ha^7k — Continaed. 

Copiet teen: Boston Athenasam,- Danbar, 
Pillin:;, WisoonsiQ IIit»torica.l Society. 

Some copies with title as above have the 
imprint Boston, 1831. (Congress, Danbar.) 

Life I of I Black Hawk, | or | Ma-ka- 

tai-me-ahe-kia-kiak, | enibraciug the | 
Tradition of his Nation — Indian Wars 
Id which he has been | engaged — Cause 
of joiuiug the British in their late War 

I with America, and its History — | De- 
scription of the Rock-river Village — 
Manners and Cnstoms — | Encroach- 
ments by the Whites, contrary to Trea- 
ty— I Removal from his Village in 1831 : 

I with an | account of the cause and 
general history | of the | late war, | His 
Surrender and Confinement at Jefferson 
Barracks, | and | travels through the 
United States. | Dictated by himself. | 
Edited by J. B. Patterson, of Rock Isl- 
and, Illinois. I 
London : | Richard James Kennett, | 

14, York street. | 1^36. ♦ 

Frontispiece 1 L title verso printer 1 1. pref- 
ace pp. iii-viii, certificate of interpreter verso 
blank 1 1. dedication in Sac pp. v-vi, same in 
English pp. vii-viii, advertisement pp. ix-xi, 
text pp. 1-177, colophon unnumbered page verso 
of p. 177, advertisement 2 U. 12<^. 

Linguistics as under previous tiUe, pp. v-viii. 

Copies teen : Shea. 

There is an edition with title-page as in the 
edition of 1834 with the imprint Boston : | pub- 
lished by Theodore Abbott. | 1845. (Astor, 
Watkinson. ) 

— Autobiography | of | Ma-ka-tai-me- 
she-kia-kiak, | or | Black Hawk, | em- 
bracing the traditions of his nation, 
various wars in which he has | been en-, 
gaged, and his account of the cause and 
I general history of the | Black Hawk 
war of 1832, | His Surrender, and Trav- 
els Through the United States. | Dic- 
tated by himself. | Antoine LeClair, 
U. S. Interpreter. | J. B. Patterson, Ed- 
itor and Amanuensis. | Rock Island, Il- 
linois, 1833. I Also I life, death and 
burial of the old chief, together with 
I A History of the Black Hawk War, 
j By J. B. Patterson, Oquawka, III. 
1882. I 

[Continental printing co., St. Louis, 
Mo., 1882.] 

f^ntispicce, title verso copyrij^ht notice and 
printers 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. affidavit 
pp. v-vi, original dedication (in Sac) p. vii, trans- 
lation of same into English p. viii, advertise* 



Black Hawk — Continaed. 

ment pp. iz-x, text pp. 11-190, appendix pp. 
191-208, 12P. 

Dedication In the Sao language, p. vlL 

Copies §een: Congreaa, Wiaooiiain Historical 
Society. 

Black Hawk, a noted chief of the Sac and Fox 
tribes of Indians, though by birth a Pottawat- 
tamie, born at Kaakaskia, HI., in 1767; died at 
his camp on the river Des Moines, 3 Oct., 1838. 
At fifteen he was ranked with the braves, and be 
came a saccessfal leader in expeditions against 
the Osage and Cherokee tribes. About 1788 he 
succeeded, as head chief of the Saoa, hia father, 
who had been killed by a Cherokee. In 1804 
the Saca and Foxes signed at St. Louis a treaty 
with Gen. Harrison, by which for an annuity of 
$1,000 a year they transferred to the 17. S. Gov- 
ernment their lands, extending about 700 miles 
along Mississippi River. This arrangement was 
repudiated by Black Hawk, who averred that 
the chiefs were drunk when they signed the 
treaty. Moved by the exhortations of the 
Shawnee prophet Elskwatawa^ brother of Te- 
cumseh, and by the presents of British agents. 
Black Uawk, with the title of general, joined 
the British with 600 warriors during the war of 
1812; but a repulse in a battle near Detroit, and 
an unsuccessful attack on a fort, surprised 
and disgusted the red men, who soon tired of 
the service. The cession of their territory waa 
ratified by another treaty made in 1815, after 
the conclusion of the war, and by a third treaty 
which Black Hawk himself signed at 8t Louis 
in 1816. In 1823 the main body of the Sim and 
Foxes removed, underthelead of Chief Keoknk, 
to their reservation across the Mississippi; 
but Black Hawk and his followers remained. 
By the new treaty made at Prairie da Chien, 15 
July, 1830, signed by chiefs of TariouB tribee, 
among them Keokuk, their lands east of the 
Mississippi became the property pf tihe whitee. 
Their removal west was opposed by Black Hawk, 
who, when the crops of his people were ploughed 
up and the lands seized for the white settlert 
who had purchased the sites of their villages, 
threatened retaliation. The militia of Illinois 
were then called out, and on 25 June, 1831, a force 
under Gen. Gaines compelled the Indians to de> 
part. Black Hawk returned in the spring across 
the Mississippi. After a band of fifty war* 
riors was attacked and scattered by the militia, 
they separated into squads and began to maa* 
sacre t ho whites. Gen. Scott marchett a force of 
U. S. troops against them, but was hindered in 
bis operiitions by an outbreak of cholera among 
the Holdiurd. The Indians were driven back to 
WisconHiii River, where they sustained a de- 
feat, inflicted by Gen. Dodge, on 21 July, 1832. 
They were completely defeated at the river 
Bad Axe. I and 2 Aug., by Gen. Atkinson, and 
the Hui render of Black Hawk took place on the 
27th. Black Hawk, his two sons, and seven 
other head warriors who were detained as hoe* 
tages were taken through the principal eaatern 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



51 



Black Hawk — CoDtinaed. 

cities, and then confined in Fortress Monroe 
until 5 Jane, 1833. Black Hawk was deposed, 
and Keoknk made chief of the Sacs and Foxes, 
who to the nomber of about 3,000 were removed 
to the region aboat Fort Des Mo\nes,—Apple' 
ton'i Oydop, o/ Am. Biog, 



Blaokmore (William). The North Amer- 
ican IndiaDB : a sketch of some of the 
hostile tribes, together with a brief ac- 
count of General Sheridan's campaign 
of 1868 against the Sionx, Cheyenne, 
Arapahoe, Kiowa, and Comanche In- 
dians. By William Blackmore. 

In Ethnological Soo. Lond. Jour, new series, 
ToL 1, pp. 287-320, London, 1869, 8°. 

Karnes of Cheyenne chiefs, with English 
eqnividents, pp. 309-310. — Names of Arapahoe 
chitofs, with English equivalents, p. 312. 

[Blakeman (Bessie C.)] Historicals | for 
I the Young Folks. | By Oro Noque. | 
Boston : | Published by D. Lothrop &, 
Co. I Dover, N. H. : G. T. Day & Co. | 
1874. 

Pp.l-vi,7-l«8,12o. 

Lord's prayer in the Natick language (flrom 
Eliot), pp. 43-44. 

Copies teen: Congress. 

Blanohard (Ira D.) The | Delaware first 
book, I prepared I by | Ira D. Blanoh- 
ard. I Second Edition. | 

Shawanoe Baptist Mission press, | J. 
G. Pratt, Printer. | 1842. 

Severee title: Lunapre > Irkvekan, | nrtam- 
«xif. I Mplcnbes | ok | halus, I tolrkvonro. 

English title with Delaware title as above on 
Terso 1 1. key to the Delaware alphabet p. 3, text 
«ntirely in Delaware pp. 4-24, 19°. 

Copies seen: Trumbull. 

For titles of other works by this author, see 
Linapie, page 314 of this bibliography. 

^— See Zeiaberger (D.) and Blanchard 
(I. D.) 

Blanohard (Rufus). The | discovery and 
conquest | of | the Northwest ' including 
the I early history of Chicago, Detroit, 
Vin- I cennes, St. Louis, Ft. Wayne, 
Prairie | Du Chien, Marietta, Cincin- 
nati I Cleveland, etc., etc. | And inci- 
dents of pioneer life in the region of 
the I great lakes and the Mississippi 
▼alley. | By Rufus Blanchard. | 

Chicago : | Cushing, Thomas & com- 
pany, publishers, I 1880. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright 1 1. in- 
troduction pp. 3-ft, contents pp. 7-16, list of il- 



Blanchard (R.) — Continued. 

lustrations p. 17, text pp. 10-484, 1 1. Washing* 
ton's Journal pp. 1-30, index pp. i-iv, S°. 

Haines (E. M.), Indian names, etc. pp.47S- 
484. 

Copies seen: Congress. 

Bland ( Col. Theodorick), jr. The | Bland 
papers: | being a | selection from the 
manuscripts | of | Colonel Theodorick 
Bland, jr. | of Prince George county, Vir- 
ginia. I To which are prefixed | an in- 
troduction, I and I a memoir of Colonel 
Bland. | [One line quotation.] | Edited 
by I Charles Campbell. | In two vol- 
umes. I Vol. I [-II]. I 

Petersburg: | printed by Edmund & 
Julian C. Rnffln. | 1840 [-1843]. 

2 vols. : 4. p. IL pp. v-xxxi, 2 11. pp. 1-160; 2 
ll.pp. 9-130, 8o. 

Appendix C. "List of Indian words (sup- 
I>OBed to be Chickasaw)", vol. 1, pp. 151-162. 

The vocabulary (about 100 words) is in Del- 
aware, not Chickasaw. 

Copies seen : Congress, Lenox. 

At the Menzies sale, catalogue no. 186, a copy 
brought $5.50. 

Theodoric Bland, soldier, bom in Prince 
George County, Virginia, died in New York 
City June 1, 1790. In 1753 he was sent to £ng- 
land, and, after preliminary studies at Wake- 
field, he purbued the academic andsubseqaent- 
.Ij the medical course at the University of Ed- 
inburgh. After being admitted to the prac- 
tice of medicine in England he returned to 
this country about 1764. He continued active 
in his profession until tho beginning of the 
Revolutionary war, when he at once sided 
with the colonists and became captain of 
the first troop of Virginia cavalry. After the 
enrolment of six companies he Joined the main 
army in 1777 as lieutenant-colonel.- Later he 
became colonel, and throughout tho war signal- 
ised himself as a vigilant and efficient officer, 
enjoying the esteem and confidence of General 
Washiugton. He served during the war for 
one term in the Virginia Senate, and later was 
elected to the Continental Congress, serving 
from 1780 till 1783. He was also a member of 
the Virginia convention of 1788 on the adop- 
tion of the federal constitution.— Applston'i 
Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 

[Blatchford (/?er. Henry).] In | otoshki 
-kikindiuin | au | kitogimaminan gaie 
bemajiincng | Jesus Krist : | ima | Ojibue 
inueuining giizhitong. | The | new 
testament | of | our lord and saviour | 
Jesus Christ : | translated into the lan- 
guage I of the I Ojibwa Indians. | 

New- York: | printed by [the American 
bible society, | Instituted in New- York 
in the year 1816. | 1844. 



62 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Blatchford (H.) — Continaed. 

Title verso index 1 L key to the orthojn^phy 
pp. iii-iv, text entirely in the OJibwa lanKuage 
pp. 1-613, l«o. 

Chpie* teen : American Bible Sooiety, Astor, 
Boston Atheneam, British Moaeam, Lenox, 
TrumboU, Yale, Eames, Pilling. 

At the Brinley sale two copies, catalogue nos. 
6864 and 5665, brought $1 each ; Quaritch, 1889, 
priced a copy 12«. ' 

[ ] lu I otoshki-kikindiuin | an | te- 

beniminrng gaie beinajiinrDg | Jesus 
Christ: | ima | Ojibne inuenining giiz- 
hitong. I The new testament | of | our 
lord and savioar Jesus Christ: | trans- 
lated into the language | of the | Ojibwa 
Indians. | 

New York : | American bible society, | 
instituted in the year mdcccxvi. | 
1856. 

Title verso index 1 1. key to the orthography 
pp. iii-iv, text entirely in the Ojibwa language 
pp. 1-717, 16°. 

Copiea teen: American Bible Society, Britinh 
Musenm, Congress, Lenox, Pilling, Powell, 
- Trumbull, Eames. 

Leclerc, 1867 catalogue, no. 1462, priced it 4 ft. 
60c. ; the Fischer copy, catalogue no. 2642, sold 
for 2«. ; the Field copy, catalogue no. 1710, $1.25 
Leclerc, 1878 catalogue, no. 2158, priced it 25 fr. 
Francis, of New York, in 1888, charged $1 50 
and Chadenat, of Paris, catalogue no. 3, No- 
vember, 1889, no. 3069, 15 fr. 

[ ] lu I otoshki-kikindiuin | an | 

tebenimiut^ng gaie bemajiint^ng | Jesus 
Christ: | ima| Ojibne inueuining giizhi- 
tong. I The | new testament \ of | our 
lord and saviour Jesus Christ : | trans- 
lated into the language | of the | Ojibwa 
Indians. | 

New York : | American bible society, 
I instituted in the year mdcccxvi. | 
1875. 

Title verso index 1 1. key to the orthography 
pp. iii-iv, text entirely in the Ojibwa language 
pp. 1-717, 16°. 

Copies teen : Astor, British and Foreign Bible 
Society, Eames, Pilling, Powell. 

Clarko & co. Cincinnati, in their 1886 cata- 
logue, no. 6758, quote a copy at 75 cents. 

Blood Indians. See Blackfoot. 

Blossom (Levi). See Lapham (I. A.) 
and others. 

Bluejacket (Charles). See Gatschet 

(A. S.) 

[Bodoni (Jean-Bap tiste), editor."] Oratio 
I dominica | in | CLV. liugvas | versa 
I et I exoticis characteribvs | plervm- 
qve expressa. | 



Bodoni (J. B.) — Continued. 

Parmae | typis Bodonianis | MDCCC 
VI [1806]. 

8 p. 11. pp. i-xix (in French), 2 IL pp. i-xix 
(in lUlian), 2 11. pp. 1-20, 1 L text pp. i-cexlriii, 
1 1. folio. 

Pars quarta, lingnas Amerioaiiaa oomplec- 

tens: Canadice, montium dialecto (ex Masdeu), 

p. ccxviii ; lUinice (ex ms.), p. ocxix; Vlrginice 

(Ex Bibliis Virginice impressis Cantabrigia), 

p. ccxxl; Savanahice (ex Chamberlaynio), p. 

ocxxii. 

Copies teen: British Museum, Lenox, Wat- 

kinson. 

An "uncut, fine, clean copy " at the FUcher 

sale, no. 1272, brought Tit. 6d. 

BolBthibault ( Francois Jules Doubletde). 
See Doublet de BolBthibault (F. J.) 

Bolin ( — ) See Chamberlain ( A. F. ) 

Bollaert (William). Observations on 
the Indian tribes of Texas. By William 
Bollaert, F. R. G. S. 

In Ethnological Soo. of London Jour. toL 2, 
pp. 262-283, London, n. d. 8°. 

A few proper names in Shawnee, Delaware^ 
and Kickapoo, pp. 282-283. 

Bolton (Henry Carrington). The | 
connting-out rhymes | of | children | 
their antiquity, origin, and wide dis- 
tribution I A Study in Folk-Lore | by | 
Henry Carrington Bolton | 

London | Elliot Stock, 62, Paternoster 
row I 1888. 

Ilalf'title verso a counting-out rhyme 1 L 
title as above verso blank 1 1. preface versa 
blank 1 1. authorities pp. vii-iz, contents verso 
blank 1 1. text pp. 1-121, appendix pp. 122-123 
(unnumbered), 4°. 

Counting-out rhyme and numerals 1-5 in 
Penobscot, p. 10. 

Copiet teen : Bureau of Ethnology. 

The original article, which appeared in the 
Journal of American Folk'-Lore, voL 1, pp. 31- 
37, containE no linguistics. 

[Bompae c i?tfr. William Carpenter). ] Cree 
primer. 

Colophon : London : Gilbert &, Riv* 
i ngton,Whitefriars Street, and St. JohQ'» 

Square. 

No title-page, heading only; text pp. 1-38, 
160, entirely in the Cree language except the 
headings. 

Lessons, pp. 1-19.— Prayers, pp. 10-28.— Cat* 
echism, pp. 24-26.— Hymns, pp. 27-36. 

Copiet teen: Pilling, Powell, Society for Pro- 
moting Christian Knowledge. 

Mr. Bom pas, a son of the late C. C. BompM* 
Esq., Sergeant-atlaw, was bom in London, Eng* 
land, in 1834. Having been first trained to th» 
legal profession, he was ordained deacon by the- 
then Bishop of Lincoln in 1859. After serrliif 



ALGONQUIAN LANOUAOES. 



53 



Bompas (W. C.)~ Continued. 

aevoral curacies in the diocese of Linooln, he 
came to CaDada as a missioDary of the Charch 
missionary society in 1865, having first received 
priestly orders from the present Bishop of 
Knpert's Land acting as commissary for the late 
Bishop of London. In 1874 he was again sum- 
moned to England to receive episcopal orders 
«B Bishop of Athabasca, and in 1884, the pres- 
ent diocese of Mackenzie being portioned off 
from that of Athabasca, bis title was changed 
to Bishop of Mackenzie River, the Right Rev. 
Dr. Yonng being consecrated as Bishop of Ath- 
abasca. 

He has written and published much material 
in the Athapascan languages, as well as a 
primer in Eskimo. 

Bond (John Wesley). Minnesota | and | 
its resources | to which are appended | 
camp-flre sketches | or | notes of a trip 
from St. Paal to Pembina and Selkirk 
I settlement on the Red River of the 
North I By J. Wesley Bond ; [Device] | 
Rediield, | 110 and 112 Nassau street, 

New York. | 1853. 

Engraved HtU: Minnesota | and | its re- 
sources I by I J. W. Bond | [Picture entitled] 
Falls of St Anthony. | 

Redfield | 110 and 112 Nassau street ( New 
York. I 1853. 

Engraved title 1 1. printM title verso copy* 
right etc. 1 L dedication verso blank 1 L preface 
pp. 5-6, contents pp. 7-8, text pp. 9-364, testimo- 
nials pp. 1-3, advertisements 8 11. map and 
plates, 12°. 

Remarks on the Cree and Sauteux lan> 
guages, pp. 348-349. 

Copies teen : British Museum, Congress. 



— Minnesota | and { its resources | to 
which are appended i camp-lire sketches i 
or I notes of a trip from St. Panl to 
Pemhina and Selkirk | settlement on 
the Red River of the North | By J. Wes- 
ley Bond I 

Keen &, Lee, | No. 148 Lake street, 
Chicago, Illinois. ! Charles Desilver, | 
No. 253 Market street, Philadelphia. | 
1856. 

Engraved title : Minnesota and | its resources 
I by I J. W. Bond | [Engraving entitled] Tails 
•of St Anthony. | 

Keen &. Lee | N*>. 148 Lake street, | Chicago, 
Illinois. 1 1856. 

Engraved title 1 1. printed title verso copy- 
right 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface 
verso blank 1 L contents pp. 7-8, text pp. 9-412, 
map, plate.'), 16°. This edition agrees with the 
New York edition of 1853 from the beginning 
of the text, p. 9, to p. 361, and is apparently 
printed from the same plates. The remainder 
«ontiat8 of supplementary matter. 



Bond (J. W.) — Continued. 

Remarks on the Cree and Sautenz lan- 
guages, pp. 348-349. 

Copies teen : Boston Public, British Museum, 
Congress. 

There is a copy of this work in the Boston 
Athenaeum library with title similar to that 
given above, except that the imprint of the 
printed title concludes: No. 251 Market Street, 
Philadelphia. | 1857. (*) 

Minnesota | and | its resources | to 

which are appended | camp-fire sketches 
I or I notes of a trip from St. Paul to 
Pembina and Selkirk j Settlement on the 
Red River of the North | By J. Wesley 
Bond I 

Chicago: | Keen and Lee, | 1856. 

Engraved title : Minnesota' and [ its resouroea 
I by I J. W. Bond | [Picture of Falls of St An. 
thony.] I 

Kedfleld | 110 &. 112 Nassau street | New 
York. I 1853 [tic]. 

Frontispiece 1 1. engraved title verso blank 
1 L printed title verso copyright 1 1. dedication 
verso blank 1 1. preface pp. 5-6, contents pp. 7-8, 
text pp. 9-334, appendix pp. 335-365, supplement 
to the third edition pp. 366-400, maps, 129. 

Copietteen: Harvard. 

Bonduel (P^e Flavien J.) Souvenir 
d'nne mission Indienne. | Nakam | et | 
son fils Nigabianong | ou | Penfant 
perdu ; | pr^c^d^ d'une notice histori- 
que, et d6di6 aux 61^ves des colleges | 
et des pension nats de la Belgique. | 
Par I le R. P. Fl.-J. Bonduel, mission- 
naire | [&c. three lines.] | Avec le por- 
trait de Pauteur. | f Design.] | 

Touruai | typographic de J. Caster- 
man et fils, I libraires-Miteurs. | 1855 

Printed cover, half-title 1 1. title as above 1 L 
text pp. 5-44, map of Wisconsin, 8^. 

Between pp. 42 and 43, Mu^iqne Indienne; 
Chant do Nigabianong, [and] Chant de Nakam; 
words and music. A few words and phrases 
of Chippeway are introduced. 

Copiet teen : British Museum, TmmbulL 

At the Field sale, catalogue no. 167, a copy 
brought $3.25. 

Souvenir religieux | d*une \ mission 

Indienne | ou | recueil de pri^res | **Le 
premier qui fui jamais dcrit dans cette 
langue," | pour Pusage des n^phytes, | 
de la mission des Indiens | M^unomo- 
nies de Saint-Michel-Archange, fondle 
le 15 d<$cemhre 1852, | au nord du lao 
Shawanow, Etat du Wisconsin, diocese 
de Milwaukie, | par le Rdvdrend P^re 
F.-L.-J. Bonduel, | missionnaire, | [(&c. 
three lines. ] | 



54 



BIBUOGBAPHY OF THE 



*Bondael (F. J. ) — Continued. 

Toumai | imprimerie de Malo et Le- 
Taaseur. | 1855. 

Prioted cover as above, half-title veno blank 
1 L title as above verso note 1 L text (entirely in 
Mennomonie, with headings soroetimee in En> 
glish alone, sometimes in the two languages) 
pp. 5-16, l«o. 

Prayers, hymns, and primer lessons. 

Copies »een: Shea, Tramball. 

Book of common prayer [Cree]. See 

Hunter (J.) 
Book of common prayer : 

Chippewa See Horden (J.) and Sand- 

ers (J.) 
Chippewa O'Meara (F. A.) 

Cree Horden (J.) 

Cree Hunter (J.) 

Book of Exodus in Micmac. See Rand 
(S.T.) 

Boraari (Ferdinando). Ferdinando Bor- 
sari I La letteratnra | degl' indigenl 
americaoi | [Three lines quotation] | 
[Scroll] I 

Napoli, I Luigi Pierro, editore I Piazza 
Dante, 76 | 1888 

Printed cover as above, title as above verso 
printer 1 1. preliminary pp. 3-6, text pp. 7-76, 8°. 

Contains notices of a number of American 
langnases, among them a few Algonqulan. 

OopieM »een: Eames, Pilling. 
Boston Athensum: These words following a title 
or within parentheses after a note indicate that 
a copy of the work referred to has been seen by 
the compiler in the library of that institution, 
Boston, Mass. 
Boston Public: These words following a title or 
within parentheses after a note indicate that 
a copy of the work referred to has been seen 
by the compiler in that library. Boston, ^fass. 

Boudinot {Rev, Eli as). A | star in the 
west ; I or, I a humble attempt to dis- 
cover I the long lost | ton tribes of Is- 
rael, I preparatory to their return to 
their beloved cMy^ \ Jerusalum. j By 
Elias Boudinot, LL. D. | [Seven lines 
quotations.] | 

Trenton, N. J. | published by D. Fen- 
ton, S. Hutchinson, and | J. Dnnham. | 
George Sherman, printer. I 1816. 

Title verso copyright notice 1 1. contents pp. 
iii-iv, pn*face pp. i-ixi, introduction pp. 23-31, 
text pp. 33-312, 8°. 

Chapter TIL An inquiry into the language 
of the American Indians, pp. 89-107, contains a 
vocabulary of several languages, among them 
the Mohegan, pp. 102-103. 

Copies teen: Bancroft, Boston Athenseuro, 
British Museum, Congress, Dunbar, Harvard, 
TmmbulL 



Boadinot (E.) — Continned. 

At the Sqoier sale, no. 108, a half-eaU; gilt 
copy brought $2.25; at the Brinley aale a copy 
with **fine portrait Inserted** sold for $2.75; 
the Murphy copy, catalogue no. 30S, half-mo- 
rocco, top edge gUt, brought $4.75. Clarke A. 
00. 1886 catalogue, no. 6281, priced it $1.75. 

Elias Boudinot, philanthropist, bom in Phila- 
delphia, Pa.. May 2, 1740; died in Burlington, 
K. J., October 24, 1821. His great-grandfather. 
Elias, was a French Huguenot, who fled to this 
country after the revocation of the edict of 
yantes. After receiving a classical education, 
he studied law with Richard Stockton, and be> 
came eminent in his profession, practicing in 
New Jersey. He was devoted to the patriot 
cause. In 1777 appointed oommiseary-general 
of prisoners, and in the aame year elected a 
delegate to Congress fh>m New Jersey, serving 
Arom 1778 till 1779, and again trom 1781 till 1784. 
He was chosen president of Congreaa on Ko- 
vember 4, 1782, and in that capacity signed the 
treaty of peace with England. He then re> 
sumed the practice of law, but, after theadop* 
tion of the constitution, was elected to the flrbt» 
second, and third Congresses, serving trom 
March 4, 1789, till March 8, 1795. He was ap- 
pointed by Washington in 1796 to succeed Rit- 
tenboune as director of the mint at Philadel- 
phia, and held the office till July 1806, when he 
resigned, and passed the rest of his life at Bur- 
lington, N. J., devoted to the study of biblical 
literature. He had an ample fortune and gave 
liberally. He was a trustee of Princeton Col- 
lege, and in 1805 endowed it with a cabinet of 
natural history, valued at $3,000l In 1812 he 
was chosen a member of the American board 
of commissioners for foreign missions, to which 
ho gave £100 in 1813. He assisted in founding 
the American bible society in 1810, was its 
first president, and gave it $10,000. He waa 
interested in attempts to educate the Indians, 
and when three Cherokee youth were brought 
to the Foreign mission school in 1818, he al- 
lowed one of them to take his name This boy 
became afterward a man of influence in hia 
tribe, and was murdered on June 10, 1839, by 
Indians west of the MississippL — AppleU>n*9 
Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 

Bourasaa (Joseph N.) Indian diction- 
ary. 184.3. 

Manuscript, 2 11. pp. 1-02, 21 unnumbered IL 
folio, in possession of Mr. John B. Dunbar, 
Bloom field, N. J. 

The dictionary occupies pp. 1-02 and is in 
English and Podawahdamih [i%c\. The unnum- 
bered leaves following contain additional and 
repeated words, illustrative sentences, names of 
berries, trees, and plants, numerals, Lont*a 
prayer, etc. in the Podawahdamih language. 

[Bowrey (Thomas).] A | dictionary | of 

I the Hudson's-Bay Indian language. 

No title-page, beading only; text pp. 1-7, 

folio; in the Cree language. AlphabetioaUy 

arranged and contains about 600 words. 



ALOONQUUN LANGUAGES. 



55 



Bowrey (T.) — Continued. 

1 place this under Bowrey on the authority 
of Watt ("Blbliocheca Britannica"), followed 
by Ludewij;, who gives it the date of London, 
1701. The only copy I have seen, that in the 
British Maseuni, bears no evidence of author* 
ship, date, or place of issue. It is folded 
top and side and bound with a quarto volume 
by Bowrey entitled Dictionary : English and 
Malayo, Malayoand English, published in Lon- 
don in 1701. 

By permission of the Museum authorities I 
have had a manuscript copy of this dictionary 
made, which is now in the library of the Bureau 
of Ethnology. 

Boyd (Stephen G.) Indian | local 
names, | with | their interpretation. | 
By Stephen G. Boyd. | 

York, Pa. : | published by the author | 
1885. 

Title verso copyright 1 L dedication verso 
blank 1 1. preface pp. v-vi, introduction pp. vii- 
X, text pp. 1-70, 8°. 

Names of places in a number of Indian Ian* 
gnages, among them the Abnaki, Delaware, 
Minsy, Algonkin, Powhatan, Lenape, Shaw* 
nee, and Chippewa. Pp. 61-70 contain a ' * Mis- 
cellaneous vocabulary*' of local names which 
are not of Indian origin. 

Oopiet teen: Congress, Eames, Pilling, Pow- 
ell. 

Priced by Clarke Sc co., 1888 catalogue, no. 
088Q, $1.25. 

Bozman (John Leeds). The | history o^ 
Maryland, | from | it« first settlement, 
in 1633, I to I the restoration, in 1660, | 
with I a copious introduction, | and | 
notes and illustrations. | By John Leeds 
Bozman. | Vol. I [-II]. | 

Baltimore : | James Lucas &, E. K. 
Dearer. | 1837. 

2 vols. : title verso copyright 1 1. preface pp. 
iii-x, contents pp. xi-xii, text pp. d-271. notes 
and illustrations pp. 273-295, index pp. 297-314 ; 
title verso copyright 1 I. contents pp. v-viii, 
text pp. 9-563, notes and illustrations pp. 66&- 
703, index pp. 705-728, 8°. 

Vol. 1, Section vii, pp. 103-193, contains a 
general sketch of the tribes of Indians inhab- 
iting Virginia, which inclndes extracts from 
and comments upon Hcckowelder s " Histori- 
cal account of the Indians who once inhab« 
ited Pennsylvaniaand the neighbouringstaten;" 
the Powhatan numerals 1-10 (from Smith), 
the Delaware or Lenape numerals 1-10 (from 
Thomas^; and copious notes on the geographic 
names of rivers, etc. given in Smith's History 
of Virginia. 

OopxeM teen: Astor, Boston Athenseum, 
British Museum, Congress. 

At the field sale, catalogue no. 182, a copy 
brought |5; the Brinley copy, no. 3666, $3.50; 
the Murphy copy, no. 317, $1. 



Bozman ( J. L. ) — Continued. 

An earlier edition, Baltimore, 1811, 8o, con- 
tains no linguistics. (Boston Athenaeum, 
British Museum, Congress, Watkinson.) 

Bradford (Alexander Warfield). Amer- 
ican antiquities | and | researches | into 
the I origin and history of the red 
race. | By | Alexander W. Bradford. | 
New- York: | Dayton and Saxton, | 
Corner of Fulton and Nassau-streets. 
I Boston : Saxton and Pierce. | 1841. 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso copy- 
right 1 1. preface pp. 5-6, contents pp. 7-8, in- 
troduction pp. 9-13, text pp. 15-435, 8°. 

Origin of the Aborigines-language, pp. 30^ 
314, includes a brief discussion of the Algon- 
quian. 

Copieg teen: Boston Athenseum, Coogross, 
Eames, Harvard. 

Priced in Stevens's Knggets, no. 329, 5«.; at 
the Squier sale, catalogue no. 114, a copy 
brought $1.63 ; Leclerc, 1878, no. 829, priced it 
18 fr. ; the Brinley copy, catalogue no. 5363, 
brought $2.75 ; priced hy Clarke &, co. 1886 cata- 
logue, no. 6291, $3; another copy, half-calf, 
$4.25: Francis, of New York, in 1889, $3. 

Sabin's Dictionary, no. 7233, titles an edition 
of the same date with imprint New York, 
Wiley & Putnam, 1841, which is perhaps an 
error. 

American antiquities | and | re- 



searches I into the | origin and history 
of the red race. | By | Alexander W. 
Bradford. | 

New- York: | Wiley & Putnam, 161 
Broadway. | 1843. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. half-title verso 
blank 1 1, preface pp. 5-6, contents pp. 7-8, in- 
troduction pp. 9-13, text pp. 15-435, 8°. 

Linguistics as given under title of edition of 
1841. 

Copiet teen ; Astor, British Museum, Con- 
gress, Lenox. 

Brice (Wallace A.) History | of | Fort 
Wayne, | from | the earliest known ac- 
counts I of I this point, | to the pres- 
ent period. | Embracing an extended 
view of the aboriginal tribes | of the 
northwest, iuchiding, more especially, 

I the Miamies, of this locality — their 
habits, I customs, etc. — ^Together with 
a comprehen- | sive summary of the 
general relations | of the northwest, 
fromthelatter | part of the seventeenth 
cen- I tury, to the struggles of 1812-14 ; 

I with a sketch of the | life of Gen- 
eral Ant aony Wayne ; I including also a 
lengthy | biography of the late Hou. 
Samuel Hanna, | together with short | 



56 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Brice ( W. A. ) — Continned. 
sketches of several of the early pioneer 
I settlers of Fort Wayne. | Al«o an ac- 
count of the I manafactaring, mercan- 
tile, and railroad interests | of Fort 
Wayne and vicinity. | By Wallace A. 
Brice. | With illustrations. | 

Fort Wayne, Ind : | D. W. Jones & 
sou, steam book and job printers. | 1868. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright 1 1. 
dedication verso blank 1 1. prefatory remarks 
pp. v-vi, biography of General Wayne pp. vi- 
xvi, text pp. 1-324, biojrraphio sketches pp. 
1-31, Index pp. 32-33, 8®. 

A few tribal names of the Algonqnian fam> 
ily, with English signification, p. 17. 

Copiei »een : Boston Athensura. Congress. 

At the P'ield sale, catalogue no. 201, a copy 
brought $1.37. 

Brickell(John). The Natural | History | 
of I North-Carolina. | With an | account 
I of the I Trade, Manners, and Cus- 
toms of the I Christian and Indian In- 
habitants. II- I lustrated with Copper- 
Plates, whereon are | curiously En- 
graved the Map of the Country, | sev- 
eral strange Beasts, Birds, Fishes, 
Snakes, | Insects, Trees, and Plants, 
&c. I By John Brickell, M. D. | [One 
line quotation.] | 

Dublin: | Printed by James Carson, 
in CoghillVCourt, Dame- | street, op- 
posite to the Castle-Market. | For the 
Author, I 1737. 

Pp. i-viii, 1-408, map, 89. 

Short comparative vocabulary of the Pamp- 
ticee and other Indians, p. 407. 

"The material for this work was stolen from 
Lawson with scarcely the disguise of change 
of form. All that portion of the work from 
pp. 277 to 408 is devoted to *An account of the 
Indians of North Carolina,' which is such a 
mutilated, interpolated, and unscrupulous ap- 
propriation of the unfortunate JohnLawson's 
work of the same sub-title, that the transcrip- 
tion is scarcely more than a parody."— JV«W*# 
Etitay, pp. 46-47. 

Copiei»een: Astor, Boston A thenff;um, Brit- 
iah Museum, Brown, Congress. 

Priced in Stevens's Nuggets, no. 340, 10«. 
td. At the Brinley sale a copy, no. 3843, " old 
calf," brought $5. Clarke &co. 1886, no. 3192, 
price it $5. 

The same sheets with a new title-page as fol- 
lows: 

The I Natural History | of | North 

Carolina. | With an | account | of the | 
Tra<1es, Manners, and Customs, of the 
Christian and Indian Inhabitants, | 
Strange Beasts, Birds, Fishes, Snakes, 



Briokell (J.) — Continned. 
Insects, I Trees, and Plants, A^, \ Illus- 
trated by Copper-Plates. [ By John 
Brickell, M. D. | [One line quotation.] | 
Dublin, Printed for the Anthor: | 
'London, Sold by Charles Corbett, at 
Addison's . Head, opposite St. Dnnstan's 
Church, Fleetstreet. | MDCCXLIII 
[1743]. Price 6«. 

Title verao blank 1 L preface pp.iii -vi. list 
of subscribers pp. yU-xv, text pp. 1-408, map, 
80. 

Linguistics as under previous title. 

OapieM nen : Boston Public, British Museum. 

Brinley: This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy 
of the work referred to was seen by the com- 
piler at the sale of books belonging to the late 
George Brinley, of Hartford, Conn. 

Brinley (George). See Tnunbull (J. 
H.) 

Brinton: This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indioatea th*t a copy 
of the work referred to has been seen by the 
compiler in the library of Dr. D. G. Brinton, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Brinton {Dr. Daniel Garrison). The | 
myths of the new world: | a treatise | 
on the I symbolism and mythology | of 
the I red race of America. | By | Daniel 
G. Brinton, A. M., M. D., | Member 
[dec. four lines.] | [Design.] | 
New York : | Leypoldt & Holt. | 

1868. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. preface verso blank 
1 1. contents pp. v-viii, text pp. 1-302, index pp. 
303-307, 12°. 

A few remarks on American languages, in- 
cluding picture symbols of the Chippewas, pp. 
7-10. — Scattered throughout are many aborig- 
inal words, including some of the Algonqnian 
dialects. 

Copiet teen: Boston Athenasum, CongreeSb 
Earn 68, Yale. 

At the Field sale, catalogue no. 210. a copy 
sold for $3; at the Squier sale, catalogue no. 
127, it brought $1.50 ; priced by Clarke & co, 
1886, $2. 

The I myths of the New World | a 

treatise | on the | symbolism and 
mythology I of the | red race of America 
I By I Daniel G. Brinton, A. M., M. D. | 
Member [i&c. six lines.] | Second edi- 
tion, revised. | 

New York | Henry Holt and com- 
pany I 1876 

Title verso copyright 1 1. preface to the first 
edition verso blank 1 1. preface to the aeoond 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



67 



Brinton (D. G.) — Continned. 

edition veno blank 1 1. contents pp. v-viilf text 
pp. 1-322, indicea pp. 323-331, 8°. 

Lingoiaticfl as under title of the first edition. 

Copies iun : Astor, Pilling. 

American | hero-myths. | A study in 

the native Aligions | of the western 
continent. | By | Daniel G. Brinton, M. 
D.y I Member [&c. five lines.] | 

Philadelphia: | H. C. Watts & Co., | 
50G Minor Street. | 1882. 

List of Dr. Brinton's works reoto blank 1 1. 
title 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface pp. 
vii-xii, contents pp. xiii-zvi, text pp. 17-239, in- 
dexes pp. 241-251, advertisement p. 1252], 8^. 

A number of Al$;onquian, Iroqnoian, Hex* 
lean, and Mayan terms passim. 

Copies seen : Rames, Pillinfi:. 

Priced by Clarke Sc co. 1886 catalogue, no. 
6303,11.75; Leclerc, 1887, priced it 10 fr.; Du* 
foss6, 1888, 6 fr. 50c. 

Aboriginal American literature. 

In Congr^s Int des Am6rioanistee, Compte. 
rendu, fiftb session, pp. 54-64, Copenbagen, 1884* 
8o. 

Revised, enlarged, and issued separately as 
follows : 

Aboriginal | American authors | and 

their productions ; | especially those in 
the native languages. | A Chapter in the 
History of Literature. | By | Daniel G. 
Brinton, A. M., M. D.^i Member [&c. six 
lines.] I [Design, with a line descriptive 
thereof beneath.] | 

Philadelphia: | No. 115 South Seventh 
Street. | 1883. 

Title reverse blank 1 1, preface reverse blank 
1 1. contents pp. vli-viii, text pp. 9-60, index pp. 
61-63, 8o. 

Notes on Delaware literature, pp. 20-21. 

Copies seen : Eames, Pilling. 

-^— American languages, and why we 
should study them. By Daniel G. 
Brinton, M. D. 

In Pennsylvania Biag. of Hist, and Biog. vol. 
0. p. 15-35, Philadelphia, 1885, 8^. 

Consists of remarks on American languages 
in general and includes Delaware examples 
and comments thereon, pp. 20-21. 

Issued separately as follows : 

-^— American languages, | aud why we 
should study them. Au address | deliv- 
ered before the Pennsylvania historical 
society, | March 9, IS-So, | by | Daniel 
G. Brinton, M. D., i professor of ethnol- 
ogy and archsBology at the Academy of 
natural sciences, | Philadelphia. | Re- 
printed from the | Pennsylvania maga- 
zine of history and biography. | 



Brinton (D. G.) — Continned. 

Printed by | J. B. Lippincott com- 
pany, Philadelphia. | 1885. 

Printed cover as above, title as above verso 
blank 1 1. text pp. 3-23, 8o. 

Copies seen : Eames, Pilling, Powell. 

Priced by Leclerc, 1887, 3fr.; by Dufoss6, 1888, 
1 f^. 50c.; by Hiersemann, Leipsic, 1889, 2 M. 

Brinton's library of | aboriginal 

Am tiricau literature. | Number V. | The 
Lenil[)4 I and their | legends; | with the 
complete text and symbols | of the | 
Walum Olum, | a new translation, and 
an inquiry into its authenticity. | By | 
Daniel G. Brinton, A. M., M. D., | Pro- 
fessor [dec. eight lines.] | 

D. G. Brinton. | Philadelphia. | 1885. 

Oeneral title of the^eries verso blank 1 L title 
as above VHrso copyright 1 1. preface pp. v-vi, 
contents pp. vii-viii, text pp. 9-256, indices pp. 
257-262, 8o. 

Chapters 1, 2, and 3, on the Algonkin and 
Iroquois stocks, the Wapanochki or Eastern 
Algonkin confederacy, and the Lenape or Dela> 
ware, respectively, contain terms in those lan- 
guages pa«#iin.— Chapter 4, the literature and 
language of the Lenape (pp. 74-108), contains a 
specimen of the Lenape Jargon (from Oabriel 
Thomas), with brief commentary thereon, p. 76; 
Matthew xxii, 1-14, in the Unami dialeet of the 
Lenape with English interlinear {trom mss. 
of Rev. Johannes Roth), pp. 80-83; letter from 
Chief Gottlieb Tobias, an educated native on the 
Moravian reservation in Canada, in the Lenape 
of to da3'. (dated Moraviantown, Sept 26, 1884), 
with English translation following, p. 88; gen« 
oral remarks on the Lenape language, pp. 89- 
01 ; dialects of the Lenape, including a com- 
parative vocabulary of the Unami and Minsi 
(fh>m Heckewelder), another of relationships 
in the Delaware, Minsi, and Mohegan (trom 
Morgan), and a third of the Delaware "at inter- 
vals during 210 years" {trom Campanius, 1645, 
Zeisberger, 1778, and Whipple, 1855), pp. 91-07; 
special structure of the Lenape, containing list 
of Lenape prefixes, sftffixes, and derivativea, 
and remarks upon the grammatic structure of 
the Ian siiage, with examples, pp. 08-108. — The 
Walum Olum. original pictographs and text, 
with the English rendering on opposite pages, 
pp. 169-217.— Notes on the text, pp. 210-232.— 
Vocabular}' of the Lenape, alphabetically ar- 
ranged by Lonape words, pp. 233-253. 

Copies seen: Boston Athenseum, Brinton, Bu- 
reau of Ethnology, Congress, Barnes, Pilling, 
Powell, Shea, Trumbull. 

Reviewed in Science, voL 5, pp. 407-408, New 
York, 1885, i°. A.lso by H. de Charencey in 
Revue d'Ethnographie, vol. 4, p. 276, Paris, 
1885, 8o. 

Clarke & co. 1886, no. 6705, priced a copy $3; 
Leclerc, 1887, 15 fr.; Dnfoss6, 1888, 16 fr.; 
Hiersemann. Leipsic, 1889, 13 M. 50 Pf. 

See Sqnior (E. G.) for a work on the same 
subject ^ 



58 



BIBLIOGBAPHT OF THE 



Brinton (D. G.) — Con tinned. 

The chief god of the Algonkins, in 

his character as a cheat and a liar. 

In American AntiqcuuriaD and Oriental Jour, 
vol. 7, pp. 137-139, Chicaj^. 1885, 8°. 

Name for Ood in Cree, Chippewa, Blackfoot, 
and New Enf^land. 

lasaed separately alao, withont ohange of 
pagination. (Eamee, Pilling;.) 

— The conception of love in some Amer- 
ican languages. By Daniel G. Brinton, 

M. D. 

In American Philosoph. Soo. Proc vol. 23, 
pp. 5i6-561, PhUadelphia, 1886,19°. 

Words, phrases, and sentences in varioas 
American languages, among them the Cree and 
Chippeway. 

Issued separately as follows: 

'^— The I conception of love | in | Some 
American Languages. | By | Daniel G. 
Brinton, A. M., M. D., | Professor of 
American Archaeology and Linguistics 
in the | University of Pennsylvania. | 
Bead before the American Philosophical 
Society, November 5, 1886. | 

Philadelphia: | Press of McCalla &, 
Stavely, 237-9 Dock Street. | 1886. 

Printed cover with half-title, title as above 
reverse blank 1 1. text pp. 3-18, 2P. 

Copie* »een: Eames, Powell. 

Priced by Leclerc, 1887, 2 fr. ; by Ihifo6s6, 
1887. 1 fr. 50 c. 
•— ^ On poly synthesis and incorporation 
as characteristics of American lan- 
guages. By Daniel G. Brinton, M. D. 

In American Philosoph. Soc. Proc voL 23, pp. 
48-88, Philadelphia, 1886. 8°. 

Contains examples in a namber of American 
languages, among them the Cree. 

Issued separately as follows : 

On I polysynthesis and incorporation 

I as characteristics of | American lan- 
guages. I By I Daniel G. Brinton, A. M., 
M. D., I Professor [&c. twelve lines.] | 

Philadelphia : | McCalla & Stavely, 

Printers, 237-9 Dock Street. | 1 85. 

Printed cover with half-title, title as above 
verso blank 1 L text pp. 3-41, S9. 

Examples in Cree, Nahuatl, Cakchiqnel, 
Choctaw, Quiche, Othoroi, Mutsun, and various 
South American languages. 

Oopietteen: Aster, Eames, Pilling, Powell. 

Priced by Leclerc, 1887, 3fr.; by Dnfoss^, 1888, 
8fr. 

Reviewed by H. de Charencey in Revue d'Eth> 
nographie, vol.4, pp. 400-462, Paris, 1883, 8P. 
— »- Rate of change in American lan- 
guages. 

In Science, vol. 10. p. 274, New York, 1887. 4°. 

States the results of a " comparison between 
the Alaguilao of Guatemala, which is the most 



Brinton (D. G.)~Continoed. 

•onthem dialect known of the Kahiutl, by 
means of a vocabulary obtained in 1878, with 
that tongue as spoken in the valley of Mexio» . 
in 1650, preserved in the 'Vocabnlario' of Mo- 
lina ;" also, a comparison of LenAp^ expres- 
sions from different 8oaroea/» Reference to the 
Klamath, Chapanec, Seiche, Kakchiqvel, and 
Huron is made. 
The language of pal»olithio man. 

In American Philosoph. Soc. Proc. xcL 25, 
pp. 212-225, PhiladelphU, 1888. 8°. 

Terms for /, thou, man, divinity, in Cree and 
Lenape, p. 216.--Cree radicals or elementa, p. 
220. — General remarks on the Cree laogoage 
passim. 

Issued separately as follows : 

The language | of | palsBolithic man. 

I By I Daniel G. Brinton, M. D., | Pro- 
fessor of American Linguistics and Ar- 
chsBology in the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. I Read before the Americaii Phi- 
losophical Society, | October 5, 1888. | 
Press of MacCalla d^ co., | Nos. 237-9 

Dock Street, Philadelphia. | 1888. 

Printed cover as above, title as above verso 
blank 1 1. text pp. 3-16, 8°. 

Oopietteen: Eames, Pilling. 

— Len&p^ conversations. 

In Journal of American Folk-Lore, voL 1, 
pp. 37-43, Boston and New York, 1888, 8«>. 

Man}' Len&p^ or Delaware terms passim. — 
The article closes with observations on "some 
peculiarities of the language." 

In the compilation of the material for this 
paper Dr. Brinton had the assistance of Bev. 
Albert S. Anthony, an educated Delaware 
Indian. 

and Anthony (A. S.), editors, A 

I Lendp^-English | dictionary. | From 
an anonymous MS. in the Archives of 
the I Moravian Church at Bethlehem^ 
Pa. I Edited, with additions, | by | 
Daniel G. Brinton, A. M., M. D., | pro- 
fessor of American archseology and lin- 
guistics in the University of | Pennsyl 
vania, | and | Rev. Albert Seqaqkind 
Anthony, | assistant missionary to the 
Dela wares and Six Nations, Canada. | 

Philadelphia: | The Historical Socie- 
ty of Pennsylvania. I 1888. 

Half-title "Pennsylvania students' series" 
verso blank 1 1. portrait of Zei^berger 1 1. title 
•'The Pennsylvania students' series, vol. I" 
Sio. dated 1889 verso blank 1 1. note verso blank 
1 1. half-title "A LenAp^-English dictionary" 
verso blank 1 1. title as above verso printers 1 
L preface signed by D. G. Brinton pp. iii-vii. 
Lenapc-English dictionary pp. 9-178, English 
index pp. 179-236. sm. 4o. 

Alphabetically arranged by Delaware words. 



ALGONQUUN LANGUAGES. 



59 



Bxinton (D.G.) and Anthony (A. S.)— 
Continaed. 

The index is an alphabetic croM-reference list to 
the English words occarring in the dictionary. 
See Doncke (C. F.) for a description of the 
original manuscript. 

"For about a century, beginning with 1740, 
missionaries of the United Bretliren, or Mora- 
vians, devoted themselves to the conversion 
and civilization of portions of the LeoAp^ or 
Delaware Indians. These earnest Christian 
men studied the native tongue, reduced it to 
writing, and printed in it, for the use of their 
ounverts, a number of works of a religious and 
educational character. The history of their 
literary activity in this language has been re- 
cently traced elsewhere, in detail, and need not 
be repeated here. While some of the results 
appeared in type, much of it remained in manu- 
script until the curiosity of scientific students 
led to its publication. Thus, in 1827, Peter S. 
Duponcean edited the grammar of Zeisberger, 
and sixty years later his En glish-Gtor man-On- 
ondaga- Delaware Dictionary was printed by 
the private liberality of Prof. E. N. Horsford. 

** These works of David Zeisberger, whose life 
found an able and sympathetic narrator in the 
late Right Rev. Edmund de Schweinitz, to- 
gether with his printed " Delaware Spelling 
Book," were the chief sources from which the 
later missionaries drew their knowledge of the 
LenAp6 dialect ; and unquestionably the pres- 
ent LenAp6- English Dictionary was founded 
mainly upon the linguistio work of this proto- 
Len&pist. Sj far as the history of the ms. is 
concerned, I can add nothing to what was stated 
in 'The Len&p6 and their Legends,' which is 
as follows: 

" * It is probable that Mr. Dencke was the com- 
piler of the Delaware Dictionary which is pre- 
served in the Moravian Archives at Bethlehem. 
The ms. is an oblong octavo, in a small, but 
beautifully clear hand, and comprises about 
8,700 words. The handwriting is that of the 
late Rev. Mr. Kampman, who was missionary 
to the Delawares on the Canada reservation 
fh>m 1840 to 1842. On inquiring the circum- 
stances connected with this ms. he stated to me 
that it was written at the period named, and 
was a copy of some older work, probably by 
Mr. Dencke, bat of this he was not certain.' 

"The Rev. C. F. Dencko, here alluded to, was 
missionary to the Delawares at New Fairfield, 
Canada, for a number of yearn after the war of 
1812. He was the author of a grammar of the 
tongue, now apparently lost, and translated 
into it various portions of the New Testament. 
His death took plaoe in 1839. 

"The ms. of Mr. Kampman was carefully 
copied and enlarged by the addition of words 
from the mss. and printed works of Zeisberger, 
Heckewelder, and Ettwein. These additions 
have, in the printed copies, been indicated by 
the capital letters, Z., E., and H. In this con- 
dition the ms. wns submitted to the Rev. Al- 
bert Seqaqkind Anthony, a bom LenAp^, and 



Brinton (D. G.) and Anthony (A. S.)~ 
Continaed. 

perfectly familiar with the language of his na> 
tion as spoken by that colony of it resident on 
the Six Nations reservation in Ontario, Can- 
ada. In this colony the usual dialect is th» 
Minsi, and, as its members belong to a portion 
of the nation who were converted by mission- 
aries of the English Church (to which Mr. 
Anthony belongs), the theological terms de- 
veloped usually differ widely from those framed 
by the Moravians. 

" Mr. Anthony kept the ms. by him for some 
months, giving its contents OM^ful attention, 
and subsequently the two editors met and passed 
in review every word in the dictionary. The 
numerous notes and corrections in brackets, 
with an appended capital A., are the omenda-^ 
tions suggested by Mr. Anthony from the pres- 
ent standpoint of the language and from the 
dialect of his ancestral sub-tribe. The latter 
differs somewhat from that employed by the 
compiler of the dictionary.* The grammatical 
forms employed indicate that this was the 
Unami (Wonami). 

" No attempt has been made to increase the 
lexicography by the insertion of words or 
forms obtained from the Delaware of to-day. 
All such, when mentioned, are by way of com* 
parison only. It would have been easy to have 
extended the vocabulary. There are evidently 
some LenAp6 radicals and many themes which 
d<^ not appear in this work, but the editors con- 
fined their efforts to presenting this work as 
exclusively concerned with the dialect as em- 
ployed by the Moravian missionaries, and 
hence all additions to the vocabulary have been 
from their writings."— Pjx/a««. 

CopieMteen: Eames, Pilling. PowelL 

Daniel Garrison Brinton. ethnologist, bom in 
Chester County, Pa., May 13, 1837. He was 
graduated at Yale in 1858 and at the Jefferson 
Medical College in 1861, after which he spent a 
year in Europe in study and in travel. On his 
return he entered the army, in August, 1862, as 
acting assistant surgeon. In February of the 
following year he was commissioned surgeon 
and iierved as surgeon-in-chief of the second 
division, eleventh corps. He waspresentat the 
battles of Chancellors ville, Gettysburg, and 
other engagements, and was appointed medical 
director of his corps in October, 1863. In con- 
sequence of a sunstroke received noon after the 
battle of Oettysburg he was disqualified for 
active service, and in the autumn of that year he 
became superintendent of hospitnls at Quincy 
and Springfield, Hi., until Ausrust, 1865, when, 
the civil war having closed, he was brevetted 
lieutenant -colonel and discharged. He then 
settled in Philadelphia, where he became editor 
of " The Medical and Surgical Reporter," and 
also of the quarterly " Compendium of Medical 
Science." Dr. Brinton has likewise been a 
constant contributor to other medical journals, 
chiefly on questions of public medicine and 



hygiene, and has edited several volumes oil 



60 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Brinton (D, 6.) — Continaed. 

therapeutics and diagnoaiA, especially the pop- i 
nlar series known as " Napbejs's Mo<lern Ther- 
apeatios," which has passed throngh so many | 
editions. In the medical coutrovemes of the | 
day, he has id ways taken the position that med- 
ical science shoald be based on the results of 
clinical observation, rather than on physiolog- 
ical expoHmonts. lie has become prominent 
as a student and a writer on American ethnol- 
ogy, hfa work in this direction beginning while 
he was a student in college. The winter of 
1856-'57, si>ent in Florida, supplied him with 
material for his first published book on the 
subject. In 1884 he was appointed professor 
of ethnology and arch»>ology in the Academy 
of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia. For some 
years he has been president of the Numismatic 
and Antiquarian Society of Philadelphia, and 
in 1886 he was el«^ctcd vice-president of the 
American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, to preside over the section on anthro- 
pology. During the same year he was awarded 
the medal of the "Soci6t6 Amdricaino de 
France" for his "numerous and learned works 
on American ethnology," being the fiist native 
of the United States that has l>een so honored. 
In 1885 the American publishers of the " Icon- 
ographic Encyclopaedia "re<iuested him to edit 
the first volume, to contribute to it the articles 
on "Anthropology*' and "Ethnology," and to 
revise that on " Ethnography," by Professor 
Oerland, of Strasburg. lie also contributed to 
the second volume of the same work an e«say 
on the " Prehistoric Archaeology of both Hem- 
ispheres." Dr. Brinton has established a 
library and publishing house of aboriginal 
American literature, for the purpose of placing 
within the reach of scholars authentic materi* 
aIs for the study of the languages and culture 
of the native races of America. Each work is 
the production of native minds and is printed 
in the original. The series, most of which were 
edited by Dr. Brinton himself, include " The 
Maya Chronicles" (Philadelphia. 1882); "The 
Iroquois Book of Rites" (1883); "The Giiegii- 
^nce: A Comedy Ballet in the Nahuatl Spanish 
Dialect of Nicaragua" (1883); "A Migration 
Legend of tiie Creek Indians" (1884); "The 
Lenape and Their Legends" (1885) ; " The An- 
nals of the Cakchiquels" (1885). ["Ancient 
Nahuatl Poetry" (1887); Rig Veda Amcricanus 
(1S90)]. Besides pul)li8hing numerous papers he 
has coDtribute<l valuable reports on his exami- 
nations of mounds, shell-heaps, rock inscrip- 
tions, and other antiquities. Hoisthoanthorof 
"The Floridiau Peninsula: Its Literary History, 
Indian Tribes, and Antiquities" (Phila<lelphia. 
1859); "The Myths of the New Worid: A 
Treatise on the Symbolism and Mythology of 
the Red Race of America" (New York, 1868) ; 
"The Religious Sentimeut: A Contribution to 
the Science and Philosophy of Religion " (1876): 
"American Hero Myths: A Study in the Native 
Religions of the Western Continent" (Philadel- 
phia, 1882) ; "Aboriginal American Authors and 



Brinton (D. 6.) ~ Continaed. 

their Prod uctions, Especially thoae in the Native 
Languages" (1883); and "A Orammar of the 
Cakchlquel Language of Guatemala " (1884). — 
Appleton't Cyclop, of Am. Biog. 

[Briflbin (Gen. James S.)] Poetry of the 
Indians. 

In Harper'a Magazine, voL 67, pp. 104-108, 
New York, 1878, 8o. 

Songs in Chippewa and Cherokee, and the 
23d psalm in Algonqoix., all with English trans* 
lation.— A number of Chippewa terms paaaim. 
British and Foreign Bible Society : Theee words 
following a title or within parentheses after a 
note indicate that a copy of the work has been 
seen by the compiler in the library of that in< 
atitntion, 146 Queen Victoria street, London, 
Eng. 
British and Foreign Bible Society. Speoi- 
meus of some of the languages and 
dialects | in which | The British and 
Foreign Bible Society | has printed or 
circulated | the holy scriptures. 

Colophon : London : printed by Messrs. 
Gilbert & Rivington, for the British 
and foreign bible society, Queen Vic- 
toria street, E. C, where all informa- 
tion concerning the society's work may 
be obtained. [1860T] 

1 sheet, large folio, 28 by 38 inches, 6 oolnnms. 

St John iii. 16, in 134 languages, among them 
the Cree (<}.y liable), no. 129; OJlbwa, no. 130; 
• Maliseet, no 131. 

Copiet ieen: British and Foreign Bible So- 
ciety, Pilling, Powell. 
— Specimens | of some of the | lan- 
guages and dialects | in which the | 
British and foreign bible society | has 
printed and circulated the holy script- 
ures. I [Picture.] | 

No. 10, Earl street, Blackfriars, Lon- 
don. I Printed by W. M. Watts, Crown 
court, Temple bar, London, | from 
types principally prepared at his foun- 
dry. I [18t;5T] 

Title verso contents 1 1. text pp. 3-15, ''fiftcts 
and fi;,'i.re8" 1 p. 16°. 

Contaiua Acta ii, 8, in Cree (syllabic charac- 
ters) and iu Chippewa, p. 15. 

Copic9 seen: British and Foreign Bible So- 
ciety, Pilling. 
Specimens | of some of the | lan- 
guages and dialects | in which the | 
British and foreign bible society | has 
printed and circulated the holy script- 
ures. I [Picture, and one line.] | 

London. | 1868. | Printed by W. M. 

Watts, 80, Gray's-Inn Road, from types 

I principally prepared at his foundry. 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



61 



Britiflh and Foreign -^ Continued. 

Pp. 1-16, 180. 

Contains Acto ii. 8, in Cree (syllAbio obarao- 
ters) aod Cbippeway, p. 15. 

Tboagh agreeing in most respects with the 
[1865) edition, this is not from the same plates. 

Oopiei seen: British and Foreign Bible So- 
ciety, Pilling. 

— St. John iii. 16 | in some of the | lan- 
guages and dialects | in which the | 
British & Foreign Bible Society | has 
printed or circulated the holy script- 
ures. I [Picture anU one line quota- 
tion.] I 

London: | printed for the British and 
foreign bible society, | By Gilbert & 
BivingtoUy 52, St. John's Square, E. C. 
I 1875. 

Title as above verso contents 1 1, text pp. 3-30, 
historical and statistical remarks 1 1. verso of* 
fleers and agencies of the society. 

Su John iii, 16. in Cree (syllabic characters) 
and Ojibwa, p. 29 ; in Mallseet, p. 30. 

Oopiee teen: British and Foreign Bible So- 
ciety, PUling, PowelL 

Some copies are dated 1868. (*) 

— St. John III. 16 I in some of the | 
languages and dialects | in which the j 
British and foreign | bible society j 
has* printed and circulated | the holy 
scriptures. | 

London : | British and Foreign Bible 
Society, Queen Victoria Street. | Phila- 
delphia Bible Society, Cor. Walnut and 
Seventh Sts., 1 Philadelphia. [1676T] 

Cover title verso contents, text pp. 3-30, 129, 
St. John iii, 16, in Cree (syllabic characters) 
and Ojibwa, p. 29; in Mallseet, p. 30. 
Oopieeeeen: Pilling. 

' St. John iii. 16 | in most of the | lan- 
guages and dialects | in which the | 
British & Foreign Bible Society | has 
printed or circulated the holy script- 
ures. I [Design and one line quotation.] 

I Enlarged edition. | 

Loudon : | printed for the British and 
foreign bible society, | By Gilbert & 
Bivington, 52, St. John's Square, E. C. 

I 1878. 

Printed covers (title as above on the front 
one verso qaotation and notes), contents pp. 
l-2.textpp.3-i8,16o. 

St. John iii, 16, in Eastern Cree (syllabic 
characters), p. 26 ; Western Cree (Roman char- 
acters), Ojibwa, Mallseet, p. 27; Miomac, p. 
28. 

Copies Been: American Bible Society,Pilling. 



British and Foreign — Continued. 

St. John iii. 16 | in most of the | lan- 
guages and dialects | in which the | 
British &, Foreign Bible Society | has 
printed or circulated the holy script- 
ures. I [Design and one line quotation.] 

I Enlarged edition. | 

London: | printed for the British and 
foreign bible society, | By Gilbert & 
Rivington, 52, St. John's Square, E. C» 

I 1882. 

Title as above reverse qaotation and notes t 
L contents pp. 1-2, text pp. 3-48, historical and 
statistical remarks 1 L verso officers and 
agencies, 16°. 

Linguistic contents as in the edition of 1878, 
titled above. 

Copies seen: British and Foreign Bible So<^ 
ciety, British Museam, Pilling, PowelL 

Eeasr. orb loaHsa, rj. 3tt ct. 16. | OOpaaiiu 

nepeBfi40BicBflLuenHaro nscaHlfl, j B34auHUxi | 
BeiHRoOpBTancKHMi H uiiocTpaiiHUMii I OnOje- 
l)cRHMio6iiiecTBOMi. | [Dosigu and one line 
quotation.] | 

HeiaraHo 4Jii 6pHTancRaro a HROCTpaeoaro 
BHdieficKaro | o6iiiecTBa, | y TiubOepra a Ph- 
BBHiTOHa (Limited), 52, Ct. 4h(obci CRsepi,^ 
40H40HI. I 1885. 

Literal translation: The gospel by John, 8d 
chapter, 16th verse. I Samples | of the transla- 
tions of the holy scripture, |' published | by tho 
British and foreign bible society. | "God's word 
endureth forever " | 

Printed for the British and foreign bible | 
society | at Gilbert & Rivington's (Limited), 
52, St. John's Square, London. 1 1885. 

Printed covers (title as above on front one 
verso quotation and notes), contents pp. 5-7, 
text pp. 9-68, 16°. 

Linguistics as in 1878 edition, pp. 37-4)8. 

Copies seen : Pilling. 

Ev. St. Joh. iii. 16. | in den meisten 

der ; Sprachen und Dialecte | in welchen 
die I Britische und Auslandische Bibel- 
gesellschaft | die heilige Schrift druckt 
und verbreitet. | [Design and one line 
quotation.] | Vermehrte Auflage. | 

London: | Britische und Auslandische 
Bibelgesellschaft, | 146 Queen Victoria 
Street, E. C. | 1885. 

Title as above on cover reverse a quotation, 
contents pp. 1-4, text pp. S-67 (verso of p. 67 
notes), remarks, officers, agencies, etc. 3 11. 
16°. 

St John ill, 16, in Eastern Cree (syllabic char- 
acters) and Western Cree (Roman characters), 
p. 18; in Mallseet. p. 39; in Micmac, p. 43; in 
OJibwa(Saulteanx),p.49; another Ojibwa ver- 



€2 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



British and ForeifCQ — Continned. 

giun. entitled by mUtftke '*Tinn6, or Chipe- 
wjan (Ronian)." p. 63. 

In this and following editions the lAngnages 
are arranjiced alphabetically instead of geo- 
graphically. 

CopieMiun: Pilling. 

St. Joan III. 16, &c. | Specimens | de 



la traduction de ce patttiage dans la 
plupart des langueset dialectes; dans 
lesc[uel8 la | Soci^t^ Bibliqao Britan- 
uiiiiie et ^traugore | a iinprimd ou mis 
en circulation les sainted dcritures. | 
[Design and one line quotation.] | 

Londres: | Soci^t^ biblique britan- 
nique et 6trangfere, | 146, Qaeen Vic- 
toria Street, E. C. | 1885. 

Title on cover as above reverse quotation, 
contents pp. 1-4, text pp. h-Vl (verso of p. 67 ob- 
servations), reinarks etc. 3 11. 16^. 

Linguistics as in the German edition of 1885. 

Copiet iun : British and Foreign Bible So- 
ciety, Pilling. 

— St. John lit. 16, &c. | in most of the | 
languages and dialects | in which the | 
British and foreign bible society | has 
printed or circulated the holy script- 
ures. I [Design and one line quotation.] 

I Enlarged edition. | 

Loudon: | the British and foreign 
bible society, | 146, Queen Victoria 
Street, London, E. C. | 1885. 

Title as above verso quotation and notes, 
contents pp. 3-4, text pp. 5-67, remarks etc. 
verso p. 67 and two following 11. 16^. 

Linguistics a^i iu the Germau edition of 1885. 

Copiet teen: British and Foreign Bible So- 
ciety, Eames, Pilling, Powell. 

Some copies are dated 1886. (Pilling.) 

— St. John iii. 16, «fec. " in most of the | 
languages and dialects | in which the | 
British and foreign bible society | has 
printed or circulated the holy script- 
ures. I [Design and one line quotation.] 

I Enlarged edition. | 

London: | the British and foreign 
bible society, | 146 Queen Victoria 
Street, London, E. C. | 1889. 

Title as above verso not«s etc. 1 1. contents 
pp. 3-4, text pp. 5-83, historical sketch etc. 2 11. 
160. 

St John iii, 16, in Eastern Cree (syllabic 
characters) and in Western Cree (Roman), p. 
23 ; in Maliseet, p. 53 ; iu Micmac, p. 57 ; in 
Ojibwa, p. 63 ; another Ojibwa version lettered 
by misUke "Tiun6 (Roman)," p. 78. 
Oopietieen: Eames, Pilling, Powell. 



Britiah MoMiim: ThaM words fDllowing a tltto 
or within parentheses after a note indicate tliak 
a copy of the work referred to has been seen 
by the-oompiler in the library of that lnatita> 
tion, London, Bng. 

Bromley (Walter). Vooabalary of the 
Micmacs. 

In aallatin (A.), Synopsis of Indian tribes, 
in American Ant Soc Trans. voL 2, pp. 3OS-407, 
Cambridge, 1836, 89. 

A copy of the original mannscript of this 
vocabulary, made by Mr. Dnponoeaa, is in the 
library of the American Philosophical Society, 
Philadelphia, Pa. It forms no. xlvi of a col- 
lection recorded in a folio acooont book, of 
which it occupies pp. 146-148. 

Brooklyn: This word following a title or indoeed 

within parentheses after a note indicates that 

a copy of the work referred to has been seen by 

the compiler in the Brooklyn Library at Brook- 

i lyn, X. r. 

Brotherton, Songs. See Baker (T.) 

Brown: This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy 
of the work referred to has been seen by the 
compiler in the library of the late John Carter 
Brown. Providence, B. L 

Brown (George Stay ley.) Tarmoath, | 
Nova Scotia; | a setiael to Campbell's 
History. | By Ooorge S. Brown. | [One 
line quotation.] | [Vignette.] | 

Boston: | Rand Avery com'jfiany, 
printers. , 1888. 

Title verso copyright 1 L dedication rerso 
blank 1 1. preface pp. 5-6. authorities oonsolted 
pp. 7-8, contents pp. 9-14, text pp. Ifr-5i2, index 
pp. 313-524, 8°. 

Chapter 7, The Micmacs (pp. 86-101), contains 
a short account of geographic names (from 
Trumbull), pp. 90-91; a general vocabulary of 
70 words, names of the seasons, days of the 
week, months of the year, phases of the moon, 
ot the day and night, numerals 1-10 (from 
Rasles), pp. 91-95; a fbrther discussion of 
Micmac ideographic names, including some in 
Yarmouth county, pp. 9S-98; title-pagea of 
Eliot's Indian bible and new testament, pp. 
98-99; Lord's prayer in Natic (from Eliot's 
catechism), p. 99; Lord's prayer in the Etohe- 
min of the Kennebec, pp. 99-100; Apostles' 
creed in Natio (from Eliot), p. 100. 

Oopiet seen: Harvard, Massachnsetts His- 
torical Society. 

Brown {Mrs. William Wallace). Some 
indoor and outdoor games of the Wa- 
banaki Indians. By Mrs. W. W. Brown, 
Calais, Maine. 

In Royal Soc. of Canada Proo. and Trans, 
vol. 6, section 2, pp. 41-46, Montreal, 1880, i^. 

Includes many Abnakl terms, names of 
games, implements used, etc 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



63 



Brown ( W. W.) — Continaed. 

A manascript collection of Passama- 

quoddy legends and folk-lore. (•) 

"CoUeoted by Mrs. W. WalUoe Brown, of 
Calaia, Maine. These are all given with the 
greatest accaracy as narrated by Indiiois, some 
in broken Indian-English. They embrace a 
very great variety of folk-lore."— Xetond't 
AlgonqtUn legends,^. 10. 

This manascript is in the possession of Mr. 
Charles G. Leland. 

— - See Reade (J.) 

Bruce (W.H.) Vocabulary of the Me- 
nomouee. 

In Schoolcraft (O. R.), Indian tribes, voL2, 
pp. 470-481, PhUadelphia, 1852, 4^. 

Contains aboat 400 words. 

Reprinted in Ulrici (B.), Die Indianer Nord* 
Amerikas, p. 30, Dresden, 1807, 8P. 

Brunaou (Alfred) . Wisconsin geograph- 
ical names. By Alfred Branson. 

In Wisconsin Hist Soc. ColL vol. 1, pp. 110- 
115, Madison. 1835. 8°. 

A few aboriginal terms with English signifi- 
cation. 

Alfred Branson was bom at Danbory, Conn., 
Feb. 9, 1793 ; removed to Ohio in 1812 ; to Wis- 
consin in October, 1835 ; served at one time as 
missionary to the Indians : was elected to the 
territorial legislature in 1849 ; and at one time 
was Indian agent at La Pointe. Re-entering the 
minijitry, thereafter served in that capacity, 
indadlng a temporary service as chaplain in 
the army, in 1862. Died at Prairie da Chien. 
Ang. 8, 1882. 

Buch das gut enthaltend den Gesang 
[Micmac]. See Kauder (C.) 

Buch das gut enthaltend den Katechis- 
mus [Micmac]. See Kauder (C.) 

Buch das gut enthaltend dep Katechis- 
mus, Betrachtung [Micmac]. See Kau- 
der (C.) 

Buch das gat enthaltend den Katechis- 
mns, Betrachtungy Gesang [Micmac]. 
See Kauder (C.) 

Buchanan (James), H, B, M. Consul, 
Sketches | of the | history, manners, 
and customs, | of the | North American 
Indians, | with | a plan for their melior- 
ation. I By James Bnchanan, Esq. | 
His Britannic majesty's consnl for the 
etate of New-Tork. | In two volames. J 
Vol.I[-II]. I 

New- York : | pmblished by William 
Borredaile, | No. 130 Fulton-street. | 
1824. 

2 vols.: title verso copyright 1 1. half-title 
Terao blank 1 L dedication verso blank 1 1. pref- 



Buchanan (J.) — Continued. 

ace pp. vii-xi, text pp. 13-182 ; title verso blank 
1 I. half-title verso blank 1 L text pp. 5-156; 12^. 

American Philosophical Society. Catalogue 
of manuscript works on the Indianti and their 
langnages, presented to the American Philo- 
sophical Society, or deposited in their library, 
vol. 2. pp. 79-82. 

Dnponcean (P. S.), Langaage of the Indians, 
vol. 2, pp. 48-77. 

These two articles are reprinted from tho 
American Philosoph. Soc. Trans. Hist, and Lit. 
Com. vol. 1, Phihkdelphia, 1819, S9. 

Chpie9 ieen: Astor, British Mnsenm, Con- 
gress, Harvard, Wisconsin Historical Society. 

At the Field sale, catalogue no. 226, a copy 
brought $3: at the Pinart sale, no. 170. 3 fir. 
Clarke &, oo. 1886 catalogue, no. 6310, priced it 
$3. 

Sketches | of jthe | history, manners, 

and customs | of the | North American 
Indians. | By James Bnchanan, Esq. | 
his majesty's consnl for the | state of 
New York. | 

London : | printed for Black, Tonng, 
and Tonng, | Tavistock-street. | 
MDCCCXXIV [1824]. 

Half-title verso blank 1 1. title vetBO printer 
1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface pp vii-xi, 
text pp. 1-371, 80. 

Linguistics as under previous title, pp. 269- 
306, 307-310. 

Oopiet t§en: Bancroft, Boston Atheneeum, 
British Museum, Congress, Watkinson. 

The Field copy, catalogue up. 227, brought 
$1.25; tho Brinley copy. no. 5366. $1.75; the 
Murphy copy, no. 396, fl.50; Qnaritcb, no. 
29926, priced it 6«., and CUrke St oo. 1886. no. 
6309, $2.50. 

Buk of Djenesis in Mikmak. See Rand 
(S. T.) 

Buk of Samz in Mikmak. See Rand 
(S. T.) 

BuBchmann ( Johann Carl £d nard ) . Uber 
den Naturlaut. Von Hrn. Buschmann. 

In Kdnigliche Akad. der Wiss. su Berlin, 
Abhandlungen aus dem Jahre 1852, pt. 3. pp. 
391-423, Berlin. 1863,40. 

Contains a few words of Pottawatameh, 
Blackfoot, Chippewa, and Shawano. 

Issued separately as follows: 

Cber I den | Naturlaut, | von | Joh. 

Carl Ed. Buschmann. | 

Berlin, | In Ferd. DUmmler'sYerlags- 
Buchhaudlnng. I 1853. I Oedrnckt in 
der Druckerei der kuniglichen Akade- 
mie I der Wisscnschaften. 

1 p. I. pp. 1-34, 40. 

Oopitt ge*n : Astor. British Museum. 

Translated and reprinted as follows: 



64 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



Busohmann (J. C. £.) --CoDtiuoed. 

— ''On Nataral SoaudSy" by Professor 
J. C. E. Buschmann. Translated by 
Campbell Clarke, esq., from the Ab- 
handlongen der kdnigllchen Akademie 
der Wissenschaften zu Berlin, aus dem 
Jahre 1852. 

In Philolog. Boo. [of London], Proa roL 0, 
pp. 188-200, r London, 1855], 8°. 

— Die Spnren der aztekisohen Sprache 
im n5rdllchen Mexico and hoheren 
amerikanischenNorden. Zugleioh eine 
Master a ng der VSlker and Sprackeu des 
nordlichen Mexico^s and der Westeeite 
Nordamerika's von Gnadalaxara an bis 
zam Eismeer. Yon Job. Carl Ed. Busoh- 
mtftin. 

In KoDigliche Akad. der Wiss. zn Berlin. 
Abhaudlungon aoa dem Jahre 1851, Zweiter 
Supp.-Baud, pp. 1-819 (forms the whole Tolume), 
Berlin, 1859, 4°. 

Comparison of the Scheyenne Tocabnlariet 
of Abert (Am. £th. Soc. Trans, vol 2), Smith 
(Schooioraft, voL3), and Maximilian, pp. 610- 
61].— Comparison of Blackfoot and Arapahoe 
with o^er Algonquian langaages, p. 61L 

Issued separately as follows: 
•^— Die I Spuren der aztekiscben Sprache 
I im nordlichen Mexico I and hoheren 
amerikanischen Norden. | Zugleich | 
eine Masterang der Volker and Spra- 
chen I des nordlichen Mexico's | and 
derWestseite Nordamerika^s | vonGua- 
dalaxara an bis zum Eismeer. | Von 
Job. Carl Ed. Buschmann. | 

Berlin. | Gedrackt in der Bachdruck- 
erei der Konigl. Akademie | der Wis* 
■enschaften. | 1859. 



Buachmann (J. C. E.) — Continaed. 

1 p. L pp. Tti-xii. 1-«19. 4°. 

Oopiei uen: Astor, Brinton, liaisonneave, 
Qnaritch, Trmnball, Eamea. 

Published at 2u liarks. An nnont half-mo- 
rocoo copy was sold at the Fischer sale, cata- 
logue no. 269, to Quaritch, for 2L 11«. ; the lat- 
ter prices two copies, catalofj^ue no. 12552, one 
21. 2t. the other 21. lOt. ; the Pinart copy, cata- 
lofcne no. 178, broaght 9 fr. ; Koehler, catalogue 
no. 440, prices it 13 H. 60 PC ; priced again by 
Quaritch, no. 30037, 22. 

Butler (Gen, Richard). Yocabalary of 
the Shawnoes. 

In Gallatin (A.), Synopsis of Indian tribes, 
in American Ant. Soc Trans. toL 2, pp. 305- 
867, Cambridge, 1836, 8^. 

The following extracts ftt>m private letters of 
Washington are found in volume 9 of Sparks's 
"Writings of George Washington," Boston, 
1835, pp. 301, 306-307: 

"I have received your letter of the 30th of 
November, accompanied by the Indian vocabu- 
lary. * * * I assure you it is a matter of 
surprise to me to find that you have been able 
to complete a work of such diflSculty and mag- 
nitude in BO short a time."— letter to Biekard 
ButJUr, Jan. 10, 1788. 

*' It is with great pleasure I transmit to you 
by this conveyance, a vocabulary of the Shaw- 
anese and Delaware languages. Your perfect 
acquaintance with Oeneral Richard Butler, the 
same worthy officer who served under your or- 
ders, and who has taken the trouble to compile 
them, supersedes the necessity of my saying 
anything in support of their veracity and cor- 
rectness. * * * I heartily wish the at- 
tempt of that singularly great character, the 
Empress of Russia, to form a universal diction- 
ary, may be attended with the merited sue- 
cess."— Letter to LufayUU, Jan. 10, 1788. 



LUTHERI 

ia^ifmiis/ 

^frocrfatt 

t>,i 

American -Virgiiiiffc 




»Bfocf^oIm/ 

Stucft wti iba uf Si^nnl. -J^un", pnvilcg. 

BURCIMR 1)1 J,nxfmiif3.3.eSai.itl).f 

.•lK<u M DC XCVl. 



)l CATECHISM US. 



' VOCABULARIUM 

BARBARO 

1 VIRGINEO- 
RUM. 

Additis pii^fim hcutioni- 
bus & obJcrvationibusHiJh- 

riiis bi'i-atirrhuf tut Ini^ita I'lc^tio- 
rr/H mtit'tcint. 




xJ 



w#' 



Anko M DC XCVl. 



FAC-SIMILE OF THE TITLE-PAGE OF CAMPANIUS'S VOCABULARIUM. 



c. 



OahoUa. SeellUiioit. 

Calendar: 

Abnaki See Vetromile (E.) 

Chippewa D616age (F. R.) 

Chippewa Jacker (B.) 

Chippewa Pr^roet (M.) 

Cree Cree. 

Cree Lacombe (A.) 

Hontagnaia Amand (C.) 

Monlagnait La Broase (J. B. de). 

Hontagnaia Tsistekaigan. 

Kipiiwing Caoq (J. A.) 

Nipieaing Caoq (J. A.) and D61tege 

(F.R.) 

Nipiiwing D616age (F. R.) 

Kipiaaing Pr6vo8t (M.) 

Calendar in the Montagnais language. 
See La Brosae (J. B. de). 

Calendar for the Saskatchewan Indians. 
See Lacombe (A.) 

Calendrier d*Oka [Nipissing]. See Caoq 
(J. A.) 

Calkina (Hiram). Indian nomenclature 
of northern Wisconsin, with a sketch of 
the manners and customs of the Chip- 
pewas. By Hiram Calkins, esq., of 
Wausau. 

In Wisoonain Hist. See. CoU. voL 1, pp. 119- 
128, MadUon, 1855, 8°. 

Contains Chippewa names of streams, fiJls, 
rapids, and chiefs, with English definitions. 

Cameron {Rev, James D.) [Gospels and 
hymns in the Ojibwa language.] (*) 
*' Mr. Cameron was ordained to the ministry 
in May [1836]. He prepared a book of twenty- 
four hymns in Ojibwa, and translated the Gos- 
pels by Mark and Ituko," ^Hittoty of American 
Mi$tiont,p.4aL 

[Campanias (Johan).] Lutheri | Cate- 
Ghismn8,{6fwer8att | p&IAmerioan-Yir- 
giniske | Spr&ket. | [Coat of arms. ] | 

Stockholm, | Tryckt vthi thet af 
Kongl. May^. privileg. | Burchardi 
Tryckeri, af J. J. Genath, f. | Anno M 
DCXCVI [16961. 

^nffraved HUe : Catechismvs Latheri | Lin- 
gra I Srecieo-Americana. 

Third Htle: Vooabnlarinm I barbaro- | Yir- 
gineo* I mm. | Additis passim locationi* | bosdc 
obaervationibos Histo- 1 rioia breTioribaa ad 



Campanias (J.) — Continued. 

iingne plenio- 1 rem notitiam. | [Typographic 
ornament.] j Anno M DC XCVI [1606]. 

Engraved title 1 1, printed tlUe rerso blank 1 
L Fortalet 7 11. text pp. 1>160 (the third title 
being p. 183), IS^. See fao-similes of title-pages. 

Catechism in the Delaware and Swedish lan- 
guages, pp. 1-129.— Oratio dominica Lingua Yir* 
giniana (ex Bibl. Virgin. Cantabrig. Nov. Angl. 
1663), p. 130. — Oratio dominica Lingna Carai* 
bioa, p. 131. — Lord's prayer, etc., in Swedish, p. 
182.— yocabulsriambarbaro-Virgineonim (clas- 
sified vocabalary in Delaware and Swedish), pp. 
135-150.— Colloqaia (dialognes) in Delaware 
and Swedish, pp. 150-153.— Numerals 1-100 in 
Delaware, p. 154. — Vocabula Mahakuasaloa 
(Susquehanna or Minqua), concluding with the 
numerals 1-102, pp. 155-160. 

The catechism appears to be more of a para- 
phrase than a literal translation. Each para- 
graph of the Delaware version is followed by 
the Swedish "versio," and that by the text of 
Luther in Swedish, the latter in larger type. 

OopieM teen: Astor, British Museum, Brown, 
Lenox, National Museum, Shea, Trumbull. 

The Field copy, no. 1405, brought $14. Two 
copies were sold at the Brinley sale, nos 6698 
and 5699; the former, "engraved title, gros* 
grain levant led morocco extra, filleted sides, 
ins. borders g. e.," brought $50; tie latter, "an- 
other fine copy, without the engraved title-page, 
old calf, g. e.," brought $25. The Pinart copy, 
no. 566, was bought by Quaritoh for 145 ft*. At 
the Murphy sale, no. 1542, a "green morooco. 
gilt-edged copy, with the rare map," brought 
$18 ; another copy, no. 1543, old calf, brought $8. 
Quaritch, na 30084, pi iced a " fine copy, calf, 
with the cypher of Charles XI of Sweden on 
sides," 82. 8*. Ellis Sl Scrutton, 1886, no. 59, 
priced it 252. Maisonneuve in 1889 priced it 
160 f^. 

John Campanius Holm, Swedish clergyman, 
bom in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1601, died there 
17 Sept., 1683. He sailed with Governor Printz 
firom Gottenburg 1 Nov., 1642, and arrived at 
Fort Christina, on the Delaware, 15 Feb., 1643, 
where he entered on his duties as chaplain to 
the Swedish colony, and continued to ofllciate 
in this capacity during six years. Prior to hla 
coming he had been preceptor of the orphans' 
seminary in Stockholm.' 

Under his ministry in the colony a church 
was erected at Tinicnm, the seat of govern- 
ment, and was consecrated by him 4 Sept., 
1646. This was the first house of worship that 
was erected within the limits ot Pennsylvania. 



ALGh 



65 



66 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



CampaniuB (J.) — Contiuned. 

He maDifeated a deep ioterest in the welfare 
of the Indiana, and performed missionary work 
among them. They visited his hoase and came 
to hear him preach. To further his work be 
applied hiiii8<>lf to learning their language, 
into which he here began the task of translat- 
ing Luther's catechism. His labors in New 
Sweden ended in May, IG48, when he sailed for 
home iu the ship "Swan," arriving at Stock- 
holm on 4 July following. On his return to 
Sweden he was made chaplain to the admiralty 
and afterward rector at Upland, where he com- 
pleted his translation of the catechism into the 
language of the Delawarea, or Lenni-Lenape. 
It was published in the Delaware and Swedish 
languages (Stockholm, 1696), together with a 
vocabulary, a copy of which is iu the library 
of the American Philosophical Society. In the 
translation he accommodates the Lord's prayer 
to the circumstances of the Indians by substi- 
tuting for *' daily bread" a plentiful supply of 
venison and corn. He was buried in the 
church of Frost Hults, where there is a monu 
ment to his momory. —Appleton't Oydop. qf 
Am. Biog. 

Campanius Holm (Thomas). Kort 
Beskrifaing | Om | Provincien | Nya 
Swerige | uti | America, | Som nu 
fortjdeu af the Engelske kallas | Pen- 
sylvania. | Af lllrde och trow^rdigo 
M^aa skrifter ocb ber&ttelser ikopale- | 
tad och sammaustrefweD, samt med 
^thskillige Figurer | atzirad af | 
Thomas Campanius Holm. ' [Figare. ] | 
Stockholm, Tryckt uti Kongl. Boktr. 
hos Sal. Wankijfs | Aukia med egeu 
bekostuad, af J. H. Werner. Ahr 
MDCCII [1702]. 

Engraved title: Novaa SveciaB | Sen | Pen- 
•ylvania) | in America | descriptio. 

Engraved title 1 1. printed title 1 1. 7 other 
p. 11. pp. 1-190, errata 1 p. maps. sm. 4°. 

£n Orde- och Samtals Bok, p& de Ameri- 
canera Spr&k wid Xya Swerige, eller som det 
nu kalias Pensylvauia I Algonqnian], pp. 153- 
179.— Om the Myucqueser eller Mynckussar 
och theraa Sprik [Onoida], pp. 180-181. 

Copies teen : Astor, British Museum, Brown, 
Congress, Lenox, Trumbull. 

Priced in Stevens's Nuggets, no. 1396, 21. 3#. 
The Fischer copy, no. 2191. was bought by 
Quaritch for 11. 15*. At the Field sale a copy, 
no. 256. sold for $17; at the Men zies sale, no. 
327, "green levant morocco, paneled sides, gilt 
edges," for $37,501 Quaritch, nos. 11837 and 
29662, prices a " red morocco extra, gilt-edged*' 
copy, 162., and nos. 11838 and 29663, an "old 
calf, neat " copy, 01. 10«. and «., respectively. 
Two copies at the Brinley sale, nos. 3043 and 
3044, brought, the former $86 and the latter $80. 
At the Pinart sale a fine copy, no. 190, brought 



CampanluB Holm (T.) — Continaed. 
95 tt. ; and at the Murphy sale, no. 28M, a red 
morocco extra copy brought $28. Priced bj 
Maisouneuve in 1889, "very fine copy,'* 250 ft*.; 
and by Dodd Mead Sc co. Nov. 1889, $55. 

A short description of the province 

of New Sweden. Now called, by the En- 
glish, Pennsylvania, in America. Com- 
piled from the relations and writings of 
persons worthy of credit, and adorned 
with maps and plates. By Thomas 
Campanius Holm. Translated from the 
Swedish, for the Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania. With notes. By Peter 
S. Du Ponceau, LL. D. President of the 
American Philosophical Society, Mem- 
ber of the Royal Academy of History 
and Belles Lettres of Stockholm, and 
one of the Council of the Historical So- 
ciety of Pennsylvania. 

In Pennsylvania Hist Soo. Mem. vol. 3, pt. 1, 
pp. 1-166. Philadelphia, 1834, 8°. 

Of the origin and language of the Indians in 
Yirginiaaud New Sweden, pp. 112-115. — Vocab- 
ulary and phrases in the American language of 
New Sweden, otherwise called Pennsylvania 
[AlgonquianJ, pp. 14i-156. — Of the Minques, or 
Minckus, and their language (pp. 157-150), in- 
eludes a short vocabulary and numerals 
[Oneida], pp. 158-159. 

Issued separately as follows: 

A I short description | of the | Prov- 
ince of New Sweden, | now called by 
the English, | Pennsylvania, iu Amer- 
ica. I Compiled | from the relations and 
writings of persons worthy of credit, | 
antl udonicd with maps and plates. | 
By Thomas Campanius Holm. | Trans- 
lated from the Swedish, | for the His- 
torical Society of Pennsylvania. | With 
notes. I By Peter S. Du Ponceau, LL.D. 
I President [&c. three lines.] | 

Philadelphia: | M»Carty& Davis. No. 
171, Market street. | 1834. 

Title reverse blank 1 1. pp. iii-xi, 13-166, 8''. 
Linguistics as under title next above. 
Copies seen : Astor, Boston Athena^am, Brit- 
ish Museum, Congress, Dunbar, Tnunball. 

At the Field sale an uncut copy, no. 257, sold 
for $1.50 ; at the Menzies sale, no. 828, a **half 
green morocco, gilt top, uncut " copy for f5.25. 
The Murphy copy, no. 453, brought $L 

Campbell (John). The affiliation of the 
Algonquin languages. By John Camp- 
bell, M. A. 

In Canadian Inst. Proc. new series, vid. l,pl. 
1, pp. 15-53, Toronto, 1879, 8°. 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



67 



Campbell (J.) — Continaed. 

A general discassion of the Algonquin Ian* 
goages with examples and aflSnities, pp. 15-25. — 
Comparatiye vooabalary of the Algonqoin Ian* 
guagea (Delaware, Miami, Misaisagna, Illinois, 
Shawno, Miomao, Sankikani, ~Cree, Virginia, 
Ni pissing, Menomeni, Blackfoot, Narraganset, 
Potawatomi, Sbyenne, Arrapaho, Ojibbeway, 
New England, Natick. Mohican, Piankashaw, 
Penobscot, Ottawa, Nanticoke. Sac and Fox, 
Pampticoke, Abenaki, Souriquois, Passama- 
qaoddy, Massachusetts, Powhattan, Minsi), 
with the Malay, Polynesian, Ural Altaic, Asia- 
He, Hyperborean, and Peninsular, pp. 26-45.— 
Vooabidary IL Comparison of characteristic 
forms in Algonquin with the same in the Ian* 
gnages of neighboring families f Athabascan, 
Iroquois, Dacotah, and ChocUw], pp. 46-49.— 
Vocabulary III. Comparison of pronoaos, prop- 
ositions, and adverbs, Algonquin and Malay- 
Polynesian, p. 50.— Vocabulary of miscellaneous 
terms, Algonquin und Malay-Polynesian, pp. 
50-53. 

Issued separately as follows: 

The afiUiation of the Algonqain lan- 
guages. By John Campbell, M. A., pro- 
fessor of ohnroh history, Presbyterian 
college, Montreal. [1879.] 

No title-page, pp. 1-41, 8o. 

Linguistics as under title next above. 

CfopieMieen: Shea. 

On some important principles of 

comparative grammar as exemplified in 
aboriginal American languages. 

In Canada Educational Monthly and School 
Chronicle, voL 1, no. 3, pp. 144-149, Toronto, 
March, 1879, 80. (Pilling.) 

This paper attempts to indicate the analogy 
of two great families of American speech with 
the northern and southern Turanian families 
of Asia, as postponing and preposing languages 
respectively, employing words and sentences 
of the Chippewa, Iroquois, Cree, Qaich6, Maya, 
Axtec, and Algonquin. 

— On the origin of some American 

Indian tribes. By John Campbell. 

[First article.] 

In Montreal Nat. Hist Soc. Proc, new series, 
vol 9, pp. 65-80, Montreal, 1879, 8°. 

Vocabulary of Algonquin dialects, and of the 
Haya-Quich6, showing similarities with the 
Malay- Polynesian, pp. 72-73. 

The second article, pp. 193-212 of the same 
▼olame, contains no Algonquian material. 

^-— The unity of the human race, con- 
sidered from an American standpoint. 

In British and Foreign Evangelical Review, 
new series, no. 37, pp. 74-101, London, January, 
1880,80. (PUling.) 

By a copious exhibition and comparison of 
grammatical and lexical forms, this article pro- 
fetaea to discover in America two main families 



Campbell ( J. ) — Continued. 

of speech, and to connect these with the North- 
em Asiatic and Malay Polynesian families, re- 
spectively. It abounds in words and sentences 
from and remarks concerning the Iroquois, 
Choctaw, Quich6, Algonquin, Creek, Kadiak, 
Tchuktchi. Cherokee, Dacotah, Mohawk, Ojib- 
beway, Cree, New England, Illinois, Penobscot, 
Menomeni, and Maya. 

Origin of the aborigines of Canada. 

In Qaebec Lit. and Hist Soc. Trans, session 
1880-1881, pp. 61-93, and appendix pp. i-xxxiv, 
Quebec, 1882. 12o. 

The first part of this paper is an endeavor to 
show a resemblance between various families 
of the New World and between these and va- 
rious peoples of the Old World, and contains 
words in several Algonquian languages, pp. 84, 
86. — Comparative vocabulary of the Algonquin 
and Malay- Polynesian languages, pp. xv-xix, 
includes words in the following: Delaware, Il- 
linois, Shawno, Missisagua, Miami, Micmao, 
Long Island, Sankikani, Virginia, Cree, Nipis- 
sing, Ottawa, Menomeni, Sao and Fox, Narra- 
gansett, Potawatomt, Blackfoot, Mohican, Ar- 
rapaho, New England, Btchemin, Scoffl, Shesh- 
tapoosh, Abenaki, Piankashaw. and Ojibbeway. 

Issued separately as follows: 

Origin | of the | aborigines of Can- 
ada. I A paper read before the Literary 
and historical society, | Quebec, | by | 
Prof. J. Campbell, M. A., | (of Mon- 
treal,) I D^^gu^ O^n^ral de Plnstitu- 
tion Ethnographiqne de Paris. | 

Quebec : | printed at the ** Morning 
Chronicle" office. | 1881. 

Printod cover as above, title as above verso 
blank 1 L dedication verso blank 1 1. text pp. 
1-33, and appendix pp. i-xxxiv, fi^^. Twenty-five 
copies printed. 

Copie$9ten: Powell. 

Oaniba. See Abnaki. 

Carey ( Matthew ), editor. See American 
Museum. 

[Carnegie (5tr James).] Saskatchewan | 
and I the Rocky mountains. | A diary 
and narrative of travel, sport, | and ad- 
venture, during a journey through the 
I Hudson's bay company's territories, 
I in 1859 and 1860. | By | the earl of 
Southesk, | K. T., F. R. G. S. [Sir 
James Carnegie.] | [Seven lines quota- 
tion.] I With maps and illustrations. | 
Edinburgh : | Edmonston and Dong- 
las. I 1875. I (The right of translation 
is reserved.) 

Half-title verso printers 1 1. frontispiece 1 1. 
title verso blank 1 1. preface pp. vii-xiii, errata 
and addenda 1 p. contents pp. xv-xxviil, list of 
illustrations pp. xxix-xxx, text with appendix 
pp. 1-423, index pp. 425-448, maps, platea, 8^. 



68 



BIBLIOQRAPHT OF THE 



Carnegie (J.) — Continued. 

Cree ■yllabic chanoten, tormiiiAtiont, etc on 
four pli^M following p. 422. 

OapUt iten : British Hnaenm, CongreM, Ear* 
▼ard, Lenox. 

'Carver (Jonathan). Travels | through 
the I interior parts | of | North-Ameri- 
ca, I in the | Years 1766, 1767, and 1766. 
I By J. Carver, Esq. | captain of a 
company of provincial | troops during 
the late | war with France. | Illustrated 
with copper plates. | 

London : | Printed for the author ; | 
And Sold by J. Walter, at Charing- 
cross, and | S. Crowder, in Pater-noster 
Row. I M DCC LXXVIII [1778]. 

Title verso blank 1 1. dedication 1 1. contents 
8 IL introdaction pp. i-ZTi text pp. 17-643, 
errata etc p. [6411, maps, 8o. 

Chapter xrii, Of their Ian znage. hieroglyph* 
icks, Stc. (pp.4l4-441), contains a rocabolary of 
the Chippeway laDgnage, pp. 420-432, and nu- 
meral terms 1-1000 of the same, pp. 433-43& 

Copies seen : Astor, British Mosenm, Brown, 
Barean of Ethnology, Congress, Harvard, Mas- 
sachasetts Historical Society. 

Priced in Stevens's Nuggets, no. 470, 8«. 6d. 
At the Squier sale, catalogue no. 166, a half- 
morocco, uncut copy brought $4«75; at the 
Pinart sale, catalogue no. 209, a copy brought 5 
fir. Quaritch, no. 29928, prices one copy, uncut, 
21.; another, half-calf, U. 10«.; and one, no. 29929, 
tree-marbled calf, extra, 21. 10«. 

— Travels | through the | interior parts 
I of I North America, | in the | Years 
1766, 1767. and 1768. | By J. Carver, 
Esq. I captain of a company of provin- 
cial I troops daring the late | war with 
France. | Illustrated with copper 
plates. I The second edition. | 

Loudon: | Printed for the Author, | 
By William Richardson in the Strand ; 
I And sold by J. Dodsley, in Pallmall; 
J. Robson, iu New | Bond-street; J. 
Walter, at C baring- cross ; J. Bew, | in 
Pater-noster Row; and Mess. Rich- 
ardson and I Urquhart, at the Royal 
Exchange. | M DCC LXXIX [1779]. 

12 p. 11. pp. i-xvi, 17-543, map, S9. 

Linguistics as in the first edition, titled next 
above. 

OopifM teen : British Museum, Brown, Con- 
gress. Massachusetts Historical Society. 

The Squier copy, sheep, catalogue no. 166, 
brought $3; the Murphy copy, calf, catalogue 
no. 483, $3. Priced by Quaritch. no. 29930, half* 
eair. 1{. 16«. 

«-^- Travels | through the | Interior 
Parte | of | North- America, | in the | 



Carver (J.) — Continued. 
Years 1766, 1767, and 1768. | By J. Car- 
ver, Esq. I Captain of a Company of 
Provincial | Troops during the late | 
War with France. | Ulustrated with 
copper platee. | 

Dublin : | Printed for 8. Price, R. 
Cross, W. Watson, W. and H. | White- 
stone, J. Potts, J. Williams, W. CoUes^ | 
W. Wilson, R. Moncrieffe, C. Jenkin, 
G. I Burnet, T. Walker, W. Gilbert, L. 
L. I Flin, J. Exshaw, L. White, J. 
Beatty, | and B. Watson. | MDCCLXX- 

IX [1779]. 

10 p. 11. pp. i-xiii, 15-508, map, 9P, 

Lioguistic chapter as above, pp. 887-412. 

Copies teen: British Museum, Brown, Dun- 
bar. 

Priced in Stevens's Nuggets, no. 471, 10«. 6d. 

Johann Carvers | Reisen | durch | 

die innern Gtogenden | von | Nord-Ame- 
rika | in den Jahren 1766, 1767 und 1768, 
I mit einer Landkarte. | Aus dem Eng- 
lischen. | 

Hamburg, I bey Carl Ernst Bohn. 1780. 

Pp. i-xxiT, 1-458, map, 12°. 

Linguistic chapter as above, pp. 880-35 9 . 

Copies seen: Brown. 

Travels | through the | interior 

parts I of I North America, | in the | 
I Years 1766, 1767, and 1768. 1 By J. Car- 
Tcr, Esq. | captain of a company of 
provincial | troops during the late | war 
with France. | Illustrated with copper 
plates, I coloured. | The third edition. | 
To which is added. Some Account of 
the I author, and a copious index. | 

London : | Printed for C. Dilly, in the 
Poultry; H.Payne, in | Pall-maU; and 
J. Phillips, in George- Yard, | Lombard- 
Street. I M DCC LXXXI [1781]. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso blank 1 1. adver* 
tisement verso blank 1 1. some account of John 
Carver pp. 1-22, 11 IL pp. i-xvi, text pp. 17-548^ 
index 10 U. 8°. 

Linguistics as given under title of flnt edi' 
tion, pp. 414-441. 

Copies seen : Boston Atheneum, Britlah Mu- 
seum, Brown, Congress. 

Priced in Stevens's Nuggets, no. 472, lOii. 
M. At the Field sale, catalogue no. 283, a half- 
morocco, uncut copy brought $5.60; at th» 
Brinley sale, catalogue no. 4468, it sold for |8. 

Three years | travels, | through the | 

Interior Parts of North America, | for 
more than | five thousand milee, | con- 
taining, I An Account of the great 
Lakes, and all the Lakes, | XalandBi and 



ALGONQUIAN 

Carver (J.) — Continued. 

Rivers, Cataracts, Mountains, Minerals, 

I Soil and Vegetable Productions of tlie 
North West | Regions of that vast Con- 
tinent; I with a I description of the 
birds, beasts, reptiles, | iusects, and 
fishes peouliar to the country. | To- 
gether with a concise | history of the 
genius, manners, and | customs of the 
Indians | Inhabiting the Lands that lie 
adjacent to the Heads and to the | 
Westward of the great River Missis- 
«ippi; I and an | appendix, | Describing 
the uncultivated Parts of America that 
lU'e the I most proper for forming Settle- 
ments, j By Captain Jonathan Carver, 

I of the provincial troops in America. | 
Philadelphia: | Printed and sold by 
Joseph Cmkshank in Market-street | 
and Robert Bell, in Third street. | 
MDCCLXXXIV [1784]. 

Title veno blank 1 1. dedioatioo pp. iii-iv, an 
address pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-xvi, Intro- 
dootion pp. xvii-xxt text pp. 23-217, 8^. 

Of their langnage, &o. pp. 170-179. 

OiiTpiu 9un: Boflton Athennnm, Brown. 

Voyage | dans | les Parties Int^ri- 

eures | dejL'Am^rique Septentrionale, { 
Pendant les ann^es 1766, 1767 & 1768. | 
Par Jonathan Carver, | Ecuyer, Capi- 
taine d'une compagnie de tioupes | pro- 
vinciales pendant la guerre du Canada 
I entre la Prance & I'Angleterre. | On-, 
-vrage traduitsur la troisi^me Edition | 
Angloise, par M. de C . . . avec des re- 
mar- I ques & quelques additions du 
traduoteur. | 
Yverdon. | M.DCC.LXXXIV [1784]. 

Pp. i-xxvi, 1-436, \7P. 

Des lanji^aes des Indiens, pp. 304-322. 

Copies teen: Brown, Pilling. 

— — Voyage | dans ' les parties iutdrieures 
I de I TAm^rique Septentrionale, | Pen- 
dant les anuses 1766, 1767 & 1768. | Par 
Jonathan Carver, | Ecuyer, Capitaiue 
d'une Compagnie de Troupes | Provin- 
ciales pendant la guerre du Canada 
•entre la | France & TAngleterre. | Ou- 
vrage traduit sur la trois^me Edition | 
Angloise, par M. de C. . . . avec des 
remarqnes & | quelques additions du 
Traducteur. | [Design.] | 

A Paris, | Chez Pissot, Libraire, quai 
•des Augustins. | M. DCC. LXXXIV 
£1784]. I Avec Approbation & Privilege 
duRoi. 



LANGUAGES. 



69 



Carver (J.) — Continued. 

Pp. 1-24, i-xxviii, 1-451, map, 8<>. 
Des langnes des Indiens, pp. 315-334. 
Copiee seen : British Museam, Brown, Con- 
gross. 
Leclerc, 1878, no. 837, prices a copy 16 fir. 

Three Years | Travels , through the | 

Interior Parts | of | North- America, | 
for more than | Five Thousand Miles, j 
containing | An Account of the great 
Lakes, and all the | Lakes, Islands, and 
Rivers, Cataracts, ' Mountains, Minerals, 
Soil a id Vegeta- | ble Productions of 
the North- West Re- 1 gions of that vast 
Continent; | with a | Description of the 
Birds, Beasts, Rep- i tiles. Insects, and 
Fishes peculiar | to the Country. | To- 
gether with a concise | History of the 
Genius, Manners, and | Customs of the 
Indians | Inhabiting the Lands that lie 
adjacent to the Heads and i to the West- 
ward of the great River Mississippi, | 
and an | Appendix, | Describing the 
uncultivated Parts of America that are 
I the most proper for forming Settle- 
ments. I By Captain Jonathan Carver, | 
of the Provincial Troops in America. | 
Philadelphia: | Printed by Joseph 
Cmkshank, in Market Street, | between 
Second and Third-Streets. | M DCC L 
XXXIX [1789]. 

Pp. l-x vi, i-viii, 9-282, 12o. 

Of their lan^age, pp. 211-228. 

Copies seen: Brown. 

Three years j travels | throughout the 

I interior parts | of i North-America, | 
for more than | five thousand miles j 
containing | An Account of the great 
Lakes, and all the Lakes, | Islands, and 
Rivers, Cataracts, Mountains, | Miner- 
als, Soil and Vegetable Productions | 
of the North-west Regions of that Vast 
I Continent ; | with a | description of the 
birds, beasts, rep- | tiles, insects, and 
fishes peculiar | to the country. | To- 
gether with a concise | history of the 
genius, manners, and | customs of the 
Indians | Inhabiting the Lands that lie 
adjacent to the Heads and | to the 
Westward of the great River Missis- 
sippi ; I and an | appendix, | Describing 
the uncultivated Parts of America, that 
are | the most proper for forming Settle- 
ments. I By Captain Jonathan Carver, 
of the provincial troops in America. | 
Printed at Portsmouth, New Hamp- 



70 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Carver (J.) — Continaed. 
shire, | by Charles Peirce, for David 
West, I No. 36, Marlborongh-street, 
Boston. I M,DCC,XCIV [1794]. 

Title veno blauk 1 1. dedication pp. iii-iv, 
address pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-xvi, introdac- 
tion pp. i-vii, text pp. »-282, 12<). 

A short vocabulary of the Chippeway Ian- 
gnage, pp.Sl5-228. 

Cfopie* teen : Boston Public, Brown. 

Reize | door de | BinDeulanden | van 

I Noord-Aiiierika, | door | Jonathan 
Carver, Schildkn. | Kapitein van eene 
Compagnie Provintiaale | Troepen Ge- 
dnnrendedenOorlog | met Frankrijk. | 
Kaar den derden Drak nit het Engelsch 
vertaald | door | J. D. Pasteur | met 
Plaaten. | Eerste [-Tweede] Deel. | 
[Portrait of Carver.] | 

Te Leyden, | bij A. en J. Honkoop, 
179e. 

2 vols. 9°. Title-page of vol. 2 has no portrait 

Lininiistics as underprevious titles, vol. 2, pp. 
160-172. 

Copies teen: Brown. 
— Three years | travels | through the | 
interior parts | of | North- America, | 
for more than | five thousand miles; | 
containing | An Account of the great 
Lakes, and all the Lakes, Islands, | and 
Rivers, Cataracts, Mountains, Minerals, 
I Soil and Vegetable Productions of 
the North- | West Regions of that vast 
Continent; | with a | description of the 
birds, beasts, | reptiles, insects, and 
fishes I peculiar to the country. | To- 
gether with a concise | history of the 
genius, manners, and customs | of the 
Indians inhabiting the lands that lie | 
adjacent to the heads and to the west- 
ward I of the great river Mississippi ; | 
and an | appendix, | Describing the 
uncultivated parts of America that | 
are the most proper for forming settle- 
ments. I By Captain Jonathan Carver, 
I of the provincial troops in America. | 

Philadelphia : | Published by Key <& 
Simpson; 1796. 

Title verso blank 1 1, dedication pp. iii-iv, 
address pp. v-vii, contents pp. ix-xz, introduce 
tion pp. i-ix, text pp. 11-360, 8°. 

Of tlieir language, Slc. pp. 273-203. 

OopUt teen : British Museum, Bureau of Eth- 
nology, Congress. 

PHced in Stevens's Nuggets, no. 473, 10«. 

td. At the Field sale, catalogue no. 281, a copy 

brought $1.75. 

— — Three Years | Travels | throughout 

the I Interior Parts | of | North-Amer- 



Carv^(J.) — Continoed. 
ica, I for more than | Five Thousand 
Miles, I containing | An Account of the 
Great Lakes, and all the Lakes, Isl- 
ands, I aud Rivera, Cataracts, Mount- 
ains, Minerals, Soil and Ye- | getable 
Productions of the North- west Regions 
of that I vast Continent; | with a | 
Description of the Birds, Beasts, Rep- 
tiles, In- I sects, and Fishes peculiar to 
the Country. | Together with a con- 
cise I History of the Qenias, Manners, 
and Customs | of the Indians | inhabit- 
ing the Lands that lie adjacent to the 
heads and | to the westward of the 
great river Mississippi ; | and an | Ap- 
pendix, I describing the uncultivated 
parts of America, | that are the most 
proper for forming | Settlements. | By 
Captain Jonathan Carver, | of the Pro- 
vincial Troops in America. | 

Printed | by John Russell, for David 
West, I No. 56, Cornhill, Boston. | 1797. 

Title verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 
1 1. an address pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-xvi, 
introduction pp. 5-12, text pp. 13-312, \3P. 

Of their language, d^c. pp. 237-254. 

Oopiet teen : Boston Athenteum, Brown. 

Three years' | travels | throughout 

the I interior parts | of | North Amer- 
ica, I for more than | five thousand 
miles, I containing an account of the | 
lakes, islands and rivers, cataracts, | 
mountains, minerals, soil and vegeta- 
ble I productions of the north west re- 
I gions of that vast continent; with a 
description | of the birds, beasts, rep- 
tiles, insects, | and fishes peculiar to the 
country. | Together with a concise | 
history of the genius, manners, and 
COS- I tomsofthe Indians inhabiting the 
lauds I that lie adjacent to the heads 
and I west of the river Missisippi [sicyf \ 
and an | appendix, | describing the | 
uncultivated parts of America | that 
are the most proper for forming | settle- 
ments. I By Jonathan Carver, | Cap- 
tain of the provincial troops in Amer- 
ica. I 

Walpole, N. H. | Published by Isaiah 
Thomas & co. | 1813. 

Title verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 
1 L preface pp. v-vi, contents pp. vii-xvi, intTo> 
duction pp. 17-23, text pp. 25-280, 16°. 

Of their language, &c. (not including the 
vocabulaiy), pp. 227-229. 

CopUt teen: Massachusetts Historical So> 
ciety. 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



71 



Carver (J.) — Continned. 

— Carver's travels | in | Wisconsin. | 

From the | third London edition. | 
New- York: | printed by Harper & 

Brothers, | No. 82 Cliff-street. | 1838. 

Pp. i-xzxii, 33-376, maps, 8^. 
Of their lan^age, Sm. pp. 265-272. 
Cktpie^Men: CongroM. 
At the Field sale, cataloKae no. 285, a copy 
broaght $2.50. 

^^^ Aventares | de Carver | chez les 
sauvages | de I'Am^rique Septentrio- 
nale | cinqui^me Edition | [Design] | 

Tours I A<i Mame et C^, imprimears- 
libraires | 1852. 

Engravtd tUU : Aventares I de Carver | chez 
lesSanvaj^es | de | TAm^riqae Septentrionale. i 
[PictareJ | 

Tours I A' Mame Sc C>« | ^itears. 

Engraved title 1 1, printed title 1 1. pp. 1-236, 
120. 

Dn langage, pp. 214-217. 

Copies teen : ConKreas. 

Besides the editions of Carver given above, 
there are, according to the catalogue of the Car- 
ter-Brown Library, editions in English as fol- 
lows: Philadelphia, Joseph Crukshank, 1792. 
129 i PhiUdelphia, 1795, 8^ ; Edinburgh, 1798, 9P ;• 
Charlestown. 1602, 12^-, Edinburgh, 1807, 8P; 
Walpole, N. H., 1838, 12o. Sabin's Dictionary 
adds to the above Edinburgh. 1808, 8^. 

Jonathan Carver, traveller, born in Still- 
water, K. Y., in 1732 ; died in London, Jan. 31, 
1780. In the French war he commanded a com- 
pany of provincials in the expedition against 
Canada, and in 1763 he undertook to explore 
the vast territory claimed by Great Britain in 
North America. Ue left Boston in 1766, and, 
having reached Michilimackinao, the remot- 
est English post, applied to Mr. Rogers, the 
governor, for a supply of goods as presents for 
the Indians oo the route he intended to follow. 
Having received a part of the required sup- 
ply, with the promise that the remainder should 
be sent after him to the Falln of Si. Anthony, 
he continued his journey ; but aa the expected 
goods did not reach him, he was under the 
necessity of returning to Prairie du Chien. 
Thence, in the beginning of 1767, he set out 
northward, with a view of finding a communi- 
cation between the headwaters of the Missis- 
sippi and Lake Superior. He reached Lake 
Superior, and returned, after spending several 
months oo its northern and eastern borders, and 
exploring the bays and rivers that flow into the 
lake. Soon after his arrival at Boston, in Octo. 
ber. 1768, at which date he had traveled nearly 
7,000 miles, he set out for England "to an- 
nounce his discoveries." On his arrival he pre- 
sented a petition to the king, praying for a re-im- 
buraement of the sums he had expended; and, 
after undergoing an examination by the Board 
of Trade, which ordered him to surrender his 
papers, he received permission to pablish his 



Carver (J.) — Continued, 
journal; but the profits he derived ^m the 
sale were insufficient to relieve his necessities, 
and in the winter of 1779 he obtained a subsist- 
ence by acting as clerk in a lottery- office. Hav- 
ing sold his name to a historical compilation, 
which was published in a large folio volume, 
entitled "The New Universal Traveller" (Lon- 
don, 1779), containing an account of all the em- 
pires, kingdoms, and states iu the known 
world, he was abandoned by those whose duty 
it was to support him. In the early part of 
1780 he was reduced to poverty, and died in a 
state of destitution. The circumstances were 
made known to the public by the benevolent 
Dr. Lettsom, who brought out a new edition of 
his travels for the benefit of his widow and 
children, and made such a representation of the 
author's sufierltigs as finally led to the institu* 
tutionof'the literary {nnd,—' Appleton'g Cyclop, 
of Am. Biog. 

Case (Lewis). Additional inqairies re- 
specting the Indian languages. [1820 f ] 

No title-page, heading only ; text pp. 1-32, Ifio. 

Contains examples of infiection, compound- 
ing, etc in the Delaware, Chippewa, and Wy- 
andot languages. 

Copies seen: Boston Athenieum, Congress, 
PowelL 

Reprinted, with short "addenda," as the 
concluding portion, pp. 31-64, of the following: 

[ ] Inqairies respecting the 1 History, 

Traditions, Languages, Man- | ners, 
Customs, Religion, &,c. | of the | In- 
dians, I living within the United Stat'OS. | 
Detroit, | Printed by Sheldon A 
Reed. I 1823. 

Title verso note 1 1. text pp. 3-64, 16o. The 
verso of the title-page says: "The following 
sheets were originally printed in two separate 
pamphlets. They are now reprinted together, 
but no alteration has been made in the form 
first given to them." 

Copies seen: Powell. 

I have seen no copy of the first edition of the 
first portion of this little work. 

[ ] [Review of] Manners and cus- 
toms of several Indiau tribes located 
west of the Mississippi, by Johu Hunter. 

In North American Review, voL 22, pp. 53- 
119, Boston, 1826, 8°. (Powell.) 

The greater i>art of this article is a criticism 
of and extracts from Heckewelder*s papers in 
the American Philosoph. Soc. Trans, of the 
Hist, and Lit Com. It was answered by 
Rawle (W.) in Pennsylvania Hist. Soc. Mem. 
vol. 1, pt 3, pp. 238-275. Philadelphia, 1828, 8«; 
and by Kasstigatorskee in the U. S. Literary 
Gazette, vol 4, pp. 362-374. Mr. Rawle's article 
was answered by Mr. Cass {q. v.) in the North 
American Review, vol. 20. 

Reprinted as follows: 



72 



BIBLIOGBAPHT OF THE 



CaM (L. ) — Continued. 

[ ] £emark8 | on the | condition, 

character, and langnages, | of the | 
North American Indians. | From the | 
North American Review, | No. L, for 
January, 1826. | 

Boston. I Cnmmings, Hilliard and 
company. | William L. Lewis, Printer. 
I 1826. 
Title veno blank 1 1. text pp. 1-70. dP. 
Copies seen: Amerioan AntiqcutriAii Society, 
llAisoniieaTe. 

At the Brinley sale, catalogue na 6360, a copy 
brought $1.50. 

[ ] 1. [Review of] Travels in the 

central portions of the Mississippi val- 
ley by Henry R. Schoolcraft. 

2. [Review of] A vindication of the 
Rev. Mr. Heckewelder^H History of the 
Indian nations, by William Rawle. 

In North Amerioan Beview, toL 26, pp. 357- 
i03, Boeton, 1828, 8o. 

Critioiams upon aud extraote from Hecke- 
welder (pp. 376-403), including Delaware worda 
and phrases from Heckewelder, with English 
equivalents, pp. 377-386; verbal ac^eotives and 
Ter\|^ substantives, in Delaware and English, 
p. 390; Mohegan adjectives, p. 391 ; oonjagation 
of the verb to be in Chippewa and English, pp. 
891-394 ; other Chippewa conjugations, pp. 398- 
400; Delaware names of animals, p. 401. 

Gen. Lewis Cass, the eldest son of Mi^or 
Jonathan Cass, was bom at Exeter, New 
Hampshire, October 9, 1782, and received a 
classical education at the celebrated academy 
in that town. At an early age he removed to 
Delaware, and took charge of the academy of 
Wilmington. In 1799 he went to Marietta, 
Ohio, where he studied law, and in 1802 he was 
admitted to the bar and beg^n to practice in 
Zanesville. In 1800 he was elected a member 
of the Ohio legislature. On March 2, 1807, he 
was appointed marshal of Ohio, which office he 
held till 1813. In the war of 1812 he rose to the 
rank of brigadier-general. On the 9th of Oc- 
tober, 1813, President Madison appointed him 
governor of the Territory of Michigan. He 
acted as governor and ex^Jieio as superintend- 
ent of Indian affairs for eighteen years. In 
1820, in company with Schoolcraft and others, 
he explored the upper lakes and the source of 
the Mississippi, with double reference to the 
characterof the Indian popolation placed under 
his charge, and to the resources and geograph- 
ical features of that immense and unknown 
region. In 1829 he was called to Washington, 
with (General Clark, of Missouri, to examine 
the laws relating to Indian affairs, and prepare 
a condensed code for the better government of 
that growing and complicated department. 
The report which he drew up on this occasion 
exhibits his ftill experience on this subject. 
In 1831 President Jackson called him to pre- 



Cass (L.) — Continued. 

side over the Department of War. Ih 1834 the 
entire Indian code was revised under hia direo- 
tion, on the basis of his prior report of 1829, 
and the new code enaoted by Congress. In 
1886 President Jackson tendered him the i>osi« 
tion of minister to France. Thia he accepted 
with ^e express privilege of viaiting the 
East. In January, 184&, he was elected United 
States senator tnm Michigan, which place he 
resigned on his nomination, May 22, 1848, as 
Democratic candidate for the Presidency. He 
was subsequently returned to the Senate, and 
was made Secretary of State by President 
Buchanan in 1857, which position he resigned 
in December, 1880. He died in Detroit^ Mich. 
June 17, 1866. 

Catalogue | de | liyres rares ; et pr^cienx 
I manuscrits et imprimis \ prlncipale- 
meut sar rAm^rique | et snr les langnes 
dn monde entier | composant la biblio- 
th^que de| M. Alph.-L. Pinart | et com- 
prenant en totality la bibliotb^qne 
mexico-gaat^malienne de | M. Pabb^ 
Brassenr de Bonrbonrg | 

Paris I y^B Adolpbe Labltte | libraire 
de la Bibliotb^qne nationale | 4, me de 
. Lille, 4 I 1883 

Cover title as above, half-title verso adver- 
tisement 1 I. title as above verso blank 1 1. pref* 
ace pp. v-viii, text pp. 1-244, table verso blank 
1 L order of sale pp. 247-248, 8o. 

Contains titles of a number of works in or 
relating to the Algonquian languages. 

Copies seen : Congress, Eames, Pilling. 

Koehler, catalogue 465, nos. 36 and 384, priced 
copies 4 M. 60 Pf.; Dufossd, 1888. 4 ft*. 

Catalogue dee livres. See Leolerc (C.) 

Catalogue | of | one handred and seven- 
teen I Indian Portraits, | representing 
I eighteen different tribes, | accompanied 
by a i few remarks | on the | character, 
&c. of must of them. | Price 13^ cents. 
[1850 T] 

No imprint; pp. 1-24,80. 

A \Mt of prominent persons belonging to 
various American tribes, whose portraits were 
painted by King, of Washington, and copied 
by Inman. The names of most of them are 
given with the English signification. Among 
the tribes represented are the Sank, Shawnee, 
Fox. Chippewa, Menomine, and Ottawa. 

Copies seen: Powell, Wisconsin Historical 
Society. 

Catalogue of the library of H. C. Mnr^ 
phy. See Bartlett (J. R.) 

Oatecliism : 

Abnaki See Abnaki. 
Abnaki Yetromile (B.) 

Algonquian Algonquian. 

Algonquian James (T.) 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



73 



Catechism — Continued. 



AlgonquUn 

Algonqoian 

BUuskfoot 

Cbippewft 

ChippewA 

Ghippewft 

Cbippewft 

ChippewA 

Cbippe 

Chippe 

Chippewft 

ChippewA 

Chippe WA 

Chippewft 

Chippe wft 

Cree 

Cree 

Cree 

Cree 

Cree 

Cree 

Cree 

Cree 

Cree 

Delaware 

Illinois 

Illinois 

lUiDois 

Massachusetts 

Menomonee 

Micmao 

Micmao 

Hicmac 

Miomac 

Mohegan 

Mon agnais 

Hontagnais 

Hontagnais 

liontagnais 

Jiansee 

Nipissing 

Kipissing 

ITiplaslDg 

Kipisslng 

Nipissing 

Nipissing 

Nipissing 

Ottawa 

Ottawa 

OtUwa 

Ottawa 

Penobscot 

Penobscot 

Pottawotomi 

Pottawotomi 

Pottawotomi 

Qairipi 



Laare(P.) 

White (A.) 

Laoombe (A.) 

Baraga (F.) 

Baraga (F.) and Weikamp 

(J. B.) 
Belcoort (G. A.) 
Chone (— ) 
IM16age (F. R.) 
Dougherty (P.) 
Doagherty(P.) 4&Bodd(D.) 
Gafron (J.) 
6n6gnen (J. P.) 
Lacombe (A.) 
Ojibway. 
Pipe. 

Bompas (W. C.) 
Oo6gnen (J. P.) 
Horden (J.) 
Hnnter (Jean). 
Lacombe (A.) 
Laverlochdre (J. N.) and 

Garia (A. H.) 
Lebret (L. M.) 
Mason (S.) 
Thibaolt (J. B.) 
Campanius (J.) 
Alloaez (C.) 
Le Boulanger (J. L) 
Marest (G.) 
Eliot (J.) 

Zephyrin Engelhardt (C.) 
Demillier(L.E.) 
Kauder (C.) 
Micmac. 
Band (S. T.) 
Qoinney (J.) 
Dorocher (F.) 
LaBrodsA (J. B. de). 
Laure (P.) 
Vaultier (— ) 
Series. 

Aiamienabowewinan. 
Catechismo. 
Caoq (J. A.) 
D6p<:^ret (E.) 
Nibima. 
Nihina. 
NUoa. 
Baraga (F.) 
Demean (J.) 
Ottawa. 
Sifferath (N. L.) 
DemUlier(L.E.) 
Wsokhilain (P. P.) 
Hoeclcen (C.) 
Potewateme. 
Simerwell (R.) 
Pierson (A.) 



Cateohiame Algonquin. See Cuoq (J. 
A.) 

Cateohiame, reoueil de prieres [Cree]. 
See Laverloohftre (J. N.) andGarin (A. 
M.) 



Cateohismo | del miasionari oattolioi | 
in lingua algonchina | pubblioato | per 
enra di £. Teza | 
Pisa I tipograaa Nistri | 1873 

SeeondHUe: Cattehisme Algonquin ! tradnit f 
mot pour mot en Latin | et phrase pear phrase 
en Fran^ais | M DCCC YI [18MJ 

Half-title on cover, balf>title verso blank 1 L 
tiUe verso blank 1 L dedication " a Federioo 
Miiller" (in Italian, by Tesa) pp. S-7, awerti- 
men to tin Italiiin, Sy Tesa) pp. 1^12, second title 
verso blank 1 L preface (in French, by the trans* 
later) pp. 3-i, text pp. 5-81, note verso blank 1 1. 
W^. Prtoted from a manuscript in the library 
of the University of Bologna. One hundred 
copies issued. 

Notions pr61iroinaires [on the structure of 
the Algonquin language],pp. 5-10.--Cat6chisme, 
pp. 11-47.— Annotasioni (by Teza,and includ- 
ing extracts fh>m Cuoq, Peter Jones, Baraga, 
Rasles, etc.) pp. 40-53; extracts from the cate* 
chism in Baraga's Otchipwe anamie-nuwinai- 
gan, Paris 1837, pp. 54-58; Lord's prayer from 
Baraga, p. 58 ; Lord's prayer from Blatchford's 
new testament, p. 60. — Breve glossario algon* 
chlno, inedito (fh>m a manuscript of the Car- 
dinal Meszofanti, with notes by Tesa, includ- 
ing extracts from Baraga, Howse, Mackensie, 
and others), pp. 63-81. 

This catechism seems to have been in use at 
the Lake of Two Mountains (Oka), Canada, 
in 1806. According to the translator's preface 
he undertook the translation " in order to 
place before the eyes of the superior the doc- 
trine taught in Algonquin." Probably nut in- 
tended for pnblication, but a private communi- 
cation by a missionary priest to the superior 
of his order calling attention to the errors of a 
catechism composed and adopted by missiona- 
ries of another order. It has the approval of 
Bishop Cadotte, himself well versed in the lan- 
guage. 

The Indian text is interlined with the Latin 
translation, the French paraphrase follows, 
and attbe bottom of the pas^e the explanatory 
notes — ail by tho translator. Diligent search by 
Teta has failed to discover the author. 

The glossary also is from a manuscript of the 
Cardinal Mezzofanti, and, according to Tesa, 
is not by the same purson as the translation of 
the catechism. It is alphabetically arranged 
in Algonquin, with French definitions, and con- 
tains 302 words. The foo^notes are by Tesa 
and include extracts from various authors. 

Copies Men: British Museum, Congress, 
EamHs. 

Leclerc, 1878, no. 2007, priced a copy 25 fr. ; 
Quaritch, no. 30065, 0«., one later for 7«.; Dn* 
foss6, 1887, no. 24643, 25 f^. ; Koehler, catalogue 
465, na 823, 18 M. 

Cateohiamva Lntheri. See Campanlua 
(J.) 

Catherine Tekakoiuta [Nipissing]. See 
Dorocher (F.) 



74 



BIBUOGBAPHT OF THE 



Catlin (George). Catalogae | of | Cat- 
lin'sladiau gallery \ of | portraits, land- 
scapes, I manners and customs, | cos« 
tnmes, &o. &c., | collected daring seren 
years' travel amongst thirty-eight dif- 
I ferent tribes, speaking different lan- 
guages. I 

New- York : | Piercy & Reed, printers, 
7 Theatre alley. | 1837. 

Title veno blank 1 1. text pp. 3-36, liP. 

A list of prominent penonaf^ee of different 
tribes, indading a namber of Alj^onqnlan dia- 
lects, most of the names being accompanied by 
the EnKllsb meaning: Sao (17), Fox (2), 
Blackfoot (13), Menomonie (18), Shawnee (7), 
Chippeway (14), Rlccaree (4;, Sbienne (2), Poto- 
watomie (3). Piankeshaw (3), Kickapoo (2), Wea 
(2). Creo (3), Delaware (3). 

Cfopiet seen : Harvard, Powell, Pilling. 

»— Catalogue | of | Cailin's Indian gal- 
lery I of I portraits, landscapes, | man- 
ners and customs, I costumes, &o. &c. | 
collected during seven years' travel 
amongst thirty-eight | different tribes, 
speaking different languages. | 

New York: | Piercy & Reed, printers, 
I 7 Theatre alley. | 1836. 

Title recto L 1, text pp. 2-iO, 19^. 

Karnes of persons with English significations 
M ander previoos title, with the addition of a 
few of the Peoria. 

OopUt eeen: Harvard, Wisconsin Historical 
Society. 

«-— A I descriptive catalogue | of | Cat- 
lings Indian gallery ; | containing | por- 
traits, I landscapes, costumes, &c. | 
and I representations of the manners 
and customs | of the | North American 
Indians. | Collected and painted entirely 
by Mr. Catlin, | daring seven years' 
travel amongst 48 tribes, mostly speak- 
ing different languages. | Exhibited for 
nearly three years, with great succesn, 
in the | Egyptian hall, Piccadilly, Lon- 
don. ) Admittance One Shilling. 

Colophon : C. and J. Adlard, printers, 
Bartholomew close, London. [1844.] 

Title verso printers 1 1. to the reader p. 3, 
certificates pp. 4-6, text pp. 7-48, 4^. 

Linguistic contents as under title next above. 

Copies seen : Boston Atheneum, British Ma- 
team, PowelL 

Thn descriptive catalogae is reprinted in the 
varions editions of Catlin*s Notes of eight years' 
travel and residence in Eorope, for titles of 
which see below. 

— Catalogue raisonn^ | de | La Galerie 
Indienne de M' Catlin, | renfermant | 
des portraits, | des paysages, des cos- 



Catlin (G.)— Continued, 
tumes, etc., | et | des scenes de mcsnra 
et con tumes | des | Indiens de PAm^ri- 
que du Nord. | Collection enti^rement 
faite et peinte par M' Catlin | Pendant 
nn s^jour de 8 ans parmi 48 tribus san- 
vages, parlant trente langues diff(6- | 
rentes, et formant une population d'nxi 
demi-milliou d'ames. | 

[Paris:] 1845. | Imprimerie de Wit- 
tersheim, | Rue Montmorency, 8. 

Title as above on cover, an lectear p. 1, oer> 
tificats pp. 2-6, text pp. 6-48, 8^. 

Llngoistic contents an under 1838 title above. 

Copies seen: Powell. 

Some copies have title-page differing slightly 
from above. (Harvard.) 

A descriptive catalogue | of | Cat- 
lings Indian collection, | containing | 
portraits, landscapes, costumes, dtc, | 
and I representations of the manners 
and customs | of the | North American 
Indians. | Collected and painted en- 
tirely by Mr. Catlin, during eight years' 
travel amongst | forty -eight tribes, 
mostly speaking different languages. | 
Also I opinions of the press in England, 
France, and the United States. | 

London : | published by the author, | 
at his Indian collection. No. 6, Water- 
loo place. I 1848. 

Title verso printers 1 1. note and certificates 
pp. a-7, text pp. 8-92, 8^. 

Proper names, with English significations, 
as under titles ahove, and with the addition of 
a few named in Mohegan. 

Copies seen: Harvard, PowelL 

Priced by Maisonneuve in 1889, 2 fk*. 

North and South American Indians. 

I Catalogue | descriptive and instruct- 
ive I of I Catlin's | Indian Cartoons. | 
Portraits, types, and customs. | 600 
paintings in oil, | with | 20,000 full 
length figures | illustrating their vari- 
ous games, religious ceremonies, and | 
other customs, | and | 27 canvas paint- 
ings I of I Lasalle's discoveries. | 

New York: | Baker & Godwin. Print- 
ers, I Printing-house pquare, | 1871. 

Abridged title on cover, title as above verso 
blank 1 1. remarl&s verso note 1 1. text pp. 5-92, 
certificates pp. 93-99, 8°. 

Linguistic contents as in the edition of 1848 
with names in the Arapaho and Micmao added. 

Copies seen: Astor, Congress, Eames, Pow- 
ell, Wisconsin Historical Society. 

The Catlin Indian collection, con- 
taining portraits, landscapes, costumes. 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



^75 



Catlin (G.)— Continued. 
&c., and representations of the man- 
ners and cnstoms of ttie North American 
Indians. Presented to the Smithsonian 
Institution by Mrs. Thomas Harrison, 
of Philadelphia, in 1879. A descriptive 
catalogue. By Qeorge Catlin, the artist. 

In Rhees (W. J.), Ylnltor's g^ide to the 
Smith'toniao Institntion and United States Na- 
tional MaseoiD, in Washington, pp. 70-89, Wash- 
ington, 1887, 8o. 

Linguistics as under title next above. 

Copies seen : PilUng, Powell. 

Part V. The George Catlin Indian 

gallery in the National Mnseum (Smith- 
sonian Institution), with memoir and 
statistics. By Thomas Donaldson. 

In Annual Report of the Board of Regents of 
the Smithsonian Institution * * * July, 
1885, part 2 (half-title 1 1, pp. i-vii, 3-039), Wash- 
ington, 1886, 8<>. 

Descriptive catalogue of Indian portraits, 
pp. 13-230. — Comparative vocabulary of the 
Mandan, Black foot, Riccaree, Sioux, and Tus- 
karora (about 130 words), pp. 551-655. 

Issued separately, with title-page, as follows: 

The I George Catlin Indian gallery | 

in the | U.S. National Mnseum | (Smith- 
sonian Institution), | with | memoir 
and statistics. | By | Thomas Donald- 
son. I From the Smithsonian report for 
1885. I 

Washington: | Qovemment printing 
office. I 1887. 

Title verso blank 1 1. contents pp. i-iii, illus- 
trations pp. v-vii, text pp. 3-915, index pp. 917- 
039,80. 

(k>pie*»een: BamM, Pilling, Smithsonian In- 
stitution. 

Issued also with the following title: 

-^— The I Gteorge Catlin | Indian gal- 
lery, I in the | U.S. National Museum, | 
(Smithsonian Institution.) | with me- 
moir and statistics. | By Thomas Don- 
aldson. I 

Washington, D. C. | W. H. Lowder- 
milk & Co. I 1888. 

Title versu blank 1 1. contents pp. i-iii, illus- 
trations pp. v-vii, text pp. 3-915, index pp. 9L7- 
939. 8o. 

Linguistics as under title next but one above. 

Ooffietteen: Lowdermilk. 

^— Letters and notes | on the | manners, 
customs, and Condition | of the | North 
American Indians. | By Geo. Catlin. | 
Written during eight years* travel 
amongst the wildest tribes of | Indians 
in North America, | In 1832, 33, 34, 36, 



Catlin (6.)— Continued. 
36, 37, 38, and 39, f In two volumes, | 
with four hundred illustrations, care- 
fully engraved from his original paint- 
ings. I Vol. I[-II]. I 

New- York ; | Wiley and Putnam, 161 
Broadway. | 1841. 

2 vols. : pp. i-viii, 1-264, slip of errata; pp. 
i-viii, 1-266 312 plates and maps, royal 8°. 

Comparative vocabulary of the Mandan^ 
Blaokfoot, Riooaree, Sioux, and Tuscarora, vol. 
2, pp. 262-265. 

Copies seen : Boston AthensDum, British Mu^ 
seum, Lenox. 

According to Sabin's Dictionary, no. 11536, 
some copies have the imprint London: Wiley 
and Putnam ; others, London : published by th» 
author, 1841. Second edition. New York, 1842; 
third edition, New York, 1842; fourth edition, 
1843. 

Letters and notes | on the | manners, 

customs, and condition | of the | North 



American Indians. | By Qeo. Catlin. | 
Written during eight years' travel 
amongst the wildest tribes of | Indiana 
in North America, | In 1832, 33, 34, 35, 36, 
37, 38 and 39. | In two volumes, | with 
four hundred illustrations, carefully 
engraved from his original paintings. | 
Third edition. | Vol.I[-Il]. | 

New- York : | Wiley and Putnam, 161 
Broadway. | 1844. 

2 vols. : title verso blank 1 L contents pp. iii- 
viii, text pp. 1-264; title verso blank 1 1. con- 
tents pp. iii-viii,text pp. 1-266; maps, plates, 8^. 

Comparative vocabulary as under title next- 
above, vol. 2. pp. 262-265. 

Copies seen; Congress, Powell, Trumbull. 
— Letters and notes | on the | man- 
ners, customs, and condition | of the | 
North American Indians. | By Qeo. Cat- 
lin. I Written during eight years* travel 
(1832-1839) amongst the wildest tribe» 
I of Indians in North America. | In two 
volumes. | With several hundred illus- 
trations I from the | Author's Original 
Paintings. | Vol. I[-II]. | Fourth edi- 
tion. I 

London : | published for the author 
by I David Bogue, 86, Fleet street, | 
late Tilt and Bogue. | 1844. 

2 vols. : frontispiece 1 1. title verso printers 
1 1. contents pp. iii-vUi, text pp. 1-261; titlo 
verso printers 1 1. contents pp. iii-viii, text pp. 
1-256, appendices pp. 257-266, large 8°. 

Linguistic contents as under previous titles. 

Copies seen : Bureau of Ethnology. 

The first issue of this edition has the imprint- 
London: I Published for the Author by | Tilt 
and Bogue, Fleet Street. | 1842. (TrnmbuU.*> 



76 



BIBLIOGRAFHY OF THE 



Catlin (G.)— Continned. 
Illustrations | of the | manners, cus- 
toms, and condition | of the | North 
American Indians : | in a series of | let- 
ters and notes | written daring eight 
years of travel and adventure among 
the I wildest and most remarkable tribes 
now existing, j With three hundred and 
sixty engravings, | from the | Author's 
Original Paintings. | By Geo. Catlin. | 
In two volumes. | Vol. I[-II]. | Fifth 
•edition. | 

London : \ Henry G. Bohn, York street 
€ovent garden. | MDCCCXLV[1845]. 

2 vols.: pp. i-viU,t-2U; i-viii, 1-2M; maps 
■Mud plates, Urge 9^. 

Comparative vocabulary of the Mandan. 
Blackfoot, Riccaree, Sioux, aad Taskarora, 
voL 2. pp. 262-265. 

Copies teen: Cooj^ess. 

At the Morphy sale a copy, no. 623, broaght 

Sabin's Dictionary, no. 11539, mentions a 
Sixth edition, London, 18f6, and titles an edi- 
tion Briissel and Leipzig, 1846-1848. A copy 
of this latter is priced by Tiiibner, 1856, no. 
1955, U li.; another copy, no. 1956, plain, 14«. 

Illustrations | of the | manners, cus- 
toms, and condition | of the | North 
American Indians : | in a series of | let- 
ters and not«s | written during eight 
years of travel and adventure among 
the I wildest and most remarkable tribes 
now existing. | With three hundred and 
sixty exgravings | from the Author's 
Original Paintings. | By Geo. Catlin. | 
In two volumes. Vol. I[-II]. | Seventh 
edition. | 

London : I Henry G. Bohn, York street, 
Co vent garden. | M D CCC XLVUI 
[1848]. 

2 vols.: frontispiece, title verso printers 1 I. 
contents pp. iii-viii, text pp. 1-256; fron tit- 
piece, title verso printers 1 1, contents pp. iii-viii, 
text pp. 1-256, appendices pp. 257-266, maps, 8°. 

Comparative vocabulary as under title next 
above, vol. 2, pp. 262-265. 

Chpies ieen: Aster, Harvard. 

Maisonneuve, no. 28 of catalogue no. 153 
<1889), titles an edition London, Bohn, 1851, 
pricing it 30 fr.; the date may bo an error for 
1857. Triibner, in Ludewig, p. 228, titles the 
second edition in German Briissel, Muquardt, 
1851, and gives the vocabularies as on pp. 348- 
^2. Sabin's Dictionary, no. 11537, mentions 
the eighth edition. London, Bohn, 1857. There 
is an edition Philadelphia, EUzard, 1857, a copy 
of which is in the library of the Minnesota 
Historical Society (*). A copy of the latter at 
the Fischer sale, no. 2213, brought 15t., and one 
at the Field sale, no. 310, 11.62. 



Catlin (G.) — Continaed. 

Illustrations | of the | mannerB, ons- 

tomsy and condition | of the | North 
American Indians : | with | letters and 
notes I written during eight years of 
travel and adventure among the wild- 
est and most remarkable tribes now 
existing. | With three hundred and 
sixty engravings, | from the Author's 
Original Paintings. | By Geo. Catlin. | 
In two volumes. | Vol. If-H]. | Ninth 
edition. | 

London : : Henry G. Bohn,Tork street. 
Coven t garden, j 1857. 

2 vols. 8°, maps. 

Comparative vooabnlary of the iff^w^^w, 
Blackfoot, Riccaree, Sioux, and Toaonwn^ voL 
2, pp. 262-265. 

Copies ieen: Lenox. 

Letters and notes | on the | man- 
ners, customs, and condition | of the | 
North American Indians. | Written dur- 
ing eight years* travel amongst the 
wildest I tribes of Indians in North 
America. [Picture.] By Geo. Catlin. | 
Two vols, in one. | With one hundred 
and fifty illustrations, on steel and 
wood. I 

Philadelphia: | J. W. Bradley, 48 
North Fourth St. | 1859. 

Pp. 1-792, 8o. 

Linguistics as under title next above, pp. 787- 
791. 

Copies seen : Lowdermilk. 

Some copies are dated 1860. (*) 

Illustrations | of the | manners, 

customs, and condition | of the | North 
American Indians | with | letters and 
notes I written during eight years of 
travel and adventure among the | wild- 
est and most remarkable tribes now 
existing. | With three hundred and 
sixty engravings, | from the | Author's 
Original Paintings. | By Geo. Catlin. | 
In two volumes. | Vol. I[-II]. | Tenth 
edition. | 

London: | Henry G. Bohn, York 
street, Covent garden. | 1866. 

2 vols, large 8°. 

Lingnistics as given under titles above. 

Copies seen: Boston Athennum, Wisconsin 
Historical Society. 

At the Field sale, no. 308, a copy with colored 
etchings, " worth nearly ten timet the prioe of 
plain copies," brought $48. 

Illustrations | of the | manners, 

customs, «& condition | of the | North 



▲LQONQUIAN LANGUAQEs. 



77 



Catlin (G.) — Continaed. 
American Indiaus. | With Letters and 
Notes, I Written during Eight Tears of 
Trayel and Adventore among the | 
Wildest and most Remarkable Tribes 
now Existing. | By Qeorge Catlin. | 
With I three hundred and sixty col- 
oured engravings | from the author's 
original paintings. | [Design.] | In two 
volumes. Vol. I[-II1. | 

London: | Chatto &, Windns, Picca- 
dilly. I 1876. 

2 vols. : pp. i-TiU. 1-264; i-Tiii, 1-2M ; plates, 
large 8P. 

Lingaistiosas under previous titles, toI. 2, pp. 
262-205. 

Oopi6iit4n: British Hoseam, Congress. 

Qoaritoh, no. 2903S, prices a copy * * beantiftiUy 
printedincoloars" 2L 2«., adding: "seUsSi. 3s.*' 

Catlings notes | of | eight years' 

travels and residence | In Europe, | with 
his I North American Indian collec- 
tion : I with anecdotes and incidents of 
the travels and adventures of three | 
different parties of American Indians 
whom he introduced | to the courts of | 
England, France and Belgium. | In two 
volumes octavo. | Vol. I[-II]. | With 
numerous illustrations. | 

New-Tork: | Burgess, Stringer &co., 
322 Broadway. | 1848. 

2 vols. : half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso 
copyright 1 L preface pp. v-ix, contents pp. 
xi-xvi, text pp. 1>296; half-title verso blank 
1 1, title verso copyright 1 1. contents pp. v-xii, 
text pp. 1-325, appendix pp. 327-336; 8^. 

List of nine proper names in OJibbeway with 
English definitions, voL 1, pp. 108-109.— A de- 
scriptive catalogue of Catlings Indian gallery, 
M described above under title of Descriptive 
estalogae etc London [1844], vol. l,pp. 248-296. 
—List of twelve proper names in OJibbewaj 
with English definitions, vol. 2, p. 279. 

Oopiet 9een: Powell, Watkinson. 
At the Fischer sale a copy, no. 350, brought 
Is. ; the Field copy, no. 305, sold for $2.50. 

^-— Catlin's notes | of | eight years' 
travels and residence | In Europe, | with 
his I North American Indian collec- 
tion: I with anecdotes and incidents of 
the travels and adventures of three | 
different parties of American Indians 
whom he introduced j to the courts of | 
England, France, and Belgium. | In two 
Tolnmes octavo. | Vol. I[-II]. | With 
aamerons illustrations. | 



Catlin (Q.) ~ Continued. 

Ifew York: | published by the an* 
thor. I To be had at all the bookstores. | 

1848. 

2 vols.: pp.i-xvi, 1-296; i-zii, 1-336; plates, 
8°. 

Linguistics as under title next above. 

Oopiet teen: Congress. 

-^-^ Catlings notes | of | eight years^ 
travels and residence | in Europe, | with 
his I North American Indian collection. | 
With I anecdotes and incidents of the 
travels and adventures of | three differ* 
ent parties of American Indians whom 
he I introduced to the courts of | Eng- 
land, France, and Belgium. | In two 
volumes, octavo. | Vol. I[-II]. | With 
numerous illustrations. | Second edi* 
tion. I 

London : | published by the author, | 
at his Indian collection, No. 6, Water* 
loo place. I 1848. 

2 vols.: pp.i-xvi, 1-296; i-xii, 1-336; phktes, 
8°. 

Linguistics as under titles abova 

Oopiet teen: British Mnseum, Congress, 
Lenox, Wisconsin Historical Society. 

Some copies, otherwise as abovts have " Third 
edition '* (Congress) ; and I have seen a copy 
of voL 2 whose title, otherwise the same, has 
"Foarth edition" (Barean of Ethnology). 

Adventures | of the | OJibbewaj 

and loway Indians! in | England, France, 
and Belgium ; | being notes of | eight 
years' travels and residence in Europe | 
with his I North American Indian col- 
lection, I by Geo. Catlin. | In two vol- 
umes. I Vol. I[-II]. I With numeroua 
Engravings. | Third edition. | 

London : | published by the author, | 
at his Indian collection, no. 6, Water- 
loo place. I 1852. 

2 vols.: half-title verso blank 1 L title verso- 
blank 1 L preface pp. v-ix, contents pp. xi-xvi, 
text pp. 1-296; half-title verso blank 1 1. title 
verso printers 1 L contents pp. v-xii, text pp. 
1-325, appendices pp. 327-336, 8^. 

A reprint of Notes of eight years' travels in 
Europe. 

Linguistics as under titles above. 

Oopiet teen: Astor, Boston Athensum, Bn* 
rean of Ethnology, Wisconsin Historical So- 
ciety. 

Qeorge Catlin, painter, bom in Wilkesbarre, 
Pa, in 1796; died in Jersey City, N. J., Decem- 
ber 23. 1872. He studied law at Litchfield, 
Conn., but after a few years' practice went to 
Philadelphia and turned his attention to draw- 



78 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Catlin (G.) — Continned. 

iDg and paLnting. As aa artist he was entirely 
self-taught. la 1832 he went to the Far West 
and spent eight years among the Indians of 
Yellowstone River, Indian Territory, Arkan- 
sas, and Florida, painting a unique series of 
Indian portraits and pictures, which attracted 
much attention on their exhibition both in this 
oountry and in Earope. Among these were 470 
full-length portraits and a large number of pict- 
aies illustrative of Indian life and customs, 
most of which are now preserved in the National 
Hosonm, Washington. In 1852-'57 Mr. Catlin 
traveled in South and Central America, after 
which he lived in Europe until 1871, when ho 
returned to the United Stages. One hundred 
and twenty-six of his drawings illustrative of 
Indisn life were at the Philadelphia exposition 
of 1870.— Appl0<on*« Oyelop. of Am. Biog. 

Caulkins (Frances ManwariDg). His- 
tory I of I New LondoDi | Connecticut.. 
I From the first sarvey of the coast in 
1612, to 1852. I By Frances Manwaring 
Caalkins. | [Quotation and seal.] | 

New London : | published by the au- 
thor. I 1852. 

Title verso copyright I 1. preface pp. iii-iv, 
contents pp. v-xi, text pp. 13-072, index pp. 
673-680, 8°. 

A chapter of names, English and aboriginal, 
pp. 118-125, contains a list of geographic names 
in the Pequot or Mohegan territory. 

Copiei9een: Boston Atheneeum, Congress, 
Lenox, Massachusetts Historical Society, 
Trumbull, Watkinson. 

Sabin's Dictionary, no. 11571, and the Brinley 
sale catalogue, no. 2252, mention a second edi- 
tion, continued to 1860, New London, 1860, 680 
pp. 9P. The Brinley cop; brought $6. 

Chamberlain (Alexander Francis). The 
relationship of the Americau languages. 

In Canadian Inst. Proc. third series, vol. 5, 
pp. 67-76, Toronto. 1887, 8°. 

"An inquiry into the arguments which have 
been advanced in favor of the north-eastern 
Asiatic or Peninsular origin of the American 
Indians, and an endeavor to assign to them an 
origin in other directions." 

Contains a few words in Chippewa, Menom- 
onee, and Miami, p. 62. 

— - Mississagua etymology. 

In Science, vol, 12, no. 293 (Sept 14, 1888), p. 
132, New York, 1888, 4°. , 

A list of al>out twenty words procured /rom 
the Mississaguas (OJibwas) of Scugog Island. 

— Notes on the history, customs, and 
beliefs of the Mississagua Indians. 

In Journal of American Folk-lore, vol. l,pp. 
160-160. Boston and New York, 1888, 8^. (Bu- 
reau of Ethnology.) 



Chamberlain (A. F.) — Continued. 

Words, pbrasea. sentendea, geographic 
names, tribal names, short love songs, etc. in 
the Mississagua langoage, pattim. 

Issued separately as follows: 

Notes on the history, | customs, and 

beliefs of | the Mississaguas I [Printer's 
ornament] | By | A. F. Chamberlain, 
B. A. I Fellow in Modern Languages in 
University College, Toronto | (Re- 
printed from The Journal of American 
Polk-Lore, | July, 1888) | 

Cambridge | Printed at the Riverside 
Press I 1888 

Title on cover as above, no inside title, text 
pp. 150-160, 8o. 

Copies teen: Pilling. 
Tales of the Mississaguas. 

In Journal of American Folk-lore, toL 3. pp. 
141-147, Boston and New York, 1889, 8P. 

Three animal stories in Mississagua, with 
interlinear English translation, followed by 
free English translation, and six stories in 
English only. The tales were procured firom 
Mrs. Bolin (N&wIglshkOke). 

The archaeology of Scngog Island. 

A paper read before the Canadian Insti- 
tute, January 12th, 1889, by A. F. Cham- 
berlain, B. A. 

No title, heading only; text 3 nnnnmbered 
pages, 8^. 

Mississagua names of articies, with English 
definitions, 3d p. 

Copies teen: Pilling. 

Reprinted from the Port Perry Standard 
(newspaper), vol. 23, no. 30, p. 2, March?, 1889. (*) 

The Eskimo race and language. 

Their origin and relations. By A. F. 
Chamberlain, B. A. 

In Canadian Inst. Proc. third series, vol. 6, 
pp. 261-337. Toronto, 1889, 8P. 

Loan words from Algonkin dialects in the 
Eskimo dialects, pp. 276-277. 

The language of the Mississaguas of 

Scugog. (Abstract.) 

In Canadian Inst. Proc. third series, toL 7, 
pp. 106-108, Toronto, 1890, 8°. 

A general account of the language of the 
Mississaguas of Scugog Island, with a list of 
some words "not to be found in Wilson's or 
Baraga's dictionaries, or different words are 
given." In the opening sentence the author 
sa3's: "In the course of a visit paid to the 
Indians of Scugog in August, 1888, the writer 
was enabled to collect a vocabulary of some 
700 words, besides personal and place names.'* 

This manuscript is described under the next 
tiUe. 

Issued separately, also, repaged 1-3, with the 
following line at top of p.1: Extract tnm 
Proceedings of Canadian Institute^ 1890. (PHI* 
ing, Powell.) 



ALOONQUIAN LAN0UA0E8. 



79 



Chambei'lBln (A. F.) — Contiaa«d. 

[Linguistio material of the Misussa- 

guas.] (•) 

Uuioscript In iHMaeuloD of Ita aathor, «bo 
wrola me cauoeniiiig H u followa under du« 
<irNi>T.2I, 1888: 

"Tbc ILitof trorda coll«t«d hj ms nmntfae 
Hiuuflagiua of Sougog Inlaad, Onurio CouQ' 
t;. Province of OnUrio, nambcn B20. They 
were collitcled et TSrious times. Aum't i, 4. a, 
ll,Ac,l«8S. AboutSSOvatacalleoUid framthe 
Die«or Cbler Jobnmu orSCDKOg; tbe fti«al«T 
part or (be remainder [rum Mn. BoIId (KAvI. 
Kiehkake (an inlellisent Indlaa nonuu), a few 
ftvm Osawaiilnilkl (an lodian formerly a leaob- 
eraoiQDRllielribel. TbeyoccDpylt pagu of 
papers 1 11 iDcbeai sppeudeil,jire anumberuf 
elymologlcal eiplaoallona. 1 have alw^i pp. 

tion and etymalogy) of InJIaa (UisalaMpia) 
penooal and eeojcnpblcal nainon. Also 8| pp. 
•ame aiie, doasly written, eonCilning 'Mylbi 
and 3oagi of the Ulatliaagnu of Scugog. 



terllnear Bngllab IranaUtiDa. and alao foil Eng- I 
tiahCranabillaa witbeipluatorynote*. I hope ' 
to have tbera pobllabeil at an xarly date In tbe I 
Journal of American Folk-lore." 

In July. 1S89, Mr. Cbaiuberlaia wrote me: 
"Uyllstof Alconkin peraonaJ namei lorar ' 
OODIalDH 30 Damea (Cblppewa cbUfly) from 
Uta. JaioeeOD (Winter Stodlei aod Sommar I 
IUiiib1r»j, IW Dlackfout Cree, and Cbippeway I 
from Morrla (ludUn Trealies), GO Cree. Chip. ' 
peway. Potowatomle, etc. trom Paul Kane ' 
(WMiileriD^af an Artist. elc.)i about 300 from 
Sebootorall (OJebway, Ottawa, FotUwottomie, 
etc), making sbont IS otoiely written pagea. 
the Indian uamea bsing followed by EngUtb 
tranaiationa. 

—<~~ 8 ladies iu AlgODkian onomatology 
■ml tetiiMiology. (*) 

Uannacnpt 42 pp, S°. A paper read befors 

the American AeaoclatlOD for the AdTancemant 
ofScienoe,atToroiito.SeptemberI,18SS. Title 
•sd note from Ita Jiutbor. I 

Deala witb the tiamea of natuial phenom> ' 
eu, animala. birda, plants, flsbes, repUles, in- 
MCle, tribal and persoaal aames, topographio | 
names, etc., and tbeir etyiDOloi^ic meaDlnga.in I 
Ciee. Lake of Two Uooctaioa. AlKonkin, Ojib- 
vay and Missiaaauga, with oocMlonal illoatra- 
tiona froDi alliBr dlaleets. I 

Cbamberlaln (Moatagae), Words, 
phraaea, seateaces, and test in the Mel- 
icite(Maliait)UDguage, BiverSt. Joba, 
New Brunswick. 

Manoicript, pp. 7-112, 4=, in tbe library of 
the Bureau of Ethnology ; recorded Id a cop; 
of the flnt edition of Powetl's " Introdnction 
to the xtudy of Indlaa languaeea," and bean 
data of December. 1880, All tbe schedaleaare < 
irellflUedeiceptno.n. "Standardaof ralue," 



Chambarlain < U.) — ContiDn«d. 

which contaiua namea of daya and mantha. 
"Story of the man tbe Bear gena Uke their 
name from." withlllenlEngUahtraoalatiaDln- 
■erlioed. pp. 104-106. 

Chamberl&jrue (Jobn^ [and TVilklns 

(D.)"}, ediiori. Oratio | dominloa | in 

diversas omniain fere | geatium lin- 

gnas I veraa | et j propriis cvjvaqve 

lingvao | cbaracteribVB expresss, | Uaa 

I cam Diijsertatioiiibua ooaaullis de Lin- 

I guarani | Origiae, variisque ipsarum 

I permatatioaibus. | Editirre | Joaane 

Cliaiuberlaynio | Aaglo Britanno, Be- 

giae Sncietatis LondiDausia &. | Bero- 

I liiiensis Socio. | [Vignette.] ] 

' AinateliRilami, | Typis Guilieloii &, 

Davidia Qosrei. | MDCCXV [1715]. 

I Folding plate 1 1. title reveru blank 1 L ds- 

dlcatio (ligned Joannoa Cbamberlayne) 3 Q. 

I reverse of Si h I. boil na " Lectori benevolo Da. 

Tid Wllklna S.P.D." which eilenda to Terse 

I of 2Sth 1. toll pp. 1-M, appendix 3 11. (bided 

Lord'a prayer In Savaoahice (from the Rev. 

Dr. Le Jean, missionary of the Society for tbe 
! Propagation of the Faith, in North CjroUna). 

p.e»: in Virginlce (Massachusetts. thimEliotl, 
I P.M.— "Appendix oontlnoosqaatuorpnecipaa* 

voces In Orallonibns Domlnit 



Terra, Paoia. In Algonkine. Savanahlce. Apa- 
laebloe, Tlrnlolane, etc. followa p.W. 

In a loiter to ma Dr. Tramboll says; The 
Lord'a prayer In Savani^ice b reprloMd In my 
Notes OD P'orty Algnukiu Tsralona (p. 9;), not 
beoanae it la Shawanese, wbloh It certainly is 
not, bat becanae it haa been copied aa aucb 
from Chambariayne by Hervaa. BodonI, Tater. 
and Aner. 11 doea not belong to any one dia- 
lect ever spoken by an American Irlbe. 

Oapiet letn: Aator. Britlth Uusenm, 



1. Lena 



ratUn» 



At tl 



• Murphy as 



0. UT, brought 



C)laniplalii(Samnelde). Les | yoyagea | 
lie la I Noyvelle Fraace | oooiilentale, 
dicte [ Canada, | faitaparleS'deCbaai- 
piain I Xainctongeois, Capltaiue pour 
le Roy ea la Marine du | Ponant, & 
toates les Deacoaaertee qu'il a faites 
eu I ce pals tlepaia I'an 1603. iaa<iueB en 
I'an IG'J9. | Oil se voit comaie oe pays a 
eat^ proDiierement deacouuert par lea 
Fraii(ai8, | nousrauthoTit^ de aos Koya 
trea-Chraatieas, lusqueg aa regne | de 
sa Majesty ft present reguante Lovis 
3CIII. I Roy de France & tie Nanarre. j 
Anec vn traittd des qnalitez St condi- 
tions reqaises & ve bon Ji parfaiot Na- 



80 



BIBLIOGBAPUY OF THE 



Champlain (S. de) — Continued, 
nigatear | pour cognoutre la diaerait^ 
des Estimee qui se font en la Naaiga- 
tion ; Lea | Marqaes Sl enseignements 
qae la prouldenoe de Dieu k misea dans 
les Mere | ponr redresser lee Mariniere 
en leur roatte, sans lesqaeiles ile tom- 
beroient en | de grands dangers, Et la 
maniere de bien dresser Cartes marines 
anec leurs | Ports, Rades, Isles, Sondes, 
&, autre chose necessaire h la Nauiga- 
tion. I Ensemble vne Carte generalle de 
la description dudit pays faicte en son 
Meridien selon | la declinaison de la 
guide Aymant, A vn Catechisme on In- 
struction tradnicte | du Francois an 
langage des peuples Sauuages de quel- 
que contr^e, aueo | ce qui s'est pass^ en 
ladite Nouuelle France en I'ann^ 1631. 
I A monseigneyr le cardinal dvc de 
Richeliev. | [Scroll.] | 

A Paris. | Chez Clavde Collet an 
Palais, en la Gallerie des Prisonniers, | 
iFEstoille d'Or. | M.DC.XXXII [16.32]. 
I Auec Prinilege du Roy 

Title verso blank 1 1, dedication " a monsei- 
gnevT rillvstrisa"* Cardinal Dvcde Richeliev" 
pp. 3-4, a poem "Svrlelivre des voyages dv 
aievr de Cliamplain " pp. 7-8, table des ohapi- 
tree pp. 9-16, text pp. 1-308, seoonde partie pp. 
1-310, 1 blank leaf, Uble pp. 1-8, traitt6 de la 
marine pp. 1-64, 1 blank leaf, doctrine cbres- 
tienne eta pp. 1-20, map, sol i°, 

MzaaA (EL), L'on^son dominloale tradvite on 
Ungate des Montagnars, pp. 16-20 (of the last 
nambering). 

Copies teen: Brown, British Maseum, Con- 
gress, Harvard, Lenox. 

Priced in Stevens's Nuggets, no. 511, "fine 
copy, vellum," 11. 7t. ; Leclero, 1867, no. 1615, 
sold a "very fine copy, wide margins," for 260 
fy.; in 1878 he priced it, no.606, 700 fr.; Qnaritch, 
no. 11873, priced a copy, the folded map in fac- 
simile, 36/.; and later, no. 28818, a perfect copy, 
951.; the Brinley copy, catalagae no. 76, broaght 
$280. 

Les I voyages | de la | Novvelle 

France | ocoidentale, dicte ) Canada, | 
faits par le S' de Champlain | Xaincton- 
geois, Capitaine pour le Roy en la Marine 
da I Ponant, Sl toutes les Descounertes 
qu^l a faites en | ce pais depuis Fan 
1603. iusques en Tan 16*4^. | Oil se voit 
comme ce pays a est^ premierement des- 
couuert par les Francis, | sous Van- 
thorite de nos Roys tres-Chrestiens, 
iusques an regno | de sa Majesty h, pre- 
sent regnante Lovis xiii. | Roy de 
France «& de Nanarre. | Auec vn traitt^ 



Champlain (S. de) — Continued, 
des qualitez &, conditions requises k vn 
bon & parfaict Nanigateur | pour oo- 
gnoistre la diuersit^ des Estimee qui 
se font en la Nanigation ; Les ) Mar- 
ques & enseignements que la prooi- 
dence de Dieu k mises dans les Mors | 
pour redresser les Mariniers en leur 
routte, sans lesquelles lis tomberoient 
en I de grands dangers, Et la maniere 
de bien dresser Cartes marines aueo 
leurs I Ports, Bades, Isles, Sondes, &, 
autre chose necessaire k la Nanigation. | 
Ensemble vne Carte generalle de la de- 
scription dhdit pays faicte en son Meri- 
dien selon I la declinaison de la guide 
Aymant, &, vn Catechisme ou Instruc- 
tion tradnicte du Francois an langage 
des peuples Sauuages de quelque con- 
tr<Se, auec | ce qui s'est pass^ en ladite 
Nouuelle France en I'ann^ 1631. | A 
monseiguevr le cardinal dvc de Riche- 
liev. I [Scroll.] I 

A Paris. | Chez Lovis Sevestre Im- 

primeur-Libraire rue du Meurier pr^sla 

Porte. I S.Victor, &. en sa Boutique dana 

UCourdu Palais. 1 M.DC.XXXnL1632]. 

I Anec Priuile^e du Roy. 

Title verso blank 1 1. dedication pp. 3-6, a 
poem pp. 7-8, table des chapitres pp. ^16, text 
pp. 1-308, 1-310, 1 blank leaf, table pp. l-8,traitt6 
de la marine pp. 1-54, doctrine ohrestienne pp. 
1-20, map, sm. 4^. 

Mass6's article, as under previous title, pp. 
16-20. 

Cfopiet teen : Boston Athenasum, Brown, Con- 
gress, Lenox. 

At the Field sale, catalogue no. 821, a copy 
broaght $31 ; Leclero, 1878, no. 2697, prioed it 
1000 f^. ; Dafoss6, 1887, no. 24801, 1000 fr. 

Les I voyages | de la | Novvelle 

France | occidentale, dicte | Canada, | 
faits par le S^ de Champlain | Xaino- 
tongeois, Capitaine pour le Roy en 1» 
Marine du | Ponant, & toutes les Des- 
counertes qu^l a faites en | oe pa!a 
depuis Tan 1603. iusques en Pan 1689. | 
Oti se voit comme ce pays a est^ pre- 
mierement descouuert par les Francois,. 
I sous Tauthorit^S de nos Roys tres- 
Chrestiens, iusques an regno | de sa Ma- 
jest^ k present regnante Lovis xnL | 
Roy de France & de Nanarre. | Aueo va 
traitt^ des qualitez & condition^ re- 
quises k vn bon & parfaict Nanigateur 
I pour cognoistre la dinersit^ dee £s- 
times qui se font en la Nanigation ; Lea. 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



81 



Cbamplaln (S. de) — Continned. 

I Marqaes &. enBeignements qae la 
proaidence de Dieii ^ mises dans lea 
Hers I pour redresser les Mariniers en 
lear routte, sans lesqaelles ils tombe- 
Toient en | de grands dangers, Et la 
maniere de bien dresser Cartes marines 
auec lears | Ports, Rades, Isles, Sondes, 
&, autre chose necessaire ^ la Nauiga- 
tion. I Ensemble vne Carte generalle 
de la description dndit pays faicte en 
son Meridien selon | la declinaison de 
la guide Aymant, Sl yn Catechisme on 
Instruction traduicte | du Francois an 
langage des peuples Sauuages de quel- 
que coutr^e, auec | oe qui s'est pass^ en 
ladite Nouuelle Prance en I'ann^e 1631. 
I A monseignevr le cardinal dvo de 
Richeliev. | [Scroll.] | 

A Paris, j Chez Pierre Le-Mvr, dans 
la grand' Salle | du Palais. | M.DC. 
XXXII [1632]. I Auec Priuilegedu Roy. 

Title verao blank 1 1. dedication pp. 3-6. a 
poem pp 7--8, table dee chapitres pp. 9-16, text 
pp. 1-308, 1-310, 1 blank leaf, table pp. l-«, traitt6 
de la marine pp. 1-54,1 blank leaf, doctrine 
ohreetienne pp. 1-20, map, am. 4°. 

Maaa6'8 article, as under preyioos titles, pp. 
16-20. 

dopiM 9een: Harvard, Lenox. 

At the Harphy Bale, catalogue no. 541, a copy 
in "maroon morocco, super extra, gilt edges, 
rich inside tooling, tall," brought $155. 

— — Les I voyages | de la | Novvelle 
France | occidentale, dite | Canada : | 
faits par le S^" de Champlain | Xainc- 
tongeois, Capitaine pour le Roy en la 
Marine du | Ponant, Sl toutes les Des- 
«u>uuertes qu'il a faites en | ce Pais 
depuis Pan 1603. iusques en Tan 1629. | 
Oh se voit comme ce Pays a est^ pre- 
mierement descouuert par les Fran9oiSy 
I souz Fauthorit^ de nos Roys tres- 
Chrestieus, iusques au regno | de sa 
Majesty ^ present regoante Lovis xiii. 
I Roy de France & de Nauarre. | Auec 
Tu Traict^ de qualitez & conditions 
reqnises & vn bon &, parfait Naui- | ga- 
teur pour cognoistre la diuersit^ des 
Estimes qui se font en la Nauigation : | 
Lies marques &, enseignemens que la 
prouidence de Dieu a mises dans les | 
Mers pour redresser les Mariniers en 
leur rqutte, sans lesquelles ils tombe- | 
roiet en de grands dangers: Et la 
maniere de bien dresser cartes marines, 
auec I leurs Ports, Rades, Isles, Sondes, 
ALO 6 



Champlain (S. de) — Continued. 
A autres choses necessaires k la Naui- 
gation. I Ensemble vne Carte generale 
de la description dndit Pays faite en 
son Meridien, selon | la declinaison de 
la Guide- Aymant ; & vn Catechisme on 
Instruction traiduite | du Francois au 
langage des Peuples Sauuages de 
quelque contr6e : Auec | ce qui s'est 
pass^ en ladite Nouuelle France en 
I'ann^e 1631. | A monseignevr le cardi- 
nal dvc de Richeliev. | [Scroll.] | 

A Paris. | Chez Clavde Collet, an 
mont sainct Hilaire, pr^ le Puits Cer- 
tain. I M.DC.XL [1640]. I Avec privi- 
lege dv roy. 

Title verso blank 1 L dedication pp. 3-6, a 
poem pp. 7-6, table des chapitres pp. ^16, text, 
pp. 1-308, 1-310, 1 blank leaf, table pp. 1-6, traittd 
de la marine pp. 1-54,1 blank leaf, doctrine 
ohrestienne etc. pp. 1-20, map, sm. 4°. 

Maas6's article as in editions of 1632, titled 
above, pp. 16-20. . 

Copies teen: Brown, Lenox. 

Quaritch, no. 28810, priced a copy 552. and 
Maisonneuve. in 1889, 800 fr. 

The edition Paris, 1830, 2 vols. 8°, does not 
contain the linguistics. (Congress.) 

(Euvres | de | Champlain | publi^es 



I sous le patronage | de TUniversit^ 
Laval I Par Tabb^ C.-H. Laverdi6re,M. 
A. I professeur d^histoire a la faculty 
des arts | et biblioth^caire de Puui- 
versit^ | SecondeMition | TomeI[-V]| 

Qa^bec | Imprim^ au S^minaire par 
Geo.-E. Desbarats | 1870 

5 vols, (the fifth in two parts) paged con- 
secutively at bottom : 2 p. 11. pp. i-lxxvi, 1- 
1478, 1 1. The pagination of the original edition 
appears at the top. Vol. 5 is a reprint, in fac- 
simile as to arrangement, of the 1632 edition of 
Les Voyages. 

Mass^'s article, as in edition of 1632, titled 
above, vol. 5, pt. 2, pp. 16-20 (pp. 1408-1412 of 
the series). 

Oopiet teen: Boston Athenienm, British 
Museum, Brown, Congress, Dunbar, Lenox, 
Watkinson. 

At the Field sale, catalogue no. 320, a copy 
brought f2] .75 ; Quaritch, no. 11872, priced it 32. 
16«.; the Murphy copy, no. 543, half green 
morocco, brought $12.50; Gagnon, Quebec, 1888, 
no. 47, priced a copy $12.50, and another, no. 20, 
$12. 

The whole of the first edition, begun in 1865, 
was destroyed by fire. 

Chapin (Rev. Alouzo Bowen.) Glaston- 
bury I for I two hundred years: | a | 
centennial discourse, | May ISth, A. D. 
1853. I With an Appendix, | contain- 



82 



BIBLIOGBAPHY OF THE 



Chapin (A. B.) — Continaed. 
ibj; I historical and statistical papers of 
iutercst. | By Rev. Alouzo B. Chapin, D. 
]>., I Rector of St. Lake's Church, [&c. 
three lines.] , [Quotation, three lines.] I 

Hartford: | press of Case, Tiffany and 
company. | 1853. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. prefatory note verso 
••collect" 1 L text pp. 5-252. 8^. 

"Indian hiatory aod anlo," pp. 9-24, gi^ea 
the etymology and signification of Indian 
names and places in various Algonquian Lan- 
guages. 

Copies teen: BritisU Museum, CongrMs, 
TnimbulL 

Chapman (Isaac A.) A | sketch | of the 
I history of Wyoming. | By the late 
Isaac A. Chapman, esq. | To which is 
a<lded, | an | appendix, | containing a 
I statistical account | of the | valley, 
I and I adjacent country. | By a gen- 
tleman of Wilkesbarre. | 

Wilke^barre, Penn. | Printed and 
published by Sharp D. Lewis. | 1830. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. preface verso 
blank I 1. text pp. 5-209, erraUp. [210 1. 129. 

" Signification of several Indian names which 
are still retained at and near Wyoming, com- 
municated by Bev. John Heckewelder," pp. 
172-173. 

Copiet ieen : Boston Athenseum, British Mu- 
seum, Congress, Trumbull, Watkinson. 

Chappell {Lieut, Edward). Narrative | 
of a I voyage | to ( Hudson's Bay | in | 
his majesty's ship Rosamond | contain- 
ing some account of | the north-eastern 
coast of America | and | of the tribes | 
inhabiting | that remote region. | By j 
Lieut. Edward Chappell, R.N, | [Two 
lines quotation.] | 

London: | printed for J. Mawman, 
Ludgate street : | By R. Watt«, Crown 
Court, Temple Bar. | 1817. 

Title verso blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 
1 1. advertisement 3 11. list of engravings verso 
blank 1 1. text and appendices pp. 1-279, map, 
89. 

"A vocabulary of the Cree or Enisteneaux 
Indians inhabiting the western shores of Hud- 
son's Bay, presented to the author by an Indian 
trader who had resided thirty years in that 
country," pp. 256-279. 

Copies seen : Astor, Boston Athenteum, Brit, 
ish Museum, Congress, Powell, Trumbull. 

A copy at the Brinley sale, catalogue no. 
5647. brought $1.75, and one at the Murphy sale, 
catalogue no. 549. $1,25; priced by Quaritch, 
no. 21972, 5*. : Clarke Sc co. 1886 catalogue, no. 
395, price an edition with title differing slightly 
from above, $2.50. 



Charenoey (Comte Hyacinthe de). Be- 
cherches sur lea noma dea pointa de 
Pespace. 

In Acad6mie nationale des aciences, arts e( 
belles-lettres de Caen. M6m. pp. 217-302, Caen, 
1882,80. 

Terms for the cardinal points of the com> 
pass in Algonquin and Cri, pp. 231-233. 

Issued separately as follows: 

Recherches | snrles | noma des points 

de Pespace j par M. le C** de Charencey 
i membre [«&c. two lines.] | [Design.] | 

Caen | imprimerie de t\ le Blanc- 
Hardel | rue Froide, 2 et 4 | 1882 

Cover title as above, title as above verso note 
1 1. text pp. 1-86, 8°. 

Famille algique: Algonquin et Cri.pp. 14-16. 

Copies seen: Brinton, Pilling, PowelL 

Ethnographie euskarienne. £tnde 

sur Porigine des Basques d'apr^s lea 
denudes de la linguistiqne par M. le 
Conite H. de Charencey. 

In Soci^t^ de G6og. Bull, seventh series, voL 
10. PP.44S-456, Paris, 1889, 8^. 

A number of Delaware words compared with 
those of the Basque, pp. 450-451.— Algonkin and 
Iroquois words, p. 451. 

Issued separately also, without title-page, 
repaged 1-12. (PilUng.) 

Charlevoix (Pierre Francois Xavier de). 
Histoire | et | description generate | de 
la I NouTclle France, | aveo | le journal 
historique | d'un Voyage fait parordre 
du Roi dans | PAm^riqne Septentrio- 
nale. | Par le P. De Charlevoix, de la 
Compagnie de J^sus. | Tome premier 
[-troisiiime]. | [Vignette.] | 

A Paris, | Chez Nyon Fils, Libraire, 
Quai des Augnstins, h POcoaaion. | 
M.DCC.XLIV [1744]. | Aveo approba- 
tion et privilege dn roi. 

3 vols. 4^, maps. The third volamelias a dif* 
ferent title-page, as follows: 

Journal I d'un | voyage | f)sit par ordre da 
roi I dans | I'Amerique septentrionnale [tie] ; | 
Adress^ a Madame la Duchesse | de Lesdigui- 
ores. I Par le P. De Charlevoix, de la Compa- 
gnie do J^sus. i Tome troisi^me. | 

A Paris, I Chez Nyon Fils, Libraire, Qua! des 
Augnstins, k rOccasion. | M.DCC.XLIV 
[1744]. i Avec approbation et privilege du roL 

Onzidme lettre, containing comments upon 
the distribution of the languages of Canada, the 
Algonquin, Pouteouatamis. Ontagamis, Mas* 
coutins, Kiokapou, Miami, Illinoia, and Huron, 
vol. 3, pp. 175-189. 

Copies seen: British Mnseum, Brown, Con- 
gress, Lenox, Watkinson. • 

The Fischer copy, no. 2221, WM bought by 
Quaritch for 12. 11«. The Field copy, no. S3U, 
sold for $10.50. Quaritch prices a oalf oopy. 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



83 



Charlevoix (P. F. X. de) — Continued, 
no. 11875. 2Z. 2*.. and % "calf gilt" copy, no. 
11876, 21, 15«. : and again, no. 29813, he prices 
a calf copy 2L 10«. At the Marphy sale, no. 
550, a copy brought $6. 

Hlstoire | et | deacription generale 

I de la I Noovelle France, | aveo | le 
joarual historiqoe | d'un Voyage fait 
par ordredu Eoi dans | rAraerique Sep- 
tentriouale. | Par le P. De Charlevoix, 
de la coaipagnie de Jesas. | 

A Paris, I Chez la Veuve Ganeau, 
Libraire, rue 8. Jacquea prfes la rue | 
du PlAtre, aux Armes de Dombee. | 
M.DCC.XLIV [1744]. | Avec approba- 
tion et privilege du Roi. 

3 vols. 4°. 

Lingaistics as under prerions title. 

Copies teen: Harvard. 

Histoire | et | description generale | 

de la I Nouvelle France, I aveo | le 
journal historique | d'un Voyage fait 
par ordre du Eoi | dans TAin^rique 
Septentrionnale. | Par le P. De Charle- 
voix, de la Compagnie | de Jesus. | 
Tome preniier[-8ixi^me]. ] [Printer's 
ornament.] | 

A Paris, | Chez Didot, Libraire, Quai 
des Augustins, | h la Bible d'or. | M 
DCC XLIV [1744]. | Avec Approbation 
^ Privilege du Roy. (*) 

6 vols. 120. Vols. 5 and 6 have title-pages as 

foUows: 

Joamal | d'un | voyage | fait par ordre du 
Toi I dans | I'Ameriqne | septentrionnale; | Ad- 
dressd k Madame la Dnchesse i de Lesdiguieres. 
I Par le P. De Charlevoix, de la Compagnie | 
de Jesus. | Tome cinquidme[-8ixidme|. | 
(Printer's ornament, i | 

A Paris, | Chez Didot, Libraire, Quai des 
Augustins, I k la Bible d'or. | M. DCC XLIV 
[1744]. I Aveo Approbation Sc Privilege du Roy. 

Caractdre de la langue haronne, voL 5, p. 
289.~^araotdre de la langue algonquine, vol. 6, 
pp. 28»-290.— Particularit^s de la langue hn- 
ronne, vol.5, pp. 290-291.— Particularit^s de la 
langue algooquine, voL 6, pp. 291-292. 

Title from Mr. Chas. H. Hull, from a copy in 
the library of Cornell University. 

Histoire | et | description generale | 

de la I Nouvelle France, | avec | le 
Journal historique | d'un Voyage fait 
par ordre du Roi | dans PAm^rique 
Septentrionnale. | Par le P. De Charle- 
voix, de la Compagnie | de Jesus. | 
Tome premier[-eixi^me]. | 

A Paris, I Chez Rolliu Fils, Libraire, 
Quai des Augustins, | h S. Athanase & 
aa Palmier. | M DCC XLIV [1744]. 



Charlevoix (P. F. X. de) — Continued. 
Avec Approbation &, Privilege du 
Roy. I 

8 vols. 12<'. Vols. 5 and 6 have title-pages as 
follows: 

Journal | d'un | voyage | fait par ordre du 
roi I dans i TAmeriqne | septentrionnale; | Ad- 
dress6 ik Madame la Dnchesse | de Lesdigui- 
eres. I Par le P. De Charlevoix, de la Com- 
pagnie I de Jesus. | Tome cinqui6me[-8i- 
xi6me]. | 

A Paris, i Chez Bollin Fils, Libraire, Quai 
des Augustins, ] ii S. Athanase Sc an Palmier. | 
"M DCC XLIV [1744]. | Avec Approbation Sc 
Privilege du Roy. 

Linguistics as under title next above, voL 5, 
pp. 28»-202. 

Copies seen: Boston Athensdum, Brown, 
Congress. 

In the Triibner catalogue of 1856, a " full 
russia, gilt edged, beautiful" copy, no. 1957, was 
priced 21. 3«. Leclero, 1878, no. 098, prices a 
copy 45 f^. 

Some copies of this edition have the imprint 
Chei Pierre Fran9ois Giffart, | rue Saint Jac- 
ques k Sainte Therese. | MDCC XLIV [1744]. | 
Avec Approbation Sc privll^ire du Roj. (Astor, 
Boston Athenieum, Brown, Dunbar.) 

Sabin's Dictionary and Leclerc's Bib. Am. 
mention the following editions: 

A Paris, chez Pierre Fran9ois Giffart, me 
Saint Jacques it Sainte Therese, M. DCC. XLIV, 
3 vols. 4°. 

A Paris, chez Rolin Fils, Libraire, Quai des 
Augustins, MDCCXLIV, 3 vols. 4°. Leclerc's 
supplement, no. 2706, prices a copy of this, 
90 fr. 

Paris, Nyon, MDCCXLIV, 8 vols. 12°. 

Paris. Didot, MDCCXLIX, 6 vols. 12o. 

Paris, Kolln flls, MDCCXLIX, 6 vols. 12o. 

The Journal d'un voyage has been reprinted 
in English as follows: 

Journal | of a | voyage | to | North- 
America. I Undertaken by Order of the | 
French king. | Containing | The ^ jeo- 
grapbical Description and Natural | 
History of that Country, particularly | 
Canada. | Together with | An Account 
of the Customs, Characters, | Religion, 
Manners and Traditions | of the orig- 
inal Inhabitants. | In a Series of Let- 
ters to the Duchess of Lesdiguieres. | 
Translated from the French of P. de 
Charlevoix. | In two volumes. | Vol. I 

[-11]. I 
Loudon : Printed for R. and J. Dods- 

ley, in Pali-Mall. | MDCCLXI [1761]. 

2 vols. : half-title verso blank 1 L title verso 
blank 1 I. contents pp. v-viii, text pp. 1-382 ; 
half-title verso blank 1 L title verso blank 1 I. 
contents pp. v-viii, text pp. 1-380, "books 



84 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Cliarlevolx (P. F. X. de) — Continaed. 
printed for R.Mid J. Dodaley" 3 IL index to 
both volumes 11 IL 8<>. 

LiDguiatioa as under titles above, voL 1, pp. 
20»-303. 

Oopiei teen: Boston Atheneum, Congress, 
Massachusetts Historical Society. 

The Fischer copy, no. 2223, brought 5s. ; the 
Field copy, no. 832, $5; the Mensies copy, no. 
876, half calf, antique, $5.75; the Squier copy, 
no. 191, 12.25; the Brinley copy, no. 78, $3.60. 
Clarke, 1886, no. 5381, prices an old oalf copy $4. 

-^— Letters | to the | Dutchess Isic'] of 
Lesdiguieres ; | Giving an Accoant of a | 
voyage to Canada, I and | Travels through 
that vast Country, | and j Louisiana, to 
the Gulf of Mexico. | Undertaken | By 
Order of the present King of France, | 
By Father Charlevoix. | Being a more 
full and accurate De- 1 scription of Can- 
ada, and the neigh- | bouring Countries 
than has been ! before published ; the 
Character of | every Nation or Tribe in 
that vast | Tract being given; their 
Religion, | Customs, Manners, Tradi- 
tions, Go- I vemment, Languages, and 
Towns; | the Trade carried on with 
them, I and at what Places; the Posts 
or I Forts, and Settlements, estab- 
lished I by the French; the great 
Lakes, | Water-Falls, and Rivers, with 
the I Man nor of navigating them; the | 
Mines, Fisheries, Plants, and Ani- | 
mals of these Countries. | With Reflec- 
tions on the Mistakes the | French have 
committed in carrying | on their Trade 
and'Settlements ; | and the most proper 
Method of | proceeding pointed out. | 
Including also an Account of the An- -j 
thor's Shipwreck in the Channel of | 
Bahama, and Return in a Boat to | the 
Mississippi, along the Coast of | the 
Gulf of Mexico, with his Voy- ' age from 
thence to St. Domingo, | and back to 
France. | [Device. ] | 

Printed for R. Goadby, and Sold by 
R. Baldwin in Pater- | Noster-Row, 
London. 1763. 

Title verso blank 1 1. contents pp. iii-xiv, 
errata verso advertisement 1 1. text pp. 1-384, 8^. 

Linguistics as under previous titles, pp. 120- 
124. 

Oopietteen: A stor, Boston Athenseum, Brit- 
ish Museum, Brown, Congress. 

A "beautiful uncut copy" at the Menzies 
sale, no. 375, brought $5. 

According to Sabin*s Dictionary, no. 12140, 
some copies are dated 1764. 



Charlevoix (P. F. X. de) — Continaed. 

A I voyage | to | North-America : | 

Undertaken by Command of the pres- 
ent I king of France. : Containing | the 
Geographical Description and Natural 
History | of | Canada and Louisiana. | 
Witb I The Customs, Manners, Trade 
and Religion | of the Inhabitants ; a 
Description of the Lakes and | Rivers, 
with their Navigation and Manner of 
passing | the Great Cataracts. | By 
Father Charlevoix. | Also, | A Descrip- 
tion and Natural History of the Islands 
in the | West Indies belonging to the 
different Powers of | Europe. Illustrated 
with a Number of curious Prints | and 
Maps not in any other Edition. | In two 
volumes. | 

Dublin : | Printed for John Exsbaw, 
and James Potts, in | Dame-Street. | 
MDCCLXVI [1766]. 

2 vols, maps, 8°. The title of voL 2 differs 
slightly from that of voL 1, which is triven 
above. 

Linguistics as under previous titles, vol. 1. 
pp. 183-166. 

Copies teen : British Museum, Brown, Con- 
gress. 

Leclerc. 1878, no. 699, prices a copy 25 fr. A 
copy at the Briuley sale, no. 80, brought $17 -, 
the Murphy copy, no. 552, sold for $9. 

I have seen several partial reprints of Char- 
levoix which do not contain the linguistics. 

Pierre Fran9oifi Xavierde Charlevoix, French 
traveller, bom in Saint Qnentin 29 Oct., 1682 r 
died in La Flecbe 1 Feb., 1761. He entered the 
Jesuit society in 1608, and while a scholar was 
sent to Quebec in 1705, and during the four 
years f^lowing his arrival taught in the col- 
lege in that place. After completing his divin- 
ity studies, •he became a professor of belles- 
lettres in France, published a history of 
Christianity in Japan, and returned to Canada. 
For some time after his arrival he remained at 
Sault St Louis. Then he ascended the St. 
Lawrence, and. reaching the Mississippi by 
way of the Illinois, descended the river to New 
Orleans, thence proceeding to France byway of 
Santo Domingo, after an absence of two years. 
From 1733 till 1755 he was one of the directors 
of the "Journal de Trevoux." He published 
in succession histories of Santo Domingo and 
Japan, and in 1744 his " Histoire dela nouvelle 
France," which had been kept bacic for twenty 
years. Simultaneously with the latter appeared 
the Journal that he wrote while in America, 
which was addressed to the Duchess de Lesdi- 
guidre, and was soon translated into English. 
Though his history was praised and qnoted as 
an authority by ssholars, it was not traaalated 
until recently, when an edition In Kngliah waa 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



85 



Charlevoix (P. F. X. de) — Continued, 
pablished by John Qilmary She* (New York, 6 
voU., 180&-'72). The iMt work written by 
Charlevoix was a history of Paragaay (1756).— 
Applston't Oyelop. of. Am. Biog. 

Chase (Pliny Earle). On certain primi- 
tive names of the Supreme Being. 

In American Philosoph. 9oc. Proo. voL 0, pp. 
420-421, PhllAdelpbia, 186P. 99. 

Terms used by a number of American peo- 
ples, among them the Algonkin, Cheyenne, 
Blaokfeet, and Arapaho. 

— On the radical significance of nu- 
merals. 

In American Philosoph. Soo. Proc. toL 10, pp. 
18-23. Philadelphia, 1&60, $<>. 

Bxam.)le8 in severallndian langaages.inclad- 
ing the Abnaki from Rasles* dictionary. 

Chateaubriand (Fioomte Francois An- 
gnste de). Voyages | en | Am^riqne ] et en 
I Italic : I par I le Yicomte de Chateau- 
briand. I En deux volumes. | Tomd 

Paris I et Londres, ohez Colburn, 
libraire, | NewBurlington street. 1 1828. 

2 vols.: 2 p.lL pp.i-iv, 1 1. pp. 1-400; 3 p. U. 
pp. 1-423. 80. 

MoisdesCypawais (Chippewa], langaealgon- 
qnine, with deflnitions, vol. 1, p. 259. — Langnea 
indiennes, pp. 273-286. inolades passing mention 
•f the Algonqaian bnt is principally devoted to 
the Hnion. 

Oopiet seen: Congress. 

——Travels { in | America and Italy, | by 
I Viscount de Chateaubriand, i author of 
[&.O. two lines.] | In two volumes. | 
Vol. I[-II]. I 

London: | Henry Colbnrn, New Bur- 
lington Street, f 1828. 

2 vols.: 3 p. II. pp. 1-356 ; 2 p. 11. pp. 1-420, 8^. 

Months of the Chipaways, vol. 1, p 244.^ 
Indian languages, as under title above, pp. 255- 
366. 

Oopiei teen: British Museum, Congress, 
Wisconsin Historical Society. 

— Voyages | en Am^riqne | en Italic, 
etc. I par | M* l^e Chateaubriand | avec. 
des gravures f 

Paris I Bemardin-B^chet, Libraire | 
31, Qua! des Augustius [ 1865] 

Printed cover, half-title 1 1. pp. 1-380, 9P. 
Langnea indiennes, pp. 138-144. 
OopieMteen: Bancroft. 

■ ■ CBuvres completes | de M. le Vicomte 
I de Chateaubriand, | membre de 
I'Acad^mie fran^oise. | Tome premier 
[-trente-sixidme]. | 



Chateaubriand (F. A. de) — Continued. 

Paris. I Pourrat fr^res, ^diteurs. | M. 
DCCC.XXXVl [-M.DCCC.XL] [1836- 
1840]. 

36 vols. 8o. 

Vol. 12, Voyage en Am6riqoe, contains: Mois 
des Cypawais, p. 157.— Langnes indiennes, pp. 
167-176. 

Copies teen : British Museum, Watkinson. 

I have seen mention of an edition Paris, 18t^ 
1831, 28 vols. 89. 

CEuvres completes | de M. le Vicomte 

I de Chateaubriand, | membre de 
PAcad^mie fran^oise. | Tome premier 
[-trente-sixi^me]. | Essais sur la vie et 
les ouvrages de M. de Chateaubriand. | 
[Picture.] | 

Paris. I Pourrat fr^res, ^diteurs. | M. 
DCCC.XXX VIII [1838]. 

36 vols. 8^. 

Lingaistics as under title next above, vol. 12, 
pp. 167, 167-176. 

Copies teen : Congress. 

1 have seen mention of an edition Paris, 1850- 
1861, 12 vols. 8o. 

Chateaubriand illustr^ | Voyages | 

en Italic et en Amerique. | 

Lagny — Imprimerie de Vialat et Cie. 
[1850t] 

No title-page, illustrated heading only; voy- 
age en Italic pp. 1-23, voyage en Am6riqne pp. 
24-103, melanges litt^raires pp. 103-112, folio. 
Imprint at bottom of p. 1. 

MoisdesCip iwais, p. 70.— Langues indiennes, 
pp . 72-75. 

Copiet seen : Lenox. 

Atala, I Ren^, | les Abencerages, | 

suivis du I voyage en Amerique,. | par 
M. le vicomte | de Chateaubriand. | 

Paris, I librairie de Firmin Didot 
frdres, | imprimeurs de Plnstitut, | rue 
Jacob, 56. I 1850. 

Half-title 1 1. title 1 1. half-title of Atola 1 L 
prefaces pp. 3-17, text pp. 10-112, half-title of 
Ren6 1 1. text pp. 115-156, half-title of *'Les 
aveotnres du dernier Abencerage" 1 I. aver- 
tissement pp. 159-160, text pp. 161-216, half-title 
of "Voyage en Am6riqne'' 1 1. avertissement 
pp. 2i9-2i0, preface pp. 221-250, introduction pp. 
26L-206. text pp. 267-525, toble p. [526], 12o. 

Mois dei* Cipawois, p. 392. — Langues indien- 
nes, pp. 400-409. 
Copies seen : Lenox, National Museum. 

Atala, I Reu6, | les Abencerages, | 

suivis du I voyage en Amerique, | par 
M. le vicomte | de Chateaubriand. | 

Paris, I Librairie de Firmin Didot 
fr^res, fils et cie., | imprimeurs de Tin- 
stitut de France, | rue Jacob, 56. | 1857. 

2 p. 11. pp. 1-625, 1 L 120. 



86 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Cbateaubrland (F. A. de)^ Continaed. 

Laogaes indiennes, pp. 400-409. 
OopieiBeen: She*. 

The Uaj^aistic Article does not appear in other 
editions of the ahove work which I have seen. 

Chemin de la oroix [Cree]. See Oarin 

(A. M.) 
Ohefenne: 

Animal names See Hayden (P. Y.) 



Qeneral discussion 

General discuasion 

Geographic names 

Grammatic comments 

Numerals 

Numerals 

Numerals 

Numerals 

Personal names 

Personal names 

Phrases 

Proper names 

Proper names 

Proper names 

Pro er names 

Proper names 

Proper names 

Relationships 

Relationships 

Sentences 

Songs 

Songs 

Tribal names 

YocAbulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Vocabulary 

Words 

Words 

Words 

Words 



Abort (J. W.) 
Jomard (B. F.) 
Dodge (R. L) 
Hayden (F.V.) 
Abert (J. W.) 
Flachnecker (G.) 
Haines (E.M.) 
Pott (A.F.) 
Bent (G.) 
Black more (W.) 
Bellas (H.H.) 
Catlin (G.) 
Hayden (F.V.) 
Indian. 

Jackson (W. H.) 
Smet (P. J. de). 
Treaties. 
Hayden (F. V.) 
Morgan (L. H.) 
Bellas (n. H.) 
Baker (T.) 
Dodge (R. I.) 
Hayden (F. V.) 
Abort (J. W.) 
Buschmann (J.C.B.) 
Campbell (J.) 
Dodge (R. I.) 
Dompuech (E.) 
Flachnecker (G.) 
Gallatin (A.) 
Haines (E. M.) 
Hayden (F. V.) 
Latham (R. G.) 
Maximilian (A. P.) 
Morgan (L. H.) 
Schoolcraa(H. R.) 
Smith (J. S.) 
Bellas (H. H.) 
Charencey (H. de). 
Chase (P. E.) 
Smithsonian. 



Chlpawa vocabalary, North Amer- 
ica. (•) 

A thin 4to, boand in cloth, pp. 75. 

Title and note from J. B. B. Clarke's " His- 
torical and Descriptive Caulogae of tbe Euro- 
pean and Adiatio Manuscripts in the Library of 
the late Dr. Adam Clarke," Sc^. London. 1835, 
p. 87. 

Chippewa. [Hymn book iu the Chip- 
pewa language.] C*) 
"A small hymn book of twelve hymns, trans- 
lated into the Chippewa, was now [1827] printed 
by the Missionary Society of the Methodist 
Xpisoopal Society in New York, and some 



Chippewa — Continaed. 

copies were now on Grape Island ; and tha da- 
sire to read and sing the hymns stimulated th» 
desire to learn."— Piayter. 
See OoUection; also Jonas (P.) 

Chippewa. A pocket | Yocabolary of 
terms | alphabetically arranged. | 

(18W.) 

Manuscript in the library of the compiler 
of this bibliography, 83 11. some blank, 5| by 8i 
inches. 

English and Chippewa, alphabetically ar- 
ranged according to the former. Possibly by 
H. R. Schoolcraft. 

Chippewa. . Sketch of a grammar, yo- 
oabalary, and phrase-book, Chippewa 
and Eoglish. About 1780. (*) 

Original manuscript, 75 pp. 4^. 

Title from Quaritoh, no. 30077, who prioea it 
18«. 
Chippewa vocabulary. (*) 

Manuscript of the last century, important 
and unpublished. It comprises 75 pp. in 2 col- 
umns i°.—LeeUre, 1867, no. 331. 

This is probably the "Chippeway- English 
vocabulary*' titled in the Pmart sale catalogue, 
no. 230. and purchased by Quaritch for 8 fhtnoa, 
title of which is given next above. 

Chippew^a. Words aad phrases of the 
Chippewa. 

Manuscript, pp. 77-228, 4P, in the library of 
the Bureau of Ethnology ; recorded in a copy 
of Pow«)irs Introduction to the study of Indian 
languages, second etlition. The name of the 
oollector is unknown ; it was received Amm the 
Mackinack Agency, without accompanying let. 
ter or memorandum, April 7,1882. Schedules 
1-8, 10. 12-14, 16, 20-25 are well filled ; schedule 
17 has a few entries ; schedules 0, 11, 15, 18, 10, 
20-30 are blank. 



Ohippewa: 

Bible, Pentateach 
Bible, Genesis (pt.) 

Bible, Genesis (pt.) 
Bible, Genesis 
Bible, Genesis (pt.) 
Bible, Psalms 
Bible, Minor pr. 
Bible, New test. 
Bible, New test. 
Bible, New test. 
Bible, (rospels 
Bible, Gospels 
Bible, Matthew 

Bible. Matthew (pt. 
Bible. Matthew 

Bible, Luke 

Bible, John 



See O'Meara (F-A.) 
Evans (J.) Mid Jones 

(P.) 
James (E.) 
Jones (P.) 
Schoolcraa (H. R.) 
0'Meara(F.Aj 
McDonald <K ) 
Blatchford (H.) 
James (E.) 
O'MearA (F. A.) 
Cameron (J. D.) 

0'Meara(F.A.) 
Horden (J.) and San- 
ders (J.) 
Jones (P.) 
Jones (P.) andJonea 

(J.) 

Hall (S.) and Cop- 
way (G.) 

Jones (J.) and Jbi 
(P.) 



ALOONQUIAN LANOUAQES 



87 



Chippewa — Continaed. 



Bible* Acts 

Bible, Eph. (pt) 
Bible, Cor. (pt) 
Bible, James 
Bible, John i-m 
Bible history 
Bible history 
Bible history 
Bible history 

Bible passages 
Bible passaf^es 
Bible passages 
Bible passages 
Bible passages 
Bible passages 
Bible passages 
Bible passages 
Bible passages 
Bible psMages 
Bible stories 

Bible stories 

Boole of oom. prayer. 

Book of com. prayer. 

Calendar 

Calendar 

Calendar 

Catechism 

Catechism 

Catechism 
Catechism 
Catechism 
Catechism 
Catechism 

Catechism 
Catechism 
Catechism 
Catechism 
Catechism 
Dictionary 
Dictionary 

Dictionary 
Dictionary 
Dictionary 
Btymologies 
C^neral discassion * 
Qeneral discussion 
Oeneral discussion 
General discussion 
General discussion 
Gieneral discussion 
General discussion 
General diitcussion 
General discussion 
General discussion 
General discussion 
General discussion 
General discussion 
General discussion 



Hall (8.) and Cop- 
way (G.) 

James <B.) 

Schoolcraft (H. R.) 

Om^jibiigeuinvn. 

Omi\|ibiigeuinyn. 

Chone (— ) 

Horden (J.) 

Verwyst (C.) 

Vogt (C.) and Gaf- 
ron (J.; 

American Bible Soc. 

Bagster (J.) 

Bible Society. 

British and Foreign. 

Churdh. 

Enew. 

Gilbert ARivington. 

Knight (E. H.) 

Schoolcraft (H.B.) 

Wilson (B.F.) 

Dougherty (P.) and 
Rodd.(D.) 

Kishemanito. 

Horden (J.) and San- 
ders (J.) 

0*Meara(F.A.) 

D616age (F. R.) 

Jac&er (£.) 

Pr6vost(M.) 
' Baraga (F.) 

Baraga ( F. ) and Wei- 
karop (J. B.) 

Belcourt (G. A.) 

Chone (— ) 

D616age(F.R.) 
' Dougherty (P.) 

Dougherty (P.) and 
Rodd (D.) 

Gaf ron (J.) 

Gu6guen (J. P.) 

Laoombe (A.) 

Qjibway. 

Pipe. 

Baraga (F.) 

Baraga (F.) and Bel- 
court (G. A.) 

Belcourt (G.A.) 

F6rard (M.) 

Wilson (E. F.) 

Schoolcraft (H. R.) 

Atwater (C.) 

Bond (J. W.) 

Cop way (G.) 

CourtdeGebelin(A.) 

Gibbs (G.) 

Jameson (A.H.) 

Jefferys (T. ) 

J6han (L. F.) 

Koh] (J.G.) 

Our. 

Pickering (J.) 

Schoolcraft (H.R.) 

Tach6 (A. A.) 

Zephyrin Engelhardt 
(C. A) 



Chippewa — Continaed. 



Gentes 
Gentes 
Gentes 
Geography 
Geographic names 
G^x>graphic names 
Greographio names 
Geographic names 
Geographio names 
Geographic names 
Geographio names 
Geographic names 
Geographic names 
Geographio names 
Geo^rapbic names 
Geographic names 
Geographic names 
Geographic names 
Grammar 
Grammar 

Grammar 
Grammar 
Grammar 
Grammar 
Grammar 
Grammar 
Grammatic oommente 

Grammatic commente 
Grammatic comments 
Grammatic commente 
Grammatic comments 
Grammatic commente 
Grammatic commente 
Grammatic commente 
Grammatic commente 
Grammatic comments 
Grammatic treatise 
Grammatic treatise 
Grammatic treatise 
Grammatic treatise 
Grammatic treatise 
Grammatic treatise 
Grammatic treatise 
Grammatic treatise 
Grammatic treatise 
Grammatic treatise 
Hymn book 
Hymn book 
Hymn book 

Hymn book 
Hymn book 

Hymn book 
Hymn book 
Hymn book 

Hymn book 
Hymn book 
Hymn book 
Hymns 
Hymns 
Hymns 



Morgan (L. H.) 

Schoolcraft (H.R.) 

Warren (W.W.) 

AbiuoJL 

Boyd(S.G.) 

Branson (A.) 

Calkins (H.) 

Connor (fl.) 

GiiaUan(J.A.) 

Hathaway (J.) 

Eelton (D. H.) 

Kuhl (J. G.) 

Lanman (C.) 

McLean (J.) 

Morgan (L. H.) 

PeUtot (E. F. S. J.) 

Schoolcraft (H.R) 

Witherell (B. F. H.) 

Baraga (F.) 

Baraga (F.> and Bel- 
court (G.A.) 

Barnard (A.) 

Bhickbird (A. J.) 

Chippewa. 

Hall (S.) 

Summerfleld (J.) 

Wilson (E. F.) 

Adelung (J.C.) and 
Vater (J. S.) 

Cass (L.) 

Featherman (A.) 

Gallatin (A.) 

Uaines (E. M.) 

Hovelacque (A.) 

James (E.) 

Jones (P.) 

Schoolcraft (H. R.) 

Wilson (E. F.) 

Adam (LO 

Belcourt (G.A.) 

Chippewa. 

Chronicles. 

Dn ponceau (P. S.) 

F6rard (M.) 

Hnrlbnrt (T.) 

Schoolcraft (H. R.) 

Vater ( J. S.) 

Verwyst (C.) 

Barnard (4.) 

Chippewa. 

Henry (G.) and 
Evans (J.) 

Horden (J.) 

Horden (J.) and San- 
ders (J.) 

Jones (P.) 

Jones ( P.)and others. 

0'Meara(F.A.) and 
Jacobs (P.) 

Prevost (M.) 

Walker (W.) 

Wilson (E. F.) 

Baierlein (E.) 

Baraga (F.) 

Belcourt (G. A.) 



88 



BIBUOGRAPHT OF THE 



Chlppe^^a — ContiDned. 



Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Hymns 

Le|[ends 

Letter 

Letter 

Lord's pnysr 

Lord's prsysr 

Lord's prayer 

Lord's prayer 

Lord's prayer 

Lord's prayer 

Lord's prayer 

Lord's prayer 

Lord's prayer 

Lord's prayer 

Lord's prayer 

Lonl's prayer 

Lord's prayer 

Namerals 

Numerals 

Numerals 

Namerals 

Namerals 

Namerals 

Namerals 

Namerals 

Namerals 

Namerals 

Namerals 

Namerals 

Namerals 

Periodical 

Periodical 

Periodical 

Personal names 

Personal names 

Prayer book 

Prayer book 

Prayer book 

Prayer book 

Prayer book 

Prayers 

Prayers 

Prayers 

Prayers 

Prayers 

Primer 

Primer 

Primer 

Primer 



Bondael (F.L.J.) 
Cameron (J. D.) 
Collection. 
Copway (O.) 
D«16age (F. R.) 
Ewh. 

OUflllan (J. A.) 
Henry (Q.) 
Indian. 

Jameson (A.M.) 
Jones (P.) 
Lord's. 

0'Meara(F.A.) 
OshkL 

Playter (O. F.) 
Strickland (S.) 
Tapper (M.F.) 
Sohooloraft (H. EL) 
Bif(canoe (C.) 
Indian. 
Aner (A.) 
BergholU (G. F.) 
Enew. 

Haines (X. IL) 
HoiAnan (C. F.) 
James (B.) 
Lord's. 
NoUoe. 

Schoolcraft (H. B.) 
Shea (J.O.) 
Tramball (J. H.) 
Wilson (E. F.) 
Tonth's. 
Belooart (G. A.) 
Carrer (J.) 
Collin (N.) 
D6l6aKe(F.B.) 
Fairbanks (— ) 
Haines (E. M.) 
Haldeman (S. S.) 
James (E.) 
Long (J.) 
Rand (S. T.) 
Schoolcraft (H.R.) 
Shea (J. G.) 
Warren (W.W.) 
Oar. 

Petaaban. 
Pipe. 
Bill. 

Jameson (A.M.) 
Baraga (F.) 
Baraga ( F. ) and Wei< 

kamp (J. B.) 
0'Meara(P.A.) 
OshkL 

Verwyst (C.) 
Baierlein (E.) 
Belooart (G. A.) 
Blackbird (A. J.) 
Lord'8. 
OJibway. 
Baraga (F.) 
Belooart (G. A.) 
Doagberty (P.) 
York (P.) 



Chippewa — Continued. 



Proper names 
Proper names 
Proper names 
Proper names 

Proper names 
Proper names 
Proper names 
Proper names 
Proper names 
Proper names 
Proper names 
Proper names 
Proper names 
Proper names 
Proper nsAies 
Psalms 
Psalms 
Reader 
Reader 
Reader 

Reader 

Reader 

Reader 

Relationships 

Relationships 

Relationships 

Sermons 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Songs 

Spelling book 

Spelling book 

Spelling book 

Spelling book 

8i>elling book 

Spelling book 

Spelling book 

Spelling book 

Stories 

Stories 

Ten commandments 

Ten comouuidments 

Ten commandments 

Ten commandments 

Text 

Text 
Text 
Text 
Text 



Brinton (D.G.) 
Catalogae. 
Chamberlain (A. F.) 
Foster (J. W.) and 

Whitney (J. D.) 
Haines (E.M.) 
Indian. 

Jackson (W. H.) 
Morris (A.) 
NeiU(E.D.) 
Report. 

Schoolcraft (H.R.) 
Stanley (J. M.) 
Treaties. 
Warren (W. W.) 
Wilson (E. F.) 
0'Meara(F.A.) 
Schoolcraft (J.) 
Baierlein (E.) 
Barnard (A.) 
Dougherty (P.) and 

Rodd (D.) 
Gallaodet'a. 
James (E.) 
Spelling. 
Dougherty (P.) 
Jaoker (E.) 
Morgan (L. H.) 
Baraja (F.) 
Baker (T.) 
Belden (G. P.) 
Brisbin (J. S.) 
Copway (G.) 
Faulmann (K.) 
Fletcher (J. C.) 
Goodrich (S G.) 
Hoflfknan (C. F.) 
Hoflffaian ( W. J.) 
Jameson (A. M.) 
Johnston (Jane). 
Lanman (C.) 
McKenney (T. L.) 
Schoolcraft (H. R.) 
Schoolcraft (J.) 
Strickland (W. P.) 
Ayer (F.) 
Baierlein (E.) 
Bingham (A.) 
Dencke (C. F.) 
Evans (J.) 
James (B.) 
Jones (P.) 
Spelling. 
Barnard (A.) 
Jaoker (F.) 
Baraga (F.) 
Blackbird (A. J.) 
Enew. 
Lord's. 
Adelang (J. C.) and 

Vater (J. S.) 
Baraga (F.) 
Giimian(J.A.) 
HoiAnan (W.J.) 
Hovelacque (A.) 



ALGONQUIAN L4NOUAQE8. 



Chlpp«w«- Contlaned. 




T»W 


JadSan. 


ToMboluy 


irK«.Tor(I.) 


Text 


Joi».(P.) 




UcEemwy (T. L.) 


TMt 


JOIH(P.S.) 


Too.biiltty 


H'Lma (J.) 


Teit 


OmsUUoU.. 




UwlUoo(-l 


Text 


PltMrtW.H.) 


TocbulMj 


U.hui (I. L.I 


T«rt 






lluliDmHi(A.P.( 


Text 






Moru. (O.) 


Text 


s«h«.io»n (J.) 




Kotlco. 


Taxt 


Wright (a T.t 


VocbnUry 


Ken (P.) 


TnMt 


AtUnd. 




Ke.lune (-) 


Tnut 






Batl«ob«r{B.U.) 


Trmrt 


BwlL 


Vo«buUry 


Bt.Johii(J.K.) 


Tnet 






8&od.il<L.) 


Tnet 


OugliUabi. 


ToubaUry 




Tmal 


B«w.rd. 






Tnot 


Bufiin (J.) 


To«.balMy 


Ulriol (E) 


TrlMDUiM 




TouboUty 


WltaoB (D.) 




ottaon. 


TocboUry 


WlUon (B. F.) 


TrllMlDaawi 


Vtmu <T. W.) 


Word! 


Boldu {0. P.| 




Ad.B (L.) 


Wofd. 




Vt>«biiUi7 


Ad>^lno((J.C.)uld 


Word. 






T.[.r(J.8.) 


Wort. 






Allon (W.) 




A. do). 








Cooke (W. W.) 


TocboUrj 


BtlM (A.) 


Word. 


Dnnaui (D.) 


TK.bul.ry 


Bmg. (F.) 


Word. 


Ft«oilot(M.H.) 


TocbulMJ 


B«toD(B.B.l 


Word. 


GKt.ch«HA, B.I 


VocbulttT 


Budcy de Loilint 


Word. 


flerard (W &.) 




<L.N.) 


Word. 


Gordon iH. 1.) 


TocboUry 


BalDoart (O, A.) 


Woid. 


QrM»rto{S.del«). 


TDubnluy 


Beltnisl (Q. C.) 


Word. 


Or.y(A.)udTn» 


TOMbulKJ 


BlukUrd (A J.) 




ball (J. H.) 


TootbalUT 


BrinWn(D.O.) 


Woid. 


Qr«wi(B.A.) 




Campbdl (J.( 


Word. 


H.lDH(E.U.) 




C«T«r (J.l 


Word. 


B.lo (H.) 


Tt>«bDl«T 


Chip.*.. 


Word. 


HlBdloy [J. L) 




Chlppfw.. 


Word. 


Hoffmso (W. J.l 




Copw.y (O.) 


Wonl. 






Db Pejater (A. 8.} 


Word. 


E<ihl (J. Q.| 


YoatbtMxy 


DoreuUi.I (0.) 


Word. 


Koirto (K.) 


Tocbaluy 




Wort. 


L.tb.Di(R.G.} 


TqcbuUry 




Word. 


MoDoBg»U(J.) 


ToMbal«7 


Edwuilt (J.) 


Word. 


Mclnloib {J.) 


ToubnluT 




Word. 


MkL«ui <J. p.) 




0>ll.lln (A.) 


Word. 


M.llBry (O.) 


Taii.ba[u7 


H^no.(E,M.) 




lUU-Brun IU.K.} 


Tootboluy 




word. 


Ueriu (A. A. tod). 


Too.biil.c7 


H.]e(a.| 


Wort. 


Norrla (P. W.) 


ToeibolMT 


B.niilloD (S. U.) 


Word. 


0'U«r. (F. A.) 


TowbiduT 




Word* 


Pelltot(E. r. 8.J.) 


Toubaluy 


HeniT (A.) 


Wort. 


Bsnuoy (A.) 


Toe.bQlU7 


Hi-iiry (O.) Mid 


Wort. 


Skodem <D. C.) 




KtmUJ.) 


Word. 


8chonibnr|tk(B.H.) 


Too.bol.ry 




Word! 


B«a»r (3. M.l 




iDTnttRltor. 


Words 


Slight (B.) 


To«bol.rj 


J.»M(E.l 


Word. 


Sm^tlP.J.a.). 


Too.bnUry 


JohMton (O.l 


Words 


8<Bitb»iilu. 


Too.bQl.rjr 


JobnutoD (ff.) 


Word. 


Tyrrell (J. B.) 




JoD« (K. F.) 




T.tor(J.8.) 


TocJjoUry 


JODM (P.) 


Word. 


T«tTanillo(B.) 




Ko.tlng (W. H.1 


Words 


Wilson (D.) 


Vocbnlwy 


Lathim (& Q.) 


Word. 


Wl^soD (B. F.) 


ToooboUry 


Long (J.) 


Worts 


Wright (8. Q.) 


Too^boluT 




Word. 


Yukl.wlb!h(F.lL) 



90 



BIBLIOGRAPHT OF THE 



Chone (Rev, — ). f Catechism and short 

bible history in the Chippewa lan- 

gnafife.] (*) 

ManuaerfptB. Title f arnishf^ by "Rev. W. F. 

Gftgnieor, Manitoalin Island, Ontario, Canada. 

ChreBtomathie Algonqnine. See Caoq 
(J. A.) 

Chriatian Covenanting Confession [Mas- 
sachusetts]. See Eliot (J.) 

Christiane OOnoowae Sampoowaonk 
[Massachosetts]. See Eliot (J.) 

ChriBtmaB (Michael). See Kaader (C.) 

ChronicleB of the Northamerican Sav- 
ages. I Vol. I. May, 1835. No. 1 [-Sep- 
tember, 1835, No. 5]. 

No title-page, beading only; text pp. 1-80, B°. 
Contains a Tocabalary of tlie Sawke and 
Hoskwawke Indian tongne, pp. 11-16, 46-48, 
go, 8o. Also: 

James (E.), Essay on the Chippeway lan- 
guage, no. 5, pp. 73-80. 
Ck^ines teen : Congress. 
Church Missionary Gleaner. Languages 
of N. W. America. 

In Church Missionary Gleaner, no. 00, Lon- 
don. 1881, 40. (Powell.) 

Contains St John, iii. 16, in Western Cree 
(Roman characters), Eastern Cree (syllabic 
characters), and Ojibbeway or Soto. 

Keprinted ftx>oi the British and Foreign Bi- 
ble Society's Specimens, etc. 
Ohnrch Missionary Society: These words follow- 
ing a title or inclosed within parentheses after 
a note indicate that a copy of the work re- 
ferred to has been seen by the compiler in the 
library of that institution, London. England. 

Chnte (James Andrew). Vocabulary of 
the Delawarcs of Missouri. 

In Maine Hist. Soc. Coll. vol. i, pp. llfr-117, 
Portland, 1856, 8*^. Included in an article by 
Willis ( W.), Language of the Abnaquis. 

See Lykina (J.) 

Ciaulcuceluswocn [Micmao]. See Rand 

(S.T.) 
Clarke (Robert) & co. Bibliotheca ame- 
ricana, 1686. | Catalogue | of a valuable 
collection of I books and pamphlets | re- 
lating to I America. | With a | descrip- 
tive list of Robert Clarke &. co's | his- 
torical publications. | 

For sale by | Robert Clarke & co. | 
Cincinnati. | 1886. 

Printed ooTor. title as above reverse blank 
1 1. note verso blank 1 L contents pp. v-vii, text 
pp. 1-280. catalogue of publications pp. 1-51,8°. 

Titles of books relating to Indians andarchte- 
ology, pp. 236-254; to Indian languages (includ- 
ing a number of Algonquian), pp. 254-257. 

Oopiet tun : Bureau of Ethnology, Eames. 



Clarke (R. ) & oa — Continued. 

1 have seen copiea of this house's catalogue 
for the years 1878. 1875, 1876, 1878. 1879, and 1883, 
and understand that there were Issues fur 1869, 
1871, and 1877. In several of them works re- 
lating to the Indian languages are grouped un- 
der the heading ** Indians aud American an- 
tiquities." 

Clarkson (Thomas). Memoirs | of the | 
private and public life | of | William 
Penn. | By Thomas Clarkson, M. A. I 
In two volumes. | Vol. I [-II]. | 

London : | printed by Richard Taylor 
and CO., Shoe-lane, | for Liongman, 
Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, | Pater- 
noster-row. I 1813. 

2 vols. : half title verso blank 1 1. title verse 
blank 1 1. preface pp. vii-zii. text pp. 1^520 ; half- 
title verso blank 1 1. title verso blank 1 L text 
pp. 1-488, contents pp. 489-500, 8°. 

Penn (W.), Letter, etc. vol. 1. pp. 375-400. 
Copiet teen : Boston Atheneum. 

1 have seen mention of an edition New York, 
1813, 129, containing Penn's Letter, voL 1, pp. 
292-315. 

Memoirs | of the | private and publio 

Ufe I of I WUliam Penn. | By Thomaa 
Clarkson, M. A. | In two volumes. | Vol. 
I[-II]. I 

Philadelphia, | published by Brad- 
ford and Inskeep, | and Inskeep and 
Bradford, | New-York. | G. Palmer, 
printer. | 1813[-1814J. (•) 

2 vols.: 3 p. IL pp. vii-zi, 1-403 ; 2 p. IL pp. 1- 
390. 120. 

Penn's Letter, vol. 1, pp. 202-315. 
Title fh)m Mr. Wiiberforce Eames. 

Memoirs | of the | private and publio 

life I of I William Penn. | By Thomaa 
Clarkson, M. A. | In two volumes. | Vol. 

I [-II]. I 
Philadelphia, | published by Isaac 

Pierce, | No. 12, South Fourth Street. | 

G. Palmer, Printer. | 1814. 

2 vols.: half-title verso blank 1 1. title verso 
blank 1 1. dedication verso blank 1 1. preface 
pp. vii-viii, list of authorities pp. iz-zi, tezt pp. 
1-403; half title verso blank 1 L title verso 
blank 1 1. text pp. 1-374, index pp. 375-390, 12o. 

Penn's Lett«r, vol. 1, pp. 292-815. 

Oopiet teen: Boston Publia 

Memoirs | of the | private and publio 

life I of I William Penn ; | who settled 
I the state of Pennsylvania, | and 
founded | the city of Philadelphia. | 
By Thomas Clarkson, M. A. | Two vol- 
umes in one. | Vol. I [-II]. | 

Dover, N. H. | Samuel C. Stevens, 
Washington-street. | 1827. 



AI^aONQUIAN LANQUAGES. 



91 



Clarkaon (T.) — Coc tinned. 

2 Tols. : title Terso bUmk 1 L dedication yerao 
blank 1 L prefiboe verao blank 1 1. list of anthor- 
ities pp. Tii-Tiii, text pp. 0-lM; half-title Terso 
blank IL text pp. 1-173, oontenU, pp. 174-181, 8^. 

Penn's Letter, vol. 1, pp. 142-153. 

Oopieiaeen: Congress. 

—^Memoirs | of the | public and private 
life I of I William Penn. | By Thomas 
Clarkson, M. A. | New edition, | with a 
preface, | in reply to the charges 
against his character made by | Mr. 
Macauley in his ** History of England/' 
I By W. E. Forster. | Illustrated with 
an engraving of Penn's treaty with the 
I Indians, | a plan of the city of Phila- 
delphia, j and a map of Pennsylvania. | 
London : | C. Gilpin, 5, Bishopsgate 
Street without, and | W.J.Adams, 59, 
Fleet Street. | Manchester : | Bradshaw 
and Blacklock, 47, Brown Street. | New 
York: | John Wiley, 161, Broadway. | 
Philadelphia: | Joseph Scattergood, 
Friends' Book Store, Arch Street; | and 
all booksellers. | 1849. 

Pp. i-lx, 1-367, 120. 

Penn's letter, pp. 137-148. 

OopUt §een: Aster, British Hoaeam. 

ClasaioaL The ' classical jonmal ; | for | 
September and December | 1811. | Vol. 
IV. I [Two lines quotation in Greek 
and a monogrammatic device. ] | 

London : | printed by A. J. Valpy, | 
Took's court, Chancery lane; | sold by 
I Sherwood, Neely, | and Jones, Pater- 
noster row ; I and all other booksellers. 
I L1811] 

Title verso blank 1 L contents (of no. vil) pp. 
iii-iv, text pp. 1-528, index pp. 627-537, verso p. 
637 eolophon givInK date 1811, 8^. 

Nnmorals 1-10 in Knistenaax (from Macken- 
lie), in Natik (from Eliot), in Bstechemines 
(ttom Barton), in Algonquin (three separate 
lists, from Mackenzie, Am. Philosoph. 8oc 
Trans. voL 4, and Lahontan), and in Delaware 
(from Am. Philosoph. Soc Trans. voL 4), p. 116. 

OopietMen: Congress. 

Coats iCaptain William). The | geogra- 
phy I of I Hudson's bay : | being the | 
remarks of captain W. Coats, | in many 
voyages to that locality, | between the 
years 1727 and 1751. | With an Appen- 
dix, I containing | extracts from the 
log of capt. Middleton on his voyage 
for I the discovery of the north-west 
passage, in | H. M. S. " Furnace'', in 
1741-2. I Edited by | John Barrow, 



Coats ( W. ) — Continned. 
Esq., F. B. S., F. S. A. | [Seven lines 
quotation.] | 

London: | printed for the Haklnyt 
society. | M.DCCC.LII [1852]. 

Haklayt society's half-title verso blank 1 1. 
title verM printers 1 1. dedication verso blank 
1 L personnel of the society verso blank 1 1. in> 
trodnctory pp. i-x. text pp. 1-141, Index pp. 143- 
147, the Haklnyt society pp. 1-8, iP, 

Cree geographic names with meanings, p. 43. 

Chpietteen: Astor, Boston Athensam, Brit- 
ish Mnsenm, Congress, Lenox. 

At the Field sale, catalogue no. 392, an nncnt- 
copy brought $2. 

Coleworthy (— ). See Barton (B. S.) 

Collection of hymns [Delaware]. Se& 
Zeiaberger (D.) 

Collection | of | Hymns | for | the nse of 
native Christians | of | the Iroquois. | 
Tahkoopehahtawun kuya nahmindt | 
ahnisheuapa nahkahmoohwenun | ka- 
hahnekahnootahpeahkin | owh Kahke* 
wagwennaby [Peter Jones]. | 

New-York: | printed at the Confer- 
ence office, I by A. Hoyt. | 1827. 

Second title: Collection | of | Hymns | for | 
the use of Native Christians | of | the Iroquois.- 
I To which are added a few Hymns | in the | 
Chippeway tongue: | translated by Peter 
Jonns. I 

Now York : | printed at the Conference of* 
flee. I by A. Hoyt. | 1827. 

Iroquois title vertio 1. 1 (p. 1), English title 
recto 1. 2 (p. 1), text pp. 2-45, 2-46 (double num- 
bers). 46-54, 160. 

Jones (P.), Hymns for the nse of native 
Christians of the Chippeway nation, pp. 37-4fi, 
37-45. 

Copies seen: Shea. 

See Chippewa Hymn book. 

Collin ( Rev. Nicholas). Philological view 
of some very ancient words in several 
languages. By the Rev. Nicholas Col- 
lin, D. D. 

In American Philosoph. Soc Trans. voL 4, 
pp. 476-500, Philadelphia, 1709, 4°. 

Numerals l-IO of the Delaware and of the 
Chippewa, p. 486. 

Come for eternity urges you. — Pimadjan^ 
kagigekamig kwishamigon. 

No title-page, headinj; only ; text in the Chip- 
pewa language 2 pp. 12P. 

Oopiessesn: Congress. 

Come for Jesus loves sinners. — Pimadjan^ 
osagian gosba Jesus paiatatini^jin. 

No title-page, heading only ; text in the Chip- 
pevra language 2 pp. 12°. 
Oopiessesn: Congress. 



92 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Cominuck (Thomas). Sketch of the 
Brothertown Indians. 

In Wisconsin Hist. Soc. Coll. toI. 4, pp. 291- 
298, Madison. 1859. 89. 

A few words of the Narrasansett Indians. 

Congress : This word following a tide or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a oopy 
of the work referred to has been seen by the 
compiler in the Library of Congress, Washing 
ton, D. C. 

[Connelly {Rev, James Martin).] The 
"Pater Noster" | written by | Students 
of the Propaganda (Rome) | in their va- 
rious tongues I Collection made by | 
Rev. J. M. C[onnelly]. | Rome, 188.1-84. 

Manuscript, 62 11. 8^, boand, in the library of 
Rev. Jacob A. Walter, Wasthington. D. C. The 
above titular matter appears on 1. 3, where an 
index to the versions also begins, ending on 1. 6. 
The versions, 55 in all, oocopy the rectos of 11. 
7-411. On the recto of 1. 1 is the following dedi- 
oation: "To Rev. Jacob A. Walter with the 
Affectionate Regards of the Collector.'* 

The Lord's prayer in tho Mexican langnage 
<no. 52), 1.58.— Mohigan* (no. 53), L SO.— Sem- 
inole* (no. 64), 1. 60. 

In a note on 1. 'd the collector remarks : " Lan* 
guages not marked (*) were written by those 
speaking the langnage as mother or adopted 
tougae." 

Connor ( Henry). Indian names of prom- 
inent points in Michigan. 

In Lanman (T. H.), History of Michigan, pp. 
260-261, New York, 1839. So. 

Chippewa names with English deflnitiona. 

Cooke ( William Wallace). Bird nomen- 
clature of the Chippewa Indians. 

In the Auk, a quarterly Joamal of ornithol- 
ogy, vol. 1, no. 3. Jaly, 1884, pp. 242-250, Boston, 
[1884J, 8o. 

Cooper (Dr. J. Q.) Vocabulary of the 
Qros Ventres or Mlnitaree (Atsina) and 
of the Sik-sik-ko or Blackfoot. 

Manuscript, 3 IL or G pp. folio (180 wordo), in 
the library of tho Bureau of Ethnology. Two 
parallel columns, Groo Vontre and Blackfoot. 
The manuscript bears the date March, 18C1. 

A copy of tho Blackfoot column has been 
made on anothor form, 7 pp. folio, and is to be 
found in the samo library. 

Copway (George). Tho | life, history, 
and travels, | of | Kah-go-ga-gah-bowh 

I (George Copway), | a young Indian 
chief of the Ojebwa nation, | a convort 
to the christian faith, and a missionary 

I to his people for twelve years ; | with 
a I sketch of the present state of the 
Ojebwa nation, | in regard to | Chris- 
tianity and their future prospects. | 
Also an appeal ; | with all the names of 



Copway (G.)— Continued, 
the chiefs now living, who have | been 
christianized, and the missionaries uow 
I laboring among them. | Written by 
himself. | 

Albany : | printed by Weed and Par- 
sons. I 1847. 



Frontispiece 1 L title verso copyright 1 1. 
dedication verso blank 1 L contents pp. v-vl, a 
word to the reader pp. vii-viii, preface pp. &-4, 
text pp. 7-224, 8° 

Songs in Ojebwa, with English translations, 
pp. 34, 63, 77. 

Ck>pies§een: Congress. 

Clarke A, oo. 1886 catalogue, no. 6344, priced 
a copy $1.50. 

The I life, history, and travels | of | 

Kah ge-ga-gah-bowh, | (George Cop- 
way) I a young Indian chief of the 
Ojebwa nation, | a convert to the chris- 
tian faith, and a mis- | sionary to his 
people for twelve years; | with a | 
Sketch of the Present State of the 
Ojebwa Nation, | in regard to | Chris- 
tianity and their future prospects. | 
Also, an appeal ; | with all the names of 
the chiefs now living, who have | been 
christianized, and the missionaries now 
I laboring among them. | Written by 
himself. | Second edition. | 

Philadelphia: | James Harmstead, 
no. 40 N. Fourth st. | 1847. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright 1 1. 
dedication verso blank 1 1. contents verso blank 
1 1. preface pp. vii-viii, **a word to the reader" 
pp. ix-z, text pp. 11-158, 12o. 

Ojebwa songs, with English translation, pp. 
29, 48, 67. 

Oopietseen: Astor, Boston Athensum, Brit- 
ish Museum, Bureau of Ethnology, Congress. 

Priced by Clarke A, oo. 1886 catalogue, no. 
6343, $1. 

Somo copies with title-page otherwise at 
above are marked "Sixth edition.'* 

— The I life, letters and speeches | of 
I Kah-ge-ga-gah-bowh. | Or, | G. Cop- 
way, I chief Ojibway nation. | A Mis- 
sionary [t&c. three lines.] | 
New Yorit: | S. W. Benedict. | 1850 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright 1 L 
dodication verso blank 1 1. contents verso blank 
11. preface pp. vii-viii, "a word to the reader'* 
pp. ix-x, text pp. 11-224, 12°. 

Songd in Ojibway, with English translation, 
pp. 29, 48, 57. 

Copies seen: Boston Public, Brinton, British 
Museum, Bureau of Ethnology, Masaaobosetts 
Historical Society, Pilling, Wisconsin Hlstor- 
ioal Society. 



ALOONQUIAN LANaUAaE& 



93 



Copway (G.) — Contiaaed. 

—-The I traditional history | and | 
characteristic sketches | of the | OJib- 
way nation. | Cy G. Copway, | or, Kah- 
ge-ga-gah-bowh, Chief of the Ojibway 
I nation. | 

London : | Charles Gilpin, 5, Bishops- 
gate without. I Edinburgh : Adam and 
Charles Black. | Dublin : James B. Gil- 
pin. I 1850. 

Title Torso blank 1 L dedication verso blank 
1 1. preface pp. v-x, contents pp. xi-zii, text 
pp. 1-298. 16°. 

Song in Ojibway, witii translation, p. 106.— 
Chapter x, Their language and writings, fM>n* 
taining general remarks on language, a ohort 
Tocabulary, characters nsed in picture writing, 
6cc. pp. 123-139. 

Ckfpies teen : Astor, British Museum, Shea, 
Trumbull, Wisconsin Historical Society. 

At the Brinley sale, catalogue no. 5373, an 
uncut fresh copy brought $1.76 ; tho Murphy 
copy, no. 671, 01.25. 

— - The I traditional history | and char- 
acteristic sketches | of the | Ojibway 
nation. | By G. Copway, | or, Kah-ge- 
ga-gah-bowh, chief of the Ojibway na- 
tion. I Illustrated by Darly. | 

Boston : | Benjamin B. Mussey & co. 
I 29 Comhill. I 1851. 

Frontispiece, title verso blank 1 1. dedication 
▼erso blank 1 1. preface pp. vii-xi, text pp. 13- 
266,12°. 

Language and writings, pp. 123-139, contains 
an QJibway-EngUsh vocabulary of 24 words, 
and songs in Ojibway. 

Copies seen : British Museum, Congress, Dun- 
bar, Harvard, Shea. 

Priced by Clarke A. co. 1886 catalogue, no. 
6346. $1.50. 

— — Recollections of a Forest Life : | or, 
the I Life and Travels | of | Kah-ge-ga- 
gah-bowhy | or, | George Copway, | 
Chief of the Ojibway Nation. | Many 
years missionary [&c. two lines.] | 
Second edition. | 

London: | C. Gilpin, 5, Bishopsgate 
without. I Edinburgh: Adam and 
Charles Black. | Dublin: James B. Gil- 
pin. I 1851. 

Pp. i-xii, 1-248, 12<>. 

Songs in Ojibway and English, pp. 25, 50- 
51,62. 

Copies seen: British Museum, Wisconsin His- 
torical Society. 

At the Brinley sale, catalogue no. 5374, a 
freah onout copy brought $2. 






Copi^ay (G.) — Continued. 

There is an edition with title-page as above 
except that the words "second edition" and 
the date are omitted. (British Museum.) 

Sabin's dictionary, no. 1G720, mentions an edi- 
tion London, H. Lea, 1850, 256 pp., 12^ ; and an- 
other London, 1854, 256 pp., 12o. 

Recollections | of | a forest life; | 

or the I Life and Travels | of | George 
Copway, I or | Kah-ge-ga-gah-bowh, | 
Chief of the Ojibway Nation. | 

London : | Henry Lea, | 22 Warwick 
Lane. | And all booksellers and Railway 
Stations. [1855.] 

Pp. i-xii. 1-248, 12o. 

Ojibway songs, pp. 25, 50-51, 62. 

Copies seen : British Museum. 

[A hymn in the Ojibway language.] 

In Tnpper (M. F.), A hymn for all nations, 
p.48, London. 1861, 8o. 
Eight stanaas ; signed Kah-ge-ga-gah-bowh. 

Indian Life | and | Indian History, | 

by an Indian author. | Embracing the 
I traditions of the North American In- 
dians regarding | themselves, particn* 
larly of that most | important of all the 
tribes, | the Ojibways. | By the cele- 
brated Kahge-ga-gah-bowh, I Chief of 
the Ojibway Nation ; | known also by 
the English name of [ George Copway. | 
Bostou : I Albert Colby and Company, 
I 20 Washington Street. | 1858. (•) 

2 p. II. pp. vii-xi, 13-266, 2 plates, 12o. Title 
from Mr. Wilberforee Eames. 

Chapter x, Their language and writings, pp. 
122-136. contains an Ojibway and English vo^ 
cabulary (20 words), p. 124.— Picture writing, 
pp. 132-134. — Specimens of Ojibway songs, pp.. 
107, 120, 158. 

See Hall (8.) and Copway (G.) 

Oeorg't Copway, an Indian chief, was bom, 
according to his own "Life," etc. (Albany, 
1847), near the mouth of the river Trent (On* 
tario), in the fall of 1318. His Ojibway nam» 
was Ka-ge-ga-gah-bowh. Mr. J. J. Enmegah* 
bowh, of Whito Earth Reservation, Minnesota, 
who claims to be a first cousin of Mr. Copway, 
informs me that the latter, like himself, was a- 
"pnre and fuUblood Indian from the right 
stock," that he was educated in the state of 
Illinois and after acquiring considerable knowl- 
edge in English books returned to his own 
tribe as a missionary, and died at Pontiac, 
Michigan, about 1863. Mr. Copway was for 
many years connected with the press of New 
York City, and lectured extensively in Europe 
and the United States. 



94 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Coqnart (Pire Claade-GodefFoi). Ser- 
nioDs montagnais. 

A MoDtagnaiii-FreDcb manuscript, 96 an- 
Dambered 11. 4° proaerved in the library of the 
archbishopric of Quebec. It is with others in 
a volume bound in red morocco. 

The subjects treated in this collection are as 
follows: De nomine Jesu. 8 pp.— In epipha- 
narae Domini, G pp.— De nnptiis Cause, 6 pp.— 
De purificatione B. M. V. 9 pp.— In diem cine- 
rum, 6 pp.— Dominica primie Qoadragesimo), 5 
pp. — In Annonciationo B, M. Virginia, 6 pp. 
< incomplete translation). — Di< 1 >tione pedum, 3 
pp.— De institutiooe sacrosanclJD Eucharistite, 
6 pp.— Do passiuno Domini, 9 pp.— De resur- 
rectione Domini, 5 pp. 

The following pages contain notes written 
with a lead pencil: Fragment of a sermon on 
the resurrection, 3 pp. — In adventum Spiritns 
Sancti, 5 pp. — Fragment of a sermon on tbo 
birth of John the Baptist, 2 pp. (text only). —In 
honorum Stie. Anufo (1761), 13 pp. — Another 
sermon on Ste. Anne (1762), 6 pp.— Third ser- 
mon on Ste. Anno (1^63), 20 pp.— Reprimands 
and complaints of the father to his flock (1764), 
-4 pp. —In fostrum Patris Fraiicisoi Xaverii, 6 
pp. — In Conoeptione B. Maria) S. Virgiis, 4 pp. 
— In Katalem Domini, 10 pp. 

Pdro Coquart was missionary at Tadousac 
from 1746 to 1765. He died at Chicontimi July 
4, 1765. 

Corcoran (Mrs. — ). See Garin (A. M.) 

Cornell (William Mason). Tho | history 
of Peansylvauia | From the Earliest 
Discovery to the Present Time. | lu- 
cladiug I an account of the first settle- 
raents by the Dutch, Sw^edes, and | En- 
glish, and of the colony of William 
Penn, his treaty | and pacific measures 
with the Indians ; | and the | gradual 
advancement of the state to its present 
aspect I of opulence, culture, and re- 
finement. I By I William Mason Cornell, 
D. D., LL. D., I late member [&,c. three 
lines.] I Author of [&c. two lines]. | 
[Seal.] I 

Philadelphia: | Quaker City publish- 
ing house, I 217 & 219 Quince Street. | 
Boston : B. B. Russell. | 1876. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyriglit 1 1. 
preface pp. 3-4, contents pp. 5-12, illustrations 
pp. 13-14, text pp. 15-565, index pp. 567-575, au- 
thors couHulted p. [576J, 8^. 

Penn (W.), Letter, etc. pp. 111-125. 

A Sachem's address to his warriors in the 
Delaware language, with English translation, 
p. 127. 

Oopiet seen : Boston Athenseum, Boston Pub- 
lic, Congress. 

The I history of Pennsylvania, | 

From the Earliest Discovery to the 



Cornell (W. M.) — Continued. 
Present Time. | Including | an account 
of the first settlements by the Datchi 
Swedes, and | English, and of the col- 
ony of William Penn, his treaty | and 
pacific measures with the Indians ; | 
and the | gradual advano ement of the 
State to its present aspect | of opulence, 
culture, and refinement. | By | William 
Mason Cornell, D. D., LL. D., | late 
member [d&o. eight lines.] i [Design.] | 

Philadelphia | John Sully &. co., | 
725 Sansom Street. [1876.] 

Portrait 1 L title verso copyright 1 L preface 
pp. 3-4, contents pp. 5-12, list of illustrations 
pp. 13-14, text pp. 15-665, index pp. 567-575, list 
of authors consulted p. 576, 8°. 

Penn's letter, as under proTious title, pp. Ill- 
125. — A sachem's address, p. 127. 

Copies seen: Hanrard. 

The I History of Pennsylvania, [ 

From the Earliest Discovery to the 
Present Time. | Including | an account 
of the First settlements by the Dutch, 
Swedes, and | English, and of the Col- 
ony of William Penn, his treaty | and 
pacific measured with the Indians; | 
and the | gradual advancement of the 
State to its present aspect I of opulence, 
culture, and refinement. | By | William 
Mason Cornell, D. D., LL. D., | [d&c. 
five lines.] | 

New York: | Published by Charles 
Drew, I No. 9 Murray street. | 1879. (*) 

576 pp. 8o. 

Penu's letter, as under previous titles, pp. 
111-125, 127. 

Title from ^r. Wilberforce Barnes. 
Correspondence. Document 512. | Cor- 
respondence I on the subject of the | 
Emigration of Indians, | between | the 
30th November, 1831, and 27th De- 
cember, 181)3, I with abstracts of ex- 
penditures by disbursing agents, | in 
the I Removal and Subsistence of In- 
dians, t&c. 4&C. I Furnished | in answer 
to a Resolution of the Senate, of 27th 
December, 1833, | by the Commissary 
Qeneral of Subsistence [G^rge Gib- 
son]. I Vol. I[-1V]. I 

Washington : [ Printed by Duff Green.| 
1834. 

4 vols. : pp. vii, 3-1179; IL pp. 1-072; XL pp. 
ISid; 1 1. pp. 1-771, 8o. 

Proper names, with English signiAcation, 
in Delaware, Shawnee, Kickapoo, Potowatomie, 
Ottawa, Peoria, Faskasia, and Wea, voL i, pp. 
. 728-732. 

Copies seen: Congress, TnunbalL 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAQES. 



95 



Cothren (William). History | of | an- 
oieot Woodbury, | Conneotioat, | from I 
the first ladian deed io 1659 to 1854, | 
inclading the | Present Towns of Wash- 
injs^ton, Southbary, Bethlem, Roxbary, 
and a part of Oxford and Middlebnry. 
By William Cothren. | [Volume I-III.] 
I [Qaotation, eight lines.] | 

Waterbnry, Conn.: | published by 
Bronson Brothers. | 1854 [-1879J. 

8 ToU. 8°. Volumes 2 and 3 have title-pages 
differing slightly from above. The pagination 
of vols. 1 and 2 is continaons. 

List of principal Pootatacks, toL 1, pp. 94- 
96.— Names of places with signification, voL 2, 
p. 877. 

Oopiei iun: Astor, Congress, Trumball, 
Watkinson. 

Cotton (Josiah). Vocabulary of the 
Massachusetts (or Nalick) Indian lan- 
guage. By Josiah Cotton. [Edited by 
John Pickering. ] 

In ICassaohusetts Hist. Soo. CoIL third series. 
ToL 2. pp. 147-257. Cambridge, 1830. 8°. 

Advertisement signed "J. D." (i. «. John 
Davis), pp. 147-148.— Notice of the manoscript, 
with remarks on the author's orthography and 
the pronunciation of the language, signed J. 
P. (John Pickering), pp. 148-151.— Table of 
contents (by the editor), p. 153.— Vocabulary, 
pp. 155-343.— Appendix, pp. 244-257. 

The words of the vocabulary are grouped or 
classified, having saoh headings as "Of arts," 
"Of beasts," "Of rational Creatures," &,o.; 
"A<Ueotives," "Verbs," "Imperative mood," 
^"Participles," "The creed," "A talk between 
two," "Adverbs," "Pronouns," "Sentences," 
and "A dialogue"; it al»o contains a letter, 
tht9yatick version being signed Jno. Nemumin. 

The Appendix contains "Examples from the 
Indian primer" of 1720, words of from one to 
fifteen syllables; two versions of the Lord's 
prayer from Eliot's bible, and two from the 
Indian primer; the ten commandments, from 
the primer; "A sermon preached by Josiah 
Cotton to the Massachusetts Indians in 1710 " ; 
and ""Extracts tmm a sermon in English and 
Indian, the English part being in the hand- 
writing of Josiah Cotton, and the Indian in 
that of his father, John Cotton." 

" The following vocabulary of the Indian Ian. 
guage, in the Natick or Massachusetts dialect, 
is faithfully copied from a manuscript compiled 
by the Hon. Josiah Cotton, a respectable inhab- 
itant of Plymouth, who died in 175S, aged 77. 
He was the second son of the Rev. John Cotton, 
pastor of the first church iu that ancient town 
twenty^eight years, fh>m 16S8 to 1007. 

"Josiah Cotton was graduated at Harvard 
College in 1006. His early years, after his 
leaving college, were spent in Marblehead, 



Cotton (J.) — Continued. 

where be was employed as a schoolmaster ; his 
studies in the mean time were principally in 
theology. He was never settled, however, in 
the ministry ; but, returning to his native town 
early in the last century, after some years of 
occupation in that place as a schoolmaster, he 
devoted himself to agricultural pursuits and 
to the discharge of several civil offices which 
he sustained. The offices which he held suc- 
cessively or in coi\j unction were those of clerk 
of the court of common pleas, Justice of the 
same court, register of probate, and register of 
deeds. In the latter office he was succeeded 
by his son, John Cotton, who was succeeded by 
his son, Rossiter Cotton, the present worthy 
occupant of that office, to whose kindness this 
society and the friends of ancient lore are in* 
debted for a communication of this manuscript, 
and of other documents eminently useful and 
acceptable for the elucidation of our early 
history. This respectable family derives its 
origin from the celebrated John Cotton of 
Boston. Josiah Cotton, as well as his father, 
In addition to their other employments, per* 
formed the duties of missionaries to the Indians 
at Plymouth and other places in that vicinity. 
The father was eminently skilled in the Indian 
language, of which there are many testimo- 
nials ; the most conspicuous is Eliot's Indian 
Bible. In the accomplishment of that labor!* 
ous work Mr. Eliot acknowledges his obliga* 
tions to Mr. Cotton, especially in the prepara- 
tion of the second edition. 

" Josiah Cotton, besides the advantages of 
much personal intercourse with the Indians, 
had the benefit of his father's information; 
and his long continuance as a religious in- 
structor to the natives, with the ready use of 
their language, of which he left numerous 
specimens in writing, may reasonably induce a 
reliance on the correctness of the present vocab- 
ulary which he compiled. A copy of some of 
his other specimens will bo found subjoined to 
the vocabulary."— A do«rti«sm«nf. 

The above vocabulary, though written, ao. 
cording to the statement of the editor, in 
1707-'8, was printed here for the first time. 

Issued separately also, with title-page as 
follows : 

Vocabulary | of the | Massachusetts 

(or Natick) | Indian language. | By 
Josiah Cotton. | 

Cambridge: | printed by E. W. Met- 
calf and company. | 1829. 

Title verso blank 1 La4lvertisement pp. 3-4, 
notice of the manuscript pp. 4-7, contents p. 0, 
vocabulary pp. 11-00, appendix pp. 100-112, 8*^. 

Some copies with this title retain the original 
pagination, 147-257. 

Oopiei nen : Congress, Dunbar, Eames, Mas- 
sachusetts Historical Society, Powell. 

At the Brinley sale, catalogue no. 5680, a copy 
brought $2. 



96 



BIBLIOQRiPHT OF TFE 



Cotton (J.) — Continaed. 

[Vocabolary of the Massachusetts 

Indian language.] 

MaDtucript in the library of the Hassachn- 
•ettfl Tlistorioal Society, Boston, Mana.: pp. 
S-107, 107b, 107c. 107d, 108-123, index of verbs 
(English and Massachnsetts) 2 11. sm. 4^. It 
Is the orif^inal of the Tocabalary titled abo re, 
and is accompanie<l by an English Massscbu- 
setts index, the title to the first Tolame of 
which is as follows: 

Index I to Cotton's MB. Yooabalary | of the { 
Massachusetts (Indian) Lang^nage. | By | Benj* 
K. Nichols Esq". I Member of the Mass. Histor. 
Society | Salem MassachnsettH, | 1832. 

Manuscript, 2 vols. 62 and 52 unnumbered 
IL 8P. Double colnmns ; arranged alphabetically 
according to English words. 

Josiah Cotton, son of the second John, bom 
8 Jan., 1680; died 19 Aug., 1756; was graduated 
at Harvard in 1608. He studied theology, 
taught In Marblohead and Plymouth, and, 
though not ordained over any church, preached 
occasionally for several years. He also gave 
his attention to agriculture, having a good 
farm in Plymouth. Having acquired consid- 
erable knowledge of the Indian language, he 
visited various tribes in Plymouth colony as a 
missionary during nearly forty years, receiving 
a salary of £20 from the commissioners for 
propagating the gospel. He was also clerk of 
the county court and register of probate.— .Ap- 
pUton't Cyclop, qf Am. Biog. 

Court de Oebelin (Antoine de). Moade 
priinitif, | aualysd et compart | avec le 
monde moaerne, | con8id6r6 1 Dans divers 
Objets conceruant rHistoire, lo Blason, 
les Mon- | noi»8, los Jeox, les Voyages 
des Phdniciens autour dn | Monde, les 
Langiies Amdricaines, &c. | on | disser- 
tations m6l6es I Tome premier, | Rem- 
plies de Ddcouvertes intdressautes ; | 
Avec une Carte, des Planches, <& uu 
Monument d*Amdrique. | Par M. Court 
de Gebelin, | de diverses Aca<l6mies, 
Censeur Royal. | [Design.] | 

A Paris, | Chez | L'Auteur, rue 
Poup6e, Maisou de M. Boucher, Secre- 
taire du Roi. ; Valeyre Valnd,Imprimeur- 
Libraire, rue de la vieille Bouclerie. | 
Sorin, Libraire, rue Saint Jacques. | M. 
DCC. LXXXI [1781]. I Avec approba- 
tion et privilege du Roi. 

Forms vol. 8 of Monde primitif, Paris, 1777- 
1782,9 vols.8^. The volumes have title-pages 
slightly differing one from another. 

Essai snr les rapports des mots, entre les 
laagues da Kouveau Monde et celles de I'An- 
oien (pp. 480-560) contains: Langue du Canada, 
which includes a short Algonkin vocabulary 
from Lahontan, pp. 503-504. — Langue des Abe- 



Court de Oebelin (A. de) — Continned. 
naqnis, pp. 514-515. — Langue des Virginiens, 
pp. 515-620. — Langue des Chi pe way et dea 
Naudowessies, pp. 520-523. — Langue de Pensyl- 
vanie, p. 523. 

Copies seen : Congress. 
Trttbner, 1856, no. 631, prices a copy of the full 
•et (dated 1787) 32. 13«. 6d.; at the FUcher sale, 
no. 1706, a copy (9 vols.) brought II. 10s., and at 
the Brinley sale, no. 5632, $20.25. 

Sabin's Dictionary, no. 17174, titles an edition 
Paris, Boudet, 1775, 9 vols. *<>. 

For a reprintof the Essai, see Sohsrer (J. B.) 

Crane ( W. W.) The American [English] 
language. 

In Putnam's Magazine, new series, voL 6, pp. 
519-526, New Yorlc, 1870, 8°. (Congress.) 

Concerning words of Indian origin, with ex- 
amples from the Algonquian languages, pp. 
523-526. 

Cree. [Calendar in the Cree language] 
t I [Two lines Cree characters] | 1855 
-TJ-U lt^56 I [Three lines Cree charac- 
ters] , [Scroll] I 

[One line Cree characters.] | 1855 

Transliteration : t | Chestekaekan | Ka esko 
netaokst Jesus 1 1855 neata 1856 | t ayameA kea- 
hekak | CI. makanewan | T) nftn&kacheheteson* 
anewan | Maneak etad peloo | 1855 

Translation : 1 1 Sign or cross yourself | since 
the birth of Jesus | 1865 also 1856 | f Sign for 
Sunday | Qu Sign for celebration of the mass | 
T) Sign for lent or penitence | Make ready as 
it ai)proaches | 1855 

Printed cover as above within borders, text 
6 unnumbered II. narrow 18^. Roman Catholio 
calendar in the Cree language ; from July, 1855» 
to June, 1856, inclusive. « 

Copies seen: Piliing. 

Cree hymn book. See Hunter (Jeau.) 



Ores: 




Bible (entire) 


See Mason (W.) 


Bible. Old test, (pt) 


Horden (J.) 


Bible, Old test. 


Mason (W.) 


Bible. Genesis 


Sinclair (J.) 


Bible, Genesis 


Steinhauer (H.> 


Bible, Psalms 


Horden (J.) 


Bible, New test. 


llorden (J.) 


Bible. X.'w test 


Lacombe (A.> 


Bible, New test. 


Mason (W.) 


Bible, Gospels 


Horden (J.) 


Bible, Matthew 


Gospel. 


Bible, Matthew 


Hunter (J.) 


Bible, Mark 


Hunter (J.) 


Bible, Luke 


Hunter (J.) 


Bible, John 


Hunter (J.> 


Bible, John 


Mason (W.> 


Bible, Acts 


Hunter (J.) 


Bible, Romans 


Hunter (J.) 


Bible, Galatians 


Hunter (J.) 


Bibl(>, Rphesians 


Hunter (J.) 


Bible, Kphesians 


Mason (W.> 


Bible, Philippians 


Hunter (J.> 



AI^ONQXTUir LAS0UA0E8. 



Cree — Continaed. 




Cro« — CoDtinaed. 




BlbKColouiui 


Hunter (J.) 


Hymn book 


Harden (J.) 


Blble,Tbe».i.n 


Hunter (J.) 


Hymn-book 


HunteKlean), 


Blbls.Tlmoth71.11 


Hanter (J.) 


Hymn book 


UcDougall (J.) and 


Bible. Tito* 


Eonter (J.) 




alsu(B.B.) 


Bible, Philemon 


□nnler (J.) 


Hymn book 


Uaokay (J. A.) 


Bible, PeUri, n 


Hooter (J.) 


Hymn book 


Uaeon (W ) 


Bible, Peter II 


U>«>a (W.) 


Hymn book 


Thlbaalt (J. B.) 


Bible. Jam.. 


M«on(W.) 


Hymn* 


Alamle NlkamoS- 


Bible, John 1 


HoDler (Jeui). 






Wble,Johni 


UUOD (W.) 


Hymn. 


Bompas (W.C.} 


Bible hielor; 


Honlen (J.) 


Bymn. 


Oarin (A. U.| 


Bible |»wgea 


Ameriuin Bible Son. 


Hymn. 


German (0.> 


Bible pM»ge. 


Bagiter (J.J 


Hymw 


Gafignen (J.P.I 


Bible puewx 


Bible Swiletf. 


Hymn. 


Banter (J.) 


Bible pHuge. 


British ud Foreign. 


Hymn* 




Bible pH»s» 


Charch. 


Hymn* 


Klrkby (-ff. W.( 




GllberlARlvlngtoii. 


Hymns 


Lacombe (A.) 


Book or com. pnyer. 


Honl™ (J.) 


Hymn* 


Laverlochire (J.N.) 


Book of mm. prv*r. 


Hunter (J.) 






C»lead«r 


Ciee. 


Hymns 


Lebr,.. L.i(. 


Celendu- 


Luombe (A.) 


Hymn* 


HoDougaU (J.I and 




BompM{W.C-) 




Glass <B.B.) 


CeteohUiD 


Gnignet. (J. P.) 


Hymn. 


Tonng(E.R.) 


CetecbUm 


Honlen (J.) 


Legend 


PetltDt(E.F.8.J.) 




Hunter (Je«i|. 


Letter 


Paper.. 


ClMohlm 


Lacombe (A.) 


Letter 


Kulan (D.l 


C«leelil«ii 


LiTeilochSrea.lf.) 


Lord's prayer 


BerghoH.(Q.r.) 




■ndGsrinfAU.) 


Lord'epmyer 


Lord's. 


Catechism 


Lebret(UM.) 


Lord's prayer 


Mt'Lean (,T.) 


CutaoUna 


U»OQ (8.1- 


Lord'.pmyer 


Hariettl (P.) 


CMeehUm 


Thib»olt(J.lt.) 




8met(RJ.deI. 




L«ombe (A.1 




ClauicaL 


IHetloDUT 


V«Kr*TlUe(V.T.) 


Numeral. 


First. 




WatkldiiE.A.) 


Kumerals 


Haines {B,K.) 




Boo<l(J.W.) 


Numerals 










James (B.) 




Faolmun (K.) 


Namer.li 


Pott (A.F.) 




UcLeen (J.) 


Prayer book 


Garln<4.M.) 




NooTellf. 


Prayer book 


Gn«gaen(J.P.) 






Prayer book 


Harden (J.) 


Oenenl dlecDuloD 


TKb6(A.A.) 


Prayer book 


Hnnter <J.) 


OtogopblenUDe. 


Co»U (W.) 


Prayer book 


KirkhyCW.'W.) 




Kellon(D.H.) 


Prayer book 


Lacombe (A) 




I«fltehe(L.F.R.) 


Pmyerbook 


Lebret(L.M.) 




MoLein (J.) 


Prayer book 


Ulckay (J. A.) 




UDrg>ii(L.B.) 


Prayer booh 


ThibaolKJ.B.) 




Petltot(B.F,8.J.) 


Prayer. 


Bompas (W, C.) 




Stnert (A.) 








Tjrrell (J.B.) 


Prayer. 


H^nlet (J.) 


Gnamu 


Hotden (.1.) 




L8fl*che(L.P.B.) 




Ho™ IJ.) 


Prayer. 


Liivedocl.tru (J.H.) 


Orunnw 


Hiinler (J.) 




and r.Mis (A. U.) 


Orammu 






MaekayfJ.A.) 


OtMomu 


. M«k.r (J. A.l 


Prayer. 


Ma«>u(S.) 




V«gr*vil]e(T.T.l 


Primer 






Adelong(J.C.) ud 


Primer 


D«l*.|!e (F. K.) 




V.Hr(J.8.) 


Primer 


rin-t. 




B«»tlMi{P.W.A.) 


Primer 


GI.M(E.B.) 


OrunmaUo comtnenU 


Finrad (H.) 


Primer 


Gn*gaen(J.P.) 




V*gr*vllle(T.T.) 


Primer 


Lacombe (A.) 




WiUon{E,F.) 


Proper names 






Adun (L.) 


Proper n.mes 


Catlin (G.) 


Onmmklig tiestiae 


Legel (E.) 


Proper name* 






V*gr«rllle {T.T.I 


Proper name. 


MoiTis (A.) 


Hymn book 


Germut (0.) 


Proper name* 


PetlMt(E.F.S.J.( 


ALQ 7 









98 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Cree — Coatinaed. 

Psalm book 
Psalm book 

Psalm book 

Psalm book 

Psalm book 

Reader 

RelatioDsbips 

Relationships 

Sermons 

Sermons 

Sermou» 

Songs 

Syllabary 

Syllabary 

Syllabary 

Syllabary 

Syllabary 

Syllabary 

Syllabary 

Ten commandmenU 

Text 

Text 

Text 

Text 

Text 

Text 

Text 

Tract 

Tract 

Tract 

Tribal names 

Yocabalary 

Tocabulary 

Vocabulary 
Yocabalary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
■ Vocabulary 
Vocabu lary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Vocabulary 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 



Horden (J.) 
Horden (J.) and 

Kirkby (W. W.) 
Hunter (J.) 
Mackay (J. A.) 
Mason (W.) 
First 

Morgan (L.H.) 
Watkins (E. A.) 
Garin (A.M.) 
German (O.) 
V6gr6Tille (V. T.) 
Petitot(B. F.S.J.) 
Carnegie (J.) 
Evans (J.) 
Lacombe (A.) 
Smet (P.J.de). 
Thibault (J. B.) 
Tattle (C. R.) 
Young (B.R.) 
Mason (S.) 
Blatchford (H.) 
Fleming (A. B.) dtco. 
German (O.) 
Lacombe (A.) 
Sinclair (J.) 
Steinbauer (H.) 
Vincent (T.) 
German (O.) 
Hunter <J.) 
Vincent (T.) 
Shea (J. G.) 
Adam (L.) 
Adelung (J.C.) and 

Vater (J. S.) 
Allen (W.) 
Balbi (A.) 
Brinton (D.G.) 
Cami>bell (J.) 
Chappell (E.) 
Edwards (J.) 
Fisher (W.) 
Fortescue (J.) 
Gallatin (A.) 
Hale (H.) 
Harmon (D.W.) 
Hayden (P. V.) 
Jones (P.) 
Keating (W. A.) 
Lacombe (A.) 
LevU (M.) 
Mackenzie (A.) 
M'Lean (J.) 
Maximilian (A. P.) 
Morgan (L. H.) 
Petitot(E. F.S.J.) 
Say (T.) 
Smet (P.J.de). 
Vincent (E. H. J.) 
Weimar (J.) 
Wilson (E. F.) 
Doncan (D.) 
Gatschet (A. S.) 
Gerard (W. R.) 
Grasserie (R. de la). 



Cree — Continaed. 

Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 
Words 

See also Montagnais. 



Green (S. A.) 
Haines (E.M.) 
Hovelac<iue (A.) 
KovAr (B.) 
Latham (R. G.) 
McDougall (J.) 
MacLean (J. P.) 
Petitot(E.F.S.J.) 
Smet (P. J. de). 
Tyrrell (J. B.) 
Vater (J. 8.) 



Creapieul (P^e FraD^ois-Xavler). Pri- 
^res I en | Algonkin [Scroll] Monta- 
gnaise , Abanaki [Scroll] Esquimaux | 
1G7G i ParleR^v^rendP^redeCrespieal. 

Manuscript, in the archbishopric of Quebec; 
3011. the flrst 2 of which are blank and annnm- 
bered, followed by an unnumbered 1. on the 
recto of which is the title and on the Terao the 
beginning of the text, prayers and religions 
songs 22 II. catechism 5 11. B9. 

The pagination is confused ; the flrst pages 
of the text are not numbered; the third bears the 
number 2, voriM> unnumbered ; leaves 4-12 bear 
the saraennmberon recto and verso ; the leaf fol* 
lowing is intercalated and numbered 11 on both 
sides, ii\e recto being blank, the verso '* For* 
mula baptisma" in Algonkin and Montagnais, 
and precepts of the church in Algonkin only. 
Leaves 12, 19, and 11, intercalated among tiie 
leaves of the catechism, belong to the book of 
prayers. Leaves 13-16 have the same number 
on recto and on verso ; a few leaves of the oate* 
chism intercalated. On leaf 13 oommenoe the 
religious songs in Algonkin and in Montagnais. 
The continuation of the prayers, or rather of 
the religious songs, is found at the end of the 
volume, after the 12th leaf intercalated fh>m the 
oatechiAm; it contains religious songs in use 
among tho ^lonragnais, with a French tranala* 
tion. The foar leaves, firom 17 to 20, of which 
it is composed bear the same number on recto 
and on verso. 

The o.k*echism hjM aspecial pagination, more 
confused if possible than the' book of prayers. 
L<^nf 11, we have seen, is intercalated in the 
prayers, while leayes 10 and precede leaves 12, 
10, and 11 which contain prayers in Algonkin and 
Montagnais. Finally come leaves 9 and 12, whieh 
belong to the catechism ; the first has lor titles 
in the middle of the recto : De 7 aacranientis, 
and toward the end of verso: Eccleais pns* 
copta; the recto of the second is blank, and on 
the verso, after the word "catechism" and the 
title "dela Messe et de la CommnnloD," we 
read this note of the author: *'Non potaiab' 
solvere et ex parte compoaita describere. Fo> 
terit supplere R. P. Lefaure." 

The manuscript is bound in parchment 
The text commences on the rerso of the leaf 
which bears the title. It is diylded into fimr 
columns, two on the verso and two on the recto, 



ALGONQUIAN LANQUAaES. 



99 



Crespieul (F. X.) — Cod tinned. 

having foar titles, from left to right : Algonkin, 
Montagnais, Abaoaki, Asqaimanx. The first 
two ooloinna only are in the handwriting of 
Father Crespieul. On pages 2 and 3 the first 
colnum and the coBimenoenient of the second 
are in his handwriting ; the succeeding pages, 
as fiir as leaf 13, have only the Algonkin col- 
umn by Father Crespieul. The text of the col- 
umn devoted to the language of the Esquimaux 
disappears on the recto of leaf 3. The Abnaki 
column of the same leaf is incomplete. The 
texts of the four columns occur on pages 4 and 
5, but are not a translation of the same prayers. 
On pages 5 and 6 the Biontognais column is 
Incomplete; the last two blank. Only the Al- 
gonkin text appears from the 6th to the 9th leaf, 
where the Montagnais text reappears in the 
prayers for the living and the dead. The 
AJgonkin and Montagnais columns have the 
prayers: Ad S3. Angelos, ad S. Michaelem, ad 
O. SS., page 11 ; ad S. Joseph um, et les com- 
mandements de Dieu, page 12. The religious 
aongs, page 13, recto, have only two columns, the 
Algonkin and the Montagnais. Both are by 
Father Crespieul. The following note appears 
«t the top of the page to the left : "Algonk— 
prsDstant Montan— et sunt magis in uso et 
sninntr a multis — Suadeo ut non immutentur." 

The Montagnais text is not again found un- 
til the recto of leaf 17 is reached, where are found 
Montagnais chants under this title: Cantitenae 
a Montanensibus cani solit«. They are accom- 
panied by a French translation as Car as page 
18, where, in the song for the communion, the 
Algonkin and Montagnais texts are opposite 
each other. 

For continuation see Vaultier (P. — ) 

Crowfoot (Chief). Crowfoot's thanks. 
The Blackfoot chiefs letter of acknowl- 
edgment to the C. P. K. 

In the Indian, vol- 1 (no. 6), p. 62, Hagers- 
viUe, Out. March 31, 1886, 40. 

A letter of six lines in Blackfoot firom Chief 
Orowfoot to Mr. W. C. Van Hone, manager of 
the Canadian Pacific Bailway, in acknowledg- 
ment of a perpetual pass over the line; fol- 
lowed by an English translation. 

Cmnminga (Richard W.) Vocabnlaryof 
the Delaware and of the Shawnee. 

In Schoolcraft (Q. R.), Indian tribes^ voL 3, 
pp. 47<M8L, Philadelphia. 1852, 40. 

Contains about 350 words each. 

Reprinted in Ulrici (B.), Die Indianer Nord- 
Ami rikaa, p. 39, Dn«den, 1867, 8°. 

ECuoq (P^e Jean-Audr^).] lenenrlne- 
kenstha | Kanesatakeha | on | Proces- 
sionnal Iroquois | h I'nsage de la | Mis- 
sion da Lac des Deux Montagnes. | 

Tiotaki [Montreal] : | tehoristorara- 
ken John Lovell, | 1864. 

Cover title as above, title 1 L text pp. 8- 
106^ 120. The inside title has no imprint ; after 



Cnoq (J. A. ) — Continued. • 

the wor^ " Montagnes " are two lines quotation, 
and in place of imprint is a picture of two an^ 
gels bowed before the cross. 

Pp. 96-108 are occupied with Hymnes et can- 
tiques en Algonquin, a number of which are 
set to music. 

Copies teen: Jacques Cartier School, Mon- 
treal, Can. 

Reprinted as the first portion of the same 
author's Tsiatak nihonon8entsiake, eto., for 
title of which see next page. 

[■: — ] Jogement erron^ | de | M. Ernest 
Renan | sur les | langues Sauvages | 
parN. O. ([Scroll.] | 

Montreal | typographic d'Eas^be Se- 
n^cal, I rue St. Vincent, 4. | 1864. 

Cover title as above, title as above verso 
blank 1 L text pp. 3-23, 80. 

A general discussion of savage languages with 
the Algonqnian and IroquoiMi as a basis of study, 
including on pp. 16-17 the Lord's prayer in both 
languases, and a few examples of long words 
on p. 22, one of them divided into 32 syllables. 

The InitiaLi N. O. adopted by Pdre Cuoq and 
appearing upon the title-pages of a number of 
his works sre the first letters of the names given 
him by the Indians among whom he lived, the 
first, Ny-kwe-natc-anibic, being a Nlpissing 
name meaning the beautiful double leaf; the 
second, Orakwanentakon, a Mohawk name 
meaning a fixed star. 

Chpiesteen: Laval. 

[ ] Jogement erron^ | de | M. Ernest 

Renan | sur les | langues sauvages | par 
I Pauteur des Etudes philologiques. | 
Deuxi^me edition enti^rement refon- 
due. I [Four lines quotation.] | 

Montreal | Dawson brothers, | 55, 
Grande rue St. Jacques, 55. | J. B. Rol- 
and & fils, I 12 & 14, rue St. Vincent, 
12 & 14. I 1869. 

Cover title as above dated 1870, title as above 
verso dedication in Nipissing and Mohawk I L 
avertissement verso blank 1 Ltoxt pp. 5-112; 
table 1 p. verso blank, fP, 

The Algonqnian and Iroquoian languages 
have been taken as the basis of discussion; the 
following are the chapter headings : 

Chap. I. Linguistique am6rloaiQe.— Son im. 
portance an point de vne ethnographique comme 
au point de vue philologique, pp. S-9. 

Chap. II. Les langues am6rioaines compa* 
r6es aux langues s6mitiques et aux langues 
indo-europ6ennes, pp. 10-I5u 

Chap, in Biohesse des langues am6ricaines, 
pp. 10-20. 

Chap. IV. Systems phoniqne et graphiqno 
des langues am6ricaines, pp. 21-25. 

Chap. y. Curienses analogies entre les lan- 
gues am6rioaines et les langues des races civi- . 
lis6es,pp.90-ao. 



100 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Cuoq-<J. A.) — ContiDued. 

Chap. YL Canctdre deslangues^^rioalnea, 
p. 31-36. 

Chap. VII. Formation dea noma dans lea 
Ungues amdriddnes, pp. 36-44. 

Chap. YIIL Dea accidenta dana oertaines 
espdcea de mote de la langae algonquine, pp. 
45-51. 

Chap. IX. Dea accidents verbaax et autres 
aocidento de la langae iroqaoise, pp. 52-06. 

Chap. X. Diversea clasaificationa des verbea 
algonquins, pp. 66-78. 

Chap. XI. Esp^cea particulidres do verbea 
algonquins, pp. 79-88. 

Chap. XII. Mots formes par onomatop^e, pp. 
80-90. 

Chap. XIII. Toar et construction des phra- 
aes [Prodigal son and Lord's prayer in Mohawk 
and Nipissing], pp. 91-100. 

Chap. XI Y. R^ponse k diverses qaestiona, 
pp. 101-112. 

Chpiet seen : Brinton, Eames, National Mn- 
aeum, Powell. Trumbull. 

Koehler, catalogue 440, no. 952, prices a copy 
7 M. Clarke Sc oo. 1880 catalogue, no. 6748, price 
a paper copy $1.50 ; Oagnon, Quebec, catalogue 
40, no. 11, 50 cente. 

[- 



— ] Catecbisme algonqain | avec 
syllabaire et caatiqaes. | Niina aiamie 
kakBedjiudiSinimasinaigan | ate gale | 
kekinoamagemagak | masinaigan gale 
aiamie nikanionan. | Kaoactageng 
[Lake of Two Mountains]. | 

Moniang [Montreal] : | tak8abik- 
ickote endato John Lovell. | 1865. 

Title verso approval of A. P. Truceau, Yic. 
Gen. Adm., Montreal, 12 mai, 1865 1 L text in 
the Nipissing langu&ge pp. 3-52, 18^. 

Primer lessons, pp. 1-10.— Catechism, pp. 11- 
45. — Hymns, dec pp. 46-52. 

Copies seen: Brinley, Powell, Trumboll, 
Yerreau. 

At the Brinley sale, catalogue no. 5658, a 
copy sold for 90 cents. 

[ ] Tsiatak nihononSentsiake | onkSe 

onSe I akoiatonsera, | lonterennaien- 
tak8a,teieri8ak8atha,iontatorihonnieu- 
I nitha, iontateret8iaronk8a, iaken- 
tasetatha, | iekaratonkSatokentisonba 
oni. I Kahiatononltokara nikarennake 
erontaksneha. | Kaneshatake tiakoson. | 
Le I livre des sept nations | on | Pa- 
roissien Iroquois, | Anquel on a ajout6, 
pour Vusage de la mission dn | Lac des 
Deux-MontagneSy qaelqnes cantiques | 
en langne algonquine. | [Design.] | 

Tiohtiake [Montreal] | tehoristora- 
rakon Jobn Lovell. ] 1865. 

Half-title In Mohawk verso in Latin 1 L title 
as above verso hymn in Mohawk 1 1. calendar 
(French and Mohawk) 4 IL followed by 6 bUnk 



Cnoq (J. A.) -—Continued. 

11. for entries, title-page beginning " lenenrine- 
kenstha" (see first Cuoqtitleherein) verso blank 
1 L text pp. 3-452, table des mati^rea pp. 453-460, 
l2o. 

The first part of th iff work, pp. 3-108, ia ooen- 
pied with the service for the maas in the Mo- 
hawk, many of the prayers having headings in 
Latin and explanations in French, and most of 
the service is set to music. The second part, 
pp. 109-294, Is headed Livre de chant pour la 
messe et les vdpres. The third part, pp. 295- 
410, Formulatre de pri^rea, is by Father J. 
Marcoux, the colophon being dated Kahna8ake 
[Caughnawaga] 15 Janvier 1852 and signed with 
his Indian name, Sose Tharonhiakanere. The 
fourth part, pp. 411-^2. is headed Supplement 
aux cantiques et anx pridres. Following the 
table are an alphabetic list of the canticles in 
Iroquois and a list of those in Algonquin, tho 
latter, numbering 59, being scattered through^ 
out parts 1, 2, and 4. 

In the copy belonging to Mi^oc Powell tho 
6 blank IL are filled with hymns in the Mohawk 
language, and, I think, in the Abb6 Cnoq'a 
handwriting. 

Copies seen: Eames, Pilling. Powell, Shea, 
Trumbull. 

Leolerc, 1878, no. 2355, prices a copy 20 tr. At 
the Brinley sale two copies were sold, nos. 5739 
and 5737, one bringing $2.50 and the other $2. 
A copy at the Murphy sale, no. 1316, "half 
morocco, top edge gilt," brought $2.25. 

[ ] J^tudes pbilologiqnes | snr quel- 

ques I langues sauvages | de | PAm^ri- 
que, I par N. O. | ancien missionnaire. [ 
[Four lines quotation.] i 

Montreal | Dawson brothers | 55, 
grande rue St. Jacques. I 1866 

Cover title as above, half-title verso printer 
1 L title as above verso dedication in Nipisaing 
and Mohawk 1 1. text pp. &-157, errata p. 158, 
Ubie pp. 159-160, 8^. 

Avant-propos, pp. 5-6. — Chapitre pr61imi> 
naire, pp. 7-10. Premidre partie : Examen crU 
tique de quelques ouvrages [Schoolcraft, 
Duponceau] d'Indianologie, pp. 11-34. — Deu- 
xidme partie: Principes de grammaire algon- 
quine, pp. 35-86 ; Principes de grammaire Iro- 
qnoise. pp. 87-122.— Troisidme partie: Lexico* 
graphic compar^e des langues algonquine et 
iroqnoise [from McKenzle, Duponceau, School- 
craft, Catlin. and others], pp. 123-157. 

Copies seen : Astor, Boston Athenieum, Bri2i» 
ton, Congress, Eames, National Moaeum, Pil- 
ling, Powell, TrnmbuU. 

The Fisher copy, no. 2462, brought 8t. 6d.; the 
Field copy, no. 473, half morocco, $3. 12. Leclero, 
1878, no. 2063, prices a copy 9 fr.; and Qoaritoh, 
no. 12555, 12«., and again, no.?0062.9ff. At the 
Brinley sale, no. 5660, a copy sold for 70 cents, 
and at the Murphy sale, no. 911*, a copy bound 
up with the same author's Jngement erron6, 
half morocco, top edge gilt, brought $2. Koeh> 



;; 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



101 



Caoq (J. A. ) — Continued. 

ler, in hb no. 440 oatalogne, no. 951, prices a 
copy 8 M.; and Clarke, 1886, na 6744, a paper 
copy, $1.50. 

Reviewed in Le Hir (A. M.), Etudes bi- 
bliqaea, toL 2, pp. 474-489, Paris, 1867, 8^. 

— Qaels ^taient les saovages que ren- 
contra Jaoq. Cartier sur les rives dn 
Saint-Laurent t [Signed: N. O., an- 
cien missionnaire. ] 

In Annales de philosophic chr6tienne, toI. 
79. pp. 198-204, Paris, 1869, 8°. 

Iroqnoian and AJgonqaian examples, with 
significations. 

[ ] 1872. Calendrier d'Oka. 1872. | 

Kijigatomasinaigan. = lakentasetatha. 
1 L Id^'.— Calendar for the Indians at the mis- 
sion of Lao des Deax Montagnes, in Nipissing 
and Mohawk. The vemo of the leaf contains 
Explication des signes (in French, Nipissing, 
and Mohawk). 

OopiuMen: Pilling, Powell, TrumbalL 

— Cantique en laugue algonquino. 

In Soci6t6 Philolog. Actes, vol. 1, pp. 73-76, 
Paris, 1872, 8P. 

Two Algonqoian versions of a hymn of six 
ttanxas, one by P. Mathevet, the other by N. 
O. [Caoql, each with French translation. 

Issued also without title-page, with heading 
as above, repaged 1-4, with the colophon Paris, 
imprimerie Jonaost, me Saint Honor6, 838 in. 
d.]. (Brinton, Pilling, PuweU, TmmbolL ) 

Fragments de Chrestomathie de la 

langue algonquine. Les huit beati- 
tudes. 

In Sool6t4 Philolog. Actes, vol. 3, pp. 39-61, 
Paris, 1873, 8°. 

Issaed separately as follows : 

[ ] Actes I de la I Sooi^t^ Philolo- 

gique I Tome III. -No 2, avril 1873 | 
Chrestomathie algonquine | 

Paris I Maisonneuve et C'^ libraires- 
^itenre | 15, quai Voltaire, 15 | 1873 

Cover title as above, half-title verso blank 
1 1. no inside title, text pp. 3fK-50, tableau synop- 
tiqne des accidents verso printers 1 L 8°. 

Oopiss teen : Astor, Powell, Trumbull. 

Priced by Triibner Sc co. 1882. p. 3, It. M. ; at 
the Pinart sale, catalogue no. 16, a copy brought 
3fr.60c 

[ ] Ocki aii | raasinaiganikikinobama- 

gan I on | nouveau syllabaire algon- 
quin. I [Picture of an Indian.] | 

Moniang [Montreal]: | takwabikic- 
kote endato John Lovell | 1873. 

Printed cover, title as above verso blank 1 L 
text in the Nipissing dialect pp. 3-64, 8'^. 

Primer lessons, pp. 3-11.— Hymns, pp. 11-14.— 
Litany, pp. 14-16.— Prayers, instructions, etc 



Cnoq ( J. A. ) — Continued. 

pp. 16-55.— Hymns with music, pp. 56-59. —Nu- 
merals 1-1000, multiplication table, primer les* 
sons, etc. pp. 60-64. 
Oopi$9 teen: Powell. 

— Fragments de chrestomathie algon- 
quine. (Symbole des ap6tres. ) 

In Soci6t6 Philolog. Actes. vol. 4, pp. 278-311, 
Paris, 1874, 89. 

L'oraison Dominicale (texte algon- 

quin avec glose). 

In Soci6t6 Philolog. Actes, voL 4, pp. 199-205, 
Paris, 1874, 9f>. 
The article is signed N. O. 
La salutation angelique (texte algon- 



quiu avec glose). 

In Soci6t6 Philolog. Actes, voL 4, pp. 207- 
209. Paris. 1874. S©. 

— Lexique | de la | langue iroquoise | 
avec I notes ot appendices | par | J. A. 
Cuoq I Pr^tre de Saint-Sulpice. | [Six 
lines quotation.] | 

Montreal | J. Chapleau & fils, Im- 
primeurs-£diteur8, j 31 et33 rueCott^. | 
1882 

Cover title as above, half-title verso list of 
books "du m6me auteur" 1 L title as above 
verso dedication 1 1. preface pp. v-ix, text pp. 
l-151,notes snppI6mentaires pp. 158-182, appen- 
dices pp. 183-215. 

Examples, comments, etymologies, etc. in 
Algonquin, pp. 173, 176, 177. 181. 182.— Numerals 
1-10, p. 188. — Comparative vocabulary of 13 
words, " from Cartier," of the Iroquois, and of 
the Algonquin, p. 187. 

There was subsequently issued, August, 1883, 
"Additamenta." pp. 218-238 (pp. 218-233 num- 
bered even on rectos, odd on versos ; there is no 
p. 234), containing explanations of doubtful 
points in the original publication, and answers 
to queries received from correspondents. Also 
contains an article (pp. 227-233) by Nantel (A.) 

Oopiet teen : Powell. Barnes. 

Some copies are undated ; in such the verso 
of the half-title is blank and they are not accom- . 
panied by the Additamenta. (Pilling, Powell. ) 

Reviewed in the Critic. New York. March 
24.1883. (Powell.) 

Koehler, in his no. 440 catalogue, no. 953, 
prices a copy, with the Additamenta. 8 M. 
Clarke, 1886. no. 6747, prices a paper copy $2.50. 

— Conte des Sauvages Canadiens. 

In Soci6t6 Philolog. Actes. vol. 13, pp. 89-91, 
Alen9on, 1883. 8^. 
A few Nipissing terms passim. 

— Lexique | de la | langue algonquine 
) par I J. A. Cuoq | Prdtre de Salnt- 

Sulpice I [Eight lines quotation] | 
Montreal | J. Chapleau et fiis, Im- 

primenrs-Editeuts | 31 rue Cott<5. | 1886 
Printed cover as above, half-title verso blank : 

1 1. title at above verso blank 1 1. dedication. 



102 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



Cixoq (J. A.) — Continued. 

verso blauk 1 I. prefitoe pp. vii-zii. text pp. 

l-i46, erraU 1 p. 8^. AlphAbetioally amnj^ed 

bj AlKonquia wordt, double oolamn, with 

copious Dotes. 

Copiea §een : Eames, Pilling, PowelL 
Priced by Koehler, catAloguo M5, no. 335, 

18 M. 
Reviewed at some length by Nantel (A.) 

in La Minerre, Montreal, August 1, 1887. 

[ ] Mi ket i oacaweniadagosiwato ket 

apitci manadjitocyik | Jezos o kitoitwa 
o tell ; Tebeniminang iji waahwin- | 
damawagoban Kitcitwa Manganitan- 
Manin Anakok : 

[Dayton, Ohio: Philip A. Kemper. 
1888.] 

A small card, 3 by 5 Inches in size, headed as 
above and containing twelve " Promises of Our 
Lord to Blessed Margaret Mary,'* in the Nipis- 
sing language. Mr. Kemper has published the 
same promises on similar cards in many lan- 
guages. 

Oopietteen: Pilling, PowelL 

[ ] Le I saint rosaire | m^it^, chants 

et T6c\t6 I 

Montreal | C. O. Beancbemin & FIIh, 
Libraires-ImprimenrSy | 256 et 258 rue 
Saint-Paal. [1839.] 

Printed cover, on the verso of which is 
"Imprimatur: tEdnardus Car., Arch. Marian- 
opolitanus fMontreal]," no inside title, text 15 
unnumbered 11. 24^. 

The recto of each leaf has a picture repre- 
senting one of the mysteries, underneath which 
is an explanation in Mohawk ; on the vorso of 
each leaf, and in the middle of the page, is the 
same explanation in the Nipissing language. 

Copifs seen : Pilling. 
[ ] A N-D de Lorette. 

1 p. 16^. Hymns, two columns, Nipissing and 
Mohawk. 

Copies seen : Shea. 

[Grammaire algonqaino.] (*) 

In a letter to me the Abb6 Cuoq says : " The 
Eoal which yon show in your search for the 
minutest details connected with your work 
leads me to say that I must hurry myself with 
a work I have in hand, namely, a grammaire 
algonqnine." 

See B^aondinoketc (F.) 

[ and D^l^age (F. R.)] lakentase- 

tatha I tslni | kacha8i8. | Teioserake, | 
1862-1863 I t A8entatokenti. | P. lon- 



Cuoq (J. A. ) and D616age (F. R)— Cont'd. 
te8aratka8a8. | K. Iaka8ententietha. | 

Tiohtiaki [Montreal]: | tehoris tora* 
rakon 

NipiMsing title : Maslnaigan | ka | pa- 

takaikatet. | Ka ako nikigo- | banen 

Jezos, I 1862-1863. i Manadjitaganidan. 

I Pakitandjikenanidan. | Kiigoeimona- 

ni8an. | 

Moniang [Montreal]: | tak8abikio> 
kote endatc | John Lovell. | 1862. 

Printed cover as above in two columns, the 
first (Mohawk) title on the left, the Nipissing on 
the right, the name of the printer (John Lovell) 
and the date being in the center under both 
titles ; no inside title, text pp. 3-14, HP. 

A Mohawk and Nipissini; calendar of church 
feast and fast days, the former by the Abb6 
Cuoq, the latter by P^re D616age. 

OopUs seen : Laval. 

For title of a similar calendar of 1867>1868, 
see D^Uage (F. R.) 

Jean-Andr6 Cuoq was bom at Le Pny, de- 
partment of Haute- Loire. France, June 0, 1821 ; 
entered a seminary of the Society of St Snl- 
pioe as a pupil October 20, 1840; was ordained 
priest December 20, 1845; arrived at Montreal 
November 21, 1816, and was sent to the mission 
of the Lake of Two Mountains (Oka) in 1817 as 
missionary to the Nipissings, and remained 
there many years as companion of Mr. Du- 
fresne, who was director of that mission and 
missionary to the Mohawks. 

Mr. Cuoq occupied himself at first only with 
the study of the Nipissing language, which he 
speaks and understands more perfectly than 
the Mohawk ; but Mr. Dufresne having been 
withdrawn from the mission in 1857, Mr. Cuoq 
then applied himself to the study of the Mohawk 
for the purpose of ministering in that language 
also. About 1864 be was sent to the College of 
Montreal, where he was charged with a dass, 
remaining there two or three years ; then he 
returned to the Lake of Two Mountains, where 
he remained until 1875. lie was then attached 
to the parochial church of Notre Dame at Mont- 
real, remaining there several years, during 
which time he composed and printed his later 
books on the native languages. He returned to 
the Lake about 1885 and is there at the present 
time (1890). 

In addition to the above works, he has com- 
posed a number in the Mohawk language. His 
modesty has prevented me from carrying out 
my desire to give a somewhat extended notice 
of his life and his mission work. 



MATCHi:Sl'Ai-.NVOG 

tvfc«ETOoo*.i*i; rnyoANATOOG 

YEUYEU 

'1 t A N U K 

'.Vnnk, ahthe nunniikfiu^^d; miirvi\mi.r.'ih uJc- 

WAi", k;:luk.'J[urii : kiti pspaiini; nawhutdi 
oiii.uogi.lt WuniK:mway<.-uon);aih. 

anic yc Bofiew't, ut -Ma' hji^UvJ. 

Ertkl. II. i:j, UtotamtiUith ftU ■ :!tMtnk mMtatft f#> 
Biioitiii yiu tr.Am:ifjt •mwcyxni tK-Sftminnittg, 

aiH.ititHtninramt otiJtt tn (iidut^ k*k m»Mit^Mmtitu^ 

JMi74.-«(,s Msnuumantimt Jifxr Cbr.fi. ' 

\ JiJIi KukkookoocomwehKanngafli quO-kinnu- 
iiit,rM(liciiJwi/,'a)wuiinon;oowjon};ani[na(li;)cS.i?a 

-b't-iwM.j I'rimuoop mlhp^ liiirtholiiiTitw iirtty)^ 



FAC-SIMILE OF THE TITLE-PAGE OF DANFORTM'S 



■^The Woful fcffedis 

OF 

A SERMON 

PtMchcditBr(^»/,0a«i.ii.i7oy. 
When Two INDUNS, 

fojias and fofeph, 

Were Executed for MURTHER, 

Ocafioncd 

Zy the Drunkcnnefs both of the 
Murthering & Murtheted Parties. 



By dainuel 2)«nfonlJ, 

■•allor of the Church olTmntM. 



I 
H^ 







pQS TO s in j^tttfenslano = 

J 1 __ J Ctn : SoW by Samuti 
ii Shop nor the Old Meo 
oufe, ia Corn Hill. 1710 



FAC-SIMILE OF THE TITLE-PAGE OF 



D. 



D. L. Moody, oo kukaskwawina fCree]. 
See Gkerman (O.) 

Dally (Engine). Rapport snr lea races in- 
digenes et sur rarch^ologie du Nonvean- 
Monde. Par M. £. Dally. 

In Soci6t6 d'itethrop. do Paris, Bulletin, vol. 
3. pp. 374-411, Paris, 1862, S®. 

Des lanpnies anciennes de rAm6riqae, pp. 
395-389, incladea a general discussion based 
upon the works of Haven, Gallatin, Barton, and 
Pickering, and contains a few Delaware words 
from Uecke welder, p. 397. 

Issned separately as follows: 

Snr les races Indigenes | et sur | 

Farch^ologie da Mexiqae | par M. £. 
Dally I membre [t&c. three lines.] | 
(Extrait des bulletins de la Soci^t^ 
d'anthropologie de Paris, | t. iii, 3« 
fascicule, 1862.) | 

Paris I Librairie de Victor Masson | 
Place do rdcole-de-m^deciue. | 1862. 

Pp. 1-36, 8°. 

Linguistic contents as above, pp. 24-2S. 

Cojn^nfen: Bancroft. 

Dalrymple (-Bet?. — ). [Vocabulary of 
the Pamunkey Indians.] 

In Historical Magazine, first series, voL 2, 
p. 182, New York and London, 1858, sm. 4°. 

Consists of 8 words and the nnmerals 1-10. 

"The folio winf; words were foand still sorviv- 
ing in 18U, at the Indian Pamnnke}* town, in 
King William connty, Va. They were col> 
lected by Rev. Mr. Dalrymple, who gave me a 
copy of them.— C. C." 

DLanforth] (8[amuelJ). Masukkenu- 
keeg I matcheseaenvog | wequetoog 
kah wuttooanatoog | Uppeyaonont 
Christoh kah ne | yeuyen | teanak | 
Wonk, ahche nnnnukquodt missinnin- 
nuh nk- | quobquenaount wutaiuskoi- 
anatamooonganoo. ' Kah Keketookaonk 
papaume wussittum- | wae kesukod- 
tnm: kah papaume nawhutch | onka- 
togeh Wunnomwayeuongash. | Nashpe 
Increase Mather. | Knkkootomweh- 
teaenuh nt oomoenwehkomong- | anit 
nt Bostonut, at New England. Eccles. 
12. 13. Nootamuttuh [<&c. six lines.] | 



Danforth (S.) — Continued. 
Y e n 8 h knkkookootom wehteaon gash 
qushkinnu- | munash en Indiane un- 
nontoowaonganit nashpe S. D. | 

Bostonnt, Printuoop nashpe Bartho- 
lomew Green, | kah John Allen. 1698. 

TrantUUion: Greatest sinners called and 
encouraged to come to Christ, and that now, 
quickly. Also, that it is very dangerous for 
people to delay their repentance, and a dis- 
course concerning the Judgment day; and con- 
cerning some other truths. By Increase 
Mather, teacher of the church in Boston. 
* * * These discourses are tx«nslated into 
Indian language by S. D. 

Title verso blank 1 1. epistle dedicatory 
in English (signed Samuel Danforth, Taunton, 
14th, 8, 1696) pp. 3-5, text entirely in the Massa- 
chusetts language pp. 7-162, postscript in En- 
glish pp. 163-104, sm. 8^. According to Dr. 
Trumbull, from whose "Books and tracts in the 
Indian language" the above translation is 
taken, this is the first Indian Imok known 
to have been printed after the removal of the 
press to Boston. See fac-sim ile of the ti i le-page. 

Copies te^n: American Antiquarian Society, 
Lenox, Tale. 

At the Brinley sale a copy, catalogue no. 801, 
was purchased by Yale College for $110 ; another 
copy, no. 5687, "best levant brown morocco, 
paneled sides, extra gilt," brought $115. 

The I Woful Effects | of | Drunken- 



ness I a sermon | Preached at Bristol, 
Octob. 12. 1709. I When Two Indians, | 
Josiasand Joseph, | Were Executed for 
murther, | Occasioned | By the Drunk- 
enness both of the | Murthcring & 
Murthered Parties. | By Samuel Dan- 
forth, I Pastor of the Church of Taun- 
ton. I [Two lines scripture. ] | 

Boston in New-England: | Printed 
by B. Green: Sold by Samuel | Gerrish 
at his Shop near the Old Mee- | ting 
House, in Corn-Hill. 1710. 

Title verso blank 1 L dedication "to the hon- 
ourable Ck>mmissioners of the Gospelling of the 
Indians in America" pp. i-iv, text pp. 1-52, 
suL 12°. See the fac*simile of the title-page. 

On p. 42 it says: "I shall Conclude with a 
few Words directed to the poor Condemned 

103 



104 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Danforth (S. ) — Coutlnued. 

Halefactora, in their awn LangoAge", which 
occopiea pp. 43-52, beginning with the words : 
"OggiiMunash KnttooonkMh," etc. See the 
&c-8iniileH of pp. 42 and 43. 
Co/fUft teen: CongreM, Lenox. 

The Lenox copy has inserted a mannsoript | 
trannlatlon of the Indian text by Dr. J. Ham- - 
mond TmmbnlL \ 

At tho Brinley sale, catalogae no. 785, a copy I 
brought $22. 

— [Vocabulary of the Maseachnsetts 
Indians.] 

Manuscript, 49 nnnumbered IL (lacking be. 
ginning and end), sm. folio, in the library of 
the Maasachusetts Historical Society, Boston, 
Haas. There is a small fragment of each of 2 
leaves at the beginning, and of 1 loaf at the end. 
The vocabulary is in double columns, very flue 
and closely written, almost unreadable. It is al- 
phabetically arranged O to W. with spacert left 
between some words, presumably for additions. 
The two fragmentary leaves at the beginning 
contained words beginning with the letter N. 
The verso of the 31st leaf and the recto of the 
32d are blank. 

The mannscript was presented to Bev. Jer- 
emy Belknap by Eliza Howard, great grand- 
daughter of Danforth, Aug. 9, 179G. 

Samuel Danforth, son of Samuel Danforth of 
Roxbury, was bom in that town on the 10th of 
December. 1666, and baptized on the 16th of the 
same month. His father was the colleague of 
John Eliot from 1650 to 1674. The son proba- 
bly learned the Indian language in his youth, 
under the direction of Mr. Eliot In 1683 he 
was graduated at Harvard College. His flrst 
publication appears to have been the Kew-Eng- 
land Almanack for 1686. In September, 1687, 
he was ordained as minister of the church in 
Taunton, Massachusetts, where he remained 
until his death. 

In 1698, Mr. Danforth and Mr. Grindall Raw- 
son were employed by the commissiouers for 
the propagation of the gospel among the In- 
dians in New England, to visit and report on 
the "Plantations of the Indians within this 
Province." This labor they commenced on the 
30th of May, and finished on the 24th of June. 
Their report was printed in the summer or au- 
tumn of the same year, as an appendix to Nich- 
olas Noyos's election sermon, entitle<l NetO'Eng- 
lands Duty and Interest, pi>. 89-99 (reprinted iu 
volume 10 of the OoUectionso/the Mcusaehusetts 
Historical Society). Mr. Danforth's translation 
into the Indian language of five sermons by 
Increase Mather was published soon after, prob- 
ably in October, as the dedication is dated on 
the 14th of that month. His labors for the wel- 
fare of the Indians in Taunton and its vicinity 
were considerable. On certain ' * lecture days " 
he preached to them in their own language. 
He also prepared in mannscript an Indian dic- 
tionary, with references under each word to 
Eliot*s translation of the bible. In 1704 he com- 



Danforth (8.) — Coutinoed. 

menced a series of revival meetings in Taunton, 
and in the same year published his sermon en- 
titled Piety Encouraged, This was followed in 
1708 by The Duty of Believers, and in 1710 by 
TJie Wqful Efeets of Drunkenness. In 1713 he 
composed ±n Elegy on the Memory (^f the Wor- 
shipful Major Thonuu Leonard, Esq., of Tauu> 
ton, which was printed on a broadside sheet. 
Two more publications, An Exhortation to All 
and a sermon at Bridgewater, appeared in 1714 
and 1717. He dieil on November 14th, 1727, in 
the sixty- first year of his age. 

Dawson (Sir John William). Acadian 
geology. I The | geological structure, | 
organic remains, and mineral resources 
I of I Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and 
Prince | Edward Island. | By | John 
William Dawson, M. A., LL. D., F. R. S., 
F. G. 8., I principal [&c. six lines.] | 
Second edition, revised and enlarged. 
I With a geological map and numerous 
Illustrations. | 

Loudon : | Macmillan and oo. | Edin- 
burgh: Oliver and Boyd, Tweeddale 
court. I Halifax : A. and W. Mackinlay. 
Moutreal : Dawson brothers. 1 1868. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright 1 I. 
de<iicatiou verso blank 1 1. preface pp. t-z, ex- 
planation of the geological map pp. xi-xiv, con- 
tents pp. xv-zviii,indexes pp. zix-xzvi, errata 
verso blank 1 1. text pp. 1-671, appendix pp. 673- 
687, index pp. 689-691, map and plates. 8°. 

Micmac language and superstition!, pp. 673- 
675, contains Micmac and Maliseet words com- 
pare<l with Greek, Latin, and Hebrew (flrom 
Rand). 

Copies seen: Astor, Boston Public, British 
Mui*eum, Geological Survey, Watkinson. 

There is an edition Edinburgh, 18&5, 12^ 
(Boston AthenH>am, Congress, Geological Sur« 
vey), which does not contain the linguistics; 
and one Montreal, 1860, 129, which I have not 
seen. 

Acadian geology. | The | geological 

st-rncture, | organic remains, and min- 
eral resources | of | Nova Scotia, New 
Brunswick, and Prince | Edward Isl- 
and. I By I Johu William Dawson, M. 
A.,LL. b.,F. R. 8.,F. G.S. | principal 
[&c. six lines.] | Third edition. ) With 
a map and numerous illustrations, and 

I a supplement. | 

London : | Macmillan and co. | Edin- 
burgh: Oliver and Boyd. Montreal: 
Dawsou brothers. | Halifax: A.and W. 
Macki nlay. New York : Van Nostrand. 

I 1878. 

Frontispiece I L title verso copyright 1 L ad- 
vertisement to third edition verso blank 1 1. 



^i TheWtful EffeHs, &c. 

I fliaS Conclude tvith a fewlFerM 
^iredeii to the poor Cen^emnetf AIj- 
lefail»rSj in tbtir evea Langtugc. 



I 



Ogguffunafli 



L_ 



FAC-SIMILE OF PAGES 42-4; 



[13 ! 



Hf Ogguflunaili 

' KtlttooonKalh mafliamukupalh el» 
kurtummunkc WjlTuinutdp uilli- 

I^^Ut nehenwoiichc wuctinoatoo- 

I^Knraonkanoowouc ; uc Brifiol^ 

•^^Ofloher IX. 1709. ne kefukoii 

adt wulTumaonkaaoo uiH^nap. 



WOI Keen J«fias kah keen 
Jojeph^ nooumook Wuc- 
finnoowaonK God, onk woh Kuk- 
keccaliogkonoo pomantamwog : 
ifti. JJ. 3. Yeu momachilhcycuc 
kuhkootumwchteaonk, iic woh rioo- 
nmokq : Tcu nohhg knkketeabogks' 
mo mm kummamonteanaH., Luk.i z.io- 
Mahtihunk yeukcfukod kukkecca- 
hogkonoo piQi appuong michcmc 
aluh uc Kcfni^utt afuh uc Chepi»b- 
£ konmkgjii^. 



IF DUNFOHTH'S WOFUL EFFECTS. 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



105 



Dawson (J. W.) — Continued. 

dedication verso bhmk 1 1. preface etc. pp. t-xIt, 
contents pp. xv-xviii, indexes and list of illos- 
trations pp. xix-xxr, errata verso blank 1 1, text 
' and appendix pp. 1-4S87, general index pp. 689- 
OM, " supplement to the second edition " pp. 1- 
102, 1 p. 8"^. 
Linguistics as under previous title. 
Copis* teen: CJongress. 

Bay (Susan). See Gkitschet (A. S.) 

Bay-breaking (The). See Shepard (T.) 

Bearbom (Henry Alexander Scaminell). 

A I sketch of the life | of the | apostle 

Eliot, I prefatory to a subscription | for 

I erecting a inonninent | to his memory. 

I [Quotation, six lines.] | By Henry 

A. S. Dearborn. | 

Roxbury: | Norfolk county journal 
press. I Over Central market. | 1450. 

Printed rover, frontispiei'o 1 L title verso 
blank 1 1. 2 other p. 11. proceedings of a nieetiufc 
pp. 7-9, introductory p. 10, text pp. 11-32, 8'^. 

The two leaves f dlowing the titlc-pase con- 
tain a reprint of the title-page of Eliot's In* 
dian bible of 1663. and ten verses from the first 
chapter of Genesis in the Massachusetts lan- 
guage (from Eliot). 

OopitM teen: British Museum, Congress, 
Eames, Massachusetts Historical Society, 
Trumbull. 

Forest (John William). History | of 
the I Indians of Connecticut | from the 
I earliest known perio<l | to 1650. | By 
John W. De Forest. | Published with 
the sanction of the | Connecticnt his- 
torical society. | [Four lines quota- 
tion.] I 

Hartford: | Wm. Jas. Hamersley. | 
1651. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. testimonial verso 
blank 1 L preface pp. v-x, centents^p. xi-xxvi, 
text pp. 1-400, appendix pp. 491-498, index pp. 
49&-509. map, 8^. 

"Langua^ie,'' being general remarks on the 
Massachusetts, Xarragansett. and Pe^iuot Ian- 
linages, and containing the Lord's pra^'cr in 
Ifohegan (from Gov. Saltonstall) and in the 
HaasaohusetU (from Eliot's bible), pp. 38-42.— 
Short vocabulary (31 words) of the Massachu- 
•eits. Narragansett, Mobegan, Pequot, and Nau- 
gataok, appendix p. 491. 

Ocpietteen: Boston Athenapum, British Mu- 
4Mnm, Bureau of Ethnology. Congress, Eames, 
Tmmbull. 

At the Murphy sale, catalogue no. 769, a copy 
liTonght $2.25 ; priced by CUrke 8c co. 1886 cat- 
alogue, no. 6358, $2.50. 

History | of the | Indians of Con- 
neotiont | from the | earliest known 
period I to 1850. | By John W. De For- 



De Forest (J. W.) — Continned. 
est. I Published with the sanction of 
the I Connecticut historical society. | 
[Quotation, four lines.] | 

Hartford : | Win. Jas. Hamersley. | 
1852 

Title verso copyright 1 L testimonial pp. iii- 
iv, preface pp. v-x, contents pp. xi-xxvi. text 
pp. 1-490, appendix pp. 491-498, index pp. 491^ 
509. map, 8^. 

Linguistics as under previous title. 

Copies teen : Harvard, Pilling. 

At the Squier sale, catalogue no. 1839, a copy 
brought $1.50. 

History | of jthe | Indians of Con- 
necticut I from the | earliest known 
period | to 1850. | By John W, De For- 
est. I Published with the- sanction of 
the I Counocticnt historical society. | 
[Four lines quotation. ] | 

Hartford : | Wm. Jas. Hamersley. | 
18.53. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. testimonial verso 
blank 1 L preface pp. v-x, consents pp. xi-xxvi, 
text pp. 1-490, appendix pp. 491-4i8, index pp. 
499-509, map, B^. 

Linguistics as under previous titles. 

Copie* teen: Astor, Boston Public, Congress, 
Massachusetts Ilistorionl Society, Wisconsin 
Historical Society. 

History | of the | Indians of Con- 
necticut I from I the earliest known 
period | to | A. D. 1850. | By John W. 
Do Forest. | [Four lines quotation.] | 
[Monogram.] | 

Albauy : | J. Munsoll, 62 State street. 
I 1^71. 

Title verso note 1 1. testimonial verso blank 
1 1. preface pp. v-x, contents pp. xi-xxvi, text 
pp. 1-490. appendix pp. 491-498, Index pp. 491^ 
509, map, 8*^. The sheets of a portion of an 
earlier edition fell into the hands of Mr. Mun- 
sell, who i:}sned it with the above title. 

Liu;;ui.')tics as under previous titles. 

Copi€uteen: Boston Public, Dunbar. 

Johu Willism De Forest, author and soldier, 
bom in HumphreysvlUe (now Seymour), Conn., 
31 March, 18'i6. He attended no college, but 
pursued independent studies, mainly abroad ; 
was a student in Latin, and became a fluent 
speaker of French, Italian, and Spanish. While 
yet a youth, he passed four years travelling in 
Europe, and two years in the Levant, residing 
chiefly in Syria. Again, in 1850, he visited 
Europe, making extensive tours through Great 
Britain, France, Italy, Germany, Greece, and 
Asia Minor. From that time until the civil 
war began he wrote short stories for periodic- 
als, having already become an author of sev- 
eral books. In 1861. as captain, he recrnite<l a 
company for the 19th Connecticut volunteers, 



106 



BIBLIOORAPHT OF THE 



De Forest (J. W.) —Continued. 

and served constantly in the field till Jannary, 
1865. From 1865 till 1868 he remained in the 
army as a^jntant-general of the reteran 
reserve cx>rp8, and afterwards as chief of a dis- 
trict under the Freedman's Bareacu Since then 
he has resided in New Haven, except when 
travellinK in Europe. The honorary degree of 
A. M. was conferred ujwn him hy Amherst 
College in 1859.— i.i>p2eton'« Cfyelop. o/Ain. Biog. 

Dejean (Eev, Aug.) Anichanabek | 
aniisinahaDiwa, | kicheanaineatchik, 
oatouik, Otawak wakanakessi. | Dejeau 
Macate ockonoye. | [Picture.] | [One 
line quotation. ] | 

WyastenoDg [Detroit] : | G^. L. 
Whitney manda inesinahkeu hanseton. 
11830. 

Title 1 L text pp. 3-105, tahle p. 106, 18° ; in the 
Ottawa language, with French and occasionally 
Xatin headings to the pages. 

Pri^res, pp. 3-9. —Catechism, pp. 10-19.— Ad- 
dition au Cat6ohisme (instructions, hymns, 
chants), pp.19-94.— Pri^res, pp. 95-103.— Alpha- 
bet, words of one syllable, vocabulary in Ottawa 
aqd FrencL, pp. 104-105. 

Copieiteen: Maisonneuve. 

I have seen but the one copy of this little 
work, snd know of the probable existence of 
but one other— that catalogued by the library 
of the Boston Athenscnm, deposited there by 
Schoolcraft. This volume han been misplaced 
on the shelves, and though the library author- 
ities at my request caused diligent search to 
be made, it has not been found. 

Leclerc in 1867, catalogue no. 427, sold a copy 
for 28 fr., and in 1878, catalogue no. 2382, priced 
one 40 fr. 

There may have been an earlier edition of 
this work. M. Dejean, in a letter to the Abb6 

K , at Bordeaux, Jan. 10, 1829, mentions a 

manuscript that had been sent to France to be 
printed : " le livre de pri6res qui est en usage 
parmi les Algonkins, et qui a 6t6 ap]>rov6 ]>ar 
rautorit6 eccl^siastiquedeMontrial/' ( Annales 
de r Association de la Propagation de la Foi, voL 
4, p. 466, 1831. ) A note, p. 468, of the same vol- 
ume, says this mauuscript was being printed 
by the association. 

-»— Lettre de M. Dejean, missionnaire 
apostoliqnc. 

In Annates do la Propagation de la Foi, vol. 
4, pp. 491-496. Paris. 1830. 8^. Dated firom L'Ar- 
bro Croche, 29 ootobre 1829. 

A few Ottawa words and phrases, with defi- 
nitions, pp. 494-495. 

In this letter M. Dejean says : " I know already 
enough of the language of the Ottawas to 
converse with them. I am engaged daily in 
compiling an Ottawa vocabulary. This lan- 
guage is very poor; it has only enough words 
to express what faHa under the senses. * * *." 



Dejean (A.) — Con tinned. 

Lettre des Ottawas an Conseil da 

Midi. 

In Annales de la Propagation de la Foi, voL 
4, pp. 544-546, Paris, 1830. 8P, Dated ftom 
L'Arbre-Croche le 25 octobro 1829. 

This letter, which was written by the Otta. 
was In the absence of the missionary Dc^Jean, 
thanks the Council of Lyons for givinjr 
them the prayer-book in their own language. 
The signatures are totemic signs. It is acoom- 
I>anied by a translation in French by M. Dejean 
" word for word, literally, to show the style of 
the barbarous language." 

DeKay (James Ellsworth). (Not pub- 
lished. ) Note. 

Colophon: Holman & Gray, book and 
job printers, 90 Fulton street, N. Y. 
[1851.] 

No title-page, heading only ; text pp. 1-12, 12^. 
Dated Jan. 1st, 1851. 

A list of Indian names of places on Long Isl- 
and, sent oat for the purpose of eliciting fur- 
ther information. 
Delafield (John), jr. and Lakey (J.) 
Au inquiry | into the origin of the | an- 
tiquities of America. | By | John Dela- 
field, jr. I With I an appendix, | con- 
taining notes, and *' a view of the causes 
of the superiority of the men of | the 
northern over those of the southern 
hemisphere." | By | James Lakey, M. 
D. I 

New-York : 1 published for subscrib- 
ers, by I Colt, Burgess &. Co., | Lon- 
don : I Longman, Bees, Orme, Brown, 
Greeu Sl Longman. | Paris : \ A, & W. 
Galignani & co. | 1839. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. dedication verso 
bUnk 1 1. preface signed "C.P.M." pp. 5-11, 
introduclion p. 12, text pp. 13-102, appendix pp. 
105-142, 10 plates and a long folded plate, 4^. 

Vocabalary of words in various American 
dialects (among them the Penobscot, Illinois, 
Delaware, Acadia, and New England) compared 
with those of various Asiatic dialects (l^m 
Yater in Mithridates), p. 25. 

Copies seen: Congress, Eames, Lenox. 

Some copies differ slightly in title-page, as 
follows: 

An inquiry | into the origin of 

the I antiquities of America. ' By John 
Delafield, jr. | With | an appendix, | 
coutaiuing notes, and " a view of the 
causes of the superiority of the men | of 
the northern over those of the southern 
hemisphere.'' | By I James Lakey, M. 
D. I 

New York : | published for snbscrib. 
ers, by | J. C. Colt. | London: | Long- 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



107 



Delafield (J.) andLakey (J.) — Cont'd, 
man, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green, & 
Longman. | Paris: | A. &^ W. Galignani 
<& CO. I 1839. 

Title verso oopyriRht 1 L dedloation verao 
blank 1 L preface pp. 5-11, introdaotion p. 12, 
text pp. 13-102, appendix pp. 105-142, plates 
and folding plate, 4°. 

LinKniatics as under previous title. 

Oopiei «Mn: Astor, Boston Athenenm, Pow- 
ell, Tmmbnll. 

Another issue with title-page as follows : 

An inquiry | into the origin of 

the I aotiquities 01 America. | By | John 
Delafield Jr. | With | an appendix, | 
containing notee, and " A view of the 
causes of thesnperiority of the | men of 
the northern over those of the southern 
hemisphere." | By | James Lakey, M. 

D. I 

Cincinnati : | published by N. G. Bur- 
gess & CO I Stereotyped by Glezen and 
Shepard. | 1839. 

Title verso copyright 1 L dedication verso 
blank 1 L preface pp. 5-11, introduction p. 12, 
text pp. ia-102, appendix pp. 105-142, plates and 
folding plate, i°. 

Linguistics as under previous titles. 

Copies teen: British Museum. 

Priced in Stevens's Nuggets, no. 807, IL \0e. 
At the Squier sale, catalogue no. 276, a copy 
brought 15.50 ; at the Ramirez sale, no. 206, 14f . ; 
at the Brinley sale, no. 5379, "gilt, flue c-opy." 
$8; at the Murphy sale, no. 2002, $7.50. Priced 
by Clarke Sc co. 1886 catalogue, no. 6360, $ia 



Delaware • Continaed. 
General discussion 



Delaware : 



Animal names 
Bible, AcU 
Bible, John i-m 
Bible history 
Bible history 
Bible history 
Bible history 

Bible passages 
Bible passages 
Bible passages 
Bible passages 
Bible stories 
Bible stories 
Catechism 
Dictionary 
Dictionary 

Dictionary 

Dictionary 

Dictionary 

Dictionary 

Dictionary 

General diseosaion 

Gtoneral discussion 



See Cass (L.) 

Luckenbach (A.) 
Dencke (C. F.) 
Grubo (B. A.) 
Roth (J.)« 
Zeisberger (D.) 
Zeisberger (D.) and 

Blanchard (I. D.) 
American Bible Soo. 
Bagster (J.) 
Bible Society. 
Linapie. 
Dencke (C. F.) 
Luckenbach (A.) 
Campanius (J.) 
Alexander (J. H.) 
Brinton (D. G.) and 

Anthony (A. S.) 
Campanius (J.) 
Dencke (C. F.) 
Ettwein (J.) 
Henry (M. S.) 
Zeisberger (D.) 
Dnponceau (P.S.) 
Heckewelder (J. G. 
E.) 



General discussion 
General discussion 

General discussion 
General discuMion 
General discussion 
General discussion 
Gentes 

Geographic names 
Geographic names 
Geographic names 

Geographic names 
Geographic names 
Geographic names 
Grammar 
Grammatic comments 

Grammatic comments 
Grammatic comments 
Grammatic comments 
Grammatic comments 
Grammatic comments 
Grammatic comments 
Grammatic comments 
Grammatic comments 
Grammatic comments 
Grammatic comments 
Grammatic treatise 
Grammatic treatise 
Hymns 
Hymns 
Hymn book 
Hymn book 
Hymn l>ook 
Hymn book 

Legends 
Letter 
Letter 
Lord's prayer 

Lord's prayer 
Lord's prayer 
Lord's prayer 
Lord's praj^er 
Lord's prayer 
Lord's prayer 
Lord's prayer 
Lord's prayer 
Lord's prayer 
Lord's prayer 
Numerals 
Numerals 
Numerals 
Numerals 
Numerals 
Numerals 
Numerals 
Numerals 
Numerals 
Numerals 
Numerals 



Heckewelder (J. G.- 
£.) and Dupon* 
ceau (P.S.) 
History. 
Humboldt (K. W, 

von). 
J6han (L. F.) 
Easstigatorskee. 
Raflnesque(C.S.) 
Schermerhorn(J. F.y 
Morgan (L. H.) 
Boyd (S. G.) 
Chapman (LA.) 
Hecliewelder (J. G. 

E.) 
Eelton (D. H.) 
Sheafer (P. W.) 
Watson (J. F.) 
Zeisberger (D.) 
Adelung (J. C.) and 

Vater (J.S.) 
Bastian (P.W.A.) 
Cass (L.) 
Gallatin (A.) 
Grube(B.A.) 
James (B.) 
Jarvis (S. F.) 
Johnes (A.J.) 
McCulloh (J. H.) 
Wilson (E.F.) 
Zeisberger (D.) 
Brinton (D. G.) 
Duponceau (P. S.> 

Emerson (£. R.) 
Smet (P.J.de). 
Grube (B. A.) 
Pyrlajus (J.C.) 

Zeisberger (D.) 
Zeisberger (D.) and 
Luckenbach (A.) 
Brinton (D.G.) 

Brinton (D. G.) 

Tobias (G.) 

Adelung (J. C.) and 
Vater (J. S.) 

Auer (A.) 

Bergholtz (G. F.) 

History. 

Home(T.H.) 

Lord's. 

Loskiel (G. H.) 

Naphegyi (G.) 

Smet (P.J.de). 

Trumbull (J. H.> 

Zeisberger (D.) 

Allgemeiuo. 

Bozeman (J. L.) 

ClassicaL 

ColUn (N.) 

Edwards (J.) 

Gibbs (G.) 

Haldeman (S. S.> 

James (E.) 

Jarvis (S. F.) 

Jones (D.) 

Parsons (J.) 



108 



BIBLIOQRAPBY OF THE 



Delaware —Continoed. 




Kununli 


IboauM <0.) 


Toubo 


Ur7 


Preahui (W.) 


VDDienli 


VrtUnoey (C.) 


Too.bnl.ry 


PrichMd {J.O 


NDtnenU 


Waleer {C.) 




ary 


ProDd <K.> 


NniiKnU 




Too.bu 


.ry 


Heaped. D.) 




Cm«([..) 


Tocabn 


Ury 


KDttenber<E.lL) 


Prayer* 


Lin.p1e. 


Vo«bo 


l"T 




Primer 






«■/ 


Seboolcnn (O. B.) 




LlD*ple 


Voeabu 


lary 


TbODia. (G.) 


Primer 


Meeker (J.) 




Ulrtol(B.> 


PnporDuow 




ToeabuUn 


VlnoeoMB.H.J.l 


Proper nuM. 




ToMbu 


.ry 


Wheeler (A. W.) 


Proper >uD.«i 


iDdllD. 


Voeabulw; 


WJUUm»n (W. D.) 


Proper Mmei 


jMk.oii(W.H.) 


Tocbu 


laiy 


WII»n(E.F.l 


Proper D.met 


BmettP.J.ile). 


Vocabu 


Uiy 


Zel.ber(tor(D.) 


Proper Dime. 


S1.iiley(J.M.| 


Wonl. 




Brinton (D.O.) 


Prop.rn.me. 








Cu.IL.) 




Ad.mMW.) 


Word. 




CbaT«Doey(B.de). 


Belitianshipe 


HorgaiKL.H.) 


Word. 




Dally (B.) 






Word. 




Gr«Mrle(RdBl«). 




LncVrnbuth (A.) 


Word. 






Sennem 


Zel>berKer{D.) 






Hale (H.) 


SpeUiDg book 


Ueeker <J.| 


Wool. 






SpelUng book 


ZnisberKvr (D.> 






KoTir (E.) 




ZelaberiterlD.) 


Word. 




LaUmnKRG.) 


TMt 


BriPlen(D.O.) 


Wonl. 




Le.ley(J.P.) 


Teit 


Cornell (W. M.) 


Word. 




LoekleKO.H.) 






Word. 




Hcloloab (J.) 


T.it 


Zelabergrr (D.l 


Word. 




UacLean (J, P.I 


Tr«t 




Woid. 




Ualle-Bron (U. K. 


TocebnluT 


AdelungW. C.l.Dd 






B.) 




VaterlJ.S.) 


Word. 




M6rlan(A.A.Ton). 


Vocabutary 


AUeo (W.) 


Word. 




OrblKn](A.D.d'>. 






Word. 




Oronfayatekba. 


Tooabolu? 


Balbl (A.) 


Word. 




B»oderi(D.C,) 


ToHibuUuT 


ltortonlB.8.1 


Word. 




Sayee <A. H.) 




Blud (T.) 


Word. 




SoboBl)or)(k(K.H.) 


Voa.bul«y 


BrioWinD.O.| 






8eoer(3.1I.) 


TooabnlMT 


Cuupbell (J.) 


Word. 




Shea (J.O.) 


Too.biil.ry 


Chul6<J,A.) 


Word. 




SmetlP.J.de). 


ToemliqUry 


ClarkwD (C 1 


Word. 




gmitbHtnlaHi 


VocabnUn 


Cornell (W.M.) 


Word. 








Commlng. (B. W.) 


Word. 




Vmttj (J.) 


Toubularj 


DekfleM (J.) ■»! 


Word. 




TalUB.A.> 




Laker (J-) 






T*Ur<J.S.) 


VocibnUry 


D.-nny (E.) 


Word. 




Warden {D. B.) 






Word. 




WIlaoD (D.) 


VoMilinUry 


Edward. IJ., 


Word. 




Tankleirltch (F. da 



Vocabulary 
VooabnUry 
Tocabolary 
Tooabulary 
Tooabnlary 
Teoabnlary 
Vonabnlary 
Vocabulary 



Vocabaiary 

Toeabulary 
Vooabnlary 
Tooabulary 
Yooabolary 



Henry (M. S.) 
Inve.tl(>tor. 
Jaoney (3. M.) 






[DA^age (Pirt FrAn(ola Bi3gi8t«).] t | 

Mnxinuigau ka | patuksiliatPk | Ka 

ako jiLkigabancu Jezus, [ 1857 gaie 1858. 

UauadJitaganiBaD. | P. Pakitaud- 

JikenaniSau. | K. IfiigoccmociiiiiiSau. | 

Moniaag [Mmitrcnl TakSabikio- 

kute eudatc .lohu LovM. ] 1857. 

CoT.r title A-piBo ilic cnitifl.ion, no Inalde 
title, teitflll. DuftuwU^. A calendu oTfaut 
and fa*( day. for the CatboUo olinnA In the 
NiplHlDg langnage. 

Capliitetn: Pilling. 

For title of a abnllar oalendat of lS<B-3. see 
Oooq (J. A.) and DtUaga (F. B.) 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



10» 



D^l^age (F.R.)— Coutinoed. 

[ ] Kikinwaamakewin | masinaikaDs 

kitshi apatshitonawats | kiwekamank, 
p waUhiwananky apitipi | kaie kotakak 
anesbinapek. | [Sealof theOblates.] | 

[Two lines syllabio characters (Mon- 
treal, etc.)] I 1859. 

Title in Roman characters (each word having 
its equivalent in syllabic characters andemeath) 
recto L 1 (p. 1), text in the Chippewa lao j^oage 
syllabic characters pp.-2-23 (pp. 1-11 and 14 hav. 
ing Roman eqoivalents interlined), 1(P. 

Primer lessons, pp. 2-5.— Prayers, pp. 6-10.— 
Hymns, pp. 11-23. 

Copies teen: Pilling, Powell. 

I have placed this work under Pdre D61toge 
npon the authority of his pre<lecessor at the 
mission, Pdre Garin. Biftbop Lorrain was 
under the Impression it should be credited to 
MM. Laverlochdre and (Hrin until the latter 
disclaimed its authorship. Later, at my re- 
quest, he communicated with Father Piao, O. 
M. I, superior of the Maniwaki mission in the 
archdiocese of Ottawa, who confirms Pdre 
Garin's impression that it was translated by 
D616age. 

[ J L. J. C. et M. I. I Kikinoamati- 



masinaigan, | gaie | aiamiekakSedjin- 
diSini-masinaigan. | [Four lines qnota- 
tion in French. ] ; [Seal of the Oblates. ] \ 

Moniang[ Montreal]: ; tak8abikickote 
endatc John Lovell | 1866. 

Title as above verso imprimatur of Vie. 
Gen. Tmtean 1 1. text pp. 3-64, IB°. Catechism 
in the Chippewa language. 

The catechism proper begins on p. 16, the 
preceding pages being occupied with the al> 
phabet, scripture lessons, numerals, etc. The 
last two pages (63-64) also contain hymns. 

Bishop Lorrain says he does not know who 
is the author of this work. Father Garin says 
he is not sure about the author, but supposes 
it can be credited to P6re D616age, his suc- 
cessor in those missions at the date of its pub- 
lication. For a reprint of pp. 3-15, see O-n^gnen 
(J. P.) 

Oopie$teen: Eames, Pilling, PowelL 

— [Primer chart in the Cree language.] 
A large sheet, 20 by 12| inches In size, con- 
taining the 18 letters of the alphabet, both 
capital and small, and easy syllables firom A., 
E, I, O, to aok, eck, ick, ock, in capital letters 
on the left-hand side and in small letters on the 
right-hand side, each of the two divisions in 53 
lines. This double alphabet and syllabary are 
printed on pp. 5-7 of the work next preceding— 
"Kikinoamati-masinaigan," and on the same 
pages of the partial reprint of that work cata- 
logued herein under On^gnen (J. P.), from one 
or the other of which it was probably extitict ed. 
Copies teen: Eames, Pilling. 
I have been unable to find anything definite 
ocmoeming this author, except that he min- 



D^l^age (F.R.) — Continued. 

istered for a number of years to the Indians of 
Maniwaki, St James Bay, and St Maurice 
River, and that he died in 1884. 

See Qarin (A. M.) 

Dellawwrohes Gesang-Buchlein. See 
Grube (B. A.) 

Demillier (Ph'e Louis Edmond). Lettro 
de M. Edmond Demilier. 

In ^nnales de la Propagation de la Foi, vol. 
8, pp. 191-200, Paris, 1835, 8?. Dated fh»m 
Pleasant Point, le 20 avril 1834. (Congress.) 

Remarks on the Abnaki language; sign of 
the cross, the pater, ave, sancta Maria, and 
definitions of about a dozen words in the sam^ 
language. 

The pater is reprinted in Shea (J. G.), 
Catholic missions, and in Trumbull (J. H.)^ 
Forty versions. 

[ — J A I Cat^chisme | en langne Mik- 
make. | Pleasant-Point le 22 Juin 1836. 
LnHey Sikatiken. 

Manuscript; 2 p. 11. title p. 1, text pp. 2-341, 
sro. 4^ ; bound in boards. On the recto of the 
first prel. leaf is a note in the same handwriting 
as that of the manuscript: " 1(M>**'* 1839, 4*' ^ du 
soir f 3 degr6s neige, nelge!!! k Pleasant 
Point. '* And on tho recto of the second preL leaf 
is the following, in Miomak, in the same hand- 
writing: 

Pan8hob8k6k Ghakhimesot8i- | a8ikhighan 
KisitSnaissa Louis | Edmond Demillier Alnam- 
bay I Patriatts 18 paimikaten- 1 nec8tafiik8akai 
nsanzek k6ssaktek8 | teinesk6 taiba nek8talis. 
I halimsS kis8k6 nisinesk6 taiba | tamba8alis. 
ala taidebi8i a86n8tch8i i akitamohangan. 27 
Mars 1836. | Sibahik Sdainek. 

At the bottom of the same page, in another 
handwriting: "This belongs to Rev** Eugene 
Yetromile Apostolic Missionary Eastport, Me." 

Micmac and equivalent French on facing 
X»ages as far as pp. 222-223 ; the remainder wholly 
Micmac, with the heading: "Pieces di verses 
en langue Miquemaque. Te Denm." 

The last page of the manuscript ends thus : 
"m8 . . . Reliqua, quae pauca, desideran- 
tur in us." From this note, and from the 
fact that the manuscript is written thronghout 
with remarkable nicety, and with no correc- 
tions or alterations such as might be expected 
in an original work, and ftt>m the further fact 
that the date, 1836, is almost too early for De- 
millier to have composed it, it would seem prob- 
able that the manuscript is a copy and not an 
original work by Demillier. 

This manuscript is now in the possession of 
Rev. M. C. O'Brien, St Mary's Church, Bangor, 
Maine, who kindly sent it to me for inspection. 

Dictionary of the Etchimin lan- 
guage. (*) 
Manuscript Referred to by Rev. Eugene 
Yetromile in " The Abnakisand their history," 
pp. 27, 50. 



110 



BIBLIOQBAPHT OF THE 



Demillier (L. E.) — Coutinued. 

The Rev. Mr. O'Brien writee me: "Father 
Demillier left other mjinuecripts, and among 
them a Paesamaqaoddy dictionary, bat they 
can no longer be found. Father Vetromile ia 
suppoaed to have had the dictionary at the time 
of his death, but whether it wa« carried by him 
to Italy, where he dieil, and there left, or is yet 
among his effects in thisooantry, ia not known." 

Esjtais I de Grammaire | Mique- 

maque | Pleasant-Point le 1*>^ Noveoi- 
bre 1836. J Fr6re Edmond Loais De- 
millier Pr6tre Missionnaire | de la Con- 
gregation des Sacrds Coenrs de Jdsns et 
de Marie | et de Fadoration perpdtuelle 
du Tr^s S^ Sacrament de PAatel | chez 
lea Indiens Passamaqnoddis, Etat da 
Maine | Etats Unis d'Amdrique. Non- 
velle Augleterre. 

Manoscript; title as above reverse blank 1 L 
text pp. 1-144, am. 4°; bound in boarda. In 
poaaeaaion of the Rev. Mr. O'Brien, St. Mary*a 
Church, Bangor, Maine, who sent it to me for 
inapection. It, alsov would aeem to be only a 
copy, for reaaona mentioned above, but Father 
YetromUe waa of the opinion that ita author 
waa Pdre Demillier. 

At the foot of the title-page, in a different 
handwriting, is a note: "Belonging to Rev. 
Eugene Vetromile, Apostolic-Miaaionary to the 
Indians, Eaatport, Me. " On the margin of p. 
S9 ia thia note : Voyez page 02, errata. 2 pagea 
onbli6ea ici." 

A partial copy of thia manuacript aa follows : 

— Essais I do Grammaire Miqiiemaqae 

I Pleasant Point le l^rNovembre 1836 | 

Fr^re Edmond Louis Demillier | Pr6tre 

missionnaire de la Congr<$gation | des 

Sacr^s Cosars do Jdsus et de Marie | ot 

de Padoratiun periietnoUe du tr^s St | 

Sacrament de I'autel | chez les Indiens 

Passauiaquoddis, Etat | du Maine, E. U. 

de I'Amdriquo, Nouvelle | Angleterre. 

Partial manuscript copy, consisting of title 
reverse blank i leaf and 8 otlier leaves, B°i 
in poaaeaaion of Dr. J. Cr. Shea, Elizabeth, New 
Jersey, who writea me: "Vetromilti lent mo 
the manuscript, but reclaimed it almost imme- 
diately, before I had time to copy more than a 
few pages." 

'-^— [Prayers and hymns in the Passa- 
maquoddy language. ] 

Manuscript; 2 p. 11. pp. 1-57, 8m.40; bound in 
boards. Several pagea are filled with Latin 
and French hymna, and a few with musical 
notation. The recto of the first preliminary 
leaf contains thia note: *' Pleaaant Point le 30 
Avril 1841. Louia Edmond Demilier." On the 
recto of the aecond preliminary leaf is the fol- 
lowing in Paasamaquoddy: Nya Marguaritte 
Joseph Marie hStohi pabattemi sikhighen, mbd 



Demillier (L. E.) — Con tinned. 

pemighetek | Nec8tamk8ak oquemoltsin kesaa- 
ktekB uainsk | tael eakSnadek ; keaaena t6debi8 
8enota8hi | ghitmSaghen. 1830. | Kiai tSnaiaaa 
P. Edmond Demillier | Alnambi6 Patliano. | 
Fr. Edmond Demillier. 

A abort cateohiam in Penobaoot begins on p. 
47 with the heading '*Cabattem8i Gh6kim- 
sote." 

Thia manuacript ia now in poaaeaaion of Rev. 
M. C. O'Brien, St Mary'a Church, Bangor, 
Maine, who kindly forwarded it to me for ex- 
amination. 

** In 1833 the Society of Picpua, a congregation 
of the third order of St Francis, sent out 
Meaara. Edmund Demilier and Petithomme, 
deatined to reatore the Franciaoau miasions in 
Maine. They arrived at Boston while the 
Bishop waa ereoting the monument of Father 
Rale, and on hia return proceeded to Pleaaant 
Point, and began their labora. Finding but 
one Penobacot able to apeak French, they com- 
menced the atudy of the native language ; De- 
milier at the villagea, Petithomme in their 
winter camp. They continued their miaaion 
with great profit, and early in 1834 the biahop, 
now posaeaaed of a manuacript prayer-book of 
Mr. Romagn6, had it printed, and thua Cacili- 
tated the labora of the miaaionary achool. 

" In the apring Mr. Petithomme received an- 
other deatination and Demilier was left alone. 
Hia atudy of the language waa moat suoceaa- 
ful; he waa soon able to confess his penitents 
in Abnaki, and when the biahop next viaited 
the miaaion he could not withhold the exprea- 
aion of hia aatoniahment at the facility with 
which the father preached in hia newly-acquired 
language. Turning hia knowledge to account. 
Father Demilier drew up a new prayer* book, 
the printed one being very erroneoua, and alao 
translated the Quebec catechism. 

** Under his care the mission took a new form. 
Many vices were abolished and some improve- 
ment made in the social well-being of theae 
Indian Catholioa, while the regularity of divine 
worship did much to restore their former piety. 

"Notwithatanding the inaignificanoe of hia 
miaaion in numbers, Mr. Demilier devoted him- 
aelf to it without a murmur till hia death on 
the 23d of July, 1843, when his flock lost a kind 
and aelfaacrificing pastor. "—jSAcs. 

Denoke (Christian Frederick). Essay | 
of a I Chippaway-Iudian | spelling- 
book, I by I Christian F. Denke [«io], | 
Missionary among the Chipuway [tic] 
•Indians. | 

Easton: | Printed by Samael Long- 
cope. I 1803. 

Title verao blank 1 L note (sonndt. Sec) 
verao blank 1 1. text pp. 5-29, am. 89. 
Copies ieen: Trumbull. 

Nek I nechenenawachgissitachik | 

bambilak | iiaga | gesohieohauohsit- 



ALOONQUIAM LANGUAGES. 



Ill 



Denoke (C.F.)— Continaed. 
panna | Johanneasa | elekhangnp. | 
Gisohitak elleaiechsiiik, | ontschi C. F. 
Denoke. | 

New-Tork : | printed for the Ameri- 
can bible society. | D. Faushaw, 
Printer. | 1818. 

Second tUU : The | three epistles i of the | 
apoetle John. | Translated into Delaware In- 
dian, I by C. F. Denoke. | 

New- York : | printed for the American bible 
aociety. | D. Fanshaw, Printer. 1 1818. 

Delaware title verso L 1 (p. 1), Enj^liah title 
recto L 2 (p. 1), text pp. 2-21. 2-21, double nam- 
bers, alternate Delaware and English, 18^. 

Copies teen: Congress, Danbar, Eames, 
Pilling, Powell, Trurabnll, Wisconsin Historic- 
al Society. 

Priced by Trflbner A co. 1856 catalogne, no. 
MO, U. ; at the Fischer sale, catalogue no. 2298, 
a copy brought Se. ; at the Field sale, catalogue 
no. 612, $2. Priced by Leclerc, 1878, no. 2525, 
40 tt. ; at the Brinle3' sale, catalogue no. 5704, Ave 
copies bronght $1.50 ; at the Murphy sale, cata- 
logue no. 2953, it brought $1 . Priced by Clarke 
Sc CO. 1886 catalogue, no. 6730, $1 ; and by Mai- 
sonneure. in 1880, 50 tr. 

Extracts fh>m this work will be found in 
Home (T. H.), Manual of bibliography; also in 
Bupp (S. D.), History of the counties of Berks 
and Lebanon. 

In mentioning the above work, Bagster't 
Bible in every land adds: "He afterwards 
furnished a version of the gospels of St John 
and St. Matthew, and an edition of these por- 
tions, printed in parallel columns, with English 
version, was published by that society." 

(, ] Eluwiwalikil Elekhasigil | enda 

lekhasik | Lamoe niiiutsehi elekil, | eki 
gisohelendasike Pemhakamigek, nane 
nndach li ahanhoqui | elekil teek pe- 
tschi Patamauet Meniechink nek Is- 
raelitschik, enda | pachtit pemameek 
kikhigan elewundasik wundamawaoh- 
towoaganii | haki Canaan, nane shaki 
wdelekhamenep nega Moschischa. | 
petschi enda allalehellechet. | [One 
line Scriptnre qnotation.] | Netamie- 
cbink Mamalekhikan. | I. 

Manuscript; title verso scriptnre verses 1 1. 
prefkce signed "Kimachitowa Denke Scheyja- 
nnppeqne Ontario enda petschimnijank enda 
luwanamixauk Anikii gischooch (Jany.) 20, 
1814" 1 1. 1 b]ank 1. text pp. 1-387, contenU 3 II. 
verso of the third blank, sm. 4^. Entirely in 

. the Delaware language; nicely written, well 
preserved; bound. Scripture narratives in the 
Delaware language. It belongs to the Moravian 
Mission, Fairfield, Canada, and was loaned to 
Mr. J. W. Jordan of the Pennsylvania Hist 
0PO. who kindly allowed me to inspect it 



Dencke (C.F.) — Continued. 
[Dictionary of the Delaware lan- 
guage.] (•) 

Manosoript, oblong octavo, comprising about 
8700 words, in the Moravian archives at Beth- 
lehem, Pa. Mr. John W. Jordan, of the Penn. 
Hist Soc'. Philadelphia, some time since called 
my attention to this manuscript He informs 
me that the handwriting of the manuscript is 
the Rev. L. F. Kampman's, but that that gen- 
tleman said he did not prepare it, but must have 
made the copy from the original manuscript 
when a missionary to the Indians at Fairfield, 
Canada, and that it was probably prepared by 
Dencke or Luckenbach. This is since con- 
flrme<l by Dr. Brinton in the following nute in 
his work entitled "The LenAp^ and their 
legends." p. 84: 

"After the war of 1812, the Moravian brother. 
Rev. C. F. Dencke, who ten years before had at- 
tempted to teach the Gospel to the Chipeways, 
gathered together the scattered converts among 
the Delawares at New Fairfield, Canada West 
In 1818 he completed and forwarded to the 
Publication Board of the American Bible So- 
ciety a translation of the Epistles of John, which 
was published the same year. 

" He also stated to the Board that at that time 
(1818) he had finished a translation of John's 
Gospel and commoncod thatof Matthew, both of 
which he expected to send to the Board in that 
year. A donadou of one hundred dollars was 
made to him to encourage him in his work, but 
for some reason the prosecution of his work 
was suspended and the translation of the Gros- 
pels never appeared*)[contrary to the statements 
in some bibliographies). 

"It is probable that Mr. Dencke was the 
compiler of the Delaware Dictionary which is 
preserved in the Moravian Archives at Beth- 
lehem. The MS. is an oblong octavo, in a fine 
but beautifully clear hand, and comprises about 
3700 words. The handwriting is that of the late 
Rev. Mr. Kampman, from 1810 to 1842 mission- 
ary to the Delaware:* on the Canada Reserva- 
tion. On inquiring the circumstances connected 
with this MS., bo stated to me that it was writ- 
ten at the period named and was a copy or some 
older work, probably by Mr. Dencke, but of this 
he was not certain. 

" While the greater part of this dictionary is 
identic-al in wordn and rendering with the sec- 
ond edition of Zeisberger's 'Spelling Book' 
(with which I have carefully compared it), it 
also includes a number of other words, and the 
whole is arranged in accurate alphabetical or- 
der. 

"Mr. Dencke al.io prepared a grammar of 

the Delaware, as I am informed by his old per- 
sonal friend. Rev. F. R. Holland, of Hope, In- 
diana; but the most persistent inquiry through 
residents at Salem, N. C, where he died in 1839, 
and at the Missionary Archives at Bethlehem, 
Pa., and Moravian town, Canada, have failed 
to furnish me a clue to its whereabouts. I fear 



112 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Denoke (C. F.) — Coutinued. 

tliat this precioas document was * sold as paper 
stock,' as I am informed were most of the um. 
which he left at his decease; a sad instance 
of the total absence of intelligent interest in 
auchsabjects in our country." 

This manascript has been pablished, with ad- 
ditions from a number of sources, under the edi- 
torship of Brinton (D.O.) and Anthonj (A.S.) 

Denig ( E. T. ) Vocabulary of the Black- 
foot, by E. T. Denig, Indian agent, Fort 
Union. 

Manuscript^ 7 pp. folio, in the library of the 
Bureau of Ethnology. * ' From a manuscript in 
posseitsion of Dr. Hajden." 

Contains about 70 words. 
Denny ( Major Ebenezer). Military Jour- 
nal of Major Ebenezer Denny. 

In Pennsylvania Hist 8oc. Mem. vol. 7, pp. 
237-485, Philadelphia. 1800, 8o. 

Vocabulary of words in use with the Dela- 
ware Indians (Fort Mcintosh, Jan. 1785), pp. 
478-481.— Vocabulary of the Shawanese (Fort 
Finney, Jan. 1786), pp. 481-485. 
Issued separately as follows: 

Military Journal | of | Major Ebe- 
nezer Denny, | An Officer in the Revo- 
Intionary and Indian Wars. | With an 
I introductory memoir. | [Quotation, 
three lines.] | • 

Philadelphia: | J. B. Lippincott & 
CO. i for the i Historical Society of Penn- 
sylvania. I 1859. 

Portrait 1 L title verso oop;pright 1 L t«xt pp. 
8-205, appendices j>p.207-281, notes pp.282-288, 8°. 

Linguistics as under title above, pp. 274-281. 

Copies teen: Boston A thenwum. 

Denton (Daniel). A | brief description 
I of I New York, | formerly called | 
New Netherlands | with the places 
thereunto a4joining. : Likewise , a brief 
relation | of the customs of the Indians 
there | by Daniel Denton. | A new edi- 
tion with an introduction and copions 
historical notes. | By Gabriel Furman, 
I Member of the New York liistorical 
society. | [Quotations, eighteen lines.] | 

New York: | William Gowans. | 1845. 

4 p. IL pp. 10-17, 2 11. pp. 1-57, 80. Forms voL 
1 of Gk>¥ran8*s Bibliothoca Americana. 

Schoolcraft (H. R.), Indian names of the 
islands and bay of New York. pp. 23-27. 

Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Con- 
gress, Dunbar, Eames, Watkinson. 

At the Field sale, catalogue no. 515, a copy 
brought $1.63. 

The original edition, London, 1670. contains 
no linguistics. (British Museum, Lenox.) 

D6p^et {Phe £lie). Oeuvres algon- 
qoines | M. Elie de D^p^ret, pretre dft 



D^p^ret (£.) — Continued. 
Sem. de St. Snip. | tome 1^ contenant : 
I Cateohisme. | Grammaire | De 1& 
communion | Actes 

M«iuscript; modem title as above yorso 
blank 1 1. t<?xt 52 unnumbered 11. i^; bound in 
skin. In the archives of the mission at Lao 
des Deux Montagues (Oka), Canada. 

The first leaf of the text is headed : Cate- 
ohisme en algonquin, which extends through 14 
IL At the top of the 15th 1. is the heading : 
Les principes De La Langue Algonquine, the 
text uf which runs through 34 IL the verso of 
the last blank. Then follows: "Instruction 
sur le saciement de renchariste on de la com- 
munion, 3 11 ; then one leaf the recto of which 
is blank, and on the verso : Actes des vertuea 
theologales. Sec 

[ ] Ji** volume. Exhortationes con- 

tenues dans ce liure. 

Manuscript; mo<iem heading as above fol- 
lowed by a list of the sermons, which occnpiea 
3 pp. text 120 11. of which 12 (interspersed) 
are blank. The text begins on the verso of the 
2d Lwith the heading: "Sur Teducation que 
les peres et les meres doivent donner aleurs en- 
fans. On the inside of the front cover is writ- 
ten: "Par Mr Deperet pretre 1743, M. Slie 
Deperet, Sulpicien mission. " 

In the archives of the mission at Lac des 
Deux Montagues (Oka), Canada. 

M. £lie D6p^ret, a priest of St. Sulplce, 
was born in the diocese of Limoges, France, in 
1690. lie came to Canada in 1714, was mission- 
ary to the Algonkins at tie aux Tourtes, then 
at Lao des Deux Montagnes, then at La Galette 
(now Ogdensburg), where he replaced the 
Abb6 Piquet during the visit of the latter to 
France in 1753-1754. He died April 17. 1757, 
while curate of Ste. Anne dn Bout de I'tle. 

He is also the author of a number of manu- 
script works in the Mohawk language, titles of 
which will be found in the Bibliography of the 
Iroquolau languages. 

[De Peyster (CoL Arent Schuyler).] 
Miscellanies, by An Officer, j Volume 1. 1 

Dumfries. | Printed at the Dumfries 
and Galloway Courier Office, | by C. 
Mnnro, | 1813. 

Title verso blank 1 L advertisement verso 
blank 1 1. contents pp. 5-8, half-title 1 1. text 
pp. 1 1-277, i°. Privately printed in an edition 
of " a few copies.** No more published. 

Words selected fh>m the Ottawa and Chip- 
pewa languages (a vocabulary of 183 words), 
pp. 271-277.— In the notes to the miscellaniflS 
are many Indian words with translation. 

Copies seen: TrumbulL 

Derenthal (Bev. Odoric). [Sermons for 

Sundays and holidays, in Menomo- 

nee.] C) 

Manuscript; 120 sermons, sketched and 

elaborated, aggregating over 800 qoorto pages. 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAOES. 



113 



Derenthal (O. ) — Con tinned. 

[Vocabnlary of the Chippewa lan- 
guage.] (•) 
Manascript, 71 pp. 4^. Compiled previoas 
to 1885. 

[Vocabulary of the Menomonee lan- 
guage. 1886!] (•) 
ICaaascript, 32 pp. 4<'. 

— [Bible history translated from Chip- 
pewa into Menomonee. 1887 T] (*) 

Hannscript. The four manascripto titled 
above are in possesaion of their aathor, who 
kindly famiahed me these meager descriptions 
of them. 

Father Odoric Derenthal, O. S. F., was bom 
at Boesebeck, Westphalia, Germany ; began his 
Btndies in his native conntry, and came to 
America in the sammer of 1875; completed his 
stadiesat Quinoy, IlL, and St. LouIa, &iCo. Or- 
dained priest in 1880, he went to the Chippewa 
missions aroand Superior, Wisconsin, in An* 
gust, 1881, and labored there foor years, open- 
ing a number of new missions ; was transferred 
to Keshena, Wisconsin, in July, 1885, and has 
since had charge of the mission and of St Jo- 
seph's Indian industrial boarding school at that 
place. 

DeSchweinitz(Bi«Aap Edmund.) The | 
life and times | of | David Zeisberger | 
the western pioneer and apostle of the 
Indians. I By I Edmund De Schweinitz. | 

Philadelphia: | J. B. Lippincott & 
CO. I 1870. 

Title verso copyright 1 1. preface pp. iii-vi, 
abbreviations p. vii, contents pp. ix-xii, text 
pp. 13-4197, appendix pp. 898-700, geographical 
glossary pp. 701-715, index pp. 717-747, S''. 

The literary works of David Zeisberger (a 
list of printed and manuscript works), pp. 686- 
692. 

CfapieMieen: Congress. 

DeSmet {Rev. Peter John). See Smet 
(P. J. de). 

Dezter {Btv, Henry Martyn). The New 
England Indians. By Rev. Henry M. 
Dexter, D. D. 

In the Sabbath at Home, vol. 2, pp. 193-206, 
Boston [1868], 9P. (Powell.) 

List of garments (7 words flrom Roger Wil- 
liams), p. 197. — Numerals 1-20 (from Wood and 
Williams), p. 203.'-Native terms passim. 

— Early missionary labors among the 
Indians of the Massachasetts Colony. 
By Rev. Henry M. Dexter, D. D. 

In the Sabbath at Home, vol. 2, pp. 272-281, 
332-839, 385-897, 461-474, Boston [1868J, 8o. 
(Powell.) 

Two short pn^rers in Hassachusetts and 
EogUah, p. 280. -Indian title of Sliot's bible, 
with English translation {ttom O'Callaghaa), 

ALG- 8 



Dexter (H. M.)— Continned. 

p. 473.— On p. 472 is given a list (not purporting 
to be complete) of 21 Indian works issued f^m 
the Cambridge press at the expense of the 
Propagation Society. 

Dictionary of the Hudson Bay Indian 
language. See Bowrey (T.) 

Dictionary: 

Abnaki See Abnaki. 

Abnaki Aub6ry (J.) 

Abnaki Lesneur ( F. E. ) 

Abnaki Mathevet (J. C.) 

Abnaki Nud^nans (J. B.) 

Abnaki Rasles (S.) 

Abnaki Yetromile (E.) 

Algonqnian Algonquian. 

Algonqnian Andr6 (L.) 

Algonquian Cnoq ( J. A. ) 

Algonqnian Lahontan (A. L. de). 

Algonquian Schoolcraft (H. R.) 

Algonquian Thavenet (— ) 

Algonqnian White (A.) 

Blackfoot Lacombe (A.) 

Blackfoot McLean (J.) 

Blackfoot Tims (J. W.) 

Chippewa Baraga iF.) 

Chippewa Baraga (F.) and Bel- 
court (G. A.) 

Chippewa Belcourt (G. A.) 

Chippewa F^rard (M.) 

Chippewa • Wilson (E. F.) 

Cree Locorabe (A.) 

Cree V6gT6ville (V.T.) 

Cree Watkins (E. A.) 

Delaware Alexander (J. U.) 

Delaware ' Brinton (D.G. ) and 

Anthony (A. 8.) 

Delaware Campanius (J.) 

Delaware Dencke (C. F.) 

Delaware Ettwein (J.) 

Delaware Henry (M.S.) 

Delaware Zeisberger (D.) 

Etchemin Demillier (L. E.) 

Hudson Bay Bowrey (T.) 

Illinois Gravier (J.) 

Illinois Le Bonlangor (J. L) 

Massachusetts Trumbull (J. H.) 

Menomonee Krake (B.) 

Microac Rand (S. T.) 

Montagnais Favre(B.) 

Montagnais Laure (P.) 

Montagnais Silvy (A.) 

Ottawa Jaunay (P. du). 

Pottawotomi Bourassa (J. N.) 

Pottawotomi Gailland (M.) 

Pottawotomi Pottawotomi. 

Virginia Strachey (W.) 

Dictionnaire et giammaire * * Crise. 
See Lacombe (A.) 

Dodge (J. Richards). Red men of the 
Ohio valley : | an | aboriginal history | 
of the I period commencing A. D. 1650, 
aftd ending at the treaty of | Greenville, 



114 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Dodge (J. R.) — CoDtinned. 
A. D. 1795; embracing notable facts 
and I thrilling incidents in the settle- 
ment by the | whites of the states of 
Kentucky, Ohio, | Indiana and Illinois. 
I By J. d. Dodge. | Editorof the Amer- 
ican Ruralist. | 
Springfielcl, O. : | Ruralist publishing 

company. | lyCO. 

Frontinpiece 1 L title verso copyright 1 1. pre- 
face pp. v-vi, coDteDtA pp. vii-x, text pp. 13-435, 
a(lvcrtiiw>nii>Dt p. 430, 12°. 

Vocabulary of the Shawnee langoage (fh>in 
Johnston (J.) in American Ant. Soc. Trans, 
vol. 2). pp. 51-00. 

Copies seen : Aster, Congress, Dunbar. 

Dodge {Col. Richard Irving). Our wild 
Indians: | thirty-three years' personal 
experience | among the | Red Men of 
the Great West. | A popular account of 
I their social life, religion, habits, traits, 
customs, exploits, etc. | with | Thrill- 
ing Adventures and Experiences | on 
the great plains and in the mountains 
I of our wide frontier. | By | colonel 
Richard Irving Dodge, | United Slates 
army. | Aid-de-camp to general Sher- 
man. I With an introduction | By gen- 
eral Sherman. | Fully Illustrated with 
Portraits on Steel, Full-page Engrav- 
ings on Wood, I and Fine Chromo-Litho- 
graph Plates. | 

Hartford, Conn. : | A. D. Worthing- 
ton and company. | A. G. Nettleton &, 
CO., Chicago, 111. N. D. Thompson <& 
CO., St. Louis, Mo. I C. C. Wick & co., 
Cleveland, O. W. E. Dibble & co., Cin- 
cinnati, O. I A. L. Bancroft & co., San 
Francisco, Cal. | 1882. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright 1 1. 
dedication verso blanlc 1 1. preface pp. v-vi, !!• 
lustrations pp. vii-xii, contents pp. xiii-zxxiii, 
introduction by Gen. Sherman pp. xzxv-xxxix, 
text pp. 29-650, SP, 

Wonderful diversity of the Indian languages, 
pp. 44-48. — Indian names, their meaning and 
significance, pp. 220-228. — Cheyenne names of 
the larger streams of the Plains, p. 231.— Chey- 
enne songs, with English translation, pp. 352- 
853.— Dance songs with music, pp. 354-355.— 
The sign language with vocabulary, pp. 379-391. 

Copies seen: Astor, British Museum, Con- 
gress, Geological Survey, National Museum, 
Powell. 

Richard Irving Dodge, soldier , bom in Honts- 
ville, N. C, 19 May, 1827. He was graduated at 
the n. S. Military Academy in 1848. assigned to 
the 8th infantry, and after serving at various 
posts was promoted to captain, 3 May, 1801. 



Dodge (R. I.) — Continued. 

He commanded the camp of instruction at El- 
mira, N. Y., in August and September, 1861, 
and served as mustering and disbursing officer 
at various places during the civil war. He was 
assistant inspector-general of the 4th army 
corps in 1803, and promoted to m^jor, 21 June, 
1804. He was member of a board to perfect a 
system of army regulations in New York City 
in 1871-'2; was promoted to lieutenant-colonel 
on 29 Oct., 1873, and since that time has served 
against hostile Indians in the west. He was 
made colonel of the Uth infantry on 20 June, 
lS82.—AppUton's Cyclop, of Am.Biog. 

Domenech {Abh4 Emanuel Henri Dien- 
donu6). Seven years* residence | in 
the great | deserts of North America | 
by the | Abb^ Em. Domenech | Apos- 
tolical Missionary : Canon of Montpel- 
lier: Member of the Pontifical Acad- 
emy Tiberina, | and of the (Geograph- 
ical and Ethnographical Societies of 
France^&c, Illustrated with fifty-eight 
woodcuts by A. Joliet, three | plates of 
ancient Indian music, and a map show- 
ing the actual situation of | the Indian 
tribes and the country described by the 
author | In Two Volumes | Vol. I[-II].| 

London | Longman, Green, Longman, 
and Roberts | 1860. | The right of trans- 
lation is reserved. 

2 vols. 8°. 

List of Indian tribes of North America, voL 
1, pp. 440-445.— Vocabularies 6lc. vol. 2, pp. 104> 
189, contain 84 words of Menomouee, Miami, 
Ojibbeway, Ricoaree, Shawnee, and Shyenne. 

Copiesseen: Astor, Boston Athenteom, Brit- 
ish Museum, Congress, Watkinson. 

At the Field sale a copy, no. 550, brought $2.37, 
and at the Pinart sale, no. 328, tt, Clarke & 
CO. 1880, no. 5415, price a copy fS. 

Emanuel Henri Dieudonn^ Domenech, French 
author, bom in Lyons, France, November i, 
1825 ; died io France in June. 1880. He became 
a priest in the Roman Catholic church, and 
was sent as a missionary to Texas and Mexico. 
During Maximilian's residence in America, 
Domenech acted as private chaplain to the em- 
peror, and he was also almoner to the French 
arm}' during its occupation of Mexico. On his 
return to France he was made honorary canon 
of Montpellier. His "Manusorit piotographi- 
qne Am6ricain, pr6c6d6 d'one notice tar rid6o- 
graphic des Peaux Rouges" (1800), was pub- 
lished by the French government, with a fiso- 
simile of a manuscript in the library of the 
Paris arsenal, relating, as he claimed, to the 
American Indians ; but the German orientalist, 
Julius Petzholdt, declared that it consisted only 
of scribbling and incoherent illustratlona of a 
local German dialect. Domenech maintained the 
authenticity of the manuscript in a pamphlet 
entitled " La v6rit6 sur le livre dea saoragea** 



Beschryvinge 

NIEUVV- NEDERLANT 

3egtijp£Q<lc de Nature, Aert, gelegencLeyt en vrachfr 

tnemeytTanliet IHtc Lmt i mit^adeis de pcoffi)tclgcke en- 

degeffciiftetDeTallea«die«UfleE totaiulcrlifmtdnMeiU(:h£a,i({bo 

iijtIiaer&lTeiiBlsnnbuyteiiiligebraait) geromlenworcloii. 

A L t M B D ■ 

mtmaaitte m ooCftemej'ttt eKgeuOB^m 

Ecn byibnder rerhael vanden Tonderlijekeii Aect 

aide het Weefen da B E y B R. S > 

Dabs. Nocb Bi Gsvobobt Is 

tfffilMiMmt0OberOei|4QltlttbeptbatlNieuwNederlattdt» 
tUfTdEiat emNedalmdts Patriot , Ofltt em 

Miemr Nederiandcr. 

A D K I A E N vander D O N C K, 

Bcydcr Rechten Do&oor, die tra^ciiwoo> 

digh Doch ia Nieow Ncdeitaot is. 




fAEMSTELD AM, 



f$|] Even Nieuwcnhofj fSo^-ISSJ^iOCttitSl tDOOtlttttttfltt'l 



C-SIMILE OF THE TITLE-PAOE OF D 



K'S NIEUW-NEDEOLANT. 



Bbschryving. 

Van, 



enyruchtbaofaeyt 

' lie 



NIEUVV NEDERLANT. 

BegnjpendedleKature,Aett7g:e(egentheytenTnicIi 

aUairbPt ondeiiiciudt^^fenfchaL . (foo iiyt h^er&haialsvxn bt^tKi n^- 
taadit) gcTcmdenwQidei^AlsnemdeinatiierBcnongemnme^^ 
pen vande'Vniden ofie Katardlen vanden Lflode. Ea& eentrafinw&veriiaq 
vandcnvrondediickciLAeiteiidchetWeelaider'BIiiVB^. 

iUft^mRllKedetlaiKlbPaMot, enDemtNieowNctkrltoite, 

A D R I A B N vanAr ^ O N C Kj 
BeyderRMhteuDofi»ar,dietegcnwoaR]i^ 

noclf inMieuwJIedeilMiAif - 
£ir hirr oAter iygm^t 







p Evert Nieawcnhof 3Bl)«J^erftOI)JIW/tt>«OnertW» 
'tRo(timi)tAit't,S[foijf-bi)eA/-AiiMo 1 655. 



OF CONGRESS. 



ALOONQniAN LANOUAGES. 



115 



Domeneoh (E. H. D.) — Continaed. 
(1861), whioh drew forth * reply from PeUholdt, 
translated into French under the title of " Le 
livre dee sanvagea an point de me de la civili- 
sation Fran9ai«e" (BrosaeU, 1S61). —Aj^^tan'i 
Oydop. €f Am. Biog. 

Donaldson (Thomas). See Catlin (G.) 

Donck (Adriaen van der). Beschryvinge 
I Van I Nieuvv-Nederlant | (Ghelijck 
het tej^enwoordigh in Staet is) | Begrij- 
pende de Nature, Aert, gelegeuthey t en 
vrncht- | baerheyt van het selve Lant; 
mltsgaders de proffijtelijcke en- | de 
gewenste toevallen, die aldaer tot on- 
derhont der Menscheni (soo | uyt haer 
selven als van buyten ingebracht) ge- 
Yondenworden. i AlsMede | Demaniere 
en onghemeyne eygenschappen | vande 
Wilden ofte Naturellen vanden Lande. 
I Ende | Een bysouder verhael vanden 
wonderlijcken Aert | ende het Weesen 
der Bevers, | Daer Noch By Gevoeght 
Is I Een Discours over de gelegentheyt 
van Nieuw Nederlandt, | tusscheii eei^ 
Nederlandts Patriot, ende een | Nieuw 
Nederlander. | Beschreven door | Adriaen 
vander Donck, | Beyder Rechten Doc- 
toor, die tegheuwoor- | digh nooh in 
Nieuw Nederlant is. | [Design.] | 

t'Aemsteldam, | By Evert Nieuwen- 
hof, Boeck-verkooper, woouende op't | 
Ruslandt in 't Sohrijf-boeck, Anno 1655. 

Title verso licenses 1 1. dedication to the 
bargomasters of Amsterdam 1 I. dedication to 
the West India Company 1 I. Inleydinge and 
poem 1 L text pp. 1-100, register 3 pp. i°. See 
the fac-simile of the title-page. 

Comments o j the Manhatten, Minqaa, Saya- 
noos, and Wappanoos, p. 67. 

Copiet teen: Lenox. 

At the Brinley sale two copies were disposed 
of, nos. 2718 and 2719, one bringing $85, the other 
$82.60. The Murphy copy, no. 2569, half-mo- 
rocoo, bronght $55. Qiiaritch, no. 29635, prices 
a ** fine, large, clean, and perfect copy, vellum " 
182., a note stating : * ' Copies for the last 40 years 
have nsoally sold from 121. to 21{." 

An edition of the same date with title-page 
differing from the above as follows: 

Beschryvinge | Van | Nieuw Neder- 
lant. I (Gelijok het tegenwoordigh in 
Staet is) | Begrijpende de Nature, Aert, 
gelegentheyt en vruohtbaerheyt | van 
bet selve Landt ; mitsgaders de profflj- 
telijoke ende gewenste toevallen die | 
aldaer tot onderhoudt der Mensohen, 
(soo uyt haer selven als van buyten 
inge- 1 bracht) gevouden worden. Also 



Donok (A. van der) — Continued, 
mede de maniere en ongemeyne Eygen- 
sohap- 1 pen vande Wilden ofte Natu- 
rellen vanden Lande. Endee en by sen- 
der verhael | vanden wonderiycken Aert 
ende het Weesen der bevers. | Daer 
noch by- gevoeght is | Een Discours over 
de gelegentheyt van Nieuw-Nederlandt, 
I tusschen een Nederlandts Patriot, 
ende een Nieuw Nederlander. | Beschre- 
ven door I Adriaen vander Donck, | 
Beyder Rechten Doctour,'die tegenwoor- 
digh I noch in Nieuw-Nederlandt is | 
En hier achter by gevoeght | Het voor- 
detligh Reglement vande Ed: Hoog, 
Achtbare | Heeren de Heeren Burger- 
meesteren deser Stede, | betreffende de 
saken van Nieuw Nederlandt. | Met een 
pertinent Kaertje van 't zelve Landt 
ver^iert, | en van veel druck-fouten ge- 
suyvert. | [Design.] | 

t'Aemsteldam | By Evert Nieuwenhof 
Boeck-verkooper, woonende op | 't Rus- 
tandt [«to], in 't Schr^f-Boeck, Anno 
1655. 

4 p. IL pp. 1-100, register 3 pp. map, 4^. See 
the fao-simile of the title-page. 

Comments on the Manhattan, Minqaa, Sava- 
noos, and Wappanoos, p. 67. 

Probably a flotitioos title-page made by pen 
or lithography from that of the 1650 edition, 
title of which Is given below. 

Oopietteen: Congress. 

Beschryvinge | Van | Nieuw-Neder- 

lant, I (Gelijck het tegenwoordigh in 
Sta^t is) I Begrijpende de Nature, Aert, 
gelegentheyt en vrucht baerheyt | van 
het selve Landt; mitsgaders de prof- 
fijtelijcke ende gewenste toevallen, die 

I aldaer tot onderhoudt der Menschen, 
(soo uyt haer selven als van buyten inge- 

I bracht)gevonden worden. Als mede 
de maniere en ongemeyne Eygenschap- 

I pen vande Wilden ofte Naturellen 
vanden Lande. Ende een bysonder 
verhael | vanden wonderiycken Aert 
ende het Weesen der bevers. | Daer 
noch by -gevoeght is | Een Discours over 
de gelegentheyt van Nieuw-Nederlandt, 

I tusschen een Nederlandts Patriot, 
ende een Nieuw Nederlander. | Beschre- 
ven door I Adriaen vander Donck, | 
Beyder Rechten Doctoor, die tegenwoor- 
digh I noch in Nieuw-Nederlandt is. | 
En hier achter by gevoeght | Het voor- 
deeligh Reglement vande Ed: Hoog. 



116 



BIBLIOGBAPUY OF THE 



Donok (A. van der) — Continued. 
Achtbare | Heeren de Heeren Burger- 
meesteren deser Stede, | betreffende de 
saken van Nieuw Nederlandt. | Den 
tweoden Druck. | Met een pertinent 
Kaertje van 't zelve Landt ver^iert, | 
en van veel druck-fouten gesuyvert. | 
[Design.] | 

t' Aemsteldam, | By Evert Nieuwen- 
hof, Boeek-verkooper, woonende op | 't 
Ruslandt, In't Schrg f-boeck, Anno 1656. 
I Met Privilegie voor 15 Jaren. 

4 p. 11 pp. 1-100, register 4 pp.Conditien 4 II. 
map, i°. 

Linguistloa as under previoas titles. 

CopieM iten: British Moseam, Congress, 
Lenox. 

The Fischer copy, no. 2318, sold for 171. 5«. ; 
the Field copy, no. 2420, $65; the Mensies copy, 
no. 800, "cmshedred levant morocoo, gilt top, 
oncat, excessively rare in ancut condition, "$00. 
Leclerc, 1878, na 866, prices a copy 200 tt. The 
Brinley copy, no. 2720, broaghtflOO, and the 
Murphy copy, no. 2750, $50. Qaaritoh, no. 20636, 
prices a fine, large, dean, vellum copy 12L 

Leclerc, 1878, no. 866, titles an edition of 1657. 
This, he informs me, is a typographic error. 

Description of the New Netherlands, 

by Adriaen van der Donck, J. U. D. 
Translated from the original Dutch [of 
the 1656 edition], by Hon. Jeremiah 
Johnson, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

In Kew York Hist Soc Coll. second series, 
vol. 1, pp. 125-242, New York, 1841, 8°. 

Of the different nations and languages, pp. 
20^-206. 

Issued separately, also, with a title-page, 
which is a translation of that of the 1656 edi- 
tion- (*) 

At the Menzies sale, no. 610, a copy of the 
separate, half green morocco, gilt top, brought 
$18. 
Dorsej: This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy 
of the work referred to has been seen hy the 
compiler in the possession of Rev. J. Owen Dor- 
sey, Washington, D. C. 

Doty (James D.) Vocabulary of the 
Menomenies. 

In Gallatin (A.), Synopsis of Indian trihes, in 
American Ant Soc. Trans, vol. 2, pp. 305-367, 
Cambridge, 1836, 8^. 

Doublet de Boisthibault (Francois 
Jules). Les voBUx I des I HaroDS et des 
Abnaquis | a notre-dame de Cbartres | 
publics poor la premiere fois | d'apres 
les manuscrits des archives d'Enre-et- 
Loir I avec | les lettres des mission- 
naires catholiques an Canada, | nne 



Donblet de Boisthibault (F. J.)— Con'd. 
introdnction et des notes | par | M. 
Doublet de Boisthibault. | [Figure and 
five lines quotation.] | 

Chartres | Nonry-Coquard, libraire 
I rue du Cheval-blanc, 26. | MDCCC 
LVII [1857] 

Half-title verso printers 1 1. title verso hlank 
1 1. introdnction pp. i-viii. 1 1. text pp. 1-50, 
notes pp. 51-80, table pp. 81-82, "ouvrages do 
m6me autenr " 1 p. colored plate, 12°. 

O Salntaris in Abnaki (nrom Rasles), p. 79. 

Copies teen: British Museum, Lenox, Shea, 
Trumbull 

Douoet (Rev, C.) See Lacombe (A.) 

Dougherty (Rev, Peter). A | Chippewa 
primer. | Compiled by the | Rev. Peter 
Dougherty. | Printed for the Board of 
foreign missions of the | Presbyterian 
church. I 

New- York : | John Westall, printer, 
29 Ann-street. I 1844. 



Title verso blank 1 1. a key to the spelling 
of the Indian pp. 3-4, text (generally in double 
columns and consisting for the most part of a 
vocabulary of words and phrases) pp. 5-84, 12o. 

Chpies teen: Boston Athenaeum, Congress. 

— A I Chippewa primer. | Compiled by 
the I Rev. Peter Dougherty. | Printed 
for the Board of foreign missions of 
the I Presbyterian church. | Second 
edition — enlarged. | 

New- York: | John Westall & co., 
printers, 11 Sornce street. | 1847. 

Title verso blank 1 1. a key to tbe spelling of 
the Indian pp. 3-4, text pp. 1-123, 12°. 

Includes a comprehensive Chippewa-Eng- 
lish vocabulary of words, phrases, and sen- 
tences. 

Copiet teen: Boston Athenfeum, Congress^ 
Massachusetts Historical Society. 

— The first | initiatory catechism, | By 
James Gall ; | with the | ten command* 
ments, | and the Lord's prayer : | trans- 
lated into OJibwa, | By the Rev. P. 
Dougherty. | Printed for the Board of 
foreign missions of the | Presbyterian 
church. I 

New York: | John Westall, printer. 
29, Ann-Street. | 1844. 

Title recto L 1 (p. 1), text (beginning on verso 
of title-page) pp. 2-24, alternate pages English 
and Ojibwa, 12°. 

Copiet teen : Boston AthensBum. 
For title of a later edition see Dougherty (P.> 
and Rodd (D.) on next page. 



ALGONQniAN LANGUAGES. 



117 



Dougherty (P.) — Continued. 

Vocabulary of the OJibwa of Grand 

Traverse Bay. 

In Schoolcraft (H. R.), Indian Tribes, vol.2, 
pp. 458-469, Philadelphia, 1852, 4°. 

CoutaiuH aboat 360 words. 

Reprinted in ITlrici (E.), Die Indianer Nord- 
Amerikas, p. 30, Dresden, 1867, 8°. 

Terms of relationship of the Qjibwa 

of Lake Michigan (Ojib wank) collected 
by Rev. P. Dougherty, missionary^Chip- 
pewa and Ottawa mission, Grand Trav- 
erse Bay, Mich. 

In Morgan (L. H.). Systems of consanf^uinity 
and affinity of the human family, pp. 293-382, 
lines 41, Washington, 1871, 4o. 

and Rodd (D.) Easy lessons | on 

I scripture history : | in the | Qjibwa 
language: | translated by | Rev. P. 
Dougherty, | aided by | D. Rodd. | 
Printed for the Board of foreign mis- 
sions of the I Presbyterian church. | 

Grand Traverse Bay. | 1847. | John 
Westall and co., printers, | 11 Spruce 
street. New- York. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso key 1 1. illustra- 
tion p. 3, text (alternate pages English and 
Ojibwa) pp. 4-69, 12o. 

Copies teen: Boston Athenteum, Congress. 

The first | initiatory catechism ; 

I by James Gall ; | with the | teu com- 
mandments I and the | Lord's prayer | in 
the I Ojibwa language: | translated by 

I Rev. P. Dougherty, | aided by | D. 
Rodd. I Printed for the Board of foreign 
missiousof the I Presbyterian church. | 
Grand Traverse Bay. | 1847. | John 
Westall and co., printers, | 11 Spruce 
street, New-York. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title recto 1. 2 (p. 3), text 
(beginning on the verso of title-page) pp. 4-69, 
alternate pogos English and Ojibwa, 16°. 

Catechism pp. 4-67. —Lord's prayer, pp. 68-69. 

Oopiet teen: Bostitn Atheneeum, Congress. 

For an earlier edition see Dongherty (P.) 



Short reading lessons | in the 

Ojibwa language ; \ translated by [ Rev. 
P. Dougherty, | aided by | D. Rodd. | 
Printed for the Board of foreign mis- 
sions of the I Presbyterian church. | 

Grand Traverse Bay. | 1847. | John 
Westall and co., printers, | 11 Spruce 
street. New York. 

Title verso key 1 1. p. 3 blank, text alternate 
pages English and Ojibwa pp. 4-95, 16^. 

Oopiet teen: Boston Atheneeam, Brinley, 
Congress, O'Callaghan, Yale. 



Dousman (George G.) See Lapham 
(I. A.) and others. 

Drake (Francis S.),e<7i/or. See School- 
craft (H. R.) 

Drake (Samuel Gardner). The | book of 
the Indians | of | North America : | 
comprisiug | details in the lives of about 
five hundred | chiefs and others, | the 
most distinguished among them. | Alsj, 
I ahistoryof their wars; their manners 
and customs; speeches of | orators, &c., 
from their first being known to | Euro- 
peans to the preseut time. | Exhibiting 
also an analysis of the most distin- 
guished authors | who have written 
upon the great question of the | first 
peopling of America. | [Picture of 
Indian and six lines quotation.] | By 
Samuel G. Drake, | member of the 
' New-Hampshire historical society. | 

Boston : j Published by Josiah Drake, 
I at the Antiquarian Bookstore, 56 
Cornhill. | 1833. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title as above 1 1. 1 other p. 1. 
pp. 1-22 (book I), 1-110 (book II). 1-124 (book 
III), 1-47 (book IV), 1-135 (book V). 

Lonrs prayer in the Mnhhekaneew language 
(from Edwards), book 2, p. 89; in Wampanoag 
(from Eliot's bible), book 3, p. 40. 

Copies teen : British Huseara. 

An earlier edition of this work, Indian Bi- 
ography, Boston, 1832, 8°, contains no lingois- 
tics. (Astor, Boston Athenaeum, Congress.) 

Biography and history | of the | In- 
dians of North America ; | comprising | 
a general account of them, | and | 
details in the lives of all the most 
distinguished chiefs, and | others, who 
have been noted, among the various | 
Indiun nations upon the continent. | 
Also, I a history of their wars; | their 
manners and customs; and the most 
celebrated speeches | of their orators, 
from their first being known to | Eu- 
ropeans to the present time. | Likewise | 
exhibiting an analysis | of the most 
distinguished, as well as absurd au- 
thors, who I have written upon the 
great question of the | first peopling of 
America. | [Picture of an Indian and 
six lines quotation.] | By Samuel G> 
Drake, | memberof the New Hampshire 
historical society. | Third Edition, | 
With large Additions and Corrections, 
and numerous Engravings. | 

Boston : I O. L. Perkins, 56 Cornhill, 
and Hilliard, Gray &, Co. | New York : 



118 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Drake (S. G.) — Continued. 
G. <& C. <& N. Carvill. | Philadelphia: 
Grigg & Elliot. I 1834. 

Engraved title '*The book of the IndiMis of 
North America " 1 1. printed title 1 1. dedica- 
tion 1 1, preface etc. pp. v-viii, text pp. 1-28, 
1-120, 1-132, 1-72, 1-168, 1 L indexes pp. 1-18, 
1-12, plates, 8°. 

Lord's praver in the liuhhelcaneewlanfcaage 
(fh>m Edwards), book 2, p. 89; in ^'ampanoaK 
(ftom Eliot), book 3, p. 40.— Specimen of the 
Tarratines, book 8, p. 129. 

Oopiet teen: Astor, British Maseum, Con- 
gress, Lenox, Wisconsin Historical Society. 

Some copies have the names Collins, Hannay 
A, Co. snbstitated for Q.Sl C.Sl N. Carvill in 
the imprint. (Astor, Congress.) 

Sabin'4 Dictionary, no. 20866, mentions the 
fifth edition, Boston, 1835, 6^. 

Biography and history | of the | In- 
dians of North America ; I comprising | 
a general account of them, | and | de- 
tails of the lives of all the most distin- 
guished chiefs, and | others, who have 
heen nott'd, among the various | Indian 
nations upon the continent. | Also, | a 
history of their wars ; | their manners 
and customs ; and the most celebrated 
speeches | of their orators, from their 
first being known to | Europeans to the 
present time. | Likewise | exhibiting 
an analysis | of the most distinguished, 
as well as absurh authors, who | have 
written upon the great question of the | 
first peopling of America. | [Picture 
of an Indian and six lines quotation.] 
I By Samuel G. Drake, | member of the 
New Hampshire historical society. | 
Fourth edition, | with large additions 
and corrections, and numerous engrav- 
ings. I 

Boston : | J. Drake, 56 Cornhill, | at 
the Antiquarian Institute. | 1836. 

Engraved title 1 L pp. i-vi, 1 1. pp. 1-4, 1-28, 
1-120. 1-132, 1-72, 1-158, 1-18, 1-12. plates, 8o. 

Linguistics as nnder title next preceding. 

Copiet teen : British Maaenm. 

-^— Biography and history | of the | In- 
dians of North America. | From its first 
discovery to the present time ; | com- 
prising I details in the lives of all the 
most distinguished chiefs and | counsel- 
lors, exploits of warriors, and the cele- 
brated I speeches of their orators ; | 
also, I a history of their wars, | massa- 
cres and depredations, as well as the 
wrongs and | sufferings which the 
Europeans and their | descendants have 



Drake (S. G.) — Continued, 
done them ; | with an account of their \ 
Antiquities, Manners and Customs, | 
Religion and Laws; | likewise | exhib- 
iting an analysis of the most distin- 
guishe<l, as well as absurd | authors^ 
who have written upon the great ques- 
tion of the I first peopling of America. | 
[Monogram and six lines quotation.] | 
By Samuel G. Drake. | Fifth Edition, | 
With large Additions and Corrections, 
and numerous Engravings. | 

Boston : | Antiquarian institute, 56 
Cornhill. 1 1836. 

Frontispiece 1 L titls verso copyright 1 L 
dedication verso advertisement 1 1. preface pp. 
v-vill, teble pp. Ix-xii, text pp. 1-48, 1-120, 1-144, 
1-88, 1-168, 8<). 

Lord's prayer in Mnhhekaneew, book 2, p. 
87; in Wampanoag, book 8, p. 45. — Specimen 
of the Tarratines. book 3, p. 137.~Lord's prayer 
in Shawnee (from Ameri<*-an Moseam), book 5, 
p. 127. 

Copies teen: Astor, British Moseam, Con- 
gress. 

A copy is priced by Qoaritch, no. 11968, 10«.^ 
and again, no. 29911, It. 6d. At the Murphy sale, 
no. 831, a copy, "calf extra, gilt edges, -with 
portrait of Mr. Drake Inserted, " bronght $3.75. 

Some copies are dated 1837. (Astor, Boreaa 
of Ethnology.) The "Seventh edition," " 1837," 
has title-page otherwise similar to the above. 
(Astor, Congress.) 

The I book of the Indians ; | or, | 

biography and history | of the ; Indiana 
of North America, | from its first dis- 
covery I to the year 1B41. I [Nine lines 
quotations.] | By Samuel G.Drake, | 
Fellow [&c. two lines.] | Eighth edi- 
tion, I With large Additions and Cor- 
rections. I 

Boston : | Antiquarian Bookstore, 56 
Cornhill. | M.DCCC.XLI [1841]. 

Pp. i-xii, 1-48, 1-120, 1-156, 1-156, 1-200, and 
index pp. 1-16, 9P. 

Lingnlstios as in fifth edition, titled next 
above. 

Oapist teen : Boston Atheneum, British Ma> 
seum, Congress. 

According to Sabin's Dictionary, no. 20688, 
there was a ninth edition, Boston, 1845. 748 pp. 
8^, and a tenth edition, Boston, MDCCCXI* 
(Vlin,8o. 

Biography and history | of the | In- 
dians of North America, | from its first 
discovery. | [Quotation, nine linos.] | 
By Samuel G. Drake. | Eleventh edi- 
tion. I 



ALGOMQUIAN LAN0UA0E8. 



119 



Drake (8. G.) — Continaed. 

Boston : | BeDJamin B. Massey & co. 
|M.DCCC.LI[1851]. 

Title veno copyright 1 L prefaces 1 L con- 
tents pp. 5-8, list of Indian tribes and nations 
pp. 9-16, teit pp. 17-4(96, appendix pp. 697-700, 
index pp. 701-720, plates, 8^. 

LinRnistios, as in fifth edition, pp. 151, 229- 
230. 321-322. 623. 

Copie*§een: British Masenro, Barnes, Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society, Wisconsin Histor- 
ical Society. 

— History | of the | Early Discovery of 
America, | and | Landing of the Pil- 
grims. I With a I Biography | of the | 
Indians of North America. | [Quotation^ 
nine lines.] | By Samuel G. Drake. | 

Boston : | Higgins and Bradley. | 
1854. (•) 

Pp. 1-720. pUtes, 8o. 

Linguistics, as in fifth edition, pp. 151,229- 
230, 321-322, 623. 

Title from Mr. Wilberforoe Eames. 

According to Sabin's Dictionary, no. 20868, 
there is an edition with the imprint Boston, 
Suibom, Carter & Bazin, 1857; and another 
Boston, 1858. 

— The I aboriginal races | of | North 
America; | comprising | biographical 
sketches of eminent individuals, | and | 

I an historical account of the different 
tribes, | from | the first discovery of the 
continent | to | the present period | 
with a dissertation on their | Origin, 
Antiquities, Manners and Customs, | 
illustrative narratives and anecdotes, { 
and a | copious analytical index | By 
Samuel G. Drake. | Fifteenth edition, 

I revised, with valuable additions, | by 
J. W. O'Neill. I Illustrated with Numer- 
ous Colored Steel-plate Engravings. | 
[Quotation, six lines.] | 

Philadelphia: | Charles Desilver, | 
No. 714 Chestnut street. | I860. 

Titio verso copyright 1 1. preface pp. 3-4, con- 
tents pp. 5-8, slpLabetic list pp. 0-16, text pp. 
17-716, index pp. 717-786, 8o. The Biography 
of the Indians with a new title-page. 

Linguistics as ander titles above. 

Oopiet seen : Astor, Congress. 

— — The I Aboriginal races | of | North 
America; | comprising | biographical 
sketches of eminent individuals, | and | 
an historical account of the different 
tribes, I from | the first discovery of the 
contineat | to | the present period | 
with a dissertation on their | Origin, 



Drake (S. G.) — Continued. 
Antiquities, Manners and Customs, | 
illustrative narratives and anecdotes, | 
and a | copious analytical index | by 
Samuel G. Drake. | Fifteenth edition, | 
revised, with valuable additions, | by 
Prof. H. L. Williams. | [Quotation, six 
lines.] I 

New York. | Harst & company, pub- 
lishers. I 122 Nassau Street. [1882.] 

Title verso copyright 1 1. preface pp. 3-4, 
contents pp. 5-8, Indian tribes and nations pp. 
9-16, half-title verso blank 1 1. text pp. 19-767, 
index pp. 768-787, 8^. 

Lingnistics as under previous titles, and in 
addition the following : 

Sqnier (E. G.), Historical and mythological 
traditions of the Algonquins, pp. 718-736. 

Copiet teen : Astor, Congress, Wisconsin His- 
torical Society. 

Clarke & co. 1886, no. 6377, price a copy 
13. 

The I old Indian | chronicle ; ; being 



a collection of excee<ling rare tracts | 
written and published in the time of 
King I Philip's war, by persons residing 
in I the country ; | to which are | now 
added marginal notes and I chronicles 
of the Indians | From the discovery of 
America to the present time. | By 8. G. 
Drake. | [Mouogram.] | 

Boston : | published at the ; Antiqua- 
rian Institute, 56 Comhill. | MDCCC- 
XXXVI [ia36]. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright 1 1. 
preface verso contents 1 1. text pp. 1-208, plates, 
16°. " Bnt 500 copies printed." 

Reprint of the Present state of New Bng* 
land. pp. 1-38. 

Copitt teen: Astor, Boston Athensenm, Brit- 
ish Mosenm, Congress. 

— The I Old Indian Chronicle; | being 
a collection of | exceeding rare tracts, 
I written and published in the | time 
of king Philip's war, | by persons re- 
siding in the country. | To which are 
now added an | Introduction and Notes, 
I By Sami^el G. Drake. | 

Boston : j Samuel A. Drake, 151 Wash- 
ington St I 1867. 

Title verso blank 1 L dedication verso blank 
1 1. prefietce pp. v-ix, contents verso blank 1 L 
text pp. 1-319, index pp. 321-3J8, ma*^, sm. iP. 

Reprint of the Present state of New England, 
pp. 119-169. 

Copiee teen : Astor, British Musenm, Con- 
gress, Eames, Massachusetts Historical Society. 



120 



BIBUOGBAPHY OF THE 



Dryasdust (Dr.) paeud, Indian names { 
along the southern border of Washing- | 
ton County [New York], 

In Waahington Coanty [N. Y.] Post, voL 16, 
no. 34, Aa^QBt 22, 1850. ( Powell.) 

Names of creeks, towna, etc. their etymol- 
ogy aud meaning. 

Dudley (Paul). English de&nitions of 
Indian terms from Panl Dudley's pa- 
pers; furnished by J. Wingate Thorn- 
ton. 

In Haine Hist Soo. CoL vol 5, pp. 425-420, 
PorUand, 1857, 9P. 

The Lord's prayer in the Indian tongue, riz : 
The Indiansof Norridgewock and Penobaoot in 
New England and Nova Scotia, pp. 427-428.— 
Description of Indian words f Algonkin, Nam- 
ganck, and Nalick] from Paul Dudley's mas. 
pp. 428-429. 

Dufo8s6(E.) Americana | Catalogue de 
livres | relatifs ii FAra^rique | Europe, 
Asie, Afrique | etOc^nie | [d^c. thirty- 
four lines. ] I 

Librairie ancienne et modeme de E. 
Dufos8<$ I 27, rue Gu^n^gaud, 27 | pr^s 
le Pont-neuf | Paris [ 1887] 

Printed cover as above, table des divisions 
1 L text pp. 175-422, 8P. 

Contains, passim, titles of works in varions 
Algonqnian langoages. 

Copies geen: Eames, Pilling. 

This series of catalogues was begun in 1870. 

Dunbar: This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy of 
the work referred to has been seen by the com- 
piler in*the library of Mr. John B. Donbar, 
Bloomfleld, N. J. 

Duncan (David). American races. Com- 
piled and abstracted by Professor Dun- 
can, M. A. 

Forms Part 6 of Spencer (H.), Descriptive 
sociology, London, 1878, folio. (Congress.) 

Under the heading "Language," pp. 40-42, 
there are given comments and extracts from 
varioas authors npon native tribes, including 
examples of the Cree and Chippeway. 

Some copies have the imprint New York, 
D. Appleton & co. [n. d.J (Powell.) 

Dunne ( Johu ). Notices relative to some 
of the native tribes of North America, 
by John Dunne, esq. 

In Royal Irish Acad. Trans, vol. 0, pp. 101- 
137, Dublin. 1803, 4P, (Congress. ) 

"Some imperfect strictures on Indian lan- 
guage," pp. 130-137, contains, in foot-notes, var- 
ious Algonkin place names, with deri vationa,and 
" some lines f Algonkin] which I wrote in Can- 
ada, not as Indian poetry, but as an arrangement 
of Indian words with some regard to measure, 
which will, at all events, frmish the ground- 



Dunne (J.) — Continued. 

work for a few remarks on the language." The 
lines are accompanied by a literal translation 
and followed by remarks on the derivation of 
the individnal worda. 

Duponoeau (Peter Stephen). Report of 
the correspording secretary to the com- 
mittee, of his progress in the investiga- 
tioD committed to him of the general 
charact'sr and forms of the languages 
of the Americau Indians. 

In American Philosoph. Soc. Trans, of the 
Hist, and Lit Com. voL 1, pp. xvii-xlvi, Phila- 
delphia, 1819. 8P. 

Treats of American languages generally, 
particular mention being made of the Karalit 
(Qreenland), Eskimaux, Delaware, and Iro- 
quois. A few examples of the last are given. 

Issued separately as follows: 

Report I made | to the Historical & 

literary committee | of the | American 
philosophical society, | held at Phila- 
delphia, for promoting | useful knowl- 
edge, I By their Corresponding Secre- 
tary, I stating I His Progress in the 
Investigation committed to Him, of the 
I General Character and Forms | of the 
I languagesof the American Indians. | 
Read in committee, | 12th January, 
1«19. 

Pp. 1-34, 8^. 

Linguistics as under title next above. 

Chpies teen : Boston Athenaeum, Eamea. 

Reviewed by Pickering (J.) in North Amer- 
ican Review, voL 9. pp. 179-187, Boston, 1810, ^ ; 
and in the Analectio Magazine, vol. 13, pp. 243- 
234. Philadelphia, 1819. 8°. (Congress.) 

Reprinted in Buchanan (J.), Sketches of the 
History of the North American Indians, pp. 
209-306. London, 1824, 8^ ; and in the American 
reprint of the same, voL 2, pp. 48-77, New York, 
1824, 2 vols. 8o. 

M^moire k Peffet de determiner le 

caract^re grammatical des langues de 
PAm^rique Septentrionale, connues 
sons les noms de Lenni Lenap^, Moh6- 
gan Chippeway, qui a obtenu le prix 
de linguistique h, PInstitnt de France 
fonde par M. de Volney. Par M. Pierre 
S. Du Ponceau. 
Paris. 1836. (•) 

8o. Title from Sabin's Dictionary, no. 21383. 

M<$moire | sur | le syst^me grammati- 
cal I des langues | de | quelques nations 
indiennes de PAm^rique | du nord ; | 
ouvrage qui, a la stance publique an- 
nuelle | de | Tlnstitut royal de France, 
I le 2 mai 1835, | a remport^ le prix 



ALQONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



121 



Dnponcean (P. S.)— Continued. 

fond^ par M. le comte de Volney ; | par 
M. P..£t. Da Ponceau, LL. D. | Presi- 
dent [dtc. six lines.] | 

Paris, I a la librairie d'A. Piban de 
la Forest | rue des Noyers, 37. | Gide, 1i- 
braire, I rue de Seine s. g. 6 bis. ! Dentu, 
libraire | au Palais-Boyal. | 1836. 

Hftlftitle 1 1. title yeno blank 1 1. ayertiMe* 
ment pp. y-xi, table pp. xili-3k,yi, preface pp. 
1-73, text pp. 75-464, 8°. 

M6iuoire ear le caractdre grammatioal dee Ian* 
gaes de VAui^rique du nord, conuues eoae lea 
noma de Lenni-L^nAp^. Mohftgan et Cbipp^- 
way (chaptera y-xx being deyoted to the Al- 
gonkin), pp. 75-2S6.— Appendix A. Yocabnlaire 
coroparatif dea langaea Algonqainea (Lenapi, 
from Hcckewelder) et Iroquuiaea (Onondi^a, 
from Zeiaberger), pp. 257-269.— Appendix B. 
Yocabnlaire comparatif etraiaonn6 aea langnoa 
de la faiuille Algonqnine (witb notea), pp. 271- 
411.— Rapport aor le camct^re g6n6ral et lea 
fbrmea graoimatlcaleade^ langaea Am6ricainea, 
fait an comJt6 d'hiatoiro et de litt^rature de la 
eoci6t6 philoaophiqiie Aiudricaine, par aon ae- 
cr6taire correapondant, pp. 413-464. 

Copies 9een: Boston Athenteuro, Congrena, 
Eamea, Harvard, Lenox. 

Trttbner. 1856, no. 632, prices a copy lOf. 6d. 
The Fischer copy, no. 2327, brought 9#. ; another 
copy, no. 2686, U. The Squire copy, no. 1051, 
half morocco, gilt top, uncut, aold fur $2. 50. Le- 
clerc, 1878, no. 2067, pricca it 10 fr. Qnaritch 
prioea the work aa follows: no. 12653, half 
bound, 1$. 6d. ; no. 12554, large paper, aewed, 
12ff. ; no. 30060, aewed, 5f ., boards, 6«. ; no. 30061, 
large paper, sewed, &«. The Ramirez copy, no. 
393, brou;;ht 8«. ; the Brinley copy, no. 5627, half 
leyant morocco, gilt, uncut, $2.25. TrUbner, 
1882, p. 3. prices it 10«. 6d.; Hiersemann, Leipaic, 
1890, 10 M. ; Maiaonneuye, 1889, 10 fr. 

— Notes and observations on Eliot's In- 
dian grammar, addressed to Jobn Pick- 
ering, esq., by Peter S. Du Pouceau. 

In Maasachusetts Hist. Soc. ColL second se 
riea, yol. 9, pp. i-xlvii [313-359], Boston. 1822. 8^. 

Supplementary to the reprint of Eliot's In- 
dian grammar, which is preceded by "Introduc- 
tory obaeryationa " by Picltering (J.) 

See Heckewelder (J. G. E.) and 

Duponceau (P. S.) 

Peter Stephen Duponceau, author, bom in 
France in 1760; died in Phihidelphia, Pa., in 
1844. Ho landed at Portemouth. N. H., in 1777, 
and waa attached to Baron St«uben'a ataff. Ho 
became a citizen of the United Statea in 1781, 
stadied law, and while practicing his profos- i 
aion translated aeyeral worka on law, and pnb- 
Uahed legal eaaaya. He waa the first to draw the 
Attention of acholars to the pbiloaophical and 
ethnological labors of early Catholic miaaiona- 



Daponceau (P. S.)~Con tinned. 

riea in thia country.— A|)p(0ton'« Oyelop, of Am. 
Biog. 

Duranqaet ( Rev, D. ) [Translation of the 
first part of Canon Sebmidt's bible his- 
tory into the Chippewa language.] (*) 

Mannacript. Title from the Bey. W. F. 
Qagnienr, S. J. Wikwemikung, Manitoolin 
Island, Ontario. Canada, March 15, 1890. Not 
haying it in hand he waa unable to giye me a 
detailed description. 

Duret (Claude). Thresor de | Thistoire 
des I langves de oest | Ynivers. | Conte- 
naut lesOrlgines, Beaut^s, Perfections, 
Decadences, Mutations, | Changemens, 
Conuersions, &. Rnines des langues | 
Hebraique, Chanan^enne, [&^c. four 
columns containing the names of 56 
languages, ending witb] Indienne des 
Torres neuues, &c. Les Langues des 
Animaux &. Oiseaux. | Par M. Clavde 
Dvret Bourbonnois, | President [dto. 
two lines.] | [Design.] | 

Imprime a Cologny, Par Matth. Ber- 
fon, I Pour soci^t^Caldoriene CIO. IOC. 
XIII [1613]. I Auec Priuilege du Boy 
Tres-Cbrestien. 

Title yerao blank 1 1. 15 other p. IL pp. 1-1030, 
largo 8°. 

Numerals 1-10 de Tancieu [ Huron] et nonyean 
[ Algonquiau ] laugage de Cauada, and of the Sou • 
riquuis and Etchemin (from Lescarbot),p.956. 

Copies teen : British Museum. 

Thresor de | Phistoire des | langves 

de cest | vnivers, | Contenant les Ori- 
gines, Beautez, Perfections, Decadences, 
Mutations, Changements, Conuersions, 
& Ruines des Langues | Hebraique, 
Chanaueenne, [&c. four columns con- 
taining the names of 56 languages, end- 
ing witb] Indienne des Terres neufues, 
&c. Les langues des Animaux & Oise- 
aux. I Par M. Clavde Dvret Bovrbon- 
nois, I President a Movlins. | Nous 
auons adioust^ Devx Indices: LVn des 
Chapitres: L'autre des principalee | 
maticres de tout ce Thresor. | Secojde 
edition. | [Design.] | 

A Yverdou, | De Tlmprimerie de la 
Society Helvetiale Caldoresqvi. | M. 
DC. XIX [1619]. 

Title yerso blank 1 L dedication 1 L approba- 
tion 1 p. indice des chapitres 4 pp. indice alpha- 
b6tique 7 pp. 8 other p. IL text pp. 1-1030, am. iP, 

Lingnistica as under title next above. 

Copies seen: British Moaenm, Congress. 
Harvard. 



122 



BIBLIOGRAPHT OF THE 



[Dnrocher (Rev. Flavien).] L. J. C. et 
M. I. I Aiamie | kushkoshknta | inUhi- 
naigan. | [Oblate seal.] | 

Ka iakonigants, | nte Opishiikolats 
[Qaebeol: | nte etat William NeilsoD. | 
1847. 

Frontispiece 1 1. title veno 6 lines of masio 
1 1, text in Montagnais (most of which is set to 
music) pp. 3-07, 12<>. 

Beligious songs, introit, kyrie, A|cnas Dei, 
credo, etc.; printed at Quebec for the use of the 
Indians of the missions on the Ssguenay and 
the north bank of the St. Lawrence below 
Tadonssao. 

Chpiei teen: Barnes, Pilling, Powell, Shea. 

Beprinted as follows : 

[ ] L. J. C. et M. I. I Aiamiea | knsb- 

kashkntu | inishiDaigan. | [Oblate 
seal.] I 

Kaiakonigants nte Opistikoiats 
[Qaebec]. | Nte etat Aag. Cot^etOie. j 
1856. 

Title (verso approval of Nil t Joseph [Bishop 
of Quebec) followed by 6 lines of music) 1 L 
text pp. 3-104, 16°. Chants for mass with words 
in the Montagnals language and headings in 
Latin. 

Oopiuteen: Laval, Verrean. 

Reprinted as the concluding portion (pp. 1- 
126) of the same author's It mishiniigin, 1867, 
for title of which see next column. 

[ ] L. J. C. et M. 1. 1 Aiamiea | kakoet- 

sbimitan 1 misinaigan. | [Oblate seal.] | 
Kaiakonigants nte opisti koiats 
[Quebec]. | Nte etat Angustin C6t^ et 
C>*. I 1848. 

Title verso blank 1 L text in Montagnais with 
French headings pp. 8-63, approbation in Hon* 
tagnais of Nil t Joseph 1 L verso blank, \7P. 

Catechism, pp. 3-42.— Tsitsijopaost kie ota- 
kussit aiamianots (pater, ave, credo, oonflteor, 
oomraandements, etc.) pp. 43-53. 

Copie* Hen: Boston Athensum, Eames, 
Verreau. 

Bevised, enlarged, and reprinted as follows : 

[— ] L. J. C. et M.L I Aiamiea | kukaet- 
shimitam | misinaigan. | [Oblate seal.] | 
Kaiakonigants nte Opistikoiats 
[Quebec]. | Nte etat Aug. Cot^etCie. | 
1856. 

Title verso blank 1 1. text in Montagnais 
with a few Latin headings pp. 3-72, 16°. 

Catechism, pp. 3-46.— Tsitsyepoost kre otak 
nssit aiamianats (pater, ave, credo, etc. las 
commandements de Dieu. commandements de 
r^gllse, etc), pp. 47-58.— Tshipiatikn mesh- 
kanakanats (way of ihe cross), pp. 6^72. 

Copies Hen: Laval, Yenreaa. 



Dorooher (F.) — Continned. 

^ Beprinted as the first portion (pp. 1-54) of the 
same author's Ir mishiniigin, 1867, for title of 
which see below. 

[ ] Ir misbiniigin. | Ekn omeru | tsbe 

apatstats IshkaamisbkomutS| Uiapo- 1 
komnts, Uaahaomnts, Ekuandjornnts, 
I Masbknaromuts, Shikotimiornnts | 
kie Piokuakmiornats. | [Cross. ] | 

Moniants [Montreal]: | akonikano 
nte etat Louis Perrault. | 1852. 

Title (verso approval of Nir ||I Pierre Flavien 
[Bishop of Quebec] in Montagnais in which 
Durocher's name is mentioned) 1 1. text in 
Montagnais with Latin and French headings 
pp. 3-164, table in Montagnais pp. 165-168, 16o. 

Prayers for the mass, pp. 3-21.— Songs for the 
mass, pp. 21-44. — Hymns, pp. 44-150.— Lita- 
nies, pp. 151-155. — Te Denm, pp. 165-166.— 
Prayers, pp. 157-163.— Picture of the Virgin with 
Montagnais inscriptions, p. 164. 

Printed for the use of the Indians at the 
trading posU of the Hudson Bay Co. along the 
northern shore of the St Lawrence, and on the 
Saguensy Biver, Eskouraun Biver, Mash- 
kuaro, Chicoutimi, Lake St John, etc. 

Copiet $ten : Laval, Verreau. 

Father Ghuin, formerly missionary at Mani- 
waki, and now (1890) pastor of a Boman 
Catholic church in Lowell, Mass., tells me that 
this is a second edition, revined and enUrgtMl of 
the original Aiamien Nikamuiu, published in 
Quebec by Wm. Keilson, in 1847, of which I 
have seen no copy, nor any other mention. Ac- 
cording to the same authority, a few of the 
cantiques were composed by P^re Amsud. 

The original work is reprinted as pp. 56-144 of 
the same author^s Ir mishiniigin, 1867, as fol- 
lows: 

[ ] L. J. C. et M. L I Ir mishiniigin. | 

Eknomeru tsbe apatstats ilnnts. | [De- 
sign.] I 

Kaiakonigants nte opistikoiats 
[Quebec] | nte etat Augustin Cot^ et C** 
i 1867. 

Title verso approbation of Bishop Pierre 
Flavien 1 1. text in the Montagnais language 
(with occasional headings in Latin and French) 
pp. 3-144. 1-126, tables pp. 127-131, \7P. 

Aiamieu-kukuetshimitun (catechism), pp. 
3-35.— Tsitsijipaost, etc. (morning and evening 
prayers), pp. 36-44. — Tshipiatiku meshkana- 
kanuta (way of the cross), pp. 44-54.— Aiamieu 
nikamun (hymns), pp. 55-144.— Enshknshkntn 
mishinaigan (mass, vespers, hymns, etc. with 
music), pp. 1-111. —Hymns, prayers, litaniea, 
etc. p. 112-126. 

A reprint by Fathers Garin and Amand of 
several works by Father Durooher, for titles 
and descriptions of which see above. 

(hpieteeen: PUling, PowelL 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



123 



Dnrooher (F.)— Con tinned. 

[ ] Catherine | Tekakonita. | (Tra- 

dnction Algenqnine.) | 

Tiohtiake [Montreal] | tehoristorara- 
kon J. Chapleau et fils. | 1876. 

Printed cover, title as above veno blank 1 1. 
text entirely in the Montagnais language pp. 
3-52,24°. 

A translation by P. Dnrocher of a letter by 
P. Chollenoe, printed in the Lettres 6diflante8 et 
cnrieases. Prepared for the press by the Abb6 
Caoq. The same matter translated by Rev. J. 
Marconx into Mohawk was published the 
same year, and by mistake the Mohawk imprint 
(Tiohtiake tehoristorarakon) was used on this 
title-page. 

Ci^lfiet ieen •• Laval, Yerreaa. 

^ Anicin4be alamie Kikklnwa^ am&g- 

nsiij aiamidte gaie i waw4bandang 
aiamie-kakwd(\jindwin. (*) 

Manuscript, 115 pp. large 8°, in the Algonkin 
language. Title from Teza (E.), Intomo agli 
stndi del Thavenet, p. 2, where be speaks of it 
as follows : " Un altro catechismo in algon- 
chino, senza tradazione, si conserva a Roma 
(nolle carte della V. Emm. coll. N*. xxvi). II 
ms. d in ottavo grande, di bnona scrittura, e ha 
115 pagine. II Mannale (see next title] d in 
foglio, e ha 12 pagine. Sono scritti tutti i due 
nel 1841." 

— Manuel du saor^ cceur de Marie. ( • ) 
Manuscript, 12 pp. folio, in the Algonkin lan- 
guage. Title from Teza (E. ), Intomo agli stndi 
del Thavenet, p. 2. See note to preceding title. 
These manuscripts were sent by P. Durocher 
from Lao des Deux Montagues, May 28, 1841, 
to the Abb6 Thavenet, asking that he have 
them printed, "deux rallies exemplaires du 
Cattehismeet mille du petit Manuel, "or, in the 
event of the request not being complied with, 
it was requested of "monsieur Thavenet de 
lenr renvoyer lenrs mannscrits par monseig* 
nenr TAvAque de Montreal, vu qu'lls n'ont point 
de duplioata." 



Durocher (F.) — Continued. 

I am indebted to the Bev. A. M. Garin, of 
Lowell, Mass-, for the following notes: 

Rev. Father Durocher was bom the 6tli of 
September, 1800, at St. Antoine, on the Chambly 
River, Canada. He made bis studies at th» 
Montreal College, kept by the priests of St. Sul- 
pice. In 1820 he began the study of theology, 
and the 29th of September, 1823, he received the 
order of the priestboo<l at the bands of Mon- 
seigneur Jean Jacques Lartignes, Bishop of 
Montreal, and was appointed assistant in the 
parish of Notre Dame, Montreal, where he re- 
mained two years. In 1825 he was sent ta 
Three Rivers, where he served two years as 
assistant. In 1827 be applied to the Superior 
of St. Sulpice to be received as a member of 
their community. Being admitted to the or- 
der he worked two years in the city of Mon^ 
treal and then went to the Lake of the Two 
Mountains to study the Algonqoln language 
and take charge ot that mission. He remained 
there 14 years and when he left he was master 
of the langnago, having composed many ser- 
mons, hymns, prayers, etc., in that tongue. All 
the Indians at the mission being Catholics, he 
wanted to work for the conversion of ^ the In- 
dians still in the state of infidelity. For that 
reason be left the community of St. Sulpice to- 
Join the order of the Oblate of Mary Immacu- 
late, and began his novitiate at Longueil the 
28th of September, 1843. He made his vows and 
was received in the order the 8th of Septem- 
ber, 1846. In the month of September, 1844, he^ 
was sent to the mission of Sagucnay, and 
tbnre began the study of the Montagnais. On 
the 3d of October, 1849, he was named superior 
of the mission on the Sagnenay, and in Septem- 
ber, 1853, he came to Quebec and established 
the House of St. Sauvenr, of which he was ap- 
pointed superior, and remained in that capacity 
until the year 1873. During that time he often 
visited the Indian missions on the Labrador 
coast and Lake St. John and composed differ- 
ent books in the Montagnais language. H» 
died at Quebec the 8th of December, 187(L 



E. 



E. (J.) See Eliot (John). 

Sames : Thia word foUowing * title or 'within 
parent heaea after a note indicates that a copy 
of tlie work referred to has been seen by the 
compiler in the library of Mr. Wilberforoe 
Eames, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SdwardB {Bev, JoDathan). Observa- 
tious I on the | language | of the | 
Muhhekaneew Indians ; | In which the 
Extent of that language in | North- 
America is shewn ; it« genius is | gram- 
matically traced : some of its peouliari- 
I ties, and some instances of analogy 
between | that and the Hebrew are 
pointed out. | Communicated to the 
Connecticut Society of | arts and sci- 
enceSy and published at the | Request of 
the Society. | By Jonathan Edwards, 
D. D. I Pastor of a Church in New-Ha- 
ven, and I Member of the Connecticut 
Society of | Arts and Sciences. | 

New-Haven, Printed by Josiah 
Meigs, I M,DCC,LXXXVIII [1788]. 

Extract from the Society's records recto 
blank 1 1. title reverse blank 1 L preface 1 1. text 
pp. 5-17, SP. 

Comparative vocabulary of the Mohegan 
and Shawanee (the latter communicated to the 
author by Oen. Parsons), pp. 6-7 ; of the Mohe- 
gan i.nd Chippiwan (the latter f^om Carver), 
pp. 7-8. — Numerals 1-10 and Lord's prayer in 
Mohosan and Mohawk, pp. 1^10.— Grammatic 
discussion of the Mohegan. pp. 10-17. 

"That the following observations may ob- 
tain credit, it may be proper to inform the 
reader with what advantages they have been 
made. 

" When I was but six years of ago my father 
removed with his family to Stockbridge, 
which at that time was inhabited by Indians 
almost solely ; as there were in the town but 
twelve families of whites or Anglo-Americans, 
and perhaps one hundred and fifty families of 
Indians The Indians being the nearest 
neighbours, I constantly associated with them ; 
their boys were my daily school-mates and 
play-feUows. Oat of my father's house I sel- 
dom heard any langnage spoken, beside the 
Indian. By these means I acquired the knowl- 
edge of that language, and a great facility in 
•peaking it. It became more familiar to me 

124 



EdwardB (J.) — Continued. 

than my mother tongue. I knew the names of 
some things in Indian which I did not know in 
English ; even all my thoughts ran in Indian : 
and though the true pronunciation of the lan- 
guage is extremely dilficult to all but them- 
selves, they acknowledged, that I had ac- 
quired it perfectly ; which as they said, never 
had been acquired before by any Anglo-Amer- 
ican. On account of this acquisition, as well 
as on account of my skill in thuir language in 
general. I received from them many compli- 
ments applauding my superior wisdom. This 
•kill in their langnage I have in a good measure 
retained to this day. 

"After I had drawn up these observations, 
lest there should be some mistake in them, I car- 
ried them to Stockbridge, and read them to 
Capt YOghum, a principal Indian of the tribe, 
who is well versed in his own language, and 
tolerably informed concerning the English: 
and I availed myself of hid remarks and correc- 
tions. 

" From these facts, the reader will form hit 
own opinion of the truth and accuracy of what 
is now offered him. 

" When I was in my tenth year, my father 
sent me among the six nations, with a design 
that I should learn their language, and thus 
become qualified to be a missionary aniong 
them. But on account of the war with France, 
which then existed, I continued among them 
but about six months. Therefore the knowl- 
edge which I acquired of that language was 
but imperfect; and at this time I retain so 
little of it, that I will not hazard any particular 
critical remarks on it. I may observe how- 
ever, that though the words of the two lan- 
guages are totally difleront, yet their structure 
is in some respects analogous, particularly in 
the use of prefixes and suffixes. — Pr^aee, 

Copiet $een: British Museum, Congress, 
EUimes, Harvard, Trumbull. 

At the Murphy sale a half-morocco copy, no. 
872, sold for $1.50. At the Brinley sale, no. 
5000, an uncut, half green morocco copy, brought 
$2. 

Observations | on the | langnage | of 

the I Muhhekaneew Indians; | in which 
I The extent of that language in North- 
Ame- I rica is shewn; its genius is gram- 
matically I traced ; some of its peoali- 
arities, and some | instances of analogy 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



125 



BdwardB (J. ) — Continaed. 
between that and the | Hebrew are 
pointed out. | Commnnicated to the | 
ConneoticQt Society of Arts and Soi- 
encesy | And published at the request of 
the society. | By Jonathan Edwards, D. 
D. I pastor of a church in New- Haven, 
and member of the | Conneoticnt Soci- 
ety of arts and sciences. | 

New-Haven, printed by Josiah Meigs, 
1787 Isic'l ; | London reprinted by W. 
Justing, I Shoemaker-Row, Blackfriars. 
I M.DCC,LXXXVIII [1788]. 

Firtt title : A | sermon i at the execation of I 
Moses Paul, an Indian ; ! Who had been guilty of 
murder, Preached at New Havnn in America. 
By Samson Occom, | A native Indian, and Mis- 
sionary to the Indians, who was in England | 
in 1776 [He for 17«e] and 1777 [nc for 1767], col- 
lectins for the Indian Charity Schools. | To 
which is added | a short accoant of the | Late 
spread of the gospel, | among the | Indians. | 
Also I Observations on the Language of the | 
Mohhekaneew Indians; | commnnicated to the 
I Connecticut Society of arts and sciences, | 
By Jonathan Edwards, D. D. | 

New Haven, Connecticut: Printed 1788. | 
London: Reprinted, 1788, and Sold b^' Buclc- 
land, Pater- | noster-row; Dilly. Poultryj 
Otridge, Strand ; J. Lepard, | No. 91, Newgate- 
street ; T. Pitcher, No. 44, Barbican : Brown, | 
on the Tolzey Bristol; Binns, at Leeds; and 
Woolmer, at Exeter. 

First title verso advertisement and Mr. Oo- 
eom*s preface 1 L introduction pp. iii-iv, text 
pp. 6-24; title to Edwards' Observations verso 
note 1 1, preface (verso numbered iv) 1 1. text 
pp. 5-15, appendix (an anecdote followed by an 
advertisement of a hymn book at the bottom 
of the page) p. 16, S°. 

It is probable that all the copies of the two 
English editions of the Observations as iuued 
were attached to Occom's sermon, but they are 
now often found apart. 

Linguistics as in the Brst edition. 

CfopUs seen : Boston Atheneum, Boston Pub- 
lic, British Museum, Dunbar, Eames. The first 
mentioned copy does not contain Occom's ser- 
mon. 

Stevens's Nuggets, no. 2044, prices a copy 5m. 
6d. At the Field sale, no. 1709, a copy brought 
$2.12. Stevens, 1887, no. 2841, prices it 8t. M, 

— Observations | on the | language | 
of the I Muhhekaneew Indians; | in 
which I The extent of that language in 
North- Ame- | rica is shewn ; its genius 
is grammatically | traced; some of its 
pecaliarities, and some | instances of 
analogy between that and the | Hebrew 
are pointed out. I Communicated to the 
I Ck>nneoticut Society of Arts and 8c i« 



Bd^nrards (J.) — Continued, 
encee, | And published at the request of 
the society. | By Jonathan Edwards, D. 
D. I pastor of a church in New-Haven, 
and member of the | Connecticut so- 
ciety of arts and sciences. | 

New-Haven, printed by Josiah Meigs, 
1788 ; I London reprinted by W. Jus- 
tins, I Shoemaker-Row, Blackfriars. | 
M,DCC,LXXXIX [1789]. 

Fir$t title: A | sermon | at the execution of } 
Moses Paul, an Indian; | Who had been guilty 
of munler, | Preached at New Tlaven in Amer- 
ica. I By Samson Occom, | A native Indian, and 
Missionary to the Indians, who was in Eng- 
land I in 1766 and 1767, collecting for the Indian 
Charity Schools. | To which is added | a short 
account of the | Late spread of the gospel, | 
among the | Indians. | Also | Observations on 
the Language of the | Muhhekaneew Indians ; 
I communicated to the | Connecticut Society of 
Arts and Sciences. | By Jonathan Edwards, 
D.D.I 

New Haven, Connecticut: Printed 1788. | 
London : Reprinted, 1789, and Sold by Buck- 
laod, Pater- 1 noster-row ; Dilly, Poultry ; Ot- 
ridge, Strand ; J. Lepard, | No. 91, Newgate- 
street ; T. Pitcher, No. 44 Barbican ; Brown, | 
on the Tolzey Bristol; Binns, at Leeds; and 
Woolmer, at Exeter. 

First title verso atlvertisement and Mr. Oc- 
com's preface 1 L introduction pp. iii-iv, text 
pp. 5-24; title to Edwards' Observations verso 
note 1 1. preface (verso numbered v) 1 1. text 
pp. 5-15, advertisement of a hymn book in 
the center of the page p. 16, 8^. 

Linguistics as in the first edition. 

Oopiee teen: Boston Public, British Museum, 
Brown, Congress, Lenox, Powell, Shea, Trum- 
bull, Wisconsin Historical Society. Some of 
these copies are separate from Occom's sermon. 

At the Sqnier sale a copy, no. 1926, brought 
30 cents. 

Reprinted in American Museum or Reposi- 
tory of . . . fugitive pieces, M Carey, editor, 
voK 5, pp. 21-25, 141-144, Philadelphia. 1789, SP. 
( Astor, British Museum, Congress, Yale.) 

Observations | on the | language | of 

the I Muhhekaneew Indians; j in which 
the extent of that language in North 
America is shewn ; | it^ genius is gram- 
matically traced : some of its peculia- | 
rities, and some instances of anology 
between | that and the Hebrew are 
pointed out. | Communicated to the 
Connecticut Society- of Arts and | Sci- 
ences, and published at the request of 
the Society. | By Jonathan Edwards, 
D. D. I Pastor of a Church in New-Ha- 
ven, and Member of the Con- | necticut 
Society of Arts and Sciences. | 



126 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



SdwardB (J.) — Continued. 

New- York : | printed by M. L. & W. 
A. Davis. I IbOl. 

Title veno note 1 1. preface 1 L text pp. 5>16, 
12^. 
LingaUtics as ander previous titles. 
Copies leen: Bostou Public, CoDgreM, Pilling. 

Doctor Edwards' observations on the 

Mobegau langaage. 

In Massachusetts flist. Soo. Coll. second se- 
ries, YoL 10. pp. 81-160. Boston. 1823. 8P. This 
volume of the "Collections " was reprinted at 
Bostou in 1843. 

This edition is preceded by an advertisement 
signed John Pickering and dated Salem, Mass., 
May 15, li'22, which occupies pp. 81-84.— The 
contents of the Observations are the same as in 
the original edition and occupy pp. 84-0& 

"Notes, by the editor," occupy pp. 98-160, 
the contents of which, in addition to comments 
and remarks on affinities, grammatic struct* 
ure, etc., are as follows : 

Nnmenils 1-10 of the Mlnsi and UnMni (fh>m 
Hecke welder), p. 101. 

" Comparative vocabulary [45 words] of vari- 
our dialects of the Lenape (or Delaware) stock 
of North American languages: together with a 
specimen of the Winnebago (or Nipegon) lan- 
guage," which includes the following: 

Mohegan (from Edwards), p. 136 ; Mohegan 
(from Jenks), p. 137 ; Lenape or Delaware (from 
Heckewelder), p. 137; Munsee or Minsi (from 
Barton), p. 138; Shawanese (from Edwards), p. 
138; Shawanese (from Archeologia Ameri- 
cana), p. 138; Nanticoke(from Murray and Hecke- 
welder) p. 139; Naraganset (from Williams), p. 
139 ; Massachusetts (from Ehot), p. 140; Penob- 
scot (from French missionaries' MS.), p. 140; 
Abnaki (from Father RAle's MS. dictionary), p. 
141; St. Francis Indians (from Holmes and 
Noyes), p. 141 ; Messisaugas (from Barton), p. 
142; Algonkin {ttom Lahontan), p. 142; At- 
gonkin (from McKenrie), p. 143; Chippeway 
(from Edwards), p. 143; Chippeway (from 
Long's Travels), p. 144 ; Knisteueaux (from Mc- 
Kenzie), p. 144 : Knisteneaux (from Harmon), 
p. 145; Explanatory remarks on the preceding 
comparative vocabulary, pp. 146-148. 

Postscript Translation of the 19th Psalm 
into the Mnh-he-con-nitk language,. done at the 
Cornwall School, under the superintendence of 
Bev. John Sergeant, Missionary (from Rev. Dr. 
Morse's Report on Indian Affairs), pp. 152-154. 

Index of Mohegan and other Indian words, 
explained in Edwards' Observations, pp. 155- 
167. 

Index of the principal matters in Edwards' 
Observations and the editor's notes, pp. 158-160. 

This reprint was also published as a separate 
paper, repaged and with addition of title-page, 
but otherwise unchanged, as follows: 

^— Observations | on the | language | 
of the I Mahbekaneew Indians. | By 



Edwards (J.) —Continued. 
Jonathan Edwards, D. D. | A new edi- 
tion : I with notes, | by | John Picker- 
ing. I As published in the Massachu- 
setts historical collections. | 

Boston : | printed by Phelps and Fam- 
ham. 1 1823. 

Title verso blank 1 1. advertisement to the 
present edition pp. 3-6, reprint of Edwards' 
Observations pp. 6-20, notes by the editor pp. 
20-56, comparative vocabulary' pp. 57-67, ex- 
planatory remarks pp. 68-73, postscript pp. 
74-76, indexes pp. 77-«2, 8®. 

Linguistics as under next preceding title. 

Oopitsteen: Boston Athena>nm, Eames. 

According to Sabin's Dictionary, no. 21972, 
there was an edition Boston, Little, Brown Sc 
CO. 1843. 

At the Sqnier sale, no. 319, a half-morocco, 
gilt- top copy of an 1813 edition sold for $2.87. 

The Works | of | Jonathan Edwards, 

D. D. I late president of Union College. 
I With a I memoir of his life and char- 
acter, I by I Tryon Edwards. | In two 
volumes. | Vol. I[-II]. | 

Andover : | printed and published by 
Allen, Morrill & Wardwell. New York : 
Dayton and Newman. | Philadelphia: 
Henry Perkins. | Boston: Crocker and 
Brewster, | Gould, Kendall and Lincoln, 
Tappan and Dennett. | Hartford : Tyler 
and Porter. | 1842. 

2 vols. : frontispiece 1 1. title verso copyright 
1 1. preface pp. iii-iv, contents pp. v-vii, memoir 
pp. Ix-lx, text pp. 1-518, 11.; title verso copy- 
right 1 L contents pp. iii-vii, half-title 1 1. text 
pp. 11-548, general index pp. 540-556, 8^. 

Observations on the language of the Muhhe- 
kaneew Indians, voL 1, pp. 46IM8D. 

Copies teen: Congress. 

Another edition : Boston, 1860, 2 vols, SP. (*) 

Jonathan Edwards, Jr., theologian, second 
son of Jonathan, sr., bom in NMthampton, 
. Mass., 26 May, 1745. died in Schenectady, N. 
Y., 1 Aug., 1801. When he was six years old 
the family removed to Stockbridge, at that 
time almost solely inhabited by Indians. Here 
he became so proficient in the Indian language 
as to surpass in the thoroughness of his schol- 
arship all other Anglo-Americans of that day. 
As it was his father's wish that he should be- 
come a missionary to the aborigines, he was 
sent, in 1755, to the Rev. Gideon Hawley, who 
was stationed on the Susquehanna Biver, to 
learn the dialect of the Oneidas. In conse- 
quence of the breaking out of war between 
England and France, in which the colonies 
were involved, young Edwards remained there 
only six months, and acquired but an imperfiBoi 
knowledgeof the language.— Ai^pleton't Oifdop. 
a/ Am. Biog. 



AliOONQUIAN LANOUAOES. 



127 



al (Gustav d'). Etudes sar This- 
primitive des races oc^aniennes, 
i^rioaines, par Gastav D'Eichthal, 
taire-adjoint de la Soci^t6 ethno- 
ae. 

Soci6t6 Ethoologiqae, M6moire8, vol. 2, 
11-320, Paris, lg45, 8^. 
lyidme 6tttde, Rapports entre qaelques 
ss amdricaines etlo copte, relates in large 
>tbe**laiigae 16iiap6-algonqaiD."and cou- 
vocabularies of that language (princi- 
(h>m DapoDoeaa) on pp. 280, 281, 283-284, 

Dwarsiats Jesas Christ [Black- 
. See Legal (E). 

William). The Aborigines of Nova 

a. 

^orih American Review, vol.112, pp. 1- 

w York, 1871, 8®. 

DOS and fragments of song in Micmao, 

L 

> nihillalquonk [Delaware]. See 
>erger (D.) 

John). [A primer or catechism in 
ifassachusetts Indian language, 
nbridge : printed by Samuel Green. 

] (•) 

earliest printed book in the Massacba- 
idian language of which any record has 
»und. No copy is known to be extant. 
3tter to Mr. Winslow, datod Jnly 8th, 
!r. Eliot wrote concerning the Indians : 
rery mnch desire to translate some parts 
Scriptares into their laugaage, and to 
lome Primer in their language wherein to 
B and teach them to read, which some of 
in do much Uso desire ; and printing snch 
j^ will be troublesome and chargable, and 
ig yet but little skill in their language 
g little Icasure to attend it by reason of 
tinual attendance on my Ministry in oar 
liaroh) I must have some Indians, and it 
) oUier help continually abont me to try 
amine Translations, which I look at as a 
and boly work, and to be regarded with 
fear, care, and reverence ; and all this is 
kble therefore I look at that as a special 
on which cost is to be bestowed, if the 
ro vide means, for I have not means of my 
r it" Again, on the 21st of October, 1050, 
•te : " for their own Langnage we have no 
my desire therefore is to teach them all 
«, and read written hand, and thereby 
ains taking, they may have some of the 
inn in their own Language ; I have one 
r who can write, so that I can read his ' 
I well, and he (with some paines and , 
Ig) can read mine." I 

native here referred to was without | 
Job Kesntan, who had taken the place i 
Long Island Indian, Eliot's first in- , 
r in the language. He is mentioned by ! 



Eliot (J. ) — Continued. 

Gookin in the History qf th$ Ohrittian Indiant 
as follows: **In this expediUon [July, 1675] 
one of our principal soldiers of the praying In- 
dians was slain, a valiant and stout man, 
named Job Nesutan ; he was a very good lin* 
guist in the English tongue, and was Mr. Eliot's 
assistant and interpreter in his translations of 
the Bible, and other books of the Indian lan- 
guage." 

Another letter of Eliot's, dated April 28th, 
1651, relates that "it hath pleased God this 
winter mnch to inlarge the abilitie of him 
whose ht'lpe I use in translating the Scriptures, 
which I account a great furtherance of that 
which I most desire, namely, to communicate 
unto them as much of the Scriptures in their 
owne langnage as I am able. Besides, it hath 
pleased Qod to stir up the hearts of many of 
them this winter to learn to read and write, 
wherein they doe very much profit with a very 
little help, especially some of them, for they 
are very ingenious. And whereas I had 
thought that we must have an Englishman to 
be their Schoole-Master, I now hope that the 
Lord will raise up some of themselves, and en- 
able them unto that work, with my care to 
teach them well in the reason of the sounds of 
Letters and spelling, I trust in the Lord that 
wee shall have sundry of them able to read and 
write, who shall write every man for himselfe 
so much of the Bible as tho Lord shall please 
to enable me to Trannlate." In the latter part 
of the same year (1651). he wrote in another 
letter: "And thus we order the Schoole: The 
Master daily prayeth among his SchoUers, and 
instructeth them in Catechisme, for which 
purpose I have compiled a short Catechisme, 
and wrote it in the Masters Book, which he 
can read, and teach them ; and also all the Cop- 
pies he setteth his Schollers when he t<»cheth 
them to write, are the Questions and Answers 
of the Catechisme. that so the children may be 
the more prompt and ready therein: we aspire 
to no higher learning yet^ but to spell, read, 
and write that so they may be able to write 
for themselves such Scriptures as I have al- 
ready, or hereafter may. (by the blessing of 
God) translate for them for I have no hope to 
see the Bible Translated, much lesse Printed 
in my dayes. Therefore my chiefe care is to 
communicate as much of the Scriptures as I 
can by writing." 

The Commissioners of the United Colonies, in 
a letter to Mr. Winslow, dated "Boston this * 
24th of September 1653," wrote: "M' Eliot is 
preparing to print a Cattichisme of the Indian 
langwige which wee shall further (as wee may) 
b}' disbursing the charge of paper and print- 
ing out of the stock but by some due allow- 
ance shall Indeavor to Incurrage Thomas 
Stanton to assist in the worke; whoe is the 
most able Interpreter wee bane in the ooun- 
trey for that Langwige that the worke may bee 
the more pfectJy carried on ; Wee haue ad* 
uised M' Eliot Btcet: that if heerafter they 



128 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Eliot (J. ) — Continaod. 

publish anythinj^e about the worke of God 
vpon the Indiaos they send it to the Corpora- 
tion and leane the dedication to them which 
wee hope wilbee attended." They also re- 
solved that " It is left to the two Commission- 
ers for the Massachnsets to gioe order for the 
printing of flue hundred or a Thousand Cate- 
chismes in the Indian langwige and to allow 
paper and the Charge of printing ; and that the 
worke may bee carried on the more exactly 
and to better Satisfaction It is ordered that 
Thomas Stanton's healpbee use4 in the same." 
One year later, on the 25th of September, 1654, 
they wrote to the Corporation in London: 
**one Cattachesme is alreddy printed and M' 
Person is preparing another to sute these 
southwest ptes where thelangnige differs fh>m 
theires who line about the Massacheuesetts." 
It appears that Mr. Eliot did not avail himself 
of Stanton's knowledge of the Indian tongue, 
as snggesteil by the Commissioners, for on the 
18th of September. 1654, they wrote to him : 
" Wee desired that Thomas Stanton's help 
might haue been vsed in the Cattachisme 
printed and wish that noe Inconvenience bee 
found through the want thereof; And shall 
now advise that before you proceed in Trans- 
lating the Scriptures or any pte of them you 
Improne the best hcalfies the Countrey af- 
foards for the Indian Languige that if it may 
bee these southwest Indians (some of whome 
as wee are now Informed desire healp both for 
Reading and to bee Instructed in the things 
of 6o<l and Christ) may vnderstand and haue 
the benifitt of what is printed." 

Seven years after the appearance of this edi- 
tion a new impression was begun, as follows : 

[A primer or catechism in the Mas- 

sachosetts Indian langa: ge. Second 
imprcBsion. 

Cambridge : printed by Samnel Green 
and Marmaduke Johnson. 1662.] (*) 

The Commissioners of the United Colonies 
wrote from Plymouth to Mr. Richard Hutchin- 
son and Mr William Ashurst, in England, 
September 12, 1061 : "By the ac<;ount yon will 
find wee haue remaining 4142&:4:4 stocke a 
great part wherof wilbee expended in print- 
ing the bible and a new Impression of a Cati- 
chisme." They also wrote to Mr. Usher in 
Boston, September 13th, 1061 : "Alsoe wee pray 
you take order for the printing of atliousand 
coppyes of Mr. Elliotts Catichismes which wee 
vnderstand are ranch wanting amongst the In- 
dians ; which being finished Receiue from the 
presse and dispose of them according to order 
abouesaid." The account presented to the 
Commissioners by Mr. Usher in September, 
1662, contains a charge: "To printing 1500 
Cattachismes," 151. Another reference to the 
book occurs in the account of disbursements 
sent by the Commissioners to England, Septem- 
ber 13th, 1667, as follows: "To Indian bibles 



Eliot (J.)— Continned. 

primers deliuered to Mr. Elliott and Mr. lohn 
Cotton and to SooUers," 21. 10«. 3d. 

No copy of this edition is known to be extant. 

The following note by Dr. Trumbull on the 
edition of 1662 requires a slight correction : 
"The cost of printing, at this period, was 
about £2. 10 per sheet, fur 1000 copies (exclusive 
of paper, which was supplied by the Corpora- 
tion), and this would not be increased more 
than twenty per cent, (to £3) by the press- work 
on 500 additional copies. At £3 per sheet, the 
Catechism must have reqaire<l five sheets (60 
pages sm. 8vo.), to bring the cost of the edition 
to £16. This agrees nearly with the charge of 
paper for printing the first edition in 1654; 
when 'for the two Catechisms,* Eliot's and 
Peirson's, Green used 30 reams. Not more 
than 14| reams was required for Peirson's 
(4| sheets per copy, edition of 1500), leaving 
at least 15| for Eliot's or sufficient for a small 
8vo. of 70 to 76 pages." The reference here to 
the edition of 1654 must be a mistake. The ac- 
count of Samuel Oreen, the printer, which con- 
tains the entries "for printing two Catta- 
chismes 30 Reame," and " for printing the 
Bible 368 Reame," was rendered in September, 
1663, and the catechisms referre<l to were 
without doubt Pierson's of 1658, and the second 
impression of Eliot's made in 1662. 

[ ]The I Indian Primer; | or, | The 

way of training ap of our | Indian Youth 
in the good | knowledge of Grod, in the | 
knowledge of the Scriptures | and in 
an ability tf> Reade. | Composed by J. 
£. I 2 Tim. 3 14, 15. Qut ken nag- | 
wutteansh nish nahtuhtauanish | kah 
pohkontamanish, waheadt | noli nah- 
tuhtauonadt | 15. Kah wutch kum- 
miikkiesnin- | neat koDwahteo wnnnee- 
tupana- ' tarn we wussnkwhongash, &c, | 

Cambridge, Printed [by Marmaduke 
Johnson! 1669. (•) 

64 unnumbered leaves, 32^. Signatures A, 
B. C, and D in sixteenti. In the Massachusetts 
Indian language. See the fac-simlleof the title- 
page. 

The first leaf, recto blank, contains on tho 
verso a cut of the royal arms. The title, sur- 
rounded by an ornamental border, is on the 
recto of the second leaf, on the verso of which, 
also surrounded by a border, and between two 
horizontal rules, is the following text in five 
lines: Prov. 22.6. | Nehtuhpeh peisses ut | 
niayut ne woh ayont: | kah kehohisuit matta 
pish I wunnukkodtumoonn [i. e. "Train np a 
child in the way he should go : and when he is 
old, he will not depart from it "J. The recto 
of the third leaf, which is marked A3, has a bor- 
der of small fleur-de-lis shaped ornaments, and 
contains two alphabets, small and capital, the 
five " Unnootoowaash " or vowela, and the nine 
** Keesontoowaash " or diphthongs. Spelling 



^ Mian Trimer-^^ 

],3 Tlic way nf mining u^ of.iur KC 
*{S Wi:>« ij.tf. i>. ilic g-xxl ^»" 
•(Jf knoAlcJge (if G.i.l. in iheMl- 
^ knfiwleiigeoftlieSciip-une- S^ 
^SK jmlifi aniWIi'V iiPci.lf. ^^ 

4^ i . — -. — a^ 

23( '^'t'ta»{h iiijt iml'tMi^jtesi'h ^^ 
^ k-k fti^l'ltliiK^'b, Wab-.t'it ^ 

{^ Iff ^"6 WHfffi^u^mf^^i'/pjf' 2^ 

— -^ 

frt«Mirf(r, Prmrt.l i^Cy,. I^j 



^f«',j«f.''^f'|?J%% 




FAC-SIMILE OF THE TITLE-PAOE OF THE PRIMER 



m&%MWW^ '^Kn ;.«i*HUW« 



^. iwci-Tdefg h i J klmo ♦ 

* • ■ ■ • 

iABChDEf GHIKLMJ: 
S NO PQ RJT UV W «. 

3 X V z. S 

I 2 

g • c. . u. ^ 



■ ■ ■• ,: ' "* 

k «s misut DC»oli ayont kjh . s» 




Wjnf Mow pj-niDlofif jtit Ut BiallMl* 
kit fi litrbiilT dtj't IDO^OE kih IT' :* pt- 

Ironcnk , kib <rini« mocBWthkiaiD'iedic 
•mnnttconiilh atttog tih litnnj'iiduog kib 
veeiconne maMMiiii) pMntinoi tcoiof, kib 



Nm/. Wim» •lUftolintimoe flji-^ippt- 
chtfeciCdai, k»^ wjmmpiiwnnd'tg C rift,, 
Om mrDiiwe ■hquonltmiidoB wit.c an- 

CATECHIZAONK. 

Kc Itfikmuauotqaeoft Ttiapo* nukChrift 

time fimlrw tttvionk kih nuk- 

Chriftline nupptEnok. 



>W.., 



IM>rp*niicr«e ulikiihktnotnwehteiongtft 
Chiil, pipiuni mik.Chrifliine pnrnuDirii 
IE*. •• J« BBtUshkct I kib pip u-v nsk- 



Tr'* U -t-i""- m's c' Join M.'Thrf., 

*'"s"'t.»>w> ■""« ;iM"»( *^«"-- 

'*"«Lp.Ntq>i"« <J»l5'^- t WiMiiort 
gqJ » tir«. >« 9- • W«t"«nk "»*- 

h?8k..^i. 'I*'*-" "''■'■'? V^*?- 
kfliMik leluiCltlft nippohqaabwaOnieDia 
"hn.».5. ^ Wihl..u<.r.k»0«n«<np.r,.. 
f m^oWilh rknou«« anBaiin(qBtogl('> Chiin 
l'w.ii«uonk innlnni>nioid(«oa|»[h, «Mi«il 
MftiK inuBaninat.g Cbrlfl fcltttwwwtrtpl"' 
tuonk. *■ Uilokpl*kiilUn1lonlii»»h- 

Nit. Ttli tWlilM WMITM^MW W*^ 

N<";'. KiuniBipmn G«J *> «*nil8i«m« 
k pomt.iiimat lulhiDDok t, ■kkiftcoitnih Hi- 
Kill u-pluhqullom»n ., wtme lailiiok ; p>- 
fuk n»nr Cod /, qui nlUcalD (, Wul«n^ 
Otlnittj Wanniumoniln tih Ni31i«»nlt. 
» Heb. < t «. * PI.1 90'*. * Mn «.> V ^O*. 
1,1. .Uir4 6.«6. HlMa.3*- /i e^.8.44 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



129 



Bliot (J.) — Continoed. 

]«MOD0 of one syllable begin on the vereo of 
tbe third leaf and end on the veno of the 
iiimrtb, followed on the same p«^e by short 
reading lessons, which end on the verso of the 
flfth leaf. "The first reading lesson," Dr. 
Tmmball remarks, *' tells as (in Indian) what 
vaa the coarse of instraction in the Indian 
schools." It says: " Wise doing to read Cate- 
chism. First, read Primer. Next, read Re- 
pentance Calling (i. 0. Baxter's Oall). Then 
read Bible." " The Lords Prayer," in English, 
mis the recto of the sixth leaf, with the same in 
Indian on the verso. The Lord's Prayer «x- 
poonded, in questions and answers, begins on 
the recto of the seventh leaf and ends ou the 
▼erso of the ninth. " The Ancient Creed," in 
Bnglish, begins on the verso of the ninth leaf, 
and ends on the recto of the tenth. The same 
in Indian begins on the recto of the tenth leaf 
and ends on the recto of the eleventh. The 
Creed expounded, in questions and answers, 
begins on the recto of the eleventh leaf, and 
cads on the verso. The recto of the twelfth 
leaf begins with the "Degrees of Christian 
Duties for several estates, collected out of the 
holy Scripture," which end on the recto of the 
twenty-fourth leaf (B8). "The large Cate- 
chism," in six chapters, with the caption " Cat- 
echisaonk," begins on the recto of the twenty- 
fourth leaf and ends on the recto of the fifty- 
eighth (D 10). The Ten Commandments are 
included in the second chapter. "A short Cat- 
echism," with the caption "Peamesik Kate- 
chisaonk," begins on the recto of the fifty- 
eighth leaf and ends on the verso of tbe fifty- 
ninth with "Finis." "The Numeral Letters 
and Figures, which serve for the ready finding 
of any Chapter, Psalm and Verse in the Bible, 
or elsewhere," in roman and arable, from 1 to 
ISO, with their names in EnglUb, fill the next 
six pages, beginning on the recto of the six- 
tieth leaf and ending on the verso of the sixty- 
second. " The Names and Order of the Books 
of tbe Old and New Testament." in English, 
begin on the rejto of the sixty -third leaf and 
end on the verso with "Finis." The sixty- 
fourth leaf, verso blank, contains on the recto 
the same out of the royal arms that appears on 
tbe first leafl 

The text is in Indian throughout, the only 
portions in English being the title, tbe Lord's 
Prayer, the Ancient Creed, the introductory 
heading to the "Degrees of Christian Duties," 
the running headings to the pages, and the lists 
of numer^ and books of the bible at the end. 
The only copy I nown is in the library of tbe 
University of Edinburgh. It bears an inscrip- 
tion on the blank leaf: "Gifte<l to the Library 
by Mr Jo. Kirtoo, Aprile 19, 1G75." The above 
title is from a photosrraphic fac-nimile. here- 
with reproduced, which was fiimiflhed me by tbe 
librarian, the late Dr. John Small. The colla- 
tion and description of tbe contents have been 
made from Dr. Small's reprint, which is an ex- 
act reproduction of the original work, page for 
page and line for line. 

ALG ^9 



I 



Eliot (J.) — Continoed. 
fThe Indian primer. 

Cambridge: printed by Samnel Green. 
lCH7f] 

On the 29th of August, 1686, Mr. Eliot wrote 
to the Hon. Robert Boyle: "My humble re< 
quest to your honour is, that wo may again re- 
impose the primer and catechism ; for though 
the last impression be not quite spent, yet 
quickly they will ; and I am old, ready to be 
gone, and desire to leave as many books as I 
can.*' 

In the library of the Massachusetts Histo- 
rical Society is a copy of Eliot's primer, in the 
Massachusetts Indian language, supposed to 
be unique, which may be of this edition. It is 
without title, name of place or printer, and also 
without date, but appears to have been com- 
plete in forty leaver, signatures A, B, C, D, and 
£ in eights. Size of the leaf, 3| inches high by 
nearly 2| inches wide. In contents it seems to 
agree closely with the edition of IGiH), as far as 
it goes, for tbe " Degrees of Christian Duties'* 
and the names of the books of tbe bible are 
omitted. The additions comprise a few refer- 
ences to bible texts under someoi' the answers. 
The first six leaves and tbe recto of the seventh 
are unpaged, but on the verso of the latter tbe 
numbering begins with 1, and continues in that 
order, the odd numbers on the left-hand side 
and the even numbers on tbe right, to the verso 
of the thirty-seventh leaf, which is marked 61, 
and followed by five more pages unnumbered. 
Tbe first signature (ranrked A) is complete, and 
contains on the recto of tbe first leaf, instead 
of a title, merely the following bible text in five 
lines between two horizontal rules, the whole 
surrounded by a border composed of acorn- 
shaped and other ornaments, similar to the bor- 
der around the title of the Indian bible of 16d5: 
Prov. 22. 6. I Nehtuhpoh peisses ut | mayut ne 
woh ayont kah | kehchisuit matta pish | wun- 
nukkotitumuoon. See the fac-simile. Tbe 
lower part of this leaf is slightly imperfect. 
On the blank verso was written, according to 
Dr. Trumbull, in tbe baud of Rev. Thomas 
Prince : " Mr. B. Green sa>s, coropo^ied by Mr. 
Eliot, &. Prinfi atCamb.ab' 1681." The only 
parts of tbe inscription now t4> bo seen are the 
words: " Prin* at Camb ab* 1684." Tbe recto 
of the sec<md leaf, which has a border of small 
fieur-do-lis shaped ornaments, oontains three 
alphabets, small, capital, and italic, full.) wed by 
tbe five " Unnont waash " or vowids, and tbe 
nine "Neesontoowaasb" or diphthongs. Seethe 
fac-simile. Tbe vcrrto of this leaf and the reuto 
of tbe thinl contain spelling lessons of one syl- 
lable, with short reading lessons on the verso 
of tbe third leaf. These lessons ormtain tbe 
references to Baxter's Call and the bible, which 
are mentioned in the note to the primer of 
1669. "Tbe Lords Prayer," in English above 
and in Indian below, fills the recto of the fourth 
leaf. Tbe Lord's Prayer expuundod, in ques- 
tions and answers, begins on the verso of thft 



130 



BIBLIOGBAPHT OF THE 



Eliot (J.) — Continaed. ' 

fourth loaf, aod enda on the recto of the sixth. 
"Tho Ancient Creed," in Eu>;li8h, begins on 
the recto of the sixth leaf and ends on the , 
verso. The same in Indian begins on the verso 
ot the sixth leaf and ends on the recto of the 
seventh. The Ancient Creed expounded, in 
questions and answers, be];ins on the recto of | 
the seventh leaf and ends on the verso, whiuli is i 
paged 1. " The large Catechism," with the cap- 
tion "Catechizaonk," commences on page 1 
(the verso of the seventh loaf) and ends on 
page 59 (the verso of the thirty-sixth leaO* 
See the fac-similes of pages 1 and 2. The whole 
of signature B, comprising pages 4-19, is lack- 
ing in this copy. "A short Catechism" fills 
pages 00 and 01, ending on the next (nnnnm- 
bered) page with "Finis." "The Numeral 
Letters and Figures." etc., in roman and ara- 
ble, from 1 to 150, fill the last four pages, be- 
ginning on the verso of the thirty -eighth leaf 
and ending with^ " Finis" on the recto of the 
fortieth Icat, verso blank. The only portions 
in English are the Lord's Prayer, the Ancient 
Creed, the running headings to the pttges, and 
the introductory heading to the numerals. 
The qnoUitiou in Indian from Proverbs 22.0, 
which appears on the first leaf, is also found in 
the primer of 1009, on the verso of the title. 

Another Indian primer, differing almost en- 
tirely in contents, was printed at Boston in 
1720, and again probably twenty years later. 
For a description of these two editions, which 
are sometimes wrongly ascribed to Eliot, see 
Indians primer. 

The I Indian primer ; | or, | The way 

of training up of our Indian Youth in | 
the good knowledge of God. | By John 
Eliot. I Reprinted from the original 
edition of 1669. | With an introduction 
by I John Small, M. A., | Librarian, 
University of Edinburgh. | 
Edinburgh: Andrew Elliot. | 1877. 

Title 1 leaf on the verso of which are the 
words " Printe.l by Turnbull Se, Spears, Edin- 
burgh," introduction pp. i-xl, reprint of the 
1609 iirimer, nearly in fac-similu, C4 uunum* 
bered leaves, 10^. 

In a letter to the compiler of this bibliog- 
raphy, dated from Edinburgh, March 12, 188G, 
Dr. Small says: "In my printed volume the 
title page of the primer was imitated, as nearly 
as i)ossible, with the types in his stock, by the 
printer who got it up foi me." 

Copie» seen: Boston AthensBnm, Eames, 
Lenox, Powell, TmmbulL 

The I Indian Primer; | or, | The way 

of training up of onr Indian Youth in | 
the goo^ knowledge of God. 1669. | 
By John Eliot, | To which is Prefixed j 
The Indian Covenanting Confession. | 
Reprinted from the Originals in the 



Eliot (J.) — Con tinned. 
Library of | the University of Edin- 
burgh. I With an introduction | By 
John Small, M. A., F. 8. A. Scot. | 
[Small printer's ornament.] | 

Edinburgh: Andrew Elliot. | 1880. 

Title 1 leaf tm the verso of which are the 
words "Turnbull &, Spears, Printers, Edin- 
burgh," introduction pp. i-xl, half title of "The 
Indinn covenanting confession " 1 leaf verso 
blank, introduction to the same pp. xliii-xlvi, re- 
print of the sane pp. xlvii-liv, folded pho- 
to-lithographic fac-stmile of the original broad- 
side containing the "Christian Covenanting 
Confession" verso blank, reprint of the 1009 
primer, nearly in fac-simile, 64 unnumbered 
leaves, 10°. 

The original introdnctfon of forty pages and 
the sixty-four leaves of the primer are from the 
edition of 1877, without being repriut^'d. 

Copiet $een : Congress, Dunbar, Eames, Mas- 
sachusetts Historicnl Society, National Mu- 
seum, Pilling, Trumbull. 

[The Assembly's shorter catechism, 

translated into the Massachusetts In- 
dian language.] (") 

On the 30th of November, lOW, Ricbani 
Baxter wrote to Eliot: "Methinks i\\e Amgem- 
blies Catechism should be next the holy Scri))t- 
nres, most worthy of j-our I^abours." lu the 
narrative entitled The Prfsmt State of New- 
England, printed at London in 1G75, "tho 
Assemblies Catechism" is mentiuut^d with 
other books translated by Mr. Eliot and 
printed in the Indian langnage. Increase 
Mather, in his letter to Dr. Lensden in 1687, 
also mentions the Assembly's catechism as one 
which the Indian children learned by heart. 
No copy of this translation has been found. 

It seems that Mr. Eliot translated several 
catechisms into the Indian language. Ac- 
cording to Daniel Gookin, "he framed two cate- 
chisms in the Indian tongue, containing the priu- 
dplesof the christian religion ; a lessor for chil. 
dren. and a larger for older persons.'' Tho same 
writer also mentions "Indian catecliisms, a 
grammar, primer," and other works, as having 
been translated by Mr. Eliot, and printed at 
the expense of the Corporation. In another 
place Gookin relates that "Indian bibles, 
primers, catechisms, and other books, trans- 
lated into the Indian langnage." were carried 
for distribution by the Christian Indians who 
started from Natick, about the year 1072, on a 
missionary expedition to the southern tribes. 
The following passage in Mr. Eliot's letter to 
the rion. Robert Boyle, dated August 29, 1680, 
may also refer to a catechism separate from 
the primer: "My humble request to your 
honour is that wo may again reiippose the 
primer and catechism ; for though the last im- 
pression bo not quite spent, yet quickly they 
will ; and I am old, ready to be gone, aud desire 
to leave as many books as I can." 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



131 



Bliot (J.) — Continued. 

[The BIX principles of religion, by 

tbe Bev. William Perkins, translated 
into the Massachusetts Indian Ian- 
gnage.] (-) 

According to Dr. Tram ball. "One of tho 
catechisms translated by Eliot— probably much 
abridged— was the Bev. WUliam Perkins's 
Foundation of the Christian Beligion^ gathered 
into 8ixe Prindplet. Increase Mather, in his 
letter to Dr. Lcasden, in 1687, mentioned that 
'many of the Indian children hod learned by 
heart the catechism, either of that famous di- 
Tine, William Perkins, or that put forth by the 
Assembly of Divines at Westminster.' Peir- 
■on borrowed much fh>m the Six PrineipUe for 
his Qniripi catechism." In another place he 
adds : "Experience Mayhew. in a notice of an 
Indian convert who died at Martha's Vineyard, 
in 1717, says: 'Mr. Perkins's Six PrincipUe t^f 
B/digion, having been translated into the Indian 
tongne, was what she took great delight in 
reading.' {Indian Concert*, p. 168.) Ko copy 
<rf this translation has been discovered, and it 
Is not certain, from Mayhew's mention of it, 
thatftwasj^nntMf." 

— [Tbe book of Genesis, translated into 
the Massachusetts Indian language. 

Cambridge : printed by Samuel Green. 
1656f] (•) 

This was probsbly Eliot's second publication 
In the Indian language. No copy has been 
found. In a letter to Thomas Thorowgood, 
dated Jane 18, 1653, he thus refers to the pro^- 
ress of his work in translating the bible: "I 
have had a great longing desire (if it were tho 
-will of God) that our Indian Language might 
be sanctified by the Translation of the holy 
Seriptnres into it . . . but I fear it will not be 
obtained in my dayes. I cannot stick to the 
work, because of my necessary attendance to 
my ministerle in Roxbnry, and among the In- 
dians, at sundry places, and the multiplied 
work, which in that kind arisi'th upon me, 
and yet through the blessing of tlic Lonl, I 
have this Winter translated the whole book of 
the Psalms . . . While I live, if God please to 
assist me« I resolve to follow the work of trann- 
lating the Scriptures." In 1654, he mentioun 
his interpreter, "whom I have used in TrauH- 
lating a good part of the Holy Scriptures." 
One year later, in a letter dated August 16, 
1665, he wrote of the Indians: "That which I 
now most follow, is, first the spreading of tho 
Goapelinto more remote places . . . The second 
thing attended, is the Civilizing of them . . . 
Tbe third thing is the Printing of the Biblo in 
their Language, Genesis is Printi'd, and wo are 
npon Matthew, but our piogroi^se is slow, and 
hands short." The Commissioners of the 
United Cok>nies replied to a letter of Mr. Eliot's, 
dated August 20, 1655, as follows: "the Com- 
IssJOQcra never forbade you to Translate the 
Scriptorea for preaching or for any other vse 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

either of youer owne or of yoaer hearers but 
advised that what you ment to print or sett 
forth vpon the Corporation Charge might be 
donn with such Consideration of the Language 
and Improueraent of the best healpes to be had 
therein that as much as may bee the Indians in 
all ptes of New England might share in the 
benifltt: which wee feare they can not soe well 
doe by what you haue alreddy printed." 

For other references to this edition, see the 
note to tbe following title. 

[The gospel of Matthew, translated 

into the Massachusetts Indian lan- 
guage. 

Cambridge : printed by Samuel Green. 
1G55.] (*-) 

Eliot's letter dated August 16, 1655, already 
referred to under the preceding title, contains 
the earlieiit mention of this book : " Genesis is 
Printed, and we are upon Matthew, but our 
progresse is slow, and hands short" It is also 
mentioned in his letter to Mr. Richard Floyd, 
dated from Roxbury, December 28, 1658, as fol* 
lows : " Yet those pieces that were printed, viz. 
Genesis and Matthew, I hod sent to such as I 
thought had best skill in the language, and in- 
treated their ani mod version m, but I heard not 
of any faults they found," And in a postscript 
to the same letter: "They have none of the 
Scriptures priated in their own Language, save 
Genesin, and Matthew, and a few Psalmes in 
Meetor." No copy is known to be extant. 

[A few psalms in metre, translated 



into the Massachusetts Indian lan- 
guage. 

Cambridge : printed by Samuel Green. 
16WTJ (•) 

Of this little book no copy has been found. 
It was mentioned as one of the three portions of 
Scripture which had been printed — " Genesis, 
aud Matthew, and a few Psalmes in Meuter" — 
in Eliot's postscript to his letter of December 
28, 1858, quoted in the note to tho preceding 
title. In the treasurer's account presented to 
the Commissioners at Ilurtford in September, 
1650, was a charge of 401., "To Mr. Green for 
printing the Psalmes and Mr. Picrenn's Cati> 
chisme." At tho next meeting in September, 
1660, it was resolved that "The Comissioners 
for the MossuchusettA are desired and Impow- 
ered lo accouiupt with Mr. Green for the forty 
pounds payed him for printing Mr. Peirson's 
Cattachisme and the Prtulme.s." 

Mr. Eliot had made a translation of some of 
the psalms into luUian metre as earl^* as 1C51. 
In a letter written by the Rev. John Wilson, 
Octol>cr 37, 1651, is an account of one of tho In- 
dian meetings, in which it is related that " the 
Indian School-Master read out of his Book one 
of the Psalmes in meeter, lino by line, trans 
lated by Mr. Eliot into Indian, all the men and 
women, &c. singing the name together in one of 
our ordinary English tunes melodiously." 



132 



BIBLIOOBAPHT OF THE 



Xiliot (J.) — Contiuaed. 

[ ] Christiane OOnoowae Sampoo- 

waonk. 

Second column: The same in Eng- 
lish. I A Christian Covenanting Can- 
fessiou Isio'], 

[Cambridge: printed by Samnel 
Green f 166- f ] (•) 

1 page, yerso blank, printed in two colamns, 
MaasaohusettA Indian and Englisli, with a line 
of 55 Ruall ornaments at the top, 4^. 

The text measarea nearly 6} by 5^ inches, 
whicli is an inch wider than the t«xt of a page 
of the Indian bible. It is printed with the same 
kind of type that was used for the bible. Each 
column is divided by a line rule |nto two parts. 
The upper or smaller divisions contain, in In- 
dian on the left-hand side and in English on the 
right, articles of belief numbered 1 to 9, with 
references to bible texts. The third article, 
which was enlarged in the English column of 
the edition described belciw, reads as follows in 
this edition: "3 He made Adam to rule this 
lA>wer world. Gen. i. 26,27." The lower di- 
visions contain additional articles and the 
church covenant, in eight paragraphs, of which 
the first five only are numbered. The covenant 
begins thus: "5. For these causes, wee that 

dwell in this Towne called are gladly 

willing to bind our selves to God. to Remember 
the Sabbath day to keep it holy, so long as we 
live," etc. 

The copy here described is in the library of 
the University of Edinburgh, and is supposed 
to bo unique. On the lower margin below the 
text, is the following inscription in the hand- 
writing of the Rev. William Trail, minister of 
Borthwick: ''This Indian Confession & Cove- 
nant of the Converts in Xew- England was 
brought from tlieuce in the year 1090 &. after- 
wards gifted to the Bibliotheek of the Coiledge 
of Ed'r (my alma mater) by W. Trail." The 
other side of the leaf contains the indorsement: 
'* Indian Confession of Faith in New England, 
given be Mr. Trail, Min.. Borthwick. 1809." 
Tlie whole is reprinted on pages xlvii-llv of 
the iutnxluction to the second edition of Dr. 
John Small's reprint of Eliot's Indian primer 
of 1669. Ediul)urgh, 1880, preceded by an ac- 
count of its history and a biographical sketch 
of the Rev. M.r. Trail, and accompanied by a 
fuU-flizod photo-lithographic fao-simile of the 
ori<;inal l)roadside, from which the above de- 
scriptiuu bus been niiide. The fac-similo given 
herewith is copied fnim an electrotype kindly 
furnished me by Dr. Small. In reprotlucing it by 
another process the size of the shet't has been 
made a little smaller than the original. 

The year in which the covenanting confession 
was first printed is not known with certainty. 
According to Dr. Trumbull, "The first Indian 
church was gathered in 1660, at Xatick; but 
Mr. Eliot had pn>posed the admission of the 
Indian converts to church estate, eight or 
nine years before this. Some peculiarities of 



EUot (J.) — Continued. 

orthography in the Indian version of this 'cov- 
enanting confession' seem to indicate that it 
was printed b^ore the Bible. It is alluded to 
by Cotton Mather (Magnulia, ill. 6. p. 178) : 
' Unto the general engagements of a coveuant 
with God which it was his desire to bring the 
Indiims into, he added a particular urticlo, 
wherein they bind themselves vxehquontamu- 
nat Sabbath^ pahketeaunat tofisohke pomanta- 
mog, i. e., to remember the Sabbath-day, to 
keep it holy, as long as wo live.'" In the 
Memorial History of Boston Mr. Trumbull 
adds: "Probably it was printwl before — but 
not long before — the gathering of the first In- 
dian church at Natick, in 1660." 

t ] Christiane OOnoowae Sampoo- 

waonk. 

Second colnmn : The same in Eng- 
lish. I A Christian Covenuntiug Con- 
fession. 

[Cambridge: printed by Samuel 
Green f 167- f] 

1 page, verso blank, printed in two coliinins, 
Massachusetts Indian and English, with a 
line of 52 small ornaments at the top, 4^. 

This seems to be a lat-er edition, uh it con- 
tains several slight chaDgen and a fow addi- 
tional words and Scripture references. The 
third article in the upper division of the En- 
glish column was made to read as follows : "3. 
He made Adam to Rule thif* Lower world, ho 
being made perfectly Righteous. Gen. i. 26, 
27." 

The only copy known of this edition, which 
is in the Congregational Library- at liowtoo, 
lacks a small portion of the lower right-hand 
comer. The fac-simile given herewith is from a 
heliotype, made a few years ago, in the posses- 
sion of the compiler of this bibliography, and is 
probably slightly reduced in size. 

[ ] The new | testament | of our | 

lord and saviour | Jesus Christ. | Traus- 
lated into the | Indian language, | aud 
I Ordered to be Printed by the Com- 
missioners of the United Colonies | in 
New-England, | At the Charge, and 
with the Consent of I he | corporation in 
England | For the Propagation of the 
Gospel amongst the Indians | in New- 
England. I 

Cambridg: | Printe<lby Samuel Green 
and Marmaduke John^$on. | MDCLXI 

[1(5(51]. 

Steond title: Wusku | wuttestanjentum | 
nul-lordumun | Jesus Christ | Nuppoiiuohwus- 
suaeuodmun. | [Diamond-shaped figure of 32 
pieces between two lines.] | 

Cambridge: | Printed by Samuel Green and 
Marmailuke Johnson. | MDCLXI [1661]. 

TranslatioH : New | his-testament | our-lord | 
Jesus Christ 1 our-deliverer. 






QOI nl<li«l(D U/dfaii>'l«au « Wu^nflnmonii«> kih 
«0<iiitCiftpAnatvf9«e.M«JbilaMt. A/mmS. 9. 1 ?«'^<* 

^*^* t. W'J'.ls liwchiflik, aroai Go» Keftik k*b 
Ofikt >b<t>< '««»nA€sefi. 0*1'% • 1. |f. 

' f» f>«<uiiriNifHit(ith<au Adam yea llVtyco* 
MCtaofikc«« Cc»t.»6,99. 

4g Ad«a ttanok nuuncru kih ««akcApiiiitf« 

Cw >. ^ ^ - 

$• h^vn fiafDmaffDvimulLuavjo aBHucf -tc- 

oAk| k»h wijffortkapurauit* . iK,^H^,^.t^• , 

6. Nctfl) acctiaua ct inatchcfcoi^anit* TjW« 

51; S* 

7^ Hrcfe chippiifa nuninatclirre^nk. 



{: 



U<r>t«r>e mllc^c^^on'r. Jlfiff^.iJ. 1 j, 

«. mm « ■ 



•Wtko.Dppa«i>onk ii>op!nhko.-ni»k()at /la'« 639. 

9. N-.oiimpua wimc woh nutcnoLkioumuR 
tvaOiduiBWiS ktfutkoduu 1 C^r • I5> 



!• lECufCbrift '»i'nns.»fR'»ri-.ih G^tD. T/i/.«. 6,7. 
X Qat fiff:kecqnipoo 5y n^wij (ninickakvodiec- 
tomp i^>k'oa>* Htb» t 16.17. 

ft. WvU^oiuoiuiOi \ttM Cbril niflbwlAiOi 
SepbftttCuvMnaa'. Ks^7 12.^ Q^ofliodftRi^icnuixi* 
«dtff }«f Keiutl-iiTA-nouu. \j4t 19.21. 

:)• Jef'iS C riii' pa>tVe Kcnvfvccri'nwanlhfk- 
<)un« Vafi fc*j'.:*-*aJ;rM?ssMfhi^1un noppoonk nbp u- 
woniakquco^ » k*H >r>.(h mi) lru(tenihouaur(hi qon 
craTtS nu.nmarchcfcongA^ 9 ah'^uonc^civJin. ile». 
a $. »^V/jf(.) If. 

4 Yciiyto^ n»n pe^ wonianc' v-'.-.t k .c wuiVr 



tt-Jlkoiini .rtunJi kj!i witnnaTpta 
GoUui. ^'js 1750. 

kai>^nn(» en God' 1 , rrr hcj.:- . »:r.c- :' ?.l*jan , 

^^'.)^.i r :kki>h* 
( ne 



^ Chfijiian Ci^VinsnMi Canfeffion 

IT.A»ft9 whh fay Kairk aad Confctk «Ub 
Month K»«i ««.««• . „ . 

I. Tncrc I* »«toMf Miely« Iifcmf 1 
rrue G^o , nmf 6 4 Jar. i© 10. l«rf , lit 

Fatbtr» 3t.'0» My Spirit. JC«f«.a8B9« t f alu» i 

9. It tlic ^"gifinliii Coo OMdt Hiifffs^ 
Eifkh ¥crv Good. Ottk #• ijfi* 

) Hs made Adam to ra^ ime Loivet wm 

(?f«.i.i6jS7* .- 

4. AJua ^Bickly Iitiic4i ^^ v<* ^^^ 

%. Adao» convcigtied ID of bit u » i 
#iro'Mf Mill af*d pvalfittcm JUai*S«i<* . ^ 
tf . ?ot tbit cial'<H vt tee tU boffo ta fia 

T/al,5i.s. 

7» 0|r fia b €•• ibU-' . ^ ^ 

1. Orittiul fio* Kiti* |.l 



i:. 



. .. Afttall ito. J/^i^iSJ 
7; By tbcfe occ deCifvt OaBBOtiioa la | 

fvr ever. /U«-6.ay. 



iBer.r 



9. 1 brlcive we Oiall all tiTe aglia 10 Je 
at ihe l«ft d«y» a Car. IS* 



pahkcirtunn toMn^ke pern*! i«t 



woh nnJK ) urc*! v.-^ t — '>4b'.>j:" 






Tlicoe tti^eoncifh , r.f4ur)tc *;ii ii:t ;^ -aoa:^ C a 



A"*€ n|i>pc x*'u{»rin.«rj>f.k , rcir.-r».« '.j-^'jn nr^hhOj"; | 
kaoonog \ k«*i nu.'.r.fr:>. ♦^0/ r-. irf.-; *"':t :?:::: , aao- * 
toweekca«0''£ar. ^ ;o.:j:>»^.i ? »f.iSkc p> .- anisrio^. 



Wot Lor J lt(ui Cbf 'i* -s 5«2M''S'r«.ii».4!:et*4c, 



f 



r. 1 Efss Cbrlft is tbc Son of Goo. T/i. o.l 
I He b:c*iDC aoian, aod It boCk Goo i 
kCin 1.1 ooc perlon. Hf(. 1,16.17. 

a.- Jcfus Chrift Utb Three olRctf « Pre 
Propbcc 9 King. i'fl>>?-i|a»«.,. <^ai« % at* J 

jt Irrif Chrift obiytd perftdly fo« of, 
pifed hfi Doth tor us wbcci H^ dy^d for aMf 
rcr«by He dcfcrvcd pardoo for all 00c fiot. JUi 

4. Kow by tilt Gofpil Kev-C!oTenint 
fv. 3 drill cillcM us a!l 10 rcp^nr , and bclM 
i>'j!y c<> tjr.'i uoco Goo* .^l^j 17. go. 

^ For thtfe ciofrsy «ree«tbat dw*ll l9 

T.'fTif c*i!cH — Aft gladly «rvi ing to h 

ouj i'ihn to Gooy co Rctrrtbcr ibe Sabba&b 
10 <crp If kolv » fo Ijog at wt lire. i 

• *.o ?o hind our t«Jvcf ro tick other 9 f O e 
rogriber cvtrf ^abbstb «ijy(«b*a It iray be doi 
fo dnt all our S'lrt^arf) diy Scrvicct» praytn S 
accorv!' ^ to fbr word ot Go»t >bO kolf ^p 
cf G')D Hflpirg li*. 

By ih'«ciniscl covenanr, we dot f{fo oor G\ 
and owr ChilJrcn to Jcfus CbriHf eo wf|fc n 
Ulai in Chorch o.J/r /•> lon^ tt «nt |Hf. 

O UrJ jijut dknft, by 1^7 Peido^M 'j|| 
frace end meny Gc^cioiiSf rcocioo is. "^ 

Alfl» 



Mi«a cKkewff^ot rr^zrurpti caT.v.v.:* j I. c-ilk. J Wcf CJcapel nof to? , b»t oitiklf ftw m | 

'r-:t'4totdiiu« Hriiic rcc;b «.'. :".*?, . '-' 0* jfTr^e ;o?^t're* •-» ^ ^•* ill IklK - ' ^ - 



FAC-SMIi-S Ul- THE CHi'--'r»N .vr\-NT:N. 



' --.|-„i\ 1»-»'. 



?»*;>•».♦-*;**;■!* H^iiiuisu-'-;***:. ..;;;^ 



Citijli,u.t C0'iC»4t Sst*, 


.-»■. 


■'k 


hvnTr^Yv :•;:'::-' 






"iy,l« mil- -.■-.■.;i-. >:..■.!, ■ f. 


,; 




«■ 
















" '•-' t^!* !i :'=■■; ""','" 


.-, 










kMOT^ pi.-| ■ -^ 1, . ■ ;-. ■ 
SfrVi-f'*..-'!.. n.-,'. ■ •-■ . 


... 





lilTun-iiiurui 




FAC-SIMILE UF TH£ C 



•m < ■ 



■ ■■ I ■ i.i^Mwipr-B5r?3Bi|P-*' 



V 




;r^i^**D5X^S^v 




j*»'5 /^(Ti jTj j^ r^ V, iTi 




1^ 



T M F N E 7/ 



T E S T A M E N T 



OF OUR 
£ O n D A N D >; A V I O U R 



t-tw 



i)0» 



> 



ESUS CHRIST, ig 



TanPiitcl into iH 

INDIAN LANGUAGE. 

AND 

OiuCrtfd tol>; Printed uy k<^^ dmwfficnffs cf tkt Vnittfl CcLnits 

ia iSlEW-ENGLAN D, 

At the Charge, an J v/Ith the Confiat of ibc 

31 j C O R P O R A T I O N IN E K G L A K D 

I For lieTropa^.tucH of the G'-^tl itmmeji tht Indians 






IS 



t> 



«09 









in NtW'£»g'-if?if» 









Printed by Samuel Green av.,! M.nOA.ii:'^'' f}*<'tr:, 

MDCLXl. 






£►©» 



t 











4 






FAC-SIMILE OF THE ENGLISH Tl T l.E-F-A( .L uK THE NEV,' T£h7"MEM Of 1C61. 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



133 



Eliot (J.) — Continaed. 

130 printed leAves withoat page nambeis, and 
2 bUnk leftTea, in the following order: 1 blank 
leaf, the title of the new testament In English 
on 1 leaf verao blank, the dedication of the now 
teatament to Charles II. in 2 leaves, the title of 
the new testament in Indian on 1 leaf verso 
blank, Matthew to Revelation in 126 leaves, 
and 1 blank leaf at the end, 4°. Signatures A, 
A (repeated). B. C. D, £. F. G, If, I. K. L, Aa. 
Bb. Cc, Dd, Ee, Ff, 6g. Hh, li, Kk, LI, Mm, 
Kn, Oo, Pp, Qq. Rr, Ss. Tt, Un, and Xx, all in 
fonra. Matthew begins on the second A2, and 
Berelation ends on Xx3. In the Massachusetts 
Indii^ language. See the facsimiles of the two 
title-pages. 

It la worthy of 'remark that the Indian title 
is dated 1061, the year in which the new testa- 
ment was finished at the press. At that time 
it waa generally the custom, when the title was 
on a leaf of the first sheet of the text, as this 
one ia, to give it the date of the year in which 
the printing was begun. If the gospel of Mat- 
thew waa first put in type, instead of the gospel 
of John (which begins a new set of si^atures 
with Aa^, then the title may huve been origin- 
ally printed with the date of 1659 or 16G0, tho 
year of its commencement, and afterwards re- 
printed with the whole sheet for particular rea- 
■ona. However that may be, in all the copies 
which I have examined, thin title appears to bo 
on the original first leaf of signature A, and 
not an insertion in place of a canceled leaf. 
Dr. Trumbull muH be mistaken iu his state- 
ment, that "the English title and the Epistle, 
printed on a sheet of which the first leaf was 
left blank, were inserted between tho first 
(blank) and second leaves of the first sheet as 
originally printed.— and the signature A3 is 
repeated.** In all the copies examined, and of 
which good descriptions have been obtained, 
the English title and dedication are not inserted 
between any of the leaves of the first sheet, but 
are placed b^ore it ; and the first leaf of "tho 
flnt sheet as originally printed" can not be 
properly called a blank leaf, as it contains the 
Indian title, and is blank only on the verso. 

By a typographicsU error, the page hea<liugs of 
chapters 21 and 24 of tho gospel of Luke, on tlie 
leeto of leaves L2 and LI, were wrongly printed 
*'Cbap. 10" and *'Chap. 15," as in both of the 
Lenox copies of the separate issue. Other vari- 
ations are found in copies bound with tlie old 
teatament and metrical psalms. In most copies 
of the bible with the English general title and 
dedication, the diamond-shaped figure is found 
on the Indian titie of the new testament, and 
the errors occur in the page headings of Luke 
4m L2 and LA. In a few dedication copies of the 
bible, which have the same errata in the page 
headings of Luke, the diamond figure is omitted 
in the Indian new testament title, the space 
between the two linesi being blank. See the 
fho-similes. In other respects the two titles are 
«o much alike that they appear to have been 
printed f^om the same type, without resetting. 



Eliot (J.) — Continned. 

Some bibles with the general title in Indian 
only, and with the diamond figure on the Indian 
new testament title, have the page headings of 
Luke 21 and 24 correctly printed. Mr. O'Cal- 
laghan {Liet of Editions qf the Jloly Script urfe 
. . . printed in Atneriea, p. 2) has called 
attention to tho fact that "each verse forms a 
distinct paragraph until we come to Luke xv. 
(verso of K3) ; between that and the end of the 
Gospel, more than one, sometimes six versos 
are crowded occasionally into a paragraph, in 
order apparently to close that gospel and sig. L 
at the same time." It is probable that sheets 
A to L (Matthew to Luke) were printed by 
Green alone, and that Jubuson began the gospel 
of John with sheet Aa. before the printing of 
Genesis had been commenced. For remarks 
on the typography and other features of the 
work, see the note to tlie whole bible of 1663. 
The above trauslation of the Indian title is from 
Dr. Trumbull's Origin and Early Progreee of 
Indian Mieeione in New England. 

In a letter to Mr. Richsrd Floyd, the treas- 
urer of the Corporation in England, dated 
from R4>xbury, December 28th, 1658, Mr. 
Eliot wrote as follows: "I shall not trouble 
you with any thing at present save this one 
businesse of momenta, touching the Printing 
of the Bible in the Indian Langua;£e, touch- 
ing which busiues.^e sundry of the Elders did 
petition unto the Commissioners, moving 
Ihera to further it, as a principall means of 
promoting Religion among thom.^ And God 
so guided (witliout mans contrivance) that 
I was there when it came in. They moved 
this doubt whether the Trauslatiou I hod 
made was generally understood i to which I 
answered, that upon my knowledge it was 
understood as farro as Conecticot: for there 
I did read some part of my Translation be- 
fore many hundred English Witnesses, and 
thd Indians manifested that they d.d under- 
stand what I read, perfectly, in respect of 
the language, they further questioned whether 
I had expressed the Translation in true 
language? I answered that I feared after 
times will find many iuflrmities iu it^ qU 
humane woiks are subject to infirmity, yet 
those pieces that wore printed, viz. Genesis 
and Matthew, I bad seut to such as I thought 
had best skill iu the language, and intreated 
their animadversions, but I heard not of any 
faults thfy found. When the Conimissiont^rs 
ended their meeting, tlu^y did commit the 
further cousiderationof this matter to our Com- 
mission«'<rs, as I understand, of whom our Gov- 
emonr is president. Therefore at the coming 
away of thin Ship, I repaired to the Governour 
about it. I proposed this expedient, for the 
more easio prosecution of this work, viz. that 
yourselves might bemoved to hire some honest 
young man, who hath skill to compose, (and 
the more skill in other parts of the work, the 
lH>tter) send him over as your servant, pay 
him there to his content, or ingago payment, 



134 



BIBLIOORAPUT OF THE 



XUiot (J.) — Continaed. 

let bim serre yon here in New-En|tland al 
the preMe in Harvard Colledjce, and work 
under the Oulledg Printer, in impreasinK the 
Bible in the Indian langaage, and with him 
send a convenient stock of Paper to begin with- 
all. The (loveruoar was pleased to send for 
Mr. Norton to advise in it, who oame and did 
heartily further it, whereupon the Govemour 
promised to write unto your selves, and pro- 
pose the matter, which also I doe, and doe 
earnestly intreat your assistance herein." In 
a postscript he added: "They have none of 
the Scriptures printed in their own Language, 
save Genesis, and Matthew, and a few Psalmes 
in Meeter. and I blesse the Lord they have so 
much, and such as see these Notes may easily 
observe that they read them, and improve 
them, which putteth my soule into an earnest 
longing that they might have more teal. I 
blesHe the Lord, that the whole book of God is 
translated into their own language, it wanteth 

V but revising, transcribing, and printing. Oh 
that the Lord would so move, that by some 
means or other it may bo printed." According 
to his promise, Governor Endicott wrote to 
Floyd, December 28th, 1658: "I have been 
move<l by divers able and godly men here with 
us to proponed unto your pious consideration, 
whether it be not needful for the better instruc- 
tion of the Indians amongst us in the true 
knowledge of Go<l, to get the whole Bible of 
the old and new Testament, which is already 
Translated into the Indian tongue, to bo 
printed; Many here with us Divines and 
others judge it a thing that will be acceptable 
to God, and very profitable for the poor Ilea- i 
thens. If your selves doe so estoem of it too, ' 
it will be necessary to provide paper and letters 
and such things as may further the work, as 
also a Journey man Printer to bo helpefull 
nndirr Mr. Greene our Printer to expedite the 
work . . . Mr. Eliot will be ready at all times 
to correct the sbeetsas fast as they are Printed, 
and desireth nothing for his paines." 

In reply to these letters, the Corporation 
wrote to the Commissioners in New England, 
May 7th, 1659, as follows : "As to the printing 
of the bible in the Indian language; mensloned 
in Mr. Endicotts letter; which wee vnder- 
stand is alreddy translated into the Indian 
toungc ; wee conceiue will not onely bee accept- 
able vnto god; but uery proffltable to the poor 
heathen and will much tend to the promotion 
of the sperituall parte of this works amongst 
them ; and therfor wee offer it not onel^- as our 
owne but as the judgment of others that tho 
New Testament bee first printed in the Indian 
language ; and doe desire to vnderstand by the 
next what number of them you intend to haue i 
printed ; and how much paper the number will } 
take vp and that you send oner one sheet of pa- ! 
per which might agree with that alretldy 
printed; and whether you haue mattorialls 
sufficient to carry on the same; and because 
wee would haue noe faile therin haue thought 



Eliot ( J. ) — Continaed. 

good to send yoa ouer a oattologae of the mat- 
terialls fltt for printing with tb« charge of them 
according to information giuen ts; because 
wee are adnertlsed that if any of them bee 
wanting it may prejudice the finniahing of the 
worke and as for a printer if you want one wee 
desire yoa to send vs word how hee must be 
quallifyed whether a Composer or letter 
printer." To this letter the Commiaaionera 
replied, September 7th, 1859: "touching the 
printing of the bible in the Indian language 
being incnrraged by yoner aelues and preaaed 
by Mr. Elliotts affectionate aeale which bee 
hath constantly held forth for thia work, wee 
shall take order for the printing of the New 
Testament; which being finished wee shall 
therby bee the better directed in our firther 
proceeding therin; wee thinke to print * 
thousand Coppies, and for paper and other 
materialls shall depend on Mr. Vsher wboe 
hath vndertakn to furnish according to the 
printers direction." In the treasurer's account 
which accompanied this letter was an item of 
80{. 07t. 06d., "To Mr. Vsher for printing let- 
ters fur the bible." Besides the type here re- 
feried to, a new printing preAs and other nec- 
essary materials were purchased in London at 
the expense of the Corporation, and sent over 
to Massachusetts, where they ware put under 
tho care of Samuel Green, the regular printer 
of tho college press at Cambridge. 

A reforeuce to the undertaking is found in 
the tract entitled, A further Account of the 
progress of the Oospel Amongst the Indians in 
New Etigland (London, 1660), in the introduc- 
tory remarks of Joseph Caryl, dated " the 6th 
of the first Moneth. 1659 ' (i. e.. March 6,1660). 
as follows : ' ' And because, as the whole Work 
is great, so there are some great partaof it now 
in hand, as tho Printing of Davids Psalms and 
the New Testament (besides an intendment of 
printing of the whole Bible) in the Indian Lan- 
guage." 

The printing of the new testament was ac- 
cordingly begun, and a specimen sheet aent to, 
the Corporation in England, who in a letter 
dated from London, AprU 28, 1660, replied as 
follows: "Conseming youer printing of the 
New Testament in the Indian language, a sheet 
wherof you have transmitted to vs, wee con- 
curr with yoner selues therin, and doe approne 
of that pronision you haue made for printing 
the same conceiuoing and offering as our Judg- 
ments that it is better to print fifteen hundred 
then but a thousand ; hopeing that by inoor- 
ragomcnt from Sion Collidge, with whom wee 
haue late conference, you may bee enabled to 
print fifteen hundred of the ould Testament 
likewise ; knowing that the foundation of true 
religion is from the bible the ould and new 
Testament and that the furtherance therof ia 
of principle consernment; and further consid- 
ering the mntablenes of the times and the 
lines of those whose hartes are stired vp in 
that worke especially Mr. Elliott whoe wee 



\i 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



135 



Sltot (J.) — Continued. 

heare hath tmisUted the whole bible into 
the Indian language ; wee haae out of our 
deaire t6 farther a worke of toe great con- 
cernment hanring hopee th^t eomthinge wil- 
bee oollected in parUcalare with Relation to 
the printing of the oold Tesrament agreed with 
an aUe Printer for three yearee rpon the 
teannee and oonditione enclosed and vnder- 
standing by Mr. Vehera agent that there ie 
nothing wanting except paper wee haue sent 

*. an hundred and foar reames of euery same the 
aheet that is now sentoaer to th is of; Thatsoe 
there might bee nothlnge to hinder the dispatch 
of the whole bible hopeing that both presses 
being imployed and all other busines layed 
aside that might hinder it there wilbcea happy 
progreaae made by the retume of the next 
ahipps which may much further contribution 
with relation to it; and although wee hiiue by 
our former letters denired that for the reasons 
therin mencioned the nume of fine hundred 
pounds per annum onely may bee charged on 
va yett with respect ti»youerpiesent imcrgcn- 
ciea in relation to the printingof the NewTes- 
tament; wee haue bine willing to comply with 
youer desires in paying; tlio bill of eight hun- 
dred iK>nndsthisyearedr.iwneonvs, which wee 
hop«9 together with the one hundred twenty fine 
pounds twelue shillings aud ten pence remain- 
ing of the stoolie in Mr. Vshers bands will more 
then finish the worke of printing the same ; . . . 
wee desire you att the earnest request of Mr. 
Johnson the Printer and for his iiicurragement 
in this Tudertakeing of printing the bible in the 
Indian language his name may bee mencioned 
with others as a printer and person that hath 
Une Instrumental! therin." 

Tba new printer, Mr. Johnson, arrived in 
Kew England in the summer of 1660. Before 
September of the same year six sheets of the 
new testament ha<l been printed, as appears 
ftomacharge of 24 1, in the treasnrer'H account 
fortibat year, '*To Mr. Green for distributing 
the fontt of letters and printing six sheets of 
the new Testament in Indian act four pounds 
per sheet." At the next meeting of the Com- 
missionera in New Haven, they wrote to the 
Corporation, September 10, 1660, as follows: 
" in Crenerall wee haue bin enformed that about 
one hundred of Mr. Elliotts Indians can read 
in the bible and many other about Plymouth 
Martina vinyards and otlier pla<-es; . . . wee 
■hall attend youer aduise for the Impression of 
the whole bible without which we should have 
rested in oar former determination that the 
coppy might haue bine fully peru.-ted and per- 
fected by the most skilfiilest healpe^ in the 
Conntrey ; and such order is taken by the aduise 
and consent of Mr. Eliott Mr. Vsher Mr. 
Green and Mr. Johnson that the Impression of 
the onld and New Testament shalbee carryed 
on together which they haue alreddy begun 
and Besolue to prosecute with all diligence ; a 
aheet of Genesee wee haue soon which wee haue 
ordered shalbee Transmitted mto you; the 



EUot (J.) — Continued. 

printers doubt not but to print a sheet euery 
weeke and compute the whole to amount to a 
hundred and fifty sheets Mr. Johnson wilboe 
gratifyed with the honor of the Impression and 
acomodated in other Respects wee hope to 
content ; the paper sent an wee are enformed 
by Mr. Vsher is not all sizable ... Two of tho 
Indian youthes fonnorly brought vp to Read 
and writ are put apprentice ; the one to a Car- 
penter the other to Mr. Green the printer whoe 
take theiro trades and follow their Busines 
nery well." The latter of these apprentices 
was probably James the printer, afterwards 
called James Printer, who was employed on 
both editions of the Indian bible, and whose 
name appears in 1709 as joint printer with B. 
Green of Mayhf;w's translation of the psalter. 
In the treasurer's account sent with th' aboye"^ 
letter, there is a charge of I'M. U. 6d., " For 
two hundred Iteame of pap r lM>ught since our 
last accoumpt letters Inke setting them in the 
presse w:th matterialls to worke as by bill ap. 
peers." At the simo meeting (September, 
1660), "The Coinissi<mers for the Massachu- 
setts are desired and Impawennl . . . alaootocall 
on Mr. Green for an accoumpt or Inventory of 
all the letters for pi in ting, and uU other Inntru- 
ments in his bunds belongin;; to the Corpora- 
tion that it ma.y bee Ri'turned tothenoxtm<-et- 
ing of the Comissiimers ; and to agree with 
him for the print in;; of the bible." 

The printing of thn new testament was com- 
p1ete<l probably in tho summer of 1661. before the ^ 
next meetin <: of t ho ( .'onimirtsioners. On tho 18t h 
of May, 1661. the Corporation wn)te to the Com- 
roissioners that they had paid the bill for 8002. 
drawn on them, "hopeing that the same to- 
gether 34 lb. which wee vnderstand by youer 
account sent remaines in stocke will bee suffi- 
cient to defray tho Charge of printing tho bible 
and the disbursments there for tho present 
yeare." They also added in rehition to the 
changeof government caused by the restoration 
of Charles II: " wr>e suppose you are not 
strangers to the condition of afi'airen; and par- 
ticularly with re!«pect vnto onrselues being now 
noe Corporation: though not without good hopes 
that the same wilbee renewed and confeirmed 
by his majestic though possibly the business 
may bee actetl by other persons ; . . . howeuer 
wee desire that the printing of the bible may 
not b(^ retaurded." Upon the reading of this 
letter at their meeting in Plj'niouth, in Septem- 
ber, 1661, the ConiTuissioncrs resolved : " Vpon 
this on formation of the Desolution of the Cor- 
poration and intimrition of hopes that his ma- 
jestic would confeirmo tho same Sec. The Com- 
issioners thought meet to present his Majes- 
tic with the New Testament printed in the In- 
dian language with these presents following 
&c.," namely, the dedication as printed in front 
of the new testament, of which the following is 
an extract: "There are divers of them that 
can and do roade some part<4 of the Scripture. 
and some Catechisms, which formerly have 



136 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Eliot (J. ) — Continaed. 

been Translated into their own Language, which 
hath occasioned the nndertaking of a greater 
Work, viz: The Printing of the whole Bible, 
which (being Translated by a painfol Labourer 
amongst them, who was desirous to see the Work 
accomplished in his dayes) bath already pro- 
ceeded to the finishing of the New Testament, 
which we here humbly present to Your Majesty, 
as the first fVuits and accomplishment of the 
Pious Design of your Royal Ancestors. The 
Old Testament is now under the Press, waiting 
and craving your royal Favour and Assistance 
for the perfecting thereof.'* 

The Commissioners also wrote to Mr. Rich- 
ard Hutchinson and Mr. William Ashurst in 
England, September 12, 1461 : " youer desire 
that the printing of the bible may not bee Re- 
tarded wilbee attended according as wee shall 
see suitable. The New Testament is alreddy 
finished and of all the old the flue bookes of 
Moses ; wee haue heerwith sent you 20 peeces 
of the New Testament which wee desire may 
bee thuse disposed vis : that two of the speoiall 
being uery well bound vp the one may bee pre- 
sented to his M^jc.itie in the first place the 
other to the Lord Chancellor; and that fine 
more may bee presented to Doctor Reynolds 
Mr. Carrill Mr. Baxter and thetwovischancel- 
lers of the vniuersities whoe wee vnderstand 
haue greatly Incnrraged the worke ; the Rest 
wee leaueto bee disposed as you shall see cause 
... By the account you will find wee haue re- 
maining 414 lb : 4: 4 stocke a great part wherof 
wilbee expended in printing the bible and a new 
Impression of a Catichisme." The treasurer's 
account for the year contained a charge of 1962. 
19t. Id., "To sundry Disbursments vpon 
the account of printing as appeers by account 
now sent." The Commissioners also wrote to 
Mr. TJsher in Boston, Septembar 13, 1661, as 
follows: "youorcare in prouiding matterialls 
and furthering the printing of the bible wee 
thankfally accept desiring the continuance of 
the same vntil it bee Issued ; and the paying of 
Mr. Green as formerly together with the salla- 
ries and other paiments according to youer or- 
der heer enclosed . . . and it is our desires tha^ 
yon will take care for the printing of the pre- 
face before the Xew Testament with the title 
ac-cording to the coppies as ulsoe to send to Mr. 
Ashurst and Mr. huchcnson about twenty 
coppies of the New Testament to be disposed of 
according to our directions and order to them." 
To this was added a postscript : ' ' Wee pray you 
todemaund and Receiueof Mr. Green the whole 
Impression ottbo Xew Testament in Indian now 
finished ; and take care for the binding of two 
hundred of them strongly and as speedily as 
may bee with leather or as may bee most seru- 
icable for the Indians; and deliuertheraforthas 
you shall haue order or direction from any of the 
Comissioners for the time being of which keep 
an exact account that soe it may bee seen how 
they are Improved and disposed of." 

Tho treasurer's account rendered in Septem- 



XUiot (J.) — Continaed. 

ber. 1662, contained the entries: *'To printing 
the title sheet to the New Testament," II., and 
"To binding 200 Testomento at 6d. a peece,"5{. 
On the 10th of September, 1662, the Commis- 
sioners wrote to the Hon. Robert Boyle, the 
chief officer of the Corporation in England: 
" Wee haue heer with sent twenty Coppies of 
the new Testament to bee disposed of as youer 
honors shall see meet." In accordance with 
this letter they directed Mr. Usher *'to send 
oner to Mr. Boyle twenty of the Indian Testa- 
ments with the preface or Epihtle. " The entire 
edition may have consisted of only 1,000 copies, 
as proposed by the Commissioners in September, 
1660; but if 1,500 were printed, as was reoom- 
mended by the Cori>oration in April, 1660. then 
450 or more were probably bound up separately. 

Pi-om the preceding extracts of the records 
it appears that forty copies in all were sent to 
EngUnd with the English title and dedication 
prefixed. It is probable that not many more 
were issued in this form. In the first lot of 
twenty copies sent over in 1661, seven were 
specified for particular persons. The first was 
for King Charles II; the second for the Lord 
High Chancellor, Edward Hyde, first Earl of 
Clarendon (bom 1608, died 1674) ; the third for 
Dr. Edward Reynolds, bishop of Norwich (bom 
1509, died 1676) ; the fourth for the Rev. Joseph 
Caryl, an eminent nonconformist divine (bom 
1602, died 1673) ; the fifth for the Rev. Richard 
Baxter (bom 1615, died 1601) ; the sixth and 
seventh for the vice chancellors of the two uni- 
versities, Oxford and Cambridge. The remain* 
ing thirteen, and the second lot of twenty sent 
over in 1062, were loft Ut the disposal of Mr. 
William Ashurst and Mr. Riohard Hutchinson, 
the officers of the Corporation. 

Copift: All of these, of which particular 
descriptions have boon obtained, contain the 
diamond -shaped figure on the Indian title. It 
has not b«en ascertained that any copiea of thia 
issue are without it. 

(1) Mr. Clarence S. Bement, Philadelphia, 
Pa. Bound in calf antique, gilt edges. Sise of 
the leaf. 7^ by 5| inches. With the diamond 
shaped figure m the Indian title. It containa 
the bookplate of "The Society for propagating 
the Gospell in Foreign parts, 1704." The title, 
however, does not appear in White Kennett*a 
catalogue of books intended for that society's 
library (Bibliothecm Americanof Primordia), 
printed iu 1713. On one of the leaves is the au- 
tograph of Wra. Herbert, 1708, the eminent 
typographical anticiuary (born 1718. died 1795). 
It was subsequently owned by James Bindley, 
Esq., F. S. A. (born 1737, died 1818), and at the 
sale of the fourth poi-tion of his library in Lon- 
don, August, 1820 (no. 790), was purchased by 
" Ford " for 3«. fid. Not long after thia time it 
passed into the collection of Colonel Thomas 
Aspinwall, the United States consul at London 
from 1815 to 1853. Soe the privately printed 
catalogue of his library (Paris, 1833), where it 
is described under no. 168. This ooUeotion of 



ALGONQUIAN LANOUAaES. 



137 



XQiot (J.) — Continaed. 

books wMpnrchMedby the late Mr. Samuel L. 
M. Barlowin 1863. SeeMr. J.O. WTighVnRough 
List . . . CataU>ffU9 of the LibrtCry of Sam- 
U4l L, M. Barlow (Xew York, 1885), no. 560. 
At the tale of Mr. Barlow's library in New 
York, February, 1890 (no. 852), the testament 
was bought for the present owner by Mr. 
Charles R. Hildeburn for $610. 

<2) Library of the Boston Athenaeum. Bos> 
ton, Mass. In the original leather binding. 
TTitb the diamond shaped figure on the Indian 
title. It was perhaps a presentation copy to 
Dr. John Fell, dean of Christ Church and 
bishop of Oxford (bom 1625, died 168C). On 
the Ter»o of the second blank leaf at the front 
is written: **From his honored fr^.end Dr. John 
Fell Deane of Christ Church in Oxon.," and on 
the first blank leaf: "Boston Atheneeum given 
by Wm.LLoring. Jan. 30th, 1833." The tes- 
tament is not mentioneil in the catalogue of this 
library printed in 1874, but it ith still there. 

(3) Library of the British and Foreign Bible 
Society, London. No description has been ob- 
tained of this copy. See Bullcn's Catalogue of 
the Library of the British and Foreign Bible 
Society (London, 1857), p. 135. 

(4) Library of the British Museum, London. 
Press mark 466. a. 21. No description has been 
obtained of this copy. See the British Museum 
Catalogue of Printed Books (London, 1887), un> 
der Eliot; and Henry Stevens's Catalogue of 
the American Book* in . . . the British Mxueum 
(London, 1866), p. 59. 

(5) Library of the British Museum, London. 
A aeeond copy, in the Grenville collection, 
bound in blue morocco. No description has 
been obtaine<l of this copy. See the Bibliotheea 

QrsmiUiana (London. 1842), vol. 2, p. 724. 

(6) Library of the late John Carter Brown, 
Providence, R. I. Bound in brown calf. With 
the diamond shaped flgurn on the Indian title. 
It is accompanied by the old testament and met- 
rical psalms in a separate volume, uniformly 
bound, for a description of which see no. 37 of 
theliatof bibles of 1663. Thotwovolumos were 
formerly owned by Edward King, viacnnnt 
Kingsborough (born 1795, died 18:i7), and at 
the sale of his library in Dublin, announced 
for June, but postponed to November, 1842 (no. 
56). brought 32. Zs. Thej' afterwards came into 
the possession of Mr. £. V. Corwiu of New 
York. Acconling to one account, he iiaid 42. 
for them in 1842, but there is a statement in 
the Publishers' Circular for 1856. that " We be- 
lieve this same copy was sold some years since 
byBartlett &. Welford for $40." At the sale 
of Mr. Corwin's library in X«w York, Novem- 
ber, 1856 (no. 2552), the two volumes brought 
$200, being purchasea by Mr. John K. Bartlctt 
for the Brown collection. This copy of the 
testament was described in the catalogue of 
the Brown library printed in 1866 (part 2, no. 
66Q). Information furnished by Mr. John Nich- 
olas Brown, in letters of November 27th and 
Decembtr 2d, 1889. 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

(7) Library of the late John Carter Brown, 
Providence, R. I. A second copy, in the orig- 
inal binding of blue morocco. With the dia- 
mond shape<l figure on the Indian title. It 
was described by Mr. John R. Bartlett in the 
enlarged catalogue of tho Brown library printed 
in 1882 (part 2, no. 888). Inserted is a slip on 
which is written: "Sunday 25 Jan. 1795. I 
took this Testament from the Prince of 
Orange's Library in his Palace at Loo, which 
was abandoned to Pillage, as a memorial to the 
melancholy scene. — II. Turner." The palace 
of the Loo, tho summer residence of the king 
of Holland, is near the village of Appeldoom, 
about midway between Zutpben and the Zui- 
der Zee. It was taken by the French in their 
invasion of Holland in December and January, 
1794-95. Informntion furnished by the late 
Mr. John R. Bartlett, in letter of August 8th, 
1882. 

(8) Library of Edinburgh University, Edin- 
burgh. Bound with a copy of Eliot's Indian 
Grammar, 1666. No description has betrn ob> 
taine<l of this copy. It is brir-fly mentioned by 
Dr Trumbull in the Meviorial Jlittory of Bos- 
ton (Boston, 1880), vol. 1, p. 474, note. 

(9) Library of Harvard University, Cam* 
bridge, Mass. In vellum binding. With the 
diamond shaped figure on the Indian title. It 
was presented to the 'library by Middlecott 
Cooke of Boston, 1764-65, whose autograph is 
on the front cover. See the Catalogue of the 
Library of Harvard University (Cambridge, 
1830), vol. 1, p. 250. luformution furnished by 
Mr. Wni. H. Tillinghast, in letter of November 
2l8t, 1889. 

(10) Lenox Library, New York. In modem 
calf binding, red e<lgos (about 1850). Size of the 
leaf, 7/« by 51^ inches. With the diamond 
shape<l figure on tho Indian title. Mr. Lenox's 
description of this copy was printed in the 
Historical Magazine (October, 1858), vol. 2, p. 
307. 

(11) Lenox Library, New York. A second 
copy, apparently in the original calf binding 
(repaired), gilt edges. Size of the leaf, 7| by 
Tt^ inches. With tho diamond shaped figure 
on the Indian title. On the inside of the front 
cover, with a blank leaf pa.««ted over it, is a 
name in manuscript whicli appears to be "W" 
Plat el." On a blank leaf in front of the title 
is written: "Presented Feby 4th 1811 by 
Rev. I. Pratt." This may bo the Rev. Josiah 
Pratt, B. I), (bom 1708, died 1844), a naMve of 
Birmingham, England, vicar of St. Stephen's 
Church in London, aud for twenty-one years 
secretary of the Church Missionary Society. 
Among his writings are a prospectus of a poly- 
glot bible issued in 1797, and a life of the Rev. 
David Biainerd, missionary to the North Amer> 
ican Indians, publishoil in 1834. The testament 
subsequently came into the possession of Mr. 
George Brinley. of Hart fonl, Connecticut, and 
at the sale of the first portion of his collection 
in New York, March. 1879 (no. 786). it brought 



138 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Eliot (J. ) — Con tinned. 

$700, b«ing purchased by Dr. George H. Moore 
for the Lenox Library. 

(12) Library of the late George Livermore, 
Cambridge, Masa. With the diamond shaped 
figure on the Indian title. According to Mr. 
Livermore*8 mannscript description of this 
copy, it is "quite large, clean and perfect, — 
as bright apparently as when printed. '* It was 
purchased in Loudon, from Thomas Rodd, the 
bookseller, in 1845. InfDrroatii>n furnished by 
Mrs. Livermore, in letter of January 14th, 1890. 

(13) A copy advertised by Bernard Quaritch, 
in April, 1884 (332 Catalogue^ no. 15996), as a 
"beautiful copy in the original rebackoil calf, 
gilt edges," for 1052; again in April. 1887 (373 
Catalogue, no. 37867), for 952; and in December, 
1887 (86 Rough Lut, no. 109), for 901. The book 
has since been sold. 

(14) Library of Trinity College, Dublin. 
Press mark kk. o. 8. No description has been 
obtained of this copy. See tlie Catalogiu Li- 
hrorum Impretsorum qui in BUtliothfca OoUegii 
Saerosanetce et Jndividuce Triuitatia . 
adiervantur (Dublin, 1861), vol. 1, p. 315, where 
it is entered under the heading of version 
Americana, as "The New Testament, transl. 
into the Indian language. Cambridge (TJ. S.), 
1661. 4°." See also no. 14 of the list of copies 
of the bible of 1663. 

A copy was priced by Mr. Obadiah Bich, 
In his chrouulogical Catalogue of Books relat- 
ing . . . to Amerxea (London, 1832), no. 326, 
at '11. 2§. A copy is also entered in C. J. Stew- 
art's CataUtgue of the Library coUeeted by Mitt 
Richardton Currer, at Ethton Hall, Craven, 
Yorkshire (Loudon, 1833), p. 8, but it does not 
appear in tlio catalogue of the portion of her 
library suld at auction in London, July, 1862. 
According to a writer in the Historical Maga- 
zine (Octolter, 1858), vol. 2, p. 308, a ^ood copy 
of the testament was then in the library of 
Pelham Priory, a seminary for young ladies 
at Pelham, N. Y. The priory was the resi- 
dence of the late Rev. Robert Bolton, and 
the supposed testament, which wa.s merely a 
copy of Mayhcw's Massachuaet Psalter, lack- 
ing beginning and end, was sold under its prop- 
er title by auction in New York, June, 1887 
(Oatalogxie of the Pene Du Bois Collection, no. 
1754), for $4. The copy described in the sale 
catalogue of the library of Mr. Henry C. 
Murphy (no. 887), was not of this issue, and 
did not contain tbe English title and dedication. 

[ ] Wusku I wuttestamentum | nul- 

lordnmun | Jesns Christ | Nnppo- 
qnohwnssuaeneihmun. | [Diamond sha- 
ped figure of 32 pieces between two 
lines.] I 

Cambridge: | Printed by Samuel 
Green and Marmadnke Johnson. | 
MDCLXI [I66I]. 

127 printed leaves without page numbers, and 
1 blank leaf, as follows : the title of the new 



Eliot (J. ) — Continued. 

testament in Indian on one leaf rerso blank, 
Matthew to Revelation in 128 leaves, and 1 
blank leaf at the end, i9. Signatures A, B. C, 
D, E, F,G. H. I« K, L, Aa, Bb.Cc Dd, £e, Ff. Gg. 
Hh, li, Kk, LI. Mm, Nn. Oo, Pp. Qq, Rr, Ss, Tt, 
Uu, and Xx, all in fours. In the Massachnsetta 
Indian language. 

The new testament as issued for the use of the 
Indians prubably did not contain the English 
title and dedication, for when the Commission* 
ers directed Mr. Usher to send the second lot 
of twenty copies to England in 1662, they were 
careful to add : '* with the preface or Epistle.** 
The number of copies bound up in this form is 
not known with certAinty. It was the inten- 
tion of the Commissioners to print 1, 000 copies, 
but the Corporation advised them to print 1,500. 

j If the e<lition consisted of the latter number, 
then 400 copies or more may have been bound 
separately. On the 13th of September, 1661, 

I the Commissioners ordered 200 of them to be 
bound " strongly and as speedily as may bee 
with leather or as may bee most seruicable for 
the Indians," as is related in the note to the 
preceding title. 

Copies : Some of these perhaps contained the 
other variety of the Indian title, without the 
diamond shaped figure. (See no. 31 of the list 
of bibles of 1663.) The English title and the 
de<lioation are omitted in the copies described 
below. 

(15) Bodleian Library, Oxford. With tho 
diamond shaped figure on the title. It was Sam- 
uel Ponompam's bookin 16G2. Thiswas proba- 
bly the Ponanipam whoso confessions of faith 
were printed in the Tears of Repentance (Lon- 
don, 1653), in A further Accfnint (London, 
1600), and whose name, spelled Ponanpam. ap- 
pears in the records of the Commissioners for 
Septeml)er, 1G61, as one of the four Indian 
schoolmasters, assistants to Mr. Eliot, who 
were allowed an annual salary of 10{. each. In 
the same records for September, 1662, tbe name 
is spelled Tanunpum. Samuel was his baptis- 
mal name. In 1G74, there was a teacher named 
Samuel at tho Indian town of Wamesit, on 
Merrimack river, about twenty miles north- 
northwest from Boston, who was perhaps tho 
same perAon. Gookin says: "Their teacheris 
called Samuel ; son to the ruler, a young man 
of good parts, and can speak, read, and write, 
English and Indian competently. He is one of 
those that was bred up at school, at the charge 
of the Corporation for the Indians." The tes- 
tament also contains the inscription, "Dono 
dedit DQs Drake 1706." See the Catalogus Li- 
hrorvin Irnprettorum Bibliotheea Bodleianat 
(Oxouii, 1813), vol. 3, p. 605, where it is entered 
under the East Indian versions, as "Xovnm Tes- 
tamontum, Indice. 4°. Camb. 1661." Infor- 
mation furnished by the librarian, Dr. Edward 
B. Nicholson, in letter of December 5th. 1889. 

(16) Mr. Frederick F. Thompson, New York. 
Bound in red morocco, gilt edges, by Brad- 
street. With the diamond shaped flgure on 



•OS! !>^ 



5' 

« 



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0Xi 



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W V ^ KV 



i- 



VV'llTTE S T AM E NT UM :'?2 



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N- U L-L O R D U M U N 



JESUS CHRIST 



Nuppcqaobwufluacnc&muOr 



•OS 

«os 



•OS 






•OS 



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CAMBRIDGE: 

Printed by Sumnel ^reen and iS\C>irm.ulf(ke fc'jtipmt 

MDCLXI. 



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! sc* 



IS 



doi 



90> 



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FAC-SIMILE OF THE INDIAN TITLE-PAGE OF THE NEW TESTAMENT OF 1661. 



tnr»»"' 



^ti^ - — 1 -i- I •-[ - ' ■——■■• -* • ^j^^ 



vr V sKV 



WUTTESTAMENTUM'i 



NUL-LORDUMUr^ 



• • • • 



JESUS CHatST 



Niippoquolifrufruiiccditnattt 






C J M B R t D C £j 

PiintCd by Sammi CJ,een and %^t.trm*dKks fobnfottl 

MDCLXI. 




mimmmmm'm'm'm'i'im 



idUtttlila 



FAC-blMILE OF THE INO an 1 1 iL.t -'Ai.K ...^ T^r. NLA' T F -T A'/L NT ..•- Ir-ol 



■ « ■ I W ' I I •■ .1 



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CONTAf SIN'-'. :■■.:■ 

OLD TEST A M ! \ 

A N D T H r A' /: rt- 



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» • * » 



i •< 

INDIAN LANGUAGE * 



Trai.fljteJ into xV. 



A A" ]> 






^IC . Ordered to be Trintcd by the C^jv^y.-ji ;?;f ? * o^ t'-.c Z'^mtd CoLhu: 
21 1 in I^ E W-t iV o /.. , r N I\ 

2§ At the Charge, and with trx C^:r.-. .:; ,C ihe 

2f CORPORA-! ! t:- >• ? N r. ^ »; /■ _v ,v d 

21' Far ihi'J'rQ^'ii. . '.'. ' ; ;».-<; /.(c Ic.dir's 

^^ 

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•OS 

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*•"- -•••• i.^m'mmm «m« 



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fac-mM-u: «.'F tf'e: fs<',.kh TiTll-paije: uf TfEi .■.•<■. i.f. li:;ll «.-f ibOj. 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



139 



BUot (J.) — Continned. 
tbe title. It Is acconipaniefl by the old t«iita- 
uMBt anfll metrical pMlmii in a neparate toI- 
nme, nnifqrmly boand. Thia copy of tho new 
tMtaiuent contains on the last page the stamp 
ef the library of Trinity College. Dublin, and 
■ppeert to hare been taken out uf a copy of 
the vhole bible formerly in the library of that 
laatitation, which was sold tk% a diiiilioatr, atl- 
Tertiaed by Mr. Bernard Qnariteh in March 
and April, 1870 (259 Catalogue, no. 277). ami in 
Ju\j, 1870 (260 Catalogue, i.o. 1171), at 801.. and 
flnally purchased by Mr. Henry C. Marpliy, of 
BroohlyiL He extracted this jiortion of it to 
go with his other (better) copy of the old 
teatament and metrical psalms, which )io 
had purchased many years bi>fore. Tlie two 
Tolumee were then reboand, in l!'70 or 1871. 
At the sale of his library in New Ytirk, Murch 
1884, the new testament (no. 887), which was 
wrongly , describ«*d as contaiiiiu); tbo Kiifcliith 
tttl^.mnd tho old testament nud Diotrical psulnm 
(no. 880), were purchased for Mr. Thoinpiou at 
1340 for each rolame. For df^HcriptlonH of the 
eompanion volnme to tho ter<tuiiient and the 
other part of tho Triuit.v ColIe<;o bible, ihm^ no8. 
19 and 38 of the list of bibloH of 16G:{. Informa- 
tion ftimiahed by Mr. Thompson, in letters of 
Vorember 18th and 23d, 1989. 

— ^The I boly bible: | contaiuiug tho | 
old testament | aud tho Dew. | TrauH- 
lat«d into the | Indian langnaj:;c, | and 
I Ordered to be Printed by tbn ConiniiH- 
rionera of the United Colonies | in New- 
England, I At the Charge, and with tbo 
Oonaentof the | corporation in England 
I For Ihe Propagation of the (vonpel 
UKnigit the Indiana ! in Now-En'^land. 
Cambridge : | Printed by Samuel 
Oieen and Marmaduke Johnson. | MD- 
CLXIII [1663]. 

Mteend tUU: Mamusse ' wnnneetnpanAtamwe 

lup-biUum God | naneeswe | uulckone tcnta- 

■Mit I kah wonk | wiiskn te.staiiicnt. | Xo. 

^[aoalikinnumnk nashpo Wnttiuneuniob Chririt 

I aoh aaoowesit | Jobn Eliot. | 

Canbridge: | Printciioop nasbpe Samuel 
Oveea kah Marma<liike Jobnson. i 1(MJ3. 

JVantlation: The- whole , holy hiH-bible Go^ 
I both I old testament', andaUo new testamciK. 
I Thiatomed by the-servaut-of Christ | who is* 
wiled I John Eliot. 

Third fiUe: Thonew ; testumont of our | lord 
■ad aavlonr . Jesus Christ. Tranrtlate<l inUi tlie 
I Indian IauiaiaiEv>, I aud | Orden-d to h*' Print- 
ed by the Commissioners of tbo United Colonies 
I In Xew-EuKland, | At iho. Charge, and with 
tbe Consent of the | eorjrai-atiun In Kn^lnud I 
Tbr the Propa^cation of tbe Gospel »mon<!Ht tlio 
Indiana | In New-EnKlaud. | 

Cambrldg: | Prtnted by .Samii«>l Gr4-<-n and 
Marmaduke Johnson. | MDCLXI [ltH!I|. 

Fourth tiiU: Wunhn j wutteMtamentiini . nul- 
iMdnmon | Jeaua Christ | Xupi)o«{uoliwu»»au- 



EUot (J.) — Continned, 

aeneiimnn. | [Diamond shaped flf^nre of 32 
pieces between two lines.] ! 

Canibrid<;e: | I^rintiMl by Samuel Green and 
Marmaduke JobnHon. | MDCLXI |160I]. 

Caption of metrical ptalmn: VVamo | 
Ketuobomae uket(Ohomaoui;usb | David. 

Trannlation: All | the-siufiing songs-of | 
Darid. 

Caption of leaf of rults: Noowomoo Wnt 
tinutowaonk [tie] God, (ten. 5. 22. Enoch 
wet'clie I pomu«ibau God nirthwudt paitukxe 
koiltumH-ar-n. Wuuk | n,. wuma> Prov. 23. 17. 
quHb Jehovah ut'tuagii : new:g , keuatontumouHli. 

600 printed leaves wil1iuutpa;;euumbers,and4 
blank leaven, in thefull(iwiu}{onler: 1 blank leaf, 
the title of tbo wliolo liible in Englinh on I leaf 
vciKo blank, tbe dedication of tin* whole bilile to 
Chailert II. in 2 leavfH, tbe title of the viliole 
biide in iLdiiiu on 1 leaf veri*o blank, thelirttof 
tbe biMikn in iNitb toHtaiiients on I leaf recto 
blank, (reneHist to Malaehi in 414 loaves. I blauk 
leaf, the title of tbe new (estament in En^^lish 
on 1 leaf verso blank, tbededirationof tbenew 
te-uament to CbaileH TI. iu 2 leuveti, the title of 
tbi> new teMtauieiit in Indi.an ou I b'af verno 
blank. Matthew to Revelation iu I'JG leaves, i 
blank leaf, tbe metrical ver»4ion of the psalms 
in r»0 loaves, rules for Cliristian living uii 1 b-af, 
and 1 blank leaf at tbe end, 4*^. Si^naturcM A 
iu fiiur. two othei leaven \\ithoiit mark, A (re- 
peated), B. C, D, E, F. G, n, I, K, L, M. X, O. P. 
Q. R. S, T, r, X, Y. Z. A a to Zz, Aaa to Z/.z, 
Aaaa to Zz/.z, Aaaaa to Lllll, all in fours, nud 
Mmmmm in two, for the uM testament: A, A 
(repeated). 15. C. D. E, F. <;. H, I. K, L. Aa. Bb. 
Co. D«l, Eo. Ff. Gj:, lib. li, Kk, U Mm, Xu, Oo, 
1*1'. ^-J'l. li^ ^^t Tt, I'll, aud X\, all in tourn, for 
the new testaunnt ; A H. C, D, E. F, (J. If, I, K, 
L. M.and X. :ill iu fours, fi>r the metric.il pH^ilms 
and ilnal loaves. Iu the Mas.saebuMetts ludian 
lan^u.ipv S«M. the fac-himiles of tbi- two peuer- 
al title<), the liri«t \y-iiiv of the metrical poalmt), 
and tbe Hrht paije of the K-afuf rules. 

Th<* bible in priuted in double column.^ each 
column witlirelV-reuofsattbesideandheadiu^is 
Iu Tiidlau at the top. There are no summarli-tt 
nt the lio;;iunin^M of the ehnpters, as iu the sec- 
ond edititm. A full ]ia^e uf text mentiures G| 
by 4d iucbcs. iucludiii;; headiu^.s, catcbwoidd, 
nud rrfi'ienees. "The pa|M'r U'«od for this 
liibl..'." Dr. Trumbull remarks, "w.is of excel- 
lent quality, of the ^i/l• known U* ohl priutera 
an 'pot' (from its oii;;inal wator-mnrk, a tank- 
aid), whirh should measure llij by 15 imhe.s. 
piviui! <Ii by 7* for tin* (luarto foM." Acconl- 
in;j to Mr. Thomas {irmtonj of VHntin'j in 
America, vol. 1, p. LTioi. "This work was print- 
id with mw- types, full liueil lMMir;;iois ou a 
bn-vif-r 1mn1>, cumI for the purpose [.'], aud ou 
(;oo«l paper." 

In 1«6.", I>r. Trumbull caused to be printed a 
frw eo]iios (H.'i) of \\U translation fnun ludian 
into En^rlish of thi- baf of rules for Imly livinj; 
apitenibd to the nu-trical psalms. The nbovo 
t laudations of tbe Indian titb-s ai-e from hisos- 



140 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

say on the Origin and Early ProgreM cf Indian 
2Iitnons in New England. The two dedica- 
tioua have been reprinted in the CoUeetioni qf 
the ^fasiochuteUM Historieal Society, voL 7 ; in 
Thontaa'fl History of Printing in America^ vol. 
1: and in O'Callaghan'a American Bibles. A 
few copiea of the now testament dedication | 
alone, transcribed from the testament in Mr. 
Livermore'a poaseasion, were reprinted sepa- 
rately for Mr. David Palsifer in 1859. 

It has alreaily been mentioned above, in the 
note to the new testament, that the printing of 
the old testament was begun in September, 1060, 
and that iMfore September, 1661. the five books 
of Moses had been finished. In Ihe meantime 
the Corporation in England had received a new 
charter, and the Hon. Robert Boyle had been 
appointed its chief officer. To him the Com- 



missioners wrote from Boston. September 10, 
1662, as followiii : " the bible is now about halfe 
done ; and ctmstant progrosse therin is made ; 
the other halfe is lilce to bee finished in a yoare ; 
the future charge is vncertaiiie, by estimate 
not lesse then 200 lb : wee Iiane heer with sent 
twenty Coppies of the new Tfstament to l>ee 
disposed ot as youer honors shall see meet ; 
. . . AVce on«ly crane leane att present for 
the pre ueu ting of an objection that may arise 
concerning the particulars charged fur the 
printing wherin you will find 21 sheets at three 
pounds ten shillings a sheet and the rest but 
att 50 shillings a sheet the Reason wherof lyes 
heer: It pleased the honored Corporation to 
send ouer one Marmadnke Johnson a printer 
to attend the worke on Condition as they will 
en forme you: whoe hath Caryed heer very vn- 
worthyly of which heo hath bine openly Con- 
victed and sencured in some of our Courts 
although as yett noe «»xecntion of sentence 
against him; peculiaru fauor haneing bine 
showed him with respect to the Corporation 
that sent him ouer; but notwithstanding all 
patience and lenitie vsed towards him hee hath 
proue<l nery idle and nought and absented him- 
selfe from the worke more than halfe a yeare 
att one time; for want of who^e assistance the 
printer by his agreement with vs was to hane 
the allowance of 21 lb. the which is to bee de- 
fallcated out of his suUery in England by the 
honored Cor|>oration there.*' Among the 
charges in the treasurer's account submitted in 
September. 1662, is one: "To sundry Disburs- 
jnent« for printing the bible by bill of p*)rtioa- 
lars £237. 05. 00." A few of the items included 
in this charge are as Tollows: "To 160 Ream 
of paper att 6«. per ream, "4AZ.; "To printing the 
title sheet to the New Testament," U.; "To 
printing 21 sheets of the old Testament, att 
31b. IDs. per sheet Mr. lohnson beini; absent/' 
732. 10«.; "To printing 25 sheets with his healp 
att 50 shill: per sheet." 621. lOf.; "To binding 
200 Testamenta at 6d. a peece," 51. In reply to 
the letter of the Commissioners, Mr. Boyle 
wrote ft>om I^ndon, April 9, 1663: "wee hope 
the bible wilbee finished by the Retame of the 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

Shipps and then and not before wee desire to 
Receiue some from you; . . . Conseming 
Marmeduke Johnson the Printer wee are sorry 
hee hath soe miscarryed by which meanes the 
printing of the bible hath bin retarded we are re- 
solved todefault the 21 lb. you mention out of his 
sallary: Mr. Elliott whose letter beares dat« 
three monthes after yoners writes that Johnson 
is againe ReturQe<l into the worke whose brother 
alsoe hath bine with vs and gives vs great as- 
surance of his brothers Reformation and fol- 
lowing his basines dilligently for the time to 
come ; and hee being (ait Mr. Eiliott writes) an 
able and vsefnll man in the presse wee hauo 
thought fitt further to make tryall of him for 
one yeare longer and the rather because vpon 
Mr. Elliotts motion and the goodnos of the 
worke; wee hane thought fitt aud ordered that 
the Psalmes of Danid in meter slialbee printed 
in the Indian language; and soe wee hope that 
the said Johnson performing his promise of 
amendement for time to come niaj* bee vsefull in " 
the furthering of this worke which wee soe 
much desire the flnnishing of.'* 

The printing of the old testament was fin- 
ished before the next meeting of the Com mis- 
sionera, when they wrote to the Corporation in 
England, September 18, 1663, as folio wh: "Some 
time atler our la^t letter Marmeduke lohn- 
son Returned to the Presse and hatti carried 
himselfe InditTerently well since soe farr as wee 
know but the bible being finished and little 
other worke presenting ; wee dismised him att 
the end of the tearme you had contracted with 
him for; but vnderstanding youer honorable 
Corporation hath agree<l with him for another 
yeare ; wee shall Indeavour to Imploy liitii as 
wee can by printing the psalmes and another 
little Treatise of Mr. BaxU^rd which Mr. Elliott 
is translateing into the Indian langn:ige wliich 
is thought may bee vsefnll and prutitahie to the 
Indians; . . . Weehaue onlere<l Mr. VHhrr 
to present youer honors by the nextshipp with 
20 Coppyes of the bible and as many of the 
Psalmes if printe<l of before the shippoa d(>part* 
ure from hence." It was also resulved that 
"Mr. Simon Bradittreet and Mr. Danforth are 
Requested to take care for the preparation of 
an epistle to the Indian Bible dedicatory to his 
M(\jestie and cause the .same to bee printe<l," 
which was accordin^ily done. After the Indian 
version of the psalms in metre had bet'n fin- 
ishetl at the press, probably in November or 
December of the same year, it was appended 
to the bible, and the work was ready for bind- 
ing. Twenty copies of the completed book in 
sheets were then sent to the Corporation in 
England, where Home of them (or perhaps all) 
were bound nnlfornily in dark-blue morocco. 
On the 7th of March, 1C64, the Cor]>oration 
wrote to the Commissioners: " Wee desire by 
youer next to In forme vs how many bible.n haue 
bine printed in the Indian Language It be- 
ing that which wee Judge might bee of pub- 
licke Repute ynto the worke.'* One copy of 



ALOOXQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



141 



Sliot (J.) — Continaed. 

the bible was preaented to king Charlen, con- 
ceming which Mr. Poyle wrote, April 21, 1664, 
AS follow* : "I waited this Day vpou the Kin^; 
with your translatioa of the Bible, which, I hope 
I need not tell you, ho receuod acoording to his 
enstome yery gratioasly. But though ho lookd 
ft pretty while vpou it, & sbewd some things 
in it to those that had the honour to be aboat 
him in his bed-chamber, into which he carr^'d 
it, yet the Vuexpectod comraing in of an Extra- 
ordinary £nuoy6 from the Emperour hindred 
me from receueing that fuller expression of his 
grace towards the translators and Dedicators 
that might otherwise have been expected." 

In September, 1064, the Commissioners wrote 
to the Corporation in England: "the number 
of Bibles with Psalm books pricted were vp- 
wards of a thousand ; of Baxters Call 1000 and 

,« of Psalters 500 diuers wherof all sorts are dis- 
posed to the Indians and the rest reddy for 
theire vse as they can be bound vp and there 
may bee occation." Among the charges in the 
treasurer's account presented at the same date 
were the foUowing: " For two smale Chests to 
pat the Bibles in that were sent to England,'* 
5&.', "To printing the Indian Psalmes 13 
•heeta at2 lb. per sheet," 26^.; " To printing the 
epistle dedicatory to the Bible," II.; " To print- 
ing 9 sheets of the Psalter at 20«. per sheet," 
91.; **To Packthred and Dry falls to put the 
bibles in," IZ. 5«.; "To boat hier for carrying 
and Becarrying paper and bibles." SLGs.-. ** To 
binding and clasping 42 bibles at 2«. 6d.per 
bible." Si. 5f. 

From the account which Samuel Green the 
printer rendered to the Commissioners, Sep- 
tember 19, 1663, it appears that he had received 
80 reams of paper from the Society in England, 
and 889 reams from Mr. Usher, making 469 
reams in all. Of this quantity he had used 30 
reams "for printing twoCattachismes" (Pier- 
son's in 1668, and Eliot's in 16G2), and 368 reams 
**for printing the Bible." leaving 71 reams in 
his possession. In addition, there were 61 
reams remaining with Mr. Usher. Dr. Trum- 
bull giTes the following estimate in his essay 
on th* Origin and Early Progreti of Indian 
MUtiOHS in New England (Worcester, 1874), 
page 38: "For printing the Bible (not including 
the Psalms in Metre) Mr. Green used 368 reams 
of paper. With the usual allowance for waste 
sheets, this would work 161,920 sheets. The 
Bible contains 544 'leaves, or 136 sheets; the 
Kew Testament 128 leaves, or 32 sheets. The 
Psalms (as printed in the Old Testament, and 
separately worked as the 'Psalter') 9 sheets. 
Assuming that the edition of the New Testa- 
ment was 1.500, of which 500 were bound sep- 
arately, we have the distribution of the paper 
nearly as follows: 

600 New Test's, of 32 sheets. Sheets, 16,000 

SOOPsalters, 9 " " 4,500 

lOIOBlbles, 130 " *• 141,440 



161.940 



Eliot (J. ) — Cotitinaed. 

sheets, within a single quire of the 368 reams 
charged. The first edition of the Bible was 
'npwanls of a thousand,' but, probably, not 
quite 1.050." 

The records of the Commissioners contain, 
under the date of September 13.1667, the t'ol- y 
lowing charges: "To two hundrecl Indian 
Bibles bound and clasped 2«.6d.," 2U\ and 
" To Indian bibles primers deliuered to Mr. 
Elliott and Mr. lohn Cotton and to Scollers," 2 1, 
10<.03d. At a meeting held in Plymouth, Sep- 
tember 5, 1072. it was resolved that " Thomas 
Danforth, Ksqr. is ordered to take care that 
all the Bibles and other prints belonging to the 
Indians be bound vp and not lost : and for that 
end is to oall for the same where they are now 
Resting and dispose therof." 

It appears that the above-mentioned charge 
of 2«. Od. for binding and clasping each bible 
was not satisfactory to the binder, John Kat- 
life, who in 1604 addressed the following letter 
to the Commissioners: "For The Honnoured 
The Comissioners of the united Collonyes in 
New England met at Hartford, These present. 
May it please your worships, The providence 
of god so ordering it, that I could not be so 
hapy as to be here at your last meeting at Bos- 
ton, there toadress myselfe unto your worships 
shout the bindeing the Indian Bibles ; the onely 
incourageing work which upon good Intelli- 
gence caused me to transport myselfe, and fam- 
ily into New England, and which I desire to 
promote, by my art, and in my Lawfull calling 
as a thing tending so much to the hunour of 
god, by the a<lvancemeut of Religion, wherein 
your honoured selves doe claime a worthy 
remembrance, as Chiefe Instruments and prop- 
agators of it and flndeing that > our worships 
had referred the care of bindeing and prico to 
Mr. Usher, I have by his appointment and ortler 
made some progress therein, yet not flndeing 
him verry willing without your worships' ctm- 
sent, toc4>me up to a suitable price (ho profi-ss- 
ing himselfe but to bee your worships' steward) 
in that behalfe, have Inforceil me to appeal Trom 
him unto yourselves in this matter and humbly 
to acquaint you that under 3«. Ad. or 3f . 6d. p, 
book I can not binde them to live comfortably 
upon it, one BiLle being as much as I can com- 
pleat in one day, and out of it tiudu Thred, 
Glew, Pastelioard, and Leather Claps, and all 
which L cannot nuply iny selfe for onr shilling 
in this country. I question not but the jirint- 
ers if thoy please are able to Infonn your Wor- 
ships of the ReaHoiiiibleness of my ap])oal ia 
this cuHC. though I bhuno not Mr. Usher in I ho 
Least, and I tinde by experience that in things 
belonging to my trade, I here pay 18*. for that 
which in England I could buy for four Hhil- 
lings, they being things not forniorlv much used 
in this c^iuntry. Were I before your Worships 
I couhl fcrtht-r amplify ray demand by Roamm 
to be Just and I.^wfull; so likewise I doubt 
not but others can that may appear before you ; 
but Relying upon your Worship's wisdome and 



142 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

that upon coosideration yoa will Judge the 
Artificer worthy of hU wages, 1 shall not 
further trouble yoa, but expecting your favour- 
able concession thereto for the better carrying 
on of the work and for my Incouragement 
therein, prayeing for your Worships* Prosper- 
rity subscribe myselfe, Your Worships' humble 
servant John Ratlifo. Boston, Aug. 30, 1664." 
Indorsed: "Massachusetts, Jno. RatlilTA Let- 
ter to Comisaioners at Hartford, August 30th, 
166i." 

Seven varieties of the Indian bible of 1663, 
with the English general title, are described 
below. Jheae differ in the number of certain 
preliminary leaves, namely: the dedication of 
the whole bible, the Indian general title, the 
leaf of contents, the English new testament 
title, and the dedication of the new testament, 
one or more of which are generally omitted ; 
also in the Indian new testament title, which 
sometimes does not contain the diamond 
shaped figure. For an account of the varia- 
tions in different copies of the new testament 
portion, see the notes to the separate issues of 
the new testament in 1661. The bible with 
Indian titles only is described under a separate 
title. 

CopitM of the firit variety : Containing the 
English general title, the dedication of the 
wli(>le bible, the Indian general title, the leaf 
of contents, Genesis to Malachi. the English 
new testament title, the dedication of the new 
testament, the Indian new testament title with 
the diamond shaped figure, Matthew to Revela- 
tion, and the metrical psalms with the final leaf 
of rules. 600iprinted leaves, and 4 blank leaves. 

(1) Mr. Theodore Irwin, Oswego, N. Y. It 
remained in the original leather binding until 
1879, when it was clowned and rebound in 
brown levant morocco by F. Bedford, preserv- 
ing three of the original blank leaves. Size of 
the leaf, 7 1^0 by 5j inches. The Indian new tes- 
tament title contains the diamond shaped fig- 
ure. On the recto of the leaf of contents is 
written, " Thomas Shepard's Book. 2. 6^. 1666. 
ye gilt of ye Rev* Translator." This was the 
son of the Kev. Thomas Shepard, minister of 
Cambridge, who died in 1619. He was bom in 
1035, graduated at Harvard College in 1653, 
aud was minister of Cbarlcstown from 1669 un- 
til his death in 1677. His library, probably 
including the Indian bible, was bequeathed to 
his son, also named Thomas Shepard (bom 
1658, died 1685), who was minister of the same 
church from 1680 until his death. A memo- 
randum on a blank leaf at the front shows that 
it was once owned by Thomas Nixon of Fram- 
Ingham, afterwards of Southborough, Massa- 1 
chusetts (born 1736, died 1800), who was an 
ensign in the French and Indian war of 1756, , 
and colonel of the sixth Massachusetts regi- , 
nient during the revolution. From him it 
passed to his son. Thomas Nixon junior (bom 
1762. died 1842), who left it to his son, Warren ' 
Nixon. At the end of the volume is the follow- 1 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

ing note in manuscript: "This edition of 
Eliot's Indian Bible owned by Mr. Nixon of 
Framlngham is more valuable on account of its 
having the epistles dedicatory, than either of 
the two copies of thU work now in the posses- 
sion of Harvaitl College. It is the same edition 
it would seem as the copy of the Rev. Doctor 
Harris, which was purchased by Mr. Crown* 
inshield after the Doctor's death for fifty 
dollars. ... If the owner of this volume 
shoald ever feel willing to part with it we are 
assured that the donation would be thankfully 
acknowledged by the College at C [am bridge)." 
The bible was afterwards deposited in the libra- 
ry of the American Bible Union of New York, 
and ill 1877 or 1878 was offered for sale to the 
Astor Library And other institutions for abont 
$500. It was purchased by Mr. J. W. Bouton, 
the New York bookseller, who priced it at $750. 
From him Mr. Irwin bought it and sent it to 
London to be rebound. See the privately 
printed Catalogue qf the Library . . . bdong- 
ing to Theodore Irwin (New York, 1887), no. 168. 
Additional information furnished by Mr. Irwin, 
in letter of AprU 26th, 1880. 

It is related in Francis's life of Eliot, that 
the Bev. Thaddens Mason Harris of Dorohes* 
ter "discovered in a barber's shop Eliot's In* 
dian Bible of the first edition, in a mntilated 
state, which was in the process of being osed 
for waste paper. It was found to contain both 
of the dedications to the King ; and Dr. Harris 
seized upon it with all the interest belonging 
to the discovery of a long-lost treasure. He 
transcribed the addresses, and pablished them 
in the Collections of the Massachusetts His- 
torical Society." Dr. Harris himself, in his 
reprint of theso dedications (JfoM. HieL 80c, 
CoU. vii. 222-228), says: '* Of six copies of the 
Indian bible, which I have seen, no one pos* 
sessed those dedications. The following were 
taken from a mutilated copy, used in a barber's 
shop for waste paper. Fnmi this intruded 
destruction they were eagerly anatched, by the 
hand which writes this, at trvkf valuable relieke.'* 
It has not been ascertained what became of this 
copy. The writer of the manascrip| note in 
Mr. Irwin's bible probably had the above ac- 
count in mind when he mentioned Dr. Harris's 
copy : but the only one sold at the Doctor's sale 
in January, 1843, was of the edition of 1685, 
which was purchased by Mr. Crowninshield 
for $30, and is now in th^ possession of Mr. Gun- 
ther of Chicago. Mr. Thomas, in his account of 
the two dedications in the Indian bible (Hit- 
tory of Printing in America, Worcester, 1810, 
vol. 1, p. 475), says: " I recollect to have seen, 
many years since, a copy that contained them ; 
that which I possess is without them, as aie 
all others which I have lately examined." 

Copies 0/ the teeond variety : Containing the 
English general title, the dedication of the 
whole bible, the Indian general title, the leaf of 
contents, Genesis to Malachi, the Indian neW 
testament title with the diamond shaped figoze, 



AliOOMQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



143 



SUot (J.) — Continaed. 

Xatibew to ReTelation, and the metrical 
peelms with the final leaf of rules. 507 printed 
leayee. and 3 bhuik leaves. The English new 
teatament title and the dedication of the new 
teatement are omitted in these copies. 

(2) Library of Brown University, Provi- 
dence, ILL A well preserved copy, with the 
exeeption that the diamond shaped fi<|[nre has 
been out oat of the Indian new testament title. 
It eootftins manuscript notes in English, In- 
dian and shorthand on the margins, nnd many 
of the passages and verses are marked, espe- 
daily in the new testament. At the end are 
fimrpagesof manuscript, in shorthand, English 
and Indian. Dr. Reuben A. Guild, the libra- 
Tlan, supposes for various reasons that this copy 
of the Uble belonged to Roger Williams (born 
ISn, died 1683), who was known to be " a pro- 
fleientln shorthand," and that the notes and 
annotationa are in his handwriting. On one of 
the pages is written " College Library," in the 
hand of James ICanning, the president of the 
University (then called the College of Rhode 
Island), flrom 1765 to 1701. "Durini; the war 
of the RevolnUon the book was one of the 500 
In the library which were removed to Wren- 
tham.lCass., for safety, in the care of the Bev. 
William Williams, a member of the first grad- 
uating class." See the Oattihgue of the Lxbrary 
qfSnwn ITnivenity (Providence, 1843), pp. 130, 
14A. Information famished by Dr. Guild in a 
letter dated April 25th, 1880, and in an article 
printed io the NevhTork TitMM for May 1st, 
1880. 

C3) Vr. J. Pierpont Morgan, New York. 
Bound in brown levant morocco by F. Bedford, 
preserving all of the original blank leaves. 
Siae of tke leaf; 71 by 5| inches. The Indian 
new testament title contains the diamond 
shaped flgare. This bible was once owned by 
White Keanett, bishop of Peterborough from 
1718 until his death In 1728, and has his name 
on the lower part of the English general title. 
In 1880, acoording to Dr. Trumbull, it was sold 
by Bernard Quaritch to Mr. George Brinloy, of 
Hartfbrd, Conn., at the sale of whose library in 
New Tork, March, 1870 (no. 787), it was pur- 
chased for Mr. Morgan for $1,000. 

(4) Library of the Zealand Academy of Sci- 
enoea (Zeenwsch Genoot«chap der Weten- 
■ehappen), Middleburg, Holland. Bound in 
leather, with red edges, in fine condition. It 
probably contains the diamond shaped figure 
on the Inilian new testament title. In the Cat- 
mloguM der BibHothefk van het Zeruwteh Oenoot' 
aekap (Middleburg, 1845), p. 3, it is entered as 
"The Holy Bible translated into the Indian 
laognage, Cambr. 1663." In the enlargc<l cat- 
alogue of the same library, p. 260, no. 1087, it is 
described with the English and Indian general 
titles and the Indian new testament title. A 
report on the two copies of the Indian bible in 
Ahe library of this academy was read at one of 
its meetings in December, 1873, by the librarian, 
F. Nagl^aa, and snbeeqaently printed in n 



Eliot (J.) — Continaed. 

separate pamphlet. An English translation of 
it is given in the Proeeedingt cf the MastaehU' 
tetti Hiitoriedl Society for 1873-75, pp. 307-300, 
in which it is stated that this copy of the bible 
contains "the double title and the dedication 
to Charles II." See no. 30 of this list for an 
account of the other copy. 

Copifi of the third variety: Containing the 
English general title, the dedication of the 
whole bible, the leaf of contents, Genesis to 
Malachi, the Indian new testament title with 
the diamond shapetl figure, Matthew to Revela- 
tion, and the metrical psalms with the final leaf 
of rules. 506 printed leaves, and 3 blank 
leaves. The Indian general title, the English 
new testament title, and the, dedication of the 
new testament are omitted in these copies. 
Several of the bibles put under this heading 
(nos. 6, 7, 8, and 14), of which full descriptions 
have not boon obtained, may perhaps belong to 
the second or fourth variety. 

(5) Astor Library, New York. Bound in 
morocco by,F. Bedford. With the diamond 
shaped flgtiro on the Indian new testament 
title. /It was a duplicate fh>m the library of 
Trinity College, Dublin, and contains the stamp 
of that institution. In March and April, 1870 
(250 \^talogue, no. 276), and in July, 1870 (260 
Catal&gue, no 1170), it was advertised for sale 
by Mr. l^rhard Quaritch at 2502. ; in January, 
1873 (2BfMitalogM, no. 0026), and in October, 
1873 (201 Catalogue, no. 18060), at 2251. ; and in 
August, 1875 (208 Catalogue, no. 7543), at 2002. 
It was purchased by Mr. Alph. L Pinart, whose 
book plate was added, and at the sale of his 
library in Paris, January, 1884 (no. 113), was 
bought again by Mr. Quaritch for 2700 francs. 
Ho advertised it in April, 1884 (352 Catalogue, 
no. 15007), at 2252., when it was purchased by 
Mr. Astor. See the supplementary Catalogue 
of the Aator Library (Cambridge, 188G). vol. 1, 
p. 402. For the description of another dupli- 
cate from Trinity College of the same edition, 
b it with Indian titles only, which also came 
into thomaikt't in 1870, see no. 88 of this list. 

(6) Bodleian Library, Oxford. See the Cat- 
alogus Libroium Jmprettorum Bibliotheetr Bod- 
leian(E (Oxonli. 1843), vol. 1, p. 250. where it is 
entered under the heading of version Virgin, 
ianop, as: ''llie ludv Bible in the language of 
the Indians in Virginia by John Eliot. A^» 
Cambridge, in New England, 1663." It is sup- 
posed to be of tlUs variety, but in the absence 
of a more particular description it can not be 
determined exactly what kind of a copy it is. 

(7) Library of the British Museum, London. 
Press mark C. 10. a. 1. With a colored frontis- 
piece of the royal arms of Euglaud inserted: 
Thin is probably the co]>3' deHcril)ed in tlm Bib- 
liotheece Uequf Catalofjiie (London, 1820), vol. 1, 
p. 270. See the British Mu*e\im Catalogue of 
Printed Book* (London, 1887). nnder Eliot; 
and Henry Stevens's Catalogue of the American 
Bookein . . . the British Museum (LoniVon, 1866), 
p. 56. It is suitposed to be of this variety, with 



144 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



XUiot (J.) — Continued. 

the dimzDund Bhaped figure on the Indi*n new 
tetttamcnt title. See also no. 23 of this lUL 

(8) Library of William Cavendish, second 
earl of Burlington and seventh duke of Devon- 
shire, Chatsworth, England. Bound in purple 
morocco. The commencement of this collec- 
tion of books dates back to the reign of Queen 
Elizabeth, but the greatest additions were 
made by William George Spencer Cavendish, 
the sixth duke of Devonshire (bom 1790. died 
1858), "who is justly entitled to be called the 
founder of the Chatsworth library in its pres- 
ent form." He purchased the library of Thomas 
Dampier.' bishop of Ely, io 1B12, and bought 
largnly at the sales of the Stanley, Home 
Tooke, Townley, Edwards, and Roxburghe 
libraries. Most of his books, which were soat- 
tered among his several houses, were remove<l 
to Chatsworth in 1815. See the Catalogue o/the 
Library at OhaUrtcorth (London, 1879), vol. 1, p. 
180. In the absence of a more particular de- 
scription, the bible is supposed to be of this 
variety, with the diamond shaped figure on the 
Indian new testament titl^. 

(9) Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 
In the original bindingof dark blue morocco, gilt 
edges. W ith the diamond shaped figure on the 

Indian new testament title. Some of the leaves 
are loose and stained. The price mark of It. 6d. 
is written on the first title. On the verso of 
the new testament title is written: "Rachel 
Gaither Daughter of John Gaither and Ruth his 
Wife was bora April 19th, 1687," and below it a 
list of the children of " Rich' Tucker and Su- 
sanna his Wife," Rachel, Susanna, Elizabeth. 
Richard, and Rebeacker, who were bom in the 
years 1744, 1746, 1748, 1750, and 1752, respect- 
ively. On the blank leaf between the new test- 
ament and metrical psalms is written : " David 
Whittle the Son of John Whittloand Rachel his 
Wife was Born . . . July 4th, 1760." The bible 
was purchased for the Library of Congress from 
a Maryland family about the year 1872. It is 
mentioned in Mr. Nathanid Paine'sliHt, printed 
in his Jirie/Xotiet o/the Librari/o/th< American 
Antiquarian Society (WorcesttT, 1873), p. 55. 
See the Alphabetical Catalogue of the Library 
0/ Congrett (Washington, 1878), vol. 1, p, 701. 

(10) Mrs. Ralph L. Cutter (Laura M. Eliot). 
Brooklyn, X. Y. In the original dark blue 
morocco binding, gilt edges, containing all of 
the original blank leaves. Size of the leaf, 7^ 
by 5| inches. AVith the diamond shaped fig- 
ure on the Indian uttw testauiont title. An un- 
UMually large and fine C4ipy, with many rough 
leavcM. It may have been a presentation copy 
to Ueury Asburttt, Es<]., the treasurer to the 
Corporation for propagating the gospel among 
the Indians in New Eug and, who died in 1680. 
At the top of the first title is the partially de- 
faced signature of "Wm. Ashhurst," sup- 
posed by Dr. Moore and Dr. Trumbull to lie 
Sir William Asliurst, the son of llenry. who 
was lord mayor of London in 1693, a prominent 
member, and afterwards governor, of the 



Eliot (J.) — Continaed. 

above named Coi-poration. and who died in 1720* 
There was another "Wm. Ashhurst," how- 
ever, an elder brother of Henry, whose sig- 
nature is found in the copy described under 
no. 17 of this list. It afterwards came into 
the possession of Mr. John Allan, of New 
York, the well known antiquarian and book 
collector (born 1777, died 1863). According to 
Mr. George P. Philes, Mr. Allan told him that 
he bought it for $10 from a person who brought 
it to him. At the sale of Mr. Allan's library 
in New York, May. 1864 (no. 1013), it was pur- 
chased by Mr. J. W.Bouton, the bookseller, 
for $825. It next came into the possession of 
Mr. George Brinley, of Hartford, Conn., and at 
the sale of the third portion of his library in 
New York. April, 1881 (No. 5682), it was pur- 
chased for 1900 by Dr. Ellsworth Eliot for his 
sister, the present owner, who is a direct de- 
scendant of John Eliot. A description of this 
copy, made by Mr. Peter Hastie, while in Mr. 
Allan's possession, was printed in the HiMtori' 
eal Magazine (March, 1859), vol. 3, pp. 87, 88. 

(11) Mr. John Lyon Gardiner, Gardiner's 
Inland, N. Y. In the original calf binding with 
gilt tooling, lacking the clasps and showing the 
marks of much use. With the diamond shaped 
figure on the Indian new testament title. The 
first leaf of the dedication is lacking. The 
second leaf is loose, together with the English 
general title and front cover. The bible is 
ruled throughout with red ink, around every 
page, around the headings of the chapters, and 
between and at the tops of the columns. This 
was evidently done before the book was bound, 
as vome of the sheets have been incorrectly 
folded. Mr. John Lyon Gardiner (bom 1770, 
died 1816), the seventh proprietor of the island, 
and grandfather of the present owner, made 
the following note in it: *'I received this 
Indian Bible from Joshu* Nc»esaoh of the Ni- 
hantic tribe in Lyme, ^Qooaehtancntt ' by 
means of Daniel Wauheat; this vj May 1813. 
It is said to be presented to the tribe by a Sa- 
chem of the Moheags in Norwich," etc. Dated : 
"Mouchongonuc, Gardiners Island, May vj, 
1H13." This copy was mentioned in the Wett- 
ehenter Xeios, in August, 1855, acoording to an 
article in the Huttorieal Magazine (April, 1859), 
vol. 3, p. 124. Information furnished by Mr. 
Ganliuer, in letter of January (Mb, 1883, and by 
Mr.Wm. Wallace Tooker, in letter of February 
12tb, 1890. See uUo The Papere and Biography 
of Lion Gardiner (St. Louis, 1883), p. 100. 

(12) Mr. Brayton Ives, New York. An an- 
UKually large and fine copy, with many rough 
leaves. It remained in the original binding of 
dark blue morocco, gilt edges, and ' ' in the 
finest condition," until after 1870. when it was 
rebound in olive levant gros grained morocco, 
by F. Bedford. Sizeof the leaf, 7/, by 5| inches. 
With the diamond shaped figure on the Indian 
new tcstunient title. As originally bound, this 
copy did not contain the leaf of contents, and 
therefore was like no. 17 of this list, desoribed 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



145 



Bliot (J.) — Cod tinned. 

•8 » fifth rariety. The leaf, however, was 
afterwards inserted firom another copy, so that 
it oonforms now with the desoription of the 
third rariety. On the verso of the title is the 
stamp of the Bodleian Library of Oxford, by 
which institation it was sold as a duplicate. 
It came to the United States aboat the year 
1863, and was offered fur sale at 1002. Mr. 
JameaT. Brace, of New York, pnrcbasedit, and 
at the sale of his library in New York, April, 
1868 (no. 267), it brought |I130-^gaiu8t Mr. 
George Brinley's bid of $1127.50— passio}; iuto 
the collectioQ of Mr. John A. Rice, of Chicago, 
who supplied the leaf of content-s from an iui- 
perfect copy of the bible in his posHeHsiou. At 
the sale of his books in New York, Mnrcb, 
1870 (no. 662), it was bought fur $\OoO by Mr. J. 
W. Bonton, the bookseller, who sold it to Mr. 
TTilliam Menzies, of Now York. It was then 
learned that the leaf of oontent« which hud 
been inserted by Mr. Rico, wsm from the editiou 
of 1685. See na 23 of the list of bibles of that 
edition. This mistake Mr. M>mxiM roctifle<l 
by inserting a genuine leaf from an imperfect 
eopy of the first edition in hi^ possession. lie 
also had the book rebound, preserving its orig- 
inal size. At the sale of his library in New 
York, November, 1876 (no. 665), it was bought 
by Mr. Joseph J. Cooke, of Providence, R. I., fur 
$9O0l When the third portion of Mr. Cooke's 
library was sold in New York, December, 1883 
{Amerieana^ no. 789), the present owner secured 
the bible for $L280. 

(13) Lenox Library. Now York. In the orig- 
inal binding of dark blue morocco, gilt edges, 
containing all of the original blank leaves. 
Sixe of the leaf, 7/« by b\^ inches. With the 
diamond shaped figure on the Indian new tes- 
tamoittltie. The number 18 is written in large 
Ugaim over the gilt on the bottom edges. On 
the first blank leaf is the name in manuscript 
of aa early owner, " Ashurst Allin, Rector of 
Somerleton near Yarmouth in Suffolk." On 
the inside of the front cover is the b >ok plate 
of the Scottish antiquary and historian George 
Chalmers (bom 1742, died 1825). While in the 
poflsesaioo of Mr. Chalmers it was seen and ex- 
amined by James Grahams, who refers to it in 
his Hittoty of the United State* (London, 1836). 
voL l,p.280. In 1841 it. was probably sold by 
auction in London, with the library of Mr. 
Clialmers. In 1861 it came into the possession 
of Mr. Bernard Qnaritoh. the IxMkseller, whose 
memorandom of collation, dated 21st March 
of that year, is on one of the blank leaves at the 
end. In Joly, 1862, he offered it for sale (185 
Oaiaiague^ no. 626), at 63{, when it was pur- 
chased by Mr. Lenox. The p^ge hea<lings of 
Luke 21 and 24, on the recto of leaves L2 and 
L4. am correctly printed in this oopy. See also 
noa. 16 and 80 of thU list 

(14) Library of Trinity College, Doblio. 
See the (Jaiatogut LU>rorum lmpre$9oruiti qui 
iM BUMaOuea OoOegii Saerotanctet et Individ- 
urn IWnOflrtif. ..odMrvantur (Dublin, 1861), vol. 

AliG 10 



Eliot (J.) — CoDtinued. 

1, p. 303, where it is entered under the heading 
of version Americana, as follows : *' The Holy 
Bil)le, translated into the Indian language (by 
John Eliot). Cambridge (New Engl.), 16(». 4P. 
(V. T.) A. f. 13." Below it is the additional en- 
try, "Cambridge, 1681 [n<j]. 4^ (N.T.) a. k. 
42 and 40." This second press mark may 
refer perhaps to two copies of the new tes- 
tament of 1001, bound separately. The bible 
is probably of this variety, but in the ab- 
sence of a better description it can not be de- 
termined exactly what kind of a oupy it is. 
Seo also no. 14 of the list of copies of the new 
testament of 1661. 

Copies of the fourth variety : Containing the 
English general title, the dedication of the 
whole bible, the leaf of contentH, Genesis to 
Malachi, tho Indian new testament title with- 
out the diamond shaped figure, Matthew to 
Revelation, and the metrical psalms with the 
final loaf of rules. 596 printed leaves, and three 
blank leaves. The Indian general title, tlio 
English new testament title, and the dedication 
of the new testament are omitted in tliese cop- 
ies, which differ from those uf the third variety 
only in the variation of the Indian new testa- 
ment titie. 

(15) Mr. Charles H. Kalbfieisch, New York. 
In the original binding of dark blue morocco, 
gilt edges. Sizoof the leaf, 7g by 5| inches. The 
Indian new testament title does not contain the 
diamond shaped figure. This copy is consid- 
ered to be one of the largest and finest known. 
Many «>f tlio leaves have not been touched by 
the binder's knife on the front and buttum edges. 
It came from the library of Philip Yorke, first 
earl of Ilardwicke and lord cliancellor of Eng- 
land from 1737 to 17o6. After the death of the 
Itight Hon. Charles Philip Yorke, the fourth 
earl of Hardwicke, a portion of the library was 
removed from Wimpole House to London, and 
sold by auction June 29th, 1888, when the bible 
(no. 45) was purchased for the present owner 
by Mr. Quaritch for 580Z. Information fur- 
nished by Mr. Kalbfieisch, in letters of Joly 
22d, 1888. and April 15th, 1889. 

(16) Lenox Library, New York. In red 
moroccu binding of the x)resent century (about 
1837), gilt edges, containing all of the original 
blank leaves. Size of the leaf, 7^ by 5[^ inches. 
The Indian new testament title does not con- 
tain tho diamond shaped figure. This copy of 
the bible was purcha!<od by Mr. Lenox probably 
some time between 1810 and 1850. It cost him 
212. His description of it was printed in the 
Hittorieal Magazine (October, 1858), voL 2, p. 
307. It has the page headings of Luke 21 and 
24 on the recto of leaves L2 and L4, correctly 
printed. Soo also nos. 13 and 30 of this list. 

Chpiei of the fifth variety: Containing the En- 
glish general title, the dedication of the whole 
bible. Genesis to Malachi, the Indian new tes- 
tament title with the diamond shaped figure, 
Matthew to Revelation, and the metrical psalma 
with tiie final leaf of rules. 505 printed leaves* 



146 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Eliot (J.) — Continaed. 

aud 3 blank leaves. The Indian general title, 
the leaf of contenta, the English new testament 
title, and the dedication of the new testament 
aio omitted. 

(17) Library of AndoTer Theological Semi* 
nary, Andover, Mans. In the original leather 
binding (apparently ), paneled sides, gilt edges. 
With the diamond shaped figure on the Indian 
new testament title. At the top of the English 
title is written the name of "Wm. Ashhnrst 
1663," an elder brother of Henry Ashurst, Esq., 
the treasurer to the Corporation fur propagating 
the gospt'l among the Indiuis in New England. 
He was a member of parliament in 1611, again in 
1654, and the author of several political tracts 
printed at London. Another copy of the bible 
containing the signature of " Wm. Ashhnrst," 
pel haps a nephew of the above, Is described 
nnder no. 10 of this list. On the blank leaf at 
the beginning of the volume is inscribed the 
following: "A present to the Society of Inquiry 
on the Subject of Missions from Jas. Chater, 
Baptist Missionary, Colombo, Ceylon, April 
1818." The Rev. Mr. Chater was the first mis- 
sionary sent to Ceylon ftom England by the 
English Baptist Missionary Society in 1812. He 
was one of the translators of the bible into Sing- 
halese, and the author of several grammatical 
works on that language. He died in 1829. The 
books belonging to the ** Society of Inquiry '* 
were deposited in the library of Andover Theo- 
logical Seminary about the year 1860. Informa- 
lion furnished by tho librarian, William L. 
Ropes, in letters of December 20th, 1888, and 
January 23d, 1890. 

Another copy, which was originally of this 
variety, was made to conform with the descrip- 
tion of tho third variety by the intertion of the 
leaf uf contents from another copy, and is de- 
scribed nnder no. 12 of this list 

Oopiet of the tixth variety: Containing the 
English general title, the leaf of contents, 
Genesis to Malachi, the Englinh new testament 
title, tho Indian new testament title with the 
diamond shaped figure, Matthew to Revelation, 
and the metricAl psalms with the final leaf of 
rules. 595 printed leaves, and 2 blank leaves. 
The dedication of the whole bible, the Indian 
general title, and the dedication of the new tes- 
tament are omitted. 

(18) Library of the American Antiquarian 
Society. WorceHt<*r, Mass. In the original calf 
binding. With the diamond shaped figure on 
the Indian new testament title. It contains the 
inscription " The propeily of Isaiah Thomas, of 
Boston and Worcester, Printer, 1791," and is 
without doubt the copy referred to by Mr. 
Thomas in his History of Printimj in America 
( Worcester, 1810), voL 1, pp. 255, 475. Tlie bible 
was probably given by him to the Society at the 
time of its foundation in 1812, or some time be- 
fore his death in 1831. See the Oatalogm of 
Booka in the Library of the American Antiquar- 
ian Society (Worcester, 1837), where it is entered 
in two places, with the English title under Bible, 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

and with the Indian title under ElioU A fac- 
simile of the Indian general title is inserted at 
the front. Information furnished by the libra- 
rian, Mr. Edmund M. Barton. 

Copies of the feventh variety: Containing the 
English general title, tho Indian general title, 
tho leaf of contents, Genesis to Malachi, and the 
metrical psalms with the final leaf of rules. 468 
printed leaves. The dedication of the whole 
bible and the whole of the new testament are 
omitted. For other copies of the old testament 
and mejbrical psalms, without the English title, 
see nos. 37-39 of this list 

(19) Mr. Frederick F. Thompson, New York. 
The old testament and metrical psalms only, 
bound together in one volume, in red morocco, 
gilt edges, by Bradstreet (about 1870). It is 
accompanied by a copy of the new testament in 
a separate volume, uniformly bound, for a de- 
scription of which see no. 16 of the list of testa- 
ments of 1661. The English and Indian general 
titles face each other, and are followed by the 
leaf of contents, with the text on the recto, verso 
blank. This is probably the copy of "Eliot's 
transition of the Old Testament and Psalm 
Book into the Indian tongue," briefiy described 
with the Indian general title, in Mr. Henry C. 
MnTphy'^tkUalogw! qfan American Library (no. 
130), printed at Brooklyn about the year 1851. 
It is said that he bought it in London fit>m Mr. 
Obadiah Rich, the bookseller, for about 2L A 
copy of the old testament and metrical psalms, 
but perhaps with the Indian title only, was ad- 
vertised for sale in Rivington and Cochran's 
Catalogue (London, 1824), no. 2219, at 18 shill- 
ings; and also in Rich's chronological Oato- 
logw (London, 1832), no. 331, at 22. 2«. The latter 
may be the copy which Mr. Murphy bought 
At the sale of his library in New York, March, 
1884, this copy of the old testament and metrical 
psalms (no. 886), and the new testament (no. 
887), were purchased for the present owner for 
$680, or $340 for each volume. Information fur- 
nished by Mr. Thompson, in letters of November 
18th and 23d, 1889. 

A copy of the Indian bible with the English 
title aud dedication, probably one of the pre- 
sentation copies, brought 19 shillings at the sale 
of the library of the Rev. Lazarus Seaman in 
Loudon in 1076. Dr. Seaman was rector of All* 
hallows (/hurch in London, one of the members 
of the Westminster Assembly of Divines in 
1613-47, and also a prominent member of the 
Corporation for propagating the gospel among 
the Indians in New England. His name is sub- 
scribed with others to one of the addresses pre- 
fixed to Strength out of Weaknesses London. 
1652. The library belonging to him was one of 
the earliest, if not the first, that was sold by 
auction in England. The sale catalogue of 
tho library of 6. and J. Meerman (Cataiogui 
Librornm Impressorum, voL I, p. 20), sold at the 
Hague in June, 1824, contains the title (no. 17): 
" The holy Bible, translated into the Indian 
Language, Cambridge, 1663, mar. yerte dor6,'* 



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KAC-SIMILE OK THE INDIAN TITLE-PAGE OF THE WHOLE BIBLE OF 1663. 



ALGOXQUIAN LANQUAGES. 



147 



Sliot (J.) — Continued. 

which broQfsht 10 florina. This collection of 
boolu ¥ras formed by Geraart Mcenuon, the 
learned typographical antiquary (bom 1722, 
died 1771), and bj' hu son Jan Meoriuou, the 
hiatoriau and political writor (boi-n 1753, 
died 1815). The ii(*8cription f^ivfa in Field's 
JBuay toward* an Indian Bibliography (no. 
405), with the Englibh title, was probably not 
of a copy in his possession, but merely om* of 
the titles of " books not actually in the author's 
collection," which were included for the pur- 
pose of making the list more complete. The 
copy which Mr. Field owned, nutwithstandiog 
his own statement and Mr. Paiiie's thai it wa^ 
of the first edition, was really of the second, 
and lacked both beginning and end. 

^— Mamnsse | wanneetapaiiatamwe | 
np-biblum Qod | naiiceswe | nukkone 
testament | kah wouk | wiiHku testa- 
ment. I Ne qaoHhkinnamuk iiuohpe 
Wnttinneamoh Christ | uoh asoowosit 
I John Eliot. | 

Cambridge: | Printeiioop na8bi>e 
Samael Greeu kah Marniaduke John- 
son. I 1663. 

Second title: Wusku | wuttestamentum | 
nul-lordumun | Jesus Christ | Nu])pu(iuohwus- 
auafeneumun. | [Diamond shaped ligure of 32 
pieces between two lines.] | 

Cambridge: | Printed by Samuel Oieen and 
Manuadnke Johnson. | MDCLXI (lOOi]. 

Caption of nutrieal pealtns : Y Vume | Kct- 
oohomae uketoohomaongash | David. 

Caption *{f Ua/ of rules : Noowomco Wnttin- 

noDwaonk [tie] God, Gen. 5. 22. Enurh weei'ihc 

I pomnshan God nlshwuilt pasukeoe kodtuni- 

waeo. Wouk | ntowomuo, Prov. 23. 17. qush 

Jehovah neteagu : new^ | keuauoioinoush. 

5M printed leaves without pu<:ii numbers, 
and 3 bUnk loave.s, in the foUowiii;; order: thu 
title of the whole biblK in ludian on 1 leaf vernu 
blank, the list of the books in both testameutH 
on 1 leaf recto blank, (leuesis to Maluchi in iU 
leaves, the title of the uew ttistanifiit in Indian 
on 1 leaf verso blank, Mutt hew to Revelation 
in VM leayeis 1 blank leaf, the metrir.il vorsiuii 
of the psalms in 50 leaves, rules for (Jhristian 
living on 1 leaf, and 1 bluuk leaf at the end, 4^. 
Signatures, besidus the two preliminary leaven. 
A.B, C, D. E. F, G. U, I. K, L. M, N, O. P, Q, K, S. 
T,U,X,Y,Z, Aa to Zz, .iVaa to Zzz, Aaau to Zzzz. 
Aaaaa to Lllll, all in fours, and Mmmmiii in 
two. for the old testament; A, B, C. D, E. F, G. 
H, I, K, L, Aa, Bb, Cc, Dd. Ke, Ff, Gg, Ilh, 11, 
Kk, U Mm, Nu. Oo, Pp, Qq. lir. S*. Tt, Uu, and 
Xz, all in fours, for the new tesUiment: A, B, 
C. D, £, F. G, U, I, K, L, M, and X, all in fours, 
for the metrical psalms and flnal leaves. In 
the Massachusetts ludian Linguage. 

Tliis is the whole bible an issued for the use 
of the Indians. It differs from the copies 
already described under the preceding title, in 
Che abeenoe of the English titles and dodica- 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

tions. Some copies of the old testament and 
metrical psalms were also bound up together, 
separate from the new testament. These are 
pluc(*d at the end of the list. 

Copieu of the whole hille: Contaiuingthe In- 
dian general title, tho loaf of eoiit4)nts, Genesis 
to Mslachi, the Indi.in new testament title, 
Matthew to Kevelation, and tlie metrical 
ps;ilijis with the flnal leal' of rules. 5!U printed 
leaves, and two blank leaves. One of these 
copies (nu. 31) al.to contains the dedication of 
the whole bible, and is described as having 
the variation of the Indian new testament title 
without the diauiond shaped Ugure. In all the 
other copies of which particular descriptions 
have been obtained, tlie Indian new testament 
title contains the diamond shaped figura 

(20) Library of the Boston Athonaptum, Bos* 
tou, Mass. Inhalf leather binding. With the 
diamond shaped figure on the Indian new tes- 
tament title. The first title und 35 leaves, or 
all before Kxodiis v, are lacking, and also the 
latter half of the metrical jisalms, with the 
finitl leaf of niles. The page headings of Luke 
21 and 24, on tlie recto of leaves L2 und L4, are 
wrongly priuted 10 and 15 in this copy. It is 
mentioned in Mr. Burllett's list, printed in the 
Hiitorieal 2Iagazine ((»eptember, 1X58), vol. 2, 
p. 277. See the Catalogue of the Library of the 
Botton Athenamm (1k>ston, 1874), vol. 1, ]». 270. 

CJl) Itostou Public Library, Boston, Mass. 
In the Prince c^dlection, press murk 21.4. In 
the original leather binding, \7ith the dia< 
niond shaped figure on the Indian new testa- 
ment title. The la-it two leaves of the metrical 
psalms and the final leaf of rules arn lacking, 
but have been supplied in manuscript fac- 
simile. On the verso of the first title is writ* 
ten, "Thomas Prince ^ Aug. 15. 17:i8. Gift of 
y.T. Shiptoii." This was the date of its acqui* 
sition by Mr. Piince At the top of the leaf of 
contents is pasted the printed b(x)k-plate: 
"This Book belongs to The New-England Li- 
brary. Begun to be collected by Thomas 
Prince, upon his entriug Hai vard-College J uly 
0. 17U3 ; and was given by s:iid Prince, to remain 
therein for ever." On the first bl.ink leaf is 
written, "This copy of the Indian Bible be- 
longs to the Old South Cliurch Library Bos- 
tou.*' The ICev. Thomas Prince w:is juistor of 
the Old South Church in Bo.itun from 1718 until 
his de;ith, October 22, 1758, aged 71 years. His 
"New-England-Library" was one of the larg- 
est and mo.f imxiurtant collections of the kind 
formed in the ei^hte»*uth century. It was be- 
qiieathetl b^' Prince's will to the Old South 
Church, in the steeple chamber of which it 
was de|H>sited. During the siege of Boston in 
1775-70, the church was used a^u riding hcIiooI 
by the British soldiers, and m.iny of the books 
were lost or carried away. In 1814 a small 
portion of the library was deposite^I in the 
rooms of the MassiU'husetts Historical Society, 
and the remaining volumes were removed to 
the house of the pastor, where they were kept 



148 



» 

BIBLIOGRiPHY OF THE 



Sliot (J. ) — Continoed. 

for many years, until a room was fitted np for 
the reception of the whole library in the Old 
South Chapel, in Spring Lane. A catalogne 
was printed in 1816, and in 1866 the entire col- 
lection was deposited in the Boston Public 
Library. The pa<;e headings of Luke 21 and 
24, on the recto of leaves L2 and L4, are cor- 
rectly printeil in this copy. See the Oataltgue 
qf the American Portion of the Library of the 
Rev. Thomas Prince (lioston. 1868), tio. 110; 
and the complete catalogne of The Prince Li- 
brary (Boston, 1870), p. 6. 

(22) Library of Bowdoin College, Brunswick, 
Maine. An imperfect copy, lacking the first 
forty-two leaves or all before signature L (Ex- 
odus XXX, 24), six leaves between the old and 
new testaments or leaves LllllSto A2 (Zechariah 
viii, 8, to Matthew iii, 10), and the last five 
leaves of the new testament or leaves Uu3 to 
Xx3 (Revelation x, 8, to the end). The metrical 
psalms are also lacking, except a small fragment 
(leaf A4). Five leaves in the old testament, 
between chapters x and xxii of 1st Chronicles 
(Ccc4 to Ddd4), are badly mutilated. The book 
was presented to the library some time previous 
to the year 1821. It is mentioned in the Hietor- 
ical Magazine (May, 1859), vol. 3, pp. 157, 168. 
See the Catalogue of the Library of Bowdoin 
College (Brunswick, 1863), p. 65. Information 
furnished by the librarian, Mr. Georg*- T. Little, 
in lett rs of December 16 and 27, 1889. 

(23) Library of the British Museum, London. 
In the Grenville collection. Bound in blue mo- 
rocco. This copy was formerly owned by the 
Hon. Edward Everett, while minister of th*) 
United States to Great Britain, 1841-1845. and 
was presented by him to the Hon. Thomas 
Grenville (born 1755, died 1846). Ko exact de- 
scription of the book has been obtained. See 
the Bibliothcca Qrenvilliana (London, 1848), part 
2. p. 451. where it is entered with the Indian title. 
See also no. 7 of this list. 

(24) United Congregational Church, New- 
port, R. I. Inclosed in a japanned tin box, and 
deportited in the safe of one of the banks. It 
is iu the original dark calf binding, with clasps, 
somewhat stsiued, and probably contains the 
diamond tthaped figure on tiie Indian new testa- 
ment title. On the recto of the second leaf is 
written, " Ezra Stiles. Bot out of the Library 
of Rev«* Joseph Noyes of New Haven, 1761." 
The Rev. Joseph Noyes was graduated at Yale 
College in 1709, ordained pastor of the first 
church in New Haven in 1716, and died in 1761, 
aged 73 years. His son, Mr. John Noyes, was 
graduated at Yale College iu 1763, and died in 
1767. On the rcclo uf the first blank leaf is 
wiitten: "Ezra Stiles £x douo D. Johannis 
Noyes, de Novo Porto, Connecticuttsis." On 
tht) title is written, "Ezra Stiles. Y. C.;" on 
one of the blank leaves, "Ezra StUes, Praeaes;" 
on the first page of the text, "Ecclesiastical 
Library Newpoii. Rhode Island, Ezra Stiles;" 
and on the inside of the front cover, "Ecclesi- 
aatioal Library in the Care of the Aasooi*iion 



Eliot (J. ) — Continned. 

of Congregational Pastors, Rhode Island, Ecni 
Stilea." The Rev. Ezra Stiles was bom in 1727, 
and from 1756 to 1777 was pastor of the Second 
Congregational Church in Newport. In 1778 
he was elected president of Yale College, which 
office he held until his death in 1795. This copy 
of the bible is mentioned in Mr. Bartlett's list, 
printed in the Hiatorieal Magazine (September, 
1858), voL 2, p. 277 ; and also in Mr. O'Callaghan's 
American Bibles (JLlh&ny, 1861), p. 12. Informa- 
tion furnished by Dr. Ellsworth Eliot. 

(25) Library of the late Joseph W. Drexel. 
New York. Bound in russia extra, back gilt 
sides filleted. Size of the leaf, 7/b by 5| inches. 
With the diamond shaped figure on the Indian 
new testament title. On the title is written the 
name of "H. Uobart." The book was after- 
wanis in the possession of Louis Hayes Petit, 
Esq., at the sale of whose library in London, 
April, 1869 (no. 638), it was purchased by Mr. 
Quaritch the bookseller. He advertised it for 
sale in July, 1869 (252 Catalogue, no. 12), at 2002. 
Mr. George Brinley, of Hartford, bought it, and 
at the sale of the first portion of his library in 
New York. March, 1879 (no. 788), it was pur* 
chased by Mr. Drexel for $550. 

(26) Rev. William Everett, Ph. D., Quincy, 
Mass. In modem binding. The Indian new 
testament title probably once contained the 
diamond shaped figure, "for there is a round 
spot in the blank space, about the size of the 
ornament, which has been skilfully repaired, 
but is evident." This copy was once owned 
by the Rev. Edward Craven Haw trey (bom 
1789. died 1862), head master of Eton School 
and afterwards provost of the College, and con- 
tains his autograph. It was presented by him 
to the father of the present owner, the Hon. 
Edward Everett (born 1794, died 1865), then 
United States minister to England, whose at- 
testation of the gift is dated June 4, 1842. This 
copy is mentioned in Mr. Bartlett*s list, printed 
in the Historieal Magazine (September, 1858), 
vol. 2, p. 277. Information fbmished by Dr. 
Everett, in letter of December 7, 1889. 

(27) Library of GUsgow University, Glasgow. 
No description has been obtained of this copy, 
which may perhaps be of one of the other va- 
rieties. See Dr. Juhn Small's introduction to 
his reprint of Eliot's Indian Primer (Edinburgh, 
1877), p. xxviii, note. 

(28) Library of Harvard University, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. In leather binding. With the 
diamond shaped figure on the Indian new testa- 
ment title. It contains the inscription : "This 
Book belonged to the late Rev*d Jn« Fox of 
Woburn, and is presented by his Son, Jon* Fox 
of Wobum to Harvard College Library. Feb'y 
26th, A. D. 1765." There are also the names of 
several of the Fox family written on the blank 
leaves. The Rev. John Fox was bora in 1679. 
was graduated at Harvard College in 1608, sac- 
ceeded his father Jabez Fox as minister of the 
Congregational church in Wobum in 1708, and 
died in 1756. See the CfaUOogtu qf the Library 



Ketoohomae ukcioohumaongAflj 

DAVID 



^--^'♦^H'l^fj 




p S A L. I. 

Ichrm CLnanumau miltin 
a noh aont nurcluB 

mauhit woiktioni^i' K» 
M;it aeep.ii:ouuii ummaycu 

matchcilacnuof* 
Mac appein wutJpvwok 
, hihADU^nuog. 

I Qut «utfa|ieneiuniuonk 

G-id quihiiinmmginic 
Kahwonk miira(iurn>«'i)«tchc(| 

quihtarnuongfiniti^ 
% Mc!iiug uc ki'l ke iepuut 

piih og'jueneunkquirii . 
KuiUh ne pjudiuiik mcetfaonk 

nilh noh utKUwutchu* 

XjH matra nagum a»neepoC ^ 

(ip^upoh;«ino p^ib 
NUb n^ Wuttanakauliionk 

ahche wnnnrgcn pish* 
4 Matta pranumWiCnUl 

mattanttatuppu 
VTcbc woirAiitrau-puniC 

ogiuencuiikquflu* 

Uttiyeu tcuunnontogkof 

onk feanontockus 
Waban ut wotkfche ohkit 

anakauttarifh. 
y Yowuuh m irra pcantogig 

nuttancepiuuDDg 
Jehoviii uiririunuxK)neanit 

ki>ivuc:he wunntccooog* 

Work rratchtrsamiiog 

rraitanc p^u ..i»g 
Micher. mukki .naonganii 

wu'inomwacnuru. 
^ Ncwutch Jeh-wjh cx)WahtfO\iB ffliy 

Wnnnomw.ic ■;cij.T'oh 
Ur.Tay .r.at p-aMrmw^cnin 

piiiawako.np.in!!. 

P S A U IL 

TOhwiitch na;? pfnfDwohteachcJ- 
MufauiMtaniwectlit ? 

l-:iwutch tihn.i chctoguas nag 
ttnnanu.nraol.cuiu 



2 ui*»tc hotafToitamwDil 

naj; Kcna»niiiuog, 

a Uppcn'"""^^^^*'*"^'*^ 
ka!ip*lku!koii.uilu!i, 

kah iivauMc d.un. 
A N /h Jipit kaunqui aranou» 

V» «i uinnu'.m<'nUuotj : 
I Mul'jUAni'g nwjuchckekutto^^ 
^uichci'hcuii nahoiu 

6 Qut onth oukkrt-flfaDt irtoin 

nuppon nuLiwadcltuiuic ; 
• Kutt'i.tMiKnoL»wjh\€4Uwihtt«ran(i| 

KuTth jU'ui uunnaumou kea 

Jc'-.vjWrfh nc noowop ; 
Kah WiMif. ktn ktjui^auinooiycumln 

kuifch j^eu kciukok. 

8 VVchqueiumean kittinrtumouOl 

ohkeo'.uuun-i; 

Kah uc noadi ut i.'itchc^ 
k'k'ko.i.putichafuul 

9 Nail pent 61 Iho^^Muehtugmg 

kullobqucialiwJiou'i, 
Kahonacuho^^kcewifq 
pilh kuiluuliquohkonog. 

to Yowiitffi kenaau wiantaoEMDk • 
\Voi kcM-tlliitamwop, 

SthiuliT^uijDk kcnaiu ohkit 

tDriini nwacnuog. 
jx \Vau '.iftmii>k Wonk Ic!:Ovah 

ri.iiiv e rf*b»-fuonk, 
Wop.kken.a-i wtkoniatrcuk 

(u!l pcnup.iiUKihaonk. 

1 2 Ch'p^utriT^napook Thrift, '(bkdjC 

oopui-tc mufquanlog 
Kcnui'fUiu, p.iub.tatiununchcg 

ncicuurukiumo:^. 



P S A t. HI. 

KOOhk-t'tnff XCih nuttin MaiiiC 
Nci» w .»lu;vmtkicdicg, 
^ah woiik >■ ulVt'h m'MTaog oeg 
1 * aycuuhkami: dug. 



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FAC-SIMILE OF THE FIRST PAGE OF THE METRICAL PSALMS, 1663. 



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.'•'1 ••- • 4- :-..;:j':, i :■. i.. 2. r.r-i;i>n <;i a-'j : ••" ^' "•' '^'^'« ^ uuh«i:u> 
'TT-. ^'> •» » I >• • -- •.«ju::.j.'.i'r..'k u.ton '»..k..:i; w :? a .1. i ' ' -^: . J. -lii- 

5. Ntir nc'-vjica :jj .<can nt nan inTir, /"■{.'. 1 .. . i '• . . i.\r. •.. .::. kujw.;tivvi'I:. 

tSuaicli'k. ..'ii- •• •■.■.••«"•.• : ••• K • .V'•^ ;.;»-. «■«!. '. •-. .■ • '-.: * . u vl k . ■• .••.:;.•. .l, 
k^.Tpewirs ..•'..-., ••_ • J.-T>.1. • >:..rivi 'ri*;...:i-. .. :••' .1 rf . ■ 1... .-: ,. .'•:•< 
liJ^k I /^ -.J •• .. • I'it.^ r.' •..:.•••'. nv ,.. it;-, p.ii •'.?-'. . . •,• -i.'jn-rJt. ../.?.-.«. -»',. 



5. Mi' If . 

luo:; tl Cf-i'-Tit-J .. 
r<:iir*:p. 

M'nr-4-'"'' 

t. s i •.*■ 






•■ I > 



. 'A ■' ■■ •'..■••iV. I a>k : Ncji.'PJ^ 

. \. ' .j''",-:'.';r-«i!tviir:.up'i'i net- 

• ■; ..ay k.i'.m;, ku* .Nt;;.. ^^.:J, 

• ..'.■.• •»..../■ 



I * 



» »••« ..-. . ,vtjr, 









.*» 



f AL-:- '/■■, i. .f 'Hi. r 



t . ■ . •■ 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



149 



Bitot (J.) — CoDtinaed. 

^ Harvard Univertitif (Cambridge, 1830), vol. 
1, p. 250. Information famished by Mr. Wm. 
H. Tillinghast, in letter of November 21. 1889. 

(29) David Hani, M. D., Boston, Mass. 
Bound in ** sound old oalf, with a chamois- 
lined, smooth morocco outside cover, the whole 
in a neat case." With the diamond shaped fig- 
ure on the Indian new testament title. On a 
blank leaf at the beginning is written, "Samuel 
Sanders, Brought by John Boighton from New 
England. Cost 5 or 6« in Boston, 1681." At 
the sale of the library of the late Caleb Fiske 
Harris, of Providenc**, in New York, April aoth 
and following days, 1883 (part 1, no. 827). it 
brought $80, being purchased by Mr. Rider the 
bookseller. It was then described as lacking 
four leaves in the gospel of Mnrk, from chap. 
▼, verse 22, to chap, xi, verse 10 (sig. F); the 

* whole of the gospel of John, and of Acts all 
before chap, xzi, verse 10, making twenty-four 
leaves (sig. Aa to FO ; with two leaves in Prov- 
erbs and four leaves in Psalms that were dam- 
Aged. After all but one (Cc in John) of the 
missing leaves had been supplied by Mr. Rider 
from another copy (no. 36), the bible was again 
•old by auction, in the library of Gen. Uoratio 
* Bogers and the remaining portion of the C. 
Fiske Harris collection, in lk>ston, January 24 
and 25, 1888 (no. 356), for $210. being purchased 
by the present owner. Information fuminhed 
by Dr. Hunt, in letter of December 27. 1889. 

(30) Lenox Library. New York. In modern 
blue morocco binding, gilt edges, by F. Bed- 
ford. Size of the leaf, 7 /J, by 5ft inches. With 
the diamond shaped figure on the Indian new 
testament title. The page headings of Luke 
21 and 24, on the recto of leaves L2 and L4, 
are wrongly pnnted 10 and 15. A description 
of this copy by Mr. Lenox was printed in the 
HiitoricalMagdnne (October, 1858), vol. 2,p. 307. 
See also nos. 13 and 16 of this list. 

(31) Library of the late George Livermore, 
Cambridge, Mass. According to Mr. Liver- 
more's manuscript description of this copy, it 
is bound in two volumes. The first volume 
contains : the Indian general title, the dedica- 
tion of the whole bible to King Charles II. in 
two leaves, the leaf of contents recto blank. 
and Oenesis to Malachi. The second volume 
contains: the Indian new testament title (loith- 
out the diamond shaped figure, according to 
Mrs. Livermore). \fatthew to Revelation, the 
metrical psalms, and the final leaf of rules. 
These two volumes were presented to Mr. 
Livermore by his friend. Mr. Edward A. 
Crowninshield, of Boston. This copy of the 
bible Is mentioneil in Mr. Bartlett's list, printed 
in the HUtorieal Magazine (September. 1858), 
voL2,p.277. Information furnished by Mrs. 
Livermore. in letter of January 14th, 1890. 

(32) Library of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society, Boston, Mass. In the original leather 
binding. With the diamond shaped figure on 
the Indian new testament title. On one of the 
blank leaves la written, "Enoch Greenlefe 



EUot (J.) — CoQtinaed. 

His booke 1672." This may be the signature 
of Enoch Greenleaf, the son of Edmund Green- 
leaf, who came to New England with his father 
about the year 1635, was of Maiden, Mass., in 
1663, and soon after removed to Boston ; or of 
his eldest son, Enoch Greenleaf, who died in 
1705. This copy is mentioned in Mr. BartletVs 
list, printed in the HUtorieal Magazine (Sep- 
tember, 1858), vol 2, p. 277. See the Catalogue 
of the Library of the McusaehtueUe Historical 
Society (Boston, 1850), vol. 1. pp. 127, 128. 

In the Chlleetiont of this Society for 1801 
(Boston, 1802), vol. 8, p. 33. is the following state- 
ment: "In the files of the Historical Society 
there is a leaf of the Indian Bible which be- 
longed to his [Eliot's] colleague, the Rev. 
Samuel Danforth. in which there are sev ral 
corrections from the hand of this worthy gentle- 
man. He was settled at Roxbnry about the 
year 1662 [or rather 1650] and died 1674, aged 40. 
He was the brother of the Deputy-Governor of 
the same name." 

(33) Library Company of Philadelphia, Phi- 
adelphia. Pa. Belonging to the Loganian Li- 
brary. With the diamond shaped figure on the 
Indian new testament title. On the first title 
is written the name * ' J. Logan." James Logan 
was born in 1674, came to Pennsylvania ai the 
secretary of William Penn in 1699, was a mem- 
ber of the provincial council from 1702 to 1747, 
mayor of Philadelphia in 1723, chief Justice of 
the supreme <;ourt from 1731 to 1739, and acting 
governor of Pennsylvania fmm 1736 to 1738. 
On his death in 1751 ho bequeathed his valuable 
library of 2,000 volumes to the city of Phila- 
delphia. They were kept in a separate build- 
ing erected for the puipose until 1792, when 
the entire collection was annexed to the Library 
Company of Philadelphia, of which it forms a 
separate division. Catalogues of the Loganian 
Library were printed in 1760, 1795, 1828, and 
1837. Fac-similes of the general title of this 
copy and of the first page of Psalms are given 
in Smith and Watson's American Historical 
and Literary Curiosities (New York, 1850), 
plate 48. This copy is also mentioned in Mr. 
Bartlett's list, printed in the Historical Maga- 
zine (Septeral)cr, 1858), vol. 2, p. 277. Informa- 
tion furnished by Mr. Charles R. Hildeburn, 
in letter of December 10th, 1889. 

(34) Library of J. Poyntz Spencer, fifth earl 
Spencer. Althorp, England. Accordinc to 
Dib<lin's Aedee AUhorjnanae (London, 1822). p. 
02, where the Indian title is given in full, 
" This copy was in the library of Colbert,"— 
referring probably to Jean Baptiste Colbert, 
the eminent French statesman and financier 
(born 1619. died 1683). The famous collpotion 
of books known as the Bibliothoca Spenceriana 
was forme<l mainly by George .John Spencer, 
the second earl (bom 1758, died 1834). No 
exact .description has been obtained of this 
copy. 

(35) J. Hammond Trumbull, LL.D., Hait- 
ford, Conn. No deaoription has been obtained 



150 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Bllot (J.) — Continaed. 

of this copy. It U mentioned in Mr. T. W. 
Field's Essay Utwarda an Indian BibUogra- 
phy (New York, 1873), p. 120: and in a letter 
written by Dr. Tramball in 1870. 

(36) Mr. E. P. Vining, St Loaiis Mo. In old 
calf bindinf^. With the diamond shaped flgnre 
on the Indian new testament tiile. It lacks all 
before slgnatore C (Genesis xxi), 28 leaves in 
the new testament (sig. F and Aa to Ff), and 
all after signature E of the metrical psalms. 
An interesting feature of this copy is the pros* 
ence of the whole of the last sheet of the old 
testament as originally printed, containing: 
Jirtt, leaf Mrommm ; second, the leaf of contents, 
recto blank; third, the Indian general title, 
verso blank ; fourth, the final leaf of the old 
testament. As the binder had neglected to re- 
move the inner half of the sheet, the title and 
leaf of contents were therefore originally in 
duplicate. On the verso of this leaf of con- 
tents is written, " Henery Newman His Book, 
Anno domny 1608. 1710." On the verso of the 
Indian title is written, *'Samnell Newman and 
David I. Newman their Book May: d : 0: 1717; " 
and in another hand, "The property of Anna 
Pecke presented to hir by her grandfather." 
On another leaf is written, "Angelina Peck — 
Pawtucket, 1831." It also contains the memor- 
andum: "Rebound by Joseph Peck Son of 
Cyrial Peck, Seekonk." The bible was after- 
wards in the possession of Mr. Rider, the 
bookseller of Providence, who took out 28 
leaves of the new testament, and two other 
leaves, to put into another copy (no. 29). It 
was then sold by auction, in the library of 
Gen. Horatio Rogern and the remaining portion 
of the C. Fiske Harris collection, in Boston, 
January 24 and 25. 1888 (no. 357), for $45, Mr. 
Yining being the purchaser. Information fur- 
nished by Mr. Yining. 

From a letter printed in the Documents relat- 
ing to the Colonial History qf . . . New York 
(Albany, 1881), vol. 13, p. 520, it appears that a 
copy of the bible was brought to Albany by a 
Natick Indian in the time of Governor Nicolis, 
1664-1068. According to Williamson's History 
of the State of Maine, "a copy of Mr. Eliot's 
Indian Bible, printed A. D. 1664, was obtained 
by Rev. Daniel Little, missionary to the In- 
diann of Penobscot and St. John, since the rev- 
olution, which he carried with him; but he 
said, ' not one word of their language could bo 
found in it.'" A copy of this edition, with the 
Indian general title, was in the possession of 
Dr. JobannSeverinYater, thoeminent professor 
of theology and librarian at Konigsberg (bom 
1771, died 1826), and is referre<1 to by him in his 
continuation of Adelung's Mithridates (Berlin, 
1816), Th. 3, Abth. 3, S. 379. In Henry G. Bohn*s 
Catalogue of Books (London, 1841), no. 5696, a 
copy is described under the heading Virginian, 
as follows : " Biblla Indica.— The Old and New 
Testaments, with a metrical version of the 
Psalms, by J. Eliot, sm. 4to. very rare, lojnred 
by damp, 12«. Cambridge, (NewEng.) 1663." 



Eliot (J.) — Con tinned. 

The copy formerly owned by Augustus Fred> 
erick, duke of Sussex, the sixth son of I'king 
George III. (bom 1773, died 1843), and wlfich is 
described under the Indian title in Pettigrcw's 
Bibliotheca Sussexiana (London, 1839), vol. 2, p. 
432, was sold by auction with the duke's library, 
in London, in July, 1844 (no. 11S8). A muti- 
lated copy, lacking the titles and many leaves 
at the beginning and end, was sold with the 
third portion of the library of the lute Joseph 
J. Cooke, of Providence, in New York, Decem- 
ber, 1883 {Americana, no. 790), for $5, Mr. D. G. 
Francis, the hooksellf r, being the purchaser. 

Copies of the old testaiiKent: Containing the 
Indian general title, the leaf of contents, Gene- 
sis to Malachi, and the metrical psalms with 
the final leaf of rules. 467 printed leaves, and 
1 blank leaf at the end. 

(37) Library of the late John Carter Brown, 
Providence, R. I. The old testament and met- 
rical psalms only, bound together in one vol- 
ume, in brown calf. It is accempanied by a 
copy of the new testament with tho English 
title and dedication in a separate volume, uni- 
formly bound, for a description of whicli see 
no. 6 of the listof testaments of 1G61. The two 
volumes were once owned by E<lwanl King, 
viscount Kingsborough (bom ITOR, <lie«l 1837), 
and at the sale of his library in Dublin, an- 
nounced for June, but postponed to Novomher. 
1842 (no. 56), brought il. 3s. Not lonj: after, 
according to one account, Mr. E. B. f-orwin, of 
New York, purchased them in Loudon for 41. 
There is another statement, however, tliat tlicy 
were sold to Mr. Corwin by Bartlett and Wel- 
ford,the New York booksellers, for $40. At 
the sale of his library in New York, November, 
1856 (no. 2552), the two volumes were purchaflcd 
for $200 by Mr. John R. Bartlett for Mr. lirown. 
This copy is mentioned in Mr. Bartlett's lint, 
printed in the Historical Magazine (September, 
1858), vol. 2, p. 277. It is also deacribSd by Mr. 
Bartlett, but not with sufficient exactnesn, in 
the catalogue of the Brown library printed in 
1866 (part 2, no. 688), and again in the enlarged 
edition of the same catalogue print<Ml iu 1882 
(part 2, no. 020). Information furnished by Mr. 
John Nicholas Brown, in letters of November 
27th and December 24l, 1889. 

(38) Mr. C. F. Gunther, Chicago, 111. The old 
testament and metrical psalms only, bound 
together in one volume, in crushed lc>vaut mo- 
rocco, gilt top and back, by R. W. Smith (about 
1885). The old testament is complete, with the 
Indian general title and leaf of contents, but 
four leaves (signature E) are lacking in the 
metrical psalms, from tho middle of Psalm LI 
to tho first part of Psalm LXVI, and many of 
the leaves have been repaired. Ou tho back of 
the title is the stamp of the library of Trinity 
College. Dublin, as a '* duplicate sold." Tho 
history of this copy, gathered from scattered 
notices and memoranda, appears to be as fol- 
lows. In March and April, 1870 (259 Catalogue, 
no. 277), and in July, 1870 (260 Catalogue, no. 



ALOOMQUIAN LANGUAaES. 



151 



Bliot (J. ) — Continned. 

1171), Mr. Bernard Qnaritch adyertiaed for sale 
at ST*, a copy of the whole bible with the In- 
diai. dtlee, lacking signature Pp (2d Samuel iv, 
9 to xiii, 22) and Ooo (Esther iv. 14 to Job vi. 
19) in the old testament, and signatare E in 
the metrical psalms, but otherwise perfect, in 
the original calf binding, and without doubt a 
duplicate from Trinity College. It was pnr- 
obased by Mr. Henry C. Murphy, of Brooklyn, 
who took out the new testament portion, which 
he sent to the binder to be bound separately as 
a companion volume to his other (better) copy 
of the old testament and metrical psalms. See 
na 10 of the list of testaments, and na 10 of the 
list of bibles. At the sale of Mr. Murphy's 
library in New York, March, 1884 (no. 885), the 
rwnainder of the volume, containing the old 
testament and metrical psalms, described as 
** without binding, quite imperfect; leaves 
wanting in many places," was bought by Mr. 
David O. Francis, the bookseller, for $5. Ho 
supplied the imperfections of the old testament 
out of another imperfect copy in his possession, 
probably the one which he had purchased for 
$5 at the sale of the third portion of the library 
of Joseph J. Cooke, of Providence, in New York, 
December, 1883 {Americana, no. 790). The vol- 
ume was then put into its present binding, and 
offered for sale by Mr. Francis, first at $125, 
again in July, 1885, at $150, and in February, 
1886 (79 Catalogue, p. 1), at $250, when it was 
purchased by Mr Gunther. For the descrip* 
tion of another duplicate of the edition of 1663 
firom Trinity College, but with the English 
title and dedication, which came into the mar- 
ket with this copy in 1870. see no. 5 of this list. 
(39) Library of the Zealand Academy of 
Sciences (Zeouwsch Genootschap der Weten- 
■chappen), Middlcburg, Holland. The old tes- 
tament and metrical psalms only, bound to- 
gether in one volume, " in red morocco, with 
green silk on the inner covers, and tooled with 
gilt edges." The title is lacking, but in its 
place ijt a manuscript account in Dutch, of 
which the following is a translation : "All the 
Bibles of the Christian Indians were burned or 
destroyed by the heathen savages. This one 
alone was saved ; and tram it a new edition, 
with improvement, and an entirely new trans- 
lation of the New Testament, was undertaken. 
I saw at Roesberri (Roccsbury ?), about an 
hour's ride from Boston, this Old Testament 
printed, and some sheets of the New. The 
printing-oflSce was at Cambridge, three hours' 
ride from Boston, where also there was, close 
to the borders of the savages, a college of stu- 
dents of another nation. The Psalms of David 
ftre added in the same metroi At Boesberri 
dwelt Mr. Hailot [N. B.— The Zealand sound of 
Eliot], a very godly preacher there. He was 
at this time about seventy years old, and his 
aoo was a preacher at Boston. This good old 
man was one of the first Independent preachers 

; to settle in these parts, seeking freedom to 
worahip. He waa the principal translator and 



Eliot (J. ) — Continaed. 

director of the printing of both the first and 
second editions of this Indian Bible. Out 
of special zeal and love he gave me this copy 
of the first edition, for* which I am, and shall 
continue, grateful. This was in June, 1680. 
Jasper Danckaerts." An account of the visit 
of Jasper Dankers or Danckaerts and Peter 
Sluyter to Mr. Eliot in the summer of 1680, 
when thifl copy was presented to them, is given 
in the note to the second edition of the bible. 
Some time after, the book came into the pos- 
session of Mr. H. J. Bosschaert of Middleburg, 
and at the sale of his library in April, 1757, in 
the catalogue of which it was marked as extra 
rare, was bought by the bookseller Gillissen 
foryL 23.40, according to one account. It next 
appeared in the library of Professor Willemsen, 
whose books were sold by auction in Middle- 
burg, in April, 1781. In the sale catalogue of 
his library it was described as containing the 
whole old testament and the psalms in metre, 
lacking the title and some few leaves in the 
psalm book. The book was not offered at the 
sale, however, but was withdrawn, and came 
into the hands of Professor de Freuiery, who, 
in February, 1807, presented it to ibe Zealand 
Academy of Sciences. It was then remarked as 
something curious that the letter r does not once 
occur in the whole book. In the Caialogus der 
Bibliotheek van het Zeeuwtch OenooUchap (Mid- 
dlcburg, 1845), p. 2, it is entered as " Het Oude 
Testament in de Americaansch-Indiaansche 
of Wiltsche taal ; " and in the enlarged cata- 
logue of the same library, p. 2G9, no. 1086, it is 
described as containing the old testament and 
psalms in the American Indian Language, 4to, 
full morocco gilt. A report on the two copies 
of the Indian bible in the library of this acad- 
emy was presented at its meeting in December, 
1873, by the librarian F. Nagtglus, and printed 
as a separate pamplilut in January, 1874. An 
English translation of it is in the Proceedingt 
q/the MassachuMetti Historical Society for 1873- 
75, pp. 307-300, from which the above particu- 
lars have been taken. The other copy is de- 
scribed under no. 4 of this list 

Another copy of the old testament and metri- 
cal psalms, but with the addition of the En- 
glish general title, is described under no. 19 of 
this list. A copy was advertised for sale by 
Rivington and Cochran of London, in their 
Catalogue for 1824 (no. 2219), as "The Old Tes- 
tament, with a metrical version of the psalms," 
translated by John Eliot, Cambridge (New 
England), 1663, 4to, calf neat. 18s. In Mr. 0. 
Rich's chronological Catalogue of Hooka re- 
lating to , , , America (London, 1832). no. 331, 
a copy of "the Indian translation of the Old 
Testament, and of the Psalms in verse," with 
the Indian general title, was offered for sale for 
7L29. 

There is no copy of the edition of 1663 in the 
library of the American Philosophical Society 
at Philadelphia, as mentioned in the lists of Mr. 
Bartlett, Mr. O'Callaghan, Mr. Field, and Mr. 



152 



BIBLIOORAPHy OF THE 






EUot(J.) — CoDtinned. 

P»li»,iiiid M might be luferred trma the ps. 

euliu way Id nhioli ths si^coua eililruu ia m- 
tcmUnthBcktalogasorthiil society-* llbrat^ 
pilntrd in IK*. Aucontinj to Mr Field and 
ilr Paine the Kew York Hletofiwl Swlelj 
•nd Ibe Long Iilimd lligtorinil Society each 
■ ■ copy of tbe flrsi «dliioii uf lbi> 
il to a mistake. Iiuwevir, m lb" auly 

Hf. Field aUo Incliiilee Id 
rtliolltxl.'aitloiiUieuamenr 
"Ur. John II. KiuK (ileceiiaeJj. Jninolca, L.I." 
Thli Tofen nilliout daali to the Qou. John A. 
£lDt{,«rJaDuili^n,X T.. ffho owned a copy of 
thBBUcondeailion only. The copy owned hj 
Col.GoorgoW Pratt WSJ notof theedlllon of 
IfldS.iu nlalod l.y j> wrilot In the Uitlarvat 
jra^aifn* (Oclolwr, 1858), raL2. p. 3DS, butoflhe 
edition of ISBS. 

Vp-BaDkLLiu psalinea. 
t'ambriilyt' printed by SsmnelQreen 
Mill Marmodiiko JobnsoD. 1663.] (*) 
M m l«Te«. 4'. 

TliH puller or book of pialnu, tianalaUil 
ibio n.., HuMathoaetU loduo lannunae. by 
John Eliot. At their Diefltiai; on ILe Juta of 
September. ISM, tlic CumiaiiiKlauurs wrolo to 
the CoqioniUoD in EobLiuJ The numl»T0f 
niblea with Puliu tii-jkn iirtntod nero niwirdt 



of a tboii 



■ CaU II 



FialttTi Ml diucra trhenif all sort* an tile- 
poKd to the Indiana aod the reU r«ddy tor 
tbeire me as they can he bound yp and there 

may hen occntjou/' In tho trcaflartr'4 account 
preeenteil to the CouKnl^glonore at Iha enme 



11 inn, n 



DuldCfl 



InMh 



ihDet,"«. 
pnalter fltl* n< 



ling B Hbef 



intcil In 
-early J2 
Ibbtbi. beginnlLR on &•■ vorao of leaf Rrr *, 
aluinl Iv'o nclio^from the top, and undin:.' on 
the voreo of Ccco 1. at the boliom. Dr. Truni- 
bnli aaj-8: "From aign. 'I'lt :> In .ia;ii i, Tiili 
bUink vorao," which la a mlKlake, oa that wooM 
compriBO only ninoleon loavee, from Psalm 
iiiUI. IJ to cii. 2S. Ue aptly remarks, how. 



;"ThiB«harKi 
tition, and It 1> probable thai 
of the Pulma were worked 
lUftd In prinlliiK the Old Trstt 



Incliicto 



Bllot (J.J — CoDtinued. 

panled eome coplea of the PidUtTi 1. e. thoj 
■ere occasionallj bound together In one toI- 

[VVame Ketoohomae uketoihoma- 

ougaab David. 

Ciiiiibri.Ii,'!- printed by Samuel Green 
and Marmaduke Joboaoa. 16r>:i.] (■) 

K W leave*, 4°. 

Eliiil'a I'DinpIi^ie tranaUtion of the nii-trical 
TKBliim AlltbD-slDgluK>onK>.orI>iiTid"|iula 
tho MM»aehn.BlU IndUo langmgp. In lt> 
preparation ho probaldy need, >u a nrtalo ex- 
tent. theKewEngUndTrwionor ■UnyPwlm 
Book," which was ■ translation Into EnKliah 
from the Hebrew, crlglnal'.y mailo ipy himael^ 
Thomas Wrhte. and Jlichard Maifaer llrst 
prUit,..! in IWo, and in a nr,v form, tborongbly 
roviaed, by Uenry Uunsier anil Kiobard Lyon, 

On the »th of April, I6S3, Ur. Bojle wrote 
totheCooimiaslonerafromLondon! -'vpon Ur. 
i:ilIiiHj moliuu and Ike Eoodnca of Ihe work«, 
wee bane thought flit ^^A ordered that ihe 
PaalniK, of DauJd In meter ahalb™ prioie.1 in 
the Indian language." Mr.ElioiaUo «-mtB,ln 
a lettor to Klebnnl Ban^r, daliil iVom Koi- 
liury tliLs Sth oftheStb [July «ih), mas," con. 



I In lieu 



r I.JI1 



» the PTMe.wblcU will beaome Din 



other proposed IVorkn." The Ct 
aeeordingly replied to Ur.BoyJo'n 
18«h of September 1MB, as toW 
bible bolag flnlabed . . . « 



"The 
ball In- 



Elilott is 



lur to Iinploy bim [Uarmvlnke Jobua 

Treatise of Mr. Baiter* whlcb Mr 

io bane ordered Mr. Tahur to pre- 

Coppyea of the bible and as many of the 
Paalmea if printed «f bell. r,.il„...|i |,,„.»depart- 
lilT l-rorii li..iiie. Th-y were fluishcd at tbe 
pri'i-, prolinbly InKovcmber or Deccoiberof 
the simi' year. In the Ireaaurer'a account pre- 

Scpiviijbiir, KHH.waitliecharBe: "Toprlatlnji 
the Iii'liiiD I'iHlmoB aahectuBta Ib.persbect." 
bey on Jnat 



thirt 



were printed 1 iliuliK, praUbl.i, Suiicit.iiicopiea 
of tbePsalma Win' atruck oiTl-nu,! Ihe fomiB 
niwd iu priming the Old TorlanM-nl, and them 
— wUhaepMlal title-page perl>a]M—»pro aepa. 
ratolj bonnd. Xo copy of this separate laane 
appears to be eitant. 

Mr. Thoniia, ia hla EiMlory of rrinlmg in I 
imtrita (Worceater, 1810). toI. 1. pp. 479 i r 
*8D, says Tbe KoweoHlnnd Version of the I '■' 
Paaluian-iuprinledmiiAibenibloi butloan. | 
not find that tliB Indian Orammarwaa pub- i 
lishedwith either of the editiona. II aocom- j 



a, Inrlndin) 
k loaf, or 



I u)l, » 



to S in fours. Jor s fuller dewriplioa 
nllutioD of the Indian bible with the 



inu, aud j.eilmj)a with apeoial llllea. 
-]V'Vuskn wnUestaijjejitiiOi nnl-lor- 
I1IUIID I lesns Christ | Nuppoqnohwns- 



Caiubridge, ] Printed for the Bight 



• • ■ e 




m 

rr V s X V 

WUTTESTAMENTUM il 

NUL^ORDUMUN 

lESUS CHRIST 

NQppoquob^afluacammOB. jgf 



«9 




!» 




P 



El 

1^ 











CAUBRIDGE, 

printed for the ^ght Honourable 
CO'KTORJTlO.TsC in London, for the 

\frofogation of the ^ofpel among the In^ .^ 
dians tn !Hc\v^EnzUnd i 6 S o. ^^f 



FAC-SIMILE OF THE TITLE-PAGE OF THE NEW TESTAMENT OF 1680. 



I I 



••- '-• '-"•**»5s; 






/./ -•. /..' Z/ J" .? /" 
W U N N E t T U P i\ N A V A M \\ i . 

UP-BIB lUM god 



KAKEESV.X 



NLIKKONE TLSTAMENT 



KAH \VO^K 



W U S K U T 1. S T A M E N T- 







Nc qucfliiinnumuk nsfhpe WutiinncunK/.i CHUTIST 

noh afaowefit ' 

fOBH, ELIOT. 

Kahohtofu or»tch:to: PnoKaCTrni:^, 



M|»M«M« 




btcuoop nafhpe StfwaW ^»<r». MDCLXXXV. 



nngsi^ii^ii^ii^mifi^irii 



fc I , . 






r T -: .'.■-.,.: 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



153 



Sliot (J.) — Continned. 

HoDoarable | corporation in London, 
fortbe I propogation [«{o]of the Gospel 
among the In- 1 dians in New-England 

16»0. 

130 leaves, iP. 8igiiatarc« A, B, C, D, £, F, 
G. H, I. K, L. M, y, O. P, Q. R, S, T. U, X, 
T, Z. Aa, Bb. Cc. Dd. Ee, Ff, Gk. Hh, and li, 
«n in fours, and Kk in two. In the Massachn- 
•etta Indian langaaKe. 

Oopiet: After the completion of the new tes- 
tament in the autninn or winter of 1681, sonic 
copies may have 1>eon bound separately- for im- 
mediate use. The metrical psalms, which were 
flniahed in 1682, may also have been appendeil. 

(1) Mr. W. G. 8hillaber, Boston, Mass. In 
modem binding of red m(»rocco, gilt edges. 
This seems to be the copy which is described 
among the books belonging to Mr. Henry Ste- 
Tens, in thi^ catalogue of Mr. Edwanl A. 
Chrowninihield's library, sold in London, July. 
1860 (na 649), as bound in "crimson morocco 
extra, gilt (^Igcs, the comer of one leaf mended 
and supplied in fac-simile." It was t>ought by 
*• Miller " for «.15*. Mr. Henry C. Murphy, of 
Brooklyn, was probably the next owner. At 
the sale of his library in New York, March. 
1884 (no. 888), it was bought for $75 by Mr. 
JToaeph F. Sabin, the bookseller, in the name of 
"Brevoort.** It remaineil in his posseMion 
vntil June, 1887, when it was sold for $80, 
through Mr. Charles L. Woodward, to the 
present owner. This testament was probably 
taken out of an imperfect copy of the bible. 

At the sale of the library of Mr. W. Elliot 
Woodward, in New York, April, 1869 (no. 6452) 
"a portion of Eliot's Indian Bible, Second Edi- 
tion, comprising title page to the New Testa- 
ment, and the Book of Matthew," bound in 
brown calf, antique, brought $':o. 

■ Mamnsse wiinncetnpanatatnwe up- 
biblnm God | naneeswe nukkone testa- 
ment kahwonk wiiHkn testament. | Ne 
quoehkinnunmk ua.sbpeWiittinneiiniob 
Christ I noh asiDwe.sit | John Eliot. | 
Nahoht6eii ontchetAe PrintencDiniik, | 
Cambridge. | PrinttMicopnaiibpe Sam- 
uel Green. M D C LXXXV [lt)?it5]. 

Translation: The- whole | holy | liis-bible God 
I both I old testament | and also | new testa- 
ment. I This turned by the-servant-of Christ 
I who is-called | John Eliot. | Second-time 
amended impression. 

Second tide: VVusku | wuttestamentum | 
Bol-lorflumun j lestis Christ | Nuppotiuohwus- 
auaenenmiin. | 

Cambridge. | Printed for the Right Hrmour- 
able I corporation in London, for the , propoga- 
tion [He] of the Gospel among the In- j dians in 
New- England 16M). 

Oaptionof metrical ptalmt: Wamc | Ketooho- 
mae uketcohomaongaHh | David. 

Caption of kt^fqf tujUm: Noiwomoo Wuttin- 



Eliot (J.) — Continned. 

noowaonk Gad [»ic\. Gen. 6, 22: Enobh [tic] 
weeche | pomushau God nishwndt pasukcne 
kodtumwaeu. Wonk | noowomoo, Prov. 23. 17: 
I Qush lehovah neteagu: new%j ! kenatuoto- 
I moush. 

608 printed leaves without page numbers, and 
2 blank leaves, in the following order: 1 blank 
, leaf, the title of the whole bible in Indian on 
I 1 leaf verso blank. Genesis to Malachi in 426 
leaves, the list of the books in lioth testaments 
on I leaf recto blank, the title of the new testa- 
ment in Indian on 1 hiaf verso blank, Matthew 
I to Uevelation in 129 leaves, the metrical version 
I of the psalms in 50 leaves, rules for Christian 
j living on 1 leaf, and I blank leaf at the end, 4°. 
I Signatures, beside the first blank leaf and title, 
I A , B, C, D. E, F, G, H, I, K, L. M. N. O, P,Q, R, S, 
T. U, X, T, Z, Aa to Zz, Aaa to Zzz, Aaaa to 
Zzzz, ^Uiaaa to Ooimm). all in fouri*, and Ppppp 
in two, for the old te.Htamont and list of books; 
X, B,C. 1). E, F, G. U, I. K, L, M. X, O, P. Q. R, S, 
T, U. X, T, Z. Aa, Bb, Cc, Dd. Ee, Ff. Gg, Hh, li, 
Kk, LI, Mm, Xn, Go, Pp, Qij, Rr, Ss, Tt, Uu, Xx, 
and Yy, all in foum, for the new testament and 
metrical psalms, besides the leaf of rules and 
final blank leaf. Matthew beuins on A2, and 
Revelation ends on Kk2, verso blank ; tho met* 
rical psalms begin on Kk3, and end on the verso 
of Yy4. In the Massachusetts Indian language. 
See the fac-similes of the two titles, the first 
])age of the metrical psalms, and the first page 
of the leaf of rules. 

The book is printed in double columns, like 
the first edition, with references at the side 
and headings in Indian at the top of each 
column. A full page of text measures 6g by 
4} inches, including headings, catchwords, and 
references, which is an increase in width of one- 
eighth of an inch. At the beginning of each 
chapt4*r is a summary in English, not in the 
first edition. These summaries increase the 
whole number of leaves to eleven more in the 
old testament and three more in the new testa- 
ment, thau there are in the edition of 1663-'61. 
The Htatenient of Mr. Thomas, in his History 
of Printing in America, that "both editions had 
title pages in English and Indian," is undnubt- 
1 edly wrong ns far as this edition is concerned, 
for no ro]>y h:is been found with an English 
I title, nor is there any probability that one was 
, ever print«rd. Acc«)riliug t<» Dr. Trumbull. "In 
printing James 1. 20. in the/ir«( and second edi- 
tions of the New Testament, the words 'qut 
asookekodtuni nehenwonche wtittah,' [but de- 
ceiveth his own heart,] were omitted. The 
I omission was discovered before the issue of 
the Hecond eilition of the Old Testament, 1 685. — 
I ami attention is directed to it, by an erratum, at 
I tho l)ottom of the psge containing the names 
and numbers of the books, — facing the title- 
page of the New Testament: 'James I. 26. 
j Asuhkaue wenan, ogketash. qut asao kekodtam' 
etc.,— tiiat is, 'After icrnati [tongue,] read qut 
I ascokekodtam' Sec.'' The abovo translation of 
the Indian title is from Dr. Trumbull's Origin 



154 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Eliot (J.) — Continned. 

arul Early Progrtu f^f Indian Mtsiiom in New 
England. 

In September, 1872, all of the remaining 
oopiee of the flrat edition of the Indian bible 
were ordered by Che Commissioners to be 
boond. It is probable that the edition was 
soon exhausted. l£any copies were lost or de- 
stroyed in the Indian war of 1 67^-76. As a new 
edition was mnch needed, Mr. Eliot began, about 
the year 1677. to revise the whole work. He 
also petitioned the Commissioners to reprint it. 
From the records it appears that it was resolved, 
at the meeting held in Plymoath, March 20, 
1678, "In reference vnto the Beuerend Mr. El- 
liotts motion for reprinting the bible in the 
Indian Langitage; The Comissioners haoeing 
had some Debate aboat that matter doe Judge 
it most expedient to Refer the determination 
therof to the next meeting of the Comission* 
ers.** Accordingly, when they met again, in 
Boston, August 25, 1679, "Appeared, the Rev. 
erend Mr. John Eliot, and made a motion re* 
ferring to the re-printing of the Bible." Con- 
cerning the extent of Mr. Eliot's labor on the 
new edition, Dr.TrumboU remarks: "In the 
revision he was greatly assisted by the Rev. 
John Cotton, of Plymouth, bnt it is not true 
that 'the second edition of the Indian Bible 
was,* as Cotton Mather assorts, * 10^0% of Mr. 
Cotton's correction and amendment.' Eliot's 
correspondence with Boyle proves that he was 
himself actively engaged in the work, though 
he acknowledges his indebtedness to Mr. Cot- 
ton, who, he writes [July 7,1688] 'has helped 
me much in the second edition.'" The Rev. 
Thomas Prince, in the manuscript catalogue 
of his New England Library, makes the follow- 
ing statement: "Y* Rev M' John Cotton of 
Plimouth being well acq"*, w"" y* Ind" Langf 
was des** by y* Ind" Comis"" to correct m' 
Eliot's vers" of 1663; took this method— while 
a good Reader in his study read y Eng Bible 
aloud, M' Cotton silently look'd along in y 
same Place in y« Ind" Bible: & wh' He thot of 
Ind" words w« He judg'd c* express y" sense 
better. There He substituted y*. &, this 2«*Edit" 
is jiccord« to M' Cotton's correction." Mr. Eliot 
himself, in the Roxbury Church Record* (Boston, 
1881). p. 196, wrote: " When the Indians were 
hurried away to an Hand at half an hon's 
warning, pore soules in terror y^ left theire 
goods, books, bibles, only some few caryed y 
bibles, the rest were spoyled Sc lost. So y* w" 
the wares w flnishd, Sc y' returned to y places 
y*' w greatly impov'ished, bnt y** esi>ecially 
bewailed y want of Bibles, y* made me medi* 
tate upon a 2** imp'ssion of o' Bible, Sc accord- 
ingly tooke pains to revise the first edition. I 
also intreated m' John Cotton to help in yt 
work, he having obtained some ability so to doe. 
he read over the whole bible, &, whatever 
doubta he had, ho writ y» downe in order, Sc 
gave y» to me, to try y» & file y"» over among 
o' Indians. I obteined the favor to reprint the 
Kew testam* & pealmes, but I met w^^ much ob- , 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

atmotion for reprinting the old testam*, yet by 
pray re to God, Patience &. intreatye, I at last 
obteined y^ also, praised be the Lord." 

The desired authority having been obtained, 
the printing of the new testament was at ouc€ 
begun. This was probably early in 1680. In 
the summerof the same year the two Labadists, 
Jasper Dankers and Peter Slny ter, visited Bos- 
ton and Cambridge, on their return from Nefv 
Netherland to Holland. The following extract 
of their Journal for July 7th and 8th, 1680, ie 
from the translation made by Mr. Henry C. 
Murphy : "The best of the ministers whom wc 
have yet heard, is a very old man. named John 
Eliot, who has charge of the instruction of the 
Indians in the Christian religion. He ha« 
toanslated the Bible into their language. We 
had already made inquiries of the booksellen 
for a copy of it, but it was not to be obtained in 
Boston. They told us if one was to bo had, it 
would be from Mr. Eliot. We determined to 
go on Monday to the village where he resided, 
and was the minister, called Roxbury. . . . 
8^, Monday, We went accordingly, about 
eight o'clock in the morning, to Roxbury, 
which is three-quarters of an hour from tiie 
city. ... On arriving at his bouse, he was 
not there, and we, therefore, went to look 
around the village, and the vicinity. We found 
it Justly called Xockthury, for it was very rocky, 
and had hills entirely of rocks. Returning to 
his house we spoke to him, and ho received us 
politely. Although he could speak neither 
Dutoh nor French, and we spoke but little 
English, and were unable to express ourselves 
in it always, we managed, by means c*' Latin 
and English, to understand each other. He 
was seventy-seven years old, and had been 
forty -eight years in these parts. He had 
learned very well the language of the Indians, 
who lived about there. We asked him for an 
Indian B ible. He said in the late Indian war, 
all the Bibles and Testaments were carried 
away, an d burnt or destroyed, so that he had 
not been able to save an y for himself : but a new 
edition was in press, which he hoped would be 
much better than the first one, though that was 
not to bo despised. We inquired whether any 
part of the old or new edition could be obtained 
by purchase, and whether there was any gram- 
mar of th at language in English. Thereupon 
he went and brought us the Old Testament, 
and also the New Testament, made up with 
some sheets of the new edition, so that we 
had the Old and New Testamenta complete. 
He also brought us two or three small speci- 
mens of the grammar. AVe asked him what we 
should pay him for them : but he desired noth- 
ing." The later history of this copy of the old 
testament is given in the list of copie.) of the 
first edition, under no. 89. 

On November 4th, 1680, EUot wrote to the 
Hon. Robert Boyle: "Our praying Indians, 
both in the islands, and on the main, are, con- 
sidered together, numerous ; thousands of 



':< 



T^ 



me^ 



■Tl 



AAA iftilBJbai Jr;&A&3fr-£ !&liil. ir^)3fi& e ^ltl£ 1&« A 1 )t A 4^ 



W A M E 

DAVID 




PS ALM U 

,T^ IcficT. ctninuT.afT •.ni-'K': 

j^M ^J^' rr.atchit woiktro«itp20jy 
-*- "■ - Mac nctpauouan ummiyeu 
nut£hc(cacnuog 
Mat •ppcinwui^'puonk 






k-» 



2 hcr.'XJ.Ui-^v. 




y. 



GoiiquU- 1. -mu-j iiiixr.il ^ 
2Cah wonl roiilinu.'? yiuyjicf;eti 

^ Mehiug mk::ht\: kiuut 
pi&ogqunncunkqu i\i 

niib moU unawuuhJ. 

Sah matli nagiim ipnccpcc 

wpP'iipohtano pish 
Kift^ r.ch vntianakiuruonfc 

i!idic tfTunrc^cr pi'H» 

rnaita 'ncCJtu.^^p-j ^ 
\ycbc \<rt»nadtraur..u[iiC 
•cq'^cncur.k'jairu> 

o ;ik ft a j: im f cr, 1« u ^^ 
V^rut wi iV<t.c ohklf 

^ttakauieaniQu 
% VvW^:fch m.'ita peantogig 
ir»*t3r?ffpj'::jji.C», 

Wonk matrficP.ifirvg 

maru netp.ia r^'^ 
M'rhfm mukki'^r'Ci^v.nit 

vfurnr»tr.*'ijnulu. 

i Kcwjsrh G'»i> ttiwahteoun may- 

WunnOT.\fc?« "iMToh 
Ummip m.» pranunwarnii* 

psiii awjkompa.uji 

V S A L. Hi 

TO^wutc•n n-'g pcna>wol,tcacheg> 
V'jIT:!. nrarr.'.vebctUt ? 
luhwu'fh fabrachc Uaj;«s niS 
uautaunsTiol.cttic 



ikjh p^A •.'ir:,:r.di(»:r, 
I7uttaf.ti^.,.p-;..,cr>;. ■..*;!-, 
kah anuL-.it ji-; ■;. 
4 N'.h jpit kcJut-.,v;r a:.i-oj; 

G'jd un !7:onr.c:'i.L' ■. 
$ MLficm.og rr.wu ski- k.:t;a.v 
wnuhcpi-LLh r:iU!; 

tf Qi.i| oTfj. riikketitliuti.T.jm 

j.upp^R nrxjwdcKiimic : 
7 Kuiiw'jr!: ra^wal^ttauwahuwairii, 

pii n'itru'.'kup Manic. ' 

I K-ifVii /V>f'nonni?.i;r.oa kca 

jcb-n iifi nc nL\v«jp: 
i\i!i V, •)'.•'< ken kjjnjurnoniyeibnih 

ku,!ch >'.u KcCjkok. 



3 WchquauTc::: kiiiinilumoufli . 

Kah ut noadt jt apl^c^eg. 

ki; f\.-Tr.p^'-.chiruut. 
9 Ni-ifi: :n<i(.'!ilhogqttebtUg lU^. 



*■• 



•«■ 



r'lh ku.Tohqnolikonof. 



20 



Vowutch kmsau wiaoCailKDik " 

Wo? k'hu;rQctanT^o«» 
Neh'^uhrauojk fcenaa ohkiK 

cunttuniwafnaog. 
If Wauffom lik wtjrk JehovA 

mihpt wabcfoorifc, 
W(.nk kcfj.-cu W'-'konta-najk 

na^'Pv!* nuncuili^ionk. 

,1 Chipwuitcusapo^k chriil, »f.kont 

Kc.'VjH ikrD» paubattmifflODdles 
ncrt cDnaiujaoofk 

KO^hkadw roh nart'm Minft 



iycuuhka:fi!rhrK, 



Mog ncg 



rAC-SIMILE CF THE FIRST TACC CF THE METKIC.L PSALMS. ,685. 



•(^m^'&i^AYM<i-:mmm^ 






If.. 



.Mu** kXii' nii'.KO-^i-v :■."•■'» IP,.';".*!*!'" nitJi-'r'rc' itlC. I--.- .-.if.-.Ttt iui!i':.v 
l)tchlCO|r <'.<■■. Ill; )r' ■(.'.■ jr-' .».,.nlfJi k4li 'JJ^Ifi,T, i;<ii["p 

•hK.etkfoo'.i .,ii..;:.J.ii?. oiiilr.,n.ira. 

lo-uj ■" ■ t.''i j'l, . . !■■■ f.i.i, Tj.'.'.tfMjfi i:uit*h wah wce'wltiiTi itirt-. 



"irfiti-.'ityiO"- n- 

WBip«.':iJi. ■•. 




i ;:,..;. JU:*U *.■.>.. k;,>.«, JJ.,.C.e. 


<*bn»n»n.rr-i.M..' 


t'l VI.- • M 1 ■;iba.-nc«;:, wr .k.-^.! Wtr,/!.!u:i n,9cupd|£Ua!-. 
!;-ATiifcu!'.n;.*uii..i!-nwd.sj„,.-jrpti,iiJin.,.i.nt 


■ ,i..-K k'r<..,. ..., 


.....J,'-! . 'IS ie'.n!ct:>.i.«,i kib 






ALOOKQUIAN LANQUAGES. 



155 



Bliot (J.) —ContinnecL 

Bonis, of whom some trae believers, some lesm- 
ers, and some are still iofaots, and all of them 
beg, cry, entreat for bibles, having already en- 
Joyed that blessin;;, bat now are in great want 
. . . We are at the 19th chap, of the Acts; and 
when we have impressed the new Testament, 
our commissioners approve of my preparing 
and impressing also the. old." The new testa- 
ment was finished at the press in the aatnmn 
or winter of 1681, and closely followed by the 
impression of the metrical psalms, which were 
oompleted in 1682. Some copies of the book 
may then have been bound for immediate use, 
beeaose, according to Mr. Eliot's letter written 
two years before, the Indians were begging, 
crying, and entreating for bibles, of which they 
were in "great want." Dr. Trnmboll, how- 
ever, sapposes that " few copies, if any," were 
"madcap separately." 

The printing of the old testament was be* 
gun in 1682, after the metrical psalms had been 
finished. On the 15th of March, 1682-3. Mr. 
Eliot wrote to Boyle : " The groat work, that I 
travel about, is, the printing of the old testa- 
ment, that they may have the whole bible. 
They have had the whole, in the first impres- 
sion, and some of the old they still have, and 
know the worth and nae of it ; and therefore 
they are importunately desiroos of the whole. 
I desire to see it done before I die, and I am so 
deep in years that I cannot expect to live 
long: besides, we have bat one man (viz. the 
Indian printer) that is able to comi>ose the 
sheets, and correct the press, with understand- 
ing. For sach reasons, so sood as I received 
the sum of near 402. for the bible work, I pres- 
ently set the work on foot; and one tenth part, 
or near is done : we are in Loviticas. I have 
added some part of my salary to keep up the 
work, and many more thiogs I might add, as 
reasons of my urgency in this matter." Three 
months later, on the 2 let of June, 1683, he 
wrote again: "Your hungry alurans do stUl 
ory onto your honour for the milk of the word 
in the whole book of God, and for the bread of 
life, which they have fed upon in the whole 
bible, and are very thankful for what they have, 
and importunately desirous to epjoy the whole 
book of God. . . . My age makes me im- 
portunate. I shall depart Joyfully, may I but 
leave the bible among them, for it is the wonl 
of life ; and there be some godly souls amoog 
them, that live thereby. The work is under 
great incumberments and discouragements." 
On the 27th of November, 1683, in another let- 
ter to Boyle, he wrote: "Although my hasty 
venturing to begin the impression of the old 
testament before I had your honour's (fiat) may 
have moved (as some intimate) some disgust, 
yet I see that your love, bounty and charity, 
doth still breath out encouragement unto the 
work, by supplies of 4601. unto the work, for 
which I do return my humble thankfalness to 
your honour, and take boldness to intreat favour 
for two requests. First, I pray, that you would 



Eliot (J.) —Contlnned. 

please to accept an apology for my haste. I am 
deep in years, and sundry say, if I do not pro* 
cure it printed while I live, it is not within the 
prospect of human reason, whether ever, or 
when, or how, it may be accomplished. . . . 
My second hamble request is, that you woald 
please to draw a cartain of love over all my 
failures, because love will cover a multitude of 
transgressions. The work goeth on now, with 
more comfort, though we have had many im- 
pediments, partly by sickness of the workmen, 
for it is a very sickly and mortal time with us, 
as also the rigour of the winter doth now ob- 
struct us. The work goeth on, I praise God; 
the sabbath is saoctifled in many places, and 
they have still fragments of their old bibles, 
which they make constant use of." The pro- 
gress of the work is related in another letter to 
Boyle, dated April 22. 1684 : " The last gift of 
4002. for the reimpression of the Indian bible 
doth set a diadem of beauty upon all your 
former acts of pious charity, and commandeth 
us to-retum unto your honours all thankful ac- 
knowledgments, according to oar abilities. It 
pleased the worshipful Mr. Stonghton, to give 
me an intimation, that your honours desired to 
know the particular present estate of the pray- 
ing Indians ; as also, when Moses's pentateuch 
is printed, to have some copies sent over, to 
evidence the real and gootl progress of the 
work. ... As for the sending any num- 
bers of Moses's Pentateuch, I beseech your 
honours to spare us in that; because so many 
as we send, so many bibles are maimed, and 
made incomplete, because they want the five 
books of Moses. We present your honours 
with one book, so far as we have gone in the 
work, and humbly beseech, that it may be ac- 
ceptable, until the whole be finished ; and then 
the whole impression (which is two thousand) 
is at your honours command. Our slow pro- 
gress noedeth an apology. We have been much 
hindered by the sickness this year. Our work- 
men have been all sick, and we have but few 
hands, one Englishman, and a boy, and one 
Indian ; and many interruptions and diversions 
do befal ns ; and we could do but little this 
very bard winter." 

The old testament appears to have been com- 
pleted in the autumn of 1685. A brief address 
was then prepared, * ' To the Honourable Robert 
Boyle Esq: Govemour, And to the Company, 
for the Propagation of the Gi>spel to the In- 
dians in New-England, and Paris adjacent in 
America," dedicating to them "this second 
Edition of the Holy Bible " in the Indian lan- 
guage, "much corrected and amended." This 
dedication, dated "Boston Octob. 23. 1685," 
and signed by William Stoughton, Joseph Dud- 
ley, Peter Bulkley and Thomas Hinckley, was 
printed on one side of a single leaf, and inserted 
after the first title in the few presentation 
copies sent abroad. A contemporary reference 
to the bible is found in a letter ftem Samuel 
Sewall to Stephen Dummer, written from Bos- 



156 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Eliot (J.) ~ Continued. 

ton, February 15th, 168| : " The beet News that 
I can think to speak of from America, is, thiU 
Mr. John Eliot, through the good hand of God 
npon him, hath procured a second Edition of 
the Bible in the Indian Language; so that 
many Hundreds of them may read the Scrip- 
tures." In the summer of 1086, Mr. John Dun- 
ton, the London boolueller. made a visit to Mr. 
Eliot, an account of which he gave in his Life 
ajid Errort^ as follows : " My next ramble was 
to Roxbury, in order to visit the Rev. Mr. Elliot, 
the great Apostle of the Indians. He was 
pleased to receive me with abundance of re* 
epect; and inquired very kindly after Dr. An- 
nesley, my Father-in-law, and then broke out 
with a world of seeming satisfaction, ' Is my 
brother Anneslev yet alive? Is he yet con 
verting souls to God 1 Blessed be God for this 
information before I die.' Ho presented me 
with twelve Indian Bibles, and desired me to 
bring one of them over to Dr. Annesley : as 
also with twelve 'Speeches of converted In- 
diMis,' which himself had published." In a 
letter to Boyle, dated "Roxbury, August 29, 
1686, in the third month of our overthrow," Mr. 
Eliot wrote: "Our Indian work yet Itveth, 
praised be Crod ; the bible is coiue forth, many 
hundreds bound up, and dispersed to the In- 
dians, whose thankfulness I intimate and tes- 
tify to your honour." 

From the prei^eding extracts of Mr. Eliot's 
letters it appears that 2,000 copies were printed 
of this edition. Mr. Eliot acknowledged the 
receipt of 9001., in three separate payments, 
for defraying the cost of the work. One of the 
persons employed on this edition was the In- 
dian called James Printer. He was educated 
at the Indian school in Cambridge, and had 
worked as an apprentice on the first edition. 
Mr. Eliot refers to him as the only man they 
had who was able to compose the sheets and 
correct the press with understanding. In 1709 
his name appears as Joint printer with B. Green 
of Mayhew'H Indian translation of the psalter. 
About the year 1855, Mr. George Liverraore 
had afew copies of thededication leaf reprinted 
separately, nearly in fac-simile, for insertion in 
the ordinary copies of the bible. The dedica- 
tion was also reprinted in O'Callaghan's Amer- 
iean BibUs, p. 17. 

Dr. John G. Shea has furnished the following 
note relating to the Indian bible: " The vol- 
ume excited interest in Rome, and a brief of 
Pope Clement XI. to the archbishop of Sara- 
gossa, Au^. 31, 1709, written to excite him to 
prevent the introduction into Spanish America 
of a Bible recently translated into an American 
language by Protestants, evidently refers to 
this, although it is spoken of as printed in 
London." 

About twenty-flve years after the publica- 
tion of this edition of the bible, ceruin letters 
were addressed to the Society in England, rec- 
ommending that a new edition be printed. The 
proposition, however, was not received with 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

faror, and in 1710 a report was drawn up show* 
ing the inexpediency of such an undertaking. 
My attention has been called to this interesting 
document by Dr. Ellsworth Eliotof New York, 
and it is given below in full: 

" Honb>* Sir,— Your Stewards and Serv«> the 
CofQlssioners, to whom the hon^'' Corporation 
for propagating the Gospel among our Indians 
have conritted a more ifflediat and subordinat 
management of that Affair, we hope do, and 
shall observe most exactly all your Directions 
and with all possible conformity. Among your 
Directions you have been pleased to propose a 
New Edition of the Indian Bible, in which 
your orders, if they be continued, will be reli- 
giously complied withall. But because it can 
hardly be well entred upon before we may have 
some Answer to the Address we now make 
unto 3'on, We improve the present Opportunity 
humbly to lay before you the Sentiments which 
your Coniissioners here generally have of the 
matter; and not they only, but we suppose, the 
Generality of t^e more considerat Gentlemen 
through the Countrey. Indeed the considera- 
tions which we have already and almost una- 
wares insinuated, may be of some weight in 
the matter. For if the printing of the Psalter 
with the Gospel of John, in sq correct a ma&er 
as may be for Sat isfaction, have taken up so 
long a time, as above a year ; how much time 
will necessarily go to so great a Work as that 
Of the whole Bible 1 For the doing of which 
also, it will be necessary to take off those per- 

■ sons fh)m their Ministry among the Indians, 
who are of all men the most essential to the In> 
dian Service. In the mean time 'tis the opinion 
of many. That an little Money as would be ex- 
pended on a new Edition of the Bible (and not 
much mure time) would go very far towards 
bringing them to be a sort of Engliih Qeneration. 
It Is very sure, The best thing we can do for our 
Indians is to Anglicise them in all agreeable 
Instances; and in that of Language, as well as 
others. They can scarce retain their Lan- 
guage, without a Tincture of other Salvage 
Inclinations, which do but ill suit, either with 
the Honor, or with the design of Christianity. 
The Indians themselves are Divided in the 
Desires upon this matter. Though some of 
their aged men are tenacious enough of Indian- 
isme (which is not all to be woudred at) Others 
of them as earnestl}* wish that their people 
may be made English as fast as they can. The 
Reasons they assign for it are very weighty 
ones; and this among the rest. That their 
Indian Tongue is a very penurious one (though 
the Words are long enough !) and the great 
things of our Holy Religion brought unto them 
in it, unavoidably arrive in Terms that are 
scarcely more intelligible to them than if they 
were entirely English. But the English 
Tongue would presently give them a Key to all 
our Treasures and make them the Masters of 
another sort of Library than any that ever will 
be seen in their Barbarous Ungno. And such 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



157 



Xniot (J.) — Continaed. 

of them as oan speak Englisb, find themaelves 
raatly accoifiodated for the entertaining and 
oommanioating of Knowledge, beyond what 
they were before. And it is hoped, That 
by gotMl English Schools among the Indians, 
and someother fit methods, the grand intention 
of Anglicising them woald be soon accom- 
plished. The Truth is, when we sit down and 
coant the cost, we much suspect our Ability to 
go through the Cost of printing the Bible; and 
yet supporting the sllual expences which roust 
be bom on other Accounts, or else the Evan- 
gelical work among the Indians fall to the 
ground. That which adds a very great weight 
unto the Scale we are upon, is this: The 
Indians, though their number and their dis- 
tance be now so small, do considerably differ in 
their Dialect. The former Editions of the 
Bible were in the /^atick Dialect. But if it be 
done in the Noop Dialect, which would best 
suit the most valuable body .of our surviving 
Indians, those on the Main, and at Nantucket 
would not understand it so well as they should. 
The Books written by two eminent I^reachers 
in their Toninie, the Indians complain of a Dif- 
ference in them that is considt^rable. Their 
Language is also coutinualiy changing; old 
words wearing out. and new ones coming on. 
Andadiscree* person whom we lately employd 
in a Tisitation of the Indian Villager, inserts 
this as one article of his Report, about this 
partioular matter. 

"'There are many words of Mr. Elliott's 
forming which they never understooil. This 
they say is a grief to them. Such a knowledge 
in their Bibles, as our English onlinarily have 
in ours, they seldom any of them have : and 
there seems to be as much difficulty to bring 
them aoto a competent knowledge of the Scrip- 
tares, as it would be to get a sensible acquaint- 
ance with the English Tongue.' 

"Your Commissioners iu general were not 
acquainted with the Letters that went from 
certain particular Gentlemen here, which gave 
the Representation that has solllcited your 
excellent charity to run into that Chanel of a 
New Edition for the Indian Bible. We there- 
fore thought it our Duty to throw in our own 
Representation on the other side, that so the 
more oonsnIBat Wisdom and Judgment of the 
Corporation may weigh all things, and proceed 
thereupon to their final Resolutions. When 
thoae are made known unto us, what ever they 
•ball be, wo shall think it our Duty to fall in 
with them, and pursue them to the uttermost. 

"Being always Your Honor's (and the Com- 
pany's) most faithfoU most sincere and humble 
8crv<. 

"That none of the Ministers who belong to 
our number. Sign with us, is owing to their 
Ibidisposition upon weighty Reasons, to think 
it proper for them to declare themselves per* 
cmptorily one wi^or other on the subject."— 
"The foregoing Representation, the original 
was written by Mr. Cotton Mather. Mr. Brom- 



Bllot (J.) — Con tinned. 

field had it of his Brother Fitoh, who gave it 
him to shew Mr. Sergeant^ which he did in the 
Council-Chamber 9Ml»fc., 1710. I accidentally 
heard Mr. Sergeant and Foster talking upon it, 
ask'd it of them, and Copied it out. S.S."— 
Samuel Sewall's Letter Book, in the Collections 
of the MoMcichusetts IlUtorieal Society, sixth 
series, vol. 1, pp. 400-403. 

The name Virffinice or Virginian was wrongly 
applied, by several European writers of the 
seventeenth century, to Mr. Eliot's version of 
the bible in the Massachusetts Indian language, 
and the error has been repeated in many cata- 
logues and other works. The same term was 
also used in the polyglot collections of the 
Lord's prayer or Oratio Dominica published by 
Andreas Miillerin 1680, Benjamin Motte in 1700, 
Johann Ulrich Krause in 1712, John Chamber- 
layno in 1715. and by others. The assignment 
of this version of the Lord's prayer to Virginia 
did not pass without criticism from a New 
England scholar. Paul Dudley, the attorney- 
general of the province of Massachuset ts. wrote 
to John Chamberlayne soon after receiving his 
work, as follows : 

" You shall now allow me as a X. E. man to 
Expostulate with you concerning one of your 
versions of the Lord's prayer, viz. that which 
you call Virginiee. 

"First I have noc [knowledge] that anything 
of that nature was done either by or in that 
colony. 

"2. The Whole Bible (besides other small 
Religious pieces) was Translated by famous 
11' Eliot into the Indian Language, and upon 
Examination I find yours to be literatim the 
same and it must be taken from Mr. Eliot's 
bible, for the Viginia Indians, the Albany In- 
dians at New York or the Mohawks and our 
Indians of this province use very different 
Dialects and hardly understand one another, 
and therefore if I had happened to have been 
with you when yon had Entitled that Transla- 
tion itshould nothaverun Virginiee [but] Indice 
nt inter Indos Novanglite loquitur Ex versione 
Johannis Elioti." The above extract of Dud- 
ley's letter has been furnished by Dr. George 
H. Moore. 

Copies: Nine of these (nos. 5, 9, 13, 15, 32, 35, 
40, 47. and 51) contain the original dedication to 
the Hon. Robert Boyle, printed on a single leaf, 
which was inserted in the few presentation 
copies sent abroad. Several others (nos. 1, 6, 12, 
24, 26, 36, 50, and 53), of which no particulai de- 
scriptions have been obtained, perhaps contain 
the dedication also. The copies issued for the 
use of the Indians are without it. 

(1) Library of the Faculty of Advocates, 
Edinburgh. No description has been obtained 
of this copy. See the Catalogue of the Printed 
Booka in the Library of the FaeuUy of Advocates 
(Edinburgh, 1867), vol. 1, p. 494. 

(2) Library of the American Antiquarian 
Society, Worcester, Mass. In modern morocco 
binding by F. Bedford (abont 1873). At the end 



158 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

is the following; man ascript note: "American 
Antiquarian Sociotj from Col: James W. Sever, 
Deo'. 4. 1858." A reprintoftlio leaf of dedication 
to the Hon. Robert Boyle is inserted. Informa- 
tion furnished by the librarian, Mr. Edmnnd 
M. Barton. 

(3) Library of the American Antiquarian So- 
ciety, Worcester, Mass. A second copy, in old 
calf binding, lackinj; the gener<*l title, the first 
leaf of Genesis, 38 leaves at the end of the new 
testament or all after signature Z (2d Corin- 
thians xiii. 4 to the end of Revelation), and the 
whole of the metrical psalms. It contains the 
autograph of an Indian owner, *' Josiah Spotsher 
his Bible," who was perhaps a relative of Daniel 
Spotso, one of the Indian preachers at Nantucket 
in 1698. Numerous manuscrip. notes in the 
same hand are scattered through the volume. 
This copy is not mentioned in the catalogue of 
the society's library printed in 1837, but it is 
probiably the one referred to in Mr. Bartlett's 
list, printed in the Historical Magazine (Sep- 
tember, 1858), vol 2, p. 277. Information fur- 
nished by the librarian, Mr. Edmund M. Barton, 

(4) Library of the American Philosophical 
Society, Philadelphia, Pa. In old leather bind- 
ing, lacking the general title and some other 
leaves, but containing the leaf of contents, the 
Indian new testament title, and the final leaf of 
rules. At the front of the volume is bound a 
copy of Eliot's Indian Orammar (Cambridge, 
1G66), pp. 66, on the title of which is the auto- 
graph of Ebenezer Hazard, the historian (born 
1744, died 1817), who perhaps gave it to the 
library of the society. Other manuscript names 
have been erased from the title. See the Cata- 
logue of the Library of the American Philoeophi- 
col Society (Philadelphia, 182«), p. 72, where it is 
entered as followa: *'537 Q. Mamusse Wun- 
netupanatamwe, &c. The Bible and New 
Testament, translated into the Massachus tts 
Indian language, by John Eliot. With an In- 
dian grammar prefixed. CambriJge, (Mass.) 
1668." Below this is another entry: •'538. The 
same, second edition. Cambridge, (Mass.) 
1680. " This is the only copy of the Indian bible 
in the library of the society. Information fur- 
nished by the librarian, Mr. Henry Phillips, 
Jr., iu letter of December 13, 1889. 

(5) Library of Andovor Theological Semin- 
ary, Andovor, Mass. In the original calf bind- 
ing, lettered on the back: as. biulia ; indica n. j 
AN'GL. This copy also contains the original 
dedication to the Hun. Robert Boyle, printed 
on a single leaf, verso blank. At the top of the 
first title is written the name, " Thomas Fayer- 
woiither's 1773," which has been crossed 
through with ink. Below it is written, in a 
difierent hand, apparently, "Bo*, at Vendue." 
On the blank leaf preceding the title is written : 
"E. Pearson's, Presented by Thomas Fayer- 
weather. Esq'. 1800." This was probably the 
Rev. Eliphalet Pearson, LL. D. (born 1752, died 
1826), preceptor ot Phillips Academy at An- 
do ver from 1778 to 1786, professor of Hebrew and 



Eliot (J.) — Continned. 

oriental languages in Harvard Ck>llege firom 
1786 to 1806, and from 1808 to 1809 professor of 
sacred literature in the Theological Seminary 
at Andover, of which he was one of the founders. 
See the Catalogue qf the Library of the Theol. 
Seminary (Andover, 1838), p. 146, where the 
title of this copy is given. Information fur- 
nished by the librarian, William L. Roi>e8, in 
letters of December 20, 1889, and January 23, 
1890. 

(6) Bodleian Library, Oxford. No description 
has been obtained of this copy. See the 
Catalogue Librorum Impreeeorum BibliotKecce 
Bodleiance (Oxonii, 1813), vol. 1, p. 259, where it 
is briefiy entered under the heading of version 
VirginiancB, below the edition of 1663, as fol« 
lows: "and 40. Cambr. 1685." 

(7) Library of the Boston Athenaium, Bo«- 
ton, Mass. In modern leather binding. It is 
mentioned, together with no. 8, in Mr. George 
Livermore's noanuscript list, made about the 
year 1855. See the Catalogue of the Library of 
the Boston Athenaeum. (Boston, 1874), vol. 1, 
p. 270. 

(8) Library of the Boston Athenaeum, Bos* 
ton, Mass. A second copy, in modem leather 
binding, lacking 16 leaves in the old testament, 
or signatures Uuu to Zsz (Psalms xvil to Ixxx), 
and the leaf of rules at the end. On the verso 
of the new testament title is a manuscript 
note in Indian, signed: "Neit pasnk|Na| 
his X mark | Co." On the verso of the first 
blank leaf is written : ** Presented to the Boa- 
ton Athenaeum | by Christopher Gore Esqr.** 
The donor of this volume (bom 1758, died 1827), 
was graduated at Harvard College in 1776, dis- 
trict attorney for Massachusetts from 1789 to 
1796, commissioner of the United States to 
England in 1796, governor of Massachusetts in 
1809-1810, and United States senator from 1818 
to 1816. This is probably the copy referred to 
in Mr. Bartlett's list, printed in the Historical 
Magazine (September, 1838), vol, 2, p. 277. See 
the Catalogue of the Library of the Boston 
Athenceum (Boston, 1874), vol. 1, p. 270. 

(9) Boston Public Library, Boston, Mass. In 
the Prince collection, press mark 21. 5. In the 
original leather binding. This copy also con- 
tains the original dedication to the Hon. Robert 
Boyle, printed on a single leaf, verso blank. 
Inside of the first cover is written : " Grindal 
Rawson Ejus Liber, 1714." The Rev. Mr. Raw- 
son (bom 1059, died 1715), was minister of the 
church in Mendon from 1680 until his death. 
He was well ac<iuainted with the Indian lan- 
guage, into which he translated several works. 
The bible was afterwards in the possession of 
the Rev. Thomas Prince, who included it in 
his "New-England Library," which was be- 
queathed by will to the Old South Church in 
Boston at his death in 1758. A brief historical 
notice of this collection is given in the noto 
to no. 21 of the list of bibles of 1663. In the 
year 1814 about three hundred volumes of the 
Prince collection, including this copy of the 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



169 



J.) — Coniinned. 

were deposited in the rooms of the Mas- 
letts Historical Society, where they re* 
1 until 1859, when they were removed to 
ISoath Chapel. In 1866, the entire Prince 
don was deposited in the Boston Pablio 
•y. Mr. George Livermore was the first 
attention to the leaf of dedication to the 
Robert Boyle, about the year 1855, at 
time this copy was supposed to be the 
me containing it. See the Catalogue of 
ibrary cf Bev, Thomcu Prince (Boston, 
p. 101, where this bible is briefly men- 
; and the OtUalogue of Ou American Por- 
f the Library of the Bev. Thonuu Prince 
m, 1M8), no. Ill, where it is described as 
ning an apostrophe in the first word of 
tie (Mamua'se) which is not fotttd liP 
copies. This apostrophe, however, is 
>ly not original. See also the complete 
pie of The Prince Library (Boston, 1870), 
Por another copy containing Mr. Baw- 
ato^rraph, sec no. 33 of this list. 
Library of Bowdoin College, Brunswick, 
, In the original leather binding, lack- 
3 leaf of rules at the end, and showing 
of mnch use. On the blank page of the 
contents between the old and new testa- 
is written: "Samuel MUler's, Esq. I 
Given him by | his Dear Deaoeassed 
I Stephen Minott. Anno | 1729." Steph- 
lOt was bom in 1662. He was a merchant 
ton, and one of the original founders of 
t Street Church in 1699. His daughter 
•A (bom 1097) was married to Samuel 
In 1724. The bible was afterwards owned 
mas WaUcutt (born 1758, died 1840), who 
Qcated in the school of Dr. Wheelock, of 
or, New Hampshire, and went as a mis- 
r to the St Francis Indians. About 
lundred volumes from his library, in- 
; the Indian bible, were presented to 
in College through the influence of the 
''ilUam Allen, who was president of that 
tion from 1820 to 1839. This copy is 
•ed in the Historical Magazine (May, 
'ol. 3, p. 158; and (February, 1861), vol. 
. See also the Oatalog\ie fif the Library 
ioin College (Brunswick, 1863), p. 65. lu- 
ion furnished by the librarian, Mr. 
• T. Little, in letter of December 16th, 

Library of the late George Brinley, Hart- 
>nn. A copy lacking the general title, 
t leaf of the metrical psalms, and the 
af of rules, which are supplied in fac- 
It contains the autograph of Zachariah 
w, 1759 (born 1717, died 1806). He was 
f Experience Mayhew, and minister of 
lians on Martha's Vineyard for many 

It was also owned by the Bev. William 
(bora 1778, died 186G), minister of the 
gational church in Green street, Boston, 
the sale of his library in that city, De- 
, 1867 (no. 2273), was purchased for $300, 

Trumbull, probably for Mr. Brinley. 



Eliot (J.) ~ Continaed. 

See the Rittorical Magazine (December, 1867), 
second series, vol. 2, pp. 391, 392. Dr. Tram' 
bull refers to it as one of Mr. Brinley> copies, - 
in the Memorial History of Boston (Boston, 
1880), vol. L, p. 471. In another place he adds: 
"Between the leaves of one of Mr. Brinley 's 
copies was found an autograph letter from 
Zachary Hossueit, an Indian preacher at Gay- 
head, Martha's Vineyard, to Solomon Briant, 
the pastor of the Indian church at Marshpee 
CMespeh'), written in 1766." The book will 
perhaps be sold with the fifth portion of Mr. 
Brinley's library. The four other copies of 
this edition which were in his collection are 
described under nos. 15^ 33, 44 and 54 of this 
list. See also no. 52. 

(12) Library of the BrlUali MiVoreign Bible 
Society, London. No description has been ob- 
tained of this copy. See BuUen's Catalogue 
of the Library qf the British and Foreign Bible 
Society (London, 1857), p. 69. 

(13) Library of the British Museum, London. 
This copy also contains the original dedication 
to the Hon. Bobert Boyle, printed on a single 
leaf, verso blank. It was purchased from a 
Mrs. George, of Bristol, in April, 1889. Infor- 
mation furnished by Mr. B. N. Bain, in letter 
of May 9, 1889. 

(14) Library of the late John Carter Brown, 
Providence, R. I. It is mentioned in Mr. Bart- 
lett's list, printed in the Historical Mdg<uine 
(September, 1858), vol. 2, p. 277. See also Mr. 
Bartlett's Catalogue of Books relating to North 
and South America in the Library <^ John Car- 
ter Brown (Providence, 1866), part 2, no. 947; 
and the enlarged edition of the same catalogue 
(Providence. 18*2), part 2, no. 1312. 

(15) Library of the late John Carter Brown, 
Providenoe, R. I. A second copy, "in the 

• original calf bincy ng, well preserved, back gilt, 
lettere<l as. bibua indica novjb anglls." Sise 
of the leaf, 7/^ by 5| inches. This copy also 
contains the original dedication to the Hon. 
Robert Boyle, printed on a single leaf, verso 
blank. It once belonged to Henry Hastings, 
fourth and last marquis of Hastings, and was 
kept in his library, Donington Park, Leicester- 
shire, England. After his death in 1868, the 
library was sold by auction at Nottingham, De- 
cember 29, 1868. According to Dr. Trumbull, 
the Indian bible is not named in the catalogue, 
but is known to have been one of the "three 
others" lumped with lot 33, " Biblia Hebraica, 
Oxon. 1750," etc. A writer in the New York 
Evening Mail for April 20, 1869, states that the 
lot containing the bible was bought by Mr. 
Quaritchfor2i. 10«. Heoflered it for sale in April, 
1869 (249 Catalogue, no. 660), for 120i. It was 
purchased by Mr. George Brinley, of Hart- 
ford, and at the sale of the fii-st portion of his 
library in New York, March, 1879 (no. 789), 
was bought for $500 by Dr. Trumbull, from 
whom it passed to the Hon. Honry C. Murphy, 
of Brooklyn. After Mr. Murphy's death, the 
bible was sold with his library by aaotion iA 



160 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

New York, March, 1884 (do. 884), when Mr. 
Bartlett purchased it for $d50, for the Brown 
collection. 

(16) CoDfire^ational Library, Boston, Maaa. 
In modern parchment binding, lacking the gen- 
eral title, the first 16 leaves uf the old testament 
or signatures A to D (Genesis i to xxxiii).46 
leaves of the metrical psalms or signatures L13 
to Yy4 (Psalms xviii. 15 to the end), and the final 
leaf of rules. Several leaves are aUo lacking 
in the Psalms, one in Hosea (Kkkkk2), one in 
Hebrews (Ee4), and leaves in other places. 
Many leaves are mutilated, including the new 
testament title. The volume appears to have 
"been made up from two imperfect copies of 
the same edition, the first portion comprising 
from Gener^is xxxiv (sig. E) to Hosea ix. 10 
(Kkkkkl),and the second portion from Hosea I 
xiii. 5 (KkkkkS) to Psalm xviii. 14 of the metri- 
cal version (L12), inclusive. On a blank page 
at the end of the old testament is written, 
*' James Esop his book,'* and a little below, 
*' Thomas Egen." The date 1670 also appears 
in some Indian writing. There are also manu- 
script notes in Indian scattered through the 
book. This copy is mentioned in the HUtori- 
vaZ Magazine (November, 1858), vuL 2, p. 343; 
and also in Dr. Dexter^s bibliography of Con- 
gregationalism (no. 1903), appended to his Con- 
greffoiionalisin . . , as teen in it* Literature 
(New York, 1880), at which time it was sup- 
posed to be of the first edition. Information 
jfumished by Rev. Henry M. Dexter, in letter of 
December 9, 1889; and by Rev. William H. 
Cobb, in letter of January 6, 1890. 

(17) Library of Congress, W^hington, D. C. 
In modem calf binding, with marbled edges, 
lettered on the back: up bihlum god. j. 
ELLIOT. 1685. Itlacksthela8t91eavosofthemet- 
rical psalms or signatures XTai to Yy4 (Psalm 
cxix. 49 to the end), and the final leaf of rules. 
The headlines and marginal text of some pages 
have been partly cut away by the binder's 
knife. Some extracts from Dupunceau and 
Muyhew are written on the blank leaves at the 
beginning. On the title is written : '' M'Kean. 
1809." This was without doubt the Kev. 
Joseph McKean (bom 1776, died 1818), minis- 
ter of the CoQgregational church in Milton, 
Mass., from 1797 to 1804, and afterwards Boyls- 
ton professor of rhetoric and oratory in Har- 
vard College. At the sale of his library in Bos- 
ton. August, 1818 (no. 112), the bible brought 
$4.50. This may be the same copy that was 
sold with the library of George F. GaUd. Esq., 
in Boston, October. 1853 (no. 650), for $30. On 
the recto of the first blank leaf is written, 
"$30.00." It was afterwards owned by Mr. 
Peter Force, the historian (bora 1790, died 1868), 
and is mentioned as being in his possession in 
the Hiitorieal Magazine (August, 1859), vol.3, 
p. 254. It was sold with his collection of books 
and manoacripts to the Library of Congress in 
ISO?. See the Oataiogtu qf Bcokt added to the 



ISUot (J.) — Continued. 

Library cf Oongreet from December 1, 1868, to 
December 1, 1867 (Washington, 1868), p. 32 : and 
the Alphabetical Catalogue of the Library of 
Congress ( Washington, 1878), vol. 1, p. 701. 

(18) Library of the Connecticut Historical 
Society, Hartford, Conn. No exact description 
has be«;n obtained of this copy, but it i.n Hup- 
p<Med to be still in the possession of the society. 
It is said to be "nearly complete," but it proba- 
bly lack.t the general title and some leaves at 
the beginning and end. According to Dr. 
Trumbull, "in many places, particularly the 
books of Genesis and Isaiah and the Psalm^ 
the paper is fairly worn out by use." The 
book contains several autographs of an Indian 
owner, probably of ^lartha's Vineyard : "Nen 
elisha you noosooquohwonk," i. e., " I, Elisha, 
this my writing," and once, "thes my piple" 
(bible). In 1698, there were two Indian preach- 
ers atOay head, on Martha's Vineyard, named re- 
spectively Abel and Elisha, the latter of whom 
was perhaps the owner of this volume. On the 
blank page between the old and new testaments 
is written: "Rec^ from the Rev^ Mr. Experi- 
ence Mayhew by Mr. Ebenezer Allien, April, 
1719." This copy of the bible, together with 
no. 19, was probably once owned by the Rev. 
Thomas Robbins, whose library was presented, 
to the Connecticut Historical Society in 1844. 
See the note to the following number. It is 
briefly described by Dr. Trumbull in the His- 
torical Magazine (October, 1858), vol. 2, p. 308; 
and again more fully in the Memorial History 
of Boston (Boston, 1880), vol. 1. p. 472.^ 

(19) Library of the Connecticut Historical 
Society, Hartfortl, Conn. A second copy, more 
imperfect than the other, is or was in this so- 
ciety's library. No description of it has been 
obtained, but it is briefly mentioned by Dr. 
Trumbull in the historical Magazine (October, 
1858), vol. 2, p. 308. These two copies (nos.l8 
and 19) wire probably owned by the Rev. 
Thomas Robbins, D. D., who was bom in 1777, 
and died in 1856 From 1808 to 1827, he waa 
minister of the south parish of East Windsor, 
Connecticut, in which place he began the for- 
mation of the extensive library which he pre- 
sented to the Connecticut Historical Society In 
1844. In 1832 he was installed pastor of the 
church in Mattapoisett, in the town of Roches- 
ter, Massachusetts, where he remained for 
nearly thirteen years. On the 24th of July, 
1838, he visited a Captain Baylies, at Bdgar- 
t4)wn, on Martha's Vineyard, and looked at his 
father's books. In his diary for July 25tb, h» 
writes : "Mr. Baylies let me have ten old books, 
including a broken Eliot's Bible. Pai^l hia 
mother, $7.00." On the 27th, after his retom 
to Mattapoisett, he writes: "Looked over my 
old books. Find that I have got parts of three 
copies of the Indian Bible." In August of the 
same year, he visited the Rev. Phineas Fish, 
minister of the Indiana at Cotnit, in the Marsh- 
pee district, and "paid him for an SUot*s Id- 

I 



ALOONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



161 



Eliot (J. ) — Continned. 

dian Bible, iini>erfect, $5.00." S«e the Diary of 
Thomas Robbiru, D. D. (Boston. 1886). vol. 2, 
pp. 502, 505. 

(20) Libraryof Dartmouth College, Hanover, 
"S. H. A copy lacking the gentiral title, the 
last leaf of the metrical psalms, aod the final 
leaf of roles. This is perhaps the copy men. 
tioned in Mr. Nathaniel Paine's list, printed in 
1873. Information famished by the librarian, 
Mr. M. D. Bisbee, in letters of January 7th 
and 31st. 1890. 

(21) Library of Dartmouth College, Hano- 
ver, N. H. A second copy, lacking the general 
title, several leaves at the beginning and end 
of the old testament, the last 27 leaves of the 
metrical psalms or all after Psalm Ixxiii, and 
the final leaf of rules. On one of the leaves is 
inscribed: "Sarah Perry Her Indgans Bible 
written in New England in the yeare 1717, " etc. 
The name of David Lyon is also written on the 
8«ne page. In another place is a manuscript 
note by Thomas Perry, datod 1723. The fol- 
lowing inscription is found on another page: 
"The Exrs. of the Wido Perry Late of Rox- 
bary present this Bible to M' Pebody for the 
Samesof the Bndians under His Care in natek." 
Below this is written in a different hand : * ' The 
Widow Perry Presents this Bible to M' Pe. 
body for the Indians under his care in Roxbery." 
The Rev. Oliver Peabody (born 1608, died 1762), 
was sent in 1721 as a missionary to the Indians 
in Natick, who were then withoat a church or 
minister. In 1729, a new church wa» formed 
there, consisting partly of English and partly 
of Indians, and Mr. Peabody was regularly or- 
dained as its pastor. Here he remained until his 
death, with the exception of one season when 
he was employed as a missionary to the Mo- 
heagan tribe of Indians in Connecticut. By 
his exertions, "the Indians were so improved 
in regard to their education, that many of them 
eonld read and write as well as understand the 
English language." Information furnished by 
Mr. M. D. Bisbee, in letters of January 7th and 
23d, 1800. 

(22) Bev. Henry M. Dexter, Boston, Mass. 
A fragment (less than halO of a copy of the sec- 
end edition. It lacks all before 1st Kings vl. 
81 (Tt3), all of the new testament excepting 
a few leaves, and the whole of the metrical 
psalms, it is mentioned in Dr. Dexter's bib- 
liography of Congregationalism (no. 1003), ap- 
pended to h'.s Crong egatioaalisin . . , a» teen 
in iU Literature (New York, 1880), at which 
time it was supposed to be of the first edition. 
Information furnished by Dr. Dexter, in let- 
ters of December 0th, 1889, and January 25th, 
1800. 

(23) Mr. Wilberforce Eames, Brooklyn, N. 
Y. In modern half leather binding, lacking 
the general title, the first four leaves of Gene- 
sis (chap, i to ix. 27) or signature A. a portion of 
one leaf in Lamentations (Zzez4), and tht) leaf of 
eontenta, all of which have been supplied in 
fao-eimile. The text of several pages has been 

ALG 11 



EUot (J.) — Continued. 

slightly cut into by the binder's knife. On the 
verso of the new testament title is written: 
"Ebenezer Cussens of Eastham | Aug. 24. 
1728," the first line of which is repeated in an- 
other hand. There was a John Cosens, an In- 
dian preacher and schoolmaster at Mouamo- 
yick, near Eastham, in 1698, who may have 
been a relative. On the same page is the fol- 
lowing inscription, apparently written by an- 
other person: "nen Laben hogsuit [or hos- 
suitfj ye notoun pipien | June 11 tays year 1747. 
I nutunumunkqun Solomon pinnion | annotu 
4 Poun I keep my Commantment." There are 
also many Indian wordii in manuscript scat- 
tered through the metrical psalms, which ap- 
pear to be variations or different sx>ellings of 
certain printed words. The bible was also 
once owned by Mr. Oabriel Furman (born 
1800, died 1854), who was Justice of the Brook- 
lyn municipal court from 1827 to 1830, state 
senator from 1839 to 1842, the author and editor 
of several historical works, and a well-known 
book collector. At the sale of his library 
in New York, December, 1846 (no. 1741), the 
book was purchase<l by Alexander W, Bradford 
for $11. Mr. Bradford (bom 1815, died 1867), 
whose autograph is on one of the blank leaves, 
was surrogate of New York city and county 
from 1348 to 1851, a well known jurist, and the 
author of the work entitled Ameriean Antiqui- 
tiet, published in 1841. At the sale of bis li- 
brary in New York, March, 1868 (no. 67), it 
brought $95, Mr. Jaques, one of the executors 
of Mr. Bradford's will, being announced as the 
purchaser. Shortly after, it came into the 
hands of Mr. Sabin, the bookseller, who sold it 
to Mr. John A. Rice, of Chicago. While in 
Mr. Rice's possession, the leaf of contents was 
probably taken out, and insert*-d in his copy of 
the first edition, no. 12 of the list of bibles of 
1663. At the sale of his collection of books in 
New York, March, 1870 (no. 663), it brought 
$120. The next owner was Dr. Edmund B. 
O'Callagban, the historian (bom 1797, died 1880). 
It is mentioned as being in his possession, in 
Mr. Paine's list, printed in 1873. When Dr. 
O'CaUaghau's books werosold in New York, De- 
cember, 1882 (no. 851), the bible was purchased 
by the present owner for $140. 

(24) Library of Edinburgh University, Edin- 
burgh. No exact description has been obtained 
of this copy. It is referred to as follows in Dr. 
John Sioall's introduction to his roprint of 
Eliot's Indian Primer (Edinburgh, 1877). p. 
xxviii : " It may be interesting here to state that 
a fine copy of this second edition of the Indian 
Bible in the original binding, and in all proba- 
bility presented by Eliot to the celebrated 
Quaker. Robert Barclay [born 1648. died 1690] . 
was, on the dispersion of the family library of 
the Barclays of Ury a few years a^o, secured 
for the Library of the University of Edinburgh. 
In 1682 Barclay received from Charles II. the 
nominal appointment of Governor of East Jer- 
sey in North America." 



162 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Eliot (J.) — Coutinued. 

(25) Ellsworth Eliot. M. D., Nev York. In 
modern morocco biudiuK, lacking onu leaf in 
GeueaiH from chup.vii. 12 to ix. 27 (A4), and four 
leavoH in the metrical psalms from ex. 3 to cxix. 
102 (Hi^. Uu). all of which hnve been Huppliful in 
fac-Miiiile. A number of leaves which were 
atuiiietl, torn, or cut into, have been neatly re- 
paired. On tho recto of the leaf of conteutfl are 
the three following inscriptions, apparently in 
the handwritint; of as many different persons: 
first, "Asiiph his Book | Asaph his Bible Sent 
to I Exp. Mayhew;" second, "Kec* from the 
Kev''. Mr. Mayhow from Martha's Vineyard, 
March 22. 17Vi:" and third, "att february the 
Uyear 174VoobibIeZacliary | hossvoit ga^head 
nohtonipeantog." Zuchary EEossveit was an 
Indian preacher at Gayhead, on Martha's Vine- 
yard. Two other bibles which may have been 
in his postiession arf described under noa. 11 and 
45 of this list. On the verso of the last leaf of 
Revelation is written: "lam Zacry Zacry a<l 
Gay he-ad. I have I sad my name ad March tho 
13. 17^2." and below, "att february tho 14 year 
1749 I oobiblc Zachary hosaveit Gayhead | noh- 
tompeantog." Manuacript notes In Indian 
are also found on tho vt-rso of the new testa- 
ment title, on the recto of the last leaf of Bevela- 
tion, and in many other places on the margins. 
About the year 1885, while in half leather bind- 
ing of the present century, and before the 
missing leaves had been supplied, it came into 
tho possession of Henry Sotheran Sc Co., the 
London booksellers, who offered it for sale to 
sevenil American dealers. After it had been 
repaired and rebound, the bible was sent to 
Messrs. George A. Leavitt & Co., and sold in 
tho second portion of the "Trivulzio Collec- 
tion." in New York, February, 1»<8 (no. 1183). 
for $280, at which price it was bought in by the 
auctioneers. It was then offered at private sale 
for $350, and was finally catalogued with the 
"Del Monte Library," and sold in New York, 
June. 1888 (no. 5G0), for $230, to the present 
owner, who is a lineal dccendant, in the sixth 
generation, of the "Apostle of the Indians." 

(26) Library of Glasgow University. Glas- 
gow. No descriptiun has been obtained of this 
copy. See Ur. John Small s introduction to his 
reprint of Eliot's Indian Primer (Edinburgh, 
1877), p. xxviii, note. 

(27) Mr. C. F. Gunther, Chicago, 111. In 
modern binding of purple morocco. At the top 
of the first title, which is mounted, is the au- 
tograph of an early owner, Josiah Cott<)n (bom 
1680. died 1756), for nearly forty years a preach - 
«r to the Indians in their own language, and the 
author of a vocabulary of the Natiek dialect. 
Ho was a son of the Rev. John Cotton, of Bo.s- 
ton, who aided Mr. Eliot in the revision of this 
«dltion. The bible came afterwards into tho 
possession of the Rev. Thaddeus Mason Harris 
(born 1768, died 1842), who was minister of the 
first Unitarian church in Dorchester fi*om 1793 
to 1836. At the sale of his library in Boston, 
January 26th, 1843 (p. 11), itappearedas. "Eliot, 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

John. Indian Bible. 4to. Cambridge. 1685." 
and was purchased by Mr. Edward A. Crown- 
inshield for $39. See the Proceedingg of the 
MatgaehusettM UUtorieal Society for 1867-6D. p. 
427. Information concerning tho Harris cata> 
logue furnished by Mr. Win. U. Tillin^hast. in 
letter of December 4th, 1889. After Mr. (Jrown- 
inshield's death in 1859, the bible was cata- 
logued to be sold by auction with his library in 
Boston, in Noveiu1)er, 1859 (no. 380), where it 
was described as bound in murocco. The auc- 
tion sale, however, did not take place in Boston, 
as the entire collection was bought by Mr. 
Henry Stoveua, and taken by him to Londun, 
where the rarest books where withdrawn, and 
the remainder sold by auction, in July. 1860. 
The bible was sold, probably at private sale, to 
tho earl of Crawford and tialcarrea. In Pro- 
thero's Memoir oj Henry Bradshaw (London, 
1888), p. 328, is the following anecdote of that 
learned libiarian of Cambridge, which seems to 
relate to this copy of tho bible : ' * The readiness 
and accaracy of his bibliographical knowledge 
wore astonishin,^. Many years ago, when he 
was as yet only a beginner, be gave a remark- 
able proof of this. It was in the year 1861. He 
happened to bo in Mr. Quaritch*s shop in Pic- 
cadilly, when that well-known bookseller re- 
ceived a ro^iaest from tho late Earl of Crawford 
and Balcarres for a 'collation,' i. e. a biblio- 
graphical description, of a very rare book, the 
Virginian or Massachusetts Bible, a large folia 
in two volumes, printed in Charles II's reign. 
Not l>eing able to lay his hand on any collation 
of the book, Mr. Qnarit^h referred to Bradshaw, 
who at once wrote down a complete collation of 
tho book from memory. It was sent 1 1 Lord 
Crawford the same evening, and proved to be 
quite correct. Anyone who knows what the 
collation of such a book is, will l»e able t4) ap- 
preciate the feat." The earl of Crawford died 
in 1869. The present earl, James Lndovic 
Lindsay, succeeded to the title in the year 
1880. At the sale of the first portion of his 
library in London. June, 1887 (no. 493), the bible 
was bought for 40/. by Mr. Quaritch, who ad- 
vertised it for sale in August, 1887 (876 Cata^ 
lojue, no. 38489). for 60{. It was finally pur- 
chased by Mr. Gnnther. 

(28) Library of Harvard University, Cam- 
bridge, Mass. Presented to the library some 
time before the year 1800. On one of the blank 
leaves is a pencil copy of an inscription said to 
be taken from the bible once owned by Profes- 
sor Ebeling, as given below. See the Catatoffue 
of tfie Library of Harvard Uhivertity (Cam- 
bridge, 1830). vol. 1, p. 250. 

In 1818, Mr. Israel Thomdike, of Boston, 
purchased the library of Dr. Chrlstoph Diuiiel 
Ebeling, the German historian, of Hamborg 
(bom 1741, died 1817), and presented it to Hat* 
vard University. This ooUeot ion of book s con- 
tained a copy of the Indian bible of 1685, which 
appears to have been exchanged as a daplioate. 
At a meeting of the corporation of Harraid 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



163 



lUiot (J.) — Continued. 

College on June 22, 1819, the president and li- 
brarian were authorized "to exchiinge one of 
the copio8 of Eliot's Indian Bible for other books 
of the Treasurer, (Hoo. John Davis)." Oo ooe 
of the blank leaves of this copy was the manu- 
script inscription referred to above: "Biblia 
Sacra iu linguam Indonim Americanae gentis 
Tuv Natick translata a Johanue Eliot Mission- 
ario Anglicano. Imprt«sa Cautabrigiae Novae 
Angliae oppido. Liber summae raritatis. V. 
Clement. Bibl. cur. T. iv. Freytag Analecta." 
This bible I have not yet been able to trace or 
identify. Mr. Davis died in 1847, and it is pos- 
sible that the book ma}' be in the possession of 
his heirs. Information furnished by Mr. Wm. 
H. Tillinghast, in letters of November 21st, 1889, 
and February 15th, 1890. 

(29) Mr. Lucius L. Hubbard, Cambridge. 
Mass. Bound in morocco, by F. Bedford. This 
copy formerly lacked about a dozen leaves, 
which were supplied out of another copy (no. 
30), before the book was rebound, so that it is 
now complete and in very fair condition. On 
one of the blank leaves at the end is written : 
"Samson Occom ooskcoweeg Sep'. y«27 AD: 
1748 ;" also, "Tho* Shaw's;" and in the upper 
comer, "17 6.53." Below these names is the 
inscription: "Purchased of the Rev^ Samson 
Occom by Thomas Shaw Esquire of New Lon- 
don Sc by him presented to Yale College Li- 
brary. A. D. 1790." On the following blatik leaf 
is also written: "Samson Occom Ooskoweeg 
AD : 1748." The former owner of this bible, 
Samson Occom (bom about 1723, died 1792), a 
noted Indian preacher, was converted to Chris- 
tianity about the year 1740. In 1748, he began 
to teach the Indians at N^w London, Conn., and 
not bmg after removed to Moutauk on Long 
Island. In 1706, he visited England, where he 
4cliTered a large number of sermons and at- 
tracted much attention. After his return to 
America, he continued his - ork among the In- 
dians until his death. The next owner, Thomas 
Shaw, was a prominent citizen of New London, 
of which he was one of the flr^t aldermen after 
its incorporation as a city in 1784. This bible 
is probably the one mentioned in Mr. Barllctt's 
list, printed in the Hiutorieal Magazine (Sep- 
tember, 1858), ToL 2, p. 277, as being at that time 
In the library of Yale College. In 1883, this 
-copy, which already lacked several leaves, was 
sold as a duplicate to the present owner, 
through Mr. D. O. Francis, the bookseller, after 
four other leaves had been taken out of it to 
complete the bible still preserved in the college 
library. Inform::tion furnished by Mr. Hub- 
bard, in letter of January 9th, 1890, and by Mr. 
Yan Name, in letter of January 29th, 1800. 

(SO) Mr. Lucius L. Hubbard, Cambridge, 
Mass. A second copy, without binding, lack- 
ing beginning and end, and many leaves in 
other places. It was once owned by Mr. Henry 
B. Schoolcraft, and some time after his death 
in 1884, came into the possessio'i of Mr. Thomas 
W. Field, of Brooklyn. At the sale of Mr. 



EUot (J.) — Continued. 

Field's library in New York, May, 1875, (no. 
617), where it was described as " wanting be- 
ginning and end, and otherwise imperfect," it 
brought $35, and was ])urchaAed for the library 
of Yale College. In 1883, it was sold a^ a dupli- 
cate, together with no. 29, to the present owner, 
through Mr. D. G. Francis. About a dozen 
more leaves were taken out of it to complete 
no. 29. Information furnished by Dr. Ellsworth 
Eliot; and by Mr. Hubbard, iu lutti^r of Janu- 
ary 9th, 1890. 

(31) Rev. John F. Hurst, D. D., bishop of the 
Methodist EpisoopalChurch, Washington, D. C. 
In moderubindiugofiiurple morocco, extra, by 
Zaehnsdorf. This copy was offered for sale by 
Mr. Bernard Quarit«h in April, 1884 (352 Cata- 
logue, no. 1599B), for 120{.; and again in April, 
1687 (373 Catalogue, no 37870), for 105^. It was 
afterwards consigned to Mr. J. W. Bouton, the 
New York bookseller, who sold it to the present 
owner at a reduced price. 

(32) Charles R. King, M. D., Andalusia, Pa. 
In modern leather binding. This copy also 
contains the orieinal dedication to the Hon. 
Robert Boyle, printed on a single leaf, verso 
blank. It was once owned by the Hon. Rufus 
King (born 1755, died 1827), a member of Con- 
gress from 1784 to 1786, and United States min- 
ister to England from 1796 to 1803. He pur- 
chased it in London about the year 1802, and 
had it there rebound, and wrot^ u]>oii one of the 
blank loaves an extract from Douglass's Brit- 
ish ScttUments in North-Ameriea. It was next 
owned by his son, tlie Hon. John A. King, of 
Jamaica, N. Y. (born 1788, died 1807), who was a 
member of Congress in 1849, and governor of 
New York from 1857 to 1859. From him it 
passed to his son, the present owner. Informa- 
tion furnished by Dr. King, in letter of January 
4th. 1890. 

(33) Mr. Levi Z. Leiter, Washington, D. C. 
In modem binding of blue levant morocco, sides 
iilletcd and paneled, and enclosed in a dark 
green morocco box. Size of the leaf, 7J by 6 
inches, nearly. It lacks the leaf of rules at the 
end and the final blank leaf, but has the gen- 
eral title and its accompanying blank leaf in 
duplicate, at the end of the old testament. The 
presence of these duplicate leaves is explained 
by Mr. Henry Stevens, in a note printed iu the 
Brinley catalogue, as follows: "Sheet Ppppp, 
the end of the Old Testament, is bound up as 
originally printed ; that is, Pppppl is the end of 
theO.T., ending on the reverse; Ppppp2 is a 
blank leaf; Ppppp3 is the title to the Old and 
New Testament, reverse blank ; and Ppppp4 is 
blank on the recto, and has the List of the 
Books on the verso. The cut-out of the two 
middle leaves of this sheet, then makes t]ie 
blank leaf and the title at the front of the book. 
In this copy, these two leaves are in duplicate, 
and as clean and fresh as they were in 1685." 
On the upper c-omer of the first title is written, 
according to Dr. Trumbull, the autograph of 

Jo. Baily. Jan. L [16]8f N. E." This was the 



It 



164 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



ZUiot (J.) — Continued. 

Rev. John Baily (bom 1644, died 1897), who was 
minister of the chorch in Watertown fxom 1085 
to 1692, when ho removed to Boston. The next 
owner was probably Mr. Edward Rawson, the 
former secretary of Massaobasetts colony, who 
died in 1693. He gave it to bis son, whose anto- 
graph is on the blank leaf preceding the title, 
as follows: "Grindall Rawson | His Indian 
Bible I Given him By hU Father | 1712." The 
Rev.Grindall Rawson (bom 1659, died 1715), 
minister of the charch in Mendon from 1680 
until his death, was well acquainted with the 
Indian language, into which he translated sev- 
eral works. The bible was afterwards in the 
possession of Mr. Henry Stevens, of London, 
who had it rebound. From him it was pur- 
chased in 1871 by Mr. George Brinley, of Hart- 
ford, Conn., at the sale of whose library in New 
York, March, 1879 (no. 790), it was bought by 
Mr. Letter for $500. For the description of an- 
other copy of this edition containing Mr. Raw- 
son's autograph, see no. 9 of this list. 

(34) Lenox Library, New York. In modem 
binding of blue morocco, gilt edges. Size of 
the leaf, 7} by 5} inches. This copy was owned 
by the Rev. Edward Craven Hawtrey, provost 
of Eton College (bora 1789, died 1862), and con- 
tains the following inscription in his hand- 
writing on a blank page at the beginning : " Of 
this Translation of the Bible another edition 
was printed in the year [1663] at Cambridge in 
Virginia. A copy of this Book was formerly 
in my Possession and given by me to the Hon : 
£. Everett, the accomplished Minister of the 
United Stetes to Gr : Britain in 1842. M' Ev- 
erett was formerly Professor of Greek in the 
College of Cambridge. E. H.'* See no. 26 of 
the list of bibles of 1663. At the sale of a por- 
tion of Dr. Hawtrey's library in Loudon, July, 
1853 (no. 425), the bible was purchased for 222. 
by Mr. Henry Stevens, for Mr. Lenox. Mr. 
Lenox's description of this copy was printed in 
the Historical Magazine (October, 1858), vol. 2, 
p. 308. 

(35) Lenox Library, New York. A second 
copy, in modem binding of dark blue morocco, 
gilt and blind tooled, gilt edges, by Hayes of 
Oxford. Size of the leaf, 7} by 5| inches. With 
many nntrironied leaves. This copy also con- 
tains the original dedication to the Hon. Rob- 
ert Bovle, printed on a single leaf, verso blank. 
It is perhaps the same copy that was adver- 
tiMed al>out tlie year 1872 or 1R73, in a Litt <^ 
Scarce and Valuable Books relative to America, 
on sale by John Bohn, Bookseller. 5, High 
Street, Canti>rhury, England, p. 1, where it is 
described as a "Fine and very large copy, 
with rough leaves, in blue morocco extra, 
blind-tooled in the old style, gilt edges," and 
prio^Hi (in ink) at ISOl., but without any men- 
tion of the dedication leaf. In March, 1874, it 
was advei-ti8e<l for sale by Triibner &. Co., of 
London, in their No. 3 Catalogue of Choice, 
Rare, and Curious Books, p. 33, *'with the 
excessively rare dedication to the Hooonrable 



Bliot (J.) — Continued. 

Robert Boyle, Esq.," and priced at 160 gain* 
eas. It was porchased by Mr. Lenox soon 
after. 

(36) Library of Leyden University, Leyden,. 
Holland. Presented by Kev. Increase Mather. 
No exact description has been obtained of this 
copy. See the Catalogus Librorum tarn im-^ 
pressorum quam rnanuscriptorum Bibliotheear 
Publicce Universitatis LugdunoBatavce (Lug- 
dnniapud Batavos, 1716), p. 405, in the "Ap- 
pendix librorum, qui, post impressum priorem 
catalogum, Bibliothccffi accesserunt," where 
it is entered as follows: " Biblia Sacra, lingud, 
Indica Americana, ex versione John Eliot, 
Cambridge 1685. Dono Creseentii Matheri, in 
quart. TKeol. 244 B." Information furnished 
by Dr. George H. Moore. 

(37) Libntry of the late George Livormore,. 
Cambridge, Mass. In modem russia binding* 
This bible was once owned by the Hon. 
Thomas L. Winthrop (born 1760, died 1841), 
who was lieutenant-governor of Massachusetta 
from 1826 to 1832, and president of the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Society and American An- 
tiquarian Society. In February, 1842, it waa 
advertised in a Catalogue of Books Ancient and 

Modem, lately selected in London and Paris, for 
sale by Cbarlea C. Little and James Brown, 
Boston (no. 217). where it was described as "a 
fine clean copy of this veiy rare work, ele> 
gantly full bound in Russia, gilt,'' and priced at 
$25. " On the 3d of March, 1842," according 
to a writer in the Proceedings of the MassaehU" 
setU Historical Society for 1867-69, p 427, Mr. 
Livermore "saw on sale, at Little and Brown's, 
a copy of Eliot's Indian Bible, the price of 
which was twenty-five dollars. He could not 
think of buying it, but his brother bought it 
and generously presented it to him." About 
the year 1855, Mr. Livermore had a few copies 
reprinted of the leaf containing the dedicati«n 
to the Hon. Robert Boyle, for insertion in thia 
copy and in those of his friends. Information 
furnished by Mr. Wm. H. Tillinghast, in letter 
of December 4th, 1889 ; and by M». Livermore, 
in letter of January 14tb, 1890. 

(38) Library of the Long Island Hiatorical 
Society, Brooklyn, N. Y. An imx>erfect copy, 
lacking the general title, the first 19 leaves of 
Genesis or all before chap. xl. 2 ( £14) the last 
leaf of the old testament (Pppppl), and th& 
whole of the new testament and metrical 
psalms. The lower margins of the volume are 
also very imperfect. This seems to be the 
copy which is described among the books be- 
longing to Mr. Henry Stevens, in the cata- 
logue of Mr. Crowninshield's library, sold in 
London, July, 1860 Cno. 1807), containing "The 
Old Testament in the Indian Language, by 
John Bliot, imperfect, wants leaves, and the 
lower margins much injured by rats or other 
irreverent vermin." It sold for 3 shillings, and 
was bought in the name of " Hotten." Mr. 
Henry C. Murphy, of Brooklyn, was the next 
owner. He made a memorandam in the book 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



165 



lEUiot (J.) — Continued. 

that it was parchased by him in London for 
$6. It was afterwards presented by him to the 
Long Island Historical Society. Information 
famished by Miss Jessie E. Prentice, in letters 
of December 13th and 26th, 1889. 

(39) A copy advertised for sale by Maison- 
nenveet cie., of Paris, in 1878. It is described 
in Charles Leclerc's Bibliotheea Americana 
(Paris, 1878), no. 2367, as lacking sheets Aaa to 
Zzz, inclusive, which comprise 92 leaves or 
from 2d Kings x. 24 to Psalra Ixxix. 13. The 
price was 15(>0 francs. This is without doubt 
the same copy that was advertised for sale by 
Bernard Quaritoh in March and April, 1870 
(259 Catalogue, no. 278), and again in July, 
1870 (260 Catalogue, no. 1172), at 502. It was 
there described as " wanting aaa to zzz in the 
Old Testament, otherwise quite perfect, with 
the titles, calf." 

(40) Library of the Massachusetts Hiatorical 
Society, Boston, Mass. In half leather bind- 
ing, lacking the general title, the last six 
leaves of the metrical psalms, or all after 
Tsalm cxxv. 4 (Xx2), and the final leaf of 
Tales. At the beginning of the volume is in- 
«erted the original dedication to the Hon. Rob- 
ert Boyle, printed on a single leaf, on the verso 
-of which is written: "Samuel Dauforth's 
book. Cost for binding, 3*>>." This leaf, 
which appears to have been taken out of an- 
other copy of the bible, was found separate 
among the miscellaneous papers in the library 
of the Society, about the year 1855 or 1856. 
The writer of the inscription was probably the 
second Samuel Danforth (boT-n 1G60, died 1727), 
minister of the Congregational church in Taun- 
ton, and the author of a dictionary of the 
Indian language, compiled from the Indian 
bible. Mr. Barllett mentions this copy in his 
list, printed in the Hislorieal Magazine (Sep- 
tember, 1858), vol. 2, p. 277. See the Catalogue 
tf the Library of the Mattaehusetti Hiatorical 
Society (Boston, 1859), vol. 1, pp. 127, 128, 414, 
-from which it appears that the old testament is 

''Imperfect, wanting title and first signature." 
See also the Proceedingg of the Masgaehugettt 
Hiitorical Society for 1860-62. pp. 378, 379. In- 
formation furniflhed by Dr. Samuel A. Green, 
in letter of January 15th, 1890. 

(41) Library of the Morse Institute, Katick, 
Mass. A good copy, "inclosed in a casket 
made from the large oak tree under which the 
apostle first gathered his dusky audience." 
See the American Bibltopolist for February, 
1870. The bible was once owned by the Hon. 
John Pickering, the philologist (born 1777, died 
1846), and at the sale of his library in Boston, 
September, 1846 (no. 803), was bought by Mr. O. 
Thayer for the town of Natick, according to a 
memorandum in the book. Dr. Trumbull, 
however, states in the Brinley catalogue that it 
was bought by Mr. Brinley. A tea party was 
given at Natick on the 28th of October of the 
tame year, in order to raise money for the pur- 
«hafle of this copy, to be preserved in the ar- 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

chives of the town. A ciroular was also 

• printed, containing Psalm C in the Natick dia- 
lect, with the English translation and the tune. 
In Bacon's Hittory cf Natick the following ac- 
count is given: " Some public-spirited individ- 
uals purchased this copy from the library of 
Hon. John Pickering; and the ceremony of its 
presentation to the town took place in the Town 
Hall on the two hundredth anniversary of 
Eliot's first visit to the Indians at Nooantum, 
October 28, 1846, the nominal, not the actual 
day." See S. A. Drake's History oj Middlesex 
County, Mass. (iBoston, 1880). vol. 2. pp. 200, 201. 
Information furnished by the librari.in, Miss 
Nellie L. Fox, in letters of January 28ih and 
aOth. 181H). 

(42) Library of the New York Historical 
Society, New York. In modern half leather 
binding. It was formerly owned by the Rev. 
Thomas Bradbury Chandler, the rector of St. 
John's Church, Elizabethtown (l>orn 1726, died 
1790), whose name, "T. B. Chandler," is writ- 
ten at the top of the general title and crossed 
through with a pen. On the same page is the 
autograph of "John Pintard 1807," the founder 
of the New York Historical Society (bom 1759, 
died 1844), who presented the book to the so- 
ciety. 

(43) New York State Library, Albany, N. Y. 
An imperfet-t copy, in modern binding, lacking 
the general title, the first seven leaves of G-en- 
esis or all before chap, xviii 7 (B4), and the 
whole of the new testament and metrical 
psalms. On one of the blank leaves is written : 
"Purchased at Gurley and Hill's auction sale, 
New York, Feb. 24. 1846." See the Catalogue of 
the New York State Library (Albany, 1850*. p. 
511; and the enlarged catalogue of the "Gen- 
eral Library." 18.55 (Albany, 1856), p. 85. In- 
formation furnished by Mr. George B. Howell, 
in letter of December 13th, 1889. 

(44) Library of the Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa. Bound in 
levant black morocco, filleted and paneled sides, 
by F. Bedford. Size of the leaf, 7i by 5| inrh«*s. 
On the verso of the blank leaf preceding the 
title is the autograph of a former owoer, 
"William Stoughton" chief-justice and lieu- 
tenant-governor of Massachusetts (born 1632, 
died 1701). On the same page is the autograph 
of another owuer, "John Danforth, 1713," who 
married governor Slough ton's niece. He was 
minister of the Congregation:il church in Dor- 
chester from 1682 until his d«^ath in 1730. aged 
seventy years. It aft<*rwards came iut» the 
pos^tession of Mr. George Brinley. of Hanfoni, 
and is perhaps the copv referred to by Mr. 
O'Callaghan in his American Bibles (Albany, 
1861). p. 18. At the sale of the third portion of 
Mr. Brinley's library, in New York. April. 1881 
(no.56*«3), the bible was purchased for $o9() by 
Mr. Charles R. Hildehurn, for the Historical 
Society of Pennsylvania. 

(45) Library Company of Philadelphia, Pa. 
An imperfect copy, lacking the general title, 



166 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF XaE 



Xiliot (J. ) — CoDtinaed. 

the first nine leaves of Genesis or all before 
ohap. xxiL 4 (C2), the leaf of contenu, the new 
testament title, the first 18 leaves of the new ' 
testament or all before Mark i. 33 (E3), another 
leaf in Mark firom chap. iii. 30 to v. 22 (E4), the 
last eight leaves of the metrical pAalmA or from 
Psalm Gxix.103 to the end (Xx and Yy), and the 
final loaf of rales. This bible was onoe in the 
poBHession of Zachary Hossveit, an Indian 
preacher at Oayhead, on Martha's Vineyard, 
whose antograph, dated September 16th, 1738, 
is on one of the leaves. Two other bibles, 
whirh may have been in his possession, are de- 
scribed under nos. 11 and 25 of this list. It 
was afterwards owned by Samuel William 
Fisher, a Quaker merchant of Philadelphia, 
(bom 1761, died 1817), who presented it to the 
Librarj Company of Philailelphia in 1815 or 
1816. See the Catalogue of the Bookt belonging 
to the Library Company of Philadelphia (Phil- 
adelphia, 1835), vol. 1, p. 10, where it is entered 
as follows: -'1639, Q. The holy bible, printed 
in the Indian language, fur the use of the In- 
dians of New England. Cambridge, 1680. (}\ft 
qf 8. W. Fis?ier." Information furnished by 
Mr. Charles R. Hildeburn,in letters of Decem- 
ber 10th and 29th, 1889. 

(46) Library of the Pilgrim Society, Pilgrim 
Hall, Plymouth, Mass. An imperfect copy, 
lacking the general title, the first ten leaves of 
Genesis or all before chap. xxiv. 20 (C3), five 
leaves at the end of the old testament or all 
after Zechariah iv. 13 (Nnnnn4), the leaf of 
contents, the new testament title, the first 
aeven leaves of Matthew or all before chap. xiii. 
49 (Cl),aud a dozen or more leaves at the end 
of the metrical psalms. On the blank page at 
the end of Revelation is written: "Johannis 
Wainwright Liber Donum Dom Josieo WiUard 
Jau'lO, 170g." The donor of this volume, J oaiah 
Willard (bom 1681, died 1756). was the son of 
the Rev. Samuel \Villard, of Boston, and was 
secretary of Massachusetts from 1717 until his 
death. The next owner, John Wainwright, ac- 
cording to Dr. Trumbull, was "probably the 
Harvard graduate of 1709, son of Col. John, of 
Ipswich. ... A few years afterwards it came 
into the possession of 'Josiah AUaunitt,' alias 
*Josiah Ned,' who left his name on several 
pages and scribbled memoranda on the margins. 
He seems to have been one of the Chrintian In- 
dians who live<l near Duxbury or at Mattakesit. 
In one place he wrote, 'Josiah Ned, 1718;' in 
another, 'Josiah Attaunitt yen wutairaun in 
March 18 in . . . . ' i. e., 'J. A. this belongs to 
him,' &.C. On the margin of one page is a note, 
dated 'ut febnuany 7 tay 1715.' ( rhe Massa- 
chusetts Indians did not pronounce the r, sub- 
stituting n for it.) The writer was 'at this 
time at the house of Pammohkauwut. who lives 
at Duxbury' ('ut ohquorapi ut wekit Pammoh- 
kauwut noh pamontog ut Togspane'). In an- 
other place the name of Duxbury is differently 
tpelled: — */evuany bwitay 20 tay, 1716, ut wekit 
pamohkaawut ut tuktpany kah yea wutappin 



Eliot (J.) — Continoed. 

annis mommehthemmut mmoowan, nuttom 
nasit saup; ' (i. «., 'February, Friday, 20th day, 
1715, in the house uf Pammohkauwut at Dux- 
bury, and here lodged, Annis Mommehthemmut 
said, I am going to Nauset to-morrow')."— Jf«- 
morial History of Boston (Boston, 1880), vol. 1, 
pp. 471, 472. Another owner of the book was 
the Hon. William Cushing, of Scituate (born 
1732, died 1810), who was Judge of the Massa- 
chusetts superior court in 1772, chief justice in 
1777, and in 1780 was chosen the first chief jus- 
tice of Massachusetts under the State constitu* 
tion. The bible was presented by his widow,. 
Mrs. Hannah Cushing, to the Pilgrim Society 
some time between the years 1820 and L830. In- 
formation furnished by the librarian, Mr. 
Thomas Bradford Drew, in letter of January 
15th, 1890. 

(47) Library of the late Col. George W. Pratt, 
Esopus, N. Y. A copy lacking the final leaf of 
rules, but otherwise woll preserved. This copy- 
also contains the original dedication to the Hon. 
Robert Boyle, printed on a single leaf, verso 
blank. Manuscript nott^s in Indian are found 
on the margins of many pages. In one place in 
the Acts is written the name of a former owner, 
apparently, "nen matthew Gocknow yeu noo» 
pipie paku." In another place is the inscrip- 
tion, "Jacob Gocknow wuttannah nuppi 
May 17. 1727 noh assoontogit ganoh ; " also, 
" Ephraim naquatanappi at July L 173 ." The 
dates 1744 and 1745, with what appears to be the 
name of an Indian, are written on one of th» 
pages of 1st Chronicles. On the margin of a 
page of the gospel of Mark is written : ** meh- 
quantamoop naumattafopjMB pish lenashpe pah* 
quohwunnitteon en watchanittooonganit Ion,'* 
and other inscriptions of the same character 
are scattered throughout the volume. This 
bible was in actual use until early in the present 
century, as the property of an Indian teacher 
at Marshpee, Cape Cod. An autograph of John 
Eliot has been pasted on the blauk leaf preced- 
ing the title page. This is probably the copy 
referred to by a writer in the Historical Maga- 
nn« (October, 1858), vol. 2, p. 308, who states that 
' ' a copy of the edition of 1663 [sic] is in the pos- 
session of George W. Pratt, of Kingston, Ulster 
County, N. Y." It is mentioned in Dr. O'Calla- 
ghan's American Bibles (Albany, 1861), p. 18, as 
of the edition of 1685. Since Col. Pratt's death 
in 1861, the bible has remained in the possession 
of his family. A portion of his library was sold 
by auction in New York, March 23d to 27th, 
1868. Information furnished by Mrs. Gasqnet 
James, in letters of December 27th, 1889, and 
January 11th, 1890. 

(48) A copy advertised for sale by Mr. Ber- 
nard Quaritch, in April, 1884 (352 0€Ualogue, 
no. 15999), with " one leaf mended, in other re- 
spects an excellent copy in the original calf 
binding," for 150<. ; again in April, 1887 (373 
Catalogue, no. 37871), for 1252.; and in Decem- 
ber. 1887 (86 Rough List, jxo. 110), for 125{. It 
also appears at the same price in a Hand-List 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



167 



Bliot (J.) — rContinaed. 

€tf a peerUiM coUeetion of Boola and Manutcripts 
(London, 1800), no. 442, to be exhibited or sale 
in tho United States in the spring of 1890. 

(49) Library of the University of South Car- 
olina, Colnmbia, S. C. An imperfect copy, 
lacking the general title, the first eleven leaves 
of Genesis, or all before chap. xxv. 16 (C4), 62 
leaves in the new te-<tament or from Acta xix. 
12 to the end of Revelation (S ~ Kk2), and the 
whole of the metrical psalms. On one of tho 
blank leaves is written : " Rec*' of Amos Iliiha* 
ton May 19<^ 1731." The hook was after- 
wards owned by a Mrs. Goodwin, and was pur- 
chased from her throagli tho Rev. Dr. Palfrey. 
Information furnished by tho librariau, Mr. 
Isaac H. Means, in letter of December 18th, 
1889. 

50) Library of J. Poyntz Spencer, fifth earl 
Spencer, Althorp, England. " In old calf bind- 
ing." No exa<:t description has been obtained 
of ihisc^py. See Dibdin's Aedet AUhorpianae 
(London, 1822), p. 02. See also no. 34 of the list 
of bibles of 1663. 

(51) Library of Trinity College, Cambridge, 
England. This copy al.so contains the original 
dedication to tho Hon. Robert Boyle, printe4l on 
a single leaf, verso blauk. Information fur- 
nished by Dr. William Everett, in lottor of De- 
cember 7, 1880. Tho book wart examined by 
Dr. Everett in the year 1869. 

(52) J. Hammond Trumball, LL. D., Hart- 
ford, Conn. No description has been obtained 
of this copy, which is mentioned in a letter 
written by Dr. Trombnll in 1879. If it is the 
one which was purchased in Dr. Trumbull's 
name at the sale of Mr. GriswoUVs books in 
1876, its history belongs in this place, as follows: 
It is bound in red morocco, extra, by F. Bed- 
ford. On tho back of tho first title is pasteil 
the book-plate, dated 1702, of William Talbot, 
successively bishop of Oxford, Salisbury and 
Durham (bom 1659, died 1730). It afterwards 
came into the possession of Miss Frances Mary 
Richardson Currer, the well-known book col- 
lector (bom 1785, died 1861). It does not appear, 
however, in the privately-printed catalogue of 
her library issued in 1833. At the sale of the 
principal portion of Miss Cnrrer's library in 
London, July and August, 1862 (no. 425), where 
it was descrilMMl as bound in "calf, m.e. water 
stained, " it brought 232., being purchased in 
the name of ** Willis." Mr. Alraon W. Gris- 
wold, of New York, was the next owner. He 
had it cleaned and rebound, and at the sale of 
a portion of his library in New Tork, announced 
for February, butpostpimed to March, 1876 (no. 
206), it was bought for $323 by Dr. Trambull, 
probably for himself or for Mr. Brinley. 

(53) Library of Utrecht University, Utrecht^ 
HoUaod. No exact description has been ob- 
tained of this copy. It was sent to John Lens- 
den for the University by Rev. Increase Mather, 
at the time of its publication, and is referred 
to by Leusden in his dedication of The Book of 
Pmim»t pabUahed in 1688, and by Hadrian Re- 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

land in his Distertationeg, published in 1708, 
vol. 3, p. 211, According to tho Bibliothecae 
Rheno-Trajfctinae Catalogue (Tri^ecti ad Rhe- 
num, 1833), vol. 1, p. 123, it contains the follow- 
ing manuscript inscription: "Biblioth. cele- 
berr. ap. Ultngectiuos Acad. Hac S. Bibliorum 
veraioneindica donat Crescent. Matherus col- 
leg, harv. ap. Cantabrigiensos in Nova Auglia, 
Praeses pro temper**. MaiJ 28. A. D. 1686." 

(5t) Mr. Cornelius Vauderbilt, New York. 
A copy bound in levant red morocco, extra gilt, 
with vellum linings and guard-leaves, by F. 
Bedford. Size of the leaf, 7^ by 5^ inches. By 
a mistake of tho binder the leaf of rules and 
tho final blank leaf were inserted at the end of 
the old testament. According to Dr. Trum- 
bull, " the volume has been skillfully cleaned 
throughout, the margins of some short and worn 
leaves oxtendc<l, aud the deficiencies, if any 
were found, are supplie^l in facsimile so x>erfect 
as to escape det^^ction." On one of the blank 
leaves is a pencil memorandum, '* From the 
library of Jonathan Edwards." This refers, 
perhap.s, to the elder Jonathan Edwards (born 
1703, died 1758), who was missionary to the 
Stockbridgo Indians from 1751 to 1757, and 
president of the College of New Jersey in 1767- 
58. His son, Jonathan Edwanls (bom 1745, 
died 1801), pastor of the church in White Ha- 
ven, Conn., fn)m 1769 to 1795, aud president of 
Union College at Schp.nt*ct;vdy, N. Y.. from 1799 
to his death, was well actjuainted with the In> 
dian language. The bible afterwartlA came into 
the possession of Mr. (roorge Brinley, of Hart- 
ford, and at the sale of the third porticm of his 
library in Now York, April, 1881, (no. 5681). was 
bought for tho present owner for $530. Infor- 
mation furnished by Mr. Vauderbilt, in letter 
of December 30th, 1889. 

(55) Library of Yale College, New Haven. 
Conn. In the original calf binding, well pre- 
served, lettered on the back, 88. biblia | 
IX Die A I N. ANOL. On the outside of each 
cover are stamped the letters, "J. [ornament] 
W." On tho first blank leaf is written, "John 
[Winthropf] | mepossidet | 1697," the surname 
being torn oflf. The name '"Winthrop" is 
written on tho second blank leaf. This was 
probably the third John Winthrop (born 1639, 
died 1707), a grandson of the governor of Mas- 
sachusetts. He was the agent of Connecticut 
in London in 1693, and governor of the same 
colony from 1698 until his death*. This copy of 
tho bible was acquired by Yale College some 
time before the year 1858. It is one of the two 
copies mentioned in Mr. Paine's list, printed in 
1873. It was then slii^htly imperfect, lacking a 
signature or about four leaves, which were af- 
terwanls supplied out of another copy (no. 29). 
Information furnished by Dr. Ellsworth Eliot; 
and by the librarian, Mr. Addison Van Name, 
in letters of December 30th, 1889, and January 
29th, 1890. 

For a description of two other copies of this 
edition formerly in the library of Yale College, 



168 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

which were sold as daplicates, Me nos. 29 and 
30 of this list. 

In Dewitt's historical Ditcourge delivered in 
the Xorth Reformed Dutch Church (New York, 
1857). p. 70, it is related of the Kev. Henricas 
Selyns, who was miuister of the Collegiate Re- 
formed Dutch Church in New York from 1682 
to 1701, that *'at the publication of John Elliot's 
celebrattHl Indian Bible he procured it and sent 
it to the Classis of Amsterdam." Mr. Samnt-l 
Bewail, during his visit to England, wrote as 
follows in his diary for February 25, 1688: 
"Viuw'd Winchester Colledge, the Chapel, Li- 
brary built in the midst of the (}reen within 
the Cloisters. Left my Indian Bible and Mr. 
Mather's Letter there." This copy may still bo 
preserved in the College Library at Winchester. 
The copy mentioned in White Kennett's Bibli- 
othecce AmericaruB Primordia (London, 1713), 
pp. 134, 144, was probably in the author's pos- 
session at that time. According to Mr. Henry 
Stevens, "The Books named in Bp. Kennett's 
Catalogue were promised to be left by will to 
the ' Society for the Propagation of the Gospel 
in Foreign Parts,' should that Soliiety provide 
accommodation for them, but that condition 
not having been fulfilled, the books were not 
separated from the Bishop's Miscellaneous Li* 
brary, and probably now form part of the 
Cathedral Library of Peterborough." 

In Rivington and Cochran's OtUeUogue (Lon> 
don, 1324), no. 2220. a copy was offered fur sale 
of "The Old and New Testament, with a met- 
rical version of the psalms, by J. Eliot," Cam- 
bridge (New England) 1680-5, 4to, calf neat, for 
11. it. An auction Oatalogue of Bookt in every 
department of Literature and Science, sold by 
Evans, in London, October 26-30, 1830, contains 
the following entry: "370 Holy Bible, in the 
West Indian Language, by Elliot, Cambridge, 
<N. America) 1685," which was purchased by 
*'Cocliran" for U. 1*. The copy owned by 
Richard Heber, Enq., was described as follows 
among the bibles in the Bibliotheea Heberiana, 
part 10, sold in London, May 30th and 13 follow- 
ing days. 1836: "417 in the Indian lan- 
guage, by J. Eliot. Cambridge. 1685. 4o." It 
brought 21. \1$. 

A copy of the second edition was once in the 
library of the American Bible Society at Now 
York, as appears from its Catalogue of Booka 
(New York, 1855), p. 27, where it is entered 
twice, first with the heading of Maesachusette 
version as "Elliot's Indian Bible. 4to. Cam- 
bridge, 1035 \eic]. (E.)," and again with the 
heading of Mohegan version as "The Mohegan 
Bible. 4to. Cambridge, 1685. (E.)" In the 
enlarged catalogue of this library (New York, 
1863). pp. 46, 47, both entries are repeated, but 
the press-marks are lelt blank, because the 
book was missing. Dr. Edward W. Oilman, 
the. present librarian, informs me that no trac« 
of the book has since been found. Mr. Bartlett 
includes in his list the name of Edward Everett 
as the owner of a copy of the edition of 1685, 



Eliot (J. ) — Continued. 

which is probably a mistake, as Dr. William 
Everett informs me (December, 1889) that no 
copy of this edition is in his possession. 

The following memoranda relate to copies of 
which the edition or date is not specified. Mr. 
Samuel Sewall, in his diary for April 7th, 1718 
(Mae*. Hiit 8oc. Coll., fifth series, vol. 7, p. 180), 
writes: "I prove Mr. William Denison's WilL 
Her brother . . . brought the widow to town. 
... I gave her ]0«. to give her sister Weld 
for her Indian Bible." Mr. Denison was a res* 
idont of Roxbury, whose wife's maiden name 
was Weld. Dr. A. C. Thompson, of Roxbury. 
had a copy of one of the editions, but he informs 
me now (December 13th, 1889) that he sold it 
"forty or more j-ears ago." A writer in the 
Historical Magazine (October, 1858), vol. 2, p. 
808, saj's: "we believe also that Mr. Samuel G. 
Drake, of Boston, has a copy." As Mr. Drake 
was at that time a bookseller, it is probable 
that the bible was in his possession for a short 
time only. Another copy, of which the date is 
unknown, was formerly in possession of the 
Rev. William Allen, of Northampton, Mass. 
(born 1784, died 1868), and is mentioned iu the 
HietoricaX Magazine (November. 1858), vol. 2, p. 
343; but I am now informed (December 21st, 
1889) by his son, the Hon. William Allen, of 
Northampton, that it "was destroyed by fire 
many years ago in New York." Another writer 
in the Historical Magazine (May, 1869), vol. 3. p. 
158. in his description of the copies at Bowdoin 
College, Brunswick, Maine, adds: "I have 
heard that a copy of this Bible is owned in 
Portland, and that several others are to be 
found in the State." In a collection of books 
belonging to Mr. W. Elliot Woodward, of Rox- 
bury, sold in New York, in April, 1869 (no. 2015), 
were "portions of an Indian bible, 117 leaves, 
comprising a part of Genesis, with all or nearly 
all of the six following books, a portion of 
Isaiah, Jeremiah, and a part of the New Testa- 
ment,'* which brought $5.50. At the sale of 
Mr. John K. Wiggin's collection of books, in 
Boston, March. 1876 (no. 804), was a "Part of 
Indian Bible, 11 leaves," which sold for $4.37. 
A copy of one of the editions was onc-e in the 
possession of the Rev. Eilardus Wcsterloo (bom 
1738, died 1790), who was pastor of the Dutch 
Reformed church in Albany from 1760 until 
his death. His son, Rensselaer Westerloo, 
was a member of Congress from 1817 to 1819. 
and died at Albany in 1851. From his family 
it was obtained by the Rev. Aaron Lloyd, in 
whose possession it remained for a number of 
years. He offered it for sale several times at 
the low price of $75. and finally sold it. Novem- 
ber 15, 1864, to George P. Philes Sc Co.. the 
New York booksellers, for $50. The book then 
lacked one leaf or more at the beginning, but 
was described as being otherwise in good con- 
dition. After Mr. Philes had sold it to one of 
his customers, the book was sent to Paris, 
where the imperfections were supplied by fao* 
simile. and it was handsomely bound. Accord- 



▲LGONQUIAN LANQUAQES. 



169 



Bliot (J.) — Continued. 

Ids to Ifr. Philea, it wu ftfterwardA offered for 
sAle in London at a large price. The name of 
the present owner has not heen ascertained. 
Information famished by Mr. Lloyd, in letters 
of December 19th and 31st, 1889. 

Farther research will bring to light many 
more copies of the Indian bible. In 1858, Mr. 
John R. Bartlctt prepared a list of 13 copies of 
the first edition, and 14 copies of the second, 
which was printed in the Iligtorieal Magcuine 
(September, 1858), vol. 2, p. 277. Mr. E. B.O'Cal- 
laghan, in his American Bibles (Albany, 1861), 
pp. 12, 18, mentioned 15 of the first edition, 19 
of the second, and 2 of which the dates were 
not ascertained. Mr. Thomas W. Field named 
23 copiesof the first edition Id his Estay towarde 
an Indian BiOlioffraphy (New York, 1873), p. 
120. The largest list hitherto published is that 
in Mr. Natbaoiul Paiue's Brief Sotiee cf the 
Library of the American Antiquarian Society 
(Worcester, 1873), pp. 54. 55, iu which 26 copies 
of the first edition are mentioned, and 28 of the 
secood. These four lists contain only copies 
owned in the United States. 

< Psalm C. I To be sung at the tea 

party given in the town-ball at Natick, 
I October 28, 1846, | for the purpose of 
raising means to purchase a copy of 
£liot's Indian Bible, | to be preserved 
in the archives of the town. 

No title-page, heading only ; 1 p. folio. Ex- 
tract from Eliot*s translation of the psalms in- 
to Indian metre, probably from the second edi- 
tion of the bible, with the English version, and 
the tnne. 

Capiei eeen: Boston Atheniram, Massacha-' 
setts Historical Society. Trumbull. 

■ [ Webkomaonganoo asquam peanto- 
gig Kah asquam Quinnuppegig, Toko- 
nogque mabche woskeche Peantamwog. 
Onk wob sampwutteahao Peantamwog. 
Wutanakansuonk wunucetou nob nob- 
tompeantog. Ussowesu Mr. Richard 
Baxter. Kab Yeuyeu qushkinnumun 
en ludiane Wuttinnonta)waonganit. 
WussobHumoowontamunat oowesuonk 
God ut Christ Jesus ut, kabooneueheo- 
nat Indiansog. Ezek. 33. 11. Qusbkek, 
qnshkek, tobwhutch wob uuppok, wot 
Israelle wek f 

Cambridge : printed by Samuel Green 
and Marmaduke Johuson. 16G4.] (*) 

90 (?) leaves, slenaturos A|toH intwelvofl(f). 
The charge in the treasurer's account was for 
eight sheets. 

Richard Baxter's Call to the Unconverted was 
first printe<l at London in 1657. This is Mr. 
Sliot's translation of it into tlieMassachnsetts 
Indian language. The abuve title, excepting 
the imprint> is copied ftom the reprint of 1688. 



Eliot (J.) — Con tinned. 

The records of the Commissioners show that 
the book was printed by Marmaduke Johnson, 
*' with our owne printer," Samuel Gn>en. 

On the 6th of July (6th of the 5th), 1663. 
Mr. Eliot wrote from Roxbury to Mr. Kichard 
Baxter in London, as follows: " My Work about 
the Indian Bible being (by the good hand of the 
Lord, though not without difficulties) finished, 
I am meditating what to do next for these Sons 
of this our Morning : they having no Books for 
their private use, of ministerial composing. 
... I have therefore pur|>osedin my heart 
(seeing the Lord is yet pleased to prolong my 
life) to translate for them a little Book of yours, 
intituled, (A Call to the Unconverted): The 
kecness of the Edge, and livfliness of the Spirit 
of that Buok, through the blessing of God, may 
be of great use unto them. But seeing you are 
yet in the Lund of tlie Living, (and the good 
Lord prolong your days) I would not presume 
to do such a thing, without makinz mention 
thereof unto your self, that so I might have 
the help and blossing of your Counsel and 
Prayers. I believe it will not be unacceptable 
to you^that the Call of Christ by your holy 
Labours, shall bo made to speak in their Ears, 
in their own Language, thut you may preach 
unto our poor ludiaus. I have begun thn Work 
already, and find a great difif*;rence in the Work 
from my former Translation : I am forced some- 
time to alter the Phrase, for the facilitating 
and fitting it to our Language, in which I am 
not so strict as I was in the Scripture. Some 
things which are fitted for English People, are 
not fit for them, and in such cases, I make bold 
to fit it for them. But I do little that way, 
knowing how much beneath Wisdom it is, to 
shew a Man's self witty, in mending another 
Man's Work," etc. The Commissioners also 
wrote to the Corporation in Eugland, concern- 
ing the printer Marmaduke Johuson, on the 
18tb of September, 1663: "the bible being fin- 
ished . . . wee shall Indeavour to Imploy 
him as wee can by printing the psalmes and 
another little Treatise of Mr. Itaxters which 
Mr. Elliott is translateing into the Indian lan- 
guage which is thought may bee vsefull and 
profitable to the Indians." In reply to Mr. 
Eliot's' letter, Mr. Baxter wrot«^, iu a letter 
dated from Acton near London, Novemlier 30th, 
1663, as follows: "We very much rejoice in 
your happy Work (the Translation of the Bible) 
and bless God that hath strengthened you to 
finish it. If any thing of mine may bo hon- 
oured to contribute in the least measure to your 
blesse<l Work, I shall liavo great cause to bo 
thankful to Go<l, and wholly submit the Alter- 
ation and use of it t*) your Wisdom. Methinks 
the Amembliet Catechism should bo next the 
holy Scriptures, most worthy of your Labours." 
Iu the account of his own life and times (Re- 
WiuivB Bixteriana, London, 1696). Mr. Baxter 
also mentions this work: "Mr. Elliot sent the 
King first the New Testament and then the 
whole Bible, translated and printed in the In- 



170 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Eliot (J.) — Continned. 

dlans' Langtiagre: Snch a Work and Fruit of a 
Plantation, &a was never before presented to a 
King. And he sent wonl, that next he would 
print my Call to the Unconvcrttd. and then The 
Practice of Piety : But Mr. Boyle sent him word 
it would be better taken here, if the Practice 
uf Piety were printed before any thing of mine. " 
In another place he writes: "When Mr. Eliot 
ha<l printed all the Bible in the Indians' lan> 
gnage, he next translatMl this, my CaU to the 
Unconverted^ as he wrote to us h^re: and 
though it was here thought prudent to begin 
with the Practice {\f Piety, tnicause of the envy 
and distaste of the times againat me, he had 
finished it before that advice came to him.'* 

Mr. Eliot fluished thin translation on the last 
day of the 3'ear, as appears from the dale at 
theeudof the reprint: "Finitur, 1663, Decem- 
ber 31." It went to the press t.arl3' in 1664, and 
was finished in or before August of the same 
year. On the 7th of M.irch, 1664, tlie Corpora- 
tion in London wrote to the Commissioners in 
New Kn;;'iand: "wee can not but take notice 
of Mr. Elliots groat painesoud labour amongst 
the jMor Indians and the gofKl Effect that hath 
followed thcrvpon ; and also«> his care in trans- 
iat ing the bible into the Indisin Language and 
attending vi>on the Correcting of the presse 
whiles the said bible was printing ; and now 
his translateing a treatise of Mr. Baxters into 
the said Language ; which althoe att present 
wee can not gratefully acknowlidge: yet when 
enabled tliervnto shall indeauor to make a pro- 
portionable £4M|uitall." 

After the book had been printed, Mr. Eliot 
wrote to the Commissioners at Hartfonl, on 
the "25 of the 6th [August 25th, 16]64," as fol- 
lows: "Touching the Presse, I thank God Sc 
yourselves for the good succosse of the work in 
it. Mr. Baxter's Call is printed and dis])''ced. 
. . . My request also, in respect to Mr. 
Johnson, is, that seing the Lonl hath made 
him instrumental! to finish the Bible, and Bax- 
ter, and is now returning for Engl"*, you would 
please to give him Ills due incouragmS and 
auch further countenance and coiiiendation, as 
your wisdo's shall see meet to afford him." 
When the Commissioners met at Hartford in 
September. 1664, they wrote to the Corpora- 
tion in England : " wee dismised Marmedulce 
Johnson the Printer att the end of his tearme 
agreed for hauing Iroproued him us well as wee 
could for the ycare past by imploying him with 
our owne printer to print such Indian workes 
as could be prepared which heo was not able 
to doe alone with such other English Treatises 
which did present ; for which allowance hath 
bine made proportionable to his laboure." 
They also addeil. in the same letter: "the 
number of Bibles with Psalm books printed 
were vpwards of a thousand ; of Baxters Call 
1000 and of Psalters 500 diners whorof all soits 
are dis]>o8ed to the Indians and tlie rest reddy 
for theire vse as they can be bound vp and 
there may bee occation." In the accoant of 



Bliot (J. ) — Continoed. 

expenditures which was presented to the Com- 
missioners in September. 1664, was one charge: 
"To printing Mr. Baxters Call 8shefts at SOs. 
per sheet," 20J. Under the date of September 
13th, 1667, the records of the Commissioners 
contain the following charge : " To 4 hundred 
Mr. Baxters call bound at Ss. per hundred,'* 

. 12$. 

No copy of this edition is known to bo ex- 
tant It was reprinted in 1688, as follows: 

[ ] Wehkomaoni^auoo | asqnam | pe- 

anto^ig I KahasquamQniuniippegig, | 
Tokonogqnu mahche woskocbe Peaii- | 
taiiiwug. Onk woh sanipwuttea- | hae 
Peantaniwog. | WutanakauHuonk wan- 
neetou noli | nohtoiupeautog. | Usso- 
wesu I Mr. Richard Baxter. | Kah | 
Yenyeu qnshkiuutiman en Indiaue j 
WuttinuoutcDwaongauit. | Wnssohsu- 
moDwontamiinat oowesuonk | God nt 
Christ Jesus ut, kah | ooneneheonat 
Indiansog. | Ezek. 33. 11. | Qushkek, 
qusbkck, tohwhiitch woh nnppok, woi 
Israelle wek ? | 

Cambridge : | Prink»d by S. G. for the 
Corporation in London | for the In- 
dians in New England 168H. 

Title 1 leaf within a bonier of small orna- 
ments verso blank, text entirely in Indian pp. 
I 3-188, 163. Signatures A to M in eights, in- 
I eluding two blank loaves at the end. 

The second edition of Eliot's translation into 
the Massachusetts Indian language of Baxter's 
CaU to the Unconrertcd. It ends on page 188 
with a brief prayer, below which are the words: 
"Finitnr, 1663, December 31." See the fac- 
simile of the title-page. 

Copies itecn : American Antiquarian Society, 
Harvard, Massachusetts Historical Society, 
Prince, Yale. 

The cony owned by the Rev. William Jenks 
was sold in Boston, December, 1867, for $27; 
Mr. Brinley's, which is perhaps the same copy, 
bound in brown levant morocco by Bedford, 
was sold in New York, March, 1879 (no. 782), 
for $135, and was purchased for Yale College. 

[ ] Manitowompae | pomantamoonk: ] 

Sampwshanau | Christianoh | Uttoh 
woh an | pomantog | Wassikkitteaho- 
nat I God. | I Tim 4 8. | Mauittdoonk 
ohtooomco quoshodtuongash yeuyea ut 
poman- | tamax)ugauit kah ue paom- 
ooug. I 
Cambridge: | Printed in the Year 

16G5. 

TraneUUion: Godly | living: | Directs | a- 
Chrirftian | how he may I live | to-please | God. 

Title 1 leaf within a border of small orna- 
ments verso blank, text entirely in Indian pp. 



j*EHKOM ^O»^aAN00t I 

llPEANtOGIG %\ 

- «it C.mwog. Oak wob fampwuiict- » fl 
^ bie Peaatimwog. ]^ j 

S Wm aa^fc mraoi fc wua:iectou aub ».'; 
•i nobcompcao og. V^ jl 



assoffssa 



J Mr. RtCft A BC 3 AZTBi, $. 

I K A H I 

4 WuuiaaoaiorvtQagiair. ^■■' 

'* WuirabftiiDdDWontaRiuoat CDWrfaerft 
^ Cod ut Qitift Jcras^at, ksh 

5 a»ieochconi't til DlA eiio0,' 

« ^ — ; ■ " - 

:. r^ jri i( 1 T g J 



R'S CALL, IGSS. 



|pOMANrAV!OONKr| 

■J; Satip'vlTiinau ■ ; 

iGhriftlanoh; 

Urtoli woU an 
PO MAN TOG 

WulBkW'rt«Ilonat 



ftjottdia tbe Yctf 



it»»» M»«« 



1 

feu t i %. 9: 



FAC-SIMILE OF THE TITLE-PAQE OF BAYLV'S PHACTICE OF PI 



_ t...uu, ,i/ .,/.i.„ r-*.' 



-!•<- 



if' 



pomaNtamoonk 



SimpwOitnau 



L^ 



hrirtianob 

Utiob «rob an 

POM ANTOG 

GOD 



-» — ^__i 

I < 8 f. 



..f^" 



^ 



FAC-SIMILE Of THE TITLE-PAGE OF BAYLV'S 



ALOONQDIAN LAKGUAGES. 



171 



Bllot (J.) — Continued. 

3-397, Uble of contents pp. [308-4001, 16°. 
SiKnatares A to Bb in eights. See the fac-sim- 
ile of the title-page. 

Mr. Eliut's tranalation into the Massacha- 
•etts Indian language of Lewirt Bayly's Practice 
of Piety, bat "considerably abridged," accord- 
ing to Dr. Trumball, whose trauHlation of the 
Indian title is given above. The author of this 
treatise was bishop of Bangor, and died in 1631. 
His **8ole claim to fame," as Prof. Tout re- 
marks, " is the above-mentioned ' Practice of 
Piety.' which, published early in the century, 
obtained at once the extraordinary popularity 
that it long maintained in puritan circles. The 
date of its first publication is not known, but 
in 1613 it had reached iu third, and in 1619 its 
eleventh edition. In 1G3U a twenty-fifth edition, 
and in 1735 a fifty-ninth e<litit>n was published." 
The printed list of e<liti»ns and translations of 
the Practice o/ Piety, prepared by William 
Cooke, F. S. A., contains seventy eij^ht titles. 
Mr. J. E. Bailey, F. S. A., has called attention to 
the entry by John Ho<lge ttes, in the Stationers 
Hall Register (iii. 475), on 11 Jan., 1611-12, of 
what was probably the first edition of the book. 
On the 6th of the 5th (August Olh), 1663, Mr. 
Eliot wrote to Mr. Richard Baxter in London, 
announcing that he had begun to translate into 
the Indian language that author's Call to Uie 
Unconverted, "When this Work is done," he 
then continues, "if the Lord shall please to 
prolong my Life, lam meditating of Translating 
. some other Book, which may prescribe to them 
the way and manner of a Christian Life and 
Conversation, in their daily Course ; and how to 
worship God on the Sabbath, fasting, feasting 
Days, aiid in all Acts of Worship, publlck, pri- 
vate, and secret; and for this purpose I have 
thoughts of translating for them, the Practice 
of Piety ^ or some other such Book : In which 
Case I request your Advice to me ; for if the 
Lord give opportunity, I may hear from you (if 
you seo cause so far to take Notice hcreoO be- 
fore I shall be ready to begin a now work; 
especially because the Psalms of David in Me- 
tre in their Language, are ».oing now to the 
Press, which will be some Diversion of me, from 
a present Attention upon these other proposed 
Works."— iWi^wiof Baxterianoe, p. 293. In the 
account of his own life Mr. Baxter writes of 
Eliot: "And he sent word, that next he would 
print my Call to the Unconverted, and then The 
Practice of Piety: But Mr. Boyle sent him word 
it would be bettor taken here, if the Practice of 
Piety were printed before any thing of mine." 
This advice did not reach Mr. Eliot until after 
he had finished his translation of Baxter's 
OaXL On the 25th of Angust, 1U6I, he wrote to 
the Commissioners at Hartford : ' ' Touching the 
Frease, I thank Go<l it, yourselves for the good 
•nccesse of the work in it. Mr. Baxter's Cull 
is printed and disp'ced. And though I have 
Mr. Shepard's Synceare Conv* St. Sound Be- 
Uever all most translaUxl, though not fltte<l 
and finished for the Presse, yet by advertizm* 



Eliot (J.) — Continaed. 

fro the hon'ablo Corporation, I must lay that 
by and fall upon the Practise of Piety, w*^ I 
hud intended to be the last: therefore this win- 
ter I puipose, if the Lord will, to set up<m that 
booke." In their next letter to the Corporation 
in England, the Commissioners wrote, from 
Hartford, September 1st. 1664, that they had 
dismissed Marniaduke Johnson the printer, 
and that " for after time wee hope to haue all 
books lor the Indians vse printed vpou ezior 
tearmes by our owno printer especially if it 
please youcr honors to send ouer a fonte of 
Pica letters Roman and Italian which are much 
wanteiug for printeiug the practice of piet3'and 
other workes : and soe when the Presses shalbe 
Iniprouo for the vse of the English woe shalbe 
carefuU that due alowance be made to the 
Stocke for the sumo." The translation was 
finished by Mr. Eliot in 1605, and the book was 
printed in the saiiuii year, probably by Samuel 
Green. Under date of September 13th, 1667, 
the records of the Commissioners contain the 
following charge for binding: "To two hundred 
Practice of piety at 6d ," 51. 

Oopiet seen : American Antiquarian Society, 
Bodleian, Yule. 

Probably the only copy that has come into 
the market in rec-ent years is the one adver- 
tised for sale by Mr. Quaritch in Octob«*r, 1873 
(291 CataloffW, no. 18070). bound in red morocco 
by B«'dford, for 90 i. It was purchased by Mr. 
Brinloy, and at the sale of the first portion of 
his library iu New York, March, 1879 (no. 795), 
it WIS bought for the library of Yale College 
for $205. 

[ ] Manitoworapao | pomantamoonk | 

Sampwshauaii | Christianoh | Uttoh woh 
an I pomantog | Wnssikkittoahonat | 
God. 1 1 Tim. 4. 8. ; Manitt5oonk ohtooo- 
moo quoshodtnongash youyen ut po- 
man- j tainooonganitkalinopaomoong. 

Cambridge. | Printed for the right 
Honerable Corperatiou in London | for 
the Goepelizing the Indins, in New-Eng 
land. I 1685. 

Title 1 leaf within a single line border versa 
blank, text entirely in Indian, pp. 3-288, 273-333, 
ti4blo of contents pp. 1334-335] verso blank, 16o. 
Signatures A to Y in eights. See the fac-sim- 
ile of the title-itage. 

The second edition of Mr. Eliot's translation 
of Bayly's Practice of Piety into the Massachu- 
setts Indian language. Dr. Trumbull has called 
attention to the four typographical errors in 
the title. The printing of this wlition was 
probably begun late in 1685. and finished in the 
summer of the following year. On the 29th of 
August, 1680. Mr, Eliot wiote from Ro.Kbnry to 
the Hon. Robert Boyle: "Our Indian work yet 
liveth, praised bo God ; the bible is come forth, 
many hunilre<ls bound up, and dispersed to the 
Indians, whose thankfulness I intimate and tes- 



172 



BIBLIOOBAPHY OP THE 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

tify to your honour. The Practice of Piety ia also 
fininhed, and beginneth to be bound np." 

Copies teen: British Museum, Brown, Har- 
vard, Lenox, Prince, Trumbull. 

A oopy was *old in the library of Rev. Will- 
iam Jonks, in Boston, Dccf>mber, 1867. for|61 ; 
and another, imperfect at beginning and end, 
for $8. 51). In October, 1873, Mr. Quaiitch ad- 
vertised a copy fur sale (291 Vatalngue, no. 1H671), 
from the library of Charles Xodier, bound in 
red morocco by Thompson of Paris, for 60Z. It 
was bought by Mr. Brinley, and at the sale of 
his library in Xew York, March, 1879 (no. 797), 
it was purchased for $50 for the Lenox Library. 
Mr. Brinley's other copy (u ». 71»6), lacking 
seven loaves, and bound in blue levant morocco 
by liedford, uas bought at the same sale by Dr. 
Trumbull, for $42.50. 

Tho I Indian | Grammar | begun : 



or, I An Essay to bring the Indian Lan- 
guage I into I rules, | For the Help of 
6uch as desire to Learn the sauie^for | the 
furtherance of the Gospel among tbem. 
By John Eliot. | [Xine lines of scrip- 
ture texts from Isa. 33. 19, Isa. 66. 18, 
Dan.7. 14,Psal. 19. 3, and Mai. 3. 11.] | 

Cambridge : | Printed by Marmaduke 
Johnson. 1666. 

Title 1 leaf within a border of small ornaments 
verso blank, dedication 1 leaf "to the Right 
Honourable, Robert Boyle, Esq.," the Indian 
gi-animar begun pp. 1-C5, final remarks p. [60], 
4°. Signatures A to I in fours, including a 
blank |^af at the end, See the fac-simile of the 
titlo-pa'io. 

The language of which this grammar treats 
was specifically that of tho M:i8sachusetts 
trilx'S of Indians, dwelling near thb sea-coast 
of the present state of Massachusetts. "It , 
was spoken," aoxording to Dr. Trumbull, 
•* with some difieri;ncos of dialect which can- 
not now be accurately indicated, by the Wam- 
panoags of Plymouth colony, the Xarragansets 
and Nliintio^, the islanders of Nope (Martha's 
Vineyard), the Moutauks, &c." In the intro- 
duction tothereprintof the grammar. Dr. John 
Pickering remarks: "It has also been called 
tho Nonantum language; but more frequently 
tho Xatick tongue, apparently from the acci- 
dental circumstance, that Eliot established his 
first Indian church in the town called Xatick, 
which was near Boston and wan once the tuwn 
of greatest note among the Indians in this 
quarter.' Mr. Eliot himself writes; "We 
Massachtiscts pronounce the n. The Xipmuk 
Iiuliant prououuvel And tho Northern Indians 
pronounce r." To illustrate this difierence in 
pronunciation he mentions the word for dog 
{Anum^ Alum^ and Arum) in these throe dia- 
lects. 

In Mr. Eli .fs letter f August 25th, 1064 (25 
of the 6ih, 6(), to the Commissioners at Hart- 
ford, inf rminz them that the Corporation in 
England had advised him to make a translation 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

of the Practice of Piety, he adds : " Moreover, 
the V are pleased to put me upon a GraBiar of this 
language, w<^ my sonn < and I havi* oft sp )ken 
of, but now I mu>t, (if the Lord give life and 
^tren•;th) be doeing about it. But we are not 
able to doe much in it, becan e we know not 
the latituds and corners t f the language : some 
general and useful cul'ections, I hope the L rd 
will enable us to pd uce. A nd for t hese reasons 
my request is, that you would please to con- 
tinue my interp'tor's ■ alary, w'^ i:* ten poutid 
more added to w* I was bold to make mention 
of afore." He also wrote to Mr. Boyle, August 
26th, 1661: " Yuu are pl««sed to intimate unto 
me a memorandum of j'our des res, that there 
may be a grammar of our Indian language com* 
posed, for publick and after use, which motion, 
as I doubt not but it springeth from your elf, 
so my answer unto yourself about it will be 
moit proper. I and my sons [John and Joseph] 
have often spoken about it. But now I take 
your intimation as a command to set about it. 
AVhcn I have finished the translation of the 
Practice of Piety, my purpose is, if the Lord will, 
and that I do live, to set upon some essay and 
beginning of reducing ibis language into rule; 
which, in the most common and us ful p ints, 
I do see, is reducible ; though there be o mers 
and auomalities full of diflScnlty t* be reduced 
under any stated rule, as yourself know, better 
than I, it is in all Ian uages. I have not so 
much either insight or Judgment, as to dare to 
undertake anything worthy the name of a gram- 
mar: only some pnparatory collections, tliat 
way tending, which may be of no small use 
unto such as may be studious to learn this Ian* 
guage, I desire, if God will, to take some pains 
in. But this i -> a work for the morrow; to-day 
my work is transla ion, which, by the Lord's 
help. I desire to attend unt >." 

'Ihe grammar was finished and printed in 
1666, in an edition, probably, of about 500 cop- 
ies accor ling to Dr. > rumbull. The records 
of the Commissioners contain, under the date 
of September 13th, 1667, the fo lowing charge 
for binding: "To 4 hundred and fifty Indian 
Graniers at 3s. a hundred," 13«. Odd. From 
this charge it may be inferred that the books 
were merely flowed and isHued in paper covert. 
Some copies may have been sent to England in 
sheets, to bo bound there for presents. Dr. 
Trumbull suppusos that "a few were bound 
with copies of the New Testament of 1663 
[sic]'," and Mr. Thomas says that " it accom; 
panted ouie copies of the Psalter ,- i. e. they 
were occasionally bound together in one volume 
small octavo [sic]." 

In the dedi ation to the Hon. Robert Boyle, 
prefixed to t e book, Mr. Eliot writes: "You 
were pleased ... to Command me (for such 
an a.spect have your so wise and seasonable 
Motions, to my heart) to Compile a Grammar 
of tills Language, for the help of others who 
have an heart to study and learn the same . 
. . I have made an Essay unto this diflSonlt 
Service, and laid together some Bones and Ribs 



"1 



*•-.-. >. 



A ^ A %"i ^'^'- v* ^'z ^'^ V "^^-^ S^- '*- A^ft i?r> A <^ ^^'^ ^^- "^ <^' v' ^St^.^l^c 

1 H 






17 






N D 



A N 



Grammar 

i^- f •: o ;a n * ^:> .r. 






^ /^rt Ejjay to bring ihslw^ww^ Language pj. 



4VW 

4; 

ft'" 



INTO 



9 



*/52? Ivnhc liviip of fuch as dtfiie to Lc-ara tiic kmhc, f .v ^j^r*. 
^^ tl.cturthcranccof dicGolViclarriOn^tiicn';. iS^' 

^1 — — " — - - — ,'5fi. 



RULES 








: • ro; 



■^•*r : ix. ri.s : - ''':''"5 



11. »' '?l'-«!/ 



Frinteii by At.ir}7ijJtfkc J okntor. . 



I V) 



•r «r "V* •»• *^ Sr* •••- «f f V V *?• *l* '^;« V '*,'• '^ ^* •? 




FAC-SIMILE OF THE TITLE-PAGE OF THE INDIAN GRAMMAR. 1666. 




^«iip,iff,S.ji.How 

,^•.1 nwcrfbnd them, "jnWs 
,*iihemjn Qiould guide mc? 
('**• m-" Mf mt I, hflf 

ii '/ '*'' ""^ '""' " '*« 
'f.tMltJncftlriT'Ml,, WhM 

words of Arr, i dnnkihtt 
rinrai time «J juJgmeai. 
Stj"' "^'""""'J It inti 
S^'^'i '■ni r.if, mn.,Ut 
^tfkmn It fiUm, «H u 






Ancmayag. 

iit luflipe niduxA tag , - kdl ; 

ivij Sm:h kcttfiltif. ; 

niAnbfa kcke ooluor.k moa»wt*'i 

anil (.A, ■.' 

ntoo, kati kogabkcn-iir.iuiMDine^'^l 

•r .rrw^ Mat J 

a&h wolhwonumoooo i 

Xunak. 
■• *■». 




FAC-SIMILES FOOM THE LI 



ALGONQUIAN LAXGUAGES. 



173 



XUlot (J.) — Continued. 

preparatory at least for sach a work. It ia not 
worthy the Naiue of a Grammar, but such as 
it is, I humbly present it to your Honout s, and 
reqne - 1 your Animadversions upon the Work, ' ' 
etc. On the last page he gives a short a< count 
of his method of learning the language, for 
which see the biographical sketch at the end 
of this article. 

Chpie* $een: Bodleian, British Museum, 
Brown, Lenox, Dr. George H. Moore, Trum- 
bull 

There is also a copy in the library oT the 
TTniversity of GSttingon ; one in the library of 
the University of Edinburgh, bound with the 
new testament of 1661 ; and another in the 
librM'y of the American Philosophical Society 
at Philadelphia, bound with the bible of 1685. 

A copy was sold by auction in Loudon, May, 
1859, for iSl. 10«. This may be the copy now 
in the Lenox Library, which contains the stamp 
of the binder : " Bound by Pratt for II. Stevens 
1660.'* Mr. Brinley's copy, l>ound in levaut 
blue morocco, was sold in New York, March, 
1879 (No. 791), for $57.60, Dr. Trumbull being 
the purchaser. 

— The Indian grammar began : or, an 
essay to bring the Indian language into 
mlesy for the help of snch as desire to 
learn the same, for the furtherance of 
the gospel among them. By John Eliot. 
[Thirteen lines of scripture texts.] 
Cambridge: printed by Marmaduko 
Johnson. 1G66. 

In Massachusetts Hist. Soc. Coll. second 
aeries, vol. 9, pp. 223-312, i-liv, Boston. 181>2, 9P. 

Reprint of Eliot's grammar, prece<led by 
"introduo ory observations " on the Massa- 
ehnaetta language, by Dr. John Pickering, 
which occupy pp. 223-242, followed by the gram- 
mar, pp. 243-312. This is followed by " notes 
and observations on Elioi*s Indian grammar, 
addressed to John Pickering, Esq., by Peter S. 
Da Ponceau,** pp. i-xxix. "Supplementary 
obaervations, by the editor,** followetl by an 
** index of Indian words in Eliot's grammar : 
including select words from his translation of 
the bible,*' the Joint work of Messrs. Pickering 
and Du Ponceau, conclude the paper. 

laaued separately with title-i>age as follows : 

-^-A I grammar | of the | Massachusetts 
Indian language. | By John Eliot. | A 
new edition : | with notes and observa- 
tions, I by I Peter 8. Du Ponceau, 
LlkD. I and | an introduction and sup- 
plementary I observations, | by | John 
Pibkering. | As published in the Massa- 
ehuaetta historical collections. | 

Boston: | printed by Phelps and 
Famham. | 1822. 

Pp.i-38^ 8-48, i-lvi, 9P. The contenU are the 
■ Mpeasabove, except that two piiges have been 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

added from Mr. Duponceau, giving the nume- 
rals, 1-10, of the true Nanticoke, the Nanticoke 
according to Dr. Barton, and the Bambur^k Afri- 
cans. 

Copies teen: Boston Athensenm, British Mu- 
seum, Brown. 

Kepriuted again as follows: 

The Indian grammar begun : or, an 

essay to bring the Indian language into 
rules, for the help of such as desire t^ 
learn the same, for the furtherance of 
the gospel among them. By John Eliot. 
[Twelve lines of scripture texts.] Cam- 
bridge : printed by Marmaduke John- 
son. 1666. 

In Massachusetts Ilist. Soc. Coll. second se- 
ries, vol. 9 [stK'ond edition], pp. 223-312, i-liv^ 
Boston, 1832, 8<3. (Eames.) 

[ ] The I Logick Primer. | Some Logi- 
cal Notions to initiate | the Indians in 
the know- | ledge of the Rule of Rea- 
son ; I and to know how to make | use 
thereof. | Especially for the Instruction 
of I such as are Teachers | among 
them. I Composed by J. E. for the | use 
of the Praying Indians. | The use of this 
Iron Key is to | open the rich Treasury 
of I the holy Scriptures. | Prov. I. 4. To 
give subtilty to the | simple; to the 
young man know- | ledge and discre- 
tion. I 

[Cambridge:] Printed by M. J. 
1672. (•) 

40 unnumbered leaves as follows: 1 blank 
leaf, title 1 leaf within a border of small orna- 
ments verso blank, introductory remarks in En- 
glish 1 leaf, text in the Massachusetts Indian 
language with verbatim English interlinear 
translation from the reci» of the fourth l(>af 
(A4) to the recto of the thirty third leaf (£), 
text in Indian alone from the recto of the thirty- 
thinl leaf to the recto of (he fortieth leaf, end- 
ing with " Finis.' verso blank, 32=>. Signatures 
A, B, C, D, and E in eights. The running head- 
ing, is: "The Logick Primer." See the fac- 
similes of the title-page and of two pages of 
the text. 

In 1670, \[r. Eliot set up at Xatick " a lecturo 
in logic and theology," which wa4 attended by 
the Indians once every fortnight during the 
summer season. The purpose of the lecturo 
was " the better to prepare and fiirnish them 
with abilities to explicate and apply the script- 
ures." On the 20th of September of the same 
year he wrote to the Corporati4m in Ix>ndon 
about tho work among the Indiana as follows: 
** And seeing they must have Teachers amongst 
themselves, they must also be taught to be 
Teachers: for which cause I have begun to 



174 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



lUiot (J.) — Cou tinned. 

teach them the Art of Teaching, and I find 
Boiue of thuin very capable. And while I live, 
my purpose is (by the Grace of Christ asaist- 
in^) to make it one of my chief cares and labours 
to teach them some of the Liberal Arts and 
Sciences, and the way how to analize, and lay 
oat into particulars both the Works and Word 
of God ; and how to communicate knowledj^e 
to others methodically and skillfully, and es- 
pecially the method of Divinity." He also 
wrote to the flon. Robert Bo3'le, in a letter dated 
September 30th, 1670 : "Touching the present 
state of this work with the Indians . . . your 
honour will see, that I have undertaken and be- 
gun a kind of academical reading unto them, 
in their own lan>;ua;;e, thereby to teach the 
teachers and rulers, and all that are desirous 
of Icaruinx." Concerning this undertaking 
Dr. Francis remarks: "We cannot suppose 
that he purposed, or expected, to indoctrinate 
the natives in the technical forms or subtile dis- 
tinctions of the logic of the schools. The ob- 
ject of his lectures was to accustom them, in 
some defi^ee, to clear and methodical habits of 
thought, that they might arrange and express 
their ideas on religio is subjects with propriety. 
These instructions seem to have been designed 
chiefly for such as were to bo trained to the 
office of teaching and expounding. In aid of 
this design, Eliot published, in 1672, an Indian 
Logiek P rimer ^ which was printed by Johnson 
at Cambridge. Natick became a kind of semi- 
nary, from which t<'achers went forth among 
their brethren at the other stations.'* 

At a meeting of the CommiKsioners, held in 
Now Plymouth, September 6th, 1672. it was re- 
solved, that "Mr. Hezekiah Ysher is ordered 
to pay out of the Indian Stocke in his custody 
... To Marmednku Johnson for printing stich- 
ing and cuting of a thousand Indian Logick 
Primers," 61. 

The following introductory remarks are pre- 
fixed to the book: "These few short Logicall 
Notions are ouely for a Thrid, to lead my Read- 
ings to them, and to guide them to follow me 
through the principal and most usefull Princi- 
ples, whereby they may be in some measure 
enabled to understand, open, and improve the 
plain things of the Kingdome of Chri.st Jesus 
revealed in the Scriptures. And touching these 
Notes, I may say as the Eunuch said to Philip, 
ActM8. 31. ilow can I nnderstaud them, unless 
some man should guide me \ Lord Jesus help 
me to htflp them, that the}' may come to the 
knowledge of thy Truth! What I have done 
is weak. To form Words of Art, is a work that 
rcquireth time and judgement. I have ad- 
ventui-ed to break the ice; Lord raise more 
able Workmen to follow, and to mend both the 
Foundation and Building." 

Dr. Trumbull gives a brief title of this little 
primer in his list of " Books and tracts in the 
Indian language or designed for the use of the 
Indians," but he had not seen it and evidently 
was not aware of its being in the Indian Ian- 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

guage, as he classes it with the Indian Dia- 
logues of 1671, which is entirely in English. 
For the clue to its Indian contents we are in- 
debted to Mr. H. R. Tedder's article on Eliot 
in the Dictionary t^f Xational Biography, vol. 
17 (London, 1886), p. 194, where it is described 
for the first time as "iulndian, with interlinear 
translation." The authorities of the British 
Museum kindly permitted the whole book to 
be photographed (full size), and from these 
negatives, now in the possession of the com- 
piler of this bibliography, a half-4lozcu photo- 
graphic copies have been made. (Eames, Dr. 
George H. Moore, Pilling. Powell.) 

The only copy we have been able to trace is 
in the British Museum, press-mark 520. a. 40. 
According to Dr. Trumbull a copy was also in 
the Bodleian, but the librarian. Dr. E. B. Nich- 
olson, writes (December 5th, 1889,) that no 
copy of the book is in that library. 

and Ra^aon (G.) Sampwntteahao 

I qiiinnnppekoropaaaenin. | Wahnwd- 
mook oggassemesaof^ Sampwutteali^e ' 
Wannamptamwaonuog, | Mache was- 
sukhiimun nt English-M&ue Uunoutco- 
waonk nashpe | N6 mutt^-wunuegentie 
Wuttinueanioh Christ | Noh asoowesit 
I Thomati Sbephard | Qaiunnppenti- 
mun en Indiaue Unnontoowaonganit 
nasbpe | NeQattiauatamwewnttiuDcu- 
moh Christ | Noh assoowesit | John 
Eliot. I Kah nawhutche ut aiyoaougash 
oggnssemeso ontcheteauan | Nashpe | 
GrindalRawson. | [Eight lines of script- 
ure texts in Indian.] | 

Cambridge. | Printed by Samuel 
Gr^en, in the Year, 1689. 

Trantlalion: The-sincere | convert [literally, 
'man who stands tnmed-about*]. | Making, 
known they-are-few sincerely | who-believe. | 
having-been written in Englishman's language 
by I that very-excellent servant-of Christ | who 
is-namcd i Thomas Shepard | is-tumed into 
Indian language by | that honoured servant-pf 
Christ I who is-named | John Eliot. | And some 
in places a-little amended j by I GrindalBawson. 

Title 1 leaf within a single line border verso 
blank, Anakausuongane Petntteaonk [i. e. In- 
troduction] with articles of belief 1 leaf, text 
entirely in Indian pp. 1-161 verso blank, 10^. 
Signatures A to K in eights, and L in four, in- 
cluding a blank leaf at the end. In the Massa- 
chusetts Indian language. See the fac-simile 
of the title-page, of which Dr. Trumbull's 
translation is given above. 

On the 25th of August, IMi, Mr. Eliot wrote 
to the Commissioners at Hartford : "Touching 
the Presse, I thank God & yourselves for the 
good snccesse of the work in it. Mr. Baxter's 
Call is printed and disp'cod. And though I 
have Mr. Shepard's Synoeare Conv* & Sonnd 




Saffipivutteahac 

OyiNNUPPEKOMPAUAENlN. 
l^abawAmook oggutTanefuog Siopwatceibai 

}f^unnamftumi»aenuQg^ 

llidlf wofiiihfcamiifl at Biie1i<b»Mln«UiiiKHiccD«annk niff>pt 
Mki Mattie-iraniicgeeic Wattioqeuaob CMIST 

Noh ■fONKfil 

THOMAS SHBPHARS>\ 

(^dkiaap^Bloiun rn IKDIASft UnnttatdDVioflginit aiAp^ 
Ac Qflibiutuive wuiilnniuaob CHRIST 

, |OHN ELIOT , 

I BA MwbuicKc uc iiycuanfaft ogcuHcaefc oartftcrfnu- 
I S«thpc 

ihmvk^oii [^i[h Kihk^d'/^i'dat Jifamt mttdohiit ne^ 

Rom. 10. 14, If. liw tih wft wjvt/H «orjw*M«M« 

r#tM 44«k«fMriv^!i:(rd:''<i««*v£ ^ Kifi tob wib bin «ufc- 
rcAtfhi^ffi matt J. xiiwttwnnk, 

C A M n a I D G E.^ \ 




. ^^ 



FAC-SIMILE OF THE TITLE-PAGE OF SHEPARD'S SINCERE CONVERT. 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES, 



175 



Eliot (J.)~~ Continued. 

BeUoTer all most tnuislated, thoagh not fitted 
and flolahed for the Presee, yet by advertiun* 
firS the hoa'able Corporation, I mast lay that 
by and fall upon the Practise of Piety, w«^ I 
had intended to be the last." Twenty-four 
years later, in a letter to the Hon. Robert Boyle, 
dated July 7th, 1688, he mentions *'Mr. John 
Cotton, who helped me much in the second 
edition of the bible," and then adds: "And 
also I most commit to him the care and labour 
of the revisal of two other small treatises, viz. 
Mr. Shepheard's Hineere Convert and Sound 
Believer, which I translated- into the Indian 
language mauy years siuce ; and now I hope, 
that the honourable corporation will be at the 
charge to print them, by your honour's favour 
and countenance. But I cannot commit them 
to the press without a careful revisal, which 
none but Mr. Cotton is able to help me to per- 
form." 

The Sincere Convert was printed in the fol- 
lowing year, with the Indian title given above. 
It was revised for the press, however, not by 
Mr. Cotton, but by the Kev. Grindall Rawson, 
minister of the church iu Mendon, " who had 
learned to preach to the Indians in their own 
langnage, and was for many years active in 
mission work among them." Mr. Eliot's Indian 
translation of the Sound Believer wan probably 
never printed. The first edition of the Sincere 
0<mvert in English is dated London, 1641 ; the 
first edition of the Sound Believer, London, 1645. 

Copies teen: American Antiquarian Society, 
Brown, Lenox, Trumbull, Yale. 

A copy of this book, lacking the title and 
bound with Rawson's yathauanittue Menin- 
flunk of 1G91, brought $12 at the sale of the Rev. 
William Jenks's library in 1867. One of Mr. 
Briniey's copies, bound in blue levant morocco 
by Bedford, sold in 1879 (uu. 803) for $40, Mr. 
Bartlett buying ic for the Brown collection; 
another, bound with Rawsou's Xaehauanittue 
Meninnunk of 1G91, in blue morocco by Bedford, 
(no. 804), was purchased for Yale College libra- 
ry for $100 ; and a third copy, with the title and 
next leaf In fac-aimile, and bound in olivu mo- 
rocco by Bedford (no. 805), was bought by Dr. 
Trumbull for $21. 

John Eliot was bom in England, probably in 
the beginning of August, 1604, and dieil at Rox- 
bury iu Massachusetts, iu May, 1690. The place 
of his birth is not known with certainty. Sev- 
eral of his biographers locate it at Nasiug in the 
county of Essex ; but later researches seem to 
fix it at Widtord in Hertfordshire, where the 
record is found of his baptism on the 5th of 
August, 1004. Bennett Eliot, his father, held 
lands in both of the above name<l counties, trora 
the profits of which the sum of SI. yearly was set 
apart by will, November 5th, 1621, for the main- 
tenance of John at college. On the 20th of March, 
1919, John Eliot was entered as a pensioner at 
Jesna College in Cambridge, where he graduated 
in 1622 with the degree of bachelor of arts. 
About the year 1630, he was employed as an assist- 



Eliot (J.) — Continned. 

ant inaschoolat Little Baddow.nearChelmsford, 
in Essex, which was kept by the Rev. Thomas 
Hooker, who had been silenced for nonconform- 
ity, and who afterwards became the first min- 
ister of the church in Cambridge (then called 
Newtown) , New England. While living in Mr. 
Hooker's family, a change took place in Mr. 
Eliot's belief, which led him to join the dissent- 
ers, although he had probably taken orders in 
the Church of England. Having resolved to 
devote himself to the ministr}', he decided to 
leave his native land in order to obtain the lib- 
ert}' of preaching without restraint, and to 
escape the persecution which followed noncon- 
formists in England. He accordingly sailed for 
America, and early in November, 1631, landed 
at Boston. For several months he preached for 
the church in that town, duting the tcmi>orary 
absence of its minister, the Rev. John Wilson. 
On the 4th of September, 1632, he was married ; 
and on the 5th of November of the same year 
he was ordained as teacher of the church in 
Roxbury, which ofiSce'ho held more than fifty- 
seven years. Twice during this long period, 
ftom 1641 to 1650, and from 1674 to 1688, he was 

^ without clerical assistance in his ministerial 
work. His first colleague was the Rev. Thomas 
Welde. from 1633 to 1641. In 1634, Mr. Eliot 
incurred the displeasure of the colonial magis- 
trates by a sermon in which he criticised their 
conduct in making a treaty with the Pequot 
Indians without first obtaining theoousentof 
the people. For these injudicious animadver- 
sions he was required to make a public apology. 
Three years later he took part in the examina- 
tion and trial of Mrs. Hutchin.son, which resulted 
in the excommunicatiou and banistiment of that 
religious enthusiast from the c-olonj'. In 1639, 
he was selected, with Rev. Thomas Welde and 
Rev. Richard Mather, to prepare a new version 
of the psalms of David in English metre. This 
joint undertaking was completed and printed 
iu the following year as The Whole Booke of 
Psalmes. more generally known as the Bay 
Psalm Book. It was the first book printed in 
the English American colonies. 

At the time of Mr. Eliot's arrival in Massa- 
chusetts there were five principal nations of 
Indians, as enumerated by Mr. Gookin, dwell- 
ing within the confines of New England, all of 
whom used " the same sort of speech and lan- 
guage," but with diflerences of dialect. The 
first of these nations, the Pequots or Petiuods. 
" were a people seatetl in the most southerly 
bounds of New England," within the limits of 
the present State of Connecticut. " Their chief 
sachem held dominion over divers petty saga- 
mores: as over part of I-oiig Island, over the 
Mohegans, and over the sagamores of Qiiina- 
peake, yea over all the people that dwelt upon 
Connecticut river, and over some of the most 
southerly* inhabitants of the Nipmuck country, 
about Quinabaag. The principal sachem lived 
at, or about, Pequot, now called New London." 
This nation was conquered and broken up by 



176 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Bliot (J.) — Continned. 

the English in 1837. The territory subject to the 
sachem of the Narrasansetts, the second great 
nati -n, " extended about thirty or forty miles 
from Sekunk river and Narraganuitt bay, in- 
cluding Rhode Island and other islands in that 
bay, being their east and north bounds or bor- 
der, and so running westerly and southerly 
untoa place called Wekapage, four or five miles 
to the eastward of Pawcotuk river, which was 
reckoned for their south and west border, and 
the easternmost limits of the Pequots. This sa- 
chem held dominion over divers petty govem- 
ours; as part of Long Island, Block Island, Ca- 
wesitt. Niantick, and others; and had tribute 
from someof the Nipmuck Indians, that lived re- 
mote from the sea. The chief seat of this sachem 
was about Narmgansitt bay and Cannonicnt is- 
land . . . . ThejurisdictionofRbode Island and 
Providence plantations, and part of Connecticut 
people, i>ossess their country/' The third na- 
tion, called Wampanoags or Pawkunnawkutts 
• (Pokanokets). " lived to the east and northeast 
of the Narragansitts : and their chief sachem 
held dominion over divers other petty saga- 
mores; as the sagamores upon the island of 
Nantackett, and Nope, or Martha's Vineyard, 
of Nawsett, of Mannamoyk, of Sawkattukett, 
Kobsqoasitt, Matakees, and several others, and 
some of the Nipmucks. Their country, for the 
most part, falls within the Jurisdiction of New 
Plymouth colony." The Mabsachusetts, "be- 
ing the next great people northward, inhabited 
principally about that place in Massachusetts 
bay, where the body of the English now dweU. 
These were a numerous and great people. 
Their chief sachem held dominion over 
many other pretty govemours ; as those of 
Weechagaskas Xeponsitt, Punkapaog, Nonsn- 
tnm, Nashaway. some of the Nipmuck people, 
as far as Pokomtaknke, as the old men of Mas- 
sachusetts affirmed .... They were in hostility 
very often with the Narragansitts ; but held 
amity, for the most part, with tlie Pawkunnaw- 
kutts. who lived on the south border, and with 
the Pawtucketts, who inhabited on their north 
and nort heast limits .... Pawtnckett is the 
fifth and last great sachemship of Indians. Their 
country lieth north and northeast from the 
Massachusetts, whose dominion reacheth so 
far as the English jurisdiction, or colony of the 
Massachusetts, doth now extend, and bad un- 
der them several other smaller sagamores; as 
the Penuakooks, Agawomes, Naam keeks, Pas- 
oatawayes, Aicomintas, and others.*' 

An account of the earliest attempts to civil- 
ize and couvert these tribes was printed at 
Loudon in 1643, in the tract entitled New Eng- 
lands First Frutts, in which an appeal was also 
made for help to continue the work. Among 
the difficulties of the undertaking, enumerated 
in that publication, was " the diversity of their 
owne Language to it selfe ; every part of that 
Conntrey having its own Dialect, difforiqg 
moch from the other." 

It was among the MaMachusetta Indians 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

that Mr. Eliot began his missionary labors. 
He commenced the study of their language 
probably about the year 1043, or perhaps earlier. 
In a letter date<l February 2d, 1649 (2. of the 
12. 1648), he wrote : "There is an Indian living 
with Mr. Richard Calicott of Dorchester, who 
was taken in the Pequott Warres, though be- 
longing to Long Island ; this Indian is ingenious ; 
can read ; and I taught him to write, which he 
quickly learnt, though I know not what use he 
now maketh of it : He was the first that I made 
use of to teach me words, and to be my Interpre- 
ter." At the end of his Indian grammar (Cam- 
bridge, 1660), Mr. Eliot gives the following 
account of his method of learning the lan> 
guage: "I have now finished what I shall do at 
present: And in a word or two to satisfie the 
prudent Enquirer how I found out these new 
wayes of Grammar, which no other Learned 
Language (so farre as I know) useth ; I thus 
inform him : God first put into my heart a com- 
passion over their poor Souls, and a desire to 
teach them to know Christ, and to bring them 
into his Kingdome. Then presently I found 
out (by Grods wise providence) a pregnant 
witted young man, who had been a Servant in 
an English house, who pretty well understood 
our Language, better then he could speak it, 
and well understood his own Language, and 
hath a clear pronunciation: Him I made my 
Interpreter. By his help I translated the 
Commandments, the Lords Prayer, and many 
Texts of Scripture: also I compiled both Ex- 
hortations and Prayers by his help. I dili- 
gently marked the difference of their Grammar 
firom ours: When I found the way of them, I 
would pursue a Word, a Noun, a Verb, through 
all variations I could think of. And thus I 
came at it. We must not sit still, and look for 
Miracles: Up, and be doing, and the Lord 
will be with thee. Piayer and Pains, through 
Faith in Christ Jesus, will do any thing." 

In 1646 Mr. Eliot began to preach to the In- 
dians in their own tongue. About the middle 
of September he addressed a company of the 
natives in the wigwam of Cntshamoquin, the 
sachem of Neponset, within the limits of Dor- 
chester. His next attempt was made among^ 
the Indians of another place, "those of Dor- 
chester mill not regarding any such thing. "^ 
On the 28th of October he delivered a sermon 
before a large number assembled in the prin- 
cipal wigwam of a chief named Waban, situated 
foui or five miles from Roxbury, on the south 
side of the Charles river near Watertown 
mill, now in the township of Newton. The 
services were commenced with prayer, which,, 
as Mr. Shepard relates, "now was in English,, 
being not so farre acquainted with the Itidian> 
language as to expresse our hearts herein be- 
fore God or them." After Mr. Eliot had fin- 
ished his discourse, which was in the Indiaa 
language, he "asked them if they understood 
all that which was already spoken, and whether 
all of them in the Wigwam did nndersUmd or 



ALQONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



177 



Bliot (J.) — Continued. ' 

onely some few? and they answered to this 
qneetion with maltitade of voycea, that they 
all of them did uaderstaad all that which was 
then spoken to them." He then replied to a 
nnmber of questions which they propounded to 
him, "borrowing now and then some small 
helpe fh>m the Interpreter whom wee bronght 
with us, and who could oftentimes expresso our 
minds more distinctly then any of us could." 
Three more meetings were held at this place 
in November and December of the same year, 
accounts of wltich are given by the Rev. Thomas 
Shepard in the tract entitled The Day -Break- 
ing, if not the Sun-Rinng qfthe OoeptU %oUh the 
Indiam in New-England, London, 1647. 

In the meantime (November, 1646), the gen- 
eral court of Massachusetts had passed an order 
for the appointment of a committee to par- 
chase lands foran Indian settlement on the site 
where these meetings were held, "for y* in- 
Guragm* of y* Indians to live in an orderly way 
amongst us ... & fhrther, to set downe. 
rules for their impve« & enioying thereof." 
The place was called Nonantum or Noonato- 
men by Mr. Eliot, '*which signifies in English re- 
joicing." ThewordiV^onantum, according to Dr. 
Trumbull, means literally "I rejoice," or "am 
well-minded." The form Noonatomen (or No- 
nanUtmun) is plural, " We r^oice." This was 

\/ the first Indian mission established in New 
England. The Indians of Concord, when they 
heard of these things, requested Mr. Eliot to 
Tisit and teach them too, which he did when- 
ever he had an opportunity. They also ob- 
tained permission from the English to begin a 
mission settlement of their own, in January, 
1647. Mr. Shattuck, in his Iliitory of Concord, 
as quoted in Francis's Life of John Eliot, 
doubto whether there was, as has often been 
stated, any definite grant of land to the In- 
dians, either at Concord or Nonantum. He 
thinks "they lired by sufi*erance on lands 
claimed by the English, prior to their gather, 
ing at Natick." Another mission was also be- 
gun at Neponset, about four miles south of 
Roxbary, among the Indians of Dorchester, at 
the request of their sachem Cutshamoquin, who 
had formerly given Mr. Eliot so little encour- 
agement. Here he set up a second lecture, 
which was continaed for several years with the 
lecture at Nonantum. 

In 1(M7 the Indians commenced to fenc-e in the 
grounds of their new settlement and to build 
a stone wall, for the making of which Mr. Eliot 
provided them with shovels, spades, mattocks, 
and crows of iron, "and to encourage their 
slothfulnesse, promised to give a groat or six- 
pence a rod, if they would thus farre attend 
their own good, and work for themselves." 
They "call upon me," he writes, September 
24th, 1647, "to help them with tools faster then 
I can get them, though I have now bought ! 
pretty store, and they (I hope) are at work, j 
The women are desirous to learn to spin, and I 
I hATe prooured wheels for sundry of them, and 1 

ALU 12 



Eliot (J.) — Continaed. 

they can spin pretty well. They begin to grow 
industrious, and find something to sell at mar- 
ket all the yeer long." In March the minis- 
ters of Boston visited the "Indian Lecture" 
at Nonantum, for the purpose of inspecting the 
new undertakiiig. Several months later Mr. 
Eliot accompanied Mr. Wilson aud Mr. Shep- 
ard on a visit to Yarmouth, where he improved 
the opportunity by preaching "to the puore 
Indians in these remote places about Cape Cod." 
According to Mr. Shepard's account of this 
Journey, "We first found these Indians (not 
very farre from ours) to understand (but with 
much difilculty) the usuall language of those in 
our parts, partly in regard of the different dia- 
lect which generally varies in 40. or 60. miles, 
and partly and especially in regard of their not 
being accustome<l unto sacred language about 
the holy things of God. wherein Mr. Eliot ex- 
cells an}' other of the English, that in the In- 
dian language about common matters exccll 
him: I say therefore although they did with 
much diflicnlty understand him, yet they did 
understand him, although by many circumlo- 
cutions and variations of speech and the helpe 
of one or two Interpreters, which were then 
present." Before the end of the year Mr. Eliot 
went on a Journey up the country towards 
Merrimack river, for the purpose of preaching 
to the Indians in that neighborhood. Further 
particulars of these visite are given in Shep- 
ard's Clear Sun-ehine of tht Gospel breaking forth 
upon the Indianein New-England, London, 1648. 
In the summer of 1648 Mr. Eliot mode four 
visite to the western Indians, who lived about 
forty miles from Roxbury, and induced Shawo- 
non, *'the great Sachym of Nashawog," to 
listen to his preaching. He also visited some 
of the southern Indians at Tihtacuttor Titacut. 
In one of his letters he remarks: "There is a 
great fishing place upon one of the Falls of Mer- 
rimack River called Pautucket, where is a 
great confluence of the Indians every Spring, 
and thither I have gone those two yeares in 
that season, and intend so to doe next Spring 
(if God will.) . . . This last Spring I did 
there meet old Papassaconnaway, who is a 
great Sogamore, and hath been a great Witch 
in all mens esteem . . . and a very poli- 
tick wise man. The last yeare he and all his 
sonnes fle<l when 1 came, pretending fcare that 
we would kill him : But this yeart^ it pleased 
G^ to bow his heart to hearts the word. . . . 
There is another great fishing place about 
threescore miles from us, whether I intend 
(Ch)d willing) to go next Spring, which be- 
longeth to the foreuamed Papassacounaway ; 
which journey, though it be like t-o be both 
difficult and chargeable for horse and men, in 
fitting provisions, yet I have sundry reasons 
which bow and draw my heart thereunto." In 
another place he writes: "Some of Sudbury 
Indians, some of Conconl Indians, some of 
Mestic Indians, and some of Dedham Indiana 
are ingenious, and pray unto God, and some^ 



178 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Eliot (J.) — Continned. 

timeA come to the place where I teach to heare 
^e word. LIdd Indians are all naught nave 
one, . . . principally because their Sachim 
is nauj^ht, and careth not to pray unto God." 
Mr. Eliot also mentions the discouragements 
which attended the work of fencing and wall- 
ing the new settlement at Nonantnm, in order 
to protei't the gardens and cornfields of the 
Indians from the cattle of the English, which 
- did much damage. "A place mast be found," 
he writes, "(both for this and sundry other 
reasons I can give) some what remote from the 
English, where they mast have the word con- 
stantly tanght, and government constantly ex- 
erci8e<l . . . Such a project in a fit place^ 
would draw many that are well minded together : 
bat I feare it will be too chargeable. . . . 
The Indians about us which I constantly teach, 
do still diligently and desirously attend, and in 
a good measure practice (for the oat ward part 
of Religion, both in their families and Sab- 
baths) according to their knowledge; and by 
degrees come on to labour." A particular ac- 
count of these matters was given by Mr. Eliot 
in Winslow's publication entitled. The Oloriout 
Progre»9 of the Gotjtel, amonggt the Indians in 
New Ewjland, London, 1649. 

The account of Mr. Eliot's work during the 
year 1649, in his own words, is as follows: " I 
had, and still have, a great desire to go to a 
great fishing place, Namaske upon Meri* 
mak ; and because the Indians way lyeth be- 
yond the great River which we cannot passe 
with our horses, nor can we well go to it on 
this side the river, iinlesse we go by Nasha- 
way, which is a1)out, and bad way, nnbeaten. 
the Indians not usin*; that way; I therefore 
hire<l a hardy man of Nashaway to beat out a 
way aud to mark trees, so that ho may Pilot me 
thither in the spring, and he hired Indians with 
him and did it ; and in the way passwl through 
a groat people called Sowahagen Indians, some 
of which had heard me at Pautuket and at 
Kashawny, and had carried homo such tydings, 
that they \»ere genarally stirred with a desire 
that I would come and teach them ; and when 
they saw a man come to cut out a way for me 
that way, tliey wore very glad ; and when he 
told them [ intended to come that way tho 
next spring, they seemed to liim full of joy, and 
made him very welcome. But in the Spring, 
when I should have gone, I was not well, 
it being a very sickly time, so that I saw the 
Lord prevented me of that Journey ; yet when 
1 went to Pautuket another fishing place, where 
ftx>m all parts abr>ut they met together, thither 
came divers of these Sowahegen Indians, and 
heard me teach, and I had conference with 
them ; and amongotherthings, Tasked whether 
Sowahegen Indians were desiroas to pray to 
Ood : they answered ; yea, I asked how many 
desired it; they answered iramu, that is AU, 
«nd with sach affection as did much affect 
those Christian men that I had with me in 
oompany." In the summer of the same year 



' Eliot (J.) — ConMnned. 
! he visited the * ' age4 Sachem at Qaabagad three . 
I score miles Westward." He also wrote, in a 
i letter dated December 29th, that "a Nipnet 
Sachem hath submitted himself to pray unto 

the Lord, and much desireth one of our chief 

I 

I ones to live with him and teach him and those 
I that are with him." Tliis year Mr. Eliot lo»t 
I one of his chief friends and advisers in this 
' work, the Rev. Thomas Shepard, who died on 
I the 25th of August, 1649. 

In the meantime, the interest excited in Eng- 
land by the published accoants of the labors 
among the Indians by Mr. Eliot in Massachu- 
setts and Thomas Mayhew on Martha's Vine- 
yard, resulted in the institution, by act of par- 
liament, Jaly 27th, 1649, of a missionary' soci- 
ety called the ** Corporation for the Propaga- 
tion of the Gospel among the Indians in Kew 
England." Contributions were soon raised and 
forwarded to the Commissioners of the United 
Colonies for the fnrtherance of the work. 

The progress of the mission among the In- 
dians in the following year (1650) is related by 
Mr. Eliot himself in several letters. On the 
18th of Febroary, he wrote : " The work of the 
Lord through his grace doth still go on as form- 
erly, and they are still full of questions, and 
mostly they now be, to know the meaning of 
snch Scrip turn's as I have translated aAd read, 
and in a poor measure expounded to them, they 
long for to proceed in that work which I havo 
* in former Letters mentioned; namely to co- 
habit in a Towne, to be under the government 
of the Lonl, and to have a Church and the Or- 
dinances of Christ among them." In another 
letter he gives some additional particulars: 
' ' But I declared unto them how necessary it was, 
that they should first be Civilised, by being 
brought from their scattered and wild coarse 
of life, unto civill Cohabitation and Govern- 
ment. . . . And therefore I propounded unto 
them, that they should look out some fit place 
to begin a Towne, unto which they might re- 
sort, and there dwell together, enjoy Govern- 
ment, and be made ready and prepared to be a 
People among whom the Lord might delight to 
dwell and Rule. . . . We accordingly attended 
thereunto, to search for a fit place, and finally, 
after sundry Joumeyes and travells to severall 
places, the Lord did by his speciaU providence, 
and answer of prayers, pitch us upon tho place 
where we are at Natick." 

This was in the summor of 1650. Mr. Eliot 
was encouraged to commenoe the long delayed 
and expensive undertaking by the expectation 
of help from the new Corporation in England. 
The site chosen for the Indian town was about 
eighteen miles southwest of Boston, on the 
banks of the Charles river. The territory wae 
granted to the "praying Indiana,'* according to 
Dr. Francis, by the inhabitante of Dedham, at 
the interceeslon of Mr. Eliot. The Indians gave 
the people of Dedham, in exchange, the town- 
ship which is now called Deerfleld. In this 
place the grass was cut, and timber ftQad and 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



179 



Xniot (J.) — Continaed. 

sqaared for the building of • meeting hoaso 
Aod fort. In a letter dated October 2lBt Mr. 
Sliot writes: "Oar work in civilizing them 
will go on the more alowly for want of tools; 
for though I have bought a few for them, we 
can do bat little, for alas a few will set bat a 
few on work, and they be very dear too." He 
remarks in Miother place: "In prosecution of 
this work in the year 1650 we began by the 
Lords assistance our first Towoe at Natick, 
where we built a Fort, and one dwelling* 
house." The name is said to signify "a place 
of hills." See Mr. Eliot's lotteni io Whitfield's 
tract entitled, Ike Light appearing more and 
more towardt the perfect Day, or, A farther Dia- 
oovery (if the present etate of the Indiant in 
New-England, London, IS51. 

Mr. Eliot had been without an assistant in 
the ministry of the church in Roxbury since 
1641 ; but the increase in his missionary labors 
now made some help necessary. The Rev. 
Thomas Danforth was therefore ordained, on 
the 24th of September, 1650, to be his colleague 
in that church, which office be filled for twenty- 
four years. 

In 1651, some of the tools and other necessa- 
ries having arrived from England, the "pray- 
ing Indians " were removed from Nonantum to 
Xatick, where the work of laying out the town 
was completed. On the 28th of April, Mr. 
Eliot wrote : ' ' Besides those works which con- 
ceme Religion and Learning, we are also a 
doing (according to the measure of our day of 
•mall things) in the civill part of this work, we 
have set out some part of the Town in several 
streets, measuring out and dividing of Lots, 
which I set them to doe, and teach them how 
to doe it : many have planted Apple«Trees, and 
they have begun divers Orchards, it's now 
planting-time, and they be full of businesse. 
. . . We also have begun a Pallizadoe Fort, 
in the midst whereof we intend a meeting- 
house and a Schoolc-house, but we are in great 
want of Tooles,and many necessaries, and when 
we cannot goe we must be content to creep: 
this present week I am going to Pawtuoket, 
the great Fishing placo upon Mcrimek, where 
I he»ir sundry doe expect my coming, with a 
purpose to submit themselves ante the Lords 
hand." Another letter, written towards the end 
of the year, continues the relation : * * Therefore 
upon the sixtday of the sixt Moneth of this pres- 
ent year I August 6tb, 1651], (their Pallizadoe 
Fort being finished) they had a great meeting, 
sad many came together from diverse parts, 
• . . and finally they did solemnly choose 
two Rulers among themselves, they first chose 
a Ruler of an Hundred, then they chose two 
Balers of Fifties, then they chose Ten or 
l*lthing Men. . . . And lastly, for that 
dayes work every man chose who should be 
his Ruler of ten, the Rulers standing in order, 
•ad every man going to the man he chose. 
. . . After this work was ended, they did 
into Ckivenant with God, and each other. 



Eliot (J.) — Con tinned. 

to be the Lords people, and to be governed by 
the word of the Lord in all things." In Octo- 
ber, Governor Endicott and about thirty of the 
chief men of Boston, visited Mr. Eliot's lec- 
ture "at Xatick, the new Indian Towne." 

In the same year, Mr. Winthrop advised Mr. 
Eliot, "to send two discreet men to the great- 
est and most potent Sachem among the Kara- 
gansets, to answer such Questions as they 
might propound, and to stirre them up to call 
on God." He therefore writes: "I did ac- 
cordingly, and sent him a Present by them ; 
but the proud Sachem did little lesse than des- 
pise the offer, though he tooke the present ; So 
they thought they should have returned with- 
out successe; but when they came among 
the people, especially such as were a little 
more remote from the great and proud ones, 
they received them with great gladnesse. 
. . . There is a great Countrey lying be- 
tween Conectacott and the Massachusets, 
called Nipnet, where there be many Indians 
dispersed, many of which have sent to our In- 
dians, desiring that some may be sent unto 
them to teach them to pray unto Grod. And 
sometimes some of our best men doe goe to 
severall places for a little while, and returne 
againe, and not without successe." On the 20tb 
of October there came to the general court of 
Massachusetts, " one Pummakummin Sachem 
of Quinnubbdgge, dwelling amongst or neer to 
the Xarragansets, who ofiered himselfe and his 
Men to worship God, and desired that some 
En glish may be sent from the Massachusets 
Government to plant his River, that thereby 
he may be pertaker of Government, and may 
be instracted by the English to know God." 
Mr. Eliot's letters descri ing the events of this 
year were printed in the tract entitled. Strength 
out nf Weakneeae; Or a Olorious Manifestation 
Of the further Progreeet of the Gospel among the 
Indians in New- England, London, 1652. 

The Indians of Natick being now, as Mr. 
Eliot remarks, " come under Civil Order, and 
fixing themselves in Habitations, and bending 
themselves to labor, as doth appear by their 
works of Fencings, Buildings &c. and espec- 
ially in building without any English Work- 
mans help, or direction a very sufficient Meet- 
ing- House, of fifty foot long twenty five foot 
broad, neer twelve foot high betwixt the Joints, 
wel sawen and framed (which is a specimen, 
not only of their singular ingenuity, and dex- 
terity, but slso of some industry) I say this be- 
ing so, now my argument of delaying them 
from entering into Church-Estate, was taken 
away. Therefore in way of preparation of 
them thereunto, I did this Somroer [1652] call 
forth sundry of them in the dayes of our pub- 
lick Assemblies in Gods Worship; somtlmes 
on the Sabbath when I could be with them, and 
sometimes on Lecture dales, to make confession 
before the Lord of their former sins, and of 
their present knowledg of Christ, and experi- 
ence of his Grace which they solemnly doing, 



180 



BIBLIOGEAPHY OF THE 



Bliot (J.) — Contiuued. 

I wrote down their confeAsions : which having 
done, and being in my own heart hopeful that 
there was among them fit matter for a Church, 
I did request all the Elders about us to hear 
them reade, so that they might give mo advice 
what to do in this great, and solemn business." 
A meeting was accordingly held in October at 
Katick, at which these confessions were read 
and translated in the presence of the ministers 
of Boston. The conclasion, however, was not 
favorable to Mr. Eiiot's projtKst, for it was re- 
solved, "not to proceed any further at present, 
yet so to carry the matter, as that the Indians 
might in no wise be discouraged, but encour- 
aged." Mr. Eliot was then desired to declare 
it to the Indians, which he did to this purpose. 
"That the Magistrates, Elders, and other 
Christian People present, did much rtjoyce to 
hoar their Confessions, and advised them to go 
on in that good way ; but as for the gathering 
a Church among them this day, it could not 
be," etc. These c-onfessions were printed with 
Mr. Eliot's relation in the tract entitled, Teart 
tuf Reptntanct ; Or^ a further Narrative of the 
Progreu of the Ooepel Amongtt the Indians in 
New-England, London, 1653. 

Mr. Eliot's original purpose was to have 
brought all the " praying Indians " together at 
Katick. * * But it so fell out. " he writes in 1654, 
** that because the Cohannet [or Dorchester] 
Indians desired a place which they had reserved 
for themselves, and I finding that I could not 
at that time pitch there without opposition 
from some English, I refused that place, and 
pitched at Natick, where I found no opposition 
at present. This choyce of mine did move in 
the Cohannet Indians a Jealousie that I had 
more afiection unto those other Indians than 
unto them. By which occasion (together with 
some other Providences of God. as the death of 
Cutshamoqum, and the coming of Josias, to 
succeed in the Sachemship in that place) their 
minds were quite alienated from the place of 
Natick, though not from the work, for they 
desire to make a Towne in that fore mentioned 
place of their owne, named Ponkipog, and are 
now upon the work. And indeed, it now ap- 
peareth to bo of the Lord, because we cannot 
have competent accommodations at Natick, for 
those that be there, which are about fifty Lots, 
more or lesse. And furthermore, by the bless- 
ing of (xod upon the work, there are People, 
partly prepared, and partly pn^paring for three 
Townes more." On the '* 13 of the 4 moneth " 
(June 13tb), 1654, a second public examination 
was made, with the help of interpreters, of some 
of the '' praying Indians "and their confessions 
of faith, at a meeting of the ministers and 
elders huld in Roxbury, for the purpose of 
deciding on the propriety of eatablishing a 
ch nrch among them. The result, ho wever, which 
Mr. Eliot desired, was not attained on this occa- 
sion. Six years passed before the first Indian 
church was organized at Natick. See Mr. 
Eliot's letter, and the oonfesaions of the Indians, 



Eliot (J.) — Continaed. 

printed in A Late and Further Manifettation of 
the Proffreee qf the Ooepel amonggt the Indian* 
in New-England, London, 1655. 

The progress made by Mr. Eliot in trans- 
lating the scriptures and other books into the 
Indian language is related in the notes to th» 
preceding titles. In 1654 a primer or catechism 
had been printed, and in 1655 the book of Gen- 
esis and the gospel of Matthew had passed 
through the press. The next three years were 
largely employeil in the translation of the whole 
bible, which was finished in the autumn or 
winter of 1658. A portion of the psalms of 
David in Indian metre was printed about the 
same time. On the 10th of December, 1668, Mr. 
Eliot wrote: "For myselfe I feele my strength 
to decay, and I am not able to doe and bear 
what I have done, and although temptation 
may sometime breed waverings, yet my soul 
doth desire St, beleeve, that I shall live and dyfr 
in the work." His two eldest sons, John and 
Joseph, began to help him in the Indian work, 
and to learn the Indian language, about thi» 
time. See Mr. Eliot's letters, printed in A fur- 
ther Aeeotnpt of the Progretee qf the Chepei 
amongtt the Indiane in New- England, London, 
1669. 

In April, 1650, preparations were made for 
another public examination of the Indian con- 
verts, "in order to their admission into Church- 
fellowship." The meeting was held at Box- 
bury, on the 5th of July, when eight of the In- 
dians made their confessions of faith before the 
ministers, elders, and interpreters assembled 
there. "This is the third time," Mr. Eliot 
writes, "that the Praying Indians (some of 
them) have been called forth into publick, to 
make open confession of the Name of Christy 
to come under the publick tryui of Gods people, 
whether they be indeed Christians, as fit matter 
for a Gospel Church." The decision of this 
conference was, that some of the principal of 
the Indians should "be seasoned In Church- 
fellowship, in communion with our English 
Churches, before they should be Churohea 
among themselves." They were accordingly ad- 
mitted on trial for aseason by the church in Box- 
bur3'. Mr. Eliot's account and the confeaaions 
of the Indians were printed in the tract entitled, 
A further Account of the progreu of the Ch^tpH 
Amongat the Indians In New England, London, 
1660. 

In the latter part of October, 1650. there waa 
printed in London a book entitled The Ohrit' 
tian Commonu^alth, which had been written 
by Mr. Eliot nine or ten years before. After 
the restoration of Charles IL in 1660, the gov- 
ernor and council of Massachusetts colony con- 
sidered that the republican sentimeots of this 
publication, if allowed "to pass unnoticed and 
unreproved, might be represented to their dis- 
advantage." The book was therefore formally 
condemned and suppressed on the 18th of 
March, and in the following May ft retraction, 
signed by Mr. Eliot, wm made pfvUlo. Th» 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



181 



Sliot {^J,) — Contiuaed. 

year 1660 was also tho date of the organization 
at Katiclc. after nine yearn of probation, of the 
first Indian chnrch in Massachusetts colony. 
One Indian chnrch had already been formed 
on Martha's Vineyard in the preceding year, 
nndt'r the care of Mr. Thomas May hew. 

In 1661, the printing of the Indian new testa- 
ment was finished, and in the following year 
A second edition of the primer or catechism 
was issne<l. The old testament and metrical 
psalms rollowed in 1663. The Indian transla- 
tions of Baxter's Call to the Unconverted and of 
Bayly's Practice o/ Piety were printed in 1604 
and 1665. In the latter year, Mr. Eliot's trea- 
tisein English, entitledCommuniono/Churchet, 
was printed by Marmadnke Johnson at Cam- 
. bridge. It is supposed to be the "first pri- 
vately printed American book." The Indian 
dammar was published in 1666. In 1668, Mr. 
Eliot's eldest son John, who bad learned the 
Indian language and helped his father in 
preaching to the Indians, died on the 13th of 
October, aged about thirty-two years. The 
Indian Primer was printed in 1669. In the 
following year Mr. Eliot and Mr. John Cot- 
ton of Plymouth, visited Martha's Vineyard, 
and assisted Mr. Mayhew in the ordination of 
(he convert Hiacoomes as pastor of the Indian 
chnrch there. 

Mr. Eliot's Brief Narrative of the Progreti of 
the Ooepel amongst the Indiant in New- Eng- 
land, in the Year 1670, was written on tho 24th 
of September of that year, and print-ed at Lon- 
don in 1671. It contains the following particu- 
lars of the state of the mission, and a list of 
the praying towns. " Upon tho 17th day of the 
6th month fAU)^ust1 1670," ho writes, "there 
was a Meeting at Maktcpog iMarshpee] near 
Aandwich in Plimdutb-Pattent, to gather a 
chnrch amongst tho Indians." This place was 
about sixty miles southeast of Natiok. Tho 
converts there,*' being of kin to our Massachu- 
set-Indians who first prayed unto God," had 
been taught by Mr. William Leveredge as early 
as 1652. After Mr. Loveredge removed to 
Long Island, Mr. Kichard Bourne was en- 
couraged by Mr. Eliot to undertake tho charge 
of these Indians, and on this occasion he was 
ordained to be their pastor. Mr. Eliot then 
continues his relation : " From them wo passed 
over to the Vinyard, where many were added 
to the Church both men and women, and were 
baptized all of them. . . . Foundation is laid 
for two Churches more. . . . Also the Teacher 
of the Praying Indians of Nantuket, with a 
Brother of his were received here . . . and be- 
ing asked, did make report unto us that there 
be about ninety Families who pray unto God in 
that Island." 

The towns of "praying Indians" in Massa- 
chusetts colony are described in the Brie/ 
Narrative in the following order : " Natick is 
our chief Town, where most and chief of our 
Rulers, and most of the Church dwells. .... 
It is (by Divine Providence) seated well near 



Eliot (J.) — Continned. 

in the center of all our praying Indians, though 
Westward the Cords of Christ's Tents are more 
enlarged. . . . We have betwixt forty and fifty 
Commnnicants at the Lord's Table." The next 
in order, " Ponkipog, or Pakeunit [Pakemit] is 
our second Town, where the Sachems of the 
Blond (as they term their Chief II lyal- Line) had 
tbeir Residence and Rights, which are mostly 
Alienat^l to the English Towns." It was situ- 
ated about fourteen miles south of Boston. Has- 
sunnimesut or Hassanamesitt was the third 
town "in order, dignity, and antiquity." It 
was about thirty-eight miles " west southerly" 
from Boston, and about two miles east of Xich- 
muke or Nipmuck river. The fourth town, 
OgquonikongquaraesutorOkoran[iakame.til,wa4 
about twelve miles north northeast from Ilansa- 
namesittand thiily miles west from Boston. " I 
was very lately among them," Mr. Eliot writes, 
and ''they desired mo to settle a stated Lecture 
amongst them, as it is in sundry other Praying 
Towns." Nashope or Nashobah was the fifth 
praying town. It was situated about twenty - 
five miles west northwest of Boston. "This 
place lying in tho Road-wuy which the Man- 
quaogs haunted, was much molested by them, 
and was one year wholly desort'Od ; but this 
year the People have taken courage and dwell 
upon it again." Waraesut or Pawtuckctt was 
the sixth town. It was about twenty" miles from 
Boston, north northwest, "at the bottom of the 
great Falls, or the great River Morymak, and 
at the falling-iu of Concord River." This place 
was much resorted to by other Indians during 
the fisliiug season. Mr. Eliot visited it " but 
once in a year." The seventh town, Panatuket. 
" is the upper part of MeriraakFalls ; so called, 
because of the noise which the Waters make. 
Thither the Penagwog-Indlans are come, and 
have built a great Fort. Their Sachems re- 
fused to pray to God .... But now since tho 
Penagwog-Sachems are cutotf, tho People (sun- 
dry of them) dwellingat Panatuket- Fort do bow 
the Ear to hear, and submit to pray unto God." 
Magunkuk(iuok or Magunkaquog, the eighth 
town, was situated "at the remoto^t Westerly 
borders of Xatick," about midway between 
that place and Hossanamesitt. This town was 
a "gathering together of some of the Nipmuk 
Indians who left their own places, and sit to- 
gether in this place, and have given up them- 
selves to pray unto God." The ninth plure, 
Quanatusset, "is the last of our PniyingTown-*, 
whose beginnings have received too mucli di>- 
couragement; but yet the Seed is alivo: thty 
are frequently with me." 

Mr. Eliot's little book entitled Indian Dia- 
loguet was printed at Cambridge in 1671. It is 
entirely in Ennlish, hut was intended for the 
use of the native Indian teachers and ministers, 
" for their Instruction in that groat Servici^ of 
Christ, in] calling home their Country men to 
the Knowledge of God, and of themselvon, and 
of Jesus Christ." lu tho introductory address 
to the Commissioners of tho United Colonies, 



182 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Xniot (J. ) — Continaed. 

signed "J. E.," Hr. Eliot writes of the In- 
dians: "God hath in mercy nUsed np sundry 
among themselves to a competent ability to 
teach their Countrymen. Many have heen sent 
forth by the Church this Winter to divers 
places, and not without good success. ... I 
linde it necessary for mo to instruct them (as in 
Principles of Art, so) in the way of communi- 
catmg the good koowledge of God, which I 
conceive is most familiarly done by way of 
Dialogues ; an Essay whcrcunto I do here pre- 
sent unto you : purposing, if the Lord will, and 
that I live, to do more of the like kinde here- 
after." In the preface he remarks: "These 
Di deques are partly Historical, of some things 
that weie done and said ; and partly Instruct- 
ive, to shew what might or should have been 
said, or that may be (by the Lords assistance) 
hereafter done and said, upon the like occasion. 
. . . For sundry weighty Reasons I desire and 
endeavour, that our Learned Indians should 
learn at h>ast the English Tongue ; our Indian 
Churches holding Communion with the English 
Churches, must perform that Service in the 
English Tongue. If the Lord give life, and 
length of dayes, I may hereafter put forth these 
or the like Dialogaes in the Indian Tongue." 
The following extract is from page 14: "At 
first this [m]atter of praying to God was a lit- 
tle thing, like a Cloud in the West of the big- 
ness of a m ins baud, but now the Cloud is 
great and wide, and spreadoth over all the 
Country. Nop and Kantuket* and Paume- 
nuk Islands, Mahshepog, and many parts of 
the main Land, to the* utmost bounds of this 
Country Eastward. And Westward, not onely 
all the Massachusots pray, but alHO a great 
partof Kipmuk." In 1C7I, the second Indian 
church in MasnachuHetts was organized at Has- 
sanamesitt. The Logick Primer, in Indian and 
English, which was printed in 1672. was also 
prepared by Mr. Eliot for the instruction of the 
native teachers. 

On the 22d of August, 1673. Mr. Eliot wrote 
to the Kev. Increase Mather: "There be 
(through the grace of Christ) six churches 
gathered, according to the order of gathering 
churches among the English, one at Natick, 
one at Hassanemeset, 28 miles to the west, one 
at Mashpege 20 miles east of Pl^'mouth, two 
at Martyu*s Vineyard, and one at Nan- 
tucket . . . All are furnishe^l with ofElcers, 
saving the church at Natick, and in modesty 
they stand off, because so long as I live, they 
say, there is no need ; but we propose (God will- 
ing) not always to rest in this answer. . • . 
We have schools; many can read, some write, 
sundry able to exercise in publick, are sent by 
the church to teach in new praying places and 
who live remote from the churches and some 
or other of them doe every lecture day, at Na- 
tick, exercise their gifts two or three on a day, 
and I moderate." 

The Indian missionaries sent out from Mr. 
Eliot's school of logic and theology at Natick, 



Bliot (J.) — Continued. 

in the winter of 1670-71 and in the three fol- 
lowing years, for the purpose of preaching the 
gospel to the pagan tribes in the western parts 
of the colony, were the means of gathering 
nine more towns in the Nipmnck country. 
These towns were situated from forty to sev- 
mty miles west and southwest of Boston. 
Their names were Manchage, Chabanakong- 
komnn, Maanexit, Qnantisset, Wabquissit, 
Pakachoog, Waeuntug, Weshakim and Qua* 
bang. In Jaly, 1673, and again in September, 
1674, Mr. Eliot visited most of these new 
places, in company with Mr. Daniel Gookin, 
the official superintendent of the Indians. The 
object of the Journey was to confirm the new 
converts in the Christian religion, " to settle 
teachers in every town, and to establish civiL 
government among them, as in other praying 
towns." At this period the fourteen principal 
towns of praying Indians under Mr. Eliot'a 
snpervision, within the jurisdiction of Massa- 
chusetts colony, were supposed to contain 1,100 
souls, of which about 145 were at Natick. In 
Plymouth colony, and on the islands of Nan- 
tucket, Martha's Vineyard and Chappaquid- 
dick, the number of converts under the care of 
Mr. Richard Bourne and Mr. John Cotton was 
estimated at nearly 2,500. Mr. Eliot's cate- 
chisms and translations were probably naed 
by all these Indians. On the 19th of Novem- 
ber, 1674, the death of Mr. Danforth deprived 
Mr. Eliot of his colleague at Roxbury. Dar- 
ing the next fourteen years he was without a 
helper in that church. 

The disastrous war with Philip, sachem of 
Pokanoket and of all the Wampuioaga, began 
in the latter part of June, 1675. Cotton Mather 
relates of this sachem that when Mr. Eliot 
once ofl'ered to preach to him and his people, 
"the Monster entertain'd it with Contempt 
and Anger, and after the Indian Mode of Join- 
ing Signs with Words, he took a Button upon 
the Coat of the Reverend Man, adding. That 
he cared for his Gospel, Just as much as he 
oared for that Button." The Narragansetts, 
who were Philip's allies, had also refused to 
listen to the teachers sent by Mr. Eliot. But 
after this war began, "the Lord Jesus," as 
Geokin remarks, "before the expiration of 18 
months, destroyed the body of this Narragan- 
sett nation, that would not have him to reign 
over them." The severest effects of the war 
were felt by the inhabitants of Massachusetts 
colony, and by Mr. Eliot's Indian converts. 
The situation of the old praying towns was 
such, " that the Indians in them might have 
been improved as a wall of defence about the 
greatest part of the colony." But the advice 
and pleadings of Mr. Eliot in their behalf re- 
ceived but little attention. Both he and Mr. 
Gookin were publicly insulted and reviled for 
taking their part. The English, in their ani- 
mosity against all Indians withoat excep- 
tion, "could with difflcnlty be restrained tcom 
involving in one common deetmotion the whole 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



183 



Eliot (J.) — Continued. 

race.** The Indian towns in the Nipmaok 
oonntry were for<^ to Join the enemy. The 
other praying townn were broken ap, and many 
of the converts were forced to flee from the 
English to the woods for safety. On the 30th 
of October, the Natick Indians, abont 200 in 
Bomber, were forcibly removed from their 

. town, and confined on Deer Island, in Boston 
harbor, "enoonraging and exhorting one an- 
ther with prayers and tears." The Ponkipog 
Indians were taken to the same place about a 
month later, and the Nashobah Indians in the 
following February. Here they remained dur* 
ing the winter, exposed to much suffering. In 
May, 1676, after some of the ill feeling against 
them had subsided, they were taken back to 
the main land, where they were permitted to 
camp during the summer. In August, king 
Philip was slain, and the war soon after brought 
to a close. The Wampanoags and Narragan- 
setts were almost exterminated. In the spring 
of 1677 the remnant of the praying Indians re- 
turned to their old plantations at Xatick and 
Ponkipog, where they were encouraged and 
taught by Mr. £liot. The eastern Indians. of 
Cape Cod and other places in Plymouth colony, 
as well as those of Nantucket and Martha's 
Vineyard, "felt very little of this war com- 
paratively." 

Mr. £liot*s Harmony of the Ootptlt was 
printed in English at Boston in 1678. In the fol- 
lowing year his Bri^ Anttver To a SinaU Book 
toritUn by John Norcol against Ii\fant'Baptisme, 
was published at the same place. The new 
edition of the Indian bible, commenced in 1680. 
was five years in passing through the press. 
In a letter written by Mr. Eliot to the Hon. 
Bobert Boylc, on the 15th of March, 1683, there 
is a reference to " tlioso remote Indians, to the 
North- West, whoso language agrceth with 
ours, so that they and we can speak to each 
other's understanding." Mr. Boyle had sent to 
him 301., which sum was intended to be used, 
whenever occasion offered, for a mission among 
those tribes. In the same letter Mr. Eliot men- 
tions "our Wamesot Indians, who are our most 
northerly plantation." Another letter to Boyle, 
dated April 22d, 1684, relates that "the stated 
places [of worship for the Indians], in the 
Massachusets, since the wars, are contracted 
into four, Natik, Ponkipog, Wamesut, and 
Cbachaubunkkakowok." In Plymouth colony 
there were about ten places, on Martha's Vine- 
yard ten, and on Nantucket five. In 1685, a 
second edition was issued of Bayly's Praetiet of 
Piety in Indian. About the same time, or in 
the followins: year, there was printed, probaI)Iy 
at Cambridge, a little tract containing The Dy- 
ing Speeches of several Indians. In the preface 
Mr. Eliot writes : "Here be But a few of the 
Dying Speeches & Counsels Of such Indians 
as dyed in the Lord. It is an humbling to me 
that there be no more, it was not in my heart 
to gather them, but Mf^or Gookios hearing 
some of them rehearsed, He first moved that 



ZUiot (J.) — Continued. 

Daniel should gather them, in the Language as 
they were spoken, and that I should translate 
them into English ; and here is presented what 
wasdone that way. These things are Priu[t]e<l, 
not so much for Publishment, as to save charge 
of writeing out of Copyes for those that did 
desire them." 

In 1684 Mr. Daniel Gookin, the eldest son of 
Mi^or Gookin, began to learn the Indian lan- 
guage, and held a lecture once a month at 
Natick, when he preached to the Indians by 
the aid of an Interpreter. This relieved Mr. 
Eliot to some extent. The church of Natick 
had received his npecial care ever since its 
organization, and had, therefore, always been 
without a minister of its own. As early as 
1687, however, one of the Indian teachers, 
named Daniel Takawombpait, was ordained to 
that office. On the22d of March, 1687, Mr. Eliot's 
wife died, in the eighty-fourth year of hor age. 
In the same year, probably, a new edition of 
the Indian primer was published, and in 1688 
the Indian version of Baxter's CkxU to the Un- 
converted was reprinted. On the 17th of Octo- 
ber, 1688, Mr. Xcbemiah Walter was ordained as 
Mr. Eliot's colleague in the church at Koxbury, 
to relieve him from his labors there. The 
Indian translation of Shepard's5>ne^r^ Convert, 
made many years before, was printed in 1689. 
It was the last of Mr. Eliot's public^itions. On 
the 21st of May, 1690, at about one o'clock in 
the morning, he died at Roxbury, in the eighty- 
sixth yuarof his age. Of six children, only two 
survived him. 

At Natick, after Mr. Eliot's death, (he In- 
dian chnrch rapidly declined. In 1698 it had 
but ten members, and on the death of the In- 
dian preacher, Daniel Takawombpait, in 1716, 
it became extinct. The use of the Indian lan- 
guage in the records of the town ceased at the 
same time. In 1721, Mr. Oliver Peabody was 
sent as a missionary to Natick, where he 
preached to the Indians in English, and in 1729 
a new church, cim-iisting partly of English and 
partly of Indians, was ga* bert>d thereunder his 
charge. The number of white residents con- 
tinually increased. In 1733 Natick was "erected 
Into a pitMrinct or parish " by an act of the gen- 
eral court, and in 1781 it was incorparated as an 
English town. The Indian residents in 1753 
numbered but twenty-live families, and in 1763 
only thirty-seven individuals. In 1792 the 
number had fallen to about thirty, and in 1797 
to twenty. Their last reservation was sold in 
1828. In the report on the Indians of Massa- 
chusetts made in 1801 by the state cominlRnion- 
er. Mr. John Milton Earle, it isstateil that "of 
all the tribes which held rcservatioutt -nd were 
placed under guardianship by the State, the 
Natick Tribe is nearest extinct. Tbere are, 
scattering about the State, and commingled with 
other tribes, particularly the Hassanamiscocs, 
those who can trace descent back to the Naticks, 
but of those who claim now to belong to the 
tribe, only two tamilies remain, and one of these 



184 



BIBLIOQRAPHT OF THE 



Eliot (J.) — Continaed. 

Ih descended equally from the NatickB and the 
UaaManainiticocs. Their whole number is 
twelve." From the iiaaie report it appeant that 
the whole number of Indians in the state of 
MaasachuHettA in 1861 was a little over sixteen 
bandred. They were mostly divided into six- 
teen tribes, viz: the Chappequiddick, tlie 
Christianlown, the Gay Head, the Marshpee* 
the Ilerrint; Pond, the Natick, the Punkapog, 
the Troy or Fall River (descendants of the Wam- 
panoags), the Uassanamisoo, the Dudley (de- 
scendants of the Xipmucks), the Dartmouth 
(descendants of the Wampanoa|i;s), the Yar- 
mouth, the Mamattakeesct, the Tnmpum, the 
Deep Bottom, and the MiddleboronKh Indians. 
* 'Of all these, it is safo to assume that there is not 
one person of unmixed Indian blood." Some of 
the tribes began to intermarry with the negroes 
and whites nearly two hundred years ago. 
Their language was gradually superseded by 
English. Thelndian bible appears to have been 
used by a few Indians about the miadle of the 
last century, but the ability to read and under- 
stand it probably did not continae many yeai's 
after that date. 

[Eliot (John) of Boston. ] The historical 
accoant of John Eliot, the first minis- 
ter of the church in Roxbury. Collected 
from manuscripts, and books published 
the last century. By one of the mem- 
bers of the Ili.storical Society. 

In Massachusetts Hist Soc. Coll. first series, 
voL 8, pp. 5-35, Boston, 1802, 8P. 

The Lord's prayer (from Eliot), double col- 
umns English and Mas-sachusotts Indian, p. 33. 

This volume of the Collections was reprinted 
at Boston in 1856. 

Eliot (William Horace). Genealogy | of 
the I Eliot family. | [Vignette.] | Orig- 
inally compiled by | William H. Eliot, 
jr. I Revised and enlarged by | William 
S. Porter, | Member C. H. society, N. E. 
H. and G. society, etc. | 

New Haven, Conn.: | George B. Basset t 
&co. I Printed by T. J. Stafford. | 1854. 

Printed cover with half-title, title as above 
verso blank I I. 2 otht«r preliminary leaves, 
preface verso contents 1 1. t<?xt pp. 9-184, 8<^. 

On the second preliminary leaf is a reprint of 
thelndian title-page of Eliot's bible of Km (Ma- 
musse Wunneetupanatainwe Sec), and on the 
third preliminary leaf a reprint of the first ten 
verses of Genesis, chap. 1, from the same work. 

Copies teen: British Museum, Eames, Har- 
vard. 

Elliott (Aaron Marshall). Speech mixture 
in French Canada, Indian and French. 

In American Journal of Philology, vol. 8, pp. 
133-167. Baltimore, 1887, 8^. (Geological Sur- 
vey.) 

Appeared also as follows: 



EllioU (A. M.) — Continaed. 

Speech mixture in French Canada, 

Indian and French. By A. Marshall 
£lliott| A. M., associate professor of 
Romance languages in Johns Hopkins 
University, Baltimore, Md. 

In Modem Language Ass. Trans, and Proo. 
VOL 2, pp. 158-180. Baltimore, 1887, 8^. (Eames.) 
A general discussion of the Algoukin and 
Huron-Iroquois languages, with many exam- 
ples from Le Jeune, Brebosuf, Belcourt, Hale, 
and Cuoq. 

Origin of the name of 'Canada.' 

In Modem Luignage Notes, vol. 3, pp. IM- 

173. BalUmore. 1888, 4P. (Eames). 

Extracts from a number of writers — Cuoq, 

Laoombe, Nantel, Schoolcraft, Lescarbot, and 

others, and contains a number of Algonquian 

words. 

Ellis (Rev, Robert). Observations on Dr. 
TrumbulPs ** Numerals in North Amer- 
ican languages.'' 

In American Philolog. Ass. Proc. eighth ann. 
seas. 1878. pp. 8-11. Hartford, 1877, 8o. 

A discussion of Algonkin numerala, followed 
by a few remarks by Dr. Trumbull. 

Emerson (Ellen Russell). Indian myths 
I or I legends, traditions, and symbols of 
the I aborigines of America j Compared 
with Those of Other Countries | in- 
cluding Uindostan, Egypt, Persia, | 
Assyria, and China | by | Ellen RusseU 
Emerson | Illustrated | [Monogram] | 

Boston I James R. Osgood and com- 
pany I 1884 

Frontispiece IL titlel 1. pp. iii-xviil, 1-677, SP, 

Names of binls, insects, fishes, trees, plants, 
and animals, in OJibway (from a list by Mr. 
Tanner), pp. 280-283.— Chants of the Lenni- 
Lenapo, embodying traditions of the deluge 
(fiom ms. of Rafinesque), pp. 352-354 ; the same 
with, reference to the creation, pp. 394-397.-— 
Many terms, phrases, and incantations in vari- 
ous Indian languages scattered throughout. 

Copies seen: Congress, Eames. 

Emory {Col William Helmsley). Thir- 
tieth Congress — first session. Ex. Doc. 
No. 41. I Notes of a military reconnois- 
sance, | from | Fort Leavenworth, in 
Missouri, I to | San Diego, in California, 
I including part of the | Arkansas, Del 
Norte, and Gila rivers. | By Lieut. Col. 
W. H. Emory. | Made in 1846-7, with 
the advanced guard of the ''Army of 
the west." | February 9, 1848.— Ordered 
to be printed. | [Four lines.] | 

Washington: | Wendell and Van 
Benthuysen, printers. | 1848. 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



185 



Bmory (W. H.)— Continued. 

TiUe verao blank 1 L letter from the Seoro- 
tary of War verso blank 1 1. half-title verao 
blank 1 L text pp. 7-614, maps, plates, 8°. 

Abert (J. W.), Report on the examination of 
IJew Mexico, pp. 417-618. 

Ck}pie» tern: British Moseam, Congress, 
Geological Survey, Powell. 

Sold bj Leclerc, 1867. no. 507, 10 tr. 50 o. At 
the Fischer sale, no. 554, a copy brought It. ; at 
the Squier sale, no. 331, 30 cu. ; at the Brinley 
•ale, no. 4719, 75 cts. Priced by Clarke dt co. 
1888, no. 542J, $2; by Dufossfi, 1887. no. 25069, 
«fr.; by LittWfield, 1887, no. 218, $1.60. 

There is an edition of this work: 30th Con- 
gress, 1st session. Senate Executive No. 7, pp. 
1-416, 8°, which does not contain Abort's article. 

B-new I me-dat)-wega-ge-qiia-we-nun. | 
(The ten commandments.) [1850T] 

No title-page, heading only ; pp. 1-4, 16^. In 
the Chippewa language. 

The ten oommandments, pp. 1-3.— The Lord's 
prayer, p. 3.— The creed, pp. 3-4.— Bible verses, 
p. 4. 

Copies teen: Pilling, Powell. 
Bngelhardt (Charles Anthony Zephyrin). 

See Zephyrin Engelhardt (C. A.) 
XSngUsh (M. C. ) See GilfiUan (J. A. ) 

ErreU (Russell). .Indian geographical 
names. 

In Magazine of Western History, vol. 2, pp. 
61-59, 23ft-246, Cleveland [18851, 40. 

Names of Algonkin (principally Delaware) 
and Iroquois origin in Penusyh-ania and Ohio. 
Hnssell Errett, Journalist, born in New York 
in 1817. He was a paymaster in the U. S. Army 
ftt>m 1861 until the close of the civil war, and 
served in Congress from 1877 to 1883. 
Bsopns. See Mnnsee. 
Etcbemin : 

Dictionary See Demillier (L. E.) 

Lord's prayer Brown (G. S.) 

Numerals CLisaical. 

Numerals Duret(C.) 

Numerals Laot (J. de). 

Numerals Lescarbot (M.) 

Relationships Morgsiu (L. H.) 

Relationships Rand (S. T.) 

Vocabulary Balbi (A.) 

V.)cabulary Bar rati (J.) 

Vocabulary X;auipbell (J.) 

Vocabulary Gallatin (A.) 

Vocabulary Latham (R.G.) 

See also Fassamaqnoddy. 
Sttwein {Htv. John). Remarks upon 
the traditions, &c., of the Indians of 
North America. By Rev. John Ett- 
wein. 

In Pennsylvania Hist. Soc. Bull. vol. I, pp. 
21M4, Philadelphia, 1848, 80. 

•Of their languages." pp. 3U-44, includes 
"A colleitiou of words" of the Maqoa, Dela- 
ware, and Mahican, pp. 41-44. 



Ettwein (J.) — Con tinned. 

[Dictionary and phrase-book in the 

Delaware language. ] ( * ) 

Manuscript; no title-page; 88 pp. About 
1300 entries ; especially rich in verbal forms. 

In the Moravian archives, Bethlehem, Pa. 
Title and note from Brinton's ** Lenape and 
their legends," p. 83. 

In a letter to me dated Feb. 3, 1888, Mr. J. W. 
Jordan, of the I'eunsylvania Historical So- 
ciety, who is much iutereste<l in and very fa- 
miliar with the Moravian manuscripts, fays: 
"The Delaware dictionary of Rev. John Ett- 
wein is now translated into English (it was 
written in Delaware and German), but when it 
will be printed is uncertain. I feel like un- 
dertaking this myself if the expense is not too 
great." 

See Brinton (D. G.) and Anthony 

(A. S.) 

John Ettwein, Moravian bishop, bom in 
Treudeustadt, Wiirtemberg, ^9 June, 1721, died 
in Bethlehem, Pa., 2 Jan., 1802. In 1754 he came 
to the American colonies, where he labored for 
nearly half a century as an t^vangelist, as a pas- 
tor, and finally as a bishop of the Moravian 
church. He was consecrated to the episcopacy 
on 25 June, 1784. In 1801, owing to the infirmi- 
ties of old age, he retired from active service. 
Few men of the last century displayed greater 
zeal in si)reading the grwpel tl: rough the coun- 
try of his adoption. He studied the lauijuage 
of the Delaware Indians, prepared a small dic- 
tionary and a phrase-book thereof, an.1 in 1788 
gave au account of their language and tradi- 
tions, including a vocabulary, since published 
by the Ilistorical society of Pennsylvania. He 
travelled thousands of miles, often on foot^ and 
preached in eleven of the thirteen original colo- 
nies and in what is now the State of Ohio, "in 
cities" to use his own words, "in villages, in 
homesteads, from pulpits, in the open air, in 
court-houses and barns, to many and very dif- 
ferent cliisses of men. " He labored frwiuently 
among the Indians, and in 1772 led the Chris- 
tian ludiauM from the Suhni itehanna to the Tus- 
cara\v as valK-y of Ohio. Not the leaht import- 
ant act of his life was the ibuiMling, in 1787, of 
the " Society for Propagating the Go.sp, 1 among 
ihe Heathenrt," which «jtill exints, has a large 
endowmtnt, and contributes liberal amounts 
tow.inls the suppoit of the exten.'^ive missions 
of the Moi avian church. Ettwein stood at tho 
head of this ehureh as its j»ret,idin^ biithop for 
seventeen years, display in;; sound jud;;nient, 
great decision of chaiacter, and often, amid 
trying circumstances, a marvelous heroism. — 
Applrton't Cyclop, of Am, Biug. 

£tudes ])hilologi<iue8. iSeo Cuoq (J. A.) 
Etymologies : 



Algonquian 
Chippewa 
Massachusetts 
Montagnais 



See Alden (T.) 

Schoolcraft <H. R.) 
Trumbull (J. H.) 
Stuart (A.) 



186 



BIBLIOGBAPHT OF THE 



XSvans ( Jamee). The | speller and inter- 
preter, I in I Indian and English, | for 
the nse of | the mission sohools, | and 
snoh as may desire to obtain | a knowl- 
edge of the I Ojibway tongne. | By 
Jamos Evans, Wesleyan Missionary. | 
[Picture.] | 

D. Fanshaw, printer, | No. 150 Nas- 
sau-street, I New- York. | 181^7 

Title Terse blank 1 1 preface in English (dated 
from the Wesleyan Mission, River St. Clair. IT. 
Canada, 25th Sept., 1837). pp. 3-13, text pp. 14- 
195, 163. Xq Ojibway and English. 

Oopiet seen: Boston Athenaeam, Massacba- 
•etts Historical Society, Powell, Trambull. 

Sabin's Dictionary, no. 23166, titles an edition 
of this work New York, I). Fanshaw, 1831. It 
Is, I think, a typographic error. 

— [The Cree syllabary.] 

In the Canadian Methodist Magazine for Oc> 
tober, 1882. is an article by the Rev. John Car* 
roll, relating to Mr. Evana. biographic in its 
general character, bat containing some acoonnt 
of the invention of the syllabic characters ; ex- 
tracts from this article will be foaud in the biog- 
raphy of Mr. Evans, given below. In the next 
iasneof the magazine, Nov. 1882, the Rev. Bger- 
ton R Young speaks more folly apon the sub- 
ject, and from this article I extract an follows : 

"The invention of what are known as the 
syllabic characters was nndoubtedly Mr. Evans' 
greatest work, and to his unaided genius be* 
longs the honour of devising and then perfecting 
this alphal)et which has been such a blessing to 
thousands of ( 'ree Indians. The principle on 
which the characters are formed is the phonetic. 
There are no silent letters. Each character 
represents a syllable, hence no spelling is re- 
quired. As soon as the alphal)et is mast«red, 
the student can commence at the first chapter 
in Genesis and read on, slowly of course, at first, 
but in a few days with surprising facility. 

"Mr. Evans' hope when he commenced this 
groat work, was the invention of some plan by 
which the wandering Indians, who never could 
remain in one place long enough to acquire the 
art of reading in the ordinary way, bat were 
ever on the move after the game on which 
they lived, might acquire the ability to read 
Ood*s word in their own languaee. In this his 
most sanguine expectations were more than re- 
alized. 

"It is a cause for righteous indignation that 
some have been found unprincipled enough to 
try and wrest the honour of this wonderful in- 
vention from him to whom it so justly belonged. 
One especially, who went out from among us, 
and was for years employed in another Church, 
arrogated to himself this honour, and even had 
the audacity to have published in some English 
papers articles in which he received all the 
credit as the inventor of the Cree S.v liable Char- 
acters. Let it be known to all, that long before 
Wm. Mason reached Norway House, the Bev. 



Evana (J.) — Continued. 
James Evans had not only perfected his inven- 
tion, bat bad so far utilized it, that portions of 
the Ooepels, and also several hymns, had been 
printed by himself and his Indian helpers. He 
whittled out his first types for patterns, and 
then using the lead famished him by the Hud- 
son Bay Company's emptj tea chests, he cast 
others in moulds of his own devising. He made 
his first ink out of the soot of the chimneys. His 
first paper was birch-bark , and his press was also 
theresultof hlshandiwork. Afterwards, thanks 
to the kindness of the English Wesleyan Mis- 
sionary Society, be was furnished with a large 
quantity of type, paper, and a capital press, and 
the sum of five hundred pounds sterling was 
given towards the erection of a printing-house. 
For years catechisms, hymn-books, and large 
portions of the Word of Ood were printed at 
Norway House. 

"When the invention became more exten- 
sively known and other Churches desired to 
avail themselves of its benefits, the British and 
Foreign Bible Society nobly came to the help of 
our own and the kindred Churches having mis- 
sions in the Northwest, and with their usual 
princely style of doing things, for years have 
been printing and gratuitously furnishing to 
the different Cree Indian missions, all the copies 
of the Sacred Word they require." . . . 

I regret to be unable to reproduce in fac-sim- 
Ue this syllabary in its earliest form as used by 
Mr. Evans or his contemporaries. I know of 
no work by Mr. Evans in which they are used, 
and of no copy of the earlier works which con- 
tains the syllabary with powers or values of the 
characten). The reproduction on the opposite 
page, taken ftom a Cree hymn-book by Messrs. 
McDongailand Glass (q. v.), printed in 1888, 
shows, perhaps, the latest and most approved 
form. 

The use of these characters -has extended 
much beyond the people for whom they wem 
invented, books having been printed in them in 
the Esldmauan language, in a number of dia- 
lects of the Athapascan, and, in addition to the 
Cree, in the Chippewa, Sauteux, Moose, and 
Moosonee divisions of the Algonquian. 

As these pages are being put in type (April, 
1890), I learn from the Rev. John McLean (q.v.), 
of Moose Jaw, Northwest Territories, that he 
has in press a work entitled "James Evans, 
Inventor of the Syllabic System of the Cree 
Language," of about 250 pages, in which will 
appear a full discussion of the history of the 
syllabary, well illustrated with specimens of 
the type. Perhaps it will appear in time to 
enable me to include its title and description in 
this bibliography under the name of its author. 

In the Proceedings of the Canadian Insti- 
tute, vol. 7, p. 109 (October, 1889), there appv>ars 
an article by Father A. G. Morice, O. M. I., of 
Stuart's Lake, British Columbia, entitled " The 
Western D6n68, their manners and easterns," 
in which the following language is nsed : "In 
these latter years, however , an eflbrt has been 



ALOOHQCIAN LANOUAQES. 



187 



Bvans ( J> ] — Continned. 

ALPHABET. 

(a) SrLLABICS. 

V« A" >* <»* 

Vpa /\P8 >po <p« 

'^ chJl p Che J ciO [j cbJL 

q ki p kf (-/ ko 5 k» 

"^ mS p mC _J ttfl [_ mi 

^ yi ^ >■» ^ yd i^ y* 



(») APPEXDA0I8. 

> a n, u in Pr'^ it >> cold. 

'•"ID, « Ar'*, sun, 

"■- •. " u-V)'". boy. 

' "P. •■ I't", dvCi. 

*-• k, " o-Q.bn\ht)leaveaine. 

' - t, M TA', tooth. 

" ■ ch, •• ^"A', very, 

• * w, when placed immediately 

to the riglit of & syllable, 
as in (j-<3-, my wife. 

* - i, when placed higJier to the 

right, as in o-^dfb'i my 
coat. 
S a wl, combining the v«)ue o( 
each point as given above, 
aiin 9t>:. ka-kwi. 



Evaxui (J.) — Contioned. 

" — tba rough breathing, or aspi- 
rate, as in A"d| aahea. 

" — a combination of " and ^ that 
it, of the aspirate and k, 
M in r'A", at the river, 

{ - r, as in bi'^'i Christ. 

1-1, .. V>ri. angel. 

o - 00, " o.V«, man. 

When "■" and "o" ar« placed 
to the right of a syllable, as in 
AP^q-o, the value of "■" is ab- 
sorbed by the syllable, while that 
of "o" is affixed. Written in Ro- 
man characters the word AP'^-o 
will illustrate:— pekis-kwaoo; "w" 
IS within the syllable, and "oo" is 
affixed to it. The value of "■,■" 
which appendage iniist be placed 
aft«r the syllable it affects, is al- 
ways absorbed except in the case of 
V', £i.-, >■, <■, in wJiich, though 
"-"is affixed in position, its value 
is prefixed. The above combina- 
tions are pronounced, w&, we, wij, 
wi. The absorbed and the prt)- 
fixed values of '"" are met with 
in the word ^-aP"<1o ■ wB-pO-kis- 
kwJoo, lie wishes to speak. 

It will be noticed that there are 
quantities between 7 and ^, v 
and <, J:c., Iciis full than thise 
given in tlio Alphabet. ^Vhen 
quantities similar to-tlie alphabeti- 
cal ones are very necessary in the 
pronunciation of a word, the period 
" • " is placed directly over the 
long «r brond syllable, o-bP'CL* ~ 
ni-kil-kwG-ti-iuiin — I shall ho in 
need. 7dC o-b<3V' - I shall bo 
there; here the hut syllables are "4" 
and "yia," both broiul. b^'^'^* 
- where yon are. The last *'s." 
is not broad, k&-ft>ya-yuu. 



188 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



ISvana (J.) — Continned. 

made by the writer of this pftper to teach them 
[the I>6n68, an Athapascan dialect] to read and 
write thnir own langaaj^n, and the renalt has 
been really wonderful. In order to attain this 
satisfactory and promising resnlt, he has had to 
compose a syllabic alphabet somewhat on the 
principle of that so suitably invented by the 
late Mr. Erans for the Cree langua;;e, but which 
he soon found to be totally inadequate to ren- 
der correctly the namerons and delicate sounds 
of the D6n6 dialects. Besides (why should I 
not say it?) it lacks that method and logic 
which have been applied to the new or improve<l 
syllibicH. and which have thereby simplified 
the acquisition of the language. I am now 
continually in receipt of letters firom Indians 
whom I never taught and who have learned to 
read after one or two weeks* (in some cases I 
might say three or four days') private instruo- 
tiou from others." 

A sample of the new syllabary, with inter- 
linear D6n6 transliteration and an English 
translation, is given in Father Morioe's paper. 

For further comment-* upon the invention of 
the syllabary see Mason (W.) 

See Henry (G.) and Evans (J.) 

See Jones (P.) and others. 

See Mason (W.) 

See Toung (E. R.) 

and Jones (P. ) The first nine chap- 
ters I of the I First Book of Moses, | 
called I Genesis. | Translated into the 
Chippe way tongue | by James Evans, | 
missionary: | and | revised and cor- 
rected by Peter Jones, | Indian mis- 
sionary. I 

York: | printed at the office of tbe 
Christian Guardian. | 1833. 

Second titU: Shongahsweh | enewh natahme- 
singin cliapters | emah netum | Oo<ioozhobee- 
guning owh Moses | Genesis | azhenokahdaig. 
I Anwaidow^h Oojebwa keezhe ahnekahnootah- 
beung I owh James Evans, | makahdaweekoon- 
ahya: | kiya | kogwahyahquahsedood | owh 
KAhkewa<[uonaby [Peter Jones], | aneshen* 
ahha raakahdaweekiionahya. | 

York: I Kedahz he ahdesegahdaig. | 1833. 

English title verso 1.1 recto blank, Chippe- 
way title recto 1. 2 verso blank, half-title recto 
1. 3, text verso 1. 3 and 21 other unnumbered 11. 
^. Alternate pages English (on versos) and 
Chippe way (on recto ■>) throughout. 

Copies seen : Trumbull. 

For iin edition of 1835 see Jones (P.) • 

The following notes arc extracted from an 
article by the Rev. John Carroll, in the Cana- 
dian Methodist Magazine for October, 1882: 

"James Evans was Englinh, bom in King's 
Place, town andcxxintyof Kingston-upon-Hull, 
January 18th, 1801. His parents were Wesleyan 
Methodists, named respectively James and 



Evans (J.) — Continned. 

Mary Evans. His fitther was the master of a 
merchant ship. 

'* Shortly before the emigration of the family 
to Canada James removed to London, and was 
employed in a large glass and crockery estab- 
lishment, where he remained about two years, 
and then proceeded to Join the family group at 
Lachnte, Lower Canada. 

" After a few months he opened a school in 
the neighborhood of L*Orignal, where he 
formed an acquaintance with Mi^s Mary Blithe 
Smith, which ripened into love and marriage. 
This occurred about the year 1822 or '23, when 
he was not much passed twenty-oue. About 
1825 they removed to Upper Canada. 

His first entrance upon Indian work in con- 
nection with Canadian Methodism was that of 
organizing a school at Rice Lake,in 1 828, to which 
he was introduced by the indefatigable Elder 
Case. Their sojourn at thi^ place comprised 
three years. Here he began to evince his inter* 
est in everything Indian, including the study and 
systematizing of their language, which pointed 
him out as specially adapted to the work of 
native evangelization, and laid the foundation 
for his great success in that work. 

" The Oedit Mission was one of the oldest 
and best: it sought the improvement of a large 
hand of Missasaugas, whose fertile lands 
skirted a sizable river, not-ed for salmon fish- 
ing, central between the two ends of the prov* 
ince. It had been intrusted to men of more 
than usual calibre — Egerton and George 
Ryersun and James Richardson — while it was 
Elder Case's frequent resting place, and the 
proper home and place of his translation work, 
and was the base of the evangelizing operations 
of tbe notable Ka-ke-way qnon-a-by, or Peter 
Jones, native missionary. Yet it was thought 
proper that Evans should be entrusted to take 
up and further carry on the great work they 
had done. 

" There was, up to the year 1832, a large body 
of unchristiani/.cd Indians at what we now 
know as Samia, and at several other places on 
and near the upper end of the St Clair River. 
A stem and experienced agent was required, 
and was found in the person of James Evans, 
and that heroic and versatile man was stationed 
by the Conference of 1834 at St Clair. 

" He went, without gainsaying, and entered 
on every part of the multifarious work which 
devolved upon him— visiting, conciliating, 
building, preaching, praying, studying the lan- 
guage, translating and getting his translations 
printed — a work he patiently continued four 
long weary years. During that time a church 
and mission-house were erected, fields were won 
from the wilderness, schools were organized 
and taught, and printed hymns and other books 
were put into the hands of his flock, old and 
young, out of which they read and sang of the 
wonderful works of Ood. 

"At the opening of the year 1838-*89 the 
Church entered on wider fields of Indian evan- 



ALGOHqUVlLN LANOUAGES. 



18^ 



Bvans (J.) — Continaed. 

gelizatioii, and a region only oooaaionaQjTlilM 
and partially occapied before was nov to to 
brougtit under oomplote cultivation and to to 
permanently occupied ; and two of the forenuMt 
men in (he ranks of the missionary laborers 
. were to toke possession of the territory in the 
name of the King of kings. These were no 
others than James Evans and Thomas Hurl- 
bnrt. He proceeded at once to his new field of 
labour, leaving his family in Canada. 

" Mr. Evans was soon called to his long and 
widest field of missionary enterprise and toil. 
The British conference, or their missionary 
committee, had determined on sending mission- 
aries among the various Indian tribeit which 
wandered in vast hordes over the wide and wild 
expanse of the Hudson Bay territory; and 
requiring a man of the needed qualiflcations 
and experience and heroism, to conduct the 
bloodless conquest, they asked Mr. Evans to 
head this important enterprise. He at once 
gave his consent, and in the following spring 
(1846) [tie for IBW J] he went out to the Hudson 
Bay territory. 

**Mr. Evans took with him from Canada two 
young Indian assistants, Peter Jacobs and 
Henry Steinhaur. His own local position was 
Norway House, where he gathered and estob- 
lished a noble mission, with thesuperintendency 
of all the Hudson Bay territory missions, extend- 
ingmany hundred miles north and west. He per- 
formed prodigies of labor and adventure during 
the six years he was there. He planted five or 
•ix most important Missions at centriil points ; 
gathered in hundreds of souls ; traversed that 
vast, wild conn try from side to side and from 
end toend over and over again, in summer's heat 
and in winter's cold, studying the languages 
and dialects, especially mastering the Cree, for 
which he invented a syllabic character by which 
nine characters, by being each turned or placed 
.in four different ways, expressed thirty-six ele- 
mentary syllabic sounds of the language; and, 
after manufacturing both types and press him- 
self, printed hymns and portions of the New 
Testament, thus, as it were, fixing a written 
language and giving the people a literature. 
In labours and exposure bo took the lead of all 
oUiers, being often mon'hs from home, and con- 
ducting his correspondence with his family on 
strips of birch bark. 

"In the absence of his Journals, diaries, in- 
cipient memoranda in language-making (both 
as to etymology and syntax), and vast numbers 
of letters of his own and others to him, which 
have passed out of my hands, I will introduce, 
a paragraph or two of a private letter addressed 
to me, at my own request, by his highly re- 
spected and venerable brother, the Rev. Dr. 
Evans, which relates to the Hudson Bay period 
of his history. Dr. Evans says : 

* * * •• 'You know his great success in the 
invention of the characters in which the Cree 
language is now written and printed. For 
some years permission to introduce types and 



Tivans ( J. ) ~ Continued. 

k press was refused, but he labored on, casting 
f^/len blocks ttom the lining of the chests in 
wfakh tea was brought into the country, and 
whittiinc '^VifTt *r:^A sbax>e as best he could, and 
by a rough, improviseb^^tSHTUf )ll« own manu- 
flscture succeeded in priatlng ml£Jf ^^yinn'^ 
sections of the Holy Sorlptiirea, and pi JKKf 
school-books, which were of great iwioe. I 
was in England, in 1841, when a aet of his home- 
made types was received by the Wesley an Mis- 
sionary Society, and took some part with them 
in obtaining permission from the Directors of 
the Hudson Bay Company to have a font cast, 
and, with a press, sunt out to Norway House, 
pledges being given that they would be used 
only for our mission work. Their arrival was 
cause uf great Joy and tha nksgivlng to God.' 

" His noble character and the circumstances 
of his death receive confirmation and illustra- 
tion from the short Conference obituary which 
was published in the British Minutes for 1847: 

'"James Evans was a missionary of remark- 
able ability aud zeal, and of great usefulness 
among the North American Indians. His suc- 
cess among the ai)origines of Canada led to his 
appointment as General Superintendent of the 
recently formed Missions in the Hudson Bay 
territory. To his mental vigour and indomita- 
ble perseverance the Indians are indebted for 
many advantages; among these is a written 
and printed character, suite<l to their language, 
of which Mr. Evans was the inventor. Many 
were the afflictions aud trials he bad to endure; 
these issued in a failure of health which ren- 
dered his return home (to England) desirable, 
but the results were not favourable. He died 
suddenly at Keilby, in Lincolnshire, on the 2d 
of November, 1846, at the house of a friend, af- 
ter attending a missionary meeting at which 
his statements had excited great interest.' " 

Events in Indian History. See "Wimer 
(J.) 

Everhardt (Job). An | epitome | of | 
stenographie ; | or, | An Abridgement 
and Contraction, of | the Art of short, 
Bwift, and secret Writing by Cha- | rac- 
ters, both fair, iineall, and legible, ua 
will I appear hereafter, as well as in 
the I Pretixt Example. | Being a brief, 
yet plain and full dis- | covcry [<&c., 
fourteen lines.] | Written by Job Ever- 
hardt. I 

Printed by M. S. for Lodowick Lloyd, 
and are to be sold | at his Shop, next to- 
the Castle-Tavern in Conihil, 1G58. 

11 p. 11. pp. 1-91 sm. 8^. The preliminary 
leaf and pp. 1-25 are engraved. 

On the 4th and 5th preliminary leaves is given 
"that famous sentence Habbalc. 2.4 [But the 
just shall live by his faith] in these three and 
thirty languages following," of which No. 12. 



190 BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE AI,>yxfQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



Everhardt (J.) — Continoed. 

is " West Indian : New BnglAnd," 1b IteXana- 
chnsetU (Natiok) dialMt, m writtoB by AUi, 
but not predMly t rtei ng with his v^iIob of 
tlie sentenoe in the filii^MnEiCMl' off tho iDdian 
bible priDtB^1|To'5«ftni ktor. 
Jik^yLt Btm: Britlob Hnaenm, Trnmball. 

-'^V7h ahzheday ahtikoo-abnnbmeabwiD . 
Colophon: PriDted by Billin & 
Brotbers, 20 Nortb William street, for 
tbe Sunday Scbool of St. John's Cbnrcb, 
Clifton,8taten Island, New York. [1852.] 
No title-patce, heading only; text entirely in 
the Chippewa language pp. 1-12, HP, 



— Con tinned. 

Om the holy geriptnres, pp. 1-11.— Hymn no. 
Il,p.l2. 

An extract probably from one of the works 
of P.A.OlIeara. 

Oopi4t teen : American Oriental Society, New 
Haven, Conn. * 

E^trh keohetwah-muzzeneSgun [Chippe- 
wa]. SeeO'Meara(F.A.) 

Ew^h oomenwalgemoowin [Chippewa]. 
See O'Meara (F. A.) 

E^trh oowahweendahmahgawin [Chippe- 
wa]. See O'Meara (F. A.) 



F. 



Faber (Jnnias), paeud, See Merlan (A. 

A. von). 
Fabre (P^re Bonaventare). See Favre 

(B.) 

Fairbanks ( — ). Namerals of the Chip- 
pewa (Ojibwa) of the tipper Mississippi. 
In Schoolcraft (H.B.), Indian Tribes, roL 2, 
ppu 2ie-218, Philadelphia, 1852, i°, 
Namerala 1-100,000. 

Falrchild (George M.) See Saaaeville 

(J.) and Shea (J. G.) 
Faith and duty of a Christian [Cree]. 

See Hunter (J.) 
Pall Indiana. See Ataina. 

Faraud {Mgr, Henry J.) Dix-huit ans | 
chez lea Saavages | Voyages et mis- 
sions I de "M^ Henry Faraud | evdque 
d'Anenionr, vicaire apostolique de Mac- 
kensie, | dans I'extr^me nord de l'Am6- 
riqne Britannique | d'apr^s les docn- 
ments de Ms' TEvSqae d'Anemonr | par 
I Femand-Michel | membre de la So- 
ci^t6 £duenne | Aveo la biographio et 
le portrait de Mgr Farand | 

Libraire catholique de Perisse fr^res | 
(nonvelle maison) | Regis Raffet et C>®, 
snocesseurs | Paris | :i8, rue Saint-Sul- 
pice. I Bruxelles | place Sainte-Gudnle, 
4. I 1866 I Droits de traduction et de re- 
production r^serv^s. 

Hair.tiUe verso blank 1 1. portrait 1 I. title 
Terso blank 1 L preface pp. yii-zri, text pp. 
1-447. table pp. 419-456, 8P. 

Reniaiks on the Cree lanj^uafce with exam* 
plas of the active and passive forms of a verb, 
pp. 82-^— On the Mootagnais, pp. 84-86.— 
Tribns saavages, pp. 333-383, contains iiames of 
tribes, with meanin^rs scattered through. 

Oopi^aeen: Astor, British Museum, Shea. 

Dix-huit ans | chez | les Sauvages | 

Voyages et missions | dans I'extr^me 
nord deVAm^rique Britannique i d'apres 
les documents de Mgr Henry Farand | 
Ev^ue [Ac. one line] | par Femand- 
Michel I [Design] I 

Noavelle Maison Perisse Fr^res de 
Paria | Llbralrie Catholique et Classi- 



Faraud (H. J.) — Continuea. 

que I [<&o.fiye lines] | 1870 | Droits de 
traduction et de reproduction r^serv^s. 
Printed cover, title 1 L pp. i-xix, 1-364, 129, 
Linguistics, as in earlier edition titled next 
above, pp. 63-«4, 65-66, 260-312. 
Copies seen : British Museum. 

Farmer's. The | farmer's monthly vis- 
itor ; I intended to promote | the inter- 
est of the farmer ; | to defend the | 
dignity of the agricultural profession, | 
and encourage the | practice of domestic 
economy. | By Isaac Hill. | Vol. 1, for 
1839 [-XIV for 1852]. | 

Concord, N. H. | published by Will- 
iam P. Foster, | for the editor. [183d- 
1852. ] 

Vols. 1-14. folio and 8o. 

Biofpraphy of Passaconnoway (vol. 12, pp. 83« 
40), contains a few Indian words with Enj^lish 
definitions. — Lanftuaf^o and religion of the Pen- 
nacooks (vol. 13, pp. 323-325), includes a list with 
definitions of about 100 "primitive names used 
in forming the nomenclature of the Merrimack 
Valley." 

Copies seen: Harvard. 

Faulmann (Karl). Illustrirte , Geschichte 
der Schrift | Popular-Wissenchaftliche 
Darstellung | der | Entstehuug der 
Schrift I der | Sprache und der Zahlen 
I sowie der | Schriftsysteme aller Vol- 
ker der Erde | von | Karl Faulmann | 
Professor der Stenographie, [&c. two 
lines.] I Mit 15 Tafelu in Farben-und 
Tondruck | und vielen in den Text ge- 
dmckten Schriftzeichen nnd Schriftpro- 
ben. I [Printer's ornament.] | 

Wien. Pest. Leipzig. | A. Hartleben's 
Verlag. | 1880. | Alle Rechte vorbehal- 
ten. 

Half title verso blank 1 1. title verso printers 
1 L preface pp. v-x, contents pp. xi-xvi, text pp. 
1-632,80. 

Indianische Bilderschriften (with specimens 
of Chippewa songs), pp. 198-205. —Schrift die 
Kri Indianer. pp. 231-232.— Schrift die Mikmak 
Indianer, (including the Lord's prayer in hiero- 
glyphs with Mikmak transliteration and 6er> 
man tr.inslation interlined), pp. 232-234. 

191 



192 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OF THE 



Faulmann (K.) — Continaed. 

Oopie§ Htn : Aator, British MaMum, Wat* 
kinson. 

Favre ( P^e Bonaventare). [Montagnais- 
French Dictionary.] 

Manascript, pp. 1-391, 3 annambered pp. 8^, 
in the library of Laval Uaiversity, Qaebeo. Pp. 
44-45 are duplicated, the first one of each num- 
ber 1>eing partially blank. All the numbered 
pages bear at the top the words Jesus t Maria. 
On the first page, in a handwriting different 
from the text, is : "P. Bonayentnra Faber, au- 
thor hujus farraginis." 

The manuscript, bound in coarse gray cloth, 
is well preserved, and though not in an elegant 
handwriting, is legible. At the bottom of p. 
885 we read " Ad Ste CrucLs TadSssaci ad N. 
D. B. V. et om Stom gloria. Inchoata 20 V*'^ 
1805. finiU 20 Martii 1696, ad St» Cruois Tadus- 
saci [«ie)." Between brackets, but in another 
handwriting, immediately above the preceding, 
wo read : " P. Bonaventnra Favre sen Faber 
collegit." Below to the right: "Seq' app>." 
Finally on the first unnumbered leaf, attached 
to the boarding after the words " Seminairo de 
Qu6bec," is found the following note : "LeP. 
Bonaventnre Favre ou Faber, anteur de ce die- 
tionnaire, 6tait un J6suite arriv6 [in Canada] 
en 1679 et mort en 1693. Ceci est uno copie faite 
k Tadoussao, commence le 20 novembro, 1695. 
et flnie le 20 mars 1696." 

The Montagnais words in this dictionary are 
arranged in alphabetic order and occupy, with 
the French translation, each a line. The first 
word is '^Abalehitdgan, — buoing, neeetnti ; " the 
hist \a''T8tSehimiktet 0),-mammarum tentM." 

Featlierman(A.) Social history | of the 
I races of mankind. | First division : | 
Nijcritians [-Third division: | Aoneo- 
Maranonians]. | By | A. Featherman. | 
[Two lines quotation.] | 

London: | Triibner &> co., Ludgate 
Hill. I l8S5[-89]. ._ (All rights reserved.) 

3 vols. 8°. 

A general discussion of a number of North 
America families occurs in vol. 3, among them 
the Algonquians, pp. 66-118, 180-183, 241-264, as 
follows : The Algonqnins, pp. 66-8'.!, contains a 
general sketch of the language, nouns, numerals, 
pronouns, with examples, p. 72 ; coqjugatiou of 
the verb to love with deterioatives, p. 73. — Nar- 
rag tnsett, including a few words passim, pp. 82- 
89. — Lenape, with a few sentences (from Holm) 
and words passim, pp. 102-110. — Powhattan, 
with a few words passim, pp. lll-llS.— Shaw- 
nees, pp. 180-183. — Chippeways, including a 
short discussion of the language and a few words 
illustrating the grammar, pp. 241-264. 

Copies geen: Congress. 

Felt (Joseph Barlow). Statistics of towns 
in Massachusetts, prepared by Joseph 
B. Felt. 



Pelt (J. B.) — Continued. 

In American Statistical Ass. Coll. voL 1, pp. 
7-99, Boston, 1847, 8°. (Astor, Boston Athe- 
nasum. British Museum, Congress.) 

Indian names of many towns in Massachu- 
setts. 

F^rard. This word following a title or within 
parentheses after a note indicates that a copy 
of the work referred to has been seen by the 
compiler in the library of the Abb6 Martin F6- 
rard, Sault au B6collet, Montreal Island, Can- 



F^rard {Abh^ Martin). [Dictionary of 
the Odjibue language: Odjihue-En- 
glish and English-Odjihue. ] 

Manuscript, sm. 4°, in possession of its 
author, who was for many years a missionary 
among the OJibwas around Lake Superior. I 
first saw this manuscript when the AbbA F6- 
rard was stationed at the Sault au R6collet, 
Island of Montreal, in 1882. Later, in the sum- 
mer of 1889, 1 again visited him, when he was 
in the House of the Immaculate Conception, a 
retreat near Montreal belonging to St. Mary'a 
College. At my req uest the abb6 has described 
the manuscript for me as follows: 

The intended Dictionary will be in O^ibue- 
English and English Odjibue— not French. 

I shall follow the same order as that adopted 
in Hebrew and Sanscrit dictionaries; that is, 
the alphabetic order of the roots. 

The radical meaning of each root will be 
given at the head of each one; hence ita deri- 
vated meanings will appear more dearly. Just 
like the rays emanating from one center. The 
number of the roots amounts to about 1,300; 
and please remember that in Odjibue a root ia 
properly the qualiflcative applied to natnnl 
objects to specify them. 

In the beginning of the dictionary I shall 
give an alphabetic list of all the natural ob- 
jects (entering or used only, nearly all, in com* 
position), with their meanings. The number 
of natural objects known to the Indians and 
employed in composition, that is, specified by 
a qualiflcative, amo unts to about 445. 

I have so far written about 1,800 pages.whicb 
is the third part, about, of the whole letter A. 
But I have developed fully the beginning of 
this letter, to accustom the philologist to the 
various terminations of the words ; henceforth 
I shall abridge considerably, contenting myself 
with indicating the formation, otherwise there 
would be no end to the work. The whole dic- 
tionary Odjibue-English may amount perhaps 
to about 1,200 pages in print, one of which will 
contain easily sir or eight pages of the manu- 
script. 

The Engllsh-Odiibue is intended to be oon 
oiso ; an English word will be referred to the 
proper Indian root, and then, as the deriva- 
tives are laid down in alphabetical order, it will 
be easy to arrive at the reqaired meaning of 
the word looked for. 

I intend to give a new edition of the Grammar 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



193 



F^rard (M. ) — Continned. 

of Bishop Baraga, with notes and oorrections. 
If I find the time I intend to publish also a small 
gloMary comparing the OcUibae roots with 
those of Hebrew, Sanscrit, Latin, Greek, Gothic, 
etc That work might perhaps please the phi- 
lologist, and show to him that after all at least 
the O^ibne language is not so barbaroas as 
many have fancied, and might, perhaps, ap- 
pear to him saperior to our modern and hybrid 
languages. 

In a later communication (Feb. 9, 1890) the 
author states: " My work goes on steadily. I 
have almost finished the letter A, which con- 
tains nearly 200 roots, and is by far the longest 
of all. I thought proper to develop those roots 
in full, in order to afford phUologists an un- 
derstanding of the genius of the Odjibue 
language. The other roots will be shortened 
in their development ; otherwise it would take 
too much time to finish the work. But the let- 
ter A will be a pattern for the others, to which 
philologists shall be referred. " 

— - rGrammatical sketch of the Odjibae 
langaage. ] 

If anuscript, occupying the last three pages 
of a sheet of note paper, and comprising the 
greater portion of a communication to the com- 
piler of this bibliography dated "College Ste. 
Marie, Bue Bleury, Montreal, Quebec, 27th 
January, 1889; " now in the library of the Bu- 
reau of Ethnology. 

See Mahan (I. L.) 

Field (Thomas Warren). Indian, Datch, 
and English names of localities in 
Brooklyn. 

In Manual of the Common Council of the 
City of Brooklyn for 1868, pp. 450-470, Brook- 
lyn. 1888, 8o. 

Reprinted in the following: 

^— Historic and Antiquarian Scenes i in { 
Brooklyn and its Vicinity, | with | illus- 
trations of some of its antiquities | by 
I T. W. Field | 
Brooklyn. | 1868. 

Title verso note "edition limited to 110 
copies" 1 1. apologia pp. iii-iv, contents verso 
blank 1 1. illustrations verso blank I 1. text pp. 
1-96, map and plates, sm. folio. 

OopUs teen: Boston Athenasum, British 
Museum, Eames. 

At the Field sale, na 948, an uncut copy 
brought $5.50. 

An essay | towards an I Indian bib- 
liography. I Being a | catalogue of 
books, I relating to the | history, antiq- 
uities, languages, customs, religion, | 
wars, literatnre, and origin of the | 
American Indians, | in the library of | 
Thomas W. Field. | With bibliograph- 
ical and historical notes, and | synopses 
ALO 13 



Field (T.W.) — Continued, 
of the contents of some of | the works 
least known. | 

New York : ; Scribner, Armstrong, and 
CO. I 1873. 



Title verso printers 1 1. preface pp. iii-iv, text 
pp. 1-430, 8o. 

Titles and descriptions of works in or relating 
to Algonquian languages passim. 

Oopiet seen: Congress, Eames, Pilling. 

At the Field sale, no. 088, a copy brought 
$4.26; at the Menzios sale, no. 718, h "half- 
crushed, red levant morocco, gilt top, nncut 
copy," brought $5.50. Priced by Leclerc, 1878, 
18 fr.; byQuaritch, no.ll996, 15*.; at the Pinart 
sale, no. 368. it brought 17 tr.; at the Mnrphy 
sale, no. 949, $4.50. Priced by Quaritch, no. 
30224. IZ. 

Catalogue | of the | library | belong- 
ing to I Mr. Thomas W. Field. | To be 
sold at auction, | by | Bangs, Merwin& 
CO., I May 24th, 1875, | and following 
days. I 

New York. | 1875. 

Printed cover, title verso blank 1 1. notice, 
etc. pp. iii-viii, text pp. 1-376, list of prices pp. 
377-393, supplement pp. 1-50, BP. Compiled by 
Joseph Sabin, mainly from Mr. Field's Essay, 
title of which is given above. 

Contains titles of a number of works in 
various Algonquian languages. 

Copies seen: Bureau of Ethnology, Congress, 
Eames. 

At the Squier sale, no. 1178, an uncut copy 
brought $1.25. 

Finotti {Rev, Joseph Maria) Catalogue | 
of the I Library | of the late ] Rev. Joseph 
M. Finotti, | Member of the New Eng- 
land Historic-Genealogical | Society, 
American Numismatic Society, &c. | To 
be sold at auction | On Thursday, Octo- 
ber 16th, 1879, I and following days, | 
by I Bangs & CO., | 739^74 1 Broadway, 
New Ydrk. | 
New York : | 1879 

Printed cover "Executor's Sale" &c. title 
as above verso blank 1 1. sketeh of Mr. Finotti 
by Dr. Shea pp. iii-iv, text pp. 5-114, addenda 
1L8'5. 

A list of books in Indian languages (most of 
them Algonquian). pp. 52-53. — Scattered 
through the catalogue are titles of a number of 
other works pertaining to Americ^tn linguistics. 

Copiet seen : Eames. Geological Survey. 

First reading book in the Micmac lan- 
guage. See Rand (S. T.) 

First I reading book. | Nistum | ayum^ 
cbekfiwe mnssinuhikun. 

No title-page, beading only; text pp. 1-16, l6o. 



194 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



First — Contiuned. 

A primer entirely Id theCroe lan^age (Roinaa 
obaractent) except the Englitih lieodiug above. 

The first page contains the alphabet. — Words 
of one and two syllables, p. 2. — Words of two 
and three svllables, p. 3. — Three syllables, p. 
4. — Three and fonr syllables, p. 5. — Phrases, 
p. 6.— Sentences, pp. 7-11.— Scriptural names, 
pp. U-15.— Roman and Arabic namerals, pp. 
15-16 

OopifM seen: Charch Missionary Society, 
Pilling. 

Fiah (Lucy E.) Words, phrases, and 
senteuces in the language of the Gros 
Ventres of the Prairies. 

Manuscript, iP, in the library of the Bareaa of 
Ethnology. Collected in 1881 at Fort Belknap, 
Montana, at the request of the Bureau and 
written on one of its forms, Powell's Introduc- 
tion t4) the Study of Indian languages, 2d edi- 
tion, thoncb the alphabet there recommended 
is not used. It has evidently been prepared 
with care, and the schedules of relationship 
have been completely filled. The other sched- 
ules are well fiUeil also, except 9, 11, and 15, 
which contain no entries. 

Fish (Paschal) and Harvey (S. D. ) Terms 
of relationship of the Kickapoo, col- 
lected hy Paschal Fish and Friend Simon 
D. Harvey. 

In Morgan (L. H.), Systems of cunaangoin* 
ity and affinity of the human family, pp. 293-^2, 
lines 51, W<i9hinxion, 1871, iT^. 

Fisher (William). New^ travels | among 
the I ludiansof North America; | heing 
I a compilation, taken partly from the 
communications already | published, of 
I captains Lewis and Clark, | to the | 
President of the United States ; | and | 
partly from other authors who travelled 
among | the various tribes of Indians. | 
Contaiuiug | a variety of very pleasant 
anecdotes, remarkably calculated | to 
amuse and inform the mind of every 
curious reader ; | with | a dictionary of 
the Indian tongue. | Compiled | hy Will- 
iam Fisher, esqr. | 

Philadelphia: | published hy James 
Sharan. | J. Maxwell, printer. | 1812. ' 

Second title : The j voyages and travels | of 
I captaiuN Lewis and Clarke, \ in the years 180i, 
1805, and 1306. | Containing | an accurate ac- 
count of their adventures, du- I ring three years 
and four months. — Which | were chiefly con- 
fined to the river Missouri.— | Then descended 
the Columbia to the Pacific | Ocean.— Ascer- 
tained with accuracy the geogra- 1 phy of that 
interesting communication across \ the conti- 
nent. — Learned the character of the | country, 
its commerce, soil, climate, animal, and | vegeta- 



Fisher (W.) —Continued. 

ble productions. — Also, the manners, and | coa- 
toms of the different tribes of Indians | through 
which they passed. | Compiled by William 
Fisher, esq. | Price one huudred and twenty- 
five cents. 

Title verso "copyright secured" 1 1. second 
title verso blank 1 1. recommendation and mes- 
sage of Thos. Jefferson 3 pp. introduction pp. 
vii-xii, text pp. 13-300, 12° 

List of moons in the Knistteneaoz language, 
p. 132. — Vocabulary of the Knisteneaux, 350 
words, from Mackenzie, pp. 133-141. 

Copies teen : Astor, Congress, Geological Sor* 
vey. 

An I interesting account | of the | 

voyages and travels | of | captains 
Lewis and Clark, | in t!!e years 1804, 
1805, 1806. I Giving a faithful dusurip- 
tion of the river Missouri and | its 
source — of the various tribes of Indians 
through I which they passed — manners 
and customs — soil — climate | — com- 
merce — gold and silver mines — animal 
and vege- | tahle productions inter- 
spersed with very enter- | taining anec- 
dotes, and a variety of other asef ul and 
I pleasing information remarkshly cal- 
culated to de- I light and instruct the 
readers. — To which is added a | com- 
plete dictionary of the Indian tongne. | 
By William Fisber, esq. | 

Baltimore. | Printed hy Anthony MU- 
tenberger, | For the Purchasers. | 1812. 

Portraits 2 IL title verso blank 1 L message 
*iiC, of Thos. Jefferson 3 pp. introdaotion pp. 
z-xiv, estimate of produce of mines p. zv, text 
pp. 16-326, 12<5. 

Lint of moons "descriptive of the several 
seasons,*' in Knisteneaux, p. 146. — Yocabolary 
of the Knisteneaux (350 words), pp. 148-155. 

Oopiee seen : British Moseam, Congress, Qeo- 
logical Survey. 

An I interesting account | of the | 

voyages and travels | of ( captains 
Lewis and Clark, | in the years 1804-5, 
& 6. I Giving a faithful description of 
the river Missouri and | its soorce— of 
the various tribes of Indians through | 
which they passed — manners and cus- 
toms — soil— I climate— commerce — gold 
and silver | mines animal and vegetable 

I productions. | Interspersed | With 
very entertaining anecdotes, and a va- 
riety of I other useful and pleasing in- 
formation re- I markably calonlated to 

delight and | instruct the readers. | To 
which is added | A completo Diction- 



ALQONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



195 



Fisher ( W.) - Con tinned, 
ary of the Indian Tongae. | By William 
Fisher, Eaq, \ 

Baltimore: | printed and published 
by P. Manro, | No. 10, North Howard 
St. I 1813. 

Title verso blank 1 L reoommendAtion p. ▼. 
message of Jefferson pp. vi-yii, introdaction 
pp. riii-xii, text pp. 13-262, 16^. 

Linguistics as under titles above, pp. 113-114, 
116-124. 

Cfopiesieen: Congress. 

See Lewis (M.) 

Fitoh (Asa). Words in the St. Francis 
[Abnaki] Indian dialect. (*) 

Manuscript, 8 pp. 199, in English and Indian. 

Names of insects in the language of 

several tribes of American Indians (*) 

Manuscript, 4 pp. SP. 

Includes a number of insect names in the Le- 
nape and St Francis languages. 

Titles and notes fiom Mr. J. K Dunbar, 
Bloom field, New Jersey, who owns both these 
manuscripts. 

Flaohenecker {Rev. George). Notes on 
the Shyenne language, by Rev. George 
Flacheuecker, Lutheran missionary, 
Deer Creek, Nebraska, September, 1862. 

Manuscript, 7 pp. folio, in the library of the 
Bureau of Ethnology'. 

Includes a list of noana, verbs, adverbs, qaes- 
tioon and sentences, numerals, pronouns, adjec- 
tives, etc 

Fleming (A. B.) & co. [Polyglot adver- 
tisement.] Souvenir of the Opening of 
the Philadelphia Centenary Exhibition. 
I [Que Hue quotation.] | A. B. Fleming 
and CO. | Chief offices: | [&,c.l 

BnMulside, 30 x 22 inches. A short advertise- 
ment in about seventy of the languagoH of the 
world, including Croe (syllabic), Choctaw, and 
Dakota. The English version is as follows : 

''A. B. Fleming Sc co.. Printing Ink Manu* 
fkctures, Leith &, Granton. Scotland. This firm 
have given special attention to tlio atlaptation of 
their Inks for Foreign Coiintriert, and having the 
largest Printing-ink Manufactory in the world, 
are prepared to execute orders promtly." 

A note at the bottom of the sheet gives us 
the following information: 

"As asouvenir of the international character 
of the Philadelphia exhibition MessrH. Fleming 
^ Co. have, with the assistance of Messrs. 
Gilbert & Rivington (the eminent Oriental 
printers), of 52 St. John's Square and 28 White* 
friars Street, London, produced the above poly* 
glot advertisement.** 

Copies Been: Pilling. 

Pletoher (Jonathan C.) Magic song in 
the Chippewa language. 



Fletcher (J. C.) — Continaed. 

In Schoolcraft (H. R.), Indian tribes, voL 2, 
p. 223. Philadelphia, 1852, iP. 

Fortescue (J.) Les Indiens oris de 
rAm6rique du Nord Traduit de VAngtais 
par A. Lesouef. 

In Soci6t6 Am. de France, Archives, new 
series, vol. 3. pp. 31-66. 
Cris vocabulary, pp. 55-64. 

Foster (John Wells) and Wliitney (J. 
D). Report | on the | geology and 
topography | of a portion of the | Lake 
Superior land district, | in | the state 
of Michigan : | hy | J. W. Foster and J. 
D.Whitney, | United States geologists. 
! In two parts. | Part I. | Copper lands. 
[-Part II. The Iron Region.] | 

Washington : | printed for the House 
of Reps. I lHr)0[-l8r)l]. 

2 vols. : letters of transmittal pp. 1-2, title 
verso hlank 1 1. text pp. 5-224, maps, plates; title 
verso blank 1 1. intro<1uction pp. iii-v, contents 
pp. vii-xii, list of illnstrations pp. xiii-xvi. text 
pp. 1-400, index pp. 401-406. maps, plates, SP. 

Origin and orthography of some of the 
proper names in the Lake Superior district (In 
which are a few Chippewa terms with English 
signification), pp. 396-400. 

Copiet seen: Astor, British Museum, Con- 
gress, Geological Survey, National Museum. 

Four gospels in the Cree language. See 

Horden (J.) 
Fox Indians. See Sac and Fox. 

Francis (Con vers). Life i of | John Eliot, 
, the I apostle to the Indians. | By Con- 
vers Francis. | 

Boston : | Milliard, Gray, and Co. | 
Loudon : | Richard James Kennet. | 
ld:U5. 

2 p. IL title verso copyright 1 1. preface pp. v- 
vii, contents pp. ix-xi, fac simile of Eliot's 
handwriting recto blank 1 1. half title verso 
blank I 1. text pp. 3-343, appendix pp. 345-357, 
16<^. Forms vol. 5 of Sparks' library of Amer- 
ican biography. 
» Remarks on the Massachusetts Indian lan- 
guage (from Eliot and Daponceau), note 3, pp. 
352-354. 

Copies seen: Astor, Congress, Trumbull. 

Reissued with new titles bearing the imprint 
New York : | Ilarper and brothers, publishers. 
I 1856. (Lenox.) 

Franklin {Capt. John). Narrative of a 
journey , to the shores of j the Polar sea,i 
in the years | 1819, 20, 21, and 22. | By | 
John Franklin, Captain R. N., F. R. S., | 
and commander of the expedition. iWith 
an appendix on various subjects relating 



196 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OP THE 



Franklin (J.) — Contioaed. 
to I science and nataral history. | Illus- 
tratod by namerons plates and maps. | 
Published by anthority df the right 
honourable the earl Bathnrst. | 

London : | John Murray, Albemarle- 
street. | MDCCCXXIII [1823]. 

Title veno printer 1 1. dedication rerso blank 
1 L slip of errata verso blank, oontenta, etc pp. 
vli-x, introdnctioD pp. xi-xvi, text pp. 1-494, ap- 
pendix pp. 405-768, maps and platee, 4°. 

Blaokfoot vocabulary (18 words), p. 109. 

Oopiet seen: Astor, British Maseam, Con- 
gress, Earaes. 

A copy at the Field sale.no. 740, brought $0.25. 
Pricetl by Quaritch, no. 11658, U. 10«. 

According to Sabin's Dictionary, no. 25025 : 
Second edition, London, John Murray, 1824, 2 
vols. 8^, which ih priced by Qaaiitch, no. 11650. 
10«., and under na 28980, 5i. 

Narrative of a journey | to the 

shores of the | Polar Sea, | in | the 
years 1819-20-21-22. | By | John Frank- 
lin, Capt. R. N., F. R. S., M. W. 8., | 
and commander of the expedition. | 
Published by anthority of the Right 
Honourable | the Earl Bathurst. | Third 
edition. | Two vols.— Vol. I[-II]. | 

London : | John Murray, Albemarle- 
street. | MDCCCXXIV [1824]. 

2 vols. : pp. i-xix, 1-370; 1 p. I. pp. i-lv, 1 1. 
pp. 1-399, maps, 8<^. In sume copies the date 
reads M DCCCC XXIV. 

Bighteen words of the Blaokfoot language, 
vol. 1, p. 170. 

Copiet teen: Bancroft, Boston Athenseum, 
Congress. 

A copy at the Field sale, no. 741, half-morocco, 
uncut, brought $2.50. Clarke Sl co. 1886, no. 
4172, prices it $3.50. 

Narrative of a journey | to the 

shores of | the Polar Sea, | in the years | 
1819, 20, 21, & 22. I By | John Franklin, 
Captain R. N., F. R S., | and com- 
mander of the expedition. | With an 
appendix containing geognostical ob- 
serva- | tions, and remarks on the au- 
rora borealis. | Illustrated by a frontis- 
piece and map. | Published by authori- 
ty of the Rt. Hou. the Earl Bathurst. | 

Philadelphia; | H. C. Carey & I. Lea, 
A. Small, Edward Parker, M'Carty & | 
Davis, B. & T. Kite, Thomas Desilver, 
and E. Littell. | 1824. 

Frontispiece 1 1 title verso blank 1 1. dedica- 
tion verso blank 1 1. contents pp. v-vi, intro- 
duction pp. vii-xi, text pp. 1-482, plate and 
map, 2P. 

Blaokfoot vocabulary (18 words), pp. 97-98. 

Copies teen : Bancroft, Congress. 



Franklin (J.) — Continued. 

Journey | to the I shores of the Po- 

lar Sea, | In 1819-20-21-22: | with | a 
brief account of the second journey | 
In 1825-26-27. | By | John Franklin, 
Capt. R. N. F. R. S. | and commander 
of the expedition. | Four vols.— With 
plates. I Vol. I[-IV]. | 
London : | John Murray, Albemarle 

Street. | MDCCCXXIX [1829]. 

4 vols. 24°. 

Blaokfoot vocabulary (18 words). voL 1, p. 214. 

Chpiet teen: Oen. A.W.6reely,Washingt4)n, 
D.C. 

There is a copy also iu the library of Cornell 
University. 

Fraser cSimon). See Tyrrell (J. B.) 

Pr6miot (Ph-e N. M.) Lettre du R. P. 
Frdmiot, Missionnaire de la Compagnie 
de Jdsns, daus FAmdrique du Nord, h 
M. Micard, Supi^rieur du S6minaire de 

Saint-Di^. 

In Annales de la Propagation de la Foi, voL 
26, pp. 241-269, Lyon., 1854, 8P. (Congress.) 

Contains remarks on the language and a few 
words and definitions iu Chippewa. 

[Fritz (JohannFriedrich) and Schultze 
(B.), editora,^ Orientalisch- und Oc- 
cidentalisoher | Sprachmeister, | wei- 
cher I nicht allein hundert Alphabete | 
nebst ihrer Aussprache, | so bey denei> 
meisten | Europaisch- Asiatisch- Afri- 
canisch- und | American ischen Volokem 
und Nationen | gebrauchlich sind, | 
auch einigen Tabulis Polyglottis yer- 
schiedener | Sprachen und 7alen vor 
Augen leget, | Sondem auch , das Gebet 
des Herni, | in 200 Sprachen und Mund- 
Arten | mit derselben Characteren und 
Lesung, nach einer | geograph ischen 
Ordnung mittheilet. | Aus glanbwUrdi- 
gen Auctoribus zusamraeu getragen, 
und mit | darzu nothigen Kupfern 
versehen. | 

LeipzijQ^, I zu finden bey Christian 
Friedrich Gessnern. | 1748. 

10 p. 11. pp. 1-224, 1-128, appendix 7 11. 99. 
The preface is subscribed by Fritz, Leipsig, 
1748, but a dedication, which precedes it, is by 
Schultze, Ilalle, 1748, who had been a Danish 
missionary at Tranqnebar and whose good 
offices Fritz acknowledges. It is probable he 
was the real editor of the work. 

Numerals, Algonkinischo (firom Lahontan) 
and Pampticough (fh>m Lawson), pt. 1, p. 208.— 
Oration Dominica, Savanhica (from Chamber- 
layne), and Virginiaua (from Eliot), pt. 2, pp. 
124-127.— Short vocabulary (4 worda) of a xmm- 



I A further Accompt I 

« ofthe Progreffe of the t 

I GOSPEL I 

I amongft the i^©Jo/^S | 
I IN I 

I NEW-ENGLAND, I 

I AND t 

t Ofthcmeansurcdifft^ualtytoadvancetheramc. g 
^ SET FORTH ^ 

In certaine Letters lent from thence declaring a| 
piirpofe of printing the Scriptures in tine S 
Indhn Tongue into which they are already % 
Tranllated. / g 

With which Letters arc likewifc fcnt aii Epi- | 
5 lorne of fomc Exhonations deltverfd by the /«• |j 
% dians at SKaO^as Tellimonies of ihcir obcdi" » 

I* enceiothcGofpell. % 

Asalfofome helps dirtying the InSUm how to |; 
ioiprovenaturalt reafon unto the knowledge g 
of the true God. & 

— ' — • -* 

<I.ONZ)ON, Pfintedby M.Siatmens ioxititCox^o-l^ 
4 ration o^NertpEnglatui^ 1659. ^- 

FAC-6IMIL.E OF THE TITLE-PAQE OF A FUBTHEH ACCOMPT. 



I 



* 



ALGONQUIAN LANGUAGES. 



197 



Fritz (J. F.) and Schultze (B.) — Con'd. 
ber of American langoaf^es, among them the 
Savanhica and yirginiana* appendix, p. (an- 
nnmbered). 

Oopiet teen: Astor, British Moso