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Full text of "A bibliography of the English colonial treaties with the American Indians : including a synopsis of each treaty"

UNIVERSITY 
OF PITTSBURGH 



PITTSBURGH 



Dar.fim, 
Z1209 
^•^ IA25 



LIBRARY 



V 



► /V*"'- v> 



English Colonial Treaties 

with the 

American Indians 



ACCOUNT 

O F TH E 

TREATY 

BETWEEN 

3|fe Cjctellentp 

Venjamin Fletcher C^pt^in General and Go- 

vernour in Chief of the Province oiNew-Tork, &c, 
AND THE 

INDIANS 

O F T H E 

jfitje Rations;, 

The la^ol^aqueis; , ^nerBeiS, ^nnontiaseiBr. CajonjeiEr 

and fytmzl3^t$^ at Many, beginning the g%th of 
^uiujfy 1694. 

Frinted & Sold hy William Bradford, Printer to Their Maje/Iiet, 

K/»i William ana Queen Mary, at the Sign of the Bible in 

New -York, 1694. 



Facsimile Title of No. 3 



\ A BIBLIOGRAPHY 

OF THE 

ENGLISH COLONIAL TREATIES 
WITH THE AMERICAN INDIANS 

INCLUDING 
A SYNOPSIS OF EACH TREATY 



BY 
HENRY F. DE PUY 

Ml 



NEW YORK 

PRINTED FOR THE LENOX CLUB 

1917 



One hundred and twenty-five 
copies printed 



\ 



INTRODUCTION 

During the long period in which Great Britain and 
France struggled for the supremacy on the North 
American continent the affairs and friendship of the 
Indians were of the greatest importance. This was 
especially true of the Iroquois and the Western In- 
dians. In New England the settlers early became the 
masters except of the eastern tribes of Abenakis and 
their kindred. The French working through their 
missionaries persuaded part of the Abenakis to migrate 
to Canada and through them exerted much influence 
with those who still remained in territory claimed by 
the English. Numerous treaties were made between 
these Indians and the Governors of Massachusetts Bay; 
and while many of the details in the treaties that were 
printed seem to relate only to trade, the real object of 
the English was to retain the Indian friendship. 

The Iroquois played a more important part than the 
Eastern Indians and finally came to be regarded by 
the British colonies as a "buffer state" between them 
and the French. The Iroquois were well aware of 
their importance to both sides and the treaties with 
them show what astute politicians they were. 

Many of the records of the various treaties with the 
Indians exist only in manuscript; some have been 
printed in the Journals of the Governors and Councils 



or in the ''Votes and Proceedings" of the legislative 
bodies; while others were separately printed. It is the 
object of this monograph to locate and describe such 
as were separately printed. A very brief synopsis of 
the contents of each treaty is given, and also the loca- 
tion of copies in the principal libraries and private 
collections. It is quite probable that they were printed 
in very small editions, which would account for their 
rarity at the present time. That they are rare is dem- 
onstrated by the fact that only one public library in the 
country contains one-third of the number of titles re- 
corded in this monograph, while thirteen titles are 
known by only a single copy. And of two no copy is 
known to exist in America. To see the ones described 
it has been necessary to visit the various libraries in 
Boston, Worcester, New York, Philadelphia, and Chi- 
cago. Seventeen public libraries and seven private 
collections have been examined and the copies located 
in them are recorded herein. 

These treaties are original sources of information of 
some of the most important events connected with the 
settlement of the country and its land titles. This is 
especially true of the period covered by the "Old 
French War," for it was during that period that the 
northern colonies courted the Indians as a protection 
against the French. Many pages in them refer to the 
negotiations for the return of white captives among the 
savages. So full are they of interesting historic details 
that the tendency in making the synopses in this book 
was to extend them too far. The synopses are intended 
to give only a hint as to the main subjects discussed in 
the treaties. 



Finally, the excuse for printing this work at all is 
the belief of the compiler that, to the special student, 
the most useful bibliography is the monograph on a 
special subject, which can give an idea of the contents 
of the books described, as well as their size and loca- 
tion. 



List of English Colonial Treaties 



DATE OF 








TREATY 


HELD AT 


IMPRINT 




1677 


Virginia 


London 


1677 


1690 


Albany 


Boston 


1690 


1694 


Albany 


New York 


1694 


1696 


Albany 


New York 


1696 


1698 


Albany 


New York 


1698 


I717 


Georgetown 


Boston 


1717 


I72I 


Conestoga 


Philadelphia 


1721 


I72I 


Conestoga 


London 




I72I 


Conestoga 


Dublin 


1723 


1722 


Albany 


Dublin 


1723 


1722 


Conestoga 


Philadelphia 


1722 


1726 


Falmouth 


Boston 


1726 


1727 


Falmouth 


Boston 


1727 


I 726-7 


Falmouth 


Boston 


1754 


1728 


Conestoga 


Philadelphia 


1728 


1732 


Falmouth 


Boston 


1732 


1732 


Falmouth 


London 


1732 


1735 


Deerfield 


Boston 


1735 


1736 


Philadelphia 


Philadelphia 


1737 


1742 


Philadelphia 


Philadelphia 


1743 


1742 


Philadelphia 


London 


1743 


1742 


St. Georges 


Boston 


1742 


1743 


Connecticut 


London 


1769 


1744 


Lancaster 


Philadelphia 


1744 



DATE OF 








TREATY 


HELD AT 


IMPRINT 




1744 


Lancaster 


Williamsburg 




1745 


Albany 


Philadelphia 


1746 


1746 


Albany 


New York 


1746 


1747 


Philadelphia 


Philadelphia 


1748 


1748 


Lancaster 


Philadelphia 


1748 


1749 


Falmouth 


Boston 


1749 


1752 


St. Georges 


Boston 


1752 


1752 


Halifax 


Halifax 


1752 


1753 


Carlisle 


Philadelphia 


1753 


1753 


St. Georges 


Boston 


1753 


1754 


Falmouth 


Boston 


1754 


1755-6 


Ft. Johnson 


London 


1756 


1756 


Crosswicks 


Philadelphia 


1756 


1756 


Catawba 


Williamsburg 


1756 


1756 


Philadelphia 


Newcastle 


1756 


1756 


Ft. Johnson 


New York 


1757 


1756 


Easton 


Philadelphia 


1757 


1757 


Harris Ferry 


Philadelphia 


1757 


1757 


Ft. Johnson 


New York 


1757 


1757 


Ft. Johnson 


Boston 


1757 


1757 


Easton 


Philadelphia 


1757 


1758 


Burlington 


[Philadelphia 


1758] 


1758 


Easton 


Philadelphia 


1758 


1758 


Easton 


Philadelphia 


1759 


17^8 


Easton 


Woodbridge 


1758 


1761 


Easton 


Philadelphia 


1761 


1762 


Lancaster 


Philadelphia 


1763 


1763 


Augusta 


Charleston 


1764 


1765 


Johnson Hall 


Philadelphia 


1776 


1768 


Ft. Pitt 


Philadelphia 


1769 



ABBREVIATIONS. 



AAS. American Antiquarian Society, Worcester. 

APS. American Philosophical Society, Philadel- 
phia. 

BA. Boston Athenaeum, Boston. 

BM. British Museum, London, England. 

BPL. Boston Public Library, Boston, 

CPC. Curtis Publishing Co., Philadelphia. 

D. Henry F. DePuy, New York. 

Friend. Friend's Library, Philadelphia. 

HC. Harvard College Library, Cambridge. 

HEH. Henry E. Huntington, New York. 

HLE. H. L. R. Edgar, New York. 

HSP. Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Phila- 
delphia. 

JCB. John Carter Brown Library, Providence. 

LC. Library of Congress, Washington. 

LCP. Library Company of Philadelphia, Phila- 
delphia. 

M. W. S. Mason, Evanston, 111. 

MHS. Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. 

N. Newberry Library, Chicago. 

NJ. New Jersey State Library, Trenton. 

NJHS. New Jersey Historical Society, Newark. 

NYHS. New York Historical Society, New York. 

NYPL. New York Public Library, New York. 

P. Pennsylvania State Library, Harrisburg. 

W. Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison. 



TREATIES 



ARTICLES 
PEACE 

Between 
The Moft Serene and Mighty PRINCE 

C H A R L E S II. 

By the Grace of God, 

King o( England, Scotland^ France and Ireland^ 

Defender of the Faithj ^c. 

And Several 

Indian'Kings and QuQens^&c. 

Concluded the 19th day oiMay^ ^^77* 



pubWeti bp ^ij$ ^aiel!ie0 Commanv* 



LONDON^ 

Printed by John BiV^ Chrijiopher Barkp"* Thomas Ncwcmh 

and Henry J£llf, Printers to the Kings 

Molt Excellent Majefty. 1(577. 



ARTICLES OF PEACE BETWEEN CHARLES 
II AND SEVERAL INDIAN KINGS AND 
QUEENS CONCLUDED THE 29TH DAY 
OF MAY, 1677. 

Printed at London, idjj 

Collation. Quarto, pp. i8. 

Size of Letterpress. 6H6 x i^ViQ. 

Copies Located. N. HEH. 

Synopsis. The treaty consists of 21 articles, in which the Indians 
acknowledge subjection to the British Crown and the British guar- 
antee them protection. They provide that no English settlement 
shall be made nearer than three miles of any Indian town and that 
the Indians shall be "secur'ed and defended in their persons, goods 
and properties against all hurts and injuries of the English." They 
are also to be protected in their "Oystering Fishing and gathering of 
Tuchahoe Curtenemons Wild Oats Rushes buckoone or any thing 
else." 

The treaty was signed by the Queen of Pamunkey, Queen of 
Waonoke, King of the Nancymond Indians, King of the Nottoways 
and Captain John West, Son of the Queen of Pamunkey, and their 
marks or totems are reproduced in facsimile, on p. i6. 

I 



Propofitions 

Made ly the Sachems of the three Maquas Cajilei, t& the 
Mayor, Aldermen, and Commanalty oj the City of 
Albany, and Military Officers of the faid City, and 
County in the City-Hall, February x^th. j689 

Peiter Schuyler Mayor, ^x}ith ten more Qentlemen^then prefent. 
Interpreted by Amout & Hiffe. 

The Names of the Sachims, StHttonguitiefs Speaker, Rode, 
Sagodd/odquifax, Oguedagoa. Tofoquatho, Odagurafe^ Anharesdois 
Jago^hera* 



PROPOSITIONS MADE BY THE SACHEMS 
OF THE THREE MAQUAS CASTLES TO 
THE MAYOR, ALDERMEN AND COM- 
MONALTY AT ALBANY, 25TH FEB- 
RUARY, 16 " 



90 

\_Colophon.~\ Boston. Printed by S. Green. Sold by 
Benjamin Harris at the London Coffee House, 

i6go. 

Collation. Quarto, pp. 12. 
Size of Letterpress. 7^ x 554- 
Copy Located. NYHS. 

Synopsis. At this council there were present Peter Schuyler, 
Mayor, "with ten more gentlemen," the representatives of the three 
Mohawk towns, eight of whom are named in the treaty, and two 
interpreters, Arnout and Hille. 

The object of the council seems to hav^e been the offering of con- 
dolences for the massacre at Schenectady and to advise as to what 
measures were to be taken. The Indians spoke first and after the 
usual condolences, stated that they had 100 young men out following 
the French and Canadian Indians and hoped for revenge. They re- 
minded the Albanians that three years before they (the Mohawks) 
were at war with the French but that Corlaer "hindered them to 
proceed." But for that they would have prevented the French from 
sowing and reaping and they would not now have been in a position 
to do much mischief. 

To the report of the council is appended an examination of three 
French prisoners who give an account of the force at Schenectady 
with some details of the fight as well as much information as to the 
state of Canada and some preparations that were being made to 
attack Albany. 

This Treaty was reprinted in the NYHS. Collections for 1869, pp. 165 
et seq. 

2 

2 



A N S W E R 

OP 

The Five Nations, 

TO THE 

QUE S T I O N 

Put to Them in May laft 

By His Excellency 

Benjamin Fletcher^ Captain General and Governour in Chief 
of the Province of ^(W-T^rit, Province of PennfUvania^ 
Country of Netv-Cajfky and the Territories and Traftsof 
Land depending thereon in America, and Vice-Admiral of 
the lame; Their Majefties Lieutenant and Commander iu 
Chief ot the Militia, and of the Forces by Sea and Land 
within Their Majefties Collony of ConmfticHty and of all 
the Forts and Places of Strength within the fame. 

Given at Albaifj the 1 5ch day of jittgup^ i ^ 9 4* 

Prcfcat 

Facsimile of Page 3. For Title see Frontispiece 



ACCOUNT OF A TREATY BETWEEN GOV- 
ERNOR FLETCHER AND THE FIVE NA- 
TIONS, AUGUST, 1694. 

[New York, Wm. Bradford, l6g4.'\ 

Collation. Pp. 39, A-K in twos. The first two leaves have no pagina- 
tion. The third leaf begins 5. The verso of last leaf blank. Sigs. A and I 
not marked. 

Size of Leaf. 7^ x 5^. 

Copy Located. BM. 

Synopsis. On verso of title "Lisenced, David Jamison." P. 3: 
Heading filling whole page as reproduced. Proceedings pp. [4] to 
top half of p. 10; continuing on lower half of same page. "At a 
meeting at Albany the i6th Day of August, 1694" to p. 15; continu- 
ing, "At a meeting at Albany the 17th Day of August, 1694" to p. 
18; continuing, "A conference held at a private House in Albany the 
20th of August, 1694" to p. 28; continuing, "At a meeting at Albany 
the 22th Day of August, 1694" to p. 31. Pp. 32-33: The Ad- 
dress of the River Indians to his Excellency Benjamin Fletcher, 
etc., at Albany, August i8th, 1694. Pp. 34-35: The Answer 
which his Excellency Benjamin Fletcher, etc., gave to the River In- 
dians, August 22nd, 1694. Pp. 36-39: "A Conference had be- 
tween his Excellency Benjamin Fletcher, etc., and the Mahikanders 
or Lower River Indians and Showannos or Far Indians, at Kingstone 
in the County of Ulster the 28th of August, 1694." Ends FiNis on 
p. 39. 

[I can learn of only one copy of this book which is in the British Museum, 
I am indebted to the kindness of Mr. Henry N. Stevens for the reproductions 
and description here given. — H. F. DeP.] 

An account of this treaty is printed in the NYHS. Coll., 1869, pp. 409-415. 

3 



JOURNAL 

or what Pa (Ted in the Expedition of 

^\^ Cjccellentp 

Coll. Bey vnin Fletcher^ Captain General and 

Covernour in Chief of the Province ot New.fork, &c> To 
jt LB A NTy to Renew the ovenant Chain vvith the five 
Canton Nationsof lidi(i}js,x\tMohA(^c(is^Oncydes^Oi70?jd<i^€s^ 
Cajfuges and Sifinekes. 

Sefuwheriy.y"^^ Tlturfdav i(ur Sun fet his Exceffency im- 
i6s)6. 11 barqued at (^/-fff^/v/c/^ On Tf^e/day mora- 

This day his Excellency viewed the Fortificat ions of theCIty 
and gaveordcrs to the Mayor&c Aldermfin for fnch Reparations 
as were found needtul in tne Biock- houfes, Platform > and 
Stockadoes. 

The27ch, Suni^j afternoon, The Sachims of 0»eid^ and 
O^^W^^e arrived ac Ma^y, in the Evening they fupped with 
his Excellency g.vmg great expreOlons of the Joy and Satis, 
fattion they. had in meeting his Excellency. 
.JrVJc^^' ^'r F^^!|'?^y ^ent Capt. J^4o^s fVeems to vi.w 
i^.ffr'fe^o '''''^''^' ^"d^'-ing^^Porttohis Excellency 
Sordidly "^ P'^'' ''' ^'^^'^' ^^''^^ ^^5 perCorrtxeii 

This 



JOURNAL OF WHAT PASSED, ETC., BE- 
TWEEN GOVERNOR FLETCHER AND 
THE FIVE NATIONS AT ALBANY, SEP- 
TEMBER, 1696. 

[Neiv York, Wm. Bradford, l6g6\ 

Collation. Quarto, pp. 11. 
Size of Leaf. 5^ x 7. 
Copy Located. BM. 

Synopsis. P. I — Title, caption, etc., as reproduced. 

Pp. 2-3 — At a meeting of the Sachems of the Five Nations at 
Albany the 29th of Sept., 1696. 

Pp. 4-5 — Ditto, I St October, 1696. 

Pp. 6-7 — Ditto, 2d October, 1696. 

Pp. 8-1 1 — At a private meeting of the Sachems at Albany the 
3rd of October, 1696. 

The only copy located is in the British Museum. The reproduction and 
above description furnished by Mr. Henry N. Stevens. 

4 



Propofirions made by tlic Five Nations of 

IndiafS, v/^. The Mobjqms^ Oae^des^ Omondog'^i 
Cayof^ges 6c Swnchsy to his ExceUency ^tdha^dE^A 
of Smomonr^ Capt General and Governour In chief 
hisMijefties Province of ^^ ij'-Tbri, ((3V. inAIbanyi 
the 2oihoi July, AnnoT>om. 1698 

PRESENT 

Hb ExoeUcncy Kichard Gart of ttet/omyn. Captain General SrCdvotnour 

in Ctiicf 01 Afew-ieHe^ &(• 

Cipf. tcH^iOTi SirWiP'i^ Coll. PererScftp^Ur, 

Hcitd'ici vmJta^taeT/ garner GrahittiU{ hJq Atto;ncy CewWial 

act Lan/iitpL > - , , .„. C^ll. Jhre^M £>' Pe/fter 

iJ. yd^e;,, ( AlJcrmcn. ^^,,^^ //, w^i. ^(i; 

Hffidnck Henftf ) Ma|or t^nci IVeffeilj^ Mayor, 

If eflc/Zf mr A-ccif, Capt Joh* fMfe BleekUi Recoj Jer. 

And feveral oilier Gcnilemen. 



PROPOSITIONS MADE TO GOVERNOR BEL- 
LOMONT BY THE FIVE NATIONS IN 
JULY, 1698, AT ALBANY. 

Printed at New York by Wm. Bradford 

Collation. Folio, pp. 22. 
Size of Letterpress. sViTisVi- 
Copy Located. NYHS. 

Synopsis. There were present Governor Bellomont and a nu- 
merous retinue and the representatives of all of the Five Nations; 
the Interpreters were Cornelius Velie and Helletie van Olanda. 
The conference convened on July 20. Governor Bellomont was 
suffering with gout. The Indians complained of an alleged sale of 
land by a few of the Mohawks and claimed that it was illegal and 
asked to have the "Writing" burned. They complained also of the 
attacks of the French and their Indian allies after peace was declared 
and of the high price of goods. They state further "that a greater 
evil could not have attended all of us in the five Nations as well as 
the brethren than the suffering the French to re-settle Candarque 
which will always be as a thorn in our sides and keep us in such a con- 
tinual alarm and watchfulness that we shall never be able to hunt 
freely whilst such a power and fortress is so near not only to annoy 
but in a capacity to destroy us." In the discussion on this matter the 
Indians took occasion to correct the Governor by reciting the whole 
history of the negotiations and acts of Governor Fletcher relating to 
Candarque. 

The conferences lasted until July 27th and a complete daily re- 
port is given of them. Besides these reports the printed account gives 
an Examination of Skachkook Indians in reference to murders at 
Hatfield ; The Governor's report of the Albany meeting to the Coun- 
cil ; Instructions to Col. Peter Schuyler ; A Message sent by the Five 
Nations in August regarding their friends who were captives in 
Canada. 

See Winsor Nar. and Crit. Hist., V, 483, 560. 



George Town 

Oa Arrmfick^ljknd Aug. pth. 17 17. 

Annoque Regni Regis G E O R G 1 1 Magna BritannU,dCc.Qii2iTto, 

A Conference of His Excellency the G O V E R N O U R, 
with the ,^C!)nn)8 and Chief Men of the Eaftem 



GEORGETOWN ON ARROWSICK ISLAND 
9TH AUGUST, 1717. A CONFERENCE OF 
THE GOVERNOR WITH THE SACHEMS 
OF THE EASTERN INDIANS. 

[Colophon:'] Boston. B. Green, IJIJ 

Collation. Pp. 13. No title page. Caption title. 

Letterpress. 65^ x 45^. 

Copies Located. AAS. JCB. LC. HLE. 

Synopsis. The Governor opened the congress by a speech in which 
he refers to various previous treaties w^ith the Indians. 

The Indians object to the construction of a Fort but are told by 
the Governor that he will build a fort where he pleases. He claims 
land on the Kennebec River to which the Indians demur. Finally 
the conference is ended by the Indians withdrawing "in a hasty, 
abrupt manner without taking leave, and left behind them their Eng- 
lish Colours." Later they brought to the Governor a letter of Sebas- 
tion Rasles, the Jesuit missionary, containing a message of Vaudreuill 
to the Indians in reference to their lands and promising help. 

This Treaty is in the Maine Hist. Soc. Coll., iii, 361, and in N. H. Prov. 
Papers, iii, 693. See Winsor Nar. and Crit. Hist., V, 424, for other refer- 
ences. 



The P A R T I C U L A R S of an 

INDIAN TREATY 

At CONESTOGOE, 

BETWEEN 

His Excellency Sir William Keith ^ Bart. Governor oi Fennfyhania^ 
And the Deputies of the Five Nations, 



PuWifhcd at the Rec^uefl- of the G E N T LE M E N who were prefen^ 
and waited upon the Governor in His Journey. 



THE PARTICULARS OF AN INDIAN 
TREATY AT CONESTOGOE BETWEEN 
HIS EXCELLENCY SIR WILLIAM 
KEITH, BART., GOVERNOR OF PENN- 
SYLVANIA, AND THE DEPUTIES OF 
THE FIVE NATIONS, IN JULY, 1721. 

Printed by Andrew Bradford at Philadelphia 

Collation. Small folio, pp. 8. Sigs. A and B. Caption title. 
Letterpress. loY^ x 55^. 
Copies Located. D. HEH. 

Synopsis. 

July 5. Complimentary speeches. 

July 6. Governor Keith tells the Conestoga Indians that he has 
arranged with the Governor of Virginia to make the Potomac the 
boundary of the hunting territory between them and the Virginia 
Indians. 

July 7. Ghesaont, a Seneca, presents a belt of wampum and seven 
bundles of skins and makes a friendly speech in which he complains 
of the sale of liquor to the Indians and the small price paid for furs. 



THE 

PARTICULARS 

OF AN 

Indian Treaty 

A T 

BETWEEN 

His Excel lency Sir Wi l L I A m Ke I T H, 

Bart. Governor of Pennfjhania, and 
the Deputies of the Five Nations. 



PubliOied 

At the Requeft of the Gentlemen 
who were preferit^ and waited upon 
the Governor in His Journey. 



D V B L I N 

Re-Printed, by Elizabeth Sadktr, for 
Satnnel V-xlkr^ at the Ghht and Scdu, 
In MsAth Street, MDCCXXIIl. 



July 8. Governor Keith makes a speech of friendship with the 
usual presents and warns the Five Nations that they cannot pass 
through the colony to make war on Indians friendly to the govern- 
ment of Virginia. He counsels them to peace with the English and 
other Indians but warns them that the French are artful and not to 
be trusted. He promises that wrongs done them by white men will 
be avenged and that he will see that they are fairly treated by the 
traders. He says he would like to stop the liquor traffic but the 
Indians make that impossible. 

Present at the Treaty: Governor Keith, Richard Hill, Caleb 
Pusey, Jonathan Dickinson, Col. John French, James Logan, Secre- 
tary, "with divers gentlemen," Deputies from the Senecas, Onon- 
dagas, and Cayugas; Interpreters Smith the Ganewese-Indian, John 
Cartledge, and, James le Tort. 

7 



TREATY AT CONESTOGOE IN JULY, 1721 

Reprinted at Dublin, 1^2^ 

Collation. Small octavo, pp. 48. 
Size OF Letterpress. sy2'>^2%. 
Copy Located. LCP. 

Synopsis. This is a volume containing the Treaty of July 5-8 at 
Conestogoe, pp. i to 27, Treaty at Albany, September, 1722, pp. 
28-45, and the Dying Words of Ocanickon, pp. 46-48. 

Mr. Hildeburn in "Issues of the Press of Pennsylvania," No. 172, says 
this Treaty was reprinted at Dublin and London in 1723 but I have not 
found a copy of the London edition. 



TREATY 

OF 

Peace and Friendfhip 

Made and Concluded between His Excellency 
Sir William Keith, Bart, 
Governor of the Province of 

Jot and on Behalf of the faid Pr6vince 

AND THE 

Chiefs of the Indians of the Five Nations, 

At ALB A NT/m the Month of September ^ ij%%. 



TREATY BETWEEN GOVERNOR KEITH OF 
PENNSYLVANIA AND THE FIVE NA- 
TIONS MADE AT ALBANY IN SEPTEM- 
BER, 1722. 

Printed at Dublin, IJ2^ 

Collation. This Treaty occupies pp. 28 to 45 of a volume containing the 
Treaty of 1721, Conestogoe [which see], and the Dying Words of Ocanickon. 
Copy Located. LCP. 

Synopsis. New York, Pennsylvania and Virginia were repre- 
sented at this council by their Governors, who sailed up the Hudson 
on a sloop leaving New York August 17th, and arriving at Albany 
August 20th. This volume contains only so much of the council 
minutes as relates to Pennsylvania. It consists nominally of the 
affair of an Indian killed by white traders near Conestogoe but the 
speeches of Governor Keith were very conciliatory and the "chain of 
friendship brightened." 

9 



THE PARTICULARS OF AN INDIAN 
TREATY AT CONESTOGOE BETWEEN 
HIS EXCELLENCY SIR WILLIAM 
KEITH, BART., GOVERNOR OF PENN- 
SYLVANIA, AND THE DEPUTIES OF 
THE FIVE NATIONS IN JUNE, 1722. 

Philadelphia, Andrew Bradford, IJ22 

The above title is taken from Hildeburn's "Issues of the Press of 
Pennsylvania," No. i86. No copy is located by him and it is evi- 
dent that he had never seen one. Possibly he took the title from an 
advertisement in a contemporary newspaper. 

10 



THE 



CONFERENCE 

With the Eaftern Indians, at the Ratification 
of the PEACE, held at Falmouth in Cafco'Bay, 
in fulj and Jugufi, 172^. 



CONFERENCE WITH THE EASTERN IN- 
DIANS AT FALMOUTH IN CASCO BAY 
IN JULY AND AUGUST, 1726. 

[Colophon:~\ ^'Boston: Printed for Benj. Eliot, at his 
shop in King Street where may also be had the 
former Printed Conference with the Eastern In- 
dians." 

Collation. Pp. 23, A-F in twos. 
Size of Letterpress. 75^ x sY^.. 
Copies Located. AAS. LC. MHS. 

Synopsis. The conference lasted from i6th July to August nth. 
About forty Penobscots only were present. The English were much 
annoyed to find no other tribes there to ratify a peace made at Boston 
the previous winter. The Indians added to this annoyance by a sug- 
gestion that a conference should be held at Mont. Royal (Mont- 
real). They were told that it was beneath English dignity to treat 
with Indians on French soil. 

The Indians demanded the removal of two houses at Richmond 
and St. George, with which the English refused to comply. The 
Indians claimed that they did not possess a single English captive. 

This Treaty and the one in Falmouth, 1727, were reprinted in Boston, 1754, 
by S. Kneeland, 4to, pp. 20, 27. 

There is a copy of this reprint at AAS. See Winsor Nar. and Crit. Hist., 
V, 432, for other references to this Treaty. 

II 



CONFERENCE 

With the Eaftern Indians at the furthei 
Ratification of the PEACE, Held at Fal. 
mouth in Cafco/Baj, in July 1727. 

ifalmOUtl), July nth, I727# 



CONFERENCE WITH THE EASTERN IN- 
DIANS AT THE FURTHER RATIFICA- 
TION OF THE PEACE, HELD AT FAL- 
MOUTH IN CASCO BAY, IN JULY, 1727. 

Printed at Boston 1 72 J 

Collation. Quarto, pp. 31. A-H in twos. Caption title. No colophon. 
Letterpress. 7^x5^. 
Copy Located. AAS. 

Synopsis. The selection of Falmouth as a meeting place seems 
to have been objectionable to the Indians who with the exception of 
the Penobscots refused to go there the year before. This year the 
same objection was made but a ship was sent for them and the 
Norridgewocks and Wowenocks came. The treaty, dated Boston, 
15th December, 1725, was read and confirmed by the signatures of 
the four chiefs whose totems are reproduced. It attempts to settle 
the disputes as to land, captives, etc. 

This Treaty was reprinted in 1754 with the Treaty of 1726. See Winsor 
Nar. and Crit. Hist, V, 432. 

12 



TWO 

INDIAN TREATIES 

THE ONE HELD AT 

CONESTOGOE 

In MAr 1728. 

AND THE OTHER AT 

PHILADELPHIA 

In yUNE following, 

BETWEEN 

The Honourable Patrick Gordon Efq; Lieut 
Governour of the Province of Pemifyhaniai and 
Counties of New-Cafikj Kmtt and Sujfex upon 
De/aivarcy 

AND 

The Chiefs of the CotteftogoCj Ddaioare^ Shavjanefe 
and Canaivefc Indians. 



TAKEN from the Minutes of Council, and publiflied by Authority. 



THi Covernmir h.tvin£ UJf Fall tc^iiaimtd ibe Induns of Concdogoe, i) Mr Wright, 
thjt he dcfgHed.it ^iju them, fr [mat their feeple were come home oki cfthe Heodt in the 
Spring, rtceivtiijn Acconm Mti -.hrtt Hieki fiuce /rem Mr Wright, that Ctft. ClviJity 
the Chief ef ihcft Induitvs «•«/) kii Peoflt were relumed mireupm the Gnememr dif. 
patched an Exfrefi to nitjuaint the Jndianj, thm ke would meet ihemjhoui the IJJ cf May 
infttni at Conf llog-jc, where he defrei that the Chief,, of all the Indians might be frefem, 
end thai Capt Civility would difpaich Meffengeri to S.dbon.iii, Opckinit Mid M.mriwk)- 
bickon Chieti of the DcUwarci, who tne up ihe Rixier Safquthannah <# ke there. 

purfiitnt t«lhn 4ppoiiiimml, the Covemeur atierdedwith fotne Memhri of Coitncil, and 
liivori ether Geialemtn, to the Nnrnter of abiut Thirty, who velutitarih »' rred iheir Comply 
tbuher, fet out from Philndclphu on the aid of Mny. '"d on ih, lid in the Eumni 
tame to the Houfe of Mr. Andrew C6rni(h, ahomua Mi.''e diflant fie,', the Indian-T.i*'". 
The S4' and r%ih Daji were fpent m waiting for feme other Perfom e^\pei}ed al iljt Tii-iij, 
aai mt^niKM Ciiilitiei, andmilK iC'h the ffejij l/egan ai fellowt. 



TWO INDIAN TREATIES HELD AT CONES- 
TOGOE IN MAY, 1728, AND AT PHILA- 
DELPHIA, IN JUNE, 1728. 

[Colophon:~\ Printed by Andrew Bradford, PhiJa. 

Collation. Folio, pp. 17. Sigs. [A] to D in twos. 
Size OF Letterpress. 10x5^. 
Copy Located. LCP. 

Synopsis. The meeting at Conestogoe was May 26th and 27th. 
Attended by Lt.-Gov. Gordon and others and Indians of the Cones- 
toga, Delaware, Shawanese, and Canawese tribes. The Governor 
related the details of trouble between the whites and Indians at 
Mahanatawny Iron Works and at the house of John Burt. 

The meeting at Philadelphia was June 4th and 5 th. Deeds of 
lands from the Indians dated September, 17 18, were shown to the 
Indians to assure them that said lands had been paid for and this 
deed is printed in the treaty as is also the petition of Palatines in re- 
gard to their land. 

13 



CQO ^OQQCvJ<^G303C>CC<^GQC503C^OC<SQ30g ?00000 




A 

CONFERENCE 

of His Excellency 

' Jonathan Belcher^ Eiq; 

Captain General and Govcmour in Chief of His Majefiy's 
Province of the ^aCfacljufctt^^Bap in ^liXll^c 
CnslanD, with eOelUafeenft chief sachem" of the 
I^CnObfCUt Tribe, JtOJOtt one of the Chief Captains 
of the fame Tribe, SLOjCUS Chief Sachem of the 
^O^riDgcUJOCli Tribe, 3lDia\Dan Do chief sachem 
of the |digll)acfeCt Tribe, and il^CD^gancffCtChief 
Sachem of the !^'mCVCfC0gj5Ul Tribe, with other 
Chief Men of the faid^nU (ail Tribes at jfaimDUt|) 
in CafCO-Ba^, 3IUl^ 1752. Annoq; Regni Regis 
G E O R G I J,- Secundi, Magnx Britannia-, f C- Sexto^ 
Falmouth^ Monday, ^uh C4. i 7 S ^, ' 
Facsimile Title of No. 14 



CONFERENCE BETWEEN GOVERNOR BEL- 
CHER AND INDIANS OF THE PENOB- 
SCOTS, NORRIDGEWOCKS, PIGWACK- 
ETS, AND AINERSCOGGINS AT FAL- 
MOUTH AND CASCO BAY, JULY, 1732. 

Printed at Boston by B. Green 

Collation. Quarto pp. 23 with a slip of Errata pasted on p. [24]. SIgs. 
A — F in twos. 

Size of Letterpress. 7^x41^6- 
Copies Located AAS. D. N. JCB. LC. 

Synopsis. One cannot read this treaty and not be struck with the 
difference between the methods used with these Eastern Indians and 
the method followed by New York, Pennsylvania and Virginia with 
the Six Nations and kindred tribes. All these latter conferences and 
treaties were marked by great dignity and the following of set forms. 
No speech ever went unanswered and it was seldom answered the 
same day but only after taking time for deliberation. At Falmouth, 
Governor Belcher replied to the Indian speeches at once and pressed 
the Indians for immediate answers. They told him they did things 
only after deliberating among themselves, but it made no difference 
to the Governor, nor did he mark his answers with presents as the 
Indians did. 

The Governor had been to inspect the English forts at St. George's, 
Brunswick, Richmond, etc., and had invited these Indians to meet 
him. His principal business with them seemed to be to advise them 
to give up the French religion and adopt that of the English and to 
drink less rum. The Indians tried to transact other business such as 
arranging for proper trading posts, regulation of hunting rights, etc., 
but they got short answers from His Excellency. 

This Treaty was reprinted at London, 1732, and there' are copies of the 
reprint at JCB. and Harvard. See Winsor Nar. and Crit. Hist., V, 432. 

14 



CONFERENCE 

Between his Excellency 

Jonathan Belcher Efq; 

Captain-General and Governour in Chief 
Of His M A J E s T Y 's Province 
o F 
Maffachufet S'Bay in New-England : 

AND THE 

CHIEF SACHEMS 

O F 

Several IndianTribes, with other Ghief 
Men of the faid Tribes, 

At Falmouth, in Gas co-B a y, in Ngw-Ettg-* 
land, July i-Jii. Annoq;Regni Regis GEO RGII 

Secundi, Magoae Britannis, &c. Sexto. 



I O N D O N. 

Printed for N. Cholmondeley, at the Corner of ThavUs-Inn, 
Holbourn; and fold by E. Nutt, ac the Royal-Exchange i 
A. DoDD, without Temple-Bar i and the Bookfellers of 
Undon and fVeJiminJler. 

{Irici Shpence.) 



( • ) 

CONFERENCE 

Held at T>eerfieldm the County of H^mp/hire ^thc 
Twenty feventh Day of /Iiip^ fly ^nno Regni 
Regis GEORGIf Secundi, Magn2e,Britan- 
nise^Francise et Hiberniae, &c. NonOyMw^; 
Domini, 1 735. By & between His Excellency 

JONATHAN BELCHER, Efq; 

Captain General and Governour in Chief 
in and over His Majefty's Province of the 

Mn[fachufetts-^ay in 'Neve England, 

AND 

£)unt(luntO0S0e and others, Chiefs of the CtgMtvaga Tribe 
of Indians, &c. who were accompanied by a Number of the 
St. Francois Indians, who at their own defire were included ia 
theTreaty with thtQ^niitra^as^the whole being Twcntyfeven. 

CtirifclUpOt Captain, with his Lieutenant and feveral others 
of the Chiefs of the Houffatonuoc Indians Scc. being upwards 
of Forty in the whole. 

ispatfcaiunit, iI5aunatttoogI)ifau, and d^empaitK, 

Three Chiefs of the Scautacook I'ribe and others, including 
Seventeen of the Moheegs^ making Eighty in the whole. 

A His 



iat^ 



CONFERENCE AT DEERFIELD, 27TH 
AUGUST, 1735, BETWEEN GOVERNOR 
BELCHER AND THE CAUGHNAWAGAS, 
ST. FRANCIS, HOUSSTONNOUCS, SCHA- 
TIGCOKES AND MOHEGAN TRIBES. 

^Boston, I735\ 

Collation. Pp. 19, A-F in twos. 

Letterpress. 7^4 x 5^. 

Copies Located. AAS. BPL. JCB. LC. 

Synopsis. About 140 Indians were present. Unlike the confer- 
ences with the Eastern Indians much formality was observed and 
wampum belts exchanged. Peace was renewed. The Indians were 
well entertained but no business of importance was transacted. Dur- 
ing the conference Rev. John Sargeant was ordained in the presence 
of the Governor and the Indians. 

This was reprinted in Maine Hist. Coll., IV, 123. See Winsor Nar. and 
Grit. Hist., V, 433. 

15 



TREATY 



O F 



FRIENDSHIP 

HELD WITH THE 

CHIEFS OF THE SIX NATIONS, 

A T 

PHILADELPHIA 

I N 

SEPTEMBER and OCTOBER, 173^. 



'P H I LAD E LV H \ A.' 

Printed and Sold by B. FRANKLIN, at the New Prmting-Officc 

near the Market. M,DCC,XXXVIL 



TREATY HELD AT PHILADELPHIA BEGIN- 
NING SEPTEMBER 28, 1736, WITH THE 
SIX NATIONS. 

Printed by Franklin at Philadelphia, lyjy 

Collation. Folio, pp. 14. Sigs. [A] to D in twos. 
Size of Letterpress, iox 5^. 
Copies Located. HSP. CPC. 

Synopsis. Except the Mohawks, all the Six Nations were repre- 
sented. There were about 100 Indians in all. Thomas Penn and 
James Logan were present, with Conrad Weiser as interpreter. The 
preliminary council was held at James Logan's at Stenton. They 
were informed that while the council would be held at Philadelphia 
that as there was smallpox in the town they should not spend much 
time there. 

The object of the treaty was to confirm the one made four years 
before. 

16 



THE 



TREATY 

HELD WITH THE 

INDIANS 

O F T H E 

SIX NATIONS, 



A T 



PHILADELPHIA. 

In J U LT, 1742. 




PHILADELPHIA: 

Printed and Sold by B. F R A N K L I N, at the New-Printing- 
office, near tlie Market. M,DCC,XLIII. 



TREATY WITH THE SIX NATIONS AT 
PHILADELPHIA, JULY 2-12, 1742. 

Printed by Franklin at Philadelphia, IJ43 

Collation. Folio, pp. 25. Sigs. [A] to F in twos, with the leaf forming 
p. 25. 
Size OF Letterpress. 10^x5^/2. 
Copies Located. D. APS. CPC. HLE. NYPL. 

Synopsis. There were present at this treaty delegates from the 
Onondagas, Cayugas, Oneidas, Senecas, Tuscaroras, Shawanese, Nan- 
ticokes, and Delawares; and one entire page is filled with the names 
of these delegates. The council was presided over by George Thomas, 
lieutenant-governor, with Conrad Weiser and Cornelius Spring as in- 
terpreters. The presents made to the Indians are specified. 

The principal business was to settle the complaints that each side 
made against the other of encroachments on their lands. The whites 
promised to remove their people from the Indian lands and the Indi- 
ans gave a like promise. One of the claims made by the whites 
was that fifty years before they had bought land at the Forks of the 
Delaware from the Delawares which the latter now refused to vacate. 
After the Indians had investigated this claim Canassatego made his 
famous speech to the Delawares. "But how came you to take upon 
you to sell land at all? We conquered you; we made women of 
you; you know that you are women and can no more sell land than 
women ; nor is it fit that you should have the power to sell land since 
you abuse it. This land that you claim is gone through your guts. 
You have been furnished with clothes, meat and drink by the goods 
paid you for it; and now you want it again like children as you 
are," etc. 

17 



THE 

TREATY 

Held with the 

mti IAN s 

O F T H E 

SIX NATIONS 

A T 

Thiladelphiay in July 1742. 

To which is Prefix*d 

An Account of the Jirft Confederacy of the SIX 
NATIONS, their preftnt Tributaries, 
Dependents, and Allies. 

LONDON: 

Re- printed and Sold byT. Sowle Ravlton r.ni 
Luke HiTfDC)ac the Bibic Ccorge'Tc:,., 
Lembard'Street, 

[ Price Six-Pence. ] 



It was also at this treaty that the Indians expressed their good 
opinions of James Logan and Conrad Weiser. Of the latter they 
said : "The Business the Five Nations transact with you is of great 
consequence and requires a skillful and honest person to go between 
us, one in whom both you and we can place Confidence. We esteem 
our present Interpreter to be such a person, equally faithful in the 
interpretation of whatever is said to him by either of us; equally 
allied to both; he is of our nation and a member of our Council as 
well as yours. When we adopted him we divided him into two 
equal parts. One we kept for ourselves and one we left for you. 
He has had a great deal of trouble for us, wore out his shoes in our 
messages and dirtied his clothes by being amongst us so that he has 
become as nasty as an Indian." 

This Treaty was reprinted in Colden's " History of the Five Indian Na- 
tions of Canada," London, 1747, p. 45. 

18 



THE TREATY WITH THE SIX NATIONS. 
REPRINT OF TREATY AT PHILADEL- 
PHIA, 1742. 

London [w. d. IJ4J ? ] 

Collation. Octavo, pp. xii, 37 [i]. 

Size of Letterpress. 6|4 ^^ 3^- 

Copies Located. D. HSP. N. W. JCB. M. HC. 

Synopsis. The preface to this edition has a list of twenty Indian 
tribes with their numbers, place of residence and their relations with 
the English and Six Nations. It refers to Colden's "History of the 
Five Nations," which, it says, is ready for the press and soon to be 
printed, referring, of course, to the first London edition of that 
book, 1747. 

19 



A 

CONFERENCE 

Held at the Fore at St. Georges m the County 
oi%rJ^ the fourth Day oi /Jugujl, Anno Regm 
Regis GEORGIJ Secuncli, Magn^ Britaiiniae, 
Franciae et HihGm\Xy&c. Decimo Sexto, Annoq,- 
Domini, 1742. 

BETWEEN 

His Excellency 

JVILLIAM SHIRLET, Efq; 

Captain General and Govemour in Chief in and over His 
Majeftj's Province oftheMa/^/j«/?//r-iy<r)' in New-Englajid, 

A N D T H E 

C6/^ Sachems & Captains 

OF THE 

or ^aco, ^u giol)n's;, Befcoininoncontp or :xme' 

refCOSgmg and ^t 5fV*anciS Tribes of INDIANS, 
Avguft 2. I 7 4 2» 



CONFERENCE AT ST. GEORGE'S THE 4TH 
DAY OF AUGUST, 1742, BETWEEN WIL- 
LIAM SHIRLEY AND THE CHIEF SA- 
CHEMS AND CAPTAINS OF THE PENOB- 
SCOT NORRIDGEWOCKS, ETC. 

[Colophon:] Boston: Printed by J. Draper, IJ42 

Collation. Quarto, pp. 19. A-E in twos. 

Letterpress. 7^x5^- 

Copies Located. AAS. JCB. HEH. LC. MHS. 

Synopsis. The Council began on the 2nd of August and closed 
on the 7th. On his arrival in Boston, Governor Shirley had sent 
a letter to those tribes notifying them of his appointment as Governor 
and notifying them that if they wished to send delegates to him they 
would be transported in the Province sloop. Accordingly they sent 
two delegates to Boston in December who laid before the Governor 
their difficulties in trade "arising from a scarcity of provisions, tobacco, 
powder and shot, and the truck master not understanding your lan- 
guage, and desired that two men might be appointed twice a year to 
view the truck houses; and that an account of the prices of beaver 
peltry and other goods might be publicly posted there." The Gov- 
ernor had promised to examine their complaints and the greater part 
of this conference was occupied in settling them. 

See Winsor Nar. and Crit. Hist., V, 434. 

20 



GOVERNOR AND COMPANY OF CONNECTICUT, 

AND 

MOHEAGAN INDIANS. BY THEIR GUARDIANS. 



CERTIFIED COPY 

O F 

BOOK OF PROCEEDINGS 

BEFORE 

COMMISSIONERS OF REVIEW, 

MDCCXLIII. 



LONDON 
PRINTED BY W. AND J. RICHARDSON. 



MDCCLXIX. 



GOVERNOR AND COMPANY OF CONNECTI- 
CUT AND MOHEGAN INDIANS, 1743. 

Printed at London in Ij6g 

Collation. Quarto, pp. [2], xxi, 283. Folding map. 
Size of Letterpress. 8§^ x 5^. 
Copies Seen. NYHS. 

Synopsis. While this work is not the record of a treaty or In- 
dian council, but rather a report of the evidence taken in the trial to 
determine the rights of the Mohegan Indians to land claimed by them 
and the Colony of Connecticut, it is included here on account of its 
relating to Indian lands about which so many treaties were made. 
The great length of the work prevents any adequate synopsis. The 
commissioners appointed to consider the cause were the Governors of 
New York and New Jersey with their respective councils or any 
five or more of them. The five who tried the cause were Cadwalader 
Colden, Phillip Cortlandt, and Daniel Horsmanden, of New York; 
and John Rodman and Robt. Hunter Morris, of New Jersey. The 
evidence submitted consisted of public records, Indian deeds, etc., 
which are copied in this report, as is also Mason's Pequot War which 
was put in evidence. The great importance of this record cannot be 
adequately shown in a brief notice. To the decision rendered Messrs. 
Horsmanden and Morris dissented and Mr. Horsmanden's opinion 
in dissent was printed in London, 1769. 

21 



TREATY, 

Held at the Town of 

Lancafter^ ia Pennsylvania, 

By the Homourable the 

Lieutenant-Governor of the PROVINCE, 

And die Honourable the 

CommifTioners for the PROVINCES 

O F 

Virginia and Maryland, 

WITH THE 

INDIANS 

OF THE 

SIX NATIONS, 

In y U N Ey 1744. 



P H I LAD E L P HI A: 

Pruned a-nd SolJ by B. FRANKLIN, at the New-Printing-Office. 
near the Market. M,DCC,XLIV. 



TREATY HELD AT LANCASTER, PA., WITH 
THE SIX NATIONS, IN JUNE, 1744. 

Printed at Philadelphia by Franklin in I J 44 

Collation. Folio, pp. 39. Sigs. A to K in twos. 
Size of Letterpress. 10^ x 5^. 

Copies Located. D. NYHS. LCP. HSP. NYPL. Friend. APS. CPC. N. 
BPL. W. JCB. M. HEH. HLE. 

Synopsis. The council was convened on Friday, June 22, 1744, 
Lt.-Gov. George Thomas of Pennsylvania presiding, with deputies 
from Maryland and Virginia and from the Senecas, Onondagas, 
Oneidas, Cayugas, and Tuscaroras, with Conrad Weiser as Inter- 
preter. 

This treaty was held to settle the disputes between the colonies of 
Maryland and Virginia and the Six Nations relative to lands claimed 
by the Indians in those colonies. It was of such importance that it 
lasted until July 4th and produced a great deal of discussion in which 
the Indians showed much ability and a knowledge of the history of 
Indian affairs. The troubles were finally adjusted and payment 
was made to the Indians. It was during the meetings of this treaty 
that the Governor of Maryland received the name Tocarryhogan. 

The troubles between the Six Nations and the Cherokees and 
Catawbas were mentioned and the Indians gave the Council a state- 
ment of the trouble. 

The death of John Armstrong, an Indian trader, was discussed 
and the Indians promised satisfaction for his murder. 

Franklin mentions this Treaty in a letter to Wm. Strahan dated 
Sept. 18, 1744, and says he is sending Strahan 200 copies for sale. 
This statement probably indicates that a large number of copies 
were printed, which may account for its apparently being less rare 
than most of the other issues. 

22 



THE 

TREATY 

Held with the 

I N D IJ N S 

OF T H E 

SIX NATIONS, 

A T 

LancaJIer, in Pennfyhania, in 

June, 1744. 

To which IS prefixM, 

An Account of the firft Confederacy of the SIX 
Nations^ their prefent Tributaries, De- 
TENDENTj, and Allies, and of their Religion^ 
and Form of Government. 

WILLIAMSBURG: 
Printed and Sold by WiLtiAM Parks. 



TREATY AT LANCASTER IN JUNE, 1744. 
Reprinted at JVilliamsburg, Va., by William Parks 

Collation. Octavo, pp. xii + 79. 
Size OF Letterpress. 7x3%. 
Copies Located. NYHS. HC. N. JCB. 

This Treaty was also reprinted in Colden's " History of the Five Indian 
Nations of Canada," London, 1747, p. 87. 

There is a Journal of Witham Marshe, secretary of the Maryland 
Commissioners, kept during this treaty published by the Mass. Hist. 
Soc, Coll. vii, 171. It was also reprinted at Lancaster, 1884, with 
annotations by W. H. Egle with the following title: 

Lancaster in 1744 ] Journal ] of the | Treaty at Lancaster | In 
1744 I with the Six Nations | By Witham Marshe, | Secretary of the 
Maryland Commissioners | Annotated by William H. Egle, M.D. | 
Lancaster, Pa. | The New Era Steam Book and Job Print. | 1884. | 
4to pp. 30. 

See also Winsor Nar. and Crit. Hist., V, 566. 

23 



=^ 



A N 



ACCOUNT 

O F T H E 

TREATY 

Held at the C I T Y of 

Albany y in the Province of NEW-TORK, 

By His Excellency the 

Governor of that Province, 

And the Honourable the 

Commissioners for the Provinces 

O F 

Massachusetts, Connecticut 

AND 

P E NNSTLVANIJy 

WITH THE 

INDIANS 

OF THE 

SIX NATIONS, 

In OCTOBER, 1745. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

Printed by B. FRANKLIN, at the New-Printing-Office, 
near the Market, M,DCC,XLVI. 



TREATY HELD AT ALBANY IN OCTOBER, 
1745, BETWEEN THE PROVINCES OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, CONNECTICUT, AND 
PENNSYLVANIA AND THE SIX NA- 
TIONS. 

Printed by Franklin at Philadelphia, IJ46 

Collation. Folio, pp. 20. 

Size of Letterpress. 9^ x 5^^. 

Copies Located. D. LCP. NYPL. Friend. CPC. M. 

Synopsis. There were present at this treaty the Governor and 
deputies of New York and Commissioners from the Colonies of Mas- 
sachusetts, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania, and Indians from all of 
the Six Nations except the Senecas. At a preliminary meeting of 
the Commissioners it was resolved that the New York and New Eng- 
land delegates should make a joint speech to the Indians and that 
afterward the Pennsylvania Commissioners should hold a separate 
council. 

The joint speech of New York and New England told the Indians 
of the war that then existed between France and Great Britain, of 
the attacks and depredations of the French and their Indian allies 
against the English settlements, and advised the Six Nations to join 
the Colonies in retaliation. It reproved the Mohawks for treating 
with the French at Montreal a few months before. The Indians 
replied that they were true friends of the English and would not 
permit the French or their Indian Allies to cross their lands to attack 
the English, but that before they declared war it was necessary that 
they should first demand satisfaction of the Canadian Indians which 
would require about two months' time. They explained their con- 
ference with the French at Montreal. The answer was satisfactory 
to all except the Massachusetts commissioners who said that the year 
before at a conference at Boston between the Mohawks and Eastern 
Indians the former had reproved the latter for hostility to the Eng- 
lish and threatened them with war if they committed any hostile acts. 
In this connection there is an interesting reference to the Boston con- 
ference in the "Itinerarium of Dr. Alexander Hamilton," privately 
printed by Mr. W. K. Bixby, St. Louis, 1907. Hamilton was in 
Boston in July, 1 744, and records in his diary of July 24th, some ac- 



TREATY, 

BETWEEN 

HIS EXCELLENCY 

The Honourable George Clinton, 

Captain General and Governor in Chief of the Province of Hew- 
York, and the Territories thereon depending in AMERICA, 
Vice-Admiral of the fame^ and Vice-Admral of the Red 
Squadron of His Majefiys Fleet » 

AND 

The Six United Indian Nations, and other Indian Nationj^ 
depending on the Province of NEW'TORK* 

Meld at A LEANT in the Months oiAugufi and September^ 
I 746. 




J>!EW-rORK: 

Printed and Sold by James Parker at the New-Printing 

Oifice in Beaver-Street, 1746. 



count of this conference in which he says that Hendrick, a chief of 
the Mohawks, said to the Eastern Indians: "We, the Mohawks, are 
your fathers and you are our children. If you are dutiful and obe- 
dient, if you brighten the chain with the English our friends and take 
up the hatchet against the French our enemies, we will defend and 
protect you; but otherwise if you are disobedient and rebel you shall 
die every man, woman, and child of you and that by our hands. We 
will cut you off from this earth as an ox licketh up the grass." It 
was apparently this promise that the Massachusetts commissioners de- 
sired the Mohawks to make good. 

The business of the Pennsylvania Commissioners related to the 
negotiations with the Catawbas (between whom and the Six Nations 
the Governor of Pennsylvania was trying to make peace) and to some 
Pennsylvania Indian traders who had been robbed by the Shawanese. 
The Indian reply to the latter matter was probably not satisfactory. 

24 

TREATY BETWEEN GOVERNOR CLINTON 
OF NEW YORK AND THE SIX NATIONS, 
HELD AT ALBANY IN AUGUST AND 
SEPTEMBER, 1746. 

Printed by Parker at New York in I 'J 46 

Collation. Folio, pp. 23. Sigs. [A] to F in twos. 
Size of Letterpress. 9^ x 5^. 
Copies Located. NYPL. NYHS. HSP. 

Synopsis. There were present Governor George Clinton, Cad- 
walader Golden, Ph. Livingston, and John Rutherford of the Gov- 
ernor's council, and the Commissioners of Massachusetts and many 
others and the Indians of the Six Nations. Sir Wm. Johnson, then 
only Mr. Johnson, was there at the head of the Mohawks. The pur- 
pose of the conference was to get the Indians to espouse the side of the 
English in the war against the French. The hatchet had been given 
to them the previous year at the Albany conference and they had 
promised to try to get satisfaction from the Canadian Indians. Now, 
however, they promised to join in the war. 

This Treaty was also reprinted in Colden's 'Tive Indian Nations of Can- 
ada," London, 1747, p. 153. 

25 



TREATY 

BETWEEN THE 

P R E S I D E N T ami COUNCIL 

O F T H E 

Province of Pennsylvania, 

AND THE 

INDIANS di OHIO, 
Held at PHILADELPHIA, Nov. i^. 1747. 




PHI LA WE L P H I A: 

Printed and Sold by B. F R A N K LIN, at the New 

Piinting-Ofllce, near the Market. MDCCXLVIII. 



TREATY WITH THE OHIO INDIANS AT 
PHILADELPHIA IN NOVEMBER, 1747. 

Printed by Franklin at Philadelphia, I J 48 

Collation. Folio, pp. 8. 

Size of Letterpress. 9% x 5^. 

Copies Located. APS. CPC. D. Friend. M. NYPL. 

Synopsis. There were present at this treaty the President and 
Council and a delegation of Indians of the Six Nations from the Ohio 
country. Conrad Weiser was present as Interpreter. 

The Indians came without invitation. They informed the council 
that at the beginning of the war with France the Six Nations had been 
advised by the English Colonies to remain neutral but that after the 
French and some of their Indian allies had attacked the English settle- 
ments the Indians had been requested repeatedly to take up the 
hatchet. That the old men at Onondaga had refused to do this but 
that "at last the young Indians, the Warriors and Captains consulted 
together and resolved to take up the English hatchet against the will 
of their old people and to lay their old people aside as of no use but in 
time of Peace." This they had done and were now come to ask for 
more and better weapons with which to carry on their war. They 
also said that "When once we the young warriors engaged we put a 
great deal of fire under our kettle and the kettle boiled high and so it 
does still (meaning they carried on the war briskly) that the French- 
men's heads might soon be boiled. But when we looked about us to 
see how it was with the English kettle we saw the fire was almost out 
and that it hardly boiled at all and that no Frenchmen's heads were 
like to be in it. This truly surprises us and we are come down on 
purpose to know the reason of it. How comes it to pass that the 
English who brought us into the war will not fight themselves? This 
has not a good appearance and therefore we give you this string of 
wampum to hearten and encourage you and to desire you would put 
more fire under your kettle." 

They received a plausible answer and a small present and a promise 
of another present the following year and expressed themselves satis- 
fied. 

26 



A 



TREATY 

HELD B V 

COMMISSIONERS, 

Members of the COUNCIL of the 

Province of P E N N SY LVA N I A, 

At the Town of LANCASTERy 

With fomc Chiefs of the SIX NATIONS at OHIO, and 
others, for the Admiflion of the Twightwee Nation into the 
Alliance of his Majesty, (:Sc. in the Montli of Jul)', 1748. 




P H I LA D E L P H I A: 

Printed and Sold by B. F R A N K L 1 N, at the New 
Printing-office, near the Market. MDCCXLVIII. 



1 



TREATY AT LANCASTER BETWEEN THE 
PROVINCE OF PENNSYLVANIA AND 
SOME OF THE SIX NATIONS AND THE 
TWIGHTEES AND SHAWNESE IN JULY, 

1748. 

Printed by Franklin at Philadelphia, 1^48 

Collation. Small folio. Title and Report 2 11., pp. i to lo. Sigs. 

[C], D, E and F in twos. 
Size of Letterpress. 10x55^. 
Copies Located. D. NYPL. BM. APS. CPC. M. Friend. 

Synopsis. Some of the Six Nations came to intercede for the 
Twightees and Shawnese who asked to be taken into the friendship of 
the English. The Twightees described themselves as living on the 
river Oubache and having twenty towns and one thousand warriors. 
They were received with satisfaction and a treaty was drawn up to be 
signed by both parties. The Shawnese on the other hand were re- 
minded that part of their nation had broken the old treaty existing 
between them and they were taken on probation. 

27 



JOURNAL 

OF TT H F 

PROCEEDINGS 

OF THE 

COMMISSIONERS 

Apptiinted for Managing 

A Treaty of Peace : 

To be Began and Held at Falmouth^ in the County of 
Torn, the Twenty-fevcnth ot September^ Anno Domini 
One thoiifand fcvcn hundred and forty-nine ; 
BETWEEN 

Thomas Hutchinfon^ yohn ChoatCj Ifrael 
JVilliams^ and Jmnes Otisy Efqrsj 

Commissioned by the Honourable 

SPENCER PHIPS, Efq; 

Lieutenant-Governor.r and Commander in Chief, in 
and over His Majefty's Province of the Maffachujetts- 
Bay in New-England^ 

on the one Part ; 

AND THE 

EASTERN INDIANS 

on tlie other Part. 



BOSTON ; NEW-ENGLAND : Printed by John Draper, 
Printer to Hi^ Honour the Lieutenant-Governour and Council. 



JOURNAL OF THE TREATY MADE AT FAL- 
MOUTH IN SEPTEMBER, 1749, BETWEEN 
MASSACHUSETTS AND THE EASTERN 
INDIANS 

Printed at Boston by Draper 

Collation. Quarto, pp. 17, [i]. 

Size of Letterpress. 8J4 x 5^. 

Copies Located. LCP. HC. JCB. LC. AAS. MHS. 

Synopsis. This treaty began September 29, and ended October 17, 
1749. There were present the Commissioners of Massachusetts and 
the Norridgewoclc and Penobscot Indians. The principal matters of 
importance at this peace-making council were in relation to the captives 
that had been taken on both sides and were to be returned without 



This Treaty was reprinted in Maine Hist. Coll., iv, 145. See also Winsor 
Nar. and Crit. Hist., V, 450. 

28 



A 

JOURNAL 

OF THE 

PROCEEDINGS 

O F 

Jacob JVendell^ Samuel Watts, 
Thomas Hubbard and Chambers 
Rupl, Efq-; 

COMMISSIONERS 

appointed by the Honourable 

SPENCER PHIPS,E(q; 

Lieuteiiaiit-Governour and Commander in Chief, in and 
over His Majefty's Province of the Majfachufetts- 
Bay in New- England , 

to Treat with the feveral Tribes 
O F 

Caftem f ttt)tatt0, 

in order to Renew and Confirm 

a general PEACE. 

BOSTON in N EIF-E N G L A N D : 

Printed by 3io[)n £)rapCC, Printer to the Honourable the Lieutcnant- 
GoviRKouR and Council, i 7 52. 



JOURNAL OF THE TREATY AT ST. 
GEORGE'S IN OCTOBER, 1752, BETWEEN 
MASSACHUSETTS AND THE EASTERN 
INDIANS. 

Printed at Boston by Draper, IJS^ 

Collation. Quarto, pp. i6. Sigs. A and B in fours. 

Size of Letterpress. 7^ x 4%. 

Copies Located. LCP. N. BPL. JCB. LC. AAS. 

Synopsis. The Council began October 13 and ended October 
20th, 1752. Present the Commissioners of Massachusetts and the 
Penobscot and Norridgewock Indians. The object was to renew 
and confirm a general peace. Governor Dummer's Treaty and the 
one at Falmouth, 1 749, had been broken by the Indians and this coun- 
cil promised amends. There was much discussion about the return 
of captives taken at Swan Island and North Yarmouth. 

See Winsor Nar. and Crit. Hist., V, 450. 

-- 29 



1^{$S§i^.^^^^^^^l^^ 






TREATY, T R A I T E, 



OR. 

/^Tticles of Peace and Faendfl\ip re- 
newed, between 

Kl ExCCLLCNCV 



O U. 

Articles de la Paix et de L'Amitic 
rcnouvclle^ Entrc 

Son Excellence 



Peregrine Thomas Hopfon, Efq; Peregrine Thomas Hopfon^ Ecuyer,. 

Captain General and Governor in 
Chief, 111 and over His Majefty's 
Province of Nova-Scotia or ^cca- 
dky Vice Admiral of tlie fame, 
and Colonel of one of His Majef- 
ty's Regiments of Foot, and His 
Majedy's Council on Behalf of 
His Majedy ; 



AND 

Major Jean Bapiijle Cope, 

Chief Sachem of thcfii-^^en CLt(Mu^ 
Tribe of Mickmaci Indians, inha- 
biting the Eaftern Coaft of the 
jaid Province, and Andrew Hod- 
ley Martin^ Gabriel Martin^ and 
tranciff^eremiahy Members and 
Delegates of the faid Tribe, -for 
themJelves and their faid Tribe, 
their Heirs, and tlie Heirs of tlieir 
Heirs forever ; Begun, made and 
concluded in the Manner, Form 
and Tenor foUo\ving„ Fiz^ 



\. JJf'-^^K^f T is agreed thit the Articles of 
^ I ^ SubmifTion ami A;jrMmfnt 
^ ' ^ made at Boflon m Ntw-Iing- 
^^m land, by the Delegates of the 
Pent^COt, NerriJgwolkf and St. John's In- 
dians, in the Year 1^25, ratified and con- 
firmed by all Uk Neva'Scolia Tribes, at /tn- 

napolis 



Capitaine General ct Gouvcrneur en 
Chef, pour le Roy de la Grande- 
Bretagnty At la Province de la 
NouvelU-EcoJfe^ ou U Accadie, 
Vice Amiral de la dite Province, 
et Colonel d'un Regiment d'ln- 
fanterie, et Ic Confeil de fa Ma- 
jeftfe dans cettc Province en Fa- 
veurde fa dittc Majcll6 d'un Pare j 

ET 

Le Major yean Bapiijle Cope, 

Chef Sachem dc la Tribu CAiSe*\ iicQcn 
•'fift— » des Sauvages Mickmack^ ha- 
bitans les Cotes de TEfl de la dit- 
te Province, et Andre Hadley 
Martin^ Gabriel Martin^ et Fran- 
qois yeremicy Membres et Envoycs 
de la fufditte Tribu pour cux 
menves, leurs Heritiers ct les Hc- 
ritrers de leurs Heritiers a Jamais, 
d'une autre Parte ; le dit Traite 
commence, Fait ct conclu^ dans 
la Manicre, Forme ct Teneur qui 
fen fuivcnt, 

■1. ^^^ ^' cO convenu que les Articles 
^ /T^ de Soumidion et d' Agreement 
SS ^ fait a Billsn dans la Neimlk^ 
^V«l AngUterre, par les Sauvages 

Depute dc Tnolfiei, Narridgwolli, ct dc U 

Riviere de St, Jean, dans lAnne* tyt?. 

ratifii ct confirmcs par touted les Tr ibos dc 
^ la 



TREATY BETWEEN GOVERNOR HOPSON 
AND THE MICMAC INDIANS, IN NO- 
VEMBER, 1752. 

Printed at Halifax by John Bushnell, I J S3 

Collation. Folio, pp. 4. 

Size of Letterpress. io|4 x 6J^. 

Copies Located. NYHS. NYPL. 

Synopsis. This treaty is printed in parallel columns in English 
and French. There are eight articles. The first article renews 
former treaties. The second buries the hatchet; the third makes an 
offensive and defensive alliance; the fourth relates to hunting and 
fishing privileges and the Indian trade; the fifth and sixth relate to 
presents of food, blankets, etc., to be given annually to the Indians. 
The seventh binds the Indians to aid shipwrecked mariners and con- 
duct them to Halifax; and the eighth determines the manner of set- 
tling disputes. The Treaty was signed at Halifax, Nov. 22, 1752. 

30 







A 






1^ 


R 


E A 


T 


Y 






HELD WITH THE 







H I 


I N D I 

A T 


A N 


s, 




C A 


R L I S . 

In October, 1753 


L E, 






P H I LA D E L P H lAt 




Printed and Sold by 


B. F R A N K L 1 N, and 


D. H A L L 


at tte 


' 


l^cw-Printing-Offct, near the Market. 


MDCCLin. 





TREATY HELD IN OCTOBER, 1753, AT CAR- 
LISLE BETWEEN THE PROVINCE OF 
PENNSYLVANIA AND THE OHIO IN- 
DIANS. 

Printed at Philadelphia by Franklin, I J S3 

Collation. Folio, pp. 12. 

Size of Letterpress. 123^ x 63^. 

Copies Located. D. LCP. HSP. N. Friend. 

Synopsis. There were present for Pennsylvania, Richard Peters, 
Isaac Norris, and Benj. Franklin. The Indians represented were 
the Twightees, Shawnese, Wyandots, Delawares, and those of the 
Six Nations residing on the Ohio. The interpreters were George 
Croghan, Andrew Montour, and Conrad Weiser. 

The Indians had lately held a conference with Virginia at Win- 
chester. They came to ask for assistance against the French who 
at that time had an expedition in their country. It was this French 
expedition that Washington met later in the year. The Indians 
got a few presents and some kind words and were hurried home to 
protect their frontiers. 

31 



CONFERENCE 

Held at St. George^s in the County of Tork, 

on the Twentieth Day of September^ Anno Regni 
Regis G E O R G 1 1 Secundi, Magnce Brita?inic8 
Francite et Hibernlee^ Ficefimo Septhno, Annocjuc 
Domini, 1753. 

BETWEEN 

Sir IFilliam Pepperrell, Baronet, yacob 
Wendell^ T'homas Hubbard^ and yohn 
JFinJlow^ Efqrs; and Mr. yames Bowdoin. 

COMMISSIONERS 

Appointed by His Excellency 

m LLI AM S H I R L E r.YXo^y 

Captain General and Governour in Chief, in and over 
His Majefty's Province of the Majachufetts-Bay in 
New-England^ 

to Treat with the 

Caftttn Snuians 

of the one Part, 

and the 31nDianS of the Penobfcott Tribe 

of the other Part. 



BOsrON in N Epy-RNG L AND : 

Printed by ©aiTtuel i&neelanti, Printer to the Honourable Houfc of 

Representatives, i 7 5 3. 



A CONFERENCE HELD AT ST. GEORGE'S 
20TH SEPT., 1753, BETWEEN SIR WM. 
PEPPERRELL AND OTHERS, THE COM- 
MISSIONERS APPOINTED BY GOV. 
SHIRLEY, AND THE EASTERN INDIANS. 

Printed at Boston, 1 7 S3 

Collation. Quarto, pp. 26. 

Size of Letterpress. 7^4 x 4^. 

Copies Located. HC. N. JCB. AAS. HEH. MHS. 

Synopsis. Like most of the Eastern treaties the principal busi- 
ness of the Indians was to get lower prices for trade articles and of 
the whites to oppose the French and secure the return of captives. 
Both of these subjects were much discussed. 

See Winsor Nar. and Crit. Hist., V, 450. 

32 



/ 



JOURNAL 

O F T H E 

PROCEEDINGS 

A T 

Two CONFERENCES 

Begun to be held at Faltnouth in Cafco-Bay, in the County 
of Yorkf within the Province of the Maffachufetts-Bay 
in New-England, on the Twenty- Eighth Day of j'fe/j^ 
17 54) 

BETWEEN 

His Excellency 
fVILLI^M SHIRLET, Efq; 

Captain- General, Govemour and Commander in Chief, m 
and over the Province aforefaid, 

And the Chiefs of the 

And on the Fifth Day of July following, 
Between His faid ExcELtENcv 
and the Chiefs of the 

^Senobftot fnuians. 



B S TO N \n NE JF-E NGLAND : 

Printed by John Draper^ Printer to His Excellency tie 
GovEENouR and Council. 1754. 



JOURNAL OF TWO CONFERENCES BE- 
TWEEN GOVERNOR SHIRLEY AND THE 
NORRIDGEWOCKS AND PENOBSCOTS 
AT FALMOUTH, 1754. 

Printed at Boston by Draper, IJS4 

Collation. Folio, pp. 27. Sigs. [A] to G in twos. Sig. A has the first 
and last leaves. 
Size of Letterpress, lo^ix^}^. 
Copies Located. LCP. N. LC. HEH. 

Synopsis. The meetings were from June 28 to July 6th. The 
first meetings were with the Norridgewocks. Governor Shirley had 
come to them at their request instead of sending commissioners. He 
told them he proposed to build a fort on the Kennebec, to which the 
Indians objected. There was much talk of the various Indian depre- 
dations in the past two years and some plain language used on both 
sides. The Norridgewocks attempted to put the blame of some out- 
rages on the "Albany" Indians but Governor Shirley gave the names 
of the leaders showing them to be Eastern Indians. Things were 
made smooth as they usually were at Indian treaties and a general 
understanding arrived at. 

The Penobscots had agreed to be present but were not there when 
the Governor arrived. Fearing from a French letter that he had in- 
tercepted, and which is printed in the treaty minutes, that they were 
kept away by French influence he sent for them and they finally came 
and held a friendly council. 

The list of outrages committed by the Indians mentioned in the 
minutes and discussed include Swan Island, Sheeps-cot, Richmond, 
Brunswick, North Yarmouth, New Meadows, and others. 

See Winsor Nar. and Crit. Hist., V, 450. 

33 



An A ccouNT of 

CONFERENCES held, 

AND 

TREATIES made. 

Between Major-general 

Sir William Johnson^ Bart. 

AND 

The chief Sachems and Warriours 

OP THE 

Skaniadaradighronos^ 



Mobmoksy 
Oneidas, 
Onondi^aSg 
Cayugas, 

Tujiaroras, 
jiugBjuageys, 



CbugnutSy 

Mabickanders^ 

Sbawanefe^ 

Kanujkagos^ 

ToderigbronoSy and 

Ogbguagoes, 



Indian Nations in Ncrfb Americay 

At their Meetings on difftrent Occafions at Fort Johnfin 

in the County of Albany y in the Colony ofNrw Tor A, 

in the Yean 1755 and I756.„ 
WITH 
A Letter from the Rev. Mr. Hawlev to Sir 

William Johnsoit, written at the Defire 

of the Delaware Inoi ans. 
And a PREFACE 
Giving a (hort Accoimt of die Six Kations, fome 

Anecdotes of the Life of Sir William, and Notes 

iUufiiatiog the Whole; 

AHo tat AppEKDiY 
Containing an Account of Conferees betntreen feverat 
Qualeeis in Plntadtlphia^ and ibme of the Heads of 
the Six KaHonsy in April f 7S6* 

LOHDOfi: 

Fainted for A. Millas, in the Strand. M DCC LVL 
C ?ivx tj, 64. ] 



ACCOUNT OF CONFERENCES HELD AND 
TREATIES MADE BETWEEN SIR WM. 
JOHNSON AND VARIOUS TRIBES OF IN- 
DIANS IN THE YEAR 1756. 

Printed at London, 7/5^ 

Collation. Octavo, pp. Title verso blank i 1. pp. xii + [3] to 77. 

Size of Letterpress. 6^ x sJ/^. 

Copies Located. D. HSP. APS. N. W. JCB. LC. HEH. and others. 

Synopsis. This contains a summary of several meetings in the 
years 1.755 ^nd 1756. They relate principally to the war with the 
Delawares and Shawnese. The first conference was December 7th, 

1755, with five of the Six Nations, at which Johnson informs them of 
the depredations of the Delawares and advises them to put a stop to 
their barbarities as the Delawares are supposed to be Dependents of 
the Six Nations. 

The next account is December 26. Three tribes of the Six Nations 
who say they are looking after the River Indians and Shawnese and 
ask for a fort to protect them from the French. For some reason 
Johnson's answer to this speech was not given until 17th February, 

1756. Then follows a letter from the Rev. Gideon Hawley to Sir 
William Johnson written at the request of the messengers sent by 
the Six Nations at Johnson's request to the Delawares. The letter is 
dated Onhughquagey, December 27th, 1755. It gives the Delaware 
version of the cause of their taking up the hatchet. 

Johnson had called a general Indian Council and it began on 
February i6th, 1756, although some of the Indians had arrived before 
and speeches are given as early as February 2nd. At this conference 
all matters of importance to the Indians and English were discussed. 
Johnson tells them of the death of Braddock, congratulates them on 
the success at Lake George and warns the Six Nations that if they 
do not now exert the authority they claim over the Delawares that 
they will soon have the latter for enemies instead of friends. This 
conference extended through the whole month of February. It was 



TREATY 

Between the Government of New-Jerjeyt 

AND THE 

INDIANS, 

Inhabiting the ieveral Parts of laid Province, 

Held at 

CROSWICKS, 

In the County of 

BURLINGTON 

On Thurfday and Fruiay the ei^lah and ftintb Day of January , iys6* 




THILADELTHIA: 
Printed by WILLIAM BRADFORD, Printer to the Province of 

Nrju-Jerfey, 



attended by Rev. Dr. Ogilvie, Rev. Gideon Hawley, Captain Butler 
and others. 

The volume ends with an abstract of the conference between the 
Quakers and some of the Six Nations at the house of Israel Pemberton 
at Philadelphia in April, 1756. See No. 37. 

See also Winsor Nar. and Crit. Hist., V, 581, and 584. 

34 



TREATY BETWEEN THE GOVERNOR OF 
NEW JERSEY AND THE INDIANS OF 
THAT PROVINCE IN JANUARY, 1756, AT 
CROSSWICKS. 

Printed at Philadelphia by Wm. Bradford 

Collation. Small folio, pp. ii. Sigs. [A] to C in twos. 

Size of Letterpress. 9 x 55^. 

Copies Located. NYPL. LCP. APS. M. D. 

Synopsis. There were present the Commissioners of New Jersey 
and the Indians of four tribes, Cranberry, Pompton, Crosswick and 
South Jersey. The Conference was for the purpose of taking up the 
complaints on either side. The Indians made their most serious com- 
plaint against the sale of rum to the Indians. The Commissioners 
as usual sympathized with them and did nothing. 

35 




TREATY 



HELD WITH THE 

CATAWBA and CHEROKEE INDIANS^ 

AT THE 

Catawba-Town and Broad-River 

iN THE 

Months of February and March 1756. 

By Virtue of a Commiliion granted by the Honorable 
ROBERT DINWIDDIE, Efquire, His Majefty's 
-Lieutenant-Governor, and Commander in Chief of the Colony 
and Dominion of VIRGINIA, to the Honorable 
Peter Randolph and William Byrd, Efquires, Members of 
His Majefty's Council of the faid Colony. 

Publijhed by Order of the GOVERNOR. 




"WILLIAMSBURG: Printed by W. Hunter. M,dcc,lvi. 



TREATY HELD IN FEBRUARY AND MARCH, 
1756, BETWEEN THE GOVERNOR OF 
VIRGINIA AND THE CATAWBA AND 
CHEROKEE INDIANS. 

Printed at Williamsburg by W . Hunter, IJS^ 

Collation. Quarto, pp. xiv, 25. Sigs. A in two, B-E in fours, F in two. 
Size of Letterpress. ^Yz x 55^. 
Copies Seen. BA. NYHS. 

Synopsis. The treaty with the Catawbas was held at Catawba 
town, February 20 and 21, 1756, and that with the Cherokees, March 
13 to 17, 1756, at Broad River. To both tribes Governor Dunwiddie 
sent speeches by his Commissioners Peter Randolph and William Byrd. 
The speeches are printed. The Indians are reproached for some 
perfidious actions but a treaty is made by which both tribes are to 
fight against the French. 

36 



SEVERAL 

CONFERENCES 

Between fome of the principal PEOPLE amongd the 

(QUAKERS 

T E N N S r LVA N lA 

AND THE 

DEPUTIES 

FROM THE 

^7X INDIAN NATIONS, 
In Alliance with Britain; 

In order to recbim their Brethren the Delaware 
Indians from their DefeilioHf and put a Stop to their 
Barbarities and tioftiiitles. 

To which is pr fijt*d 
(As introJudlory to the faid Conferences) 

Two ADDRESSES from the faid QUAKERSs 

one iQ the Lieutenant-Governor, and the other to the 
Gencril'Afikmbly of the Province of Pennfylvania ; as alfo 
the Lieutenant-Governor's DECLARATION of WAR 
againd the faid Dela-yjarc JndiUnSf and their Adherents, 

NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE: 

FriflCed by I. Thompson and Companv. 
M D c c L V I. 



CONFERENCES BETWEEN SOME QUAKERS 
AND SOME OF THE SIX NATIONS. IN 
APRIL, 1756, AT PHILADELPHIA. 

Printed at Newcastle upon Tyne in IJS^ 

Collation. Octavo, pp. 28. 

Size of Letterpress, 6^ x 3%6. 

Copies Located. D. BPL. JCB. and others. 

Synopsis. Although this is not an official treaty it deserves mention 
as an attempt to mediate between the Delawares who were on the 
warpath and the Province of Pennsylvania which had just declared 
war on them. The conference took place at the house of Israel 
Pemberton on the 19th, 21st and 23rd, Fourth Month. There 
were present on the 21st, twenty Quakers, seven Indians and some In- 
dian women and Conrad Weiser, Daniel Claus and Andrew Mon- 
tour as Interpreters. 

The Quakers reminded the Indians of the peaceful conduct of 
their forefathers and assured them of their good feeling and asked the 
Indians to find some way to reach the Delawares and persuade them 
to make peace. The Indians replied that they were glad to know 
that there wxre some people left with peaceful principles. "We 
thought that the people of that profession were all dead or buried in 
the bushes or in the ashes." They promised to send messengers to 
the Delawares but advised the Quakers that it would be dangerous 
for any of them to attempt to go. 

An account of this conference is also given in the Account of Con- 
ferences with Sir Wm. Johnson printed in London the same year. 
See No. 34. 

The volume also contains addresses to the Lt. Governor and the 
General Assembly with the Lt. Governor's answer and the Proclama- 
tion declaring war on the Delawares. 

37 



TREATY 

WITH THE 

Shawanefe and Delaware Indians^ 

Living on and nedr the Sufquehanna River. 
NEGOTIATED 

At FoRt-Johnson, in the County of Albany^ 

i N 

The Province of N E W - Y O R K, 

By the Honourable 

Sir William Johnson^ Baronet, 

His Majefiy'i Sole Agent, and Soperintendant of the Affairs of the Sir 
Confederate Nations of Indians, their Allies and Dependents. 

(Publijkedjrom the frlgind Records,) 
By Order of His Excellency the Right Honotuable 

JOHN Earl of LOUDOUN, 

CommuMler in Chief of all His Majefty's Forcet in Ntrtb-4intn{a, ke. 5cc. 

WITH 

A PREFACE. 

EXPLAINING 

The Rise and Progrzss of the laid TREATY. 



N E H^ - r R K: _ 

Printed and Sold by J. Parker and fT. fFeyman, at the Nev-Printsng' 

Office in Bcaver-ftreet. Mdcclvii. 



TREATY WITH THE DELAWARES AND 
SHAWNESE AT FT. JOHNSON IN JULY, 

1756. 

Printed at New York by Parker & Weyman, IJ S7 

Collation. Folio, pp. 10. 

Size of Letterpress. io>^ x lY^. 

Copies Located. HSP. HC. HLE. 

Synop.sis, The Preface gives a good summary of Indian affairs 
for 1755 and 1756, Johnson had held a treaty in February with the 
Six Nations and asked them to remonstrate with the Delawares and 
Shawnese who were devastating the frontiers of Pennsylvania. The 
messengers sent by the Six Nations to these two tribes returned in 
April with a belt asking Sir William to meet them at Onondaga in 
May or June at a great Council of the Six Nations. Johnson went 
to Onondaga in June, but the Delawares and Shawnese did not ap- 
pear until the Council Fire had been covered, so he invited them to 
meet him at Ft. Johnson and this folio records the treaty so held. 

Sir William as usual was very frank in his speech about the perfidy 
of the Shawnese and Delawares, but told them he was willing to be- 
lieve they were bewitched by the French. If they had real grievances 
he was willing to remove them and if they were willing to cease their 
depredations he was ready to make a peace. To this the "Delaware 
King or Chief" [probably Teedyuscung] replied he would inform his 
people on his return home of what had been said and send an 
answer. At this Sir William called a meeting of the few chiefs of the 
Six Nations and told them what he intended to say to the Delawares 
and asked them to second it. They in turn gave the Delawares a 
scolding so that the next day the Delaware chief promised to keep 
his people at Tioga quiet but said he had no control of the Delawares 
who lived near the French at Ft. Duquesne. 

An interesting episode at this treaty was the receipt during the 
council of the king's patent creating Johnson a baronet and appoint- 
ing him sole agent of Indian affairs. He showed and explained the 
patent to the Indians. A Seneca Chief made a congratulatory 
speech and Sir William furnished a "tub of punch." 

38 



M 



N U T E S 



O P 



CONFERENCES, 



HELD WITH THE 



INDIANS, at EASTON, 

In the Months of July and November ^ 1756* 



TOGETHER WITH 



Two MESSAGES fent by the Government to the 

Indians redding on Safquebanriah ; and the REPORT of the Com- 
mittee appointed by the Assembly to attend the GO VERNOR at 
the laft of the faid Conferences. 




PHI LAD E LP H lA- 

Printed and Sold by B. F R A N K L I N, and D HALL, at the 

New-Printmg-Office^ near the Market. MPCCLVII. 



MINUTES OF CONFERENCES AT EASTON 
IN JULY AND NOVEMBER, 1756. 

Printed at Philadelphia by Franklin, I J 57 

Collation. Folio, pp. 32. 

Size of Letterpress. 12^ x 6^. 

Copies Located. HSP. APS. CPC, JCB. 

Synopsis. This is a record of two conferences and two messages 
to the Indians in an attempt to stop the Indian depredations on the 
frontiers. The first message refers to the conference in February at 
Ft. Johnson and the one at the home of Israel Pemberton in April 
and is dated Phila. April, 1756. The Governor sends a message to 
the Delawares and Shawnese on the Susquehanna by some of the 
Indians who were at Pemberton's. He offers peace if they give 
up their captives. 

The second item in the book is the account of a conference at Easton 
beginning July 28, 1756, with Teedyuscung and fourteen other Dela- 
wares. In his speech the Governor recounts the causes of the trouble 
with the Delawares and Shawnese in great detail and Teedyuscung 
promised to do all the English asked. The account shows something 
of the amount of wampum required for a treaty. 

The third part of the book is a council at Easton beginning Novem- 
ber 8th, with the Delawares and Shawnese. Teedyuscung is again 
in the lime-light quibbling on his old grievance about land. Captain 
Newcastle, one of the Sachems of the Six Nations who attended the 
conference in July, had died in the meantime. 

39 



MINUTES 



O F 



CONFERENCES, 



HELD WITH THE 



INDIANS, 

At Harris's Ferry, and at Lancaster, 



In March, April, 2sA May, 1757. 




PHILADELPHIA', 

Printed and Sold by B P R A N K L I N, and D. H A L L, &t the 
Nm-Printiti^Officiy near the Market. MDCCLVa 



TREATY HELD IN MARCH, APRIL AND 
MAY, 1757, BETWEEN GEORGE CRO- 
GHAN REPRESENTING SIR WM. JOHN- 
SON, AND THE INDIANS AT HARRIS 
FERRY AND LANCASTER. 

Printed at Philadelphia by Franklin, 1757 

Collation. Large folio, pp. 22. Sigs. [A] to F in twos. 

Size of Letterpress. 12^/2 x 6^. 

Copies Located. NYPL. LCP. HSP. APS. CPC. N. P. M. LC. D. Friend. 

Synopsis. These minutes cover two distinct conferences ; the first 
was held at the house of John Harris in April with George 
Croghan alone of the whites and the second in May at Lancaster at 
which Governor Denny attended with a large following. At both 
places there were deputies from all of the Six Nations and also from 
the Delawares, Nanticokes and Conestogas. The printed account 
is George Croghan's report to Sir Wm. Johnson of the Minutes 
kept at the conferences. There is also a report of Conrad Weiser of 
a journey to Shamokin in April, 1743, on the affairs of Virginia and 
Maryland. 

It was expected that Teedyuscung and his Delaware followers 
would come to the treaty to settle the complaints he had made the 
previous year at Easton but although the Indians waited more than 
a month for him he did not come. He sent various excuses, one of 
which was a shortage of provisions, on which the Governor sent him 
a supply but still he did not come. The Mohawks said the Dela- 
wares had sent them a haughty speech in which they said they were 
no longer subject to the Six Nations. It was evident that Teedyus- 
cung did not want to treat with the whites when the Mohawks were 
present. This appeared later in the year at the treaty at Easton. The 
conferences were of some interest and importance but the results were 
small. 

See Winsor Nar. and Crit. Hist., V, 596. 

40 



PROCEEDINGS 

AND 

TREATY 

WITH 

The Shawanefe^ Nanticokes^ and Mohikander 

INDIANS, 

Living 

At Otfwingo, on one of the Weft Branches of the 
Sufquehanna River 

NEGOTIATED 

At For/- 7oy6;^«, in the County of Albany, in the Province 

of N E W -r R K , 

B Y 

The Honourable Sir William Jobnfon^ Bart. ^c. 

PtJBtlSHEO 
By Order of his Excellency the Right Honourable 

JOHN Earl of LOUDOUN, 

Commander in Chief of all His Majefl;'j Forces in Utrtb-Amtnta, tic. 



N E ly - r R K: 

Printed and Sold by J. Parker and W "Wevmaw, at the New Pfinting-OIRcc in 
Biavtr-Sirtett mocclvk. 



CONFERENCE WITH THE MOHICKAN- 
DERS, SHAWANESE AND NANTICOKES 
AT FT. JOHNSON, IN APRIL, 1757. 

Printed at New York by Parker & Weyman, IJSJ 

Collation. Folio, pp. 14. The signature marks are peculiar. Title, verso 
blank, i leaf; pages iii — 6, Sig. A in two; pp. 7-10, no mark; pp. 11-14, D 
in two. 

Size of Letterpress. loj/g x 5%6- 

Copies Located. HLE. LCP. HC. D. 

Synopsis. The year 1757 was exceptional for treaties with the 
Indians. At the same time that this treaty was being held at Ft. 
Johnson, George Croghan, Sir Wm. Johnson's deputy, was meeting 
the deputies of these and other Indians at Harris Ferry and Lan- 
caster. These delegates came to Ft. Johnson by an error. In the 
previous January Sir William had sent a belt to the Shawnese 
Chief for information and with a request that they would be ready 
to join the English arms if they should be called upon. The message 
was understood by them to be an invitation to a council at Ft. John- 
son and they came accordingly. Sir William was equal to the occa- 
sion and made them welcome and by his good address and diplomacy 
secured their friendship and sent them home well pleased. The 
Mohickanders gave him an interesting account of how they happened 
to be living at Otsiningo on the Susquehanna with the Shawnese 
and Nanticokes. 

The proceedings also give an account of why the Cayugas were not 
present. They had intended to come with these Indians having 
been asked by Sir William to come to Ft. Johnson but they had re- 
ceived intelligence from the Oneidas that the latter expected to be 
attacked by the French and the Cayugas were therefore holding them- 
selves ready to assist the Oneidas. 

Sabin, No. 65,759, cites a Boston edition the same year in folio but I 
have not seen it. Winsor Nar. and Crit. Hist., V, 581 and 596 refers to 
Sabin but cites no location of the Boston edition. 

41 



MINUTES 


o F 


CONFERE SCES, 


HELD WITH THE 


INDIANS, 


E A S T O JSl, 


In the Months of Ji/Vj', and Aui^ujl^ 1 75 7. 


« 


P H I LA D E L P H 1 A: 


Printed and Sold by B. FRANKLIN, and D. HALL, at the 
New-Printing-OJice, near the Market. iMDCCLVH. 



TREATY HELD IN AUGUST, 1757, AT 
EASTON BETWEEN THE PROVINCE OF 
PENNSYLVANIA AND TEEDYUSCUNG, 
KING OF THE DELAWARES, REPRE- 
SENTING TEN TRIBES OF INDIANS. 

Printed at Philadelphia by Franklin, IJ S7 

Collation. Large folio, pp. 24. Sigs. [A] to F in twos. 

Size of Letterpress. 12^ x 6^. 

Copies Located. D. LCP. HSP. APS. CPC. N. LC. HLE. Friend. 

Synopsis. There were present Governor Denny with his Council 
and many other officials and citizens, Teedyuscung and the representa- 
tives of the Ten Nations, i.e. the Six Nations with the Delawares, 
Shawnese, Nanticokes and Mohicans. George Croghan attended to 
represent Sir William Johnson and wrote the published report. 
Thomas McKee, Conrad Weiser and John Pumpshire were the In- 
terpreters. 

The Treaty was a most important one, for at it peace was made 
between the Province of Pennsylvania and the Indians that had for 
years devastated frontiers. Teedyuscung did most of the talking for 
the Indians and proved a most difficult person to negotiate with. The 
fact that the Six Nations had called the Delawares women and for- 
bidden them to sell land still rankled in his mind and he insisted on 
taking up some of the old land questions which Governor Denny 
told him had been referred by the Crown to Sir William Johnson to 
investigate and settle. He objected to going before Sir William 
whom he said he did not know though he admitted that he was the 
great friend of the Indians. Evidently he feared to meet there the 
great men of the Six Nations who would take charge of affairs and 
relegate him to a back seat. So captious was he that he was finally 
reproved by another Delaware Chief who said, "What, has not our 
brother desired you to bring us down by the hand to make Peace? 
Why don't you do it? We have been here these twenty days and have 
heard nothing but scolding and disputing about land. Settle the 
Peace and let all these disputes stand till after." The peace was 
finally declared, the Indians gave up some of the prisoners they had 
taken and promised to send in the others. 

The official deliberations began on July 25 th and ended on August 
7th. 

See Winsor Nar. and Crit. Hist., V, 596. 

42 



MESSAGE 



FROM 



Mis Excellency Francis Bernard, Erq; 

Captain General Governor and Commander in Chief of New-Jerfey, &c. 

T O 

The MINIS INK INDIjiNS. 

CONFERENCE 

In Confequence thereof. 
Held at BURLINGTON, Mgujl .the.jth and 8th, 1758. 



Province of N E fF • J E R S E r 

(L.S) By Hii Excellency FRANCIS BERNARD, Efq; Captain General. 
Governor, and Commander in Chief of his Majefly's Colony of 

New-Jerfey^ i^c 

To Tcxdeulcung, King oj the Delaware Indians, by Mofes Totamy and Ifaac 

Stelic, Meljcngen aeputedby me:. Greeting, 

WAS furprifed on my Arrival here, with Jiis Majefty's Royal Commlffion, 
as Governor of this his Province, to find, that Invafions have been lately 
niadepn the Inhabitants of this Colony, and much 31ood fhed by Indians,, 
luppofcd to be thofe of Mimjirik or Pompton, who have refided within 
this Colony, and have fome Time fince withdrawn themfelves • And as I have 
no Knowledge of any Reafon they, or any of them, have for being difcontented, 
01 offering Violence to the Inhabitants of bis Majefty's Colony under my Go- 
vernment , and no publick Complaints have been made by the Indians of 
Mtmjink or Pomptou^ formerly Inhabitants of this Colony, at any of the 
Conferences held between the Commiflioners of New-Jerfey, and the Indian. 
Inhahitants of the fame , to prevent any further Hoftilities, I hereby fend you 
this Power, to go to the Indians of Mtmjink and Pompton, formerly Inhabi- 
tants of this Colony , and in my Name, to dcfire them to defift from Hoftilities, 
and kindly to invite them to a Conference with this Colony ; and to afTurc them 
jbat they fhall be received in the moft friendly Manner, and every Endeavour 
(hall be iifed to cft.iblifli and confirm a Friendthip between the Sabjedtsof our 
Great King GEORGE, our common Father, and them, as a Thing of the 
greateft Ufe. / You are to enforce the natural AfFedlion between us and them, 
and how much it is for their Intercft to be at Peace with a People, who have 
the Means of making them happy and cafy, and have, by the Bleflings of Pro- 
vjdence, Provifions, and every NeceiTary of Life in plenty, fufBcient to fup- 
ply their Frienda in Diftrefs. 

A As 



A MESSAGE FROM HIS EXCELLENCY 
FRANCIS BERNARD, ESQ., TO THE MIN- 
ISINK INDIANS. AND A CONFERENCE 
HELD AT BURLINGTON, AUGUST THE 
7TH AND 8TH, 1758. 

Philadelphia, I'J^S 

Collation. Pp. 6. Caption title. 

Size of Letterpress. 10 x 5§^. 

Copy Located. HSP. [The Brinley copy.] 

Synopsis. The first item in this paper is a letter from Governor 
Bernard to Teedyuscung to the effect that depredations on the New 
Jersey settlers have been committed by the Minisink Indians and the 
Governor asks him to confer with that tribe and invite them to a 
conference. This letter which constitutes the "Message" is dated 
25 June, 1758. 

The conference was attended by the Governor and several members 
of the Council and the Indians with John Pumpshire as interpreter. 
After the usual formalities the Indians informed the Governor that 
they received his overtures for peace with great pleasure and sug- 
gested a council at the Forks of the Delaware where the Council Fire 
was kindled at the next full moon after that date. To this sug- 
gestion the Governor agreed. 

43 



MINUTES 



O F 



CONFERENCES, 



HELD AT 



AT, 



In OCTOBER, 1758, 



Witli the Chief Sachems and Warriors of the Mohawks^ 

Oneidwsy Qttondaects, Cajugar^ Senccas, Tufcaroras, Tuteloes, Sianiada- 
nadi^roms, confifting of the Namicokes and Gonoyu who now make oiie 
Naliori , CbugnuU^ Ddawar6St Uaamies, Maiickanders, or Mohichm ; 
Mini/inks, and fy/i^t'ttgerft or Pitwjilom. 




PIIlLAJOhELPHJA: 

Pxiatcd and Sold by B. F R A N K L I N, and D. H A L L, at the 

Nm-Print'mg-OJJice, near the Market. MDCCLVIH. 



CONFERENCE AT EASTON IN OCTOBER, 
1758, BETWEEN THE GOVERNORS OF 
PENNSYLVANIA AND NEW JERSEY 
AND INDIANS OF THE SIX NATIONS, 
DELAWARES, MINNISINKS AND MANY 
OTHER TRIBES. 

Printed at Philadelphia by Franklin, I J 5^ 

Collation. Large folio, pp. 31. Sigs. [A] to H in twos. 

Size of Letterpress. i2^x6>^. 

Copies Located. D. HSP. APS. CPC. N. P. JCB. M. LC. 

Synopsis. Present, Governors Denny and Bernard with their 
Commissioners and others. George Croghan, Deputy agent under 
Sir Wm. Johnson, 507 Indians representing fifteen tribes and Conrad 
Weiser, Henry Montour, Stephen Calvin, Isaac Stille and Moses Tit- 
tany, Interpreters. This conference was held to settle many things 
left undone at the Treaty made at Easton in 1757. At that treaty 
Teedyuscung, the Delaware chief, had been the chief man and done 
all the talking for the Indians but now the great chiefs of the 
Six Nations were present and one of the first questions they asked 
was "Who made Teedyuscung a great man and wherefore is he 
called a King?" He was careful at this Conference to call the Six 
Nations "Uncles" and they treated him with scant courtesy. He 
had promised the previous year to return all the captives he had, which 
he had not done. One of the Oneida Chiefs rebuked him saying: 
"Remember, cousin, you have made this promise in our presence. You 
did it indeed before and you ought to have performed it. It is a 
shame for one who calls himself a great man to tell Lies," with much 
more to the same effect. 

Many land matters were taken up and the government of Pennsyl- 
vania agreed to renounce its claim to part of the land, it had bought 
at Albany three years before and deed it back to the Indians. 
New Jersey also settled the claim of the Minnisinks for all the land 
they claimed in New Jersey. 



THE 

MINUTES 

TREATY 

HELD AT 

E A S T O N, in Pemifylvama, 

In Oaober, 1758. 
B Y 

The Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania, 

AND 

The Governor of New-Jersey j 

WITH 

The Chief Sachems and Warriors of the 

MOHAWKS. NANTICOKES and CONOYS. 

ONEYDOS, CHUGNUTS. 

ONONDAGAS. DELAWARES, 

CAYUGAS, UN AMIES, 

SENEGAS. MOHICKONS, 

TUSCARORAS, M I NI S INK S, and, 

TUTELOES, WAPINGS. 




Woodbridge, in Nem-Jerfey : 

Punted and Sold by James Porker, Printer lo the Government of 

Nnc-Jer/ty, 175?- 



One of the events of the Conference was the arrival of the messen- 
gers who had accompanied Christian Frederick Post on his journey 
to Ohio. They reported a message from the Ohio Indians and an 
answer was sent in return. 

This Treaty appears with the date 1759 on the title in the LCP, HLE, 
and Friends copies. 

44 



CONFERENCE AT EASTON IN OCTOBER, 

1758. 

Reprinted at Woodbridge, New Jersey, by James 
Parker J lys^ 

Collation. Folio, pp. 35. 
Size of Letterpress. 10x5^^. 
Copies Located. NYHS. NJ. 

45 



M I N U T E S ' 

O F 

CONFERENCES, 

HELD AT 

BOSTON, 

In A U G U S ty i-j6u 

\(Vith the Chief Sachems and Warriors of the 

NO NDAGOES, f CAYUGAS, 

ONEIDASy t NANTtCOKES, 

MOHICKONS, 1 DEL ATF ARES, 

rUTELOESy i CONOrS. 




PHILADELPHIA: 

Printed and Sold by B. F R A N K L I N, and D. H A L L. at tlic 
Niw-Printhig-Office, near tbc Market. MDCCLXI. 



MINUTES OF CONFERENCE IN AUGUST, 
1761, AT EASTON, WITH ONONDAGAS, 
CAYUGAS, ONEIDAS, NANTICOKES, 
MOHICANS, DELAWARES, TUTELOES 
AND CONOYS. 

Printed at Philadelphia by Franklin, Ij6l 

Collation. Folio, pp. 18. Sigs. [A] to E in twos. 

Size of Letterpress. 125^ x 6H- 

Copies Located. LCP. HSP. CPC. BPL. P. D. 

Synopsis. Present Lt. Gov. James Hamilton and others with 
representatives of the eight tribes to the amount of nearly 500. 
Samuel Weiser, James Sherlock, Joseph Pepy, Interpreters. The con- 
ference began August 3rd and ended August 12th. The business of 
the treaty consisted largely of questions about law and captives. 
Teedyuscung was there again trying to open up questions that he 
himself had settled at previous treaties. The question of the settle- 
ment made by the Connecticut claimants at Wyoming was discussed. 
The Indians were requested to annul the sale of any lands they had 
sold to Connecticut settlers. The Cayugas said they had given to 
Sir Wm, Johnson all the white captives of their tribe, but the Dela- 
wares and others had not complied with their promise made at Easton 
in 1758 to do so. 

46 



MINUTES 



o I 



CONFERENCES, 



HELD AT 



LANCASTER, 



In AUGUST, i-j6z. 



With the Sachems and Warriors of feveral Tribes of 



Northern and JVeftern INDIANS. 




PHILADELPHIA: 

Printed and Sold by B. F R A N K L I N, and D. H A L L, at the 
NewPrinting-Office, near the Market. MDCCLXIII. 



MINUTES OF CONFERENCES AT LANCAS- 
TER IN AUGUST, 1762, WITH NORTHERN 
AND WESTERN INDIANS. 

Printed at Philadelphia by Franklin, Ijdj 

Collation. Folio, pp. 36. Sigs. [A] to G in twos. 

Size of Letterpress. 12^x6^/2. 

Copies Located. LCP. HSP. APS. CPC. P. HEH. D. Friend. 

Synopsis. The conference began August 1 1 th and ended August 
28th. Present Lt. Gov. James Hamilton and others with repre- 
sentatives of the Delawares, Shawnese, Twightees, Wawachtanies, 
Tuscaroras and Kickapos. Isaac Stille and Frederick Post Inter- 
preters. These were all from the Ohio country or the West. On 
the 14th representatives of the Senecas, Onondagas, Cayugas, Oneidas 
and Conoys attended. The affairs of this conference were most 
interesting from the fact that many captives were brought to the 
meeting to be given up and as the names of these captives are given 
as well as their captors and the localities where they were taken, the 
printed minutes take on an interest that is lacking in some printed 
treaties. 

The Connecticut claims to land at Wyoming were discussed and 
the Indians said that Connecticut had paid some Indians $2,000.00 
for this land but that the sale had never been discussed in the Councils 
of the Six Nations and was therefore void. 

Teedyuscung was again in evidence and his affairs were finally 
disposed of. 

47 



JOURNAL 



OF THE 



CONGRESS 



OF THE FOUR 



SOUTHERN GOVERNORS, 



AND T H fj 



SUPERINTENDENT OF THAT DISTRICT, 



WITH THE. 



FIVE NATIONS OF INDIANS, 

AT AUGUSTA, 1 763. 



SOUTHiCAROLIN A.- 
CHARLES-TOWN: PmNTiD BY PETER TIMOTHY, M.BCc.ixr-r. 



JOURNAL OF THE CONGRESS OF THE FOUR 
SOUTHERN GOVERNORS . . . WITH 
THE FIVE [SOUTHERN] NATIONS OF 
INDIANS AT AUGUSTA IN NOVEMBER, 

1763. 

Collation. Folio, pp. [4] + 3 to 45. 
Size OF Letterpress. 11^x5^. 
Copy Located. W. J. DeRenne. 

Synopsis. The first twenty-one pages are taken up with the cor- 
respondence and deliberations over the place of holding the treaty, 
Augusta being finally determined upon. The Congress was finally 
opened November 5 with Governors Wright of Georgia, Boone of 
South Carolina, Dobbs of North Carolina, and Lt. Gov. Fauquier 
and Superintendent John Stuart representing the Southern Colonies 
and about 700 Indians of the Cherokees, Choctaws, Chickasaws, 
Creeks and Catawbas. The Interpreters were John Butler, James 
Beamer, John Watts, James Colbert, Stephen Forrest and John 
Proctor. Governor Wright opened the conference and made Super- 
intendent Stuart spokesman for the whites. The minutes of the pro- 
ceedings and reports of the various speeches occupy pages 21 to 38, 
in which much friendship is professed on both sides, one Indian say- 
ing they were "as good friends as if they had sucked one breast." 
He thought the Traders made all the trouble and thought theirs 
number should be limited to two. 

Pages 38-41 record the Treaty agreed upon. The white people 
were to be secure. The Indians forgiven past offenses. They were 
to live together as one people. The Traders were to be protected. 
Justice was to rule and all murderers were to be executed. And the 
Boundaries occupied by the various tribes and the Whites were de- 
fined. The remaindc. is devoted to correspondence about the treaty 
in which is expressed distrust in the good faith of the Creeks, Fifty 
copies of the Treaty were ordered printed. The Conference was a 
very important one and the foregoing gives no idea of the details of 
the grievances of both sides that were discussed. 

48 



E W 



OF THE 



TITLE 



TO 



I N D I ^ N y4, 

A TRACT OF COUNTRY 



O N THE 



RIVER OHIO 



CONTA INING 

Indian Conferences zx.'Jihnfon-Hall, in May, 1765 — the 
Deed of the Six Nations to the Proprietors of Indiana— the 
Minutes of the Congrefs at Fort Stanivix^ in OSfober and 
Novemhir^ 1768— the Deed of the Indians, fettling the 
Boundary Line between the Englifh and Indians Lands — 
and the Opinion of Counfel on the Title of the Pro- 
prietors of Indiana. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

Printed by S T Y N E R and C I S T, in Second- 
Jlreet^ near Arch-Jlrcei. m dcc lxxvj. 



VIEW OF THE TITLE TO INDIANA 

Printed at Philadelphia, IJjO 

Collation. Octavo, pp. 4.6. 
Size of Letterpress. 

Copies Located. LC. HEH. AAS. H. R. Wagner. 

It is said that it was also issued without imprint and date but I have not 
seen such a copy. 

Synopsis. In the spring of 1763, a number of Traders were 
plundered by the Shawnese, Delawares and others of the Ohio River 
Indians of goods and furs to the value as was claimed of £80,000. 
They represented their case to Sir Wm. Johnson, who laid it before 
the Indians at the councils held at Ft. Johnson in 1765 and 1768. 
At the latter the Indians agreed to give the traders a tract of land 
south of the Ohio, and bordering on it and on the Monongahela 
in payment. This grant by the Indians was not confirmed by the 
King in 1770 when he ratified the treaty of 1768 establishing a 
boundary line but the case was reserved for later consideration. 

To more effectually prosecute their claims the traders gave power 
of attorney to William Trent and during the negotiations and lobby- 
ing necessary in London to get it allowed it became known as the 
"Case of Wm. Trent." 

Probably the first publication to contain these treaties is the "Case." 
It is a quarto lO^^ inches by 8^4 with 8 pp. giving a resume of the 
traders' case, and 24 pp. of Appendix which prints the Minutes 
of the two treaties and the Indians deeds. This quarto I have seen 
only in the New York Public Library, and that copy shows no evi- 
dence of ever having had a title page; the only title is the caption to 
the first leaf, case. It was probably printed in London about 1770. 
The Appendix of the "Case" is the same as the "View of the Title to 
Indiana" except that in the latter the legal opinions of Dagge and 
others have been added. 

This same subject is discussed in "Report of the Lords Commis- 
sioners for Trade and Plantations on the Petition . . . for a Grant 
of Land on the River Ohio," etc. Lond. 1772. The treaties were 
again reprinted in "Plain Facts: being an Examination into the 



MINUTES 



OF 



CONFER ENCES, 

HELD AT 

F R T ' P I T r^ 

In APRIL AND M A V, 1768, 
UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 

GEORGE C/^OGZ/^A; Efquire, 

Deputy Agent for 7 ;VZ)/^;V AFFAIRS, 
WITH THE 

CHIEFS and WARRIORS 

OF THE 

Oho and other IVeftern INDIAN S, 




PHILADELPHIA: 

Printed and 5oId by WILLIAM GODDARD, at the Nev, Prmt.ng- 
Ofjicz, in MarUt-Streit. 



Rights of the Indian Nations of America to their respective Coun- 
tries," etc. Phila. 1781, said to be by Samuel Wharton. Wharton 
and Franklin were both interested in pressing the Claim at London 
and it is not improbable that some of the tracts relating to it were 
written by them. The whole case became a great land scheme which 
was finally combined with others and was known then as The 
"Walpole Company." 

49 



MINUTES OF CONFERENCE AT FT. PITT 
IN APPvIL AND MAY, 1768. 

Printed at Philadelphia by Hall, IJOq 

Collation. Folio, pp. 22. Sigs. [A] to F in twos. 
Size of Letterpress. 12^ x 6^. 
Copies Located. LCP. HSP. 

Synopsis. This conference was between George Croghan, Deputy 
Agent for Indian Affairs, and Indians of the Six Nations, Delawares, 
Shawnese, Munseys and Mohicans. Over iioo Indians attended. 
Henry Montour was Interpreter. 

The murders of Indians and whites was the first business and a 
list of them is given. A Shawnese Chief accused the whites of hold- 
ing forts in the Ohio country against the wishes of the Indians but 
he was reproved by a speaker of the Six Nations who said that it was 
agreed that when the French were driven out the English should 
hold their forts. The alleged treaty of Col. Bradstreet with the 
Indians in 1764 was produced to confound the Shawnese in their 
contention. 

One of the interesting cases considered was a settlement made at 
Redstone Creek by some Pennsylvanians. They were ordered to 
leave by the Governor but the Indians objected and asked them to 
remain. 

50