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Full text of "Biennial report, Wake County Public Schools"

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:port [OF 


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Wake 


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Board 


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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 
State Library of North Carolina 



http://www.archive.org/details/biennialreportwaOOwake 



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Biennial Report WAKE COUNTY 
PUBLIC SCHOOLS.: .: .: .: .: 



" It is the duty of the 
State to make the most 
of every child born in 
it."— E. E. Halk 



"The object of the 
common school system 
is to give to every child 
a free, straight, solid 
pathway, by which he 
can walk directly up 
from the ignorance of 
an infant to a knowledge 
of the primary duties of a 
man."— Horace Mann 




ZEB V. JUDD 

Superintendent 



Sentinels op the School Path 




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|4orth ilarolina State Library 
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BIENNIAL 

REPORT 

Waiit Count? public 
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ZEB V. JUDD 
Superintendent 




BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1905-07 



Thomas Johns, Chairman 
J. L Foster b. S. Franklin 



Page Tzvo 




BO MtD OF EDrJCATION, lii07-'0!1 

J. D. Ai^i.EN, Chairman 

L. J, Sears E M. RoLLr^fs 



Pase Three 




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Pas^e Foi 



people of Wakt Countp: 

I came into your service two years ago for the second time, hav- 
ing several years previously taught two terms in a little school- 
house in Holly Springs 
Township. I came with 
that deep interest in the 
county that can best come 
from one who has grown to 
manhood within its borders, 
and with that understand- 
ing of people and country 
life that can only come from 
one who has shared many 
of the same experiences. 

The call to the superin- 
tendency came unexpected 
and unsought but it seemed 
a direct and an urgent call. 
With clear vision of the 
field and of the need of the 
children, and with faith that 
the people of the county 
were ready for much under- 
taking if only the way were 
presented to them, I took 
up the work. 

This faith has been more 
than justified. You have 
rallied to the schools and 
have developed a wide- 
spread interest that has 
leaped into achievement 
with surprising rapidity. The returns from our united efforts 
during these first two years have been even larger than one might 
have hoped for. Your generous gifts for buildings ; your willing- 
ness to assume additional taxation ; the valuable assistance given 
by women ; in brief, your cordial support of every effort to build 
up the schools of the county indicates strong purpose on your part 
to give your children every possible educational advantage. 

This report is to show to you that your material prosperity — 
for Wake is a wealthy county — is expressing itself along upward 

Page Five 




Zeb V. JuDD, Superintendent 
1905-'07 
1907 -'09 



lines; and to emphasize the fact that "Property, being dependent 
on education, can afford to pay to make education universal." 

The retiring Board of Education has done a great work for this 
county. Their labors, as public officers, can not be too highly 
valued, for each of them gave his service at a sacrifice of time and 
money. The progress made during their administration, as shown 
by this report, brings them the satisfaction of having wrought 
well. 

The members of the present Board in assuming their office have 
outkned an intelligent and progressive policy, and there is every 
reason to believe that under their management the schools will 
continue to improve. 

I wish you to know that we are deeply indebted for assistance 
in every phase of our work to State Superintendent J- Y. Joyner 
and to his assistants in the State Department of Education. I 
am sure you will join me in cordially extending thanks to them, 
and to The News and Observer, The Raleigh Bvening Times, The 
Woman's Betterment Association, The Woman's Club of Raleigh, 
and to the many other agencies that have contributed to our suc- 
cess. I wish personally to express my very deep sense of grati- 
tude to the men and women who have so generously given time 
and worthy service to our cause. 

And now a personal word to the teachers : I here express to 
you, fellow-workers, my appreciation of the devoted, conscientious 
service you have given the schools of this county. I now repeat 
what I have so often said, that I have never seen a more faithful 
and earnest band of workers. No true history of our great county 
can ever be written without a prominent place being given to your 
labors. 

As we enter upon the duties of the new school year. I can only 
bespeak the same unselfish giving of yourselves in that earnest, 
persistent effort to upbuild our schools that has characterized 
your services in the past. Some one has said. "No one has come 
to true greatness who has not felt, in some degree, that his life 
belongs to his race and that what God gives him, is given for man- 
kind." May not this be the motto of each of us : "I will leave my 
country not less, but greater and more powerful than she was when 
committed to me." 

Faithfully yours, 

Zeb V. JUDD. 



Pas;e Six 



QTfte Campaign for Cbucation 

From the beginning of the present administration, it was evi- 
dent that the greatest need of the Wake County schools was an 
intelHgent, careful presentation of the claims of education. Men 
and women everywhere were anxious to hear discussions of the ad- 
vantages to be gained through definite, systematic training of the 
young — training, not merely of the intellect, but in all the virtues 
that go to make up character. Just as the pastor preaches to his 




Zebulon, June, 1908 



flock the gospel of spiritual salvation, so those who are entrusted 
with our schools must preach to all the people the gospel of edu- 
cation. 

To this end no efifort has been spared to respond to all calls for 
discuss-on of the different phases of education. Wherever there 
have been the first signs of an awakening, efifort has been made to 
deepen these feelings, and there labor has been concentrated. 
There has been a campaign for education going on in the county 
almost continuously during these two years. Sometimes, the 
particular object in view was creating sentiment for local taxation; 
sometimes it was raising funds for building; while, again, it was 
quickening the interest of the people in the general cause of edu- 
cation, and making them catch the spirit of iHorace Mann when 

Pas[e Seven 




LiTTJ^E River No. 2, April 6. I'JOG 




The Turner Schooi,, May 190() 



Page Bight 



he exclaimed, "I would much sooner surrender a portion of the 
territory of the commonwealth to an ambitious and aggressive 
neighbor than I would surrender the minds of its children to the 
domain of ignorance." 

Among those who have rendered valuable aid in this campaign 
are State Superintendent J- Y. Joyner, Governor R. B. Glenn, 
Mr. R. D. W. Connor, State Treasurer B. R. Lacy, Superinten- 
dent John E. Ray, Prof. J. B. Carlyle, Superintendent R. B. White, 
Dr. Charles D. Mclver, Dr. C. Alphonso Smith, and Dr. S. C. 
Mitchell of Richmond. 

Special mention should be made of the interest shown in public 
education by the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 
On various occasions the Capital City Council has sent out strong, 
able speakers, and the councils of the county have presented to 
the schools not less than a dozen flaes and Bibles. 



"The child is the great asset of society; it is the invested capital that a 
generation bequeaths to humanity; it is the working capital that builds for 
prosperity. The public school is the great exchange to which this capital 
is placed, and whatsoever force withdraws its contribution, or fails to meet 
at the exchange, or tends in any way to wrap the social asset in a napkin 
of ignorance and withdraw it from the great circulating medium of intelli- 
gence is an enemy to society and more to be dreaded than all the political 
evils that engross the attention of the nation." 

E. C. Brooks, 
Department of Education, Trinity College. 

"The blessings enjoyed by us to-day have not been wrought out by our own 
efforts, but have been given to us by the self-sacrifice and devotion of our 
forefathers. It is our duty, therefore, to make the life of the next genera- 
tion as large as possible. Without public education this can not be accom- 
plished." President J. I. Foust, 

State Normal and Industrial College, North Carolina. 



Page Nine 




Thk Old Apex Building 







The New Apex Building 



PaiTC Ten 



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tKljc I.ocal trax jHobcment 

For a number of years the census report of North CaroHna 
showed a greater percentage of illiteracy than any other State in 
the Union except one. It was North Carolina's educational Gov- 
ernor, Hon. Charles B. Aycock, who said, "Thank God for South 
Carolina !" This condition of illiteracy was caused in large meas- 
ure by the fact that so small an amount of money was available 
for school purposes, and that this had to be divided between the 
races. The great multiplicity of small schools further increased 
the difficulties of the problem. 

North Carolina expends annually $2.63 for each child of school 
age. Wake County had last year a per capita of $3.00. Massa- 
chusetts spends on the education of every child within her borders, 
between the ages of five and eighteen, $26.42 a year. It is worthy 
of note that of this amount 96.57 per cent is raised by local tax- 
ation. 

In North Carolina the first local tax to supplement public school 
funds was voted in 1875 at Greensboro. June 30, 1905, there were 
more than four hundred local tax districts in this State, of which 
number all but 65 were in the rural districts. 

Raleigh, the capital of the State and the county seat of Wake, 
voted a school tax in 1877; and, with this exception, there was not 
a single local tax district in Wake County at the beginning of the 
present administration, July 4, 1905. 

November 6, 1905, the freeholders of District No. 2, White Oak 
Township, commonly known as the Jenks School, made application 
to the County Board of Commissioners for an election to ascertain 
the will of the people as to whether there should be levied a special 
annual tax of not more than thirty cents on the one hundred dol- 
lars valuation of property and ninety cents on the poll, to supple- 
ment the public school funds. The election was held on the 15th 
of December ; and after a strong, persistent fight, it was carried by 
a majority of 24 votes. 

Before June 30, 1906, elections had been carried at Fuquay 
Springs by a majority of 27 ; at Wendell by 27 ; and at Wakefield 
by 35. Elections had also been held at Rolesville, Holly Springs, 
Salem, the Patrick School, and Apex, all of which were lost by 
large majorities. 

In the following August, the Pearce School (Wake Forest No. 
6) held an election with the following result: 20 ballots "For 

Page Eleven 






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Special Tax" and 4 "Against Special Tax." In September Salem 
laid off a new district and called a second election, which carried 
with only one vote cast against the special tax. On May 7, 1907, 
Holly Springs and the Patrick School, both of which had failed 
the previous year, carried elections with only 18 and 2 votes, 
respectively, cast against the tax. 

Pa^e Tivelve 




:Wil^ 




FuQUAY Sinkings 

On the same day, Cary and Zebulon voted on a special tax. At 
Cary, out of a registration of 102 names, only two votes were cast 

against the tax. At Zebu- 
lon the election carried 
unanimously. 

On the 28th of May, 
Apex held an election on a 
special tax with the result 
that only nine votes out of 
one hundred and forty-two 
registered were cast 
"Against Special Tax." On 
the same day elections were 
lost at Wilbon and at Ca- 
tawba Springs. 

During the past two years 
a special tax to supplement the public school fund has been voted 
in eleven districts. In all but two the maximum rate will be 
levied. The receipts from this source for i907-'o8, according to 
reports made to the office of the Register of Deeds, will be $6,- 
915.11. 

Wherever a local tax has been voted, marked improvement has 
been noticed. There is a healthier school spirit and greater enthu- 
siasm for education. Better houses have been built; a larger 
number of well-trained teachers has been employed, at increased 
salaries ranging from $40.00 to $95.00, for terms averaging more 
than eight months. 

Pa^e Thirteen 



The Old Patrick School 

The new building is similar in appearance 

to that of White Oak No. 2 



The idea grows. In White Oak Township, where there are 
seven school districts, the first local tax in Wake County outside of 
Raleigh Township, was voted December 15, 1905. Within eigh- 
teen months of this date, three neighboring districts in this 
township carried elections for a special tax by overwhelming 




Holly Springs High .School 



majorities. While this report is being written news comes that 
two other d'stricts in this township have voted a special school tax, 
one of which did not register an opposing vote.* A seventh dis- 
trict lies along the county line, and is small in area and in popula- 
tion. It is seeking to effect a consol dation with an adjoining 
district in Chatham County. I am told by reliable citizens that as 
soon as this shall have been done, this district, too, will fall into 
line. 



* St Veil riistricls in < ttior parts of the pi>unty have sent in election rplnrns show- 
i-'etrn.xl nijij.iiiies i..r tilt- i:i.k iiiiikiiig a total of eighteen local tax disi rids for the 
C"Unt.v, exclusive of Raleigh. 

PaiTC Fourteen 



Consolibation 



Throughout the entire county our people are beginning to 
recognize the importance of introducing the grade system into 
the schools. As long as the schools are ungraded a large number 
of classes will be necessary ; and, as a matter of course, very little 
time can be devoted to each class. Where there are advanced 
studies, so much time is consumed with them that the primary 
studies are frequently neglected. It has often occurred that the 

lower classes have recited 
not more than three times a 
day. 

In view of these facts, 
the General Assembly of 
1905 enacted a law that in 
schools where only one 
teacher is employed, the 
high school branches shall 
not be taught. Th's has 
caused much dissatisfaction, 
as thereby many of the 
brighter and more ambi- 
tious pupils are either ex- 
cluded from the schools or 
compelled to continue in 
those subjects already mas- 
tered. 

These conditions offered 
little incentive to progress 
in the publx schools ; many 
of our abler farmers sent 
their sons and daughters to 
private high schools, while others less able were forced to keep 
them on the farms. 

Further, it has been seen that the average cost to the county 
per pupil is much greater in the small schools than in the large 
ones. By an act of the General Assembly of 1901, County Boards 
of Education are required to run all the schools of any given 
township the same number of days. A just and equal distribu- 
tion of the public school moneys to the various districts provides 
so small a fund for the little districts that the committeemen are 
compelled to offer meager salaries and to accept the services of 
inferior eachers. While the County Board of Education has 

Page Fifteen 




Barton's Ckeek To\v>'.siiip 
Districts Nos. 2 and 5, Cousolidated 




Proposed Building with Floor Plan for Dlstkicts Nos. 2 and 5 
Bartou's Creek Township, Consolidated 




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Page Sixteen 




North Carolina Stare Library 
Raleigh 

fixed $35.00 as the minimum month- 
ly salary for a one-teacher school 
having a censtis of 60 pupils, the 
maximum salary allowed schools 
with less than 60 pupils is $30.00. 

The neglect of the lower grades, 
the prohihition of the high school 
studies, and the small salaries al- 
lowed have combined to make our 
people dissatisfied with the old- 
fashioned ungraded one-teacher 
school. Formerly the public school 
was an insignificant factor in the 
community's life. The people paid little attention to the teacher 
and her methods, or to the character of the school she conducted. 
Now they have become more discriminative in their judgment. 
These conditions have caused our people to seek relief through 
consolidation. 

Within the last two years fourteen small schools have been con- 
solidated. Since the writing of this report was begun, four others 
have combined and four more are before the Board for consider- 
ation. 

It might be well to call attention here to the way consolidation 
is effected. It has been the custom of the Board to take every 
precaution against unwise consolidation. x\n order for consolida- 
tion has never been passed except upon a strong majority petition 
from the people. All petitions for consolidation are held over 
one month before action is taken. In the meantime, the people 
of the districts affected are notified through their committeemen, 
and requested to appear before the Board if they know any just 
cause why the petition should not be granted. 




Schools Nos. 4 and 6 
Holly Springs Township, Consolidated 



Pao-e Seventeen 





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Pfl,o-^ Eighteen 



It might be pointed out that the action in relation to Districts 
No. 5, Barton's Creek Township, and No. 7, White Oak Town- 
ship, form exceptions to this rule for consolidation. In neither 
of these cases was any petition presented. The fact is that neither 
of the schools was consolidated with any particular school by order 




District Xo. 8, St. Maky's Township 

of the Board. The attendance at these schools became so small 
that it did not justify the employment of a teacher and the Board 
simply abolished them. 

As County Superintendent, I wish to add this word : We must 
not suffer from the dehision that all small schools should be 
abolished and that all the remaining schools be made large ones. 
In the rural districts, on account of creeks and bad roads, it will 
always be necessary to maintain a certain number of small schools. 




DisTKicT No. 2, St. Mary's Township 
These two schools were consolidated. 



Pa£e Nineteen 







School No. 5, Little River TowNsmr 

Consolidated with School No. 1. The building for the latter, which was burned, was 

not as good as the one here printed. 




Perspective of Building for Schools No. 1 and 5 
Little River Township, Consolidated 



Pase Tivcnty 




Justice School and Old Bay Leaf 
consolidated 



Justice School 



New building- completed January, 1907 
High School established July 9, 1907 




Old Bay Leak 




Bay Leaf High School 



Page Tzventy-one 





Proposed Plan for Consoliiiatkd School 
New Light Township 



Pas[c Tzooity-two 




These pictures represent two 
small schools in New Light 
township. The people are con- 
sidering the matter of consoli- 
dating them with School No. 2 
in the same township. 



Schools No. 3 and 4 
New Light Township 








These two schools, Nos. 2 and 3, 
Oak Grove township, were consoli- 
dated. For the new seiiool a build- 
ing identical with that of the Bay- 
Leaf High School is under con- 
struction. See page 21. 




Page Twenty-three 





itCftf i*^*; V 






' It mounts athwart the windy hill 
Through sallow slopes of upland bare." 



Page Tivcnty-fonr 



puiltiinB 



On July I, 1905, there were in Wake County 96 school build- 
ings for the white race, of which number JJ consisted of only one 
room. Three had cloak rooms ; not one contained a lunch cup- 
board. Many of these buildings were in bad condition, and a 
largfe number of them have since been abandoned. 




Last Log Schoolhouse 
Abandoned May 1906 



During July and August. 1905. the County Board of Education 
ordered seven schoolhouses to be built. Each of them was to be 
a one-room structure, and to contain neither cloak room nor lunch 
closet. They were to range in cost from $260.00 to $400.00. 




Withiu four nailes of the Capitol. Abandoned fall of I'JOi. 

Pa^e Tzventx-five 



Before contracts for them had l:;eeii let, all Ijut two had been 
changed to two-room plans, and cloak rooms had been added to 
some. The best honses built during- the }ear i905-'o6, however, 
cost less than nine hundred and fifty dollars. 




Old Mount Heihmon 

District No. 1, Cedar F.vtiv Tomi'-hip 

F(<r new building see Ml. Hope on page 27 




L... .. 



Oak Hill 

District No. 7, Swift Creek Town&bip 



Page Twenty-six 




Paiic Tivcntx-sci'cn 



Counting- houses ordered and in process of erection, there have 
been built since July i, 1905, 38 schoolhouses ranging in cost 
from $470.00 to $7,172.00. Three private academies have been 
bought. 

The cheapest white schoolhouse built during the vear i9o6-'o7 
was erected at a cost of $1,500.00. It has been the policy of the 
Board to paint every new house erected. 

One of the most encouraging features about the building move- 
ment is, that while formerly every dollar that went into a school- 
house was taken out of the public school fund, one-half from a 
general building fund and one-half from the district fund, now 
many of the people have become so impressed with the necessity 
of having modern, well-equipped schoolhouses that they are will- 
ing to pay a large part of the cost of construction b\' local sub- 
scription. In four districts $4,836 was thus contributed. 




M 1. ll.Ml. 

District No. 0, St. Maiy'.s Towusbip. old Ijuilding 

During the present administration there has been an effort to 
replace, as rapidly as possible, the qld inadequate buildings with 
new ones, well heated, well lighted, commodious, and well ar- 
ranged. From June 30, 1905. to June 30, 1907, tliere has been 
expended on the schools of Wake County: 

WHITE 

Buildings and sitos .$24,01.3 .71 

Eepairs and ])ainting 2,386.72 

School fuinitiue 0,722.71 

Total $32,12.5 . 14 

COLOIM-:!) 

Buildings and sites $3.19.5.69 

Eepairs and painting 1.182.24 

Total $4,377 . 93 

Total for both races $37.-503.07 

According to the report of the County Superintendent for 1904 
and 1905, the total value of school property in Wake County was 



$36,057.00. Tlie report for the year ending- June 30. 1907, shows 
the total school property of Wake County to be $85,401.69. of 
which amount $48,745.33 in school houses and furniture is 
insured. 




Tlie small building in 
the rear of this pictuie is 
a part of the old school- 
house at Garner. 

The larg'e building in 
front \va-« erected in 1906 
and was burned by light- 
ning soon aft r comple- 
tion. 




The New Building at Garner Under Construction 



Pas'e Tzi'cnt\-}iinc 





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Paet' Thirty 



Hthvaviti 



Libraries established prior to January i, 1907: 
No. Vols. 
White At Present 

Barton's Creek, No. 1 83 

No. 3 54 

Holly Spiings, No. 2 lOSf 

No. 3 (i2" 

House Creek, No. 1 11 7t 

No. (i 170 

Mark's Creek, No. 2 fl8t 

Middle Creek, No. 2A 84 

Neuse, No. 3 7(i 

New Light, No. 6 84 

Oak Grove, No. 2B 40* 



No. Vols. 
White At Present 

Panther Branch.No. 1 46 

No. 5B 57 

No. 1 48t 

No. 5A 105 

No. 6 72 

No. 1 <J8 

No. 4 72 

No. 7 84 

No. 1 1 30* 

No. 8 86 

No. 9 120t 



St. Mary's, 



St. Matthew's, 
Swift Creek, 

Wake Forest, 
White Oak, 



Supplementary library secured prior to January 1, 1907: 

No. Vols, at Present 
St. Mary's, No. 1 36 



Libraries established since January i, 1907: 
No. Vols. 
At Present 

No. 1 85 

No. 1 83 

No. 4 85 



White 
Buckhorn, 
Cedar Fork, 
Holly Springs, 
House Creek, 
Little River, 



White 
Panther Branch, No. 2 
St. Matthew's, 



No. 
At P> 



No. 2 . . 
No. lA 
No. 2 . . 



Mark's Creek, 
Middle Creek, 
Neuse, 
New Light, 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



Cary High School 



88 


Swift Creek, 


63 




06 


Wake Forest, 


84 




85 


White Oak, 


350J 




108 


Negro. 


84 


Little River, 


BY PURCHASE 

ichool 



No. 


3 


No. 


5 


No. 


1 


No. 


3 


No. 


5 


No. 


6 


No. 


1 


No. 


2 


No. 


2 . . . . 



Vols. 
I sent 

85 
110 

84 

86 

85 

90 

79 
332 

95 

84 



500 



Supplementary libraries established since January i, 1907: 

Holly Springs, No. 2 36 Mark's Creek, No. 2 36 

House Creek, No. 1 36 Oak Grove, No. 2 B 40* 



*This library rei^eived no county or state aid. 

tThis number includes Supplementary Library. 

JThis includes village library recently combined with school library. 

^Eight books were added to St. Mary's No. 1 in 1907. 



Page Thirty-one 




School No. 5, Swift Creek 
Township, with drawing- and 
floor plan of proposed new 
Imildiny. 




Pai^c TJiirty-tivo 



During the past year the library movement has received marked ^ 

impetus, as will be seen from the following statement : O 

Total number of libraries in county 44 |H 

Total number supplementary libraries in county 5 

Total number of volumes in county 4,612 



Total amount for libraries and eases $1,080.20 

A special bill was passed by the last Legislature authorizing 
the Wake County Board of Education to establish, in addition to 
the regular six biennial libraries, a twenty-dollar library in any 
school that would present to the County Board of Education the 
sum of ten dollars ; further, that ten-dollar supplementary libraries' 
might be added biennially. 

From present indications it is reasonable to expect that before 
many years shall have passed, there will be a good library in 
every white school in the county. 



"It is recorded that God opened the heavens to the patriarch of old and 
showed him a ladder leading thither. This ladder is let down to every 
descendant of Adam ; it is offered to thy child. But he must be taught to 
climb it." — John Henry Pestalozzi. 

"Let it be one of the highest virtues on earth faithfully to educate the 
children of others who neglect it themselves." — Martin Luther. 

"If people or rulers neglect the education of the young, they inflict an 
injury upon both church and state; they become the enemies of God and 
man; they advance the cause of Satan, and bring down upon themselves the 
curse of Heaven." — Martin Luther. 



X 



Added since January i, 1907: ' - r^ 

Number libraries 22 > 

Number supplementary libraries 4 ;bi 

Number volumes 2 873 (/5 

Amount given since January 1, 1907: *^ 

By local contribution for libraries $210.00 t^l 

By local contribution for supplementary libraries 20.00 f^ 

By state and county — for libraries 410.00 tB 

By state and county — for supplementary libraries 40 . 00 J 

By books ( estimated value ) 221 . 70 pw 

Twenty-one library cases 178.50 "^ 



Page Thirty-three 




"If I could put my w'oods in song 
And tell wliat's there enjoyed, 
All men would to my gardens throng 
And leave the cities void " 



Page Thirty-four 



^ttenbance 



The population of Wake County is largely rural, and the occu- 
pation of its people is chiefly farming. It has an area of 950 
square miles, and consists of 19 townships. These are subdivided 
into 93 white school districts (85 rural, 8 city) and 65 colored (60 
rural, 5 city). The total population of the county (census of 
1905) is 54,626. 

Raleigh,* the only city in Wake, has a population of 23,000. 
By virtue of an act of the General Assembly the 13 schools of 
Raleigh Township are subject to the immediate control of a board 
of seven men who elect a special superintendent for them. 

Last year there were employed 287 teachers : 





White 


Colored 


Total 


Rural 

City 


115 
54 


79 
39 


194 
93 


Total 


169 


118 


287 



According: to the last school census there were in the county : 





Rural 


City 


Rural and 
Ciiy 


White and 
Colored 


Total 




White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


Rural 


City 




Boys -^^ 

Girls --_ 


3,738 
3, 392 


2,831 1.870 
2,905 1,933 


1,803 
1,772 


1 
5,608 4,634 
5,325 4,677 


1 
6,569 3,673 
6,297 3,705 


10, 242 

10, 002 


Total- 


7, 130 5, 736 3, 803 


3, 575 


10,933 9,311 

1 


12,866 ,7,378 20,244 
1 ' 1 



Of the above number there were 


enrolled during the last year : 




Rural 


City 


Rural and 
Ciiy 


White and 
Colored 


Total 




White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


Rural City 




Bovs 


9 F^m 


1 937 










4,530 L-- - 




Girls ''?' ^f^'^ 


2 319 


1 


4 702 




Total- 










9,232 2,399 

1 




4,976 


4,256 1,542 


857 


6, 518 


5, 113 


11,631 



*As extended by act of the General Assembly of 1907. 



Page Thirty -five 



On an average there were present in the schools every day of 
the term : 





Rural 


City 


Riir<l and 
Cily 


White and 
Colored 


Total 




White 


Coloied 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


Rural 


City 




Bovs 


1,390 
1.292 


925 

1,156 










2. 315 

2, 448 

4.763 






Girls _ 


1 


i 


1,963 






~r 






TotaL 


2,682 


2,081 


1,271 


692 


3,953 


2.773 


6,726 





SUMMARY 








Rural 


City 


Total census 

Total enrollment 

Average daily attendance 

Illiterates (12 to 21) 

Total illiterates 


12. 866 

9.232 

4,736 

J White 236^ 

(Colored 346 

528 


7,378 
2,399 
1.963 



These figures tell their own story and indicate where our labors 
are most needed. The most serious question before us to-day is 
that of attendance. Of the entire rural census only ^2 per cent 
were enrolled in the public schools, and of these a fraction less than 
52 per cent were in daily attendance. The city schools enrolled 33 
per cent of the school census of Raleigh Township, and made an 
average daily attendance of 82 per cent of this number. 

In addition to working for more money to secure modern build- 
ings and equipment, longer terms, and better pay for teachers, a 
large part of our work for the next two years must be directed 
toward getting the children into the schools, and then keeping 
them there. 

"It is idle to dream of a free people unless it be an educated people. 
This education must be fostered and controlled by the people for their own 
safety. The ideal democracy is dependent upon some knowledge of and 
power to discern the truth. Ignorance is bondage — unworthy of strong 
men and altogether hopeless. Knowledge of truth brings freedom. 'Ye 
shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free.' " 

President Francis P. Venable, 

University of North Carolina. 



*A number of districts failed to report on illiteracy. 



Po^c Thirt\'-six 



One of the most valuable aids to the teaching profession of this 
county has been the County Teachers' Association, which was or- 
ganized on the lyth of March, 1906. Two days before, the 
teachers had been assembled in Raleigh to be instructed in 
methods of teaching the public school branches. But an equally 
important object of this meeting was to cultivate among the 
teachers a deeper professional feeling, and to create a more perfect 
realization of the responsibilities that rest upon the teacher. The 
program consisted of two features, addresses by prominent edu- 
cators, and instruction by well-trained and experienced teachers. 

The social side of this meeting is worthy of mention. The 
teachers had been notified through the office of the County Super- 
intendent that during the meeting they would be, through the 
Woman's Club, the guests of the people of Raleigh. Upon their 
arrival, a committee met the teachers and sent them with escorts 
(boys from the Raleigh High School) to the homes where they 
were to be entertained. The second evening a concert and re- 
ception was given at Peace Institute under the auspices of the 
Teachers' Club of Raleigh. After the program refreshments 
were served. 

All the sessions were well attended, and at the close of the 
meeting, the teachers organized the Wake County Teachers' 
Association with ninety-four members. 

The teachers returned to their schools with quickened interest, 
and with a deeper love for their work. 

The first regular meeting of the Wake County Teachers' Asso- 
ciation was held at the North Carolina Summer School. During 
the past session three bi-monthly meetings were held, at the last of 
which the teachers were again entertained by the Woman's Club 
and the Woman's Betterment Association. The annual concert 
and reception was held at the Baptist University for Women. 

For a better appreciation of the work of the Association, note 
the following programs : 

program 

TOINT TOWNSHIP MEETING OF THE TEACHERS OF 
WAKE COUNTY 

THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 1906. 



8 p. M. — Hall of Representatives. 
1. Invocation — Rev. M. M. Marshall, D.D. 

Pas^e Thirtv-scven 




Poo-c Thirty-eis'ht 



2. Addresses of Welcome: 

On behalf of City — Mayor Jas. I. Johnson. 

On behalf of Educational Institutions — Dr. George T. Winston. 

3. Responses to Addresses of Welcome: 

On behalf of Women Teachers — Miss Minnie L. Franklin, Gary. 
On behalf of Men Teachers — Prof. J. E. Dowd, Leesville. 

4. Addresses: 

The Joint Township Teachers' Meeting — Gounty Superintendent Zebu- 
Ion Vance Judd, Wake County. 

The Woman's Association for the Betterment of Public Schoolhouses 
in North Carolina— Mrs. W. R. Hollowell, State President, Goldsboro. 

Southern Educational Progress — Dr. Chas. D. Mclver, President State 
Normal and Industrial College. 

The Relation of the Average Intelligence of a State's Citizenship to Its 
General Welfare — Dr. C. Alphonso Smith, University of North Caro- 
lina. 

5. Announcements. 

6. Adjournment. 



FRIDAY, MARCH 16. 



9 A. at. — Hall of Representatives. 

1. How to Teach Reading — Prof. Charles L. Coon, State Department of 

Education. 

2. Local History — Prof. E. P. Mo?e5, Superintendent City Schools, Raleigh. 

3. Language Lessons — Prof. Charles L. Coon. 

4. Announcements. 

5. Adjournment (1 p. M.). 



2:30 p. M. — Hall of Representatives 

1. History — Events Leading Up to the Revolutionary War — Prof. E. L. Mid- 

clleton Princi|ial Gary High School. 

2. First Lessons in Drawing — Prof. Charles L. Goon. 

3. Adjournment to Raney Library Hall for Joint Session with Woman's 

Club. 

4. Words of Welcome — !Miss Fannie E. S. Heck, President Woman's Club. 

5. Stereoptican Entertainment and Lecture on Roadside Improvement — 

Mrs. F. L. Stevens, Raleigh. 

6. Music — Mrs. Horace Dowell, Miss Martha Manney. 

7. Announcements. 

8. Adjournment. 



Page Thirty-nine 



8 p. M. — Peace Institute. 

Concert and Reception Tendered by Teachers' Club of Raleigh — President, 

Dr. R. T. Vann, President Baptist University for Women; 

Secretary, Mr. Ernest Cruikshank, St. Mary's. 

1. Concert under the Direction of Mr. James P. Brawley, Director of Music, 
Peace Institute. 

PROGRAM. 

Peace Institute Auditorium. 
Mrs. Helen IMcLemore, Soprano. 

Mrs. Henri Appy, Soprano. 

Mrs. Wade R. Brown, Contralto. 

Mr. Wade R. Brown, Tenor. 

Mr. A. C. Jackson, Baritone. 

Miss Emma V. Anderson, Violinist. _^ 

Mrs. Jessamine Harrison Irvine, Pianist. 

Miss Elizabeth D. Burtt, Pianist. 

Mr. James P. Brawley, Pianist. 

(1) 

Cotillion Valse Albeniz 

Mr. Brawley. 

(•2) 

The Ould Plaid Shawl (Old Irish) Battison Haynes 

Loch Lomond ( Old Scotch ) Vogrich 

Love Has Eyes (Old English) Bishop 

Mrs. Brown. 

(3) 

Czardas Joseffy 

A la bien Aime Sclniett 

Mrs. Irvine. 

(4) 

Legende Bohm 

Hungarian Dance No. 5 Brahms 

Miss Anderson. 

(5) 

Spanische Caprice Moszkotvski 

Miss Burtt. 

(6) 

"Meine Ruh ist hin" Schubert 

Pastorale Bizet 

Mrs. McLemore. 

(7) 

Morning Benoist 

Mrs. Appy, Mrs. Brown, Mr. Brown, Mr. Jackson. 



Page Forty 



2. Toasts — Toastiiiaster, Superintendent James Y. Joyner. 

Woman as an Educator — Rev. McNeely DuBose, Rector St. Mary's 

School. 
Our Great Women — Dr. B. F. Dixon, State Auditor. 
The Public Schools of Wake County — Hon. Thomas .Johns, Chairman 

County Board of Education. 

3. Reception, 9:30 to 11. 

4. Announcements. 

5. Adjournment. 



SATURDAY MARCH 17. 



10:30 A. ii. — Hall of Representatives. ' 

1. Organization of Count}' Teachers' Association. 

2. The Wake Betterment Association — Miss Edith Ro\'ster, Peace Institute. 

3. Privileges and Opportunities of Public School Committeemen — Superin- 

tendent James Y. Joyner. 

4. The Place of Public High Schools in Our Educational System — Dr. 

Francis Preston Venable, President University of North Carolina. 

5. The Need of a Well Defined System of Public High Schools in Wake 

County— Prof. J. B. Carlyle, Wake Forest College. 

6. Final Adjournment. 



program 



JOINT TOWNSHIP MEETING AND THE BI-MONTHLY MEETING 
OF THE WAKE COUNTY TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION 

THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 1907. 

8:30 p. ji. — Hall of Representatives. 
1. Invocation — Rev. T. N. Ivey, D.D. 
2 Address of Welcome — Hon. Joseph G. Brown. 

3. Response to Address of Welcome — Mr. W. O. Beazley. 

4. Address, "The Three Tasks of the South''— Dr. S. C. Mitchell, of the 

Chair of History- of Richmond College, Virginia. 

5. Announcements. 

6. Adjournment. 

FRIDAY", IMARCH 22. 



10 a. m. — Hall of Representatives. 

1. Language — Miss Edith Royster. 

2. History— Prof. D. H. Hill. 

3. Reading — Miss lone Dunn. 

4. Round-Table Discussion, "The Recitation"" — Led bj- Superintendent Zeb 

V. Judd. 

5. Adjournment for dinner (1 p. m.) 

Page Forty-one 




Pao'c forfx-tz^u 



2:30 p. M. — Hall of Kepkesextatives. 

1. Language — Miss Edith Royster. 

2. Reading — Miss lone l^unii. 

3. Excursion to Agricultural and ^Mccliaiiical C'<ill('g(' and xarious parts of 

the city. 

4. Methods of Teaching Agriculture (Illustrated Lecture) — Dr. F. L. 

Stevens. 

5. Insects Injurious to Cultivated Plants (Illustrated Lecture) — Prof. 

Franklin Sherman. 

6. Announcements. 

7. Adjournment. 



8:30 p. M. — Baptist Uxiver.sity for \Yomex. 

Concert and Reception given by the Woman's Club of Raleigh, and the 
Wake County Betterment Association. 

1. Concert under the Direction of Mrs. E. C. Duncan, Chaiinian of the 
Music Committee of the Woman's Club. 

PROGRAM. 
Faircloth Hall. 
Vocal tSoloisfs — ]\Iiss Blinn, Mrs. Dowell. Mrs. Hall. [Mrs. [NIcKinnnon. 
Pianists — ^Irs. A. \A'. Knox, ^liss Swicegood. 

Chorus — Last Night. 

Woman's Clul) Chorus. 

Reading — [Mary Stuart Schiller 

[Miss Lucile ^^'ithers. 

Ladies Quartette. 

Miss Burkhead, [Miss Green, Mrs. Hall. [Mrs. Albright. 

Song — Springtide Becker 

[Miss Blinn. 

Piano Solo— "Brer Rabbit." 

Miss Swicegood. 

Duet — Hear [Me, [Norma. 

Mrs. Chas. [\kdvimmon, [Mrs. J. .T. Thomas. 

Violin Solo Mazurka hy Utratkoicski 

[Miss Phyllis Woodall. 

Chorus— I Would That My Love. 

Club Chorus. 
Two Songs. 

Mrs. Hall. 
Piano Solo — The Lorelei. 

Mrs. Knox. 

Group of Songs. 

Mrs. McKimmon. 

Pai^c Fortx-tliree 



Recitation — Tom Sawyer. 
Group of Songs. 
Chorus — ^loon Rise. 

2. Reception, 0:30 to 11. 

3. Announcements. 

4. Adjournment. 



Mark Tivain 



Miss Annie Thompson. 

Mrs. Dowell. 
Woman's Club Chorus. 



SATURDAY, MARCH 23. 



10 A. M. — Hall of Representatives. 

1. Round-Table Discussion based on Jean ^litchelTs School — Led by Super- 

intendent Zeb V. Judd. 

2. Address, "Rural Education in Relation to State and National Life," 

Professor J. B. Carlyle, Department of Latin, Wake Forest College. 

3. Final Adjournment. 




'Along a pine-clad bill it lies 
O'erlooked by limpid Soullicrn skies. 



Page forty- four 



Sncreaseb Salaries anb Henstfjeneb 
Wtvm 

Within the last decade there has been phenomenal development 
throughout the entire South in agriculture and industry. There 
has been in consequence such a demand for intellig-ent' energetic 
young men that it is becoming exceedingly difficult to secure their 
services as teachers. Recent years have witnessed the opening to 
women of professions and occupations hitherto closed to them. 
Trained women are more in demand to-day than ever before. All 
the world is competing for their services. These new conditions 
make higher salaries for teachers an absolute necessity. 

As the public is coming into a higher appreciation of intelligent 
service in other professions and occupations, so school boards and 
committeemen are awakening to the diiTerence in value between 
the services of poorly-trained, and well-trained teachers. This 
fact is brought out in the following table : 

1904-'05 

Average salary for white men teachers $34.59* 

Average salary for white women teachers 29.33* 

1905-'06 

Average salary for white men teachers $37 .84 

Average salary for white women teachers 29.72 

1900-7 

Average salary for white men teachers .$43 . 33 

Average salary for first-grade white women 35.87 

TERM OF WHITE SCHOOLS 

1904-'05 113 days. 

1905-"00 ]15 

1906-'07 ...v. 117.22 " 

1906-'07 in local tax districts 161.8 " 

Four districts supplemented their funds by local taxation, the 
total amount of which was $905.00 for the year 1906-07. Four 
others lengthened the term by local subscription, as shown by the 
following table : 



No. Extra 
Days Taught 



Wilbon 15 

Holly Springs 47 

Apex . ' 40 

Olive Chapel ' 40 



Paid Teachers 

$ 14.50 
184. 50 
149. 00 
170.00 



Total 142 i 468.00 

•These figures were obtained from records in Superintendeut's office. 

Pas'e Forty-five 



The above figures do not include money contributed for in- 
creasing- teachers" salaries. 

MUSIC TAUGHT IN CONNECTION WITH PUBLIC SCHOOLS 





Days Taught 


Enroll me^jt 


Paid 
Teacher 


Catawba Springs. Swift Creek No. 2_ 


140 


13 


1210. 00 


Wilbon. Holly Springs No. 4 


100 


9 


55. 04 


Mt. Moiiah. St. Mary's No. 5 


111 


S 


97. 50 


Wendell, Mark.s Creek No. 1 


140 


Ifj 


150. 75 


Olive Chapel, White Oak No. 9 


160 


13 


300. 00 


Holly SpriniTs. Holly Springs No 2_ 


11« 


8 


96.03 ■ 


Wakefield. Little River No. 4 


ISO 





270. 00 


Fuquay Springs 


100 





320. 00 


Total 


1107 




1, 4f)9. 00 



SL'PPLEMENT To SAL.\KIES P.V SUPSCRIPTION 

Our people have shown their faith in and desire for better 
teachers, not only by a]^plying to the Iloard of Education for in- 
creased appropriations, but also by contributing to supplement the 
salaries allowed. In some instances this supplement was paid 
through the County Treasurer ; in others, directly to the teacher. 

Following are the districts that reported their contributions to 
the Count}' Superintendent, with a statement of the amount: 

Barton's Creek, No. (i .$15 . 00 

Holly Springs. No. 2 lo . GO 

Little River, No. 4 90 . 00 

Middle Creek. No. 3 150 . 00 

New Light, No. 7 17.50 

Oak Grove, No. I 10 . 00 

St. Mary's, No. 5 20 . 25 

Wake Forest, No. (i 58 . 50 

White Oak, No. 1 120 . 00 

Wliite Oak, No. 4 27 . 50 

White Oak, No. 9 210.00 

Total $73U . 75 



Page Forty -six 



^i)t Wovk of tfje Wakt Countp l^omen 

July I, 1906-June 30, 1907 

The \\'oman's lictterment Association has Idccii of invahiable 
assistance to the schools of Wake County. During its brief his- 
tory of five years it has made itself felt in ever}- phase of the 
school work. To its iuHuence may be attributed much of the in- 
creased attendance, the deepened -ntercst among both patrons and 
pupils, and the call for better buildin.gs and equipment. 




MISS CLYDE HOLT 

President Woman's Betterment Association 

Holly Springs 

The best part of the woman's work can never be estimated in 
dollars and cents. Information about material help is difficult to 
get. owing to the modesty of our women in making claim for 
credit. There is regrettable hesitancy in report-making. 

Pao'c Fort\-seven 



Though many of the schools were not heard from, $1,145.86 
was reported to the Secretary as having been raised last year 
directly through the Association. 

In addition to the cash offerings, much labor was given for the 
improvement of grounds and buildings. Two associations sub- 
scribed $750.00 toward new buildings. This amount is not in- 
cluded in the above, as it was not paid in last year. Through the 
Executive Committee at Raleigh, prizes, aggregating in value 
$108.00, were distributed. These prizes were given bv ]^Iessrs. 
Royal & Borden, Chas. J. Parker, Josephus Daniels, Clarence H. 
Poe, Mrs. E. E. Moffitt, and the Central Association. 

As County Superintendent, I feel that too much can not be said 
in commendation of this most valuable auxiliary to the County 
Department of Education. The County Association has spared 
neither time nor pains in the effort to advance the interests of the 
public schools. 

The iifth annual report may be obtained from 2\Iiss Edith 
Royster, President, or from Aliss Daisy Bailey W'aitt, Secretary 
of the Executive Committee, of Raleigh. 

The following condensed summaries of work done at places 
where prizes were won will doubtless be of interest. 

June 30, 1906, to July i, 1907 

HOLLY SPRINGS 
District No. 2, Holly Springs Township 

Awarded first prize — $50.00 from the County Association. 

Amount raised. $268.72. 

Means : Fees, contributions, and entertainments. 

In addition, ten women have become personally responsible for 
$500.00. pledged by the local association to the building fund. 

Old house, barn, and 90 wagon loads of rubbish were removed 
from school site. 

Street was opened leading to school house, and walks laid off. 

Four acres of the ten-acre school site were planted in cotton, 
and is now being cultivated by the members of the ^^'oman's Bet- 
terment Association. The seed and fertilizer were donated, the 
latter by the Raleigh Phosphate \\'orks. The grounds will be 
laid oft', sodded, and set with shrubbery as soon as the services 
of a landscape gardener can be secured. 

The association sent out committees of two to canvass that sec- 
tion of the county in the effort to secure petitions for the location 
of one of the county high schools at Holly Springs, and to 
strengthen sentiment for the local tax election then pending in 
that district. So successful were these women in their eff'orts 

Pas!,c Fort\-ci"]it 



that the his^h school was secured ; and, akhough a local tax elec- 
tion had failed the previous year, it carried at this time hv a large 
majority, only i8 votes heing- cast against the tax. 

A supplementary library was obtained. 

The teachers were Air. R. A. lUirt and Miss Clvde Holt. 




The Woman's Betterment Association of Holi,y Springs 
Chopping their Cotton Field 




The Woman's Betterment Asssciation of Holly Springs 
Resting in the Shade 



Paoc Fortx-ninc 



ROCK SPRING 

District No. 3, Swift Creek Township 

Awarded one of the second prizes — a case of maps worth $12.50, 
from Mr. Charles J. Parker, and a picture worth $5.00, from the 
County Association. 
Amount raised, $57.00. 

Means : Fees, contributions, entertainments. 
Bought : An unabridged dictionary and stand ; one framed 
1 picture; 56 Perry pictures; shades for eight windows. Had the 

: windows arranged so room could be ventilated, paying entire cost 

of material and labor. 
2; Teacher's chair and desk and rural library were secured. 

^ Two framed pictures, a globe, soap, towels, and two door 

ml . scrapers were contributed. 

5 Washed eight windows and scoured the floor. 

Of Cut down 15 trees and laid off a play ground; planted flowers, 

^ shrubs, etc. 

^ More than one hundred stumps were removed by the pupils. 

X 



The course of the road was changed to run bv the front of the 



^ house. 

CD 

2; Walk was laid off. 

Money was raised for a supplementary library. 
There are nine active members of the association exclusive of 
pupils, with Mrs. J. W. Penny, President. 
Miss Claire Turner was the teacher. 

CADE SPRINGS 
District No. 4, St. Mary's Township 

Awarded one of the second prizes — teacher's desk and chair 
worth $17.50, given by Royal & Borden. 

Amount raised, $47.28. 

Means : Entertainment, box party, ice cream party. 

This amount was raised to improve the old house and to buy 
new desks. As the little fund grew the need for a new school- 
house seemed more and more apparent. By the close of the term 
$750.00 had been subscribed by the community, and a plan selected 
for a $1,600.00 building. The county will give the desks for the 
new building, and the Betterment Association, of which Miss 
Sarah Stancil is president, can use the $47.28 to beautify the 
house and grounds. 

Page Fifty ,^'g'*' 



WENDELL 
District No. i, Mark's Creek Township 

Awarded picture. 

Amount raised, $182.80. 

Means : Prize party ; box party ; contributions from teachers 
and pupils, including ten dollars for labor given. 

Yard was cleaned and windows were washed. 

Flower garden was plowed and laid off. 

Bought : Eight framed pictures, window shades, zinc to replace 
dirt boxes under stoves, hat and cloak racks, chandelier, two 
lamps, two rugs, etc. 

Miss Marie Moss was president of the Association. 

Mr. K. H. Mclntyre was principal of the school. 

EAGLE ROCK 
District No. 2, Mark's Creek Township 

Awarded year's subscription to Nezvs and Observer, offered by 
Mr. Josephus Daniels. 

Amount raised, $38.20. 

Means : Two box parties, play, contributions. 

Bought: Shades for 14 windows, chair for teacher, two framed 
pictures, two hanging lamps, curtain for stage. 

Cleared away undergrowth around the building and plowed the 
land. 

Rearranged grounds by transplanting trees and laying off cir- 
cular walks. 

Planted about twenty-five flower plants, four trees, and a scup- 
pernong vine. 

Washed 16 windows. 

Mrs. Eli T. Scarboro is president of the Association. 

The teachers are Miss Annie Pulley and Miss Hattie May 
Weathers. 



Framed pictures were awarded to Apex and Wilbon ; a year's 
subscription to The North Carolina Booklet to Mt. Moriah; to 
each of the following schools, a year's subscription to The Progres- 
sive Farmer: Nos. i, 4, and 7, House Creek Township; No. i, 
Cedar Fork Township; No. 3, St. Matthew's Township; No. i, 
Panther Branch Township. 



Page Fifty -one 



-^i. 

"---.. 
'■*-.*. 




'The sedges Haunt their harvest. 



Page Fifty-tz^'o 



^cf)ool Socials 



A distinctive form of educational activit_\- in the county last 
winter was the school social. For popular gatherings no place is 
better than the schoolhouse, and no chaperones are better than 
the fathers and mothers. 

Our school officers and teachers have recognized these facts ; 
and by allowing the schoolhouse to be used for public entertain- 
ments, they have made it the center of the community's social life 
and interests. Incidentally, much money has been raised for 
school improvement. 

Often the entertainment was in the form of ice-cream suppers, 
oyster suppers, or box parties, thougii not infrequently guessing 
and voting- contests afforded much amusement and some revenue. 

For the box parties, the young ladies of the community ar- 
ranged boxes and baskets of things good to eat. Sometimes 
they prepared them at home ; sometimes they purchased them 
and filled them with fruits, candies, and other delicacies. These 
refreshments were sold to the highest bidders, and the young 
man who purchased a box or basket invited the young lady who 
gave it to share its contents. Her name was found inside on a 
slip of paper, but the buyer in some occult fashion usually learned 
before making the purchase what name he would find. 

An attractive appearance always added to the sale-value of 
these parcels. The addition of a big ribbon bow often made a 
basket irresistible. 

Following are a few of the more successful of these school 
socials, with the amount of money raised : 

Wendell — 1 prize party $100 . 05 

1 box party 43.50 

Eagle Rock— 2 box parties 30 . 00 

1 play 7.45 

Cade Springs — 1 entertainment 22. 12 

1 box party 7 . 88 

1 ice-cream supper 13 . 53 

Wilbon — 2 entertainments and 1 oyster supper 60. 11 

Samaria — 1 box party ■ 16 . 00 

Ebenezer — 2 box parties 4 . 98 

Mt. Hermon — 1 entertainment 6 . 75 

Oak Hill— 1 box party 12.10 

Dutchman — 1 entertainment 16 . 00 

Fuquay Springs — 1 entertainment and 1 oyster supper 88 . 00 

Page Fiffy-thrcc 



Holly Springs — 1 oyster supper and box party 35.68 

1 birthday party 12 . 54 

1 play 21 . 10 

1 boys' minstrel IS . 05 

Turner School — 1 entertainment 6.25 

Total $480 . 59 




Q I I ill' 111 




Wendeli^ Graded School 



Page Fifty-four 



WHITE SCHOOL DATA, 1906-'07 



ScHooT.s AND Teachers 



Barton's Ckeek Township: 

No. 1, C. E. Edwards, E. S. Edwards 

No. 2, Mrs. E. W Brogden (a) 

No. 2, Mattie Nichols (b) 

No. 3, Essie L. Burt 

No. 6, G. L. B. Penny 

No. 7, Mrs. S. W. Thompson 

BucKHORN Township: 

No. 1, Beatrice Council 

No. 2, Sankie Gilbert 

Gary Township: 

No 1, W. G. Crowder 

No. 2, A. P. P.Jones, E. E. Rollins 

Cedar Fork Township: 

No. 1, M. M. Kollins, Ida Thompson 

No. 2, G. J. Green, Mrs. G.J. Green 

No 3, E. Walton 

Holly Springs Township: 

No. 2, R. A. Burt, Clyde Holt 

No 3, Delcie Collins 

No. 4, J. C. Utiey, Mamie Burt 

No. 5, Lillian Markham 

House Creek Township: 

No. 1, Alma Sorrell 

No. 2, Cora McC. Morgan 

No. 3, Mrs. C. B. Smith 

No. 4, Metta G. GuUey 

No. 5, Mrs. Sarah E. Bledsoe 

No. 6, J. E. Dowd, Eula Baucom 

Little River Township: 

No. 1, Oscar Caudill (a) 

No. 1, Lessie Weathers (b) 

No. 2, Allie Weathers 

No. 3, Birdie D. Baker 

No. 4, W. O. Beazley, W. S. Beazley, Mary A. 

Craig, Ella S. Pippin 

No. 6, Florence Powell 

Mark's Creek Township : 

No. 1, K. H. Mclntyre, Marie Moss, Jennie Hester 

No. 2, Annie Pulley, H. M. Weathers 

No. 3, Ettie Avent 

No. 4, Mamie I aker 

No. 5, Mrs. Lela M. Horton 

No. 6, A. R. Hodge, Jr. 



>> 






e3 











c 


a 


M 


a 


a 


a 


2 


di 


<u 


C 


H 


O 
98 


59 
37 


110 
110 


100 


89 


'?2 


121 


49 


29 


' 100 


51 


41 


i 123 
109 


111 
75 


63 
45 


128 


50 


39 


90 
135 


93 
210 


56 
98 


116 


102 


82 


120 


94 


53 


100 


92 


56 


114 


105 


93 


108 


65 


36 


90 


104 


68 


100 


57 


55 


119 


73 


39 


125 


74 


58 


100 


62 


40 


no 


34 


45 


130 


65 


36 


112 


149 


80 


95 


112 


36 


105 


22 


120 


51 


34 


120 


72 


60 


180 


226 


195 


103 


36 


54 


160 


172 


150 


120 


98 


85 


110 


73 


41 


140 


53 


39 


120 


42 


27 


100 


69 


39 



OS 

>< 
< 



39 
25 
10 
17 
19 
30 



31 
23 



31 
56 



36 
28 
32 



65 
20 
35 

28 



15 
21 
38 
18 
24 
47 



23 
13 
20 
33 

94 
21 



83 
63 

18 
20 

22 
17 



Page Fifty-five 



WHITE SCHOOL DATA, 1906-'07— Contioued 



Schools and Teachers 



Middle Creek Township: 

Xo. 2. Ada Xorris. Kate Maynard (a) 110 

No. 2, ]\Iamie Lee A vent (b) 110 

No. 3, A. A. Crater, Alice Taylor . | 160 

No. 4, Vallie Adams 1 no 

No. 6. A. E. Sorrell ' 95 

Neuse River TowNsiiii': 

No. 1, Mrs. Lillian B. Simmons 140 

No. 2. Ora A. Taylor 120 

No. 3, Mrs. Alice M. Reddish 144 

New Light Towxshii' : 

No. 1, Elizabeth T. Kelly -.. | 88 

No. 2, Nora Wlieeler 100 

No 3, W. J. Simpson i 100 

No. 4, W. D. Ray I 120 

No. 5, Annie Bell Woodlief 1 120 

No. 6, Alice E. Ray I 107 

No. 7. D. H.Stallings ' 120 

Oak Crove Township: J 

No. 1, H. ,T. Sorrell I 105 

No. 2, L. Olivia Parhain(a) 100 

No. 2. A. C. VVeatherly(b) ^ 115 



Panther Branch Township: 

No. 1, Marv Williams II31 

85 

99 

120 



No. 2. Alice Bryan, Jessie Turner 
No. o, Adelaide Stephenson 

No. 4, Ruth C. Taylor 

No. 5, Mamie Lane Taylor (a) 



No. •"). Mrs. Mary Person Cooper (b) 120 



St. 31ary's Township: 

No. 2, Nannie A. Penny 

No. 4, Sarah Stancil 

No. ."), Will Francis, OHie Stegall(a) 

5, Willie Staley(b) 

6, Stella Johnson 



No. 

No. 



St. Matthew's Township: 

No. 1. Catherine E. Vernon 

No. 2, Lucy M. Powell 

No. 3, D. R. Green 

No. 4, Mrs. J. F. Keith 

No. '), Vernia England 



110 
112 
111 
111 
110 



130 

115 
92 
79 



58 
54 
59 



55 

86 
97 

85 
78 
66 

87 



61 
141 



52 
80 
65 
51 

149 



54 
76 

105 

92 



100 50 
70 48 



95 
120 
120 



49 
38 



68 
34 
112 
54 
68 



30 
42 
50 



36 
53 
64 
57 
52 
53 
67 



54 
49 
59 



47 
74 
37 
39 
52 
34 



47 
49 
40 
42 
70 



28 
32 
40 
26 

48 f 29 



Page Fifty-six 



WHITE SCHOOL DATA, 1906-'07— Continued 



Schools and Teachers 



Swift Ceeek Township: 

No. 1, Ernie Booker, Allie Ogburn 

No. 2, T. C. Council, May Adams 

No. 8, Claire Turner 

No 4, Annie Terry 

No. 5, W. W. Utlev 

No. 6, J. P. Goodwin 

No. 7, Mary Woodward 

No. 8, Elsie Griffin 

Wake Forest Township : 

No. 1, MaryJarman, Edith Taylor, Marie Lankford, 

No. 2, Pearle Harpjer, Ida Winstead 

No. 3, Tiliie Goldie Ranes 

No. 4, Rubv L. Britt 

No. 5, W. F. Hodge 

No. 6, L. N. Ranes, Laurie Kedford 

White Oak Township : 

No. 1, J. H. Campen, Minnie Franklin 

No. 2, Alice K. Kawlev, M. M. Mitchell 

No. 4, T. H. Barbee-_"_ 

No. 5, A'iola Maynard 

No. 6, Hattie Lee Upehurch 

No. 8, M. B. Forbes 

No. 9, A. T. Holleman 



103 
111 
110 
107 
100 
103 
115 
100 



180 
12.5 
100 
120 
130 
117 



160 
130 
110 
120 
100 
120 
120 



05 

3 

a 
O 


□ 

a 

o 
□ 


149 


79 


81 


113 


53 


37 


57 


35 


74 


66 


83 


51 


71 


61 


61 


42 


299 


76 


116 


94 


52 


31 


59 


28 


73 


56 


63 


76 


110 


103 


93 


75 


74 


45 ! 


60 


43 


61 


65 


68 


55 


65 


45 









47 
63 
22 
18 
30 
32 
35 
21 



62 
58 
17 
17 
29 
38 



49 
54 
22 
21 
19 
29 
34 



COLORED SCHOOL DATA, 1906-'07 



Baeton's Creek Township: 

No. 1, F. P. Tharpe 

No. 2, Sylvia C. Thornton 

No. 3, Glovenia Mayo 

No. 4, Hattie B. Love 

Buckhorn Township: 

No. 1, Candaee Rice 

No. 2, Lucy J. Royster 

No. 3, Thomas Morrison 

Gary Township: 

No. 1, Blanche A. Blake 

No. 2, W. B. Hunter, M. A. Height 

Cedar Fork Township: 

No. 1, Ada Ruffin 

No. 2, Flossie E. Burroughs 



85 


75 


48 


110 


63 


44 


120 


84 


65 


122 


104 


81 


18 


59 


17 


88 


54 


46 


85 


73 


45 


100 


31 


30 


110 


131 


102 


60 


72 


51 


109 


82 


63 



20 
32 

28 
42 



7 
20 

27 



16 
60 



26 
37 



Page Fifty-seven 



COLORED SCHOOL DATA, 1906-'07— Continued 



Schools and Teachers 



Holly Springs Township: 

No. 1, Alice E. Carring'ton 

No. 2, S. F. Turner, Mag-gie Edwards 
No. 3, Tempie' H. Howell 



Hous Creek Township : 

No. 1, Nannie AV. Fuller, Lula J. Peace, Nellie 

Jjgon 

No. 2, Annie Debnam 

No. ;!, .Tolin H. Harp 

No. 5, Nannie J. Chavis 

No. 6, VV. H. Kay 



Little River Township : 

No. 1, Moliie Alston ___ __ 

No. 2, Mary N. Watson, Joshua Jones 

No. 3, Bertha R. Perry 

No. 4, S. H. High, Cecilia Fuller 



Mark's Crekk Township: 

No. 1, Pattie A. Hi^rh 

No. 8, Nora L. Wilder 

No. 5, Thomas J. Foster, Lee Metta TerrelL 

Middle Creek Township: 

No. 1, Maggie V. Birdsall 

No. 2, Antoinette H. Clanton 

No. 3, Mary F. Sims 

No. 4, Sarah J. Peddy 



Neuse River Townsnip: 

No. 1, Allie L. Banks 

No. 2, I. C. High, .Ir., Rosabelle Birdsall 
No. 3, James A. AVatkins 



New Light Township: 

No. 1, Dicy B. Chavis(a)--- 
No. 1, Georgia E. Cooke (b) 
No. 2, Minnie L. Brooks ._- 
No. 3, Robert B. Eatjn 

Oak Grove Township : 

No. 1, Sarah J. Pratt 

No. 2, R. E. Steptoe 

Panther Branch Township: 

No. L Fannie J. Sims 

No. 2, Alice B. Ellerbee 

No. 3, Carrie T. Mial 



110 
120 
100 
125 



110 
130 
118 
145 



120 
100 
120 



105 

100 

105 

70 



113 70 34 
115 116 103 



120 



98 



128 218 



58 

89 

84 

104 



103 

81 

160 



84 

44 

140 



101 
64 
76 
40 



149 
16 
79 
69 
91 



48 

83 

79 

145 



62 
45 
86 



86 
65 
56 
30 



120 79 54 
140 159 128 
73 



42 
46 
51 
69 



114 


105 


119 

82 

120 

142 


50 
43 
60 
71 


105 
112 


52 
35 


110 
110 
100 


99 

57 
84 



24 
44 



61 

48 
57 



Page Fifty-eight 



COLORED SCHOOL DATA, 1906-'07— Continued 



Schools and Teachers 



St. Mary's Township: 

No. 1, W. A Jones, Parthenia Day 

No. 2, Christine C. Perry 

No. 4, Lizzie B. Foster 

No. 5, Leah H. Gorham 

No. 6, Fidelia Adams 

St. Matthew's Township: 

No. 1, B. M. Montague, Nannie Staneill 

No. 2, John G. Dunn. Sarah Townes 

No. 3, C. S. High, Blanche High 

No. 4, Mabel Young 

No. 5, R. H. Peace 

Swift Creek Township: 

No. 1, Ada C. Holland 

No. 3, J. Y. Hackney, E. E. Whitaker 

Wake Forest Township : 

No. 1, Sarah C. Johnson, M. Braswell, Eliza Haw 
kins 

No. 2, Minnie B. Flagg, Mattie Jeffreys 

No. 3, F. R. Freeman, Mary A. Outlaw 

No. 4, M. Lillian Braswell, Lydia Whitaker 

White Oak Township: 

No. 1, M. W. Brown, Candace Rice 

No. 3, Annie E. Bunch 



a 


a 


B 

a 



a 
W 


120 


143 


133 


110 


64 


36 


90 


55 


55 


130 


101 


77 


100 


87 


65 


110 


117 


92 


100 


120 


93 


103 


81 


65 


60 


81 


62 


102 


51 


45 


130 


62 


55 


100 


202 


113 


115 


322 


159 


]13 


147 


134 


131 


121 


119 


105 


179 


115 


103 


171 


116 


94 


40 


34 



Q3 






34 
26 

28 
29 
41 



57 
40 
35 
48 
20 



21 
51 



68 
43 
65 

80 



69 
15 



Page Fifty-nine 




Paorc Sixty 



®J)e Count? ^igJ) ^cf)ool£( 

Under the provisions of an act of the General Assembly of 
1907, the County Board of Education established at Gary, April 
3, 1907, the first county high school in the State of North Garo- 
lina. To secure this school, the stockholders of Gary High 
School sold to the county for $2,750.00 their entire plant, worth 
about $6,000.00. While this report is in preparation, improve- 
ments are being made which will increase the valuation of this 
property to more than $8,000.00. 

Gary has a population of only 508 ; but it contains much tax- 
able property. The special tax of the district for the year 1907- 
'08 will be $1,888.51. The entire fund for this school will be a 
little less than $4,500.00 annually. 




The Old Pitbt.ic School Building Ai Oary 

Wake Gounty is entitled to three other public high schools, and 
the greatest interest and activity is being shown in the efifort to 
secure the location of them. The women of Holly Springs have 
been canvassing that section of the county to get a large petition 
asking for one of these schools. As a special inducement for 
the Board's placing the high school for the southern part of the 
county at Holly Springs, the people offer a new six-room brick- 
veneered building erected at a cost of $7,270.15. of which amount 
they subscribed about $3,500.00. Other places showing marked 
interest in the high schools are Fuquay Springs, Garner, Bay 
Leaf, Rolesville, Wendell, Wakefield, and Zebulon. 

Touching the high schools, I may be pardoned for allowing this 
report to go a little beyond July i, in order to record the action of 

Pas;e Sixty-one 




Page Sixty-tzvo 



the succeeding- Board of Education in locating the remaining 
three public high schools at Bay Leaf, Holly Springs, and Wake- 
Ion. The contest for the latter was especially spirited. It re- 
sulted in a compromise ; and the school will be built between the 
two small villages of Wakefield and Zebulon, which are hardly 
more than a mile apart. Citizens and friends of these places 
donated ten acres of land as a school site, and $8,000.00 for the 
building. 

In addition to the above, Raleigh has a high school which, under 
the principalship of Mr. Hugh Morson, has done excellent work 
since its establishment in 1905. A sixteen-thousand-dollar build- 
ing for this school is now in process of erection, and will be 
ready for occupancy early in April. 



"North Carolina possesses every element of wealth excepting skilled labor 
and technical knowledge. Give her these and she will become the garden- 
spot of the earth." Presidext Geo. T. Winstox, 

Agricultural and Mechanical College of North Carolina. 

Life lies before vis as a large quarry lies before the architect; he deserves 
not the name of an architect except when out of this fortuitous mass he 
can combine with the greatest economy and fitness and durability some 
form, the pattern of which originated in his spirit. — Goethe. 

The youth who does not look up will look down; and the spirit that does 
not soar is destined perhaps to grovel.- — Disraeli. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE LIBRARY. 



Page Sixty-three 









iiD:i^|f?l[llX7^ 





Page Sixty-four 




' For Nature beats in perfect tune.' 



Page Sixty -five 




Colored School, No 6, House Creek Township 




Shotwell Colored School, Mark's Creek Township 



Page Sixty-six 



Colleger in Mafee Count? 

At first it was intended that this report should mention only the 
public schools of the county, but it seems fit in this connection to 
make a brief statement of the advantages for college and business 
education ofifered by the colleges in Wake. 

There are five colleges for the academic training of white boys 
and girls, as follows : 



Wake Forest College 

Agricultural and Mechanical College 

Baptist University for Women 

St. Mary's School 

Peace Institute 



Total 



Two Business Colleges : 

King's Business College 

Draughon's Business College 

Total 



Oi 3 01 



30 
41 
30 
19 
15 



135 



13 



Two institutions offer insti-uction in the higher branches 
of study to the colored youth : 

Shaw University 

St. Augustine School 



Total 



fl 




5p 

E = 


11 


sS 


^Oh 


Z 


> 



871 
452 
402 
200 
171 



1, 596 



301 
100 



401 



526 
375 



$488, 925 
400, 384 
200, 000 
110, 000 
125, 000 



1, 324, 309 



10, 000 
1, 000 



901 



11, 000 



225, 000 
155, 000 



380, 000 



Note.- — The above figures were furnished by the heads of the 
several schools. 



Page Sixty-seven 




Page Sixty-eight 



OTafec Jf orEs:t College 

Wake Forest, the oldest college in North Carolina, was estab- 
lished in 1834, and for four years was conducted as a Manual 
Labor School. In 1838 it was chartered as a college. Since that 
date it has graduated 1,077 men. The number of graduates last 
year was 52 and the enrollment was 371. 

The college has seven buildings, including a Gymnasium and 
Hospital. The value of the buildings and grounds is $188,925.00; 
and the endowment is $300,000.00, aggregating $488,925.00. 

Eighteen professors, six instructors, and six assistants give in- 
struction in the sixteen departments of the college. Four degrees 
are conferred, — Bachelor of Arts, requiring four years; Master of 
Arts, five ; Bachelor of Science, four, which may include two years 
in medicine ; Bachelor of Laws, three, including Law and Political 
Science. 

The College Library contains eighteen thousand volumes and 
the best current literature. All students have free access to the 
library. 

Wake Forest has been closely identified with the public schools 
of North Carolina. Twenty per cent of the County Superinten- 
dents, two State Superintendents, and a large number of the 
teachers received their training at Wake Forest. The college lays 
stress on the obligation of its men to the public, and large numbers 
of her sons are entering the service of the State. The famous 
Literary Societies offer excellent training for such service. So 
important is the work of these Societies in the view of the Trustees 
and Faculty that all other student orders or fraternities are for- 
bidden. 

Living expenses and special fees at Wake Forest have always 
been moderate. Young men of character who are prepared to do 
college work are welcomed. It is urged that students complete 
the full high school course before seeking admission to the College. 
Those who present certificates from accredited high schools are 
admitted to the college classes without examination. Aid toward 
meeting expenses may be secured from the Students' Aid Fund, of 
which Dr. Walter Sikes is Treasurer. General correspondence 
mav be addressed to President W. L. Poteat. 



Pa^c Sixtv-iiiiie 



»»»»• 




Page Seventy 



^. & iW. CoUcgc 

The College is beautifully located in the western suburbs of 
Raleigh, a mile and a quarter from the State Capitol. 

The purpose of the College is to furnish industrial education in 
the followmg subjects: Agriculture, Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 
and Mmmg Engineering, Industrial Chemistry, and Cotton Manu- 
facturing. It is well equipped for instruction in all these lines, 
ownmg 675 acres of land with suitable farm buikKngs, also labora- 
tories, drawing-rooms, work-shops, power-houses, electric plants, 
and other similar equipment. There is a model cotton mill, fully 
equipped for instruction in carding and spinning, weaving and 
designing, dyeing and other textile work. 

The courses of instruction offer a combination of practical and 
theoretical work, about half the time being devoted to lectures and 
recitations, and the other half to work in the shops, laboratories, 
drawing-rooms, green-houses, dairies, fields and mills. It is in- 
tended to furnish both technical and liberal education. There are 
full courses of four years, short courses of one and two years, and 
special winter courses of eight weeks. Teachers' courses, for the 
special training of rural teachers, include a one-year's course and 
a four-weeks' course in May. 

The College has a Faculty of forty teachers and five hundred 
students; tuition is $45.00 per year; there are 120 scholarsh:ps. 
Self-supporting students earn about $6,000.00 annually by work 
at the College. There is no room for idlers; the motto of the 
College is Work; its rule of conduct for each student is "Do your 
work thoroughly day by day; Let others alone; Be a gentleman." 

The College is intended to supply the State's need for industrial 
workers, managers and promoters to meet the changed conditions 
due to the abolition of slavery and the demand for educated skilled 
white labor. 

"A century ago education was for the few, and was designed to 
equip them for the learned professions ; to-day education is for the 
many, and is intended to fit them for life's practical work." 



Page Scvcntv-one 




Paiic Sc: ■ciify-f7\.'o 



^i)t l^apm mni\itv&itv for OTomen 

This institution was established for the purpose of offering to 
young women a grade of instruction equal to that given in the 
colleges for boys. Its plant consists of six buildings well furnished 
and equipped, occupying three acres of ground in the heart of 
Raleigh, all appraised at $200,000.00. 

It has a Faculty of thirty-four officers and teachers, and oft'ers 
instruction in the Arts, Sciences, Philosophy, Music, Art, Elocu- 
tion, Business, Pedagogy, and Bible. 

The School of Arts, Sciences, and Philosophy employs ten pro- 
fessors, two assistants, and two instructors. Heads of depart- 
ments, with one exception, teach only one subject each. The 
Chemical, Physical, and Biological Laboratories are equipped with 
$2,500.00 worth of apparatus. 

The School of Pedagogy is open only to Juniors and Seniors, 
but a short course is offered for common-school teachers. 

The Music School employs eleven teachers, and uses thirty-three 
pianos, together with claviers, violins, and a large pipe organ. 

The Business School fits capable young women for self-support 
by office work. 

The Bible School is designed to prepare pupils for better service 
in their churches, and counts for the A.B. degree. 

The Art School employs two teachers, who give instruction in 
Oil and China Painting, and in Applied Design. 

In addition to her regular work in Elocution, the head of that 
department, with the aid of an expert assistant, directs the training 
of the students in Physical Culture. 

The school is conducted on the self-government plan, whereby 
students largely regulate their own conduct, under the general 
direction of the college authorities. 

The religious life of the school is nourished and developed partly 
by daily chapel exercises and the regular Sunday school and church 
services, but mainly by numerous weekly classes for Bible and 
Mission study, Personal Worker's Classes, a vigorous Y. W. C. A., 
and daily twilight prayer-meetings. 

The school is run at cost as nearly as possible, and nearly one- 
half of the boarding pupils save from $50.00 to $60.00 per session 
by three-quarters of an hour daily domestic service. 

For further information, address R. T. Vann, President, Ra- 
leigh, N. C. 



Pao^e Seventx-thrcc 




Pogc Sei-cnty-foiir 



St. Mary's School, the Diocesan School for the Episcopal Church 
in the two Carolinas, is the oldest of the educational institutions 
for women located in Raleigh. It was established in 1842 by Rev. 
Aldert Smedes, and was conducted by him and his son, Dr. Bennett 
Smedes. for fifty-five years as a private Church school, until its 
purchase by the Church in 1897. 

St. Mary's is located in the west enci of Raleigh in a beautiful 
grove of twenty acres, with the school buildings in the middle of 
the grounds, surrounded by beautiful old oak trees and attractive 
stretches of campus. The original buildings still form the central 
group in the landscape, but they are now sheltered by the newer 
buildings, which are being added from time to time as the needs of 
the School demand. This arrangement in itself speaks the ideal 
for which St. Mary's stands — the conservation of all the best 
Southern traditions of the past, modified by the changed conditions 
of the present — a blend of the conservative and the progressive. 
The spaciousness of the grounds and the convenient grouping of 
the buildings, of which there are at present nine, make a strong 
impression on the visitor. 

St. Mary's maintains an academic course equal in standard to 
that of the other colleges for women in the Carolinas, and lays 
special stress on the general development of its students. "Special 
attention to the social and religious side of Christian education 
without slight to academic training" is a slogan of the School. 
The Academic Department includes the College, the Preparatory 
School and the Primary School ; the Fine Arts Department em- 
braces a flourishing Music School, a good Art School, and a young 
School of Elocution ; and there is a well-established Business De- 
partment, and a newly instituted course in Home Economics 
(domestic science and domestic art). 

In its present buildings St. Mary's can accommodate 125 board- 
ing students and twenty-five teachers. The School is at present 
without endowment, but maintains a number of scholarships. The 
expenses of the School are moderate, ranging from $275 to $400. 



Page Seventy-five 



"The people's schools in a State, a county, or a community, can be no 
better than the people desire and decree. Upon the people themselves must 
largely rest the responsibility of making the schools what they ought to be. 
and to the people themselves largely belongs the credit or discredit of what 
they are." State Superintendent J. Y. Joyner. 

"Education is power, and power is wealth to North Carolina, and encour- 
aged by the present results we should press forward to do still more in the 
future for the educational broadening of the youth of our State, getting as 
we do from such work, a return not only in dollars and cents, but in moral 
and mental development, — a high type of useful men and women to be the 
future guides and rulers of our people." 

Governor R. B. Glenn. 

'"The education of the masses is the chief business of the State. No other 
work in which the State engages compares with this in beneficial results. 
It is the State's only means of securing to every one equal opportunity, and 
by equal opportunity I mean the chances to be the thing which God in- 
tended each of us to be." Ex-Governor C. B. Aycock. 



Uofki Carolina State! LibranJ 



-Jtni^H^r 





The wood was sovran with centennial trees ' 




GC 379.75655 W146r 

1905/07 

Wake County (N.C.). Board of Education. 
Biennial report, Wake County Public Scho 



3 3091 00202 1202 



Date Due 


APR 13 


197i 






WOV 1 '? 1 


"^7^ 




i 


•'■" i ^ t 


'Jf7 






























































































































m 


PRINTED 


IN U. S. A. 





PAMPHLET BINDER 

I^Z Syracuse, N. Y. 
^3 Stockton, Calif. 



NORTH CAROLINIANA 
RESTRICTED 




^^e Co., N. C. Board of Education 
Report cof thej .^ake County Public SchooJs 




^fWW.'^ 



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