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Full text of "Biographical annals of Lebanon County, Pennsylvania : containing biographical sketches of prominent men and representative citizens and of the early settled families"

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974.801 
L49b 
1213997 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALCX3Y COLLECTION 




ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01205 3523 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/biographicalannaOOjhbe 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS 



OK 



Lebanon County 



PENNSYLVANIA 



CONTAINING 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PROMINENT AND REPRESENTATIVE CITIZE-S 
AND OF MANY OF THE EARLY SETTLED FAMILIES. 



ILLUSTRATKD. 



(^^ CHICAGO: 

^ _, , ^ . J. H. BEERS cSc CO. 



PRKFACK 



1213997 



HE importance of placing in book form biographical history of repre- 
sentative citizens — both for its immediate worth and for its value 
to coming generations — is admitted by all thinking people; and 
within the past decade there' has been a growing interest in this 
commendable means of perpetuating biography and family genealogy. 

That the public is entitled to the privileges afforded by a work of this 
nature needs no assertion at our hands; for one of our greatest Americans has 
said that the history of any country resolves itself into the biographies of its 
stout, earnest and representative citizens. This medium, then, serves more 
than a single purpose ; while it perpetuates biography and family genealogy, 
it records history, much of which would be preserved in no other way. 

In presenting the Biographical Annals of Leb.vnon County to its 
patrons, the publishers have to acknowledge, with gratitude, the encourage- 
ment and support their enterprise has received, and the willing assistance 
rendered in enabling them to surmount the many unforeseen obstacles to be 
met with in the production of a work of this character. In nearly every 
instance the n.iaterial composing the sketches was gathered from those imme- 
diately interested, and then submitted in tvpewritten form for correction 
and revision. The volume, which is one of generous amplitude, is placed in 
the hands of the public with the belief that it will be found a valuable addition 
to the library, as well as an invaluable contribution to the historical literature 
of the State of Pennsylvania. 

THE PUBLISHERS. 



INDKX 



Adams, Jacob G 62 

Albright, Rev. Isaac H., Ph. D 179 

AlKvein, John M 358 

Arnold, Augustus P 765 

Arnold, Charles F 689 

Arnold Family 352 

Arnold, George 352 

Arnold, Henry L 344 

Arnold, J. Adam 711 

Arnold, John, J. S 730 

Arnold, Lorenzo H 719 

Arnold, Moses 764 

Arnold, William J 718 

Atkins, William T 229 

Ault, William 90 

Bachnian, Christian 183 

Bachman Family 406 

Bachman, George 183 

Bachman, John A 419 

Bachman, John Z 721 

Baeshore, William H 679 

Bahney, Adam 61 

Balsbaugh, John A 520 

Balsbaugh, John L 220 

Barto, John 457 

Bassler Family 354 

Bassler, Capt. John H 353 

Beattie, John, M. D 765 

Beaver, C. Grove 348 

Beaver Family 348 

Becker Families loi, 214, 286. 415 

Becker, J. Adam 503 

Becker, Thomas L loi 

Becker, Willoughby 286 

Beckley, John A 318 



Beckley, Joseph R., AI. D 211 

Behm, Christian G 561 

Behni, Alorris K 652 

Behm. Rudolph 400 

Behney, Cyrus L 474 

Behny, D. II 612 

Behny, Mrs. J 709 

Behiiy, J. Frank 708 

Behny, Mrs. PhoeI)e E 612 

Bennetch Family ;^/2 

Bennetch. J. Henry 371 

Berst Family 221 

Beshore, Peter 766 

Betz, Jacob W 409 

Bibighaus. Mrs. C. E 649 

Bibighaus Family 650 

Bierman, Hon. E. Benjamin 216 

Bierman Family 216 

Biever, Amos H 709 

Binner, T. B 608 

Black, John H. ( Annville) 24S 

Black, John H 423 

Blecker, Rev. A. 'M 495 

Boeshore Family 759 

Boeshore, Frank B 439 

Boeshore, Jacob B 759 

Bollinger, Levi R 4^3 

Bollman Family 435 

Bolman, John A 436 

Bollman, Thomas J 436 

Bollman, William H 437 

Bomberger, A. S 511 

Bomberger, Rev. Cyrus S 130 

Bomberger Family I13 

Bomberger. Henry S 714 

Bomberger, John K 113 



INDEX. 



Boniberger, Levi K 475 

Bordner. Daniel T 59 

Bordner Family 59 

Bower, A. H 294 

Bower Family S37 

Bower, Henry J.. AI. D 537 

Bowman, Charles M 224 

Bowman, J. Alfred 391 

Bowman, John J 38 

Bowman, Joseph 619 

Bowman, j\Ioses L 38 

Bowman, William J 599 

Bowman. Zacharias A 380 

Brecht. Samuel A.. M. D 559 

Brendle, Abraham S 504 

Brendle Family 505 

Brightbill, Morris E 367 

Brightbill, Samuel L 367 

Bromer, Rev. Edward S 551 

Brown. John H 204 

Bnibacher. Ephraim 389 

Brunner, William E 247 

Bucher, Christian 126 

Bucher Families 93, 152 

Bucher, Henry 93 

Bucher, T. Reily, ]M. D 152 

Bucher, John C, M. D 637 

Buck. David B 580 

Burkey. James 602 

Carpenter, Frederick 316 

Carpenter, Reuben 744 

Christ, Father Adam 615 

Christ, Cyrus M 337 

Christian, John D 172 

Christian, Mrs. Mary A 172 

Cilley, John H 376 

Coleman, B. Dawson 3 

Coleman Family I 

Coleman, George Dawson i 

Collins, Milton J., V. S 604 

Corl, Harry L 309 

Croll, Rev. P. C 34i 

Deaner. H. Clay .3.39 

Deffenbaugh, George R 612 

Deppen, John C 296 

Derr, Mrs. Caroline 289 

Derr, G. B. M 411 

Derr. William M 288 



Dctweiler, W. Harry 384 

Dewald, Joel 7S8 

Dewald, Mrs Sarah 758 

Dietz Family 271 

Dietz, Harry 271 

Dissinger, Aaron A 634 

Dissinger, Edmund 275 

Dissinger Family 301 

Dissinger, Frank R 301 

Dissinger, Joseph E 734 

Dohner, Cyrus 430 

Dohner Family 429 

Dohner, Nimrod R 43° 

Donges, Mrs. Cassia 648 

Donges, George W 647 

Donges, George W.. Jr 648 

Donges, John A 282 

Dubble, Joel 500 

Dundore Family 613 

Dundore, Jacob K 613 

Eby, Ambrose M. . ^ 403 

Eby, John M 403 

Eby, Samuel 402 

Ehrgood, Judge A. W 250 

Ehrhorn, Mrs. Anna 408 

Ehrhorn, George C. J 408 

Ellis Family 146 

Ellis. George W 146 

Engle Family 512 

Engle, Samuel F 51.2 

Erb, Mrs. Celinda 223 

Erb Family 222 

Erb, Hiram L 222 

Erb, Will H 541 

Eshelman, Henry E 84 

Euston, Henry T 552 

Evans, Thomas 160 

Fauber, Mrs. Ella L 459 

Fauber, Thomas J 459 

Feenian, Elias 739 

Fegan, John W 151 

Felterolf, Samuel 139 

Fernslcr, Philip B 566 

Fink, Charles M 654 

Fisher, Rev. I. Calvin 584 

FitzGerald, Capt. M. J 115 

Fluck, Rev. J. Lewis 696 

Forney, Jacob 277 



INDEX. 



Fox, Mrs. Helen 1 442 

Fox, John 464 

Fox, Samuel E 441 

Frantz, Daniel A 251 

Frantz, M. K in 

Frantz, Theodore P 176 

Fretz, Milton B., M. D 23 1 

Fritz, Henry 396. 460 

Funck Family 343 

Funck, John K 343 

Funck, Josiah 80 

Funk, Aaron S 410 

Gable Family 187 

Gable, John F 188 

Gable, John W 188 

Garrett, Benjamin F 284 

Garrett, George W 518 

Garrett, Mrs. Maria S 284 

Gassert, George 76 

Gassert, William 448 

Gates, Alfred 426 

Gates, Alfred, M. D 652 

Gates, John 481 

(Jebhard, Edward 57S 

Gebhard, Henry L 170 

Gebhard, Miss Maria R 578 

Geib, Mrs. Mary 443 

Geib, Samuel 442 

George, Charles H 609 

Gerberich, Daniel P., M. D 168 

Gerberich, Edwin T 592 

Gerberich Family 168 

Gerberich, Morris B., M. D 312 

Gerberich, William 440 

Gerhart, Hon. Conrad G 120 

Gerhart Family 120. 749 

Gerhart, Jacob G 749 

Gerhart, Levi S 556 

German, Charles L 741 

Gettel, Josiah M 68 

Gibble, Aaron 656 

Gingrich, Christian, Sr 4S7 

Gingrich, Christian C 548 

Gingrich, Edward H., M. D 601 

Gingrich Family 405 

Gingrich, Henry B 375 

Gingrich, John H 405 

Gloninger, Andrew B., M. D 314 

Gloninger Family 314 



Gobin, Gen. John P. S 3 

Gockley, Hon. Henry S 366 

Greenawalt Family 176 

Greider, A. L 412 

Grittinger, Adam 272 

Grittinger, Henry C 273 

Groh, Abraham S 502 

Groh, Christian 295 

Groh, Israel W 159 

Groh, John H 296 

Groh, Mrs. Sabina E 159 

Grove, Jacob W 293 

Grove, Mrs. Pauline 294 

Grumbine, Ezra, M. D 8 

Grumbine, Lee L 48 

Grumbine, Mrs. Roie (x\dams) 51 

Guilford, Simeon 35 

Guilford, William M., M. D 35 

Haak Families 225, 525 

Haak, Henry 225 

Haak, Isaac B 467 

Haak, Samuel 525 

Harris, James A., M. D 702 

Hartnian, Abner 1 522 

Hartman, John W 401 

Hartz, Elias H 199 

Hartz, Levi 646 

Hauck, Adam 70 

Hauer, Mrs. Catherine 685 

Hauer, Elmer E 73, 

Hauer, Harvey T 542 

Hauer, Mrs. Louisa 58 

Hauer. Peter 189 

Hauer, Samuel 58 

Hauer, William H 685 

Heagy, Jacob 390 

Heilman Family 2^3 

Heilman, Reuben 497 

Heilman, Samuel P 233 

Henry, Charles V 635 

Henry Family 635 

Herr, Abraham E 434 

Herr Families 302, 445 

Herr, John 445 

Herr, Rudolph 30.5 

Her , Samuel 508 

Hershberger, Abraham 480 

Hertzler, Daniel R 643 

Hetrick, C. R 617 



INDEX. 



Hetrick, Valentine 707 

Heverling, Cyrus 705 

Hibshman Family 131 

Hibshman, Joseph G 142 

Hibshman, William H 131 

High, Maurice F 174 

Hitz, Cyrus 91 

Hoelzle, Joseph 637 

Hoelzle, Miss Mary A 637 

Hoffman, Hon. Cyrus E 85 

Holland, John A 597 

Hood Family 499 

Hood, James T 499 

Home Family 186 

Home, J. H., M. D 186 

Horst, Abraham S 133 

Horst, Andrew L 232 

Horst, Mrs. Clara L 232 

Horst Families 326, 428, 769 

Horst, Franklin B 695 

Horst, George H "JJ 

Horst, Harry B 770 

Horst, Henry B 4^8 

Horst, Irwin 694 

Horst, Jacob S 562 

Horst, Joseph S 695 

Horst, Peter 326 

Horst, Samuel S 232 

Houck, Alfred R i54 

Houck, Frank F 514 

Houck, Henry 154 

Houck, Luther F 359 

Huber, John 388 

Hull, William F 610 

Hunsicker, Frank W 688 

Hunsicker, John 240 

Hursh, J. B 416 

Hutter, Dr. Edwin W 677 

Hutter, Mrs. Elizabeth E 677 

Illig, Andrew S 462 

Illig, E. R 605 

Illig Families 2:2<' 46-. 605 

Illig, Hiram L 2>i 

Imboden Family 134 

Imboden, Philip L 482 

Imboden, Samuel K 135 

Imhof, John A 550 

Johnston, Mrs. Hannah F 117 



Johnston, Thomas S., D. D 117 

Kalbach Families I43. 539, 543 

Kalbach, Harrison 100 

Kalbach, Isaac A 561 

Kalbach, James 143 

Kalbach, Joseph E 539 

Kalbach, Nathaniel L 543 

Kalbach, Miss Sarah R 561 

Karch, Jacob B 276 

Karch, Mrs. Mary A 276 

Karch, Mrs. Minnie E 91 

Kaufman, William H 720 

Kegerreis Family 530 

Kegerreis, Isaac 529 

Kembel, George E 771 

Kettering, Jacob 447 

Kettering, John H 699 

Kettering, Samuel 501 

Killinger, Charles H 244 

Killinger Family 242 

Killinger, John H 280 

Killmoyer, John 510 

Kinports, Judge John H 17 

Kinports, H. Lucian iS 

Klein, Warren F., M. D 626 

Kleiser, John 155 

Klett, A. F 255 

Kline, George W., Jr 22, 

Kline, George W., Sr 23 

Kline, Mrs. Martha W 24 

Kline, Samuel M 589 

Kline, Willoughby C, M. D 687 

Klopp, Adam C 683 

Klopp, Jerome 173 

Knoll, Jonas L 253 

Krall Family 582 

Krall, John M 582 

Kreider, Aaron S 333 

Kreider, Abraham 292 

Kreider, Andrew 328 

Kreider, David 330 

Kreider, David A 45 

Kreider Families 43, 94. 106, j,z'& 

Kreider, Harry C 692 

Kreider, Henry H 331 

Kreider, Henry S 321 

Kreider, Bishop Jacob K 95 

Kreider, Joseph H 2,t,2 

Kreider, Joseph L 106 



INDEX. 



Kreider, Tobias K ^~s 

Kreider, William H 46 

Kreider, William L 43 

Kreiser, Elias B 3(3^ 

Kreiser Family 362, 

Kramer, Dr. Edward P 748 

Kremer, Franklin W., D. D 740 

Krum, Calvin D 489 

Krum Family 489 

Kurtz, j\Iiss Anna 533 

Kurtz, Benjamin 532 

Kurtz, Miss Eliza 533 

Landis, David U 737 

Landis, Jacob 567 

Landis, John M 638 

Landis, J\L D 620 

Lantz, Cyrus R 19 

Lauck, Joseph F 700 

Layser, David P 725 

Leininger, P. F 350 

Lenig, Charles A 645 

Lerch, Adam G 3O1 

Lerch Family 361 

Lerch, John H 6g [ 

Leslie, Cyrus H., M. D 408 

Light, Adam H 319 

Light, Christian H 281 

Light, Daniel S 724 

Light, David 579 

Light, Dawson L 564 

Light Families 236, 264. 554 

Light, Grant S 630 

Light, Harry H 112 

Light, Hezekiah 394 

Light, Ira J. (Lebanon) 733 

Light, Ira J. (Schaefferstown) b},2 

Light, Jacob H 451 

Light, Jacob K 554- 

Light, Jeremiah B 509 

Light, John H 642 

Light, John K 762 

Light, Joseph E 421 

Light, Joseph J., M. D 631 

Light, Nathaniel 650 

Light, Nimrod 265- 

Light, Samuel E 289 

Light, Samuel L 238 

Light, Seth 629 

Light, Simon P 533 



Light, Stephen A 266 • 

Lineaweaver Family 53 

Lineaweaver, Thomas T 54 

Long, Cyrus P 370 

Long Family 703 

Long, Henry L 622 

Long, Philip S 703 

Longenecker, Harry G 752 

Loose, Adam 528 

Loose, Harry B 761 

Lord, James 371 

Louser Family 568 

Louser, Harry G 731 

Louser, Henry 71 

Louser. Jacob E 71 

Louser, John 7 [ 

Louser, John H 568 

JMcCurdy, Elmer E 293 

AlcCurdy Family 299 

McGovern, Charles S 768 

McGovern, James F 545 

McNair, Mrs. Catherine E 434 

McNair, Franklin L 1.33 

Mack, J\lrs. John J 277 

i\Ianbeck, Edward K 496 

Manbeck, Mrs. Elmira 497 

Mark, Col. John U 28 

:\larshall, Edwin B., M. D 571 

Marshall, Joseph B., M. D 571 

Alaulfair, Augustus 346 

Maulfair, Daniel 346 

Maulfair, Homer D 713 

Meily, Judge Frank E 24 

Meily, Harry S., M. D 364 

Meily, John 320 

;\Ieiser Family 469 

Meiser, George S 469 

Mengel, Edmund W 740 

Meyer, David H 583 

Meyer, Henry D 722 

Millard, Jacob B 692 

Miller, Abraham H 256 

Miller, Adam B 258 

Miller, Charles L., M. D 195 

Miller, David W 194 

Miller, Edward W 536 

Miller Family 192, 256 

Miller, Franklin T 488 

Miller. Grant L 261 



INDEX. 



Miller, Harry lAl 196 

Miller, Henry 193 

Miller, Isaac V 97 

Miller, J. Henry 197 

Miller, John P 284 

Miller, Samuel B 621 

Mish Family 74 

Mish, John W 74 

Mock, Franklin 549 

Mock, John H 411 

Mock, Peter B 279 

Moore, Andrew P 165 

Moore, Daniel S 156 

Moore, Edward 66 

Moore Families 66, 156, 161, 586 

Moore, John M 586 

Moore, Jonathan W 163 

Moore, Mrs. Lizzie 157 

Moore, Michael M 161 

Mosser, Aaron W 485 

Moyer, Gabriel H 653 

Moyer, Major H. P 136 

Muth, H. M 651 

Newgard, Fliram G 633 

Newhard, James J 369 

Newhard, Mrs. Valeria S 369 

Nissley, Jacob 493 

Noel, Hon. William J 598 

Oberholtzer Family 5^5 

Oberholtzer, Jacob F 515 

Oberholtzer, John B 184 

Oltenbuerstel, Henry T 737 

Olwine, Daniel 655 

Olwine, John H 313 

Page, Rev. John M 335 

Painter Family 379. 5o6 

Painter, Jacob H 506 

Painter, Joseph M 379 

Parthemore, Jacob 395 

Patschke, Benjamin F 565 

Patschke. William 103 

Peiffer, Henry 574 

Peiffer, James F 603 

Peiffer, Samuel S 706 

Pfannkuch, Henry 738 

Rank, David F 167 



Rank, David S 209 

Rauch, Bernhard 47 

Rauch, John B 521 

Rauch, Miss Margaret J 47 

Ream, Alfred G 291 

Ream, T. Frank 686 

Rebstock, David 263 

Rehfuss, Abraham 753 

Relnoehl Family 56 

Reinoehl, George H 356 

Reinoehl, John K., A. M.. M. D 42 

Reinoehl, Tobias 56 

Reinoehl, Mrs Mary A 357 

Rex, Cyrus 72 

Rex Family 7- 

Richards Family 10 

Richards, Lieut. Henry M. M 10 

Ricker Family 107 

Ricker, Samuel 107 

Riegel, Samuel 227 

Rigler, Albert C 383 

Rigler Family 382 

Rise, Adam 32 

Rise, Jacob L 33 

Rise, William S 215 

Risser, Abraham L 704 

Risser Family 205 

Risser, John S 205 

Risser, Samuel S 325 

Risser, Ulysses G., M. D 657 

Ritcher, Abner A 641 

Roberts, Mrs Mary 756 

Roberts, Tobias 756 

Rodearmel, John R 229 

Roller, Michael 717 

Roop, Rev. Hervin U., A. B., A. M., 

Ph. D 47^ 

Rover, Nathan H 600 

Rummel, A. S 420 

Salem United Brethren Church 180 

Samler, Louis 538 

Sanders, Samuel 157 

Saylor, Clayton P 175 

Savior, David L 334 

Saylor Family 175 

Schaefifer, Mrs. Emma S 562 

Schaeffer, Thomas J 561 

Schantz Family 244 

Schantz, Rev. Franklin J. F., D. D.... 244 



INDEX. 



Schmaltz, Edward 140 

Schmaltz Family 140 

Schmaiik, Rev. Theodore E., D. D. . . . 25 

Schock, Mrs. Emma J 625 

bchock, George B 625 

Schropp, Adam B = fq 

See, Richard J 7 

Seibert, Mrs. Amanda 214 

Seibert Family 213 

Seibert, George U 213 

Seibert, George W., J\I. D 450 

Seidle, C. N 381 

Seltzer, Col. A. Frank 18 

Shaak Family 95 

Shaak, Reuben A 95 

Sheaf, John B 74^ 

Sheaffer, William 61S 

Shenk, Christian 304 

Shenk, David 478 

Shenk Family 88 

•Shenk, Henry 88 

Shenk, Jacob M 104 

Shenk, John H in 

Sherk Family 63 

Sherk, John H 716 

Sherk, John K 63 

Shindel Family 660 

Shindel, Col. Jacob 665 

Shindel, Col. Jacob A 672 

Shindel, Lieut. Jay M ■ 673 

Shindel, Hon. John 667 

Shindel, John Peter 662 

Shirk, Howard C 682 

Shneider, Charles 745 

Sholly, Henry J 229 

Shoop, Monroe F 698 

Shope, Jacob B 535 

Shugar, Mrs. Catharine 361 

Shugar, John H 360 

Shultz, Abner W., :\I. D 374 

Siegrist Family 2>i7 

Siegrist, Henry W ZZl 

Smith, Augustus S., }*I. D 27S 

Smith, Henry 729 

Smith, Jacob 578 

Smith, Joseph .\ 631 

Smith, Simon P 135 

Smith, William H. H 351 

Suavely, Henry C 527 

Snyder, Christian H 736 



Sowers, Edwin U 268 

Sowers, Joseph A 267 

Spahn, William H 572 

Spang, George H 306 

Spang, George T 309 

Spangler Family 1 19 

Spangler. Michael 119 

Spangler, rhoui.is G 323 

Spannuth, Aaron G 558 

Spayd, Daniel K 627 

Sprecher Family 51 

Sprecher, John S 51 

Staeger, Jacob W 735 

Stager Family 491 

Stager, Jonas H. W 491 

Stabler, Rev. William E., D. D 476 

Stambaugh, Mrs. Emma E 393 

Stambaugh, Samuel C 392 

Stauffer, Abraham G 547 

Stauffer, A. S 748 

Stein Family 86 

Stein, Thomas S 86 

Steiner, Aaron H 261 

Steiner, George H 340 

Stiner, Levi 570 

Stohler, John B 273 

Stoner, Augustus D 305 

Stoner, Mrs. Susan 306 

Strack Family 149 

Strack, George M 149 

Strickler, Cyrus F 424 

Strickler Family 425 

Strickler, Monroe J. 256 

Strohm Family 437 

Strohm, J. M., RL D 437 

Strohman. Joseph 743 

Swonger, John J 404 

Swope. A. P 588 

Swope, Davilla 396 

Swope, Edwin S 575 

Thomas, John H 171 

Thompson, Pierce H 624 

Tice, Andrew iiS 

Tice, David 55 

Tice, William P 483 

Trabert. J. William, M. D 393 

Trautman Family 398 

Trautman, ^\'illiam G 397 

Uhrich, George W 239 



INDEX. 



Uhrich, John 477 

Uhrich, Mrs. Mary 240 

Uhrich, Valentine D 431 

Umbenhen, George 444 

Umberger, Edmund R., M. D 127 

Umberger, Henry G 128 

Urich, Isaac K., M. D 385 

van de Sande, William 148 

Vogt, Aaron M 591 

Wagner, Charles B., D. D. S 122 

Walborn, Edward Z 422 

Walborn, Noah P 471 

Walter Family 144 

Walter, John, M. D 144 

Ward, Benjamin F 486 

Warner, D. H., M. D 586 

Weaver, Daniel 166 

Weaver, William L 2,2"/ 

Weber Family 754 

Weber, Misses Laura J. and Anna E. . . 756 

Weber, Samuel 754 

Weidman Family 200 

Weidman, Grant 202 

Weidman, Grant, Jr 203 

Weigley Family 269 

Weigley, John J 269 

Weimer Family 64 

Weimer, John A 66 

Weimer, Lucian E 64 

Weirick, Charles D 594 

Weirick, John H 454 

Weiss, Charles Z 312 

Weiss, Henry S 310 

Weiss, Samuel, M. D 40 

Wenger Family 298 

Wenger, John L 298 



Wengert, John 576 

Werner Family 639 

Werner, Frank M 639 

Westenberger, Rev. David 83 

Westenberger, Henry B 715 

Westenberger, Jacob 158 

Westenberger, John A 681 

Wilhelm, John H 524 

Wilhelm, M. H 712 

Wise, David F 456 

Witman, Absalom M 432 

Witmer, Charles K 31 

Witmer, Frank B., M. D 452 

Witmer, Peter B., A. M 30 

Witmoyer, John H 453 

Wittle, Samuel 767 

Worth. Titus T 128 

Yingst Family 386 

Yingst, John A 386 

Young. John 39 

Young. IMrs. Mary A 40 

Zeigler, Uriah C 465 

Zeigler, Uriah C, Jr 466 

Zerbe Family 98 

Zerbe, Thomas T, M. D 98 

Zimmerman, Miss Ann M 209 

Zimmerman, Cyrus F '. . . 212 

Zimmerman, Harry, D. D. S 460 

Zimmerman, John G 563 

Zimmerman, Peter 208 

Zinn, Eli 585 

Zinn Family 207 

Zinn, George 207 

Zinn, John 357 

Zug Family 79 

Zug, John L 79 





{^^^l 



^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 



GEORGE DAAVSON COLEMAN. With very few exceptions the busi- 
ness of the city of Lebanon is carried on by descendants of old and worthy 
famihes, whose individual members in their time were prominently identified 
with the institutions of the county. Ever since the name of Lebanon was 
attached to a county organization the family of Coleman has been through its 
different members very prominently identified with the advancement and 
progress for wdiich this section of the State is so distinguished. 

Robert Coleman, the progenitor of the family in America, was one of 
the most successful ironmasters in Lancaster county, Pa., during the latter 
part of the eighteenth century, and was not only prominent in the business 
world, but became a man of distinction in the public life of the State, having 
been a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly as early as 1788. He was also 
for many years associate judge of Lancaster county. ■ Robert Coleman was 
born November 4, 1748, near Castlefin, in County Donegal, Ireland, and came 
to this country in 1764, arriving at Philadelphia. He carried letters to Blair 
McClanaghan and the Messrs. Biddle. who recommended him to Mr. Read, 
then prothonotary of Reading, Pa., who employed him for two years. At 
the end of that time he became a clerk for Peter Grubb, at Hopewell Forge, 
with whom he remained six months, leaving to take a place at Quinttapahilla 
Forge, near Lebanon, Pa., owned by James Old, who had large iron works 
near Reading and Norristown for some time. Some time later, when Mr. Old 
removed from Speedwell Forge to Reading Furnace, he took Mr. Coleman 
with him, and they were associated in business for some years. While at the 
Furnace ■Nlr. Coleman married Mr. Old's eldest daughter, and not long after- 
ward he rented Salford Forge, near Norristown, where he continued for 
three years. In 1776 he moved to Elizabeth Furnace, in Lancaster county, 
which he first rented, afterward buying it gradually from the different members 

1 



2 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

of the firm who owned it — Stiegel, Stedman & Benezet. There he manu- 
factured ammunition for the Government during the Revolutionary war, and 
it is of interest to note that the iron chain which was stretched across the Dela- 
ware river below Philadelphia, to prevent the approach of the British warships 
at the time that city was threatened by Gen. Clinton, was manufactured by 
him. He was the first of his family to obtain an interest in the ore bank of 
Cornwall, Lebanon county, which he purchased from the Grubb family. Mr. 
Coleman was a man possessed of a penchant for hard work, which, coupled 
with fine business judgment, soon caused him to forge to the front as a lead- 
ing man in the iron business. On October 4. 1773. he married Anne Old, 
who was born May 21, 1756, and they had four sons. \\'illiam, Edward, James 
and Burd. Mr. Coleman retired from business and removed to Lancaster in 
1809. 

Tames Coleman passed his life in the iron business in Lancaster and 
Lebanon counties. He married a IMiss Dawson, of Philadelphia, who bore 
him the following children : George Dawson ; Ann ; Sarah ; Harriet : and 
Robert. 

George Dawson Coleman was btirn in Philadelphia January 13, 1825. 
He received his preparatory education at Princeton. X. J., and then matricu- 
lated at the Lmiversitv of Pennsylvania, Collegiate Department, from which 
he graduated in 1843. Ii^ 1846. together with his brother Robert, he came to 
Lebanon count v and erected the Xorth Lebanon Furnaces (the first anthra- 
cite furnaces built in Lebanon county ) , where they began the manufacture of 
pig-iron. The brothers owned together a 15-48 interest iii the Cornwall ore 
deposit. In 1852 Robert withdrew from the firm, and from that time until 
his death the North Lebanon Furnaces were owned and operated by George 
Dawson Coleman, and were left intact to his heirs. During his life !Mr. Cole- 
man was a successful and enterprising iron manufactiu'er, and was well and 
favorablv known in that connection throughout the State. He was a large 
stockholder in the Pennsylvania Steel Company, at Steelton, Dauphin county. 
He was a warm supporter of the Go\ernment during the Civil war, and was 
one of that noble band of capitalists who furnished the sinews of war freely, 
and without whom the Go\-ernment could not have prosecuted a successful 
fight against rebellion. He contributed liberally of his own means to the 
organization and equipment of the difi^erent regiments from his section of the 
State, and especial mention should be made of the Xinety-third Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, which regiment he was instrumental in raising, contributing over 
$10,000 for its equipment, and whose subsequent military career he watched 
with intense interest and solicitude. He also gave liberallv to the assistance 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 3 

of the widows and orplians uf thdse wlio fought in the ranks. 'Sir. Coleman 
was an active member of the Sanitary Commission, and fre(|uentlv in person 
distributed its stores upon the battleheld. He was deeply interested in and 
clieerfuhy aided all movements tending to develop and improx'e the com- 
munity. He was a member of the State Board of Charities from the time 
of its organization, in 1869. and was president of the same at the time of his 
death. For a number of years lie was president of the b'irst National Bank 
of Lebanon. In his earlier life he was prominent in the political affairs of 
the State, as a matter of duty serving during the Civil war in the State As- 
sembly, and subsequenth' ser\-ing three years in the State Senate. His course 
as a legislator was marked by the faithful and conscientious discharge of all 
his duties, and he was recog'nized as a valuable coadjutor in the important 
work of legislation. 

In his religious character ]\Ir. Coleman was most exemplarv. He took 
a deep and personal interest in the religious welfare of those in his employ, 
and erected and supported chiu'ches f( ir them at Elizabeth and Lebanon Fur- 
naces. Several vears before his death ]\Ir. Coleman presented his grandfa- 
ther's residence, at the corner of Front and Pine streets. Philadelphia, to St. 
Peter's Church, contributing in addition a large sum for the purpose of alter- 
ing and arranging- the house for their mission work. His whole life was an 
example of generosity and kindness of heart, and in the community in which 
he lived and labored no man was more universally respected and beloved. His 
home life was a model of excellence and conjugal felicity. He married in 
1852 Miss Deborah Brown, a native of Philadelphia, daughter of William 
and Deborah (Norris) Brown, wIkj are now deceased, and she sur\-ived him, 
as did also two sons and five daughters. The following children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Coleman: Robert. Harriet, Debbie N.. Sarah, James. Frances. 
\\"illiam. Bertram Dawson. Edward and Annie. 

George Dawson Coleman died at Lebanon September 9. 1878, after a 
long and useful life, mourned bv a verv large concourse of friends and neigh- 
bors, who were unanimous in the opinion that his death was a distinct public 
calamity. 

GEN. JOHN PETER SHINDEL GOBIX. If. as has been written In- 
one of the bards, ''true history is biography," it follows that to chronicle the 
deeds and achievements of the successful and representative citizens of a 
community is but to write the historv of that communitv, and the biographer 
becomes the true historian. Thus it will be seen that the importance of making 
permanent record of the Yives of men who have contributed to the material 



4 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

growth and development of a community, and have reflected credit and honor 
upon it, cannot be overestimated. 

Lebanon county. Pa., counts among her citizens many who are well worthy 
of the distinction of receiving extended notice in any volume devoted to the 
annals of the county, and among all of them stands conspicuously Gen. John 
Peter Shindel Gobin, the present lieutenant governor of the Commonwealth, 
who by reason of his long and useful life, his brilliant military record, his 
distinguished career as a public official, and his sterling worth as a man, 
has won the admiration and esteem of all who know him. not only among 
his fellow citizens of Lebanon, but throughout the entire State. 

Gen. Gobin is a native of Pennsylvania, having been born at Sunbury, 
Northumberland county, January 26, 1837, and comes of sturdy pioneer 
stock. His paternal ancestors were numbered among the soldiers of the 
Revolutionary and other wars of the country, while among his maternal 
ancestors were ministers of renown. Charles Gobin, his great-grandfather, 
was a captain in a l^attalion of Berks county associators, and served in the 
Jersey campaign in the war of the Revolution during the summer of 1780, 
and later was on the frontiers in command of a company of militia to protect 
the settlers from the threatened invasion of the Indians, Tories and British 
from New York. His grandfather, Edward Gobin. was a soldier of the 
war of 1812-14. On the maternal side, his grandfather, John Peter Shindel, 
for whom he was named, was a pioneer Lutheran minister, who resided in 
Lebanon at the beginning of the last century, removing to Sunbury. Pa., 
about the year 1812. His son. Rev. Jeremiah Shindel, a noted member of the 
Lutheran ministry, was born in LelDanon. Prior to studying for the ministry 
Rev. Jeremiah served an apprenticeship at the printer's trade in Harrisburg,. 
where he had as fellow workmen the late distinguished Pennsylvanians, 
Simon Cameron and William and John Bigler. Later he prepared for the 
ministry, in 1830 was licensed to preach, and in 1831 was ordained. In 
1859 he was elected to the State Senate of Pennsylvania from the district 
composed of Lehigh and Northampton counties, serving as senator for three 
years. In 1862 he was appointed chaplain of the One Hundred and Tenth 
Regiment. P. V. I., and served two years. 

The parents of Gen. Gobin were Samuel S. and Susan (Shindel) Gobin, 
the former of whom was a large contractor. Gen. Gobin inherited the 
martial spirit of his paternal ancestors, and the scholarly characteristics of 
those on the maternal side. He received an academic education in the schools 
of his native town, and learned the printer's trade in the office of the Sunbury 
American. Later, under the preceptorship of M. L. Shindel and Gen. J. K. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 5 

Clement, he studied law, and was admitted to the Bar in 1858. His early 
professional career, however, was mterrupted by the breaking out of the 
Civil war, as, upon President Lincoln's first call for three months' men, he 
left his law practice and entered the army, April 19, 1861, as first lieutenant 
of Company F. Eleventh Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers. At the expira- 
tion of his term of enlistment he returned to his home, recruited a company, 
and on September 2, 1861, was commissioned captain of the same, which 
was mustered in as Company C, Forty-seventh Regiment, Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteers. Promotion was rapid for this intrepid young soldier, and he was 
•successively advanced to the ranks of major, lieutenant-colonel and colonel 
of the Forty-seventh Regiment, and was brevetted brigadier-general of vol- 
unteers for meritorious services on March 13, 1865, and complimented in 
general orders for gallantry at the battle of Pocotaligo, S. C. Besides the 
latter engagement he participated in those of St. John's Blufif, Sabine Cross 
Roads, Pleasant Hill and Cane River Crossing, serving in the departments 
of the South, the Gulf and the Shenandoah. Gen. Gobin was with Gen. Sheri- 
dan in his celebrated campaign, during a portion of the time commanding a 
brigade in the Nineteenth Corps, participating in the battles of Opequan and 
Fisher's Hill, and particularly distinguished himself at Cedar Creek, where 
his command was right of Sheridan's line. When a portion of the line gave 
way from the severe pressure of the enemy's front, which overlapped the 
Union force. Gen. Gobin held fast, and thus gave the enemv its first repulse, 
which proved the turning point in the tide of battle. For a time he was 
Judge Advocate General of the Department of the South, and remained with 
his regiment at Charleston, S. C, in command of the First sub-district, acting 
as Provost Judge of that city, until January, t866. He was mustered out 
of the service on January gth, of that year. 

Immediately after leaving the army. Gen. Gobin located in Lebanon, and 
resumed the practice of his profession, and there he has since resided and fol- 
lowed the law. meeting with a success that has easily placed him at the head 
of the Lebanon County Bar. The public life of Gen. Gobin has been varied, 
and imiformly successful and distinguished. Early in his professional career 
he served for a time as county solicitor of Lebanon county, and this was fol- 
lowed, in 1884, by his election to the State Senate, in which body he 
served continuously from that year until 1899. an unprecedented term, 
resigning in the latter vear to assume the duties of the office of lieutenant- 
governor of the State, to which position he had been elected at the general 
election of i8g8. He has served as a trustee of the Soldiers' and Sailors' 



6 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Home at Erie : as a commissioner of the Soldiers' Orphan Schools ; and as 
commissioner of the Gettysburg Monumental Association. In 1874 he was 
commissioned colonel of the Eighth Regiment, National Guard of Pennsyl- 
vania, and since 1885 he has been brigadier-general of the Third Brigade 
of the Guard, and commanded in the numerous riots of the State. During 
the Spanish-American war he held a commission as brigadier-general of 
A'olunteers. 

Gen. Gobin assisted in the organization of the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic, and has had conferred upon him the highest honors of the organization, 
having been elected department commander in 1886, and commander-in-chief 
of the organization in the United States in 1897. He is an active member 
of the Loval Legion, and of the Sons of the Revolution. In fraternal society 
circles he is very acti\"e and prominent; has been Grand Commander of the 
Knights Templars of Pennsyh'ania , Grand Captain General of the Grand 
Encampment of the L'nited States; Grand Generalissimo; Deputy Grand Com- 
mander and Grand ]\Iaster of the United States. In Odd Eellowship he is a 
Past Grand Patriarch of the State of Pennsylvania. 

Aside from his profession Gen. Gobin has various local interests and 
connections of importance, being a member of the board of directors of the 
First National Bank, of Lebanon, and of the Cornwall & Lebanon Railway 
Company, and also solicitor for l^oth corporations. 

As a soldier, public official, lawyer and citizen. Gen. Gobin has had a 
brilliant and uniformlv successful career. As a young man he abandoned 
his chosen profession at the threshold, to go to the front and serve his conntry 
in her hour of peril with an ardor that patriotism could alone inspire, there to 
win laurels and fame; as a public official he has displayed wisdom, conserva- 
tism and executive ability far abo\e the ordinary, winning merited recognition 
and promotion at the hands of his fellow-citizens and the State at large; as a 
lawyer he has won a place at the head of the Bar of both his county and State; 
and as a citizen, he leaves nothing tO' be desired. 

Gen. Gobin is of pleasing personality; kind and courteous to all, of com- 
manding figure and magnetic temperament, he impresses favorably all who 
come in contact with him. His characteristics are strong and rugged — a 
stanch friend, a good fighter, but generous foe, warm-hearted and charitable. 
These are traits which, coupled with his achievements, have endeared him to 
his many friends and won him the respect and admiration of his enemies, 
if enemies he has, and where is the man who has impressed his personality 
upon the affairs of his time that has not? 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 7 

RICHARD J. SEE. Among the prominent and influential citizens of 
Lebanon county few occupy a more enviable position in public esteem than 
does Richard J. See, the president of the ]\Iyersto\vn National Bank, and 
business man and capitalist well kmown all over the State. 

Br birth Mr. See is a Pennsylvanian, and his early ancestors were of 
German extraction, his maternal grandfather, Jacob Seltzer, having been a 
native of Germany, and one of the leading and most influential men in Berks 
county, through a long and active life. The birth of Mr. See took place 
at Womelsdorf, in Berks county, and he was one of a family of six children 
born to George and Elizabeth (Seltzer) See, the f(-irmer of whom was born 
in 1799, ill Schuylkill county, Pa., and came to Berks county in young man- 
hood. By trade he was a builder and contractor, and became well and favor- 
ablv known in his locality, rearing a family which has reflected credit upon him 
and the community. His wife, Elizabeth (Seltzer), born in 1804. died Octo- 
ber 7, 1 88-1, 'iiifl the death of Mr. See occurred in 1869. Their children were 
as follows: Jonathan, of Berks county; Charles, of Ashland, Schuylkill 
county: Eliza, deceased: Richard J., of i\lyerstown : Helen, wife of John A. 
Oberly, of Oil City, Pa. : and Jane, who died young. In politics ^Ir. See 
was identified with the Democratic party. The family was reared in and 
has always been consistently connected with the Reformed Church. 

Richard J. See was reared in the village of his birth, and secured his 
education in the local schools. At the age of sixteen years he entered the 
employ of a village merchant, Elias Fiddler, in the capacitv of clerk, and there 
he learned the principles of this business, which five years later he put 
into practice, when, in association with William S. Filbert, he purchased Mr. 
Fiddler's business and conducted a general store for the succeeding five years. 
In 1 861 he came to Lebanon county and engaged in farming, continuing to 
follow agricultural pursuits for some seven years, and then began dealing in 
horses, and for fifteen years he continued to follow this line, becoming well 
known east and Avest for his honest and upright methods of doing business. 
In 1884 he retired from the farm, and with his wife and infant granddaughter 
removed to Myerstown, where he purchased an elegant home, and which pleas- 
ant city has ever since been their place of residence. As one of the organizers 
of the Myerstown Bank, his interest has always centered in this institution 
and he has served on its board of directors and as vice-president, and, upon 
the death of the late A. H. Carmbny. became its able president. Since that 
time his careful, conser\ative course has retained him the confidence of the 
financial world, and he is one of the most highly regarded citizens of this place. 

In 1858 :\Ir. See was united in marriage with ]Miss Mary Elizabeth 



8 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Leisse, daughter of John S. and Rebecca (Van Reed) Leisse, prominent farm- 
ing people of Berks county, now deceased, who had a family of three children, 
Margaret Anna. John Calvin, and Mrs. See, the latter being the only sur- 
vivor. One daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. See, Annie R., who became 
the wife of George H. Horst, and who passed away at the early age of 
twenty-two years, on October 28, 1884, leaving behind an infant daughter, 
Mary E., who has taken her mother's place in the hearts and home of her 
grandparents. She is a young lady of most winning personality, and is pur- 
suing her studies at Bryn Mawr College, being particularly talented in music. 
Like his honored father, Mr. See has always supported Democratic can- 
didates and principles. He is a man of luierring judgment and has con- 
sistently sustained a reputation for safe and conservative business methods. 
He is at all times approachable in matters concerning the public weal, and is 
charitable and benevolent in private life, never having been a man of ostenta- 
tion. In him Myerstown finds one of her best citizens. 

EZRA GRUMBINE, M. D. This is a familiar and honored name in 
Lebanon county, where the bearer has for many years gone in and out before 
the people in the busy life of a practicing physician, and has ever evidenced 
a disposition to sacrifice his own comfort in order to ameliorate the sufTer- 
ings of others. Dr. Grumbine is not only well and favorably known in the 
field of medicine, but of late years has made his genius felt in the line of 
finance, being at the present time president of the Lebanon County Trust 
Company, one of the leading financial institutions in this section of the State. 

Dr. Grumbine was born February r, 1845, ^t Fredericksburg, Pa. He 
traces his ancestry six generations back to Leonhart Krumbein, who im- 
migrated from the Palatinate in Germany to this country, crossing the ocean 
in the ship "Brothers." and landing at Philadelphia on September 30. 1754- 
Settling near Schaefferstown. Pa., he reared a family of children among whom 
was a son who received his father's name of Leonhart. This Leonhart's 
son. Jacob, migrated to the northern part of Bethel township. Lebanon 
county, Pa., to a farm at the foot of the "Little Mountain." two miles north 
of Fredericksburg. 

Among Jacob's numerous family was one who received the name of 
John Grumbine, a man of short stature and kind disposition, who married 
Susanna Feehrer, and they had one child. John Philip Grumbine. the father 
of the subject of this sketch. Mrs. John Philip Grumbine's maiden name 
was Maria Light. 

Dr. Ezra Grumbine was educated in the common schools of his native 




''■^'i-" ^•«!a>r;S &'£' 




^-^-^-t^J 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 9 

village, at the Lebanon Valley Institute at Annville, at Dickinson Seminary, 
Williamsport, and at the Medical Department of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, graduating from the latter institution, in March, 1868, wth the de- 
gree of Doctor of Medicine. His preceptors in the study of medicine were 
Drs. Fahnestock and Grumbine at Annville, and Dr. H. K. Hartzell at Goods- 
ville, in Lehigh county. Previous to his entering upon his medical career, 
he taught school in Bethel and South Annville townships, and for one season 
had charge of the school in the borough of Dillsburg, in York county, 
Pennsylvania. 

In 1869 lie settled in Fredericksburg for the practice of his profession, 
but two years later removed to Mt. Zion, where he has since resided, enjoy- 
ing a large general practice. He keeps in close touch with his profession, 
and is a member of the Pennsylvania State Medical Society, and of the 
local county association. He is also a member of the Lebanon County 
Historical Society, to whose literature he has at different times made con- 
tributions; and in 1894 he read a lyric poem in the local vernacular before 
the annual meeting of the Pennsylvania German Society at Reading. He 
is one of the earliest members of this association. Appointed postmaster 
by Postmaster-General Key in 1877. he served in that capacity at Mt. Zion 
for thirteen years. 

Dr. Grumbine is a gentleman of decided opinions, and has the courage 
■of his convictions when once he has made up his mind. This was shown in 
the fall of 1892 when he accepted the nomination for Congress on the Pro- 
hibition platform, making a gallant losing fight. Of late years he has given 
considerable attention to business lines, and in 1902 became one of a party 
of gentlemen who organized the Lebanon County Trust Company, and was 
elected its president. This institution is rapidly taking rank as one of the 
leading financial centers of the section, owing to the careful management of 
its board of directors. 

The Doctor is a man of refined and cultivated tastes, and is not only a 
master of the two lines mentioned, but has evinced a decided literary bent 
which he has frequently indulged as a means of relaxation from his pro- 
fessional labors. From the fact that his verses, both in English and in the 
Pennsylvania German vernacular, have been copied by metropolitan journals, 
and that his productions have appeared in Philadelphia. New York and Bos- 
ton, his friends have solicited him to have a volume of his writings published. 
This he may do at some time in the future. 

In 1868 Dr. Grumbine was married to Annie Elizabeth Beaver, eldest 
daughter of Dr. Daniel H. Beaver, of Fredericksburg. She was born De- 



lo BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

cember 13, 1849. ^^^ died in September, 1880, leaving two sons and one 
daughter. Harvey Carson, the elder son, was educated in the common schools 
of Mt. Zion, Fredericksburg and Lebanon ; at Palatinate College, Myerstown ; 
Lafayette College, Easton; and Wesleyan University, Connecticut, at which 
last named institution he took the degree of Ph. B. He then went abroad 
and finished his studies with a three-years course in the University of ]Munich, 
Germany, where he received the degree, cum landc, of Doctor of Philosophy. 
He is at the present time filling the chair of English Literature in the Uni- 
versity of Wooster, State of Ohio. Thaddeus Stevens, the other son. was edu- 
cated in the common schools and at Schuylkill Seminary at Fredericksburg. 
He served an apprenticeship as a druggist, and matriculated as a student in the 
College of Pharmacy at Philadelphia, but ill health obliged him to abandon 
the study. Bessie Shirley, the daughter, was educated at the ^loravian Semi- 
nary and College for Women at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

The second marriage of the Doctor occurred January 10. 1882, when 
he called to preside over his home. Miss Virginia S. Uhler, a native of Lebanon 
and a daughter of the late Captain Joseph Uhler, whose early ancestor was 
Anastasius Uhler, a Palatine immigrant who landed at Philadelphia from the 
ship "Samuel," August 11, 1732. 

LIEUT. HENRY MELCHIOR MUHLENBERG RICHARDS. The 
city of Lebanon, the center of a county of the most fertile of Pennsylvania's 
farming lands, figuratis'elv lldwing with "milk and honey," worthily bears a 
name made famous in the early days of Christian history. It is the home of 
wealth, culture and education, numbering among its citizens many who have, 
with honor, distinguished themselves in notable fields of activity. In recall- 
ing these the biographer finds a prominent example in Lieut. Henry ]\Ielchior 
IMuhlenberg Richards, who has not only been himself disting-uished, but whose 
ancestrv is also one of eminence in the religious, military and public life of the 
State and Nation. 

Henry Melchior Muhlenberg Richards was born August 16, 1848, in 
St. John's Evangelical Lutheran parsonage at Easton, Pa., a son of Rev. 
John William Richards, D. D., who was born April 18, 1803, and died Janu- 
ary 24, 1854, a prominent divine of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. He 
was given the degree of D. D. by Jefierson College, August 6, 1851 : was 
secretary of the Ministerium in 1843, and served three terms in that incum- 
bency, and was elected president of the same in 1850. which office he held at 
the time of his death. On May 21, 1835, he married Andora Garber, born 
Mav 21, 181 s, died Mav 26, i8q2, onlv daughter of Henrv Garber. born 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. ii 

March 23, 1792, died November i, 1848, and Susanna Paul. Ijorn September 
2, 1789, died June 4. 1832, daughter of Abraham Paul, born July 11. 1765, 
died March 29, 1823, and Ann Barbara Hortter, born September 18, 1764, 

died April 11, 1845, ^'^'"^ ^^ Abraham Paul, born July 28, 1730, died , 

son of Andrew Paul, born about 1700, died 1790, in Germantown, Pa., and 
Elizabeth Reiner, daughter of Henry Reiner, born in 1675, died in 1749, of 
Limerick, Montg'omery county. Henry Garber Avas a son of Benjamin 
Garber, born February 20. 1769. died August 6, 181 8, and Hannah Reiner, 
born May 5, 1774, died April 27, 1861 (daughter of Henry Reiner, born in 
1738, died February 19, 1816, and Susanna Gisbert, born 1742, died Feliru- 
ary 24. 1816, the former a son of Philip Reiner, born about 1712. died 
about 1795, son of Henry Reiner, born in 1675, ^^^^^^ '" 1749)- son of Benedict 
Garber, of Alsace, Germany, born October 13, 1732, died June 12, 1817. The 
latter emigrated to Trappe, Montgomery county. Pa., in 1741. and during the 
Revolution served in Capt. Jacob Peterman's Fourth Co., Sixth Battalion, 
Philadelphia County Militia, of 1780. On November 2/, 1758. he married 
Dorothea Loreht, born December 5, 1733, died February 25, 1807. Benedict 
Garber was a son of Henry and Catherine Garber. both of whom died on 
shipboard in 1741. 

Rev. John William Richards, D. D., was a son of Hon. Matthias Rich- 
ards, born February 26. 1758, who died August 4, 1830, of Reading, Pa., 
volunteer in Col. Daniel LUlree's Second Battalion, Berks County Regiment, 
1777, at the battles of Brandy wine and Germantown, and in operations prior 
to the encampment at Valley Forge: Major of the Fourth Battalion Phila- 
delphia County Regiment, 1780; Justice of the Peace, 1788, for forty years; 
Judge of Berks County Courts, 1791-97, also about 1824; Inspector of Cus- 
toms, 1801-02; Member of Congress. 1807-11; Collector of Revenue, 1812; 
Clerk of Orphan's Court for Berks county, 1823; Trustee of Trinity Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Church, of Reading. Pa. On May 8, 1782, he married 
Maria Salome Muhlenberg, born July 13. 1766, died March 13, 1827. sister 
of Major-Gen. John Peter Gabriel Muhlenberg, of the Continental army, of 
Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg, first Speaker of the United States 
Congress, and Rev. Gotthilf Henry Ernst Muhlenberg, D. D., prominent Luth- 
eran divine and eminent botanist. She was the youngest daughter of Rev. 
Henry Melchior Muhlenberg, D. D.. born Sei)tember 6, 171 1, who died Octo- 
ber 7. 1787, the distinguished Patriarch of the Evangelical Lutheran Church 
in America, and Anna Maria Weiser, born June 24. 1727, died August 22r 
1802 (daughter of Col. John Conrad Weiser, born November 2, 1696. died 
July 13, 1760, married 1720. Anna Eve , born January 2^. 1700,, 



€2 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

died December 2-/, I'j'j'^. ihe eminent head of the Indian Bureau of the Prov- 
ince of Pennsylvania, 1731-60; Justice of the Peace. 1741-52; President Judge 
of Berks County Courts, 1752-60; Lieutenant Colonel, October 31. 1755. 
-commanding the First Battalion, Pennsylvania Regiment, in defense of the 
Blue Ridge frontier during the French and Indian War ; son of John Conrad 
Weiser, born 1660, died 1746. and Anna Magdalena Uebele, born 1666, died 
May I, 1709; leader of the German Palatine immigration into Xew York 
Province, 1710; Captain of German contingent from Queensbury, in British 
army assembled at Albany, N. Y.. during summer of 171 1, as an expedition 
against Montreal, Canada: son of Jacob Weiser, born about 1625; son of 
Jacob Weiser, born about 1590, both holding the honorable ofifice of "Schuld- 
heisz,'" or Chief Magistrate, of Gross-Aspach, County of Backnang, Wurtem- 
berg, Germany) ; son of Nicholaus Melchior Muhlenberg, of Eimbeck, Han- 
over, (jermany, and Anna Mary Kleinschmid. daughter of an officer in mili- 
tary service; a scion of the German noble "von Miihlenberg" family, which 
had its origin in Ziracka, a prince of the Wendish and Sorbic tribes, who was 
converted to Christianity about 950, A. D., and had his residence near the 
present city of Muhlberg. Hon. Matthias Richards was a son of Matthias 
Richards, born January 9, 1719, and died March 28, 1775. of New Holland 
township. Montgomery countv. Pa., a j^rominent and wealthy landed proprie- 
tor of that locality, and member of the building committee of the Swamp 
Evangelical Lutheran Church in 1767 (married, about 1748. Ann Margaret 
Hillegas, born August 15, 1726, died January 6, 1773, daughter of John 
Frederick Hillegas. bom November 24. 1685, died January 6, 1765, and Eliza- 
beth Barbara , who died March 4. 1759; a prominent resident of 

"Goshenhoppen," Montgomery county. Pa., whence he emigrated from Ger- 
many, arriving September 18, 1727; uncle of Michael Hillegas, first Treasurer 
of the United States, 1775-1789) ; son of John Frederick Reichert, born 1679, 
in Augsburg, Germany, who died in September, 1748, and was buried at 
Swamp Exangelical Lutheran Church, of which he was one of the founders ; 

arrived in America about 1700 or 1703; married Anna Maria . born 

1685, who died March 18. 1756; son of an officer in the German army. 

Lieut. Richards received his preliminary education in the public schools 
of the city of Reading, Pa., to which place his father removed, from Easton. 
Pa., in March, 185 1, and where he died while pastor of Trinity Evangelical 
Lutheran Church. On June 30, i860, he entered the Reading High School, 
at the head of all the male applicants, graduating from the same in 1864. In 
June. 1863. at the age of fourteen years, he enlisted as a private (doing duty 
as a drummer), in Company A. Twenty-sixth Emergency Regiment. Pennsyl- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. ij 

vania Volunteers, and served through the Gettysburg campaign, participating 
in the battle of Gettysburg. In disguise, he and his brother penetrated into 
the midst of Early's Corps of the Confederate army, and were the first to give 
notice of its retrograde movement from Harrisburg towards Gettysburg. On 
July lo, 1864, he re-enlisted, as a private, in Company A, One Hundred and 
Ninety-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served in West Virginia, under 
Gen. Sheridan. In July, 1865, he entered the United States Naval Academy at 
Newport, R. I., as a midshipman, graduating from the same in July, 1869. at 
Annapolis, Md. During this time he ranked at the head of his classes each 
year, never falling below numl>er three, and graduated a "star" pupil, the 
highest honor, when he was publicly complimented by Admiral David D. 
Porter, and given his diploma by Gen. U. S. Grant. In 1866 he made a cruise 
along the coast of the United States on the U. S. S. "Macedonian"; and in 
1867, on the T". S. S. "Savannah, ' he made a cruise to Europe and participated 
in the great naval ovation to the Empress Eugenie, at Cherlxjurg. France ; and 
in 1868 he cruised among the islands on the west coast of Africa on the U. 
S. S. "Savannah," having previously visited the United States Military 
Academy at West Point. During 1869-70-71. on the U. S. S. "Juniata" and 
the U. S. Flagship, "Franklin," he cruised about Europe and Africa. 

In April, 1870, Lievit. Richards was at Tunis, Africa, to avert a threat- 
ened fanatical outbreak against the Christians : actively engaged in the Franco- 
German W'^ar of 1870-71, being with the German army in July, 1870, prior 
to the battles of Worth and Gravelotte: with the French fleet off Heligoland, 
in the German Ocean, in August, 1870, awaiting the attack of the German 
fleet, but dispersed by a hurricane; with the German fleet at \\^ilhelmshaven, 
in September, 1870; in Havre, France, October and November, 1870, during 
the adxance of the German army ; with Bourbaki's defeated army in Switzer- 
land in January, 1871 : and at Marseilles in April, 1871. during the Com- 
munistic Outbreak. In January. 1871, he was on active duty in Spain during 
the outbreak of the Carlist Insurrection, and at Naples and Civita Vecchia^ 
Italy, in March, 1871, guarding American interests during troubles incident 
to the occupation of Rome by King Victor Emmanuel and the deprivation 
of the Pope's temporal power. 

During these years. Lieutenant Richards passed through many exciting 
adventures. In April, 1870, he narrowly escaped death in the Bay of Tunis, 
while on boat duty during a tempest; in February, 1871, he made a dangerous 
ascent of Vesu^'ius during an eruption ; had a hazardous experience in cross- 
ing the Alps, in IMarch, 1871, by the Simplon Pass, after a winter's storm; 



14 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

and was attacked and nearly captured by Spanish brigands in the vicinity of 
San Koque, outside of GibraUar, in May, 1870. 

During 1872. Lieutenant Richards was on duty at the Torpedo Station, 
Newport, R. I., attached to the nitro-glycerine department, at which time he 
invented a circuit closing fuse, far superior to anything then in use, which 
was adopted by the government. In 1873- 1874 at the personal solicitation of 
it? commanding officer. Commander (now Admiral) George Dewey, he was 
attached to the U. S. Steamer "Narragansett," on surveying duty in the 
Pacific Ocean. The charts now in use of the Peninsula of Lower California, 
the Gulf of California, the Mexican Coast and various islands in the Pacific 
Ocean were mainly the result of his work. At this time occurred the "Vir- 
ginius" difticulty A\ith Spain, when Commander Dewey asked to be ordered to 
attack Manila, in the Philippine Islands, in case of war. which he so gallantly 
captured in 1898. While at Panama in .\pril, 1873, a severe revolutionary 
outbreak occurred, when Lieut. Richards volunteered for active service and 
was sent on shore in performance of same, which was of a dangerous char- 
acter. He also volunteered for and was given charge of a hazardous boat 
■expedition to Las Tres Marias Islands, February 22, 1874, and saved the 
vessel from shipwreck on La Roca Partida, of the Revillagigedo Group of 
Islands, March 28, 1874. Lieut. Richards was commissioned Ensign in the 
L'nited States Navy, on July 12, 1870: commissioned ]Master, on July 12, 
1 87 1, and was promoted to Lieutenant in November, 1874. After these years 
of arduous and faithful service, to the regret of his commanding officer, he 
decided to tender his resignation as an officer in the L'nited States Navy, to 
take effect January i, 1875, to enable him to be more with his family, as, 
during ten years of service, he had only l>een able to remain home some six 
months in all. 

After leaving the naval service, [Mr. Richards entered the employ of the 
Philadelijhia & Reading Railway Company, in the office of its General Super- 
intendent, at Reading, I-"'a., and later, that of the Engineer of [Machinery, 
Avhere he remained until the fall of 1878. During this time occurred the ter- 
rible labor riots of 1877, resulting in much bloodshed and loss of propertv at 
Reading, when he assisted in organizing a company of Coal and Iron Police, 
composed of veteran soldiers, and served in the same during the continuance 
of the disturbances. From the fall of 1878 until August. 1881, Lieut. Rich- 
ards was associated with Charles M. Roeder, of Reading, in the insurance 
business, when he was offered a prominent position in the growing Bolt and 
Nut Works and Rolling Mill of J. H. Sterbergh, of Reading, which he 
accepted, and with which business he has since been identified. 



BIOGRAPHICAI- ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 15 

When a war with Chile was threatened, in 1892. he ^•ohlnteered for ser- 
vice, and again \-olunteered, in April, 1S98, so soon as a war with Spain 
became evident. His services were accepted and he resumed his position as 
a Lieutenant (Senior) in the United States Navy, was immediately ordered 
on duty and served during the entire war, at the front, as Executive Officer 
of the U. S. S. "Supply,'" one of the large trans-Atlantic passenger steamers 
of the International Steamship Company, American Line, fitted out by the 
Government as an auxiliary cruiser and supply ship. He was at Guantanamo 
Bay, oft' Santiago, with the "Cristobal Colon" at the Jacuro Anchorage, on the 
blockades of Manzanillo and Cienfuegos. at the Isle of Pines, on the blockade 
off Bahia Honda, Cabanas, Muriel, Havana (during the last engagement of 
the war), Matanzas, Cardenas, and at San Juan and Palominos Island, off 
Porto Rico. He carried his Aessel safely through the vortex of a terrible West 
India hurricane on the way to San Juan. He reached Gibara, Cuba, upon the 
cessation of hostilities, just as the only surviving Spanish man-of-war, "La 
Infanta Isabella," had entered, and anchored beside her, and was probably the 
first United States naval officer to exchange friendly greetings with a free 
Spanish naval officer, on the close of the war. Some months after the close 
of the war he was given his honorable discharge, with the thanks of the 
Government. 

Lieut. Richards then resumed his position in the iron business, and upon 
the consolidation of his and various other large establishments, on September 
I, 1899, into the American Iron & Steel Manufacturing Company, he was 
made its General Auditor, and a member of its board of directors, which 
necessitated his removal to Lebanon. Pa., where the general offices of the 
companv were located, and that citv h?s been his place of residence since. At 
the annual meeting of the companv. held in February, 1901. be was elected 
Treasurer. During the strike of its employes, beginning in May, 1902, and 
culminating in terrible riots and bloodshed in September, which was only 
terminated by the timely arrival of troops, he was shot in the right side, while 
<lefending the company's property. 

In June, 1893, this distinguished ijfficer was ai:)pointed by Go\-. Pattison 
a member of the commission to locate and describe the forts of Pennsylvania 
used for defense against the Indiaiis prior to 1783. His exhaustive report on 
the "Frontier Forts of the Blue Range" was ordered printed by the Legisla- 
ture, and has become the standard work on that subject. Besides this, he is 
the author of many historical works, among which may be mentioned : "Citi- 
zens of Gettysburg in the Battle," published in the Century [Magazine, Janu- 
ary. 1887; "Quarter-Centennial History of St. John's Lodge. No. 435. F. & 



1 6 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

A. M.," book form, issued in February. 1894: "Pennsylvania's Emergency 
■Men at Gettysburg," issued in book form in February. 1895; "Pennsylvania's 
Military Methods during the French and Indian War," published in the Amer- 
ican Historical Register of April-May, 1897; "The German Leaven in the 
Pennsylvania Loaf," for the Wyoming Historical and Geological Society, 
published in book form in December, 1897; "The First Discoverers of Amer- 
ica. German not Latin," Vol. VIII, Pennsylvania-German) Society. 1898; 
"The German Emigration from New York Province into Pennsylvania" 
(in collaboration with his brother. Rev. Prof. M. H. Richards. D. D.). Vol. 
IX, Pennsylvania-German Society. 1899; "The Descendants of Henry ]\Iel- 
chior Muhlenberg," Vol. X, Pennsylvania-German Society, 1900; etc. 

Lieut. Richards is a member of the following societies: Pennsylvania 
Society, Sons of the Revolution ; Pennsylvania Commandery, Military Order 
of Foreign Wars of the United States, in which he was national delegate; 
Pennsylvania Commandery. Naval Order of the United States, of which he 
is a member of the council and historian ; Pennsylvania Commandery. Naval 
and Military Order of the Spanish-American War; Grand Army of the 
Republic, national aid-de-camp, quartermaster of McLean Post. No. 16. De- 
partment of Pennsylvania, from November, 1875. to January, 1900, etc.; 
Naval Academy Graduates Association ; Navy Athletic Association ; Pennsyl- 
vania-German Society, of which he is secretar}- ; Historical Society of Penn- 
sylvania ; Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania ; American Academy of 
Political and Social Science; Wyoming Historical and Geological Society of 
Pennsylvania; Historical Society of Montgomery county. Pa.; Historical 
Society of Berks County. Pa. ; Historical Society of Lebanon County. Pa., 
of which he was vice-president; St. John's Lodge. No. 435. F. & A. M., of 
Reading, in which he is past master by merit. 

In the Evangelical Lutheran Church, the church of his ancestors. Lieut. 
Richards has been actively at work since his return from military service, and 
has been prominently identified with various of its important operations. He 
served as superintendent of Trinity Lutheran Sunday-school, at Reading. Pa., 
from the early part of 1881 until the close of 1899, during which time he 
brought about many improvements and many important advances. Upon 
his removal to Lebanon he was elected a trustee of Salem Evangelical Luth- 
eran Church, and became actively engaged in the work of its Bible School. 
He has since become identified with the St. James' Evangelical Lutheran 
Congregation of Lebanon, recently organized, and was elected the superin- 
tendent of its Bible School. 

On December 26, 187T, Lieut. Richards was married to Ella \'anLeer, 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 17 

who was born November 8. 1848, a daughter of Branson and Druciha (Tur- 
ner) VanLeer, on her paternal side a descendant of the German noble "von 
Loehr" family, having its origin in \\'erner von Loehr, mayor of the city of 
Mayence, who was raised to the nobility June 13, 1521 ; on her maternal side 
descended from the English families of Washington, West, Gilpin, Penning- 
ton, etc., and, through them, from the old reigning families of England, 
Scotland, Ireland, Germany, France, Spain, the Byzantine Empire, the Holy 
Roman Empire and Scandinavia, the records remaining unbroken in authentic 
data for 2,400 years, and extending through the Irish traditional lineage to 
the Jewish royal line, and thence back to Adam. Their offspring are 
Rev. Henry Branson Richards, pastor of St. James Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, of Lebanon ; Charles Matthias, a practicing physician at Reading, 
who married Anna Alfarata Harner ; and Florence and Alice, both of 
Lebanon. 

JUDGE JOHN H. KINPORTS (deceased). One of the best known 
and prominent citizens of his time in Lebanon county, was the late Judge 
John H. Kinports, a leading merchant and banker of Annville, and e.x-clerk 
'of the Orphans' Court, and of the Court of Quarter Sessions of Lebanon 
county, and an ex-Associate Judge of the Lebanon County Court. He was 
a son of John Kinports, a native of Lancaster county. Pa., who removed 
thence to Lebanon county, and subsequently to Dauphin county, where he 
died in 1855. John Kinports was a farmer by occupation, was twice mar- 
ried, and the father of t\velve children. His first wife was Barbara Huber, 
of Lancaster county, by whom he had the following children : John H. ; 
Jacob; Barbara; Catherine; Anna; Mary; Elizabeth. The second wife was 
Elizabeth Hess, by whom he had children as follows : David ; Daniel ; 
Abraham ; Lydia ; and Veronica. 

John H. Kinports was born January 21, 182 1, on a farm in Lebanon 
county, where he spent his early life. \\^hen fifteen years of age he entered 
the employ of James Bingham, of Annville, with whom he continued for 
three years, and continued a citizen of Annville until his election to the 
office of clerk of the Orphans' Court and of the Quarter Sessions Court, when 
he removed to Lelianon city, and there resided during his incumbency of that 
official position. Returning to Annville, he engaged in merchandising in 
partnership with C. H. Killinger. later with H. H. Kreider, and still later 
with D. O. .Shenk, continuing wnth the latter gentleman under the firm name 
of Kinports & Shenk until Judge Kinports' death. At that time the Judge 
was succeeded by his sons, George W. and H. Lucien, the style now being 
2 



1 8 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Shenk & Kinports. Judge Kinports was one of the organizers of the Ann- 
A'ille National bank, became its first president, and was holding that office at 
the time of his death, on March 8, 1893. For ten years he served as an 
associate judge of the Lebanon County Court. 

Judge Kinports married Mary Ann Stein, of Annville, who died Janu- 
ary 5, 1898, and their children were as follows: George W., Anna, Barbara, 
Rebecca, John H., Philip, Frank, Lizzie, Charles and H. Lucien. 

COL. A. FRANK SELTZER, a prominent member of the Lebanon 
County Bar, was born on the old Seltzer plantation at Lhiion Water Works, in 
Lebanon county, and is descended from two of the oldest families in the county. 
The name Seltzer is derived from Seltzer Springs, in the Duchy of Nassau, 
Germany, from \vhich place Mathias Seltzer, the founder of the American 
branch of the family, emigrated. He located at L^nion Water Works, Leba- 
non county, in 1730. There his grandson, Jacob Seltzer, was born. Jacob 
married Eleanor Clark, who was born in Lebanon county, a daughter of Ben- 
jamin Clark, also a native of the county. 

John Clark Seltzer, son of Jacob and Eleanor and father of A. Frank, 
■was born at the old homestead at Lhiion \\''ater Works, and became a promi- 
nent man. He was the first postmaster at Mt. Nebo, then called Seltzer- 
ville. In pohtics he was an old-line Whig, and on the disintegration of that 
party became a Republican, and he was always acti\'e in public affairs. He 
married Elizabeth Faber, a native of Lebanon county, and a daughter of 
Jacob I'"aber, a granddaughter of Philip Faber (born in Lebanon county), 
and a descendant of Adam Faber, who emigrated to America in the seven- 
teenth centin-y. 

A. Frank Seltzer is an alumnus of Franklin and Marshall College, and 
received from that institution the honorary degree of Master of Arts. He 
entered the L^nited States military service in June, 1862, as first lieutenant 
of Companv G, One Hundred and Fifteenth Regiment, Pennsyhania A'olun- 
teers. Third Brigade, Second Division, Third Corps. Army of the Potomac. 
He was promoted to captain in July, 1863, and participated in some of 
the most important battles of the war. among which were Fredericksburg, 
Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. He was honorably discharged from the 
service on March 30, 1864, on account of physical disability. In 1865 he 
Avas admitted to the Lebanon County Bar, since which time he has been in 
continuous and successful practice of his profession, taking high rank. He 
is a member of the Bars of both the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania and of 
the United States. From January, 1893, ^o January, 1896, he served as 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 19 

district attorney of Lebanon connty. In 1899 he was appointed aid-de-camp 
on the stafif of Gov. A\'iniam A. Stone, of Pennsylvania, with the rank of 
Heutenant-colonel, which position he holds at the present time. Col. Seltzer 
is active in Grand Army circles. He is a charter member of Sedgwick Post, 
No. 42, G. A. R., and a past commander of same. Pie is a meml:)er of the 
Lebanon County Historical Society, of the Pennsylvania German Society, 
and of other organizations. 

Some years ago Col. Seltzer contributed humorous articles to a number 
of well known journals, under the nom-de-plume of "Paul Grave."" He 
also delivered humorous lectures before Teachers" Institutes and other 
assemblies throughout the eastern part of the United States. Col. Seltzer has 
been an acti\'e Republican campaigner. In successive State and National 
contests he addressed many important meetings. He made a tour of the 
world in 189S, and before and since that time has been an extensive traveler. 

CYRUS RESSLEY LANTZ. The history of a state as well as that 
of a nation is chiefly the chronicle ijf the lives and deeds of those who have 
conferred honor and digiu't}' upon, society. The world judges the character 
of a community by that of its representative citizens, and yields its tribute 
of admiration and respect for the g'enius, learning or virtues of those whose 
deeds constitute the record of a State's prosperity and pride. Time's long 
scroll contains many names of citizens who have reflected credit on classic 
Lebanon, but none are written in better form than the honored one which 
appears at the head of this sketch. It is not a light thing to write biography. 
Space forbids biit the mere chronicling of facts. Those who peruse must 
*'read between the lines'" for lessons of noble endeavor and victorv of spirit 
over flesh. 

Cyrus R. Lantz, prominent lawyer and financier of Lebanon, Pa., was 
born August 26, 1842, and is a native of Cornwall township, in the county 
where he has passed his entire lifetime. His pre-scholastic training was thor- 
ough, and the foundation thus laid proved amply adequate foi"' the later 
splendid educational equipment which he added by self-exertion. Not that 
Mr. Lantz is profoundly educated in book lore, for the great Civil war 
claimed his youthful energies in the collegiate period of his life — but he is 
educated in that broader sense, that he had for his tutor the experience of 
practical life. • He left the school room at the age of fourteen, and matricu- 
lated in the greater educational institution referred to, entering the mercantile 
establishment of Isaac Hambleton at Cornwall. A year"s experience there 
was followed bv a change in the current of his life, he entering the school 



20 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

room as a teacher. Mr. Lantz was l)ut a mere lad, fifteen years old, but so 
well had he applied himself to his books, and so thoroughly was he possessed 
of the teaching instinct — teachers are born, not made — that his first term 
in North Lebanon township was not less successful than his later efforts. For 
three years he taught country schools, then with the idea of taking higher 
work he stood successfully an examination before the present deputy State 
Superintendent, Hon. Henry Houck. The school room, with its humdrum 
moriotony, was, however, not destined to be the arena of action for Mr. 
Lantz. Like many youths of spirit he had chafed against the fate that 
kept him from being among the first to answer his country's call, and taking 
counsel of nothing but valor, he signed for the defense of Old Glory and the 
constitution, on the very day of the examination, August 13, 1862. As a 
private soldier our subject did his duty. The fame of the officers in the 
Civil war has been svmg in song and story, but every true patriot realized 
that the war was fought to a successful finish by the boys whose only shoulder 
straps were battle scars. 

The war record of Mr. Lantz is thus brieflv stated. A private soldier, 
Companv E, One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania \^olunteer 
Infantry, he was mustered in at Harrisburg August i6th, moved to Washing- 
ton, and became part of Jennings' Brigade. Abercrombie's Division, and 
engaged in the defense of the capital until Dec. 2d ; the regiment was then 
brigaded with the Twenty-fourth and Twentx'-eighth Xew Jersey and Twenty- 
seventh Connecticut, and joined the Second Division of the Second Army 
Corps under Gen. Howard, doing camp dutv till Mav, 1863. The regiment 
was then brigaded with the Nineteenth and Twentieth Massachusetts and 
Forty-second and Fifty-ninth New York, and saw ser\'ice as follows : on 
duty Arlington Heights till Augiist 23d; Chair P> ridge. Dec. 2d; Falmouth, 
Dec. 6th-9th . from this point to Fredericksburg, where it participated in 
some of the hottest actions of that disastrous battle from the loth to the 15th. 
The regiment first took positions at Lacey House, where it remained under 
fire until nine efforts to cross on pontoons had been frustrated bv the galling 
fire of the enemy's sharpshooters ; finally it succeeded and drove the skirmish 
line of the Thirteenth, Seventeenth and Eighteenth Mississippi and Fifth 
l^""lorida back to Piincess Anne street, being the first Federal brigade to cross 
the river; it held advanced position under heavy artillery fire during the nth, 
1 2th and 73th. On the latter date the men made assault on the famous 
"stone wall," held by McLaw's Dixision, but were repulsed and lay in front 
of Confederate lines until night ; then they withdrew and remained in town 
ijntil the 15th, when they returned to camp at Falmouth; next came picket 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 21 

and outpost duty near Fredericksburg, Decemljer 17th to ^lay 2d, 1863, and the 
Chancellorsville campaign from April 27th to May 6th. In this campaign! 
the regiment crossed to h>edericksburg on May 3d, assisted in the assault 
which Sedgwick made on Mayries Fleights, pursued the enemy t(nvard Chan- 
cellorsville. and did fatigue duty the nights of the 3d and 4th, occupied 
Fredericksburg the night of the 5th; returned to b'almouth ; and on ]\Iay 14th 
embarked for home and was mustered out at Flarrisburg on the 29th. In 
the attack on the stone wall at Fredericksburg Mr. Lantz was shot three times, 
but escaped with little injury. The first time he was shot through the cap. 
the second bullet struck him in the breast, hitting a pocket Bible which his 
sister gave him, and which undoubtedly saved his life; the third shot struck 
the lock of his gun and just grazed his fingers. With the exception of this 
slight wound our subject returned from service without harm, and with the 
consciousness of dutv bravelv done. He also served eight years as captain 
of Company E, Eighth Regiment, National Guard, Pennsylvania. 

Picking up the thread where it had been broken, ]Mr. Lantz entered the 
schools of Lebanon as a teacher, also receiving the appointment of L'nited 
States marshal for purposes of draft in the township of Cornwall, at South 
Annville. Still successful in the schoolroom, he was promoted from one 
grade to another until he had reached the grammar school. In cnnnection 
with his duties he had taken up the studv of law with Hon. Josiah h'unck, 
of Lebanon, and in the summer of 1S69 passed the examination and was 
admitted to the Bar. 

In this new field of endeavor Mr. Lantz immediately took an advanced 
position. He was appointed a notary by Gov. Geary, and was deputy treasurer 
of Lebanon county for two years. In 1S71 he was elected district attorney 
of this county, in which position he served three years. r\irther political 
preferment came to him in 1880, when he was nominated by the Republicans 
of his district for State Senator in Garfield's campaign. The campaign which 
followed was the high-water mark of political pyrotechnics in Lebanon. 
Under the leadership of Mr. Lantz a tabernacle was erected on the public 
square, and nightly meetings were held, attended by uniformed wide- 
awakes from every part of the county. Carrying the day. ]\Ir. Lantz became 
a vigorous and helpful member of the State Senate, serving on some of the 
most important committees and being heard in carefully prepared efforts in 
the advocacy of good measures on the fioor. Fie was particularly strong in the 
special sessions, called by Gov. Pattison for the purpose of forcing a reap- 
portionment bill upon the Repul)licaiis, in which attempt he ing'loriously failed. 
Since his senatorial experience ]\lr. Lantz has contented himself with wi:>rk- 



22 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

ing in the ranks as a i^rivate, where he has always been forceful and effective 
in his thorough organization of the voting element. On the hustings our 
honored subject is a powerful advocate, and is frequently called upon to take 
part in the campaigns waged by his party. In 1884 he accompanied the 
"plumed Knight," James G. Blaine, on his trip through the old Keystone 
State, and did valiant service for the ticket, in many campaigns speaking 
in two languages in every township of his county. 

In connection with his extensive practice Mr. Lantz has found time for 
the promotion of many business enterprises and has long been regarded as a 
leader of the financial thought of the count}. He has been president of the 
People's National Bank of Lebanon since 1898. and has contributed much to 
its solid character by his broad business policy. In 1883 he assisted in 
the organization of the Homestead Building and Savings Association, and 
since that date has been its proficient secretary. Other public institutions with 
which he has been connected are the Lebanon Valley Fair Association, the 
Lebanon Mutual Fire Insurance Company, the Hook and Ladder Company, 
of which he has been president twenty years, and the Lebanon Ice Company. 

The social and religious life of our subject has been equally promi- 
nent and helpful. Joining Old Salem Lutheran Church when a ladl of 
thirteen, he has always been active in the Master s service. For twenty-five 
years he A\'as secretary to the church council, and is now an honored elder 
of that organization. Possessed of fine musical ability, Mr. Lantz sang in 
the choir for twenty-five years, and was for fifteen years tlie leader, ill-health 
causing his retirement finally from that branch of the service. In the Sunday- 
school he has been a power, having for long years been teacher of a class of 
some three hundred young people. He is one of the most prominent lavmen 
in the national meetings of his spiritual advisers, the General Council of the 
Lutheran Church of North America. In charitable work he is unostenta- 
tiously helpful, and is active in e\'ery good work and word in his community. 
Mr. Lantz has always kept up his early interest in educational matters. For 
years he was president of the school board, and is the father of the present 
system of promotion followed in Lebanon schools, which has been effective 
in maintaining a most efficient corps of teachers. 

The married life of Mr. Lantz has ):)een a model one. he and his wife 
being the parents of two bright children. The date of marriage was April 
26, 1865, Mrs. Lantz's maiden name being ^lary A. Kauft'man, her place of 
nativity North Lebanon township. Lily Jane, their accomplished and gifted 
daughter, married Jacob Ely Reinoehl, a prominent and successful attorney 
of Lebanon. The son, Henry K., was graduated from ^Muhlenberg Col- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 23 

lege, and taking a theolog'ical course at (Chicago, is now the popular pastor 
of a large and prosperous congregation at Frankfort, Indiana. 

It is good to have lived: it is better to have lived a life helpfuU}- efficient 
in promoting the improvement of society ; to have it said, as can be faithfully 
asserted of Cyrus R. Lantz, that the world is better for his having lived in it. 

GEORGE W. KLINE, Sr. The courts of Lebanon county have been 
the arena of action for many gifted attorneys-at-law — men of character, and 
with a just appreciation of the sacredness of the law as the conservator of 
peace and justice. It has been now some years since the gentleman \\-hose 
honored name opens this sketch was wont to be heard in forensic debate 
before the courts of the county, but there are those who still remember his 
singularly effective efforts and the unassuming modest life he lived. 

George W. Kline, Sr., for long years an able attorney of Lebanon, was 
a native of York county, Pa., where he was born, at Wrightsville, March 12, 
1795. His death occurred at Lebanon June 21, 1845. His parents were 
Jacob and Elizabeth (Withers) Kline. He studied law under Hon. ^V'illiam 
Jenkins, and w\as admitted to the Bar August 20, 1821. He immediately 
located at Lebanon for the practice of his profession, which he continued 
until his death. He was in many respects one of the finest lawyers who ha\e 
ever appeared before the courts of the county. His marriage occurred JMarch 
3, 1823, the lady's maiden name having been Catherine Lineweaver, of an old 
and honorable family of the county. There were but two children, Matilda 
Henrietta, now deceased, and George W., Jr. The mother of these children 
died March 19, 1871. 

George W. Kline, Jr., deceased, was born in Lebanon March 13, 1833. 
He was given a splendid preliminary education at Lel^anon Academy, and was 
prepared for Yale at the noted Hopkins Grammar School of New Haven. 
Matriculating at Yale, he immediately took an advanced position in his class 
and graduated with honors, his class being the famous one of 1853, containing 
many names that have since been noted for high position. Entering the 
office of hiis uncle, the late Hon. Levi Kline, of Lebanon, he took up the study 
of the law and was admitted to the Bar April 25. 1857, though he never 
pursued his profession. His tastes led him rather into literary work, and he 
soon became connected with the press of the city, where his facilit}' as a writer 
made him a valuable addition to the staff. In his politics he was a Repub- 
lican, and was most patriotic. When the Rebels invaded Pennsylvania, in 
1863, ]\Ir. Kline was one who enlisted with the "emerg'ency men." as a pri- 
vate. He was a most companionable man, and was one of the leading ^Masons 



24 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEl^ANON COUNTY. 

of the city at the time of his death. This sad event occurred October 15, 
1889. Mr. KHiie married, November 14, 1872, Martha Weidman. daughter 
of the late Gen. John Weidman, of whom a biography appears elsewhere. 

FRANK E. MEILY, one of the most prominent citizens and members 
of the Bar at Lebanon, and ex-judge of the Lebanon county court, was born in 
Lebanon October 21, 1855, and is a son of the late Charles H. Meily, who was 
born on the Meily homestead, on the southeast corner of Ninth and ^^"alnut 
streets, Lebanon, in 1827, and died in May, 1890. He married Sarah, daugh- 
ter of Michael Steckbeck, and she died in 1889. To this union children as 
follows were born : Elizabeth, who married the late Joseph H. Light, the dis- 
tinguished editor of the Lebanon Nncs; Henrietta, who is unmarried: Alice; 
Emanuel G. ; Nora M. ; Charles H., Jr.. deceased; and Frank E. In his 
younger days Charles H. Meily served as a clerk in a general merchandise 
store in Lebanon, but in 1857 he embarked in the lumber business with the 
late Judge Adolphus Reinoehl. under the firm name of Reinoehl & Meily, and 
continued that connection until a short time prior to his death. Mr. ^leily was 
prominent in politics, and took an active part in local affairs, holding several 
offices, among which was that of treasurer of the school board. Socially he 
was a member of the Masonic fraternitv and the order of Odd Fellows. 

Emanuel Meily, the grandfather, was a native of Lebanon. He was a 
weaver of carpets and old-fashioned quilts, and some specimens of his skill 
are still to be found among the people of Lebanon, his name being woven in the 
corner, and these are highly prized. He married a ]Miss Shoemaker, and had 
issue as follows: Emanuel, now of California; John, deceased; George, now 
of Illinois; Edward, deceased; Samuel, deceased; Joseph, deceased; Milton, 
now of South America ; and Charles H. 

Judge Frank E. Meily graduated from the Lebanon high school and then 
entered Muhlenberg' College, Allentown, Pa., where he was graduated in 1876. 
taking first honors, being valedictorian of his class. After his graduation he 
read law in the office of the late W. M. Derr, of Lebanon, and was admitted 
to the Lebanon county Bar in 1879, and subsequently to the Bars of all the 
other courts. In 1892 he was elected city solicitor of Lebanon, and in Janu- 
ary, 1894, was appointed by Gov. Pattison Judge of the Lebanon County 
Court, which had just been created by the Legislature, the act making Lebanon 
county a judicial district by itself. This position was held by him with dis- 
tinction until the next general election, the following year. Judge !Meily is a 
man of wide experience, exhaustive reading and rare ability. His mind is 




<^^M^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 25 

quick to act, but it is governed by a calm, keen judgment, which carefully 
weighs each side before deciding, and few men are better qualified naturally to 
uphold the law and defend the innocent. 

REV. THEODORE EMMANUEL SCHMAUK. D. D., pastor of 
Salem Lutheran Church, a large and leading religious organization in Leba- 
non county. Pa., a man of scholarly attainments, the editor of various religious 
publications of his denomination, and an author whose works have shown 
research and genius, was born in the Evangelical Lutheran parsonage, in 
Lancaster, Pa., in the year i860. His surname is an honored inheritance 
from his father, the late Rev. Benjamin William Schmauk, who for almost 
thirty years was pastor of Salem Church, Lebanon. 

In recalling some of the leading events of the life of the late Rev. B. W. 
Schmauk, we refer to a biography prepared by Rev. Dr. F. J. F. Schantz, 
in loving memory of this divine, and read upon its title page the statement : 

"Rev. Benjamin William Schmauk, born in Philadelphia. Pa.. October 
26, 1828; died, in Lebanon, Pa., April 4, 1898, aged sixty-nine vears, five 
months and eight days." His parents were Benjamin F. and Theresa 
(Schultzj Schmauk, and his connection with the church began at his baptism 
and was cemented by his confirmation in 1S43. Ot natural ability, he had 
reached the Philadelphia High School early in life, and had the advantage 
of being instructed by such educators as Dr. Pile, Alexander Dallas Bache, 
later superintendent of the American Coast Survey, and the Hon. John S. 
Hart. Upon the completion of a two-year course in the high school, Mr. 
Schmauk learned the silver-plating business and followed this trade for five 
years. As early as the age of twenty-one the young man displayed unusual 
seriousness of mind and conduct, and when opportunity offered, became a 
student under Rev. \\'. J. Mann, D. D., in Philadelphia, pursuing under him 
a course in German, Latin and other higher branches, and under the tutor's 
direction reading works on History, Theology and Aesthetics, also taking 
instruction at Crawford's Academy. Then one term was passed in the Gettys- 
hnrg Theological Seminary, and after his return he continued his theological 
studies under Dr. Mann and Rev. Dr. Demme. 

At the meeting' of the Lutheran Ministerium of Pennsylvania, held in 
Trinity Church, at Reading, Pa., April 3 and 7, 1853, Mr. Schmauk was 
licensed to preach the Gospel. In July, 1853. he became pastor of Zion 
Church, in Lancaster. Pa., and faithfully labored in this, his first charge, 
until July, 1864, becoming known for his ability in the pulpit as well as for 
his devotion in pastoral work, and for his loyalty to the cause of the Union 



26 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

in the dark days of the Ci\-il war. In May, 1864, Pastor Schniauk was sent 
as a delegate from the Synod of Pennsylvania to the General Synod at York, 
Pa., and took part in the proceedings of that historic convention, which finally 
resulted in the organization of the General Council of the Lutheran Church in 
North America, and in the establishment of a Theological Seminary in 
Philadelphia. 

Having received an urgent call from Salem Evangelical Lutheran Church, 
at Lebanon, he here entered upon his work July i, 1864. and for the twelve 
succeeding years not only added to the membership of this church, but labored 
abundantly throughout the Lebanon Valley. He was noted for his 
careful pulpit preparation, his earnest sermon delivery, his faithful pastoral 
care, his sympath)^ in sickness and distress, and his deep interest in the spir- 
itual welfare of his flock. On Christmas Day. 1866. he gathered together the 
scattered Lutherans in Annville and succeeded in organizing the St. Paul's 
congregation there, and built, in February. 1869. a permanent house of wor- 
ship. Other congregations were cared for jjy this untiring pastor, Cornwall 
profiting by his ministry for many years, and other villages looking to him for 
spiritual guidance. When Jonestown lost its regular pastor. Pastor Schmauk 
ministered here, and during an interim at ATyerstown, of a year's duration, he 
looked after the congregation of the faithful of that place. 

Pastor Schmauk was deeply interested in the affairs of the Conference 
to which he belonged, and in critical ecclesiastical periods he was never afraid 
to do just what he thought right. He served as German secretary of the 
Synod of Pennsylvania in 1868-69, but later declined re-election. He was 
ever ready wnth word, pen and purse to advance the interests of the Synod. 
Very dear to his heart were the founding of the Theological Seminarv at 
Philadelphia and the opening of Muhlenberg College at Allentown. and to 
both enterprises he was a liberal contributor. During his pastorate at Leba- 
non he was a delegate to the second meeting of the General Council, held at 
Pittsburg. Pa., in 1868, having also been present at the preliminary meeting 
held at Reading in December, 1866, when grave matters of import to the 
church were discussed and settled. During the year 1878-79 Pastor Schmauk 
was elected temporary professor of German in Muhlenberg College, dis- 
charging the duties of the position in connection with his duties as pastor of 
St. Michael's congregation, at Allentown. Pa., whither he had gone in 1876. 
At this time Muhlenberg College conferred upon him the honorary degree of 
A. M. In 1876 he became a member of the board of trustees of the college, 
but resigned before the expiration of his term of office. He was re-elected 
in 1S82. and again in 1889, holding the position through the balance of his 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 27 

life. During the pastorate at Allentown he was made president of the Sec- 
ond, or Lehigh Valley, Conference, and continued in office until his return to 
the territory of Lebanon county. In 1883 Salem Church. Lebanon, again 
sought a pastor, and it was at this time that the congregation remembered 
the faithful services and devotion of Pastor Schmauk, and not only extended 
a call to him to return, but also one to his son. Rev. Theodore E. Schmauk, 
who was ordained at a meeting of tlie Synod in 1883, to become the junior 
pastor. These calls were accepted, and amid much rejoicing the father and 
son preached sermons in Salem Church on the first Sunday in Jul}-, 1883, 
and at the same time became the pastors of St. Paul's Lutheran Church at 
Annville. Active once more in his old charge, the beloved pastor of this flock 
was spared for nearly fifteen more years of usefulness. The last great work 
in which he was especially interested was the erection of a new Chapel, and 
an extraordinary sermon which he preached in the last winter of his life, 
to inspire his people and prove to them the wisdom of the new enterprise, is 
still recalled. Its influence was not lost, for the Chapel of his hopes has l>een 
erected by a loving people as a memorial to his life and labors. 

During his second pastorate at Lebanon Rev. Schmauk rendered impor- 
tant services to many other congregations, ^^■as deeply interested in the work 
of the Fourth, later the Lancaster, Conference, and from 1889 was for years 
its president. During these last years he represented the Synod of Penn- 
sylvania in the meetings of the General Council held in New York. Pittslwrg 
and Bufi^alo, and took an absorbing interest in both home and foreign mission 
\vork. His interest in the prosperity of the Theological Seminary at Mt. 
Airy, Muhlenberg College and the Orphans' Home at Germantown was 
shown by deed as well as by word. Muhlenberg College honored him with 
the degree of Doctor of Divinity, but he declined to accept. 

On June 25, "1857, Rev. Schmauk maiTied Catherine W'ilhelmina, daugh- 
ter of John and Fredericka (Knecht) Hingel, of Philadelphia. In the city 
of Lebanon stands a building of most beautiful architecture, called the Salem 
Memorial Chapel, erected in memory of Rev. B. W. Schmauk, and of all 
the sainted dead of Old Salem. 

Such was the father under whom the present pastor of Salem Lutheran 
Church was permitted to grow to manhood in the closest bonds of filial aft'ec- 
tion and I'eligious fellowship. 

Following a thorough preparatory education, Dr. T. E. Schmauk entered 
the University of Pennsylvania, and there took a classical course, graduating 
in the class of 1880, with the honors, later graduating from the Lutheran 
Theological Seminary of Philadelphia, in the class of 1883. In 1897 the 



2 8 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred on him. As noted above, in 
association with his father, he became pastor of Salem Church, and at the 
death of the latter assumed full charge, and has become a power in his denomi- 
nation and a factor for good in the religious world. He wields a facile pen ; 
is editor of the leading theological journal of the Lutheran Church in Amer- 
ica, The Lutheran Church Rcviezv of Philadelphia, and author of the Graded 
Sunday School System of the Lutheran Church, which is the first complete 
practical application, in religious mstruction, of the principle of pedagogical 
gradation, long universal in secular education. Dr. Schmauk is the editor of 
the Lutheran Sunday School Lessons and of the many publications of the 
General Council Graded series; and since 1889 has been the literary editor of 
Tlic Lutheran. He is also an author of no small standing in the religious 
world, his books best known, perhaps, being: "The Negative Criticism of 
the Old Testament," "Catechetical Outlines of the Old Testament." "The 
Voice in Speech and Song," "Charms of Conversation," "History of Old 
Salem and Lebanon" and "History of the Lutheran Church in Pennsylvania." 
Few students of Pennsylvania history are more thoroughly at home as to 
old records and authentic annals, and he holds a life membership in the His- 
torical Society of the State, and was one of the organizers of the Lebanon 
County Historical Society, being a member of the executive committee. His 
interest has been particularly centered in early German annals, and he is one 
of the founders and an ex-president of the Pennsylvania German Society of 
the State. He has been chairman of the executive committee of this society 
for many years. He is one of the founders and an ex-chancellor of the Penn- 
sylvania Chautauqua. In all church mo\ements he is deeply interested. He 
is a member of the board of trustees of Muhlenberg College ; member of the 
Church Book committee of the General Council ; member of the Convocation 
of Church Musicians of the Lutheran Church ; chairman of the Sunday School 
Work committee of the General Council ; and member of the Committee on 
Education in the Lutheran Church, and of several joint committees of the 
several bodies of the Lutheran Church. While not personally known to all 
congregations of his denomination scattered over the United States and 
Canada, there are very few who do not know him through his writings, which 
penetrate into almost every home. 

COL. JOHN MILLER MARK, one of the oldest and best-known citi- 
zens of Lebanon, was born on a farm in East Hanover township, alx)ut three 
miles from the village of Jonestown, March 15, 1822, son of George Mark, 
who was liorn on the same farm January 16, 1797. and died January 14. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 29 

1839. His father, also George INIark, was a native of Germany and was one 
of the early settlers of East Hanover township, and followed farming all 
his life, his son following in his footsteps, and dying on the same farm. 

George Mark, the father of Col. John Miller Mark, married Elizabeth 
Miller, who was born in North Annville township, Lebanon county, 'Slay 
13, 1799, and died in 1836. The following children were born of this union: 
Catherine, born June 9, 1818, married Joseph F~rank, and died July 14, 1888; 
John Miller; Elizabeth, born October u, 1823, married Joseph Farnsler. and 
died September 3, 1896; George, born September 3, 1825, died ]\Larch 22, 
1897; Sallie married George Mark, and died young. 

John Miller Mark was reared on the farm and attended the common 
schools. On April i, 1839, he left the farm and went to work in a store 
in Fredericksburg, Lebanon county, where he remained one vear antl then 
went to Bellegrove, in the same county, where he was employed in a store. 
Mr. Mark remained in the employ of George Weidman, at Bellegrove, for 
three years, and in 1843 purchased the store which he conducted until 1849. 
He then removed to Jonestown, and for a time was engaged in a lumber 
business, but in 1853 ^'^^ returned to Lebanon, where, in the following year, 
he embarked in the hotel business, on the corner of Ninth and Chestnut streets. 
He here operated the "Lnion Hotel" until 1861, when he rented it in order 
to offer his services to his country. \\'hen the Civil war was over, Air. Mark 
resumed the management of the "Lhiion Hotel," and continued its popular 
host until 1870, when he retired, again renting the propertv. 

Col. Mark was a gallant soldier. In i86t he raised Company D, of the 
Ninety-third Pennsylvania \"olunteer Infantry, and was commissioned captain 
of this company, and on June i, 1862, he was commissioned major by Gov. 
A. G. Curtin, and was (promoted to be colonel November 2/, 1862. Col. 
Mark was mustered out of the service on account of disability on March 12, 
1863, his honorable discharge being signed by Assistant Adjutant General 
C. A. \\niittier, by command of Maj. Gen. Sedg'wick. While captain of 
Company D, he participated in many of the serious engagements of the war, 
and was wounded at the battle of Fair Oaks, \'a., by a ball passing through 
his right fore-arm, and was also slightly wounded in the leg, a fragment of 
an exploding shell also striking him in the neck. Although the latter did 
not cut the flesh, Col. Mark felt the effects of the blow until a few }ears 
since. Following this misfortune on the field, Col. Alark was then stricken 
with typhoid fever and was sent to the hospital in Philadelphia, but was not 
received there and was given up to die. He insisted upon being sent home, 
and soon after his return experienced beneficial results and finally considered 



30 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

himself well enough to return to his command. Following his return, his 
efficiency was recognized by his promotion to the office of major, and later to 
that of colonel, and he was at that time ranking colonel of the brigade, in 
direct line of promotion to the position of general. However, he began to 
realize that he could not continue military service, as his return to duty had 
been too soon, his recovery not having been completely accomplished. 

It was with feelings of regret that Col. Mark gave up his brilliant military 
prospects and returned to his home, and it was also' a source of grief to his 
comrades-in-arms. In 1863 he was appointed deputy-marshal of Lebanon. 
For manv years he was a store-keeper and ganger in the Internal Revenue 
department. For se\-eral years Colonel Mark was chief of police of Lebanon 
county, and also served one term as register and recorder of the county. 
Every duty entrusted to bis care was performed with an eye to the public 
good, and both in militar}^ and civil life, he has lived up to the full measure 
•of first-class citizenship. 

On January 26, 1843, Col. Mark was united in marriage with Catherine 
Zinn, born in Cornwall township, Lebanon county, December 5, 1819, and 
they had cbildren as follows: Milton, a resident of Denver, Colo.; Cyrus, 
a resident of Pueblo, Colo. ; Monroe, a resident of Oregon City. Ore. ; Charles, 
a resident of San Diego, Cal. : John, who died in Pueblo. Colo. : and Penrose, 
who lives in Lebanon. Col. Ivlark is a valued and active member of Sedg- 
wick Post, G. A. R. ; Mt. Lebanon Lodge, A. F. (S: .\. ]\I. ; and Alohegan 
Lodge, I. O. O. F. He was a member of the fire department of Lebanon for 
many years, and is now an honorary member. 

PETER B. WITMER. A. M. (deceased). One of the oldest edu- 
cators, and proprietor of the old. well-known educational institution of Leba- 
noii count\' — the old Palmyra Academy, which be fciunded — was Peter B. 
Witmer, A. M., born in Lebanon township, Lebanon county. October 25, 
1823, son of Michael and Anna ( Burkholder) Witmer. 

The origin of the Witmer family in America is as follows : In the 
Year 1733 four Witmer brothers sailed for America on the ship "Hope of 
London,"" Daniel Reed, master. Tbey arrived in Philadelphia the latter part 
of August, and on the 28th of that month the elder lirothers took the oath of 
allegiance. They were all natives of Canton Zurich, Switzerland, and were 
of the Reformed faith. The four brothers, Michael, Ulrich, Peter and John, 
settled in Lancaster county. Pa. The ancestor of Peter B. was Peter, father 
of Peter, father of Michael, our subject's father. 

Michael Witmer, father of our subject, was born in South Lebanon 
township, Lebanon county, January 13, 1796, and died December 31, 1877. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 31 

He married, in April. 1821, Anna Burkholder, of South Annville township, 
who was born June 25, 1797, and died April 25, 1869, their children being: 
Abraham, born February 10, 1822; Peter B., born October 25, 1823; 
Rosanna. born October i, 1825; Anna, born October 6. 1827; Maria, born 
December 24. 1829; Jeremiah, born December 19. 1832; LTriah, born Novem- 
ber 6, 1834; John B., born April i, 1838; and Michael, born September 15, 
1842. 

The early life of Peter B. Witmer was spent on the farm. At the age 
of seventeen )-ears he entered a private school at Columbia, Lancaster county, 
Pa., and later attended Fairview Academy in Adams county. Pa. AVhen 
nineteen years old he became a pupil at ]\Iount St. Mary's College, Emmits- 
burg, Md., and later entered Princeton College (now Princeton L'niversity ). 
He received his degree, A. M., from Franklin and Marshall College, and 
began teaching independently August 3, 1846, in Lebanon county, and subse- 
quently in Bernville, Berks county, after which he removed to Annville. 
Later he remo\'ed to [Nlyerslown, remaining seven vears in the latter town, 
removing" to Palmyra in 1857 and there founding a select boarding school, 
which was known as the Palmyra Academy, which he conducted until 1894, 
when the school was abandoned. His death occurred September 11, 1899. 

}.Ir. ^Vitmer married, in ^lay, 1850. Mary Ann Bachman, who was bom 
January 29, 1829, in South Annxille township. Lebanon county. Their chil- 
dren are: Rose; Anna; John B.. who died July 6. 1901. was an attorney: 
Emma J. married Dr. H. B. Felt}-, now of Abilene, Kans. ; Charles K. : Peter 
B. ; also four others, who are deceased. 

John B. Witmer was born in Palmyra October 3, 1857, and was educated 
at the Palmyra Academy and ]\It. St. Mary's College, Md., graduating from 
the latter place in 1877. He spent several years in teaching in the Palmyra 
Academv. He read law* in the office of the late Grant W'eidman, Sr.. of 
Lebanon, and was admitted to the Lebanon County Bar in 1882, practicing 
until his death. 

Charles Killixger Witmer was born in Palmyra January 18. 1867. 
He was educated at the Palmyra Academy under his father, and at Franklin 
and Marshall College, graduating from there in 1888. He taught in the 
Palmvra Academy for one year, following which he was for a year principal 
of the grammar school department of Waynesboro. Pa. He next became 
instructor in science in the Hannibal (^lo.) high school, for three years, and 
then became principal of the Lebanon high school, continuing in that position 
for eight years, resigning in 1901 to enter the Law Department of the L^ni- 
versitv of Pennsylvania. He is at present completing his course in the Law 
Department of Yale University. 



32 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Peter B. Witmer, Jr., ]\I. D., graduated from Franklin and Marshall 
College in 1892, Jefferson jMedical College in 1896, was connected with the 
Methodist Episcopal hospital of Philadelphia for eighteen months as resident 
physician, and then went to Abilene, Kansas, where he commenced the practice 
of medicine with his brother-in-law. Dr. Felty. 

ADAM RISE, late president of the Valley National Bank, and senior 
member of the general hat firm at No. S31 Cumberland street, Lebanon, was 
at his death by far the oldest native Lebanon citizen, having attained the 
advanced age of eighty-four years. For over seventy years, either as assistant 
or business manager, he was connected with the hat business, and was one 
of the most reliable dealers in that line in his vicinity. He might almost 
be said to have been born to the work. His father, Adam Rise, Sr., was a 
hatter and followed that trade in Lebanon for many years. Among the old 
settlers he was one of the most highly honored and respected citizens of the 
place. He married Catherine Gessman, and by her had five children : Samuel, 
Henry, Mariah, Adam and John, all of whom are deceased. 

Adam Rise was born in Lebanon, Pa., AugTJSt 6, 1818, and there grew 
to manhood. In the public schools of his city he acquired an education suf- 
ficient for all ordinary business purposes, and at the age of twelve began 
learning the hatter's trade. As the work proved to be in line with his 
natural bent he progressed rapidly, and in the course of time opened the 
general hat store on Cumberland street, with which he was connected up 
to the time of his death, which occurred June 3, 1903. 

On January 27, 1839, Mr. Rise married Rebecca Louser, who was born 
October 16, 181 8, daughter of Jacob and Mary Louser, pioneer citizens of 
Lebanon. Mrs. Rise was an admirable helpmeet for nearly sixty-three years, 
and she died December 9, 1901. Of this union there were four children: 
Mariah, wdio never married, kept house for her father ; Jacob L. is mentioned 
below; Catherine S. is deceased; and Eliza R. is the wife of C. M. Bowman. 
Mr. Rise possessed all the requisites for a successful merchant, and from 
time to time enlarged his stock of hats. Finally as his trade increased he 
received his son, Jacob L., as a partner. The profits from his business he 
wisely invested, and besides his interest in the general hat store, he owned 
a large amount of bank stock, several valuable buildings in Lebanon, and 
had interests in other city enterprises. As a superior business man he was 
made president of the Valley National Bank, and for over fifty years, from 
the time of its organization, he served as treasurer of the Perseverance Fire 
Insurance Company. 





ty/-t^^-t^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEP5AN0N COUNTY. 33 

jNIr. Rise was a Democrat, and wielded a strong iniluence in local politics. 
Fraternally he belonged to the F. & A. M. for fifty-five years, and to the 
I. O. O. F. for fifty-seven years. Personally he was remarkably well pre- 
served, and his mind was keen and active. Honesty of purpose, courage and 
energy were impressed upon his countenance and emanated from his move- 
ments and attitudes, impressing the beholder with reverence and respect. 
That he was a power in his community was evident even to casual observers. 
In religious connection he was a member of the Reformed Church. 

Jacob L. Rise, active member of the firm of A. Rise & Son, possesses 
many traits characteristic of his father, and seems to be quite as successful in 
business, a large share of the progress made by the firm in recent years having 
been due to his wise management. As a young man he served valiantly in 
the Civil war for a full term of enlistment, as a member of Company E, 
One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and 
was in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville; he was discharged 
in May, 1863. He married Lizzie Alwine, of Lebanon, who died leaving three 
daughters, Julia, Rebecca and Catherine. Mr. Rise, like his father, is a 
Democrat. Fraternally he is a ]\Iason in good standing. As a business man 
he is generous and honorable in all his dealings, and he has a host of warm 
friends. 

HIRA]\I L. ILLIG, the present recorder of Lebanon county, was born 
July 24, 1846, son of Jonathan and Eliza (Ramler) Illig. 

The family is one of the oldest in the section, and the Pennsylvania 
branches were founded by Andreas Illig, who came originally from the Palati- 
nate, Germany. He and his wife sailed from Rotterdam, on the good ship 
"Molley,"" John Hodgesen, master, in 1727, and landed in Philadelphia Sep- 
tember 30th of that year. The parcelling out of the fertile Millbach valley, de- 
cided Mr. Illig to locate in that region, and soon after his arrival he settled 
upon the farm now occupied by his descendants, Hiram L. and Andrew S. Illig. 
The present occupants have in their possession the original deed, written on 
parchment, dated 1727, and bearing the signatures of William, Thomas and 
Richard Penn, under the seal of Great Britain. Andreas Illig cleared up his 
new land, and there made a comfortable home for himself and family. He 
and his wife Dorothy had two children: Leonard, who is mentioned below; 
and a daughter, who married a Mr. Scholl. Andreas Illig died May 14, 

1758- 

Leonard Illig (i) succeeded to his father's estate, and there made a 
good home, making many improvements upon the work of his predecessor. 

3 



34 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

During his young manhood he married and among his children were three 
sons, Leonard (2), John and Simon, and a daughter, who married a Mr, 
Reed. He served in the war of the Revohition. His death occurred December 
23. 1797. 

Leonard IlHg (2). upon reaching manhood, settled upon the home farm 
and there engaged in agriculture. As a progressive farmer he made improve- 
ments on the old place, among his additions being the old mansion still to 
be seen there. During his young manhood he married Catherine \\'echter, 
and they liad three children: Jonathan, who is mentioned below; Leonard, 
who never married ; and Elizabeth, who became the wife of Jacob Schoch. 
He died February 2, 1836. 

Jonathan Illig was born in 1806, and was reared on the family home- 
stead. Upon reaching manhood he turned his attention to farming, following 
same in Millcreek township. In 1837 Mr. Illig married Eliza Ramler, who was 
born in Heidelberg township, daughter of Christian Ramler, who served in 
the war of 181 2. He was elected sheriff of Lebanon county, in 1840. To 
Mr. and INIrs. Illig were born nine children, seven of whom grew to maturity : 
Mary, who married George Seltzer, of Lebanon City; Elias R.. a miller 
and farmer of Millbach ; Elizabeth, who married Capt. J. G. Baddorff, who 
is the present treasurer of Lebanon county: Jonathan C, of Reading, Pa.; 
Hiram L., who is mentioned below; Andrew S., of Richland: and Thomas 
B., who is in partnership with his brother Jonathan C, in the dry goods 
business in Reading. 

After his marriage Mr. Illig settled upon the homestead farm in Mill- 
creek township, and followed agriculture. He lived to the age of fifty-seven, 
dying in 1S62. He was prominently identified with the Evangelical Lutheran 
•church at Millbach, where he is buried. 

Hiram L. Illig was reared in Millcreek township. In the free schools 
of his vicinity, and Fremount Seminars', Norristown, Pa., he was educated. 
Upon leaving school he taught eight consecuti\-e terms in the public school 
at Millbach, in Lebanon county. 

In November, 1875. Mr. Illig married Clara Gernant, of Leesport, and 
they have two children : Charles L., residing in Pottsville, Pa. : and Laura 
G., who is living at home. 

After his marriage Mr. Illig settled upon the homestead farm in IMill- 
creek township, and continued his agricultural pursuits, which he has steadily 
followed for the last twenty-se^-en years. Mr. Illig has always been a man 
of many interests, especially active in public affairs, and has served as school 
director for twenty-five years, a place which he is still filling. On November 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 35 

4, 1902, through the esteem of his feUow citizens he was elected county 
recorder, and is noAV performing the duties of the office. Of St. Paul's 
Evangelical Lutheran Church of JMillbach, he has served as deacon four 
years and trustee since 1886. He is the possessor of_ a collection of local 
specimens of Indian relics, numbering over twelve thousand (12,000), 
together with typical specimens from all over the United States. Politically 
he affiliates with the Republicans. 

WILLIARI MOORE GUILFORD, M. D. Amon^gthe prominent and 
representative citizens of Lebanon county is Dr. William Moore Guilford, 
a well known and highly esteemed physician of the city of Lebanon, where 
he was born November 26, 1832, a son of Simeon and Catherine E. (Doll) 
Guilford. He comes of Revolutionary ancestrv, his grandfather, Simeon 
Guilford, having served for a period of six years in the Revolutionary army. 

Simeon Guilford (2), son of Simeon and father of \A'illiam M., was 
for many years prominently identified with the iron business of Pennsylvania, 
and won public approval as a skilled and reliable civil engineer. He was born 
in 1801 — the same year that witnessed the birth of so many who later became 
distinguished in various walks of life — in Northampton, Hampshire Co., 
Mass.. and from the age of fourteen years displayed those solid traits of 
character which the country accepts as distinctively associated with New 
England ancestry and environment. Previous to 1823 he had become skilled 
enough in his profession to be engaged as one of the civil engineers on the 
Erie Canal, which was then in course of consti'uction, later in the same year 
coming to Pennsylvania, where he became principal assistant to Canvas White, 
who was the chief engineer of the Union Canal. Mr. Guilford was too 
good an engineer himself to be blind to the advantages which he could not 
avoid seeing would result from the location of a different route from that 
already selected by Mr. White. Mr. Guilford was able to prove that the 
route of his selection would diminish the cost of the work, by affording a 
better water supply by diminishing the waste of water or leakage occasioned 
by the interstitial character of the limestone region. He was also able to 
provide a superior hydraulic cement, manufactured from an argillaceous 
limestone, which he had discovered on the line of the work, and its use in 
this connection saved the company many thousands of dollars. In conse- 
quence of this important service rendered the company, he was presented 
by them with a set of Ree's Cjxlopedia, of forty-six volumes, and this gift 
was accompanied by complimentary resolutions. 

In 1827 I\Ir. Guilford accepted the appointment of principal engineer in 



36 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

the service of the State, which was tendered him by the State Board of Com- 
missioners. His first work in that connection was the survey of the route 
for a canal from Clark's ferry on the Susquehanna river to Northumberland, 
and in the short space embraced between jSIay 31 and June 26, 1827, he 
surveyed both sides of the river, locating, platting, estimating and reporting 
seventy-nine miles of canal, besides side lines, alterations, etc., amounting to 
fifteen miles more, and also determining the locality of a dam of 2,200 feet, 
across the river, near Sunbury ; a bridge of the same dimensions at Duncan's 
Island ; and a dam and inlet lock at the mouth of Penn's creek, at Selinsgrove. 
Before leaving the line he was tendered, by the citizens and contractors, a 
public dinner, at which he was presented with a pair of silver pitchers, appro- 
priately inscribed. 

On various occasions ]Mr. Guilford was called upon tO' make surveys, 
locate and render estimates of proposed improvements, his judgment and 
accuracy having won general confidence. Among the important enterprises 
of this kind were : The locks and dams on the Conestoga river and the Cohoes 
ci-eek; a similar work on the Rancocas creek, N. J. ; and on the canal and reser- 
voir at Beaver, Ohio. 

Between 1825 and 1832, Mr. Guilford discovered the celebrated Chest- 
nut Hill iron ore, on the Greider farm, near Columbia, Pa., which he owned 
for some years, also three other fine deposits of hematite ore, in Lebanon 
county, and others of less importance. In 1830-31, in partnership with the 
late Dr. George N. Eckert, he erected in the Swatara Valley, in Schuylkill 
county, the "Swatara Furnace" for the manufacture of iron by charcoal, 
and here pig iron and such castings as stoves, water pipes, etc., were pro- 
duced in large quantities, this establishment remaining in operation for twenty 
years. In 1853, for sundry reasons, the partnership was dissolved, and the 
works abandoned. In 1855. in connection with other capitalists, Mr. Guil- 
ford started a blast furnace at Lebanon, making use of anthracite coal as a 
fuel. This was known as the Dudley Furnace and use was made of the Corn- 
wall ore. 

After retiring from the iron business, Mr. Guilford devoted his atten- 
tion for many years to his property interests in Shelbyville, Ottawa and 
Chatsworth. 111. In politics he was veiy prominent in the Whig party, and 
was its candidate for canal commissioner in 1843. failing of election on 
account of conditions which resulted in the defeat of the whole Whig party. 

In May, 1830, Mr. Guilford was married to Catherine E. Doll, a niece 
of Judge Andrew Grofif, of Lancaster. Three children of their family survive, 
namely: Dr. William M., of Lebanon; Dr. S. H., a dentist in Philadelphia; 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 37 

and Robert E., a successful merchant in Shelbyville, 111. ]\Irs. Guilford died 
October 8, 1850. Her husband survived her many years, his death occurring 
in 1894, at the age of ninety-three years. 

William M. Guilford was fashioned by nature for a physician. His 
early ambitions were all in the line of medicine, and after finishing a general 
and classical course of study at Lelianon Academy, in his native city, at 
the early age of sixteen years he commenced its serious study untler Prof. 
Henry Childs, of Berkshire Medical College, at Pittsfield, Mass. In 1849 
he attended a course of lectures in that institution, and also a course in the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. LIpon his return to 
Lebanon he entered the office of John \V. Gloninger, as a student, subsequently 
attending two full courses of lectures in the Medical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, from which he graduated in April, 1852. Dr. Guil- 
ford spent the winter of 1852-53 in gaining valuable experience in walking 
the hospitals of Philadelphia, and in the meantime attende'd the lectures in 
Parish's School of Practical Pharmacy, in that city. 

Thus qualified. Dr. Guilford located, in November, 1854, in his native 
city, and entered upon a practice which has been eminently successful, and 
which has made his name almost a household word through Lebanon and 
its environs. Since 1854 his faithful service and trained skill have been 
devoted to this locality. 

Aside from his vocation Dr. Guilford has been a prominent factor in 
the progress and de\'elopment of Lebanon, and has been connected at \'arious 
times with many of the leading financial enterprises of the city. He was 
one of the founders of and a director in the Farmers and Mechanics Bank, 
a director in the Lebanon National Bank, the Lebanon Trust & Safe Deposit 
Bank, the Lebanon Manufacturing Co.. and other organizations. 

Dr. Guilford has always been pleasantly associated with his brother 
physicians. He is a member of the Lebanon County Medical Society, of 
which he was president in 1892 ; of the Medical Society of the State of Pennsyl- 
vania, being a member of its board of censors ; of the American IMedical Asso- 
ciation ; was president of the board of pension examiners in 1870; has been 
president of the medical staff of the Good Samaritan Hospital since 1889 
and visiting physician of the same; was consulting physician to the Pennsyl- 
vania State Asylum for the Chronic Insane in 1894-1903. and has been vice- 
president of its consulting staff" since 1894; was president of the city board 
of health in 1887-88; is one of the censors of the Medico-Chirurgical College 
of Philadelphia; in 1863 was second lieutenant of the Lebanon County 
Emergencv Company; was one of the examining surgeons for the Ninety- 



38 BIOGRAPHICAL AXXALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantr\% prior to its muster into the service 
for the Civil war ; and for fifteen successive years was appointed by the 
directors of the poor as physician to the County Hospital. To those who can 
appreciate the duties attendant upon so many public offices of responsibility, 
it has been a matter of wonder that Dr. Guilford has so efficiently performed 
every duty, and in the meantime given careful and conscientious attention 
to an absorbing practice. 

On November 12, 1856, Dr. Guilford was united in marriage with ^lary, 
daughter of John Elder, and great-granddaughter of Rev. John Elder, a 
graduate of the University of Edinburgh, and for sixty years pastor of Paxton 
Presbyterian Church, where he was ordained December 21, 1738. Eour of 
the sons of Rev. John Elder were officers in the Revolutionary army. The 
mother of ]\Irs. Guilford was Jane Henderson Richie, a native of Dauphin 
county. Pa. To Dr. and 'Sirs. Guilford were born the following children : Jane 
Richie, Avho is tlie wife of John Hurst, of Syracuse, N. Y.; William Moore, 
Jr., B. S. (Haverford College, 1890) : Paul, A,I. D. (University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1891) ; Adaline E. ; and Arthur B. 

JOHN J. BOWAIAN, one of the progressive and leading business men 
of Alyerstown, Pa., who was born and reared in that town, is the only son of 
Moses L. and ]\Iary (Muth) Bowman, the former of whom is deceased, his 
wife surviving and making her home in ^lyerstown. 

Moses L. Bowman was born July 12, 1825, anad died at his home in 
Myerstcwn, September 27, 190T, having been one of the most successful 
merchants of Alyerstown, where he had been in business for half a century. 
He was a son of Jacob Bowman, a farmer of Lebanon county, located near 
Palmyra, Pa., and was a member of one of the old and prominent families 
of that locality, his forefathers having emigrated from Switzerland and set- 
tled in Lebanon county in its early days. Jacob Bowman was the father 
of the following children: Jacob C, Moses L., John M., Sallie (deceased), 
Eannie and Carolina. Moses L. Bowman left the farm when a boy of four- 
teen years, and commenced clerking in the store of David Bowman, of 
Lebanon, which stood on the present site of the Ross Drug Company, of that 
city. Pie later went into business for himself, and was very successful. On 
May 20, 1852, he married !Miss j\Iary !Muth, of Myerstown, a daughter of 
John and Alary (Zimmerman) Muth, of that place, and John J. Bowman 
was the only child of this marriage. Starting out in life a poor boy. by his 
industry and thrift Moses L. Bowman became one of IMyerstown's wealthiest 
and most inlluential men. Eor more than half a centurv he owned and 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 39 

operated one of the largest mercantile firms, and at the time of his death he 
owned a fine farm, beautiful residence, excellent and large stock of goods, and 
a good storehouse. In politics, he was a stanch Republican, and was active 
in local afifairs, but never sought or desired office. In the Reformed Church 
he was long one of its most liberal supporters and earnest members, and 
held various official positions in the same. In his untimely taking away, 
Myerstown lost one of its best citizens, and he has bequeathed to his descend- 
ants an untarnished name and the influence of a true, upright life. This 
influence reaches beyond the term of his own existence, and is such as to 
stimulate others to high and noble deeds. His wife was a member of a large 
family of children, all of whom grew to maturity : William. Jeft'erson, Cyrus, 
Franklin. Edward, Amanda, ]\Iary, Amelia, Harriet and Katherine. The 
]\Iuth family is an old and well known one of Lebanon county. 

John J. Bowman was educated in the public schools of Alyerstown, the 
Palatinate College of iNIyerstown and the Franklin and iNIarshall College of 
Lancaster, Pa. After leaving college he went into his father's store and 
is now conducting this large establishment, which is prospering greatly under 
his able management. I'he old, reliable and strictly honorable methods which 
gained it such repute with the trade in the past, are continued, and Mr. 
Bowman is decidedly one of the leading merchants of Lebanon county. 

On January 19, 1893, Air. Bowman married Lizzie A. Loose, of Beth- 
lehem, Pa., daughter of Rev. Isaac and Catherine Loose, the former a minister 
of the Reformed Church of that place. Mr. and ]Mrs. Bowman have had three 
children : The eldest, a son, was still born ; those living are Clafflin L. and 
Mary Katherine. [Nlr. Bowman is a stanch Republican in his political affilia- 
tions, while both he and Mrs. Bowman are earnest and active workers in the 
Reformed Church. They are both ^•ery highly esteemed and take an important 
part in the social life of INIyerstown, where both are so well and favorably 
known, and none more richly deserve the success which has attended their 
efforts. 

JOHN YOUNG (deceased) was born in Lehigh county. Pa., February 
6, 1S24, son of Jacob and Catherine Young, of the same county. John 
Young was reared on the farm, and received his education in the country 
schools. He learned the printer's trade when a young man. under his brother 
Joseph's direction, in ^^lontgomery county, and afterward did newspaper work 
in several counties in Pennsylvania, locating in Lebanon about 1850. He 
published a paper, the Pcnnsylvanier, for three years. In 1S50 he changed 
the name to Volkszcitung, meaning, in English, the people's paper. This he 



40 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

conducted with success until 1SS5, when he sold out to Frank F. Hauck, who 
is the present editor. 

Mr. Young married Miss Elizabeth Rolland, and they had two children, 
one of whom reached maturity, Ella M., the wife of Dr. Frank ]M. Brundage, 
who represents the United States at Aix-la-Chapelle. Germany, as a consul for 
his government. His second marriage, on July 10, 1862, was to ]\Iiss [Nlary 
Ann Reinhart, of Bethel township, Lebanon county. Pa., who still lives in 
Lebanon. She was born March 14, 1839, daughter of Oliver and Hannah 
Reinhart, of Lebanon county, the former of whom was a farmer and teacher. 
Mrs. Young was one of a family of nine children, of whom grew up : 
Catherine, the wife of Emanuel Behney, of Schuylkill county. Pa. : Sarah 
Ellen, the wife of William Johnson, of Schuylkill : ^lary Ann, the widow of 
John Young; and Ephraim, who was killed in the Civil war. The Reinharts 
are one of the old families of Lebanon. 

John Young was a stanch Republican, and a member of the Union or 
rather Independent Church, being an exhorter and teacher for many years. 
He was a self-made man, honest, and true to his convictions. He had at the 
time of his death accumulated a small fortune. His widow resides at her home. 
No. 638 Chestnut street, Labanon. Mrs. Young is a member of the Zion 
Lutheran Church, and a noble Christian woman. 

SAMUEL \YEISS, M. D. Among the representative members of the 
medical profession in Lebanon, none stand higher in public esteem than does 
Dr. Samuel Weiss, who was born August 20, 1845, in South Lebanon town- 
ship, Lebanon county, son of Samuel and Sarah (Smith) ^^'eiss, both natives 
of the same county. 

Samuel Weiss, the father, was born in 1800, son of Henry \\''eiss. who 
was a resident of Lebanon county near Schaefferstown, and died in 1886. 
The mother of Dr. Weiss was a daughter of Henry Smith, a well-known resi- 
dent of Cornwall, Lebanon county. These parents had a family of seven 
children, four of whom still survive. J\Ir. and i\Irs. A\^eiss were highly re- 
spected people, and were members of the United Brethren Church. 

Dr. Weiss was reared on his father's farm, and until he was eighteen 
years of age devoted his winters to study in the public schools and his sum- 
mers to farm work, developing in this manner both mind and body. Ambitious 
to enter wider fields of usefulness, the young man spent one year in the 
Lebanon Academy, while it was under the scholarly care of Cyrus Boger, 
and supplemented this with two years at the Millersville State Normal 
School. In April, 1867, he first turned his attention to medicine, entering 





a^^^M^^ /U^^^Jt 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXXALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 41 

upon a course of study with Dr. ^Villialn M. Guilford, of Lebanon, where 
he prepared for entrance to Bellevue Medical College, New York City, 
graduating- with credit four years later. 

In 1872 Dr. Weiss located for practice in Lebanon, and his services have 
been in active demand ever since. His capacity was recognized by his appoint- 
ment to the position of county physician, a position of responsibility which he 
held for fifteen years (with but one year's intermission), during' which time he 
served with great efficiency. 

Dr. Weiss has been prominently identified with State politics, for a 
number of years. His personal following is large, and his popularity led 
to his selection in 1900, by the anti-Quay people of Lebanon county, to stand 
for State Senator, of the Seventeenth Senatorial District of Pennsylvania, to 
fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Gen. J. P. S. Gobin, who be- 
came a candidate for Lieutenant-governor. The political history of the 
canvass all over the State, at this time, tells of much party and factional feeling, 
and in Lebanon county the result was waited for with interest all over the 
State. Current history records the attitude of the various factions in regard 
to Senator M. S. Quay, and the party to which Dr. Weiss was attached did 
good work in the county canvass. Doubtless it was on account of the reali- 
zation of the peculiar fitness of Dr. Weiss for the high honor, that caused his 
triumph, for he was elected Senator by a majority of between 2,300 and 
2,400, although many of the Quay men did not vote against him. When 
Senator Quay came up in the United States Senatorial contest. Dr. Weiss 
conscientiously opposed his election. Dr. Weiss's ability has been recognized 
by the administrative body by his selection for the following committees : 
Appropriations, Banks and Building and Loan Associations ; Educational ; 
Forestry, Game and Fisheries ; Pensions and Gratuities ; and Public Health 
and Sanitation. 

Dr. Weiss has been connected with many enterprises of a financial 
nature in his city and for a time was a director in the People's National 
Bank, resigning from the same. He is at present a director in the A-'alley 
National Bank of Lebanon. As a progressive and thorough physician and 
skillful surgeon. Dr. Weiss enjoys an enviable reputation. He was the 
first surgeon in Lebanon county to perform ovariotomy, and has kept in touch 
with all modern discoveries, being generally regarded as a leader in the pro- 
fession. Since its establishment, he has been surgeon and a member of the 
gynecological staff of the Good Samaritan Hospital of this city. 

In 1889 Dr. Weiss was united in marriage with ^liss Zitella r^IcCauly. of 
Lebanon. ''1; 



42 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

JOHN K. REINOEHL, A. M., M. D. The issues of life and death 
constitute important and grave responsibihty and no one who has ever stood 
beside the sick bed and watched with agonizing expectancy every motion of 
the physician as he diagnoses the case can fail to estimate this responsibility 
at its value. An honest physician is in some respects the noblest work of 
creation ; and when with honesty is coupled profound therapeutic knowledge 
the combination is indeed a happy one. 

Dr. John K. Reinoehl (deceased), one of the leading physicians and 
surgeons of Lebanon for twenty years, and a gentleman whose sterling 
integrity, broad culture and genial personality caused his selection for 
political preferment, was a native of Lebanon, having been born in the city 
August 3, 1858, a son of George H. and Mary A. (Krause) Reinoehl. The 
latter was born September 21, 1834, and still survives her husband. The 
Reinoehls were Lebanon county people as early as the present day record 
vouches, the first recorded name being George Reinoehl, the great-grandfather 
of our deceased subject. His son, Samuel, was born in the village in the year 
1800, and died in 1866. The father of Dr. Reinoehl was born JMarch 18, 
1835, and died ]\Iarch 23, 1898. 

Dr. Reinoehls youth was passed amid gentle home environment, and 
careful direction was given to his early training, both as to general culture 
and specific education. The excellent school system of the city grounded 
him thoroughly in the "three R's" and the Swatara Institute prepared him for 
his college course at Muhlenberg. From this latter excellent school he was 
graduated with distinction in 1879, "^'^'ith the degree of Master of Arts. 
Deciding on medicine as a profession he began a course of reading with the 
late Dr. George P. Lineweaver and in due time matriculated at the 
Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania. The diploma of 
this institution was issued him in 1882, and he immediately opened an office 
in his native city. His success was most marked from the beginning. Dr. 
Reinoehl was at home in the field of general therapeutics and also established 
an enviable reputation as a deft manipulator of the surgeon's knife. His 
practice was extensive and largely in counsel. 

Dr. Reinoehl had a fine conception of the duties of an American citizen, 
and was therefore always found ready to do his share of the unremunerative 
labor necessar}^ in every municipality. His fine ability soon marked him for 
higher service, and he was sent to the Legislature in 1892, and again in 1894, 
in that body acquitting himself with great satisfaction to his constituents. 
As stated our deceased subject took great interest in the local affairs of the 
city. In his younger manhood he served five years in the Pennsylvania 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 43 

National Guard. In 1883-85 and 1889-91 he was coroner's physician of the 
count3^ On the city board of health he gave good service in 1885-86 and 
1890-91. In 1889 he received the appointment of secretary to the United 
States Board of Examining Surgeons, a position which he resigned in 1892 
to enter upon his legislative duties. 

Fraternally Dr. Reinoehl was a prominent Mason, a Knight Templar of 
Hermit Commandery, and secretary of the Royal Arcanum. He was a mem- 
ber and strong supporter of the Lutheran church, and was charitable to a 
fault. He belonged to the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, being a charter 
member of the chapter of Muhlenberg College, and also belonging at the 
University of Pennsylvania. 

Miss Emma M. Dillon and Dr. Reinoehl were married in Philadelphia 
November 27, 1884. Mrs. Reinoehl is a daughter of Thomas H. and Cath- 
erine Dillon, and was born in Philadelphia September 11, 1868. To this 
union came three bright children: John K., Jr., born July 7, 1886; Mildred, 
born July 7, 1896, died Augiist 5, 1896; Irene, born September 10, 1898. 

The death of Dr. Reinoehl was the result of an accident, and occurred 
July 10, 1902. In this event the community suffered an irreparable loss, the 
medical fraternity lost one of its brightest members, and the home a kind and 
indulgent husband and father. 

WILLIAM LONG KREIDER, one of the leading citizens of Palmyra, 
Lebanon county, comes from a long line of honorable ancestry. Going as far 
back as Jacob Kreider, the great-grandfather of William L., we find that he 
was born in Lancaster county, and was a descendant of one of four brothers 
of the name who had emigrated either from Germany or Switzerland. Jacob 
married in his neighborhood and settled on Snitz Creek, below Lebanon, in 
what is now North Cornwall township, but at that time was Lebanon town- 
ship, in Lancaster county. 

Henry Kreider, son of Jacob, was born on the old homestead on Snitz 
Creek, September 25, 1774, and died April 9, 1835. He married Christianna 
Wittemeyer, daughter of Ludwig Wittemeyer, born August 3, 1777, and died 
August 3, 1864. 

Jacob Kreider, son of Henry, was born in 181 2, in South Lebanon town- 
ship, and died m 1874. He married Mary Long, born in 18 19, on the old 
Long homestead in South Annville township, daughter of Joseph Long, and 
died in 1889. The maternal grandfather, Joseph Long, was a son of 
Christian (3), son of Christian (2), a son of the Christian Long who took 
up 400 acres of land from the Penns, which was then located in the boundaries 



44 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

of Lancaster county, but which is now included in Lebanon county, and a part 
of which is now owned by Joseph L. Kreider. The children of Jacob and 
Mary (Long) Kreider were: Joseph L.. of North Cornwall township; 
Henry L., of Cleona, Pa.: W. L., of Palmyra: Abraham L.. of the State of 
Washington; Benjamin, of Cleona; and Sarah, the wife of Adam ]\Ioyer, of 
Palmyra. 

William Long Kreider was born September 26, 1838. on the farm now 
owned by Andrew Kreider, on the Berks and Dauphin turnpike, in South 
Annville township, Lebanon county. He was reared on the farm, attending 
the common schools and the old Ann\-ille Academy. His young manhood 
was spent mainly on the farm, although he was also occupied in other ways, 
spending two years as a clerk with Christian Hoverter and one year with 
Killinger & Kinports, at Annville. He operated a fulling mill on his father's 
land for two years. In 1864 he married, and in the next year removed to the 
farm of his father-in-law, David ^Yilhelm, at Palmyra, and in the succeeding 
fall built a store building and dwelling house at Palmyra. Here Mr. Kreider 
engaged in a mercantile business with his brother, Abraham. Both were men 
of business ability, and they soon realized the convenience of their location 
as to transportation, and in 1866 they bought the grain warehouse, coal siding, 
etc., from Martin Early, and combined all their lines of business. In the 
spring of 1867 they sold the mercantile line to Jerome and Michael Deininger, 
but continued in the coal and grain business for a number of years. Later 
Abraham withdrew in order to enter upon grain brokerage in Chicago, and 
was succeeded by his brother Henry, although he retained his half interest 
in the property. When he returned to Palmyra, he, with Henry, took charge 
of this business, William retiring from active participation, but still retaining 
his half-interest in the property. For a few years he then engaged in farming, 
but later bought out the warehouse business and resumed operations in grain 
and coal, subsequently taking his son, David A., into partnership, under the 
firm name of W. L. Kreider & Son. About four years later they went out 
of the business, renting the warehouse to Jacob Landis & Son. For the 
succeeding two or three years, Mr. Kreider engaged in no active business, but 
in 1888, when the first shoe factory was organized in Palmyra, he became a 
director, and later ser\-ed the company for two years as president. Later he 
withdrew from this company and in 1891 built a shoe factory near the rail- 
road station, with dimensions of 32x50 feet, which were doubled in 1893. In 
1895 it was found necessary, on account of the great growth of the business, 
to build the two additions of 34x50 feet, three stories high, and in 1897. they 
added a three-story building of 30x65 feet. The combined floor space is more 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANXALS OF LEBANON COUNIY. 45 

than 24,000 feet, and the factory turns out infants', children's and misses' turned 
shoes, mocassins and soft soles, employing from 175 to 200 skilled hands. The 
territory covered by sales is mainly the Middle West, although purchasers 
come from California and Utah. Mr. Kreider is a man of so much business 
ability that he is able to operate many lines, and all successfully. In 1897 he 
added a flouring mill of 125 barrels capacity a day to the grain warehouse, 
which is now operated by John S. Bomberger & Son. Other enterprises in 
which he is interested are : the Londonderry Water Company, of Mhich he 
has been president since its organization ; and the Lebanon & Annville Electric 
Railway Company, of which he was one of the first directors. For a time he 
was a director in the Palmyra Bank. Mr. Kreider also owned a lumber yard, 
and erected a planing-mill which he sold to W. H. Erb some two years ago. 
Much of the desirable residence portion of East Palmyra has been his prop- 
erty, and he laid it out into town lots, and erected about twenty-five of the 
comfortable and attractive residences. He has always dealt extensively in 
real estate, and in 1890, in company with Henry H. Long, bought a tract of 
forty acres from Michael Kreider. They platted the same, and started the 
town of Cleona, on the Pennsylvania & Reading Railroad, building a large 
warehouse, where they handled coal and lumber; the town now has a popula- 
tion of some 200 people. 

In 1864, Mr. Kreider married Catherine Wilhelm, who was born March 
9, 1846, on the Gravel Hill road. Palmyra, daughter of David and Fanny 
(Deininger) Wilhelm, the former of whom was born near the old New 
Market forge and the latter on the same farm as her daughter, which is the 
old Benjamin Deininger farm. Children as follows blessed this union : David 
A., born July 15, 1866; William H., December 22, 1869; Mary A., February 
3, 1873 (died October 21, 1881) ; Harry Clayton, September i, 1875; Katie 
M., April 17, 1878 (married Eugene Bowman, cashier of the Palmyra Bank) ; 
and Edwin Franklin and Fanny Violet, twins. September 16, 1883, of whom 
Fanny died January 2, 1887. ^"d Edwin, January 11, 1888. The three sons, 
David A., William H. and Harry Clayton, are all interested with their father 
in the shoe manufacturing business, under the firm name of W. L. Kreider's 
Sons. Mr. and Mrs. Kreider are valued members of the River Brethren 
Church. In politics he is a Republican. 

DAVID A. KREIDER, one of the substantial men of Palmyra, was Ijorn 
in Palmyra, July 15, 1866, and received his educaflon in the common schools 
of that city, and at the Reading Business College. In the spring of 1886, he 
embarked in a coal, grain and lumber business with his father, but two years 



46 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

later, established a general store in Palmyra, and operated it alone. After 
about eighteen months, however, he again entered the coal, grain and lumber 
branch of commercial activity, locating at Cleona, Pa., just after that town had 
been laid out, and before any buildings had been erected. Mr. Kreider built 
and then sold to the new residents a number of pleasant homes, and was 
largely instrumental in the establishment of the prosperity of the place. Later, 
he returned to the farm at Palmyra, and for some time Avas employed in 
attending to it and erecting some eight or ten houses in his vicinity. 

The next occupation of Mr. Kreider was that of clerk in the Kreider 
shoe factory, and occasionally he went upon the road as a traveling man. This 
continued for about a year, when he purchased the planing mill and lumber 
yard of W. H. Erb, and the following year, he and his father bought the coal 
and grain business of J. Landis & Son. The planing mill was rented to 
W. H. Erb, but he and his father continued the coal and grain business for 
two years, and then began operating the new flouring mill also. However, 
a year later, the flouring mill was rented to Hofifer & Staufifer. After a few 
months spent in well-earned rest, Mr. Kreider became the fourth member of 
the firm of W. L. Kreider & Sons, shoe manufacturers, which style was 
changed, June 12, 1900, to that of W. L. Kreider's Sons, upon the retirement 
of the senior member. Mr. David A. Kreider attends to the business of the 
office as well as the purchasing, and is a very energ'etic young man of excellent 
ability. 

David Kreider married Minnie Erb, daughter of Isaac Erb. formerly a 
coal and lumber dealer of Swatara Station. The children born to j\Ir. and Mrs. 
Kreider were: Willie E., David, Minnie, Irwin, Paul, Harry, Ruth, Ray- 
mond and Violet Edith, the last named dying at the age of three years, three 
months and three days. Mr. Kreider is a consistent member of the River 
Brethren Church, and he and his family are important factors in the social 
life of Palmyra. 

WILLIAM H. KREIDER, one of the leading young business men of 
Palmyra, and a member of the firm of W. L. Kreider's Sons, was born in 
Palmyra December 22, 1869, a son of William L. Kreider, an extended sketch 
of whom appears elsewhere in this volume. The boyhood days of our 
subject were spent in Palmyra, where he received a liberal education in the 
public schools and at the Palmyra xA.cademy. After completing his educa- 
tion he first worked upon* his father's farm, and then entered his father's 
employ, when the latter was successfully conducting a grain business at Pal- 
myra, remaining in that line until 1887, when he entered the Palmyra Boot 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 47 

and Shoe factory, and worked at the bench for three years, learning the 
business thorouglily. He was promoted until he became foreman for the 
company, and held that position for two years, when he resigned to enter 
the shoe factory of his father, the latter having in the meanwhile embarked in 
this line of commercial activity. One year later the young man was made 
a member of the firm. In addition to his interest in the shoe business Mr. 
Kreider is a director in the Londonderry Water Company. While deeply 
immersed in his business cares, Mr. Kreider ardently supports the principles 
of the Republican party, and is a man who enjoys in highest degree the 
confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens. 

On December 25, 1890, Mr. Kreider was married to Susie E.. daughter 
of John K. and Elizabeth E. Landis. Mrs. Kreider was born at Lyonsville, 
Dauphin county, near Palmyra. The following children have been born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Kreider: Elizabeth M., born October 3, 1891 ; Edwin F., 
born July 3, 1893; Catherine P., born September 24, 1S98. The religious 
affiliations of INIr. Kreider are with the United Brethren Church, of which he 
is a trustee, and to which he is a liberal contributor. 

BERNHARD RAUCH (deceased) was one of the pioneer citizens of 
Lebanon, and was born in 1801, and died September 22, 1882. He spent his 
boyhood days on the farm and learned the trade of a wool dyer. On April 
29, 1827, he was married to Miss Jane Brown, of Colebrook, Lebanon 
County, who was born in 1805, and lived to a good old age. They had ten 
children, six of whom grew to maturity. We have record of the following: 
John H., born in 1828, is deceased; Sarah, born in 1830, lives in Lebanon; 
Elizabeth, born in 1833, is deceased; Louisa, born in 1835, is deceased; Mary 
Anne, born in 1838, is deceased; Miss Margaret J., born July 18, 1839, now 
resides in Lebanon; William, born January 11, 1842, is a shirt-maker in the 
city of Lebanon; Cyrus G., born in 1844, is now a partner with his brother, 
William, as a shirt manufacturer. Mr. Ranch was a Democrat and a mem- 
ber of the Reformed Church, being one of the leading members. He was a 
director of the First National and Valley National Banks of Lebanon, and 
also served as school director. 

Mr. Ranch started out in life a poor boy with no money, but by hard 
toil and economy he left considerable property at the time of his death. He 
was respected for his honesty and integrity, and possessed a splendid moral 
character, was a good citizen and was well liked by all who knew him. A 
man with a big heart, he was good and kind to the poor and much devoted 
to his family. He never catered for notoriety, much preferring to lead a 



48 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

quiet humble life. He left behind him a large fam.ily and a host of friends 
to mourn his loss. Sarah and Margaret J. Ranch reside in their well fur- 
nished home at No. 132 South Eighth street, where they have been living 
retired since the death of their father. They are members of the Reformed 
Church of the city of Lebanon, and in younger life were among the active 
members and teachers in the Sunday School. 

LEE LIGHT GRUMBINE, lawyer and journalist, was born in Freder- 
icksburg, Lebanon county, July 25, 1858. His early ancestry emigrated to 
America from the Rhine country about the year 1755, and his genealogy^ 
connects him with the early jNIoravian settlements in eastern Pennsylvania, 
through his paternal great-grandfather, Peter Fviehrer, who was a ^loravian 
teacher among the pioneer settlers of the New World. 

Mr. Grumbine was educated in the public schools. Palatinate College and 
Wesleyan University, MiddletoAvn, Conn., graduating A. B. from the last 
named institution in 1881. In 1884 he received the degree of A. M. from his 
alma mater. While in college he began the work of giving public elocution- 
ary entertainments which he has kept up as a diversion ever since, varying it 
with lecturing and teachers' institute work. In 1886 he was chosen instructor 
of elocution in Cornell University, but through some misunderstanding never 
entered upon the duties of the position. 

After leaving college, Mr. Grumbine engaged in teaching, and in the 
meantime studied law, being admitted to the Bar of Lebanon County in 1884, 
and to the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in 1887. For seven years he 
practiced law, a part of the time as a member of the firm of Gobin & Grum- 
bine. Leaving the practice of the law temporarily he turned his attention to 
literary work and founded the Lebanon Daily Report. 

Mr. (Srumbine's career has been one of great versatility along various 
lines, and it must be said that whatever he has attempted he has carried 
through successfully. His chief work of course has been that of a lawyer. 
Quiet and unobtrusive in manner, independent in conduct even to aggressive- 
ness, without the employment of the arts of the politician, or the seeker of 
favor, he has, by sheer force of his character, ability and rectitude of life, com- 
manded a leading position at the Bar of his county, and enjoys the confidence 
of a large clientage. He served continuously for many years as a member 
of the examining board of the Bar. 

As a journalist he made a brilliant record in the short time that he was 
engaged in that work. He, in conjunction with the Sowers Brothers, who 
were conducting a printing house, founded the Lebanon Daily Report in 




J.^ 



^yxJ? 



oLjCLxZ^ cJL, , 't3J|A^*-'^^^*^*-^>*-*^'-^-^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 49 

November, 1889. and he was for four years its editor, gaiiding hand and part 
owner. Conducted on thoroughly independent hues, in the pubHc interest, 
it at once became a recognized force in Pennsylvania journalism, his edi- 
torials being frequently quoted in the metropolitan press. Under his manage- 
ment it was foremost in reform, the dread of evil doers and machine poli- 
ticians. Among the more prominent achievements of the Report during ]\Ir. 
Grumbine's editorship was the establishment of the Pennsylvania Chautauqua 
at Moimt Gretna, and of the Pennsylvania-German Society. In the famous 
Swallow campaign, in 1898 he took editorial charge of the Harrisburg 
Comiiwivzccalth, a Prohibition daily printed at the State capital, and always 
stood very closely to Dr. Swallow in his memorable fights against the saloon 
and the Quay machine. He was also one of defendant's counsel in the libel 
suits brought against Dr. Swallow. He resumed the practice of the law in 
1894, and has been prominent in many of the leading cases of tlie county. 

Another field of activity in which the subject of this sketch has won 
distinction is that of literature and public speaking. He is a vigorous, con- 
vincing and yet graceful writer on many subjects, and has contributed a 
number of valuable papers to different periodicals. He is the author of a 
volume of poems and translations, which illustrate a prefatory treatise on the 
Pennsylvania-German language — a study of its status as a spoken dialect and 
form of literary expression with reference to its capabilities and limitations. 
His verses both in English and Gennan breathe a genuine poetic spirit, and as 
lyric songs and pictures of Pennsylvania-German life give the writer the rank 
of a real poet. He is a recognized authority on the Pennsylvania-German 
dialect, and has made a close study of the provincialisms of eastern Penn- 
sylvania, having their origin in German idioms and expressions, which he has 
frequently treated in lectures. An article on the same subject was read before 
the American Philological Association, of which he was for years a member. 
He has also in course of preparation a history of the Mennonites, which he is 
writing for the Pennsylvania-Gernian Society, and which will be published 
by the Society as soon as finished. Another book in course of publication 
at this writing is a volume of public speeches on the liquor traffic to be 
issued by the State Executive Committee of the Prohibition party. A number 
of these have been published as campaign! documents and distributed over the 
State by the hundred thousand. As a public speaker he has been very suc- 
cessful. 

Mr. Grumbine has also displayed a considerable talent in organizing or 
in the art of doing things. Among his achievements in this line it may be 
said that he was the prime mover in the organization of the Pennsylvania 

4 



50 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Chautauqua and a member of its first board of managers. \Mth the resources 
of a first-class newspaper at hand he was prominently instrumental in the 
organization of the Pennsylvania-German Society. Recognition of this fact 
is made in Vol. I of the Society's Proceedings : "during the months of 
December, 1890, and January, 1891, articles appeared in various journals 
throughout eastern Pennsylvania, the earliest being in the Lebanon Daily 
Report, followed by the Nczv Era of Lancaster and the Philadelphia Inquirer, 
advocating the formation of a Pennsylvania-German Society." It was not the 
intention of its promoters to perpetuate the dialect, as is sometimes thought. 
but to secure for the heroic and pious German settlers of Pennsylvania that 
recognition which is due them, and to save to history their contributions to 
the material, political and religious development of the nation, which the 
society has been doing with eminent success and satisfaction. It numbers most 
of the leading professional and business men of Pennsylvania-German ex- 
traction in the State and elsewhere among its members. !Mr. Grumbine has 
been a member of the Executive committee of the society continuously ever 
since its organization. He has also been one of the leading spirits in the 
Lebanon County Historical Society since it was founded, has been a member 
of its Executive committee since its organization, and has contributed a number 
of palmers to its publications. He planned and helped to organize the Lebanon 
County Trust Company, one of the flourishing financial institutions of this 
county, of which he is one of the directors, vice-president and solicitor. 

In politics ^Ir. Grumbine has been a Prohibitionist for twenty years, 
having by his labors, his earnest devotion to the cause and his forceful writing 
and speaking won a high place in the confidence and the councils of the party. 
He lias for many years served on the State Executive committee and has 
taken a leading part in the party's conventions, presiding, on several occasions, 
and frequently serving as chairman of the committee on Resolutions. He 
was the author of the Gettysburg platform of 1903, which committed the party 
to "license repeal" as the first step toward the solution of the liquor problem, 
and which was justly regarded as one of the strongest and most statesman- 
like papers ever adopted by a political convention. It attracted wide attention. 
He w'as the Prohibition candidate for the office of lieutenant-govemor in 1902, 
running a close second to Dr. Swallow^ for the nomination of governor. In 
1900 he accompanied the Prohibition candidate for president on his tour 
through the State, and was one of the leading speakers in that campaign. 
Serving in numerous capacities of trust and responsibility in private life he 
never held a public office. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 51 

Mr. Grumbine was married, in 1881, to Roie E. Adams, of Naples, N. 
Y., and has one son, LeRoy .Vdanis Grumbine, a student in Oberlin College 
and Conservatory. 

ROIE (ADA^IS) GRLAIBINE, musician, and wife of Lee L. 
Grumbine, though residing for the greater part of her life in Lebanon county, 
was born in the village of Naples, Ontario Co., N. Y. Her father, John 
Adams, was a native of Exmouth, England, and her mother. Sibyl Fox, of 
Saybrook, Conn. Through her mother she is descended from the large and 
prominent family of Palmers, originally from Massachusetts. Miss Adams 
was educated in the Naples xA.cademy, and graduated in music from the then 
celebrated Lyons Musical Academy, of Lyons, N. Y., of which Rev. L. 
Hinsdale Sherwood, father of William H. Sherwood, the great pianist, was 
the founder, and during his life the principal. She also studied under the 
latter and in Boston and other places. She came to Lebanon county as teacher 
of music in Palatinate College, Myerstown, and was principal of the [Musical 
Department in this institution for nearly ten years. It was owing alike to 
her ability as a teacher and to her administrative powers that this department 
rapidly grew in numbers and in influence until it became the leading and most 
important department of the college. Since her marriage she has resided 
in the City of Lebanon, where she continued her teaching, her pupils numl)er- 
ing hundreds ; and scores of these are now themseh-es teaching music here 
and in other places. It is not too much to say that for upwards of twent}- 
years Mrs. Grumbine exerted the leading musical influence in this com- 
munity, which in music culture ranks second to none in the State. She has 
also been a contributor to various musical periodicals. 

JOHN S. SPRECHER. The Sprecher family was founded in Leba- 
non county by Frederick Sprecher, who emigrated from Germany and set- 
tled on a farm in North Cornwall township, two miles west of the city of 
Lebanon. His property contained 144 acres, and it had been but slightly 
improved, requiring both his own and his son's industry to clear it up. This 
land is still in the possession of the family, being a part of the estate of the 
late Daniel Sprecher. Frederick Sprecher lived to advanced age. He was 
twice married, one son. George, being born to his first marriage, in 1805. 
His second wife was a member of the Stover family, and she bore two chil- 
dren to him: Frederick: and Elizabeth, who married Jacob Stover, of North 
Cornwall township. 

Frederick Sprecher (2), son of Frederick, was born in 1809, and died 



52 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

May 14, 1879. He Avas reared on the homestead and spent his life operating 
the home farm, until within twelve years of his decease, when he retired 
from active labor. For a long period he served faithfully on the school 
board, and was a leading man in the township, advocating reforms of all 
kinds, anxious to have the children afforded good educational advantages 
and cheerfully contributing to the building of good roads. In politics he 
was a strong Democrat. In his death the Lutheran Church lost a worthy 
member who had served as trustee, elder and deacon. His wnfe was Miss 
Susannah Seachrist, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Imboden) Seachrist, 
born in 1817, in South Lebanon township, and died September 27, 1902, her 
death occurring at the home of her son, John S., where she had lived for 
the twelve previous years. Children as follows were born to Frederick and 
Susannah Sprecher : Mary, who died unmarried ; John S. ; Lavina, who died 
unmarried ; Daniel, who was a farmer of North Cornwall township on the 
old homestead, and who died in 1883, leaving a widow and eight children; 
Miss Catherine; Ezra, who died in infancy; Emma Susan, who died unmar- 
ried; and an unnamed infant. 

John S. Sprecher was born July 30, 1837, and grew to manhood on 
the old homestead, obtaining his education in the common schools and the 
academy in his locality. When he was twenty-three years of age he settled 
on the farm he still occupies, adjoining the old homestead, his fine farm of 
102 acres being the best proof of his ability as an agriculturist, his reputa- 
tion being that of one of the best farmers in the county. Mr. Sprecher is 
more than that, no man standing in higher esteem. 

On November 17, 1854, Mr. Sprecher was married to !Miss Frances 
Kettering, daughter of Samuel and Frances (Shenk) Kettering, born April 
-15, 1840, in Millcreek township. Three children have been born to IMr. and 
INIrs. Sprecher, namely: Anna 3>Iary, born June 8, 1861. is the wife of Simon 
Long, of North Lebanon township, and they have had children, Samuel, 
Elias, John, Amos, Leah, Cora, Nancy, Bulah, Fannie (deceased) and an 
infant unnamed (deceased) ; Samuel F.,-boni August 29, 1865, now a lead- 
ing stock dealer in North Cornwall township, married Sallie Shaak, and 
they have had children, John. ]\Iabel AI., Helen and Charles (deceased) ; 
and Harvey, born August 3, 1S69, died October 23, 1869. 

Mr. and Airs. Sprecher belong to the ■Lutheran Church, in which he 
holds the offices of trustee and treasurer, and has long been one of the elders. 
As stated, no man in this part of Lebanon county is more highly esteemed, 
and if he desired he could probably be elected to almost any local office, but 
he only serves when he feels that he can benefit his neighborhood by doing 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 53 

so, and has been judge of elections and school director. His home is one of 
hospitality, and his hand is extended in hearty good will to all who deserve 
his friendship. 

LINEAWEAVER. The first ancestor of the Lineaweaver family of 
Lebanon, Lebanon county, one of the oldest and most prominent of the 
Lebanon Valley, to come to America, was Peter Lineaweaver (Leinweber, 
as the name was then spelled), who emigrated from Zweibrucken. in the 
Rhine Palatinate, near Frankfort-on-the-]\Iain, in 17.29. He was of the 
Reformed faith, and was thoroughly in sympathy with the large numbers 
of Germans arriving in America in that decade from the Rhine Palatinate. 
He settled in the Swatara Valley, in what is now Lebanon county, taking up 
300 acres of land there in 1733. At his death he left one son, Peter (2). 

Peter- Lineaweaver (2) was born in 1747, in Londonderry township, 
then Lancaster county. In 1777 he enlisted, at Lancaster, as ensign in one 
of the companies of the Revolutionary forces recruiting at that point. He 
held tracts of land in Fayette county, but so far as can be learned never 
lived there. He died in August, 1806, leaving a son, Peter (3), born in 
1774, in Londonderry township. 

Peter Lineaweaver (3) was register of wills and clerk of the court 
under appointment of Gov. John A. Schultze, and had charge of the mails 
between Reading and Harrisburg. He was a man of prominence and influ- 
ence, and was actively interested in the political questions of the day. His 
death occurred at Lebanon in 1S35. He married Susanna Gilbert, born 
1774, died 1855. Seven children blessed this union, as follows: George, 
M. D., who married Sarah Toby, Catherine, born in 1801, who married 
George W. Kline; Elizabeth, born in 1804, married to John Krause; IMaria^ 
Jacob and Dr. William Gilbert (born iSti), who all died without issue; 
and Henry D., born 18 14, who married Elizabeth Siegrist. 

George Lineaweaver, M. D., eldest child of Peter (3), was born in 
Londonderry" township in 1799, and he died in i860. Being brought to 
Lebanon by his father, he was educated in the public schools and at the 
academy, and then studied medicine with Dr. John B. Mish, and attended 
one course of lectures at the University of Pennsylvania, in the Medical 
Department, in 1819. In 1846 Jefferson ^Medical College conferred the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine upon him because of his professional standing, 
and the interest he manifested in the institution. In 1820 Dr. Lineaweaver 
began the practice of his profession, and soon took prominent place in its 
ranks in his county, which prominence extended year by year, until he was 



54 BIOGRAPHICAL AXXALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

known and esteemed throughout the Lebanon Valley. He was also dis- 
tinguished, aside from his profession, and held offices of honor and trust, 
and was noted for his remarkable memory. In 1839 he was appointed by 
Gov. Porter to the office of register of wills of Lebanon county, a position 
his father had had. Dr. Lineaweaver married Sarah Toby, a daughter of 
Captain Simeon Toby, of Philadelphia, and to them were born the following 
children: George Peter, M. D., born August 27. 1827, married ]Mary 
McxAbee. and died about 18S5 ; Simeon Toby, ]\I. D., born January 29. 1829, 
married Alary A. O. Harbaugh, and died in 1899: John Krause, AI. D., born 
April 30, 1 83 1, married Jane S. Crane; Samuel T.. born April 9. 1837, mar- 
ried Emma Jeffries; Washington Kline, born November 21, 1839, married 
Eliza F. Pleasants, and died in 1888; Albert, born September 28, 1843. niar- 
ried Cecilia C. Carver; and two others died in infancy. 

George Peter Lineaweaver, eldest son of Dr. George, studied medicine 
with his father and subsequently received the degree of AI. D. from Jefferson 
Medical College at Philadelphia. He married Alary AIcAbee. a sister of 
the wife of Kline Cyrus Lineaweaver, son of Henry D. and Elizabeth, by 
whom he had three children : George, now deceased ; A\'illiam ; and Fanny, who 
died in infancy. Dr. George P. Lineaweaver took up the practice of his 
profession in Lebanon, and continued his residence there until his death. 
His extensive knowledge of medicine made him a worthy successor of his 
father, and he built up a large practice in his native town. He and his 
brother, Simeon, were the only two members of the family of that genera- 
tion to continue living at Lebanon. 

Simeon T. Lineaweaver, M. D., was born in L-ebanon January 29, 1829, 
and died July 11. 1899. His early education was gained in the old Lebanon 
Academ_y. after which he read medicine with his father and attended medical 
lectures at Jeft'erson Aledical College. Philadelphia, graduating in the class 
of 1864. He began the practice of his profession at Alillerstown, Perry 
Co., Pa., and in 1877 ^""^ removed to Hagerstown, Md. In 1881 he settled 
permanently in his native town, where he was prominently and successfully 
engaged in the practice of his calling until his death. He married Alary 
A. O. Harbaugh. born at Lewisburg, Pa., daughter of the late Rev. Henry 
Harbaugh, D. D. The issue of this marriage was as follows: Sarah; 
John K.. deceased; Thomas T. ; Alary L. ; Henry PL; Grace G. ; and 
Simeon E. 

The Rev. Henry Harbaugh, D. D., graduated from old Alarshall Col- 
lege (now Franklin and Alarshall) in the class of 1842. L^nion College, 
Schenectady, N. Y., conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Divinity, 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 55 

and he began his ministerial work in the Reformed Church at Lewisburg, 
Pa., whence he went to Lancaster and th.ere liad charge of a congregation. 
He came to Lebanon in i860, and was pastor of St. John's Reformed Church 
until 1864, when he resigned to accept the chair of Didactic Theology in 
the Theological Department of Franklin and Marshall College, then at 
Mercersburg. His death occurred at Mercersburg in 1868. He was twice 
married, his first wife being Louisa Goodrich, of Ohio, who bore him one 
daughter, Mary A. O., who married Simeon T. Lineaweaver. The second 
^\^fe was Mary L. Linn, of Lewisburg, and of this marriage ten children 
were born. 

DAVID TICK, a prominent and substantial citizen and retiretl farmer 
and machinist of ^Myerstown. Pa., was born in Jackson township September 
3, 1825, on the old Tice homestead near ]\Iyerstown. a son of Michael and 
Catherine (Noecker) Tice, deceased. [Michael Tice was reared in Jackson 
township, and was 'a son of David Tice (for whom our subject was named), 
one of the very early settlers of the district. David Tice was the father of 
two children. All of the name have always been highly respected and have 
occupied prominent positions in the several communities in which they have, 
from time to time, made their homes. Michael Tice was a farmer for 
many years, residing in Jackson township. He had a family of thirteen 
children : Henry, Israel, Eliza. David, Susan, Andrew, Catherine, William 
P., Percival, John, Lavina, Rebecca and Aaron, all of whom grew to 
maturity. All are now deceased, except Catherine, wife of Samuel Reber; 
David; and William P., of Myerstown. 

David Tice was reared upon the- homestead farm, and received very 
meager educational advantages. He married Miss Eliza Zinn, a native of 
Jackson township, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Groh) Zinn, old resi- 
dents of Lebanon county, and seven children were born to them, four of 
whom reached maturity: William H., who is a merchant at Myerstown, 
Pa.; Sarah J., at home; M. Ella, a clerk for her brother, William H. ; and 
Lizzie R., wife of Elmer Haak, of Myerstow-n. 

Mr. Tice began the battle of life a poor boy. but by hard work and 
economy he has placed himself in comfortable circumstances, owning a fine 
farm of ninety-one acres, as well as the old homestead, consisting of one 
hundred and six acres ; both tracts are in an excellent state of cultivation. The 
first thirty years of his business life were spent upon the farm, but later 
he located at Myerstown, where he learned the machinist's trade, and about 
that time went into partnership with John Gairing, for the purpose of manu- 



56 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

facturing threshing machines. After continuing in that Hne for ten years 
with marked success he retired, and is now spending his dechning years at 
his comfortable home on East Main street. 

In pohtics Mr. Tice is a stanch Repubhcan, but has never desired nor 
sought office, preferring to give his time and attention to his private affairs. 
In rehgious matters he is a consistent member of the United Brethren Church, 
of which he has served as trustee, always holding important oifices. In busi- 
ness and private life INIr. Tice has always proven himself an upright, loyal, 
true. Christian man, and one in whom every confidence may be placed. 

TOBIAS REINOEHL. Few men in the city of Lebanon have wielded 
a wider or more powerful influence in the vicinity than has IMr. Reinoehl, re- 
tired manager of the Lebanon Courier, under the firm name of Worth & 
Reinoehl. For thirty-five years, through the columns of his paper, he has 
instructed the public, given practical advice, and voiced the unbiased senti- 
ments of the people. As a public educator his services have been invaluable. 
Now, at the age of seventy years, having well earned a right to leisure, he is 
living a quiet life at his handsome residence at No. 340 North Ninth street. 

Mr. Reinoehl comes of an old distinguished Lebanon family. In 1749 
there came to that village from Wittenberg, Germany, a man of force and 
ability, George Henry Reinoehl, accompanied by his son, Henry, who was 
about eight years of age. From him have descended all the Reinoehls in this 
country. By his marriage here there were three sons : George and Conrad, of 
Lebanon ; and Christopher, who was a drummer in the Revolutionary war. 

George Reinoehl, son of George Henry, married and had fifteen children 
— fourteen sons and one daughter. 

George Reinoehl, Jr., grandfather of Tobias, was a prominent business 
man of Lebanon for many years. For some time he conducted a blacksmith's 
shop, which was widely patronized, and he also engaged in the lumber 
business, carrying on a large and extensive trade. He was also the owner 
of a large farm in South Lebanon, now Cornwall, townsliip. By his marriage 
there were four children: Mary, who married John Yorty; Samuel, who is 
mentioned beloAv ; Helena, who married John Marquart; and George, who 
settled in Ohio, later in Indiana, whence he removed to [Minnesota, where he 
died. 

Samuel Reinoehl, father of Tobias, was born in 1805. Upon reaching 
manhood he made his residence in Lebanon, where he became well-known and 
highly esteemed, and continued in the lumber and coal business. In 1827 he 
married Marv L^hler. a noble woman, who is now deceased. Bv this mar- 






^^e^i 



Lt 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 57 

riage there were thirteen children : Catharine, Helena, Adolphus, all deceased ; 
Tobias, who is mentioned below; George H., now deceased; Eliza Catharine, 
widow of John M. Good, residing in Lebanon ; John L., merchant of Lebanon ; 
Mary A., widow of John Rodearmel ; Rosanna, the wife of Edwin W. Stoner, 
of Lebanon; Samuel U., and IMichael W., both members of the Reinoehl 
Lumber Company, and the latter county recorder; and two children, both 
named Selma, who died young. Mr. Reinoehl died in 1866 in his sixty-second 
year, and the mother in 1876. 

Tobias Reinoehl was born in the city of Lebanon, February 16, 1833. In 
the public schools of his city and in Lebanon Academy he acquired his educa- 
tion, developing the quick perceptive powers, the natural taste for good litera- 
ture, and habits of perse\-erance and industry, which pre-eminently charac- 
terized his later work. Discerning, at the early age of twelve, the place he was 
to fill in life, he contentedly started in at the bottom and apprenticed himself 
to a printer. For four consecutive years he patiently applied himself to the 
work, mastering all the details, and familiarizing himself with many other 
branches of newspaper work. Later he followed his trade in Harrisburg, 
where he remained nearly a year, in St. Louis, Mo., for about a year, and 
finally in Philadelphia, acquiring in these large cities a knowledge of journalism 
which made him confident of success in that line. A young man of push, 
energy and considerable attainments, he came to Lebanon in 1855 ^"^ P*-^^" 
chased an interest in the Lebanon Coiiricr. It was soon apparent to the public 
that a new man had the handling of this paper, and one who thoroughly under- 
stood his work. Old subscriptions were renewed, new ones came in, and the 
paper continued to flourish. For thirty-four successful years in partnership 
with Col. T. T. Worth, until 1889, when they both retired, he continued the 
management, winning for himself a lasting reputation as an eminent news- 
paper man of his State. In 1863. Mr. Reinoehl enlisted in Company E, Forty- 
eighth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer INIilitia, to protect his State, serving 
some nine weeks. He has been married twice; first time to Emma L. Negly, 
of Lebanon, and, after her death, to Catharine M. Ellinger, of Lancaster, Pa., 
in 1858. By the first marriage there was one child, Mary Alice, who married 
George T. Kaley, and who is deceased. By the second marriage there were six 
children, four of whom are now living: Emma E., who married D. P. Wit- 
meyer ; Martha E., the wife of Frank A. Osbourn, now deceased, senator of the 
Third Pennsylvania District; and Catharine E. and Grace E., who are li\-ing 
at home. 

Mr. Reinoehl's large acquaintance with the public pre-eminently fitted 
him for filling offices of public trust, and he has long been prominent in this 



58 BIOGRAPHICAL AXNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

field. In i860, under Gov. Andrew G. Curtin, he was appointed notary public, 
a position which he has filled to the present day with marked ability, altogether 
more than forty-two years. He has served the Fourth w^ard in the city 
council for several terms, and, under the old borough law, served as assistant 
burgess for some time, filling both offices with distinction. Politically he is a 
firm Republican. In religious sentiment a Lutheran, he is a trustee of Salem 
Evangelical Lutheran Church. Fraternally he stands high, and affiliates with 
a number of orders. He is a member of IMount Lebanon Lodge, No. 226, F. 
& A. ]M. ; Weidle Chapter, No. 197, R. A. ]M. ; Lebanon Council, No. 27, R. S. 
& S. I\I. ]\I. ; Hermit Commandery, No. 24, Knights Templar; ^Mohegan 
Lodge, No. 288, I. O. O. F. ; Uncas Encampment, No. 144, I. O. O. F. ; 
Washington Camp, No. 254, P. O. S. of A. ; Swatara Tribe, No. 276. I. O. of 
R. ^I. ; Acme Lodge. No. 427, K. of P. ; Lebanon Castle, No. 6, A. O. K. of 
M. C. ; and Kittatinny Lodge, No. 85, A. O. U. W. High intellectual endow- 
ments and a large capacity for work have been promoters of Mr. Reinoehl's 
success in life. 

SAMUEL HAL'ER (deceased) was born iMarch 5. 1833. and died in 
Lebanon February 27, 1882. He was a son of Henry Hauer, who lived on 
a farm in Lebanon county and was one of a family of twelve children : 
Levi, Jacob, John, George. Peter, Catherine, Samuel. Elizabeth, Sarah and 
three that died in infancy. 

Samuel Hauer was reared on the farm, and when eighteen years old 
came to the city of Lebanon. He learned the trade of a brick mason, and 
followed the same for about ten years, after which he began the manufacture 
of cigars. He continued at this work for fifteen years, and then went into 
the general grocery business and continued until the time of his death. On 
December 16, 1858, he was married to Miss Louisa Euston, daughter of 
Thomas and Elizabeth (Thomas) Euston, of the city of Lebanon. Her 
father was a farmer and miller by trade, and devoted his life to these pur- 
suits. She came of a family of nine children, all of whom lived to maturity : 
Mary, Susan, William, Joseph and John, all deceased ; Louisa, widow of our 
subject; Henry, of Lebanon, an iron superintendent; Edward, an architect 
of Lebanon ; and Sarah, the wife of Cyrus Heverling, of West Lebanon, Pa. 
Samuel Hauer was the father of seven children: Harr\', who died young; 
Elmer E., cashier of the People's National Bank; Han-ey, an architect of 
Philadelphia ; Elizabeth, the wife of Adam Saylor, of Lebanon ; Florence, 
a teacher in the public schools of Lebanon : INlary, a stenographer and insur- 
ance representative: and Emma, also a teacher in the public schools of 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 59 

Lebanon. Mr. Hauer was a stanch Republican, and a member of tlie 
Evangelical Church. He was an active Mason and a member of the I. 
O. O. F., of Lebanon. He was a self-made man, by hard work, pluck 
and energy managing to obtain considerable of this world's goods before 
he died. He was one of the leading business men of Lebanon, and at one 
time was assistant burgess of the city. A man, honest and true to his con- 
victions, with a noble moral character, he was one who enjoyed the friend- 
ship of many. His widow is now residing at her fine home. No. 643 Walnut 
street, with her three youngest daughters, in retired life. She is a member 
of the Evangelical Church of Lebanon, and is a noble Christian woman, an 
esteemed citizen, and comes from one of the old and respected families of 
her home city. 

DANIEL T. BORDNER. The Bordner family is one of the old and 
prominent ones of Lebanon county, and the first family record leads to 
Daniel Bordner, the great-great-grandfather of Daniel T. Bordner, who was 
born about 1750, and lived to be about ninety years old. He resided near 
Millersburg, Berks county, where he owned a farm, and his remains lie 
buried in the vicinity. Godfrey Bordner, the grandfather, settled in Union 
township and engaged in teaming between Philadelphia and Pittsburg, and 
he died in the latter city from a fever contracted on his last trip. He mar- 
ried a Miss Gassert, who bore him six children, namely: Daniel, who mar- 
ried a Miss Tobias ; John, who married a ]\Iiss Miller ; Godfrey ; Jacob, unmar- 
ried, who went to California in 185 1 and was lost sight of; William, who 
moved to Indiana, where he married and reared a family ; Sarah, wli(^ married 
Solomon Rhine and located in Dauphin county, where she still resides, the 
mother of a family. 

Capt. Daniel Bordner was born in 1807, in East Hanover township, 
where he remained until 1850, when he came to LTnion township and bought 
a store and hotel property, but seven years later turned the store over to his 
son, Daniel T. Until 1869 he operated the hotel and then rented it and 
removed to his property across the street. Capt. Daniel was an active and 
influential man in the State militia, with which he was connected for years, 
serving in 1845 ^^ captain. In politics, during early life, he was an ardent 
Whig, and from the day the Republican party was formed under the oaks 
at Jackson, Mich., until his death, he was a radical member of it. He 
never sought or desired office, but was content to be a worker in the ranks, 
and was happy in the success of his party. ^lany times he was sent as a 
delegate to the conventions, and never failed to cast his vote. In 1828 he 



6o BIOGRAPHICAL AXNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

married Anna Maria Tobias, born in Berks county in 1808, and to them 
were born children as follows: Daniel T. ; John, born in 1834, died in 
1855; Katherine, born in 1835, married Henry Gingrich, and had one child, 
Lizzie, who married Will. S. Rise. 

Daniel T. Bordner was born Alay 27, 183 1, in East Hanover township, 
and resided there until 1850, when he came to Union township and entered 
his father's store. In 1868 he built the store and residence he now occupies, 
in Bordnerville, a village named for his family. I\Ir. Bordner conducts a 
first-class general store, and since 1872 has carried on farming. In that 
}'ear he bought a farm of eighty-two acres, from John Copenhaver, and has 
been interested in placing it under a fine state of cultivation. In the store 
he is ably assisted by his son, Daniel ^^^ebster, who has almost grown up in 
the business, and has a thorough knowledge of the needs of country trade. 
In early life Mr. Bordner was a Whig, and cast his first vote for President 
for Gen. Scott, the last nominee of the Whig party. While not as radical 
in politics as his father was, he is a Republican, and heartily sustains the 
principles of that party. 

On June 14, 1857, Mr. Bordner was united in marriage with IMiss 
Sarah Weaver, born August 16, 1839, at Fredericksburg, Lebanon county, 
daughter of Jacob and Anna (Sherk) \\^eaver. Her ancestors on her 
father's side came from Holland in the seventeenth century and settled at 
New Amsterdam, New York, thence moving to Fredericksburg. To IMr. 
and Mrs. Bordner have been born these children : Lizzie, born Januaiy 

30, 1858, married Rufus Good, and they have children, Sadie, Agnes, Annie, 
Jennie, Henry and William; Irwin, born November 12, 1859, is manager of 
a department in a grocery store in Chicago; Cora, born March 15, 1861. 
married Jacob M. Groh, and they have children, INIaggie, Jolin, Adam and 
Annie; Grant, born February t6, 1863, married Annie Sherk, and they have 
children, Annie, Daniel, Maggie, Samuel and Esther and Edith, twins; John 
Sherman, bom September 16, 1864, married Ida Aloore, who died leaving 
children, Ethel, Annie and Dora, and he married (second) Dora Estelle 
Carter (he is an extensive manufacturer, operating two glass factories, one 
at Alexandria, and the other at Richmond, \^a., and employing about 500 
men); William, Annie and INIaria died in infancy; Henry Dawson, bom 
April I, 1869, married xA.nnie Overholtzer, and has one daughter, Esther; 
Sarah Agnes, born December 12, 1870, married Samuel Groh, and they 
have children, Nancy, Daniel and Sarah: Daniel ^^'■ebster, born September 

31, 1872, unmarried, resides at home; and Jane Catherine, born February 
IT, 1876, married George A. Speck, and they have one child. Ralph. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 6i 

ADAM BAHNEY, one of the substantial and representative citizens of 
Lebanon county, who for many years carried on an extensive business in 
Myerstown, as cabinetmaker, furniture dealer and undertaker, now lives 
retired from activity, although interested in many of the leading enterprises 
of this community. 

Mr. Bahney was born February lo, 1839, ii'' jMillcreek township, a son 
of Isaac and Sarah (Bortner) Bahney, both of Lebanon county. The 
former was born in Lebanon county in 1808, and died in 1847. He was 
a son of Christopher, son of Thomas, son of Thomas, the founder, also 
known as Felty, who is supposed to have emigrated to America prior to the 
Revolutionary War, and who first settled near 'Sit Aetna, in Berks county, 
the name being originally spelled Behney. Grandfather Christopher Bahney 
was the father of eight children, viz. : Isaac, Augustus, William, Jacob, 
Henry, Matilda, Eliza and Sarah. Isaac Bahney was married to Sarah 
Bortner, daughter of Jonathan Bortner, of Dauphin countv. \\-here the 
former was born and reared, and these children were born to this marriage : 
Aaron, of Reading; Christopher, deceased, of Urbana, Ohio; Adam, of 
Myerstown; and Emma, the widow of John AValtz, of Lebanon City. For 
many years Isaac Bahney was a successful dealer in horses and stock. He 
was stanch in his adherence to the prinicples of the Democratic party. His 
religious membership was in the Reformed Church. 

Until he was sixteen years of age, Adam Bahney remained in the local- 
ity of West Myerstown, and was there educated. At the above age he 
began to learn the cabinetmaking trade at Myerstown, on the very lot which 
he now owns. However, his health gave way and he was obliged to change 
his conditions and went to Lebanon, where he was employed for a time in 
the shops. In 1863 he came back to Myerstown and purchased the shops 
in which he had been employed as an apprentice. Here he established him- 
self in a very small way, as he had but limited means. That he is now 
a large property owner in this city, including "The Bahney House," the only 
first-class hotel in this place, one fine farm in Jackson township, and 
valuable property in Myerstown, besides being interested in many prosper- 
ous enterprises of the vicinity, testifies to his diligence and perseverance, his 
prudent husbanding of his means, and to a temperate and industrious life. 
Mr. Bahney is an entirely self-made man, one who has given his close atten- 
tion to his own in-terests as well as to pleasing the public, and one whose 
career has been marked with an unswerving integrity, which makes his name 
but another, among his neighbors, for probity and honesty. 

On May 10, 1866, ]\Ir. Bahney was married to Sarah Noocker, a daugh- 



62 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

ter of Isaac Noocker, of INIyerstown, and of an old family there. Two children 
were born to this marriage, namely : Lottie L., the wife of George H. 
Horst, cashier of the Myerstown National Bank; and Isaac N., who carries 
on his father's business at Myerstown. The mother of these children diea 
May J I, iS8i. Mr. Bahney was married, second, June 2, 1894, to Amelia 
Wilhelm, of Host, Berks Co., Pa., and a member of one of the most hon- 
orable old families of the county. Mr. and Mrs. Baliney are spending their 
lives in great ease at their pleasant home in this city, enjoying the esteem of 
all who know them. 

Mr. Bahney has for a number of years been a member of the board of 
directors of the Myerstown National Bank, and is manager and a director of 
the Dauphin Turnpike Company. His religious membership has from early 
youth been with the Reformed Church, and he has served as treasurer and 
trustee. A stanch Republican, he supports zealously the principles! he 
believes will best advance the country's interests. ]\Ir. Bahney stands as 
a representative man of Lebanon county, a good citizen, a kind neighbor and 
a lover of his city, home and family. 

JACOB G. ADAMS, a well known attorney of Lebanon, and one of 
the leading exponents of the legal profession in Lebanon county, was born at 
Monroe Valley, Swatara township, Lebanon county, November 6, 1852, son 
of Samuel Adams. 

Samuel Adams was born in Lancaster county. Pa., in 1800. and died in 
1873, coming to Lebanon county in 1852. He married Susanna Gress, born 
at Muddy Creek, Lancaster county, the daughter of Jacob Gress. she being 
a widow when she married Mr. Adams, and had one daughter, Mary, who 
married John Martin, now of Hebron, Lebanon county. Mr. Adams was 
a widower and had two sons, Josiah S. and Amos S., both now of Lebanon; 
and one daughter, Rebecca, deceased, who was married to Jacob Heartter, of 
Tremont, Schuylkill county. Jacob G. Adams was the only child born to his 
parents. The grandfather, Jacob Adams, was born Alarch 14. 1763. The 
Adams family came originally from Germany. 

Jacob G. Adams was reared in Monroe Valley on the old farm, and 
attended the common school of his district, where he laid the foundation 
of a good education, remaining on the farm until sixteen years of age. Sub- 
sequently he commenced teaching school, spending one term at the Ljiion 
township school; two terms at the Swatara school, and then four terms in 
Lebanon. During the time he was teaching school in Lebanon he read law 
with John Benson, one of the oldest, if not the oldest, members of the present 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 63 

Bar. ]\lr. Adams was admitted to the Bar January i, 1877, and began prac- 
tice at once, meeting with uncjuahfied success. In 1877 he was elected dis- 
trict attorney of Lebanon county, taking charge of the office Januar}' i, 
1878, and during his occupancy of that office brought to bear upon his duties 
his legal knowledge, calm judgment and keen foresight, which enabled him to 
make a record worthy of himself and his party. For three years Mr. Adams 
filled this office with distinction, and since then has acted as solicitor for the 
board of county commissioners for three years, and as solicitor for the county 
poor directors for a similar term. 

Mr. Adams was married, September 18, 1879, to Laura E. Benson, 
daug'hter of John Benson, of Lebanon. To this union the following children 
have been born : John B., who graduated from the Lebanon high school and in 
December, 1901. was appointed a clerk in the office of the United States 
consul at Aix-la-Chapelle, Germany; Robert L. and Paul G., twins, graduates 
of the Lebanon high school, who read law with their father, and are now 
students in the Law Department of the L^niversity of Pennsylvania ; Sarah 
and Laura E. ; and five other children, now deceased. 

JOHN Iv. SHERK, one of the oldest and best known farmers of North 
Annville township, Lebanon county, residing on his farm about one and a 
quarter miles from Belle Grove, was born about half a mile south of Belle 
Grove May 31, 1831. a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Kaufifman) Sherk. The 
father was born in Hano\'er township. Lebanon county, in 1807, and died 
in 1872. The mother was born near Kauffman's Meeting House, in North 
Armville township, in 1806, and died in 1896, a daughter of Abraham Kauff- 
man. The paternal grandfather was John Sherk, who married Franey 
Ellenberger. The origin of the Sherk family in America is traced back to 
three brothers who emigrated from Europe. One settled near Ephrata, 
Lancaster county. Pa., one in Bethel township, Lebanon county, and the 
third in Hanover township, Lebanon county, the latter being the forefather 
of our subject. 

John Sherk, the grandfather, had the following family: Jacob; John 
married Mary Wenger ; Joseph died unmarried ; Fanny, deceased, married 
Ephraim Light ; Nancy died unmarried. The children born to Jacob and 
Elizabeth Sherk were: IMoses, born October 14, 1827, married INIary Core; 
John K. 

John K. Sherk, the venerable subject of this sketch, remained at home 
until his marriage, when he began life on his own account, operating a 
rented farm of fifty acres near Belle Grove. Through constant effort and 



64 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

thrift he managed to accumulate sufficient to purchase his present home of 
113 acres, to which he removed about 1857. In addition to this property, 
which is a very fine one, he owns a farm of 104 acres in East Hanover 
township, and another in North Annvihe township, of 150 acres. He also 
owns twenty-four acres of timber land in the mountains, and a house in 
Belle Grove, all of this property having been obtained by his own efforts. 

Mr. Sherk was married to Elizabeth Light, born February 26, 1834, 
and died February 18, 1900. She was born near Gingrich Meeting House 
(Mennonite), in North Cornwall township, Lebanon county, a daughter of 
Abraham Light. The following family was born to Mr. and Mrs. Sherk 
Mary A., born in i860, married John Wenger, and has one child, Elizabeth 
John L., born October 6, 1862, married Naomi Fry, and has one child. Earl 
Jacob E., born March 28, 1865, married Emma Fritz, and had four chil- 
dren, Charlie, John, Ralph and Jay, the last two deceased. Mr. Sherk has 
served as auditor of North Annville township, and is a man most highly 
esteemed for his many excellent qualities, nobility of character and honesty 
of purpose. In religious matters he is a consistent member of the United 
Brethren Church, and is an earnest Christian and conscientious man. 

LUCIAN E WEIMER, treasurer and general manager of the Weimer 
Machine Works Company, and one of the most prominent citizens of Lebanon, 
Pa., was born in Reading, Pa., July 26, 1839, a son of William and Catherine 
(Lotz) Weimer. 

The Weimers came originally from Germany. Catheiine (Lotz) Weimer, 
the mother of our subject, was the daughter of Col. John Lotz, a son of Nicho- 
las Lotz, of the l^evolutionary army. The Lotz family settled in Reading, 
Pa., at an early date. William Weimer was born in Reading, Pa., and on 
January i, 1856, established what is now the Weimer Machine Works 
Company, on Seventh street, in company with his eldest son, P. L. Weimer, 
and Lucian E. Weimer. At this time the business was small, including foundry 
and machine w'ork, but the same year they broke ground for the erection of a 
new plant facing the station of the P. & R. Railroad, east of Eighth street, and, 
when suitable buildings were erected, moved the plant, and began business at 
the new stand, January i, 1857, where they have continued, although with 
greatly enlarged and extended facilities. In i860 William Weimer retired 
from active business, turning the same over to his sons, P. L., John A. and 
Lucian E., and they continued the business under the firm name of P. L. 
Weimer & Bros. In 1879 the firm name was changed to that of Weimer 
Brothers, the members being the same. In September, 1879, John A. Weimer 




.^^a:^^^^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 65 

died, and in 1880, the company was incorporated as The Weimer Machine 
Works Company, with P. L. Weimer as president and chief engineer, and 
L. E. Weimer as treasurer and general manager. In September, 1892, P. L. 
Weimer died, and John A. Weimer, son of L. E. Weimer, was made president, 
L. E. Weimer treasurer and general manager. The Company does a general 
machine and foundry business, and manufactures specialties for furnaces, 
the latter being made from patents owned by the company. The works are 
the oldest in that line in Lebanon county, and have enjoyed uniform success, 
the company being the pioneer manufacturing plant in the city. For almost 
three years during the Civil war, the Weimer Works were operated day and 
night, making gun lathes for the Scott Foundry of Reading, Pa., to manu- 
facture cannon for the government's use on fortifications and vessels. They 
also manufactured some five hundred wrought iron field pieces. 

Lucian E. Weimer was raised in Reading, Pa., receiving an academic 
education. He began as a clerk in the works of his father and brother in 
Lebanon, January i, 1856, and ser\'ed a full apprenticeship in the foundry 
machine department, and about tai years on the drawing board. During this 
time, he was foreman of the works, and his brother, P. L. Weimer, was chief 
engineer, and from that time to the present, Mr. Weimer has been identified 
with this great industry. In political circles he has been a very prominent 
factor, serving as chairman of the Lebanon County Republican Committee, 
and in 1896 was a delegate from Pennsylvania to the Republican National 
Convention at St. Louis, when the late President McKinley was first 
nominated. 

Mr. Weimer has always taken a great interest in local enterprises, and 
particularly in the fire department. For a number of years he was president 
of the Perseverance Fire Company, in which position he was succeeded by his 
son, John A. He was also a charter member of the Lebanon Hook and Ladder 
Company. For forty years he was a meml^er of the Masonic fraternity, and 
is now a member of the different Masonic l:)odies from the Blue Lodge to the 
Knights Templar and Mystic Shrine, belonging also to the Elks and the Steitz 
Club, of Lebanon ; the ^^'ymonissing Club of Reading, Pa. ; and the Lebanon 
County Historical Society. He is president of the Lebanon Gas Company. He 
was also one of the organizers and charter members of the Lebanon Street 
Railway Company, and of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, of 
Lebanon, Pa. He was one of the organizers and charter members of the Mt. ' 
Lebanon Cemetery Association of Lebanon, Pa., and has been its treasurer 
since its organization in starch. 1870, and was the chairman of the com- 
mittee which selected the present site for the Mt. Lebanon Cemetery. 
5 



66 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Mr. Weinier holds large real estate interests, and owns some of the best 
improved property in the city, including many of the leading business blocks. 
In 1891 he was elected president of the Valley National Bank of Lebanon 
previously having been a member of the board of directors, and he held that 
position until 1899. He was chairman of the building committee of that cor- 
poration when the present handsome structure was erected. ^Ir. Weimer 
married Miss Clara L. Wallis, of Milton, Pennsylvania. 

JOHN A. WEIMER, ex-Mayor of Lebanon and President of the 
Weimer Machine Works Company, is one of Lebanon's most prominent and 
popular citizens. He is a son of Lucian E. Weimer, and was born in Lebanon, 
January 26, 1863. He was educated in the public schools of his own city. In 
the spring of 1879 he entered the office of the Weimer Machine Works 
Company, and took instructions from his father in financiering and superin- 
tending, and from that time to the present he has been connected with the 
concern. In 1883 he was made superintendent of the Weimer Machine Works 
Company, and in 1892 was made its president and general superintendent, 
which position he still holds. For a number of years he has been active in 
public matters and in politics, serving in common councils as a Republican 
from the Fourth ward in the years of 1887 and 1888, and in 1896 he was 
elected mayor, being the fifth one. Mr. Weimer is also president of the Per- 
severance Steam Fire Engine and Hose Company. He is a member of all the 
Masonic bodies, a member of the Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, a charter member and the first Exalted Ruler of the local Lodge of 
Elks, No. 631. He was one of the organizers of the Steitz Club and of various 
other organizations. 

On October 24, 1889, John A. Weimer was 'married to Miss Florence 
Wiley, of Lancaster, Pa., a daughter of the late Col. William M. Wiley, a 
prominent and successful railroad contractor. 

EDWARD MOORE, now residing on one of his large and attractive 
farms just south of Millbach, is one of the most promient agriculturists 
of Lebanon county, where he owns no less than three fine farms, and is 
putting into practice, with most excellent results, .some of the most pro- 
gressive methods of agriculture. He was born January 23. 1837, son of 
Michael B. and Mary fStrickler) Moore. 

The family is an old one in this section, and its first American repre- 
sentative was John George Moore, who came from Holland about 1720, 
and first settled in Schoharie county, N. Y. Later, about 1733, he moved to 




(^^^ d laic^-.^.-..^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 67 

Lebanon county, Pa., settling in the Millbach Valley, where he took out pat- 
ents of land, granted by John. Thomas and Richard Penn. Here he cleared 
up a fine farm for himself, and became one of the prominent men of the 
township. By his marriage there were two sons, John and Michael. 

Michael Moore, son of John George, and grandfather of Edward, mar- 
ried and had several children : Michael B., John, Rebecca, Catherine and 
Mary, all of whom are now deceased, and ^Margaret, who is still living. 

Michael B. Moore, son of Michael, and father of Edward, was born in 
1807, and received the usual rearing of a farmer's boy of his period. About 
1835 he married Mary Strickler, and they had two sons: Edward, who 
is mentioned below ; and Daniel S., who is deceased ; Mrs. Moore is still 
living, at the advanced age of eighty-seven, residing at the home of her son, 
Edward. After his marriage Mr. Moore settled upon a farm near Mill- 
bach, where he afterward engaged in agriculture. Well laid plans and thor- 
ough execution of them crowned his efforts with success, and encouraged 
him to purchase other farms in the county, where he also carried on his 
industry with good results for many years. He became in time one of 
the largest landowners in the township, and as an agriculturist occupied a 
leading place in the county. He possessed a remarkable constitution, dying 
in 1899, ^^ the advanced age of ninety-two years, three months and fifteen 
days. Mr. Moore was a remarkable manager, wherein lay his success as an 
agriculturist. He lent his infiuence to all good works and was especially 
interested in developing' the resources of his countv. He was one of the 
substantial members (jf the German Reformed Church. Politically he affili- 
ated with the Democrats. 

Edward Moore has inherited both his father's al)ilitv and taste for agri- 
culture. Reared on the home farm in Millcreek township, he was there 
early initiated into that occupation. In the public schools of his vicinity 
he received a good common school education, developing hal)its of industry 
and trustworthiness which have characterized . him through life. Encour- 
aged by his father's successes in agriculture, upon leaving school he deter- 
mined to make a farmer of himself, and, settling upon a farm in Millcreek 
township, he there started life for himself. A short test proved he had 
undertaken the work for which nature had prepared him. Under his man- 
agement the old farm, which embraces sixty-five well cultivated acres, seemed 
to renew its life, producing large and valuable crops, and under fresh improve- 
ments taking on a new aspect. He has never married, but has for his house- 
hold companion his aged mother, who is now in her eighty-eighth year. 
In his agricultural pursuits he has branched out extensively, and besides 



68 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

the home place has two other large farms in the county, one embracing 
207 and the other seventy acres. He has superintended the management 
of both these farms, in addition to carrying on the home place, and has 
derived from each a large income. He is now considered one of the 
wealthiest farmers and largest landowners in the county. As an agri- 
culturist he has taken great pride in his work, and vastly improved the build- 
ings and grounds of each place, making his farms especially attractive. 
They are well equipped with the latest improved machinery. Besides his 
real estate, Mr. Moore owns a great deal of personal property, and is the 
largest tax payer in Millcreek township. He has accumulated part of his 
property by his own efforts, the rest being inherited from his father. In 
the management of each, however, he has evinced much economy and shrewd 
business judgiiient. Though by no means an aged man, he has now retired 
from active work, and is availing himself of his well earned leisure. 

Mr. Moore has always evinced a keen interest in the public, affairs of 
his section, and in politics he has adhered strictly to the teachings of his 
forefathers, who since the organization of the party have been stanch Demo- 
crats. He is a strong advocate of the principles laid down by Thomas 
Jefferson and Andrew Jackson. Reared in the German Reformed Church, 
he is a consistent member of the church of that denomination in Millbach. 

The Strickler family of which Mrs. Moore is a member is one of the 
oldest in Millcreek township, and was a highly influential one. From them 
the village of Stricklerstown received its name. 

JOSIAH MEILY GETTEL, organizer of the Lebanon Manufacturing 
Compan}^ also for many years its efficient superintendent, has been well- 
known in Lebanon for fully fifty-six years. He started out a plain car- 
penter, and attained his final influential position mainly through persistent 
eft'ort, wise economy and squareness in business. Born in Fredericksburg, 
Lebanon county, April 26, 1829, son of John and Elizabeth (]Meily) Gettel, 
he conies of a highly respected family. 

John Gettel was a prominent agriculturist in Lebanon county for many 
years. During his young manhood he married Elizabeth Meily, who was 
descended from one of the old and honored Lebanon county families. Of 
this union there were four children : Mary, married to Jeremiah Heilman, 
of Jonestown, Pa., and Elizabeth, married to David Bixler. who, are now 
deceased; Anna is the wife of Joseph Smith, of Robinson. 111.; and Josiah 
M. is mentioned below. 

Josiah M. Gettel started out in life under some rather disadvantageous 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 69 

circumstances. Bereft of both parents before he reached the age of six 
years, his educational advantag-es were few. At the early age of four 
losing his father, and a year later his mother, he was sent to live with a 
man named Light. Here he remained until he was fourteen, taking many 
a hard lesson in the school of self-reliance. Fur the next two years he lived 
with liis uncle, Henry Meily. of Jonestown, Pa., then, at the age of sixteen, 
realizing the necessity of fitting himself for some lucrative position in life, 
he went into a cabinetmaker's shop and set about learning the trade. With 
a resolute mind he applied himself to his work until he had mastered every 
detail. Though now, in 1847, a mere youth, he went to Lebanon and fol- 
lowed the trade as a carpenter. A skilled and conscientious workman, with 
fidelity and constancy as his watchwords, he found no difficulty in securing 
trade, and continued his business for three successful years. In 1850, when 
but twenty-one years old, he married Maria A. Shindel, daughter of Judge 
John Shindel, and a representative of one of the first families of Lebanon. 
She proved an estimable and most helpful woman throughout her life, being 
a woman full of good works. She died July 20, 1891. Bv this marriage 
there were two daughters : Sarah, widow of the late Rev. J. Klein Fisher, 
has one son, Arthur G. ; and Emma V. Both daughters reside with their 
father. 

Soon after his marriage Mr. Gettel rose from the position of a carpenter 
to that of a contractor and builder. Giving eminent satisfaction in this line, 
and realizing large profits, he continued the business in Lebanon for a num- 
ber of years; and some of the handsomest residences in the citv were erected 
by him during this period. In 1857 he organized the luml^er and planing- 
mill firm of Boas, Gasser & Gettel, and for three years, until i860, when the 
buildings were destroyed by fire, he carried on a flourishing business. Then, 
resuming his recent lucrative occupation as builder and contractor, he went 
to Schuylkill county. Pa., and superintended the erection of 
many buildings, among them a large number of both business and private 
houses in Mahanoy City, which was just opened at that time. At the end 
of a year he returned to Lebanon, where he carried on the same business until 
1863. For the next three years he served as superintendent of the Meily & 
Weimer Car Shops, handling the business with much ability. In 1866, 
believing there was capital enough in Lebanon to sustain a large manufac- 
turing establishment, he organized what has since become one of the leading 
industries in the city, the Lebanon Manufacturing Company. Of this com- 
pany he was at once made superintendent, and he served as such, with the 
exception of three years, 1894-1897, until January i, 1902, when the firm 



70 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

became consolidated with that of M. H. Treadwell & Co. The success of 
the enterprise speaks for itself of Mr. Gettel's ability as a superintendent. 
After his resignation in 1894 he was engaged for three years in the manu- 
facture of implements. He is now a director and a large stockholder of the 
Lebanon Manufacturing Company. 

A man of great force of character, Mr. Gettel has always been extremely 
temperate in habits, and in politics he is a Prohibitionist. A noble Chris- 
tian gentleman, he in early life identified himself with the United Brethren 
Church, of which he is the only surviving charter member, and in 1866 with 
several others organized the Trinity, United Brethren Church. In this 
religious body he has long been an active worker, having served as a trustee 
from the organization unlil recently, and he gives liberally for its support. 

ADAM HAUCK, one of the wealthy and highly respected citizens, 
residing on his fine farm two miles south of Lebanon city, in North Cornwall 
township, Lebanon county, was born in that township March 17, 1838, son 
of Samuel and Lydia Hauck. 

Adam Llauck was reared upon his father's farm, receiving a good edu- 
cation at the public schools, and when he was twenty-one years of age, his 
father placed one of his farms in North Cornwall township in his charge, and 
the young man successfully operated it for seven years. At that time 
occurred the death of his father, and Mr. Hauck purchased a fine farm of 
eighty-two acres, two miles south of Lebanon city, on the Lancaster 
road, to which he later added until he had a property of 105 acres, 
where he carried on general farming and was very successful. This farm is 
now operated by his eldest son, ]\Ir. Hauck in 1894 removing to his present 
home of forty acres, one of the finest farms in the county, beautifully situ- 
ated, and provided with a comfortable and modern frame residence, excellent 
barns and other buildings, and everything kept in good condition. Mr. 
Hauck is a Republican in politics, and although he has never desired or 
accepted office, he can always be depended upon to support any measure cal- 
culated to prove of benefit to the county or township Having been quite 
a traveler and a close observer, Mr. Hauck is a delightful conversationalist, 
and some of his adventures are worthy of publication. 

On September 27, i860, Mr. Hauck was married to Miss ]\Iarian Shenk. 
daughter of jNIichael and Sarah (Host) Shenk. Mrs. Hauck was born in 
Heidelberg township, Lebanon county. Eight children were born to them: 
Malinda married Jacob Hemperly, of North Lebanon township, and has two 
children, Adam and Harry; Mary married William Longnecker. of North 



BIO(".RAPHICy\L ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 71 

Cornwall township, and has two children. Manerva and Mary; dranl. farmer 
of the homestead, married Kate Bomherger, and has one cliild, Ahel Valen- 
tine; John is single and at home; Sarah married Prof. Amnion A. Killian, of 
North Cornwall township, Lebanon county, and has one child, Lillian Irene; 
and three died in infancy. The members of the Llauck family are con- 
nected with the Lutheran Church, and all are import.'uit factors in the social 
life of their community. 

HENRA" LOUSER (deceased). The history of any locality is an 
account of its leading citizens, and among those who aided in the develop- 
ment and establishment of the present prosperity of Lebanon, Pa., one 
deserving of honorable mention, is Henry Louser, deceased, who for many 
years was one of the well-known merchants of the community, wliere he and 
his family were so prominent. 

Henry Louser was born in the Second Ward of Lebanon, in Octal>er, 
1826, and died in the same month, 1896. His father, Jacob Louser, was the 
son of John Louser, a native of Schaefferstown, Lebanon countv. The latter 
was a locksmith by trade, who located in Lebanon during the last century. 
John Louser owned the property on the southeast corner of Ninth and Chest- 
nut streets, which is now owned and occupied by J. Louser & Bro. Jacob 
Louser, the father of Henry, succeeded his father, John, in the locksmith 
business, and in 1850 also engaged in merchandising, having associated with 
him his two sons, John and Henr\-. Jacob's interest was later transferred to 
three of his younger sons, Jacob, William and George, and the firm name 
was changed to that of J. Louser & Bros. The first vacancy in this firm was 
made upon the death of George, and later, in order of mention, died Jacob, 
Henry, John and William, the latter conducting the business until 1901, 
when he, too, passed away, and the present proprietors. Jacob and John, sons 
of Henry, succeeded to it, they having represented part of the interest of their 
fathei; from the time of his demise until they entered int<i full possession. 

Henry Louser was married, in 1855, to Rebecca M. Embich, daughter 
of Samuel Embich, who died in 1864., at the age of thirty-six. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Louser were born the following family: Jacob E. ; Samuel .A., born in 
June, 1857; Catherine, born in June, 1859, married J. Harry Brown, of 
Lebanon; and John. Mrs. Louser was a good and devoted wife and mother, 
and a consistent member of the Salem Lutheran Church. Mr. Louser was 
later married again, his second choice being Anna Mc(iowaii. who died in 
1891, without issue. 

Jacop F. and John Lousf.r, the .senior and junior members of the well- 



72 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

known firm of J. Louser & Bro., were born in the building which they now 
use as a place of business, corner of Ninth and Chestnut streets, and were 
both educated in the public schools of Lebanon. After leaving school they 
entered the store of J. Louser & Bros., as clerks, and continued in this 
capacity until 1901, when they became the proprietors. Both are highly 
esteemed, not only as the representatives of an old and solid business con- 
cern, but as honorable men, thoroughly conversant with every detail of their 
trade. John Louser is a member of Camp No. 65, P. O. S. of A., and is active 
in the organization. Both Jacob and John are earnest meml^ers of the 
Salem Lutheran Church. Jacob Louser was married, in 1875, to Mary 
Rosenberger, daughter of William and Rachael Rosenberger, of Lebanon. 
To this union were born Rebecca M., who married Mason D. Hoke, of Bis- 
marck, Pa.; William IL, born June 17, 1877, who married Ella ^^lountz; and 
Anna. 

CYRUS REX. The Rex family was established in Lebanon county by 
Abraham and Samuel Rex, who came hither from Chestnut Hill, German- 
town, and located at Schaefferstown, formerly in Lancaster county, where 
Samuel became a prominent man, serving as justice of the peace and as a 
successful merchant, and becoming widely known as a scrivener. His 
pleasant manner made him many friends, and although he left no issue, in 
affection he was known as "Uncle" by a great many of the residents. 

Abraham Rex. the father of Cyrus Rex, of Rexmont, came to Lebanon 
county prior to his marriage with Miss Elizabeth Schaeffer, daughter of Henry 
and Eva Schaeffer, and granddaughter of Alexander Schaeffer. the founder oi 
Schaefferstown. After marriage Mr. Rex embarked in a mercantile business, 
and for many years Avas the leading merchant of that place. Here he erected 
an excellent hotel which he operated for a long time. He became widely 
known as a business man and public-spirited citizen, and was one of the 
directors in the Lebanon Bank. His family of seven children all reached 
maturity, these being: M^ry, who became the wife of Peter Zimmerman; 
Samuel S., a merchant, who married Lucetta Shultz, daughter of Peter Shultz; 
Franklin, who was killed in a railroad accident when returning from his 
graduation as a physician ; Ann, who married W. M. Weigley of Schaeffers- 
town ; Abraham, a merchant at Schaefferstown, who married Amanda Horter, 
of Germantown; George, born December 3, 181 5. who read medicine with Dr. 
Gloninger, practiced at Jonestown, later at South Bend, Ind., and also at Phila- 
delphia ; and Cyrus. 

Dr. Georee Rex, of the above familv, was on December 26, i86r, nom- 





-i. 




BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. n 

inated by President Abraham Lincoln, Brigadier Surgeon of Volunteers, and 
on March 9, 1866, had conferred upon him by President Johnson, the Senate 
concurring, the rank of Bre\'et-Colonel, to date from June i, 1865, for faith- 
ful and meritorious service. During the progress of the \var Dr. Rex served 
on the field as well, and was placed in charge of the military hospitals at St. 
Louis, Mo., Omaha, Neb., Baltimore, Md.. and Chester, Pa. This brave 
ofificer, skilled surgeon and honorable man died at Cornwall, April 20, 1884, 
at the age of sixty-nine years. His wife was Henrietta Harper, of Lebanon 
county. 

Cyrus Rex, the only surviving member of the family of Abraham and 
Elizabeth Rex, and its youngest member, was born August 2, 1822. His 
education was acquired in the best institutions of learning and by observation 
and experience in European travel. Upon his return to America he engaged 
in a brokerage business for several years in Philadelphia, but came to Lebanon 
in 1857 and accepted a clerkship in the Lebanon Bank. Here he remained nine 
years, and in 1866 moved to Cornwall, where for seven years he engaged in 
a mercantile business, removing then to Rexmont, where he has continued in 
the same line until the present. Mr. Rex has been a very prominent factor in 
the material development of this part of the county. It was his public spirit 
that accomplished the platting of the village of Rexmont, one of the most 
attractive and prosperous communities of South Lebanon township. He also 
owns a fine farm of ninety-six acres, and is interested as director and stock- 
holder in both the Valley National Bank and the People's Bank of Lebanon. 
Mr. Rex has never married. He is a man of genial manner, thorough educa- 
tion, and a pleasing personality, which has brought him a large circle of 
friends. In political sentiment he is a Cleveland Democrat. Fraternally he 
aflfiliates with the I. O. O. F., which he joined in 1848, and in religion, like his 
father before him, he is a Lutheran. 

ELMER E. HAUER, cashier of the People's National Bank, of Leba- 
non, Pa., was born in that city August 9, i86r. His early education was 
obtained in the common schools of Lebanon, and after completing the course 
with credit he entered his father's grocery store and assisted in the business 
until the father sold it, in 1881, a month prior to his death. Elmer E. 
then embarked in the photographic business, which he learned in the studio 
of F. W. Quinby, and purchased the establishment of J. H. Keini, and 
conducted this for several years. In 1888, when the People's National 
Bank of Lebanon was organized, he was chosen teller of the same, begin- 
ning his duties as such the day the bank opened for business. This position 



74 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

he held until January 12, 1897, when he was promoted to be assistant cashier, 
and this was followed January Ji, i8g8, by his election as cashier of the 
bank, succeeding the late Mr. Woomer. His fraternal connections are 
with the I. O. O. F., the P. O. S. of A., the Red Men. the Knights of Malta 
and the Knights of the Mystic Chain. 

On June 27, 1888, Mr. Hauer was married to Lizzie M. Kleiser, a loative 
of Lebanon and a daughter of John Kleiser, one of the board of county com- 
missioners of Lebanon county. Two children have blessed their union : 
Ralph and Julia. Mr. Hauer is one of the substantial men of this city, and 
is highly esteemed for his integrity of character and many estimable personal 
characteristics. 

JOHN VYEIDMAN MISH. one of Lebanon's oldest and best-known 
citizens, was born April 22, 1822, in what is now the Hartman House, on 
North Ninth street, Lebanon, son of the late Dr. John Bickel Mish. 

John Mish, the great-grandfather of John Weidman Mish, was born 
September 8, 1729, and died January 20. 1810. He married Margaret 
Swake, who was born September 28, 1838. Both were buried in Friedler's 
Kirche (Church) graveyard, near Shiremanstown, Cumberland county, Pa. 
The great-grandfather on the maternal side was John Bickel, a native of 
Switzerland, bom in 1748, who came with his parents to America when he 
was a boy. settling in Pennsylvania, prior to the French and Indian war. 
He was one of the first settlers of what is now Bethel township. Lebanon 
county, served in the Revolutionary war as a member of Capt. Koppen- 
heffer's company, of Col. Timothy Green's battalion, and subsequently saw 
service on the frontier. His death occurred in 1840, at Jonestown, Lebanon 
county. Of his children, John married and reared a large family, dying 
in advanced age. He was the first postmaster of Jonestown. His daughter, 
Catharine, married Jacob Mish, of Harrisburg, and they were the grand- 
parents of lohn Weidman Mish. 

Dr. John Bickel Mish, father of Mr. Mish, of Lebanon, was born 
January 12. 1791, in Harrisburg, Pa., was educated in private schools and 
studied medicine with Dr. Samuel Agnew, a leading physician of the State 
at that time. He matriculated, November 14, 1811, in the Medical De- 
partment of the I^niversity of Pennsylvania, and attended one course of lec- 
tures, but did not graduate, as upon his return he began the practice of 
medicine, and. as was the general or quite common custom of the day. 
acquired a large practice and did not get back to the University. He settled 
in Jonestown. Lebanon county, where he remained until 1821. when he 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 75 

returned to Lebanon, and in that city practiced his profession with great 
success until his death on December 15. 1837. In March. 1826. the Alle- 
ghany College conferred on him the honorary degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
Dr. Mish was very prominent both as a physician and as a surgeon as 
well as a citizen. By appointment of the governor, he served as prothon- 
otary of Lebanon county in 1837, and was at the same time serving as 
chief burgess of the borough. He was captain (jf a cavalry company, and 
was popular in military circles, and was buried with the honors of war. 
Physically Dr. Mish was a large man, six feet one inch tall, well pro- 
portioned, and without superfluous flesh. Gen. Simon Cameron, who was 
the warm friend and companion of the Doctor when they were young men 
together in Harrisburg, often was known to remark that "he was the hand- 
somest man in the State." 

In i8i6 Dr. Mish married Maria Weidman. daughter of Capt. John 
Weidman, of the Revolutionary war, then residing at and owner of the 
Union Forge, Lickdale, Lebanon ' county. Mrs. ^^lish was burn in 1793, 
and died in t866. They had four children, three sons and one daughter, as 
follows: John Weidman; Dr. Physick Bickel, deceased; Catherine Eliza- 
beth, who resides in New Jersey; and Charles Carroll, deceased. 

John Weidman Mish was reared in Lebanon and was educated in the 
old Lebanon Academy. \A''hen in his eighteenth year he began teaching 
school in Union township, Lebanon county, and in 1841 he became principal 
of the Annville Academy, where he taught one year. He then began reading 
law with his uncle, Jacob B. Weidman, and in 18.-I5 was admitted to the Bar, 
practicing his profession for several vears, for three years being district 
attorney, the first man elected to that office under the new constitution. The 
county was Republican in politics, and he was a Democrat, but his popu- 
larity won the office. The legal profession not offering him the opportuni- 
ties he desired, although fitted by nature to win laurels in it, he retired from 
it and became interested in buying and selling real estate. 'Mr. Mish has 
proven a successful business man, and is secretary and treasurer of the Leb- 
anon Gas Co., holding this position since 1856, tlie date of its organization. 
For many years he served as director of the Lebanon National Bank; was 
president of the Dime Savings Bank of Lebanon for three years: was cashier 
of the First National Bank of Lebanon for ten years, when he resigned; 
was treasurer of the borough of Lebanon for some time: and is now and 
has been for twenty years, president of the Lebanon Cemetery Company. 
He also served two terms in the city council. 

Mr. Mish was made a Mason at Mt. Lebanon Lodge in 1848, and 



76 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

is tlie oldest Free-Mason in Lebanon county. He is also a member of 
Mohegan Lodge, No. 288, I. O. O. F., of whidi he is a charter member, 
having formerly belonged to Lebanon Lodge of that order. In religious 
belief he is attached to the Reformed church. 

In 1848, Mr. Mish was married to Amelia Krause, born in 1826, in 
Baltimore, and died in 1S96, leaving five children, as follows: Matilda 
K., the wife of Charles H. Killinger, of Lebanon; Mason P., of Lebanon; 
William W.. residing in South Lebanon township: Robert C, in business 
in Los Angeles, Cal. ; and John, a resident of Lebanon. 

GEORGE GASSERT, an honored citizen of Lebanon. Pa., is a con- 
tractor and builder, and by trade a carpenter, in that city. He was born in 
Lebanon May 2, 183 1, and is a son of John and Sarah (Schott) Gassert, 
of Lebanon county. 

John Gassert, the father, was a farmer. Fie was born in Cornwall 
township in 1797. and died in Lebanon in 1873. His wife, Sarah Schott, 
was born in South Lebanon township in 1801, and died in 1883. They 
were the parents of eight children: Sarah; Magdalena ; John; George; Eliza- 
beth; Joseph: Samuel, of St. Louis; and William, of Lebanon. Politically 
the father was a stanch Democrat. John Gassert was a son of John Gassert, 
a native of Germany, who settled in Lebanon county when it was a part 
of Lancaster county, and there died in 1850. The maternal grandfather, 
George Schott, was born in Lancaster, now Lebanon, county, in 1763, and 
died in 1854. 

George Gassert was born and raised on the farm, two miles south of 
the city of Lebanon, and attended the country schools. At the age of twenty 
he was put to the trade of carpenter, and he pursued this occupation, with 
contracting and building until 1883, when he retired from contract work. 

On April 10, 1858, Mr. Gassert married Miss Susanna Kauffman, 
who was a daughter of John Kauffman, of Lebanon county, who was a 
farmer and potter by trade. Their married life was enhanced by the birth 
of three children: Sarah, Elizabeth and John (who is a brick layer, of 
Lebanon). His wife, Susanna, died in 1881. Mr. Gassert is one of the 
leading Democrats of Lebanon. He was in the employ of the United States 
government during the war of the Rebellion, as a member of the Construc- 
tion Corps. He is a member of the Salem Lutheran church, and is one 
of the oldest members, having joined the church over fifty-two years ago, 
and has been an elder, deacon and tru.stee in the church. 

As a contractor and builder Mr. Gassert has built many of the principal 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNIY. ij 

business houses and residences in the city of Lebanon, and was the con- 
tractor and builder of the Bethany Orphans' Home at Womelsdorf. Berks 
county, Pa., a Reformed Cliurch institution, which at this time is in a pros- 
perous condition. Quite a number of churches in Lebanon county are the 
work of his creation, and only lately he superintended the erection of Salem 
Lutheran chapel, on Eighth street, near Willow, one of the finest buildings 
in this locality. Mr. Gassert is a self-made man, and only by pluck and 
industry was he able to reach the ])oint of his aml>ition. At the time of 
the introduction of the water supply into the city of Lebanon he was a 
member of city councils, and he is the owner of considerable real estate in 
Lebanon city. 

GEORGE H. HORST, cashier of the Myerstown National Bank, and 
one of the highly esteemed and influential citizens of Lebanon county, was 
born March i6, 1850, only son of Henry and Sarah (Landis) Horst, the 
former of whom was for many years a leading business man of Dauphin 
county. 

Henry Horst was born in 1823, in South Annville township, Lebanon 
county, and died in 1891, at LTnion Deposit, Dauphin county. His parents 
were Joseph and Barbara Horst, most highly respected farming people, and 
early settlers in Lebanon county in the locality of what is known as Horst's 
Mills. The Horst family was founded in America by three brothers of 
the name who emigrated from Germany prior to the war of the Revolution, 
settling in Lancaster and Lebanon counties, Pennsylvania, and from these 
early pioneers the various branches of the family have descended. The only 
sister of George H. Horst is Emma, the wife of A. L. Landis. who is a 
prominent man and justice of the peace at L^nion Deposit, Dauphin county. 
Henry Horst was widely known. During a long and active life he was 
an extensive dealer in horses and stock, being a shipper of cattle and horses 
from western to eastern markets. He was a member of the firm of Bals- 
baugh, Gingrich, Horst & Co., who put up an iron blast furnace at Union 
Deposit in 1855, and carried on business there for some years. He was 
a prosperous business man and made his own success. During his many 
years at Union Deposit Mr. Horst was a consistent member of the United 
Brethren Church and a public spirited citizen. His political affiliation was 
with the Republican party, but he took no active part in politics, though he 
was a school director. 

George H. Horst was born in Annville, Lebanon county, but was taken 
to Dauphin county at -the age of one year, when his father there entered 



78 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

into active business. His education was liberal, attendance at the common 
schools of L^nion Deposit being succeeded by a period at the Millersville 
State Normal School, in Lancaster county. He left school at the age of 
eighteen in order to make a trip and see something of the great West, 
and during an absence of four years visited Indiana, Kansas and Colorado, 
but decided to locate permanently in the East. With this intention he came 
to Myerstown, where he organized a State Bank, this being, in 1873, the 
same safe financial institution which, in 1900, became the Myerstown National 
Bank, with a capital of $50,000. Upon its organization Mr. Horst became 
its cashier, remaining as .such until its change into a national bank, in 1900, 
since when he has continued m the same position in the new organization. 
Mr. Horst drew the first charter for the first (State) bank, and this was 
granted by a special act of the Legislature. The bank continued to do busi- 
ness under that charter and the renewal of it, in 1892, until it was changed 
into a national bank, in 1900. For the past thirty years Mr. Horst has 
been e.stablished as a leading factor in the life of Myerstown, and has taken 
an active part in all its interests. For many years he has been president of 
the board of trustees of the Reformed Church, of which he is a consistent 
member. He is the treasurer of the Tulpehocken Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company, and also treasurer of the Goodwill Fire and Hose Company, of 
Myerstown. His interest in educational matters has been shown by his long 
and disinterested service on the school board, and his connection with the 
Palatinate College. He was for a long time treasurer of the Association 
of that college, from its organization, in about 1894. to the time of its sale 
to the Evangelical Church, which now owns it. Mr. Horst was one of 
seven members who organized the Myerstown Water Company, and has been 
a member of the board of directors and secretary since its organization. 
However, with all a public spirited citizen's interest in the place of his resi- 
dence, he will not enter public life, his other duties making that impossible. 
Mr. Horst has been a lifelong Republican from principle, but he has held no 
public office except that of school director. 

In 1881 Mr. Horst was united in marriage with Miss Annie R. See, a 
daughter of Richard J. and Mary Elizabeth I'Liesse) See, of Myerstown, and 
one daughter. Mary E.. was born to this union; the mother died in 1884.' 
Miss Horst is one of the most accomplished and attractive young ladies of 
the town, a graduate of Albright College, and is a student at Bryn Mawr Col- 
lege, where she is taking a post-graduate course. In 1891 Mr. Horst was 
married (second) to Lottie Bahney, the only daughter of Adam Bahney, 
a capitalist and prominent resident of Myerstown. - 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 79 

JOHN L. ZUG, one of the old and honored citizens of North Lebanon 
township, residing- upon his fine farm midway l>etween Lebanon and Myers- 
town, descends from one of the early settlers of this part of Pennsylvania. 
His ancestry emigrated to America from Switzerland, to escape religious 
persecution. I'lrich Zug. a man of intelligence and thrift, was the great- 
great-grandfather of John J.. Zug, of North Lebanon township. He was a 
member of the Dunkard faith, and belonged to that body of early Christians, 
who, although stern in belief, were ever righteous in their dealings. This 
faith was handed town to his descendants, and Abraham Zug, the grand- 
father, was a minister in that church, and his son. Re\-. John Zug. preached 
the doctrines of this religion for thirty years. 

.'\braham Zug was born and reared in Lancaster, county, moving with 
his family about 1816 to Lebanon county, where he died at the age of 
sixty-nine years. His father, Rev. Hannes Zug, had preached the faith for 
fifty years, and lived to be almost ninety years of age. in 1821, having 
been a preacher since 1772. His home and n^inistry were at White Oak, Lan- 
caster county, where his father, Ulrich, had settled in 1727. His baptism was 
in 1742. His life and work did much to estalilish the church in Lancaster 
county, and he is recalled in the church historv with great honor. His 
family consisted of six sons and two daughters. 

John Zug. father of John L. Zug, was born May 14. 1797. in Rapho 
township. Lancaster county, and died July 19. 1873, in Lebanon county. 
For more than half a century he was a consistent member of the Dunkard 
church and during thirtv years its faithful minister, one of the zealous 
workers for the welfare of the Tulpehocken church, where his father had 
also labc^red. Mr. Zug was ever ready to minister in all kindness to every 
one, and his influence is felt to this day. He was united in marriage with 
Margaret Lane, born in 170.5, in Jacksori township, daughter of Joseph 
and Margaretta (Rumler) Lane, and eight children were lx)rn to them, as 
follows : .\braham and Mary, both deceased ; Rebecca, deceased wife of 
Henry Ballinger; Israel, who died in Illinois; John L. ; Nathan, who died 
in Illinois; Katie, deceased wife of David Yingst : and Reuben, residing in 
South Lebanon township. The father engaged in farming in Heidelberg 
township, where is situated the family homestead. 

John L. Zug was born Deceml)er 9, 1829. in the old Heidelberg town- 
ship home, and was there reared and received such schooling as the time 
and locality afforded. Mr. Zug remained at home assisting his father until 
he was thirty-three years old. and then secured a small tract of land, which 
'he 'cultivated for five years, buying then a farm of thirty-seven acres located 



So BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

near Prescott, in South Lebanon township, where he continued for twenty- 
years, remo\ing- then to his present home in North Lebanon township, where 
he owns seventy-eight acres of the finest land in- the township. Mr. Zug 
owns other property in South Lebanon township, and is regarded as one 
of the substantial, as well as upright and reliable, citizens of this locality. 
His friends are many and sincere, his just character and kind disposition 
gaining him esteem and friendship. 

On May 14, 1S63, Mr. Zug married Eliza Fox, born September 15, 
T836, in Berks county, a daughter of Samuel and Sarah ' (Gansert) Fox, 
her death occurring March 22, 1902. I'he five children born to this happy 
union were: Ephraim, a farmer on the homestead, and the owner of the 
Prescott warehouse, , coal yard and creamery, and of a branch creamery at 
Stouchsburg, married Barbara Longenecker, and has three children, Nora, 
Mary and Naomi; Benjamin F., who attends to his brother Ephraim's 
business at Prescott, whither he moved September 8, 1903, married Ella 
Fry; Lizzie is at home; and Sarah and an infant daughter, deceased. With 
his whole family, Mr. Zug belongs to the Dunkard church, and they are 
justly regarded among Lebanon county's worthy and estimable citizens. 

JOSIAH FUNCK. This highly respected and prominent member of 
the Lebanon County Bar, and one of the most distinguished citizens who has 
ever been connected with the public life of the city, died July 17, 1896. The 
death of Hon. Josiah Funck was looked upon by all citizens as a distinct public 
calamity, and he was followed to his last resting place by a very large con- 
course of sorrowing friends and fellow-citizens. As a lawyer, Mr. Funck had 
reached the top of the profession in eastern Pennsylvania, and was regarded 
as one of the most profound jurists who have ever practiced in the Lebanon 
courts. He had a keen appreciation of the high character of his profession, 
believing implicitly that the law was the conservator of justice, that justice 
should ever be blind, and that the duty of the practitioner was to interpret 
rightly the principles of jurisprudence regardless of individual advantage. 
His influence was powerful in the Bar of Lebanon County, of wdiich he was 
dean at the date of his death, and by which he was greatly revered. 

Hon. Josiah Funck was a native of Lebanon county, born on the old 
Funck homestead, near the city of Lebanon, December 26, 1825, a son of 
Jacob and Sarah (Bowman) Funck. His grandfather was named Martin, as 
was also his great-grandfather, the latter being one of the earliest settlers of 
Lebanon county, he having come to the county before it had been erected from 
old Lancaster countv. The education of Josiah Funck was secured in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 8i 

common schools, and m Lebanon Academy, then under one of its noted early 
instructors, Prof. Kluge. After graduating- from this school he taught school 
in East Hanover township during the years 1848-49. Deciding at this time 
upon the law as a profession, he began its reading in the office of the Hon. 
Levi Kline, then one of the leading lawyers of Lebanon. April 7, 1851, marks 
the date of his admission to the Bar, and for nearly a half century he practiced 
his profession with the greatest success. During this time he was frequently 
honored by responsible public positions, all of which he administered with rare 
fidelity. His first public office was that of District Attorney of Lebanon 
county, to which he was elected in 1854. In this office he served with dis- 
tinction for one full term, and then retired to private practice, which was not 
interrupted until 1872, save for a few months during the Civil war, when 
he became captain of Company H, of the Emergency troops. As a lawyer he 
was profoundly versed in legal jurisprudence. In 1873 he had attained such 
high standing in the legal circles of the State that he was selected to repre- 
sent Lebanon county in the Constitutional Convention of I'enns^lvania, and he 
became one of the most useful members of that august body — a body composed 
of men, who, regardless of personal gain or party politics, were "actuated 
by a desire to frame a fundamental law that would help to preserve the rights 
and privileges of the people of this free Commonwealth, and also to promote 
its strength, to preserve order and obedience to its ordinances." In the year 
1875 Mr. Funck became connected with one of the most noted law cases that 
has come up in the courts in the distribution of the large fortune of the noted 
James Lick, the founder of the great Lick Observatory, his client being John 
H. Lick, a son of the gentleman named. He spent considerable time in Cali- 
fornia, and was successful after a hard legal fight in securing the rights of his 
client to a very large share of his father's estate. 

Mr. Funck married Miss Bella I. Marshall, daughter of the late Dr. Jacob 
Marshall, of Reading, Pa. Dr. Marshall was formerly of Ann\'ille, Lebanon 
county, whence he removed to Reading. His mother was a Gloninger, of the 
old family of that name of Lebanon county, and whose members were dis- 
tinguished pioneers. To Josiah Funck and his wife were born the following 
children: Mary L., deceased; Jacob Marshall, a leading member of the 
Lebanon County Bar; Edwin B., deceased; Helen I., who married Major 
Lincoln Karmany, of the Marine Corps of the United States Navy, now in the 
Philippine Islands ; Sarah B. ; Alfred Coit, an attorney in the United States 
Patent Office in Washington. 

Besides having attained distinction at the Bar, Mr. Funck was a suc- 
cessful financier, and held large and important interests in Lebanon. In later 

6 



82 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

life bis shrewd business foresight liacl brouglit bim a competence, Init he could 
not bring himself to leave the forum where the field for activity was so great. 
It held for him a fascination which clung to him through life. He loved his 
profession, and honored it b}' an eminence attained by few of its devotees. At 
the time of his death he was dean of the Lebanon County Bar, and the follow- 
ing resolutions on his life and character were adopted by his fellow practi- 
tioners, at a meeting held July 20^ 1896 : 

Resolved, That in the death of Hon. Josiah Funck the Bar of Lebanon County has 
lost one of its most prominent members since the erection of the county. 

That his course at the Bar was an example to all practitioners as indicative of the 
necessity for and the good results flowing from hard and incessant labor ; 

That the Bar concedes to him fidelity to his client, a determination to win for his 
client by all fair and honorable means, and a persistency and pertinacity which more than 
once snatched victory from the jaws of defeat; 

That his death has deprived the community at large of a useful and public-spirited 
citizen ; 

That we extend our sympathies to the bereaved family in their great sorrow. 

We respectfully request the Court ic enter these proceedings upon its record. 

In Church and religious matters Mr. Funck was much interested and 
gave liberally of his means to the support of his own denomination and that 
of many others in the community. He was also exceedingly charitable, giving 
largely to organized charities and also in a private way. He was long con- 
nectetl with St. Luke's Protestant Episcopal Church of Lebanon, and was one 
of the oldest members in point of service in that church in the city, having 
been a charter member in Christ's church, corporated January 6, 1859, this 
name being afterward changed to St. Luke's. During his long service he 
frequently served as senior warden, and was also treasurer for many years. 
Mr. Funck was for a long term of years a member of the board of directors 
and treasurer of the Church Home for Children, the following minute being 
spread on the record of the Board at the meeting following his death : 

Since our last meeting, the Church Home for Children has suffered a great loss in the 
■death of Mr. Josiah Funck, a member of the Board from its formation, and who served 
most acceptably as the treasurer of the Home for many years. He was a steadfast friend 
of the institution from its inception, always present if possible at the meetings of the Board 
and ready to do whatever lay in his power for the interests of the Home by valuable advice 
and liberal contributions. It is not for us to speak of the rare gifts and qualities which made 
him a man of mark in the various relations which he sustained. We v\'0uld only speak of him 
as a fellow member of the Board, whose pleasant and cordial manner made it a pleasure to 
meet with him. We would place on record this expression of our esteem and regard for a 
■departed friend and fellow member, our sense of the value of his services to the institution 
which we represent, and express to his family our sincere sympathy in their loss. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 83 

Mr. Funck was a worthy and prominent member of the Grand Army of 
the RepubHc, for which organization he had great regard. Sedgwick Post, 
No. 42, the local organization, passed the following resolutions relative to his 
death : 

Again we have been called to part with a comrade who has answered the last roll 
call. In the death of Comrade Josiah Funck the Post mourns the loss of a valued member, 
his family a fond and affectionate parent: and the community, the Church and the Bar, in 
all of which he was a Shining example, feel with tis the great loss which we have sustained. 
Tendering our sincere sympathy to the afflicted family we bow with meek submission to Him 
who doeth all things well. 

.\s a token of respect for our departed Comrade, the charter of this Post shall be 
draped in his memory for the usual length of time. This Memorial shall be spread on the 
records, and a copy thereof, properh' engrossed, shall be presented to the family of the de- 
ceased. 

REV. DAVID WESTENBERGER. bishop of the Lebanon County 
District of the Rlennonite Church, was born January 31, 1857, on the old 
Westenberger homestead, in South Ann\i]le township, Lebanon county, one 
mile from Annyille, a son of Dayid and Sarah ( Gosser ) Westenberger. 
The father was born at Weg'ley's Mills, near Schaefferstown, Lebanon cotmty, 
Noyember 16. 1822, and is still Hying, residing on the old farm. 

Henry Westenberger, the grandfather, purchased the homestead where 
the succeeding generations of the family haye been Iwrn. and here Henry 
died, about 1866. In religion he was a deyout Mennonite, and his son, 
Dayid, father of Bishop Westenberger, is one of the deacons of the church. 
Sarah (Gosser) Westenlierger died in August, 1863, the mother of fiye 
children: Leyi, a farmer of Dattphin county. Pa,, married I'anny, daughter 
of Jacob Ebersole; Henry, a farmer of Lancaster county, married Maria 
Lehman ; Mary married Christian Stern, of Lancaster cotmty ; Sarah married 
Abraliam Ebersole ; and Rey. Dayid. 

Dayid Westenberger was reared tipon the farm, an^l attended the com- 
mon schools of his neighborhood, following the calling of a farmer all his 
life, and now owns the old farm of seyenty-three acres, which he has impro\-e(l. 
and which is now regarded as one of the best farms in the townshiix All 
his life he has taken an active interest in the work of the Mennonite Church. 
In 1888 he was ordained as a preacher of his faith, since which time he has 
had charge of Gingrich church. On January 10, 1893, he was ordained 
bishop by Bishop Jacob Brubacher, of Lancaster county, and he is now in 
charge of four churches, which comprise the Lebanon county district. Bishop 
Westenberger is a ^'ery eloquent preacher, and has gained the affection of 
his people by his kindly manner, devout life and blameless character. .Ml 



84 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

his teachings are carried out in his Hfe, and he is recognized as a thoroughly 
good man, as well as faithful clergyman. 

In 1880 Bishop \Vestenberger was married to Martha Ebersole, born 
in Lancaster county, in 1856, a daughter of Jacob Ebersole, formerly of 
Lancaster county, but now of Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. 

HENRY E. ESHELMAN, cashier of the Jonestown Bank, and one 
of the leading men of this vicinity, was born in Jonestown, February 15, 
1849, ^ ^o" o^ Christian and Sarah R. (Heilman) Eshelman. The father 
was born in Fredericksburg. Lebanon county. Pa., and died June 12, 1873, 
and the mother was born in Jonestown, November 6. 181 8, and still survives. 

Christian Eshelman, the paternal grandfather, was a man well and 
favorably known, antl Henry Heilman, the maternal grandfather, was a 
highly respected man. Christian Eshelman (2), the father of ' Henry E. 
Eshelman, came to Jonestown at a very early day, and learned the saddler's 
trade. Later he was in the employ of Henry Meily, a coal and lumber 
dealer, and subsequently entered into a mercantile life. After passing 
through a series of co-partnerships, he finally took his son into partnership 
with him under the style of C. Eshelman & Son, dealers in coal and lumber. 
Altogether, lie was in business for over thirty years, meeting with success. 
AVhen he came to Jonestown he was a poor boy with nothing but the clothes 
on his back, but he died possessed of a modest fortune. He was one of the 
charter members of the Jonestown Bank when it was started in 1873, and 
also served on the school board and as a councilman of Jonestown. In his 
death Jonestown lost one of its best and most representative men, while in his 
family his demise was deeply felt, as he was a man to command not only 
affection, but respect and confidence. 

Henry E. Eshelman was reared in Jonestown, receiving an excellent 
education in the public schools and at the business college at Norristown, 
Pa. At the age of eighteen he began work for his father, and so continued 
until 1 87 1, when he was admitted as a partner in the business. When the 
Jonestown Bank was organized he was made acting teller, and was appointed 
notary public for the bank. After years of faithful service, in 1893, he was 
made cashier, which position he still holds. For six years he has served as 
county auditor, and he is thoroughly conversant with all matters pertaining 
to the management of financial institutions. In addition to his other inter- 
ests, he is a director of the Lebanon Mutual Fire Insurance Company, and 
has settled up a large number of estates, involving vast interests. His keen 
insight and calm, level judgment make him eminently fitted for the positions 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. «5 

•of trust he holds, and influence others to depend upon his decision in mat- 
ters of importance. 

Mr. Eshehiian was married to Alary Ahce Buck, born in Lebanon, 
daughter of Rol^ert and Mary Buck. Two chilch'en ha\-e been born to this 
union : Salhe B. and Raymond B., the latter deceased. 

HON. CYRUS E. HOFFAIAN. Of the earnest, public-spirited men 
-who early settled Richland, Mr. Hoffman is one of the few surviving first 
residents of that place. Since 1858 he has been almost continuously identi- 
fied with the public interests of Richland — as station agent, postmaster and 
recorder of wills, and, evincing marked fidelity in the performance of every 
duty, he has been of invaluable service to the community. Now, in his 
seventy-fourth year, he has retired from active work, and is availing himself 
of the peace of his pleasant Richland home. 

Mr. Hoffman is of German extraction. His father, Sebastian Hoff- 
man, a well-known drover of Schaefferstown for many years, was born at 
Ichenstruth, on the Rhine, in Germany, November 4, 1781, and there he 
passed many years of his life. Prospects of bettering his fortunes induced 
him during his young manhood to come to America. Settling in Schaeffers- 
town, he there engaged in buying and selling live stock, and meeting with 
great success, he continued the business for many years. During his early 
manhood he married, in the old country, Margaret Uhr, w'ho died before 
his departure for A.merica, leaving two sons, Christian and Frederick, who 
came to America with him. In 1827, after settling in Pennsylvania, he 
married Catherine Iba, of one of the pioneer families of Heidelberg town- 
ship. To this marriage there were born four children: Henry; Cyrus E., 
who is mentioned below; William, a resident of Kleinfeltersville. Lebanon 
county; and Daniel, of Winchester, Ind. The father of this family died 
in Schaefferstown, August 25, 1849, '^'''d his wife died October 6, 1856. 
Both were influential citizens of Schaefferstown; and as a Whig he was 
prominent in local politics. He was a consistent Christian, and a leading 
member of the Reformed church. 

Cyrus E. Hoffman early gave evidence of a decidedly marked intel- 
lectual bent. Born in Schaefferstown, February 12, 1830, he there, in a 
well ordered home, grew to manhood. In the public schools of his native 
-town he procured his earlv education, and later attended the Myerstown 
and Annville academies, further cultivating his literary studies. Inherent 
-ability and thorough equipment for the work decided him upon leaving 
■school to engage in teaching, and securing a position in Schaefferstown, 



86 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

he there took up iiis profession. A strong disciphnarian, and an expert at 
imparting Icnowledge. lie met with marked success, and continued in this 
wc)rk for many years. Good business openings in tlie Httle settlement of 
Richland induced him, in 1858, to move there, and he at once secured a 
position as station agent for the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Company. 
Practical business knowledge and thoroughness of work won him the confi- 
dence of Ijoth the officials and the general public, and he continued there 
for the most part throughout the rest of his business life. About 1893 
he retired, having filled the position with marked satisfaction for fully thirty- 
five years. Shortly after taking up the duties of this office he was appointed 
postmaster of Richland, and, performing his work with marked ability and 
fidelity, he continued as such for twenty-seven years. 

On December 8, 1850, Mr. Hofifman married Elvira Bair, of Schaeffers- 
town, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Bricker) Bair, natives of Schaef- 
ferstown. To Mr. and Mrs. Hofifman has been born one child. Dora, whO' 
is now a highly accomplished young woman, exceedingly active in church 
circles. 

Mr. Hoffman's scholarly attainments and his business ability have 
brought him to the front in the public affairs of his section. While in 
Schaefferstown he very ably officiated as justice of the peace for many years, 
and in 1856 through the merited esteem of his fellow citizens he was elected 
to the State Legislature, where he represented his district with marked efficiency 
for one term, and an extra session. In [896 he was elected register of wills 
for Lebanon countv, in the performance of his duties acquitting himself 
with his usual ability. Since the organization of the party, in 1856, he 
has been a stanch Republican. Lie is an acti\'e member of the Schaefferstown 
Lutheran church, and has served both as superintendent of the Richland 
Sunday-school, which he organized some thirty years ago. and as class- 
leader. Pie possesses great strength of character, is independent in his views, 
and thoroughl)- well-informed upon all questions of the day. 

THOMAS SYDENHAM STEIN, an educator of Lebanon county, 
and a citizen of Annville, was born April 7, 1848, in North Annville. a son 
of Dr. Henry and Matilda R. (Seltzer) Stein. 

Dr. Henry Stein was born in Annville, October 22, 1807, a son of Philip 
and Mary Ann (Stoever) Stein, who were born in Annville, where the former 
followed the trade of hatter for many years, becoming prominent in the locality, 
and serving as justice of the peace. Dr. Henry Stein was educated in his native 
place, and read medicine with Dr. David Marshall, attending medical lee- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 87 

tures at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, subsequently taking a course 
at Baltimore. For about thirty years he practiced his profession in Ann- 
ville, and he died May 16, 1861. His wife, Matilda R. (Seltzer) Stein, 
whom he married October 13, 1840, was born April 12, 1818, in Jonestown, 
Pa., and died May 28. 1899, a daughter of John George and Elizabeth 
(Zimmerman) Seltzer, the latter of whom was born May 27, 1782, and 
died December 19, 1859. 

John George Seltzer was born October t6, 1782, in Jonestown, Lebanon 
county, and died February 19, 1840, having been a prominent merchant and a 
member of the Pennsylvania Legislature. To John Georg-e and Elizabeth 
(Zimmerman) Seltzer, were born children as follows: Sanniel. liorn August 
31, 1801, became a physician, practiced in Columbus, Ohio, and died there 
in 1852; Sarah, born April 6, 1804, married John Capp. died November 
17, 1863: Mary, born Ma)' 30, 1806, died unmarried, January 26. 1881, 
on the old homestead; Elizabeth, born December 3. 1808, married John 
Diller, and died September 8, 1849; George, born October 12, 1810, clied 
June 13, 1830; Priscilla. born February 13. 1813, died July 20, 1831 : John 
C, born October 12, 1815, served in the Pennsylvania Legislature, and 
died in 1891 ; Matilda R.. born April 12, 1818, married Dr. Henry Stein, 
and died May 28, 1899; Sabina, born December 17, 1820, married Rev. 
Hoffmeier, of Manchester, Md., and died May 2, 1882; and Thomas, born 
April 26, 1824. died January 3, 1882. 

Dr. Henry and Matilda R. (Seltzer) Stein became the parents of children 
as follows: (i) Ann Eliza, born April 8, 1841, died February 18. 1843. 
(2) George Seltzer, born September 9. 1842, was educated in the public 
schools and Annville Academy, and read medicine with Dr. Schneck, c>f 
Lebanon. He then took a course of lectures in the ^ledical Department of 
the I'niversity of Pennsylvania, and was soon after appointed assistant sur- 
geon of the War Hospital at Philadelphia. In 1867 he went to Columbus, 
Ohio, and has since practiced there, with marked success. (3) Ann Mary, 
born December 14, 1844. died November 26, 1869. (4) Emma Clarissa, 
born February 10, 18-I7. died August 8, 1847. (S) Thomas Sydenham 
is mentioned below. (6) Ellen Jane, born August 24, 1850, died December 
15. 1850. (7) Philip Titus, born November T, 1851, died July 4. 1853. 
(8) Philip Calvin, born April t6, 1854, died February 20, 1856. (9) Henry 
Augustus, born March 27. 1857, was educated in Annville. and became 
a teacher of music, but died May 22, 1886. The Stein family has lr)ng been 
associated with the Reformed church, as were the Seltzers with the Lutheran 
church. 



88 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Prof. Thomas S. Stein received his education in the pubHc schools, Ann- 
ville Academy, and the I>ebanon Vahey College, attending the latter up to 
the junior year, finishing his studies at Fran}clin and Marshall College, grad- 
itating there in 1874. He adopted teaching as his profession, and after 
leax'ing college continued teaching, for twenty-five years, in Pennsylvania, 
New Jersey, New York and Maryland. For several years he had charge 
as teacher and principal of the SchuylkilP Seminary, at Fredericksburg, Pa., 
anrl was connected with that school for thirteen years, having been with it 
when it was located at Reading, and going with it upon its removal to 
Fredericksburg in 1886. From 1894 to 1895, and from 1897 to 1898, he 
was an instructor of Latin, Greek and German at Albright College, at Myers- 
town. Pa., but in 1898 he returned to his old home in Annville. At present 
(1903) he is teaching German in Lebanon Valley College. 

On June 22, 1888, Prof. Stein was united in marriage with Sadie E. 
M. Campbell, who was born at Linden Hall, Center county, Pa., a daughter 
of George W. and Eliza i\I. Campbell, both of whom were born in Center 
county, the former February 4, 1820 (died November 15, 1896), and the 
latter January 15, 1828. The children of these parents were as follows: Eliza- 
beth is deceased; David M., born January 18, 1849, resides in Linden Hall; 
John Elmer, born August 14, 1850, is also at home: Sarah Margaret, born 
October 26. 1852, is the wife of Prof. Stein; Jane Ella, born March 13, 
1856, died August 27, 1865; Mary W., born in 1858. died in infancy; Mary 
W. (2), born May 26. i860, died Jan. 15, 1865: Nannie, born April 18, 
1862, married James C. Gilliland, in 1894, and resides at Oak Hall, Center 
county; and George W., born May 3, 1871, died August 17, 1876. 

HENRY SHENK, a retired merchant, now living at his elegant home 
on Cumberland street, Lebanon, Pa., has been widely known in his vicinity for 
many years. He was born in Heidelberg township, Lebanon county, August 
5, 1828, and comes of one of the oldest families of his section. 

John Shenk, great-grandfather of Henry Shenk, was one of the first 
pioneers of Lebanon county, and settled before the Revolution at the old 
homestead, which is still in existence, a place called Buffalo Springs, and situ- 
ated in Heidelberg township, Lebanon county, being seven miles southeast of 
the city of Lebanon. 

Joseph Shenk. son of John and grandfather of Henry Shenk. was one 
of the early Lebanon county farmers. He was born October 12, 1779, and was 
married October 17. 1802, to Fannie Ober, of Mastersonville, Lancaster 
countv. Thev had eighteen children, namely: John, Barbara, Jacob (father 




tlj w 




BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 89 

of Henry), Elizabeth, Henry, Mary, Fannie, Joseph, Mary, Mohy, Catherine, 
Annie, Rebecca, John, Sarah, Lydia, Susanna, and one unnamed. Mrs. Fannie 
(Ober) Shenk died April 23, 1856. At her death there were living eighty 
grandchildren and thirty-two great-grandchildren. 

Jacob Shenk, father of Henry, was born in 1S06, and resided in Lebanon 
County throughout his life. Reared to farm work, upon reaching manhood 
he continued that occupation, and became one of the most progressive and 
successful agriculturists of his section. In early manhood he married Magda- 
lena Miller, and they had eight children : Henry is mentioned below : Joseph 
and Fannie are now deceased ; John lives retired in Illinois ; Christian is a resi- 
dent of Lebanon ; Catherine married Abraham Oberholtzer, of Lebanon ; Jacob 
M. is living in retirement in Lebanon; and Michael, the youngest, is also a resi- 
dent of Lebanon. Jacob Shenk, the father, was a man of ability, and a thor- 
ough Christian gentleman. In religious sentiment he belonged to the Re- 
formed church, and in politics he affiliated with the Republicans. He died in 
1874. 

Henry Shenk remained on the home farm until he was eighteen, receiving 
his education in the public schools of his neighborhood, and his physical train- 
ing through vigorous farm labor. Upon leaving home he went to Berks 
county, and secured a position as clerk in a general store. Here he remained 
for a number of years, acquiring an experience, which he afterward turned to 
good account. Possessed of a superior amount of prudence and keen business 
insight, he was enabled during this period, though receiving by no means a 
munificent salary, to lay aside the neat little sum of three hundred dollars, 
with which to start in business by himself. With this small sum, in 1851, 
he courageously opened a store of his own at Hamlin, Lebanon county. This 
he conducted with much success for six years, when he sold out and engaged as 
clerk in the George & Pile establishment in Lebanon. After two years, how- 
ever, seeing a good opening for a clothing store, he purchased a stock of 
Reizenstein & Bro., and again went into business by himself. Three years 
later he closed out his supply of clothing, which he replaced by a large stock of 
dry goods. After a prosperous period he disposed of his Lebanon business 
entirely, and, moving to Philadelphia, became a salesman for Hood. Bonbright 
& Co., and so remunerative was this business that he continued it for ten 
years. Having by this time amassed considerable wealth, he now. in company 
with a Mr. Hall, under the firm name of Hall, Shenk & Co., opened a large 
wholesale dry goods house in Philadelphia, which he continued with his usual 
success, for eight years. After a few more years in Philadelphia he returned 
to his old home in Lebanon, where he has since remained. 



go BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

About the time of starting into business by himself, in January, 185 1, 
Mr. Shenk married Ehzabeth Groh, of Lebanon county, who was born in 1830, 
daughter of Henry Groh, a resident of the county. She was a faithful help- 
mate for many years, and died in 1896. By her, Mr. Shenk had four children, 
three of whom grew to maturity, but Mary and Catherine are now deceased; 
and Harry J., who is engaged in the dry goods business with C. & H. J. Shenk, 
of I-ebanon, married Elizabeth Sarah Beaumont Hempstead, of Philadelphia, 
and they have two children, Henry DeLos Shenk and Beatrice Elizabeth 
Shenk. 

Mr. Shenk is an exceptionally well-preser\ed man for one of his years, 
and possesses a remarkable memory. In manner, he is affable and kind, and he 
wins the friendship of all who know him. Though he has centered his forces 
upon business, he has always manifested a keen interest in politics, and he votes 
the Republican ticket. Religiously he l^elongs to the Old Lutheran Church of 
Lebanon ; and fraternally affiliates with the I. O. O. F. Strict attention to 
business, an unlimited capacity for work, frugality, and temperate habits have 
been promoters of his success. 

WILLIAM ALILT, during his active life an honored resident of Leba- 
non county, was born in North Annville township, in 1827, and died in 
1872. His ancestors, more thoroughly German in their personal character- 
istics, spelled their name Auldt, and lived and flourished in the State of 
Maryland, longer ago than authentic records extend. The fertile acres upon 
which they gathered their crops and fed their kine constituted what is now 
the immediate vicinity of the capital of the L^nited States, although later 
members of the family entered the ranks of commerce and trade, as indi- 
cated by William Ault, the father of the above mentioned William, who was 
a tanner by trade, as well as a farmer. The father married Elizabeth 
Black, who, like himself, was a native of the State of Maryland, and who 
bore him several children. 

As was natural under the circumstances, William Ault, the younger, 
grew up in the shadow of the tannerv, and while still young had a fair 
understanding of the business. Although so many 3'ears have passed since 
he passed from the familiar haunts of Lebanon county, he is recalled as 
possessing good business ability, and traits of character which won him a 
high place in the community. Of him it may be said that his marriage was 
the turning point in his career, for thereby he received an added inspiration 
to well doing. His wife and helpmate was formerly Mary A. Reisner, of 
Lebanon countv, a daughter of lohn Reisner. who came from Germanv ta 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 91 

America when sixteen years of age. The marriage, consummated in 1855, 
resulted in the birth of seven children, five of whom grew to maturity : 
Albert C, a resident of Illinois; William, deceased; Emma L., also living 
in Lebanon; Clara C, of Sacramento, Cal. ; and ]\Iinnie E., the wife of 
William Karch, and the mother of three children, Ralph, Catherine and 
Ruth. Mr. Karch is one of the promising and very enterprising young 
business men of Lebanon, a stanch Republican, and an active member of 
the Evangelical church. 

Special mention is due Mrs. William Ault, who, after her husband's 
death, came to Lebanon with her children to support, and with but a hundred 
dollars to her name. Like the Spartan mothers of old her sole thought 
•was for the education and training of those entrusted to her care, and in 
the light of so urgent a responsibility opportunities seemed to unfold for her 
development and utility. W^ith her little hoard she opened a shop on Cum- 
berland street, Lebanon, and here, for thirty years, conducted a millinery 
establishment, which grew in proportions as her reputation for skill and 
reliability became known. She was thus enabled not only to fulfill her 
expectations in regard to her children, but managed to save considerable 
money over and above expenses, which was invested in valuable property 
at Nos. 708, 710 and 712 East Cumberland street. She possessed truly 
remarkable financial ability, and by her tact and genial per.sonality won 
and kept the trade of the best and most exacting people for miles around. 
She was more than a business woman, for her strong character penetrated 
manv avenues of usefulness, and she was equally at home in society and 
church. .A.n active and enthusiastic member of the Evangelical church, she 
was a teacher in the Sunday-school for many years, a regular attendant 
at prayer meeting and general services, and a promoter of all lines of church 
work. She was also a stanch promoter of temperance, and one of the hardest 
workers in the W^omen's Christian Temperance L^nion of Pennsylvania. A 
truly fine and noble woman, she inspired the love and esteem of all with 
whom she was associated, and her death caused a void possible only through 
the loss of one gifted with such largeness of heart, great moral and intel- 
lectual strength, and many sided usefulness. 

CYRLTS HITZ, one of the well-known farmers of South Annville town- 
ship, Lebanon countv. Pa., whose long agricultural experience enables him 
to operate successfully one of the finest farms of his section, was born in 
Cornwall township, Lebanon county, October 10, 183 1, a son of Lantz Hitz. 
who was born in Germany. 



92 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Lantz Hitz started for x^merica when still a lad, but the parents and 
all but two of the children died on board ship without ever seeing the land 
of their hopes. The brother and sister who survived were cared for and 
bound out to service to different parties, Lantz falling into the hands of 
a very hard master, who resided near Philadelphia. The child endured 
unkind treatment for three years, and then ran away, finally reaching Corn- 
wall township. Here he found work and friends, and later married Mary 
Fees, a daughter of Samuel Fees, and in the course of time moved to South 
Annville township, where he was employed on the Gingrich farm. His 
industry brought him success, and when he died he owned a farm of his own, 
located on the Horseshoe turnpike road, near Fontana. To him and his wife 
were born children as follows : John, who resides in Kansas ; George, residing 
at South Bend, Ind. ; Maria, who married Joseph Dessinger, and is deceased ; 
Mollie, deceased; Joseph, deceased; Cyrus, mentioned below-; Sally, deceased; 
Lantz, who resides at Annville; Katie, who married Samuel Kellar, of Camp- 
Tjelltown ; Henry and Adam, twins, the former a resident of Alount Pleasant, 
and the latter of Hummelstown; Da\'id, deceased, who resided near Eliza- 
bethtown; and Samuel, deceased. 

In 1861 Cyrus Hitz began farming for himself on the Behm farm, 
near Annville, where he remained several years, moving then to a farm on 
the Reading turnpike road, where he spent two years. Later he carried on 
a farm on the Reading turnpike, at another location, for two more years. 
Mr. Hitz then took charge of the old Bachman farm at Fontana, where he 
engaged in farming for eight years, in 1876 purchasing the John A. Heisey 
farm, comprising ninety-four acres, located on the Horseshoe turnpike road, 
where he has since resided, gradually adding improvements, building his 
commodious barn in 1885, and making an addition to his residence in 1895, 
both being comfortable and well suited to the wants of the family. 

The marriage of Mr. Hitz was to Elizabeth Hoffer, who was born on the 
Horseshoe pike, August 7, 1839, daughter of George and Anna (Gingrich) 
Hoffer, and granddaughter of Christian Gingrich. Her death occurred May 
26, 1902. To Mr. Hitz and wife were born the following named children : 
Anna, born May 13, i860, married Albert Ressor, and they have four children. 
Harry, Ellen, Anna and Hoffer. Lizzie Agnes, born September 9, 1863. 
married William Bachman, who is teller in the Lebanon County Trust Com- 
pany, and resides at Annville; their children are Clarence, Lizzie and Walter. 
Ida F., torn October 26. 1865. died March 31, 1870. Emma R., born Octo- 
ber 13, 1868, married Joseph Westenberger, of South Annville township. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 93 

and has a family, and Valeria E., born January 26, 1875, is at home. Mr. 
Hitz and his family belong- to the United Christian church, in which they 
are hi,s;hly esteemed. In political sympathy he is a Democrat.' 

HENRY BUCHER. a retired farmer of Jackson township, of good 
citizenship and large means, was born October 6, 1835, in South Lebanon 
township, near Cornwall, a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Schoak) Bucher. 

The Bucher family originated in Switzerland, from which country 
came three brothers to America, all locating in the State of Pennsylvania, 
one in Lancaster county, another in Lebanon county, while the third settled 
in Cumberland county. Dr. Benedict Bucher, the grandfather of Henry 
Bucher, sprang from the brother who settled in Lebanon county, and was 
born in South Lebanon township, where he married and reared these chil- 
dren : Jacob, Henry, John, Christian, Benedict, Susan and Mary. 

Henry Bucher, the son of Dr. Benedict, and the father of Henry, was 
born Eebruary 6, 1798, and died in 1872, having been one of the thrifty, 
honest and respected farmers of South Lebanon township. His five children 
bore these names: Mary, the wife of Dr. Smith, of Bismarck, Lebanon 
county; Catherine, the widow of Joseph Horst, of Horst Mills, Lebanon 
county; Dr. B. D., a physician of Lebanon; and Miss Lavina, who resides 
with her brother Henry. 

Henry Bucher was the youngest of his parents' children, and was reared 
on the farm, and was given the best education the local schools afforded, 
early becoming interested in farming, which he has followed all his life Avith 
eminent success. Although manhood found him without much capital, he 
possessed good habits and was industrious and economical. In the evenin.g 
of life he is able to enjoy the fruits of his labors, owning one of the best 
farms of his township, comprising 109 acres, and having here a comfortable 
residence and a fine brick barn, which is both handsome and substantial. • 
In addition to this fine property Mr. Bucher owns a nice home in Myers- 
town. Mr. Bucher has been a practical farmer, and his careful methods 
have resulted in a productive and A'aluable farm. 

In 1864 Mr. Bucher married Miss Catherine Dohner, daughter of Jacol) 
Dohner. of South Lebanon township, and seven children were born to this 
union, namely: Monroe, of Myerstown ; Henry J., a bookkeeper, of Wil- 
mington, N. C. ; Miss Ada M. and Solomon, at home; Rosa, the wife of 
Martin Hertzler, of Richland; Calvin, of Bridgeport, Pa.: and one 
child that is deceased. The religious membership of the family is in the 
Myerstown Reformed church. In politics Mr. Bucher has been actively 



94 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

identified with the Democratic party, and has frequently been called upon 
to accept off.ce, and has served very satisfactorily as school director, judge 
of elections, and as one of the most competent auditors the township ever 
had. All his life he has taken a deep interest in public affairs, and has 
been liberal in contributing to worthy enterprises, and in every way is a 
most estimable and worthy citizen of Jackson township. 

KREIDER. One of the earliest settlers of North Lebanon township, 
Lebanon county, was John Kreider, the great-grandfather of Jacob K. 
Kreider, of Cornwall township. The old home has sheltered fovir genera- 
tions of Kreiders, but has now passed into the possession of Henry L. Long 
and his son, John, of Fairland and Cleona. This old farm, beautifully 
located just north of the village, was long considered one of the most 
valuable in this part of the county. 

Michael Kreider, son of John, was lx)rn on this old homestead, and 
spent his whole life here, engaging in agricultural pursuits and becoming 
a man of means and influence. By marriage he became connected with the 
Staver family, and five children were born to him, three sons and two 
daughters, namely: John, who was a farmer of North Annville township; 
Tobias, the father of Jacob K. ; Christian, a farmer of Cornwall township; 
one daughter, who became the wife of John Bachman, of South Annville 
township; and the other, the wife of Benjamin Moyer. of North Annville 
township. 

Tobias Kreider was also born on the old homestead, and lived there 
through life, becoming a wealthy and leading farmer of the township. He 
accumulated much property, owning three fine farms and a mill, and in addi- 
tion did distilling. Eor many years both he and wife were consistent and 
active members of the United Brethren church, in which he was a class 
leader. Tobias Kreider was twice married, first to Catherine Kreider, who 
became the mother of four children, two of w-honi died in infancy: John 
died unmarried; and Mary married Christian Bomberger. The second 
marriage of Mr. Kreider was to Maria Kreider, a sister of his first wnfe, 
and seven children were born to this union: Michael, deceased, who w^as 
a farmer on the old homestead in North Lebanon township : Josiah, deceased, 
who was a farmer in South Annville township ; Jacob K. ; Tobias, who is a 
farmer of North Cornwall township; Eliza, deceased wife of John H. Yingst, 
Sr.. of Lebanon; Sarah, the wife of Peter Shenk, of South Annville town- 
ship; and Leah, who is the wife of Abraham Meyer, of North Annville 
township. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 95 

Bishop Jacob K. Kketder was born July 24, 1838, on the old family 
homestead, and he was educated in the common schools, occupying himself 
with farm work. VMien about twenty-three }ears old he was married, and 
then located on a farm of 116 acres, located about one mile west of Lebanon, 
in North Cornwall township, and here he successfully engaged in farming 
for twehe jears. retiring then from activity. Mr. Kreider at that time 
erected one of the finest brick residences in this part of the county, at 
Fairhnd, on the Reathng and Harrisburg Pike road, in the northwestern 
corner of North Cornwall township, surrounded with beautiful grounds 
some thirteen acres in extent. Mr. Kreider owns another property in the 
same locality. For a long period he has been one of the substantial men 
of th.e county and prominent in its affairs, a man of excellent business judg- 
ment and unimpeachable nitegrity. 

On November 22, 18G0, Mr. Kreider was married to Elizabeth Myer, 
daughter of John and Mary (Royer) Myer, born May 9, 1843, in North Ann- 
ville township. Both Mr. and Mrs. Kreider are valued members of the River 
Brethren church, in which he has been active since young manhood. In 1871 
he was ordained a minister in the church and in 1887 was made a bishop, 
the only one in Lebanon county raised to that high ecclesiastical office. His 
bishopric covers Lebanon and a part of Dau])hin ccnnity, and few men of 
his religious faith in this part of the State can show more satisfactory results 
of work done in this line. The church ;it Fairland was erected under his super- 
vision, as were also the church at Harrisburg, and the one at Hummelstown. 
His ministrations have been wonderfully blessed, and he is much respected and 
belo\'cd among the people who have known him from childhood. 

REUBEN A. SHAAK, one of the well known and highly respected 
citizens of South Lebanon township, Lebanon county, was born on the old 
homestead in that township Jime 18, 1836, a son of John and Eva (Six) 
Shaak, and a grandson of Philip and Magdalena (Andreas) Shaak. 

Philip Shaak was born March 28, 1765, and died December i, 1855. 
He was a son of Michael Shaak, the founder of the family in America, 
who came hither from his native Switzerland lietween 1750 and 1755. ^s 
records of the latter date show him to have at that time been a resident 
of what was then Lebanon township, Lancaster county, but is now Lebanon 
county and South I,ebanon township. Philip Shaak was a farmer of means 
and prominence, was a man of the highest personal character, and for years 
was an elder in the Reformed church. His life covered over ninety years, 
and he died one of the most substantial as well as most respected men of 



96 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

the townsliip. His children nunil)ered seven, as follows: John; Philip, a 
farmer and horse dealer: Jacoh, who left no family; Rudolph, a farmer; 
Catherine, who died unmarried; Elizabeth, who married Henry Bucher; 
and Anna, who married Benjamin Zeller. 

John Shaak, the eldest member of the family, was born February 24, 
1705. on the old homestead in South Lebanon township, and was reared 
to agricultural pursuits, becoming one of the most successful farmers of 
his vicinity, owning several of the most valuable farms. Air. Shaak was 
prominent in all progressive movements, served as director of the poor, and 
could always be depended upon to assist in all benevolent and charitable 
enterprises. For many years he was active in the Avork of the Reformed 
church, belonging to its ofHcial board and contributing to the continuance 
of its missionary and other w-ork. His death occurred June 16, 1881. He 
married Eva Six, who was born January 24. 1799, in Lebanon county, and 
died July 31, 1S56, at the age of fifty-seven years. They had a family of 
eleven children, namely: Louisa (deceased), wife of John Arndt, of Jones- 
town, Lebanon county; Elizabeth (deceased), wife of Jacob Eby, of South 
Lebanon township; Flenry (deceased), a farmer of South Lebanon town- 
ship; John (deceased), also a farmer of South Lebanon township; Catherine 
(deceased), wife of John Troxel, of Jonestown; Matilda, the widow of 
Jacob T. Werner, of Prescott, Lebanon county; Abel, a farmer of South 
Lebanon township ; Reuben A. ; Ann Maria, wife of Uriah Light, of Leba- 
non county; Rebecca, wife of J. Adam Becker, of South Lebanon tow'nship; 
and Philip, who died in early manhood, and was followed by his widow. 

Reuben A. Shaak was reared on the homestead, and was educated in the 
public schools. Until his marriage, Novetiiber 21, 1865, he remained at 
home with, his parents, assisting on the farm. At that time he began farming 
on his own account, being given a part of the old homestead, and on that 
farm Mr. Shaak continued, with the exception of one year, vintil he was 
prepared to retire from active labor. Having one of the finest modern 
homes of his locality, Mr. Shaak retired from the cares of business in 1897. 
He is one of the most substantial as well as one of the most highly respectetl 
citizens of the' township. He was very successful in his farming operations, 
and was one of the most enterprising and progressive among the agricultur- 
ists, keeping posted on nil matters relating to his line of work. He and his 
family rank among the intelligent and cultured people of the locality, and 
their home is not only one of thrift and comfort, but of refinement as well. 
At one time Mr. Shaak owned two farms, and still retains seventy-five 
acres where he has lived so long, the other land having been distributed 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 97 

to his family. Mr. Shaak has served ver)' acceptably on the school board, 
hi*? interest in educational advancement having been sincere and constant. 

In 1865 Mr. Shaak was married to Christiann Heilman, who was born 
May 23, 1839, daughter of John and Susannah (Urich) Heilman, of Heil- 
mandale. Four children were born to this union, as follows : Sallie. the 
wife of Samuel Sprecher, a cattle dealer of Cornwall township; Minnie 
E., the wife of Miles H. Shaak, a farmer of South Lebanon township; John 
H.. a farmer of South Lebanon township, who married Amy L. Royer; 
and Adam J., a farmer on the old homestead, who married Mary E. Ruhl. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Fleilman have passed away, the father's death 
occurring in 1S74. He was a son of Philip Heilman, whose wife's maiden 
name was Beard. The mother of Mrs. Shaak died at the home of her 
daughter, June 11, 1889, aged seventy-three years. They were the parents 
of four children, namely: Christiann; John Adam, who died in i860, 
unmarried; Sarah, who was the wife of Frank Heilman, and died in 1864; 
and Eliza, who died unmarried in 1868. They belonged to the Reformed 
church. 

Both Mr. Shaak and his wife are consistent members of the Reformed 
chinxh, and for some time he has been one of its elders. They are very 
much respected in South Lebanon township, and belong to the very best 
people of their neighborhood. 

ISAAC V. MILLER. Among the successful and highly respected 
farmers of Jackson township, Lebanon county, is Isaac V. Miller, who, 
through his own industry and foresight, has attained his present gratifying 
position. He was born in Jackson township, November 2, 1836, a son of 
Jonathan and Elizabeth (Haak) Miller, now deceased, who were natives 
of Lebanon county. 

Jonathan Miller was a son of Valentine Miller, whose father, first name 
unknown came from Germany long before the Revolutionary war, and 
founded the family in this country. Valentine Miller lived to be ninety-four 
years of age, and was the father of three children: Jonathan, Leonard and 
Cyrus, all now deceased. Jonathan Miller was a farmer by occupation, and 
a hard-working, industrious man. Seven children were born to himself and 
wife: Isaac V.; Cyrus, of Myerstown ; Jonathan, of Myerstown ; Rebecca, 
married to Curtis Hibshman ; Katherine, deceased; Elizabeth, widow of 
Hiram Seibert; and Lucetta, unmarried. In politics Jonathan Miller was a 
stanch Republican, and took an active part in local afl^airs. although he never 
desired office. His religious connections Avere with the Myerstown Reformed 

7 



98 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

church, in which he served for many years as deacon and elder. At his 
demise the community lost an honorable, upright. Christian man and good 
citizen. 

Isaac V. Miller was reared upon his father's farm and learned thor- 
oughly the business of conducting a farm, afterwards adopting an agricul- 
tural life, which he has followed most successfully. His education was 
obtained in the common schools and at the old Academy, and was supple- 
mented by close observation and reading. His present fine property, which 
was the old Miller homestead, is one of the best in the county, and joins 
the village of Myerstown. Recently he disposed of one acre for $400, and 
five acres more at v$2 50 per acre, to be used for factory purposes, so that 
this holding of his is very valuable. Modern methods are pursued upon the 
farm, and the results are exceedinglv gratifying. 

On November 2^, 1866, Mr. Miller was united in marriage with Miss 
Sarah A. Zinn. of Jackson township, a daughter of John Zinn, a farmer 
of the same township. Mrs. INIiller was a member of the following family: 
Moses, deceased ; Abraham, deceased ; John, of Annville, Pa. ; William, of 
Indiana; Henrv, of Myerstown; Katherine, widow of John Meily, deceased; 
Mary, deceased ; Eliza, wife of David Tice, of Myerstown ; and Sarah A., Mrs. 
Miller. Like his father before him, Mr. Miller is a stanch Republican although 
he has not desired political preferment, but is public-spirited and anxious to pro- 
mote the best interests of the community. Both he and his w-ife are consistent 
members of the L'nited Brethren church, in which for thirty-six years he has 
been elder and trustee, while he is now treasurer of the Sunday school. 
The Miller household is a pleasant one, and a favorite gathering place for 
their many friends. Mr. and Mrs. INIiller have two most charming and 
intelligent daughters, Mary, who lately wedded Ralph J. Coover, a rising- 
young man of Mverstown ; and Miss Elizabeth. All are important factors 
in the social life of the communitv, and have many friends among all who 
know them. 

THOMAS T. ZERBE, M. D. One of the leading citizens of Lebanon 
county, and one of her prominent and successful physicians, is Dr. Thomas T. 
Zerbe, who was born October 24, 1846, in Schaefiferstown, Pa. His father 
was the late Dr. Jonathan Zerbe, long prominent in medical circles and in 
public life. Dr. Jonathan Zerbe was born in historic Tulpehocken. Berks 
county, Pa., in 181 1. and died in Schaefiferstown in 1877. 

Michael Zerbe, the grandfather of Dr. Thomas, was also born in Berks 
county, and came from one of the very old Pennsylvania families. His 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 99 

grandfather came to America from one of the French cantons of Switzer- 
land in the days of Queen Anne. Subsequently he secured a grant of land 
in what is now Berks county, and permanently settled there in 1723. Michael 
Zerbe was the father of a numerous family, which he reared in Berks county. 
His son, Jonathan, grew to manhood on the old home farm, but, at maturity, 
started out to see something- of the world. He spent some time in the State 
of Virginia, where he attended school and acquired that degree of pro- 
ficiency and fluency in the English language which he knew was necessary to 
success in an English-speaking country. On his return to Pennsylvania he 
settled in Schaefferstown, in 1837, where he entered upon the study of medi- 
cine in the office of Dr. John Schertzer, then one of the leading physicians of 
Lebanon county. After attending courses of lectures at Jefferson Medical 
College, and obtaining his degree in medicine, he located at Schaefferstown, 
succeeding to the practice of his old preceptor. There he practiced for many 
years, and became eminent in his chosen profession. Dr. Jonathan Zerbe 
was an ardent Republican in politics, and Avas elected to the General Assembly 
by his party in 1870-71. He aided in the organization of the Republican party 
in Lebanon county, and took an active and aggressive part in the Fremont 
campaign of 1856. He took a deep interest in religious matters, and was an 
active member of the Lutheran Church. 

In October, 1840, Dr. Zerbe married Martha A. Meyer, a daughter of 
Christopher Meyer, an extensive land owner and farmer, and Catharine 
(Krumm) Meyer. Five children were born to this union: Charles M., a 
lawyer, engaged in the practice of his profession at Lebanon, Pa. ; Agnes 
E., the deceased wife of Dr. George Mays, of Philadelphia, Pa. ; Dr. Thomas 
T., the subject of this sketch; Jennie M., the wife of Jacob F. Hickernell, of 
Schaeft'erstown ; Dr. B. Frank, a prominent citizen of Schaefferstown, who 
is not now actively engaged in the practice of his profession, devoting most of 
his time to the cigar manufacturing industry, in which he and Dr. Thomas 
are partners. 

On the maternal side the Zerbe family of Schaefferstown is related to 
the Schaeffer family, whose ancestor in this country, Alexander Schaeffer, 
founded Schaefferstown (then known as Fleidelberg) in 1743. Alexander 
Schaeffer was a native of the LTniversitv to\\n of Heidelberg, in Germany. 

Dr. Thomas T. Zerbe was educated in the public schools and Academy at 
Schaefferstown, and then entered Franklin and Marshall College, at Lan- 
caster, Pa. He read medicine with his father, later graduated from the 
Medical Department of the LTniversitv of Pennsylvania, in the spring- of 1869, 
and ever since has been engaged in the practice of medicine at Schaefferstown. 



loo BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

He is a man of great intelligence, public spirit and general popularity. A 
stanch Republican, he has ably represented his party and Lebanon county in 
the General Assembly, in 1899, and again in 1903. His influence is felt in 
local matters also, and he is a valuable member of the school board. Fratern- 
ally he is a Mason. 

In 1878 the Doctor married Miss Emma E. Taylor, of Charming Forge, 
Berks county, a daughter of William and Maria (Reed) Taylor, deceased. 
Four children have been born of this union : Florence T., Mabel Reed, William 
T.. and Marie Marguerite. 

HARRISON KALBACH. one of the old and well-known citizens of 
Lebanon, is a native of North Heidelberg, Berks county, born April 3, 1832. 

Adam Kalbach, his father, was born in Penn township, Berks county, 
and was a son of Adam, who was also born in Pennsylvania. Adam Kal- 
bach married Catherine Aldhouse, who was born near Reading, Berks county. 
Tlie Kalbachs and tlie Aldhouses are old and substantial families of that 
county. To this marriage six sons and three daughters were born, as fol- 
lows : Sarah, deceased: Harrison; Isaac and Catherine, deceased; Levi; 
William; Amelia, deceased; James; and Amanlon, deceased. 

Mr. Kalbach worked on the farm until he was about twenty-two years 
of age, wlien he was married, and then went to work in the Penn Mills, 
owned by his father-in-law, John Staudt, which were located in Penn town- 
ship. Here he continued for eight years, during a part of the time being 
part owner of the mills. During this time he also owned a patent right on 
a water wheel, which was manufactured at Bernville, Berks county, and 
a part of Mr. Kalbacli's time was spent at that manufacturing. He also 
built canal boats and other small craft while engaged at Penn Mills, and 
later engaged in the lumber business, buying standing timber and cutting 
and hauling the same to Penn Mills, where it was manufactured. Mr. 
Kalbach has been engaged in the lumber business extensively and exclusively 
for a number of years, and now is one of the largest operators in this section 
of the State. Besides the Penn Mills, he owns and operates seven portable 
saw mills, in Dauphin, Franklin, Cumberland and Fulton counties, in Penn- 
sylvania and \Vest Virginia. At the present time, in company with his 
son, Aleson Z., and son-in-law, M. J. Fox, Mr. Kalbach is engaged in cut- 
ting timber on a 4,800-acre tract in Fulton county. They are building a 
3-foot gauge railroad from Richmond to a saw mill (three and a half miles) 
and through the timber, in all about ten miles. They run two mills along 
this track. Mr. Kalbach is also installing electric power at Penn Mills, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. loi 

is running wires to Bernville for lighting the stores, hotels and churches, 
as well as the town. He also intends to furnish power to run motors, and 
will use the water power to run the dynamos. In 1885 Mr. Kalbach removed 
to Lebanon, but soon afterward returned to Berks county. In 1887, how- 
ever, he located in Lebanon, permanently, and erected his handsome resi- 
dence on the corner of Cumberland and Third streets. ]Mr. Kalbach is the 
holder of valuable improved property in Lebanon, owning a niimber of fine 
brick residences on the principal streets of the city. 

On October 26. 1854, Mr. Kalbach married Catherine Staudt, who 
was born in Penn township, Berks county, Pa., April 13, 1836, daughter of 
John Staudt. She died September 9, 1S99. To this union children were 
born as follows: Morgan Davius, born April 13, 1856, in Penn township; 
Levi Harrison, born September 20, 1857, in Penn township; INIilton Cle- 
ment, born May 12, 1859, in Penn township, died October 12. 1859; Mary 
Catherine, born February 7, 1861, in Penn township, married M. J. Fox, 
of Schaefferstown, Pa., and they now live in Carlisle, Pa.; Adam Calvin, 
born July 26, 1863, in Penn township, met death by being run over by the 
cars at Fast St. Louis. 111., in September, 1900; William, born January 8, 
1866. in Penn township; Emma Jane, born November 28, 1869, in North 
Heidelberg, married Harry Gountey, of Allentown, Pa.; Aleson Z., born 
September 18, 1873, i" North Heidelberg; Sallie Agnes, born April 5. 1876, 
in Penn township, married Irvin Eashman, of Lebanon; and Minnie Laura, 
born Augxist 10, 1879. in Penn township. Mr. Kalbach is a member of 
the Reformed church, and liberally supports the same. In politics he belongs 
to the Republican party. 

THOMAS LEVAN BECKER, president of the Lebanon National 
Bank, and a well-known surveyor and conveyancer, has for about twenty 
years been a leading business man of Millbach. He is a lineal descendant of 
Jacob Becker, the first American representative of the family, who came 
from Germany some time prior to 1734, and settled in what is now Lebanon 
county, where, in the year 1741, he received from John, Thomas and Richard 
Penn a large land grant. By his marriage there v.'ere two sons : John, who 
is mentioned below ; and George. 

John Becker, son of the emigrant, was a prosperous farmer and influen- 
tial citizen of Millcreek township. He married and had seven children: 
Michael ; John Adam, who is mentioned below ; Cathryn Hoffman ; Elizabeth 
Strickler ; Barbara Moore ; Ann Amelia ; and Margaret, who died single. 
' ■ John Adam Becker, grandfather of Thomas L., was born on the Mill- 



I02 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

creek homestead, and there grew to manhood. Reared to farm work, upon 
reaching manhood he followed that occupation for his life work, and settled 
on the old Becker homestead in Millcreek township. Prospering in his busi- 
ness he made a g'ood home for himself and family, and was one of the leading 
men of the township. By his marriage there were four children : John, who 
is mentioned below ; Michael ; Sarah, who married Capt. Tice, a prominent 
officer of the Civil war; and Elizabeth, who was married to George Moyer. 

John Becker, father of Ihomas L., also a thrifty farmer of Millcreek 
township, was born in 1813, and in a comfortable home grew to manhood. 
Reared to a life of strong activity, upon reaching manhood he was well 
prepared to shoulder the responsibilities of life, and deciding to follow agri- 
culture, he settled upon the old homestead farm in Millcreek township. This 
he improved, cultivated extensively, and made into one of the most attractive 
pieces of property in the vicinity. Wise management brought in good money 
returns for his labor, and he prospered from the start. He spent the strength 
of the greater part of his manhood on this farm, and near here in 1884 he died. 
About 1833 he married Caroline Stump, daughter of Leonard Stump, of one 
of the old families of Millcreek township, and of this union there were nine 
children: Willoughby, now deceased, who was a prominent agriculturist of 
Millcreek township ; John Adam, of South Lebanon township ; Mary, who 
married J. Henry Bennetch ; Elizabeth, who married J. M. Zimmerman, a 
farmer of Millcreek; Emma, who married Aaron Bollinger, of Richland. b<3th 
now deceased; Agnes J., who married JL.evi R. Bollinger; Amanda, widow 
of George U^. .Seibert, now residing in Richland ; Thomas Levan, mentioned 
below ; and Ida, who died in childhood. The mother of this family died on 
the old homestead in 1882. John Becker, the father of this family, was a 
strong energetic farmer, and a leading man in the public affairs of the town- 
ship. Marked business and executive ability won him the confidence of the 
community, and he very ably served at different times in various local offices. 
In politics he was a strong Democrat; and in religious views he was liberal. 
As a large stockholder in the Lebanon National Bank he acted as director for 
twenty-five years, until the time of his death. 

Thomas Levan Becker is about forty-eight years old, and a strong man 
physically and intellectually. He is the product of careful schooling, good 
healthful farin life, and practical business training. On the old Becker home- 
stead, in Millcreek township, he grew^ to manhood, and in the district schools 
of his neighborhood procured his early education. Like the average farm boy 
of his time he was assigned to home tasks ; and in the performance of them, as 
well as in the mastery of his studies in school, evinced marked originality and 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 103 

above ordinary ability. At an early age he entered the Palatinate College, 
of Myerstown, and later the Millersville State Normal School, where he cul- 
tivated his literary and scientific studies. A good mathematician, also pos- 
sessed of considerable legal knowledge, upon lea\ing school he opened an 
office in Millbach, and engaged in surveying and conveyancing. A master of 
each work he secured at once plenty of business, which has steadily increased 
from vear to vear. Deriving from it a large income he has continued to follow 
it steadily, and is still engaged in the business. He has made a special success 
of conveyancing, and has served as administrator and executor for many 
important estates, including the one connected with the celebrated Texter will 
case. In 1885 he succeeded his father as director of the Lebanon National 
Bank, and upon the death of Grant Weidman he was made president, a posi- 
tion which he is still filling with marked ability. He is also a director in The 
Sinking .Spring Fire Insurance Company of Reading, Pa. Besides his many 
other ventures Air. Becker has throughout his career given considerable atten- 
tion to agriculture, and he now possesses a splendid, w^ell-improved 300 acres 
of farm land. 

In 1882 Mr. Becker married Alaria Stewart, of Millcreek. only daughter 
of Uriah B. Stewart, a prominent surveyor and conveyancer, of Millcreek 
tov/nship, who married Maria Kahl. Five children have been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Becker, only one of whom is now living: Clarence D. Mr. Becker 
has always been a man of many interests, and possessed of marked executive 
ability, and he has managed his various affairs with thoroughness and 
fidelity. In politics a stanch Republican he has been active in local affairs, 
and has ser\-ed his township very efficiently as notary public for seventeen 
years. Socially few if any stand higher in the community. 

WILLIAM PATSCHKE, a citizen of Lebanon who has overcome many 
difficulties while forging his way to the front as an extensive brick manufac- 
turer, is a typical German American, and worthy of all honor as an industrious 
and helpful member of society. He was born in Baden. Germany, October 
20, 1838, a son of George and Mary (Shillinger) Patschke, who died after 
emigrating to America. The parents had a large family of children, as follows : 
William; Charles; Louise; Fredericka, who died on the ocean while on the way 
to America; Julius, who died in infancy; and George. By a second wife 
George Patschke had the following children : John F. ; Julius ; Edward ; Levi ; 
Amelia, the wife of A. C. Crawford, a merchant of Lebanon; Earhart ; Benja- 
min F. ; Wesley ; Sarah ; Annie ; and Luther. George Patschke was lx)rn in 
Baden, Germany, about 1815, and died in Lebanon in 1890. He was for many 



I04 BIOGBAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

years a well known and useful citizen in Lebanon, to which city he emigrated 
with his family in 1852. 

William Patschke came to America five years after the rest of his family, 
and at the time he was nineteen years of age. He soon after took up his resi- 
dence in Lebanon, and at the time he had not a dollar to his name, and was 
absolutely without influence of any kind. He found work as a day laborer in 
a stone quarry, and was later employed in a brick yard, where he became inter- 
ested in the work to which his mature years were devoted. He subsequently 
worked on the old Union canal, and at the breaking out of the Civil war went 
to Peru, Ind.. and found employment in a brewery. About 1864 he returned 
to Lebanon and obtained a temporary position with the government at Union 
Deposit, and later worked in a Lebanon brewery. His interest in his adopted 
country resulted in his enlistment, February 21, 1865, in the Thirteenth Penn- 
sylvania Cavalry, as a volunteer, and he was sent to North Carolina and Vir- 
ginia, where he rendered service under General Sherman. After his honorable 
discharge in August, 1865, he returned to Lebanon and worked in the brewery 
of Henry Hartman, afterward embarking in the brick manufacturing business 
in partnership with Jacob Moeckel, an arrangement amipably and satisfactorily 
continued for about twenty-two years. During this time Mr. Patschke 
accumulated a competence, and he now owns considerable valuable property 
in the city. 

Through his marriage with Mrs. Lydia Billman, nee Brandt, Mr. Patschke 
is the father of two children, Edwin W., and Lydia L. In politics he has 
always been a Republican, but has taken advance ground of his partv on the 
temperance question. Himself and family are associated with the Seventh 
Street Lutheran Church of Lebanon, of which he has been treasurer and 
trustee, and he is one of the leadmg supporters of the church. As one of the 
foremost citizens of the Lebanon Independent District he has served as school 
director and tax collector, and has been closely allied with events of importance 
to the advancement of the locality. He is public spirited and enterprising, and 
endowed with high moral sense, tact and kindliness. 

JACOB M. SHENK, prominent citizen and capitalist of Lebanon, Pa., 
was born on the old Shenk homestead in Heidelberg township, Lebanon 
county, Pa., January 31, 1847, son of Jacob and Magdalene (Miller) Shenk, 
the former of whom was a native of Heidelberg township, and the latter of 
Schaefferstown, Lebanon county. The paternal grandfather was Joseph 
Shenk (then spelled Schenck), also bom in Heidelberg township, and his 
father was a native of Holland, who emigrated to the United States during 




J C^ jJA^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 105 

the seventeenth century, and founded the Shenk homestead in Heidelberg 
township, now owned by Samuel Brubaker. The old Shenk mansion still 
stands, and is one of the finest residences in the valley. 

Jacob M. Shenk was reared on the old home farm until he attained his 
majority, receiving a good English education. In 1868 he left the farm to 
come to Lebanon to accept a position in the store of his brother. One year 
later he went West, and at Sterling, 111, he became a member of the firm of 
Edson, Shenk & Martin, dry-goods merchants. In December, 1873, however, 
Mr. Shenk sold his interest in the above firm, and, returning East, engaged 
in the dry-goods, carpets and queensware business with his brother, Christian. 
Ten years later he disposed of his interest in the dry-goods department oi 
this establishment, continuing, however, in the c^ueensware and carpet depart- 
ments until 1892. j\Ir. Shenk has been prominently identified with many of 
the principal industries and enterprises of Lebanon, a number of which he has 
assisted in organizing. In 1887 he built the Lebanon Electric Light Plant, was 
made president of the corporation, and continued as such until its consolidation 
in 1900. In 1891-92, he built the Lebanon & Annville Electric Street Railway, 
of which he became president and general manager, filling these important 
offices until the sale of the property to the United Power & Transportation 
Company in 1898. In 1891-92, he built the Eighth Street Market House, 
Lebanon (one of the finest buildings in the city), and was made president 
of the Alarket House Company, holding that position at the present time. 
In 1896 he purchased an interest in the Lebanon Iron Company, was elected 
president of the same, and held that office until the corporation was merged 
into the American Iron & Steel Company. He was president of the Lake 
Conewago Ice Company, until its absorption by the United Ice & Coal 
Company, of Harrisburg, of which company he is a director. Mr. Shenk was 
vice-president of the Lebanon Mutual Fire Insurance Company, for eleven 
years, director twenty-five years, and was elected president upon the death of 
John Meily, in April, 1902. He was a director of the Lebanon Trust & Safety 
Deposit Company, and after the collapse of the same was made assignee. 

On May i, 1873, Mr. Shenk married Lydia, daughter of Daniel Stichter, 
one of the leading citizens of Lebanon, born in 1847, on the site of the present 
dry-goods store of C. & H. J. Shenk, on Cumberland street. 'Sirs. Shenk died 
June 10, 1883, leaving one daughter, Katherine Veronica, who died at Colo- 
rado Springs, Colo., August 8, 1901. She was educated in the Lebanon high 
school, finishing at Miss Cooper's School in New York City. Mr. Shenk was 
a thirty-second degree Mason, and a Mystic Shriner; also a member of the 
Royal Arcanum. Being a very prominent Republican, he has served his party 



io6 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

upon numerous occasions, and has served in tlie city council as well as dele- 
gate to many County and State Conventions. He is treasurer and a trustee 
of the Wernersville Insane Asylum, appointed first by Gov. Hastings, and re- 
appointed by Gov. Stone. He is also a director of Good Samaritan Hospital, 
and a member of the Ad\'isory Board of the Widows' Home, Lebanon. In 
every relation of life Mr. Shenk has demonstrated his ability to regulate vast 
affairs, and to- lead to' successful fruition mammoth financial enterprises, while 
as a public official, his record has been unblemished. 

JOSEPH LONG KREIDER, a well-known retired farmer of Lebanon 
county, residing on the line separating South and North Annville townships, 
was born on his father's farm (now owned by Andrew Kreider) December 
20, 1834, a .son of Jacob and Mary (Long) Kreider. The father was born in 
South Lebanon township in 181 2, and died in 1874. He married Mary Long, 
who was born on the old Long homestead in South Annville township (now 
owned by Mr. Kreider) in 1819, daughter of Joseph Long, and died in 1889. 
Joseph Long, the maternal grandfather, was a son of Christian (3), grandson 
of Christian (2), and great-grandson of Christian (i), who took up 400 acres 
of land from the Penns. which was then included in Lancaster county, later in 
Dauphin, and is now in South Annville township, Lebanon county, lying along 
the Berks and Dauphin turnpike. 

The paternal grandparents of Joseph Kreider were Henry and Christiana 
(Wittemeyer) Kreider, the former of whom was born on the old Kreider 
homestead, located on Snitz Creek, now in North Cornwall township, Lebanon 
county, September 25, 1774. and died April 9, 1835. His wife was born 
August 3, 1807, daughter of Ludwig Wittemeyer, and died August 3, 1864. 
The great-grandfather Kreider was named Jacob, was born in Lancaster 
county, and was a descendant of four brothers of that name who emigrated 
from Europe (either Germany or Switzerland). He married and began 
housekeeping on Snitz creek, in North Cornwall, about three miles from the 
city of Lebanon, where he lived out his long life and reared a large family. 

The chiildren of Jacob Kreider and his wife Mary Long were as follows: 
Joseph L. ; William L., of Palmyra, Lebanon county; Henry L., of Cleona, 
Lebanon county; Abraham L.. of the State of Washington; Benjamin L., of 
Cleona, Lebanon county; and Sarah, who married Adam Moyer, of Palmyra. 

Joseph Long Kreider was reared upon his father's farm, and received a 
good common-school education, remaining at home until his marriage, when 
he began farming for himself on a farm on the Berks and Dauphin turnpike. 
In 1870 he removed to his present farm (the old Long homestead), which he 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 107 

continues to operate, although he does not make his home upon it, having 
erected a handsome home on the pike in 1893. His farm now comprises no 
acres, he having sold a portion of his property, on which part of Fairland now 
stands. Mr. Kreider has served most acceptably as school director of South 
Annville township. His religious connection is with the River Brethren 
Church. 

On October 19, 1857, Air. Kreider was married to Leah Moyer, born in 
North Annville township, Lebanon county, April t8, 1837, a daughter of 
John Moyer, also a native of North Annville township, Lebanon county, born 
in iSio, who died in 1867. He married Mary Royer, who was born near 
Ephrata, Lancaster Co., Pa., daughter of John and Elizabeth (Royer) Royer. 
Children were born to John and Mary Moyer as follows : Leah, who is Mrs. 
Kreider; Susan, married to Levi Hershey: Elizabeth, married to Jacob K. 
Kreider; Abraham; Israel; Samuel, deceased; Harvey M. The family of Mr. 
and Mrs. Kreider is as follows: Annie Mary, born July 3, 1859, married 
Milton Light, of Swatara township, Lebanon county, and has four children^ — 
Alice, Kate, Harvey and Joseph; Amanda, born September 4, 1861, married 
Frank Bachman, of Cleona, Lebanon county, and has one child, Leah ; 
Lydia, born October 17, 1862, married Daniel Bomberger, now of Kansas, 
and has four children, Mary, Alice, Ida and Maud; Elizabeth, born February 
II, 1864, married Penrose Hoffer, and has had six children, Annie, Harry, 
Sallie, Violet, George (deceased) and Christopher; Ellen, born September 17, 
1866, married Reuben Bachman, of North Cornwall township, Lebanon 
county, and their only child, Homer, born March 3, 1899, died September 15, 
1899; Emma, born January 8, 1871, married Martin Gingrich, and died with- 
out issue. May 22, 1899; Joseph, born January 9, 1878, married Fanny Weiss, 
of South Lebanon township. Lebanon county, and has two children, Rosa 
and Weiss. 

SAMUEL RICKER, of Fredericksburg, is one of the most prominent 
men of Lebanon county, and probably the oldest justice of the county, having 
filled that position since 1880. As an educator, surveyor and conveyancer, he 
has long stood guard of the different interests of his section. He was born in 
Cumberland county. Pa., on the Walnut Bottom road, between Carlisle and 
Shippensburg, January 29, 1835, son of John Jacob and Susanna (Shaeffer) 
Ricker. 

Mr. Ricker is of German extraction. On August 25, 1742. Johan Fried- 
rich Ricker landed at Philadelphia, having crossed the Atlantic from Rotter- 
dam (last touching at Cowes) on the brigantine "Mary," of which John 



io8 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Mason was master. From the best obtainable information, it is learned that 
he settled at what is now Hockersville, se\-eral miles south of Derry station, 
and twelve miles east of Flarrisburg. 

In the old Lutheran Church burying ground, at Hummelstown, Dauphin 
county, Pa., are the graves of Jacob Ricker (son of Johan Friedrich) and his 
wife Christina. The record on the tombstone says Jacob died March 19, 
1802, aged eighty-two years, and that his wife, Christina, born in October, 
1729, died October 13. 1794, aged sixty-hve years. Jacob and Christina 
Ricker had two sons, John and Frederick, of whom the latter lived to a ripe 
old age, and died leaving no children, and was buried in the same burial 
grounds at Hummelstown. 

John Ricker, son of Jacob, owned a farm several miles southwest of 
Hummelstown, on the Swatara creek, but did not make that section his per- 
manent home. He sold this farm and purchased 420 acres of land three miles 
west of Hummelstown, where he passed the remainder of his life. In 1815, 
after the Harrisburg turnpike was completed, he erected a large, commodious 
brick house, intended for a public house, which became a noted hostelry. As 
an innkeeper he won a State-wide reputation, and his hotel was noted for 
being supplied with the purest spring water in that section of the country, 
gushing delightfully from a three-inch spout. In farming he branched out 
extensively, and prospering in all his ventures, he amassed considerable wealth. 
In 1804 he helped to re-organize the Lutheran Church at Hummelstown, and 
continued an active and interested member until his death, June 20, 1849, 
aged ninety-three vears. Flis remains rest in the same Lutheran cemetery 
mentioned above. His wife died twelve years pre\iously and \\as laid to rest 
in the same cemetery. In her maidenhood she was Mary INIagdalena Fish- 
burn, daughter of Philip C. Fishburn, and by her marriage with Mr. Ricker, 
became the mother of nine children, as follows : ( i ) Mary married Nicholas 
Plouse, and had two sons, David and John ; (2) John Jacob is mentioned belo\v ; 
(3) John married Hannah Orth, and had six children, Elizabeth, Catharine, 
Hannah, Maggie, Lavina and Sarah; (4) Frederick married Catharine Backen- 
stose, and had eleven children, Levi B., David, Alfred, Elizabeth, Catherine, 
Louisa M., Frederick A., Margaret H., Sarah Ann. Mary Jane and George 
T. ; (5) Hannah married John Baughman, and had no children; (6) David 
married Hannah Abrims, and had two children, Samuel A. and John E. ; (7) 
Catharine married Christian Hartzler, and had one son, Reuben T. ; (8) 
Daniel married Mary Grate, and had one daughter, Man,' Magdalena ; and 
(9) Christina married Henry Geistwite, and had eight children: John, ^^'ill- 
iam, Joseph, IMichael, Mary, Kate, Sallie and Hannah. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 109 

John Jacob Ricker was born on his father's farm near Hummelstown, 
June 9, 1797. He was given careful training and assisted his father in the 
management of his farms and hotel, and gradually became familiar with both 
lines, which he later followed for himself. He became the lessee of a farm and 
hotel on the ^Valnut Bottom road between Carlisle and Shippensburg, but 
later removed to St. Thomas, Franklin county, ten miles west of Chambers- 
burg, where for nine years he operated a farm and tavern at the Pittsburg 
turnpike. During much of this time this turnpike was lined with teams haul- 
ing merchandise from Philadelphia to Pittsburg, and the tavern-keeper was 
a busy and pro.sperous member of the community. Mr. Ricker later returned 
to Dauphin county, but after fourteen years removed to Cumberland county, 
where he died in i860. During his young manhood he married Susanna 
Shaeffer, who bore him fourteen children, seven of whom grew to maturity. 
John S., a tanner, who married a widow, Mrs. Dumy, and is deceased ; Daniel, 
a farmer, now deceased, who married Martha Carbaugh ; Richard, a farmer, 
also deceased, who married Mary Brindle ; Jacob, a hotel keeper, now deceased, 
who wedded Elizabeth Palmer; William H., a miller in Huntingdon county, 
who married Mary Imboden ; Mary A., who became the wife of Jeremiah 
Hocker, and is deceased; and Samuel. Mr. Ricker was a progressive and 
well informed man, a man of influence in the several communities in which 
he made his abode. In business he was successful, and his word carried 
weight in public afifairs. 

Samuel Ricker was in his infancy when his parents moved from Cum- 
berland county to Franklin county, and but nine years old when they located 
in Dauphin county, where he grew to manhood. In the public schools 
of the various counties in which he lived he procured a good solid educa- 
tion, developing habits of order and correctness as well as thoroughness and 
investigation. His fund of knowledge and a taste for imparting it decided 
him to engage in teaching, and, settling in Fredericksburg, he there began his 
labors. From the start he won the confidence of both patrons and school 
boards, and he continued to follow this profession for about twenty years. 
He was alert, progressive, and did much to build up the schools with which 
he was connected. Throughout this period he was always a thorough stu- 
dent, and by 1870 he had acquired sufficient knowledge of surveying and 
conveyancing to warrant him in opening an office and engaging in these 
lines. His accuracy and prompt attention to hi? duties won him patrons, and 
he gradually worked up a large business in both lines. As a surveyor he 
has done much to develop the resources of Lebanon county. As a con- 



no BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

veyancer he has been entrusted with many important estates, acting as admin- 
istrator, trustee and executor. 

In 1857 Mr. Ricker married Mahnda Weller, daughter of Jacob and 
Mary (Peffley) Weller, who are now deceased. By this union there have 
been three children: Allen Ira, who died in childhood; Mary Susan, a 
graduate of Schuylkill Seminary ; and Anna Rachel, at home. 

Mr. Ricker is eminently a student gifted in various lines, and of con- 
siderable experience in a legal direction. In 1880 he was chosen justice of 
the peace, and through the merited esteem of the public he has continued 
in the ofifice ever since. While serving the public in this capacity he has 
pursued a commendable course, making every possible effort to reconcile 
parties at variance, to save needless waste of time and money at law, to pre- 
vent the ill-will, enmity, hatred and bitter feelings which are so often the 
results of law suits. In connection with this office he does not neglect his 
surveying and conveyancing. In 1887 he was elected county surveyor of 
Lebanon county, in which capacity he served the public three years. He 
and his family are members of the United Evangelical Church. Sunday 
school work has for many years been his delight, and he is a supporter and 
advocate of the foreign mission cause, having a number of times in recent 
years headed the list and collected funds for the famine-stricken, starving 
and perishing of foreign lands. He advocates the temperance cause, and 
believes the most successful way to stem the tide of intemperance is for 
parents to instill the principles of temperance in the hearts and minds of 
their children, and picture to them the evils and harm of intemperance and 
the disgrace and suffering of inebriates. His first presidential vote was cast 
in 1856 for John C. Fremont, and he has since advocated and supported the 
principles of the Republican party. He was a charter member of Cedar Hill 
Cemetery Association, organized and incorporated in 1870, and has served 
as secretary at and since its organization. In 1870 he received the appoint- 
ment of census enumerator of Bethel and North Lebanon townships. Leba- 
non county. The duties of this appointment he promptly and efficiently 
discharged. He has always had the public welfare thoroughly at heart, and 
during Lee's invasion of the State, in the Civil war, enlisted June 18. 1863, 
in Company K, Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteer Militia, and was hon- 
orably discharged at the expiration of his term of service. Possessed of the 
highest ideals, and the force of character which is ever striving to attain 
them, he is a source of inspiration to those who know him, and a g^eat factor 
for good in his community. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY, iii 

M. K. FRANTZ, son of Henry and Catharine (Kline) Frantz, was 
born in Tulpehocken township, Berks county, Pa., Augiist 2, 1837, on the 
farm on which his father Henry, his grandfather ]\Iathew, his great-grand- 
father Christian, and his great-great-grandfather. Christian, Sr., Hved and 
farmed. The deed for this tract of land was secured by Christian, Sr., in the 
year 1760, it being a patent deed granted by Thomas and John Penn, son and 
grandson of William Penn. the founder of the province of Pennsylvania. The 
deed has been handed from one generation to another, and is now in the 
possession of M. K. Frantz, the present owner of the land. About 1775, some 
fifteen years after the first title was obtained. Christian Frantz, Sr., devised the 
farm to his son. Christian, who about fifteen years later moved to Virginia. 

Mathew Frantz, the grandfather of M. K. Frantz. was born on the old 
farm, and learned the potter's trade. Besides the attention he gave to the oper- 
ation of his farm he found time to manufacture crocks, which he sold not only 
to the people in Berks county but across the Blue mountains to the people in 
Schuylkill county. The clay from which they were manufactured is still 
found in abundance along Reaver Creek, which runs through the farm. 

Henry Frantz, father of M. K. Frantz, was born in 1803, and lived until 
1890, being over eighty-seven years old. He was born on the original tract 
of land, and there lived all his life, respected by all with whom he came in 
contact. 

M. K. Frantz assisted his parents on the farm. In the early days of the 
common school system, the three or four months the school was kept open 
afforded only a limited amount of education to the farmer boys. In Mr. 
Frantz's case this was supplemented by a term of twelve weeks at the Myers- 
town Academy, conducted by Peter B. Witmer, after which at the age of seven- 
teen years he commenced teaching in the common schools, and for seven suc- 
cessive seasons he was teaching in Berks and Lebanon counties. In the year 
i860 he ventured in the prodtice business, buying country produce and shipping 
it to Philadelphia and New York. In January, 1865, he also embarked in the 
mercantile business, and was continually in the produce and mercantile busi- 
ness until the year 1897, when his sons acquired the business that he for a 
period of thirty-seven years conducted successfully. His entire attention was 
then directed toward his farms and farming, until the spring of 1899, when he 
rented the farm and again went into the produce commission business, with 
headquarters at the Reading Terminal Market. Philadelphia. He is enjoying 
a prosperous business, having shippers from Pennsylvania, Maryland and 
Delaware, who consign various kinds of country produce to be sold on 
commission. 



112 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

On January 3, 1857, Mr. Fi'antz was married to Isabella Walborn, daugh- 
ter of Peter D. and Lydia Walborn. Ten children were born to them, of 
whom two died in infancy, and Stanton H., at the age of twenty-seven years. 
Of the others, Permilla married H. S. Gockley : Miss Emma is at home; Agnes 
married F. P. Miller, a prosperous baker and business man of Myerstown; 
Mary married Oliver K. Albright, of Reading, who is in the shoe business; 
Rebecca married Rev. A. F. Mace, a Reformed minister, now located at 
McClairsville, Bedford Co., Pa. ; and Charles P. and Tilden PL are con- 
ducting the general merchandise and produce business at Myerstown, and a 
general produce and commission business in Philadelphia. The entire family 
are industrious, active and successful. All of them had educational advantages, 
and all were students at Palatinate College (now Albright Collegiate Insti- 
tute) , at Myerstown. 

HARRY PI. LIGHT, one of the leading citizens and financiers of Leb- 
anon, was born in 1862, in that city, a son of Samuel L. and INlaria E. (Henry) 
Light, who are mentioned elsewhere. 

After completing the common school course and graduating from the 
Lebanon high school with credit, in 188 1, he entered the Eastman Busi- 
ness College at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and took a complete commercial 
course. This he put to practical advantage as a clerk in the grocery store of 
J. D. Kerr & Co., of Lebanon, with whom he remained from the latter part 
of 1882 until 1885. Later he embarked in a retail coal business wuth a partner 
under the firm name of Scarlett & Light, and continued until 1887. He 
then l:)ecame a member of the firm of Light Bros. & Co., in the coal, brick, 
ice and real estate business, remaining so connected until 1891. In that year 
he became one of the promoters of the East Lebanon Iron Company, of which 
he was made president and general manager, and remained in that dual 
capacity until the sale of the concern, on Septemljer i, 1899, to the American 
Steel & Iron Manufacturing Company, of which he was made purchasing 
agent, a position he held with ability until he resigned in June, 1900. He was 
also promoter and manager of the East Lebanon Land Company, by which 
200 acres of land were laid out in building lots between Lebanon and Avon. 
He is a member of the board of directors of the American Steel & Iron Manu- 
facturing Company. 

In 1890 j\Ir. Light was one of the original incorporators of the Lebanon 
and Ann\'ille Trolley Company ; was a director in the Lebanon Electric Light 
Company, from 1891 to 1897; and was one of the organizers and charter 
members of the Farmers National Bank, afterward resigning, and two years 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 113 

later becoming a director in the Lebanon Valley National Bank, of Lebanon. 
In company with Simon P. Light, he iDought a controlling interest in the 
People's Telephone & Telegraph Company, which in 1901 they sold to 
the United Telephone & Telegraph Company, of which company he is also a 
director. Mr. Light was also a promoter of the United Power & Transporta- 
tion Company, of Philadelphia, in January. 1899; is the owner of the Heights 
Company, a large real estate concern ; and is a member of the board of man- 
agers of the Pennsylvania Chautauqua, at Mt. Gretna. 

Mr. Light is a member of Mt. Lebanon Lodge, A. F. & A. M., and is also 
connected with the higher branches of Masonic circles, including the Com- 
mandery and Shrine. His religious membership is with Zion Lutheran 
Church. In politics he takes an independent stand. 

In 1887 Mr. Light married Miss Emma L. Light, daughter of Daniel and 
Barbara (Sholley) Light, and they have five daughters: Vara K., B. Joyce, 
F. Marie, Pauline E., and Eloise H. 

JOHN KREIDER BOMBERGER, one of the representative citizens of 
North Cornwall township, is a worthy member of one of the old and honored 
families of Lebanon county, the Bomberger family locating in Penn township, 
Lancaster county, as early as 1722. 

Christian Bomberger. the founder of the family in Pennsylvania, with 
his wife, Maria, came from Eschelbrun, the lower Rliine district of the Grand 
Duchy of Baden, Germany, accompanied bv their two sons, John and Chris- 
tian. The latter was a minister, and was the ancestor of the branch of the 
family from which came John K. Bomberger of West Cornwall township. 

John Bomberger, son of Christian, was the father of these children : 
Christian, John, Jacob, Abraham, Joseph, Daniel and Peter. 

Abraham Bomberger, son of John, was the grandfather of John K. Bom- 
berger of Cornwall, and he, with his brother Christian, was the first of the 
family to locate in Lebanon county, settling about two miles south of the city 
of Lebanon, in North Cornwall township. Christian married Barbara Reist, 
but had no issue, and he died at the age of fifty-five years, leaving a large 
estate. Abraham farmed for some years in North Cornwall, but later moved 
to North Lebanon township, where he died. His marriage was to Annie 
Kreider, and one child was born to this union. Christian, the father of John K. 
Bomberger. 

Christian Bomberger was born December 8. 181 3, in what is now North 
Cornwall township, and was reared on the farm and educated in the local 
schools. He became one of the leading men and successful farmers of his 

8 



114 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

locality, served acceptably on the school board and in other offices, and was a 
strong supporter of the Whig party in politics. He began farming on the land 
which his uncle Christian had formerly owned, and which had come into his 
possession, and here he lived until his accidental death, in 1858, in a stone 
quarry on his own land. His farming operations had been very successful, 
and he was widely known for his excellent methods and their satisfactory 
results. Christian Bomberger was a man of integrity and business honor, 
and was one of the organizers of the Lebanon Valley Bank, now known as the 
Valley National Bank, and was one of its first directors, being a member of its 
board at the time of his death. He was married, September 26, 1839, to Mary 
Kreider, born in North Lebanon township, in 181 8. daughter of Tobias and 
Catherine Kreider, who died July 11, 1863, the mother of eight children, as 
follows : John K. ; Abraham, who died in Jackson township, Lebanon county, 
in 1900; Catherine, deceased, who was the wife of Josiah Kreider; Christian, 
who lives in Portland, Oregon ; Mary, who is the wife of John S. Suavely, of 
Lebanon; Anna, who is the wife of Levi Kreider, of Dickinson county, Kans. ; 
and Tobias, and Daniel, who live in Annville. 

John K. Bomberger was born November 11, 1840, the eldest son in 
his parents' family, and secured a good common school education. Mr. Bom- 
berger was but eighteen years of age when accident deprived him of his 
father, and caused him to assume heavy responsibilities. He took charge of 
the farm for his mother, and at her death he assumed full control, retaining the 
same until he moved to his own place in the spring of 1869. Here Mr. Bom- 
berger has a most productive farm of ninety acres, located three and one-half 
miles from Lebanon, West Cornwall township, where he has carried on general 
farming, and some stock and cattle raising. Mr. Bomberger has been a very 
active worker in the Prohibition party, for twelve years being chairman of 
Lebanon county, and for }-ears a delegate to State conventions, becoming well 
and favorably known in the great cjiuse all over the country. Mr. Bomberger 
is a man of original and intelligent ideas, and in everv' way has shown his 
sincere interest in all measures and movements promising to benefit his com- 
munity. 

On March 8, 1864, Mr. Bomberger was married to Miss Elizabeth Smith, 
daughter of Peter and Elizabeth (Horst) Smith, who was born February 18. 
1843, and died June 25, 1877. A family of seven children was born to this 
union, as follows; John S., a farmer of South Lebanon township, married 
Selena Wilhelm and has one child, Verona ; Elizabeth married Samuel S. 
Bowman, and has one child. Miles; Mary married William S. Reist, of South 
Lebanon township, and has three children, John, Robert and Isaac ; Sarah mar- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 115 

ried Josiah M. Brandt, of South Annville township, and has one son, John ; 
Christian S., a student at the State Agricuhural Cohege, in Center county, 
class of 1904, married Eha Stauffer; Peter S. married ^Maggie Hoke and has 
one son, John ; Adam S. is unmarried. 

In addition to heing a first-class citizen in every respect, j\Ir. Bomberger 
has also an honorable war record. On August 13, 1862, he was mustered into 
Company E, One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer 
Infantry, under Capt. L. L. GreenawaJt, and took part in the terrible battle of 
Chancellorsville, and other engagements, and was mustered out of the service 
May 29, 1863. 

CAPT. AT. J. FITZGERALD is a retired army captain of the United 
States Army, now residing in Lebanon. Pa. He was born in Ireland Sep- 
tember 24. 1837, in County Westmeath, son of John FitzGerald, and left 
his father's home wdien only nine years old, coming to Baltimore, Md., to 
visit a relative who promised to continue his education. He had gone to 
school for a time in Ii'eland, and attended also in Baltimore. But he had 
not been in this country long before he was apprenticed to learn the brick- 
mason's trade. At the age of eighteen, in 1855, he enlisted in Company 
E, First United States Artillery, and remained in the service for five year's, 
serving at Fortress Monroe, Va., Fort Dallas, Fort Miami, Fort Capron, 
Fla., and Fort Moultrie, S. C. He was in the Ordnance Corps on Sullivan 
Island, at the United States Arsenal at Charleston, S. C, and was taken 
prisoner December 31, i860, by the State of South Carolina. From there 
he was sent to the United States Arsenal at Augusta, Ga., and again taken 
prisoner, later being released. He was ordered to Washington, D. C, and 
discharged at his own request. He then re-enlisted in the First Artillery, 
March 14, 1861. Owing to the fact that he had given all his spare time 
while serving in the South to the study of pharmacy and materia medica, 
he received appointment as liospital steward at Fort McHenry, Md. After 
eight months of service he was moved to Frederick, Aid., as chief steward 
of the general hospital at that place, where he was taken prisoner. After 
the battle of Antietam he had some 4,500 sick and wounded under his 
charge, as steward. In May, 1863, he was relieved from duty at Frederick, 
Md., to take charge, as chief steward, of the Naval Academy at that time 
converted into a hospital. On June i, 1863, he was appointed second lieu- 
tenant of the Ninth United States Infantry, and received orders to report at 
Presidio, Cal. From there he went to join Company C, at San Juan Island. 
in Puget Sound, Washington Territory. There he served in a joint mill- 



ii6 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

tary occupation with the British troops until September, 1865, during which 
time he performed the duties of acting assistant quartermaster^ acting 
assistant commissary of subsistence and post adjutant. He was then ordered 
back to the Presidio of San Francisco, Cal. In the meantime he received 
his promotion to first heutenant, and served as acting adjutant, quartermas- 
ter and commissary during his stay at the Presidio. From there he was 
ordered to Surprise Valley, Cal., where he built Fort Bidwell, and was 
commander there for two years. Then he was transferred to the command 
of Fort Crook, Cal., remaining there ten months, at the end of that time 
being returned to Fort Bidwell and appointed quartermaster and commis- 
sary. There he remained until November, 1868, when he was relieved and 
ordered East, on general recruiting service in New York City. As soon as 
he arrived in New York he received orders to proceed to Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Here he threw up his detail and rejoined his regiment, at Omaha, Neb. 
After remaining there a short time he was transferred to Company F and 
ordered to take command of it and Fort Sidney, Neb. He served there 
eighteen months, was relieved, with his company, and ordered to Fort 
Russell, Wyoming Territory. After serving there he was ordered to the 
Omaha Barracks, where, in 1873, he received promotion as captain of Com- 
pany D, Ninth United States Infantry, and was ordered to Fort Sidney, 
Neb. After a short stay there he went back to Omaha, where he received 
orders to go to Fort Russell, thence to the Red Cloud Indian Agency, in the 
Sioux Nation, to duty at Fort Robinson, where he was wounded. Later 
he proceeded to Fort AIcKinney, in the Big Horn mountains, remaining 
there until his retirement, in 1879. During all those years he was engaged 
in scout duty and fighting Indians all over Florida, the Pacific coast and the 
plains, and recei\-ed his retirement from the go\-ernnient for wounds and 
injuries received while in line of duty. He was for a time assistant adjutant 
general of Colorado. He came to Lebanon in 1889. 

Capt. FitzGerald is a member of the Society of the Military Order of 
the Loyal Legion of the U^nited States, the Society of the Army of the 
Potomac and the G. A. R. He is a IMason of high rank in Lebanon City. 
He org-anized Company H, of the Fourth National Guard, of Lebanon, and 
at the beginning of the Spanish-American war tendered his and his com- 
pany's services to the United States. He is a stanch Republican, and one of 
the honored citizens of Lebanon. 

The Captain has three children : Mrs. Alice Cavanaugh ; Gerald, of 
Washington, D. C, who is a machinist in the United States Navy yards; 
and John, of Philadelphia, who is also a machinist. Capt. FitzGerald is a 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 117 

man well-learned, of keen mind and splendid character, and a true patriotic 
citizen. A man with a big heart, and kind toward all, he is noted for his 
hospitality. He served his adopted country like a true American, and spent 
all the better part of his life in hard service for that country, proving him- 
self a man who never flinched from duty as a citizen or a soldier. 

THOMAS S. JOHNSTON. D. D. In his day Thon:as S. Johnston 
was one of the most widely known ministers in the Reformed Church in the 
State of Pennsylvania. Gifted with absolute sincerity of purpose, and pos- 
sessing an overwhelming desire to better the conditions and lives of those 
who composed his en\-ironment, he \\'as never weary of well dijing, and con- 
sidered no task too arduous for the service of his ^Master. lu his character 
he embodied the high moral sense and conservative reliability of his Scot- 
tish ancestors, adapted to the exigencies of times a little earlier and less 
liberal than those of the present. He was born in the city of Philadelphia, 
August 4, 1818, and his death occurred June 11, 1887. 

Thomas Johnston, the father of Idiomas S., was born in Scotland, and 
upon emigrating to America many years ago settled in Philadelphia. He 
had formerly been a shoe merchant in Edinburgh, and he undertook his former 
occupation in the city of his adoption. Five children were born to himself 
and wife, namely: John, Samuel, Thomas, Jemima and Helen, all of whom 
are deceased. 

Rev. Dr. Johnston was reared and educated in Philadelphia, and was 
prepared for the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church at the seminary 
conducted by the church. For a number of years he preached in Philadelphia. 
beginning at the age of twenty-one, but eventually came to Lebanon and 
assumed charge of the Second Reformed Church, with which he was con- 
nected for so many years, resigning at the close of his twentieth year. He 
filled many positions aside from that directly connected with his charge, one 
of the most important being that of secretary of the Foreign Missionary 
Society of the Reformed Church of the United States. He was a forceful 
and convincing speaker, and found no difificulty in conveying to large audiences 
his own optimistic and happy thoughts of life. He judged leniently the 
frailties of human nature, yet in his own existence stood for the sentinel 
which suggested better things, and was ever ready with advice, counsel and 
help. 

About 1843 Dr. Johnston was united in marriage with Hannah Frailey, 
daughter of Leonard Frailey, a cutlery merchant of Philadelphia, and who 
had two other children, John and Susan, now deceased. Mrs. Johnston, 



ii8 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

who is still living in her commodious home on Eighth street, Lebanon, is 
remarkably active for her advanced years, and is a delight to the many friends 
who draw inspiration and help from her noble character. Like her husband, 
her life has been of great help to those around her, and she ever worked hand 
in hand with the man whose life work represented her own idea of exalted 
existence. Six children were born to Dr. and Mrs. Johnston, viz. : Thomas, 
a practicing physician of Duncannon ; James, a medical practitioner of 
Denver, Colo. ; Mary, deceased ; Susan, the wife of Samuel Raber, of Denver, 
Colo. ; Jennie, the wife of Llarris Tabor, of New Jersey ; and Elizabeth, the 
wife of Robert Marshall, of Lebanon. 

ANDREW TICE, late one of the highly respected and eminently suc- 
cessful farmers of Jackson township, resided on a well cultivated farm, two 
miles northeast of Myerstown, and was born April 7, 1822, at the time of 
his death being one of the oldest citizens of this locality. He was the son of 
John and Catherine (Line) Tice, of Jackson township, now deceased. 

It is supposed that one John Tice, who came from Germany in the early 
history of the country, was the great-grandfather of Andrew Tice. One of 
the sons of John, Philip, became the father of two children : John and Henry, 
and the former was the father of Andrew, of Jackson township. John Tice 
was born in 1799, and lived to be an old man. In 1820, he married Catherine 
Line, and they had five children: Andrew; Eliza, widow of Henry Kreitzer; 
David, deceased; Rebecca, deceased, who married William Peiffer; and 
Catherine, who married Lamiel Groh. John Tice was an old-time Democrat, 
and was a stanch supporter of Andrew Jackson. For many years he was 
a member of the Reformed Church of Tulpehocken, lived an honorable life, 
and died firm in the faith of his creed and at peace with all men. 

Andrew Tice was reared upon his father's farm, receiving his education 
at the old-fashioned schools. After attaining his majority, he adopted the 
calling of a farmer, and by hard, unremitting work accumulated a fine property 
of eighty-seven and one-half acres, all in a fine state of cultivation, and sup- 
plied with comfortable buildings. On August 10, 1845, '""^ '^^"'is united in mar- 
riage with Miss Eliza Shirk, daughter of Samuel and Catherine (Noeker) 
Shirk, farmers of Jackson township, and a member of a family of seven 
children: Cyrus, of Lebanon county; William, of Iowa; John; Henry; 
Catherine, deceased ; Catherine, who married Jacob Edris, of Missouri ; and 
Mrs. Tice. Mrs. Tice was born August 27, 1827, and has lived a long and 
viseful life. The grandfather of Mrs. Tice, .A.bram Shirk, was among the 
very early settlers of Lebanon county. One child was born to Mr. and IMrs. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 119 

Tice, Mary A., widow of George W. Uhrich, deceased, of Myerstown, Pa., 
who is the mother of ten children: George, of Myerstown; Catherine; Annie, 
deceased ; Ida ; John ; Mary ; Harry ; Valentine, of Lebanon connty ; Andrew, 
deceased ; and Ira, of Myerstown. In addition to rearing their one child, Mr. 
and Mrs. Tice brought up several orphan children to be a credit to them- 
selves and the community : Dr. Milton Batdorf , a practicing physician of 
Myerstown; Caroline Seibert, who married Henry Tice, of Lebanon county; 
Levi Wolf, of Iowa ; Henry Wolf, of Ohio. In politics Mr. Tice was always 
a stanch Democrat, but never aspired to political preferment, having suf- 
ficient to occupy him in his farm duties, and in his Christian work of caring 
for the fatherless and homeless. In his life both he and his good wife lived 
up to the teachings of the Myerstown Reformed Church, of which they were 
active members for many years. Few people were more worthy the respect 
and esteen.i of their fellow citizens than was Mr. Tice, who with his wife 
passed his declining years in peace and happiness which comes of a well 
spent life and good deeds done without hope of reward but simply for the 
sake of Him whom they followed. Mr. Tice entered into rest July 26, 1903. 

MICHAEL SPANGLER. The Spangler family is one of the old 
established ones of Lebanon county, Michael Spangler, its founder, coming 
to the locality from his German home, as early as 1732, purchasing at that 
time a tract of land near Myerstown. Here he reared a family of ten sons 
and two daughters, one of the former, George Spangler, becoming the grand- 
father of Michael Spangler of West Cornwall township. 
George Spangler was born near Myerstown in 1782, and was the youngest 
of his father's numerous sons. He owned a small property and supported 
his family by his own industry, rearing them to respectable maturity and in the 
religious faith of the Reformed Church. His wife was Catherine Dandies, 
and their children were; Jacob; John; George; William; Catherine, who mar- 
ried John Lowinell; and Sarah, who married John Beckley, a prominent 
farmer. 

Jacob Spangler, father of Michael, was born in 1806, in Prescott, Lebanon 
county, and died in 1877. His trade was that of shoemaker, which he followed 
through life, in Lebanon township, this county. His father had taken part 
in the war of 1812, and he was captain of the Light Horse Guards, a company 
of militia. 

Michael Spangler was born in 3830, in South Lebanon township, a son 
of Jacob and Maria (Beckley) Spangler, the latter of whom died in 1851, 
at the age of forty-two years, having been the devoted mother of twelve 



120 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

children, ten of whom grew to maturity, namely : Michael ; Jonathan, de- 
ceased ; Samuel, a resident of Lebanon; David, a resident of Ohio; Maria, 
who died unmarried; Isaac and Israel, both residents of Illinois; Joseph, of 
Myerstown ; Catherine, the wife of Daniel Stover, of Prescott ; and Rudolpn, 
deceased. 

Michael Spangler was reared in South Lebanon township, and under his 
father's instruction became a first-class shoemaker, engaging in this business 
for a period of twenty-three years. Then Mr. Spangler decided to try farm- 
ing, and accordingly purchased a tract of fifty acres in 1865, and moved upon 
it in the follownng year. Until 1901 when he retired from activity, Mr. 
Spangler operated his farm with great success, selling the propertv then to his 
son Abel, but he still makes it his home. 

In 1859 Mr. Spangler married Barbara Witmer, born in 1830, in Corn- 
wall township, a daughter of Peter Witmer, of Lebanon county, and a family 
of five children was born to them, namely : Solomon, who married Elizabeth 
Mellinger, of Ephrata, Lancaster county, lives at Bismarck, and they have one 
son, Michael H. ; Oliver, who married Catherine Mellinger, lives near Lebanon, 
and they have two children, Catherine and Willie; Abel, who is the farmer 
on the home place, married Sarah Greiner, of Lancaster county, and they 
have one .son, Harvey; Amanda resides at home; and Daniel, who married 
Elizabeth Steckbesk, resides in Lebanon and they have four children : Henry, 
Herman, Daniel and Leroy. 

Mr. Spangler is a man who is veiy highly esteemed in his community, 
his estimable life and character making him one of the most respected men 
in West Cornwall township. For fifty-four years he has been one of the 
leading members of the Reformed Church, and has been entrusted with the 
duties of the highest positions on its official board. For twenty vears he has 
been treasurer of St. Paul's Reformed Church at Bismarck, for six years the 
leader of the prayer meeting, for three years deacon, and for six years has 
been one of the elders. Few men in this localitv have a larger circle of warm 
friends. 

HON. CONRAD G. GERHART, mayor of the city of Lebanon, and 
one of its substantial and influential citizens, was born there, September 16, 
1841, son of William and Elizabeth (Uhler) Gerhart. 

Conrad Gerhart, his grandfather, was a native of Germany, who emi- 
grated to America and settled in Lebanon at an early day, where he followed 
a tailoring business. 

William Gerhart, son of Conrad and father of Hon. Conrad, was born in 



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BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNIY. i2i 

Lebanon, and followed a butchering business for a numljer of years. His deatli 
occurred in June, 1890, in the eighty-ninth year of his age. Jiis widow, 
Eh'zabeth Uhler, daughter of Michael Uhler, a native of Germany, was also 
born in Lebanon county, June 6, 1806, and is nearing her end of a century, 
remarkably preserved, and most highly esteemed. Ten children were born to 
William and Elizabeth Gerhart, as follows: Maria, who died in 1850, at the 
age of twenty-five years; Elizabeth, who married John Mills fa member of the 
gallant Ninety-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, anrl killed at the battle 
of Fredericksburg), and died in 1888; Catherine, wh.o married Cyrus Bemes- 
derfer; John; Mary, who married William Synder; William, who enlisted in 
the Ninety-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, served three years, was 
orderly sergeant and had been commissioned second lieutenant, but who fell 
a martyr to his country on the second day of the battle of the Wilderness; 
Conrad G. ; Sarah, wdio married Samuel Shank; George B., and Caroline, who 
married George R. Rise. 

The early life of Hon. Conrad G. Gerhart was probably not very different 
from thousands of other healthy, happy schoolboys of his time, except that as 
early as ten years he was taught that industry is indispensable to success in 
any vocation, and that a trade was a stepping-stone to higher things. For 
some years he worked on the Union canal in the summer and went to school 
in the winter. He entered later a cigarmaking establishment, and also assisted 
his father in the butcher shop, and was thus engaged at the outbreak of the 
Civil war. Loyal to the core, in September, 1861, he enlisted as a musician in 
the Ninety-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry and was discharged in 
1862. In 1863 he re-enlisted in the Twenty-sixth Emergency Regiment and 
participated in the battle of Gettysburg, and was discharged with his com- 
rades when the emergency was over. After his return from the army, Mr. 
Gerhart resumed work at the butcher business, and in 1872 embarked in that 
line on his own account. To do this he borrowed S300, Arlolphus Reinoehl 
signing the note with him as security. Mr. Gerhart paid the note in full, when 
due, and now has it framed and hanging in his library. He continued until 
the spring of 1888, when he made a specialty of the manufacture of sausages 
on an extensive scale, and still continues interested in this business. He was 
one of the organizers of the Central Market House, on Ninth street, and is 
one of its directors. 

From his youth ]\Iayor Gerhart has taken an intelligent interest in public 
affairs, and since his majority has been actively identified with the Republi- 
can party. In 1896 he served as select councilman from the Third ward, and 
in 1899 he was honored by his fellow-citizens with the election to the 



122 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

mayoralty. During his administration municipal reforms have been many, 
and many important improvements have been made and enterprises promoted. 
One of the most important of these was the improvement and enlarging of the 
city water plant. Mr. Gerhart is a man of large means, and was one of the 
original nine that organized the Farmers National Bank in 1892. was then 
elected a director, serving as such officer to date, and for five years has been 
president. He is a man of ])ublic-spirit, of unswerving integrity and enjoys 
the esteem of his fellow-citi/ens. Flis fraternal connection is with the Sedg- 
wick Post, No. 42, G. A. R. 

In 1864 occurred the marriage of Mayor Gerhart to Catherine F. Ritter, 
who was born in Franklin county, Pa., daughter of Jacob and Sarah Ritter. 
She passed out of life in 1890. The children to this marriage were: William, 
who died in 1881, at the age of seventeen years ; Dora M., who married George 
W. Kochenour. of Lebanon; Minnie M., who married George A. Maulfair, of 
Lebanon : and Anna M., at home with her father. 

CHARLES B. WAGNER, D. D. S.. who bears the proud distinction 
of being the pioneer dentist of Lebanon, was born in Haines township. Center 
county. Pa.. February 4, 1832. He is a son of Rev. Philip and Catherine 
(Bordner) Wagner, of Millheim, Center county, Pennsylvania. 

Rev. Philip Wagner was born near Carlisle, Pa., November 28, 1800, 
and died February 15. 1870. He became a minister of the Evangelical Associ- 
ation at New Berlin. Union county. Pa., in 1822, and was elected presiding 
elder in 1833, in which capacity he acceptably served for almost a quarter of 
a century. He was also the president of the conference a number of sessions, 
and a member of ten General Conferences. He was a clergvman of marked 
ability and splendid oratorical powers, speaking both English and German 
fluently, and during the years of his faithful ministry he was considered one 
of the leading men of the church, and as a man was greatly beloved for his 
nobility of character. His wife. Catherine (Bordner) Wagner, was bom 
April 9, 1799; she died September 8, 1870, and her remains repose beside 
those of her husband in the cemetery at Lewisburg, Pa. Rev. Philip and 
Catherine (Bordner) Wagner were the parents of six children: David, a 
miller by trade; and Benjamin. Elizabeth, Eliza. William B. and Charles 
B., all of whom have been gathered by the silent reaper except the two last 
named, William B. being a prominent minister of the INIethodist Episcopal 
Church at .Seneca Falls. N. Y. ; and Charles B., our subject. 

Charles B. \Vagner was reared in the country, and his boyhood days 
were passed at Millheim. When quite young he worked at haymaking and 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 123 

harvesting for a "fip" (634 cents) a day, and in later years in the summer 
season he was hired out by the month to a farmer for a small salary ($2.00 
per month). During the winter he was at home and attended school, but 
school-going in those days did not amount to much, as the boys were obliged 
to help the farmers thrash their grain. His schooling, in consequence, was 
somewhat limited, but by close application, after he entered the professional 
world, he became a proficient scholar. 

Dr. Wagner was but a youth when he first became interested in dentistry. 
His father wore a small gold plate, which his son had an occasional oppor- 
tunity to examine. The mechanism of the little skeleton of a plate was some- 
what of a curiosity to him, and he determined then that he would like to l>e 
a dentist. Years passed and it was not until 1852, that an opportunity pre- 
sented itself to study the profession of his choice. At Millheim he placed 
himself under the instruction of a practicing dentist, with whom he re- 
mained two years. At that time there were few dental colleges, and it was 
not deemed necessary by most preceptors, outside of the cities, to advise 
students to attend college. It was the custom of the preceptors usually to 
take large fees, and at the end of the student's term to induce him to purchase 
some of his stock, such as instruments and office fixtures that might be 
needed, at prices almost equal to those of new and improved appliances. These 
instruments, were, no doubt, received by them in a similar manner. "Well 
do 1 remember," remarked the Doctor, "that I had such an experience at the 
end of my term. Some of the instruments purchased, appeared to me, 
after I became wiser in dentistry, as though they had been used by the 
man who made the Golden Calf for Aaron in the wilderness." 

We are permitted to quote Dr. Wagner's own words, which prove quite 
interesting : "My greatest worry when I started out in my profession was 
the lack of means, as I had but fifty cents of my own. For the balance of 
the money needed, I was obliged to depend upon good frinds, who took my 
honesty as a guarantee for future reimbursement. 

"In 1856 I was married to Miss Elizabeth Stine, of Millheim, a daugh- 
ter of Mr. and INIrs. Isaac Stine, natives of East Hanover, Lebanon county, 
who moved to Center county. Pa., when their daughter was quite young. 
In October, 1856, we left Millheim in private conveyance for Lebanon, Pa., 
where we rented a frame house on East Cimiberland street, then the property 
of David Hallman. Here we used a wooden box as a table, on which we 
served our first meal — the first provided for ourselves. We commenced 
housekeeping with about $60. We were entire strangers in Lebanon and in 
the county, but when Sunday came we attended Emanuel Evangelical Church, 



124 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

and after service we made ourselves known to the pastor, Rev. C. Haman, 
now an ex-bishop residing at Reading, Pa., who became our first guest after 
we had been fixed for housekeeping. He made it pleasant for us, encouraged 
me in my business, and received us as members of his church by certificate 
from our former pastor. Rev. D. Kramer, at Millheim, of the same denomi- 
nation. I had been converted between Christmas and New Year in 1854, 
in the old church at Millheim, since destroyed. 

"In 1S62-63 I was superintendent of the Sunday School in our church, 
and have served as superintendent and assistant at different times. On 
Sunday, April 14, 1861, I organized the Infant Sunday School in our 
Chestnut Street Church, which bears the honor of being one of the oldest 
in the entire church. While residing at Lewisburg, Pa., between 1868 and 
1872, vinder the administration of Rev. Mr. Bowersox, in the Evangelical 
Church, I was the first layman elected Sunday School superintendent in that 
Church before the minister, and always had the school in charge. I likewise 
organized the first Infant Sunday School of the Lewisburg church, which re- 
ceived, I am sure, appreciative approval. In Januar}-, 1883, I was chosen 
trustee of the Emanuel Evangelical Church, Lebanon. 

"In October, 1889, after the decision of the Supreme Court of Pennsyl- 
vania, as to the Esheritcs and Dubbsites, I was elected a lay delegate from the 
Evangelical Church, Chestnut street, Lebanon, Pa., to meet with the ministers 
of the East Pennsylvania Conference, which convened at Reading, October 
10, 1894. Unexpectedly I was made vice-president of the convention, and 
was elected one of the lay delegates to the General Conference which met in 
Grace Church, Naperville, 111., November 29. 1894. I served the General 
Conference on the committee on Sunday-school Organization, and was made 
a member of the committee to aid in organizing a charitable society for dis- 
abled ministers and their wives, and the children, widows and orphans of 
the United Evangelical Church. I served in the home church in other offices, 
such as superintendent and trustee, class leader, steward and treasurer of 
the Sunday School for a number of years ; and treasurer of the church in 
general before the trustees held that office. In 1897 I withdrew my member- 
ship from the Eirst United Evangelical Church, and joined with St. Paul's, 
on North Eighth street, of the same denomination. When the new church 
was built in 1899- 1900, I was elected a member of the Committee on Finance, 
and acted as secretary. 

"In Lebanon, in 1856, I cast my first vote for president, John C. Fre- 
mont being the man of my choice, for which I have never had occasion to be 
sorr}^ In the year 1865, I was elected a member of the school board from 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 125 

the East ward, and was made president of that body — an honor that will 
ever be held in dear remembrance. In Februaiy, 1891, I was elected a mem- 
ber of the common council from the First ward, and used my best endeavors 
to render a faithful performance of duty in behalf of the best interests of 
the city of Lebanon. 

"In 1875 I was appointed a member of the board of health from the 
First district of the Borough. The high testimonial accorded the board by 
a grateful community for the fine sanitary condition of the Borough proved 
an appreciative endorsement that the onerous duties of the board were well 
performed. 

"In September, 1862, when the government called for the militia of 
Pennsylvania to defend the State against invasion, I enlisted as a private in 
Company A, Eleventh Pennsylvania Regiment, the first of the 25.000 Penn- 
sylvania defenders to cross the border and aid in saving ]McClellan's base of 
supplies at Hagerstown, just previous to one of the bloodiest battles of the 
war at Antietam — a never-to-be-forgotten event in my life that will ever re- 
main green on memory's tablet. 

"In 1857 I built a house on East Cumberland street, adjoining Hersh- 
berger's furniture warerooms, where I resided until 1868. In the spring of 
that year I removed from Lebanon to Lewisburg, Pa., where I had purchased 
a fine property, which I sold in 1872, and returned to Lebanon. In 1876 
1 built a house at No. 728 Chestnut street, between Seventh and Eighth 
streets, my present home." 

Dr. Wagner was oot content with the education received in his student 
days, but as prosperity came to him continued to study and to keep abreast 
of the rapid progress of his profession. He attended the Philadelphia Dental 
College, from which he graduated in 1875. He made the first set of teeth on 
vulcanized rubber in Lebanon county. 

In early life he connected himself with a dental society, becoming a 
member of the Susquehanna Dentist Association. He was one of the 
organizers of a society called the Central Pennsylvania Dental Association, 
which in later years became the Lebanon Valley Dental Society, of which he 
has been an active member ever since, frequently contributing papers of 
interest at its meetings, and which he has served as treasurer for a number 
of years. For many years he has been an active member of the Pennsyl- 
vania State Dental Society. At the session held in Wilkesbarre, Pa., he 
was nominated for president but declined to be a candidate. 

On the evening of !May 20, 1902, the members of the Lebanon Valley, 
Dental Association tendered Dr. Wagner a banquet at the "Eagle Hotel" 



126 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

that proved to be a brilliant success, the members taking this method of 
showing their high esteem for him. Many of the members were accompanied 
by their wives, and daughters. The tables in the spacious dining hall were 
arranged in the form of a "Y", and with their spotless linen, silverware, 
dainty candelabra, and red carnations, produced an effect delightful to the 
artistic eye. Sociability reigned supreme, and formality was an unbidden 
guest. Dr. Wagner and his estimable wife occupied the post of honor at the 
extreme end of the table, and as the elegantly attired ladies and gentlemen 
gathered around the festive board, formality was laid aside, and good fellow- 
ship ruled the feast. The menu comprised the ^•ery best the market afforded, 
and no description could do it justice. 

Dr. Wagner is a member of Lebanon Lodge No. 121, I. O. O. F., 
and other minor organizations. Both he and his wife are greatly interested 
in the Home for Widows and Single Women, at Lebanon, Mrs. Wagiier 
being a member of the board of managers, and the Doctor giving efficient 
service on the advisory board. Today he is not only one of the foremost 
of the highly esteemed citizens of the city of Lebanon, but a grand old man, 
tilled with noble lofty deeds, enjoying the sincere respect of the church he 
loves so well, and the entire community in which he has lived so long. The 
classic lines of the gifted Longfellow are indeed a fitting close to this 
biography ; 

Lives of great men all remind us 

We can make our lives sublime, 
And, departing, leave behind us 

Footprints on the sands of time. 

CHRISTIAN BUCHER, Bishop of the German Baptist Brethren 
Church at Schaefferstown, was born November 4, 1833, on the old Bucher 
homestead in South Lebanon township, a son of J"acob and Veronica (Bru- 
baker) Bucher, the former of whom was a farmer on the old Templeman 
farm, near Rexmont. 

The grandfather of Bishop Bucher was Dr. Benedict Bucher (2), who 
died May i, 1830, and he was a son of Dr. Benedict Bucher, who was born 
in Switzerland, Europe, in 171 7, and died in 1787. The first Dr. Benedict 
Bucher settled on the present site of Denver Station, in Lancaster county, 
about 1759. Dr.- Benedict Bucher (2) was the father of eleven children, 
seven of whom grew to maturity. Jacob Bucher, the father of Bishop 
Bucher, was born in 1807, married Veronica Brubaker in 1830, and died 
in 1 87 1. Their eight children were: Lydia, Christian, Anna, Jacob, 
Susanna, Veronica, George and Elizabeth. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 127 

Bishop Christian Bucher was reared on a farm, and obtained his edu- 
cation in the pubHc schools. In 1858 he married EHza Dohner, daughter 
of John and Katherine (Smith) Dohner, of South Lebanon township, and 
seven cliildren have been born to this union, namely: ]\[ohler and Alice, 
twins, the former a resident of Heidelberg township, and the latter the wife 
of Jonas Brubaker, of South Lebanon township ; Allen, a minister in the Ger- 
man Baptist Brethren Church, in South Annville township ; Esther, the wife of 
Isaac Heagy, of Penryn, Lancaster county; Clara, at home; Ada and Amy, 
twins, the former of whom married Monroe Keller, of Lime Rock Station, 
Lancaster county, and the latter at home. 

Bishop Bucher's youth and young manhood were spent in farming and 
school teaching, the latter from the fall of 1853 to the spring of 1861. Later 
he did surveying and conveyancing. When he came to Heidelberg township 
he bought a farm of ninety acres of the executors of John Funk, deceased, 
and operated it for a few years, and then removed to Schaefferstown, where 
for several years he conducted a mercantile business. After this he went 
back to the farm in Heidelberg township for a few years, and in 1887 he retired 
from farming activities. In 1861 he was ordained a minister in the German 
Baptist Brethren Church, and in 1875 was chosen elder of Lebanon county, 
and served as the only one until 1897. ^^^^^ ^^i'' ha\-e shown more devotion 
in their calling than has Bishop Bucher. For more than forty years he has 
labored early and late, and he has his reward in the many accessions he has 
made to the church, in the good feeling he has e\-erywhere cemented among 
the brethren, in the churches he has helpetl to organize and build, and in the 
honor, love and esteem in which he is universally held. 

EDMUND ROBERTS UMBERGER, M. D. (deceased). One of 
the well known phvsicians and surgeons of Lebanon two decades ago, was 
the gentleman whose name appears above, and whose family is represented 
at the present day by Henry G. LTmberger, head bookkeeper at the Lebanon 
Furnaces of the Pennsyh-ania Steel Company. 

Dr. Edmund Roberts LTmberger was a native of Lebanon county, born 
at Jonestown, June 16, 1837. His father. Dr. David Umberger, was a leading 
physician of Dauphin and Lebanon counties. He first practiced in Harrisburg, 
and then removed to a farm at Jonestown, where he intermingled farming with 
the practice of a physician. Later in life he remo\ed to Linglestown. and died 
at Dauphin, Dauphin county. He married Juliet Roberts, a member of a 
prominent family of that name in Pittsburg, many members of which were 
noted physicians. 



128 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Dr. Edmund R. Uniberger was educated in the public schools, taught 
school for several years, studied medicine with his father and afterwards entered 
the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania, where he gradu- 
ated in 1 86 1. The following year he enlisted in the army as assistant surgeon 
of the Ninety-third Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers, which was made 
up chiefly of companies from Dauphin and Lebanon counties. On October 
14, 1863, he was promoted to the full surgeoncy with the rank of Major, 
in which capacity he served until the end of the war. Returning home 
he immediately entered upon the practice of his profession at Lebanon, 
meeting with great success, and building up a large practice, which extended 
beyond the boundaries of his home county. His death occurred December 
10, 1882. 

Dr. Umberger was married February 15, 1876, to Ellen Good, who 
was lx)rn in Lebanon, the daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth Good. The 
father was a native of Rehrersburg, Pa., and the mother of Fredericksburg. 
To Dr. Umberger were born the following children : Edmund Roberts, born 
in 1876, deceased in 1877: Henry Good, born June 6, 1878; and John 
Roberts, born August 8, 1882, is an electrician. The different members of 
the family are honored representatives of Lebanon society, and as such receive 
the kindly wishes of a large circle of acquaintances. 

Henry Good Umberger graduated from the Lebanon high school in 
1894. After spending several months clerking in a store, he entered the 
office of the East Lebanon Iron Company, H. H. Light, president, as ofifice 
boy and worked his way up to the position of bookkeeper. In 1900 he entered 
the offices of the Lebanon Furnaces, where he is at present head bookkeeper. 
He is an active worker in the St. John's Reformed Church, of Lebanon, in 
which he is serving as deacon. 

TITUS T. WORTH (deceased). One of the most prominent and 
distinguished of Lebanon county's citizens was the late Titus T. Worth, a 
descendant of one of Pennsylvania's oldest families. He was born at Union- 
ville, Chester county, July 13, 1823, a son of Benjamin and Phoebe (Taylor) 
Worth, the former of whom was born in Chester county, August 5, 1789, 
and died June 17, 1831. Mr. Worth was a grandson of John and Mary 
(Bentley) Worth, the former of whom was born in Chester county, October 
10, 1745. and died October 17, 1790. 

In 1838 Titus T. Worth became a resident of the town of Westchester, 
where he attended the school of Anthony Bolman for two years, and then 
began an apprenticeship at the printer's trade in the same town in the oflice 




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J^^^ 



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BIOGRAPHLCAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 129 

of the Register and Examiner, of which Joseph Painter was the proprietor. 
In this office Bayard Taylor, ex-Chief Justice of Pennsylvania, Paxson, and 
ex-Judge William Butler, of Westchester, were also serving apprenticeships. 
All of this coterie became distinguished men, and the fiiendships then formed 
lasted through life. In 1844 Mr. Worth removed to Lebanon, and, ni part- 
nership with Hiram Brower, purchased the Lebanon Courier. Two years 
later Mr. Brower sold his interest to John W. Killinger, and this firm, under 
the name of T. T. Worth & Co., conducted the Courier until April i, 
1855. Then Tobias Reinoehl, one of Lebanon's oldest and most highly 
honored citizens of to-day, succeeded to Mr. Killinger's interest in the paper, 
the firm name becoming Worth & Reinoehl, and the business continuing 
thus until April i, 1889, when the paper was sold to the present owners, 
Messrs. Rodearmel & Atkins. 

Mr. Worth was prominent in social and business affairs in Lebanon city 
and county; was one of the organizers of the Valley National Bank of 
Lebanon, and was its first vice-president, and later its president; was presi- 
dent of the Lebanon Gas Company ; president of the West End Chain Works ; 
and a director and stockholder in many other enterprises. In politics he 
was an original Republican, and ever a power in Lebanon county, although, 
like his old friend. Bayard Taylor, he believed that the editor of a great 
newspaper should not accept public office, and repeatedly declined offers of 
high positions from his party. Had he consented he might have been a 
member of either the House or Senate at Washington. Upon pressure 
he did, however, accept the office of State printer of Pennsylvania, a position 
which he filled with credit, but which he soon resigned, as it was not congenial 
to him. When his friend. Secretary of War Simon Cameron, proffered 
Mr. Worth the position of paymaster, with the rank of major, in the United 
States army, it was accepted, and his commission sent him, but his second 
thought induced him to decline it. A man of rare executive ability he was 
naturally a leader of men, and an editorial writer of exceptional ability. 
His Quaker ancestry was ever prominent in his strict honesty and unswerving 
integrity. He died March 13, 1892, at his home in Lebanon, after a short 
illness. 

As stated, his friendship with his companions of the printing office 
continued through life. An incident may be related that throws a humorous 
light on the distinguished Mr. Taylor, and shows that in boyhood he was 
quite as full of pranks as others of his age, who never attained fame. Even 
in his youth Mr. Worth was a fluent writer, and, like other youths, was 
prone to fall into verse. A \o\t sonnet, which he had every reason to expect 

9 



I30 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

would meet with general approbation, was set up and was on the galley, 
ready for the press, but he had not counted on the mischief of his fellow 
printer's composition. When the gem appeared it had been changed by 
the versatile Taylor into a very humorous garble by the substitution of original 
ending lines. It was not imtil years after, upon a re-uniting of the old friends, 
that JVIr. Worth discovered who had changed his verse. 

On October ii, 1850, at Harrisburg, Pa., Mr. Worth was married to 
Mary Ellen Wiestling, daughter of Dr. Joshua M. Wiestling. 

REV. CYRUS S. BOMBERGER. Rev. Cyrus S. Bomberger, the 
able and faithful minister of the German Baptist Church in Cornwall town- 
ship, Lebanon county, is a most excellent fanner, and a citizen of the highest 
personal character. 

Rev. Bomberger was born August 25, 1839. o'l the family farm located 
in South Lebanon township, on the Schaefferstown road, some two miles 
from the city of Lebanon, a son of Joseph J. S. and Hannah (Kreider) 
Bomberger, and a grar.dson of Joseph Bomberger, whose wife was a Smith. 
Grandfather Bomberger was a successful farmer in South Lebanon township, 
and died when his grandson was a small child, leaving five children, as fol- 
lows : Joseph ; Henry, who married Fannie Bachman ; Elizabeth, who mar- 
ried Philip Farmsler; Catherine, who married Joseph Light; and Polly, who 
married Abraham Riest. 

Jose])h Bomberger, the father of Rev. Cyrus, was born and reared in 
this county, engaging all his life in agricultural pursuits. He was a man 
whose influence was always directed in support of morality and temperance, 
and both he and wife were leading members of the United Brethren 
Church. Seven of their children grew to maturity, namely : Christian K., 
who is a retired farmer in Lebanon; Rev. Cyrus S.. of Cornwall township; 
Aaron K., who resides in Lebanon; Joseph K., who resides in Harrisburg; 
Levi K., who is a farmer of North Cornwall township; Mary, who is the wife 
of Michael Hostetter, of North Cornwall township; and William, who died 
at the age of fourteen years. 

Rev. Cyrus S. Bomberger grew up on the home farm, and obtained his 
education in the common schools and at Millersville Normal School, and lo- 
cated on his present farm in 1867, following his marriage. This farm com- 
prises ninety acres of fine land, and is favorably situated three miles south- 
west of Lebanon, in North Cornwall township. Mr. Bomberger operated 
this farm in addition to attending to a wide ministerial field, until 1892, since 
which time it has been in the very capable hands of his son. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 131 

In September, 1866, Mr. Bomberger was married to Miss Annie Yorty, 
daughter of Jacob Yorty, and she was born and reared on the farm which 
has always been her home. Two children were born to this union, Yorty 
and Cyrus J., the former of whom is the farmer on the home place. He mar- 
ried Miss Anna Brubaker, and they have two children. Howard and Mable. 
Cyrus J. resides in Harrisburg, and holds a position of fireman on the 
Pennsylvania R. R., and is unmarried. 

Since 1875 Mr. Bomberger has been a worthy member of the German 
Baptist Brethren Church, and since 1S78, a minister in the same. His 
earnest and faithful work has produced gratifying and encouraging returns, 
and he has l>een advanced to the second degree in the church ministerial 
polity, a much deserved recognition of his usefulness. Mr. Bomberger covers 
a wide field in his ministerial and pastoral work, ofiiciating at South Ann- 
ville, Palmyra and Spring Creek, at Belle Grove and Conewago Meeting- 
Houses, and besides these regular points answers demands from any other 
community where he is called. Mr. Bomberger is a convincing speaker, fully 
able to expound relig'ious truth, while as a kind, sympathetic adviser and 
pastor, he holds a warm place in the hearts of his people. 

WILLIAM H. HIBSHMAN. Jackson township, Lebanon county, is 
the home of manv excellent farmers and highly esteemed citizens, and one of 
these is William H. Hibshman. now retired from active labor. ^Mr. Hibsh- 
man was born September 10, 1832, in Jackson township, a son of Jacob and 
Elizabeth (Lesher) Hibshman, the former of whom was a native of Lebanon 
county, and the latter of Lancaster county. 

The founder of the family in America was Johann (or John) Gebhart 
Hibshman. a native of Switzerland who came to America in 1732, at the 
age of nineteen. Five years afterward he returned to his native land for 
his wife, returning with her to America September 24, 1737. in the ship 
"St. Andrew", which sailed on that date from Rotterdam, Holland, for 
New York. LTpon landing in the New World, he located in Lancaster county. 
Pa., and purchased a tract of land four miles north of the borough of 
Ephrata. He and his wife had four children: Wendel. born in 1740, married 
Hannah Heffley, and settled at Ephrata: Henry settled in Lebanon county; 
Catherine married an Albrecht, and lived in Selin5gro^■e. Pa., and Elizabeth 
married Conrad Mentzer. 

Henry Hibshman, the grandfather of William H., was the first of the 
family to locate in Lebanon county. He married Catharine Leisey and be- 
came the father of three sons and five daughters : Henrv. who had two sons, 



132 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Samuel (who married IMattie Gibble, and had three sons and two daughters), 
and Daniel, and one daughter, Mary; Wendel, who had tw^o sons and one 
daughter, Frank (married to Sarah Reiter), John (married to Sarah Bom- 
berger) and Lucetta (married to John Philip) ; Jacob, mentioned below; 
Maria, who married Adam Bassler; Elizabeth, who married John Lehman; 
Christina, who married Henry Creek; Eva, who married Daniel Weist; and 
Hannah, wife of Jacob Gockley. Henry Hibshman and wife are buried in 
the old Schaefferstown cemetery. 

Jacob Hibshman of the above family was born as early as 1790, and he 
died in 1838. In 1812 he was married to Elizabeth Lesher, and they became 
the parents of nine children : ( i ) Catherine married Henry Mace, and had 
three children, living : John H., who married Amanda Yingst, and had ten 
children ; Sarah, who married John Smaltz, and had two daughters and one 
son ; and Amanda, who married William H. Hunsicker, and had no children. 
(2) Curtis married Rebecca Miller, and had no children. (3) Elizabeth 
died unmarried. (4) Henry married Elizabeth Spayd, and died jMay 16, 
1880; she died in October, 1882. They had ten children: Henry W., of 
Tremont, Schuylkill county; Jacob, of Strausstown ; Samuel, of Philadelphia; 
Anna, of Jackson township, Lebanon county; Rachel, of Shillington, 
Berks county; Lizzie, of Philadelphia; Catherine, who died unmarried at 
the age of twenty-seven; George and Sarah, who both died in infancy; and 
Christina, who died at the age of twenty- four. (5) Sarah married Christian 
Hostetter, and had two sons, one of whom died unmarried, and the other 
married but died without issue. (6) Mary (Polly) died unmarried. (7) 
Jacob married Henrietta Swope, and had seven children : William and John 
of Lebanon county; Frank and Augustus of Philadelphia; Amanda, who 
married and died in 1899; and Sarah and Elizabeth. (8) Lydia married 
Moses Becker, and had two children, a son and a daughter. (9) William 
H. is the only one of the family noAv living. Jacob Hibshman and his wafe 
Elizabeth sleep their last sleep in the old cemetery at Schaefferstown. 

William H. Hibshman was reared in Jackson township on his father's 
farm, now owned by John H. Krall, and in boyhood attended tlie public 
schools of the township and the INIyerstown Academy, securing an education 
which gave him a certificate to teach school. This profession he toUowed for 
four years, and then began to farm. In 1848 he was united in marriage to 
Miss Sariah Loose, daughter of William and Leah (Bicknel) Loose, of 
Berks county, and one child was born to this union, Harrison W., who was 
married to Agnes Zinn, of Jackson township, lately deceased. The children 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 133 

born to this union were: Lillie, Mary, William H., Henry Z., Catherine, 
Howard, Clinton, Mabel, Bertha and Walter. 

Mr. Hibshman during his early life found it necessary to practice 
economy and to be industrious, and he has had the natural reward, owning 
now a fine farm along the Lebanon and Dauphin pike road, between Lebanon 
and Myerstown, on the line of the Lebanon & Mj'erstown Street Railway, 
whither he came in 1873. fhis is one of the very productive farms of the 
locality, and on account of its location is very valuable. When a boy of seven- 
teen he learned the milling business with Peter Reist, of Annville, and fol- 
lowed it for some time, residing in Berks county from 1863 to 1873. 

In politics Mr. Hibshman is a zealous and interested Republican, and he 
has most efficiently served his township in the office of tax collector. His 
connection with tlie Reformed Church has covered many years, and he has 
been deacon, trustee and elder. Although Mr. Hibshman is approaching the 
age when both mental and physical powers usually show signs of failure, 
such is not the fact in his case. His memory is excellent, and his rem- 
iniscences of old days in this section of the State are very interesting. 

Mr. Hibshman has many friends, his exemplary life and high moral 
character giving him the respect and esteem of all who know him. 

ABRAHAM S. PIORST, one of the representative men and well known 
citizens of South Lebanon township, Lebanon county, was born in Heidel- 
berg township Januarv 2, 1840, a son of Peter and Anna (Schaeffer) Horst, 
prominent people of this locality. 

Abraham S. Horst was reared upon the homestead farm in South Leba- 
non township, and educated in the common schools of the neighborhood. 
AVhen twenty-eight years of age he married and located in Center county. 
Pa., where for seven years he was engaged in farming. He then returned 
to the old homestead and has since been activelv engaged in farming, his 
portion of the property consisting of eighty acres. The house standing 
upon his property was erected by his sfi"Jind father. Peter Horst. and in spite 
of its age is one of the most comfortable and substantial residences of the town- 
ship. It was built in 1837. bnt it is in excellent condition and affords a pleas- 
ant home for the family. The barns and fences, as well as the general 
appearance of the property, denote the industry and thrift of the owner, 
while the fields of grain and health\- oixliard add to the pleasant surround- 
ings. Mr. Horst has always taken an active interest in public affairs, and 
"has served as school director and assistant assessor of the township. 

On March 26, 1868, Mr. Horst was married to Lavina Groh. who was 



134 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

born in Suutli Lebanon township, August i6, 1847, (laughter of Henry and 
Mary (Mayer) Groh. Four chikb'en have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Horst : Frank G., a carpenter at Cleona, married Miss Katie Philbps, and 
has two children, Allen and Sadie; Henry G., a farmer in South Lebanon 
township, married Sally Stabler, and they have one child, Oscar; Abraham 
G. is a farmer at home; and Allen G. is a student at the State Normal. Mr. 
Horst is a meinber of the Mennonite church, while his wife is connected 
with the Lutheran church. They both liave many friends, to whom they 
dispense a most delightful hospitaHty, and they are numbered among the 
substantial and prosperous farming people of Lel^anon county. 

IMBODEN. The Imboden family is one of the oldest and most promi- 
nent in South Ann\'ille township, Lebanon county, a leading one in intelli- 
gence, wealth and business progressiveness. 

The first settler of the Imboden name, known in this part of the Keystone 
State, was Philip, the grandfather of Samuel K. Imboden, who was one of 
a family of seven sons and tw'o daughters born to the first generation of the 
family in what is now Lebanon, then Lancaster, and later, Dauphin county. 
I'hese children bore the names of : Philip, Jacob. Solomon, William, Samuel, 
John, George, Elizabeth and Louisa. One of these sons located! in the 
Shenandoah Valley and became the father of General Imboden, an officer of 
the Confederate army, who participated in the raid into Pennsylvania in 1863, 
when Chambersburg was burned, and was, also, in command of a brigade 
at the battle of Gettysburg. The children of Philip Imboden were as fol- 
lows : Solomon, issue, ten children ; Philip, issue, one child ; Daniel, issue, 
three children; Jacob, twice married, no issue; Samuel, twice married, issue, 
first wife, four children and one living, second wdfe, six children, two living; 
George, issue, seven children; and John, issue, three children. 

Samuel Imboden, the father of Samuel K. Imlioden, was born July 4, 
181 1, on the farm now owned by Jacob Behm, on tlie road from Annville 
to Campbelltown, in South Ann\'ille township, Lebanon county. In his 
young manhood he learned the trade of blacksmith, and w^orked at the same 
for five years, and then l>egan farming- on land a half mile east of Campbell- 
town. In 1865 he removed to Campbelltown and resided there until his 
death. He married (first) Nancy Kreider, daughter of Joseph Kreider, 
and an aunt of Andrew, David, Henry H. and Joseph Kreider, of Annville. 
To this union these children were born : Mary, who is the widows of Calvin 
Clendennin, of Bismarck, Lebanon county; Elizabeth, deceased, wife of John 
Risser, of Palmyra; Samuel, who died in infancv; and Nancv, deceased 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 135 

wife of Henry Fegan, of Canipbelltown. The second marriage of Samuel 
Imboden was to Lydia Kreider, a sister-in-law, and the children of this union 
were: Moses K., deceased; Samuel K. ; and Henry, Lydia and Lovina, all 
deceased ; and Susan, the wife of Michael Mover, of Campbelltown. The 
father of this family belonged to the Lutheran Church, while the mother 
was a Mennonite. 

Samuel K. Imboden was born June 18, 1S43, on the old homestead 
farm, near Campbelltown, and grew up there, receiving his education in the 
common schools. In 1865 he began to operate on his own account, and con- 
tinued to farm near Campbelltown until 1881, when he purchased the Hilig 
Hotel, at what is called Sporting Hill, east of Annville. This hostelry is 
situated on the Berks and Dauphin turnpike road, and during the succeeding 
ten years, wearv travelers were sure of good entertainment at this hospitable 
inn. In 1889 Mr. Imboden retired from the active operation of this hotel, 
renting it to his son Albert. In 1891 he built a handsome residence just 
across the street, where the family resides. Mr. Imboden is now engaged in 
the lime business, quarrying it on his own land. Albert Imboden managed 
the baOtel for three years and then was succeeded by John Arndt, but iNIr. 
Imboden still owns the property. 

For six years Mr. Imboden served as school director of South Annville 
township. In 1881 he was elected a member of the board of county com- 
missioners for three years, serving with fidelity to the public in this important 
capacity. Following this he engaged for some three years in the cattle busi- 
ness. 

In 1864 Mr. Imboden was married to Julia, daughter of Daniel Heil- 
man, born October 18, 1844, iri Londonderry township, and the issue of this 
union is as follows: Albert, Samuel H.. Raymond D., Cora, and Ellen and 
Morris, deceased. The religious connection of the family is with the Lutheran 
Church. Fraternally Mr. Imboden belongs to the I. O. O. F. He is a man 
much respected in his locality, not only for his honorable business methods, 
but also for his neighborliness and kind and friendly attitude to all, justly 
being regarded as a representative and prominent citizen. 

SIMON P. SMITH. The retirement of Simon P. Smith and his 
faithful wife to their pleasant home in Lebanon, in 1901. followed over 
forty years of unceasing activity on their finely developed farm near this 
town. They are still the possessors of the land wh.ich has witnessed 
their rise from comparative poverty and obscurity, and are able to enjoy 
in peace and quiet the affluence wrought b}- their labor and wise planning. 



136 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Simon P. Smith was born June ii, 1839, a son of Peter and Elizabeth 
(Harst) Smith, now deceased. The family owes its origin in this country 
to an ancestor who found his opportunities in Germany too limited, and 
who arrived in Lebanon county during Colonial days. Peter Smith, the 
grandfather of Simon P., was a farmer m this county, and his children 
were called John, Henry, Joseph, Peter, Isaac, Jacob, Catherine and Maria. 
His son Peter was a farmer in this county during the whole of his active 
life and to himself and wife were born eight children : Adam; Cyrus; Monroe, 
of South Lebanon township; Simon P., of the city of Lebanon; Joseph, 
of Virginia; and Benjamin, Elizabeth and Maria, of Lebanon county, all 
deceased. All of the children lived on farms, either their own or their hus- 
bands', and all were fairly successful and prosperous. Peter Smith was a 
Republican in politics, and a member of the Mennonite Church. 

Simon P. Smith married, in South Lebanon township, November 26, 
1863. Maria, daughter of Rudolph and Elizal^eth Kreider, members of 
old families of the county. Two children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith, of whom Harvey is a minister in the United Evangelical Church, 
of Mohrsville, Berks county. Pa. ; and Cora is the wife of Milton Urich. 
Mr. Smith was reared to farming, and he always considered that he was 
better fitted for that kind of occupation than any other. His success is 
proof of the correctness of his surmise, and he has dignified the most useful 
and necessary calling to which the energies of man are directed. He is an 
enthusiastic Prohibitionist, and has done much to further the cause of tem- 
perance among his friends and fellow townsmen. The United Brethren 
Church has no more active worker, and he has faithfully served its interests 
as deacon, steward and trustee. He enjoys not only the respect, but the 
appreciation and good will of all who know him. 

MAJOR H. P. MOYER, cashier of the Farmers National Bank, of 
Lebanon, is one of the city's prominent citizens, and one who has been 
identified with much of its growth and present prosperity. The birth of 
Mr. Moyer took place at Sinking Spring, Berks County, Pa., August 28, 
1844, and he is a son of Rev. David and Mary (Peffley) Moyer, both natives 
of Berks county. 

Rev. David Moyer was born at Reading, Pa., in 1825, and died in 1868, 
a son of David Moyer, a native also of Berks county, of German ancestry, his 
father being a native of Germany. Rev. David Moyer was a prominent clerg}-- 
man of the United Brethren Chtuxh, and served successfully charges at Myers- 
towTi, Schaefifersto\An, Jonestown, Annville and Heilmandale, in Lebanon 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 137 

county, and Millersburg, LTniontown, Ling-lestown and Harrisburg, in Dau- 
phin county. His wife, Mary (Peflley), survives, and resides at No. 813 Wal- 
nut street, Lebanon, and is most highl)^ esteemed by all who know her. The 
eight children born to Rev. Moyer and wife were: Major Harry P.; John 
P., who was prominently identified with the public school work in the State 
of Louisiana, w'here he died at the age of thirty years; Martin P., who is 
a prominent citizen of Fort White, Florida, engaged in fruit-growing and 
cattle-raising; Nelson P., who resides at Washington, D. C, where he is 
employed in the Government Bureau of Printing; Mary E., wife of R. R. 
Eschleman, of Reading; Kate, who married A. P. Swope, of Lebanon; Emma, 
who married S. S. Bomberger, of Lebanon ; and David, of Philadelphia. 

Major Harry P. Moyer was ten years of age when the family came to 
Lebanon county and located at Myersto\Mi, and he there attended the public 
schools and later the Myerstown Academy, and was still a student at the 
outbreak of the Civil war. In August, 1862, he enlisted for a service of 
nine months, in Company E, One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, but preferring to enter the cavalry service, he severed his con- 
nection with the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Regiment, and on Sep- 
tember I, 1862, re-enlisted, entering Company E, Seventeenth Pennsylvania 
Volunteer Cavalry, for three years, in which he gallantly served his country 
until the close of the war. In many ways Mr. Moyer has a very remarkable 
record. His service from September i, 1862, to June 16, 1865, included 
1. 01 5 days, during which time he was ne\'ef absent from his command, and 
bravely bore his part in every engagement in which his company took part, 
a long and thrilling list: Chancellorsville. Beverly Ford, Aldie, LTpperville, 
Gettysburg, Williamsport, Beaver Creek, Boonsboro, Falling Waters, Brandy 
Station, Raccoon's Ford, Barnett's Ford, Martin's F'"ord. Stephensburg. Rap- 
pahannock Station, Oak Flill. Thoroughfare Gap. Bealton's Station, Mine 
Run, Kilpatrick's Raid, to Richmond, Todd's Tavern, Yellow Tavern, 
Meadow Bridge, Hanover Farm, Old Church, Cold Harbor, Trevillian 
Station, White House, White Post. Cedarville, Berryville, Kearneysvdle, 
Leetown, Smithfield, Winchester, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek. Luray, Gordon- 
ville, Sheridan's Raid to the James River, Stony Creek, Dinwiddie Court 
House, Five Forks, Scott's Cross Roads, Drummon's Mill. Sailor's Creek, 
Appomattox Station. Appomattox Court House, and many other skirmishes 
in which comrades fell. While serving in the Shenandoah Valley Mr. Moyer 
was captured by the Confederate Guerrilla Mosby, but was re-capttn-ed b}^ the 
Union forces on the same dav. Among the souvenirs which grace the walls 
of Major Moyer's library in his home is an official record of the Seventeenth 



138 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, giving names and dates of ninety-two 
engagements in which the regiment participated. This record he prizes very 
highly. A brave soldier, he has retained a taste for military afifairs, and 
on July 25, 1885, became a member of the Pennsylvania National Guard, 
and was appointed sergeant major of the Third Brigade, National Guard of 
Pennsylvania, and on June 28, 1887, was appointed quartermaster of the 
Third Brigade, with the rank of major, by commanding officer Gen. J. P. S. 
Gobin, being re-appointed June 26, 1890, and again re-appointed June 26, 
1895. Major Moyer was with the brigade when it was called upon to suppress 
the Homestead riots, and also at the t'mie its services were required in the 
coal regions of Hazleton. The post of duty has always been the place of 
his choice, and he is highly appreciated by his comrades, both in war and 
peace. 

After his return from the Civil war Mr. Aloyer entered Lebanon Valley 
College, and graduated from that institution in 1868. This was followed 
by several years of successful teaching in the public schools. In 1869 he 
was united in marriage with Sarah A. Baumgardner, of Dauphin county, 
daughter of John Baumgardner, and remo\-ed to LelDanon county in 1870, 
entering the employ of John H. Shugar, wholesale and retail grocer. For 
five years Mr. Moyer continued with Mr. Shugar, and then accepted a position 
as chief clerk in the United Brethren Mutual Aid Society of Pennsylvania, a 
prominent life insurance company located at Lebanon. In 1890 he was 
elected a director in the institution, and served in the capacity of superin- 
tendent of agents, and also as treasurer of the company until 1894. when he 
resigned. In 1892 Major Moyer became the prime factor and promoter 
in the organization of the Farmers National Bank of Lebanon, and was 
elected cashier, a position he has acceptably filled ever since. His unusual 
business ability has also been recognized by other business organizations, 
and he is a director and the treasurer of the Lebanon Valley Savings and Loan 
Association of Lebanon; treasurer and director of the Safety Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, of Lebanon; treasurer and director of the Central 
Market House Company ; director in the West End Rolling Mill : and presi- 
dent of the Lebanon Board of Trade. 

Major Moyer has been active in politics, and served the city of Lebanon 
as clerk for five years, and for the same number of years as city treasurer. 
For four years he served in the Select Council, and was on the school board 
for three years, in all these offices giving close and careful attention to the 
various demands of each, ha\'ing- an unusual capacity for work. Aside from 
business he has found time actively to support the LTnited Brethren church. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 139 

and serve as Sunday school superintendent, and also to look into charitable 
and benevolent enterprises. His social faculties also have not been neglected, 
his membership with Sedg-^vick Post, No. 42, Grand Army of the Republic, 
the Patriotic Order Sons of America, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and other fraternal associations, giving- him a large circle of congenial 
associates. His two accomplished daughters are M. Ella and Sidnie M., 
and his family home in Lebanon is an abode of frequent hospitality, comfort 
and culture. His interests are so large and his connections so numerous 
that few citizens of Lebanon are unacquainted with him; thev respect and 
honor him not only as an energetic, public spirited and successful business 
mgn, a brave and fearless soldier, but also as an estimable and representative 
private citizen. 

SAMUEL FELTEROLF. a prominent farmer and well-known citi- 
zen of North Londonderry township, was born August 6, 1839, in L'pper 
]\Iacungie township, Lehigh county, about eight miles distant from Allen- 
town. His parents were Samuel and Julia (Grammes) Felterolf, the former 
of whom was born in jSo8, in Albany township, Berks county, and died in 
188^, and the latter of whom was born in 1807 in Lehigh county, and died 
in Lebanon county in 1891. The paternal grandfather was Adam Felterolf, 
a native of Berks county, who married Susan Sheiben, and later removed 
to Columbia county. Pa., where both died. Their children have all also 
passed away, their names being as follows : Peter, Gideon, Samuel, Rachel, 
Daniel, Michael and Adam. 

In 185 1 Samuel Felterolf and his wife moved to Lebanon county, in 
the spring of that year settling in Hanover township, where they resided 
uvitil 1866, when they removed to the farm on which their son Samuel 
now resides, and there their last days were passed. By trade the father 
was a mason, and he followed same for some thirty years in Lehigh county. 
Both parents were consistent members of the Lutheran church. Their chil- 
dren besides Samuel were: Maria, wife of Cornelius Fox, of East Hanover 
township, now deceased ; Tilman. a resident of Licking county, Ohio ; Eliza, 
wife of Henrv Ricker, of North Londonderry township; Susan, wife of Har- 
rison Shiffler, of Missouri: Rebecca, wife of Elias Hartz, of Palmyra; and 
Peter, a resident of Columbia county: 

Samuel Felterolf was but twelve vears of age when he came with his 
parents to Lebanon county. He secured a good common-school education. 
At th.e age of thirty years he married, and left the parental roof one year 
after (having in the meantime operated the nome farm), locating in East 



I40 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Har.over township, Dauphin county, where he remained for eight years, 
farming for his father-in-law. Then he came back to the old farm, as his 
father was growing somewhat feeble, and he managed the place until his 
parents' deatli. after which he purchased it. It comprises 124 acres of fine 
land, and is situated two miles n.orth of Palmyra. Mr. Felterolf is a pro- 
gressive and enterprising farmer, thoroughly understanding his business, 
and is classed with the excellent agriculturists of the township. 

In 1 87 1 Mr. Felterolf was married to Mary Reigert, who was born 
on the old Reigert farm in Dauphin county, a daughter of John and Bar- 
bara (Behm) Reigert, the latter an aunt of Rudolph Behm, of Palmyra. 
The children of this marriage are: Annie. Emma, Mary, Ella, Susan, 
Clara (the wife of Rudolph Ensminger of North Londonderry township). 
Harry (farmer on the home farm), and Kate. The religious connection of 
thie family is with the Lutheran Church. In politics Mr. Felterolf is identified 
with the Republican party. 

EDWARD SCHMALTZ, whose attractive, well improved farm stands 
in one of the pleasant suburbs of Richland, is a man of great energy- and 
marked business ability. Starting life with nothing but his own brains 
and muscles to depend upon, he has in the steady pursuit of one main indus- 
try — farming — amassed considerable property and won a leading place 
among agriculturists of his section. He was born in Bern township, Berks 
county, March 18, 1836, son of John and Rebecca (Spatz) Schmaltz. 

Samuel Schmaltz, grandfather of Edward, came from Germany to the 
Colonies some time prior to 1775. As a loyal, patriotic American, when 
the Revolutionary war broke out he enlisted, and as a man of marked 
military ability served as captain under George Washington. By his mar- 
riage there were two sons: Benjamin and John, the latter mentioned below. 

John Schmaltz, father Of Edward, was one of the prominent agricul- 
turist of Millcreek township. In a well-ordered home he received careful 
rearing, and at an early age was given practical experience in farm manage- 
ment. Both environment and education decided him upon reaching man- 
hood to devote his attention to agriculture, and becoming successful lie 
continued it for the most part throughout his business life. During his 
young manhood Mr. Schmaltz married Rebecca Spatz. who was a faithful 
helpmeet for many years. She is now deceased. B}^ this union there were 
eight children, three of whom married as follows: Annie E., to Ludwig 
Fisher, of Berks county (she died in 1901); Elmyra, to Israel Shirk, a 
farmer of Berks county ; and Ella to Peter Steiner, of Pottstown ; Edward is 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 141 

mentioned below; John is a farmer of BerlsS county; Franklin is a resident 
of Jackson township, this county ; and James, of Myerstown ; Rebecca mar- 
ried B. W. Bennage, of Jackson township. The father of these children 
settled upon a farm in Millcreek township about 1849, '^^'^'^^ there passed the 
rest of his life, engaged in agricultural pursuits. He improved the property, 
kept the place thoroughly intact, and was considered one of the prosperous, 
progressive farmers of the county. He died at the age of sixty-seven years. 

Air. Schmaltz was energetic, thrifty and capable, and won the respect 
not only of agriculturists, but of the business and professional men in his 
community. He took an active part in the public affairs of his township, 
and in politics affiliated with the Republicans. He was a man of marked 
integrity of character, and the Reformed Church counted him among its most 
consistent members. 

Edward Schmaltz was about fourteen years old when his parents set- 
tled upon the Millcreek farm. He received the ordinary rearing of a farmer's 
boy of his day — plenty of practical discipline in the everyday work of the 
homestead, and in' the free schools of his neighborhood thorough training, 
in the rudiments of knowledge, and in self-control and attention. A whole- 
some regard for agriculture decided him upon reaching manhood to engage 
in that pursuit, and having natural ability and practical knowledge of the 
work his efforts were crowned with success. When twenty-four years old, 
September 13, i860, Mr. Schmaltz married Mariah Halstein, of Millbach, 
who was born in 1841, daughter of John and Mary (Moyer) Halstein, who 
are mentioned below. To Mr. and Mrs. Schmaltz have been born nine chil- 
dren : Mary, who married George Peiffer, of Berks county; Calvin, a resi- 
dent of Richland, who married Mary Brown; John, who assists his father 
on the home place, and who married Noma Light: Henry, a resident of Rich- 
land ; Adam, who is living at home, and who married Clara Grenawalt ; Emma, 
who married William Rauch, of Richland; Edward, a resident of Palmyra, 
Pa. ; Penrose, who is living at home ; and Monroe, who is also at home. 

After his marriage Mr. Schmaltz settled upon a seventy-acre farm 
within a quarter of a mile of Richland, and there he has since resided. He 
has improved the property, kept the buildings in good condition, and has 
carried on a very successful business. Wise in his management, his well 
cultivated fields have produced abundant harvests, and, always finding a 
ready market for his products, he has not had the misfortune of seeing things 
go to waste. His farm is now one of the most attractive and valuable pieces 
of property for its size in the township, and tliere he is still enjoying the results 
of his years of hard labor. 



142 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Mr. Schmaltz's well directed efforts, and his keen intelligence, have 
brought him to the front in the public affairs of the community, and for 
many years he has acted as school director, lilling the position with marked 
ability. In religious circles he is highly esteemed, and is now deacon and 
trustee of the Tulpehocken Reformed Church, of Richland. He is strictly 
honest, square in all his dealings with his fellow men, and entirely worthy 
of the trust imposed in him. Politically he affiliates with the Democrats. 

The Halstein family, of which ]\Irs. Schmaltz is a member, were among 
the pioneers of Millcreek township. Her father, John Halstein, married 
Mai'y Moyer, and they had five children: Mariah (Mrs. Schmaltz), who 
has been mentioned; John, a resident of Millbach; Retisa, who married John 
Bomberger, of South Lebanon township; Emma, the wife of John Reist, of 
Heidelberg township ; and Hiram, a resident of Lebanon. 

JOSEPH G. HIBSHMAN, late one of the prosperous and enterpris- 
ing citizens of Heidelberg township, Lebanon county, was born July. 8, 
1837, a son of Samuel and Martha (Gibble) Hibshman, of whom the former is 
deceased, but the latter is still living, making her home in Jackson township. 

Samuel Hibshman was a son of John Hibshman, an old settler of Leba- 
non county, whose father is supposed to have emigrated from Germany at 
a very early date. John Hibshman's wife, Elizabeth, bore him a son, Samuel 
(who in time became the father of Joseph G.), and other children, as fol- 
lows: John, of Lancaster county; Samuel, of Ohio; Joseph G. ; Katherine, 
who married Simon Dohner, of Jackson township ; INIary, who married Martin 
C. Hacker, of Millcreek township. Samuel Hibshman, the father, was an 
industrious man, and successfully followed his trade, that of a shoemaker. 
In religious matters he was a member of the German Baptist church. 

Joseph G. Hibshman was reared on his father's farm, receiving a com- 
mon school education. After attaining his majority, he hired himself out 
as a laborer and worked energetically to accumulate sufficient money to 
establish himself in business. For a number of years he was a dealer in 
jimk and scrap iron, and built up a good trade in that line, and owned a 
comfortable home, all of his success being due to his unaided efforts and 
thrift. 

On November 15, 1879. Mr. Hibshman was united in marriage with 
Miss Anna Bollinger, of Millcreek township, a daughter of Jonathan and 
Marv ( Rover "l Bollinger, deceased. Three children were born to this mar- 
riage: Paul; Samuel and Verda, at home. Mrs. Hibshman is one of a 
familv of five children born to her parents: Aaron, deceased; Levi S., a 



BIOGRAPHICAL. ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 143 

prominent farmer and deacon in the German Baptist Church ; Amanda, 
married to H. M. Muth, of Myerstown, Pa.; Mariah, w'lie of Israel Wenger; 
and Mrs. Hibshman. Mr. Hibshman was one of the highly esteemed people of 
Heidelberg township, and had many friends throughout the county, where his 
excellent qualities were known and appreciated, and his death, which occurred 
August 10, 1903, was sincerely mourned. Mrs. Hibshman was a devoted 
companion of her husband, and is greatly beloved for her many womanly 
qualities. 

JAMES KALBACH, a prominent citizen of Myerstown, of ample 
means and large business interests, is well known through the State of Penn- 
sylvania in connection with his milling and lumbering enterprises. For the 
past thirty-five years he has been actively engaged in these industries, and 
is one of the largest lumber dealers in his part of the State. 

Mr. Kalbach is of German extraction, the founders of his family here 
having come from Germany in 1775. Mr. Kalbach was born June 13, 
1841, in Heidelberg township, Berks county, a son of Adam and Katherine 
(Aulthouse) Kalbach, the former of whom was born in 1809 in Berks 
county, was a prominent farmer in that county, and died in 1880. He was 
a son of Adam Kalbach, who came from Germany with his father when 
but six years of age, married, and became the father of the following chil- 
dren : Isaac, Adam. John, William, Jacob and Joseph. Of this family, 
Isaac was a drover, Jacob and William were distillers, and Joseph and Adam 
were farmers — all industrious men of business ability. 

In 1890 Adam Kalbach married Katherine Aulthouse, and their children 
were: Sarah, deceased; Harrison, of Lebanon; Isaac, deceased; Katherine, 
the wife of Jared Prossman, deceased: Levi, of Bernville. Berks county; 
James; William of Robesonia, Berks county; Amelia, the wife of H. Filbert, 
deceased; and Mandon, deceased. It is a rather remarkable fact that all of 
these sons e;igaged in the lumber business. Adam Kalbach was one of the 
leading and wealthy residents of Berks county for his day, and was a large 
land owner, possessing at one time 600 acres of land. After the Mexican war 
he was captain of a company of Home Guards. His political adherence was 
given to the Democratic party. 

James Kall^ach was reared to young manhood on the farm, and was 
educated in the district schools. For nine years he followed farming, but 
gradually drifted into the more congenial life of a lumberman, and his great 
success in that line testifies to his fitness for it. For twenty years he was 
connected with the lumber firm of Harrison & Kalbach & Bros., of Lebanon. 



144 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

In 1884 he located in Myerstown, at which time he purchased the handsome 
brick residence on South Railroad street which has since been the family- 
home. Mr. Kalbach thoroughly understands the lumbering business in all 
its practical details, and for the past thirty-hve years has devoted his atten- 
tion closely to it, a statement which may well be credited when it is stated that 
in some years he has spent 265 days in the timber at work. 

In 1 86 1 Mr. Kalbach was married to Miss Sarah Derr, who was one 
of a family of seven children born to John and Mary (Kline) Derr, of 
Berks county, their surviving children being: John Derr, of Bernville; 
William, of Berks county , Adam, of Schaefferstown ; Isaac, of the same place; 
Levi, deceased ; Mrs. Kalbach, and Mrs. Kaufman, deceased. This is one 
of the old German families of Berks county. 

A family of nine children was born to Mr. Kalbach and his wife, eight 
of these growing to maturity, as follows : D. C, of the firm of James Kal- 
bach & Sons ; Morgan, a merchant of North Heidelberg township, Berks 
county; James A., who is a practicing dentist at No. 2053 North 7th St, 
Philadelphia ; Edward, formerly a brilliant young attorney with George W. 
Wagner, of Reading, now deceased; Elmer, representative at Norristown 
of the firm of James Kalbach & Sons; Emma, wife of Charles O. Mennick, 
a teacher and farmer of North Heidelberg township; Sarah Jane, wife of 
Dr. J. M. Collins, a veterinary surgeon of Myerstown ; and Miss Cora, at 
home. Mary died in childhood. 

Mr. Kalbach is a man of business, well equipped wuth energy, health 
and ability, and has taken a leading position in his line of activity in the 
State. He is a stanch Democrat, but he has ne\er sought or been willing 
to accept political office. For many years he has been a consistent member 
of the Reformed Church, serving as deacon and elder. In North Heidelberg 
township he was one of the school directors for a period, and has always 
given his influence to the advancement of educational opportunities. He is 
a man devoted to 'his home and family, and in every respect a first-class, 
representative citizen. 

JOHN WALTER, M. D., who is one of the leading physicians of 
Lebanon, Pa., widely known through the county, and prominent in city 
affairs, was born near Lickdale, Union township, Lebanon county, August 
9. 1858. 

Several generations of the Walter family have been bom in Lebanon 
county, John Walter, the great-grandfather of Dr. Walter, being a resident 
of North Lebanon township, where his son, John (2), was bom. Daniel 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 145 

Walter, son of John (2). and father of Dr. Waher, was born in 1824. in 
Union township, followed farming and milling through life, and died in 18S0. 
He married Elizabeth Good, who was born in Reading, Pa., in 1819, daughter 
of Peter Good, of Berks county, and died in 1899. The children born to 
Daniel and Elizabeth Walter were: Henry G., a citizen of Lebanon: Dr. 
William G., deceased; Adam, a citizen of Lebanon; Elizabeth, who died in 
infancy; and John. 

Like many another professional man. Dr. John Walter was born and 
reared on a farm, learning in early life many practical lessons which ha\'e 
always been of benefit. His parents believed in education, and he was sent 
to the public schools until he was prepared to teach. He taught school 
in the winters, and attended in the spring until 1885, when he entered 
the Cumberland Valley State Normal School, at Shippensburg, where he 
graduated in 1886. Had he chosen teaching as his life work, he would 
doubtless have been one of the leading educators of the county. His inclina- 
tions, however, led him in the direction of medicine, and in the office of 
the late Dr. V. H. Allwine, of Lebanon, which he entered in 1886, he 
prepared for entrance into Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, where 
he graduated in the class of 1889. Very soon after he began a practice which 
has been actively pursued for fifteen years, becoming each year more absorbing 
and more satisfactory. 

In 1890 Dr. Walter received an appointment as a member of the lx>ard 
of health, serving in the same position, with great efficiency, for a period of 
nine years, during the last five of which he was president of the board. 
In 1893 he was appointed a member of the United States Pension Board, 
and he has sensed in the position of president of it ever since. Dr. Walter 
is a devoted member of his profession, and a representative member of the 
Lebanon County Medical Society and of the Pennsylvania State Medical 
Association, being chairman of the latter. He has taken a deep interest in 
the Lebanon Nursing School, and is one of the attending physicians at the 
Good Samaritan Hospital of Lebanon. Aside from his medical connections, 
which are all of the most honorable character, he is also a meml:)er of the 
Rescue Hose Company, and has been president of this fire department com- 
pany for seven years. His fraternal associations are with the I. O. O. P.. 
the P. O. S. of A., the A. O. U. W., the Knights of Malta, and the 
Brotherhood. 

In 1891 Dr. Walter was married to Nellie A. A\'aller. of Smethport, 
Pa., daughter of Edwin F. Waller, and two sons have been born of this 



140 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LERANOxV COUNTY. 

union: John Allen, born February 2^, 1894; and Daniel E., born August 
29, 1896. 

Politically the Doctor comes of good old Lebanon county Democratic 
stock, and as a pastime and recreation from his medical duties, he figures 
quite prominently in politics, and has become one of the leaders of his 
party, at present serving his fourth term as chairman of the Democratic 
county committee, to which he was elected April 2, 1900. His word is as 
good as his bond, and his faithfulness to a pledge once given is never deviated 
from; knowing tliis, his party stands by him with a fealty that cannot be 
questioned. It is an easy matter to lead in a majority county, but to stead- 
fastly put up a bold front and "hold the fort" for a minority, requires match- 
less skill, keen discernment, and the faculty of sizing men up at their true 
worth. He has shown consummate ability as a leader, as has been fully 
attested on many a stubbornly contested battlefield with his opponents. The 
Doctor is genial in his social walks, is a man of warm impulses, and his 
friendship is something worth possessing. As a public spirited citizen, he 
stands the peer of any man. ever ready to respond to any call calculated to 
advance materially the interests of the city. 

GEORGE WILSON ELLIS, one of the most prominent citizens of 
Jonestown, and a man known all over Lebanon county, was born in Jones- 
town April II, 1850, son of Henry M. and Eliza (Horn) Ellis. The father 
was born in Pottstown, Pa., in 1819, and died in October, 1898. The mother 
was torn in Womelsdorf, Berks county, Pa., in 18^4, and died in July, 1900. 

The paternal grandfather Ellis, a native of England, emigrated to 
America at an early date, and settled in the neighborhood of Trenton. N. J., 
removing thence to Pottstown, where he \\orked at his trade of shoemaker. 
His children were: Henry M., father of Gei>rge Wilson; Nathaniel, chief 
burgess of Phoenixville, Pa., who also held the oftice of United States 
marshal under Cleveland's administration ; and Daniel, who lost his life 
during the Civil war, while a private in a Pennsylvania regiment. 

The maternal grandfather of ]Mr. Ellis was John Horn, a native of 
New Jersey, and his father was a native of Ireland, who emigrated and settled 
in New lersey prior to the Revolution. Great-grandfather Horn married 
a Hayne, whose two brothers, Frederick and Isaac Hayne, served as 
soldiers in the Revolutionary war. They later owned the large double fann 
whereon now stands the Chronic Insane Hospital at Wernersville. Pa., and 
conducted a blacksmith sh(ip, distillery and wheelwright shop. Washington 
Horn, son of John, and uncle of George W. Ellis, served in Company A, 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 147 

Ninety-third P. V. I., was promoted from the ranks to captain of Company 
A, and died soon after the close of tlie war from wounds and exposure dur- 
ing his service. 

Henry M. Ehis, the father of our subject, learned the carpenter's 
trade from a man named Coonley, in Union township, Lebanon county, he 
having" come to Lebanon county from Montgomery county, Pa., \vhen a 
young man. He helped to lay the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad from 
Reading to Philadelphia, and worked at his trade in Jonestown for over 
fifty years. In 1873 he was elected county commissioner, and he held 
various oft^ices in the borough of Jonestown. His sympathies were with the 
Republican party. Fraternally he was an Odd Fellow. He was a member 
of the Lutheran Church, for many years being treasurer, and held that ofiice 
when the present church building was erected in Jonestown. He held a 
commission in the Pennsylvania National Guard under Gov. Schultze. He 
was a rugged man physically and mentally, and impressed his individuality 
upon the community. The children born to Henry M. Ellis and wife were 
as follows: Mary died in 1867, aged twenty-four years; Rebecca married 
Samuel Traftord, and died in 1896, aged forty-eight years; George W. is 
mentioned below ; Victoria married W. H. Bomgardner, of Reading, Pa. ; 
Lizzie M. married Capt. Jerome W. Henry, a captain of the 127th P. V. I., 
who later re-enlisted, and was wounded on the battlefield of Frederickslmrg, 
from which wound he later died ; Laura married Harvey Hoverter ; Henry 
died in 18S8, aged twenty-one years. 

George Wilson Ellis was reared in Jonestown, attending the common 
schools and the Swatara Institute (later Heilman's Hall, now the Orphans' 
Flome), of Jonestown. When in his seventeenth year he began to learn 
the trade of blacksmith with Isaac Miller, with whom he spent over tAvo 
years. He next worked for Light Bros., at their forge in North Annville 
township (Newmarket Forge), as blacksmith and carpenter, for two years. 
He then worked in Light's rolling-mill, Lebanon, where he had charge of a 
sheet mill for five years, spending altogether seven years with Light Bros. 
In 1877 he returned to Jonestown and engaged in blacksmithing for himself, 
at which he has since continued. For five vears he was in partnersliip with 
Mr. Miller, -with whom he learned the trade. 

Mr. Ellis was married to Annie Mary Light, sister to the father of 
Samuel E. Light, of Lebanon. She Avas born at Newmarket Forge in 1855, 
daughter of Jacob Light, who was a pioneer ironmaster of Lebanon county, 
and the first owner of Newmarket Forge. The chfldren of Mr. and ]\Irs. 
Ellis are: Warren, born December 2"]. 1874, who studied at ^luhlenberg 



148 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

College, took a four-years course at Mt. Airy Seminary in theology, was 
ordained a Lutheran minister, established the Broad Street (Philadelphia) 
Mission, where he preached two years, and is at present taking a philosophic 
course at the University of Pennsylvania; Charles, a jeweler by trade, who 
died October 19, 1901, aged twenty-four years: Ray G., who w-as educated 
at the common and normal schools and is a teacher at the present time; 
Herbert, a student in Fredericksburg; Fred R. ; Miriam; and Anna. 

Mr. Ellis has been prominent in public matters and politics for many 
years. For thirteen years he served as a councilman of Jonestown borough, 
and in 1895 served as chief burgess. In the same }'ear he was elected to 
represent Lebanon county in the Pennsylvania Legislature, receiving the 
largest vote cast at that election, and leading the Republican ticket. In 1897 
he was re-elected to the same office, again leading his ticket, with an increase 
in majority over that which he received in 1895. 

Fraternally Mr. Ellis has been a member of Mt. Lebanon Lodge, F. & 
A. M., since 1880, and of the Commandery since 1885. Religiously he is a 
member of the Lutheran Church, and has served as superintendent of the 
Sunday school for the past fifteen years. 

WILLIAM VAN DE SANDE was born in Germany, near Frankfurt-am- 
Main, May 2, 1827. His father. Dr. D. F. G. Van de Sande, was born in 
Cape Town, South Africa, and came to the United States in 1838, locating* 
at Fort Plain, N. Y. Later he went to Boston, where he continued to follow 
his profession, that of doctor of medicine. He died in tlxat city. He was 
the father of twelve children, all of whom grew to maturity, William 
being the eldest, and of the others are named Elizabeth ; Daniel, a celebrated 
musician of Chicago, 111.; Lewis, of Boston, Mass.; Joluii (deceased), who 
was a major in the war of the Rebellion; George (deceased), who was a 
graduate of West Point, served in the Rebellion, and was captain of Lincoln's 
guard; Mimmie, widow of Homer Locke; Mary, who is unmarried; and 
Louisa, wife of Benjamin Mann, of Washington, D. C. 

W'illiam van de Sande was educated in Germany and at Fort Plain 
(N. Y.) College. At the age of sixteen he went to New York and secured 
a position in the custom house. Later he learned the watchmaker's trade. 
In 1849 ^''6 went to Philadelphia, where he was employed by James E. Cald- 
well & Co., and where he remained three years. Returning to New York 
City in 1852, he went into business, entering the co-partnership of a large 
importing house, which imported watches, diamonds and jewelry. He con- 
tinued in that firm until 1861, during which time he did all the traveling, 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 149 

spending all the winter seasons in the Southern States, South America, 
Cuba, Mexico and California. In 1861 he separated from the firm, and 
returned to his nati\'e land, where he was employed as a civil engineer until 
1865, when he returned to America. Soon after his return to this country 
he located in Lebanon, Lebanon county. Pa., and bought an interest in a 
forge of the firm of Mitchell & Weiley. Three years later he bought out 
Mitchell, and changed the plant from a forge to a rolling-mill ; again he 
converted it into a puddling jjlant, which he conducted with marked suc- 
cess. In i88.| he sold out his entire interest to Jacol) Capp, and has since 
lived in retirement, having amassed a small fortune in the iron business. 

Mr. van de Sande was mari'ied to Miss Sarah M. Dunot, of Philadel- 
phia, Pa., a daughter of Miller Dunot. of Wilmington, Del. This marriage 
has been blessed with children as follows: Elizabeth, Mimmie and William, 
all residing with their parents in Lebanon. Mr. van de Sande is an inde- 
pendent politician, and in religion is a member of the Presbyterian Church. 
In fact,, he was educated for the ministry, but never followed it up. He 
is now seventy-si.x years of age, possesses a sound mind and a retentive 
memory, and is a man well-read, and with considerable literary ability and 
taste. He has written several stories and some poetry. He has never cared 
for politics, and has always desired to live a quiet, modest life. Mr. Van de 
Sande is to-day one of the most honored citizens of Lebanon, a man with a 
clear head, a lucid mind, and a generous heart for all. He is well liked 
by all who know him, and is now living retired, having spent his active days 
in a manner worthv of his ancestry. He attributes his success to honesty 
and close attention to business, and all agree, who are acquainted with him, 
that he is one of Lebanon's most successful business men. 

GEORGE M. STRACK, one of the honorable citizens and substantial 
retired farmers of Jackson township, is a native of that township, bom 
October 31, 1829, near Strack's Dam, son of Christian and Catherine (Moyer) 
Strack, natives of Heidelberg township, the latter a daughter of Michael 
Moyer. 

Christian Strack was born in 1792 and died at the age of ninety-one 
years, in 1884. and was a son of Henry Strack, a farmer in Heidelberg town- 
ship, who was born in Switzerland. Henry was one of the early settlers of 
Lelianon county, and at one time owned the land upon which now stands 
the village of Reistville; he married twice, and was the father of eighteen 
children. 

Christian Strack was a leading member of the Tulpehocken church; 



ISO BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

indeed, he took a prominent place in almost every circle, being one of the 
best farmers of the county, and for many years a Justice of the Peace. As 
a scrivener, surveyor and conveyancer his services we're constantly in demand, 
and his writing appeared in the recorder's ofiice on many of the legal papers 
during many years of his useful life. As an administrator of estates, his 
integritv was such that no single act of his was ever disputed. Like a good 
citizen, he took an intelligent interest at all times in public affairs, and always 
supported the Republican party. Mr. Strack was the father of eight children, 
as follows: Louise, Michael, Christian, Jacob, George M., Rebecca, John 
and Henr)^ all now deceased except George M. 

George M. Strack grew up on the farm and attended the subscription 
schools, educational opportunities being meager at that time in his locality. 
Public education, with all its privileges, was not then dreamed of. His 
time was employed in farm work, and at the age of twenty-two years he 
married Miss Sarah Anna Diehl, born April 27, 1831, in Jackson township, 
daughter of Philip and Eva Diehl, farming people of that township. Two 
children were born of this union: J. A. D., born June 4, 1863, married 
Sarah A. Krick. and died June 4, iqo2, leaving seven children. Franklin, 
Edwin, Albert, Flarry, Annie, James and Sarah; and Sarah Anna, married 
John H. Hibshman, and they reside on the old farm with Mr. Strack. The 
mother died February 22, 1803, a consistent member of the Zion Lutheran 
Church, and a woman of many amiable traits of character. 

Mr. Strack, who has reached the advanced age of seventy-four years, 
and is in perfect health, is spending the evening of life in his comfortable 
home in a residence erected in 1783, at peace with the world, and honored 
and respected by all who know him. His large farm is situated about four 
miles northwest of Myerstown, this property containing sixty-two acres, 
while he owns four more farms, aggregating 516 acres of the valuable land 
of Lebanon county. He has always been one of the liberal-minded men 
of the community, and of such unquestioned integrity that he has been 
called upon to fill many responsible positions. For the past forty years he 
has been one of the active Republicans of this section, was director of the 
poor from 1877 to 1880, and has been urged for other offices by his party 
on many occasions, and has been the efficient township auditor several terms. 
Since 1866 he has been a director of the Annville Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company. His connection with Kimmerling church began in 1855, and for 
thirty-eight years he has served as secretary, and has been elder and deacon, 
and since 1870 one of the trustees. 

Christian Strack is still remembered on account of his estimable char- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 151 

acter, and his son, George j\I.. worthily fills his place. He is becoming one 
of the venerable citizens of Jackson township, and counts his friends by the 
hundred, a testimonial to an exemplary life and a genial, kind, neighborly 
disposition. Many of the large estates of this locality have passed through 
his hands as administrator, his duties being performed with fidelity and 
scrupulous honesty. 

JOHN W. FEGAN. The fine farm which was the pleasant home of 
John W. Fegan. one of the leading and highly respected citizens of Lebanon 
county, now living retired in Annville, is one which was among the first 
cultivated tracts in North Lebanon township, its settlement being at a time 
when the young city of Lancaster was the nearest market place, and wheat 
growers were obliged to carry their bags of grain thither on horseback, dispos- 
ing of the cereal for sixty-two cents a bushel. 

John W. Fegan was born March 31, 1829. at Annville, Lebanon county, 
son of Daniel and Magdalina (Killinger) Fegan, the former of whom was 
born in England, and came as a boy, with his parents, to America. They 
located in Franklin county. Pa., and there Daniel grew to maturity, coming 
then to Lebanon county. He served in the war of 181 2. At Annville he 
married Magdalina Killinger, daughter of John Killinger, and settled in 
that place, becoming a prominent man in the county. While filling the office 
of sheriff of the coimty, he resided at Lebanon. He was a hatter by trade, and 
followed this business at Annville for ten years, engaging then in farming and 
continuing to rent land for this purpose until within ten years of his death. 
His prudence and industry resulted in the accumulation of a competency. In 
political life he was prominent, and capably served in local offices, was 
assessor ot his township, and was elected by the Republican party three 
years sheriff of the county. His reputation was that of being one of the 
honorable and progressive citizens of his time and locality. Both he and 
wife were consistent members of the Reformed Church. They had thirteen 
children born to them, eleven of these growing to maturity, as follows : 
Eliza, deceased, wife of Samuel Benson; Susannah, deceased, wife of Moses 
Gruber; Fannie, deceased, wife of John Nowlen; Rosannah, deceased, wife of 
Ephraim Bergner; Polly, deceased, wife of Elias Yorty; George, a carpenter 
and mechanic, who died in loAva ; John W. ; Peter, who died unmarried at 
the home of John W. ; Daniel, a retired carpenter and farmer at Annville; and 
Henry H. and Joseph K., twins, the former a farmer of Campbelltdwn, Lon- 
donderry township, and the latter a carpenter at South Annville. 

John W. Ffgan was reared at Annville and recei\ed the best education 



152 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

afforded at the time in the pubHc schools. At the age of twenty years 
he selected blacksmithing as his choice of a trade, and became an apprentice 
under Isaac Shiffler at Mt. Pleasant, South Annville township, and after 
becoming a skilled workman, followed the business for seven years for him- 
self at Annville. Then he purchased a small tract of eighteen acres of land 
in South Annville township, two years later selling it and purchasing lOO 
acres in the same township, where he operated for four years, and then sold 
that and bought his present farm. Here Mr. Fegan has 120 acres of the 
finest kind of land, which owes its development and improvement to him. 
His long years of industry ha\'e proved very fruitful, and he is now known 
among the substantial men of his township, and one who has been a very 
important factor in its agricultural development. He has retired from 
active work, and resides in a comfortable home in Annville. Mr. Fegan 
is highly esteemed in financial as well as other circles, and is one of the 
stockholders in the Farmers" National Bank of Lebanon. 

In 1855 Mr. Fegan was married to Miss Lucetta Shiffler, born January 
28, 1832, daughter of George and Catherine (Sherk) Shiffler, a native of 
Lancaster county, near Ephrata, the family moving to near Palmyra, Dauphin 
county, when she was about sixteen years of age. Mr. Fegan and his 
estimable wife had a family of eleven children born to them, as follows: 
John, a farmer, is one of the school directors of North Lebanon township; 
Mary, who is the widow of Amos Boltz, resides in Annville, and has one 
son, Walter F. ; Frank, a carpenter, married Leah Poorman and they have 
one son, Lloyd, and reside at Cleona ; Simon, who is a farmer on his father's 
ninety-acre farm, married Tacie Marks, and they have two children, Mark 
and Mary : and Harry, who is a teacher in the public schoools, resides at 
home. Six children died in early childhood. This worthy and prominent 
family belongs to the Reformed Church at Annville. 

I. REILY BUCHER, M. D., an old and well-known physician of Leba- 
non county, who has been located in the city of Lebanon since 1876, becoming 
one of her most esteemed citizens, was bora August 22, 1832, in Schaeflfers- 
town, this county, a descendant of a long line of eminent physicians. 

Dr. Benedict Bucher, the great-grandfather of Dr. Bucher, of Lebanon, 
with his brother, Hannes Bucher, came to America about 1750, from the 
Canton of Bern. Switzerland, and with many others of their countrj^men, 
settled in Cocalico township, Lancaster county. Pa. Dr. Benedict Bucher, the 
grandfather of Dr. I. Reily, perpetuated his father's name and fame, and 
was born August 7, 1759, in Cocalico township, Lancaster county, and studied 




1", QlLi^^^^-cJ^.hx.J}, 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNIY. 153 

his profession under his father. About 1780 he located in Lebanon town- 
ship, Lancaster county, which is now CornwaU township, Lebanon county, 
and there practiced his profession, became prominent in local affairs, and on 
account of eminent ability and superior education, was called upon to fill many 
public ofhces. His death occurred May i, 1830; his wife, Susanna Mohler, 
born January 29, 1764, died September i, 1827. 

Dr. Christian Bucher, son of Dr. Benedict (2), was born in Cornwall 
township, Lebanon county, April 16, 1796, and died December 22, i860. 
His marriage was to Mary Valentine, and they reared these children : Dr. 
Samuel, who located at Cedarville, 111., where he died; Susan, who married 
Henry Houck, of Lebanon; Dr. Alfred; Mary Ann, who married Frank H. 
Goshert, of Lebanon ; and Dr. Isaac Reily, of Lebanon. 

Dr. Bucher was educated in the common schools of Schaefiferstown, and 
during the winter of 1850-51 he attended the Strasburg Academy in Lan- 
caster county. In 1852 he made a trip to Minnesota, which was then, a Terri- 
tory, but soon after went to his brother Samuel, who had removed to Cedar- 
ville, 111., and was there engaged in the practice of medicine. Accepting a 
position as clerk in a store at Buena Vista, 111., a village near Cedarville, he 
remained for a short time, but evidently inherited instincts and tastes urged 
him to enter the professional world, and he became a student of medicine 
under his brother. Dr. Bucher, at Cedarville. During the summer of 1853 
he engaged in clerking in a wholesale and retail store at Peru, 111., but in the 
following winter resumed his studies at Cedarville. In the spring of 1854 he 
took a walking trip through the State of Iowa, working his way by the 
performance of small jobs as he went along, and in the fall of the same 
year returned to his birthplace, and continued his medical studies under his 
eminent father. The winters of 1856 and 1857 were spent in attendance upon 
lectures at the Pennsylvania Medical College, and he was there graduated 
in the latter year. Upon his return home he took charge of his father's 
practice, and continued to reside at Schaefferstown until 1876, when) he 
removed to Lebanon, where he has ever since remained, becoming both pro- 
fessionally and personally a most valued citizen. 

On October 2, i860. Dr. Bucher was married to Mary E. Heister, who 
was born Aiay 2, 1835, in the residence now occupied by Dr. Bucher, and 
died in 1897. To this union eight children were born, the survivors being: 
Dr. John C, of Lebanon ; Dr. Heister, of Reading, who married Vara Kal- 
bach, and has one daughter, Mary Elizabeth; and j\Iay and Paul, twins, born 
in 1876. In his sons he sees his name and profession honorably perpetuated. 

Dr. Bucher has, in every sense of the word, been a successful physician, 



154 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

being a man of large sympathy, calm discrimination and much tact and 
personal magnetism, and this, combined with the experience of many years 
and devotion to his profession, has enabled him to not only amass worldly 
possessions, but also to gain his fellow-citizens' confidence and esteem. Ad- 
mirably fitted to represent liis profession, he has been highly honored by 
the various bodies, and in 1897 was called upon to become the president of 
the Lehigh Valley Medical Society. Much credit is due his efforts in the 
organization of the Lebanon County Medical Society, one of the representa- 
tive bodies of the State. Since 1S84 he has been a member of the American 
Medical Association, and with ability and dignity he has represented the 
same at the conventions held in Cincinnati, Ohio; Nashville, Tenn. ; Denver, 
Colo.; Nebraska; Baltimore, Md. ; Washington, D. C. ; and Atlantic City, 
N. J. His fraternal association is with the Masons, Mt. Lebanon Lodge, 
A. F. & A. M., and the Chapter and Commandery, of Avhich latter he was 
treasurer. The Doctor's political connection is with the Democratic party. 
He has served as a member of the Lebanon city school board, and also on the 
board of health. 

HENRY HOUCK, one of the most honored citizens of Lebanon, was 
born March 6, 1836, in Palmyra, Lebanon county. Pa., son of Samuel and 
Rosanna (Tontz) Houck, the former of whom was born in 1808, and died in 

■1875; 

Tlie early education of Henry Houck was obtained in the common schools 

and at the Annville xAcademy. and he also attended one term at Arcadia 
Institute at Orwigsburg, and later, while engaged in teaching, took lessons 
in Greek and Latin from tutors. Franklin and Marshall College gave him 
the degree of A. M., and Pennsylvania College that of Lift. D. At the age 
of sixteen he began teaching, and has been identified with educational work 
ever since, being at present deputy superintendent of education for the State 
of Pennsylvania, to which honorable position he was appointed in 1869. Mr. 
Houck has ser^^ed as county superintendent of Lebanon county, as recording 
clerk of the school department of the State, and has been deeply interested in 
every educational movement. 

On April 10, 1856. Henry Houck was married to Susan Margaret 
Bucher. daughter of Dr. Christian Bucher, and the following named chil- 
dren were born to this union : Harvey Bucher, Mary Valentine, Rosa 
Tontz, Elizabeth Heister. Paul Winters, Alfred Rhodes and Susan INIargaret. 

Alfrfd R. HorcK, postmaster of Lebanon, and a prominent and repre- 
sentative citizen of that place, was born January 29. 1868. in the brick resi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 155 

dence on the corner of Fifth and Chestnut streets, Lebanon, where his father 
still resides. He received his education in the public schools and the high 
school of Lebanon, and also took a special course at tiie Annville Normal 
school. In 1884 he entered the Weimer Machine shops, in Lebanon, ami 
served an apprenticeship of three years, following this with a three years' 
course in the draft room and mechanical engineering department of the same 
establishment. For the succeeding six years he wor'<ed in the mechanical 
engineering department of the same shops, and in 1S97 took a position as 
mechanical engineer in the Lackawanna Iron & Steel Works, at Scranton, 
Pa. In 1898 Mr. Houck entered the United States Revenue Service as 
chief stamp deputy, or cashier, in the department at Lancaster, and filled the 
position for two years and nine months, resigning to accept the position 
of postmaster, to which he had been appointed February i, 1901. Socially 
Mr. Houck is a member of the Elks. 

JOHN KLEISER, one of the welLknown citizens of Lebanon, ami 
member of the board of comity commissioners, was born ]\Iay 30, 1837, on 
the corner of Tenth and Chestnut streets, in that city. 

Ignatius Kleiser, his grandfather, was born in Germany, and came to 
Lebanon at a very early day. He carried on a meat business in a building on 
the corner of Tenth and Cumberland streets, for many years, and owned the 
hotel located on the corner of Tenth and Cumberland streets, which, in its 
time, was one of the popular public houses of Lebanon. His son Joseph, the 
father of John, was born in Lebanon, and was a prosperous butcher there. 
Fie married Rosanna Zimmerman, who was also born in Lebanon, daughter 
of John and Elizabeth Zimmerman. Joseph Kleiser died in 1866, his wife 
surviving until 1890. to her eighty-fourth year. Four children were born to 
them : Cyrus, who is the proprietor of the "American House," in Lebanon ; 
Ignatius and Jeremiah, deceased ; and John. 

John Kleiser was reared in Lebanon and attended the common schools 
of that citv. Later he served an apprenticeship at the shoemaker's trade, and 
for a number of years worked as a journeyman for the late Joseph Bowman, 
making the greater number of the fine shoes which were a feature of that 
merchant's trade. In 1861 Mr. Kleiser enlisted for Civil war service, enter- 
ing Company E, 127th Regiment, P. V. I., under Capt. Greenawalt, and 
served through his term of nine months. After the close of the war he 
engaged in railroading, and for sixteen years was em])lcyed on the old Corn- 
wall railroad, beginning as front brakeman and working his way up to the 
position of conductor, in which capacity he served eight of the sixteen years. 



156 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

In 1880 Mr. Kleiser embarked in the boot^ shoe, trunk and satchel business, 
opening a store at No. 28 South Ninth street, in Lebanon, and has continued 
to prosper in that hne ever since. He is a business ni::n of integrity and has 
a large patronage. 

In i860 Mr. Kleiser was married to Julia A. Albright, the only child 
of Louis Albright, an early and well-known citizen of Lebanon, and to this 
union the following children have been born: Annie M., who married J. 
Shindel Krause, of Lebanon; Grant E., of Lebanon; Elizabeth M., who mar- 
ried Elmer E. Hauer, of Lebanon; and Joseph A., of Lebanon. 

Mr. Kleiser has been a prominent citizen of Lebanon county for many 
years, and has a wide circle of acquaintances and a host of warm friends. 
He has been a lifelong member of the Republican party, and in 1899 v.-as 
honored by his party and fellow citizens by election to the important and 
responsible position of member of the board of county commissioners for 
Lebanon county, for a term of three years, which position he is now filling 
with credit to himself and satisfaction to the county. Mr. Kleiser is a mem- 
ber of Sedgwick Post, G. A. R., and of Mohegan Lodge, No. 288, I. O. 
O. F. His religious connection is with the Salem Evangelical Lutheran 
Church. 

.DANIEL S. MOORE, who died on his well-improved farm April 19. 
1901, was one of the largest land owners and most prominent agriculturists 
in Millcreek township, and his loss was felt in many circles. 

Mr. Moore was a member of one of the pioneer families of Lebanon 
county, and was of good Dutch extraction, John George Moore, the first 
American representative of the line, coming from Holland about I72C. 
After a short residence in Schoharie county, N. Y., he located in Lebanon 
county. Pa., where about 1730 he took out a patent of land in ]\[illcreek 
township. This he cleared and improved, making a good farm for himself. 

John Moore, son of John George, and grandfather of Daniel S., was 
reared in Millcreek township, and there U])on reaching manhood engaged in 
agriculture. He was a man of thrift and energy, and thoroughly prosperous. 
In the public affairs of the day he took an ardent interest, and in politics he 
was a strong Jefferson Democrat. 

Michael Moore, son of John, and father of Daniel S.. devoted his long 
and active life to the steady, conscientious pursuit of agriculture. Upon his 
father's farm he received thorough preparation for his life work. About 
1835 ^^- Moore married Mary Strickler, and they had two children: Ed- 
ward S. and Daniel S. After his marriage Mr. Moore settled upon a farm 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 157 

about half a mile southeast of Millbach, where he engaged in agriculture 
very successfully for many years. He improved the place, put the buildings 
in good condition, and in other respects added to the value of the property. 
Making an unqualified success of his work here, he purchased other farms in 
the vicinity, which he also managed with good results. In all his ventures 
he prospered, and in time became one of the largest land owners in Mill- 
creek township. He lived to the advanced age of ninety-three years, and his 
wife, who is still living, is now eighty-seven. Mr. Moore possesses a large 
capacity for directing affairs, wherein lay his success as an agriculturist. In 
many walks of life he was influential, and the Reformed Church counted him 
among its most substantial members. Politically he was a strong Democrat. 

Daniel S. Moore was decidedly a product of good wholesome farm life. 
Born on the old Moore homestead, just out of Millbach, April 26, 1843, ^^ 
there early shouldered life's responsibilities, receiving careful training in 
habits of industry and self-reliance. In tlie public schools of his vicinity he 
gained a practical rudimentary education, displaying much natural abilit)- at 
grasping information. Both inclination and environment, however, decided 
him upon reaching manhood to engage in agriculture, and securing a farm 
in Millcreek township he there followed his pursuit for many years. A good 
practical manager, not afraid of work, he had large and profitable crops from 
the start, and encouraged by his success he later purchased other farms in the 
township, which he managed with equal profi.t. He greatly improved all his 
property, and was long known as one of the wealthy farmers and large land- 
owners of the township. At the time of his death he owned there three well- 
improved farms to divide among his heirs. 

On May 18, 1897, Mr. Moore married Lizzie Sanders, of Schaeffers- 
town, who now resides upon one of the attractive Moore farms in Millcreek 
.township, which she is managing with much success. By this marriage 
there was one daughter, Frances May, who was born April 22, 1900. 

Mr. Moore as one of the most capable men in his locality. To each task 
he gave the full strength of his manhood, making a thorough success of 
each undertaking. He kept himself well informed upon the latest movements 
in agriculture and evinced rare judgment in detecting those of practical 
value. Like his predecessors, he was a strong Democrat in politics. Botii 
he and his wife belonged to the Reformed Church of Millbach, and he served 
as deacon there for many years. 

Samuel Sanders, father of ]^drs. ]\Ioore, comes of one of the old and 
highly respected families of Lebanon county, his grandfather Sanders having 
come hither from Germany in the early days. John Jacob Sanders, father 



158 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

of Samuel, was born in Lebanon county, Pa., and there passed many years 
of his active and useful life. Samuel Sanders married Susannah Layser, 
and they had six children: John S., now a resident of Schaefferstown ; 
James, who lives in Sterling, 111.; Lizzie (Mrs. Moore), who is mentioned 
above; Sallie, who married Aaron Bowman, of Millcieek township; Mary, 
now deceased; and Malinda. who has never married. Mr. Sanders, the 
father, now in his seventy-first year, is living in retirement in North 
Lebanon. 

JACOB WESTENBERGER. one of the representative and progres- 
sive farmers of Cornwall township, Lebanon county, was born March 9, 
1852, in Cornwall township, a son of Joseph and Veronica (Hostetterj 
Westenberger, who removed to South Annville township when he was a 
child but one year of age. 

Mr. Westenberger grew to maturity in South Annville township, and 
attended the local schools, acquiring a good education. At the age of 
twenty-two years he began to farm for himself, locating on a tract of seventy- 
three acres, near by, where he remained for eight years, removing then to a 
larger farm, containing 123 acres, in the same township, where he also 
remained eight years. Then he removed to the farm which he now occupies, 
purchasing the same, which contains almost ninety acres of some of the finest 
land in this part of Lebanon county. It is particularly well located also, 
within three miles of the southern limits of the city of Lebanon. Thus he and 
his family enjoy all the benefits and privileges of both country and city life. 
Mr. Westenberger carries on a general line of farming, employing modern 
methods and improved machinery, being a man of practical ideas and pro- 
gressive and intelligent activity. 

While not an active politician, Mr. Westenberger affiliates with the 
Republican party, and is ready to put his shoulder to the wheel to assist all 
enterprises which his judgment convinces him ^^'ill benefit his community. 
The township has had no more careful judge of elections, nor more capable 
member of its school board. 

In 1873 Mr. Westenberger was married to Mary A. Black, born in 
North Lebanon township, a daughter of Hugh and Leah (Boyer) Black, 
and their two sons, John H. and Albert, both remain in the pleasant old 
home, the latter having married Miss Gertie Treist, of Cornwall township. 
Since 1893 Mr. Westenberger has been a zealous member of the United 
Brethren Church, and in 1S95 he was licensed to preach, officiating as min- 
ister at various stations both in Lancaster and Lebanon counties. He is the 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 159 

class leader of the Rockerty Church, and has done much to assist in the 
upbuilding of this congregation. Both he and his wife are esteemed and 
beloved by all who know them, and are true Christian people. 

ISRAEL W. GROH, who entered into rest December 20, 1895, was 
born June 19, 1834, in Heidelberg township, near Schaeffcrstown, Lebanon 
county. Pa., a son of Michael and Susanna (Moyer) Groh. 

Michael Groh was the father of five children as follows: John M., who 
married Lizzie Macilli, and settled in Breathedsville, Md. ; Sarah M., who 
married John M. Hill, and located at Sheridan. Pa.; Israel W. ; Susanna H., 
who married Frank Iba, and settled in Schaeffcrstown; and Michael, who 
died in infancy. The father belonged to the German Reformed Church at 
Schaeffcrstown, which he served as a deacon, and in which he otherwise 
took an active and leading part. 

Israel W. Groh was brought up on a farm, receiving his preliminary 
education in the winter terms of the country schools, sucii as they were. 
His summers w-ere spent at work upon the home farm. His thirst for knowl- 
edge was not satisfied w'ith the little that home schools offered him, and at 
sixteen he went to Maryland to learn English. Having overcome this great- 
est obstacle to his rapid advancement he returned to Pennsylvania and 
entered Mt. Joy Academy, later attending the State Normal school at Mil- 
lersville (at that time a subscription school). At each place he distinguished 
himself for his scholarship, and when he left the school room as a pupil it 
was only to re-enter it as a teacher. lie also served successfully as a leader 
of singing classes. After his marriage, in 1861, he returned to the farm. In 
1875 he purchased the David Zug mill, and in the following year took pos- 
session of it, and from that time until his death conducted it with unvarying- 
success. At his death he left considerable property, which descended to his 
son, Calvin E., who manages it with the same care and ability evinced by 
his father. 

In 1 86 1 Mr. Groh was married to Sabina E. Eberly, and two sons were 
born of this union: Calvin E., born August 30, 1862; and Harvey, born 
October 26, 1867, died in infancy. The widowed mother lives at the mill 
with her son. 

In politics Mr. Groh was a stanch Republican. In his religious faith 
he was a Spiritualist, but believed implicitly in the wisdom and love of the 
Creator, but he denied the divinity of Christ. He was a man of much intel- 
lectual vigor, and of great force and simplicity of character. In his con- 
victions he was firm, but ever tolerant of the opinions of others, fii every 



i6o BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

relation of life he practiced the strictest integrity; and his direct and even 
judgment made his counsel much sought by his associates. He enjoyed a 
very extensive acquaintance, and had the universal contidence and esteem of 
all who knew him. 

THOMAS EVANS. Among the prominent citizens of Lebanon, Pa., 
is Thomas Evans, who for twenty years has been closely identified with the 
iron interests of the Lebanon Valley, and who, though now retired from 
active business, continues his identification with the manufacture of iron as a 
director in the American Iron and Steel Company. 

John B. Evans, his father, was a native of England, and emigrated to 
America in about 1842. After two years of residence in New York City, 
he went, about 1844, as far west as Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was joined 
by his family in the following year. Mr. Evans was a worker in iron. The 
wife and mother died when our subject was but a boy. 

Thomas Evans went to school and passed his boyhood days in Cincinnati. 
About 1850 he worked in a rolling mill in St. Louis, Mo., and, after two 
years there, went on a visit to Portsmouth, Ohio, where he learned the trade 
of roll turner in a rolling mill, remaining for some time in that city. Returning 
to Cincinnati in April, 1858, he remained there working at his trade until 
185Q, when he went to Shelby, Ala., there building the first rolling mill 
ever erected in that State, which mill was put in operation in May, i860. Mr. 
Evans operated the plant vmtil the John Brown raid, at that time finding 
it expedient to return North. In the fall of i860 he again went South, this 
time to Ettawa, Ga., where,, as superintendent, he took charge of the Ettawa 
Iron Works, and remained there until May 15, 1861, and again the war sent 
him North. In the following August, Mr. Evans went to Newport, Ky., 
to the Swift Iron & Steel Works, where he got up rolls and machinery 
especially constructed for the manufacture of iron for the protection of the 
Mississippi river gun boats, being built for tlie Federal government. During 
that winter he took charge as manager of the entire plant of the Swift Iron & 
Steel Works, and manufactured iron for the United States monitors, built 
at Cincinnati. In July, 1862, he enlisted in the Federal army, and was made 
captain of Company C, Forty-first Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, and ser\'ed 
as such for three months. He then returned to the management of the Swift 
mill, where he continued until 186S, in which year he returned to Cincinnati. 
In that city he organized a company which was known as the Evans, Clifton 
Company, and built the \^ilcan Rolling ^Mill and Tube Works, which he 
operated until December, 1878, and he then again took charge of the Swift 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. i6[ 

Works in Newport, Ky. He remained there until 1880, when he came to 
Pennsylvania, and took charge of the E. & G. Brooks Iron Company, at 
Birdsborough. In August, 1882, he broke ground in Lebanon for the erection 
of the works of the Lebanon Iron Company, and in May, of the following 
year, began the manufacture of iron as the general manager of the above 
company, in which he was a large owner, and he so continued until the com- 
pany was merged into the American Iron and Steel Manufacturing Com- 
pany, in February, 1901, becoming a director in the latter organization. 

Mr. Evans has been active in the manufacture of iron since his location 
in Lebanon, and he was president of the Lebanon Chain Works, which enter- 
prise, by his genius and knowledge of iron and steel, was made a most suc- 
cessful venture. He was a director in the Lebanon Electric Street Railway, a 
dn^ector in the Electric Light Company, and is at present a director in the 
American Ice and Coal Company, of Harrisburg. 

Mr. Evans is a member of Robert Burns Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of 
Newport, Ky. ; Olive Branch Chapter, of the same ; and is a member of 
Reading Commandery, K. T., and of Reading Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

In December, 1872, Mr. Evans was married to Fannie R. Robson, a 
member of one of the prominent old Kentucky families, whose father was 
for many years a leading business man of Cincinnati. 

MICHAEL M. MOORE, of Millbach. a retired agriculturist and dealer 
in cattle, horses and mules, carried on his industries in that place for about 
fifty years. His keen business judgment and his integrity of character have 
won him the confidence of the community, and he has been influential in the 
public affairs of Lebanon county. 

Mr. Moore was born December 18, 1832, on the old family homestead 
near Millbach, and comes of a fine old Pennsylvania-Dutch family. His 
great-grandfather, John George Moore, the first representative of the family 
in America, came from Holland some time between 1720 and 1730, and first 
settled in Schoharie county, N. Y. Prior to 1730 he moved to Millcreek 
township, Lebanon Co., Pa., and there secured from John, Thomas and 
Richard Penn a tract of wild land. He cleared it, erected good buildings, 
and improved it in other respects, making in time a good home for himself, 
where he passed many fruitful years of his life. He was the father of four 
children: John (who is mentioned below), Elizabeth. Catherine and 
Rebecca. Mr. Moore was a strong, energetic man, and as a pioneer of 
Lebanon county was influential in establishing a good government, and in 
developing the resources of the section. 
11 



i62 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

John Moore, son of John George, and grandfather of Michael M., was 
a resident of Mihcreek township for many years, and was there reared to 
farm work. Upon reaching manhood he married! Ehzabeth Moyer, and 
their nine children were: John, Monroe, Michael, George, Jonathan (who is 
mentioned below), Henry, Philip, Mary and Eve. The father of these 
children engaged in agricnltural work in Millcreek township, and carried on 
a successful industry' for many years, as a wise business manager receiving 
good financial returns for his labor. He took an intelligent interest in the 
public alTairs of his day, and in politics was a strong Jeffersonian Democrat. 

Jonathan Moore, father of Michael M., was, like his predecessors, a 
prosperous agriculturist of Millbach. In a well regulated home he received 
careful rearing, and in the public schools of his neighborhood a good prac- 
tical education. Both environment and inclination led him upon reaching 
manhood to engage in agriculture, and he early purchased an attractive farm 
within a quarter of a mile of Millbach, where he settled and continued his 
pursuit. About 1830 he erected on this place some fine new buildings, which 
are now in the possession of his son. John M. Other improvements followed, 
and he in time had one of the most \'aluable farms in the count)\ Meeting 
with success, he continued in that line for the most part throughout his 
business life. He was practical, progressive and thorough in his work, and 
stood high among the agriculturists of his section, where he was quite influ- 
ential. About 1820 Mr. Moore married Katherine Miller, and of this union 
there were three children: John M., a retired farmer and watchmaker of 
Millbach; Michael M., who is mentioned below; and Elizabeth, who died in 
childhood. 

'Mr. Moore possessed all those sterling traits of character that go into 
the making of a strong, vigorous man — a large capacity for work, high ideals, 
and the energy that goes out to attain them. In public affairs he always 
evinced a keen interest, and in politics afhliated with the Democrats. He was 
a man of strong religious convictions, and a substantial member of the 
Reformed Church. 

Michael M. Moore passed his early life in a comfortable, well-ordered 
home in Millcreek township, and in the steady performance of rural pur- 
suits received thorough training for life's activities. In the public schools 
of his vicinity he gained a good rudimentary education, and there developed 
habits of industry and alertness of much value to him in later life. On 
December 7, 1851, Mr. Moore married Henrietta Weigley, who was born in 
April, 1828, in Jackson township, daughter of Jacob and Katherine (]\Iiller) 
Weigley. pioneer settlers of that townsliip, who had a i'amily of ten children, 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 163 

all now deceased. Mrs. Moore, who was a devoted wife and mother, died 
April 21, 1902. To Mr. and Mrs. Moore were born three children: Miller 
Adam, a blacksmith of Millbach ; Jonathan W., who is a dealer in coal at 
Sheridan; and Andrew P., a cigar manufacturer of Richland. Of these, 
Jonathan \V. and Andrew P. are mentioned below. Miller A. IMoore was 
born October 21, 1852, and married Emma C. Smith, daughter of Dr. Seth 
K. Smith, of Newmanstown, Lebanon Co., Pennsylvania. 

After his marriage Mr. Moore settled in Millbach and engaged in farm- 
ing. Wise management and patient industry crowned his efforts with suc- 
cess, and he continued in that line for many years. About 1855, in addition 
to his other business, he began to speculate in cattle, horses and mules, giving 
the latter his chief attention. A perfect knowledge of thoroughbreds enabled 
him to detect at a glance a good animal, and he seldom made a mistake in a 
purchase. Perfectly fair in his dealings with others, he soon worked up a 
large trade, which steadily increased from year to year, and, deriving a good 
income from the business, he continued it for over forty years, over all the 
eastern part of Pennsylvania, closing out in 1896, when he retired from active 
work. He has prospered in all his undertakings in life, and now, in his 
seventy-first year, is availing himself of well-earned leisure. 

Mr. Moore is a man of marked integrity, and possesses a cjuiet dignity 
that commands the respect of even casual observers. He is absolutely honest, 
abstemious in his habits, generous in business, and sympathetic toward the 
unfortunate. Tlie Reformed Church of Millbach counts him among its influ- 
ential members, and for over forty years he has faithfull)' served as treasurer. 
His wife was also an esteemed member of that church for many years. 
Throughout his long life he has always evinced an ardent interest in every- 
thing pertaining to the welfare of the community, j/'olitically he is a strong 
Democrat. 

JONATHAN W. ^.TOORE, dealer in coal at Sheridan, Lebanon 
county, is one of the leading business men of Millcreek township. He was 
born March 15., 1855, at Millbach, that township, and remained there until 
the age of sixteen years, during which time he had gained an excellent com- 
mon-school education under Hiram L. Illig. Then he entered Albright Col- 
lege, at Myerstown, where he remained for two years, and then began as a 
clerk in the store of Allen Weigiey, at Myerstown. Here INIr. ^loore 
remained about tweh-e months, and then took a short trip to Virginia, after 
which he returned to his home and resumed clerking, this time in the store 



i64 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

of J. A. Weigley, at Richland, remaining in this capacity for eighteen 
months. In June, 1873, he entered the employ of the Philadelphia & Reading 
Railway Company, as assistant agent at Sheridan, Pa., and filled the duties 
of that position for five years, during which period he was appointed agent 
pro tem. at Sheridan, serving three months, tie was next appointed station 
and express agent and telegraph operator at Sellersville, Bucks county, con- 
tinuing there two years. He was then transferred to \\'ernersville, Berks 
county, as station agent and telegraph operator, and Atlantic steamship line 
agent, filling this position for two years. Mr. Moore then returned to Sheri- 
dan, and became station and express agent and telegraph operator, a position 
he most efficiently filled for eleven years. One year, from July 13, 1888, to 
July 13, 1889, in connection with the Philadelphia & Reading agency, Mr, 
Moore was bonded for $20,000 by the City Trust Safe Deposit & Surety- 
Company, of Philadelphia, in a pig iron transaction between his employers 
and William M. Kaufman & Co. This position he filled with credit. In 
1892, after Iw^enty years of service with the company, he resigned and 
embarked in a coal business at Sheridan, where he has been successfully 
engaged ever since. 

Since ]\Iay i, 1903, Mr. Moore, besides attending to his coal business, 
has been connected with the Pennsylvania Furnace Company, of Sheridan, 
Pa., and has full charge of all their properties, viz. : two blast furnaces, 
twenty-five tenement houses and a farm. 

In 1882 Mr. Moore was married by Rev. Charles H. Leinbach, to IVIary 
R. Kaufman, daughter of Z. M. Kaufman, who was at one time one of the 
leading men in Lebanon county, manager of the Sheridan Furnace, and mem- 
ber of the firm of William Kaufman & Co., manufacturers of pig iron. This 
company, through its industries, built up the village of Sheridan, and owned 
almost all of the property. The Kaufmans were long regarded among the 
important manufacturers of the State. Two children, Elsi K., and Lulu, 
were born to Mv. and Mrs. Moore, the last named dying in childhood. Mrs. 
Moore belonged to a family of five children, the other members being: John 
K., of Reading; Sallie, wife of Henry Mellen, a hotel-keeper of Sheridan; 
Katherine, the postmistress of Sheridan ; and Clara, deceased. 

In politics Mv. Moore is identified with the Republican party, but he has 
never accepted public office. In November. 1895, l^^ served six weeks as 
juryman in the United States Courts (Eastern district), Philadelphia. Pa. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Masons, belonging to Chandler Lodge, 
No. 227, of Reading, Chapter No. 152, De Molay Commandery, No. 9, 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 165 

Knights Templar. He is a member of the Tulpehockeii Reformed Church 
(of which Rev. Charles H. Leinbach is pastor), and is one of the honorable, 
reliable and much respected citizens of his locality. 

ANDREW P. MOORE, a well known cigar manufacturer at Richland 
Station, whose handsome residence stands at. the corner of Railroad and Main 
streets, has been engaged in his line for seventeen years, and is now con- 
sidered one of the solid business men of the place. Dealing in only first- 
grade articles, his establishment is considered thoroughl}^ reliable, and does 
the largest business of any similar factory in its section of the country. 

Mr. Moore was born at Millbach, August 30, 1858. Reared in Millbach, 
he there early entered the public schools, where his alertness of intellect and 
studious habits at once manifested themselves. Ambitious for a higher edu- 
cation, he later attended the Palatinate College, now known as Albright 
College, at Myerstown, finishing his work there about 1880, and also attend- 
ing the Millersville State Normal School. Thus it may be seen that he 
spared himself neither time, hard work nor money in preparing for life's 
activities. Facing the stern problems of life, he decided tO' engage in business, 
and going to Richland, Pa., he entered the establishment of Klopp & 
Kegerreis, and began learning the business of cigarmaking. Strict attention 
to business and a well trained intellect enabled him in a short time to master 
the details of his work, and he afterward continued there for several years. 
Then, in 1886. he opened a cigar factory of his own in Richland. Thorough 
knowledge of the work, and sound business judgment, enabled him to make a 
success of the industry from the start. Manufacturing good articles, he had 
little if any difficulty in securing a place for them on the market, and he 
soon worked up a large trade. From year to year he has enlarged the 
business, and he is now employing thirty hands in his factory. His cigars 
are of the best five and ten cent brands, and win a reputation for excellence 
wherever they are sold. The industry has long yielded a large income, and 
Mr. Moore is now considered one of the solid business men of Richland. 
Besides the factory he owns one of the finest residences in the city. 

Mr. Moore is one of the most intelligent and progressive men of Rich- 
land. He has traveled extensively, across the country and through many 
of the States of the Union. With the topics of the day he is thoroughly con- 
versant, and as a stanch Republican he takes an active interest in politics. 
Reared in the faith of the Reformed Church, he is now a leading member of 
same at Millbach. He is a man of abstemious habits, and possesses to a 
marked degree the other family traits — energy, honesty and sound judgment. 



1 66 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

In 1879 Mr. Moore married Fannie I'rank, and they have one child, 
Gertrude F. WilHam Frank, Sr., father of Mrs. Moore, comes of an old 
and honorable family of North Annville township, and he is still a resident 
of Richland. He had a family of live children : Adaline, now a resident of 
Myerstown ; D. R., who resides in Richland: Fannie, Mrs. Moore; William; 
and Lizzie. 

DANIEL WEAVER, a successful business man of Avondale, Lebanon 
county, and a member of one of the well known families of that locality, was 
born at Millbach, Millcreek township, this county, May 30, 1861, son of 
John and Susannah (Shower) Weaver, who were born and reared in Leb- 
anon and Berks counties, respectively. 

By calling the father was a farmer, and he became one of the successful 
men of his township. The following children were born to himself and wife: 
John, a farmer of Lebanon county ; Henry, a mechanic, of Reading, Pa. ; 
Samuel, an engineer at Avondale; Sarah, unmarried; Elizabeth, who married 
Eli Furistim : Maiy, deceased, who married Samuel Gibble; and Daniel. 
John Weaver, the father, was a son of John Weaver, a blacksmith, located 
between Myerstown and Richland. 

Daniel Weaver was the eldest son in the above family, and was reared 
in Millcreek township. At the age of twenty-four years he began farming 
on seventy acres of land in Lancaster county, where he remained eight 
years. At the expiration of this time he went to Millbach and rented a farm, 
but later removed to South Annville township and fanned in that locality 
for two years. His next home was West Myerstown, where he remained 
three years, engaged in conducting a butcher shop and market, and at the 
end of that time began the manufacture of the famous bologna sausage. 
His efforts in this direction were commenced on a small scale, by the purchase 
of about 200 pounds of beef, which he smoked in the garret with the fire 
contained in an iron kettle. From this primitive beginning has grown a 
business of great magnitude, the plant now comprising twenty-six large 
smokehouses and a large drying house, its capacit}' being fifty tons. In 
conjunction with this plant there is a larg^e icehouse and cold storage equip- 
ment, and the factory has a fifty-horse-power boiler, two steam engines and 
a gasoline engine; a dynamo for making the electric light used in the estab- 
lishment and for pumping power; a steam stuft'er of 100 pounds force, and 
a No. 66 grinder. The dnily product of the factory averages about six tons, 
and employment is given to fifteen people outside of the family. This estab- 
lishment has been built up through the efl^orts of Mr. Weaver since 1897. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 167 

In addition to this plant proper Mr. Weaver has erected six good frame 
houses, and has a Httle village of his own about him. which is known as 
Avondale. He also owns a farm of thirty-five acres, surrounding the plant ; 
a farm of 170 acres in Dauphin county. Pa., which is well improved; a small 
property of fifteen acres at West Myerstown ; a farm of eighty-three acres 
east of Avondale, in North Lebanon township; and a small property near 
his plant. In 1900 he established a branch plant at Rochester, N. Y., for the 
purpose of manufacturing bologna sausage. In addition to these many 
interests, Mr. Weaver owns a steam crusher, with which he crushes stone 
for the city of Lebanon. Although he started out in life a poor man, through 
good management, industry and thrift he has accumulated a handsome for- 
tune, and is one of the substantial men of Lebanon county. The inside busi- 
ness of the establishment is attended to by his son, John S. Weaver. Our 
subject is treasurer of the Weaverstown Water Company, which was organ- 
ized January 29, 1903, with a capital of $10,000, to furnish water from a 
spring on Mr. Weaver's farm, having a capacity of I3<S gallons per minute, 
to Avon, Hebron and East Lebanon. Mr. Weaver has been the main factor 
in the organization of this company. 

On March 24, 1881, Mr. Weaver was married to Sarah Smith, who was' 
born near lona, in South Lebanon township, October 23, 1862. They have 
had children as follows: John S., Jacob, Henry, Caroline. Leslie, Paul, 
Mary, Nathan, Martin, Sarah, Daniel (deceased) and Emma. The parents 
are members of the German Baptist Brethren Church, in which they take 
an active part. Mr. Weaver is a Republican in politics. He possesses won- 
derful executive ability, and his success has been accomplished through 
legitimate means, and his trade is built upon the sound foundation of merit 
and integrity. 

DAVID F. RANK, farmer of Union township, Lebanon county, was 
born in Jonestown, Lebanon Co., Pa., November 7, 1844, a son of David and 
Mary M. (Seltzer) Rank. 

The earliest record of the Rank family shows that John Rank married 
a Mrs. Furnesler, and their children were: Thomas. Elizabeth, Maria, 
David, Amos and John. 

David Rank, father of David P., was born in Jonestown, where he grew 
to manhood, and first engaged in the mercantile business. He subsequently 
became a lumber and coal merchant, and so continued until his retirement in 
1861 or 1862, after which he gave his attention to his banking interests until 
his death, which took place July 20, 1875. He was a director in the Lebanon 



1 68 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

National Bank. David Rank married Miss IMary M. Seltzer, a native of 
Jonestown, and the daughter of Michael and Sarah (Scliaeffer) Seltzer, 
To this union three children were born ; Emily, Michael and David F. 

David F. Rank was reared in Jonestown, where he attended the public 
schools, and he later \\ent to Nazareth Hall, in Northampton county, where 
he remained for three years. The succeeding eighteen months he spent at 
Gettysbui'g preparatory school, and in 1863 he enlisted in Company A, 
Twenty-sixth P. V. I., and participated in the battle of Gettysburg. After 
his discharge he entered Union College, at Schenectady, N. Y., from which 
he was graduated in 1867. Following this Mr. Rank entered the law office 
of John Linn, of New York City, was admitted to the Bar of New York in 
1869, and continued in active practice until 1890. In that year he located 
in Jonestown, but for the past thirteen years he has made his home upon his 
farm, one and one-half miles north of the ^-illage. In politics Mr. Rank 
has always been a Democrat, but not an office seeker, although in the fall of 
1902 he was elected county commissioner for Lebanon county by a flattering 
majority of 3,200, and has very acceptably served in that capacity. 

Mr. Rank was married to Miss May Groat, a daughter of Frederick J. 
and Mary Groat, of New York City, on April 6, 1875. Seven children have 
been born to this union: David A., who is deceased; Frederick; Mary 
Juanita, deceased ; Thomas J. ; Alma C. ; Natalie P. ; and ^Michael Seltzer. 
Mr. Rank is one of the representative men of his township, a power in local 
politics, and very progressive, thoroughly alive to the best interests of the 
community, and a general favorite. 

DANIEL P. GERBERTCH. M. D., a well known and successful piiy- 
sician of Lebanon county, was born October i. T855, in East Hanover town- 
ship, Lebanon county, son of Daniel U. and Catherine (Boeshore) Gerberich. 
The Gerberich family is of German extraction, Andrew Gerberich, the 
great-great-grandfather of Dr. Gerberich, having been a native of Western 
Germany. From there he came to the United States in 1727. and located 
in Lancaster county. Pa. Henry Gerberich, son of Andrew, was also a farmer 
in Pennsylvania, and lived to the age of eighty-three. The family has for 
generations shown remarkable vigor, the great-grandfather living to the age 
of ninety-tw^o, while a number of the other members of the family have long 
survived the Psalmist's limit. 

Daniel U. Gerberich, father of Dr. Gerberich. was born in East Hanover 
township. Lebanon county, and passed his life there engaged in agricultural 
pursuits. His death occurred in 1898, at the age of sixty-eight years. The 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 169 

mother of Dr. Gerberich was born in Union township, Lebanon county, 
daughter of Thomas Boeshore, who was a direct descendant of an old Hugue- 
not family, which was driven at the time of the edict from France into Ger- 
many, and later found a quiet home m America. Mrs. Gerberich died in 
1896, at the age of sixty-four years. A family of twelve children came to 
Daniel U. Gerberich and his wife, of whom seven survive : Alfred, who 
graduated from the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania, 
was a successful teacher and a physician of standing in Annville, Lebanon 
county, at the time of his death, when he was twenty-three years of age. 
Daniel Philip is the subject of this biography. Morris B. graduated from the 
Lockhaven Normal School, and later from Hahnemann Aledical College, in 
Philadelphia, is now a physician and public official of Lebanon, serving his 
second term as president of the city council. Grant was principal of the 
high school at South Annville, and is now superintendent of the public 
schools of Johnsonburg, Pa. Edward and Francis are both farmers m Union 
township. Harvey, who was a clerk in Lebanon, is taking a course in medi- 
cine in the Hahnemann Medical College in Philadelphia. Kate married 
Harvey Loser, a merchant in Annville. 

Daniel Philip Gerberich belongs to a family which is noted for its edu- 
cational attainments. His early schooling was obtained in his own neigh- 
borhood, and when but sixteen years old he became a teacher, following 
the profession tor eight years, all in Lebanon county but one year, when 
he was engaged in Schuylkill county. He spent eighteen weeks at Palatinate 
College, IMyerstown, and supplemented every educational advantage with 
private study, gaining in this way a permanent State certificate. Dr. Ger- 
berich spent his younger years, when not engaged in teaching, at farm work. 
Under the late Dr. William Grumbine, of Annville, Le read medicine, and 
took one course in old school practice, later entering Hahnemann Medical 
College, in Philadelphia, graduating March 12, t88i. After three years in 
practice at Myerstown. Dr. Gerberich mo^•ed to Lebanon, since which time his 
energies have been fully employed in caring for a large and constantly in- 
creasing practice. 

Dr. Gerberich is well known as an instructor, and has served as medical 
preceptor for eighteen students, his preparation being so thorough and careful 
that the standing of bis pupils at College has reflected great credit upon 
him. For three years he served the county ts cironor's physician, and he 
is valued as a consulting physician for a number of institutions. Dr. Ger- 
berich belongs to the State Homeopathic Medical Society. Fraternally he 



I70 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

belongs to the. Masonic Blue Lodge, Chapter, Commandery and jMystic Shrine, 
and is a past officer in the various bodies. 

On April 6, 1882, Dr. Gerberich was united in marriage with Miss Susan 
L. Hinterleiter, a native of Berks county, Pa., and one son has come to this 
union. Guy Asher, born May 25. 1883, who is a graduate of the Lebanon 
high school, and has entered Hahnemann Medical College, at Philadelphia, 
preparing for the medical profession. Dr. Gerberich and family are mem- 
bers of the Salem Lvitheran church. He is a Republican, but no politician, 
though he has been twice elected delegate to State conventions. The Doctor 
has been quite an extensive traveler, having visited every State and Territory 
in the Union, but three, besides Cuba, the Bermuda Islands, Mexico and 
Canada. 

HENRY L. GEBHARD is a resident and thrifty merchant of Lebanon, 
Pa., where he was born March 3, 1850, a son of Edward and Mary (Louser) 
Gebhard. deceased. 

Edward Gebhard was born in iS'5. a son of George Gebhard, a farmer 
and one of the old settlers of Lebanon county, and he died April 12, 1899. 
His trade was that of a hatter, but he also was one of the leading butchers of 
Lebanon for thirty-five years. To Edward and Mary (Louser) Gebhard 
were born eleven children : Miss INIaria, of Lebanon ; Susan, the wife of 
John Embrick, of Lebanon; Sarah, the wife of Solomon Stine, of Lebanon; 
Eliza, the wife of Otimus Wilhelm, of Wilmington, Del.; Edward G., a 
butcher, who died at Cornwall, Pa., November 6. 1901 ; Henry L. ; Emma, 
who became the wife of Henry Fortner of Lebanon; Katherine, the wife of 
William Swape, of Lebanon; the other children died when young. Edward 
Gebhard started out in life a poor boy but he became one of the leading 
citizens of Lebanon, and when he died he owned about thirty houses and lots 
in that city. He was a stanch Republican, and a true Christian citizen. 

Henry L. Gebhard was reared in Lebanon and received his education 
in the city schools. As a boy he learned the butcher's business in his father's 
shop. On December 17, 1875, he was married to Miss Katherine D. Linder- 
muth, of Lebanon county, who was born in 1855, a daughter of Samuel and 
Katherine Lindermuth. This marriage has been blessed with eleven children, 
seven of whom are living: William L., who now works with his father in 
the shop; Charles E., a teller in the Lebanon National Bank; Harry G., a 
butcher working with his father; Lillian T. : Catherine M. ; Maria B. ; and 
J. Allen, who is the youngest; the rest died in infancy. Mrs. Gebhard was 
the second in her father's familv of children. Her brothers and sisters 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 171 

were: Agnes, the wife of Edward Garrett, of Richmond, Pa.; Rosa, the 
wife of Harvey Berger, of Lebanon ; and John, also of Lebanon. Mr. Geb- 
hard is a Repubhcan, and he and his family are members of the Salem Lutheran 
Church of Lebanon. He has been a member of the city council from the 
First ward, and was county recorder from i8g6 to 1900. He has always 
taken an active part in politics. He is a member of the K. of P. No. 427, 
and has passed all the chairs. He is one of the successful business men of his 
city and owns several good houses and lots in Lebanon. He has just erected, 
a three story building at No. 710 Chestnut street, where he conducts a first- 
class butcher business, the first floor being a store room, and the other two 
floors being divided into smaller rooms. He and his family are among the 
honored and esteemed residents of Lebanon. 

JOHN HENRY THOMAS, one of the well-known citizens of Ann- 
ville, Lebanon county, secretary of the Annville Fire Insurance Company, 
was born April 24, 1847, ^'^ North Annville, son of Adam and Catherine 
(Shenk) Thomas, the former of whom is a son of Jacob and Christiana 
(Ensminger) Thomas, the former a well known tailor of Lebanon, Pa., and 
subsequently a farmer of South Annville township. Adam Thomas was born 
in Lebanon, Pa., November 2.}^, 1815, and died in Annville, May 19, 1857. 
The mother of John H. Thomas was born October 4, 1826, and died in 
Annville January 8, 1901, a daughter of Christian and Anna (Longenecker) 
Shenk, and a granddaughter of Jacob and Barbara (Brandt) Longenecker. 
Christian Shenk was a tanner and farmer of North Annville. The children 
born to Adam Thomas and wife were as follows: John Henry; Jacob, born 
October 17, 1848. a resident of Hummelstown, Dauphin county; Adam, 
born May 5, 1850, a resident of Harrisburg; Annie Mary, who died in 
infancy: Rosa Anna, born June 3, 1854, died November 13, 1882; and Chris- 
tian, born May 26, 1857, died September 12, 1898. The parents had allied 
themselves with the Reformed Church. Mr. Thomas was engaged in the 
butchering business in Annville, where he was known and much respected, 
and where he fraternized with the order of Odd Fellows. 

John Henry Thomas was reared in Annville, and after the death of his 
father, spent three summers working on a farm, attending school during the 
winters, and then spent seventeen months as a clerk for C. H. Steinmetz, of 
Annville. but his guardian then desired him to become a student at the Ann- 
ville Academy. Completing hi', academic course. Mr. Thomas supplemented it 
with a commercial course, and then learned the trade of house painting, which 
occupation he followed for five years. It was at this date that Mr. Thomas 



172 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

began serious preparation for a profession in which he later became so emi- 
nently successful. Attending night schools, he taught during the daytime 
and during vacations attended the Normal classes, so fitting himself as an 
educator that his services were retained continuously in South Annville 
township for seventeen years, two years m the country and the remainder in 
town. In 1884 he was elected clerk of the Orphans' Court of Lebanon 
county, for a term of three years, on the Repul^lican ticket, and later accepted 
the position of secretary of the Annville Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 
with which prosperous organization he is yet connected. Mr. Thomas is 
also a notary public. 

On February 15, 1902, Mr. Thomas was united in marriage with Miss 
Clara S. Stroh, who was born in South Annville, daughter of Michael and 
Sybilla (Spang) Stroh, of Annville. Fraternally he is connected with Wash- 
ington Camp, No. 87, P. O. S. A.; and with Mt. Lebanon Lodge, No. 226, 
F. & A. M. In Annville and vicinity where his life has been passed, Mr. 
Thomas enjoys universal esteem, being kno\vn for his admirable qualities of 
head and heart. A success as a teacher, he has also capably filled the various 
other positions with which he has been connected. 

JOHN D. CHRISTIAN, who died October 13, 1875. ^^as for many 
years an honored citizen of Lebanon. He was born July 19, 1820, a son of 
John and Margaret Christian of Reading, Pa., who were the parents of three 
children : Henry, deceased, who lived in Philadelphia, and was one of the 
leading and well known railroad men of his day; Edward, deceased, who 
was a farmer living near Reading. Pa. ; and John D. 

John D. Christian was reared on the farm near Reading, Pa., and 
received his education in the public schools. He was married December 24, 
1848, to Miss Mary Ann Goodhart, who was born September 7, 1829, a 
daughter of William and Elizabeth (Newkirk) Goodhart, of Exeter town- 
ship, Berks Co., Pa. They had the following named children : William G.. 
of Lebanon, who married Adda E. Christ; Amanda P.. who is the wife of 
Samuel Shirk, of Lebanon; and Emma H., the wife of Luther F. Hanck, an 
attorney of Lebanon. Mrs. Christian was one of a family of ten children, 
named as follows: Mary Ann. widow of our subject: John N., of Berks 
county; Reuben, deceased; Henrietta, of Reading; Amelia, deceased; 
Lovesia, deceased; Catherine, the widow of Isaac Boyer, of Reading; Louisa, 
the wife of Daniel Heehn, of Mt. Penn; Elizabeth, the widow of Josiah 
Ruth; and William F., of Exeter, Berks Co., Pa. John D. Christian was a 
Protestant, and was ven^ liberal in his religious views. He was a stanch 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 173 

Democrat of the old school, and took an active part in politics. He was a 
Mason of good standing, and was also a member of the I. O. O. F. He 
started out in life a very poor boy, received his schooling in the local schools, 
and worked himself up to be the general supervisor of the Reading Road, 
which position he held for many years before his death, and at the time of 
his death had been with the company for forty years. He was a man with 
natural business qualities, a sound mind, and one that stood high in the 
esteem of his fellow men. He gave employment to many hundreds of men, 
and was well liked by all. He was kind-hearted and in sympathy with the 
poor, and was a kind husband, and much devoted to his children. 

JEROME KLOPP, member of the well known grain, coal and lumber 
firm of A. C. Klopp's Sons, and one of the substantial business men of Sheri- 
dan, was born Dec. 20, 1843, on a farm in [Marion township, Berks county, 
son of A. C. and Sarah (Loose) Klopp, deceased, natives of Berks county. Pa., 
where the father was born January 27, 1S20, and his wife in 1823, in Myers- 
town, Lebanon Co., Pa., while his death occurred February 10, 1901. 

A. C. Klopp was the son of John Adam Klopp, a native of Berks county, 
a farmer and the son of German parents, who were among the early settlers 
of that county. John Adam Klopp was the father of the following children : 
Samuel, Benneville, Adam C, Eli, Jonathan, Benjamin, John, Sarah and 
Eliza. Sarah married John Conrad, and Eliza married John Sheetz, and all 
are now deceased. The father of our subject was a farmer in early life, but 
later became a lumber and coal dealer at Stouchsburg, Berks Co., Pa., and 
Sheridan, Lebanon county. Politically he was a stanch Republican, and a 
leading member of the Reformed Church, serving as elder, deacon and 
trustee of the latter. He married Miss Sarah Loose, of Lebanon county, in 
1842, a daughter of John and Magdalena (Fisher) Loose, also of Lebanon 
county, old and highly respected residents of that locality. Five children 
were born to these parents, three of whom grew to maturity: Jerome; A. C, 
of the firm of A. C. Klopp's Sons ; and Rebecca P. Mr. Klopp was one of 
the leading business men of Berks and Lebanon counties, and a man widely 
knovv-n throughout the State. 

Jerome Klopp was reared in Lebanon county, on his father's farm in 
Jackson township, and attended the public schools of his neighborhood, and 
later had the advantage of a course at the Stouchsburg and Myerstown 
academies. After completing his education he taught school for three years, 
and then settled on a farm where he remained eight years. At this time a 
partnership with his father and brother was offered him, and he entered the 



174 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

firm of A. C. Klopp & Sons at Stouchsburg, in 1876, and later made his 
home at Sheridan, where a branch was established. Upon the death of the 
father, the style was changed to A. C. Klopp's Sons, which firm is one of the 
leaders in the grain, coal and lumber line in Lebanon county. Fraternally 
Mr. Klopp is a member of the K. of P. lodge of Myerstown, in which he is 
very popular, and also of the Golden Rule lodge of Good Fellows of Stouchs- 
burg. 

Mr. Klopp was married December 25, 1866, to Eliza Katharine Groh, 
daughter of Josiah and Mary (Loose) Groh, of Berks county, prominent 
people of that locality. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Groh : 
Katie, who married our subject; Samuel H., who married Susan Huyert, of 
Marion township, Berks Co., Pa.; Amelia, married to Adam Huyert of Host, 
Berks Co., Pa. ; and Alice, who married George Hain, of Jackson township, 
a farmer. The following family was born to Mr. and INirs. Klopp: Henry I., 
of West Borough, Mass., a physician of the State Hospital, who married 
Bessie L. Stump; Charles G., a clerk of Philadelphia, who married Mary A. 
Smith; Minnie O., at home, a graduate of Albright, class of 1899, a talented 
young lady; and Anna M., the youngest, deceased. Mr. Klopp is a stanch 
Republican, although not an office seeker, while taking a very active interest 
in local afifairs. For a number of years he has been a leading member of the 
Reformed Church, in which he has been deacon and secretary. Mr. Klopp 
and his family have long been important factors in the social life of Sheridan, 
as he is in commercial circles, and all are highly esteemed by all who know 
them. 

MAURICE F. HIGH. There are few men in Pennsylvania who 
possess a more thorough knowledge of the nut and bolt manufacturing busi- 
ness than Maurice F. High, assistant superintendent of the American Iron 
& Steel Company, formerly the Pennsylvania Bolt & Nut Company. For 
thirty years he has been gathering- information regarding his chosen line of 
activity, having started from the bottom, and worked his way through every 
department of the works. He is a Pennsylvanian by birth, and was born in 
Berks county, December to, 18^3. in which county his great-grandfather 
settled in the verv early davs. after emigrating from Switzerland. His par- 
ents were Jeremiah and Henrietta (Bartlett) High, and his grandfather was 
Jacob High, a well Imown farmer of Berks countv. Jeremiah High became 
the father of nine children, among whom were : Mary, the widow of William 
Ganster, of Berks county; John, of Reading; Catherine, wife of James 
Parker, of Reading; Maurice F. ; Elmira; Sarah; Rebecka; and Calvin. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 175 

When two years of age Maurice F. High was taken by his parents to 
Reading, Pa., where he was educated in the public schools. The family 
resources seem not to have been sufficient for the maintenance of all the chil- 
dren, and the youtliful Maurice began to be self-supporting- when eleven 
years of age. For about two years he filled the position of office boy for Dr. 
Brown, a dentist of Reading, after which he entered the employ of J. H. 
Sternl)erg-, a nut and hoh manufacturer. His first work in trying to learn 
the business was as a nut burrer, and he remained with the concern for about 
ten years, making steady progress in the various departments, and at the end 
became a nut and bolt maker. He was fortunate in being selected by the firm 
to go to San Francisco with three nut machines built by the Sternberg firm, 
and on the Pacffic slope he was employed for six years by the Pacific Rolling 
Mill Company. L'pon returning to Lebanon in 1882, he became identified 
with the Pennsylvania Nut & Bolt Company, as foreman, and was thus 
employed until the company became known as the American Iron & Steel 
Company, when he became assistant superintendent. His position is a 
responsible one, and represents years of application, and an honest endeavor 
to place himself at the head of the captains of this particularly useful 
industry. 

In 1883 Mr. High was united in marriage to his first wife, Alice Moore, 
sister of Charles A. Moore, a fruit and fish merchant of Lebanon, and 
daughter of William and Elizabeth Moore, of Lebanon. Mrs. High, who 
died in 1891, was the mother of three living children, Elizabeth, Frederick 
S. and Elmira. On October 10, 1900, Mr. High married Minnie G. Thomas, 
of Lebanon county, a daughter of Jacob and Mary (Yingst) Thomas, also 
of Lebanon county. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas were: 
Mary, Alice, Cora, Sallie, Adancia, and INIinnie L. Mr. High is a Republi- 
can in politics, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Fratern- 
ally he is associated with the Independent Order of Odd b^ellows. No. 121, 
and the Order of Elks, No. 631, of Lebanon. Himself and wife are well and 
favorably known in Lebanon, Avhere they have many friends, and enjoy an 
envialjle popularity. 

CLAYTON P. SAYLOR, a prominent citizen and carriage manu- 
facturer of Annville, proprietor of the extensive carriage works of J. L. 
Saylor & Son. and a director in the Lebanon Countv Trust Company, of 
Lebanon, was born in Annville. August 2, iSoo. Peter Saylor, the gre"t- 
grandfather, who was an early settler of Swatara township, Lebanon county, 
married Elizabeth Miller, and they had issue as follow^s : John, David, Jacob, 



176 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Samuel and four daughters. Of these children, John Savior, the grandfather, 
was born March 22, 1804, in Swatara township. He married Sarah Lerch, 
who was iDorn in 1807, and they had children as follows: John L., Daniel, 
Elizabeth, Adam, David L., Elias and William. 

John L. Saylor, the father, was born February 7, 1834, in Swatara 
township, and attended the public schools. He learned carriage-making, 
engaging in the business in Annville, in 1866, which he conducted on a large 
scale — by himself, until 1882, when he admitted as a partner his son, C. P. 
Saylor. In 1897 he retired from active life, the business of J. L. Saylor & 
Son passing to the son. On August 25, 1857, John L. Saylor married Ellen 
J, Freylinghausen, of Jonestown, Pa., and to them were born children as 
follows: Laura E., Clayton P., George Mc, Anna M., Olivia G., Ellen J., 
Sally, Mabel W., Bryon C, Clyde J. and Roger E. 

Clayton P. Saylor was reared in Annville. and attended the public schools, 
later spending two years at the Lebanon Valley College. At the age of 
twenty-one years he entered his father's carriage works, and became a 
partner in 1882, and, as noted above, succeeded in 1897 to the business, 
which he has successfully carried on to the present time. Mr. Saylor manu« 
factures "anything on springs," and also does general repairing, his trade 
coming from Lebanon, Harrisburg and other neighboring cities, as well as 
the vicinity. Mr. Saylor was one of the organizers of the Bedford Ice 
Company, of which he is secretary and treasurer and was also one of the 
organizers of the Lebanon County Trust Company, of which he is a director. 
Fraternally he is associated with the ^lasonic and Odd Fellows fraternities. 

THEODORE P. FRANTZ is an honored representative of one of Leba- 
non county's oldest and most honored families, and he established the furni- 
ture business now carried on by his son in the city of Lebanon during the 
'forties. 

The family of which Ivlr. Frantz is a member was first represented in 
Lebanon in the person of Daniel Frantz, who was a native of Berks county, 
Pa., born August 18, 1792, and died in Lebanon December 12, 1839. He 
was a son of Daniel and Maria Frantz, and the family were residing at 
Reading at the time of his death. Daniel Frantz was but a young man when 
he came to Lebanon, and he engaged in the mercantile business, in which 
he was for many years a familiar figure in the city. He married November 
8. 1 82 1, Elizabeth Greenawalt, who was born in Lebanon in 1795, and whose 
death occurred August 4, 1856. She was the daughter of Capt. John Philip 
Greenawalt, who was born in Lebanon county, then a part of Lancaster, 




n/ ip ^^:..^y^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 177 

was one of the leading farmers of his section throughout his Hfetime, and a 
man whom tradition records as heing possessed of many noble attributes. 
His title of captain was received from his having been the leader of a com- 
pany during the war for Independence. His father was Philip Lawrence 
Greenawalt. a native of Germany, who came to this country early in the 
eighteenth century, and settled in Lancaster county. Pa., where he passed 
the remainder of his life. He also was a prominent figure in the Revolutionary 
struggle, having held the rank of colonel in the American army, his com- 
mission bearing date of July i, 1776, issued by the authority of the "Supreme 
Executive Council of the Commonalty of Pennsylvania." He was colonel oi 
the First Battalion of militia of Lancaster county. He was, as will be sup- 
posed, a very loyal supporter of the cause, and besides giving his own ser\ices 
to the government, expended a large sum of money in prox'iding for the 
troops. This sum, which at that time represented many times its present value, 
exceeded $35,000, which he expended for clothing and food for his men and 
horses. Congress reimbursed him for this expenditure, but in the worthless 
currency of the time, which was never redeemed. Thus the colonel lost the 
full amount. The records of such deeds should receive careful attention from 
the hands of the historian, as the inside history of the great struggle "for 
independence proves without a doubt that the cause would have been lost had 
it not been for such self-sacrificing patriots. Such men as Robert Morris 
and Col. Greenawalt not only made it possible to carry on the fight at the 
critical time when fighting was necessary, but by their uncomplaining and 
generous conduct after the war made it possible for the government to strug- 
gle along through the dark period immediately subsequent. Had those who 
advanced funds been so disposed they could have so harassed the government 
that the fruits of victory might have been swallowed up in financial ruin. 
A copy of the document which constituted the commission of Col. Greena- 
walt, together with some of the Continental money, is in the possession of 
Theodore P. Frantz, of Lebanon, who prizes it as a sacred reminder that 
his ancestor was not found wanting in patriotic spirit in the "days that tried 
men's souls." The home of Col. Greenawalt was within the city limits of what 
is now Lebanon, but which during his time was in Lancaster county. 

Capt. John Philip Greenawalt married Catherine Shaft'ner, who was born 
in Lebanon, daughter of the keeper of the "Buck House," which was for 
many years a landmark in Lebanon. It stood opposite the court house, now 
the "Central Hotel," on the corner of Eighth and Cumberland streets, and at 
its old watering trough a very pretty little scene occurred, in which the great 
Washington and Catherine Shaffner were the chief actors. It showed the 
12 



178 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

kindness of heart of the maiden and the gracious magnanimity of the griz- 
zled man of war. It was in the fall of the year, when Washington was on 
his way to Valley Forge, his route being through Lebanon. Tired and thirsty 
he drew rein at the trough, and sat in deep meditation while the horse was 
drinking. Suddenly the stillness was broken by a soft voice at his elbow, 
and turning, he met the courtesy of little Catherine Shaffner, who held up to 
him a sparkling glass of wine. Bowing graciously, the General quaffed it ofif, 
and then removing one of the cockades from his hat, handed it to her with 
warm words of thanks for her kindness. This memento of the occasion 
remained in the ])ossession of the familv for many )ears, but was finally mis- 
laid and lost. 

To Daniel and Elizabeth (Greenawalt) Frantz came the following named 
children: Uriah (deceased), Catherine Elizabeth (deceased), Theodore 
Philip, Lydia G., Daniel, Edmond and Charles S., all of whom were bom in 
Lebanon. In 1862 Charles S. enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and 
Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, under Capt. Greenawalt, 
and saw service at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and in other engagements. 
Theodore P. Frantz, born February 25, 1828, was reared in Lebanon, 
Avhere lie received a good common school education. As he approached man- 
hood he was apprenticed to the cabinetmaker's trade in Philadelphia, in 1844, 
and in 1847 set up a shop for himself in Lebanon. From this time on until 
1878 he was engaged continuously at the furniture business, retiring then in 
favor of his son, Daniel A., who had assumed control. During the war Mr. 
Frantz served in the construction corps of the Union army for fifteen months, 
building bridg'es in ^^irginia, Tennessee and other Southern States. Later 
he served as a member of Capt. Ulrich's company of emergency troops. He 
has always been notably public-spirited, and has been especially interested in 
the fire department of his native place, being now the oldest active fireman 
in the State of Pennsylvania. The Perseverance I'ire Company of Lebanon, 
to which he belongs, was organized in 1848, and he is the last survivor of 
those who took part in its organization. Fle was the company's first treas- 
in-er, was chief for one year, has been president and is now vice-president, 
and he has often gone as delegate to the firemen's State conventions. Though 
seventy-five years of age Mr. Frantz is always among the first to rally at 
the tap of the bell. 

Socially Mr. Frantz has been quite prominent in the Masonic fraternity, 
belonging to the blue lodge, chapter, council, commandery and Mystic Shrine, 
and he has been active in all these bodies. For twenty-three years he sensed 
as tyler in the varicnis lodges, and he has attended several State conclaves, 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 179 

and the national conclaves held at Baltimore, Washington, Denver and Boston. 
He also aftiliates with the Sons of America. Mr. Frantz is a Democrat in 
political sentiment, but he takes no active interest in party affairs. 

On October 10. 1848, Theodore P. Frantz was married to Susan C. 
Gutelius, who was born in Lebanon No\-ember 4, 1828, daughter of John P. 
Gutelius, a native of Lancaster county. Mr. Gutelius was a hatter, and 
followed his trade for a number of years in Lebanon, then removing to BlufT- 
fon, Ind., where he died. He married Mariah' Arndt. a native of Lebanon, 
where she died before his removal to the west, the mother of two daughters, 
Susan C. and Margaret. To Theodore P. Frantz and his wife were born the 
following children: Catherine E., deceased; John G.. deceased; Gertrude; 
Maria; Daniel A., who is mentioned elsewhere; Lily, deceased; William T., 
in the furnishing business in Lebanon : Jacob Arndt, a salesman in Lebanon ; 
Charles, who is in the men's furnishing' business in Lebanon; and Edwin, a 
salesman. Mr. and Mrs. Frantz are members of St. John's Reformed church, 
of which he was treasurer for ten years, and has been a trustee for fifteen 
years. 

REV. ISAAC H. ALBRIGHT, Ph. D., was born in Cumi-:-' d 
county. Pa., April 9, 1853. His parents were Michael and Fannie ( Hrats- 
berger) Albright, who were of German descent. They had three sois and 
one daughter, Isaac H. being the eldest child. Lhitil nineteen ve irs dM 
the subject of this sketch \vorked on the farm, studying at the public and 
preparatory schools and teaching school for one term before he entered col- 
lege. In 1872 he matriculated at the Lebanon Vallev College, Annxille. 
Pa., and graduated at the head of his class in 1876, receiving the degree of 
A. B. He continued his studies under private instructors for several years, 
devoting much time to the German and Llebrew languages and completed 
his master course in 1879, receiving at that time the degree of A. M. He 
entered college with the intention of subsenuentlv pursuing a medical course. 
but becoming a Christian early in his college course he changed his phms 
and entered the ministry of the United Brethren in Christ, in 1876. In his 
young manhood he married Miss Kate Uhler, of Derry Church, Pa., a 
daughter of George and Marv Idiler. Thev have five chddren : John \\^, 
Mary Bertha, George H., William O. and Isaac H. 

Rev. Albright's first charge was Manheim, Pa., where he remained 
three years. His next appointment was Florin. Pa., where he also preicbed 
for three years. He then was assigned to Mt. W^olf, Pa., in which ]ilace he 
resided three vears. From there he went to the First Cliurch of York. Pa. 



i8o BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

He carried on a most successful pastorate in that place for five years, during 
which time he built the Third Church, which church Jacob Allison paid for. 
He also erected the Fourth Church in the eastern part of the same city. These 
are now flourishing congregations. 

At the annual conference held in 1890. in Chamber sburg. Pa., he was 
elected presiding elder and assigned to the Baltimore District. He served in 
this capacity for a period of four years. He was next assigned to Dallas- 
town, Pa., where he remained five years and enjoyed phenomenal success. 
He then accepted a call to serve the Church in Shamokin, Pa., at which place 
the property was very heavily in\olved in debt, but through his determined 
efforts this debt was greatly reduced during his three years' pastorate. 
Last October he was sent to the Salem Church in Lebanon, Pa., which is the 
mother of all the United Brethren Churches in this section of the country. 
While serving as presiding elder he received the degree of Ph. D. in course 
from his Alma Mater. He was twice elected a delegate to the General Con- 
ference, the highest legislative body of the church, and was a member of 
the General Missionary Board for four years. He edited a monthly paper 
for seven years, entitled The True Believer. He served as a trustee of the 
Lebanon College for many years, and was a member of its executive com- 
mittee. The Doctor has had some heavy and difficult charges, but by his inde- 
fatigableness has closed a good work on every appointment. 

S.\LEM United Brethren Church. . United Brethrenism had its 
beginning in Lebanon, Pa., more than a century ago. The first his- 
torical reference to the origin of the church in this place is found in the jour- 
nal of Rev. Christian Newcomer, who afterward became a bishop. He says: 
"May 27, 1797 — This day a sacramental meeting is to commence at Martin- 
Kreider's, near Lebanon. Brother Crum delivered the first discourse." 
Under date of October 7, 1797, he .says: "This forenoon we had a blessed 
meeting at Brother Martin Kreider's; in the afternoon we preached at 
Lebanon.'' Martin Kreider's place was located about a mile southwest of 
Lebanon. His gra\-e is found in a private burial ground on the old home 
place. He was bom February 14, 1740, and died November 14, 1827. 

The early preachers preached at Martin Kreider's, at Abraham Draksel's 
near Ebenezer, in the First Reformed Church, and in other private houses, 
until "Light's IMeeting House" was built, which took place in 1820. This 
meeting house was built bv the Mennonites, and was deeded by Abraham 
Light, the grandfather of Solomon Light, of Annville, Pa., May 26, 1817, 
to Felix Light, Abraham Light, Jr., and Martin Light, trustees for the 
"Mennonite Societv and Communitv." The consideration for the lot. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. i8i 

located near the corner of Lehman and Seventli streets, was five shilUngs law- 
ful money of Pennsylvania, which is equal to sixty-two and a half cents of 
our money. This church was frequently used as a place of worship by 
preachers and people of a number of denominations other than the Mennon- 
ites. In it some very stirring evangelistic meetings were held, and many 
persons were won to Christ. Among those who were sa\ed, or led into a 
deeper spiritual life at these early meetings, were Casper Sherk, a Mennonite 
preacher, and Felix Light, the former's son-in-law. Thev soon found a want 
of congeniality among the Mennonites because of an empty formality which 
prevailed among them, and began to associate themselves with other con- 
verted, spiritual co-laborers, such as Henry Landis, Martin Kreider, and 
others, who called themselves the unsectarian (unparteuschen) Mennonites. 
Felix Light became a minister of great usefulness, and when his sons, John 
and Casper, started out in the ministry, they were classed among the 
"algemeinen brueder," or "Lichtes Lent," who later mostly merged formally, 
into the L^nited Brethren in Christ. The meeting house became the property 
of our Church some time in its early history, but when, we have not been 
able to learn. Our preachers commenced to use it regularly in 1825, and 
continued to do so as long as it remained standing. The annual conference 
sessions of 1836 and 1839 were held in it. Bishop Samuel Lleistand and Bishop 
Jacob Erb, presiding, respectively. The church was about 40 by 60 feet in size, 
and was built of brick. Rev. C. S. Crider, grandson of Rev. ]\lartin Rreider, 
became the pastor of Lebanon station in 1845, 'ind ^^''th the following mem- 
bers of the trustee board, Casper Light, William Light and Abraham Sherk, 
determined to build a new church. They bought two lots, numbering 275 
and 276, on the corner of Ninth and Church streets, of Michael and Eliza- 
beth Haag for $200, and built on the corner lot a substantial two-storied lime- 
stone church. This was named the "Salem Church." The date of the deed 
is September 17, 1845, ^i""^- ^^^ "^^^^ building was begun during the same year. 
When the old meeting house was torn down much of the material was used 
in the building of a parsonage. No. 242 North Ninth street, which was after- 
ward sold. The present parsonage was built in 1873, and enlarged in 1903. 
The corner stone of the old Salem church was laid by Rev. Simon Dreis- 
bach, assisted by the pastor, Rev. C. S. Crider. The building was dedicated 
October 18, 1846, by Bishop J. Russel, assisted by Rev. G. Miller and the 
pastor. The cost of the building was $4,000. Many precious seasons of 
grace were held in this church, and the congregation in due time became too 
large to be accommodated within its walls, and in 1S90 arrangements were 
made to tear it down and build a larg-er structure. At this time the board of 



1 82 BIOGRAPHTCAI.. ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

trustees was composed of the following brethren : Abraham ]\Iiller, Gideon 
Light and Abraham Herr. Rev. H. S. Gabel was the energetic pastor. 
Under the supervision of these strong men, backed by a loyal membership, 
the present commodious and beautiful church was erected. The corner stone 
was hiid July 6, 1890, by Presiding Elder James Shoop, assisted by Revs. 
H. S. Gabel and S. Etter. On December 21, 1890, the first story was formally 
opened for divine services by Rev. C. J. Kephart, assisted by the pastor. On 
Sunday, May 15, 1892, it was dedicated with imposing ceremonies by Bishop 
E. B. Kepliart, D. D., LL, D., assisted by the pastor, Rev. H. S. Gabel. Rev. 
J. G. Fritz and Rev. James Shoop. The clergymen of the various churches 
in the city were also in attendance, as well as a number of cur own pastors 
from surrounding charges. Over $8,000 in cash and subscriptions were 
secured on this occasion, covering the entire balance necessary to pay the 
total cost of the church, which was $18,700. The total estimated value of 
'.he church property, including the parsonage, three houses and several vacant 
lots, is estimated at $33,000. This does not include Ebenezer Cemetery, 
which is also owned by the church. 

The following is a list of the preachers and pastors who preached in 
Lebanon since 1797: Christian Newcomer, Henry Crum, George A. Geet- 
ing, Joseph Hofifman, Abraham Draksel, Martin Kreider, Felix Light, Henry 
Heistand and John Neidig. In 1825 Lancaster Circuit was formed, and 
Lebanon was constituted a part of it. Jacob Erb ser\ed it in 1825-26; Gideon 
Smith, 1827; Simeon Dreisbach, 1828-29-30; Gideon Smith, 1831 ; David 
Runx, 1832; Jacob Roop and John Snyder, 1833; Daniel Funkhouser, 1834; 
John Snyder, 1835; Christian Hershey, 1836; John Eckstein, 1837; Daniel 
Funkhouser, 1838-39. In 1840 Lebanon Circuit was formed with Lebanon 
as a part, and Jacob Roop served it in 1840; Christian Peflfley and Philip 
Fry, 1841 ; John Light, 1842-43-44; Christian S. Crider, 1845-46-47, under 
whom Lebanon became a station and was afterward served as follows : 
John A. Sand, 1848-49-50; Henry Shropp, 1851-52-53; George W. Hoff- 
man, 1854-55-56; David Holifman, 1857-58-59; John Stamm and D. Strick- 
ler, i860; A. Steigerwalt and C. J. Burket, 1861-62; J. B. Dougherty, 1863- 
64-65; Jacob H. Mark, 1866-67-68: Henry Gelbach, 1869-70-71; Jacob 
Runk, 1872-73; James Shoop, 1874-75-76; E. Light, 1877-78; J. P. Smith, 
1879-80-81-82; U. Gambler, 1883-84-85; D. S. Longenecker, 1886-87-88- 
89; H. S. Gabel, 1890-91-92-93-94; J. H. Von Nieda, 1895-96; J. P. Smith, 
1897-98-99; J. Runk and I. E. Runk, 1900; J. Runk and R. R. Butterwick, 
1901 : and I. H. Albright. 1901-02. The present membership of the church 
is 597. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 183 

GEORGE BACHMAN. The Bachman family has long been one of 
the most prominent and wealthy agricultnral ones of Lebanon county, owning 
many of the finest farms and most comfortable homes, and contributing also 
some of the county's best citizens. In George Bachman is found a worthy 
representative, and he was born April 9, 1840, a grandson of John Bachman 
of South Annville township, and a son of Christian and Sarah (Zinn) 
Bachman. 

Christian Bachman, the father, was born January 17, 1812, and died 
January 2, 1900. His birth occurred on his father's farm in South Annville 
township, and there he remained until manhood, making- trips during his 
school vacations to Manheim in Lancaster count}', Lancaster City and Car- 
lisle, Dauphin county, where he was engaged in clerking. When but nine- 
teen years of age he embarked in a mercantile business at Fontana, Lebanon 
county, where he continued for seven }'ears, and then went to farming in 
Cornwall township, on the land adjacent to the farm now owned by his son 
George. Mr. Bachman successfully operated this farm for some thirty-five 
years, and finally divided its 315 acres into two farms. In addition to this 
valuable property, he owned another farm of 162 acres, this being now 
occupied by his son John. Mr. Bachman was one of the heaviest land- 
holders in the county, and one of the leading and progressive farmers. 
Through his whole life he continued his industry, taking a constant pleasure 
in seeing the great yields of his fields and the increase of his stock. Mr. Bach- 
man was a man of many excellent traits of character which were generally 
recognized and which resulted in his having many friends. He was a mem- 
ber of the Republican party, but it was from principle and not with any desire 
for office. For many years he was an elder in the Reformed Church, a man 
whose example and precept thoroughly agreed. He was a widower for many 
years, his wife dying December 31, 1870, at the age of fifty-nine years, two 
months and twenty days. They had a family of twelve children born to them, 
namely: one that died in infancy; Malinda, who is the widow of Cyrus 
Ginrich, resides in Dauphin county; Annie, who is the wife of Christian 
Smith, of North Cornwall township; George, of Cornwall; Catherine, who 
died in childhood ; John, who is a farmer of Cornwall township ; Fannie, 
who is the wife of Henry Kreider, of South Annville township; Miss Sarah, 
who resides in Annville; Rosanna, who died in childhood; Christian, who was 
a farmer of Cornwall township, died at the age of thirty-five years, leaving a 
widow and five children; Miss Emma, who resides in Annville; and Mary, 
who is the wife of Joseph Reist, of Annville. 

George Bachman was reared on the farm and attended the local schools. 



1 84 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

remaining" at home with his father, until the age of twenty-five years, at 
which time he married and then settled on a farm adjoining the one he now 
occupies. It contained 169 acres, and Mr. Bachman successfully managed 
that large jiroperty for a period of twenty years, locating then on his present 
farm of 166 acres. Here he owns one of the very finest farms of this great 
agricultural county, and operates it according to the best known methods, 
Mr. Bachman being an intelligent and progressive man. In politics he is a 
Republican, and like other men of reliability has found himself called upon 
to accept some public office, and is ser\'ing now as township auditor. 

On March 9, 1865, Mr. Bachman was married to Mary A. Bowman, 
daughter of George and Fannie (Horst) Bowman, born Feb. 14, 1844. 
They have a family of seven children, namely : Fannie, born December 25, 
1865, is the wife of Monroe Y. Croll. of South Lebanon township, and they 
have children, Abraham, George and Ethan ; Christian Harvey, born Novem- 
ber 5, 1867, a farmer on his father's farm, married Fannie Yordie, and they 
have children, Aaron. Ada, Edna, Christian and Mary; Stephen, born 
August 22, 1870, a farmer of South Lebanon township, married Lizzie Bru- 
baker, and they have children, Isaac, Lizzie and George; George, born Janu- 
ary 28, 1874. dTed in December, 1878; Mary Ellen, born September 14, 1880, 
is at home; Oscar H., born August ly , 1882, a resident of Cleona, married 
Anna Hoffer, and has one child, Esther; and Sarah Z., born August 17, 
1887, is at home. Mr. Bachman, his wife and children belong to the 
Reformed Church of Bismarck. The family is most highly esteemed in 
Cornwall township. Mr. Bachman is a man who is much respected both per- 
sonally and in business, and is regarded as one of the representative, public- 
spirited men of this locality. 

JOHN B. OBERHOLTZER. This representative citizen of Lebanon, 
and popular ex-sheriff of the county, is at present the genial host of the 
"Colonial Hotel," and a gentleman upon whom the god of hospitality^ and 
good cheer has set his seal of approval; not to know our subject is to argue 
oneself a stranger in this section of the Keystone State. He was born at 
Campbelltown, Lebanon county, July 27, 1859. 

John Oberholtzer, his grandfather, was the first of the name of whom 
we have accurate knowledge, he having been for long years an acceptable 
minister of the Mennonite Church in Lebanon county. His son, Christian, 
born in Campbelltown in 1822, married Elizabeth Beamsderfer. This lady 
was born March 2, 1837. and is still living, the object of the devoted attention 
of her large family. She was a daughter of Joseph, and he the son of Michael 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 185 

Beamsderfer, the former a native of Schaefferstown. Michael Hved to the 
advanced age of ninety-six years, and died in 1876. Christian Oberholtzer, 
the honored father of our subject, died April 26, 1876. He was a farmer 
by occupation, and in mental equipment above the average of his class. Gifted 
with an observant mind and being a great reader he became a well-informed 
man. He was equally proficient in English and German, and was one of the 
best Biblical scholars in this section of the State. He was thrice married, 
the first wife bearing Iiim a son, Harry C. Oberholtzer. His second wife 
died without issue. The children of the lady who now survives him are : 
Elizabeth, deceased ; John B. ; Fannie, deceasetl ; Leah, Mrs. Isaac J. Tschudy ; 
Emma. Mrs. William Wealand ; Christian, clerk in the "Colonial Hotel;" 
Ella, Mrs. Charles Lenig; and Joseph P. 

John B. Oberholtzer was well grounded in the elementary studies in the 
district school. Owing to the death of his father, he remained on the farm 
until three years past his majority. In the winter months he had picked up 
a good knowledge of carpentering, tin-smithing and mason work, and was 
able thus to turn many a dollar to the support of his mother's family. In 
1883, however, he began life for himself, engaging with John F. Hain, the 
bottler of Lebanon, and with whom he spent the following three years. Six 
years were then passed in the hotel business, he having the advantage of train- 
ing under such experienced hosts as William H. Killinger and John R. Forney, 
who at different times were proprietors of the "Union Hotel." This experience 
was sufficient to qualify him to become "mine host" on his own account, 
and renting the "Farmers' Hotel" he dispensed hospitality for the following 
three years. Mr. Oberholtzer has always been a stanch Republican, and his 
faithful work in the ranks of that party, and the fact of his great popularity 
with the voters, made him an easy winner, when, in the primaries of 1897, 
he submitted his name for nomination for sheriff. The same elements com- 
bined to give him victory at the polls, and for a term of three years the 
courts of Lebanon had an able and impartial officer to execute their decrees. 
At the end of his term of office, he again resumed the hotel business, this 
time taking charge of the "Colonial Hotel, ' on South Eighth street, which 
he is rapidly bringing to the front as one of the best hostelries of the 
county. 

On Augxist 26, 1882, Mr. Oberholtzer was married to Kate Eldora 
Graul, a native of Reading, Pa., who died in 1887. To this marriage was 
born a son, who died in infancy. On Thanksgiving Day, 1900, Mr. Ober- 
holtzer was happily joined in marriage to Emma Fisher, a lady of many 



186 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

graces of character, and a daughter of John Fisher, a prominent citizen of 
the county. She was born in Derry Church, Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. 
Fraternally Mr. Oberholtzer aftlliates with the Odd Fellows, among 
whom, and all over the county, he is held in the highest esteem. 

J. H. HORNE, M. D. In Dr. J. H. Home, Millcreek township has 
not only a leading physician, but also one of the most honorable citizens of 
Lebanon county. Dr. Home was born January 3, 1865, in Lower Heidel- 
berg township, Berks Co., Pa., a son of Charles and Sarah (Heister) Home, 
the former of whom was born in 1831, and the latter in 1832. 

The great-grandfather of Dr. Home was named Peter Home, an Eng- 
lish Quaker, and one of the earliest settlers of Berks count3^ His son. also 
Peter, the grandfather of Dr. Home, was a well-known farmer and upright 
citizen. His family numbered eight children, namely: John, deceased; Jere- 
miah, of Robesonia, Pa. ; Elias, of Waterloo, Black Hawk Co., Iowa; Charles, 
father of Dr. Home; Mary, wife of Reuben Fields, of Berks county; 
Malinda, wife of Isaac Graeff, of Rolxsonia; Amanda, wife of Alvin 
Lamm, of Lower Heidelberg, Berks county, and Amelia, wife of David 
Ringler, of Womelsdorf, Berks county. The father of Dr. Home was a ver}- 
sincere supporter of the Democratic party. He was ah\'ays prominent in the 
Refomied Church, serving as elder and on the board of trustees. In 1852 ^Mr. 
Home married Sarah Heister, a daughter of Isaac Heister, of Berks county, 
and a family of seven children was born to this union, as follows: Violanda. 
wife of Levi Gruber, of Brownsville, Berks county; Peter, of Sinking Springs. 
Berks county; Isaac, a farmer of North Heidelberg township, Berks county; 
Adam, of Brownsville; Dr. J. H., of Newmanstown ; Sallie, wife of Harvey 
Wentz, of Chester Springs, Chester county; and Lizzie, wife of James Fitler, 
a box manufacturer of Robesonia, Berks county. 

The boyhood of Dr. Home was spent on his father's farm and he 
attended the public schools in his locality. x\t the age of eighteen years he 
went to Aba, Hardin Co., Ohio, and lliere enjoyed Normal School advan- 
tages for three years, returning then to liis home in Berks county. After three 
years spent in teaching, he began the study of medicine under Dr. D. H. 
Hain, of Mt. Pleasant, Berks county, with wliom he remained three and one 
half years, in the meantime attending lectures at Jefferson Medical College, 
at Philadelphia, where be graduated in i8gi. He began the practice of his 
profession at \\^omelsdorf, wh.ere he remained two years and then, in 1893, 
settled at Newmanstown. Here he has built up a large and lucrative prac- 
tice. His close attention to the demands of his profession, his genial manner 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 187 

and agreeable personality, in combination with marked ability, have gained 
him the confidence of the whole community. 

In 1892 Dr. Home was united in marriage wnth Miss Sallie A. Knoll, 
daughter of John and Amanda (Wenrich) Knoll, of Berks county, and one 
son, J. Ellwood. has been born to this union. 

Dr. Home is a member of the order of K. of P., No. 169, of Newmans- 
town, and the Jefferson ]\Iedical College Alumni Association. He is examiner 
for six life insurance companies. Professionally he belongs to the Lebanon 
County Medical Society. Lie is a member and elder of the Reformed Church 
at Newmanstown. Dr. Home is one of the very highly esteemed residents 
of this community, both personally and professionally. 

GABLE. The Gable family, which is worthily represented in Heidel • 
berg township, Lebanon county, by John Wendel Gable and his son, John 
Franklin, was founded in America by John Gable (2), who w-as born Febru- 
ary II, 1756, near Zeifenbeck, Principality of Waldeck. a son of John Gable 
( J ) . With other young men he was sold by the government to King George 
III, of England, and with his regiment was taken to Baton Rouge, La., 
thence to Vera Cruz, and finally to Havana, at which latter place he remained 
in bondage two years and seven months. Yle afterward came to Philadel- 
phia, from which city he came to Pleidelberg, Lebanon county, where he 
found employment with Hones Shenk, and later with Mr. Krall. In 1788 
he went to Warwick, Lancaster county, where he worked for Joseph Ging- 
rich. On August 23, 1789, he was married to Elizabeth Marzall, daughter of 
John Wendel Marzall, the latter a native of the Pfalz, Germany, who emigrated 
to America in 1762, purchased land near Lime Rock in 1764, and there lived 
until his death in 1804. John Gable and his young wife set up their house- 
hold in Mt. Joy in 1790, and in 179-, moved to Sporting Llill, Lancaster 
county, where he worked at the weaver's trade. In 1803 Mr. Gable moved to 
Warwick township, settling on a small farm of about twenty acres, which he 
received from his father-in-law, and which is now the site of Lime Rock 
Station, on the Reading and Columbia railroad. In connection with the culti- 
vation of his land he also worked as a weaver. His death occurred in 1852. 
To John Gable and wife were born four children, as follows: Maria, born 
August 17. 1790, married Rev. H. Scriba, a Lutheran minister at Man- 
heim. Pa.; John (3), born November 8, 1795; Christian, born April 28. 
1803; and Catherine, born December 13, 1804. 

John Gable (3) was married Decemlier i. 1818, to Ann ]\Iaria Lutz, 
daughter of John Lutz, who was born in 1754. at Hanau, Germany, and 



1 88 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

came to America in 1775 or 1776. To John Gable (3) and his wife were 
born seven children as follows: Jonathan Monroe, born January 4, 1820; 
Mary Caroline, born July 16, 1821 ; Solomon Augustus, born January 30, 
1825; John Wendel, born March 20. 1826; Davis Emanuel, born June 24, 
1829; William Henry, born August 31, 1836; and Jacob Benton, born June 
4, 1839. 

John Wendel Gable was born near Lime Rock. On October 31. 
1848, he was united in marriage with Magdalene Diehm, who was born 
October 31, 1824, daughter of Isaac Diehm, and to this union came three 
sons, John Franklm, born April 28, 1850; Isaac Addison, born December 16. 
185 1, died May 22. 1863; and Levi D., born July 29, 1859, died May 4, 1863, 
Mrs. Magdalene (Diehm) Gable was a noble Christian woman, devoted to 
her home and family, and living a life that showered richest blessings on those 
around her. She entered into rest eternal July 31, 1895, aged seventy years 
and nine months. 

John Wendel Gable was a miller at the Speedwell Mills. In April. 185 1. 
he moved into his own house near Pennville. Lancaster county, but in the 
spring of i860 he moved with his family to Heidelberg township, Lebanon 
county, locating on a farm of 100 acres which he had purchased the previous 
year. He began farming, and being a man of broad understanding and 
practical common sense, he did not follow the old beaten track in the methods 
employed, but cleared and prepared his land on scientific principles, until in 
a short time the appearance of his farm underwent a wonderful change, and 
in place of bush and brier grew waving fieldso f grain and tobacco. The old 
brown sandstone house, which had been erected in 1749 by John George 
Smith, was completely renovated and repaired, until it bids fair to make a 
comfortable home for generations yet unborn. 

Mr. Gable took a great interest in education, and has ever been the warm 
friend and supporter of the schools, giving his time and means freely to 
advance its cause and encourage others to do the same. He is an active 
worker in the Lutheran Church, and has always been devoted to the interests 
of the Sunday School, acting as superintendent for more than thirty years. 
For many years he has served in its council, and has done much to make his 
chosen faith an influence for good in the community. 

John Franklin Gable, the only surviving child of his father, 
was educated in the district schools and at Palatinate College. In 1867 he 
began teaching in the public schools, and continued this work with much 
success for twenty-two terms, working during the summers on his father's 
farm. The management of the farm has gradually fallen upon his shoulders, 



BIOGRAPHICAL. ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 189 

and he now takes entire charge of it, besides operating, with great success, 
the Locust Grove Flour and Grist Mill. Like his father he is a practical 
workman, and sees at once the correct solution of whatever problem life pre- 
sents to him. This, coupled with the executive ability that accomplishes what 
it undertakes, has brought much prosperity to him. In 1866 he united with 
the I>utheran Church, and has so ordered his life in harmony with the faith 
he professes, as to merit the high esteem of the community in which his 
life has been passed. 

On November 24, 1870, John Franklin Gable was wedded to Clara 
Bennetch, who was born November 30, 1851, fifth child of Bennevil and 
Sarah (Witters) Bennetch, the former born July 17, 1817, died June 4, 
1899, and the latter born January 6, 1822, died July 5, 1878. To John F. 
Gable and wife have been born children as follows: (i) Flora, born July 8, 
187 1, became an instrumental music teacher. On May 19. 1894, she married 
Ira J. Light, a graduate of the Millersville State Normal School, now teach- 
ing in the high school at Schaefferstown, Pa., and they have had fi\e children, 
namely: Myra, born March 22, 1895; Adin Gable, January 24, 1896; 
Alin Caleb, March 2, 1898; Warren Eugene, March 22,, 1900; and John 
George, October 24, 1902, died April 3, 1903. (2) Charlotte, born March 5, 
1881, was graduated June 26, 1902, at the Millersville State Normal School, 
and is now teaching the Waldeck school in Heidelberg township. (3) 
Mollie, born August 5, 1883, is a student in the Millersville State Normal 
School. (4) Emma, born Jime 12, 1889, is at home. 

PETER HALT^ER. The ranks of the "Boys in Blue" are fast being 
depleted by the great enemy of life, but while they are here it behooves the 
present generation to give them their full meed of praise for the glorious work 
they have accomplished in saving the Union. There are a number of these 
old veterans in Lebanon county, among whom is the gentleman whose name 
forms the caption of this paragraph, and who has for a long lifetime lived an 
honofable and upright life within the county. He is at the present engaged in 
the real estate and general insurance business, and has in the past been 
connected with many of the leading enterprises of the city of Lebanon. 

Peter Hauer is a native of the county, born August 27, 1838, a son of 
Henry Hauer, a native of Dauphin county. Pa., and his wife, Catherine 
Grumbine, of Lebanon county. Henrv Hauer was a leading farmer of the 
county during his lifetime, his decease occurring in 1868, when he was aged 
seventy-one years, and that of his wife two years previous, at the age of sixty- 
eight years. They were the parents of nine children, of whom the eldest was 



I90 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Levi, a farmer, now deceased; Jacob, deceased, who was engaged in the 
toliacco business for years in Lebanon ; Catherine, who married Michael Klein- 
felter, and is now deceased ; George, a retired farmer of Bethel township, 
Lebanon county; Elizabeth, widow of Isaac Wagner, of Lebanon; Samuel, 
now deceased, for years engaged in the tobacco business in Lebanon, as a 
member of the firm of Hauer Bros.; Sallie, who became the wife of William 
Belleman, and now resides in Missouri; John, deceased; and Peter, the subject 
of this sketch. The parents of this family were worthy and highly respected 
residents of their community, and were always found ready to engage in any 
movement that meant the uplifting of humanity. They were devout members 
of the Lutheran Church. 

Peter Hauer was brought up to the labor of farm life, where he developed 
a sturdiness of character and strong physical health which has followed him 
through life. He received a fair education in what was called at that time the 
"paying school,'" at Fredericksburg. At sixteen he became apprenticed to the 
miller's trade at the Grove Flouring Mill, near Fredericksburg, serving one 
year as an apprentice, the following two years as a journey- 
man. He then changed his location to East Hanover township, Lebanon 
county, where he rented the old Maulfair Mill and went into business for 
himself. He, however, operated this mill but the short period of a year, 
when he went back to Fredericksburg and engaged in the produce busi- 
ness. After two j-ears here he sold out. and in 1857 removed to Lel:)anon, 
and where he has since resided. He first engaged with the old Peter Strickler 
mill on North Ninth street, and after a number of years with them became 
connected with the North Lebanon Mill. 

\Vhile engaged in the North Lebanon mill, the storm which had been 
gathering over the nation for so many years broke in all its destructive fury. 
Mr. Hauer had watched the progress of events with great solicitude, and was 
one of the first to offer his services for the suppression of rebellion against 
the recognized authority of the United States. On September 9. 1861, his 
name was enrolled as Corporal of Company A, Ninety-third Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteers, at Camp Coleman, Lebanon, Pa. This Regiment went to the front in 
November, 1861, camping at Fort Good Hope, near Washington City, and 
later tiking position at Tennallytown, near Georgetown. Here the regiment 
participated in severe daily drill until March, 1862, when it became part of the 
troops who participated in that fatal first fight, the battle of Bull Run. After 
tills b-^tt1e the regiment returned to Camp Tennally. where some time later 
it embarked with McClellan's troops and went to Fortress IMonroe, at Newport 
News, where it disembarked and engaged in the Peninsular Campaign. Mr. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 191 

Hauer was with his regiment in all the service here, which has become a matter 
of history ; he was at AA'arwick Court House, at Yorktown, and on May 5, 1862, 
engaged in the bloody battle of Williamsburg. Following this he was at Fair 
Oaks, Seven Pines, and engaged in the various parts of the Seven Days fight, 
which ended in the great battle at Malvern Hill, the end of this series of 
engagements finding the regiment at Harrison's Landing. Thence the 
regiment again embarked and returned to Alexandria, where it remained 
until it joined the army that was gathered to prevent Lee's first invasion of 
the North. The regiment reached the field in time to participate in the battle 
of Antietam. The exposure consequent upon the severe service here brought 
on our subject a spell of sickness and he was forced to pass a considerable 
period of time in the Broad and Cherry Street Hospital, Philadelphia. This 
sickness left him in such a weakened condition that he was unfit for active 
service, and in August, 1863, he was given an honorable discharge for dis- 
ability. He returned to his home with the consciousness of having done what 
he could to save the honor of the flag". 

After a convalescent period, and when he had partially regained his 
health, Mr. Hauer resumed work at his trade in the Walter Mill at Jonestown, 
and it w-as there that in October, 1863, he suffered the accident which caused 
him to lose his right arm, it having to be amputated at the shoulder. It seemed 
somewhat singular that a soldier who had passed through a number of the 
hottest battles of the war should return from the service unharmed and in less 
than a six-month suffer so terrible an accident, which incapacitated him for 
active service at his trade, making it necessary to adopt other means of liveli- 
hood. He returned to Lebanon, where he secured the appointment of collector 
of taxes for Lebanon county and the borough of Lebanon, together with that 
of court crier. In the fall of 1869 he became a candidate on the Republican 
ticket for the office of register of wills of Lebanon county, and w-as elected, 
in which office he served with credit to himself and satisfaction to his con- 
stituents for the three years' term of office. His next venture was in the 
grocery business, which he conducted for three years and then sold out, having 
been appointed again as tax collector of Lebanon county. This office he 
administered with fidelity for the following ten years, having also been com- 
missioned as a notarv public. The commission of Mr. Hauer as notary public 
has been renewed six different times, covering a period of twenty-four years, 
and he is holding said appointment at the present time. In the vear 1887 he 
became engaged in the general insurance business, which he is still conducting, 
being also interested in real estate. Another business connection has been that 
of collector for the Lebanon Gas Company for o\'er thirty-five years. Mr. 



192 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Hauer also ser\ed a period of three years as treasurer of the County Alms 
House. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Firemen's Aid Association, and is of course an honored member 
of that grand organization, the Grand Army of the Republic. In religious 
matters he is a leading member of Zion's Lutheran Church. 

Mr. Hauer has been twice married. On June 17, 1859, by Rev. J. H. 
Rohmig, he was joined in wedlock with Miss Clarissa, daughter of Peter 
Meyers, whO' was born in Fredericksburg, Lebanon county. May 19, 1841, 
and died February 27, 1885. She was the mother of the following children: 
Miss Annie L., of Philadelphia; Katie E., of Lebanon, married to W. G. Hain; 
Grant L., Lincoln M. and William H., all three deceased; George I., married 
and living in Pittsburg, Pa.; Lottie C, of Lebanon, married to Geo. W. 
Daugerty; Charles P., married and living in Philadelphia; Warren M., 
married and living in Reading, Pa.; Raymond M., deceased; and Miss Mabel 
C, of Lebanon. Mr. Hauer's second marriage occurred December 20, 1887, 
the lady's name Ijeing Mrs. Mary A. Fisher, a native of Lancaster county. 
Pa., and a daughter of Jacob Pfeffer, now deceased. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hauer are worthy and respected citizens of Lebanon, where 
the high integrity and many noble qualities of citizenship of this old veteran 
endear him to a large circle of friends and acquaintances. 

MILL.ER. For ninety -three years Henry Miller went in and out among 
the good people of Lebanon county. What an immeasurable span, taken in 
the light of development which had taken place in all departments of civilized 
life! When a mere lad he opened his eyes in \\onder at the first steamboats 
that plied the rivers ; \\'hen a young man he looked incredulously at the then 
crude locomotive; in the prime of life he stood aghast to find men communi- 
cating with each other, as it were, by flashes of lightning; he had passed his 
sixty mark ere the telephone became a slave of commerce; he was an old 
man when rapid transit began to revolutionize cities. From the day of small 
things, when hand labor accomplished everything, he saw gigantic and intricate 
machinery doing the work of hundreds of hands, and doing it infinitely better. 

At the time of his death, April 25. 1903. four generations — Henry Miller, 
David W. Miller, Charles L. Miller, and his son, Charles David Miller, were 
living in the city of Lebanon, where each of them in turn was born. This 
is a record which but few families in the country can equal. The earlier 
members of the family were in their day prominent and useful citizens, wiio 
bore their share of the heat and burden of the day and left unstained records 
to posterity. 




c/^l^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 193 

Tohn Miller, the first of the family in this country, came from tlic 
Palatinate, Germany, on the Rhine, making the voyage to America in the 
ship "Mortonhouse," James Coultas. master, which sailed from Rotterdam, 
and touched last at Deal, England, according to the clearance, dated June 
21, 1729. There were 180 persons on board. They arrived at Philadelphia 
in August, 1729, and on the 19th of that month signed a declaration of their 
allegiance of King George IT They located some seventy-five miles west of 
Philadelphia, in the wilderness among the Indians, in that section now em- 
bracing Lebanon, Lancaster and Dauphin counties. 

Daniel Miller, the next in the line of whom we have record, was a native 
of West Hanover township, Dauphin county, where his birth occurred May 
19, 1781, his death June 23, 1859. He married Catherine Ensminger, who 
was born September 22, 1786, and died September 7, 1861. and they reared 
children as follows : John, born June 8, 1807, died November 5, 1901 ; Daniel, 
born October 13, 1808, died February 9, 1896; Llenry, born March 31. iSio, 
is mentioned below; Elizabeth, born December 6, 181 1, died in 1827; Cath- 
erine, born February 2, 1813, died July 25, 1896; Peter, born June 2, 1814, 
died Au.gust 16, 1887; Mary, born October 25, 181 5, is the widow of David 
Spang; Adam, born March 8, 1819, died in 1825; Susan, born January 25, 
1822, died August 3, 1893; Christian, born April 3, 1824, died May 12, 
1887; David E., born December 9, 1827, is still living. Four of the sons 
were six feet and one inch in height, and the daughters were all tall women. 
As may be seen, this family is also remarkable for longevity. 

Henry Miller^ born March 31, 1810, was married April 4, 1833, to 
Sabina Tittle, who was born September 14, 1812, and died May 3, 1883. 
They became the parents of the following children : John Henry, born March 
3, 1834; Catherine Anna, September 14, 1835 (a widow) ; Mary Anna, 
December 29, 1837 (a widow) ; David W., December 16, 1839 (mentioned 
below) ; boy twins, June 25, 1841 (one died when one day old, the other, 
Jacob, surviving until June 18, 1844); Daniel, September 19, 1843; Sabina, 
May 15, 1S45 (died February 12, 1869) ; Emma Lydia, May 20, 1847; Jere- 
miah, December 22, 1849, died May 19, J903; John Adam, March 24, 185 1; 
Jennie Frances, May 13, 1854 (a widow). As will be seen, all but four of 
the large family survive. On April 4, 1883, Mv. and Mrs. Miller cele- 
brated their Golden Wedding. Mrs. Miller passed away a month later, and 
Mr. Miller survived her twenty years, living in the old home with his two 
daughters, Emma and Mrs. Jennie F. Shaak. Mr. Miller early learned 
the trade of millwright, but subsequently turned to farming in order to secure 
work for his children. 

13 



194 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Mr. Miller was originally a Whig in political sentiment, in time becoming 
a Republican. His first vote was cast for Henry Clay, in 1832. In 184a 
he supported Gen. William H. Harrison, and in 1888 voted for his grandson, 
Benjamin Harrison. In i860 he \oted for Abraham Lincoln, and he 
cast his ballot for every Republican candidate since, including William Mc- 
Kinley, in 1900. In 1885, Vi'hen seventy-five years old, he was elected director 
of the poor of Lebanon county. 

David W. Miller was born December 16, 1839. He remained on the 
home farm until his sixteenth year, receiving a fair education in the schools 
of his district, and applying himself to such purpose outside of school that 
he had become qualified at that age to teach. For seventeen consecutive 
terms he then wielded the ferule in the county, working on the farm in vaca- 
tions. He looks upon this period of his life with great pleasure, having had 
many prominent men, now high in business circles, under his instruction. 

When the tocsin of war was sounded, in the 'sixties, Mr. Miller left 
the peaceful humdrum of the schoolroom for the more active forum of the 
field, enlisting in August, 1862, and becoming a private in Company E., One 
Hundred and Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, Capt. L. L. Greena- 
walt commanding the company, and Col. \\\ W. Jennings the regiment. 
He took part in the engagements at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. 
At rVedericksburg, when volunteers were called for to man a battery which 
had lost all its men the day before, he was the first to offer his services, others 
following. He remained there two weeks, seeing much hard fighting. After 
the nine months of his enlistment had expired he returned home, and re-en- 
listed in Company E. Forty-eighth Regiment. Emergency Troops, of which he 
was second lieutenant. 

After the war was over Mr. Miller resuiued teaching, and continued in 
that calling until 1872, at which time he entered upon the business which 
has since assumed such large proportions, as a member of the Lebanon 
Lumber Company. Later the firm name was changed to D. W. Miller & Co. 
Under the skillful management of Mr. Miller the business assumed increas- 
ingly large proportions, a condition which has continued since he turned it 
over to his sons, in 1897. Mr. Miller has always been active in the business 
life of the city. He is president of the Fidelity Building & Loan Association, 
and is a director of the North Lebanon Shoe Company. He is president 
of the Indian River ]\laiuifacturing Company, which owns 16.000 acres of 
land on the Indian river, in Florida, which they are developing. 

In local municipal affairs Mr. Miller has been quite active, but he 
has contented himself with doing his part in seeing that good men were 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 195 

elected to the different offices. In school affairs he has gone a little farther. 
His early experience in the school room was taken advantage of by his fellow 
townsmen, and he is now serving on the board of school controllers. He is a 
prominent and forceful worker in the ranks of the Republican party, which 
he represented in the Electoral College of 1896 from the Fourteenth Con- 
gressional District, and had the pleasure of casting his vote for that peerless 
American, the late William McKinley. 

Jn social life Mr. Miller gives most of his attention to that grand organi- 
zation which is the wonder and credit of the age, the Grand Army of the 
Republic. He is one of the leading members of the local post, Sedgwick, 
No. 42, of which he was commander in 1873. and which he has represented 
in the Department Encampment for a number of years. He was the depart- 
ment's representative in the National Encampment at Providence. Indian- 
apolis, Louisville, St. Paul, Pittsburg, Philadelphia and Buffalo. He served 
as aide-de camp on the staffs of both Gens. Clarkson and Gobin when they 
were grand commanders. Since he was twenty-one years of age Mr. Miller 
has been a member of Lebanon Lodge. No. 121, I. O. O. F., and has filled 
all chairs (being a past grand) and represented his lodge in the Grand Lodge 
twice. For fifteen years he was secretary of his lodge, and during that time 
missed only two meetings. He also belongs to the I. O. R. M. and the 
A. O. U. W., in which latter he held the office of treasurer for a number 
of years. 

On October 8, 1863, Mr. Miller married Mary Ann Louser, daughter 
of Michael Louser and Mary Brandt. She was born in the city of Lebanon 
October 4. 1839, and died May 14, 1903, mourned by a large circle of friends. 
To this union two sons were born, Charles Lincoln and Henry Michael. 
Mrs. Miller was a member of Zion Lutheran church, to which Mr. Miller 
also belongs, and in the work of which both bore a verv active part ; he was a 
member of the board of trustees for fifteen years. 

Charles Lincoln Miller, M. D.. the eldest son oi David W'., and 
the senior member of the lumber fi.rm of Miller Bros., which has its vards 
on the corner of Sixth and Willow streets. Lebanon, was born in that citv 
August 20, 1865. He was thoroughly grounded in the elementary branches 
in the excellent public schools of the city, and in his later teens taught school 
for three years. While engaged in teaching school he began his study of 
medicine with Dr. Samuel Weiss, and in 1886 matriculated in the Medical 
Department of the Luiiversity of Pennsylvania. There he took a full three 
years' course, and practiced medicine the following four years in the citv 
of Philadelphia, two years of that period being chief of the Skin Clinic at 



196 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

the Polyclinic Hospital, and for two years more was chief of the Medical 
Clinic at the same hospital. In the latter part of 1893 he gave up his practice 
and returned to Lebanon, where he succeeded to his father's lumber business, 
the latter's health having failed temporarily. The firm was then Miller, 
Cilley & Co.. becoming subsequently Miller, Louser & Co., the last named 
firm consisting of C. L. Miller, Samuel Louser and Henry M. Miller, the 
latter a younger brother. In the year 1899 this firm was changed to ^Miller 
Bros., upon the retirement of Mr. Louser. The business of this firm consists 
of the manufacture of all kinds of lumber and mill work, they having the 
most extensive plant of the kind in Lebanon. It covers between five and 
six acres, on Willow street, extending from Fifth to Seventh streets. 

After his return from Philadelphia Dr. Miller became ambulance surgeon 
to the Good Samaritan Hospital of the city, serving as such during the balance 
of 1893 and 1894. In 1894 he was appointed a member of the United States 
Board of Examining Physicians of Pensions, of which he was chosen secre- 
tary, holding that position until last year, when he became president. Although 
entirely out of the practice of medicine at the present time. Dr. Miller retains 
his interest in the profession, and keeps himself in touch with and abreast 
of the progress in the field of medicine. He is still a member of the Lebanon 
County Medical Association, of which he was secretary for five years, and 
is at present treasurer. He is also a member of the Pennsylvania State 
Medical Society. Further, he is a member of the General Alumni Association 
of the University, and is vice-president of the Lebanon County Alumni Asso- 
ciation of the University. He is prominent in other societies of the city, 
taking a deep interest in the work of the Lebanon County Historical Society, 
of which he is a member. In the fraternities he keeps in touch with the best, 
being a member of the Odd Fellows, the Elks, and the Red Men, in all of 
which he is helpful in maintaining the principles for which they stand. 

On February 18, 1893, Dr. Miller was joined in marriage to Mary 
Jeanette Scott, of Winchester, Va., daughter of Charles Scott. This union 
has been blessed with one son, Charles David Miller, born September 27, 1894. 
Harry Mich.a.el Miller, youngest son of David W. Miller, and junior 
member of the firm of Miller Bros., was born in Lebanon August 13. 1869. 
He, too, received a good preliminary education in the public schools, which 
was supplemented by a course in architecture in a Philadelphia school. Upon 
his return he became a member of the lumber firm, as noted in the sketch 
of his brother. He is a wide-awake, earnest business man, and in his per- 
sonality combines qualities which make him exceedingly popular in Lebanon 
circles. He takes an active part in the social life of the city, being a member 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 197 

-of the Elks, of which he is past exalted ruler, and giving his active aid to all 
movements looking to the hetterment of society in his native city. He was 
married December 10, 1891, to Miss Minnie Jones, daughter of Richard 
Jones, of Lebanon, Pa., formerly of Philadelphia. 

ft is not fulsome praise to say that no single family is held in greater 
esteem than that of the one whose history we have just recorded. The older 
members are men of character, and the younger men are rapidly forging to the 
front as leading business men of their native city. They deserve and receive 
the popular esteem in which they are held. 

J. HENRY MILLER. Connected for long years with the business 
interests of Lebanon, and one of the authorities in the matter of fire insurance 
in the city, is the gentleman whose name is here given. He has been con- 
nected with the promotion'and organization cf a large number of the lead- 
ing financial, industrial and social institutions of the city, and is a man whose 
life has been helpful along very many lines. 

The birth of Mr. Miller occurred on the old Daniel Miller farm about 
two miles south of the town of Annville, this county, March 3, 1S34. He 
is the son of Henry Miller, one of Lebanon county's most respected citizens, 
whose life of probity and uprightness was such as to continue his existence 
to the remarkable age of ninety-three years. He died at Lebanon, April 25, 
1903. 

J. Henry Miller passed the period of his boyhood aiding in the cultiva- 
tion of farms in North and South Annville and East Hanover townships. 
In these places he attended the district school, and later was given a course 
at the Annville Academy. His attention to his books had been of such a nature 
as to qualify him for teaching, and at the age of eighteen he taught his first 
school in Union district. This was followed by terms in North Annville. 
East Hanover and North Cornwall townships. In 1S58 he came to Lebanon, 
and in 1861 and 1862 he taught two sessions in the city schools there. Late 
in i860 he began his connection with the general insurance business, with 
which he has continued to the present time. In i860 he became secretarv 
of the Washington ]\futual Fire Insiu'ance Company, of which he was one 
of the organizers that year, and has been its secretary continuously and also 
treasurer since January i, 1899. He was also one of the organizers of the 
Lebanon County Mutual Live Stock Insurance Company, in 1869, and has 
served continuously as its secretary and treasurer. Lie assisted in organizing 
the Lebanon Steam Company in 1888. and has been its treasurer continu- 
ously since its organization, and also its secretary since 1893. He was instru- 



198 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

mental in organizing the Lebanon Market House Company in 1890, of which 
he has since been secretary and treasurer. The Lebanon Cemetery Associa- 
tion was one of the earliest institutions to claim his attention, and he assisted 
in its organization in 1859, has been a- director and since 1896 has served 
as its secretary. In the year 1894 he became one of the organizers of the 
North Lebanon Shoe factory, one of Lebanon's successful industries, and 
has been its president from the beginning. The Lebanon County Trust Com- 
pany is one of the latest of his successful efforts at organization, it having 
been organized in 1902, and he is chairman of its finance committee. In 
fire insurance our subject represents a large number of companies as agent, 
the following being some of the leading ones : Insurance Company of North 
America, American Fire Insurance Company, Franklin Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, the Pennsylvania, the Girard, the Spring Garden (all of Philadelphia), 
the Hanover, the Hartford, the New Hampshire,*the Orient, Phoenix, Liver- 
pool, London & Globe, the Royal, Commercial Union, Connecticut, Fidelity 
&- Casualty and Fidelity & Deposit. 

During the Civil war Mr. Aliller served as a corporal of Company A. 
Eleventh Pennsylvania Militia. He served in the Pennsylvania Legislature 
in 1877 and in 1878, was in the Lebanon Council for two terms when the 
borough government existed, and was president of the last council before 
the form of government was changed to that of the city, he being largely 
instrumental in bringing aboiit that change. Our subject has also shown 
a deep and helpful interest in educational matters, having been a member 
of the school board for a number of years. In religious affiliations he was 
an active member of Zion's Lutheran Church, covering a period of forty- 
three years, and was treasurer of the congregation for twenty-seven years 
of that time. He also served a long period as superintendent of the Sunday 
School. Our, subject now worships in Old Salem Lutheran Church, where 
he has charge of the home department and visitors' class in the Sunday 
School. Fraternally he affiliates with the A. O. U. W. In his politic 1 senti- 
ments he is a Republican. 

Mr. Miller was married, August 17, 1855, to Rosanna, daughter of 
George and Catherine Early. This lady is a native of East Hanover, Dauphin 
Co., Pa., where she was born March 17, 1834. She has borne her husband 
the following children : Luther Henry, deceased in 1900, at the age of thirty- 
two years; Mary Alice, at home; Charles Augustus, who died when thirteen 
months old; Emma Elizabeth, married to John K. Royal, city treasurer of 
Harrislmrg, Pa., who has two children, fohn D. and Elizabeth; Lincoln 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 199 

Early, a dentist at Wrightsville, Pa., who married Lulu Slike, and has one 
daughter, Margaret ; and Rosa Jane, who became Mrs. W. H. Clark, of 
Lebanon, Pa., and has one daughter, Kathryn. 

ELIAS H. HARTZ, one of the well-known citizens of Palmyra, was 
fborn August 6, 1843, on a farm in South Annville township, Lebanon county, 
son of John and Catherine (Hershey) Hartz. The father was born in 1800, 
in Hanover township, and died in i88j, a son of John Hartz, an old resident 
of Dauphin county. The mother was also born in Dauphin county, a daughter 
lof John Hershey, and both parents lie at rest in the cemetery at Gravel Hill. 
The children born to John Hartz and wife were these : Levi, born July 2. 
1826, died August 6, 1903 ; Jeremiah, born September 20, 1831, lives in North 
Annville township; Mary, born August 25, 1833, married Peter Keath, of 
Manheim, Pa.; Josiah, born October 9, 1835, resides in North Londonderry 
township; John, born November i, 1837, resides in Annville; Samuel, born 
September 19, 1839, died about ten years ago; Elias H. ; Cyrus, born Septem- 
ber 20, 1844, resides in Palmyra; Catherine, born October 29, 1845, niarried 
Adam Detweiler, of North Londonderry township ; and Lydia, born December 
28, 1847, resides at Palmyra. 

John Hartz, father of Elias H., removed from Dauphin county to South 
Annville. Lebanon county, and later to Gravel Hill, near Palmyra, where the 
mother died. Mr. Hartz was a farmer all his life, and he was one of the 
earnest and active members of the L^nited Brethren Church. In politics he was 
identified with the Republican party. 

Elias H. Hartz was reared on the farm in South Annville township, and 
obtained his education in the public schools. He followed the profession of 
teaching for a period of fourteen years in Annville and Londonderry town- 
ships, and about 1868 or 1870 came to T^ndonderry township. In 1874 he 
began farming on Gravel Hill, but two years later removed to Dauphin county. 
where he followed farming iive years. Mr. Hartz afterwards bought sixteen 
acres of well improved land at Gravel Hill, where he followed general farming 
for one year. In 1883 he bought his present farm in Palmyra, consisting 
of forty-seA-en acres, which was formerly the property of Samuel Brehm. 

In January, 1874, Mr. Hartz was married to Sallie Rebecca, daughter of 
Samuel and Julia (Grannas) Felterolf, both of whom were natives of the 
Lehigh Valley, and to whom were born the following children : Maria, who 
married Cornelius Fox, of East Hanover; Tillman, who lives in Ohio; Samuel, 
who lives on the old homestead; Eliza B., who married Henry Ricker. of 
Gravel Hill; Susanna Ann, who married Harrison Shiffler, of Missouri; Sallie 



200 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Rebecca, who became Mrs. Hartz ; and Peter A., who resides in Columbia 
county, Pennsylvania. 

A family of five children has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hartz, namely : 
Minnie N., lx)rn October 28, 1874, married Dr. U. G. Risser, of Campbell- 
town: Irena May died at the age of six years; Harvey E., born January 6, 
T879. graduated from the Cum])er]and \'alley Normal School, from Franklin 
and Marshall College, in June, 1901, taught in the Lebanon High School one 
term, and is now engaged in the study of law at the Michigan University, at 
Ann Arbor; Sannie A., born December 24, 1881, is a teacher; and Roger B. 
was born September 27. 1S88. The religious connection of this family is with 
the L'nited Brethren Church. Mr. Hartz is a prominent member of the Re- 
publican party in his community, and belongs to the county central committee. 
The family is one of the most highly cultured in Palmyra, and is prominent 
in both social and religious circles. 

WEIDMAN. For over a century the individual members of this 
family have gone in and out before the people of Lebanon county, the early 
members, as well as those of later date, having been men of probity, who 
lived upright lives in the community. Beginning with Capt. John Weidman, 
of Revolutionary fame, it has furnished Lebanon county not a few of her 
leading citizens, in ])oth commercial and professional walks of life. 

Probaljly the first of the family to come to America was Christopher 
Weidman, who was a native of Switzerland. He settled in Warwick town- 
ship, Lancaster county. Pa. The Capt. John referred to above was one of his 
sons, born in the aforesaid township, June 4, 1756. He received a good edu- 
cation, and was brought up to commercial pursuits in Philadelphia. At the 
outbreak of the war for Independence he became an officer in one of the 
associated battalions, and when Congress directed the organization of the 
German regiment he was commissioned an ensign, July 12, 1776. His pro- 
motion to first lieutenant bears date of May 14, 1777. His war record includes 
active service at the battle of Long Island, White Plains, Trenton, Princeton. 
Germantown, Monmouth and Newtown. He was with Gen. Sullivan on the 
memorable campaign which that noted Indian fighter made against the 
Indians in New York in 1779, during which year he was adjutant of the regi- 
ment. His retirement from the service bears date of January i, 1781. He 
was an original member of the Societv of the Cincinnati. A brave and gallant 
officer, he was among the distinguished men of the German regiment who not 
only acquitted themsehes nobly upon the battlefield, but who bore the fatigue 
and privations of the terrible winter of 1778 at Valley Forge. At the close 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 201 

of the war Capt. \\'^eidman resumed commercial life in Philadelphia, but kiter 
returned to the neighborhood of his birthplace and kept a store. Having been 
well educated he also did surveying in the neighborhood. The year 1800 
marks his coming to Lebanon county, where he purchased the Union Forge 
estate, and conducted the same successfully for many years. He was a man 
of fine judgment, his gifts being utilized as one of the Associate Judges (if 
that day, he serving from 1821 to 1830. After a long and highly honorai)]e 
career he passed to rest in Lebanon, June 6, 1830. Capt. John Weidman 
married Catherine Mason, of Philadelphia, May i, 1786. Catherine was born 
February 16, 1763, and died in Lebanon, October 8, 1794. She became the 
mother of Elizabeth, Jacob Barge, John and Maria. 

Jacob Barge Weidman was born in the city of Philadelphia May 12, 
1789. He was reared in a home where love of country was taught both l)y 
precept and example, these virtues being instilled into his young mind as he 
listened to the stories of daring and adventure participated in by his noble 
father during the Revolutionary days. He was given a splendid education 
for those days, first at the Latin school of James Rose, in Harrisburg. and 
then at Dickinson College, from which institution he graduated with honor. 
He took up the study of law with Samuel Laird, of Harrisburg, a noted 
lawyer of that city, and was admitted to the Dauphin county Bar in August. 
1813. He at once settled in Lebanon, where the Bar of the county had just 
been organized, its roll containing names which have since attained world-wide 
fame — James Hopkins, Thomas Elder, George Fisher, George H. Porter 
and James Buchanan being among the number. Jacob B. Weidman imme- 
diatelv took front rank in this galaxy of legal lights, and for forty years was 
regarded as one of the best lawyers in eastern Pennsylvania. He followed his 
profession almost slavishly, stepping aside but seldom to participate in the 
activities of political life, though well qualified for any position to which he 
might have aspired. The single exception was in 1837, when he was pre- 
vailed upon to accept a seat in the Pennsylvania State Constitutional Conven- 
tion, and where the high character of his services contributed much toward 
the splendid result of the sittings of that notable body. He died at a ripe age, 
in the zenith of an honorable career, March 5. 1857. Jacob B. Weidman 
married (first) Mary Murray, of Harrisburg, daughter of William Murray: 
'(second) Mary Eliza Morris, of Philadelphia: and lastly Elizabeth C. Mur- 
ray, of Harrisburg. There were two children born to the first marriage. Jnlm 
and Sarah. 

John Weidman, eldest son of Jacob B. and Mary (Murray) Weidman, 
was born August 25, 181 5, at Lebanon. He was educated at the Lebanon 



200 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Rebecca, A\ho became JNIrs. Hartz ; and Peter A., who resides in Columbia 
coun ty, Pennsylvania. 

A family of five children has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hartz, namely: 
Minnie N., lx)rn October 28, 1874, married Dr. U. G. Risser, of Campbell- 
town: Irena May died at the age of six years; Harvey E., born January 6, 
1879. graduated from the Cumberland \''alley Normal School, from Franklin 
and Marshall College, in June, 1901, taught in the Lebanon High School one 
term, and is now engaged in the study of law at the Michigan University, at 
Ann Arbor; Sannie A., born December 24, 1881, is a teacher; and Roger B. 
was born September 27, 1S88. The religious connection of this family is with 
the United Brethren Church. Air. Hartz is a prominent member of the Re- 
publican party in his community, and belongs to the county central committee. 
The family is one of the most highly cultured in Palmyra, and is prominent 
in both social and religious circles. 

WEI DM AN. For over a century the individual members of this 
family have gone in and out before the people of Lebanon county, the early 
members, as well as those of later date, having been men of probity, who 
lived upright lives in the community. Beginning with Capt. John Weidman, 
of Revolutionary fame, it has furnished Lel)anon county not a few of her 
leading citizens, in both commercial and professional walks of life. 

Probably the first of the family to come to America was Christopher 
Weidman, who was a native of Switzerland. He settled in Warwick town- 
ship, 1-ancaster countv. Pa. The Capt. John referrefl to above was one of his 
sons, born in the aforesaid township. June 4, 1756. He received a good edu- 
cation, and was brought up to commercial pursuits in Philadelphia. At the 
outbreak of the war for Independence he became an officer in one of the 
associated l)attalions, and when Congress directed the organization of the 
German regiment he was commissioned ai: ensign, July 12, 1776. His pro- 
motion to first lieutenant bears date of May 14, 1777. His war record includes 
active service at the battle of Long Island. White Plains, Trenton, Princeton, 
Germantown, Monmouth and Newtown. He was with Gen. Sullivan on the 
memorable campaign which that noted Indian fighter made against the 
Indians in New York in 1779. during which vear he was adjutant of the regi- 
ment. His retirement from the service bears date of January i, 1781. He 
was an original member of the Societv of the Cincinnati. A brave and gallant 
officer, he was among the distinguished men of the German regiment who not 
only acquitted themsehes nobly upon the battlefield, but who bore the fatigue 
and privations of the terrible winter of 1778 at Valley Forge. At the close 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 201 

of the war Capt. Weidman resumed commercial life in Philadelphia, but Liter 
returned to the neighborhood of his birthplace and kept a store. Having been 
well educated he also did surveying in the neighborhood. The year 1800 
marks his coming to Lebanon county, where he purchased the Union Forge 
estate, and conducted the same successfully for many years. He was a man 
of fine judgment, his gifts being utilized as one of the Associate Judges df 
that day, he serving from 1821 to 1830. Afier a long and highly honorable 
career he passed to rest in Lebanon, Jvme 6, 1830. Capt. John Weidman 
married Catherine Mason, of Philadelphia, May i, 1786. Catherine was lun-n 
February 16, 1763, and died in Lebanon, October 8, 1794. She became the 
mother of Elizabeth, Jacob Barge, Tohn and Maria. 

Jacob Barge Weidman was born in the city of Philadelphia May 12, 
1789. He was reared in a home where lo^'e of country was taught both by 
precept and example, these virtues being instilled into his young mind as he 
listened to the stories of daring and adventure participated in by his noble 
father during the Revolutionary days. He was given a splendid education 
for those days, first at the Latin school of James Rose, in Harrisburg, and 
then at Dickinson College, from which institution he graduated with honor. 
He took up the study of law with Samuel Laird, of Harrisburg, a noted 
lawyer of that city, and was admitted to the Dauphin county Bar in August. 
181 3. He at once settled in Lebanon, where the Bar of the county had just 
been organized, its roll containing names which have since attained world-wide 
fame — James Hopkins, Thomas Elder, George Fisher. George H. Porter 
and James Buchanan being among the number. Jacob B. ^^^eidman imme- 
diatelv took front rank in this galaxy of legal lights, and for forty years was 
regarded as one of the best lawyers in eastern Pennsylvania. He followed his 
profession almost slavishly, stepping aside but seldom to participate in the 
activities of political life, though well qualified for any position to which he 
might have aspired. The single exception was in 1837, when he was pre- 
vailed upon to accept a seat in the Pennsylvania State Constitutional Conven- 
tion, and where the high character of his services contributed much toward 
the splendid result of the sittings of that notable body. He died at a ripe age, 
in the zenith of an honorable career, March 5, 1857. Jacob B. Weidman 
married (first) Mary Murray, of Harrisburg, daughter of William ^Murray : 
'(second) Mary Eliza Morris, of Philadelphia; and lastly Elizabeth C. Mur- 
ray, of Harrisburg. There were two children born to the first marriage. John 
and Sarah. 

John Weidman. eldest son of Jacob B. and Mary (Murray) Weidman, 
was born August 25, 181 5, at Lebanon. He was educated at the Lebanon 



202 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Academy, and at Dickinson and Princeton Colleges, studied medicine with Dr. 
John B. Mish, and graduated from the Medical Department of the University 
of Pennsylvania. However, he concluded to study law, which he pursued 
under the direction of his father, was admitted to the Lebanon county Bar 
in 1842. and practiced his profession in Lebanon. He was elected district 
attorney of Lebanon county in 1859. serving one term. In ante-war times he 
was a brigadier general of the militia, and when the Civil war came he entered 
the army as captain of Company F, Fourth Pennsylvania Cavalry, serving 
until his impaired health compelled him to resign. He returned home, but 
never recovered, and died April 23, 1863. He married, in 1838, Emma 
Roberts Grant, of Melrose, N. J., and they had the following children: Grant, 
John, Martha, Jacob Barge. Sarah Ann, Emma R., Mary Virginia, James B., 
and Elizabeth Cook. 

Grant Weidman, eldest son of John and Emma R. (Grant) Weidman, 
was born at Melrose, near Trenton, N. J., September 8, 1839. His early 
years were spent at his father's home in Lebanon, Pa., and when quite young 
he entered a boarding school. From a preparatory school in Lititz, Pa., and 
schools in Bristol and Lawrenceville, N. J., he passed with a high degree of 
scholarship into Princeton University, from which he was graduated in the 
class of 1859. He inherited the love of study which had characterized his 
father's and grandfather's careers, and witli natural industry had applied him- 
self assiduously during his entire school life. Electing to enter the legal 
profession, he entered his father's office as a student, and there, under that 
able jurist's wise guidance, prepared for admission to the Bar, and, on August 
23, 1861, became a fully licensed member of the Lebanon county Bar. L^nlike 
many young lawyers, he did not seek a home among strangers to begin his 
practice, but remained in Lebanon, and ever made it his home. His legal 
work covered all branches, and he was equally at home, as well as equally 
busy, in all courts. However, he avoided criminal cases whenever he could, 
having a dislike for that class of work. His studies did not end with his first 
brief, but he kept continually at his books, and, though a wide general reader, 
he usually chose those works that bore upon his beloved profession, and that 
would widen his already erudite knowledge of the law. His reputation for 
integrity among his fellow practitioners was of the highest, and he was held 
in great respect for his marvelous ability to see at once the true facts in a case*, 
and to have at his fingers' ends the exact references that best applied. This 
saved many a tiresome and ]ong-dra\\n out ca^^e. and often won for him the 
gratitude of both sides. 

When the Civil war broke out he enlisted in the State militia, and was 




^^^^^^z^.^^:,:;!^.,^.,,^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 203 

second lieutenant of Company A, Eleventh Regiment, in 1862. He after- 
ward served as major of the One Hundred and Seventy-third Pennsylvania 
Volunteers. In his political faith Mr. Weidman was a Democrat, and was 
always active in the work of his party. 

He was a member of the National Convention, 1880, that nominated 
Winfield S. Hancock for President. He filled the office of district attorney, 
and gave efficient service as a member of the school board; and he was once 
the nominee of his party for Congress, but as he was a Democrat, in an over- 
whelming Republican district, he met with defeat. 

Fraternally Mr. Weidman was a Mason, belonging to all the bodies of 
that order, from the Blue Lodge through and including the Knights Templar 
and the Mystic Shrine, and he had held all the offices. In 1874 he held the 
office of Grand Commander of the Knights Templars of Pennsylvania. He 
was a member of the State Society of the Cincinnati, and was its treasurer; 
and he also belonged to the Loyal Legion. 

In spite of the engrossing nature of his profession and his devotion to it. 
Mr. Weidman found time to take an active interest in the financial and manu- 
facturing w^orld, and at the time of his death was president of the Lebanon 
National Bank, the largest institution of its kind in the county. He was a 
director in a number of manufacturing and industrial corporations, and was 
a manager of the Good Samaritan Hospital. 

On September 7, 1864, at Harrisburg, Pa.. Grant Weidman was united 
in marriage with M. Elizabeth Henry. This union was blessed with children 
as follows: John, deceased; Grant; Mary Henry, who married Thomas T. 
Lineaweaver, of Lebanon; Ethel Roberts; Sarah Elizabeth and Edward 
Ingleton and Christian Henry, both deceased. Like his father and grandfather 
Mr. Weidman was a Lutheran, and was always interested in the church and 
its work, and was a trustee for many years. He was a man of kind and genial 
disposition, who made and retained many friends, and he delighted to welcome 
them into his own home. In society he was very popular, his bright, sprightly 
conversation gathering around him, wherever he went, a group of admiring 
listeners, and when thoroughly aroused by a discussion his eloquence and his 
wit held his hearers' rapt attention. The mere mention that Mr. Weidman 
would address the jury would fill the court room, not only with those inter- 
ested in the trial in question, but with those who enjoyed his unusual forensic 
ability. As a reasoner he Avas always logical, and his command of English 
made him a clear and decisive speaker, who never failed to express his full 
and exact meaning. His kindly nature made him generous to a fault, and he 



204 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

gave freely of his services to those in need, and was charitable of his means to 
the unfortunate. In his home he found his rest and happiness, and was 
devoted to his family. His death occurred November ii, 1895. 

JOHN H. BROWN, one of the representative farmers of Jackson town- 
ship, occupying a fine farm which has been in the family for a number of years, 
conveniently situated between Lebanon and Myerstown, belongs to a family 
established in this part of Lebanon county in 1840. 

John H. Brown was born November 20, 1853, on this old family home- 
stead, a son of Aaron and Elmira (Shott) Brown, the former of whom was 
born about 1831, near Womelsdorf, Berks county, and died at the age of 
sixty-five years. His father was Samuel Brown, who was the son of John 
Brown, the latter being one of the early settlers of Berks county. The family 
has always been identified with agricultural interests, and is not as numerous 
as many in this locality, two children only being born to Samuel Brown, the 
grandfather of John H., namely: Lavina and Aaron. 

Aaron Brown married Elmira Sholt, of Cornwall township. In 1840 he 
came to Jackson township and purchased the farm now occupied by his son, 
which is located near the line of Heidelberg and South Lebanon townships, 
three miles southwest of ^Myerstown. and five miles from Lebanon, thus 
insuring fine markets. Here his three children were born, viz. : John H. : 
Frank T., a farmer in Jackson township; and Annie, the wife of Joseph 
Dohner, a South Lebanon township farmer. Although a consistent member 
of the Republican party, Mr. Brown never antagonized members of the oppo- 
site belief, and he held many of the local offices to the satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. For a number of years he was a leading member of the Reformed 
Church, and worthily held the position of elder and deacon. His wife passed 
away at the age of sixty years. They were among the most respected residents 
of the township. 

John H. Brown was reared on the farm in Jackson township, and attended 
first the public schools and later the Palatinate (now Albright) College, at 
Myerstown. After two years spent in teaching school he settled down to 
farming, the fertile acres of the old homestead ofifering great inducements and 
encouragement, although since then Mr. Brown has added much to the 
productiveness and value of the place. It contains sixty-five acres, and is 
known as one of the best farms of the locality. 

Soon after locating on the farm, on May 18, 1878, Mr. Brown married 
Miss Catherine Binner, daughter of Henn,- and Catherine (Iceman) Binner, 
of South Lebanon township, both deceased. The five children born to this 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 205 

marriage are: Miles N., Paul A., Nora K., Raymond H. and Arthur A., all 
bright, intelligent, wide-awake, well-informed young Americans. In politics 
Mr. Brown is identified with the Republican party, but he has no political 
ambition. He is known throughout the township as one of the reliable citizens, 
a man of moral character and sterling integrity. 

JOHN S. RISSER, a prominent farmer of South Londonderry township, 
Leliianon county, residing at Lawn, is a representative member of one of the 
oldest families in that part of Pennsylvania. 

The first of the Risser family to leave Germany and sail for the United 
States were Ulrich and Jacob Risser, brothers, who came over in the ship 
"Adventurer,' John Doris, master, from Rotterdam. They landed at Phila- 
delphia and qualified October 2, 1727. Other members of the family followed. 
Johannes (John) came over in the ship "Queen Elizabeth," Alexander Hope, 
master, from Rotterdam, and qualified September 16, 1738. Peter, another 
brother, came in the ship "Robert and Alice," Walter Goodman, master, and 
qualified September 3, 1739, and still another brother, Philip, came in the 
ship "Loyal Judith," Edward Pointer, master, from Rotterdam, last from 
Deal, and he qualified September 3, 1739. 

Johannes Risser was the progenitor of the Rissers of South Londonderry 
township, Lebanon county. He settled in ]\It. Joy township, Lancaster county, 
and was the great-great-grandfather of John S. Risser, of Lawn, who is of 
the fifth generation. 

Peter Risser, son of Johannes, was born in Mt. Joy township, November 
5, 1750, and married Hannah Snyder, who was bora January 17, 1754. He 
moved into what is now South Londonderry township, Lebanon county, and 
established the Risser homestead, which is situated about two miles south from 
Lawn, about in the corner where Lebanon, Lancaster and Dauphin counties 
meet. The children of Peter and Plannah Risser were- Christian, born 
December 11, 1776; Peter, August 29, 1779; Feronica, July 25, 1791 : John, 
March 5, 1782. 

Peter Risser (2), son of Peter, and the grandfather of John S. and 
Samuel S. Risser, was born on the old homestead, and married a member of 
the Witmer family. They had the following children : John was born January 
27. 1809; Annie, born July 2, 1810, married John L. Gish, of Donegal town- 
ship, Lancaster county (both are deceased) ; Christian was born March 20,. 
1812; Abraham, born September 19, 1814, married a Nissley (both are 
deceased) ; Elizabeth, born P'ebruarv 10, 1816, married Joseph Shenk, and both 
are deceased; Peter, born May 3, 1818, married (first) a Shenk (who died in 



2o6 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

the first year of married life), and (second) a Horst ; Joseph, born March 22, 
1820, married Fanny Nissley; Samuel, born April 15, 1823, married Fanny 
Stauffer; Feronica (Fanny), born August 29, 1826, married John Oberholtzer, 
and they live in South Londonderry township; Mary, born September 29, 
1828, married Capt. Coble, a soldier of the Civil war. 

John Risser, the father of John S., was born on the old homestead 
farm. He married Mary Shenk, who was born November 13, 181 5, in Heidel- 
berg township, Lebanon county, daughter of Joseph Shenk, whose wife was an 
Ober. To this marriage came children as follows: Frances (Fanny), born 
August 6, 1835, married John H. Risser, who is deceased; Joseph, born 
December 28, 1836, married Annie Garber, and lives in Mt. Joy township, 
Lancaster county; Abraham, born October 20, 1838, married Annie Ebersole, 
and died December 25, 1876; John S. was born May 24, 1842; Samuel S., 
born March i, 1849, married Mary Kuhns, and resides one mile south of Lawn. 
The father of this family lived on his farm in South Londonderry township, 
two miles southwest from Lawn station, where he died December 9, 1869, 
his widow surviving until August 11, 1892. They were most worthy mem- 
bers of the Mennonite Church. 

John S. Risser was born on his father's farm, and there grew to manhood. 
His education was obtained in the common schools and at the old Palmyra 
Academy, when it was conducted l)y Peter Witmer.. Mr. Risser taught school 
one term in his own neighborhood, but has given his attention almost entirely 
to agriculture, ever since his twenty-first year. On attaining his majority he 
entered into a satisfactory arrangement with his father, to work the farm on 
shares, and two years later bought his present farm from his father. The 
property is located at Lawn, and he continued there until the spring of 1901, 
when he retired from activity and removed to the village. It originally was 
ov/ned by Clinton Kelley, and is regarded as one of the fine farms of the sec- 
tion. Mr. Risser has been interested for some time in a number of enterprises, 
and has held some of the local political offices. At one time he engaged in 
merchandising at Lawn; with his son, Harvey S., and his brother, Samuel S.. 
he owns and operates the Lawn Creamery ; for th.e past ten years he has been a 
director in the Elizabethtown National Bank, and he has very frequently been 
called upon to settle up estates. For fourteen years Mr. Risser served faith- 
fully on the school board, and he has been assistant assessor and is now serving 
as registrar assessor of the township. 

In 1864 Mr. Risser was married to Mary Ann Shenk, born April 12, 1843, 
at Deodate, Dauphin county, a daughter of Jolin M. and Mary (Gingrich) 
Shenk, the former of whom was born November 15, 1814, at Deodate, a son of 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 207 

Christian Shenk, of Dauphin county, and died February 26, 1902. The 
motlier of Mrs. Risser was born in Derry township. Dauphin county, a daugh- 
ter of John Gingrich. They had the following children : Cyrus, born May 21, 
1839. died March 22, 1903; he married Anna Herr, who lives at Deodate, 
Dauphin county. Diana, born April 24, 18^ i, is the widow of Samuel Hoover, 
and lives in Derry township, Dauphin county. Mary Ann is Mrs. Risser. 
Christian M., born January 14, 1845, is unmarried. Elizabeth, born in Jan- 
uary, 1847, married (first) Abraham Herr, and (second) Henry Sommer, of 
Kansas, where she now resides, a widow. 

Mr. and Mrs. Risser had children as follows: Clara, born February i, 
1868, died September i, 1868. Harvey S., born November 14, 1869, married 
Sebilla N. Greiner, of Mt. Joy township, Lancaster county, April 23, 1895. 
Ida, born July 18, 1S7], died August 17, 1871. Ezra S., born Februai-y i, 
1873, married Fanny Brubaker, of Rapho township, Lancaster county, Feb- 
ruary 14, 1901. xMice, born October 28, 1874, married Irwin KUlian, of 
Cornwall township, Lebanon county, February 4, 1902. Noah W. was born 
October 6, 1877. John W. was born November 16, 1879. Anna Mary, born 
December 11, 1S81, married Clarence Mease, of Onset, Lebanon county ^ 
July 4, 1903. 'J'his family is no more widely known than it is generally 
esteemed, many of its members representing the best citizens of this locality. 

GEORGE ZINN. One of the live business men, successful agricul- 
turists and representative citizens of Cornwall township, is George Zinn, the 
well-known owner and operator of a first-class grist and flour mill at Bismarck, 
Lebanon county. 

The Zinn familv is an old one in this county, having been founded here 
by George Zinn, the great-grandfather of the present George Zinn. His 
son, also George, was born in Lebanon county, where his life was passed in 
farming and milling, residing at Bismarck until advanced age. His children 
were: John; Mary, the wife of John Zimmerman, of Lebanon county; Rose, 
the wife of Seth Royer, of Lebanon county; Sarah, the wife of Christian Bach- 
man, of Lebanon county; Catherine, the wife of J. M. Mark, of Lebanon 
comity; and Veronica, the wife of Joseph Lhrich, of Lebanon county. 

John Zinn, the father of George, was reared in the old Zinn homestead, 
and became one of the extensive farmers of the county. He married Miss 
Sarah Shimp, daughter of John and Eliza (Stewart) Shimp, and they became 
the parents of six children, as follows: George; Catherine, the wife of Aaron 
Vogt, of Jackson township ; Mary Ann, the widow of Henry Klick, of Bethel 
township; John, a farmer of Cornwall township, who married Hannah Hoke; 



2o8 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Cyrus, who died at the age of twelve years ; and EHas, a farmer of Cornwall 
towmship, who married Clara Messner. The mother lived to the age of 
seventy-six years, the father dying eighteen years earlier. 

George Zinn, of Bismarck, was born November 14, 1847, ^t the old 
homestead, and was reared to farm life. His education was secured in the 
public schools, and after its completion he learned the trade of milling, in the 
mill which he now owns. Here he was employed until he was twenty-seven 
years of age, when he took entire charge and has operated it with eininent 
success ever since. Mr. Zinn is a practical miller and has nitroduced methods 
and machinery which enable him to compete with any other flour making con- 
cern in his locality. This is both a grist and fiour mill, and is regarded as one 
of the best in the county, the trade being in both custom and commercial work. 
In addition to the milling business, Mr. Zinn operates a small farm, and proves 
himself as excellent a farmer as he is a miller. He is one of the township's 
progressive, public-spirited men and occupies a position of prominence. 

In 1872 Mr. Zinn was married to Miss ^Mary E. Bowman, daughter of 
Oliver and Maria (Light) Bowman, and their one estimable daughter, Sallie, 
is now the wife of M. L. Bachman, the leading implement dealer of Bismarck. 
They have one son named after the grandfather, George Zinn. The religious 
connection of the family is with the Reformed Church of Lebanon, and it 
occupies a high social position in this A'icinity. 

PETER ZIMMERMAN (deceased) was for many years a most highly 
respected farmer of Lebanon county. Pa., and he left many friends in 
Schaefferstown to mourn his loss, when death came in 1887. He was born 
in 1802, in Jackson township, and \\as a son of Henry Zimmerman, who was 
a son of George Zimmerman, a native of Germany, and supposed to have been 
the founder of the family in Berks county. Henry Zimmerman had a family 
of ten children, and of these the late Peter Zimmerman was the youngest. 

Peter Zimmerman married Mary Rex, who was born in 1802, in Schoe- 
neck, Lancaster county, and died in 1880. She was a sister of Cyrus Rex, of 
Rexmont. Six children Avere born to Peter Zimmerman and his wife, and 
of this family five reached years of maturity, viz : Edmond died in Kansas ; 
Mary Ann (now deceased) married Jacob Rhoads, of Lancaster county; 
Susan Amanda married Dr. Alfred Bucher (now deceased), of Rexmont; 
Ann Matilda is residing at the old homestead; and Rebecca is the wife of 
E. R. Illig, of Millbach. 

Peter Zimmerman located in Schaefferstown about 1834, and lived in 
this place for more than half a century. He was a stanch Democrat, but 



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BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 209 

never sought political office. For many years he was a member of the Luth- 
eran Church, and was deacon, elder and trustee. Few men were more highly 
esteemed than was Peter Zimmerman. He was honest and upright, and dur- 
ing his eighty-five years of life, set an example of industrious activity and of 
kindness to his neighbors and care for his family, which deserves remem- 
brance and emulation. 

Miss Ann Matilda Zimmerman, who still resides at the old home of her 
parents, occupies one of the historic old residences of the city. It was 
erected by a maternal ancestor, more than 150 years ago, and is a place of a 
great deal of interest. Miss Zimmerman possesses and highly prizes the old 
Rex family Bible, which was brought from Germany to America some 200 
years ago, in which the German characters show that it must be at least 300 
years old. The only survivor of the Rex family is Cyrus Rex, (^f Rexmont,, 
as mentioned above. 

DAVID SPANGLER RANK, native and "to the manner born," a 
soldier going forth in the wake of the old flag at fifteen, a successful preceptor 
of youth, an honored and worthy representative of the "embattled farmer" 
class, a popular attache of the department of law enforcement and a leading 
spirit in the business world — this is the record in epitome of the gentleman 
whose name forms a caption for this article. 

David S. Rank, treasurer of the Lebanon Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, was born in East Hanover township, March 2, 1848, the son of David 
M. and Lucetta (Spangler) Rank. The first of the family of whom record is 
made is Grandfather George Rank, a native of Lancaster county, Pa., who 
removed with his family to East Hanover township in 1803. Here he passed 
a worthy existence, and lies buried beneath the greensward of his adopted 
county. His son, David M., the father of our honored subject, was born in the 
township mentioned in 1809, and for eight and a half decades lived a singularly 
upright and busy life among Lebanon citizens, a member of that w^orthy class, 
the tillers of the soil, and wdiom one of our worthy sages has well denominated 
the "salt of the earth." The Spanglers are Myerstown people from time 
immemorial. Mrs. Rank, who survives her husband at the advanced age of 
eighty-seven years, w^as born in the county in 1814, the daughter of Christian 
Spangler. The Spanglers have also been agriculturists. Mrs. Rank is the 
mother of five children, namely: George, Aaron, David S., Lucinda and 
Emma. 

There was little of moment in the life of David S. Rank during the 
period of adolescence. He found plenty to do on the farm of that kind of labor 

14 



2IO BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

which developed a sturdy constitution, for he was a vigorous lad, and whenever 
he dodged the plow handles through a stumpy field, or engaged in breaking a 
team of young oxen or a favorite colt, it was done with the snap which has 
been characteristic of his later career. To his primary education in ilie 
common schools of his district was added supplementary literary training at 
academies in Palmyra and Ann\ille. Pie was destined for more work of this 
kind, but the inherent patriotism which burned within him as he listened to 
the stories of returned soldiers from the field of fratricidal strife, made the 
lad a man in thought, and he resolved to become one in deed. But the govern- 
ment enrolling ofiicers had been exceedingiv strict so far, and our subject's 
tender age and size had precluded possibility of entering the army. Like a 
great many boys oi that day he grew mightily in his fifteenth year — was it 
because they thought great thoughts? — and the government officers having 
become less vigorous in discipline, David was enabled to gratify the desire of 
his heart, in i^^eljruary, 1864, to don the uniform of a "boy in blue." He 
enlisted as a private soldier in Company B, of the Twentieth Pennsylvania 
Cavalry, in which organization he saw much active service until his muster 
out at Philadelphia in Julv, 1865. The first part of his service was under Gen. 
Hunter, and it is Init necessary to add the name of (ien. Phil Sheridan as one of 
his commanders to convince an intelligent reader that the war record of Mr. 
Rank was full of interest and glory. He was with the latter commander in 
his memorable raid of the Shenandoah Valley, as far as White House Landing, 
and is a li\ing witness of the fact tersely stated by Gen. Sherman, that "war 
is hell." He was mustered out at Cloud's Mill, Va., July 16, 1865, and 
received his honorable discharge at Philadelpliia soon after. 

Re-entering school upon his return home, Mr. Rank finished his educa- 
tion and then entered a mercantile establishment in East Hanover township. 
From 1869 to 1873 our subject taught schocil successfully in the county, but 
owmg to his father's advanced age and failing health dutifully returned home 
and took upon himself the management of the farm. His father's death 
occurred in 1895, and in the fall of that year Mr. Rank came to Lebanon, 
where he has since resided. He served under Sherift' Stein as a deputy for 
three years, and in 1898 was chosen to his present position as treasurer of the 
Lebanon Fire Insurance Company. Since 1894 he has also been a director and 
secretary of the Jonestown Bank, one of the prosperous financial institutions of 
•the county. Mr. Rank is also actively identifietl with the ice business of 
Lebanon, having been superintendent of the Lebanon Ice Company for the 
past five years. He is also again in the Sheriff's office, having been appointed 
a deputy in 1901 by Sheriff Copenhauer. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 21 1 

Mr. Rank celebrated marriage with Miss Kate Reeme in 1871, a lady who 
was a native of Linglestown, Dauphin county, Pa., born in 1S51. Her death, 
which occurred in 1SS5, left Mr. Rank with three children, namely: Lena, 
wife of W. J. Schools, an attorney of Lebanon ; Clara, wife of Hai'vey B. 
Stein, a clerk for the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company ; and 
Edward, born November 18, 187S. Mr. Rank again married, the lady's 
maiden name having been Jennie Gerbrich. Mrs. Rank is a native of East 
Hanover township, and is the daughter of George Gerbrich, a worthy farmer 
of that section of the county. Socially Mr. Rank and his family are highly 
esteemed in Lebanon. They are active members of the Lutheran Church, and 
are found identified \vith every good work for the advancement of society in 
their community. 

JOSEPH R. BECKLEY, M. D., a leading member of the medical profes- 
sion of Lebanon, Pa., was born three miles southeast of the city, September 20, 
1859. 

Joseph Beckley, tlie father of Dr. Beckley, was a son of Michael Beckley, 
of Lebanon county, and was born in 1815, and died in 1898. The mother 
of Dr. Beckley was Mary Ann Eckert, who was born at Reistville, Lebanon 
county, in 1820, and died in 1883. 

Dr. Beckley was reared on a farm, and after finishing the common 
school course, attended the Millersville State Normal School, and the Lebanon 
Valley College, at Annville. Beginning in the fall of 1877, he taught school 
for four consecutive terms, following which he took another course of one 
year at the Leljanon Valley College. He then began the studv of medicine with 
Dr. Samuel Weiss, of Lebanon, and in the fall of 1882, he entered the Medical 
Department of the Universitv of Pennsylvania, and was graduated in the 
class of 1885. Immediately thereafter he opened an office in Lebanon, and 
]:)egan the practice of his profession, at which he has since continued. 

Dr. Beckley has served as a member of the Lebanon board of health, as 
coroner's physician for nine vears, as ]:)rison plivsician for nine vears, and is ,\t 
ihe present time the president .:)f the Lebanon Board of Water and Lighting" 
Commissioners. He is a meml^er of the Lebanon County Meflical Society, of 
which he has served as president, secretary and treasurer. Dr. Beckley is 
also a member of the Pennsylvania Medical Society. 

In 1888 Dr. Beckley was married to Minerva S. HoiTer. daughter of 
George Hoffer, now of Annville, Lebanon county, and to them two daughters 
have been born, Carrie M. and Mabel L. The Doctor and family are members 
of the First United Evangelical Church. When the present church edifice was 



2 12 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

erected he was chairman of the building committee, and has been a member 
of the board of trustees for a number of years, *being its secretary. In 1888 
he was made assistant Sunday School superintendent, and in 1893 he was 
made superintendent, a responsible position he still holds. The Doctor is a 
member of the Mystic Friends and the Knights of Malta. In business con- 
nection he is a member of the board of directors of the Farmers' National 
Bank of Lebanon, and is president of the Safety Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, of which he has been a director since its organization. He is also a 
member of the board of directors of the Keystone Match and Machine Com- 
pany, which company now manufactures bicycles; and he is secretary and 
treasurer of the Peerless Brick Manufacturing Company. 

CYRUS F. ZIMMERMAN, postmaster of Palmyra, and one of the 
leading men of the city, was born at Union Deposit, Dauphin county, October 
22, 1859, a son of Daniel and Sarah (Dietrich) Zimmerman. 

The boyhood days of Cyrus F. .Zimmerman were spent in Union Deposit, 
where he attended the public schools, and he later spent one term at Lel^anon 
Valley College, and still later attended Allentown Business College. After 
completing his common school course, Mr. Zimmerman taught school for 
three terms, and then clerked for two years more in the store of O. P. Grove, 
Harrisburg, Pa., and then resumed his studies, graduating from business 
college in 1883. The following year he engaged in general merchandising 
at Palmyra, in the storeroom now occupied by H. S. Gibble, there continuing 
for nine years. His next business venture was as a clerk in a grocery store in 
Philadelphia for a year, where he learned many new ideas, and returning to 
Palmyra, he kept the books of the J. Landis & Sons Shoe Manufacturing 
Company, subsequently going on the road as one of the company's salesmen, 
and January i, 1903, was admitted to partnership. Mr. Zimmerman has 
always been a stanch Republican, and his effective work for the party was 
rewarded September i, 1897, ^Y '''is appointment as postmaster at Palmyra, 
and after filling that oiiice for one year and four months under fourth class, he 
was re-appointed by President McKinley on January i, 1899, under the third 
class; reappointed by President Roosevelt on March i, 1903, for second term. 
FYaternally Mr. Zimmerman is a member of Camp 192, P. O. S. of A., in 
which order he is very popular. 

Mr. Zimmerman was married to Miss Lizzie K. Landis, daughter of 
Jacob Landis, senior member of the J. Landis Sons Shoe Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of Palmyra, and the following children ha^•e been born to them : J. 
Landis, Paul F., Lomie E. and Marlin U. Mr. Zimmerman is one of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 213 

most enterprising of the city's young business men, and the success which has 
crowned his efforts is but the just reward of industry, integrity and natural 
abihty. 

GEORGE U. SEIBERT. Though it was several years ago, Oct.>l)er 29, 
1890, that Mr. Seibert died, tliere are people in the cimnty that stiU honor his 
memory. As an able agriculturist he assisted materially in developing the 
resources of Millcreek township, and in the public affairs of the comunity his 
word carried w-eight. He was born near Richland, in ^lillcreek township, 
November 6, 1837, son of Michael and Sara (Unger) Seibert. 

The family is one of the oldest in this section and George U. was directly 
descended from John Jacob Seibert, who came in 1738 from Germany, and 
settled in Pennsylvania. Michael Seibert, the great grandfather of George, 
is the next of whom we have definite record. His parents are supposed to 
have come from Germany, and were among the pioneers of Berks and Lebanon 
counties. This same Michael had a son named John, who is mentioned below. 

John Seibert, grandfather of George \J., was one of the prominent agri- 
culturists of the section. He married and had five children, all of whom are 
now deceased : Michael, Jacob, Katherine, Elizabeth and John. 

Michael Seibert, father of George U., was a man of ability and great 
force of character. As an agriculturist he made a thorough success of life, 
and was a power in stamping upon the community in which he lived the prin- 
ciples of good go\'ernment, and giving to the institutions a high moral tone. 
Reared to farm work, upon reaching manhood he naturally turned to that 
occupation for his livelihood, and settling upon a farm in Millcreek town- 
ship, he there pursued the industry. During his young manhood he married 
Sara Unger, of Linglestown, Dauphin county, and they became the parents 
of five children: John U., deceased, who married Mary A. Bennetch. of Mill- 
bach ; George U. ; Maria, married to Chambers Bobb, of Schaefferstown ; Re- 
becca, who married William Lesher: and Sara, who became the wife of Frank 
Kilmer. After his marriage A^r. Seibert continued his industry upon the farm 
in Millcreek township. Applying practical and advanced methods to his work, 
his place yielded large and profitable crops, enabling him to branch out exten- 
sively. He improved the property and in time had an attractive and comfort- 
able home for himself and family. He possessed those sterling traits of char- 
acter that win success for a man at every step in life. He was capable, ener- 
getic and rhrifty, and performed his work both easily and well. His well- 
directed eft'orts and his high moral character won the respect of all who knew 
him, and he made many friends in his life time. As a strong Democrat he 



2 14 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

exerted an influence upon local affairs. In religion he was a member of the 
Reformed Church in Tulpehocken. 

George U. Seibert was reared in an atmosphere of good, wholesome 
farm work. His earliest years were passed on the homestead near the Jack- 
son and Millcreek town line, and here he grew to manhood. Li the public 
schools of his section he procured his education, evincing a ready power of 
<^rasi)ing information, which characterized him through life. A practical 
knowledge of agriculture decided him upon reaching manhood to engage in 
that occupation, and a little experience soon proved he had not made a mistake 
in his calling. 

On August 17, 1867, Mr. Seibert married Amanda Becker, of ]\Iillcreek 
township, daughter of John and Caroline Stump Becker. Mrs. Seibert is 
still living, residing with her daughter in Richland. This daughter, Mar\- 
Agnes, the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Seibert, married Milton J. Klopp, a 
traveling salesman for the Klopp Cigar Manufacturing Company, of Rich- 
land. They ha^e six children — Sajlie S., Howard G. S., Edith A., Lillian A.. 
Louis M. and Curtin L. 

After his marriage Mr. Seibert settled upon a promising ninety-acre 
farm in Millcreek township, where he followed agriculture. He improved 
the place, opened up new areas to cultivation, kept the buildings in excellent 
repair and there carried on a flourishing industry. He was both progressive 
and practical in his methods, and his well-laid plans resulted in abundant early 
harvests, which commanded the best prices in the markets. 

Mr. Seibert was energetic, wise and persevering in business, and took 
few, if any, backward steps in life. He achieved success by centering his 
energies upon one main industry, seeking in every way to perfect it. His 
high moral character and intellectual attainments, as well as his winning so- 
cial attributes, won him tlie esteem of all who knew him. As a Democrat he 
was influential in local affairs, and the Reformed Church counted him among 
its most substantial members. 

Mrs. Seibert comes of one of the old pioneer families of the township. 
Jacob Becker, the first American representative of the family, came from 
Germany prior to 17,34, and settled in Lebanon county. That same year 
he received from John, Thomas and Richard Penn a tract of land in Mill- 
creek township. Bv his marriage there \vere two sons — John and George. 

John Becker was a prosperous farmer and influential citizen of Mill- 
creek townshi]3. He had eight children — ^[ichael. John Adam, Catherine, 
Elizabeth, Barbara, Anna, .\melia and Margaret. 

John .A.dam Becker, grandfather of Mrs. Seibert, was born and reared 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LLBANON COUNTY. 215 

in Millcreek township. Accustomed from his earhest years to farm work, 
upon reaching manhood he settled upon a farm in ]\Iillcreek township and 
engaged in that occupation. He was thoroughly successful in his work and 
made a good home for himself and family, and was one of the most highly 
respected citizens of the township. By his marriage there were three chil- 
dren — John, Michael and Sarah, who married Captain Tice, a prominent 
officer in the Civil War. 

John Becker, father of Mrs. Seibert. was another thrifty agriculturist 
of Millcreek township. Born in 1813, in a good home, he grew to manhood, 
receiving careful training in habits of industrv and self-reliance. L^pon 
reaching manhood he settled upon a farm in Alillcreek tcnvnship. and en- 
gaged in agriculture. He cultivated the place extensively, improved it in many 
respects, and made an excellent home for himself and family, possessing 
in time one of the most prosperous and attracti\e farms in the township. He 
passed the greater part of his acti\-e life upon this farm, and there, in 1884, 
died. 

About 1833 Mr. Becker married Caroline Stump, daughter of Leonard 
Stump, and a descendant of one of the pioneer families of the township. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Becker were born ten children: Mary, deceased, was 
the wife of J. Henry Bennetch ; Amanda is Mrs. Seibert; Willoughby. de- 
ceased, was a prominent farmer of Millcreek township; John .Vdam, married 
to Rebecca .Shaak, was a ])rominent farmer of South Jack.son township; 
Lizzie married Monroe Zimmerman, of Millcreek township; Emma married 
Aaron Bollinger, and both are deceased; Agnes J. married Levi Bollinger; 
TLomas L. is a prominent citizen of Alillcreek township; Ida died in child- 
hood; and Monroe is deceased. Tlie father of this familv was a leader in 
the public affairs of the township and at different times held various local 
ofilices. In politics he afiFiliated with the Democrats, and in religious views 
he was independent. As a large stockholder in the Lebanon National Bank, 
he acted as director for twenty-five years, or until the time of his death. 

WILLIAM S. RISE is one of the successful and honored business men 
of the city of Lebanon. He was born in Lebanon, Pa., September 30, 1859. 
a son of John and Barbara Rise. 

John Rise was a tinsmith, and the .son of Adam Rise, a hatter by trade. 
who was one of the old settlers of Lebanon. John Rise was the father of 
nine children, three of whom are now living, Charles, William S.. and Anna, 
al! residing in Lebanon, lohn Rise was a gallant .soldier in the war of the 
Rebellion, and belonged to the Ninetv-third Regiment, Pennsvlvania Volun- 



2i6 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

teer Infantry, which served during the entire war, and rendered distinguished 
services in behalf of the Union. 

Mrs. WiUiam S. Rise was the only child of Henry Gingrich, who was 
born October 7, 1833, and died July 27, 1897. Henry Gingrich was a son of 
Lewis and Margaret Gingrich, who were old settlers of Lebanon county. 
On May 26, 1859, Henry Gingrich married Miss Catherine Bordner who was 
born June 21, 1835, a daughter of Daniel and Maria (Tobias) Bordner. 
These families were among the old settlers of Lebanon county. 

William S. Rise has been the father of four children : Catherine, Mar- 
garet, William and Henry, the last named having joined the silent majority. 

Mr. Rise is a self made man. He was educated in the public schools of 
Lebanon, and started out in life without a dollar, but by hard work and 
good management he has accumulated a small fortune. He is at present one 
of the leading tinners and contractors in the city of Lebanon, conducting his 
business at No. 105 South Ninth street. In politics he votes the Republican 
ticket, and in 1894 was honored with a seat in select council of the city. 

Mr. Rise is a Protestant in religious belief. He belongs to the I. O. 
O. F., Lodge No. 280; and is a member of the Patriotic Order Sons of Amer- 
ica Camp No. 254; and likewise of the Improved Order of Red Men, all of 
Lebanon. He is one of the progressive and substantial citizens of Lebanon, 
and in his domestic life is honored as a kind and loving father. 

HON. E. BENJAMIN BIERAiAN, ex-president of the Lebanon Val- 
ley College, and member of the Pennsylvania State Legislature, from Leb- 
anon coimty, was born December i. 1839, near the cit}^ of Reading, Berks 
county, Pa. He is the eldest son of Benjamin and Anna Bertram Bierman, 
the latter of whom was a daughter of Capt. William Bertram. His ancestors 
on Iwth sides came from Westphalia, Prussia, emigrating to America soon 
after the Revolutionary war, the Biermans locating near the birthplace of the 
subject of this sketch, in Berks county, and the Bertrams in northern Lan- 
caster county. The paternal ancestors were noted for mechanical ingenuity, 
while on the maternal side there is a long line of teachers. 

Benjamin Bierman, the father, was born in Rockland township. Berks 
county, April 2, 1S19, son of John Bierman, who was born in Friedensburg. 
same county, in 1782, a son of Jacob Bierman, who came from Prussia and 
settled down to farming in that county. John Bierman, the grandfather of 
E. Benjamin Bierman, married Rebecca Weil, a native of Bucks county. Pa. 
Benjamin Bierman, son of John and the father of E. Benjamin, was a cabinet 
maker and wood turner, and successfully carried on business for many years 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 217 

near Hamburg. He died December 27, 1894, and is buried with his wife in 
St. Michael's Church cemetery, four miles west of the aljove named town. 
He was a man well informed on general topics, and a warm friend of educa- 
tion. During his early life he was active in public affairs, frequently repre- 
senting the Republican party in conventions, and on several occasions was 
honored with a place on its ticket. In his church relations he was constant 
and faithful. His wife, Anna Bertram, was born in Bern township, Berks 
county. February i, 181 5, and died February 6, 1893. lier father, Capt. 
William Bertram, w'as born January 29, 1791, in Lancaster county, son of 
Peter Caspar Bertram, a native of Prussia, who emigrated to America and 
landed at Philadelphia October 3, 1790, and was the first of the Bertrams in 
the New World. From Philadelphia he went to Warwick township, Lan- 
caster county, now Brickerville, where he took charge of the parochial schools 
of the Lutheran Church, being teacher, organist and assistant to the minister, 
who. at that time, was the father of John Andrew Schultz, later Governor of 
Pennsylvania. After serving in the capacity mentioned for several years ^Ir. 
Bertram took charge of a church in Berks county known as the Dunkel's 
Church, and there he died in 1842. He was a man of fine education, and an 
•excellent penman, and a well preserved diary which he kept for many years 
is now in the possession of the subject of this sketch. 

Tlie Bertrams in Prussia were generally teachers, the line being easily 
traced back to 1640. Capt. William Bertram taught school for many years 
during the winter seasons, following carpentering and contracting during the 
summers in Berks county, w^here his death occurred August 23, 1864. The 
mother of E. Benjamin Bierman was trained under her father's watchful 
care, and her literary ability was encouraged. Her knowledge of the litera- 
ture of her time was very extensive, and she was especially well versed in 
the Bible. Her memory was remarkable, and she could quote religious 
hymns learned in early life, and the Scriptures, with perfect accuracy, in 
advanced years. The four children born to Benjamin and Anna Bertram 
Bierman were: E. Benjamin; William IL. deceased; George F., a minister 
in the United Brethren Church; and Kate A., married to James M. Boyer, 
of Tamaqua, Pennsylvania. 

When E. Benjamin Bierman was ten years old he was enrolled as a pu])il 
m a subscription school in charge of John R. \\^agner, near St. IMichael s 
Lutheran and Reformed Union Church, in Upper Bern township, Berks 
county, near which place his parents were then living. He entered ui'on 
school work earnestly, and at the end of four months had won a place in the 
highest class in the school. During the summer months of 1850 he pursued 



2i8 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

his studies privately, and in the foHowing winter returned to the school room, 
and for the succeeding" four months easily held his position in the class, 
although many of his fellow students were twice his age. During the sum- 
mers of 185 1 and 185 J, he assisted in farm work and also applied himself to 
study, and during the succeeding winter, under the instruction of John S. 
Guldin, an experienced teacher, stood at the head of every class of which he 
was a member, and, although young, was frequently called to assist his teacher 
in school work. During the summer of 1853 he was employed as clerk and 
bookkeeper in a store at Shartlesville, owned by his former teacher, John R. 
\\'agner, and near the close of the year he attended a school near his home for 
one month. After some private instruction in Latin, natural philosophy and 
astronomy, taken while clerking in a store, at Hamburg, Berks county, during 
the winter months of 1854, he entered the Lehigh County High School, at 
Emaus, on December 6, 1855, and there pursued his studies w-ith so much 
interest, enthusiasm and success that he was soon promoted to be assistant 
teacher; and when, in the following spring, his principal accepted a simliar 
place in the Juniata County Normal school, Mr. Bierman was offered and 
accepted the position of assistant, and thus spent the spring, summer and 
fall of that year. In the fall of 1856 he returned to his home in Berks county, 
and, at the solicitation of the board of directors, took charge as teacher of 
one of the public schools near his old home, which he taught during the win- 
ter months of 1856-57-58-59 and 1860-61, continuing in the profession for 
thirty years. In the spring of 1857 he entered the R'eading (Pa.) Classical 
Academy, a school of high grade and excellent repute, where under the tuition 
of Prof. James S. Lee, A. M., and Rev. William A. Good, A. M., he spent the 
greater part of four years teaching during the winter months, and studying 
the rest of the year in preparation for the junior year in college, studying the 
ancient and modern languages, including Latin, Greek, French and German ; 
the literature of these languages ; also higher mathematics, general history 
and ])hysics. The last two years of his connection with this school he was an 
assistant teacher. 

After his marriage in 1862, Mr. Bierman took charge of a school in 
Tremont, Schuylkill county, but after two years' successful work there he was 
by unanimous \ote called to the principalship of the Hamburg public high 
school, in his native county, which position he filled for three successive years 
to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. 

In 1867 Prof. Bierman assisted in the organization of the Lebanon 
Valley College, located at Annville, was elected professor of mathematics and 
astronomy, and was closely identified with its general management for many 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 219 

years, from 1890 until 1897 being its honored president. In 1867 he received 
the degree of A. M., from Lafayette College, and in 1892 that of Ph. D., from 
Ursinus College. As a teacher he ranks high. In 1858 he was awarded the 
Teacher's County Professional Certificate, and in 1868 the State Teacher's 
diplf^ma. While active in the profession he w-as prominent in County and 
State Teachers' Associations, and in the College Association of the Middle 
States and Maryland; from 1878 until 1880, he was secretary of the Depart- 
ment of Higher Instruction of the National Teachers' Association. He is 
an active member of the Pennsylvania German Society; the Lebanon County 
Historical Societv : the Pennsylvania Historical Society; the various Masonic 
bodies; and the Patriotic Order Sons of America. He has been a member or" 
the Church of the United Brethren in Christ since 1868, and has for years 
been prominnent in her church councils, annual conferences and general Sun- 
day School and educational work. 

In the fall of 1882 Prof. Bierman moved to Philadelphia where he 
remained eight years, during which time he industriously availed himself of 
many of that noted city's educational advantages, and from 1883 to 1887, 
was teacher of languages and general literature in the North Broad Street 
Seminary. 

In politics he has always been a stanch Republican, and was active in 
the campaigns of i860, 1872 and 1880, and the latter year he was a delegate 
from Lebanon county to the Republican State Convention, and during the 
same year a member of the State Central committee. After an interesting 
and exciting campaign in 1900, he was nominated and elected a member of 
the Pennsylvania State Legislature, and in 1902 was re-elected liy a largely 
increased majority, to the same honorable position, in which he has distin- 
guished himself and reflected great credit upon his county. Among his asso- 
ciates in the legislature he is known as a working member, and ranks as a most 
careful and conscientious legislator. 

On August 27,. 1862, Prof. Bierman was married to Miss Anna M. 
Isett. a daughter of Dr. Benjamin F. Isett, who was born February i, 1842, 
in Berks county. Pa., where for many years her father was a practicing 
physician. Dr. Isett was born January 29, 1807, in Montgomery county, 
Pa., and died in October, 1869. During the thirties he attended lectures in 
the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Isett mar- 
ried Lavinia Christman. wdio was born in Berks county. Pa. The ancestors 
of Mrs. Bierman were Jacob and Frederick Isett, who came from Rotterdam, 
Holland, to America, landing at Philadelphia September 11, 1732, and set- 
tling near that citv, Frederick becoming the great-grandfather of Mrs. Bier- 



2 20 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

man. They left Rotterdam with their parents, but the father died on board 
the ship during the ^'oyag•e, and his body hes buried at sea. 

]\Irs. Bierman was educated at the Pennsylvania Female College, at 
Collegeville, now a part of the Ursinus College, and taught school during her 
younger days. She is now prominent in L^nited Brethren Church and mis- 
sionary work, and is also active in several charitable societies. The high 
esteem in which this family is justly held is because of intrinsic worth, and it 
represents the best and highest type of citizenship, exerting an influence 
which educates and refines the circles with which it comes in touch. The 
beautiful home of Dr. and Mrs. Bierman, in Annville, is one of genial hos- 
pitality, exemplifying the ideal of American social life. 

JOHN L. BALSBAUGH was born in Derry township, Dauphin county, 
Pa.. October 30, 1846. His ancestry originated in Germany, their home hav- 
ing been in the beautiful valley of the Palatinate, along the brook Pfahls. hence 
the name Balsbaugh, originally Pfahlsbach. His father, John Balsbaugh, was 
born on the old homestead near Swatara Station, Derry township, in 1808. 
He had two brothers, Abraham and George, and one sister, Elizabeth, wife of 
Rev. George Landis. John Balsbaugh married Catharine Landis, who was 
born in 1810, daughter of Christian and Catharine (Bowers) Landis. To this 
union were born these children : Mary, Abraham and Elizabeth, who died in 
infancy; Sarah, who died at the age of eight; Susanna, who was blind, and 
who died at the age of forty-four; Christian, who married Caroline Bright- 
bill, and resides at Hummelstown; Jeremiah, who married Sarah Hocker, and 
resides at LIummelstown ; John L., who married Catharine Berst; Caroline, 
Avife of ex-County Treasurer George H. Grove, of Hummelstown; and Uriah, 
a banker at Plummelstown. 

lohn Balsbaugh, the father, was a man of prominence in business, as 
well as active in farming interests in his native community. He, with two 
other men, founded the Union Deposit Furnaces. In politics he was a stanch 
Republican, and in religious afifairs a loyal adherent of the United Brethren in 
Christ. 

John L. Balsbaugh, the subject of this sketch, spent his boyhood days 
on his father's farm in Derr>' township. Dauphin county, attending the public 
schools during the winter months and working on the farm during the sum- 
mer. On October i. 1867. he was united in marriage with Catharine, daugh- 
ter of David and Susan (Landis) Berst. In 1868 he located in South Ann- 
ville township, Lebanon county, and seven years later he purchased the farm 
of 173 acres, on which he resided, it being the central farm of the township. 



BIOGRAPHICAI, ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 221 

In 1887 he purchased the Hartz farm, which originahy was a part of the 
farm, making his holdings 216 acres. In 1894 he removed to the Hartz farm, 
on which he had erected a fine, substantial country home — the barn built 
jn 1S88 and the house in 18Q3. In addition to his farming interests he is a 
director of the Mt. Joy Mutual Fire Insurance Company, as also of the Ann- 
ville National Bank. He sensed several terms as school director and assisted 
in the erection of three school houses — Garfield, Mt. Pleasant and Detweiler's 
■ — in 1880. The homestead place is noted as being the birthplace of Col. John 
Motter, late of Harrisburg, who was quite conspicuous among cavalry men 
during the Civil War. 

Rev. Jonathan Heister performed the ceremony uniting in wedlock John 
L. Balsbaugh and Catharine Berst, to which union were born seven children — 
Clara, bom September 12, 1868, is at home; Lizzie, born October 17, 1870, 
married Simon K. Behm, a farmer of the same township ; Landis B., born 
April 17, 1 87 1, who resides on the homestead farm, married Cora Risser and 
has four children — Ada, Iva, Edith and Homer; Katie died May 13, 1875, 
aged one year, one month and ten days; Susan J., born June 4, 1876, is at 
home; Mary L., born January 8, 1883, is at home; and Carrie M. died Febru- 
ary 13, 1888, aged three years, five months and twenty-six days. 

Catharine (Berst) Balsbaugh was also of German parentage. Peter 
Berst (originally Byrsch) was born in Germany in 1716, and on coming 
to America he settled in Dauphin county. Pa., on what is known as the old 
Berst farm of 300 acres, on which the noted Hummelstown brownstone quar- 
ries are now located. 

John Berst, son of Peter, born in 1762. died February 11, 1832, was a 
minister of the gospel in the German Baptist church. He had two sons, one 
of whom went to Darke county, Ohio, and located there ; and John, Jr. 

John Berst, Jr., son of John, was born in 1792 and died May 26, 1832. 
He remained on the homestead farm. On November 30. 18 18, he married 
Catharine Longenecker. and had one son, David, born in 1822. 

David Berst, son of John, Jr.. died October 18, 1895. He was married 
to Susan Landis, of Derry township, born August 8, 1821, and died June 7, 
1 87 1. They had issue as follows: (i) Catharine, born August 15, 1S47, 
married John L. Balsbaugh. (2) Mary, born September 25, 1849. married 
Abraham Hollinger, and they now reside in Wayne county. 111. They have 
three children — Lizzie, who married Rev. Christian Gruber; David, and John. 
(3) John L. was born October 22, 1851. (4) Lizzie died at the age of two 
years. (5) Lovina died January i, 1870, aged seven years. The other three 
children died in infancy. For his second wife Da^•id Berst married, January 



222 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

I, 1874, Caroline Biever, born September 2. 1841, and diced Octol^er 15, 
1879. To this second marriage was born one daughter, Susan Ellen, Decem- 
ber 16, 1874, who at the age of fourteen went to Illinois, and subsequently 
married Levi Gruber, and she died February 19, 1902, leaving twin sons, Ray 
and Carl, both now deceased. After his second marriage David Berst resided 
on the Dr. Coover farm, beyond Harrisburg, but later relinquished house- 
keeping to make his home with his children, and while on a visit to his daugh- 
ters in Illinois he took sick and died. His remains are buried near Fairfield, 
Wayne county, Illinois. 

HIRAM L. ERB (deceased), for many years a leading merchant of 
Clay township, Lancaster county, and one of the public-spirited and progres- 
sive citizens of the town, was a member of a family long prominent in the 
annals of Lancaster county. 

Jacob Erb, the great-great-grandfather of Hiram L.. was brought from 
Switzerland to America by his parents in 1728. He was but four years of 
age at that time, so that practically his entire life was passed in the New 
World. They located near Hammer Creek, in Warwick township. About 
1782 Jacob removed to Clay township, where he purchased several hundred 
acres of land, with mill privileges, and he made his home there for the re- 
mainder of his life. Besides a mill at Clay village, he operated another 
farther up Middle Creek, and he also cleared and improved large portions of 
his extensive estate. Until the outbreak of the war of the Revolution he was 
a belie\'er in the Mennonite faith, but the principle of non-resistance taught 
])y that society was in too great opposition to his patriotic spirit, and he with- 
drew his membership to support the provisionary government. He became a 
man of prominence in public affairs, and represented his district in the State 
Legislature. He died in 1810. when he was past eighty years of age. His 
wife was a Miss Johns, and their family consisted of two sons and several 
daughters. Of the sons, John is mentioned below ; and Christian lived on the 
homestead in Warwick, where some of his descendants are still to be found. 

John Erb, son of Jacob, was for three years in the service of his country 
during the Revolution, acting as teamster. He was but sixteen at the time 
he entered the service, and after the close of the war he resided at Clay, 
where he operated both the mills belonging to his father, and also looked after 
the cultivation of the home farm. He was prominent in all public affairs, 
was the founder of the school at Clay, and' took an active interest in religious 
affairs. John Erb married Judith Hull, and their, children were : Jacob : 
John; David; Isaac; Samuel; Joseph; Molly, who married Abraham Erb and 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 223 

moved to Canada; Elizabeth, who married Michael Shepler; Nancy, who 
married Abraham Bear ; and Catharine, who married Joseph Weidman. 

John Erb, son of John, was born November 3, 1786, and passed his life 
in Clay, engaged in farming and milling, and in keeping a public house. He 
belonged to the Old Line Whig party, and at one time served as county com- 
missioner. He married Barbara Bergelbach, and his children were: Hiram; 
John B. ; Henry B. ; and Priscilla Cecilia, who ma<rried George W. Steinmetz. 
John Erb died in 1862, in the seventy-sixth year of his age. 

Hiram Erb, son of John and father of Hiram L., was born at the upper 
mill in Clay township April 11, 1810. The common schools afforded him his 
educational advantages, and at the age of nineteen he succeeded to the milling 
business established by his great-grandfather, for forty years successfully 
following that line. Snme 150 acres of tlie old home tract belonged to him. 
and he met with abundant success in farming it. In i86q, in partnership with 
his son, Hiram L., he established a general store at Richland, Lebanon 
county, but in 1875 the business was removed to Clay, where prosperitv 
awaited the enterprising proprietors. President Taylor appointed Mr. Erb 
postmaster, and he efficiently discharged the duties of that office for four 
years. He was originally a Republican, and an intimate acquaintance of 
Hon. Thaddeus Stevens, one of the party's founders, but in 1872 his admira- 
tion for Horace Greeley carried him into the Democratic ranks, after which 
he voted independent of party affiliations. Mr. Erb served as school director 
for three years, and always supported educational and religious movements. 
On May 16, 1839, he married Catharine Lane, widow of John S. Bear. One 
child, Hir?m L., blessed this union. Catharine Lane Erb died in 1886, at the 
age of seventy-six years. Hiram Erb died in 1892, aged eighty-two years. 

Hiram L. Erb was born November 24, 1840, and he entered into rest 
January ij , 1900. Like his father before him. he was trained to farming 
and niilling, Ixit on accoimt of ill health entered the mercantile world, in part- 
nership with his father, in 1869, under the firm name of Hiram Erb iS: Son. 
His political faith was like that of his father, and he served the Democratic 
party as a member of the county committee. He also served on the school 
board. In his religious connection he was a member of the United Brethren 
Church. Kind hearted and liberal, his charitv was often the means of helping 
a weary fellow traveler to rest and comfort. He was a man of manv friends. 
and his genial social nature made his home a favorite meeting place. 

On Xo\-eml)er 24, 1863, Hiram L. Erb was married to Celinda Becker, a 
daughter of William and Lucy (Spayd) Becker, of ]\Iill Creek township. 
Three children blessed this union, two of whom reached maturitv : Laura, 



224 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

widow of Rev. C. J. F. Miller, a prominent minister of the United Brethren 
Church, who was born in i860, and who died November 7, 1899, leaving- 
eight children, Edgar L., Clio D., Lois E., Victor H., Earl Raymond, Guy 
Ralph, Erickson Colon and Vivian E. ; Linnie, widow of Rev. A. L. Shan- 
non, a well known minister of the L'nited Brethren Church, who was born in 
1864, died December 13, 1900, leaving six children, Helen E., Florence L., 
Carl E., Paul E., Mary A. and Minerva E. 

The Becker and Spayd families, from which Mrs. Hiram L. Erb is 
descended, were among the early settlers of Lebanon county. John Becker 
came from Germany to Lebanon county, Pa., about 1735 or 1740, and his 
son, George, was one of the pioneers of Kleinfeltersville, Lebanon county. 
William Becker, son of George and father of Mrs. Hiram L. Erb. was born 
in 1816, became one of the leading farmers of his township, and died October 
29, 1879. William Becker married Lucy Spayd, and of the three children 
born of this union, Mrs. Erb alone lived to mature years. 

Mrs. Hiram L. Erb is now making her home in Richland, Lebanon 
county. She is a kind and Christian woman, whose gentle spirit has en- 
deared her to all who come within the circle of her acquaintance. 

CHARLES MICHAEL BOWMAN, editor and founder of the Leb- 
anon J 'alley Standard and the Lebanon Daily Times, as well as one of the 
leading literary lights of this city, was born October 21, 1847. i''^ Lebanon, 
Pa., descending from one of the oldest and best known families in this section 
of the State, his ancestors having located there from their native land, Swit- 
zerland. The family has followed agricultin-al pursuits for many generations, 
and has always been prominent in both business and private life. His father, 
Joseph Bowman, was a successful shoe merchant and served at one time as 
sheriff of the county. The grandfather was a large land owner in Lebanon 
county, and was a man who enjoyed the respect and esteem of the community. 

Charles M. Bowman was educated in the public schools of Lebanon, and 
at the age of sixteen years, he began an apprenticeship at the printer's trade, 
ser\ing under Col. T. T. Worth, editor of the Courier, and became a practical 
printer, understanding the trade in all its details. In 1871, he established the 
Lebanon Valley Standard (weekly), and in 1876 he founded the Lebanon 
Daily Times, both of which he still controls. These papers have enjoyed 
from the start a fair measure of prosperity, and have always been alive to the 
best interests of this section. Under Mr. Bowman's able management and 
editorial charge, they have wielded and continue to wield an important in- 
fluence in the communitv. Besides conducting the business and editorial 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 225 

force of the above mentioned publications. Mr. Bowman has been for many 
years actively interested in manufacturing enterprises, in the coal trade, and 
also in various inventions of his own conception. He organized the Electric- 
Light and Power Company; three large manufacturing plants in Lebanon, 
and in other connections he has displayed extensive executive ability and force 
of character. As an inventor in various lines he has gained a considerable 
reputation, his inventions bearing the stamp of genius and skill, and being 
protected by patents the world over. Mr. Bowman's position as an editor 
and publisher has precluded his holding public olflce, although he has often 
been urged to accept. Through his newsjiapers, he has rendered important 
service to the Republican party organization, and has gained a reputation a.? 
a brilliant and trustworthy editor. He is a member of the Ma.sonic fraternity, 
cf the I. O. O. P., the P. O. S. of A., and the Order of Heptasophs. 

On ]\Iarch 26, 1S72, Mr. Bowman married Eliza R. Rise, youngest 
daughter of Adam Rise, president of the Valley National Bank of Lebanon. 
The children born of this union are: A. Rise, Matilda R. and Roy M. 

HENRY HAAK is among the prominent, wealthy and most highly 
esteemed citizens of Lebanon county, and, for almost a half century, was a 
very important factor in the business life not only of his own county, but 
also of other localities. He is a meml^er of one of the old and honorable 
families of Jackson township. Since April, 1903. he has retired from active 
business, owing to ill health. 

The Haak family is of German extraction, its founder in this part oi 
Pennsylvania, in the person of the great-grandfather of Henry Haak, of 
Myerstown, having come hither from Germany. His son Jonathan was one 
of the early settlers of Jackson township, where he engaged extensively in 
agriculture, and there reared a family of seven children, namely: Henrv (the 
father of the present Henry). Jonathan and Michael, and four daughters. 

Henry Haak, the father, was born in 1812, in Jackson township, and 
married Sarah Bassler, who bore him the following children : Adam, de- 
ceased; Jerome: Sarah, a widow-; Henry, our subject; Katherine; Maria, 
widow of Percival Tice; Thomas, deceased; and Aaron, of Missouri. Henry 
Haak was one of the excellent farmers of Jackson township, and one of the 
leading and representative citizens. His political convictions made him a 
zealous Republican, but he was no office seeker. He reared his family to in- 
dustry and respectability. 

Henry Haak, of Myerstown, the proprietor of the well-known Prescott 
and Stouchsburg creameries, and the manager of a large and important grain 

15 



226 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

business in Myerstown, was born on a farm in Jackson township, one mile 
south of Myerstown, May 12, 1836. His schooling was obtained in his 
locality, and until he was eighteen years of age he assisted on the home farm. 
Starting out then to make his own way in the world, be began as a day 
laborer in a sawmill, and a year later went to work on the old Union Canal. 
As* he had been industrious and prudent with his earnings, by the time he 
was of age he possessed enough money with which to begin a grain business 
-at Myerstown, in association with others, the firm beginning as Bassler, 
Coover & Co. After three years of great success, a re-adjustment of the 
business took place, and the lirm name was changed to Coover & Haak. and 
one year later Mr. Haak had become the head of the firm, the title then being 
Haak & Himmelberger. This firm took up a milling business and a short 
time after, Mr. Haak engaged under his own name in a grain business in 
Myerstown. Mr. Haak soon saw the opportunities presented by a wider field 
■of activity and freeing himself of business claims at Myerstown, went to 
Prescott, Lebanon county, and there, after erecting a large warehouse, went 
into a general grain and feed business, adding coal and salt, conducting it 
,vith such ability that it was prosperous from the very start. In 1884 he 
established the first creamery in Lebanon county, its success being so assured 
hat in 1892 he established a branch at Stouchsburg, Berks Co., Pa., both of 
rhese enterprises being still conducted with increasing prosperity 'and still 
nanaged with the business foresight and ability which have so characterized 
Vlr. Haak from young manhood. In 189S he built the Princely & Emperor 
Shirt Factory in Lebanon, which he still owns, renting it. Mr. Haak owns 
I \-alual)le ranch in Kansas, one and one-quarter sections of land near \^^ash- 
ngton, which he purchased in 1877, and conducted a stock farm there 
for six vears. His other possessions are large and valuable, including four 
due farms in Lebanon county, properties both at Prescott and [Myerstown, 
<nd the beautiful and picturesque Lake Tulpehocken, a sheet of water well 
stocked with game fish, one of the most valuable properties in the county. It 
is not so remarkable that an honorable, upright, exemplary man should be 
ihe fortunate owner of this large wealth, but it presents another aspect when 
it is remembered that it lias been accumulated from the earnings of a lad in 
the humble position of a sawmill laborer. Any one who has won his way 
from early limited en\dronment. can well understand the self-denial and the 
steady perseverance it has required. To-day Mr. Haak is one of the wealthy 
ind influential men of Lebanon county, but he is much more, a first class 
citizen, a public-spirited and generous lover of his community, and a pro- 
moter of all the moral and educational enterprises which his judgment de- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 227 

cides will prove benelicial to Jackson township. His political sympathy has 
identified him with the Republican party. 

On February 28. 1865, Mr. Haak was married to Miss Priscilla C. 
Spangler, daughter of Levi and Leah (Tice) Spangler, who were married 
December 17, 1840. Levi Spangler was born in 181 7, a son of Christian 
Spangler, a well known farmer of Jackson township and a direct descendant 
of Micliael Spangler, who came to Lebanon county from Germany in 1737, 
purchasing land in Jackson township among its first settlers. ]Mrs. Spangler 
was a daughter of the noted Capt. Tice, of Civil war fame. They had nine 
children born to them, namely : Priscilla C. ; Lucinda. Mrs. Dr. Grim, of 
Lawrence county, Pa.; Ira, of Iowa; Malinda, widow of Harry James; 
Jerome and Levi, both of Iowa; Albert, deceased; Monroe, of Iowa; and 
Emma, of Myerstown. One son, H. S., was born to Mr. and Mrs. Haak 
in 1867. 

i\Ir. Haak is liberal in his religious views, supporting all moral 
measures, as noted above, and contributing to the spread of religious truth, 
irrespective of creed. His wife is a member of the Reformed Church, and 
they are most highly esteemed in Myerstown for their many most estimable 
characteristics. 

SAMUEL RIEGEL, teacher. The people of Lebanon county ha\e 
alwa}s been interested in then- school system, and have demanded a high 
standard of excellence in their teachers. The result is that many schools are 
served by men who have been retained for years in the same position. The 
gentleman named ab(jve has been a teacher in Lebanon for four decades, with 
the exception of four years passed in the schools of the county. He has been 
principal of Fairview school since the adoption of the present school law. 
While Mr. Riegel is widely known in educational circles, he is equally well 
known in the field of vocal music, having been conductor of music classes 
throughout the covinties of Lebanon, Berks, Lancaster and Dauphin almost 
continuously since his young manhood. 

Prof. Riegel was borij in the city of Lebanon in the old McConnell 
homestead, at No. 119 South Ninth street, September 4. 1S45, son of Abra- 
ham and Mary (McConnell) Riegel. On the paternal side he is in the fifth 
generation from Adam Riegel, who landed in America August 13, 1750, and 
through his paternal grandmother is in the sixth generation in descent from 
Johannes Light (originally Licht), the first settler of the Light family in 
Lebanon county. Johannes Light immigrated to this country in 171 9. 
Samuel Riegel's mother was a native of Palmyra, where her birth occurred 



228 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

June 17, 1825. She was the daughter of Jacob McConnell, born in Lebanon^ 
opposite the McConnell homestead, January 17, 1790, and died November 
24. 1868. Through her Prof. Riegel is a descendant of Casper Snavely 
(originally Schnebeli), who emigrated to America from Canton Zurich, 
Switzerland, in 1736. 

Prof. Samuel Riegel was nurtured in a refined home, and passed the 
period of his youth and young manhood in the pleasures and duties which 
come to the average village boy. His preliminary training was gained in the 
public schools, and was supplemented by more advanced work in the Leb- 
anon Normal classes, he having decided to make teaching his lifework. He 
received his first certificate to teach August 16, 1862. His first work was 
in the primary school in Fredericksburg. After a term the following year 
in Cornwall township he had attained such proficiency as to attract the atten- 
tion of the school committee of Lebanon, and w^s invited to join their teach- 
ing force. He subsequently taught two terms in the country, but has been 
identified with the schools of Lebanon for practically forty years. When 
Prof. Riegel entered the Lebanon school it was ungraded, and he has seen 
its development to its present efiicient status, coming up through the grades 
by promotion until he reached the principalship. He was one of the first 
principals appointed under the school law of 1893, being given the principal- 
ship of Fairview. Prof. Riegel is an all-round school man, and deserves the 
popularity with which he is regarded in Lebanon. 

The school duties of Prof. Riegel have only absorbed a part of his atten- 
tion. Possessed of a fine voice, and early developing a love for music, he 
began to be a most popular leader as the years went by. and was in demand 
constantly in Lebanon and adjoining counties. As an incident showing this 
popularity it is related that the community of Richland waited three years 
for him rather than lose the opportunitv of securing his services, and for 
eighteen years following he taught music in that locality. Prof. Riegel 
organized his first class in 1862, and taught music continuously thereafter 
until 1895. On June 6, 1885, there was held a rather extraordinary gather- 
ing which amounted to an outpouring, in the Tulpehocken Reformed Church, 
two miles east of Myerstown, consisting of those who had come under the 
instruction of Prof. Riegel during the past years. Six hundred badged mem- 
bers formed the chorus, led by our subject, and the audience of three 
thousand people was also largely made up of his former pupils. 

Prof. Riegel still retains his interest in the subject of music, but is not 
so active, as was his wont in years gone by. He assisted in the organization 
of the Lebanon Choral Society, in which he retains his membership. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 229 

served as choirmaster of the First Reformed Church for a period of fifteen 
years. A deservedly popular member of society, he is a citizen highly es- 
teemed by all. 

WILLIAM T. ATKINS, one of the editors and proprietors of the 
Lebanon Courier, was born in Lebanon, Pa., September 23. 1865, son of the 
late William and Frances (Ilean) Atkins. After attending the public schools 
of Lebanon until he was thirteen years of age, Mr. Atkins began and served 
an apprenticeship of four years, after which he secured a position in the 
office of the State printer at Harrisburg. where he remained during one 
session of the State Legislature (1886), and then returned to the Courier 
office at Lebanon. In 1889, in company with Messrs. Light & Rodearmel, 
he purchased the Conner from Messrs. Worth & Reinoehl. In 1898 Mr. 
Atkins and Mr. Rodearmel purchased the interest of Mr. Light, and they 
now run the leading weekly paper of Lebanon county. Mr. Atkins is a mem- 
ber of Mt. Lebanon Lodge, F. & A. M., and of the Chapter, Commandery, 
Consistory and Mystic Shrine. 

John Reinoehl Rodearmel, one of the editors and proprietors 01 the 
Lebanon Courier, was born in Lebanon. September i, 1862, son of the late 
John and Mary (Reinoehl) Rodearmel. The father was born in Palmyra, 
Lebanon county, and was for twenty-five years a bookkeeper for the lumber 
firm of Reinoehl & Meily, later the Reinoehl Lumber Company. In his early 
days he was a school teacher, and for years was a clerk in the Quarter- 
master's Department at Philadelphia. 

John R. Rodearmel graduated from the Lebanon public schools in June, 
1879, and the same summer began apprenticeship to the printer's trade, in the 
office of the Lebanon Courier, and in 1889 became a member of the tirni. 
becoming a co-partner, in 1898, with William T. Atkins. Mr. Rodearmel 
is a member of all the Masonic bodies. Both the partners are men of exten- 
sive reading and wide experience. 

HENRY J. SHOLIA^, ex-county commissioner of Lebanon county and 
one of its leading and representative citizens, comes from one of the old 
agricultural families of this portion of old Lebanon, wdiich his own public 
spirit and practical ideas have assisted to make prominent. 

Henry J. Sholly was born August 22. 1840. in North Lebanon town- 
ship, a son of Balser and Mary (Henning) Sholly, the former of whom wrs 
born in Swatara township and the latter in North Annville township. Bal- 
ser Sholly was one of the good and upright citizens of the county ; he fol- 



2 30 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

lowed an agricultural life in North Lebanon township, and died at the age 
of fifty-two years, his widow surviving him a long period, dying at the age 
of seventy-two. They were consistent members of Kimberling's Reformed 
Church. Eleven children were born to them, and nine of these attained 
maturity, those beside Henry J. being: John, now deceased, was a general 
vitility man and lived in Swatara township ; Catherine died the wife of Levi 
Eichenberger ; Elizabeth died the wife of Joseph Briger; Peter, deceased, 
was a farmer and also a cigar-maker; Barbara died the wife of Daniel 
Light ; Susan died the wife of William Eberhart ; Sarah died unmarried ; 
and Balser, a farmer, was accidentally killed by a freight train while cross- 
ing the tracks, in South Bend, Indiana. 

Henry J. Sholly was reared on the farm in North Lebanon town- 
ship, and secured his education in the public schools. At the age of twenty- 
two years he started out to battle with life on his own responsibility, engag- 
ing in farming, as that was the vocation for which he had been trained. For 
twenty-three years he cultivated a rented farm in North Lebanon town- 
ship, and then purchased his prese'nt most desirable farm, comprising iic 
acres, delightfully located two miles northeast of the city of Lebanon. Air. 
Sholly has taken a deep interest in agricultural matters and has developed 
his farm to an unusual state of productiveness. His commodious buildings 
are all of substantial structure, while his residence is one of comfort and 
convenience. 

Henry J. Sholly is' one of the practical, self-made men of the township, 
broad-gauged and progressive, and is one who stands ever ready to advocate 
measures that will benefit the community. In politics he is identified with thf 
Democratic party, and he has filled a number of the local offices in its gift, 
with credit to himself and his constituents. His interest in the public schools 
has been shown by nine years of service as school director, and he was 
elected assessor for three terms, in a Republican township. In 1893 he was 
elected a county commissioner, and ably served during a period when it was 
necessary to make manv improvements and also to reduce the public debt 
There is probably no local ofifice that Henry J. Sholly could not secure if he 
so desired, so great is his personal popularity. He has shown that he has 
held the public welfare on a par with his own, and is known as an honorable 
and trustworthy man. Fraternally he is connected with the P. O. S. of A., 
No. 65. Golden Eagle. No. 314, Valley Commandery No. 5. and Kittating. 
No. 85. 

On September 5. 186.2. Henrv J. Sholly was united in marriage with 
Miss Elizabeth Kreider. born in Cornwall township, daughter of Abraham 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY; 23 f 

and Mary (Riddle) Kreider, and a family of eight children was born to 
this union, namely: Alice is the wife of Dawson L. Light, of North Lebanon 
township; Emma married Thomas Bamberger, and she and her son were 
killed by the electric car in Independent District, Lebanon; Ida is the wife 
of Frank Blanch, of North Lebanon township ; Elmer E. married Sallic 
Thomas, and they reside in North Lebanon township, he assisting his father 
on the farm; Miss Clare L. ; Henry Jennings is deceased; Katie is the wife of 
Harry W. Geesey, of Lebanon ; and one died unnamed. The religious 
connection of the family is with Kimmerling's Reformed Church. The fam- 
ily is prominent socially in the township. 

MILTON B. FRETZ. M. D., one of the leading physicians of PaL 
myra, Lebanon Co., Pa., and a man widely known for his great ability and 
deep erudition, was born September 28, 1855, in Bucks county. Pa., a son 
of Jonathan and Mary CBleim) Fretz. The father was born in Bucks coun- 
ty and the mother in Northampton county. Pa., and the former died in 
August. 1901. aged eighty-seven years, while his wife passed away in Novem 
ber. 1898. aged sixty-five vears. The grandfather was John Fretz, a native 
of Berks county. Pa. The maternal grandfather was Rev. Christian Bleim, 
a Mennonite preacher. 

Dr. Fretz was reared upon his father's farm imtil he was fourteen year.-- 
of age. His earlv education was obtained in the various institutions of 
Bucks county, and in his eighteenth year he entered the Millersville State 
Normal School, and after finishing his course there taught three terms. 
Having always had an ambition to become a physician, he began the stud} 
of medicine with Dr. John A. Laros, of Coopersburg. Lehigh Co., Pa., and 
graduated from the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvanir 
in 1873. Following this he began the practice of his profession in Mont 
gomery county. In 1884 he took a post-graduate course in the Philadel- 
phia Polyclinic. In 1885 he located in Palmyra, where he has since remained, 
building up a large and lucrative practice which is constantly increasing 
Dr. Fretz is a man of wide experience, and a physician of keen insight and 
unusual ability. Keeping thoroughly abreast of the times, he is well fitted 
to cope with disease, and is one of the most successful physicians in the treat- 
ment of his cases in the county. In 1886 Dr. Fretz opened a drug store at 
Palmyra, which he still conducts in connection Avith his practice, and is very 
successful with it. as he is in his profession. The children of Dr. Fretz are 
as follows: Dr. Howard G., who, having read medicine with his father. 
graduated from the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania. 



132 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

1900. is now resident surgeon of Girard College, Philadelphia ; Carrie, who 
graduated in literature and music from Irvin College, Mechanicsburg, Pa., 
in 1899, and from the Musical Conservatory of the Philadelphia Musical 
Academy, in Philadelphia, May 13, 1903, is now a teacher of music, and 
a most accomplished young lady. 

SAMUEL SHENK HORST (deceased), for many years a respected 
and useful citizen of Lebanon, was for over twenty years a prominent busi- 
ness man of that city. First as a merchant, later as a manufacturer, he 
assisted materially in the ui)building of the industries of the place, and his 
usefulness and success were entirely the result of his own thrift and energy. 

Mr. Horst was born in South Annville township, Lebanon county, 
March 5, 1845, 'irid came of an agricultural people of this section. Both his 
grandfather, Peter Horst, and his father, Joseph Horst, were prominent farm- 
ers of Lebanon county. Joseph Horst married Barbara Shenk, and the sub- 
ject of this sketch was the youngest of ten children. 

Samuel S. Horst spent the first ten years of his life on the home farm, 
thence moving to Lebanon, where he soon met with a severe loss in the death 
of his father. Being quite young, however, he was sent to the public schools, 
afterward to the Millersville Normal School, and gained a thorough and 
practical education. Early shouldering the active responsibilities of life, he 
taught school in the country districts for a number of years, and then entered 
a store as a clerk, where he discharged his duties with faithfulness and ability. 
On May 24, 1877, he married Clara L. Light, and by this union there has 
been one son, Andrew L., who is a graduate of Harvard College, and is now 
a resident of Chicago. 

Samuel S. Horst, in partnership with his father-in-law, Andrew Light, 
conducted a general store in Lebanon, and during six years carried on a 
highly prosperous business. Later he began the manufacture of lime. Suc- 
ceeding in ])roducing a fine article, he was enabled to find ready sale for it. 
and from year to year added to his business. For fully fifteen years he was 
engaged in this line, in 1892 selling out to J. B. Millard, after which he lived 
a retired life, until his death on May 10, 1903. He was mourned as a good 
citizen, and as a man whose example was well worthy of emulation. 

Mr. Horst always evinced a keen interest in the public affairs of his city. 
As a Republican he exerted an influence in politics. In religious sentiment 
his views were those of the United Brethren. His interest in religious educa- 
tion was shown by his support of a native scholar in the African mission of 
the United Brethren Church. 




'^ZH^^^- 




BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNIY. 233 

SAMUEL PHILIP HEILMAN, Heilman Dale, Lebanon county, Pa., 
son of John and Catharine (Heihaian) Heihnan, cousins, grandson of John 
Henry Heihnan, was born December 4. 1842. at Heihnan Dale. Veit, the an- 
ci^stor of the family, lived in 1305, during an era when men had but a single 
name and were often distinguished frLim each uther by the name of their occu- 
pation attached to their single name. Thus \^eit was a distinguished physician. 
and was styled 'Veit. the Heilman," and through usage the definitive WDrd 
became the family or surname. Veit, the Heilman, and many of his de- 
scendants, were members of the German order of nobles, had their family 
coat of arms, and occupied many places of trust and honor as generals, 
feudal lords, and church dignitaries. Their home and achievements were in 
the Rhine country. One of the descendants was a partner of Gutenberg, the 
inventor of printing, while another, Ludwig Heilman, in 15 12, wrote a cele- 
brated hymn in trivunph of the Reformation. 

In Grimm's monumental Deutsches Woerterbuch heilman is given as a 
synnnvm for Arzt. Ger. Medicus. Lat. Doctor Eng. The interesting facts 
shown in the foregoing clause are that there is a family history of nearly six 
hundred years, and that Dr. Heilman is a member of the same honored pro- 
fession as his ancestor in times past was, whose eminence was such as to 
bring to him the distinctive appellation the heilman (cure-man). 

Samuel Philip Heilman obtained an elementary education at Annville 
(Pa.) Academy, and Heilman Dale High School, received the degree of 
A, B., from Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa., in 1862. and 
A. M., in 1865; began to read medicine in 1864. at Lebanon, Pa., under the 
preceptorship of C. D. Gloninger, M. D. : took two winter and one summer 
courses of lectures at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Medi- 
cine, and received the degree of M. D., therefrom, March 14, 1867. 

I. Medical Relation.s and Activities. — Dr. Heilman has practiced 
medicine at Heilman Dale since June following his graduation from the 
University of Pennsylvania, March 14. 1867. He is a member of the 
Lebanon County Medical Society: was its president in 1891 ; and again in 
1898; its secretary 1893 and 1894; on its Board of Censors for three years 
from 1892; its treasurer 1889 and 1890; and is now the Medical and Surgi- 
cal Reporter of said society; is a member of the State Medical Society of 
Pennsylvania, was vice-president ot same 1902-03, and is now a member 
of a standing committee on Food Adulteration appointed one year ago by 
said society. Was dispensary physician to the Hospital of the Good 
Samaritan. Lebanon, Pa., 1892; is now, and for eight years has been medi- 
cal inspector for the county of Lebanon to the State Board of Health and also 



234 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

is now quarantine officer for said county to said State Board. Is a member of 
the American Medical Association, to the annual meetings of which he has 
often been sent as the delegate of his county medical society. 

II. Religious Relations and Activities. — He is a member of the 
Reformed congregation of the Hill Church, Lebanon county, a place of pub- 
lic worship established as early as 1740, one hundred and sixty-three years 
ago. by the large assistance of his great-great-grandfather, John Adam Heil- 
man, which place of worship was preceded by only one in what is now Leb- 
anon county, and that only by a few years. Of -this congregation Dr. Heil- 
man has been the organist for thirt3^-five years, as he is that now; was its 
trustee and treasurer for six years prior to 1887; a teacher in its Sunday 
School since 1867; and a member of its Home and Missionary Society. Is 
Secretary of the Committee on Sunday Schools of the Eastern Synod of the 
Reformed Church in the United States ; chairman of the Committee on Sun- 
day School work of Lebanon Classis of saifl S\"nod ; vice-president and secre- 
tary of the Board of Trustees of said Classis; delegate of said Classis to the 
Eastern Synod of the Reformed Church, Shamokin, Pa., 1895, and dele- 
gate of said Classis to the General Synod of said church, Dayton, Ohio. 1896. 
and for three years prior to 1902 member of the executive committee of the 
Lebanon County .Sabbath School Association. 

HI. Agricultural Relations and Activities. — He was the secre- 
tary of the Mt. Gretna Agricultural, Mechanical and Industrial Exposition 
Association for twelve years prior to 1903; secretary of the Heilman Dale 
Creamery Association for eighteen years ; a member of the Lebanon County 
Agricultural and Horticultural Association, of which association he is also 
the secretary ; delegate member of the State Board of Agriculture ; lecturer 
at many county and local farmers' institutes; delegate by appointment of 
the Governor of the State to the Farmers' National Congress, Parkersburg, 
W. Va.. 1894, Atlanta, Ga.. 1895. St. Paul, Minn., 1897, Boston. Mass.. 
1899, Macon, Ga., 1902, and Niagara Falls, N. Y., 1903. 

IV. Educational Relations and Activities. — He was a director 
of public schools in North Lebanon township, Lebanon county, 1879-82; is 
now, as he has been since 1895, ^ member of the Board of Trustees of Frank- 
lin and Marshall College, Lancaster, Pa., his Alma ]\Iater ; a graduate member 
of the Goethean Literary Society of that college; a member of the Genera! 
Alumni Association of said college and vice-president of same, 1900-01 ; a 
member of the Eastern Alumni Association of said college, and vice-presi- 
dent of same, 1902-03. 

V. Historical Relations and Activities. — He is a charter mem- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 235 

ber of the Pennsylvania German Society, founded 1890; a charter member of 
the Lebanon County Historical Society, founded 1898, of which society he 
has continuously been the secretary, and had a leading part in its establish- 
ment : corresponding member of the Dauphin County Historical Society; a 
member of the Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the Revolution by virtue 
of the services of his great-grandfather. John Adam Heilman (2), as first 
lieutenant in the army of the war of the Revolution, who as such had par- 
ticipated in the battles of Princeton and Trenton; a member of the Penn- 
sylvania Ethnographical Survey Corps, the purpose of which survey is to 
collect data showing what each nationality brought hither, and to illustrate 
the distribution of the various race elements in our population, the interaction 
of these different nationalities and thereby to arrive at accurate conclusions 
as to the forces which have developed our American civilization. 

VI. Other Relations and Activities. — He was for many years a 
member of the Traveling Men's Club, a delegate to the National Pure Food 
and Drug Congress, Washington. D. C. March 7, 1900, and at many and 
various times delegate to county and State political conventions, and to State 
and national medical meetings. He is the postmaster at Heilman Dale, as he 
has been since March i, 1886. 

In these positions, and in his relation to these various bodies. Dr. Heil- 
man has contributed to the same many papers on topics medical, religious, 
agricultural, educational, historical, sanitary, social and miscellaneous. 

VII. Locality and Habitat. — Heilman Dale, four and one-half 
miles northwest of the county seat, Lebanon, is not a city, town or village, 
but the general name of a country settlement or rural territory, some miles in 
length and breadth, thickly populated, with a railroad station and postoffice 
as the center of its communal life and activity. Amongst the earliest settlers 
in the section designated Heilman Dale were John Peter Heilman, from 
Wurteml:>erg, Germany, in 1732, and John Adam Heilman, from Zuzen- 
hausen, Baden, Germany, in 1738. Both were tillers of the soil, as all, or 
nearly all, of their descendants have been, and are now. Dr. Heilman was 
born, reared, and lives as he has lived all his life-time, on a farm the land of 
which was acquired by his great- great -grandfather, the said above named 
John Adam Heilman, immigrant of 1738, being in the fifth generation from 
said immigrant ancestor. The 366 acres of land originally warranted to 
John Adam Heilman are still in the possession of, and occupied by. some of 
his descendants. 

On the farm owned and occupied by Dr. Heilman stands a building now 
used as a dwelling house, erected in 1793 by his great-grandfather, John 



2 36 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Adam Heilman (2d), for a paper mill, known as the Heilman paper mill, 
in which was carried on the manufacture of paper from that year until 1835. 
Through the same farm extends the channel of the now abandoned L'nion 
canal (abandoned in 1884), the first canal built in this country, the construc- 
tion of which was entered upon as early as 1795, although not completed 
until the year 1827. It was in that day considered a marvelous work of en- 
gineering, attracting the attention of master engineers far and wide, and of 
public men, amongst the latter Gen. Washington, who ^•isited and inspected 
the canal twice during the last years of his life. It extended from Reading, 
Pa., on the Schuylkill river, up and through the Lebanon valley, on to near 
Harrisburg, Pa., on the Susquehanna river, opening up navigation between 
these two large rivers, was seventy-seven miles in length and contained twen- 
ty-five locks and one tunnel 600 feet in length, the first tunnel constructed in 
the United States, and a remarkable piece of work in that early day. 

Dr. Heilman married September 30, 1885, Miss Elizabeth, daughter of 
Dr. Daniel H. Beaver, of Fredericksburg, Lebanon Co.. Pa., and has three 
children: Anna Barbara, 1886; Catharine Ruth, 1888; and John Beaver, 
1896. 

LIGHT. The value of genealogy is now widely recognized and many 
important historical facts have been discovered by genealogical research. Fam- 
ily history is peculiarly interesting, and it is especially so when it involves so 
much of historical interest, as does the history of the Light family, which has 
produced men of prominence in all generations since its establishment in 
America. Of this notable family Samuel L. Light, manufacturer of Lebanon, 
is a most worthy representative. 

The first of the name of whom we have authentic record is John Peter 
Light, who came from the Palatinate in Germany, and located in what is 
now Lebanon county, then Lancaster, where stands the old Light fort on 
the old Union canal, just west of Eleventh street, in the city of Lebanon. 
This was between 171 5 and 1720. during the reign of Queen Anne. He 
purchased a large tract of land embracing in its boundaries most of the 
site of what is now the city of Lebanon, and erected the usual log house, a 
structure which w^as later replaced by a substantial stone one. This gen- 
tleman was the maternal ancestor of our honored subject, tliough of the 
same name. 

Onlv the names of his sons are of record. John. Jacob, Martin and 
Henrv. Following the line of succession, Jacob's son John (commonly known 
as Honesley) became the father of John; Jacob; Joseph; Barbara, who mar- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 237 

ried Jacob Light; Elizabeth, spinster; and Mary, Mrs. Casper Light. The 
children of the second son, Jacob, were: John; Phronicia, 2\Irs. Felix Light; 
Felix; Sarah, the mother of our worthy subject; ^Mary, who became Mrs. 
Abraham Shirk; Barbara, who married E. K. Kimmell ; and Gideon, who 
married Nancy Witmeyer. 

The father of our subject was John Light, b(jrn in Lancaster county, 
Pa., in 1809, the son of Samuel Light and his wife. Mary. This lady 
was the daughter of Henry Light, the youngest son of John Peter Light. 
Passing again to the paternal side of the family, Grandfather Samuel Light 
was the son of John, who is first heard of in 1756, near the present site 
of Pittsburg, where he located some years before the French and Indian 
war. Here he and his family came very near suffering- martyrdom from the 
Indians who infested that region. The family took refuge in Fort Duquesne, 
and later came back to the line of civilization in ]Montgomer_\- countv. He 
resided here for a few years, and after the death of his wife, whom he 
buried in (jld Coventry [Meeting House cemetery, he again crossed the moun- 
tains, this time floating down the Ohio to where Cincinnati had been founded 
a short time before. At this point he remained untd his decease, which 
occurred very near the himdred mark. 

Grandfather Samuel Light went along to Ohio, but when he was about 
eight years old he and his brother Jacob returned to Lancaster, Pa., with 
their uncle Martin Light, with whom they lived, never returning to Ohio. It 
is recorded that he removed from Lancaster to Lebanon county in 181 3. where 
he purchased a farm of 274 acres on the Berks and Dauphin turnpike, and upon 
which the village of Sunnyside now stands. Grandfather Light was a man 
of fine influence in his day, and very liberal towards educational institu- 
tions. He was instrumental in having the Berks and Dauphin turnpike built. 
and 'the old Lebanon Academy on Tenth street was the recipient of his 
bounty. He was the owner of New ]\Iarket Forge which remained in the 
family for a period of 100 years, also of a woolen mill which burned to the 
ground soon after his death. He died in 1834, leaving children as follows, 
(i) Elizabeth married Andrew Robb. a jeweler. For this elder daughter 
Mr. Light built in 1820, for a residence, the building now being occupied 
as a store by Mr. Hottenstein. on Cumberland street, near Tenth. (2) 
Jacob, the eldest son. married Marv Longenecker and lived at New ^Market 
Forge. (3) Mary (Polly) became Mrs. Levi LThler. Old settlers will 
remember that the husband had a store on the corner of Cumberlanci and 
Ninth streets, the present site of the Lebanon National Bank. (4) Henry 
died at the age of thirty years, single. ( ^) Catherine married Jesse Rein- 



238 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

hold, of Lancaster county. (6) Sally was the second wife of Jesse Rein- 
hold. (7) John is mentioned below. (8) Ann, the youngest of the fam- 
ily, married Samuel Rea, of Chester county, Pa., their eldest son, James, now 
lives in Washington, D. C, and their second son, John, was elected National 
Commander of the G. A. R. in 1887. 

John Light, father of our worthy subject, married, in 1834. Sarah 
Light, who was born February 27, 181 3, and died in 1879. She was a 
descendant of John Peter Light. They were the parents of the following 
children : Ephraim, of Reading, Pa. ; ^Nlary, married to W. M. Goodman, 
an attorney of Reading, Pa. ; Samuel L., of this review ; Jacob, who died at 
the age of ten years ; several who died in infancy. John Light was a mer- 
chant in early life, as a member of the firm of Shirk & Light. They owned 
and operated many boats on the old Union canal, and owned warehouses 
and handled grain. They also operated a freighting line overland from 
Cornwall to Lebanon, prior to the building of the Cornwall railroad. The 
firm dissolved in 1858, after Avhich Mr. Light partially retired from business. 
During his lifetime he was a dealer in country real estate, buying and improv- 
ing many farms in the county. He was one of the organizers of the old 
Valley Bank, of which he was a director as long as he lived. He was 
elected county commissioner at an early date on the free school issue, after 
a hard fight. He died in 1884, after a long and useful life, having merited 
the esteein of all with whom he had been associated. 

S.\MUEL L. Light, the immediate subject of this review, was born 
April 30, 1842, in the old Light residence (a log house, since torn away), 
near the present Widows' Home, on North Tenth street, Lebanon. He 
secured a good common school education in the schools of his native village, 
and at Otterbein University, Ohio. At the age of t\\-enty he was married 
to Maria E. Henry, a native of Lebanon county. Pa., born in October. 1-843, 
daughter of John Henry, a native of Dauphin county, who removed thence 
to Franklin county, and in 1845 settled in Lebanon county. Mrs. Light died 
April 25, 1893. She was a woman possessed of many noble qualities and 
endeared herself to a large circle of acquaintances. Her children were: 
Harry H., an iron manufacturer; John, a real estate dealer: J. Warren, 
a merchant; J. Ray, a druggist; and Florence Augusta, wife of William S. 
Davis, of Lebanon. 

Mr. Light began life as an agriculturist in North Lebanon township, 
where he remained for three years. He then engaged for a time in ^hs 
cattle business. Of late years his field of activity has been exceedingly wide. 
He has been the promoter and organizer of a large number of successful 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 239 

enterprises, aii<l is looked upon as one of the shrewdest tinanciers of the 
county. It will not be out of place to mention some of the enterprises which 
he has been instrumental in organizing, and with many of which he is stil! 
connected: Gideon Light & Company, brick and coal dealers; S. L. Light 
& Co., ice; proprietor of the Lebanon Rolling Mills from 1876 to 1S79; 
secretary and treasurer of the Lebanon Stove Works; J. D. Kerr & Co., 
grocers; Light & Co., wholesale shoes; S. L. Light & Son, wholesale grocers; 
stockholder in the East Lebanon Rolling Mills, and now in the trust. H. L. 
Light, his son, being a director; director in the Lebanon County Trust Com- 
pany ; director in the Le]:)anon Central Market House , director in the Citv 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company : director in the Lebanon Valley Iron Com- 
pany; president of the Lebanon Textile Company and S. L. Light Brick 
Plant. Mr. Light also built and started the "St. George Hotel" of Lebanon. 
Possessed of indefatigable purpose and wide experience in the manip- 
ulation of business forces. Mr. Light has been a power for good in the com- 
munity of Lebanon, where he is imiversally regarded as a man of the strict- 
est probity of character. He is forceful but fair, and many a young man has 
had cause to thank him for kindly advice and financial assistance in his 
early business struggles. The lives of such men are a continual source of 
inspiration to a community, and Lebanon citizens are a unit in their appre- 
ciation of the career of this native son. 

GEORGE W. UHRICH (deceased), who passed out of life at his com- 
fortable home on Main street, Myerstown, February 26, 1900, was one of 
the leading citizens and honorable men of Jackson township. For fifty-five 
years he had lived an estimable life, giving an influence in favor of temper- 
ance and morality, supporting the Lutheran Church, extending kindness to 
hi;; neighbors, helping those In need or discouragement, and at the same time 
industriously pro^'iding for the welfare fo his family. What better summing 
can there be at the end of a iife? 

The birth of the late George W. Uhrich took place June 24, 1845. i" 
lackson township. He was a son of Valentine and Katherine (Mace) Uhrich, 
the former of whom for fifty years was a leading farmer of the township, 
dying at the age of seventy-five years. The name of the grandfather was Val- 
entine also, and he is supposed to have come from Germany early in the settle- 
ment of Lebanon county, with his father, also Valentine, who established the 
family 160 years ago. The children of Grandfather Valentine were: 
Michael, Valentine, John, Elizabeth. Katherine and Malinda. Valentine (3) 
was born in 181 2 on the old homestead in Jackson township, and died in 



240 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

1887. In 1839 he married Katherine Mace, of Heidelberg township, and 
their four children who grew to maturity were: John, a retired farmer of 
Myerstown; George W., deceased; Amanda, the wife of Dr. Willoughby 
Kline, of Myerstown ; and Valentine, a retired farmer of Myerstown. Like 
all his family, Valentine Uhrich was a consistent member of the Lutheran 
Church. In politics he was a Democrat. 

The late George W. Uhrich w^as reared on the farm, and attended the 
district schools and later the Myerstown Academy. His life was given to 
farming, and until within seven years of his death he continued to engage 
actively in farm work. Then he purchased a nice home in Myerstown to 
which he removed, and there he died, surrounded by all the comforts of life. 
In November, 1864, he married Mary Tice. who was born July 6, 1846, 
daughter of Andrew and Eliza (Shirk) Tice, of Jackson township, who still 
reside on their old home. Ten children were bom of this marriage, as fol- 
lows: Katherine, deceased, wife of Jacob Bomberger; Annie, who died at the 
age of fourteen; Valentine, who died young; George, a clerk in the firm of 
Stambaugh & Hoak, in Lebanon : Ira, a farmer on the old home in North 
Jackson township; John, of New York; Mary, wife of Harry Gernert, a 
farmer of Jackson township; Harry, of Lebanon; Ida, wife of William Nolb, 
of Myerstown ; and Wallace, at home. 

Mr. Uhrich was a life-long Democrat but never cared for office. In the 
Lutheran Church he was a leading member, deacon, elder and trustee. In 
addition to his fine farm of 130 acres, he owned the comfortable home in 
Myerstown and a house in Lebanon, and was regarded as one of the sub- 
stantial men of the township. Mr. Uhrich was a kind husband and father, 
and the whole community mourned him sincerely, every one being his friend. 
His family is held in high esteem. 

JOHN HUNSICKER. a prominent citizen and manufacturer of Leb- 
anon, and president of the select council of the city government, is a native 
of Lebanon county, having been born in Union township, August 10, 1840, 
a son of Jacob Hunsicker. 

Jacob Htmsicker, the father, was a son of Christian Hunsicker, who was 
a native of Bethel township, Lebanon county, lx>m liear Fredericksburg; it 
is thought he served in the Revolutionary war. The ancestry of the family 
is .Swiss. Jacob Hunsicker was born in 1804, and died in 1864. He was a 
farmer. His wife, Catherine (Groh), born in 1808. in Fredericksburg, died 
in 1881 : she was a daughter of John Groh, a native of Bethel township. 
They had children as follows : Joshua, deceased ; John, of Lebanon ; Annie, 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 241 

who married David Liglit, of Lebanon; Elizabeth, who married Edward J. 
Bomberger, of LTnion township, Lebanon county ; and Sarah, who married 
John B. Ranch, of Lebanon. 

John Hnnsicker was reared on a farm and attended the pnljhc schools, 
finishing- his education at the AIillers\-ille State X^rmal School. In i860 he 
began teaching school, and taught one term \'ery successfully. In 1862 he 
enlisted for service in the Civil war, entering Company E, One Hundred and 
Twenty-seventh Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, a fine regi- 
ment, attached to the Second Brigade, Second Division, Second Army Corps. 
For the time it w-as out this regiment saw much service, and Mr. Hunsicker 
was a faithful soldier, until June, 1S63, when his term of enlistment expired. 
He was in the battle of Fredericksburg, in December, 1862, and at Cliancel- 
lorsville, in May, 1863. Upon his return home Mr. Hunsicker resumed 
school teaching, but the death of his father, in 1864, recalled him to the home 
farm. He took charge of the property, but in 1865 came to Lebanon and con- 
tinued to teach until 1868. 

In the above year Mr. Hunsicker went to Middletown, Pa., and accepted 
a position as bookkeeper at a furnace, continuing in that position for tliree 
years. Coming back to Lebanon at the expiration of that period, he, in 1871. 
entered the store of John B. Ranch, in Lebanon, and remained there until 
the following May, when he became timekeeper for the Lebanon Manufactur- 
ing Company. In 1878 he was made treasurer of that company, and retains 
tliis responsijjle position, also attending to the bookkeeping. His responsi- 
bilities were further increased and the confidence of the company shown, in 
1894, by his selection as secretary of the company also. When the plant of 
the Lebanon Manufacturing Company was leased for a period of ten years 
by the M. H. Treadwell Company, in 1892, Mr. Hunsicker became treasurer, 
and in 1897 he was made treasurer of the Union Boiler Company; in 1896 
he became president of the Lebanon Stenm Company. Mr. Hunsicker is a 
director in all of these companies, and is connected in the same way with the 
Lebanon Market House Company and the Washington Fire Insurance Com- 
pany. His prominence and influence in the city were recognized by his elec- 
tion, in 1886, as a member of the select council of Lebanon, from the Fourth 
ward, and with the exception of one year he has filled the office continuously 
up to the present time. In 1892 his efficiency resulted in his election to 
the presidencv of this body, and he was again chosen to that incumbency 
in 1903. 

In 1873 Mr. Hunsicker was united in marriage to Annie E. Shirk, who 
was bom on a farm near Fredericksburg, daughter of John Shirk. They 

16 



242 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

have two children, John and Thomas J., survivors of a famil}' of six, the 
deceased members being, Paul S., William J., Bessie and Annie. 

Mr. Hunsicker is a member of Sedgwick Post No. 42, G. A. R. The 
religions membership of the family is with Trinity United Brethren Church, 
of which our subject is a trustee. Not only is ]\Ir. Hunsicker known as a fine 
financier and excellent business man, but his good judgment and progressive 
ideas have rendered him one of Lebanon's most useful public citizens. 

KILLINGER. The Killinger family is one of the oldest and most 
prominent in Lebanon county. So far as known at present, the founder of 
the family in Pennsylvania was Michael Killinger. 

^Michael Killinger was born May 15, 1731, and died July 11, 1815, and 
was buried at the old historic Hill Church, in North Lebanon township, Leba- 
non county. He received a patent from the Penns, proprietors of Pennsyl- 
vania, dated September 9, 1765, for 1,000 acres of land along what is now 
the Berks and Dauphin pike, in Londonderry township, Dauphin county (now 
North and South Annville townships, Lebanon county), and he built his home 
on the banks of the stream called Killinger's Run. These children were the 
issue of Michael Killinger and wife: Andrew. George, Michael and John. 

John Killinger was bom on the old homestead September 25, 1765, and 
died September 11, 1810. He married Susanna Deininger, and their chil- 
dren were: John; Catherine, who married H. Garman ; Susan, who married 
C. Miller; Rosina, who married Peter Bachman; and Magdalena, wlio mar- 
ried H. Fegan. 

John Killinger (2), son of John, was born in February, 1797, on the old 
homestead, and died September 17, i860. ^Ir. Killinger was a prominent 
and influential man in his community and a leader of his political party in his 
section, filling many of the local offices and ably representing his district in 
the Pennsylvania State Senate in 1837, and again in 1838. For many years 
he was a well-known merchant at Annville, Lebanon county. His marriage 
was to Fanny Sherzer, and tl\e three children of this union were all sons, 
viz. : John \V., Charles H. and Jacob S. Charles H. Killinger, now 
deceased, lived at Annville and later removed to Philadelphia, where he mar- 
ried Cornelia Pliess, the one son of this marriage being Paul Killinger, now a 
resident of Philadelphia. Jacob S., also deceased, resided for a time at 
Annville, but later removed to Kansas City, Mo. His marriage was to 
Louisa Henry, and they had issue: Fanny, who married John C. Yocum; 
and Emma. 

John W. Killinger, the eldest of the family of John Killinger (2), was 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 243 

born September 18, 1824, on the old homestead, and died in 1896. His educa- 
tion was secured in the schools at Annville, at Harrisburg Academy and Mar- 
shall (now Franklin and [Marshall) College, from which latter he graduated in 
18:1.3, receiving his degree of A. M. m 1846. For many years INIr. Killinger 
was a trustee of the college, having such an association with it at the time of 
his death. I'nder ihe great statesman, Thaddeus Stevens, of Lancaster, he 
studied law- and was admitted to the Bar of LeJjanon county in 1846. From 
that time for a period of over forty years he was in active practice of his 
profession, becoming widely known for his legal ability and exhaustive knowl- 
edge of jurisprudence. In 1848 he was appointed district attornev of Leba- 
non county, and faithfully served until he was nominated for the Legislature, 
in which august body he was an able representative during 1850 and 185 1, 
and a member of the Senate from 1854 to 1857. So conspicuous were his 
.services and so general was the appreciation of them, that Mr. Killinger was 
returned to the House of Representatives of the LTnited States for six terms, 
1859-1863, i87i-]875 and 1877-1881. Flis nther public services included 
two years as assessor of internal revenue, from 1864 to 1866. Mr. Killinger 
was an enthusiastic supporter of the Republican partv and an able expounder 
of its principles and aims, taking a very active part in every campaign for more 
than forty years. His coimsel was invoked and his judgment consulted 
by the political leaders of his day, and Pennsyhania has had few more disin- 
terested or honest political organizers. 

John W. Killinger was a man of many interests, and was notably identi- 
fied with the industrial development of the county. His foresight prompted 
him to be one of the incorporators and a director of the great Lebanon Valley 
Railroad, with whose fortunes he was associated from the time of construc- 
tion until its merger wnth its still greater neighbor, the Philadelphia & Reading 
Railroad, of which he was legal adviser until his death. Mr. Killinger was 
also an incorporator and a director of the A'alley National Bank, of Lebanon. 
At various times he was engaged in the iron business, his quick compre- 
hension of commercial possibilities enabling him to distinguish between wnse 
and doubtful investments. In local matters and affairs pertaining to the 
growth and welfare of his city he was ever interested, giving time, name and 
means to a number of enterprises which were largely successful on account 
of his interest. For a time he served as the president of the Union Fire 
Company, of Lebanon, and later as its treasurer, always showing an active 
interest in its progress. Mr. Killinger also took an active part in the organ- 
ization of St. James' Reformed Congregation, of Lebanon. He married 



244 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Mary A. Hittell, a native of Hamilton, Ohio, and three children were born 
to this union, namely : Charles H., John W. and Flora C. 

Charles H. Killinger^ one of the most prominent members of the 
Lebanon Bar, was born in Lebanon and was given superior educational 
advantages. After an attendance at Franklin and Marshall College, at Lan- 
caster, he entered the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale University, graduat- 
ing from that notable institution in the class of 1874. His law reading was 
done with his distinguished father, and his legal course was completed in the 
University of Pennsylvania. In 1877 ^''^ '^'^'^^ admitted to the Bar of Lebanon 
county, and subsec[uently to the Supreme and Superior Court Bars. For 
more than twenty years he has been in active practice and holds a high rank 
in the profession. Mr. Killinger is president of the Valley National Bank of 
Lebanon. 

Mr. Killinger is associated with the various Masonic bodies of Lebanon, 
was one of the founders of the Lebanon County Historical Society, and is 
treasurer of the Union Fire Company. He represents, as local attorney, the 
Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company, and acts as counsel for a number 
of other corporations. He was one of the incorporators of the Lebanon 
Steam Company, and is associated with other local enterprises and corpora- 
tions. While a Republican in politics, he has never taken any active part 
therein. 

Mr. Killinger was married, in 1879, to Alatilda K. Mish, only daughter 
of John Weidman Mish and his wife, Amelia Krause. Two daughters are 
the offspring of this marriage, Catherine H. and Dorothea. 

REV. FRANKLIN J. F. SCHANTZ, U. D. A very prominent citizen 
of Myerstown, Pa., who has filled the responsible position of president of 
the Evangelical Lutheran ]\Iinisterium of Pennsylvania, and who for many 
years has had charge as pastor of the Friedens Evangelical Lutheran Church 
at Myerstown, and the congregation at Mount Aetna, is Rev. Dr. Franklin 
J. F. Schantz, a distinguished author and 'lecturer on matters pertaining to the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church as well as the Pennsylvania-Germans. 

Dr. Schantz is of German ancestry, and the founder of his family in this 
State, in the person of Johan Schantz, arrived in Pennsylvania October i, 
1770. accompanied by his four sons. Jacob, one of these, who became the 
grandfather of Dr. Schantz, was born in 1761. He was a redemptioner, and 
had his home with a farmer and miller named Kohler, learning the milling 
business, in which he engaged throughout life. Flis home was located in 
Egypt, Lehigh (then a part of Northampton) Co., Pa. Jacob served as 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 245 

frontier ranger in the Revolutionary war. Later, in 1788, he married r\Iaria 
Bortz, and they became the parents of a large family, one of whom, also 
named Jacob, became the father of Dr. Schantz. 

Jacob Schantz (2) was born Nn\-ember 28, 1791, and died in June, 1843. 
By occupation he also was a miller, and like his father owned and operated 
the mill at the head of Cedar creek, in Lehigh county. He married Sarah 
Fogel, born July 25. 1799, who died April 25, 1871, daughter of Hon. John 
and Catherine (Stettler) T^ogel, of Fogels\-ille, Pa. The Fogel ancestors of 
Dr. Schantz came to America prior to 1740. The parents of Dr. Schantz 
had six children, viz. : Hiram J. died in 1893 ; Dr. Tilghman P. died in 1852 ; 
Elemina C, who was the wife of Dr. Thomas B. Cooper, died in 1896; Fliza 
Amanda, the wife of Rev. Aaron S. Leinbach, D. D., died in 1867; Rev. 
Franklin J. F., D. D., still resides at Myerstown ; Llewellyn R. A. was killed 
at Allentown, Pa., June 27, 1852. 

Rev. Dr. Schantz was born January 8, 1836, at the home of his parents 
at the head of Cedar creek, in Upper Macungie township, 
Lehig'h Co., Pa., and he was baptized in his infancy bv Rev. Daniel Zeller. 
In youth he was instructed in St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church, at 
Allentowai, Pa., where he was confirmed October 26, 1851, by Rev. Joshua 
Yeager. His early education had been olitained in the public and private 
schools in the neighborhood, and was supplemented by attendance at Allen- 
town Academy from April, 1848, to 1850, and from the spring of the latter 
year until the fall of 1853 he was a student in the Allentown Seminary. In 
the autumn of the latter year he entered the Junior class of Franklin and 
Marshall College, at Lancaster, and was graduated in 1855, entering that 
same year the Theological Seminary at (lettysburg. and completing the 
required course on September 15, 1857. Thus equipped, the young man was 
licensed as an Evangelical Lutheran minister at the meeting of the \A^est 
Pennsylvania Synod at Carlisle, Pa., on September 28, 1857, '^'"'^^ ordained 
at the meeting of the German Evangelical Lutheran Ministerium of Penn- 
sylvania, in St. John's Church, Easton, Pa., on June 3, 1858. 

On April 29, 1858. Rev. Dr. Schantz was united in marriage with ]\Iiss 
Cordelia S. Saeger, daughter of Charles and Eliza (Eckert) Saeger. of Allen- 
town, Pa. Of the children born to this union two sons, Jacob S. and Charles 
H., and one daughter, Agnes E., were buried prior to the death of the mother, 
which occurred on June 26, 1889, at ]\Iyerstown. Three of the children are 
living: Henry F., M. D., of Reading: Mrs. John P. Spanglcr, of Myers- 
town ; and Mrs. W. Stanton Haak, of Lebanon. 

From October, 1857, to January, 1861, Rev. Dr. Schantz had charge of 



246 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Trinity Church, in Reading, and of the Catasauqua parish from 1861 to 1866. 
On Novemljer 5, 1865, he assumed the responsibilities of assistant agent of 
the I'heological Seminary in Philadelphia, continuing as assistant agent until 
September 30, 1866, when he became general agent, until June 30, 1867. In 
July of the latter year he became pastor of the "Myerstown Church, and still 
continues in that relation, also looking after the spiritual wants of the congre- 
gation at Mount Aetna, Pa. From July, 1867, to December, 1881, he was 
pastor of Zion's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Jonestown, Lebanon Co., Pa., 
and from 1876 to 1879 supplied Emanuel Lutheran Church, at Brickerville, 
Lancaster Co., Pa. During all these years of unremitting work as pastor in 
various fields Dr. Schantz has been called upon to occupy many of the most 
prominent positions in the gift of his religious body. He has been called to 
the offices of secretary and also president of conferences, member and secretary 
of the synodical executive committee, secretary of the Ministerium, trustee of 
the Orphans' Home at (jermantown, trustee of Muhlenberg College, visitor of 
Emaus Orphans' Home and delegate to the General Council, these various 
honors bringing with them duties and responsibilities not only absorbing 
much time but requiring wise and judicious deliberation. Dr. Schantz has 
served on numerous committees of the Ministerium. and is a member of the 
English Home Mission Board of the General Council. The degree of Doctor 
of Divinity was conferred upon him by Augustana College and Theological 
Seminary, at Rock Island, 111., in 1894. ,\t a meeting of the Evangelical 
Lutheran Ministerium of Pennsylvania, in Allentown, Pa., in May, 1901, 
Rev. Dr. Schantz was elected president oi that great body, and re-elected at 
its meetings in Easton, PA., in May, 1902, and in Philadelphia in June, 1903. 

From 1899 to 1900 the Doctor was president of the Pennsylvania-Ger- 
man Society, and he has given much attention and study to the history and 
early settlement of his ancestors in this State. Domestic and agricultural in 
their tastes, they also possessed homely virtues which formed a foundation 
upon which a thriving and happy people builded. 

It was Rev. Dr. Schantz who. after much patient research, prepared a 
number of histories of congregations, which were published in pamphlet form 
and are preserved in safe places among the archives of the several churches. 
Those most notable were : "The Sesqui-Centennial Discourse. Christ Evan- 
gelical Lutheran Church, near Stouchsburg, Pa., 1893;" "The Sesqui-Cen- 
tennial Sermon. Jordan Evangelical Lutheran Church, Lehigh Co., Pa., 
1894;" "The Historical Discourse at the 155th Anniversary of Jerusalem 
Church, in Sahsbury township, Lehigh Co., Pa., 1896;" ''Historical Address 
at the Centennial of the Third Church Building of Christ German Lutheran 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 247 

Congregation, Rockland township, Berks Co.. Pa., 1898" (first church l.iuilt 
in 1743); "History of Brickerville Congregation, Lancaster Co.. P\a..'" read 
before Lancaster County Historical Society, 1898. 

The following papers prepared Ijy Dr. Schantz have alsn appeared in 
print: "Semi-Centennial Celebration of the Historical Origin <if Muhlen- 
berg College, on the College Canipus. June 23, 1898:" "The Domestic Life 
and Characteristics of the Pennsylvania-German Pioneer, a Narrative and 
Critical History, Prepared at the Request of the Pennsylvania-German Soci- 
ety, 1900;" "The County Historical Society" (read at the tirst stated meeting 
of the. Lebanon County Historical Society. Lebanon. Pa.. February, 1898), 
of wdiich Dr. Schantz w'as one of the founders. He has frequently lectured, 
both in English and in the dialect c)i the Pennsylvania-German. In fact. Dr. 
Schantz is at home in many kinds of intellectual work and is capal)le of trans- 
acting a vast amount of detail business. At any rate, when many hard 
workers in the churcli are beginning to think of rest and relaxation, he is still 
vigorous and useful. His circle of personal friends embraces the liest in 
church and. community, and his power for good in his own denomination 
cannot be estimated. As a citizen of Myerstown he is \'enerated and beloved. 

WILLIAM E. BRUNNER, president of the Jonestown Bank, and also 
of the Palmyra Bank, is one of the best known and most highly respected 
citizens of the Lebanon Valley. 

Mr. Brunner was born May 6, 1834, at Jonestown, a son of John and 
Margaret (Seltzer) Brunner. and on both paternal and maternal sides comes 
of old and prominent Lebanon county stock. Both parents were likewise 
born in Jonestown, where their fathers, Henry Brunner and Christian Seltzer, 
represented wealth and solid worth. Both John Brunner and wife died in 
1862, being separated by death only a few months. Mr. Brunner was a 
man of some note in his tlay, serving as a justice for many years, and he 
represented his district in the State Legislature. Fie was active in politics 
as a member of the Whig party, and his religious connection was with the 
Reformed Church. 

William E. Brunner was reared in Jonestown, where he attended the 
public schools, supplementing the education thus obtaineil witli two )-ears" 
attendance at a private sch.ool in Harrislmrg, Pa. His father was one of the 
old merchants of the town, and in his store William received his first Inisiness 
training, remaining there until 18^8. Mr. Brunner then embarked in a mer- 
cantile business in Campbelltown for liimself, continuing same until 1880, 
during wdiich period he was also indirectly engaged in farming. In 1858 



248 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

he removed to CampbelltOAvn, where he has since resided. In 1870 he became 
the president of the Jonestown Bank, and has remained in that position ever 
since. In 1880 he was one of the organizers of the Pahnyra Bank, and was 
elected its first president ; he was instrumental in the organization of the Hum- 
melstown Bank, in 1875. and was a director thereof several years, when he 
withdrew. JNIr. Brunner is the owner of much fine farming land — a tract of 
]o6 acres in South Annville township, Lebanon county; one of 212 acres in 
South Londonderry township; two of 180 and 140 acres, respectively, in North 
Londonderry township; and one of 156 acres in Hummelstown borough, 
Dauphin county. 

On November 26, 1857. ^Ir. Brunner was united in marriage with ISIiss 
Louisa Hocker, who was born at Hockersville, Dauphin county, daughter of 
Benjamin and Fanny (A\"eidman) Hocker, and the following children have 
been born to this union: John, who died in childhood; Emma ^Margaret, who 
married I. O. Nisley, of Middletown, Dauphin county; Fanny Elizabeth, 
deceased ; Mary L., who lives at home ; Anna Weidman, who married G. 
R. Kreider, of Annville, Pa., and has three children, Gideon R., Anna L. and 
Paul W. ; Fannie S., who married C. G. Campbell, of IMiddletown, and has 
one child, William Brunner; Carrie H. ; Benjamin H. ; ^liriam S. ; Helen H. ; 
and two children, who died in infancy. In religious faith Mrs. Brunner is 
a Lutheran, and Mr. Brunner is a meml)er of the Reformed Church. IMr. 
Brunner is a man of activity and energA' in his business affairs, and is thor- 
oughly resj)ected because of his uniform adherence to honorable methods. 
His name is a svnonvm for integrity, and his financial institutions stand on 
a solid basis. As an evidence of the confidence in which he is held by his 
fello\v citizens, he was chosen county auditor, and filled that position accept- 
ablv for one term. Llis political faith is that of the Repul^lican partv. 

JOHN H. BLACK, one of Annville's most prominent and popular 
citizens, proprietor of the Keystone Marble and Granite \\'orks, was born 
June I. 1846. at the old Black homestead on White Oak street. South Ann- 
ville. His father was David Black, who was born February 8, 1812, at 
Rocherty, south from Lebanon, and died December 11, 1871, while the grand- 
father was Peter Black, who Avas born on a farm between Lebanon and the 
Rochertv road, near the birthplace of his smi, December 15, 1783. and died 
August 9, 1862. His wife was Elizabeth Zimmerman, who was born October 
9, 1789. in Lebanon, and died November 23. 1851. The great-grandfather 
of John H. Black was Michael Black, who was born in Ireland and came 
to America about 1778, and here married a German lady by the name of 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 249 

White, afterward settling in Jackson township, north from ]\[yerstown. Leb- 
anon county, where he fohowed farming. 

Grandfather Peter Black was a shoemaker by trade, and in ]Si8 he 
located in Annville, and for many years was liigh constable of South Ann- 
ville township. David Black, the father, learned the stonemason trade, and 
in about 1835 established liimself in the marlile and tombstone business, on 
the corner now occupied by the residence of his son. His were the first 
marble works in Annville. David Black married Lucy A. Ault, who was 
born on West ]\Lain street, Annville, September 2, 1816, and died December 
18, 1893. She was a daughter of David and Elizabeth Ault, both of whom 
were l:;orn in Annville. The children of this marriage were: Rosanna. born 
in 1836, married Alfred Corl. and died in 1897; Elizabeth married J. W. 
Eberlv. and resides in Annville; Sarah married Ezra Rohland. (it Lebannn ; 
Dorothy died in infancy; Louisa married Allen Cleland. and is deceased; 
Maria died at the age of seven years; John H. ; Emma married Jacob Imboden, 
of Lebanon ; Aaron died aged but a few }-ears ; and David died between fi\-e 
and six years ; Samuel P. is a resident of Columbia, Lancaster county. 

John H. Black vv^as reared in Annville. He attended the public schools, 
and the old Annville Academy where so many of the residents of Annville 
climbed up the hill of learning, at this time the teacher being Daniel Bals- 
bach. Upon leaving school he went to work with his father at the marble 
trade, at which he continued until 1867, when he took a course at the LInited 
States Commercial College at New Haven, Conn., and in 1868 he was taken 
into partnership by his father and upon the latter's death, succeeded tn the 
business. In 1894, in association with C. S. ^Maulfair. he leased the Keystone 
Marble Quarries, which are situated one mile from Derry Church, in Dauphin 
county. It is somew^hat remarkable that tliis is the only place in Peimsylvania 
where genuine marble is quarried, this fact making the product of great 
value. The stone is suscepti1)le to a high polish and is very well adapted for 
use in monuments and grave-stones, and particularly is it suited for orna- 
mental building purposes. In 1891 the quarry was assigned to Mr. Black, 
who subsequently formed the Keystone Marble Company, which is incorpo- 
rated at $200,000 capital, having associated with him in the enterprise George 
B. Uhrich, with himself as president, Mr. Uhrich as secretary and treasurer, 
and J. B. Millard as vice-president — a very efficient set of officers. This stone 
was used in the building of the Annville National Bank, St. PauFs Ex-an- 
gelical Church in Lebanon, the Washington Public School in Lebanon, the 
United Brethren Church at Palmyra, at least fifteen different Iwildings in 
Harrisburg, and many residences in different places. 



2 30 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

In 1871 Mr. Black was married to Miss Anna M. Beaver, who was 
born in Annville, a daughter of Samuel Beaver, and to this union four chil- 
dren were born, namely: Two died in infancy: Florence E.. died at the age 
of ten years, ten months and ten days; Ella N., an accomplished lady, is a 
graduate of the Lebanon Valley College. 

Mr. Black is a member of the First Evangelical Lutheran Church of 
Annville, and takes an active interest in church work, having been twice a 
'delegate to the General Synod of the Lutheran Church. He also gives a 
great deal of attention to the Sunday School, of which he has served as 
superintendent since 1882, having commenced to teach in the Sunday School 
at the early age of fifteen years. For five years he was president of the Leba- 
non Valley Sunday School Association, and for three years was county presi- 
dent of the State Association. 

In the commonest and broadest acceptation of the term Mr. Black is a 
self-made man. His standing in Lebanon county is high, and he is regarded 
as one of the substantial and representative men of Annville. He has been 
one of the school directors of South Annville for six years, and is deeply 
interested in educational work, having for nine years .been a member of the 
boaid of management of the Pennsylvania Chautauqua at ]\It. Gretna. Mr. 
Black has always been a Republican, and has always taken a .somewhat active 
part in politics. Fraternally he belongs to the I. O. O. F. and K. of P. 

JUDGE A. W. EHRGOOD. one of the most prominent members of the 
Lebanon County Bar, a man widel}- renowned for his just rulings and impar- 
tial administration of justice, wns born October 2. 185 1. at Monroe Forge, 
Bethel township, Lebanon county, a son of Jacob and Rebecca (Walborn) 
Ehrgood. 

Jacob Ehrgood was a native of Berks county, and died at Union Forge, 
now known as Lickdale, in 1854. at the age of thirty-three years. By occu- 
pation he was an iron woi'ker. The mother was a native of Lebanon county, 
and died in 1899, at the age of seventy-four years. The founder of the 
Ehrgood family in the New World was Christian Ehrgood (or Ehrgott. as 
the name was then spelled), who came from Germany in the early histon- of 
the countrv. settling in Berks county. Pa., and from him have descended the 
numerous representatives of this name throughout Pennsylvania and other 
States. 

Judge Ehrgood attended the district schciols, and at the age of thirteen 
was apprenticed to the trade of shoemaker with William B. Uhrich, in 
Swatara township. Lebanon county. For two and one-half years he remained 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 251 

with M\. Uhrich, and during that time went to school one month. In 1867, 
after serving his apprenticeship, he was again permitted to attend the pubhc 
school of Swatara township, where he gained a substantial knowledge of the 
English branches, which he supplemented by a course at the Millersville State 
Normal School, from which he was graduated in 1876. He had taught six 
terms before and while attending the Normal School, and taught two terms 
following his graduation. The schools in which he served as instructor were 
located in the townships of Union, Swatara and South Annville. During 
these years of study and hard work, Judge Ehrgood cherished an aml)ition 
which grew stronger with succeeding years, and finally he was enabled to 
gratify it by entering the oftice of William G. Lehman. Esq., of Lebanon, and 
commencing the study of law. On January 16, 1880. he was admitted to the 
Bar, and in May, 1882, to the Supreme Court. Immediately upon his admis- 
sion to the Bar, he began the practice of his profession in Lebanon. In 1886 
he was elected district attorney of Lebanon County, assuming the duties of 
that office January i, 1887, for a term of three years. In 1895 '''^ ^^''"^^ elected 
judge of the Fifty-second Judicial District of Pennsylvania, composed of 
Lebanon County, for a term of ten years. Having fitted himself for his 
chosen profession by careful and conscientious study. Judge Ehrgood entered 
upon his life work fully equipped, and since then has distinguished himself 
by his masterful conduct of the numerous cases confided to him. During 
the time he filled the office of district attorney he was untiring in his efforts 
to uphold the majesty of the law and to protect the rights of the people of 
his district. Since succeeding to the Bench he has added to his re])utation as 
an able and experienced exponent of the legal profession, while he is recog- 
nized as one of the most successful jurists in the State. 

Judge Ehrgood was married to Anna Mary Schantz, a native of Lebanon 
countv, daughter of Joseph Schantz. To this union children were born as 
follows: Dora INIabel and Allen Henry. Judge Ehrgood has served as 
chairman of the Republican County Committee, and has always taken an 
active and prominent part in politics and all public matters. Fraternally, since 
1 87 1, he has been a member of the P. O. S. of A., and also belongs to the 
Junior O. V. A. M.. the Royal Arcanum and the Masons. 

DANIEL A. FRANTZ, who has for the past quarter of a century con- 
ducted the furniture business in the city of Lebanon, is a man whose keen 
commercial instinct has carried him from a very modest l)eginning to a posi- 
tion in the business world enjoyed by few. He is a man of the strictest 
integrity, and is esteemed for his solid and substantial qualities of citizenship. 



252 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

]\Ir. Frantz was born February 13, 1856, in Lebanon, where he has 
passed his entire life, and is a son of Theodore P. Frantz, who receives 
extensive mention elsewhere. He was given a good common school educa- 
tion and passed his vacations and leisure hours with his father in the furni- 
ture store, where he early learned the rudiments of the business in which he 
has been so successful. In 1878, a year prior to attaining his majority, he 
practically succeeded his father in the business, although that gentleman re- 
mained in the store until 1887. At that time the business was quite primitive 
in extent, carried on in one room, 20x 16 feet in dimensions, on Cumberland 
street, the site he now occupies. As year succeeded year his trade increased 
and he gradually enlarged his establishment to its present proportions, the 
successive steps being taken as follows: In 1877 he increased his floor space 
to 16 X 50; in 1882 added one story of 87 feet: in 1884 added another story 
of 45 feet; in 1885 added the remaining story of 43 feet: in 1893 built the 
addition on the extreme end of his lot, thereby adding 68 feet; in 1894 put in 
a basement of 204 feet under the entire building, pinning up the brick walls 
while the work was being accomplished. ]\Ir. Frantz next purchased the 
adjoining store, which he subsequently sold to the Miller Organ Company, 
and from whom he now rents the third floor and basement. This gives him 
? total floor space of 30,000 square feet, which is said to be the most extensive 
of any furniture business between Philadelphia and Chicago. In connection 
with the furniture business he conducts an extensive undertaking establish- 
ment, which is furnished with all the appliances now known to that trade 
for emljalming and caring for the dead. 

In social life Mr. Frantz takes a helpful interest, l^eing a member of 
Camp No. 65. P. O. S. of A., and of which organization he is a trustee. He 
is also affiliated with tlie Knights of Pythias and the I. O. O. F. He was 
married in January, 1887, to Miss Grace Eliza Strassner, who was born in 
Orrville, Ohio, daughter of Rev. PVederick and Mary Strassner. Rev. ]\Ir. 
Strassner is a prominent and leading divine of the Reformed Church in the 
Buckeye State, where his close acquaintance with the family of the late 
lamented President McKinley made him an official at the funerals of both 
mother and son. Children have been born to ]\Ir. and Mrs. Frantz as 
follows: Edith, Decemlier, 1S88; Frederick, April, 1893: Susan, March 13, 
1895. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frantz are leading members of St. John's Reformed 
Church, in which organization Mr. Frantz is particularly active and helpful. 
She takes great interest in the children of the church, being at the present 
time president of the Junior Christian Endeavor Society and a teacher in 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 253 

the Sunday School. She also is a member of the choir, in which her superior 
musical talent is greatly appreciated. In the social life of the city Air. and 
Mrs. Frantz are most popular, and are greatly esteemed for the graciousness 
of their bearing- and their kindly hospitality. 

JONAS L. KNOLL. Of the many names written un the scroll ui the 
industrial world of Lebanon county, some few stand prominently in view, 
and of these, there is none higher than that of the late Jonas L. Knoll, patentee 
and manufacturer of the Knoll Washing Machine and Spring Frame Bicycle. 
Mr. Knoll was born March 22, 1847, in North Annville township, Lebanon 
county, a son of Christian and Fannie (Landis) Knoll; and him, their young- 
est son, unlike all the others, nature richly endowed with wonderful mechani- 
cal skill, for during his long- and useful career, his ingenuity proved of great 
benefit and profit, not only to himself but to countless uthers. 

Christian Knoll, his father, was a worthy representative of an old and 
highly esteemed family of Lebanon county. His entire life was passed in 
agricultural pursuits, and was blessed with the abundant prosperity that is 
the reward of persistent industry and unquestioned integrity. Fie was a 
Dunkard in religion, while his political faith was that of the Republican party, 
and his fidelity to its principles was the outcome of earnest and patient study 
of the great questions of the day. By his marriage with Fannie Landis, he 
became the father of the following children: Isaac, of Annville; John, of 
Annville; Catherine, deceased; Fannie, widow of Samuel Shanaman, of Ann- 
ville; Christian, deceased; Anna, w-ife of Joseph Bender, of Lebanon county; 
Elizabeth, deceased; and Jonas L. 

The early days of Jonas L. Knoll were passed upun his father's farm, 
and in the neighboring schools he obtained his preliminary education, supple- 
menting the knowledge there acquired by attendance at Annville College. 
After leaving school he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed until 
his marriage; after which, until 1880, he lived on a small farm near Annville. 
In the latter vear, he located in Lebanon, where he was first employed in the 
Miller Organ Factory, and later in the Lebanon IMachine shops. Flis next 
venture was a family grocery, but this not proving congenial, he disposed of 
it, and became a tree agent. As a salesman he proved a distinct success, his 
genial disposition winning him many friends all over his territory. For about 
five years he was agent for a washing machine, and from a study of this ma- 
chine, committed to him for sale, was evolved the Knoll Washing ]Machine, 
that has met with so great favor. His first patent was taken out July 16, 
1889, and a second patent obtained Deceniber 4, 1894. From a small be- 



2 54 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

ginning, the business increased so rapidly tliat Mr. Knoll was obliged to in- 
crease his facilities for their manufacture. Accordingly he erected a large 
factory in Lebanon, and in an incredibly short time this machine was being 
sold all over the United States and Canada. In 1893. at the World's Fair in 
Chicago, was awarded the first premium to Mr. Knoll for this machine; this 
proving it to be the best and most widely known throughout the continent. 
On January 3, 1899, he took out letters patent on a Spring Frame Bicycle, 
and subsequently established for its manufacture, also a large bicycle factory 
at Lebanon. His inventive genius did not stop here, but continued and found 
expression in a number of other ingenious devices, for which he secured 
patents. Unlike many inventors, he did not prove a failure in the business 
world, but, on the other hand, so conducted his affairs that he became pos- 
sessed of considerable property through wise purchases of real estate, and at 
the time of his death, besides his comfortable home, owned a number of other 
houses. Truthfully has it been said of him that he never made a failure of 
anything he undertook. 

Outside of his manufacturing business, Mr. Knoll was interested in other 
aft^airs, especially those of his church. As a local minister of the Salem 
United Brethren Church of Lebanon, he was one of the pillars of that de- 
nomination, having faithfully served for many years as a member of its 
official board, and a teacher in the German department of the Sunday School. 
Above and beyond this it may be said, he was ever acti\e in word and deed in 
the support of all religious work. 

On June 20. 1869, Mr. Knoll was united in marriage with Mary Boltz, 
who was born October 18, 1849, ^ daughter of Simon and Rebecca (Poor- 
man) Boltz, of North Annville township. Five children came to brighten 
their home, but of these, only two, a son and a daughter, have lived to ma- 
turity : Raymond, though quite young, is a meml^er of the American Eagle 
Fife and Drum Corps, and is fast winning his way into the hearts of the 
young people everywhere. Gertrude, an accomplished young lady, is a gradu- 
ate of the Lebanon High School, and had the honor of being valedictorian of 
the class of 1902 of that institution: almost immediately upon the death of 
her father she entered Lebanon Business College, for the purpose of acquiring 
there a more thorough business education, which she felt she mostly needed, 
and after completing the commercial course of the college, she assumed a 
share of the responsibility of the work left by her father, and has since then 
been bookkeeper and typewriter for her mother who now conducts the busi- 
ness. Miss Gertrude is also possessed of rare musical talent and has been 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 255 

organist of Salem Laiited Brethren Church, of Lebanon, for six successive 
years. 

On January 11, 1902, ^Ir. Knoll, a kind husband and loving father, en- 
tered into rest eternal, sincerely mourned, not only by his own familv, but by 
his friends and fellow townsmen, who had learned to love and esteem him for 
his kindly ways and his honest upright life. He himself was a strictly self- 
made man, and the struggles of his o\vn youth and early manhood were not 
forgotten in the prosperity of his later years, and many a poor struggler on 
fortune's ladder found in him a steadfast friend and wise counselor. His 
habits were temperate, and foreseeing the injurious effects of the liquor traffic 
on the coming generations, he threw the might of his political influence with 
the Prohibition party, and steadfastly labored for its success. Llis charity 
was broad and his impulses generous, and in his death the community lost a 
citizen loyal and true in every relation of life. 

A. F. KLETT is a member of the firm of Fox & Klett, which was 
established at Rexmont, Lebanon county in 1889, and is a leading mercantile 
house in South Lebanon township, its proprietors, S. E. Fox and A. F. Klett, 
being recognized men of ability and progressive spirit. The senior partner 
resides in Lebanon, and the business is under the direct management of Mr. 
Klett. 

Mr. Klett was born April 12, 1864, in Fredericksburg, Lebanon county, 
a son of Charles and Caroline (Feiddler) Klett, the former of whom was 
born in Hessen-Darmstadt and the latter in Wurtemberg, Germany. These 
parents came to America prior to marriage, living until then and some time 
after, in Berks county, whence they moved to Fredericksburg, where the 
mother died in 1882, at the age of fifty-two years. The father, at the age 
of seventy-seven years, makes his home with one of his daughters, at Rex- 
mont. Until he retired from activity, he followed the trade of wdieelwright. 
Politically he has always been in sympathy with the Democratic party. Re- 
ligiously both he and wife belonged from youth to the Lutheran Church. 
The four children born to these worthy parents were : .\melia, deceased, 
wife of Samuel Lemberger; Aaron F., of South Lebanon township; In/in 
H., a clerk in his brother's establishment, who married Kate Souliard, and 
has one child, Guy; and Satilla, who married Pierce Kennedy, of Rexmont, 
and has one child. Myrtle. 

Aaron F. Klett was reared in Fredericksburg and attended the public 
schools and then learned the trade of cigar-making, following the same for 
three years. He then accepted a position with S. E. Fox, at Cornwall, as 



2 56 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

general assistant in his store and as a reliable deliverer of goods. His ex- 
cellent record in this line, gained the attention and confidence of Mr. Fox to 
such an extent that he was gradually pronaoted until he was made head clerk 
and then it was but a step to a partnership. At this time the present business 
was established at Rexmont, and since then Mr. Klett has had its manage- 
ment, a position which the results have proven him to be eminently qualified 
for. In every department he exercises the same care and with the assistance 
of three employees, oft'ers to the residents of Rexmont a choice selection of 
first-class goods at the latest market figures. Mr. Fox was the first post- 
master of this place, and was succeeded by Mr. Klett who held the oftice 
until 1 90 1. His interest in all that concerns the community is sincere, and he 
has served very acceptably on the school board and has favored impro\e- 
ments and reforms wherever need became apparent. Fie has other business 
interests, having, in the fall of 1902, with his brother, purchased the mer- 
cantile establishment of Martin Gephardt, of Campbelltown, which is under 
the supervision of Irvin Klett and conducted under the firm name of Klett 
Bros. At present they are closing out this business for the purpose of locat- 
ing and opening a general store and hardware store in the new Greiner 
Building at Palmyra. 

Mr. Klett is a member of the Knights of the Mystic Chain, K. of ^L, 
Cornwall Beneficial, and A. F. & A. M., No. 226. On March 4. 1889, he was 
married to Miss Minnie Hartman, daughter of Samuel Hartman, of Corn- 
wall, a lady of most estimable characteristics and a consistent member of the 
Methodist Church. One child has been born to this union, Charles Roy. I\Ir. 
Klett belongs to the Lutheran Church. Fie has, by his ability and strict 
integrity, gained the respect and esteem of all who know him. 

MONROE J. STRICKLER, senior member of the firm of E. Strick- 
ler's Sons, millers, resides in Lebanon. Lebanon countv, Pennsylvania. 

ABRAHAM H. MILLER was born February 6, 1845, "^ North Ann- 
ville township, Lebanon county. Pa. His father, Abraham Miller, was a son 
of John Miller, and was born and lived all his life on a farm at Heilmandale, 
North Annville township. 

John Muller, the founder of the family in America, emigrated from 
Hamburg, Germany, in 1752, and settled in Lebanon (then Lancaster) 
county. 

Abraham H. Miller was but an infant when his father died, and he was 
left entirely to the care of his mother ]\Iagclalene (Heisey) Miller, who was 
born in South Annville township, near the Horseshoe pike, in 1810, a daugh- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 257 

ter of Henry Heisey, one of the prominent old families of that part of the 
country. The mother died in 1886. Mr. Miller was reared on a small farm 
adjoining the old homestead, where he and his mother lived alone until his 
two older brothers became old enough to farm the old place. At this time 
the whole family moved on the farm, and lived there for several years, but 
upon the marriage of the older brothers he and his mother again moved back 
to the small farm, where he remained until he became of age. On February 
10, 1866, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Annie S. Kreider, a daughter 
of Edward Kreider, then steward of the Lebanon County Almshouse. The 
four children of this union now living (1903) are: Grant L., who has 
charge of the Miller Organ Company's music store in Lebanon ; Henry Ray- 
mond, who is a member of the firm of Powers & Miller, shoe dealers of Leb- 
anon: Ida N., wife of John C. Borgner; and Renie A., a young lady, at home 
with her parents. Two other children, Abner A. and William, died, both 
aged about three years. After marriage Mr. Miller and his wife set up house- 
keeping in an old one-story spring house on the homestead farm, where they 
resided several years, in 1869, removing to Lebanon, where they have since 
resided. 

During nine years Mr. Miller was employed as teacher in various public 
schools in the winters, and in the summers he worked on the farm. In 1872 
he resigned as teacher of one of the schools of Lebanon, and entered the hard- 
ware store of Philip Greenwalt, where he served one and one-half years, at the 
end of that time associating himself with Adam B. Miller, and forming the 
Miller Organ Company. During the first years of this partnership he worked 
in the factory wherever he was needed, and doing whatever he was able to 
perform — often turning the scroll-saw by hand, treading the turning-lathe, 
varnishing and furnishing organ cases, selling organs and doing office work. 
In a short time he became quite proficient in tuning, and for many years he 
personally tuned evei-y organ manufactured, only relinquishing this part of 
work when the office demanded his entire attention. 

Mr. Miller has taken an active interest in church and other religious 
work. He has been superintendent of St. Mark's Reformed Sunday School 
since its organization in 1885. He has also served as a director in the local 
Y. M. C. A., since its organization in Lebanon. For several years he has 
been a director of the People's National Bank of Lebanon, Pa., and in Jaiui- 
ary. 1903, was elected president of that institution. The rest of Mr. Miller s 
history is bound up in the Miller Organ Company, to which he has thus far 
given thirty of the best years of his life. In politics he is a Republican. 



258 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

ADAM B. MILLER was born January lo, 1848, in North Lebanon 
to\\nship, Lebanon county, Pa., a son of Rudolph MiUer, and a grandson of 
Daniel Miller, both of Lebanon county. The origin of the family was in 
Germany. Mr. Miller was raised on a farm a short distance north of the city 
of Lebanon, and acquired his education in the common schools in the vicinity. 
In connection with farming his father engaged in carpenter work, and this 
gave young Adam early access to, and familiarity with tools, thus fostering 
a natural talent and mechanical bent which afterward brought about great 
results. On Nov. 14, 1868, he was united in marriage with Sarah Yeakley, 
a daughter of Joseph Yeakley, who lived near Jonestown, this county. Four 
children were born to this union, namely: Ella, who died aged three years; 
Harry, who died aged one and one-half years ; Mary E., who is the wife of 
Howard Strickler. of Lebanon ; and Miss Emma L. The religious connection 
of the family is with St. Mark's Reformed Church. 

After his marriage Mr. Miller commenced life by farming the old home- 
stead place, but his career as a farmer was of short duration, as his me- 
chanical turn of mind found no congeniality in following the plow. Before 
he commenced farming he had constructed many of his implements himself. 
He made harrows, plows, sleighs and even the harness for the horses himself, 
and it was during his first year's farming that he commenced and finished his 
first organ, building it at odd moments, mornings and evenings, as well as 
on days too inclement for working on the farm. His agricultural career was 
terminated in January, 1872, when he moved to town. There he worked for 
a short time at carpentering, but receiving several orders for organs he soon 
concluded to devote all his time to that work. Realizing, however, that he 
was handicapped bv not having a thorough knowledge of the various processes 
necessary to the successful manufacture of such instruments, he made a visit 
to New York, with the intention of entering a factory and serving an appren- 
ticeship. Fie made application at a large factory, stating that he wished to 
learn how to build organs. The foreman, upon looking him over, seemed 
inclined, probably from his rustic appearance, to take it as a good joke. He 
tcild him it would take him twenty years to learn to make an organ in all its 
parts, and refused to gi\'e him employment. With a heavy heart Mr. Miller 
retreated, i)ut next day succeeded in purchasing from the concern the neces- 
sarv material for several organs, and he returned home determined to go 
ahead and succeed anyhow. The balance of that year and the next were 
years of intense application and experiment, with many discouragements and 
difficulties all the way. However, during these eighteen months, the second 
shop was erected, and a few crude machines, such as a turning lathe, a small 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 259 

saw and a mortising machine, all worked by foot and hand power, were 
introduced and a number of instruments were finished and sold. Some of 
the difficulties refused, however, to be solved. One of the chief of these was 
the necessity of steam power and machinery adapted to the work. During the 
summer and fall he induced his future partner to join hands with him, and 
thenceforth there were two heads to plan and study, and two pairs of hands 
to work. The rest of Mr. Miller's history is bound up in the history of the 
Miller Organ Co., for it has Ijeen his life work, and all his energies were 
bent toward the success of the enterprise which he had the honor to originate. 
Jn politics he is a Democrat. 

The Miller Organ Company, well-known in this and many foreign 
countries, was founded and is owned by Adam B. and Abraham H. Miller, 
both natives of Lebanon county, where they have lived all their lives. 

The story of the growth and development of the enterprise is both inter- 
esting and instructive. Its founders were men of no earlv technical training, 
no business prestige and hardly any financial backing. Their friends looked 
upon the venture as foolish, and some were outspoken in predicting its early 
failure; none of them would give the founders much encouragement. In 
1870 Adam B. Miller, who was then farming the old homestead, conceived 
the idea of building an organ for his own use. He was led to this resolve for 
•several reasons. First, he hatl somehow set his heart on being the possessor 
of such an instrument; and .second, his father was firmlv opposed and abso- 
lutely refused to gi\'e his consent to the purchase of one. His first stej) was 
to draw a rough sketch of the cM^gan that was to be, on a box lid. This was 
comparatively an easy matter, but the inside construction oi an organ he had 
never seen, and none of his friends or acquaintances had as yet possessed such 
instruments. Here was a dilemma. After some time he made the acquaint- 
ance of his future partner, who owned one that had become deranged. That 
was his opportunity. He ofl-'ered Uj rejiair the instrument free of charge, 
and the offer was gladly accepted, thus giving Mr. Miller the opi)ortunity 
he longed for. He forthwith made the plans for his organ, and when his 
day's work on the farm was accomplished, and on rainy days, he applied him- 
self to the completion of his cherished task, and after three or four months 
had the satisfaction of seeing his work completed. This organ, though crude 
and simple, when compared with the elegant product emanating from the 
factorv in after vears, was nevertheless an object of satisfaction anfl ]iri(le to 
its owner. It is still in ]\Ir. Miller's home, where it is destined to remain an 
heirloom of the family. When this instrument was seen by a relative of Air. 
Miller, he was induced to build a similar one, for .use in the relative's family, 



26o BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

and when this second instrument was finished he received another order. It 
was while this third instrument was building that he first thought of the pos- 
sibility of his making the building of organs a business. Next spring there 
was a farmstock for sale, and Mr. Miller moved to town. He built a small 
shop on his lot, 10x12 feet, one story high, and in this made a number of 
organs. Orders now came in too fast for one man alone to build, and he hired 
a man to help him. The little shop soon was too small and a larger one was 
erected. This shop was built and laid out as a dwelling house, for the venture 
was as yet by no means sure, and should it fail the building could be used as 
a residence. At this juncture, October, 1873, the present partnership was 
formed. In 1874 the two-story dwelling-house was enlarged to three stories, 
and an addition of 40 feet, also three stories high, w'as built, and steam and 
modern machinery were introduced for the first time. With most encourag- 
ing success the business grew, and in 1878 an extension of 50 feet westward 
was made. In 1880 it was found necessary to add 50 feet eastward, and in 
1883 the fourth-story part of the factory was built. In 1886, still expanding, 
an annex, or pipe organ shop, was erected, on the west side of Eighth street, 
three stories in height, which is now used for storage purposes, as the build- 
ing of pipe organs was abandoned on account of the fact that the reed organ 
trade demanded all the resources of the firm. 

This business is not of mushroom growth, its progress being regular 
from year to year, as the excellence of the product became known. In 1901 
the factory employed sixty skilled laborers and manufactured over 1,600 
organs. The trade extends all over the United States, and at least one-third 
of the output goes to foreign ports, the company having large sales in Eng- 
land, Scotland, Ireland, Germany, Holland, Russia, Australia, New Zealand. 
South Africa, etc. The firm has also a fine retail store at No. 738 Cumberland 
street. Lebanon, where a large line of the most prominent makes of pianos is 
housed, and a large wholesale and retail piano business is transacted. This 
building is 200 feet deep, and was especially built by the firm and arranged 
for this purpose. 

The proprietors of this industry are both men of mechanical ability, as 
well as of business acumen. They embarked in the enterprise under the great- 
est difficulties, with practically no capital and no demand, entering a field 
seemingly already full, and with no trade connections or business reputations 
in their proposed line. Sales were hard to make and frequently during the 
first year, after a ten-hour day of hard manual labor, the two proprietors 
would take a team and drive about the countrv half the night, negotiating 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 261 

sales. The business is managed from the home office entirely, no traveling 
agents being employed. Indomitable energy, and faith in themselves and their 
enterprise, carried them through, and success finally came to them. Both 
partners are men of the most unquestioned integrity, and their personal stand- 
ing is with the most prominent citizens of Lebanon. 

GRANT L. MILLER, one of the enterprising young business men of 
Lebanon, at the present time the popular manager of the Miller Organ Com- 
pany's music store, is a son of A. H. [Miller, a member of the above company, 
and was born in Lebanon November 5, 1868. He was educated in the schools 
of his native city, from which he graduated in 1886, and at once entered upon 
a business life, becoming an attache of the Miller Organ Company, in their 
factory, where he remained until 1892. By that time he had secured such a 
knowledge of the business, and had shown to his superiors such good execu- 
ti\e ability, that he was given the managership of their large music store, one 
of the most extensive in that line in the State. In this he has not disappointed 
his employers, and is conducting the store with the greatest success, his genial 
personality being a large factor in his popularity. 

Mr. Miller is a leading hgure in the social and religious life of the city, 
and is found in every movement which has for its object the betterment of 
society. He is a member of that popular organization for men, the Steitz 
Club, and of the St. Mark's Reformed Church. 

Mr. Miller was happily married April 25, 1899, to Miss C. A. Baker, 
one of Lebanon's most accomplished young ladies, the daughter of Adolphus 
Baker, deceased, for long }'ears a prominent citizen of the city. The union 
has been blessed with a sturdy little son. Grant L., Jr., born February 2-/, 
1902. 

AARON H. STEINER. Perhaps few residents of North Jackson town- 
ship, Lebanon county, are better known in his locality than is Aaron H. 
Steiner, who conducts a fine farm three miles north of Myerstown, and oper- 
ates the old Steiner mill, wdiich was established by his father for the accom- 
modation of the countryside, and which is still a recognized necessity. 

Mr. Steiner was born December 31. 1853. in North Jackson township, 
a son of Moses and Lucy (Spannuth) Steiner, the former of whom was 
long a farmer and miller in North Jackson township. He was born in 1829, 
a son of John Steiner (2), grandson of John, and great-grandson of Chris- 
tian, the ancestrv leadins: back to Germanv. Christian Steiner came to Penn- 



262 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

sylvania prior to the Revolutionary' war, and founded a sturdy, honest, 
reliable and industrious family which has been honorably continued ever 
since. The children of John Steiner (2) were three in number, namely: 
Rebecca, who married John Miller ; Franklin, long deceased ; and ]Moses, who 
became the father of Aaron H. 

About 1849 Moses Steiner married Lucy Spannuth, and five children 
were born to this union, as follows : Rebecca, the wife of Aaron Spitler, 
of Bethel township, who has conducted a general mercantile business at 
Greenville, Pa., for about thirty years; Aaron H. ; Albert, a farmer of North 
Jackson township; Elizabeth, the wife of P. P. Batdorf, of Myerstown; 
and Susan, the wife of Franklin Albert, of jMyerstown. The parents of this 
family were consistent members of the Lutheran Church. The father died 
in 1896. When only eighteen yer^rs of age, before the public schools were 
organized, he opened a subscription school in a building which still stands, 
near Aaron Steiner's residence. After the public schools were organized 
he was a teacher in same successfully for a number of years. 

Aaron H. Steiner was reared on the home farm, which he now owns 
and occupies, and obtained his education in the country schools. With 
his father he learned the principles of both farming and milling, and has 
put them both to such practical use that he is now one of the substantial 
as well as prominent men of his locality. His well cultivated farm of forty 
acres, with its excellent improvements, testifies to his excellence in agricul- 
ture, while the old mill, built fifty years ago, under his capable operation 
gives most excellent satisfaction to its numerous patrons. The politics of 
the Steiner family have always been Democratic in tenor, and Mr. Steiner 
is a leading worker in his vicinity and has held a number of the local ofifices. 
For three years he was the efficient township auditor, has been judge of 
elections, and is now a useful member of the school board. For many years 
he has been deacon and elder in the Lutheran Church at Myerstown. and is 
a man whose integrity is above reproach. 

On January 4, 1873, Mr. Steiner was married to Miss Amanda Brown, 
daughter of William and Priscilla (Price) Brown, who are deceased, and 
a member of an old and honored family of Bethel township. Mrs. Steiner 
is one of a family of six children, namely: John, of Spring City. Mont- 
gomery Co., Pa.; Amanda, ]\Irs. Steiner; Emma, the wife of \\'illiam Edris, 
of Reading; Morris, of Reading: Su.san. wife of John Heninger, of Berks 
county; and Elizabeth, wife of Harry ]\liller, of Reading. The Brown 
familv is a very highlv estimated one in Lebanon county. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 263 

A family of five children has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Steiner, as fol- 
lows : Harvey, who is clerk in a store at Lebanon, was married in 189Q 
to Miss Emma Walborn, daughter of Noah Walborn, of North Jackson. 
Jennie, Annie (who is a school teacher in Jackson township), Miles (who 
is a school teacher in Jackson township), and Wayne , arc all at home. ]\Ir. 
Steiner has given his children educational advantages, and they and thf 
parents are among the most esteemed residents of the neighborhood. 

DAVID REBSTOCK, senior member of the firm of Rebstock & Benja- 
min, proprietors of the Lebanon Steam Laundry, was born March 2^. 1858, in 
the Fourth ward, Lebanon, a son of Francis and Catherine (Walters) Reb- 
stock, the former of whom was born in Germany, and tiie latter in Lebanon 
county. 

Francis Rebstock, the father, was born in 1830, in Wnrtemberg, Ger- 
many, and came to the United States in 185 1. After spending some time 
in New York City and State he came to Lebanon, and died here in 1870. 
His marriage was to Catherine Walters, who was born at Jonestown. Lebanon 
county, a daughter of Andrew Walters, a native of the United States, of 
German ancestry. Two children were born to these parents, David and 
Elizabeth. The latter, born in Lebanon, was educated in the public schools, 
graduated from the high school, and is engaged in teaching in Lebanon. 
During the years from 1861 to 1865 the family resided in Buffalo, New ^'ork. 

David Rebstock attended the public schools of Lebanon and entered 
the high school, but the death of his father threw responsibilities upon him 
which made it necessary for him to leave his books and assist in the main- 
tenance of the family. When but twelve vears of age he became an employe of 
the "Eagle Hotel," in Lebanon, and continued his service there for three 
years, beginning then an apprenticeship to the plumbing business. One year 
later the firm with which he was connected failed, and thus disarranged his 
plans. Mr. Rebstock then took charge of the "Eagle" restaurant, in the 
basement of the "Eagle Hotel," and managed that enterprise for six years. 
His next business venture was in the transportation line; buying out an old 
business he engag"ed in the transfer of passengers and baggage, and success- 
fully continued same for nineteen years, selling in 1900. 

In i88g. in partnership with G. S. Bowman, Mr. Rebstock established 
the Lebanon Steam Laundrv, but this business association lasted only three 
months. Mr. Bowman was succeeded by C. E. Ranch, and six years later 
Mr. Rebstock bought the latter's interest and took his foreman. Frederick 
G. Haddon. into partnership. On Janua'-y 7. 1902. Mr. Haddon sold his 



304 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

interest to D. H. Benjamin, and the firm style now is Rebstock & Benjamin. 
They do general laundry work, and make a specialty of shirt work for New 
York shirt manufacturers. During the winter months 170 people are em- 
ployed, and in the summers 218 are needed, and on account of expandnig 
business and better accommodations the number may be increased to 300. 
This one of the largest stock laundries in the country, the work being of 
the best kind, and every modern device being employed for the satisfaction 
■of patrons. 

Mr. Rebstock was one of the organizers of the North Lebanon Shoe 
Factory and is a director in that concern, and is also vice-president of the 
Sbamokin & Mt. Carmel Street Railway Company, in the coal regions near 
Sunbury, Pa. Mr. Rebstock is a director of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation, in which he is much interested, and belongs to the Royal Arcanum, 
P. O. S. of A. and A. O. U. W. His political affiliation is with the Demo- 
cratic party, and he is serving his third term as a member of the select coun- 
<:il of Lebanon, representing the Third ward. 

In 1889 Mr. Rebstock was married to Emma C. Dietzler, daughter of 
Rev. J. M. Dietzler, of Annville, Pa., pastor of the New Lutheran Church 
of that place. Mrs. Rebstock was born at Bernville, Berks Co.. Pa., jMarch 
17, 1858, and is a lady of education and pleasing presence. The following 
■children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Rebstock: Allen E., Charles A.. 
David, Beatrice and Adelaide, twins, James E. and Catherine. 

Mr. Rebstock is a member of the Moravian Church of Lebanon, of 
-which he has been a trustee for eighteen years, and has been the efficient 
superintendent of the Sunday-school for fourteen years. 

LIGHT. For a number of years the name of Light has represented in 
Lebanon county a high standard of citizenship, its representatives taking a 
conspicuous position in the political, business and religious affairs of South 
Lebanon township. 

Nimrod Light, the present popular postmaster at Avon, Lebanon 
county, and also a prominent dealer in grain, coal and feed, a member of the 
well-known firm of Light Brothers, was born March 5, 1851, in Avon, a son 
of Joseph and Sarah (Horst) Light. Joseph Light was a son of Joseph and 
Catherine (Light) Light, old residents, and was born in 1824 in South 
Lebanon township. He died in 1879, one of the most prominent men of his 
locality. He was reared on the farm, and educated in the schools of his 
vicinity, and early developed a fine business instinct which led him into mer- 
cantile pursuits. In association with his brother-in-law, Henry Horst, he 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 265 

embarked in a mercantile business at Avon, which he later removed to Ann- 
ville and carried on there until 1855. Mr. Light was appointed postmaster 
M'hen the office was established at Avon, and then embarked in a grain and 
coal business, taking as partners David Werner and Henry Smith 
Weiss. A few years later these partners retired, and after a time 
alone Mr. Light admitted to partnership John Swope. This connection 
continued until 1873, when these partners were bought out by their sons, 
Nimrod Light and John A. Swope. Mr. Light then gave his whole allen- 
tion to his official duties as postmaster and associate judge, filling both tliose 
honorable offices until his death. He was one of the active and influential 
Republicans of his district and little was done in his county without his 
knowledge and approval. For years he was one of the magistrates of North 
Lebanon township: was treasurer of the Almshouse; was one of the most 
useful and intelligent members of the Board of Education ; and as agent 
attended to the railroad business at Avon, from the establishment of the 
station there. No less active was Mr. Light in advancing the interests of his 
religious body, the United Brethren Church being indebted to him for much 
of its financial prosperity, his long service as one of its trustees being most 
effective. Mr. Light was a man universally respected. To his marriage 
with Sarah Horst came eleven children, namely: Joseph H., deceased, 
formerly the editor of the Daily Nexvs; Nimrod ; Miss Amelia ; Noah, of the 
firm of Light Brothers; Barbara, the wife of Rev. S. S. Daugherty, of Lititz ; 
Stephen A.; Miss Sadie; Mary Ellen and Lizzie, both deceased; Annie. 
the wife of Daniel Weidman, of Lititz ; and Asaph, deceased. The mother 
survived the father twenty-one years, dying in 1900, at the age of seventy- 
two. 

Nimrod Light, who is so well and favorably known to the citizens of 
Avon, was educated in the public schools, and as noted, in 1874, in associa- 
tion with John A. Swope, succeeded to the prosperous grain, coal and teed 
business managed by their fathers, the new firm being Light & Swope, which 
continued until 1889, when occurred the death of Mr. Swope. Mr. Light 
then admitted to partnership his brother Noah, and the firm style became 
Light Brothers. The attention of the members of this firm is given to this 
business and also to the cultivation of a fine tract of eighteen acres. Mr. 
Light is a Republican, and he succeeded to the office of postmaster at the 
time of his father's decease, filling the same to the complete satisfaction of all 
concerned. Mr. Light has taken a deep interest in educational matters, and 
has given useful service as school director. 

In 1873 ^^- Light was married to Miss Melissa Light, born in 1853. in 



266 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

South Lebanon township, a daughter of FeHx H. and Sarah (Henry) Light. 
A family of seven children has been born to Nimrod Light and wife, as 
follows: Charles H., who follows the trade of miller, married Kate Gass; 
Minnie married William Saltzer, of Lebanon, and they have two children, 
Miriam and Bessie ; Herbert is deceased ; Bennett, Bessie, Nancy and 
Horace are all at home. Mr. and Mrs. Light are very prominent members of 
the United Brethren Church, Mr. Light being one of t!ie trustees and a fre- 
quent delegate to the church conventions. Like his father, he has devoted 
time and means to the furthering of the work of the Avon church, and not 
only in it, but in the community, is most liighly regarded. He shows his inter- 
est in his community by his ready and liberal assistance in all the movements 
which his judgment assures him will benefit the town, and by his exemplary 
life sets an example of a high standard of citizenship. 

Stephen A. Light, another member of the Light family who is most 
favorably known in Lebanon county, was born in 1861, in North Lebanon 
township, the sixth child of Joseph and Sarah (Horst) Light. He com- 
pleted the common school course, and then entered the Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, leaving there to engage in teaching. After four terms of teaching he 
became associated with his Ijrothers in the grain and feed business, this con- 
nection dating from 1890. Since 1895. however, he has added other interests, 
starting in a small way his textile works under the name of the Avon 
Knitting Mills, an industry which has through his energy and ability, been 
developed into a thriving and expanding business. In 1897 he found it advis- 
able to admit a partner, T. G. Spangler becoming a member of the firm, and 
at the same time a slight change was made in the firm business style, which 
is now the Avon Knitting Company. In 1900 it was incorporated with the 
following officers: Samuel L. Light, president; T. G. Spangler, secretary; 
Stephen A. Light, treasurer; and Prof. E. Benjamin Bierman, vice-president. 
After the incorporation the plant w-as enlarged, and now gives employment 
to 100 persons, although the business was started with less than twenty-five. 
The output, mainly skirts and underwear, is of such uniform excellence that 
a ready market is already found in almost every State in the Union. The 
energy of Mr. Light keeps everything moving, and his influence is felt in 
every department of the great business. 

In 1900 Mr. Light was united in marriage with Miss Ella Krall. and 
they have one daughter, Helen. In politics Mr. Light is a stanch Republican. 
Like his father and older brothers, he is active in the United Brethren 
Church. His business and personal standing Is high, ?nd he worthily repre- 
sents an honorable Lebanon county name. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 267 

JOSEPH ASBURY SOWERS, president of The Report Publishing 
Company, of Lebanon, Pa., owning and conducting The Evening Report 
newspaper, daily except Sunday, and The Semi-Weekly Report, both influen- 
ential and prosperous journals of the famed Lebanon Valley, and one of the 
largest and most progressive job, book and general printing establishments in 
interior Pennsylvania, was born March 3, 1858, in Lebanon, his parents being 
John and Catharine (Uhler) Sowers. 

He received a good rudimentary education, and learned the printer's 
trade in his native town, working at the same in Philadelphia and later in 
the middle West. In 1877 he located in Hamburg, Iowa, and, two years 
later, married Miss Marv E. Alberson of that place. In 1879. with ]\1. J. 
Stanffer. he founded the Sidney ( Iowa) Democrat. He was also associated 
at one time with the Shenandoah (Iowa) Reporter, as business manager. 
In 1882 he returned to Lebanon, where, with his brother, Edwin \]. Sowers, 
he founded the business which has in the past twenty-one years developed 
into the large interests of The Report Publishing Company. 

The historv of this enterprise is unique. In 1882 the Sowers brothers 
established a job printing office on the third floor of the Raber building, the 
first floor being occupied by Levi Laudermilch, dry-goods merchant. The 
job printing firm was known under the style of Sowers & Bro. until 1890, at 
which time The Report Publishing Company (limited) was formed, and 
The Report newspaper established. In 1900 the above partnership was dis- 
continued and the company was incorporated with J. A. Sowers as president; 
E. v. Sowers, secretary and treasurer, and the following directors : J. P. S. 
Gobin. James Lord. J. L. Lemberger and Ira M. Rutter. This same board 
of officers and directors continues, with the addition to the directors of Silas 
S. Herr. The growth of the concern, beginning with the establishment of 
the small jobbing plant in the room on the third floor of a building on Cum- 
berland street, to its present large and commodious buildings, fronting on the 
Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, between Ninth and Tenth streets, has 
been marvelous. Before the erection of the present buildings, a liandsome 
stone front structure was erected on North Ninth street, near Cumberland, 
but this soon proved inadequate. Then followed the present three-story 
brick building, 40 x 120 feet, to which an addition was made subsequently, of 
50 X 80 feet, with a frontage of one-half a block. The plant ci^nsists of five 
cylinder presses, three jobbers, five linotype machines, with a coiuplete 
pamphlet bindery, three folding machines, two wire stitcliers, power paper 
cutter, all of which is in addition to the other accessories of a complete job 
and newspaper plant. All machinery is driven by electricity, each machine 



268 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

having its own separate power. Tlie company make a specialty of chnrch 
and Sunday School work, and are handling over twenty regular publications 
for Philadelphia and New York concerns, besides numerous periodicals and 
pamphlets. 

Mr. Sowers has an interesting family of three sons and two daughters. 
He is a leading member and officer of Centenary Methodist Episcopal 
Church. He is a man of deep political convictions, but independent in 
thought and action. His influence is ahvays felt for good men in public 
office and for measures regarded economically sound as gauged by the scien- 
tific trend of the age, regardless of partisan traditions and sentiments. He is 
a thorough business man, his personal and practical knowledge of details 
being considered remarkable. It is a noted fact in the Report establishment, 
that he can, upon an instant's notice, take the place, in the company's plant, 
of any employe, however high or however low his position, and whether in 
the mechanical or other departments. A strict disciplinarian and a man of 
iron will, his personality is yet modified by a w^arm heart and a generous 
nature, endearing him to all who come in contact with him, yet abating in no 
degree the uniform respect accorded him. Like more notable figures in the 
history of American publication interests and journalism, Mr. Sowers, in the 
way of recreation, takes deep interest in out-door, horticultural and agricul- 
turnl pursuits, both theoretically and practically, his pleasant suburban home 
to the east of Lebanon afitording him opportunities in this direction. 

EDWIN UHLER SOWERS, secretary and treasurer of The Report 
Publishing Company, Lebanon, Pa., of which extended mention is made 
in the foregoing, was born in Lebanon, September i, 1864. His father, John 
Sowers, a native of Franklin county, Pa., was born in 1795, and married 
Catharine Uhler, of Lebanon county, Pennsylvania. 

Edwin LT. Sowers was reared in Lebanon, receiving his education in 
the public schools. After finishing his scholastic course he learned the 
printer's trade in the office of the Pciuisyhanicr, a newspaper owned by John 
Y'oung, and the English and general job printing" department of which was 
in charge of Joseph H. Light, well known in publication circles. The appren- 
ticeship of the subject of this sketch was interrupted by ill health, but he finally 
completed his novitiate in the office of the Lebanon Advertiser, a w-idely 
known journal of its day, and, at the time referred to, owned by William M. 
Breslin. Subsequently, Mr. Sowers w^as engaged in the notion and men's 
furnishing store of Simon G. Boltz, and in 1882 embarked with his brother. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 269 

Joseph A. Sowers, in the printing business, since developed into the concerns 
of The Report Pubhshing Company. 

In 1885 Mr. Sowers married Martha E. Herr, the accomphshed daugh- 
ter of Christian Herr, deceased, of Lancaster county, Pa. They have two 
bright sons, one of whom is nearly grown. Their delightful home is located 
in Berwyn Park, one of the fashionable' residential sections of Lebanon, in 
which city Mr. and Mrs. Sowers are important social and religious factors. 

Mr. Sowers is a member of Centenary Methodist Episcopal Church and 
is superintendent of the Sunday School, one of the largest and most active in 
Lebanon. 

In politics Mr. Sowers is in no sense a partisan. He is a supporter of 
high ideals in public life, wherever found, and a w'orker for good govern- 
ment irrespective of party lines. He stands for sound business methods in 
local governmental matters, uninfluenced by economic dc.igmas affecting- 
national concerns. He has a capacity for affairs, and a pleasant personality 
which adds to his effectiveness as a business man, coming in contact with 
others. He has artistic and literary tastes which make themselves felt in 
various departments of the newspapers owned by his company. He has the 
love of exactness which characterizes the successful business man, but this 
does not dull his personal generosity. He is devoted to his calling, his home, 
his church and his native city of Lebanon. 

JOHN J. WEIG'LEY, whose attractive farm stands in the suburbs of 
Richmond, just north of the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, is one of the 
successful agriculturists of his township. He has made his money in the 
continuous pursuit of one main industry, and besides his fine farm, now owns 
valuable property in the village. He was born February i_', 1842, a son of 
Isaac and Elizabeth (Zeller) Weigley. 

Mr. Weigley's family is of English extraction, and his great-grandfather 
\\'eigley came from England, and was among the early settlers of ]\Iillcreek 
township, where for years he was an influential citizen. Jacob Weigley. 
grandfather of John J., received the ordinary rearing of pioneer boys of his 
day. L^pon reaching manhood he settled upon a farm in Millcreek township, 
and engaged in agriculture. He was thrifty and industrious, and made a 
good home for himself and family. By his marriage there were ten children : 
Mary, Isaac, Charles, William, Allen, Oliver. John, Lucy, Caroline and Hen- 
rietta, all deceased except Caroline. The father of this familv was a strong, 
capable pioneer, and assisted materially in developing the resources of his 
section. He was public spirited and influential in local affairs. 



270 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Isaac Weigley, father of John J., won a good place for himself in life as 
an agriculturist and an artisan. Born in Millcreek township, in 1813, he there 
received careful training in habits of industry and self reliance. By assisting 
liis father on the farm he early became familiar with practical methods of 
agriculture; and as a further equipment for life he learned pump-making. 
Upon reaching manhood he married Elizabeth Zeller, who was born in Mill- 
creek township, and was a descendant of an old family, who settled in the 
same township, between 1704 and 171 5. By this union there were seven 
children: Melinda ; Cathryn ; Francis, who enlisted in the Civil war, and died 
in the service; John J., who is mentioned below; and Wayne, Jacob and 
William. After his marriage Mr. Weigley settled upon a farm in Millcreek 
township, and there engaged very successfully in agriculture. Hard work and 
wise management transformed the wild tracts into well-cultivated fields, 
yielding abundant harvests, and continuing to prosper he made a comfortable 
home for himself and family. In addition to his farming he worked at his 
trade as a pump-maker, and being proficient in his line, secured all the work 
lie could possibly attend to, thus materially increasing his income. He lived 
to the advanced age of eighty-five, and died in 1898. Mr. Weigley was a wise 
liusiness manager, and a thorough, conscientious workman. His well- 
directed eft'orts and his high moral character won him the respect of the com- 
munity. As a Democrat in politics his word carried weight in local affairs, 
j-fe was a consistent member of the Reformed Church. 

John J. Weigley inherited his father's taste for rural pursuits, and his 
skill in managing aft'airs. On the home farm in Millcreek township he 
received the ordinary rearing of boys of his locality, early evincing traits of 
self-reliance and competency. He procured his education in the public schools 
of his vicinity, receiving thorough drill in the rudiments, which he has later 
.' upplemented by extensive reading and contact with the world. Both envir- 
onment and education decided him upon reaching manhood to make farming 
the business of his life. About 1868 Mr. Weigley married Maria Kilmer, of 
Marion township, Berks county, who was born in 185 1, daughter of Israel 
and Lavina (Botdorff) Kilmer. To Mr. and Mrs. Weigley have been born 
se\-en children: Ira F., a cigar manufacturer, of Richland: ]\Iary L.. who 
married Eugene Eck, of Shamrock, Berks county, and resides in Richland : 
Harry, a carpenter and machinist of Richland; Dawson K., a clerk with the 
Geib Mercantile Co., of Richland; Robert I., a teacher in Millcreek township, 
^\■ho resides at home; Ray W. ; and Kathryn E., who is living at home. 

After his marriage Mr. Weigley settled upon a neat little forty-acre farm 
in the suburbs of Richland, where he now resides. Giving his time largely to 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 271 

the cultivation of this place, he has thoroughly developed its resources. He 
has put the buildings in excellent condition, equipped the place with all neces- 
sary machinerv, and now has a most attractive and productive farm. He has 
made well out of his industry, and owns a fine residence and four acres of 
valuable land in the village of Richland. Mr. Weigley has achieved his suc- 
cess by directing his forces in one main line, preferring to perfect one thing 
rather than to half do many. He is honest in business, temperate in habits, 
and kind in his family. The Reformed Church of Tulpehocken counts him 
among its most worthy members. As a strong Democrat he has always 
evinced a keen interest in public affairs. 

Israel Kilmer, father of Mrs. Weigley, is a descendant of an old family 
of Berks county. He married Lavina Botdorff, who also comes of a pioneer 
family of Berks county. To Mr. and Mrs. Kilmer were born six children : 
Emma, Maria, Levi, Rebecca, Martha and Isaac. 

HARRY DIETZ, superintendent of the Tulpehocken Stone Quarries, 
of South Jackson township, in the little village of Millardsville, and an hon- 
ored and respected citizen of Myerstown, was born January 16, 1849, i" York 
county, Pa., a son of Eli and Susan (Hale) Uietz. 

Eli Dietz was a son of Henry Dietz, also a native of York county, and 
was of German extraction. Henry Dietz was the father of a numerous family, 
their names being thus recorded: Samuel, Emanuel, Philip, Eli, Elizabeth, 
Sarah, Susan, Marv and Elinor. All of them have passed away except 
Philip and Susan. 

Eli Dietz. the father of Harry, was born January 4, 1823, in York 
county, and died in 1896. In 1845 ^^^ married Susan Hale, who was l.iorn in 
1818, and died in 1882. They were the jxirents of a large family, the six who 
grew to maturity being: Katherine, deceased; Harry: John, a farmer in 
Cumberland county: Ellen, deceased, who was the wife of William Bricker; 
Miss Mary, with her brother in Cumberland county; and Samuel, a farmer of 
the same county. The earlier memljers of the family were farmers, but Eli 
Dietz was a carpenter by trade, and an honest, industrious, self-respecting 
man, de\-oted to his family and the support of the Mennonite Church. In 
politics he was a Democrat. 

Harry Dietz, the well-known citizen of Myerstown, removed with his 
parents to Cumberland county when a child of four years, and was reared 
and educated there. In young manhood he was occupied with various enter- 
prises, after marriage beginning to farm in York county, but within two 
vears he had estalilished an excellent blacksmithing business in the same 



2/2 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

locality, and conducted same for twelve years. In 1890 he came to Lebanon 
county and embarked in stone quarrying with Jacob B. Millard, at the Tulpe- 
hocken Quarries, where he has been the very efficient manager and superin- 
tendent ever since. Mr. Dietz and his son John L. have since engaged in the 
quarry business under the name of Harry Dietz & Son, having dissolved the 
connection with the before mentioned Jacob B. Millard, with whom they 
started in the business. The quarries are very valuable, and the work under 
Mr. Dietz's superintendence has resulted in the placing on the market of some 
of the finest stone found in the county. In manner pleasant yet firm, Mr. 
Dietz is on very amicable relations with his employes, and has no difficulty 
in adjusting little differences such as always will occur where a large body of 
men are at work, to the satisfaction of all without loss to the business. 

Prior to his marriage Mr. Dietz was engaged at work in Harrisburg for 
a time, but, as noted, for a number of years he has resided in Lebanon county 
and Jackson township. On August 10, 1876, he was married to Rachel E. 
Millard, daughter of Jacob and Anna Alillard, of York county. She was the 
youngest of a family of four surviving children, the others being: Andrew B., 
of Cumberland county; Webster, of York county; Elizabeth, wife of Isaac 
Millard, of York Haven, Pa. 

Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Dietz : J. Eby, deceased ; J. 
Lerue. engaged with his father at Millardsville; W. G., a machinist of Myers- 
town; and Anna M., who died in childhood. 

In politics Mr. Dietz, like his father, has always zealously supported the 
Democratic party. Since 1897 he has been a very useful member of the 
school board and an interested, public-spirited citizen. His religious connec- 
tion is with the Winebrennerian Church. Mr. Dietz started out in life much 
handicapped by limited means, but he has always been active and industrious, 
and now has the satisfaction of occupying a responsible position in business 
and of enjoying the esteem and respect of his fellow-citizens. 

ADAM GRITTINGER, late one of Lebanon county's most prominent 
men. having been active in the affairs of the county for upwards of half a 
century, was a native of the county, born in Londonderry township, January 
I, tSoo, a son of John Grittinger aii,d his wife Jean Nichols, the former of 
German descent, and the latter of Irish. His educational advantages were 
limited, consisting only of a few years in the common schools of the county, 
which at that early period were poor, indeed. While a lad he was apprenticed 
to a carpenter, but his ambition to secure knowledge and advance himself in 
life, prompted him to continue his studies at every opportunity, and it was in 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 273 

reading all books which came within reach that his leisure hours were spent 
As he grew up, he became a school teacher, and as such was employed in 
Hummelstown. 

On July 12. 1829. Air. Grittinger was married to Elizabeth Snivels 
eldest daughter of John and Catharine Snively of Shady Grove. F"ranklin 
county, Pa. Of the large family of children born to them, there survive but 
two, Catharine J. (wife of John K. Funck) and Henry C, both residing in 
Lebanon. The wife and mother died March 19, 1857. 

Mr. Grittinger located in Lebanon about 1830 and for the following two 
years was engaged in mercantile business, after which he returned to teaching. 
During the year 1836-37 he was employed as an assistant engineer in the 
location and construction of the State canal intended to connect the head- 
waters of the Allegheny and Susquehanna rivers. Subsequently he became 
a conveyancer and surveyor, and .^^o continued untd his death, secur- 
ing a large business and gaining a very high reputation in his pro- 
fession, and was considered to have had few e(^uals in that line. In about 
1838 he was elected clerk of the Orphan's Court of Lebanon county, and in 
1847-48, he represented the county in the State Legislature. He held the 
position of county surveyor several terms, was chief burgess of the Ijorough 
of Lebanon in 1863-64, and was prominently identified with the public schools 
of the town. His death occurred September 16, 1874. Mr. Grittinger was 
a man of high integrity, sterling qualities of head and heart, and was greatly 
respected by the entire community. 

JOHN B. STOHLER, of Heidelberg township, blacksmith and manu- 
facturer of edge tools, with business located about two miles southwest of 
SchaefTerstown, was born July 15, 1841. near Elizabeth Furnace, Clay town- 
ship, Lancaster county, a son of John and Sarah (Beamesderfer) Stohler. 

The Stohler family probably came from the Palatinate, Germany, to 
America prior to the time of the Revolution. John Stohler, the grandfather, 
was a soldier in the War of 1812, and was a native of Lancaster county. 
He was the father of sons and daughters, namely, by his first wife: 
John, Henry, George, Polly and Catherine; and by his second wife, Lydia, 
Susan and William. Catherine died unmarried, but Polly became the wife of 
Isaac Good. 

John Stohler (2), father of John B., was born October 13. 181 4. in 
Lebanon county, and died January 6, i8g4. aged seventy-nine years. His 
marriage to Sarah Beamesderfer resulted in the birth of four children. 
namely: Sarah, Mary, John B. and Andrew, all of whom have passed away 

18 



274 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

■except John B. By trade Mr. Stohler was a blacksmith. In politics he was 
a Republican. In religion he was a member ot the Lutheran Church. He 
was well known in his locality for his industrious habits, and the business he 
■established in 1842, coming from Elizabeth Furnace, is still carried on by his 
son at the same place 

John B. Stohler was two years of age when his parents settled in Heidel- 
berg township, and he grew up in the knowledge of his trade under his 
father's instruction. He attended the local schools and received a common 
education. He began working in the blacksmith shop at the age of ten, 
•operating the bellows, and he had a box placed in front of the anvil on w hich 
he stood, with sledge in hand, to help his father forge the iron as it was 
brought from the fire. The first horse that he shod was brought to the shop 
by J. H. Wise, now judge of the courts of Dauphin county. Pa. In 1861 he 
went to Stephenson county. 111., and in 1862 left and accompanied Frank 
Tarbox, a freighter, as one of his teamsters. He drove a team of mules from 
Freeport, 111., to Boulder City and Denver, Colo., loaded with agricultural 
implements. It took fifty-two tlays to make this trip. He stayed at Boulder 
City and Denver during the summer, working at blacksmithing and in 
November returned to Freeport, 111., working for some tnne in a reaper fac- 
tory. In 1863 he left for Rockford, III. and entered Mannes' Machine shop. 
From Rockford. 111., he went to Indianapolis, Ind., and worked in Sinker's 
machine shop, and then worked his way around to his old home. Mr. 
Stohler is known as a skilled workman and his neighbors have reason to feel 
gratified that after trying other localities, he finally chose his old home as his 
permanent place of residence. 

Mr. Stohler is especially skilled in the art of making edge tools by hand, 
and while he makes all kinds, his specialty is the "Home-made Stohler axe," 
for which the demand has ever been greater than the supply, regardless of the 
fact the cost is more than double that of factory made axes. The wood cut- 
ters, carpenters and farmers for miles arcamd use these tools, all of which 
are made and tempered in charcoal fire, Mr. Stohler burning his own char- 
coal. FTe is gifted in being able to detect any possible flaw in the steel, and 
has an instinctive knowledge of tempering that as yet has never failed him. 
People frequentlv come some distance to see him, and have him fashion tools 
of their own designing. Nor is his skill wholly confined to tool making, ns 
he is an able blacksmith, and a mason — doing most of the mason work in 
))uilding his shop, l)arn and houses — and besides is something of a carpenter 
and plasterer, to the extent of doing his own work. He has even made some 
of his furniture. He has been in business for thirty-seven years, has built 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 275 

up a very prosperous trade, has accumulated property, and is looked upon as 
one of the substantial men of the township as well as one of the most highly 
esteemed. 

In 1869 M^- Stohler married Amanda Werner, daughter of Beneville 
and Laura (Beekey) Werner, and three children were born to this union, as 
follows: John N., a graduate of the Millersville State Normal School, is a 
teacher in Heidelberg township; Estella ]\I. is the wife of Evan Kurtz, of 
Heidelberg township; and Sallie L. is the wife of Lucian L. Zimmerman, a 
farmer of Millcreek township. In politics Mr. Stohler has been a life-long 
Republican. In religious connection he is a Lutheran and has been deacon 
and trustee in the Schaefferstown Church. Mrs. Stohler belongs to an old 
county family, and was born July 28, 1841, the other members of the family 
being: Malinda: Emanuel; Sarah; Isaac, of Alyer^town; and Catherine, 
wife of Reuben Miller, of Cornwall township. 

EDMUND DISSIXCjER. a ]jniminent citizen and representative business 
man of Bismarck, Lebanon county, who has been identified with the inter- 
ests of this town since 1881, was born September 25, i85(^), in Heidelberg- 
township, Lebanon county, a son of Jacob and Mary (Newman) Dissinger. 

Jacob Dissinger and his wife were both born in Millcreek township. The 
former learned the blacksmith trade and followed it through life with suc- 
cess, working first at the "Halfway House" in North Lebanon township, 
and later at Reistville. where he died at the age of seventy-nine years. Mr. 
Dissinger was one of the most respected men of his community, and for 
many years was a deacon in the Lutheran Church. He was well known as 
a skilled workman, and this reputation his son, Edmund, has sustained. \ 
family of ten children was born to Jacob Dissinger and his wife, as follows: 
Jacob and Jonathan both died in childhood; Emma, a twin of Jacob, married 
James Steinmetz, and resides at Schaefferstown ; Amelia married Frank Ice- 
man, of Iowa; Mary Ann married F. P. Lauser. of Palmyra: Edmund and 
Isabel, twins, the latter the wife of Alfred Witmer, of Reistville; Thomas 
H., a wheelwright, of Reistville; and George and David, twins, the forme'" 
of these being a blacksmith at Reistville, and the latter a merchant at Sport- 
ing Hill, Lancaster county. 

Edmund Dissinger attended the public schools and as a boy played 
around his father's forge, and when old enough learned the business, and 
worked for his father for eight vears. Locating then nt West Mverstowii, 
he worked there for one year, and then, on Alarch 17, t88i, established him- 
self at Bismarck, where he has continued ever since. There is verv little 



276 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

about a general blacksmith business that Mr. Dissinger does not under- 
stand, and his trade is large, the community relying on his skill, for he is 
an excellent mechanic. Through his industry Mr. Dissinger has accumulated 
a competency, and owns his shop and two dwellings, both valuable properties. 
Mr. Dissinger is a man of public spirit and intelligence, and he served very 
acceptably on the school board for three years. 

In 1879 Edmund Dissinger was married to Miss Malinda A. Witmer, 
born July 21, 1856, at Bismarck, daughter of Henry and Ann (Feese) 
Witmer, and a family of six children was born to this union, namely: Sadie 
is at home; David, who is engaged in business with his father, married 
Vergie Lehman ; Katie Ann is deceased ; and Clara, Ada and Edmund. For 
a considerable period Mr. Dissinger has been an active member of the Re- 
formed Church. He is one of the town's reliable men. His paternal grand- 
father, George Dissinger, was a noted veterinary surgeon in Heidelberg 
township, and the maternal grandfather, David Newman, of Millcreek town- 
ship, was one of the best carpet weavers of that vicinity. 

JACOB B. KARCH. In the dccith of this man, November 20, 1897, the 
city of Lebanon lost one of its most substantial citizens, and the Valley 
National Bank one of the most efficient men who ever filled the position of 
cashier. He was reared to a business life, as his father, Joseph Karch, 
had been for years a prominent Lebanon banker. The elder Mr. Karch 
made Lebanon his home for a long period. During the early part of his 
career he engaged in the mercantile business, but later he became cashier of 
the Valley National Bank, which position he filled with much credit to him- 
self. Mr. Karch married Amelia Heichold, and they had two children : 
Jacob B., who is mentioned below: and Maria, who married Rev. A. R. 
Bartholomew, of the Reformed Church. 

Jacob B. Karch was born in the city of Lebanon, February 2, 185 1. 
and there grew to manhood, receiving his early education in the schools 
of that place. Intellectually ambitious, he was later sent to Franklin and 
Marshall College at Lancaster, Pa., and finally, as a preparation for his 
future career, he attended the Eastman Business College of Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., graduating with honor. Clearly competent to fill a responsible posi- 
tion, he now entered the Valley National Bank, of which his father was 
then cashier, and began work as a bookkeeper and assistant cashier. This 
place he filled very acceptably for ten years. On September 17. 1872. Mr. 
Karch married Mary A. Plummer. of Chesapeake City. Md.. a most admir- 
able woman, who has won for herself hosts of friends in Lebanon. Since 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 277 

her husband's death she has hved m retirement at her new and pleasant 
residence on Cumberland street. Three children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Karch: Joseph P., an engineer at Pittsburg, Pa., who married May- 
Wales, of Hornerstown, N. J.; Mary C, who died young; and Martha T., 
who married John J. Mack, a wholesale grocer of Lebanon, and has one 
■child, Josephine E. 

Mr. Karch, upon the death of his father, became cashier of the V^allev 
National Bank, and, winning the entire confidence of stockholders and de- 
positors, retained this position throughout the rest of his life, altogether 
thirty years. Mr. Karch"s business dealings were always marked by clear- 
headedness and the strictest honesty. Possessed of many winning traits, 
he always gained the good-will and respect of clerks and assistants. Fra- 
ternally he stood high, and affiliated with the F. & A. M. ^md the I. O. O. F. 

JACOB FORNEY, one of the leading and prominent farmers of Corn- 
wall township, Lebanon county, was born on the farm where he is still living, 
April 14, 1850, a son of John and Sallie ( Bachman) Forney. 

John Forney was born on the homestead farm, where he resided during 
his life, which terminated in 1854, while he was still a young man. His 
widow was left with one child, Jacob. John Forney was a farmer l:)y occu- 
pation, and a son of John Forney, Sr. Sallie Forney married again, her 
second husband being Henry Gingrich, now also deceased, by whom she had 
four children. Mrs. Gingrich is still living at the age of seventy-eight years, 
a most remarkable lady, deeply beloved by her children and all who know her. 

Jacob Forney was reared upon the home farm and in South Annville 
township, being educated in the public schools. After his marriage, he be- 
gan farming on the old homestead, which he ow-ns, consisting of 140 acres of 
rich, well improved land, on which he carries on general farming. This prop- 
erty is very valuable, and has been in the possession of the family for nearly 
one hundred years. 

On November 23, 1871, Mr. Forney married Miss Mary Shenk, daugh- 
ter of Benjamin and Mary (Henry) Shenk, born in Dauphin county, near 
Palmyra. Lebanon county. April 2, 1853, and two children have l)een born 
to this union : John B. and Harry S., both at home. Mr. Forney is one of the 
public-spirited men of the county. In political matters, he is a stanch Repub- 
lican, and has served most acceptably on the school board. During the many 
years he has been connected with the best interests of this county. Mr. Forney 
has proven himself a worthy, honorable, upright man, and has always kept 



278 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

himself well posted on current affairs, so that he can converse intelligently and 
agreeably upon many matters. 

AUGUSTUS STONER SMITH, M. D., one of the well known 
physicians of Lebanon county. Pa., and prothonotary of Lebanon county, was 
born in Bethel township, Berks county, adjoining Bethel township, Lebanon 
county, February 28, 1840, a son of Martin Smith. 

Martin Smith was born in Dauphin county, now- Lebanon County, Pa., 
in 1794, and died in Millersburg, Pa., in 1855, ^ged sixty-one years and two 
months. The mother of Dr. Smith was Elizabeth Stoner, w^ho was born in 
East Hanover, Lebanon Co., Pa., in 1806, and died in 1886. aged eighty 
years and one day. The paternal grandfather w'as Peter Smith, born in 
Dauphin county, Pa., now Lebanon, and his wife was Barbara Moyer. The 
maternal grandfather was Jacob Stoner, a native of West Hanover township. 
Dauphin county, and his wife was Elizabeth. The father of Dr. Smith 
learned the trade of shoemaking, and followed it for a number of years, but 
later in life was a farmer. 

Dr. Smith was born and reared on the farm until he was between five 
and six years of age, when he was taken by his parents to Millersburg, and 
there attended the common schools. Later he took a course at Myerstown 
Academy, in Lebanon county, and still later had the advantage of several 
terms at Freeland Seminary, now Ursinus College. After graduation. Dr. 
Smith began to earn his own living as a clerk in the general store of Fredrick 
Harner, at Millersburg, and subsequentlv began the study of medicine in that 
village with the late Dr. Daniel L. Batdorf. 

In 1S62, he enlisted as a private in Company F. One Hundred and Sixty- 
seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, being mustered into service, 
November 12, 1862, and was honorably discharged with the regiment, 
August 12, 1863. He was transferred from the ranks to the position of hos- 
pital steward, which he held at the time of his discharge. The One Hundred 
and Sixty-seventh regiment was composed of Berks county men, with the 
following officers : Charles A. Knoder, colonel ; Joseph DePuy Davis, lieu- 
tenant; Gustavus A. Worth, major. Soon after organization, the regiment 
was ordered to Suffolk, Va., to the Department of the James, under General 
Dix. Later it was attached to the Army of the Potomac, First Brigade, First 
Division, First Corps, and with this army participated in the pursuit of Lee 
to beyond the Rappahannock, where, its term of service being about to 
expire, it was relieved at the front and ordered to Reading. Pa., and on 
AugT-ist 12, 1863, it was mustered out. After the war Dr. Smith located at 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 279 

Fredericksburg, Lebanon county, and was engaged in a general practice until 
1892, when he came to Lebanon, and continued at his profession, since which 
time he has built up a very satisfactory practice, which is constantly 
increasing. In 1900 Dr. Smith was elected to the office of prothonotory of 
Lebanon county, on the Republican ticket, for the term of three years, taking 
that oflice in January, 1901. 

Dr. Smith was married, in 1876, to Mary Jane Walker of Jonestown, 
Lebanon county. Pa., and to their marriage two children have been born : 
Martin Walker, assistant prothonotary ; and Elizabeth May. Socially, Dr. 
Smith is a member of the G. A. R. and the P. O. S. of A. His religious con- 
nections are with St. Mark's Reformed Church, of which he is a generous 
supporter and active member. Dr. Smith stands high in the confidence of 
the general public, as well as with his brother physicians, and is a public- 
spirited man, taking a deep interest in local affairs, and lending his influence 
toward the betterment of existing conditions. Both he and his family are 
popular socially, and are justly regarded as among the leading people of 
Lebanon. 

PETER B. MOCK, one of the enterprising and public-spirited farmers 
of Schaetferstown, Pa., was born in that city, March 22, 1849, a son of John 
and Sarah Mock, deceased. John Mock was a carpenter by trade and fol- 
lowed the same for a number of years ni Schaefferstown. His birth occurred 
about 1 81 5, and he died in 1898, being a son of Philip Mock, an old settler 
and merchant of the same city. The father of Philip was John Mock, who is 
supposed to have come from Germany to Pennsylvania before the Revolu- 
tionary war. 

Philip Mock was the father of children as follows: John, AVilliani. 
George and Rebecca. John Mock, father of our subject, had three children : 
Rebecca married John Kroll. of Schaefferstown; Catherine married John 
Bender, also of Schaefferstown, and Peter B. John Mock was a stanch 
Democrat for many years, and was a hardworking man, a good citizen and 
was highly respected by all who knew him. In religious belief, he was a con- 
sistent member of the Schaefferstown Lutheran Church. 

Peter B. Mock was reared in Schaefferstown and educated in its public 
schools. After growing to manlT^od's estate, Mr. Mock was engaged in 
several lines of business, but is now farming his property of forty acres of 
finely cultivated land, which he owns as well as a 'comfortable home in Schaef- 
ferstown. On November 24, 1877, Mr. Mock was married to Miss IMary 
Ream, daughter of William and Eliza (Miller) Ream of Schaeft'erstown. 



aSo BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Mr. and Mrs. Mock have one daughter, Beulah EHzabeth. Mrs. Mock is 
the only daughter of her parents to attain to maturity. Her grandfather, 
Martin Ream, was a farmer who resided near Schaefferstown, while her 
father, Wilham Ream, was a wagon maker by trade and hved to be eighty- 
two years old. In poHtics, he was a stanch RepubHcan, in religious connec- 
tion was for many years an elder in the Lutheran Church of Schaefferstown, 
and one of its active members. The grandfather, Joseph Miller, was a 
farmer by occupation, and met his death by violence by an unknown party 
who took his life for his money, near his farm, in 1877. This person has 
thus fai escaped detection. 

Mr. Mock is a Democrat, and takes an active interest in local affairs, 
although he has never desired office. For a number of years he has been a 
member of the Lutheran Church, and is one of its most liberal suporters. 
Both he and his family are important factors in the social life of Schaeffers- 
town, where the names of Mock and Ream are held in high esteem, and their 
representatives are among the leading people of the community. 

JOHN H. KILLINGER, president of M. H. Treadwell & Co., of 
Pennsyh'ania, successors to the Lebanon Manufacturing Company, and one 
•of the most ]M-ominent business men of Lebanon, Pa., was born in Monroe 
Valley, Lebanon Co., Pa., August 29, 1859, ^o" o^ Philip W. and Mary 
Elizabeth (Halter) Killinger. 

Philip W. Killinger, son of Michael Killinger, was born near Annville, 
Lebanon Co., Pa., in 1826. His wife was born in 1828, in Washington City, 
daughter of Nicholas Halter, a nati\e of Switzerland, who for many years 
was employed in the dead letter office of the post office department at Wash- 
ington. For many )ears Philip \V. Killinger was in the iron business, operat- 
ing what was known in those days as a bloomery ( manufacturing charcoal 
blooms) in the Monroe Valley. Later in life he managed a furnace at Mid- 
dletown, Dauphin Co.. Pa., where his death occurred in 1882, he then being 
one of the leading iron manufacturers of this part of Pennsylvania. The 
death of his wife was prior to his, it taking place in 1877. 

John H. Killinger attended the public schools of Lebanon, in 1876 grad- 
tiating from the high school of the city, following which he took a course in 
telegraphy at Cornwall, and also acted as office boy. Later he became time- 
keeper for the Lebanon Manufacturing Company, in Lebanon, and six months 
from the time he became an- em])loye of this concern, he entered the drawing 
room, going through a course of mechanical drawing. From the drawing 
room, he went into the machine shop and served a two years" apprenticeship 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 281 

learning the trade of a macliinisl. Air. Killinger worked six months as a 
journe)man, and then for two years was in charge of the draw ing room. His 
next promotion was to the position of assistant superintendent, and m 1894 
he was made superintendent. 

Air. Kilhnger was a man who was able to look ahead and see possibili- 
ties in his work, and July i, 1890, he resigned his position as superintendent 
and entered the foundry business at Alyerstown, Lebanon county, with Air. 
M. H. Treadwell, of New York City, which concern was incorporated in 

1901. with Air. Killinger as president. At this time he gave up the active 
management of the Alyerstown comi)any and returned to his position as 
superintendent of the Lebanon Alanufacturing Compan}-. On January i, 

1902, Al. H. Treadwell & Co., applied for a charter and leased the Lebanon 
Manufacturing Company for a period (if ten years, making Air. Killinger 
president of this company also, he still retaining the presidency of the Alyers- 
town company. In addition, he is president of the AI. H. Treadwell Co., of 
New York City, to which chair he was elected in 1898. Al. H. Treadwell & 
Co. is one of the largest and most important concerns of Lebanon, and much 
of its present success is due to the untiring efforts of Air. Killinger and his 
thorough mastery of all the details of the business. 

In 1887, Air. Killinger was married to Aliss Laura Strickler, daughter 
of the late Abraham Strickler, one of the old and prominent citizens of Leb- 
anon, who bore a worthy part in the upbuilding of the city where he was so 
honored. Airs. Killinger died during the hrst year of her married life, and in 
1892, Air. Killinger married AJiss Kate Funck, daughter of Jacob Funck, of 
Lebanon. One daughter, Louise, born in 1892, has come to brighten their 
home. In his church connections Air. Killinger is a member of St. John's 
Reformed Church. Social by nature, he has associated himself with Alt. 
Lebanon Lodge, F. & A. AL, and is a man who enjoys the highest respect and 
esteem of the entire community. 

CHRISTIAN H. LIGHT. The Light family is one of the old and 
prominent ones in Lebanon county, and has many representatives, a leading 
one being Christian H. Light, who resides on one of the hue farms which 
make so beautiful a setting for the city of Lebanon. 

Peter Light, the grandfather, was born in Swatara township, became 
wealthy and prominent, married a Aliss Beam, and reared a large family. 
David Light, son of Peter, and father of Christian H., died in 1888, at the 
age of eighty-six years, his widows Alolly (Hunsicker) Light, surviving until 
1899, and dying at the age of eighty-seven. David Light spent his life in 



282 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Swatara township, and was one of the extensive farmers of his section, 
owning two large estates. He held a number of the local offices. Both he 
and his wife were active members of the United Brethren Church, in which 
he held official position. The six children born to David Light and wife were 
as follows: Ezra, of North Lebanon township; Peter, of the far West; Adam, 
of Swatara township; Christian H. ; David, of Xurth Lel^anon township; and 
Emma, Mrs. Dohner, of South Lebanon township. 

Christian H. Light was born March 2, 1842, in Swatara township, and 
was reared on his father's farm. His education was secured in the common 
schools of his locality. Mr. Light has from his earliest youth been interested 
in farmmg. and at the age of twenty-two began operating on his own respon- 
sibility, on one of his father's farms. He continued thus for over twenty- 
one years, three years in Swatara township and nineteen in North Lebanon, 
buying then the farm of seventy-four acres which he still occupies. Mr. 
Light has always followed farming, but has also been" interested in real 
estate and owns valuable property in Lebanon, and for five years he con- 
ducted a dairy business, having a milk route in Lebanon. Few men stand 
better before the township as reliable, public-spirited and liberal, and he has a 
wide circle of public and private friends. In politics a Republican, he has 
served as auditor, and also as school director. 

In 1866 Mr. Light married Priscilla. daughter of Henry and Catherine 
( VVeller) Light, of Swatara township, and they had four children born to 
them : Melissa, wife of Horace Blouch, has one son, Levi ; Pamilla, wife of 
William Tittle of North Lebanon, has children, — ]\Iabel, Edna and Elmer; 
Richard, a painter, is at home, Miss Gertie is at home. The family belongs 
to and generously supports the Ebenezer United Brethren Church, in which 
Mr. Light has served on the official board. They rank among the most 
highly regarded residents of North Lebanon township. 

JOHN A. DONGES. Among the older residents of the pleasant old town 
of Myerstown, Pa., none are more highly esteemed bv all classes than is 
John A. Donges, one of its pioneer merchants, who was born here, July I2v 
1829, a son of George W. and Henrietta (Stoner) Donges. 

George W. Donges, who for many years was one of the leading business 
men of Myerstown, was born in Lebanon county in 1804, and died in flyers- 
town in 18S6. In 1835 he established himself in the tailoring and mercan- 
tile business, in that place, continuing the same through a long and honorable 
career. His political connection wns with the Democratic party. For years 
he was a leading member of the Lutheran Church. The children born to 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 283 

George W. and Henrietta Donges were the following: John A., of Myers- 
town; Sarah, the wife of Daniel Warrick, of Illinois; Mary E., of Myers- 
town; Ellen, the wife of Joseph S. Coover, of Myerstown; Amelia; Susan: 
and George W., who died March 19, 1902. 

John A. Donges was reared in Myerstown, and attended the public 
schools and also the Myerstown Academy, beginning at the age of eighteen 
years to assist in his father's store, the site of which was the same now- 
occupied by Donges Brothers. Until i860 he continued as assistant, and then 
a reorganization of the business was effected, and it was continued under the 
firm name of Donges & Stoner, but for the past thirty years the firm style 
has been Donges Brothers, representing one of the largest business houses 
in this place. This firm carries a large and varied stock, and its trade is 
constantly expanding, the honorable methods of the house continuing the 
same as at its establishment so many years ago. 

Mr. Donges has been a very successful man in his business enterprises 
and occupies a prominent position in financial and commercial circles in 
Lebanon county. He is a member of the board of directors and is also the 
vice-president of the Myerstown National Bank ; treasurer of different manu- 
facturing companies; a director in the Lebanon Manufacturing Company, of 
Lebanon ; director in the Annville Fire Insurance Company ; and trustee and 
treasurer of the Mount Hope cemetery. His interest in educational matters 
has been shown by a long service as school director, and he has taken an 
active part in the growth and development of many enterprises beneficial 
to this community. For fifty vears he has been a leading figm'e in the busi- 
ness world in Myerstown, and he is the oldest active merchant in Jackson 
township. For many years he has been fraternall}- connected with both the 
Masonic and Odd Fellow orders. In politics he is affiliated with the f^emo- 
cratic party. 

In 1862 Mr. Donges was married to Miss Rebecca L. Bassler, a daugh- 
ter of Henry and Barbara (Unger) Bassler. There are no surviving chil- 
dren to this union. The Bassler family is one of the old and honored ones 
of this county and extended mention of the same will be found elsewhere. 
The four surviving children of Henry and Barbara Bassler are: William 
D.. of Philadelphia; Capt. John H., of Myerstown; Mrs. Donges; and Mrs. 
Annie M. Hyde. Mr. Donges is approaching the evening of life, and a retro- 
spect shows good reason why he should possess the esteem and respect of 
those who have known him best through the whole period. His career has 
been marked by business integrity, and he justly represents a most honor- 
able Lebanon county name. 



284 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

BENJAMIN F. GARRETT (deceased), one of the respected citizens of 
Lebanon, Pa., was born in Myerstown, Pa., January lo, 1836, and died in 
1896. His first wife was Miss Fritz, a daughter of Henry Fritz, of Lebanon. 
They had four children : WilHam, who is a baker in Lebanon ; Ida ; Charles ; 
and Edward, of Lebanon. He married for his second wife, in 1889, Miss 
Maria Weiss, a daughter of Samuel and Sarah (Smith) Weiss, of Lebanon. 
They had no children. Mrs. Maria (Weiss) Garrett was one of a family 
of five children: Henry, deceased; Maria, the widow of Benjamin F. Gar- 
rett; Solomon, out West; Oliver, of Lebanon; and Samuel, a physician of 
the State of Pennsylvania. Sarah (Smith) Weiss was a daughter of Henry 
Smith, of Cornwall, Pa., in which town she was brought up. Samuel Weiss 
was reared in Schaefferstown, Pa., and was a farmer all his life. He came 
from one of the old settled families of Lebanon county. 

Mr. Garrett was brought up on the farm, and received his education in 
the common schools of Lebanon. He learned the trade of coachmaking 
while a boy, and followed this occupation the greater part of his life, and 
at the time of his death owned a valuable piece of property. Politically he was 
a stanch Republican. In his religious life he was a leading member of the 
Evangelical Church, holding office in same. He was an esteemed citizen, 
honest and true to his convictions, a kind husband and a good man to his 
family. 

His widow is a noble Christian woman, and is now spending her old 
age in retired life. She is a member of the Evangelical Church, and is 
highly respected by all who are acquainted with her. 

JOHN P. MILLER, long engaged in a blacksmith business in the 
pleasant and prosperous town of Myerstown, is one of the respected and useful 
citizens of this community. Mr. Miller was born October 4. 1839, at Sink- 
ing Springs, Berks county, a son of Michael and Julia Ann (Palm) Miller, 
the former of whom was a well-known carpenter in his locality, and a man 
of exemplary life and character. The family is of German extraction, the 
great-grandfather of John P. having come from Germany and settled in 
Berks county at an early day, and there John Miller was born, and there he 
married and reared four sons and one daughter, namely : Michael. Da\-id, 
John, Isaac and Mary. 

Michael Miller was born in 1805, in Berks county, and died in 1887. 
His wife was Julia Ann Palm, whose father was a physician of high stand- 
ing, also of German extraction. This marriage resulted in the birth of 
a family of twelve children, as follows: Lvtcien, of Jackson township; Har- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 285 

rison, of Washington, D. C. ; John P., of Myerstown; George L., of Berks 
county; Charles T., of Reading; and Catherine, the wife of Roscoe Edgar- 
ley, of Philadelphia, the others dying in childhood. 

John P. Miller was born in a village in Berks county, and accompanied 
his parents to Myerstown when he was nine years of age. His education 
after this time was very meager, as he was but twelve years old when he 
became a driver on the old Union canal, his attention to duty and unfail- 
ing industry soon contributing to his promotion and before he was eighteen 
years of age he was made a captain. He was, however, a very sensible young 
man, and at this time decided to learn a good, self-supporting trade, and in 
1858 began an apprenticeship in the blacksmith business with Joseph Carl, 
of Myerstown, following the same until 1861. Mr. ^Miller enlisted, in 1862, 
for service in the Civil war in the One Hundred and Forty-ninth Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteer Infantry, under Capt. John H. Bassler, this regiment mak- 
ing a record for itself as the second Buckjail. Mr. Miller's excellence as a 
mechanic was made use of during his long and loyal service of three years, 
being honorably discharged in 1865. After the ending of the war, Mr. 
Miller returned to Myerstown, and entered the Sheridan Iron Furnace of 
Lebanon county, where he followed his trade and later went to Clearfield 
county, where for some years he engaged in rafting. In 1868 he returned 
to Myerstown and opened up a geiieral blacksmith shop, and, in 1883, a first- 
class bakery. He continued in business until 1894, when he sold his busi- 
ness to his sons and retired from active labor. 

On July 29, i860, Mr. Miller was married to Tillie C. Woomer. who 
was born January 2, 1838, and died in June, 1897. Seven children were 
born to this union, namely: Franklin P. and John H., who are the very 
capable proprietors of the Myerstown Bakery; Ida M., who married George 
Eberly; Delilah M., who married Abner High, of Schuylkill county; Martha, 
who married Edmund Fisher, of Myerstown; and William Eugene, of 
Lebanon. One died in childhood. 

Mr. Miller has always affiliated with the old Democratic party. His 
fraternal relations are with the 1. O. O. F. and the K. of P., he being an active 
member of both orders. For many years he has been a consistent member 
of the Lutheran Church, and one of its liberal supporters. Mr. Miller is a 
self-made man, and although he began at the bottom of the ladder, he feels 
well repaid for his years of toil and perseverance. With a well-established 
family and an ample income from valuable property, and surrounded with 
all the comforts of life for his declining years, he also enjoys the esteem 
and respect of his fellow citizens for his integrity of character. Although 



2»6 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. ' 

denied many school advantages in his youth, Mr. Miller is a very well- 
informed man, and keeps thoroughly posted on the current events of the 
<lay. 

WILLOUGHBY BECKER, a retired agriculturist residing on his 
well-improved farm one-half mile north of Millbach, on the Richland road, 
has for the past thirty-six years been one of the most prominent men in his 
special field of labor in the township. In addition to the former Hulstein 
farms, he now owns one of the oldest farms in the county — the Zeller home- 
stead with its old stone house erected as a fort as early as 1745. He has also 
other valuable property in the vicinity, yielding a large income, and now in 
his sixty-eighth year he is availing himself of his well earned leisure. 

Mr. Becker comes of a family of successful agriculturists, his ancestors 
having been pioneer farmers of the township. Jacob Becker, the first Amer- 
ican representative of the family, came from Germany some time prior to 
1734, and settled in Lebanon county, where, in the above mentioned year, he 
received from John, Thomas and Richard Penn, a grant of land. The parch- 
ment of conveyance is still in the possession of the family. By his marriage 
Jacob Becker had sons : John, who is mentioned below ; George ; and others. 

John Becker, the next in the line of descent, was a prosperous farmer 
and influential citizen of Millcreek township. He married and had seven 
children: Michael; John Adam, who is mentioned below; Catherine; Eliza- 
beth; Barbara; Anna Amelia; and Margaret. 

John Adam Becker, grandfather of Willoughby, was born and reared in 
Millcr-eek township. Accustoiued from his earliest years to farm work, upon 
reaching manhood he engaged in that occupation, settling upon a farm in 
Millcreek township. He prospered in his work and made a good home for 
himself and family, and was an influential citizen of the township. By his 
marriage there were four children : John, mentioned below ; Michael ; Sarah, 
who married Capt. Tice, a prominent officer in the Civil war, and Elizabeth, 
married to George Moyer. 

John Becker, father of Willoughby, was, like his predecessors, a thrifty 
agriculturist of Millcreek township. Born in 1813, he was reared in a good 
home, and early trained to habits of industry and self-reliance. Upon reach- 
ing manhood he took up life as an agriculturist, and settled upon a farm in 
Millcreek township. He improved this place, transformed the wild sections 
into cultivated fields, and gave the whole an air of prosperity and attractive- 
ness. In the cultivation of this farm he spent the strength of his manhood; 
and near there, in 1884, he died. About 1833 Mr. Becker married Caroline 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 287 

Stump, a daughter of Leonard Stvimp, and a descendant of one of the pioneer 
famihes of the township. Of this union there were the following children: 
Wilioughby, our subject; John Adam, of South Lebanon township; Mary 
(now deceased), who married Henry J. Bennetch, a prominent farmer of 
Millcreek township; Elizabeth, wife of J. JM. Zimmerman, a prominent 
farmer of JNIillcreek township; Emma, married to Aaron Bollinger (both are 
deceased) ; Amanda, the widow of George U. Seibert, a resident of Richland; 
Agnes J., who married Levi Bollinger, of Richland; Thomas L., a prominent 
citizen of IVTillbach ; and Ida, now deceased. 

The father of this family was a strong, energetic farmer, and a leading 
man in the public affairs of the township, holding at different times various 
town offices. In politics he affiliated with the Democrats; and in his 
religious views he was independent. He accumulated considerable property 
in his life time, and was a large stockholder in the Lebanon National Bank, 
of which he acted as director for twenty-five years. 

Wilioughby Becker fell heir to a good heritage of energy, and the brain 
power to direct it aright. Born on the old homestead in Millcreek township, 
March 10. 1836, he there received the ordinary rearing of well-to-tlo farmers' 
boys of his day. In the public schools of his vicinity he procured thorough 
drill in the common branches, which he has since supplemented by extensive 
reading and contact with the world. Both inclination and environment 
decided him upon reaching manhood to engage in agriculture, and this he 
followed for a while upon the home farm. In 18C0. when about twenty-four 
years old. Mr. Becker married Sarah Kehl. of Berks county, who died about 
1878, and he afterwards married Anna Eliza Miller, daughter of John Miller, 
of Berks county. By the first union there were six children : Monroe K., an 
agriculturist of Berks county ; John D. ; Henry S. ; George K., now de- 
ceased ; Mary C, and Sallie A. 

In 1863 Mr. Becker settled in Berks county, where he engaged in 
farming for about twenty- four years. Prospering in his work, in 1887 he 
returned to Millcreek township, and purchased for about twenty-five 
thousand dollars, the well-improved Holstein farm, containing 195 acres, 
valued at $130 an acre. Possessed of a large capacity for directing affairs, he 
has thoroughly developed the resources of this extensive farm, and has made 
it pay in every respect. After getting well started here, he also purchased 
the old Zeller farm, containing 152 acres, and located at Newmanstown. This 
place he has likewise managed with most excellent results. Though both 
farms were in good condition when he ])urchased them, he has measurably 
improved them, and in other respects added to their values. He has evinced 



288 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

marked ability in applying practical and progressive methods in his industry, 
and has won the confidence of farmers far and near in his section. Knowing 
thoroughly how to make land pay, he has invested in it extensively, and 
besides his large farms, now owns considerable valuable timber land in Mill- 
creek and Heidelberg townships. 

Mr. Becker is a shrewd financier and a most remarkable manager, and 
would undoubtedly have made a success of work in almost any walk in life. 
He is independent and progressive in both thought and action. In politics 
he reserves the right of voting for the best man, esteeming principle more 
than party. He is a man of marked integrity, and has served as deacon of 
the Saint Daniel's Lutheran Church, of Robesonia, Berks county, of which 
his family are also members. 

WILLIAM M. DERR. When a great man dies in any community a 
loss is incurred that can never be wholly made good. Others may step into 
the \-acant place, but their powers are not his powers, and somewhere the 
void is felt. Though it was six years ago, May 31, 1897, that William M. 
Derr. a time honored and prominent Lebanon lawyer, passed away, there are 
poor farmers with difficulties to solve that still think of him with regret ; busi- 
ness men, who wish they might view their own cases in the light of his superior 
legal acumen; aspiring young lawyers, who would turn to him for advice; and 
scarcely an assemblage of eminent citizens occurs that some one does not miss 
the flow of his eloquence, his flashes of wit, or his brilliant repartee. Especially 
is this true of meetings of the Lebanon Bar Association, of which he was long 
a member and for some time president. 

His road to success in life was b}- no means strewn with roses. He came 
of good parentage, to be sure, but he had opposition to contend with. Born in 
Reading, Pa., he was the son of George Derr, of that place, who moved with 
his family to Lebanon county when William was but three months old. Here 
the son grew to manhood, and in the public schools of the city of Lebanon 
procured his early education. Gifted with quick perception, a large capacity 
for work, and a taste for good literature, he here further developed those 
powers, which pre-eminently characterized him in later vears. Being clear- 
headed, he perceived at an early age what nature had designed him for, and 
after leaving the Lebanon schools, he began the study of law. Soon, however, 
paternal objections turned him aside from his chosen career, and he was sent 
to the Pennsylvania Medical College at Philadelphia to study medicine. Later 
he traveled for a couple of years through the Western States, greatlv enlarging 
his knowledge of the world and of people. Fully convinced by this time of 




'^/r^to^^ 



'tyri^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 289 

his right to choose his own career in hfe, he returned to Lebanon and again set 
about studying law. A httle practice proved he had abihty, and he continued 
the profession throughout the rest of his hfe. He was an untiring student, and 
whatever cause he espoused he worked at it through ah its intricate details. 
Sparing no effort to increase his stock of knowledge, he won clients and 
friends, and soon had a reputation fur legal lore extending beyond his 
county. In arguing a case "his legal discrimination was acute and his analysis 
of law and fact clear, strong and convincing," and he always secured a strong 
hold upon the confidence of the court and jury. For forty years he practiced 
his profession, and during that time was looked upon as a leader, though the 
I-ebanon Bar comprised men of most excellent repute. Only once was his 
work interrupted. During the Civil war he enlisted in Company A, Ninety- 
third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, becoming captain of his company, and 
served in the Virginia campaigTi. 

On April 3, 1846, Mr. Derr married Caroline Hildebrand, who was born 
March 22, 1826, daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Brubaker) Hildebrand, 
of Lancaster county. Two children were born of this union : Francis, who died 
young; and Cyrus G., a prominent lawyer of Reading, Pa., who married 
A^irginia Weidman, of Lebanon, and has one daughter, Caroline R., now the 
wife of John M. Archer, of Reading, Pennsylvania. 

At the time of his death Mr. Derr was the oldest member of the Lebanon 
Bar, being about seventy. He was, however, well preserved, having been a 
strong man both physically and intellectually all his life. A man of the 
highest integrity, he looked upon his profession as a means of doing good. 
It has been said of him : "Humane and sincere, he always leaned to the side 
of the weak and friendless. He always espoused the cause of the masses, and 
labored faithfully and earnestly for everything that tended to elevate the 
character and better the conditions of his fellow men." During his career he 
was solicited to become judge, but declined the honor. He was a Christian., 
and a member of the St. John's Reformed church, and he was a liberal con- 
tributor to the Widow's Home, and all charitable institutions. As a Republi- 
can he wielded a strong influence in politics, but for himself was ne\-er am- 
bitious for public positions. 

SAMUEL E. LIGHT. The metamorpliosis of the country during the 
past half century due to the rapid development of the iron industry has been 
most marked in Lebanon county. Prior to the great Civil War the county was 
dotted over with small rural communities, whose sleepy contentment was but 
the reflection of their individual members. The wand of the iron magician 

19 



290 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

has changed all this. He fitted the ploughshare of the farmer with a sub- 
soiler that ran deep into the bowels of the earth, and threw to the surface the 
material of which not only it was made, but thousands of other useful articles, 
which, in the making, have transformed these rural communities into bus)^ 
municipalities. In all this development, the family which is represented by 
the gentleman here mentioned has taken an exceedingly active and prominent 
part. A number of its different members have been leading figures in the 
development of the iron industry in Lebanon county, but none possibly have 
been more active than Samuel E. Light. Mr. Light is at the present time 
president of the Lebanon Iron & Steel Company. He was born at New 
Market Forge between Annville and Palmyra, Lebanon county, August 31, 
1854. With his parents he removed, in 1867, to the village of Lebanon, 
where he continued his attendance at the public schools. At the age of fifteen 
he left school and entered the office of the Lebanon Rolling Mills, w-hich at 
that time were owned by his father, in the capacity of an errand boy. He 
applied himself closely to his duties, and was promoted from one branch of 
the service to another, until, in 1874, he became head bookkeeper of the mills, 
and two years later was promoted from that position to the night superin- 
tendent's place. From 1876 to 1879 he acted in the capacity of chief clerk, 
and in the latter year became sole owner of the mill. He conducted these 
mills until 1888, when he sold out his interest to the Lebanon Rolling Mill 
Company, which took out articles of incorporation, and he became its presi- 
dent. This institution in 1902 was absorljcd by the Leljanon Iron & Steel 
Company, of which Mr. Light was chosen president. 

The public life of Mr. Light has been helpful to the community in which 
he has lived. In 1880 he was elected a member of the borough council of 
Lebanon from the Third ward, and served in that body with acceptance for 
the two following years. He has always been stan.chly Republican, and has 
been a tower of strength in the local contests, and very helpful in the larger 
State and national contests. In 1900 he represented his congressional district 
at the National Republican Convention at Philadelphia, and had the pleasure 
of assisting in the nomination of Mr. McKinley for President and Mr. Roose- 
A-elt for Vice-President. During the same year he was app(iinted commis- 
sioner from Pennsylvania to the Paris Exposition, a position in which his 
line judgment and executive abilitv were exceedinglv helpful. 

Mr. Light is a worthy member of the Mount Lebanon Lodge, F. & A. 
M., also the Knights Templar Commandery and the Elks. Marriage was 
entered into by Mr. Light in 1880, he having been joined in that year to Miss 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 291 

Laura, daughter of the late William Bresslin. editor of the Lebanon 
Advertiser. 

Touching somewhat upon family history, the father of Mr. Light, 
Henry Light, was born on a farm in North Annville township, Lebanon 
county, October 10, 1831. At the age of eig'hteen years he went to New 
Market Forge, Lebanon county, a point situated five miles from Annville, 
and three from Palmyra, and which was o\vned by his father. Jacob Light. 
This gentleman was bom in Lebanon county in 1800. and died in 1868. 
Samuel Light, the great-grandfather, was a native of Lancaster county. He 
came to Lebanon county at a very early date, and bought wliat is now the 
Henry Heilman farm at the tollgate, just west from Lebanon. When a 
young man. Henry Light, together with his brothers, Cyrus and John, rented 
from their father the New I\Iarket Forge, which they operated for a number 
of years, buying the property from the estate after their father's death. In 
1867 Mr. Light came to Lebanon, but retained his interest in New [Market 
Forge until 1870, when the furnace passed out of the family. When Mr. 
Light came to Lebanon in 1867, he established the Lebanon Rolling Mills, 
his brothers being interested with him. He retained his interest in the enter- 
prise until his death in 1892. In 1853 he married Louisa C. Early, who was 
born March 25. 1834, at Palmyra, this county, the daughter of John and 
Mary M. (Snively) Early. John Early was born near Palmyra, this county, 
in 1806, and was a merchant and iron maker, but in later life a farmer; he 
died in 1899. His father was William Early, a native of Pennsylvania, born 
between Palmyra and Campbelltown. Mary M. Snively was born near Shady 
Grove. Franklin county. Pa., in 1812. and died in 1879. To Henry Light 
and wife children were born as follows: Samuel E. ; Louis S., a resident of 
Morida; Mary, who married William Bresslin. of Leljanon. and died in 1891. 
leaving a son and daughter; Lizzie A., married to John Roberts, of Lebanon; 
Abraham, an iron maker of Lebanon ; Leander, a machinist of Lebanon ; 
William Light, a machinist of Lebanon; and Lillian, a graduated nurse. 

ALFRED G. REAM takes a prominent place among the leading farmers 
and substantial and representative citizens of Jackson township, where he 
owns a fine. \velI-inipro\-ed farm, witliin one and one-half miles <>f Mvers- 
town. 

Mr. Ream was born July 30, 1850, at Schaefferstown. a son of Peter 
and Rebecca (Garrad) Ream, the former of whom was an honest, indus- 
trious citizen, a wagonmaker bv trade, who resided and carried on his business 
nt Schaefferstown. His familv onsisted of twelve children, tlie se\en sur- 



292 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

vivors being: Sophia; Katharine; Martha, widow of Henry Missimer, of 
Lebanon ; Jeremiah, a wagonmaker of Schaefferstown ; Peter, a shoemaker of 
Schaefferstown ; WiHiam, of Sacramento, Cal. ; and Alfred G. Mr. Ream 
was a Repubhcan in pohtics. In rehgion he belonged to the Schaefferstown 
Lutheran Church. 

Alfred G. Ream was reared and educated in Schaefferstown, and in young 
manhood learned the tinsmith's trade under Harry Artz, of Myerstown, fol- 
lowing the same for some years. About 1874 he began farming on the prop- 
erty he now owns and occupies, this being a part of the old Haak homestead. 
' In the same year he was married to ]Miss Mary Haak, daughter of Michael 
and Mary (Noecker) Haak, who had a family of five children, viz.: Isaac 
B., of Myerstown; Samuel, also of Myerstown; Jonathan, a farmer on the 
old homestead; Sallie, the wife of A. B. Landis, now deceased; and Mary, 
Mrs. Ream. Two daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. Ream : Jennie M., 
who is the wife of Harry Dundore, of Lebanon; and Sarah S., who is the wife 
of Harry Zinn, of Myerstown. Both of these daughters were educated in the 
Palatinate College, and are intelligent and accomplished ladies, and both were 
successful teachers before marriage. 

Mr. Ream is a zealous Republican, but has never accepted any office 
except that of director of the poor for the county. He has been one of the 
industrious and upright men of his locality, one whose support could always 
be counted upon for any needed reforms or improvements or for any chari- 
table or benevolent enterprises. His home is the abode of genial hospitality. 
Mr. Ream is a consistent member of the United Brethren Church. In his 
neighborhood he has many friends, and his business affairs have always been 
adjusted without any recourse to law. He is one of Jackson township's best 
citizens. 

ABRAHAM KREIDER, one of the directors of the Lebanon National 
Bank, and a prosperous retired farmer of Lebanon, was born in Cornwall 
(then South Lebanon) township, Lebanon Co., Pa., April 30, 1834, son of 
Moses and Katherine (Kreider) Kreider. 

The Kreider family originated in Germany, whence representatives came 
to this countrv and settled in Pennsylvania, in what was then Lancaster 
count}-, l3ut is now Lebanon county; All of the various members of this large 
and representative family were farmers. The parents of Abraham Kreider 
were second cousins, and his father, Moses Kreider, was born in 1805. upon 
a farm near Snitz Creek, being the son of John Kreider, who was also born 
on the home farm. His mother, Katherine Kreider, was born in 181 1, on the 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 293 

home farm, daughter of Abraham Kreider, a son of Martin Kreider, a Men- 
nonite minister. To Moses Kreider and his wife eight children were born, 
five sons and three daughters, of whom four sons and one daughter survixe. 

Abraham Kreider was reared upon his father's farm, receiving his edu- 
cation in the public schools of his district, and remained at home until 1875, 
when he remo\-ed to a farm he had purchased, on the Colebrook road, about 
one mile south from Lebanon, and there continued to pursue agricultural 
pursuits until 1886, when he located in Lebanon. There he has since lived, 
residing at No. 223 South Ninth street, in the Second ward, his pleasant home 
belonging to him. In addition to this valuable piece of property Mr. Kreider 
owns a tine farm which is located in North and South Lebanon townships, 
and upon which his wife w'as born. In 1875 ^e became a stockholder in the 
Lebanon National Bank, and ten years later was elected to the board of 
■directors of that institution, and he also owns bonds of the Cornwall & Leb- 
anon Railway Company. 

Mr. Kreider was married in 1858 to Elizabeth Hoffman, who was born 
in 1840, daughter of Michael Hoffman; she died April 14, 1888, aged forty- 
seven years. On June 5, 1890, he was married to Lydia Hoffman, her sister. 
In political matters Mr. Kreider is a Republican, and he gives his support to 
all measures he deems best for the welfare of the community. In his religious 
afifiliations he is a member of the First Reformed Church, while Mrs. Kreider 
is a member of the Salem Lutheran Church. 

JACOB \V. GROVE (deceased). The late Jacob W. Grove was one 
of the prosperous business men of Fredericksburg, Pa., who was born in 
Bethel township, one half-mile south of Fredericksburg, on a farm, in April, 
1817, and died at his fine home in Fredericksburg, April 27, 1886, being a 
son of John and Elizabeth (Wenner) Grove, of Bethel township, now 
•deceased. 

The Grove family was established in Lancaster county in 1824, the 
emigrant ancestor being a native of Zurich. Switzerland, who came to Amer- 
ica in 1724. His son, Peter Grove, was born June 13, 1724. just prior to the 
emigration of the family, and he died in 1803. His wife, Veronica (Groh) 
Grove, died January 25. 1773, and they had these children: Maria, born 
December 14, 1756, died August 27, 1824; Veronica, born July 3, 1759, died 
August 27, 1824; Anna Barbara, born September 14, i860, died July 30, 
1836; Jacob, born October 9, 1761, died May 17, 1842; Peter, born May 5. 
1764, died April i, 1847; ^^^^ John, born April 22, 1768. died May 26, 1835. 
■while his wife, Elizabeth (Wenner) Grove, was born February 14, 1785, and 



294 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

died January _', 1847. They had these children: John Peter, born June ij. 
1814, (hed June 8, 1864; John born August 29, 1S15, died January 6, 1876; 
Jacob \V. ; Anna Barbara, born January 10, 1819, died December 24, 1897: 
M. J., born May 20, 1821, died November 9. 1877: Ehzabeth, born March 
2}^. 1823, (h'ed September 4, 1882; and Elias, born February 3, 1825, died 
February 5, 189O'. 

Jacob \V. Grove was reared on tlie old homestead in Bethel township, 
and received liis education in the puljlic schools of his neighborhood, and in 
Washington City. Finishing his school course, he returned to the old home 
and took up farmmg and milling with his brother Elias. and they met 
with marked success. At the time of his death he was one of the wealthy men 
of his locality, owning four fine farms, and valuable mill property and con- 
sid,eral)le real estate in Fredericksburg. While a life-long Republican, he 
never aspired to public office. In religion he was a Mennonite, and lived out 
his faith in honest dealing with all mankind, and never willingly wronged a 
single person. Such a man could not help but gain not only esteem, but also 
affection, and at his death the community lost one of its best citizens. 

On May 3, 1861, Jacob W. Grove was united in marriage to Miss Paul- 
ine Hautz, of Bethel township, a daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Strow) 
Flautz, of the .same locality, now deceased, prominent farmers, and the par- 
ents of fi\e children: Catherine, who married Michael Grove, deceased, of 
Fredericksburg; Elizabeth, who married Martin Pudy ; Mary, who married 
John Faber, deceased ; Sabine ; and Mrs. Grove. Jacob Hautz was the son of 
John Hautz, a leading farmer of Bethel township. Mrs. Grove was born in 
1838, and is a lady of great strength of character and many virtues. She is 
now living in her beautiful home in Fredericksburg, surrounded by tl^e com- 
forts and luxuries of life, she having built this home soon after the death of 
her husband, and it is considered one of the finest in this locality. Airs. Grove 
is an active member of the Church of God, of i^redericksburg, and she is never 
so happy as when attending to some of the duties connected with her religious 
hfe. Her charities are nvmierous, although many know nothing of them, for 
she does good not to be seen of men, and her name is held in lo\-ing reverence 
by a large circle of friends. 

A. H. BOWER, one of the leading and honored citizens of Lebanon, is 

a slater and contractor of that city, born in the city of Elberfeld, on the 
Rhine, Prussia. July 31. 1839, a son of ^^'il]iam L. and Susan J. Bower. 
A\ho lived in hZlljerfeld for manv vears. H'>tli William L. and his father 
V ere also slaters bv trade. William L. Bower was the father of seven chil- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. -95 

dren: William H., of New Jersey; Jnlia, deceased; Amelia, deceased: 
Berthe, ileceased ; Augustine, deceased; Richard O., who lives in Wilming- 
ton, Del. ; and A. H., of Lebanon. 

A. H. Bower came to America when onh thirteen \ears okl. He re- 
ceived his education in the Lutheran schools of his native land, and came to 
this country with his father and lirothers and sisters, liis mother having 
died in the old country wlien he was se\en years old. His father continued 
his trade of slating in this country until he died in Lhiladclpliia. His son. 
A. H.. followed his trade of slating in different parts of Pennsylvania. On 
August 26, 1859. he was married to Sarah Schott, who was kjrn in 1840. 
a daughter of Peter and Magdalena (Moore) Schott. They had the fol- 
lowing named children: Benjamin F., who died at the age of thirtv-five; 
Clara, who is at home, and is the widow of Charles Fisher; Emma M.. 
deceased; Grant E., deceased; A. R., of Lebanon, who is assisting his father. 
in the slate business, and who married !Miss Catherine Snyder, of Lebanon: 
and one child that died in infanc}'. 

Mr. Bower came to Lebanon in 1856. He was the first man to intro- 
duce slating for roofing in Lebanon. At that time there were no railroads 
in this part ni the country. He has coul acteii for and rooted manv of the best 
houses in this section of the State. H e put the roof on the State capitol of 
Pennsylvania, and many of the finest and best buildings of Lebanon city. He 
started out in life a poor bov and has made a great de:il of monev. but has 
also sufTered many losses. He is one of the honorable and free-hearted 
citizens of Lebanon, a man good and kind to all. He is a stanch Republi- 
can, and is at present a member of the city council of the First ward. He 
is one of the leading members of the Zion Lutheran Church of Lebanon, 
in which he has served as deacon and elder. He is a member of the L O. 
O. F., No. 288; the B. U. (H. F.) C. of A., Circle No. 25, of Lebanon 
city ; and also a member of the Union fire company of that city, and one 
of the pioneers of the I'lre Department and Aid Society. He is a director 
for the Commercial Fire Insurance Company, of Lebanon; and is president 
of the Lebanon lAve Stock Insurance Company. He is a man known for 
his honesty and integrity and sincerity, and is true to his convictions. His 
daughter, Clara J. Fisher, and granddaughter. Martha May Fisher, reside 
with him at his home at No. 123 South Fifth street, Lebanon. 

CHRISTIAN GROH. deceased, one of the highly respected and hon- 
orable citizens of North Lelianon township. Lebanon county, was a son of 
Abraham Groh. and he was l)orn in 1814. Being reared to farm life and edu- 



296 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

cated in the neighborhood schools, he finally became the owner of a fine farm 
of 100 acres, and later, about 1860-61, purchased another farm of fifty-five 
acres situated in Jackson township, Lebanon county, where he lived the 
remainder of his life, and died, when se^•enty-nine years of age. Ht was 
regarded as one of the substantial men of the community. His v.-ife was 
Rebecca Immel, daughter of Leonard Immel, and was born in Jackson town- 
ship. Christian Groh and wife had six children: John H. : Mary A., 
deceased, married William B. Light; Rebecca married U. R. Reinhold, of 
Canton. Ohio; William L., of Lancaster county, is manager for the Free- 
man estate in Lancaster county; George A. lives in Jackson township. 
Lebanon county; Emma J. married John S. Kreider, of Lebanon. Mr. 
and ]\Irs. Groh were consistent members of the United Brethren Church. 

John H. Groh was born February 22, 1837, and he remained upon his 
father's farm, receiving an excellent education in the public schools. About 
the age of twenty years, he removed to the Halfway House, between IMyers- 
town and Lebanon, where he conducted a general store, and operated for 
ten years. His next venture was in a farming line for two years, when 
he located in Avon, entering the employ of William B. Light in the lumber 
business. After two and one-half years in this line, Mr. Groh entered the 
employ of Werner & Weiss, grain, coal and lumber merchants. He con- 
tinued in this connection until the death of Mr. Werner, when he was taken 
into the firm, and the style became Weiss, Groh & Co. This was continued 
until the death of Mr. Weiss, when Charles Z. Weiss and Mr. Groh formed 
the partnership of Weiss & Groh, which still exists. The success of the 
house is largely due to the efforts of Mr. Groh, who has given to it his 
entire time and attention, and has himself become one of the substantial 
men of the county. In politics he is a stanch Republican, and he and his 
entire family stand very high among the leading people of Lebanon county, 
where they have been known for so many generations. 

JOHN C. DEPPEN, one of the prominent men of Myerstown. after 
a life of hard work is now enjoying in retirement from the cares of active 
business the fruits of industry. He was born in Bethel township, Berks 
county, January 8. 1840. a son of Gabriel B. and Katherine (Killmer) 
Deppen. both natives of Berks county. 

The great-great-grandfather was of French birth, who came to Amer- 
ica at a very early day in the settlement of the country, but nothing further 
is known of him than that he was a most excellent man. One of his grand- 
sons, Henry Deppen. grandfather of John C. was a farmer of Berks county. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 297 

and the youngest son of a large family of children. Gabriel B. was his only 
son. In 1837, he was married to Katherine Killmer, a daughter of Jonatlian 
Killmer, and to this union three children were born : John C. ; Miss A. 
Elizabeth, of Myerstown; and Caroline C, wife of William A. Fisher, of 
Myerstown. Gabriel B. Deppen was born in Berks county in 1816, and died 
in Lebanon county in 1889; his wife was born in Berks county, in 1814. 
and died in 1891. He moved to Lebanon county in 1842, and lived to beci)me 
one of its leading and representative citizens. For thirty-four years he 
was station agent at Myerstown, and at one time Associate Judge of Lebanon 
county for five years. In politics, he was a strong Republican, and took an 
active interest in local matters. In his religious opinions, Mr. Deppen was 
independent, and lived a life which showed forth the gentle, noble qualities 
of the man, and his Christian charity for all. His family loved him, while 
among his many friends, he was held in highest esteem. 

John C. Deppen was reared in Myerstown, and educated in the Myers- 
town Academy, Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pa., and had a short term 
in the State Normal School, Millersville, Pa. Leaving school he learned tele- 
graphing and became employed by the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad 
Company as clerk and operator, serving seven years as telegraph operator 
at Harrisburg, Pa., and seven years as clerk and operator at Myerstown, 
and twenty-two years as station agent at Sheridan and Myerstown, Pa., 
resigning on account of ill health after being in the service 01 that railroad 
company for thirty-six years. In accepting his resignation the superintend- 
ent in a letter expressed his appreciation of a long and faithful service to 
the company. 

Mr. Deppen was married to Miss Elmira Hofifman, of Lebanon, Pa.. 
a daughter of David Hoffman. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Deppen, four of whom lived to maturity : May C. ; Edith R. ; Ella S. ; and 
A. Gertrude, who married Charles E. Fisher, and is now deceased. Mr. 
Deppen is a Republican in politics, but has never aspired to public office. 
Like his father, he is not a member of any church, but adheres to a high 
moral standard, and assists any movements he believes to be for the best 
interests of the community. Working his way up from small beginnings, 
Mr. Deppen may w-ell feel gratified with the results accomplished. No man 
stands better in the community, and his wife and children are very important 
factors in the social life of Myerstown. The success which has attended 
the efiforts of all is merited. Fraternally, Mr. Deppen is a member of the 
Masonic order, and also of the T. O. O. F., and is very popular in both 
organizations. 



298 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTS. 

JOHN L. WENGER, one of the leading citizens of Swatara township, 
residing on his liomestead adjoining tb.e town of Jonestown. Lebanon county, 
where for several generations his family have made their home, was born 
April 8. 1 84 1, a son of Jacob ^^'enger. 

Hans Wenger. the great-great-grandfather, emigrated to America Sep- 
tember 16. 1748, from either Switzerland or Germany, in the ship "Paliena." 
John Brown, master, which sailed from Rotterdam. He brought with him 
his family, which consisted of five sons, two of whom are known to have 
been Stephen and Christian. Hans located in Lebanon county and pur- 
chased the property now owned by our subject, which had been bought 
from the Penns by a man named Shirrock, now spelled Shirk, in 1740. 
and there he passed the remainder of his life. His .son, John, succeeded him. 
and he in turn was succeeded by Jacob, the grandfather of John L.. Iiorn 
in 1778. who lived to the age of seventy-nine years, and was a farmer b\' 
occupation, but one of the most progressive men of thai locality. He served 
as county commissioner and took an active part in local affairs. The maiden 
name of his wife was Barbara Wolf, born in 1775. They had a family as 
follows: Susannah, married to \lr. Zollenberger, of Franklin county. Pa.: 
John, a minister in River Brethren Church ; Barbara ; Jacob, father of our 
subject ; Samuel ; Elizabeth, married to George Light, a Mennonite min- 
ister; Levi; Christian, who became a minister of the River Brethren Church, 
but later entered the ministry of the Lmited Zion's Children. 

Jacob Wenger, the father, was born May 17, 1807. and died April 10. 
1881, on the old homestead, where he was born. His father was born in 
Dauphin county, married in Lancaster county, and died in Lebanon county. 
and yet never mo\'ed from the family estate, the changes having been made 
in the countv lines during his lifetime. Jacob Wenger spent his life upon 
the home farm, and became one of the successful men of the township. His 
religious affiliations were with the United Zion's Children Church. He 
married Mary Light, a daughter of Henry Light, of Lebanon county, and 
she died at the age of forty-seven years, having had three children, the two 
besides John L., being: Susan, deceased, married Elias Brandt, and their 
children were, Lizzie, John, Annie, Daniel, Emma, Eva and Ellen: Miss 
Catlierine. a resident of Jonestown. 

John L. Wenger. the youngest of the family, has always lived upon the 
homestead, and is one of the substantial men of Swatara township. The 
farm contains 120 acres of finelv cultivated land, and it is his pride to keep 
his premises in excellent condition. In addition to his other interests, !Mr. 
Wenger is director in the Jonestown Bank, and treasurer of the Country- 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNIY. 299 

men's Fire Insurance Company, of Lebanon county. In 1863, he was mar- 
ried to Alary C. Strubhar, who was born September 11. 1845, '" Annville 
township, Lebanon county, daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth ( Frank) Strub- 
har. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Wenger have had *hree children: L)aniel S., a retired 
farmer who died at the age of thirty-six years, married Miss Clara K. 
OI)eriioltzer : Miles J., married to Laura Hinterliter, resides an the home farm: 
Lizzie S.. married and had a son. Herman W. W'olf, and later married 
Robert J. Bond, of Jonestown, by whonj she has two children, Edith Martha 
and Esther Mary. 

ELMER ELLSWORTH McCURDY, one of the prominent and rising; 
young attorneys of Lebanon, is a nati\e of the county, having been born at 
Fontana, July 3, 1861, a son of Henry S. and Mary Jane (McCullough) 
McCurdy. 

The McCurdy family is of Scotch-Irish descent, although represen- 
tati\-es of it have been in this country for many years, great-grandfather 
McCurdy having removed from Chester county. Pa., to Lebanon county, 
about the year 1821. 

Henry McCurdy, grandfather of Elmer Ellsworth, was a native of 
Chester county. Pa., but came to Lebanon coimty in the early part of the last 
century. From his boyhood he was engaged as a teamster, principally for the 
family of Colemans, being in their employ for many years. 

Henry S. McCurdy, the father, was born at Cornwall, Lebanon county, 
Pa., July 10, 1832, and his wife was born near Annville, same county, 
October 21,, 1843. -^t present, he is engaged in farming, but for many years 
was occupied in making fences. Both he and his wife are living, and they 
have been the parents of three children, one of whom died in infancy: Eliza- 
beth is now the wife of J. \V. Albert, of Lebanon county: and Elmer Ells- 
worth is our subject. 

Like many boys in liis locality, Elmer E. McCurdy was reared upon his 
father's farm, receiving his early education in the. common schools. The 
ambition of the boy, however, sought wider fields, and in 1875, '""^ ^^''^^ given 
the advantage of a term at a private school at Manheim, Lancaster county, 
conducted by Prof. Benjamin Banner. After this he spent a year, 1876-77, 
at Palatinate College, now Albright College, at Myerstown, .and then 
attended the high school at Annville. conducted by Judge Ehrgood. In the 
spring of 1878, Mr. McCurdv began to make practical use of the knowledge 
gained, and for five vears taught successfullv in Snuth Annville tnv/U'^ln']). 
During the spring of 1882. and the fall of 1883. Mr. AlcCurdy pursued his 



300 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

studies at Lebanon Valley College, and after attending Lock Haven Normal 
College in the spring of 1883 and from January, 1884, until July of the 
same year, he graduated at the latter institution. 

Young as he was, this same year, Mr. McCurdy was elected principal 
of the Hummelstown Public Schools, Dauphin county, and occupied this 
chair until 1887, when he entered the ]Millersville State Normal School and 
took the scientific course, graduating in it in 1888. At this time, Mr, 
McCurdy was made scientific orator, and was the first to enjoy that honor at 
the State Normal. His oration was well prepared and delivered, he having 
had some experience, having been one of the honor men at Lock Haven. 
After graduating from this latter place of learning, Mr. McCurdy was elected 
Supervising Principal of Schools at Everett, Bedford county, and continued 
there until 1893. In November, 1891, he was highly honored by being 
selected to succeed Prof. M. G. Brumbaugh in the department of English 
grammar, literature and rhetoric in Normal College at Huntingdon, Pa. It 
was a tempting offer, but as the Everett school board insisted upon retaining 
his services he was obliged to decline the proposal. He located in Lebanon 
after giving up teaching, and began the study of law under his former pro- 
fessor, Judge Ehrgood, continuing with this learned member of the Bar 
until March 22, 1895, when he himself was admitted to practice. He located 
on South Eighth street, and there remained until March, 1897, when he 
formed a partnership with General J. P. S. Gobin, and continues in this 
professional relation. 

In 1898 Mr. McCurdy was elected upon the Republican ticket, District 
Attorney of Lebanon county, at the general election, for three years, and 
during his term of ofifice was an efficient and able representative of the 
interests of the county and the preservation of the rights of its citizens. In 
addition to his professional duties, Mr. McCurdy is a director in the City 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company, a director in the Century Printing Com- 
pany, and of the Y. M. C. A., of Lebanon. In his fraternal relations. Mr. 
McCurdy is a member of Washington Camp No. 254, P. O. S. of A. and 
Lebanon Valley Commandery, No. 5, S. of A. In church circles, he is an 
earnest member of and worker in Trinity United Brethren Church, and is 
president of Lebanon County Sunday School Association. 

In August, 1884, Mr. McCurdy was married to Miss Alice S. Tittle, 
who was born near Annville. Lebanon county, daughter of Amos C. Tittle, 
one of the old citizens of this county, and highly respected by all. One child, 
Edith, has been born to the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. McCurdy. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 301 

FRANK R. DISSINGER. The Dissinger family is one of the old 
established ones of Lebanon county, and was founded in Pennsylvania by 
John Dissinger, who emigrated from Germany and settled near Schaeffers- 
town just after the close of the Revolutionary War. As he was young at 
that time it is possible that he was accompanied by his parents, of whom we 
have no record. John Dissinger married Catherine Naeft, whose parents 
were also natives of Germany. A son of this marriage was the grandfather 
of Frank R. Dissinger. 

John Dissinger (2) was born in 1798, on a farm near Schaefferstown 
and followed farming nearly all his life in this locality. After the death of his 
wife, he removed to the home of his eldest child, Mary, Mrs. Bamhardt 
Forrest, in Campbelltown, where he died in 1881. The wife of John 
Dissinger (2) was Catherine Connor, born about 1802, whose parents were 
natives of Ireland, her death occurring about 1857. Their children were: 
^lary (Polly), wife of Earnhardt Forrest, who for fifty years carried on a 
tailoring business at Campbelltown ; Rev. Henry, deceased, who married 
(first) Elizabeth Grumbein, and (second) Catherine Gensinger; John, 
deceased, who married Mary Books; Lydia, deceased, who married Rev. 
Samuel Books; Rev. Moses, who married (first) Susan Clark and (second) 
Amelia Seager; Edward, the father of Frank R. ; Frank, who married (first) 
Susan Yokem and (second) Mary Fink; Cyrus, who married Emma Mor- 
vits; Kate, deceased, who married Henry Strohm; Samuel, who died young; 
and David, deceased, who married Fanny Clement. 

Edward Dissinger was born October 16, 1827, ahd remained on the farm 
until he was sixteen years of age and then came to Campbelltown to learn the 
tailoring trade with his brother-in-law. Atout 1870 he took charge of the 
Campbelltown Hotel, now the Rising Sun Hotel, and remained in charge 
several years, selling then to Eby & Saunders, and buying the property owned 
by Jacob Funk in the west end of Campbelltown, where he engaged in , 
merchandising. A few years later he added a hotel and operated both for 
several years. When he gave up the latter enterprise he enlarged his store, 
and continued in the business very actively until 1890, when he was succeeded 
by his son, Frank R. 

In the meantime, in association with his sons, Charles R. and Frank R., 
Mr. Dissinger purchased the hardware store of Samuel Johnson, and this 
business they operated in partnership until 1890, during the same period 
conducting a produce business jointly. As above mentioned Frank R. 
Dissinger took the general mercantile business in 1890; Charles R., with J. 
M. Brandt, took the hardware store, while the father confined his eneroies to 



302 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

the management of the produce business. The first marriage of Edward 
Dissinger was to Barbara Harman, and two children were born to that 
union, namely: Henrietta, born December 7, 1850; and one that died in 
infancy. His second wife was Eliza Rodearmel, born December 3, 183 1, 
daughter of Peter Rodearmel and wife (nee Hoak) and to this marriage 
children were born as follows: Ambrose R., born September 23, 1853, died 
l^ecember 18, 1856; Charles R., born August 17. 1855, died August 24, 
1891; John R., born August 30, 1857, died December 15, i860; Frank R., 
born June 28, i860: Minnie R., born July 5, 1862: William R., born July 28, 
1865, died November 18, 1900, married Gertrude Fosoldt, and left children, 
Ralph and Ruth; Edward R., born February 3, 1868, married Ida Plouse, 
and has a daughter, Violet; Nellie R., born September 15, 1870, died 
November i, 1888; Morris R.. born April 26, 1873, died September 4, 1873; 
and Emma R., Iwrn January 26, 1875, died August 27. 1875. 

Frank R. Dissinger, is a product of Campbelltown. being reared there 
and educated in the public scliools, later attending Prof. Peter W'itmer's old 
academy at Palmyra. After two terms of teaching in South Londonderry 
township, he became a clerk in his father's store, and continued until admitted 
to a partnership, serving five years as postmaster under President Cleveland's 
administration. 

In 1889 Mr. Dissinger married Villarah Slabach. born in Lancaster 
county, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Graybill) Slabach, and three children 
have been born to this union, viz. : Harvey S., Charles S. and Jestina S. 
Socially the family is prominent, and Mr. Dissinger is one of the energetic 
and public-spirited young citizens of this locality. In 1898 with John F. 
Lesher, Mr. Dissinger leased the Chautauqua store and picnic grounds at 
Mt. Gretna, and they operated them so successfully and satisfactorily that 
in 1902 they leased, in addition, the store and the boarding house of the Mt. 
Gretna Camp-meeting Association. 

HERR. The Herr family of Annville is one of the oldest and most 
prominent in Leljanon county. The origin of the family was in five brothers 
who came from Germany to America over a century ago. Three of these set- 
tled in Lancaster county. Pa., one in Lebanon county, and one went to Can- 
ada. The brother who settled in what is now Lebanon county was Abraham. 
and he was the progenitor of the Herr family in Annville of the present time. 
He bought what was known as the old Forge property in Annville. which 
consisted of a mill and forge, and he carried on milling and farming there for- 
the balance of his life. Abraham Herr became the father of the following 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNAI.S OF LEBANON COUNTY. 303 

children : Al)raham. Henry, Christian. Rudolpli, and Nancy, who married 
Samuel Shenk. 

Abraham Herr. son of Abraham, was born August 12. 1794, on the old 
homestead, and engaged in farming, renting the mill, which he had purchased 
from his father's estate. His marriage was to Elizabeth Ensminger. daughter 
of Jonathan Ensminger, who was born June 11, 1776. and died October 22, 
1853. Mrs. Herr was born May 28, 1797, in South Annville township, Leb- 
ant)n county, and died August i, 1877. To the marriage of Abraham and 
Elizabeth Herr, were born the following children : Veronica, who married 
Peter Reist, of Lebanon county and they removed to Dayton, Ohio, where 
she died in 1897; Jonathan, who married a daughter of Abraham Brightbill. 
and died in 1898; Rudolph; and Abraham, who married a daughter of Mar- 
tin Meyer, was born July 10, 1829, and died July 29, 1889: he lost his eye- 
sight at about the age of twenty-one years, through a blasting accident. 

Rudolph Herr, son of Abraham Herr (2), was born March 13, 1826. 
in the old Herr home, which still remains and wdiich he owns, and from boy- 
hood until manhood he assisted his father. In 1847 ^^^ moved from the old 
place and engaged for himself in farming and driving cattle. Some time later 
he became interested in the lumber business with which he was connected 
for forty-five years, or until 1899, when he sold and retired from the cares 
of business life. Mr. Herr owned and operated a portable mill, got out hard 
wood lumber, and kept a large yard in Annville, where he handled large quan- 
tities of yellow pine, with other varieties of lumber. During the Civil war ho 
operated extensivelv. In i860 he built his present handsome brick residencr 
on Main and Mill streets in Annville, where he resides in the enjoyment of 
ease and ample means. Air. Herr is a man of intelligence and travel, having 
visited Canada and twenty-two States of the Union, sometimes on business, 
and on other occasions merely for pleasure. 

On January 7. 1847, Mr. Herr was married to Sarah Ann Groh, who 
was born near Schaefferstown, Lebanon county, November 2, 1827, daughter 
of Abraham and Sarah (Strickler) Groh. She died March 17, 1899. To 
Rudolph Herr and wife the following children were born: Henry, born 
April 20, 1850. is farming on the old place: John E., born December 9, 185], 
is engaged in the lumber, coal and feetl business in Annville: .A.aron G., born 
August 24, 1856, resides in Ann\ille: William O., born September 18, 1857, 
is bookkeeper in the shoe factory of A. S. Kreider & Co., of Annville; and 
Albert, l)orn October 6, 1859, is engaged in the bologna sausage business in 
.\.nnvil!e. The one daughter, Sally, was born June i-j, 1861. and married 
Christian Geyer, a lawyer, who is postmaster at Catawissa. Columbia ylo.. 



304 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Pa. Mr. lien- and family belong to the United Brethren Church, of which 
he has been a member for fifty-two years. Mr. Herr has been very generous 
in his contributions to this church, and has promoted its usefulness in every 
possible way, serving on its board of trustees and actively assisting in its 
various most worthy enterprises. 

Mr. Herr has always been a public-spirited and liberal-minded man, and 
he was one of the prime movers in locating the Lebanon Valley College at 
this ]3oint. His time, money and influence were engaged, and he served on 
the first board of trustees, and later, at different times, has assumed a like 
responsibility. He is known as one of the most liberal friends of the college, 
and is held in very high esteem by his fellow-citizens. His interest in other 
enterprises has resulted in their success, one of these being the Lebanon 
Manufacturing Company, in which he has been a director since its establish- 
ment. While engaged in the lumber business, he also did much contracting 
and building, and many of the town's best buildings attest his ability. 

While the name of Herr bears with it honor and respectability in Leb- 
anon county, it is a matter of remark that the same is the case in Lancaster 
county, the founders evidently having been men of more than usual stability 
of character, bringing with them from their German home, those habits of 
thrift and simple ways of living, which, added to the religious teachings of 
good parents, proved the best foundation stones on which to erect ample for- 
tunes and to establish most creditable reputations. 

CHRISTIAN SHENK, one of the leading citizens and business men 
of Le]>anon, senior member of C. & H. J. Shenk, proprietors of the largest 
dry goods (department) store between Reading and Harrisburg, was bom 
in Heidelberg township, Lebanon county, November i6, 1836. 

After attending the comm.on schools of his district, Mr. Shenk entered 
the ]\lillersville (Pa.) State Normal School, and later he attended school near 
Hagerstown, Md., for a year. The above scliooling was supplemented by a 
course at the Poughkeepsie (N. Y.) Business College, after which he began 
active life for himself. In 1864 he became a salesman for Riddle. Gill & Co.. 
Philadelphia, which firm he left to accept a similar position with the house of 
Hood. Bonwright & Co., Philadelphia. In 1869 he came to Lebanon, and 
after spending two years as a salesman in the store of his brother. Henry 
Shenk, one of the old time merchants of Lebanon, he began business for 
himself in this city, in 1871, conducting a general merchandise store. In 
1901 the firm was changed to the present style, by the admission of his 
nephew, H. J. Shenk, into partnership. The business is now that of a 





{:k^^L^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 305 

department store, the stock consisting of dry goods, notions, clothing, etc., 
and is conducted on tlie latest ideas, and contrasts favorably with those of the 
larger cities. 

Mr. Shenk has been active in business matters outside of the mercantile 
line, and has been associated in the organization of and made director of some 
of the leading enterprises of Lebanon county. For some years, he was a 
director in the Cornwall & Lebanon Railroad; director in the Lebanon Trust 
and Safe Deposit Bank ; a director in the Lebanon Electric Street Railroad 
Company, and a director in the Lebanon Electric Light Company. For some 
time, he had been a director in the West End Rolling Mill Company, and is 
now president of that enterprise. He is a Republican in politics, and for 
three years served on the school board. 

During the Civil war, he served in the Seventeenth Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteer Cavalry, and was a patriotic man. He is now a member of Sedgwick 
Post, G. A. R., Camp No. 381, P. O. S. of A., and the Steitz Club. Relig- 
iously he belongs to St. John's Reformed Church, being an elder in the 
church. Mr. Shenk married Miss Harriet, a daughter of the late Beal Few, 
deceased. 

The father of Mr. Shenk was Jacob Shenk, who was born in Heidel- 
berg township, Lebanon county. Joseph Shenk was the father of Jacob, 
father of Christian, and was born in the same place, where the great-grand- 
father, a German by birth, settled some time in the seventeenth century. The 
maternal grandmother was Fanny Ober, of Mastersonville. Pa., and on both 
sides of the house, the families are old, prominent and highly esteemed. 

AUGUSTUS D. STONER (deceased), who died at his home in Myers- 
town, Pa., November 27, 1895, after a long and useful life, was one of the 
most highly esteemed residents of Lebanon county, a devoted hu?band. lov- 
ing father and kind and helpful friend. 

The birth of Mr. Stoner took place April 21, 1821, at Newmanstown, 
Millcreek township, and he was a son of Rudolph and Elizabeth Stoner, the 
former of whom was for a long period a well-known, skilled bricklayer in 
Newmanstown. The grandfather of Augustus D. Stoner came to Pennsyl • 
vania from Germany, and the family was of German extraction throughout, 
good, solid, reliable people. A family of ten children was born to Rudolph and 
Elizabeth Stoner, all of them having passed away except Charlotte, the wife 
of Henry Souders ; and Polly, who is Mrs. Dundon. 

The late Augustus D. Stoner grew to young manhood in Newmanstown, 
where he attended school and then perfected himself in his father's business. 
20 



3o6 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

While still a young man he came to Myerstown, and here formed a partner- 
ship with John A. Donges in a general mercantile line, the business being car- 
ried on some years under the firm name of Donges & Stoner. After the dis- 
solving of this partnership, each member began an individual business, Mr. 
Stoner opening up a general store on Railroad street, on the site of the present 
store of Corl & Manderbach, where he continued some years, closing out his 
active interest, however, some twenty years prior to his death. Mr. Stoner 
was a self-made man, and the ample fortune he secured was through his own 
•efforts. As a citizen of Myerstown for so many years he was well known by 
■every one, and was universally esteemed in every relation of life. He was the 
soul of integrity and exemplified a true Christian spirit, not onlv in the 
Tivangelical Church of which he was a class leader, Sunday School superin- 
tendent, trustee and elder, but in all those matters which test men's religion in 
outside life. Mr. Stoner was kind and charitable, and was ever ready to 
give a kind word, or lo do a kind act. In his early life he w^as a Democrat, 
but Inter, having strung feelings on the temperance question, he became a 
zealous Prohibitionist. 

For his wife Augnastus D. Stoner selected ^liss Susan Myers, a great- 
granddaughter of the man from whom the name of INIyerstown was obtained, 
and in whose honor it was named. She was a daughter of Daniel and Cath- 
erine (Christ) Myers, a family which was held in great respect in this com- 
munity, and was one of a family of seven children, the four survivors being: 
Daniel ; Isaac, of Myerstown : Mrs. Stoner, and Maria, the widow of George 
Mark. A familv of seven children was born to Mr. and Mrs. Stoner, and of 
these the following nametl reached maturity : Minerva ; Myers R. ; J^nies 
A., who is deceased; John, of Reading; Harry, a cigar-maker in ^^lyerstown ; 
and Miss Sallie, who resides with her mother at the old home on !Main 
street. Both are consistent members of the Evangelical Clnu'ch. and ^liss 
Sallie is \ery active in the work of the Sabbath School. 

Mr. Stoner was one of the charter members of the order of Odd Fellows 
in Myerstown, and also took a deep interest in its movements and the work 
of the order, living closely up to his obligations. In closing this too brief 
sketch of one of Myerstown's good men it is well to remember that the record 
of such li\es does a world of benefit to a community, showing the value of 
honesty, integrity and Christian living. 

GEORGE H. SPANG (deceased). In the death of George H. Spang, 
on September 21, 1901. the city of Lebanon lost one of her most substantial, 
influential and highlv valued citizens. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 307 

George H. Spang was born January 8, 1844, in North Lebanon town- 
ship, Lebanon county, son of George A. and Leah (Fisher) Spang, the 
former of whom was a son of Michael Spang. For many years Michael 
Spang kept the "Spang Hotel," which still stands on the Berks and Dauphin 
turnpike road, north of the lane leading to the Lebanon County Almshouse. 
The mother of Mr. Spang was a daughter of Joseph Fisher, who lived on the 
farm which is now the site of the Almshouse. 

The late George H. Spang acquired his education in the common schools, 
and then, in 1855, came to Lebanon and learned the carpenter's trade. In 
the early days of the Civil War, on September 23, 1862, Mr. Spang offered 
his services to his country, enlisting in a company recruited in Lebanon, 
under Captain Rank, this being attached to the One Hundred and Fifty-second 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, and known as the Third Artillery. This battery 
was stationed at Baltimore until the battle of Gettysburg, in July, 1863, when 
it was moved to Mount Airy, thence to Gettysburg, where it was heavily 
engaged on the right wing of the Union forces, the spot now being commemo- 
rated by a handsome monument. Mr. Spang served as quartermaster- 
sergeant of his company, and was mustered out by special order June 16, 
1865. 

Few artillerymen in the Union army became as expert in range-finding 
as Mr. Spang, and his remarkable work in this line elicited the commendati()n 
of his officers and the admiration of his comrades. At Gettysburg he was in 
the thickest of the fray, having charge of two field pieces, and it was these 
guns which did such deadly work, when Pickett made his famous charge, on 
account of the accuracy with which artilleryman Spang found the range. 
To recall a bit of that day of carnage, during which Mr. Spang was particu- 
larly conspicuous, when Pickett's line approached, the officer who had charge 
of the artillery had some trouble in getting results from his guns, owing to 
faulty range, and in this emergency Mr. Spang was called upon to gauge the 
distance, doing so almost instantly, placing it fully 200 yards nearer than any 
other estimate, striking the line of the adversary in the middle. 

In 1868 Mr. Spang became a partner with John H. Bressler in the 
hardware business in Lebanon, and proved as successful a merchant as he 
was faithful as a soldier. All progressive movements in Lebanon received 
support from Mr. Spang according to their merits. From the beginning he 
was active in founding and building up the fire department, and in August, 
1865, became a member of Union Fire Company, No. i, and it was through 
his untiring eff'orts that the present efficient steam engine was purchased. 
Mr. Spang was the first chief engineer of the department, being elected as 



3o8 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

such at the reorganization of the department in 1873, three delegates from 
each company joining in convention, lie being a delegate from the L'nion 
company. His first appointment was for a period of three months, but later 
he was elected for a term of two years. For over thirty years he acted as 
president of the Union Fire Company, holding that position at the time of 
his death. 

In political activity Mr. Spang took a keen delight, faithfully serving the 
Democratic party and stanchly upholding its principles. Influential in its 
ranks, he was profifered many testimonials of esteem and confidence. In 1876 
he was a delegate to the National Democratic convention, and supported 
Samuel J. Tilden for president. In 1880 he was again a delegate and gave 
his support to that brave soldier and courtly gentleman. Gen. Winfield Scott 
Hancock. In local matters he was zealous in support of his party, and was 
true to his political friends. When Dr. Gloninger was a candidate for 
Congress, he received the assistance of Mr. Spang, who served as president 
of the organization known as the "Boys in Blue." In 1883 he was elected 
county commissioner of Lebanon county, a wise and satisfactory choice 
which his administration proved, and at the end of his first term, he was 
re-elected. Many needed reforms were inaugurated and one of the most 
important improvements in the county was brought about, the remodeling 
of the county almshouse and the erection of a hospital at that institution. 
During his term of office the annex to the court house and the new county 
jail were erected. 

In fact, to recount the public services of Mr. Spang is to recall the lead- 
ing events in the city's career. Although the city was Republican, his personal 
attributes were so highly esteemed that he was elected city treasurer in 1893. 
In 1896 his election took place as the first president of the Fireman's Relief 
Association, for a term of four years, and in 1898 he was deemed the most 
suitable citizen to become president of the Fireman's committee to make 
arrangements for the State Firemen's convention, which was held in Lebanon 
in October of that year. In 1900 he was the unanimous choice of his Demo- 
cratic friends for the State Senate, and received a very large vote. For 
years he served as treasurer of the Democratic city committee. Mr. Spang 
was one of the organizers of the Lebanon ^Manufacturing Company, of which 
corporation he was treasurer and a director. Fisher Hall, well known to old 
residents of Lebanon, was built by Peter Fisher, and ]Mr. Spang became first 
its manager and then its owner, and in 1898 lie remodeled it and renamed the 
building the Academy of ]\Iusic. In fraternal life he was a Knight Templar 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 309 

Mason, and also belonged to the Odd T'ellows, the L'nited Workmen and the 
Lebanon Clnb, the latter a pnrely social organization. 

Mr. Spang was married to Miss Emma L. Focht, danghter of William 
Focht, deceased, and three children were born to this nnion, namely: George 
T., Amelia E. and Margnerite L. 

George T. Spang, son of the late George H. and Emma L. (Focht) 
Spang, was born Jannary 14, 1S74, in Lebanon. Secnring a good common 
school education he then entered Shortridge ^Medina College and later Muhlen- 
berg College, graduating from the latter institution with the degree of B. A. 
in the class of 1896. Mr. Spang then began the study of law in the office of 
Ehrdman & Diefendorfer, of Allentown, Pa., and later entered the Law 
Department of the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in the class of 
1899. For two years Mr. Spang practiced law in the office of Francis G. 
Lewis, in Allentown, but upon the death of his father he returned tO' Lebanon 
to take charge of his estate and is now engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession there, also managing the Academy of Music. 

On November 14, 1901, Mr. Spang was married to Miss Mamie Ziegen- 
fus, daughter of Charles Ziegenfus, of Allentown. Mr. Spang is a young 
man of marked ability and is popular in business, professional and 
social circles. He has membership in the Union Fire Company, and the 
Lebanon Cycle Club. Fraternally he is a Mason, and also a member of the 
Fraternal Order of Eagles (of which he is treasurer), and of the Patriotic 
Order Sons of America. 

HARRY L. CORL, member of the w^ell known and successful firm of 
Corl & Manderbach, general merchants of Myerstown, Pa., and one of the 
honorable citizens of that locality, was born in Myerstow-n, March i, 1845, 
a son of Joseph and Catherine (Lindermuth) Corl. 

Daniel Corl, grandfather of Harry L. Corl, was one of the pioneer 
blacksmiths of Lebanon City, a man widely esteemed. He was the father of 
the following children: Lieut. Joseph. John, William, Abraham. Fianna 
(widow of John Whitmeyer). and Eliza (widow of William Kinter). The 
Corl family is numbered among the early settlers of Lebanon county, and all 
of its members are highly respected. Of the above family, Joseph, the 
father of H. L. Corl, was born in Lancaster City, in 1820. and died in 
Myerstown in 1897. By trade he was also a blacksmith, and became one of 
the leading men of Myerstown, wealthy and influential, and for forty years 
worked at his trade in the city of his adoption. He married Catherine Linder- 
muth, a native of Berks county, about 18^0, and three children were born 



3IO BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

of this union : Emma, who married WilHam vSeltzer, a miller of Myerstown : 
Harry L. ; Katherine, who married M. H. Manderbach, of the firm of Cor! 
& Manderbach. 

Harry L. Corl was a small child when brought by his parents to Myers- 
town, and received his education in the township schools, and learned the 
trade of blacksmith, being the third generation of the Corl family in this line 
of trade, and covering a period of one hundred years, but when he grew to 
manhood, he did not like the calling, and so accep^ed a clerkship with Donges 
& Weirick, general merchants of Myerstown, but later went to Reading, 
where he filled a clerkship in a store in that city. Returning to Myerstown, he 
entered the employ of Donges Bros., and in 1879, he and his brother-in-law- 
purchased the business of Augustus Stoner & Son, forming the firm of Corl 
& Manderbach, general merchants, at the present site, where the establishment 
has since been conducted. During the twenty-four years they have been in 
the business, the partners have built up their business to very satisfactory 
proportions, and now enjoy a most excellent trade among the leading people 
of the city and surrounding district, and they have the best store and carry 
the finest line of goods of any concern in Myerstown. 

Mr. Corl was married, in 1888, to Miss Celia Kline, of Myerstown, a 
daughter of Daniel Kline, one of the old settlers of Marion township, Berks 
county. No children have been born of this marriage. Mrs. Corl is one of a 
family of four children, now living: John, of Robinson, Pa.; Peter S., a 
farmer, of Myerstown; William K., and Mrs. Corl. Mr. Corl is a stanch 
member of the Republican party, although he does not desire office. Both he 
and his wife arc members of the Lutheran Church, in which they take an 
active part. Fraternally, he is connected with the I. O. O. F., No. 149, and 
the P. O. S. of A., Camp No. 64, Myerstown, and is one of the honorable and 
successful business men of Pennsylvania, whose faithful devotion to his 
work, and sober, temperate habits have made hini what he is. 

HENRY SMITH WEISS (deceased) was for many years one of the 
leading business citizens of South Lebanon township. He was born June 20. 
1833, in this township, where he later accumulated a competence and bore 
so honored a part in ])ublic affairs, a son of Sanniel and Sarah (Smith) 
Weiss. His education in the common schools was supplemented by a busi- 
ness course at I\>ughkeepsie. New York. 

When about twenty-eight years old Mr. Weiss left the farm, the limited 
opportunities there not offering sufficient chance for development of his busi- 
ness ability, and, in partnership with Jt)seph Light and David T. Werner. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 311 

embarked in a grain and coal business at Avon, a fine business point, the 
building of the railroad at this time offering facilities, in addition to those 
offered by the canal. This firm prospered exceedingly, shipping large (quan- 
tities of grain. Later this partnership was dissolved, ]\Ir. Light retaining 
the old stand, and Messrs. Weiss and Werner erecting a new elevator south 
of the railroad, the same now being operated by the young firm of Weiss 
& Groh, its members being Charles Z. Weiss and John H. Groh. 

The firm of Werner & Weiss continued until 1892, when, on the death 
of Mr. Werner, the firm of Weiss, Groh & Co., was formed, Henry S. Weiss 
being the senior partner. In 1888 the old firm had added lumber to its 
business, which was as successfully handled as the other commodities. 

In every sense of the w'ord, Henry Smith Weiss was a good citizen. 
During the Civil war, although engrossed in business cares, he loyally enlisted 
on two dift'erent occasions, in defense of his country, serving with the rank 
of sergeant in the Forty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Politi- 
cally he was identified with the Republican party, although no seeker after 
office. Although Mr. Weiss never lost his interest in farming, he was es- 
sentially a man of business, keen, quick, of good judgment, and capable 
of exercising that foresight which makes the success of trade. He was one 
of the directors of the Peoples National Bank, for a time owned and operated 
the Moyer Mill in North Cornwall township, and was connected with the 
Orchid Milling Company, of Pottsville. His ownership of real estate was 
large, and while he was a liberal contributor to public and private charities. 
he was able to leave a competency to his family. The lamented death of Mr. 
Weiss took place November 20, 1897. 

On June 2. 1866, Mr. Weiss was married to Miss Rosa Royer. born 
February 29. 1844, daughter of Seth Royer, of Millbach. She died August 
8. 1892, preceding by six years the death of her oldest son. George L. 
Weiss, the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Weiss, was born in February. 
1867, and died in February, 1898. His education iiad been pursued in the 
Lebanon High School and the Myerstown College, from which institution 
he entered the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania, from 
which he graduated -and located in practice at Lebanon. His career at 
college had been so brilliant and his prospects for a useful life were 5:> 
promising that his early death was the saddest of blows, not only to his 
family but to the staff of the Lebanon Hospital, of which he was a mem- 
ber. He married IMiss Laura Miles, by whom he was survived. Avith one 
son, Harry F. The other members of the family Avere : Jeneltie S., a 
resident of Lebanon; Charles Z., born October 11, 1870: Samuel R.. who 



312 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

is engaged in gold mining in the Klondike; Harry F., who died October 
24. 1892, aged seventeen years; Alfred S., a graduate of the Medico-Chi- 
rurgical College, Philadelphia, and now located in practice at Lebanon: and 
Miss Fannie B., of Lebanon. 

Charles Z. Weiss was liberally educated like the other members of his 
lather's family, and early became associated with the latter in business. .As 
stated above he is still interested in this line, and he is also a director of 
the Peoples National Bank of Lebanon. Politically he is one of the very 
active Republicans of the county, and is the chairman of that very important 
political body, the County Republican committee, having previously served 
as its treasurer. Mr. Weiss is a leader in public movements and promotes 
to the best of his ability those enterprises which promise to benefit his city. 
His residence is in South Lebanon township on his father's old home, and 
he also manages his own farm in North Lebanon township. 

Mr. AVeiss was married on January i, 1900, to Miss Cora Erb, daugh- 
ter of Edwin and Annie (Horst) Erb, and three children have been born to 
this union, namely : Henry S., Pauline E. and Harold E. 

MORRIS B. GERBERICH, M. D., a well-known physician and public- 
spirited citizen of Lebanon, was born in Union township, Lebanon county, 
during the early days of the Civil war, on July 5, 1861. His parents were 
Daniel U. and Catherine (Boeshore) Gerberich, both natives of Lebanon 
county. [Mention of the ancestral family of Dr. Gerberich will be found 
^'Isewhere. ] 

Dr. Gerberich attended the common schools of Lebanon county and then 
entered Myerstown College, later graduating from the State Normal School 
at Lockhaven, in 1884. During his attendance at the latter institution he 
began teaching during the winter seasons, and followed that profession for a 
period of six years, his proficiency being such that he obtained a permanent 
State certificate. 

When he decided upon a medical career the young man found in his 
brother, Dr. Daniel P. Gerberich, of Lebanon, a wise assistant and careful 
instructor, and after proper preparation in his office took a course of lectures 
in Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia, and graduated at that great 
institution in the class of 1887. Dr. Gerberich began practice at Annville, in 
Lebanon county, and remained there until his removal to Lebanon, in 1900. 
Since that date Dr. Gerberich has been numbered among the successful prac- 
titioners of the city, and has added medical reputation to a name which 
already had become most highly esteemed by the profession and public in 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 313 

Lebanon tlirough his brother, Dr. Daniel P. He is a member of the 
Homoeopathic Medical Society of the State of Pennsylvania, and he has been 
appointed as medical examiner, of Lebanon, by a number of life insurance 
companies. 

Dr. Gerberich has taken a great interest in public matters since locating 
in Lebanon, and that his usefulness to the city has been appreciated was 
demonstrated by his election as a member of the common council, from the 
Fourth ward, in 1898, and emphasized by his re-election in 1900, and again 
in 1902. In April, 1902, he was elected president of the council, and 
re-elected in 1903. While in the city council he was appointed and served 
on some of the leading standing committees, being two years on the finance 
committee, and two years on the city property committee, when the present 
spacious and beautiful city hall was remodeled, and refurnished and fitted 
out throughout, this work being under the direction and supervision of the 
city property committee. 

On April 2, 1889, Dr. Gerberich was married to Miss Amanda Wolf, 
daughter of Herman Wolf, of Lebanon county, and three daughters have 
blessed this union, namely: Pearl S., Grace H. and Mattie C. Dr. Gerberich 
is a member of the P. O. S. of A. His religious connection is with the 
Lutheran Church. Since his removal to Lebanon he has continuously been 
assistant teacher of the Bible class of the Sunday School of his church, and 
in July, 1903, he was elected by the congregation as elder to the church 
council. As a physician he stands high in the public esteem, while as a 
citizen he is placed among the most progressive and useful members of the 
community. 

JOHN H. OLWINE, one of the thrifty and successful farmers of Jack- 
son township, residing on the line of North Lebanon. Jackson and Bethel 
townships, was born on the old Samuel Olwine farm in Jackson township, 
January 7, 1847. 

The parents of Mr. Olwine were John and Barbara (Harnish) Olwine. 
the former of whom was born in 1821. a son of Samuel Olwine. whose father 
was one of the Hessian prisoners captured by Gen. Washington's army in 
1776. Samuel Olwine. the grandfather of John H., was the father of five 
children, viz : Jonathan, Mary, Elizabeth. Katherine and John. 

John Olwine married Barbara Harnish. and died January 15. 1881, 
the father of five children : Amanda, the wife of John Behney ; John H. ; 
Susan, deceased; Sarah, the wife of H. D. Hoffman, of Lebanon; and Daniel, 
a farmer of Jackson township. In politics Mr. Olwine was actively identified 



314 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

with the Democratic party. His religious membership was in the Lutheran 
Church. 

John H. Ohvine was born and reared and has made his home in Jack- 
son township. His education was obtained in the public schools, and after 
completing- the course and attaining his majority, he started out for himself 
as a farmer, being entirely without means, possessing, however, good habits. 
courage and untiring industry. In any case these attributes and possessions 
contribute to success, and in the case of Mr. Olwine have made him the owner 
of a fine ninety-eight-acre farm, well improved and under fine cultivation, 
it being one of the most p'^oductive in the neighborhood. In politics he 
is a Democrat and has served as school director, assistant assessor and 
inspector of elections. He has always taken an active part in church work, 
and has served both as deacon and elder in the Reformed Church at Mt. 
Zion. 

In 1869 Mr. Olwine was married to Amelia S. Schaumm, one of a family 
of four children born to Jacob and Mary (Peifer) Schaumm, one of the 
prominent old families of the locality, the other children being : Michael ; 
Clara, wife of Nathaniel Allwine, and Miss Rebecca. The seven children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Olwine are: Lillie M., wife of William Manbeck. 
a farmer of Jackson township; William M., educated at Palatinate College 
at Myerstown and Kutztown Normal School in Berks county, now teacher 
in the Myerstown Secondary School; Clayton E., educated as above, a book- 
keeper at Newark, N. J.; John C, a bookkeeper also located at Newark; 
and Jennie S., Robert J., and Llarry Isaac, at home. Mr. Olwine has given 
his children every educational advantage in his power and has reared chil- 
dren who reflect credit upon their parents and locality. He is most highly 
respected in every way, a good citizen, friendly neighbor, devoted husband, 
careful and judicious father. 

ANDRE\^^ B. GLONINGER, M. D., a physician and surgeon of Leb- 
anon, Pa., was born in Lebanon, June 14, 1861. His father the late Dr. 
C3TUS Dorsey Gloninger, and Dr. John W. Gloninger, his grandfather, were 
two of the most prominent physicians who ever practiced in Lebanon. The 
subject of this sketch graduated from Franklin and Marshall College with the 
class of 1880. having previously prepared for college in the public schools. 
He received his medical diploma from the Medical Department of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, graduating with the class of 1883. 

Dr. Cyrus Dorsey Gloninger, father of Dr. A. B. Gloninger, was born in 
Lebanon, Pa., March 13, 1824, the eldest son of Dr. John W. Gloninger and 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 315 

Mary Ann Hassinger. He attended the Lebanon Academy and graduated 
from Marshall College, then at Mercersburg, in 1843. He studied medicine 
with his father, and graduated from the Medical Department of the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania in 1846. The two following years he pursued his 
medical studies in the medical universities and hospitals of Europe. Return- 
ing home, he entered upon the general practice and soon acquired a marked 
reputation for ability and skill in every department of his profession, espe- 
cially in the treatment of the eye. /vside from the science of medicine his 
literary studies were extensive. He was especially well-informed in all that 
relates to the collateral sciences, and his knowledge of sacred and profane his- 
tory, strengthened by travel and observation, made him an agreeable and en- 
tertaining companion. He was a frequent and valuable contributor to various 
journals and periodicals. As a public man he was very prominent and was 
twice, 1866 and 1870, the Democratic candidate for Congress, but was de- 
feated. He was one of the founders oi the Lebanon Manufacturing Com- 
pany, and was president of the Lebanon National Bank. He was an active 
and zealous member of the St. John's Reformed Church, for which he did 
much work and ga\e valuable support. He was charitable, and his private 
charities were numerous. 

Dr. Gloninger married Julia A. Beaumont, who was born in Wilkes- 
barre, Luzerne Co., Pa., daughter of the late Hon. Andrew Beaumont, a 
native of Connecticut, where his ancestors settled in 1635, who migrated to 
Luzerne county. Pa., when he was seventeen years of age, and became a 
brilliant lawyer, served in both branches of the State Legislature and was 
twice elected for Congress ; he married Julia Colt. 

Dr. John W. Gloninger, the grandfather of Dr. A. B. Gloninger, was 
born in Lebanon, Pa., September 23, 1798, son of John Gloninger and Cath- 
arine Orth. His early educational training was under a famous pedagogue. 
one Mr. McMullen. Afterward he was sent to a select school at Harrisburg, 
and then to Baltimore, where he completed his academic education. In 181 5 
he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. King. Early in the year of 181 7 
he went to Philadelphia, and became a private pupil of Prof. Dorsey, and at 
the same time attended lectures at the L-niversity of Pennsylvania and Block- 
ley hospital. In 1818 he went to New York City, entered the office of Prof. 
Hosack as a student, and attended lectures at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, graduating in April, 1819. He remained in New York pursuing 
his studies in the hospitals luitil the following year, when he returned to 
Lebanon, and began the practice of his profession. For thirty years he main- 
tained the position of leading physician. In 181 7 he was elected a member of 



3i6 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

the Philadelphia Medical Society, in 1823 a member of the Pittsburg Medical 
Society, and in 1826 was elected a Fellow of the University of New York. 
In 1828 the Jefferson Medical College conferred upon him the degree of M. 
D. In 1838 he was elected honorary member of the New York State Medical 
Society. In 1841 the University of Maryland conferred upon him the hon- 
orary degree of M. D., the University of Pennsylvania granting him the same 
honor in 1848. He was trustee of Marshall College, and was one of the 
founders and a trustee of Lebanon Academy. He took a deep interest in the 
Reformed Church, and gave freely and liberally to all church enterprises. In 
1 84 1 he was elected president of the Lebanon Bank, which position he held 
until 1867, when he declined a re-election. He was married twice, first to 
Mary Ann Hassinger in 1820, and second to Catherine Arndt, in 1847. Dr. 
Gloninger died March 10, 1874. 

The great-grandfather of Dr. A. B. Gloninger was Col. John Gloninger, 
who was born in Lebanon township, then in Lancaster county, September 
19, 1758, son of Philip and Ann Barbara Gloninger. His ancestors w^ere 
of German origin, and settled first along the Chickies creek in Lancaster 
county, and then removed to Lebanon township, and were among the earliest 
settlers in that locality. He received most of his educational instruction from 
the pastor of the Reformed Church. He ser\'ed in the Revolutionary war, 
first as a subaltern and then in the command of the Second Battalion of Alili- 
tia of Lancaster county as Lieutenant Colonel. He served as a representa- 
tive in the Pennsylvania Assembly in 1790, resigning as such to accept a seat 
in the State Senate, from which he also later resigned. He was appointed by 
Governor Mifilin, a warm personal friend, an associate judge of Dauphin 
county, but subsequently resigned from this position. Upon the erection of 
Lebanon county in 181 3, he was commissioned as associate justice of that 
county, and filled that position for many years. He married Catharine Orth, 
daughter of Adam and Catharine (Kaucher) Orth. His death occurred 
January 22, 1836. 

FREDERICK CARPENTER, the genial host of the "Franklin Hotel" 
at Schaefferstown, was born September 11, 1862, in Cornwall township, Leb- 
anon county, a son of Reuben and Catherine (Bostwick) Carpenter. 

Reuben Carpenter was by occupation a furnaceman and farmer, and 
he was a son of Reuben Carpenter. He was born in Lancaster county about 
T815, and died in 1897. By his marriage with Catherine Bostwick, who 
was born in Lancaster county in 1819, and died in 1900, he became the 
father of these children : Harry, of Bismarck, Lebanon county ; Mary, 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 317 

wife of Frederick Lininger, of Cornwall township ; John, deceased ; Simon of 
Bismarck; Rebecca, wife of Isaac Zellers, of Rexmont; Daniel, a resident 
of Harrisburg; Emma, wife of Charles McMinn, of Bismarck; Reuben, of 
Rexmont ; William, deceased ; and Frederick. Mr. Carpenter was a very zeal- 
ous Republican, and it was a proud day for hnii when, accompanied by 
his seven sons, he cast his vote for that great statesman, James G. Blaine, 
for president. Mr. Carpenter was a man of remarkable physical endurance, 
and has been known frequently to work for eighteen hours a day at the 
old charcoal furnace in Cornwall township. In religious belief, he believed 
in the faith of the Reformed Church. 

Frederick Carpenter was reared in Cornwall township, and spent his 
youth on the farm and in attendance at the common schools. In young 
manhood he accepted a clerkship in the general store of C. Rex & Co., at 
Rexmont, where he remained for two- years, and then worked as a florist 
with Mrs. Sarah Coleman, of Cornwall, and later was employed by Burkey 
&: Co., for some three years, and then went to Rexmont, where he built 
the "Rexmont Hotel" and conducted a hostelry here for seven years, when 
sold out. He then spent two years with his old tirm of C. Rex & Co., and 
then came to Schaefferstown. The property of the "Franklin House"" had 
been bought by him four years previously, and since 1S97 he has conducted 
here a first-class, modern, up-to-date hotel. His patronage is large and is 
continually increasing, the "Franklin House" having gained a reputation 
for its comforts and good cuisine. 

On November 27, 1884, Mr. Carpenter married Miss Sallie Dissinger, 
of Cornwall, daughter of Franklin and Elizabeth (Fink) Dissinger, an 
old family of Cornwall township. Lebanon county. The children born to 
this union are: Bessie, George, Pierce, Edna, Catherine, Earl, Lillie and 
Frank. In politics Mr. Carpenter is a stanch Republican and is his party"s 
candidate for sheriff in 1903. Fraternally he belongs to Masonic Lodge 
No. 307. of Womelsdorf, of Berks county; No. 121, of Lebanon, I. O. O. F. ; 
P. O. S. of A., No. 289, of Rexmont; and Knights of the Mystic Chain. 
of Cornwall. Mr. Carpenter is a man held in much esteem; he is self- 
made, honest, reliable and a good citizen. 

Mrs. Carpenter was born November 15, 1866, and her father still 
resides at Rexmont. The others of the family were : Catherine, ]\Irs. Jacob 
Hoke, of Cornwall; Franklin, of Elizabethtown, Lancaster county; Lillie. 
Mrs. Frank Shaw, of Elizabethtown; Solomon, a minister of the Evangelical 
Church ; Philip, of Cornwall ; Edward, of the United States army ; and Rob- 
ert, of Lancaster county. 



3i8 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

JOHN A. BECKLEY, one of the most highly esteemed, rehable and 
representative citizens of Prescott, South Lebanon township, Lebanon county, 
a prominent poHtician, justice of the peace and man of substance, belongs to 
one of the old and honorable families of this section of the State. Mr. 
Beckley was born July 19, 1849, on the old Beckley farm in Jackson town- 
ship, which his forefathers settled upon about 1750. His parents were John 
and Sarah (Spangler) Beckley, of South Lebanon township. 

The grandparents of John A. Beckley were Frederick and Margaret 
(Strock) Beckley, the latter of whom was a native of Berks county. The 
former was a son of Uhrich Beckley, who came from Ireland to Lancaster 
county when a boy of eighteen years, in the early days of its settlement, and 
m 1767 he bought the farm m South Jackson township from one John Brant, 
who obtained the property from John and Richard Penn in 1745. The family 
tradition tells that the price paid was .to be one red rose, to be picked on the 
24th of June each year forever. Uhrich Beckley married a French lady who 
came to America from Alsace Lorraine, and they had sons, John, Jcjnathan 
and P'rederick, the latter being the father of John, who was the father of 
John A. Beckley, of Prescott. 

'John Beckley was born in the old home in 181 1, was a farmer of 
excellent repute, as his father before him had been, and died in 1889. His 
wife, Sarah, was a daughter of George Spangler, of South Lebanon town- 
ship, and their children were: John Adam, of Prescott; F. P., of Prescott; 
George, who was killed by a horse at the age of thirty-one years ; and Salla 
C, who died at the age of eighteen. John Beckley was a Democrat in his 
political belief. Religiously he was a member of the Lutheran Church. 

John Adam Beckley was reared on a farm but was given most excellent 
educational opportunities, after completing the public school course attending 
Palatinate, now Albright, College, and the Lelxanon A'allev College, of Annville 
For the three succeeding years he followed the profession of teaching, and 
then engaged in farming on his well-improved estate of fifty acres, giving vip 
activity there in 1901. For the past twenty-one years he has dispensed 
impartial justice as a magistrate in Prescott, has been tax collector and a 
director of the poor in Lebanon county, and has also been one of the standard 
bearers of Democracy. In 1900 he was the candidate of his party for the 
State Legislature, and his popularity was shown by his receipt of the full 
party vote. His time is much occupied with settling up estates and he is the 
guardian of a number of wards, his known integrity and high character 
making him very frequently the chosen officer in such cases. 

On November 14, 1872, Mr. Beckley was united in marriage with Miss 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 319 

Katherine Lealiman, born November 14, 1848, the youngest daughter of 
Joseph and Mary Leahman, of Lebanon. This family came from the State 
of New York to Pennsylvania, and they had a family of five children namely, 
exclusive of Airs. Beckley ; Elizabeth, the wife of Amos Wheeler, of Huni- 
melstown; Mary, the wife of David Law, of Philadelphia; Henry, of 
Lebanon City; and Joseph, of Palmyra. Mr. and Mrs. Beckley have no 
children. The agetl mother of the former lives with them, tenderly cared 
for. in her eightieth year. Mr. Beckley is a man of social instincts and enjoys 
membership with a number of fraternal orders, among these being: Knights 
of Malta, No. 117, Lebanon; 1. O. O. F., No. 121, Lebanon; Golden Eagle. 
No. 167, and Garfield Commandery, No. 50. Both Mr. and Mrs. Beckley 
are consistent members of the Salem Lutheran Church of Lebanon. They 
are among the most highly esteemed residents of this locality, and a visit tc 
their hospitable home is something to be long remembered. 

ADAM H. LIGHT, one of the leading citizens of Swatara township 
residing on his pleasant farm near Banker Hill, was born in that vicinity. 
April 22. 1840, a son of David and Alollie ( Hunsicker) Light. 

David Light was born in Swatara township, and died in 1888, at the 
age of eighty-seven years. His wife was born in Union township, Lebanon 
county, and died in 1898. David was a son of Peter Light, who married a 
Miss Beam, was a farmer of Swatara township, and one of a large family of 
children born to his father, Henry Light, great-grandfather of our subject. 
Peter Light was born on the old homestead near Tenth street, where he was 
reared, but after his marriage he located in Swatara township, and spent the 
remainder of his life. His children were: Jacob; Darvid ; Peter, who died in 
Buffalo, N. Y. ; and Elizabeth, who married Rev. Christian Peffley. David 
Light spent his life in Swatara township as a farmer, owning three farms, 
one of 140 acres, one of 122 acres, and one of eighty-five acres, the last 
named being in North Lebanon township. Both he and his wife were 
consistent members of the United Brethren Church. They had these 
children : Peter, who went West prior to the Civil war, served three years in 
that struggle, then went to Missouri, and for years nothing has been heard of 
him; Adam II.; Christian H., a farmer and dairyman of North Lebanon 
township; David, a resident of Heilmandale, a farmer: and Emma B.. 
married to Noah Dahner, of lona, Lebanon county. 

Adam H. Light was reared and educated in Swatara township, attending 
the common schools, and at the age of twenty-two years he started out in life 
for himself as a farmer on his present property. Mr. Light has always been 



320 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

one of the public-si^irited citizens of the township, and has twice served most 
acceptably as school director, and as assistant assessor and treasurer, as well 
as Judge of election. In addition to his other interests, he is a stockholder of 
the Farmers National Bank of Lebanon. He owns another farm of 128 
acres, in North Lebanon township, which like his home place, is in an 
excellent condition. 

In 1861, Mr. Light was married to Sarah Good, a daughter of Christian 
and Catherine (Noll) Good, born in Dauphin county, Pa. The following 
family has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Light : Christian David, unmarried, 
at the home place; Mary Jane, married to John M. Miley, a farmer of North 
Lebanon township ; Katie, unmarried ; Grant, unmarried, at home ; ^\ndrew, 
who died in 1893, aged twenty-three years: Irvin, unmarried, at home. Mr. 
and Mrs. Light are members of the United Brethren Church of Mountville, 
of which he has been trustee for a number of years, and they are most highly 
esteemed throughout the entire neighborhood. 

JOHN ]\IEILY (deceased), for many years one of the leading manu- 
facturers of Lebanon, one of the proprietors of the Lebanon \"alley Furnace 
at that place, and a man well known and highly esteemed in commercial 
circles throughout the State, was born at Mechanicsburg. Cumberland Co., 
Pa., September 9, 1826, a son of Martin and Magdelene (Groh) Meily. 

John Meily, the grandfather of John, was born in 1776, and died in 
1844. while his wife, a member of the old Lebanon family of Overholzer, 
was born in 1776, and died in 1854. The father, named Martin, was bom in 
1801, and was an excellent example of a self-reliant, self-made man, never 
having had the advantage of attending school. During his boyhood he was 
reared upon a farm, and learned the trade of a potter. After attaining to 
manhood's estate his sterling worth was recognized, and for ten years he 
served as justice of the peace, and for three years as notary public. Although 
denied the advantages of an education, he was a man who knew how to make 
the most of every opportunity, and studied law as related to titles, becoming 
so expert upon this subject that he was elected surveyor of Lebanon county 
and held that office most acceptably for a number of terms. Prior to the 
birth of his son. John, Martin Meily remo^•ed to Mechanicsburg, Cumberland 
Co., Pa., from Bethel township, Dauphin (now Lebanon) Co.. Pa. In 1823 
Martin Meily married ]\Iagdelene Groh. born in 1798. daughter of John 
Groh. of Bethel township, Dauphin (now Lebanon) Co.. Pa., and three 
sons were born of this union, Benjamin, John and Jacob. 

John Meilv was reared in IMechanicsburg, attending the common 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 321 

schools. After leaving" school he was employed as a clerk for a short time, 
but eventually returned to the old Meily home in Lebanon county, and 
embarked in the transportation business on the old Union canal at Jonestown, 
with offices at that point and at Middletown, Pa. Later he was connected 
with a mercantile concern in Philadelphia, and resided in that city. In about 
j<S6o, he engaged in the iron business with which he was familiar, in part- 
nership with Henry Meily, at Middletown, Pa. In 1867, in partnership with 
Richard Meily, his late partner, and Lyman Nutting (now deceased), he 
built the Lebanon Valley Furnace, which in partnership with Richard Meily 
he continued to operate until his death. The success which attended his 
business career was largely due to his thorough attention to detail, intimate 
knowledge of his undertaking, and his high sense of honor, which gave 
absolutely fair treatment to customers and employes alike. 

All his life, Mr. Meily was closely identified with the interests and 
principles of the Whig, and later the Republican party, although he never 
desired office. Notwithstanding his preference for a private life, while living 
at Jonestown he was induced to accept nomination on the Whig ticket, to the 
Pennsylvania Legislature, and was elected by a large majority, but from that 
time he declined to accept office. 

Mr. Meily was twice married, his first wife having been Helen Halter, of 
Washington, D. C, who w^as connected with leading Lebanon families. To 
this union six children were born, the survivors being: James, of Phila- 
delphia; John, Jr., of Lebanon; Mary, of Lebanon; and Helen, wife of 
Edward M. Taylor, of Wilmington, Del., who has three children, John 
Meily, William and Helen. Mrs. Meily died February 25, 1873, and Mr. 
Meily was married to Miss Katherine DeHuff. a member of the old Lebanon 
family of that name which is so well known in this portion of the State. 

Few men in Lebanon enjoyed in higher degree the respect and esteem 
of their fellow citizens than did Mr. ]Meily, and his death, which occurred 
April 3, T902, was sincerely mourned. In addition to his iron interests he 
was president of the Lebanon County Insurance Company. For many years 
he was a consistent member of St John's Reformed Church of Lebanon, in 
which congregation he was a prominent figure. 

HENRY S. KREIDER, one of the substantial and representative 
farmers of South Annville township, Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, who 
resides upon his w^ell improved and valuable farm located three miles south 
of the village of Annville, was born December 31, 1842, near Lebanon, in 
North Cornwall township. 



322 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

The parents of Air. Kreider were Jonas and Barbara (Schaffer) 
Kreider, the former of whom was born in North Cornwall township, about 
two miles from Lebanon, on Snitz Creek, December 27, 1810, a son of 
Henry Kreider, and the latter in North Lebanon township, in August, 181 7, 
a daughter of John Schaffer. Jonas Kreider died in 1887, and his widow in 
1889. They had a family of seven children born to them, as follows: John, 
a farmer of North Cornwall township; Christiana, the wife of Christian 
Kroll, of South Lebanon township; Henry S. ; Catherine, the wife of Chris- 
tian Yardy, of North Cornwall township; Barbara, tlie wife of Rudolph 
Behm, of Palmyra; Mary, the widow of Christian Bachman; and Levi, a 
resident of Dickinson count}', Kansas. The father owned the old Kreider 
farm at Snitz Creek, North Cornwall, comprising one hundred acres, 
which came to him from his grandfather, who took up the land all along that 
creek. The original house is still standing, built in 1767, and is now owned 
by John Kreider, the brother of Henry S. Kreider. 

Henry S. Kreider was reared on the old farm, and attended the com- 
mon schools. In 18(9 he married, and the next year located on the old farm 
which he operated for a year, and then tno\'ed upon the old Urich farm, on 
ihe Horseslioe turnpike road, and which belonged to his father, and here he 
was engaged in farming for fourteen years. Air. Kreider then removed to 
West Cornwall township, and took charge of the Christian Bachman farm 
imtil 1S95, when he purchased his present most desirable estate, this formerly 
having belonged to Jacob Graybill, and later to Christian Ressor. This farm 
comprises over 122 acres, and with his other farm in West Cornwall town- 
ship, makes him a large landowner in this part of Lebanon county. The 
large and substantial stone residence was erected in 181 2. a brick addition of 
modern architecture being added in 1848, making it a most comfortable 
home. In 1812 the large stone barn was built, and since that time it has been 
added to and remodelled to suit the growing needs of this large estate. 

On December 9, 1869, Mr. Kreider Avas married to Fanny Bachman. 
born on the old Bachman farm, in North Cornwall township, July 4, 1845. 
daughter of Christian Bachman. who was born January 17. 1812, on the old 
farm, a son of John and Sarah (Zinn) Bachman, the latter of whom was 
iiorn in October, iSii, at Zinn's Mill, in Cornwall, now North Cornwall 
township, and died December 31, 1870. The children of Mr. Kreider were 
the following: Sallie, born November 26, 1870, in Cornwall township, died 
March 11, 1871 ; Christian B., born December 31, 1871, in Cornwall town- 
ship, was educated in the public schools, graduated from the Millersville State 
Normal School, took a course in the Lebanon Business College, and taught 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 323 

school for five years; Jonas B., born April 8, 1874, died October 15, 1894; 
Henry B.. bom April 25, 1876; George Z., born Angust 18, 1877; Edward 
B., born June 7, 1879; Emma Virgie, born Xovember 9, 1880, died February 
13, 1883; Fanny May, born November 18, 1882; and an infant that died 
unnamed. Mrs. Kreider is a member of the Reformed Church, and the 
family is one which is held in high esteem in South Annville township. 

THOMAS GEORGE SPANGLER. One of the leading industries of 
Lebanon county is that of the manufacture of textile fabrics, and the Lebanon 
Textile Company, of Avon, of which the gentleman whose name initiates this 
paragraph is the honored secretary, easily stands first as regards (quality 
of manufactured product. The responsible position of secretary of so impor- 
tant a concern is the culmination of a business career altogether honorable in 
its gradual ascent from humble beginnings. Mr. Spangler was not exactly a 
"rail splitter," nor did he tread the towpath in his youth, and yet it can be 
truly said that he began at the bottom round of the ladder. 

Mr. Spangler is indigenous to Lebanon county, born at Prescott, October 
22, 1846. The original American ancestor of the family was Peter Spangler, 
his great-great-grandfather, who settled in Lebanou countv in the latter part of 
the eighteenth century. A son of the same name was followed l)y grandfather 
George Spangler, a gallant commissionetl officer in the war of 181 2, the sword 
which he carried in that eventful struggle being treasured as a precious relic in 
the home of his loyal grandson. The early members of the family were repre- 
sentative agriculturists in their day, and men who left well defined traditions of 
probity of character and uprightness. 

George Spangler, son of George and Catharine (Dinges) Spangler, was 
born in South Lebanon township February 28. 1819. He grew to manhood's 
estate on the old Spangler homestead, but left the farm for the life of the 
artisan, being apprenticed to the tailor's trade. He followed that business 
until toward his prime, when he went back to the peaceful life of his ancestors, 
and died as a worthy representative of the agricultural interests of Lebanon 
county, December 17, 1891. He was a faithful and consistent member of the 
Lnited Brethren Church, and a man held in high repute in the county. He 
married Mary Moury, also a native of this country, born October 15, 1821, 
daughter of Jacob and Mary (Zortman) floury, both of whom were early 
pioneers in this section of the State. ]Mrs. Spangler was a woman of strong 
character, and a devout member of the U^nited Brethren Church. Her death 
occurred September 10, 1901. She was the mother of the following children : 
Frank, of Cincinnati, Ohio; Elizabeth, widow of Isaac Strohm. of Lebanon; 



324 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Thomas G. ; Emma, Mrs. S. J. B. Spangler, of North Lebanon town- 
ship; George, of Philadelphia; and Elmer, Jared and an unnamed infant, 
deceased. 

Thomas G. Spangler was reared amid the rural serenity of farm life. 
His primary education was supplemented by literary courses at IMyerstown 
Academy, Palatinate College and the Millersville State Normal. At the 
early age of seventeen he began teaching, his first school being in South 
Lebanon township. For a period of some twelve years Mr. Spangler continued 
to wield the ferule successfully at various points in the county, and established 
an enviable reputation in educational circles. In 1872 he entered the office of 
the county recorder as deputy. The following year marked his first connection 
with the United Brethren Mutual Aid Society of Lebanon, as corresponding 
secretary, in which capacity he remained until within a few years of its close, 
when he was chosen treasurer. Mr. Spangler turned his attention to the manu- 
facturing line, and in company with Stephen A. Light established the present 
business, the firm being known at that time as the Avon Knitting Company. 
In 1901 it was reorganized under its present name — the Lebanon Textile Com- 
pany. Under the efficient management of our subject and his partner 
the enterprise is proving singularly successful, and bids fair to attain large 
proportions. 

Fraternally Mr. Spangler affiliates with the I. O. O. F., holding member- 
ship in Mohegan Lodge, No. 288, of Lebanon, in which he has filled all the 
chairs, being past grand, and has represented his lodge at the sessions of the 
Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania. He has been very active in this order. He 
is a member of the United Brethren Church, and takes great interest in the 
Y. M. C. A., being one of the original directors and sen-ing on the educa- 
tional committee. At the present time he is serving his third term as vice- 
president of the Young People's Christian Union of the eastern branch of 
the United Brethren Church. He was a delegate to the convention at 
Dayton, Ohio, in 1890. when the original organization was effected ; he also 
ser\ed as delegate to the General Biennial Convention in 1904, at Elkhart, 
Ind. He holds the office of secretary of the Conference Missionary and 
Church Extension Society of the Eastern Pennsylvania Conference. Politi- 
cally he is a Republican. 

In 1877 Mr. Spangler was united in marriage with Miss Amanda Light, 
daughter of Felix Light, deceased. Mrs. Spangler is a native of South 
Lebanon township, born March 7, 185 1. To this union has come an inter- 
esting family of nine children, as follows : Newton L., a druggist in Guthrie, 
Okla. ; Paul M.. a student in Lebanon Vallev Collcs:e: Naomi M.. a 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 325 

stenographer with the Daily Republican. Lelianon; Ira H.. dental stndent in 
the Medico-Chirnrgical School, Philadelphia ; Howard G. ; Eva R. : Warrev 
W'.; Homer L. ; and George E. Mr. and Mrs. Spangler and their family are 
popular members of Lebanon societ}^ and enter heartily into every good 
work for its advancement. Mr. Spangler is especially earnest and effective 
in matters of school jurisprudence, having been secretary of the school board 
of Lebanon for many years, during part of which time he has also served as 
director, and her splendid school system is largely due to his intelligent and 
pamstaking efiforts. 

SAMUEL S. RISSER, a well-known farmer of South Londonderry 
township, Lebanon county, is one of the leading men of his locality, and was 
born on the old Risser farm in South Londonderry township, March i, 1849, 
and received a most excellent education in the common schools of his district, 
the old Palmyra Academy and the Normal School at Lebanon. Remaining 
with his father until fourteen years of age, he then took up his residence 
w'ith his brother, John S., and lived with the latter until he attained his 
majority. 

Like many ambitious young men, he engaged in school teaching for a 
number of years, the greater portion of w^hich were spent in Londonderry 
township, one at Colebrook, and two at the Imboden school. In 1871 he went 
west to Kansas, where he spent several months, returning that fall and 
stopping over in different localities. That same year, he began teaching the 
Risser school at Lawn, where he remained six successive terms, but in 1876 
he resumed farming, purchasing the old Robinson farm from Joseph Nissley. 
This farm is a very excellent one, containing 132 acres of finely cultivated 
land. The buildings are all modern, and many of them have been erected by 
him. Among other improvements Mr. Risser brought running water to his 
farm, which enhances its value considerably. In partnership with his brother 
John S., he owns the old Peter Risser farm in South Londonderry township. 
In addition to his farming interests, Mr. Risser is also a partner in the Lawn 
Creamery, a thriving industrv, at Upper or West Lawn, the other partners 
being his brother, John S., and the latter's son, Harvey S. Mr. Risser is also 
auditor of South Londonderry. 

In 1875, Mr. Risser married Mary A. Kuhns, born in Mt. Joy township, 
Lancaster county, June 29, 1856, daughter of Aaron and Anna (Rutt) Kuhns, 
the former of whom w^as born in Mt. Joy township, ami the latter in West 
Donegal township, Lancaster county, in 1828 and 1835, respectively. The 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Kuhns were as follows : Mrs. Risser, Mrs. 



326 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Amos Risser, Jacob, and Mrs. Gish. The paternal grandfather was John 
Kuhns, while on the mother's side the grandfather was named Jacob Rutt. 
Mr. and Mrs. Risser have one son, Alvin K., born August 14, 1877, educated 
in the common schools, graduated from the Shippensburg Normal School, 
who taught school one term in North Londonderry township, and one term 
in Rapho township, Lancaster county, after which he entered The Pennsyl- 
vania State College in Center county. After completing the first year of the 
course he taught a term at Colebrook, when he was appointed Assistant in 
Agriculture at the Pennsylvania Experiment Station, where he still remains, 
his career for one so young havmg been singularly successful, while his future 
seems very brilliant. Mr. and Mrs. Risser are consistent members of the 
Mennonite Church, and are honorable, upright, hard-working people, who 
stand very high in the respect of those who know them. 

PETER HORST, one of the well known citizens of South Lebanon 
township, Lebanon county, and a descendant of one of the old and highly 
honored families of this section, was born on the farm where he now resides, 
near Horst's Mill, July 5, 1845, son of Peter and Anna (Shaeffer) Horst. the 
former of whom died December 28, 1891, aged eighty-one years, five months 
and three days, and the latter died January 19, 1888. aged seventy-three years, 
eight months and two days. 

Peter Horst, the father, was a son of Peter, who married a Miss Heisey, 
and by profession was a physician, but devoted his energies to farming and 
milling, becoming one of the large land owners of the county. His property. 
consisting of 300 acres of land, was all in one large tract, on which stood 
his mill which gave to the locality its name of Horst's Mill. During a long 
and honorable life he amassed a large competency and was known as one of 
the representative men of Lebanon county. His religious afifiliations were 
with the Mennonite Church. Peter, (2), the father, was born on the home- 
stead as was his father before, and his son after, him, and with the exception 
of eight years spent near Schaefferstown. his life was lived upon his farm. 
On October 29, 1835, while residing near Schaefferstown. he was married, 
and after eight years' residence in that locality, he returned to the homestead, 
and took charge of 155 acres, and also became the owner of other property, 
being one of the successful men of the township. In height, like his father, he 
was tall and commanding in appearance. He took a deep interest in local 
affairs, and served as school director for several terms. In addition to his 
otlier interests in Lebanon county, he owned a fine farm of 272 acres in 
Center count\-. Pa. He and his wife were devoted members of the Mennonite 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 327 

Church. The following family was born to them : ( i ) John, born October 
3O; 1837, died at the age of fifty-two years, was a farmer in South Lebanon 
township, on a farm adjoining the homestead; he left a widow, Leah (Funk) 
Horst, and two children, Irvin, a cigar manufacturer of Schaefferstown ; and 
Laura, who married Aaron Risser, a resident of Bellaire, Pa. (2) Alirahan; 
is a farmer of Lebanon township. (3) Jacob is a farmer of South Lebanon 
township. (4) Peter is mentioned below. (5) Anna married Jacob Bru- 
baker, of South Lebanon township, a retired farmer. (6) Elizabeth died at 
the age of eleven years. (7) Catherine died at the age of eight years. (8,' 
Joseph died at the age of eight years. (9) Michael died at the age of six 
months. 

Peter Horst (3), our subject, was I'eared upon the homestead farm, 
where he has spent his life, and received his education in the public schonls ot 
his district. After his marriage, he began farming on his own account, and 
has continued that calling ever since, now owning 114 acres of the old home- 
stead, where his own birth occurred, as did that of his father, grandfather and 
possibly great-grandfather. 

On December 14, 1878, Mr. Horst was married to Amanda Gingrich, 
daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth (Westenberger) Gingrich, born in South 
Annville township, January 27, 1858, and died March 10, 1900. Five chil- 
dren were born to them : Amanda, Annie, Elizabeth, Amnion and Ada, all 
at home. The name Horst has been long associated with the best interests 
of Lebanon county, and Mr. Horst has won the confidence and respect of 
his fellow citizens by his industry, thrift and uprightness of living. 

\\TLLIA]\I L. W'EAVER. Among the prosperous and successful 
farmers of Jackson township, one who deserves special mention is William L. 
Weaver, residing at "Weaver's Hotel," on the Dauphin and Berks turnpike. 
Jackson township, near the Berks cminty line, who was born in Heitlelberg 
township, October 17, 1845, ^ son of Benjamin and Sarah (Letller) Weaver, 
of the above named township. 

Benjamin Weaver was the son of John Weaver, whose father came 
from Germany in the early days of the history of this locality. 

John Weaver, grandfather of William L., was a thrifty and prosperous 
man, for whom the village of W^eavertown was named. He was the father of 
the following family: Daniel. Israel. John, Benjamin, Elizaljeth. Sarah, 
Rebecca and Lucy. A consistent meml^er of the German Baptist Clnn-ch. he 
was active in all good work. In p(Tlitica] matters, he adhered to the principles 
of the Republican party. 



328 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

Benjamin Weaver, the father, born in 1820, and died in 1900, was the 
father of these children: Leah; WilHam L. ; John, of Jackson township; 
Sara, deceased; Henry, of Lebanon county: Samuel, deceased; Mary, Annie 
and Jonathan, of Jackson township. 

William L. Weaver was reared upon the farm in Jackson township, and 
recei\'ed his education in the public schools. Upon attaining to manhood, 
he decided upon an agricultural life, and by hard work and untiring industry 
is now the owner of several fine farms, one of eighty acres, one of eighty-six 
acres, and one of forty acres, all of which are well improved. He is also the 
proprietor of "Weaver's Hotel." 

On December 26, 1869, Mr. Weaver was married to Aliss Mary Hos- 
tetter, daughter of Samuel Hostetter, of Jackson township, and one of a 
family of five children: Elizabeth, wife of John Lefifler; Lydia, wife of Elias 
Brubacker; Catharine, widow of Aaron Bollinger; Mary, wife of William L. 
Weaver ; and Samuel, of Richland. Nine children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Weaver ; Robert ; W'allrow ; Cora, married to Francis Moyer ; Cath- 
eryn, married to Reiley Capp ; Loudie, Augustus, Mary, William and Fides, 
the five last named being at home. 

During a life of hard work and kindly charity. Mr. Weaver has made 
many friends and firmly established himself in the confidence of the neighbor- 
hood. Both he and his estimable wife come of o]d and honorable families in 
this locality, and not only are they themselves a credit to their ancestors, but 
they have reared a fine family of intelligent and prosperous children to carry 
on the name of Weaver, as well as to transmit the many virtues of lx)th the 
\\'eavers and Hostetters to future generations. 

ANDREW KREIDER, one of Annville's most prominent citizens, 
president of the Annville National Bank, and a man who has been identified 
with almost all of the leading public enterprises which have made that town 
and vicinity prosperous, was born on a farm in South Annville township, 
July 18, 1828, a son of David and Sarah (Henry) Kreider. 

The Kreiders are connected by marriage with many of the other old 
and prominent families of Lebanon and Lancaster counties. Jacob Kreider, 
the grandfather of Andrew, was born about two miles south of the city of 
Lebanon, and married Mary Stauffer, daughter of Abraham StaufTer, of a 
prominent family of Lancaster county. Nine children were born to them 
as follows: Elizabeth, David, Joseph, Michael, Nancy, Susan. Kate, Mary 
and Lydia. Jacob Kreider was a son of Henry Kreider, who was born south 
of Lebanon, where the founder of the family settled on coming to America 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 329 

from Switzerland. Se\'eral brutliers of the name came to Pennsylvania 
together, and one of these settled in Lancaster county, and the others in that 
part of Lancaster which is now included in Lebanon county. 

David Kreider, the father of ^Andrew, was born about two and one-half 
miles southwest of the city of Lebanon, October 16, 1803, and died 
December 14, 1871, while the mother was born January 20, 1808, at 
Palmyra, Lebanon county, and died November 6, 1852. Their children 
were as follows: Andrew; David, born in 1832; Henry H., born September 
30, 1835; Mary, born in 1838, married Abraham M. Brightbill ; and Joseph 
H., born January 23, 1841. David Kreider was twice married, his second 
wife being Magdalena Shenk, who was born in Dauphin county, and the 
children of this union were: Elizabeth, deceased; Daniel; Lydia, the wife 
of Henry Kettering; Annie; and Aaron S. 

Andrew Kreider was reared on the farm, and attended the country 
schools in his locality, and also the old Annville Academy. In September, 
1862, during the Civil war, he became a member of a cavalry company of 
Pennsylvania Emergency troops, ready for the defense of the State. 

In 1867 Mr. Kreider erected his present comfortable home in Annville, 
and determined to make this pleasant village his place of residence, since 
which time he has been identified with its prosperity. For several years he 
•engaged in the lumber and real estate business, doing much in this line to 
■bring the town into touch with other parts of the county. In 1873 he was 
one of the organizers of the Annville Savings Bank, which has grown into 
the Annville National Bank, of which he served as vice-president until the 
death of President Judge Kinports, when he became the head of this leading 
financial institution of Lebanon county. No citizen has been more deeply 
interested than he. in the growth of the Lebanon Valley College, an insti- 
tution of learning whose graduates rank with those from much older 
iColleges. 

On May 29, 1866, Andrew Kreider was united in marriage with Emma 
L. Miller, who was born in North Annville, June 12, 1846, a daughter of 
George A. Miller. The children born to this marriage are the following: 
Sallie. Raymond, Edwin and Anna E., all of whom have been given fine 
■educational advantages, and all are graduates of the Lebanon Valley College. 
The United Brethren Church, of which Mr. Kreider is a member, has profited 
much by his generosity, as have the various charities of the locality, his 
private benefactions, however, exceeding his public ones. Mr. Kreider has 
always been public-spirited, and was instrumental _ in getting Annville's 
present water supply, contributing both time and money to that much needed 



330 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

public improvement. In all other public mo\ements he has always been 
found on the side of progress, and is very justly regarded as the town's 
leading and most useful citizen. 

DAVID KREIDER, one of the most prominent and public-spirited 
citizens of Annville, Lebanon county, was born on the old Kreider farm in 
South Annville township, December ii, 1832. a son of David, Sr., and 
Sarah (Henry) Kreider. David Kreider Sr., was twice married, and became 
the father of ten children, eight of whom are still living in Annville with 
their families. The other two are deceased, but are represented in Annville 
by some of their children. 

The boyhood days of David Kreider, our suljject, were spent on his 
father's farm, during which time he attended the common schools of the 
r;eighborhood. Later he enjoyed the advantages of a term of six months at 
Orwigsburg, Schuylkill Co., Pa. In 1855 he married, and for one year worked 
the homestead, and he was but twenty-three years of age when he located in 
Annville and engaged in a milling business, along which line he has continued 
ever since, achieving marked success. The mill he owns is one of the land- 
marks of Lebanon county, having been built during the latter part of the 
e'ghteenth century, in 1793, by Abraham Raiguel, and came into the pos- 
session of the father of Mr. Kreider in 1840, and into its present owner's 
hands in 1856. In addition to his milling interests Mr. Kreider is a director 
of the Annville National Bank, having held that office since 1894, and is one 
of the directors of the Annville Water Company, he and his brothers all being 
interested therein. Mr. Kreider is now, and has been for twelve years, one 
of the managers of the Berks and Dauphin Turnpike Company. He was a 
trustee of the Lebanon Valley College from 1867 to 1887. Mr. Kreider was 
one of five men, the others being John Bachman, Jacob Shertzer. Joseph 
Bcmberger and George Reigler, who bought the Annville Academy, and 
who later sold same to Annville village, the village donating it to the United 
Brethren conference; from that beginning has grown the Lebanon \^alley 
College. Few men are more earnest in their church work than is Mr. 
Kreider, he being- connected with the denomination known as the United 
Brethren in Christ ; he is a trustee of the parsonage. Politically he has 
always been a Republican. 

Mr. Kreider was first married to Leah, daughter of Daniel Kreider, and 
second to Elizabeth, daughter of John B. Graybill. He is the father of the 
following named children: John G., of Annville; David G.. of Annville; 
Joseph Lehn, a student at Yale L^niversity, and Lillian G., at home, a 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 3ji 

teacher of music. Among the representative men of Lebanon county Mr. 
Kreider takes foremost rank, and he and his family are important factors in 
the social life of Annville. 

HENRY H. KREIDER, one of the leading citizens of Annville, vice- 
president of the Annville National Bank, and head of the firm of Kreider & 
Company, dealers in lumber, coal and grain, was born September 30, 1835. 
in the old Kreider homestead in South Annville township, Lebanon county, a 
son of David and Sarah (Henry) Kreider. 

Henry H. Kreider was educated in the public schools of Annville, later 
intending school at Mechanicsburg, and still later the Annville Academy. 
From 1855 to i860 he engaged in teaching school, and from i860 to 1866 
he was in the mercantile business as a member of the firm of Kimports & 
Kreider, disengaging himself in order to embark in a milling business which 
he carried on for some four years. Later he added coal, in 1872 becoming 
interested in coal and grain, and adding lumber in 1891. Mr. Kreider has 
been a very successful business man, and is well and widely known because of 
his large interests in Annville and vicinity. For many years he has been one 
of the most progressive and public spirited of the town's citizens, his interest 
in the growth and development of her resources being shown in the organi- 
zation of the Lebanon Valley College, in 1867, of which he has been a trustee 
ever sirice, and was also treasurer until 1899. To Mr. Kreider more than to 
any other man, on account of his efforts during his long incumbency of the 
oftice of treasurer of the college, is due its development to its present stage. 
Mr. Kreider was also one of the organizers of the Annville National Bank, 
of which he has been a director since its foundation, and since 1893 has been 
its very efficient vice-president. Another large and important business enter- 
prise which owes much to the energ}' of JNIr. Kreider is the Annville Water 
Company, of which he is also president, and he was one of the original 
directors of the electric railroad from Lebanon to Annville, which was subse- 
quently sold to another company, which extended the road to Palmyra. In 
1876 he was elected to the office of prothonotary of Lebanon county for a 
term of three years, and previous to that he was county auditor for a term of 
three years. Mr. Kreider was originally a Whig, and later a strong Repub- 
lican in politics, in which he has taken an active part. His first vote was cast 
for John C. Fremont. He was a delegate to the Republican National Con- 
vention from his native State in 1884, when J^nies G. Blaine was nominated 
for president. 

On September 6, 1859, Mr. Kreider was married to Mary Hoverter, 



332 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

daughter of Christian Hoverter, of Annville, and the following named 
children have been born to this union : Morris David, who is a carpenter by 
trade; William Henry, who graduated from the Lebanon Valley College in 
1894, and from the Law Department of Yale University in 1896, subse- 
quently took a special course in law in 1897, the same year was admitted to 
practice in all the courts of Connecticut, and in 1898 was admitted to the 
Pennsylvania Bar, and is now in successful law practice in Philadelphia, 
being a partner of Senator John C. Grady, the leader of the Republican party 
in the Pennsylvania Legislature; and Mary E., still at home, w^ho took a 
classical course in Lebanon Valley College, graduating in 1899, graduated 
after a course in instrumental music in 1896, and in vocal music in 1898, 
and took a musical course in the London Conservatory of Music in 1898. 

JOSEPH H. KREIDER, brother of Andrew, was born January 23, 
1841, receiving an excellent education, studying at Mt. Pleasant L"nion Col- 
lege, in Westmoreland county. Pa., at Lebanon \''alley Institution, at Dickin- 
son Seminary, Williamsport, and at the State Normal Institute, Lancaster. 
He taught during the intervals of his attendance at these institutions in South 
Annville, and North Annville two terms, teaching three terms altogether. 
However, he had taken the responsibilities of life upon his shoulders at a 
much earlier age, when a mere boy of fourteen or fifteen years, buying and 
selling stock and grain for his father. He left home when sixteen years old, 
and from that time w^as self-supporting. When twenty-three years old. in 
1863, he bought what is known as the Clear Spring Mill, to which he gave 
its present name; he took possession in 1864. During 1864-65 he bought 
and sold hay to the government in partnership with his brother, Andrew. In 
1865 he began milling, and in 1868 reconstructed the mill. He has continued 
in that line ever since, and for a time had, as a partner, his brother, H. H. 
Kreider. Buying him out he took his son Gideon into partnership in 1888, 
and the firm is now known as Joseph H. Kreider & Son. They have another 
mill at Penrythe, being large manufacturers of flour for shipment. Mr. 
Kreider was one of the organizers in 1889 of the Millers' Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, of Harrisburg, Pa., has been treasurer ever since its 
organization, and is also a member of the board of directors. He was one of 
the organizers of the Annville Savings Bank : was one of the original 
organizers of the Annville Water Works Company, of which he has been a 
director ever since. Believing that the best interests of the town could be 
furthered by having a good conservative paper, Mr. Kreider, in conjunction 
with Rev. J. R. Meredith, started a paper in 1887, which was called the 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 333 

Jnnville Journal. At the expiration of two years Mr. Meredith retired, but 
Mr. Kreider retained its management until recently. From the first this ven- 
ture was a success, and tended much to the advancement of the town, its voice 
being always on the side of progress, and its columns open for discussion on 
all civic matters. Mr. Kreider relinquished its management with reluctance, 
and only because he felt the time had come for him to lay aside some of his 
interests in order to take life a little easier. He is one of the managers of the 
Berks & Dauphin Turnpike Road Co., a position he has filled for twenty-one 
years. He was for fourteen years engaged in quarrying limestone for the 
furnaces, beginning in about 1879- 1880. In partnership with his son-in-law, 
C. M. Coover, he also owns the Lebanon Paper Box Factory, which was started 
in Annville five years ago. Two years ago they built in Lebanon, and moved 
the works to that city. Such has l:)een the success of this concern that on 
December 23, 1903, it was incorporated, with a capital of $30,000. Thus it 
will be seen that Mr. Kreider has taken a leading and active part in the devel- 
opment of home industries and numerous enterprises calculated to raise 
the standard of progress and prosperity in his community, and contributing 
materially toward its welfai'e. In religion he is a member of the United 
Brethren Church. 

]\Ir. Kreider was married February 23, 1864, to Anna Catherine Boiler, 
daughter of William and Emma (Hansell) Boiler, of Philadelphia. Four 
children have blessed this union: (i) Gideon R., born January 6, 1865, is 
interested in business with his father, and is manager of the People's Ice Com- 
pany, of Harrisburg. Pa. He married Anna W. Brunner, daughter of William 
E. Brunner, of Campbelltown. (2) Emma Sara, born January 22, 1868, 
married C. M. Coover, of Annville, a box manufacturer of Lebanon. (3) D. 
Albert, born March 23, 1871, received his primary schooling in Annville, 
graduated from Lebanon Valley College in 1892, in the classical course, and 
took a post-graduate course in Yale L^ni\'ersity, which he attended for three 
years, taking the degree of Ph. D. He was appointed assistant in chemistry 
before he was graduated, was then elected by the corporation instructor in 
physics, and in 1902 was elected assistant professor in physics. He married 
Anna Ruth Forney, a graduate of Lebanon Valley College, class of 1892, 
classical course. (4) Josephine, born ]\Iarch 16, 1873, married C. Y. Henry, 
the present district attorney of Lebanon county. All of the family have had 
the advantages of college education. 

AARON SHENK KREIDER, proprietor of the A. S. Kreider & Co. 
shoe factory, Annville, one of the large and important industries of that place. 



334 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

was born in South Annville township June 26, 1863, a son of David and Alag- 
dalena (Shenk) Kreider. the latter a daughter of Christian Shenk. Mrs. 
Kreider was born in 1818, in Dauphin county, and died in 1887, at the age 
of sixty-nine years. 

Aaron S. Kreider was reared on the farm, and remained there until the 
death of his father, when he accompanied his mother to Campbelltown, Leba- 
non county. There he attended the public schools and later Lebanon Valley 
College, still later studying at the Allentown Business College, from which he 
graduated in 1880. Going West, he visited friends at Fulton. Mo., and for 
some time engaged in farm work in that locality, later accepting a clerical posi- 
tion in the town, in the mercantile house of Spicer, Smith & Co., remaining 
there some three years. In the spring of 1883 '^^ started out to make an over- 
land trip through the western States, to see the country and for recreation, the 
journey covering Missouri. Kansas, Nebraska and the two Dakotas, and end- 
ing in Minnesota. Toward the close of the year he returned to Pennsylvania 
and accepted a position as clerk in the hardware store of E. Dissinger, at 
Campbelltown, where he remained until the spring of 1885. ^"^1 then took 
charge of Mr. Dissinger's store, at Roseland, Lebanon county. In the spring 
of 1886 he began farming, and at the same time built a warehouse and coal 
landing on the Cornwall & Lebanon railroad, and brought to bear influence 
which resulted in the establishment of a postofifice at that point, which he named 
Lawn. Mr. Kreider is really the founder of the town, as there was nothing 
there when he secured the side track in 1886. Engaged in his various lines of 
business, managing his farm and shipping grain and stock extensively, Mr. 
Kreider was one of the most progressive and successful citizens of the village, 
where he remained until 1893, when he removed to Palmyra. Here he rented 
from the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Co. coal yards, and from W. L. 
Kreider a warehouse, and began looking into the prospects for other industrial 
enterprises. In the spring of 1894 he rented the plant of the Palmyra Boot & 
Shoe Co., which he operated until the spring of 1895. wdien he built a factory at 
Annville. The plant was a small one at the beginning, but has been enlarged 
from time to time until it is now a commodious four-story brick structure, front- 
ing 130 feet on Railroad street and 187 on Sheridan avenue, with floor space of 
about 46,000 square feet : employment is given to about five hundred people, 
^^•ho turn out ladies', misses' and children's shoes. Full of energ}- and business 
acumen, capable of handling enterprises of magnitude, Mr. Kreider, in 1901, 
embarked in another industry, which promises to be of vast importance in the 
industrial world in Lancaster county. This was the foiTnation of the Kreider 
Shoe Manufacturing Co., of Elizabethtown, Lancaster countv, which is a 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 335 

stock company, and of which he is both president and general manager. This 
concern turns out boys', youths" and little gents' shoes, and has already gained 
a prominent position in the trade. The other enterprises with which Mr. 
Kreider is prominently connected are the Lebanon Valley Savings & Loan 
Association, of which he is president, with headquarters at Lebanon, and the 
Washington Mutual P'ire Insurance Company, of which he has long been a 
director. He has been treasurer of the Pennsylvania Shoe Manufacturers' 
Association since its organization September 19, 1899, and director and 
member of the executive committee. 

Mr. Kreider has a happy home and is surrounded by a family of 
intelligent children. On April 26, 1885, he was united in marriage with 
Elizabeth Bucher Horst, who was born June 16, 1864. at what is known as 
Horst's Mill, half wav between Schaefferstown and Cornwall. Mrs. Kreider 
is the daughter of Henry Horst, who was born at Horst's Mill, which he later 
owned, the property having been in the possession of his father and grand- 
father. It is one of the historic old homes of the county, settled very many 
years ago by German pioneers. Nine children were born to ]Mr. and Mrs. 
Kreider, as follows: Amnion; David Robert; Aaron S., Jr.; Henry H. ; 
Alfred Joseph, who died in 1802, aged two years; Clement; Howard; Nancy; 
and Elizabeth. Perhaps Mr. Kreider's first interest outside of the welfare of 
his family and the development of his large business organizations, is in the 
German Baptist Church, of South Annville, in which he is active, and to 
which he is a generous contributor. He is also a trustee of Elizabethtown 
College, an institution controlled by that denomination. 

Mr. Kreider's great business success must be regarded as but the just 
result of clear-headed judgment and business foresight, combined witli 
executive ability of an unusual order. Aside from this Mr. Kreider is an 
honest, upright man. whose reliability and integrity are far beyond question 
?nd he has not onlv gained, but has held, the respect and esteem of business 
associates, employes and personal friends. 

REV. JOHN MITCHEL PAGE, rector of St. Luke's Episcopal 
Chin"ch. Lebanon, comes of the Colonial Virginia family of that name, but 
was born in what is now the borough of Bronx, in the city of New ^'ork. 
son of Roger Jones Page, and a grandsniT of Rev. Charles Page, of Amherst. 
Virginia. 

Roger Jones Page was born in Louisville, Ky., and was prominent at the 
Bar of that State. He died in 1889. The mother of the Rev. Mr. Page was 
Mary Mitchel. daughter of John Mitchel, leader of the Irish-National party 



336 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

in 1848, and subsequently a journalist in New York City. Mrs. Page makes 
her home with her son at the Rectory. 

The boyhood days of Rev. John Mitchel Page ^vere spent in Kentucky, 
but he later returned to New York and entered Columbia College, where he 
was graduated in the class of 1887. For three years he pursued the study 
of architecture, then his chosen profession, and was for a time on the staff 
of the Municipal Bureau of Buildings, in New York City. Through his active 
interest in the Brotherhood of St. Andrew, of which he was one of the Na- 
tional Council, Mr. Page was drawn into the work of the Church, and in the 
autumn of 1891 he laid aside his architectural work in order to prepare for 
the priesthood. Entering the General Seminary in New York City, he pur- 
sued a three years" course, and was made Deacon on Trinity Sunday, 1894, 
and ^\•as ordained to the priesthood on Septuagesima Sunday, 1895. As a 
Seminarian Rev. Mr. Page was one of the staff of St. Andrew's, Harlem. 
Flis first regular charge was the curacy of St. John's, Boston Highlands, 
from which position he was called to be vicar of the Chapel of the Heavenly 
Rest, New York City. During the summer of 1896 he acted as rector of St. 
Paul's Church, at St. Paul, Minn., taking the place of his old friend. Rev. 
John Wright, during his absence in Europe. It was during his residence in 
St. Paul that he was called to the temporary charge of St. Luke's at Leb- 
anon. This was in the fall of the above year, and in November following, 
he was tendered the rectorship of St. Luke's ; it was accepted by him on the 
strength of a petition presented to the vestr}-, by a large majority of the 
parishioners. Mr. Page has been conducting the work of the parish, together 
with its missions at W'est Lebanon and Colebrook, along the normal lines, 
and uniler his administration, the work has continued to increase. The 
enlarging work of the parish demands more accommodation than can be sup- 
plied by the church and Rectory, consequently some members of the parish 
have erected a Parish House, adjoining the church edifice, and fronting on 
Sixth street. Rev. Mr. Page serves as Warden of the Church Home at Jones- 
town, for four years was chairman of the committee of Education of the 
Diocese of Central Pennsylvania, and in 189S he was one of the speakers at 
the National Church Congress, held at Pittsfield, Massachusetts. 

During his rectorship Mr. Page has had many distinguished clergymen 
of New York and other points to visit St. Luke's. He is a man of scholarly 
training and dignified bearing, devoted to his calling, and happy in the assur- 
ance that his efforts are appreciated by his parishioners and that he enjovs 
their confidence and support. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 337 

CYRUS M. CHRIST, one of the leading and representative business 
men of Lebanon county, and proprietor of the hotel at Bismarck, known as 
the "Cornwall House," was born in Lancaster county, on the Elizabeth Farm. 
September 2;^. 1855, son of William and Mary (Marks) Christ. 

Cyrus M. Christ was only fourteen years of age when the family removed 
to Coatesville, Chester Co., Pa., and after three years the young fellow started 
out in life for himself, settling at Cornwall. Lebanon county, where, until 
1897, he spent the greater portion of his time working in the ore banks and 
furnace, with remarkable success. At this time he took charge of the "Corn- 
wall House," at Bismarck, and has since continued in this line with very 
satisfactory results. Possessing a social and genial manner, Mr. Christ is 
eminently fitted for his business, and enjoys a large patronage. In politics, 
he is a stanch Republican, and has acceptably filled the offices of collector and 
assessor of Cornwall township. Mr. Christ is also a member of Camp 70, 
P. O. S. A., Bismarck. 

In 1875, Mr. Christ was married to Miss Emma Snyder, of Cornwall, 
daughter of John and Susan (Gushard) Snyder. Six children have been 
born to them: Sallie, wife of Samuel Menser, a grocer of Lebanon city, and 
the mother of two children, Dorothy and an infant daughter; Flarry, at hi)me, 
who married Stella Smith, and has one child, Plilda ; Charlie, who married 
Miss Rachael Carpenter, and resides in Bismarck; Mamie; Margie and 
Frank. Mrs. Christ is a consistent member of the Lutheran Church, in which 
she takes an active part, and the entire family are important factors in the 
social life of Bismarck. 

HENRY WARREN SIEGRIST. One of the prominent young citizens 
of Lebanon, Pa., is Henry Warren Siegrist, treasurer of the Cornwall and 
Lebanon Railroad Company, who was born in that city. May 26, 1869. 

The great-great-grandfather of Air. Siegrist was John Lorenzo Siegrist, 
who was the first American ancestor of the family. He sailed from Rotter- 
dam, Holland, on the ship "Eastern Branch." Capt. James Nevin, in the 
year 1753, and qualified in Pennsylvania, October 3, 1753. His birth 
occurred in 1731, and his death in Lel^^non county, in 1825. His wife, 
Magdalena Null, was born in 1751. and died in 1806. Their children were: 
John, Jacob, Magdalena, Maria, Anna Maria, Christiana, Rebecca and Solo- 
mon. John Lorenzo Siegrist settled <m a farm in what is now South .\nn- 
ville township, one-half mile from the village of Annville. 

Solomon Siegrist was born in Lebanon county, near Annville, in 1771. 
eldest child of John Lorenzo, and died in 1824. The issue from his marriage 



338 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

with Christiana Yetter was as follows : Henry, John, William, Daniel, 
Samuel, Elizabeth, Molly, Catherine, Rebecca and Sallie. 

Henry Siegrist, the eldest son of Solomon, was born on the farm in 
South Annville township, March i6, 1800, and died August 13, 1874. For 
many years he was a farmer and an extensive dealer in cattle. In later 
years he removed to Lebanon, and spent many years there as the proprietor 
of the "Eagle Hotel." Henry Siegrist married Hannah M. Carmany, born 
November i, 1801. and died February 6, 1886. Their children were the fol- 
lowing : Caroline, who married Isaac Hoffer, the first mayor of Lebanon, 
and both are now deceased; John H., who married Molly F. Farrow, of St. 
Louis, Mo., where she resides; David C, Avho married Lina Bowman, and 
resides at St. Louis. Mo. : Louisa, who married Henry T. Hoffman, both 
•deceased; Priscilla, who married Henry T. Hofifman, both deceased; Rebecca, 
Jacob and Barbara, all died unmarried; and Aaron F.. the father of Henrj^ 
A\'arren. 

Aaron F. Siegrist. tlie youngest son of Henry, was born on the old 
homestead near Annville. January 29. 1845, ^i""^' ^^'^d October 26, 1899. 
He succeeded his father as proprietor of the "Eagle Hotel," and in 1882 
became freight and ticket agent for the Cornwall & Lebanon Railroad, at 
Lebanon, which position he held until the time of his death. Mr. Siegrist 
became a prominent man in local affairs, served as a member of the borough 
council, and was also on the school board of the city. Mr. Siegrist was 
past officer of all the Masonic bodies of Lebanon. In 1868 he married Emma 
L. Zimmerman, who was born in Lebanon, January 19. 1846. a daughter 
of Henry Zimmerman, an old and prominent citizen of Lebanon, and a lead- 
ing contractor and builder of that city for a long period. The only child 
of Henry and Emma Siegrist was Henry Warren. 

Henrv Warren Siegrist was reared in Lebanon, and attended the city 
schools, graduating with credit from the high school in June. 1885. In 
the following month he entered the general office of the Cornwall & Lebanoti 
Railroad, at Lebanon, as office boy, but was soon promoted, and from March 
to September. 1886. was occupying a position as clerk in the general office 
of the road; from September. 1886, to March. 1892. was accounting clerk; 
from March. 1892. to January. 1897, was chief clerk: and then w^as made 
treasurer of the road, a position which he still holds. 

Mr. Siegrist is prominent in business, church and social circles in 
Lebanon ; is a past officer of the different Masonic bodies of the city ; is 
treasurer of the Y. INT. C. A. ; a member of the Pennsylvania Society. Sor.s 
of the Revolution ; and the Pennsvlvania German Society ; and is identified 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 339 

with other social organizations. Frcm 18S3 to 1895 ^^^ ^^'^s organist and 
choirmaster of Salem Lutheran Church, and since 1895, has tilled that posi- 
tion at Zion Lutheran Church. 

On April 29, 1896, Mr. Siegrist was united in marriage with Margaret 
Grayson Valentine, daughter of Rev. Milton Valentine, D. D., LL. D., presi- 
dent of the Lutheran Theological Seminary, of Gettysburg, Pa., the latter 
being one of the oldest as well as most distinguished Lutheran ministers and 
scholars in this country, and who married Margaret Grayson Gait, of an 
old and prominent Maryland family. 

HENR^' CLAY DEANER, one of the representative men of Annville, 
and one who enjoys in highest degree the confidence and respect of his fellow 
townsmen, w'as born at Keedysville, Washington Co., Md., November 13, 
1854, a son of Jonas S. and Ann Maria (Baker) Deaner. The father was 
born in the same county, in 1824, and his wife was born in the same localitv 
and year. The paternal grandfather was Samuel Deaner, also a native of 
Washington count}-, Md. The maternal grandfather, Jacob Baker, was a 
native of Germany. The ancestors on both sides were among the early set- 
tlers of Maryland. 

Jonas S. Deaner served in the war with Mexico, and upon his return 
he resumed his occupation of school teaching, although later in life he became 
a farmer. During his lifetime, he served for three or four years as counts- 
commissioner of Washington county, Md., and was a worthy and higiily 
esteemed man. The mother still survives, and her mother lived to the 
advanced age of ninetv-eight years, seven months and twenty-nine davs, 
retaining her faculties to the last. The children born to Jonas S. Deaner 
and his wife were: Arbelin, who died young; Eugenia, married to Daniel 
M. Neikerk, of Washington county, Md. ; Henry Clay ; Webster, who died 
young; Faimie ]\Iay, married to Daniel D. Keedy. of Rohrersville, Washing- 
ton County, Alaryland. 

Henry Clay Deaner attended the public schools and completed a classi- 
cal course at the Lebanon Valley College in 1879. During 1879-80, he 
taught in a select school at Hagerstown, Md., and from 1880 to 1885 was 
professor of ]\Iathematics and Astronomy at the Lebanon A'allev College, 
and from 1885 to 1897 was professor of Latin and .Vstronomv. Since that 
time he has been extensively engaged in the horticultural business, growing 
peaches, pears and plums in an orchard of 100 acres in the peach belt of 
Maryland. However, he has always taken a deep interest in educational 
matters, and is now a school director of South Annville township. 



340 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

On June 21, 1882. Prof. Deaner married Ella J. Rigler, of Annville. 
Pa. One child was born to this union, but it died in infancy. Prof. Deaner 
is a member of the United Brethren Church, and is a pioneer of the Chau- 
tauqua movement in Pennsylvania, and has been a member of the board of 
directors for many years. He has a cottage at the Chautauqua, Mt. Gretna, 
Pa. Prof. Deaner is a man of high culture, marked ability and extensive 
reading, a fine conversationalist and a gentleman \\'hose erudition is profound. 

GEORGE H. STEINER, a thrifty and successful farmer of Jackson 
township, residing on a pleasant and finely cultivated farm one and one-half 
miles northwest of Myerstown, Pa., was born October 26, 1852, a son of Levi 
and Rebecca (Loose) Steiner. A full account of the Steiner and Loose 
families will be found elsewhere. 

Levi Steiner, the father of George H., is a retired farmer of Myerstown, 
and one of the esteemed citizens of that community, and during his active 
life was one of the successful farmers of Jackson township. Levi Steiner 
is the son of Christian Steiner. also a farmer and native of Jackson township, 
and probably the son of Michael Steiner, recorded as one of the very early 
settlers of this locality, who founded the Steiner homestead, still in the 
family. Christian Steiner became the father of two children : Levi ; and 
Susan, now deceased, who married Adam Loose. Levi Steiner married 
Rebecca Loose, of Jackson township, and three children were born of this 
marriage: George H. ; Jonathan; and Magdalina married Monroe Haak, of 
Myerstown. Levi Steiner and his most estimable wife are members of the 
Lutheran Church of Myerstown, and have many friends in that city. 

George H. Steiner was reared upon his father's farm, receiving a most 
excellent education, first in the common schools, then at the Myerstown 
Academy, and still later at what is now Albright College of Myerstown. 
After completing his education, Mr. Steiner decided to follow an agricultural 
life, and now owns and occupies a finely cultivated form of eighty-four, acres, 
known as the Uhrich farm, where he and his wife make a pleasant home and 
extend a warm hospitality to a large circle of friends. On Mav 11. 1875. '"i^ 
was united in marriage with Miss Amanda Uhrich, the only child of 
John and Priscilla (Swartz) Uhrich, of Jackson township, and early 
settlers of Lebanon county, a full sketch of whom appears in the life of 
Valentine D. Uhrich to be found elsewhere. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. 
Steiner has been blessed with four children : Rebecca P. is unmarried ; Caroline 
M.. graduated at Albright College in 1900, and is now the wife of Aug. 
Grove, of Bluffton, Ind. ; Uhrich L. attended xA.lbright College, and January 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 341 

8, 1903, married Sallie M. Schoener; and Anna Magdalina graduated from 
Myerstown high school in 1903. Thoroughly believing in giving his children 
a good education, Mr. Steiner has spared no pains or expense in equipping 
them for the battle of life. In politics Mr. Steiner is a stanch Republican, 
and takes an active part in local affairs. For three years he served as school 
director, and during his occupancy of that office, the Myerstown high school 
was erected, the success of the undertaking being largely due to his ability 
and intelligent foresight. The family are all members of tlie Lutheran 
Church, in which he has long been an elder and deacon. The Steiner 
family occupy an important place in the social life of the community, and all 
enjoy in an unbounded degree the esteem of all who know them. 

REV. P. C. CROLL. A man of ripe scholarship and marked executive 
ability, whose life has been consecrated to the cause of the Master and to the 
uplifting of men, there is particular pro])riety in here directing attention to 
the life history of the pastor of the Lutheran Church of Lebanon. He has 
devoted himself without ceasing to the interest of humanity, and to the fur- 
therance of all good works. His reputation is not restricted, and his power 
and influence in his holy office have been exerted in a spirit of deepest human 
sympathy and tender solicitude. There has not been denied him the full 
harvest, nor the aftermath whose garnering shall bring him the full reward in 
the words of commendation, "Well done, good and faithful servant!" Flis 
wide acquaintance in the State, and his prominence as an author of religious 
literature will make his history one of peculiar interest to the readers of this 
volume. 

Rev. Mr. Croll is at the present time pastor of the Seventh Street Luth- 
eran Church, of Lebanon, which in the few years of his pastorate he has made 
one of the leading church organizations of the city. He was born October 2, 
1852, near Kutztown, Pa., and is the sixth son of John and Catherine Croll. 
He was reared amid the quiet and peaceful scenes of rural life, on a small 
farm in Lehigh county, and where he was grounded in the elementary 
branches in the district school. Leaving the farm at sixteen, he matriculated 
at the Keystone State Normal School, alternating his studies with teaching 
three winter terms. In 1873 he entered Pennsylvania College at Gettysburg, 
from which he was graduated with honor in 187G. Having felt the prompt- 
ings of Divine inspiration towards the ministry, he at this time enrolled as a 
student in the Theological Seminary of the same place, and after a course of 
three years was ordained to the ministry of the Lutheran Church. 

Rev. Mr. Croll's first pastorate was at Womelsdorf, the active work of 



342 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

which he took up immediately on his graduation. This large country parish 
he served successfully until December, 1882, when he was called to the pastor- 
ate of St. Matthew's English Lutheran Church at Schuylkill Haven. In the 
following ten years he there established that reputation for indefatigable and 
tireless work which is his distinguishing characteristic. Under his guiding 
hand the parish grew to large proportions, erected a beautiful new church 
edifice, and made many other marked improvements. The field at Lebanon 
ofTering a wider scope for his talents, Rev. Mr. CroU on October i, 1892. 
accepted a call from the Seventh Street Lutheran Church, and has since that 
time devoted himself to its service. Here he has met with the most flattering 
success, and has built up one of the largest church organizations and Sunday 
Schools in the city. A heavy debt has been liquidated, and many improve- 
ments made to the church property. In the ecclesiastical life of his denomin- 
ation Rev. Mr. Croll is a prominent figure, having been honored w-ith many 
of the important offices in the Synod. He has thrice represented it in the 
General Synod, has traveled extensively in his country, and is one of the best 
known divines of his church. 

But it is not alone to his active life in ministerial work that Rev. 'Sir. Croll 
owes his prominence. He early became a prolific and facile writer on religious 
subjects, and is looked upon in this line as a trenchant and powerful exponent 
of the truth. Besides hundreds of articles in such leading papers as the 
Lutheran Observer, Nezi' York Voice, Christiaji Work, Nezc York Independ- 
ent, Homiletical Rex'iei^.', Lutheran Quarterly and Historical Register, his 
honored name will be found appended to the following as author : "Essay on 
Scott's Marmion," "Jesus and Hillel" (Elevir Library series), "Jewish 
Artisan Life" (Fatherland Books), three chapters in "Koestlin's Life of 
Luther'' (Translations), "Tributes to Luther" (a quarto centennial volume). 
"Alii, or Blessed are the Merciful" (Fatherland series), "Ancient and His- 
torical Landmarks in the Lebanon Valley," an illustrated work, and the text 
of "Lebanon County in Art." a large folio. A beautiful little brochure, called 
"In Memoriam," in memory of a favorite deceased daughter, is one of the 
most touching of the products of Rev. CroU's pen. His last work is called 
"Bible-Quiz," a booklet of practical questions and answers on the sacred book. 

In the field of periodical literature Rev. Mr. Croll has been quite active 
also. He is the founder and editor of the Pennsylvania German, a magazine 
of high rank, and much sought after by the class for whom it is published. 
He was editor for three years of the St. Matthezc's Lutheran Herald, a parish 
paper. An(^ther line of work in which he has taken a helpful interest is the 
Lebanon Countv Historical Societv, of which he was one of the founders, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 343 

before which lie has read several helpful papers and original poems. He is 
also a member of the Pennsylvania German Society. For six years he was 
a member of the board of directors of the Loysville Orphans" Home. 

Rev. Mr. Croll is a pulpit orator i^f much power. He is called on fre- 
quently to officiate in other pulpits, and in 1900 was honored by being invited 
to deliver the Alumni address at his Alma Mater, a duty which he performed 
with much satisfaction to his fellow alumni. 

The domestic life of our honored subject has been most felicitous, the 
lady whom he chose as a life-companion and helpmeet having proved an 
invaluable aid in his different ministerial fields. Her maiden name was 
Sallie A. Greiss, daughter of Philip and Catharine Greiss, and their marriage 
took place in Alburtis, Pa., the place of her residence, March 11, 1880. She 
has become the mother of a bright and interesting family, whose names are 
as follows: Edward Everett, born January 15, 1881 ; Rose Wentworth, born 
April 28, 1883, now deceased; Herbert Greiss, born February 11, 1886; 
Philip Raymond, born November 29, 1887, now^ deceased; Annie Katharine, 
born April 17, 1889; Paul Revere, born January i, 1892; Alden Theodore, 
born January 12, 1894; and Hilda Marion, born August 31, 1895. 

JOHN K. FUNCK is a member of one of the oldest families of Lebanon 
county, and has himself been for the past fifty years prominently identified 
with the business interests of the city of Lebanon. He is a man who merits 
the highest respect of his associates, and is most worthy of representation in 
this volume. 

John K. Funck w-as born in Lebanon county, on his father's farm near 
the city, September 3, 1836. His great-grandfather was Martin Funck, wh(j 
settled in Lebanon county, then a part of Lancaster, just west of the city 
of Lebanon. He died in December, 1796, leaving children as follows: 
Martin, Jr. ; Ann, who married Henry Fox ; Barbara, wdio married Henry 
Neave; Mary, who became Mrs. George Gloninger; Magdalena, who married 
Henry Light, Jr. ; Christina, Mrs. Christian Oberholtz ; and Elizabeth, who 
married John Hauer. 

Martin Funck, Jr., grandfather of John K., w^as born November 29, 1766. 
On March 4, 1792, he married Barbara Longenecker, and to them came the 
following children : Barbara, born in 1795; Martin, 1707; Elizabetli. 1799; 
Jacob, 1801 ; Elizabeth (2), 1802; John, 1805; and Maria and Ann, twins, 
1811. 

Jacob Funck, father of John K., was born April 16, 1801, on the old 
Funck homestead west of Lebanon. He was a worthv member of the agri- 



344 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

cultural class throughout his lifetime, and died in 1880. He was twice 
married, the first marriage taking place March 3, 1825, when he was joined 
to Sallie Bowman. She died in January, 1830, aged twenty-nine years, three 
months and sixteen days. Her children were: Josiah, born in December, 
1825, who died July 17, 1896; and Levi, born in December, 1827, who died 
January 30, 1838. The second marriage of Mr. Funck took place December 
31, 1830, which he married Mary Kreider, who became the mother of Sarah, 
born November 29, 183 1 ; Jacob, October 14, 1834; John K., September 3, 
1836; Mary, May 28, 1838; Barbara, March 28, 1840; Adam, April 29, 
1843 ' ^"d Lydia, April 2-], 1847. 

John K. Funck was born on the date given above and attended the com- 
mon schools and later the Lebanon Academy. After leaving school he 
taught until the close of the school year of 1856, when he engaged in the 
dry goods business continuing in that line until 1879, "^^hen he retired from the 
business on account of ill health. In 1883 he entered into the millinery busi- 
ness, but retired from that line in 1893 to accept the treasurership of the 
Lebanon Boiler, Foundry & Machine Company. In 1895 ^^ accepted the 
snperintendency of the American Safety Head Match Company, since which 
time he has been engaged in settling up estates. 

During the Civil war Mr. Funck was a member of the Emergency Troops, 
serving in the company commanded by his brother, Josiah. In his younger 
days he served a term as councilman from the Third ward of the city, and in 
February, 1902, he was again elected to that body from the Second ward, 
and is now serving in that position with much acceptance. He affiliates with 
the Grand Army of the Republic, being a member of Sedgwick Post, No. 42. 
He is also a member of Castle No. 497, Knights of the Golden Eagle, and 
holds the honorable position of State Representative of that society. 

On September 6, 1859, Mr. Funck married Catherine Jane Grittinger, 
a member of one of the leading old pioneer families of the county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Funck are worthy members of Zion Lutheran Church, and are 
ranked among Lebanon's most solid and substantial citizens. 

HENRY L. ARNOLD. Of the many prominent business men of 
Lebanon there are few. if any. more widely known or more sincerely 
respected for square dealings and honesty than Henry L. Arnold. He was 
born in North Lebanon. Pa.. December 5. 1828. and is one of the many 
hundreds of Arnolds in this country, most of whom have descended from 
seven brothers, who settled in different parts of the American colonies prior 
to the Revolution. 




a^a.C ^^^^-^^t^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 345 

Both his grandfather, John Arnold, and his father, John Arnold, Jr.. 
were born and reared in Lebanon county, and both were farmers. His father 
married Catherine Riddle, and they had eight children : Polly, a resident of 
Lebanon ; John, of Burlington, Iowa ; Sarah, of Lebanon ; Joseph and 
Lucetta, now deceased; Henry, mentioned below; George, a retired merchant 
of Lebanon, who has a sketch elsewhere in this volume; and Edward, who 
after a service of nearly forty years as railroad freight agent, was killed near 
his office while crossing the Reading railroad track. 

Henry L. Arnold spent his childhood on a farm, and received such edu- 
cation as the common schools could offer, and a naturally keen intellect could 
master. At the age of nineteen he left his home and learned the blacksmith's 
trade, at which for several years afterward he worked diligently. For 
three years he was located at Fredericksburg, and was there married. About 
1853 he moved to Lebanon and opened up a shop; while he still continued 
his blacksmith's work, he also, after about five years, commenced the manu,- 
facture of brick, and was thus engaged for some six years. Not content with 
these demands upon his time, he invested largely in real estate, opened up 
Leman street and built houses in that section. He still owns some twenty 
houses in different parts of the city. Later he secured a position as foreman 
and master mechanic of the railroad shops owned by the Lebanon & Corn- 
wall Railroad Company. So admirably did he fill this place that he remained 
nere nearly tw-enty-six years making a record quite phenomenal. Finally, in 
1893, he gave up his position with ihe railroad company, and engaged in the 
brewing business. With John Hartman as partner, he purchased of S. 
Seibert & Meiley, assignees, then by sheriff's sale again in 1894 the brewery 
in North Lebanon, now run under the name of the New Lebanon Brewery 
Company, in which Mr. Arnold owns a two-thirds interest. This company 
has become a noted and leading one in Lebanon. By steady application to 
business throughout his life, and by wise management of his financial affairs, 
Mr. .A.rnold has amassed considerable wealth, and he now owns, besides his 
interest in the brewery, considerable valuable property in Lebanon. 

In 1852. when about twenty-four years old. Mr. Arnold married 
Henrietta Ulrich, of Lebanon county, daughter of Samuel Ulrich. and they 
have had eight children, five of whom grew to maturit}'. John Adam is a 
coal dealer of Lebanon. Pa. Francis is next in the order of birth. The others 
are married : Alice to Frank Swieser, of Reading. Pa. ; Catherine to Pious 
Arnold, of Lebanon; and Amelia, to Philip Arnold, of that city. Mr. Arnold 
has always evinced a keen interest in politics and votes the Democratic ticket. 
He belongs to the Roman Catholic Church. Much of his life has been spent 



346 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

in directing men working under him, and he has won an excellent reputation 
for fairness and justice in his dealings. Indeed he is well-liked wherever he 
is known, and he has many warm friends in his city. 

AUGUSTUS MAULFAIR, a leading citizen of North Annville town- 
ship, was born at Maul fair Store, at the Union Waterworks, North Annville 
township, Lebanon county, July 15, 1843. a son of Daniel and Sarah N. 
(Clark) Maul fair. 

Daniel Maulfair Avas born October 29, 1812, on the old family home- 
stead, about a half mile southwest from Belle Grove (which farm is now 
owned by Joseph Wagner), and died December 30, 1887. He was a son of 
John Maulfair, who was also born in Lebanon county. The great-grand- 
father of Augustus Maulfair was born in Germany and came to America 
with a brother, they being as far as discovered, the only members of the 
family who ever crossed the ocean. Together they established the old Maul- 
fair homestead. This was in pioneer days and before the country had been 
settled in their vicinity. The brother was killed by the Indians and his wife 
was captured, but she escaped from the savages five years later, but never 
recovered from the hardships she had been forced to endure, and died soon 
after. As they left no issue, John succeeded to the whole property. He had 
these children: Michael, who married Christina Ellenberger; John, who 
married Elizabeth Seltzer; Elizabeth, who married Peter Beck; Jacob, who 
married Sabina Winters; Henry, who married Elizabeth Walborn, of Berks 
county; Catherine, who married David Wagner; Polly, who married 
Abraliam Bowman ; Daniel ; William, who married Eliza Bolton ; Sarah, who 
married George Miller; Joseph, who married Priscilla Staeger; Mary, who 
married Joseph Earley ; and Rebecca, who married Samuel Zimmerman. 

Daniel Maulfair, the father of Augustus, married Sarah N. Clark, who 
was born August 1 1, 1820, in the neighborhood of Bunker Hill, a daughter of 
John and Elizabeth (Ellenberger) Clark, the former of whom was born in 
Lebanon county, a son of Jacob Clark, and tlie latter of whom was a 
daughter of Jacob Ellenberger. The children of IMr. and Mrs. Clark were : 
Sarah, the miOther of Augustus Maulfair; Mary, the wife of Elijah Weidner; 
Rebecca, who died at the age of one year; Elizabeth, the wife of John Frank; 
John, who married Lucilla Bowman; Amanda, the wife of Jacob Mark; and 
Amos, single. 

The children of Daniel and Sarah (Clark) Maulfair were: Augustus; 
Amos, who married Emma Losh, of Lebanon ; Tacy Ann, married Isaac 
Steiner, of Sparrows Point, ]\Id., and they had children: Warren (born 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 347 

February 11, 1877), Tacy Ann (born July 3, 1882, died in 1892), and 
Landrie M. (born November 10, 1888) ; and Daniel, who married Sarah 
Lick, resides at Lebanon and has two children, Forest and Tacy. On May 
3, 1843, Daniel Maulfair opened a store at the Union Waterworks, and this 
enterprise has been in the hands of the family ever since. It was here that 
Augustus Maulfair learned the principles of business. His education was 
begun in the common schools, and completed by six months at the Annville 
Academy. In April, 1868, he succeeded to the store, and has conducted it 
continuously ever since except from April, 1876, until April, 1878, during 
which time it was rented to Ephraim Borgner. In April, 1878, /\ugustus 
Maulfair succeeded to the store, continuing until in February, 1888, when he 
went to Lincoln, Lancaster Co., Pa., where he spent the year, returning to 
his store April i, 1889. During all these years until the canal was 
abandoned, he had served as weigh-master at the water works, a period from 
1868 to 1881. inclusive. Mr. Maulfair has served for twelve years as school 
director, being appointed in 1886, 1891, 1897, and in 1900. On August iC, 
1898, he was appointed postmaster of Alger. He is one of the active Repub- 
licans of his district, and has never failed to cast his vote at any election, 
believing that to be a citizen's duty. 

Augustus Maulfair married Catherine Dohner, born January 30, 1846, in 
North Annville township, west of the present home. She is a daughter of 
Bishop Jacob and Barbara (Brandt) Dohner, the former of whom was long 
bishop of the IVIennonite Church in Lebanon county. He was born May i, 
1806, in Cornwall township, Lebanon county, and died January 31, 1881. 
The mother of Mrs. Maulfair was born December 5, 1807, and died 
November 9, 1893, a daughter of Henry Brandt and his wife Maria Kreider, 
a daughter of Flenry Kreider. Joseph Dohner, the grandfather, was a 
native of Lebanon county, who married Annie Kreider, sister of Jacob 
Kreider, who was the grandfather of Andrew, David and Joseph Kreider of 
Annville. Their cliildren were : Jacob, bishop of the Mennonite Church : 
John, who married Catharine Long; Joseph, who married Mary Kreider; 
Christian, who married Catharine Light ; Moses, a Mennonite preacher, who 
married Catharine Huber ; Annie, who married Christian Moyer ; Mary, who 
married John Huber; Elizabeth, who married David Dohner; Catharine, 
who married Christian Burkholder ; and Lydia, who married John Rider. The 
children of Bishop Dohner and wife were: Henry, born February 8, 1832, 
died unmarried Januarv 16, 1896; Annie married Adam Boger ; ]\Iary married 
Henry Fry; Jacob died at the age of three years; Elizabeth married Henry 
Miller; Joseph enlisted in the Ninety-third Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry 



340 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

in the Civil war, was taken prisoner, and died ; Catharine became Mrs. Maul- 
fair; John died in infancy; and Barbara married Michael Urich. 

The children born to Augustus Maulfair and wife are : Homer, Albert and 
Carrie Annie, of whom Albert, born May 13. 1869, died September 13, 1870. 
Homer was born September 15, 1867, and resides m Lebanon; he married 
Jennie Boyd, daughter of William and Susan Boyd of Cornwall township, 
Lebanon county, and their children were: Boyd A. (born January 29, 1892, 
died October 12, 1893), Susan Catherine (born May 27, 1895), ^^^ Lamont 
(born July 20, 1896, and died August 20, 1896). Carrie Annie was born 
March 25, 1877. and married Harry W. Light, son of Felix and Catharine 
Light. A son, Clark Maulfair, was born September 16, 1899, but lived only 
fifteen days. This family is an old and honorable one, and is connected by 
marriage with many of the other prominent families of the county. 

C. GROVE BEAVER. Among the old and prominent families of the 
State of Pennsylvania, is that of Beaver. It is of German extraction and the 
founder of the family came to America from Alsace. C. Grove Beaver, of 
Fredericksburg, is a direct descendant of one of the three brothers who 
landed from a little sailing vessel "Friendship," John Mason, captain, at Phila- 
delphia, November 2, 1744. The names of these German emigrants were 
George, John and Dewald Bieber, later softened into Beaver. The sons of 
these early settlers took part in the War of the Revolution and spent that 
memorable winter of history, 1777, at Valley Forge. A later descendant of 
one of these sons, was Dewald Beaver, the grandfather of C. Grove Beaver, 
who married Elizabeth Hunter. Both were natives of Berks county and in 
early married life lived on a farm, but their last years were spent at Reading. 
Their eight children were : Catherine, wife of James Cornett ; Dr. D. H. ; 
John ; Elizabeth, wife of D. Light; Esther married a Weiser ; Susanna married 
a Grim ; Jacob and the other, Samuel, died young. 

Dr. D. H. Beaver, the father of C. Grove Beaver, was born May i, 
1819. and died in Fredericksburg, November 9, 1884. Although reared a 
farm boy, he did not accept farming as a vocation, but studied medicine and 
graduated in the same at the University of Pennsylvania, and then moved to 
Lebanon county. For one year he lived at Shirksville and then located at 
Fredericksburg, where he remained until his death, after long years of 
faithful attendance upon the sick through Lebanon county. He was well- 
know^n and much esteemed in the profession. For many years he w^as a 
leading member of the Lutheran Church. Dr. Beaver was a strong sup- 
porter of the principles of the Republican party. In 1847 he married Barbara 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 349 

Grove, daughter of the late John and Elizabeth ( Wenner) Grove, of Bethel 
township, the former of whom was a miller and also owned a farm. His four 
children were: Annie, wife of Dr. Grumbine, of Mt. Zion, Pa.; Catherine E., 
wife of M. W. Case, of Philadelphia; C. Grove, of Fredericksburg; and Eliza- 
beth, wife of Dr. S. P. Heilman. Dr. Beaver was also interested in a mer- 
cantile business and was a stockholder in the Lebanon Paper Mills. 

On the maternal side, C. Grove Beaver also belongs to a very old and 
prominent county family. It was established in Lancaster county in 1724, 
by his great-great-grandfather. Peter Grove, great-grandfather, was born 
June 13, 1724, just prior to the departure of his parents for America, from 
Zurich, Switzerland. He died in 1803. His wife, Veronica Groh, died 
January 25, 1773, and they had these children: Maria, born December 14, 
1756, died December 11, t8oi ; Veronica, born July 5, 1759, died August 2^, 
1824; Anna Barbara, born September 14, 1754, died July 30, 1836; Jacob, 
born October 9, 1761, died May 17, 1842; Peter, born May 5, 1764. died April 
I. 1847; and John, born April 22, 1768. 

John Grove, the grandfather, died May 26, 1835, and his wife, Annie 
Elizabeth Wenner, was born February 14, 1785, and died January 2, 1847. 
John Grove, son of Peter and the father of Mrs. Beaver, had these children : 
John Peter, born June 27, 1814, died June 8, 1864; Job, born August 29, 
181 5, died January 6, 1876; Jacob W., born December 2, 1816, died April ly, 
1886; Anna Barbara, born January 10, 1819, died December 24, 1897; M. J. 
born May 20, 1821, died November 9, 1877; Elizabeth, born March 23, 1823, 
died September 4, 1882; and Elias, born February 3. 1825. died February 5, 
1890. 

C. Grove Beaver was born October 31, 1852, in I*"redericksburg, where he 
now lives retired from business activity. He attended the schools of his 
native place, and then spent three years at the Gettysburg College. Later he 
took a course at the Eastman Business College at Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and 
then went into the business establishment of his uncles. Grove Bros., of 
Danville, Pa., iron manufacturers. He entered the business as bookkeeper 
and later became superintendent remaining there for ten years. In 1882 he 
entered into partnership with his brother-in-law, M. W. Kase, at Danville, 
in a general hardware business and then moved to Jersey Shore to take 
charge of a branch of the business there. After five )^ears of successful busi- 
ness endeavor, he sold out his interests at that place and returned to his old 
home at Fredericksburg. He was his father's executor, luit with that 
exception, he has not actively engaged in business since 1887. 

On August I, 1 88 1, Mr. Beaver was married to Miss Catherine Fitz- 



350 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

gerald of Jersey Shore, a daughter of Thomas and Sarah Fitzgerald. Mr. 
Beaver has always been an adherent of the Republican party. He is widely 
known and is a worthy representative of two of the oldest and most honorable 
families of the Keystone State. 

P. F. LEININGER, one of the leading business citizens of Myerstown, 
a prominent dealer in clothing and gentlemen's furnishing goods, was born 
in Robesonia, Berks county, Pa., January i8, 1854, a son of Peter E. and 
Katherjne (Arnold) Leininger. 

Peter E. Leininger was born in 1823, in Berks county, and died in 1890, 
a son of Frederick Leininger, whose father probably came at an early day and 
settled with other German emigrants in Lancaster county, as there the family 
is an old established one. Frederick Leininger was torn in Lancaster county, 
and by a first marriage had four children, Peter E., Eliza, Susan and Han- 
nah; by a second wife, Frederick, William, Martha and Eve; and to his third 
marriage were born Jacob, Martin, Elizabeth and Katherine. 

After Peter Leininger married Katherine Arnold he settled in Berks 
county, and later in Lebanon, where he died. His children were : John, 
deceased; George, of Lebanon county; Emma, the wife of William Zebe; 
Katherine, the wife of Jacob Rutter, of Richland; Peter F., of Myerstown; 
Alfred, deceased; Aaron and Eli, of Myerstown; and Addie, the wife of 
John Rupp. For many years prior to death, Mr. Leininger was a highly 
respected farmer of Millcreek township and was long identified with the 
Democratic party. In religion he was a member of the Lutheran Church. 

When but three years of age, P. F. Leininger came with his parents to 
Lebanon county, attended the common schools, and remained engaged on the 
farm until he was sixteen years of age, when he found employment at the 
ore mines of Jackson and South Lebanon townships. After three years of 
industry at the mines, he went to Reedsville and embarked in butchering 
business, which he later removed to Myerstown, where he continued for sev- 
enteen years. In 1893 he opened up a first-class clothing and gentlemen's 
furnishing house in Myerstown, and now commands a large and lucrative 
trade, his patronage including the best and most desirable in this vicinity. 
In politics Mr. Leininger has always been a stanch Democrat, and has exerted 
considerable influence in his party in this community. His fraternal associa- 
tions include Camp No. 64, P. O. S. of A., Myerstown, in which he is treas- 
urer; the I. O. O. F., of Myerstown; the Jr. O. U. A. M.. of Myerstown. 
For thirty-two years he has been an active member of the first-named order, 
and is well-known in the fellowship through the State. 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 351 

In 1877 Mr. Leininger was married to Katherine, the daughter of Henry 
and Katherine Spangler, of Jackson township, and two daughters were born 
to this union, viz.: Maggie, the wife of John N. Shirk, of Myerstown; and 
Jennie, an accompHshed stenographer. Mrs. I-eininger comes from one of the 
oldest of the county famihes, and is one of a family of three children, the 
others being, Henry P., proprietor of a hotel in Lebanon ; and Sarah, the 
wife of Adam Krisser, a farmer of the county. The Spanglers have lived in 
Lebanon county for 175 years. 

Throughout his active life, Mr. Leininger has been one of the useful 
and industrious men of his community, and has accumulated by honest 
endeavor and close application, an independent fortune. His life history 
is an inspiration to those who are still at the bottom of the ladder, as it gives 
a striking example of what may be attained by the use of proper methods. 
Mr. Leininger belongs to the Lutheran Church, and Mrs. Leininger to the 
Reformed. They are very highly esteemed people and ha\-e many friends 
in and around Myerstown. Mr. Leininger is one of those persons whose 
quick sympathetic nature inclines him to render assistance to any in need, 
and he has often been led to help those who failed to appreciate his endeavors, 
and proved ungrateful for his kindness. His natural generosity, however, is 
too great to permit him to bear any malice in his heart, and he has only good 
wishes for each and every one. 

WILLIAM H. H. SMITH. This gentleman is a prominent and worthy 
citizen of Annville, Lebanon county, where he is engaged in operating a tin 
and stove store. He was born in Annville December 24, 1853, and was given 
a good education in the public schools of his native village, which was further 
supplemented by attendance at the old Palmyra Academy, and later at the 
Lebanon Valley College. Upon leaving school he entered his father's tin 
shop, where he thoroughly learned the tinsmith's trade, which he has followed 
all his life time with the exception of two years, when he was connected with 
the Mutual Benefit Association of North America for Unmarried People. 
He succeeded his father in business in the year 1884. The life of Mr. Smith 
has been helpful along lines of public utility, he having been always prominent 
in the affairs of township and village. When but twenty-one years of age he 
was elected to the responsible position of auditor of the township, which 
office he held continuously, giving excellent satisfaction, until he was elected 
school director, an office he still holds. He served as trustee of North Annville 
village for a number of years. His connection with the school board began in 
1895, ^"d he was president of the board for four years. If Mr. Smith has 



352 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

any particular hobby, it is in his determination to secure superior educational 
advantages for the children of his district, and he has for years given much 
time and thought to that subject. To his efforts in a large measure was due 
the inauguration of the present long school term of eight months, instead of 
seven as previously held. In the fraternities, Mr. Smith is a leading member 
and was one of the organizers of the local lodge of the Junior Order of 
American Mechanics, and which he is now serving as treasurer. He is a 
prominent member of the Knights of Pythias, and is also treasurer in that 
organization. He has membership in the P. O. S. of A., and is also a mem- 
ber of the Lebanon Valley Commandery of that same society. The married 
life of Mr. Smith began in 1875. Mrs. Smith was Miss Maggie Mark, a 
native of Jonestown, Lebanon county, and a daughter of ]\Ioses Mark. Mr. 
and Mrs. Smith have two lovely daughters, their names being Estella and 
May. 

A conscientious, upright and fearless advocate of the truth as he sees it, 
Mr. Smith stands second to none in the old community of Annville, which 
has always been noted for the high character of its citizenship. 

GEORGE ARNOLD, senior member of the firm of George Arnold & 
Sons, whose general store now stands on the southeast corner of Sixth and 
Lehman streets, Lebanon, has been long and honorably known in his vicinity, 
first as a coachmaker, and later as a merchant and a prominent bank official. 
Born near Kimmerlings Church in North Lebanon township, October 10. 
1830, he is a son of John and Catherine (Riddle) Arnold. 

John Arnold, his great-grandfather, came from Europe and settled in 
Lebanon county. Pa. John Arnold (2), son of John and grandfather of 
George, married and had four children, all now deceased ; Jacob, John. Chris- 
tina and Mary. 

John Arnold (3), son of John (2), father of George, was born in 
Lebanon county in 1798, and was reared to farming, following that occu- 
pation for the most part throughout his mature life. A man of strong con- 
stitution he lived to the age of eighty-seven, and died in 1884. During his 
early manhood, in 1816, he married Catherine Riddle. They had eight 
children: Miss Mary, of Lebanon, now in her eighty-second year: John, a 
retired farmer of Burlington, Iowa: Sarah, who married Jacob Seifert, of 
Lebanon; Joseph, deceased: Lucetta. who married Jonathan Arnold, and is 
deceased; Henry L., now in business in Lebanon; George, mentioned below; 
and Edward, who after thirty-five years of service as freight agent, was 
killed near his office while crossing the Reading railroad track. 




J^j^^^^-y^ 6iryUf^^ 



I BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 353 

George Arnold received the ordinary training of a farmer's boy and his 
education was acquired in the old-time subscription schools. Starting out in 
life at the age of eighteen he entered a coachmaker's shop at Annville, Pa., 
where, after completing the trade, he remained some time as an entploye. In 
1855, prepared to conduct the business by himself, he went to Lebanon, pur- 
chased the tract of land where the Methodist Episcopal Church now stands, 
and erected a coachmaking shop, where in partnership with Peter Arnold, he 
carried on a prosperous business for some time. In i860 he sold his shop to 
his brother, Joseph Arnold, and for the next three years he followed his trade 
in Annville, later working for John Allwine of Lebanon, and finally as a 
coachmaker for William Fauber, of the same city. Being possessed of con- 
siderable means, he next purchased the \alualjle property on the northwest 
corner of Sixth and Lehman streets and opened a general store. In the 
course of time, enlarging his stock, he received his sons as partners, and 
moved to the present location. He early established his business upon a very 
firm foundation, and continued it with rare success for twenty years. Then, 
retiring, he left his sons, who are excellent business men, in full charge of the 
establishment. Mr. Arnold has succeeded exceptionally well out of his bus- 
iness ventures, and he is now a stockholder and a director of the Farmers' 
National Bank. Fle has erected from time to time some of the handsomest 
residences in Lebanon. 

On November 20, 1855, Mr. Arnold married Agnes Eagle, who was 
born in 1829, daughter of John and Elizabeth Eagle, of Lancaster county, Pa. 
Mrs. Arnold was an excellent helpmeet for nearly forty years, and she died 
December 25, 1892. By her Mr. Arnold had four children : Charles V., a 
merchant, who married Helen Levengood, and had eleven children, eight of 
whom are now living: Miss Mary C. at home; Stephen, a member of the tirm 
of George Arnold & Sons, who married Ella Levengood, who -died leaving 
three children; and Annie J., who married Wilson Miller, a clerk in a Phila- 
delphia banking house, and has three children. As a Democrat Mr. Arnold 
has always manifested a keen interest in politics. He served two terms in the 
city council, and though nominated for a third refused to run. In religious 
sentiment he is a Roman Catholic. He is a man of great integrity of cliar- 
acter and is highly respected in this city. 

CAPT. JOHN H. BASSLER. The Bassler family is one of the oldest as 
well as one of the most prominent in Lebanon county, and has contributed 
members who have adorned the business and professional circles of that and 
other communities. Its founders were men of strong character, who came as 

23 



354 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

refugees from their native Switzerland to America long prior to the Revo- 
lutionary war. These sturdy ancestors handed down many of their sterling 
qualities, and a most worthy representative of this family is to be found in 
Capt. John H. Bassler, a resident of Myerstovvn. 

Capt. Bassler was born February 6, 1834, on the farm now owned bv 
Davilla Swope, near Myerstown, a son of Henry and Barbara (Unger) 
Bassler, the former of whom was born in the old Bassler homestead Decem- 
ber 10, 1797, and died in Myerstown, January 16, 1851, after a successful 
agricultural life. His parents were Simon and Catherine (Houtz) Bassler. 
of Jackson township, the former of whom was a son of Simon Bassler, who 
was born in 1734, and died in 1802. This Simon Bassler was a son of 
Henry Bassler, who was born in Basel, Switzerland, and who w^as the emi- 
grant to America in 1707. settling in Rhinebeck, N. Y., on the Hudson river, 
whence he moved into the Schoharie Valley, New^ York. Later he and his 
neighbors found that their farms were claimed by the proprietors of large 
tracts of land known as "Manor Lands." and that it was difficult to secure 
title to them. Thev had heard of the liberal terms offered by William Penn 
to settlers in Pennsylvania, and resolved to brave the dangers and hardships 
of a long journey through an unexplored country, inhabited only by Lrdians, 
for the sake of securing free homes. They crossed the wilderness to the 
upper waters of the Susquehanna, constructed a raft on which they floated 
down the river, and after many days reached the mouth of the Swatara. 
Thev followed up that creek to the Ouittapahilla, and, traveling up that 
stream, some of the party located on its headwaters, wliile the rest, including 
Henry Bassler, crossed the divide and selected homes on the upper course 
"of the Tulpehocken. This was in 1723. He took up a tract of land in the 
vicinitv of Myerstown. and purchased it as soon as it was surveyed, in 1734, 
the same year of the birth of his son, Simon, who settled on the farm which 
is still the property of his descendants. Henry Bassler, the father of Capt. 
John, married Barbara LTnger. who was born January i. 1799, daughter 
of Valentine and Catherine (Felty) Unger, of w-hat is now Bethel township. 
Lebanon count}', and they had the following children born to them : Sarah 
Ann. Maria Elizabeth. Susannah, Anna M.. John H., Rebecca L., William 
D. and Amanda C. The survivors of this family are Anna M., Rebecca L.. 
William D. (of Philadelphia) and John H. 

John H. Bassler was reared on the farm on which he was born, and 
obtained his education in the subscription schools, the ^Myerstown Academy, 
and. later, the Millersville State Normal School. At the age of eighteen 
years he was qualified to teach school, and this profession he followed with 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 355 

eminent success for seven years, becoming the principal of the Myerstown 
Academy, in which position he remained three years. Then came the dark- 
days of the Civil war. following the Union reverses near Richmond in the 
summer of 1862, and, however tender the ties of family, or pleasant and 
lucrative his profession, he felt that his services were needed at the front. 
Within eight days he raised a full company of volunteers, incorporated as 
Company C of the One Hundred and Forty-niiilh Regiment, which became 
notably known as the Second Bucktail regiment, his companv taking a \erv 
prominent part in the later campaigns. Capt. Bassler saw much liard service 
and was severely wounded at Gettysburg, July i, 1863, Iving within the 
Confederate lines, and was practically a prisoner until the retreat of the 
enemy, and was not carried off the field until the evening of July 5th. This 
wound necessitated an honorable discharge and a long convalescence. As 
soon as he was again able to take up business he engaged in contracting 
and car building at Myerstown, but his old feeling of patriotism conquered 
as soon as he found himself able to return to the service of his country, 
and on September 28, 1864, he tendered his services to President Lincoln, 
and was placed in command of Company H, Tenth Regiment. Veteran 
Reserve Corps, and later, January ig, 1865, was transferred to and appointed 
Captain of Company B, Twelfth Veteran Reserves. On November 30th, 
of the same year, his loyalty and services were recognized by the Government 
by his appointment as assistant superintendent of the Bureau of Refugees, 
Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, with headquarters at Luml^erton. N. C. 
On February 13, 1866, he was finally mustered out of the service at his own 
request, and returned to Pennsylvania, locating in Schuylkill county in 1867. 
There Capt. Bassler was chosen principal of the Pine Grove public schools, 
which position he resigned one year later in order to accept a position on 
the Lebanon & Fremont branch of the Lebanon Valley Railroad, as station 
agent at Tower City, Pa. ; five vears later he gave this position up in order 
to embark in a mercantile business at the same place. However, on. account 
of his wife's delicate health, he decided to make a trip to California, locating 
at Riverside in 1877. His care proved of no a\-ail. as her death occurred 
there October 31, of that year. Capt. Bassler then went to Oakland. Cak. 
and engaged in carpenter work on the Central Pacific Railroad. In 1880 
he returned to his old home in Myerstown. and here he has remained in 
familiar localities ever since, interested in local enterprises, notably the cream- 
ery business and the Myerstown Enterprise, a first-class village newspaper. 
During the last years he has assumed no new business cares, living somewhat 
retired. His literarv talents were valued during his editorship of the above- 



356 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

named journal, from 1894 to 1896, the paper being the property of himself 
and George D. Coover. 

On October 2, 1859, Capt. Bassler was married to Miss Sarah Brobst, 
a daughter of Valentine and Mary (Miller) Brobst, of Berks county, and 
this marriage was blessed with the following named children ; Horace, born 
March 8, 1861, died in Oakland, Cal., August 12, 1879; Laura, born in 
Washington, D. C, November 17, 1865, is now a resident of New York- 
City; Robert, born in Tower City in 1S73, died in 1874; Ralph, born June 
23, 1875, is a resident of Chicago, and connected with the Chicago American. 
The second marriage of Captain Bassler was on December 14, 1880, to 
Miss Amanda Mosser, of Myerstown, daughter of Daniel and Magdalena 
(Holstein) Mosser, of an old family of Jackson township. One son, Harvey, 
came to this union, born x\pril 21, 1883; he is now a student at Albright 
College, Myerstown. 

In politics Capt. Bassler has always been a Republican. Reared a mem- 
ber of the Reformed Church, he later became a con\'ert to the truths of 
spiritualism. He is one of the valued members of Capt. William Tice Post, 
No. 471, G. A. R., of Myerstown, belonging to that army of esteemed citi- 
zens which is yearly growing less, to whom our fair land owes a deep debt 
of gratitude. His long service in the army was honorable in the highest 
degree, and had no call to arms intervened he would probably have been 
one of the leading educators of his State. In his advancing years he is 
surrounded by warm and sincere friends, and enjoys the esteem of the whole 
community. The Captain was never involved in any case at court, not even 
as a witness, except in 1883, when one night he wounded two burglars, and 
capturing one of them, had him lodged in the Lebanon jail. As a matter 
of good citizenship it was necessary to prosecute this criminal, who was 
sentenced to four years in the penitentiary. 

GEORGE H. REINOEHL. The well-directed career of George H. 
Reinoehl was interw oven with many of the most stable enterprises of Lebanon. 
and he represented a type of men who have ever been regarded as the bulwarks 
of the communities in which they settled. For more than a hundred 3'ears 
different members of the family have been among the foremost promoters 
of large accomplishments in this county, the first to come from Europe and 
settle here, the paternal great-grandfather, George, setting an example of 
industry, frugality and sound business sense, carefully maintained by his 
descendants. His son. George, the paternal grandfather, was a farmer on 
a large scale in Lebanon county, as was also Samuel, his son, and the father 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 357 

■of George H. Samuel eventually embarked upon an extensive lumber busi- 
ness, and in this line of activity acquired a reputation as one of the sub- 
stantial business men of his locality. Through his marriage with Mary 
Uhler, he raised a large family of children, among whom were: Adolphus. 
deceased; Tobias: George H.. born March 18, 1835: John: Samuel: Mi- 
chael ; Lena ; Catherine ; Mary ; and Rosa. 

Educationally, George H. Reinoehl was favored with average training, 
his foundation at the public schools being supplemented by life-long reading, 
study and practical observation. For many years he was one of the leading 
hardware merchants of Lebanon city, and he was also a director and vice- 
president in the Valley National Bank, the Lebanon Gas Company, and many 
other enterprises equally important to the growth of the city. His sound 
business judgment was appreciated in the various avenues in which it was 
exerted, and he bore an enviable reputation for wise conservatism and far 
sighted discrimination. He was an active member of the Lutheran Church, 
of which he was treasurer, trustee and a leader in the Sunday School for 
about thirty years. Fraternally he was connected with the Odd Fellows. 
Kind of heart, generous, charitable in his judgment, appreciative of the 
gifts and goodness in others, he made and retained hosts of friends, to whom 
his death, March 23, 1898, at the age of sixty-three years, was a sore afflic- 
tion. 

On July 29, 1855, Mr. Reinoehl married Mary A. Krause, a daughter 
of John and Catherine (Derr) Krause. of Lebanon. Their union was blessed 
with the following children: Catherine, the wife of Jacob G. Schropp. of the 
Lebanon Daily Nczvs; Dr. John K., killed recently by a runaway horse; Frank 
H., cashier of the Valley National Bank; Helena, the wife of G. Malilon 
Pott, and living in Allentown, Pa. ; Evelyn M., the wife of Dr. Fred. Gates, 
of Lebanon: and George S., manager of the Pennsylvania Telephone Company 
of Lancaster city. Mrs. Reinoehl is spending the evening of her life in her 
pleasant home on Chestnut street, wdiere gather her many friends and well 
wishers, by all of whom she is greatly beloved and honored. 

JOHN ZINN, one of the leading and prominent men of Cornw-all 
township, Lebanon county, was born December 21. 1854. in the house which 
is now his home, and where he is so well and favorably known. The boyhood 
days of Mr. Zinn were spent upon the farm, and he received a good common 
school education in the neighborhood schools. Remaining at home until the 
death of his father, he took charge of the homestead of 158 acres, well im- 
proved, and furnished wdth excellent buildings. This property is considered 



3 38 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

one of the finest in Lebanon county, and on it he carries on general farming 
making a complete success of all he undertakes. 

In 1896, Mr. Zinn was married to Miss Hannah Hoke, daughter of 
David Hoke, and one child has been born of this union : George Earl. Mr. 
and Mrs. Zinn are members of the Reformed Church, in which they take a 
very active part. Mr. Zinn and his family have always occupied prominent 
places among the leading men of this portion of the State, and they can 
always be counted upon to support all measures tending toward the advance- 
ment of their community. 

JOHN M. ALLWEIN, traveling salesman for the American School 
Furniture Company, of New York, and a resident of Lebanon, was born in 
North Lebanon township, December 15, 1850, a son of William and Mary 
(Mars) Allwein, of German and English descent, respectively. William 
Allwein was a plasterer by trade, and was born in June, 1813, his death 
occurring in 1888. Flis father, Philip, devoted his active life to farming and 
Ijlacksmithing, and reared a large family of whom Edward, Elijah, Henry, 
Adam, Sarah, Isabella and Rebecca are living; while John, Samuel, Joseph, 
William, Elizabeth, Polly, Catherine and Mary are deceased. Philip Allwein 
was one of the very early settlers of Lebanon county, and his little blacksmith 
shop was one of the busiest centers for miles around. 

William Allwein was a farmer as well as plasterer, and his property 
was always under a high state of cultivation, and yielded profitable harvests. 
He was a life-long Democrat, and a member of the Catholic Church. As his 
name implies, he was of German descent, and inherited the personal charac- 
teristics which have enabled Germany to impress itself upon the map of the 
world. To himself and wife, Mary, were bom eleven children, of whom the 
following attained maturity: Henry, deceased; Maria, also deceased; Frank 
M., a plasterer of Lebanon; Isaac, a resident of Lebanon and a grocer by 
occupation ; Amelia, living on the home farm in North Lebanon township ; 
Nathaniel, also a plasterer by trade; John M. ; Polly, the wife of Aaron 
Witmer, of Lebanon city ; and Aaron, living on the home place. Mrs. 
Allwein was born in 1814 in the city of Lancaster and died March 4, 1901. 

Although a farmer lad, and compelled at times to labor long and 
faithfully, John M. Allwein managed to secure a fair education, finishing in 
the State normal schools at Lebanon and Millersville, Pa. For twelve years 
he was engaged in teaching in the schools of Lebanon county, after which he 
came to Lebanon city in 1880, and clerked for some time. As a traveling 
salesman he was first identified with the Keystone Furniture Company, of 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 359 

Philadelphia, and afterward with the United States School Furniture Com- 
pany of Chicago. In 1891 he became connected with the American School 
Furniture Company of New York City, for which he is still traveling. In the 
meantime he has established a reputation for executive and business ability 
of a high order, which has been duly recognized by his fellow townsmen on 
various occasions, and in various ways. His business interests are centered 
in some of the most important commercial concerns of the town, including 
the Lebanon County Trust Company, of which he is secretary, and a stock 
holder : he is a stockholder in both the Lebanon National and the Farmers 
National banks; a stock holder in the Mutual Benefit Building & Loan Asso- 
ciation; and a director in the Mechanics Building & Loan Association. Mr. 
Allwein is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of the Catholic Church. 

On May 13, 1880, Mr. Allwein married Mary A. Steckbeck, born in 
Lebanon county April 29, 1855, a daughter of David and Mary (Arnold) 
Steckbeck, parents also of three other children : Priscilla, the wife of Henry 
Arnold, of Lebanon city; Moses, a resident of Avon; and Aaron, a farmer 
of North Lebanon township. The father of Mrs. Allwein was one of the best 
and most prominent farmers of Lebanon county, and came from an old and 
honored family. 

LUTHER FRANKLIN HOUCK. Flaving been for many years en- 
gaged in the practice of the law in Lebanon, twelve years of which time was 
served most acceptably as county solicitor. Luther Franklin Houck is well 
and favorably known all over the county, and is generally conceded to be 
one of the best lawyers practicing before the courts of the county. 

Luther Franklin Houck is a native of Palmyra, Pa., where he was liorn 
January 29, 1844. He received his primary education in the public schools 
of his native village and Lebanon, which was supplemented by courses at a 
private academy at Palmyra conducted by that noted educator, Peter B 
Wetmor, A. ]\I., and by advanced work in the Lelxanon Academy. His first 
connection with professional life was as a teacher, the schools in the city of 
Lebanon ha\ing been the forum of action for a period of some twelve years. 
During the latter part of this experience he took up the study of the law 
under Grant \Veidman, now deceased, spending his vacations in his ofrice. 
He was admitted to the Bar April 14, 1879. In 1875 he had been elected 
justice of the peace, an office which he held for five and a half years. 

In November, 1880, Mr. Houck received the nomination of his party 
for District Attornev and in the election Avhich followed was chosen to 
that office. Entering the office in January following, he performed its duties 



360 BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF LEBANON COUNTY. 

most capal)ly for three years. His service in this office was so acceptable 
as to secure liim the appointment as county soHcitor, and for the next twelve 
years he looked after the legal interests of the county, in connection with 
his general practice, having been reappointed different times. He has since 
been in practice as a private member of the Bar, and has always held a lead- 
ing position, his knowledge of legal jurisprudence being broad and compre- 
hensive. For several years he was a member of the examining committee 
of the Lebanon County Bar, in which he succeeded in upholding the high 
standard always maintained by that body. He is also a member of tl'e 
Lebanon County Law Library committee. 

Fraternally Mr. Flouck is a worthy member of the L O. H., and the 
A. O. U. W. In religious life he affiliates with the Lutherans, being a 
member of the Zion's Lutheran Church. 

On June 19, 1879, Mr. Houck was married to Emma H. Christian, of 
Lebanon, who was born in Reading in 1856, daughter of John and Mary 
A. (Goodheart) Christian, the former of whom is deceased. The parents 
of Mrs. Houck came originally from Berks county. Pa. This marriage has 
been blessed by two children: John Christian, born April 28, 1880 ; and 
Mary Amelia, October 6, 1882. John C. graduated at Ursinus College, in 
Montgomery county, and is now studying law in his father's office. 

JOHN H. SHUGAR (deceased) was one of the old and well-known 
citizens, and for many years a leading merchant of Lebanon. He was born 
in that city, on West Cumberland Street, June i, 1839, son of Baltzer Shugar. 
a native of Lancaster county, who died when his son was about nine years 
old. His wife was Anna Bender, who was born near Jonestown, Lebanon 
county. 

Thrown upon his own resources, John H. Shugar at the age of nine 
years was obliged to provide for his own support, and his first work was 
carting on the old canal which was then being constructed. This made it 
necessary for him to go to Womelsdorf. Berks county. During the Civil 
war he was employed by the government in buying horses for the United 
States army. After the close of the war he engaged in the grocery business 
in Lebanon, his location being on the north side of Cumberl