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Full text of "Biographical annals of Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, containing genealogical records of representative families, including many of the early settlers and biographical sketches of prominent citizens"

GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



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CONTAINING 

l^A[,OGICAL RECORDS OF REPRESENT 
MANY OF THE EARLY SETTLERS 



TIVE . . lNCLLDlN(i 

AND BIOGRAPHICAL 



SKETCHES OF PROMLNENli CITIZEN' 



ELL \V (JO IJ K ( J l; J -. W T ir-. EDIT 



Kaoirlfdge of kindred and 1/ie i/eneit/iif/ifs irf the illicit 
'Hh a part of the knoicledr/e of a m<in\o own nelf. It 

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VOL I. 



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THE LKWIS PU 




I 



BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS 

OF 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY 

PENNSYLVANIA 

CONTAINING 

GENEALOGICAL RECORDS OF REPRESENTATIVE FAMILIES, INCLUDING 

MANY OF THE EARLY SETTLERS AND BIOGRAPHICAL 

SKETCHES OF PROMINENT CITIZENS 



KLLWOOD ROBER TS. EDITOR 



••Knoirledye i>f kindred and the (jineulofiifs of th, unrinit f.iuiilu.s disirrttl, th, IdyUest praise, lleirin 
niiisixtct/i II pari of the knoicledye nf n miin'>: oim stlf. It i\ ,i ijrmt .ipur to rirtiie to look hack oh the irorth 
of our line."— Lord Boron. 

■■There i« no heroir poem in the world tint /.v ,// //„ Ijott ,oi the life of ,t mao.:' — s'/c Walter Sroft. 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOL. 



T. S. BENHAM & COMPANY 

AND 

THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Nkw York Chicago 

1 i1 4 



INTRODUCTORY 1136168 



lleginning- with the Cdiiiiiis;- df the Swede-, to the hanks of the n\er Delaware, in the 
early ])art of the sexenteenth eeiUiin-. ilown to the present day, the twentieth century of the 
great region known 1)_\- the distinguishing nauie of I'ennsyhania, at first a province and ncnv 
a commonwealth of eoiumanding importance, has held, at whate\er stage in its de\-elop- 
ment and progiiess, a conspicuous and highly important place in its relationship to the sis- 
terhood of states comprising the great and unhroken Federal I'nion. It was the central 
colony an.d the connecting link between the north and south for many years during the 
t\)rmati\-e governmental epoch; its men of influence molded the political history of the 
American people during many years. Its principal city was long the seat of government 
of the I'nited States, and has been, from the earliest days to the present, a i)rincii)al centre 
of all that marks the progress of civilization — in the arts and sciences, in e\ery product of 
hiuiian mind and hand. Not once in the almost two and a half centin'ies of its existence 
has I'enns_\-l\ania retrograded. Its career has e\"er l)een a steadfast and unfaltering "for- 

The histor}- of this great commonwealth and of man)- of its sul)di\isions has been 
written along civil, political and military lines b_\- \-arious authors and at different times, 
each succeeding- writer adding a new chapter of annals, or giving a different coloring to 
a story already told, treating the subject from a different view point, or in the full glare 
of a light which to his i)redecessor was l)ul dim and uncertain. The splendid narrative 
affords an inspiration to the men and women of the present day. as it assuredly will to 
those who are soon to succeed them, and entirely justifies the pregnant words of Martin- 
eau : "To have ha<l forefatliers renowned for honor.aljle deeds, t<i l)elong by nature to 
those wild have bravely borne their part in life, and refreshed the world with mighty 
thoughts and healthy admiration, is a privilege which it were mean and self-willed to 
despise. It is a security given us of old, which it were false-hearted not to redeem, and 
in virtues bred of a noble stock, mellowed as they are by re\erence. there is often a grace 
and ri])eness wanting- to self-made and brand-new excellence. Of like \-aIue to a people 
are hemic national traditions, gi\'ing them a determinate character to sustain among the 
tribes of men, making them familiar with images of great and strenuous life, and kind- 
ling them with faith in gloriotts possibilities." 

While Montgomery was not ci-eated as a sepai-ate county until 17S4. its history is. 
until tiiat time, identical with that of the three original counties organized by I'enn — 
Chester, Bucks and Philadelphia — and at least a portion of its territory was the scene 
of some of tlie most important of the transactions wiiich marked the forniati\e period of 
tlie great commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and .some of its people were actors in those 
stirring and momentous events. Here the foundations of civil and religious liberty were 



iv INTRODUCTORY 

laid deep and strong. The indi\"idual was exalted in all his best attributes. Fe;:n had pro- 
claimed to all who wcjuld come that they should feel assured, for themselves and for all 
generations to come after them, of their freedom as men and christians, "that they may 
not be brought in bondage but by their own consent, for we put the power in the peo- 
ple." He made it his greatest care to frame a constitution "as near as may be conven- 
iently to the primitixe. ancient and fundamental laws of the Kingdom of England." but 
introducing the democratic method of making all offices elective, and a new principle of 
perfect religious freedom — "that no man nor numljer of men upon earth hath power or 
authority to rule o\er men's consciences in religious matters" — which stood in marked con- 
trast with the theocratical ideas of the Puritans in Xew England, and to the aristccrati- 
cal reign of Locke in Carolina. 

In response to Penn's liberal scheme of government, his declaration of his intention 
to "try this holy experiment of a free colony for, all mankind," there came a sturdy peo- 
ple — men, and women, too. of brawn and brain and conscience, their hearts fervent in rev- 
erence of God and a desire for religious and ci\il liberty — who had voluntarily separated 
themselves from their natixe land in order to enjoy the pri\-ileges which had been denied 
them there. It woidd lie wirth much could we be affordetl a glimpse of these pioneers. 
They were men of no ordinary mold. Great as was their strength of character, and broad 
(for the times) as was their mental scope, they were building far better than they knew. 
Simple and clean in their lixes, tlie homes which they builded were humble, but they were 
the seat of all the domestic virtues, and the children they reared inherited the athletic frame, 
rugged constitution and noble principles of their forbears. 

Montgomery county affords a peculiarly interesting field for such research as has 
been required in the making of the volumes now presented to the reader. Her sons at home 
and abroail haxe shed lustre upon her name by deeds of gallantry on land antl sea. bv 
achievements in the arts and sciences, in the professions, in statesmanship, and in com- 
mercial affairs, ^^d^erever they hax'e dispersed, in the long-ago or in more recent davs, 
they liaAc been a power for ideal citizenship and good government. Even in the colon- 
ial period, when its territory yet formed a portion of the county of Philadelphia, were men 
there of the highest attainments and of world-wide renown. Here lived the Aluhlenbergs, 
David Rittenhouse. John Lukens, Benjamin Lay, and many others who. b}- natural ability, 
scholarly acquirements and, above all, by their intense patriotism, shed upon their age. a 
lustre \\hich yet illumines our own, and will be transmitted to the latest generation. The 
Revolutionary era abounded in memorable events in T\Iontgomery county. At \*alley Forge 
the army under ^\■ashington endured with patience privations unparalleled in behalf of free- 
dom and independence. The valleys of the Schuylkill and Perkiomen were the scene of 
some of the most remarkable strategic movements of the heroic period. Washington. La- 
fayette, Wayne and other famous leaders were familiar figures to the forefathers of that 
day, and of whose own number were men who fought at Germantown, at Brandy wine and 
at ]ilonmouth. In the great Civil War. men of Montgomery County were among the 
most valiant and faithful defenders of the l'ni(jn. It gaxe to the country Hartranft, Han- 
cock, Slemmer, Zook. and a luist of others whose names are emljlazoned upon the roll of 
fame. Three go\ernors of the State — Portel", Shunk and Hartranft — were born within 



INTRODUCTORY v 

the limits of this historic old county, and the home of Pennypacker. a descendant <if diie 
of its oldest families, is upon the bank of the Perkiomen. 

Thus, in each succeeding generation, and at every stage of i;s progress, the pe iple 
of the county nf Montgnmery have had the service of men of the Inftiest character and 
liighest capaliility, in arms, in the arts of peace, in statesmanship, in affairs and in letters. 
It is to connect the acti\e progressix'e men of the present generation with their illustrious 
ancestry that the present volumes have been undertaken, in the convection that 

"It is indeed ;i blessing when tlie \irtiies 
Of noble races are hereditary. 
And do derive themselves from the imitation 
Of virtuons ancestors." 

The pul)Iishers here take Dccasicm to express their obligations to the editor. 'Sir. VA\- 
wood Rob.erts. "Xatixe here, and to the manner born," he has given to his labors not 
only diligence and industry, Imt something of that enthusiasm which is praiseworthily be- 
coming in him who hokls a proper appreciation of a noble people from whom he sprang 
ami amidst whom he xvas reared. With reference to the biographical matter it is to be 
said that the utmost care has been exercised. Yet, in some cases, it may be that a sketch 
will be found incomplete or faulty, and such shortcoming is ascribable to the paucitv of 
data furnished, many families being without exact records in their familv line. In all cases 
the sketch has been submitted to the subject or to his representative for correction or 
rexision, and upon him rests the final responsibility in case of omission or inaccurac\-. 

It is confitlently believed that the present work will prove a real addition to the 
mass of literature concerning the people of the historic region under consideration, and that, 
without it, much A'aluable information therein contained would be irretrievably lost, owing 
to the passing awa}- of many custodians oi family records and the disappearance of such 
matter. PUBLISHERS. 



INDEX. 



Alderfer, John B., 319 
Allebach, D. Melvin. 17-' 
Allebaugli, Elmer S., 255 
Anders. Samuel K., 19 
Anders, William S.. 499 
Anderson, John F.. 124 
Argue. Andrew K., 63 
Arnoldy. Henrie. 300 
Arthur, Albanus C, 393 
Ashton, Charles B.. 95 
Auchenbach, William. 525 
Ayars, Matilda M., 419 

Bach, William P., 215 
Baker, Andrew H.. 21 
Barlow, Harvey, 199 
Barlow, Joel, 394 
Bate, Richard H., 4S7 
Bate. William T., 484 
Bauer, George, 195 
Bean. Wilmer M., 97 
Beaver, Barnet K., 438 
Beeber, Thomas R.. 30T 
Beener, Christian. 219 
Bellows'. Horace M.. 436 
Benner. Milton B.. 307 
Bergey, David H., 50 
Berlvliimer. Charles, 155 



Berkhinier. ( 


'.eorge 


BerkhniHT, 


nhn. 


Kinder, Will 


am J 


Hishoi). Dan 


rl M. 


KlaltneV, Jol 


n 177 


P.lnck. ]Wuy. 


ii'm r 


R,>„r... FJi. 


ilicth 



Bradle 



.104 



y. Andrew J., 4S0 
r.rant. Samuel S., 427 
l^recht, John E.. 364 
Brooke, William. 205 
Rrophy. Joseph J., 360 
Brownljack. Henry M., 2. 
Huckman, Thomas, T12 
Rnckwaltcr, I. \.. J^2 



Butcher. William, 1.?.*^ 
Bnzby, Thomas P., 528 

Caley, Cyrus H., 107 
Cameron, James S., 355 
Carey, Joseph H., 203 
Cassel, Benjamin C, 174 
Cassel, Isaac R., 394 
Cas-selberry, Clarence 'M.. 181 
Castner, George W., 296 
Chain. B. Percv. 89 
Childs, Louis M., 42 
Childs, S. Powell, 127 
Clamer, Francis J.. 56 
Clark, Isaac J., 528 
Clayton, Abraham T., 59 
Clayton, Hamilton, 65 
Clayton, William L., 469 
Cleaver. Chalkley K.. 338 
Cleaver, Jonathan. 540 
Clemmer, Josiah. 247 
Clymer. Frank M.. .^94 
Colton, John M., ^24 
Comly. Harry. 380 
Couard. Henry F., ij'i 
Conrad, John M.. 159 
Cooke, Jay, 62 
Corson, Ellwood M.. 292 
Corson, Isabella F.. 471 
Corson. Mary. 471 
Corson, Jos'eph K.. 44 
Coulston, Joseph P.. 524 
Coulston. Walter. 74 
Cox, B. Wilson. tI ? 
Cox. Charles A., 510 
Cozens, James A.. ,^yj 
Crawford, .•\lbert, 224 
Cressman. Henry C, 102 
Custer, Horace .A., 2ro 

Davidhciser, Franklin 1! . 43 
Davidheiser. Milton R , 430 
Davidheiser. Willi.nm W.. 416 
Davis, Jesse B., 93 
Davis, Jesse M.. 322 
Davis. Tohn. 182 
Davis. Mary .\., 463 
l)a\i-, rile Family. 71 



DePrefontaine, Charles. 147 
DePrefontaine. Walter, 150 
Detwiler. George M., 358 
Dingee, Albert H.. 529 
Dingee. Lester I.. 529 
Dotterrer. Augustus' \\'., 395 
Dresher, Samuel, 460 
Duddv, John. 448 
Duffie'ld. Frank W., 158 
Dyer, John T., 35 
Ebert, Horace M., 9 
Edwards, Jacob, 527 
Egbert, Allan C. 257 
Eo'olf, George L., ,?96 
Ehst, Jacob M., 407 
Ellis, David M.. 3-'S 
Erb, Israel M., 381 
Es'penship, Matilda B., 347 
Evans. Benjamin, 297 
Evans, L. Krvder, 213 
Evans. Miller' D., 222 
Evans. Montgomerv. 4 
Evans, Oliver M.. u(> 
Evans, William, 298 

Famous, Benjamin F., 164 
F'arrall, Frank P., 330 
Feather, Hiram B., 187 
Fegelv, Calvin. 191 
Fegely. W. O., 369 
F'egley. FVanklin G.. 27^ 
Felty, L. R., 540 
Finkbiner, U. S. (j., 2.v8 
F'isher, Adam, 452 
Fisher, Harvey S., .184 
F'isher, John F.. 175 
Fisher, Samuel R., 2,?o 
Fisher, S. Wilson, 264 
I'leck, Byron M., 463 
FornancL-. Jos'eph. 373 

■•"reed, Elias K., 4<)i 
l-'reed. William G,, \(v) 
Fretz, Allen M., 245 
Fritz, John S., 202 
Fritz, John S., 493 
'•"ronhiser, Samuel, 183 
IVorer. Henry. 350 
I'ryer. Josiah. .^90 



INDEX. 



Gable. Percival K., 77 
Garber, Joseph S., 420 
Gehman, Abner H., 277 
Gehret, George W., 361 
Geist, Howard W.. 351 
Gilbert, Elias H., 220 
Gilbert, James \\'., 20? 
Gilbert, John G.. 132 
Gilbert, ^laurice E., 250 
Gilbert. William, 404. 
Gillin, Robert H., 451 
Gillin, Thomas S., 449 
Glenn. Thomas .\., S31 
Godshalk, Frank S., 318 
Godshalk, George D., 31 ^ 
Godslialk. T- \V., 493 
Gov:]..'. r^..:'r:' U,. 252 

Go.v, > . I G.. 362 

Gntv ' , ; - I. . 312 
Gol«.Ji.. J c !. \'.. 8 
Groff, Heurv A.. 27 
Groff, Joseph W., 36S 



Hainer, Levi .\V.. 295 
Hall. Joanna, 379 
Hall, William 'SI.. 379 
Hallman, Harry F.. 265 
Hallman, James M.. 253 
Hallowell, Alfred P., 66 
Hallowell, Jacob L., 435 
Hallowell, Joseph W., 136 
Hallowell, William J., 481 
Hamel, George, Sr., 539 
Hampton, John. 52 
Harrv. Edwin M.. 203 
Hart.' Andrew L.. 458 
Hart, Elwood L., 14: 
Hart. Zieber, 220 
Hartenstine. Samuel. 406 
Hartranft. Caroline K.. 266 
Hartranft. John F.. S17 
Harvev. David G.. 67 
Hawkin^, Charles G.. 413 
Heckler, Isaac R.. 3S2 
Heebner. Jacoli W.. ^V 
Hclffenstein. Albert,' 118 
Hendricks, Abraham H., 186 
Hendricks, Joseph H.. :'^:^3 
Hcrner, Henry H., 447 
Herner, John R., 475 
Hieh. David K.. V'8 
Hiali. .SanuK'i 11.. 530 



Jarrett. John H., 354 
Jarrett, Samuel F.. 444 
Jenkins. Earl A.. 11 
Jenkins. Howard ^1.. 38 
Jenkins, Parker, 426 
Johnson, Jacob S., 237 
Jones, George W., 289 
Jones. Jonathan R., 542 

Kane, Edward F., sSS 
Kane, James J„ 538 
Keeler, Henry A., loi 
Kehl, Albert G., 542 
Kennedy, David R., 119 
Kepler, Fnrman, 422 
Kepler, Levi F., 453 
Keyscr, Esther W.. 308 
Keyser, Milton T., 114 
Kibblehouse. Ralph K., 268 
Kirk, Tesse 7.7^ 
Knipe. Irvin P , 02 
Kratz. FKiiry W" . 432 
Kranse. Anna J . 267 
Kriebel. -^Ijraham. 421 
Krieble, Jesse S , 290 
Krieble. John K.,-I7S 
Kulp. Sa-nnel N,. 86 
Kurt.?. Irwin B., 196 

Landis, T. Horace. Sr 
Landis, Jonas SL. .364 
Laros. Jesse S., 478 
Larzelere, Nicholas H., 6 
Latch, Edward B., 121 
Leaf, Henrv P., 19=; 
Lee, J. Ellwood, 22 
Leitenl)erger, John, 316 
Lenhart, John E., 446 
Levengood. Peter Y., 260 
Lewin, T. Milton, 482 
Lewis, Effie jNI., 494 
Linde, C-'tbarine. 279 
Linde. Chris-Han. 279 
Lindsav, .-\ndrew. 69 
Livezev, M.-- R., 6o 
Livezey, T. Ellwood. 32 
Livezey. Thomas H., 5:0 
Lodge. John W.. 176 
Longstr^tb. Sarah H.. 454 
Looniis. John. 251 
Longhlin. .Mexander, 472 
Lovett. Ribert, J.90 
Lowery. Ha.rv S. 531 



Hill.v, 


.^. \l.,lil>H,,'47^ 


Lukcn-. CharlL-.. ^o; 


H,ll... 


\^.:t, 1, S.,^308 


Lnkenv. (i,.,r,e W."?I7 


H.n.i. 


" -:... ; i,„i7 A., 4S9 


Luker., (n'M-Kc T.. so6 


Hi.i,.., 


.n .-.^H iw\ .,1 Montgomery 


Lukcns, lawond, VJd 


( 


iiiiiii\. .;4[ 


Lukens, The Familv, ,02 


Hobart 


Wiili.ini Al . 189 


Lukens, William E., 521 


HoI.MM 


, b'rr, l.Ml.l C, 12 




Hoff.. ■ 


' f' ir>' n |-.. 16 


Manv. Charles H . 476 


HoU-. 


■.!^- . '..rles.96 


March. Tb.p.as J. 324 


Hoi'.. 


^; 1. ...... _C.. 197 


Martin, Williim 1., s4 


HolK. 




Afatlier. Charles. ^, 


Hoot. I 


Hwiind ^^5^ 


Mather, K:r„-. ,S, 


Hoover 


Franci^'C. 162 


Matlu-u- l-:,l' .r. '^o 


Hoovei 


Hiram C. >o 


Manck. ri'u biiiiilv. ^00 


Hower 


Frank A., T6:; 


McCap.i. I,,~ ■■', W., ',^4 


Hughes 


, The Faniilv,'282 


McFarland. The 1-amilv. 



JMcGinlev. Joseph J., 225 
McHarg, John S., 446 
McHarg, William, 367 
McKinlay, John, 348 
McMahon, George, 423 
Meschter, George K., 306 
Messinger, S. L., 216 
Metz, Abraham K., 445 
Metz, John K., 309 
Mills, Ellis, 3^1 
Mintzer, William :\I., 25 
Moore, Herbert L'., 4,9 
^b.nre. M .\nna. 497^ 
.AbiruM;;. ( K'^rge C. 109 
,\b.n-|-, .b-lin R. 139 
\b.rri~. ( il'vcr G., 409 
M' 'I'l' .n. I I'r 1-arni. .^19 
M.y.v. i./.a, E.. 470 
.Mnrpli), .\,„lrew J.. 479 
.Murpliv, lieniamin F.. 163 
.Alurphy, George D., 141 

Nash, Daniel, 502 
Nash, Harrv L., 228 
Nash, Joseph v.. 125 
Neiman, Howard Y., 214 
Newlni. Franklin. 271 
Newport. David. 129 
Nipp.v William D., s^i 
Noble. Snnnel. 6! 
Nyce. Edwin S., 404 
Nyce. Jacob P.. 315 

Oberholtzer. :\ [orris B.. 360 
O'Brien. Michael P.. 76" 
Ortt, Rowley K., 83 

Penrose, Benjamin F., 383 
Phillips. Thonias W.. 140 
Pifer, Georee W., 228 
Porter. T. Elmer. 400 
Potts. William W.. 326 

Rambo. Charles W.. 231 
Ramev. Cl'arles. 227 
Ramsev. Kllcn D . 343 
Rapp. Piln- s 4_>ij 
Raudenl.-i-.li. ( )ueii M, 
Reifs:n-,U-r. Horace 1^-514 
Reigner. Jesse B.. 350 
Rex. John H., 64 " 
Richards, -\".ia F. . 190 
Richard^-. William B , 321 
Richard. -> I'-n. 1 D.,' 10 
Ri.ghter, li.-r;-.-.' I'.. |j8 
Roberfs, \l-.u-iio-i I'... ,12 
Roberts, Cinidis 1|., 274 
Roberts, F.llwnod. 542 
Roberts, Hnqh. 88* 
Roberts. Willis R . 160 
K idrnb.-iivdi. \N-illnm H.. 11 
'-• ■■-. Tl,^. l-'amilv, ^16 



Ku>er. J -h-i D., 303 
Rupert. William W.. 207 
Ruth, Jacob K.. 310 



Sands, Jfor-iti, 
Sassaman, He 



206 
■y S., 



INDEX. 



Saylor. Albert G,, 198 
Saylor, Elmer E., 422 
Schall. John W., go 
Scheldt. Adam, 104 
Schirmer. John. 157 
Schneider. Henry W., 269 
Schrack. Tohn, ,^98 
Schreiher. Jolm S., 138 
Schreiber, Theodore. 133 
Schwab. George M., 152 
Schwenk, Samuel Z., 399 
Schweyer. Henry A., 346 
Seiple. Samuel C, ,S44 
Seipt. George A.. 311 
Shade. Jacob. 414 
Shade, John M., 208 
Shaner, Harry A., 413 
Shellenberger. Edwin M.. 170 
Shelly. Daniel W., 543 
Shelmire, Tohn S.. 401 
Sheppard. William. 261 
Shoemaker. Jesse C.. 164 
Shoemaker. Joseph A.. 144 1 
Shoemaker, Lonis' R.. 378 
Shoemaker, Marv S.. 148 
Shoemaker. Witfiam H., 146 
Shiiler, William R., 357 
Simpson. Charles. 417 
Slingluff, Henry G, 142 
Slmglnff, Willi.im lb. 280 
Slough, l-lpbrann h\. 303 
Smith. Frank L.. 424 
Smith. Newberry A., 46 
Smith. O. P., 212 
Smith. Thomas V., 258 
Snell. William C, 392 
Snyder. John C. 294 
Snyder. Stephen. 319 
Sonnner, Henry J., 499 
Sonder, Elmer N.. 476 
Soudcr, Harvcv. 3=2 



Spang. Joseph. 204 
Springer. Daniel J., 239 
Stager, John, 544 
Stahlnecker, Henry W., 467 
Stannard, Edward J., 153 
Stannard, Lewis J., 323 
Steele. Thomas C, 211 
Stmson, Charles H., 87 
Stong, Lewis B., 133 
Stout. Amanda, 492 
Stout, John D., 420 
Stover, Christian, 401 
Strahan, J. A., 107 
Strasser, Ernest W., 461 
Streeper, Thomas' S,, 332 
Strehle, August, 474 
Styer. Freas, 320 
Summers, The Family. 534 
Summers, William, 536 
Supplee, J. Henderson, 506 
Supplee, Joel. 249 
Swavely, Samuel B., 412 

Taft, Eugene L., 254 
Taggart, William, 235 
Taubel. Louis E., 223 
Templeton, Charles. 85 
Thomas. Benjamin, 36 
Thomson, James K., 49 
Thomson. Thomas, 522 
Titlow, Jacob R., 234 
Todd, John, 188 
Townsend, Edward Y., .46 
Townsend, Henry T., 48 
Townsend, John W., 48 
Twaddell, John H., 200 
Tyson, John H.. 99 
Tyson, Joseph H., 310 

Updegrove, E'rancis B., 349 
Vanderslice, John }il., 192 



VanHorn, James. 167 
Voorhees, J. Frank. 396 

Wagner. John T., 221 
Walt, Abram. 370 
Walt, Andrew, 462 
Walton, Amos, 149 
Walton, William E.. 143 
Wanger, Irving P., 28 
Wanner, Ell wood J., 509 
Watt, George W., 299 
Weber, J. Howard, 173 
Weigner, John K., 314 
Weinberger, J. Shelly, 432 
Wells. Mary M., 270 
Wells, William J., 440 
Wentz, Abram, 70 



W< 



135 



West, Willi.-ini, 168 
White, Daniel H., 483 
Wiand. William H., 457 
Wickersham, Frank, 466 
Wieand, Charles' S., 408 
Willauer, William, 384 
Williams, Irvin C, 229 
Williard, Philip, 456 
Wise, Henry Y.. 426 
Withers, M. Augustus, i8o 
Wolford, Benjamin D,, 380 
Wood, Charles S.. 513 
Wood, David E., 430 
Wood, Horace C, 159 
Wood, John. 532 
Wood, Richard F., 464 
Woodward. S. B., 542 



Yeager. Samuel S.. 
Yerger, Samuel M. 



Ziegler. Elmer B.. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



COLONEL JAMES BOYD. The bar of 
every county in Pennsylvania has its oldest mem- 
ber, the honor being handed down from one to 
another as each in turn departs from the scene of 
his earthly labors and triumphs. Colonel James 
Boyd enjoys special distinction in this respect. 
He is not only the nestor of the bar of Montgom- 
ery county but he is the oldest attorney in active 
practice at this time in the state of Pennsylvania. 

James Boyd, grandfather of Colonel Boyd, 
was a native of County Tyrone, Ireland. Emi- 
grating to this country, he settled at Connellsville, 
in the coke region of Pennsylvania. 

Colonel Boyd is the son of Jeremiah and Eliz- 
abeth (Long) Boyd. He was born in the old 
homestead in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, 
March 29, 1821. He was educated in the com- 
mon schools of that vicinity in his earlier boy- 
hood days, and when he was eighteen years of 
age his father and the family removed to Ger- 
mantown, in Philadelphia county, where the son 
completed his education at the old academy con- 
ducted by Professors Green, Smith and Collum. 
The family then removed to Norristown, where 
the question of a profession for the son arose, he 
being upon the threshold of manhood. It was 
the father's wish that his son should become a 
druggist, and, without consulting with him, the 
elder Boyd purchased a drugstore in Norristown 
at the corner of Main and Cherry streets then 
owned by Dr. Huddleson, an early practitioner of 
medicine who is long since deceased. The son 
entered the store and, after a trial of business for 



three months, came to the conclusion that he was 
not fitted by nature for that occupation, and so 
disposed of it to another person. He then went to 
his father, who was greatly displeased at the turn 
of affairs, and informed him that he had decided 
to go west. The mother of Colonel Boyd pre- 
vailed on him, however, to remain at home. 

At that time debates in the public school- 
houses were very common, and young Boyd soon 
became talked about for the forcible arguments 
which he advanced for the side which he hap- 
pened to take, whatever might be the subject of 
dispute. Being six feet three inches in height 
and endowed with a clear voice and pleasing 
mode of address, he invariably commanded atten- 
tion when he spoke. The father, hearing of the 
success of his son's efforts in this line, at once 
made the suggestion that he enter the legal pro- 
fession through the usual course of preliminary 
study. The idea was acceptable to the young 
man and he acted upon it at once, entering the 
office of Daniel H. Mulvany. a Norristown law- 
yer of great learning and ability. In response to 
a request of the elder Boyd, Mr. Mulvany en- 
gaged in conversation with the son, the result of 
the conference being that Mr. MuLvany accepted 
him as a student, and he immediately started in 
to read law. 

Mr. Boyd applied himself to his legal studies 
with his habitual earnestness and diligence and 
he soon mastered the intricacies of the law, being 
admitted to the bar August 16, 1842, by Judge 
Fox. He then opened an office for himself in the 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



same building in which he is now located, and 
■waited, as is the custom, for his first client. ^Ir. 
Boyd made a success for himself in his profes- 
:sion from the start. Attorney Freedley, who soon 
gained a lucrative practice, was thought to have 
• done exceedingly well by securing four hundred 
-dollars in fees for his first year's work, but Mr. 
!Boyd outstripped all his competitors by his per- 
severance and attention to business. His fees for 
the year in which he began practice, amounted 
in the aggregate to seven hundred and sixty dol- 
Jars, a sum which has never before or since been 
•equaled by a beginner in the course of his first 
year. 

The successes of Attorney Boyd rapidly in- 
creased and he soon became known far and near 
as a prosperous and popular lawyer. His busi- 
3iess grew rapidly and he was generally recog- 
nized as one of the most prominent members of 
the Montgomery bar, which then, as now, had a 
liigh reputation among the legal fraternity of 
the state. 

In railway management Colonel Bo}-d has 
long held a very prominent place. In 1845 he 
"Tvas appointed counsel in IMontgomery county for 
the Philadelphia, German town & Norristown 
Railroad Company. In 1852 he received a sim- 
ilar appointment for the Philadelphia & Reading 
Railway Company, which he still holds, although 
Montgomer)' Evans is associated with him. He 
still travels frequently to Philadelphia where he 
Is summoned to confer with the president and 
■other officials of the Reading Railway Company, 
who have the greatest confidence in his judgment. 
■ which in matters of legal business, is unequaled. 
lln 1884 he was elected president of the Perkio- 
:men Railroad Company, a few years later of the 
'.Stony Creek Railroad Company, and a short time 
afterwards of the Philadelphia, Newtown & New 
York Railroad Company, all of which positions 
lie still holds. He has been a director of the 
Montgomery National Bank of Norristown since 
its organization, and also counsel for the institu- 
tion. He is a director of the Philadelphia & 
Reading Railway Company and also of the 
Plymouth Railroad Company. He was one of 
the organizers of the Norristown Insurance & 



Water Company and also of the Norristown 
Gas Company, and was for many years presi- 
dent of both, holding the office until recently. 

Colonel Boyd has always been a careful in- 
vestor. He holds stock in many of the prominent 
corporations of Philadelphia and is the owner of 
valuable property in ^Montgomery and other 
counties of the state, being generally regarded as 
one of the wealthiest men in Norristown. 

In politics Colonel Boyd was a Whig during 
the existence of that party but later became a 
Democrat. He was elected burgess of Norris- 
town many years ago. At that time there was no 
regular police force. After asking the town 
council to provide pohce protection and being re- 
fused, he appointed a policeman, and, later, an 
additional one, and, there being no public funds 
available from which to pay them, he met the 
expense from his own resources. It was quite 
common in those days for the youngest member 
of the bar to be elected burgess for one year, but 
at the end of Colonel Boyd's term, he had con- 
ducted the borough government so successsfully 
that there was not the slightest difficuUy in se- 
curing him a re-election, the rule being set aside 
for the time being. 

In 1873 Colonel Boyd was elected a member 
of the constitutional convention of Pennsylvania 
on the Democratic ticket and became a prominent 
member of that body which framed the consti- 
tution under which the people of the state are 
now living. He was one of three members who 
refused to attach his signature to the instnmient 
after it was drafted and accepted by a majority 
of the convention. There were some provisions 
in the document of which his conscience did not 
approve and he decided that he would not sign. 
It is characteristic of him that, having once made 
up his mind, he can not be swerved from his de- 
cision. Colonel Boyd's speeches at the time the 
constitution was discussed in the convention were 
considered models of good sense and elegant dic- 
tion, and they added ven,- much to his reputation 
as an orator. At this time an amusing episode 
occurred, being a mock trial of Colonel Boyd for 
the offense of impersonating a Methodist min- 
ister. During the existence of the constitutional 



MONTGOMERY COUXTY. 



convention, E. C. Knight invited its members 
to be his guests at Cape May. On the trip Colo- 
nel Boyd was introduced to a Methodist clergy- 
man, and, being an inveterate joker, succeeded 
in making him believe that he belonged to the 
same profession, much to the amusement of the 
other members of the convention. Later the 
mock trial was arranged by ex-Governor An- 
drew G. Curtin, Colonel Boyd being arrested as 
the defendant in the case of the Commonwealth 
vs. James Boyd, on the charge of impersonating 
a minister. J\len of note from all parts of the 
state being members of the convention, including 
many prominent lawyers, the trial proceeded in 
due form, the testimony being carefully recorded 
by a court reporter. The speeches of counsel on 
both sides caused much merriment, and some of 
the rulings were absurdly funny, Colonel Bo}d 
adding much to the general amusement by his 
witty sallies. The trial was printed and the de- 
mand from the legal fraternity all over the coun- 
try greatly exceeded the supply. 

Colonel Boyd was and still is a strict discip- 
linarian, severely rebuking familiarities. He 
counted among his personal acquaintances, Lin- 
coln, Grant, Sherman and many other notabili- 
ties of their time. Eew men in Pennsylvania 
were better or more widely known than he dur- 
ing the more active years of his life. His after 
dinner speeches are renowned for their wit, and 
several bar dinners recently held in Philadelphia 
have been greatly enlivened by the scintillations 
of his dry humor. 

As a lawyer Colonel Boyd owes much of his 
success to his keen wit and to superior manage- 
ment, especially in the handling of witnesses on 
cross-examination, in which he is an adept, lead- 
ing those of his opponent to contradict themselves 
in their statements and thus to ruin their case. 

Colonel Boyd has long beeen president of the 
Montgomer}' County Bar Association. He has 
won the respect and esteem of all with whom he 
came in contact. He is exceedingly kind-hearted 
and genial. Many a young man in the legal pro- 
fession has come to him for advice, and he has 
given them advice that has been of the greatest 
benefit to them in the trial of their cases. Strug- 



gling lawyers have been very much aided by his 
friendly suggestions. 

Colonel Boyd often relates with much gusto 
the practical joke which he once played on Dan- 
iel Doughert}-, the "silver-tongued orator" of 
Philadelphia, who was very popular with the 
ladies because of his fine Shakespearean render- 
ings and other accomplishments. He had at one 
time built up quite a practice in the courts of 
jMontgomery count}-, and was very often in Xor- 
ristown. At his parlor in the leading hotel, the 
old JMontgomery House, now the Hotel J^Iont- 
gomery, he entertained delighted audiences in 
the evenings. When he had occasion to deliver 
a speech in behalf of a client in the courthouse, 
his admirers usually made it a point to be present. 
Colonel Boyd decided, when he had an oppor- 
tunity, to head off the brilliant Philadelpdia law- 
yer, whom no one else had ever been able to 
match, and the opportunit}- was not long in pre- 
senting itself. The two were pitted against each 
other and the followers of Dougherty had gath- 
ered in force to witness his triumphs through his 
brilliant oratory which was supposed to be irre- 
sistible when he addresed a jury. On this oc- 
casion, however. Colonel Boyd had the right to 
speak first, and he made the most of the privi- 
lege. He knew that Mr. Dougherty would be 
obliged to leave on the 5 :30 train in the evening, 
and, launching into his address at 3 o'clock, he 
contrived to consume the time so that it was 
5 :20 o'clock when he concluded his speech, to 
the utter discomfiture of Mr. Dougherty and his 
friends. The great orator made no attempt to 
speak at all. Colonel Boyd has often been pitted 
against Wayne MacVeagh and other eminent 
lawyers, whose fame was world wide, and he 
proved himself equal to any of them in fertility 
of resources and skill in handling his case. W^ayne 
MacVeagh said of Colonel Bo\-d on one occasion 
that he was the most forcible and convincing 
speaker he had ever heard : stern and unbending 
at times, but with a heart as mellow and kind as 
could be desired when occasion required it. 

Colonel James Boyd married Sarah Jamison, 
who died in 1884. She was the daughter of the 
late Samuel Jamison, a prominent manufacturer 



^lONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



of Xorristown. Their children were Howard 
(deceased), who married Miss j\Iary, daughter 
of William H. Slingluff, they having one child, 
James S. Boyd, Jr., a student at the University 
of Pennsylvania, where he takes much interest in 
athletics ; and Wallace J., who served in the house 
of representatives, and is long deceased, leaving 
one child who died in infancy. 

Colonel Boyd is widely known for his charity 
to the needy, his benevolence being unostenta- 
tious but none the less prompt and generous. He 
is universally esteemed by his fellow members of 
the bar and by all who know him. The dinner 
given to him by the members of the bar on the 
occasion of the sixtieth anniversary of his admis- 
sion, was an event long to be remembered. Em- 
inent associates in the legal profession vied with 
each other in paying deserved tribute to their 
guest and friend. Hon. Wayne MacVeagh left 
an important case in Washington to be present 
and add his word by way of testimony to the 
splendid qualities of the grand old man. 

Mental power and self control are the quali- 
ties which have given to Colonel Boyd his pre- 
eminence in the profession in which his success 
has been so great. With a jury he has been al- 
most irresistible, carrying its members with him 
by his mental force. Independent in his bearing, 
his humor and sarcasm are powerful weapons 
against his adversaries in legal contests. His in- 
vective, when he feels called upon to 
use it, is terrible. His varied and wide 
experience, his legal knowledge, and his at- 
tainments in his profession have long given him 
fame and reputation that have not been ap- 
proached by any of his contemporaries in the 
practice of law. Had he cared for preferment of 
that kind he might have occupied a seat on the 
bench where his great learning and the force of 
his intellect would have made him a shining light 
in the judiciary of the state and country. 

MONTGOMERY EVANS. This family 
OF Evans, which (according to a genealogical 
chart compiled by I. I. H. Harris, of St. John's 
College, Cambridge, and now in the British 
^luseum) is descended from Elystan Glodrydd 



through his second son Idnerth, was originally 
settled in Carmarthenshire. 

John Evans, gentleman, a lineal descendant, 
having performed valuable military service dur- 
ing the reign of Queen Elizabeth, in aiding to 
suppress the Irish rebellion, obtained from the 
Crown a grant of land and emigrated from Car- 
marthenshire in Wales to Limerick, Ireland, 
where he was living in and before 1628. He mar- 
ried Ellen De Verdon and dying January i, 1632, 
left issue two sons and three daughters. 

George, the elder son, represented Limerick 
in parliament for many years and died in 1707 
at a very advanced age, having passed a most 
eventful life. 

John, the younger son, who was a colonel in 
the English army, married and had issue three 
sons, Simon, the oldest, buried at Fanningstown, 
County Limerick, Ireland ; William ; and John,^ 
the youngest, buried at Ballygrenane in the same 
county. 

William, with his wife Ann came to Amer- 
ica with the Welsh emigration that sailed in the 
year 1698, which Proud mentions in a foot note, 
vol. I, page 222, and Jenkins in his Historical 
Collections of Gwynedd speaks of as follows: 
"The main company of emigrants sailed from 
Liverpool on the i8th of April, 1698. Their ship 
was the Robert and Elizabeth, its master Ralph 
Williams, its owner Robert Haydock of Liver- 
pool. They touched at Dublin before proceeding 
and it was not until the ist of May that they 
finally spread the ship's sails for the new world. 
Forty-five passengers died of dysentery. It was 
not until the 17th of July that they reached port 
in Philadelphia. 

Having settled temporarily at Gwynedd in the 
then province of Pennsylvania while prospecting 
for land, he subsequently purchased two tracts, 
aggregating seven hundred acres, in Manatawny, 
afterwards Limerick township, and there settled 
permanently. Here \\'^illiam's death soon after 
occurred and his wife, surviving him but a few 
years, died in 1720. Her will recorded in Phila- 
delphia, June i8th of that year, devises the es- 
tate to her five children, namely : \\''illiam, 
Owen, George, Elizabeth and David. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Of these, Owen, born in 1699, was for niany 
years justice of the peace and at one time a mem- 
ber of the colonial assembly. He was also a mem- 
ber of the vestry of St. James' Protestant Episco- 
pal church of Evansburg from 1738 until the 
time of his death. Bean, in his History of Mont- 
gomery County, page 917, says : "Owen Evans 
was an early settler. He was appointed a justice 
of the peace in 1732 and continued to hold that 
office until his death. He appears to have been a 
prominent man and died in 1754, aged fifty-five 
years." 

On August 14, 1 72 1, in Christ church, Phila- 
delphia, he married Mary, the daughter of Will- 
iam and Mary Davis, and had by her eight chil- 
dren, one of whom, 

David, born January 22, 1730, inherited from 
his father the homestead and lived thereon until 
the time of his death, which occurred October 23, 
1800. On October 27, 1762, in St. Michael's and 
Zion's church, Philadelphia, he married Anna, 
the great-granddaughter of John and Frances 
Brooke, and left issue: Sarah, who married 
James Garrett and moved to Maryland; Mary, 
who married Amos Evans of Limerick ; Matthew 
and \Mlliam, who died young, and 

Owen, born October 27, 1767, who on March 
20, 1792, married Rachel, the great-great-grand- 
daughter of John and Frances Brooke. The issue 
of this marriage was eight children, of whom the 
youngest was 

Thomas Brooke, born in Limerick, April 21, 
1809, who, after receiving the customary educa- 
tion that was then accorded to youth of his sta- 
tion in life, became a teacher. He subsequently 
learned the trade of tanning and afterwards estab- 
lished himself in the tanning business. Mr. 
Evans was prominent in local affairs, was a jus- 
tice of the peace from 1841 to 1861 and clerk of 
the county commissioners and for the board of 
poor directors for many years. He was active 
and influential in the community until his death, 
which occurred December 13, 1863. On Novem- 
ber 9, 1834, he married Mary Ann, the daughter 
of Daniel and Mary (Kendall) Schwenk, and 
there were born unto them eight children, of 
whom the eldest, Robert Brooke, was for manv 



years a justice of the peace in Limerick; Benja- 
min F. Montgomery ist, and Zella died young; 
Mary Elizabeth married to B. Frank Saylor and 
residing in St. Louis ; Charlotte, deceased ; Emma, 
married to Garrett E. Brownback, of Linfield, and 
Montgomery, 2d, the subject of this sketch. 

Montgomery Evans, 2d, one of the leading 
attorneys of the Norristown bar, was born in 
Limerick, November 18, 1853. He was educated 
in the public schools of his native township and in 
select schools in Phrenixville, Spring City and 
Norristown, was graduated from Lafayette Col- 
lege in 1875, as valedictorian of his class, and 
was a member of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity and 
of the Phi Beta Kappa society. For two years he 
was principal of the public schools of Montrose 
in Susquehanna county. He afterwards studied 
law with the late Benjamin E. Chain and on 
November 30, 1878, was admitted to the bar. 

For a number of years Mr. Evans was a part- 
ner of Louis M. Childs, the firm being Childs & 
Evans. Subsequently this partnership was dis- 
solved and he associated himself with Messrs. 
Holland and Dettra, which firm under the style 
of Evans, Holland & Detra, is recognized as 
among the leading attorneys of the state. 

Mr. Evans is .president of the Norristown 
Trust Company, of the Norristown Insurance 
& Water Company, and of the Bridgeport Water 
Company, and with Colonel James Boyd is coun- 
sel in this county for the Reading Railroad Com- 
pany. Since 1885 he has been treasurer of the 
Law Library. He is a director of the Norris- 
town Gas Company, the Gas Company of Mont- 
gomery county, Norristown Steam Heat Com- 
pany and Western North Carolina Land Com- 
pany; also secretary and treasurer of the last- 
named corporation. 

His career of more than a quarter of a century 
has been marked by continued advancement ; as 
a lawyer he stands high. To natural ability are 
added the results of careful study and observa- 
tion, and fidelity to his clients' interests, coupled 
with sound judgment and conservative advice 
has gained him that confidence which has classed 
him among the trustworthy and reliable attorneys 
in this state. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Mr. Evans is a Democrat in politics but has 
never sought or held office. He is an elder of 
the Central Presb)'terian church and superinten- 
dent of its Sunday-school and is also a member of 
the board of trustees. He is treasurer of the 
Trustees of the Presbytery of Philadelphia North. 

On November 30, 1886, he married Cara G., 
daughter of Rev. James Grier Ralston, D. D., 
who was the owner of Oakland Female Seminary. 
Three children have been born of this union — 
Dorothy, Roger (deceased), and Montgomery. 

NICHOLAS H. LARZELERE. The revo- 
cation of the famous Edict of Nantes, signed by 
Henry IV, in 1598, which gave religious freedom 
to all parties, was an act which lost to France 
many of her best and most desirable citizens, a 
large number of families finally finding refuge 
in America. Among those who fied from the 
persecutions following the ill-advised action of 
Louis XIV. were Nidiolas and John Larzelere, 
who settled on Long Island. Nicholas removed 
ultimately to Staten Island, where he married 
and reared a family which consisted of two sons, 
Nicholas and John, and two daughters. Of the 
sons, Nicholas, in 1741, removed with his family 
to Bucks county, Pennsylvania, and settled in 
Lower Makefield township. He died at the age 
of eighty-four, having reared a family of eight 
children, and was buried in the Episcopal grave- 
3'ard at Bristol. 

The eldest son of the first settler in Bucks 
county of the name, also Nicholas (great-great- 
grandfather), was born on Staten Island in 1734. 
He married Hannah Britton, of Bristol town- 
ship, and removed into Bensalem township, where 
he became possessed of a large estate, rearing 
a family of ten children. He was a soldier in the 
Revolutionary war, and died at the age of eighty- 
four years. 

Benjamin Larzelere (great-grandfather), eld- 
est son of Nicholas, last-mentioned, married Sa- 
rah Brown, of Bristol township, the couple having 
eight children, and he dying at eighty-four years 
of age on the farm which he purchased in that 
township, and on which the present borough of 
Bristol is partly located. 



Nicholas Larzelere (grandfather), eldest son 
of Benjamin, located in Abington township, 
Montgomery county, in 1825. He married Esther 
Berrell, daughter of Colonel Jeremiah Berrell, 
and reared a family of twelve children. He died 
at sixty-seven years of age, in 1858, and was 
buried in the Presbyterian graveyard at Abington, 
one of the most ancient burial places in that 
vicinity. 

Benjamin Larzelere (father) was born in 1826 
and is still living. He married Mary Maxwell, 
eldest daughter of Henry and Ann (Buskirk) 
Maxwell, of Moreland township. Mrs. Maxwell 
was the daughter of Jacob Buskirk, originally 
from Holland, who married Elizabeth Lawrence, 
eldtst daughter of Jonathan Lawrence. Jona- 
than Lawrence was the eldest son of John and 
Mary (Townley) Lawrence, who came from 
Ei'gland to Massachusetts in 1713. Mary Law- 
rence was a daughter of Charles Townley of 
Lancashire, England, the genealogy of whose 
family has been traced in England to the reign 
of Henry VIII. 

Nicholas Henry Larzelere was born in War- 
minster township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania. 
He was reared on his father's farm in Warring- 
ton township, to which the family had removed, 
and was educated in the common schools of the 
neighborhood, attending them in winter, as is the 
usual custom in rural districts, and assisting with 
the duties of farm life during the greater part of 
every year. Having decided to take a college 
course, he entered the Doylestown English and 
Classical Seminary at the age of eighteen years, 
teaching part of the time. He entered the fresh- 
man class of Lafayette College at Easton in Sep- 
tember, 1 87 1, graduating from that institution in 
1875. In his junior year he won first honors in 
an oratorical contest between Franklin and Wash- 
ington Halls. In his senior year he had the honor 
of representing Lafayette College in the inter- 
collegiate oratorical contest, which took place in 
the academy of music. New York city, January 
13, 1875. The institutions represented were Am- 
herst, Princeton, Williams, Cornell, New York, 
Columbia and Lafayette colleges. 

In September, 1875, Mr. Larzelere entered the 




/l/fi^^jPurieZiAX^ 



■ las Larzclerc ( jl- ' andfather) , eldest son 

■■-ihi. locate' ' A.bington township, 

• •• He married Esther 

Jeremiah Berrell, 

, iwriM- children. He died 

f age, in 1858, and was 

• ian graveyard at Abington, 

'.nt burial places in that 

' . r) was bom in 1826 

cd Mary Maxwell, 

:ul Ann (Buskirk) 

or Aloreiand township. Mrs. Maxwell 

• inughter of Uc,J,\ Buskirk, originally 

""iizabeth Lawrence, 

Lawrence. Jona- 

I son of John and 



'g retiige 


Mary (Towni'. 


who came from 


from the 


F.' trland to Mr. 


[713. Mary Law- 


action of 


f<'!in- was a 1' 


^ Townley of 


-arzelere, 


[,Hiu:ashire, Ei. 


> of whose 


,,M.„P,-<--,i 


•■■ > lias been .:,. 


.. ilu- ,.',cny 




. VIIL 






...las Henry 1 




Oi tlK- 


i;i;Ti:V.'! townshi. 




s family 


He was reared 


■ ■■ ■•;-- 


.;ttled in 


ton township, > 


, , ;v..;..vcu. 


t the. age 


and was educ« 


lools of the 


of eight 


ncii:'-Vr»:,-K^'!. , 


er, as is the 


lul grave- 




:;.d assisting with 
he greater part of 



township, ;. 
Bristol is pan 



■,c. He ciitcrcu .jk Ucsli- 
College at Eaijtni in Sep- 

- *■ •' • nstitution in 

-I honors in 
and Wash- 
ad the honor 
\n the inter- 
luii took place in 
\ ork city, January 
, resented were Am- 
:!ti5, Cornell, New York, 
■ colleges. 

r j.rzelere entered the 




/i/^^cuneit/ix^ 



MONTGO^IERY COUNTY. 



office of Hon. George Ross, a leading lawyer of 
Doylestown, reading law under his direction for 
one year. At the end of that time he entered the 
oftice of Hon. B. Markley Boyer, afterwards 
president judge of the courts of Montgomery 
county. At tlie end of two years of diligent 
study, Mr. Larzelere was admitted to the bar of 
Montgomery county, September 28, 1877. ]\lr. 
Larzelere married, September 21, 1880, Miss Ida 
Frances, second daughter of Dr. John W. and 
Hannah Loch, of Norristown. They have two 
sons, John Loch and Charles Townley Larzelere, 
who are students at Princeton University. In 
religious faith Mr. and Mrs. Larzelere are both 
Presbyterians. On his father's side Mr. Larze- 
lere"s ancestors adhered to the Presbyterian faith, 
while on his mother's side they were mostly mem- 
bers of the Society of Friends or Quakers. 

In the practice of his profession Mr. Larzelere 
soon attained a commanding position among his 
associates at the bar. He took the lead from the 
beginning and has well maintained it to the 
present time, his industry, devotion to the inter- 
ests of his clients, and his fertility of resources 
overcoming every obstacle that appeared in the 
course of his career. He has been counsel, on 
one side or the other, of the majority of the im- 
portant cases that have arisen in the Norristown 
courts in the more than a quarter of a century 
that has intervened since his admission. He was 
a recognized leader from the beginning of his 
career, and he has won some notably splendid 
triumphs before juries and elsewhere, the force 
of his reasoning powers enabling him to present 
his case in the strongest possible light to the court 
or the jury as the case might be. Among the more 
notable of the cases in which he distinguished 
himself, from time to time, are the following: 
Bradfield et al. vs. Insurance Company : Com- 
monwealth vs. Gaffey, indicted for manslaughter 
at the hospital for the insane. The matter of 
freeing the DeKalb street bridge at Norristown, 
one of the most stubborn legal contests ever 
waged in the county ; Rudolph vs. Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company, in which as in the DeKalb 
street bridge case, the damage verdict consider- 
ablv exceeded a hundred thousand dollars, and 



many other cases involving damages on account 
of railway construction, in all of which he ac- 
quitted himself with the highest credit, and won 
the highest encomiums for his ability and success 
in presenting his case to the best possible advant- 
age. Success is the best test of a lawyer's ability, 
and, judged by this, ^Ir. Larzelere is entitled to- 
the highest consideration as a master in the legal 
profession. 

In politics :\Ir. Larzelere was originally a 
Democrat, according to the traditions of his 
family, but he was never a strong or unreason- 
able partisan. When the Democratic party, in 
the nomination of William J. Bryan for the pres- 
idency, in 1896, and the endorsement of the fal- 
lacy of silver coinage at the ratio of 16 to i, 
abandoned the principles of sound finance, Mr. 
Larzelere publicly announced that he could na 
longer support that organization and, with voice 
and vote, supported McKinley and Hobart, the- 
Republican nominees for the offices of president 
and vice president. His vote and his influence 
have ever since been cast on the side of sound, 
money, and safe methods in connection with the 
administration of national affairs. He is a 
stanch Republican and a member of the Union 
League. When Judge Swartz was a candidate 
in 1904 for judge of the Pennsylvania supreme 
court, Mr. Larzelere presented his name at the 
Republican county convention in a speech that 
will long be remembered for its earnestness and 
eloquence, by all who heard it. 

In everything that relates to progress and im- 
provement in the borough of Norristown, his 
home during all his adult life. ]\Ir. Larzelere 
has been actively interested, always casting the 
weight of his influence on the side of advance- 
ment. He has been for a number of years prom- 
inently identified with the street railway system, 
which has assisted so much in the development 
of the best interests of the county seat. He has 
been president of the Schuylkill \'alley Traction 
Company during its entire existence, and still 
occupies a prominent position in connection with 
the management of the company's line and the 
operation of its various branches, which are be- 
ing- extended in manv directions so as to become 



^lOXTGOMERY COUNTY. 



an important link in the chain of communica- 
tion between different sections of the county and 
state. In this work of development and growth 
of the popular means of transportation, j\Ir. 
Larzelere has assisted very materially, his ef- 
forts being constantly directed towards the im- 
provement of the service so that the public con- 
venience may be promoted to the fullest possible 
extent. He is also solicitor for the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company in Montgomery county, for 
the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Compam-, the 
Lehigh Valley Traction Company, the Bell Tele- 
phone Company, the Western Union Telegraph 
Company and many other great corporations 
which have business interests in his district. All 
these are added to a large and exacting practice, 
which has grown, year by year, to large pro- 
portions. The law firm which was for many 
years Larzelere & Gibson, Mr. Larzelere's part- 
ner being JMuscoe i\L Gibson, son of Rev. Isaac 
Gibson, has within a few years been enlarged 
further by the addition of Gilbert R. Fox, also 
of Norristown, the firm name being Larzelere, 
Gibson & Fox, in which working shape it is pre- 
pared to take up any and all legal business that 
is presented, and carry it to a successful issue. 
Mr. Larzelere, notwithstanding the fact that he 
is a very busy man in his profession, is not un- 
mindful of other business interests and oppor- 
tunities, and is in the directorates of several rail- 
way, manufacturing and fiscal corporations. j\lr. 
Larzelere and his. family reside in one of the 
handsomest and most complete homes in Nor- 
ristown at DeKalb and Basin streets, with ex- 
tensive grounds laid out elegantly, forming a 
fine setting for his residence in the finest part of 
Norristown. He has found time among his 
other occupations to devote a good deal of at- 
tention to literature, and art and has collected 
one of the best private libraries in the state, as 
well as a collection of oil paintings representa- 
tive of the highest excellence and merit among 
modern artists. 

JACOB V. GOTWALTS, a prominent 
lawyer, and ex-District Attorney of Mont- 
gomery county, was born in Lower Provi- 



dence township, ]Montgomery county, Penn- 
sylvania, May 13, 1840. He is the son of Jacob 
and Esther (Vanderslice) Gotwalts, both natives 
of Pennsylvania. They had four children, Jacob 
V. being the only one now living. 

Jacob Gotwalts (father) was a farmer in 
Lower Providence township, where he owned two 
farms. His wife was Esther Vanderslice, daugh- 
ter of Anthony Vanderslice. He and his wife 
were Mennonites in religious faith. He died in 
185 1, aged fifty years. His wife survived him 
until 1900, when she died at the age of eighty- 
seven years. He was a \Miig in politics. 

Adam Gotwalts (grandfather) was also a 
farmer who lived and died in Montgomery 
county. The family originally came from Ger- 
many, but the first ancestor in this country set- 
tled in Montgomery county in the latter part 
of the seventeenth century. Anthony Vander- 
slice (maternal grandfather) was a native of 
Pennsylvania. He was a farmer, and was also 
interested in canal boating. He died at an ad- 
vanced age, leaving several sons and daughters. 

Jacob V. Gotwalts lived on his father's farm 
until he was ten years of age, when he entered 
Freeland Seminary, now LIrsinus College. In 
1856 he became a student at Dickinson College, 
at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and graduated in i860. 
He was principal of the Cape May High School, 
New Jersey, for four years, and a member of the 
faculty of Treemount Seminary for more than a 
year before he commenced the study of law in 
the office of Hon. George N. Corson, of Norris- 
town. He was admitted to the bar in August, 
1867, and immediately began the practice of law. 
He continued in Norristown until 1894, when he 
removed to Pottstown. being a member of the 
firm of Gotwalts & Saylor. 

On December 3. 1873, ^Ir. Gotwalts married 
Miss Henrietta Rover, daughter of ex-Senator 
Lewis Royer and Isabella (Treon) Royer. Mrs. 
Gotwalts belongs to the Reformed church. 

Mr. Gotwalts was district attorney of Mont- 
gomery county from 1876 to 1879. He was a 
school director and a member of town council 
while he lived in Norristown. He does a general 
law practice, but makes a specialty of criminal 



MONTGOAIERY COUNTY. 



law, in which he has been very successful. He is 
attorney for a number of corporations. He is a 
Democrat in pohtics and was a delegate to the 
National Democratic Convention in 1876, at St. 
Louis, when Hon. Samuel J. Tilden was nominated 
for President, and also a delegate at the recent 
convention held at the same place when A. B. 
Parker was nominated. He has been a Mason for 
more than forty years, and belongs to Phoenix 
Lodge, No 75, Free and Accepted Masons, also 
to the Elks, and the Knights of Friendship. 

Mr. Gotwalts is genial in disposition, and has 
made many strong friendships. He has been a 
prominent figure at Democratic county conven- 
tions for many years, and has frequently re- 
sponded to calls for speechmaking during differ- 
ent campaigns in behalf of his party. He is a 
fluent speaker, his manner being logical and con- 
vincing, and his eloquence being frequently inter- 
spersed with sallies of humor that enable him to 
please and captivate his audience. 

HORACE MILTON EBERT, secretary of 
the March-Brownback Stove Company, of Potts- 
town, was born in Cressona, Schuylkill county, 
Pennsylvania. January 9, 1866. He is the son of 
Joseph R. and Margaret (Wurts) Ebert. 

Joseph R. Ebert (father) was born in Mont- 
gomery county. In young manhood he was a 
carpenter, and afterwards became an agent for 
the Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company. 
He was station agent at various places. Joseph 
R. Ebert made his home in Norristown for many 
years, and about 1894 removed to Pottstown, 
where he died in 1897, aged fifty-eight years. His 
wife died in 1900, aged sixty-two years. In poli- 
tics he was a Republican. The family were mem- 
bers of the Lutheran denomination. Margaret 
Wurts Ebert was also born in Montgomery 
county. jNIr. and Mrs. Ebert had four children : 
Walter Winfield, died in infancy ; Ida JNIay, died 
unmarried at the age of thirty-eight ; Horace M. ; 
Ella Blanche, a music teacher. 

William Ebert (grandfather) was born in 
Pennsylvania, and was of German descent. He 
was a cabinet-maker and later a miller, being the 
owner of a mill at Mingo, below Royersford. He 



lived most of his life in ^Montgomery county 
and died at the age of seventy years. He and 
his wife had four sons and three daughters. 
George Wurts (maternal grandfather) was also 
born in Pennsylvania, and was of German de- 
scent. He was a farmer in Schuylkill county. 
He was twice married and had seven children. 
George Wurts died at an advanced age. 

Horace M. Ebert removed to Norristown 
with his parents when he was seven years of age, 
and lived in that borough for many years. He 
completed the public school course in that bor- 
ough, graduating from the Norristown high 
school in the class of 1881. After receiving his 
diploma he took a clerical position with the 
Philadelphia & Reading Railway Company, and 
later was employed for a time in the Pencoyd 
Iron Works, one of the most extensive establish- 
ments of the kind in America. In the year 1892 
Mr. Ebert went to Pottstown, where he has held 
ever since the position of secretary of the March- 
Brownback Stove Company, one of the most suc- 
cessful corporations engaged in above manufac- 
turing in Pennsylvania, employing one hundred 
and fifty persons or more in its various depart- 
ments. Mr. Ebert belongs to the Elks and the 
Foresters of America. He served in the Spanish- 
American war, raising a company in Pottstown 
and neighboring townships. He w^as its first 
lieutenant, and he served with it throughout the 
Porto Rican campaign. 

Mr. Ebert has always taken an active interest 
in politics, national, state and local, being strongly 
attached to the principles and policy of the Re- 
publican party. His name has frequently been 
mentioned in connection with public positions, and 
at the Republican County Convention of 1902 
he was nominated by acclamation for the position 
of assemblyman on the party ticket, along with 
Messrs. Rex, Weida, Ambler and Landis. Mr. 
Ebert as well as his colleagues on the assembly 
ticket took an active part in the canvass, which 
was one of the most earnest ever made in ^lont- 
gomery count}-. They were triumphantly elected 
in November of that year, Mr. Ebert's popularity, 
wherever he is known, being attested by his large 
vote in Pottstown. Norristown. and elsewhere in 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



the county. At Harrisburg Mr. Ebert was one 
of the most useful, industrious and influential 
members of the House of Representatives. He 
He served on the committees as follows : To 
Compare Bills, Corporations, ^Manufacture, and 
Federal Relations, and took a large share in the 
work of the session. 

DR. DAMD DORRINGTON RICHARD- 
SON, third son of Major George Park and Sarah 
Ann Richardson, and grandson of George Rich- 
ardson, of Richmond, Virginia, is a native of that 
city, born May ii, 1837. 

Dr. Richardson's preparatory education was 
obtained at Transylvania University, at Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, from the medical department of 
which he graduated with the degree of M. D., at 
the termination of his third course of lectures, in 
February, 1858. He removed to Philadelphia the 
following spring and organized a school for prep- 
aration for the degree of Doctor of Medicine and 
for the medical staff of the army and navy. This 
enterprise proved very successful. 

Dr. Richardson served three years, from 1858 
to 1861, as interne at the Howard and Philadel- 
phia Hospitals, being appointed in the latter year 
resident physician at the Northern Dispensary, 
Philadelphia, the institution being under his en- 
tire charge. He held this position until Decem- 
ber, 1866, when he was appointed superintendent 
and physician in chief of the Philadelphia Hospi- 
tal, Department for the Insane. 

In 1871 he graduated with the degree of 'M. D. 
from the University of Pennsylvania. In 1879 
he was appointed superintendent of the State 
Hospital for the Insane, at Warren, Pennsyl- 
vania, organizing that institution and placing it 
on a good working basis, and remaining in charge 
as superintendent until July, 1881, when he was 
unanimously recalled to the Philadelphia Hos- 
pital, of whose Department for the Insane he had 
previously had charge, performing the duties in 
a highly successful and satisfactory manner. He 
retired from this position in 1886 to engage in 
private practice. 

Dr. Richardson was not to remain thus, how- 
ever, for any great length of time. His ability 



as a superintendent of institutions for the insane- 
had now received very general recognition, and 
in 1889 he was elected the first superintendent of 
the Delaware State Hospital for the Insane, at 
Farnhurst, which position he held until October 
I, 1893, when he resigned to take charge of the 
male department of the State Hospital for the 
Insane, Southeastern District of " Pennsylvania, 
Norristown, in which he has been equally suc- 
cessful, keeping the institution up to the high 
standard which it had attained under his pre- 
decessor. Dr. Robert H. Chase, and making many 
improvements in the care and treatment of the 
unfortunates in his charge. Dr. Richardson is a 
model resident physician, giving personal super- 
vision to every detail of the work of the institu- 
tion of which he has charge. His many years of 
successful experience in the management of the 
insane, has made him an adept in that field of 
labor which he has chosen for his life-work. 

Dr. Richardson's interest in anatomy made 
him a frequent visitor to the dissecting room, and 
in 1858 he was appointed demonstrator in the 
Philadelphia School of Anatomy, of which the 
late Dr. D. Hayes Agnew was the principal. He 
continued in that position for a period of eight 
years. In 1886 he was appointed assistant dem- 
onstrator of anatomy in the University of Penn- 
sylvania, Department of Medicine, continuing in 
that position until 1890. 

In 1861 Dr. Richardson published the "Chem- 
ical Remembrancer." In 1876 he prepared for 
publication "The Old and New Notation of 
Chemistry Reconciled." In 1885 he revised for 
publication his clinical lectures on insanity, de- 
livered from time to time in the Department for 
the Insane of the Philadelphia Hospital. 

Dr. Richardson is a member of the American 
Medical Association, of the American ]\Iedico- 
Psychological Association, the Philadelphia 
County Medical Society and the Philadelphia 
Neurological Society. 

Dr. Richardson married, in i860, Margaret 
Spear Hancker, of a Pennsylvania family. 

The Norristown Hospital for the Insane, with 
which Dr. Richardson has been identified for so 
long a time, may be properly noticed in this con- 



MONTGOMERY COUXTY, 



nection. Its grounds comprise nearly six liun- 
drecl acres of fertile land finely situated on the 
banks of Stony creek, just before that stream 
enters the borough of Norristown. The site 
commands a very extensive view of the surround- 
ing country, and the institution and its grounds 
make a highly picturesque scene. It was erected 
by a commission appointed by Governor John 
Frederic Hartranft in 1876, one year having been 
consumed in the selection of a site, and another 
in the adoption of a suitable plan of hospital 
buildings. Its construction required nearly two 
years, the buildings as they then were (many ad- 
ditions and improvements having since been 
erected), being completed in February, 1880. 
The plan of the institution is unique, the segregate 
or detached system being adopted for the dif- 
ferent wards. The plan of treatment is rational 
throughout and entirely opposed to the old 
theory that the victims of insanity are possessed 
of an evil spirit. There is an absence of re- 
straint except in the violent ward ; patients are 
kept employed as much as possible; there is a 
thorough night service, as well as the strictest 
scrutiny by day; each case is scientifically in- 
vestigated and treated, as much as may be ; and 
every employe is expected to realize the responsi- 
bility resting upon him as a part of a system for 
improving the condition of the patients in the 
hospital. 

Of late years the institution has been very 
much overcrowded, its total population, including 
attendants and other employes, being about 
twenty-five hundred, the patients being nearly 
equally divided between the sexes. 

E.ARL A. JENKINS, recorder of deeds of 
Montgomery county, to which office he was 
elected November 4, 1902, was born at Colmar, 
November 21, 1850. He is a son of Milton and 
Sarah (Ellis) Jenkins, both living at Colmar. 
Milton Jenkins was reared on a farm, attending 
at intervals the public schools of the vicinity, and 
spending two years. 1868-9, at Freeland Seminary, 
Collegeville, now Ursinus College. On leaving 
that institution he learned the trade of butcher- 
ing with James W. Buzby, near Spring House, 



in Gwynedd township. Later he engaged in that 
business at Colmar and has followed it success- 
fully ever since. 

Earl A. Jenkins has been an earnest, active 
and influential member of the Republican party, 
ever since reaching manhood. In township, 
county and state politics he has always taken a 
deep interest, doing his utmost to secure the suc- 
cess of the principles and candidates of his party, 
and working very effectively to that end. He 
has served occasionally in township offices, and 
his worth is very generally known to party lead- 
ers and its membership throughout the county, 
of which he has been a life-long citizen. When his 
name was mentioned for the nomination for re- 
corder on the party ticket in the summer of 1902, 
other aspirants, recognizing his strength, grad- 
ually withdrew until he was left without a rival 
before the party convention, in September of that 
year. He was therefore nominated by accla- 
mation. Mr. Jenkins entered into the canvass 
with his usual energ\\ His efforts contributed 
much to party success at the polls, and he was 
elected in November, with the rest of the Repub- 
lican ticket, by a large majority. He entered 
upon the duties of his position early in January, 
1903, and has performed them very acceptably 
throughout, giving close attention to business, 
and being affable and courteous to all with whom 
he comes in contact. The growth of the county 
has made his department one of the most impor- 
tant of the court house offices, and it requires a 
person of good business ability to perform the 
duties acceptably. 

In 1874 Mr. Jenkins married Elizabeth Clark, 
daughter of James (deceased) and Mary (Mc- 
Cormick) Clark, both of whom were natives of 
Scotland, where Mr. Jenkins' wife was born, May 
21, 1848, the family coming to this country about 
1853 or 1856, and locating near Colmar. They 
have four children : Ethel I., Royden C., M. Rus- 
sell and Earl \\'ayne. 

3,Ir. Jenkins is a direct descendant of Jenkin 
Jenkins, who came from Wales and settled in 
Hatfield township in 1729. His eldest son, John 
Jenkins, was the progenitor of all the family who 
now bear his name. He bought land in Gwynedd, 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



adjoining Langsdale, in 1746, and died in 1803 
or 1804. His son John, born in 1742, died in 
1805. He was an officer in the Revolutionary 
army. He married Elizabeth Lukens, widow of 
Abraham, and had six children : Owen, Sarah, 
Jesse, John, Edward and Elizabeth. 

John Jenkins (grandfather) married Ann 
Todd, and lived to a very advanced age, dying 
at North Wales, at the home of his son-in-law, 
Abel Lukens, October 5, 1880, in his ninety- 
seventh year. He had seven children: Naomi 
married Abel Lukens, Charles Todd married 
Sarah Lukens, Jane married Samuel Rhoads, Ann 
T. married Jacob B. Rhoads, Silas T. married 
Eliza Morgan, John S. married Eliza Stoner, 
Milton married Sarah Ellis. (For further par- 
ticulars of the Jenkins family, see the biographical 
sketch of J. P. Hale Jenkins, of Norristown, a 
cousin of the recorder of deeds. Earl A. Jenkins, 
of Colmar, which will be found elsewhere in this 
work.) 

Milton Jenkins (father) was born March 9, 
1825. He married, December 26, 1849, Sarah 
Ellis, born December 6, 1826. Sarah (Ellis) 
Jenkins is the daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth 
(Jones) Ellis, who were married October 16, 
1818. Jonathan was born in December, 1790, and 
•died November 26, 1871. His wife was born 
April 10, 1797, and died August 18, 1875. Jona- 
than's father was William Ellis, a well-known 
citizen of the county, who died at the age of sev- 
enty-eight years. His mother, Sarah (Barnes) 
Ellis, died at the age of eighty years. Eliza- 
beth (Jones) Ellis was the daughter of John and 
Esther (Conard) Jones. 

]\Iilton and Sarah Jenkins have had seven 
children, as follows : Earl A., bom in 1850, mar- 
ried, November 18, 1874, Elizabeth Clark, who 
was born May 21, 1849. Mr. and Mrs. Earl A. 
Jenkins have four children: Ethel lona, born 
October 30, 1875 ! Royden C, born September 3, 
1877, and married May 3, 1899, to Clara Keighly, 
the couple having three children, Elizabeth, Sarah 
and lona; Milton Russell, born December 19, 
1885 ; Earl Wayne, bom August 24, 1888. 

Ida, second child of Milton and Sarah Jenkins, 
born September 24, 1852. died October 8, 1854. 



Horace J\L, born December 28, 1853, married 
December 28, 1880, Mary Clark, who was born 
January 29, 1859. Mr. and Mrs. Horace M. 
Jenkins have had five children, as follows : Ros- 
coe C, born November 25, 1881, and died Jan- 
uary 9, 1889 ; Laura Z., born November 4, 1883 ; 
Clark, bom April 12, 1886; Donald, born October 
31, 1889; and May, born February 13, 1892. 

Elma. born February 29, 1856, married, April 
29, 1885, George E. Brecht. Mr. and Mrs. 
George E. Brecht have three children as follows : 
Ralph Anson, born July 13, 1886; John Ernest, 
born February 13, 1889 ; and Sarah Elizabeth, 
born September 25, 1892. 

Anson B. Jenkins, born November 2, 1857, 
is unmarried. 

Elizabeth Jenkins, born January 19, i860, 
married November 25, 1885, Gilbert M. Clark, 
who was born May 31, i860, and died May 2, 
1899. Mr. and Mrs. Clark have one child, a 
daughter, Cara, born May 6, 1894. 

U. S. Grant Jenkins, born January 3, 1863, 
married, November 15, 1893, Cara SchoU. They 
have the following children: Rlilton Carl, born 
August 22, 1894; Hazel, bom June 3, 1898; and 
Everett, born June 19, 1899. 

Mrs. Earl A. Jenkins was born in Scotland. 
Her father, James Clark, was born June 16, 1812, 
died May 26, 1898. He married, January 27, 
1843. Mary McCormick, born September 13, 
1821. James Clark's parents were Quintin and 
Jane (Blaine) Clark. Mary Clark's parents were 
Robert and I\Iary (]\IcClelan) McCormick. 

FREELAND G. HOBSON, lawyer, banker, 
and one of the most prominent men of affairs 
of Montgomery county, is of excellent lineage. 
On the paternal side he traces his ancestry to 
the families of Bringhurst, Turner, Lewis, Shaw, 
Morris, Jenkins, Wainhouse, Hawkes, Prache, 
Sellers, Johns, Hughes, Currier and Gibbons, 
and on the maternal side to the families of Van- 
derslice, Gotwals, Hunsicker and Pennypacker. 
He is a descendant of Francis Hobson, who came 
from England in 1712, accompanied by his wife 
Martha \\'ainhouse. and settled in New Garden 
township. Chester county. Pennsylvania. They 





i/V^#W?'t!f^ 



adjoining Langsdale, in 1746, and 
or 1804. His son fohn. bom in ; 
1805. He was ' ' 

army. He marr: 
Abraham, and Ir 

Jesse, John, Edward and tii^abeiii. 
Tohn Tcnkins rsrrandfathpr) i 

To.; ■ ' ■ ■ 

at 

Aly. 

seventh 
married 

T 
E 



Ills, 

>:....> <.i diis 

r:i March 0, 
rah 

•;is') 



> . iiw 


Wile Was botii 


\upru8t 


iB. 1875 


Toiia- 

-;-v- 

.C-S) 


i. eighty 


r years. 


EiizA- 



beth (Jones) Ellis was the daughter of John and 
Esther (Conard) JcMies. 

Milton an>.i Sarah Jenkins have hatl ?cvrn 
children, as follows: Earl A., b--"-" ''= ■■'^-- '■■'-■- 
ried, November 18, 1874, Eli 
was boni May 21, 1849. Mr. 
Jenkins have four children: 
October 30, 1875: Royden C. 
1877, and married !vlay - ■■ - 
the couple having three 
and lona ; Milton Ruf- 
I ;->.': T.\.ri Wayne, bom August 2^ lii&j, 

~ 'cond child of Milton and Sarah Jenkins, 
born September 24, 1852, died October 8, 1854. 



icc M., born December 28, 1853, married 

bcr 28, 1880, Mary Clark, who was born 

29, 1859. Mr. and Mrs. Horace '\\. 

have had five children, as foiiovis: Ros- 

. born November 25, i88r, and died Jan 

ar V 9. 1889 ; Laura Z., bom November 4, 1883 ; 

7!ark, bom April 12, 1886; Donald, born October 

3r, 1889; and May, born February 13, 1892. 

Elnia. born February 29, 1856, married, April 
29, 1885, George E. Brecht. Mr. and Mrs. 
George E. Brecht have three children as follows : 
Ralph .\nson, born July 13, 1886: John Ernest, 
bom Februarv 13, 1889; and Sarah Elizabeth, 
born September 25, 1892. 

An.son B. Jenkins, born November 2, 1857, 
is unmarried. 

Elizabeth Jenkins, born January ig, i860. 
married November 25, 1885, Gilbert M. Qark. 
who was born jMay 31, i860, and died May 2, 
1899. Mr. and Mrs. Clark have one child, a 
daughter, Cara, born May 6, 1894. 

U. S. Grant Jenkins, bom January 3, 1863, 

married, November 15, 1893, Cara Scholl. They 

have the following children: Milton Carl, born 

' ■■- : t 22, 1894; Hazel, bom June 3, 1898; and 

. bom June 19, 1899. 

■ Earl A. Jenkins was born in Scotland. 
Her father, James Clark, was born June 16, 1812, 
died May 26, i8g8. He niarried. January 27, 
1843. Mar^' McCormick, born September 13, 
T.S21. James C !ark"s parents were Quintin and 
Jane (Blaine) Clark. Mar)' Clark's parents were 
Robert and Mary (McQelan) McComiick 

FREELAND G. HOBSON, lawyer, banker, 

and one of the most prominent men of affairs 

,>f " fnntgomery county, is of excellent lineage. 

paternal side he traces his ancestry to 

'lies of Bringhurst, Turner, Lewis, Shaw, 

Jenkins, Wainhottse, Hawkes, Praohe. 

Johns, Hughes, Currier and Gibbons, 

the maternal side to the families of Van- 

. Gotwals, Hunsicker and Pennypacker. 

! descendant of Francis Hobson, who came 

i;oiii England in 1712, accompanied by his wnfe 

Martha W'ainhouse, and settled in New Garden 

townshir ■"'-■--- -untv, PennSA-lvania. Thr-- 





5"!^ 



AlONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



13 



were members of the Society of Friends, as were 
most of the settlers in those parts of the pro- 
vince. On February 5, 1712, they presented 
their letters from Friends at LaGrange, near 
Charlemont, Ireland, to the Newark Monthly 
Meeting. Francis Hobson, the first of the family 
name in America, was a weaver, but became a 
farmer, buying two hundred acres in New 
Garden township in 1713. 

Francis, son of the immigrant, Francis Hob- 
son, was born September 12, 1720, married Mary 
Shaw in 1744, and in 1748 removed to Limerick 
township, Montgoiuery county, where he bought, 
near Royersford, a farm of two hundred acres, 
which is still known as the Hobson farm. One 
of his sons, Moses Hobson, in 1791, bought the 
Limerick farm, upon which he resided during 
the remainder of his life. He was a justice of 
the peace and a surveyor. Many of the old sur- 
veys in that part of the county were made by 
him, and his field notes, and legal papers ex- 
ecuted by him as a justice of the peace shows 
his penmanship to have been very fine. He died 
intestate in 1825, when the Limerick farm came 
into the possession of a brother, John. 

John Hobson, born June 10, 1772, married 
Penelope Turner, and reared four children upon 
the ancestral farm. Moses, who became the suc- 
cessor of his namesake uncle as surveyor and 
justice ; Mary ; Charlotte, who became the wife 
of Homer Kimberly, of Batavia, New York ; and 
Francis. 

Francis, youngest child of John and Pene- 
lope (Turner) Hobson, was born October 10, 
1803. He inherited the homestead farm, and 
lived there many years, subsequently removing 
to Reading, where he died, August 24, 1874. 
Notwithstanding he was far beyond the military 
service age, when he was sixty years old he 
served with the emergency force, called out in 
1863 to repel the invasion of the state by the 
Rebel army under General Lee. He married, 
January 11, 1829, Matilda, daughter of William 
and Mary (Morris.) Bringhurst. Two children 
were born of this marriage. Frank j\l. and 
Sarah H. 

(i) William Bringhurst was a descendant of 



Dr. Thomas Bringhurst, a noted physician and 
surgeon of London, England, who married Eliz- 
abeth Hughes, August 27, 1647. Their son 
John, born November i, 1665, was a printer in 
London, and, for advocating the freedom of the 
press, he was, on September 20, 1684, fined the 
sum of one pound and stood for two hours in 
the pillory. He married Rosina Prache, daugh- 
ter of the Rev. Hillarius Prache, a Lutheran 
clergyman. After the death of Mr. Prache, his 
widow, Barbara, came to America, where she 
was subsequently joined by her daughter, Ro- 
sina, who was afterwards the widow of John 
Bringhurst, and who brought her son, George 
Bringhurst. The last named, born May 15, 1697, 
married September r, 1723, Anna, daughter of 
John and Sarah (Sellers) Ashmead. Their son 
William married Mary Morris, June 4, 1769, 
and they were the parents of six children, of 
whom the eldest was Israel, who was born Feb- 
ruary 28, 1770, and died in February, 1807. 
Israel married, September 27, 1792, Mary Lewis, 
a daughter of Isaac and Sarah (Jenkins) Lewis. 
She was a descendant of Jenkin Jenkins, who 
was born in Wales in 1659, came to America 
and settled in Gwynedd in 1729. Isaac Lewis 
was a son of Enos, who was a son of Lewis, who 
in 1704 married Grace Johns, at Gwynedd Meet- 
ing. Sarah Jenkins was a daughter of John and 
Sarah (Hawksworth) Jenkins, and her mother 
was a daughter of Peter Hawksworth, who died 
in 1769, and who w^s buried at St. Thomas. 
Israel and Mary (Lewis) Bringhurst were the 
parents of seven children, among whom was 
Wright A. Bringhurst, who was a member of 
the state legislature and a noted humanitarian, 
who, at his death, bequeathed a large sum for 
the support of the poor in Norristown, Potts- 
town and Upper Providence. He died in 1876. 

W. Super, D. D., (deceased), was during 
his life president of Ursinus College. His widow 
is still living, and resides in Collegeville, Mont- 
gomery county. 

Frank M. Hobson, only son of Francis and 
Matilda (Bringhurst) Hobson, was born Janu- 
ary 22, 1830, and was educated at Washington 
Hall, Collegiate Institute, Trappe. When eight- 



14 



MOXTGO^IERY COUNTY. 



een years old he removed from the homestead 
to Trappe, where he taught school and engaged 
in farming. In 1856 he became identified with 
a mercantile business in CoUegeville, which he 
continued until 1880, when he relinquished it to 
enjoy comparative ease. His life has been one 
of great activity and usefulness. He was a prac- 
tical surveyor and a conveyancer and general bus- 
iness manager, and acted in many fiduciary capac- 
ities, settling numerous extensive estates, among 
them that of his uncle, Wright A. Bringhurst, 
who left a large sum of money for the support 
of the poor of Xorristown, Pottstown and Up- 
per Providence township, and he was a trustee 
of the Bringhurst fund from its founding until 
1900, when he resigned. Mr. Hobson, also con- 
tinually occupied with the duties of important 
positions, was at various times postmaster, audi- 
tor or school director. He was also treasurer 
of the Building & Loan Association of CoUege- 
ville; president and director of the Perkiomen 
& Reading Turnpike Company ; a director of 
the First National Bank of Norristown, and of 
the Iron Bank of Phoenixville for nearly twenty 
years; and for many years the secretary and 
treasurer of Ursinus College. 

Mr. Hobson was married, October 8, 1856, 
to Miss Lizzie Gotwals, a daughter of Jacob and 
Esther (Vanderslice) Gotwals, and a sister of 
Jacob V. Gotwals, a leading lawyer of Potts- 
town. Of this marriage two children were born : 
Freeland G. and Mary Matilda. The latter be- 
came the wife of the Rev. O. P. Smith, D. D., 
who was for fifteen years pastor of the old his- 
toric Trappe Lutheran church, and is now pas- 
tor of the 'Lutheran church of the Transfigura- 
tion of Pottstown. 

Lizzie Gotwals was descended from a num- 
ber of lines prominent in JNIontgomery county. 
She was a descendant of Reynier \'anDerSluys 
(\'anderslice). She came to Philadelphia from 
Friesland, Holland, and settled in Germantown 
prior to 1739. The son of Reynier VanDerSluys 
was Anthony, who married INIartha Pennepacker, 
a daughter of Hendrick Pennepacker, a man of 
great influence in the early colony, who was born 
in 1674 at Flombon, married in 1699 to Eva Um- 



stead and died 1754. Governor Pennypacker 
of Penns\lvania is descended from this same 
ancestor, and has published an interesting book 
concerning his life and times. Through Eva 
Umstead, this line runs into the large Umstead 
families. 

John \'anderslice, a son of Anthony, mar- 
ried Elizabeth Custer. Their son was named 
Anthony, who married Sarah Hunsicker, a 
daughter of Bishop Heinrich Hunsicker of the 
i\Iennonite church. Heinrich Hunsicker was 
the son of Valentine Hunsicker, born in 1700, 
and died in 1771, who married Elizabeth Kolb, 
born in 17 16, who was the daughter of Jacob 
Kolb, born in 1685, and of Sarah VanSintern, 
who was the daughter of Isaac VanSintern, 
born in 1660, who was married in Amsterdam 
to Neeltjee Classen, and who came to America 
in 1687 with his four daughters. 

The daughter of Anthony and Sarah (Hun- 
sicker) Vanderslice was Esther, who was born 
December 5, 1810, and died September 3, 1898. 
She married Jacob Gotwals, and they became the 
parents of Lizzie Gotwals (Hobson), mother of 
the subject of this sketch. The mother of Jacob 
Gotwals was Elizabeth Funk, who was the 
daughter of Christian Funk and Barbara Cassel, 
who were married in 1757. Christian Funk was 
a Mennonite bishop, living in Franconia town- 
ship. In 1776 at a township meeting he opposed 
Pennsylvania throwing off allegiance to the king, 
but after the establishment of independence, 
while the ^Nlennonites still refused allegiance, 
Christian Funk advised his brethren to pay their 
taxes to congress, for which offense he was in 
1778 suspended from his church. Afterwards 
he published a pamphlet, having very wide cir- 
culation, entitled A ]\Iirror for All Mankind. 
Christian Funk w^as the son of Heinrich Funk 
and Anna ]\Ioyer. Barbara Cassel was a daugh- 
ter of Yellis Cassel, who came to America on 
the ship Friendship, October 16, 1727, and set- 
tled in Skippack township. He was a ;\Ien- 
nonite preacher at Skippack for many years. 

Freeland G. Hobson, eldest child and only 
son of Frank M. and Lizzie (Gotwals) Hobson, 
was born October 13, 1857, in CoUegeville, 



MONTGOMERY COUXTY. 



15 



TNIontgomery county, Pennsylvania. He began 
his education in the public schools of Upper Pro- 
vidence, and completed a full course at Ursinus 
College, graduating in 1876. He entered the 
office of his uncle, Jacob V. Gotwals, then Dis- 
trict Attorney, as a student at law, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar October i, 1880. He opened 
an office in Norristown, and soon acquired a 
lucrative practice. One of his cases was a ver- 
itable causa cclcbre, and excited great and gen- 
eral interest. Antonio Frederico, in 1890, killed 
a fellow Italian at Conshohocken. He fled but 
was captured at San Francisco and brought to 
trial under an indictment for murder. Mr. Hob- 
son defended him in a trial lasting for a week, 
which resulted in acquittal, and Mr. Hobson re- 
ceived many congratulations for the ability he 
had displayed in his defense, which was founded 
upon the theory that there was an inter lack of 
motive in the shooting, and that the killing was 
accidental. 

Mr. Hobson is actively interested in numer- 
ous financial and commercial companies which 
engage much of his attention. In September, 
1888, with others, he organized the Norristown 
Trust Company, of which he was made secretary, 
treasurer and trust officer, positions which he has 
held to the present time. This corporation, of 
which he has been the executive head from its 
founding, has rapidly grown in public favor, and 
is now the largest and most flourishing financial 
institution m the county, with assets under its 
control of over four million dollars. His popu- 
larity amongst his fellow bankers is best attested 
by his recent unanimous election as president of 
Group 2, Pennsylvania Bankers' Association, 
comprising the banks and trust companies of 
Bucks, Montgomery, Chester, Delaware, Berks 
and Schuylkill counties. He is a director of the 
United Telephone Company, with lines extend- 
ing all over eastern Pennsylvania ; is a director 
of the Montgomery County Gas Compan}-. a 
corporation furnishing gas to Norristown ; a di- 
rector of the Rambo & Regar Company, one of 
the most successful hosiery manufacturing cor- 
porations in the Schuylkill valley; president of 
the Perfect Light Company of Pennsylvania, 



and interested in the same; and treasurer of the 
Iberia Lumber Company, a very successful 
Alontgomery county corporation, operating in 
the state of Louisiana; secretary of Riverside 
Cemeter}- Company, as well as of the Montgom- 
ery Cemetery Company; treasurer of Hamilton 
Apartment Company; and director in numerous 
other corporations. 

]\Ir. Hobson is a member of Trinity Reformed 
church of Collegeville, in which he has been an 
elder for ten years. Active in church work, he 
has been a delegate to the classes, synods, and 
general synod of the Reformed church in 
the United States, and in all of these 
bodies he has taken a very active part 
and on several occasions he has argued 
important appeals before them. At the general 
synod in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1902, he was 
elected vice president of the body and presided 
at many of the sessions, an honor never before 
conferred upon a layman, and his prompt dis- 
patch of business gained him verj' general com- 
mendation. He has also served as secretary and 
treasurer of the Montgomery county Sunday- 
school Association and as president of the 
Schuylkill Valley Union of Christian Endeavor, 
and he has appeared upon the programs at two 
International Christian Endeavor conventions, 
one at Cleveland, Ohio, in 1894, and at Boston, 
Massachusetts, in 1895. 

]\Ir. Hobson has ever been deeply interested 
in education. For six years he served most use- 
fully and acceptably as president and director in 
the Collegeville school board. His principal ef- 
fort, however, has been to advance the interests 
of L'rsinus College, from the days of his leav- 
ing it as a graduate in 1876, and since then he 
has ever lived under its shadow. For many 
years he served as secretary and treasurer of the 
Alumni Association, and when ten years ago 
that body was invited to elect directors from its 
own numbers, he was the first alumnus so chosen 
and in 1903 he was elected for the third five-year 
term. \\'hen his father resigned the two-fold 
position of secretary and treasurer, in 1900, Mr. 
Hobson was elected treasurer, a position which 
he yet occupies. He is a member of the execu- 



i6 



.AlOXTGOMERY COUNTY, 



tive committee and chairman of the finance com- 
mittee, and he is in constant request for addresses 
before the students on anniversary and various 
other occasions. Mr. Hobson is otherwise in- 
dustrious in the field of hterature. He is the 
founder and editor of Montgomery County 
Law Reporter a weekly legal periodical now in 
its twentieth volume, which reports all the de- 
cisions of the Montgomery county courts. He 
is author of the History of Providence Town- 
ship and a contributor to Bean's History of ^lont- 
gomery County, writing much of the township 
work. In 1884, when the centennial of Mont- 
gomery county was celebrated, he acted as chair- 
man of the executive committee of the Montgom- 
ery County Historical Society, of which he is a 
charter and a valuable member, and it was in no 
small degree owing to his energy that the event 
proved so decided a success. He was also edi- 
tor-in-chief of a beautiful and well written com- 
memorative volume. 

An ardent American, Air. Hobson is a prom- 
inent leader in the Patriotic Order of the Sons 
of America, holding membership with Camp No. 
267, at Ironbridge. In August, 1893, he was 
elected state president at the state convention 
held in Chester. At the conclusion of his term 
of office, at Erie, Pennsylvania, he was made the 
recipient of a handsome cane fashioned from a 
piece of the hull of the old flagship "Lawrence" 
the presentaJ;ion being made by Hon. John F. 
Dowling, mayor of Erie. 

Mr. Hobson is also a prominent member of 
the \'alley Forge Memorial Association, and 
since 1886 he has been the treasurer and chair- 
man of its executive committee. He is a Repub- 
lican in politics, an earnest supporter of the prin- 
ciples of his party, but he has never sought po- 
litical preferment. He was one of the three or- 
ganizers of the Riverside Cemetery Company, a 
beautiful lawn cemetery, and has been secretary 
of the corporation from its founding. 

Mr. Hobson married, September 15, 1880, 
Miss Ella M. Hendricks, daughter of the Rev. 
Joseph H. Hendricks, D. D., and Kate Hen- 
dricks. Three children have been born of this 
union : Frank H., a graduate of Ursinus College, 



class of 1903, and at present pursuing his law 
studies in the University of Pennsylvania ; Anna. 
M., a sophomore at Ursinus College; and Cath- 
erine, who is attending Ursinus Academy. Dur- 
ing the summer of 1903 j\lr. Hobson, with his 
wife and three children, made an extended voy- 
age abroad, visiting the principal cities of Great 
Britian and the continent. 

REUBEN F. HOFFECKER was born in 
North Coventry township, Chester county, Penn- 
sylvania, near Pottstown, on October 20, 1833. 
His earlier education was acquired in the com- 
mon schools of his native township. Afterwards 
he attended Oakdale Seminary at Pughtown, 
Chester county, and also Washington Hall Col- 
legiate Institute at Trappe, Montgomery county. 
His career as a teacher was begun in the very 
house which he had attended as a child near his 
home in Chester county, on December 5, 185 1,. 
when he was just past eighteen years of age. He 
continued to teach in his native county until 1861, 
when he came into jNIontgomer}- county and took 
charge of the public school at Port Kennedy, 
where he remained until 1864. In this 3-ear he 
was elected to the principalship of the Con- 
shohocken schools, and it was at about this time 
that the picture was taken from which the ac- 
companying engraving was made. He was then 
in robust health, strong, energetic and a tireless 
worker. His work in Conshohocken was inter- 
esting to him and enlisted his most energetic 
efforts. Many of his pupils of those days be- 
came honorable men and women, achieving dis- 
tinction in the skilled and learned professions. 

He continued as principal at Conshohocken 
until INIay, 1878, when he was elected superin- 
tendent of the schools of Montgomery county 
by a vote of 177 to 18. This office he held con- 
tinuously until overtaken by death on December 
18, 1903, being re-elected the eighth time. He 
was in the middle of his ninth term, and in the 
midst of an earnest efifort to get township high 
schools in many more districts, when, after an 
illness of but nine days, he passed quietly to rest. 
With an unabated vigor, an unflagging determ- 
ination, and a spirit that acknowledged no de- 



present pursuing his law 

.\y of Pennsylvania; Anna. 

- College ; and Cath- 

; ., -lus Academy. Dur- 

. ot 1.J03 Mr. Hobson, with his 

children, made an extended voy- 

. siting tilt Dnncipal cities of Greai 

ind the contin 

iJEX F. HOFi KcKKR was born in 

)ventry township, Chester county, Penn- 

.. near Pottstown, on October 20, 1833. 

er education was acquired in the com- 

■ ols of his native township. Afterwards 

: !*'d Oakdale Seminary at Pughtown, 

onntv, and also Washington Hall Col- 

■'>titute at Trappe, Montgomery county. 

. .'cr as a teacher was begun in the very 

, hich he had attended as a child near his 

1 Chester county, on December 5, 185 1, 

was jusi past eighteen years of age. He 

! to teach in his native county until 1861, 

<ame into Montgomery county and took 

i the public school at Port Kennedy, 

,- remained until 1864. In this year he 

Ted to tlie principalship of the Con- 

.^ at about this time 

om which the ac- 

ade. He was then 

4, energetic and a tireless 

Conshohocken was inter- 

listed his most energetic 

Ijtipils of those days l>e- 

,;id women, aoiueviiv ! s - 

md learned p. 

i'lincipa! n? ' 

. 'A hen he w 

schools of . 

. .;; to 18. Thi^ ....-■ . •;. 

kintil overtaken by death on December 
^ being re-elected the eighth time. He 
' r- middle of his ninth term, and in the 
an earnest effort to g*,t township liigli 
n many more distric ■ '■ '• ■ 

: but nine days, he [i:\ 
unabated vigor, an : 
aioii, and a spirit that acknuwku^cvi ;. 




Iht X.ivK lui 




MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



feat, he strove to promote school interests dur- 
ing all the twenty-six years of his superintend- 
ency. The best estimate of his life and labors is 
probably that of Superintendent Charles A. Wag- 
ner, of Cheltenham township, who for a number 
of years was closely and intimately associated 
with Superintendent Hoffecker in the adminis- 
tration of the school interests of the county. 
Writing for the public prints Superintendent 
Charles A. Wagner, of Cheltenham, said: "For 
nearly twenty-six years Rueben F. Hoffecker 
discharged the duties of the office of county su- 
perintendent of schools of Montgomery county. 
He spared himself no time, avoided no exposure, 
shunned no labor in the performance of his of- 
ficial duties. He was always prompt and 
punctual. He kept every engagement. He was 
fearlessly honest and always tried to be fair and 
just. Many school improvements had at first 
only his force and influence to push them on. 
Longer terms, better salaries, graded courses, 
graduation of pupils, school libraries, free text- 
books and supplies, — these and other advances 
are universal at his death, though not one was in 
existence at the commencement of his service. 
Others helped to accomplish these results, but 
through wise and inspiring leadership he blazed 
and led the way. 

"He was a clear and logical thinker and a 
very forceful speaker. He was not eloquent. 
He had rather a convincing and convicting earn- 
estness. His standard of scholarship for teach- 
ers and pupils aimed at absolute accuracy. A 
wrong date was an irritation to him, and he sel- 
dom allowed inaccuracies to pass uncorrected. 

"Reuben F. Hoffecker led an immeasurably 
useful life. Many men and women are to-day 
what they would not have been had not his life 
touched theirs. Many of the younger school 
men in the county to-day who are doing notably 
successful work have caught his earnestness, his 
dauntlessness, and, led by his example, are show- 
ing a like indefatigable energy. Thus the good 
that this man has done is living after him. The 
world is better because he lived." 

In politics Mr. Hoffecker was a Democrat, 
but not a strong partisan. He was married 



August 28, 1879, to Miss Lemontine L. Stewart, 
daughter of Enoch H. and Lydia E. Stewart. 
Miss Stewart was born April 10, 1836, in Nor- 
riton township, and had been a teacher in the 
public schools of the county for nearly twenty- 
seven years. Immediately after marriage they 
settled down to plain, simple and unostentatious 
home life in Norristown. 

Reuben Hoffecker was the oldest child of 
George and Rachel (Smale) Hoffecker, who 
were married October 28, 1832, by Rev. John C. 
Guldin. They had five children, Reuben F., who 
died December 18, 1903 ; John S., now a farmer 
in Chester county ; Mary A., who died December 
9, 1877 ; Annie E., of Norristown : and Cyrus 
H., of Chester county. George Hoffecker was 
a blacksmith in his younger days and later a 
farmer in Chester county. He died September 
20, 1877, in his seventy-third year. His wife 
died July 5, 1879, in her sixty-eighth year. She 
was a member of the Lutheran church. He was 
a member of the Reformed church. He was a 
Democrat in politics. He held several official 
local positions, but was not an office-seeker. 
Reuben Hoffecker's grandfather, Philip Hof- 
fecker, was a native and citizen of Chester 
county. He was a soldlier in the war of 1812. 
He was married to Elizabeth Hoffecker. They 
had eight children: John, born August i, 1803; 
George (Reuben's father), born March 4, 1805; 
Maria, January 20. 1807 ; Magdalena. January 
28, 1809; Elizabeth, August 30, 181 1: Joshua, 
August 30, 1813 ; Philip, February 4, 1816: and 
Susanna, February i, 1820, who died in infancy. 
Reuben Hoffecker's paternal great-grandfatlier, 
Philip Hoffecker, was born in Germany. He 
came to America when about eighteen years of 
age in Captain Francis Stanfield's ship Sarah, 
that sailed from Rotterdam, September 20, 1764. 
He settled in Coventry township, Chester county, 
Pennsylvania. On April 19, 1774, he married 
Elizabeth Benner, daughter of Henry Benner, a 
farmer in Chester county. They had nine chil- 
dren — John bom February 10, 1775 ; Philip. Jan- 
uary 10, 1777 : Henry, September 8, 1779 : Mary 
and Elizabeth (twins), April 23, 1782; Jacob, 
June 6, 1785 : Barbara, May 4, 1788; ]\Iary, Feb- 



i8 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



ruary 5, 1791 ; and Susanna, JNIarch 16, 1794. 
Philip's marriage has already been mentioned. 
Henry located in East Nantmeal township, 
•Chester county, and has left a large number of 
■descendants. Elizabeth married Mr. Miller, who 
•died soon after marriage, and then she married 
John Mauger. She left children by both mar- 
riages. Jacob settled in Luzerne count}- and died 
leaving one son and three daughters. The son 
died leaving no children and the name in that 
family became extinct. Barbara married Daniel 
Beary. They had three daughters, Elizabeth, 
Anna and Maria. Mary died unmarried. Su- 
sanna married John Benner and they had one 
son and six daughters. 

Reuben Hoffecker"s maternal grandfather, 
John Smale, was a native of Berks county, Penn- 
sylvania. He started life as a stonemason. Later 
lie turned his attention to farming in Chester 
<ounty opposite Pottstown, where he owned one 
■of the finest farms jn that section. He married 
J\Iary Yocum. They had two sons, George and 
Jonas, and one daughter, Rachel, who became the 
■^vife of George Hoffecker. 

J\Irs. Hofifecker's father, Enoch H. Stewart, 
was born in Doylestown, April 30, 1800. His 
father, Charles Stewart, died February, 7, 1804. 
His widowed mother with her children removed 
to Montgomery Square, iMontgomery county. 
Mr. Stewart was taught a trade but, disliking it, 
studied for a teacher. He began teaching in Le- 
.liigh county in 1827. About 1830 he came to 
Montgomery county and taught in the school- 
■.house near the Old Swedes church in Upper 
Merion. He afterwards taught in the townships 
of Plymouth, Norriton, Gwynedd, Montgomer}-, 
Upper Dublin, and the borough of Norristown. 
He closed his labors as a teacher in June, 1869, 
after having taught about forty years. 'Sir. 
Stewart was married in October, 183 1, to Lydia 
E., widow of Lemuel Stebbins. to whom she had 
been married December 2, 1819. Her maiden 
name was Lydia E. Speakman. Mr. Stebbins 
died in April, 1824, and left two children, ]\Ia- 
tilda, born February 8, 1822, and Lemuel, born 
January 28, 1824. Lemuel died unmarried. Ma- 
tilda married John Donat of Jarrettown, ^lont- 



gomery county, in October, 1850, and they had 
six children ; Bertha, who married George Evans, 
of Norristown ; Charles, Winfield, Harry, Alonza 
and Alva. ]\Ir. Donat died March 10, 1888, and 
his wife died October 17, 1893. Winfield, Harry 
and Alonza survived their parents. 

Enoch H. Stewart and wife had two daugh- 
ters, JNIartha, born July 17, 1832, and Lemontine, 
whose birth and marriage have been already 
mentioned. IMartha was also a teacher. She 
died September 6, 1856. Mr. Stewart died June 
8, 1876. His wife died June 3, 1892, aged nearly 
ninety-three years. 

]Mrs. Hoffecker's grandfather, Charles Stew- 
art, was a native of Pennsylvania, but of Scotch- 
Irish descent. The Stewarts were among the 
earliest settlers of Bucks county. Charles Stew- 
art's second wife was ^lartha Poland, daughter 
of George and Elizabeth Poland. They had 
five children, Elizabeth, born November, 17, 
1789; Deborah, born May 8, 1792; Charles, Feb- 
ruary 8, 1795 ; Joseph, June 17, 1797 ; and Enoch 
H., April 30, 1800. Elizabeth married Charles 
Green, of Quakertown ; Deborah died unmarried. 
The only male descendant of this branch of the 
Stewarts is Crary G. Stewart, son of Charles 
Stewart. 

Mrs. Hofifecker's paternal great-grandfather, 
George Poland (Boland), was married to Eliza- 
beth Evans, of Gwynedd, a Quakeress of Welsh 
descent. They had three daughters, Elizabeth; 
]\Iartha, born January 6, 1763, and Tacy. 
George Poland was noted for his sterling integ- 
rity. He owned a farm near Montgomery 
Square (known for the last century as the Sel- 
sor farm), and when he became involved in debt 
and the law allowed him to pay in Continental 
money, which he could have done, he refused to 
do so, choosing to suflfer loss rather than have 
his creditors lose. As he left no male descend- 
ants the name of Poland became extinct in IMont- 
gomery county when his widow died in 1817. 

^Irs. Hoffecker's maternal grandfather, 
Thomas Speakman, was a native and citizen of 
Chester county, a descendant of an old English 
Quaker family He married Lydia Evans, oldest 
daughter of Elisha and Sarah Neide Evans. She 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



19 



died August 23, 1799, and left an infant daugh- 
ter, Lydia E. Speakman, who at twelve years 
of age was brought to Bridgeport, Pennsylvania, 
to reside with her grandfather, Elisha Evans. 

Mrs. Hioffecker's maternal great-grandfa- 
ther, Elisha Evans, a Quaker in religion, was a 
man of more than ordinary enterprise and fore- 
thought. He was the owner of a large tract of 
land which now covers the chief part of the 
present borough of Bridgeport. He was mar- 
ried four times. He had children by his first 
wife, Sarah Neide, and also by his second wife, 
Rebecca Jolly, but not any by Sarah Hays or 
Bathsheba Cottel. He died in 1830. He was 
survived by his widow Bathsheba Evans and also 
by twelve of his children — John, William, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Patton, Sarah Evans, J\Irs. Amelia 
Worthington, Jolly, Mrs. Catharine Elliott, 
Charles, Mrs. Sophia Levering, Cadwallader, 
George, and Jared Evans. 

SAAIUEL K. ANDERS, President of the 
People's National Bank of Norristown, is a de- 
scendant of Balthasar Anders and his wife, Anna 
Hoffrichter, who came in 1734 to Pennsylvania 
with one child, George, born in 1733, in Germany. 
The couple had two more children born in this 
country; Anna, born April 8, 1736; Abraham, 
born April I, 1739. Balthasar Anders (great- 
great-grandfather) was by trade a shoemaker, 
and lived in Towamencin township, Montgomery 
count}', Pennsj'lvania, upon the property now 
owned by George Anders, and there followed his 
trade until his death, which occurred Ii'Iay 25, 
1754, aged fifty-six years. His wife died March 
29, 1784, aged eighty-three years and nine months. 
His mother, who came with him to this country, 
was buried September 30, 1734, in Philadelphia, 
eight days after their arrival. 

Abraham Anders (great-grandfather), son of 
Balthasar Anders, married Susanna, daughter of 
Melchior Kriebel, November 25, 1765. Their 
children were : Benjamin, born November 30, 
1766; Rosanna, bom July 19, 1769, died Decem- 
ber 24, 1853 ; Abraham, born June 2, 1774; Anna, 
born April 13, 1780. Susanna, wife of Abraham 
Anders, died March 28, 1813, aged seventy-three 



years, five months. Abraham Anders died April 
19, 1819, aged eighty years, six days. 

Abraham Anders (grandfather), son of 
Abraham Anders, married Susanna, daughter of 
Abraham Dresher, November 25, 1802. Their 
children were: George, born November 19, 
1803 ; Lydia, born July 6, 1805 ; Abraham, born 
September 2, 1807; Anna, born October 24, 1809; 
Samuel, born March 18, 1812; Susanna, born 
October 2, 1815; and Sarah, born August 8, 
1820. Susanna, wife of Abraham Anders, died 
October 26, 1831, aged fifty years, three months. 
Abraham Anders died August 2, 1852, aged sev- 
enty-eight years, two months. He lived in 
Worcester township on a farm which he owned. 

George Anders (father), son of Abraham 
Anders, married Susanna, daughter of Samuel 
Kriebel, October 27, 1825. Their children were: 
Sarah, born June 3, 1828, died September 3, 
1828; Elizabeth, born May 15, 1830; Abraham 
K., born October 5, 1833 ; Rosanna, born October 
16, 1836, died same day ; Samuel K., born October 
10, 1838; William K., born June 12, 1841 ; Daniel 
K., born September 19, 1846. Susanna, wife of 
George Anders, died May 21, 1857. George 
Anders died January 23, 1876. 

Balthasar Anders and his wife and the suc- 
cessive generations of the family which have 
been mentioned were members of the religious 
body known as Schwenkfelders, who were so 
called from Caspar Schwenkfelder, a Silesian no- 
bleman, born in 1490, who, having become im- 
bued with the principles and doctrines proclaimed 
by John Huss, renounced the Catholic church 
to become an evangelist, and for thirty-six years, 
with voice and pen, exhorted men to repentance 
and godliness. He denied that the external word 
• — that is, the scriptures — is endowed with the 
power of healing, renewing and illuminating the 
mind, but ascribed this power to the internal or 
eternal word, that is Christ himself. He dif- 
fered with Luther and, cut off from fellowship 
with the Lutherans, he and his followers were 
persecuted by the Catholics. He died at Ulm, 
December 10, 1562. The Schwenkfelders after 
his death increased and maintained their faith and 
worship in the Fatherland for nearly two hundred 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



}-ears. About 1725 persecution which had ahnost 
ceased for a time, was renewed with great fury, 
and this unhappy people were given the choice of 
apostasy, continued endurance or flight from the 
country. The exodus commenced in February, 
1726. One hundred and seventy famiHes fled 
to Saxony, where they were hospitably received 
and treated with much consideration by Count 
Zinzendorf and others. They remained eight 
years, but in 1733 they were informed that they 
would be tolerated no longer in Lusatia, where 
they had settled, an application having been made 
for their return to Silesia. Two families emi- 
grated to Pennsylvania, arriving at Philadelphia 
September 18, 1733, and sent such a good report 
of the country that the whole band determined to 
follow them. They set out for Altona in Den- 
mark in April, 1734, where they arrived May 
17, and on the 28th embarked on three small ves- 
sels for Harlem, arriving there June 6, thence 
proceeded June 19 to Rotterdam, embarking for 
Pennsylvania on an English ship, the "St. An- 
drew," touching at Plymouth, England, and arriv- 
ing at Philadelphia on September 22, 1734. They 
spent the 24th in thanksgiving to God for deliver- 
ing them out of the hands of their persecutors, for 
raising up friends in the time of greatest need, 
and for leading them into a land of freedom where 
they might worship without being molested by 
civil or ecclesiastical power. That day, Septem- 
ber 24, has been so observed ever since. They 
settled in the neighborhood of Chestnut Hill, 
and in Burks, Lehigh and Montgomery counties, 
the greater number in what is now Montgomery. 
Samuel K. Anders was educated in the public 
schools of Norriton, and on reaching manhood 
engaged in agricultural pursuits on his own ac- 
count, following that occupation for twenty years. 
In 1888 he was elected a member of the board 
of county commissioners on the Republican ticket, 
having previously served as school director and 
in other minor positions. As a county commis- 
sioner, he was faithful, vigilant, and earnestly 
devoted to the public interests ; many improve- 
ments in the court house, rebuilding the county 
prison and other public institutions having been 
brought about largely through his instrumen- 



tality. He is the only person who ever served in 
that position in Montgomery county for so long 
a period. In the discharge of his official duties 
he displayed the same integrity, ability and good 
judgment that that have characterized him in all 
business, public and private. On the death of 
Abraham A. Yeakle, president of the People's 
National Bank of Norristown, in 1888, he became 
his successor, and has held the position by suc- 
cessive re-election ever since, the success of the 
institution having been largely due to his care- 
ful and conservative management. 

In i860 Mr. Anders married Mary A. Heeb- 
ner, the daughter of the late David S. Heebner, 
of Lansdale. They had four children, two of 
whom died in infancy ; another, A. Laura, died at 
the age of sixteen years ; the only one now living 
being George H. Anders, who served for a num- 
ber of years as deputy in the county treasurer's 
office. Mrs. Mary A. Anders died September 16, 
1881. 

Samuel K. Anders is a man of pleasing per- 
sonality, his manners being affable, his natural 
kindness of heart being tempered by a practical 
good sense and keen insight of human nature. 
As a politician, a financier, a business man and a 
citizen, he has been eminently successful and is 
universally esteemed. 

George H. Anders, son of Samuel K. Anders,, 
attended the neighboring school in Norriton town- 
ship, and, for a time, the Norristown high school. 
He was engaged in farming in Norriton until his 
removal to Norristown. In politics he is, like 
his father, an active Republican, and served for 
some years in Norriton township as a school 
director, besides occasionally filling minor town- 
ship offices. He was frequently a delegate to 
county conventions. He married Eveline, daugh- 
ter of Nathan and Martha J. Schultz, of Norris- 
town. The father, for many years proprietor of 
a hotel at Marshall and DeKalb streets, Norris- 
town, has been deceased some years. Mrs. Eve- 
line Anders was born July 19, 1862. She was 
married January 16, 1883. Their children, all 
born in Norriton township : Laura S., bom 
October 23, 1884; Stanley S., born October 12, 
1886; Rebecca, born February 8, 1889, died April 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



25, 1890; Samuel K., Jr., born September 25, 
1891. 

George H. Anders served six years as deputy 
county treasurer during the terms of Abraham C. 
Godshall, of Lansdale, and Henry W. Hallowell, 
of Bethayres. 

On the death of ex-Judge Charles H. Stinson, 
Samuel K. Anders became a member of the board 
of trustees of the Norristown Hospital for the 
Insane, a position which he still holds. On the 
death of David Schall, he was appointed a mem- 
ber of the board of directors of the Montgomery 
county prison, which also he still holds. 

ANDREW H. BAKER, son of Benjamin 
and Mary A. Baker, was born j\Iarch 21, 1836, 
at Eagleville, Lower Providence township, Mont- 
gomery county. His father lived most of his 
later years on the Germantown Pike, near its 
intersection with the present Stony Creek Rail- 
road, where he died in 1885 at the age of seventy- 
seven years. His wife survived him some years. 
The children of Benjamin and Mary A. Baker 
were : Arnold, married Lucy Von Nieda, and 
lives in Norristown ; Andrew H. Baker ; Martha 
H., married William S. Finney, and removed 
to Kansas, where they have children; Elizabeth, 
married Samuel Rittenhouse, of Norriton, who 
also has several children ; Cornelia G., wife of 
John C, son of Andrew Morgan, of Worcester, 
who died two weeks after her father; Hannah 
M., married Mark R., son of Alexander Supplee, 
first lieutenant of Captain Pechin's company dur- 
ing the war of the rebellion. 

Andrew H. Baker, was educated in the dis- 
trict schools and at Treemount and Freeland 
seminaries, and in his eighteenth year took charge 
of the pulilic school at Washington Square, 
where he taught for some time. He afterwards 
taught the school at Centre Square until i86t, 
for a period of six years, when he removed to 
Norristown, and was appointed clerk to the 
county commissioners. He held the clerks'iii) 
for twelve years, evincing not only ability in 
clerical duties, but also public spirit, and in the 
absence of the county treasurer he frequently 
'filled the latter's place as assistant deputy treas- 



urer. He was also clerk of the military relief 
board during the war, and clerk of the board of 
jury commissioners during the first five years of 
the establishment of. said board. He studied 
surveying for a time with Elijah \\'. Beans, and 
practised some. Mr. Baker was a member of 
the Norristown school board for about ten years 
and was secretary thereof until he left Norris- 
town. 

On the organization of the First National 
Bank of Conshohocken, in 1873, Mr. Baker was 
elected teller, which place he filled two years, un- 
til the founding of Jenkintown National Bank, 
1875, when he was chosen cashier, which posi- 
tion he has now filled twenty-seven years. He 
was president of the Jenkintown school board 
for three terms. He has also been treasurer of 
the Jenkintown Building Association since its 
organization, member of the board of trustees 
for the state in behalf of JMontgomery county 
of the State Normal School at West Chester; a 
member of the board of directors of the Chelten- 
ham and Willow Grove turnpike company, and 
of the Abington Library for several years ; is 
one of the managers of the Jenkintown Reading 
Room, and was for many years a choir leader 
and superintendent at St. John's church and 
Burr's Meeting house, and president of the board 
of health since its organization in 1893. 

In December, 1857, Mr. Baker married i\Ia- 
tilda L.. daughter of William Barton, of Nor- 
riton. They had one son, Frank H. Baker, born 
September 10, 1858, who studied law in the of- 
fice of B. E. Chain, and was admitted to the bar. 
He has filled many clerical and other positions, 
including executorships and other offices of trust 
and responsibility. He was for some time L'nited 
States mail agent between New York City and 
Pittsburg. Mrs. Alatilda Baker died in i860 of 
typhoid fever. October 6, 1864 Andrew H. 
Baker married Emily J. McGonigle, principal of 
one of the Philadelphia public schools. They 
had two children, Walter C. and INIay A., both 
of whom died in childhood. An adopted daugh- 
ter, Alice G.. died several years ago at the age 
of twenty-three years. Emily J. (McGonigle') 
Baker died January 13, 1904. 



MONTGO^IERY COUNTY. 



Frank H. Baker is now employed at Broad 
Street station of the Pennsylvania Railroad. He 
has been twice married, his first wife being ]\liss 
Sarah T. Yost, of Norrisonville, who died about 
1895, leaving one child, Andrew A. Baker. He 
married (second wife) Mrs. Anna L. Leip- 
heimer, widow of Richard Leipheimer, who died 
October 27, 1901. They are living on Noble 
street, Norristown. 

Arnold Baker (grandfather) kept the Barley 
Sheaf hotel on Germantown Pike, where is now 
Hartranft Station. In a barn which once stood 
on this property, the first court in Montgomery 
county was held in 1784. It has not been occu- 
pied for thirty years or more as a hotel. 

In early life while teaching at Centre Square, 
Andrew H. Baker became a member of St. John's 
Evangelical Lutheran church, near Belfry. On 
removing to Norristown he transferred his mem- 
bership to the Lutheran Church of the Trinity 
on DeKalb street. After removing to Jenkin- 
town he became a member of Abington Presby- 
terian church, the oldest organization of that de- 
nomination in that section of Pennsylvania. 
When Grace ^Memorial Presbyterian church ac 
Jenkintown was founded, he became a member 
there, and has long been an elder and trustee. 
Mr. Baker is a man who stands very high in the 
community in which he lives, his long and hon- 
orable career inspirig the highest confidence in 
all with whom he comes in contact. In every 
relation of life he is an example to those around 
him, his sound judgment and keen sense of jus- 
tice causing his opinions to have much weight 
with those who know him. 

J. ELL^^■OOD LEE. One of the most im- 
portant industrial enterprises of Montgomery 
county and at the same time one of the youngest 
is the plant of the J. Ellwood Lee Company 
at Conshohocken. This business was established 
by J. Ellwood Lee, who was born in Consho- 
hocken in i860. He is the oldest son of Bradford 
Adams Lee, who has been a resident of Consho- 
hocken for more than a half century, and Sarah 
A. (Raysor) Lee, also a resident of the same 
town. Through his paternal grandmother, Mr. 



Lee is connected with the family of Presidents 
John Adams and John Quincy Adams, and 
through his paternal grandfather with the New 
Jersey and Virginia branches of the Lee family. 

E. Bradford Adams Lee, father of J. Ellwood 
Lee, was born in New Castle county, in the state 
of Delaware, October 29, 1838. He is a son of 
Thomas and Ann N. (Adams) Lee. Ann Not- 
tingham (Adams) Lee, grandmother, was a 
daughter of Edmund and Jane Adams. Her 
father, Edmund Adams, was born May 20, 1769. 
His wife Jane, whom he married June 14, 1792, 
was born September 2, 1772. Their children 
were: James, born December i, 1793; Elizabeth, 
born October 21, 1794; Mary, born March 24, 
1797; Rebecca, born December 23, 1800; Jona- 
than, born July 26, 1803 ; Elisha, born November 
26, 1805 ; Ann Nottingham Adams, who was the 
mother of Elisha Bradford Adams Lee, born 
February 16, 1808. Jane Adams died February 
16, 1845. Her husband died January 28, 1817. 

Elisha Bradford Adams Lee, father of Mr. 
Lee, came to Pennsylvania at the age of four 
years, his parents removing from Delaware in 
1842 and establishing a home in Conshohocken. 
There he had but limited educational advantages, 
being employed from the age of eleven years in 
earning his own livelihood. For more than thirty- 
five years he was engaged in the rolling mills of 
J. Wood and Brother. For a time he entered 
into mercantile business. Later he became inter- 
ested in business with his son, and he has been 
employed with the J. Ellwood Lee Company in 
various responsible positions. Mr. Lee married 
July 3, 1859, ^t Conshohocken, Miss Sarah A. 
Raysor. She was the daughter of William and 
Elizabeth ( Gulp) Raysor, and was born March 
8, 1841. Their children: John Ellwood, subject 
of this sketch; Conard Berk, born April 23, 1862, 
who married, October 12, 1887, Anna May Hen- 
dren, and died May 8, 1897, leaving no children ; 
Mary Elizabeth, born January 20, 1865, married 
June 14, 1899, William Cleaver; IMaria B., born 
August I, 1870; Harry Adams, born November 
3, 1879. i\Irs. Bradford Lee died July 8, 1886. 
She was a member of the Presbyterian Church, 
and a woman whose consistent life and many 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



23 



Christian qualities endeared her to her family 
and friends. 

Thomas Lee, grandfather, was born in Dela- 
ware county, Pennsylvania, in 1799. He mar- 
ried, June II, 1829, Ann Nottingham .A.dams. 
Their children were as follows : Edmund Adams, 
born April 23, 1830; William, born October 21, 
1831 ; Daniel W. Coxe, born February 12, 1834; 
Mary Jane, born July 5, 1836; Ehsha B. Adams, 
father of J. Ellwood Lee. Mrs. Thomas Lee died 
October 24. 1844. Thomas Lee married a sec- 
ond wife, who was Rebecca N. Adams, a sister of 
his first wife. There were no children by the sec- 
ond marriage. Mrs. Rebecca Lee died July 18, 
1848, and Mr. Lee married a third time, Septem- 
ber 8, 1849, Sarah Logue. By this marriage there 
was one daughter, Elizabeth Lee. The mother 
died July 29, 1854, her husband having died eight 
days previously, both being victims of cholera, 
which was then raging at Conshohocken. 

J. Ellwood Lee was born November 15, i860. 
He received his education at the Conshohocken 
High School, being a graduate of the class of 
1879. Immediately after his graduation he en- 
tered the surgical instrument business in Phila- 
delphia, with William Snowden, remaining with 
him for nearly five years. On April 12, 1882, he 
married Miss Jennie W. Cleaver, youngest daugh- 
ter of ]\Irs. A. J. Cleaver. In November, 1883, 
Mr. Lee broke off his connections with ]Mr. 
Snowden in the Philadelphia business, and 
branched out for himself, starting in the attic of 
his home in Conshohocken, to make bandages, 
ligatures, and a few like surgical necessities. 
From this small beginning sprang the present 
great industrial enterprise of which Mr. Lee is 
now general manager and treasurer. The goods 
which are manufactured by this company are 
known throughout the entire civilized world. The 
capital originally invested by Mr. Lee in starting 
the enterprise was $29.85 (the company still owns 
the book in which this original entry was made), 
and the capital now employed to carry on the busi- 
ness is nearly a million of dollars. The annual 
sales now amount to more than the sum named, 
showing what can be done from a small begin- 
ning. The superior quality of the products of the 



J. Ellwood Lee Company has created a wide de- 
mand for them. Soon after beginning the work 
in which it is now so extensively engaged, Mr, 
Lee erected a two-story shop, and fitted it with the 
appliances needed for the business. In 1887 a 
three-story mill of stone was erected, much larger 
than the older structure. In 1888 the rapidly ex- 
panding business requiring still more complete 
arrangements for its operations, Mr. Lee formed 
the J. Ellwood Lee Company, with a capital of 
$75,000, which has been increased from time to 
time as necessity required, until it has reached the 
figures already mentioned. The company owns 
many valuable patents, a large number of them 
the product of Mr. Lee's inventive genius, he 
being one who can very readily adapt the means 
at hand to the end required. He has been uni- 
formly successful in meeting the needs of sur- 
geons in any particular direction required, con- 
structing the article desired in such a manner 
that it is the best possible for the purpose for 
which it is to be employed. The perforated metal- 
lic splint is an illustration of this adaptation of 
means to ends. It has superseded almost eiairely 
the old, ill-contrived wooden splint, being light, 
flexible and easily kept in place. One secret of the 
remarkable success which Mr. Lee has achieved 
is his ability to meet any and all emergencies that 
are likely to arise in connection with the science 
of modern surgery. Besides surgical instruments, 
the establishment manufactures also antiseptic 
preparations of all kinds and many appliances 
coming more properly under the head of surgical 
supplies for the use of hospitals, surgeons and the 
medical profession generally. The establishment 
has agencies in all the large cities of this country, 
in fact in all large cities throughout the world. 
^Ir. Lee owes his success in life to his inventive 
genius, his persistency in his undertakings, and 
his capacity for business. The management of 
an establishment like the J. Ellwood Lee Company- 
is a task that demands executive ability of a high 
order. He directs the operations that are in 
progress with consummate skill, and is thor- 
oughly at home in all the details of a business 
which he has built up from the small beginning 
already mentioned, until now it is one of the 



24 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



largest and most flourishing of its kind in the 
world. 

Mrs. J. Ellwood Lee is the daughter of Jona- 
than and Anna J. (Wood) Cleaver. She was 
born October 8, i860. Their children: ]\Iary 
Cleaver, born July 29, 1884, died February 7, 
1893; Elsie, bom January 19, 1888; J. Ellwood, 
Jr., born August 13, 1891 ; Herbert B., born June 
II, 1900, and died February 11, 1902. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lee, with their two surviving children, re- 
side in Conshohocken. 

Mr. Lee has been a member of the town coun- 
cil since 1898. He was chosen by acclamation 
a delegate to the national Republican convention 
for the renomination of President Roosevelt. Mr. 
Lee is a member of Calvary Protestant Episcopal 
church, Conshohocken, having been a vestryman 
since 1888. He is also a member of the Penn 
Club, and of the Pencoyd Club, of Wissahickon. 
He is of a very social temperament and fond of 
athletic sports. 

As a Republican Mr. Lee has a deep interest 
in the success of the candidates and principles of 
the party. He has not sought or held office, 
aside from what has been mentioned, his business 
absorbing his attention to the exclusion of such 
matters. He is always alert to the interests of 
Conshohocken, and ever ready to do what he can 
to promote the welfare of the community of which 
he is an honored member. 

HENRY I^IARCH BROWNBACK, post- 
master of Norristown and ex-district attorney of 
Montgomery county, is one of the best known 
of the younger members of the Norristown bar. 
He is the youngest son of James and Ellen 
(March) Brownback, and was born in West 
Vincent township, Chester county, Pennsylvania, 
December 17, i860. The Brownback family, 
German in origin, has many branches in eastern 
Pennsylvania, and its members are influential 
in their different communities. 

The immigrant was Gerhard Brumback 
(anglicized into Garrett Brownback), who sailed 
from Amsterdam in the ship Concord in 1683, 
landing at Philadelphia. Garrett Brownback 



settled first at Germantown, and removed later 
to Chester county, where he became a large land- 
holder and the first hotel-keeper in his section. 
He was the founder of the Brownback Reformed 
church, still in existence. He lived to the age of 
ninety-six years, dying about 1757. He married 
JMary Pepen, youngest daughter of Howard 
Pepen, whose wife was Mary Rittenhouse. The 
couple had two sons: Benjamin and Henry, and 
four daughters. Benjamin Brownback married 
Mary Paul and had three sons : Henry, John and 
Edward. Henry married Magdalena Paul, and 
had five children: John, Peter, Benjamin, Annie 
and Susan. Many of the descendants of Garrett 
Brownback are useful citizens, filling positions 
of honor and trust in dift'erent sections of the 
state. 

One of the great-grandsons of Garrett 
Brownback was William Brownback (grandfa- 
ther), a native of Chester county, who became a 
successful farmer. His wife was Eliza Wilson. 
She died in 1840 aged thirty-two years, leaving 
a family of four children; her husband survived 
her for half a century, dying July 29, 1890, at 
the age of eighty-four years. He was an ex- 
emplary citizen, and a life-long member of the 
Reformed church, participating actively in its 
atifairs. One of his sons was James Brownback 
(father), who was born March 4, 1833, in 
Chester county. After obtaining his education, 
he began life as a farmer, pursuing that occupa- 
tion successfully. He sold out his other inter- 
ests in 1865, and engaged in business as an iron 
founder, at Linfield, this county. Where he still 
resides, although his firm, the i\Iarch-Brownback 
Company, removed to Pottstown in 1891, he be- 
ing its president and its business being prosper- 
ous. Mr. Brownback is also interested in other 
enterprises in that vicinity. In 1857 he married 
Ellen March, at Lawrenceville, Chester county. 
The couple had three children, Ada E., died No- 
vember 13, 1899, wife of Henry G. Kulp, Potts- 
town ; William M., married Annie Yocum, of 
Bryn Mawr, where the family reside ; and Henry 
M. Brownback, of Norristown. 

Henrv M. Brownback became a resident of 





X-W^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Montgomery county when his parents removed 
from Chester county to Linfield. He was then 
but seven years of age. He attended private 
schools, and Ursinus College. Subsequently, he 
studied law in the office of his uncle, Franklin 
March, then in active practice at Norristown as 
■a member of the Montgomery county bar. Hav- 
ing passed a most creditable examination, he 
was admitted to the bar December 4, 1882, be- 
ginning immediately the practice of his profes- 
sion, in partnership with Mr. March, the firm 
being March and Brownback. This arrange- 
ment continued in force successfully until Janu- 
ary I, 1903, when it was dissolved. Mr. Brown- 
back continuing, however, to devote himself to 
the practice of law. He became the nominee of 
the Republican party for the position of district 
attorney in 1889, and was elected to the position 
in November of that year, serving the term of 
three years with credit to himself, and with fidel- 
ity to the interests of the public. He has filled 
the position of solictor for several county of- 
ficials, from time to time, and has achieved ex- 
ceptional success as a lawyer. 

July 2, 1890, Mr. Brownback married Miss 
Augustine Marguerite Lowe, a daughter of Prof. 
T. S. C. Lowe, then a resident of Norristown 
"but more recently of Pasadena, California, who 
"has been largely interested in railway contruc- 
tion and other important business enterprises, 
and is the owner of many valuable inventions. 
^Ir. and Mrs. Brownback have two sons, Henry 
Lowe and Russell James. 

Early in July, 1899, Mr. Brownback was ap- 
pointed postmaster at Norristown by President 
McKinley. In January, 1903, his term of four 
years having expired, he was re-appointed bv 
President Roosevelt to the position. As post- 
master Mr. Brownback has been faithful, ener- 
getic and progressive, always desiring to promote 
in every possible way the convenience and ac- 
comodation of the public. Under his supervis- 
ion free rural delivery has been instituted, the 
routes which branch out from Norristown ex- 
tending to various sections of the county. Dur- 
ing his administration, also, the movement for 
a public building in Norristown was carried to 



a successful conclusion. Courteous, obliging and 
faithful in the discharge of his duties, Mr. 
Brownback is a model official 

GENERAL \\TLLL\M M. MINTZER, the 
son of Henry and Rebecca (Bechtel) Mintzer, 
was born in Chester county, June 7, 1837. He 
was one of nine children, five of whom are now 
living, as follows : General William M. ; Eliza- 
beth, wife of John F. Reeser, of New Ringgold, 
Pennsylvania ; Rebecca, wife of Chaney Town- 
send, of Philadelphia ; Warren, of Pottstown, and 
Sallie, wife of Clayton Gulp, of Philadelphia; 
Joseph died in Philadelphia. 

Henry Mintzer (father) lived all of his life on 
a farm which was a part of the present site of the 
borough of Pottstown. He was postmaster in 
Pottstown during Lincoln's administration and 
was a school director. His wife was Rebecca 
Bechtel, who died in 1896, aged eighty-six years. 
He died in 1883, aged seventy years. His wife 
was a member of the Lutheran church. 

William Mintzer (grandfather) was of Ger- 
man descent, but was born in Pennsylvania. He 
operated a line of stages between Pottstown and 
Philadelphia and also conducted a general store 
in Pottstown. He was a member of the school 
board and borough council and took an active in- 
terest in the affairs of the borough. His wife was 
Sarah Missimer, and they had a family of nine 
children. He died at the age of fifty-six years. 

Peter Bechtel (maternal grandfather) was a 
native of Pennsylvania of German descent. He 
owned a large farm and was the proprietor of 
a prominent hotel in Pottstown for a. number of 
years. His wife was Catharine. He died at an 
advanced age. 

General William M. Mintzer has lived in 
Pottstown nearly all his life. He attended the dis- 
trict schools and was a student for one term in 
the Hill school. He began learning the machinist 
trade at the age of nineteen and spent four years 
in this way. During the last six months of that 
time he was a member of the Madison Guards, a 
militia company of Pottstown, and when Fort 
Sumter was fired on by the Confederate forces, 
he dropped the hammer and chisel and immedi- 



26 



MONTGOAIERY COUNTY. 



ately left the machine shop. Upon receipt of tele- 
graphic orders sent by Colonel John Frederic 
Hartranft to Captain Stroiigh, the commander of 
the company, to prepare for going to the front, 
]\'Ir. Mintzer immediately went to the armory and 
arranged to recruit a company. He headed that 
enlistment roll, being the first man to enlist in 
the borough of Pottstown after the firing upon 
Fort Sumter. Captain Strough, by the advice 
of his family physician, tendered his resignation 
on Wednesday night and D. Webster Davis was 
elected captain, but owing to the severe illness 
of his wife, was obliged to resign. On Thursday 
morning, immediately after the resignation of 
Captain Davis, Mr. i\Iintzer suggested the name 
of John R. Brooke, formerly major-general in the 
regular army and now retired, as the proper per- 
son to command the company, and he was elected 
captain that same evening. At that same meeting, 
owing to the activity and interest of Mr. Mintzer 
'"n recruiting the company, he was elected by the 
company to the office of third lieutenant, an office 
Tiot recognized in militarv affairs at that time, and 
was presented with a sword and sash by the citi- 
■^ens of Pottstown, as were also the other officers 
of the company. After the sword presentation 
that morning the company took the train and went 
to Harrisburg. Arriving at Harrisburg, the 
office of third lieutenant was not recognized and 
Mr. Mintzer shouldered a musket and went into 
the ranks as a private soldier. Soon afterwards 
he was appointed quartermaster sergeant on 
Colonel Hartranft's noncommissioned staff and 
served in that capacity until the expiration of the 
three month's service. The company was then 
reorganized under President Lincoln's call for 
three hundred thousand men, of which Quarter- 
master Mintzer was made first lieutenant. He 
served as first lieutenant from September i8, 
1861, until June 2. 1862, when he was promoted 
to Captain of Company A, and promoted to lieu- 
tenant-colonel September 29, 1864; to colonel, 
October 30, 1864 ; and to brevet brigadier-general, 
March 13, 1865. 

After the battle of Fredericksburg, Decem- 
ber 13, 1862, General Mintzer was detailed as 
provost marshal of the First Division, Second 



Army Corps, then commanded by General Win- 
field Scott Hancock, and had three companies of 
the regiment. A, B and K, with him on duty and 
at headquarters. When General Hancock took 
the command of the corps, Captain Mintzer went 
with him and served with him until April, 1864, 
when he returned to his regiment and was in all 
the movements of Grant's first campaign through 
the Wilderness, and was in every other engage- 
ment from that time to the close of the war. He- 
was in command of the picket line of his regi- 
ment when Lee surrendered at Appomatto.x, on 
the morning of April 9, 1865. General Mintzer 
was a brave soldier and few men among the thou- 
sands who enlisted from Pennsylvania saw as 
much active service as he. 

On February 5, 1863, General IMintzer mar- 
ried Amelia Weand, daughter of David and Ma- 
tilda (Shuler) Weand. The couple had four 
children : George, Helen, John and Charles. 
Helen died at the age of twenty-five years ; John 
married Bessie Smith. They now live at Home- 
stead, where he is connected with the Carnegie 
Steel Company. Charles married Ida Weiler.. 
They live in Pottstown. 

General Mintzer is a Lutheran in religious 
faith and his wife belongs to the Trinity Re- 
formed church. He is a member af Richards 
Post, No. 595, Grand Army of the Republic. He 
is also a member of the L'nion Veteran Legion 
and is present Commander of Camp 22, of Potts- 
town, and is a member of the Loyal Legion of the 
United States. 

General jMintzer has been in the coal business 
for the past twenty-five years, representing the 
Berwind W^hite Coal Mining Company. He has 
lived at his present home about twenty years. He 
was postmaster two terms under General Grant 
and was appointed the third time, but declined 
to hold the position longer. He was also a mem- 
ber of the school board some years. Politically he 
is a Republican. 

Mrs. ]\Iintzer's parents. David and Matilda 
(Shuler) Weand, were natives of New Hanover 
township, [Montgomery county. They were the 
parents of seven children, three sons and four 
daughters, of whom five are now living : Amelia^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



27 



wife of General Mintzer : Milton, of Pottstown; 
John, of San Antonio, Texas ; Mary, widow of 
Levi Prizer, of Norristown ; and Emma, wife of 
William Shuler, of the Shuler House, Pottstown. 
David Weand was raised on a farm and in young 
manhood was a cigar manufacturer. Later he 
went into the grocery business in Pottstown for 
about twenty-five years. His death occurred 
May 12, 1885, at the age of seventy-two years. 
His wife died February 3, 1874, aged fifty-five 
years. She was a Lutheran in her young days, 
but after her marriage went with her husband 
to the German Reformed church. He was a mem- 
ber of the borough council a number of years 
when a young man. His father was Wendel 
Weand, a native of Pennsylvania, who owned 
a farm in New Hanover township, ^Montgomery 
county, where he resided all his life. He died 
before reaching an advanced age. His wife was 
Catharine Dotterer, who lived to be eighty years 
of age. They had seven sons and two daughters. 
He belonged to the branch of the Weand family 
from which Judge Weand of Norristown has 
descended. 

The maternal grandfather of Mrs. Mintzer 
was Samuel Shuler, a native of Pennsylvania and 
of German descent. He was a farmer near Sun- 
neytown, Montgomery county, where he died in 
middle life. His wife was Elizabeth Zepp, who 
lived to be ninety-three years of age. She and her 
husband had five children. 

HENRY A. GROFF, elected register of wills 
of Montgomery county in 1902, was born in 
Lower Salford township, December 16, i860. He 
is the son of Jacob S. and Anna (Alderfer) 
Grofif, of Lower Salford. 

Jacob S. Grof¥ (father) was born November 
5, 1836. He was reared on a farm until he was 
sixteen years of age. His father was Abraham 
Grofif. Jacob attended the schools of the vicinity 
and learned the trade of a miller with William 
Godshalk, of New Britain, Bucks county, Penn- 
sylvania, who afterwards represented the dis- 
trict in Congress for two terms. Having com- 
pleted his apprenticeship, he accepted a position 
in the mill of Benjamin S. Alderfer, in Lower 



Salford, and married his oldest daughter, pur- 
chasing the mill in 1878. He married Anna 
Alderfer, daughter of Benjamin S. and Lena 
(Nyce) Alderfer, October 4, 1856. She was born 
October 6, 1834. The children of Jacob S. and 
Anna Groff : Abraham A., born March 4, 1858; 
Henry A., subject of this sketch; Benjamin A., 
born April 30, 1866; Ellwood A., born October 
30, 1870. Abraham A. Goff, the eldest child of 
Jacob Groff, married Kate K., daughter of 
Abraham Moyer, of Franconia. Benjamin A. 
Groff maried Annie M., daughter of Rev. Jacob 
B. Booz, of Upper Salford township; Ellwood 
A. Groff married Minerva R., daughter of Jacob 
Ruckstool, also of Upper Salford. 

The children of Abraham A. and Kate K. 
Groff, who were married December 8, 1883: 
Anna M., born June 6, 1885 ; Alice, born Septem- 
ber 2, 1887 ; Lizzie, born June 27, 1891 ; Jacob, 
born September 15, 1893: Clayton, born June 26, 
1899. Abraham A. resides in Lower Salford, 
near Lederachsville. 

The children of Benjamin A. and Annie M. 
Groff, who were married October 2, 1886: Vin- 
cent; Eva, born June 27, 1891 ; Ellwood, born 
November 28, 1892; Martha, born May 17, 1894; 
Lydia, born October 2, 1896; William Irvin, born 
April 29, 1902. Benjamin A. Groff is the en- 
gineer at the jMontgomery County Home. He 
resides in a tenement house belonging to the 
Home. 

The children of Ellwood A. and INIinerva R. 
Groff, who were married July 29, 1893 : Jacob 
R.. born November 27, 1894; Reinhart R., born 
September 16, 1897 ; Benjamin, born December 
17, 1901. Ellwood A. Groff resides on the home- 
stead in Lower Salford. 

Air. and Mrs. Jacob S. Groff are both living. 
They are Mennonites in religious faith. Mr. 
Groff takes an active interest in politics, being 
an earnest Republican. He never missed an elec- 
tion since his maturity. 

Abraham Groff (grandfather) had six chil- 
dren, as follows : 

David, married Maria Fluck and resides in 
Sellersville, Bucks county, Pennsylvania. They 
have the following children : Henry F., married 



28 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



Kate Wagner ; Abraham F., married Emma 
Deatz; Anna, married Harry Schlosser; Hetty 
(deceased) ; Hannah, married Irvin F. Baringer. 

Hetty, married Levi- Bleam, of Milford 
Square, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, who is de- 
■ceased. He left a son Henry, who marrred Tilly, 
•daughter of Daniel Reiff. 

Mary, married Jacob Rosenberger, of Bridge- 
town, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, who is now 
deceased, leaving two daughters ; Amanda, mar- 
ried Ephraim Leister ; and Mary. 

Betsy, married Ezra Moore, of Bridgetown, 
now South Perkasie, Bucks county, Pennsylvania. 
She is deceased, leaving two daughters, Harriet, 
married John A. Freed, of Perkasie, and Hetty, 
married Milton Shelley, of Quakertown. 

Jacob S. (father). 

Isaac S., married Sarah Eisenberg, who died 
several years ago leaving one son, Harvey, who 
resides in Philadelphia. 

The Groffs are descended from Jacob Groff, 
who emigrated from Holland about 1758 and 
came to Pennsylvania, settling in Bucks county, 
near where is now Sellersville. He brought with 
him four children : John, Peter, Mary, Henry, 
bom on the ship coming to this country. 

Henry Groff, last mentioned, is the ancestor 
of Register of Wills Henry A. Groff. His chil- 
<iren: Jacob, Abraham (grandfather), Elizabeth, 
Polly, Susan, Hester. All of these lived in Bucks 
county. 

Henry A. Groff, subject of this sketch, at- 
tended the public schools of the vicinity of his 
home in Lower Salford, being occupied at inter- 
vals on the farm and in the mill of his father. 
Later he became the proprietor of the coal, lum- 
ber and feed business of Salford Station, in which 
he is still engaged. He was postmaster for a 
number of j^ears, beginning with Cleveland's first 
term, in 1885. In politics he is an active Re- 
publican, always laboring actively for the success 
of the principles and candidates of the party. His 
popularity was attested by the large vote he re- 
ceived on the Republican ticket in 1902. He has 
performed the duties of the office very success- 
fully. He married, in 1881, Emma K., daughter 
of Henry B. and Hannah (Kooker) Allebach, 



of an old family in Hilltown, Bucks county. Their 
children: Jacob A., born December 29, 1881 ; 
Ella A., bom July 10, 1883; Allen A., born Jan- 
uary 21, 1885 ; Hannah A., born January 6, 1887; 
Harvey A., born June 17, 1891 ; Anna A., born 
April 8, 1899; Lillie A., born November 12, 
1901. 

Mr. ' Groff is a typical representative of the 
Pennsylvania German race who form so large an 
element in the population of Montgomery county. 
In religious faith he is a Mennonite, as are all his 
family, attending the Lower Salford Mennonite 
meeting house. He is courteous and affable, giv- 
ing strict attention to business and performing 
every duty with fidelity and care. 

HON. IRVING PRICE WANGER has 
been a prominent figure in [Montgomery county 
politics from the time he attained his majority, 
and has the distinction of being its first Repub- 
lican district attorney, the first person to be 
elected to that office more than once and of serv- 
ing much longer in congress than any other rep- 
resentative of any district of which either of the 
counties forming the present district has been a 
part, except that lately represented by Hon. A. 
C. Harmer. He is descended from early settlers 
of i\Iontgomery county, of the religious sect 
known as Mennonites and Brethren (Dunkards). 
He was born March 5, 1852, in North Coventry 
township, Chester county, and is the oldest son 
of George and Rebecca (Price) Wanger. His 
father, the late Geoerge Wanger, was a prom- 
inent citizen of northern Chester county, well 
known as a man of force of character, a strong 
advocate of the public-school system and the 
abolition of slavery, and active in the formation 
of the Republican party in Pennsylvania. In 
1850 he married Rebecca, a daughter of Rev. 
John Price, and reared a family of four sons, all 
of whom survive. A daughter died when three 
years of age. His death occurred December 30, 
1876, in the fifty-seventh year of his age. 

Irving P. W^anger was reared on the old 
homestead in Chester county, and educated in 
the public schools of the district and at the Potts- 
town High and Hill schools. He taught school 










1 


J^^ "«l» . 
i M 


I 


1 ^^ 

- ^ 



^lONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



29 



one year, and in 1870, became a clerk in the pro- 
thonotary's office at West Chester. In 1871 he 
was appointed deputy prothonotary and resigned 
the position at the end of the year to engage in 
the study of law at Norristown. 

In January, 1872, he began his legal studies 
with Franklin March, Esq., and on December i, 
of that year was appointed deputy under Wil- 
liam F. Reed, the first Republican prothonotary 
elected in Montgomery county. He continued 
the study of law, and was admitted to the bar in 
December, 1875. Beginning the practice of law 
early in 1876 Mr. Wanger soon won the repu- 
tation of being an eloquent and forcible advocate 
and acquired a practice from all sections of Mont- 
gomery county. In 1889 he formed a partner- 
ship with Irvin P. Knipe, (who concluded his 
legal studies with Mr. Wanger as his preceptor), 
under the firm name of \\^anger & Knipe, which 
became one of the most prosperous legal firms 
in the country. 

JMr. Wanger's talent for public speaking 
caused his services to be in demand at meetings 
in behalf of candidates of the Republican party, 
to which he was attached by inheritance as well 
as conviction, being an earnest advocate of its 
principles. In 1878 he was elected burgess of 
Norristown. He was also solicitor for the 
school board of Norristown for a number of 
years. He was elected district attorney of Mont- 
gomery county, in 1880. In this position he in- 
stituted several reforms, among them the practice 
of dividing the list for criminal court among 
several days, so that all the witnesses and others 
interested need not undergo the inconvenience 
of attending court the first day of the term and 
possibly the entire week, and thereby effecting a 
considerable saving to the county treasury. This 
practice has been uniformly followed since. 

In 1880 Mr. Wanger was a delegate to the 
national convention and voted continuously 
therein against the unit rule, and for tlie nomin- 
ation of jMr. Blaine until the final ballot when 
requested by friends of the latter to vote for Gen- 
eral Garfield. In 1886 Mr. Wanger was again 
nominated for district attorney and was elected 
by a majority of one thousand one hundred and 



eighty-seven votes, running several hundred 
ahead of his ticket, notwithstanding the fact that 
his opponent was one of the most capable candi- 
dates the Democracy ever nominated. 

In 1889 Mr. Wanger was chairman of the 
Republican county committee, and in 1890 he 
was unanimously nominated for congress by the 
Republicans of the seventh district and made a 
vigorous canvass, being defeated by only one 
hundred and eighty-seven votes. This was the 
year of the Delamater campaign, when the Re- 
publican ticket in Montgomery county was de- 
feated as a rule by much larger majorities. Two 
years later Mr. Wanger was. again the nominee 
of his party for congress, and he won by a ma- 
jority nearly the same as. that against him in 
1890, although there was a majority in the dis- 
trict for Cleveland. He was re-nominated in 
1894 and re-elected by a majority of four thou- 
sand eight hundred and twenty-six. In i8qG, 
1898, 1900 and 1902, he was elected by large ma- 
jorities, showing that his course at Washington 
has been such as to commend him very strongly 
to the people of his district. His support has 
not been confined to Republicans alone, many 
Democrats and persons of other party affiliation 
at each election testifying their appreciation of 
his worth as representative by voting for him. 
As a congressman Mr. Wanger has taken an 
active part in debates on the tariff", the silver 
bill, Philippine legislation and other questions 
of national interest. He is very attentative to 
all matters affecting his constituants, doing ev- 
erything possible to promote the prosperity and 
welfare of the people of his district and of the 
country at large. He has always voted with his 
party upon questions involving its principles in 
every division that has taken place in the house of 
representatives, ably and earnestly seconding 
the administration of McKinley and Roosevelt, 
and upholding their policy whenever it has been 
a matter for action in congress or elsewhere. It 
was upon the motion that the special committee 
was appointed which investigated the hazing of 
cadets at the United States Military Academy 
and suggested important legislation upon the 
subject, which was adopted. His principal com- 



20 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



mittee service has been as a member of the com- 
mittee on interstate and foreign commerce and 
as chairman of the committee on expenditures in 
the postoffice department. In every respect he 
has been a faithful and devoted exponent of the 
public wishes at Washington as his repeated re- 
flections show. 

On June 25, 1884, Mr. Wanger married 
Emma C. Titlow, daughter of the late John Tit- 
low, of North Coventry. She had been a playmate 
and schoolmate of his youth. They have had 
five children, three of whom survive: George, 
Ruth and JMarion. The other two, Lincoln and 
Rebecca, died in infancy. Mr. Wanger lives at 
the old Chain homestead. No. 827 West Main 
street, Norristown, which he has modernized, 
making it a very pleasing type of architecture. 
His mother, from whom he inherits many of his 
characteristics, also makes her home with him. 
She is the sister of the late Rev. Isaac Price, a 
noted and eloquent preacher of the Brethren, and 
the descendant of a long line of preachers of 
that church. Mr. Wanger himself is a member 
of St. John's Episcopal church of Norristown. 
He is also a member of the Independent Order 
•of Odd Fellows, Improved Order of Red Men, 
and of nearly all of the INIasonic bodies of this 
state, having been grand commander of Knights 
Templar in Pennsylvania in 1894-5. 

As a public speaker, Mr. Wanger is argu- 
mentative, logical, clear and deliberate — appeal- 
ing to the reason and judgment of his hearers, 
rather than to their prejudices or personal feel- 
ings. He is a ready debater and parlimentarian 
— quick to perceive the weak point in his oppon- 
ents argument and always ready to take advant- 
age of such weakness. During his service in 
congress he has made many friends among the 
representation from other states, frequently se- 
curing their services when occasion requires it 
in his own district. 

HON. HIRAIM CONRAD HOOVER, ex- 
member of the Pennsylvania legislature, the last 
associate judge of the courts of Montgomery 
county, and for many years president of the 
Montgomery County Historical Society, is a son 



of Hon. Philip and May Alary (Conrad) Hoover, 
and was born in Gwynedd township, Montgomery 
county, October 23, 1822. 

Between 1727 and 1776, several immigrants 
by the name of Huber came from the Palatinate, 
and landed at Philadelphia. Of this number were 
four brothers. Christian, John, Martin and Jacob, 
who came in the ship Pink Plesance, commanded 
by Captain John Paret. These brothers landed on 
September 21, 1732, at which time Jacob was 
under sixteen j-ears of age. Of all the immi- 
grant Hubers, these four brothers were among 
those that changed their name from Huber, the 
German form, to Hoover, the English spelling. 
One brother went to western Pennsylvania, an- 
other to Lancaster county, the third to Georgia, 
and Jacob, the youngest, seems to have been the 
Jacob Hoover who bought a farm in Plumstead 
township, Bucks county, in 1748. It has been 
established that Jacob Hoover was the father of 
Henry Hoover, who was bom in 175 1, in Bucks 
county. He married ]\Iargaret Kern, and in 1797 
moved from Hilltown township, Bucks county, to 
Gwynedd township, ^Montgomery county, where 
he purchased a farm of two hundred acres. In 
politics he was a Democrat, and in religion a 
member of the Reformed church, in which he 
served as elder. When troops were ordered out 
to suppress the Fries Rebellion in eastern Penn- 
sylvania, one regiment of infantry sought to take 
his buildings as temporar\' quarters, but he re- 
fused with such determination that they went to 
an adjoining farm of William Foulk. Henry 
Hoover died April 9, 1809, aged fifty-seven years, 
and his widow survived him until November 27, 
1813, dying at the age of sixty-two years. They 
had five children : Christian ; Jacob ; Philip ; 
Elizabeth, who married John Rile; and Mary, 
wife of \\'illiam Kneedler. 

Hon. Philip Hoover, the father of Judge 
Hiram C. Hoover, was educated in his youth in 
the German language, but after his marriage he 
was taught to read and write English by his wife, 
who had received a good education in both lan- 
guages. He became a member of a volunteer 
organization when but eighteen years of age and 
rose from the ranks to the captaincy. He filled 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



31 



-many offices in the township, such as assessor 
and collector of taxes, and in 1831-32-33 was 
-elected a member of the state legislature, where 
he served with credit and satisfaction to his con- 
stitutens— all positions having sought him, as he 
did not aspire to them. He was the executor, 
administrator and guardian of many estates, in all 
of which he rendered satisfactory accounts. 

Philip Hoover was regularly catechised and 
received as a member of Boehm's Reformed 
church, at Blue Bell, by Rev. George Wack, its 
pastor. In 1810 he was elected a deacon, and 
served as such until 1823, when he was elected 
an elder, holding that position, with the exception 
of three years, until his death — a period of more 
than forty years. He held the office of presi- 
dent and treasurer of the consistory for some 
time. He was also frequently a delegate to classis 
and synod. 

In the War of 1812 he served as lieutenant of 
another company (the organization to which he 
previously belonged having been disbanded), for 
three months, being practically its captain, as that 
officer had returned home soon after being mus- 
tered into service. He also provided a team to 
convey military stores from Philadelphia to Mar- 
cus Hook. Afterwards he was elected colonel of 
a regiment of militia. 

Philip Hoover was born July 20, 1782, and 
was married to Mary Conrad, November 13, 1804. 
They were the parents of thirteen children but 
only six reached the age of maturity. Mary Con- 
rad Hoover, daughter of Hon. Frederick Con- 
rad (who was a member of congress for four 
years) was born August 23, 1785, and died Oc- 
tober 17, 1868, aged eighty-three years, one 
month and twenty-four days. Their children 
were: Frederick W., Julian, Susanna, Maria, 
Henry C, Ann Catharine, Judge Hiram C, .\lbert 
C, Ann Elizabeth, Andrew J., and two sons and 
one daughter that died in infancy. 

Judge Hiram C. Hoover received his literary 
education in common and select schools and stud- 
ied surveying. Possessing fine musical talent, he 
began to teach music and to organize church 
choirs at an early age. While teaching music he 
■engaged in fanning, which he followed until 



1872. In 1849 he bought a part of the St. Clair 
estate in Norriton township, and when, in 1872, 
the Stony Creek Railroad was built through part 
of his land, his neighbors suggested his building 
grain and mercantile stores where the railroad 
crossed Germantown turnpike. He thus founded 
Hooverton, which has absorbed Penn Square and 
gives promise of future importance. He soon re- 
tired from business, and the feed, coal and lum- 
ber business is now in the hands of his son Will- 
iam A., while the general mercantile establishment 
is conducted by his son-in-law, Albertus Hall- 
man. Judge Hoover lives a retired life except 
what time he gives to his interests as a stockholder 
in several industrial enterprises. He has served 
as guardian for the heirs of eighteen estates and 
not a single exception has ever been filed to any 
of his estate accounts. He has served many years 
as treasurer of Philadelphia classis, whose finan- 
cial matters include seven different accounts, 
which have been found correct by the finance 
committee each year. 

In early life Judge Hoover took much interest 
in military affairs. He was a member of the First 
Troop of Montgomery Cavalry sixteen years, and 
in 1861 sought to reorganize the troop for active 
service in the war, but circumstances prevented. 
He has been active and useful in civil, educational 
and religious affairs, and has done much toward 
the development of his section. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics and has filled some of the most im- 
portant political offices of his county. He was 
a member of the Pennsylvania house of- represen- 
tatives in 1862, 1863 and 1864, and during his 
three consecutive terms served on many leading 
committees, having been chairman of the commit- 
tee on agriculture in 1863. In 1865 he \vas elected 
associate judge of Montgomery county, and in 
1870 was elected for a second term which would 
have ended in 1875, but the office was abolished by 
the state constitution of 1874. He served as jus- 
tice of the peace for four terms, nearly twenty 
years, and as school director for seventeen years, 
while in his party he was made chairman of the 
county committee for three successive years. 
Judge Hoover has served as trustee of Ursinus 
College for twenty-five years, and of Franklin and 



2>2 



MOxXTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Marshall College five years. He was president 
of the Norristown and Centre Square Turnpike 
Company from its organization in 1868 until its 
dissolution a few years ago. In 1844, when the 
Philadelphia riots occurred, he served as an of- 
ficer in the First Troop of Montgomery county, 
one of the companies that suppressed the riots. 
He is an old and prominent Mason, being a mem- 
ber of Charity Lodge, No. 190, Free and Accepted 
Masons ; a life member of Chapter No. 190, Royal 
Arch Masons; also a charter member of Com- 
mandery No. 32, Knights Templar. Judge 
Hoover has been an elder in Boelim's Reformed 
church since 1856, has been president of the con- 
sistory during all the time except two years, and 
has frequently served as a delegate to various 
church bodies. Among his most important labors 
has been the instruction of different Bible classes 
and the efficient supervision of Sunday-schools, in 
which work he has spent many happy hours, dur- 
ing a period of over fifty years of continuous 
service. 

On March 4, 1847, Judge Hoover married 
Margaret Dull, youngest daughter of Frederick 
and Sarah Dull, of Whitemarsh township. Judge 
and Mrs. Hoover had four children : William A. ; 
Irvin W., now dead ; Sarah D., who married 
James W. Hercus, of Washington city, and died 
March 18, 1894 ; and Mary M., who married Al- 
bertus Hallman, a business man of Hooverton. 

Judge Hoover was very active in the old 
IMontgomery County Agricultural Society. At 
its organization at Springtown he was made a 
member of the executive committee and later its 
chairman. Subsequently the society divided and 
Judge Hoover became president of the Norris- 
town branch, and served as such for three years. At 
the one hundredth anniversary of Washington's 
evacuation of Valley Forge in 1778, the Judge 
presided and again in 1903 he attended the meet- 
ing, it being the one hundred and twenty-fifth an- 
niversary. He is a member of the Patriotic 
Order of Sons of America and was a charter 
member of Camp No. 322, at Penn Square, and 
also a charter member of an auxiliary camp. No. 
38, of Patriotic Order of True Americans, which 
later was united with the Patriotic Daughters of 



America, and he was elected the first national as- 
sistant president of the united organization. 
He has for more than twenty years of its existence 
taken an active interest in the work of the Mont- 
gomery County Historical Society, presiding at 
its meetings, reading an occasional paper, and 
participating in its reunions and annual outings. 
In every relation of life he has performed his duty 
and won the esteem and respect of his fellow citi- 
zens because he has fairly earned such distinction. 
Courteous in his manners, unostentatious in his 
bearing, he is in every situation the same digni- 
fied, pleasant and earnest man. It is largely 
through his instrumentality that the Hoover Fam- 
ily Association has been organized, its annual re- 
unions being a delightful feature in its history. 

T. ELLWOOD LR'EZEY. The Livezeys 
are an old family in Plymouth township, although 
their first ancestor in this country settled at 
Abington, in which neighborhood many of the 
name are still found. . The name is often pro- 
nounced Leusley at the present day, and there 
would seem to be some reason for such pronun- 
ciation as William Penn conveyed to Thomas 
Leuisley or Leusley of Norton, in the county of 
Chester, England, March 2-3, 1681, two hundred 
and fifty acres of land in Pennsylvania. 

At Chester Monthly Meeting in Pennsyl- 
vania, Eleventh-mo. 3, 1686-7, Jonathan Livsly 
and Rachel Taylor proposed marriage with each 
other, he residing in Dublin township, Philadel- 
phia county. A month later they were given the 
liberty to proceed and accomplish their intentions 
of marriage. The will of Thomas Livezey, of 
Dublin township, dated Sixth-mo. 12, 1691, was 
proved Fourth-mo. 22, 1692, showing that he 
died between these dates. In the will are men- 
tioned his son, Jonathan ; daughter, Ann Little- 
more and her three children : daughter-in-law, 
Rachel Livezey ; daughter, Margaret Lorenson 
and her three children ; grandson, Thomas Live- 
zey ; and granddaughter, Mary Livezey. The 
records of Abington Monthly Meeting show 
that he died Eighth-mo. 19, 1691, and was buried 
in Oxford township, near Tacony bridge. 

Jonathan Livezey died Ninth-mo. 23, 1698, 




eA (iliu^2^^^^^.1^i^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



33 



in Dublin township. He was the son of Thomas, 
and left a widow, Rachel (Taylor) Livezey, who 
later married Joseph Gilbert of Byberry. Jona- 
than Livezey was the ancestor of the Livezeys 
of jNIontgomery and adjoining counties. His 
wife, according to a tradition in the Gilbert fam- 
ily, had been brought by her father to America 
to prevent her from marrying a person of whom 
he disapproved. The children of Jonathan and 
Rachel (Taylor) Livezey: Mary, born Twelfth- 
mo. 9, 1687; Thomas, born Tenth-mo. 17, 1689, 
died Third-mo. 5, 1759, married, in 1710, Eliza- 
beth Heath; Jonathan, born Third-mo. 15, 1692. 
died Third-mo. 24, 1764, married, in 17 17, Esther 
Eastburn ; Martha, born Third-mo. i, 1694, mar- 
ried, Seventh-mo. 25, 1721, Robert Thomas; 
Rachel, born Second-mo. 15, 1696, married, in 
1717, Evan Thomas; David, born Twelfth-mo. 
20, 1697. died Seventh-mo. 1750, married, in 
1 72 1, Rebecca Hinkson. It may be added that 
Mary Livezey married John Paul, and that 
Rachel, the mother of the children named above, 
had five children by the second marriage with 
Joseph Gilbert, one of whorh, Benjamin, was the 
Indian captive whose story of many years spent 
with the savages is so interesting. He was twice 
married, his first wife being Sarah Mason and 
his second, Elizabeth Peart. 

Thomas Livezey (great-great-grandfather) 
who married Elizabeth Heath, was a member of 
Abington :\Ionthly IMeeting. His son, Thomas 
(great-grandfather) was born First-mo. 25, 
1723, and died of palsy. Ninth-mo. 11. 1790. He 
married, at Abington, Fourth-mo. 2, 1748, 
Martha Knowles, who was born Fourth-mo. 24, 
1723, and died Eleventh-mo. 2, 1797. 

Martha, the wife of Thomas, was the daugh- 
ter of Francis Knowles, whose parents were John 
and Elizabeth. Francis was born Twelfth-mo. 
2, 1685 at West Chester, in Berkshire. Great 
Britain. 

Samuel Livezey, (grandfather) son of 
Thomas and Martha, was born First-mo. 26, 
1760. He was considered unfit for manual labor 
in his youth on account of a delicate constitution, 
and therefore engaged in mercantile business. 



When he was about fifty years of age he became 
a minister of the Society of Friends, and so con- 
tinued until his death. He established the store 
at Plymouth Meeting, on the property which 
has continued in the family ever since. His wife 
was Mary Wood. He located at Livezey's store 
near Plymouth Meeting in 1788. His children 
were : Thomas ; Martha, who married Jacob Al- 
bertson; Rachel, who married Jonathan Mauls- 
by ; Samuel ; Mary, who married Lewis Jones ; 
Joseph ; and Ann, who married William Ely. 
Samuel Livezey died Ninth-mo. 3, 1840, in his 
eighty-first year. 

Thomas Livezey (father), born Fourth-mo. 
27, 1803, died Tenth-mo. 2, 1879. His brothers 
selecting other business, he became a farmer and 
storekeeper. He was an influential man in 
Friends' meeting and in the community, although 
not a minister, as was his father. His wife was 
Rachel, daughter of Joseph and Mary Richard- 
son, of Attleboro (now Langhorne), Bucks 
county, Pennsylvania. She was born Eighth- 
mo. 27, 1808 and married Tenth-mo. 18, 1832. 
She died Sixth-mo. 1890. in her eighty-second 
year. 

The Richards came from England in early 
colonial times, and have become connected with 
many Friends' families in eastern Pennsylvania 
and elsewhere. Thomas and Rachel R. Livezey 
had seven sons, as follows : Dr. Edward Live- 
zey, born Eighth-mo. 28, 1833, and died Fourth- 
mo. 15, 1876; Samuel, born Third-mo. 9, 1835; 
Joseph R., born Ninth-mo. 20, 1838; John R., 
born Sixth-mo. 21, 1842, and died Sec6nd-mo. 
13, 1867 ; Henry, born Twelfth-mo. 24, 1843, ^"^ 
died Ninth-mo. 24, 1846; Henry 2d., born Sixth- 
mo. 25, 1847, died Twelfth-mo. 4, 1873; '^^^ 
Thomas Ellwood, born Eighth-mo. 11, 1849. 

Dr. Edward Livezey studied medicine with 
Dr. Hiram Corson, graduated at the University 
of Pennsylvania in 1859, served a year and a half 
in the Wills' Eye Hospital and a year in the 
Pennsylvania Hospital, also subsequently in the 
Government Hospital at Broad and Cherry 
streets during the Rebellion, and located at No. 
507 North Sixth street, Philadelphia, where he 



34 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



had a large practice at the time of his deatli, 
which occurred suddenly. His wife was Mary 
Balderston. He left several children. 

Samuel, second son of Thomas and Rachel 
Livezey, was engaged for many years in the meat 
packing business in Chicago, but of late years 
has resided in Norristown. He married. Elev- 
enth-mo. 20, 1877, Mary Roberts, daughter of 
Hugh and Alice A. Roberts. A sketch of his 
wife appears elsewhere in this work. Samuel 
and Mary R. Livezey have one son, Thomas H., 
born Tenth-mo. 18, 1879. He married, Tenth- 
mo. I, 1902, Joanna M., daughter of William 
(deceased) and Caroline R. Miller. They reside 
on Marshall street, Norristown. 

Joseph R. Livezey, third son of Thomas and 
Rachel, has long been engaged in the real-estate 
business in Philadelphia. He married Deborah, 
daughter of Joseph Morgan. The}' have two 
children, Sarah and Morgan. 

John R., fourth son, studied conveyancing 
and was engaged in that business at the time of 
his death. He died unmarried. 

Henry, ist, died in infancy. Henry, 2d, read 
law with Judge F. C. Brewster, of Philadelphia, 
and Daniel H. Mulvany, of Norristown. He was 
admitted to the Norristown bar, November 10, 
1869, and when his promising career was cut 
short by death he was associated with the late 
Judge Boyer. 

Thomas Elhvood Livezey, the subject of this 
sketch, was a fanner on the homestead, which 
has been for three generations in the family. 
The house in which he resided was built prior 
to the Revolutionary war. The farm is one of 
the finest in Plymouth valley, being underlaid 
with limestone and having extensive quarries 
which are no longer worked. It has been 
brought to a high state of cultivation and is very 
productive. T. Ellwood Livezey married. Elev- 
enth-mo. 16, 1871, Mary E., daughter of James 
and Mary (Holt) Childs. Their children: 
Rachel R., married Samuel Ifill of Germantown, 
born Eighth-mo. 19, 1872; Anna C, born Tenth- 
mo. 23, 1874, married Dr. William G. Miller, of 
Norristown; Mary J., born Twelfth-mo. 21, 1877, 
died Eighth-mo. 17, 1878; Emma, born Ninth- 



mo. 30, 1879, died Fifth-mo. 13, 1891 ; Thomas 
J., born Sixth-mo. 24, 1881 ; Walter C, born 
Ninth-mo. 14, 1884; Tacy B., born Fourth-mo. 
30, 1887, died Fifth-mo., 13, 1891 ; Emily R., 
born Seventh-mo. 16, 1894. 

The Childs family have long been domiciled / 

in Montgomery county and are of English de- 
scent. Henry Childs of Colds Hill, Hertford- 
shire, England, was eminent as a writer and 
speaker among Friends and was on intimate 
terms with William Penn, the founder of Penn- 
sylvania. He bought from Penn five hundred 
acres of land on January 20, 1687. Accom- 
panied by his son Cephas, he came to America 
in 1693 and located in Plumstead, Bucks county, 
Pennsylvania. Henry settled finally in Ann 
Arundel county, Maryland, and in.1715 gave 
the Bucks county land to his son Cephas, who 
settled on it, having married in 1716, Mary At- 
kinson, of Philadelphia. They had nine chil- 
dren, of whom Henry, born January i, 1725, 
married Mary Shoemaker of Gwynedd, August 
3, 1750. Their children were: Sarah, John, 
Isaac, George and Thomas. Of these John 
(great-grandfather of Mary Childs Livezey) 
was born April 3, 1755, in Plumstead, from 
which place his father removed with his family 
in 1776 to Cheltenham, Montgomery county. 
John married, June 5, 1777, Mary, daughter of 
Peter Phipps of Abington. They had twelve 
children, eight of whom grew to maturity, 
namely : Mary, Peter, Sarah, James, Tacy, Eliz- 
abeth, John and Margaret. Peter (grandfather) 
was born in 1780, in Cheltenham. He married 
Sarah Rogers and had children, two of whom, 
James (father) and Sarah, survived to advanced 
years. Peter married (second wife) Rosanna 
Lee, of Lower Merion, daughter of James and 
Elizabeth (Crickbaum) Lee. Their only child 
was S. Powell Childs, a prominent farmer and 
leading Republican of Plymouth township, now 
deceased. James Childs was a farmer residing 
for many years near Montgomery Square, but 
the latter part of his life he spent with his daugh- 
ter's family on the Livezey farm at Plymouth 
Meeting. He survived his wife several years, 
and died at the age of eighty-seven years. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



35 



T. Elhvood Livezey was educated in the 
l*"riends' School at Plymouth Meeting and at- 
tended Friends' Central School in Philadelphia 
one year but was compelled to withdraw at the 
end of that time on account of ill health and be- 
cause his services were needed at home in assist- 
ing his father on the farm, in which he always 
took much interest, preferring agricultural pur- 
suits to any other employment. He made farm- 
ing his lifework and was very successful in it. 
He was in every respect a first class farmer, his 
stock being of the finest and l>est breeds, his 
crops among the largest in the county, and every- 
thing about the farm well cared for. Genial in 
disposition and always ready to accommodate a 
friend or neighbor, few men were so popular in 
the community as he. In politics he was a Re- 
publican but he never sought or held office, pre- 
ferring to attend strictly to business connected 
with his occupation of farming. He succeeded 
his father as director in the First National Bank 
of Norristown, which position he held until his 
death. He was an active member of the Society 
of Friends, and for a number of years held the 
jjosition of overseer in Plymouth Preparative 
Meeting. For twelve years prior to his death 
he held the office of treasurer of Gwynedd 
Monthly ^Meeting, filling the position with great 
acceptability. He not only manifested much in- 
terest in the meeting but also in the school at- 
tached to it, being for twenty-five years a mem- 
ber of the school committee, and for twenty 
years its treasurer. His hospitable home, being 
convenient to the meeting house at Plymouth, 
has for several generations been a resort for 
Friends in attendance at meetings, and the rites 
of hospitality were well maintained by T. Ell- 
wood Livezey until his death, which occurred on 
Tenth-month 8, 1903, as the result of an accident, 
and by his widow and sons since his death. 

JOHN T. DYER, one of the most prominent 
business men of Norristown, is a native of Lehigh 
county, where he was born April 19, 1848. His 
ancestors were English Friends or Quakers. They 
were among the early settlers of Pennsylvania. 
He is the son of Richard H. and Caroline (Hoff- 



man) Dyer. The Dyers settled in the vicinity of 
Dyerstown, Bucks county, the family giving 
name to the place. 1-136 JL68 

Jesse Dyer (grandfather) was a farmer by 
occupation. He was born at Dyerstown and died 
near Doylestown, Bucks county, in 1855, at the 
age of eighty-two years. He was a member of 
the Society of Friends (Orthodox). He married 
Lucinda Hough. The couple had three sons, 
Thomas P., Richard H. and John S. The father 
was a successful business man and accumulated a 
competence. 

Richard H. Dyer (father) was born in War- 
rington, Bucks county, in 1817. He was educated 
in the schools of the vicinity, obtaining a good 
education. On reaching manhood, he engaged in 
teaching in the public schools of Lehigh county. 
After being occupied in this vocation for several 
years, he became interested in building and con- 
tracting, combining these occupations with the 
lumber business. He was also engaged in gen- 
eral merchandising, shipping produce to Phila- 
delphia and New York. His strict integrity and 
careful attention to business brought him suc- 
cess in all the enterprises with which he was 
connected. He was an earnest, enterprising and 
public-spirited citizen, doing all that he could to 
promote the welfare of his community, contribut- 
ing liberally of his means to every worthy object. 
He married Caroline Hofifman. The couple had 
si.x children as follows: William G., John T., 
Eugene, Elizabeth, Emily and Laura. In 1854 
iMr. Dyer removed to Slatington, residing there 
until his death in 1876. 

John T. Dyer was educated in the public 
schools of the vicinity, and after leaving school 
was employed as a clerk in one of the quarries at 
Slatington. He soon became interested in rail- 
road construction, superintending the building of 
new lines. In 1880 he engaged extensively in 
railroad contracting on his own account, his first 
large contract being on the New York, Ontario 
& Western. He did much of the construction 
work on the Pennsylvania Schuylkill Valley line, 
which led to still more important contracts. He 
soon afterwards located permanently in Norris- 
town. He also was extensively engaged in execut- 



36 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



ing other railroad contracts, including the follow- 
ing : Bay Ridge and Annapolis Railroad ; fourteen 
miles of the Ohio River Railroad, from Parkers- 
burg, West \"irginia. south, and a similar stretch 
on the Chicago. Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad. 
Mr. Dyer has also done much work on trolley line 
construction in Norfislown and elsewhere, em- 
ploying large numbers of men, and pushing his 
contracts with great energy and success. He 
built the terminal at Waterbury, Connecticnt, and 
several sections of the Trenton Cut-ofT Branch of 
the Pennsylvania railroad. 

Mr. Dyer married, December ii, 1879, Jilary 
F., daughter of the late Dr. Cornelius S. Baker, a 
prominent physician and druggist of Norristown. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Dyer are: Elsie, 
Caroline, Frederick, John L., William Gordon 
and Marion. 

Mr. Dyer is a Democrat in politics and was 
for several years a member of the board of trus- 
tees of the Norristown Hospital for the Insane, 
by appointment of Governor Pattison. In these 
as in all other positions in which he has been 
placed, ;\Ir. Dyer has performed his duties faith- 
fully and conscientiously, endeavoring to pro- 
mote the public interests by every means in his 
power. He is also connected with several Nor- 
ristown corporations, including the Merchants 
Ice Company, with extensive plant at Markley 
and Marshall streets. j\Ir. Dyer has for a number 
of years been very extensively engaged in stone- 
crushing at Howellville and near Norristown, 
also at Trap Rock quarries at Birdsboro, Penn- 
sylvania, carrying on the business on a very large 
scale. He is interested in many local enterprises, 
and is generally recognized as a liberal and pub- 
lic-spirited citizen. By his industry, energ}' and 
business ability, he has achieved a position and a 
reputation among the business men of eastern 
Pennsylvania .such as few have attained. 

The Bakers (Mrs. Dyer's family), are of New 
England origin, although long domiciled in east- 
ern Pennsylvania. David Baker (grandfather) 
was a native of Connecticut. He came to New 
Jersey settling near New Brunswick. His son, 
Cornelius Baker, studied at Yale College, enter- 
ing the medical department, where he studied 



under Professor Tully, then at the head of that 
department. He graduated from the institution 
most creditably. Dr. Baker married a daughter of 
Professor Tully, who did not, however, live very 
long. He practiced medicine at Churchville, 
Bucks county, for a time, and married (second 
wife) Miss Elizabeth Feaster, of a prominent 
family, long settled in that section of the state. 
Dr. Baker also practiced medicine at Carlisle two 
\ears, and then removed to Norristown where he 
spent the remainder of his life, dying in 1886, 
in his seventy-second year. The family resided 
on DeKalb street, and he conducted for many 
years the drug store at the west corner of Main 
and DeKalb streets, which, since his death, has 
been conducted by his son, Theodore \\'. Baker, 
and George W. Grady, the firm being Baker & 
Grady. 

BENJAMIN THOMAS. The Thomas fam- 
ily are of Welsh origin but they are among the 
earliest settlers in this section of Pennsylvania. 
The progenitor of the American branch of the 
family was William Thomas, who came from 
\\^ales about two hundred years ago, locating 
in Philadelphia. His descendants are widely 
dispersed throughout the country, while many 
members of later generations are yet located in 
Chester county. 

Thomas Thomas, father of Benjamin 
Thomas, was a teacher, surveyor and convey- 
ancer. He was a son of Benjamin and Abigail 
(Powell) Thomas, and was born in Charlestown 
township. Chester county, December 24, 1805. 
He made the best possible use of such educa- 
tional facilities as were available in country dis- 
tricts at that time and succeeded in acquiring 
sufficient knowledge to enable him to enter upon 
life as a teacher, an occupation in which he ac- 
quitted himself most creditably for many years. 
While teaching in the old subscription and com- 
mon schools of that day, he combined with the 
task of instruction the business of a surveyor and 
conve}-ancer for many years. He removed to 
Norristown in 1830 and taught in the schools of 
that bornrfr'- ;ind vicinity for a number of years. 
He suh<;e-;.,jntly located in Upper ]\Ierion, and 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



Z7 



later in Bridgeport, where he followed teaching 
and conveyancing, and then engaged in a whole- 
sale coal business which he successfully con- 
ducted during the remainder of his life, his son 
Benjamin being associated with him in his later 
years. He was a man of high character and an 
exemplary member of the Protestant Episcopal 
church. He was a Whig until the dissolution 
of that party, when his abhorrence of human 
slaver}- led him to become a Republican and he 
voted for its first presidential candidate, John 
C. Fremont, and affiliated with it during the re- 
mainder of his life. He commanded the entire 
respect of his fellows and was called to fill 
various local offices in the various villages in 
which he made his home. In his early manhood 
he was a member of a local military company. 
In 1836 he married Susanna Fryer, born July 
15, 18 1 3, a daughter of William and Catherine 
Fryer. To them were born five sons and one 
daughter: Benjamin, William F., Charles S., 
George W. H., John W. and j\Iary E. A., all of 
whom are living except George, who died No- 
vember 21, 1891. He was engaged very extensively 
in the real estate, insurance and conveyancing busi- 
ness at Bridgeport. John W. is the foreman of 
the Herald job office in Norristown, having oc- 
cupied that position many years. The father of 
this family died in 1886, aged eighty-one years. 
His widow survived him about ten }ears dying 
about 1896, at the advanced age of eighty-three 
years. 

Benjamin Thomas, eldest son of Thomas and 
Susanna (Fryer) Thomas, was born in the town- 
ship of Upper Merion, February 25, 1838. At- 
tending the district schools whenever he could, 
he acquired a practical education which well 
fitted him for the busy useful life which was 
before him. At fourteen years of age he left 
school and entered upon the active duties of life, 
taking the position of clerk in the book and 
stationery store of the late Franklin D. Sower, 
on Main street, Norristown. Later he learned 
the trade of a machinist with Ezekiel Potts & 
Company, Bridgeport, and followed that occu- 
pation for a number of years in different estab- 
lishments. He then associated himself with his 



father in the coal business, as already stated, 
continuing in this partnership until the death of 
his father, March 30, 1886, when he became sole 
proprietor, and remained in the business until 
1902, carrying .on an extensive and profitable 
trade in a territory having a radius of forty miles. 
On the death of his brother George, in 1891, 
Benjamin Thomas succeeded also to his insur- 
ance and conveyancing business, proving as suc- 
cessful in it as in his original avocation. Care- 
ful and painstaking in the investigation of titles 
and in the preparation of wills, deeds and other 
legal documents, Mr. Thomas is possessed of 
all needful qualifications for his business, and 
commands the confidence and patronage of the 
best classes in the community. He has been 
prominently connected with various enterprises 
in Bridgeport, having been one of the organizers 
of the Fame Building & Loan Association, of 
that place, and has served as its secretary since 
its formation, in 1871. He has also been a di- 
rector of the Montgomery National Bank of Nor- 
ristown since 1890, and when its president, John 
Slingluff, was removed by death in 1899, he be- 
came his successor at the head of the board of 
directors, and was elected president of the bank, 
in which position he has acquitted himself to 
the entire satisfaction of both owners and patrons 
of the institution. 

Mr. Thomas is a member of Charity Lodge, 
No. 190, F. & A. Jil. ; Norristown Chapter, No. 
190, R. A. ]\I. and Hutchinson Commandery 
Knights Templar ; of Norris Lodge, I. O. O. F. ; 
and several other benevolent and fraternal or- 
ganizations. He is one of the most interested 
members of Christ ( Swedes) church Tapper 
^Merion, having served as a vestryman for more 
than a quarter of a century and being also its 
treasurer and one of its wardens. 

In politics Mr. Thomas is a Republican h\ 
inheritance and conviction as well, and he is an 
earnest worker for party success at elections in- 
volving local, state or national issues. He has 
served as councilman, clerk, school director and 
treasurer of the borough of Bridgeport. In 1887 
he was elected recorder of deeds of jMontgomery 
county, on the Republican ticket, serving the 



38 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



term of three years. In all these various posi- 
tions, as well as in his ordinary pursuits, Mr. 
Thomas has acquitted himself with such ability 
and integrity as to earn the genuine regard and 
confidence of the community, who number him 
among their most useful and honored members. 

October i8, 1871, Mr. Thomas married Mary 
Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas and Catherine 
Van Horm, of an old and well-known Bucks 
county family. 

HOWARD M. JENKINS was descended 
from the old Welsh stock which has given to 
Montgomery county so many of its prominent cit- 
izens. The immigrant ancestor of the family 
was Jenkin Jenkin, who came from Wales about 
1729. He was born in that country in 1659. His 
wife was born in 1690, being much younger than 
her husband. He died September 15, 1745, at the 
advanced age of eighty-six years ; she died No- 
vember 27, 1764, at the age of seventy-four years. 
On November 17, 1730, Jenkin Jenkin bought of 
Joseph Tucker land in Hatfield, 350 acres, ex- 
tending from the Gwynedd line to the Cowpath 
Road, and from the ]\Iontgomery township line to 
the road extending from Lansdale to Colmar. He 
settled on this land and described himself as be- 
ing of Hatfield when he made his will in 1745. 
Jenkin Jenkin left four children : John, born Feb- 
ruary 15, 1 7 19, in Wales, married Sarah Hawkes- 
worth, daughter of Peter and Mary, and had eight 
children; Mary, died unmarried; Jenkin, Jr., 
married a Thomas, and had four children, David, 
who died unmarried, Elizabeth, Hannah, and 
Eleanor; Elizabeth, married John Hawkesworth, 
son of Peter and Mary, and had seven children. 
John Jenkins, son of Jenkin Jenkin, was the pro- 
genitor of the Jenkins family in this county. He 
died in 1803 or 4. The children of John Jenkins : 
John, born in 1742, died in 1805, married Eliza- 
beth Lukens, widow of Abraham, and had six 
children, Owen, Sarah, Jesse, John, Edward, 
Elizabeth ; Levi, married Susan Shelve ; Ann, 
married Susan Kousty ; Edward (great-grand- 
father), born July 12, 1758, died in 1829, mar- 
ried Sarah Foulke, daughter of Theophilus, and 
had six children, Charles F. (grandfather), mar- 



ried Mary Lancaster, Ann, Jesse, married Mary 
Ambler, Alargaret, married Peter Evans, Rachel, 
married Meredith Conard, Caleb, died young. 
The Hawkesworths (Peter and Mary his wife) 
came from England about 1730, and settled in 
Hatfield township. The Foulkes' were an old 
family in Gwynedd, their ancestor, Edward 
Foulke, and Eleanor his wife, having come from 
\\^ales in 1698, and settled at Gwynedd. A son 
Hugh Foulke married Ann Williams, and settled 
at Richland (Ouakertown), in Bucks county, 
Pennsylvania, and had a large family of children, 
among them Theophilus, who married Margaret 
Thomas. The fifth child of Theophilus and Mar- 
garet (Thomas) Foulke was Sarah, who married 
Edward Jenkins, (great-grandfather) of Gwy- 
nedd. Sarah was born in 1764, and died in 1828. 
Edward Jenkins and Sarah Foulke resided at 
Gwynedd where the family have ever since been 
located. 

The children of Charles F. and Mary (Lan- 
caster) Jenkins were seven in all, of whom five 
died young. Algernon S. (father) born in 
Gwynedd, died there in 1890; he married Anna 
I\Iaria Thomas, daughter of Spencer and Heph- 
zibah (Spencer) Thomas, and had one child, 
Howard Malcolm, born 3d-mo. 30, 1842. Al- 
gernon S. Jenkins' second wife was Alice A. 
Davis, who is still living. She has one child, 
George Herbert Jenkins, of the Philadelphia 
bar. Charles F. Jenkins, great-grandson of Jen- 
kin Jenkin, the immigrant, was born at Gwynedd 
3d-mo. 18, 1793, and died there 2d-mo. 5, 1867. 
He obtained his education at the academy of 
Enoch Lewis, a celebrated teacher and mathema- 
tician, of New Garden, Chester county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He was a man of great intelligence, and 
had read very extensively during life on a great 
variety of subjects. Few men of his time were 
better informed than himself on the questions of 
the day. Having been trained to mercantile busi- 
ness in his father's store at Gwynedd, he engaged 
in business in Philadelphia on Second street, 
nearly opposite Christ Church, for a dozen years 
on reaching manhood with success, but in 1830, 
on the death of his father, Edward Jenkins, he 
returned to Gwvnedd. and conducted the store 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



39 



nearly to the close of his life. He was a Whig 
and Republican in politics and was all his life 
actively interested in public affairs. He was for 
many years a director in the public schools, and 
was several times a candidate on his party ticket 
for member of the Legislature, but at a time 
when the nomination of the Democratic party in 
Montgomery county was equivalent to an election. 
He was for many years secretary of the Bethle- 
hem Turnpike Company, a director of the Bank 
of ]\Iontgomery County, of the Montgomery Mu- 
tual Fire Insurance Company, etc. Charles F. 
Jenkins was in every relation the same straight- 
forward, honest and earnest man, honored and 
respected by all who knew him. Another son 
who grew to manhood, married and reared a fam- 
ily was William H. Jenkins, for many years post- 
master, and most of his life proprietor of the 
Gwynedd store, where he was succeeded by his 
son Weaker H. Jenkins. Mary Lancaster, mother 
of Algernon and William H. Jenkins, was a de- 
scendant of Thomas Lancaster, an eminent Alin- 
ister of the Society of Friends at Richland, who 
married Phebe Wardell, and had a large family 
of children. 

Algernon S. Jenkins (father) was for many 
years the confidential counselor, justice of the 
peace and conveyancer for a large section of 
country centering at Gwynedd. He was inter- 
ested in everything that was calculated to pro- 
mote the common welfare, he was honored with 
many trusts in the course of a long life, and was 
faithful to them all. He was the Republican 
leader in Gwynedd for forty years of his life, and 
was also the candidate of his party for legislative 
and other positions on the county ticket at a 
time when no Republican could be elected. He 
enjoyed the confidence and esteem of all, and left 
behind him as a legacy to his descendants an hon- 
ored memory. He was an exceedingly careful 
and correct business man, his conveyances of 
property and other legal papers being always pre- 
pared with the most scrupulous neatness and ex- 
actness, such as few could hope to equal. His 
good judgment made his counsel of all the more 
value to those who needed it. 



Howard M. Jenkins will be remembered as an 
author and journalist who achieved distinction in 
whatever he undertook, and as a most useful and 
valuable leader in the Philadelphia Yearly Meet- 
ing of Friends. His clear insight in matters of 
business gave him an influence possessed by few 
men. Moderate in his views, careful to avoid 
giving ofl^ense in the expression of his opinions, 
but strong and earnest in his convictions, he was a 
power in a deliberative assembly. Plain and 
practical in his ideas, he knew how to solve the 
puzzling problems that arose, and his counsel 
was certain to be safe in the great majority of 
cases. 

Howard M. Jenkins was educated at the 
Foulke Boarding School in Gwynedd, assisting 
his father on the farm and in his business as op- 
portunity oiifered. He inclined, however, towards 
journalism, and the opportunity came to gratify 
his taste in this direction. In conjunction with his 
brother-in-law Wilmer Atkinson he purchased 
in 1861, the Norristoivn Republican, and the 
two conducted it with ability and success. Those 
were war times, and stirring events were oc- 
curring daily and history was being made with 
bewildering rapidity. The firm of Jenkins & At- 
kinson conducted the Republican for three 
years, when it was merged into the Herald and 
Free Press, the oldest newspaper in the county 
of Montgomery, and then as it is now, an able 
exponent of Republican principles. Wilmer At- 
kinson withdrew, and the firm became Wills, Ire- 
dell & Jenkins, the other partners being Morgan 
R. Wills, the present proprietor of the Herald, 
and Robert Iredell, Jr., who afterwards became 
identified with the Allentown Chronicle, and 
is now long deceased. Ultimately, Mr. Wills se- 
cured the complete control of the Herald, and 
Jenkins & Atkinson went to Wilmington, Dela- 
ware, and established the Daily Commercial, the 
first Republican daily in that state. The publica- 
tion was a success, and while located there, How- 
ard M. Jenkins did much to Republicanize the city 
and the state. In 1879, the enterprise was dis- 
posed of, and after a brief sojourn in West Ches- 
ter, Howard M. Jenkins became connected with 



40 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



the Philadelphia organ of the Society of Friends, 
the Friends Intelligencer, as editor-in-chief, a 
position which he held until his death. 

Howard M. Jenkins married 3d-mo. i6, 1865, 
Mary Anna, born i2th-mo. 5, 1843, daughter of 
Thomas and Hannah (Quinby) Atkinson, and 
sister of Wilmer Atkinson, so long associated 
with Howard M. Jenkins in the newspaper busi- 
ness, and for many years since with Charles F. 
Jenkins, son of Howard, in the publication of the 
Farm Journal, an agricultural monthly, having 
a very large circulation and much influence. The 
Atkinsons were an old Bucks county family, de- 
scended from settlers who came to Pennsylvania 
in the time of William Penn. John Atkinson ob- 
tained a certificate from the Lancaster Monthly 
Meeting dated 1699, for himself, his wife and 
children, to Friends in the Province of Pennsyl- 
vania. The parents, it is said, died at sea, leav- 
ing three children: William, born 1687; Mary, 
born 1689 ; and John, born 1691. The family 
have continued to be Friends through many gen- 
erations since that time. Thomas and Hannah 
Atkinson, parents of Mary Anna (Atkinson) 
Jenkins, removed from Bucks county to Upper 
Dublin township, Montgomery county, in 1849, 
purchasing a farm on which they spent the re- 
mainder of their lives, each dying at an advanced 
age. Mary Anna attended the Byberry Friends' 
Boarding School conducted by the Hillborns, well 
known teachers. The family relations of Howard 
M. Jenkins were always of the most delightful 
character, and his children were reared under the 
most favorable influences. The children of How- . 
ard and Mary Anna Jenkins : Charles Francis, 
born i2th-mo. 17, 1865. He attended the Friends' 
School at Wilmington, Delaware and public 
schools in West Chester and Gwynedd. He mar- 
ried Marie G., daughter of Edward and Isabella 
(Mitchell) Cope, of Germantown, where he lives, 
and is engaged in the publication of the Farm 
Journal; Anna M., born ist-mo. 7, 1867, at Wil- 
mington, Delaware, attended the Wilmington, and 
later the West Chester public schools and 
Swarthmore College, from whence she gradu- 
ated in the class of 1887, married I. Daniel Web- 
ster, M. D., of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, 



and removed to Mankato, Minnesota, where they 
reside ; he follows the practice of medicine ; 
Thomas Atkinson, born 5th-mo. 24, 1868, at- 
tended Wilmington and West Chester Schools, 
and Swarthmore College, where he graduated in 
the class of 1887, and the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, where he graduated in the class of 1888, 
and Johns Hopkins L^niversity, Baltimore, where 
he graduated in the class of 1894, in Romance, 
Languages and Literature, and is now professor 
in those branches and French at the LTniversity 
of Chicago. He married Marion Magill, daugh- 
ter of ex-President Edward H. Magill, of Swarth- 
more College, and Sarah (Beans) Magill; Ed- 
ward Atkinson, born 7th-mo. 8, 1870, at Wil- 
mington, attended the West Chester schools, and 
Swathmore College, from which institution he 
graduated in the class of 1892. He married Mary 
Ellen Atkinson, of Buckingham, Bucks county, 
Pennsylvania ; Algernon S., born in Wilminglon, 
loth-mo. 21, 1874, died ist-mo. 21, 1878; Flor- 
ence, born 9th-mo. i, 1876, attended Friends' 
School at Gwynedd and George School at New- 
town, Bucks county, is unmarried, and resides 
with her mother; Arthur Hugh, born in West 
Chester, Pennsylvania, i2th-mo. 5, 1880, attended 
Friends' School at Gwynedd, George School and 
Swarthmore College, of which institution he is a 
graduate; he is engaged on the Farm. Jonrnal, 
is unmarried, and resides with his mother. Charles 
F. and Marie Jenkins have four children, Alger- 
non S., Isabella, Charles Francis, and Edward 
Cope. I. Daniel and Anna M. Webster have four 
children, Dorothea, Agnes Elizabeth, Alan King, 
and Philip Jenkins. Thomas A. and Marion Jen- 
kins have four children, Beatrice, Edward Magill, 
Francis Arthur and Wilmer Atkinson. Edward 
A. and Mary Ellen Jenkins have three children, 
Howard M., iMiriam and Barbara Schofield. 

The career of Howard M. Jenkins up to the 
time of leaving Wilmington has been already out- 
lined in connection with his earlier achievements. 
In 1879 he established his family in West Chester, 
where he resided seven years, devoting his time 
entirely to literary work. A Republican in poli- 
tics, he objected to machine rule. In 1881, he 
became connected with the Philadelphia Amev- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



41 



icaii, established by Wharton Barker, as asso- 
ciate editor with Robert Ellis Thompson. He 
continued in this position until its publication was 
suspended in 1890, making many valuable contri- 
butions to its pages, covering a wide range in lit- 
erature and politics. He became associated with 
Charles Heber Clark in the editorial management 
of the Manufacturer. He also wrote for a New 
York firm a History of Philadelphia, complet- 
ing his share of the work, the first of three vol- 
umes, in 1895. It was while he was at West 
Chester in 1884, that he purchased from Dr. 
Joseph Gibbons the Friends' Journal, which he 
published for a few months, when it was pro- 
posed to unite it with the Friends' Intelligencer, 
the leading paper for many years in the Society. 
Their union was accomplished, and Howard ^I. 
Jenkins became editor-in-chief of the Intelli- 
gencer and Journal, a position which he held until 
his death, filling it with great ability and doing- 
much to develop its present usefulness. He was 
strongly in sympathy with the various activities 
of the Society of Friends of more recent years, 
the Eirst-day school, the Friends' Association, and 
others, and it was probably owing as much to him 
as to any other person that the Biennial Confer- 
ences which have done so much to awaken a more 
general interest in the principles and testimonies 
of Friends were established in their present suc- 
cessful working. 

The family removed to Gwynedd in 1886, 
where his father, anxious to have his son with him 
in his declining years, built a residence for him 
and his family. Algernon S. Jenkins was killed 
by a fall in his barn in 1890, cutting short the con- 
genial intercourse of the two. In 1893 he pre- 
pared for the Friends' session of the Religious 
Parliament held in connection with the World's 
Fair at Chicago, a pamphlet "The Religious 
Views of the Society of Friends," which has been 
very extensively circulated, and proves how well 
he understood the mission of the Society. His 
"Historical Collections of Gwynedd," an admir- 
able epitome of the history of his native township, 
had appeared some years earlier, a second edi- 
tion being afterwards printed when the first had 
become exhausted. His "Family of A\'illiam 



Penn," first published in installments in the Penn- 
sylvania Magazine of History of the State His- 
torical Society, also added greatly to his reputa- 
tion as a writer. He had partly written at the 
time of his death, "Pennsylvania, Colonial and 
Federal," a magnificent work in three volumes, 
published since that event. He had done much 
work prior to his death on "The Spencer Family," 
but was prevented from completing it by the pres- 
sure of other matters. 

No sketch of Howard M. Jenkins could be re- 
garded as complete without some reference to his 
splendid work in Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of 
Friends, in whose business sessions he was ex- 
ceedingly active and influential, always laboring 
earnestly for the good of the Society which he so 
deeply loved. He was gifted with clear insight 
in all matters relating to the progress of the So- 
ciety, and his views were strongly impressed upon 
the body of Friends, not only iri this country but 
also in England. It was largely through his in- 
strumentality that the pleasant relations between 
Friends in England and the more liberal branch 
of Friends in America, interrupted by the division 
in the Society in 1827, were gradually being re- 
sumed, and it may be hoped will ultimately be- 
come still more cordial. 

Howard M. Jenkins had a keen perception 
of the ludicrous, and a sense of humor which made 
him a very pleasant companion. He enjoyed 
raillery, and was always good at repartee. He 
was sanguine but not to a degree to disturb the 
even balance of his mind. For a philanthropist 
he was exceedingly practical, almost discouraging 
at times to those who imagine that the world can 
be reformed at once. He was methodical, patient 
and industrious, always hopeful, ever confident 
that the right would ultimately win, notwith- 
standing the obstacles that temporarily hindered 
the triumphs so much desired by him and his co- 
laborers in the cause of truth. 

Howard M. Jenkins was the earnest promoter 
of the plan for a summer settlement of Friends at 
Buck Hill Falls, an ideal place for a mountain re- 
sort, and witliin easy reach of the great cities of 
Philadelphia and New York, in which and in the 
vicinity of which are located so large and so in- 



42 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



fluential a section of American Friends. The plan 
for an inn, surrounded by the cottag-es of Friends 
and Friendly people was at length realized, a 
beginning being made through the agency of the 
Buck Hill Falls Association, so that the opening 
was made for the season of 1901. It was a success 
from the start, and promises to be much more of a 
success in the future than even so thorough an 
admirer of this beautiful nook among the everlast- 
ing hills as Howard I\I. Jenkins imagined it could 
be. He was enthusiastic in its praise, and it was 
in showing its beauties to a friend, Isaac H. Cloth- 
ier, that he, whose life was of so much value to 
the Society of Friends, lost it through a misstep. 
He wished that they should cross the stream in 
order to take in the spkndid view of the falls 
from the opposite side. The temporary foot 
bridge had been swept away by the high water of 
a few days previous,' and he undertook to secure a 
plank and place it in such a position that the two 
could pass over the narrow chasm. Stepping 
upon it to show his companion that it was safe, 
he fell into the boiling whirlpool formed by the 
mountain torrent below. His death was almost 
instantaneous, and the leader of Quakerism on the 
American Continent was no more. In the whole 
circle of seven Yearly Meetings, and far beyond 
the limits of the Society, in the literary and re- 
ligious world, the shock was profound. His 
death occurred on loth-mo. 11, 1902, and his 
funeral at Gwynedd Meeting-house on the 15th 
was attended by many of the leading Friends 
throughout and even beyond the Yearly jNIeeting. 
The scene was most impressive. Addresses were 
delivered by many who had known and loved him 
in life, including Robert Ellis Thompson, Rufus 
M. Jones, O. Edward Janney, Joel Borton, Ell- 
wood Roberts, Sam.uel E. Griscom, Elizabeth 
Lloyd, Samuel S. Ash and others. The heartfelt 
tributes there uttered were taken up and repeated 
in the newspaper press to whose writers he was so 
well known. The loss to his community, to the 
Society, and to the cause of progress was indeed 
irreparable. He passed away with his work 
largely done but still incomplete, and in a manner 
which showed how frail is the hold of humanity 
upon life. 



Howard M. Jenkins was associated in various 
capacities with the following organizations: The 
Historical Society of Pennsylvania, The Histori- 
cal Society of Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, 
Philadelphia Yearly Meeting's Committee on 
George School at Newtown, Pennsylvania, Penn- 
sylvania Forestry Association, Universal Peace 
Union, Friends' Book Association, Mohonk Con- 
ference of Friends of the Indian, Bucks County 
Historical Society, History Club of the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, Phi Beta Kappa Chapter of 
Swarthmore College, Celtic Association of Phil- 
adelphia, Contemporary Club, Browning Society, 
Franklin Inn Club, Pennsylvania Society for fhe 
Abolition of Slavery (reorganized). Buck Hill 
Falls Company, Board of ^Managers of Swarth- 
more College, Pennsylvania State Editorial As- 
sociation, and many others of more or less im- 
portance in connection with philanthropic and hu- 
manitarian movements of various kinds. His as- 
sistance in every such movement was sought and 
valued. When it became necessary for any ac- 
tion to be taken by the Yearly Meeting or other 
authority to make any representations to Con- 
gress or the President, as coming from the So- 
ciety of Friends, his good sense and sound judg- 
ment could be relied upon to present the subject 
in the best and most effective way. 

LOUIS 'M. CHILDS, recognized as one of 
the principal leaders of the Norristown bar, is 
a native of Pennsylvania, descended from an 
early English ancestry. The family originated 
in Hartfordshire, one of the most beautiful and 
interesting counties in England, and the pro- 
genitor of the American branch came from the 
village about ten miles distant from the city of 
London. 

From the original Childs stock came John 
Childs, the paternal grandfather of Mr. Childs, 
born in JNIontgomery county, Pennsylvania, 
who was a farmer in Norristown town- 
ship, and died in 1826, in early manhood. His 
wife, who was Ann Moore, survived him sixty- 
five years, dying in 1892, at the venerable age of 
upwards of ninety years. Joseph Foss, maternal 
grandfather of Mr. Childs, was of German de- 




^C^tM^ /^. '^^cJ^a^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



43 



scent, and his ancestors came to Pennsylvania 
early in the eighteenth century. He was a farmer 
by occupation, and a member of the Society of 
Friends. He and his wife, who was a Jones, 
both died early in life and on the same day, leav- 
ing two daughters. 

Jacob Childs, father of Louis i\l. Childs, was 
a native of Montgomery county and was born 
and reared upon a farm in Plymouth township. 
He removed about 1844 to Norristown and be- 
came one of its most useful and enterprising citi- 
zens. He was actively engaged in mercantile 
pursuits, and for some years in the iron manu- 
facturing business. He was prominent in public 
afifairs and served as a member of. the town covm- 
cil for the unusual period of thirty-six years, 
and was for some years president of that body. 
He also occupied the position of borough treas- 
urer for the period of six years. He married 
Lydia Foss, a native of Chester county. Both 
of Quaker descent, they affiliated themselves 
with the Society of Friends, but were not mem- 
bers. Mr. Childs died in 1886, at the age of 
sixty-four years, and his widow still survives, 
making her home in Norristown. They were 
the parents of five children : Mary, deceased ; 
Louis ^I. ; Walter F. and Emma H., (twins) ; 
and Lillian. 

Louis j\L Childs, eldest son of Jacob and 
Lydia (Foss) Childs, was born in Norristown, 
August 19, 1852. Studious from the first, he 
laid the foundation of an excellent education 
early in his youth, graduating from the high 
school at the age of fifteen years. He graduated 
in a higher course in 1868 and again in i86q, 
and when only seventeen entered the sophomore 
class in the University of Pennsylvania, from 
which he graduated in 1872, in his twentieth 
year. For a year afterward he was engaged in 
his father's iron establishment and he then en- 
tered upon a course of law reading in the office 
of S. R. Fox, and was admitted to the bar nf 
Montgomery county in March, 1870, and has 
since then been actively engaged in his profes- 
sion, maintaining offices at No. 505 Swede street, 
Norristown. With ample equipment for all the 



departments of law, civil and criminal, he en- 
tertains a preference for those of commercial and 
corporation law, for which he has developed 
genuine talent and aptitude. His abilities found 
almost immediate recognition, and he entered 
upon ample employment in conducting the legal 
affairs of various important financial and com- 
mercial corporations. He has been phenomenally 
active in connection with banking affairs and has 
successfully reorganized several banking com- 
panies, in some instances finding it necessary to 
conduct litigious proceedings, which served to 
prevent insuperable difficulties. Among the in- 
stitutions thus reorganized, involving severe and 
protracted labor and requiring deep knowledge 
not only of law but of business methods, were 
the Tradesmen's National Bank of Consho- 
hocken, in 1889, and the Doylestown National 
Bank in 1903. Mr. Childs has been for some 
years attorney for the Tradesmen's National 
Bank of Conshohocken, the National Bank of 
Norristown, the Jenkentown National Bank, the 
iMontgomery Trust Company and the Bucks 
County Trust Company. He has also been for 
several years counsel for the Norristown Water 
Company, the Norristown Gas Company and 
the Standard Oil Company. 

Mr. Childs has always been an active and 
efficient advocate of the principles of the Repub- 
lican party and he has wielded a potent influence 
throughout his county in maintaining its organ- 
ization and aiding in its usefulness, but without 
aught of personal ambition or self-seeking and 
has never sought or held a public office. 

Mr. Childs was married, in September, 1889, 
to Miss Alice G. Hibberd, a daughter of Norris 
and Eliza (Moore) Hibberd. Of this marriage 
have been born three children — Alice H., Mar- 
jorie and Louis M. Childs. Mrs. Childs is a 
member of the Presbyterian church, and her hus- 
band is an attendant there. The family home is 
at No. 15 Jacoby street. 

FRANKLIN B. DAMDHEISER, of the 
firm of Davidheiser & Keiser, contractors and 
builders "of Pottstown, is a native of Berks county, 



44 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



Pennsylvania, where he was born January 19. 
1861. He is the son of John and ]\Iary (Binger- 
man) Davidheiser. 

John Davidheiser (father) is also a native of 
Montgomery county. He is a farmer in Potts- 
grove township. His wife is a native of Berks 
county. They have had eleven children, seven 
sons and four daughters, of whom seven are now 
living as follows : Franklin, Ephraim, Harrison, 
Howard, Annie Miranda, wife of Maurice Dot- 
terer; Ida, wife of William Reppert, and Sallie, 
wife of Calvin Prutzman. John Davidheiser and 
his wife were Lutherans in religious faith. In 
politics he is a Democrat. They live in ^^'est 
Pottstown. 

Samuel Davidheiser (grandfather) was born 
in Montgomery county, and was reared in Potts- 
grove township. He was a farmer by occupation. 
He was blind for eighteen years before his death. 
He was twice married, his second wife being a 
Mrs. Eagle, whose maiden name was Levengood. 
They had a large family of children. 'Sir. Bing- 
erman (maternal grandfather) lived at Pine Iron 
Works, in Berks county, for some time, but later 
went to Harrisburg, where he was accidentally 
killed on a railroad, when he was upwards of sev- 
enty years of age. He was a miller by trade. His 
wife was a ]\Iiss Hatfield. They had a large 
family. 

Franklin B. Davidheiser was reared on a farm 
in Montgomery county, spending the summers in 
the usual way, and attending the district schools 
in winter. He worked at the carpenter trade three 
years, and then began contracting on his own ac- 
count. Most of his life has been spent in Alont- 
gomery county, although he lived for some time 
in Kansas, and in the South. He has been a resi- 
dent of Pottstown for the past eighteen years. 

On October 30, 1887, he married Mary Emma, 
daughter of John and Rebecca (Burkey) Endy. 
Mr. and Mrs. Davidheiser have had six children : 
Harry, (died at the age of three months), Sallie 
Rebecca, Alary Ella, Charles E., Morris E., 
Hilary E. 

Air. and Airs. Davidheiser. are members of 
Emmanuel Lutheran Church of Pottstown. He 
belongs also to Stichter Lodge, No. 254, Free and 



Accepted Alasons ; and Pottstown Chaper, Royal 
Arch Alasons. Politically Air. Davidheiser is an 
Independent. He built his present substantial 
brick residence. No. 518 North Franklin street, 
in 1893. He owns several business lots. 

Airs. Davidheiser's parents reside at Leesport, 
Pennsylvania. They lived for some time in Alont- 
gomery county. They had eight children, of 
whom six are now Hving, as follows : Alary 
Emma, Harry, Cora, wife of Oscar Hiester ; John, 
Lizzie, wife of Alilton Snyder; and Oscar. John 
Endy follows various pursuits. His father was 
David Endy. Airs. Davidheiser's maternal grand- 
father was Jonathan Burkey. 

JOSEPH K. CORSON, Al. D., of White- 
marsh township, Alontgomery county, Pennsyl- 
vania, a physician and surgeon of high repute, 
and who made an excellent military record in the 
line and in the medical department of the army 
during and subsequent to the Civil war, is a rep- 
resentative of the Corson family whose ancestral 
history is given on other pages of this work. 

He was born at Alaple Hill, in the township in 
which he now resides, November 22, 1836, son 
of Dr. Hiram and Ann (Foulke) Corson. He 
began his education under private tutors in the 
parental home ; studied advanced branches under 
the preceptorship of Frederick Anspach, of the 
Lutheran church at Barren Hill, and then finished 
a course under the Rev. Samuel Aaron, an ac- 
complished teacher, in the famous Treemount 
Seminary at Norristown. He then entered the 
drug store of William and John Savery, in Phil- 
adelphia, and in 1858, at the age of twenty-two, 
received his degree in pharmacy. Being oflfered a 
situation in St. Paul, Alinnesota, then a small but 
growing town, he accepted, but the failure of his 
employers soon left him without employment, and 
he returned home. There he engaged in the lime 
business with his cousin, Laurence E. Corson, at 
Norristown. Soon afterward he matriculated in 
the Aledical Department of the L^niversity of 
Pennsylvania, but his studies were almost im- 
mediately suspended on account of the outbreak 
of the slaveholders' rebellion. Laying aside his 
text books, he enlisted in a company of the Fourth 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



45 



Pennsylvania Regiment, recruited in Norristown, 
and of which Walter H. Cook was captain. His 
company was mustered into the service of the 
United States at Harrisburg, and then proceeded 
to Perryville. Mr. Corson was honorably dis- 
charged on July 26, 1861, having completed his 
three months term of service under President Lin- 
coln's first call for troops, and retiring with the 
rank of sergeant. He then resumed his medical 
studies in Philadelphia, and received an appoint- 
ment as medical cadet in the army hospital at 
Broad and Cherry streets, and served in that ca- 
pacity from June i, 1861, until March, 1863. In 
the same month he graduated from his medical 
school with the degree of doctor of medicine, and 
was at once commissioned assistant surgeon of 
the Sixth Regiment, Pennsylvania Reserve Corps, 
a position which he filled from j\larch 2t„ 1863, 
to June ri, 1864, and he was subsequently acting 
assistant surgeon at Camp Discharge, in Lower 
Merion township, Montgomery county, Pennsyl- 
vania. During his army service he was present at 
the battles of Gettysburg, Falling Water, 
Manassas Gap, Bristow Station, Aline Run, Rap- 
pahannock Station, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, 
North Anna River, and Bethesda Church in Vir- 
ginia, and acquitted himself so creditably that he 
received from the President the brevet commis- 
sion of major, "for faithful and meritorious serv- 
ice during the Wilderness Campaign in Virginia." 
He subsequently received the congressional Medal 
of Honor, conferred "for most distinguished gal- 
lantry in action near Bristow Station, Virginia, 
with the Pennsylvania Reserves," and his honor- 
able discharge from the army, consequent upon 
the close of the war, he practiced medicine at 
home in association with his father. 

October 9, 1867, Dr. Corson was commis- 
sioned assistant surgeon with the rank of first 
lieutenant, in the United States army. From No- 
vember of that year to. March i, 1868, he was on 
duty at Governor's Island, in New York Harbor, 
and during this time made a sea voyage to Gal- 
veston. Texas, with recruits, and at New Or- 
leans cared for forty of their number who were 
stricken with cholera. From March to Septem- 
ber of the same vear he was on dutv at the cav- 



alry depot at Carlisle Barracks; to December 6, 
1869, was stationed at Fort Fred Steele, in Wy- 
oming, and while here (July 23, 1869), was pro- 
moted to a captaincy in the medical corps. His 
further army service was as follows: Omaha 
Barracks, to July, 1870; Fort D. A. Russell, 
Wyoming, to September, 1870; Fort Bridger, 
Wyoming, to November, 1872 ; Mobile Barracks, 
Alabama, to September, 1873 ; Mount Vernon 
Barracks, Alabama, to May, 1876; Plattsburg 
Barracks, New York, to May, 1878 ; Fort Whip- 
ple, Arizona, to October, 1878 ; Fort Yuma, Cal- 
ifornia, to August, 1882 ; Jefferson Barracks, Mis- 
souri, to November, 1886; Fort Sherman, Idaho, 
to September 15, 1890; Washington Barracks, 
District of Columbia, to October, 1894, during 
which time he was commissioned surgeon with the 
rank of major. After a leave of absence for one 
month, which he spent at home, he was assigned 
to duty at Fort D. A. Russell, Wyoming. He re- 
mained in the army until 1897, when he was 
placed on the retired list, and took up his residence 
at his elegant home, "Maple Mill," in White- 
marsh township, Montgomery county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Dr. Corson is a member of the Patriotic 
Order of the Sons of the Revolution, and of the 
Military Order of the Loyal Legion. 

Dr. Corson married, November 2, 1874, Miss 
Mary Ada Carter, daughter of Judge William 
Alexander Carter, of Fort Bridger, Wyoming, 
originally from Virginia, where the family is one 
of the oldest and most honored in the state. Two 
children were born of this marriage, Mary Car- 
ter and Edward Foulke Corson. The daughter 
was born at Mount \"ernon Barracks, Alabama, 
January 4, 1876. For the obtainment of better 
educational advantages for her, her parents sent 
her to school in Philadelphia. On her return 
home after a year's absence, in June, 1890, the 
train in which she was traveling went over an 
embankment, and she sustained such injuries that 
she died within an hour. The remains were in- 
terred at West Laurel Hill Cemetery. The son, 
Edward Foulke Corson, was born at Jefferson 
Barracks, Missouri, in February, 1883. He at- 
tended the Friends' School in Washington City 
while his father was stationed there. In October, 



46 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



1895, he entered the Germantown Academy, from 
which he was graduated in 1901. He has just 
completed his second year in the Medical Depart- 
ment of the University of Pennsylvania. 

NEWBERRY ALLEN SMITH, who for 
many years was a highly respected citizen of Ab- 
ington township, Montgomery county, Pennsyl- 
vania, was a native of the city of Philadelphia, 
born April 24, 1807. His paternal ancestors were 
English, and his maternal ancestors, the Keysers, 
were of an old German family which located in 
Germantown during the time of William Penn. 
The earlier generations of the Keyser family were 
prominently identified with the Society of Dun- 
kards. His parents were Newberry and Sarah 
(Keyser) Smith, who were married in 1804, the 
former named having been a native of Burlington, 
New Jersey, and the latter of Germantown, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Newberry A. Smith obtained an excellent ed- 
ucation in the schools of his native city, and the 
knowledge thus acquired thoroughly qualified him 
for a life of usefulness and activity. He was a 
prominent and successful wholesale merchant of 
Philadelphia, but retired from active business pur- 
suits in 1864. From about 1853 until his death, 
October 25, 1877, a period of almost a quarter of 
a century, he was a resident of Abington town- 
ship, and during those years he faithfully and con- 
scientiously performed all the duties pertaining to 
good citizenship. 

On March 8, 1832, Mr. Smith married Ann 
A. Gorgas, who was born May 30, 1813, a daugh- 
ter of George and Rachel (Clemens) Gorgas, and 
three children were the issue of this marriage: 
I. Sarah K., born November 29, 1832; she was 
united in marriage, June ii, 1862, to Edward Au- 
gustus Turpin, who was bom in Powhattan 
county, Virginia, January 8, 1804, a son of Hor- 
atio and Mary Ann (Bancroft) Turpin, and a de- 
scendant of an old and prominent family who 
were connected in marriage relationship with 
some of the leading families of Virginia and the 
south. Mr. Turpin was a graduate of Translyania 
University, at Lexington, Kentucky, and read 
law in the office of his cousin, John J. Crittenden, 



who was secretary of state, at Washington, D. C. 
Mr. Turpin, however, did not practice law. Dur- 
ing the administration of James Buchanan as 
president of the United States, he was appointed 
United States minister at Caracas, Venezuela, and 
served in that capacity during the administration 
of President Buchanan and part of that of Presi- 
dent Lincoln. After a long and useful career Mr. 
Turpin died June 22, 1880. By his marriage with 
Sarah K. Smith he had born to him one daughter, 
Emma Smith Turpin, the date of the birth be- 
ing December 17, 1864. His widow married, 
secondly, George Cockburn Harvey, who was 
born in 18 15, in Bermuda, and for a number of 
years was a prominent merchant in Halifax, Nova 
Scotia. To this union there was no issue. 2. 
Emma Wayne, born June 13, 1837; she was 
united in marn'age in 1856 to Edward C. Stock- 
ton, who died in 1863. They were the parents of 
two children : Newberry Allen Stockton, born Oc- 
tober 22, 1859, who married Christine S. Hare, 
daughter of Charles W. and Mary Hare, in June, 
1887, and their children are: Mary H., born Sep- 
tember 3, 1888; Newberry Allen, born December 
31, 1890; and Christine H., born June 3, 1897. 
The second child of Edward C. and Emma W. 
Stockton was Constance W., born in 1862, and 
died in 1864. 3. Anna W., born in 1840, died in 
infancy. 

EDWARD Y. TOWNSEND, whose death 
occurred at his country home at Bryn Mawr, 
Pennsylvania, November 5, 1891, in the fullness 
of a well-spent life, was for eighteen years the 
president of the Cambria Iron Company, and one 
of the most useful, representative business men 
of Philadelphia. During his entire lifetime he 
worthily upheld the name of a family that has 
been held in esteem since the days of William 
Penn. His ancestors in direct line were John W., 
William, John, and Joseph, and he was the fifth in 
lineal descent from the latter named, who was a 
younger brother of Richard Townsend, who was 
prominently connected with William Penn in the 
early history of the province of Pennsylvania. 
Joseph Townsend came to America in 171 2, soon 
after the arrival here of William T'cnn, and pur- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



47 



chased a large tract of land, including a part of 
the site of the present town or borough of West 
Chester, and extending westward to the Brandy- 
wine. In 1746 he built a dwelling near West 
Chester, which is still standing and in a fair state 
of preservation. Herein they lived, and they wor- 
shipped according to the tenets of the Society of 
Friends or Quakers. 

Edward Y. Townsend was born in West Ches- 
ter, Pennsylvania, October 4, 1824, a son of John 
W. and Sybilla K. (Price) Townsend, the latter 
named having been a daughter of Philip Price. 
His early education was acquired in Anthony 
Bolmar's school at West Chester, which he left 
when eighteen years old to enter the wholesale 
dr\- goods house of Wood, Abbott & Co., of Phil- 
adelphia. This firm was composed of Richard D. 
Wood, James Abbott, Josiah Bacon,- John Yarrow 
and others, and transacted a large and profitable 
business with the south and west. During his ap- 
prenticeship he made many business trips on 
horseback through the then unsettled wilderness 
of the frontiers, extending as far as Santa Fe, 
New Mexico. These journeys were made alone, 
and some of them consumed weeks and months. 
Wood, Abbott & Co. having subsequently dis- 
solved, about the time Mr. Townsend became of 
age, he was taken into partnership in the new firm 
of Wood, Bacon & Co., where he continued until 
the acquisition of a large interest in the Cambria 
Iron Company by Richard D. Wood and his 
brother, Charles S. Wood, when in 1855 the firm 
of Wood, Morrell & Co. was organized and he 
became an active partner in it. The Cambria Iron 
Works were situated at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, 
and this concern was organized to lease the works 
and carry on the business of making iron rails, 
and to purchase the stock with the idea of ulti- 
mately reorganizing the company. Of the six part- 
ners that composed the firm, three took the active 
management of the business, namely: Charles S. 
Wood, Edward Y. Townsend, and Daniel J. IMor- 
rell. In 1857 the rolling mill was destroyed by 
fire, but the firm immediately rebuilt it and con- 
tinued the business until 1861, when, one of the 
purposes of the partnership being carried out by 
the purchase or control of all the stock of the old 



Cambria Iron Company, that corporation was re- 
organized, Charles S. Wood becoming president, 
Edward Y. Townsend vice-president, and Daniel 
J. Morrell general manager. The company was 
one of the earliest to become interested in the 
Bessemer patent for making steel, and gradually 
increased the capacity of the works until it became 
one of the largest producers of steel rails in this 
country. Upon the death of Charles S. Wood, 
in i\Iay, 1873, Mr. Townsend was elected to the 
presidency of the company, which he held up to 
the time of his decease. In this wide field of use- 
fulness his remarkable business qualities had 
ample scope, and they were eminently successful. 
With the assistance of an able board of directors, 
and by careful, conservative management, he was 
enabled to reduce the floating debt and to place 
the establishment on a sound financial basis, and 
in this way it was able to withstand and recover 
from the destructive flood of 1889 without em- 
barrassment. That great disaster was an especial 
shock to Mr. Townsend's kindly and sympathetic 
nature, and one from which he never fully recov- 
ered, as so many of his workmen and their fami- 
lies were swept away. When the news of the dis- 
aster reached him he hurried from his home, ac- 
companied by a personal friend, Mr. J. Lowber 
Welsh, to the residence of Mayor Fitler, where 
he met in consultation several members of the 
Citizens' Permanent Relief Committee of Phila- 
delphia. Day after day his entire time and atten- 
tion were absorbed by the company afifairs, and his 
energy in getting the works started again helped 
to restore confidence in the future, which was 
almost as much needed as food, clothing or shel- 
ter. He donated generously to various worthy 
charities, and was ever ready and willing to 
counsel and help those who came to him for ad- 
vice and assistance, and thus his death was sin- 
cerely mourned by all classes of men. 

Mr. Townsend first became a resident of 
Montgomery county in 1868 when, with his wife 
and two sons, he came to spend the summer at 
Haverford. Five summers were thus spent by 
the family until Bryn Mawr was formed, when 
they passed two summers at the hotel erected 
there by the Pennsylvania Railroad Companv. In 



48 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



1874 Mr. Townsend purchased a few acres on 
Merion Avenue, where he enjoyed his summers, 
and five 3'ears later he purchased the adjoining 
property owned by the Tilghmans and extending 
along Montgomery Avenue, making about thir- 
teen acres in all, in the middle of the new settle- 
ment of Bryn Mawr, on the north side of the rail- 
road. The property was mostly unimproved farm 
land, and Mr. Townsend spent considerable time 
and money in grading it and having it cultivated 
and planted with rare trees, which now, after 
thirty years of growth, are monuments to his 
memory. There was an unsightly dam in the 
middle of the place on Montgomery Avenue, and 
he arranged with the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany when widening the cut at Bryn Mawr to 
have the earth hauled in to fill up the low places, 
thus greatly improving the appearance of the 
place, and the creek which before flowed through 
the land was placed in a deep culvert. The only 
positions held by Mr. Townsend were director- 
ships in the boards of the Philadelphia National 
Bank and the Philadelphia Trust and Safe De- 
posit Company. His political affiliations were 
with the Republican party. He was brought up 
in the Society of Friends, but of late years at- 
tended the Protestant Episcopal Church of the 
Holy Trinity, Nineteenth and Walnut streets, 
Philadelphia. 

Edward Y. Townsend married Henrietta M. 
Troth, daughter of Henry and Henrietta Troth, 
the former named having been an honored and 
public-spirited citizen of Philadelphia. Their chil- 
dren are Henry T., and John W. Townsend. 

HENRY TROTH TOWNSEND, of Lower 
Merion township, Montgomery county, Pennsyl- 
vania, eldest son of Edward Y. and Henrietta M. 
(Troth) Townsend, was born October i, 1851. 

He was educated at private schools in the city 
of Philadelphia, and in 1870 he graduated from 
the Polytechnic College of Pennsylvania, taking 
the degree of Mechanical Engineer. In 1872 he 
was elected treasurer of the Logan Iron and Steel 
Company, which position he held for ten years, 
when he was elected president of the company. 
After a continuous service in that capacity for 



twenty-two years and a service of thirty-two 
years in all with the same company, he declined 
a re-election as president in January, 1903, al- 
though continuing to serve as a director. For a 
number of years he has served as a director in the 
Southwark Foundry and Machine Company, in 
the Bryn Mawr Hotel Company, and in the Phila- 
delphia National Bank. Mr. Townsend is a mem- 
ber of the council of the Philadelphia Board of 
Trade. He also holds membership in the Merion 
Cricket Club, the Art Club of Philadelphia, the 
Engineers' Club, the Church Club, and the Amer- 
ican Institute of Mining Engineers. 

Mr. Townsend was married, in 1874, to Maria 
Potts, daughter of Robert S. Potts, a member of 
an old Montgomery county family, residents of 
Pottstown, and they immediately settled at Bryn 
Mawr, where they have since continued to reside. 
They are the parents of one son — Edward Y. 
Townsend — and three daughters. 

JOHN W. TOWNSEND, vice-president of 
the Cambria Steel Company, whose works are lo- 
cated at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, was born in the 
city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 29, 1855. 
He is a son of the late Edward Y. and Henrietta 
M. (Troth) Townsend. 

John W. Townsend graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania in 1875, and three years 
later was given the degree of Master of Arts. 
He entered the office of the Cambria Iron Com- 
pany after leaving college, and is now in his thir- 
tieth year of continuous service in that company, 
and of the lessee company — the Cambria Steel 
Company — serving now in the capacity of vice- 
president and a member of the boards of both 
companies. Mr. Townsend became a voter in 
Montgomery county shortly after attaining his 
majority, residing at Bryn Mawr eight months 
of the year, and the remainder of the time he re- 
sides at No. 2103 Walnut street, Philadelphia. 
Upon his marriage, which occurred in 1881, his 
father built for him the stone house on the north 
side of Montgomery Avenue, near Merion Ave- 
nue, Bryn Mawr, in which he resided until 1902, 
when the needs of a growing family necessitated 
his building the larger house in which he now 




^Chni^/Li. 



OT^n 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



49 



lives. It is west of his old house, both houses 
being on the old Tilghman property purchased by 
his father in the year 1879. In the early days of 
the history of Bryn Mawr, Mr. Townsend'took a 
deep interest in its development and welfare*, col- 
lecting the subscriptions and arranging for the 
macailamizing of a portion of Montgomery Ave- 
nue, v^fhich was then only covered with gravel. He 
also devoted considerable time to the societies 
which in the early days were formed to attend to 
the general care and needs of the neighborhood. 
The deep interest he has always taken in literary 
and scientific matters is evidenced by the fact of 
his holding membership in a number of societies 
and clubs, among whicif are the following : Frank- 
lin Institute, Engineers' Club, Historical Society, 
Numismatic and Antiquarian Society, Horticul- 
tural Society, Foresters Association, Genealogi- 
cal Society, Philobiblon Club, University Arch- 
aeological Society, Archaeological Institute of 
America, Academy of Fine Arts, Contemporary 
Club, University Club, Rittenhouse Club, Penn 
Club, Church Club, and the Merion Cricket Club. 
He is a member of the Board of College Alumni 
of the University of Pennsylvania, of the Church 
Club, a director of the Young Alen's Christian As- 
sociation of Philadelphia, and has been for many 
years a vestryman of the Church of the Holy 
Trinity, at Nineteenth and Walnut streets, Phila- 
delphia. 

Mr. Townsend married Mary S. Sharpe, 
daughter of Charles A. and Marianna S. Sharpe, 
and their children are : Charles S., a graduate in 
the class of 1904, University of Pennsylvania; 
Edith,. a graduate of the Ingleside School, at New 
Milford, Connecticut ; John W., Jr., a member of 
the class of 1907, University of Pennsylvania; 
Stockton, a member of the class of 1905, Episco- 
pal Academy ; Roger R. ; and Richard L. Town- 
send. 

JAMES K. THOMSON. The Thomsons 
are an old family in Norriton township. Hannah 
Thomson kept the Jeffersonville Hotel in 1784 
when Montgomery . county was created. The 
(late stone in the western wall shows the in- 
scription, "A. T., 1765," the initials being those 



of the builder, Archibald Thomson, who was a 
colonel in the Revolutionary war. Colonel 
Thomson's grandfather, also Archibald, on 
IMarch 23, 1742, purchased of the Isaac Norris 
estate one hundred twenty-si.x and one-half 
acres of land, and in 1743, of Samuel Norris, 
ninety acres. He died September 17, 1746, in 
his sixty-eighth year, leaving a, widow, Rebecca, 
and the following children : Robert, James, Sam- 
uel, Archibald, Moses, Martha and John. Re- 
becca died in 1748. . 

Robert Thomson, the eldest son, had pur- 
chased land five years before his father, as well 
as two other tracts later. These tracts are all 
located in Norriton, Jeffersonville Hotel stand^ 
ing in their center. He died August 6, 1747, in 
his fortieth year. His wife's name w^as Mary, 
and his children were: Archibald (Colonel), 
Mark, James, Martha, Agnes, and Rebecca. 
Robert Thomson's widow afterwards married 
Robert Curry, a neighbor. She died April 9, 
1804, aged ninety-seven years, her husband hav- 
ing died ten years previously. Of the children of 
Robert Thomson, Mark settled in Sussex county. 
New Jersey; James married Sarah Falconer and 
settled in Chester county ; Martha married James 
Sheppard and settled in Pl)-mouth ; Agnes mar- 
ried Thomas Darrah and settled in Bucks county ; 
Rebecca married William Darrah and settled in 
Bucks county. Archibald Thomson married 
Hannah Bartholomew. Having built the hotel, 
he secured a license as an innkeeper in 1766. He 
took a very active part in the Revolutionary war, 
but like other members of his family he died 
early, — on November 19, 1779, i" the thirty- 
ninth year of his age. His wife and seven chil- 
dren survived him, as follows : Sarah, Robert, 
Joseph, Mark, Benjamin, Archibald and ]\Iary. 
His widow conducted the inn after his death. 
She died November 4, 1789. 

Benjamin Thomson (grandfather) married 
Elizabeth Stroud, and they had a large family of 
children. She lived to a great age, and was 
known as Aunt Betsy Thomson, dying in 1878, 
at the age of one lunidred and two vears. 
.\niong the children of Benjamin and Elizabeth 
Thomson was James, who married Susan Keel. 



50 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Their children were : John A., deceased, Mark, 
a well-known resident of Norristown; Archibald 
D., who died in 1880; Samuel, who died young; 
James K. ; Emma Margaret, who died young ; 
and Charles H., who lives in Roxboro. 

James K. Thomson was born January 27, 
1844, at Laurel Hill, Philadelphia, where his 
parents were residing at that time. His father 
died in May of the same year, from the accidental 
running of a hemlock sliver under his finger nail 
while he was unloading a barrel of flour from a 
wagon. His wife had died a month previous. 

The earlier years of James K. Thomson were 
spent on a farm, he attending the schools of Ply- 
mouth township, in which he resided. From 
1871-75 he was engaged in mercantile business 
at 128 East Main street, Norristown, being most 
of the time with Ambrose Dettre. He was mar- 
ried March 9, 1875, to Annie Ramsey, they com- 
mencing married life on the Herberner farm, 
near Hickorytown, now occupied by Orlando 
Rex. Later he occupied the Vail farm, and for 
a time served milk in Norristown. Another 
farm he occupied was that of James Loeser, the 
farm which he now owns. From 1883-1886 he 
occupied the Harley farm and for the next three 
years the Sylvester Zimmerman farm in Whit- 
pain. In 1890 he returned to the Rhoads farm 
where he now lives, purchasing it in March, 1903, 
after having occupied it thirteen years. It con- 
tains seventy-seven acres of good land and a 
house which was erected in 1775 and is still in 
good condition, having been very substantially 
built. The couple have one child, Mary R. 
Thomson, born May 18, 1877. Mrs. Thomson is 
a daughter of Michael S. and Mary Holgate 
(Rodenboh) Ramsey. She has a brother, Wil- 
liam H. Ramsey, who lives in Norristown, and 
a sister, Mary J., in Upper Providence. Her 
father died in 1857, and her mother in January, 
1899, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. 

James K. Thomson has l^een, from the time 
he became of age, a very active Republican, tak- 
ing an earnest interest in party successes in town- 
ship, county, state and nation. The district in 
which he resides being Democratic, he has held 
no ofifice therein except those of auditor and 



member of the election board. In November, 
1 90 1, he became a candidate for director of the 
poor of Montgomery county, on the Republican 
ticket. He was elected and has filled the office 
with credit to himself and benefit to the institu- 
tion. 

Mr. Thomson is a successful farmer. He 
takes an active interest in farmers' institutes and 
other agencies for promoting the progress of 
agriculture. He is prominent in every move- 
ment for the advancement of the community in 
which he lives. Since 1865 he has been a mem- 
ber of Curtis Lodge, No. 239, I. O. O. F., of 
Norristown, filling several subordinate offices 
therein. He is also a member of Cold Point 
Grange and has been its secretary for the past 
fourteen years. He was its master for one year 
and also of the Pomona Grange No. 8, of Mont- 
gomery county, of which he is chaplain. 

DR. DAVID HENDRICKS BERGEY is the 
son of Godshalk Reifif and Susan D. (Hendricks) 
Bergey. He was educated in the public schools 
of Lower Salford township, at West Chester State 
Normal School and at Ursinus College. He 
taught public schools for two years, and in 1881 
commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Sam- 
uel Wolfe, of Skippack. He entered the medi- 
cal department of the University of Pennsylvania, 
October i, 1881, graduating with the degree of 
]\I. D., May i, 1884, and also received the degree 
of B. S. from the University June 13, 1884. He 
received the degree of A. M. from the Illinois 
Wesleyan L^niversity in 1894 for non-resident 
work in science and philosophy. Dr. Bergey en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine at North Wales, 
Pennsylvania, from June, 1884, to November, 
1893. In the fall of 1893 he entered the Labora- 
tory of Hygiene of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania as a special research student, and was ap- 
pointed Scott Fellow in Hygiene, 1894-95 ; In- 
structor in Hygiene, 1895-96; First Assistant in 
Hygiene, 1896-1903; Assistant Professor of Bac- 
teriology, 1903. He is the author of the follow- 
ing text books: "A Handbook of Practical Hy- 
giene," 1899; "The Principles of Hygiene," 1901. 

Dr. Bergey married June 5, 1884, at Skippack, 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



51 



Pennsylvania, Annie S., daughter of Joseph F. 
and Catherine (Stauffer) HaHman, of Skippack 
township, Montgomery county. Joseph Hallman 
is a farmer by occupation. He is the son of Joseph 
and Margaret (Fry) Hallman and a descendant 
of Anthony Hallman, of Skippack township, who 
was one of the building committee of the Old 
Trappe Lutheran church in 1743. ]\largaret Fry 
(grandmother of Mrs. Bergey) was a descendant 
of Henry and Catherine (Levering) Fry, who 
came to America in 1680. 

Dr. David H. Bergey is a Republican in poli- 
tics. He held the office of school director in 
North Wales for three years, and served as secre- 
tary of the board of health of North Wales from 
its first organization until 1893. 

Dr. Bergey stands very high in his profession 
for so young a man, being but little past forty 
years of age. He has achieved a high rank among 
the medical practitioners of Philadelphia and of 
the country. He is a member of the following 
organizations : Montgomery County Medical So- 
ciety, Pennsylvania Medical Society, American 
Medical Association, Society of American Bac- 
teriologists, American Association of Pathologists 
and Bacteriologists, American Climatological As- 
sociation, American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, National Educational Associa- 
tion, University of Pennsylvania Chapter Sigma 
Xi. 

Godshalk Reiff Bergey (father) was born in 
Lower Salford township, Montgomery county, 
Pennsylvania, January 25, 1833. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of the township, and at 
Washington Hall Collegiate Institute at Trappe, 
Pennsylvania. He taught in the public schools 
of Berks and Montgomery counties and later en- 
gaged in the occupation of farming which he fol- 
lowed in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, up to 
1 901. He now lives retired in Philadelphia. He 
is a Republican in politics, and served as a mem- 
ber of the school board of Lower Salford town- 
ship for a number of years. In religious faith he 
is a member of the Mennonite church. He mar- 
ried, January 13, 1856, Susan D. Hendricks, 
daughter of John H. and Mary (Detweiler) Hen- 
dricks, (both deceased), of Skip])ack township. 



The ceremony was performed by Rev. Henry G. 
Johnson of Skippack. John H. Hendricks (father 
of Mrs. Bergey) was the son of Henry and Bar- 
bara '(Hendricks) Hendricks, of Towamencin 
township. Mary Detweiler was the daughter of 
Joseph and Susanna (Shoemaker) Detweiler and 
granddaughter of Jacob and ]\Iaria (Funk) Det- 
weiler, great-granddaughter of John Funk, and 
great-great-granddaughter of Bishop Henry 
Funk, of Lower Salford township. 

Godshalk Reifif Bergey had by his union in 
marriage born to him the following children : 
I. Nelson H., born January 3, 1857; he married, 
October 25, 1879, -^lary IMoyer, and has children : 
L. Arthur, Sallie M., Susan M., Katie M., Nelson 
and Raymond D. 2. Dr. David H., of this review, 
3. Elizabeth H., born August 9, 1862 ; she married 
John C. Kaiser, June 11, 1881, and has children : 
Harn,- G., Lizzie Irene, Susan May, who married 
Harry Gottshalk, September 2, 1903 ; Ida Myrtle 
is the next in order of birth ; Barbara Ella and 
Bertha Alvilda, who is deceased. The mother of 
these children, Elizabetli (Bergey) Kaiser, died 
April 8, 1890. 4. Sarah H., born December 4, 
1863; she married Nari Hunsicker, November 18, 
1882, and had one child, Lovina B. Hunsicker. 
The mother died October 8, 1883. 5. Mary H., 
born April 7, 1865, died January 21, 1866. 6. 
Irwin H., born March 31, 1869; he married, Feb- 
ruary 20, 1892, Mary Kepler; no issue. 

The Bergeys are one of the oldest families of 
German descent in Montgomery county. John 
Ulrich Bergey, the founder of the family in this 
country, emigrated to America about the year 
1 71 7, presumably from Saxony, and located in 
Salford township, Montgomery county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he purchased a farm of 250 acres 
from Hugh Roberts, March 16, 1726. In 1760 he 
served as road supervisor of Salford township. 
At the organization of the congregation of the 
Salford Mennonite church, in 1738, John LHrich 
Bergey was one of the charter members. His 
wife was Anna Mary Bergey. The ancestors of 
Dr. David H. Bergey in direct line of descent are 
as follows, the list being confined to those living 
in America: i. John LHrich Bergey, founder of 
the family ; 2. Jolm Bergey, whose wife was Anna 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Bergey ; John Bergey was a miller in Upper Sal- 
ford township ; 3. Jacob Bergey. married Eliza- 
beth Godshalk. Jacob Bergey was a farmer and 
weaver by occupation, and resided in Lower Sal- 
ford township ; 4. Rev. David Bergey, married 
(first wife) Elizabeth (Reiff) Kolb ; second wife 
Annie (Biirgstresser) Kreamer. He was a 
farmer by occupation; he was a minister in the 
Mennonite church, residing in Lower Salford ; 
5. Godshalk R. Bergey, married Susan D. Hen- 
dricks. He was a farmer by occupation but now 
resides in Philadelphia; 6. Dr. David H. Bergey. 

Among other prominent ancestors of Dr. 
David H. Bergey may be mentioned the follow- 
ing: Jacob Reiff, the elder, of Lower Salford 
township ; Valentine Hunsicker, of Lower Sal- 
ford ; Dillman Kolb, Peter Schumacher, and Isaac 
Von Sintern, of Germantown ; Jan de Voss, burg- 
omaster in Hansbooten, in Flanders, about 1550; 
Gerhart Clemens, of Lower Salford; Leonard 
Hendricks, and Rev. Jacob Gaettschalk, of Towa- 
mencin ; Christian ]\Ioyer of Lower Salford, and 
Jacob Shoemaker of the same township. 

Among prominent ancestors of Annie S. Hall- 
man (wife of Dr. Bergey) are the following: 
Christian Stauffer, of Lower Salford ; Dillman 
Kolb, Isaac A'an Sinterm and Jacob Schumacher, 
of Germantown ; Jacob Grater, of Skippack, and 
Valentine Hunsicker, of Lower Salford. 

JOHN HAMPTON, one of the most prom- 
inent farmers in Upper Merion, has long been 
influential in Republican politics in Montgomery 
county. An active worker at the polls, he also 
takes an active part in the township 'and neigh- 
borhood affairs generally. He filled the position 
of countv commissioner, one of the most respon- 
sible offices, for a period of six years, from 1887 
to 1903, during which many important improve- 
ments were carried through and the recon- 
struction of the courthouse entered upon, al- 
though not completed. Besides the services thus 
rendered as a leading spirit in the board, Mr. 
Hampton has been frequently a delegate to 
county conventions of his party, has been town- 
ship auditor and Republican county committee- 
man for many years. 



Mr. Hampton resides near the village of 
Abrams. He is the second son of John and Anna 
( Chalfant) Hampton. He is a native of Dela- 
ware county, Pennsylvania, where he was born 
August 15, 1842. His grandfather resided in 
Chester county and was a leading farmer there. 

John Hampton, Sr., (father) grew to manhood 
in Chester county. On coining of age he removed 
to Montgomeri,- county, locating in Upper Mer- 
ion township in 1840. He died in January, 1881. 
He was a Republican in politics and in religious 
faith a member of the Baptist church. He took 
an active interest in township aifairs and served 
as road supervisor, besides holding other local 
positions. He married Anna Chalfant, who was 
born in 1806 and died in 1878. The couple had 
four sons, David, John, Isaiah and George (de- 
ceased). Their daughters were Lydia ; Sophia, 
who married Joseph Gill ; Jane, deceased ; and 
]\Iary, who married Jacob Michner. 

Coming with his parents to LTpper Merion at 
the age of two years, ex-Commissioner John 
Hampton has been practically a lifelong resident 
of the township. He was educated in the com- 
mon schools and Treemount Seminary and as- 
sisted his father until twenty-five years of age. 
After reaching his majority, he made choice of 
the occupation of farming, in which he had been 
reared, and purchased the farm which lie has 
since occupied, one of the most fertile and best 
cultivated in his section of Montgomery county. 
]\Ir. Hampton is a practical, progressive and 
prosperous farmer, giving the most careful at- 
tention to business. He has long been an active 
member of the Patrons of Husbandry. He is 
also a member of the Alasonic order. 

In 1866 ]\Ir. Hampton married Estb8r Hallo- 
well Ramsey, daughter of Benjamin B. and Sarah 
Potts (Hallowell) Ramsey. Mrs. Hampton was 
born November 15, 1839, in LTpper Alerion town- 
ship. Her father was a member of an old Mont- 
gomery county family of Swedish descent. He 
was a mechanic and also engaged in the lime 
business, which has so long been an important 
industry of tapper Merion. Mr. Ramsey was a 
Republican and served as justice of the peace for 
many years, his influence being exerted to dimin- 



i: 




MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



53 



ish rather than to encourage htigation. He also 
held the office of school director for several 
years. Although not a member he was a fre- 
quent attendant at Christ (Swedes') church, Up- 
per Merion. He marred Sarah Potts Hallowell, 
also of an old Upper Merion family, of English 
descent. Their children are: Nathan H. and 
(2) Esther H., twins, born November 15, 1839. 
Nathan H. resides in Lancaster. He married 
Miss Cascaden, who is now deceased. (3) Han- 
nah Wager, born May 14, 1842. (4) Elizabeth 
A. married George W. H. Thomas, a well- 
known resident of Bridgeport, who died several 
years ago. (5) Charles A. married Clara Mar- 
tin. The couple reside in Conshohocken. 

I\Ir. and Mrs. John Hampton have four chil- 
dren : Clarence, born October 21, 1867, married 
:\liss Lillie Pannepacker, and has one son, Wil- 
liam. They reside in Philadelphia. Clarence 
Hampton, a teacher of long experience, is super- 
vising -principal of a Philadelphia grammar 
school, and stands high among the educators of 
that city. William T., born October 27, 1870, 
died March 19, 1890. Howard, born October 
25, 1872, is unmarried and resides with his par- 
ents. Bertha Esther, born September 3, 1876, 
married Herbert H. Ganser, who is the superin- 
tendent of the Gas Company of Montgomery 
county, of Norristown, where the couple reside. 
They have no children. 

Eew men are possessed to such an extent of 
the esteem and confidence of their neighbors as 
John Hampton. When he has been a candidate 
for public office he has invariably led his ticket, 
receiving many votes from political opponents. 
In every relation of life he is an example which 
eveiy one may follow. 

CHARLES MATHER, a conveyancer of 
Jenkintown, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, 
was born in Cheltenham township, Montgomery 
county. !\rarch 19, 1823, a son of John and Martha 
(Potts) Mather, the latter named being a daugh- 
ter of Zcbulon Potts, who was an officer in the 
Revolutionary army, the first sheriff of Montgom- 
ery county, and a member of the senate at th.' 
tin-.c of his death. 



The Mather family are of English ancestry. 
Joseph IMatther, the great-great-grandfather of 
Charles Mather, came to America in 1682, prev- 
ious to the coming of William Penn, and settled 
in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, where he served 
for four )-ears with Phineas Pemberton. In 1697 
he married Elizabeth Russell, of Cheltenham 
township, a daughter of John Russell, and after 
his marriage resided on the Russell homestead, a 
tract of three hundred acres of land situated in 
Cheltenham township, and there spent the re- 
mainder of his life. He died in 1724. Their chil- 
dren were : Isabella, Elizabeth, Mary,. Richard, 
John, and one other son who died in early life. 

Richard Mather, the great-grandfather of 
Charles Mather, was born in Cheltenham town- 
ship, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, in 1698. 
He learned the cabinet making trade, but never 
followed that business, residing on the homestead 
farm the greater part of his life. In 1727 he mar- 
ried Sarah Penrose, daughter, of Bartholomew 
■and Esther (Leach) Penrose, and their children 
were : Joseph, Bartholomew, Elizabeth, Sarah, 
Richard, Benjamin, Mary, Isaac, Esther, and 
Hannah. Richard Mather, father of these chil- 
dren, died July 17, 1776. 

Isaac Mather, grandfather of Charles Mather, 
was born in Cheltenham township, Montgomery 
county, Pennsylvania, July 9, 1749. He acquired 
a common school education, and afterward served 
an apprenticeship at the trade of millwright. In 
1769 he erected a mill near what is now Chelten 
Hill Station, the mill being now the property of 
John Wanamaker. He subsequently removed to 
Whitemarsh, Montgomery county, and there en- 
gaged in the milling business for a number of 
years. He spent the autumn of his life on the 
homestead farm, where his death occurred in 
1808. He married Mary Morris, daughter of 
Joshua Morris, May 17. 1770. and they had issue: 
Susanna, Mary. Josejih, John, Sarah, Joshua, 
Charles and Isaac. 

John Mather, father of Charles Mather, was 
born at Whitemarsh. Montgomery county, Penn- 
sylvania, February 13, 1776. He received a com- 
mon school education, and his business career was 
devoted to milling and farming. .\ portion of the 



54 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



latter years of his life were spent on the home- 
stead farm, and the remainder in Jenkintown, 
where he died on August 7, 1865. His wife, 
Martha (Potts) ]\Iather, who died on August 2, 
1873, bore him the following named children : 
Isaac, born August 27, 1806, married Ann Hallo- 
well, and resides on the old homestead, now in his 
ninety-eighth year. Edward, born July 24, 1808, 
married Hannah Paul, and died March 26, 1901. 
John, born June 27, 1810, not heard from since 
1838. Martha, born May 19, 1812, died unmar- 
ried on September 13, 1886. Daniel, born De- 
cember 6, 1816, died May 12, 1817. Rebecca S., 
born January 18, 1819, widow of Charles Mitch- 
ener. Elizabeth H., born November 21, 1820, be- 
came the wife of Samuel W. Noble, and died Sep- 
tember 12, 1897. Charles, born March 19, 1823, 
mentioned hereinafter. Jane, born May 13, 1825, 
died July 23, 1897. Ann, born August 31, 1827, 
unmarried, and living at the present time ( 1904). 
Charles Mather, youngest son of John and 
Martha Mather, acquired his education in the 
Friends' School of Jenkintown, and afterwards 
engaged in agricultural pursuits until he attained 
the age of twenty-one }-ears. He then went to 
Rochester, New York, was there employed for 
two years, and at the expiration of this period of 
time returned to Jenkintown and purchased a 
spice mill in Philadelphia which he operated for 
three or four years. He then sold his spice mill, 
and for the following five years was engaged in 
the manufacture of printing ink. He was next 
engaged in the advertising business, which he con- 
ducted until 1861, when he returned to Jenkin- 
town, and since that date has been engaged in a 
conveyancing and insurance company. He is 
secretary of the Union Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company of Jenkintown, and of the Mutual Home 
Insurance Company of the same place. He served 
as justice of the peace for a number of years, but 
resigned this office to become a notary public for 
the Jenkintown Bank. He was one of the first 
borough councilmen, and served one term as 
burgess. Politically he is a Republican, but takes 
no active part in political matters. Socially he is 
a charter member of Friendship Lodge No. 400, 
Free and Accepted ^vlasons. He is an honored 



resident of Jenkintown, and is respected and es- 
teemed by the whole community. 

Mr. Mather was married to Alice O. Warner, 
daughter of William and Maria ( Pierie) Warner, 
of Philadelphia, in that city, by Ma^'or Swift, on 
December 31, 1846. To them were born the fol- 
lowing named children : Mary W., born October 
22, 1847. Charles, born April 18, 1849, married 
Annie Bates, daughter of George and Margaret 
Bates, and they are the parents of four sons : 
Charles, born August 19, 1883; Pierie, born Jan- 
uary 18, 1885; Raymond, born June 28, 1886; 
Otis, bom January 30, 1890. William W., born 
April 4, 1852. 

WILLIAM JOHN MARTIN. Dennis 
Charles Martin, a highly respected and worthy 
citizen of Bryn Mawr, Montgomery county, 
Pennsylvania, was born in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, September 14, 1856, a son of the late 
William John and Anna M. (Kelly) Martin. 

William J. Martin (father), for many years 
an active and prominent citizen of West Haver- 
ford, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, was 
born in London Derry, Ireland, in 1824, and died 
June 13, i860. He acquired a practical education 
at the national schools of his native country, and 
when a youth of seventeen years emigrated to the 
L'nited States, he being of the same opinion as 
many other young men that the opportunities for 
business success were greater there than in the 
country of their birth. Upon attaining his ma- 
jority he engaged in the shipping business, run- 
ning merchant vessels, trading between this coun- 
try and the West India islands, making the city of 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, his business center. 
In 1856 he removed from Philadelphia to West 
Haverford, taking up his residence at the old 
Revolutionary hostelry known as the "Old Buck," 
at which place he died. 

William J. Martin was united in marirage to 
Anna M. Kelly, daughter of Dennis and Mary 
(Boyle) Kelly, and the following named children 
were born to them: i. Henry D., born March 21, 
1853, in Philadelphia, near Eighteenth and Cherry 
streets. He acquired his early education in the 
private school of Professor Roth, located at Broad 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



55 



and Pine streets ; he then attended Villa Nova 
College, at \^illa Nova, Pennsylvania, for about 
one year, and this was suplemented by a full 
course in one of the commercial colleges in Phila- 
delphia. He then entered the commercial world, 
serving almost constantly in the capacity of trav- 
eling passenger agent for railroads. For a num- 
ber of years he served as the Philadelphia repre- 
sentative of the Atchison, Topeka & Sante Fe 
Railroad, after which he traveled for the Old 
Colony Railroad, and subsequently became man- 
ager, in Philadelphia, for the Union Steamship 
Advertising Company. He was a consistent mem- 
ber of the Bryn Mawr Catholic church, where he 
worshipped regularly, was a member of the Mar- 
ion Cricket Club, and in politics was an indepen- 
dent Republican. His death occurred at Atlantic 
City, New Jersey, August 5, 1903. 2. William J., 
born June 24, 1854, died February 21, 1884. 3. 
Dennis C, bom September 13, 1856, mentioned 
hereinafter. 4. Mary E., born September 15, 
1858; she was educated at Sharon Convent, 
Sharon Hill, Delaware county, Pennsylvania, and 
she resided with her parents up to the time of 
their demise. Since the death of her mother she 
has held and filled the position of Sacristan of the 
order of Mother of Good Counsel, of the Church 
of Our Mother of Good Counsel, of Bryn Mawr, 
Pennsylvania. For many years she has been ac- 
tively connected and interested in the church and 
charitable work belonging to the parish, and is 
much respected and esteemed by all who know 
her. 5. Anna M., born November 30, 1859, died 
July 6, 1896. 

Dennis Kelly, maternal grandfather of Dennis 
C. Martin, married Mary Boyle, in Ireland, she 
coming from a highly respected and wealthy fam- 
ily who resided in County Donegal. In 1802 Mr. 
and Mrs. Kelly emigrated to America, locating 
at the lower banks of Cobb's Creek, situated in 
Lower Merion township, Montgomery county, 
Pennsylvania, a part of which property is now 
owned by the Ashurst estate. He purchased land 
there, erected thereon a mill, and began the man- 
ufacture of cotton goods. Later he purchased 
land on Cobb's Creek, upon which was standing 
an old powder mill, which he remodelled and used 



for manufacturing textile goods. Subsequently 
he purchased another mill, including considerable 
land, located above Leedom's saw mill on Cobb's 
Creek, after which he purchased a large tract of 
land from the Humphrey estate, and erected 
thereon an additional mill, and finally purchased 
two more mills which were located at Hadding- 
ton, Philadelphia county. In addition to these en- 
terprises he had an interest in the Blonden and 
Goodintent Mills, situated in the city of Philadel- 
phia, all of which were used for the manufacture 
of cotton and woolen cloths for the trade, and dur- 
ing the progress of the Civil war his mills were 
kept working steadily in order to supply the de- 
mand required by the United States government. 
His land holdings comprised seven hundred and 
thirty acres, covering two miles in length by one- 
half mile in width, which extended from the 
southern line of Haverford east to and beyond 
the city line of Philadelphia. He was one of the 
influential and prominent men in the community, 
took a keen and zealous interest in local affairs, 
and the various important improvements of the 
county were brought about largely through his 
instrumentality and liberality. Mr. and Mrs. 
Kelly were the parents of eight children, namely: 
I. Margaret, born in 1801 ; she became the wife of 
Charles Kelley, and their children, all of whom 
are now deceased, were as follows : Dennis B., 
Walter, Sallie, William, Edward, J\Iary, and 
Louise Kelley. 2. Hannah, born in 1808, died 
]\Iarch 7, 1867 ; she was the wife of John Russell, 
and their children were Mary Jane, born Septem- 
ber 13, 1828, died March 23, 1859; Dennis A., 
born January 27, 1830, died July 29, 1830; John 
A., born January i, 1832. 3. Dennis. 4. Eliza- 
beth, twin with Dennis. 5. William, born in 1810, 
died March 9, 1836. 6. Mary, born February 16, 
181 1, died July 28, 1892; she was the wife of 
Jacob Ott, and their children are as follows: 
Jacob, born July 3, 1833, died July 13, 1886; 
Mary, born January 28, 1835, died in 1837 ; Sarah 
E., born i\tay 7, 1837, died August 16, 1863; 
Dennis, born October 3, 1839, died in 1840; An- 
drew, born June 29, 1841, died in 1846; Mary 
Ann, born January 29, 1843, died in 1845 ; Joseph 
born October 4, 1844, died October 5, 1867 ; Jare- 



56 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



miah J., born January i, 1852. 7. Elizabeth, born 
May 5, 1819, died April 29, 1888; she was the 
wife of Erederick Eckert, who died June 20, 
1856; and had four children, Mary, Anna, Bessie 
and Frederick; she was then united in marriage 
to Professor Peter M. Arnue ; no issue. 8. Sarah, 
died September 4, 1873 ; she was the wife of Rod- 
erick O'Connor, and their children were : Dennis, 
deceased ; William, deceased ; Roderick, deceased ; 
Erederick, deceased; Charles, Mary, and Sarah. 
9. Annie M., aforementioned, bom May 10, 1824, 
died November 21, 1896, as the wife of William 
J. Martin. Dennis Kelly, father of these chil- 
dren, died July 21, 1864, in his eighty-fifth year, 
and his wife, Mary (Boyle) Kelly, died May 24, 
1861, in her seventy-eighth year. They, their 
children and grandchildren are buried in the Au- 
gustinian St. Denis' Cemetery, the ground for 
which was donated to the church of St. Denis by 
Dennis Kelly. 

By his will dated June 5, 1863, proved August 
3, 1864, will book II, page 591, letters granted 
same day to Hannah Russell and Dennis P. Kelly, 
executors, he gave and devised all his estate unto 
his six daughters — Margaret, Hannah, Mary, 
Sarah, Elizabeth, and Ann — during the term of 
tlieir natural lives, to be equally divided among 
them share and share alike, and at the death of 
said daughters, or any of them, share of said 
daughter or daughters to go and be vested in the 
children or child of the said daughter or daugh- 
ters respectively in fee simple, to be equally di- 
vided of said children of the said daughters as 
tenants in common. And he did direct and re- 
quest his daughter Hannah to take as part of her 
share of said real estate the Mansion House which 
he occupied, situated in Lower Merion township. 

Dennis C. Martin, son of William J. and Anna 
M. (Kelly) Martin, received his early educational 
training at a private school situated at Haverford, 
and this was supplemented by a course at Mount 
St. Mary College, located at Emmitsburg, Mary- 
land. Shortly after the completion of his studies 
he accepted a clerical position, and later he as- 
sisted in engineering in both Delaware and Mont- 
gomgery counties, after which he retired from ac- 



tive business pursuits. He is now living privately 
on the old homestead in Bryn Mawr, the house in 
which he resides having been erected in 1739 by 
the Miller estate, an addition being placed to the 
property in 1780 by the same family. In the early 
years ofi700 and up to and including the year 
1845, this old property was used as a public hos- 
telry known as the Old Buck Hotel, which name 
it retained until its purchase by Dennis Kelly, Sr., 
and it is still in the possession of the family. Dur- 
ing the Revolutionary war, just previous to the 
troops going to Valley Forge, a letter, which is on 
record, shows that General Washington wrote to 
Philadelphia requesting the government to fur- 
nish the soldiers with blankets, they being then 
on their way to camp. At that time General 
Washington was making the old hostelry his 
headquarters. 

Dennis C. Martin was united in marriage to 
Mary Elizabeth Leary, daughter of Daniel and 
Elizabeth (Duane) Leary, and their children are: 
William J., born September 23, 1901, died August 
29, 1902; and Marie Gertrude, born January 7, 
1904. 

FRANCIS J. CLAMER, a leading citizen of 
Collegeville, and for some years its burgess, is 
descended from an honored family of Hamburg, 
in Germany, it having produced many statesmen 
and soldiers. He was born in that ancient city, 
July 4, 1 84 1, and was there educated. 

He was the son of George P. H. and Marie 
(Rush) Clamer, the wife also being descended 
from a distinguished German family. His fa- 
ther was the son of Christian J. Clamer, the 
most extensive planter in the vicinity of Ham- 
burg, being an influential and wealthy citizen. 
The family history dates back to the twelfth 
century. The country from which came the 
original Clamer is not known, but the dignity of 
the family began with the development of the 
city of Hamburg. There was born, September 
13, 1706, Guilliam Clamer, whose father was 
Johannes Clamer, a prominent merchant of Ham- 
burg. Johannes' mother was Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of the eminent family of Vegesack, who came 




■^^^^^c:^j' 



^^^ 




56 



MONTGOMER 



miah J., hom fannarv i, T852. 7. Eli/aMh. hom 
May 5. r- 
wife of ; 

iFlcr,- n: ,. 

ur Me was then united in marriage 

(• I M. Arniie; no issue. 8. Sarah, 

d'. . 1873 ; she was the wife of Rod- 

c- ind their children were: Dennis, 

<!' :ii. deceased ; Roderick, deceased ; 

I' -ad; Charles, Mary, and Sarah. 

(I .icmentioned, bom May 10, 1S24, 

died Jsovciabcr 21, 1896, as the wife of William 
J. Martin. Dennis Kelly, father of these chil- 
dren, died July 21, 1864, in his eighty-fifth year, 
and his wife, Mary (Boyle) Kelly, died May 24, 
1861, in her seventy-eighth year. Thc^-, iiic'r 
children and grandchildren are buriel 
gnstinian St. Denis' Cemetery, the . 
which was donated to the church of .■^i 1 • .!: ; 
Dennis Kelly. 

I5y his will dated June 5, 1863, proved August 
3, 1864. will book II, page 591, letters granted 
same day to Hannah Russell and Dennis P. Kelly, 
executors, he gave and devised all his e.state unto 
his six daughters — .Margaret, Hannah, Mary, 
Sarah, Elizabeth, atid Ann — during the term of 
their natural lives, to be equally divided among 
them share and share alike, and at the death of 
said daughters, or any of them, share of said 
daughter or daughters to go and be vested in the 



qi. 

share 
he occu^ 
Dennis 

M. (Kelly) .. 
training at a pri . 
and this was siippi 
St. Mary College, loc. 
land. Shortly after the 
he accepted a clerical pos. 
sisted in engineering in both L 
gomgery counties, after which ht 



tivp business pursuits. He is now living privately 

' old homestead in Bryn Mawr, the house in 

lie resides having been erected in 1739 by 

i^iier estate, an addition being placed to the 

pro])erty in 1780 by the saine family. In the earl\ 

y-TT- fT7oo and tip to and including the yeai 

property was used a? a public hos 

- ihe Old Buck Hotel, which nan;. 

: irchase by Dennis Kelly, Sr.. 

•^session of the family. Dur- 

. •■ war, just previous to the 

tr^wi ^ Forge, a letter, which is on 

recorl - neral Washington wrote t^ 

'" ' ' .government to fu- 

;ets, they being tht 

\l that time Genern 

■;ie old hostelry hi 



Mary Elizal • 
Elizabeth (D 
William J., h 
29, 1902: 3; 
1904 



■.iiited in marriage t' 
i.ghter of Daniel and 
ud their children are: 
JJ, 1901, died Augusi 
• dc. born Tanuarv 7, 



'"' ^, <. icading citizen of 

years its burgess, is 
•cl family of Hamburg, 
1.^; produced many statesmen 
as born in that ancient cit} 
nil was there educated. 
'e son of George P. H. and Mar^e 
■ uT, the wife also being descender 
a liisiingtiished German family. His fa- 
.%as the son of Christian J. Clamer, tht 
-• ^ \!' • -ivc planter in the vicinity of Hani 
■'. : J an influential and wealtliy citizen. 
■I'. !;;)!:'_ history dates back to the twelftti 
century. The country from which came th. 
original Clamer is not known, hut the dignity ot 
the family began with the development of the 
cit\- of Hamburg. There was born, September 
r.^, 1706, Guilliam Clamer, whose father was 
Johannes Clamer, a prc«ninent merchant of Ham- 
burg. Johannes' mother was Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of the eminent family of A'egesack, who came 



I 




<^^::^^^^-€:^J' ^ 




MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



57 



from Bremen and settled at Hamburg, having 
a civil and military record for five hundred years 
or more. 

Guilliam, son of Johannes and Elizabeth 
Clamer, was named for his maternal grandfa- 
ther, his mother's grandfather, Conrad Vegesach, 
had the honor of being a senator of Hamburg. 
Guilliam Clamer was given a liberal education. 
When he was sixteen years of age he entered 
the office of Reynier Von Schoonhoven. The 
youth was exceedingly capable, and in ten years 
succeeded to the business, the former proprietor 
retiring. Having been honored with office, he 
set out on a tour of Europe, with the expectation 
that the knowledge thus gained would redound 
through him to the benefit of his native city. In 
1/34 he married Anna Maria Boon, daughter of 
Philip and Anna (Moelman) Boon. Philip was 
the son of Adrian Boon, a senator of Hamburg. 
The wife died at the birth of a daughter in 1737, 
and the husband again married, the second wife 
being Catharine Elizabeth Schluter, daughter of 
David Schluter, Doctor of Laws, and his wife 
Catharine, the bride being a cousin . of his first 
wife. Guilliam Clamer was a child of the second 
wife. He was born September 13, 1706. He 
was a man prominent in church councils and in 
the affairs of the city, and ultimately became sen- 
ator and administrator of Hamburg, and ad- 
miral of the fleet, protecting its commerce in the 
days of pirates and buccaneers. Guilliam and 
Jacob Clamer, who were brothers, were heirs- 
at-law of Senator Jacob Langerman, who died 
intestate in 1762. They were aware that it had 
been his great desire to present his various col- 
lections to his beloved city, and instead of en- 
riching themselves they gave his magnificent li- 
brary of seven thousand volumes to Hamburg, 
and a large donation from Guilliam Clamer, in 
the shape of historical books, guns and other 
relics. Louis XV. conferred valuable gifts on 
Guilliam by way of testifying his admiration for 
the man. 

His son, Guilliam Clamer, Jr., was twenty- 
six years of age at the time of his father's death 
in 1774. In 1776 he married Miss Philipsen, by 
whom he had three sons, of whom Christian 



Heinrich was the oldest. He studied at a agri- 
cultural college, and his father bought him the 
estate of Majenfeld, seven miles from Hamburg, 
paying for it 70,000 marks. He married Sophia, 
daughter of Johann George Hofifman, overseer 
of the castle of the King of Saxony at Dresden. 
He was the first to introduce orange culture into 
Saxony. Guilliam Clamer and his wife had six 
sons and three daughters. George P. H., father 
of Francis J. Clamer, was baptized June 12, 1802. 
He was born June i, of that year. 

In 1808 the French fleet was stationed at 
Hamburg, which city was in 1810 incorporated 
with the French empire. The Russians came to 
its relief. The result of strife was the temporary 
ruin of the prosperity of Hamburg and of the 
wealth of the Clamers, their landed estates being 
devastated alike by friend and foe, as is usually 
the case during wars. The generations of the 
Clamers in the past two centuries are thus as fol- 
lows : Guilliam, senator of Hamburg ; Guilliam Jr., 
the illustrious merchant of the same city ; Chris- 
tian H., the country gentleman of Majenfeld; 
George Heinrich (father), the greatest silver- 
smith and artist of his day; Franz Julius, subject 
of this sketch, who is the inventor of the Ajax 
metal, now of Collegeville ; Guilliam H., his son, 
the young metallurgist, who is carrying forward 
what his father so well began. Back of these 
stretch away into the dim past many generations 
of Clamers, who were always known as patriotic 
and useful members of their communities. Their 
marriage alliances brought them into contact with 
some of the best blood of Germany. 

The children of Christian J. Clamer: George 
P. H. (father) ; Francis J., Henry, William, 
Theodore, Nicholas, Johanness (Mrs. Arps), Wil- 
helmina (Mrs. Wilhelm Whitrock), Augusta 
(Mrs. Vanholm). At the diamond wedding of 
the parents, the emperor presented a diamond 
iron cross. He died at the age of ninety-two 
years, and his wife, who was a Hoffman, also 
lived to a great age. 

George P. H. (father) received a liberal edu- 
cation and learned to be a silversmith. He was 
an artist in work of this kind, having been sum- 
moned to Mexico to fashion the ware for the 



58 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Catholic churches of that country, and was the 
designer of all the work. His family remained 
in Hamburg, but he came and settled in Phila- 
delphia in 1852, after traveling over a great part 
of the United States, having selected that city 
for his residence. His family speedily joined 
him, and he secured employment at special art 
work in his line, at which he continued until he 
was eighty-three years of age. His last work 
was a bronze portrait of the late William L. El- 
kins, the traction millionaire. The portrait hangs 
at the Union League, in Philadelphia. He died 
on February 20, 1889, at the age of eighty-seven 
years. His wife died on March 11, 1886, at the 
age of seventy-seven years. Their children were : 
Francis J. (subject of this sketch) ; Augusta 
Maria, Mrs. Henry Buch (herself and her hus- 
band both being deceased) ; Louisa Henrietta 
(Mrs. Spicker), he being deceased, and she re- 
siding in Philadelphia. 

Francis J. Clamer came to America with his 
mother in 1852, at the age of eleven years, they 
joining his father in Philadelphia as has been 
stated. He completed his education at Camden, 
studying chemistry and the natural sciences gen- 
erally under the best chemists of the country, 
after which he acquired under the tuition of his 
father a knowledge of the trade of goldsmith 
and silversmith. Later he engaged for five years 
in the merchandise, hardware and house-furnish- 
ing business. Then engaging in the manufacture 
of bronze hardware, he experimented in the pro- 
duction of anti-frictional metal, and in 1868 ac- 
complished the first practical results. By 1880, 
with hard study and hard labor, he made his 
discovery a complete success. About that time 
he made the acquaintance of the late William L. 
Elkins, William G. Warden and J. G. Hendrick- 
son, who had heard of his success, and advanced 
money to manufacture it on a large scale, and a 
corporation was formed known as the Ajax 
Metal Company, known the world over and hav- 
ing a large establishment in Philadelphia. In 
1897 Mr. Clamer turned over the active work to 
his son. The officers of the company are : Presi- 
dent, J. G. Hendrickson ; Vice President, Guil- 



liam H. Clamer. The last-named is also man- 
ager. 

Since he was fourteen years of age ;\Ir. 
Clamer has accomplished successfully everything 
that he has undertaken to do. He had all his life 
resolved that he would retire at fifty-five years 
of age, which he was able to realize. In 1888 
he purchased a small farm near Collegeville, 
which he rented out in 1889, and bought Pro- 
fessor J. Shelly Weinberger's farm. During the 
summer of 1890 he occupied the Weinberger farm, 
and spent the winter in Philadelphia, making the 
location which he calls "The Glen" his home. 
Mr. Clamer has built many houses, and owns 
twenty-two properties which he rents. In 1903 
he built on Main street, Collegeville, of native 
stone, a palatial mansion in modern style, of beau- 
tiful design, and equipped with all conveniences, 
in which he now resides. It occupies a con- 
spicuous site, and is admired by all who see it. 
He makes frequent visits with his family to his 
native land. 

In 1864 he married, at Philadelphia, Miss 
Margaret Diederich, born April 30, 1843, the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Diederich, of 
Wurtemberg, Germany. Her family came to 
America in 1859. Mr. Diederich was a baker 
by trade, carrying on that business in Philadel- 
phia, but on account of his wife's ill-health he 
removed to Collegeville, where he bought a small 
farm and retired from active labor, residing 
there until his death. The couple were Luther- 
ons. Their children: Catharine, died at the age 
of twenty years ; Warren, died at the age of 
twenty-two years; Margaret (wife of Mr. 
Clamer). The mother dying, Mr. Diederich 
married a second time and had two children, 
John, and Frederika, (Mrs. George Yeakle). 

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Clamer: Guil- 
liam, who is highly educated and is manager of 
the Ajax Metal Company, and married Miss 
Florence Foulkes, of Philadelphia ; Marie, un- 
married ; Gertrude and Alma, also unmarried. 

Mr. Clamer is fortunate in all his surround- 
ings, enjoying the respect and esteem of all with 
whom he comes in contact. He has been blessed 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



59 



abundantly in life, and enjoys the fruits of a well- 
spent life. He is a Republican in politics, and 
was unanimously elected burgess of Collegeville, 
succeeding Professor Weinberger. He is one of 
the board of trustees of Ursinus College. 

ABRAHAM THEOPHILUS CLAYTON, 
the leading pharmacist of Cheltenham township, 
in Montgomery county, his place of business being 
located in Ogontz, is a native of Bucks county, 
Pennsylvania, where he was born January 15, 
1862, being the son of Jehu (deceased) and 
Christianna (Harris) Clayton. 

The Clayton family are among the oldest in 
Bucks county. Jonathan Clayton was the earliest 
of the family to settle in that locality. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Evans, their son Richard E\ans 
Clayton being the grandfather of Abraham T. 
Clayton. Richard E. Clayton, grandfather, mar- 
ried Elizabeth Delve, daughter of Elias Delve, of 
Philadelphia, the family being of French ances- 
try. The children of Richard E. and Elizabeth 
(Delve) Clayton were: Rosanna, married Benja- 
min Hillborn (deceased) ; George S., married 
Annie Wipert; Richard E., married Emma Bay- 
ley ; Jehu ; Frank, who died in defense of his 
country during the war for the Union, while he 
was confined in Andersonville prison ; Joel, died 
in 1868, unmarried ; Elizabeth, wife of Andrew 
Roberts ; Levin, married Mary Fetters ; Mary 
Ann, deceased. Richard Clayton died in 18 — . 
His widow, Elizabeth Delve Clayton, died June 
16, 1893, at the advanced age of eighty-five years. 

The children of Jehu and Christianna Harris 
Clayton: Abraham T., subject of this sketch; 
Ella Lizzie, wife of ^Maurice P. Horner, thev hav- 
ing four daughters, Anna, Edith, Laura, Mildred, 
and one son who died in infancy; Anna Mary, 
died in infancy. By a previous marriage of Mrs. 
Clayton with j\lr. Town, she had one daughter, 
Mrs. Levina Prince. 

Abraham T. Cla\ton acquired his elementary 
education in the public schools of Bucks county, 
Pennsylvania, and completed it in the public 
schools of Philadelphia. He studied pharmacy in 
the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, graduat- 
ing March 15. 1884. He soon afterwards engaged 



in business in Ogontz, and has ever since effic- 
iently conducted the only drug store in the town. 

Mr. Clayton married at Frankford, Pennsyl- 
vania, November 30, 1887, Anna F. Shallcross. 
They have had the following children : Ella ]May, 
born January 12, 1889; Abraham T., Jr., born 
October 17, 1890; Lottie Christine, born Julv 10, 
1894. 

Mr. Clayton is a member of the school board 
of Cheltenham township. Fraternally he affiliates 
with Friendship Lodge No. 400, of Jenkintown, 
Free and Accepted Masons ; Abington Chapter, 
No. 245, Royal Arch Alasons, of Jenkintown ; 
Philadelphia Consistory, thirty-second degree, 
A. A. S. R. ; St. John's Commandery, No. 4, 
Knights Templar; Abington Lodge, No. 388, 
Knights of Pythias, Ogontz ; Shekinah Castle No. 
26, Knights of the Golden Eagle, Ogontz ; Martha 
Washington Council, Junior Order United Amer- 
ican Mechanics, and Jenkintown Council, Royal 
Arcanum. In politics Mr. Clayton is an active 
worker in the ranks of the Republican party, and 
he has been a delegate on frequent occasions to 
party conventions. Mr. Clayton and his family 
attend St. Paul's Episcopal church at Ogontz. 

The Harris family, maternal ancestors of Mr. 
Clayton, are old settlers of Bustleton, above 
Frankford, in Philadelphia. The grandparents 
were Theophilus and Eleanor, who passed their 
entire lives in Bucks county, Pennsylvania. The 
great-great-grandfather, also named Theophilus, 
was an eminent Baptist minister, and presented 
the Baptist church to the congregation in Bustle- 
ton. The Harris family owned large tracts of 
land in the vicinity, and gave the land used for the 
burial ground. The Harris family are supposed 
to be of ^^'elsh ancestry, and settled in Bustleton 
at a very early date. The children of Theophilus 
and Eleanor Harris : Mary, wife of John B. Her- 
itage ; Theophilus, married Miss Fletcher, now 
deceased; Christianna, (Mrs. Clayton); Ellen 
and Thomas, twins, Ellen being the wife of 
George W. Heritage. 

Benjamin Shallcross, father of ^Nlrs. Clayton, 
is a member of an old family in Frankford and 
vicinity. He was the son of Leonard and Eliza 
(Langcake) Shallcross, natives of Frankford, 



6o 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Pennsylvania. JJenjamin Shallcross married 
Frances Corson, daughter of Benjamin and Mary 
(Scull) Corson. Benjamin and Mary Shallcross' 
children : John, married Lucy W. Cottman. and 
have one child, John Burton; Leonard Chapman, 
married Annie Cripps, and they have three chil- 
dren, Howard, Ethel and Elizabeth ; Lizzie May, 
married Charles Ford ; Mrs. Clayton ; Anna F. ; 
Sarah Chapman, wife of Clarence E. Hammond, 
their children being Clarence and Helen (died in 
infancy) ; Lettie M., wife of Lincoln Cartledge, 
their children being Lincoln, Jr., and Charlotte; 
Catharine Finn, wife of Paul Craig, their children 
being Helen and Catharine. 

MARY ROBERTS LIVEZEY, daughter of 
Hugh and Alice A. Roberts, is a native of Wil- 
mington, Delaware, where she was born Tenth- 
month (October) 25, 1847. Her earlier years 
were spent in that city, in Cecil county, Mary- 
land, and in Bucks, Philadelphia, and Montgom- 
ery counties of Pennsylvania, the family having 
changed their location from time to time. She 
attended the public schools in these various lo- 
calities, and also obtained such knowledge as 
was gained in the schoolrooms where she was 
engaged in the instruction of pupils of various 
ages and acquirements. 

In 186 1 Hugh Roberts, having sold the farm 
in Maryland which he had owned for several 
years, removed to Bucks county, Pennsylvania, 
and thence after two years to Philadelphia, lo- 
cating in Gwynedd, Montgomer\- count}-, and 
still later to Norristown. 

Mary Roberts became a teacher in the puljlic 
schools at Franklinville, in Whitpain township, 
in the fall of 1866, it being located near the farm 
on which the family resided for nearly twenty- 
years. Meeting with much success in her calling 
of teacher, she remained in that position si.x 
years, when she became principal of what was 
later the Audenried school, in Cheltenham town- 
ship, where she remained another six years. In 
this position one of her directors was Thomas 
Williams, for many years president of the Chel- 
tenham school board and an active friend of edu- 
cation, and a friendship was formed between the 



two which lasted until his death, a few years ago. 

In Eleventh-month, 1877, Mary Roberts be- 
came the wife of Samuel Livezey, son of Thomas 
and Rachel (Richardson) Livezey, of Plymouth 
fleeting. They have one child, Thomas Hugh 
Livezey, born Tenth-month 18, 1879, who is em- 
ployed in a responsible position at the PencoyQ 
Iron Works. He married Tenth-month i, 1902, 
Joanna M., daughter of \\'illiam (deceased) 
and Caroline R. Miller, of Blue Bell. 

Samuel Livezey was employed for many 
years in one or another of the great packing 
houses of Chicago, and thither he removed again 
with his family soon after the birlli of tlu-ir child, 
ren-iaining there several years Init returning again 
to Plymouth IMeeting and locating finally in X<ir- 
ristown, on ^Marshall street, above Stanbridge 
(No. 908), Norristown, Their son resides a 
few doors above, at No. 928 ^Marshall street. 
Samuel Livezey has been for sonie years retired 
from business. 

Mary R. Livezey has taken a very active part 
in aiding the Montgomery County Historical 
Society to clear of debt its property on Penn 
street, adjoining the public scquare, having of- 
ficiated as chairman of five annual suppers held 
for that purpose on Washington's birthday, and 
having, with the aid of an organization of women 
whom she called around her, raised about two 
thousand and five hundred dollars in this way. 

She has also been active in the Society of 
Friends, taking an active part in Philadelphia 
Yearly ]Meeting and in First Day School and 
Philanthropic work generally, as well as in the 
movement for equal rights for women, of which 
she is an earnest advocate, holding that the an- 
ticjuated idea that man is a superior being and 
woman is inferior is an error that should be ban- 
ished from the statute books of the state b\- a])- 
propriate legislation of a more liberal character 
than that now existing. The society of Friends 
has always recognized the equality of the sexes 
and its influence has been exerted for the two 
centuries and a half of its existence in favor of 
the enfranchisement of women. 

Educated in such a school, Mary R. Livezey 
has profited by its lessons 'and is an able and 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



6i 



fearless advocate of other reforms, including 
temperance, personal purity and kindred objects. 
She has been useful and effective in these and 
other channels, taking her stand with the pro- 
gressive and earnest men and women of the day 
in efforts to enlighten the public mind, break 
down the authority of tradition and superstition 
and point the way to a better era than any which 
the world has ever seen. 

SAMUEL NOBLE, dealer in dairy products 
at Jenkintown, Pennsylvania, is a member of an 
old family long resident in that section of the state 
of Pennsylvania. He is the son of Samuel ^^^ 
and Elizabeth H. (Mather) Noble. He is a na- 
tive of Abington township, having been born at 
the old homestead, now the grounds of the Golf 
Club, November i8, 1849. 

William Noble and his wife Frances, who 
were the progenitors of the family, were natives 
of the city of Bristol, England, where, being con- 
sistent members of the Society of Friends, then 
proscribed on account of their religious faith, they 
suffered persecution. Their son Abel, in 1684, 
when he was not yet of age, emigrated to Amer- 
ica and settled in Philadelphia. He learned the 
trade of a cooper, and subsequently followed it 
for a time, but subsequently became the owner of 
an extensive tract of land in Bucks county, on 
which he settled. Among his children was Joseph, 
great-great-grandfather of Samuel Noble, the 
subject of this sketch. Joseph Noble married 
Mary, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Lov- 
ett) Smith, her father having been one of four 
brothers who emigrated from England and settled 
in Burlington county, New Jersey, where they 
founded the city of Burlington. They were long- 
known as the "Burlington Smiths", the designa- 
tion attaching also to their descendants, the fam- 
ily being owners of the ground on which the city 
now stands, and also of much valuable property 
adjacent. Samuel and Mary Noble, the latter be- 
coming Mrs. Samuel Wetherill, were children of 
Joseph and Mary Noble. Samuel married Lydia, 
daughter of Isaac Cooper, of New Jersey, in 
1746. Their children were eight in number, sev- 
eral of them dying young. Those who grew to 



maturity were Hannah (Mrs. William Norton), 
Samuel and Richard. Samuel was born in 1766. 
He married, in 1792, Elizabeth, daughter of Rob- 
ert Tompkins, of Philadelphia. Of their children, 
Joseph, born in 1799, died in 1854; Dr. Charles, 
born in 1801, died in 1873; Lydia, married 
Thomas Longstreth, died in 1876. Samuel 
Noble's first wife, Lydia, dying, he married a sec- 
ond time, in 1817, Sarah, daughter of Samuel 
Webster, of New Jersey. The children of the 
second marriage were Samuel W. and Richard. 

Samuel W. Noble, father of Samuel Noble, 
was born August 15, 1818, in Philadelphia. His 
father was at that time engaged in business in 
that city as a tanner and currier. Samuel W. re- 
sided there until he was about seventeen years of 
age, meanwhile attending school and acquiring a 
good English education. Developing a fondness 
for agricultural pursuits, he removed to Byberry, 
where he became proficient in the occupation of 
farming. In 1838 the father purchased a farm of 
eighty acres in Abington township, Montgomery 
county, and subsequently an additional thirty-five 
acres immediately adjoining the other. In 1839 
Samuel W. Noble removed to this farm, and upon 
it his entire life ever after was spent in agricul- 
tural pursuits and in the nursery business. He 
married, October 30, 1844, Elizabeth H., daugh- 
ter of John and Martha P. Mather, of Chelten- 
ham township. Their children : Henry A., born in 
1845, now a resident of Philadelphia ; Sarah, died 
young; John M., born in 1848, deceased; Samuel, 
born in 1849 ; Clara, deceased ; Howard, born in 
1852, teller of the Jenkintown National Bank; 
Lydia L., deceased ; Franklin, born in 1855, "ow 
residing in New York; Thomas L., born in 1857, 
residing in Abington ; Charles M., born in 1859, 
now a resident of Idaho; Mary T., born in 1861, 
married Joseph Lippincott : Anna, born in 1862; 
Elizabeth, deceased. 

Samuel \\'. Noble was an active man in his 
community, being a consistent member of the So- 
ciety of Friends, and ever attentive to his relig- 
ious, social and other duties. He devoted much 
attention to his chosen pursuits, farming and hor- 
ticulture. He was for many years a member of 
the Pcnnsvlvania Horticultural ScicieU'. He was 



62 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



in 1875 elected president of the Jenkintown 
National Bank, of which he was one of the incor- 
porators. He was secretary and treasurer of the 
Cheltenham and Willow Grove Turnpike Com- 
pany, and at one time was president of the Union 
Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Montgomery 
county. He was for more than forty years treas- 
urer of the Abington Library Company, an insti- 
tution that was organized in 1804 and was very 
useful and popular. He was influential in every 
neighborhood enterprise that tended towards the 
advancement of the interests of the public. He 
was a Republican in politics, and served as a 
school director for a number of years, but was in 
no sense an office seeker. The family have been 
Friends for seven generations, and are now mem- 
bers of Abington Meeting, one of the oldest in the 
country. Samuel W. Noble died in 1887, at the 
age of sixty-nine years. 

Samuel Noble was educated in Abington 
Friends' School and the Friends' Central School, 
Philadelphia, under the care of Aaran B. Ivins, a 
very thorough teacher. He spent his early life on 
the homestead farm, remaining there until 1899, 
when the farm was sold and he purchased a farm 
in Buckingham township, Bucks county, Penn- 
sylvania, where since that time he has engaged in 
agricultural pursuits and in dairying. He has 
filled the position of school director. 

JAY COOKE, a resident and citizen of Mont- 
gomery county, Pennsylvania, honored through- 
out the nation and favorably known to the entire 
civilized world for his eminently useful and pa- 
triotic services during the Civil war, was to the 
nation in that tremendous struggle what another 
masterly financier, Robert Morris, was to it in 
its infancy, during the battling for independence. 

He is a native of Ohio, born in Sandusky, Au- 
gust 10, 1821. He is of Puritan ancestry, and his 
father, Eleutheros Cooke, was an early settler in 
that state. The elder Cooke located at what was 
then called Portland, which was then changing 
from an Indian village to what is now known as 
the city of Sandusky, and there built the first 
stone house in the village. He was the leading 
lawyer in that region, and represented his district 



in the legislature for a number of years, both be- 
fore and after he had served in congress, (1831- 
2^) and was primarily instrumental in procuring 
the granting of the first railroad charter in the 
world, in 1826. Mr. Cooke was a man of great 
public prominence, and was orator on the occa- 
sion of a visit by President Harrison (1835) and 
other of the great men of that day. 

Jay Cooke, after completing his education, en- 
tered the banking house of Enoch White Clark & 
Company, in Philadelphia, in 1838. He soon gave 
evidence of that masterly ability which was after- 
ward to stamp him as the foremost financier of 
the world in his day, and before attaining his ma- 
jority was made the confidential clerk of the firm, 
with power of attorney, and personally conducted 
many of its most important transactions. On his 
twenty-first birthday he was admitted to partner- 
ship, and was a member of the firm for sixteen 
years. During this period he personally effected 
the sale of the Western, Northern, Wyoming & 
Delaware Divisions of the Pennsylvania Canal, 
and assisted in the negotiation of the government 
loans required to carry on the Mexican war. 
This special experience served to fit him for the 
masterly part he was to take in financiering the 
much more important conflict of 1861-65. 

Early in 1861 Mr. Cooke associated with him- 
self William G. Moorhead in the banking firm of 
Jay Cooke & Company. The firm opened houses 
in New York and Washington City, under its 
own name, and established a branch house in 
London in connection with Hugh McCulloch & 
Company, under the firm name of Jay Cooke, Mc- 
Culloch & Company. This banking business, 
probably the most extensive in the country, was 
carried on with entire success, including the build- 
ing and financing of nearly all the older railroads 
of the country, and until the setting in of the 
panic of 1873, the inevitable revulsion from the 
unprecedented inflation of the period immediately 
following the war. The era of shrinkage and 
liquidation had come, and many hitherto prosper- 
ous banking establishments went down in the gen- 
eral crash. Jay Cooke & Company were heavily 
involved in consequence of their effort to carry 
through the construction of the Northern Pacific 




JAY COOKE 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



63 



Railroad,' the most stupendous and important en- 
terprise of the times. Their suspension was a na- 
tional calamity, and expressions of regret were un- 
iversal, the fact being generally recognized that 
their failure was consequent upon their making 
possible the construction of that great transcon- 
tinental line which promised so much to the pros- 
perit}- and development of the west and of the na- 
tion at large. It is gratifying to note that Mr. 
Cooke, with wonderful courage and indominatable 
will, set himself to the work of self-restoration, 
and in a few years had retrieved his shattered 
fortune. 

A peculiar tribute is due Mr. Cooke for his 
great services during the Civil war period. The 
story is one which in a sense belongs to a past 
age, and only one who lived through the tre- 
mendous conflict which absorbed the energies of 
the American government and of the people for 
nearly five years can form an adequate idea of the 
vastness of his task and of the necessities which 
called into exercise his magnificent abilities as a 
financier. Without the successful negotiation of 
the government loans, the war could not but have 
proved a failure, no matter how brave the sil- 
diers of the Union upon the field of battle, or how 
skillful their generals. ' When President Lincoln 
issued his initial call for seventy-five thousand 
men, following the assault upon Fort Sumter, 
the national treasury was practically bankrupt, 
and the credit of the country was at a low ebb. 
President Buchanan had been obliged to pay 
twelve per cent, interest for a loan to carry on 
the government upon its ordinary basis during the 
latter part of his administration. The enormous 
sums of money required to equip and maintain the 
army and navy, in fact to create them, were not 
to be had until the genius of l\Ir. Cooke was in- 
voked to aid in the sale of the government bonds 
whose issuance was imperatively necessary as the 
sole resort. To Mr. Cooke, as the fiscal agent of 
the government, was entrusted the great task of 
negotiating the loans, and nobly did he fulfill the 
trust, devoting to it his undivided attention and 
w cighing himself down with a vastness of respon- 
sibility which would have crushed one of less 
heroic mould. Appealing to the patriotism of the 



American people and enlisting the aid of their 
local leaders in every walk of life, he achieved a 
remarkable success, negotiating all the great gov- 
ernment loans, amounting to the stupendous sum 
of more than two thousand million of dollars, and 
at a less compensation that his firm had received 
for negotiating the Mexican war loans of less 
than seventy million dollars. At one critical time 
he saved to the United States Treasury one hun- 
dred millions of dollars, at the same time elevat- 
ing the national credit to a higher point than that 
of any nation on earth, and making possible the 
death-stroke to the great rebellion. It is not too 
much to say that Mr. Cooke was in the field of 
these, his stupendous transactions, as necessary to 
this great result as was Lincoln in the presidency, 
Grant on the field, and Farragut on the sea. 
During all the years of the great conflict, Mr. 
Cooke enjoyed confidential relations with the prin- 
cipal public men of that day. He made repeated 
visits to Washington for conference with Presi- 
dent Lincoln, Secretary of the Treasurry Chase, 
Senators Fessenden and Sherman, and General 
Grant, besides many others, and all the great 
men named visited him from time to time at his 
home near Philadelphia. 

For many years past Mr. Cooke has resided in 
Montgomery county, in the serene enjoyment of 
a happy and well earned retirement. Upwards of 
eighty years of age, he preserves his mental fac- 
ulties unimpaired, keeping closely in touch with 
the events of a period less stirring than was his 
own, and secure in the afifection of his family and 
of a troop of friends who hold him in honor for 
the usefulness of his life and the nobility of his 
character. Soon after the war he erected the pal- 
atial residence which is his home in Cheltenham 
township, at Ogontz, so named for the Indian 
Chief of the early days of Ohio, his father's 
chosen friend, upon whose shoulder he had been 
carried as a child. 

ANDREW KEEL ARGUE, a leading real 
estate and insurance agent of Jenkintown, Penn- 
sylvania, is a native of Philadelphia, where he was 
born January 14, i860. He is the son of George 
W. and Hannah M. (Keel) Argue. His maternal 



64 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



ancestors were of German origin. On his father's 
side they were probably of French-Huguenot ex- 
traction, although at an early date they emigrated 
to Ireland. It is believed that the grandfather, 
Robert Argue, was the progenitor of the family 
in this country. He located at Evansburg, in 
Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. He was a 
veteran of the war of 1812. He resided in Evans- 
burg until near the close of his life, when he went 
to reside with his son, George W., in Philadelphia, 
and he and his wife both died in that city. He 
married Sarah Parks. He had a brother, David, 
who was a resident of Philadelphia, where he was 
engaged in business as a contractor, he having 
two sons and two daughters. Of the sons, Will- 
iam resided in Washington, and Robert in Phila- 
delphia. 

George W. Argue was the only son of his 
parents. He was born in Evansburg, and spent 
his early life on the homestead farm. He subse- 
quently became a locomotive engineer, and a resi- 
dent of Philadelphia because of his employment 
in that city. The latter part of his life was spent 
in Norristown, where he died. He married Han- 
nah M. Keel, of an old Montgomery county fam- 
ily. Their children : Theodore, died in infancy ; 
Robert David, who married first Sarah Barr, and 
had one child, May, wife of Charles Felter, his 
second wife being Gussie Richter, by whom there 
were no children; Andrew K., subject of this 
sketch; Annie E., Sarah J., wife of George Mc- 
Coy, who resides in Norristown. 

Andrew K. Argue acquired his education in 
the public schools of Philadelphia. After leav- 
ing school he engaged with C. H. Royal in the 
leather business. He was next employed with 
McNeely & Co., as leather assorter, and then for 
a time with Costello, Covey & Co., as assorter 
and traveling salesman. He was also engaged 
with Francis Haggerty in a similar capacity, the 
duties of general manager being added, and with 
Selser, Meurer & Co. In 1889 he engaged in the 
leather business on his own account in Philadel- 
phia. In 1896 he retired from it, and established 
a fire and life insurance business in the borough 
of Jenkintown, to which somewhat later he added 
real estate. 



Mr. Argue married, in Philadelphia, May 9, 
1882, Mary E., born October 8, 1858, daughter of 
Andrew Watson. Their children are: i. Andrew 
S., born February 8, 1883 ; 2. Theodore E., born 
July 23, 1884, died June 22, 1885 ; 3. Grace M., 
born February 11, 1886, died November 7, 1890; 
4. Elsie K., bom October 12, 1887; 5. Mabel A., 
born August 15, 1889, died November 17, 1890; 
6. Robert E., born July 4, 1891 ; 7. Edith M., 
born November 18, 1892; 8. Harold S., born May 
2, 1894; 9. Arthur C, born June 15, 1896; 10. 
Mary E., born May 28, 1899, died August 2, 
1899; II. Ruth, born March 6, 1901, died July 
25, 1901. 

JOHN H. REX. The Rex family are of 
German origin, having come to this country a 
century and a half ago. Levi Rex (great-grand- 
father), was a resident of Chestnut Hill. He 
married Catharine Riter, the couple having a 
large family of children. Among his children 
was John Rex (grandfather), who married 
Sarah Lentz. The couple lived on a farm in 
Whitpain township which descended to him 
from his , father, Levi Rex. John Rex was an 
active Whig, and on retiring from the farm, re- 
moved to Norristown, where he lived at the lo- 
cation on Main street afterwards occupied by 
Dr. Louis W. Read, and now by Dr. A. H. Read 
and sister. 

John S. Rex (father) married Charlotte 
Hobensack, a member of a well known family 
in that section of Montgomery county. John H. 
Rex was born in Whitpain township, September 
18, 1870. He attended successively the public 
schools of the neighborhood ; Sunnyside School, 
Ambler, conducted for many years by the Misses 
Knight ; the William Penn Charter School, a 
Friends' institution, founded more than two cen- 
turies ago and located on Twelfth street below 
Market, Philadelphia ; the University of Penn- 
sylvania, in the Arts Department, where he 
studied two years preparatory to the law course, 
entering the law department in 1890. After some 
time spent in study, his health became impaired 
and he went west, residing at Colorado Springs 
for a year or more. Having recovered com- 




Jri^jV./t^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



6.^ 



pletely, he returned to Montgoniery county and 
became a law student under the late Charles 
Hunsicker, and on his death, continued his legal 
studies with the late Henry R. Brown. He was 
admitted to the bar in June, 1896. About five 
years ago he located with Air. Brown in His- 
torical Hall where he has continued his legal 
practice with considerable success. In 1900 he 
was elected a member of the town council of Nor- 
ristown, serving for three years, and resigning 
during the term because he has been nominated 
and elected a member of the house of represent- 
atives of Pennsylvania, on the Republican ticket, 
in November, 1902. 

Mr. Rex, as well as his parents, took up his 
residence in Norristown more than a dozen years 
ago, they occupying elegant residences on West 
Main street. Mr. Rex married Emily, daugh- 
ter of Dr. Geeorge T. Harvey, and Mary, his 
wife (deceased), of Doylestown, Pennsylvania. 
The Harveys are an old Bucks county family, 
their ancestors being among the early settlers of 
that part of the state. The couple have one 
child, Robert Bertram, born June 24, 1902. 

As a member of the town council Mr. Rex 
was progressive, public spirited and an earnest 
advocate of borough improvements of every kind. 
He was one of the most active as well as most 
useful members of that body. In the legislature 
Mr. Rex took a very active part in business, be- 
ing a member of several important committees 
and introducing many notable measures. 

In politics Mr. Rex has made a reputation as 
an earnest and aggressive Republican, a pleasing 
and powerful speaker, and an indefatigable 
worker for party success. During the campaign 
of 1902, when he was a candidate for assembly- 
man, he visited all sections of the county, speak- 
ing in behalf of the election of Samuel W. Penny- 
packer for governor, and his party ticket, con- 
tributing greatly to the splendid majority re- 
corded in November of that year. His ability 
as a public speaker was generally recognized by 
his party associates and by Republican leaders. 

In addition to his labors in law and politics, 
Mr. Rex has engaged very successfully in build- 
ing houses in West Norristown, as well as in 
5 



other sections of the borough. Either alone or 
in conjunction with others, he has erected ele- 
gant residences on Lafayette, Oak, Main, George 
and Kohn streets, and Forest Avenue, in the 
sale of which he has been remarkably successful- 
Mr. Rex is a member of the Masonic order, the 
B. P. O. E. and of the Historical Society of 
Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. He is also 
a member of the Protestant Episcopal church. 

HAMILTON CLAYTON, proprietor of the 
hotel at Branchtown, in the Twenty-second ward', 
of the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is a: 
representative of one of the oldest, best knowru 
and most prominent families in Montgomery 
county. He was born in Moreland township, in 
the lower section of Montgomery county, and ad- 
jacent to the rural portion of Philadelphia, Sep- 
tember 14, 1832, a son of Ezekial and Ann (Sny- 
der) Clayton. 

Ezekial Clayton (father) was a native of 
Moreland township, Montgomery county, and his 
entire life was spent in that vicinity. He was ex- 
tensively engaged in agricultural pursuits, from- 
which he derived a lucrative income. He married' 
Ann Snyder, daughter of Christian and Sarah' 
(Bennett) Snyder, the former named having: 
been elected to the position of sheriff of Mont- 
gomery county in 1825, and served in that capac- 
ity for three years. Ten children were the issue 
of this marriage, the majority of whom attained 
years of manhood and womanhood, married, and 
reared families. The surviving members of the 
family are : Hamilton, mentioned at length herein- 
after: and Jonathan Clayton. 

Hamilton Clayton resided in his native town- 
ship until he was about thirty years of age, as- 
sisting his father on the farm in his boyhood days, 
and attending the schools of the neighborhood, in 
which he succeeded in obtaining a fair education. 
Not being desirous of making farming his life 
work, he served an apprenticeship at the trade of 
harness making, and after thoroughly mastering 
the details of this line of industry he followed it 
successfully for a number of years. Later he en- 
gaged in the business of stage driving, which prior 
to the intrndnrtion of steam railroads was an oc- 



66 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



cupation of some importance and a lucrative 
means of livelihood. For almost half a century, 
however, he has been the proprietor of the 
Branchtown Hotel, located on the Old York road, 
and dating back considerably more than a cen- 
tury. He is of a genial and cheerful disposition, at- 
tentive and considerate to the wants and wishes of 
his patrons, and therefore enjoys the distinction 
of being the most popular and obliging host in the 
section of the city in which he resides. He is also 
a reliable and public-spirited citizen, promoting 
the interests of his city, state, and nation to the 
best of his ability. 

Hamilton Clayton was married May 30, i860, 
to Margaret Shelmire, who was born January 3, 
1843, a daughter of George F. and Sarah H. 
(Clayton) Shelmire, both of whom were natives 
of Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. Their 
children were: i. Eleanor, born August 21, 1861, 
became the wife of George Childs Homiller ; 2. 
Josephine B., born October 9, 1864, became the 
wife of Walter B. Nimmo ; 3. Emma, born De- 
cember 31, 1865; 4. Montgomery B., born De- 
cember 27, 1867, died September 24, 1883; 5. 
Jennie, born March 8, 1869. 

ALFRED P. HALLOWELL, ]M. D. The 
Hallowells are an old family in Montgomery 
county, Pennsylvania, dating back to the time of 
William Penn, the founder of the province. John 
and Mary (Sharpe) Hallowell emigrated to 
Darby, Pennsylvania, from Nottinghamshire, 
England, about 1682, and in 1696 settled at Ab- 
ington, where he purchased six hundred and thirty 
acres of land. John had been married twice, his 
first wife being Sarah, who bore him one child. 
His second wife, Mary (Sharpe) Hallowell, bore 
him nine children, three of whom were born in 
England, the others in America. They were: 
Sarah, 1677; Thomas, 1679; Mary. 16S1 : John, 
1685; Elizabeth, 1687; Hannah, 1689: Samuel, 
1692; Benjamin, 1694: and Jane, 1696. 

Thomas Hallowell, second child of John and 
Mary Hallowell, married, in 1702, at Darby, 
Pennsylvania, Rosamond Till, and became the 
progenitor of a numerous and influential family. 
Their children were: John, born in 1703; ]Mary, 



1705; Thomas, 1706; William, ; Rosamond, 

1709; Elizabeth, 171 1; Sarah, 1714; Thomas, 
1715; Samuel, 1717; and Joseph, 1719. 

William Hallowell, son of Thomas and Rosa- 
mond (Till) Hallowell, was twice married. His 
first wife was Margaret Tyson, who bore him 
twelve children. She was born in 1708, died in 
1753, and was a daughter of Matthias or Matthew 
and Mary Tyson. Their children were : Thomas, 
born in 1730; Rosamond, 1731 ; Matthew, 1733; 
William, 1734; John, 1736; Tynear, 1739; David, 
1740; Mary, 1742; Isaac, 1744; John, 1746; John 
3d, 1749; and Joshua, 1751. 

John Hallowell, son of William and Margaret 
(Tyson) Hallowell, was born in 1749. He re- 
sided on the old homestead which has been in the 
possession of the family since 1783, when he pur- 
chased it from its previous owners, Robert Paul 
and his wife, Rachel Paul, the deed being dated 
April 19, 1783. He resided on this farm until his 
death in 1792, which was caused by yellow fever 
contracted while on a business trip to Philadel- 
phia, it being then epidemic in that city. Prior to 
the Revolutionary war he owned and operated a 
mill on the Pennypack creek. He married, No- 
vember 3, 1774, Martha Roberts, who was born 
IMarch 9, 1753, daughter of Thomas, Jr., and Leti- 
tia Roberts, of j\Iilford township, Bucks county, 
Pennsylvania. Their children were: Isaac, born 
in 1776, married Alary Fletcher; Israel, mentioned 
hereinafter: Ann. born in 1781, became the wife 
of Joseph Williams ; and John R., born in 1785, 
who married Ann Jarrett. 

Israel Hallowell, second son of John and 
JMartha Hallowell, was born November 8, 1777. 
He purchased the old mill and homestead from 
his brother Isaac, who inherited the property, and 
resided there until his death, December 22, 1853. 
He married Mary Jarrett, who was born June 5, 
1 78 1, died January 6, 1867. Their children were : 
Ann L., born September 23, 1806, died July 4, 
1882; she was the wife of Isaac Alather, of Jen- 
kintown, probably the oldest resident of Mont- 
gomery county, a sketch of whom appears else- 
where in this work. Martha, born March 8, 
1809, died July 5. 1880 ; she was the wife of Sam- 
uel Parry, father of Franklin. John, born June 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



67 



25, 181 1, died January 6, 1890; he was married 
to Rachel WilHams, who was born July 23, 181 2, 
and long deceased. Tacy, born October 22, 1815, 
died in March, 1891, was the wife of David East- 
burn. \V. Jarrett, mentioned hereinafter. Harry 
W. Israel, born February 18, 1819, married Re- 
becca Williams. Mary, born December 21, 1821, 
died April 23, 1897. Jonas, born April 10, 1824, 
died December 25, 1899 ; he married Esther 
Fenton. 

\Y. Jarrett Hallowell, second son of Israel and 
Hilary Hallowell, was born on the homestead on 
June 8, 1816, and lived there his entire life. His 
active career was devoted to farming and milling. 
He was a very useful man in his communit}-, and 
was held in high esteem by all who knew him. He 
was united in marriage to Lydia A. Lloyd, who 
was born in Moreland township, a daughter of 
Joim and Sidney (Paul) Lloyd. Their children 
were : ;\Iary J., born April 3, 1850, died July 19, 
1850 ; John L.. mentioned hereinafter ; Ella L., 
born December 23, 1852 ; Alary J., second, born 
February 28, 1855, became the wife of Morris 
Williams, and died March 21, 1883, leaving one 
child, Mary Williams; Tacy J., born July 11, 
1858. W. Jarrett Hallowell died February 20, 
1897. 

John L. Hallowell, only son of W. Jarrett and 
L^-dia A. Hallowell, was born April 21, 1851, on 
the old homestead where he still resides. He was 
educated at the Abington Friends' School ; at 
Loller Academy, a somewhat celebrated school at 
Hatboro ; at Friends' Central School, at Phila- 
delphia; and Pierce's Business College, in Phila- 
delphia, where he pursued a year's course. Since 
leaving school he has devoted himself to farming 
and milling, residing all his life on the homestead. 
He is a Republican in politics, and served as su- 
pervisor in 1 89 1, and township auditor for several 
terms. 

In Horsham township, Montgomery county, 
Pennsylvania, October 14, 1875, Mr. Hallowell 
married Laura Phillips, who was born September 
3, 1852, a daughter of Alfred and Mary F. 
(Comly) Phillips. Their children are : Walter, 
born November i, 1876: and Alfred P. 

Alfred P. Hallowell, second son of John L. 



and Laura Hallowell, was born in Bethayres, 
Pennsylvania, March 18, 1878. He was educated 
in the Abington Friends' School, and after com- 
pleting his studies there began the study of medi- 
cine in the Hahnemann Medical College at Phila- 
delphia, graduating therefrom in 1900. For eigh- 
teen months thereafter he was the physician in the 
Children's Homeopathic Hospital. He began the 
practice of his profession at Ashbourne in 1902, 
and since that date has been engaged with build- 
ing up a large and lucrative practice, which is con- 
stantly increasing in volume and importance. He 
is a popular citizen, and is highly esteemed in the 
community in which he resides. 

DR. DA^TD GASTON HAR\'EY. a popu- 
lar physician and surgeon of Moreland township, 
residing at Huntingdon Valley, is a native of Phil- 
adelphia. He was born in that city, September 16, 
1873. He is a son of David and Sarah (Kelley) 
Harvey, both residents of that city and natives of 
Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Harvey was educated in the public schools 
of Philadelphia, and in the Manual Training 
School. He read medicine in the office of Dr. 
James S. Shoemaker for one year. He next took 
a preparatory course before entering the Hahne- 
mann Homeopathic Medical College, and after 
three years of study in that institution he gradu- 
ated with honors, ]\Iay 8, 1894. After his gradu- 
ation he spent one year in the Children's Homeo- 
pathic Hospital in Philadelphia. Since 1895 he 
has been continuously engaged in the general 
practice of medicine in Huntingdon \'alley, Beth- 
ayres, and elsewhere in that vicinity. Dr. Har- 
vey is a reliable physician, and is generally re- 
garded as a successful and skillful practitioner. 
He is held in high esteem for his careful atten- 
tion to his patients and his many excellent quali- 
ties. He is a member of the Alumni Association 
of Hahnemann College, and also of the Twenty- 
fourth W^ard Medical Society of Philadelphia. He 
is also a member of Eagle Lodge, No. 222, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, of Huntingdon 
Valley. He is a progressive citizen, manifesting 
an active interest in whatever is calculated to 
promote the prosperity of his section of the 



68 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



count}', and is deeply interested in public affairs. 
In politics he is a Republican, although too much 
engrossed in his practice of his profession to de- 
vote much time or attention to politics. In re- 
ligious faith. Dr. Harvey is a Presbyterian, be- 
ing a member of that church. 

Dr. Harvey married, April 24, 1S91, Jane T., 
daughter of ex-county treasurer Henry W., and 
Margaret (Thomson) Hallowell, well known 
Friends of that vicinity. The couple have two 
children, Elizabeth, born June i, 1902, and Henry 
W. Hallowell, born February 23, 1904. (For a full 
account of the Hallowell family, see the sketch of 
Henry W. Hallowell, elsewhere in this work.) 

WILLIAM J. BINDER, editor and pro- 
prietor of the Daily Pottstoivn Ledger and the 
Montgomery Ledger of Pottstown, was born in 
East Nantmeal township, Chester county, Penn- 
sylvania, September 30, 1843. He is the son of 
John and Anna Mary (Steltz) Binder. 

John Binder (father) was born at Yellow 
Springs, Chester county. He learned the car- 
penter trade, following it to some extent. He 
also farmed for a few years. The greater part 
of his life, however, was spent in teaching school. 
He was reared mostly in Montgomery county 
and in 1835 returned to Chester county where 
he remained until 1856, when he removed to 
Pottstown, where he died. He taught in the 
schools of both counties and after going to Potts- 
town conducted a private school there. During 
his residence in Chester county he taught school 
and farmed at the same time, spending his 
winters in the former occupation and his sum- 
mers in the latter. He owned a farm in East 
Nantmeal township. He died in 1866, at the age 
of fifty-eight years. His wife died in 1878, at 
the age of seventy-six 3'€ars. Both were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which 
he took an active part. He was a Democrat un- 
til the time of the Civil war when he became a 
Republican and remained so until his death. 

John Binder married Anna Mary Steltz, 
daug-hter of Valentine Steltz, of New Hanover 
township, Montgomery county. She was born 
at Falckner's Swamp, New Hanover township, 



Montgomery county. They had four children : 
Aaron M. (deoeased), a soldier in the Civil war, 
of Company A, Second Minnesota Veteran In- 
fantry, Fourteenth Corps ; Elizabeth, wife of 
David Herst, of Easton, Pennsylvania ; Tamsen, 
widow of Jeremiah H. Binder, of Pottstown; 
and William J. Binder. 

Jacob Binder (grandfather) was born in 
Pennsylvania 'and was a farmer. He died well 
advanced in years. His wife was Susanna Bin- 
der, who lived to a very great age. They had a 
large family. 

The father of Jacob Binder was Jacob Bin- 
der, Sr., (great-grandfather). His father was 
Moses Binder (great-great-grandfather). His 
father was Casper Binder (great-great-great- 
grandfather), and his father was Rohland 
Binder (great-great-great-great-grandfather) . 
Moses Binder was the emigrant and the founder 
of the family in America. He came from Wur- 
temberg, Germany, in the ship Francis and Eliz- 
abeth, and landed at Philadelphia, September 
21, 1742. He located near Sassamansville, New 
Hanover township, where he died and was buried 
in the Lutheran cemetery at Falckner Swamp. 
He was an active member of that church. 

The maternal grandfather of William J. Bin- 
der was Valentine Steltz, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania. He had eight children. He married the 
second time and had other children. He was a 
farmer and died at an advanced age. He was 
buried at Sassamansville. 

William J. Binder lived in Chester county 
until he had reached the age of thirteen years, 
when he removed with his father's family to 
Pottstown and has lived there ever since. He at- 
tended the country schools while living in 
Chester county and graduated at the ' Pottstown 
high school, afterward entering the Hill school 
at Pottstown, then conducted by its founder. 
Professor Matthew Meigs, LL. D. 

At the age of seventeen years he began to 
learn the printing trade in the office of the Mont- 
gomery Ledger, founded October i, 1843, ^rid 
served an apprenticeship of four and a half 
years. In 1863, Mr. Binder enlisted in the 
Twenty-sixth Emergency Regiment, Pennsyl- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



vania Volunteers, Colonel Jennings command- 
ing. He also saw service in the One Hundred 
and Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania Regiment in 
1864, and early in 1865 was a private in Com- 
pany E, One Hundred and Fifth Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel Miller com- 
manding. Altogether he served eleven months. 
He was at Petersburg and participated in the 
operations culminating in the surrender of the 
army of northern Virginia, under General Lee 
at Appomattox Court House. He was honor- 
ably discharged in June, 1865. 

After the war he returned to the printer's 
trade in Indianapolis, Indiana, and in April, 
1866, purchased a half interest in the Montgom- 
ery Ledger, of Pottstown, Pennsylvania, from 
William L. Williamson, and thirteen years later, 
in Septembr, 1879, bcame the sole proprietor 
of the paper, and has conducted the business 
ever since. October i, 1873, he established the 
Pottstown Ledger, in partnership with Lewis H. 
Davis. 

December 26, 1867, William J. Binder mar- 
ried Mary A. Hilton, daughter of James and 
Margaret (Walmsly) Hilton. They had nine 
children, as follows : Hilton S., assistant editor 
of the Ledger; Mary E., a stenographer ; Ella 
M., a clerk in the Ledger counting room ; Bessie 
A., at home ; Edith H., a teacher in the public 
schools of Pottstown ; Laura D,. who died at the 
age of six years ; John K., a reporter on the 
Ledger; Florence M., at home ; and Chester 
M., a printer in the Ledger office. 

Mr. and Mrs. Binder belong to the Methodist 
Episcopal church, where he is an official member 
and has local deacon's orders. In politics Mr. 
Binder is a Republican. 

He is a member of the Royal Arcanum, and 
also of M. Edgar Richards Post, No. 595, Grand 
Army of the Republic. He resides at No. 267 
King street, in his own residence, and also owns 
the property at the corner of High and Charlotte 
streets, where his printing office is established. 
He published a "History of Methodism in Potts- 
town and in the neighboring regions," in 1902. 

James Hilton, Mrs. Binder's father, came here 
from England when he was twenty-one years of 



age and was a woolen manufacturer at Mana- 
_\unk, Philadelphia, and afterwards at Glasgow, 
Pennsylvania. His wife, Margaret Walmsly, 
was brought here a babe in arms. They had six 
children who are living : William ; Mrs. Binder ; 
Joseph, of Philadelphia ; Elizabeth, wife of A. 
W. Shick, of Orwigsburg, Pennsylvania ; James, 
of Philadelphia ; and Ella M., widow of Colonel 
H. A. Shenton, of Pottstown. Mrs. Binder's 
father died in Glasgow, this county, in 1872, at 
the age of fifty-six years. Her mother died in 
1900, at the age of eighty-three years. 

ANDREW LINDSAY, M. D., of Bryn 
Mawr, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, is a 
lineal descendant of a family of Scotch-Irish or- 
igin whose residence in the state of Pennsylvania 
antedates the arrival of William Penn. The pio- 
neer members of the family located in the region 
now known as Aston, Delaware county, and for 
more than two centuries their descendants have 
also made their home in the territory included in 
that boundary. 

John Lindsay, father of Dr. Lindsay, was born 
and reared in Haverford township, Delaware 
county, the birthplace of his father, although the 
latter subsequently removed to Philadelphia 
county. He received a good common school ed- 
ucation, and his business career was devoted to 
agricultural pursuits which he followed until his 
advanced years forced him to retire from the ac- 
tivities of life. He was a strong advocate of the 
old Whig party, and frequently spoke in public 
on the issues of the day. He was chosen to rep- 
resent Delaware county in the state legislature 
during the years 1830 and 183 1, and these duties 
were performed with great credit to himself and 
his constituents. He married Miss Sarah Brooke, 
daughter of General William Brooke, of Dela- 
ware county, who won distinction in the Revolu- 
tionary war. and his ancestors were natives of 
England, who emigrated to America early in the 
seventeenth century, and several of the members 
served as officers and soldiers in the war of 
1812. Their children were: William, James, 
Eliza. John. Sarah, Margaret and Andrew. John 
Lindsav. father of these children, died at his home 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



in Haverford in i860, at the advanced age of 
eighty-eight years. 

Andrew Lindsay was born on the old home- 
stead in Delaware county, Pennsylvania, June 11, 
1829. He was educated in the private schools of 
Norristown, Pennsylvania, at Delaware College, 
Newark, Delaware, and Union College, graduat- 
ing from the latter named institution in 1852, and 
during his term there was a classmate of the late 
Governor Hartranft. His tastes and inclinations 
led him to adopt the profession of medicine as his 
life work, and accordingly he matriculated at Jef- 
ferson Medical College in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, graduating therefrom in 1856. After eight 
years active practice in the city of Philadelphia 
he made an extended tour of Europe, whereby he 
gained a fund of practical and valuable informa- 
tion and experience, and upon his return to his 
native country in 1865 he located in Radnor, 
Montgomery county. Subsequently he removed 
to Bryn Mawr, in which town he has made his 
home for the past twenty years, and where he is 
regarded as a model citizen, having taken a keen 
and active interest in professional, political and 
social life. He is a staunch adherent of the prin- 
ciples of Republicanism, but has never sought or 
desired political office. He is affiliated with the 
Masonic Order. 

Dr. Andrew Lindsay was married, December 
15, 1859, to Miss Hannah L. Eox, daughter of 
Charles Fox, a manufacturer of brick in Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. Their child, Catherine F. 
Lindsay, died at the age of six years. Mrs. Lind- 
say died at her home in Bryn Mawr on March 18, 
1903. 

ABRAM WENTZ. The progenitors of the 
Wentz family of Whitpain and adjoining town- 
ships of Montgomery county were among the 
early settlers of that section of Pennsylvania. 
They were of German origin. They located in 
Whitpain township long prior to the Revolution- 
ary war. Abram Wentz was born on the old 
homestead, a short distance below Centre Sc|uare, 
February 14, 1827. He is the son of Abraham 
and Charlotte (Tyson) Wentz, daughter of 



Joseph Tyson, of Worcester township, well- 
known residents of Whitpain. 

Abraham Wentz (father) was bom in the 
building known as Wentz's, or the Rising Sun, 
tavern, a Revolutionary inn dating back to 1764. 
He was a man of great worth, respected by all 
who knew him. The house in which the hotel 
was kept until 1867, when it was closed to the 
public, is still standing. It is in good condition, 
having been built with heavy brick walls, two- 
stories in height. In the days of wagon travel 
from the interior to Philadelphia it was an im- 
portant stopping-place for teams, and was known 
as "the wheat market," because the millers from 
along Wissahickon and elsewhere would meet the 
farmers there and purchase their grain. At the 
Wentz hotel the general elections were held from 
1831 to 1867. Abraham Wentz was mentioned as 
an innkeeper in the list of taxables in Whitepain 
in 1762, indicating that a public house was kept 
prior to the erection of the brick building. Abra- 
ham Wentz was a Democrat in politics, and held 
several minor township offices. He died in Sep- 
tember, 1870, at the age of eighty-four years. His 
wife, Charlotte, died in December, 1881, in her 
ninety-third year. Her family was one of the 
oldest in Montgomerjr county, she being the 
daughter of Joseph Tyson. The Tysons were 
also of German origin, settling at or near Ger- 
mantown, and spreading over the lower end of 
Montgomery county, where they are still quite 
numerous. The children of Abraham and Char- 
lotte Wentz : Joseph Tyson, who engaged in the 
lumber business in his younger days, and lived re- 
tired the latter part of his life in Norristown, 
where he died a few years ago at an advanced 
age; Hannah and Mary (deceased); Elizabeth, 
who is a resident of Norristown ; Barbara and 
John (deceased) ; Abram, subject of this sketch; 
and Henry, also deceased. 

Colonel John Wentz (grandfather) was a 
leading citizen of Whitpain township. He com- 
manded a regiment under the old militia laws of 
the state, and was ever afterwards known by that 
title. He not only stood high in military mat- 
ters, but in civil office as well. He was for many 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



years a justice of the peace, and his docket con- 
taining the record of the business which came be- 
fore him is still in a good state of preservation, 
and is now in the possession of the Montgomery 
County Historical Society. His books were kept 
in the neatest and most businesslike manner, be- 
ing a model of accuracy in every respect. He 
married many couples, as was the custom with 
leading justices of the peace in his day. His in- 
fluence was exerted in the direction of discourag- 
ing unnecessary and trivial litigation. 

Abraham Wentz (great-grandfather) is the 
person of that name who was assessed as an inn- 
keeper in Whitpain township in 1762. He then 
owned 150 acres of land. The ancestral home- 
stead continued in the possession of the family 
for nearly a century and a half. The Skippack 
road, on which the Wentz tract is situated, was 
laid out in 1713. The Wentz family belonged to 
Boehm's Reformed church, at Blue Bell. 

Abram Wentz grew to manhood on the home- 
stead, attending neighborhood schools, and assist- 
ing his father in farm work in the intervals of 
study. He followed the occupation of farming 
until he was about fifty years of age, when he re- 
moved to Norristown, where he now resides, 
having since lived retired. He is a Democrat in 
politics, but never sought or held office, preferring 
a quiet life to the excitement of political strife, 
except that he filled for a number of years the po- 
sition of township auditor. He has been for many 
years a member of the board of directors of the 
Montgomery National Bank of Norristown. In 
religious faith he adheres to the Reformed church, 
like his ancestors. He married, April 30, 1858, 
Miss Louisa Castner, daughter of Jesse and 
Parthena Castner, well-known residents of 
Gwynedd township. Their children were: i. 
Tyson, who died in his tenth year. 2. Walter, who 
died in his fifth year. 3. Chester, who died in in- 
fancy. 4. Earl C, still surviving, who was born 
October 27, 1885. 

The Castners are an old Montgomery county 
family, also of German descent though long dom- 
iciled in this country, Mrs. Wentz's father, Jesse 
Castner, lived near Gwynedd station, and followed 
all his life the occupation of farming. He died 



September 9, 1883, in his seventy-second year. 
Mrs. Wentz's grandfather, also Jesse Castner, 
was in his ninety-second year at the time of his. 
death. Her great-grandfather, Samuel Castner, 
died in his ninety-eighth year. Her mother died 
May 15, 1881. 

THE DAVIS FAMILY. The first ancestor 
of whom we have any authentic information was 
Samuel Davis, born in Wales in 17 10, who with 
three brothers came to America and settled in 
Plymouth township, where he purchased a large 
tract of land. May 24, 1736, he married Jane 
Rees, daughter of John and Hannah Rees, and 
their children were : David, born February 4, 
'^7Z7'^ John, bom September 6, 1738; Stephen, 
born October 3, 1740 ; Hannah, born July i, 1743 ; 
Katharine, born July 3, 1744; Samuel, born Jan- 
uary I, 1747; Mary, born October 19, 1750; and 
Daniel, born May 3, 1751. The mother of these 
children died in giving birth to her youngest child. 
In 1753 Samuel Davis married Susannah Hughes, 
a widow, and their children were : William, born 
March 25, 1754, died in infancy; and Thomas, 
born August 9, 1756. 

Stephen Davis, son of Samuel and Jane Davis, 
married Mary Shafer, and their children were : 
Susan, born June 18. 1766; Rees, bom October 
13, 1769; Stephen, born July 18, 1777; Catherine, 
born 1767; Daniel, born June 6, 1772; Betsey, 
born 1775 ; Samuel, born 1782; Mary, born 1784; 
and Hannah, born 1785. Stephen Davis, father of 
these children, died November 11, 1808, survived 
by his widow, who passed away September 21, 
182c. 

Rees Davis, son of Stephen and Mary Davis, 
married Rebecca Roberts, and their children were : 
Thomas, Rebecca, William, mentioned herein- 
after, and Daniel. 

William Davis, son of Rees and Rebecca 
Davis, was born in Plymouth township, Mont- 
gomery county, Pennsylvania, February 25, 1793. 
He was reared and educated in his native county, 
and during his active years of life was extensively 
engaged in wagoning and hauling freight to and 
from Philadelpliia during the erection of the 
buildings of Girard College, and he hauled much 



7^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



of the marble building stone from Upper Merion 
township to the college grounds. The latter years 
of his life were spent in West Conshohocken, 
where he was regarded as an exemplary citizen. 
He married Phoebe Supplee, born March 13, 
1791, daughter of John and Rachel Supplee, and 
their children were: Jane, born January 6, 1812, 
died young ; Rachel, born September 7, 1814, died 
young; Rebecca, born September 21, 1816, be- 
came the wife of Godfrey M. Young ; Evan, born 
September 13, 1818, died young; Mary, born 
June 4, 1820, became the wife of David Horton ; 
Catherine, born April 11, 1823, died young; Mark, 
born May 3, 1825, died young; William, born 
September 13, 1826; Charles, born December 2, 
1828; Rees, born October 23, 1830, died young; 
George W., born July 13, 1832 ; and Andrew, born 
May 7, 1835, died young. The mother of these 
children died November 24, 1862. Mr. Davis 
chose for his second wife Lydia Supplee, born 
February 28, 1797. There was no issue of this 
marriage. Mr. Davis died August 15, 1878, aged 
eighty-four years. Mr. Davis and also his son, 
William Davis, Jr., were instrumental and ren- 
dered important service in the organization of 
and procuring the franchise for the erection of the 
Matsonsford bridge across the Schuylkill river 
at West Conshohocken. 

William Davis, Jr., son of William and Phoebe 
Davis, was born near the old Swede church in 
Upper Merion township, Montgomery county, 
September 13, 1826. When about the age of three 
years he came with his parents to West Consho- 
hocken, where he was reared to manhood and at- 
tended the schools of the neighborhood. He re- 
mained under the parental roof until about the age 
of twenty, when he began business on his own ac- 
count in the anthracite coal trade. In 1850 Mr. 
Davis engaged in mercantile business at West 
Conshohocken in partnership with his brother, 
Charles Davis, and his brother-in-law, David 
Horton, under the firm name of William Davis, 
Jr. & Co. This business arrangement was suc- 
cessfully continued up to i860, when the firm 
was reorganized, William Davis, Jr., and his 
brother, George Davis, constituting the firm, 
which then engaged in the lumber and coal trade 



in addition to the mercantile department, at West 
Conshohocken, and continued up to 1870. In that 
year George Davis withdrew from the firm, and 
William Davis, Jr., conducted the business alone 
up to 1877, when he admitted his two sons — Will- 
iam Egbert and Reese P. — into partnership. This 
arrangement was successfully continued by the 
father and sons, and under their united and well- 
directed efforts the business was developed to one 
of the most important enterprises in West Con- 
shohocken, the firm name of William Davis, Jr. 
& Co. becoming well and favorably known for 
their straightforward and honorable business 
methods. In 1902 the firm relinquished the mer- 
cantile department of their business and has since 
entirely confined their efforts to their lumber and 
coal trade, which has now attained to considerable 
magnitude. 

William Davis, Jr., has proved himself worthy 
of commendation, and by his enterprise and pro- 
gressiveness has contributed to the material ad- 
vancement of the neighborhood m which his ac- 
tive years of life have been spent. He was one 
of the charter members of the First National Bank 
of Conshohocken, and served as a member of the 
board of directors for many years ; he also served 
for many years as treasurer of the Merion Build- 
ing and Loan Association. For about a quarter 
of a century he was a member of the school board, 
taking an active interest in the advancement and 
improvement of the educational system, and in 
fact it can be truthfully said that Mr. Davis gave 
liberally of his time and substance for every en- 
terprise that had for its object the advancement 
of the material and moral welfare of the com- 
munity. During recent years, owing to the im- 
pairment of his hearing, he partially relinquished 
active business pursuits, leaving the details of his 
business interests to others. 

On June i, 1853, Mr. Davis was married to 
Emily Yocum Egbert, daughter of David N. and 
Maria (Yocum) Egbert, of Lower Merion town- 
ship, and her birth occurred May 13, 1826. Their 
children were : Julia D., born April 7, 1854, died 
April 2, 1863; William Egbert, born July 7, 
1855: Reese P., born August 30, 1857; Francis 
AI., born August 17, 1859, died April 3, 1863; 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



7Z 



Emily Yocum, born November 27, 1866; and 
Clarence H., born September 16, 1869; died in 
1874. 

Reese P. Davis, son of William and Emily Y. 
Davis, was married October 6, 1887, to Jennie J. 
Henderson, born November 16, 1861, died August 
10, 1895, daughter of Charles and Mary Emily 
(Rambo) Henderson, of Upper Merion township, 
Montgomery county. To this marriage were born 
two children : John Kersey, born February 24, 
1891 ; and Emily Mary, born December 19, 1894. 
On September 13. 1898, Reese P. Davis married 
Virginia N. Dunglison, who was born March 15, 
i860, daughter of J. Robley and Bella (Wallace) 
Dunglison, and granddaughter of the celebrated 
Dr. Robley Dunglison, who came from England 
by request of Thomas Jefferson to take charge of 
the Medical Department of the University of V'ir- 
ginia, and who later became dean of the Jefiferson 
Medical College of Philadelphia. Dr. Dunglison 
became famous as a writer and lecturer, and was 
the author of the "Dunglison Medical Diction- 
ary," which has become known the world over. 
Two children were the issue of the marriage of 
Reese P. and Vrginia Norris (Dunglison) Davis, 
namely : Norris Dunglison, born July 5, 1899 ; and 
William, born March 11, 1901. 

JESSE JARRETT KIRK, a well known 
farmer of Whitemarsh township, for many years 
one of its supervisors, was born in Horsham town- 
ship. He is the son of James and Tacy (Jarrett) 
Kirk, and was born January 6, 1827. 

The Kirks are one of the oldest families in 
Montgomery county. The ancestor of the family 
came from Scotland in 1687, and settled in what 
is now Delaware county, Pennsylvania. In the 
line of descent from him was the grandfather of 
the subject, Jesse Kirk, who was a native of Hor- 
sham township, in Montgomery county. He was 
educated at the schools in the vicinity of his home, 
and after spending a few years in the occupation 
of a farmer engaged in the hotel business in con- 
nection with his fanning interests. He was a 
successful business man. and accumulated a com- 
petence, leaving considerable wealth. Among his 
children was James (father), who was born on 



the homestead in Horsham township. He obtained 
a good education at the neighborhood schools, and 
after farming for a time decided, like his father, 
to engage in the hotel business. He located at 
what was known as the old Hay market Hotel, on 
Sixth street, between Coates and Green streets in 
Philadelphia. He conducted that establishment 
for some time, was very successful, and became 
widely known and popular. In politics he was a 
Republican, doing all that was possible to promote 
tlie success of its candidates. He married Tacy 
Jarrett. daughter of Jesse and Elizabeth Jarrett, 
of the same township. Their children were: J. 
Edwin, Elizabeth, Hymen, Mary, John, Jacob, 
Willi-m H., Ellwood, Harry and Jesse J., the last 
named the subject of this sketch. 

Jesse J. Kirk was educated in the neighbor- 
hood schools, including what was known as the 
Eight Square School, in Whitemarsh township, 
where he studied under Margaret Farou, a 
teacher of some note. On leaving school he en- 
gaged in farming, but did not long continue in 
that occupation. When he was quite young his 
father removed to Upper Providence township. At 
the ?ge of fifteen years Jesse entered the Plymouth 
Meeting store in Whitemarsh township, remain- 
ing there for five years in the position of clerk and 
general manager. He then engaged in similar 
pursuits at Spring Mill, in the same township, 
remaining there a year. On account of ill-health 
he was advised by his physician to engage if pos- 
sible in some outdoor employment. He therefore 
purchased a team and engaged in hauling for 
some time. He next engaged in the digging of 
iron ore in Plymouth and Whitemarsh townships. 
there being an immense quantity near the surface 
in that vicinity. He so continued until the fur- 
naces ceased operations and there was no further 
demand for the product. He then betook himself 
to farming as a healthy outdoor occupation, and 
has followed it ever since. In 1872 he removed 
to his present home in Whitemarsh township. 

On November 9, 1849, ^I""- Kirk married Miss 
Margaret Freas. bom February 11, 1825, daugh- 
ter of George and Rachel Freas, of Whitemarsh 
township. They had the following children ; 
Emma, born Januarv 6. i8si who married 



74 



^lOXTGOMERY COUNTY. 



George W. Keys, who has been for a number of 
years in the office of the recorder of deeds at 
Norristown, either as recorder or as deputy ; 
Mary R., born October 3, 1852. unmarried, and is 
housekeeper for her father ; WilHam A., born De- 
cember I, 1859, married Annie A'andyke, and has 
seven children. Mrs. Kirk died ^Xlarch 17, 1892. 

Mr. Kirk is a thoroughgoing Republican. Al- 
though not an office seeker, he has held the office 
of assessor four years, and supervisor for nearly 
twenty years, having been named by both parties 
for the latter position on several occasions. He is 
a member of the Masonic order. In religious 
faith he affiliates with the Society of Friends, al- 
though not a member. He is connected with Fort 
Washington Lodge, No. 308, F. and A. M. 

John Kirk, the immigrant, located in what is 
now Upper Darby, in Delaware county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He was a member of the Society of 
Friends, and was married the same year he located 
in Darby, to Joan, daughter of Peter Elliott. He 
died in 1805. They had a family of ten children. 
Most of those in Montogmery county are de- 
scended from John, the second son of John and 
Joan Kirk, including Jesse J. Kirk. He was born 
January 29, 1692. In 1712 he purchased from 
John and Sarah Ironmonger 200 acres of land in 
Abington township, Montgomery county, adjoin- 
ing Upper Dublin township, on which he spent 
the remainder of his life. He paid 260 pounds 
for the entire tract. He subsequently made an- 
other purchase of 500 acres of land in Upper 
Dublin township. He was a stone mason by 
trade, and in 1722 built the stone mansion for Sir 
William Heith on Graeme Park, in Horsham 
township. In the same year he married, in Ab- 
ington Meeting, Sarah, daughter of Rynear Ty- 
son. John and Sarah Kirk were the parents of 
eight children. The Kirks have intermarried with 
many prominent families of lower ]\Iontgomery. 

WALTER COULSTON. The Coulston 
family, which is of Welsh descent, is one of the 
oldest and most prominent in ^Montgomery 
county, Pennsylvania. The earliest ancestor of 
whom there is any authentic information was 
William Coulston (great-grandfather), who was 



born on the old homestead in Whitemarsh town- 
ship, and was known as one of the most success- 
ful farmers of the vicinity. His children were: 
Charles, William, John, Thomas, Alary (Airs. 
William Kettler), and Sarah (Mrs. Jacob Rorer), 
all of whom are now deceased. Thomas Coulston 
and I\Ir. and Mrs. William Kettler owned a fine 
farm in Gwynedd township, Alontgomery county, 
and resided thereon the greater part of their lives. 

William Coulston (grandfather) was a native 
of Whitemarsh township, born August 9, 1797. 
He was educated in the common schools of the 
vicinity, and his entire active career was devoted 
to farming pursuits. He married Ann Meredith, 
who was born October 29, 1802, daughter 
of Joseph and Hannah Meredith, the former 
named having been a descendant of an old 
family of Welsh descent, the immigrant hav- 
ing been David Meredith, who came to Penn- 
sylvania in 1700, and settled in Plymouth town- 
ship, jNIontgomery county. Three children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Coulston, namely : James 
Meredith, Elizabeth, and Hannah. William 
Coulston died April 17, 1863, in his sixty-sixth 
year, and his wife, Ann (Meredith) Coulston, 
died March 25, 1833, in her thirty-first year. 

James Meredith Coulston (father) was born 
near the old homestead in Whitemarsh township, 
January 27, 1831, and when about three years of 
age he accompanied his parents to the farm on 
on which he spent the remainder of his life. He 
assisted in farming during the summer months, 
and attended school in the winter months accord- 
ing to the usual custom among farmers. On the 
death of his father he inherited his portion of the 
estate, and later purchased the remainder from 
his sisters. He was an active Republican, always 
standing by the candidates and the policy of the 
party. He served a number of years as a member 
of the Whitemarsh school board, and also held 
other township positions, but was in no sense an 
office seeker. He was a director in the Montgom- 
ery Alutual Fire Insurance Company, and in other 
ways was active in promoting the interests of the 
community in which he resided. He usually at- 
tended Plymouth Friends' Meeting, although not 
A member of the societv. He was affiliated with 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



75 



:\Iarble Hall Lod.s^e. Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

On April ", 1856, James M. Coulston mar- 
ried Tacy Amanda Freas, born December 19, 
1836, daughter of Joseph and Ann (Nyce) Freas, 
and their children were : i. Annie F., born July 4, 
1857, became the wife of Daniel H. Maguire, and 
their children are: Dora, James C, and Edna 
Maguire. 2. Alice H., born October 30, 1858, 
became the wife of Harvey W. Lentz, and their 
children are : J. Howard, Walter, Joanna, Fred- 
erick, and Tacy C. Lentz. 3. William C, born 
June 16, i860, married Kate C. Ambler, who 
bore him one child, Alice L. Coulston ; William 
C. Coulston died September 30, 1900. 4. Eliza- 
beth C. born January 17, 1862, became the wife 
of William Potts Jones, and their children are ; 
Evan D.. Frances C, and L. Elizabeth Jones. 5 
and 6. Thomas C. and Sarah R. (twins), born 
July 12, 1863: the former died in infancy, in the 
autumn of 1863. 7. Frances C, born January 
29, 1868. 8. Joseph Percival, born April 25, 

1870, mentioned at length hereinafter. 9. J. War- 
ren, born November 12, 1871, died November 18, 

1871. 10. Walter, born February 2, 1873, men- 
tioned hereinafter. 11. Russell L., born January 
12, 1880. died April 18, 1880. James M. Coul- 
ston, father of these children, died March 24, 
1901. Few men were so much respected in their 
neighborhood as he, his kindly manner and genial 
disposition making him a universal favorite. 

Mrs. Coulston, widow of James M. Coulston, 
who occupies the old homestead with her son, 
\\'alter Coulston, is a member of an old White- 
marsh family, of German origin, whose name 
was originally spelled Fries. George Freas, 
grandfather of Mrs. Coulston, married Barbara 
Wolf, and their children were: John, George, 
Samuel, Jacob, Benjamin, Daniel, Joseph, W'ill- 
iam, Mary (Mrs. Samuel Roberts), and Cath- 
erine (Mrs. William Freas). Joseph Freas, father 
of Mrs. Coulston, was born May 6, 1794, on the 
homestead in Whitemarsh township. His youth 
was spent on the farm with his parents, he receiv- 
ing such education as the neighborhood schools 
afforded at that time. He decided to learn the 
trade of blacksmith, and became an apprentice to 



his brother, Samuel Freas. at Plymouth Meet- 
ing. He remained at his trade for some years, but 
farming being more t.o his taste he abandoned 
the pursuit of his trade and returned to White- 
marsh. He purchased the home farm from his 
father and cultivated it for many years. In polir 
tics he was a member of the Whig party, but he 
never sought or held office, preferring to devote 
his time and attention entirely to his business. He 
married, January 15, 1818, Ann Keely, born No- 
vember 17, 1792, daughter of Henry and Eliza- 
beth Keely, of Philadelphia county. Their chil- 
dren were : Henry, born in 1818 ; Joanna, born in 
1820; Walton, born in 1822; Issachar, born in 
1824 : Elizabeth, born in 1826 ; John Quincy, born 
in 1828; Orlando, born in 1830; Caroline, born in 
1834; Tacy Amanda, born in 1836, widow of 
James M. Coulston ; Barbara A., born in 1839. 
Joseph Freas died November 22, 1879, survived 
by his wife, who passed away December 21, 1888. 
Joseph Percival Coulston, third son of the late 
James M. Coulston and his wife Tacy Amanda 
(Freas) Coulston, was born on the family home- 
stead in Whitemarsh, Montgomery county, Penn- 
s_\ Ivania, April 25, 1870. He was educated in the 
public schools of the township, and also attended 
the Norristown high school, where he completed 
his education and from which institution he was 
graduated. Returning to his home he assisted in 
farming the homestead, and later leased a fine 
farm in the same vicinity, which he has culti- 
vated and improved to a high state of perfection, 
and on which he has resided continuously up to 
the present time ( 1904) . He has won the reputa^ 
tion of being a model farmer, and he is also one 
of the well known and prominent citizens of the 
community, taking an active interest in all enter- 
prises that have a tendency toward the progress 
and development of his township and county. He 
is a Republican in politics, and active in the sup- 
port of party interests. In 1896 Mr. Coulston 
married Anna 'SI. ^Miller, born June 7, 1876, 
daughter of George and Mary (]\Iarkley) Miller, 
the former named being one of the prosperous 
farmers of \\'hitemarsh. They are the parents 
of one child. Hannah Coulston, born May 28, 
1901. Mr. Coulston anrl his family attend the 



76 



MONTGO^IERY COUNTY. 



Lutheran church, at Barren Hill, Pennsylvania. 
Walter Coulston, fifth son of the late James 
M. Coulston and his wife Tacy Amanda (Freas) 
Coulston, was born in Whitemarsh township, 
Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, February 2, 
1873. He obtained his early education in the 
public schools of Whitemarsh and Norristown, 
and this was supplemented by attendance at the 
Pierce Business College, Philadelphia. After pur- 
suing the course in that institution he returned 
to the farm, where he has since remained, en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits, of which he is 
especially fond, and universally recognized as a 
practical and progressive farmer. In politics he 
follows in the footsteps of his father, being a 
staunch Republican. He is a member of the Pa- 
triotic Order of Sons of America, and of the 
Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 
He attends the Lutheran church at Barren Hill, 
Pennsylvania, is a man of the highest honor and 
integrity, is faithful in the performance of his 
duty to his mother, with whom he resides, and is 
highly respected by all who enjoy his acquain- 
tance. Mr. Coulston is unmarried. 

J\nCHAEL PIERCE O'BRIEN was de- 
scended from an old and eminently respectable 
family of County Meath, Ireland, where his 
grandfather, Michael O'Brien, was born, who 
was an only child of his parents, and was edu- 
cated and reared to manhood in his native county, 
where he was a merchant for many years and an 
extensive land owner. He married and had an 
only child, Christopher O'Brien, who was given 
a practical education and was reared to man- 
hood on his father's estate. He married Cath- 
erine Gugarty, and to this union were born the 
following named children: i. Michael, whose 
name introduces this review, and who was bap- 
tized Michael Pierce O'Brien ; 2. John, who mar- 
ried Alary A. Tracy ; 3. Rosanna, deceased ; 4. 
Margaret, who married James Tracy : 5. ]\Iaria ; 
6. Elizabeth ; 7. Matthew, who married Mar- 
garet Ryan ; 8. Henr)-. Of these children, 
Maria, Elizabeth and Henry reside at present at 
Conshohocken, Pennsylvania. Both the parents 
— Christopher and Catherine (Gugarty) O'Brien 



— lived to be over three score years of age, the 
father having died in his native land. 

Michael Pierce O'Brien was born on his fa- 
ther's estate, February 18, 1829. His early 
mental training was acquired in the schools of 
the neig'hborhood and under private tuition, and 
this was supplemented by a course at Maynooth 
College, a celebrated institution of learning of 
those days in the city of Dublin, Ireland. At 
the early age of nineteen the young student, be- 
ing desirous to satisfy his ambition in life, de- 
cided to come to the United States and accord- 
ingly in 1848-49 sailed for Philadelphia with 
many others, sons and daughters of the Emereld 
Isle. L^pon his arrival here the ambitious youth 
at once made his way into the valley of the Le- 
high in Pennsylvanina. Here he found employ- 
ment, and became connected with the Lehigh 
\''alle}- Railroad Company, where he remained 
for some time, subsequently coming to Consho- 
hocken, where he accepted the position of general 
agent for the railroad company, and here it may 
be said that the company could have had no bet- 
ter representative than Michael P. O'Brien. He 
was the soul of honor and integrity, and by dili- 
gence, perseverance and husbanding his resources 
he was enabled to engage in other enterprises in 
Conshohocken, becoming identified with Colonel 
James Boyd, of Norristown, and Charles H. 
Stinson, of the same place, under the firm name 
of the East Conshohocken Quarry Company, 
which was engaged in the quarrying of Consho- 
hocken stone, probably the finest in the country 
for building purposes. This enterprise proved 
very remunerative under the judicious manage- 
ment of these gentlemen. Later Mr. O'Brien be- 
came engaged in building and real estate enter- 
prises in Conshohocken and vicinity, which under 
his capable management proved very profitable. 

He was a man of exceedingly kindly and am- 
iable disposition, thinking evil of none, but quick 
to call to order anyone who did wrong, and pos- 
sessing a native courage which made him fear 
no man. He was the man for any emergency 
that might arise ; he rose rapidly in every posi- 
tion in which he was placed, with the faculty of 
accimiulating money in every enterprise with 



.MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



' '' :: • ■ n, at Darren Hill, Pennsylvania. 
. rtilston. fifth son of the late James 
and his wife Tacy Amanda (Frcas) 
was born in Whitemarsh township. 
ry county, Pennsylvania, February a. 
Mc obtained his early education in the 
schools of Whitemarsh and Norristown. 
this was supplemented by attendance at the 
-rce Business Collegfe, Philadelphia. After pur- 
.linsT the course in that institution he returned 
to the farm, where he has since remained, en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits, of which he is 
especially fond, and universally recognized as a 
practical and progressive farmer. In politics he 
follows in the footsteps of his father, being a- 
staunch Republican. He is a member of the Pa- 
triotic Order of Scais of America, and of the 
Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 
IT ■• ' '■ ' '• ' ■ - Hiii^ 

1' and 

i' I his 

diiiv xu ui.s njuiiicr, with whom ht rei.iues, and is 
highly respected by all who enjoy his acquain- 
tance. Mr. Coulston is unmarried. 

MICHAEL PIERCE O-BRIKX was de- 
scended from an old and eminently respectable 
family of County Meath, Ireland, where bis 
grandfather, Michael O'Brien, was born, who 
was an only child of his parents, and was edu- 
cated and reared to manhood in his native county, 
where he was a merchant for many years and an 
extensive land owner. He married and had an 
only child, Christopher O'Brien, who was given 
a practical education and was reared to man- 
hood on his father's estate. He marri.ed Cath- 
erine Gugarty, and to this union were horn the 
following named children: i. Michael, whose 
name introduces this review, and who was bap- 
tized Michael Pierce O'Brien ; 2. John, who mar- 
ried Mary A. Tracy ; 3. Rosanna, deceased ; 4. 
Margaret, who married James Tracy ; 5. Maria ; 
6. Elizabeth ; 7. Matthew, who married Mar- 
garet Ryan ; 8. Henry. Of these children, 
Maria, Elizabeth and Henry reside at present at 
"^vnshohocken, Pennsylvania. Both the parents 

"^ristopher and Catherine (Gugarty) O'Brien 



— lived to l)e over three score years of age, the 
father ha\-ing died in his native land. 

Michael Pierce O'Brien was bom on his fa- 
ther's estate, February 18, 1829. His earl\ 
mental training was acquired in the schools of 
the neig'hborhood and under private tuition, and 
this was supplemented by a course at Maynooth 
College, a celebrated institution of learning of 
those days in the city of Dublin, Ireland. At 
the early age of nineteen the young student, be- 
ing desirous to satisfy his ambition in life, de- 
cided to come to the United States and accor ' 
ingly in 1848-49 sailed for Philadelphia w ' 
many others, sons and daughters of the Emercm 
Isle. Upon his arrival here the ambitious youth 
at once made his way into the valley of the Le- 
high in Pennsylvanina. Here he found employ- 
ment, and became connected with the Lehigh 
Valley Railroad Company, where he remained 
for some time, subsequently coming to Consho- 
hocken, where he accepted the position of general 
agent for the railroad company, and here it ma 
be %aid that the company could have had no Ll 
ter representative than Michael P. O'Brien. JI; 
was the soul of honor and integrity, and by di: 
gence, perseverance and husbanding his resource 
he was enabled to engage in other enterprises i 
Consholiocken, becoming identified with Colon; 
James Bo\d, of Norristown, and Charles I' 
Stinson, ><i the same place, under the firm nan • 
of the East Conshohocken Quarry Compan> 
which was engaged in the quarrying of Conslv 
hocken stone, probably the finest in the counir 
for building purposes. This enterprise prov^ 
very remunerative under the judicious manag 
ment of these gentlemen. Later Mr. O'Brien b 
came engaged in building and real estate entt 
prises in Conshohocken and vicinity, which undei 
his capable management proved very profitable. 

He was a man of exceedingly kindly and am- 
iable disposition, thinking evil of none, but quick 
to call to order anyone who did wrong, and pos- 
sessing a native courage which made him fear 
no man. He was the man for any emergency 
that might arise; he rose rapidly in every posi- 
tion in which he was placed, with the faculty of 
accumulating money 'in every enterprise with 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



n 



I which he became identified, and soon became 
I recognized as an able financier. He filled many 
j positions of trust in connection with banking and 
! other institutions, serving for many years as 
; president of the First National Bank of Consho- 
; hocken, of which he was one of the organizers. 
I He was also a director of the Norristown Trust 
! Company, a director of the Norristown and Ger- 
! mantown Railroad, and a director of the Ply- 
" mouth Railroad, in both of which latter named 
institutions he took an active and earnest inter- 
est. It will thus be seen that his interests were 
varied anti numerous, constantly demanding 
[ much of his time and thought. He, however, 
i found time to take an active interest in civil and 
local affairs. Politically he was an ardent Dem- 
' ocrat, but received the votes of men of all parties 
when he was a candidate for public office, and he 
! was therefore an exceedingly hard man to defeat ; 
indeed, few men in any community have ever 
been so much respected for their sterling qual- 
ities. 

Michael P. O'Brien was married March i8, 
1853, to Mary Fox, who was born May 22, 
1835, at Stanton, Leicestershire, England, a 
daughter of Thomas and Anna (Chesterton) 
Fox, and to this marriage were born the follow- 
ing named children: i. Harriet Clark (Mrs. 
David H. Tracey) ; 2. Catharine (Mrs. James 
Bullock), now deceased: 3. Anne (Mrs. Horace 
Hallowell) : 4. Thomas C, deceased: 5. Mar- 
garet, deceased : 6. Mary, deceased ; f. ]\Iary 
Louise; 8. Madaline (Mrs. Anthony N. Bul- 
lock) : 9. Elizabeth Eustace (Mrs. Edward D. 
Britt) : 10. Michael Pierce, Jr.; 11. Jane, de- 
ceased: 12. Louis Henry. ■ The father of these 
children, Michael P. O'Brien, passed to his re- 
ward August 24, 1900, beloved and esteemed by 
all who knew him. He was a consistent chris- 
tian of the Roman Catholic faith, and carried 
with him his religion into all the transactions of 
his daily life, performing every thing conscien- 
tiouslv in regard to the rights of others. He was 
a good citizen, a loving husband, and an indul- 
gent father to his children. Mrs. Mary (Fox) 
O'Brien is among the last of this generation of 



the descendants of George Fox, the well known 
founder of the Society of Friends. She came to 
this country when but seven years of age. 

PERCIVAL K. GABLE, whose energies 
throughout his business career have been directed 
toward the conduct of various hotels, and who 
has thereby attained most gratifying success, is a 
representative of a family that through many gen- 
erations has been thus numbered among the pub- 
lic entertainers. The name of Gable figured con- 
spicuously in connection with the hotel business 
through more than a century, and is also found in 
the early annals of the state in connection with 
tlie transfer of property and the recording of 
deeds, which indicates that they were land owners, 
and belonged to the class which constitutes the 
substantial citizenship of a community. 

It is definitely known that all of the Gables in 
America do not trace their ancestry to one source, 
for there is authentic record of the arrival of 
Peter and Maria Gabele in 1732, of Hendrick 
Gaabell a little later in the same year ; of Conrad 
Gable in 1738; of John Philip and Johan Fred- ^- 
erick Gabel, brothers, in 1739; Anthony Gabel 
in 1751 ; John Peter Gable in 1752; Philip Henry 
and Sebastian Gabel in 1753; Johannes Gabel in 
1754; and Conrad Gabel in 1773. Various dif- 
ferences in the orthography of the name appear, 
as there does in the place of location of these 
various emigrants to the American shores. 

It is to Johan Philip Gabel that Percival K. 
Gnble traces his ancestry. Johan Philip Gabel 
was a son of Johan Jacob and Maria Margaret 
Gabel, who were residents of Rabach. in Zwei- 
breucken, the Pfalz, Germany. There the son 
was born in 1698, was there reared, was married 
'" 1735' 3"d '" 1739 came to America. He sailed 
on the ship "Samuel" from Rotterdam, Captain 
Hugh Percy in command of the vessel, and even- 
tually landed safely at Philadelphia. He was 
accompanied by his brother, Johan Frederick 
Gabel, and the original ship list gives the age of 
the former, on August 27, 1739, as forty-one 
years, and that of the younger brother as thirty- 
seven. Johan Philip Gabel settled in Upper Sal- 



MOXTGOMERY COUNTY. 



ford township, Montgomery county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he soon became recognized as a 
prominent and influential citizen. He was chosen 
an officer in the old Goshenhoppen church, being 
in 1774 one of four who signed for the Lutheran 
congregation a joint contract with the Reformed 
congregation for the occupation of the church, 
built jointly in that year. He is mentioned among 
the taxpayers of Upper Salford township, Mont- 
gomery county, in 1769, as the owner of one hun- 
dred acres of land, and his name appears among 
the taxpayers of 1774, where he is recorded as 
"Philip Gabel, Sr.," in order to distinguish him 
from his son of the same name. As his name does 
not appear in the tax list of 1779, it is evident 
that he must have died between 1774 and 1779, 
and was at least seventy-six years of age at the 
time of his death. His wife, Elizabeth Catherine 
Gabel, was a daughter of Heinrich and Maria 
Barbara Culman, and was born in Greselbach, 
Hernbasch, Germany, August 13, 1705. She 
became the wife of Johan Philip Gabel in 1735, 
and with two infant sons, Johan Frederick and 
Johan Peter, accompanied her husband to Amer- 
ica. Their other children were Johan Philip ; 
Catherine Elizabeth, born ]\larch 15, 1741 ; ]Mar- 
garet, born June 6, 1743 ; and Maria Catherine, 
born November 3, 1744. 

Captain Johan Philip Gabel, the third son of 
Johan Philip and Elizabeth Catherine Gabel, was 
the great-grandfather of Percival K. Gable. He 
was born in Upper Salford township, Jilontgom- 
ery county, Pennsylvania, on the 27th of October, 
1739, exactly two months after his parents landed 
at Philadelphia. He, too, became active in pub- 
lic afifairs, and his labors aided in shaping the 
early policy, and in formulating the history of his 
community. Early identified with the Lutheran 
church, he became an elder in the congregation, 
and did much to advance the cause of the church 
in this locality. He became a large landowner, a 
successful merchant and also a noted hotelkeeper, 
being the proprietor of the old Gabel House in 
the Springhouse and Sunneytown turnpike, about 
two miles north of Salfordville, which is still 
standing. That he was married in 1766 is indi- 
cated by the inscription on his tombstone that he 



"lived thirty-six years in wedlock, and five and 
one-half years as a widower," or a total of forty- 
one and a half years after his marriage, which 
reckoned back from the date of his death, Janu- 
ary 18, 1808, fixes the date of his marriage about 
July, 1766. His wife ^Margaret died September 
5, 1802, aged seventy-seven years, nine months 
and five days, according to her tombstone, which 
would fix the date of her birth at November 30, 
1724. Captain John Philip Gabel was her sec- 
ond husband. She was a daughter of Nicol and 
Maria Elizabeth Bittel, and on the 19th of No- 
vember, 1745, she became the wife of Killian 
Gouckler. By that marriage she had eight chil- 
dren: John George, John Michael, Mary Eliza- 
beth, Catherine, John Nicholas, Anna Alargaret, 
Christina Barbara and John Gouckler. The 
mother and all of the children are mentioned in 
the will of Killian Gouckler, which was proved 
September 9, 1765, his wife being designated as 
his executrix. He was the owner of two hundred 
and ninety acres of land, on a part of which still 
stands the old Gable House in Upper Salford. It 
is referred to in the will as a tract of two hun- 
dred and eighty acres, but after the Gouckler es- 
tate became the property of Captain John Philip 
Gabel, through his marriage to Mrs. Gouckler, 
and the purchase of the interests of the other 
heirs, it was resurveyed, and found to contain 
ten acres more than the will designated. The 
draft and a memorandum of the resurvey for 
Philip Gabel are now in possession of Percival 
K. Gable. 

Prior to 1757 the Gouckler-Gabel estate be- 
longed to "Jacob Nuss, late of Upper Salford 
township, in the county of Philadelphia," as the 
old Deed-Poll recites, and this property, "a cer- 
tain messuage or tenant plantation and two hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land situate in Salford 
township,"' under a court writ dated March 8, 
1757, was seized by James Coultas, high sheriff 
of Philadelphia county, to satisfy a debt of four 
hundred and forty-two pounds (English), one 
shilling and six pence, owed by Jacob Nuss to 
Adam Clampflfer, and was bought at public sale 
by William Clampflfer. of Philadelphia, and trans- 
ferred, to him February 28. 1758. On the 9th of 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



79 



March, of the same year, W'iUiam Clampffer sold 
the property to Killian Goiickler, with an addi- 
tion which made the tract, as found upon resur- 
vey, to contain two hundred and ninety acres. 
Captain Phihp Gabel not only became the posses- 
sor of this property, but also owned land ad- 
joining which he obtained from the Gouckler 
estate. There is extant a deed of sale of two 
tracts owned by Michael Royer, one of which is 
described as "by late Christopher Hanckband, 
now Philip Gabel, the younger's land." On the 
9th of November, 1778, he bought for nineteen 
hundred and fifty pounds "a certain messuage or 
tract of land situate on the south side of Main 
street, in Germantown," in the deed for which he 
is described as "Philip Gabel, of Upper Salford 
township, Innkeeper." On the 7th of April, 1794, 
this Germantown property was sold by "Philip 
Gabel, of Upper Salford township, late of Phila- 
delphia county, but since the division in the 
County of Montgomery and Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania, Innkeeper, and [Margaret, his 
wife." It is probable that what is known as the 
old Gabel House was built by Killian Gouckler, 
if not by the preceding owner, Jacob Nuss, and 
that Mr. Gouckler, as well as 'Sir. Gabel, con- 
ducted a tavern. Family tradition has it that the 
house was built either two years before or two 
years after the first church building of "Old Gosh- 
enhoppen," which would make the date of its erec- 
tion either 1742 or 1746, at any rate it has stood 
for more than a century and a half, a silent wit- 
ness of the events which have made history, shel- 
tering many an one whose acts have aided in shap- 
ing the annals of the state. Captain Philip Gabel 
prospered in his business undertakings as a 
farmer and innkeeper, and as opportunity af- 
forded increased his realty holdings. In the tax 
list of 1769 for Upper Salford township, Phila- 
delphia county, he is assessed for one hundred 
and fifty acres of land, four horses, six head of 
cattle, and one servant ; in the list for 1774, for 
two hundred and sixty acres of land, four horses, 
four head of cattle, and one servant; in 1780 his 
taxable property was valued at five thousand and 
fifty pounds ; and in 1783 he is taxed for two hun- 
dred and eighty-five acres, four horses, four head 



of cattle and eight sheep. He managed his busi- 
ness afi^airs in a most systematic manner, keeping 
a set of books, and his old ledger, displaying his 
beautiful penmanship, is now in possession of 
Percival K. Gable, of Norristown, as is the old 
hotel license, granted September 25, 1787, and 
deeds for his farm of three hundred and forty 
acres. Aside from his business, he not only took 
a deep interest in church but also in military af- 
fairs, and was captain of a company of the First 
Batallion of Philadelphia county militia, com- 
manded by Colonel Daniel Heester (Heister) dur- 
ing the Revolutionary war. 

John Philip Gabel, the grandfather of Perci- 
val K. Gable and the only child of Johan Philip 
and Margaret Gabel, was born July 29, 1768, in 
Upper Salford township, Montgomery county. 
He was not only a worthy successor of his father 
in business, but also developed still greater busi- 
ness enterprises, and became even more widely 
known as a merchant, hotel proprietor and exten- 
sive land owner. He, too, conducted the Gabel 
House, and in addition to his tavern and his home 
in Upper Salford he owned at the time of his 
death fifty-nine acres of land in Skippack and 
Perkiomen, a tavern and six acres of land at 
Whitemarsh, a tavern and twenty acres in 
Gwynedd, and four acres of wood land in Fred- 
erick, making a total of four hundred and forty- 
four acres, his estate being appraised at fifty 
thousand dollars. The same devoted following 
of Christian teachings and the same fidelity to the 
church that were numbered among the strong 
characteristics of his ancestors were also manifest 
in him, and he served as elder and treasurer in 
the old Goshenhoppen church. His death oc- 
curred October 4, 1835. His wife, whom he had 
married December 3, 1797, bore the maiden name 
of Catharine Schneider. She is a descendant of 
Conrad and Catharine Schneider, natives of Ger- 
many. Their son, Conrad Schneider, Jr., was 
bom in Germany in 1699, and was married there 
in 1724 to Catharina Detz, who was born in that 
country in 1700, and was a daughter of Sebastian 
and Eva Detz. Conrad and Catharina (Detz) 
Schneider came to America on the ship "John- 
son." landing at Philadelphia, September 19, 1732. 



8o 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



It was their son Henrich and his wife Christina 
Schneider who were the parents of Catharine 
Schneider, the wife of PhiHp Gabel. She was 
born April 5, 1776, and died February i, 1822. 

The children of Philip and Catharine Gabel 
were: Charles, born April 9, 1799, and died No- 
vember 27, 1879; Sarah, born February 13, 1800, 
and became the wife of John Groiif; Esther E.. 
born May 18, 1803, and married John Smith ; 
Philip, born April 21, 1805 ; Margaret, born No- 
vember 17, 1807, and married Michael Reifif; 
Elizabeth, born July 30, 1810, and married 
Abraham Groff ; Anna Catharine, born May 6, 
1812, and married Zachariah Leidy ; and Jesse. 

The last named, Jesse Gable, born December 
29, 1816, followed the same business pursuit 
which had engaged the attention of his ancestors. 
He was first proprietor of the Upper Hotel at 
Skippackville, then another lower down until 
about 1850, and in 185 1 he built the lower hotel 
in the same place, this being now the Valley 
House. From 1868 until his death, which oc- 
curred September 16, 1874, he was proprietor of 
the Farmers' Hotel at Norristown, and his life 
labors returned to him gratifving success. In the 
affairs of the community he manifested a public- 
spirited interest, giving to many measures for the 
general good his hearty cooperation and financial 
support. His fellow townsmen, recognizing his 
worth and ability, called him to public office, and 
he served as treasurer of Montgomery county 
from 1851 until 1853, while at the time of his 
death he was president of the board of prison in- 
spectors. He was married June 18, 1843, to Mary 
Kemmerer, daughter of Jacob and Susan (Mc- 
Noldy) Kemmerer, of Red Hill, Pennsylvania. 
She was born January 27, 1821, and died Sep- 
tember 27, 1896. They had twelve children : 
John Philip, born January 17, 1844. died October 
9, 1857 ; Oliver, born May 3, 1845, died May 22, 
1852; Caroline, born October 27, 1846, died Oc- 
tober I, 1896; Catharine Ann, born May 17, 1849, 
died March 24, 1852; Jesse, born July 14, 1851, 
died February 28, 1853 ; Mary, born July 14, 1851, 
is the wife of Aaron H. Harley, proprietor of a 
hotel in Philadelphia, and they have six children ; 
Emm-' Louisa, born April 30, 1853, died Decem- 



ber 15, 1881 ; Rosa, born December 19, 1854, was 
married in 1878 to Hiram Pierce Beerer. and they 
had two children ; Elizabeth, born October 18, 
1856, died June 23, 1857; Allen Nelson, born 
April 5. 1858, died June 29. i860; Percival Kem- 
merer is the next of the family ; and Charles, born 
May 18, 1863, died October 26, same year. 

Percival Kemmerer Gable, born in Skippack- 
ville, Pennsylvania, February 27, i860, pursued a 
public school education, and in early life devel- 
oped a native talent for hotel-keeping, inherited 
from a long line of ancestors who had been iden- 
tified with this department of business activity 
almost from the time of the establishment of the 
colony of Pennsylvania. That Mr. Gable entered 
upon a work for which he was eminently fitted is 
demonstrated by the success which has contin- 
ually attended his efforts. His work has broad- 
ened in scope, his business increased in magni- 
tude, and he has largely followed the methods of 
the pioneer who works . upon new and original 
lines, and accomplishes a task which is of benefit 
to his entire locality. Mr. Gable first became 
proprietor of the Valley House of Skippack, 
which had been built for his father, and after 
conducting it for a time took charge of the Hart- 
ran ft House of Norristown. Atlantic City next 
became the scene of his labor, where he conducted 
Hotel Appledore, and later he was proprietor of 
the Central House of Lansdale, Pennsylvania, and 
then of the Red Lion, of Quakertown, this state, 
On the 13th of May, 1895, he took charge of the 
Rambo House of Norristown, of which he has 
since been proprietor, and has made it one of the 
popular hostelries of this part of the state, thor- 
oughly equipped with all modem conveniences 
and splendidly adapted for the entertainment of 
the traveling public. Studying the demands of 
the public throughout his business career, he has 
become thoroughly conversant with modern meth- 
ods of hotel-keeping, and because of his progres- 
sive ideas and earnest eiTorts to promote the com- 
fort of his guests he receives a liberal patronage. 

His citizenship is of that character which 
prompts cooperation in all measures for the gen- 
eral good, and while in Quakertown he served as 
president of the town council. His political al- 




^^^>'<^Z>tL^ <:j4^l<i^-u^c:^<^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



legiancc is given the Democracy, and in 1887 and 
again in 1893 he was a delegate to the Democratic 
state convention. He is identified with various 
benevolent, fraternal and social organizations. He 
belongs to Warren Lodge, No. 310, F. and A. M., 
of Trappe ; Norristown Chapter, No. 190, R. A. 
M. ; Hutchinson Commandery, No. 132, K. T., 
and Lulu Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is 
also a member of Lansdale Lodge, No. 997, L O. 
O. F., of Lansdale, Pennsylvania ; Milford Cas- 
tle, No. 165, Knights of the Golden Eagle, of 
Trumbauersville, Bucks county; Norristown 
Lodge, No. 171, B. P. O. E. ; Beaver Tribe, No. 
62, L O. R. M. ; Norris Lodge, No. iir, Broth- 
erhood of Union ; Hartranft Conclave, Order of 
Heptasophs ; Knights of the Royal Arch ; and 
Camp No. 1 14, Patriotic Order of Sons of Amer- 
ica. He is identified with the Newtown Masonic 
Relief Association, with the Deutsch Amerik ; the 
Norristown Maennerchor, of which he is the 
treasurer ; the Norristown Rifle and Gun Club, 
of which he is also the treasurer; and the Penn- 
sylvania Gun Club. He is also connected with 
Beneficial Section, N. M., of which he is treas- 
urer. He is a member of the Fairmount Fire 
Company, and he has deep interest in whatever 
tends to promote a spirit of fraternity, of mutual 
helpfulness and of desirable social relations among 
men. 

Mr. Gable has been twice married. He wed-- 
ded M. Levina Kohl, a daughter of John and 
Levina Kohl. Mrs. Gable died April 16, 1882, 
and the only child of that marriage died in in- 
fancy. On the 23d of April, 1885, Mr. Gable 
married Ella J. Kulp, who was born January 3, 
1861. She is a daughter of Professor Henry D. 
and Matilda (Johnson) Kulp, of Lucon, in 
Skippack township, a granddaughter of John and 
Susan (Detwiler) Kolb ; and a great-granddaugh- 
ter of Henrich and Barbara (Hunsicker) Kolb, of 
Skippack, Pennsylvania. Hendrich Kolb was a 
son of Henrich and Elizabeth (Cassell) Kolb, of 
Skippack, and the ancestry is traced back still 
further to Jacob Kolb, who was born in Germany, 
May 21, 1685, and came to America in 1707. He 
was a son of Dielman Kolb, of Aolfsheim, Baden, 
Germany, who married a daughter of Peter Schu- 



macher, who settled in Gerniantown, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1685. Jacob Kolb married Sarah \'an 
Sinterm and came to America in 1707. Mrs. 
Gable is numbered among his descendants in the 
sixth generation. By her marriage she has be- 
come the mother of three daughters : Rosa Linda, 
born March 5, 1887; Elsie Irene, born May i, 
1888 ; and Mary Kulp, born September 19, 1889. 
The family are members of the Reformed church 
of Norristown. He is thus identified with the 
material, social and moral development of his 
borough and among the popular and public-spir- 
ited citizens he is numbered. 

PROF. J. • HORACE LANDIS, A. M., 
County Superintendent of Public Schools in 
Montgomery county, is a native of Grater's Ford, 
where he was born October 20, 1854. He is the 
son of John and Anna (Hunsicker) Landis. 

John B. Landis (father) was a native of Up- 
per Providence township. He was born in 1814. 
After receiving an ordinary education in neigh- 
borhood schools he learned the trade of a 
plasterer, which he followed for many years at 
Trappe, Norristown, and elsewhere in the county. 
Later he engaged in farming at Grater's Ford, 
where he owned a fine farm of 140 acres. Dur- 
ing the latter years of his life his time was em- 
ployed principally in the management of his farm. 
He was an active Republican in politics, earnestly 
working to promote the success of its principles 
and candidates. He was a member of Trinity 
Reformed church, Collegeville, although the fam- 
ily were originally Mennonites. He married 
Anna, daughter of Abraham and Elizabeth Hun- 
sicker. She was born in 1817. Her mother, 
Elizabeth Hunsicker, died a few years ago at 
the age of ninety-nine years. Mr. and Mrs. John 
B. Landis had the following children : Elizabeth 
B. (deceased) ; Mary M., Anna (deceased) ; 
Hattie, Hannah H. (deceased) ; Abraham, Katie 
H., Benjamin, J. Horace, subject of this sketch ; 
Henry. Josephine, Frits, A. Lincoln, Elias (died 
in infancy). John B. Landis died in 1896, and 
his wife in 1897. The Hunsickers are an old 
family in Montgomery county, the progenitor in 
America being Valentine Hunsicker, a native of 



MONTGOAIERY CDUXTY, 



Switzerland, who came to this country in 1717, 
and about 1720 settled in Perkiomen township. 
His descendants are now to be found in a major- 
ity of the townships of the county. 

John Landis (grandfather) was born in 
Montgomery county, near Branchville, in 1775, 
and died in 1831. Early in life he removed to 
Upper Ptrovjdence township, and purchased a 
large farm on which he spent the remainder of 
his life. In politics he was a Whig. He mar- 
ried Mary Beitler, of an old Chester county fam- 
ily. The couple had four children: Abraham, 
John, (father), Jacob, and Hannah, who mar- 
ried Daniel Longacre. The Landis family trace 
their ancestry back to Holland, whence their 
progenitor emigrated to this country at an early 
date. Some branches of the family spell the 
name Landes. 

J. Horace Landis was reared on the home- 
stead farm, alternating school study with .work 
in the fields during the summer season. The 
foundation of his education was laid in the 
schools of Perkiomen township. He followed 
farming for a time, and then entered Ursinus 
College, where he perfected himself in several 
branches. Having a desire to become a teacher, 
he became a student at the Millersville State Nor- 
mal School in Lancaster county, graduating 
therefrom in the elementary course in 1877. 
Soon afterwards he took a post-graduate course 
at that institution, subsequently entering the 
University of Pennsylvania. In 1895 ^^e de- 
gree of Master of Arts was conferred upon him 
by Ursinus College. While attending the var- 
!ious institutions of learning which have been 
named, Professor Landis taught school at inter- 
vals, and during vacations. He served for sev- 
eral years as principal of the public schools of 
Mauch Chunk, the county seat of Carbon. He 
was also principal of the Schwenksville and 
Landsdale schools, both in ^Montgomery county, 
filling all these positions very successfully, and 
being generally recognized as. one of the leading 
educators of the county, and taking a very active 
part in the annual institutes. In 1892 he was 
elected principal of the Conshohocken public 
schools, filling the position in the most satis- 



factory manner, and being chosen by successive 
re-elections until his appointment to the office of 
county superintendent, made vacant by the death 
of Professor Reuben F. Hoffecker, in December, 
1903. He had under his charge as principal of 
the borough schools of Conshohocken about 
twenty-five teachers, and under his management 
the various departments attained a high standard 
of efficiency. On Christmas day, 1879, Professor 
Landis married Lizzie K. Kratz, a daughter of 
Michael Kratz, a well-known business man of 
Greenlane, Montgomery county. The couple have 
one child, Vesta K., who has for some time been 
engaged in teaching in the public schools of 
Conshohocken. 

In politics Prof. Landis is an earnest Repub- 
lican. He is a member of the Schwenksville 
Mennonite church, Schwenksville, Pennsylvania. 
His selection as county superintendent at a time 
when a number of competitors were seeking the 
honor, was a high tribute to the esteem in which 
he was held not only in Conshohocken but 
throughout the county. He had shown himself 
in his management of the Conshohocken schools 
to be an able, progressive and popular teacher, 
and it was generally felt that the educational in- 
terests of the county would be safe in his hands. 
It was his aim in the position to secure for the 
borough schools what was attainable in the way 
of buildings, books, furniture and other edu- 
cational equipment. During his principalship, 
Latin, German, typewriting, sewing, vocal music 
and manual training were introduced into the 
Conshohocken schools, and the buildings de- 
voted to school purposes were very much 
improved. As a teacher. Professor Landis en- 
joyed the confidence of his pupils and of the en- 
tire communit}-. He greatly extended the course 
of study, and elevated the educational standard 
of the borough. He had no difficulty in inter- 
esting the pupils in school work, and in securing 
the full cooperation of parents and directors in 
school progress. In the position of county super- 
intendent Professor Landis has very thoroughly 
fulfilled the expectations that were entertained 
at the time of his appointment. He has pursued 
a wise, liberal and progressive policy, laying 



MOXTGO-MERY COUNTY. 



83 



more stress upon originality in research on the 
part of the pupils of the schools under his super- 
vision than upon mere memory work. He has 
sought to increase the usefulness of the schools 
in every possible way, favoring a generous policy 
as regards school buildings and equipment, and 
encouraging teachers and pupils to cherish the 
highest and best aims. He has been in the posi- 
tion of county superintendent what he was as a 
teacher — alert, progressive, and ever ready to do 
his utmost to promote the interests of education. 
Professor Landis is a member of the Masonic 
order. Mrs. Landis belongs to a family long 
resident in ]\Iontgomery county. Tbeir first an- 
cestor in America was Valentine Kratz, who 
came to Pennsylvania early in the eighteenth 
century, settling in what is now Skippack town- 
ship. The family are of German origin. 

RO\\'LEY K. ORTT. who is one of Xorris- 
town's widely-known manufacturers, has risen by 
his own exertion to the position which he now oc- 
cupies, inventive genius and mechanical skill en- 
abling him to perfect a lawn mower on entirely 
new principles, making it a novelty in its line, a 
steady demand existing for it in all parts of the 
world. 

Mr. Ortt was born October 25, 1855, at North 
Ridge, Niagara county, New York. His father 
was a contractor and builder who enlisted at the 
beginning of the Rebellion in the Eighth New 
York \'olunteers. He was discharged in October, 
1863, at Baltimore, after serving three years. He 
was a helpless invalid and was brought home by 
two comrades in an invalid's chair and placed 
in bed. His wife undertook to lift him and 
strained herself, causing a rupture, from which 
she died one week later. The husband's ailment 
was due to the fact that he was placed in the cook- 
house, the steam from cooking pork being the 
cause of his sickness. After his wife's death a 
nurse was secured to take care of him. There 
were four children : Hannah M., John PL. Row- 
ley K.. and Cyrus N. Ortt. Hannah died in 1894; 
John in 1874, his death being caused by a kick 
from a horse ; Cyrus lives in Pekin, New York, 
where he owns a small farm, and his father, who 



is now seventy-eight years old and seems to grow 
stronger with age, lives with him. The father 
was born in Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, but 
when he was a mere lad the family removed to 
New York state. 

The Ortts came originally from Germany, but 
have long been naturalized in this country. Ar- 
thusia (Peterson) Ortt (mother) was a daughter 
of John Peterson, a farmer living at North Ridge. 
John Peterson had seven children : John, Nathan, 
Cyrus, Arthusia, Melinda, Oranda, and Jane. 
Arthusia married Elias Ortt (father), as has 
been said. Elias Ortt built many of the prom- 
inent buildings in that section of the country prior 
to the war. He built a church, parsonage and a 
school house at Beemsville in Canada, removing 
his family to that place while engaged in the 
work. Having learned that Elias's wife's mother 
was dying, the family started to return, and when 
they reached the Suspension bridge which was 
just being built at that time, there being only a 
walk for the carpenter to cross it consisting of 
three six inch boards, and the boat known as the 
"Maid of the Mist" being on the opposite side of 
the river and not likely to return for some time, 
and Mrs. Elias Ortt (mother) being very anx- 
ious to reach her mother's bedside before she 
passed away, and there being apparently no other 
way. she said she could walk over on those three 
narrow boards, and she did so, one of the car- 
penters going ahead, holding her hand and her 
husband following. Mrs. Ortt was thus the first 
woman who ever crossed the Suspension bridge. 
There were three children at that time, Anna, 
John and Rowle\-, who were strapped in the 
basket running on a cable rope used to draw the 
workmen across, and thus all reached the New 
York side of the river safely. 

The inventive genius of Rowley K. Ortt was 
manifested at a very early age. When onl\- nine 
years old he went to live with a cousin and later 
with Thomas Parker. While at Mr. Parker's he 
was replanting twenty acres of corn which had 
been partly ruined by the grub worms. While en- 
gaged in this laborious task he conceived the idea 
of the jabber planter, using it next day with fairly 
good results. The next night he improved on his 



84 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



first idea and made a new planter which worked 
still better, and was loaned to a neighbor named 
Fuller. Fuller secured a patent for the machine 
and started to manufacture it, which he did suc- 
cessfully. Rowley K. Ortt at this time was only 
seventeen years of age and of course received 
nothing for his invention. 

While hauling logs from the woods the young 
inventor had another opportunity to display his 
genius. The bob-sled upset and broke the short 
reach on the hind bob. Ortt went to work and 
bored a hole through the back bolster, and coupled 
it by a swivel to the front bolster and to this day 
all bob-sleds are made in that way. 

In 1878 Thomas Parker took the agency for 
the Norristown gleaner and binder, manufactured 
by William A. Singerly in what was then known 
as the agricultural works and is now the Key- 
stone Hosiery Company's building, at Astor and 
Oak streets, Norristown. ;\Ir. Parker could not 
succeed with them and ;\Ir. Ortt took hold and 
succeeded in making them operate very well. The 
result was that the company induced him to come 
to Norristown in 1879. He made a number of im- 
provements, including a chain tightener, a fric- 
tion tension, etc. He left the company in 1883, 
going into the shoe business at 125 East Main 
street. In 1892 he sold out the shoe store and 
has since been working on patents. Among those 
he has secured are devices for curtain fixtures for 
inside shutters for lace curtains ; also a double nut 
tack, a bonnet for vestibule cars, and the Clipper 
lawn mower. The last he is now manufacturing, 
being unable to supply the extensive demand for 
the machine, which is steadily growing in popu- 
lar favor. Mr. Ortt is now manager of a large 
establishment in the lower part of Norristown, 
owned and operated by the Clipper Lawn Mower 
Company, Incorporated. 

]Mr. Ortt has been twice married. His first 
wife was Jane Greavy of Norristown. The couple 
were married in 1882, she dying in 1889, and leav- 
ing two children, Hannah L. Ortt and Ellwood 
K. Ortt. He married, in 1893, Rachel P. Flint 
of Germantown. They have one child, Horace 
F. Ortt. 

The relationship of the Ortts and Petersons 



has been mentioned. The Petersons were con- 
nected also with the Tanners and the Brownells, 
both old families, the Brownells being of Rhode 
Island. Phoebe Tanner, daughter of Josias Tan- 
ner, by his second wife, Phoebe Brownell, was 
born ]\Iay 11, 1775. Phoebe married John Peter- 
son in November, 1793, both being of South 
Kingston, Rliode Island. The couple removed to 
Bristol, Vermont, and later to Ridgway, in what 
is now Orleans county, New York. They en- 
dured the privations of early frontier life, going to 
western New York when it was still a wilderness. 

Josias Tanner was the son of Francis Tanner 
and his wife Elizabeth (Sheldon) Tanner. Eliza- 
beth was a daughter of Isaac Sheldon, a respected 
citizen and freeman in South Kingston. She 
was born in 1713. Josias was a Revolutionary 
soldier. 

Francis Tanner was the son of William and 
Elizabeth Tanner of South Kingston. He was 
born July 3, 1708. After his marriage he re- 
moved to the neighboring town of Hopkinton. 
where he bought twelve hundred acres of land. 
He was admitted a "freeman" in South Kings- 
ton in 1753, and in 1762-5 held the honorable po- 
sition in that day of justice of the peace, holding 
his commission (still in existence) from the gov- 
ernor of the province. He died January 3, 1777, 
and his widow in 1801. 

William Tanner, father of Francis, and 
founder of that branch of the Rhode Island Tan- 
ners in America, first appears in the state in 1682, 
as witness to a deed of Frances Houlding, wife of 
Randall Houlding, the leading spirit in the col- 
ony that she had lately represented in England. 
In 1687 William Tanner paid a tax on one poll. 
In 1693 he bought land in South Kingston, hav- 
ing somewhat earlier married a daughter of 
Henry Tibbitts, an influential landholder who in 
his will provided an estate for each of his chil- 
dren and for each grandchild whose parent on the 
Tibbitt side was dead. William Tanner was 
prominent in founding the old Seventh-Day Bap- 
tist church in Westerly, now Hopkinton, and held 
an influential position therein. He was living as 
late as 1735, and his third wife, Elizabeth, as late 
as 1752. The date of his birth is unknown, but 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



§5 



was probably about 1660-3. I' 's not known from 
what part of England he came, nor to what branch 
of the Tanners he belonged. The family has been 
traced to the time of Edward III, if not to the 
Norman conquest. It is probable that William 
Tanner and a brother or two brothers crossed the 
ocean to escape the rigorous measures enforced 
against the Baptists in the time of Charles II. 

William Tanner was the father of fifteen chil- 
dren. Francis had seven children. At his death 
he gave his slave, Quom, his freedom. The boy, 
Ouom, was a Revolutionary soldier. 

Josias Tanner was the father of thirteen chil- 
dren. He was admitted a "freeman" in 1757. 
He was ensign of the Second Continental Com- 
pany, 1762, and a private of the First Battalion, 
Rhode Island troops. Colonel Green commanding, 
from June i to July i, 1778, Colonel Arnold's de- 
tachment. He died March 14, 1810, and his 
remains rest on the old homestead in Rhode 
Island. 

CHARLES TEMPLETON, a leading man- 
ufacturer and organizer of industries, was born in 
Bridgeport, Pennsylvania, February 24, 1859, ^"d 
resided there until 1865, when his parents re- 
moved to Norristown. His opportunities for ed- 
ucation were confined to the public schools of 
Bridgeport and Norristown. In 1876 he started 
out on his own account, going to Philadelphia and 
obtaining employment on the Centennial Expo- 
sition grounds as a clerk. He remained there 
until December of that year, and in March fol- 
lowing entered the Wanamaker store in the in- 
voice department. He was thus engaged for a 
year, and during that time, and the two years 
he was with Benjamin Israel, he attended night 
school at the Spring Garden Institute. 

In 1879 Mr. Templeton became connected 
with the Thomas Potter Sons & Co.'s oil cloth 
works as a general utility man. He remained 
with this firm until 1891 and by strict attention to 
his duties was in 1883 made superintendent of the 
light weight oil cloth department. By strict 
economy, during the years he was with the Potter 
firm, he managed to save the means which en- 
abled him to join with other capitalists in organ- 



izing the Western Linoleum Company, whose 
works are located at Akron, Ohio. Mr. Temple- 
ton was general superintendent of the company, 
and the inventor of the new methods which the 
company introduced in the manufacture of light 
weight oil cloths of all kinds. Patents were ap- 
plied for, but all were not granted, and the failure 
to secure them proved a benefit to manufacturers 
of other kinds of articles. Mr. Templeton re- 
mained in the company until 1896, in full charge 
of the works which, under his supervision, have 
become the most extensive and successful of the 
kind in the L'nited States, or in the world. 

In 1896 Mr. Templeton severed his connection 
with the business, and came to Norristown and 
opened the Keystone Oil Cloth Works, the bus- 
iness being incorporated in 1898, with Mr. Tem- 
pleton as president. The establishment did a 
large and very successful business until July 15, 
1 90 1, when the plant was turned over to the 
Standard Table Oil Cloth Company of New Jer- 
sey, which had absorbed ninety per cent of the 
production of light weight oil cloth made in 
America. In March, 1901, Mr. Templeton was 
called upon by a majority of the manufacturers 
in the United States to labor to bring about har- 
mony of interets among the producers of that 
line of goods. The result of this was the organ- 
ization of the Standard Table Oil Cloth Company 
of New Jersey, and the consolidation as above 
mentioned. At the formation of this company 
I\Ir. Templeton was elected one of the general su- 
perintendents. He at once made a personal in- 
spection of the different plants which had been 
consolidated. This was a work not at all to his 
liking but was completed satisfactorily. The 
company's interests in Pennsylvania are looked 
after by Mr. Templeton, who is now one of the 
board of directors. The company is doing a suc- 
cessful and remunerative business and ships goods 
not only to all parts of the United States but to 
all foreign countries where such goods are used. 

In politics Mr. Templeton is a Republican. 
While in Philadelphia he took an active interest 
in politics, and was a worker but not an office 
seeker. He is a member of Shekinah Lodge, 
Free and .Accepted ^Masons, Xo. 246, of I'hiladel- 



86 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



phia, and also of Oriental Chapter, No. 183, R. 
A. M. ; Hutchinson Commandery, No. 32, Knights 
Templar, of Norristown. He is a member of the 
Odd Fellows, Red Men and the Elks. 

Mr. Templeton married ]\Iiss Mary Hodgkin- 
son, daughter of John S. and Elizabeth (Hooley) 
Hodgkinson, of Philadelphia. She was born No- 
vember 19, 1864. Their children are Elizabeth, 
Sara C, Harry, Marie, Nelson G. and John S. 

Mrs. Templeton is of English extraction, all 
her people having emigrated from Manchester, 
England, to this country. Her grandfather, A. 
Hooley, started in the silk manufacturing busi- 
ness, and was very successful. The firm he estab- 
lished is still in business, being carried on by his 
grandchildren. Their father was also a manu- 
facturer and was ver}- successful, but died in the 
prime of life. 

Mr. Templeton's father was John H. Temple- 
ton, who was a Chester county man and learned 
the carpenter trade in Norristown, becoming a 
large contractor, the firm being Raysor & Tem- 
pleton. He built the DeKalb street bridge and 
did the wood work on the courthouse, when it 
was erected more than a half century ago. 

Mr. Templeton is a striking example of what 
energy and perseverance will accomplish when 
rightly directed. Mr. Templeton's whole life has 
been a magnificent success. He enjoys the con- 
fidence and respect of the business community, 
illustrating as he does the truth of the maxim, 
"that every man is the architect of his own for- 
tune." 

SAMUEL N. KULP, a retired farmer of 
Abington township, is of German descent, al- 
though his ancestors came to this country more 
than two centuries ago. His grandfather, Isaac 
Kulp, was a weaver at Milestown, in what is 
now the Twenty-second ward of Philadelphia. 
He married Elizabeth Moore. 

Isaac Kulp, (grandfather) and his wife Eliz- 
abeth had the following children : Joseph, Philip 
(father), Jacob, ]\Iary Ann (Mrs. George 
Wentz), Hannah (Mrs. Jacob Wentz), and Ehza 
(Mrs. John Pierson). Philip (father) was born 
at Milestown, and also followed the occupation 



of a weaver until he purchased a farm on which 
he afterwards resided, operating it very success- 
fully. He married Ann, daughter of John and 
Sallie Nice, of the vicinity of Milestown, also of 
an old family in that section, the former of Ger- f 

man descent, and highly esteemed for their plain 
and substantial virtues. The children of Philip 
and Ann Kulp: Isaac and John (both de- 
ceased): Samuel N., subject of this sketch; 
Sarah N. (Mrs. Reuben Harper) ; Margaret H. 
(Mrs. Alfred Buckman) ; Maria L. (Mrs. John 
Hawkins) ; Eliza A. (Mrs. F. B. Thompson). 

Samuel N. Kulp was born November 29, 
1826, and was reared to farm life, attending a 
neighboring school. At the age of seventeen 
years he learned the trade of millwright in Ab- 
ington township, and was employed in that oc- 
cupation until he was twenty-six years of age. 
He married, December 16, 1852, Mary Ann, 
born June 12, 1828, daughter of John and Kittie 
Ann (IMiles) Blake, of Abington township, in 
Montgomery county. Their children : IMargaret 
B., born October 5, 1853, married, November 2, 
1876, Samuel. R. Livezey ; Joseph K., born Oc- 
tober 27, 1855, married, November 26, 1884, 
Voila S. Tomlinson : Ida Ann, born August 7, 
1857, married October 30, 1877, John R. Read- 
ing; John B., born January 30, i860, married, 
September 20, 1885, Mary E. Wiggins ; Emma L.. 
born August 6, 1863, married, March 22, 1892, 
Thomas McNair; William, born January 21, 
1866, married, January 25, 1893, Nellie J. Gen- 
try. Mr. Kulp, three years after his marriage, 
purchased a farm within the limits of the city of 
Philadelphia, on which he resided for a period 
of eighteen years. He then removed to his pres- 
ent home in the township of Abington, not far 
from the city line, on which he has lived since 
1873. For the past ten years he has relinquished 
the cares of farming, leaving them to others. 
He was also at one time engaged in real estate 
operations. He is one of the oldest citizens of 
that section of Montgomery county, and is highly 
esteemed by all who know him, for his integrity 
and other sterling qualities. His political asso- 
ciations were with the Whig party, and with the 
Republican party since its formation in 1856. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



87 



He has, however, never held public office, al- 
though he might have done so, had he not been 
too busy with his own affairs to participate in 
movements of a public character. In recent 
years he has allied himself to the Democratic 
party. In religious faith he affiliates with 
the Baptist denomination, worshipping at the 
Lower Dublin church. Mr. Kulp's career is an- 
other exemplification of the power of honest in- 
dustry to aid in the realization of prosperity and 
win the respect and esteem of the whole com- 
munity. He is emphatically a selfmade man, 
having begun life without aid from an}- source 
except his own industry and ambition, and the 
faithful assistance of his dutiful wife. 

CHARLES H. STINSOX. The Stinsons 
are an old family in Montgomery county, being of 
Scotch-Irish descent. Hon. Robert Stinson was 
prominent in politics in the early part of the last 
century, being for many years a justice of the 
peace, and serving as an anti-masonic member of 
the legislature in 1836. He married Elizabeth 
Porter, daughter of Stephen Porter and niece of 
General Andrew Porter. The Porters were a 
prominent family of Norriton township, and 
while none of the name remain in this vicinity, 
many of the old families are connected with them 
by descent or intermarriage. Hon. Robert Stin- 
son (grandfather) had several children, as fol- 
lows : Margaret, Stephen Porter, Mary H., 
George W., Charles H., John E., Elizabeth, Fran- 
cis G., Robert Burns and Jane. All these chil- 
dren are now deceased except Francis G. Mary 
H. Stinson left a considerable sum of money to 
found a home for aged women which is located on 
Swede street, Norristown. 

Charles H. Stinson (father) was bom in Nor- 
riton township, June 28, 1825. After some time 
spent in the select schools and academies of that 
day he became a student at Dickinson College, 
Carlisle, graduating in the class of 1845. In 
1846 he entered as a law student with his brother, 
George W. Stinson, and remained with him until 
the death of the latter in 1848. He completed his 
studies under Addison May, then of Norristown, 
but later of West Chester, and was admitted to 



the bar, May 22, 1849. He entered at once upon 
the practice of law, taking very soon a leading 
rank in his profession and becoming very suc- 
cessful therein. During the later years of his life 
he was counsel for the Pennsylvania Railroad 
Company in [Montgomery county, during which 
period the Schuylkill \'alley and Trenton Cut-off 
branches of that line were constructed, each ex- 
tending through the county and each giving rise 
to many damage suits which were defended by 
Mr. Stinson with great ability and shrewdness, 
his son, C. Henry Stinson, and William F. Solly, 
then engaged in the active practice of law but 
now the judge of the orphans' court at Norris- 
town, being associated with him in the conduct 
of many of these cases. 

Charles H. Stinson was a prominent Republi- 
can from the formation of the party in 1856. Hav- 
ing refused the nomination for state senator in 
1864, he accepted it in 1867, and with Dr, Worth- 
ington of West Chester as his colleague, he was 
elected to represent the counties of Montgomery, 
Chester and Delaware, then forming the district. 
He took an active part in the work of that body in 
1868, was elected speaker in 1869 ^"d re-elected 
in 1870 to that position, in which he presided with 
that dignity and fairness which always charac- 
terized his bearing toward those with whom he 
came in contact. Having declined the appoint- 
ment of additional law judge of Montgomery and 
Bucks counties, tendered him by Governor Geary, 
on the death of Judge Henry C. Ross in 1882, he 
accepted the appointment of president judge from 
Governor Hoyt. In the fall of that year he was 
named by acclamation by his party for the posi- 
tion but the district being Democratic at that time, 
his opponent, Hon. B. Markley Boyer was elected, 
although Mr. Stinson ran considerably ahead of 
his ticket. Judge Stinson was given an oppor- 
tunity to exercise that philanthropic spirit which 
characterizes the family, in the capacity of mem- 
ber of the board of trustees of the Norristown 
Hospital for the Insane, a position which he held 
from the organization of the institution until his 
death, being its honored president from the time 
of the death of ex-Governor John F. Hartranft. 
In this position Judge Stinson was influential in 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



the adoption of many improvements on the old 
hospital system, among them the placing of a 
woman at the head of the department for females 
in that institution, which innovation has resulted 
in great benefit and is being extensively imitated 
throughout the country. In every relation of life 
Judge Stinson was faithful in the discharge of 
duty. He died rather suddenly, March lo, 1899. 

HUGH ROBERTS, a rising member of the 
Philadelphia bar who practiced law a dozen years 
or more in Iowa, Missouri and Kansas, was born 
in the twenty-third ward of Philadelphia, Janu- 
ary 8, 1868. He is of Welsh Quaker stock on his 
father's side, their ancestor, Edward Roberts, hav- 
ing come to America in 1699, when he was twelve 
years old. He settled first in Abington, where in 
1714 he married Mary Bolton, daughter of Ed- 
ward and Elizabeth Bolton. In 1816 he removed 
to Great Swamp in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, 
and afterward successively to Richland and Ouak- 
ertown. Edward Roberts was a minister of the 
Friends' Society for forty years. He died in 1768, 
aged eighty-one years, and his wife in 1784, aged 
ninety-seven years, six months. He had a large 
family of children who married into prominent 
families of eastern Pennsylvania, thus establishing 
an extensive connection so that Edward Roberts 
became the founder of a very numerous and in- 
fiuential line of descendants. 

His son, David, who was born in 1722, and 
died in 1804, married in 1754, Phoebe Lancaster, 
daughter of Thomas and Phoebe (Wardell) Lan- 
caster, an eminent minister among Friends who 
died in 1750, while on a religious visit to the island 
of Barbadoes. Thomas Lancaster had eleven chil- 
dren, John, Phebe, Job, Joseph, Jacob, Isaac, 
Aaron, Moses, Elizabeth, Benjamin and Thomas, 
and his descendants are very numerous especially 
in the west, including, as a matter of course, all 
the descendants of David and Phebe Roberts. 

David and Phebe Roberts' children were: 
Amos, born Fourth-mo., 19, 1758, married Mar- 
garet Thomas, daughter of Edward and Alice, 
Eleventh-mo., 30, 1775 ; Mary, Elizabeth, Nathan, 
^ane, Abigail, Nathan, David and Ivan. 

Amos Roberts (great-great-grandfather), and 



IVIargaret, his wife, had the following children, 
Mordecai, Mary, Alice Matilda, Hugh, Andrew, 
George, Phebe, Margaret and Deborah, all na- 
tives of Richland except Deborah, who was born 
in Philadelphia county. 

Hugh Roberts (great-grandfather), married 
Sarah Spencer, eldest daughter of Nathan and 
Rachel Pim Spencer, in 1806. He was a miller 
and lived near Branchtown, Philadelphia. Their 
children were as follows : Lydia died in infancy ; 
Caroline, born in 1809 and died in 1872, married 
Charles S. Rorer; Spencer Roberts, born in 181 1, 
died in 1885; Margaret, 1813-1891, married Gid- 
eon Lloyd; Edmund, born in 1815, died 1866; 
Alfred, born in 1817, and Maria, in 1819, died 
in infancy; Hugh, born Eighth-mo., 5, 1821, died 
Eighth-mo., 23, 1894. 

Hugh Roberts (grandfather), married Alice 
Anna Gallagher, born Eighth-mo. 5, 1819, and 
died Fourth-mo. 10, 1902, in Norristown, Penn- 
sylvania. Their children: Charles H., born 
Sixth-mo. 18, 1843 ; Ellwood, born First-mo. 22, 
1846, and married Mary L. Carter; Mary, born 
Tenth-mo. 25, 1847, and married Samuel Live- 
zey. All of them are residents of Norristown. 

Charles Henry Roberts (father), was educated 
in common schools in the vicinity of Wilmington, 
Delaware, where he was born, and in 1862 he be- 
gan teaching. After following that profession 
for a number of years in Pennsylvania and Da- 
kota, where he removed in 1877, he studied law, 
and has practiced that profession continuously 
since, in Dakota, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas and 
other states, residing successively in Yankton, 
Sioux City and Kansas City, and removing in 
1903 to Norristown. He married Third-mo. 20, 
1865, Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel and 
Louisa (^^lakey) Stradling, both of old Bucks 
county families. Their children : Alice Anna, born 
Fourth-mo. 16, 1866, followed the profession of 
teaching for fiiteen years and accepted a position 
in the United States census bureau at Washing- 
ton in 1900; Hugh; Samuel, born Eighth-mo. 5, 
1871, has followed the occupation of a druggist 
and traveling salesman for a number of years ; 
he resides in Chicago, married Third-mo., 1902, 
Edith Lillian Storey ; and Louisa Elizabeth, born 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



89 



September 2^, 1886, graduated at tlie Kansas City 
high school, Fifth-mo. 27, 1902, with high honors. 
Hugh Roberts was educated in the Friends" 
Schools taught.by his father at Salem, New Jersey, 
and elsewhere, and followed the profession of 
teaching in Iowa for several }ears. He entered 
his lather's office as a student-at-law and was 
admitted to the bar in 1889, passing the best 
examination ever recorded up to that time in the 
state of Iowa. He has since practiced law contin- 
uously in the civil and criminal courts of Iowa, 
Missouri and Kansas, including the supreme 
courts of each state. In the fall of 1901, he left 
Kansas City and came to Norristown, was ad- 
mitted to the Philadelphia bar in February, 1902, 
and has practiced law in the courts of that city 
ever since, his office being at No. 17 North Juni- 
per street, opposite the City Hall. He has re- 
ceived many encomiums from members of the 
bench and bar and from others for the ability he 
has displayed in trying cases, winning them in the 
face of almost insurmountable obstacles in man\- 
instances. He has also been interested in building 
operations and real-estate enterprises in Norris- 
town. During his practice in Kansas City, he 
achieved many successes and was recognized as 
a leading member of the Kansas City bar. 

B. PERCY CHAIN. The Chain family was 
established in America by John Chain, who set- 
tled on the west bank of Stony Creek in what is 
now Norristown. On September 5, 1770. he pur- 
chased of Mary Norris, for fifty pounds sterling, 
a farm of one hundred and seventy-six acres, on 
which a large part of West Norristown is now 
situated. A portion of the property, at Main and 
George streets, was in the possession of his de- 
scendant, James M. Chain (unc' -) and his 
widow until her death a few years ago. The 
mansion, built in 1859 by I\Ir. Chain, and the 
grounds are now owned and occupied by Ellwood 
Roberts. The residence of Congressman Wanger 
at Main and Stanbridge .streets, was the original 
Chain homestead. John Chain married Ann, a 
daughter of Edward Lane and Ann Richardson, 
the latter a daughter of Judge Samuel Richard- 
son, of I'hiladelphia. He died Septenibcr 9, t8oo. 



in the eighty-fourth year of his age. and lies 
buried at Norriton and Lower Providence Pres- 
byterian church cemetery. 

Matthew Chain (great-grandfather) suc- 
ceeded his father by will to the ownership of the 
farm. He died August 23, 1827, in his eightieth 
year. He married twice, and reared two children, 
one of whom, John Chain (grandfather), born 
December 16, 1781, lived on the homestead all 
his life. John Chain 'devoted his life to agricul- 
tural pursuits, and died April 9, 1829. He mar- 
ried October 24, 1808, Ann Evans, a sister of 
Benjamin Evans, one of the early eminent lawyers 
of the county, and a descendant of the founder of 
Evansburg in Lower Providence. They had a 
family of five children : Eleanor, who died un- 
married ; Hannah, who married John S. McFar- 
land, of the Montgomery county bar; James, 
2klark, and Benjamin E., all now deceased. 

Benjamin E. Chain (father) was born at Nor- 
ristown, Pennsylvania, October 15, 1823, and was 
educated at Norristown Academy, Lawrenceville 
(New Jersey) Seminary, and Washington and 
Jefferson College, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, 
from which institution he graduated in 1842. He 
read law one year with the late Gilbert Rodman 
Fox, of Norristown, and completed his prepara- 
tion for the bar under Hon. James 'M. Porter, of 
Easton. He was admitted in November, 1844, 
and began practice at Norristown. In 1850 he 
was elected district attorne}', Ijeing the first to 
fill that office by the vote of the people under the 
constitution adopted in that year. He was con- 
nected with many noted cases, as counselor on 
one side or the other, and had a large practice in 
the orphan's court. He died March 28, 1893, in 
the seventieth year of his age. In politics he was 
a Democrat, and took an active part in political 
aft'airs, though in later life his time was monopo- 
lized by business. He was one of the founders of 
the First National Bank of Norristown, and was a 
director in it. He was vice-president and solicitor 
of the Montgomery Insurance Trust & Safe De- 
posit Company, was the first president of the Nor- 
ristown Gas Company, and was interested in 
other Norristown enterprises. ' During Lee's in- 
vasion of Penns\h-ania he served in the emer- 



go 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



gency corps. He was a lifelong friend and the 
legal adviser of General Winfield Scott Hancock, 
who was frequently a guest at his home. Mr. 
Chain was devoted to Hancock's interests, and did 
considerable campaign work for the Democratic 
ticket during the General's candidacy for presi- 
dent of the United States in 1880. At General 
Hancock's death in 1886, Mr. Chain attended to 
the details of his burial at Norristown. 

Mr. Chain was a member of the Protestant 
Episcopal church, and for a period of twenty-five 
years occupied the position of vestryman and 
senior warden in St. John's at Norristown. In 
1845 he married Louisa Bean, of Norristown. 
The couple had four children. Two died in in- 
fancy and two survive: a daughter, ]\Iary Ham- 
ilton, widow of Francis D. Farnum, who was 
a prominent cotton manufacturer of Norristown : 
and a son, Benjamin Percy Chain, the last of the 
surname Chain of this branch of the familx'. 

B. Percy Chain of the Norristown bar is the 
only son of Benjamin E. and Louisa B. Chain. 
He was born at Norristown, December 22, 1858. 
B. Percy Chain grew to manhood in Norristown. 
He graduated at Treemount Seminary and La- 
fayette College. He studied law with his father, 
and was admitted to the bar of the county in 
1884. He has successfully practiced his profes- 
sion ever since. Mr. Chain, like his father, is in- 
terested in business enterprises in and about Nor- 
ristown. He is a director in the [Montgomery In- 
surance Trust & Safe Deposit Company. 

On August 30, 1893, Mr. Chain married Miss 
Bessie Brooke, youngest daughter of Lewis T. 
Brooke, of the firm of Lewis T. Brooke & Son. 
real estate dealers of Philadelphia. Mr. Chain is 
a Democrat, although taking little part in poli- 
tics. He is a vestryman and the treasurer of St. 
John's Episcopal church, Norristown. He is also 
a member of the Ersine Tennis Club, of which he 
was an incorporator in 1892. and is the president. 
The home of ]\Ir. and Mrs. Chain is at the south 
comer of Jacoby and Arch streets. They have 
these children : Adelaide B., Harriet B. and John 
Chain. 

On Benjamin E. Chain, during the latter part 
of his life time, and on B. Percv Chain, since the 



death of his father, has devolved the custody of 
the tomb of General Hancock in Montgomer^■ 
county, it having been erected originally under 
General Hancock's own supervision. On se\- 
eral occasions efforts have been made to have the 
remains of General Hancock removed to Arling- 
ton cemetery near ^\'ashington, but in deference 
to the wishes of the people of Norristown, and 
in accordance with the advice of ^Messrs. Chain, 
father and son, there has been no change in that 
respect. 

GENERAL JOHN W. SCHALL, com- 
mander of the First Brigade, National Guard of 
Pennsylvania, is one of the best-known military 
men of the state. He made a distinguished record 
in the war for the Union forty years ago, and has 
also participated actively in later movements, in- 
cluding the Spanish- American war. 

General John \V. Schall, who served with dis- 
tinction in the Civil war, and now holds the rank 
of brigadier general in the National Guard of 
Pennsylvania, is a son of Hon. David and Cath- 
erine (Andy) Schall. He was born June 22. 
1834, in Berks county, Pennsylvania. The Schalls 
are descended from a prominent French Hugue- 
not family, who were driven from France by the 
religious persecutions following the revocation of 
the Edict of Nantes. Members of the family 
made their way to the new world about 1748, and 
settled in Pennsylvania, where their descendants 
have become numerous. Hon. George Schall, 
paternal grandfather of General Schall, was a 
resident of Berks county during the greater part 
of his life, and was there largely engaged in the 
manufacture of iron. He was a Democrat, be- 
came prominent in politics, served in various of- 
ficial positions, and was a member of the state 
senate at the time of his death in 183 1. He mar- 
ried Miss Catherine Oyster and reared a family 
of eight children, one of whom was Hon. David 
Schall (father), who was born at Olev, I\Iav 2^, 
1801. 

David Schall received a superior education, 
and succeeding to his father's interests, became 
a wealthy iron manufacturer, and maintained his 
connection with that important industry all his 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



91 



life. He was honored by his party with election 
to the office of associate judge of Berks county, 
which position he held for two terms. He was 
connected with the local militia, serving as major 
of his battalion. In religion he was a member of 
the Reformed church, with which he was officially 
connected for many years. He died at Dale, 
Berks county, January 22, 1877, at the age of 
seventy-six years, and his remains rest in the 
cemetery adjoining his church at that place. He 
married Catherine Andy, a native of Berks 
county, and a daughter of Jacob Andy. They had 
a family of nine children, five sons and four 
daughters, all of whom grew to maturity and be- 
came active and useful citizens. 

General John W. Schall was reared in Berks 
county and educated in private schools at Trappe 
and Norristown, after which he pursued an ex- 
tended course of advanced study in the military 
academy at Norwich, A'ermont. After graduating 
he was connected for several years with an en- 
gineering corps under John C. Trautwine, and 
later engaged in the dry goods business at York, 
Pennsylvania, where he subsequently became a 
member and first lieutenant of the York Rifles, a 
military organization. Immediately upon the 
call of President Lincoln for volunteers in 1861, 
the York Rifles profifered their services in a body, 
and were one of the first companies to enter the 
service fully armed and equipped. For this 
promptness in time of danger they were after- 
wards awarded medals by the state. They were 
commanded by Captain George Hay and were 
mustered into service April 19, 1861, as Company 
K, Second Pennsylvania Infantry, only four days 
after the President's proclamation had been 
signed, and just one week after the first gun was 
fired on Fort Sumter. 

At the expiration of their term of enlistment, 
three months. Lieutenant Schall returned and or- 
ganized a company for three years' service, but 
received authority from the secretary of war, 
Simon Cameron, to organize a regiment at York, 
Pennsylvania. L^pon the formation of this regi- 
ment, the Eighty-seventh Pennsylvania Infantry, 
he was appointed colonel but declining to accept 
that rank he was made lieutenant colonel and 



served as such until May 9, 1862. when, a va- 
cancy occurring, he was promoted to the col- 
onelcy of his regiment. The early service of Col- 
onel Schall was mostly in the mountains of West 
Virginia, and during Lee's advance on Gettysburg 
he was engaged in a hotly contested fight at Win- 
chester, under General Milroy, where he lost 
nearly his entire command in killed, wounded and 
prisoners, and reached Harper's Ferry, after four 
days of fighting, with only sixty men and riding 
another colonel's horse, his own having been shot 
from under him. Colonel Schall was subse- 
quently transferred to the Army of the Potomac, 
Third Brigade, Third Division, Sixth Army 
Corps, and served in that command until the ex- 
piration of his term of enlistment. At the battle 
of Cold Harbor, he was shot through the right 
arm, while commanding the brigade, but remained 
on the field until the fight terminated, and only 
then sought medical attention for his injuries. 
Colonel Schall was honorably discharged from 
military service, October 14, 1864, and upon that 
occasion was the recipient of a letter from his su- 
perior officer. General James B. Ricketts, com- 
mandant of his division, in which he said : 

"Your time of service having expired with 
that of your gallant regiment, I can not part with 
you without some expression of my high appre- 
ciation of your faithful service. 

"Always zealous and reliable, you have shown 
the best quality of a soldier, which would bring 
certain promotion, had you decided to remain in 
the corps, which you have ornamented by your 
distinguished conduct throughout the arduous 
summer campaign, since crossing the Rapidan, in 
May last. 

"I particularly recall your gallantry at Cold 
Harbor, where commanding a brigade, and 
wounded, you nobly refused to leave the field, and 
in the Valley where you shared in our glorious 
victories — Opequon and Fisher's Hill. 

"I part with regret from so good a soldier, and 
wish you every success, in your future life." 

Soon after the close of the war Colonel Schall 
located at Norristown and engaged in the iron 
business. In April, 1875, he was appointed re- 
corder of deeds for Montgomerv countv to fill a 



92 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



vacancy and was subsequently elected twice to 
that position, serving in all for a period of seven 
years. In 1890 he was appointed postmaster at 
Norristown by President Harrison and served as 
such until 1894. 

General Schall's connection with the National 
Guard of Pennsylvania began shortly after the 
war. He served as inspector of the National 
Guard under General John F. Hartranft, and 
after the latter's election to the governorship was 
appointed an aide on the General's staff, with the 
rank of lieutenant colonel. While General Hart- 
ranft was still in command of the division, in Sep- 
tember, 1879, General Schall was elected colonel 
of the Sixth Regiment, and was re-elected several 
times. In July, 1894, he was appointed a com- 
mand the First Brigade by Governor Pattison. 

On September 3, 1873, General Schall was 
united in marriage with Mary A. Hooven, a 
daughter of James Hooven (now deceased), of 
Norristown. Politically the General is an ardent 
Republican, and has always taken an active and 
intelligent interest in civic and governmental af- 
fairs, at the same time keeping himself thoroughly 
posted on everything pertaining to military mat- 
ters. His life has been active and many-sided, its 
history comprising high records as a soldier, of- 
ficial, business man and citizen. General Schall 
is connected with the Grand Army of the Re- 
public and was its adjutant general for 1902 ; and 
is also a member of the IMasonic fraternity and the 
Loyal Legion. 

IRVIN FOLEY KNIPE, eldest of the six 
sons of Dr. Jacob O. and Clara Foley Knipe, was 
born at Norristown, Pennsylvania, February 27, 
1866, educated at the Norristown public schools 
and at the University of Pennsylvania, graduating 
from the academic department of the latter insti- 
tution in 1886, and from the law department in 
1889. From April, 1886, to August, 1889, he was 
a reporter on the Norristozvn Herald, and since 
1889 has been practicing law in Norristown, in 
association with his preceptor, Hon. Irving P. 
Wanger, member of congress from the eighth 
Pennsylvania district, under the firm name of 
Wanger & Knipe. He has been borough solicitor 



of Norristown for a number of years, and in a 
similar capacity represents a number of other 
boroughs in Montgomery county. In 1897 he 
compiled and published a comprehensive digest 
of the laws and ordinances of and relating to 
Norristown. On December i, 1902, Mr. Knipe 
was elected chairman of the Republican county 
committee of Montgomery county. 

On February 23, 1899, he married IMargaret 
Richardson, also a member of the Montgomery 
county bar, daughter of John C. and Ellen ^Rit- 
tenhouse) Richardson. They reside in Norris- 
town. They are especially interested in local his- 
torical and genealogical matters and have prob- 
ably the largest private library thereof in the 
county. 

The Knipe family settled in what is now Up- 
per Gwynedd township, Montgomery county, in 
1763, when the great-great-grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch purchased for three hun- 
dred and eighty-seven pounds sterling, a farm of 
one hundred and fifty acres on which he and his 
descendants lived for nearly a century and a 
half. 

The immigrant records of Philadelphia show 
that Johannes Kneip (or Knip), aged thirty-eight, 
landed September 25, 1748, and Johannes Knipe 
September 30, 1754. The ancestor, whichever of 
these two he was, on May 24, 1789, wrote in Ger- 
man his signature "Johannes Kneip" to his will, 
and died in November, 1792, leaving among his 
large family a son David, who in turn was the 
father of Jacob, himself the father of Jacob Oliver, 
whose son is Irvin P. Knipe. Jacob Knipe, a 
widely known physician, settled at Falkner 
Swamp, New Hanover township, and there died 
August 28, 1883. His wife was Rachel Evans, 
descended from two different Welsh families ot 
the same name, one of her ancestors being John 
Evans who came from Radnorshire, Wales, before 
the time of Penn, and settled at London Britain, 
Chester county ; while the other, David Evans, 
was born in Wales, 1690, and about 1719 settled 
in Montgomery county on a plantation compris- 
ing the north corner of Montgomery township 
and the east corner of Hatfield which he entailed 
to his grandchildren by his daughter Rachel, and 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



93 



which (prior to its division in 1823) was the lar- 
gest tract of land in Montgomery county in the 
hands of one person. 

On his mother's side, Mr. Knipe's genealogy 
includes the families of Poley Boyer, Heebner, 
\\'arley, Rhoads and Bigony. Francois Pechenet 
(Bigonet, Bigony), believed to be of Huguenot 
origin and a native of Nismes, in the province of 
Languedoc, France, emigrated from Lisbon, 
"qualified" at Philadelphia, December 7, 1773, and 
settled at Falkner Swamp, where he married 
Mary Brandt, probably an emigrant from Ger- 
many. 

In three generations of Mr. Knipe's family, 
including paternal and maternal ancestry, there 
were thirteen practitioners of medicine. 

Aliss Margaret Richardson, who subsequently 
married ]\Ir. Knipe was admitted to the bar of 
Montgomery county, September 5, 1898. By a 
strange coincidence she, the first woman lawyer 
in the county, bore precisely the same name as 
Dr. Margaret Richardson, the first woman physi- 
cian in the same county, although in no wise re- 
lated. Mrs. Knipe's father was a member of the 
state legislature, and through her mother she is 
connected with the families of Royer, Shupe and 
I Rittenhouse, being in direct descent from Will- 
I iam Rittenhouse, the first papermaker in America, 
ancestor of David Rittenhouse, the eminent as- 
I tronomer and scientist. 

I CAPTAIN JESSE B. DAVIS. For many 

I years one of the best-known and most popular 

j men of Montgomery county was Captain Jesse B. 

Davis of Norristown. His ancestors were Welsh 

! and they were early settlers in America. The 

family is a large one and widely scattered over 

the counties of Chester, Montgomery and Bucks. 

Hon. Roger Davis, the first of the family of 

whom anything definite is known, was a noted 

physician. He practiced in Charlestown town- 

j ship, Chester county. He was a Democrat in pol- 

I itics and represented his district in congress for 

' two terms, from 1812 to 1816. That he was pop- 

; ular and filled the position acceptably to his con- 

, stituents is shown by the fact that he was given 

; two terms, as was also his immediate successor. 



Dr. William Darlington, another Democrat, who 
sustained, as his predecessor had done, the admin- 
istration of President Madison and the war for 
free commerce and sailors' rights, Dr. Davis 
having taken his seat just prior to the declaration 
of war against England, in the session of con- 
gress of 1812. 

Dr. Roger Davis married Sarah Jones. Their 
eldest son, after the Welsh custom, was named 
Jones Davis. He was born in Charlestown town- 
ship, March 7, 1788. After receiving a good ed- 
ucation he studied medicine, graduating at an 
early age. His younger brothers, Roger and 
Thomas, also studied medicine, the latter after- 
wards becoming eminent as a practitioner at 
Trappe, and still later at Evansburg, where he 
died. He married Sarah Reiff. Their only child 
was a daughter, Mary Davis, who is still living, 
and resides in the Dr. Davis mansion. 

Dr. Roger Davis, the youngest of the sons, 
also practiced medicine, but died of Asiatic chol- 
era in 1832. 

As soon as he had graduated, and immediately 
after the declaration of war with Great Britain, 
Dr. Jones Davis offered his services and was ap- 
pointed surgeon's mate by President Madison. 
His cominission, still in existence, signed by the 
president, bears date July 6, 1812, showing that he 
entered the service within a month after the dec- 
laration of war. He was attached to the Six- 
teenth Regiment of regular infantry, and at once 
marched by land to the Canada border. He was 
with his regiment at Lundy's Lane and at the 
sortie at Fort Erie, under Colonel (afterwards 
General) Winfield Scott. He aided in dressing 
the wounds of Colonel Scott received in the ac- 
tion at the fort. With his brigade he marched to 
Lake Champlain and he was for a short time 
stationed at the famous Fort Ticonderoga. After 
two years' service he left the army and began the 
practice of his profession at Pughtown, Chester 
county. On March 14, 1814, he married Char- 
lotte, daughter of Jesse Bean, of Norriton town- 
ship, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. Their 
children were seven in number. 

Jesse B., the subject of this sketch was born 
June 9, 1815. 



94 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



Samuel, born April 25, 1817, married Mrs. 
Margaret Emery. They had one son, Jones, now 
deceased. Samuel J. Davis died of pneumonia. 
He was buried in Pikeland cemetery in Chester 
county. 

Hannah Matilda, born January 2^, 1819, mar- 
ried William B. Shupe, and both are now de- 
ceased. 

William B., born March 9, 1821, died Febru- 
ary 8, 1832. 

John R., born March 27, 1822, died August 9, 
1900. He was a coal operator at Scranton, where 
he acquired a large fortune. He married Miss 
Jessie Corson. They had two children, one of 
whom died in infancy and the other is Mrs. Math- 
ews, of Scranton. Mrs. Davis having died, 
John R. Davis married his first wife's sister Au- 
gusta, and they had two children, Annie and 
Walter E. 

Charles Thomas, born December 14, 1830, 
married Hannah Slinglufif. Their children are: 
John R., Elizabeth A., Charlotte R., Hannah Ma- 
tilda, and Sarah Ellen. Charles T. Davis is a 
farmer and resides on the Davis homestead, near 
Shannonville, now Audubon, in a house built by 
a French refugee more than a century ago. 

Sarah x\nn, married Jackson Miller, and re- 
sides at Jeffersonville. Their children : Emeline, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Ambo, Eleanor, Eliza K., and two 
sons, who died in infancy. 

After practicing medicine and following other 
employment for several years in Chester county. 
Dr. Jones Davis removed with his family in 1824 
to Norriton township, near Jeffersonville, where 
he resided until 1828, when he, being an active 
Democratic politician, was nominated in the party 
convention for the office of sheriff of Montgom- 
ery county, to which he was elected. His com- 
mission was issued by Governor Schultze, and he- 
served the full term of three years. During a 
part of this time, in addition to his official duties, 
he ran the Pawling grist mill at the foot of Swede 
street, Norristown. In 1832 he removed to Lower 
Providence township, where, in connection with 
his brother, Dr. Thomas Davis, he was extensively 
engaged in the practice of medicine, having his 
residence on a farm north of Jeffersonville which 



he eventually bought. In 1842 Dr. Jones Davis 
was elected prothonotary of Montgomery county 
on the Democratic ticket, succeeding Josiah W. 
Evans. He served three years, having James B. 
Evans as his deputy. 

He died September 18, i860, his remains being 
interred 'in the burying-ground at St. James 
church, Evansburg, of which his wife had been a 
member for some years. His wife died October 
26, 1845, resting in the same cemetery. 

Captain Jesse Bean Davis was born at Pugh- 
town, Chester county, where his father was then 
practicing his profession. He was educated in 
the public schools of the vicinity and in the Man- 
tua Military School, Philadelphia, graduating 
from the latter in 1842, with the rank of second 
lieutenant. He secured the position of bookkeeper 
in the wholesale grocery of Marshall & Kellogg, 
Philadelphia, remaining two years. He then 
took charge of his father's farm and managed it 
for several years. Having a military education, 
he joined Captain Mathey's Democratic troop and 
trained with it for seven years. He then organ- 
ized a company of artillery called the "Washing- ' 
ton Grays," being elected its captain. During 
twelve years that he held this command he served 
in the Native American riots in Philadelphia in 
1844. .Soon after the company disbanded, in 
1855, he was elected clerk of the courts, on the 
Democratic ticket, serving three years. In the 
legislative session of 1858-9 he was appointed 
transcribing clerk of the state senate. Previously 
Captain Davis had been elected colonel of the One 
Hundred and Ninth Regiment Pennsylvania State 
Militia. He also served for a time as major of its 
First Battalion. 

Captain Davis was several times a candidate 
for the legislature, but was unsuccessful. In 1878 
he was nominated and elected to the responsible 
office of county commissioner, serving three years. 
In 1868 he was named for prison inspector by 
Judge Chapman, being reappointed by Judge 
Ross in 1871. Part of the time of his six years' 
service he was presidait of the board. He was 
an earnest and efficient advocate of retrenchment 
and economy. Having begun dealing in live stock 
in i860, in 1868 he bought a lot and erected build- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



95 



ings at Jeffersonville. He soon became the lead- 
ing drover of the vicinity. 

Jesse B. Davis married Eleanor A., daughter 
of John and Hannah Shannon, of Norriton town- 
ship. His wife was a member of an old and 
highly respected family in that section of the 
county. " The couple had two children, John S. 
and Charlotte E., the latter now owning the old 
homestead of Captain Davis, No. 534 Swede 
street, and residing in it. Miss Davis has in her 
possession her grandfather's sword and his com- 
mission as surgeon's mate, as well as other cher- 
isiied family relics, many of which have been 
handed down in the familv by inheritance for 
more than a century. 

Captain Jesse B. Davis died November 18, 
1896, and his wife passed away November 19, 
188 1. Both were interred in ^Montgomery ceme- 
tery. 

CHARLES B. ASHTON is of English de- 
scent, his grandfather, Benjamin Ashton, having 
been born and reared in England, and his father 
having lived in that country until after his mar- 
riage. He was born in Phcenixville, Chester 
county, Pennsylvania, December 22, 1858. 

Benjamin Ashton (grandfather) was born in 
Hull, England. He was a manufacturer of cloths 
and broadcloths, and also was engaged in con- 
tracting and building. He built the famous docks 
and wharfs in his native city, and was a man of 
means. He married Miss Ann Stewart, a de- 
scendant of the famous Scottish Stewarts. Benja- 
min Ashton died in Sheffield. England, and was 
buried in that city. His wife married (second 
husband) John Cliffe, of Wortley, England, and 
after her death was buried in the same cemetery 
as her first husband. 

Charles Ashton (father) was born in Shef- 
field. England, ]May 19, 1815', and grew to man- 
hood in that city. He married Caroline Butter- 
worth, daughter of John and Mary Butterworth, 
residents of Balby, near Dorchester, England. 'The 
Butterworths had lived in that section of Eng- 
land for generations. Charles Ashton was mar- 
ried October 28. 1843. His wife was born Febru- 
i| ary 28, 1823. 



Charles Ashton (father) was a student in the 
parish school during the early part of his life. 
Here the text-book was the Bible. His education 
was completed in the Sheffield Academy and he 
afterwards was employed for several years by an 
iron manufacturing company at Sheffield. He 
was apprenticed to learn chemistry and the apothe- 
cary business, and after finishing his apprentice- 
ship he sailed for America, bringing with him 
his wife and two sons, George and Benjamin, 
and leaving his eldest daughter, Catharine, with 
her grandmother Cliffe. He arrived in America 
in 1848 and settled in Philadelphia. His first 
position was with the Sauerman firm, who'put fire 
plugs in Norristown. About 1852 he removed to 
Phcenixville, Chester county, and was employed 
by the Phcenixville Iron Company until 1865. I" 
1867 he went to Bridgeport, having secured em- 
ployment with the Newbold Iron Company as a 
blacksmith and there remained a number of 
years. He afterwards became a traveling sales- 
man for Levi Oberholtzer & Company, which po- 
sition he was filling at the time of his death. In 
1882 he and his family removed to Norristown. 
He was a member of the First Baptist church in 
Bridgeport for many years. Although an Eng- 
lishman by birth, reared under the free trade 
government, he was a firm believer in the Repub- 
lican policy of protection, and advocated it in an 
able manner on all occasions. He was an active 
member of the Republican party. 

Charles and Caroline (Butterworth) Ashton 
had the following children : Catharine, born De- 
cember 9, 1844, in Sheffield, married Joseph F. 
Atkinson on April 2, 1874. Their children are : 
Theodora, Grace and Eveline. George B., born 
February' 4, 1846, died November 12, 1850, in 
Sheffield, England. Benjamin, born March 29, 
1848, died Alarch 10, 1853, in Sheffield, England. 
Ann, born January 20, 1850, died September 25, 
1853, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Esther, born 
March 12, 185 1, died January 11, 1852, in Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. Caroline, born February 6, 
1853. died August 5, 1898, in Philadelphia, Penn- 
M'lvania. Mary Jane, born April i. 1855, died 
September 28. 1881. in Phcenixville. Pennsyl- 
vania. Isabella Angeline, born May 20, 1857. died 



96 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



February 25, 1859, in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. 
Charles B., born December 22, 1858, is in Phoe- 
nixville, Pennsylvania. Justitia Matilda, bom 
May I, 1861, died August 10, 1889, in Phoeenix- 
ville. Sarah Elizabeth, born May 24, 1863, is 
unmarried. 

Charles B. Ashton removed with his father's 
family from Chester county to Port Providence, 
Montgomery county, when he was five years old. 
Two years later the family removed to the Corner 
Store, near Montclare, JMontgomery county. 
About 1867, they settled in Bridgeport, where 
Charles B. Ashton attended the public schools. 
His school days ended, he entered the employ of 
J. D. Sisler of Bridgeport, and remained with 
him one year. Not being satisfied with the op- 
portunities afforded in that business, he secured a 
position with William Stabler, druggist of Nor- 
ristown, with the intention of learning the pro- 
fession. In 1883 he matriculated at the Phila- 
delphia College of Pharmacy and in 1887 re- 
ceived his diploma for proficiency in his craft, 
which established him as a Doctor of Pharmacy, 
Ph. G., and qualified him a fully registered 
pharmacist under the laws of Pennsylvania. 

He was appointed druggist for the State Hos- 
pital for the Insane for the southeastern district 
of Pennsylvania, at Norristown, and served very 
acceptably for a term of four years, when he re- 
signed that he might enjoy a visit of six months 
with his sister's family in England. 

After returning to America he held several 
positions, the most prominent being with Haz- 
zard & Hazzard Company, of New York city, at 
their Newport branch. He left this firm in 1893 
and opened his drag store at the corner of Arch 
and Airy streets, Norristown, where he has since 
been engaged in business, besides operating a 
branch store at the intersection of Fourth Ford 
and Holstein streets, Bridgeport, since February, 
1904. 

Mr. Ashton is a staunch and active Republican 
and has been honored by his party with the office 
of coroner, being appointed by Governor Stone on 
January 2, 1901. He has been a member of the 
Republican county committee for six }'ears and 
ha? represented his party in senatorial conven- 



tions for a number of years. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Baptist denomination for twenty years, 
and has been prominent as a teacher in the Sun- 
day-schools, and in the church choir. He was 
baptized in the Bridgeport Baptist church and 
transferred his membership by letter to the Nor- 
ristown Baptist church. Later, with sixty-seven 
others, he withdrew from this church, the object 
being to organize the Olivel Baptist church, the 
third Baptist church in Norristown, which was 
organized in 1903. He was elected trustee and 
chorister of the new organization. 

On June 22, 1896, Charles B. Ashton mar- 
ried Mary, only daughter of Joseph and Melissa 
(Lang) Ruch. Mr. and Mrs. Ashton have one 
son, John F. Lang Ashton, born August 22, 1898. 

Mr. Ashton is active among the druggists of 
Pennsylvania and is an energetic worker in the 
Montgomery County Druggists' Association, of 
which he is secretary. He represented the organi- 
zation in the National Association of Retail Drug- 
gists, which met at Cleveland, Ohio, in Septem- 
ber, 1902. Mr. Ashton is a member of Charity 
Lodge, No. 190, F. and A. M., of Norristown; 
Norristown Chapter, R. A. M., of Norristown; 
Hutchison Commandery, No. 32, K. T. ; Norris- 
town Lodge of Elks, No. 714; and Linnwood 
Lodge, A. O. U. W., of Norristown. 

MRS. CHARLES HOLCOMB. Charles 
Holcomb (deceased), a prominent farmer and 
blacksmith of Abington and Cheltenham town- 
ships, was born in Cheltenham, near Ogontz, No- 
vember 5, 1825. He was the son of Edward and 
Charlotte (Marple) Holcomb, his mother being 
the daughter of Joseph and Hannah Marple. 

When Charles Holcomb was between six and 
seven years of age, his parents removed to Ab- 
ington village. There he spent his boyhood days, 
and later learned the blacksmith trade with Isaac 
Rittenhouse, of Willow Grove. He established 
himself in business at the locality known as Ab- 
ington Corner, remaining there until 1863, when 
he purchased twenty-seven acres of land in More- 
land township, adding to it by further purchases 
until he had increased it to eighty-seven acres. 
For ten years he also engaged in blacksmithing 




MARIA L. HOLCOMB CHARLES HOLCOMB 

HOLCOMB FAMILY. 



MOXTGO^IERY COUNTY. 



97 



at that place, but then relinquished that branch 
of his occupation, and thereafter devoted himself 
solely to farming. He died August 7, 1903. He 
married, at Hatboro, April 7, 1870, Maria L., 
born October i, 1836, daughter of Zachary and 
Priscilla (Barnes) Francis. The couple had two 
children: John Edward, born ]\lay i, 1872, and 
JMary Elizabeth, born March 13, 1875. The Hol- 
combs are members of the Society of Friends. 

Zachary Francis, father of Mrs. Holcomb, 
was born in Abington township in 1800. He 
was a farmer, and spent his entire life in that 
vicinity. He died September 10, 1868. Pris- 
cilla Barnes Francis, mother of Mrs. Holcomb, 
was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania. She 
was married in 1835. Their children: Maria L., 
Mrs. Holcomb; William; ^Nlary Jane, wife of 
Jesse Webster. 

Edward Holcomb, father of Charles Hol- 
comb, was a native of New Jersey, where he was 
born in September, 1791, coining with his par- 
ents to i\Iontgomery county. Pennsylvania, when 
he was but four years of age. He married Char- 
lotte Marple in 1823. She had been previously 
married to a man named Hawkins. The chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Holcomb : Charles, 
subject of this sketch ; Elizabeth Jenkin, born in 
Abington, February 5, 1828, died July 2, 1869; 
John J. born September 2, 1830, married first, 
Emma Cowell, there being by this marriage two 
living children, viz: Charles E. and Sarah, wife 
of James Rollinson. His second wife was Har- 
riet Charloteen, by whom he had one child, Eliza- 
beth C, they having also an adopted son, James 
Henry, who married Hannah Trank, deceased, 
they having two children. Charlotte, deceased, 
and Helen, wife of Howard Gilbert. 

WILMER AI. BE.\N, instructor in music in 
the public schools of Norristown and prominent 
in church choir work, is the son of Edwin .\., and 
Elizabeth (Hood) Bean. He was born in Nor- 
ristown, .\pril 23, 1839. He received his early 
education in .Mrs. Jane Craig's private school, in 
the old Central Presliytcrian church on Main 
street. Later he entered ( )ak Street public 
school, from which he graduated in June. 1874, at 



the age of fifteen years. In Septeiuber of that 
year he entered the office of the Norristown 
Herald, and learned the trade of a printer, work- 
ing at that place about six years when he went to 
Philadelphia, where he found employment for 
some time in the job printing department of Leh- 
man & Bolton's lithographing establishment, on 
Library street. He left there to become a part- 
ner in a job printing enterprise with Theodore 
Knabb, also of Norristown. .'^fter several years 
in business, he withdrew from the firm and in a 
clerical capacity entered the printing house of 
George S. Harris & Sons, at Fourth and Vine 
streets, afterwards at 816 Arch street, Philadel- 
phia. A change in the management of the house 
caused a change in his position, which he shortly 
afterwards resigned. For some time thereafter 
Mr. Bean filled various positions as printer, proof- 
reader and foreman in several Philadelphia print- 
ing houses. He finally settled in the work of a 
compositor, and for ten years held that position 
on the old North Auicrican, located at Seventh 
and Chestnut streets, Philadelphia. He takes 
pride in referring to this, as it was the best po- 
sition he ever held in the printing business. 

From boyhood Mr. Bean had always mani- 
fested a decided aptitude for music. When an ap- 
prentice at the Herald office he studied music with 
Professor Thomas H. Ervin, the blind organist 
of Olivet Presbyterian church, Philadelphia. 
Afterwards he displayed remarkable skill on the 
cornet, on which he learned to play without a 
teacher, performing on that instrument for several 
years in the Norristown Band and Philharmonic 
Orchestra. He is one of three surviving mem- 
bers of the last named organization, the others 
being W. S. Gourley and Charles Kirk, Jr., now 
residents of Philadelphia. It has often been re- 
marked that few could produce better tones from 
the cornet than he. and he still delights to play 
on the favorite instrument of his boyhood days. 

It was while he was engaged as a printer on 
the Xorth Ameriean that a vacancy occurred in 
the leadership of the choir of the First Baptist 
cluirch of Norristown. Some of his friends in the 
church suggested him for the position. He was 
elected in i88(^ and this was the beginning of his 



98 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



musical career in church work. By thorough 
study in the new field, he made a reputation for 
excellent music for the church, and gathered about 
him one of the best volunteer choir organizations 
that Norristown has ever had. His care and pre- 
cision and the keen judgment he displayed in the 
selection of anthems placed him in the front rank 
of clioir leaders. While holding this position he 
was selected from a number of applicants for the 
percentorship at the Tabernacle Prebyterian Sun- 
day-school, at Thirt3'-seventh and Chestnut 
streets, Philadelphia, which he still holds. 

After directing the music in the Baptist church 
for nearly eight years Mr. Bean was unanimously 
chosen choir master by the vestry of St. John's 
Episcopal church, Norristown, which position he 
has filled most acceptably to vestry and congrega- 
tion ever since. In 1892 he withdrew from the 
printing business to take charge of the music in 
the public schools of Norristown, and from that 
time has devoted himself entirely to his adopted 
profession, proving a most faithful and efficient 
teacher. From the beginning Mr. Bean has had 
a successful musical career, as may be attested by 
his many private pupils and public positions. For 
three years he was the principal instructor of the 
Philadelphia Choral Union's sight-reading classes, 
but the press of other duties and the severe strain 
obliged him to discontinue that work. In 1903 he 
was elected supervisor of music in the public 
schools of Bridgeport. 

Mr. Bean has spent fifteen years of active 
effort in church choir work and has seldom or 
never been absent from rehearsals or service. He 
has written some very good music, principally 
hymn tunes, which have attained prominence and 
popularity. On the training of the boy voice and 
indeed on all matters pertaining to voice culture, 
Mr. Bean is an authority, as his vested choir of 
men and boys at St. John's church fully attests. 
As a vocalist Mr. Bean has a fine resonant bari- 
tone voice. 

In religious faith Mr. Bean is an Episcopalian, 
being a member of St. John's church. He mar- 
ried Miss Kate Jamison, daughter of Robert Jam- 
ison,, of Norristown. Thev have two daughters. 



Edith Marion and Bessie Lane Bean, the latter a 
gifted musician and organist of the First Presby- 
terian church of Conshohocken. Miss Bean also 
attained distinction for her literary work as a 
member of the graduating class of 1903 of the 
Norristown high school, she having been awarded 
the alumni prize of ten dollars in gold for the 
best essay in the use of standard English. Her 
subject was the Power of Shakespeare in the De- 
velopment of Character. In the same year she 
was also awarded the prize of ten dollars offered 
by the Historical Society of Montgomery County 
for the best essay on the subject of Valley Forge. 

In politics Mr. Bean is an active Republican 
but he has never sought or held office except that 
of assessor in the first ward of Norristown. He 
is a member of Norris Lodge, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, of Charity Lodge, No. 190, F. 
& A. M. ; of Norristown Chapter, R. A. M., and 
of Hutchinson Commandery, No. 32, Knights 
Templar. 

Edwin A. Bean (father) was born February 6, 
1 83 1, in Norriton township. In 1848, at the 
age of seventeen years, he entered the Clayton 
flour, grist and saw mill, on the township line be- 
tween Lower Providence and Norriton, as an 
apprentice, and at the end of two years, left the 
establishment capable of doing full duty as a fin- 
ished journeyman. In 1850 Mr. Bean came to 
Norristown and entered the employ of Bean & 
Morgan, in their sawmill and lumber yard, being 
engaged there one year, and then entering the 
planing mill of Bolton & Christman, where he re- 
mained until August I, 1862. He then enrolled 
himself in the Company of Captain David B. 
Hartranft, Seventeenth Regiment, Pennsylvania 
Cavalry. On September 19, 1862, he was mus- 
tered into the United States service for three 
years, at Harrisburg. 

On November i, 1862, Mr. Bean was made 
quartermaster's sergeant of the regiment and 
served in this capacity until May i, 1864, when 
he was promoted to be quartermaster of the regi- 
ment, with the rank of first lieutenant, serving as 
such until the end of the war. He was mustered 
out of service on June 16, 1865, at Cloud's Mills, 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



99 



Virginia. From the day of his enlistment until 
the expiration of his term of service at the close 
of the war, Quartermaster Bean was with his reg- 
iment in all its battles, raids and skirmishes, 
among them being the following : Chancellorsville, 
Beverly Ford, Aldis, Upperville, Goose Creek, 
Gettysburg, Williamsport, Funktown, Beaver 
Creek, Boonsboro, Falling Waters, Brandy Sta- 
tion, Racoon Ford, Barnett's Ford, Martin's Ford, . 
Stevensburg, Brandy Station (second), Rappa- 
hannock Station, Oak Hill, Thoroughfare Gap, 
Liberty, Bealton Station, Rickeysville, Mine Run, 
Barnett's Ford, Kilpatrick's Raid to Richmond, 
Todd's Tavern, Yellow Tavern, Meadow Bridge, 
Hanovertown, Hawes' Shop, Old Church, Cold 
Harbor, Trevillian Station, White House, Jones' 
Bridge, Darbytown, White Post, Cedarville, Ber- 
ryville, Kearnsvill^ Leetown, Smithfield, Win- 
chester, Luray, Toiti's Brook, Cedar Creek, Gor- 
donsville, Sheridan's raid to the James river canal 
and White House, Dinwiddle Courthouse, Five 
Forks, Scott's Crossroads, Drummond's Mills, 
Saylor's Creek, Appomattox Station and Ap- 
pomattox Courthouse. 

The war ended, Mr. Bean returned home, and 
accepted a position in a planing mill in Philadel- 
phia, owned by Rimby & Maderia, and also in the 
new mill built by the firm after being burned out. 
He became superintendent, having the planing 
and flooring work under his charge. About 1878 
a new company was formed on the ruins of Rimby 
& Maderia, of which Mr. Bean became a member. 
After a short career, misfor-tune overtook the 
combination and the mill was sold to Mahlon Ful- 
ton, Mr. Bean remaining as manager until Mr. 
Fulton's death, when the son of Mr. Fulton as- 
sumed the management and with him Mr. Bean 
continued until the year 1900, since which time 
he has lived retired in Norristown. 

On January 27, 1856, Edwin A. Bean mar- 
ried Elizabeth, daughter of Simon and Magda- 
lena (Gotwals) Hood. They have but one child, 
Wilmer M. 

Edwin A. Bean is a member of Norris Lodge, 
No. 430, I. O. O. F. ; also a member of the Ma- 
sonic Fraternity ; formerly of Hiram Lodge, No. 
21. of Virginia, now of Charity Lodge, No. 190, 



of Norristown, also a life member of H. R. A. 
Chapter, No. 190, also of Norristown, Pennsyl- 



JOHN H. TYSON, a prominent business man 
in Norristown, is a member of an old Montgomery 
coimty family of Dutch origin. He is a son of the 
late ex-sheriff Jacob Tyson and Sarah Y. (Lin- 
derman) Tyson. He was born January 17, 1857, 
in the township of Upper Providence, near what 
was then the village, now the borough of Trappe, 
Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. 

Jacob Tyson (father of the subject of this 
sketch) was born near Trappe, January 10, 1818, 
a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Bergey) Ty- 
son. His ancestors were residents of the county 
for several generations. On his mother's side. 
Sheriff Tyson's ancestors (Bergeys) were an old 
Revolutionary family. John Tyson, his grand- 
father, was a weaver by trade and a well educated 
man for those days. Jacob Tyson, grandfather 
of John H. Tyson, was born near Skippackville, 
January 6, 1786. He was a farmer by occupation, 
a good business man, and a citizen of the strictest 
integrity. In religious faith he was a member of 
the German Reformed church. He had nine chil- 
dren, one of whom is still living — Harriet Saylor, 
a widow. Those deceased are r Susan, Charles, 
Mary, Abraham, John, Margaret, Elizabeth and 
Jacob. Abraham and John emigrated to Canada 
in 1845, were married there and reared large fam- 
ilies. Abraham located permanently in Berlin, 
Waterloo county, and John in the city of Guelph, 
both places being in Canada West. Jacob Tyson 
during his boyhood days, alternated his time 
working on his father's farm and attending 
school, as was the custom with boys reared on 
farms. He continued to live on the same home- 
stead for a period of sixty years. During this 
time, in addition to conducting large farming in- 
terests, he was for twenty years engaged in the 
butchering business, a part of which time he 
drove a wagon over a portion of Montgomery 
county. He continued the quiet routine of a 
farmer's life until 1877, when he was prevailed 
upon to offer himself as a candidate for the office 
of high sheriff of Montgomery county. He was 



MOXTGO.MERY COUNTY. 



elected to the position and during his incumbency 
made a very efficient official. For a number of 
years subsequently, he was actively identified 
with both political and public interests in the 
county, but during the last dozen years of his 
life he was engaged in the coal business, although 
he had lived semi-retired until the time of his 
death which occurred November 9, 1899. 

Sheriff Tyson was a Democrat and a staunch 
supporter of the policy of that party. He was 
president of the live stock company of his town- 
ship for many years. He had filled various local 
and political places of trust. He was a member 
of the German Reformed church. He married, 
March 12, 1846, Sarah Y. Linderman, daughter 
of Isaac Y. Linderman, Esq., of Limerick town- 
ship, in Montgomery county. This marriage re- 
sulted in the birth of seven children, all of whom 
are living, as follows : Wilhelmina L., wife of 
Joseph R. Hunsicker, of Norristown ; Joanna L., 
wife of H. H. Hunsicker, deceased, also of Nor- 
ristown; Sallie L., widow of Amos Forker ; Har- 
riet L., wife of Allen G. Reiff ; Elizabeth L., wife 
of Clarence R. Free ; j\lary L. ; and John H. 

John H. T}"Son was reared on the farm near 
Trappe. where he grew to manhood. His edu- 
cation was obtained at the ordinary neighborhood 
schools, and he was for some time a student at 
Washington Hall Collegiate Institute, at Trappe. 
conducted by County Superintendent Abel 
Rambo, long since deceased, where boys were 
fitted for a college career or for a business life. 
Like other boys of that day, who were sons of 
farmers, he worked on the farm during the sum- 
mer months. In November, 1877, Mr. Tyson's 
father being elected sheriff of Montgomery 
county, he removed to Norristown with the fam- 
ily, and served during his father's term as sheriff 
in the position of outside deputy, doing nearly all 
the laborious work connected with the office. He 
is well acquainted throughout the county. At the 
expiration of the term in the sheriff's office, he 
engaged in the coal business with his father at 
Alarshall street and Stony Creek, where they did 
a very successful business. About a year prior 
to his father's death, which occurred in 1899, he 
purchased his father's interest in the business 



and has since managed it, giving it careful atten- 
tion and adding largely to the amount of business 
done. Air. Tyson is a Democrat in politics but 
not an office seeker in any sense of the word. He 
has been a member of county and borough com- 
mittees of the party, and on several occasions a 
delegate to county and state conventions. He is 
and has been from boyhood a member of the Re- 
formed Church of the Ascension of Norristown. 
He is a stockholder of the Peoples National Bank 
of Norristown. He owns and takes care of con- 
siderable real estate in Norristown and vicinity, 
and is administrator or e.xecutor of several estates, 
to which he gives his personal attention, manag- 
ing them very successfully. He also finds time 
to pursue his avocation of auctioneer, conducting 
many sales of personal property in Norristown 
and its vicinity. 

Mr. Tyson married, November 21, 1901, Miss 
lola E. Kehl, daughter of Augustus and Eliza- 
beth (\\'alt) Kehl, of Pottstown, Pennsylvania. 
Their union has been blessed with one child, 
Elizabeth K. Airs. Txson was born March 29, 
i860, in Bechtelsville, Berks county, where her 
parents were then living, her father being exten- 
siveh- engaged in the commission business. Her 
parents removed from Bechtelsville to Limerick 
township, in Montgomery county, where her 
father bought a large farm which he owned and 
cultivated for forty years, he being one of the 
most successful men of his day and locality. He 
had a good education for that day, was a clerk 
in mercantile business, and afterward did a whole- 
sale and retail commission business in Philadel- 
phia. In politics he was a Democrat, and held 
various township offices but never sought any- 
thing higher in that line. He was one of the or- 
ganizers of the National Bank of Royersford and 
a director in the institution to the time of his 
death. In religious faith he was a Lutheran, be- 
ing a member of St. James church. Limerick, in 
which he was for many years an elder and at the 
time of his death a trustee. He married Eliza- 
beth Walt, January 13, 1859. The couple had 
three children, as follows : lola E. ( Mrs. Tyson) ; 
George H.. who was born March 17, 1862, and 
died February 17, 1899; and Laura A., who was 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



liorn November 19, 1864, and married, June 9, 
1903, Samuel H. Porter, a prominent druggist of 
Pottstovvn. Augustus Kelil, father of Mrs. Tyson, 
was the son of George and Sarah (Dotterer) 
Kehl. Their children were : Augustus, Jonathan, 
\\'illiam D., Margreta and Sarah Ann. A few 
years before his death, Augustus Kehl purchased 
a fine home in Pottstown, and retired from active 
business, dying there. The Walts are of an old 
family in Montgomer}- county, of German de- 
scent, Henry Walt having emigrated with his 
wife Catharine from the fatherland. Among 
their children was Andrew, who resided in Upper 
Salford township, ^lontgomery county, where he 
spent the greater portion of his life as a farmer. 
He married Elizabeth, daughter of Abraham 
Schwenk. They had eight children. Henry S. 
Walt, grandfather of Mrs. Tyson, was born De- 
cember 6, 1806, in Upper Salford, where he re- 
mained until his removal to Limerick at the age of 
fourteen years. His father's death, when Henry 
was a mere schoolboy, cut short his educational 
opportunities as his services upon the farm were 
invaluable, he being the chief dependence of his 
widowed mother. After renting the homestead 
farm for two years, he removed to another farm, 
belonging to his grandfather Schwenk, in Skip- 
pack, which he cultivated in ten years. In 1842 
he purchased his home in Limerick, devoting 
thirty years to the emplo,\-ment of farming 
thereon. In 1872 he sold this farm to one of his 
sons. Mr. Walt married, March 26, 1829, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Abraham Stauffer, of Limerick. 
They had nine children. Mr. Walt was a Repub- 
lican in politics, and served as school director. He 
was identified with St. James Lutheran church. 
Limerick, as elder, deacon and treasurer. 

HEXRY A. KEELER. There were seven 
brothers named Keeler came from Germany to 
America, two of whom settled in Pennsylvania 
and the remaining five went to dififerent sections 
of the country, their place of settlement being un- 
known except that it was in the west. The two 
who settled in Pennsylvania were James and 
Joseph. James went to Phoenixville where some 
of his descendants still reside. Joseph (great- 



grandfather) located in Frederick township, 
Montgomery county. He owned a large farm on 
which stood the Green Tree Hotel, which he con- 
ducted in connection with his farming. For forty 
years or more he was the host of the hotel and 
was known far and near as a genial and an up- 
right man. He was a member of the Reformed 
church and donated the ground on which the 
Keeler church now stands, which he and his chil- 
dren helped to build. It is occupied on one Sun- 
day by the Lutherans and on the next by the Re- 
formed church. Several years before his death he 
rented the hotel to his son Eli, and building a fine 
residence on one corner of his farm he lived in 
retirement until his death in the early part of the 
'60s. He married Mrs. Boyer and they had the 
following children : James, Eli, Benjamin. Frank- 
lin, Lebina and Delina (twins), and Sarah. 

Benjamin (grandfather) was born in the 
hotel, as were all the other children, and received 
his education in the district schools during the 
winter months. During the summer he worked 
on his father's farm. He married Miss Esther 
Stitler, daughter of Adam Stitler. After his 
marriage he rented his father's farm, on which he 
worked until 1856, when he came to Norristown 
and entered the employment of Bean & Wentz, 
lumber dealers, and remained there until two 
years before his death, which occurred in 1875. 
Benjamin, like his father, was a Democrat, but 
never held office. He was a member of the Wash- 
ington Troop of Cavalry, commanded by Captain 
John Smith, of Pottstown. He and his wife are 
both buried in the Keeler cemetery. Their chil- 
dren were: Franklin, Amanda, Adam Wilson, 
William, who died in infancy, Henry S. and Mary 
Jane, deceased. Franklin married and Amanda 
became the wife of John Auckie. Adam Wilson 
enlisted in Company E, Ninety-fifth Regiment of 
Pennsylvania \'olunteers and served in the Sixth 
Corps, which belonged to the Army of the Po- 
tomac and was iji the battles and skirmishes inci- 
dent to four years" service. He never married as 
he was a sea-faring man and saw but little of 
shore life. Henry S. married Miss Ida Mc- 
Cauley, but had no children. He enlisted in Com- 
pany G, One Hundred and Ninety-seventh Penn- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



sylvania Regiment, attached to the Western 
Army, and did duty chiefly at Rock Island, Illi- 
nois. Mary Jane married Walter Rodenbaugh 
and had two children, Walter and Norman. 

Franklin S. Keeler was born in Frederick 
township, where he grew to manhood and then 
came to Norristown to engage in canal boat trans- 
portation on the Schuylkill canal, in which he con- 
tinued for twenty years or until about 1875, when 
he engaged in the barge transportation business as 
captain, operating in New Jersey bay and Long 
Island sound, and is still thus engaged. His home 
is in Norristown, although he is away a good deal 
of the time. His opportunity for an education 
was afTorded by the common schools of the day 
and since attaining manhood he has had the ev- 
eryday schooling of a practical life. In politics 
he is a Republican but was never in one place long 
enough to aspire to public office. He married 
Emma Heckman, daughter of John Heckman, 
who was killed in the Civil war. Their children 
were: Elmer A., Henry A., Katie A. and William 
S. Elmer A. married Ida Heckman, now de- 
ceased, and has two daughters, Laura and Cora, 
who reside in White Stone, Long Island, New 
York, and are attending college at Dean Acad- 
emy, Franklin, Massachusetts. Elmer A. com- 
menced driving mules on the canal for his father 
when he was ten years of age, attending school in 
the winter. After six years spent in this way 
he grew tired of the business and went to New 
York city. With the money he had saved he 
acquired a part interest in a barge, and managing 
his affairs with skill and industry he acquired 
more barges from time to time and eventually be- 
came a stockholder and manager of a Canal Com- 
pany. He is also president of the Excelsior 
Company of New York. He is a Republican. 
Katie A. is unmarried and resides with her pa- 
rents in Norristown. William S. is a graduate 
of the Norristown high school and is a draughts- 
man and assistant superintendent with R. S. New- 
bold & Son. 

Henry A. Keeler was born in Hamburg, 
Berks county, August 21, 1867. He attended the 
common schools of Hamburg until he was thir- 
teen years of age when his parents removed to 



Norristown. For a year he clerked in a grocery 
store owned by Mr. Davis. He then went to 
New York and was engaged by his brother Elmer 
on a barge. At the age of eighteen he returned 
to Norristown and served an apprenticeship of 
three 3'ears with James A. Hurst in the carpenter 
trade, and was Mr. Hurst's foreman for three 
years and a partner in the business for four 
years. Mr. Hurst went out of business and Mr. 
Keeler continued by himself as a contractor. He 
is a Republican and a member of Cavalry Baptist 
church. 

He is a member of Norristown Lodge, No. 
620, Free & Accepted Masons ; Norristown Chap- 
ter, No. 190, Royal z\rch Masons ; Hutchinson 
Commandery, No. 32, Knights Templar ; Norris- 
town Lodge, No. 714, B. P. O. E. 

He married Maud I. Matthias, daughter of 
Charles and Elizabeth (Dalby) Matthias. She 
was born in Radnor, Delaware county, December 
14, 1872. Their children are : Earl A., Claud H., 
Ronald G., Ralph L., Marion E. and Henry. 

HENRY C. CRESSMAN, one of the self- 
made business men of Norristown, is a native of 
Montgomery county. He was born near Barren 
Hill, called at that time Smoketown, May 2, 1832, 
remaining in that neighborhood until he was 
twelve years of age. Feeling that there was some- 
thing desirable for him beyond his father's house, 
he started out with all his worldly possessions in 
a small bundle, to seek his fortune in the world. 
His first employment was on the farm of Peter 
Streeper, about a mile from Barren Hill. His 
compensation was his clothing and board with an 
opportunity to attend school when not otherwise 
engaged. Mr. Streeper treated him kindly, find- 
ing an abundance of work for him and giving him- 
a good home until he was sixteen years of age. 
The lad then went to visit a cousin in Philadelphia 
who was a marble cutter. Watching him while at 
his work, young Cressman became imbued with 
the idea of becoming a marble cutter and, without 
consulting any one, he entered into employment 
with Gordon & Fletcher as an apprentice in their 
marble yard. He remained, however, but a few 
months with this firm, owing to an accident in 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



103 



which a marble mantle was broken. He returned 
to his home, and the next spring, April i, 1849, 
he went to Norristown, where he indentured him- 
self to Franklin Derr, the well-known dealer in 
marble, who had a vacancy caused by an appren- 
tice quitting his employ. Mr. Derr was loth to 
lake another apprentice on account of the trouble 
he had liad with the one whose place was vacant, 
but he finally concluded to do so and the papers 
of indenture were made out July 4, 1849. They 
were to hold him until he became of age. He 
was to receive as compensation for his services 
thirty dollars a year and board, but no schooling. 
The only holidays-were to be Fourth of July and 
Christmas. .Vt the end of his term of service as 
apprentice, he had thoroughly learned his trade 
and had also gained the confidence of Mr. Derr 
to such a degree that he retained him in his em- 
plo}ment until his death. Mr. Cressman became 
in time Mr. Derr's right-hand man, and was the 
one looked to for advice and counsel. He was 
expected to oversee all kinds of work in that line 
(if business. 

Mr. Cressman helped to build many of the 
finest edifices in Norristown, including Odd Fel- 
Inws hall, the Montgomery county prison, the 
court house, the First Presbyterian church, the 
Lutheran Church of the Trinity, the Central Pres- 
byterian church, the Albertson Trust Building, 
the First National bank and Montgomery Na- 
tional bank, the Music Hall, Mr. Hooven's large 
mansion, adjoining the Montgomery bank, now 
the Masonic Temple, and many other of the finest 
residences in Norristown. After Mr. Derr's 
death, Mr. Cressman was employed by his son, 
Henry A. Derr, remaining with him until just 
before his death. About 1880 he built, on West 
Airy street, the house in which he now resides 
and the store property now owned by George W. 
Pifcr, and conducted a grocery business therein, 
his wife and a hired boy managing it. This he 
kept up until about 1890, when he sold it to Mr. 
Pifer. On leaving Mr. Derr, he established a 
marble yard in the rear of his home and makes 
the business the means of keeping himself con- 
tented, working only when it suits him to do so, 
antl doing onlv ordered work. He .sends it 



wherever it is ordered, some going as far west as 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Mr. Cressman's wages 
after completing his apprenticeship were one dol- 
lar and fifty cents per day, and that was the rate 
until the beginning of the Rebellion, after which 
wages advanced until Mr. Cressman earned three 
dollars per day. 

Mr. Cressman has seen Norristown grow 
from a small village to a place of twenty-seven 
thousand inhabitants and has aided in building 
it up as well as adding to its prosperity. He has 
been a member of the Masonic order since 1863, 
and is now a member of Hutchinson Com- 
mandery, No. -^2, Knights Templar. He is treas- 
urer of Charity Lodge, No. 190, and a member 
of the Temple committee. He is also a member 
of Montgomery Lodge, No. 57, Lidependent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He has never sought or 
held office in either lodge. He is a member of 
the First Methodist Episcopal church at Norris- 
town. 

Politically Mr. Cressman was reared an old- 
line Whig, and is now a Democrat. He was 
elected on the Democratic ticket a member of the 
town council of Norristown, serving three years, 
but would never again accept the office. 

November 16, 1853, Mr. Cressman married 
Miss Susan S., daughter of George and Chris- 
tiana (Lowther) Gibbs. Mrs. Cressman was born 
i\Iarch 17, 183 1, in Norristown, within two blocks 
of where she now resides and she has never lived 
at a greater distance dian that from her birth- 
place. 

George Gibbs, her father, was born in New- 
York city and went from there to Jersey City as 
a boy of sixteen years of age. On the breaking 
out of the w-ar of 1812 he enlisted in the United 
States army and served under General Zebulon 
M. Pike. At the close of the war it is supposed 
he went to Delaware as he married there, his wife 
being of an old Delaware family, descending from 
early Swedish settlers. From Christiana Hun- 
dred, in the state of Delaware, he went to Norris- 
town with his family. He had learned the trade 
of a mule spinner and went to Norristown to find 
work at his trade. He secured employment in 
McCrcdy's Mill and worked there until his death, 



I04 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



which occurred jMarch 17, 1835. The couple had 
seven children: Lewis married Ophelia Fields; 
Mary married John Fry and had four children, 
Maria, Sarah, Margaret and John; Margaret 
married Ahlum Cope and had five children, 
George, Howard, Warren, Levi and Ellen (both 
parents and daughter Ellen were drowned in the 
Johnstown flood and Mr. Cope's body was never 
found) ; George married Emma Winters, their 
children being George and Clara; Christiana 
married George Master and had one child, 
Charles ; Susan S. is the wife of Henry C. Cress- 
man ; 2^Iaria died unmarried. Mrs. Fields, the 
eldest child of Mr. and I\Irs. Gibbs, had the fol- 
lowing children: John, William Elihu, Cath- 
arine and Mary. 

Mrs. Gibbs died in Norristown in 1843 and 
with her husband lies buried in the Episcopal 
cemetery connected with St. John's church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cressman have had but two 
children : Franklin D., who was born September 
4, 1854, and died in childhood; and Annie L., 
who'was born June 3, 1862, and now resides with 
her parents. She has musical talent of a high 
order and has taught music since she was eleven 
years of age. She gives instruction in piano and 
organ music and has the remarkable record of 
having given mnsical instruction in her own 
home for thirty years without a break. She was 
organist thirteen years in the First Presbyterian 
church and three years at the Evangelical Luth- 
eran Church of the Trinity. Her first teacher was 
Professor Blaufuff from Saxony in Germany, 
and under the tuition of Constantine Von Stern- 
berg of Philadelphia she completed her musical 
education, except that she afterwards attended 
the Conservatory of ilusic in Philadelphia for a 
single term. 

ADAM SCHEIDT, of Norristown, Pennsyl- 
vania, president and general manager of the 
Adam Scheldt Brewing Company, and one of the 
most enterprising and widely known of American 
brewers, comes from a family which dates back 
to the year 1700. His early paternal ancestor 
was Heinrich Scheldt, who was born at Schweiss- 
bacher Miihle (Landgericht Wolf stein Bezirk 



Kusel), Bavaria, Germany, and there died, in 
1792. His son, Nockolaus, who died April 15, 
183 1, was married to Katharina Ihrig, and their 
son, Johann Adam Scheldt, was father of Adam 
Scheldt, the immediate subject of this memoir. 

Johann Adam Scheldt was born in the ances- 
tral village before named, September 23, 1809. 
He was educated in Bavaria and learned the trade 
of a miller, which he follow^ed until he was 
twenty-two years of age. After his marriage, in 
1 83 1, he settled in Oberweiler in Thai, where he 
carried on a grain business, lime-burning and 
farming until about 1868, when he retired from 
active business life. He was a man of intelli- 
gence and strength of character, as is attested by 
the fact that he held a number of government 
appointments, and was elected for several terms 
to the office of adjunct, a position corresponding 
to that of burgess of a borough in this country. 
He was a Lutheran in religion, and was elder 
in his church. In politics he was allied with the 
Conservative party. He died April 29, 1894, at 
the advanced age of eighty-four years, seven 
months and six days. 

Johann Adam Scheidt was married, December 
I, 1831, in Oberweiler in Thai, to Maria Katha- 
rina Pfleger, daughter of Philip and Maria Kath- 
arina (Rheinheimer) Pfleger. Her father was 
bom in 1779, in Jettenbach, and died in Ober- 
weiler, in 1836; his wife was born in 1782, and 
long survived her husband, dying in 1865, also 
at Oberweiler. They were the parents of eleven 
children, seven of whom were sons: i. Katha- 
rina, born December 6, 1832, died November 27, 
1847; 2. Karolina, born November 14, 1834; 3. 
Jacob, bom September 26, 1836; 4. Peter, born 
December 21, 1838; 5. Karl (Charles) born July 
12, 1840; 6. Friedrich, born December 13, 1842; 
7. Adolph, born June 23, 1844; 8. Ludwig, born 
May 28, 1846, died July 3, 1901 ' 9. Philippina, 
born June 15, 1849, "ow deceased; 10. Katharina, 
born July II, 1851 ; 11. Adam, mentioned below. 

Adam Scheidt, youngest child of the family 
last named, was born at the paternal home in 
Bavaria, February 14, 1854. He received his 
education in his native village and learned the 
trade of cooper and brewer, which he diligently 




^A 



u 



J 



I04 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



\vhi-!i V The couple had 

d Ophelia Fields; 
iiad four children, 
u,u John ; Margaret 
and had five children, 
. jn, Levi and Ellen i^both 
; I Iter Ellen were drowned in the 
1 and Mr. Cope's body was never 
Ld Emma Winters, their 
: and Clara; Christiana 
tcr and had one child, 
^ iiarlcs ; Susan S. is the wife of Henry C. Cress- 
man ; IMaria died unmarried. Mrs. Fields, the 
eldest child of Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs, had the fol- 
lowing children: John, William Elihu, Cath- 
arine ail'! " ■ ■- 

Mrs. . and 

with her -^opal 

■■ inetery coiuK iiu s church. 

Mr. and M liave had but two 

. ■ - .• -,;;i,ber 

L., 
s\'. . with 

her parents. She lias musical taiciu i,.t a high 
order and has taught music since she was eleven 
jears of age. She gives instruction in piano and 
organ inusic and has the remarkable record of 
having given musical instruction in her own 
home for thirty years without a break. She was 
organist thirteen years in the First Presbyterian 
church and three years at the Evangelical Luth- 
eran Church of the Trinity. Her first teacher was 
Professor Blaufuff from Saxony in Germany, 
and under the tuition of Constantine Von Stern- 
berg of Philadelphia she completed her musical 
education, except that she afterwards attended 
the Conservatory of Music in Philadelphia for a 
single term. 

ADA:\I SCHEIDT, of Norristown, Pennsyl- 
vania, president and general manager of the 
Adam Schcidt Brewing Company, and one of the 
most enterprising and widely known of American 
hrewiTs, comes from a family which dates back 
in tlio year 1700. His early paternal ancestor 
was llcinrich Scheidt, who was born at Schweiss- 
'^•;'M>er Miilile (Landgericht W'olfstein Bezirk 



Kuscl), Bavaria, Germany, and there died, ir. 
1792. His son, Nockolaus, who died April 15 
1831, was married to Katharina Ihrig, and thtn 
son, Johann Adam Scheidt, was father of Adaiii 
Scheidt, the immediate subject of this memoir. 

Johann Adam Scheidt was born in the.ance- 
tral village before named, September 23, i8g'/. 
He was educated in Bavaria and learned the trad' 
of a miller, which he followed until he \\.i 
twenty-two years of age. After his marriage, ; ; 
1831, he settled in Oberweiler in Thai, where I1 
carried on a grain business, lime-burning ar. ■ 
farming until about 1868, when he retired fro: 
active business life. He was a man of intell' 
gence and strength of character, as is attested li 
the fact that he held a number of governmc 
appointments, and wa-. elected for several ter 
to the office of adjunct, .1 position correspondi; 
to that of burgess of a liorough in this count: 
He was a Lutheran in religion, and was. eld ; 
in his church. In politics he was allied with i' 
Conservative party. He died April 29, 1894, 
the advaiK-.i a^x' of eighty-four yeans, sevi 
mom' 

J' : ^•-•idt was married, Decembc 

I, 1831, 111 ' '■ r . v,i';r in Thai, to Maria Katli 
rina Pfleger, daughter of Philip and Maria Kat 
arina 1 l;i;( -i ;:ii ii c-r i Pfleger. Her father %\ 
bom I'.cnhach, and died in Ob* 

weik- wife was born in 1782, a- 

long . usband, dying in 1865, a' 

at C.!' V v were the parents of ele\- 

child; A horn were sons: i. Kath 

rina, ' •■ 6, 1832, died November 2 

1847. i)orn .November 14, 1834; 

Jacob, Utu .September 26, 1836; 4. Peter, bon. 
December 21, 1838; 5. Karl (Charles) born July 
12, 1840 ; 6. Friedrich, born December 13, 1842 
7. Adolph, born June 2^, 1844; 8. Ludwig, bor'. 
May 28, 1846, died July 3, 1901 ; 9. Philippine, 
born June 15, 1849, now deceased; 10. Katharina. 
born July 11, 1851 ; ir. Adam, mentioned belov 

Adam Scheidt, youngest child of the fan. 
last named, was born at the paternal home 
Bavaria, February 14, 1854. He received ' 
education in his native village and learned 1 
trade of cooper and brewer, which he diligen. 




%,^rf/(^9^rv^^Mi>U^ 



>e^^^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



los 



followed until about the time of attaining his 
majority. He then entered the German army 
(December 12, 1874), in the Eighth Regiment, 
Third Company, which was then stationed at the 
historic fortified city of Metz. In March follow- 
ing he entered the Officers' School for five months 
and then returned to his company, after which he 
was promoted and did active duty in his new 
grade. In September, 1876, he was assigned to 
a recruiting station at Zwybriiken, and promoted 
to a higher grade of non-commissioned office. 
where he performed various duties until the ex- 
piration of his term of service, when (in Septem- 
ber, 1877) he was honorably discharged with an 
unblemished soldierly record. 

In March, 1878, Mr. Scheidt, then twenty- 
four years of age, came to the United Sattcs to 
join his brother Charles, who had preceded him 
and was located at Norristown, Pennsylvania, 
where he was conducting a small brewery, and 
a saloon in connection, at 18 West ]\Iain street, 
which is now conducted as the Hotel Finley. 
Adam Scheidt reached that place in the evening 
of Monday, April i, and at once accepted a posi- 
tion with his brother. He gave his evenings to 
study of the English language, under the tutor- 
ship of Mr. Bloomaker, under whom he soon 
attained a degree of proficiency which fitted him 
for a participation in the business. He then be- 
came a partner with his brother, and half-owner 
of the brewing plant, the business being con- 
ducted under the firm name of C. & A. Scheidt, 
and this association was pleasantly and profitably 
maintained until October 9, 1884, when Charles 
Scheidt died, after a short illness, following an 
operation for the removal of a cancer back of 
the left eye, performed at the Jefiferson Hospital, 
I'liiladelphia. The deceased was in the prime of 
life, aged only forty-four years, two months and 
twenty-seven days, and was unmarried. 

Adam Scheidt was now left with the entire 
responsibility of the business, nor could one have 
been better equipped for the task. As a practical 
brewer he had no superior and few equals in Amer- 
ica, havingthoroughly learned his art in his native 
Bavaria, the model brewing region of the earth — ■ 
and he was now entirelv familiar with Ameri- 



can business methods and had made an extensive 
acquaintance in business circles over a large terri- 
tory. He purchased his deceased partner's half- 
interest in the real estate at public sale, and the 
half-interest of the personal property at private 
sale, under the appraisement, from the father, 
who inherited from the son Charles, the latter 
named having died without issue. Mr. Scheidt 
retained the sole ownership until October 7, 1890, 
when he effected the incorporation of the Adam 
Scheidt Brewing Company, of which he at once 
became president and general manager, and in 
which two-fold capacity he has continued to the 
present time. 

Under J\Ir. Scheldt's masterly management 
the business has been extended and the plant 
correspondingly enlarged. Through purchase 
from time to time, the ground occupied has been 
increased to about seven and one-half acres, the 
brewing plant occupying the east side of Stony 
creek, between Marshall and Elm streets, and the 
bottling plant the northwest side of the creek, 
and both provided with railroad sidings. To 
the brewing plant new buildings have been added 
at frequent intervals and the old ones have been 
remodeled and modernized. Obsolete wooden 
construction has been replaced by steel and iron, 
until every building is fireproof; the latest and 
most improved machinery has been installed, 
much of it having been specially constructed for 
this establishment ; and an efficient electric plant 
upon the premises is utilized not only for light- 
ing, but also for driving the major part of the 
machinery, the pumping apparatus included, to 
the displacement of steam. The equipment also 
includes three ice machines, with a daily refrig- 
erating capacity of two hundred and thirty tons ; 
a carbonic acid gas collecting plant ; and all other 
scientific appliances now applicable to the art of 
brewing. In every stage of manufacture, all malt 
liquors here made, of whatever description, are 
safeguarded through a strict regard to chemical 
laws effecting their fermenting, aging and keep- 
ing properties. Only filtered air is allowed to 
come into contact with the liquors, which are also 
cooled in closed rooms impervious to unfiltered 
and bacteria laden air. 



io6 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



The bottling plant now in use is entirely new 
and contains ever}' device which long experience 
has demanded, either of necessity or for conveni- 
ence. All the machinery is driven by electricity. 
The electric wires, steam pipes, water pipes, re- 
frigerating pipes, carbonic acid gas pipes and air 
pipes are carried to the bottling house from the 
brewing plant by a trunk line which crosses the 
mill race and Stony creek and is supported by 
the railroad trestle bridge crossing the creek. 
Malt and other supplies, and also coal, are 
brought to the plant in cars and put in proper 
places by means of elevators and conveyers. 

The product of the Scheidt Brewing Company 
comprises various kinds of ale, porter, brown 
stout and lager beer, and includes the famous 
Lotos Export Beer and Twentieth Century Ale, 
of which the Scheidt Brewing Company is the 
sole manufacturer. The annual capacity of the 
plant is more than one hundred thousand barrels, 
and the output for the year ending January, 
1904, was sixty-seven thousand seven hundred 
and fifty barrels. Shipment is made in refrig- 
erating cars, built for and owned by the Scheidt 
Brewing Company, and which are cooled by ice 
manufactured on the grounds of the Company. 
The company maintains branch houses in Phila- 
delphia, at 963-971 North Ninth street, and in 
Baltimore, at 312 South Eutaw street, and dis- 
tributing depots • in Lansdale, at the Broadway 
House, and in Conshohocken, adjoining the 
Philadelphia & Reading Railroad freight station, 
besides many agencies both within and outside 
the state. 

In 1891 the ale and porter brewing and bot- 
tling establishment of A. R. Cox, now deceased, 
at the corner of Main and Markley streets, ad- 
joining the Hartranft Hotel, in Norristown, was 
bought by the Adam Scheidt Brewing Company 
and the business removed from the Cox prop- 
erty to the Scheidt plant, with which it was con- 
solidated. 

While giving constant and careful personal 
attention to the conduct of the extensive business 
of which he is the head, Mr. Scheidt is also con- 
nected with various other important corporations, 
being president of the Penn Trust Company, of 



Norristown, Pennsylvania, and a stockholder in 
the Norristown Trust Company, the First Na- 
tional Bank of Norristown, the Central Trust 
Company of Philadelphia, and other manufac- | 
turing corporations in Pennsylvania and other j 
states. In religion he is a Lutheran, having been ] 
baptized in the church and confirmed in the 
place of his nativity, and received by certificate 
into Trinity Lutheran church of Norris- 
town. He has always been a liberal supporter 
of the church and of its various benevo- 
lences, as well as of other deserving charities. 
In politics he is a Republican. Being too much 
occupied with the cares of business to engage in 
party affairs he has never sought or held public 
office. He holds membership in a number of 
fraternal and social clubs and societies. His 
personal characteristics are those becoming to 
the well equipped man of affairs, who has through 
his own industry and intelligent efforts accjuired 
means and an honorable position in life and stands 
secure in the respect and confidence of the com- 
munity in which he lives and the various circles, 
business and social, in which he moves. As a citi- 
zen he bears a full share in promoting the inter- 
ests of his city and in enhancing its importance 
and prestige. Habits of close observation and 
wide travel have afforded him a broad knowledge 
of men and affairs and aided in making him a 
congenial companion to those who are brought 
into association with him. While a thorough 
American in his tastes an habits, he at the same 
time cherishes a laudable aft'ection for his native 
land and his kindred there. Before his father's 
death, the son Adam paid a visit to his father 
and relatives in 1891, and on that occasion made 
numerous off-trips to different parts of Germany 
to renew old acquaintances. In his youth, be- 
fore coming to America, in following his occupa- 
tion, he had been located in various parts of Ger- 
many and France. 

Mr. Scheidt was married, January 30, 1883, at 
No. 144 West Marshall street, Norristown, to 
Miss Rosa Isabella Hindennach, who was edu- 
cated in the public schools of that city and is a 
member of Trinity Lutheran church. Her par- 
ents are Jacob Friedrich and Christina (Koel- 




REV. J. A. STRAHAN 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



107 



blin) Hindcnnach, both natives of Germany. Mr. 
Hindennach is a cooper and brewer and yet fol- 
lows that occupation. He has been active in pro- 
moting the usefulness of St. Paul's German 
Lutheran church in Norristown, and has served 
as superintendent of its Sunday-school for many 
years. 

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Scheldt, all of 
whom are affiliated with Trinity Lutheran church, 
are: i. Adam Jacob, born April 11, 1884; 2. 
Harry Adolph, born March 25, 1886, died July 
19, 1886; 3. Anna Amelia, born April 4, 1888, 
died December 4, same year ; 4. Nina Rosa, born 
April 27, 1891 ; 5. Helen Christina, born Septem- 
ber 22, 1892; 6. Katharina Augusta, born July 
25, 1894; 7. Karl Friedrich, born April 5, 1896; 
8. Louis Paul, born February 4, 1898. 

Adam Jacob, eldest son of Mr. Scheldt, has 
attended the Norristown high school, and is now 
in his third year at the Pennsylvania Military 
Academy, Chester, Pennsylvania. 

REV. J. A. STRAHAN is the Rector of 
the Church of the Immaculate Conception at 
Jenkintown, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. 

This now flourishing parish was at its in- 
ception but an out-mission. It was ministered 
to by the Rev. John McGovem, at that time 
rector of St. Joachim Church, Frankford, Phila- 
delphia. The first baptism recorded by him was 
in May, 1864. The first regular pastor appointed 
for the parish was the Rev. Thomas Toner and 
the date of his appointment was January, 1866. 
Under his pastorate the present church property 
was purchased, and the present church erected. 
The corner-stone was laid in July, 1866, and the 
house now occupied by the Sisters, then used as 
a rectory, was built about the same time. Father 
Toner labored zealously and faithfully for the 
interests of the Catholic church and for the spir- 
itual needs of the parish until 187 1. In Septem- 
ber of that year he was succeeded by Rev. Will- 
iam J. McKean, another efficient worker in the 
parish, who died ten years later from the efifects 
of a fall. The next pastor was the Rev. John 
Mellon, who died in 1885, and was succeeded in 
March, 1886, by the Rev. Thomas W. Power, 
who died in 1892. For a few months the spiritual 



needs of the parish were given attention by 
Father Garvcy. 

On September 8, 1892, the Rev. Joseph A. 
Strahan was appointed rector. Since taking 
charge of the parish "Father Strahan has entirely 
renewed the whole interior of the church, built a 
new stone school house, and greatly improved 
the property. The church has now a seating ca- 
pacity of nine hundred. There is an attendance 
of 225 at the school, which is in charge of the 
Sisters of St. Joseph. 

Rev. Joseph A. Strahan is a native of Phila- 
delphia. He acquired his early education in the 
schools of St. Philip and St. Michael. He next 
took a classical course in St. Charles Preparatory 
College. He studied philosophy and theology, 
in St. Charles Seminary, at Eighteenth and Race 
streets, in Philadelphia. He was ordained to the 
priesthood October 18, 1872, in the Seminary 
Chapel, by the Rt. Rev. James F. Wood, D. D. 
His first appointment was that of assistant at St. 
James' church, Philadelphia, where he remained 
upwards of a year, and was then transferred to 
the Church of the Holy Innocents, at Bethlehem, 
Pennsylvania. Two years later he was trans- 
ferred to the Church of St. Cecelia, at Phila- 
delphia, now called the Church of the \'isitation. 
There he labored faithfully as assistant for a 
period of nine years. His next appointment was 
to found a parish at Tacony, in the upper part 
of Philadelphia, made by Rev. JNIaurice Walsh, 
administrator. He purchased land and built a 
rectory, and also the basement of a church. Eight 
years later he was appointed to his present posi- 
tion. Under the ministratioijs of Father Strahan 
the parish has grown and prospered. He is ever 
to be found at his post of duty, laboring faithfully 
for the good of the flock. He is held in high 
esteem, not only by his own parishioners but also 
by members of all denominations. His present 
assistant is the Rev. 1\I. A. Walsh, a graduate of 
St. Charles Seminary, formerly assistant at St. 
Clement's Church, near Darby, Pennsylvania. 

CYRUS HICKMAN CALEY. secretary of 
the Upper IMerion school board, is a native of 
Delaware county, Pennsylvania. He was born 
February 11, 1842, near Radnor Friends' Meet- 



io8 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



ing. He is the son of Samuel and Lucy C. ( Hick- 
man) Caley. His mother was a daughter of 
Cyrus and Phebe (Matlack) Hickman. 

Samuel Caley (father) was born near New- 
town Square, Delaware county, and lived there 
most of his life. He married Lucy C. Hickman, 
born in Westtown township near the noted 
Friends' School. Samuel died in December, 1886, 
and his wife April 13, 1900. Of their children 
Cyrus H. is the eldest; Samuel, born in June, 
1844, died August 20, 1901, married Mar}- Yar- 
nall, having one child, Mary Frances ; Annie died 
in childhood ; William, born December 6, 1850, 
married (first wife) Miriam Bowker, they having 
one child, Howard B. Caley (deceased) and mar- 
ried (second wife) Anna Mulford ; he is living 
now in Delaware county ; Elizabeth, born in 1853, 
resides in Media ; Hannah married Empson Gar- 
wood ; and Margaret resides at Media. Samuel 
Caley was born March 14, 1815, and at the time 
of his death was seventy-one years of age. 

The grandparents of Cyrus Caley were Sam- 
uel and Ann (Phillips) Caley. The great-grand- 
father, Samuel Caley, married a Miss Reese. His 
father was also named Samuel Caley. The family 
is of English origin and settled at Newtown 
Square nearly two hundred years ago. 

Cyrus H. Caley was reared on the farm, at- 
tended the Friends and public schools of the 
neighborhood, also Gwynedd Friends' boarding- 
school, at that time under the charge of Hugh 
Foulke. He studied two terms at ^Millersville 
State Normal School. He farmed with his father 
until his marriage. 

March 16, 1865, he married Annie L. Beidler 
and bought a farm ilear White Horse, Chester 
county, Pennsylvania, where he remained three 
years. He then purchased a farm near Newtown 
Square, remaining there eight years. He sold that 
farm and made several changes in the next five 
years, finally settling in Upper INIerion about a 
mile and a half from Port Kennedy, where he has 
lived ever since. He is a prosperous farmer and 
attends Norristown market. 

In February, 1891, he was elected to the school 
board of Upper ;\Ierion township and has been its 



secretary almost from the beginning of his term 
of service. In politics he is a Republican and 
takes an active interest in the success of his party. 

July 3, 1863, he enlisted in Company E, Forty- 
seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Militia. He re- 
mained at Harrisburg for three months, was sent 
to Hagerstown, Maryland, and after remaining 
there one month, the troops went to Minersville, 
Pennsylvania, to quell a riot. He was mustered 
out of service at Reading, September 10, 1863. 

Annie L. (Beidler) Caley is a daughter of 
Abraham and Sarah W. (Stephens) Beidler, both 
deceased, of Upper Merion, near Valley Meeting. 
Abraham Beidler, son of Jacob Beidler, was born 
in 1810 at Diamond Rock, Chester county, and 
died in 1872, in his sixty-second year. His wife 
died in 1864, in her forty-second year. They 
were married in 1841 and lived on a farm which 
was part of the tract of land taken up by Stephen 
Stephens, the ancestor of Sarah W. Stephens. 
They are buried in Valley graveyard. Their chil- 
dren are : Hannah Mary, born April 30, 1842 ; 
Annie Landes. born March 5, 1844, wife of Cyrus 
Caley ; Margaret Currie, born January 4, 1846 ; 
Stephen Leslie, born December 2, 1848: William, 
born June 5, 1851, who died young; Ellen Pris- 
cilla, born May 5, 1853 ; Fannie Elizabeth, born 
in 1854; Harry P., born in 1856, and died in in- 
fancy; Sarah Louisa, born June 25, 1857; Jacob 
Howard, born March 20, 1859 ; Abraham Lincoln, 
born in 1861, and died in infancy; Laura May, 
born in 1863, ^"d cl'ed in infancy. 

Hannah Mary Beidler married in 1871 Mor- 
decai Davis, son of Joseph and Eleanor (Ste- 
phens) Davis. Mordecai Davis is now deceased. 
They had one child, Ellen Stephens Davis, born 
August 28, 1872. 

Margaret Currie Beidler married Abraham 
Metz and had three children : Sarah Eliza Metz, 
born May 13, 1870; Thomas Overton Metz, born 
August 10, 1874; and Frank Beidler Metz, born 
October 23, 1876, and died in 1877. Mr. and 
Mrs. Metz reside at Atlantic City. 

Stephen Leslie Beidler married Emma Yarnall 
and they reside at Willistown. They had three 
children, as follows : Elizabeth Yarnall, married 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



109 



Charles Worrilow and is living near Newtown 
Square; Stephen Leslie, born April 12, 1882; and 
William M. 

Ellen Priscilla Beidler married Jonathan D. 
Elliott of Chester county and they reside in West 
Philadelphia. Their children are: Alva Wayne, 
born October 23, 1879; Roland Arthur, born Oc- 
tober 23, 1882; Fannie Louisa, born November 
20, 1884; Edna Bell, born December 29, 1886, and 
died in infancy ; Norman Walker, born July 9, 
1888; Mary Ella, born January 8, 1890; Paul 
Duer, born December 8, 1892, and died in 1893. 

Fannie Elizabeth Beidler married Marine 
Thomas of Wilmington, formerly of Norristown. 
They have one son, Joseph Davis Thomas, who 
was born October 27, 1877, and married Mabel 
Boddy. 

Sarah Louisa Beidler married Joathan Rob- 
erts, son of William B. and grandson of Jonathan 
and Eliza Roberts, of Red Hill, Montgomery 
county, Pennsylvania. They had five children : 
Mary Davis, born February 12, 1883 ; Edith May, 
born January 28, 1886: Walter Jonathan, born 
January 24, 1890; William B., bom September 
24, 1893 ; Edward Holstein, born November 24, 
1894 ; and Louisa S. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts reside 
in Atlantic City. 

Jacob Howard Beidler married Rebecca Jane 
Shainline. They reside in Upper Merion and 
have five children : Helen Anderson, born April 
2. 1888; Jonathan Warren, born May 20. 1890; 
Ethel Jean, born January 22, 1893 ; Anna Landes, 
born December 12, 1894; and J. Howard. 

The children of Cyrus and Annie L. Caley 
were: Harry Thomas, born Twelfth-mo., 1865, 
died Fourth-mo. 13, 1867; Sarah Lucy, born 
Fifth-mo. II, 1868: Ella Beidler, born Twelfth- 
mo. 14, iSfk); Laura Massey, born Twelfth-mo. 
6. 1873 : J. Oswald, born Fourth-mo. 4, . 1876 ; 
Jonathan Richards, born Third-mo. 8, 1878 ; 
David Ashmore, bom Eighth-mo. 21, 1880; Han- 
nali Mary, born Fifth-mo. 4, 1883. 

Ella Beidler Caley married William Fred- 
erick, engineer at Watts Mills, Norristown. They 
havt- two children : .A.nna and Frances. 

Laura Massev Calev married \\'illiam C. 



Moore. They reside at Blue Bell and have one 
child, Cyrus Norman. 

J. Oswald married Lydia Foulke Moore. 

David Ashmore is clerk at Hotel Bolton, Har- 
risburg. He married Catharine Moyer of Harris- 
burg. 

2klr. and ]\Irs. Cyrus Caley are not members of 
the Society of Friends but they and several of 
their family attend Valley Meeting. 

GEORGE C. MORGAN, though compara- 
tively a young man, being less than fifty years of 
age, has made a record as one of the most ener- 
getic and enterprising business men of Montgom- 
ery count}', Pennsylvania. He is the proprietor 
of the grain elevator and the flour, feed and coal 
depot at Elm street and the Stony Creek Railroad. 
He is descended from Welsh-Quaker stock, al- 
though he is himself a member of the Oak Street 
Methodist church, Norristown.^ 

George C. Morgan was born at Chester 
Springs, Chester county, Pennsylvania, June 10, 
1856. He is the son of Antrim F. and Martha 
(Harris) Morgan. His father and mother had 
five children. as follows: Thomas H., who resides 
at the old family homestead in Quakertown, 
Bucks county, Pennsylvania ; Hannah, widow of 
Stephen F. Penrose ; Kate, deceased, who married 
Charles E. Smulling. of Quakertown ; George C, 
subject of this sketch ; and Joseph A., of Norris- 
town. 

.\ntrim Foulke Morgan, father, was born at 
?iIontgomeryville. in Montgomery county, March 
8, 18 18. On reaching manhood he removed to 
Chester .Springs, in Chester county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he engaged in the milling business 
with his brother Joseph for a number of years. 
The remainder of his life was spent at Quaker- 
town, Bucks county, where he became a farmer 
and continued in that occupation until his death. 
He also engaged in the wood business there for a 
number of years. In politics he was a Whig, and 
a Republican after the formation of that party in 
1856. Init in the latter years of his life he afiiliated 
with the Prohibition party, believing that the im- 
portance of legislation against the liquor traffic 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



overbalanced every other issue. He was a life- 
long member of the Society of Friends. On the 
31st of December, 1846, he married Martha Har- 
ris, who was born in Chester county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and who died at Quakertown, in Bucks 
county, three months after the decease of her hus- 
band, in 1898, at the age of seventy-four years. 
Antrim Foulke died in 1897 at the age of seventy- 
nine years. He was for many years a trustee of 
the Friends' School at Quakertown, and also one 
•of the elders of the Society at that place. In 
1894 he was the candidate of the Prohibition 
party for congress in the district composed of 
Bucks and Montgomery counties, and in 1895 the 
•candidate of the same party for the legislature. 
He was a member of Horsham Friends' Meeting 
in his younger days. 

Morgan Morgan, the grandfather, born 5th- 
mo. 16, 1782, was a justice of the peace at Mont- 
gomeryville for twenty-five years. He was a 
blacksmith and gunsmith by trade, and was one 
•of the workmen in that occupation who could 
make a double barrelled gun in the early days. 
He was a native of Horsham township, of Welsh 
parentage, his father having emigrated from 
Wales and settled there, where he died. He was 
a member of Horsham Friends' Meeting, and one 
•of the building committee appointed to erect the 
present meeting house. Morgan Morgan mar- 
ried, iith-mo. 15, 1810, Ann Custard, born 8th- 
mo. 14, 1787. Their children: Amelia, bom 8th- 
tno. 5, 181 1, died at the age of four months ; Jo- 
seph C, born loth-mo. 10, 1812, died 2d-mo. 27, 
1888 ; Amelia Ann, born 5th-mo. 10, 1815, died in 
1855; Antrim F., born 8th-mo. 31, 1818, died 
i2th-mo. 24, 1897; George, born 2d-mo. 7, 1821, 
•died 3d-mo. 2, 1839; Elizabeth, born 6th-mo. 20, 
1823 ; Hannah, born i2th-mo. 28, 1828. 

Thomas Harris, maternal grandfather, was 
the son of Colonel John Harris, of Revolutionary 
fame. Col. John Harris was a native of England. 
He was born April i, 1753, and died December 
2^, 1838, at the age of eighty-three years, three 
months and six days. He came to America when 
a boy, and settled in Chester county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He was an officer in General Anthony 
AVayne's Division. He was a farmer by occupa- 



tion and also operated a mill. Thomas Harris, 
grandfather, was a native of Chester county, and 
married Catharine Smith, who was of German 
descent. He was born in 1780, and died in 1842. 
His wife was born May 5, 1783, and died August 
2, 1856. Their children: Thomas, born May 3, 
1814, died September 22, 1825 ; Jackson, born 
loth-mo. 8, 1819, died 7th-mo. 3, 1822; Mary, 
born iith-mo. 29, 1823, died 6th-mo. 14, 1852; 
Martha, mother of George C. Morgan, born 
loth-mo. 24, 1825, died 3d-mo., 10, 1898. 

George C. Morgan was reared in Quaker- 
town, and attended the Friends' school there in 
his boyhood days. On leaving school he went to 
Conshohocken, where he spent two years learn- 
ing the trade of miller with his future father-in- 
law, John J. Brooke, now a resident of Norris- 
town. At the close of his apprenticeship he went 
to Greenlane, on the Perkiomen, where he fol- 
lowed the occupation of milling for two years. 
In 1878 he removed to Norristown, and pur- 
chased the old mill at the corner of Main and 
Markley streets which he soon afterwards de- 
molished and re-established it near the corner of 
Marshall and Barbadoes streets. It was a large 
and well equipped structure in every respect. He 
operated it by steam and water for nearly twenty 
years, from 1879 ^° 1898. In the last named 
year he sold it to the Stony Creek Milling Com- 
pany, who in turn disposed of it to the Eastern 
Milling-and Export Company. 

In 1895 Mr. Morgan bought the Shaffer brick 
manufacturing plant, located on Forest avenue, 
Norristown, but just beyond the borough limits, 
and operated it very successfully for a number of 
years, the establishment being finally merged into 
the Morgan Brick Company, which, on Mr. Mor- 
gan's withdrawal, became the Norristo\vn Brick 
Company. In 1902 Mr. Morgan formed a part- 
nership with his son, Warren B. Morgan, and 
built a grain elevator and feed house on the Stony 
Creek Railroad at Elm street. He has combined 
this business with the retail coal trade and it has 
since been successfully conducted under the firm 
name of George C. Morgan & Son. 

Mr. Morgan married, on March 25, 1880. ]\liss 
Inez, eldest daughter of John Jacob and Catharine 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



'(Hunsberger) Brooke. They have had nine chil- 
dren, as follows: Warren B., associated with his 
father in business; Lottie; Elsie; George R. ; 
John J. B.; Inez; Blanche; Janet; and Catharine. 
Elsie and Janet died at the age of eighteen 
and eleven months, respectively. 

Mr. Morgan is class leader and president of 
the board of trustees of Oak Street Methodist 
Episcopal church, of Norristown, of which he and 
his family are members. In politics he is an ac- 
tive and prominent Prohibitionists, being earn- 
•estly devoted to antagonism to the liquor interests. 
He has frequently been a candidate for public 
office on the ticket of that party. He has been 
treasurer of the Prohibition county committee 
since 1880. He was for two years postmaster at 
Hillegass. Mr. Morgan is actively connected with 
several Norristown enterprises. He is a director 
in the West Norristown Building & Loan Associa- 
tion. In addition to his other occupations, Mr. 
Morgan, some years ago, engaged very exten- 
sively in building operations in the vicinity of 
■Green and Brown streets, in the borough of Nor- 
ristown, erecting many dwellings. He has also 
been largely identified with the ownership of real 
■ estate in other sections of Norristown. I\Ir. 
Morgan has done much to assist in the progress 
■of the community in which he lives, exerting him- 
self vigorously in whatever occupations he has 
been engaged, and being in every respect a use- 
ful and valuable citizen. 

The Brooke family, to which Mrs. Morgan 
belongs, is among the oldest in Montgomery 
county. John is a prominent name in the family, 
there having been a John Brooke in nearly every 
generation to the present. John Brooke, with 
Frances, his wife, and two sons, James and i\Iat- 
thew, arrived in Pennsylvania from Yorkshire, 
England, in 1699. John had purchased from 
William Penn a tract of seven hundred and fifty 
acres of land, and on his death his sons took up 
the land in the township of Limerick, settling 
upon it. It occupied the central portion of the 
township. The house which they built in 1714 
has been partly incorporated into the modern 
dwelling which is still standing on the premises 
■originally owned by them, and the house built by 



Matthew Brooke's widow in 1721 was torn down 
in 1835 by one of the Bornemans who owned the 
property at that time. John Brooke, the father of 
James and Matthew, and the progenitor of the 
family in America, was detained, according to a 
family tradition, in quarantine at Gloucester, be- 
low Philadelphia, with a contagious disease, and 
died there. His will corroborates the tradition, 
as it bears date 8th-mo. 25, 1699, directing that 
his property be divided among his three sons, one 
Jonathan, having been left in England. The 
Brookes were among the earliest settlers above 
the Perkiomen, although there was a Swedish set- 
tlement at Douglassville, and a few Germans had 
even then located themselves in New Hanover 
township. James and Matthew Brooke set apart 
a burial place containing two acres and four 
perches of land, and a deed was made for it to 
trustees by their sons, William and George 
Brooke. 

John J. Brooke, father of Mrs. George C. 
Morgan, was born August 21, 1840, on the home- 
stead of later generations of the family in Lower 
Pottsgrove township. He was educated in the 
schools of the neighborhood, working at inter- 
vals on the farm as was then customary in the 
rural districts of the county. He learned the mill- 
ing trade at what was then known as Brower's 
Mill, in Plymouth township. In 1867 Mr. Brooke 
purchased the mill and operated it himself with 
the exception of one year, 1882, when he rented 
it to Jonathan Nyce, until 1899, when he sold it to 
A. T. Cross, who has since sold it to the Alan 
Wood Steel Company, at Ivy Rock, and the mill 
site is now a part of their extensive grounds. 
Since selling his mill in Plymouth township, Mr. 
Brooke has been employed a part of the time at 
the old Morgan Mill, on Marshall street, Norris- 
town. He lives retired at No. 1020 Main street, 
in that borough. 

John J. Brooke married Catharine, daughter 
of Samuel H. and Catharine (Haldeman) Huns- 
berger, of East Coventry township, Chester 
county, Pennsylvania. Her parents lived about 
four miles from Pottstown, her father being a 
miller and farmer. Mrs. Brooke's mother was the 
daughter of Abraham Haldeman, who was a Men- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



nonite preacher for many years. The Huiisber- 
gers were also an old Mennonite family, long 
domiciled in the vicinity of Sumneytown, in Mont- 
gomery county. Samuel H. Hunsberger was a 
Republican in politics, and served for a number of 
years as a supervisor in East Coventry town- 
ship. 

Air. and Mrs. John J. Brooke have the follow- 
ing children : Inez, wife of George C. Morgan ; 
Mary, wife of Allen Hallman ; Charlotte, wife of 
William H. Moser, of Upper Merion township, 
Montgomery county ; and Miss Daisy, residing 
with her parents. In addition to the children men- 
tioned, Mr. and Mrs. Brooke had a son John and 
a daughter Lillian, who are deceased. 

John Brooke, grandfather of Mrs. Morgan, 
married Maria Christman, of an old Lower Potts- 
grove family. They resided at Crooked Hill, in 
that township. He was a farmer, and died Jan- 
uary 27, 1861. at the age of sixty-two years. He 
had nine children, all of whom are now deceased 
except John J., father of Airs. Alorgan ; Firman, a 
druggist in Chicago, and Josiah, who lives re- 
tired in Philadelphia. 

Mrs. Morgan's great-grandfather was twice 
married and died in 1812. He was the son of 
Matdiew Brooke, one of the immigrant's three 
sons. The surviving brothers and sisters of Mrs. 
John J. Brooke are Abraham, residing in Vir- 
ginia; Elizabeth (Mrs. John Detwiler), of Clif- 
ton, Virginia; .\nnie (Mrs. Thomas Whiteman), 
of Parkesburg, Pennsylvania; and Emma (Mrs. 
Penrose Thomas), of Norristown, Pennsylvania. 

THOMAS BUCKMAN, deceased, for many 
years a highly respected and influential citizen of 
Jenkintown, Montgomery county, Penns)-lvania, 
where he was actively and extensively engaged 
in agricultural pursuits, was born December 11, 
1802, a son of Thomas and Alary (Harding) 
Buckman. 

The educational advantages enjoyed by 
Thomas Buckman during his boyhood days, and 
which thoroughlv qualified him for a life of use- 
fulness and activity, were obtained at the Friends' 
School, situated in Abington township, Mont- 
goiuery county. After completing his studies he 



rented a farm which was located in the vicinity 
of Jenkintown, and after operating this success- 
fully for a short period he purchased a seventy 
acre farm in Cheltenham township, which he 
cultivated and tilled for a number of years there- 
after, finally disposing of it to John Fork. He 
then purchased another farm of one hundred 
and eleven acres from Mr. Troutwine, this land 
being located near Rydal Station, Alontgomery 
county, and resided there up to the time of his 
demise, September 20, 1892, in the ninetieth year 
of his age. He was practical and progressive in 
his methods, painstaking and careful in the per- 
formance of his labor, and his broad acres yielded 
him a goodly return and large financial gain. 
He was just and conscientious in all his aft'airs 
of life, and bore the respect and esteem of all 
who knew him. He was a good citizen, a loving 
husband, and an indulgent father. 

Air. Buckman was twice married. His first 
wife, whose maiden name was Ann Comly, a 
daughter of Clement and Rebecca (Jones) 
Comly, bore him seven children, namely : Amos,, 
deceased ; Alfred C, deceased ; Alary, deceased ; 
Jacob T., deceased : William, deceased ; Thomas 
and Joseph Buckman. The mother of these chil- 
dren died about 1861. Air. Buckman then mar- 
ried, secondly. Alary Ann Brooke, born August 
I, 1830, daughter of Thomas and Alary (Reyner) 
Brooke, who bore him two children : Linford, 
who died in infancy ; and Jessie T., who died at 
the age of nearly nine years. The paternal 
grandfather of Airs. Brooke was general William 
Brooke, whose history is narrated' as follows: 

General Brooke was born in Limerick town- 
ship, Alontgomery county, Pennsylvania, Alay 
12, 1746, and was the oldest son of Alatthew 
Brooke and Sarah Reese, and the third in de- 
scent from the emigrant John Brooke, who with 
his wife came from England to take up a grant 
of land of seven hundred and fifty acres pur- 
chased from William Penn in England. The 
vessel arrived at Philadelphia in the year 1698, 
though both John Brooke and his wife died on 
board as she was coming up the Delaware, and 
were buried at or near what is now Cooper's- 
Point. Camden, Xew Jersey. His will was pro- 




^yL Ac./ 



'??^A>n 



sy^ 



IMONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



bated at Trenton and is a very interesting docu- 
ment, and photographs have been made and are 
in the possession of a number of his descendants. 
At the breaking out of the Revokitionary 
war, General Brooke, who was then not quite 
thirty years of age, volunteered his services, and 
was commissioned a captain in the Fourth Com- 
pany, Chester County Volunteers, on May 14, 
1777, as a major in the Fourth Battalion in 1779, 
and as a major in the Sixth Battalion, ^Nlay 10, 
1780. He also served as a major in the Fourth 
Regiment of Foot, containing six hundred and 
seventy men, of which Lieutenant-Colonel Rich- 
ard Willing was the commanding officer. It was 
while serving as a captain that General Brooke 
had the following experience, as related by 
George Smith, M. D., in his "History of Dela- 
ware County, Pennsylvania :" 

"It sometimes happened that some of our 
military scouts were captured by the enemy, when 
not sufficiently on their guard. About this per- 
iod, such a party under the command of the late 
eneral William Brooke, of Haverford, who was 
then a captain, were one night taking their ease 
at a house, late the property of George Svv^ain, 
when the house was suddenly surrounded by a 
larger party of the enemy. Brooke determined 
not to be taken, leaped from a window and ran, 
but in getting over the fence into the road found 
that a partial dislocation of his knee had hap- 
pened. Putting his foot through the fence, and 
giving his leg a quick extension, the joint was 
brought into a proper condition, when he hastily 
made his escape." 

During his absence with the army on one of 
the forages made into the territory surrounding 
Philadelphia, while the British army were in pos- 
session of the city, his dwelling was plundered 
of nearly every article of food and furniture, so 
that his wife, with two young children, was 
obliged to turn out in the snow and seek shelter 
elsewhere. This outrage afterwards formed 
the basis of a claim against the government, the 
original papers of this claim being on file at the 
Historical Society of Pennsylvania in a volume 
of manuscript entitled "Depredations by British 
Army, Chester County, 1777," as follows: "An 
estimate of Goods and Chattels taken and de- 



stroyed from William Brooke by the British 
Armies under the command of Lord Cornwallis 
on the nth of December, 1777. 

i s. d. 

Six sheep, six cows and two calves. 45 15 

Beds, bedding and wearing apparel. 100 .. 

Household and kitchen furniture. .20 . . 

Provision and poultry 12 10 . . 

Fat and store hogs 21 17 6 

Two tons of hay and grain in the 

sheaf 10 . . 

210 2 6 
Chester S. S. : 

Personally appeared before me, one of the 
justices, etc. for the County of Chester, William 
Brooke, and on his solemn oath doth declare and 
say that the above amount is just and true as it 
stands stated and that he hath received no part 
thereof. 

Given under my (obliterated) the 27th of 
August, 1783. Jno. Bartholomew. 

Endorsed on back "Haverford." 

Wm. Brooke's account. 

Among said papers is the claim of John Lind- 
say, a son-in-law of General Brooke, who resided 
near him in Haverford. for goods and chattels 
destroyed by the British Army on the following 
day 1 2th of December, amounting to £134 3s. 6d. 

General Brooke performed further special 
military service, as will be seen from the minutes 
of the Supreme Executive Council, then sitting 
at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, under date of Oc- 
tober 2, 1777, as follows: 

Ordered : — 

"That Col. Evans, Col. William Evans, Col. 
Gibbons, Col. Thomas, Capt. Thomas Kevis, Capt 
William Brooke, Capt. Jacob Rudolph be au- 
thorized and required to collect without delay, 
from such of the inhabitants of the County of 
Chester, as have not taken the oath of allegiance 
and abjuration or who have aided or assisted the 
enemy. .\rms and accoutrements, blankets, shoes 
and stockings, for the use of the army ; that they 
appraised the same when taken, according to 
their quality, allowing at the rate of three pounds 
for a new single blankets, and give certificate 
for the same to the owner; that they called to 
their aid the militia of the commonwealth, who 
are hereby ordered to obey and assist them in 



114 



MONTGOxMERY COUNTY. 



the execution of this order, and that they deliver 
the same, so taken, to the order of the Clothier 
General, or his Agent, with whom they are to 
correspond in the discharge of this business." 
Official record of this is found in volume 5. page 
69, Pennsylvania Archives. 

For General Brooke's Revolutionary services, 
he was granted by congress several grants of 
land in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, as fol- 
lows : 400 acres, surveyed Feb. 4th, 1785, 100 
acres, surveyed Jan. 24, 1783 and 200 acres, sur- 
veyed June II. of the same year. 

At his home in Haverford, General Brooke 
possessed as an heirloom a splendid mahogany 
chest of drawers, known as a high boy, and it 
was during one of the raids, when his house was 
plundered, that the top drawer was forced open 
with a bayonet in the hands of a Hessian soldier, 
in the belief that said chest contained treasure. 
This chest of drawers remained in his possession 
until his death in 1829, when it passed into the 
possession of his son Thomas Brooke, who was 
the father of Mrs. Buckman, and then in turn it 
passed to his son, George Brooke, Esq., of Dela- 
ware county, Pennsylvania, and at his death some 
few years ago it was bought at public sale. The 
purcliaser in turn delivered it to Benjamin 
Brooke, from whom it went to Mr. Francis JNI. 
Brooke, who represented another branch of the 
family, and is still in the possession of his heirs. 
An old "grandfather's clock" from which the 
leads have been taken to make into bullets, was 
also sold at the same time as the chest of draw- 
ers, and is now in the possession of Mr. George 
Brooke Lindsay, of Chester, Pennsylvania, a 
lineal descendant of General William Brooke. 

After the Revolution was over. General 
Brooke returned quietly to his plantation in Hav- 
erford to pursue the more peaceful avocation of 
farming, surrounded by his numerous family, 
until the depredations of the British navy on our 
merchant ships on the high seas made it neces- 
sary that we should once more lay aside the 
ploughshare for the sword, as the country \\as 
once more destined to go to war with England. 
Among the first to ofifer their services was Gen- 
eral Brooke, who was promptly commissioned a 



brigadier-general of the Third Division of 
Militia, with headquarters at Chester, where the 
troops soon assembed, and made every prepara- 
tion to defend the shores of the Delaware against 
an anticipated invasion by the British. 

General Brooke's remaining years were spent 
at the old homestead in Haverford, which he had 
built and lived in for many years prior to the 
Revolution, and was located at the junction of 
Darby and Ithan creeks, in Qiester county, and 
the old house is still standing, though it has long 
since passed out of the family and is fast going 
to ruin. His death occurred in 1829, at a ripe old 
age, and he was buried beside his wife, who had 
preceded him a number of years before, at Old 
St. David's church at Radnor, one of the most 
historic and interesting Episcopal churches in 
this country, and where he had been married on 
June 5, 1770, to Margaret Moore, who came 
of a family long settled in that neighborhood. 
Here also are buried besides General Brooke and 
his wife, among other children, his eldest daugh- 
ter, Elizabeth, and her husband George Weed,, 
and with this old church General Brooke had 
been identified nearly all his life, having served 
as a vestr}'man for many years. 

The Brooke family history has been written 
up by Mr. Frank Brooke Evans, of Philadelphia, 
and shows a connected history from the coming 
of the emigrant in 1698 from Huddersfield, 
England, where the family had been settled since 
1534, several of the children of the emigrant hav- 
ing remained in the old country and leaving 
numerous descendants. 

:\nLTON T. KEYSER, the well known 
clerk of the Farmers' Hotel, at Main and Barba- 
does streets, Norristown, is a native of Skippack 
township, where he was born July 26, 1869. He 
remained on the home farm until 1886, when he 
engaged in work on his own account. He com- 
menced by working for Daniel Detwiler on his 
farm near what is known as Linfield, Montgomery 
county. He continued with Mr. Detwiler a short 
time and then went to Parkerford, in Chester 
county, to learn the baking trade, with John 
Rochester, but before completing his apprentice- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



115 



ship went to Pottstown and worked for more than 
a year for Eli Reigiier, in a bakershop, where he 
finished his trade. Returning to Skippack, he 
worked ten months for John Alderfer on a farm. 
He then became employed as a butcher with 
Philip Davis, of Skippack, and remained with 
him for three years and ten months, and was then 
home with his father for a year. This was in 
1892, and at the end of that year he went to Rox- 
boro, where he took charge of the bar for Eman- 
uel Brendlinger, a hotel proprietor, and has been 
in the hotel business ever since, including nine 
years at the Farmers' Hotel in Norristown, the 
last three with his brother, John T. Keyser, the 
present owner of the establishment. 

Mr. Keyser has been for fourteen years a 
member of Ironbridge Lodge, No. 104, Knights 
of the Golden Eagle. He is a member also of 
Curtis Lodge, No. 239, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, of Norristown; and of Beaver 
Tribe, Improved Order of Red Men, No. 62, of 
Norristown ; and of the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks. Politically he is a Republi- 
can. 

Isaac C. Keyser (father) was born in Skip- 
pack township, October 21, 1837, and died Sep- 
tember 8, 1902. He married Elizabeth Tyson, 
born in the same township, November 22, 1839. 
They were married September 26, 1863. Their 
children were : Benjamin T., born August 4, 1865 ; 
John T., born January 14, 1867; Milton T., born 
July 26, 1869 ; Isaac T., born April 22, 1873 ; Am- 
brose T., born April 4, 1876, and died January 
30, 1904 ; Franklin T., born in October, 1878 ; and 
Elizabeth T., born February 10, 1881. 

John H. Keyser (grandfather) married Eliza- 
beth Cassel. Their children are : Mary married 
Charles Baringer, they having twins who died in 
infancy ; Sarah married Abraham Gulp, their chil- 
dren being Isaiah and Elizabeth ; Magdelana mar- 
ried another Abraham Gulp, but no relation of her 
sister's husband, their children being Amanda, 
Mary, Sally and John; Eliza (deceased) married 
Frank Leidy, and had two children, Jacob and 
Anna ; Catharine died unmarried ; Isaac G. was 
the father of ^lilton T. Keyser. 

Mrs. Isaac C. Keyser was the daughter of 



Benjamin and Mary K. (Markley) Tyson. Mr. 
Tyson was born in Skippack, as was his wife. 
They were of an old Skippack family, having 
lived there for generations. The Tysons came 
originally from Germany. They were farmers 
and owned a homestead. Mrs. Mary K. Tyson 
died in February, 1904, aged eighty years, two 
months and fourteen days. Mr. Tyson and his 
father (who was Benjamin Tyson) were mem- 
bers of the Reformed church, and Mrs. Mary 
Tyson was a Lutheran. He served one term as 
county commissioner. Isaac C. Keyser was a 
Mennonite in religious faith, and his wife a mem- 
ber of Trinity Reformed church at CoUegeville. 

Benjamin and Mary K. Tyson's children 
were : Cornelius, who married Emma Rechner 
dnd had one child, May; Benjamin, who married 
Miss Wolford, their children being Harvey and 
Benjamin; Markley, who married Elizabeth Bur- 
get, their children being May, Benjamin, Mary, 
Susie, Nevin and Alvin ; Mary, who married 
Joseph Ruff, their children being Amanda, Ella 
and Ambrose; Mary K., mother of Mrs. Isaac C. 
Keyser (Elizabeth Tyson) ; Deborah, who mar- 
ried William Y. Garges, their children being 
Minerva, Tyson and Mary; and Philip Tyson 
(deceased). 

Benjamin T. (brother of the subject of this 
sketch) married Amanda Bean, and she dying 
December 21, 1890, he married (second wife) 
Miss Kate Dreibelbis, they having no children ; 
John T., married Sarah Burgett, their children be- 
ing Howard, John, Helen, Benjamin and 
^^erda. 

Milton T. Keyser married May 3, 1898, Miss 
Barbara Feather, daughter of William and Lucy 
A. (Brey) Feather. Mrs. Keyser was born De- 
cember 27, 1876, in Topton, Bucks county, Penn- 
sylvania. William Feather was born at Swamp, 
March 29, 1836, and was all his life a brickmaker. 
He was a Lutheran in religion and a Democrat in 
politics, but never sought office. He married, in 
July, 1863, Miss Lucy A. Brey. Their children 
are : Clinton, who died in infancy ; Andora (de- 
ceased) ; Sarah, who married Howard Fisher, 
their cliildren being Hattie, Samuel, John, Will- 
iam Lord and an infant ; Milton, who married 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Miss Null, and they have two children, Gertie and 
Wayne, one being deceased; Annie, deceased; 
William, who married Cenia Aliller, their chil- 
dren being Russell and Willy ; Albert, who mar- 
ried Sallie , and has one child, Lillie ; Bar- 
bara, who married Milton T. Keyser ; John, de- 
ceased; Jacob, unmarried and resides with his 
parents in Allentown ; Lizzie, who married Clem- 
ent Hillegass and has one child, Sorden; Mary, 
unmarried, residing with her parents ; Adam, who 
died in infancy ; Frank, who resides with his pa- 
rents ; Josiah, who died in infancy; Tillie and 
Millie, residing with their parents. Mrs. Feather, 
nee Miss Brey, had the following brothers and 
sisters : Emma, Angeline. Edward, Mary, Hannah 
(deceased), Isaac, Henry (deceased), Albert 
(deceased), Tillie, Ella and John. 

Isaac T. Keyser is unmarried. Ambrose T. 
Keyser married Miss Rachel McKoons of Nor- 
ristown, there being no children; Franklin T. 
Keyser married Miss Mabel L. Trainor, of Phil- 
adelphia : and Elizabeth T. Keyser married 
George A. Brooks, of Philadelphia, June 26, 1901. 

WILLIAM H. RODENBAUGH, for many 
years chief-of-police in Norristown, has had a 
varied experience in investigation of a criminal 
character. He has made several journeys half 
way across the continent or more to bring back 
selfconfessed murderers and other offenders. 

The Rodenbaughs are an old family in :\Iont- 
gomerv county. Michael Rodenbaugh was born 
in 1780 in the vicinity of Plymouth Meeting. On 
reaching manhood he became a farmer and team- 
ster between Pittsburg and Philadelphia in 1824, 
hauling produce from one of these cities to the 
other. He followed this occupation all his life. 
He was a Friend, as were his wife and family. In 
politics he was a Whig until the organization of 
the Republican party when he became a member 
thereof. He married and had the following chil- 
dren: Nathan (father) ; Benjamin, who in 1849 
went to the gold regions of California, which was 
the last heard of him; Susan, who married 
Thomas B. Evans (first husband) and David 
Bowers (second husband), dying in 1900; Will- 
iam ; Airs. Mary Ambler ; Alichael, who married 



Alary Jane Doan, and died at Germantown in 
1899, while his widow formerly residing at Chest- 
nut Hill, died in October, 1903 ; Elizabeth, who 
married Maland Zearfass, and died in 1863 ; and 
Ezra, who died in 1895. 

Nathan Rodenbaugh (father) was born in 
Whitemarsh township, October 29, 1813, in the 
old Rodenbaugh homestead. He grew to man- 
hood on the farm, receiving a common school ed- 
ucation, and following in the footsteps of his 
father, driving team most of his life. About 
1870 he joined the First Baptist church in Nor- 
ristown and died in that faith. He was a Whig 
and a Republican in politics though never an 
office-seeker. He did not miss voting during his 
long life and always took a deep interest in the 
primary meetings of the party. He married in 
1834, Margaret, daughter of Nathan and Alar- 
garet (Wolf) Macolly, her family being of Dutch 
descent. They had the following children : Eliza- 
beth, who died April 7. 1863 ; Benjamin, who died 
April 9, 1863 ; Charles, who was born March 29, 
1 84 1, married Elizabeth Keyser, and his second 
wife was Eleanor Price, of Philadelphia; Catha- 
rine: William H. ; Margaret, who was born in 
1848, and died in 1850; Sylvester, who married 
Jennie Hauk, of Phoenixville, who is deceased ; 
Arrabell, who married Nathan Haines Jones, of 
New Jersey, and now resides in Philadelphia; 
and Howard, born March 29, 1856, who married 
Jane Keeler, of Norristown, and lives in Skip- 
pack. 

Nathan married (second wife) Tamson Ma- 
colly in Alarch, 1865, they having one child, 
Sarah, born in 1866, married Elroy Williams. 
They have one child, J. Merrill Williams. Nathan 
Rodenbaugh died June 29, 1899. His first wife 
died in August, 1864; and his second wife died 
August II, 1890. 

William H. Rodenbaugh is the oldest chief- 
of-police in length of service in the state of Penn- 
sylvania, and the second oldest in the United 
States. He was born December 19, 1847, on 
the old homestead in Plymouth township. His 
father removed to Norristown in 185 1, where the 
son has since resided. His education was obtained 
at the public schools of Norristown, he being one 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



17 



of the first pupils at Sandy street building. When 
but ten years of age he worked in a brickyard 
in the summer, going to school in the winter. He 
continued in this laborious occupation until 1862, 
when he ran away and went to a recruiting sta- 
tion and tried to enlist but could not get himself 
ly accepted. After the severe whipping he received 

on account of his unappreciated patriotism, he 
•commenced work in the Hooven Rolling Mill. 
Although the balls weighed more than he did, he 
earned a dollar and twenty-six cents per day, 
which was then considered good wages for a 
toy. He worked at this for two years, when he 
commenced driving team for his father, who was 
a teamster at the Hooven Mills. He continued 
as a teamster for two years and then became an 
apprentice with Lewis H. Davis at the trade of 
bricklaying, serving in this capacity for three 
years, during which time Mr. Davis constructed 
many of the prominent buildings in Norristown, 
among them being the Albertson Trust Building, 
the Acker Building and others. He worked at 
his trade until 1876, when he entered the Norris- 
town police department as patrolman, serving as 
such for eighteen months, when, on April i, 1878, 
he was appointed chief-of-police and has filled 
the position from that time to the present without 
a break. His first case of importance was in con- 
connection with the detectives Henry Weil 
and George Jackson, who arrested Tom Taylor, 
leader of the famous Masked Burglars' gang. 
Taylor had been a fugitive from justice for some 
time. He was in hiding at Port Indian and liv- 
ing with a Mrs. Klinetop as her husband. She 
was the mother of the famous Klinetop Sisters, 
variety actresses. Mrs. Klinetop was known to 
be the owner of a handsome little dog, and as she 
came to Norristown for her mail, her dog at- 
tracted the chief's attention, he having been noti- 
fied that the owner of the dog was involved with 
Tom Taylor. The chief took the steamer with her 
one day and located her at Port Indian, then in 
company with the detectives named, all in disguise 
of other men, they watched in that vicinity ten 
days and were rewarded on Sunday evening by 
accomplishing his capture. He was convicted and 
sentenced to fifteen vears. 



Chief Rodenbaugh's next important case was 
the arrest and conviction, at different times, of 
the Geiyer gang, who had for some time been 
operating in and around Norristown. At one 
time the gang robbed a Norristown summer home 
of enough furniture to furnish two houses. They 
were arrested in the courthouse in the act of tak- 
ing out a marriage license. B. F. Geiyer has at 
various times been sentenced to terms of impris- 
onment e([ualing in the aggregate twenty-three 
years, all during Chief Rodenbaugh's term of 
service, he being his captor on all these occasions. 
Irwin, who assisted in robbing the country seat, 
served three years in the penitentiary and is now 
leading an honest life. 

Another of Chief Rodenbaugh's experiences 
was the arrest and conviction of the Boemke gang 
of German burglars, who robbed Landis & 
Souder's store, at Souderton, of two thousand five 
hundred dollars worth of silk and other valuable 
goods. A week later they held up the Heckler 
family at the point of a pistol and robbed them. 
The Chief located them at a tramp boarding- 
house, kept by a giant German, and arrested 
them all. Ten burglars were given seven years 
each in the penitentiary and the lodging-house 
keeper received one year for harboring thieves 
and receiving stolen goods. The stock of goods 
was mostly recovered in Philadelphia and Bal- 
timore and in different places where they had 
been sent. Many of the valuable silks had been 
sold and were partly made up into dresses when 
recovered. 

Chief Rodenbaugh has been in every state in 
the Union on official business connected with the 
pursuit of criminals, bringing persons accused of 
crime to Norristown, or obtaining extradition 
papers for their surrender. He has been in the 
far west among the mines and arrested criminals 
there, and has traveled thousands of miles hand- 
cuffed to a prisoner, the days and nights being 
passed in this way. In the Kaiser murder case 
a few years ago, Chief Rodenbaugh took an active 
part, the mystery being completely unraveled, and 
Clemmer, who fired the shot which killed Mrs. 
Kaiser on a lonely road in Upper Merion town- 
ship, two miles from Norristown, being hanged, 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



while the wretched husband, who assisted in the 
murder, committed suicide in jail to escape the 
gallows. 

On several occasions Chief Rodenbaugh has 
exchanged shots with burglars and other crim- 
inals, but was never seriously hurt except once, 
when he was stabbed in the face by a person 
whom he was trying to arrest. In nearly thirty 
years of service. Chief Rodenbaugh has been ab- 
sent from the station house only eight days on ac- 
count of sickness. Under Democratic and Re- 
publican administrations he has continued in 
office. He has, however, always been a staunch 
Republican and has never missed election, in- 
variably voting the Republican ticket. He has 
cast but one vote outside of Norristown. 

In February, 1864, he became a member of 
the Humane Fire Company, and still belongs to 
it. He is also an Odd Fellow, being a member of 
Curtis Lodge ; a Red Man, being a member of 
Beaver Tribe, and a Mason, belonging to Charity 
Lodge, No. 190, of that order. He is a member 
of Norristown Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; 
and of Hutchinson Commandery, Knights 
Templar. 

On June 6, 1876, Chief Rodenbaugh married 
Theresa J. Shanks, daughter of William M. and 
May (Crawford) Shanks. She was born in Co- 
lumbus, Georgia, where her parents were engaged 
in manufacturing, and where they resided during 
the Rebellion. Mrs. Rodenbaugh was born Feb- 
ruary 26, 1854. Her father was conscripted into 
the Southern army, but was not allowed to serve 
as his services as a manufacturer in making cloth 
for the Confederacy were too valuable. As soon 
as the war ended the family came north and lo- 
cated in Norristown, where they engaged in man- 
ufacturing. The oldest son, ex-Councilman John 
C. Shanks, is now with Dobsons at Falls of 
Schuylkill. The youngest brother fills a like 
position in a Rahway, New Jersey, manufacturing 
establishment. 

Mr. and Mrs. - Rodenbaugh have had three 
children: Sylvester, born June 21, 1878, died Oc- 
tober 3, same year ; Henry Nathan, born Novem- 
ber 20, 1879, graduated from the Norristown high 
school, and graduated also in the class of 1901 



from the University of Pennsylvania, as a Me- 
chanical Engineer, being now located at Roanoke, 
Virginia, with the Norfolk & Western Railway 
Company in that capacity ; Mary Crawford, born 
March i, 1883, graduated from the Norristown 
high school in the class of 1902, and graduated 
from Drexel Institute, Philadelphia, in the class 
of 1903, and is now employed by the Norristown 
Trust Company. 

ALBERT HELFFENSTEIN, one of the 
best-known residents of Norristown, who held the 
office of register of wills for three years, is the 
son of Jonathan and Emeline (Bush) Helffen- 
stein. He was born near North Wales, Febru- 
ary 10, 1840. 

The Helffenstein family is very prominent in 
the history of the German Reformed church, of 
Pennsylvania, as its members for many genera- 
tions have been ministers in this church. 

Rev. John Conrad Helffenstein (great-grand- 
father) was born February 16, 1748, in the Pal- 
atinate, Germany, and emigrated to America in 
1772. During the remainder of his life he was 
pastor of the German Reformed church at Ger- 
mantown, Pennsylvania, except for a short time 
spent as a minister at Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 
He died May 17, 1790. Three of his sons, Sam- 
uel, Charles and Jonathan, were ministers of the 
Reformed church. 

Rev. Samuel Helffenstein (grandfather) was 
the son of Rev. John C. and Mrs. (Kircher) 
Helffenstein, his mother having been a resident 
of Philadelphia. His health was very poor, espe- 
cially during the early part of his life, and he was 
not sent to school. He was educated in the synod 
and was ordained a minister in 1797. He first 
served as pastor of Boehm's and Wentz's congre- 
gations in Montgomery county, and afterwards 
preached at the Race Street church in Philadel- 
phia for thirty-four years, until 1832. He then- 
removed to a country home in Gwynedd town- 
ship, near North Wales, where he died October 
17. 1866, aged ninety-one years. He was one of 
the most eminent ministers of the Reformed 
church that has ever lived in America. He was 
the author of "The Doctrines of Divine Revela- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



19 



tion as Taught in the Holy Scripture," which he 
wrote at the age of seventy-one years. 

Rev. Samuel Helffenstein married Christina 
Steitle when he was a young man, and they had 
twelve children. Of these Samuel, Albert and 
Jacob became ministers. Another son was Dr. 
B. W. Helffenstein. long a resident of Norristown. 
and a practicing physician. He was also an ac- 
complished musician. 

Jonathan Helffenstein (father) was born in 
Philadelphia in 1814, ^vas a farmer by occupation 
and died in March, 1847. His mother survived 
him until i860, being eighty-one years of age at 
the time of her death. He married Ameline Bush, 
daughter of Henry Bush, and she is enjoying good 
health at the age of ninety-two years. They had 
five children, as follows : Samuel B., Albert, 
Annie, Emanuel and Emily. Samuel B., born 
November 24, 1838, married, in 1873, Hannah R., 
daughter of Peter Streeper, of Whitemarsh. 
Samuel B. Helffenstein was the editor of the Nor- 
ristown Defender until his death. Annie, married 
Thomas B. Evans, of Norristown. They have 
two daughters, Addie and Winnie. 

Albert Helffenstein lived at North Wales until 
he was fourteen years of age, when he removed to 
Norristown, and was employed as a clerk until 
his eighteenth year. He learned the trade of 
printing in the office of the Norristown Defender, 
then under the control of Colonel William P. Sey- 
mour, and in 1864, he and his brother, Samuel B. 
Helffenstein, purchased the paper from its 
owner, General Schall, and managed it success- 
fully for a number of years. In 1872, after sell- 
ing out his interest in the paper to his brother, he 
became foreman on the Norristown Times, where 
he remained until 1890. Until 1894 he served as 
register of wills of Montgomery county, and has 
since been engaged in the printing business. 
After the death of Samuel B. Helffenstein, 
Thomas B. Evans managed the Norristown 
Defender for the widow of Samuel and it after- 
wards came under the management of I. R. Cas- 
sel. At the sheriff's sale after 'Sir. Cassel's own- 
ership, Mr. Albert Helff'enstein purchased the 
paper, with its stock and good will. 

In 1861 Albert Helffenstein married .Matilda 



Earl, daughter of Lawson Earl, of Norristown. 
They have three children : Emily, who married 
Charles Howe, of Norristown ; Mary, who mar- 
ried Thomas T. Stiles, of Norristown ; and Katie, 
wife of Thomas M. Williams, of Philadelphia. 

]\Ir. Helffenstein has always been an active 
member of the Democratic party, working earn- 
estly for the success of its principles and candi- 
dates. He is a member of the Humane Fire Com- 
pany. He served for two months as an emer- 
gency soldier in Company H, Thirty-fourth Penn- 
sylvania Militia, being stationed successively at 
Harrisburg, Reading and Philadelphia. As an 
othcial Mr. Helff'enstein was courteous and oblig- 
ing to all with whom he came in contact, perform- 
ing faithfully all the duties entrusted to him. As 
a citizen he fulfills every requirement, taking an 
active interest in elections and endeavoring to se- 
cure what he blieves to be best calculated to pro- 
mote the progress and prosperity of the com- 
munity. Few men are more worthy of respect or 
are so highly esteemed by their fellow-citizens 
generally. 

DAVID ROBINSON KENNEDY was born 
in Chester county, Pennsylvania, March 24, 1802, 
and died at Port Kennedy, Upper Merion town- 
ship, Montgomery county, February 11, 1882. 
He was the son of Alexander and Margaret (Rob- 
inson) Kennedy. 

The Kennedy family originated in Scotland, 
near Ayr, in Dunure, or at any rate settled there 
after one of the early struggles. They were High- 
landers. The first in history was Archibald Ken- 
nedy, the leader of a noble clan, who was made 
baron, also Marquis of Ailsa, and Earl of Cas- 
sillio in 1150, and was called Lord Kennedy. The 
family have been in possession of the estate in a 
continued line from the time of this Archibald 
Kennedy, who lived in 1150, until the present day. 

The home in Ireland is a very beautiful estate, 
and in the time of William Kennedy included 
eight hundred acres of land. The Kennedy fam- 
ily are highly connected and well spoken of in Ire- 
land. Two of their number have been kings in 
that country, namely Brian and Mahon. They 
were praised by all and considered as honest and 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



good monarchs who reigned for the good of the 
country. 

The Kennedy coat of arms has the Arms Ar- 
gent, Chevrons Gules, between three cross craslets 
fitchie and sable, the whole within a double tres- 
sure flory, a counter flory of the second crest, etc. 
The Kennedy Clan has a good plaid, the motto 
being, "Fight to the finish." 

William Kennedy (grandfather) lived at 
Bally, Clouch county, Derby, Ireland. His wife 
was Tamahil Kennedy, and their children were : 
Margaret, who married James flairs ; Mary, who 
married Mr. Johnson and removed to England ; 
William, who came to America with his brother 
Alexander; Robert, who remained on the home- 
stead in Ireland, where the widow of one of his 
sons, now a very old woman, lives with her three 
sons ; and Alexander. 

As has been said, Alexander and \Mlliam 
Kennedy emigrated to America. Alexander set- 
tled at Port Kennedy, after a short time spent in 
Chester county, and William made his home in 
Exton, Chester county, Pennsylvania. At the 
time of his arrival at Port Kennedy. Alexander 
Kennedy was poor, and he entered into the employ 
of a wealthy man of the neighborhood. Through 
his industry and thrift he accumulated in the 
course of time a handsome fortune. At the death 
of its owner, Mordecai Moore, Mr. Kennedy pur- 
chased, in 1803, the farm now known as the Zook 
homestead. He moved to this fann in 1805 and 
continued to reside there until 1824, when he died, 
at the age of sixty-three years. Alexander Ken- 
nedy was a member of the Great Valley Presby- 
terian church, and both he and his wife are buried 
in the cemetery of this church. Like his sons he 
was a Democrat and was a man of wealth and in- 
fluence, owning a great deal of property in Ches- 
ter and Montgomery counties. He was the 
founder of Port Kennedy, as it is now called, or 
Kennedy's Hollow, its original name. 

Alexander Kennedy married JMargaret Robin- 
son. All his children, except the two eldest, who 
were natives of Chester county, were born at Port 
Kennedy, on the Zook farm. Their children 
were : William, deceased, who for a time was a 
merchant at Kennedy's Hollow, but later removed 



to Kent county, Maryland: David Robinson; 
Margaret ; Jane ; EHzabeth ; Alexander, who re- 
moved to East Pikeland, Chester county; John, 
born October 18, 1815, who married, in 1841, 
Margaret S. Connell, of Lancaster county, and 
had eight children. He died September 4, 1877. 

David Robinson Kennedy grew to manhood at 
Port Kennedy, attending the public schools. He 
owned and operated a limestone farm, and he and 
his brother John were the principal property 
holders in Port Kennedy. • He was a member of 
the Presbyterian church, the ground for which 
was donated by William Kennedy. The Ken- 
nedy brothers also were the principal contributors 
in erecting the church edifice. David Robinson 
Kennedy and his brothers built up a great part 
of Port Kennedy and furnished employment for a 
great number of people in their lime-manufac- 
turing establishment. 

During the early part of his life Mr. Kennedy 
was a Democrat in politics but he became a Re- 
publican about 1857. He was not a politician but 
always supported his party financially and other- 
wise. 

David Robinson Kennedy married Miss \'io- 
letta M., daughter of Colonel Abel and Mary 
(Moore) Reese. Colonel Reese was a member 
of an old Chester county family, and Reeseville, 
near Berwyn, was named for him. The family is 
of Welsh descent. The father of Colonel Abel 
Reese, was also named Abel Reese and was an ex- 
tensive landholder in the neighborhood of Ber- 
wyn, being a very wealthy man. Colonel Abel 
Reese commanded the Forty-fourth Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Alilitia, in the war of 1812. He 
and his wife were Presbyterians, and are buried 
in the same churchyard, in Great Valley, as Mr. 
Kennedy. The children of Colonel Abel and 
Mary (Moore) Reese were: Violetta M., born 
June 22, 1817, and Mary Ann, who married 
Squire James Sloan, of Philadelphia, afterwards 
of Port Kennedy. 

The children of Mr. and Mrs, David Robinson 
Kennedy were as follows : Anna Mary died in 
childhood. John R. grew up in Port Kennedy and 
was educated in the public schools there and in 
Pliiladel])hia. He now resides in Seattle, Wash- 




JACOB LATCH, SR. 



MONTGOMERY COUXTY, 



ington. where he is engaged in business. Mar- 
garet K. married William Morrison, an attomey- 
at-law in York, Pennsylvania. Their children 
are Violetta J., Mary Kennedy, John K., and W. 
Earl. Elizabeth died in childhood. Violetta R. re- 
sides at home. Mary married George Gunkle, of 
Chester county, who is now deceased. They had 
one child, Robinson K. 

Mrs. ^'ioletta ]M. Kennedy, widow of David 
Robinson Kennedy, died October 23, 1903, at her 
residence at Port Kennedy in her eighty-seventh 
year. She had been an invalid for some time. 
She suffered a stroke of paralysis from which she 
failed to rally, being only partly conscious from 
that time until her death. 

A sister of Mrs. Kennedy married Squire 
James Sloan. 

Mrs. Kennedy was possessed of rare business 
ability, being endowed also with many of the vir- 
tues which adorn woman. At her husband's 
death she continued the business of burning lime 
and furnishing fluxing stone for several years, 
giving employment to many persons, and only re- 
tiring when advanced age required her to relin- 
quish it. She was charitable to the poor, and the 
later years of her life, when she was more at 
leisure, were spent largely in work of this kind. 
She was a valued member of the community in 
which she lived. 

EDWARD BIDDLE LATCH, the son of 
Gardiner and Henrietta (Wakeling) Latch, the 
grandson of Jacob and Jane (Jeanette Rose) 
Latch, the great-grandson of Rudolph and Mary 
( Bealert-Baler) Latch (Lutz-Lasch), the great- 
great-grandson of Jacob and Dorothy Bealert 
(Baler), was born November 15, 1833, at INIer- 
inn, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. 

Jacob Bealert (Baler) (great-great-grandfa- 
ther) at and prior to 1755 was owner of a tract 
i of land lying to the northward of City Line, and 

between the Old Lancaster Road and what is 
now called Lancaster Avenue or Turnpike. Ru- 
dolph Latch (Lutz-Lasch) (great-grandfather), 
i of German extraction, was married March 5, 
i 1755. to Mary, the daughter of Jacob and Doro- 

; thea Bealert (now written Bealer) ; she died 



September i, 1813. The children by this mar- 
riage were: Nancy, Mary, Jacob, John, David, 
Elizabeth, Susanna, Joseph, Samuel, Hannah, 
and George. The latter named was born March 
16, 1776, and thus through this branch an Ameri- 
can ancestry of about one hundred and fifty years 
is attained. Mrs. Latch inherited about one 
hundred acres of her father's estate. 

Jacob Latch (grandfather) was born October 
31, 1758, and died June 29, 1845. He was a son 
of Rudolph and Mary (Bealer) Latch. He mar- 
ried Jane (Jeanette), the daughter of Peter and 

(Gardiner-Gardner) Rose, December 24, 

1782. The children by this marriage were: 
Sarah. ?\Iary, Jane, Gardiner (Gardner), Francis 
H., Jacob. Peter R.. and Hannah H. 
The latter was born January 30. 1803, 
and was married to Jacob Stadelman, Sr. 
The average age of the parents and chil- 
dren thus specified was eighty-four years, 
their ages, not counting the odd months and days, 
being, respectively. 87, 93, 92. 90. 90, 43. 90, 90, 
78, and 83. At some time during the American 
revolution, Jacob Latch enlisted in the Con- 
tinental army, serving for a time under Captain 
Young and Colonel Parschall (Paschall?). He 
volunteered to cut the rope at the west end of 
the Middle Ferry over the Schuylkill, at what is 
now called ^Market street, accomplishing the feat 
under fire from the British soldiers who were 
then occupying Philadelphia. At this time, also, 
the party of which Jacob Latch was a member 
were listening for and soon heard the roar of 
the guns that told of the battle of Germantown. 
Later Jacob Latch was called "Washington's 
Runner," but what special duty was involved has 
not been fully determined, Jane, his wife, also 
licing very reticent concerning Revolutionary his- 
tory, some of which she would not tell even as 
late as 1852. Subsequent to the war of the Revo- 
lution, Mr. Latch was elected and commissioned 
captain in the Fifth Company of the Thirty- 
sixth Regiment of the Pennsylvania Militia, un- 
der date of 1807, but his old friends used to ad- 
dress him as Major Latch. 

Jane Latch, as already stated, was the daugh- 
ter of Peter Rose. In the Revolutionary days, 



MONTGO^IERY COUNTY. 



and prior thereto, Peter Rose owned a tract of 
land extending irom low water mark on the 
Schuylkill for a distance of about a mile up 
Market street, the private burial ground of the 
Rose family, although unused, still remaining at 
Fortieth and Ludlow streets. Peter Rose mar- 
ried ]\Iiss Gardiner (Gardner), the daughter of 
a neighbor whose farm adjoined his own. The 
ancestors of Jane Latch came over in the ship 
with William Penn at his second coming in 1699, 
whereby, through this branch, a claim for an 
American ancestry goes back for two hundred 
and five years. 

Gardmer Latch (father) was born January 
22, 1792. During the war of 1812, although not 
a participant therein, he was under orders to 
hold himself at a minute's notice for active 
service. Later he was duly elected, commis- 
sioned, and served as colonel of the Pennsylvania 
militia. Immediately prior to his marriage his 
parents, in order to keep their eldest boy near 
them, deeded to him six acres of ground from 
the old farm whereon to build himself a house. 
This plan was so successfully carried out that 
he brought his bride directly to the present 
homestead, and here all his children were bom. 
He married Henrietta, the daughter of Samuel 
and Elizabeth (de Monseau) Wakeling, on April 
4, 1822. The children by this marriage were: 
I. Elizabeth D., born January 24, 1823, died April 
21, 1896; she became the wife of Thomas J. 
Knapp, and their children were: Edmund W., 
Henrietta W., and De Monseau, who died at the 
age of five years. 2. Jeannette Rose, born June 
21, 1824, remained single, and died March 10, 
1902, at the age of seventy-seven years. 3. Sam- 
uel W., born October 29, 1825, died September 
24, 1832. 4. Isabella A., born December 3, 1826, 
died in July, 1871 : she was the wife of William 
Ashworth, and their children were: James, Isa- 
bella Caroline, and William D. 5. Jacob, born 
March 5, 1828, married Emeline Cooper, and 
their children were: William, who died at the 
age of seven years ; Edward, who died at the age 
of fourteen years, and Gardiner C. 6. Mary Ann, 
born August 4. 1829, died July 17, 1891. 7. 
Gardiner Latch, Jr., died in infancy. 8. Joseph 



(afterward known as Gardiner J.), born ^lay 9, 
1832, was married to Ellen Fitzgerald, no issue,, 
and died October 14, 1899. 9. Edward Biddle, 
mentioned hereinafter. 10. Caroline Biddle, born 
January 8, 1835, became the wife of Anthony K. 
Royce, and their children were: Lucy A., who 
died at the age of eigtheen years; and Edward 
L. Royce. Jacob Latch, second son of Gardiner 
and Henriette Latch, made a splendid soldierly 
record during the Civil war. He enlisted in 1862 
in Company I, One Hundred and Twenty-first 
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, Colonel 
Chapman Biddle commanding, and served until 
the close of the war, participating in the most 
important campaigns and sanguinary engage- 
ments of the great struggle. His service was in 
\^rginia under Generals McClellan, Burnside^ 
Hooker, Meade. Warren, Grant, Sheridan, Rey- 
nolds, and others of the great captains who com- 
manded the Army of the Potomac, or such of 
its corps as his regiment was identified with. He 
fought in the battle of Fredericksburg, December 
13, 1862, and in the following year took part iri 
the notable "mud march" under Burnside, Janu- 
arv 20-25, and in the battle of Chancellorsville, 
]May 3-5, 1863. He was also engaged with his 
regiment in the famous battle of Gettysburg- 
July 1-3. Serving • with the rank of first ser- 
geant, the dreadful mortality among the com- 
missioned officers of his company left him as the 
ranking ofificer after the last named battle, and 
he held the command with honor to himself and 
to the admiring satisfaction of the regimental 
commander. Sergeant Leach was a participant 
in all of the famous battles and minor engage- 
ments which took place under General Grant — 
the Wilderness, May 5-7, Spottsylvania, May 8 
and 20, the North Anna, May 23-27, the To- 
potomy. May 20-31, Bethesda Church, June 1-5, 
Cold Harbor, June 5-12, Petersburg, June 17 to 
-August 15, the Weldon railroad, August 16, Pop- 
lar Grove Church and Preble Farm, October I, 
and the Applejack raid, December 6-12, all in 
1864. He was also present in all the operations 
of the closing days in 1865, and took part in the 
engagements at Dabney's Mill and Hatcher's 
Run. Februarv 6-12, the Bovdton Plankroad and 



( 



^lONTGOAIERY COUNTY. 



123 



Gravley Run, March 31, Five Forks, April i, 
I and the capture of General Lee's army at Ap- 
j pomattox Court House, April 9, 1865. He was 
with his regiment when it marched down Penn- 
sylvana Avenue in Washington City, in tri- 
umphal procession shortly after the cessation of 
hostilities, and was honorably mustered out with 
the colors. 

Samuel Wakeling, the father of Henrietta 
' (W'akeling) Latch, was born in England, No- 
vember 9, 1768. He learned the bookbinding 
I business with Edmund de Monseau, in Pater 
j Noster Row, London, England, and with such 
j further success that he carried off in marriage 
I his employer's daughter, the above mentioned 
Elizabeth de Monseau. The fruits of this mar- 
riage were nine children, namely : Samuel, who 
I died quite young and was buried in St. Paul's 
i England ; Mary Ann ; William, who died in in- 
' fancy and was buried in Christ Church burying 
ground in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Isabella, 
i Elizabeth, William Henry, buried at Old Oxford, 
Philadelphia; Henrietta, Samuel, and Edmund 
D. Wakeling. On July 14, 1793, Samuel Wake- 
ling left England and arrived in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, August 26, 1793, with a view of 
settling in the United States. He returned to 
England for his family, set sail from thence on 
July 14, 1794, and arrived in Philadelphia on 
October i, 1794. He located in Frankford, Phil- 
adelphia, and established a prosperous business. 
Consequently, through this branch, an American 
ancestry of one hundred and ten years is attained. 
Edmund de ]\Ionseau, the father of Elizabeth 
(de }iIonseau) Wakeling, married Elizabeth 
Loaste, they being refugees from France owing 
to some religious or political disturbance. As 
already intimated, the de Monseaus established 
themselves in the bookbinding business in Pater 
Noster Row, and the Loaste family took up the 
manufacture of silk goods, a sample of which is 
available at the present time. 

Edward Biddle Latch acquired his education 
in the public schools. He learneS mechanical 
engineering at the Norris' Locomotive Works, 
remaining for six years, 1851-1857. He was ap- 
pointed a third assistant engineer in the United 



States navy, September 20, 1858, attached to the 
L'nited States steamship "Atlanta," Paraguay 
Expedition, 1858-59; United States steamship 
"Sumpter," on the west coast of Africa in the 
suppression of the slave trade, 1860-61 ; promoted 
to second assistant engineer, 1861 ; attached to 
the United States steamship "Hartford" (Ad- 
miral Farragut's flagship) West Gulf Squadron, 
1862-64. While on the "Hartford" as second 
assistant, upon the detachment of Chief Engineer 
Kimball (who was ordered on special duty at the 
Neptune Iron Works, New York City) he was 
placed in charge of her machinery by the com- 
manding officer (Captain, late Rear- Admiral, 
Palmer), before Port Hudson fell, retaining 
charge of the same until the "Hartford" steamed 
into New York harbor on August 10, 1863, bear- 
ing the pennant of, at the time, Rear-Admiral Far- 
ragut. During his attachment to the "Hartford" 
'Sir. Latch participated in the following engage- 
ments : Forts Jackson, St. Philip, and the Con- 
federate fleet in the Mississippi river, April 24, 
1862: theChalmette Battery, New Orleans, April 
25, 1862 ; first passage of the Vicksburg batteries, 
June 28, 1862 ; second passage of the Vicksburg 
batteries, July 15, 1862; passage of the Port 
Hudson terrible batteries, March 15, 1863 ; Grand 
Gulf, March 19, 1863; Warrenton, March 28, 
1863; Grand Gulf, March 31, 1863; Forts Mor- 
gan, Gaines, and Powell, also the Confederate 
fleet, including the ram "Tennessee," "Selma," 
"Gaines,'' torpedoes, etc.. Mobile Bay, August 5, 
1864. He was promoted to first assistant en- 
gineer, 1863, attached to the United States steam- 
ship "Wachusett," East India Sqiiadron, 1865- 
68 ; Naval Academy as instructor in the engineer- 
ing department, 1869-70. He was promoted to 
chief engineer. 1870; United States steamship 
"Congress," special service, 1870-72; member of 
board inspection, 1873-75 ; receiving ship "Colo- 
rado," 1876; sick leave, 1876-77: retired, Novem- 
ber 22, 1878. 

Since his retirement Mr. Latch originated and 
developed the Mosaic system of Chronology. 
He wrote numerous elucidations of the scrip- 
tures, and of ancient relics in their relationship 
to universal historv bv the Mosaic System of 



124 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Chronology. He developed the Mosaic laws for 
determining the distances of the planets from 
the sun. He is the editor of The Greater Light, 
a Philadelphia monthly, and the author of "A 
Review of the Holy Bible," 1884; Indications of 
the Book of Job," 1889; "Indications of the Book 
of Genesis," 1890; "Indications of the Book of 
Exodus," 1892; "Indications of Romans" (in 
The Greater Light, 1900-1) ; "Indications of the 
Revelations" (in The Greater Light, 1901-3) ; 
"Indications of Leviticus" (now running in The 
Greater Light, 1904). His present address is 
Merion, (Academy Post Ofifice), Montgomery 
county, Pennsylvania. His early political affili- 
ations were with the Whig party, but later he 
took an active interest in the affairs of the Re- 
publican party. He is a member of the Baptist 
church, and his fraternal relations are with the 
Order of Free and Accepted Masons. 

JOHN F. ANDERSON was bom August 
23, 1836, in Ardmore, Montgomery county, and 
grew to manhood in that vicinity. He is the son 
of James and Mary (Wilson) Anderson. He 
acquired his education at the public schools of 
the neighborhood. When the Rebellion broke out, 
he enlisted in Company B, First Pennsylvania 
Reserve Cavalry, under the command of Captain 
Owen Jones, of Lower Merion. The date of ^Vr. 
Anderson's enlistment was August 8, 1861. He 
served two months, being mustered out of the 
L'nited States service October 9. with a surgeon's 
certificate. At the time of the Gettysburg cam- 
paign, Mr. Anderson again went to the front, re- 
enlisting in Colonel Moser's Regiment, and serv- 
ing three months. 

On his return from the scene of war, and until 
two years before his marriage, ]\Ir. Anderson 
was associated with his brother in mining iron 
ore in Upper Merion township. He bought his 
farm in Copper Merion in the year 1869. 

On June 15, 1876, John F. Anderson married 
Miss Catharine C, daughter of Josiah B. and 
Catharine (Christman) Jilissimer. Mrs. Ander- 
son is a native of the upper section of the county, 
having been born near Pottstown on February 
18. 1849. 



]\Irs. Anderson's father, Josiah B. iNIissimer, 
was born April 4, 1808, and lived in the vicinity 
of Pottstown nearly all his life. He was the 
owner of a farm in Pottsgrove township, on 
which he lived thirty-three years. He died there 
in September, 1870. His wife survived him eigh- 
teen years, dying in July, 1888. Husband and 
wife were buried in Limerick churchyard. Both 
were members of the Lutheran church. Mr. 
Missimer was a Republican in politics, but never 
sought or held public office. ^Ir. and Mrs. Missi- 
mer had eight children : ( i ) Elizabeth married 
John G. Powell. (2) Rebecca married R. Brooke 
Evans. (3) John (deceased) married ]\Iiss 
Maltby. He served three years in Company H. 
Si.xty-eighth Pennsylvania \^olunteer Infantry. 
Colonel A. H. Tippin's command. He was pro- 
moted to quartermaster's sergeant, August i, 
1863, having enlisted nearly a year previous as a 
corporal. He was discharged June 9, 1865. (4) 
Warren (deceased) married Amanda Shaner. He 
enlisted in Company A, Fifty-third Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, commanded by Colonel John R. 
Brooke, now General Brooke. He enlisted Sep- 
tember 18, 1861, and was discharged November 
7, 1864, his term of enlistment having expired 
some time previously. He was wounded at the 
second battle of Fredericksburg. (5) Catharine 
C. is the next of the family. (6) Henry Clay, 
married Miss Mahaflfy, and resides in Erie, Penn- 
sylvania. He is a graduate of Yale College, and 
is superintendent of the city schools of Erie. Penn- 
sylvania. (7) Montgomery married Elizabeth 
Yost. (8) Mary died in childhood. 

After Mr. Anderson's marriage he engaged in 
the occupation of farming at his present location 
in Upper Merion. . He is a Democrat in politics. 
In religious faith he is an Episcopalian, being a 
member of All Saint's church, Norristown. as is 
his wife and family. 

John F. and Catharine Anderson have three 
children. Joseph Wilson, born November 2, 1877, 
was graduated at the Norristown high school, 
and then entered the medical department of the 
L^niversity of Pennsylvania, from which he was 
graduated in the class of 1899. He is practicing 
medicine at Fifteenth and Ontario streets, Phil- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



125 



adelphia. He enjoys a large and successful prac- 
tice. Dr. Anderson married Elizabeth Jarrett, 
who is a graduate of the Woman's Medical Col- 
lege, of Philadelphia, and they have one child, 
Elizabeth, born July 15, 1902. 

John Aubrey, born September 14, 1882, was 
graduated from the Norristown high school in 
the class of 1900, and then became a student in 
the University of Pennsylvania, and is taking the 
law course. 

Mary C, born January 29, 1886, attended the 
Norristown high school, graduating with the class 
of June, 1903, and is now attending \\'ilson Col- 
lege, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. 

Isaac Anderson (grandfather) was born at the 
Anderson homestead in Schuylkill township, 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, November 23, 
1760. He married Mary Lane, and their chil- 
dren are James, Sarah, Edward, Samuel, Eliza- 
bear, Wesley, Simon M., Isaac, Mary, Joseph E., 
and Mary. In politics Isaac Anderson was a Jef- 
fersonian Democrat. He was long a justice of 
the peace by appointment of the governor. He 
was elected to a seat in the assembly of Pennsyl- 
vania to fill a vacancy occurring in 1802. His 
term expiring, he was elected a member of the 
house of representatives at Washington and sup- 
ported President Jefferson in all his measures. 
He was opposed to the system of slavery and 
voted to free all slaves born in the District of 
Columbia after a certain date. He also supported 
the proposition to impose a penalty of ten dollars 
a head on all slaves imported into the country and 
to prohibit all importations of this kind after a 
specified time. He was a presidential elector in 
the Monroe campaign in 1816. He was prom- 
inently suggested as a candidate for governor, 
and stood high in popular esteem. He and his 
wife were both members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, and services were frequently held 
at his house, he occasionally preaching and ex- 
horting. He was a man of fine presence, being 
six feet, four inches in height and well propor- 
tioned. He was first lieutenant of the Sixth Com- 
pany. Fifth Battalion, Chester county militia. 
His commission was dated May 24, 1779. He 
died October 27, 1838. His widow, who was 



born May 22, 1762, died August 27, 1847. Both 
were buried in the Anderson family burying- 
ground near Valley Forge. She was a Methodist 
for sixty years. 

James Anderson (father) was born on the 
Anderson homestead where he was reared. He 
studied medicine and located in Ardmore, where 
he acquired a large and lucrative practice and 
became a very wealthy man. He was an active 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

James Anderson married (first wife) Sarah 
Thomas. Their children were : Mary, Dr. Isaac, 
Naomi, Sarah, Dr. James R., Kueiah, Patrick, 
and Drusilla. 

James Anderson married (second wife) Mary 
Wilson. Their children were : Dr. Joseph, John,, 
Cerona, Matthias, Jackson and Ultimus Adjutor. 
Dr. Joseph resides at the homestead, Ardmond. 
Matthias died in infancy. Andrew Jackson, de- 
ceased, was an attorney of Norristown. Ultimus 
Adjutor is deceased. Cerona is unmarried. 

JOSEPH Y. NASH was born near Fort 
Washington, in Upper Dublin township, Mont- 
gomery county, March 4, 1864. He lived at his 
birthplace until he was ten years old, when his 
father sold the farm and purchased another farm 
on Church road in Springfield township. He 
owned this place for twenty-two years and then 
sold it at a large profit. In 1894 Mr. Nash, the 
father, bought the farm in Norriton township 
where his son now lives. 

Joseph Nash (father) was born near Fort 
Washington, Upper Dublin township, Montgom- 
ery county, September 21, 1833, was reared on 
the farm where his birth occurred, and which he 
inherited eventually. After buying his farm in 
Springfield township and selling it to the railroad, 
he purchased a house and lot at Flourtown, where 
he passed the remainder of his life, dying May 
29, 1894. He is buried in the Lutheran and Re- 
formed cemetery, of Whitemarsh. He was a 
Democrat, but took no active part in politics. He 
was a member of the Episcopalian church. His 
wife spenrls most of her time with her son in 
Flourtown. They were married April 4, 1861. 
and they had five children: Elsie IsL. born April 



126 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



4, 1862, married Stoughton R. Clark, and lives in 
Philadelphia-. They had three children: Walter, 
Emily and Susan, the last two being deceased. 
Joseph Y. Nash is the second. Harry L., born Oc- 
tober 30, 1866, married Miss Barbara Blair, and 
they have two children, Ruth and Dorothy. Anna, 
bom December 27, 1870, married Harry H. Tip- 
pin. Daniel I., born March i, 1875, married 
Sarah Matz, and has one child, John Earle. 

Daniel Nash (grandfather) was born near 
Edge Hill, in Upper Dublin township, and grew 
up there. He was a farmer, being the owner of 
several farms, each containing two hundred acres 
or more. He was a man of wealth and influence 
in his day. In religious faith he was an Epis- 
copalian and is buried in the cemetery of St. 
Thomas' Episcopal church of Whitemarsh, as is 
his wife. He married Maria Shaffer, also of 
Fort Washington, and their children were: 
Mary, who married Robert Yamel ; Joseph, father 
of Joseph Y. Nash ; Daniel and Sarah, who died 
young; Rebecca, who married William Shafer 
and lives at Fort Washington ; and Amanda, who 
married Hugh Richmond and they live near Fort 
Washington. 

Joseph Y. Nash was educated in the public 
schools, and remained with his father until 1889, 
when he rented the Yeakle farm and managed it 
for five years, thus making his start in life. In 
1895 he bought his present home from his father 
and has been engaged in general farming ever 
since. He has eighty acres of land with fine 
buildings. In politics Mr. Nash is a Democrat, 
and although he is on the wrong side to seek 
office in his county, which has a Republican ma- 
jority, he takes an active interest in politics. He 
has served on the election board several times and 
has been chairman of the Democratic committee 
of the east district of Norriton township several 
years. He is a member of the Reformed church 
at Blue Bell, and his wife is a member of the 
same church. 

On May 4, 1888, Joseph Y. Nash married 
Mary E. Johnson, who was born April 19, 1865, 
in Whitpain township, a daughter of Henry and 
Margaret (Hoffman) Johnson. He was a lime 
burner for many years. Henry and Margaret 



(Hoffman) Johnson had a large family. Samuel 
married Elizabeth Smith and has thirteen chil- 
dren. Annie married Daniel Hallman and has two 
children, Emaline and Mary. Rachel married 
George Hamilton and has the following children : 
Mary, George and Walter. Harry married Katie 
Brewer and has three children : Harry, Robert and 
Edna. Mary Emma married Joseph Nash. Mar- 
garet married William Hussler. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Y. Nash have the follow- 
ing children: Evelin M., who was bom Decem- 
ber 30, 1888, and died November 27, 1894 ; Emily 
M., born February 27, 1891 ; and Mable E., born 
September 13, 1892. 

Joseph' Y. Nash's mother was Emily (Yeakle) 
Nash, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Hus- 
ton) Yeakle. 

Joseph Yeakle (maternal grandfather) was 
the son of Jacob Yeakle, and was born April 11, 
181 1. He married (first wife) Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of John Huston, who was born April 11, 1813. 
She died on June 18, 1852, and Joseph Yeakle 
married (second wife), Mary Huston, who was 
bom February 19, 181 7, and died February 14, 
1877. The children of Joseph and Elizabeth 
(Huston) Yeakle were : Huston, born December 
I3> 1835, and died November 12, 1840; James, 
born December 8, 1837, and died April 7, 1843 ; 
Emily, born October 15, 1839; Elenora, born 
April 29, 1842, and died May 15, 1843; Daniel 
W., born November 24, 1844; Jacob, born Jan- 
uary 25, 1847; Elvie, born September 5, 1850; 
John H., born August 12, 1853, and died March 
7, 1854; and Thomas C, born January 19, 1855. 

Jacob Yeakle (great-grandfather) was the son 
of Abraham Yeakle, and was born September 29, 
1780. He married Gertrude, daughter of George 
Urff'er, November i, 1808. Their children were: 
Susan, born September 4, 1809 ; Joseph ; Leah, 
born June 4, 18 14; Charles, born July 7, 181 7; 
George, bom February 27, 1820; and William, 
born November 7, 1821. 

Jacob Yeakle was a farmer and resided in 
Springfield township, Montgomery county, where 
he died May 29, 1863. His widow, Gertrude, 
died February 9, 1868. 

Abraham Yeakle (great-great-grandfather) 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



127 



was the son of Christopher Yeakle and was born 
March 14, 1752. He married Sarah, daughter 
of Christopher Wagner, October 10, 1776, and 
their children were: Isaac, born November 9, 
1777 ; Samuel, born February 26, 1779, and died 
March 5, 1779; Jacob, born September 29, 1780; 
Susannah, born November ir, 1782; Maria, born 
September 4, 1784; and Christopher, born May 
21, 1787, and died July 10, 1813. Sarah, wife of 
Abraham Yeakle, died May 28, 1833. He died 
June 17, 1841. He lived in Springfield township, 
Montgomery county, where he owned a farm. 

Christopher Yeakle (great-great-great-grand- 
father) was the son of Regina and Christopher 
Yeakle. He married ]\Iaria, daughter of Susanna 
and Balthasar Schultz, on August 9, 1743. Their 
children were: Susanna, born October 8, 1744; 
Maria, born September 21, 1747; Regina, born 
October i, 1749; Abraham, born March 14, 1752; 
Anna, born July 16, 1755 ; and Christopher, born 
October 7, 1757. 

Christopher Yeakle (great-great-great-grand- 
father) died January 3, 1810, aged ninety-one 
3'ears and nine months. His wife died March 4, 
1807, aged eighty-nine years. Christopher 
Yeakle was about eighteen years of age when he 
came to Pennsylvania with his mother in 1734. 
His father died in Germany. He learned the trade 
of a cooper and in 1743 built the log house, at 
Cresheim, Germantown township, Philadelphia, 
which was his dwelling until about the time of 
the Revolution when he purchased the property 
on the summit of Chestnut Hill, and died there at 
a very advanced age. He was a man of consid- 
erable wealth. His mothef, a sister of David and 
Christopher Heebner, came to Pennsylvania with 
her only son. She died April 4, 1753, aged sixty- 
five years and five months, her husband having 
died in Germany several months previous to her 
emigration. 

The Yeakle family have always been Schwenk- 
felders, having settled in Pennsylvania with that 
colony. 

S. POWELL CHILDS. There are few 
older or more prominent families in Montgomery 
■county, Pennsvlvania, than that bearing the name 



of Childs, and S. Powell Childs, now deceased, 
was one of its most worthy representatives. He 
was a descendant in the sixth generation of Henry 
Child, who resided in Colds Hill, in the parish of 
Rinderham, Hertford county, England. The 
family were members of the Society of Friends, 
and Henry Child was eminent as a writer and 
speaker among them. He was on close terms of 
acquaintance with William Penn, from whom 
he purchased five hundred acres of land for which 
he paid ten pounds sterling; the purchase was 
made on January 20, 1687, and the land was then 
located in Plumstead, Bucks county, Pennsyl- 
vania. Henry Child was the father of several 
children and, in 1693, he accompanied his young 
son Cephas to America. Cephas Child was placed 
with a family in Philadelphia, where he learned 
the carpenter trade, and his father returned to 
England, but subsequently crossed the ocean 
again and finally settled in Anne Arundel county, 
Maryland, and in 17 15 he gave the above men- 
tioned land to his son Cephas. 

Cephas Child was married to Mary Atkinson, 
of Philadelphia, in 1716, and at once settled on 
the land bequeathed to him by his father, which 
was located in Bucks county, Pennsylvania. They 
were the parents of nine children, the sixth of 
whom was named Henry. He was born on the 
homestead in Bucks county, January i, 1725. He 
married Mary Shoemaker, of Gwynedd Monthly 
Meeting, August 3, 1750, and their children were: 
Sarah, John Isaac, George and Thomas. 

John Isaac Child, grandfather of S. Powell 
Childs, was born April 3, 1755, in Plumstead, 
Bucks county, Pennsylvania, from which place 
his father removed with his family to Cheltenham, 
Montgomery county, same state, in 1776. On 
June 5, 1777, John I. Child was married to ]\Iary 
Phipps, daughter of Peter Phipps, of Abington, 
and twelve children were the issue of this union, 
eight of whom attained years of manhood and 
womanhood, their names being as follows : Mary, 
Peter, Sarah, James, Tacy, Elizabeth, John and 
]\Iargaret. 

Peter Child, father of S. Powell Childs, was 
born in Cheltenham township, Montgomery 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1780. He married Sarah 



128 



.MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Rogers, by whom he had several children, all de- 
ceased. Sarah was the widow of Charles Shoe- 
maker, late of ^Vhitpain township, whom she mar- 
ried in the year 1840. The second wife of Peter 
Childs was Rosanna Lee, nee Kerckbaum, of 
Lower iNIerion, Pennsylvania. One child was 
bom of this union, S. Powell Childs. 

S. Powell Childs was born June 7, 1832, in 
Plymouth township, ?\Iontgomery county, Penn- 
sylvania, on the farm upon which he resided until 
his death. It was then the property of Samuel 
Powell, his maternal granduncle. The farm was 
then rented and occupied by Peter Child and his 
family, who afterwards purchased it. Samuel 
Powell (granduncle) was a widower and child- 
less, and he made his home with the Childs fam- 
ily, being cared for by Mrs. Childs, his niece, until 
his death in April, 1844. S. Powell Childs was 
named in honor of his uncle, who bequeathed to 
him a handsome legacy, and when he became old 
enough he was the almost constant companion of 
Mr. Powell. S. Powell Childs attended school 
regularly from the age of six to eleven years, 
after which he worked until his fifteenth year on 
the farm during the summer months, and attended 
school during the winter months, and the knowl- 
edge thus gained was supplemented by one term 
in the private academy of Samuel Aaron, at Xor- 
ristown, Penns}lvania. At this time he was an 
earnest and thoughtful reader, and the books 
from which he derived a vast amount of knowl- 
edge were obtained from the Whitpain library 
and other sources. After the death of his father, 
in 1844, his time and effort were needed in assist- 
ing his mother in the management of the farm, 
and in marketing the products in the city of Phil- 
adelphia. Upon attaining his majority, in 1853, 
he purchased his father's estate of sixty acres 
and the old homestead, to which he added twen- 
ty-five acres a few years later, and he greatly im- 
proved this property by the erection of new and 
commodious buildings, and by a skillful system 
of husbandry. 

In politics ;\Ir. Childs was a Republican, hav- 
ing been one of the local founders and an active 
member of that party, but he never desired or 
sought office, although he served in various ca- 



pacities. He held for a term the office of as- 
sistant internal revenue assessor, and in 1876 he 
was tendered and accepted the nomination for 
state senator, and although he received all the 
votes of his party, which was then in the minority, 
he was defeated. He always manifested a great 
interest in educational matters, was instrumental 
in the many improvements in the public schools, 
was one of the early advocates for a township 
high school, and later had the satisfaction of as- 
sisting in the organization of one. In 1856 he 
was elected a school director, and was the incum- 
bent of the office for a number of years, during 
which time he served as secretary of the board. 
His nomination for office has always been on the 
minority ticket, }-et he has always been elected by 
a large majority. He contributed liberally of his 
time and money to the establishment of the cor- 
poration known as the Plymouth Valley Cream- 
ery Compan}', and for a number of years was a 
member of the Alontgomery County Agricultural 
Society, a portion of which time he served as 
manager and vice-president. For a long period 
of time he was a reporter of statistics for the state 
board of agriculture of Pennsylvania, chief re- 
porter for Montgomery county, and at the same 
time filled a similar position for the United States 
board of agriculture. In matters of local interest 
and improvement Mr. Childs evinced a deep 
concern, and he materially aided every worthy en- 
terprise. He was a member of the board of man- 
agers of the Alontgomery County Mutual Fire 
Insurance Company, and he aided largely in hav- 
ing the company extend the principles of insur- 
ance to damage done by storm as well as by fire. 
He was an advocate of good roads, and prior to 
his death enjoyed the privilege of seeing the 
principal roads of Plymouth township macadam- 
ized, and also the running of trolley cars on the 
principal roads of the township. In every posi- 
tion in which he was placed he was a progres- 
sive, liberal and public-spirited citizen, who could 
be depended upon to support every worthy ob- 
ject. He was active in the organization of Cold 
Point Grange, No. 606, Patrons of Husbandry, in 
October, 1875, ^"d was elected its first master,. 
to which position he was re-elected several times,. 




v_ — a y — ff ^^^ \ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



[29 



and during this time it became the banner Grange 
of the state. He was also treasurer of this 
Grange. For several terms he held the position 
of master of the Montgomery County Pomona 
Grange, being treasurer of the same, and he also 
held membership in the Pennsylvania Grange, 
serving as a member of the executive committee. 
His father and all his paternal ancestors, both 
male and female, for five generations, were mem- 
bers of the Society of Friends. His mother was 
not a Friend by birthright, but was reared in 
that faith. She resided with her son and his 
family until her death, February 20, 1888, at the 
advanced age of ninety-two years. 

On February 9, 1854, Mr. Childs married 
Mary A. Schlater, a daughter of William and 
Sarah Schlater, of Plymouth township, who died 
January 21, 1855, On February 24, 1859, Mr. 
Childs married Malinda Freas, born September 
17, 1837, a daughter of George and Margaret 
Freas, of Plymouth township, and a descendant 
of the Rev. Thomas Dungan or Dungannon, an 
Irish refugee, who fled from religious persecu- 
tion in his own country to America, settling in 
Providence, Rhode Island, where he became a dis- 
ciple of Roger Williams ; in 1684 he came from 
Providence to the colony of Penn, locating in 
Bucks county, where he was the first Baptist 
minister, and his death occurred there in the 
year 1688. The children of S. Powell and ]\Ia- 
linda (Freas) Childs are : i. Horace G., born June 
7, i860, who was killed by lightning on June 6, 
1883. 2. Mary B., born June 13, 1862. 3. Sher- 
man, born August i, 1864, died August 7, 1866. 
4. Sarah S., born September 20, 1868, a teacher 
in the public schools of Norristown. 5. George 
Freas, Ijorn August 6, 1870, mentioned herein- 
after. 6. Ella F., born June 17, 1872, died No- 
vember 19, 1880. 7. Elizabeth H., born January 
27, 1875. S. Powell Childs, father of these chil- 
dren, died May 7, 1890, in the home where he was 
born, and where he resided during his entire life- 
time. His widow and children reside in Norris- 
town, Pennsylvania. 

George Freas Childs, only surviving son of the 
late S. Powell Childs and his wife Malinda H. 
(Freas) Childs, was born on the homestead in 



Plymouth township, Montgomery county, Penn- 
sylvania, August 6, 1870. He attended the public 
schools of the township, Treemount Seminary, 
Norristown, which was under the competent pre- 
ceptorship of Dr. John W. Loch, and the Nor- 
ristown high school. During his vacations he as- 
sisted with the manifold duties of the farm, and 
upon the completion of his studies he was engaged 
in farm duties for a year. He then pursued a 
course at the Pierce Business College, Philadel- 
phia, after which he secured a position with the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Company, at Philadelphia, 
and later was transferred to the auditing depart- 
ment of the same corporation, at Pittsburg. In 
1898 he was transferred from Pittsburg to the 
Philadelphia office of the same company, where he 
has since been located. Since his return from 
Pittsburg, Mr. Childs has resided in Norristown. 
He is a Republican in his political views, but takes 
no active part in politics outside of casting his 
vote for the candidates of his party. 

Mr. Childs married, August 11, 1897, Sarah 
Yeakle, daughter of Samuel Hudson and Re- 
becca Pollis (Burke) Yeakle, of Bucks county, 
Pennsylvania. They have one child, Charles Ray- 
mond, born May 19, 1900. 

DAVID NEWPORT, for many years a min- 
iter in the Society of Friends, is the son of Jesse 
\V. and Elizabeth (Ellison) Newport. He was 
Ijorn December 18, 1822, in the city of Phila- 
delphia. He is a retired farmer, living at Willow 
Grove, in Abington township, Alontgomery 
county, Pennsylvania. 

David Newport is a descendant of Thomas 
Newport, who settled in New Jersey about 1698, 
coming from London, England. The manner of 
his becoming a Friend is something remarkable. 
The people of his neighborhood were in the habit 
of meeting at his house for social worship, and 
as he had an excellent voice he occasionally sang 
to them. On one occasion, instead of singing, he 
felt it his duty to speak to them, and thus he be- 
came their minister. Becoming acquainted with 
Friends and their principles, and finding them 
similar to their own, he and his people connected 
themselves with the Society. Thomas Newport 



I30 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



"married Elizabeth Lockvvood, and became the 
father of two children — Jesse and Mary. The 
famil}' removed and lived near Duck Creek, Dela- 
ware, Mary going to Philadelphia, where she 
conducted a profitable business, and left to Phila- 
delphia Meeting the fund nowf in its possession. 
Jesse was the father of ten children— Thomas, 
Aaron, David, Jesse, Benjamin, Richard, Eliza- 
beth, Lydia, Mary and Sarah. In 1786 Jesse re- 
moved to Oxford township, and thus they became 
members of Abington Monthly Meeting. In 
1794 Jesse, with seven of his children, removed 
-to Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, where 
the, seven children were said to have become the 
.parents of seventy children, an average of ten 
•each, all of whom lived to manhood and woman- 
4iood. The Newports were noted for conscien- 
tiousness and fidelity to known duty. Jesse, son 
01 Thomas, during the Revolutoinary War, pur- 
chased nothing but iron and salt aside from the 
productions of the farm, he being opposed to 
war, and unwilling to pay taxes for the support 
of the army, just as some of his descendants a 
century later were unwilling to buy any of the 
products of slave labor and thus lend support to 
an unjust system. 

In reference to his ancestors David Newport 
^ays, in his "Eudemon," page 512: "It is said 
to be difficult to name the eight different great- 
grandparents of an individual. The following 
are mine: Jesse Newport and Mary Long; 
Thomas Wood and Sarah Yerkes; John Barker 
and Elizabeth Rodman; John Ellison (3d) and 
Elizabeth Doughty. The great-grandparents of 
my wife, Susan S. Newport, were : William Sat- 
terthwaite and Pleasant Mead; William Clay- 
-poole and Elizabeth Hall ; Samuel Griscom and 
IRebecca James ; Giles Knight and Elizabeth 
James. 

"Jesse Newport was the son of Thomas New- 
port, of London, the immigrant. Thomas Wood, 
who was a soldier under Washington, was a 
grandson of Thomas Wood. He died in 1795. 
in his ninety-fourth year. He was a minister of 
Abington Meeting for forty-five years. He mar- 
ried Martha Lloyd, loth-mo. 24, 1713. Eliza- 
beth Rodman was the fifth in descent from John 



Rodman, the immigrant. Her father, Thomas, 
married Elizabeth Pearson, who as is supposed 
was son of the Thomas Pearson who came over 
in the "Welcome," with William Penn. John 
Ellison married Hannah Boyd, a granddaughter 
of Griffith ap Griffith, who was the lineal descend- 
ant of Llewellyn ap Griffith, who was the last 
Prince of Wales, so the family record says. The 
Satterthwaites, my wife's family, have a record 
from Clement Satterthwaite, the father of Wil- 
liam, who married Agnes Brathwaite. They 
were the parents of William, who settled in 
Bucks county. He was born in 1709. His son 
William married May, the granddaughter of 
Giles Knight, who came over in the ship "Wel- 
come" with William Penn. William Claypoole 
was the grandson of the immigrant, James Clay- 
poole, the friend of William Penn,' William Clay- 
poole's son John married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Samuel Griscom. She was the distinguished 
Betsy Ross, who died in 1836, in her eighty-fifth 
year. My wife remembers her well. James 
Claypoole's brother John married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Oliver Cromwell. Among my an- 
cestors who have been largely members of the 
Society of Friends since George Fox's time, 
several of them were called to the ministry of the 
word, among the most notable of whom was John 
Rodman (2d) of New York, of whom mention 
is made in the discipline of New York Yearly 
}\Ieeting, on page 4. The records of the Society 
of Friends at Flushing, Long Island, contain the 
following note of his death : 

" 'John Rodman, an eminent doctor, did 
abundance of good in that practice, and was also 
a worthy minister of the gospel in this town about 
forty years, a man beloved by all sorts of people, 
lived to a good old age, about seventy-eight years, 
died the loth of 7th month, 1731. His wife 
INIary survived him and died in 1748, aged 
eighty-five years.' The account adds : 'They had 
twelve children.' '" 

David Newport's mother Elizabeth was a 
greatly favored minister in the Society of Friends 
for forty-three years, passing away from this 
state in her seventy-sixth year. His brother El- 
lison, and his sister, Martha Travilla, were 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



both acknowledged ministers amongst Friends. 

David Newport was not seventeen years old 
when he went to the country to learn the prac- 
tical duties of a farmer. He attended a Friends' 
school in Philadelphia, and later was sent to the 
Friends' school at Alexandria, Virginia. Early 
in life he became deeply interested in moral ques- 
tions and in politics, especially in the slavery 
question, then assuming great prominence ow- 
ing to the attitude of southern slaveholders in 
forcing it upon the country. Being born a Friend 
he inherited hatred of oppression in every form, 
and was an enthusiastic advocate of freedom. 
He was one of seven voters of Moreland town- 
ship who in 1848 cast their ballots for Martin 
VanBuren, the Free-Soil nominee for president. 
He acquired also a literary taste, and contributed 
articles to the Norristown papers, the "Herald," 
"Free Press" and "Republican." After the war 
began and the new system of internal revenue 
was framed by Congress, President Lincoln ap- 
pointed him collector for the congressional dis- 
trict composed of the counties of Montgomery 
and Lehigh, with his office in the court house at 
Norristown. He chose Samuel Homer and 
Howard M. Jenkins as his deputies, and during 
the four years he held the position, from 1862 to 
1866, about two and a half millions of dollars 
passed through his hands in the shape of direct 
tax. He fulfilled all his duties with fidelity and 
strict integrity, attending carefully to business, 
and rendering a complete account of the trans- 
actions which was never questioned by the au- 
thorities at Washington. 

David Newport has also achieved consider- 
able fame as an author. He published a volume 
■of poems, and a volume entitled "Indices, Histor- 
ical and Rational." Within a few years he has 
published another volume, "Eudemon, Spiritual 
and Rational : the Apology of a Preacher for 
Preaching." His book of poems is called "The 
Pleasures of Home." The volume contains a 
poem which attracted wide attention at the time 
it was published, during the great national crisis 
rif 1864, and which for this reason is here repro- 
ilnced: 



LINCOLN AND LIBERTY. 

Lilies on hearing that California had voted 

for Lincoln in 1864. 

From where the placid Delaware winds onward 
in its course, 

To where Niagara's waters flow with their re- 
sistless force ; 

From where New England's stalwart sons amidst 
the woods of Maine, 

The axe rings forth the anthem, rings forth the 
glad refrain ! 

The miner in the land of Penn, the boatman at 
the oar, 

The farmer in the teeming West, among his 
garnered store, 

The sailor on the ocean, amidst the surging sea. 

All, all have caught the glad acclaim, — LIN- 
COLN and Liberty ! 

And wliere Columbia's patriot sons encamp at 
Richmond's gate, 

Their every shot and every shell proclaim the 
voice of fate ! 

The slave's dull ear has caught the note, — the 
anthem of the free. 

As Dahlgren's voice pronounces clear,- — LIN- 
COLN and Liberty ! 

"Twas thus along our country's shore, from heart 

to heart it flew ; 
The lightning's wing conveyed the news that 

gladdened not a few — 
All oe'r the land, from lake to gulf, responsive 

thrilled each breast, — - 
From North to South, from sea to sea, and in 

the fair young West — 

And o'er Pacific's gentle wave, far toward the 

setting sun, — 
From where the sands with gold are mixed, and 

silvery waters run ; 
From where Nevada rears his head, and Winter's 

chaplet crowns ; 
^^'here Nature, both in mount and tree, in giant 

growth abounds, — 

There, in that land where Broderick lived, there 
where he fought and fell. 

In Freedom's ranks his friends have ranged, and 
Freedom's cohorts swell ! 

The tide from out the Golden Gate is ebbing to- 
ward the sea ; 

Amidst the shrouds the sailor sings, — LIN- 
COLN and Liberty. 



132 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



It is as a preacher, however, that David New- 
port is best known, the solemnity and impressive- 
ness of his communications causing them to at- 
tract attention from members of all denomina- 
tions. Although somewhat mystical at times, he 
clearly understands the fundamental principles 
of the Society for which he speaks, and his 
thoughts and impressions are uttered in no un- 
certain tone. He does not lack that most im- 
portant characteristic of a preacher, inspiration, 
and he has a wealth of illustration that makes 
his sermons interesting to his auditors. He has 
a valuable gift in the ministry, his general in- 
telligence aiding greatly in making his remarks 
-acceptable to his hearers. In addition to this, 
his consistent life still further strengthens his 
public utterances. Few men have obtained more 
rational enjoyment from life than he, squaring 
his conduct as he does by the golden rule, and 
endeavoring to live in his daily life the truths 
taught by the principles of the Society of Friends. 
His earnestness in all that he does and says gives 
to his words and his actions an influence that is 
permanent in its character. He has been a 
preacher since 1871. 

David Newport was for a number of years 
connected with the firm of William C. Newport 
& Co. as a manufacturer of phosphates for agri- 
cultural purposes at Willow Grove. The last 
few years he has, however, lived retired, the 
firm having been dissolved by the death of his son 
a number of years ago. The son left a widow aiid 
several children. David Newport married, April 
8, 1847, Susan Satterthwaite. Their only living 
child is Emma N., wife of Canby Tyson. Mrs. 
Newport's grandmother, Betsy Ross, as already 
explained, had the honor of making the first 
American flag. 

JOHN G. GILBERT, deceased, former hotel 
proprietor of Pottstown, was a native of that 
borough. He was born January 8, 1864, and is the 
son of Jesse B. and Levina (Guldin) Gilbert. 

Jesse B. Gilbert (father) was engaged in the 
express business for many years. Mrs. Gilbert 
died in 1884, aged fifty-six years. He survived 
her several years, dying in 1896, aged sixty-six 



years. Both were buried at the old Pottstown 
cemetery. In politics, Mr. Gilbert was a Demo- 
crat and served as a member of the town council. 
He was an influential man in Pottstown and was 
respected by the whole community. ]\Ir. Gilbert 
was a candidate on one occasion for prothonotary. 
He was a member of the Emmanuel Lutheran 
church, as were his family. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Gilbert 
had the following children : Andora, Ambrose and 
Henrietta Esto are deceased ; Jeremiah, married 
Ida Fillman and they reside at 120 North Wash- 
ington street, Pottstown, where he is engaged in 
the undertaking business ; Jacob, unmarried, liv- 
ing at the American House, Pottstown, where he 
is engaged in business ; Clare married John Sassa- 
man, and is living in Reading, where he is en- 
gaged as a driver, and they have one child ; Harry, 
residing in Pottstown, where he is engaged in 
business at the Montgomery House, married Rae 
Dignon and they have three children ; Edward is 
married and lives on Walnut street, Pottstown, 
where he is engaged in business at the Montgom- 
ery House, having two children. 

John Gilbert (grandfather), resided in or 
near Gilbertsville, where he was a blacksmith by 
occupation. 

John G. Gilbert attended school until he was 
about fourteen years of age. He then worked 
for his father for some time, and later in the iron 
industries of Pottstown, until he was about twen- 
ty-one years of age. He then followed profes- 
sional ball playing and roller skating for about 
twelve years. He next bought the Central House, 
at Boyertown, Berks county, where he conducted' 
the hotel business for one year and two months, 
and then purchased his last hotel, then known as 
Sellingers, but it became known as the Gilbert 
Hotel and Cafe, where he conducted business 
very prosperously for a dozen years. He recently 
renovated his place of business, and it is one of 
the finest hotels in Montgomery county. 

Mr. Gilbert married Ida S., daughter of Wjll- 
iam and Elizabeth (Reppert) Dellicker, of near 
Hill Church, where they were engaged in farm- 
ing, but later removed to Pottstown where Mr. 
Dellicker conducted a grocery business. He died 
about six years ago, and was buried in ]\It. Zion 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



133 



■cemetery. Mrs. Dellicker lives on Beech street. 
They had several children. 

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Gilbert were married 
March 17, 1888. They have had four children, of 
whom three survive, as follows : Clara, born July 
21, 1889; Jennie, born March 26, 189 1 ; Jesse, 
born May 27, 1893 ; Charles, born January 2, 
1892, died February 15, 1897. 

Mr. Gilbert was a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd -Fellows, belonging to Manatawny 
Lodge No. 214, of Pottstown, and Encampment 
No. 85 ; to Knights of Pythias Lodge, No. 421, 
also of the Fraternal order of Eagles, of Reading 
Lodge, No. 66. In religious faith Mr. Gilbert was 
a member of the Emmanuel Lutheran church. He 
died November 12, 1903. 

THEODORE SCHREIBER, son of Theo- 
dore and Anna (Shaffer) Schreiber, is a native 
■of Whitpain township. He was born in Broad 
Axe Hotel, December 29, 1871, his father being 
at that time the proprietor of the hotel. The son 
attended the public schools of the township at 
Shady Grove and Sandy Hill, until he was about 
twelve years of age. In 1883, his parents re- 
moved to Philadelphia, where the family resided 
for three years. City life was distasteful to the 
son who longed for the free air and enjoyment to 
be had in the rural districts. The family returned 
to Broad Axe in 1886, the father having erected a 
house on the farm adjoining the hotel, where the 
son was given the opportunity to acquire a knowl- 
edge of farming operations, for a few years. In 
1895 he bought the Jeffersonville Hotel, two miles 
above Norristown. He married, in 1895, Sarah, 
daughter of IMichael and Catharine Hayes, of 
Norristown. Their children are : Theodore, born 
May 16, 1896, and died in August, 1896; Catha- 
rine, born Deceniber 24, 1897 ; Francis, born Jan- 
uary 17, 1899 ; Mary, born December 4, 1899, and 
died March 4, 1900; Theodore, born December 4, 

1900, and died April 29, 1902; and William, born 
December 28, 1903. 

Having conducted the Jeffersonville Hotel 
very successfully for a period of six years, Mr. 
Schreiber removed to Norristown, on February i, 

190 1, where he continued in the same line of bus- 



iness until April 4, 1902, when he took charge of 
the Broad Axe Hotel where he has since re- 
sided. 

The Schreibers are of German origin and are 
an old family in the middle section of Montgom- 
ery county. The Schreibers have long affiliated 
with the Democratic party. In religious faith Mr. 
and Mrs. Schreiber are attached to the Catholic 
church. (See history of the family in the John 
Schreiber sketch.) 

LEWIS B. STONG. Among the esteemed 
citizens and influential business men of the city of 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, no more worthy rep- 
resentative of honest and industrious manhood 
can be found than Lewis B. Stong, whose ability 
and enterprise have added materially to the com- 
mercial activities of that great center of trade. He 
has been the architect of his own fortune. Be- 
ginning in life without means or influential 
friends, beset with obstacles on every side, he 
nevertheless worked his way up from a humble 
position to the prominent one he now occupies in 
commercial circles, and won an enviable reputa- 
tion for the strictest integrity and the utmost 
probity in all his transactions. He was born at 
the old Stong homestead in Worcester township, 
near Centre Point, May 16, 1865. The earlier 
generations of the family spelled the name Stang. 

The earliest ancestor of the family of whom 
there is any authentic information was Philip 
Stang, born in 1760, at Stong's Mill, in Worcester 
township. He married .Barbara Wentz, of Wor- 
cester, the daughter of the founder of Wentz's 
church, in that township. Their son, Henry 
Wentz Stong, also born at Stong's Mill, was the 
grandfather of Lewis B. Stong, and his son, 
Henry Cassel Stong, father of Lewis B. Stong, 
was born August 21, 1835, at the old Stong home- 
stead. 

Henry Cassel Stong (father) attended the 
public schools of the district and also a pay school 
until he attained the age of fourteen years. In 
the meantime he assisted his father in the grist 
and saw mill and on the home farm, continuing 
these pursuits until the year 1876, when he es- 
tablished a flour and feed business in Philadel- 



[34 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



phia, in the management of which he achieved a 
large degree of success. He was also promi- 
nently associated with the Corn Exchange, now 
the Commercial Exchange of that city. He re- 
tired from active business pursuits in 1882, when 
he removed to Norristown where he resided until 
1890, in which year he took up his residence with 
his son, Lewis B. Stong. On November 8, 1856, 
he was united in marriage to Emeline Brunner, 
daughter of Henry and Sarah (Comfort) Brun- 
ner, of Hatfield township. Henry Brunner was a 
farmer and brick manufacturer, widely known in 
his day in that section of the county. Their chil- 
dren are : Lewis B., mentioned hereinafter. Jennie, 
wife of Philip Yost, formerly of Pottstown, but 
now a resident of Philadelphia; they are the pa- 
rents of three children — Walter L., Clarence M., 
and Alma B. Yost. Mary C, wife of John 
Leister, of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, but now 
a resident of Philadelphia; four children were 
the issue of this marriage, two of whom are living 
at the present time, namely : Lizzie and Em.ma 
May Leister. The family are members of the 
Reformed church. Mr. Stong is a Democrat in 
his political affiliations, but takes no active part 
in local affairs. 

Lewis B. Stong obtained his education in the 
public schools of his native township and in those 
at Norristown, whither his parents removed when 
he was a boy. When he was thirteen years of age 
his parents located in the city of Philadelphia, 
where he has since resided. In 1884 Mr. Stong 
began the business of buying and selling poultry, 
in which occupation he has since been success- 
fully engaged, and he is now one of the most ex- 
tensive wholesale dealers in that line in the city of 
Philadelphia. Since 1898 he has been located at 
^^'o- 335 North Front street, where he occupies 
the greater part of two four-story brick buildings, 
giving employment to a large force of men in kill- 
ing, dressing and packing poultry for shipment to 
dififerent parts of the country. He purchases the 
greater part of his poultry alive, and if they are 
not of a suitable size for the market he fattens 
them by his own process. They are then killed, 
dressed, and placed on the market or held in cold 
storage for future shipment. He makes a spe- 



cialty of broilers and squabs, which he freezes and 
holds so that he has always a large stock on hand 
and is ready for any demand. He was the first 
man to make a success of preserving broilers, 
squabs and sweet breads by the freezing process 
and for six years he controlled the markets of 
Philadelphia in the line of squabs, thereby ob- 
taining large profits in return for the labor and 
care bestowed on these articles of merchandise. 
In 1 89 1 Mr. Stong bought a farm near Centre 
Square, in Whitpain township, on the State road, 
which was formerly known as the Jacob Reif 
farm. It contains thirty acres of finely located and 
highly cultivated land, adjoins the properties of 
William Meigs and Miss Ellen Duddy, and is 
operated by Mr. Stong as a general farm, being 
very productive. To this place Mr. Stong and 
his family are very much attached, spending their 
summers there, devoting their time to such out- 
door work as the farm alifords, and enjoying the 
healthful change from the confinement of city 
life. Mr. Stong is a horseman, and life on the 
farm permits him to enjoy his hobby. In politics 
he is an Independent, but is not an active partic- 
ipant in political affairs. 

In October, 1888, Mr. Stong married Eliza- 
beth Smeltz, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
in November, 1868, a daughter of Louis and 
Pauline (Eberhardt) Smeltz, of Philadelphia. 
Louis Smeltz was born in Germany in the year 
1835, came to America with his parents when a 
child, was engaged in the poultry business in Phil- 
adelphia, and died February 6, 1896. His wife, 
Pauline (Eberhardt) Smeltz, whom he married in 
June, 1859, was also a native of Germany, and 
she bore him seven children, as follows : John E. ; 
Pauline C, who became the wife of Merritt Hut- 
ton, and they reside in Philadelphia ; Louis C. ; 
Elizabeth mentioned above as the wife of Lewis 
B. Stong ; Anna, deceased ; Anna M., who became 
the wife of Joseph Neely; and Millie C, who 
became the wife of Dr. S. B. Segrest, of Phila- 
delphia. Mrs. Smeltz, mother of these children, 
resides in the city of Philadelphia. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stong are the parents of two daughters: Edna 
Alberta, born in 1889, attends school in Philadel- 
phia; and Florence May, born in 1890, also at- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



135 



tends school. The domestic life of Mr. Stong and 
his family is very pleasant and peaceful, every 
member contributing his or her share to the gen- 
eral happiness. They are attendants at the Re- 
formec.l church. 

0\\"EX RAUDENBUSH, son of Enos and 
Catharine (Fulmer) Raudenbush, was born on 
the Raudenbush homestead in Rockhill township, 
Bucks county, Pennsylvania, on February 24, 
1839. He attended the public and private schools 
of his county until he was twenty years of age, in 
the meantime assisting his father in the duties of 
the farm. The homestead of the family in Bucks 
county had been in the Raudenbush name for two 
generations at that time. He remained at the 
home of his parents until his twenty-third year, 
when he entered the employ of Charles Yeakle, a 
farmer near Flourtown, in Springfield township, 
Montgomery county. There he remained for 
twelve years. He removed to Blue Bell, in Whit- 
pain township, where he is at present a prom- 
inent and prosperous farmer. 

Owen Raudenbush married December 28, 
1885, Emma Catharine, widow of Jacob Van 
Winkle, and daughter of Francis Swayne Sheetz 
and Louisa Ann (Daub) Sheetz, of Sandy Run, 
"Camp Hill," Springfield township, ^Montgomery 
county. The Sheetz homestead at Camp Hill, 
where Mrs. Raudenbush wis born, had been in 
the possession of the family prior to 1781. 

Francis Swayne and Louisa Ann Sheetz had 
three children : James Albanus, born in 1832, mar- 
ried Amanda, daughter of Harmon Winder and 
Anna (Hoagland) Winder, of Camp Hill, and 
had children: John Hoagland; Francis Swayne; 
Emma Louisa ; James Henry ; Edmond Albanus, 
who was born January 14, 1865, and married, Oc- 
tober 17, 1886, Mary Martsely, of Philadelphia, 
and had one child, Marion .A.., born August 13, 
1890 ; Amanda ; Kate Agnes ; and Anna Lillian, 
born June 7, 1870, and married, June 5, 1900, John 
Anthony, son of Alexander and Rose Ross of 
Philadelphia. The second child of Mr. and Mrs. 
Sheetz was Emma Catharine, born November 14, 
1842. She married, in 1867, Jacob Van Winkle, 
and afterwards Mr. Raudenbush, thev removinc; 



to Blue Bell in 1887, where they still live. Ed- 
mond \'anRoom, who died, in 1852, was the third 
child of Mr. and Mrs. Sheetz. 

The Sheetz family, of Camp Hill, were prom- 
inently connected with the movement for the set- 
tlement of the community and were always strict 
adherents of the Democratic party. In religion 
they were attendants of the Lutheran and Re- 
formed churches. ^Ir. and ^Irs. Raudenbush. 
both attend St. Paul's church, at Whitemarsh. 

ADAM W. WERKISER. The Werkiser 
family are of German origin, being among the 
oldest of that nationality in ^Montgomery county. 

Adam Weaker Werkiser is the son of Henr)r 
and Emeline (Meeker) Werkiser. He was bom 
.'August 25, 1866, and resides at No. 1014 Cherry 
street, Norristown. He is unmarried and is en- 
gaged in the milk business, being one of the most 
extensive and successful dealers at the county 
seat. 

Henry Werkiser (father) is the son of Sam- 
uel and Elizabeth (Fetter) Werkiser, of Whitpaira 
township. He was born near Belfry, December 
21, 1 83 1. He attended the pay school at Bethel, 
in Worcester township, until he had reached his 
sixteenth year, also engaging in farming in the 
intervals of school study, as is usual in country 
districts. On reaching that age he decided to 
learn the trade of a stone mason, in accordance 
with the rule formerly prevalent of having every 
farmer's boy acquire knowledge of another call- 
ing in life. He served the usual time as an ap- 
prentice at the trade, and continued to work at it 
for many years, both as a journeyman and con- 
tractor, building many houses and barns in that 
section of the county. He married, March 28, 
1858, Emeline Meeker, daughter of J3enjamin and 
Eliza (Meeker) Weber, of Philadelphia. He 
then settled at Center Square in Whitpain town- 
ship. He died December 18, 1890, but his wife 
is still living. Their children are as follows: 
Samuel and Elizabeth, twins, were born December 
3, 1859, and the latter, unmarried, is living in Nor- 
ristown. Samuel never learned a trade and lias 
followed farming most of his life, but now lives 
in .Vorristiiwn and is emploNed by Mr. ^larch, ot 



136 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Bridgeport. He is a Democrat. He was married. 
March 26, 1890, to Emma Shaffer, of Oreland, 
and their children are : one that died in infancy ; 
Harry Walter, deceased, who was born in 1896; 
Samuel Warren, born December 8, 1901 ; and 
Carl, deceased. Cornelia Hecklin Werkiser, born 
September 24, 1861, is unmarried and resides in 
Norristown. Harry Fetter, bom June 29, 1864, 
learned the mason's trade with his father and fol- 
lowed it for a number of years, after which he be- 
-came a dealer in milk at Belfry, and after 1897 
he followed the same business in Norristown. In 
politics he is a Democrat and was candidate for 
councilman in the sixth ward of Norristown but 
■was defeated. In April, 1903, he removed to 
Center Square, where he now resides. He mar- 
ried Annie, daughter of Ellwood Hart, who is 
living near Center Square. Adam Walter Wer- 
Iciser is the youngest of the brothers. 

Adam W. Werkiser was educated at Bethel, a 
public school, from which he was graduated at 
the age of eighteen years, after which he learned 
the mason's trade with his father and worked at 
it until he was twenty-three years of age. Sub- 
sequently he was employed in a creamery for five 
years and in 1897 he settled in Norristown, where 
he is engaged in handling milk, cream, eggs and 
ice, in connection with his brother Harry, under 
the firm name of H. \\'erkiser & Brother. They 
tlo an extensive business, employing four men 
and four teams. 

Adam W. Werkiser is a Democrat in his poli- 
tical affiliations, but does not seek office. He is 
connected with the Tribe of Red Men of Norris- 
town and the ^lystic Chain, and has filled all the 
chairs. 

JOSEPH \\'. HALLO\\'ELL, a prominent 
citizen of Jenkintown, Montgomery county. 
Pennsylvania, was an honored representative of 
one of the most prominent families of the county 
— a family most of whose members were Friends, 
and distinguished for integrity, devotion to prin- 
ciple, and longevity. 

He was born at Meadowbrook, February 18, 
1823, son of John R. and Ann (Jarrett) Hal- 
lowell. He was a descendant of John Hallowell, 



who came from Nottinghamshire, England, 
in 1682, with William Penn and a company of 
English Friends. John Hallowell settled near 
Darby, and was one of the original members of the 
Friends" Meeting there. In 1696 he purchased 
from Silas Crispin, executor of the estate of 
Thomas Holme, a tract of 630 acres of land in 
Abington township, adjoining Upper Dublin 
township, and extending along the line of the 
manor of Moreland for more than a mile. His 
first dwelling on this tract was a rude cabin 
constructed partly in the ground and on the side 
of a hill, resembling the cave dwellings built by 
some of the first settlers of Philadelphia. He 
was twice married, his first wife being Sarah 

, who bore him one child. His second 

wife, who was ]Mary Sharpe, was the mother of 
nine children, three of whom were born in 
England, and the others in America, viz. : Sarah, 
born 1677; Thomas, 1679; Mary, 1681 ; John, 
1685; Elizabeth, 1687; Hannah, 1689; Samuel, 
1692; Benjamin. 1694; and Jane, 1696. 

Thomas Hallowell, second child of John and 
Mary (Sharpe) Hallowell, married in 1702, at 
Darby, Rosamond Till, and because the progeni- 
tor of a numerous and useful family. Their chil- 
dren were: John, born in 1703; ]\[ary. 1705; 

William ; Rosamond, 1709; Elizabeth, 

171 1 ; Sarah, 1714; Thomas, 1715; Samuel, 1717; 
and Joseph, 1719. William, the third son, was 
twice married. His first wife was Margaret 
Tyson, born 1708, died 1753, a daughter of 
Matthias (or Mathew) and Mary Tyson, and she 
bore her husband twelve children : Thomas, 
born in 1730: Rosamond, 1731 ; Mathew. 1733; 
William, 1734; John, 1736; Tynear, 1739; David, 
1740; Mary, 1742; Isaac, 1744; Jobn. 1746; 
John (3d). 1749: and Joshua, 1751. 

John Hallowell (3d), named above, resided 
until his death on the old homestead, which has 
been in possession of the family since 1783, when 
he purchased it from Robert and Rachel Paul, 
the deed being dated April 19 of that year. Prior 
to the Revolutionary war he owned and operated 
a mill on the Pennypack creek. In 1793 he was 
a victim to yellow fever, contracted while he was 
on a business trip to Philadelphia, where the dis- 




'^^^^"^^-t^, 



j^f) MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



.narrit^d. who came from Nottinghamshire, England, 
- 1 ■ '1. in 16S2, with WilHam Penn and a company of 
Enghsh Friends. John Hallowell settled near 
Darby, arfd was one of the original members of the 
] Friends' Meeting there. In 1696 he purchased 
from Silas Crispin, executor of the estate of 
1 Thomas Holme, a tract of 630 acres of land in 
1. Abington township, adjoining Upper Dublin 
township, and extending along the line of the 
manor of Moreland for more than a mile. His 
first dwelling on this tract was a rude cabin 
nstructed partly in the ground and on the side 
.1 hill, resembling the cave dwellings built by 
• >•! the first settlers of Philadelphia. He 
• married, his first wife being Sarah 
who bore him one child. His second 
Siiarpe, was the mother of 
Ml whom were born in 
- in America, viz.: Sarah, 
679; Mary, 1681 ; John, 
: Hannah, 1689; Samuel, 
;md Jane, 1696. 
second child of John and 
■.oil, married in 1702, at 
:iud because the progeni- 
useful family. Their chil- 
li, born in 1703; Mary, 1705; 
, Rosamond, 1709; Elizabeth, 
4; Thomas, 1715; Samuel, 1717; 
'1. WilHam, the third son, was 
His first wife was Margaret 
i:"ni 1708, died 1753, a daughter of 
( or Malhew) and Mary Tyson, and she 
husband twelve children : Thomas, 
1730: Rosamond, 1731 ; Mathew, 1733; 
1734; John, 1736; Tynear, 1739; David, 
iiiry, 1742; Isaac, 1744; John, 1746; 
i'j), 1749; and Joshua, 1751. 
juhn Hallowell (3d), named above, resided 
;ntil his death on the old homestead, which has 
, been in possession of the family since 1783. when 
;~. he purchased it from Robert and Rachel Paul, 
11- the deed being dated April 19 of that year. Prior 
to the Revolutionary war he owned and operated 
■.~^, a mill on the Pennypack creek. In 1793 he was 
I Mai- a victim to yellow fever, contracted while he was 
l^liLwell, on a business trip to Philadelphia, where the dis- 




-'^z^^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



^37 



ease was epidemic. He married, November 3, 
1774, Martha Roberts, born March 9, 1753, 
daughter of Thomas, Jr., and Letitia Roberts, of 
Milford township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania. 
The children of this marriage were : Isaac, born 
in 1776, who married ]\Iary Fletcher; Israel, 
Lorn 1777, who married Mary Jarrett ; Ann, born 
1781. who became the wife of Joseph Williams; 
and John R., further referred to below. 

John R. Hallowell, youngest child of John and 
Martha (Roberts) Hallowell, was born in 1785 
on the family homestead, which he subsequently 
purchased, and which was afterward the resi- 
dence of his son, Joseph W. Hallowell. In his 
tarly life he worked in his father's mill. He 
married Ann, daughter of William Jarrett, of 
Horsham township, Montgomery county, and to 
them were born children as follows : William J. : 
Lydia, who became the wife of Morris Paul : 
Martha, who became the wife of Edwin Satterth- 
waite, who was a grandson of Betsy Ross, the 
woman who designed and made the first (stars 
and stripes) American flag; Joseph W., further 
written of below ; and Penrose. 

Joseph W. Hallowell, son of John R. and Ann 
(Jarrett) Hallowell, received his early education 
in the schools of the neighborhood, and also at- 
tended the select school of the renowned teacher, 
Benjamin Hallowell, a relative, at Alexandria, 
A'irginia. Soon after completing his studies he 
came into possession of about one hundred and 
fifty acres of land at Meadowbrook, on which he 
resided for a number of years, and until his son 
Edwin S. married and took charge of the conduct 
<if the farm, and who successfully managed it 
tmtil Mr. Hallowell sold it to Thomas Wana- 
maker. Mr. Hallowell also owned a fine farm 
of 212 acres on the Doylestown turnpike, and in 
1884 lie built a handsome country seat at Jenkin- 
town, where he passed the later years of his life, 
and where his family still reside. 

Mr. Hallowell was one of the incorporators 
and for many years a director of the Jenkintown 
National Bank, and also a director of the York 
Road Turnpike Company, of the Jenkintown 
Water Company, and of several building and loan 



associations. He was a prominent member of 
Abington Monthly [Meeting of Friends, in which 
he was an elder and a trustee. He never sought 
official station, nor ever held an office except that 
of school director. In politics he was a stanch 
and active Republican. He was a man possessed 
with a marked individuality, and was an impor- 
tant factor in promoting the numerous local en- 
terprises with which he was identified, and in 
other ways advancing the material, moral and 
spiritual interests of the community. He was 
particularly interested in educational affairs, and 
rendered valuable service in maintaining and im- 
proving the public school system. To this add 
his personal beauties of character as a model citi- 
zen, an affectionate husband and an indulgent 
parent, and he stands forth as a splendid type of 
American manhood. His death occurred April 
3- 1904- 

Mr. Hallowell married, ]May 20, 185 1, ]\liss 
Hannah S. Lloyd, born March 9, 183 1, a daughter 
of John and Sidney (Paul) Lloyd, both old resi- 
dents of ]\Ioreland township, and descendants of 
old and highly respected families. Of this mar- 
riage were born the following named children: 

1. Edwin S., born June 6, 1852; he married, 
March 2, 1881, Miss Mary Linton, born June i, 
1853. a daughter of Charles and Hannah (Water- 
man) Linton. Of this marriage were born nine 
children: i. Florence, born ]\larch 2, 1882: died 
May, T884: 2. Lydia, born December 29, 1884, 
died May, 1891 ; 3. Hannah L., bom September 
6, 1886; 4. IMary L., born September 12, 1888; 
5. Emma L., born December 18, 1890: 6. Francis 
S., born December 15, 1891 ; 7. Rebecca, born 
August, 1893, died December 2t,. 1901 ; 8. Jose- 
phine, born December, 1894, died August, 1895 ; 
9. Edwin Joseph, born September 16, 1900. 

2. Emma L., bom December 21, 1854. 

3. Fannie, born August 12, 1856. died March 
2, 1900. 

4. Anna, bom September 28, 1865, married 
William Penrose, born July 31, 1847, a son of 
Jarrett and Tacy Ann Penrose. Of this marriage 
was Ijorn one son, Joseph Hallowell Penrose, 
born July 31, 1903. 



t38 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



WTLLIA^I BUTCHER, a prominent farmer 
in Norriton township, was born in \\'orcester 
township, ^Montgomery county, November 13, 
1838. He is the son of John and Rachel (Wag- 
ner) Butcher. 

John Butcher (father) was a native of Phila- 
delphia, where he learned his trade of blacksmith. 
He was born July 4. 1800, and lived until 1892. 
He started to follow his trade in Fairview vil- 
lage, afterwards removing to Centre Point. In 
1839 he settled on the Williams farm in Norri- 
ton township, the same farm which is now owned 
by his son William. He was a skilled mechanic, 
and men came from a great distance to get their 
horses shod in his shop. In making axes and 
all kinds of farm implements he had no superior 
and very few equals in Montgomery county. 

In early life John Butcher was a A\'hig-. and 
on the organization of the Republican party be- 
came one of its members and remained so until 
his death. He married Rachel \\'agner, a mem- 
ber of an old Pennsylvania family. She was a 
Presbyterian and a member in Norristown for a 
time, but afterwards transferred her membership 
to the Wentz church, in Worcester township. 
They and their children who are deceased are 
buried there. Their children were : 

Peter, died young; Catharine, died young; 
Mary Ann, married John Stiver, and after his 
death married ^lichael Rodenbaugh ; they had a 
large family of children (she is now deceased) ; 
Louisa, married Albanus Lair, and they also had 
a large family ; William ; John W., married Eliza 
Jane Caldwell ; John was a soldier in the Civil 
war. 

William Butcher removed with his parents to 
his present home when he was one }-ear old, and 
was reared on this farm. He worked on his 
father's farm until he was twenty-four years of 
age, also devoting some attention to learning the 
trade of blacksmith. His education was obtained 
at the public schools of the neighborhood, which 
he attended three or four months in winter. As 
soon as he was old enough to work in the shop 
or on the farm he was employed in one of those 
occupations the entire year. The acquisition of 
the knowledge which has sufficed for a successful 



career as an agriculturist was gained principally 
in the great school of life. 

Arriving at the age of twenty-four years, Mr. 
Butcher married and started out in life on his 
own account, his first venture being as a tenant 
on the farm of Charles Johnson, in Plymouth 
township. He was a tenant on different farms in 
the neighborhood for a period of sixteen years. 
In 1880, his mother having died in the meantime, 
his father offered him the farm as a tenant, ask- 
ing him to make a home for himself, which Mr. 
Butcher did. On the death of his father in 1892, 
he purchased the farm at the administrator's ap- 
praisement, and is still its owner. It contains 
seventeen acres, in which he raises garden truck 
and farm products generally, attaining better re- 
sults than many farmers on tracts several times 
its size. 

In politics yir. Butcher is a Republican, and 
has been all his life, believing that the principles 
of his party stand for the greatest good to the 
greatest number of the people of the United 
States. He has been a delegate to county con- 
ventions, but not an office-seeker or an office- 
holder, as his time was too much taken up with 
his farm to accept township office. 

Mr. Butcher's father built the blacksmith 
shop and all the buildings now standing on the 
farm except the principal residence. 

William Butcher married Elizabeth Roden- 
baugh, daughter of Michael and Alice (Johnson) 
Rodenbaugh. She was born in Plymouth town- 
ship, March 22, 1840. They have no children. 

JOHN SHAFFER SCHREIEER is the son 
of Theodore and Anna (Shaffer) Schreiber. He 
was born July 29, 1857, at Broad Axe, in Whit- 
pain township, where his father was proprietor of 
a hotel. He attended the public schools at Shady 
Grove and Sandy Hill, and later entered the 
school in charge of Miss Ellen Sheaff, at St. 
Thomas's church, Whitemarsh, at which he re- 
mained until he had reached his sixteenth year. 
In the meantime, during school vacations and at 
other times, he assisted his father on the farm at- 
tached to the hotel, containing forty-six acres of 
highly imprnved lami. He continued farming on 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



139 



this tract until his marriage, February 22, 1882, 
to Helen, daughter of John and Mary Ann 
(Butcher) Stiver, of Norriton township. 

After Mr. Schreiber's marriage he removed to 
the homestead farm in Whitemarsh township, and 
cultivated it for four years. At the end of that 
time he engaged as farmer with Thomas Shepard, 
of Upper Providence, until 1888. He then re- 
moved to the estate of Jesse Strepper, where he 
remained until the spring of 1893, when he 
rented the hotel at Broad Axe, which he ran till 
November, 1897. In the meantime ]\Ir. Schreiber 
gained a practical knowledge of farming and 
also interested himself in matters of local im- 
portance generally. In 1897 he removed to the 
farm of Albert Beck, in Upper Dublin town- 
ship, remaining there until the spring of 1899, 
when he rented the farm attached to the Broad 
Axe hotel, on which he had spent his boyhood 
days. During his occupancy of this farm, Mr. 
Schreiber has put in practice the lessons of ex- 
perience previously gained in following farming, 
and he has been very successful in raising good 
crops, and maintaining his reputation as one of 
the best farmers of the vicinity. 

In politics Mr. Schreiber is a Democrat, and 
manifests much interest in its success, although 
he has never been a candidate for public office. 
He was, however, taken up by his friends in 
February, 1904, and elected school director of 
Whitpain township, by a large majority. In re- 
ligious faith the family are members of the Ger- 
man Baptist or Brethren church, worshipping at 
the church in Upper Dublin township, near 
Ambler. 

Theodore Schreiber (father), was bom March 
21, 1825, and died May 5, 1898. His father was 
also Theodore Schreiber. He married, Decem- 
ber 25, 1849, Anna Shaffer, born in 1830. She died 
August 21, 1901. Their children were: Ellen 
(deceased) and Kate (twins), born October 30, 
1850; Kate married, July 4, 1872, Seth James. 
Amanda, born June 14, 1854, was married Feb- 
ruary 9, 1875. John S., subject of this sketch. 
Mary, born May i, 1859, married June 24, 1884, 
J. Howard Marlin, they residing in Philadelphia. 
Harry, born April 7, 1866, died May 4, 1866. 



George, born June 5, 1868, died July 12, 1868. 
Theodore, born December 29, 1871, married 
Harah Hays, of Norristown, they having children. 
John Stiver, Mrs. Schreiber's father, was born 
October 22, 1820. He was the son of Michael 
Stiver. 

JOHN ROBERTS MORRIS, son of Charles 
Ellis and Elizabeth Holstein (Amies) Morris, 
was born August 14, 1856, at Dry Valley, now 
Winfield, Union county, Pennsylvania, where his 
father was the manager of an iron furnace. Soon 
after the birth of John R. Morris, his parents re- 
moved to Conshohocken where his father man- 
aged the iron works of J. B. Moorhead & Com- 
pany, and in 1859 the father became superinten- 
dent at the works known as Swedes' Furnace, at 
Swedeland, midway between Bridgeport and 
West Conshohocken, in Upper Merion township, 
where the son attended the private school kept by 
Mrs. Allen, and later the school taught by Isabel 
Hitner, at Swedeland. He next attended the 
school of Mrs. Craig, at Norristown, and after- 
ward was a pupil of Professor George Barker, 
at Germantown. He then went to the Oak street 
public school, Norristown, after which he en- 
tered a Norristown bookstore, acting as clerk for 
a time. His father, having abandoned the iron 
business, operated the Holstein lime kilns, near 
King-of-Prussia, in Upper Merion township, and 
John became bookkeeper for his father. He was 
thus engaged until arriving at the age of twenty- 
one years, when he entered into a partnership 
under the title of Charles E. INIorris & Sons, 
manufacturers and dealers in lime, in which he 
continued until the late seventies, when the elder 
Morris bought the farm of Lewis Schronk, of 
Spring House, in Gw>Tiedd township. The fam- 
ily removed to this farm in the same year and 
John Morris was actively engaged as managing 
farmer for his father until the death of his pa- 
rents, December 28, 1883. 

On July 28, i88r, Mr. Morris married Ella 
Mary, bom July 28, 1856, daughter of Alfred 
Dupont and Mary (Henderson) Woolaston, of 
Henderson Station, in Upper Merion. Their 
children are : Emilv ^^■alker, who was born ?\Iarch 



140 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



27, 1882, and resides with her parents at their 
home, Norwood ; Courtland Southworth, who was 
born December 19, 1884, and resides at home, 
managing the family estate ; Russell Dupont, who 
was bom August 29, 1887, and died September 
6, 1896; and Charles Ellis, who was born Oc- 
tober 17, 1889, and is a student at Blue Bell. 

I\Ir. Morris continued to reside on the farm 
near Spring House until 1888, when he removed 
with his family to a farm near Lafayette Station, 
where he remained for two years, after which he 
returned to Gwynedd township and spent the fol- 
lowing three years at farming. Later he was 
engaged with the Prudential Insurance Company, 
at Amblfr. In 1895 he purchased the old Wentz 
homestead, at one time known as the Rising Sun 
Tavern or Wentz"s Tavern, on Skippack road, 
a half mile south of Center Square. The fann 
contains forty acres of highly improved land, to 
which, on account of the many trees to the north 
of the house, the name "Norwood" has been 
given. John R. Morris is a Republican in poli- 
tics and he and his wife are members of the Epis- 
copal church. 

Charles Ellis l\Iorris (father), born ]\Iarch 7. 
1825, was the son of Samuel \\'ells ]\Iorris. 
Samuel W. Morris was the son of Benjamin Wis- 
tar Morris, who married IMary Wells, at Muncy 
Meeting of Friends, Pennsylvania, December 5, 
1710. 

]\Irs. John R. ^Morris is a native of Chicago, Il- 
linois. She is the daughter of Alfred Dupont and 
Mary (Henderson) Woolaston. Mrs. ]\Iorris' 
father, Alford Dupont Woolaston, was a native 
of Wilmington, Delaware. In the early '50s he 
moved to Chicago. He owned large tracts of 
timber in Illinois and jNIichigan and he died in 
Michigan about 1870. His wife, the mother of 
]\Irs. Alorris, died when Mrs. Morris was nineteen 
months old and she was reared by her aunt. ;\Irs. 
A\'oolaston belonged to a well-known famil}- of 
L'pper Merion, after whom Henderson Station 
•was named. Her parents removed from Chicago 
when I\Irs. Ella Mary Morris was quite young, 
making their home at the Henderson homestead. 
She attended the private schools taught by the 
IMisses Allen, and later the school of ]\Iisses Bovne 



and Dillaye, at Sixteenth and Chestnut streets, 
Philadelphia. At the age of fifteen she removed 
with her uncle and aunt, j\Ir. and Mrs. John 
Southworth, to Springfield, Massachusetts, where 
she attended the schools taught by the Misses 
Howard. Later she returned to Upper Merion 
and made her home with her uncle, Wallace Hen- 
derson, of Henderson Station, Upper Merion, 
.where she remained until her marriage to Mr. 
Morris. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Holstein (Amies) Morris, 
mother of John R. Morris, was the daughter of 
William and Mary Atlee (Holstein) Amies. Mrs. 
William Amies was the daughter of Colonel 
George W. Holstein, a very prominent resident of 
Upper Merion township. Her maternal great- 
grandmother was Elizabeth ^^■ayne, a sister of 
Major General Anthony Wayne, of Revolutionary 
fame. 

The Holsteins are the descendants of Matts 
Holstein, who was bom in Philadelphia (or 
where that city now stands), in 1644, of Swedish 
parents, two years after the second immigration 
of Swedes to the banks of the Delaware and 
Schuylkill. The family were thus located in 
Pennsylvania forty years prior to the coming of 
William Penn. ]\Iatts Holstein's son, !\Iatthias, 
came to Upper Merion in 1705, and bought one 
thousand acres of land, running west from the 
Schuylkill, near Swedes' Ford, and extending to 
Red Hill, in the same towTiship. In 1714 he built 
a stone house near the center of the tract, where 
four generations were born and lived. 

THOMAS W. PHILLIPS belonged to an old 
Montgomery county family, long resident in 
Whitpain township. He is the son of Aaron and 
Emeline (Fitzwater) Phillips. He was born May 
10, 1845, on the old Phillips homestead, now 
owned and occupied by Benjamin F. Murphy. He 
attended neighboring schools until he was eigh- 
teen years of age, principally the Ellis school, on 
the State road, near Washington Square. From 
that time he assisted his father in working on the 
home farm and superintending its operation. 

On ^larch 4, 1871. he married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Barnabas and Rebecca (Neiman) 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



Davis of Hickon-town, in Plymouth township, 
after which he settled on the homestead. Later 
he worked in Plymouth township as a carpenter, 
and in 1880 bought the place now owned by James 
B. Murphy on Skippack pike, known as Spring 
Brook Farm. Soon afterward Mr. Phillips' death 
occurred, February 3, 1887. Mr. Phillips was a 
Republican and a Quaker. Mrs. Phillips at once 
retired from farming to devote herself to the edu- 
cation of her children. Susan, the elder, born De- 
cember 18, 1876, married Harry Mumbower, on 
May 4, 1899, 3""^ th^3' have one child, Viola 
Elizabeth, born January i, 1900; Norman Mary, 
born May 3, 1879, is deceased. 

After living in retirement for several years, 
Mrs. Phillips bought the farm of George Chap- 
elle on the State road, above Centre Square. She 
managed the farm until her son, Aaron Phillips 
came of age, when she relinquished its manage- 
ment to him, and later sold it to him. Aaron 
Phillips makes his home with his mother. Since 
Mrs. Phillips' first purchase, the adjoining farm 
of thirty-one acres has been added to the prop- 
erty, as well as the tract of Eugene Johnson. 

GEORGE DEAN MURPHY. Among the 
highly cultivated and therefore productive farms 
of Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, located in 
Whitpain township, is the one owned and oper- 
ated by George D. Murphy, fourth son and fourth 
child of John and Mary Ann (Gillen) Murphy 
nee Dean, who was born in Gwynedd township, 
Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, September 
28, i860. 

He attended the public schools of the district, 
and later was a student at Sunnyside Academy 
which was located at Ambler and conducted by 
the Misses Knight. He continued his studies in 
this institution until his nineteenth year, after 
which he assisted his father on the home farm at 
Pennlyn, until the death of the latter on August 
20, 1887. He then purchased the homestead and 
operated it for seven years, and at the expiration 
of this period of time he sold the same to Charles 
Edward Ingersoll, of Philadelphia, for whom he 
farmed for three years. In April, 1897, Mr. 
Murphy purchased the farm owned by Mrs. Phil- 



lips, widow of Thomas Phillips, situated on Skip- 
pack pike in the vicinity of Center Square. It con- 
tains twenty-five acres of highly improved and 
fertile land which is well watered and drained^ 
being supplied by several streams flowing from 
never failing springs, and from this circumstance 
the property has taken the very appropriate name 
of Springbrook Farm. He cultivates the farm 
for general purposes, operates an extensive dairy 
in which are all the modern improvements, and in 
addition is engaged in the operation of filling 
silos and harvesting grain and grass, for which 
purpose he furnishes the machinery and power 
that is necessary. He has always exhibited a keen 
interest in local politics, and has served his town- 
ship in the capacity of tax collector and constable. 
His affiliations are with the Democratic party. 

September 8, 1892, Mr. Murphy married 
Emma Jacobine Sophia Halberstadt, born June 
21, 1869, a daughter of Jacob and Frederica 
Emma (Ebalt) Halberstadt, of Philadelphia. Mrs. 
Murphy, in girlhood, attended the public schools 
of that city and also the Knapp school located at 
Ninth and Race streets until her sixteenth year, 
then remained at home and assisted her mother in 
various domestic duties until her twenty-third 
year. In 1891 her parents removed to Gwynedd 
township where they purchased the Bodine farm 
of twenty-five acres. Mr. and Mrs. Murphy are 
the parents of two children: Anna Dean, born 
June II, 1893: and Charles Fitzwater, born Sep- 
tember ID, 1897. The family are members of St. 
Thomas' Episcopal church at Whitemarsh. 

ELWOOD LYLE HART, son of Solomon 
and Hannah (Lyle) Hart, of Blue Bell, was born 
July 20, 1830, in Whitpain township. Montgom- 
ery county, Pennsylvania. He attended the pub- 
lic schools in the vicinity until he reached his fif- 
teenth year, when he found employment among 
the farmers of the neighborhood for three years. 
At the end of that time he became an apprentice of 
Isaiah B. Houpt. of Norristown, to learn the 
mason trade and served for three years. At the 
age of twenty-one he commenced work as a jour- 
neyman, continuing thus for six years, when he 
began contracting on his own account in ma- 



142 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



sonry, building the foundations of many of the 
mills in Conshohocken, including the Wood roll- 
ing mill, several cotton factories and other es- 
tablishments. He continued in business for over 
thirty years as a contracting mason. When he 
was twenty-six years of age he married Kate, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth Smith, of 
Plymouth township. She was born INIay 12, 1841. 
The couple had nine children : Jacob, Azor, Will- 
iam and Perry, deceased; Norman, born at Con- 
shohocken ; Elmer Ellsworth, bom September 18, 
1862, married Hannah, daughter of Nathan and 
Sarah Rambo, born March 10, 1864, and married 
Elmer Ellsworth in 1886. They have seven chil- 
dren, Kate, Emma, Elmer, Anna and Sarah, and 
William and Elwood, deceased. Anna Coulston, 
born May 17, 1864, married Harry, son of Harry 
Werkeiser, who was born June 29, 1864, and lives 
at Center Square, having no children. Elwood, 
whose wife is Phoebe Stackhouse, lives at Con- 
shohocken and has three children : Albert Mauck, 
Kate and Eugene. Israel, born in May, 1872, mar- 
ried Margaret Cameron, of Norristown, they hav- 
ing one child, Dorothy, born in 1903, and they 
living at Conshohocken. The children of Elmer 
E. and Hannah Hart are: Kate, born September 
13, 1887, William Aspinwall, born August 13, 
18S9, and died December 29, 1889 ; Emma Mover, 
born October 8, 1890; Elwood, born October 5, 
1892, and died October 5, 1894; Annie Coulston, 
born June 13, 1894; and Sarah Mclnnes, born 
September 7, 1900. They live at Wharton, j\Ior- 
ris county, New Jersey, where Mr. Hart is yard- 
master at the Wharton Furnaces. The children 
of Elwood and Phcebe Hart are : Kate, born Oc- 
tober 18, 1889 ; and Eugene, born March 17, 1892. 
Elwood L. Hart continued to live at Con- 
shohocken during his entire career as a contractor. 
In 1887 he removed to Centre Square where he 
"kept the hotel until the spring of 1893, when he 
retired from the hotel business and purchased the 
old parsonage property of St. John's Lutheran 
church, above Centre Square, on which he made 
many improvements and removed to it. Mr. Hart 
is a Democrat in politics, having always voted 
for the candidates of that party and been a con- 
sistent worker therein, although he has never 



sought or held office. The family are attendants 
at St. John's Evangelical Lutheran church, above 
Centre Square. Air. Hart has retired from active 
business and devotes his time to the care of the 
home farm which consists of twenty-six acres of 
finely situated land, kept in a high state of culti- 
vation by the present owner. 

Mr. Hart's parents, Solomon and Hannah 
Lyle Hart, were both natives of Whitpain town- 
ship and are farming people. The father died 
when thirty-five years of age. The mother died 
about 1884. They were buried at Barren Hill, 
in Whitemarsh township. Andrew, his brother, 
married Jane McCool and lives at Penllyn Station, 
having five children : David, Allen, Annie, Emily 
and Harry. John, another brother, born in 1828, 
married Elizabeth Jones, of Norristown, and has 
several children. His sister Kate, born in 1825, 
married John Stillwel! and lives at Hatboro. 

HENRY GEIGER SLINGLUFF was born 
February 20, 1859, on a farm at North Wales, 
Montgomery county, being a son of William Hall- 
man and Margaret Ann (Shepherd) Slingluflf. i 
His parents, soon after his birth, removed to Rose 1 
Valley, near Ambler, where his father had rented I 
a farm. They remained there for nine years, ; 
Henry attending for some time the public school i 
of the district. The family then removed to Fort i 
Washington where they lived until 1870. About I 
this time William H. Slingluflf (father) bought \ 
the property known as the Jones' farm, on Blue ! 
Bell road, about a half mile south of that village, i 
which contained twenty-three acres of highly cul- | 
tivated land. Mr. Slingluflf operated it as a truck ) 
and fruit farm for the Philadelphia market, which \ 
he attended in all for nearly fifty years, earlier | 
in life from North Wales and Rose Valley and ' 
more recently from the farm now managed by 
Henry G. Slingluff, who came into possession of it 
in the spring of 1903 and has greatly improved 
the buildings and their surroundings. 

Henry G. Slingluff married, April 20, 1880, 
Flora Margaret, daughter of Andrew Jackson and ■ 

Christiana (Dugan) Krewson, of Cheltenham I 

township, she living in a neighborhood to which ; 

he went soon after leaving school in his seven- ! 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



143 



teenth year, to learn the trade of miller. He was 
compelled to abandon the pursuit of milling on ac- 
count of ill health and entered the employ of 
Thomas Rowland & Sons, manufacturers of 
shovels and other implements, with whom he re- 
mained until 1893, when in conjunction with his 
brother Casper, he rented his father's farm, on 
which he now lives. His children : Delia Bertha, 
bom March 8, 1881, married, April 10, 1901, 
Eugene Nice, son of Henry Fasset and Sarah 
Large (Nice) Conard, and having one child, 
Verol LeRoy, born June 20, 1903. Eugene Con- 
ard lives on his father's farm and assists him in 
its management. Ethel Alfreda, born July 3, 1882, 
resides with her father. Lyle Krewson, bom 
March 16, 1885, resides with his father, assist- 
ing him in the management of the farm and at- 
tending Girard Avenue Market, Philadelphia. 

Mr. Slinglufif is a Republican in politics but 
has not given much attention to party affairs 
since he has resided in Whitpain township. When 
a resident of Cheltenham he was a member of the 
vigilance committee and was known as a party 
worker. In other matters which concern the com- 
munity, however, including education and general 
public improvement, Mr. Slingluff is much inter- 
ested. In religious faith the family are German 
Baptists or Dunkards, and attend the meeting at 
Rose Valley, in Upper Dublin township. 

William Hallman Slingluff (father), born 
December 20, 1825, was the son of Henry and 
Elizabeth (Schlater) Slinglufif. He married Jan- 
uary I, 1852, Margaret Ann, daughter of Levi 
and Hetty (Wilkinson) Shepherd, residing near 
Springhouse in Gwynedd township. The children 
■of William H. and ]\Iargaret Ann Slingluff are: 
Emma Jane, born May 28, 1853, died unmarried 
in 1881 ; William Hallman, born September 18, 
1854, married Ella Long, and is now deceased; 
Levi Shepherd, born May 22, 1856, married 
Idella, daughter of Andrew and Hannah 
(Woods) Berkhimer; George Berkhimer, bom 
September 9, 1857, married Ella Long, widow of 
his brother, William Hallman Slinglufif, and re- 
sides at Centre Square ; Henry Geiger, subject of 
this sketch : Casper Schlater. born August 4, 1863, 
married Alice Shugard and resides at Blue Bell. 



The Shepherds are an old family in Montgom- 
ery and Gwynedd townships. Levi and Hetty 
Shepherd had several children besides Mrs. Sling- 
lufif, among them, William Shepherd, a resident of 
Montgomery Square, who served as poor director 
for several years ; Linford L. Shepherd, a well- 
known dealer in cattle, who resides afFranklin- 
ville in Whitpain township for many years, and 
married Emily, daughter of Amos Jones, a well- 
known resident of Upper Gwynedd, who had a 
large family of children, while Linford L. and 
Emily Shepherd had ten children in all, of whom 
Kate, married Jonathan Cleaver and resides near 
Conshohocken. Linford L. Shepherd died March 
15, 1894, at the age of seventy-three years. His 
widow resides with one of her children in Con- 
shohocken. 

Levi Shepherd, Jr., another son of Levi and 
Hetty Shepherd was a farmer of Gwynedd town- 
ship. 

Elizabeth Slinglufif (grandmother), was the 
daughter of Casper Schlater, born July 13, 1759, 
in Upper Dublin township. He married Mary, 
daughter of Nicholas Seltzer. His father and 
mother, Casper and Barbara Schlater, arrived at 
Philadelphia from Rotterdam, in the ship Thomas 
Coatman, on September 22, 1752. 

Casper Schlater (great-grandfather) was a 
man of education and business capacity and a 
leader of the Democratic party, filling the ofiRces 
of county treasurer and commissioner in 1817 
and 1818. Because of his sound judgment he was 
also frequently called upon to act in the settlement 
of estates and the adjustment of disputes between 
neighbors. He was a member of Boehm's Re- 
formed church and filled the ofiSces of elder, 
deacon and trustee. 

WILLIAM EBER WALTON, son of Amos 
and Henrietta (Vonderau) Walton, was born at 
Walton Farm, in Whitpain township, near Blue 
Bell, January 12, 1861. 

Amos Walton (father) married, January 28, 
1S58, Henrietta, daughter of Francis and Annie 
(Lebold) Vonderau. He is the son of Eber and 
Anna (Shaw) Walton, and was born in the house 
in which he now lives, near Blue Bell, November 



144 



^lONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



i6. 1832. He belongs to an old family of Friends, 
whose ancestor settled in Pennsylvania at a very 
early date. He is a successful farmer. His chil- 
dren are: William E., Francis V., who married 
Emma Wilkey ; Emma V., unmarried; and Annie 
v., who married Warren Brooke. 

Eber Walton (grandfather) was born near 
Ouakertown, Pennsylvania. At sixteen years of 
age he removed with his father's family to Beaver 
county, Pennsylvania, but returned to Quaker- 
town, and in 1823 married Anna, daughter of 
Joseph Shaw, of that place. He removed to 
Southampton, Bucks county, and in 1830 pur- 
chased the farm where his son Amos now resides. 
Their children were : Joseph, who married Eliza- 
beth Conard ; Mary, who died young ; Israel, who 
married Tacy Conard ; Amos ; and Mahlon, de- 
ceased. 

Abraham Walton (great-grandfather) re- 
moved to Beaver county, Pennsylvania, and later 
to Mount Etna, Indiana, where many of his de- 
scendants are now living. 

\MIliam E. Walton attended the public schools 
at Sandy Hill and Shady Grove, in \\'hitpain, 
until his seventeenth year, in the meantime assist- 
ing his father on the home farm and attending the 
markets of Norristown. He engaged in the bus- 
iness of killing and marketing sheep, making a 
specialty of lamb and mutton, and has a high rep- 
utation among his customers for the quality of 
his meat and his upright dealing. 

William E. Walton married, February 15, 
1887, Naomi, daughter of Henry and Susan 
(Smith) Moser, or Norritonville. Their children 
are: Herbert j\Ioser, born December 3, 1889; 
Henrietta Von Derau, born August 4. 1890; 
Henry Moser, born January 27, 1892; Ell wood, 
born December 24, 1894; Flora Moser, born April 
8, 1896; Grace Algemine, born October 22, 1898; 
Mabel Anna, born March 10, 1900; William, born 
May 24, 1901 ; and Ruth B., born October 23, 
1902. 

In politics Mr. Walton is a Republican. His 
father's family were old-line Whigs and Repub- 
licans, and, prior to the Rebellion, took an active 
interest in the anti-slavery movement. 

The Mosers are of German descent, and are a 



prominent family in the history of ]\Iontgomery 
county, having been long settled in the middle 
and upper townships. 

HOX. JOSEPH AMBLER SHOEMAKER, 
a resident of Jenkintown fox more than half a 
centur}-, and one of the most influential and popu- 
lar men in the lower end of ^Montgomery county, 
Pennsylvania, is a member of an honorable fam- 
ily of German descent, long resident in that 
county. The progenitor of the American branch 
of the family came to Philadelphia with William 
Penn in 1682, settled at Germantown, and in 
every generation since that time his descendants 
liave been among the most substantial and pub- 
lic-spirited citizens of that section of the state. 

Joseph Shoemaker, grandfather of Hon. Jo- 
seph A. Shoemaker, resided in Gwynedd town- 
ship, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, and by 
exercising the characteristics which he inherited 
from his forefathers — industry, enterprise and 
perseverance — he was successful in his business 
undertakings and was enabled to provide a com- 
fortable home for his family. He married Tacy 
Ambler, of Welsh descent, who bore him the 
following named children : Ezekial, John, Joseph,. 
Jesse, Ann. Ellen, and Hannah Shoemaker. 

John Shoemaker, father of Hon. Joseph A. 
Shoemaker, was born in Gwynedd township, 
Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, in 1790. 
After completing a common school education he 
learned the trade of harness maker, which line 
of business he pursued during his entire active 
career. He was a resident of Jenkintown for 
many years, during which time he took an active 
interest in its welfare and improvement, and in 
his old age, after retiring from business pursuits, 
he removed to Horsham township, where his 
death occurred in 1863, aged seventy-two years. 
His wife, Elizabeth (Logan) Shoemaker, daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Mary Logan, of Abington' 
township, bore him eight children, as follows : 
Hannah, who became the wife of John Jones ; 
]\Iaria. who became the wife of William Steel; 
Tacy, who became the wife of George Logan,. 
after the death of her sister. Jane, who was his 
tirst wife : INIartha ; Jo.seph A., mentioned here- 



OMEI 



■VTY. 



e history of Montgomery 
\ig settled in the middle 



rs for tht 



Wiiiianj 

r»S-7 "NJaotr 



E. W 
i. Hai' 





} 27, 1892; 




lora Moser. b' 




' j .' ■,;■■■! ulne. born October .. 


\d-: :•■■ 


■ r.i Ixrn March. lo. 1900; Willi.. 


.l.i> M. 


!.A... and Ruth B., bom Octvl- , . 


.joa. 




Tr .-,n!^ 


■■tu-. Vr ^Vn*t.-:n i^ r, Rrr,.,h'ican. I] 




Repub 




. active 



f German descent, and arc a 



'■: L RSHOEMAKJiR, 
• more than half a 
■ i I M'lluential and popu- 

■ J'ntgomery county, 
: an honorable fam- 
■-■ resident in that 
ie American branch 
li'hia with William 
inantown, and in 
e his descendants 
stantial and pub- 
'*n of the state. 
f Hon. Jo- 
iiedd town- 
uiia, and by 
he inherited 
.rprise and 
lis business- 
side a com- 
arried Tacy 
•e him the 
im, Joseph, 
aiuj ilauiiali Sho' naker. 
■A-r. father of Hon. Josepb 

in Gwynedd township, 

1 'eiins> Ivania, "n 1790. 

.,!ion school edi ation he 

i harness maker, w ich line 

"-i",,d during his enti, ■• active 

>Ident of Jenkinti vn for 

h time he took ai active 

- and improvement, nd in 

retiring' from business pu suits, 

Fiorsham township, wher his 

■ 1863, aged seventy-two y ;ars. 

:h (f-ogan) Shoemaker, dai gh- 

■ "'iry Logan, of Abingtoor 

i.rnt children, as follo\rs: 

V i Jie wife of John Jont^; 

.'i^iiu, uho i.'(:i:.inic the wife of William Steej; 

Tac\. vviio btrcame the wife 'if George Logan, 

after the- death of her si.Uer, Jane, who was his 

first wife: Martha; JosejJJi A., mentioned here- 




^ 



^ &-f'^'^.^:tyfl^-^^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



[45 



inafter; Elizabeth; and John, deceased. Of this 
family all are deceased but Martha and Joseph. 

Joseph A. Shoemaker was born in Gwynedd 
township, Alontgomery county, Pennsylvania, 
May 13, 1826. He was educated in the Friends' 
school at Gwynedd, then a flourishing institution, 
and he remained in that vicinity until he attained 
his thirteenth year. He then went to Philadel- 
phia county, and at the age of sixteen years be- 
came an apprentice to the blacksmith trade at 
Bridesburg, continuing in the same line after- 
wards in Upper Dublin township, Montgomery 
county. After completing his term of appren- 
ticeship he went to Broad Axe, Whitpain town- 
ship, remaining there two years. He then took 
up his residence in the state of Illinois, where he 
followed his trade of blacksmith for a short time, 
and upon his return east engaged in dealing in 
cattle and horses, and subsequently for one year 
was the tenant of a farm in Horsham township. 
His next occupation was the management of a 
sawmill in the same locality, which he operated 
with a fair degree of success for three years. In 
1853 he located in Jenkintown, and engaged in 
the butchering business in partnership with his 
brother-in-law, George Logan. He prospered in 
this occupation, accumulating a sufficient com- 
petency to allow him to retire from active pur- 
suits in 1885. He then erected a handsome resi- 
dence on a small farm, where he has resided up 
to the present time, surrounded by every com- 
fort and convenience, and where he is enjoying 
to the utmost a life of ease and luxury, which is 
a fitting climax to his many years of toil. Among 
the positions of trust and responsibility to which 
he was appointed are the following: director in 
the Jenkintown National Bank, treasurer of the 
Philadelphia Drovex-ard, director of the Masonic 
Hall Association, and president of the North 
Cedar Hill Cemetery Company, at Frank ford, 
Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Shoemaker is a thoroughgoing Republi- 
can, having supported the candidates and prin- 
ciples of that party from its organization to the 
present time, a period of more than fifty years, 
and having always been active in its behalf. He 
filled the position of councilman in Jenkintown 



for several years, and was president of the body 
for a time, devoting himself to the interests of 
the community in which he lives, as he has done 
in every office which he has held. He was the 
incumbent of the offices of assessor and assistant 
assessor, his good judgment and knowledge of 
real estate values standing him in good stead in 
these positions, and he also served repeatedly as 
an election 'officer. Owing to his prominence as 
a- party worker he has frequently been a delegate 
to county and state conventions, and assisted in 
framing the party ticket whiph has been pre- 
sented to the voters of the county and the com- 
monwealth on different occasions. In 1887 he 
was elected a member of the house of representa- 
tives at Harrisburg, and was re-elected by a 
handsome majority in 1889, serving two terms 
with great credit to himself and satisfaction to 
his constituents, in whose behalf he labored with 
industry, energy and fidelity. He was a member 
of the committee of the house at the session of 
1887, through whose instrumentality the splen- 
did work, "The Birds of Pennsylvania," was 
printed and distributed to the members of the 
General Assembly, and through them to their 
constituents throughout the state. In the session 
of 1889 he was chairman of the committee on 
geological survey, a member of the committee on 
printing, and also of those on corporations, con- 
gressional apportionment, banks and banking, 
and the committee to compare bills. In his legis- 
lative career Mr. Shoemaker was ever the friend 
of the people, leaving nothing undone that was 
possible to promote prosperity and the general 
welfare. There is no kinder neighbor or friend 
than he and no one who is more ready to do a 
favor for those who are deserving. He is 
actively and prominently identified with various 
fraternal organizations, holding membership in 
the Masonic order, the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. Knights of P\thias, and the Order 
of American Mechanics. 

Mr. Shoemaker married. January i. 1857, 
Esther Ann Harper, born June i, 1837, daughter 
of William Harper, of Abington. Five children 
were born of this union, as follows: i. Clara S., 
born October 30, 1837. became the wife of Dr. 



146 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Henry W. Wass, January i, 1880, and their chil- 
dren are: Mabel, born October 4, 1880, and 
Esther A. Shoemaker, born May i, 1886. 2. 
WilHam H., born June 29, 1859, died March 16, 
1902; he married, April 19, 1899, Katherine 
Saam, and they were the parents of one child, 
Amalia I. Shoemaker. 3. Henry, born October 
26, 1863, died January 21, 1865. 4. Lizzie L., 
born February 10, 1865, became the wife of Wil- 
liam H. Fretz, February 10, 1887, and their chil- 
dren are: Joseph Lewis, born January 3, 1889; 
Frank F., born March 19, 1895 ; Elizabeth L. S., 
born June 2, 1899 ; and Emily H., born Decem- 
ber 14, 1900. 5. Jennie L., born September 21, 
1874, became the wife of Dr. Harry C. Millar, 
September 26, 1895, and their children are, Kath- 
erine S., born September 27, 1897, and Joseph 
Ambler Shoemaker Millar,' born June 25, 1901. 
Mrs. Shoemaker, mother of these children, born 
June I, 1837, died August 3, 1902. She was a 
most estimable lady of the old school type, and 
was much esteemed for her many deeds of kind- 
ness and charitable acts to the deserving poor of 
the neighborhood. 

WILLIAM HARPER SHOEMAKER, de- 
ceased, who was born in Jenkintown, Pennsylva- 
nia, June 29, 1859, a son of Hon. Joseph A. and 
Esther (Harper) Shoemaker, was a representa- 
tive of a class of men whose value to a com- 
munity is not marked merely by the success that 
attends their efiEorts in business undertakings, 
but also by their character in public and private 
life. He was the descendant of two of the most 
prominent and most highly respected families of 
Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, sketches of 
whom with particulars as to their ancestry ap- 
pear in another part of this work. 

William H. Shoemaker was educated in the 
Friends' School in Abington, and afterward at- 
tended the Friends' Central High School located 
at Fifteenth and Race streets, Philadelphia. He 
then took a course in Pierce's Business College, 
graduating in 1880, after which he engaged in 
the butchering business with his father. At the 
expiration of two years he went to Colorado, re- 



maining in the west a year. Upon his return to 
Jenkintown he again engaged in the meat busi- 
ness and continued the same for six years. In 
1889 he purchased the ice business of James Sat- 
terthwaite at Ogontz, conducting it for a few 
years along the same lines as his predecessor, 
but, as Mr. Shoemaker was of a very progressive 
and enterprising disposition, he put in a machine 
for the manufacturing of ice, and in order to 
give the people of this vicinity a luxury drove 
artesian wells three hundred feet into rock to 
get the purest water that nature can produce. 
He was the first manufacturer of ice in this ter- 
ritory of Montgomery county, for which inno- 
vation he deserved and received great credit and 
praise. In addition to this extensive enterprise, 
he was also engaged in quarrying stone and sell- 
ing coal, and to these lines of work he devoted 
his personal attention up to the time of his de- 
cease. In 1893 he was elected a member of the 
town council, and during his several years in- 
cumbency of this office discharged his duties and 
obligations faithfully and efficiently. 

Mr. Shoemaker was a model citizen, and a 
successful business man in every sense of the 
word. In public and private life he was ever 
faithful to the duties that devolved upon him, 
meeting promptly and fully every obligation that 
he incurred. His name was synonymous with 
honorable dealing in all business transactions in 
which he was concerned. His short but active 
life demonstrated the possibilities that are open 
to young men, whose purpose is high and reso- 
lute, to become leaders in the affairs of business. 
It may be said of him that his death, which oc- 
curred March 16, 1902, was a shock to the whole 
community, of which he was an honored and 
useful member, all classes recognizing his sterl- 
ing worth. It is another instance in which death 
cut short prematurely an exceedingly promising 
career. 

Mr. Shoemaker married, in Philadelphia, 
April 19, 1899, Katherine Saam, who was born 
in that city, July 6, 1867, daughter of Conrad 
and Amalia (Immel) Saam. They are the par- 
ents of one child — Amalia Immel Shoemaker 




^/ 



1^-^. 



KRY COUNTY. 



1 Kiud- 


: ptior of 


t-MAKER, de- 


an, Pennsylva- 


Joseph A. and 


. 'opreSenta- 


• a com- 


ccess that 


LUidertakings, 


: lie and private 


, a isvo of the most 


respected families of 


\!\aiiia, skek'Iies of 



.tiiiing in the west a year. Upon his return to 
likintown he again engaged in the meat busi- 
* and continued the same for six years. In 

8S9 he purchased the ice business of James Sat- 
lorthwaite at Ogontz, conducting it for a few 
years along the same lines as his predecessor, 
but, as Mr. Shoemaker was of a very progressive 
and enterprising disposition, he put in a machine 
for the manufacturing of ice, and in order to 
give the people of this vicinity a luxury drove 
artesian wells three hundred feet into rock to 
gi't the purest water that nature can produce. 
He was the first manufacturer of ice in this ter- 
ritory of Montgomery county, for which inno- 
vation he deserved and received great credit and 
praise. In addition to this extensive enterprise, 
he was also engaged in quarrying stone and sell- 
ing coal, and to these lines of work he devoted 
his personal attention up to the time of his de- 
cease. In 1893 he was elected a member of the 
town council, and during his several years in- 
cumbency of this office discharged his duties and 
obligations faithfully and efficiently. 

Mr. Shoemaker was a model citizen, and a 
successful business man in every sense of the 
word. In public and private life he was ever 
faithful to the duties that devolved upon him, 
meeting promptly and fully every obligation that 
he incurred. His name was synonymous with 
honorable dealing in all business transactions in 
which he was concerned. His short but active 
!Tf<" demonstrated the possibilities that are open 
to >oimg men, whose purpose is high and reso- 
lute, lo become leaders in the affairs of business. 
It may be said of him that his death, which oc- 
i Mvred March 16, 1902, was a shock to the whole 
'Miiunity, of which he was an honored and 
ful member, all classes recognizing his sterl- 
ing worth. It is another instance in whiclj death 
cut short prematurely an exceedingly promising 
career. 

Mr. Shoemaker married, in Philadelphia, 

jjril 19, 1899, Katherine Saam, who was born 
111 that city, July 6, 1867, daughter of Conrad 
and Amalia (Imme!) Saam. They are the par- 
ents of one child — Amalia Immel Shoemaker — 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



t47 



born June 12, 1900. Conrad Saam was born in 
Marburg, Germany, in 1831, and died November 
3, 1898. His wife, who survives him, was also a 
native of Marburg, Germany. 

CHARLES DE PREFONTAINE, of Bhie 
Bell, Whitpain township, Montgomery county, 
who has long been usefully identified with the 
interests of the community, is of French descent, 
and his American ancestors date back to the co- 
onial period. His great-grandfather, John De 
Prefontaine, born in Philadelphia county, was a 
surveyor and conveyancer. He married Anna H. 
Buck and their son Benjamin was born in the 
county named, in 1790, and died there, fifth day, 
tenth month, 1828. He was a teacher by occu- 
pation. He married Phoebe Walters, and they 
were the parents of three children — Ann Eliza, 
who married Samuel Jones; Rebecca, who mar- 
ried Charles Paradee ; and John. 

John De Prefontaine, youngest child in the 
family named, was born September 30, 1819, and 
died October 5, 1894. He married ]\Iary Megar- 
gee, who was born October 16, 1819, and survived 
her husband nearly two years, dying September 
20, 1896. About 1848 this couple removed to a 
neighborhood above Germantown, near the Mont- 
gomery county line, where they lived and culti- 
vated a farm for about six years. For three years 
thereafter they lived upon a farm near Doyles- 
town, in Bucks county, and then settled at Jarret- 
town, in Upper Dublin township, where they spent 
the remainder of their lives. Their children were 
as follows : Charles, who is further referred to 
hereinafter; Walter, born October 28, 1845, ^"d 
died unmarried in 1866; Anna, born in March, 
1848, and married Francis Houpt, of Dresher- 
town; Joseph, bom June 6, 1850, and died Janu- 
ary 28, 1854; Albert, who was born in 1852, and 
married Emily Irvin, and resides in Philadelphia ; 
and William, of Jarrettown, who was born April 
12, 1855, and married Ida Tyson, of Horsham. 

Charles De Prefontaine, eldest child of John 
and 2vlary (Megargee) De Prefontaine. was 
born in Milestown, Philadelphia county, Penn- 
sylvania, January 7, 1844. As was usual, Charles 
began to aid in the farm work as soon as he was 



of suitable age, and his school attendance was lim- 
ited to such times in the winter as his labor was 
not necessary, and did not exceed more than four 
or five years altogether, closing with a brief at- 
tendance at the Germantown Academy, when he 
was in his seventeenth year. He made the best of 
his opportunities, however, and supplemented the 
instruction he had received with diligent private 
reading, thus equipping himself for a creditable 
discharge of every duty that came to him in after 
life. On leaving school he clerked in a store for 
an uncle, Albert Megargee, and then took em- 
ployment with another uncle, William Megargee, 
a dairyman and. farmer, for whom he sold milk 
for two years at Milestown, just over the Mont- 
gomery line, in Philadelphia county. On Feb- 
ruary 22, 1867, he married Emma Elizabeth, 
daughter of Joseph and Mary (Donivan) Shields, 
of Philadelphia. On April ist, of the same year, 
Mr. De Prefontaine removed to Blue Bell, in 
Whitpain township, which has since been his 
place of residence. He at once rented a building 
and opened a general store, which he conducted 
with such great success that in 1875 he was en- 
abled to purchase the property, and he removed 
his now greatly increased business to the adjoin- 
ing building, which he now occupies. In 1867 
he was appointed postmaster and he has con- 
ducted his office with such ability and integrity 
that he has been continued therein to the present 
time, covering the remarkable period of thirty- 
seven years. 

Mr. De Prefontaine is a man of marked public 
spirit, and has always afforded his unstinted aid 
to all that would conduce to the welfare of the 
community, but has never sought a political of- 
fice. He has always given an earnest and intelli- 
gent support to the principles and policies of the 
Republican party. In religious faith, he and his 
family are Methodists, members of the congrega- 
tion that meets at the Union Meeting House near 
Blue Bell, and where are buried I\Irs. De Prefon- 
taine, who died April 21, 1899, and a daughter, 
Anna Rebecca. Mr. De Prefontaine is a trustee 
and steward of his church, and for twenty-five 
years has been superintendent of its Sunday- 
school. 



148 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



The children of Mr. and Mrs. Charles De Pre- 
fontaine are as follows : 

1. Mary, born January 20, 1868, married 
November 24, 1892, Nathan, son of William 
and Elizabeth (Myers) ]\Iegargee, of Ogontz. 
They reside in Denver, Colorado, where Mr. 
Megargee is a member of the firm of Megargee 
& Malen, preservers of fruits, etc. Their chil- 
dren are: Glenn Earle, born in 1897; and Nathan 
Leslie, born in 1901. 

2. Kate, born August 19, 1870, married, 
March 27, 1894, Albert Tyson, of Horsham town- 
ship, and their children are Emma, Harold, and 
Russell. 

3. Anna Rebecca, born August 21, 1871, died 
April 15, 1895. 

4. Walter, born February 23, 1874; resides in 
Norristown, and is a music professor and director 
of music in the First Presbyterian church. He 
married, September 26, 1895, Rachel Mitchell. 
daughter of Charles and Mary Shaw (Conard) 
Shoemaker, and they are the parents of one child, 
Charles LeRoy, born October 25, 1896. 

5. Clara, born November 14, 1875, married, 
July 30, 1895, Albert, a son of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Fry, of Penllyn, and their children are Alice, 
Florence, Rachel and Albert. 

6. Emma, born April 18, 1877, married, March 
24, 1897, Oliver Edward, son of Edward Judson 
and Mary Jane (Child) Stannard. (See Stan- 
nard sketch elsewhere in this work.) Their chil- 
dren are : Clara Elizabeth, born January 3, 1898 ; 
Ethelyn Minerva, who was born December 29, 
1898, and died January 10, 1899 ; and Mary Jane 
Child, born July 26, 1901. 

7. Alice B., born March 17, 1880, is unmar- 
ried, and resides with her father. 

8. Charles, born August 8, 1882, assists 
his father in the conduct of the store. He mar- 
ried, March 23, 1904, Clara Shook, daughter of 
Albert and Cora Shook. 

:\IRS. :\IARY SHAW (CONARD) SHOE- 
MAKER, residing at No. 1930 Judson Place, 
Philadelphia, is the daughter of Joseph Phipps 
and Rebecca Adamson (Shaw) Conard. She 
wac born December 9, 1840, in the family home- 



stead, near Blue Bell, now occupied by her 
brother, Henry Fassett Conard. She attended 
the public school at Blue Bell until she reached 
her fifteenth year, and then remained with her 
parents until her marriage, on December 24, 1863, 
to Charles Shoemaker, son of Enoch and Rachel 
(Mitchell) Shoemaker, of Springfield township, 
Montgomery county. 

Charles Shoemaker was born in Springfield 
township, July 8, 1836, and there lived until 1878, 
when he removed to Whitpain. He was reared 
to the occupation of farming and followed it all 
his life. He was interested in whatever seemed 
likely to benefit his community. In politics he 
was a Republican, believing its principles best cal- 
culated to promote the progress and prosperity of 
the state and country. After his marriage, he 
rented the farm of his father, who had bought 
it of the Mitchell estate, until the spring of 1878. 
He was identified with the Ambler Building and 
Loan Association from 1883, being a director for 
several years and holding the office of vice presi- 
dent at the time of his death, which occurred Jan- 
uary 6, 1898. He was one of the organizers and 
first directors of the Ridge Avenue farmers' mar- 
ket. Mr. Shoemaker was not a public man, car- 
ing little for politics, finding his pleasures after 
the toil of the day, in the refuge of his home and 
with home companions. Mr. and Mrs. Shoe- 
maker had nine children. Joseph Conard, the 
eldest, born July 10, 1865, attended the public 
school at Blue Bell, and married, February 17, 
1887, Tacy C, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth 
(Conard) Walton. He is managing the farm 
formerly occupied by his parents near Blue Bell, 
and has three children. Enoch, second son of 
Charles and Mary Shoemaker, born November 
22. 1866, is deceased. Ella, born July 9, 1868. 
married John Bothwell, son of David and Mary 
(Eothwell) Park, of Horsham township, and they 
have two children, Benjamin P. W.. born De- 
cember II, 1896, and John Bothwell. Rebecca 
Jane, born January 23, 1871, is unmarried and 
resides in Philadelphia ; Rachel, born September 
10, 1873, married, September 26, 1895, Walter, 
son of Charles and Emma Elizabeth (Shields) 
De Prefontaine, of Blue Bell, and they have one 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



149 



■child, Charles Leroy, born October 25, 1896, and 
now residing in Xorristown where Mr. De Pre- 
fontaine is organist at the First Presbyterian 
■church. Annie Cora, born August 26, 1876, at- 
tended Abington Friends' School and the West 
Chester State Normal School, and is unmarried 
and resides in Philadelphia. Mary Klauder, born 
March 29, 1879, attended the public school at Blue 
Bell and also the Schissler College of Business at 
Norristown, is unmarried and resides in Phila- 
delphia. Charles, born September 30, 1881, at- 
tended the Blue Bell school and the Pierce College 
■of Business, in Philadelphia, and is engaged in 
the insurance business in that city. Frank, born 
August 3, 1884, attended school at Blue Bell and 
the Schissler College of Business, and resides in 
Philadelphia where he is engaged in commercial 
pursuits. 

The Conard family to which Mrs. Shoemaker 
belongs is one of the oldest as well as largest in 
Montgomery county, and is widely distributed 
elsewhere. Thones (or Dennis) Kunders, who 
was the founder of the family in this country, emi- 
grated from Germany in October, 1683, and was 
one of the early settlers of Germantown. In re- 
ligious belief he was a member of the Society 
of Friends, as are most of his descendants in this 
section of Pennsylvania. The first Friends' meet- 
ing in Germantown .was held at his house or cave, 
as their temporary homes hastily constructed in a 
new country, often were, soon after the arrival 
of the little band of immigrants. He had been a 
blue dyer in the fatherland, and he continued that 
humble occupation after settling in Germantown. 
The German immigrants believed in education, 
and as early as 1701 they made provision for it, 
by starting a school. In 1688 Thones Kunders 
was one of the little band of Germantown Friends 
who raised their voices against negro slavery, 
theirs being the first formal protest ever made in 
America in opposition to a system that ultimately 
led to such dreadful consequenc.es in bringing 
about the war of the Rebellion. In 1691, on a 
charter of incorporation being granted to the vil- 
lage of Germantown, Thones Kunders was chosen 
as one of the burgesses. He resided at German- 
town a period of forty-six years until his death. 



The name Kunders gradually became An- 
glicized into its present form. In 1722 Thones 
Kunders wrote his will and signed his name 
"Cunrads." In 1747, in the will of one of his sons, 
the name is spelled "Conrads," showing the evolu- 
tion to the established orthography of the present 
day, although another son spelled it "Conders," in 
accordance with the diversity of spelling that 
then often prevailed in the same family name. 

Henry Cunreds, the youngest son of the im- 
migrant, on May 16, 171 1, bought of Charles 
Mullen, a tract of two hundred and twenty acres 
and one hundred and eleven perches of land in 
Whitpain township. ]\Iontgomery county, Penn- 
sylvania. This tract was located near Blue Bell, 
and the small stone house which he built and in 
which he lived during the remaining forty-seven 
years of his life, was standing until within a few 
years. Joseph Conard, fifth son of Henry Cun- 
reds, and grandson of the founder of the family 
in this country, died in Whitpain in 1786. His 
second son, John Conard, married Sarah Childs. 
They had a family of eleven children, of whom 
the fourth was Joseph Phipps Conard, who mar- 
ried Rebecca Shaw in 1835. The couple had nine 
children, of whom the subject of this sketch was 
one. 

AMOS WALTON, a well-known farmer of 
W^hitpain township, is the son of Eber and Anna 
(Shaw) Walton. He was born in the house in 
which he now lives, November 16, 1832, near Blue 
Bell. He attended the public school at Sandy Hill 
until his eighteenth year, after which he engaged 
in farming with his father and later became man- 
ager of the farm, and finally its owner. He mar- 
ried, January 28, 1858, Henrietta, daughter of 
Francis and Annie (Lebold) Vonderau. Their 
children are as follows : William Eber, born Jan- 
uary 17, 1861, married Naomi, daughter of Henry 
and Susan (Smith) Moser, March 8, 1889; Fran- 
cis Vonderau, born November 7, 1863, married 
Emma L., daughter of Edward and Mary Ann 
(Betzold) Wilkey, of Spring House, Pennsyl- 
vania, April 3, 1888 ; Emma Vonderau, born Jan- 
uary 12, 1867, unmarried and resides with pa- 
rents : Annie Vonderau, born November 16. 1874, 



ISO 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



married Warren, son of Evan and Laura (Beck) 
Brooke, of Cold Point, September 21, 1899. 

The children of William E. and Naomi Wal- 
ton are : Herbert Moser, born December 3, 1889 ; 
Henrietta Vonderau, born August 4, 1890 ; Henry 
Moser, born January 27, 1892; Ellwood, born 
December 24, 1894: Flora Moser, born April 8, 
1896; Grace Altamine, born October 22, 1898; 
Mabel Annie, born March 10, 1900 ; William, born 
May 24, 1901 ; and Ruth, born October 23, 1902. 

The children of Francis V. and Emma L. Wal- 
ton are : Amos B., born January 8, 1889 ; Edward 
B., bom April 23, 1891, and Emma May. 

The children of Warren and Annie V. Brooke 
are : Emma Walton, born April 5, 1901 ; and I\Iar- 
guerite, born October i, 1902. 

Eber Walton (father) was born near Quaker- 
town, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, May 4, 1800. 
He was the son of Abraham Walton, also born in 
that locality a descendant of one of the early set- 
tlers. Abraham Walton (grandfather) removed 
with his family to Beaver county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1816, at the time when a tide of emigration was 
setting toward that part of the state. After he 
grew to manhood Eber Walton returned to Quak- 
ertown, and married, in 1823, Anna, daughter of 
Joseph Shaw, of that place, who was a member 
of a well-known family of Friends and a farmer. 
Soon after his marriage Eber Walton removed 
to Southampton township, Bucks county, where 
he established himself as a farmer. His next 
removal was to Plymouth township, Montgom- 
ery county, where he continued farming, and in 
1830 he purchased the farm where his son now 
resides, which is known as "Walmere." About 
1835 Abraham Walton removed his family from 
Beaver county, Pennsylvania, to Mount Etna, 
Indiana, where some of his descendants are now 
living. The children of Eber and Anna (Shaw) 
Walton are: Joseph, born December 19, 1825, 
married in 1847, Elizabeth, daughter of John and 
Sarah (Childs) Conard, of Whitpain township; 
Mary, born in 1827, died in infancy; Israel, born 
in November, 1829, married Tacy, daughter of 
James and Sarah Conard ; Amos, subject of this 
sketch ; Mahlon, born in 1834, died in 1857. 

Joseph Walton, after his marriage, with Eliza- 



beth Conard, settled on a farm adjoining that of 
his father. Their children are: John and Sarah 
(twins), bom in 1848, John marrying Margaret, 
daughter of Jonathan Ambler, of Maryland, and 
living at Ouakertown. 

Israel and Tacy (Conard) Walton have one 
son, Henry Conard, who was born in 1857, mar- 
ried Winifred, daughter of Ethan Weidner, of 
Wliitpain township, they living in Philadelphia. 

Since coming into possession of the home- 
stead Amos Walton has managed it as a dairy 
and general farm, and has been very successful 
in his vocation. The Waltons for many genera- 
tions have been members of the Society of 
Friends, attending Plymouth Preparative and 
Gwynedd Monthly Meetings. In politics Amos 
A\'alton is a Republican, as are all the family. 

^^'ALTER DePREFONTAINE, organist at 
the First Presbyterian church, Norristown, is a 
native of Whitpain township, where the DePrefon- 
taines, originally of French extraction, have long 
been domiciled. He was born at Blue Bell, Feb- 
ruary 23, 1874, being the son of Charles Paradee 
DePrefontaine and Emma Elizabeth (Shields) 
DePrefontaine. Walter DePrefontaine attended 
the Central public school at Blue Bell, also assist- 
ing his father in the store, and graduated from the 
township high school at sixteen years of age. He 
then for one year attended Sunnyside Academy, 
the well-known school kept for many years by the 
Misses Knight, at Ambler. At the same time he 
took up the study of instrumental music under 
private tuition, and ultimately entered the musical 
profession. 

]\Ir. DePrefontaine married, September 26, 
1895, Rachael IMitchell, daughter of Charles and 
;\Iary Shaw (Conard) Shoemaker, of Blue Bell. 
They have one son, Charles LeRoy, born October 
25, 1896. 

Mr. DePrefontaine was for nine years organ- 
ist at St. Thomas' Episcopal church, at White- 
marsh. He also did much teaching of instru- 
mental music in Whitpain and adjoining town- 
ships until December, 1902, when he removed to 
Norristown, where he continues his profession of 
musical director, making a specialty of the organ. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



and occupies the position of organist at the First 
Presbyterian church, comer of DeKalb and Airy 
streets, one of the largest and most important of 
that denomination in the county of Montgomery. 

Mr. DePrefontaine, apart from his devotion 
to his profession, takes an active interest in pub- 
he affairs. He is a Repubhcan in pohtics. In re- 
ligious faith he is a Methodist, as have been the 
DePrefontaines for many generations. 

Charles P. DePrefontaine (father) has for 
many years conducted the general store and post 
office at Blue Bell. He is the oldest child of John 
and Mary (Megargee) DePrefontaine. Their 
son Charles (father), born January 7, 1844. at 
Milestown, married, February 22, 1866, Emma 
Elizabeth Shields, born May 3, 1842, and their 
children are: Mary, born January 20, 1868, mar- 
ried Nathan James, son of William and Elizabeth 
Megargee, of Milestown, they living in Denver, 
Colorado, and having two children, Glenii Earle 
and Nathan Leslie. Kate, born August 19, 1870, 
married Alarch 27, 1894, Albert A. Tyson, of 
Horsham, their children being, Emma D., born 
August 17, 1895, Horald, born October, 1898, and 
Albert R., born 1900. Anna Rebecca, born Au- 
gust 21, 1872, died in April, 1895. Walter is the 
next of the family. Clara, born November 14, 
1875, married July 30, 1895, Albert, son of John 
Fry, and has four children, Alice, born Janu- 
ary 19, 1897; Florence May, born July 19, 1899: 
Rachel, born in May, 1901 ; and Albert. Emma, 
born April 18, 1877, married, March 24, 1897, 
Oliver Edward, son of Edward Judson and Mary 
Jane (Child) Stannard, of Whitpain, their chil- 
dren being, Clara Elizabeth (1898) ; Ethelyn 
Minerva (1898, died 1899); ]\Iary Jane Child 
(1901). Alice born March 16, 1880, is unmarried : 
Charles born August 8, 1882, married Clara 
Ward Shook, March 23, 1904. 

John DePrefontaine (grandfather) ami Mary 
Megargee, his wife, had the following children : 
Charles Pardee (father) ; Walter, born in 1845, 
died unmarried in 1866; Anna, born in 1848, 
married Francis Houpt, of Dreshertown ; Joseph, 
bom June 6, 1850. died January 28, 1854: Albert, 
born in 1852, married Emily Irvin and lived in 
Philadelphia; William, born April 12, 1853. mar- 



ried Ida Tyson, of Horsham, and lived at Jarret- 
town. 

Rachel Mitchell, daughter of Charles and :\Iary 
Shaw (Conard) Shoemaker, was born at Barreij 
Hill. Her parents soon afterward removed to 
Blue Bell, where she attended the public schools 
and later the Abington Friends school, and, after 
taking a course at Pierce's Business School, Phil- 
adelphia, was employed at office work for several 
years. Charles and Mary Shoemaker had the 
following children : Joseph Conard, born July 10, 
1865, married February 17, 1886, Tacy Conard, 
daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Conard) Wal- 
ton, their children being : Elizabeth Walton, born 
September 15, 1887; Sarah Pearl, born in 1895; 
Violet, born 1897 : and Joseph Conard, born No- 
vember, 1899; Enoch (deceased) ; Ella,born July 
9, 1868, married, ;\Iarch 7. 1895, John Bothwell^ 
son of David and Mary (Bothwell) Park, of 
Horsham township, their children being, Benja- 
min Pennypacker Wertsner, born December 19, 
1895, and John Bothwell, born in July, 1899 ; Re- 
becca Jane, born January 2;^,. 1871, unmarried and 
lives in Judson Place, Philadelphia; Rachael 
Mitchell, born September 10, 1873, married, Sep- 
tember 26, 1895, Walter DePrefontaine; Annie 
C, born August 26, 1876, unmarried, resides at 
Judson Place, Philadelphia; Mary Klauder, bom 
March 29, 1879, and Charles, born September 30, 
1881, are unmarried; Frank, born August 31, 
1884, is living in Philadelphia. 

Benjamin DePrefontaine, father of John 
DePrefontaine, was born in 1790 and died Oc- 
tober 5, 1828. He married Phoebe Walters. 

Charles Shoemaker, father of Rachael Mi 
Shoemaker, was born July 8, 1836, and died 
January 6, 1898. He married December 24, 1863, 
Alary Shaw Conard, born December 9, 1840. 

JOHN BERKHIMER, one of the best-known 
farmers of Whitpain, was born April 18, 1846, 
in Upper Dublin township, Montgomery county, 
Pennsylvania. He is the son of Jacob and Tacy 
Weber (Deaves) Berkhimer, his father being a 
farmer. The son was brought up to hard work 
on the farm, going to. school when there was 
nothing to be done at home, as it was a well- 



rs^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



settled principle at that time that work must not 
be interfered with for the secondary purpose of 
gaining an education. On reaching his eighteenth 
year he laid aside his books and betook himself en- 
tirely to the cultivation of the soil. At the age of 
twenty-one years he was apprenticed to the trade 
of stonemason, at which he worked for ten years, 
and then again engaged in the occupation of farm- 
ing in Plymouth township, when he rented the old 
Berkhimer homestead known as the Maples, suc- 
ceeding to the title on the settlement of his father's 
estate, which occurred in the year 1895. The 
Maples contains sixty-four acres of rolling and 
highly fertile land, part of it heavily timbered. 
and all in a fine state of cultivation. The farm 
takes its name from the many maple trees that 
surround the dwelling and are found elsewhere on 
the place. Mr. Berkhimer operates The ^Maples 
as a dairy and truck farm, his products being 
shipped to the Philadelphia markets. 

Mr. Berkhimer has been twice married. His 
first wife was Susanna Rex, of Plymouth town- 
ship. Their children are: Tacy, born June 27, 
1868, unmarried; and Mary Ann, born January 
2, 1874, unmarried. Both daughters reside at 
The Maples. Mrs. Berkhimer died September 10, 
1877, and he married (second wife) Mrs. Jose- 
phine Rapine, widow of Jerome Rapine, of White- 
marsh township. ]\Irs. Rapine, whose maiden 
name was Hallman. had two children by her first 
marriage. 

Mr. Berkhimer has always been actively inter- 
ested in the attairs of his community. He is a 
Democrat in politics. He is a member of the 
Baptist church, at Cold Point, Plymouth town- 
ship, of which he is a trustee. He is a progres- 
sive citizen and engaged earnestly in whatever 
tends to religious and social improvement. 

Jacob Berkhimer (father) was born January 
6, 1809. He was the son of George and Margaret 
Berhimer. He married, November 14, 1841, Tacy 
Weber Deaves. Her mother was Tacy Weber, of 
Fairview Farm, at Sandy Hill, in Whitpain town- 
ship. Their children are: Susanna Deaves, born 
September 27, 1842, married, June 3, 1869, Nich- 
olas R., son of William and ]Marv Ann Rex, of 



Plymouth township ; George E., born January 13, 
1845, died July 3, 1845, ^"d was buried at Ply- 
mouth Meeting; John, subject of this sketch; 
William D., born j\Iay 22, 1848, married 
Margaret, daughter of Joel Dewees, of 
Whitpain township, they living on the 
township line near Blue Bell road, in 
\\'hitpain ; Isaac, born in 1848, died Au- 
gust 13, 1848; Mary Elizabeth, born October 5, 
1850, died September 22, 185 1; Jesse, born Oc- 
tober 5, 1852, married Sarah, daughter of Will- 
iam Moore, who dying, he married (second wife) 
Emily, daughter of Samuel and Sarah Fisher, 
they living at West Ambler ; Jacob Alartin, born 
December 25, 1854, married Sarah J. Thomas, 
of Harmonville, in Whitemarsh township, where 
they live, having one daughter ; Charles, born ^lay 
3, 1859, unmarried, lives at Fairview Farm, and 
owns the property which formerly belonged to his 
grandfather Deaves, and prior to that to his 
great-grandfather Weber, who held it from his 
father. 

The children of Nicholas R. and Susanna D. 
(Berkhimer) Rex are: Jacob, born November 11, 
1871, died July 11, 1872; Mary Ann, bom Sep- 
tember 22, 1877, died September 6, 1878; Will- 
lam Berkhimer, born September 24, 1882, unmar- 
ried and resides at Fairview, where he assists his 
uncle, Charles Berkhimer, in managing the farm. 

George Berkhimer (grandfather) was born 
October i, 1773. 

George Berkhimer (great-grandfather) was 
born in 1750. 

GEORGE MICHAEL SCHWAB, deceased, 
was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, Oberamt- 
Kintzelsau, town of Hollenbach, January 16, 
1834. He was the son of Tobias and Barbara 
( Steichauf ) Schwab. They had eight children, 
four sons and four daughters, three of whom are 
now living as follows : Frederick, of Charlotte 
street, Pottstown ; Charles Tobias, of Stowe, 
Pennsylvania : and John, of Shelby, Ohio. Bar- 
bara, is the deceased wife of Leonard Rahn, of 
Hollenbach, Germany. 

The father of Mr. Schwab was a baker, land- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



t53 



owner and farmer. He died in Germany at the 
age of more than fifty years. His widow Hved 
to seventy years or more. 

Mr. Schwab's grandfather, Steichauf, was a 
farmer in Germany and died there at an advanced 
■age. 

George M. Schwab, now deceased, was about 
nineteen years of age when he came to America. 
He worked in a bakery in Philadelphia for sev- 
•eral years. He then went to Pottstown and was 
■employed with Michael Spindler in his bakery for 
four years. He then opened a bakery on his own 
account on High street and succeeded in estab- 
lishing a large business which he continued un- 
til his death. He also was a director in the Citi- 
zens National Bank of Pottstown. 

On April 9, 1859, George M. Schwab mar- 
ried Catharine Schurg, daughter of Johann 
Michael and Clara (Honung) Schurg. The 
ceremony was performed by the Rev. George F. 
Miller. The couple had seven children, three 
:sons and four daughters : Clara Barbara, unmar- 
ried ; Anna Margaret, who became the wife of 
T. Walter Baer, and they are the parents of three 
■daughters: Ethel G., Mabel F., and Florence E. 
Baer; they reside in Philadelphia; Marie T., 
who became the wife of Allen A. Trout, of Potts- 
town, Pennsylvania, and died two years later at 
the age of twenty -two years, leaving a daughter. 
Flora M., now also deceased; Katharin Eliza- 
beth, unmarried ; George William, unmarried ; 
■Charles Frederick, unmarried ; and Martin 
Luther, unmarried. 

George M. Schwab died March 7, 1896, in 
his sixty-third year. His widow, who survives, 
was born in Bartenstein, Germany Oberampt- 
I Gerebrunn, May 5, 1836. She is an active mem- 
. ber of Emmanuel Lutheran church, as was her 
1 husband. He served on the church council for 
j some years. 

Airs. Scliwab's mother died when her daugh- 
ter was a mere child. Her father died in 1876, 
at the age of seventy-six years. They had ten 
children, six sons and four daughters, seven of 
whom are now living, as follows : York, Lewis, 
John. Andreas, Leonard, Catharine (Mrs. 
Schwab), and Alarv, wife of Frederick Schwab. 



Mrs. Schwab's paternal grandfather was John 
Schurg. He was a farmer in Germany. His 
wife's name was Clara. They had a small 
family. 

Mrs. Schwab's maternal grandfather was 
Michael Honung. He was a farmer and died in 
Germany, at the age of eighty-two years. He 
had three children, one son and two daughters. 

Mr. Schwab was an Odd Fellow. In, politics 
he was a Democrat. He was one of Pottstown's 
prominent and highly respected citizens. He 
accumulated money and property by his industry 
and good management. He was a man of the 
highest integrity and was thoroughly respected 
b\' the communit}' in which he lived. He died, 
leaving behind him a good name, — the most 
precious of legacies — to his children. In 1884 
he took a trip to his fatherland and also visited 
Belgium, France and Switzerland, and in 1888 
his eldest daughter made a trip to the same 
country. 

EDWARD JUDSON STANNARD, one of 
the prominent farmers of Whitpain township, is 
the son of Heman and Minerva Stannard. He 
was born at Fairhaven, Vermont, December 12, 
1829. He attended school at that place in the in- 
tervals of work on the farm, and at sixteen years 
of age entered Castleton Seminary, at Castleton, 
\'ermont. After spending a year at that institu- 
tion, he returned to the farm and again took up 
the work of assisting in farm management until 
the death of his father, when he assumed its 
management. 

In 1869 Mr. Stannard married Alary Jane, 
daughter of Oliver and Edith (Shaw) Child, he 
originally of Carthage, New York, and she of 
Quakerstown, Bucks county, Pennsylvania. Mrs. 
Stannard was born August 26, 1838. Their chil- 
dren are Ethelyn Alinerva, born July 7, 1870, un- 
married, resides with her parents; Oliver Ed- 
ward, born November 2, 1871, married, March 
24, 1897, Emma, born .\pril iS, 1877, daughter of 
Charles and Elizabeth (Sheild) DePrefontaine, of 
Blue Bell, their children being. Clara Elizabeth, 
born January 3. 1898; Ethel}Ti Alinerva. born 
Decemjjer 29. 1898. and tlied January 10. 1899; 



154 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Mary Jane Child, born July 26, 190 1 ; and one 
died in infancy ; Lewis Judson, born May 2, 1875, 
married Bertha Elizabeth, daughter of Albert 
and Mary (Craft) Rile, residing in the vicinity, 
and having two children, Mary Elizabeth, born 
June 13, 1898, and Edith R., born May 18, 1900; 
Edith B., born February 18, 1877, died August 
26, 1877; Edward Judson, born February 20, 
1881, died August 30, 1881. 

In the spring of 1876 Edward J. Stannard left 
Fairhaven, having purchased the farm on which 
he now resides, which is known as South View, 
the name being suggested by the slope of the land 
in that direction, and the great extent of country 
that can be seen from the house. The farm con- 
tains seventy acres of fine land. It was formerly 
the property of William Zorn, who was a relative 
of Mrs. Stannard. 

Heman Stannard (father) was the son of 
Samuel and Jemima (Wilcox) Stannard. He 
was born in Collingsworth, Connecticut, Decem- 
ber 27, 1780. He married, September 5, 1809, 
Minerva, daughter of Samuel Smith, a farmer of 
Fairhaven, Vermont. Their children : Betsy, born 
June 23, 1810, married Almon Bartholomew, of 
Whitehall, New York; infant, born June 23, 1812 ; 
Samuel, born December 29, 1813, died September 
15, 1815; Eliza B., born May 15, 1816, married 
Satterlee Miller, of Fairhaven, Vermont ; Julia B., 
born April 4, 1820, married Edmund Kirtland, of 
Grandville, New York; Mary Ann, born April 
20, 1823, unmarried, and resides at West Poult- 
ney, New York; Heman, born February 3, 1826, 
married Maria Kirtland ; Edward Judson, subject 
of this sketch, and Charlott, deceased. 

Samuel Stannard (grandfather) was born in 
Collingsworth, Connecticut in 1749, the family 
having long been residents of that place. He 
was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. He re- 
moved to Fairhaven, Vermont, and became a 
valued member of that community, much inter- 
ested in its prosperity. In 1770 he married Je- 
mima Wilcox, born in 1746. Their children : 
Betsy, born August 12, 1771, married Ansel Mer- 
ritt, and removed to Pottsdam, New York ; Daniel, 
born January 14. 1773, married ]\Iary Davidson, 
of Fairhaven, A'ermont ; Charlotte, born Novem- 



ber 23, 1774, married Bohan Sheppard, and was 
left a widow with several children ; Eliza married 
Oliver Childs, whose first wife was Edith, daugh- 
ter of John Shaw and Elizabeth (Ball) Shaw, of 
Quakertown, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, and 
mother of Mary Jane Child, wife of Edward J. 
Stannard ; .Samuel, born October i, 1776, married 
Reubena Petty, of Georgia, Vermont, their child 
being General Samuel George Stannard, of St. 
Albans, Vermont, who lost an arm at Gettysburg ; 
Heman (father) born in 1780, died Mav 16, 
1863. 

Edward J. Stannard is a Republican in poli- 
tics and has always taken an active interest in 
party success. In Fairhaven, where he resided 
the greater part of his life, he was more prom- 
inently identified with politics than he has been 
since his coming to Pennsylvania. He became a 
member of the party on its organization in 1856, 
having prior to that time supported the principles 
and candidates of the Whig party. The Stan- 
nard family are Episcopalians in religious faith 
and they are members of St. Thomas' Episcopal 
church, of Whitemarsh. 

Samuel Stannard (grandfather) enlisted in 
the Revolutionary war in the Seventh Regiment, 
Connecticut Troops, under Colonel Charles 
Webb, and Captain Nathaniel Tuttle, July 14,^ 
1775. He participated in the battles of German- 
town and Monmouth. He was at the Valley 
Forge camp ground during the winter of 1778-9 
and at Morristown, New Jersey, in 1779-80. He 
became a sergeant, August 18, 1780, and at the 
close of the Revolution returned to Fairhaven, 
Vermont and received the appointment of captain 
of the Vermont state militia. 

JOSEPH WARREN McCANN was the 
youngest child of Philip Rees and Elizabeth 
(Watts) McCann. He was born February 12, 
1866, in the house in which he now lives, which 
was piirchased by his grandfather, John McCann, 
in 1814. It is situated on the Blue Bell road, 
about a mile south of the village. It is known as 
Spring Valley Farm, and contains forty-eight 
acres of highly cultivated land, sloping toward 
the south and west. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



[55 



Soon after his birth his parents removed to 
Plymouth township where his father had rented a 
farm. Remaining there one year, the family re- 
moved to Chestnut Hill where they resided for 
some year as tenants, after which they returned 
to Spring Valley where the family has since re- 
sided, and where Philip Rees IMcCann died, Jan- 
uary 22, 1890. 

Joseph W. McCann received his education 
largely at Chestnut Hill school and Bryant and 
Stratton's Business College at Philadelphia. He 
married, September 6, 1892, Mary, daughter of 
Ezekiah and Isabella (Deane) Hallman. Their 
children are : William Phillips, born May 6, 1893 ; 
Joseph Warren, born December 28, 1895 ; 
Maurice Albert and Thomas Jesse, twins, born in 
1898. 

Joseph W. McCann conducts the Spring Val- 
ley Farm in conjunction with his sister, Ann 
Catharine, who owns the place. They operate the 
place as a vegetable farm and attend the Phil- 
adelphia market. 

Philip Rees McCann (father), born Septem- 
ber 16, 1816, was the son of John and Ann 
(McAfTee) McCann. He married Elizabeth 
Watts, of Sellersville. They had the following- 
named children : Ann Catharine, born June 20, 
1847, proprietor of the homestead. Spring Val- 
ley, is unmarried and makes her home with her 
brother Joseph. 2. Helen Virginia, born Febru- 
ary I, 1849, married, October 20, 1883, Frederick 
Mutchmore, of Ohio, and had three children. 
George, born February 12, 1886 (deceased), 
Minnie, born August 30, 1888, and Helen, born 
February 26, 1890. Mr. and Mrs. INIutchmore re- 
side at Mount Airy, Philadelphia. 3. Thomas Jef- 
ferson has the following children : Gertrude Eliza- 
beth, born October 31, 1880, and resides with her 
parents at Barren Hill ; Mabel, who died August 
26, 1901 : Grover Cleveland, born ^lay 15, 1899; 
and Francis, born in 1891 ; 4. William, born July 
22, 1854, married in April, 1903, Elvie, daughter 
of Jones Detwiler, they living near Blue Bell. 
William is road supervisor of Whitpain town- 
ship. 5. I\Tary, born August 28, 1856, married 
James P. Simpson, of Baltimore, Maryland, they 
having five children: Grace, born September 13, 



1890; Edith Elizabeth, born October 12, 1891 ; 
James P., born September 3, 1894; Laura, born 
September 12, 1897 ; and Alary, born in February, 
1899. 6. Hepsy Norris, born July 4, 1858, married 
George L. Watson and they have three children : 
Ethel, born September 11, 1887, Elizabeth born 
June 18, 1890; and Leon, born February 15, 1893. 
They live in West Philadelphia. 7. Martha Con- 
ard, born April 29, i860, married Jacob Engle- 
nian, of Bustleton, Philadelphia ; they having five 
children, as follows : Marion Sarah, born March 
3, 1888; Edna, bom March 12, 1890; Florence, 
born March 12, 1892; Myrtle, born January 3, 
1896, and Jacob Schlichter; 8. J. Warren is the 
subject of this sketch. 

John McCann (grandfather) was born in Ire- 
land, April 14, 1770, married Ann McAffee, born 
,\pril 13, 1778. John McCann was a contractor 
and fanner in Norristown. 

CHARLES BERKHIMER, son of Jacob and 
Tacy Weber (Deaves) Berkhimer, was born at 
Fairview, the old homestead of the Weber fam- 
ily, at Sandy Hill, in Whitpain township, May 3, 
1859. He attended school at Sandy Hill until his 
seventeenth year, beside assisting his father on the 
farm during the intervals of school study. After 
the death of his parents he became owner of the 
farm, which takes its name f ram the elevated posi- 
tion of the land from which the surrounding 
country may be seen in every direction for many 
miles. Few places in Montgomery county offer 
better facilities in the way of scenery than may 
be enjoyed from the door of the old stone man- 
sion of Fairview Farm. 

Charles Berkhimer is unmarried and the pre- 
siding genius in his household is his widowed 
sister, Mrs. Rex, who with her son, assists in the 
management of the farm. 

Jacob Berkhimer (father), born January 6, 
1809, married November 25, 1841, Tacy Weber 
Deaves, born June 23, 1814. Their children are: 
Susanna Deaves, born September 27, 1842, mar- 
ried June 3, 1869, Nicholas Rex, born July 25, 
1842, son of William and Mary Ann Rex, of 
Plymouth township, their children being Jacob 
and Mary Ann (died in infancy) ; and \\'illiam 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Berkhimer, born September 24, 1882, residing at 
"Fairview Farm," with his mother and uncle, his 
father, Nicholas Rex, having died June 25, 1883. 
George E., second child of Jacob Berkhimer, born 
Januar}^ 13, 1845, died July 3, 1845. John, born 
April 18, 1846, married Susanna Rex (first wife), 
whose daughters Tacy B., born June 22, 1868, and 
Mary Ann, born January 2, 1874, reside with 
their father at the Maples in Whitpain township. 
Susanna Berkhimer having died December 10, 
1877, John Berkhimer married (second wife) 
Mrs. Josephine (Hallman) Rapine, widow of Je- 
rome Rapine, of Whitemarsh township, by whom 
she had two children. William Deaves, born May 
22, 1848, married JMargaret, daughter of Joel De- 
wees, of Whitpain township, they living on the 
Township Line road near Blue Bell. Isaac, born in 
1848, died in infancy. Mary Elizabeth,, born in 
1850, and died in infancy. Jesse Deaves, born Oc- 
tober 5, 1852, married Sarah, daughter of Will- 
iam Moore, and she having died, married (second 
wife) Emily, daughter of Samuel and Sarah 
Fisher, they residing at West Ambler. Jacob 
Martin, born on Christmas day, 1854, married 
Sarah J. Thomas, of Harmanville, where they live. 
Charles is the other member of the family. 

Air. Berkhimer's grandfather, George Berk- 
himer, was born in 1773. He was the son of 
George Berkhimer, born in 1750. 

HENRY FASSETT CONARD was born 
October 22, 1849, and is a son of Joseph Phipps 
and Rebecca A. (Shaw) Conard. The father 
was born December 24, 1812, and on the 12th of 
March, 1835, was married to Rebecca A. Shaw. 
He died November 26, 1897, and his wife in 
April, 1873. They became the parents of the fol- 
lowing named : Charles E., who was bom Febru- 
ary 9, 1836, died on the loth of April of the same 
year ; Ann W., born June 13, 1837, married Jacob 
T. Buckman, April 14, 1859; Mary S., born De- 
cember 9, 1840, became the wife of Charles Shoe- 
maker, December 24, 1863 ; Alice S., born ]\Iay 
10, 1843, was married February 13, 1877, to John 
Walton; Elizabeth R.. born March 15, 1847. is the 
wife of Franklin Stackhouse ; Henry Fassett is 
the sixth of the family ; Ehvood, born September 



25, 1852, married Ella Burk, September 3, 1883 ; 
Israel S., born June i, 1856, was married ]\Iarch 
16, 1880, to Jane Cline; John R. born January 8, 
i860, died April 2, 1861. The father of this 
family was a strong anti-slavery man prior to 
the Civil war. He gave his political support to 
the Whig party in early life and when the Re- 
publican party was formed to prevent the further 
extension of slavery he joined its ranks and was 
one of its valiant supporters in his township. His 
ancestors were connected with the Federalist 
party. His farm contains fifty-nine acres of un- 
dulating land and the place is richly cultivated, re- 
turning golden harvests for the care and labor 
bestowed upon it. 

Henry Fassett Conard attended the central 
public school at Blue Bell, where he completed a 
good education. In the meantime he assisted in 
the operation of the home farm until his nine- 
teenth year, becoming familiar with farm work in 
all of its departments. At length he succeeded his 
father in the ownership of the old homestead and 
engaged there in general farming and dairying. 
He is now assisted by his second son Eugene in 
the cultivation of the home place and he uses four 
horses in operating his land. Everything about 
his farm is neat and thrifty in appearance and in- 
dicates his careful supervision. 

In his political view Mr. Conard is a Pro- 
hibitionist, giving his allegiance to the party be- 
cause of his earnest interest in the temperance 
question. Previous to his affiliation with the 
Prohibition party he was a Republican. He is a 
member of the Society of Friends, belonging to 
Plymouth Meeting, in which his ancestors wor- 
shipped for many generations. 

Mr. Conard was married on the 6th of July, 
1875, to Miss Sarah H. Nice, a daughter of 
Harper and ]\Iary Kelter (Large) Nice, who were 
residents of Broad Axe, Whitpain township, 
Montgomer}- county. Her father was born March 
29, 1815, at Branchtown, Philadelphia county, a 
son of John and Sarah (Harper) Nice. The 
mother of Airs. Conard was a daughter of Jesse 
and Katherine (Kelter) Large. Harper Nice and 
Mary Kelter Large were married February 20, 
1840, and unto them were born nine children: 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



157 



Lemuel, bom March 29, 1841, was married to 
Rebecca Fisher, September 22, 1864 : Jesse Large, 
bom June 12, 1842, married Mar\- Catherine 
Rossiter, October 9, 1861 : Catherine Large, bom 
December 26, 1843. was married November 5. 
1867, to John N. Slingluff : John, bom August i, 
1845, died September 12, 1863 ; Jacob Large, bom 
October 13, 1848, was married to Irene Whit- 
comb, March 18, 1869: Harper, bom March 26, 
1850, was married to Annie Elizabeth Stout, No- 
vember 24, 1874; Eugene Edgar, bom July 30, 
1852, was married to Hester Wertzner, Novem- 
ber 4, 1875 ; Sarah Harper Large, bom July 25, 
1854, is the wiie of Mr. Conard; and Horace 
Humphrey, bom April 8, 1857, died November 
4, 1859- 

Unto Mr. and ilrs. Conard have beei bom 
five children: Walter, married Bertha A. 
Bitting, a daughter of C. C. Bitting. They 
reside at Cheltenham, ilontgomery count}-. 
Eugene Nice, bom ^Nlarch 24. 1879, mar- 
ried Delia Bertha SlingluflF, a daughter of 
Henr>- G. and Flora (Kinsen) Slingluff, the wed- 
ding taking place April 10, 1901. They reside 
upon the old family hranestead, Eugene Nice as- 
sisting his father in its operation. By his mar- 
riage he has one child, Veral LeRoy Qmard, bom 
June 20, 1903. Alice Rebecca, bom January- 30, 
1881, is at home with her parents. Joseph 
Harper, bom November i, 1883. died Septem- 
ber 14. 1884. Mary Catherine, bom December 
30. 1885. resides athcxne. unmarried. 

JOHN SCHIRNrER, who foUows farming in 
\Miitpain township, Mcmtgomery county, was 
bom in -\llfields. in the duchy of Baden, Ger- 
many, on the 1 2th of May. 1837. His parents 
were Killian and Joseppa (Yeomani Schirmer. 
The father was a farmer by occupaticm and at an 
early age John Schirmer became his assistant in 
the cultivation and impro\-ement of the land which 
he operated. In the winter he was accorded the 
privilege of attending the parochial school in the 
home parish imtil his fourteenth year. After that 
his entire attention was devoted to farm work 
- until he attained his majority. In the meantime 
^^ had mentally discussed the possibilities of the 



new lorld and reviewed the sittiation as he imder- 
stood it, and had resolved to seek a hc«ie and 
fortune beycmd the Atlantic. Accordingly he 
sailed for the United States and settled in New 
Jersey, where he remained for eight months. On 
the expiration of that period he removed to Phil- 
adelphia, Pennsylvania, where he learned the 
trade of shoemaking, which he followed for more 
chan six years. Leaving that dty he tocdc up his 
abode in Horsham township, Montgomery cotmty, 
where he purchased a small farm of ten acres, 
continuing its cultivation for six years. He then 
sold the property- and bought an adjoining tract 
of land of twentj-three acres, which he also cul- 
tivated and improved for a period of six years. 
He then disposed of his second farm and pur- 
chased his present property-, comprising forty 
acres of rich rolling land which is highly cul- 
tivable and is now splendidly improved. He has 
lived upon this place for twenty-six years and his 
labors have been effective in making it a very 
productive tract so that it returns to him a good 
income for his labors. 

-After coming to -\merica ilr. Schirmer took 
out naturalization papers and became a citizen of 
the republic He has always voted the Demo- 
cratic ticket and while he has never taken an ac- 
tive part in politics as an officer seeker he has 
always felt a deep interest in movements pertain- 
ing to flie general welfare and his labors have been 
a co-operant factor in many measures for the 
public good. His religious faith is that of the 
Catholic church. 

On the 27th of January-, 1861. Mr. Schirmer 
was united in marriage to Miss Wilheknina Kel- 
ler, a daughter of -\nton and Katherine Keller, 
who were at that time residents of Philadelphia, 
but were natives of Canton .\rkan. Switzerland. 
L'nto Mr. and Mrs. Schirmer have been bom ten 
children. Mar>- Caroline, the eldest, bom June 
13. 1862. became the wife of John .\nsel on the 
i8th of December. 1882. and they reside at North 
Wales. Montgomen,- cotmtj-. John William 
Schirmer bom December 27, 1864, married 
Elizabeth Haines and resides at North Wales. 
They had six children: Leon Haines, bom Oc- 
tober 8, 1887 : Ro>- William, deceased : Hazel hy. 



158 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



born September 8, 1891 ; Verda, who died in in- 
fancy; Faguna; and Iris Edith, born July 25, 
1901. Agnes Ameha Schirmer, born October 26, 
1866, became the wife of Harry Irwin on the 18th 
of June, 1888 ; and resides at Burlington, New 
Jersey. They have two children: Agnes Wil- 
lielmina, bom March 9, 1889 ; and Anna Theresa, 
born November 21, 1891. Richard Schirmer, 
born December 17, 1868, married Miss Mary 
Myers, of West Point, Montgomery county, in 
July, 1894, and they now reside at North Wales. 
Their first child died in infancy and they now 
have a daughter, Margaret, who was born March 
9, 1898. Clara Cecelia Schirmer, born February 
13, 1870, is the wife of Isaac Elmer Manks, of 
Philadelphia, and their marriage, which was cele- 
brated December 24, 1887, has been blessed with 
one child, John Schirmer, born April 29, 1889. 
Ella Josephine Schirmer, born March 24, 1873, 
became the wife of William Condon of Philadel- 
phia, and they now reside in that city. Hannah 
Theresa Schirmer, born May 16, 1875 ; Wilhel- 
mina Blandina, born September 19, 1877; George 
Aloysius, bom April 24, 1880; and Joseph, born 
November 2, 1882, are all at home with their 
parents. 

FRANK WESLEY DUFFIELD, born at 
Jenkintown, September 25, 1861, is one of a fam- 
ily of twelve children, of Christian Bosbyshell and 
Mary Jane (Williams) Duffield, the latter a 
daughter of Richard and Maria (Castner) 
Williams. 

Christian B. Duffield (father) was a farmer at 
Jenkintown. When Frank W. Duffield was four 
years of age he removed to Southamptonville, in 
Bucks county, where they lived for a shore time, 
operating his brother's farm. Their next move 
was to the farm of General W. H. David, at 
Davisville, Bucks county. 

Frank W. Duffield attended the public schools 
until his thirteenth year, when he commenced to 
do all kinds of farm work and remained at this 
laborious occupation until his twenty-second year, 
when he took upon himself the responsibilities and 
duties of married life. He married Ellen, daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Conard) Walton, on 



December 27, 1883. Mrs. Duffield was born July 
30, 1855. Their children : Joseph Wahon, who 
was born May 22, 1885, attended the George 
School ; Eugene Miller, who was born March 22, 
1887, and attended the Friends' School at Plym- 
outh Meeting; Mary Elizabeth, born July 12, 
1890; and Grace Ola, born November 28, 1892, 
at Plymouth Meeting. 

Frank W. Duffield is a Republican in politics. 
He has never held office but is actively interested 
in the success of the party's principles and candi- 
dates. 

In religious faith the Duffield family in former 
generations were members of the Methodist 
church, both the father and grandfather being at- 
tached to that denomination, but Mr. Duffield at- 
tends Plymouth Friends' Meeting, of which his 
wife and her family are members. 

Mr. Duffield operates his farm for general 
purposes combined with dairying. It is stocked 
with twelve head of cattle and five horses. He 
is one of the most successful farmers of the 
township, giving strict attention to keeping his 
farm in order and producing abundant crops of 
hay, grain and other articles. 

Christian Duffield (father) was the son of 
George Duffield. George Duffield (grandfather) 
was the son of Jacob Duffield, who emigrated 
from England and settled near Bustleton, about 
1750, and followed the occupation of farming. 

The children of Christian and Mary Jane 
(Williams) Duffield were: Richard Edwin mar- 
ried Cecelia Shelmire, they having two children 
and residing at the old Conard property in Whit- 
pain township, on the Chestnut Hill road ; John 
Ellwood married Clara Engle, of Moreland town- 
ship, they having four children and residing on the 
Chalkley Steyer farm, in Whitpain township; 
one died in infancy; Ellen married Harvey Fes- 
mire, of Moreland township, and had seven chil- 
dren, he being deceased and his widow residing at 
Davisville, Bucks county ; Harvey Alfred married 
Anna Hallman who is a widow with one child; 
Frank Wesley, subject of this sketch; Frederick 
Bickley married Addie Hurlock, having two chil- 
dren and residing at Belfry on the Stony Creek 
Railroad; Harriet Ida, one of twins, married 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



159 



Thomas H. Fetter and has one child, they residing 
in Hatboro; Daniel Jeanes married and has one 
child, residing in Philadelphia; Flora Louisa, 
born October 8, 1875, unmarried and resides in 
Philadelphia. 

JOHN MEREDITH CONRAD, son of 
Nathan and Martha (Lukens) Conrad, was born 
at the old homestead of the Conrad family in 
Whitpain township, February 18, 1848. He at- 
tended the public schools at Sandy Hill and the 
Ellis school on the DeKalb street road near Wash- 
ington Square. He also was a student for some 
time at Treemount Seminary, then in charge of 
Professor John W. Loch, Norristown. He mar- 
ried, March 5, 1874, Elma B., daughter of Lee and 
Mary S. (Wood) Garrigues, of Jarrettown, in 
Upper Dublin township, Montgomery county. 
Elma B. Garrigues was born March i, 1850, and, 
after attending the public schools of the neigh- 
borhood, became a student at Millersville State 
Normal School, where she completed a course and 
returned to her home at Jarrettown. 

John M. Conrad and wife have had five chil- 
dren : Mary Garrigues, born November 20, 1875, 
unmarried, resides with her parents ; Ellie Wood, 
born April 2, 1878, unmarried and resides with 
her parents; Lee Garrigues, born June 12, 1881, 
met an awful fate, losing his life at the burning of 
Park Hotel, New York city, February 22, 1902, 
whither he had gone with his relative, Henry 
C. Conrad, his charred remains being afterwards 
found and interred in Plymouth Friends' bury- 
ing-ground; John Meredith, born February 12, 
1889. resides at home and attends the Friends 
school at Plymouth Meeting : Ida Garrigues, born 
July 24, 1893, is a student at the same institution. 

Nathan and Martha Conrad had the follow- 
ing children : Edwin, born May 17, 1840, married, 
February 14, 1867, Annie Yerkes ; Ellen M., born 
December 24, 1842, unmarried ; Ellwood, born 
August 27, 1844, married Mattie S. Wood, March 
20, 1873, and (second wife) Hannah Edmunds, 
in 1879; Lukens B., born December 5, 1845, died 
September 26, 1852 ; John Meredith, born Febru- 
ary 18, 1848, married Alma M. Garrigues, March 
5, 1874; Rachel, born October 29, 1851, died 



September 26, 1852; Nathan, born December 26, 
1854, died unmarried. 

Nathan Conrad (father) was born March 11, 
1808, on the old homestead now occupied by his 
son, John Meredith Conrad. He was the son of 
Henry and Anna (Osborn) Conrad. He mar- 
ried Martha Lukens Meredith. 

Henry Conrad (grandfather) was the son of 
John and Ann (Rogers) Conrad, and married, 
February 27, 1787, Ann Osborn. John Conrad 
(great-grandfather) was the son of Henry and 
Catharine (Streypers) Cunreds, and died in Nor- 
ristown township in 1793. 

Lee Garrigues, father of Mrs. John M. Con- 
rad, was the son of Benjamin and Ann (Lee) 
Garrigues, and was born August i, 1819, and 
married, February 13, 1845, Mary Wood, born 
June 9, 1822, the daughter of Joseph and Rachel 
(Malone) Wood, and their children were: Anna 
Garrigues, born July 11, 1846, died July 11, 
1847; Edward Garrigues, born December 29, 
1847, died in 1867; Elma B. Garrigues, born 
March i, 1850, married Mr. Conrad; James San- 
ford Garrigues, born September 9, 1855, married 
Ida F. Rittenhouse, they residing on Stanbridge 
street, Norristown. 

The Conrad family have always been attached 
to the religious belief of the Society of Friends 
and take an active interest in its affairs. Nathan 
Conrad (father) was an overseer and elder of 
Gwynedd Monthly Meeting, of which John M. 
Conrad and his family are members, attending 
Plymouth Meeting. In politics John M. 
Conrad's forefathers were Federalists and Whigs. 
He is a Republican, but has never sought or held 
office'. The homestead on which he and his family 
reside contains ninety-eight acres. He devotes 
his attention to general farming, combined with a 
dairy. 

HORACE CENTENNIAL WOOD, who oc- 
cupies the old homestead of the Wood family, on 
Skippack turnpike, at Centre Square, in Whitpain 
township, is of the third generation of the family 
who has occupied it, he having been born there 
January 2, 1876. He was the youngest son of 
Charles Supplee and Andora (Tyson) Wood. He 



i6o 



^lONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



attended the public school at Centre Square until 
he was sixteen )-ears old, helping on the farm 
during the summer vacations. After leaving 
school he assisted on the farm until his marriage. 

On June 30, 1897, Horace C. Wood married 
Caroline Krauss, sixth child of Jacob and Sophia 
(Krauss) Weigner. Their childrea are : Charles 
Earle, born January 24, 1898, and Ruth Mildred, 
born November 17, 1900. Horace C. Wood and 
his wife continued to live on the Wood homestead 
for one year, then removing to Worcester town- 
ship, where he farmed. In the following year 
Mr. Wood succeeded his father in the manage- 
ment of the home farm, which contains fifty acres 
of rolling land. Mr. Wood has a dairy of eigh- 
teen cows, stock of all kinds, and raises all kinds 
of vegetables and grains. He attends the Nor- 
ristown market. In politics he is a Republican 
but never sought office. The Wood family have' 
always been members of Boehm's Reformed 
church, of Blue Bell.^ 

Charles Wood (father) and Andora (Tyson) 
\\'ood, his wife, had two sons : Horace C. and 
Tyson Supplee, the latter residing with his parents 
at Norristown. Charles _S. Wood (father) was 
born on the homestead, in Whitpain township, 
March 31, 1848. and died March 3, 1904. 

Charles S. Wood (grandfather) was also 
born in Whitpain township, September 15, 1803. 
On February 11, 1840, he married Malinda Sup- 
plee, who was born in 1804. They had six chil- 
dren, of whom Charles S. Wood was the fifth. 
Charles Wood (grandfather) succeeded his 
father, Jonathan Wood, son of James Wood of 
Horsham township, who moved to Whitpain 
ab6ut 1780. 

Mrs. Horace C. Wood is a daughter of Jacob 
A. Weigner who was born in Worcester township, 
November 15, 1837. The mother, Sophia Krauss, 
was born in Upper Hanover township, January 
15, 1841. They were married February 2, 1864, 
and had eleven children : Priscilla, born December 
21, 1864 and died September 25, 1870; John K., 
September 25, 1866; Christanna K., December 
31, 1867; Mary M., April 25, 1870, and died Sep- 
tember 24, 1870; Ida K., October i, 1871 ; Laura 
K., .\ugust 8, 1873 ; Caroline K., March 18, 1875 ; 



Sophia K., June 23, 1877; Henry K., April 24^ 
1879; Ella K., December 31, 1880; and Emma 
K., August 21, 1882. 

WILLIS R. ROBERTS. The name of Rob- 
erts is one of the most common among people of 
Welsh descent, because of the fact that Robert 
is one of the common first names so-called. The 
custom that formerly prevailed of using the con- 
nective "ap," for "son of," so that the children, 
of Robert were John ap Robert, Thomas ap 
Robertj and so on, which in the course of time 
as an "S" was added to the surname and the 
"ap" dropped, became John Roberts, Thomas 
Roberts, etc., is at least partly responsible for 
the great number of Roberts families that now 
exist in this state and throughout the country. 

The ancestor of Willis Read Roberts was 
Aaron Roberts, born about 1682. It was not 
until recently that the names of the parents of 
Aaron Roberts were ascertained. In a letter of 
removal which the father of Aaron brought with 
him to this country in 1690, his name is given as 
Robert Ellis. It is believed that he afterwards 
signed his name Ellis Robert, although it has 
been suggested that this may have been the sig- 
nature of one of his sons. Robert Ellis is said to 
have come to Pennsylvania at the time that Hugh 
Roberts, a noted minister among Friends, one of 
the early settlers of Merion township, Montgom- 
ery county, Pennsylvania, returned to this coun- 
try after a religious visit to his old home in 
Wales. Hugh had previously located in Merion, 
about 1683. 

The letter of removal given by the quarterly- 
meeting at Tyddyny Gareg to Robert Ellis, as- 
the name was understood at that time, is very 
interesting, speaking of himself and his wife, 
Elin Ellis, as having been PreacTiers of Right- 
eousness to arid amongst their neighbors, they 
having been "convinced of the Truth about 
twenty years before" (that is, about 1670). At 
the same meeting a very beautiful letter was 
given to Hugh Roberts, then returning to Penn- 
sylvania after a religious visit in which he had' 
ministered very acceptably to Friends in Wales. 

The first son of Robert and Elin Ellis was- 




#^^-V (^(^^j^^,^^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



[6i 



Abel. He married Mary Prince, in 1701, and he 
signs the marriage certificate as Abel Robert. 
In the family column of names on his marriage 
certificate, immediately under the names of him- 
self and wife according to the custom of that 
day, appear the names of Moses Robert, Ellis 
Robert, Aaron Robert and Evan Robert. These 
are the names of four of the children of Robert 
Ellis as given in the letter of removal which has 
been mentioned, and it ma\- be taken for granted 
that these four were his children and the brothers 
of Abel Robert. 

Willis R. Robert is the son of John and Alary 
Adamson (Read) Roberts. He was born in Xor- 
ristown, Pennsylvania, December 9, 1854. He 
was educated in the public schools and the high 
school of Xorristown, and also took a course and 
received the degree of Ph. B. from the University 
of Michigan at Ann Arbor, Michigan. He was 
employed for a number of \ears at the office of 
the Xorristown Herald, in the capacity of 
business manager. Later he secured a po- 
sition with The Religious Press Associa- 
tion, a prominent Philadelphia establish- 
ment, with which he has ever since been 
connected. He married. June 3, 1880, 
IMargaret AT Jamison, born June 4. 1856. They 
have three sons: Willis Read, bom May i, 1881 : 
Victor Jamison, born January 29, 1883 ; and 
Paul Greir, born November 15, i'888. In politics 
Mr. Roberts is a Republican, but he has never 
sought public office, preferring to attend strictly 
to business. In religious faith he and his family 
arc members of the First Presbyterian church 
of Xorristown. he being an elder of the church. 
They reside in the old Jamison mansion at the 
corner of DeKalb and Airy streets. 

John Roberts (father) was the son of John 
and Rachel (Shoemaker) Roberts. He was born 
at Xorristown. Xovcmbcr 8. 18^3. and died De- 
cember 20, 1864. He married Xovember i. 
1849. ^fary Adamson Read, daughter of Thomas 
and Sarah (Corson) Read. She was a most 
estimable woman, and survived her husband 
nearly thirty years. She was born September 
14, 1824, and died February 4, 1894. Their chil- 



dren were: (i) Elihu Read, born December 12, 
1851, married September 3, 1891, Isabella Web- 
ster, born August 19, 1856, of Philadelphia. 
They have one child, Gene Roberts, born No- 
vember 9, 1893. (2) Willis R., subject of this- 
sketch. (3) Nellie Jones Roberts, born Novem- 
ber 17, 1858, died March 11, 1863. (4) Joseph^ 
born April 4, 1864, died January 2, 1865. Elihtt 
Roberts and Isabella Webster were married Sep- 
tember 3, 1 89 1. He is a prominent citizen of 
Norristown, an earnest Republican, and has 
represented the third ward for many years in town 
council. He has been president of that body for 
a number of years, and is a model presiding of- 
ficer. 

John Roberts (grandfather) was the son of 
Joseph and Hannah (Rees) Roberts. They re- 
sided near where Norristown has since been lo- 
cated, in Norriton township. John Roberts 
was born Ninth-mo. 8, 1769. He married 
Twelfth-mo. 10, 1801, Rachel Shoemaker, a 
member of an old Montgomery county family of 
German descent. 

Joseph Roberts (great-grandfather) was the 
son of Aaron and Sarah (Longworthy) Rob- 
erts. Joseph Roberts was born in Norriton town- 
ship. Ninth-mo. 11, 1729, and married, Eleventh- 
mo. 13, 1757, Hannah Rees, of an old family of 
Welsh descent. 

Aaron Roberts (great-great-grandfather), 
born about 1682, married, Eighth-mo. 6, 1727, 
.Sarah Longworthy. of an English family. He 
was the son of Robert Ellis, whose certificate 
from meeting at Tyddyny Gareg. in Merioneth- 
shire, Wales, is dated l-"ifth-mo. 28, 1690. and 
Elin (Ellen), his wife. Robert and Elin Ellis 
had seven children, as follows : .\bel, Moses. El- 
lis, Aaron, Evan, Rachel, and Jane, all of whose 
surnames were Roberts, or at that time Robert. 
When they came to Pennsylvania in 1690, Rob- 
ert Ellis and his wife were probably both of mid- 
dle age (probably forty or fifty years old) when 
they came to this country in comjjany with Hugh 
Roberts, .\aron, who was their fourth child, 
was probably eight or ten years of age at that 
time, .\aron bought land in Norriton township. 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



in or near what is now Norristown, in 17 14. His 
marriage with Sarah Longworthy, of Radnor, 
took place in 1727. 

The maternal grandparents of Willis Read 
Roberts, Thomas and Sarah (Corson) Read, re- 
sided at what is now known as iMancill's Mill, 
in Upper IMerion township, a short distance be- 
low Port Kennedy, for many years. Thomas 
Read was a native of Delaware county, Pennsyl- 
vania, as were also his parents, AMUiam and 
Susan Read. Sarah Corson, his wife, was the 
fourth child of Joseph and Hannah (Dickinson) 
corson, who lived beyond childhood. She was 
born December 13, 1793, in Plymouth township, 
r\Iontgomery county, Pennsylvania, on what has 
since been known as the Campbell farm, near 
Hickorvtown. In 1816 she married Thomas 
Read. They lived for a short time at Hickory- 
town, and then removed to Pawling's Bridge, in 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, next to the farm 
and mill in Upper Merion township, and finally 
to Norristown, where both died, Thomas on Sep- 
tember 23, 1856, Sarah on ]\lay 8, 1859. Their 
children were: Susan, born October 6, 1817, died 
at the age of seven years ; Sarah, born September 
13, 1819, married Charles Jones; Hannah, born 
January 2, 1822, married George Schultz, and 
was for many years a widow and died September 
16, 1901 ; Mary Adamson, mother of Elihu R. 
and Willis R. Roberts; Edwin, died in infancy; 
Louis Wernwag, surgeon-general of Pennsyl- 
vania, and one of the most eminent physicians 
and surgeons of his time ; Joseph' Corson, mar- 
ried Minnie Burrins; Alan Wright, who resided 
abroad and died unmarried ' December 29, 1901, 
at Copenhagen, Denmark. Sarah Corson Read 
belonged to a family distinguished in the line of 
medical and other attainments. She was a sister 
of Dr. William Corson, of Norristown, and of 
Dr. Hiram Corson, of Plymouth Meeting, as well 
as of Allan W. Corson, a celebrated teacher, hor- 
ticulturist and mathematician, of Plymouth j\Ieet- 
ing. All her children are deceased. 

FRANCIS CONRAD HOOVER, a com- 
petent and experienced farmer whose home, "The 
Pines," at Blue Bell, is one of the attractive 



country places of \Miitpain township, Montgom- 
ery county, Pennsylvania, is descended from some 
of the earliest of the German settlers of the 
Lehigh \'alley. The family is now widely rep- 
resented in the professions and in many lines of 
business throughout the state, and the present 
generation is sustaining the honorable record 
which was the bequest of the forefathers. 

Philip Hoover, grandfather of Francis Con- 
rad, was a sturdy and energetic farmer, a man 
of large capacity and uncompromising principles. 
He was a leader of public opinion in his town- 
ship, and a generous supporter of every good 
cause. Among his children were Hiram, now 
Judge Hoover of Hooverton, and Frederick Will- 
iam, who was the eldest son and the father of 
Francis Conrad Hoover. 

Frederick William Hoover, was born Janu- 
ary 17, 1806, and was reared to the varied ac- 
tivities of his father's farm. He attended the 
country schools, and after. finishing his school 
work, succeeded to the management of the home- 
stead farm. He was a capable man and a worthy 
citizen. His industry and frugality enabled him 
to provide the comforts of life for a large family. 
His wife was IMaria Fleck, who died June 11, 
1878, and his death occurred March 20, 1859. 
(For full history of the Hoover family see 
sketch of Judge Hoover in this work.)' 

Francis Conrad Hoover, seventh son and 
eighth child of Frederick William and Maria 
(Fleck) Hoover, was born January 22, 1845, in 
Warrington township, Bucks county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He attended the district school until he 
was fifteen years old, when he went to live with 
an uncle, Andrew Jackson Hoover, a farmer of 
Gwynedd township, Montgomery county. He re- 
mained here as assistant farmer, teaching country 
school during the winters, until his marriage in 
1870. P^or two years after this he was estab- 
lished on his uncle's farm as dairyman and man- 
ager, in which capacity he developed much skill. 
Following this engagement, he moved to the farm 
of B. P. Mertsner of Whitpain township, Alont- 
gomery county, known as The Evergreen, which 
he worked on shares for twenty-three years. His 
record as tenant of this farm is most unique, for 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



163 



during the whole time of his residence there, no 
written agreement between him and the owner of 
the property was ever made concerning a division 
of profits or of crops and their relations were al- 
ways most friendly and harmonious. No better 
testimonial as to the character of both men could 
be given than this simple statement. It implies a 
living up to the golden rule that is most unusual 
in the fierce business competitions of our times. 
In the spring of 1895, having purchased the Will- 
iam Dull property, known as The Pines, below 
Blue Bell on Skippack pike, Mr. Hoover left 
the Evergreen farm, which he had conducted so 
successfully for so many years, for comparative 
ease and retirement. At The Pines he has only 
twelve acres of land, highly productive, but it fur- 
nishes him occupation and interest, while afford- 
ing a leisure earned by years of arduous labor. 
Mr. Hoover has always maintained an interest in 
public affairs, and he has been school director in 
his township for twenty years, as well as for sev- 
eral years justice of the peace. He and his family 
are prominent members of the Reformed church, 
belonging to the congregation of Boehm's church 
at Blue Bell, where Mr. Hoover has been superin- 
tendent of the Sunday-school for twenty-five 
years, as well as for many years an elder and the 
director of the choir. He is a Democrat, though 
he has ever held to principle before party. His 
fair-mindedness, kindliness, and integrity, have 
won universal esteem. 

He married Marietta, daughter of Charles and 
Elizabeth (Wilson) Danehower, of Spring 
House, Gwynedd township. Montgomery county, 
on March 15, 1870. She was born November 18, 
1843, being one of five children. The children 
born of her marriage with Mr. Hoover are as fol- 
lows : Bertha Elizabeth, born September 25, 1875, 
who married Abram A., son of John and Priscilla 
Nash of \\'arrington township, Bucks county, on 
October 4, 1900. and has two children, — Muriel 
Frances, born October 10, 1901, and Eleanor 
Ruth, born January 3, 1903 ; Marie and Ada 
Emily. The two youngest daughters are living 
at home and .\da Emily is attending the high 
school. 



BENJA-MIN FRANKLIN ^lURPHY. a 
leading farmer and dairyman of \\'hitpain town- 
ship, Montgomery county, is a man who takes a 
lively interest in public matters and is always in- 
terested in new ideas for the general good. As a 
farmer he keeps in touch with the most approved 
modern methods, and he is careful in the breed- 
ing and selecting of his stock. 

John ]\Iurphy, father of Benjamin Franklin 
]\Iurphy, came from the north of Ireland and set- 
tled in Jarrettown, Upper Dublin township, about 
1850, four years before his son Benjamin F. was 
born. He was a farmer, possessed of the lively- 
disposition and cheerful humor of his race. He 
took a leading part in township affairs, and was 
especially interested in public education. He 
served as supervisor of public roads and was 
fearless and independent in the expression of his 
political views, which accorded with the prin- 
ciples of the Democratic party. He married 
Mary Ann (Dean) Gillen, a widow, who bore 
him four sons, John Fitzwater, Benjamin Frank- 
lin, Andrew Jackson and George Dean, who were 
given all the advantages afforded by the public 
schools. John Murphy died August 20, 1887, 
aged sixty-five years, and his wife died in 1861. 

Benjamin Franklin, second child and second 
son of John and ]\Iary Ann Murphy, was bom 
September 16, 1854, in Whitemarsh township, 
Montgomery county, Pennsvlvania. .After leav- 
ing school he was apprenticed to the carpenter's 
trade, and for eight years he was occupied with 
the work of carpentering and building. Ulti- 
mately, however, he returned to the farm and to 
the activities of his earlier years. He bought the 
property formerly known as the Chalkley Potts 
farm in A\'hitpain township, which is now his 
home. The land is rolling and well drained, and 
he has brought it to a high state of cultivation. 
His dairy herd is carefully bred, and selected with 
much intelligence. In it are strains of Holstein, 
Guernsey, and Alderney blood. 

March 28, 1878, he married Julia Frances, 
fifth daughter and ninth child of John Jacob and 
Louisa Hoft'man. Her parents were Lutherans, 
and with her husband and familv she adheres to 



1 64 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



that denomination. The children born to INIr. 
and Mrs. Murphy, are as follows : George Dean, 
bom June 26, 1879, died June 23, 1881 ; John H., 
born March 26, 1882. died August 5, 1882; Ida 
L., born August 7, 1883, died February 24, 1885 ; 
Harvey, born January 13, 1886; Emma Blanche, 
born November 9, 1887, Benjamin Franklin, born 
January 5, 1890, Walter H.. born August 12, 
1893 and Clara M., born October 11, 1895, are at 
home. 

In politics }ilr. Murphy is a Democrat when 
national issues are involved and votes indepen- 
dently at local elections. He was supervisor of his 
town for ten consecutive years, and was a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order Odd Fellows for 
twenty years, but withdrew from the organiza- 
tion. 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN FAMOUS is a 
member of a well known family long resident west 
of the Schuylkill river. He was born in TredyfTrin 
township, Chester county, Pennsylvania, at the lo- 
cality known as "The Eagle." He is the son of 
John and Susanna (Shenaman) Famous. 

When he was of the proper age he attended the 
public schools of the district, assisting at the same 
time in the farm work at home. Mr. Famous 
married, on March 7, 1874, Hannah Elizabeth 
Davis, who was born in Camden, New Jerse\ , 
June 9, 1856, only daughter of Charles Gordon 
.»nd Anna McDowell Davis. Mr. and Mrs. Ben- 
jamin Franklin Famous have eight children, as 
follows: Thomas McDowell, born ^ilarch 17, 
1875; Benjamin Franklin, born December 17, 
1876; Anna Louise, born January 17, 1878, who 
married Albert Momme, and has two children, 
Benjamin Theodore and ^Marion Elizabeth ; 
Emma Catharine, born January 25, 1881 ; Oscar 
Ernest, born June 6, 1883 ; Smedley Darlington, 
born February 8, 1886; Caroline Troubat, born 
August 26, 1888; Clarence, born November 24, 
1895. 

John Famous ( father) was a farmer by oc- 
cupation, and was prominently associated with 
others of his community in general improvements. 
He served for some time as a supervisor of pub- 
lic roads of Tredyffrin township, where he died 



in 1885, in his seventy-ninth year, his wife hav- 
ing died in 1859, in her thirty-ninth year. 

Charles Gordon Davis (father of Mrs. Ben- 
jamin F. Famous) was born July 24, 1828, at 
Branchtown, in Philadelphia. He was the son of 
Henry and Louisa Gordon Davis, now deceased. 
Charles Gordon and Anna ( McDowell) Davis' 
other children, besides Mrs. B. F. Famous, were 
Charles Thomas, George Henry and Phineas 
Louis. ]^Irs. Famous" mother, Anna ^IcDowell, 
was a direct descendant of Toby Leach, who 
came with William Penn. 

Benjamin Franklin Famous, Jr,, married 
Lydia L., daughter of William and Lydia Keech 
Meigs, on April 4. 1901. They have two chil- 
dren: Emanuel Bollinger, born ]\Iarch 15. 1902, 
and Benjamin Franklin, third, born August 11, 

1903- 

The farm of the Famous family in Whitpain 
township is known as "The Willows." It con- 
tains seventy-seven acres of rolling land in a high 
state of cultivation, and is well located. The prin- 
cipal interest of ]\Ir. Famous is his dairy. Among 
the cattle found at The Willows, are strains of 
Alderney, Guernsey and Holstein stock. 

In religious faith, ^Nlr. and Mrs. B. F. Famous 
and family are Lutherans, attending St. John's 
Lutheran church. In politics Mr. Famous is a 
Republican and was supervisor for eleven years 
in Tredyti'rin township, Chester county. His 
father and two of his brothers had also been su- 
pervisors of that township. 

JESSE CHILDS SHOEMAKER, one of the 
most substantial farmers of Whitpain township. 
was born September 6, 1854, at the old homestead 
of the Shoemaker family, near Blue Bell, in that 
township, being the son of Charles Kenderdine 
and Sarah (Childs) Shoemaker. He attended 
the Sandy Hill public school in Whitpain town- 
ship, until his seventeenth year, and remained at 
home assisting his father for several years with 
the farming. 

On January i, 1880, Mr. Shoemaker married 
Catharine Annie, daughter of William Grow and 
Catharine (Vaughan) Smith, and made his home 
for the following fifteen years at the Shoemaker 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



16.:; 



homestead as managing farmer and dairy- 
man. In the spring of 1893. Mr. Shoe- 
maker bought the property known as the "Wood" 
farm, near ^^'ashington Square, in Whitpain, to 
whicli he soon after removed and where he has 
since resided. I\[r. Shoemaker has always taken a 
hvely interest in the affairs of his community in 
both a poHtical and rehgious sense. In pohtics 
he is a RepubHcan and has served as school direc- 
tor of his district and rendered valuable service to 
his party as a member of the vigilance commit- 
tee. Mr. Slioemaker is a member of Boehm's Re- 
formed church. ISlue Bell, which Mrs. Shoe- 
maker and the children also attend. The children, 
eight in number, are as follows : Chauncey Har- 
vey, born January 13, i88t : Catharine \'aughan, 
July 19, 1882: Gertrude :\Iyrtle, January 5, 1884: 
Rachel Getty, :\Iarch 25. 1886; William Grow, 
April 23, 1888; John Oscar, September 5, 1889: 
Charles Kenderdine, March 13, 1894: and .\nna 
Ethel, March 10, 1897. . 

Charles Js.. Shoemaker ( father) was the son 
of Thomas Supplee Shoemaker and was born 
June 4, 1819. He died January 11, 1892. He 
married Sarah Childs, who was born December 
2. 1818, and died October 23, 1902. They had the 
following named children : Phcebe Gouldy, born 
March i, 1841. married in 1866, Charles C. 
McCann ; Matthias, who was born August 17. 
1843. and died at Andersonville prison, in June. 
1865, enlisted in response to the three-months 
tall and later joined the Thirteenth Pennsylvania 
Cavalry ; George, born February 2, 1845, married, 
in June, 1864, Harriett Henshall, and lives at 
Olney, Philadelphia ; Emma Jane, born August 
28, 1848, resides at Blue Bell ; an infant daughter, 
born October 16, 1850, died unnamed; Albert B., 
born September 6, 185 1, married Rachel De 
Haven, having three children living and resides 
at Jeffersonville, where he works as a carpenter 
and carries on business as a contractor ; Jesse 
Childs is the next of the family ; Sarah C. born 
February 2, 1857, married Henry C. Hoover, and 
lives at Blue liell, having two children : Charles 
Thomas, born November 10, 1859, died December 
8. 1876; Anna C, horn March 29, 1864, resides 
with her sister. V.w.\mi lane, at Blue Bell. 



^^'illiam G. Smith (father of Mrs. Jesse C. 
Shoemaker) was born July 2;^. 1823, he married 
Catharine \'aughan, of an old Lower Merion 
family, July 22, 1847. ^I''- and Mrs. Smith had a 
large family of children, for data as to whom, see 
sketch of Thomas \'. Smith. William G. Smith, 
who was a Democrat in politics, lived for many 
years at "Willow Lawn," a mill and farm in 
Norriton, and later in Norristown. He served a 
term as county commissioner. I\lr. Smith was 
an extensive contractor, being a mason by trade, 
and built many county bridges. 

Mrs. Shoemaker was born in Lower Merion 
township and attended the Lafa}ette school until 
her twelfth year. 

The Shoemaker familv were pioneers in the 
settlement of Pennsylvania. Jacob Shoemaker 
(great-great-grandfather) had several children as 
follows : IMatthias (great-grandfather) born in 
1736, and died in 1816; Barbara, born in 1738; 
Jonathan, born in 1739; Isaac, born in 1741 ; 
Hanah, in 1743; Elizabeth, in 1745; Sarah, in 
1748 ; and David, in 1753. 

Matthias purchased, ;\larch 28, 1777, from 
John Yedder, forty-seven acres of land, which 
with thirty-three acres bought about twenty years 
later from Henry Conard, constituted the Shoe- 
maker homestead where several generations of 
the name were born and reared. At Matthias 
Shoemaker's death, the farm came into posses- 
sion of his only son, Thomas. 

The children of Thomas Shoemaker (grand- 
father) were : Enoch, born 1804 ; Job, 1805, died 
1828: David, 1807: Alan, 1808; Matthias, 1810; 
Hannah, 1813, died 1817: Jesse, 1815, died 1854; 
Charles K., 1819, died 1892. 

FRANK A. HOWER, deceased, for a quar- 
ter of a century the popular and efficient editor 
and publisher of Tin- Home Xcws, a weekly paper 
of Bryn Mawr. Montgomery county, Pennsyl- 
vania, was born February 29, 1848, in Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania, one of four sons bom to Dr. 
Joseph B. and Margaret E. (McNaughton) 
Hower. 

The early childiiood <lays of Frank A. Hower 
were spent in Lancaster where he acquired his 



1 66 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



education, graduating from the public schools at 
the age of fourteen years. Shortly afterward he 
entered the printing office of the Lancaster Ex- 
aminer to learn the printing trade, where he re- 
mained until ]\Iay 26, 1864, when he enlisted in 
Company K, Ninety-second Regiment of Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, then the Ninth Regiment 
Cavalry, as a bugler, and was mustered out with 
the company at Lexington, North Carolina, July 
18, 1865. During one engagement he was shot 
in the calf of the right leg, and up to the time of 
his death the bullet was still imbedded in the 
fleshy part of the limb. He also partially lost the 
hearing of the left ear. At the close of the war 
Mr. Hower returned to Lancaster and resumed 
work at his trade ; from there he went to Read- 
ing and worked on one of the papers in the capac- 
ity of compositor, and later went to Coatesville, 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, where in partner- 
ship with Dr. William George, he started the pub- 
lication of the Coatesville Times, which is still 
published in that town. After the paper had been 
in existence for a short period of time he dis- 
posed of it, being actively connected with the pub- 
lication of the Rochester, New York, Herald, and 
the Sunbury, Pennsylvania, Express. In 1876 
Mr. Hower removed to Philadelphia, and being 
aware of the fact that Bryn Mawr was going to 
grow into a thickly populated center, located there 
and on June i, 1877, established the Home Nen's, 
a weekly paper. His publication office at that 
time was in a cottage on the grounds where at 
present stands the Bryn ^lawr Hospital. At first 
he had no printing material, type or presses, but 
gathered the local and other news of interest and 
had the typesetting and presswork done at 
Parkesburg, by William F. Potts. Several years 
later Mr. Hower fitted out a printing office in a 
building that stood on the ground owned by the 
Humphrey estate, opposite Dr. Charles T. Goent- 
ner's property, on Lancaster avenue, Bryn Mawr. 
After conducting business here for about two 
}'ears, he sold the paper to Samuel A. Black, and 
on July I, 1 88 1, established The News, a weekly 
publication, in a building situated north of Lan- 
caster avenue on Robert's Road, where he re- 
mained until January, 1883, when the office was 



removed to the "Old Temperance Hall." Lan- 
caster avenue and Buck road. The business was 
conducted in that building for nineteen years, but 
when about to issue the silver anniversary edition 
of the paper on j\Iay 22, 1902, the building was 
destroyed by fire. After this catastrophe the type 
was set in the parlor of the residence and the 
presswork was done in Philadelphia, until a suit- 
able location could be secured. On August 8, 
1890, Mr. Hower again purchased the Home 
Nezi's from the heirs of Samuel A. Black, and 
consolidated it with The News, afterward calling 
the paper The N'eu's and Home News. On Au- 
gust 18, 1902, the office of the paper, as well as 
the residence, was moved to its present location, 
on Lancaster pike, a short distance east of the 
Bryn ]Mawr depot. 

In politics i\Ir. Hower was always an adher- 
ent of the principles of the Republican party, and 
whenever an election was about to be held he was 
found working for the entire Republican ticket, 
whether local or national, using the. columns of 
his paper to further their election. Senator Mat- 
thew Stanley Quay and Senator, Boise Penrose 
often consulted him upon matters of vita! interest 
to the party, counting him as one of the best co- 
workers in the political arena. His political 
acumen was recognized at numerous times by 
being called upon to officiate at conferences of 
the state and national leaders of the Republican 
party, and whenever his party controlled the ap- 
portionment of office he was foremost in the ranks 
to plead the cause of some friend for official ap- 
pointment, notwithstanding that he had been 
earnestly solicited at various times to become a 
candidate for at least some county office. In 
1889, when the Haverford district was created by 
the division of the Bryn Mawr district, he was 
elected committeeman and continued in that office 
until 1901. For a number of years Mr. Hower 
was a member of the Knights Templar, Knights 
of the Golden Eagle, Junior Order of United 
American Mechanics, and Typographical Union, 
but as his business enterprise occupied all of his 
time he allowed himself to run out in the orders. 
At the time of his death he was a member of 
Colonel Owen Jones Post, No. 591, Grand Army 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



[67 



of the Republic, being one of its charter members. 
He was also a member of the Bucks-AIontgomery 
Press League, the State Editorial Association, and 
the Pen and Pencil Club. 

On June 4, 1879, Mr. Hower married ]\Iiss 
Anna M. Grubb, daughter of William B. and 
Catharine E. (Hagerty) Grubb, at the home of 
the parents, 2205 Spruce street, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. Their children were : William G., 
Frank A., Charles JNI., James S., Thomas, Harry 
\'.. Catharine M., Anna j\l. and Mary M. 
Hower. Mr. Hower died October 23, 1902, and 
the funeral services were conducted at his late 
residence on Lancaster avenue, Bryn Alawr, by 
the Rev. James Houghton, pastor of the Church 
of the Redeemer. He was buried in his soldier's 
uniform, and the casket was draped in the Ameri- 
can tlag according to a desire often expressed by 
him. The interment was made at iNIount Moriah 
cemetery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

JAMES VAN HORN, cashier of the Hat- 
boro National Bank, was born in Northampton 
township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, December 
24, 1837, a son of Isaac and Cynthia (Craven) 
\"an Horn, and a descendant of a family of Hol- 
land Dutch extraction. Abraham A'an Horn was 
the first of this family to settle in Northampton 
township, Bucks county, locating there about the 
year 1720. He married Martha Dungan, and 
among the children born of this marriage was a 
son, Isaac Van Horn, who was born November 5, 
1745, and married Mary Betts, who was born 
October 2, 1760, daughter of Thomas and Sarah 
Betts. Their children were as follows : Isaac was 
born January 25, 1787; Sarah, born November 5, 
1789, became the wife of James P. iloore; Abra- 
ham was born January 10, 1791 ; Samuel, born 
October i, 1792, married Phoebe Twining, and 
died April 7, 1846; John, born June 26, 1794, 
married Sarah Martindale; Aaron, born April 
7, 1796, married Elizabeth Scarborough; ]\Iartha, 
born March 29, 1799, became the wife of Jona- 
than Smith, August 10, 1819, and died January 3, 
1857 ; Charles, born April 18, 1801, married Sarah 
Twining; and Ann was born September 19, 1803. 

Abraham \'an Llorn, second son of Isaac and 



I\Iary (Betts) \'an Horn, was united in marriage, 
June 3, 181 2, to Susan Ruckman, born Novem- 
ber 9, 1787, daughter of James and Mary Ruck- 
man, the former born November 11, 1748, and the 
latter, a daughter of James Hart, l)om January 15, 
1752. jNIr. and Mrs. Ruckman were the parents 
of twelve children, namely : Susannah, born 
JNIarch 11, 1773, died August i, 1777; William, 
born October 30, 1774, died January 5, 1775 ; 
Jane, born December 10, 1775, died April 15, 
1776 ; John, bom February 20, 1777, is also de- 
ceased ; A\'illiam, born February 23, 1779, died 
September 27, 1797; Sarah was born April 15, 
1781 ; Elizabeth was bom June 25, 1783; Mary 
was born August 10, 1785 ; Susan, born Novem^ 
ber 9, 1787, is mentioned before as the wife of 
Abraham Van Horn ; Jane was born October 5, 
1789; Isabel was born March 8, 1792; and Ann 
was born February 23, 1794. Abraham and Susan 
(Ruckman) Van Horn were the parents of eight 
children, namely: Isaac, born May 2, 1813, men- 
tioned hereinafter; j\Iary Ann, born August 19, 
1815, who became the wife of Adrian Cornell, 
January 8, 1840, and died August 6, 1893 ; James 
Ruckman, who was born April 29, 1817, and died 
May 4, 1817; James R., born March 21, 1818, 
who married Anna Craven, January 24, 1872, and 
died May 4, 1888; Isabella, born June 9, 1821, 
who married George W'. Hunt, October 27, 1847, 
and is still living; Sarah Ruckman, born Febru- 
ary II, 1826, who became the wife of W. Earle 
Campbell. February 9, 1853, and is still living; 
Elizabeth, born July 16, 1828, who became the 
wife of George W. Craven, February 25, 1858, 
and both are still living; and Emily Jane, born 
August 7, 1832, who became the wife of William 
Godshalk, October 12, 1876, and died September 
17, 1898. Abraham Van Horn, father of these 
children, died April 7, 1869. 

Isaac \'an Horn, eldest son of Abraham and 
Susan \'an Horn, was united in marriage, October 
I, 1835, to Cynthia Craven, born May 27, 1817, 
(laughter of Thomas and Jane (Krewson) Craven. 
Thomas Craven, born February 21, 1785, died 
August 21, 1868, and Jane (Krewson) Craven, 
his wife, was born May 6. 1795. Their marriage 
ceremony was performed February 20, 1812, and 



1 68 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



they were the parents of the following named chil- 
dren : Anna Eliza, born October 14, 181 3, died 
February 6, 1833; Matilda, bom ]\Iarch 13, 1815, 
married Aaron Cornell, and died Augnst 5, 1902; 
Cynthia, born j\Iay 27, 1817, is mentioned alx)ve 
as the wife of Isaac \'an Horn; James R.. born 
December 20. 18 18. married ]\Iary Cornell, and 
died Decciiiln-T 22. 1847: Sarah, born January 
27, ]S_M, ilird hiiu' iS, 1S21 ; and Jane, born May 
8, i8-'8. became the wife of William Moore, 
March 15, 1854. Isaac and Cynthia (Craven) 
Van Horn, were the parents of the following- 
named children: Charles Krews(.)ii, l)orn August 
3, 1836, died Januar) id, 1S37; James, Ixirn De- 
cember 24, 1837, is menliijned at length herein- 
after; Thomas, born October 11, 1840, married 
Elizabeth Webster Hart, September 15, 1862 ; and 
Julia A., born October 3, 1845, became the wife of 
Abraham A, Slack, September 14, 1870. Isaac 
Van Horn, father of these children, died Decem- 
ber 21, 1898, and his w ife, L'ynthia (Craven) \'an 
Horn, passed awa\' .May 2-,. 1899. 

James \'an Horn, son of Isaac and Cynthia 
(Craven) \'an Horn, was educated in the public 
schools, and Millersville State Normal School, 
and for a few years after completing his studies 
he taught in the public schools of Bucks county 
and Philadelphia. In 1861 he was appointed dep- 
uty recorder of deeds by his father, who at that 
time held the office of recorder of deeds for Bucks 
coiuity. He subsequently served nine years in the 
internal revenue department, fifth district of 
Pennsylvania, and after the expiration of this 
period of time he was for four years superin- 
tendent of coal works in Armstrong county, Penn- 
sylvania. In 1876 he was elected cashier of the 
Hatboro National Bank, and has served in that 
capacity ever since. The high esteem in which 
he is held in the community is evidenced by the 
fact that he served as secretary of the Hatboro 
school board for nine years, has been borough 
treasurer for over twenty years, was burgess of 
the borough for three years, and is secretary of 
the board of trustees of Loller Academy. He is 
a member of the Abington Presbyterian church. 
and has been an elder since 1882. He is an ad- 
herent of the principles of Republicanism. 



On June 3, 1862, Mr. Van Horn married Re- 
becca A. Cowell, and the issue of this marriage 
was four children : Sarah, bom March 27, 1865, 
died in infancy; Ella, born November 11, 1866, 
is the widow of Professor W. H. Detwiler; 
Edgar, bom November 8, 1870, died in childhood ; 
and Arthur, born December 21, 1874, died in 
infancy. 

WILLIA!^! WEST, a retired farmer of 
Kin,g-uf-Prussia. Upper Merion township, ]\Iont- 
geHiier)' county, l'enns}lvania, belongs to a fam- 
ily who were among the early settlers of Pennsyl- 
^■aIlia. Thomas, his great-great-great-grandfa- 
ther, came from England in 1713, and located in 
Delaware county. He was a farmer, and in his 
religious views a member of the Society of 
Friends. By diligence and the exercise of good 
judgment, he became the possessor of a consid- 
erable landed estate. 

Among the children of Thomas West, the im- 
migrant, was Thomas, Jr., born' on the home- 
stead, and reared as a farmer. He married 
Susanna Powell, of the same county. They had 
a number of children, among them being a third 
Thomas, great-grandfather of William West. 
The third Thomas West married Sarah, daugh- 
ter of Job Yarnall, of Delaware county. One of 
the children of Thomas and Sarah \\'est was 
another Thomas (grandfather). He was a na- 
tive of Delaware county, also, born on the home- 
stead, and was a farmer. He married Elizabeth 
Maris. One of their children was Caleb West, 
father of William. He was born in Springfield 
township. Delaware county. Pennsylvania, in 
1 80 1. He learned the tanning trade with Jo- 
seph Rhoads. o*^ Springfield township, Delaware 
county, and followed that occupation for some 
vears, but was a farmer later in life. He removed 
to Radnor township, also in Delaware county, in 
1842, and in 1852 to Tredyfifrin township, 
Chester county, and died there. In politics he 
was a Whig. He was a man who was interested 
in county affairs and might have held office, but 
preferred to attend strictly to his business. Like 
all the family, he was a member of the Society 
of Friends. He married Sarah, daughter of 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



t69 



Enos Williamson, a farmer of Xewtown township, 
in Delaware county, wlio is also deceased. Their 
children were T. Elhvood. .Sarah E., and William 
is the oldest. 

William West was born in Aliddletown town- 
ship. Delaware county, Second-mo. 14, 1830. 
He was educated in the public schools of Dela- 
ware county, and in Treemount Seminary at Nor- 
ristown, conducted at that time by Rev. Samuel 
Aaron. On leaving school he was apprenticed to 
his uncle, Thomas H. \\'est, to learn the trade of 
tanner and currier, which was for several gener- 
ations a sort of inheritance in the West family. 
He remained there for several years until he had 
acquired a knowledge of the business, and then 
remained two years longer. He then returned to 
the home place, where he farmed until 1857, 
when he removed to I'l^per INlerion township. 
Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, and farmed 
the Roberts farm for si.xteen years. In 1873 he 
purchased the Rebecca Elliott home at King-of- 
Prussia. He has an elegant home, in which he 
is surrounded by all the comforts of life. He at- 
tended the Philadelphia market forty-nine years. 

William West married, January 21, 1858, Re- 
becca K., daughter of Charles Thomas, of an old 
family of Friends of Tredyffrin township, 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, of Welsh descent. 
The couple have three children, as follows : Ruth 
A., married David Wilson, son of Winfield S. 
Wilson, of Tredyffrin township, and resides in 
Bridgeport, where he is a member of town coun- 
cil ; they have five children — William West, Em- 
ma J., Winfield S.. Rebecca T.. and Elizabeth 
W. 2. Sarah W., married Charles Evans, a son 
of Morris J. Evans, deceased, of Philadelphia ; 
their children are William \\'est, Athalia \\'.. 
and Charles Morris. 3. Elizabeth W., married 
William \'., son of Edwin Conrad, and they 
have one child, William West. 

William West is a man of business, being 
frequently called upon to act in the settlement 
of estates and other positions .of trust requiring 
good judgment in the performance of their du- 
ties. He is a member of the Iwanl of directors 
"f the \\ayne Trust Company, of Delaware 
county and of that nf the P.erwvn (Chester 



count) ) National liank. In politics he is a Re- 
jjublican. He has often been solicited to become 
a candidate for office, but has uniformly declined 
such honors, preferring to attend strictly to busi- 
ness interests of one kind or another. He is, like 
his forefathers, an active member of the Society 
of Friends, and a man who enjoys the respect 
and confidence of the community. 

\MLLIAM G. FREED, a well-known retired 
farmer of Worcester township, was born in 
I'"ranconia township, September 8, 1835, a 
son of .Abraham and •;Mary (Godshalk) 
Freed. The father, who was born Feb- 
ruary 13, 1806, and was one of a family of 
seven children, followed farming in early life 
and afterward abandoned that pursuit to engage 
in the lumber business. On May 17, 1829, he 
married r^Iary Godshalk. who was born August 
15. 1807, and died February 11, 1844. They had 
eight children : Enos, Eliza, Isaac, William, Abra- 
ham, John, Jacob and ?*Iary. On the 23d of No- 
vember, 1846, Abraham Freed married Anna 
Sigler, widow of William Sigler. Abraham 
Freed died June 11, 1862. 

William G. Freed attended the public schools 
of the vicinity until he was ten years of age, leav- 
ing home and going to reside with William Moyer 
on a farm in Franconia township, with whom he 
remained two years in that township, and two 
more after Mr. Meyer's removal to an adjoining 
township. At the age of fourteen years he re- 
turned to the home of his parents, where he was 
engaged in assisting his father in building houses 
for another year. Deciding to learn the wheel- 
wright's trade, he took up his residence with his 
brother Enos, serving an apprenticeship of two 
and a half years. He then took charge of the 
shop, which he managed for his father, being thus 
emplo\ ed until he reached the age of twenty-one 
years. He then took entire charge of the shop 
and conducted the business for himself, doing 
this very successfully. 

.'\t the age of thirty-one years he sold out his 
interest in the wheelwright shop and engaged in 
farming in Worcester township, remaining there 
two years. He then bought his present farm in 



I/O 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Worcester, consisting of eighty-eight acres. 3ilr. 
Freed has been a very successful farmer. He is 
a Republican in politics, and a IMennonite in re- 
ligious faith. 

On March 15, 1862, William G. Freed mar- 
ried Lydia K. Mover, who was born December 
2, 1839. She is one of a family of nine children, 
and is the daughter of John O. INIoyer, of Wor- 
cester township. William G. and Lydia Freed 
had seven children, two of whom died in infancy. 
Elizabeth, born December 24, 1865, married Har- 
man Delp, a farmer, and they have two children : 
Annie, born September 17, 1867, married Abra- 
ham Kulp, a farmer, and they have four children ; 
Martha, born September 29, 1870, married 
Henry Nice, of Norristown, and have three chil- 
dren : Lydia was born August 8, 1872 ; and Will- 
iam, born October 7, 1874, is at home with his 
father. 

EDWIN M. SHELLENBERGER, of West 
Point, was born in Towamencin township, IMont- 
gomery county, January 25, 1844. His paternal 
grandfather was Philip Shellenberger, who was 
born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, and died at 
an advanced age, his remains being interred at 
Hill Town Church. For many years he conducted 
a tavern. His wife, who bore the maiden name of 
Elizabeth Appel, was born in Bucks county, also 
lived to a ripe old age and was laid to rest in Hill 
Town Church cemetery. Their children were 
Henry, George, Jesse, Michael and John, all of 
whom are now deceased, 

George Shellenberger, father of Edwin J\L 
Shellenberger, was a native of Bucks county, 
born in 1792, and he lived to be about seventy 
years of age, his remains being then interred in 
Christ Church cemetery at Kulpsville, Pennsyl- 
vania, He married Catherine Zearfoss, who was 
born in Whitman township, Montgomery count)-, 
and died September i, 1887, at the age of eighty- 
seven years. Her remains were then placed by 
the side of her husband's in Christ Church cem- 
etery. Her father, Benjamin Zearfoss, was a 
farmer and shoemaker and was buried at St. 
John's church near Belfry, Montgomery county. 
His wife, who was also laid to rest there, bore the 



maiden name of ^Matilda Weaver, Their children 
were Catherine, Fred, Jacob, Benjamin and 
Lydia, the wife of Henry Bideman, They, too, 
are all deceased. The children born unto George 
and Catherine (Zearfoss) Shellenberger were : 
Edwin 'SI., Hillery, George, Jesse, Aaron, }vla- 
tilda, Lydia, Catherine and Elizabeth. 

Edwin M. Shellenberger pursued his educa- 
tion in the public schools until about twenty years 
of age and then began farming on his father's 
land, where he remained for about three years. 
He next purchased his present property at West 
Point, Montgomery county, where he has resided 
for twenty years. Here he was largely engaged 
in the production of vegetables and each week at- 
tends the Philadelphia market where he places 
his products on sale. He is a Democrat. He and 
his wife attend the Schwenkfelder church. 

!Mr. Shellenberger was married to Miss 
i\Iary Bookheimer, a daughter of Frederick 
Bookheimer. Both her paternal and ma- 
ternal grandparents were early residents of 
]\Iontgomery county. Her father was a farmer in 
Gwynedd township, Montgomery county, and 
died in April, 1885. Her mother is still living 
in Gwynedd township, at the age of sevent}- 
eight years. ]\Irs. Shellenberger was born March 
27, 1848, and was one of a family of eight chil- 
dren, the others being : Amanda, Addison, Eliza- 
beth, Lydia, Samuel, John and Hannah. Unto 
]\Ir. and ]Mrs. Shellenberger have been born the 
following children: Howard, the eldest, born 
March 18, 1868, married Annie Bruner, a daugh- 
ter of Mrs. Hannah Bruner, and they have one 
child, Elmer E. Howard Shellenberger is now 
acting as driver for Benjamin Frederick of West 
Point. Ida Jane, born October 28, 1869, is the 
wife of Irwin Quinn, a son of Mrs, Emma Quinn, 
and they reside at West Point, he being employed 
in the North Wales planing mill. They have four 
living children: Robert, Lawrence, Edwin and 
Hazel, and they also lost two. Jesse Shellen- 
berger, born May 19, 1872, is an engineer in the 
employ of Hairy Moyer, of West Point. He mar- 
ried Laura Allebach, a daughter of Joseph Alle- 
bach. Allen Shellenberger, born March 30, 1874, 
is employed by Harry :\Ioyer at North Wales. He 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



wedded Mary Booc, a daughter of Jacob Booc 
and they have a daughter, Grace. Lydia L. Shell- 
eiiberger, born May 5, 1877, is the wife of Fred 
Galbraith, a son of Fred Galbraith, Sr. He is em- 
ployed by the Fairview Creamery and they have 
one child, iilildred. George Shellenberger, born 
November 27, 1878, is a farmer of Worcester 
township, Montgomery county. Samuel, born 
December 17, 1884, is employed in a sash fac- 
tory at Lansdale, Pennsylvania. Gurness, born 
September 5, 1886, is on a farm in Worcester 
township. Clarence, born August 20, 1889, is at 
home with his father. 

S.\MUEL SCHULTZ YEAGER, a prom- 
inent farmer of Worcester township, was born 
September 23, 1869, in the township where he 
now lives. He attended the district schools until 
he was fifteen years of age, when he went to work 
on his father's farm. After five years spent in 
this way he obtained employment with Joseph K. 
Schultz, another farmer, with whom he remained 
four years. He then assisted Jacob Fisher on his 
farm for two years. He married and removed to 
Lansdale, working in the fluur mills of A. C. Got- 
shall & Company for two years. During the first 
year he lived in a house which he rented, but the 
next year he built a house for himself. In the 
spring of 1898 he sold his home in Lansdale and 
bought the farm on which he lives. It consists of 
thirty-six acres, and has a good dairy. Mr. Yea- 
ger attends the Schwenkfelder church, of which 
he is a member. He is a Democrat, as was his 
father before him. 

In 1894 Samuel Schultz Yeager married Flora 
M. Cassel, who was born March 26, 1870, a 
daughter of jMahlon H. and Lydia K. (Meschter) 
Cassel. Samuel S. and Flora Yeager have one 
child, Elmer, born July 23, 1901. 

Mahlon H. Cassel married Lydia K., daughter 
of Rev. George Meschter, January 25, 1868. The 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Cassel : Minnie M.. born 
November 27, 1868; Flora; Alice, born July 12, 
1871 ; Martha, born May 8, 1873. -Minnie M. 
Cassel married Milton Benner, who lives in Wor- 
cester township. Mattie is deceased. Alice mar- 
ried Melvin Allebach, and is also deceased. Joseph 



Cassel, the grandfather of Mrs. Yeager, born 
April 28, 1805, married, November 9, 1826, Re- 
becca, daughter of Abraham Heebner. Their 
children : Mary, born September 7, 1827 ; Amos, 
who was born June 23, 1830, and died ]\Iarch 2, 
1858; Sarah, January 31, 1832; Henry, May 30, 
1834; Edith. October 28, 1836; Susanna. April 
4, 1839; JMahlon, April 10, 1840; Hannah, July 
29, 1845; Christian, November 19, 1846; and 
Leah, April 21, 1850. 

Abrahaui Heebner was the father of the wife 
of Joseph Cassel (]\Irs. Yeager's grandfather). 
He mariied, December i, 1791, Catharine, 
daughter of Matthias Rittenhouse. Their chil- 
dren were : Sarah, Hannah, Christopher, John, 
Joseph, Susanna, Rebecca, (grandmother) ; Alary 
and Elizabeth. Both the Cassel and the Heeb- 
ner families were Schwenkfelders. 

Rev. George Meschter (Mrs. Yerger's ma- 
ternal grandfather) was born INIarch 28, 1808, 
and married. May 13, 1830, Sophia, daughter of 
Andrew Kriebel. Their children were : Cath- 
arine, born Alay 7, 1831 ; Abraham, August 31, 
1833 ; Maria, who was born April 6, 1836, and 
died in infancy ; Jacob, born July 4, 1837 ; George, 
born May 2, 1840; Lydia (mother), born June 5, 
1843 ; John, June 15, 1847; and Aaron, who was 
born April 17, 1852, and died in infancy. He was 
a minister of the Schwenkfelders and lived in 
Lower Salford, near Mainland. He died many 
years ago. His wife died in 1852. Rev. George 
Meschter's father was Christopher, born July 21, 
1779, who was the son of Christopher Aleschter, 
born December 17, 1746, who was the son of 
Melchior Meschter and his wife Regina, who 
came in 1734 to Pennsylvania with the other 
Schwenkfelders. 

Jesse Yeager (father), bqfn February 6, 1831, 
married, October 12, 1858, I\Iary, daughter of 
Frederick Schultz. Their children are as fol- 
lows : Selina, bom May 23, 1859, married Alfred 
Bans, a farmer of East Greenville, and they have 
had three children, one being deceased. Isaiah, 
born July 13, 1861, is deceased. Mary Ann, born 
October 19, 1862, died at the age of eighteen 
years. Isabella, born October 18, 1864, married 
Frederick Rentschler, who came from Germany 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



in infancy and is a farmer of Worcester. John, 
born August 27, 1866, married a western woman, 
and resides in Texas, where he is a farmer by 
occupation. They have had one child, now de- 
ceased. Samuel is the subject of this sketch. 
Irwin, born March 19, 1S72, a motorman on the 
trolley line, living in Gcrmantown, married Ella 
Henry, and they have four children. ]\Iorris, born 
September 28, 1874, killed on the railroad at Lan- 
caster, stepping out of the way of one train and 
being struck by another which was coming in the 
opposite direction. 

Frederick Schultz (maternal grandfather), 
born June 28, 1795, was the son of Rev. Mel- 
choir Shultz. He married. May 31, 1827, ^lary 
K., daughter of Abraham Kriebel. Their chil- 
dren : Dinah K.. born February 23, 1828, died 
January 21. 1846; .\donia K., born March 25, 
1830; Xaomi K., born October 21, 1832; ]\Iary 
K. (mother), born December 17, 1834; Lydia K., 
born January 4. 1839, died January 28. 1846; 
Joseph K.. bom April 9, 1841, married October 
18. 1864, Sarah S., daughter of Isaac S. Kriebel. 
and they have eight children ; he was a farmer 
in Worcester township: Sarah K.. born April 12. 
1845. Frederick W. Schultz died April 12. 1867, 
and his widow died July 20. 1875. 

Rev. Melchoir Schultz (great-grandfather), 
born March 25, 1756, was the son of George 
Schultz. He married Salom, daughter of Chris- 
topher Wagner, November 29. 1781. Their chil- 
dren were Christina, Regina. Maria. Henry W.. 
Sarah, Frederick and Susannah (twins), and 
Rosina. He lived in Worcester township. 

George Schultz (great-great-grandfather) 
was the father of Melchoir Schultz, who came to 
Pennsylvania with the Schwenkfelders in 1734. 
George Schultz married Maria, daughter of 
Abraham Yeakle, January 31, 1744. He died 
October 30, 1776, aged sixty-five years, and she 
December 13, 1797, aged seventy-nine years. 
Their children were: Abraham, born March 23. 
1747, and Rev. JNIelchoir. 

D. MELVIN ALLEBACH, a prominent 
farmer of Worcester township, was born in Skip- 
pack township, December 30, 1869. He attended 



the common schools until he was seventeen years 
of age, when he became a clerk in the general 
merchandise store of J. F. Bean, at Creamery, 
remaining there for three years. He then was em- 
ployed as a clerk by A. F. Scheetz, of Doylestown, 
for two years, and by J. S. Geller, of Lansdale, 
for seven years. At the end of that time he 
bought his farm in Worcester township, which 
ci'usists of nineteen and one-half acres, and where 
lie now lives. He has a good dairy and is a suc- 
cessful farmer. He and his wife are members 
of the Schwenkfelder church. 

In 1893 D. INIelvin Allebach married Alice, 
daughter of i\Iahlon H. and Lydia K. (Meschter) 
Cassel. She was born July 12, 1871, and had 
three sisters, as follows: Minnie M., born No- 
vember 27, 1868, married M. B. Benner ; Flora, 
bom March 26. 1870, married S. S. Yeager ; and 
Martha, born ]\Iay 8, 1873, is deceased. The chil- 
dren of D. Melvin and Alice (Cassel) Allebach 
are: Iva, born September 29, 1894, attending the 
Metz school ; Claude, born August 22, 1896, at- 
tending scliool : and Harold, born November i, 
1901. Mrs. Alice Allebach died April 7, 1902. 
D. Melvin Allebach married for his second wife 
Susan Kriebel, May 21, 1904. Mr. Allebach is a 
Republican but not an office seeker. 

David H. Allebach (father) married Sarah 
S. Kulp, and they had five children: H. Wilson 
Allebach married Minerva, daughter of 
William Gerges, of Lansdale. and resides 
at North Wales, having previously been a 
clerk at Lederachsville. They have three chil- 
dren. Maggie Allebach is deceased. Esther mar- 
ried Sylvanus Clemens, a farmer in Hatfield, and 
they have three children. Phares is deceased. D. 
jNIelvin is the youngest. 

Henry M. Kulp (matemal grandfather) had 
six children, two deceased : Mary Ann, who mar- 
ried Peter B. Clymer, a grocer at No. 532 Sus- 
quehanna avenue. Sarah S. (mother) ; Margaret 
Jane, wife of Benjamin W. Markley, of Towa- 
mencin, who is a farmer by occupation, and they 
have four children ; Sadie, wife of Professor H. 
G. Landis. principal of the Lansdale high school, 
and they have had three children, of whom two 
are deceased ; Ella ;\Iav, wife of Frank Landis, of 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



["3 



Worcester township, a farmer by occupation, and 
they have one child ; Verna, who married Howard 
Ruth, of Towamencin township, a farmer b_\- oc- 
cupation and they have one child ; and Jennie, un- 
married, attending the West Chester school. 

David G. Allebach (grandfather) was born in 
Montgomery county in 1801, and died in 1888. 
He was a farmer. 

J. HOWARD WEBER, of Worcester town- 
ship, was bom November 14, 1864, at North 
Wales, Montgomery county, being the son of 
John M. and Barbara (Custer) Weber. He at- 
tended the Ander's school in his native township 
until he was seventeen years of age, when he went 
to work on the farm for one year. He then started 
to learn his trade of blacksmithing, serving the 
the required term of three years with William 
Johnson, of Gwynedd Square. He went to Phil- 
adelphia and was employed by the Rapid Transit 
Company for one }'ear, when he returned to 
Gwynedd and engaged in the blacksmith business 
for himself for eight years. After an absence of 
one year, he again returned to Gwynedd Square 
and remained there until 1900. In that year he 
removed to his farm in Worcester township 
where he farms and manages his blacksmith shop 
at the same time. He has twenty-seven acres and 
nine perches of good land, and does a dairy busi- 
ness, selling milk to the Center Point Creamery. 
He is a Democrat in politics and a member of the 
Wentz Reformed church. 

John 'SL \\'eber (father) was born in Wor- 
cester township, February 5, 1835, and is the son 
of John H. and Elizabeth (Markley) Weber. He 
was educated in the public schools and early in 
life learned the blacksmithing trade. He carried 
on this business in Worcester and North Wales 
for twenty-five years, being one of the old type of 
mechanics who are proficient either in country or 
city work. He was employed at the Cramp's sliip- 
yard and by the Rapid Transit Company in I'hil- 
adelphia for some time. He removed to Norris- 
town in March, 1882. and was employed at his 
trade by William INI. Singerly, proprietor of the 
Philadelphia Record, for eight years. Since that 
time he has been engaged in the box (le|)artnient 



of the William K. Grcsh & Son Cigar Manufac- 
tory. 

John M. Weber (father) filled the office of 
mercantile appraiser in 1872. He was employed 
in the custom house at Philadeplhia under Gro- 
ver Cleveland's administration, when John R. 
Reed was collector of the port, serving for a 
period of four years. In politics the family have 
always been Democrats. 

John M. Weber married Barbara Ann Custer, 
who was born in Worcester township, a daughter 
of Nathan and Catharine (Umstead) Custer. Mr. 
Custer was a carpet weaver and farmer at Fair- 
view, and had eight children. The children of 
John M. and Barbara Weber are: Warren C, 
bom October, 1859; Catharine, who died young: 
Emma, who died at the age of ten years ; John 
Howard; Ida May, who died at the age of four 
years ; and Clara Ella, who married Winfield 
Rosco Hartzell, principal of the Plymouth high 
school. Warren C. Weber was one of the first 
five to be appointed mail carrier in the borough 
of Norristown, and has held that position ever 
since. He married Martha Famous, daughter of 
Hiram and Catharine Famous. Mr. Famous is a 
carpenter in Conshohocken. Warren and Martha 
Weber have one son, Carbon Lester Weber. 

John H. Weber (grandfather) was born in 
Worcester township, April 8, 1798. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Markley, born in Bucks count}', in 
1799. She was the daughter ot George and 
Elizabeth Markley. 

Abraham Weber (great-grandfather) was 
born in Worcester on the same farm. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Hoot, a native of Gwynedd town- 
ship. She was born on the old Hoot homestead. 

Jacob Weber (great-great-grandfather) was 
born in Towamencin township. His wife was 
Elizabeth. 

Christian Weber was the founder of the fam- 
ily in America. He emigrated from Germany, 
September 2j. 1727, locating in Philadelphia for 
one vear. and then removing to Towamencin 
township, at that time in Philadelphia coimty. and 
now Alontgomery. The family have all licen 
farmers from one generation to another. 

John H. and Elizabeth (Markley) Weber 



174 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



(grandparents) had six children, of whom four 
reached maturity : Abraham, deceased ; George 
M., a school teacher in early life, who was born in 
Worcester township, and died in January, 1900; 
Emeline Margaret, born in Worcester township, 
wife of James W. Slough, now living retired at 
West Point; Jacob M., who died in 1888, in 
North Wales. 

The Custer family, to whom the mother of 
J. Howard Weber belongs, emigrated from Hoi- 
land among the early settlers of Pennsylvania. 
The grandfather of Mrs. John M. Weber, Har- 
mon Umstead, at one time owned a large portion 
of what is now Franklin Square, at Sixth and 
Vine streets, Philadelphia. 

J. Howard Weber married (first wife) Livia 
Stohlberger, also of Gwynedd Square, April i. 
1886. They were married by Rev. W. F. Burns. 
Mrs. Weber died October 26, 1894, and was 
buried in the Baptist cemetery in Upper Gwynedd. 
Their children: Philip S., born February 24, 1887, 
at Gwynedd Square, residing with his father ; and 
Linda, born October 21, 1891, attending school. 

J. Howard Weber married (second wife) 
Kate F., daughter of Simon K. and Esther 
(Freyer) Cassel. She was born November 25, 
1868, and the marriage took place September 26, 
1896, Rev. W. S. Anders performing the cere- 
mony. Her mother was the daughter of Bernard 
B. and Catharine (Kriebel) Freyer. Simon and 
Esther (Freyer) Cassel were married September 

5, 1865. Their children : Allen F., born Decem- 
ber 4, 1866; Jacob, a deaf mute, born Novembel 

6, 1870; Kate F., wife of Mr. Weber; Charles 
F.. born October 3,. 1872; Annie F. (deceased), 
born August 10, 1874; Edith F. (decea.sed), born 
July 20, 1876 ; Susanna, born July 20, 1878, wife 
of Wilson Keller; George, born December 13, 
1879; Elizabeth, born October 14, 1881, wife of 
Irwin Underkiifler. 

Daniel K. Cassel (grandfather of Mrs. 
Weber) was the well-known genealogist and his- 
torian, author of the "Kulp Family," "Cassel 
Family," etc. He was born April 22, 1820, and 
has been deceased several years. His wife was 
Elizabeth Kulp. 

The maternal grandfather of Mrs. Weber, 



Bernard B. Freyer. married Catharine Kriebel, 
daughter of Job Kriebel, September 13, 1840. 
Their children: Esther (mother), born August 
31, 1841 ; Jacob, born April 26, 1844; Judia, born 
October 2, 1846; and Susanna, born November 
13, 1850. 

The Cassel family have been very prominent 
in Montgomery county. They were originally 
Mennonites. 

BENJAMIN C. CASSEL, a well-known and 
representative citizen of ' Worcester township, 
[Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, was born in 
that township, and reared on a farm not far from 
his present home, the place being now in pos- 
session of J. C. Blattner. He follows farming 
to a limited extent in connection with another line 
of business. 

His grandfather was Benjamin Cassel, whose 
first wife was Sarah Heebner. After her death 
he married Mrs. Kate (Clemmens) Beyer, a 
widow. The children of the latter marriage were 
Jacob, Benjamin, Joseph, Enos, Abraham, Eliza- 
beth, Hannah, Sarah, Catherine and Susan. 
Abraham, the fifth child and fifth son of this 
family, grew up as a country boy, was educated 
in the district schools, and became a farmer. He 
was prosperous and respected, and reared a 
worthy family. His wife was Susanna Cassel, and 
the names of his seven children were as follows : 
Isiah, Elizabeth, Cornelius, Abraham, Susanna, 
Benjamin C. and Mary, deceased. 

Benjamin C, sixth child and fourth son of 
the foregoing family, was born December 15, 
185 1, in Worcester township. He attended 
school in the neighborhood until he was sixteen 
years of age, and for several years thereafter 
worked on a farm. In 1875, the year following 
his marriage, he removed to the place he now oc- 
cupies, comprising fifty-one acres of land. This 
land he cultivates for the greatest possible return, 
giving much attention to gardening. He also 
buys live stock which he feeds for the Philadelphia 
market. He is a well-known dealer in the market 
at Eighteenth and Bridge streets, where his meats 
have gained a reputation for their high quality. 
He is a Democrat and bears his part in duties of 



MOXTGOAIERY COUNTY. 



'75 



citizenship, keeping an intelligent interest in the 
course of national affairs. He and his family 
attend the Reformed ]\Iennonite church. 

On the 17th of March, 1874, Benjamin C. Cas- 
sel married Mary ]., daughter of Jesse and Mary 
(Bechtel) Detro. His wife is one of a family of 
nine children, as follows : Eliza, born December 
3, 1842, who is unmarried; Hannah, who married 
William Delp, of Lansdale, and has one child ; 
Harry, deceased ; Mahlon, a commission merchant 
of Philadelphia, who married Tillie Lambert and 
has two children ; Abraham, now a farmer of Le- 
high county, who married Annie Shields, and has 
six children: Mary J., wife of Benjamin C. Cas- 
scl ; Josiah, a marketman of Philadelphia, whose 
wife was Kate Hochman, and who is the father 
of nine children ; Amanda, wife of Benjamin 
Wycle, a minister of Saints church, who is the 
mother of two children; and Ida, who lives in 
Lansdale with her mother. Mr. and ]\Irs. Benja- 
min C. Cassel have no children of their own but 
have reared six adopted children. 

JOHN F. FISHER was born December 22, 
183 1, near the town of Shoffenhausen, Switzer- 
land. He was a farmer in his native country until 
he was twenty-four years old, and then, in 1855, 
came to America. He settled in Norriton town- 
ship, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, where 
he followed his trade of blacksmithing for one 
year. Obliged to leave this work on account of 
failing health he went to Worcester township, 
^ and worked on farms in that and adjoining town- 
ships for several years. In 1870 he bought his 
farm in W'orcester township, which includes over 
sixty-eight acres, and where he has carried on 
general farming ever since. He has a good dairy. 
The house on the farm was built in 1754, an addi- 
tion being built in 1813, and both parts are won- 
derfully well preserved. Mr. Fisher is a staunch 
Democrat and served as supervisor for two years. 
He belongs to the German Reformed church. 

John F. Fisher is a member of Zook Post, No. 
II, G. A. R., of Norristown. He enlisted in de- 
fense of the L'nion, April 21, 1861, at Harris- 
burg, as a private in Company E, Fourth Penn- 



sylvania Infantry. By reason of faithful service 
he was promoted to the rank of corporal. Captain 
George Anny commanded the company, which 
was attached to the Fourth Regiment, Pennsyl- 
vania \'olunteers, under the command of Colonel 
John F. Hartranft, and assigned to the First Bri- 
gade, Third Division, JNIcDowell's Army. The 
regiment left Camp Curtain, on April 21, and 
proceeded to Philadelphia, going thence to An- 
napolis by boat, and marching thence to Wash- 
ington. The regiment went into camp at Blad- 
ensburg and Shutler's Hill, where the picket lines 
were attacked on June 30, along the old Fairfax 
road. On July 19th the regiment marched to 
Blackburn's Ford and Centre Hill, and thence to 
Washington. From W^ashington the regiment 
went to Harrisburg, where Corporal Fisher was 
honorably discharged, July 21, 1861, having 
served the period of his enlistment. Two brothers 
of Mr. Fisher, Jacob and George, served in the 
Civil war. They are now deceased. The regi- 
ment was enlisted for three months and took part 
in the first battle of Bull Run. 

In 1861 John F. Fisher married Anna Weig- 
ner, daughter of Joel Weigner. Their children 
are : Sarah W. Fisher, who was born October 10, 
1862, and resides with her parents ; Susannah W., 
who is bookkeeper and cashier for G. F. Pfund & 
Son, pork packers, in the Reading terminal mar- 
ket ; and one deceased. 

The founder of the ^^"eig^er family in this 
country was Susanna (Seipt) Weigner, who 
came to Pennsylvania with the Schwenkfelders in 
1734. She brought with her three children: 
Abraham. George and Rosina, who died Septem- 
ber 14, 1800. Susanna Weigner, the widow, died 
September 18, 1755. 

Abraham Weigner (great-grandfather), the 
son of Susanna Weigner, married ]\Iay 31, 1750, 
Susanna, daughter of Abraham Yeakle. Their 
children were : Maria, born Alay 27, 175 1 ; Sarah, 
born June 5, 1753, and died August 8, 1758; 
Rosina, born February 7, 1755 ; Susanna, born 
July 25, 1757, and died August 19, 1788; Abra- 
ham, born September 25, 1760; and John (grand- 
father), born July 9, 1765. Abraham Weigner 



176 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



died March 13, 1781, aged sixty-two years. Sus- 
anna, his widow, died January 28, 181 2, aged 
eighty-three years and one month. 

John Weigner (grandfather) married Rosi- 
na, daughter of David, Kriebel, September 10, 
1795. Their children were : Daniel, born Sep- 
tember 26, 1797; George, born August 25, 1799; 
Joel (father), born May 14, 1801 ; x\braham, born 
November 8, 1802 ; Leah, born July 4, 1804 ; John 
born November 5, 1806 ; Lydia, born September 9, 
1808; and Ezra, born January 12, 1814. John 
Weigner (grandfather) died September 6, 1847, 
aged eighty-two years. Rosina, his widow, died 
February 11, 1855, aged eighty-two years and 
seven months. 

Joel Weigner (father) married Sarah, daugh- 
ter of Henry Heebner, in 1833. Their children 
were : Anna, born September 3, 1834, wife of John 
F. Fisher; Lydia, born July 26, 1837, and died 
May 25, 1865; and Abigail, -born November i, 
1842, and died March 16, 1868. Joel Weigner 
died March 13, 1857. 

Henry Heebner (maternal grandfather of 
I\Irs. Fisher), born December i, 1778, was the 
son of George and Anna (Shubert) Heebner. He 
married, April 21, 1807, Anna, daughter of Chris- 
topher Schultz. Their children were : Sarah 
(mother) born January 30. 1808; Susanna, born 
June 25. 1810; George, born November 24. 181 1 ; 
Abraham, born May 14. 1814. and died February 
24. 181 5; Hannah, born February 24. 1816; 
Maria, born October 31, 1817; .\bigail. born De- 
cember 29, 1819 ; John S., born jNIarch 2, 1822. 
and died in 1903 ; and Anna, born February 28, 
1827. John S. was long a director in the ]\lont- 
gomery National Bank, of Norristown. and was 
one of the most substantial citizens of L'pper 
Gwynedd township, residing on the farm prev- 
iously owned by his father. Henry Heebner died 
March 30, 1847. His wife preceded him in death, 
dying April 2, 1839. 

George Heebner (great-grandfather ) w as the 
son of David Heebner, who came with his wife, 
Maria, to Pennsylvania in 1734. George Heeb- 
ner married, April 26, 1769, Susanna, daughter 
of Balthasar Heydrick, and had one son, Baltha- 
sar, born June 12, 1770. .Susanna, wife of George 



Heebner, died June 19, 1770. and George Heeb- 
ner married (second wife) Anna, daughter of 
David Shubert. Their children : Maria, born 
April 28, 1773 : Salome, born October 18, 1774, 
and died March 31. 1776; Regina, born January 
13, 1777; Henry (grandfather), born December 
I, 1778; Barbara, born jNIarch 13, 1780, and died 
May 16, 1786; and Catharine, who was born 
July 17, 1782, and died May 14, 1786. George 
Heebner died August i8, 1783, aged thirty-nine 
years. Anna, his widow, died August 23, 1784, 
aged thirty-five years. 

David Heebner (great-great-grandfather) had 
the following children: Christopher; Susanna; 
Rosanna, born May 9, 1738: and George (great- 
grandfather), born June 21. 1744. David Heeb- 
ner died December 2j . 1^84. His widow Maria, 
died June 11, 1793. 

JOHN WILLL\M LODGE, M. D., of Lower 
Merion township, Montgomery county, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he was born on February 12, 1838, 
is descended on the paternal and maternal sides 
of the family from earl}- settlers of the state of 
Pennsylvania, and is a son of Thomas Garrett 
and Susan (Evans) Lodge. > 

Abel Lodge, ancestor of Dr. John W. Lodge, 
was a native of England, and came to this coun- 
try with William Penn on his second visit to the 
province. He settled at Kingsessing, where he 
purchased a large tract of land, a portion of 
which is still in the possession of his descendants. 

John Lodge, grandfather of Dr. John VV\. 
Lodge, was a native of Kingsessing, received a 
common school education, and during the active 
years of his life followed the occupation of farm- 
ing. He was united in marriage to Elizabeth 
Reid, at the old Swedes' church in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, by the Rev. Nicholas Collin. May 
29, 1793, and among the children born of this 
marriage was a son, Thomas Gerrett Lodge. 

Thomas Garrett Lodge, father of Dr. John W. 
Lodge, was born at Kingsessing, March 28, 181 1, 
and was the youngest of a family of several chil- 
dren. After receiving a good education in the 
schools of the neighborhood he followed his fa- 
ther's pursuit, that of farming, in which he was 




THOMAS G. LODGE 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



177 



Highly successful. He was a man of exemplary 
habits, and was well known for his rectitude and 
probity of character. He was one of the organ- 
izers of St. John's Protestant Episcopal church 
of Merion, in 1861, and served as vestryman up 
to the time of his death. On December 20, 1832, 
he was married to Susan Evans, daughter of Jo- 
seph and Mary Thomas Evans (a descendant of 
John ap Thomas, who with Dr. Edward Jones 
was the agent through whom many of the early 
settlers purchaser their land from William Penn), 
and ten children were the issue of this union, 
five of whom still survive. 

One of their sons, Joseph Evans Lodge, was 
first lieutenant in the Third Regiment United 
States Cavalry, and another son, Louis K. Lodge, 
was for many years superintendent of the central 
■division of the Pennsylvania Railroad, and also 
held an important position in the service of the 
company at Altoona, Pennsylvania.. The first 
ancestor in this country of the Evans famil\-, of 
whom Mrs. Susan (Evans) Lodge was a mem- 
ber, was Robert David, who came from \\'ales 
with a colony from Merionethshire during the 
early settlement of Pennsylvania. Before em- 
igrating to this country he purchased two hun- 
dred and eighty acres of land in Merion township, 
then a part of Philadelphia county, Pennsylvania, 
and a portion of these lands deeded by William 
Penn to Robert David, by deed dated March 18, 
1681, is still in possession of the family. His 
granddaughter Elizabeth Roberts married John 
Evans, M'ho came from Wales in 171 1, and their 
son Nehamiah Evans was ensign in the 4th Coiu- 
])any, 3rd Battalion, Revolutionary army. 
Thomas Garrett Lodge died January 23, 1894, and 
his wife Susan (Evans) Lodge died in the year 
1880. 

Dr. John W. Lodge, only surviving son of 
Thomas G. and Susan (Evans) Lodge, was born 
at the family homestead in Lower Merion. He 
was educated at Lower Merion Academy, the 
West Chester Academy, and at Charleston 
(South Carolina) College. He graduated in his 
medical studies in 1859, and at once entered upon 
the practice of his profession. In 1861, at the 
breaking out of the rebellion, he was commis- 



sioned captain and assistant surgeon of the Sec- 
ond Regiment, Pennsylvania \'olunteer Reserve 
Corps, and was sent to Easton, Pennsylvania, to 
organize a camp and military hospital, which was 
to be established at that place for the PennsylW- 
vania Reserves. Li August, 1861, he was ordered' 
to the command of General Nathaniel P. Banks, 
on the Upper Potomac, and later he served withi 
his regiment in the Army of the Potomac. Fqe,- 
a time he was medical officer on the staff of Gen- 
eral John F. Reynolds, and in August, 1862, he 
was appointed executive officer of the military- 
hospital at Hestonville. In 1864 Dr. Lodge fiUed 
a similar position at the south hospital, and was- 
acting surgeon of the United States Volunteers. 

After the war Dr. Lodge was elected one of 
the consulting surgeons of the Philadelphia Hos- 
pital. At the present time (1904) he is one of 
the physicians of the Bryn Mawr Hospital, and 
one of the surgeons of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road Company. During the many years of his- 
professional career he has taken an active inter- 
est in all organizations that have for their ob- 
ject the advancement and ethics of the profession. 
He has had a wide experience in hospital and gen- 
eral practice, and stands high among the medical 
practitioners in his section of the county. He is 
a member of the Pennsylvania Commandery of 
the J\Iiltiary Order of the Loyal Legion. 

Dr. Lodge was married April 4, 1866, ta 
Aliss Sarah J. Simmons, born September 5. 1839, 
a daughter of Anthony Hathaway and Sarah 
(Davis) Simmons, and granddaughter of Colonel 
Anthony Simmons, one of the judges of the dis- 
trict court of Phiadephia. To this marriage was 
born one daughter, Carolina Alexander. Mrs. 
Lodge died November 22,, 190 1. 

JOHN BLATTNER, of Worcester township, 
Montgomery county, an energetic and successfnl 
farmer, has won for himself a creditable place 
and a competence in the business world, though 
he came to America as a boy \\ith no resource- 
save his inheritance of a sound body and a vigor- 
ous mind. 

He was born in ^\'ittenburg. Germany. Sep- 
tcmcr 16, 1842, a son of Anthony and Lona 1 Her- 



t/S 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



man) Blattner, his father being a farmer. ^^Ir. 
Blattner was one of three children, his brother 
remaining in Germany, and his sister coming to 
America, where she married Andrew Gaysor, 
in Philadelphia. He attended school until he was 
fourteen and then worked on his father's farm, 
until seventeen years of age, when he came to 
America. He went to Norriton township, Mont- 
gomerv county, where he worked on the farm of 
Henry L. Heebner for about four years. He was 
next in the employ of Dr. Martin for a time, after 
which he was employed for two years by Dr. 
Krause. Following this, he worked for five years 
for Charles Kreble, and then bought the prop- 
erty where he now lives. This farm consists of 
fifty-two acres, and in addition ht owns two 
other pieces of land in Worcester township, one 
consisting of twenty-eight and the other of forty- 
two acres. Dairying is the principal line of his 
farm work, and he keeps on an average on the 
home place about sixteen head of cows. He 
is a careful manager, thorough in all his methods, 
and confines his operations to the business lines 
with which he is thoroughly familiar, and in which 
his practical experience and sound judgment win 
him success. 

Mr. Blattner is highly regarded in the com- 
munity and is thoroughly in touch with the spirit 
of his adopted country. While not a member of 
any church he is tolerant in his views and is 
ready to co-operate in any good work, either in 
the church or outside of religious organizations. 
In politics he is a Republican and follows the 
course of public affairs with much interest. 

On December i8, 1869, John Blattner and 
Elizabeth Cassel were married by the Rev. S. M. 
K. Huber. Mrs. Blattner was a daughter of 
Abraham and Susanna Cassel, and was one of a 
family of seven children, as follows : Isiah, born 
March 8, 1842; Elizabeth, born October 18, 1843, 
the wife of John Blattner; Cornelius, born June 
23, 1845, deceased; Abraham, born March 23, 
1847, now living at Skippack ; Susanna, who was 
born January 30, 1849, and married Herman 
Wise, a shoe dealer of Norristown, and who has 
had nine children, three of whom are dead; Ben- 
jamin, who was born December 15, 1853, and is a 



farmer of \\'orcester township, represented else- 
where in this work; and ^lary, born January 12, 
1855, the wife of Michael Kreeble, a farmer of 
Worcester township, and the mother of three 
children. 

John and Elizabeth (Cassel) Blattner have 
become the parents of nine children, as follows: 
Charles, who is a farmer in Belfry, born June 25, 
i87i,_ married Rachel Green, and has had two 
children, of whom Bertha, three years old, is 
living; George, born August 5, 1872, and living 
on one of his father's farms, married Annie Fisher 
and has four children, Elizabeth, Frances, Flor- 
ence, and George; Joseph, a farmer and huckster 
of ^\'orcester township, born September 15, 1873, 
married Emma, daughter of Anthony Shultz of 
Belfry, and has two children, John and Elmer; 
Abraham, born April 16, 1875, died September 
II, 1875 ; Mary Ann, borii October 10, 1876, died 
August 14, 1877 ; Frank, a milk dealer of Nor- 
ristown, bom November 28, 1877, married Lina 
Shultz, daughter of Wilson Shultz of Lonsdale; 
Aaron, born July i, 1879, ^"d living on one of 
his father's farms, married Alice, daughter of 
Anthony Schultz of Belfry; Ella, born March 6, 
1882, is at home; Margaretta, born July 11, 1885, 
died in March, 1904. 

JOHN K. KRIEBLE. The branch of the 
Krieble family represented by John K. Krieble, 
a valued and influential citizen of Worcester 
township, jMontgomery county, was founded in 
the United States by Melchoir Krieble who came 
to Pennsylvania in 1734, accompanied by his 
wife, whose maiden name was Anna Diescher, 
daughter of Christopher Diescher. They resided 
on the old Rittenhouse property in Towamencin 
township, and there they reared a family consist- 
ing of four children — David, Susanna, Melchoir 
and Rosina Krieble. Melchoir Krieble, the father 
of these children, died February 14, 1790, at the 
advanced age of eighty years, and his wife, Anna 
(Diescher) Krieble, died December 26, 1789, 

John K. Krieble, a descendant of the above 
named couple, was born in Gwynedd township, 
Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, May 31, 1847. 
He pursued his studies in the common schools of 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



179 



the neighborhood until he attained the age i:>f fif- 
teen years. Two years later he entered the Tree- 
mount Seminary which was under the preceptor- 
ship of John ^^'. Loch, a capahle educator, and 
after a one-term course of instruction in that insti- 
tution he attended Freeland Seminary for two 
terms, thus completing his education at the age of 
nineteen years. Being thoroughly qualified for the 
position of school teacher, both by the excellent 
educational advantages he had received and the 
faculty he possessed of imparting knowledge to 
others, he chose that vocation as a means of liveli- 
hood and served as a teacher in the townships 
of Towamencin, Gwynedd, Worcester and Lower 
Providence, and he also taught the high school 
in North \\'ales for one term, his entire time of 
service in this capacity covered a period of nine 
years. He then engaged in the grocery business 
in the city of Philadelphia, later removed to Nor- 
ritonville, where he continued in the same line of 
trade for five years, and finally located on his 
present farm in Worcester township where he 
conducted a general line of farming and dairying 
until 1901, when his son A. R. Krieble rented it. 
His farm consists of forty acres of rich and arable 
land, and his dairy is equipped with fifteen head 
of well selected cows. 

Mr. Krieble is a member of the Schwenkfelder 
church, a member of the Farmers Union, and a 
Republican in politics. 

Mr. Krieble was united in marriage, Novem- 
ber 18, 1871. to Katie L. Reifif. born March 31, 
1849, a daughter of Abraham and Sallie (Landes) 
Reiflf. j\Ir. and Mrs. Krieble have seven chil- 
dren: I. Abram R., the eldest born December 21, 
1872, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he attended 
the common school of Worcester township until 
the age of fourteen years, w^hen he was graduated 
in the second class. He subsequently attended 
the normal school at West Chester where he pre- 
pared himself for the position of teacher, after 
which he served in that capacity, having charge of 
the primary class of Metz's school, in Worcester 
township, for one term, and of the "Meeting 
House school," in Franconia township, for one 
term. The work proving uncongenial he returned 
home and has since devoted his attention to farm- 



ing pursuits. 2. Susan Helen, the second child, 
born July 28, 1874, became the wife of \\'ilson K. 
Heebner, son of Jacob D. Heebner, and a ma- 
chinist by trade, residing at Norristown, and their 
family consisted of two children, one of whom is 
now deceased. 3. Charles C, born March 5, 1877, 
is a graduate of the Schissler Business College. in 
Norristown, married Elizabeth Costigan, daugh- 
ter of George Costigan, and is now employed in 
Norristown, where he resides. 4. ^lary R,, a twin 
of Charles C, is engaged as a dressmaker by 
private families in Philadelphia, Norristown and 
adjacent towns. 5. Isaac R., born September 27, 
1 88 1, is also a graduate of the common schools of 
the township, has taught three terms of school 
in Montgomery county, and was graduated June 
25, 1904, from Perkiomen Seminary, near the head 
of his class. 6. Addison R., born October 21, 1884, 
is a graduate of the common school and when he 
attended the age of seventeen years attended one 
term at the Schissler Business College at Norris- 
town ; he secured employment in Philadelphia but 
after a short period he was forced to resign on 
account of ill health. He is at present at home on 
the farm with his brother. 7. Jacob Wallace, born 
June 30, 1889, is attending the common school 
from which he expects to graduate soon. 

The father of ]\Irs. Krieble, Abraham S. Reiflf, 
was born January 16, 1817, and her mother, Sallie 
(Landes) Reiflf, was born October 4, 1820. They 
were united in marriage January 23, 1842, and 
nine children were born to them : Mary L., bom 
March 31, 1843: Susan L., born January 22, 
1845 : George L., born December 8, 1846 ; Kate L., 
born March 30. 1849 ; Abram L., born ftlarch 23, 
1851, and died July 31, 1887; Sarah L., born May 
I7> 1853 ; Annie L., bom August 23, 1855 ; Jacob 
L., born October 30, 1857; and Isaac L., who was 
born February 8, i860, and is deceased. 

HEXRY S. SASSAMAN, a justice of the 
peace residing at No. 371 North Evans street, 
Pottstown, Pennsylvania, is a member of an old 
family of German origin long domiciled in the 
upper section of the state. He was bom in Doug- 
lass township, Berks county, May 24, 1843. He 
is the son of Christian and Maria (Sassaman) 



i8o 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Sassaman, both natives of the vicinity in which 
their son was born. They had six children, four 
sons and two daughters, as follows : Willoughby ; 
Augustus, deceased ; Mary, wife of Henry Hoff- 
man ; Lucy, wife of Joel W. D. Whitman ; Henry 
S. Sassaman; and John S. Sassaman. 

His brother, Augustus S. Sassaman, was a 
practicing lawyer in Berks county for many years, 
and was once elected assistant law judge for a 
term of ten years in the Berks county courts. He 
died at the age of sixty-one years. 

Christian Sassaman (father) was a tanner by 
trade and later a farmer in Berks county, where 
he died, March 17, 1890, aged eighty years. His 
wife died in 1893, lacking two months of being 
eighty years of age. They were member of the 
German Reformed church, as are all the family. 

John Sassaman (grandfather) was born in 
Germany and came to America at the age of four- 
teen years, settling in Berks county, where he fol- 
lowed blacksmithing and afterwards farming. 
He died in Berks county, aged sixty-eight years. 
His _wife was Barbara Geyer, who was born in 
Swamp, New Hanover township. They had three 
sons and one daughter. 

Henry Sassaman (maternal grandfather) 
lived in Berks county and died there as an ad- 
vanced age, leaving a large family of children. 

Henry S. Sassaman was reared in Berks county 
on his father's farm, and lived there until he was 
forty years of age. He attended the public schools 
of the vicinity and followed the occupation of a 
teacher for nearly twenty years in the winter 
months, commencing work of this kind when he 
was but sixteen years of age. He also followed 
milling through the same period, gave some at- 
tention to farming and engaged in other pursuits 
prior to his removal to Pottstown. 

On November 4, 1861, he married Sarah Nei- 
man, daughter of Frederick and Charlotte ( Yor- 
gey) Neiman. The couple had eight children : 
Emma, Franklin, George W., Ada M., Ralph, 
Henry, Lucy E. and Maurice E. Emma died at 
the age of twenty-five years. Franklin married 
Anna Emes. They live at Reading, where he is 
employed in a puddling mill. They have five 
;hildren living : Lottie, Edith, Lester, Stanley and 



Ruth. George W. died at the age of nineteen 
years. Ada M. married Charles A. Keim, now de- 
ceased. They had two children, Franklin L. and 
Lillie G. Franklin is a student at Girard College. 
Ada M. married (second husband) William Ber- 
gey. They have three children, George A., Henry 
Emerson Bergey and an infant son. Ralph died 
at the age of nineteen years and two months. 
Henry died at the age of five years and six 
months. Maurice E. married Nettie Maiger. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Sassaman and their 
children are members of the Reformed church. 
He is a member of the Order of Heptasophs. Po- 
litically he is a Democrat. Mr. Sassaman is an 
assessor and has served twelve years in that ca- 
pacity. He was judge of elections in Douglass 
township, Berks county. He went to Pottstown 
in 1883 and was elected justice of the peace, in 
which office he is now serving his eighteenth year, 
having been appointed twice to fill vacancies and 
elected the remainder of the time. He has always 
been very careful in his decisions and few, if any, 
have been reversed. 

On November 15, 1883, Mr. Sassaman met 
with an accident which has crippled him for life. 
While cutting wood to build a fire the ax glanced 
and cut him on the knee of the right leg, the in- 
jury confining him to his bed for eleven months. 
He has no action in the knee. He owns a sub- 
stantial brick residence. No. 371 North Evans 
street, in which he resides. 

DR. M. AUGUSTUS WITHERS, physician 
and druggist at the corner of High and Charlotte 
streets, Pottstown, was born in Strasburg town- 
ship, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. November 
6, 1829. He is the son of IMichael and Mary 
(Smith) Withers, both of whom were natives of 
Lancaster county. The couple had eight chil- 
dren, of whom five are now living : Clara Amelia, 
widow of Colonel Emlen Franklin, of Lancaster ; 
Ann Josephine and Louisa (twins), the former 
the widow of John H. B. Wagner, and the latter 
the widow of Dr. A. J. Carpenter, of Lancaster; 
Anna, widow of Bernard Wolfe of Pittsburg ; and 
Dr. M. Augustus Withers. 

]\Iichael Withers (father) was a miller when 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



a young man, and later in life he engaged in the 
lumber and coal business in Lancaster, which 
he continued until he retired from active pur- 
suits. He lived in Lancaster the greater part of 
his life and died there in 1891, aged about sev- 
enty years. His wife died in 1865, aged sixty- 
three years. Both were members of the Lutheran 
denomination. 

George Withers (grandfather) was a native 
of Lancaster county. He was one of the first iron- 
masters in the state of Pennsylvania, and also 
carried on farming, at the same time operating a 
mill, himself and his brother doing business to- 
gether. He was a Revolutionary soldier, and his 
widow drew a pension for many years on that ac- 
count. His wife was Anna Kindig. He lived to 
a good old age and left two sons and two daugh- 
ters. He was of German descent, like most of 
the people of that section of Pennsylvania. 

Chester Chapin Smith (maternal grandfather) 
was a Connecticut man and died young. He had 
an only daughter. His widow married Joseph 
Ehrenfried and they had no children. He was 
state printer for Pennsylvania, having been ap- 
pointed by Governor Ritner, and published a 
paper at the same time. 

Dr. M. Augustus Withers was reared in Lan- 
caster. He attended Franklin Academy and 
graduated from Yale College in 1848. He then 
studied medicine and was graduated from the 
medical department of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania in 1 85 1. He began practicing medicine in 
Lancaster, continuing there for three or four 
years. He removed to Safe Harbor, staying there 
a year or two. He removed to Pottstown in 
1859 and bought a drug store. He has been a res- 
ident of that borough ever since, conducting the 
drug business and practicing medicine at the same 
time. Dr. Withers had begun and finished the 
study of medicine in 1849 ^^''t'"' F- -■'^- ^I"blen- 
berg. of Lancaster. He practiced for a time at 
Millersville. 

Dr. Withers entered the army as an assistant 
surgeon from the state of Pennsylvania in the fall 
of 1861 and served two years, half the time as 
assistant and then being promoted to surgeon of 



the Seventy-sixth Regiment, Pennsylvania Vol- 
unteers. 

After the war he returned to Pottstown and 
has carried on the drug business ever since, but 
gave up the practice of medicine about twenty 
years ago. 

In 1857 Dr. Withers married Mary Louise 
IMusselman, daughter of Henry and Anna (Eshle- 
man) Musselman. They have one daughter, 
Anna j\lary, now the wife of Horace Evans, pres- 
ident of the Pottstown National Bank. They 
have two sons, Louis W. and George W. Evans. 
Dr. Withers and wife are members of the Protes- 
tant Episcopal church. He is a member of Stich- 
ter Lodge, Free and Accepted ]\Iasons, and is a 
past master of the lodge. Politically he is a Re- 
publican. He is a member of the County and 
State Medical Societies. Dr. Withers is princi- 
pal owner of the Pelican State Manufacturing 
Company at Windgap, Pennsylvania. He resides 
in the property in which his store is located. He 
erected the store building in 1883. 

George Withers (grandfather) and his 
brother Michael were both extensive landowners 
in Lancaster county, and, as already stated, were 
prominently identified with its iron and flour mill- 
ing industry. Both were men of independent 
means. They owned and operated the Mount 
Eden and Conowingo Iron Furnaces, the first 
built in 1808, the second in 1809. Both took an 
active part in public afifairs and each held a num- 
ber of public positions. 

DR. CLARENCE MARMADUKE CAS- 
SELBERRY is one of the most prominent of the 
younger members of the medical fraternity of that 
section of Montgomery county adjacent to Potts- 
town, where he was born October 5, 1875. He is 
the son of Marmaduke Burr and Amanda Eiiza- 
])etli (Yocom) Casselberry, the former a native 
of Montgomery county and the latter of Berks 
county. The couple had four children, one son 
and three daughters, namely: Gertrude (de- 
ceased), who was the wife of Dr. D. Walter 
Spence; Ella, wife of Ellsworth Lincoln Ed- 
wards, of Pottstown ; Dr. Clarence M. ; and Mary 



l82 



MONTGO-MERY COUNTY. 



Elizabeth, wife of Robert J. Scott, of Pittsburg. 
Pennsylvania. 

]\Iarmaduke B. Casselberry (father) was a 
general merchant, subsequently a tanner, and still 
later a banker in Pottstown, of the M. Burr Cas- 
selberry & Company's Bank, previously known for 
many years as John W. Casselberry & Company, 
bankers and brokers. The past ten years or more 
he has lived retired. He and his wife are Luth- 
erans. He was among the emergency men in 
Pennsylvania during the Rebellion, when the 
state was menaced by the Confederate forces for 
a short time. Mr. Casselberry is an active Re- 
publican and votes the ticket of that party. He. 
was member of the board of health of Pottstown 
under the administration of Burgess Jesse Evans. 
Richard Casselberry (grandfather) lived in 
the central part of Pottstown. He came orig- 
inally from Evansburg, a few miles above Xor- 
ristown, the ancestral home of the family. He 
was a farmer by occupation. He married Eliza- 
beth ]\Iiirer and they had a large family. He was 
prominent in politics and an active worker in the 
Republican party. 

John Yocom (maternal grandfather) was a na- 
tive of Berks county, conducted a general store at 
Amityville, and was also engaged as a farmer. 
He removed to Pottstown and entered the iron 
business, in which industry he was interested 
until the time of his death. He died suddenly 
while going to a fire near his home on High 
street, when he was about forty-eight years old. 
His wife was Hannah Caroline Miller. They had 
several sons and daughters. 

iNIoses Yocom (maternal great-grandfather) 
was also a native of Pennsylvania, being of Swed- 
ish descent. The founder of the Yocom family in 
this country was Peter Yocom, who came from 
Sweden in 1638 and settled near Philadelphia. 
His children were : Peter, born in 1678 ; ^Moses, 
born in 1879; Catharine (unmarried) born in 
1682 ; Charles, born in 1683 in Philadelphia ; 
Swan, who settled a few miles above Philadel- 
phia; Jonas, who was the head of Dr. Cassel- 
berry's family on his mother's side; Andrew; 
John ; and Julia, who married a Morgan, one of 
the ^^"elsh settlers of that vicinitv. One of the 



Yocoms married a INIiss Ball, who was a sister | 
of Washington's mother. Peter Yocom, the I 
founder of the family, is often mentioned in \\"i\\- 
iam Penn's letters. 

Dr. Clarence M. Casselberry was reared in 
Pottstown and attended the public schools for 
some time. He then prepared for college at the 
Hill school, Pottstown, and then entered the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, being gratuated from the 
medical department of that institution in 1897. 
He became an interne at St. Joseph's Hospital at 
Providence, Rhode Island. From that place he 
went to Boston and practiced in that city four 
years, being connected with The Boston Emer- 
gency Hospital there, as attending surgeon. He 
returned to Pottstown in 1902 and opened an 
office there, and is now successfully engaged in 
the practice of medicine. 

He is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church of the Transfiguration, Pottstown. Dr. 
Casselberry is a member of the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, the Ancient Order United 
Workmen, and also vice president of the [Mont- 
gomery County Medical Society and a member of 
the State ^ledical Society and the American ]Med- 
ical Association. 

Politically Dr. Casselberry is a Republican, al- 
though he has never sought office and is more de- 
voted to the duties of his profession than to merely 
partisan pursuits. 

DR. JOHN DAVIS, for more than forty 
years a practicing physician at Pottstown, is one 
of the prominent citizens of that place. He is a 
native of an old Chester county family of Welsh 
descent and was born near Marshallton, January 
19, 1833. He is the son of Aaron and Hannah 
(Woodward) Davis, who were both natives and 
almost lifelong residents of Chester county. They 
had five children, three of whom are now living, as 
follows : Dr. John Davis and Mary Elizabeth, 
wife of George Shenk, of Pottstown ; and George 
W. Davis, of Philadelphia. • 

Aaron Davis (father) was a farmer by occu- 
pation. He lived three years in [Montgomery 
coimty near the close of his life and died there in 
1883, aged sixty-three years. His widow survived 




y 



4^>-£-^ ^Wt^i^-i<C— 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



until June, 1902, and was ninety-four years of 
age at the time of her death. They incHned 
toward the faith of the Society of Friends. 

John Davis (grandfather) was born in Ches- 
ter county and was a farmer. His wife was Mar- 
jorie Hall, and they had five children. He lived 
to the age of eighty years. 

Jacob Woodward (maternal grandfather) was 
a well-known resident of Chester county of Eng- 
lish descent. He was a wheelwright. His wife 
was Lydia (Woodward) Woodward. He died 
at the age of seventy years. The couple had six 
children. 

Dr. John Davis was reared on the farm in 
Chester county, attending the district schools of 
the neighborhood. He engaged in teaching school 
for seven years and in the merchandising in ]\Iar- 
shallton for several more years. In 1859 he began 
studying medicine and in 1862 graduated from 
the Eclectic Medical College in Philadelphia, be- 
ginning the practice of medicine that year in 
Pottstown, where he has followed it continuously 
and very successfully since. 

On August 26, 1858, he married Sarah A. 
Hoopes, daughter of Enos and Ruth Ann Hoopes, 
of Chester county. They had three children, of 
whom but one is now living, Helena, wife of Dr. 
Alfred Mullhaupt, of St. Marys, Elk county, 
Pennsylvania, where she, as well as her husband, 
is a practicing physician. They have two sons, 
Alfred and John. 

]\Irs. Sarah A. Davis died in September, 1865, 
aged thirty-five years. She was a Methodist in 
religious faith. 

On March 5, 1867, Dr. Davis married (second 
wife) Elizabeth Missimer, daughter of James and 
Matilda (Reifsnyder) Missimer. They have had 
five children, of whom one is now living. Dr. \\'ill- 
iam J. Davis, of Pottstown, who married Clara 
Linderman, they having three children, Florence, 
Helena and John. He graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania in 1889. 

Dr. John Davis and wife are members of the 
Methodist church. He is a steward in the church. 
Politically Dr. Davis is a Prohibitionist, being en- 
tirely opposed to the manufacture, sale and use of 
intoxicants. 



He is one of the directors of the Ellis Key- 
stone Agricultural Works, a director in the Potts- 
town Power, Heat & Light Company, a director 
in the Pottstown Security Company, and in the 
Guardian Building & Loan Association. He is a 
member of the IMontgomery County IMedical So- 
ciety. Dr. John Davis stands high in the medical 
profession, his practice extending over a large 
section of Montgomery and Chester counties, ad- 
jacent to Pottstown. He is earnest, progressive 
and highly esteemed by all who know him. 

SAMUEL FRONHISER, the son of Samuel 
and Mary (Springer) Fronhiser, was born in 
Washington township, Berks county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1835. His parents were also natives of 
Berks county. Samuel and Mary Fronhiser had 
two sons and three daughters : Catharine, 
deceased wife of Daniel Cleaver; Samuel 
Fronhiser; Abraham Fronhiser, of Mont- 
gomery county; Mary, wife of Thomas Miller; 
and Hattie, wife of Joel Moyer of Berks county. 

Samuel Fronhiser (father) was a farmer and 
died in 1841. His wife survived him and died at 
the age of seventy-seven years. Both were Luth- 
erans. She married (second husband) Jacob 
Dearolf, who is also now deceased. They had two 
children. 

The paternal grandfather of Samuel Fronhiser 
was a native of Pennsylvania and lived in Berks 
county where he died. He was of German de- 
scent and his people came from Kalem, Germany. 
His wife lived to be ninety years of age. 

The maternal grandfather of Samuel Fron- 
hiser was also a native of Berks county, where he 
was a farmer. He died there at an advanced age. 
He had a small family. 

Samuel Fronhiser went to Chester county in 
1854 and followed farming, butchering aud boat- 
building. By trade he was a carpenter and later a 
contractor and builder. In the fall of 1862 he 
enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Sev- 
enty-fifth Regiment, and served nine months. He 
was in several small battles and did a great deal 
of scouting and marching. He was a private and 
served in the commissary department most of the 
time. After the war he returned to Chester 



i84 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



count}- for one year and then removed to Potts- 
town. He engaged in carpentering and later be- 
came a partner in the coal and iron business with 
J. Fegely & Company. This partnership contin- 
ued for more than twenty years. 

His health failing, Mr. Fronhiser went to 
Europe, visiting the old home of his ancestors and 
traveling over the continent with Rev. Mr. Kep- 
Tier, for some years pastor of the Emanuel Luth- 
eran church of Pottstown. Afterwards he looked 
after his varied interests in Pottstown, he owning 
considerable real estate in that borough, and being 
actively engaged in the care of his property. He 
is vice-president of the Security Company, and 
was a member of Pottstown council for several 
terms. He was a member of the Mutual Insur- 
ance Company of ^Montgomery county at Xorris- 
town, with which Mehelm ]\IcGlathery was so 
long connected as secretary. He is also interested 
in the Pottstown Cold Storage Company and 
various other business enterprises in that borough. 
Mr. Fronhiser belongs to Graham Post, No. io6, 
Grand Army of the Republic. In politics he has 
always been a Republican. 

On February 19, 1859, he married Susan, 
daughter of Richard and Harriet (Skean) Geist. 
They have two children : Amy S. and Wilfred G. 
Fronhiser. The son married Mrs. Daisy Percy. 
He is in the chinaware and queensware business in 
Pottstown. 

Mrs. Susan Fronhiser, wife of Samuel Fron- 
Tiiser, died June 4, 1890, aged forty-nine years and 
six months. She was a member of Trinity Re- 
formed church. Mr. Fronhiser is a member of the 
Hill Lutheran church. 

Mr. Fronhiser is emphatically a self-made 
man, his success in life being due very 
largely to his own exertions. Beginning life for 
himself when a mere boy without a dollar of cap- 
ital, but with a courageous heart, industrious 
habits, and a determination to succeed in life, he 
has accomplished excellent results, accumulating 
considerable property and being generally recog- 
nized as one of the most substantial and reliable 
TjiLsiness men of Pottstown. He has contributed 
much toward the development of that borough, 
liaving erected many of its attractive dwellings 



and been concerned in the management of various 
important enterprises. His success is all the 
more remarkable because he lacked the advantages 
of an extended education, his experience in this 
direction being limited to such knowledge as he 
succeeded in acquiring for himself in the occa- 
sional leisure moments of a practical business life. 
Although of a retiring and unostentatious disposi- 
tion, he has always been energetic in business pur- 
suits, and, having been blessed by nature with a 
strong constitution, a vigorous mind and a dis- 
criminating judgment in business affairs, he has 
achieved a position that is highly creditable to 
him in every way, and he is known as one of 
Pottstown's most enterprising and public-spirited 
citizens. 

ISAAC iMATHER. It is but seldom that 
a community is priviliged to enjoy the neighbor- 
ship with one who has witnessed nearly a cen- 
tury of life, and who is yet spared and in full 
possession of his faculties. Yet such a remark- 
able instance of longevity is seen in the person 
of the venerable Isaac Mather, of Cheltenham 
township, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, 
who now (in 1904) is approaching the beginning 
of his ninety-ninth year, and who during all his 
remarkably long career has enjoyed the esteem 
and affection of all about him for his nobility of 
life and usefulness. 

The history of the family from which lie 
comes is full of interest. The blathers of the 
present day, among whom is Isaac IMather, trace 
their lineage through a long line of worthy an- 
cestors, all of them trained in the belief of the 
Society of Friends, and practicing its teachings 
in their daily lives. The American ancestor was 
Joseph Mather, who came from the town of Bol- 
ton, in Lancashire, England, as one of the ser- 
vants of Phineas Pemberton, who settled in Falls 
township, Bucks county, Pennsylvania, Eleventh- 
mo., 1682. He married Elizabeth, daughter of 
John Russell, of Cheltenham, Sixth-mo. 8, 1697, 
the marriage taking place at the house of Rich- 
ard Wall, in Cheltenham. Among those present 
who signed as witnesses were John Russell, Sam- 
uel Richardson, Henry Baker, Phineas Pember- 




J2- 



«84 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



«»unly riir one }ear anu mtn rcinoved tn Potts- 
towii. He engaged in carpentering and later be- 
came a partner in the coal and iron business with 
J. Fegely & Company. This partnership contin- 
Hed for more than twenty years. 

His lie;' ' Mr. Fronliiser went to 

Europe, vi- .iie of his ancestors and 

traveling ' l'U with Rev. Mr. Kep- 

ner, for soitie years pastor of the Emanuel Luth- 
■eran church of Pottstown. Afterwards he looked 
after his varied interests in Pottstown, he owning 
considerable real estate in that borough, and being 
actively engaged in the care of his property. He 
is vice-president of the Security Company, and 
was a member of Pottstown council for .several 
term.s. He was a member of the Mutual Insur- 
ance Company of Montgomery county at Norris- 
town. with which jMehehn McGlathery was so 
long connoct<'d as secretary. He is also interested 
in tiic Putistown Cold Storage Cnmpanv r ' 
various other business enterprise 
Mr. l-'rnnhiser belongs to Grab:: 
Gran,! Army of the Republic. 1.. j..ji;ul> i.'- 
alwa\ s been a Republican. 

<»n February 19, 1859, he married Sr- 
<laughttr of Richard and Harriet (Skean) G- 
They have two children: Amy S. and Wilfre! 
Fronhiser. The son married Mrs. Daisy Per 
He is in the chinaware and queensware busines- 
Pottstown. 

Mrs. Susan Fronhiser, wife of Samuel Fron- 
hiser. died June 4, 1890, aged forty-nine years and 
six ni.nt';s. She was a member of Trinity Re- 
forme. I 'l/.irch. Mr. Fronhiser is a member of the 
Hill l.utlicran church. 

J\lr. hronhiser is emphatically a self-made 
man, his success in life being due very 
largely to liis own exertions. Beginning life for 
himself when a mere boy without a dollar of cap- 
ital, but with a courageous heart, industrious 
habits, and a determination to succeed in life, he 
has accomplished excellent results, accumulating 
considerable property and being generally recog- 
nized as one of the most substantial and reliable 
business men of Pottstown. He has contributed 
much toward the development of that borough, 
having erected many of its attractive dwellings 



and been concemci ;;i me nianai^'enient of various | 

important enterprises. His success is all the ] 

more remarkable because he lacked the advantages ! 

of an extended education, his experience in this 1 

direction being limited to such knowledge as he 1 

succeeded in acquiring for himself in the occa- 
siunal leisure moments of a practical business life. 
Ahhenigh of a retiring and imostentat ious disposi- 
tion, he has always been energetic in business pur- 
suits, and, having been blessed by nature with a 
stro'-.g constitution, a vigorous mind and a dis- 
criminating judgment in business affairs, he has 
acbifved a position that is highly creditable to 
hJi;) in every way, and he is known as one of 
Pott.<ic>wn's most enterprising and public-spirited 
citizens. 

ISAAC MATHER. It is but seldom that | 

A Community is priviliged to enjoy the neighbor- t 

■^h<" 'vith one who has witnessed nearly a cen- i 

spared and in full 

. •t such a remark- 

-cen in the person 

er, of Cheltenham 

'Mity, Pennsylvania, 

.,.pr..<aching the beginning 

r, and who during all his 

. r has enjoyed the esteem 

• 'Ut him for his nobility of 

e-f the family from which he 
c f interest. The Mathers of the 

; ong whom is Isaac Mather, trace 

:' :iough a long hne of worthy an- 

c< : tliem trained in the belief of the 

.Socniv ■■! Friends, and practicing its teachings 
in their daily lives. The American ancestor was 
Joseph Mather, who came from the town of Bol- 
ton, in 1 .ancasbire, England, as one of the ser- 
vants of Phineas Pemberton, who settled in Falls 
township. Bucks county, Pennsylvania, Eleventh- 
mo., 1682. He married Elizabeth, daughter of 
John Russell, of Oieltcnham, Sixth-mo. 8, 1697, 
the marriage taking ]>lace at the house of Rich- 
ard Wall, in Chehenham. Among those present 
who signed as witnesses were John Russell, Sam- 
uel Richardson, Henry Baker, Phineas Pember- 




^^^CLC^cL c.-^ ^:^c^^.i^^^^ 



^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



i8; 



ton, Richard Wall, William Gabitas, Evan Mor- 
ris, John Goodson, John Jones, Isaac Norris, 
Samuel Carte and Everard Bolton, and others. 
In 1720 Joseph Mather went on a visit to Eng- 
land, when the meeting furnished him with a very 
favorable certificate. He died in Cheltenham in 
1724, and his widow administered upon his 
estate. She was a minister at Abington, and 
died Ninth-mo., 1730. 

By the death of John Russell, father-in-law 
of Joseph Mather, in 1698, his tract of three 
hundred acres came into the Mather family. 
Richard, son of Joseph, still held it in 1734, and 
he with others built the first grist mill at Shoe- 
makertown, in 1747. Isaac blather erected the 
mill at what is now Chelten Hills Station in 1769, 
and about the same time Richard and Bartholo- 
mew blather built a grist and saw mill on the 
stream crossing ^^'ashington Lane. Of the or- 
iginal tract, Richard Mather held 123 acres in 
1776, and Bartholomew jMather ninety-three 
acres. For several years past the neighborhood 
in which the Mathers settled has been building 
up ra[)idly, and is adorned with handsome resi- 
dences. The Ogontz Seminary for Young La- 
dies, the Cheltenham Academy for Boys, as well 
as many private holdings including the John 
Wanamaker tract and others, are a part of the 
original Mather homestead, as is also the home- 
stead property of the present Isaac Mather. 

The present Isaac Mather was born in White- 
marsh township, October 27, 1806, the eldest son 
of John and IMartha (Potts) Mather. He ac- 
quired his education in the common schools of 
that day, and subsequently attended a private 
school at Gwynedd which was taught by Joseph 
Foulke, and was known as Gwynedd Friends' 
Boarding School, which was attended by many 
outside of the Society of Friends, drawn to it on 
account of its wide reputation for thoroughness 
and the enforcement of discipline. When Isaac 
Mather had completed his school studies he 
learned the trade of a miller with his uncle, 
Charles INIather, at what was known as Mather's 
Mill, near where the borough of .\mbler is now 
located. He continued in that business until 



1 84 1, conducting successfully for many years a 
milling business on Washington Lane, in the 
township of Cheltenham. Since 1841 he has de- 
voted his attention entirely to agricultural pur- 
suits, residing on the old homestead near Jenkin- 
town. 

Isaac Mather married. May 13, 1830, Ann 
L. Hallowell, who was born in the same year 
with himself ( 1806) on September 23. She was 
a daughter of Israel and Mary (Jarrett) Hallo- 
well. Three children were born of this union : 
I. Martha, born First-mo. 31, 1833. 2. Israel 
H., born Fifth-mo. 9, 1834, who married Sarah 
C. Lloyd, daughter of John and Sidnea Lloyd, 
and to them were born two children: (a) Annie 
;\I., who married Charles Jarrett, and to them 
were born five children — Samuel M., Martha M., 
Caroline, Charles, and Isaac M.; (b) Howard, 
who married Caroline Yerkes, and to them were 
bom three children — Sarah C, Franklin H., and 
Emily T. Sarah C. (Lloyd) Mather died 
Fourth-mo. 22, 1867, and Israel H. Mather mar- 
ried (second) Hannah Larzelere, daughter of 
Nicholas and Esther Larzelere, and to them was 
born one child, Esther L. ; she married Franklin 
Shelby, and to them were born two children^ 
Franklin and Hannah L. 3. Isaac P. Mather, 
born Ninth-mo. 14, 1848. 

The parents of this family, Isaac and Ann L. 
(Hallowell) Mather, lived together in affection- 
ate companionship for more than a half century. 
It was given them to have their lives extended 
over the most remarkable period in the world's 
history. They witnessed the beginning and de- 
velopment of much that now enters into modern 
life. In their young married life there was no 
cooking stove or sewing machine, and in many 
homes the spinning wheel was still used. In the 
field was no reaper, and grain was cut with the 
cradle, and threshed with the flail. For travel 
there was only the horse, for there was no rail- 
road. The newspaper and the magazine were 
only seen in the cities, and the family library 
comprised a few books. In 1804 the Jenkintown 
library was started. Mr. Mather bought a share 
in 1827, and is still a member. He was always 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



a great reader, and very much interested in the 
library, being president a considerable portion of 
the time. 

Mr. Mather suffered a sad bereavement in 
the death of his estimable wife, who peacefully 
passed away on July 4, 1882, in her seventy-sixth 
year. She was a perfect type of the Christian 
wife and mother, and her life was in all things 
an example of true womanhood. She was a 
modest, sincere and consistent member and elder 
of the Abington Friends' Meeting, in which her 
husband has been during all his life an active 
member, and for the greater part of the time an 
elder. His life, now prolonged far past the scrip- 
tural limit, notwithstanding his sorrows, has been 
blessed. He has enjoyed to the present time good 
health, retaining his mental faculties to a remark- 
able degree. Ever held in aitection and rever- 
ence by a large circle of friends, his cheeriness 
of spirit has never forsaken him, and now, in the 
far-spent evening of life, he looks forward with 
unfaltering faith to 

"The day that hath no evening, 
The health that hath no sore ; 

The light that hath no ending. 
But lasteth evermore." 

ABRAHAM H. HENDRICKS, district at- 
torney of Pottstown, Pennsylvania, was born at 
Collegeville, 'INIontgomery county, Pennsylvania, 
December 21, 1866. He is the son of Joseph H. 
and Catharine (Hunsicker) Hendricks, both 
natives of Montgomery county. They had five 
children, one son and four daughters, as follows : 
Ella M., wife of F. G. Hobson, of Norristown ; 
Bertha, wife of Rev. Charles Wehler, of Phoenix- 
ville, Pennsylvania, Abraham H., of Pottstown; 
Miss Sarah C, of Collegeville; and Lizzie, who 
died in infancy. 

Joseph H. Hendricks (father) was a school 
teacher in young manhood, and is now pastor of 
Trinity Reformed church of Collegeville. He 
celebrated his fortieth anniversary as a minister 
in April, 1902. He is also pastor of the Skippack 
church. 

Abraham H. Hendricks (paternal grand- 



father) was a native of Montgomery county. By 
occupation he was a farmer. His wife was Cath- 
arine Hunsicker and they had six children. At 
the time of his death he was more than seventy 
years of age. 

Rev. Abraham Hunsicker (maternal grand- 
father) was also a native of Montgomery county 
and was of German descent. He was a farmer 
and a Mennonite preacher and was the founder of 
Freeland Seminary, now Ursinus College. His 
wife was Elizabeth Alderfer, who lived to her one 
hundredth year. He was more than sixty years 
old at the time of his death. 

Abraham H. Hendricks lived in Collegeville 
until 1S93. He attended the public schools there 
and was graduated from Ursinus College in the 
class of 1888. He began reading law in the office 
of Bickel & Hobson of Norristown in the same 
year. He was admitted to the bar in June, 1890, 
and has practiced in Pottstown ever since. 

On October 21, 1890, he married Miss Ella T. 
Miller, daughter of Addison T. and Lucinda 
(Dismant) Miller. They have one daughter, 
Miriam E. Hendricks. Mr. Hendricks is a mem- 
ber of Trinity Reformed church at Collegeville 
and his wife of St. Augustus Lutheran church at 
Trappe. 

Mr. Hendricks belongs to Warren Lodge, No. 
310, Free and Accepted Masons, and is past 
master of the lodge; to Pottstown Chapter, No. 
271, Royal Arch ^lasons ; to Nativity Comniandry 
No. 71, Knights Templar; to Manatawu)- I^odge, 
No. 214, L O. O. F., and Excelsior Encampment, 
No. 85. He is first exalted ruler of the Benevo- 
lent Protective Order of Elks, No. 814, of Potts- 
town; past regent of Pottstown Council, No. 351, 
Royal Arcanum, and representative in the grand 
council for four years; also a member of Wash- 
ington Camp, Patriotic Order Sons of America, 
of Pottstown; and of the Fraternities' Accident 
Order. 

Mr. Hendricks is one of the most prominent 
Republicans of Montgomery county. He was 
solicitor of the borough of Pottstown for three 
years, until March, 1899, being elected by a Dem- 
ocratic town council; and in the fallof 1898 was 
elected to the office of district attorney, and re- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



187 



elected in 1901, being the only district attorney of 
Montgomery county that ever served two succes- 
sive terms in the position. 

The name Hendricks is of wide distribution in 
all parts of the United States and the family are 
undoubtedly of Dutch origin, their first ancestor 
in this country having settled at Germantown. 
The family name is said to have been originally 
Hendricksen. 

The father of District Attorney Hendricks was 
born December 21, 1834, in Upper Providence 
township, his maternal grandfather, being Rev. 
John Hunsicker and his maternal great-grand- 
father Rev. Henry Hunsicker, both very prom- 
inent and influential jMennonite bishops in their 
day in eastern Pennsylvania. He was at first, on 
reaching manhood, a teacher, becoming assistant 
in Freeland Seminary and vice-principal of the 
institution, founded by Rev. Abraham Hunsicker, 
wdiose daughter he married in the fall of 1858. 
While engaged in this occupation, at a meeting of 
the Christian Society in i860, he was chosen to the 
office of minister. On June 25, 1861, he was or- 
dained. TJie Christian Society, of Collegeville, 
was the outgrowth of a disownment by the Men- 
nonite church of Rev. Abraham Hunsicker, Israel 
Beidler, Abraham Grater, and Henry A. Huns- 
icker and about forty of their followers, by a 
branch of the Mennonite church of which they 
had all been members. The charges against them 
were founded on their liberal views of Christian 
doctrine, church fellowship, education, and kin- 
dred matters. The schism gave rise to the build- 
ing of the Christian Meeting-House at College- 
ville, which was opened to worship in 1855. Of 
this church Mr. Hendricks became the pastor in 
1862. The charge subsequently known as Trin- 
ity Christian church, with its branches at Skip- 
packville, and Iron Bridge (formerly Rahn's Sta- 
tion) remained independent until 1888, when all 
became connected with the German Reformed 
church in the United States, although the Skip- 
packville congregation was not formerly made a 
part of that denomination until 1892. The Col- 
legeville church was very advanced in its views 
on slavery, intemperance and on popular educa- 
tion. Mr. Hendricks is one of the oldest pastors 



in the county. He is a pleasant and popular 
speaker and is highly respected by the entire com- 
munity in which he has been so active a spirit 
during his long lifetime. 

District Attorney Hendricks is one of the best- 
known lawyers of Montgomery county. He has 
performed efficiently the duties of the responsible 
office which he has held and has been especially 
active in the effort to put a stop to lawlessness in 
all sections of the county, doing all in his power 
to discover and punish the authors of the mys- 
terious assaults and murders which have oc- 
curred from time to time in the last few years. 

HIRA2\I B. FEATHER, one of the leading 
grocers of Pottstown, was born in Falkner's 
Swamp, New Hanover township, [Montgomery 
county, Pennsylvania, June 18, 1846. He is the 
son of Jacob and Carolina (Bitting) Feather, both 
natives of Montgomery county. Jacob and Caro- 
lina Feather had four children, two now living : 
Hiram B. and Mary, wife of Jacob S. \\'agner, of 
Falkner's Swamp. 

Jacob Feather (father) was a shoemaker by 
trade, but spent the greater part of his life on a 
farm in New Hanover township. He died in 
May, 1884, aged sixty-seven years. His wife 
died five weeks later, aged seventy years. In re- 
ligious faith he was a member of the Reformed 
church and his wife was a Lutheran. 

Isaac Feather (grandfather) was born in 
Montgomery county. He was a weaver and in 
his younger days was engaged in the hotel busi- 
ness. His wife was Mary Bickel. They had four 
children. At the time of his death Isaac Feather 
was about seventy-five years of age and his wife 
lived to the age of ninety-four. Isaac Feather was 
of German descent. 

The maternal grandfather of Hiram B. 
Feather was Isaac Bitting. He was born in 
Montgomery county. His wife's given name was 
Elizabeth and they both lived to an advanced age, 
leaving a large family. 

]\Ir. Hiram B. Feather has lived all of his life 
in Montgomery county, except one year spent in 
Philadelphia and one year in Berks county. He 
attended the district schools and later the Wash- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



ington Hall Seminary at Trappe. For the next 
four years he taught school. He attended Pierce's 
Commercial School in Philadelphia. After clerk- 
ing one year in Reading and two in Pottstown he 
opened a grocery store of his own in Pottstown, 
which he has conducted very successfully ever 
since. 

November 28, 1872, Hiram B. Feather married 
Miss Sallie G. Hartline, daughter of George and 
Elizabeth (Gauser) Hartline. They had three 
children, two sons and one daughter, all of whom 
died in early childhood. Mrs. Feather died in 
May, 1897, at the age of forty-eight years. She 
was a member of Trinity Reformed church to 
which I\Ir. Feather also belongs and in which he 
is an elder. 

Politically i\Ir. Feather is a Democrat. He is 
a director of the school board, which position he 
has held for more than fourteen years, and he is 
now serving his sixth term as treasurer of the 
board. He is also a member of the board of 
health. He resides in the house adjoining his 
store, 213 Charlotte street, which he built in 1893. 

DR. JOHN TODD, a prominent physician 
of Pottstown and one of the best known medical 
men in the county, was born at Collegeville, Mont- 
gomery county, •Pennsylvania, April 30, 1830. 
He is the son of John and Christianna (Bachman) 
Todd, both natives of Montgomery county. John 
and Christianna Todd had six children, four sons 
and two daughters : Dr. John Todd ; William, of 
Norristown ; Oiristianna, wife of Horace Royer, 
but now deceased ; Emily, wife of H. W. Kratz, of 
Norristown : Samuel N. of Boyertown ; and 
Brooke, of Reading, Pennsylvania. 

John Todd ( father) was a farmer and lived in 
Upper Providence township at Freeland, now Col- 
legeville, where he died in 1863, aged eighty-five 
years. His wife died in February, 1887, aged 
seventy-six years. He was a Presbyterian and 
his wife was reared an Episcopalian. John Todd 
was sheriff of Montgomery county one term and 
treasurer one term. Under Governor Porter he 
was appointed appraiser of damages in connection 
with the Pennsylvania Railroad. In politics he 
was a Democrat. 



Andrew Todd (grandfather) was born in Ire- 1 
land but removed to America and settled in Mont- > 
gomery county early in life. He was bom of ] 
Scotch-Irish parents. He was the first justice of ! 
the peace in ]\Iontgomery county and held office | 
as long as he lived. He was a farmer. He died i 
on the farm near Collegeville, when nearly eighty- 1 
seven years of age. He was a brother of the i 
father of Mrs. Abraham Lincoln. , 

John Bachman (maternal grandfather) was i 
a native of ^lontgomery county and died in mid- i 
die life. He had a small family. j 

Dr. John Todd was reared in Montgomery j 
county and attended first the district schools and 1 
later Freeland Seminary, now Ursinus College. 1 
He taught school for about three years. In 1854 ; 
he began the study of medicine at Harleysville I 
and graduated from the Pennsylvania Medical 1 
College in 1857. He practiced thirteen years at | 
Boyertown before going to Pottstown, where he ! 
has been since 1870. The Doctor has had an ex- 
tended practice and his records show that he has 
been in attendance at almost five thousand births. I 

In March, 1857, he married Miss Amanda 
Smith, daughter of J. K. Smith, a hardware mer- j 
chant of Philadelphia. Her mother was a Keeler. I 

Dr. John Todd and Amanda (Smith) Todd \ 
had one child, a daughter, Amanda, who married i 
George Kramer, of Philadelphia. They have three ; 
children : Jacob, Stanley and ]\Iabel. 1 

The second marriage of Dr. John Todd oc- 
curred November 23, 1862, to Sarah ^NI. Heller, \ 
daughter of Daniel and Mary Heller, of Boyer- i 
town. By his second marriage he had seven chil- i 
dren : ( i ) Blanche married Irvin Gulp, of Phila- ■■ 
delphia, and they have two children, Robert and j 
Helen. (2) Bertha married Lyman Byers, of At- ' 
lantic City, and they have three children, Blanche, I 
John and Clarence. (3) Sarah married Maurice ' 
Gilbert, of Pottstown, and they have one child, 
Marion. (4) Mary married H. I. Schotter, and 
they live in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. 
(5) Clara died at the age of three years. (6) John, 
an electrician, married Miss Effie Davis and they 
have three children : John, Geraldine and Ruth. 
(7) Florence died at the age of three years. 

Dr. John Todd and wife are members of the 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



189 



Lutheran church. Dr. John Todd is a member 
of Stichter Lodge, No. 248, Free and Accepted 
Masons; Plioenix Chapter, Xo. 194, Royal Arch 
Masons; and Phcenix Commandery, No. 15, 
Knights Templar. Politically he is a Democrat. 

Dr. John Todd was burgess of Pottstown for 
several years, a member of the town council nine 
years and was elected to the constitutional con- 
vention, which did not convene. He is a trustee 
of the Bringhurst Trust Fund and is a director 
of the Security Company. He was a delegate to 
the Democratic national convention in Chicago, 
in 1896. 

Dr. John Todd is a member of the Pottstown 
Medical Society and is president of the Hospital 
Staff. 

WILLIAM M. HOBART, the son of John H. 
and Mary (Mintzer) Hobert, was born in Norris- 
tovvn, Pennsylvania, September 16, 1840. His 
father was a native of Philadelphia and his mother 
of Pottstown. John H. and Hilary Hobart had six 
children : Robert Enoch, deceased ; Captain Will- 
iam M. ; David Potts Hobart, of Williamsport ; 
John Henry, of Philadelphia ; and two who died 
in infancy. 

John H. Hobart was an attorney in Norris- 
town for many years and afterward removed to 
Pottstown where he practiced for some years, 
dying there in March, 1888, aged seventy-eight 
years. His wife died in i860. In religious faith 
they were Episcopalians. John H. Hobart was a 
graduate of West Point Military Academy but 
never entered the army. During the emergency in 
the Civil war he took a company and went with 
it, but saw no further service. He was district 
attorney of Montgomery county for a number of 
terms, first by appointment and afterwards by 
election. 

Robert Enoch Hobart (grandfather) was born 
in Philadelphia. He was a dealer in real estate 
and insurance. He was married at Pottsgrove, by 
Rev. Slater Clay, to Sarah May Potts, born Janu- 
ary 18, 1770. In his later years he removed to 
Pottstown, where he completed the house on the 
hill commenced by his brother-in-law, David 
Potts. In 1825 he became one of the incorpora- 



tors of Christ church of Pottstown. Robert Enoch 
Hobart was a member of the legislature, and while 
serving in that capacity he died at Harrisburg, 
March 17, 1826. His wife died January 2, 1826, 
and both were buried in the family graveyard. 

Enoch Hobart (great-grandfather) was born 
in Philadelphia, April 25, 1768. He was educated 
as a lawyer and practiced in that city. His wife 
was Anna (Pratt) Hobart, of Philadelphia. 

The founder of the Hobart family in this 
country was Captain Joshua Hobart, who came 
from Hingham, England, and settled in Hing- 
ham, Massachusetts, in 1633. Captain Joshua 
was distinguished in the early annals of Massa- 
chusetts as a member of the house of assembly for 
twenty-five years, and speaker in 1674. 

William Mintzer (maternal grandfather) was 
a native of Pennsylvania, and his history is 
in the biographical sketch of General William 
M. Mintzer in this work. 

Captan William M. Hobart lived in Xorris- 
town until he was sixteen years of age, attending 
Treemount Seminary and the Hill school of Potts- 
town. He enlisted in Company C, Fourth Penn- 
sylvania Regiment, and served three months as a 
private, and then re-enlisted as first lieutenant of 
Company A, One Hundred and Sixteenth Penn- 
sylvania Volunteers, serving nearly four years. 
He was mustered out as captain of Company A. 
He took part in all the battles of the Army of the 
Potomac in which the Second Corps was en- 
gaged. 

After the war he was engaged in civil en- 
gineering in the oil country of Pennsylvania, 
where he built railroads. He remained thus em- 
ployed for four years. He then accepted a posi- 
tion with the Pottstown Iron Company, where he 
remained twelve years. Becoming interested in 
the lead and zinc mines of Missouri he went west. 
He still owns an interest in the Montgomery Lead 
& Zinc Company and other enterprises. 

December 18, 1867, Captain Hobart married 
Miss Elizabeth Wills Rutter, daughter of Charles 
and Mary (Ives) Rutter. They have four chil- 
dren: Anna P., married Joseph Hartshorne and 
resides at Stowe. They have one child, Josephine. 
Mary Ives (deceased) was the first wife of Joseph 



I go 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Hartshorne and they had one daughter, JMerriel. 
Elizal^eth Rutter and Samuel Osborn Hobart are 
the }'Ounger members of the family. Captain 
Hobart and wife are members of the Episcopal 
church. Politically he is a Republican. 

•}.IISS ANX.\ E. RICHARDS, daughter of 
George .and Anna (Sands) Richards, of Potts- 
town, occupies the family homestead. Her pa- 
rents were both natives of Pennsylvania, her 
father having been born in Montgomery county 
and her mother in Berks county. They had four 
children, two sons and two daughters: Sophia j\l., 
wife of Dr. Thomas Lancaster, of 1303 North 
Broad street, Philadelphia ; Mark H. Richards, 
deceased; }ilatthias E. Richards, deceased; and 
^liss Anna E. Richards. 

]\Iatthias E. Richards served in the army dur- 
ing the whole of the Civil war, being on General 
Bartlett's staff and a major in the Ninety-sixth 
Regiment. He participated in all the battles of 
the Virginia campaign. Before the war he was 
an attorney-at-law in Pottsville. He studied in 
Lawyer Gowan's office and practiced there a num- 
ber of years. M. E. Richards Post, G. A. R., was 
named for him, as was also the public fountain 
on High and Charlotte streets. He was one of the 
first defenders of the LTnion from Pennsylvania. 

]Mark H. Richards was for many years a real- 
estate agent for the Reading Railroad Company. 
He was an active man in politics, being formerly 
a Whig and afterward a Republican. He took an 
active interest in school matters in Pottstown and 
one of the schoolhouses is named in his honor. 
He was a justice of the peace in Pottstown. Both 
Matthias and i\Iark Richards were public-spirited 
men. 

Dr. Thomas Lancaster, the husband of Sophia 
M. Richards, came from England when about 
twelve years of age and practiced medicine in 
Philadelphia for many years. He now lives re- 
tired in that city. Mrs. Thomas Lancaster 
died January 13, 1904, at the old home in Potts- 
town and her remains were interred in Philadel- 
phia, at St. James the Less cemetery. 

George Richards (father) was born in New 
Hanover township, Montgomery county, Penn- 



sylvania, on June 17, 1788. He was educated in 
]\Iontgomery count}- but when he became of age 
he went to Philadelphia and entered a counting 
house as clerk. He became a shipping merchant 
and part owner of several vessels running between 
the L'nited States and South America. In 181 1 he 
made a voyage to Cuba, and another to Porto Rico 
in the same year. In 1812 he made a third voyage 
to La Guayra, the seaport of Caracas, the capital 
of Venezuela, South America. Here he witnessed 
the terrible earthquake that shook the city of 
Caracas. He was at one time taken prisoner by 
order of the king of Spain for shipping tobacco. 
Spain thought that the privilege of shipping to- 
bacco belonged exclusively to her. He engaged 
in farming in New Hanover township for some 
years and lived retired in Pottstown for the re- 
mainder of his life. He owned the home at No. 
213 High street, where two of his children were 
born and which home has been in the familx' for 
more than seventy years. He died there August 
19, 1873, aged eighty-five years, two months and 
two days. His third wife, Anna Sands Richards, 
died April 6, 1843, aged thirty-nine years. In re- 
ligious faith he was a Lutheran and his wife was 
a Baptist. 

George Richards was a ]\Iason for many years 
and was a soldier in the war of 1812. He was a 
member of the Pennsylvania legislature, being 
senator from Pottstown district. He was also 
burgess of Pottstown and interested actively in 
all public affairs. 

His first wife was JMiss Sophia Herman, 
daughter of Rev. F. L. Herman. They had one 
son, Dr. John Richards (deceased). His second 
wife was Maria IMathias. 

John Richards (grandfather of Anna E. Rich- 
ards) was born Aprd 18, 1753, and died Novem- 
ber 13, 1822. He was a member of the fourth 
congress, 1796-97; state senator, 1801-07; mem- 
ber of the Pennsylvania convention on federal con- 
stitution in 1787. During the Revolution he was 
appointed a magistrate before whom the people 
were obliged to take the oath of allegiance to the 
government. He was a member of Lodge No. 8, 
Free and Accepted Masons, one of the very old- 
est in Pennsylvania, which met at the Valley 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



[91 



Forge encampment in 1777 and was attended by 
General ^^'ashi^g•ton and many distinguislied 
American officers. His wife was Sophia Hu- 
bener, whom he married May 2, 1775. They had 
a large family. One of their sons, JMark Rich- 
ards, was a prominent resident of Philadelphia. 
Sophia Hubener was the daughter of John 
Hubener. The parents of John Richards were 
Mathias and ^largaret Richards. 

The founder of the Richards family in this 
countr_\- was John Richards who came from Ger- 
many and bought land in New Hanover township, 
Montgomery county. 

■ The maternal grandfather of Miss Anna E. 
Richards was Othniel Sands, and his wife was 
Catharine Sands. He lived at Amity where he 
owned a sawmill. In religious faith he was a 
Baptist. He died well advanced in years, leaving 
a large family. 

Miss Anna E. Richards is the only remaining 
representative of the family now living in Potts- 
town. 

CALVIN FEGELY, of the firm of J. Fegely 
& Son, wholesale dealers in hardware, coal, iron, 
etc., 60-62 High street, Pottstown, Pennsylvania, 
was born in Pottstown, September 16, 1858. He 
is the son of Jacob and Mary (Hunsberger) 
Fegely. Jacob Fegely was a native of Berks 
county and I\Iary, his wife, was a native of 
Chester county. They had seven children, three 
sons and four daughters, three of whom are now 
living: Calvin; Mary, wife of George Gilbert of 
Lehighton, Pennsylvania, and Susan, wife of Dr. 
Charles M. \'anderslice, of Pottstown. 

Jacob Fegely (father) was a mill-wright by 
trade hut he worked at his trade only a few 
years. In 1853 '^^ came to Pottstown and estab- 
lished a coal business in partnership with his 
brother Isaac. The firm continued so for a num- 
ber of years when William Swinehart became in- 
terested in the business, and they began dealing in 
lumber also, and later Isaac withdrew and Samuel 
Fronehiser became a member of the firm, which 
was known as J. Fegely & Comiiany from the 
time of Mr. Swinehart's connection with it, this 
arrangement continuing until about 1886. 



In the year mentioned the business was di- 
vided, Mr. Swinehart taking the lumber depart- 
ment and Mr. Fronehiser retiring from the busi- 
ness. The firm then became J. Fegely & Son, 
Mr. Fegely's son, Calvin, being associated with 
him. In 1878 hardware was added to the busi- 
ness, first in a retail way, and, since the son be- 
came associated with the firm, a hardware busi- 
ness has been conducted along both wholesale 
and retail lines. 

Jacob Fegely continued in the business to the 
time of his death, in November, 1901. He died 
at the age of seventy years. His wife survives 
him. Both were members of Emmanuel Lutheran 
church. He was church treasurer until his death, 
a period of forty years. He was a member of the 
town council one year and a school director one 
term. Politically Mr. Fegely was a Democrat. 

Jacob Fegely was one of the organizers of the 
Warwick Iron Company and its treasurer for 
many years. He was also one of the directors of 
the Electric Light Company, Pottstown Market 
Company, Pottstown Cemetery Company and of 
the Pottstown Hospital. He was president of the 
Iron National Bank, and one of its organizers; 
of the South Bethlehem Bank and of the Security 
Company of Pottstown. He was always active 
in support of institutions and enterprises whose 
tendency was towards the development of Potts- 
town. He owned a farm in Chester countv. He 
erected one of the handsomest residencs in Potts- 
town, at No. 63 High street. He was also the 
owner of the Merchants' Hotel, now the largest in 
Pottstown. 

Jacob Fegely (grandfather) was a native of- 
Berks county, Pennsylvania. He was of German 
descent, and a farmer by occupation. He died at 
the age of eighty-five years. His wife, Susanna 
Fegely, died at the age of seventy-nine years. 
They had seven children. He was a Lutheran in 
religious faith and was church treasurer for many 
years. After retiring from the farm, he resided 
in Pottstown ten or twelve years previous to his 
death. 

Conrad Fegely (great-grandfather) was a 
resident of Berks county, living there his whole 
life. 



192 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



John Hunsberger (maternal grandfather) was 
a native of Chester county and a farmer by occu- 
pation. His wife was Rebecca Hunsberger. He 
died at the age of seventy-five years, she at the 
age of eighty-seven. They had five children. 

Calvin Fegely has resided in Pottstown all his 
life. He attended the public schools of that 
borough in the different grades, and later the Hill 
school for two years. He .followed farming one 
year and in 1874 became bookkeeper in his father's 
store. He has continued in the business ever 
since, becoming a member of the firm in 1886, 
and carrying on the business the same as it was 
prior to his father's death. 

On April 14, 1878, he married Miss Lillie 
Hetzel, daughter of Samuel and Susanna (Wart- 
man) Hetzel. The couple have had four chil- 
dren: Minnie, who died at the age of nearly ten 
years ; Florence, who married George W. Zimmer- 
man, of Collegeville ; Anna and Jacob. 

Mr. and I\Irs. Fegely are members of the 
Lutheran church. Politically he is a Democrat. 
The family reside at No. 55 High street, the old 
homestead which he has remodeled. 

He is a member of the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks. Mr. Fegely is a director in the 
following corporations : Security, of Pottstown ; 
the Pottstown Water Company; the Pottstown 
Passenger Railway Company ; and the Cold Stor- 
age Company of Pottstown. 

Mrs. Fegely's father, who is deceased, was a 
glassblower by trade, and later worked in the 
rolling mills as roller for many years. His wife, 
who is a native of Montgomery county, is still 
living in Pottstown. The couple had four chil- 
dren, all of whom are living: John, Jane, Daniel 
and Lillie (Mrs. Fegely). Jane is the wife of 
Daniel Weidensaul. 

JOHN :\IITCHELL VAXDERSLICE, of 
Collegeville soldier, author and lawyer, was born 
in 1846, and spent his early life upon a farm ad- 
joining Valley Forge Campground. He was edu- 
cated at Freeland Seminary, now L'rsinus College, 
at Collegeville. 

Before he had reached the age of seventeen 
years he enlisted in the service of his country 



during the Rebellion, becoming a member of the 
famous Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry, a regi- 
ment which was at one time commanded by 
Colonel (afterwards General) D. ]\IcJ\L Gregg, 
and was thoroughly disciplined by that officer. 
Mr. A'anderslice served with this gallant regi- 
ment until the close of the war, when he returned 
to Freeland Seminary to review his studies, re- 
maining there until 1866. He then entered the 
office of Theodore Cuyler, Esq., at that time one 
of the foremost lawyers of the city of Philadel- 
phia. After three years of study he was admitted 
to the Philadelphia bar in 1869, since which time 
he has been in constant, active and successful 
practice, having been engaged in many important 
cases. He was at one time counsel for the Bal- 
timore & Ohio Railroad Company, which posi- 
tion he resigned in order to be able to give more 
attention to his other clients. His practice has 
been mostly in the civil courts, although he has 
tried two murder cases, being successful in both 
of them. 

As a youthful soldier, John M. Vanderslice 
won special mention from his superiors on several 
occasions. He was awarded a congressional 
medal for distinguished gallantry at the battle of 
Hatcher's Run, in February, 1864. At the time 
of the surrender of General Robert E. Lee to 
General Grant at Appomattox, he was a prisoner 
of war with the Confederate arm}', having been 
captured in a sabre charge under General Gregg, 
at Farmville, two days previously, after having 
his horse killed, the third one during a week. 
Mr. Vanderslice has been for many years. secre- 
tary of the Survivors' Association of the Eighth 
Cavalry, by the members of which organization 
he is held in the highest esteem. He was one of 
the early members of Post No. 2, Grand Army of 
the Republic, of Philadelphia, and was for sev- 
eral years its adjutant. He served for six years 
as assistant adjutant-general of Pennsylvania, 
and was one year department commander. Dur- 
ing these seven years, owing to the organizing 
and executive ability of Mr. Vanderslice, the 
membership of the Grand Army in Pennsylvania 
was increased from 4.500 to 25,000. In 1883 he 
was appointed adjutant-general of the organ iza- 




//^?72i^?:<^^^«?C^>u^»<^=i2^ 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



193 



tion, during which year the total membership 
was increased a hundred thousand. He was for 
three years editor of the Grand Army Scout and 
Mail, and was also one of the commissioners ap- 
pointed to organize the Soldiers' Home at Erie, 
Pennsylvania. He was for seventeen years one 
of the executive committee of the Gettysburg 
Battlefield Memorial Commission, and he in- 
augurated the movement for state appropria- 
tions to erect monuments to mark the positions 
of the various regiments during that memorable 
conflict. He was secretary of the committee upon 
inscriptions, and his familiarity with the official 
reports and the studious attention which he gave 
to all the details of the work, caused him to be 
known as one of the best informed men as to the 
battle. When the Alemorial Association trans- 
ferred the battlefield of Gettysburg to the L^nited 
States authority, Mr. Vanderslice was upon mo- 
tion of General Daniel E. Sickles selected to write 
a history of the Association, and of the battle. 
This work was distributed by the Association 
among the several state libraries, and many thou- 
sand copies were afterwards published and sold 
by the author. It is the recognized authority upon 
the history of that great conflict. 

Mr. \'anderslice has always been an ardent 
Republican in politics, and is considered an elo- 
quent and forcible speaker, having made speeches 
in several states during national campaigns. He 
served for six years as a member of Philadelphia 
Councils, and, although bitterly opposed because 
of his independence, he has always been elected 
l)y increased majorities, receiving the votes of 
his fellow citizens without regard to their poli- 
tics. He successfully advocated many improve- 
ments for the city, it being through his de- 
termined efi^orts that asphalt pavement, now so 
general in the city, was introduced, and improve- 
ments made in the water and other departments. 

In religious faith Mr. \'anderslice is a liap- 
tist. He is a member of Grace church, Philadel- 
I)hia. Rev. Russell H. Conwell, pastor. Mr. 
V'anderslice frequently delivers lectures before lit- 
erary and other societies. He is a past depart- 
ment commander of tlie Grand .-Kmiy of the Re- 
public, a past master workman of the .\ncient 



Order of United Workmen, and past regent of 
the Royal Arcanum. 

^Ir. Vanderslice married, in 1870, Caroline 
Cecilia Hamer, daughter of Dr. James Hamer, 
now deceased, of Collegeville. She is a gradu- 
ate of Pennsylvania Female College, of which 
the late Dr. J. W. Sunderland was president. 
She is not only a fine classical scholar, but an ac- 
complished musician. Her father's people were 
among the Welsh Quakers who settled that sec- 
tioin of ^Montgomery county at an early date. 
Her grandfather and father were well known 
physicians in Montgomery county, and her 
brother is also a physician, practicing in College- 
ville. Her mother's family, the Downings, were 
direct descendants of Cotton Mather. The chil- 
dren of ]\Ir. and ]\Irs. John M. Vanderslice are: 
]\Iiriam, Stanley, Ethel and Edith, all deceased, 
and Clarence and Mabel, living. Clarence is a 
graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, and 
was admitted to the bar in 1898. He enlisted a 
few days afterward as a private soldier in the 
Spanish war, in the Sixth Pennsylvania Regi- 
ment, the services of which w-ere confined to 
drill and discipline. He married Florence Live- 
zey, of an old Pennsylvania colonial family, her 
ancestor, Jonathan Livezey, having come from 
England to the province in the time of William 
Penn. Miss Mabel is an accomplished musician, 
having had instruction at the Philadelphia Musi- 
cal Conservatory, and afterwards by Professor 
Henry Gordon Thunder. It is worthy of note 
that the Vanderslice family has been represented 
by some of its members in ever)- war in which 
the country has been engaged, from the time of 
the Colonial Indian wars to the late Spanish- 
American war. 

The \"anderslices are one of the oldest fam- 
ilies in Pennsylvania. Reynier van Der Sluys 
came from Harlingen, North Friesland. Hol- 
land, and settled in Germantown. in Philadelphia 
county, Pennslyvania, about 1700. He and his 
son Adrien were made citizens September 29, 
1709, along with Daniel Pastorius, Dirk Key- 
ser, and several other aliens. Their petition for 
citizenship was pending for several years. Rey- 
nier \'an Der Sluys died in Germantown in 1713. 



194 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



His will, witnessed by John Cadwallader, his at- 
torney, and Daniel Sprogel, is on record in Phil- 
adelphia in the register of wills' office. His wife 
Anna, also a native of Harlingen, survived him 
some years and died in Germantown. Reynier 
and Anna Van Der Sluys had six children, Ad- 
rien (Arnold), Henry, John, Anthony, Anna 
and Elencha. The third son, John, bought a 
tract of land from John Ruloff \'anderwerf on 
the Skippack Creek, in Worcester township, 
Philadelphia, now Montgomery county. The 
deed was dated May 13, 1726, and recorded in 
deed book 2 F, page 258, at Philadelphia. John 
Van Der Sluys died in 1742. He and his wife 
Frances had five children. Anna, Mary, Reynier, 
Jacob and John. The will of Frances is on rec- 
ord in Philadelphia. The vendue bill of the 
property of John's estate is in the possession of 
Governor Pennypacker. 

The second son of John and Frances Van Der 
Sluys, Jacob, born in 173 1, married Ann Francis. 
Jacob took title by patent recorded in Philadel- 
phia, in patent book A, volume H, page 189, to 
a tract of land upon the west bank of the Perkio- 
men, on the road from Shannonville (now Au- 
dubon) to Phoenixville. This land is now a part 
of, the Gumbes estate. Jacob Vanderslice was a 
school trustee in 1768 and for many years after- 
wards, of Providence township, then Philadel- 
phia, now Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. 
He died in 1793, leaving four children: John, 
Catherine, Debbie, and Thomas. 

Thomas Vanderslice, born in 1736, served as 
a trooper during the Revolutionary war, and aft- 
erwards lived at the old homestead, dying there. 
It is still standing at the entrance to the Gumbes 
property. He married Tacy, daughter of Cap- 
tain Joseph Richardson, a great-grandson of 
Samuel Richardson, who came from Jamaica, in 
1684, and was a judge and also a member of the 
colonial council. Tacy Richardson's great- 
grandmother was a daughter of Judge John Dean 
and Catharine Aubrey, born in 1637. Thomas 
and Tacy Vanderslice had nine children, as fol- 
lows : Edward, Anne, John, Thomas, Marcus, 
Augvistus, Mary, Jacob, and Joseph. All but two 
of these, with their parents, are buried in the 



graveyard of Lower Providence Presbyterian 
church at 2\Iount Kirk. 

Edward Vanderslice (grandfather) married 
Elizabeth Pawling, daughter of Benjamin and 
Rebecca (Lane) Pawling. Benjamin Pawling's 
father, Joseph, was the son of John and Ephia 
(DeWitt) Pawling. John Pawling owned two 
grist mills and a large tract of land upon both 
sides of the Perkiomen, near Schwenksville, 
Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, including 
Pennypacker's Mill, and what is now the home 
of Governor Samuel W. Pennypacker. John 
Pawling died in 1733, and his will is recorded 
in Philadelphia, in book E, page 243. He was 
buried in Pawling's private burying ground on 
the farm near Gratersford, now owned by Enos 
Schwenk. He and his brother Henry, who in 
1713 settled at Pawling's Bridge, near the junc- 
tion of the Perkiomen and the Schuylkill river, 
were the sons of Henry Pawling, an English of- 
ficer who resigned his commission and, having 
married Neetje Roosa, settled at Esopus, New 
York, and afterwards served in the colonial 
service. He was the sheriff of L'lster county. 
New York. 

Rebecca (Lane) Pawling, wife of Benjamin 
Pawling, was the daughter of Samuel Lane. 
Sanuiel Lane's father was William, and Wil- 
liam's father was Edward Lane, who came from 
Jamaica in 1684 and took up several thousand 
acres of land on both sides of the Perkiomen 
from the Skippack creek to the present German- 
town turnpike, enbracing the present site of Ev- 
ansburg and Collegeville. The Lanes and Pawl- 
ings are buried in the churchyard of St. James 
Episcopal church at Evansburg, of which their 
families were the founders, and which was par- 
tially endowed by the Lanes. 

Edward and Elizabeth Vanderslice had six 
children, — Benjamin Pawling, Tacy, Rebecca, 
Marcus LaFayette, John \'an Rensselaer and 
Samuel Lane. 

Marcus \'anderslice (father) was born on 
the Pickering creek, near Kimberton, in 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, in 1813. He mar- 
ried Margaret Mitchell, and had nine children, 
as follows : Ellen, Thaddeus Lawrence, Ann, 



MOxNTGOMERY COUNTY. 



[95 



John Mitchell, subject of this sketch: Theodore 
Pennypacker, Louisa, Elizabeth. Gertrude and 
Arabella. He was among those who early and 
strenuously advocated improved educational fa- 
cilities in the public schools. He was in his youth 
an organizer of the Sons of Temperance in 
Phoenixville, and was an earnest and zealous 
member of the Abolition Society, aiding in as- 
sisting many escaped slaves along what was 
known as the "L'nderground Railroad" to free- 
dom. He was in his early life a farmer, but 
afterwards engaged in business in Philadelphia, 
where he died in 1876. During Lee's invasion of 
Pennsylvania he served two months with the 
emergency troops, although he was then fifty 
years of age, and his two eldest sons were in the 
Uinted States service. Margaret Alitchell was 
the daughter of John and Margaret (Dennison) 
Mitchell, who came with other Irish Protestants 
from county Donegal. Ireland, and settled in 
Chester county in 1790. They are buried in East 
Vincent Baptist churchyard, in Chester county. 
Margaret (Mitchell) Vanderslice was from an 
early age a very active Baptist, aiding in the 
establishment of three Baptist churches, one of 
them being the Grace Baptist Temple, Philadel- 
phia. She died in 1896. aged eighty-one years. 

GEORGE BAUER, of 356 South street, 
Pottstown, was born in Wittenberg, Germany, 
December 19, 1830, his parents being Johan V. 
and Rosina (Limbach) Bauer, both natives of 
Germany. George Bauer was one of five children, 
four sons and one daughter, all now deceased ex- 
cept himself. 

Johan V. Bauer (father) was a weaver and a 
farmer in Germany, and died there at the age of 
seventy-eight years. His wife came to America 
at the advanced age of eighty-five years and lived 
with her son. George, until her death, November 
12, 1889, at the age of ninety-three years. Both 
were members of the Lutheran church. Even in 
her extreme old age Mrs. Baur could read fine 
print without the aid of glasses, which she never 
used for any purpose. 

The grandfather, John Bauer, was also a 
weaver and was born and died in Germany. The 



maternal grantlfather was a farmer in Germany, 
where he died. 

George Bauer was reared in Germany on his 
father's farm and received a good common-school 
education. In accordance with the law in Ger- 
many he served two years in the regular army 
and in 1857 came to America. He lived in Phila- 
delphia for more than ten years. He and his 
brother-in-law, Leonard Schurg, then opened a 
bakery in Pottstown. the partnership continuing 
for three years when it was dissolved and Mr. 
Bauer bought the bakery at No. 267 High street. 
He remained with this establishment, conducting 
the business very successfully for sixteen years, 
since which time he has lived retired at his 
present home. 

August 5, 1859. George Bauer married Miss 
Barbara Schurg, daughter of John and Clara 
(Horning) Schurg. They had no children. Mrs. 
Bauer died at noon, on Friday, July 24, 1896, at 
the age of sixty-seven years, two months and 
twenty days. She was a member of Emmanuel 
Lutheran church of Pottstown, of which Mr. 
Bauer is also a member, and in which he served 
as an elder for six years. Politically ]\Ir. Bauer 
is a Democrat. 

George Bauer is the only one remaining to rep- 
resent the family name in this country. He be- 
gan life as a poor boy and by hard work and econ- 
omy, combined with good business management, 
he has accumulated a competency for old age. He 
is one of Pottstown's honored citizens and is held 
in high esteem for his correct life and good quali- 
ties of head and heart. 

HENRY POTTS LEAF, of the firm of Metz 
& Leaf, dealers in coal, lime, sand and feed, at 
Pottstown, Pennsylvania, was born April 15, 
1835, in the borough in which he now resides. 
He is the only child of William and Mary Ann 
(Lightcap) Leaf, both natives of Montgomery 
county. 

William Leaf (father) was a miller in early 
life and later had charge and was part owner of 
an omnibus line on Fifth street, in Philadelphia. 
He followed this latter occupation for many years. 
He sold out this business to the first city pass- 



196 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



enger railroad company, of Philadelphia and be- 
came its superintendent. After some years he 
went to Washington as superintendent of the 
Georgetown and Washington Railroad. He was 
afterward superintendent of the Union Line, Phil- 
adelphia. He left Philadelphia to accept a posi- 
tion in Newark, New Jersey. He had charge of 
the Orange & Newark Railway, of the Pennsyl- 
vania System, for many years, or until within a 
few jears of his death, when he retired to a farm 
two miles west of Pottstown. He removed to 
that farm in 1876, and died there at the age of 
seventy-one years. His wife died one year prev- 
ious to his death, at the age of seventy-three years. 

George Leaf (grandfather) was a native of 
Montgomery count}-. He was a general mer- 
chant and owned property in the county. Both 
he and his wife, whose maiden name was Leonard, 
died in the prime of life, leaving a family of ten 
children. The children were reared and cared for 
by their aunt, Anna Leonard, whose parents were 
Quakers. 

John Lightcap (maternal grandfather) was 
also born in Montgomery county. His wife was 
Sarah Lightcap and they had several children. He 
died when he was about seventy years of age. 

Henry P. Leaf was two years and six months 
old when his parents removed to Indiana. They 
resided six miles west of Indianapolis until Henry 
was ten years of age, when the}' removed to Phil- 
adelphia. As the family lived in that city for 
several years, until 1859, Henry P. Leaf received 
the greater part of his schooling there, attending 
the Hancock grammar school. He learned the art 
of wood engraving and followed that occupation 
for several years. 

In 1859 he took up his residence on a farm two 
miles west of Pottstown and remained on that 
place for thirty-one years. In 1890 he went to 
Pottstown and lived retired for a few years. Since 
1894 he has been engaged in the coal, lime and 
feed business in partnership with Samuel Metz, 
the firm name being Aletz & Leaf. He is a stock- 
holder in the Citizens' Bank of Pottstown, and 
also in the Glasgow Iron Works. 

In February, 1858, Henry Potts Leaf married 
Miss Esther A. Weber, daughter of William H. 



and Ann (Bean) Weber. They had five children : 
]\Iary, who died at the age of three years ; Annie, 
who died at the age of eight years ; William ; 
Sarah W. ; and Leonard. William Leaf is em- 
ployed in the machine department of the Stetson 
Hat Works in Philadelphia. He married Annie 
Kerlin. They have two children living: Esther 
and Ruth. Sarah W. resides at home and Leon- 
ard is a clerk in the Pottstown National Bank. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leaf are members of the Pres- 
byterian church. Mr. Leaf is an elder in the 
church and has been for a number of years. He 
is also a church trustee. During the Civil war he 
enlisted at the emergency call and went to Cham- 
bersburg. He saw no active ser^'ice. In politics 
Mr. Leaf is a Republican. He resides at No. 171 
Hanover street. 

RE\'. IR\MN BISHOP KURTZ, pastor 
of the Emmanuel Lutheran church of Pottstown. 
was born in East Greenville, Alontgomery county, 
Pennsylvania, July 19, 1867. He is the son of 
Augustus E. and Elizabeth (Bishop) Kurtz, both 
natives of Montgomery county. Augustus E. 
and Elizabeth Kurtz had eight children, five of 
whom are living: Rev. Irwin B. ; Calvin B., of 
East Greenville; Lillian E., wife of Charles Dim- 
mig, of East Greenville ; Alvin, of East Green- 
ville ; and Melvin, who entered the Lutheran 
Theological Seminary, Mt. Airy, from which he 
expects to graduate in 1906. 

Augustus E. Kurtz was a tinsmith by trade 
and followed this occuupation all his life. He 
was the first burgess of East Greenville. He 
died in April, 1901, aged sixty-five years, and his 
wife survives him. In religious faith they were 
Lutherans. Augustus Kurtz was succeeded in 
business by his son Calvin, who still carries it on.' 

Michael Kurtz (grandfather) was born in 
Falkner's Swamp, New Hanover township, ^lont- 
gomery county, and was a farmer. He died at 
the age of seventy-five years. 

IMichae! Kurtz (great-grandfather) was born 
in Germany and became a resident of Falkner's 
Swamp, ^Montgomery county, where he died. 

William Bishop (maternal grandfather) was 
a native of Montgomery county and died there at 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



[97 



the age of thirty-five years. He was a fanner. 
He married ]\Iary Samsel and they had two chil- 
dren, a daughter and a son. 

Rev. Irwin B. Kurtz has lived all of his life 
in Montgomery county. He attended the public 
schools of East Greenville, the Perkiomen Sem- 
inary, the West Chester State Normal School, 
the Keystone State Normal School, of Kutztown, 
and ]\Iuhlenberg College, from which he was 
graduated in 1890 as valedictorian of his class, 
which was the largest class graduated from the 
institution up to that time. He afterward engaged 
in teaching for some time and then entered the 
Lutheran Theological Seminary at Mount Airy, 
Philadelphia, graduating in 1893. 

He was immediately called to be assistant pas- 
tor to the late Rev. Daniel K. Kepner, pastor of 
Emmanuel church, and after being in that posi- 
tion two years he was called, in 1895, to the Au- 
gustus Lutheran church at Trappe as pastor. He 
served that congregation more than two years, 
and at the death of Rev. Daniel K. Kepner, in 
May, 1897, he was called to succeed him as pas- 
tor of Emmanuel church in Pottstown, where he 
has since remained. The church at present has a 
membership of more than sixteen hundred per- 
sons. 

October 9, 1894, Rev. Irwin B. Kurtz married 
Miss Mary E. Faust, of Allentown, Lehigh 
county, Pennsylvania, daughter of J. Tihlman 
and Ellen (Druckenmiller) Faust, the former now 
deceased. They have had three children : Luther 
Augustus, who was born and died at Trappe; 
Irwin Faust Kurtz ; and Ellen Elizabeth Kurtz. 

Rev. Mr. Kurtz is a member of the Royal Ar- 
canum and also the Alpha Tau Omega, a college 
fraternity. Politically he is a Democrat. ;\Irs. 
Kurtz is a descendant of the Jaegers, who were 
noted theologians in the Lutheran church, both in 
Germany and America. Rev. Mr. Kurtz preaches 
in both the German and the English languages, 
alternating the two. 

GEORGE C. HOLLENBACH, of 428 High 
street, Pottstown, Pennsylvania, was born in 
Lower Pottsgrove township, IMontgomery county, 
Pennsylvania, November 7, 1849. He is the son 



of Bernard and Margaret (Saylor) Hollenbach, 
natives of Wittenberg, Germany. Bernard came 
to America at the age of eighteen years and his 
wife at the age of four years. They had one child, 
George C. Hollenbach. 

Bernard Hollenbach (father) was a machinist 
and an engineer on the Reading Railroad. He 
was fatally injured by the explosion of a boiler and 
died about six months later, in 185 1, at the age of 
twenty-seven years, nine months, and some days. 
His wife is still living. She married (second 
husband) John G. Miller and they now reside in 
Pottstown, having recently moved from their farm 
in Lower Pottsgrove. John G. Miller and ]\Iar- 
garet Saylor Miller had three children : Catharine, 
wife of John S. L'mstead, of Pottstown ; Eliza- 
beth, deceased ; and Rosa, wife of John Benner, of 
Kansas. Bernard Hollenbach was a Lutheran 
and his wife belonged to the same church. She 
afterwards united with the Methodist church. She 
died December 31, 1903. 

The paternal grandfather of George C. Hol- 
lenbach died in Germany, at the advanced age of 
eighty-four years. He had two sons, Bernard 
and George. The latter was drowned at sea in 
1861. 

The maternal grandfather of George C. Hol- 
lenbach was George Conrad Saylor. He was born 
in Wittenberg, Germany, and came to America 
with his family, locating in Pottsgrove township 
where he engaged in farming. He resided in the 
same place until six months before his death when 
he went to live at the home of his son, John, in 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, where he died at 
the age of sixty-six years. His wife was Catha- 
rine (Scholl) Saylor, a native of Germany. She 
died in Pottsgrove township and was more than 
seventy years of age at the time of her death. 
They had three children. George Conrad Saylor 
was a soldier in Germany. 

George Hollenbach was reared in Pottsgrove 
township and had charge of sheep from the time 
he was nine years old until he was thirteen years 
of age. He then worked four years on the canal 
and at boating for the United States government 
for three more years. He returned to his home 
and worked in a paper mill several months, and 



198 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



then on the telegraph Hne for two years and also 
followed various occupations. He lived in Sana- 
toga from 1872 to 1900 and was postmaster there 
for eighteen years. He also engaged in the gen- 
eral merchandise business in 1876, bought and 
sold horses, and fattened horses on the farm. In 
i8go he leased the Mill Park Hotel farm and 
stock-yard and lived there until 1893, when he re- 
tired and moved to his present hime. He owns 
property in Pottstown and in Pottsgrove town- 
ship. 

Air. Hollenbach is a director in the Citizens' 
Bank, and a director in the State Aline in North- 
hampton county. He is also interested in and a 
director of the copper mines at Ringing Rocks, 
two miles from the center of Pottstown, where a 
syndicate has control of seventy acres of rich cop- 
per mines. 

George C. Hollenbach was superintendent 
and general manager of the Ringing Rocks Rail- 
way Company. He is still interested in farming, 
owning two farms in Lower Pottsgrove township, 
one of thirty-seven acres and one of forty acres,- 
he superintending the conduct of the same. He is 
the owner of nine separate residences properties 
in Pottstown ; two in Sanatoga ; also a small farm 
of five acres at Sanatoga ; and a farm of fort}- 
five acres in Upper Pottsgrove township. He was 
one of the organizers of the United States Graph- 
ite Company, of which he is a director. 

June 8, 1873, George C. Hollenbach married 
Miss Alary Steinbright, daughter of Henry and 
Mary (Nace) Steinbright. They had two chil- 
dren : Harry U. and George. George died at the 
age of twenty-three years and nine months. Harry 
U. Hollenbach married Alary Schmick and they 
live in Pottsgrove township, where he is a ma- 
chinist. They have two children living, George 
C. and Florence. Two of their children died. 

Air. and Airs. George C. Hollenbach are mem- 
bers of the Emmanuel Lutheran church, in which 
he has served as a deacon and an elder for a num- 
ber of years ; and was superintendent of the Union 
Sunday-school at Sanatoga for twenty years. He 
belongs to Aladison Lodge No. 466, I. O. O. F., 
and was past grand for thirty-one years. He 
also belongs to the Knights of the Alystic Chain, 



Sparta Castle, Faglesville, and also to the Pa- 
triotic Sons of America, the Brotherhood, the 
True Blues and the Royal Arcanum. 

Politically Air. Hollenbach is a Republican and 
he represented the seventh congressional district 
in the state legislature in the sessions of 1893 and 
1895. He served on the ways and means com- 
mittee, the game and fish, and the insurance com- 
mittee. He was a school director in Pottsgrove 
township for a nimiber of years, was auditor 
in the same township and he served as a member 
of the Republican county committee. 

Airs. Hollenbach's father was born in Germany 
and her mother in Bucks county, Pennsylvania. 
They had two sons and one daughter: John Stein- 
bright, of Norristown ; Henry, of Gwynedd town- 
ship ; and Alary Ann. wife of Air. Hollenbach. 

.ALBERT G. S.\YLOR, of 214 High street. 
Pottstown, Pennsylvania, was born in Limerick 
township. Alontgomery county, Pennsylvania, 
about two miles from Trappe, November 16. 
1826. He is the eldest son of Henry and Alary 
(Groves) Saylor, both natives of Alontgomery 
county. They had five' children, as follows: 
Susanna (deceased) ; Albert G. ; Azariah. of Col- 
legeville : Dr. Henry A. (deceased) : and Ada 
Eliza Saylor, of Pottstown. 

Henry Saylor (father) was born July 20, 1800. 
and lived on the farm near Limerick Square all 
his life. During the early part of his life he com- 
bined huckstering with farming but afterwards 
devoted himself entirely to his farm. He died 
April 21, 1877, at the age of seventy-six years. 
His wife survived him until 1880, being at the age 
of sighty years, four months and eighteen days, 
at the time of her death. Henry Saylor was a 
Democrat in politics and served as assessor of his 
township. Both he and his wife were members 
of the Lutheran church. Henry Saylor married 
Alary A. Groves, daughter of John Groves, in 
1 82 1. She was born in Alontgomery county. 

Henry Saylor (grandfather) purchased a farm 
in Limerick township in 1708, and it is still in 
the possession of the family. He lived nearly all 
of his life in Alontgomery county and died in mid- 
dle age. He was buried at Trappe. His wife was 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



199 



Susanna Schrauder, and they had two children : 
Henry and Susanna. The family is of German 
extraction. 

John Groves (maternal grandfather) spent 
most of his life in Montgomery county. 

Albert G. Savior has lived all of his life in 
Montgomery county. He was reared on his 
father's farm in Limerick township, attending the 
old-fashioned schools. He afterwards taught 
school for a short time. He entered the general 
store of Mr. Henry McKinty, at Douglassville, 
Berks county, as a clerk, and three months later 
took a position as clerk for Daniel H. Beecher of 
Pottstown, remaining with him for four years. 
His next position was with Frederick Bickel for 
whom he worked until I\Ir. Bickel sold out his 
business to Mr. Umstead Wells, ISIt. Saylor re- 
maining with him until after his marriage. In 
1850 he opened a notion and millinery store 
in Pottstown, and in i860 he added dry goods. 
Until 1884 he was actively engaged in his business 
and then, after carrying on the store for thirty- 
four }ears, he sold it to Landis & Snell. Since 
1884 Mr. Saylor has lived retired. 

In December, 1848, Albert G. Saylor married 
Miss Mary Ann Oberholtzer, daughter of Henry 
and ^lary (Bechtel) Oberholtzer, of Lancaster 
county. Pennsylvania. They had two children : 
Henry D. and Mary A. Henry D. Saylor is an 
attorney and is at present consul general at 
Coburg, (Germany, transferred from Dawson, 
Yukon territory. He was state senator from 
Montgomery county. He married Dora Gerhart 
and they have three children : Albert G,, Harold 
D. and Dorothy. ;\lary A. Saylor died April 11, 
1883, at the age of twenty-one years, six months. 
Mrs. Mary Ann (Oberholtzer) Saylor died in 
May, 1869. in her forty-fourth year. She was a 
member of the Lutheran Church of the Trans- 
figuration. 

November 6. 1888, Albert G. Sa\lor married 
(second wife) Miss Mary Ann Sassaman, daugh- 
ter of Jacob and Salome (Stauffer) Sassaman of 
Berks county, Pennsylvania. Both are members 
of the Lutheran Church of the Transfiguration. 

Mr. Saylor belongs to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and has been a member of this 



fraternity for more than fifty years. Politically 
he has always been a free and independent voter. 
Mr. Saylor is a stockholder in the National 
Bank of Pottstown : in the Iron National Bank 
and the Security Company of Pottstown; and 
has been interested in the Pottstown Cold Storage 
Company and a director in the same since its or- 
ganization. He is secretary and treasurer of the 
Pottstown Fire Insurance Company. He has also 
been secretary of the Pottstown Cemetery Asso- 
ciation for thirty years. He is a stockholder in 
the March-Brownback Stove Company. He owns 
a number of properties in Pottstown and has been 
a useful and helpful citizen to the borough. Since 
his retirement from business he has devoted a 
great part of his time to securing manufacturing 
establishments and other industries for his city. 
Mr. Saylor started with practically nothing, for 
when a lad of seventeen he came to Pottstown 
with but fifty cents as his capital. He has builded 
his own fortune and is a self-made man whose 
success is creditable and enviable. He has been 
treasurer of his church council for more than 
thirty years and for many years he was super- 
intendent of the Sabbath-school. He has often 
represented his church at the synod and he is a 
member of the church council. 

HARVEY BARLOW, wholesale grain dealer 
of Pottstown, was born in Linfield, Montgomery 
county, Pennsylvania, November 3, 1857. He is 
the son of Joel and JNIary (Christman) Barlow. 

Joel Barlow (father) was also born in Mont- 
gomery county, Pennsylvania. In early life he 
was a carpenter but spent his later years on his 
farm, where he died. He married Mary Christ- 
man, also a native of Montgomery county, and 
they had one child, Harvey. 

The paternal grandfather of Harvey Barlow 
was a farmer in Limerick township, Montgomery 
county. He died at a very early age. He married 
Susanna HoUowbush and they had three children. 
After his death, his wife married (second hus- 
band) David Evans, and they had three children. 

George Christman (maternal grandfather) 
was born in Montgomery county and lived at 
IJmerick Station, where he died at the age of 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



eighty years. By his first wife he had eight chil- 
dren. He married (second wife) 3\Iargaret 
Hulby. They had no children. In addition to 
farming he also engaged in the boating business 
on the canal. 

Harvey Barlow was reared on a farm in 
Lower Pottsgrove township and received his ed- 
ucation in the district schools and in the sem- 
inary at Boyerstown. He lived at home until he 
was twenty-six years of age, learning carpentering 
and mill-wrighting. After leaving home he fol- 
lowed these trades for one year and then engaged 
in the grain, feed and coal business at Sanatoga 
for three years. From 1889 to 1894 he was in the 
grain business at Linfield, being associated with 
Jared Evans. In the latter year the firm removed 
to Pottstown where they still continue the busi- 
ness. They buy grain, shipped from the west, 
while it is on the tracks. 

March 21, 1883. Harvey Barlow married Miss 
Lizzie A. Schaeffer, daughter of Zephaniah 
Schaeffer, and they have one daughter, Evalin. 
I\Ir. and ]\Irs. Barlow are members of the Presby- 
terian church in which he was a trustee for many 
years. They reside at No. 79 North Franklin 
street, w-here he owns a beautiful home. Polit- 
ically Mr. Barlow is a Democrat. 

]\Ir. Zephaniah Schaeffer and wife, parents of 
Mrs. Barlow were both born in ^Montgomery 
county, where he was a farmer. Mr. Schaeffer 
resides at the home of Mr. Barlow in Pottstown. 
His wife died about 1878. They had ten chil- 
dren, four of whom are now living : Ida ; Lizzie 
A., Mrs. Barlow ; Ella, wife of Aaron B. Scheffey, 
of Phcenixville ; and Martha, wife of J. W. Binder 
of Pittsburg. 

JOHN H. T\\^-\DDELL, the popular hotel- 
keeper of Royersford, claims descent from some" 
of the royal families of Europe. He was born 
in West Philadelphia, December 19, 1858, and 
was reared in the fashion of city boys at that 
time, attending the public schools and a business 
college. He is the son of Charles and ]\Iary 
(Hassom) Twaddell, both of Philadelphia, the 
father the son of James S. and Mary (Steel) 
Twaddell. 



Three Twaddell brothers came to America 
during colonial times, landing at Marcus Hook, 
in Delaware county, and all three settling in 
Pennsylvania. The family was granted a coat- 
of-arms, of which John H. Twaddell has a fac- 
simile. In Europe the family were prominently 
identified with the ruling class in church and 
state. _ 

James S. Twaddell (grandfather) established 
a powder mill in Philadelphia and became an ex- 
tensive manufacturer of that material, being a 
competitor with the Duponts, for more than a 
century located on the Brandywine, at Wilming- 
ton, Delaware. ]\Ir. Twaddell accumulated a 
large estate, owning several blocks of houses in 
that city. In politics he was a Whig, but never 
aspired to political honors. His children : James, 
a merchant-miller; Sallie (Mrs Crabb), whose 
husband was a member of the Pennsjdvania leg- 
islature ; Abigail (j\Irs. Banks); Deborah (Airs. 
Dr. William Crabb) ; Charles (father) ; John P., 
died unmarried; Susan, died unmarried. The 
family were Presbyterians. 

Charles (father) grew to manhood in Phila- 
delphia, where he married and lived all his life. 
He was in the powder mill with his father, con- 
tinuing in that business for some time after his 
parent's death, but later selling the mill. He was 
a Democrat in politics but never held office. He 
died July 3, 1873. His wife survived him, dying 
September 12, 1898. She was the daughter of 
John and Alary Hasson, both of Philadelphia, 
the father being a prominent contractor and 
builder of that city. Their children : John, Ben- 
jamin, Alary (mother) ; Peter, George, Alfred. 
James and Alargaret, unmarried. 

The children of Charles and Mary (Hassom) 
Twaddell : James, died at the age of fifteen years ; 
Sarah (Mrs. L. G. Dutton), who died leaving no 
children ; John H., subject of this sketch ; Alary 
E., (Airs. J. A. Passmore) ; Charles P., of West 
Philadelphia ; Esther (Mrs. A. P. Hill) ; William 
H., unmarried; Emily (Mrs. R. C. Schaeffer). 

John H. Twaddell remained under the par- 
ental roof until he was married, being previously 
■ engaged for some time in the flour, feed and coal 
business in Philadelphia. After his marriage he 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



bought a farm which he managed for two years, 
and then took a position as clerk in the Philadel- 
phia post-office. Later he went to Chadd's Ford, 
in Chester county, and engaged in the hotel busi- 
ness, later purchasing the hotel and remaining 
there seven years, then going to Kennett Square, 
where he bought another hotel. He was there 
three years, when he bought the jNIansion House 
at West Chester, and was there fourteen months, 
and selling the establishment, as well as one at 
Kennett Square, and all his other hotel proper- 
ties. From West Chester he went to Atlantic 
City, and rented a hotel one year, and then re- 
turned to Chadd's Ford, where he remained a 
year. In April, 1901, he bought the American 
House at Royersford, where he yet remains. He 
has wonderfully improved his place of business, 
remodeling, refitting and refurnishing it. He 
now has a commodious hotel opposite the rail- 
road station, four stories high, of stone, contain- 
ing in all twenty-seven rooms, wtih hot and cold 
water, gas. electric lights and all modern appoint- 
ments. Mr. Twaddell has been successful finan- 
cially and otherwise, being a courteous and accom- 
modating landlord, whose patrons never find any- 
thing lacking that he can supply. 

On May 27, 1879, he married Mary P. Oster- 
holdt, a native of Philadelphia, where she was 
born Sept. i, i860. She is the daughter of Will- 
iam and Catharine (Plunkett) Osterholdt, both 
of Philadelphia, he the son of Freder- 
ick and Matilda (Barr) Osterholdt. Frederick 
Osterholdt was the son of Frederick. Sr., of 
Heidelberg. Germany, who came to America with 
John Jacob .^stor. He was a butcher by trade, 
and his descendants carried on the business which 
he established. He left Germany in order to 
avoid enforced military service and to escape 
from under the domination of monarchical tyr- 
anny. He left home without the consent of his 
family or their knowledge, selling his tmie to the 
captain of the vessel to pay his passage. He 
landed in New York, but soon came to Philadel- 
phia, where he amassed an immense fortune. 
His children : Frederick. Jr.. Peter, Catharine 
(Mrs. William Myers), Dorothy (]\Irs. Diehl), 
Henry, George, Eliza (Mrs. J. Haines), who is 



now above ninety years of age. The family are 
Lutherans. 

Frederick Osterholdt, Jr., grandfather of 
Mrs. Twaddell, was born in Philadelphia and 
reared in the butchering business which he con- 
ducted on an extensive scale and which his sons 
carried on after his retirement. He built a home- 
stead in which he lived over fifty years. He 
died at the age of seventy-nine years. His chil- 
dren : Frederick, yet living at the age of seventy ; 
William, now of Royersford; Mary (Mrs. Keith- 
line) ; Edward, at the old homestead ; Elizabeth 
(Mrs. William Cook) ; Henry, residing in Phil- 
adelphia; Matilda (j\Irs. C. Wolf). The chil- 
dren of William and Catharine Osterholdt: 
Mary, wife of Mr. Twaddell ; George B. Mc- 
Clellan, of Philadelphia; Matilda G. (Mrs. Jo- 
seph R. Wilson) ; William, of Cleveland, Ohio ; 
Joseph, died at the age of thirty-four years, leav- 
ing no children; Catharine H. (Mrs. Henry C. 
Bonsall) ; John T., at Royersford ; Charles J., 
of Philadelphia, unmarried ; Walter, also of Phil- 
adelphia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Twaddell have five children, as 
follows: Gertrude, born February 27, 1881, wife 
of M. C. Eppihimer, of Royersford ; Charles W., 
born December 16, 1883 ; J. Logan, born Decem- 
ber 30, 1886; William B., born February 2, 1891 ; 
Irma, born April 28, 1894. Mr. Twaddell and 
his wife are Presbyterians in religious faith. He 
is a Knight Templar, of IMasonic Lodge, No. 
475. of Kennett Square. He is also a member of 
Chapter 275, Royal Arch Masons, of Kennett 
Square, and a member of Lipper Birmingham 
Lodge, No. 940, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. He is also connected with the lodge of 
Heptasophs at Kennett Square, with the Knights 
of the Royal Arch, and with the Improved Order 
of Red Men, Winona Tribe. In politics he is a 
Republican. 

Frederick Osterholdt, born at Heidelberg, 
Germany, who came to America young, died 
in 1844 at the age of fifty-three years, and was 
Iniried in an old Philadelphia cemetery. Twelve 
years later the bodies had to be removed, and his 
was found to be petrified and very heavy. He 
was identified in his lifetime with the militia of 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



his state. His son Frederick married Matilda 
Barr, daughter of William Barr, who served 
through the Revolutionary war with distinction, 
being killed in battle. A son, William Barr, 
served in the war of 1812. 

\\'ilHam Osterholdt, father of Airs. Twaddell, 
was reared in PJiiladelphia, Ijeing also engaged 
in the butchering business from which he retired 
in 1895. He is still living in Philadelphia. He 
was a leading Republican, and an active party 
worker when younger. He was born October 
24, 1837. Catharine (Plunkett) Osterholdt 
was bdrn in Philadelphia, December 15, 1837. 
Her parents were John and ]Mary ( McKay) 
Plunkett, both natives of Ireland. They were 
married in America, and settled in Philadelphia, 
where he was a maker of fine boots and shoes. 
Later he went to New Orleans, where he died of 
yellow fever, his wife dying some years after- 
wards in 1855, at the age of fifty-three years. 
They were both members of the Catholic church. 
After her husband's death, Mrs. Plunkett reared 
her sons with great care. She was a strong ad- 
vocate of temperance, and reared her sons with 
her convictions, from which they never departed. 
The children were : John, murdered during the 
rebellion ; Thomas, followed canal boating on the 
Reading canal ; Maria, married H. G. Watson, 
a merchant at Chambersburg ; Elizabeth, married 
J. Kernan; Margaret (Mrs. I. N. Sage) ; Cath- 
arine (Mrs. William Osterholdt). 

The maternal grandparents of John H. Twad- 
dell were John and Sarah (Woodman) Hassom, 
he is a native of Delaware, and she of Bethlehem, 
Pennsylvania. He was the son of John and Alary 
Hassom, of Delaware, whose family for gener- 
ations had been members of the Society of 
Friends. The children of John and Mary Has- 
som were: Peter, William, Mary (Mrs. John 
Snell), Betsey (Mrs. N. Cornish), and John, Jr. 

John Hassom, Jr., the maternal grandfather 
of Mr. Twaddell, was married in Philadelphina, 
and settled in that city as a contractor and builder, 
remaining there during his lifetime. He was al- 
ways a member of the Society of Friends, and 
died 9 mo. 5, 1880. His mother was Rachel 
Springer, daughter of Peter and Mary Springer. 



Peter Springer was the son of Carl Christopher 
Springer, a minister in the Old Swedes' church, 
at Wilmington, who was a native of Sweden. 
He owned large tracts of land which he leased 
for ninety-nine years and his descendants have 
not yet acquired their title. 

The children of John Hassom, Jr. : Margaret, 
died in infancy; William, died unmarried at the 
age of seventy years ; John, died in 1903 leaving 
four children ; George, died leaving four chil- 
dren ; Peter, of Passellville, Pennsylvania ; Mary 
E., mother of Mr. Twaddell ; Benjamin, of Hunt- 
ingdon ; Alfred D., of Philadelphia; James H., 
of Philadelphia, and Alargaret, also of Philadel- 
pha, still unmarried. 

JOHN S. FRITZ, the son of John and Cath- 
arine ( Sassaman ) Fritz, was born in Douglas 
township, Berks countv, Pennsvlvania, Julv 23, 
1837. 

John Fritz (father) was born on the home- 
stead in Douglas township, Berks county, in 1802. 
In young manhood he was a tailor but soon de- 
voted himself to farming, an occupation which he 
followed all his life, dying at the age of thirt\- 
seven years. He was a Democrat, and both he 
and his wife were members of the Lutheran 
church of Pottstown. He married Catharine 
Sassaman of Douglas township, on September 4, 
1820, and they had six children, three sons and 
three daughters, two now living. Airs. Catharine 
Fritz died in 1895, at the age of seventy-two. 
They had six children : Ephraim Fritz, born Jan- 
uary 15, 1828, married September i, 1857, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Peter Egolf. They had one 
son, John (deceased). Ephraim Fritz died sev- 
eral years ago. The other members of the family 
are : John S. ; Nathaniel, deceased ; Almira, widow 
of Daniel B. Levengood, of Pottstown ; Amelia, 
and Sarah, deceased. 

John Fritz (grandfather) was also born in 
Douglas township, Berks county, Pennsylvania, 
where he lived all his life, and owned a farm of 
one hundred acres. He was a Democrat in poli- 
tics and an active member of the Lutheran church. 
He married Sarah Sands and they had six chil- 
dren : Samuel, Joseph, David, Catharine Holl- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



203 



man, Sarah Keiser and John. He died at the 
age of eighty years. 

The Fritz family is of German origin and emi- 
grated to this country in the early part of the 
eighteenth century, settling in Douglas township, 
Berks county. 

John S. I-'ritz was reared on the farm in Berks 
county and attended the district schools. His 
father died when the son was six years of age. 
Until he was grown he worked on his mother's 
farm and then worked out by the month until 1872 
when he bought sixteen acres of land in Berks 
county. He sold this land in 1883 and removed to 
Pottstown, entering the employ of his brother 
Ephraim in his coal-yard. In 1895 he left the 
coal-yard and ever since has been helping his son, 
Daniel L.. who is a grocer in Pottstown. He lives 
.retired. 

December 10, 1859, John S. Fritz married 
Miss Mary Levengood, daughter of Jacob and 
Mary (Bechtel) Levengood. They had four chil- 
dren : ]\Iary Emma died at the age of thirteen 
months. Anna ^Miranda died at the age of seven 
years. Daniel L., a grocer in Pottstown, married 
Jennie Engel and has three children : John E., 
Ralph E. and Bessie E. Ephraim L. 
married Lulu Schick and has three children : El- 
mira, Daniel and Allen. Ephraim L. is engaged 
in the livery business in Pottstown. 

Mrs. John S. Fritz died in 1875, at the age of 
thirty-six years. She was a member of the Re- 
formed church. John S. Fritz belongs to the Em- 
manuel Lutheran church, where he was a deacon 
about twenty years. Politically he is a Democrat. 
He lives at no King street, where he owns a fine 
brick home. He built another house by the side 
of his own for his son Daniel L. 

J.\M ES W". GILBERT, who is now living re- 
■ tired in Pottstown, was born in Phoenixville, 
j Chester county, Pennsylvania, January 8, 1864. 
I He is the son of Washington and Catharine 
I (Rover) Gilbert, both of whom were born in 
Pennsylvania, 

Washington Gilbert (father) was by trade a 
tinker and a tinner. He removed from Chester 
county to Montgomery county many years ago. 



residing in Upper Pottsgrove township. He lived 
there on a farm iwtil he went to Pottstown, where 
he died February 20, 1892. His wife is still liv- 
ing in Pottstown. Both were LutheTatJS. Wash- 
ington and Catharine (Royer) Gilbert had two 
children: James W. and George, of Lehighton, 
Pennsylvania. 

James Gilbert (grandfather) was a tinker and 
a farmer in Upper Pottsgrove township, Mont- 
gomery county. He was born in Falkner's 
Swamp, New Hanover township, Montgomery 
county, and was of German descent. His wife 
was Sarah Bickel and they had one son, Washing- 
ton Gilbert. 

Samuel Royer (maternal grandfather) was a 
printer by trade but later became a farmer. He 
resided north of the borough of Pottstown. He 
married Miss Van Buskirk, and they both lived 
to be advanced in years and had a large family. 
Samuel Royer belonged to the State Militia. 

James W. Gilbert removed from Chester 
county with his parents when he was eight years 
of age and spent the remainder of his boyhood 
days on the farm in Upper Pottsgrove township, 
attending the schools of the vicinity. He was 
elected constable in his township, and after remov- 
ing to Pottstown was elected and served two 
terms in the same office, also being a member of 
the police force of the borough of Pottstown for 
several years. 

James W. Gilbert married ]\Iiss Ida Dierolf, 
daughter of Mabray and Hannah (Weiler) Dier- 
olf. They have two children : May and Charles. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert reside at No. 509 North 
Charlotte street. 

Mrs. Gilbert's parents were natives of Berks 
county, where they still reside, being engaged in 
the occupation of farming. 

Air. Gilbert is living retired. 

JOSEPH HENRY CAREY, of Pottstown, 
was born in that borough, July 7, 1858. He is 
the son of Manning Force and Mary (Missimer) 
Carey. 

Manning Force Carey (father) was born in 
Cliestcr county, Pennsylvania, and was a butcher 
by trade. He removed to Montgomery county 



204 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



when a young man and settled in Lower Potts- 
grove township, where he lived until he married. 
He then removed to Pottstown, and attended 
market there for a number of years. He died in 
187.9, at the age of forty-seven years.. His wife 
died in Philadelphia, in 1900, at the age of sixty- 
five years. Both were Lutherans. Mrs. Mary 
(Missimer) Carey was born in Limerick town- 
ship, Montgomerv county, Pennsylvania. Mr. 
and ^Irs. Carey and four children : George W'., of 
Philadelphia ; Joseph Henry, of Pottstown ; ]\I. 
Force Carey, of Philadelphia; and Fred ]\I., of 
New York city. 

Joseph Carey (grandfather) was born in 
Pennsylvania and was a stone quarryman. He 
was killed by a blast when he was fifty-five years 
of age. He was a local Methodist preacher, and 
after his day's work was finished he would walk 
seven or eight miles to Pottstown and conduct 
revivals, preaching and exhorting. His wife was 
Lydia Gruver, who lived to be about seventy- 
nine years of age. They had four children. After 
the death of Mr. Carey, Lydia (Gruver) Carey, 
his wife, married David Ganger (second hus- 
band) and they had two children. 

George Missimer (maternal grandfather) was 
born in Limerick township, Montgomery county, 
Pennsylvania, and farmed there for many years. 
During the last years of his life he lived retired 
in Pottstown, where he died when he was ninety- 
four years old. His wife was Susanna Christ- 
man and they had a large family. He was a sol- 
dier in the war of 181 2. The father of George 
Missimer was Frederick Missimer, the son of 
Cassimer Missimer, who was the immigrant. He 
came from Alsace, France. Cassimer Missimer 
was the founder of the family in ^Iontgomer\' 
county and in America. 

Joseph H. Carey was reared in Pottstown and 
attended the public schools. At the age of four- 
teen years he began to learn the printing trade, 
at the Pottstown Ledger of^ce, and for many years 
has been foreman of the job printing department. 
He is connected with the newspaper and print- 
ing department of the Pottstown Ledger^ and for 
twenty years has been correspondent for various 
Philadelphia newspapers. He worked for J. B. 



Lippincott & Company, book publishers, in Phil- 
adelphia at one time, and was also reporter for the 
Norristown Register. 

iNIarch 31, 1887, Joseph H. Carey married 
■Miss Agnes A. Reinert. daughter of Benneville 
and Cecelia Reinert. They had two children, 
Hilary and Pauline. Mr. and Mrs. Carey arc- 
members of the First ]\'Iethodist Episcopal 
church. He is a steward in the church, and also 
Sunday-school librarian. 

Politically Mr. Carey is a Democrat. He was 
a member of the school board for ten years, hav- 
ing been elected three times in a strong Repub- 
lican ward, and was treasurer of the board. In 
1901 "Sir. Carey was appointed borough and school 
tax collector by Judge Weand, a vacancy having 
occurred. He resides at 326 Cherry street. 

JOSEPH SPANG, the well-known Pottstown 
brick manufacturer, residing at. 104 South Char- 
lotte street, in that borough, was born in York, 
Pennsylvania, August 6, 1839. He is the son of 
Jeremiah and Catharine (Fricker) Spang, both 
of whom were born in Pottstown. They had a 
family of five children — three sons and two 
daughters — of whom three are now living: John, 
of Philadelphia ; Joseph, of Pottstown ; and ]\Iary, 
widow of Mahlon Coller, also of Pottstown. 

Jeremiah Spang (father) was a millstone- 
maker. He removed to York, Pennsylvania, liv- 
ing there a number of years, and then returned to 
Pottstown, where he resided until his death in 
1876, in his sixty- fourth year. His wife died in 
1887, aged nearly seventy-six years. He was a 
Lutheran in religious faith, and she was reared a 
Catholic. 

Adam Spang (grandfather) was a native of 
Montgomery county and also a "burr-maker. He 
was married three times and had seventeen chil- 
dren in all. He died at the age of upwards of sev- 
enty years. 

Anthony Fricker (maternal grandfather') was 
born in New Hanover township, Montgomery^ 
county. 

Joseph Spang lived in York until he had ' 
reached the age of eighteen years. He attended 
the public schools there, being reared partly upon 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



205 



the farm and partly in the town. He pursued the 
even tenor of ordinary Hfe until the breaking out 
of the Rebellion in 1861, when he enlisted for the 
defense of the government in Company C, Fourth 
Penrisylvania Regiment, for three months, and at 
the expiration of his term, re-enlisted in Company 
A, Fifty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers. He en- 
listed a third time in the field and served to tlie 
end of the war. At first a private, he became 
successively corporal and sergeant. He was 
slightly wounded in the battle of Petersburg. Mr. 
Spang participated in the following engagements 
with the commands to which he belonged : in the 
seven days fighting before Richmond ; in the 
battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellors- 
ville. Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania 
Court House, Cold Harbor, Petersburg. He was 
in the hospital at York, Pennsylvania, and re- 
turned to his regiment when convalescent, and was 
afterwards engaged in the action of Hatcher's 
Run, South-Side Railroad, Farmsville, and Ap- 
pomattox Court House. 

After the war Sergeant Spang returned to 
Pottstown and engaged in the brick manufac- 
turing business which he has conducted success- 
fully ever since. 

On December 26, 1865, he married Miss 
Emma H. Craver, daughter of William M. and 
Priscilla A. (Clayton) Craver. They have had 
four children : Anna Priscilla married Harry G. 
Rinehart, of Pottstown, and they have four chil- 
dren : Claude, Carl, Evah-n and Mildred. Ella 
May died in infancy. William H., a typewriter 
and stenographer, married Ella May Burk. Joseph 
died at the age of six months. 

Mr. and Mrs. Spang are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and he is a church 
trustee. He is also a member of Richards Post, 
Xo. 595, Grand Army of the Republic, and of 
Encampment No. 22, Union Veteran Legion. 

Politically ]\Ir. Spang is a Republican, being 
an active worker in behalf of the interests of that 
party. He cast his first presidential vote for 
Abraham Lincoln in i860. He served in the 
town council for a term of three years. 

Li 1891 he built an elegant home for himself. 



in which he now resides, and owns several other 
properties in Pottstown. 

William M. Craver (Mrs. Spang's father) was 
born in Pennsylvania and her mother in Mary- 
land. They had a family of eight children, of 
whom seven are still living. Her father was a 
hatter in York. He died in 1876 at the age of 
fifty-nine years. His wife survived until 1887, 
when she died at the age of sixty-seven years. In 
religious faith both were members of the Lutheran 
denomination. 

Daniel Craver (Mrs. Spang's grandfather) 
was a native of Pennsylvania and a hatter by 
trade. He was of German descent. His wife was 
Rebecca Nefif. Both lived to be upwards of sev- 
enty years of age. They had a family of si.x chil- 
dren. ]\Ir. Graver's father was George Craver. 

Mrs. Spang's maternal grandfather was John 
Clayton. He was a native of Maryland, but his 
parents came from England. His wife was Har- 
riet Houchman. He lost his life by accident in 
middle age, but his wife lived to be upwards of 
eighty. They had a family of three daughters. 

Mr. Spang's family are descendants of Michael 
Spang, who emigrated from Germany to this 
country about one hundred and fifty years ago. 

WILLIAM BROOKE, a retired farmer, re- 
siding at No. 259 Chestnut street, Pottstown, was 
born in Limerick township, Montgomery county, 
Pennsylvania, June 23, 1841. He is the son of 
Robert and Catharine (Yost) Brooke, both of 
whom were born in JNIontgomery county. 

Robert Brooke (father) was a teamster for 
twelve years, driving a six-horse team to Pitts- 
burg. He later bought a farm in Limerick town- 
ship, where he lived for forty-five years, and 
where he died, June 11, 1880, at the age of eighty 
years. His wife died in 1878, at the age of sev- 
enty years. She belonged to the German Re- 
formed church. Mr. Brooke was a member of 
the school board for a number of years. They had 
twelve children, nine sons and three daughters, 
seven of whom are now living: Michael; Mary 
Elizabeth, widow of John A. Loughridge ; 
Martha, wife of Andrew Fenstermacher ; Will- 



2o6 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



iam; Charles: Kate, wife of William H. Jones; 
and Isaac. 

Matthew Brooke (grandfather) lived in Mont- 
gomery county during the greater part of his life. 
He was a farmer by occupation. He married 
Mary Stetler and they had a large family. The 
Brooke family is of English descent, Matthew 
Brooke having come to America from England, 
accompanied by his brother, early in the eigh- 
teenth century. 

Peter Yost (maternal grandfather) was born 
in Pennsylvania and lived in Montgomery county 
most of his life. He owned the mill now known 
as the Kepler Mill, and carried on the milling 
business in. connection with farming. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Ziegler and they had a large fam- 
ily. The Yost family is of German origin. 

William Brooke has lived in Montgomery 
county all his life. He was reared on the farm 
and attended the district schools in his youth and 
he lived at home until the time of his father's 
death. He then abandoned farming and removed 
to Pottstown in 1882. He built his present home 
in 1888. 

December 31, 1880, William Brooke married 
Miss Effietta Scholl, daughter of Conrad and 
Elizabeth (Scholl) Scholl. They had no chil- 
dren. Mrs. Brooke died June 23, 1891, at the 
age of lifty-eight years. She was a member of the 
Lutheran church. Her parents lived in Mont- 
gomery county all their lives. 

August 13, 1862, William Brooke enlisted in 
Company H, Sixty-eighth Pennsylvania Regi- 
ment, commanded by Colonel Lipton. He served 
one year as a corporal. He was in the battles of 
Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, in the latter 
of which he was badly wounded in the right arm, 
May 3, 1863. He was confined in Carver Hos- 
pital at Washington for three months, and was 
mustered out of service on August 13, 1863, and 
returned to his farm. 

HORATIO SANDS, a civil engineer of 
Pottstown, residing at 245 Beech street, was born 
at the home where he now lives, on July 27, 1850. 
He is the son of William L. and Caroline ( Missi- 
mer) Sands. 



William L. Sands (father) was born in Long 
Swamp, Berks county, Pennsylvania. He was a 
general contractor and was for many years super- 
intendent of the roadway department of the Phil- 
adelphia & Reading Railroad. Late he was a 
car-builder in Pottstown. Among the large 
buildings that he constructed were: the Memor- 
ial Hall in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia ; the 
Insane Asylum at Norristown, and the first cable 
power stations in Philadelphia. He removed to 
Pottstown about 1844. 

On July 13, 1845. William L. Sands married 
Caroline Missimer. Rev. L. L. Herman officiated 
at the ceremony. They were active members of 
the Trinity Reformed church, whose building at :1 
Pottstown Mr. Sands designed. In politics he 
was a Republican. He died at his home in Potts- 
town, on February 22, 1892, at the age of seven- 
ty-five years, three months and two days. His ! 
wife died November ig, 1899, ^t the age of sev- 1 
enty-seven years, eleven months, and twenty-one 
days. She was born in Montgomery county. Mr. 
and Mrs. William L. Sands had three children, all 
sons : Winfield Scott, Horatio and Joseph Bailey. 

Samuel Sands (grandfather) was born in S 
Berks county and was buried at Long Swamp. t 
Like his son William, he was a carpenter and }' 
builder. He married l\Iiss Lesher. The Sands j 
family is of German descent. Samuel Sands was j 
driven out of Germany on account of his religion j 
and came to Berks county, settling at Long i 
Swamp. ] 

Joseph Missimer (maternal grandfather) was 
a native of Montgomery county. He married 
Mary Geist, February 17, 181 1. His second mar- 
riage was with Catharine Geist. a sister of his 
first wife, August 11, 1816. Joshua was his oldest 
son, being the child of his first wife. Delilah, 
Mary, Cassimer, Caroline, Susan, W'ashington, 
Rebecca, Kate and Isabella were children of the 
second marriage. Joseph Missimer died on Au- 
gust 3, 1847. at the age of sixty-one years. He 
was a soldier in the war of 1812. His father was 
Henry Missimer, who was the son of Cassimer 
Missimer, the founder of the Missimer family in ' 
America. 

Horatio Sands was reared in Pottstown and 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



207 



has spent all of his life, except eighteen months, 
in that borough. During this eighteen months he 
was a resident of Royerforcl. He was educated 
in the public schools of Pottstown. and in the Hill 
school at the same place. He studied civil and 
mechanical engineering and learned to build lo- 
comotives at the Baldwin Locomotive Works in 
Philadelphia, and for the last tw^elve years has 
]3racticed civil engineering. His first employment 
was at Lititz, Lancaster county, in the Lititz 
^Vater Works, and later he was employed in the 
following water works : the borough of East 
Greenville, Montgomery county ; the borough of 
Honeybrook, Chester county : and Malvern, Ches- 
ter county ; Aberdeen. Maryland ; and he was su- 
perintendent of the Home Water Works at Roy- 
crsford. 

On May 29. 1881, Horatio Sands married 
Miss Priscilla N., daughter of Henry Koch, of 
Pottstown. They were married by Rev. A. W. 
Kreamer, of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, pastor of the 
First Reformed church. They have four chil- 
dren, namely: William Lesher, born September 
29. 1886; Bell Bisbing, bom March 12, 1888: 
Margaret Dull, born September 3, 1889 ; and 
Matthew Stanley Quay, born August 6, 1895. 

Mrs. Sands and the children are members of 
the Trinity Reformed church, and Mr. Sands was 
reared in that faith. Politically Mr. Sands is a 
Republican. He was borough engineer of the 
borough of Honeybrook for one year, of the 
borough of East Greenville for two years, of 
Aberdeen, Maryland, one year. Mr. Sands occu- 
pies the home where his father and mother lived. 
Mrs. Sands was born at Gilbertsville, Montgom- 
ery county, and her i)arents were natives of Berks 
county. 

PROFESSOR \\TLLL\M \\'. RCPERT, 
superintendent of schools in the borough of Potts- 
town, is a native of Chester county. He was bom 
near Oxford October 29. 1852, being the son of 
( ieorge and .\nna (Durnall) Rupert, both natives 
fif Pennsylvania. The couple had three children : 
Professor William W., of Pottstown : Elizabeth, 
wife of Rev. Edwin Macminn, D. D., of Bur- 
lington, Iowa : and Edgar W. Rupert, of Oxford. 



George Rupert ( father) was a farmer in Ches- 
ter county, near Oxford, where he died in 1891, 
aged eighty-two years. His wife died earlier, 
aged about sixty-five years. Both were Baptists 
in religious faith, the husband being a deacon in 
the church for many years. 

William Rupert (grandfather) was a native of 
Pennsylvania and the early part of his life was 
spent in the neighborhood of Philadelphia, though 
he afterwards lived for many years in Chester 
county, where he died at an advanced age. His 
wife was Elizabeth Achufif. They had a large 
family. He was a teacher and followed that occu- 
pation for forty years at one place, Fox Chase, 
near Philadelphia, and now within the limits of 
that city. The family are of Welsh descent. 

Air. Durnall (maternal grandfather) was a 
native of Pennsylvania. His wife was Elizabeth 
Durnall. He was a farmer and both he and his 
wife lived to an advanced age. They had a large 
family. 

Professor William W. Rupert lived on the 
farm until he was twenty years of age and at- 
tended the district schools of that vicinity. Later 
he spent three }'ears in the Union high school in 
Lancaster county, a private institution conducted 
by James W. Andrews, A. M. Subsequently he 
took a course in civil engineering, graduating 
from the Polytechnic College of Pennsylvania, 
and located at Philadelphia, in 1877. He then 
taught school near Oxford for one year, having 
also taught in the same school before entering 
college. \Miile he was employed there a second 
time he accepted a position as professor of mathe- 
matics in the Parkesburg Classical Institute, of 
Chester county, remaining in that position one 
\ear. From Parkesburg he went to Pottstown 
in 1879 as principal of the high school, continuing 
in that situation for nine years. He was then 
elected the first borough superintendent of Potts- 
town, which position he has held ever since. 

On July 27, 1882, he married Mrs. Clara S. 
Davis, widow of Dr. Brooke Davis, and daugh- 
ter of John and Margaret (Sommers) Miller. The 
couple have two children : William Earle and 
Alarion E., both of whom were educated in the 
schools of Pottstown. Mrs. Rupert is a member 



208 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



of the Baptist church, which Professor Rupert 
also attends. PoHtically he is a RepubHcan. 

Mrs. Rupert's parents were natives of Chester 
county. They had three children: Franklin, of 
Chester county, who resides on the farm ; Lewis 
Miller, of Chester county; and Mrs. Clara S. 
Rupert. Mrs. Rupert had two children by her 
former marriage : Brooke Davis and Edgar Davis. 
Her father was a farmer and one of the directors 
of the First National Bank of Pottstown. 

Professor Rupert is the author of the follow- 
ing works : "Guide to the Study of History and 
the Constitution of the United States," published 
by Ginn & Company, of Boston ; "Rupert's Geo- 
graphical Reader," published by Leach, Shewell 
& Sanborn, of Boston; "Famous Geometrical 
Theorems and Problems with their History," 
published by D. C. Heath & Company, Boston; 
and "Geography of Pennsylvania," published by 
]\IcMillan & Company, New York. 

Professor Rupert is one of the most success- 
ful teachers in the country, and it is due largely 
to his energy and ability that the schools of Potts- 
town enjoy so excellent a reputation. 

JOHN M. SHADE, for more than a dozen 
}-ears superintendent of the Royersford Water 
Works, is descended from an old family in ^lont- 
gomery county. He is a native of Limerick 
township, where he was born October 31, 185 1. 
He was reared on a farm, varying such duties 
with work in a blacksmith shop, and attendance 
at a neighborhood school. He is the son of 
Jacob and Mary (Major) Shade, both of ]\Iont- 
gomery county. 

Jacob Shade (father) was the son of Jacob 
and Mary (Shunk) Shade. Both members of 
old families in that section of the county, of Ger- 
man descent. Jacob was a favorite name in the 
Shade family, some one of their number having 
borne it in each generation. Jacob Shade, great- 
grandfather of the subject of this sketch, mar- 
ried a Miss Buck, of another old upper end fam- 
ily, the couple having the following children : 
Henry, Daniel, Jacob (grandfather) : Elizabeth, 
Christina and Catharine, all died unmarried ; 
Margaret (Mrs. B. Place). 



Jacob (grandfather) was born in Upper 
Providence township. After several removals 
he finally located on a farm near where Royers- 
ford has since been built. He died in 1829. He 
was a member of the Reformed church, and stood 
well in the community. His widow married 
again, her second husband being Benedict Gar- 
ber, a blacksmith located at first in Copper Provi- 
dence township. He removed in 1834 to the 
vicinity of Limerick church, where he worked 
at his trade many years. He retired from busi- 
ness in 1848, and after a few changes of residence 
located in Royersford, built a residence, and lived 
there until his death. His wife died there also 
in 1875. j\Ir. and I\Irs. Benedict Garber had two 
children — Francis, also a blacksmith by occupa- 
tion, and Martha (Airs. Evan Lewis). 

Jacob Shade's children were: Abel, died at 
the age of thirty-two years ; Jeriah, a Reformed 
minister; Henrietta (Mrs. F. Isett) ; Charlotte 
(Airs. Peter Cramer) ; Daniel, who learned the 
trade of a wheelwright and later became a prac- 
ticing physician ; Jacob, father of John Shade, 
subject of this sketch, who was an infant at the 
time of his father's death, and was reared by his 
step-father, Benedict Garber, with whom he 
learned the blacksmith trade, and later succeeded 
Air. Garber. remaining at the original stand near 
Limerick church from 1848 to i860, and then 
removing to a location near Linfield, where he 
continued until 1901. He then retired from 
active labor, and settled at Royersford, where he 
still resides, enjoying the fruits of a well-spent 
life. He still owns the country home of six acres, 
in that vicinity. Mr. Shade was for many years 
a leading Democrat of Limerick, being prominent 
in party councils.. He was nominated for re- 
corder of deeds of Alontgomery county by his 
party- convention, and made a close race with 
his Republican opponent, but was defeated along 
with the rest of the Democratic ticket. He was 
a man of the highest integrity and honor, who 
performed every duty in the most satisfactory 
manner. In 1851 he married Miss Mary A. 
Major, an intelligent and cultured woman, who 
made him an excellent wife. She was born in 
Limerick township, August 10, 1827. being the 





-^rfn^^ju .-Mtu^xj^jlj 



^lONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



209 



daughter of Jacob and :\Iary (Schenck) Major. 
Jacob Major was a son of John I\Iajor, and the 
father of the last named came from Wales at the 
same time as the ancestors of the Evans family, 
also prominent residents of Limerick. John 
I^Iajo'r was a leading farmer of the township, 
and a strong Democrat. He filled a number of 
township offices, but never aspired to higher 
honors. His children were: Jacob, William, 
John, George, Hannah (Mrs. Daniel Miller). 

Jacob Major was reared in farm pursuits, 
alternating this employment with work at the 
shoemaker's bench.' He followed that trade for 
some time afterwards. He died in Limerick in 
185 1. His widow survived him seventeen years, 
maikng her home with her daughter, Mrs. Jacob 
Shade. Mrs. Major died in 1868. She was a 
daughter of Matthias Schenck, a tailor by trade, 
and a native of Montgomery county, of German 
descent. He had but one child— Mary Magda- 
lene, grandmother of John I\L Shade. The chil- 
dren of Jacob and Mary U. INIajor: Matthias, 
died in 1863, leaving ten children, all of whom 
are living ; John, a railway engineer, who died in 
1899, leaving three children ; Louisa, died young; 
Mary A., mother of John M. Shade; Elizabeth 
(Mrs. Jacob Font); David died young; Enos, 
of Spring City; Catharine (Mrs. N. Brant). 
They are all members either of the Lutheran or 
Reformed churches. 

Jacob and Mary A. Shade had ten children 
as "follows: John M., subject of this sketch; 
Zephaniah, foreman in the pattern-fitting depart- 
ment of the stove works; Charlotte CSlrs. Wil- 
liam Saylor) ; Samuel, a stove mounter ; Jacob 
A., died' at the age of twenty-two years; Cath- 
arine (Mrs. Charles Hetrick) ; .Mary E. (Mrs. 
Daniel Shelcap) ; Harriet, unmarried ; Fred- 
erick, who has been emplo\cd by the Home 
Water Company of Royersford for seven years ; 
Charles II. , by occupation a blacksmith, but at 
present employed in the life insurance business 
at Spring City. The nmther is a member of the 
Reformed Church. 

John M. Shade is naturally ingenious, and soon 
acquired a knowledge of the use of tools which 
has been of great value to him in his subse(|uent 



life. He remained at home until he was fourteen 
years of age ; he then worked as a farm hand, 
and when he was seventeen years of age he found 
employment at the stove works of March, Brown- 
back & Co., at Linfield, being thus engaged for 
three years. He then spent a year in work on 
the construction of the Colebrookdale Railroad. 
He was then for a time at New Bedford, Massa- 
chusetts, engaged in the construction of a coal 
pocket for the Philadelphia and Reading Rail- 
way Company. After recovering from an attack 
of typhoid fever he returned to March, Brown- 
back, & Co.. remaining there two years, dur- 
ing which time he married and located at Linfield 
in June, 1876. He then removed to Royersford 
(in 1878) and became employed with Schantz 
& Keely, stove manufacturers, being thus em- 
ployed until 1880, when he took a position with 
the American Wood Paper Company of Spring 
Citv, being engaged eleven years with this firm, 
where he was engineer in charge of repairs, 
superintending the mill for two years. He was 
then one year with the Keystone Meter Company, 
of Royersford. In 1893 he took the management 
of the Royersford Water Company, in which he 
has continued ever since, being most emphatically 
the right man for the place. In 1878 !Mr. Shade 
built a commodious residence in Royersford, 
which he occupies. He is a practical man, giv- 
ing the closest attention to business, and doing 
all that is possible to promote the prosperity of 
the community in which he lives. Politically he 
is a Democrat, but has never been an office-seeker. 
He has filled several important positions, includ- 
ing nine years consecutively in town council, and 
director in the Water Company for a dozen or 
more years. He has also held several minor of- 
fices. Mr. Shade is a member of the Reformed 
church, where he is a deacon. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Masonic order, and of the Knights of 
the Golden Eagle. 

INIr. Shade married ]\liss Annie C. Ran, a 
native of Chester county. She was born in No- 
vember, 1852, being a daughter of John and 
Frederika (Bausman) Ran. The parents of Mrs. 
Shade are deceased. Both her parents were born 
in Gcrmanv. Their children: David. John, 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



Harry, Mary (iMrs. John Grander) ; Lydia (Mrs. 
D. Hillborn) : Annie C (Mrs. John M. Shade). 
Mr. and Mrs. Shade have the following chil- 
dren : Bessie and Mary E. 

HORACE A. CUSTER, the leading book- 
seller and stationer of Pottstown, is a native of 
that borough. He was born January 12, 1845, 
being the son of Aaron L. and Elizabeth (Kinzer) 
Custer, who lived in Berks county about five miles 
from Pottstown. When a young man Aaron 
Ludwig Custer removed to New Holland, Lan- 
caster county, where he engaged in mercantile 
life in a general country store and married there. 
Mrs. Custer was born in Lancaster county. The 
couple had seven children, three of whom are now 
living, as follows: Rose A., wife of Samuel R. 
Ellis ; Carrie K., widow of Jacob Hartranft ; and 
Horace A. Custer, all residents of Pottstown. 

Aaron L. Custer (father) went to Pottstown 
many years ago and was postmaster of that place 
in the '40s. Later he engaged in the bookselling 
business with Abner Evans, under the firm name 
of Evans & Custer. Both are now deceased and 
have been succeeded in the business by their 
sons. This was the first bookstore of the place. 
!Mr. Custer also served as notary public for the 
Pottstown Bank. He was one of the public spir- 
ited citizens of Pottstown and took a deep and 
helpful interest in all matters pertaining to the 
general welfare. Aaron Custer died in 1881, aged 
seventy-seven years. His wife survived him until 
1892 and was eighty-four years of age at the time 
of her death. Both she and her husband were 
buried in Pottstown cemetery. Both of them were 
Lutherans in religious faith. He was secretary 
of the school board for a number of years and 
also secretary of the board of vestrymen of the 
Lutheran Church of the Transfiguration. 

Jonathan Custer (grandfather) lived in Berks 
county and died there in middle life, leaving a 
family of seven sons and three daughters. He was 
a farmer by occupation. Mr. Custer was of Swed- 
ish descent and belonged to the same family as 
General Custer, who perished in a fight with 
Indians in the west. The name was originally 
spelled Roster. 



The maternal grandfather, Kinzer, was a na- 
tive of Lancaster county and was of German de- 
scent. He owned a large farm and was a man of 
considerable prominence, holding several public 
offices. He and his wife died advanced in years, 
leaving a large family. 

Horace A. Custer has lived in Pottstown all 
his life. He attended the public schools and the 
Hill school at Pottstown, took a position in the 
store with his father, and succeeded him in the 
business after his death. He has been at his 
present location No. 231 High street, for thirty 
five years. He was one of the original members 
of the Goodwill Fire Company and its first sec- 
retary, and he served as one of the building com- 
mittee for the erection of the fine new building 
of the Goodwill Company on Hanover and Queen 
streets. 

In 1863 he enlisted in Company F, Twenty- 
sixth Pennsylvania Emergency Regiment, and 
served during the Gettysburg campaign. He 
afterwards enlisted in Company F, One Hun- 
dred and Ninety-seventh Regiment, serving five 
months. He was discharged at the expiration of 
his term of service. Air. Custer was in the ranks. 
After the war he returned to die book business in 
which he is still engaged. 

On September 24, 1874, he married jNIiss 
Elizabeth Shaffer of Reading, daughter of Jacob 
and Mary (Baum) Shaffer. They had one son, 
Clarence, who died at the age of twenty years. 
They reside at No. 350 Walnut street. 

Mr. Custer is a member of the Lutheran 
church, and his wife of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He is also a member of the vestry. Mr. 
Custer is also a member of Stichter Lodge, No. 
254, Free and Accepted Masons, of Pottstown 
Chapter, and of Nativity Commandery. He has 
been a Mason since 1867. ]Mr. Custer was one 
of the charter members of Graham Post. Grand 
Army of the Republic. He is a member of the 
Benevolent Order of Elks. 

Politically he is a Republican and was burgess 
of Pottstown one term, from March 4, 1900, to 
March 4, 1903. In view of the large Democratic 
majority in that borough, this is a strong proof 
of his popularity. He was also a member of the 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



board of school directors for eleven years. His 
father also served as burgess of Pottstown many 
years ago and theirs is the only case on record 
where father and son have filled the same office. 

MAJOR THOMAS CAPXER STEELE 
was born in P^lemington, New Jersey, January 5, 
1841. He is the son of John Button and Eliza- 
beth (Capner) Steele. His father was a native 
of Pennsylvania and his mother of Xew Jersey. 
They had seven children, three sons and four 
daughters, four now living, as follows: Major 
Thomas Capner Steele ; Elizabeth Capner, wife of 
Frank E. Brakett, of Cumberland. [Maryland ; 
Edith Button Steele, of Philadelphia : and John 
Hall Steele, of Philadelphia. 

John Button Steele (father) was born in \\'est 
Bradford township, Chester county, March 18, 
1810, and died June 13, 1886, aged seventy-six 
years. He was a civil engineer all his business 
life, but was reared on a farm. He removed from 
Chester county to Pottstown in 1846 and lived 
there until his death. His wife was born April 
2, 1809, and died April 24. 1882, at the age of 
seventy-three years. She was a Unitarian, as 
was also her husband. He was not a soldier but 
was very active in the war of the Rebellion as a 
consulting engineer for the government in keep- 
ing the railroads in repair. 

John Button Steele (grandfather) was born in 
Cheshire, England, and came to America in 1795, 
locating at Whitemarsh, Montgomery county, but 
removing in 1805 to West Bradford, Chester 
county, where he died September 16, 1866, aged 
ninety-three years. His wife was Ann Exton, 
who was born in 1785 and died in 1859. They had 
nine children. He was one of the board of di- 
rectors in the (k-rmantown Turnpike Company 
as well as the founder of the Perkiomen Turnpike 
Company. He represented Chester county in the 
state legislature. His father was George Steele, 
born at Cheshire, England, in 1737. 

Thomas Capner (maternal grandfather) was 
born at Temple Mills, Lancashire. England, and 
came to America about the time of the Revolution. 
He was a soldier in the war of 18 12 and died soon 
after at Flemington. New jersey. He was a 



farmer. The name was originally Capnerhurst, 
but on coming of age he dropped the last syllable. 
His wife was Mary Choyce, of Leicestershire, 
England. He died at the age of forty-five years 
and his wife survived him. living to be sixty years 
of age. They had six children. 

Major Thomas C. Steele was reared in Chester 
county and in Pottstown, having spent most of his 
life in Pottstown since he was five years old. He 
attended the Pottstown schools and Haverford 
College in Belaware countv, graduating in 1859. 
He entered the engineer corps of the Philadelphia 
and Reading Railroad, remaining in this position 
until 1862. He enlisted in the One Hundred and 
Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania Regiment, Twentieth 
Corps, and served principally in North Carolina. 
He afterwards commanded Company H and was 
in the battle of Newbern. 

After the war he again entered the service of 
the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad and served 
with that company until 1876 when he went to 
Sterling, New York, and took charge of develop- 
ing some iron-ore mines there. On his return he 
was chief assistant engineer in charge of the con- 
struction of Nesquehoning Valley Railroad and 
Nesquehoning tunnel in Carbon county and later 
was chief assistant engineer on the construction 
of the Berks County Railroad. After the comple- 
tion of this road he entered the service of the 
United States government in exploring the ex- 
treme northwest, in light house and buoy duty on 
the northwest coast, where he lived three years. 
He returned to Pottstown and was engaged with 
the Pottstown Iron Company until 1893. since 
which time he has lived retired. 

January 18, 1866, he married Lydia Man- 
chester Hart, of Reading, daughter of Asa and 
Susan B. (Mayer) Hart. They had three chil- 
dren : John Button Steele, Asa Manchester Steele 
and Esther Clarkson Mayer Steele. John Button 
Steele married Edith Caldwell Williamson, on 
April 15, 1903. The other two children reside in 
Philadelphia. Mrs. L}dia M. Steele died Febru- 
ary 14, 1887, at the age of forty-one years. She 
was a member of the Episcopal church. 

October 21, 1891, Major Steele married 
(second wife) Ann Hunter Neide, daughter of 



MOXTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Joseph Neide and Rebecca Shafer Neide. They 
have one daughter, Rebecca Neide Steele. IMajor 
Steele and his wife are members of the Episcopal 
church. 

j\Iajor Steele was quartermaster of the Sixth 
Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer jMilitia during 
the whole of the Spanish- American war. Polit- 
ically he is a Republican and is a member of the 
town council of Pottstown, representing the 
fourth ward. 

RE\'. O. P. SAIITH, D. D., pastor of the Lu- 
theron Church of the Transfiguration, Pottstown, 
was born in New Tripoli township, Lehigh coun- 
ty, Pennsylvania, September 4, 1848. He is the 
son of Frederick and Mary Margaret (Schwab) 
Smith, natives of Bavaria, Germany. They had 
six children, four sons and two daughters, four 
now living, as follows : Louisa, widow of Robert 
L. Roberts, of Bangor, Penns)-lvania ; Henry S., 
of Bethlehem ; Theodore S., of Allentown, Penn- 
sylvania ; and Rev. O. P. Smith. The first named 
is a mechanical engineer connected with the 
Bethlehem Steel Company, and Theodore S. is a 
music dealer and a musician of considerable note. 
He is an organist and chorister of Tripoli and is 
prominently connected with music circles in his 
part of the state. His daughter, Ida Minerva 
Smith, has attained considerable fame as a violin- 
ist. She was educated in the Conservatory of 
]^Iusic at Boston and at her graduation the faculty 
presented her with a special seal in addition to 
her diploma, in recognition of her superior merit 
and skill as a violinist. 

Frederick Smith (father) was a parochial 
school teacher and organist in New Tripoli town- 
ship for forty-five years. He came to America in 
1830 when a young man, living in Philadelphia 
one year. He was a teacher and organist there. 
He then removed to New Tripoli where he en- 
gaged in teaching music for forty-five years. He 
also served as church organist, was a parochial 
school teacher and was a scrivener, who executed 
many deeds, wrote wills and prepared other 
papers of like character for the people of his com- 
munity. He was recognized in his locality as a 
man of strong character and sterling worth. 



He died in Tripoli in 1875, at the age of sevent_\-- 
three years. His wife died two weeks before his 
death, at the age of seventy-two years. 

Frederick Smith (grandfather) was a teacher 
and an organist in Germany and died in that 
country. 

The maternal grandfather of Rev. O. P. Smith 
was born in Bavaria, Germany. He conducted a 
distillery in that country and died of apoplexy at 
the age of forty-five years. 

Dr. O. P. Smith was reared at New Tripoli 
and received his elementary education in the dis- 
trict schools of the neighborhood. He then at- 
tended ^luhlenberg College at Allentown, gradu- 
ating in June, 1871. He spent three years at the 
Lutheran Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, 
and was ordained a minister in the city of Lan- 
caster, June 3, 1874. 

His first pastorate was at Trappe in ]\Iontgom- 
ery county, and while living at Trappe he also 
served the St. James congregation at Limerick 
and the Jerusalem congregation at Schwenksville. 
He continued with these three congregations for 
fifteen years. In May, 1889, he removed to Potts- 
town and took charge of the Church of the Trans- 
figuration there, of which he is at present the 
pastor. The membership of his congregation is 
about four hundred and fifty. 

June 24, 1874, he married Laura A. Barnes^ 
daughter of Ezra and Caroline (Starr) Barnes.. 
i\Irs. Laura Smith died in 1884, aged thirty-six 
years. 

October 21, 1887, Dr. Smith married }^Iary AL 
Hobson, daughter of Frank ]\I. and Elizabeth 
(Gotwals) Hobson. They had two sons. Francis 
H. and Oliver H. 

Politically Rev. Smith is a Democrat. He is- 
connected with the Lutheran Theological Sem- 
inary at ]\Iount Airy. Philadelphia, and has been 
secretary of the board for fourteen years. He is 
a member of the English home mission board of 
North America and has been for eighteen years. 
He has served as president of the Philadelphia 
and Norristown conferences and on a number of 
important committees in church work. 

^^'hen a young man he taught three terms in 
the public schools and during his college course- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



gave instruction in the German langaiage in con- 
nection with the public schools of the city of Al- 
lentown. He also taught in the Washington Hall 
Institute at Trappe. For a number of years he 
preached in both the German and English lan- 
guages biit of late confines himself entirely to the 
English language. He has done much effective 
work in behalf of the church and has promoted 
its material as well as spiritual growth. Through 
his instrumentality the church at Trappe was re- 
modeled at a cost of seven thousand dollars ; the 
St. James church was erected, costing nine thou- 
sand ; a new church was built at Schwenksville, at 
a cost of fifteen thousand dollars ; the parsonage at 
Pottstown was bulk for ten thousand dollars ; and 
the Pottstown Church of the Transfiguration was 
remodeled at a cost of thirteen thousand dollars. 
During the summer of 1903 Dr. Smith made an 
extended tour through England, France, Belgium, 
Italy, Spain, Switzerland, Germany and Holland, 
and was greatly benefited by the trip, gaining in 
health as well as in knowledge of the old world 
and its peoples. 

Mrs. Mary M. Smith's parents were natives 
of Montgomery county, her father of Limerick 
and her mother of Lower Providence township. 
They had two children : Freeland G. Hobson and 
Mary M. Frank ]M. Hobson was a general mer- 
chant at CoUegeville for twenty-six years. The 
history of the Hobson family may be found in 
connection with the sketch of Freeland G. Hobson 
in this book. 

RE\'. L. KRYDER E\"ANS, D. D.. pastor 
of Trinity Reformed church, Pottstown, and the 
■oldest continuous pastor in Pottstown, was born 
near Spring Mills, Gregg township, Centre 
■county, Pennsylvania, December 20, 1839. ^^ '^ 
the son of James G. and Rebecca (Kryder) Evans, 
natives of Centre county. They had three chil- 
dren : Rev. L. Kryder Evans ; J. Wells Evans, 
of Spring Mills; and Rev. John M. Evans, of 
Oak Ridge, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania. 

James G. Evans (father) was reared on his 
father's farm. He learned the trade of a plasterer, 
which he followed until the year 1852. when he 
bought his father's farm. He died in 1899, at 



the age of eighty-seven years. His wife still sur- 
vives. Both were members of the Reformed 
church. He was township assessor and school 
director for several years. 

Lott Evans (grandfather) was born August 
2, 1782, near Joanna Station in Berks county, 
Pennsylvania. He removed to Centre county 
when a young man. For a period he was a clerk 
in the store of John Irvin. Later he engaged in 
farming, finally purchasing and settling on a farm 
near Spring Mills, where he spent the remainder 
of his days. For a number of years he was a jus- 
tice of the peace. His wife was Jane Usher. He 
died at the age of sixty-eight years and seven 
months. He had twelve children. His father was 
John Evans, a Revolutionary soldier. The family 
are of Welsh descent. 

Alary Evans (sister of paternal great-grand- 
father) was married to James Watson. They had 
four children, one of whom, Ann, was married to 
John Irvin, Sr. These were the parents of Gen- 
eral James Irvin. From their descendants, 
through intermarriage, came some of the most 
distinguished citizens of Centre county, soldiers, 
jurists and statesmen: The Watsons, the Penn- 
ingtons, the Trvins, the Greggs and the Curtins ; 
names that not only adorn the history of their na- 
tive county, but shod a lustre on the history of our 
republic. 

Hon. Jacob Kryder (maternal grandfather) 
was born near Mifflinburg, Union county, Penn- 
sylvania. He married Margaret Elizabeth Neidig 
and spent his life in farming. He died at the age 
of seventy-eight years. The couple had thirteen 
children. He resided near Milheim. Centre 
county, on a farm, and reared a family of ten 
children. 

Jacob Kryder was a member of the second 
constitutional convention of Pennsylvania. He 
also represented Centre county in the legislature 
and served ten years as associate judge of courts 
at Bellefonte. He was a Democrat of the "Jack- 
son'' type, a most worthy, influential and highly 
esteemed citizen. 

M.\RG.\RET Eliz.\beth Neidig, wife of Jacob 
Kryder (matemal grandfather) was a daughter 
of Solomon Neidig and Catharine (Clay) Neidig. 



214 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Solomon came from the Palatinate, Germany. He 
first settled in Exeter township, Berks county, but 
later removed to the lower end of Penns \"alley, 
Centre county, near Woodward, where he pur- 
chased a large tract of land, which he cleared and 
settled there. 

John Kryder (maternal great-grandfather) 
was born in 1739, and died March 10, 181 3. His 
wife was Angelia Fox, who was a redemptioner 
and came from Germany. She was born in 1743 
and died January 18. 1821. John Kryder came 
from Germany and served in the French and In- 
dian ^\■ar. 

Rev. L. Kryder Evans, D. D., spent his boy- 
hood days on the farm at Spring Mills, attended 
the district schools and later the Aaronsburg 
Academy, under Professor J. I. Burrell. He 
taught in the public school in Brush Valley one 
winter and in Zion two winters. The latter vil- 
lage is about five miles east of Bellefonte. He 
taught school during the winter and was em- 
ployed on the farm during the summer. 

During the summer of i860 he attended Fair- 
view Seminary, Nittany Valley, and in the fall 
of that year entered the freshman class of Frank- 
lin and Marshall College, at Lancaster, graduat- • 
ing in 1864, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
He was the valedictorian of the class. In the 
summer of 1863 he taught one session at the 
Boalsburg Academy, Centre county. In the fall 
of 1864 he entered the Theological Seminary of 
the Reformed church then located at Mercers- 
burg, Pennsylvania, remaining there until the end 
of the session of 1865. He taught the Oley 
Academy at Friedensburg, Berks county, during 
the spring and summer of 1865. In September 
he went to Germany and spent two years at the 
imiversities there: six months in the University 
of Berlin, six months at the University at Bonn 
and one year at the University of Tuebingen. He 
returned home in September, 1867, was examined 
by West Susquehanna Classis at Boalsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, October 29, 1867, and licensed to preach. 
He accepted a call to the Reformed church of 
Williamsport, Pennsylvania, in December, 1867, 
and served a pastorate of four years. During his 
pastorate at ^^■illiamsport he also supplied at 



stated times three other congregations, one in 
Nippenose valley, one in White Deer valley, and 
the third in Black Hole valley, all in Lycoming 
county. In the spring of 1871 he received and 
accepted a call from Trinity Reformed church, 
Pottstown, and entered upon his pastorate there 
December 10, 1871, where he still continues in 
that position. The membership of his church is 
about nine hundred. His degree of Doctor of 
Divinity was given him by Franklin and IMar- 
shall College, in June, 1899. Dr. Evans served 
three years as school director, has contributed 
some articles for the press, and for a year was 
associated with the faculty of the Hill school at 
Pottstown, teaching a class in German. He also 
prepared a number of young persons for college. 

On October 28, 1875, he married ^iliss Ella 
V. Longaker, daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth 
(Boyer) Longaker, at Norristown. They have 
two children : Anna R. and Daniel Longaker 
Evans. 

Daniel L. Evans is a graduate of Franklin 
and ?ilarshall College, and at present a student in 
the law department of the L'niversity of Penn- 
sylvania. Miss Anna R. Evans is a graduate of 
Pottstown high school, ' and also completed a 
course at Wilson College, Chambersburg. She 
was organist at Trinity Reformed church, Potts- 
town, for a number of years. On the i8th day of 
June, 1903, she was married to Dr. Frederick \^^ 
A'anBuskirk, a young physician of Pottstown, 
where she now resides. 

DR. HOWARD Y. XEOIAN, of 310 Evans 
street, Pottstown, was born in Berks county, 
Pennsylvania, June 3, 1859. He is the son of 
Frederick W. and Charlotte R. (Yorgey) Nei- 
man, both natives of Berks county. They had 
seven children, four now living : Sarah Ann, wife 
of Esquire H. S. Sassaman, of Pottstown : Leah 
Y., widow of William K. Ludy, of Pottstown : Dr. 
Howard Y. Neiman ; and Cordelia, wife of James 
:\I. :Mohl, of Pottstown. 

Frederick W. Neiman (father) was a miller 
in ^lontgomery county and later in Berks county, 
following his occupation at Colebrookdale Sta- 
tion until his death, ^May 21, 1883. aged seventy 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



years. He was a member of the state militia, be- 
longing to Captain Bradford's R\i\e Company. 
He was school director and held various local 
offices in his township. His wife still survives at 
the age of eighty-three years. He and his wife 
were both members of the English Reformed 
church. 

Peter Neiman (grandfather) was born in 
Montgomery county. He was a farmer and a 
hatter and served in the war of 1812. His wife 
died at the age of forty-five years but he lived to 
be seventy. They had eleven children. 

Carl Neiman (great-grandfather) was the 
first of this branch of the family in America. He 
was born in Bavaria, Germany, coming to this 
country and settling in New Hanover township 
about 1756. He engaged in farming until the 
Revolutionary war. He served under Washing- 
ton for seven years and was present at the sur- 
render of Lord Cornwallis at New York. His 
wife was Sophia Neiman and they had seven 
children. 

Jacob R. Yorgey (maternal grandfather) was 
born on a farm in Berks county, where he lived 
all of his life and died at the age of eighty-seven 
years. His wife was Sarah Reifsnyder, who died 
when she was seventy-two years of age. They 
had seven children, three sons and four daughters. 

Dr. Howard Y. Neiman lived in Berks county 
during the early part of his life, attending the 
public schools, Mount Pleasant Seminary, at 
Boyertown, and Oley Academy, at Greensburg, 
before entering Kutztown State Normal School 
where he studied two years. Before and during 
the time he spent in that institution, he taught 
three terms of school. In 1876 he began the study 
of medicine at Jefferson Medical College in Phil- 
adelphia, where he was graduated after a three 
years' course, receiving the degree of yi. D. He 
began the practice of his profession in Norris- 
town, but eighteen months later he removed to 
the west end of Montgomery county, where he re- 
mained until 1886. Since that time he has ])rac- 
ticed very successfully in Pottstown. 

In addition to his large general practice he is 
on the stafif of physicians and surgeons of the 
Pottstown Hospital, and is highly regarded by 



all who know him. Dr. Neiman belongs to the 
Alontgomer)- Count}' Aledical Society and to the 
Pennsylvania State Medical Society. He is an 
earnest student of his profession and stands high 
among the physicians of the county. He is a 
member and medical examiner of the Ancient 
Order of Foresters, of the Improved Order of 
Heptasophs, also medical examiner of the New 
York Life Insurance Company and the Mutual 
Continental Life Insurance Company, and is phy- 
sician by appointment to the poor of the city. In 
the fall of 1894 he was appointed on the board of 
the officers of the 3.Iedico-Chirurgical College of 
Philadelphia. 

He belongs to the order of Forestry, Court 
Sylvan, No. 68 ; to ]\Iount \'ernon Conclave, No. 
153, Improved Order of Heptasophs; to the Pa- 
triotic Order Sons of America ; and the Junior 
Order of Hibernians, of which he has been sec- 
retary for several years. In politics he is a Re- 
publican and was school director while living in 
Upper Pottsgrove township. 

On September 7, 1878, he married Miss ]\Iary 
Ada Bickel, daughter of Samuel B. and Sophia 
(Emery) Bickel, of Norristown. They had one 
son, Frederick B., now living at Phoenixville. He 
married Maud, daughter of Harry Brownback. 
On May 18, 1899, Dr. Neiman married Aliss 
Lizzie R. Bhaer, of Leesport, daughter of Henry 
G. and Elizabeth (Lenhart) Bhaer. Dr. Neiman 
and his wife are members of the English Trinity 
Reformed church of Pottstown. 

WILLIAM P. BACH, postmaster of Potts- 
town, was born in German town, Philadelphia, 
September 20, 1845. He is the son of Francis S. 
and Mary P. (Price) Bach, the former a na- 
tive of Bucks county and the latter of Chester 
county, Pennsylvania. They had five children, 
two sons and three daughters, as follows : Eliza- 
beth P., wife of Aaron S. Bums, of Prick's Lock, 
Pennsylvania ; \Mlliam P., of Pottstown ; Irvin 
P., of Peoria, Illinois, manager of the Central tel- 
ephone ; Emma P., wife of Aaron Hartenstine, 
of Pottstown ; and Rebecca P., wife of Allen 
Davis, of Norristown. 

Francis S. Bach ( father) was a cari)entcr by 



2l6 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



trade, "spending most of his life in Germantown 
where he died in 1883, at the age of sixty-two 
years. His wife is now Hving in Norristown, at 
the age of eighty-four years. They were both 
members of the German Baptist Brethren church. 
In poHtics he was an ardent Republican. Dur- 
ing the Civil war he served twice in the emer- 
gency call. 

The paternal grandfather was also a carpen- 
ter and worked at his trade until his death at the 
age of eighty-six years. He was a native of 
Bucks county, but was of German descent. He 
had six children. 

John Price (maternal grandfather) was a na- 
tive of Chester county. He was a prominent min- 
ister of the Brethren church. His wife was 
Mary Rinehart and he was the father of twelve 
children. 

The great-grandfather was George Price. 
The founder of the Price family in America was 
John Price, who spelled his name Priez. He 
came to this country from Germany and located in 
Bucks county. 

William P. Bach was reared on a farm in 
Chester county, south of Pottstown. He attended 
the district schools and later what is now known 
as the Hill school, Pottstown, which at that time 
was a boarding school, conducted by Professor 
Matthew Meigs. In 1862 he enlisted in Company 
H, Sixty-eighth Pennsylvania A'olunteer Infan- 
try. He served as a private twenty-one months, 
when he was discharged on account of wounds. 
At the battle of Fredericksburg he was wounded 
in the right hand, and at the battle of Gettysburg 
in the left leg and right foot, these being the 
only two engagements in which he took part. 

After the war he carried on the harness busi- 
ness in Pottstown for thirty-seven years and still 
has an interest in that business, which is now 
managed by his son William P. 

On June 30, 1866, he married Miss Elizabeth 
IMay, daughter of Thomas ]\Iay. They had seven 
children, four sons and three daughters, as fol- 
lows : George, Percy, William, Harry, Evelyn, 
Blanche and one who died in infancy. George is 
a conductor on a street railway in Camden. He 
married Orpha Rhoads. Percy died aged seven 



years. William is in the harness business in 
Pottstown. He married ]\Iary Yorgey. They 
have two children, Leon and Edith. Harry is a 
salesman in the harness department of Straw- 
bridge & Clothier's store in Philadelphia. The 
other children are at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bach are members of the Baptist 
church of which he has been a trustee for twen- 
ty-four years. He was made postmaster under 
Harrison for one term and again appointed by 
McKinley, in September, 1898, and re-appointed 
by Roosevelt, February 19, 1903. He was chief 
burgess of Pottstown for three terms, and presi- 
dent of the school board two years, holding both 
offices at the same time. He has been actively 
identified with the affairs of a pubHc character, 
especially in politics, in Pottstown for the past 
twenty-five years. He is a member of the Royal 
Arcanum and the Loyal Association, also M. 
Edgar Richards Post, No. 595, G. A. R., and of 
Union Veteran Legion Encampment, No. 22. 

REA^ S. L. !\IESSINGER, S. T. D., the 
well-known pastor of the Reformed church at 
Trappe, is a native of Iowa. He was born at 
Cedar Rapids, in that state, February 21, 1858. 
He is the son of Elias and Euphemia (Lockard) 
Messinger, both of Northampton county, Penn- 
sylvania, at the time of their marriage, they re- 
moving afterwards to the west. 

Ehas Messinger (father) was the son of Isaac 
and Susan (Keiffer) ]\Iessinger. Isaac Messinger 
was a native of Northampton count}', Pennsyl- 
vania. His father, Jacob Messinger, came from 
Germany, and settled in Northampton county, 
Pennsylvania, where he owned a large tract of 
land. He donated the ground on which Salem 
Reformed church in Forks township was 
erected. Isaac was a hotel keeper, and, as was 
usually the case with the innkeeper of the olden 
times, he was widely known and respected. It 
is remembered of his good wife that she started 
a Sunday school in the barroom, instead of per- 
mitting it to be used as a lounging place on that 
day. In politics Mr. Messinger was a Democrat 
but he never sought or held office. His children 
were;\Maria (Mrs. P. Miller) ; Kate (]Mrs. Fritz 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



]\Iiller) ; Samuel, a prominent farmer and mem- 
ber of the Reformed Church; Aaron, EHas (fa- 
ther) ; Sallie (Mrs. J. Fenner) and another son. 
Elias Messinger was reared in Northampton 
county, where he taught neighboring schools for 
a time, and was also employed as a daguerreo- 
type artist. About 1857 he removed to Iowa, en- 
gaging in tlte merchandise business at Cedar 
Rapids, which he continued for about four years, 
and then sold out his business at a heavy loss and 
returned to his native county in 1861. Soon 
afterwards he enlisted in the Union army and did 
his duty at the battle of Gettysburg and else- 
where in defense of the national government. 
In that battle he was wounded by a minie ball 
from which he never fully recovered. He re- 
mained on duty for a time at the hospital. At 
the close of the war he was assigned to duty in 
the guard at Washington, where he remained 
about one year. He was honorably discharged, 
and later received a pension. Being a natural 
artist, during his stay at Washington he painted 
a picture of the White House which has been 
much admired. On his return to his home he 
engaged in painting, doing fine work on organs, 
chairs, etc., afterwards becoming a traveling 
salesman for Smith, Kline & Co., wholesale 
druggists of Philadelphia. This calling Mr. 
Messinger pursued during active life. He retired 
from business, and died at Allentown, September 
7, 1902, at the age of eighty years, and eleven 
months. He was a member of the Reformed 
church, and a Democrat in politics, although not 
particularly active. His wife survived him, and 
is still living at the age of nearly seventy-four 
years, in Allentown. She is a daughter of Eph- 
raim and Jane (Drake) Lockard, he of North- 
ampton county, and she of ]\Ionroe county, Penn- 
sylvania. He was a farmer. The Lockard fam- 
ily are of Scotch-Irish descent. The wife's fam- 
ily, the Drakes, are of Holland Dutch origin. 
Mr. Lockard was a Democrat in politics. He 
died at the age of eighty-four years, but his wife 
at the age "f fifty years. They were strict Pres- 
byterians. Their children : Euphemia (mother 
of Rev. Dr. S. L. Messinger) ; Jefferson, a shoe- 
maker bv trade, who took an active interest in 



politics, and filled the position of assessor as well 
as other township offices ; Silas, a farmer ; John, 
also a shoemaker, who died in young manhood ; 
Ellen (Mrs. H. Kuntzman) ; Morris, a farmer 
and quarryman. 

The children of Elias and Euphemia Mes- 
singer : Slias L. (subject of this sketch) ; William 
E., a teacher, and a painter for the past dozen 
years or more ; Alice, wife of James Henbest, of 
Providence, New Jersey; Susan A. (Mrs. Jacob 
Dolan, of New York city) ; John C, principal of 
the Bethlehem high school for six years, and later 
a prominent manufacturer and inventor, of Beth- 
lehem. 

Rev. Silas L. •:Messinger, S. T. D., was reared 
at the homestead of his mother's family in North- 
ampton county. His youth was spent as a hired 
farm-laborer, and attending school a few months 
in winter. Accustomed to farm pursuits, he la- 
bored earnestly also to acquire an education. He 
became able to teach in 1876 and secured a school, 
continuing in that employment for five winter 
terms, and still perfecting his education as far as 
he could with his somewhat limited opportunities. 
While preparing for college he received instruc- 
tion from a Presbyterian minister, and entered 
the freshman class at LTsinus College in the year 
1881, graduating in 1885 with the second honor 
of his class, thus realizing the benefits of his 
earlier efforts to acquire an education that would 
fit him for some suitable position in life. He took 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Mr. Messinger 
entered the School of Theology connected with 
LTsinus, and graduated therefrom in 1887. He 
was then licensed to preach by Philadelphia 
Classis, on May 21, 1887, at the same time re- 
ceiving a call to preach at Blaine, Perry county, 
Pennsylvania. At that place he had four con- 
gregations. He remained there five years and 
three months, and then went to Pleasantville 
Reformed church, in Bucks county, Pennsyl- 
vania. He was there four years and four months, 
and on January i, 1897, took charge of St. Luke's 
Reformed church, at Trappe, where he still con- 
tinues. There was a large number of applicants 
for the pastorate of the Trappe church, of whom 
Rev. Dr. Messinger was not one, but when the 



2l8 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



ballots were counted at the congregational meet- 
ing he had a large majority of the votes, and he 
accepted the call. He succeeded Rev. E. C. 
Hibshman. who had resigned to go to Strouds- 
burg. 

St. Luke's church has a long and interesting 
history. It was founded October i8, 1742, by 
Rev. John Philip Boehm. For twelve years the 
congregation worshipped in the historical Old 
Trappe (Lutheran) church. In 1755 the congre- 
gation built a log church on a site in its present 
cemetery. In this it worshipped until 1835, when 
a new church edifice was built on the site where 
the first stood. The present large building was 
erected in 1874. In 1887 extensive repairs and 
improvements were made, with the addition of 
two Sunday school rooms. From its beginning 
this church has had the services of seventeen 
pastors, as follows: Rev. John Philip Boehm, 
1742-1748; Rev. John Philip Leydich, 1748-1784: 
Rev. John Herman Wynckhams, 1784-1787: Rev. 
Frederick Wm. Vandersloot, Sr., 1787-1813; 
Rev. Fred. Wm. Vandersloot. Jr., 1813-1818; 
Rev. Lebrecht Frederick Herman, 1818 ; Rev.John 
C. Guldin. D. D., 1819-1840; Rev. Jacob Wm. 
Hangen, 1841-1843; Rev. Andrew S. Young, 
1843; Rsv. John R. Kooken, 1844- 1846; Rev. 
Alfred B. Shenkle, 1847-1867; Rev. H. H. W. 
Hibshman, D. D.. 1 867-1 869 ; Rev. J. H. A. Bom- 
berger, D. D., LL. D., 1 870-1 883 ; Rev. H. T. 
Spangler, D. D., 1884-1886, and 1889-1890; Rev. 
J. B. Shmuker, D. D., 1886-1889: Rev. Edwin 
C. Hibshman, 1891-1896. In November, 1896, 
Rev. S. L. Messinger, S. T. D., was given a call, 
and he began his present pastorate on January i, 
1897. The work of the church is in a prosperous 
condition. 

In 1904 the church was beautifully renovated 
in every part, and a new pipe organ was installed, 
at a cost of $1,800. At the solicitation of the 
pastor, Rev. Dr. Messinger, this sum was donated 
by Andrew Carnegie and Mrs. Henrietta Patter- 
son, of Philadelphia, each contributing $goo. 
The present parsonage was built in 1869. It has 
been repaired at different times, and in 1904 it 
was thoroughly renovated and slightly enlarged. 

Rev. Dr. Messinger is a most popular and 



satisfactory pastor. He is an eloquent speaker, 
and the church has greatly prospered under his 
ministrations. The Sunday school connected 
with the church is very successful. Rev. A. B. 
Stoner being the capable superintendent. There 
are also a Young People's Christian Endeavor 
Society, a Junior Endeavor Society, and a large 
\Voman's Missionary Society. Much work is 
done for the orphans and the poor. The rela- 
tions between the pastor and his people are ex- 
ceedingly pleasant and kindly. The congregation 
numbers over 300 members. 

In 1894 Rev. Mr. Messinger received the de- 
gree of Master of Arts (in course) from L'r- 
sinus College : and in 1902 and 1903 he completed 
a post-graduate course as a non-resident student 
of the American Cniversity at Harriman, Ten- 
nessee, receiving the degree S. T. D. The course 
consisted of seventeen branches, arranged under 
the heads of Philosophy, Theology, and English 
Literature. The average of his examination 
marks for the course was above ninety-six per 
cent. He was required to write a thesis of five 
thousand words, on an accepted theme. On a 
card which Mr. Messinger received from the 
president of the institution was the statement : 
"Your thesis is excellent, and I mark it 100." 
Genial and pleasant in his manners, an earnest 
worker, and a thorough believer in the doctrines 
he teaches, Rev. Dr. Messinger is a model of 
what a clergyman should be in every respect. 

When Rev. Dr. ]\Iessinger was located at 
Ursinus College in the capacity of a student, he 
often engaged in teaching, chiefly in the Ursinus 
Academy ; and since he has been pastor of the 
Trappe church, he taught for a time at Ursinus. 
He is an everyday student and educational 
worker, and is constantly pressing forward and 
upward in attainment of this kind. 

On October 27, 1887, Mr. Messinger mar- 
ried at Schwenkville, Montgomery county, Miss 
Laura K. Bechtel, who was born at Limerick 
Square, February 28, i860. She is the daughter 
of Dr. J. Y. and Margaret (Koons) Bechtel, 
both of Montgomery county, — he is a son of John 
and Mary Bechtel. John Bechtel was at one 
time a hotel keeper at Crooked Hill, and later a 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY, 



219 



farmer. His children : ]\Iary ( Mrs. Mock, and, 
second marriage. Mrs. Loomis) ; John, a hotel 
keeper : Jacob, Washington, Lavina, Jeremiah, 
an attorney-at-la\v : J. Y., father of Mrs. Mes- 
singer. 

Dr. J. Y. Bechtel is a well-known physician 
and druggist of Schwenkville. He is a man of 
high educational attainments. After graduating 
at a medical college he began practicing when he 
was twenty-one years of age, and is yet engaged 
in practice, at the age of seventy-four years. 
His first location was at Limerick Square, from 
which place he removed to Schwenkville about 
T862. In politics he is a Democrat. He and his 
family are members of the Reformed church. 
His wife is the daughter of James and Anna 
Koons. James was an elder in Trappe Reformed 
church for forty years. The children of James 
and Anna Koons: Elizabeth (Mrs. A. Thomas) ; 
John, 'a farmer ; Margaret, mother of Mrs. Mes- 
singer ; Abram, who was killed in the rebellion ; 
Ann (Mrs. Shupe") : J. Evans, a farmer. 

The children of Dr. and Mrs. Bechtel : Laura, 
wife of Rev. Dr. S. L. Messinger ; James A., a 
druggist (deceased); John, a druggist; M. 
Evelyn. 

The children of Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Messinger : 
Carl J., born October 8, 1889 (deceased) ; Eve- 
lyn H., born December 16, 1890; Nellie A., born 
November 5, 1892; ]\Iark G., born March 9, 
1896; Cynthia G., born January 3, 1898. 

CHRISTIAN BEENER, a retired business 
man, who resides at No. 557 Kohn street, was 
very successful in the accumulation of property. 
He is emphatically a self-made man. He was 
born in Wurtemberg, Germany. March 29, 1843. 
He is the son of Henry and Christian (Schiefer) 
Bcener, both natives of that section of Germany, 
from which he came. The couple had five chil- 
dren, all sons, of whom four are now living, as 
follows : Jacob, of Norristown ; Christopher, in 
the west ; Christian ; and William. 

Henry Beener (father) was a farmer and 
came to America, March 29, 1856, locating in the 
vicinity of Montgomery Square and coming into 
the possession of a hundred acres at that place. 



He died there in 1873, aged seventy years. His 
wife died two years later, aged seventy years. 
Both were members of the Lutheran church. He 
was forced into the regular army in Germany, 
according to the practice in that country, and 
served six years as a soldier. 

The paternal grandfather of Mr. Beener was a 
farmer and the proprietor of a large vineyard on 
the Rhine in Germany. He died there well ad- 
vanced in years, leaving a number of children. 

The maternal grandfather also died in Ger- 
many. He was a shoemaker by trade and had 
several sons and daughters. 

Christian Beener was thirteen years old when 
he came to America, and well remembers the trip, 
which was made in a sailing vessel, the voyage 
across the Atlantic requiring three weeks. He 
lived with his father at Montgomery Square until 
he was sixteen years old. He then came to Nor- 
ristown to learn the trade of butchering, serving 
five years, and starting for himself in 1863. He 
followed that occupation in Norristown until 
1897, and then sold out. Since then he has lived 
retired and now looks after his property inter- 
ests, which are very extensive in Norristown and 
its vicinity. 

In 1865 he married Miss i\Iary Hoffman, 
daughter of Jacob and Louisa Hoffman. Thev 
had nine children, seven sons and two daughters, 
as follows : Emma, Mary, David, Christopher, 
Christian, John, Harry. Frank and William. 
Emma married Martin Ruth, of Norristown. 
They have two children, Arthur and Mary. Mary 
married Martin Eskroff. They live in Philadel- 
phia. David died at the age of twelve years. 
Christian married Miss Reed. They live in Nor- 
ristown, he being a plumber by trade. John is a 
machinist in Atlantic City. He is also married. 
Harry is a machinist and resides with his parents 
as do also those not otherwise mentioned, except 
Christopher, who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. 
Beener are members of the Lutheran church. 

Politically he is a Democrat but he lias never 
taken a very active interest in politics. Airs. 
Becner's parents were also born in Wurtemberg, 
Germany. They had nine children. Her parents, 
after coming to .A.merica, lived first at New Or- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



leans a short time, then moved to Ohio, and from 
Ohio came to Pennsylvania by wagons in 1854, 
before the railroads were built. They settled in 
Gwynedd, ^lontgomery county, where they be- 
came owners of a large farm. Both are now de- 
ceased. 

ELL\S H. GILBERT, the genial proprietor 
of the Merchants' Hotel at Pottstown, is one of 
the best-known citizens of that borough. He was 
born in Berks county, February 10, 1861, being 
the son of Elias and Rebecca (Wartman) Gilbert, 
both natives of Montgomery county. The couple 
had four sons and four daughters, six of whom 
are now living, as follows : Sarah, wife of C. \V. 
B. Todd, and John W., both of Reading; Ellen, 
wife of N. K. Gery, of Tioga, Philadelphia ; Elias 
H., of Pottstown ; Emma, wife of W. M. Staulifer, 
of New Holland, Lancaster county ; and Howard, 
of Pottstown. 

Elias Gilbert (father) was a blacksmith in 
early life, and later became a hotel proprietor in 
Berks. Lehigh and Alontgomery counties. He 
was landlord of the Alerchants' Hotel, Potts- 
town, for ten years, and died there four years 
later, in 1899, aged seventy-four years. His wife 
died in March, 1901, aged sixty-eight years. Both 
were Lutherans in religious faith. 

John Gilbert (grandfather) was a native of 
]\Iontgomery county. He was also a blacksmith 
most of his life. His first wife was Miss Yerger 
and his second wife ■Miss Bickel. He had two 
sets of children, his son Elias being his only 
child by the first marriage. 

The origin of the Gilbert family has been 
traced. Their ancestor was one of the five broth- 
ers who came to this country from Germany and 
located in Falkner's Swamp in IMontgomery 
county, being among the early settlers. 

Elias H. Gilbert was reared in IMontgomery 
county, his boyhood days being spent partly in 
Berks and Lehigh counties, and since 1881 he has 
lived in Pottstown. His early schooling was 
obtained in Berks and Lehigh counties, and he 
later attended the Perkiomen Seminary at Penns- 
burg. He taught three terms in the district 
schools. He engaged in mercantile business four 



}-ears before entering the employ of his father, 
whose successor he became as proprietor of the 
^lerchants' Hotel, the largest in Pottstown, and 
on of the oldest established inns in that section 
of the county. 

For three years ]\Ir. Gilbert was deputy during 
the term of county treasurer Isaac Fegely, be- 
fore taking the hotel. During this time he re- 
tained his residence in Pottstown, making daily 
trips to Norristown. 

3ilr. Gilbert married Miss Ida Moll, daughter 
of Benjamin and Anna Maria (Keiser) IMoll. 
They have had four children : Charles S., Anna, 
John and Sarah, all living except Jolin, who died 
at the age of twenty months. Mr. Gilbert is a 
Lutheran. His wife is a member of the German 
Reformed church. 

Mr. Gilbert is a member of Stitchter Lodge, 
No. 254, Free and Accepted Masons ; of Wash- 
ington Camp, No. 92, Patriotic Order S6ns of 
America ; of the Protective Order of Elks, No. 
814, and of the Heptasophs. Politically he is a 
Democrat. 

In addition to his hotel interests in Pottstown, 
he owns a one half interest in the Merchants' 
Hotel at Reading, in partnership with his sister, 
iMrs. Todd. Mr. Gilbert is an ideal hotel-keeper, 
attentive to the comfort of his guests and watch- 
ful of every detail of his business. Few men 
in liis community are so well-known or so popular 
as he. 

ZIEBER HART, in his day one of the best- 
known contractors of Norristown, was also very 
prosperous, owning a large number of dwellings, 
in different sections of the borough. 

He belonged to an old Montgomery county 
family, of German origin, but long settled in the 
county seat and its vicinity. Mr. Hart was born 
on what is now known as the Scott Farm, within 
the present limits of Norristown, February 8. 
1825. He was the son of Jacob and Hannah 
(Zieber) Hart, both natives of the vicinity. The 
couple had twelve children, of whom but two are 
now living : George, of Norristown, and Jacob, of 
Plymouth, near Cold Point. 

Jacob Hart (father) was a farmer all his life, 



MONTGO^IERY COUNTY. 



residing in Plymouth township, near Norristown, 
where he owned a farm of two hundred acres, on 
which he died at the age of sixty-four years. His 
wife died some years previously, at the age of 
forty-seven years. Mr. Hart afterward married 
Mrs. Anderson, whose maiden name was Highley. 
There was one son by the second marriage — Lane 
S. Hart, long a resident of Harrisburg. 

John Hart (grandfather) was born in Ger- 
many, and came to Montgomery county in youth. 
He was a farmer by occupation, and lived to be 
eighty-five years of age. His wife was Catharine 
Wolf, and the couple had two sons, Jacob and 
John. 

John Zieber (maternal grandfather) was a 
farmer and miller, and lived in Norriton township. 
He lived to an advanced age, and left a large fam- 
ily of children. 

Zieber Hart was reared on his father's farm 
in Plymouth township, until he was eighteen years 
of age. He then went to Norristown where he 
resided the remainder of his life, a period of 
more than sixty years. Most of that time he 
lived on Swede street. He received his education 
at the country schools of the neighborhood, and 
• afterwards learned the trade of a bricklayer, at 
which he worked as a journeyman for ten years 
then becoming a contractor on his own account. 
He did the brickwork on a great number of 
houses, among them the first brick on the west 
side of Stony creek, which now divides the bor- 
ough of Norristown into two nearly equal por- 
tions. He built the house for Barney Beaver, on 
West Main street, and it is now owned and occu- 
pied by Walter S. Hutchison. 

In 1852 Mr. Hart married Miss ]\Iary 
Streeper, of Plymouth township, daughter of 
John and Ann (Deal) Streeper. The couple had 
three children, one of whom is now living, Harry, 
also a bricklayer, and residing in Norristown. He 
married Miss Annie Humphrey, who is now de- 
ceased. They had one daughter, Alary. Airs. 
Alary Hart, wife of Zieber Hart, died about 1857. 
She was a Lutheran in religious faith, as were the 
family generally. In 1862 Mr. Hart married Aliss 
Alary Hallman, of Whitpain township, daughter 
of Henry and Alary (Weber) Hallman. They 



had two daughters, Katie and Mazie. Airs. Mary 
Hart (second wife) died in 1881, aged fifty-three 
years. The parents of Air. Hart's second wife 
removed to Norristown and spent their declining 
years. He died thirty years or more years ago, 
aged seventy years, his wife surviving him some 
years, and dying at the age of eighty-seven. They 
had ten children, most of them now deceased. 

Politically Mr. Hart was a Democrat although 
he never sought or held office. 

Air. Hart's death was due to an accident. 
which occurred in Plymouth township, near Black 
Horse Hotel, where he was superintending the 
work on a blacksmith shop which he was erecting. 
While standing on the edge of the roof he lost 
his balance and fell to the ground, a distance of 
ten or twelve feet. It was found that he was 
seriously injured and an ambulance was sum- 
moned, which conveyed him to his home. He 
lingered a few days, and died on October 30, 
1903. 

Air. Hart was an energetic, enterprising 
builder, who achieved success in life entirely 
through his own exertions. He was genial and 
afifable, very kind-hearted, and as a very natural 
consequence highly esteemed wherever he was 
known. Few men have done more to benefit the 
community. 

JOHN T. WAGNER, of the firm of Wagner 
& Nyce, attorneys-at-law at Norristown. was born 
in Hamburg, Berks county, Pennsylvania, Janu- 
ary 26, 1866. He is the son of Jacob H. and 
Sarah A. (Wanner) Wagner, both natives of 
Berks county, Pennsylvania. They had twelve 
children, six sons and six daughters : Lucy ; Bar- 
bara, wife of Alilton N. Brandt, of Collegeville ; 
Isabella, wife of Joseph Cook, of Norristown ; 
Charles A., superintendent of the schools of Chel- 
tenham township ; John T. ; Elmira, wife of Sam- 
uel K. Bookheimer, of Centre Point: Alvin E., of 
West Point, principal of the L'pper Gwynedd high 
school : Katie ; Hannah ; J. Fred : and two others 
who died in infancy. The father was a mill- 
wright, miller and carpenter for many years, and 
later a farmer in Alontgomery county, locating at 
first at Grater's Ford, in 1879, and later at Iron 



MOXTGOMERY COUNTY. 



Bridge on the Perkiomen. He is a Lutlieran in 
religious faith. His wife is a member of the 
German Reformed church. 

Solomon Wagner (grandfather) was a native 
of Pennsylvania. He lived in Berks county and 
died there at an advanced age. His wife was 
Barbara (Hassler) Wagner. He also was a 
farmer and they had eight children. 

^lartin W'anner (maternal grandfather) was 
a native of Pennsylvania. He also resided in 
Berks county and died there at the age of nearly 
seventy years, death resulting from a fall from a 
bridge. His wife was Hannah (Christ) Wanner. 
He was a broommaker by occupation. The 
couple had si.x children. She was a widow many 
years and died on Christmas day, 1901, at the age 
of ninety-four. 

John T. Wagner was twelve years of age when 
he came with his parents to Montgomery county. 
He was reared on the farm and during his early 
youth attended the country schools of the neigh- 
borhood. Later he became a student at Ursinus 
College, Collegeville, graduating from that in- 
stitution in 1892, working his own way through 
school. While he was attending college, he taught 
school in the winter for four years, being thus pre- 
eminently a self-made scholar. Being animated by 
a desire to enter the legal profession, for which 
his qualities of mind well fitted him, he began the 
study of law in the autumn of 1892 at the Univer- 
sity of Michigan at Ann Arbor. After studying 
two years at the university he came to Xorris- 
town and studied in the office of Edward E. Long 
another year, and was admitted to the bar De- 
cember 5, 1895. He has practiced here ever since, 
for five years in partnership with Mr. Williams, a 
schoolmate of his, and for about a year with 
Edwin S. Xyce. 

On December 25, 1899, he married Miss Mary 
C. Bean, daughter of James U. and Sarah 
(Beyer) Bean. They have a little daughter, 
Grace Dorothy. Mrs. A\'agner belongs to the 
Lutheran church. 

■ Politicall\- Mr. ^^'agner is a Democrat of the 
old Berks county school but he is liberal in his 
views as is indicated from the fact that he was 
associated in the practice of law with Mr. Will- 



iams, who is prominently active in the councils of 
the Republican party. 

Mr. Wagner is also identified with several in- 
dustrial enterprises, including the Kitchen Spe- 
cialty Company at Reading, manufacturers of tin 
specialties, and the Household ^Manufacturing 
Company of Royersford. 

^Ir. Wagner's success in life is largely the 
result of his own untiring efforts. He remained 
at home with his father until twenty-one years of 
age, giving his parents the benefit of his assist- 
ance and good management. Starting out on his 
own account in the world to make his way through 
life in a creditable manner, he earned with his own 
hands the money to pay his way through college 
and to enable him to pass a successful examina- 
tion for admission to the bar. He enjoys a good 
degree of patronage and is generally recognized 
as one of the rising young members of the Mont- 
gomery county bar. He is not now and never has 
been an office-seeker, preferring rather to devote 
himself assiduously to the study and practice of 
law. He does not court notoriety, but rather 
shuns it, being modest and retiring, althougli of 
a very genial disposition. 

.MILLER D. E\'AXS, a leading member of 
the ]Montgomery county bar, is almost a lifelong 
resident of Pottstown. He was born in Down- 
ingtown, Chester county, Xovember 3, 1838, be- 
ing a son of AMIliam and Rachel (Boomer) 
Evans, he a native of Delaware county and she 
of Chester county, this state. The couple had 
eight children, three sons and five daughters, of 
whom three are now living, as follows : Miss 
^lary H. and IMiss Esther T. Evans, of Morgan- 
town, Pennsylvania ; and JMiller D. Evans, of 
Pottstown. William Evans died in Morgantown, 
Pennsylvania, in 1855. aged sixty-three years. 
His wife died about 1889, aged eighty-nine years. 
Both were members of the Society of Friends, and 
although the sect is opposed to warfare, he was a 
soldier in the war of 1812 and held a commission 
as lieutenant from Governor Findlay. 

\\'illiam Evans (grandfather) was a native of 
Delaware county, of Welsh descent, and by occu- 
pation a farmer. He was a Revolutionary sol- 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



dier. He tlied at the age of sixty-six years, leav- 
ing a family. 

The maternal grandfather tlied in Chester 
county. 

Miller D. Evans lived in Chester county until 
he was thirteen years of age, attending the public 
and private schools there, and following the occu- 
pation of a teacher for seven years. He began 
studying law in Reading with Henry ^^'. Smith, 
one of the leading members of the Berks county 
bar. In 1865 he was admited to the bar and began 
practicing at once at Reading. In 1866 he went 
to Montgomery county and was admitted to the 
bar there in that year. He has been practicing at 
Pottstown ever since. 

He was an emergency soldier in 1862 for a 
short time, and in 1863 was a member of Com- 
pany F, Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
which was the first company in the field at Get- 
tysburg. 

On May 22, 1S72, he married Miss Annie L. 
Rittenhouse, daughter of General James and Lu- 
cinda (Trexler) Rittenhouse, of Berks county. 
They have had two children : Lucy R., who died 
at the age of eight years ; and James R. Evans, 
who is a graduate of the Rensselaer Polytechnic 
College, of Troy, New York, in the scientific de- 
partment. ]Mrs. Evans is a member of the Luth- 
eran Church of the Transfiguration of Pottstown. 

i\Ir. Evans is a Republican although never 
taking a very active part in politics and holding 
no office except member of the Pottstown school 
board. He was its president for some years and 
solicitor of the borough of Pottstown for twenty 
years. He is attorney for the National Bank of 
Pottstown, the Pottstown Iron Company, the 
Warwick Iron Company, the Glasgow Iron Com- 
pany and a number of other corporations. 

LOUIS E. TAUBEL, one of the leading 
manufacturers of Norristown, and proprietor of 
the Star Knitting Mills at Penn and Arch streets, 
Norristown. is a native of New Jersey, having 
been born at Riverside, that state, July 9, 1856. 

His parents are Charles and Amelia (Clott) 
Taubel, natives of Hesse Darmstadt. Germany. 
Thev had eleven children, six sons and five 



daughters, of whom seven are now living, as fol- 
lows ; John : Rosa, wife of Charles Hamil ; Louis 
E. ; Henry ; William ; Katie, wife of Theodore 
Snyder ; Hannah, wife of Augustus Weber. All 
are residents of Riverside except Louis E. Taubel, 
of Norristown. 

The father was a shoemaker in early man- 
hood, at Riverside, which is still his home. For 
the past ten years he has lived retired. He and 
his wife are members of the Lutheran church. 
Mr. Taubel's ancestors for many generations on 
both sides were Germans. 

Louis E. Taubel grew to manhood at River- 
side, attending the public schools there, but his 
educational privileges were somewhat limited. He 
followed various pursuits and then started in the 
knitting manufacturing works as an engineer, 
and gradually acquired a knowledge of the busi- 
ness. In ]May, 1895, he came to Norristown and 
built the Star Knitting Mills in 1898, for the 
manufacture of all kinds of hosiery, and now 
gives employment to about three hundred and 
seventy-five persons. Mr. Taubel sells his goods 
in all parts of the world. The building which Mr. 
Taubel now occupies is one hundred and eighty- 
six feet long and forty-five feet in width, with 
three stories and basement, and separate dye 
houses, boiler and engine-room. 

On January 26, 1879, '^^ married Miss Rosa 
Gerner, daughter of Frederick and Mary Gerner. 
They had four children, three sons and one 
daughter: William, George and Edward, and a 
daughter, ]\Iary, who died aged six years and 
three months. 

-Mrs. Taubel died in April, 1900, aged forty- 
one \ears. She was a member of the Moravian 
church at Riverside but after coming to Norris- 
town united with the First Presbyterian church, 
of which ^Ir. Taubel and his son, William, are 
also members. He is also an Elk. Politically 
Mr. Taubel is a Republican but is not a politician 
nor has he ever sought or held office. He is 
recognized as one of Xorristown's most enter- 
prising and public-spirited citizens. 

The establishment of Mr. Taubel, like many 
others of its class in Norristown. is a boon to 
working i)eople. furnishing steady employment 



224 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



throughout the year to several hundred persons. 
In the summer of 1903 he estabhshed a branch 
manufactory at Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, em- 
ploying forty-five people. In his Norristown build- 
ing he manufactures all his packing boxes. Such 
men as he, who have the ability to plan and op- 
erate profitably enterprises of this character are 
public benefactoi-s, enabling hundreds of families 
to procure by their industry the means necessary 
to pay rent, store bills and other household ex- 
penses. The fact that Norristown has been fairly 
prosperous even during the years of financial de- 
pression, is due largely to the energy of such 
men as Mr. Taubel, who are willing to invest 
their capital and devote their time and attention 
to business that furnishes employment to those 
who desire it. The more of such manufactories, 
especially where they are judiciously managed, 
the better it is for the community in which they 
are located. 

ALBERT CRAWFORD is descended from 
one of the old colonial families of Montgomery 
county. He was born in Lower Providence 
township, January 27, 1826. He grew to man- 
hood in the same neighborhood in which he now 
lives, and was educated in the common schools 
of the vicinity. He is the son of Joseph and Re- 
becca (Francis) Crawford. 

Joseph Crawford (father) was the son of Jo- 
seph and Ann (Edwards) Crawford. Ann Ed- 
wards was the daughter of Revolutionary fame. 
The Edwards family were of Welsh descent. 
The Crawfords were from Ireland originally, al- 
though they have been long domiciled in this 
country. Joseph Crawford served in the militia 
during the Revolutionary war, being with Wash- 
ington when he crossed the Delaware to attack 
the Hessian troops at Trenton, and participating 
in other movements of that period. He was 
about eighteen years of age at the time of the 
action at Trenton. At the end of the war he set- 
tled in Roxboro. where he married. In 1795 he 
purchased the farm on which Albert Crawford 
now resides. He lived on this farm the greater 
part of the time until his death which occurred 
in 1844. He was a lifelong member of the Pres- 



byterian Church. He was a director in the Bank 
of Montgomery county, now the Montgomery 
National Bank. He was a practical and suc- 
cessful farmer. Politically he was a Whig, but 
never aspired to public office. Major Edwards, 
the father of Mrs. Ann Crawford, was a resident 
of Montgomery county. About 1775, he sold a 
part of his farm to his son John, and farmed the 
remainder of it, dying about 1795. The children 
of Joseph and Ann Crawford were: Joseph (fa- 
ther) ; Margaret, wife of Captain Abram 
Brower; and Alexander, who died unmarried. 

Joseph Crawford (father) was born and 
reared in Lower Providence township, and after 
reaching manhood he gave all his attention to 
farming the homestead. He died in early man- 
hood, in 1830, being- less than thirty years of age. 
He was a Whig in politics. His wife survived 
him many years, and educated the children. 
Later the widow married (second husband) 
Jacob Culp. She was the daughter of John 
Francis, a prominent farmer of the township, 
whose other children were: Ann (Mrs.- George 
Highley) ; Deborah (Mrs. H. Loucks) ; Eliza 
(Mrs. Thomas Shepard) ; and Felix, who died 
when a young man. All were Presbyterians, and 
were buried at the Lower Providence Church. 

The children of Joseph and Rebecca Craw- 
ford were: Ann (]\[rs. Joseph Rhoads) ; Albert, 
mentioned hereinafter; and Amanda (Mrs. Sam- 
uel F. Jarrett). The children by the second mar- 
riage (Mrs. Crawford to Jacob Culp) : Joseph, 
who died in 1903 ; and Emma (Mrs. Davis). 

Albert Crawford was born and reared on the 
homestead farm, which he inherited under his 
father's will, ^^'hen he grew to manhood, he 
sold it to his sister Ann, and took possession of 
the farm on which he now lives, which had been 
left him by his grandfather. He has been en- 
gaged in general farming, raising some stock, and 
attending Philadelphia markets. He also fattened 
cattle. In addition to the home farm of one 
hundred and foin-teen acres, Mr. Crawford owns 
a tract of forty acres on the Perkiomen, and sev- 
eral Norristown properties. He has been a suc- 
cessful farmer, and is a broad-minded, intelligent 
business man. He has been a Republican from 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



225 



the formation of the patty, bvit has never aspired 
to office. He was reared in the Presb}teriaa 
faith, but is not a member of any cluircii. He is 
a man of integrity and honor, widely known and 
highly respected, 

\[r. Crawford married, in 1855, Miss Ade- 
laide Corson, born in Lower Providence, near 
Areola Station, October 28, 1834. She is the 
daughter of Charles and Sarah (Egbert) Cor- 
son, of the well-knowai family of that name in 
Alontgomery count}'. Charles Corson's father 
and grandfather were both named Joseph Corson. 
The Corsons were originally French Huguenots, 
whose ancestor settled on Long Island, and later 
in Bucks county, Pennsylvania. The brothers 
and sisters of Charles Corson were: Alan W., 
teacher, surveyor, and in general one of the most 
useful men of his day ; Sarah, who married 
Thomas Read; Mary (Mrs. Charles Adamson) ; 
Joseph, Charles (father of Airs. Crawford) ; 
George, a well-known resident of Plymouth 
Meeting; Dr. Hiram, who lived to a great age, 
and died in 1898; and William, a Norristown 
physician ; all are long since deceased. The fam- 
ily has very remarkable traits, and few have 
equaled them in the history of Montgomery 
county in ability and usefulness. All, including 
Charles, were identified with the Society of 
Friends, and were active in the anti-slavery cause. 
Charles died in 1878. His wife was the daughter 
of Laurence and Sarah Egbert. The children of 
Laurence and Sarah Egbert were: Thomas, 
George, David, Mary (Mrs. A. Corson); Sarah 
and Susan (twins). Susan being Mrs. James 
Rogers, and Sarah, the wife of Charles Corson. 

The children of Charles and Sarah Corson 
were : Richard R., William, George, the well- 
known attorney, now deceased ; John J., a lead- 
ing real estate agent of Norristown : Laurence, 
who died at the age of forty years : Adelaide, 
wife of Mr. Crawford; Susan (Mrs. Felix F. 
Highley, deceased) ; and Mary F., who died at 
the age of forty-nine years. 

The children of Albert and Adelaide Craw- 
ford were: Joseph, a druggist, of Philadelphia, 
who married Mary Hayer, of Lancaster, in June, 
1898, and they had three children, Sarah, who 



died in infancy ; Anna H., and Joseph Crawford. 
J. Norman, who farms the homestead, who mar- 
ried Josephean Rittenhouse, and they have four 
children: Bessie F., Adelaide C, Albert N. and 
Harold R. Sarah C, wife of W. B. Henderson, 
who died in 1896, leaving two sons; and Mary, 
unmarried. At the death of their daughter, Mrs. 
Henderson, Mr. and Mrs. Crawford took charge 
of her two children and are rearing them. They 
are Joseph C, born October 17, 1892, and Alan 
T., born November 7, 1894. 

JOSEPH J. McGINLEY, long identified 
with the Times Publishing Company of Norris- 
town, is one of the most active young business 
men of that borough. He is largely self-edu- 
cated, having left school at an early age to make 
his way in the world. He is the son of Francis 
and Mary (Walters) McGinley and was born 
at Norristown, August 20, 1868. 

I'Vancis jMcGinley (father) is a native of Ire- 
land, where he lived until he was fourteen years 
of age. He then came to America with relatives 
and resided for a short time at Frankford, Phil- 
adelphia. He then went to Norristown and 
learned the trade of shoemaker. After complet- 
ing his apprenticeship in 1852, he worked as a 
journeyman for a number of years. He then be- 
gan business as a shoe dealer on his own ac- 
county, at 270 East Main street, where he still 
carries on the business, though now nearly sev- 
enty years of age. Politically he is a Democrat 
and in religious faith a Catholic. He is highly 
esteemed as a man of honesty and integrity, who 
attends faithfully to every duty as a man and a 
citizen. In 1854 he married Mary Walters, 
daughter of Daniel Walters of Norristown, and 
the couple have ten chidren, as follows: Daniel, 
long engaged in the printing business in New 
York city: John, Frank and James, all deceased; 
Clara, who married Charles Dale of Norristown ; 
Joseph J., the subject of this sketch; Annie and 
Bernard, who died youiig; Edward, a paper ruler 
by trade; and Mary, a stenographer. Mrs. Mc- 
Ginley is also a native of Ireland, and is slightly 
younger than her husband. 

Bernard ]\IcGinley (grandfather) was a na- 



226 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



tive and lifelong resident of County Donegal, 
Ireland. 

Joseph J. McGinley has been a lifelong resi- 
dent of Norristown, where he attended the pub- 
lic schools a short time, and afterward St. Pat- 
rick's parochial school until he was thirteen years 
of age. He worked in a woolen mill for three 
years, then resumed study for a year in the 
parochial school, and afterward learned the car- 
penter trade, completing his aprenticeship in 
the planing mill of Guest, Grater & Company. 
He attended night schools, taking a course in 
bookkeeping at Schissler's School of Business 
He also solicited newspaper and other advertis- 
ing and orders for periodicals for a time. In 1892 
he accepted a position as bookkeeper with the 
Times Publishing Company of Norristown, grad- 
ually working his way upward until he has be- 
come its secretary and general business manager. 
Industry, careful attention to business and per- 
,sistence in what he undertakes, are his dis- 
tinguishing qualities, and they have made his in- 
fluence felt in the community in which he lives. 

In politics Mr. McGinley is a Republican and 
he takes an active interest in the success of its 
candidates. He is clerk of the Bridgeport bor- 
ough council. He is a member of the Catholic 
church as are the other members of his family. 
He is interested in everything pertaining to the 
public welfare. 

Mr. McGinley married, in 1897, ^Nliss Bridget 
McHugo. daughter of Mrs. Margaret McHugo. 
The couple reside in Bridgeport. They have two 
children living: Alfred and Eleanor, and one de- 
ceased. 

DR. HARRY O. DENGLER, the well- 
known veterinarian, located on West Main street, 
adjacent to the Hotel Hartranft, Norristown, 
comes from a Bucks county family, having been 
born in Quakertown, August 23, 1863. He is a 
son of William H. and Catharine Y. (Sterner) 
Dengler, both natives of eastern Pennsylvania. 
They had two sons and two daughters, of whom 
two are now living: James A., of Quakertown, 
and Dr. Harry O. Dengler, the subject of this 
sketch. 



William H. Dengler (father) was a tinsmith 
by trade and resided at Quakertown, carr\^ing on 
business there. He died in April, 1898. aged 
sixty-six years. His wife survived until April. 
1 90 1. Mrs. Dengler (mother) belonged to the 
Lutheran church, and her husband to the Re- 
formed church. 

Dr. Dengler grew to manhood in Quakertown, 
and received an elementary education in its pub- 
lic schools. On reaching manhood he engaged 
in the occupation of a teamster, but soon 
abandoned it for something more in harmony 
with his tastes. In 1884, he entered upon studies 
preparatory to becoming a veterinary surgeon. 
Dr. C. J. Blank of Easton being his preceptor. In 
1888 he graduated from Ontario Veterinary Col- 
lege, and began practicing his profession in Nor- 
ristown, on May 3, 1888, and has practiced there 
continuously since. Dr. Dengler is recognized 
as one of the most successful practitioners in his 
line 

February 3, 1898, he married Miss Sarah Mc- 
Coy, daughter of Robert McCoy. They have one 
son, Harry O., Jr. Mrs. Dengler belongs to the 
Episcopal church. 

Dr. Dengler is a member of the following or- 
ganizations : Charity Lodge, No. 190, Free and 
.Accepted Masons ; Norristown Chapter, No. 190, 
Royal Arch Masons ; Hutchinson Commandery, 
No. 32, Knights Templars : and the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. 

Dr. Dengler is a Democrat in politics but has 
never been in any way an office-seeker. He has 
been in the fullest sense of the term the architect 
of his own fortune. Starting out in life for him- 
self when a boy of twelve years, he earned the 
money with which he made his way through 
school and since that time has not been dependent 
upon anyone for pecuniary aid, but by his own 
industry, frugality, and good management has 
achieved success, and secured a generally recog- 
nized standing among the business and profes- 
sional men of Norristown. He has an extensive 
and constantly increasing patronage, and his 
reputation extends beyond the borders of the 
county. Ontario Veterinary College, of which 
he is a graduate, is one of the largest and best 



MONTGOMERY COUNTY. 



227 



veterinary colleges in the world, and to the in- 
struction which he there received, are largely due 
the ability and thoroughness which Mr. Dengler 
has displayed in the practice of his profession. 
His neatly-arranged and well equipped office 
testifies to his qualities of order and care. 

CHARLES RAMEY, who lives retired at 
No. 1002 DeKalb street, Norristown, was born 
in Upper Merion township, March 28, 1826. He 
is the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Griffith) 
Ramey, both of whom were natives of Montgom- 
ery county. They had three sons and four daugh- 
ters, of whom Charles Ramey is the only one now 
living. 

Jacob Ramey (father) was a farmer and shoe- 
maker in early manhood, and later a farmer on 
what is called Walnut Grove farm near Consho- 
hocken. Soon after his marriage he was called 
,out with his militia company, Captain Holgate 
commanding, to Marcus Hook, in the war of 
1812. He came home with camp fever from 
which he recovered, but he died in 1828. After 
the war and until his death he was a farmer and 
a merchant, carrying on business in the "Bird-in- 
Hand" store, in the village now known as Gulf 
Alills, in partnership with his cousin, Daniel Alte- 
mus. He was thirty-seven years old at the time 
of his death. His wife survived until 185 1, and 
was in her sixty-seventh year when she died. 
Both attended the Society of Friends Meeting. 

Lawrence Ramey (grandfather) was a na- 
tive of Wales and came to Pennsylvania when a 
small boy. He was a farmer and also a shoe- 
maker. He died at the age of seventy-five years. 
His wife was Catharine Conrad. They had two 
sons and one daughter. Both were buried at 
Plymouth Meeting Friends burial-ground. 

Charles Ramey's grandfather Griffith was a 
native of ^lontgomery county. He died in mid- 
dle life leaving four daughters and one son. 

Charles Ramey has lived all his life in Mont- 
gomery county, and the greater part of it in Nor- 
ristown. He was reared on the farm and at- 
tended the district schools and the old Academy 
on DeKalb street, taught by Rev. Samuel Aaron, 
.and still later Treemount Seminar\-. under the 



care of Rev. Samuel Aaron, a Baptist preacher, 
and a gerat temperance and abolition lecturer. 
In March, 1850, he removed to Norristown, and 
engaged in the mercantile business on Main street, 
for thirty-three years. He retired in 1883. 

On August 25. 1853, Mr. Ramey married 
Miss Ellen Wood, daughter of Timothy Wood. 
They had five children, two daughters and three 
sons: Ida W., Sallie ;\1., William Howard, 
Charles Clifton and Horace. Ida died in 1876 
at the age of nearly twenty-two years. Sallie i\L 
married Frank L. Jones, of Norristown and they 
have two children, Charles Ramey and Helen 
Mary Jones. William Howard died June 9, 1885. 
in his twenty-eighth year. Charles Clifton mar- 
ried Irene Mitchell, and they had one child, Cath- 
arine, who died in infancy. Charles Clifton is 
employed by the Eastern Export Milling Com- 
pany in New York, which owns twenty-eight 
mills. He was born Thanksgiving Day, 1862. 
Horace, who was born August 11, 1864, and had 
been engaged in the bookselling business in Nor- 
ristown, died in 1882 when eighteen years of age. 

Mrs. Ramey died August 31, 1892, aged sixty- 
seven years. She belonged originally to the old 
school Presbyterians, but was married by a Bap- 
tist minister and later united with the Episcopal 
church. Mr. Ramey's faith is that of the Friends. 
He has attended Quaker meetings since he was 
four years old. He belongs to Curtis Lodge, No. 
239, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
also Norristown Encampment. He joined the 
Odd Fellows in May, 1850, and the Encamp- 
ment in 1861. He is the oldest member of Curtis 
Lodge and is a veteran of Philadelphia Lodge 
since 1 90 1. He also belongs to the Montgom.ery 
County Historical Society. 

Politically he was first a Whig and has been a 
Repulilican ever since the organization of the 
party in 1856, and an active worker. He served 
as school director from 185 1 to 1S54. He has at 
various times owned considerable property in 
Norristown and Bridgeport. 

His wife came from Maiden in Ulster countv, 
New York, where she lived until sixteen years 
old, coming tJien to Pennsylvania, ."^he had four 
brothers and one s