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Full text of "The biographical annals of Ohio, A handbook of the government and institutions of the state of Ohio"




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REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
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GENEALOGY 

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THE 

BIOGRAPHICAL ANN A LS 
QFQHIO 



1904-1905. 



A HANDBOOK OF THE 

GOVERNMENT AND INSTITUTIONS OF THE 

STATE OF OHIO 



COMPILED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE ACT OF APRIL 
' 19, 1904. 



BY 



F. E. SCOBEY^ CLERK OF THE SENATE 

E. W. DOTY, CLERK OF THE HOUSE 

76TH GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 



SprluKfU'Ul, Ohio: 

The Sprin^tlPld Puhlisainj,' Comy.'iny, 

State Printers. 

1905. 



Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 
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JOHN E. MILLER. 



John E. Miller, Democrat, served his first term as Representative from 
Pickaway County, was born on a farm near Jackson, Jackson County, Ohio. He 
has resided in and near Darbyville, Pickaway County, Ohio, since he was about 
one year old. Mr. Miller received a common scliool education in Darbyville and 
was a teacher in the common schools of our county for several years. He was 
married to Mary T. Miller in 1884. After marriage he entered Starling Medical 
College, of Columbus, Ohio, and graduated and from that time until his death he 
was a successful physician at Darbyville. enjoying a large practice, but death 
called him May 8, 1904, while a member of the General Assembly, 

He was buried in Muhlenberg Township Cemetery, near Darbyville, under the 
directions of the Masonic Lodge, of Williamsport. Ohio, and the I. O. O. F. orders 
of Derby and Mt. Sterling, Ohio. The General Assembly was represented by Dr. 
Charles D. Watkins, of Licking County, Dr. J. H. Criswell, of Marion Counry 
Hon. R. R. Reynolds and Hon. Hiram Bronson. of Franklin County, members 
of the House. Hon. E. W. Doty, Clerk of the House and Hon. Andrew Jackson. 
Sergeant-at-Arms of the House, who were the honorary pallbearers on the sad 
occasion. 

(Mrs. Mary T. Miller, wife of Hon. John E. Miller.) 



(459) 




A. E. MOON. 



A. E. Moon, Republican, Representative from Clinton County, was born in 
Jefferson Township, of that county, December 26, 1859. As soon as old enough. 
commenced work on his father's farm, farming in summer and attending the 
district school in winter until eighteen years of age, when he took co the prof^^s- 
sion of teaching, which profession he followed for nine years and in which he 
was very successful, rising in the profession rapidly, being principal of high 
schools the last four years of his vocation, until an affliction of the eyes com- 
pelled him to quit teaching. Was afterward made secretary and bookkeeper 
and then manager of the Midland Creamery Company, which position he held 
ten years and managed the business very successfully; was also secretary of 
the Midland City Building and Loan Association for six years; was Deputy 
Auditor of Clinton County for more than two years and until nominated to tho 
Legislature. His popularity in Clinton County may be shown by the fact that 
in the primary over two competitors, he had a plurality in every voting precinct 
in the county except one, and a total majority of nearly six hundred over both 
competitors, and at the election in November, receiving a majority in every pre- 
cinct except one, carrying two Democratic townships by a small majority, hav- 
ing a total majority of nearly eighteen hundred. 

Mr. Moon was married to Jeanette James. October 29, 1882. They have 
three children, one son and two daughters, whom he is educating in the Wil- 
mington High Schools and Wilmington College. Mr. Moon is a member of the 
standing committees on Fees and Salaries, Institution for Feeble Minded Youth 
and Insurance. 



(460) 










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CHANDLER JXJLIUS MOULTON. 



Chandler Julius Moulton was born at East Randolph, Vermont. December 
26, 1839. He came to Lucasville. Ohio, with his parents in 1848. He received 
his early education in the public schools, and attended the Ohio Wesleyan 
University, at Delaware, in 1858-1S59. In 18G7 Mr. Moulton entered the mer- 
cantile business at Lucasville, which he has carried on ever since, in connection 
with lumber dealing and farming. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
a Mason and a Knight Templar. 

Mr. Moulton has always been a Republican. He was chairman of the Re- 
publican County Committee twice, the last time being in 189G. Ho has been a 
member of the Republican County Central Committee for six or eight years at 
different times. Mr. Moulton was elected Representative of Scioto County, in 
the Legislature in 1900, and again in 1903. 



(461) 



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CHARLES MONTGOMERY MYERS. 



Charles Montgomery Myers, Republican, one of the Representatives from 
Hamilton County, also a member of the Seventy-fifth General Assembly, was 
bom in Wooster, Wayne County, Ohio, received his education in the public 
schools of Ashland, Ashland County, Ohio, and at the ase of fifteen years, he 
went to Cincinnati. Is President and General Manager of the Corrugated Elbow 
Co., manufacturers of sheet metal' goods. Mr. Myers is a widower. and has one 
child, a little girl four years old. He is a member of the Standing Committees 
on Fees and Salaries. Prisons and Prison Reforms, and is chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Manufactures and Commerce. 



(462) 



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ORRIN H. NIHART. 



Orrin H. Nihart, the Republican member from Williams County, serving 
his second term, was born in that county, October 17, 1871. His early life was 
spent on the farm. Began teaching at the age of 18, which profession he fol- 
lowed for several years. Graduated from the Northern Indiana Normal in 1895. 
receiving the degree of A. B. The fall of the same year entered medical college. 
graduating from Starling Medical, Columbus. Ohio, in 1898. He was elected 
coroner of Yilliams County in the fall of 1898 by a good majority, but refused 
the second nomination. In the fall of 1901 he received the nomination for 
Representative by the unanimous vote of the convention and was elected by a 
good majority. In 1903, was renominated and re-elected by a very substantial 
majority. 

He is a member of the T. P. A. M., I. O. O. F. and K. of P. In 1898 he was 
married to Miss Lulu I. Ewan, daughter of A. H. Ewan, of Bryan. Ohio. 



(463) 



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OWEN J. O'DONNELL. 



Owen J. O'Donnell, Democrat, is serving his second term as Representative 
from Putnam County; was born in Madison, Indiana, in July, 1866. He received 
a common school education in Madison, and was entered as an apprentice to a 
tailor in that city. Completing his trade he moved to Cincinnati, and in ISSS 
located in Leipsic. Putnam County. In 1892 he was married to Miss Kate Kihm. 
and has five children, two boys and three girls. Having been reared a Democrat. 
Mr. O'Donnell is an earnest advocate of the principles of that party. He is an 
active friend to the cause of organized labor. Of pleasing address and good 
judgment, Mr. O'Donnell gained many friends during his first term in the 
General Assembly and his influence was more than once exerted on the right 
side of important measures before the House. 

Mr. O'Donnell is a member of Standing Committees on Ditches. Drains and 
Water Courses; Hospitals for Epileptics and Public Buildings and Lands. 



(464) 



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G. F. OSLER. 



G. F. Osier is a native of Ohio. He was born and educated in Muskingum 
County. He has for the past ten years been engaged in the practice of law in 
Hamilton County, from which he was elected to the Seventy-sixth General 
Assembly as a Republican. 



(465) 



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LOUIS H. PAINE. 



Louis H. Paine, Republican from Lucas, is the son of Rev. Louis Paine, D. 
D., who was long active in the Methodist ministry of eastern Ohio. 

Born October 1, 1875, at Limaville, Stark County, Ohio, he was educated in 
the public schools of Alliance, Warren and Cleveland; graduated from Boston 
University in 1898 with degrees of A. B. and LL. B.; after which he was ad- 
mitted to the Ohio Bar, immediately returned to Toledo, began the practice of 
law which he has continuously followed for the past six years. Mr. Paine is a 
close student of political science and economics, and in the opinion of the 
writer, holds safe and sound opinions along these lines. 

His work during the session has been directed toward legal subjects mostly. 
particularly municipal law, he being chairman of the Committee on Cities. He 
is also a member of the Committee on Fees and Salaries and Public Building 
and Lands. 



(466) 




J. B. PUMPHREY. 



J. B. Pumphrey, Republican Representative from Hardin County, was born 
in Fayette County, Ohio, in 1838. Served in the One Hundred and Twenty-third 
O. V. I. and mustered out in 1865 as First Lieutenant. Was for six years County 
Commissioner of Hardin County. Represented the Thirteenth Senatorial Dis- 
trict in the 69th General Assembly. Farmer and stock dealer. 



(467) 



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L. Q. RAWSON. 



L, Q. Rawson, member of the House of Rep- esentatives, from Cuyahoga 
County, was born at Fremont, Ohio, October 28, 1871. He attended the Com- 
mon and High Schools of his native city and was graduated from the Law 
School of the Cincinnati College and admitted to the bar in 1892. He went to 
Cleveland the same year and entered the law office of Hon. L. A. Russell with 
whom he was connected as an assistant until January 1, 1900. A year later ho 
formed a partnership for the practice of law with Frank F. Gentsch. Esq., with 
whom he is now associated under the firm name of Rawson & Gentsch. with 
offices in the American Trust Building, Cleveland. 

He was elected on the Republican ticket to the House of Representatives of 
the 76th General Assembly, from Cuyahoga County by nearly six thousand ma- 
jority, and served as a member of the Committees on Finance, Public Buildings 
and Lands, and as Chairman of the Committee on Insurance. 

Mr. Rawson was married to Beatrice F. Floyd, of Cleveland, December 26, 
1895, and has one child — a daughter. 



(468) 




CHRISTOPHER M. RAY. 



Christopher M. Ray, Republican Representative from Erie County, is of 
Scotch-Irish descent, bom March 6, 1SG2, near Stratford, Ontario, on a farm, 
moved with his parents to Erie County, Ohio, at the close of the Civil War, 
where he has since resided; educated in the common schools of the county, 
attended school at Milan Seminary and the Ohio Normal University at Ada, Ohio. 
Taught in the country schools of Erie County for ten winters, working on the 
farm during summer. Graduated from the Law Department of the Ohio Normal 
University, at Ada, Ohio, November, 1892, admitted to the practice of law, De- 
cember 8, 1892, at Columbus, Ohio; opened an office for the practice of his pro- 
fession at Huron, Erie County. Ohio, where he has since resided. Served his 
native township as assessor for five consecutive terms. Served one term as 
Township Clerk of his Township. Was twice elected Mayor of the village of 
Huron. Elected to the 7Gth General Assembly. November 4, 1903. by the largest 
majority given a' candidate for that office in ten years. Married September 23, 
1896, to Lutie J. Squier. Is a member of the following standing committees of 
the House: Cities, Banks and Banking, Public Printing and Military Affairs. 




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JOHN REICH. 



John Reich was born in Germany forty-five years ago and came to this 
country in 1885. He received his education in the High Scliool and Seminary in 
Germany, engaging in the newspaper business after coming to Cleveland. Ohio. 
He is at present editor and publisher of the "Clevelander Herold." a German 
paper published in Cleveland. He was elected by the Republicans of Cuyaho^'a 
County in the fall of 1903 as a member of the House of Representatives. 



(470) 







RICHARD R. REYNOLDS. 



Richard R. Reynolds, Republican, one of the four Representatives from 
Franklin County, was born March 2G. 1852. in the city of Columbus. He learned 
the carpenter trade in 1868 and has worked at it ever since. He joined the 
Carpenters' Union, No. Gl, in 1884, and is still a member of that organization. 
Served one term on the Board of Equalization. Was elected to the TGth General 
Assembly by a majority of 2,777. 



(471). 



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FRANKLIN P. RIEGLE. 



Franklin P. Riegle, Republican Representative from Wood. County, was 
born in Van Buren County, Michigan, May 14, 1870. When he was a few months 
old his parents moved to Delaware Township, Hancock County, Ohio, where 
they resided until he was fourteen years of age, when the family moved to 
Jackson Township. Wood County, where he has since resided. His early educa- 
tion was received in the district schools. He attended Findlay College, the Ohio 
Normal University at Ada, and later studied law at Ohio State University. He 
commenced to teach at the age of seventeen, which profession he followed until 
elected State Representative in 1899. Since then he has followed the practice 
of law. He was a member of the House in the 74th General Assembly. 



(472) 



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WILLIAM Z. ROLL. 



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William Z. Roll, Republican, Representative from Warren County, who is 
serving his second term, was born at Burlerville, Warren County, Ohio, October 
14, 18G5. His parents being poor he worked on the farm in summer and at- 
tended school in the winter until 188G, when he received a certificate and taught 
school six years. He then took a year's course in the National Normal Univer- 
sity, at Lebanon, Ohio, after which he became principal of the Utica schools. 
holding this position seven years. He then became general manager of the 
Valley Telephone Company, and took up the study of law and was admitted to 
the practice December, 1903. He was elected to the 75th General Assembly 
by a majority of 1,279 and to the 7Gth- by a majority of 1,818. 

He was married to Miss Frances G. Bird, of Burlerville, Ohio, December 
22, 1889. 

He Is a member of the I. O. O. F. having represented Warren County for 
four years in the Grand Lodge of Ohio. He is also a member of the B. P. O. 
Elks and I. O. R. M. 

He is a member of the standing committees on Common Schools, Public 
Printing, (Chairman) Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home. 



(473) 




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D. P. ROWLAND, of Hamilton County. 



Dem,as Perlee Rowland was born in Dearborn County, Indiana, March 27, 
1851, and came to Cincinnati in 1879 to work at his trade as a journeyman 
carpenter. 

His record as a Republican is well known. He j-yined the Carpenters' Union 
No. 2, in Cincinnati, in 1882 and for nearly twenty years has been an active. 
conservative member of it, serving in nearly every office within its gift, from 
doorkeeper to president. He attended the National Convention of his trade, held 
in Detroit, Michigan, in 1888, and was elected General President of the National 
Organization, and served in that capacity for two years. In 1S90 "D. P." (as 
he is familiarly called) was sent as a delegate to the Building Trades Council 
of his city and served in that capacity for several years. In 1S91 he was elected 
President of that body and served two consecutive terms. During the year ot 
1892 he represented his local union in their national convention and was elected 
a member of the General Executive Board, serving for two years. Was a mem- 
ber of the House in the 75th General Assembly. 

He also represented their national organization in the American Federa- 
tion of Labor Convention in Denver and New York City. In 1892 he was ap- 
pointed to the position of Superintendent of the Free Employment Office in 
Cincinnati by our deceased and lamented Governor, William McKinley. ami 
served for two terms in that department. Mr. Rowland is well known in labor 
circles as an old stand-by and conservative adviser. 



(474) 




F. C. RUSSELL. 



F. C. Russell, Republican, Representative from Meigs County, was born 
at Dorchester, Grafton, County, New Hampshire, June 22, 1833. His. parents 
moved to Ohio in 1836, since which time Mr. Russell has lived in Athens and 
Meigs counties. He enlisted in Company C. Thirtieth O. V. I., July 18G1. serv- 
ing in that regiment and the cavalry service until 18G5, leaving the army with 
the rank of major. Afterwards ho studied law and was admitted to the bar 
at Chllliocthe, Ohio, in 1871. Has practiced law from that time until the 
present, excepting for a time when he was Common Pleas Judge. 

Was a member of the 74th General Assembly and re-elected to the 7Gth 
General Assembly. Mr. Russell is a member of the standing committees on 
Hospitals for Epileptics, Library, Claims (Chairman.) 



(475) 



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BENJAMIN J. SAWYER. 



Benjamin J. Sawyer, Republican, Representative from Cuyahoga County, 
was born at Bedford, Ohio, January 29, 18G9.* He graduated from Bedford High 
School in 1S8G and from Hiram College in 1900 and was admitted to the bar 
at Cleveland, Ohio, in 189G. 

He was married to Miss Laura B. Sencabaugh at Cleveland. Ohio, in 1900. 
Five children have been born to them, three girls and two boys. 

He was elected a member of the TGth General Assembly in the fall of 1003. 

He Is a member of the Judiciary Committee, Fish and Game Comniiitee 
and the Soldiers' and Sailors' Home Committee. 



(476) 




CARL F. SHULER. 



Carl F. Shuler, Republican, Representative from Montgomery County, was 
born in Miamisburg, Ohio, March 31st. 1875. Graduated from Adelbert College 
of Western Reserve University in 189G. Studied law 189G-1899. Admitted to 
practice of law October, 1899. Enlisted in First O. V. C, May 4, 1898, and 
mustered out of service October, 1898. 



(477) 




WILLIAM WALKER SMITH Jr. 



William Walker Smith, Jr., Representative from Hamilton County, repre- 
sents the professional and business element in the citizenship of Cincinnati. He 
is an attorney and counselor-at-law with offices in the United Bank building. 

Mr. Smith, who is the son of Wm. W. Smith, was born in 1870, graduated 
from the Franklin school in 1887, and later completed his studies in the east. 
His legal education was obtained at the Cincinnati Law School, which gained 
a national reputation under the deanery of Gen. Jacob D. Cox. 

He has been greatly interested in the advancement and improvement of 
Walnut Hills, where he has resided all his life, and is a charter member of the 
Walnut Hills Business Club, a Mason, being a member of the Walnut Hills 
lodge, and a member of the Cincinnati Lodge No. 5, B. P. O. Elks. He is al.'^o 
a member of the Cincinnati Bar Association as well as the State Bar Associatiou. 

Mr. Smith is now serving his second term in the Ohio legislature, and was 
re-elected by a largely increased majority. He was assigned to the Judiciary 
committee, of which he is secretary; County Affairs committee, of which he is 
also secretary, and chairman of the Universities and Colleges committee. As 
a stalwart Republican, he has been faithful to the stewardship entrusted to him 
by his constituents and alert in the interest of the Republican party and of the 
state. 



(478) 




HARVEY E. SMITH. 



Washington county, the oldest county in the state, is represented by Harvey 
E. Smith, of Marietta, who has always been an earnest Republican, because he 
believes that the greatness of our country in the closing years of the nineteenth 
century is due more to the principles of government as espoused by the Repub- 
lican party than to anything else. 

He was born on a farm near Chester Hill, Morgan county, Ohio, May 27, 1S63, 
of Quaker parents, Humphrey Smith and Susanna (Lewis) Smith, all of his 
ancestors being Quakers, who emigrated to Ohio early in the nineteenth cen- 
tury and settled in Harrison and Belmont counties. 

He attended village school, normal school at McConnellsville, and Ohio 
State University, at Columbus. He began teaching school at the age of seven- 
teen, and when not attending school taught continuously until 1898. the last 
work being done in the ^Marietta High school. 

He was married to Eva L. Barnes, of Chester Hill, Ohio. To this union 
one son, Edward Orton Smith, was born, but on the 29th of September, ISSG, 
he was called upon to bear the sorrow of the death of his wife. In 18S9 he 
married Ella Curry, of Chester Hill, and immediately moved to Marietta, where 
they now reside. 

Always a student of geology, he became extremely interested in the devel- 
Ington County in the foremost rank in the production of white sand oil. He has 
able to locate some of the richest pools in the state, resulting in placing Wash- 
ington county in the foremost rank in the production of white sand oil. He has 
since 1898 devoted his entire time to the oil business, and on the 15th of Septem- 
ber was nominated by acclamation, and in the following election was elected 
with a majority of 1,027. 

He la a member of the standing committees on Mines and Mining, Public 
Works, and Soldiers' and Sailors' Homes. 

(470) 



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C. F. SMITH. 



C. F. Smith, Democratic member from Wyandot County, was born in Kanan 
Township, Morrow County, Ohio, December 18, 1862. Was reared on a farm in 
said county; attended the country school until eighteen years of age. Spent 
the next two years in college, returning to the farm, pursuing this occupation 
until the spring of 1889, when he engaged with the Central Ohio Buggy Com- 
pany as traveling saleman, remaining with them until the spring of 1891, retir- 
ing to go in the insurance and loan business at his present home at Upper San- 
dusky, Ohio. 



(480) 



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J. S, STUCKEY. OF Van Weet County. ' 



J. S. Stuckey, Republican member of the 76th Geiueral Assembly from Van 
Wert County, was born in Auglaize County, Ohio, October 21, 1841, from which 
place his parents soon thereafter removed to Van Wert county, which has ever 
since been the home of Mr. Stuckey. His opportunities for attending school 
were very limited, the only chance being that of a f'.w weeks at the country 
school during mid-winter, when no work could be done on the farm. 

Notwithstanding these disadvantages, Mr. Stuckey has, by diligent and 
earnest effort, acquired that which many so-called educated men lack, viz., a 
practical general business education. 

Mr. Stuckey enlisted July 26, 1861, as a private in Company I, 27th O. V. I., 
and after four years constant service in this regiment was mustered out by 
reason of the expiration of the war First Lieutenant of Compauy F. 

Mr. Stuckey was married to Miss Mary F. Gilliland, of Van Wert County, 
September 14, 1865. To them have been born eleven children, eight of whom 
are yet living, viz., five sons and three daughters. Immediately after marriage 
be located on his farm near Van Wert, where he has ever since resided. Mr. 
Stuckey for many years has been closely identified with the agricultural affairs 
of his state and county, serving in the most important duties and positions 
connected with both state and county boards of agriculture. 

For many years he has served as president of the Van Wert Mutual Insur- 
ance Company, besides having filled many local places of trust and honor con- 
ferred upon him by the people of his county. In the Republican county con- 
vention of 1903 he was nominated for state representative to the 76th General 
Assembly and elected November, 1903, over his opponent, J. M. Dull, by 252 
majority, a good majority for Van Wert County. 

Mr. Stuckey is a member of the following standing committees: Fees and 
Salaries, Agriculture and Turnpikes. 



(481) 



81— B. A- 



D. D. SPANGLER. 



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(482) 



D. D. Spangler, the Representative of Henry County, was born in Marion 
Township, Henry County, Ohio, May 19, 1868. Till he was eighteen he worked 
exclusively on the farm, attending a few months each winter the district school. 
So determined was he to secure an education that it is said of him in his younger 
years, when sent out in the fields by himself, he would frequently be found 
with a book or a newspaper; but the gratification of his desires for a number of 
years seemed very far distant. However, in the summer of 188G prospects be- 
came brighter. An uncle from St. Paul, Kansas, who is a professor, and spent 
his vacation in Ohio, became interested in his nephew. In August, 1886, the sub- 
ject of this sketch accompanied his uncle to St. Paul, Kansas, where for two years 
he applied himself closely and diligently to his books. He always was a model 
student, leading in his classes. In the monthly tests, which were always re- 
warded by prizes, he frequently carried all of them. 

The cou^^e of s^-vdief? nres?rib3u by the JTistitntion ■ro^hi*^^ wp« 'conducted 
by the Jesuits, embraced iouf yedto, buL vjn\.uxii:3L<a,jLicfca au Lui^c *uov.a.uau such 
that with only one year yet to complete the course, he had to abandon his beloved 
professors and fellow students and return to Ohio. 

Upon his return to Ohio he took the county examination, passed it suc- 
cessfully, and for four terms taught the school where he had been a pupil. Not 
being satisfied with his education, at the age of twenty-two he resumed his 
studies again at Pio Nono college, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he graduated in 
June, 1893, as valedictorian of his class. In the fall of 1893 he accepted a 
position as principal in the schools at Decatur, Indiana, where he labored suc- 
cessfully for years. 

Returning to Ohio, he purchased a farm on which he has since resided, 
dividing his time between farming and teaching in the South Ridge special 
school district as principal and superintendent for a number of years. 

Being politically inclined, he entered the field for Representative of Henry 
County in 1899, against the Hon. T. M. Gehrett and James Anderson, and came 
out of the convention as second man. As a man who strictly attends to his 
own business he was practically unknown in the greater part of the county. 
Making an honorable and clean campaign, and by his telling and timely talks 
before the convention, he made such an impression upon the people that at this 
time he became their choice for Representative by acclamation. Neither did 
his constituents desert him at the election. Where he was best known people, 
regardless of party, supported him at the election. 

He is a firm and ardent believQr and supporter in the principles of Democ- 
racy and never lets an opportunity pass in public or private to let himself be 
heard and felt, and is a staunch friend of labor. The Democratic executive 
committee of Henry County invited him to take the stump, which he cheerfully 
did, and by the close of the campaign he was kno w'n as the silver-tongued orator 
of Henry County. 

As a member of the 76th General Assembly he serves on the important com- 
mittees of Common Schools, Boys' Industrial School, and Elections. 



(483) 




JAMES M. SPRAGUE. 



(484) 



James M. Sprague, one of the self-made, prominent business citizens of Cin- 
cinnati, general agent for .the Bankers' Security Company for southern Ohio, 
with offices in the Traction building, and a well-known and popular politician, 
was born October 23, 1864, in this city. He is a son of Henry B. and Elizabeth 
Sprague, natives of New York. 

Mr. Sprague left school at an early age and was first employed as an office 
boy by the law firm of Cowan & Ferris. He then became connected with the 
Bromwell Brush & Wire Goods Coropany as collector, and still later was a con- 
ductor on tLe Cmclnnau cirv^"!: T^ilx^ry a^^-o^ r,.,.. -,^.jr>. or iaii'.ii.i .■^r^vice. 
Mr. Sprague resigned that position in order to accept that of government 
storekeeper, from which he was promoted to that of ganger. He was later made 
deputy revenue collector, but a change of administration brought about his 
withdrawal from that position. Soon after, he was appointed deputy in the 
Probate Court, which position he held for several years, resigning it in order 
to accept the general agency of an eastern surety company. That position he 
also resigned and accepted his present responsible position on October 1, 1901. 

Mr. Sprague was married in 1898 to Caroline Virginia Fieber, and they have 
a handsome home at No. 1529 Lincoln avenue. They have one child, Elvina 
Stoll, a beautiful and bright little girl. 

Mr. Sprague is identified with a number of fraternal organizations. As a 
Mason, he is past master of his blue lodge, and has taken all the degrees up 
to that of Shriner. He is a member of Cincinnati Lodge No. 3, Knights Templar, 
National Union, Cincinnati Gymnasium, Gymnasium Boat Club and is an Elk 
of high standing, being a member of the Past Master's Association. 

Mr. Sprague well represents the progressive, energetic, reliable business men 
of this city, alert for every chance of individual or civic advancement, devoted 
to the upbuilding of the city's trade and reputation, and contributing time 
and influence to further all public spirited movements. Personally, :Mr. Sprague 
has many friends who enjoy the sincerity of his friendship and the genial 
nature of his companionship. 

Ml . Sprague was nominated in the fall of 1903 on the Republican ticket for 
the House of Representatives from Hamilton County at large. 

(From the Centennial History of Cincinnati.) 



(485) 




YOUNG STEPHENSON, M.D. 



Young Stephenson, M.D., was born in Union township, Brown county, Ohio, 
April 19, 1834. He attended the district schools near his home, Ripley High 
school, and college at Delaware, Ohio, four years. After his course at Delaware 
he attended the Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio, and afterward the Star- 
ling Medical College of Columbus, Ohio, graduating from that institution in 
1865. He was superintendent of the graded schools of Georgetown, Ohio, three 
years, and of the graded schools of Higginsport, Ohio, two years. He was 
president of the Brown County Teachers' Institute four years, county school 
examiner six years and a member of the board of education of the Georgetown 
special district nine years. He was clerk of the Court of Common Pleas of 
Brown county for more than six years. He has always been an enthusiastic 
member of the secret fraternal societies of the land, having filled the position 
of first, or Major Surgeon, of the Third Regiment, uniform rank. Knights of 
Pythias, of Ohio, for twelve years. He was elected as a Democrat, receiving 
3,248 votes to 2,407 for his adversary.* 



(486) 







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J. M. STEWARD. 



J. M. Steward, Democrat, Representative from Fairfield County. Was born 
1841. Was in educational work until 1888, when he became a farmer. 



(487) 



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EARLE STEWART. 



Earle Stewart, the Representative from Clark county is a lawyer and resides 
in Springfield. He was born in a log house near Clifton in the southern part 
of the county, August 12, 1870, and was reared on the farm. He worked not 
only on the farm, hut also in the mill, and for two years he was engaged in 
teaching school. Graduating from Clifton high school, for a year he attended 
Wittenberg, later he entered and graduated from Antioch College, and in 1S95 
he graduated in law from the Ohio State University, where he was honored, as 
likewise was he at Antioch, by being selected as class orator. He read law for 
awhile in the office of Harrison, Olds & Henderson, of Columbus. 

Mr. Stewart began the practice of his chosen protession in Springfield 
shortly after his admission to the bar in 1895. He is a member of and for sev- 
eral years was the secretary of the Springfield Bar and Law Library Association; 
is an active member of the Commercial Club and of the Young Men's Literar>' 
Club of his city. 

He was sent to the legislature as a Republican, and is a member of the 
standing committees of the house on Cities, Insurance, Hospitals for the Insane 
and Universities and Colleges. 



(488) 



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WASHINGTON I. TENNEY 



(490) 



Miami county has always been worthily represented in the Ohio General 
Assembly, and the present member, Hon. Washington I. Tenney, of Troy, 
elected a member of the 75th and 76th General Assemblies, is no exception 
to the high-class officials sent by the people of that section to represent them in 
the halls of legislation. Mr. Tenney is a native of Miami county, Ohio, where 
he was born May 3> 1833. His education was secured in the common schools of 
that county, except one winter spent in Columbus, where he attended the high 
school of which Asa D. Lord was superintendent. 

Representative Tenney has always been a stalwart Republican and cast 
his first vote for General John C. Fremont for president, in 1856, believing in 
the policies and principles of the party from its birth. He entered the service 
of his country for one hundred days, as a member of ComDa^v D, One Hundrerl 
and Forty-Seventh Regiment, 0. V. I., stationed at Fort Ethau Aileu. lit wz,c a.:z: 
with his command at Fort Stevens, when General Jubal Early undertook to 
capture the city of Washington. 

In Miami county he has on several occasions been honored by his fellow 
citizens. He was a member of the agricultural board and its secretary for 
twenty-five years, member of the Troy board of education nine years,, and county 
Auditor two terms. In the Seventy-fifth General Assembly he was a member 
of the committee on Agriculture and of the committee on the Institution for 
the Deaf and Dumb and chairman of the committee on Turnpikes. In the 
Seventy-sixth General Assembly he was a member of the committee on Agricul- 
ture and of the committee on Claims and chairman of the committee on Dairy 
and Food Products, and served with credit on these important committees. 
His record as a member of the House showed a diligent and industrious member, 
always on the side of the people and always caring for their wants. 

Mr. Tenney's father, Dr. Eli Tenney, born in 1809, was an allopathic physi- 
cian, a member of the Ohio legislature in 1856, and county Auditor one term. 
He died suddenly in office September 15, 1873. His mother, Margaret A. 
Hatcher Tenney, was born in Virginia in 1809, came to Ohio with her parents 
early In life and was married in 1830. Seven children were born of this union, 
four girls and three boys. The sisters are all dead. 

In 1858 Representative Tenney married Jennie C. Kelley, and to them were 
bom eight children, five boys and three girls, all of whom are living save one 
daughter, who died in 1891. Mrs. Tenney passed aw ty May 21, 1901, beloved 
by all who knew her. Mr. Tenney is an honored member of the Grand Army of 
Republic. 

Mr. Tenney is now superintending his large farm. For twenty years he 
was a teacher of high repute in his county. He is a sturdy, manly man, of 
excellent judgment, and one whom it is a pleasure and delight to know. In 
all the relations of life he has been true to himself and his friends, and his 
record is one of which his children may feel proud. 



(491) 







WARREN THOMAS. 



Warren Thomas, Republican, of Trumbull county, the son of Melancthon 
Thomasand Emma Calhoun Thomas, was born at Niles, Ohio, October 27, 18TG. 
and resided there until eight years of age, when the family removed to Cortland 
in the same county, where he acquired his education, graduating at the head of 
his class in the Cortland high schools in May, 1896. During vacation and for 
some time after graduating, he worked in the ofEce of H. D. Holcond, real estate 
agent and justice of the peace; in October of 1896 began the study of law in the 
office of Tuttle & Fillius, at Warren, Ohio, and was admitted to the bar in 1S99. 
Mr. Thomas immediately commenced the practice of law in Warren, where he 
has since resided. 

He has served on the county executive and central committees for sever?.! 
terms and was elected a member of the 76th General Assembly by over thirty- 
eight hundred majority, is a member of the Judiciary committee, committee on 
Claims "and chairman of the committee on Enrollment. 

Mr. Thomas was married March 19, 1902, to Miss Lenore Hall. 



(492) 




^iatw>>lt^^&i 



SHERMAN THOMPSON. 



Sherman Thompson was born near Urbana, Ohio, May 8, 1864. 

He graduated from Oberlin college in 18SG, after which he engaged succes- 
sively in school teaching, civil engineering, farming and shipping live stock. 

He was elected to the 76th General Assembly November 4, 1903 as a Repub- 
lican. 



(493) 



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C. A. THOMPSON. 



C. A. Thompson was born in Wayne county, W. Va., on the 4th day of 
September, 1870. When about three years of age he moved with his parents 
to Iron ton, Ohio, where he has since resided. He graduated in the I ronton 
high school in the spring of 18S6, and at the Ohio State University with the 
class of 1892, with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. The following year 
he took charge of the high school at Bement, Illinois, where he taught tT\o 
years, returning to the Ohio State University and graduating in the law cla>s 
of 1895, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, since which time he has prac- 
ticed his profession at Ironton. He was appointed to the position of City 
Solicitor of the city of Ironton to fill out the unexpired term of C. 0. Rea, 
resigned during the fall of 1896, and served in that capacity until the first 
Monday in May, 1903, being elected three times in succession. He was elected 
to represent Lawrence county in the 76th General Assembly, which office he now 
holds. During the Spanish American war he was captain of Company I of the 
Seventh Regiment. Is now the colonel of the Seventh Regiment, O. N. G. He 
is a Reipublican. 



(494) 



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FRANCIS W. TREADWAY. 



Francis W, Treadway, born at New Haven, Conn, January 7, 1869; removed 
to Cleveland when ten years of age, and was educated in the Cleveland grammar 
and high schools, Worcester Polytechnic Institute (B. S., 1890), and Yale Uni- 
versity (LL.B., 1892). Joint author "Ohio Mechanics' Lien Law," Tread way & 
Marlatt, 1901. United States Commissioner for the northern district of Ohio, 
1902-3; chairman committee on Banks' and Banking; member of committees on 
Cities, Common Schools and Girls' Industrial Home. He was elected as a 
Republican. 



(405) 



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OSCAR TYLER. 



Oscar Tyler, Republican, Representative from Cuyahoga county, was born 
in Troy, N. Y., June 29, 1846, and was educated in the public schools of that city. 

He has always taken an active part in the interest of labor. On different 
occasions he has been delegate to the conventions of the Railroad Employes' 
Organization. He is president of the Republican Club of Collinwood; member 
of the B. of L. E., and trustee of the same; Royal Arch Mason and member of 
of the B. of L. E. legislative board in Ohio. For forty years he has been an 
engineer on the L. S. & M. S. railway, the past fifteen years drawing the pay 
car over the eastern division. He is a member of the Railroad and Telegraphs, 
Boys* Industrial School and Public Works committees in the House. 



(496) "CH-'ii) 



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PHILIP M. WAGNER. 



(498) 



Philip M. Wagner, tlie Representative from Tuscarawas county, was bom 
on August 20, 1868, near Sandyville, Ohio. He is of German descent. His 
maternal grandfather came to this country with the original Zoarites. Mr. 
Wagner has been a resident of Tuscarawas county nearly all his life. His youth 
was spent on the farm, attending the common schools in winter. At the age 
of fourteen he became a carpenter's apprentice and served in that capacity for 
two years. Then with characteristic energy he prepared himself for teaching. 
Beginning in 1886 he* taught a number of years with eminent success. Through 
this he earned the means of securing a collegiate training. He attended the 
Ohio Normal University and Scio College. From the former he received the 
degrees of Bachelor of Pedagogy and Master or Pedagcs:': -'-'oir -.iie i-vi.e' ^'•e 
degrees of Bachelor of Philosophy and Master of Philosophy. Having decide'd 
to change his profession he entered Ohio Medical University in 1893, from which 
institution he was graduated with the degree of M. D. as an honor member of the 
class of 1896. He then went to Columbia City, Ind., where he practiced med- 
icine for about one year. On April 27, 1897, he was married to Miss Henrietta 
M. Wilson, of Sunbury, Ohio. Soon after this they located in Canal Dover 
where their popularity has grown rapidly from year to year. In 1S98 he was 
appointed a member of the city board of school examiners and served until he 
was elected a member of the board of education in 1900. He is now serving 
his second term as a member of the board, and takes a deep interest in educa- 
tional affairs. He has also been a member of the city board of health. That 
Dr. Wagner is a public-spirited and useful citizen will be attested by all who 
know him. As a physician he enjoys an extensive and lucrative practice and has 
the respect and confidence of all in the community. The' doctor frequently 
finds recreation in writing. He is the author of a neat volume of poems, "At 
the Dawn." A second volume, the product of his pen, will soon appear. In fra- 
ternal matters he is a member of the Royal Arcanum, the Tribe of Ben Hur and 
the Fraternal Order of Eagles. Though reared in a normally Democratic county, 
he has always been an ardent Republican. His popularity in the county is best 
shown by the fact that in the fall of 1903 he was the choice of the Republican 
convention for Representative and was elected a member of the 76th General 
Assembly by a handsome majority over his Democ -atic competitor, a candidate 
for second term. Dr. Wagner is a member of ihe standing committees on 
Villages, Boys' Industrial School, and Common Schools. 

(Written by F. P. Geiger, Supt. of Schools, Canal Dover, 0.) 



(4W) 









mLJ^ 



DR. CHARLES D. WATKINS. 



Dr. Charles D'. Watkins has the honor of being the first Republican Repre- 
sentative ever elected in Licking county. He was born in Fultonham, Mus- 
kingum county, Ohio, on September 22, 1864, and is a son of Dr. John Watkins, 
who was Representative from Muskingum county in 1840. He removed to Licking 
county in 1883 and graduated from the Columbus Medical College in 1S8G, since 
which time he has resided in Etna. He was married in 1887 to Miss Essie ^L 
Farrell, of Columbus, Ohio, who died in 1903, leaving three daughters, Irma, 
Ruth and Marcia and one son, Charles; 

He is a member of the L O. O. F., Knight Templar, a Shriner and a member 
of the M. W. A. 

He is a member of the standing committees on Public Works, Railroads and 
Telegraphs and Institution for the Deaf. 



(500) 




T. H. WATSON. 



T. H, Watson, Republican, Representative from Carroll-Harrison County, 
was born April 24, 1851, in Minerva, Stark County, Ohio, received a common 
school education at Minerva and lived there until twenty-three years old, when he 
was married to Mary Hursh. His father was a stone mason by trade and taught 
him the trade. He commenced working at the age of eighteen ,and worked for 
four years for his father, then worked for Robert Rue for three years as fore- 
man. He commenced contracting for himself about 1S76. Bought a farm south 
of Minerva in 1883 and moved on it, but continued contracting also until 1904, 
when he moved to Minerva. In 1902 he bought the Roller, Taylor and Grunder 
Hardware store in Minerva, which is known as the firm of Grunder & Watson 
now. He is a director of the bank in Minerva, having been elected in 1S96, and 
still holds said office. He is a member of Trip Lodge No. 491, I. O. O. F., Car- 
rollton, Ohio, having been a member of the lodge for thirty-two years, and is 
also a member of the Masonic lodge of the same city. He has held sever.-^.! 
oflSces in the county of Carroll and is president of Carrollton County Agricul- 
tural Society. He is a member of the House committees on Agriculture, 
County Affairs, and Ditches and Drains. 



(BOl) 



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DUDLEY P. WAYNE. 



Dudley P. Wayne, Republican, one of the Representatives from Hamilton 
County, was born in Cincinnati, May 18, 1861. Was educated in the public 
schools of that city, and then attended Urbana University, at Urbana. Ohio, 
where he graduated in 1881. He studied law in Ramsey, Matthews & Matthews 
office in Cincinnati, and at the same time attended the Cincinnati Law School, 
graduating with the class of 1883, and being admitted to the bar in June of 
that year. He was married to Adelaide L. Smith, of Urbana, Ohio, in December, 
1884. Mr. Wayne was a pioneer in the settlement of South Dakota, where he 
helped to found the town of Ipswich, which became the county seat of Edmunds 
County, in 1884, and where he continued the practice of his profession until 
March, 1894, when, owing to climatic conditions, affecting his health, he re- 
turned to Cincinnati, where he now has a large and growing practice. Mr. 
Wayne was a member of the House in the 75th General Assembly. Mr. Wayne 
resides in Harrison, in the western part of the county and maintains his law 
office in Cincinnati. He has always been a Republican. 



(503) 




JAMES A, WELKER. 



James A. Welker, Republican Representative from Siark County, was born 
In 1869. Admitted to the bar in 1894, is a graduate of 0. N. U. On the Common 
School, Enrollment, and Manufactures and Commerce standing committees of the 
House. 



(503) 




EDWWIN S. WERTZ. 



(«04) 



ifcWA^ ^r:..;. 



Edwin S. Wertz, Democratic member Wayne County. Born Dalton, Ohio, 
August 7, 1875. Son of W. H. H. and Carrie Virginia Wertz. Educated in 
Dalton public schools, prepared for college at Wooster University preparatory 
department. Studied at Ohio State University four years, completing in that 
time work scheduled for seven years. Graduated from college of Arts, Phil- 
osopliy and Science with Ph.B. degree and from law college with LL.B. degree. 
During college life admitted to the bar in June, 1900. Was employed on the 
Press-Post as university reporter. After graduation in 1900 was employed by the 
Columbus Citizen as court house reporter until August, 1902, when he formed 
a partnership with his father in the wholesale hardwood lumber business with 
Ms office at Dalton. While working as a reporter, was a member of News- 
writer's Union No. 2, of Columbus, Ohio, and was one of the representatives from 
tii&l Lody to tLc Ccli:mb'.!<: ■■^•'des and Labor Assembly. In 1901 was president 
of Young Men's Democratic Club, of Columbus. In 1898 left college and en- 
listed as a private in Light Battery H, First Ohio Vol. Artillery, serving seven 
months. 

Member of I. O. O. F., K. O. T. M., and is a Knight Templar. Nominated 
for Representative by primary election with six candidates. Ran nearly 300 
votes ahead of the ticket at the general election in November, 1903. 
Was Democratic nominee for Speaker Pro. Tem. of the House. 

Served on committees on Common Schools, Public Ways, and Enrollment. 
Introduced the first state aid good roads bill, creating a state highway depart- 
ment in the state government, providing for the gradual permanent improve- 
ment of the public highways with the aid of and under the supervision of 
competent state authority. The provisions of the bill are now law in the Wertz- 
Fisher Good Roads Law. Introduced the following bills: Prohibiting the use 
of free passes by all public officials; repealing all perpetual franchises. In- 
troduced four bills looking to the betterment of rural schools. One required 
the employment of the same teacher for at least a full school year, and requiring 
at least thirty-two weeks of school each year. The second provided that the 
people of any township should be given a voice to say whether the schools 
should be- centralized or not. The new code proposed giving the right to the 
boards of education only. 

The third required that there should be regular graded courses of study 
In every elementary school, subject to the approval of the commissioner of com- 
mon schools. The fourth provided that when a teacher received a certificate 
in the county where he resided, it should be good for the unexpired time in any 
other county. The first three bills were incorporated in the new school code, 
and are now part of the school law. The fourth was also agreed to, but was 
stricken out by the conference committee. At present secretary of the Ohio 
Good Roads Association. He addressed House in an hour speech against Chap- 
man bill abolishing spring elections. 



(605) 




WILLIAM CURTIS WHITNEY. 



Willigm Curtis Whitney, Republican, one of the Representatives from 
Franklin County, was born at Kirtland, Lake County, Ohio, December 12, 1873. 
His father was a minister of the United Brethren church, and his early education 
was received in the public schools in various places in northeastern Ohio. He 
left the Akron high school for Otterbein University, Westerville, Ohio, in 18S9, 
and was graduated from this school with the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. 
He married a classmate, Edith H. Turner, of Lewisburg, Preble county, Ohio. 

After a course in the Chicago Homeopathic Medical College, he was grad- 
uated in 1898 with the degree "Doctor of Medicine cum laude." While a student 
he spent his vacations working on the farin, in the shops and in a grocery. 

After practicing medicine for two years at Richville, Stark County. Ohio, 
he was called in 1899 to the professorship of Biology and Geology in Otterbein 
University, which position he now holds, and is also college librarian. He 
continues in the practice of medicine and manages a dairy farm near the town. 
He is an ardent student of farm problems, and intensely interested in the ad- 
vancement of agriculture. 

Dr. Whitney is a member of the committee on Common Schools, Institution 
for the Blind and Federal Relations. 



(506) 




C. F. WILLIAMS, OF Hamilton County. 



Charles* F. Williams, Republican, a Representative from Hamilton County, 
Is a practicing attorney. He also served in the 75th General Assembly, and was 
bom April 23, 1873, in Cincinnati, Ohio. He attended the public schools, grad- 
uating from Woodward high school in 1891, and the Cincinnati Law Schools 
In 1897. Mr. Williams is a member of the standing committees on Elections, 
Finance, Public Works, Military Affairs (Chairman). 



(507) 



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W. J. WILLIAMS. 



W. J. Williams was born May 21, 1869, on a farm near New Bedford, Law- 
rence County, Pa. He is a graduate of the Normal department of Mount Union 
College, and of the Puget Sound University at Tacoma, Washington, receiving 
from the latter institution the degree of A.B. H > was admitted to the bar in 
1895, and has been practicing law at Youngstown, Ohio, since 1897. He was 
married in 1895 to Sara L. Cooper, the daughter of James A. Cooper, of Coits- 
ville, Ohio, and has one child, Alice K. Williams. 

He is probably the most expert theoretical fisherman in the state, and in 
the organization of the 76th Assembly, his ability in this line was recognized 
by Speaker Thomas, who conferred upon him the distinguished honor of chair- 
man of the Fish and Game committee. 

He was probably the most regular and constant attendant at the sessions 
of the House of which he was a member, and at all committee meetings, of any 
member of the 75th or 76th General Assembly, and no matter what the condi- 
tion of the weather, Mr. Williams was always found in his place attending to tho 
great and arduous duties incident to his office, and it was a matter of common 
comment as to how he succeeded in devoting himself so exclusively to the duties 
of his office without impairing his health. He hopes that as a reward for all 
the aforesaid, he may have this published, together with his photograph in that 
great literary work so interesting to read, containing the brilliant eulogies 
which so many eminent statesmen have pronounced upon themselves, known 
as The Biographical Annals of Ohio. 



(608) 



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J. MADISON WILLIS. 



J. Madison Willis, bom October 19, 1869, on a farm near Bloomingburg, 
Fayette County, Ohio. Early life spent on the faim; education acquired in 
country school, Bloomingburg high school, followed by short course of study at 
Ann Arbor, Michigan, matriculating there in 1888 and remaining until death 
of . his father in 1890; came home and took up business of father, that of farm- 
ing. Still continues and has added the raising of fine stock, which proves 
profitable along with pleasure. Is also identified with banking interests. Mem- 
ber of Masonic fraternity, Garfield Commandery, K. of P., No. 28. and other 
benevolent societies. Was elected as a Republican in the Fayette-Madison dis- 
trict to the 75th General Assembly and re-elected to the 76th. Is a member of 
the Finance committee, Mines and Mining, and chairman of Federal Relations. 

Great-grandson of Nathaniel Willis, founder of the Scioto Gazette (1796) 
and printer of the first journals of the legislature of Ohio, and the laws of the 
territory. Married June, 1892, to Dollie C. Keller, of Oakland, Maryland, and 
has two daughters, six and four years old. 



(509) 



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if?7r-y.li7^y 



R. L. WOODBURN. 



. R. L. "Woodburn, Republican, Representative from Union County. Born 
November 26. 1843. Enlisted June 20, 1863 in Co. B, 86th Reg. 0. V. I. Dis- 
charged by expiration of time February 10, 1864. Graduated at the Ohio "Wes- 
lejran University June 25, 1869. Admitted to the practice of the law November, 
1871. _. . ^ 



(610) 




PAUL B. WORTHINGTON. 



Paul B. Worthington, Republican, Representative from Belmont County, 
who also served in the 75th General Assembly, was born in Jefferson Countv, 
Ohio, December 2, 1862. He is a son of the Hon. William M. Worthingn;on, .M.D., 
who as a Republican, represented Jefferson County in the 53d General Assembly 
of Ohio, and who died in 1864. After the death of his father he removed to 
Belmont County, where he has since lived. H attended the Barnesville public 
schools. Graduated from the Columbus Business College in 1883. Was a clerk 
from 1883 to 1889. Since that time has been engaged in business for himself 
in Barnesville, where he has by his own efforts, established one of the largest 
mercantile houses of that place. Was a member of the city council for six 
years. As a business man took active part in the campaigns of 1S9G and 1000. 
Is a member of the M. E. church. Was married in 1894 to Miss Myra Kemp, 
who, with his mother and two bright little girls, Helen and Kathorine, reside 
at his home on North Lincoln avenue, Barnesville. He is chairman of the 
Boys' Industrial School and served two terms on the Finance committee and 
on the committee for Prisons and Prison Reforms. 



(511) 




CHARLES I. YORK. 



Charles I- York, Democrat, Representative from Ottawa County, was bom 
at Greenwich, Huron County, Ohio, February 18, 1856. He received his early 
education in the country and private schools in the vicinity of his birth. His 
parents and all his grandparents were born in the state of New York. At the 
age of seventeen years he began teaching a country school. His father being a 
fanner, when not engaged in teaching or attending school, he worked on the 
farm-. From 1878 to the fall of 1881 he was engaged as traveling saleman for 
a furniture industry. In the fall of 1881 he entered the law department of the 
Michigan University, Ann Arbor, Michigan, where, on March 28, 18S3, he re- 
ceived the degree of Bachelor of Laws. In 1883 he began the practice of his pro- 
fession in Ottawa County, at Port Clinton, where he now resides. 

In 1888 he was elected Prosecuting Attorney and re-elected in 1891. In con- 
nection with his practice he has promoted several industries. He was elected to 
the 75th General Assembly, The following year he was nominated by acclama- 
-tion, as a candidate for congress in the 9th district, running against Hon. Jas. 
A. Southard. In the organization of the 76th General Assembly, Mr. York re- 
ceived the solid support of the Democratic members of the House for Speaker, 
and was chosen their minority leader. He was a member of the Finance, 
Judiciary committees and a member of the committee on Rules. He is a mem- 
ber of t^e I. O. O. F., K. of P. and F. and A. M. lodges. 



(512) 




. D. E. YOST. 



D. E. Yost, Democrat, Representative from Monroe County, Ohio, in the 
76th General Assembly, was born on a farm near Antioch, Perry Township, 
Monroe county, Ohio, February 15, 1868. His ancestors came from Ireland and 
Germany before the Revolutionary war and settled ic. the state of New Jersey, 
emigrating from thence into the northwest territory while it was yet an un- 
broken wilderness. 

Mr. Yost received his education in the common schools of his native county, 
attending high school at Sistersville, AV. Va„ and New Matamoras. Ohio; the 
National Normal University, Lebanon, Ohio, and Franklin College, New Athens, 
Ohio. He taught in the common schools of his native county from 1886 to 
1894, during which time he resided at Centerview, Ohio. Was admitted to the 
bar December 6, 1894 at Columbus, Ohio, and removed to the county seat of his 
native county, Woodsfield, Ohio, March 20, 1896, and engaged in the practice of 
law. Was married to Miss Margery M. McElroy, May 2, 1897. He is a member 
of the Church of Christ, an Odd Fellow and a Mason. 

Mr. Yost has been a member of the board of education, justice of the peace, 
a member and secretary of the Democratic county executive committee, and was 
elected to the 76th General Assembly of Ohio as a Democrat by a majority of 
649 votes over Samuel F. Rose, Republican. He is a member of the standing 
committee on County Affairs, Labor, and Villages. His speech nominating Hon. 
John H. Clarke for U. S. Senator fully established his reputation as a brilliant 
orator and the wit of the House. 

In matters of legislation Mr. Yost has distinguished himself as a human- 
itarian and economist, being especially interested in promoting the welfare of 
labor and organized labor unions. He is also an author and poet of no mean 
ability. 

I looked, and lo! a motley crowd 

On fame and pleasure bent. 
Each worshipper in accents loud 
Sang songs of discontent. 



tS~-B. A. 



(513) 







GROUP OF EIGHT ASST. CLERKS HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 

1. John P. Maynard. 



2. C. R. Doll. 
5. J. C. Riley. 
7. Ira I. Morrison. 



4. Katheryn Oren. 
6. C. L. Williams. 
8. T. J. Corkery. 



3. E. W. Hughes. 



(514)1 







'^■\<. N /A ^' ^A r^\ A 




PAGES. 

1 Malcolm Baker. 2 C. M. Kingman. 3 Leon M. Evans. 4 Morris- C. Haas. 
5 F. B. Thornton. 6 Ralpti Lanning. '^ Harry W. Crafts. 8 Owen O'Donnell. 
9 Harry W. Daust 10 Rolla W. Huston. 11 John W. Tippie. 12 Roy King. 



(615) 



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On left— FRANK NEWCOMER, 1st On right— H. H. REDKEY, 2d Asst. 
Asat. Sergeant-at-Arms. Sergeant-at-Arma. 



(616) 



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(617)-C5lO 



PART THREE. 



THE EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT OF THE TERRITORIAL 
, AND STATE GOVERNMENTS OF OHIO. 



(fil9) 



TABLE OF CONTENTS— PART THREE. 



PAGE. 

The Governor 522 

Lieutenant Governor 528 

Secretary to the Governor 531 

Secretary of State 533 

Auditor of State 537 

Treasurer of State 543 

Attorney General 546 

Board of Public Works 549 

Commissioner of Common Schools 554 

Dairy and Food Commissioner ^. . . . 562 

Adjutant General 565 

State Insv.r-1 ..•:^ I"-i.'aiir^"'jL'. 570 

Inspector of Building and Loan Associations 572 

Supervisor of Public Printing , 574 

Commissioner of Railroads and Telegraphs 577 

Bureau of Labor Statistics 580 

Inspector of Mines 582 

State Highway Commissioner 588 

Inspector of Workshops and Factories 590 

Inspector of Oils 594 

State Examiner of Steam Engineers 596 

State Fire Marshal 599 

Board of Library Commissioners 602 

State Board of Pardons 608 

State Board of Health 610 

Canal Commission 613 

Ohio Fish and Game Commission 617 

Board of State Charities 618 

State Commissioner of Soldiers' Claims 622 

Board « f Medical Registration and Examination 625 

State Board of Dental Examiners 631 

Board of Pharmacy 633 

Board of Live Stock Commissioners 635 

Board of Veterinary Examiners 638 

Board of Arbitration , 639 

State Geologists 643 

State Board of Embalming Examiners 644 

Archaelogical and Historical Society 645 

State Agent for War Claims vs. U. S. Government 648 



(520) 



. C^^O 




MYRON T. HERRICK. 



(622) 



HON. MYRON T. HERRICK, Governor of Ohio. 

Myron T. Herrick was born at Huntington, Lorain County, Ohio, on the 
9th of October, 1854, the son of Timothy R. and Mary L. Herrick. His father^ 
came from a Massachusetts family of colonial origin. His grandfather, Timothy 
Herrick, was one of the pioneers of Lorain County, Ohio, and was a soldier in the 
second war with England. Timothy R, Herrick, Governor Herrick's father, was 
bom in Watertown, New York, in 1828. 

Governor Herrick was educated in the district school at Huntington, the 
union schools at Wellington, Ohio, and later on attended college at Oberlin and 
at the Ohio Wesleyan University, at Delaware, Ohio. In 1899 the emeritus 
degree was conferred upon him by the Ohio Wesleyan University. 

Governor Herrick came to Cleveland in the year 1875. He entered the law 
offices of J. F. & G. E. Herrick, and was admitted to the bar in 1878. Mr. 
Herrick was a successful lawyer, and latterly became well kiiovvn as z cuzi^t^-^ 
man and financier of ability. He is today recognized as one of the leading and 
most successful bankers in the country. He is at present the chairman of the 
executive council of the American Bankers' Association. In addition to his many 
financial interests, Governor Herrick is interested in various manufacturing, 
industrial and building enterprises in Cleveland, and the city has in many 
ways profited by the energy and public spirit which he has displayed. 

Governor Herrick reorganized the Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway Company, 
and placed the property on a good business basis, and it now forms an impor- 
tant link in the Wabash system. 

Governor Herrick's first vote was cast for President Rutherford B. Hayes, 
and he has ever since remained a Republican. He was a member of the Cleve- 
land city council in 1885, and accepted a re-election at the close of his first term 
of office. He has always taken an active interest in political issues, local and 
national. He was a delegate to the national conventions of 1888, 1892, 1896 
and 1904, and elector-at-large for Ohio in 1900. He is at present a member of 
the Republican National Committee and of its Advisory Committee. Under 
President McKinley he was offered the United States Treasurership, and later 
the United States Ambassadorship to Rome, but both of these were declined. 
He was also offered the Ambassadorship to Rome by President Roosevelt, but 
again declined. In 1893 he was a member of the Electoral College, and served 
as chairman of the prelimary session when McKinley was nominated for Gov- 
ernor of Ohio. He was appointed by Governor McKinley as a member of his 
military staff. 

In 1886 he was elected secretary and treasurer of the Society for Savings, 
and in 1894, upon the death of the President, Samuel H. Mather, he succeeded 
him to the office of president, which he still occupies. 

He became a candidate in 1903 for the office of governor of the state of 
Ohio, and received the marked honor of being selected as the unanimous choice 
of the nominating convention — the second instance of the kind in the history of 
the state, William McKinley being the other candidate for governor to receive 
this recognition — and he was elected governor of the state by a majority greater 
than that ever given a candidate for that office in Ohio. 



(523) 



524 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Governor. 



THE OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR. 

The Constitution of Ohio provides that "The supreme executive 
power of the state shall be vested in the Governor." 

He is elected by the people for a term of two years. He must be 
an elector and not hold any other office under the authority of the State 
or the United States. In case of death, removal or other disability, the 
Lieutenant-Governor shall execute the office of Governor. The Governor 
must see th^ the laws are faithfully executed and may request of the 
executive officials reports of their respective departments. 

At every session of the General Assembly he must report the con- 
dition of the state bv m^'^^^gc, reconimer"''"^,^ ^hc^^iii such legislation as 
may to him seem proper. He may convene the General Assembly upon 
extraordinary occasions. He may adjourn it in case of disagreement 
upon this subject between the two branches thereof. 

The Governor is Commander-in-Chief of the army and navy and 
custodian of the Great Seal of the State. 
• He may grant reprieves, commutations and pardons. 

Must approve or disapprove all bills of the General Assembly. 

Such, briefly, are the constitutional provisions relating to the Chief 
Executive. 

In addition to the powers conferred and duties imposed upon the 
Governor by the Constitution, are those which the General Assembly has 
seen fit to provide by statute, and it is through these that the greater por- 
tion of the actual duties of this office arise, as well as most of the ap- 
pointive power of the Governor. As Commander-in-Chief of the army 
and navy, it seems appropriate that he should appoint the Adjutant-Gen- 
erai, and the twelve other members of his military staff 

There are certain state offices not created by the Constitution whose 
chief incumbents are nominated by the Governor, and by and with the ad- 
vice and consent of the Senate appointed. Such are the Commissioner of 
Insurance, Commissioner of Railroads and Telegraphs, Commissioner of 
Labor Statistics, Inspector of Workshops and Factories, Chief Mine In- 
spector, State Fire Marshal, Chief Examiner of Stationary' Engineers, 
State Pension Claim Agent, and Chief Engineer of Public Works. 

Numerous commissions, such as the Canal Commission, Shiloh Bat- 
tlefield Commission, and Fish and Game Commission, containing from 
two to seven members each, with terms varying from one to five years, 
have been created by law. Here vacancies are constantly occurring, 
which are filled by the Governor, aiid frequently he is called upon, when 
the General Assembly provides for some new commission, to appoint an 
entire board. 

The Governor is ex-ofHcio the President of the State Board of Chari- 
ties, composed of six members, who are appointed for a term of three 



Pt^^^fff;^ • H 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 525 

The Governor. 

years. This Board exercises a general supervision of the public institu- 
tions, and is of valuable aid to the Governor in overseeing the numerous 
large state properties.„There are thirteen benevolent, two penal and two 
corrective institutions in this state.,Each of these is managed by a board 
of trustees composed of six members appointed by the Governor, by and 
with the advice and consent of the senate, for a term of live years. 

Recurring to the duties of this office, we find the Governor, of neces- 
sity, a busy man. The actual duties of the office occupy much of his 
time, while the constant and pressing demands made by the general public 
leave him few spare moments. 

He must examine and approve or veto all bills passed by the General < 
Assembly, issue re^uisitiori papers, ir.ve'^tigr'^^ ^pn1i,^.:.-;ns fcr .,cLrdo.:s, i 

commutations and reprieves, certify under the Great Seal of the State as | 

to the official character of numerous state and county officials ; upon appli- j 

cation commission notaries public and commissioners of deeds, and, with j 

few exceptions, commission all elective officers, both civil and military. \ 

He must attend board meetings, counsel heads of departments, maintain i. 

a general supervision of all great state institutions, examine, approve and i 

sign numerous state papers, hear and dispose of complaints against in- j 

dividuals and institutions, and keep a constant watch over the affairs of [; 

state. All of this entails the keeping of numerous records, the assorting , 

and filing of many papers and constant attention to a large corre- I 

spondence. To aid him in his work the Governor has a Private Secre- 
tary, three clerks and a messenger. 



526 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Governor. 



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THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



527 



The Governor, 



TABLE SHOWING THE TERRITORIAL AND STATE GOVERNORS FROM 

1787—1902. 



Name. 



Politics. 



County. 



Arthur St. Clair. 



Edward Tiffiii*| 

Thomas Kirker*a 

Samuel Huntington*!. . . 
Return Jonathan Meigs JrJ° 

Othneil Looker* 

Thomas Worth ^><?tnn*t . 
Ethan Allen Biovsn^J. . . 

Allen Trimble* 

Jeremiah Morrow*t 

Allen Trimble 

Duncan McArthur*t 

Robert Lucas* 

Joseph Vance*t 

Wilson Shannon 

Thomas Corwin*tt§ 

Wilson Shannont 

Thomas W. Hartley* 

Mordecai Bartley*t 

William Bebb 

Seabury Ford* 

Reuben Wood* 

William Medill*t 

Salmon P. Chase* § 

William Dennison, Jr.*° 

David Tod* 

John Brough* 

Charles Anderson* 

Jacob Dolson Cox*t 

Rutherford B. Hayestlj.. 

Edward F. Noyes '. . 

William Allentt 

Rutherford B. Hayesfj j . ■ 

Thomas L. Young*t 

Richard M. Bishop 

Charles Fostert§ 

George Hoadly 

Joseph B. Forakert 

James E. Campbellt 

William McKinley, Jr.*|{. 

Asa S. Bushnell 

George K. Nash 

Myron T. Herrick 



Federalist. 



Democrat. . 
Democrat . . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 
Democrat. . 

Federalist. . 
Democrat. . 
Federalist. . 
Federalist. . 
Democrat . . 

Whig 

Democrat. . 

Whig 

Democrat. . 
Democrat . . 

Whig 

Whig 

Whig 

Democrat . . 
Democrat. . 
Republican. 
Republican . 
Republican. 
Republican. 
Republican . 
Republican. 
Republican. 
Republican. 
Democrat. . 
Republican. 
Republican . 
Democrat. . 
Republican. 
Democrat. . 
Republican. 
Democrat. . 
Republican. 
Republican. 
Republican. 
Republican. 



c;' 



Elected. 



Served. 



Territorial 



Ross 

Adams 

Trumbull.. . 
Washington . 
Hamilton. . . 
Ross? 

J.i.a.lL.iiLvyIi . . . 

Highland. . . 

Warren 

Highland. , . 

Ross 

Pike 

Champaign. . 

Belmont 

Warren 

Belmont. . . . 
Richland. . . . 
Richland. . . . 

Butler, 

Geauga 

Cuyahoga. . . 

Fairfield 

Hamilton. . . 
Franklin. . . . 
Mahoning. . . 
Cuyahoga . . . 
Montgomery 
Hamilton. . . 
Hamilton. . . 
Hamilton. . . 

Ross 

Sandurky. . . 
Hamilton. . . 
Hamilton. . . 

Seneca 

Hamilton. . . 
Hamilton. . . 

Butler 

Stark 

Clark 

Franklin. . . . 
Cuyahoga. . . 



Appointed 

by the 

Congress 

1803-5... 

Acting.. . 

1808 

1810-12.. 
Acting.. . 
1814-16.. 



1787 
1804 
1807 
1809 
1811 
1814 
1815 



-180.3 
-1807 
-1803 
-1810 
-1814 

-1813 
-■^23 



Acting.. . 


1822 


1822-24.. 


1823-1826 


1826-28.. 


1827-1830 


1830 


1831-1832 


1832-34.. 


1833-1836 


1836 


1837-1838 


1838 


1839-1840 


1840 


1841-1842 


1842 


1843-1844 


Acting... 


1844 


1844 


1845-1845 


1846..... 


1847-1848 


1848 


1849-1850 


18.50-52.. 


1851-1853 


1853 


1854-1856 


1855-57.. 


1856-1860 


1??59 


1860-1862 


1861 


1862-186i 


1863 


1864-1865 


Acting.. . 


1866 


1S65 


1866-1868 


1867 


1868-1872 


1S71 


1S72-1874 


1«73 


1S74-1S76 


1875 


1876-1877 


Aoting.:. 


1S77-187S 


1S77 


1878-18S0 


1879-81.. 


1880-1884 


18S3 


1884-1886 


1"««5-87.. 


1RS6-1890 


1889 


1890-1892 


lS<>l-93.. 


1892-1896 


1895 


1896-1900 


1S99 


1900-1904 


1904 


1904-1905 



♦Governors so marked had previously served in the General Assembly. 

tGovernors so marked also served in the Senate of the United States. 

tGovernors so marked also served as members of the Congress from Ohio. 

I [Governors so marked were subsequently elected President of the United 
States. 

§Governors so marked became Secretary of the Treasury of the United 
States. 

•Governors so marked became Postmaster General of the United States. 

aThomas Kirker, Speaker of the Senate, was called to act as Governor, vice 
TlfQn, resigned. 



THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR. 




WARREN G. HARDING, 
Lieutenant. Governor. 



(628) 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR WARREN G. HARDING. 
Publisher of the "Star," Marion, Ohio. 

But few men in Ohio public life have made the rapid stride in general favor 
and esteem that has marked the career of Hon. Warren G. Harding. One of 
the leading Republican editors of Ohio and a member of the Senate in the 74th 
and 75th General Assemblies of Ohio, he is alitady at tli: ITor... in p.irty 
thought and leadership and other honors await his beck and call. In his capacity 
as Lieutenant Governor of Ohio. Mr. Harding was presiding officer of the Senate 
of the 7Gth General Assembly and in all sessions of the last three legislatures he 
was among the men who dictated policies on questions of interest to the State 
and he was always consulted on matters of party action. 

Lieutenant Governor Harding is a native of Morrow County, born at Corsica 
on the 2d of November, 18G5, and secured his education at the old Ohio Central 
College at Iberia. In 1882 he taught school and afterwards began the study 
of the profession of law, but bing enamored of the newspaper business, be- 
came a writer for the press. Warren G. Harding entered public life in the sum- 
mer of 1899, when he was nominated senator from the Thirteenth District, com- 
posed of the counties of Logan, Union. Marion, Hardin, and was elected by a 
big majority. In 1901 Senator Harding broke the one term rule of the Thirteenth 
District that had been in vogue for half a century. His eloquence brought him 
the honor of presenting the name of Senator J. B. Foraker for a second election 
to the United States Senate. 

At the Republican convention in June, 1903, in Columbus. Senator Harding 
was elected by acclamation for the office of Lieutenant Governor and his 
election followed in November of the same year. 

His style of delivery is forcible, his arguments are convincing, his im- 
promptu wit is unfailing and his statistical knowledge and memory are won- 
derful. 

He was married to Florence M. King, a highly educated and accomplished 
lady and a fitting helpmate to her distinguished husband. 



(629) 
84— B. A. 



530 


THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 








The Lieutenant-Governor. 






LIST OF LIEUTENANT-GOVERNORS OF OHIO. 




Years. [ Names. 


Counties. 



1852—1854. 

1854—1856. 

ia56— 1858. 

1858—1860. 

1860—1862. 

1862-^1864. 

1864—1866. 

1866—1868. 

1868—1870. 

1870—1872. 

1S72— 1874. 

1874—1876. 

1876—1877. 

1877—1878. 

1878—1880. 

1880—1882. 

1882—1884. 

1884—1886. 

1886—1888. 

1888—1890. 

1890 

1890—1892. 

1892—1896. 

1896—1900. 

1900—1902. 

1902—1903 . 

1903—1904. 

1904—1905. 



William Medill 

James Myers 

Thomas H. Ford '. 

Martin Welker 

Robert C. Kirk 

Benjamin Stanton 

Charles Anderson 

Andrew G. McBurney 

John C. Lee 

John C. I^ee 

.T^.-c'^ M'^'ller . 

Alphonso Hart 

Thomas L. Young 

H. W. Curtis (vice Young) 

Jabez W. Fitch 

Andrew Hickenlooper 

Reese G. Richards 

John G. Warwick 

Robert P. Kennedy 

Wm. C. Lyon 

Elbert L. Lampson 

Wm. V. Marquis (vice Lampson) . 

Andrew L. Harris 

Asa W. Jones 

John A. Caldwell 

Carl L. Nippert '. . . 

Harry L. Gordon (vice Nippert) . 
Warren G. Harding , 



Fairfield. 

Lucas. 

Richland. 

Stark. 

Knox. 

Logan. 

Montgojnery. 

Warren. 

Lucas. 

Lucas. 

Cuyrihcga. 

Highland. 

Hamilton. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Hamilton. 

Jefferson. 

Stark. 

Logan. 

Licking. 

Ashtabula. 

Logan. 

Preble. 

Mahoning. 

Himilton, 

Hamilton 

Hamilton. 

Marion. 



THE SECRETARY TO THE GOVERNOR. 






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TOD B. GALLOWAY. 
Secretary to the Governor. 



(531) 



532 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Secretary to the Governor. 



SECRETARY TO THE GOVERNOR. 

The duties of the Secretary to the Governor are of a personal 
rather than a public character. The official compensation of $800.00 per 
annum is but a partial compensation. Prior to 1904 the title of this office 
was "Private Secretary to the Governor." The following list of private 
secretaries is apparently incomplete, as no sufficient record exists prior to 
1867 of the gentlemen who acted in this capacity. 

PRIVATE SECRETARIES FROM 1367 TO 1902. 



Years. 




RfcsIdenCtt. 



:g whz. 



1867 . . . 

1867 . . . 

1867-8., 

1868-70, 

1870-4., 

1874-6., 

1876-7.. 

1877-8. 

1878 . . . 

1878-80, 

1880-4., 

1884-5. 

1885-6.. 

1886-90, 

1890-2., 

1892-6., 

1896-9., 

1899 . . . 

1900-2. 



F. A. Marble 

G. M. Bascom 

Wm. H. Busby 

Wm. R. Thrall 

John B. Nell 

John H. Putnam 

Alfred K. Lee 

Rodney Foos 

Robert F. Hurlburt . . . 

R. H. Bishop 

Fred D. Mussey 

Daniel McConville, Jr 

Frederick Green 

Charles L. Kurtz 

Claude Meeker 

James Boyle 

J. Linn Rodgers 

Opha Moore 

F. N. Sinks 



Knox County . . . 
Franklin County. 
Franklin County. 
Franklin County. 
Franklin County. 

Ross County 

Franklin County. 
Franklin County. 
Delaware County. 
Hamilton County 
Hamilton County 
Jefferson County.. 
Cuyahoga County 
Athens County . . 
Hamilton County 
Hamilton County 
Franklin County. 
Franklin County. 

(Acting) 

Franklin Coanty. 



Governor 


Cox. 


Governor 


Cox. 


Governor 


Cox. 


Governor 


Hayes. 


Governor 


Hayes. 


Governor 


Allen. 


Governor 


Hayes. 


Governor 


Young, 


Governor 


Bishop. 


Governor 


Bishop. 


Governor 


Foster. 


Governor 


Hoadley. 


Governor 


Hoadley. 


Governor 


Foraker. 


Governor 


Campbell. 


Governor 


McKinley 


Governor 


Bushnell. 


Governor 


Bushnell. 


Governor 


Nash. 



SECRETARIES TO THE GOVERNOR 1904 TO DATE. 


Years. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Sec'y to Whom. 


1904-6 


Tod B Galloway " 


Franklin County. 


Governor Herrick. 









THE SECRETARY OF STATE. 




LEWIS CASS LAYLIN. 

Lewis Cass Laylin, Secretary of State, was born in Norwalk, Huron County. 
His father, John Laylin, was a soldier in the war of 1812, and served under 
Colonel Lewis Cass. 

He vas graduated from the Norwalk high school in 1867, and in 1869 he 
was elected superintendent of the public schools of Bellevue, and was unan- 
imously re elected for five successive years. 

He was admitted to the bar March 13, 1876, and in 1879 he was elected 
Prosecuting Attorney of Huron county, and held that office seven years. 

In 1887 he was elected Representative to the 68th General Assembly, and 
in 1889 he was re-elected and received the unanimous support of the Republican 
minority for the speakership of the House of the 69th General Assembly. In 
1891 he was renominated by acclamation by the Republicans of Huron County, 
and was again re-elected. On January 4, 1892, he was chosen Speaker of the 
House of Representatives of the 70th General Assembly. 

At the Republican state convention of 1900 he was nominated by acclama- 
tion as candidate for Secretary of State, and at the November election of that 
year he was elected to that office by a plurality of 69,311. He was unanimously re- 
nominated for asecond term at the state convention of 1002, and at the election 
following he was re-elected by a plurality of 90,465. In 1904 he was renominated by 
acclamation for a third term, and his plurality at the election in November was 
230,389, being the highest plurality ever given in Ohio for the head of the state 
ticket. 

He has served as member and chairman of the Huron county Republican 
central and executive committees, and also as member of the Republican state 
central and executive committees. 

He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, is a past master of Bellevue 
lodge, No. 273, F. and A. M., and a past eminent commander of Norwalk Com- 
mandery, No. 18. 

On November 3, 1880, Mr. Laylin was married to Miss Francos L. Dewey, 
the youngest daughter of Hon. John Dewey, late of Norwalk. They have three 
sons, Clarence Dewey, Robert Weyburn and Lewis Fairchild. 

(633) 



534 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Secretary of State. 



The Department of State is one of the most important divisions of 
the executive branch of the state government. 

Under the Constitution of 1802, the Secretary of State was appointed 
by the General Assembly, and the duties of the office consisted mainly, to 
use the words of the old Constitution, in keeping a "register of all official 
acts and proceedings of the Governor." 

The office, however, under the Constitution of 185 1, was made elec- 
tive, and elevated to the dignity of a department ; and by virtue of that 
Constitution, and subsequent legislation thereunder, some of the most 
important executive and a dministrative functions ' of the state gov- 
ernment are devolved upon this office. 

The Secretary of State is made by law the custodian of the acts ot 
the General Assembly, and under his supervision the same are printed 
and published, and by him all exemplifications of the same are required 
to be authenticated, and all commissions issued by the Governor to be 
countersigned. 

In this office also, under general statutes, all incorporations are re- 
quired to be created. Recent legislation, requiring domestic and foreign 
corporations to file annual reports and imposing a franchise tax based 
upon capital stock, which the Secretary of State is required to collect and 
pay into the state treasury, makes this department one of great conse- 
quence and importance to the state. 

I The Secretary of State, by virtue of his office, is a member and the 
Secretary of the State Sinking Fund Commissioners, President of the 
Board of Printing Commissioners, member of the Decennial Board of 
Apportionment for legislative purposes, membtr of the State Board of 
Appraisers and Assessors, and of the State Building Commission. 

He is also, by virtue of his office, made State Supervisor of Elections, 
and State Supervisor and Inspector of Elections, and as such has the 
power of appointment and removal of the members of the boards of 
Deputy State Supervisors of Elections in the various counties ; is required 
to collate and publish the election laws of the state ; to determine the ar- 
rangement of the ballot, and prepare and furnish forms and instructions 
to the various county boards of elections ; to receive and file certificates 
of nominations, or nomination papers for presidential electors and state 
officers; to hear and determine objections or other questions as to the 
validity of such papers; to decide upon the validity of all nomination 
papers of a county, district, sub-division of the district or circuit, when 
the county, district or circuit board, authorized to pass upon these papers, 
fails to decide; and a decision of the Secretary of State upon these 
questions is final. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



535 



The Secretary of State. 



FORMER SECRETARIES OF STATE. 



The incumbents of the office under the old territory and since the 
organization of the state government were as follows: 



Name. 



♦Winthrop Sargent .- 

•Wm. H. Harrison 

♦Charles Willing Byrd 

♦*Wm. Creighton, Jr. 

Jeremiah McLene 

Moses H. Kirby 

tB. Hinkson 

Carter B. Harlan 

William Trevitt ). 

John Sloane 

Samuel Galloway 

Henry W. King , 

William Trevitt : : 

James H. Baker 

Addison P. Russell : 

JBenjamin R. Cowen 

Wilson S. Kennon 

Wm. W. Armstrong 

§Wm. H. Smith 

John Russell .• • 

Isaac R. Sherwood 

Allen T. Wikoff 

William Bell, Jr 

Milton Barnes 

Charles Townsend 

James W. Newman 

James S. Robinson 

ttDaniel J. Ryan 

jJChristian L. Poorman 

Samuel M. Taylor ., 

Charles Kinney 

Lewis C. Laylin 



Years. 



1788—1798 
1798—1799 
1799—1803 

■« QO^ 1 0->r> 

1808— is;5i 

1831—1835 

1835—1836 

1836—1840 

1840—1841 

1841—1844 

1844—1850 

1850—1852 

1852—1856 

1856—1858 

1858—1862 

1862 

1862—1863 

1863—1865 

1865—1868 

1868—1869 

1869—1873 

1873—1875 

1875—1877 

1877—1881 

1881—1883 

1883—1885 

1885—1889 

1889—1891 

1891—1893 

1893—1897 

1897—1901 

1901—1907 



♦Secretary of the Northwest Territory. 
♦♦Resigned December, 1808. 
tResigned February, 1836. 
^Resigned May, 1862. 
§Resigned January, 1868. 
ttResigned April, 1891. 
I j Appointed April, 1891. 



A glance at the above list of former Secretaries of State reveals the 
names of several who have not. only attained distinction in public life. 
and in the world of letters, as in the case of William Henry Harrison, 



536 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Secretary of State. 



President of the United States, and William Henry Smith, a well-known 
literateiir and foimder of the Associated Press, but of others as well, who 
have held important national positions. 

THE PRESENT OFFICERS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE. 



Office. 


Name. 


County. 


Chief Clerk * 


Edward D. Howard. 

Leslie C. Smith 

Durward C. Cain . . 

George E. Wood 

Charles R. Brewer.. 
Edward Hummel... 
Howard M. Shaul . . . 
Calvin W. Reynolds. 
Henry W. Frillman. 

Henry G. Bohl 

Frank M. Lasley 

Benton Morrow 

Byron L. Booth 

W. G. McCartney.. 
W. F. Franks..'.... 
John G. Smock 


Franklin 


Statistician 


Cuyahoga. 


Stationery Clerk 


Noble. • 
Sandusky. 


Recording Clerk 


Wood. 


Assistant Recording Clerk 

Proof Reading and Com. Clerk. ., 
Corporation Clerk 


Hamilton. 

Champaign. 

Lawrence. 


Assistant Corporation Clerk 

Corporation Fee Clerk 


Franklin. 
Washington. 


Assistant Corporation Fee Clerk. . 
Stenographer 


Jackson. 
' Franklin. 


Corporation Stenographer 

Superintendent Book Room 

Shipping Clerk 

•Mailing Clerk 


Summit. 
Ashtabula. 
Medina. 
Montgomery. . 







THE' AUDITOR OF STATE. 







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WALTER D. GUILBERT. 

Walter D. Guilbert was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, of French-Irish 
ancestors, and was reared on a farm. His great-grandfather on the maternal 
side settled in Maryland about 1750 and played an active part in the Revolution- 
ary War. He was wounded several times, and at the battle of Brandy wine 
only escaped capture by the thoughtfulness of his comrades, who carried the 
wounded man to a swamp and securely hid him until the British had with- 
drawn. The father of Mr. Guilbert came to this country from France when a 
youth and settled in Guernsey county. 

The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools and at Wenona 
Academy, Illinois. He was twice elected Auditor of Noble county, Ohio, and 
proved himself a most capable official. In 1888 he became chief clerk in the 
Auditor of State's office, continuing in that position until 1896, when he suc- 
ceeded to the important office of Auditor of State, having been nominated by 
the Republican party and elected in the fall of 1895. In his career as a public 
officer, Mr. Guilbert is a genial, patient and painstaking official, combining 
with these virtues an earnest intention to perform his duties in such a manner 
as to insure the best results for the people of Ohio. It is no flattery to say 
that his manner of transacting the business of his department has made him one 
of the most popular men who ever occupied a position in the state capital. He 
was renominated unanimously in 1899 and elected by an increased plurality for 
a second term. In 1903 Mr. Guilbert was unanimously chosen by his party 
and was elected by an increased majority for a third term on which he entered 
in January, 1904. Mr. Guilbert has been active in the affairs of his party, hav- 
ing served as chairman of his county committee for a number of years, and as 
a member of the state executive committee. He was a delegate to the national 
Republican convention in 1888 and also in 1904. 

Mr. Guilbert was married February 5, 18GS, to Miss Mary L. Jordan, of 
Noble county. They have a family of three children, two sons and one daugh- 
ter. He is connected with a number of secret and social organizations, being a 
Mason, a Knight Templar, a member of the Mystic Shrine, of the I. O. O. F., of 
the K. of P., and I. O. R. M. 

(637) 



538 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Auditor of State. 



DUTIES OF THE AUDITOR. 

The Auditor of State is elected every four years, and is the chief 
accounting officer of the State. No money can be paid into or out of 
the State Treasury except upon his warrant. He is custodian of all field 
notes, maps, records, documents, papers and implements of every de- 
scription relating to or used in the survey of the public lands within the 
State, and is required by. law to keep a record of deeds executed by the 
Governor. He is required to prepare all forms and instructions for 
county officers, and county officials are required, by law, to use such 
blanks and obey such instructions. He is required to audit all requi- 
sitions, vouchers and claims against the State, and pass upon t^- vplid'iy 
and correctness of the same before issuing his warrant on the State 
Treasury for payment. He is required to direct suit to be brought against 
delinquent revenue officials, and look after and see to the collection of all 
claims in favor of the State. He may remit illegal taxes or penalties and 
direct that tax duplicates be corrected. 

The work in the office has been greatly increased since the present 
auditor went into office as chief clerk in 1888 by reason of the determina- 
tion to add to the revenues of the State by traffic and excise taxes, which 
should meet the growing needs of the State government, and forever pre- 
vent an increase in the common burden of taxation upon private individ- 
uals and small property holders. The work of putting various revenue 
acts in operation fell upon this department as follows: 

In 1889 the liquor traffic tax act giving the state a portion of the tax was 
passed and put in operation. In 1896 this act was amended increasing the tax. 
which now yields as the state's portion over one million dollars annually. 

In 1893 what is known as the Nichols law, tpxing express, telegraph and 
telephone companies, was passed and put in operation, which yields to the 
state and counties annually more than $30,000.00. 

In 1894 an act levying an excise tax on gross receipts of express companies. 
was passed, and put in operation, which brings into the State Treasury about 
$12,000 annually. In 1902 this law was repealed and express companies included 
In the excise law of 1902. 

In 1894 an act taxing sleeping-car companies was passed and put in opera- 
tion, which brings into the State Treasury $5,500 annually. 

In 1896 a law was passed taxing freight line companies, which brings into 
the state $8,000 annually. 

In 1896 an act levying an excise tax on the gross receipts of all public 
corporations (electric light, gas, natural gas. pipe line, water works, street rail- 
roads, railroads and messenger or signal companies). In 1902 this law was 
amended so as to include suburban or interurban railroad, telegraph, telephone. 
express and union depot companies, and the tax increased to one percent on the 
gross receipts, which yielded last year for state purposes the sum of $1,432,000. 
In 1904 this law was amended to include water transportation companies and 
heating or cooling companies. 

In 1902 an act was passed creating a Bureau of Inspection and Supervision 
of Public Offices, of which the Auditor of State is Chief Inspector and Super- 
visor. 

In 1904 an act was passed, known as the "Direct Inheritance Tax Law," 
providing for a tax of two percent on legacies in excess of three thousand dol- 
lars. It is made the duty of the Auditor of State to collect this tax. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 539 



The Auditor of State, 



The Auditor of State, in addition to the duties pertaining to his 
office, is under the law, a member of the following executive bodies which 
make constant demands upon his time and energy. 

1. Sinking Fund Commission, composed of Auditor of State, President; 
Secretary of State, Secretary; and the Attorney-General. Duties: Have charge 
of disposing of bonds for state revenues and for the payment of principal and 
interest of the state debt. 

2. Board of Equalization foe Banks, composed of Governor, President; 
Auditor of State and Attorney-General. Duties: Equalizing valuation for taxa- 
tion of national and incorporated banks, as returned by the county auditors to 
the Auditor of State. 

3. Board of Equalization for Railroads, composed of Auditor of State, 
President; Trea^Tire^- of s?+9te. A tto^rey General and Commissioner of Railroads 
and Telegraphs. Duties: Equaiiziiig tue vaiue ul idliiOctd jjiopcL^ f^. t^::a- 
tion as returned by boards of county auditors to the Auditor of State. 

4. Board of Equalization for suburban and interurban electric railroads. 
Auditor of State, President; Treasurer of State, Commissioner of Railroads and 
Telegraphs and the Attorney-General. Duties: Equalizing valuation for taxa- 
tion the property of suburban and interurban electric railroads, as returned by 
the boards of county auditors to the Auditor of State. 

5. Decennial State Board. ex-ofRcio member of State Decennial Board of 
Equalization, for the equalization of real property, as returned by the county 
auditors to the Auditor of State. Meets every ten years and continues in ses- 
sion from five to seven months. 

6. State Board of Appraisers and Assessors for Express. Telegraph and 
Telephone Companies, composed of Auditor of State, President; Treasurer of 
State and Attorney-General. Duties: To appraise the value of the capital stock 
of said companies for taxation. 

7. State Board of Appraisers and Assessors for Sleeping Car Companies, 
composed of Auditor of State, President; Treasurer of State and Attorney-Gen- 
eral. Duties: To appraise for taxation that portion of the capital stock repre- 
senting cap tal and property of such companies owned and used in Ohio, upon 
which a tax of one percent is levied and collected annually by the Auditor of 
jState. 

8. State Board of Appraisers and Assessors for Freight Line Companies, 
composed of Auditor of State, President; Treasurer of State and Attorney-Gen- 
eral. Duties: To appraise for taxation that portion of the capital stock repre- 
senting capital and property of such companies owned and used in Ohio, upon 
which a tax of one percent is charged and- collected annually by the Auditor of 
State. 

9. State Board of Appraisers and Assessors for Electric Light, Gas, 
Natural Gas, Pipe Line, Water Works, Street, Suburban or Interurban Rail- 
roads, Express, Telegraph. Telephone, Messenger, or Signal, Union Depot. 
and Railroad Companies, Water Transportation and Heating or Cooling Co.nl- 
PANiES, composed of Auditor of State, President; Treasurer of State, Attorney- 
General and Secretary of State. Duties: To fix the amount of gross re- 
ceipts of the aforesaid companies, upon which an excise tax of one percent is 
charged and collected annually by the Auditor of State. 

10. State Board of Appraisers and Assessors for Appointing Boards of 
Review, composed of Auditor of State, President; Treasurer of State, Attorney- 
General and Secretary of State. Duties: To appoint Boards of Review in all the 
cities of the State, which boards take the place of the Annual City Boards of 
Equalization. 



540 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Auditor of State. 



11. State Board of Tax Commission, composed of the Governor, Auditor 
of State and Attorney-General. Duties: For the remission of illegal taxes and 
penalties and to correct tax duplicates. 

12. Emergency Board, composed of the Governor, Auditor of State. At- 
torney-General, Chairman of Senate Finance Committee and Chairman of tho 
House Finance Committee. Duties: To authorize departments and institutions 
in case of an emergency to expend a greater sum than the amount appropriated 
by the General Assembly for such department or institution. 

'13. Printing Commission, composed of the Secretary of State, Auditor of 
State and Attorney-General. Duties: To contract for all printing for the state. 

14. Paper Commission, composed of the Secretary of State, Auditor of 
State and Attorney-General. Duties: To contract for furnishing paper for the 
state. 

15. Bo«.?.D lu Af<r^^,\h Tlans and Specifications, composed of the Governor, 
Auditor of State and Secretary of State. Duties: All plans and specifications 
of state buildings, improvements or betterments of whatever kind, must be sub- 
mitted to and approved by this board. 

16. Fee Commission, composed of Auditor of State, Secretary of State and 
Attorney-General. Duties: To prepare a schedule of fees to which the various 
county ofiBcials are legally allowed to charge under the provisions of the 
statutes. 

17. Board for University Lands, composed of Secretary of State, Auditor 
of State and Attorney-General. Duties: To determine the claim of title to un- 
patented surveys of persons in possession of lands in the Virginia military dis- 
trict of the state. 

18. Board to Grant Permission to Certain Banking Institutions to 
Transact Business in Ohio, composed of Secretary of State, Auditor of State 
and Attorney-General. Duties: Defined in the title. 

19. Legislative Apportionment Board, composed of the Governor, Auditor 
of State and Secretary of State. Duties: To ascertain and determine the ratio 
of representation in the General Assembly according to each decennial census. 

20. Board to Appoint Agent to Prosecute Claims Against the Go^'ERN- 
ment, composed of the Governor, Auditor of State and Attorney-General. Duties: 
Defined in the title. 

21. Board to Employ Counsel for State Officials, Institutions anh 
Boards, composed of Governor, Auditor of State and Attorney-General. Duties 
Defined in the title. 

22. Board of Appeals, composed of the Auditor of State, Treasurer of State 
and Attorney-General. Duties: To consider appeals of corporations from the de- 
cision of the Secretary of State in levying fees under the Willis Corporation 
Fee Law. 

23. Board of Deposit, Treasurer of State, Chairman; Auditor of State and 
Attorney-General. Duties: To designate such banks and trust companies within 
the state, state depositories, foi' the purpose of receiving on deposit funds of 
the state. 

24. Board for Tuberculosis Hospital, Governor, Auditor of State. Attorney- 
Gteneral, Secretary of the State Board of Health, and one person, resident of the 
state, to be appointed by the Governor. Duties: To select and purchase a site 
for the location of, and prepare plans and construct buildings for a State 
Sanatorium for the treatment of persons suffering from tuberculosis. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



541 



The Auditor of State. 



THE ROSTER OF THE AUDITOR'S DEPARTMENT— 1902. 



Name. 


Office. 


W. D. Guilbert 


Auditor of State 


E. M. Fullington 


Deputy Auditor. 
Chief Clerk 


G. W. Taylor 


J. W. Newton 


R R and Bank Clerk 


G. F. Craword 


Bookkeeper. 
Corresponding Clerk. 
Land Clerk 


Mary C. Morrison 


Orrin Henry 


W. G. Barthalow 

C. W. Poe 


Canal and Trust Fun.: Clerk. 
Statistician. 


I. W. Danford 


Excise Tax Clerk 


E. A. Archer 


Excise Tax Clerk 


C. E. Ward 


Transcribing Clerk. 
Transcribing Clerk. 
Liquor Tax Deputy. 
Examiner of Public Institutions 


S. R. Clark 


A. L. Gorman 


F. C. Rochester 


J. A. Ellis 


Clerk. 


Fred Payne 


Messenger. 





AUDITORS OF STATE FROM 1803 TO 1902. 

Until the Adoption qf the New Constitution in 1851, Term, Three Years; 

Afterward, Four Years. 



Name. 



Term. 



Thomas Gibson* 

Benjamin Hough 

Ralph Osbom 

John A. Bryan 

John Brough 

John Woods 

Wm. D. Morgan 

Francis M. Wright 

Robert W. Tayler| [ 

Oviatt Cole 

James H. Godman 

James Williams 

John F. Oglevee 

Emil Kiesewetter 

Ebenezer W. Poe 

W. D. Guilbert 

W. D. Guilbert 

W. D. Guilbert (incumbent) 



1803-1808 
1808-1815 
1815-1833 
1833-1839 
1839-1845 
1845-1852 
1852-1856 
1856-1860 
1860-1863 
1863-1864 
1864-1872 
1872-1880 
1880-1884 
1884-1888 
1888-1896 
1896-1900 
1900-1904 
1904 



♦Resigned. IJResigned April, 1863. 



542 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Auditor of State. 



BUREAU OF INSPECTION AND SUPERVISION OF PUBLIC OFFICES. 



Name. 


Office. 


W. D. Guilbert 


Chief Inspector and Supervisor. 


G. W. Rutledge 


Deputy Inspector and Supervisor. 


A. B. Peckinpaugh 


Deputy Inspector and Supervisor. 


J T. Tracy 


Deputy Inspector and Supervisor. 


S. A. Hudson 


Clerk. 







THE TREASURER OF STATE. 



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W. S: McKINNON. 



W. S. McKinnon, of Ashtabula, the present Treasurer of State, was born at 
Owen Sound, Ontario, December 19, 1852. He early removed to the United States 
and settled at Cleveland,where he spent his youth. Mr. McKinnon is a machinist 
by trade and is the owner of extensive machine shops. He has held several posi- 
tions of trust among the people of Ashtabula County, having been member of the 
board of education, of the city council, and mayor of Ashtabula. 

He was married April 2, 1878, to Miss J. Octavia Porter, and they have four 
boys and one girl. 

Mr. McKinnon is a strong Republican, and as such was elected to the 73d. 
74th and 75th General Assemblies. He was elected Speaker of the House of 
the 75th General Assembly and served as such during the regular and extra- 
ordinary sessions. 

Mr, McKinnon was elected Treasurer of State from Ashtabula county in 1903. 



(643) 



544 



THE mOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Treasurer of State. 



THE TREASURERS OF STATE. 

Term, three years, until the adoption of the new Constitution in 1851, afterwards 

two years. 



Name. 



Term. 



♦John Armstrong 

William McFarland 

♦♦Hiram M. Curry 

Samuel Sullivan 

Henry Brown ... 

Joseph Wiilteiiili 

Albert A. Bliss 

John G. Breslin 

tW. H. Gibson ; 

A. P. Stone 

G. V. Dorsey \ ■ 

W. Hooper 

S. S. Warner 

tisaac Welsh 

Leroy W. Welsh 

John M. Millikin 

Anthony Howells 

Joseph Turney 

Peter Brady *. 

John C. Brown 

William T. Cope 

Samuel B. Campbell 

Isaac B. Cameron 

W. S. McKinnon 



1792- 
1803- 
1816- 
1820- 

- cnty_ 

1847- 
1852- 
1856- 
1857- 
1862- 
1865- 
1866- 
1872- 
1875- 
1876- 
1878- 
1880- 
1884- 
1886- 
1892- 
1896- 
1900- 
1904- 



-1803 
-1810 
-1820 
-1823 
-1835 
-1847 
-1852 
-1856 
-1857 
-1862 
-1865 
-1860 
-1872 
-1875 
-1876 
-1878 
-1880 
-1884 
-1886 
-1892 
-1896 
-1900 
-1904 
-1906 



♦Treasurer of the Northwest Territory, 
♦♦designed February, 1820. 
^ tResigned June, 1857. 
JDied November 20, 1875. 



ROSTER OF THE TREASURY DEPARTMENT— 1901-2. 



Name. 



Office. 



Treasurer of State . 

Cashier 

Bookkeepers 

Corresponding Clerk 

Messenger 

Guards 



W. S. McKinnon. 
Charles C. Green. 
John W. Barnaby. 
Arthur H. Griffiths. 
Laura Boyd. 
Z, R. Jackson. 
J. M. Hughes. 
A. J. Runyon. 



COMPTROLLERS OF THE TREASURY. 



THE office of Comptroller of the Treasury was established in 1859, 
as an intermediate check between the Auditor of State and the 
State Treasury. Warrants issued by the Auditor were not pay- 
able at the Treasury until countersigned by the Comptroller or his proper 
representative, whose books were practically duplicates of the books kept 
in the office of the Auditor and Treasurer. The office was abolished in 
1877, General Wilson being then in charge. The following list gives 
the names and terms of service of the several incumbents: 

W. B. Thrall, 1859-1862; Joseph H. Riley, 1862-1865; Moses R. 
Brailey, 1865-1871 ; William T. Wilson, 1871-1877. 

Office abolished in 1 877. 



(M6) 
16— e. A. 



THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 



mm 



i |ippp^'!l^.|^iiii^ 



1 



,<iS?»S»; 




\. 



iX 



%*:~ 



\ 



\ 



WADE H. ELLIS. 



Wade H. Ellis was born in Covington, Kentucky, both his paternal and 
maternal ancestors coming from Virginia; his father's grandfather.William Ellis, 
from Fauouier County and his mother's father, Christopher Blackburn, from 
Caroline County. Christopher Blackburn's maternal grandfather was Captain 
James McPike, who served under Col. Howard and Gen. Little and later under 
the command of Gen. Lafayette in the revolutionary war. 

Mr. Ellis attended the public schools of Covington, Hughes high school and 
Chickering Institute in Cincinnati, and later graduated from Washington and 
Lee University at Lexington, Va. Here he studied law, receiving the debater's 
medal, the law scholarship and the honors of his class. He began the practice 
of law in Cincinnati, but in 1894 discontinued for a time his professional 
work to become the managing editor of the Cincinnati Tribune, an independent 
Republican newspaper. In 1896 the Tribune being consolidated with the 
Commercial Tribune, Mr, Ellis was made managing editor of the new paper, 
and continued in that capacity throughout the memorable campaign of 1896, 
and until July, 1897, when he resigned to return to the practice of law.havingbeen 
appointed First Assistant Corporation Counsel of the city of Cincinnati. In 
this latter capacity he served nearly six years, with two administrations, re- 
signing January 1, 1903, to resume private practice. 

When Governor Nash called the extraordinary session of the 75th General 
Assembly In the summer of 1902, to pass a uniform municipal code, made nec- 
essary by the sweeping decisions of the Supreme Court of Ohio against special 
legislation, he invited Mr. Ellis to draft the law, which was presented to the 
legislature and subsequently passed October 22, 1902. Later, Mr. Ellis pub- 
lished the "Annotated Edition of the Ohio Municipal Code." On June 17, 1903. 
he was unanimously nominated by the Republican state convention for Attorney 
General, and elected in November of that year by the overwhelming majority 
which the whole ticket received. 

In 1894 Mr. Ellis was married to Miss Dessie Corwli^ Chase, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Francis M. Chase, of Cincinnati. 

(646) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 547 



The Attorney-General. 



THE OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL. 



THE 76th General Assembly passed an act making many and im- 
portant changes in the organization, powers and duties of the 
Attorney General's Department, greatly increasing its usefulness 
and influence. The Attorney General, by this act, is now made the chief 
law officer of the ft?t« p.^A vo state cf?.cer or the head of any department 
is authorized to employ any other counsel. 1 he Attorney uenerai is em- 
powered to appoint a First Assistant, who may act in his place during his 
absence, a Second Assistant, a Chief Clerk, (in addition to the stenog- 
rapher, and messenger in the office) and such special counsel in State 
cases as he may deem necessary for the conduct of the legal business of 
the State. 

The work of the Attorney General's office has greatly increased since 
the first Attorney General, Henry Stanbery, was chosen in 1846, until it is 
now one of the busiest and most important departments of the State. Be- 
sides representing the State in all cases before the Supreme Court, where 
the docket shows a rapidly increasing number of such cases, as well as 
before the Circuit and Common Pleas Courts throughout the State, the 
Attorney General is the legal adviser of all the State officers, depart- 
ments and institutions. In addition to this he is a member of numerous state 
boards established at various times by the General Assembly which re- 
quire continuous attention. Among these boards are the following: i, 
State Board of Appraisers and Assessors for Express, Telegraph and 
Telephone Companies; 2, State Board of Appraisers for Sleeping Car 
Companies; 3, State Board of Appraisers for Freight Line Companies; 

4, State Board of Appraisers and Assessors for Electric Light, Gas, etc. ; 

5, State Board of Appraisers and Assessors for Appointing Boards of 
Review ; 6, Board of Equalization for Railroads ; 7, Annual State Board 
of Equalization for Banks ; 8, State Board of Tax Remission ; 9, Sinking 
Fund; 10, Emergency Board; 11, t^rinting Commission; 12, Paper Com- 
mission; 13, Fee Commission; 14, Board of University Lands; 15, Board 
to Appoint Agents to Prosecute Claims vs. U. S. Government; 16. Board 
of Appeals under the Willis Law. 



548 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Attorney-General. 



ROSTER OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT— 1904. 



Office. 




Term of Service. 



Attorney General 

1st Asst. Atty. General 
2d Asst. Atty. General 

Special Counsel 

Special Counsel 

Chief Clerk 

Stenographer 

Stenographer 

Messenger 



Wade H. Ellis . . . , 

Geo. H. Jones 

Wm. H. Miller..., 
Smith W. Bennett. 
Roscoe J. Mauck . . , 
Ralph E. Westfall. 



January, 1904 

January, 1904 

January 

January 

January 

January 



1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 



Minnie G. Culton, 
William Sheehan 



January, 
January, 



1904, 
1904, 



to January, 
to January, 
to January, 
to January, 
to January, 
to January, 

to January, 
to January, 



1906 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1906 
1906 
••j'j6 
1906 
1906 



ATTORNEY GENERALS FROM 1846 TO 1904. 



Name. 


Years of Service. 


Terms 


Henrv Stanberv 


Five 


1846 — 1851 


Tosetih McCormick 


One (part) 


1851 — 1852 


n-ftorfiTA E Pusrli 


Two 


1852 — 1854 


Georsre W VIcCook 


Two 


1854 — 1856 


Pranois D Kimball 


One (part) . . 


1856 — 1857 


n P Wolcott 


Four 


1857 — 1861 


TaTTiG^ ivrurrav 


Two 


1861 — 1863 


Lyman R. Critchfield : 

Wm P Richardson 


Two 


1863 — 1865 


One (part) 


1865 


Chauncey N. Olds 


One 


1865 — 1866 


Wm H West 


Four 


1866 — 1870 


Francis B Pond 


Four 

Four 


1870 — 1874 


John Little 


1874 — 1878 


Isaiah Pillars 


Two 


1878 — 1880 


Georee K Nash 


Three 


1880 — 1883 


D A HoUingsworth 


One 


1883 — 1884 


James Lawrence 


Two 


1884 — 1886 


Jacob A Kohler 


Two 


1886 — 1888 


David Kemper Watson 


Four 


1888 — 1892 


John K Richards 


Four 


1892^1896 


Frank S Monnett v . . 


Four 


1896 — 1900 


J M Sheets 


Four 


1900 — 1904 


Wade H Ellis 




1904 




• 





THE STATE BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



THE State of Ohio, in 1827, opened for public use a system of canals 
which connected the waters of Lake Erie on the north, with those 
of the Ohio River on the South, by two inland waterways which 
traversed the State in its eastern and western divisions. The eastern sys- 
tem was generally known as the "Ohio" canal, and extended from the 
Cuyahoga River at Cleveland to the Ohio River at Portsmouth, tapping 
in its route directly or by branches, the valleys of the Cuyahoga, Tuscara- 
was. Tvlushiiigtiiii, Licking, Hocking, and Scioto Rivers, and forming 
waterways between the cities of central and eastern Ohio. This canal 
system necessitated the building of 308 miles of public works, over a route 
which varied in height above the lake level from 395 feet at Akron locks, 
only 35 miles from Cleveland, to 317 feet at Licking Summit, and falling 
96 feet below^ the level of the lake as the canal enters Portsmouth, 308 
miles to the south. 

The western system known as the "Miami and Erie" canal, is 245 
miles long, extending from Toledo to Cincinnati, and piercing the western 
tier of counties. 

The act to provide for navigable c_anals was passed by the Twenty- 
third General Assembly, February 4, 1825. Work was begun in the same 
year, and was continued until the reservoirs were completed in 1842. The 
following figures are of interest. 

LAND GRANTS MADE BY CONGRESS TO AID IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF CANALS 

IN THE STATE OF OHIO. 

1st. Date of Grant, March 2, 1827. Object— To aid in opening 
canal to unite at navigable poin|:s the Wabash River with Lake Erie (so 
far as the same is in the State of Ohio.) Extent — ^A quantity of land 
equal to one-half of five sections in width on each side of canal. 
Grantee— State of Indiana, thence to State of Ohio, by joint resolution of 
State of Indiana approved February i, 1834. Number of acres— 292.- 
223.51. 

2d. Date of grant. May 24, 1828. Object — To aid in extending 
Miami Canal from Dayton to Maumee River. Extent— Quantity equal 
to one-half of five sections in width on each side of said canal. 
Grantee— State of Ohio. Acres— 438,301.32. 

3d. Date of Grant, May 24, 1828. Object— To aid in the con- 
struction of Canals in the State of Ohio. Extent— Five hundred thous- 

(549) 



-is 



550 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The State Board of Public Works. 

and acres, to be selected from land subject to private entry. Grantee — 
State of Ohio. Acres — ^499,997.12. Total number of acres — 1,230,521.95. 

MIAMI AND ERIE CANAL. 

The distance from the Ohio' River to the Loramie Summit is 100 
miles, and the lift 512 feet. There were formerly 53 locks south of the 
Summit, but in 1863 ten were cut off at Cincinnati. From the north end 
of Loramie Summit to level of Lake Erie the distance is 123 miles, the 
number of locks 52, and fall 395 feet. Cost of construction, $5,920,200.41. 

The distance from Lewistown Reservoir to State Dam across great 
Mianii Tvivev nt rort J'-C^r^i^on is 23^ miles. Between this point and 
Lockington, the Sidney Feeder, 13^ miles in length, was constructed at 
a cost of $392,258.32. 

The St. Mary's Feeder and Loramie Feeder are 2^ miles, 3,361 feet 
in length respectively. 

The total cost of construction of the Miami and Erie Canal system 
was $8,062,680.80. 

OHIO AND ERIE CANAL. 

The north end of Portage Summit is 35 miles from lake level in 
Cuyahoga River and has 42 locks. 

The Summit level is 9 miles long, 395 feet above Lake Erie, 491 feet 
above Ohio River at Portsmouth, and 968 feet above the Atlantic Ocean. 

Distance from south end of Summit to Dresden side-cut 102 miles, 
number of locks, 29; fall, 238 feet; from Dresden Junction to mouth of 
Muskingum River at Marietta, 91 miles, fall, 154 feet; from Dresden 
Junction to Licking Summit 31 miles; locks 19, rise 160 feet; from south 
end of Licking Summit to Ohio River at Portsmouth 116 miles, locks, 
53, fall, 413 feet. Cost of construction, $4,695,203.69. 

The Walhonding Canal extends from Rochester to Roscoe, distance 
25 miles, locks 12. Cost, $607,268.99. 

The Columbus Feeder extends from Columbus to Ohio Canal at 
Lockboume, distance 11 miles, locks 2, fall 14 feet. Cost, $61,483.00. 

RESERVOIRS. 

St. Marys — Number of acres (original), 17,603, cost, $528,222.07. 
Lewistown — Number of acres (original), 7,200, cost, $600,000.00. 
Licking — Number of acres (original), 4,200, cost, $200,000.00. 
Portage, Summit County — Number of acres (original), 2,000, cost, 
$80,000.00. 

Loramie — Number of acres (original), 1,900, cost, $22,000.00. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 551 



The State Board of Public Works. 



SIZE OF CANALS. 

The Ohio, Hocking, Walhonding, and Miami and Erie Canal from 
Cincinnati to Dayton, were constructed 40 feet in width on top water 
line, bottom 26 feet, depth 4 feet ; Miami and Erie Canal from Dayton to 
Junction 50 feet top, 26 feet bottom, depth 5 feet; Junction to Toledo 
60 feet top water line, 46 feet bottom, depth 6 feet. 

The size of locks is 90. feet in length of chambers, with 15 feet clear 
width between walls, as originally built. 

COST OF CONSTRUCTION. 

■ The entire cost of construction of the canals, including reservoirs 
and feeders, was $14,340,572.59, besides material aid from private m- 
dividuals and corporations in donations of land, right of way, and 
moneys. Th eState has received by sale of the lands granted by the 
general government for canal purposes, $2,257,487.32. The expenditures 
for the maintenance of the Ohio canals in repairs and cost of collections up 
to July I, 1904, has amounted to $12,066,686.13. The receipts from 
actual earnings for the same time have amounted to $18,003,352.34, leav- 
ing a net credit to the canal of receipts over expenditures for maintenance 
account of $5,936,666.21. 

The Public Works at present comprises 581 82-100 miles of navigable 
canals, about 30,000 acres of reservoir area, besides their feeders, and 
the navigable rivers of the state. 

ABANDONMENT. 

In 1894 the General Assembly ordered the abandonment of that part 
of the eastern system which was known as the Hocking Canal, 56 miles, 
and in 1896, 19 miles of the "Walhonding" Canal. 

LEASE OF THE PUBLIC WORKS. 

On the -second day of June, 1861, the Public Works of Ohio were 
leased by the act of the Legislature, passed May 9, 1861, for twenty 
thousand and seventy-five dollars ($20,075.00) per annum. Said lease 
continued in force until December i, 1877, a twhich time the lessees aban- 
doned the Public Works and by appointment of the Superior Court of 
Montgomery County they were placed in the hands of a receiver until 
May 15, 1878, at which time the State Board again took possession of 
the Public Works of Ohio. 

Amount received from lessees, 16 14 years, at $20.075 $331,237 50 

Amount received from December 1, 1877, to May 15, 1878 69.765 59 

Total amount received and included in above table |401,003 09 



552 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The State Board of Picblic Works. 



The expenditures by the Board of Public Works for superintendence 
and repairs ceased with the transfer of the canals to the lessees. All 
expenditures during that time were for the settlement of prior claims, 
awards of damages, expenses of the office of the Board, expenses in- 
curred in the appraisement of personal property sold to the lessees, and 
the payment of outstanding indebtedness provided for by the act "making 
appropriations for the maintenance of the Public Works," passed May 
13, 1861. 

Under the law authorizing the lease of the Public Works of the 
State, C. S. Hamilton was appointed by the Governor, Paul Weatherby 
by the Board of Public Works, and John J. Isham by the lessees, to ap- 
praise the personal property of the State, which the i^ss^e^ v.-^r'^ r^qi.nred 
by said act lo pui chase. The vaiue ot tne property appraised by them 
and transferred to the lessees amountd to fourteen thousand one hundred 
and seventy-three and 64-100 dollars ($14,173.64.) 



MEMBERS AND OFFICERS OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS— 1904. 



Office. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Term 
Ex- 
pired. 


President 


W. G. Johnston 

Wm. Kirtley, Jr 

Geo. H. Watkins 

W. H. McCiintock.... 

Chas. E. Perkins. 

Samuel Bachtell 

■ 


Akron 


1905 




Defiance 


1906 


Secretary ... . 


Portsmouth 


1907 


DeSance . . 


1905 


Chief Engineer 

Asst. Engineer 


Akron 


1906 


Columbus 


1906 







THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNAtS OF OHIO. 



553 



The State Board of Public Works. 



FORMER MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



Name. 



Term of 
Service. 



Alexander McConnell 

John Harris 

R. Dickinson 

T. G. Bates 

Wm. Wall 

Leander Ransom 

Wm. Rayen 

Wm. Spencer 

O. Follett ..... 

J. Blickensderfer, Jr 

Samuel Farrer 

B. S. Hamlin 

A. P. Miller 

Geo. W. Monypenny 

James B. Steedman 

Wayne Griswald 

J. Blickensderfer, Jr 

A. G. Conover 

John Waddle 

R. L. Backus 

John L. Martin 

John B. Gregory 

Levi Sargent 

John F. Torrence 

James Gamble 

James Moore 

John M. Barrere , . . . 

Philip D. Herring 

Richard R. Porter 

Stephen R. Hosmer 

Martin Scldlder 

Peter Thatcher 

J. C. Evans 

George Paul 

James FuUington 

Stephen R. Hosmer 

Leo Weltz 

Henry Weible 

John P. Martin 

C. A. Flickinger 

Will S. Jones 

Wm. M. Hahn 

Frank J. McColloch • 

Charles E. Groce 

E. L. Lybarger 

Frank A. Huffman 

Charles A. Goddard 

W. G. Johnston 

Wm. Kirtley 

L. D. Hamlin (to fill vacancy) 
Geo. H. Watkins short term) 
Geo. H. Watkins 



1836—1838 

1836—1838 

1836—1845 

1836—1842 

1836—1842 

1836—1845 

1839—1840 

1842—1845 

3 «-».".— 1319 

1845—1852 

1845—1852 

1849—1852 

1852—1855 

1852—1853 

1852—1856 

1853—1857 

1854—1858 

1856—1860 . 

1857—1860 

1858—1861 

1859—1862 

1860—1863 

1861—1864 

1862—1865 

1863—1864 

1864—1871 

1864—1870 

1865—1877 

1870—1876 

1872—1875 

1875—1881 

1876—1879 

1877-1880 

1879—1885 

1880—1883 

1881—1884 

1883—1884 

1883—1886 

1884—1887 

1885—1891 

1886—1892 

1887—1893 

1891—1897 

1892-1898 

1893—1899 

1897—1903 

1898—1903 

1899 

1903 

1903—1903 

1903—1904 

1904 



THE COMMISSIONER OF COMMON SCHOOLS. 



Wfj^j S tawwifPLf ^ ■^i^ ' <Km^'m 'i i-K m mvKPii3i m mmvi»9* ' -" ■ mw i i JHMyjjy i |i^t|j 



\'^ 






M^0'^^' 




EDMUND A. JONES. 



(654) 



;^;; 



M'MS 



Hon. Edmund A. Jones, State Commissioner of Common Schools, Is a typical 
New Englander. He was born at Rockvllle, Mass., February 11, 1842. His an- 
cestors were natives of the same state, his great-grandfather having been born 
at Medway, Mass., about the middle of the eighteenth century. His father and 
grandfather were both teachers in their native state of Massachusetts, the former 
reaching the age of eighty-four years at the time of his death in 1899. 

Mr, Jones received his early education in the common schools, and, after 
further preparation for college at Mt. Hollis Academy, in 1860 entered Amherst 
College. After completing his sophomore year in that institution, he offered 
his services in defense of his country, and was assigned to Company B, Forty- 
bfcCouiI MiiLc>iichu£Ctt£ He^^iircnr or Infantry. His regiment was sent at once to 
join Gen. Banks' command at New Orleans. In the first battle in which he was 
engaged, at Bayou La Fourche, in June, 1863, he was seriously wounded. In 
the following month, after his colonel had recommended him for promotion 
because of meritorious service, he was honorably discharged. In the fall of 
the same year, 1863, he re-entered Amherst College, from which institution he 
received the degree of A. B. in 1865, and the degree of Master of Arts in 1868. 
Both before and after his military service, he was president of ,his class in 
college, having this honor at the time of his graduation. 

Mr. Jones' career as a teacher began in Illinois in 1865, where he taught in 
an academy, to the principalship of which he had been promoted before leaving 
for Ohio in 1869. 

In October, 1869, ,he accepted the superintendency of the city schools at 
Massillon, which position he occupied for four years. He then assumed control 
of the schools at Marietta for a period of two years. His work at Massillon had 
been so satisfactory to the people of that city that they induced him to return. 
Faithfully and efficiently for the last twenty-nine years has he served that city, 
whose people were only willing to release him to accept tne honors of the office 
to which he has been elected by the people of the state. For, when the city of 
Clevland, in 1889, offered him increased salary to come to that city, Massillon 
promptly met the offer and retained him in the position he had filled so long and 
so acceptably to the patrons of her schools. 

Mr. Jones enters upon the duties of the office with the confidence and respect 
of the entire teaching force of the state. His experience as an institute in- 
structor throughout the state, and his excellent service as a member of the 
state board of school examiners, has given him a large acquaintance, and has 
won him hosts of friends, all of whom unite in wishing mm the highest measure 
of success in his administration of the educational affairs of the state. 



(«5) 



556 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS 0^ OHIO. 



The Commissioner of Common Schools. 



CLERICAL FORCE, OFFICE OF SCHOOL COMMISSIONER. 



The clerical force of the office is limited to three clerks and a sten- 
ographer. The correspondence is heavy as the commissioner's opinion 
is daily sought on all subjects pertaining to school laws and school man- 
agement. 

^ CLERKS. 

J. H Sny-^^r, Chief Clerk, Martin's Ferry. 
King G. Thompson, Statistical Clerk, Columbus. 
Miss B. M. Danford, Caldwell, Correspondence Clerk. 
Miss Mary E. Douds, Canton, Stenographer. 

stenog'rapher. 
O. G. Brooks, Messenger, Ironton. 

THE COMMISSIONERS OF COMMON SCHOOLS. 



Name. 



Years of 
Service. 



Samuet Lewis 

Hiram H. Barney . 

Anson Smytlie 

♦C. W. H. Cathcart 
Emerson E. White 
♦John A. Norris . . . 
*Wm. D. Henkle . . 
Thos. W. Harvey . . 
Charles C. Smart . . 

John J. Burns 

D. F. DeWolf 

Leroy D. Brown . . . 

tEIi T. Tappan 

tJohn Hancock .... 
♦Charles C. Miller . 
Oscar T. Corson . . . 
Lewis D. Bonebrake 
Edmund A. Jones . . 



1837—1840 

1854—1857 

1857—1863 

1863 

1863—1866 

1866—1869 

1869—1871 

1871—1875 

1875— 1S7S 

1878-1881 

1881— 1SS4 

1884-1887 

1887— 18S9 

1889-1891 

1891—1892 

1892— 1S9S 

1898—1904 

Incumbent 



•Resigned. tDied in office. 



'.tm.m'^im... 4-.«-. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 557 



The Commissioner of Common Schools. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL COMMISSIONER. 

The office of state commissioner of common schools is a statutory 
and not a constitutional office, the act of March 12, 1836, being the virtual 
formation of the present school system of the state. Laws previously 
enacted had not been so broad or liberal in their treatment of education 
as this act which created the office of superintendent of common schools 
and provided that the officer should be elected by joint resolution of the 
General Assembly. The term was fixed at one year and the salary at 
$500.00. On April i, 1837, Samuel Lewis of Hamilton County was duly 
^lert-eri, TT.. filed hl.^ first rci:Grt at the convenmg of the General As- 
sembly, and on January 16, 1838, that body ordered 10,500 volumes of it 
printed. On March 7, 1838, an act reorganizing the school laws of the 
state was passed and under section eight thereof the term of the state 
Superintendent was fixed at five years unless the incumbent was removed 
by joint resolution. The salary was placed at $1,200.00. Two days later 
Mr. Lewis was elected for the term of five years. On March 23, 1840, 
the office of state Superintendent was abolished and the duties which he 
had performed devolved upon the Secretary of State, who was authorized 
to employ a clerk to do the work at a salary of $400.00. This law con- 
tinued in force until March 14, 1853, when the office of state commis- 
sioner of common schools was again created. 

This law provided that the officer should be chosen at the general 
election, and the term was fixed at three years, the salary being placed at 
$1,500.00. The duties of the commissioner were plainly prescribed and 
provision made that while he was absent on official visits to the various 
counties of the state the State Librarian was to act in his stead and be 
his secretary. 

This law was a complete reorganization of the Ohio school system, 
and in addition to providing for the present classification of township 
districts and cities and villages, contained provisions for separate schools 
for colored children, county boards of examiners for teachers and for 
school libraries. Subsequent legislation has followed in the main the 
classification made in this act. 

On March 27, 1884, a law was passed providing that the term of 
the comriiissioner would begin on the second Monday of July follow- 
ing his election instead of the second Monday of January. This change 
was made in order that the commissioner's term might terminate, ap- 
proximately, with the school year. 



>«*• ^.^^.-s^fe^'-*- 



558 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Commissioner of Common Schools. 

Ohio's educational system. 

The educational system of Ohio has, from its inception, been strict- * 
ly democratic in its nature, the management and support of the schools 1 
being left almost entirely in the hands of the residents of the various | 
school districts. I 

The state is divided into districts, classified as city school districts. 1 
village school districts, special school districts and township school dis- 4; 
tricts. The schools are governed by boards of education, selected by the l| 
electors of the various districts. In 1894 the electoral franchise for the Ij 
election of school officers was conferred upon women and this law still | 
continue^ in foi'ce. The number of members in boards of education in I 
city school districts is now fixed at not less than two nor more than fj 
seven elected at large, and in cities in which the population reaches ! 
50,000 or more, not less than two nor more than thirty elected from sub- '; 
districts, and in village, special and township school districts the boards 
consist of five members elected at large. Prior to 1892 the sub-district j 
schools were in reality governed by a board of sub-directors consistinc: I 
of three members, one of whom was elected as member of the township 
board, but in that year the board of sub-directors was abolished and the 
entire authority conferred upon the township board. This did not give 
entire satisfaction, consequently, in 1898, the board of sub-directors was 
re-established, but with the power of recommendation only, final action 
by the township board being necessary. In 1904, by the passage of the 
Harrison school code, the present system was brought into operation. 

The school funds are derived from the income from school lands ^ 
set apart by the National and State governments for educational pur- f 
poses and by state and local taxes, the state contributing about one- j 
eight of the total amount. I 

The state commissioner of common schools has supervision of the \ 
school funds to the extent of appointing examiners in cases where mis- 
application or fraud in the management of the same make it necessar}'. 

The following statistics from the annual report of the state com- 
missioner for the year ending August 31, 1903, will give some idea of 
the magnitude of the educational work being accomplished in this state , 
at the present time. f 

The expenditures of the public schools for the year 1854 were from 
the State School Fund $1,113,089.02; from the School and Trust Funds 
$112,463.65; from the School District Library Fund $55,904.45; from 
Local Levies $980,000.00 — in all $2,266,457.12. For the year endinc: 
August 31, 1903, the expenditures of the public schools aggregated 
$16,740,004.09. In 1854 the enumeration of youth of school age ag- 
gfregated 816,408; for 1903 it reached 1,243,791. The number of school 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 559 

The Commissioner of Common Schools. 

houses in 1854 was reported as about' 10,300, estimated as worth $3,704,- 
720.90; while the present number is 13,115, worth $50,006,648.00. In 
1854 there were reported 57 high schools employing 71 male and 63 
female teachers, there being 57,649 pupils enrolled. In 1903 there were 
845 recognized high schools with 1,479 male and 773 female teachers, 
there being 57,649 pupils enrolled. 

In addition to the enrollment in the public schools it is estimated 
that 50,000 pupils are being educated in parochial and private schools. 
There are 36 colleges and universities with 1,200 instructors and 8,148 
students. This does not include professional schools, normal academies, 
ct cetera, of which the state has its full proportion. 

STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS. 

There have been a number of changes in the law relating to the 
state board of school examiners. When first enacted in 1864 the board 
consisted of three members who were appointed by the state commis- 
sioner. Since 1883 the number has been fixed at five. The term is five 
years and ends on August 31. The following have served on the board 
since its creation : Marcellus F. Cowdery, Thomas W. Harvey, Eli T. 
Tappan, Israel W. Andrews, William Mitchell, Theodore Sterling, John 
Hancock, Thomas C. Mendenhall, Andrew J. Rickoff, Alston Ellis, Henry 
B. Fumess, John B. Peaslee, William W. Ross, Charles R. Shreve, Charles 
L. Loos, A. B. Johnson, Henry M. Parker, William G. Williams, Elmer 
S. Cox, Charles C. Davidson, Marcellus Manley, Charles E. McVay, 
Thomas A. Pollock, E. E. White, W. J. White, E. A. Jones, R. W. Stev- 
enson, Edward T. Nelson, James W. Knott, J. C. Hartzler, L. D. Bone- 
brake, J. P. Sharkey, Charles Haupert, C. W. Bennett, J. D. Simkins, W. 
W. Boyd, W. H. Meek, M. E.Hard, W. H. Mitchell, C. C. Miller and 
Arthur Powell. The last five, named are the present members of the 
board. 

SCHOOL-BOOK LAWS. 

The first law relating to the use of text books in the schools of Ohio 
was passed April 22, 1885. It required boards of education to adopt text 
books and prohibited any change in the same within five }ears, except by a 
three-fourths vote. A provision was also made authorizing boards to 
provide free text books. 

On the 28th day of April, 1890, an amendment to this law was passed 
providing for a school hook hoard, composed of the Governor, State 
Commissioner of Common Schools, Supervisor of Public Printing, and two 
persons to be appointed by the Governor. This board was authorized to 
pass upon all books used in the schools and to fix a price upon the same 
not to exceed eighty per cent, of the publisher's wholesale list price, and 



560- ^'-f THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OP OHIO. 



in case no satisfactory books could be secured the board was authorized to 
receive bids from publishers and authors for furnishing text books, and 
report the result of the same to the next session of the General Assembl\ 
for action theron. 

On May 4, 189 1, the last-mentioned law was repealed, and a new law 
enacted changing the membership of the "State School Book Board" to 
the Governor and Secretary of State with the State Commissioner of Com- 
mon Schools as secretary. The principal provisions of the former law 
were retained, with further provisions in regard to publication of text 
books by the state and a reduction in the maximum price to seventy-five 
per cent, of the wholesale list price. The law now in force was passed 
Apn: 22, 1896, inakiiig the State Commissioner of Common Schools a 
member of the State School Book Commission together with the Gover- 
nor and Secretary of State. The main provisions of the former law 
were retained, the method of enforcing the law and carrying the same into 
effect being simplified. 

Under this law the schools of Ohio are provided with good text books 
at a reasonable price and boards of education have the power of providing 
free text books if they so desire. 



The Commissioner of Common Schools. i 



THE DAIRY AND FOOD COMMISSIONER. 



wi^-*Mi^*^-m*s 






l--^>) 



'"■>>► 




iiftflfiiMTiliiiriMrr' '- ■ ■ -^ ■■^'■'^■^■- ^--^---- 



i-'ntrftf r-r^^ 



HORACE B. ANKENEY. 



(562) 



Horace Ankeney, successor to Honorable J. E. Blackburn as Dairy and Food 
Commissioner, like his predecessor, was born in a log house. The date was 
February 11, 1850; the place, Beaver Creek Township, Greene County, Ohio. 

After completing the common schools, his father, a believer in higher 
education, sent him to Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, where, in 1872, he took 
his A-B. degree with honor and later received the degree of A.M. in course. 

A lover of country life, he went back from college to the farm and has 
given the best energy of his life towards the uplifting and benefiting of his own 
immediate community. 

First teaching a couple of years the higher branches in the graded school 
near by, he afterwards became a member of the Township Board and served in 
that capacity for twenty years. Township supervision and the Township High 
School soon followed his entrance to the board and Beaver Creek Township, 
although a purely country district, furnishes now each year from six to twelve 
pupils as matriculates to some college or university. Sharing an interest also 
in higher education as well as common schools, he served as Trustee of Heidel- 
berg Unrversity, from 1885 to 1900, and of Miami University (Oxford, Ohio), 
from 1887 to 1900, being compelled to resign the latter upon taking his seat 
as a member of the. 74th General Assembly. 

After serving in the 74th and 75th General Assemblies, his friends encour- 
aged him and led the way for his candidacy and election to the position which 
he now holds, being nominated at the Republican conventioji in Cleveland, in 
June, 1902, and elected the November following. 

Though a practical farmer, he shared some of his time with bank directors 
and stockholders of manufacturing interests. In 1883 he consented to become a 
candidate for Infirmary Director, to which office he was elected, and served a 
couple of terms. Noting the lack of uniformity in the administration of the 
poor laws, he set to work to have the matter remedied, and failing through a 
special act of the legislature, privately published the first collation and annota- 
tion of these laws, but was permitted later to see a similar work done by the 
State Board of Charities under a special act of the legislature. 

A believer and encourager in good citizenship, he has always faithfully sup- 
ported the church to which he belongs, viz.: the Reformed Church in the United 
States and their institutions, serving continuously since 1887 as Trustee and 
Treasurer of her Theological Seminary (Heidelberg) located at Tiffin, Ohio. 



(663) 



564 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Dairy and Food Commissioner. 



ROSTER DAIRY AND FOOD DEPARTMENT. 



Ohio. 



Horace Ankeney 

John J. Kinney 

George Demuth 

C. M. Shafer 

R. L. Allbritain 

Roscoe J. Mauck .... 
Lynne W. Neereamer 

Annie C. Hoge 

Dr. F. H. Frost 

William Martin 

W. E. Johnson ...... 

E. C. Hamilton 

Anthony Sauer 

George H. Riley 

0. V. Rumbaugh 

F. A. Gamble 

W. H, Westman 

Moses Walton 

John A. Smith 

Milton James ... 

Perry L. Hobbs 

T. D. Wetterstroem . . 

Azor Thurston 

O. S. Marckworth 

H. A. Weber \ 

William McPherson . . 

B. S. Young 

J. H. Deal 

O. G. Brooks 



Commissioner 

Asst. Commissioner 

Asst. Commissioner 

Chief Inspector, Food Dept... 

Chief Clerk 

Chief Counsel 

Stenographer 

Clerk 

Drug Inspector 

Inspector Food Dept .> 

Inspector Food Dept 

Inspector Food Dept 

Inspector Food Dept 

Inspector Food Dept 

Chief Inspector, Liquor Tax.. 

Inspector, Liquor Tax 

Inspector, Liquor Tax 

Inspector, Liquor Tax 

Inspector, Liquor Tax 

Inspector, Liquor Tax 

Chemist 

Chemist 

Chemist 

Chemist 

Chemist 

Chemist . ; 

Chemist 

Chemist 

Messenger 



Columbus. 

Cincinnati. 

Toledo. 

Canal Fulton. 

Columbus. 

Columbus. 
/♦_.,, — ►-,-- 

V^C LLiJ^ ^UO. 

Columbus. 

Lebanon. 

Chardon. 

Jackson. 

Washington, C. H. 

Cincinnati. 

Ashley. 

Herring. 

Van Wert. 

Cleveland. 

Spring Valley. 

Logan. 

Caldwell. 

Cleveland. 

Cincinnati. 

Grand Rapids. 

Columbus. 

Columbus. 

Columbus. 

Ada. 

Scio. 

Columbus. 



THE ADJUTANT-GENERAL. 



^' 




A. B. CRITCHFIELD. 



THE department of the Adjutant-General is, as its name implies, 
the headquarters of the National Guard of Ohio, of which the 
Governor is Commander-in-Chief. Under the law, the Adjutant- 
General is appointed by the Governor for a term of two years, 
with the grade of Brigadier-General, and upon him also devolve the 
duties of Quartermaster General. He has two assistants, each with the 
rank of Colonel — the Assistant Adjutant-General and !the Assistanfi 
Quartermaster-General. To the Assistant Adjutant-General is assigned 
the supervision of all affairs of the department pertaining to organiza- 
tion, inspection, discipline, and all similar work pertaining to the Adjutant- 
General's department proper. The Assistant Quartermaster-General has 
charge of all ordnance and quartermaster's stores and of the military 
property of the state, and supervises the affairs of the department per- 
taining to property, transportation, and annual returns to the War De- 
partment. Both assistants operate under the immediate direction of the 
Adjutant-General who is in control of the military department of the 
state. 

The Adjutant-General is also Superintendent of the State Capitol 
buildings and grounds. 

(665) ' . 



566 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Adjutant General. 

ROSTER OF THE GENERAL STAFF (1904). 

Bri&.-General AlVIMON B. CRITCHFIELD, Shreve 

Adjutant-General Inspector General; ex-offlcio Chief of Staff 

Colonel WORTHINGTON KAUTZMAN, Bellefontaine Asstant Adjt. -General 

Brigadier-General CHAKLKS W. MINER (retired) U. S. Army, Attached 

Colonel EDWARD T. MILLER, Columbus Assistant Quartermaster-General 

ROSTER OF THE DEPARTMENTAL FORCE. 

G. S. McCormick, Wooster Second Co Signal Corps. Chief Clerk 

-Capt. Wm. E. Thompson, Ironton Co. 1, 7th Inf., O. N. G., Financial Clerk 

Capt. Julius Armstrong, Columbus Record Clerk 

Capt. R. Ross Shaw, Columbus Bond Clerk 

Capt. M. D. Townsend, Conneaut Quartermaster and Ordnance Clerk 

Sergt. Geo. T. Blake, East Liverpool Enlistment Clerk 

James A. Gallagher, Cleveland Quartermaster and Ordnance Clerk 

Major John C. J^ulton, Cleveland Ninth Batt., Inf., Commission Clerk 

Miss Olive Shurtz, Columbus Stenographer 

Miss Florence Cummins, Galloway Stenographer 

THE DIVISION, OHIO NATIONAL GUARD. 
MAJOR-GENE-RAL CHAS. DICK, 



COMMANDING. 



• 



HEADQUARTERS Akron, Ohio. 

PERSONAL STAFF. 

Captain Aid. 

Captain Aid. 

GENERAL STAFF. 

Lieutenant-Colonel GEORGE M. WRIGHT, Akron Assistant Adjutant-General. 

Lieutenant-Colonel C. BARTON ADAMS, Lancaster Assistant Inspector-General. 

Lieutenant-Colonel MOULTON HOUCK, Toledo Chief Quartermaster. 

Lieutenant-Colonel HARRY FREASE', Canton Chief Commissary. 

Lieutenant-Colonel FREDERICK C. BRYAN. Akron Judge- Advocate. 

Lieutenant-Colonel FRANK M. RITEZEL, Warren Chief Ordnance Officer. 

Captain CHAS. B. WINDER, Bloomdale Inspector Small Arms Practice. 

ATTACHED. 
Lieutenant- Colonel EDMUND C. BRUSH, Zanesville . . . Chief Surgeon. 

FIRST BRIGADE. 

BRIGADIER- GE'NERAL WM. V. McMAKEN, 

COMMANDING. 

Headquarters Toledo 

PERSONAL STAFF. 
FmST LIEUTENANT Aid. 

BRIGADE STAFF. 

Major WILLIAM H. DUFFY, Toledo Assistant Adjutant-General. 

Major FRANK M. BELL. Lima Assistant Inspector- General. 

Major EDWARD W. RYDAIAN. Toledo Brigade Quartermaster. 

Major CLINTON B. WILCOX. Sandusky ...Brigade Commissary. 

Major JOHN PROCTOR, Cincinnati Brigade Ordnance Officer. 

ATTACHED. 
Major FRED C WEAVER, Dayton Surgeon, O. N. G. 

TROOPS. 

The First, Second, Third and Sixth Regiments of Infantry. 
The Ninth Battalion of Infantry. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



567 



The Adjutant General. 



SECOND BRIGADE. ' 

BRIGADIER-GENERAL JOHN C. SPEAKS, 
COMMANDING. 
. HEADQUARTERS : Columbus. 

PERSONAL STAFP\ 
FIRST LIEUTENANT ^j^j^ 

. BRIGADE STAFF. 

Major MAC LEE WILSON Columbus ;..Asistant Adjutant-General. 

Major DANIEL C. STEARNS Berea Assistant Inspector-General. 

^J^^°^ S'^§ST^o^;• f^V?i>i^' Columbus Brigdade Quartermaster 

Major MARCUS A. FISHER, Canton Brigade Commissarv 

Major THOMAS E. BRADBURY. Gallipolis Brigade Ordnance Officer." 

ATTACHED. 
Major LOVETT T. GUERIN, Columbus Surgeon, O. N, G. 

TROOPS. 

The Fourth, Fifth, Seventh and Eighth Regiments of Infantry. 



STATIONS OF TROOPS. 



ADA.... 
AKRON. 



ALLIANCE 

ASHLAND 

BATAVIA 

BEREA 

BLOOMLALE... 

BRYAN 

BUCYRUS 

CANTON 

CAREY 

CHILLICOTHE. 
CINCINNATI... 



CLEVEIAND. 



CLYDE 

COLUMBUS. 



COVINGTON... 
CIRCLEVILLE. 
CONNEAUT. . . 
DAYTON 



DELAWARE... 

EATON 

FINDLAY 

FOSTORIA 

FREMONT 

GALION 

GALLIPOLIS.. 

GENEVA 

GREENVILLE. 
HICKSVILLE.. 



.Lieutenant-Colonel J. Guy Deming and Co. G. 2d Infantrj'. 
.Headquarters of Division. 
Cos. B. and F. 8th Infantry. 

• Major Stanford M. S warts and Co. K. 8th Infantry. 
.Co. E. 8th Infantry. 

.Co. K, 1st Infantry. 

.Co. A, 5th Infantry. 

.Headquarters 2d Infantry and Co. H, 2d Infantry. 

.Co. E. 6th Infantry. 

.Headquarters and Co. A, 8th Infantry. 

• Co. C, 8th Infantry. 

.Maj'or Bert L. Wallace and Co. B, 2d Infantry. 

.Co. H, 4th Infantry. 

.Headquarters and Cos. A, B, C, F, G. I and M 1st Infantry. 

Light Battery B and 5th Co. Medical Department. 
.Headquarters and Cos. C F, I and K, 5th Infantry. 

Headquarters and Co. D, 9th Infantry. 

Headquarters and Cos. A, B, C and D, Batt. Engineers. 

Light Battery A and 3d Co. Med. Dept. 

Troop A and 2d Batt. Naval Brigade. 

• Co. I, 6th Infantry. 
.Headquarters Second Brigade. 

Headquarters and Cos. A. B, and C. 4th Infantry. 

Co. B. 9th Infantry, 2d Co Signal Corps. 

Light Battery H, Troop B and 2d Co. Med- Deot. 
.Co. A, 3d Infantry. 
.Co. L, 4th Infantry. 
.Co. L, 5th Infantry. 
.Headquarters and Cos. G and K, 3d Infantry and Ist Detachment 

Med. Dept. 
.Co. K, 4th Infantry. 

• Co. F, 3d Infantry. 

• Co. A, 2d Infantry and 2d Detachment Med. Department. 
.Major Georjre W. Cunningham and Co. D, 6th Infantrj'. 
.Lieutenant-Colonel Myron C. Cox and Co. K, 6th Infantry. 
.Co. L. 8th Infantry. 

• Co. C, 7th Infantry. 
.Co. E, 5th Infantry. 

• Major Ray M. Gilbert and Co. M, 3d Infantry. 
.Co. E^ 2d Infantry. 



il% "*-#»! -^^ 



568 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Adjutant General. 



STATIONS OF TROOPS-Concluded. 



HILI5B0R0 

IPONTON 

KENTON 

LEBANON 

LANCASTER.... 

LIMA 

LONDON 

LOWER SALEM. 

MANSFIELD 

MANCHESTER. . 

MARIETTA 

MARION 

MARYSVILLE... 
MIAMISBURG... 
MIDDLETOWN.. 

NAPOLEON 

NEWARK 

NEW LEXINGTON 

NOR WALK 

GTIAWA 

PIQUA 

PAlNEsyir.L^,.., 

Jt' \J*%. i Oi-.i.> i <ji\ , 

PORTSMOUTH. . 

RAVENNA 

SABINA 

SANDUSKY 

SHREVE 

SIDNEY 

SPENCERVILLE 
SPRINGFIELD.. 



SUMAfERFIELD. 

SYCAMORE 

TIFFIN 

TOLEDO 



URBANA 

VAN WERT 

WADSWORTH 

WARREN 

WASHINGTON C.H 

WOOSTER 

XENIA 

YOUNGSTOWN.... 
ZANESVILLE 



Co. D, 1st Infantry. 

Hf>adquarten> and Co. I, 7th Infantry. 

Co. I. 2<l Ii.fantry. 

Co. H. l8t Infantry, 

Lieutenant-Colonel Lewis H. Palmer and Co. F, 7th Infantry. 

Cos. C. and K, 2d Infantry. 

Co. L, 4th Infantry. 

Co. D. 7th Infantry. 

Major Frederick S. Marquis and Co. M, 8th Infantry, 

Co. G, 7th Infantry. 

Co. B. 7th Infantry. 

Major Fred S. Titus and Co. D, 4th Infantry. 

Co. E, 4th Infantry 

Major Herbert G. Catrow and Co. H, 3d Infantry 

Co. L, l8t Infantry. 

Co. F, 6th Infantry. 

Major Elmer Blizzard and Co. G. 4th Infantry. 

Co. H. 7th Infantry. 

Major Albert W. Davis and Co. G, 5th Infantry 

Co. M. 2d infantry. 

Co. C, 3d Infantry. 

liirttoi Harry P. Bosworth and Co. M, 6th Infantry 

Uo. M. 6th Infantry. 

Co. K. 7th Infantry. 

Co. B. 5th Infantry. 

Co. E. lat Infantry. 

Co. B. 6th Infantry. 

Co. H, 8th Infantry. 

Lieutenant-Colonel W. T. Amos and Co. L, 3d Infantry. 

Co. F, 2d Infantry. 

Major Thomas J. Kirkpatrick and Cos. B and E, 3d Infantry. 

Co. A. 9th Infantry. 

Major Robert W. Calland and Co. E, 7th Infantry. 

Co. L, 2d Infantry. 

Co. I, 8th Infantry. 

Headquarters First Brigade. 

Headquarters and Cos. A, C, H and L, 6th Infantry. 

Light Battery D and 1st Batt Naval Brigade and 4th Co. Med. Dept 
Ist Co. Signal Corp. 

Co. D. 3d Infantry. 

Co. D. 2d Infantry. 

Co. G. 8th Infantry. 

Lieutenant -Colonel Harry B. Ramey and Co. D, 5th Infantry, 

Co. M, 4th Infantry. 

Major Frank C. Gerlach and Co. D. 8th Infantry. 

Co. I. 4th Infantry, Co. C. 9th Infantry. 

Co. H. 5th Infantry. 

Major Orthillo V. LewTnan and Co A, 7th Infantry and 1st Co. Med 

Dept. 



THE NAVAL RESERVES. 



FIRST BATTALION. 

HEADQUARTERS U. S. S. "ESSEX." Toledo. 

Lieutenant-Commander Edward W. McNelly, Commanding. 



SECOND BATTALION. 

HEADQUARTERS U. S. S. "Hawk." Cleveland. 

Lieutenant-Commander Manning K. Eyre, Commanding 



• 




THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 


569 


The Adjutant General. 


' 


ROSTER OF ADJUTANTS-GENERAL, 1803—1904. 




Years. 


Name. 


Politics. 



1803 

1803—1807.. 

1807.. 

1807—1809.. 
1809—1810.. 
1810—1819.. 
1819—1828.. 
1828—1837.. 
1837—1839.. 
1839—1841.. 

IfiAl is-*.". 

1845—1851.. 
1851—1857.. 
1857—1861.. 
1861—1862.. 
1862—1864.. 
1864—1868.. 
1868—1869.. 
1869—1874.. 
1874—1876.. 
1876—1877.. 
1877—1878.. 
1878—1880.. 
1880—1881.. 
1881—1884.. 
1884—1886.. 
1886-«-1890.. 
1890—1891.. 
1891—1892.. 
1892—1893.. 
1893—1896.. 
1896—1898.. 

1898 

1899—1900.. 
1900—1904 . . 
1904—1905.. 



I Cornelius R. Sedan . . 

I Samuel Finley 

j David Zeigler 

I Thomas Worthington . 

I Joseph Kerr 

I Isaac Van Horn 

I Wm. Daugherty 

I Samuel C. Andrews, 

j Wm. Daugherty 

I Jacob Medary, Jr 

: i'.vlw, II. Cainniings. . 

Thos. W. H. Mosely. . 

J. W. Wilson 

H. B. Carrington . . . . , 

C. P. Buckingham... 

Chas. W. Hill 

Benj. R. Cowen 

E. P. Schneider 

Wm. Knapp 

James O. Amos 

Allen T. Wlkoff 

Chas. W. Carr 

Luther M. Meiley. . . 

Wm. H. Gibson 

Samuel B. Smith 

Eben B. Finley 

Henry A. Axline 

*Morton L. Hawkins . 

Thos. T. Dill 

*Edgar J. Pocock 

James C. Howe 

♦Henry A. Axline . . . 

♦H. B. Kingsley 

Henry A. Ax'ine 

Geo. R. Gyger 

A. B. Critchfield 



Republican. 

Republican. 

Federalist. 

Federalist. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Federalist. 

Whig. 

Democrat. 

Whig. 

Whig. 

Democrat. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Democrat. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Democrat. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Democrat. 

Republican. 

Democrat. 

Democrat. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Republican. 

Republican. 



•Resigned. 



FORMER SUPERINTENDENTS OF THE STATE HOUSE. 



Office abolished and vested in the Adjutant-General. 
William A. Piatt, i860; William M. Awl, 1862; John H. Grove, 1868; 
Charles M. Ridgway, 1870. 



THE STATE INSURANCE DEPARTMENT. 



' »w!/^> ? mimf^Mi^'''^^ ' ^ ' "'.ivi"i! ' ^mii^ ' w» '^^^ i ^jw'^^ui i j^'^ j^ i ij p i^^gBtijp, ' ; j| 



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i^il% A^Titf ^iifcy»^tSfe1>.>. ;.*^ ^^■^. >?vf . ■■, Y*A 



■%M^^!*S:&Sta 






ARTHUR I. VORYS. 

THE State Insurance Department was established by the Act of 
March 12, 1872. Prior to that time, insurance companies were 
regulated by the Department of the State Auditor, under the 
Act of April 15, 1867. The Bureau of Building and Loan Com- 
panies was added to the department May i, 1891, and subsequently Bond 
Investment companies. All insurance companies, operating in Ohio, are 
required to annually submit statements, reporting their financial condi- 
tion on December 31, and other information required by law and the 
regulations of the department. No insurance company and no agent of 
non-Ohio companies is permitted to transact business, unless duly licensed 
by the department. Licenses expire annually, and, if compliance with the 
law is shown, the licenses are usually renewed. 

As a comparative statement of general interest, the following figures 
disclose the extent of the business transacted in Ohio and supervised the 
first year of the department, 1872, and the last year, 1903, viz.: 

In 1872 — Sixty-seven life insurance companies and associations wrote 
in Ohio risks aggregating $30,187,044.00, receiving premiums of $4,493,- 



(570) 



.■:t:.^t-.^ r.. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 571 

The State Insurance Department. 

260.70, and paid losses of $1,481,538.87. One hundred and thirty-eight in- 
surance companies and associations other than Hfe wrote risks aggregating 
$378,690,031.37, receiving premiums of $4,530,743-75, paying in losses, 
$1,609,295.81. 

In 1903 — Sixty-eight life insurance companies and associations 
(other than fratemals) wrote risks in Ohio aggregating $149,090,197.00, 
receiving premiums aggregating $22,678,673.40, paying losses of $8,300,- 
118. 13. Sixty-seven fraternal beneficiary associations wrote risks aggre- 
gating $51,758,519.00, and paid losses amounting to $2,828,466.37. Three 
hundred and thirteen insurance companies other than life wrote risks 
aggregating $1,067,777,885.18, receiving premiums aggregating $14,541,- 
704.3'. ^^ l^^P^'S '^"SS-> .>: $7,594,057.10. 

In 1873 the receipts of the department were fees aggregating $26,- 

246.71, and the expenses, including salaries, were $9,440.93. While in 
1903 the fees paid amounted to $71,581.55, taxes $721,174.90, fire marshal 
tax, $46,967.44; total received by the department, $839,723.89. The 
total expenses of the department were $33,468.94, including printing, 
binding, stationery and supplies procured through the Supervisor of 
Public Printing and the Secretary of State, and not including disburse- 
ments in the Bureau of Building and Loan Associations. 

The following persons have served as Superintendents of Insurance, 
appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate, at and during 
the times indicated : 

NAMES OF SUPERINTENDENTS OF INSURANCE. 

William F. Church 1872—1875 

William D. Hill 1875—1878 

Joseph F. Wright 1878—1881 

Charles H. Moore. 1881—1884 

Henry J. Reinmund 1884—1887 

Samuel E. Kemp 1887—1890 

William H. Kinder 1890— 189b 

William M. Hahn 1893—1896 

William S. Matthews 1896—1900 

Arthur I. Vorys 1900 

The following are the present employes of the department : 
ROSTER OF THE, INSURANCE DEPARTMENT, 1903. 



Name. 


Office. 


Arthur I Vorys 


Superintendent of Insurance. 


J. T Brasee 


Deputy Superintendent. 


John W Crooks 


Examiner. 


Graham Rudd 


Assistant Examiner. 


Georce W Steinman . 


Assistant Examiner. 


H. S Bassett . 


Statistician. 


Herbert Starek 


Bookkeeper. 


Miletus Garner 


Correspondence Clerk. 


Walton Weber 


License Cleric 


N. T. Gant, Jr 


Mailing Clerk. 


Fred H. Caley 


Messenger. 


S. E. Stilwell 


Actuary. 


Danforth E. Ball 


Assistant Actuary. 


Fred Johnson 


Assistant Actuary. 







THE INSPECTOR OF BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS. 



THIS bureau was created May i, 1891, by the enactment of the 
Corcoran law, making the Superintendent of Insurance ex 
officio Inspector of Building and Loan Associations. 

The deputy ispectors, who have at various times been in 
charge of the bureau, with their residence at the time of appointment, 
term of service, and politics are : 



Name. 


1 

Politics. 


* 
Residence. 


Term of Service. 


H. F. Cellarius. .. 
K. V. Haymaker. 

A. J. Duncan 

Dwight Harrison. 
Roscoe J. Mauck.. 
Geo. S. Marshall. 
0. P. Sperra 


Democrat.. . 
Republican . 
Republican. 
Republican. 
Republican. 
Republican. 
Republiean . 


Dayton 

Defiance 

Canton 

Georgetown . 
Gallipolis... 
Columbus. . 
Ravenna. .. 


May, 1891, to July, 1893. 
July, 1893, to June, 1894. 
June, 1894, to August, 1897. 
August, 1897, to June, 1900. 
June, 1900, to December, 1901. 
December, 1901, to May, 1903. 
May, 1903— Incumbent. 



The present force of this bureau consists of : 



Name. 


Residence. 


Office. 


Joseph Everhart 


Basil 


Chief Clerk. 


David A. Jones 

Alfred McClure 

John W. Hook 


Columbus 

Columbus 

West Union 

Warren 

Marion 

Akron 

Coshocton 

Coming 


Clerk. 

Statistician. 

Examiner. 


Emery P. McCorkle ." 

Arthur Williams 


Examiner. 
Examiner. 


P. B. Johnston 

R. A. Crawford 

D. H. Foster 


Examiner. 
Examiner. 
Examiner. 



This bureau originated with those who were connected with build- 
ing associations and who most thoroughly appreciated the necessity of 
state supervision. 

The work of the bureau is largely that of auditing the annual re- 
ports of the associations, pointing out to such associations such prac- 
tices as may contravene the law and requiring their abandonment; fur- 

(572) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 573 

The Inspector of Building and Loan Associations. 

nishing legal and other advice to such associations ; examining such asso- 
ciations as may seem to need it and as the resources of the office admit. 

If any association fails to abandon any illegal practice within thirty 
days after being so notified by the Inspector, or if any association is found 
to be in an unsound condition and the interests of the public demand its 
dissolution, such facts are communicated to the Attorney-General, whose 
duty it is to institute the proper proceedings to revoke the charter of such 
association and wind up its business. 

The building association interests of Ohio now amount to more than 
a hundred million dollars. 

The Deputy Inspector, by virtue of an act passed in April, 1898, is 
also Supervisor of bond investment companies. 




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MARK SLATER. 



Mark Slater, Supervisor of Public Printing, was born at Dayton, Ohio, 
August 9, 1864, where he resided until his appointment by Governor Nash, May 
1, 1901. His father, Calvin T, Slater, was an Englishman, and his mother, nee 
Angeline Emiot, was of French extraction, born and raised in Canada. All ol 
his adult life, Mr. Slater has been a devotee of the art preservative, his first 
employment being in the United Brethren Publishing House, in Dayton, where 
he was engaged 15 years. He afterward had in charge the printing for the 
National Cash Register Company at Dayton, then embarking in business on his 
own account, in a job printing office, where he was engaged at the time of his 
appointment. He is a member of the Typographical Union No. 57. 

Mr. Slater is a true blue Republican and has been an active factor in party 
management in Dayton and Montgomery County ever since reaching his major- 
ity. He was a member of the Republican Committee in his county four years, 
and has belonged to the Garfield Club of Dayton ever since its inception. He 
served as Secretary of the Republican State Central Committee for two years 
and now represents the Third District on that committee. 

On February 25, 1892, he married Miss Lottie Aveyard, and two daughters 
have been the result of that union — Gladys, aged eight years, and Charlotte, 
aged three. Mr. Slater is a first-class official and a popular gentleman. He 
unites all the elements of political success. 



(574) 



THE SUPERVISOR OF PUBLIC PRINTING. 



THE Department of Public Printing consists of a board of Com- 
missioners of Public Printing which is composed of the Auditor 
of State, the Secretary of State, and the Attorney-General, and 
a supervisory department, which is managed by an officer called 
the Supervisor of Public Printing, who is appointed by the Governor for 
a term of two years. 

- In the early history of the. state, the Public Printer was elected by 
the General Assembly, generally on the recommendation of the Commit- 
tee or. P\Tvli« P.-iini.;g v.liiv-h was charged with the duty of canvassing 
for bids and recommending as its candidate the party presenting the 
most favorable terms or most favorable conditions for the execution of 
the work. 

The office of Supervisor of Public Printing was created by the Gen- 
eral Assembly in the year i860, the appointing power being vested in the 
Commissioners of Printing, who appointed L. L. Rice to the office. In the 
year 1864, the law was so changed as to vest the appointment of the 
Supervisor in the Governor, who appointed W. O. Blake as such officer. 

STATE BINDERY. 

The State Bindery was organized in the year 1867 by the Supervisor 
of Public Printing and the Trustees and Superintendent of the Deaf and 
Dumb Asylum, for the benefit of the unfortunate deaf mutes of that In- 
stitution. 

The Supervisor is charged with the superintendence of the State 
Bindery, which is located on the grounds of, and largely operated by 
pupils of, the Institution for Deaf Mutes, in Columbus. He is also given 
executive authority in the oversight of the printing done under the several 
state contracts, and must see that the work is properly done and promptly 
delivered. He must keep a record of all the work done by the two 
branches of state printing and state binding, and submit an annual report 
to the Governor covering the business done by these departments. 

STATE PRINTING. 

The contracts for state printing are let by commissioners every two 
years by competitive bids, which are duly advertised. There are seven 
classes of printing, which are defined as follows : 

First Contract— All bills for the General Assembly and such resolutions and 
other matters as it may order printed in bill form. 

Second Contract — Journals of the Senate and House of Representativea. 

(575) 



»--■■,{ siSf*" -;• "^^T-.i-i -^*v. ^i«« 



576 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Supervisor of Public Printing. 



Third Contract — All reports, communications, etc., printed in pamphlet form, 
except bulletins of the Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station. 

Fourth Contract — General and Local laws and Joint Resolutions. 

Fifth Contract — All blanks, circulars, etc., for the executive departments not 
printed in pamphlet form. 

Sixth Contract — Reports of the Secretary of State, Inspector of Building and 
Loan Associations and Commissioner of Labor Statistics. 

Seventh — Reports of the auditor of State, Commissioner of Common Schools, 
Superintendent of Insurance (Life and Fire) and State Board of Agriculture. 



The state binding is done by day labor, chiefly, as has been stated, 
by the pupils or ex-pupils of the Institution for Deaf Mutes. 



The number of person? ?o employe 






DEPARTMENT ROSTER— 1904. 



Name. 




Residence. 



Mark Slater 

D. L. Agler 

George Schmelz. 



Supervisor 

Clerk 

Foreman of Bindery. 



Dayton. 

Columbus. 

Columbus. 



NAMES OF FORMER SUPERVISORS WITH TERM OF SERVICE. 



Name. 


Term 
of Service. 


L. L. Rice 


I860 — 1864 


Wm. 0. Blake 


1864 


W. H. Foster i 


1864—1867 


li. L. Rice 


1867 — 1875 


Chas. B. Flood 


1875 — 1877 


Wm. W. Bond 


1877 — 1879 


Wm. J. Elliott 


1879 — 1881 


Joshua K. Brown 


1881 — 1885 


W. C. H. De la Court 


. 


1885 — 1887 


Leo. Hirsch 


1887 — 1891 


S. V. Hinkle 


1891 — 1892 


Leo. Hlrcsh. 


1892 — 1901 


Mark Slater 


1901 







THE COMMISSIONER OF RAILROADS AND TELEGRAPHS. 






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J. C. MORRIS. 



Mr. J. C. Morris, Commissioner of Railroads and Telegraphs, was bom In 
loungstown, Ohio, August 18, 1857, and was educated in the public schools of 
that city. But while yet a boy he secured employment in a local grocery store 
and continued in that employment until his nineteenth year, when he began 
railroading. He continued in this vocation until he was appointed Chief In- 
spector in the office of the State Commissioner of Railroads and Telegraphs, 
faithfully performing the duties of this appointment until the 16th day of 
March, 1901, at which time he was appointed Commissioner of Railroads and 
Telegraphs. 

During all this long period of railway service — 26 years In all — he was in 
the employ of the Erie Railway Company, a fact that speaks well for the char- 
acter of the service he rendered. 

He is a married man, having been married to Miss Emma Morris of Youngs- 
town, Ohio, on April 24, 1878. They have four children, all boys. Mr. Morris is 
a Mason, a K. of P., and a member of the Order of Railway Conductors. 



(677) 



tT— a JL 



578 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Commissioner of Railroads and Telegraphs, 



THE DEPARTMENT OF RAILROADS AND TELEGRAPHS. 3 



The Department of the Commissioner of Railroads and Telegraphs 
was created by an act of the Fifty-seventh General Assembly passed 
April 5, 1867, which required the appointment of the officer within fifteen 
days after the passage of the act, and prescribed his duties. He has a 
general police authority over roads operating in Ohio, and is required 
to give careful attention to the construction, operation and maintenance 
of the roads and their equipment so far as these matters relate to the 
safety and general welfare of the public. The following extract from the 
last report of the Commissioner, is a tribute to the friendlv readiness -^^ tlii, 
railroad companies to safeguard the public, as well as an indication of 
the watchfulness of the department : 

The railroads of Ohio have never been in a better physical condition 
than at the close of the present year. One hundred and twenty-six trestles, 
having an aggregate length of sixty-seven thousand, nine hundred and 
thirty-four feet or twelve and eighty-seven-hundredths miles, have been 
filled and abolished. Large sums of money have been spent in better- 
ments, the road bed materially improved, light rails replaced by rails of 
greater weight and modern steel bridges taking the place of wooden 
structures. It is unnecessary to suggest that this will greatly increase 
the safety of the traveling public. 

Eight thousand, eight hundred and seventy-one more people were 
employed by the railroads of Ohio during the year last passed than dur- 
ing the previous year. In the year 1902 the railroads gave employment 
to seventy-five thousand, one hundred and twv^nty persons. 

Wonderful activity has been manifest during the year in the mat- 
ter of construction of electric railroads and a large amount of capital is 
now invested in such enterprises. In so far as I have been able to ob- 
serve, roads of this kind have been well constructed. At the present time 
electric railroads are not required to report to any Department of the 
State, except a report of gross earnings to the Auditor of State, and I 
would recommend appropriate legislation requiring such roads to make 
an annual report of their operations and financial condition and to author- 
ize a police supervision over them for the protection of life and property. 

From a financial standpoint the railroads of Ohio have enjoyed a 
year of unprecedented prosperity. The gross earnings from operations 
within the state are, for the first time, in excess of one hundred million 
($100,000,000.00) of dollars. The net receipts were in excess of thir- 
teen millions, five hundred thousand ($13,500,000.00) dollars, insuring 
to the stockholders a reasonable return for the capital invested. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



579 



The Commissioner of Railroads and Telegraphs. 

There are a total of one hundred and seventy- four interlocking 
machines now in operation in Ohio for the purpose of protecting cross- 
ings, at grade, of steam railroads. Of this number, twenty have been 
installed during the year and the general condition of those previously 
put in operation has been much improved by rearrangement and recon- 
struction. . 

ROSTER OF DEPARTMENT, JULY, 1902. 



Name. 



Office. 



J. C. Morris. . . . 

H. E. King 

E. H. Hanna 

W. O. Jackson. . 
0. F. McJunkin. 
D. F. Johnson . . 

D. S. Archer. . . 
C. L. Hughes 



Commissioner. 
Chief Clerk. 
Statistician. 
Chief Inspector. 
Deputy Inspector. 
Inspector of Couplers 

and Brakes. 
Stenographer. 
Messenger. 



FORMER COMMISSIONERS OF RAILROADS AND TELEGRAPHS. 
(Term of office: Two years.) 



Name. 


Term. 


George B. Wright 


1867—1871 


Richard D. Harrison . . 


1871—1872 


Orlow L. Wolcott. . 


1872—1874 


John G. Thompson 


1875—1876 


Lincoln G. Delano 


1876—1878 


William Bell, Jr 


1878—1880 


James S. Robinson 


1880—1881 


Hylas Sabine 


1881—1885 


Henry A.pthorp 


1885—1887 


William S. Cappelar 


1887—1890 


James A. Norton 


1890—1892 


William Kirkby 


1892—1897 


Raymond S. Kayler 


1897—1901 


J. C. Morris 


Incumbent 







Mr. Wright resigned in October, 1871. 
Jjr. Harrison died in April, 1872. 
Mr. Thompson resigned in Dec, 1875. 
.Mr. Bell died In June, 1902. 



Mr. Robinson resigned in February, 1881. 
Mr. Cappellar resided in May, 1890. 
Mr. Norton resigned in May, 1892. 



THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS. 




MICHAEL D. RATCHFORD. 



Commissioner of Labor Statistics Michael D. Ratchford, the subject of thib 
sketch, was born in Clare, Ireland, in 1860. Migrating with his parents to 
Stark County, Ohio, some ten years later, he attended the public schools there 
until he reached his twelfth year, at which age he entered the mines where ho 
labored for more than twenty consecutive years. His education, however, was 
principally acquired by attending evening school, and by careful home study 
during the earlier years of his occupation in mining. 

Mr. Ratchford, although mainly conservative in his views upon the labor 
question, was an active trade unionist, and as such he realized the growing: 
needs of a thorough organization of mine workers, and labored unceasingly to 
that end. He was elected to and served in the office of President of the Mas- 
sillon, Ohio, miners, 1890-92; General Organizer, 1893-94; President Ohio IMiners. 
1895-96; President of the United Mine Workers of America, 1897-98. It wa.s 
while serving in the chief executive oflBce that he established and put into 
practice a working-day of eight hours; instituted mutual relations and an 
annual wage contract between mine workers and operators through which 
strikes have since been averted; and made uniform the conditions of mining 
throughout the bituminous coal fields. 

He was appointed by President McKinley September 7, 1898, as member 
of the National Industrial Commission created by Congress, where he served 
for nearly two years, resigning the same to accept the office of Commissioner of 
Labor Statistics of Ohio, to which he was appointed by Governor George K. 
Nash, April 25. 1900, and reappointed April 25. 1902. 

Mr. Ratchford is unswerving in his devotion to the Republican party, and 
as such has ably discussed the issues for which his party stands in many states 
Of the Union during national and state compaigns. 



l«0) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



581 



The Bureau of Labor Statistics. 



The Commissioner of Labor Statistics is appointed by the Governor 
by and with the advice and consent of the Senate for a term of two years. 
The Chief Clerk and office force of the Bureau are appointed by the Com- 
missioner with the consent of the Governor. The superintendents and 
clerks of the five Free Public Employment Offices— Cleveland, Columbus, 
Cincinnati, Dayton and Toledo, which are under the direction and super- 
vision of the Bureau, are also appointed by the Commissioner in the same 
manner for a term of two years. 

The Bureau, under the law — Sec. 308 of the Revised Statutes — 
collects, arranges and systematizes all statistics relating to the various 
branches of labor in the state, and especially those relating to the com- 
mercial, inuub trial, social, educational and sanitary conditions of the labor- 
ing classes. 

• - - - 

COMMISSIONERS OF LABOR STATISTICS. 
Appointive by the Governor, and term of office for two years. 



Incumbents. 


Years of Service. 


- 
Terms. 


Henry J. Walls 

Henry Lusky 


Four 

Four 

Two 

Three 

Two 

Four 

Two 

Two 

Incumbent 

Incumbent 


1877—1881 
1881—1885 


Larkin McHugh 


1885—1887 


Alonzo D. Fassett 

John McBride 

Wm. T. Lewis 

Wm. Ruehrwein 

J. P. Jones ' 

M. D. Ratchford 

M. D. Ratchford 


1887—1890 
1890—1892 
1892—1896 
1896—1898 
1898—1900 
1900—1902 
1902—1904 



Note. — Commissioner Fassett was legislated out of office in 1890, and was 
succeeded by Mr. McBride, who resigned before his term expired. 



THE INSPECTOR OF MINES. 



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GEORGE HARRISON. 



George Harrison, Chief Inspector of Mines, wa;^ born in Greenhead, Northum- 
berland County, England, April 30, 1846, and went to work in the mines at the 
age of eight years and passed through all the stages of labor, connected with 
mines from trapper boy up to superintendent and manager. Was a trade union- 
ist from boyhood, and having removed to Durham County in 1863, was an active 
worker in the establishment and maintenance of the Durham Mines Union, and 
for many years was one of its representatives and a member of its Executive 
Board in the seventies. Came to America in 1880, and located in Byesville, 
Guernsey County, Ohio, and has resided in the state ever since. During these 
years he was connected with the practical mine workers and since 1887, has had 
charge of the management of mines located in Guernsey, Portage, INIahonini:, 
Jefferson, Jackson and Perry Counties. He was President of the Miners' Union 
in the Cambridge District for a number of years and a State Organizer and Sec- 
retary of the Miners' State Executive Board, and was one of the fearless advo- 
cates of .conciliation and arbitration in the councils of the miners in the eighties. 
when the National Federation first assumed great powers. He has always been 
an active worker in mining matters, and his admonitions were always listened 
to by that organization which is so powerful in the coal-producing districts of 
the United States. 

From April, 1895, to August, 1903, he was in charge of mining properties 
In Jackson County, owned by the Wainwright Coal Company, and is still ^ 
resident of Wellston of that county. From July, 1903, up to the time he was ap- 
pointed Chief Inspector of Mines, by Governor Myron T. Herrick, on ]May 25. 
1904, he was associated with W. A. Gosline & Co., of Toledo, Ohio, opening up 
mining property in Perry County. 

(582) 



':"*^^3,^i#*' 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 583 

The Inspector of Mines. 

A REVIEW OF THE OHIO STATE MINING DEPARTMENT. 

In the year 1871, owing to a catastrophe occurring in the Avondale 
Mine, located in the anthracite region of Pennsylvania, in which one 
hundred and nine persons lost their lives for the want of a second opening, 
the miners of this state held meetings and signed petitions requesting 
that laws be enacted to regulate and ventilate mines, and that an author- 
ized official supervisor be appointed. These petitions were presented to 
the Senate by Senator Woodworth, of Mahoning county, and were re- 
ferred to a select committee of seven senators from the mining regions of 
the state. This committee authorized Senator Daugherty to prepare a 
bill on the subject. Six of the s^v*»n ^en^'tors .cccmni'^'idcd t!:f passage 
of the bill, but it was met with persistent opposition from interested par- 
ties. 

Senator Woodworth thereupon introduced a joint resolution in the 
Senate, authorizing the Governor to appoint a commission of three com- 
petent persons, one or more of whom should be practical miners, to in- 
spect the leading coal mines of the state in regard to ventilation, means 
of ingress and egress, and all other matters affecting the lives and health 
of the miners ; and also to inquire into the cause of strikes and report to 
the Governor, for the use of the Legislature, the facts found in the prem- 
ises, recommending such legislation as in the judgment of the commission 
the facts might demand. Governor Hayes appointed a board composed 
of the following members : Charles Reemelin, of Cincinnati ; B. F. Skin- 
ner, of Pomeroy; and Andrew Roy, of Glen Roy, Ohio. This board was 
on duty four months. In the month of January of the following year 
(1872) the report of the commissioners was laid before the Legislature. 
Senator Jones, of Trumbull county, chairman of the Committee on Mines 
and Mining in the Senate, introduced the bill for the ventilation and in- 
spection of mines at this session, which, although passing the Senate by 
a unanimous vote, failed to secure a constitutional majority in the House, 
and a substitute by Representative Conrad, of Portage county, was made 
a law. This substitute contained all the provisions of the Senate bill, 
except as to the official supervision of the mines by the state. Owing to 
the fact that it failed to provide for the inspection of mines, its precepts 
and provisions were disregarded by nearly every mine owner in the state. 
Accordingly Governor Hayes, in his next annual message to the Legis- 
lature, called attention to its defects, and urged the Legislature to so 
amend the law as to provide for authorized official supervision ; otherwise 
it would continue to be for the most part inoperative. Mr. Sterling, of 
the House, introduced a bill supplementary to and amendatory of the law, 
as enacted, providing for a state inspector of mines, and prescribing his 
duties, but this failed to become a law. 



584 THE BIOGRAPHICAI- ANNAT-S OF OHIO. 

The Inspector of Mines, 

However, during the early part of the session of the Legislature, 
two bills were introduced in the House of Representatives for the inspec- 
tion of mines, one by Mr. McLain, of Trumbull county, the other by IMr. 
Baker, of Perry county. The McLain bill was amendatory to the act in 
force, and had the same object in view as the bill introduced by Mr. 
Baker, but the Baker bill, containing the whole act, was adopted in com- 
mittee as being simpler than the other, and it became a law. 

On April 6, 1874, Wm. Allen, Governor of Ohio, appointed Andrew 
Roy, Dell Roy, Ohio, to be the first Inspector of Mines. On April 18, 
188 1, a law was enacted by the General Assembly providing for the ap- 
pointment of an assistant Inspector of Mines, and on June 4, of the same 
year J'^co^ I Kle^n, of Stark county, was appointed to fill that posi- 
tion by State Mine Inspector Andrew Roy, by and with the approval of 
the Governor. 

On April 11, 1884, a bill was introduced in the House, which was 
subsequently amended by the Senate, and passed in its amended form, 
creating the office of Chief Inspector of Mines, with an assistant desig- 
nated as a District Inspector in each district. The state was divided into 
three districts, and three District Inspectors appointed. This was due to 
the rapid growth of the mining industry, and the great increase in the 
number of mines, which in turn, increased the amount of work to be done 
in the office, making it impossible for the Inspector, with one assistant, 
to perform these duties in a satisfactory manner. * 

• On March 24, 1888, the General Assembly amended Section 290 of 
the Revised Statutes, providing for the appointment of five District In- 
spectors instead of three. Again on April 18, 1892, Section 290 of the 
Revised Statutes was revised and supplemented by an additional Sec- 
tion, by the General Assembly, which provided for the appointment of 
seven District Inspectors. This number has been maintained up to the 
present time. The following is a Hst of the Chief Inspectors of Mines, 
and the term of office served by each, since the creation of the department, 
together with a list of the Deputy Mine Inspectors, and the time ser\^ed 
by each : 

It might be of interest in connection with the history of the Mining 
Department to note the following facts: When the Department was first 
created there were in operation about two hundred mines. The statistics 
received for the year 1903 disclose the following: Nine hundred and 
eleven mines in operation, employing forty-one thousand three hundred 
and ninety-six men; amount of coal produced, twenty-four million five 
hundred and seventy-three thousand two hundred and sixty-six tons ; 
number of mining machines in use, seven hundred and seventy- four ; 
amount of coal produced by mining machines, fourteen million five hun- 
dred and sixty thousand nine hundred and thirty-one tons; tons of fire 
clay mined, one million five hundred and sixty-seven thousand six hundred 
and three. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



585 



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THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Inspector of 'Mines. 


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THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



587 



The Inspector of Mines, 



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STATE HIGHWAY COMMISSION. 




SAM HUSTON. 



Sam Huston, the present State Highway Commissioner, was born in Island 
Creek Township, Jefferson County, Ohio, February 28th, 1850, and spent his 
early yearr upon a farm. He was educated n common schools, academy and 
college, graduating and receiving his diploma in the Scientific and Engineering 
Course. Served as a member of Board of Education and as Township Clerk. 
Was elected County Surveyor of Jefferson County in 1885, and re-elected in 
1888, 1891, 1894 and 1897, serving from January, 188G, to September, 1901, a 
period of fifteen years and eight months. The Legislature, during his incum- 
bency, changed the beginning of the official year of the office of County Sur- 
veyor from January to September, causing an interim of eight months to which 
he was appointed by the County Commissioners. 

During his service as County Surveyor and Engineer he had charge of the 
construction of a large number of miles of improved roads in Jefferson County, 
costing in the aggregate upward of $800,000. One system included 78 miles. In- 
cluded in the work under his charge was about 120 miles of stone and brick 
surfaced roads, together with about 30 miles which were graded without surfac- 
ing. Mr. Huston has studied, investigated and promoted good roads for thirty 
years, beginning his work of promotion of good roads in 1874, and in doing so 
has visited thirty-five states and territories, traveling from Maine to California. 

Mr. Huston was appointed State Highway Commissioner June 30th,' 1904, 
by Governor Herrick, for the term ending June 30th, 1908. 



(688) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 589 

State Highzvay Commissioner, 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

The Highway Department was created by the 76th General As- 
sembly of the State of Ohio, at its regular session, the act being entitled 
"An act to establish a state highway department by the appointment of 
a state highway commissioner and assistants, and defining the duties 
of the office, and to provide for a system of state, county and townshi]:) 
co-operation in the permanent improvement of public highways." The 
act was passed April 18, 1904. On the same day another act was passed 
"Providing for the operations of the State Highway Department and pro- 
viding for investigating the chemical and physical character of road 
makinsr material etc." The intention of the department is indicated in 
Builetm i\.o. i, issuea I\iarch 14, 1905. 

Section 2 of the bill "To establish a state highway department" pro- 
vides, that the Highway Commissioner may make inquiries in regard to 
the best methods of road making throughout the United States. This 
recognizes that the science of road building is one of advancement, and 
that the Department of Highways is to be a progressive one, and that it 
shall keep in touch with whatever is new in road building, and make it 
available for the benefit of the state. Along the same line is the provision 
that the Commissioner may "make investigations and experiments in re- 
gard to the best methods of road making and the best kinds of road 
material and investigate the chemical and physical character of road 
materials." 

The Department is to be a school for the dissemination of informa- 
tion to the people of the state as to the needs and developments in the 
science and practice of road building, and in carrying out the evident 
intent of the Legislature, the Commissioner of Highways expects to take 
part in meetings and conventions in the interest of good roads through- 
out the state, and aid local authorities to the economical and efiFective 
expenditure of the funds at their command for road construction and 
maintenance. 

The work of the Department will not in any manner interfere with, 
nor supersede the local authorities in their work of road construction and 
maintenance under former laws, but hopes to co-operate in a friendly 
way and to mutual benefit. 

The second purpose of the acts of the Seventy-sixth General As- 
sembly is to provide that the State Highway Department should have the 
direction of the construction and future maintenance of such roads as 
might be built under any state appropriation for aid, or from any appro- 
priation from the federal government. 

The Department is organized as follows : 

Commissioner Sam Huston Steubenville, 

Chief Clerk F. W. Burdell Columbus. 

Stenographer Miss Hannah Jones Columbus. 



THE INSPECTOR OF WORKSHOPS AND FACTORIES. 



J. H. Morgan, present Chief Inspector of the Department of Workshops and 
Factories, was born in Wales, February 14, 1862. With his parents he came to 
this country in 1869, locating at Newark, Ohio. Attended the public schools 
until fourteen years of age, when he went to work in the glass factory. Two 
years later removed to Cleveland, where he worked in the sheet rolling depart- 
ment of the Cleveland Rolling Mill Co.; removed to Bridgeport in the autumn of 
1885, and in 1890 removed to Cambridge, where he still resides. 

A sheet and tin roller by occupation, he always took an active interest in 
labor organizations; has been national vice-presid*=^nt and rit^'OT^nl trzztm cf t'j*-' 
A. A. of S. I. and T. W. In 1895 he was elected Stae Senator lo represent the 19th 
District in the Seventy-second General Assembly. On December 1, 1901, was 
appointed Chief Inspector of Workshops and Factories. 



The department originated from the urgent appeals of organized 
labor throughout the state to the General Assembly, and its purpose is to 
save life and limb by ordering safeguards to be thrown around all danger- 
ous machinery and looking after sanitary conditions in workshops and 
factories and ordering fire escapes on such shops where necessary, and 
causing all owners of buildings used for the assemblage of people to sup- 
ply them with proper means of egress and fire protection. 

The act of 1884 creating the Department of Workshops and Fac- 
tories, provided for the appointment of one inspector by the governor, but 
did not specify the term of office or make any provisions for office room. 
Henry Dorn, of Cleveland, was appointed Inspector, and entered on the 
duties of his office April 14, 1884, establishing headquarters at Cleve- 
land. April 29, 1885, the act was amended creating the office of Chief 
Inspector, and providing for the appointment of three District Inspectors, 
and locating the department in the State Capitol.. Henry Dorn was ap- 
pointed Chief Inspector, serving from April 29, 1885, to April 29, 1889. 

W. Z. McDonald, of Akron, was appointed Chief Inspector April 29, 
1889, and served one full term to April 29, 1893. March 23, 1892, the 
law was amended empowering the chief inspector to appoint eight addi- 
tional District Inspectors. Mr. McDonald was reappointed for a second 
term and served until June 12, 1893, when removed. 

E. M. Slack, of Columbus, the chief clerk, was placed in charge of 
the department, as acting Chief Inspector, June 12, 1893, and served until 
December 7, 1893, in that capacity. 

J. W. Knaub, of Dayton, was appointed Chief Inspector to fill the 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 591 

The Inspector of Workshops and Factories, 

vacancy occasioned by removal of W. Z. McDonald, December 7, 1893, 
and served until April 29, 1897 ; reappointed for a term of four years, 
term ending April 29, 1901, and served until December i, 1901, when 
the present incumbent was appointed. 

April 2y, 1896, a law was enacted providing for the inspection of 
bakeshops and empowering the Chief Inspector to appoint two Bakeshop 
Inspectors, making total number of District Inspectors thirteen. 

The act creating and governing the department makes it the duty of 
the Governor, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to ap- 
point the Chief Inspector, whose term is four years. 

The act also empowers the Chief Inspector, with the approval of the 
Governor; to appoint all District Inspectors, whose term of office is three 
years. 

It is the duty of the Chief Inspector to give his entire time and at- 
tention to the duties of his office, to direct and supervise the work of his 
District Inspectors and to make such rules and regulations, not incon- 
sistent with the law, as will be for the best interest of the service. 

It is the duty of the District Inspectors to give their entire time and 
attention to the duties of their office ; to visit all shops and factories in 
their respective districts; to inspect all manufacturing, mechanical, elec- 
trical, mercantile art and laundering establishments, printing, telegraph 
and telephone offices, railroad depots, hotels, memorial buildings^ tenement 
and apartment houses, halls, school houses, colleges, academies, seminar- 
ies, churches, theatres, opera houses, hospitals, medical institutes, asy- 
lums, infirmaries, sanitariums and children's homes, for which purpose 
the State is divided into thirteen inspection districts, equalized as nearly 
as pos; ibie. 

It is the duty of the two Bakeshop Inspectors to inspect all bakeshops 
in the state as to their sanitary condition, f^.tc, the state being divided 
into two districts for that purpose, known as the Northern and Southern. 

The present working force now consists of one chief inspector, thir- 
teen district inspectors, two bakeshop inspectors and four clerks, as 
follows : 



592 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Inspector of Workshops and Factories, 



PRESENT WORKING FORCE. 



Name. 



Office. 



From What City 
or Town 
Appointed. 



J. H. Morgan 


Chief Inspector 


Cambridge. 
Cleveland. 


I'rank C. Base 


First District Inspector 


John F. Ward 


Second District Inspector 


Youngstown. 


John W. Bath 


Third District and High Explosive 




Inspector 


Elyria. 


E. S. Bryant 


Fourth District Inspector 


Bloomdale. 


John W. Bly 


Fifth District Inspector 


Findlay. 


L. W. Ralston 


Sixth District Inspector 


Mechanicstown. 


L. E Linton 


Seventh District Inspector 


Zanesville. 


Richard Lloyd 

C. B. Baker 


Eighth District Inspector 


Columbus. 


Ninth District Inspector 


Piqua. 
Cincinnati. 


David Fisher 


Tenth District Inspector 


JohnH. Gillen 


Eleventh District Inspector 


Portsmouth. 


0. D. Bell 


Twelfth District Inspector 


Cambridge. 


Edward Griffin 


Thirteenth District Inspector 


Cleveland. 


Theodore Wagner. . . 


Bakeshop Inspector, Northern Dist. 


Cleveland. 


William W^oehrlin... 


Bakeshop Inspector, Southern Dist. 


Cincinnati. 


H. G. Helsley 


Chief Clerk 


Warrep. 


H. G. Morgan 


Recording Clerk 


Niles. 


Bertha Young 


Order Clerk 


Columbus. 


Mae Gracey 


Corresponding Clerk 


Cincinnati. 









THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



593 



The Inspector of Workshops and Factories. 



NAMES OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS FROM THE TIME THE ACT WAS 
AMENDED CREATING SUCH OFFICE UP TO THE PRESENT TIME AND 
GIVING TERM OF SERVICE OF EACH. 



Name. 



Residence. 



♦John Lyons 

Wm. Z. McDonald . . 

•tGeorge Lutz 

John H. Ellis 

H. C. Traphagen 

t James A. Armstrong 

David Fisher 

Evan H. Davis 

Charles Bums 

John W. Bath 

♦A. M. True 

Calvin C. Banks 

rW. R. Matthews 

E. T. Ridenour 

Thos. T. Yeager 

P. M. Campfield 

Willard Ducomb 

♦James H. Lloyd 

R. M. Hull 

W. A. Stoller 

W. D. Hall 

John Ty singer 

Jas. H. Arbogast 

John M. Williams. . . 
Frank C. Base 

D. T. Davis 

Jacob Metzger 

Richard Lloyd 

John F. Ward 

E. S. Bryant 

John W. Bly 

L. W. Ralston 

E. W. Bagley 

C. B. Baker 

John H. Gillen 



Term of Office. 



Cleveland 

Akron 

Lancaster 

Columbus 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Warren 

Elyria 

Canton 

Canton — . . . 

Zanesville 

Springfield 

Portsmouth 

Toledo 

Findlay 

Columbus 

Salineville 

Cleveland 

Warren 

Zanesville 

Springfield ... 

Portsmouth 

Cleveland 

Findlay 

Zanesville .__ 

Columbus 

Youngstown. 

Bloomdale 

Findlay..... 

Mechanicstown. . 

Zanesville 

Piqua 

Portsmouth 



1905. 



May 13. 1885, to Sept. 15, 1886. 

bept. 15, 1886, to April 29, 1889 

May 13, 1885, to Feb. 15, 1887 

Feb. 15. 1887. to May 31, 1896.' 

May 13, 1885, to May 31, 1888 

May 1. 1891, to .T'.i-^a oa ^.^oo 

Aug. 1, 1899; term ends' May 1 

May 1, 1889, to May 1, 1896. ' 

June 1, 1892, to May 1, 1896. 

June 1, 1892; term ends May 1. 1905 

June 1, 1892, to Dec. 1, 1895 

Dec. 1, 1895, to May 1, 1896. 

June 1. 1892, to Jan. 27, 1896. 

June 1, 1892, to May 1, 1896. 

June 1, 1892, to May 1, 1896. 

Nov. 23, 1892, to June 15, 1902. 

Jan, 15, 1892, to June 15, 1899. 

May 7, 1896, to Nov. 20, 1900. 

May 1, 1896, to June 15, 1902. 

May 1, 1896. to July 1, 1899. 

May 1, 1896, to June 15, 1902. 

May 7, 1896. to June 15, 1899. 

May 1, 1896. to June 15, 1902. 

May 7. 1896, to June 15, 1902. 

July 1, 1899; term ends May 1, 1905. 

June 15, 1899, to June 15, 1902. 

June 15, 1899, to June 15, 1902. 

Nov. 24, 1900; term ends May 1, 1905. 

June 15, 1902; term ends May 1, 1905. 

June 15. 1902; term ends May 1, 1905. 

June 15, 1902; term ends May 1, 1905. 

June 15, 1902; term ends May 1, 1905. 

June 15, 1902; term ends May 1, 1905. 

June 15, 1902; term ends May 1, 1905. 

June 15, 1902; term ends May 1. 1905. 



tDeceased. 
♦Resigned. 



BAKESHOP INSPECTORS. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Term of Office. 


Theodore Wagner.. J Cleveland 

William Woehrlin . . f Cincinnati 


Oct. 1, 189G; term ends May 1, 1905. 
Oct. 1, 1896; term ends May 1, 1905. 



tS— R A. 



THE INSPECTOR OF OILS. 



INSPECTOBS OF OILS, 1900-6. 

John R. Malloy Inspector of Southern District. 

Feaxk L. Baird Inspector of Northern District. 



John R. Malloy, Inspector of Oils for the Second District, was bom in New 
Haven, Connecticut, July IG, 185G. When five years of age his mother died, 
after which his father enlisted in the army, p^rvins- \l'^^t^\ t^'^ ,:lc2c cf the re- 
bellion. Attoiided the public doUouic, u£ incvv naven unui ibbi, wnen ne moved 
to Ohio with his father, and the following year took up his residence at the 
National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers near Dayton, of which his father 
was an inmate. Young Malloy remained at the Soldiers' Home attending school 
until the summer of 18G9, when he was obliged to leave, the law establishing 
the Home not permitting children of soldiers to become inmates. He returned 
to Connecticut and was apprenticed to the printer's trade in the office of the 
Meriden Daily Republican. Upon the establishment of the Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Orphans* Home at Xenia, in 1870, he returned to Ohio and attended the Home 
school until the summer of 1872, when, having arrived at the age of sixteen 
years, he was discharged from the Home. Was appointed a page in the Ohio 
Constitutional Convention of 1873-74 by President (afterward Chief Justice) 
Morrison R. Waite. Was recording clerk of the House of Representatives of 
the 62d General Assembly and assistant clerk during the G7th and 68th General 
Assemblies. Was a member and president of the Ohio State Board of Pardons 
in 1890-91, which position he resigned on being elected clerk of the House of 
Representatives at the organization of the 70th General Assembly, which he 
held through the 71st and 72d General Assemblies. Was appointed Inspector 
of Oils for the Second District of Ohio, by Governor Nash, May 15, 1900, reap- 
pointed May 15, 1902, and again appointed by Governor Herrick, May 15, 1904. 



Frank L. Baird, Inspector of Oils for the First District of Ohio, was born 
In Perrysburg, Wood County, Ohio, December 5, 1861. His father, Edward L. 
Baird was First Lieutenant and Adjutant. 21st Ohio Volunteer Infantry, serving 
three years and three months, dying shortly after he came out of the service. 
His family removed to Toledo in 1SC7 where he has lived a greater portion of 
the time, acquiring a common school education. Mr. Baird entered the Railroad 
service. May 1, 1877, being employed by the L. S. & M. S.. L. E. & W. and D. & 
R. G. Railroads. In 1889 he was appointed a Deputy Collector of Internal 
Revenue by Collector Geo. P. W^aldorf; was Deputy County Clerk 1893-4-5-G. 
Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue 1897-8-9. Appointed Oil Inspector by 
Governor Geo. K. Nash, May 15, 1900; re-appointed May 15. 1902 and appointed 
by Governor Myron T. Herrick, May 15, 1904. 



(C94) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



595 



The Inspector of Oils. 



INSPECTORS OF OIL. 



Appointive by the Governor. Term, two years. Under the act of 
1892 the State was divided into two districts, and a Chief Inspector ap- 
pointed from each district. 



Name of Inspectors. 



Years of 
Service. 



Fred W. Green 

Wm. B. Williams 

Louis Smithnight 

D. C. Ballentine 

Louis Smithnight 

George B. Cox 

Joseph H. Dowling 

George Caufield, Northern District 
B. L. McElroy, Southern District . 
J. B. Luckey, Northern District . . 
Chas. L. Kurtz, Southern District 
.Tohn R. Malloy, Southern District 
F. L. Baird, Northern District 



1878- 
1879- 
1880- 
1884- 
188G 
188G- 
1890- 
1892- 
1892- 
1896- 
189G- 
1900- 
1900- 



-1879 
-1880 
-1884 
-188G 

-1890 
-1892 
-1896 
-1896 
-1900 
-1900 



THE CHIEF EXAMINER OF STEAM ENGINEERS. 




William E. Kennedy, Chief Examiner of Steam Engineers, is an Ohio boy, 
bom in Cincinnati, Ohio, Hamilton County, in 1862, and has always been a resi- 
dent of that city. He attended the public schools of Cincinnati. At a very early 
age, he left school, and found employment in one of the largest machine shops 
in Cincinnati, where he worked for years. He has held some very important 
positions in one of the largest ice manufacturing concerns in the country, and 
for ten years was Chief Engineer at the Hunt Street Pumping Station, Cincin- 
nati Water Works, which very responsible and lucrative position he resigned 
September 26, 1903, to accept the position of Chief Examiner of Steam Engineers 
for the State of Ohio, tendered him by Governor Nash. 

Mr. Kennedy has a large circle of friends throughout the state, and is a 
member of several engineering organizations, and as such had much to do with 
the securing of necessary legislation for the amending of the Engineers' License 
Law, during the last session of the General Assembly. He is one of the Di- 
rectors of the Young Men's Blaine Club, of Cincinnati, and takes an active 
Interest in the affairs of his home city. 



(596) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 597 

The State Examiner of Steam Engineers, 

The law creating this department- was passed March i, 1900, and 
amended March 13 and April 30, 1902, and March 3, 1904, and provides 
for better protection of Hfe and property against injury or damage result- 
ing from the operation of steam boilers and engines by incompetent 
engineers and others; and provides that it shall be unlawful for any 
person to operate, or cause to be operated, a stationary steam boiler or 
engine, in the State of Ohio, of more than thirty horsepower, without a 
duly licensed engineer in charge. Any person who desires to act as a 
stationary engineer is required to make application to the district exam- 
iner for a license so to act, upon a blank furnished by the examiner, pro- 
viding he has had not less than one year's experience as a fireman or oiler, 
and if he passes the required examination upon the '-'On^tii-tio.f and 
operation of steam engines, boilers, pumps and hydraulics, a license is 
granted him to have charge of, or operate, any steam plant. The fee for 
license is $2.00, and licenses are renewed yearly at a cost of $2.00, pro- 
viding they are not sooner revoked for intoxication or other sufficient 
cause. Any person dissatisfied with the action of any district examiner 
in refusing or revoking a license, may appeal to the chief examiner, who 
immediately investigates. 

The Governor, with and by the advice and consent of the Senate, ap- 
points a Chief Examiner; and the Chief Examiner, with the approval of 
the Governor, appoints one clerk and eight district examiners, not more 
than four of whom shall belong to any one of the political parties. All 
the examiners are required to be competent and practical steam engineers, 
and hold their offices for a term of three years from the date of their ap- 
pointments, and until their successors are appointed and qualified. The 
Chief Examiner has his office in the State House, where all the records 
are kept, and he issues such instructions, and makes such rules and regu- 
lations as will secure a uniformity of action throughout the different 
districts. In order to facilitate a thorough and efficient examination of 
the engineers, the State is divided into eight districts by the Chief Ex- 
aminer. 

It is the duty of the district examiners to notify every person oper- 
ating a steam boiler or engine, to apply for a license, and to give such 
person a reasonable opportunity to take the required examination; and 
any owner, steam user, or engineer, who, after being duly notified, vio- 
lates any of the provisions of this law, is liable to a fine of not more than 
$100 nor less than $10. And any engineer who fails to exhibit his license 
under glass in a conspicuous place in his engine-room is liable to a fine 
of $5.00. The examiners have authority to visit any and all engine or 
boiler-rooms of the State, at all reasonable hours. 



598 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



' The State Examiner of Steam Engineers. 



DEPARTMENT ROSTER— 1900-1901. 



Name. 


Office. 


Headquarters. 


George M. Collier 

Charles J. Manney 

George G. Bennett 


Chief Examiner 

Clerk 

District Examiner 

District Examiner 


Columbus, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Cleveland Ohio 


Thomas Winship 


Toledo Ohio 


Eber H. Harman 

August Deschler 


District 'Examiner 

District Examiner 


Columbus, Ohio. 
Chillicothe Ohio 


Elmer E. Miller 


District Examiner . . . 


Canton Ohio 


Jofi H. Ebright 


!»i>-*t>ift TT'vprpirjpr 


Znncsvillc, Ohio. 



DEPARTMENT ROSTER— 1901-1902. 



Name. 


! 

Office. 1 Headquarters. 


George M. Collier 


Chief Examiner 


Columbus Ohio. 


Charles J. Mannev 


Clerk 

District Examiner 


Columbus, Ohio. 


George G. Bennett 


Cleveland Ohio. 


Thomas Winship 

E H Harman 


District Examiner 

District Examiner .... 


Toledo, Ohio. 
Columbus Ohio. 


August Deschler 

J. A Manning 


District Examiner 

District Examiner . . 


Chillicothe, Ohio. 
Ashtabula Ohio. 


Jos. H. Ebright 

John Sherrod 


District Examiner 

District Examiner 


Zanesville, Ohio. 
Cincinnati. Ohio. 


W. E. Faswell 


District Examiner 

Messenger 


Bucyrus, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio. 


A. H. Siotts 



DEPARTMENT ROSTER— 1903-1904. 



Name. 


Office. 


Headquarters. 


Wm. E. Kennedv 


Chief Examiner 


Columbus Ohio. 


Charles J. Manney 


Clerk 


Columbus Ohio. 


George G. Bennett 


District Examiner 


Cleveland Ohio. 


Thomas Winship 


District Examiner 


Toledo. Ohio. 


E. H. Harman 


District Examiner 

District Exuminer 


Columbus. Ohio. 


August Deschler. .. 


Chillicothe Ohio. 


J. A. Manning. . . 


District Examiner 


Youngstown. Ohio 
Zanesville, Ohio. 


Jos. H. Ebright 


District Examiner 


Jno. T. Schuller 


District Examiner 


Cincinnati, Ohio. 


W. E. Haswell 


District Examiner. 


Bucyrus, Ohio. 
Columbus Ohio. 


A. H. Stotts 


Messenger 







THE STATE FIRE MARSHAL. 



"iii'«'"l»| 'iW!WL'^'- "'.- 



,>-' 





^% 



HY. D. DAVIS. 



Hy. D. Davis was born in Adams County in 1861 ^and christened Hyman 
DeBruin, after a minister of that name who was long venerated in the Ohio 
Valley. His father moved to Highland County and soon after gave up life in 
the Civil War. 

His life was that of the farmer boy until, at the age of 20, he began read- 
ing law with Sloan, Newby & Morrow at Hillsboro, supporting himself and his 
mother meanwhile by teaching school in winter. After admission to the bar 
he was elected IMayor of Hillsboro and re-elected twice, making six years' ser- 
,vice in that office. 

Seven years ago he formed a law partnership with Sidney Vessy, of Cleve- 
land, and a year later became Police Prosecutor, which position he held during 
three years until a political revolution occurred in that city. One year later 
he was appointed State Fire Marshal, which office he now holds. 

Mr. Davis has always been active in fraternal work, being a member of a 
number of fraternal orders, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Sons of Veterans, 
Maccabees, Elks and Fraternal Order of Eagles. He served two terms as mem- 
ber of Board of Grand Trustees of Fraternal Order of Eagles, and was last year 
chairman of the board. 



(609) 



600 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHltT. 

The State Fire Marshal, 

DUTIES OF THE STATE FIRE MARSHAL. 

The act which established the office of the State Fire Marshal was 
passed by the Seventy- fourth General Assembly on the i6th day of April, 
1900, and on July 15, Governor Herrick, by the authority given him under 
this act, appointed Hy. D. Davis, of Cleveland, Ohio, to be the second 
State Fire Marshal. 

Under the provisions of the act it becomes the duty of the Fire 
Marshal to cause an investigation of all fires which occur in the State, 
with the object in view of reducing, if possible, the enormous fire waste, 
lessening the loss to insurance companies, and thereby reducing insur- 
ance premiums. It is also his duty to inake ar. investiguucr: cf :n 
flammable and other conditions from which fires are liable to originate, 
and have the same remedied, or removed. For many years, on account 
of the difficulty connected with establishing the crime of arson, very few 
incendiaries have been punished in the State, the total average per year 
not exceeding two. Estimating the loss caused by incendiary fires upon 
the best information to be obtained, the total loss to the people of the 
State resulting from such fires will amount to from twenty to forty per 
cent, of the total fire waste of the State each year. The wisdom of the 
legislature in providing some means of reducing this waste is therefore 
apparent. To assist the Fire Marshal in carrying out the object of the 
act, the State was divided by him into twelve districts and a division 
assistant to the Fire Marshal was appointed for each district, to whom, 
under the provisions of the law, township clerks, mayors of villages and 
chiefs of fire departments report all fires occurring in their respective 
territories. All fires reported as suspicious a-e investigated by the as- 
sistant, and where necessity requires one of the two deputies appointed 
by the Fire Marshal goes to the scene of the fire and holds an inquest. 
The testimony of all witnesses who have knowledge of the fire, is taken 
in writing under oath. If the facts warrant, an arrest is made and the 
guilty party bound over to the grand jury, indicted and tried for arson. 
The office is provided with a corresponding clerk and a statistician, whose 
duties are to keep a complete and classified record of all fires and their 
causes. The office has already met with unexpected success in the prose- 
cution of incendiaries and a goodly number of fire-bugs who, through 
the efforts of the office are now in the "Pen," will be prevented for some 
time from carrying out their nefarious calling of setting fire to buildings 
for the purpose of securing insurance or for any other motive. Below 
will be found a complete roster of the employes of the department, to- 
gether with their postoffice addresses : 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



601 



The State Fire Marshal. 



ROSTER OF STATE FIRE MARSHAL'S OFFICE, 1904-1905. 



Name. 


. Office. 


Residence. 


Hy. D. Davis 

Orlof T. Brown 


State Fire Marshal 

First Deputy. .. . 


Cleveland, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Toledo, Ohio. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio. ' 

r.Mf Hwi'itus. 0"".., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Toledo, Ohio. 
Luckey, Ohio. 
Milan, Ohio. 
Van Wert Ohio 


H. S. Commager 


Second Deputy 


Frank C. Manak 


Chief Assistant 


Clarence Maris, M. D 


Pyrologist 


W. H. Ball 

C. E. Ellis 


Assistant Fire Marshal... 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 

Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal... 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal. . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal. . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal... 
Assistant Fire Marshal. . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal... 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . , 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 
Assistant Fire Marshal... 
Assistant Fire Marshal . . . 
Inspector 


Garrett Fox 

H. T. Brockman 

Silas Cole..: 

J. J. Finnucan 

Michele D'Errico 


John Ambroes 


F. G. Neuhaus 

Frank Newcomer 


C. E. Goodell 


Frank Dimon 

C. J. Putman 


A. T. Ullman 




F. B. Morehouse 

R. R. Gurney 

A. J. Fiorini 

J. E Innis 


Huntsburg, Ohio. 
Mansfield. Ohio. 
Dayton, Ohio. 
Williamsburg, Ohio. 
Washington C. H., Ohio. 
Logan, Ohio. 
Oak Hill, Ohio. 
Bellaire. Ohio. 


A. C. West 

E. D. Ricketts 

J. J. Williams 

Madison Aldredge 


J. B. Morgan 

P. M. Beckett 

J. H Ki lius 


Zanesville, Ohio. 
McConnelsville, Ohio. 
Cleveland Ohio 


Michael Rvan 


Inspector 


Cleveland Ohio 


Jessie Canfield 


Stenographer 


Akron, Ohio. 


Flora Wenban 

Nettle B Gill 


Stenoirranher 


Cleveland Ohio 


Stenographer 


Columbus, Ohio. 









THE BOARD OF LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS. 



THE Ohio State Library was established by Governor Thomas 
Worthington in the year 1817. The general assembly which 
met December 2, 1816, appropriated $3,500.00 as a contingent 
fund for the Governor of 18 17. In the summer of that year 
Governor Worthington visited eastern cities to investigate the manage- 
ment of state institutions. While in Philadelphia he determined to 
purchase a collection of hooks for the establishment of a state library. 
On his return he authorized the fitting up of a room p.bove the auditor's 
office, in the south end of the old state office building, then on'High Street, 
immediately south of the avenue to the west entrance of the State House. 
He deposited therein the books he had selected — 509 volumes — the be- 
ginning of the State Library. Most of these books are still in the library. 

John L. Harper was the first librarian. Changes in this office were 
frequent till 1824, when Zachariah Mills was appointed. He served 
eighteen years. ... 

In 1844, the library was placed under a commission consisting of 
the Governor, the Secretary of State and the State Librarian. The latter 
was appointed by the Governor. In April, 1896, the law was again 
changed and the entire management of the library was vested in a board 
of commissioners appointed by the Governor for a term of six years. 
They elect the librarian and all the assistants. 

f The State Library was open originally only to state officers and 
members of the general assembly. The regulations provided that *'the 
librarian shall open accounts with the Governor, Secretary, Treasurer 
and Auditor of State, the Judges of the Supreme Court, and the members 
of the general assembly and their clerks." The privilege of drawing books 
did not extend beyond the period the legislature was actually in session. 
As late as 1895 books were loaned only to "members and officers, and ex- 
members and ex-officers of the general assembly; state officers, and 
clerks in the several departments of the state government at Columbus, 
and ex-officers of the same; the Judges of the Supreme Court, of the 
Supreme Court Commission, of the Circuit Court and the Common 
Pleas Court; officers and teachers of the benevolent institutions of the 
State, and of the State University; officers of the Penitentiary; widows 
of ex-members and ex-officers of the general assembly and of ex-state 
officers; and clergymen resident of Columbus." 

Under such regulations the circulation of the library was, of course, 

(602) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 603 

The Board of Library Conmiissioners. 

quite limited. In the long period since it was founded many valuable 
works have been placed on the shelves that were accessible to the general 
public only for purposes of reference in the reading room of the library. 
These were sought by those who were engaged in the preparation of some 
literary work or in the study of some "special science or subject of art." 
The newspaper files were frequently consulted by editors and reporters, 
The books had a limited circulation among state officers and their families. 
Members of the legislature, as a rule, found themselves too busy to read. 
They made frequent use of the state documents kept in the library. 

The first board of library commissioners under the Garfield Act of 
1896 was appointed by the Governor in April of that year. The mem- 
bers were Rutherford B. Hayes, J. F. McGrew and Charles A. Re_yiiOlu6. 
One of the first acts of this board was to open the library to citizens of the 
state. The old distinctions in favor of state officials were in large measure 
removed. Citizens of the state who desire to draw books now do so by 
furnishing the library board a satisfactory guarantee, or by making appli- 
cation through their local library. Those living in distant parts of the 
state may borrow books by paying transportation both ways. The books 
are not sent out indiscriminately. Rare and valuable works are not issued 
for use outside of the library. Those in the circulating department, how- 
ever, are issued freely on the same conditions to all citizens. 

While it contains works in almost every department of literature, 
the library is strongest in state publications, government documents, his- 
tory and its related branches, bound periodicals, and newspaper files. In 
recent years a systematic effort has been made to add to the early liter- 
ature relating to the state. The work of collecting has necessarily been 
slow, but the very substantial progress already made warrants the hope 
that this may soon become the best reference library in the country in all 
things pertaining to Ohio. 

There are at present (November 15, 1902) 81,876 bound volumes in 
the State Library. Of these 20,0*76 are in the 

' TRAVELING LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

This department was organized in the summer of 1896. A travel- 
ing library is a collection of from twenty-five to thirty-five books sent 
out by the State Library to a reading club, an association of citizens, 
a board of education or a pul)lic library, to be kept three months, with 
privilege of renewal. 

The objects of the department are: i. To furnish good literature to 
patrons. 2. To strengthen small libraries. 3. To create an interest in 
the establishment of new libraries. 



604 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Board of Library Commissioners. 



ir 



On receipt of a request on the forms furnished by the State Library 
properly filled and signed by the members of the club, the officers of a 
free public library, board of education, or other associations, the books 
will be shipped. The parties receiving the books must pay transportation 
both ways. 

The conditions under which these libraries are issued are very 
simple. The organizations to which they are sent obligate themselves 
for their proper use and safe return. The system has proven very popular. 
Traveling libraries have been sent out as follows : 

T^ibr^n'es. Vols. 

Prior to MorcmDcr 15, 1C9C 2 50 

November 15, 1896, to November 15, 1897 62 1,331 

November 15, 1897, to November 15, 1898 379 9,887 

November 15, 1898, to November 15, 1899 445 12,812 

November 15, 1899, to November 15, 1900. 711 19,505 

November 15, 1900, to November 15, 1901 762 20,689 

November 15, 1901, to November 15, 1902 803 22,031 

November 15, 1902, to November 15, 1903 : 923 27,078 

Note — Detailed history of the State Library has been written by William 
T. Coggeshall, John C. Tuthill and C. B. Galbreath. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

The State Library will be open, except Sunday and holidays, from 
8 a. rn. to 5 p. m. During the months of July and August the Librar}' 
will close at 4 p. m. During sessions of the legislature the Library will 
be open, except Saturday, till 9 p. m. - 

A-ll citizens of the state over twenty-one years of age will be per- 
mitted to draw books in accordance with the following rules : 

All State officers elected by the people or appointed by the Governor 
may draw books by giving receipt. 

Citizens who desire to draw books may do so on furnishing the 
Library Board a satisfactory guarantee or through the public library in 
their city. 

No one shall keep from the Library more than two volumes at one 
time, nor any volume more than two weeks without renewal. 

One renewal will be allowed and the book may be kept for two weeks 
from the date of renewal. 

No borrower shall keep a book more than three days after notice 
has been mailed to his address that it is wanted at the Library or that the 
book is due. 

Any book not returned after one week*s notice may be sent for at 
the expense of the borrower. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



605 



The Board of Library Commissioners. 



Any book not returned after one month's notice may be considered 
lost, in which case the borrower shall pay its full value or the value of the 
set to which it belongs. 

All expenses connected with the issue of the books or their return 
shall be paid by the borrower. 

Any person failing to return a book within one week after notice has 
been mailed forfeits the privilege, of the Library until reinstated by the 
Board. 

The Board will determine what books may not be taken from the 
Library. 

Traveling libraries, of from 25 to 35 volumes each, will be loaned for 
from tnree to five inouLiis. For particulars, address State Librarian, 
Columbus, Ohio. 

* LIST OF OHIO STATE LIBRARIANS FROM 1817 to 1902. 



Name. 



Term 
of Service. 



John L. Harper 

John McElvain 

David S. Broderick 

Zechariah Mills 

Thomas Kennedy. . 

John Greiner 

Elijah Hayward 

James W. Taylor... 
W. T. Coggeshall.. 

S. G. Harbaugh 

W. C. Hood 

H. H. Robinson 

R. M. Stimson . . 

H. V. Kerr 

Joseph H. Geiger. . 

H. L. Conard 

H. W. Pierson , 

F. B. Loomis 

John M. Doane 

W. G. Sibley , 

John C. Tuthill.... 

Joseph P. Smith 

C. B. Galbreath 



1817—1818 

1818—1820 

1820—1824 

1824—1842 

1842—1845 

1845—1851 

1851—1854 

1854—1856 

1856— 18G2 

1862—1874 

1874—1875 

1875—1877 

1877—1879 

1879-1881 

1881— 18S3 

1883—1885 

1885— 1SS6 

1886—1887 

1887— 1SS9 

Dec.l,18S9, 

to Feb. 20, 

1890 

1890—1892 

1892—1896 

1896—.... 



•••<-3i«8» >• 



606 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Board of Library Commissioners. 



STATE LIBRARY COMMISSION FROM 1845 TO 1891. 




First 



Second , 
Third .. 
Fourth 
Fifth .. 
Sixth . . 
Seventh 



1845-1847 



1847- 
1849- 
1851- 
1852- 
1854- 
1 9.^^- 



•1819 
■1S51 

■1852 
•1854 
•18 5 G 

-18B9 



Eighth I 1859, 



Ninth 18G0 



Tenth 

Eleventh . . . 
Twelfth ... 
Thirteenth . 
Fourteenth 
Fifteenth ... 
Sixteenth . . . 
Seventeenth 



Eighteenth 

Nineteenth 

Twentieth 

Twenty-first 

Twenty-second . . . 

Twenty-third 

Twenty-fourth . . . 

Twenty-fifth 

Twenty sixth 

Twenty seventh . . . 
Twenty-eighth . . . 

Twenty-ninth 

Thirtieth 

Thirty-first 

Thirty-second . . . . 



Thirty-third I 1894-189G 



18G2 

18G3 

1865 

18C6 

1867 

1868 

18G9-1871 
1872 

1873 

1874 

187G 

1877 

1878 

1880 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888-1889 
1890-1892 
1892-1894 



Mordecai Bartely, Samuel Galloway, John 

Greiner. 
William Webb, Samuel Galloway, John Greiner. 
Seabury Ford. Samuel Galloway, John Greiner. 
L^euben Wood, Henry W. King, Elijah Hayward. 
leuben Wood, William Trevitt, Elijah Hayward. 
.Vm. Medill, Wm. Trevitt. James W. Taylor. 



idimon. P, ('hasp 



\^^ u, u^-er. 



[llam 



T. Coggeshall. 

Salmon P. Chasj, Addison P. Russell, Wil- 
liam T. Coggeshall. 

Wm. Dennison, A. P. Russell, W. T. Coggeshall. 

David Tod, W. S. Kennon, S. G. Harbaugh. 

David Tod, W. W. Armstrong, S. G^. Harbaugh. 

Chas. Anderson, Wm. H. Smith, S. G. Harbaugh. 

J. D. Cox, W. H. Smith, S. G. Harbaugh. 

R. B. Hayes, John Russell, S. G. Harbaugh. 

R. B. Hayes, Isaac R. Sherwood, S. G. Harbaugh. 

R. B. Hayes, Isaac R. Sherwood, S. G. Harbaugh. 

Edward F. Noyes, Isaac R. Sherwood, S. G. 
Harbaugh. 

Edward F. Noyes, A. T. Wikoff. S. G. Harbaugh. 

William Allen, A. T. Wikoff. W. C. Hood. , 

R. B. Hayes, Wm. Bell, Jr., H. H. Robinson. 

Thos. L. Young, Milton Barnes, R. M. Stimson. 

R. M. Bishop, Milton Barnes, R. M. Stimson. 

Charles Foster, Milton Barnes, H. V. Kerr. 

Charles Foster, Chas. Townsend. J. H. Geiger. 

Charles Foster, J. W. Newman, H. L. Conard. 

Geo. Hoadly, J. W. Newman, H. L. Conard. 

Geo. Hoadly, J. S. Robinson, H. W. Pierson. 

J. B. Foraker, J. S. Robinson, F. B. Loomis. 

J. B. Foraker, J. S. Robinson, John M. Doane. 

J. B. Foraker, Daniel J. Ryan, John M. Doane. 

Jas. E. Campbell. Daniel J. Ryan, John C. Tuthill. 

William McKinley, Jr., C. L. Poorman, Jos- 
eph P. Smith. 

William McKinley, Jr., Samuel M. Taylor, 
Joseph P. Smith. 



LIBRARY COMMISSIONERS UNDER GARFIELD ACT OF 1896. 

1896-1897— Charles A. Reynolds, President; Rutherford B. Hayes, J. F. McGrew. 
189S — J. F. McGrew. President; O- E. Niies. Chas. A. Reynolds. 
1899-1901 — J. F. :McGrew, Presiaent; O. E. Niles, Chas. Orr. 
1002 — J. F. McGrew, President; Chas. Orr, John McSweeney. 
1904 — J. F. McGrew, President; Chas. Orr, John McSweeney. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 607 

The Board of Library Commissioners. 

John Franklin McGrew was born in Steubenville, Ohio, April 3, 1854. He 
moved to Steubenville in February, 185G; graduated from Wittenberg College, 
Springfield, in 1873; was admitted to the bar in 1877, and has been in practice 
since that time, with the exception ot two years, during which time he was 
manager of the Republic Printing Company, of SpringHeld, publishers of The 
Republic. He was elected to the Sixty-ninth General Assembly in 1889, as a 
Republican, and was re-elected to the Seventieth General Assembly. He was 
appointed Library Commissioner by Governor Bushnell April 22, 189G, for 
the term of four years- and was reappointed by Governor iNash, in April, 1900, 
for the full term of six years. 

Mr. McGrew has taken a very active interest in everything pertaining to 
the State Library and for a number of years has been President of the Board 
of Commissioners. 



Charles Orr was born at Cedarville, Ohio, January 8, 1858. His parents, 
John and Henrietta Orr, later moved to Xenia, where he attended the city 
scho'-'ls and £AH.-iotr..ri ii^iij. the iii^,li school in lo7C. La^'er he crie?.^^'^ \^ the 
book and stationery business, in connection with whicn ne operatea a oook 
bindery and built up an extensive trade. From Xenia he went to New York 
City, where he was for a time employed in the famous Brentano book store. 
He then went to Ann Arbor, Michigan, from which city he was soon called to 
the Case Library, of Cleveland, Ohio, of which he has had charge for the past 
twelve years. In the spring of 1899 he was appointed on the Board of Library 
Commissioners to succeed Captain Charles A. Reynolds, who resigned to as- 
sume command of his company in the Philippines. 

Mr. Orr has spent the greater part of his life in contact with books. He 
has been active in the Ohio Library Association, which he has served as 
Secretary and President. 



John McSweeney was born in Wooster, Ohio, August 1, 1854. He is the 
son of the late John McSweeney, the eloquent advocate, whose fame extended 
beyond the borders of Ohio. He was graduated from the Wooster High School, 
and at the age of twenty-two from the University of Wooster. Later he studied 
law in the Boston Law School, and was admitted to the bar in 1879. Soon after- 
ward he was elected City Solicitor of Wooster and served in this position 
from 1879 to 1883. In the latter year he was elected Prosecuting Attorney of 
Wayne Couny, a position which he held until 1889. Since then he has applied 
himself o the practice of law and has built up a large practice. He was 
appointed by Governor McKinley a trustee of the Ohio Hospital for Epileptics, 
served through the two terms of Governor Bushnell's admnistration and was 
reappointed by Governor Nash. He was appointed Library Commissioner by 
Governor Nash in April, 1902, for the full term of six years. 

Mr. McSweeney has been, not only a hard student, but an ardent lover 
of literature. He is an excellent judge of books and finds his new position 
very congenial to his tastes. 



Charles Burleigh Galbreath was born in Fairfield Township, Columbiana 
County, February 15, 1858. His early life was spent on the farm. At the age 
of seventeen he began teaching school. In Juue of 1879 he completed a course 
in the Lisbon High School, and in September of the same year entered Mount 
Union College, from which he was graduated in 1883. One year later this insti- 
tution conferred upon him the degree of A. M. He was superintendent of the 
Wilmot, Stark County, schools from 1883 to 1885, when he resigned to accept 
the superintendency of the East Palestine, Ohio, schools, where he remained 
eight years. Although unanimously re-elected for two years more, he resigned 
to accept a position in Mt. Hope College. While in East Palestine he was for 
two years editor of The Reveille, now The Reveille-Echo. He was school ex- 
aminer of Columbiara County from 1885 to 1893. In 1S9G he was elected State 
Librarian by the Library Commission created by the Seventy-second General 
Assembly. He is a member of the Ohio Library Association, the American 
Library Association and the National Association of State Librarians. Of 
the last named organization he was President in 1900. 



THE STATE BOARD OF PARDONS. 



THE Ohio State Board of Pardons was created by an act of the 
General Assembly of Ohio, April ii, 1888. The act provided 
the Governor should nominate, and by and with the advice and 
consent of the Senate, appoint four suitable persons having the 
qualifications of electors, two of whom should be appointed from each of 
the two leading political parties. Two of the members thereof, appointed 
from the same political party should serve for one and three years re- 
spectively, and two members thereof, appointed from the other political 
party should sf^rve for tv;o and four years, respectively; and that there- 
after the Governor in like manner should appoint a member of said board, 
of like qualifications and from the same political party as the member 
whom he succeeds, who shall serve for four years. 

The act further provided that the Board should organize by electing 
one of their number president, and it was made the duty of the executive 
clerk of the Governor to act as Secretary. 

The Board meets regularly on the first Thursday after the second 
Monday in January, and on the same day every third month thereafter, 
arid at such other times as they may deem necessary. 

The Board has formulated rules for the guidance of the applicants, 
which, together wdth other blanks, can be secured from the Secretary, at 
the Governor's office. 

All cases presented to the Board are heard by the entire Board, and 
the cases separately referred to some member of the Board for investiga- 
tion, who makes a written report to the entire Board at its next meeting, 
when the report is adopted or rejected, and together with all other papers 
is transmitted to the Governor for his consideration. 

The Board makes an annual written report to the Governor on the 
first Monday in December of each year, of its actions during the last 
preceding year, its officers and members, and the names thereof, with a 
recommendation for such legislation as they think proper in order to 
carry out more fully the object and purpose of its creation. 

Under the constitution and laws, the Governor can not pass upon 
or grant a pardon until after the case has been submitted to the Board of 
Pardons, and passed upon by that body, except in cases specifically men- 
tioned in the statutes. 

The Board was created for the purpose of relieving the Governor 
of the task of examining manifold papers and documents, which con- 
sumed a large part of his time, to the detriment of other important public 
business. 

(608) 



;»*ii<i;*%y!j-«i 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



609 



The State Board of Pardons. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF PARDONS, 1888-1902. 
Chables C. Lemert, Secketaby. 



Names. 


Years. 


Counties. 


Chas. N. Vallandigham 

A V Rice 


1888 

1888 

1888..-. 

1888 

1888 

1888 .-., 

1888 

1889 

1889 .T. 

1890. 

1890 

1890 

1891 

1891 

1891 

1892 

1894 

1895 

1895—9 

1896 

1897 

1897 

1897 

1905 

1905... 

1907 

1907 


Franklin. 

Putnam. 

Cuyahoga. 

Hamilton. 

Allen 


Thos. T. Thompson 

Nathan Drucker 

Theo. E. Cunningham 


L. D. Hagerty 

Henry Kahlo 


Lucas. 

Hamilton. 

Cuyahoga. 

Hamilton. 

Wayne. 

Franklin. 

Athens. 


Nathan Drucker 

E. J. Kennedy 

Cassily C. Cook 

L. W. Baughman 

John R. Malloy 

L. A. Koons 


J. W. Baughman 


Wayne. 
Cuyahoga. 
Franklin. 
Mahoning 


E. J. Kennedy 

Harry Miner. 

Jamse P. McNally 


M. M Rose 


Washington. 

Fairfield. 

Darke. 


George Ewing 

J. E. Braden 


S. F. Hanselman 


Portage. 
Fulton. 


John A. Wilkins 


S. J. Hatfield 


Shelby. 
Franklin. 


P. H. Bruck 


S. S. Deaton 

George Ewing 


Champaign. 
Fairfield. 


S. J. Hatfield 


Shelby. 







39— B. A. 



THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



T 



HE Ohio State Board of Health was estabUshed by an act of 
Legislature, passed April 14, 1886. Hon. J. B. Foraker, then 
Governor of Ohio, appointed the following persons as 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 



Nan>P 


Iw^^Idencc:. 


•V'-ifi of 
Service. 


W. H. Cretcher, M. D.* 


Belief ontaine 


1886 — 1889 


T. Clarke Miller 


Massillon 

Cincinnati 


1886 — 1887 


John D. Jones, M. D.il 


1886—1889 


Simon P. Wise, M. D .' 


Millersburg 


1886 — 1896 


D. H. Beckwith, M. D 


Cleveland 

Columbus 

London 


1886 — 1890 


Thos. C. Hoover, M. D 

H. J. Sharp, M. D 


1886—1897 
1886—1892 



♦Deceased. 



ijResigned. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD IN ADDITION TO THE ABOVE. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Term of 
Service. 


Edward T. Nelson, A. M., M. D 

Jos. T. Anderson, M. D 

S A Conklin M D 


Delaware 


1887—1897 


Cincinnati 


1889—1891 


Canton 


1889—1893 


"Wm T Miller M D 


Cleveland 

Loudonville 

Cincinnati 

Lima 


1890—1904 


A T Scott M D 


1891—1892 


Byron Stanton, M. D 

R D Kahle M D 


1892—1904 
1892—1899 


To<5iah Hartzell Ph D 


Canton 

Zanesville 


1893—1904 


T C Crossland M D 


1896—1904 


FlnrTxrln Ci Palmpr M T) ... 


Geneva 


1901—1904 


Frank Warner, M. D . . * 

W. C. Chapman, M. D 


Columbus 

Toledo 


1898—1904 
1899—1904 



(610) 



■9^t a»«if'j.»"its«»'»i»''; 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 611 

The State Board of Health. 

The Board held its first meeting in Columbus on April 30, 1886, and 
organized by electing Dr. W. H. Cretcher President, and appointing Dr. 
G. C. Ashmun, the health officer of Cleveland, as Secretary. 

Dr. Ashmun resigned this position in June, 1886, and Dr. Guy Case, 
of Cleveland, was appointed as his successor. Dr. Case tendered his 
resignation July 2^, 1886, and Dr. C. O. Probst, of Columbus, was ap- 
pointed Secretary on the same date. Dr. Probst has continuously filled 
the position since that time, and is the present Secretary. 

The Board first directed its efforts to building up a complete health 
oranization for the entire State. In 1886 the larger cities and a very few 
villages were the only municipalities that had availed themselves of the 
piovioioiii ol an act permitting tiiem to establish a local board of health. 

The Board at once took up the work of increasing the number and 
improving the efficiency of local boards of health. Within a few years 
it secured a board of health in all cities and villages. , 

In 1893 the townships, which up to that time had had practically no 
protection in health matters, were required to establish boards of health, 
so that - provision is now made for a board of health in every city, vil- 
lage and township, a grand total of two thousand one hundred and twelve 
such boards. 

Sanitary legislation has been secured from time to time enlarging 
the powers and increasing the duties of both the State and local boards 
of health. 

In furtherance of its work the Board began, in 1,897, ^ systematic 
examination of the streams in Ohio. Each main stream, with its tribu- 
taries, has been carefully examined from source to outlet with a view to 
determining the source and character of its pollution. Monthly chemical 
and bacteriological examinations of the waters of these streams, taken at 
various places on each stream, have been made, and careful gagings and 
measurements to determine their rates of flow at different seasons of the 
year. This work is completed for the main drainage system of the State. 
Five special reports of much value have been published upon this sub- 
ject. 

An act of 1898 authorized the Board to establish a Laboratory "for 
the examination of public water supplies, the diagnosis of diphtheria, 
typhoid fever, hydrophobia, glanders, etc., and for the examination of 
food suspected to be the cause of disease." 

The Laboratory has been placed at the disposal of all local boards 
of health, and much good has already resulted from its establishment. 

The Board is frequently called upon to examine the sanitary condi- 
tion of public institutions and school buildings, to investigate the causes 
of outbreaks of epidemic diseases, and to assist the local authorities in the 
abatement of nuisances injurious to health. 



612 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS. OF OHIO. 

The State Board of Health. 

Beginning with a Secretary, the working force of the Board has 
been gradually increased until it now embraces a chief clerk, two 
stenographers, an engineer, a chemist and bacteriologist and an assistant 
chemist. 

The immense growth of public sentiment in the last ten years in 
favor of improved sanitary conditions and more stringent measures for 
the prevention of disease has been due in no small part to the progressive 
character of the work of the State Board of Health; and we may con- 
fidently hope that this enlightened sentiment will gradually lead to a 
more generous support of health measures, whereby the sum of human 
happiness and average duration of life may be materiallv increa?^d. 

The State Board has kept in close touch with the local boards and 
is, constantly helping them by aid and advice. 

In 1888 a monthly journal was established as a medium of frequent 
communication between the State and local boards of health. A sum- 
mary of the weekly reports of contagious diseases, made to the State 
Board, by the local boards, is published therein, with other original and 
reprinted matter of interest, or suitable for the guidance or instruction 
of health officers and members of boards of health. 

In 1 89 1 a call was issued for a meeting of the State Board of Health 
and representatives of local boards of health. About forty delegates 
were present at this meeting. Annual meetings have been held regularly 
since; the attendance at the late meetings has been nearly or quite four 
hundred. 

The State Board of Health has endeavored to disseminate among the 
people plain instructions for the prevention of the dangerous contagious 
diseases. Suitable pamphlets were prepared, and hundreds of thousands 
of copies have been distributed. All local boards of health have been 
supplied with copies of these, and when a contagious disease appears 
in any community they are urged to distribute the appropriate circular 
to families having the disease, and to their neighbors. 

In 1893 an act was passed providing that plans for all proposed 
water works or sewerage systems, or for changes or extensions thereof 
should be submitted to and approved by the State Board of Health. The 
Board has examined and passed upon about two hundred and fifty such 
plans. It has been able in this way to protect many communities against 
the introduction of an impure water supply, and to prevent what in sonic 
instances would have been dangerous pollution of sources of existint; 
public water supplies. To this end it has encouraged the introduction of 
sewage purification plants, of which there are now some twenty-six in 
the state, and at the present time is especially endeavoring to secure the 
filtration of public water supplies where pollution is known to exist. 



THE CANAL COMMISSION. 



IN the year 1887, Hon. Jacob A. Kohler, Attorney-General, called 
the attention of Governor Foraker and the Board of Public Works 
to the valuable state property, in the city of Akron, that had been 

unlawfully taken possession of by individuals and corporations, and 
shortly thereafter, ten civil actions, against as many different defendants, 
were commenced to recover state property valued at one hundred thousand 
($100,000) dollars. 

When the succeeding General Assembly convened, the governor 
recommended that a commission be created to ascertain what lands the 
State owned ; thereupon Hon. J. Park Alexander, of Summit county, in- 
troduced a bill, embodying the ideas of the governor and attorney-gen- 
eral, creating "a commission to establish the boundaries and lines of the 
canals, canal basins, reservoirs, etc., of the State, by actual surveys by 
metes and bounds, together with maps and plats of the same, and to 
define and protect the ownership and titles in and to all lands belonging 
to and connected with said canals." 

Subsequently, the duties of the commission were enlarged by adding 
to its work tlie duties previously performed by the swamp land com- 
missioner, and providing for the recording of all documents, maps, plats 
and records in any wise appertaining to the title of any real estate formerly 
belonging to or now owned by the State. 

By the act of the General Assembly passed April 28, 1902, dedicating 
Buckeye Lake, Indian Lake, Portage Lake and the Celina Grand Reser- 
voir to the use of the public for park and pleasure resort purposes, the 
management and control of said parks was placed in the hands of this 
commission, the Board of Public Works and the Chief Engineer of the 
Public Works, acting as a Joint Board. 

Owing to limited appropriation, $1,000.00 per year, the work of the 
joint board has been confined to the clearing out of stumps and logs 
dangerous to navigation and to policing the reservoirs during the sum- 
mer months. 

The commission is generally called a "Canal Commission," but 
should be called a land commis^ioin, as it has nothing to do with the 
navigation or management of the canals, and has no relation whatever 
to the old board of canal commissioners that laid out and constructed the 
public works of the State. 

(613) 



■•!«'**».* ...Jtl'S 



614 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Canal Commission. 

The duties of the commission -are to locate and define the state's 
property, to recover such portions of it as are found in the unlawful 
possession of individuals and corporations, to lease such portions of it 
as are not necessary for canal purposes, to acquire title to swamp lands 
and to collect the cash indemnity due for such lands when they have been 
disposed of by the United States. 

The original act was passed March 28, 1888, and shortly thereafter 
Governor Foraker appointed as members of said commission. General 
William H. Gibson, of Seneca county ; Col. Charles F. Baldwin, of Knox 
county, and Judge Alexander S. Latty, of Defiance county, General 
Gibson being made president, Judge Latty vice-president, and T. C. Ryan, 
Gi Wdshiiigiuii couiiLy, Secretary. Colonel Baldwin resigned after a few 
months' service, and Hon. R. AI. Rownd, of Franklin county, was ap- 
pointed in his place. 

The commission found that there was practically nothing wdth which 
to commence their labors. The original surveys and maps of the canals 
had all disappeared along with the books that showed the awards of dam- 
ages paid for lands appropriated for canals and reservoir purposes, 
portunately a half dozen of these books were found in a consignment of 
old paper that had been shipped to one of the paper mills on the Miami 
and Erie Canal, and were finally restored to the State, where they have 
been of inestimable value in aiding the recovery of State property. 

The first three or four years may be called the period of surveys and 
discovery. More than twelve hundred miles of transit lines have been 
run since the commencement of the canal and reservoir surveys, while 
hundreds of monuments have been planted to perpetuate the lines es- 
tablished for the boundaries of the State property. In addition, the titles 
to lands owned by the State, at one time and another, aggregating one 
million two hundred and thirty thousand five hundred and twenty-two 
(1,230,522) acres, have been recorded in the records of the office. 

Twenty-seven volumes of maps have been completed and bound in 
convenient book form, and others are in process of completion. 

These maps when completed will embrace the entire canal system, 
including the canals, reservoirs, basins, wide-waters, feeders, raceways, 
water-powers, hydraulics, dams, slack waters, locks, aqueducts, bridges, 
culverts, bulk-heads, waste-weirs, and in fact nearly every thing per- 
taining to the public w^orks of the State. 

In addition to these, plats have been made of all the swamp lands 
in the northwestern part of the State. This was necessary in order to 
determine the indemnity due the State, from the United States, for swamp 
lands, and the commission has filed claims for swamp land indemnity 
aggregating $121,601.66, which claims are pending for hearing before the 
Secretary of the Interior. 



V. ">#-*!»,*•> -*•»!«=*.■>♦ ■i^<» 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 615 

The Canal Commission. ^ 

While investigating the subject of titles a few years ago, the com- 
mission discovered that there \vcre 2,614 acres of land in the Mercer 
County Reservoir and 80 acres in the Loramie Reservoir that was still 
owned by the United States, the State of Ohio having by some oversight 
failed to acquire the title to these lands at the time the reservoirs were 
constructed. 

Parties immediately undertook to locate these lands with military 
bounty land warrants. 

Thereupon the commission filed a protest with the Commissioner of 
the General Land Office setting forth the injury that would be done the 
public works of Ohio. The Commissioner of the General Land Office, 
aiier a conical iasllng iicjirly four years, rejected the applications. 

The commission, after a second attempt, secured the passage of a 
bill by Congress at its last session granting these lands to the state, thus 
completing the state's title to its reservoir lands. 

In order to recover much of the state's property, tedious and expen- 
sive litigation has been necessary, but fully ninety per cent, of the value 
of property involved in the suits commenced on behalf of the state has 
been recovered. 

The net results to the state from the work of the commission in 
lands recovered, and lands leased and sold, is approximately $1,200,000.00, 
and this will be substantially increased if pending litigation results in 
favor of the state. 

The fixed policy of the commission has been to lease the state lands 
rather than to sell them in order that the state may derive a steady in- 
come from the same. 



6l6 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Canal Commission. 



The following is a list of the different canal commissioners who have 
served on that board from time to time, the date of each commission 
being some day in the latter part of April : 



Names. 


Years. 


County. 


Wm H. Gibson 

A. S. Latty 


1888—1890 

1888—1890 


Seneca. 
Defiance. 


C. F. Baldwin (Resigned) 

R. M. Rownd 


1888— 

1888—1900 


Knox. 
Franklin. 


Wm. E. Boden , . , . ... 

A K Roose . 


1890-1892 

lyyy — 1892 


Pickaway. 
Franklin. 


R. M. Rownd 


1390 — 1892 


R M Rownd 


1892 — I89fi 


Franklin 


Daniel Hartnett 


X892 — 189G 


Henry. 


A. T. Wikoff 


189G — 1900 


Franklin. 


C. W. McCracken 


189G — 1900 


Crawford. 


A. T. Wikoff 


1900 — 1902 


Franklin. 


H. W. Blachly 


1900 — 1904 


Van Wert. 


♦A. T. Wikoff 


1902 — 


Franklin. 


W. C. Wikoff 


1902 — 1904 


Franklin. 


W. C. Wikoff (Appointed two years > . . 
H. W. Blachly (Appointed two years) . 


1904— 


Franklin. 


1904 — 


Van Wert. 







The membership of the commission was reduced from three to two mem- 
bers in 1892. 

♦A. T. Wikoff died July 22, 1902, and W. C. Wikoff was appointed to fill 
out the unexpired term ending April 28, 1904. 



:%i -??;, 



■in I 



.jWti^tf$-^ 



OHIO FISH AND GAME COMMISSION. 



THE Ohio Fish and Game Commission was created in 1886, and 
is composed of five members, appointed by the Governor, who 
serve for five years each without compensation, except their 
actual expenses incurred in the performance of their duties. The 
law defines the duties of the Commissioners as follows : "To examine the 
various rivers, lakes, ponds and streams in the State, or bordering there- 
on, and to ascertain whether they can be rendered more productive of 
fish and game, and what measures are required to effect this object, either 
in restoring the production of fish and game in and about them, or in 
protecting sij.! r,ropr.rati::;r th^ fish which at pr'^^^nt ■f^^nn'^nt ?nrl abound 
in them, or otherwise; and the Commissioners shall carry into effect all 
measures. in this behalf, that they deem necessary, so far as means are 
placed at their disposal for these purposes; and they shall also inquire 
into the matter of artificial propagation of fish in the waters of the State, 
and adopt such plans to test the efficiency of this mode of increasing the 
quality of edible fish as they think best." 

To carry into effect the laws providing for the preservation of game 
and the protection of land owners from trespass against those who hunt 
illegally, the Commission appoints a force of wardens, deputy state 
wardens and special wardens, and by these a large number of arrests 
and convictions are made each year. Special wardens are appointed for 
some of the public lakes and reservoirs of the state, and there are also 
special wardens for Lake Erie. 

In the matter of propagating fish the Commission maintains a fine 
hatchery near London, Ohio, where black bass, marble cat, and crappies 
are raised and at the proper time are distributed to the public streams and 
lakes throughout the state. A new hatchery lor the artificial propagation i 

of fish for Lake Erie is also maintained at Lakeside, Ohio, Ottawa County. 
The lake fishing interests being of great magnitude and importance, the 
work of the Commission in respect to propagating these fish is one of ; 

vital necessity. The . Commission has accomplished great good in its ! 

various endeavors, and there is every reason to believe that the future I 

will be even more productive of satisfactory results. ; 

The present personnel of the Commission is as follows : J. L. Rodgers, j 

President, Columbus; Thomas B. Paxton, Cincinnati; D. W. Greene, | 

Dayton; Paul North, Cleveland, and L. J. Weber, McConnelsville. The 
Secretary of the Commission is George C. Blankner, of Columbus. The 
active field work of the Commission, which means the control of all 
wardens, is under the charge of Mr. J. C. Porterfield, Chief Warden, of ; 
Columbus. 

(617) 



(I «*<* f4m^mx% m- 



THE BOARD OF STATE CHARITIES. 



THE Ohio Board of State Charities is composed of six members 
appointed by the Governor. The law requires that the member- 
ship shall be equally divided between the two leading political 
parties, and fixes the term of office at three years. The mem- 
bers receive no compensation for their services, but their actual expenses 
incurred in the discharge of their duties are paid by the State. The 
Board appoints its own secretary, who is not a member of the Board. It 
Is required i^ i'lolu quaiiciiy meetings, but special meetings may be held 
at any time. 

It was first established by an act of the legislature passed in 1867, 
Massachusetts being the only state to precede Ohio in the enactment of 
such a law. Its organization at that time was due to the efforts of a 
member of the House of Representatives from Cuyahoga county. Hon- 
orable D. A. Dangler, who had the support of the then Governor, Jacob 
D. Cox. The motive that actuated Mr. Dangler in the introduction of 
his measure is defined by him as follows: *T availed myself of the op- 
portunity, as a member of the Ohio Legislature, of visiting the state 
institutions for the purpose of familiarizing myself, as far as possible, 
with their arrangement. It was after such a visit that I became im- 
pressed that the citizens of the great state of Ohio should have a more 
perfect knowledge of the management of these institutions than was 
gained by the annual visits of their representatives in the Legislature." 
In a speech advocating the passage of the bill introduced by him, Mr. 
Dangler said: 

"My objects are, by the agency of a common center and common 
head, to crystallize those various suggestions tending towards reforma- 
tion and economy in the present system of management and extend their 
application to all alike by the same agency; to extract from the systems 
in use in the European, states and countries, such ideas as may be appli- 
cable to our peculiar wants and requirements; through the introduction 
of statistics and analytical records, to assist in the diminution of crime, 
suffering and sickness, by pointing out the causes, occasion and the 
source; by the adoption of similar rules and regulations for institutions 
of a like character, to render their management uniform, harmonious 
and effective, and by a common standard of qualification for the various 
offices, prevent the appointment of any but those fully qualified to dis- 
charge the various duties with honesty and efficiency." 

(618) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



619 



The Board of State Charities. 



In 1872 the Board was abolished, but it was again organized in 
1876 under the old law with the additional provision for a salaried sec- 
retary. On April 15, 1880, the law was so amended as to provide for 
a Board of six members, instead of five, the original number. 

The Board is required to submit an annual report to the Legislature, 
setting forth the conditions of the institutions coming under its super- 
vision, together with any suggestions or recommendations it may have 
to offer relative to their management. Its work is not executive, but is 
entirely supervisory over the whole system of public charitable and cor- 
rectional institutions of the state, including those maintained by municipal- 
ities and counties. It has authority to require such reports from all insti- 
tutions supported in whole, or in part, by public funds, az h m-^y •>»•!-' 
necessary. All of these institutions now make annual, and some of them 
quarterly reports to the office of the Board. One of the most important 
duties devolving upon it is that requiring the submission of all plans for 
state institutions, jails, children's homes, workhouses and infirmaries to 
the Board for criticism and approval. The Governor of the State is ex- 
officio president of the Board, and may, at any time, order an investigation 
by the Board, or a committee of its members, of any institution over which 
it has supervisory power. 



PRESENT MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF STATE CHARITIES. 
(Term of office, three years.) 



Names. 


Residence. 


Date of Original 
Appointment. 


Present 

Term 
Expires. 


Myron T. Herrick, Gov. . 


Cleveland . . 
Cincinnati. . 
Cleveland.. 
Mansfield.. 


President ex-officio 


' 


J. G. Scbmidlapp 


October 10, 1902 

August 10, 1S92 


April 22, 1907 
April 22, 1907 
April 22, 1905 
April 22, 1905 
April 22, 1906 
April 22, 1906 


Henry C. Ranney 

Roeliff Brinkerhoff 


April 23, 18S0 


Martin Dewey Follett 

Jesse N. Oren 


Marietta. ... 
Wilmington 
Columbus. . 
Columbus. . 


April 28, 1891 


April 26,1903 


Rutherford H. Piatt 

H. H. Shirer 


January 26, 1901 

Appointed by the Board 







620 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



1 



The Board of State Charities. 



NAMES OF THE MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF STATE CHARITIES SINCE 
ITS ORGANIZATION IN 1867. 



Names. 



Residence. 



Date of Original 
Appointment. 



To Succeed. 



•Albert Douglass 

♦G. D. Harrington 

♦Robert W. Steele 

♦Douglas Putnam 

♦Joseph Perkins 

♦John Davis 

♦John W. Andrews 

Board abolished in 1872, 

reorganized in 187G. 
♦Rutherford B. Hayes, 

Governor 

♦John W. Andrews 

♦Chas. J. Albright 

♦Charles Boesel 

♦Joseph Perkins 

♦Murray Shipley 

♦R. M. Bishop, Gov 

Roeliff Brinkerhoff 

♦M. D. Carrington 

♦Chas. Foster, Gov 

♦William Howard Neff., 
♦George Hoadley, Gov. . 

♦Lyman J. Jackson 

John Beatty 

Joseph B. Foraker, Gov. 

John G. Doren 

H. H. McFadden 



♦James L. Wilson 

♦Charles Parrott 

Jas. F. Campbell, Gov. 

M. D. Follett 

♦Wm. McKinley, Gov. 
Henry C. Ranney 



♦Asa S. Bushnell, Gov. 

W. A. Hale 

♦Geo. K. Nash, Gov.... 
Rutherford H. Piatt... 

J. G. Schmidlapp 

Jesse N. Oren 

Myron T. Herrick, Gov. 



Chillicothe. 
Columbus. . 

Dayton 

Marietta . . . 
Cleveland . . 
Cinrinra,ti, . 
Columbus. . 



Columbus. . 
Columbus. . 
Columbus. . 
N. Bremen. 
Cleveland. . 
Cincinnati. , 
Cincinnati. , 
Mansfield. . 

Toledo 

Fostoria. . . 
Cincinnati. , 
Cincinnati. , 
New Lex'n. 
Columbus. . 
Cincinnati. , 

Dayton 

Steuben'le. 



Greenfield. . 
Columbus. . 
Hamilton. . . 
Marietta. . . 

Canton 

Cleveland. . 

Springfield. 

Dayton 

Columbus. . 
Columbus. . 
Cincinnati. . 
Wilmington 
Cleveland. . 



May 17, 1867.. 
June 4, 1867. 
May 23, 1867.. 
June 8, 1867.. 
June 10, 1867. 
July 27, 18GS... 
March 15, 1870, 



President, ex-officio. 

April, 1876 

April, 1876 

April, 1876 

April, 1876 

April, 1876 

President, ex-ofllcio. 

April, 1878 

April, 1879 

President, ex-oflacio. 

April, 1880 

President, ex-officio. 

August, 1885 

October, 1885 

President, ex-officio. 

February, 1887 

May, 1887 



April, 1888 

January, 1889 

President, ex-officio. 

April, 1891... 

President, ex-officio. 
August, 1892 



May 12, 1897 

January, 1901 

President ex-officio. 
President ex-officio. 

October, 1902 

April, 1903 

President ex-officio. 



^ t..Ci'' •..•■(>' '>tS3. 

G. D. Harring- 
ton. 



R. B. Hayes. 
C. J. Albright. 
Murray Shipley. 
R. M. Bishop. 



Chas. Foster. 

Chas. Boesel. 

Jos. Perkins. 

Geo. Hoadley. 

Lyman Jackson. 

M. D. Carring- 
ton. 

John Beatty. 

J. W. Andrews. 

J. B. Foraker. 

John G. Doren. 

W. A. Hale. 

Asa S. Bushnell. 

W. H. Neff. 

J. E.Campbell. 

Geo. K. Nash. 

H. H. INIcFad- 
den. 

Wm. McKinley. 

James Wilson. 

Chas. Parrott. 



♦Deceased. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 621 

The Board of State Charities. 



SECRETARIES OF THE BOARD. 

The Secretary of the Board, in addition to other cities, visits and 
inspects all the institutions coming under its supervision. 

Since its organization in 1867 it has had four secretaries : Rev. 
Albert G. Byers, M. D., 1867 to 1890; John G. Doren, December, 1890, 
to April, 1892; Joseph Perkins Byers, son of the first Secretary, April, 
1892, to November, 1902; H. H. Shirer, since December i, 1902. 

The present Secretary was born near Dayton in 1872. He graduated 
from the High School of that city and received the degree of A. B. at 
Heidelberg University at Tiffin in 1897. At the time of graduation he 
vvab elected an inGTrurivi .»l the University and continued in that work 
until his unanimous election as Secretary of the Board of State Charities. 



It 



STATE COMMISSIONER OF SOLDIERS' CLAIMS. 



>^ 



^^X 



:^'rk 



:^^ 






.r/. 



^ 



1 



W. L. CURRY. 



(622) 



W. L. Curry was born in Unionl County, Ohio, June 25, 1839. He is 
the son of Stephenson Curry, and his grandfather. Colonel James 
Curry, was an officer of the "Continental Line" in the 4th and 8th 
Virginia during the War of the Revolution, and was granted, .as part pay- 
ment for his service, one thousand acres of land in Union County and the family 
settled in that county in the year 1811. Mr, Curry, the subject of this sketch, 
worked on his father's farm during his boyhood days until he arrived at the 
age of twenty-one. He was given a good education in the country schools and 
he also attended a private select school for two or three terms at the old acad- 
emy in Marysville, the county seat, and taught school in the county four win- 
ters. In the fall of 18G0 he entered the Otterbein College at Westerville, Ohio, 
intending to complete a scientific course in three years, and In January, 18G1, 
commenced the study of law. The fall of 18G0 ended his school days, as at the 
breaking out of the war of the rebellion he enlisted ir Hii iiir-'"i'.:v .oruo^*".' 
in April, 1801, for the first three months* service. At the organiza- 
tion of the company he was elected First Lieutenant and the company 
commenced drilling at once, but the quota of Ohio v.-as filled before 
this company was mustered in. He then enlisted in the first call for three 
years' troops as a private in the First Ohio Volunter Cavalry. At the organi- 
zation of the company he was appointed Orderly Sergeant and was promoted 
successively to Second Lieutenant, First Lieutenant and to the Captaincy of his 
company, and also served several months as Regimental Quartermaster. 
Colonel Curry served through thg war with his regiment, participating in all 
of the battles of the Army of the Cumberland, including the Siege of Corinth, 
Miss., Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge and the campaign 
of the "One hundred days under fire from Chattanooga to Atlanta." 

He was at one time a prisoner of war and was discharged by reason of 
"injuries received in the line of duty," after a service of three and one-half 
years at the front. 

After the war he engaged in the mercantile business in Union County, until 
the year 1875, and that year he was elected Auditor of Union County and 
served as County Auditor three successive terms. On retiring from that office 
he engaged in the lumber business, and in which he still retains an interest. 
He served as Assistant Adjutant General of Ohio during both President Mc- 
Kinley's terms as Governor, and' also served in the National Guard of Ohio five 
years as Lieutenant Colonel of the 14th Regiment O. V. L 

His family has been engaged in all the wars in this country since the 
Revolution and two brothers served through the War of the Rebellion, and 
one of whom attained the rank of Captain. He has always taken a great in- 
terest in military affairs and has written and published the history of "Union 
County in the War," a history of the "First Ohio Cavalry," and a number of 
patriotic poems. 



(623) 



624 THE, BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

State Commissioners of Soldiers' Claims, 

PURPOSES OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

This office was created by act of the Legislature of Ohio, passed 
April 12, 1900. W. L. Curry, the present Commissioner, was appointed 
immediately after the passage of the act and his commission bears date 
of April 12, 1900. The following extract from the law sets forth the 
duties required of the Commissioner: 

"That for the purpose of preparing and collecting the claims of 
Ohio soldiers, and their legal representatives, against the government 
of the United States, growing out of military services, and for the pro- 
tection and relief of Ohio soldiers, whether in the service or discharged, 
.there be and is hereby e^^tablished, at the seat of government of the State, 
••i-sai ottice of Ohio soldiers claims. 

r . "The chief of said office shall be styled the 'Commissioner of Sol- 
^ diers' Claims,' and he shall be appointed by the Governor. 

"It shall be the duty' of the Commissioner, on demand, to furnish 
and give all necessary instructions and advice to soldiers and marines 
of Ohio, or their heirs, or legal representatives, respecting the claims 
of such soldiers and marines against the Unjted States for pension, 
bounty, back pay, or otherwise, by reason of military service, and to col- 
lect such claims, and perform all other duties which the Governor may 
. require of him appertaining to the duties of said office. 

"The Commissioner shall have power to administer oaths and af- 
firmations, he shall keep a seal of office, and his official certificate shall 
be received in evidence without further authentication. 

"He is required to give a bond in the sum of $10,000 conditioned 
for the faithful performance of his duty and all claims prosecuted is 
without expense to the claimant." 

• The term of office is for two years and the Commissioner holds his 
office until his successor has been appointed and qualified. 



THE BOARD OF MEDICAL. REGISTRATION AND 
EXAMINATION. 



THE law providing for the State Board of Medical Registration 
and Examination was passed on February 27, 1896 (Sections 
4403c, d, e, f, and g, Revised Statutes of Ohio.) 

The first Board was appointed by Governor Bushnell in 
March, 1896, and held its first session on March 25, 1896. 

The Board consists of seven members representing the different 
schools of medicine in proportion to their numerical strength m the State, 
and the members are appointed by the Governor, each for a term of 
seven years. . 

The Secretar}% who is made executive officer of the Board by the 
law, is not a member of the Board, but is elected each year by the Board. 
The law requires that the Secretary shall be a physician in good standing. 

The purpose of this department is to regulate the practice of medicine, 
surgery and midwifery in the State of Ohio, and to protect the people of 
the state from illegal practitioners of the same. 

The duties of the department consist of the examination and regis- 
tration of competent persons for the practice of medicine, surgery and 
midwifery, the regulation of medical colleges and the prosecution of 
illegal practitioners of medicine, surgery and midwifery. 

The department is self-supporting, depending upon the fees col- 
lected from the examination and registration of Dhysicians and midwives 
for its revenue. 

The law of February 2j, 1896, provided that the Board should issue 
certificates upon the basis of graduation from medical colleges recognized 
as in good standing by the Board. On April 14, 1900, an amendment to 
the law of February 27, 1896 (Sections 4403c-f, Revised Statutes of 
Ohio), was passed requiring that all applicants for registration in the 
State of Ohio shall appear before the Board and pass an examination 
in Anatomy, Physiology, Chemistry, Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 
Practice of Medicine, Practice of Surgery, Obstetrics, Pathology and 
such other subjects as the Board may require. 

The fee for registration under the provisions of the law of February 
27, 1896, was $5.00, and the fee for examination under the present law 
is $25.00. 

The following facts are $tated for the information of those desiring 
to practice medicine or surgery in the State of Ohio : 

(626) 
40— B. A. 



626 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Board of Medical Registration and Examination. 

1. No person can lawfully practice medicine in the State of Ohio 
unless licensed to do so by the State Board of Medical Registration and 
Examination. 

2. Certificates entitling the holder to practice medicine and surgery 
in Ohio are issued only after examination by the Board, except in the 
following cases : 

(a) Applicants who were matriculated on January i, 1900, in any 
medical college in the State of Ohio, recognized by the State Board of 
Medical Registration and Examination, who have graduated since Jan- 
uary I, 1900, and who file their diplomas for registration prior to July 
I, 1904, may receive certificates under the Act of Fc^m^ry '^y^ T^of-. 

(b) The Board may in its discretion dispense with an examination, 
in the case of a physician or surgeon duly authorized to practice medicine 
or surgery in any state, territory or the District of Columbia, who may 
desire to change his residence to Ohio, and who makes application on a 
form to be prescribed by the Board, accompanied by a fee of fifty dollars, 
and presents a certificate, or license issued after an examination by the 
medical Board of such state, territory, or the District of Colum.bia, ac- 
corded orily to applicants from states, territories and districts whose laws 
demand qualifications of equal grade with those required in Ohio; but 
such examination shall not be dispensed with unless under the law and 
regulations of the state, territory or the District of Columbia, equal rights 
and privileges are accorded to physicians and surgeons of Ohio, holding 
the certificate of the Board, who may desire to move to, and practice in 
such state, territory or the District of Columbia. 

3. Examinations will begin on the second Tuesday of June and De- 
cember, and will continue for three days. Examinations will not be held 
at any other time except as stated above. 

4. Completed applications must be filed with the Secretary of the 
Board at least ten days prior to the day set. for the examination which 
the applicant desires to enter. 

5. A fee of twenty-five dollars must accompany each application. 

6. Only graduates in medicine from colleges recognized by the 
State Board of Medical Registration and Examination are admitted to 
the examinations. 

7. The examination is written and must be in the English language. 
It includes Anatomy, Physiology, Pathology, Chemistry, Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics, the Principles and Practice of Medicine, Surgery, 
Obstetrics, and such other subjects as the Board shall require. The 
applicant is examined in the Materia Medica and Therapeutics and the 
Principles and Practice of Medicine, of the school of medicine in which 
he desires to practice. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 627 

The Board of Medical Registration and Examination, 

8. Copies of questions which have been used in previous examina- 
tions will not be furnished under any circumstances. 

9. Persons failing in one examination may be re-examined within 
one year without the payment of an additional fee. 

10. Blanks for application will be furnished by the Secretary upon 
request. 

11. The applicant's diploma must in every case accompany his ap- 
plication papers. After verifying the diploma the Secretary will return 
it by express at once. 

12. All correspondence should be addressed to Dr. Frank Winders. 
Secretary, Columbus, Ohio. 

Postage stamps should be enclosed for answer. 



628 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Board of Medical Registration and Examination. 



OFFICIAL BOARD. 1896-1897. 



Name. 



Residence. 



N. R. Coleman, M. D 

David Williams,' M. D 

H. H. Baxter, M. D 

Cady Markley, M. D 

S. B. McGavran, M. D 

Charles A. L. Reed, M. D 

11= E. Beeue, ^T. ■• .. ... , 
♦John K. Scudder, M. D 



Columbus. 

Columbus. 

Cleveland. 

Toledo. 

Cadiz. k 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 



♦Term expired March, 1896, succeeded by H. H. Baxter, M. D., Cleveland. 



ill 



OFFICIAL BOARD, 1898-1899, 



Name. 



Residence. 



N. R. Coleman, M. D. 
David Williams. M. D, 
H. H. Baxter,' M. D. . 
L. F. Towers, M. D. . . 
S. B. McGavran, M. D. 
H. E. Beebe, M. D. . . 
•C. A. L. Reed, M. D. , 
A. Ravogli, M. D 



Cincinnati. 

Columbus. 

Cleveland. 

Toledo. 

Cadiz. 

Sidney. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 



♦Dr. C. A. L. Reed resigned, succeeded by Dr. A. Ravogli, Cincinnati. 



OFFICIAL BOARD. 1900-1901. 



Name. 

• 1 


Residence. 


N. R. Coleman, M. D 

David Williams M D 


Columbus. 
Columbus. 


H. H. Baxter M. D 


Cleveland. 


S. B. McGavran, M. D •. . . 


Cadiz 


A. Ravoeli M. D 


Cincinnati. 


Ij F TowGrs M 13 •.«••••...••.•••• ••••••••••••• 


Toledo. 


H. E. Beebe, M. D , 


Sidney. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



629 



The Board of Medical Registration and Examination. 



OFFICIAL. BOARD, 1901-1902. 



Name. 



Residence. 



N. R. Coleman, M. D. . 
♦David Williams, M. D, 
H. H. Baxter, M. D. . . . 
S. B. McGavran, M. D. 

A. Ravogli, M. D 

L. F. Towers, M. D. . . 

H. E. Beebe, M. D 

s. M. SIit;rina3i. TJ D. 



Columbus. 

Columbus. 

Cleveland. 

Cadiz 

Cincinnati. 

Toledo. 

Sidney. 

Columbus. 



♦Deceased, succeeded by S. M. Sherman, Columbus, Ohio. 



OFFIClfRS. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Office. 


N. R. Coleman, M. D 


Columbus 


President. 


H. E. Beebe, M. D 


Sidney 


Vice-President. 


Frank Winders, M. D 


Columbus 


Secretary. 
Treasurer. 


S. M. Sherman, M. D 


Columbus 









OFFICIAL BOARD, 1902-1903. 



Name. 



Residence. 



N. R. Coleman, M. D. 
H. H Baxter. M. D. . . 
S. B. McGavran. M. D. 

A. Ravogli, M. D 

L. F. Towers, M. D. . . 

H. E. Beebe, M. D 

S. M. Sherman, M. D. 



Columbus. 

Cleveland. 

Cadiz 

Cincinnati. 

Toledo. 

Sidney. 

Columbus. 



630 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Board of Medical Registration and Examination. 



OFFICERS. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Office. 



N. R. Coleman, M. D 


Columbus 


President. 


tt. E. Beebe, M. D 


Sidney 


Vice-President. 


Frank Winders, M. D 


Columbus 


Secretary. 


S. M. Sherman, M. D 


Columbus 


Treasurer. 









OFFICIAL BOARD, 1903-1904. 



Name. 



Residence. 



n. H. Baxter, M. D. . . , 

H. E. Beebe, M. D 

S. B McGavran, M. D. 

A. Ravogli, M. D 

S. M. Sherman, M. D. 
L. I. Towers, M. D. . . . 
E. J. Wilson. M. D. . . . 



Cleveland. 

Sidney. 

Cadiz. 

Cincinnati. 

Columbus. 

Toledo. 

Columbus. 



OFFICERS. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Office. 


H. E. Beebe, M. D. * 


Sidney 


President. 


S B. McGavran M. D 


Cadiz 


Vice-President. 


Frank Winders, M. D 


Columbus 

Colvjmbus 


Secretary. 


S. M. Sherman, M. D 


Treasurer. 



THE STATE BOARD OF DENTAL EXAMINERS. 



THE Seventy-fifth General Assembly amended the law regulating 
the practice of Dentistry in Ohio. The wholesale registration 
permitted by the former law is restricted, and only graduates of 
Ohio colleges up to June meeting of the Board, 1905, and pro- 
prietors of dental offices continuously since January i, 1893, are per- 
mitted to register without examination. 

The clause in law admitting an under-graduate "to examination 
during the years 1902 ana 1903 who is a legal resident of this State and 
has been a student of dentistry, under a preceptor, for twelve months 
prior to the passage of this act" has eliminated its effect, by expiration 
of stated period ; therefore, no under-graduate is eligible to examination. 

After 1905, June meeting, everyone who desires to practice dentistry 
in Ohio must be a graduate of a reputable Dental College and pass the 
State Board of Dental Examiners, before a certificate of registration will 
be issued; therefore, our law eventually works into a very effective 
one. 

The registration fee is $10.00; the examination fee $20.00. There 
have been 3,534 certificates of registration issued since the passage of 
the former law, which took effect July 4, 1892; however, a great many 
of these were issued to persons having no intention of practicing in Ohio, 
but registered because the law was so lax — a diploma and fee of $2.00 
was all that was required. 

At last meeting of Board the Secretary was authorized to prepare 
and publish a list giving location of all registered dentists in Ohio, mail- 
ing copy to each which will very materially assist in eradicating an illegal 
element. 

Judge Marcus G. Evans rendered a very able opinion sustaining 
Board in case of Glenn vs. State Board of Dental Examiners. Glenn had 
brought mandamus proceedings to compel Board to register him under 
provisions of former law. 



(631) 



632 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



I 



The State Board of Dental Examiners. 



The members of the Board are as follows, and their terms expire 



May 31, 1905: 



Name and Office. 



Residence. 



Henry Barnes, M. D., President , 

H. C. Brown, D. D. S., Secretary, 185 E. State Street. 

L. L. Barber, D. D. S., Treasurer 

J. K. Douglas, D. D. S 

C. Stanley Smith, D. D. S , 



Cleveland. 

Columbus. 

Toledo. 

Sandusky. 

Cincinnati. 



■<^^i^mmi0^!i^sm^--:dm«b 



■■'H *■'<'««*.«'-'»*.••*» mi* s*r •T*s>«'?'.^' 



THE BOARD OF PHARMACY. 



ORIGINALLY created by act of the General Assembly, March, 
1884. Object, to regulate the practice of pharmacy in the state 
of Ohio. Board composed of five members. Term five years. 
The term of one member expires each year (March or April). 

Appointment by the governor with consent of the Senate. The Ohio 
Pharmaceutical Association recommends each year five persons from 
which the governor may appoint one for the vacancy. ^ 

The principal executive ofl^ccr is the -ecrctriy, '*^'^?o^e "fTit e >^ at the 
capitol. 

This officer is a member of the board and is elected annually by the 
board. 

All persons engaged in the practice of pharmacy in Ohio as propri- 
etors or managers of retail drug stores were registered without examina- 
tion as pharmacists and received certificates of such registration by reason 
of their being in such practice when the law was enacted. Those en- 
gaged as clerks or assistants under the same conditions were likewise 
registered and received certificates as assistant pharmacists. 

The limit within which any person could take advantage of this pro- 
vision was three months, and that limit expired in July, 1884. Subse- 
quent to that date all persons are required to pass an examination in order 
to secure a certificate of registration entitling them to practice pharmacy 
in Ohio. 

Certificates are issued for a period of three years and renewable tri- 
ennially so long as the holder continues to practice pharmacy in this state. 

The renewal fee is two dollars for pharmacist and one dollar for an 
assistant pharmacist. Examinations are held on the second Tuesdays and 
Wednesdays of the months of January, May and October, all in Colum- 
bus. The requirements for pharmacists' examination are four years' ex- 
perience in the business of a retail apothecary, and for an assistant 
pharmacist two years' like experience. Credit on this requirement is 
given for time spent in receiving instrution in a recognized college of 
pharmacy, but under-graduates do not receive credit for college work 
on pharmacists' examination. For the first grade the applicant must be 
21 years of age, and for the second, 18 years of age. 

The examination fee for pharmacist is five dollars, and for an as- 
sistant two dollars. No additional charge for registration or certificate. 
Original certificates issued for three years. 

(G33) 



634 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Board of Pharmacy, 



Every pharmacy, or retail drug or chemical store must be under the 
immediate supervision of a registered pharmacist. Assistant pharmacists 
may sell or compound drugs, medicines or poisons only in a store -which is 
in charge of a registered pharmacist. The board is charged with the duty 
of enforcing the statute. 

The act of 1884 was repealed April 21, 1898, and a new one enacted 
in its place. The provisions of examination and registration (as outlined 
above) are those embodied in the later act. The status of the board was 
not changed. 

The expenses of the board are paid from the fees and penalties aris- 
ing from renewal fees, examination fees, and the penalties arising from 
fines in pr^se^ritions. Receipts are paid into the state treasury and ex- 
penses paid on warrant issued by the Auditor of State. 

* 

PRESENT MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 



Names. 


Residence. 


Term Expires. 


Charles W. Tobey 


Troy 


April 6, 1906. 


W. R. Ogier ; 


Columbus 

Delphos 


April 7 1907. 


F. H. King 


March 31, 1908. 


Julius Greyer 


Cincinnati 

Cleveland 


March 31, 1909. 


Geo. W. Voss 


March 31, 1905. 









George W. Voss is the president of the board and W. R. Ogier is 
secretary and treasurer. 



THE BOARD OF LIVE- STOCK COMMISSIONERS. 



W. W. MILLER^ SECRETARY. DR. PAUL FISCHER, VETERINARIAN. 

ACCORDING to a law passed May 7, 1902, the Ohio State Board 
of Agriculture constitutes the State Board of Live Stock Com- 
missioners. This Board appoints a veterinarian, who is sub- 
ject to its rules and regulations, and, in certain cases, when 
deemed advisable, additional veterinarians may be t^mporarilv anoointed. 

This Board is delegated with power to prescribe rules for carrymg 
into effect and enforcing all the laws of the state with reference to pro- 
tecting live stock and exterminating disease, and is authorized to, and 
does, co-operate with the Bureau of Animal Industry of the United 
States Department of Agriculture. The scope of the Board's work is 
entirely administrative in character, the object being not to treat disease, 
but to prevent its spread and provide means for eradication. Prevention 
is brought about, as far as possible, by enforcing the laws forbidding 
the transportation of diseased animals through the state, and by regii- 
lating the sanitary condition of stock-yards and railway cars and other 
conveyances used for transporting animals; and also the condition of 
buildings and public and private premises v/here live stock may be 
quartered. 

The shipments of Southern cattle infested with ticks, the carriers of 
Southern cattle fever, are carefully guarded and regulated. Under the 
rules and regulations of this. Board, Southern cattle, which are liable to 
convey Southern cattle fever (Texas fever) to native cattle, must be 
shipped in distinctly placarded cars and unloaded in special pens provided 
for that purpose. Cars and other conveyances used for transporting 
such cattle must be thoroughly disinfected, according to prescribed 
methods, before they can again be used for transporting other animals 
or merchandise of any kind. In this way the spread of Southern cattle 
fever can be kept under absolute control. 

When dangerously infectious or contagious diseases break out their 
further spread is checked by enforcing strict quarantine regulations. In 
enforcing these regulations and in receiving information regarding out- 
breaks of dangerous diseases the co-operation of live stock owners and 
transportation companies is of the greatest value, in fact without such 
co-operation no effective work can be done. 

(635) 



636 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Board of Live Stock Commissioners, 

Certain widespread diseases and others of a very malignant nature 
receive particular attention. The introduction of diseases at present not 
existing in the United States, but which might at any time be introduced 
with imported animals, such diseases, for instance, as contagious pleuro- 
pneumonia in cattle and foot and month disease in cattle, swine and other 
animals are guarded with the greatest caution, since their introduction 
would mean incalculable losses to individuals and their extermination an 
enormous cost to the country. When in the opinion of the Board of Live 
Stock Commissioners it is necessary to prevent the further spread of any 
dangerous, contagious, or infectious disease, to destroy certain affected 
or exposed animals, such animals, after being examined by the state 
veterinarian and pronounced affected with the disca-r itn. ........tk-ix, ■•??- 

be ordered destroyed. For animals thus destroyed the owner receives a 
certain compensation from the state. Claims under this provision must 
be approved by the Board of Live Stock Commissioners, reported by this 
Board to the Governor, and by him communicated to the legislature with 
the recommendation, if the matter is approved by him, that the proper 
appropriation be made to pay such claims. Thus far this provision has 
been applied to glanders in horses and mules, and rabies (hydrophobia) 
in swine. 

Animals affected with rabies, southern cattle fever, sheeppox, mange, 
or any other dangerous, infectious or contagious disease, the spread of 
which can be controlled by isolation of the infected animals, are strictly 
quarantined until all danger of communicating the disease has passed. 
The cost of the quarantine is always borne by the owner of the quar 
antined animals. 

Shipments of live stock into the state and cars or other conveyances 
carrying such live stock, are subject to inspection by the State Veterin- 
arian whenever this is necessary to enforce any of the rules and regula- 
tions of the Board. The State Veterinarian is the authorized person to 
issue certificates of health for animals intended to be shipped to other 
states requiring such certificates. 

Special plans for controlling tuberculosis in cattle and swine and 
for reducing the losses occasioned by hog cholera are being introduced ; 
literature relating to these subjects is from time to time issued by the 
State Veterinarian and distributed to all applicants who may be inter- 
ested. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



637 



The Board of Live Stock Commissioners, 



OFFICERS. 



Name. 


Office. 


Jeremiah L. CarDcnter 


President. 


Wm Miller 


Vice-President 


Wells W. Miller. 


Secretary. 


James W. Fleming 


Assistant Secretary. 
Veterinarian. 


Paul Fischer 







MEMBERS. 



•I'll 

m 

i 



Name. 



Term Expires. 



Thaddeus E. Cromley, Ashville, Pickaway County.. 

Thomas L. Calvert, Selma, Clark County 

William Miller, Gypsum, Ottawa County 

Jeremiah L. Carpenter, Carpenter, Meigs County.... 

Charles H. Ganson, Urbana, Champaign County 

Alfred Putnam Sandles, Ottawa, Putnam County 

Roldon O. Hinsdale, Wadsworth, Medina County 

Samuel Taylor, Grove City, Franklin County 

L. P. Bailey, Tacoma, Belmont County 

E. L. Lybarger, Spring Mountain, Coshocton County 



January, 1905. 
January, 1905. 
January, 1906. 
January, 1906. 
January, 1907. 
January, 1907. 
January, 1908. 
January, 1908. 
January, 1909. 
January, 1909. 



THE BOARD OF VETERINARY EXAMINERS. 



THE law creating the State Board of Veterinary Examiners was 
passed by the General Assembly May 21, 1894. The Board 
consists of five members ; the Secretary of the State Board of 
Agriculture and the Secretary of the State Board of Health 
are made ex officio members by the law, while the Governor has the ap- 
pointment of the other members. A list of the officers, from the organic''- 
tion of the board to date, is given below : 





PRESIDENTS 




Names. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


Li N "Rontiaiii 


Oxford 


July 25, 1894, to Feb. 1, 1895. 
February 1, 1895— still serving. 


W W Miller 


Castalia. ... * 








SECRETARIES 


3. 


Names. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


Dr. C. 0. Probst 

Dr. N. B. Smith 


Columbus 

Basil 


July 25, 1894, to July 2, 1895. 
July 2, 1895, to October 6, 1896. 
October 6, 1896. to July 18, 1898. 
July 18, 1898, to October 6, 1898. 
October 6, 1898— still serving. 


Dr. H. J. Detmers 


Columbus 


Dr. W. E. Wight 

Dr. D. S. White 


Delaware 

Columbus 







C43«) 



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41 






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SELWYN N. OWEN. 
Member State Board of Arbitration. 



Selwyn N. Owen was admitted to the bar in 1862, and began practice in 
Fremont, Ohio. In 1863 he removed to Bryan, Ohio, where he soon entered 
upon a large and remunerative practice in Northwestern Ohio. 

In 1876 he was elected to the Common Pleas bench and re-elected in 1881. 
In 1883 he was elected to the Supreme Court of Ohio, where he served for 
nearly six years, four years of which time he was Chief Justice of that court, 
retiring in 1889. He at once entered upon a successful practice and \n 1893 he 
was appointed to a membership of the State Board of Arbitration and was made 
its chairman, in which capacity he is still serving. In 1897 he was appointed 
by Mayor Samuel L. Black, Director of Law of the city of Columbus, and served 
for two years. He is a Democrat in politics and will be 67 years old on July 5, 
1903. 



(639) 




I^^i^ 



NOAH H. SWAYNE. 
Member State Board of Arbitration. 




Governor Charles Foster was succeeded by Noah Haynes Swayne, a son of 
Judge Noah H. Swayne of the United States Supreme Court and Sarah Ann 
Wager of Harper's Ferry, Virginia. He was born in Columbus, Ohio, November 
30, 1847. He prepared for college at Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachu- 
setts, and graduated from Yale in the class of 1870. He is a member of the 
bar of the State of Ohio and is senior member ol the firmof Swayne, Haynes, 
Fuller and Tyler, of Toledo. Ohio. He served one term in the Legislature, hav- 
ing been a member of the 65th General Assembly. In 1900 he was Presidential 
Elector and in 1903 he was nominated as Elector at Large from the State of 
Ohio, by the Republican convention, held in the summer of that year. He is 
President of the Toledo City Library Board and has occupied a number of 
similar positions. He was married March 16, 1886, to Miss Frances, daughter 
of the late J. B. Sickles, of St. Louis, Missouri. 



(640) 




JOSEPH BISHOP. 
Member " State Board of Arbitration. 



Joseph Bishop was appointed by Governor McKinley to represent labor on 
the State Board of Arbitration, and upon the organization of the Board, May 
29, 1893, he was elected Secretary and has filled that position ever since. He 
is the acting member of the Board and the only one who devotes his entire 
time to the work. All routine business passes through his hands and the policy 
pursued in labor controversies is in the initiatory stage left to his judgment. 

Mr. Bishop was born at Buford, South Wales, June 9. 1839. His father 
was an iron worker and emigrated to America in 1840, locating at Pittsburg, Pa. 
Here, Joseph attended the public schools until he was thirteen years old at 
which agK he started to work in the rolling mill. In 1859, he took an active 
part in organizing the United Sons of Vulcan, or Puddler's Union, the first or- 
ganization of iron workers in this country. He continued to work at his trade 
of puddling and his activity in the union until the breaking out of the Civil 
War, when he enlisted in Company B, 13th Pennsylvania Volunteers. At the 
close of the three months' service he re-enlisted in Company B, 102nd Pennsyl- 
vania Regiment, and was commissioned First Lieutenant. At the close of the 
war he returned to Pittsburg and resumed his vocation. At the National Con- 
vention of the United Sons of Vulcan, held at Philadelphia, in August, 1874, Mr. 
Bishop was elected National President, wbich office he held for three years, 
and during which time he established the first yearly scale of wages for the 
iron workers of America. He formed the plan of consolidating the various 
iron workers' unions into one organization. The result of this effort was the 
formation on August 4, 187G, of the Amalgamted Association of Iron and Steel 
Workers' of the United States. He served as its President until 1881, when he 
retired from office and again went to work in a rolling mill continuing there 
until 1885, when he removed to Columbus. 

Mr. Bishop was appointed a member of the State Board of Arbitration by 
Governor McKinley in April, 1893, re-appointed by Governor Bushnell in 189G 
and 1899, and again re-appointed by Governor Nash in 1902. 

(641) 

41--B. A. 



THE STATE BOARD OF ARBITRATION. 



THE State Board of Arbitration was organized May 29, 1893, under 
an act of the previous session of the General Assembly of Ohio, 
Governor ^IcKinley having appointed as members of such board 
the Hon. John Little, ex-member of Congress, from Greene 
County; the Hon. Selwyu N. Oweu, ex-Cliiei jubiice ui the Supreme 
Court of Ohio, and Joseph Bishop, a representative of the Trades Unions, 
both of the latter from Franklin County. Mr. Owen was elected chair- 
man of the Board and Mr. Bishop secretary, and these officers have 
served iminterruptedly by re-appointment and re-election. Mr. Little 
died October 18, 1900, and in his stead the Governor appointed Mr. R. 
G. Richards, of Steubenville, a former Lieutenant-Governor of Ohio. 
On February 20, 1902, Mr. Richards tendered his resignation having 
previously been elected to the Common Pleas bench. The vacancy caused 
by the resignation of Mr. Richards was filled on J\lay loth, when the 
Governor appointed George W. Crouse, of Akron, to serve the imex- 
pired temi. Mr. Crouse served until the end of the term, April 9, 1903, 
when he was succeeded by ex-Governor Charles Foster, of Fostoria. Mr. 
Foster died January 9th, 1904. The vacancy thus caused was filled by 
the appointment of Hon. Noah H. Swayne, of Toledo. There have 
been no other changes in the board since its creation in 1893. It has 
acted as arbitrator in a number of serious difficulties between employers 
and workmen. Its most important work, however, has been along the 
line of mediation and conciliation. In many instances what might have 
been serious trouble has been checked in its incipiency through the prompt 
and conciliatory officers of the board. 



(m) 



STATE GEOLOGISTS. 



THE First Geological Survey of Ohio was authorized in 1837, ^^^ 
work was begun in that year by W. W. Mather, who published 
in 1838 the results of the field w^ork done by himself and as- 
sistants in 1837 and 1838. From 1839 to 1869 the work stood 
in abeyance. 

The second Geological Survey was undertaken during the year- 1869 
by Legislative auUionty with Prof. Jchn S. l^'tY:be\fy ^u d-r-'s^e, and 
was prosecuted by him till 1882 by which time seven volumes had been 
published. These volumes were devoted chiefly to the scientific side 
of the subject; the economic side on which the popular interest chiefly 
centered w^as delayed. 

Partly owing to this delay Professor Edward Orton, who had been 
working on the Geological corps since 1869, was promoted to the. position 
of State Geologist. He immediately took up the economic reports bring- 
ing them out in three principal volumes and a number of smaller publi- 
cations. 

In 1889, at the request of Professor Orton, a third organization of 
the Survey was made by which it became a permanent bureau with in- 
structions to present annual reports. But one report was submitted 
strictly according to the terms of this law. From 1893 to 1899 the work 
stood in abeyance, no appropriations being made, though the office existed 
at least by title. 

In 1899 on the death of Edward Orton, his son Edward Orton, Jr., 
was appointed, and is still in office. A fourth series of publications has 
been begun, and one volume distributed. 

The roster of State Geologist is therefore : ' 

W. W. Mather 1837-1839 

John S. Newberry 1869-1882 

Edward Orton 1882-1899 

Edward Orton, Jr 1899- 



(643) 



STATE BOARD OF EMBALMING EXAMINERS. 

John H. Shearer, Alliance June G, 1902 to June 5, 1905 

R. E. Jones, Columbus June k, 1903, to June 5, 1906 

W. M. Bateman, Zanesville July 2, 1904, to June 5, 1907 



(644) 



THE ARCHAELOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

A BRIEF HISTORY. 

DURING the year 1875, ^^ archoeological society was formed at 
General Brinkerhoff's home, in Mansfield, Ohio. The society, 
through the efforts of General Brinkerhoff, received an appro- 
priation from the I^egislature of two thousand five hundred dol- 
lars, to be expended in making an exhibit at the Centennial Exposition 
at Philadelphia. Prof. John T. Short, of the Ohio $tate University, was 
secretary of the society, and it flourished under his secretaryship until 
nis untimel> deaili (November 11, 1883), when the society became dor- 
mant and practically inoperative. Governor Hoadley, who took an active 
interest in all matters pertaining to the archaeology and history of the 
State, upon his accession to office conferred with Mr. A. A. Graham and 
suggested a revival of the old society. A meeting for the purpose of 
carrying into effect this suggestion was convened at the Secretary of 
State's office, on the twelfth day of February, 1885, and it was decided 
to extend to all persons in the State interested in the formation of such 
a society, an invitation to meet on the twelfth day of March following, 
at Columbus, Ohio. In response to the circulars sent out, some sixty gen- 
tlemen, from all parts of Ohio, representing the various departments 
of scholarship, convened on the day specified, in the Library Room of 
the State Capitol. The meeting having been called to order by Hon. S. 
S. Rickley, the Hon. Allen G. Thurman was made President, and Mr. A. 
A. Graham elected Secretary. This convention continued in session for 
two days, and resulted in perfecting an organization known as The Ohio 
State Archaelogical and Historical Society, which was duly incorporated 
on the 13th day of March, 1885. The articles of incorporation succinctly 
set forth the purposes and aims of the society, as follows : 

1. The name of such corporation shall be The Ohio State Archaeo- 
logical and Historical Society. 

2. Said corporation shall be located and its principal business trans- 
acted at the City of Columbus, County of Franklin, and State of Ohio. 

3. Said society is formed for the purpose of promoting a knowledge 
of Archaeology and History, especially of Ohio, by establishing and main- 
taining a library of books, manuscripts, maps, charts, etc., properly per- 
taining thereto ; a museum of prehistoric relics and natural or other 
curiosities or specimens of art or nature promotive of the objects of the 
Association — said library and museum to be open to the public on reason- 
able terms — and by courses of lectures and publication of books, papers. 

. (645) 



646 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Archaeological and Historical Society. 



and documents touching the subjects so specified, with power to receive 
and hold gifts and devises of real and personal estate for the benefit of 
such Society, and generally to exercise all the powers legally and properly 
pertaining thereto. 

4. Said Society has no capital stock. 

The Articles of Incorporation were signed by twenty-eight persons. 



TRUSTEES OF THE SOCIEJY IN 1904. 
Elected by the Society. 



Name. 


! 

Residence. 


Term ETxpirea 


Hon. J. Warren Keifer 

Bishop B. W. Arnett 

Hon S. S. Ricklv 


Springfield 

Wilberforce 

Columbus 

Canal Winchester... 

Sandusky 

New Lexington 

Franklin 

Oberlin 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Mansfield 

Marietta 

Columbus 

Dayton ;. 


1906. 
1906. 
1906. 


Mr. G. F. Bareis 

Hon. Rush R. Sloane 

Prof. C. L. Martzolff 

Prof. J. P. MacLean 

Prof. G. Frederick Wright 

Col James Kilbourne 


- 1906. 
1906. 
1905. 
1905. 
1905. 
1905. 


Judge James H. Anderson 

Gen. R. Brinkerhoff 


1905. 
1904. 


Hon. M. D. FoUett 


1904. 


Hon D. J. Ryan 


1904. 


Rev. H. A. Thompson, D. D 

Mr. W. H. Hunter 


1904. 


Chillicothe 


1904. 







)■ 



m 



APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR. 



Name. 


■ 
Residence. 


Term Expires. 


Prof. M. R. Andrews 


Marietta 


1905. 


Hon. M. S. Greenough 


Cleveland 


1905. 


Col. J. W. Harper - 

Rev. N. B. C. Love 


Cincinnati '. . 

Elmore 

Springfield 


1906. 
1906. 


Prof. B. F. Prince. 


1905. 


Hon. E. 0. Randall 


Columbus 


1905. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



647 



The Archaeological and Historical Society. 



OFFICERS OF THE SOCIETY IN 1902. 

ELECTED BY THE TRUSTEES, JUNE 6. 1902. 



Name. 


Office. 


Elected. 


Gen. Roeliff Brinkerhoff : 


President 


1903 


Geo. F. Bareis 


1st Vice-President 


1903 


G. Fred Wright 


2d Vice-President 


1903 


E. 0. Randall, Ph. B., LL. M 

Hon. S. S. Rlckly 


Secretary and Editor 

Treasurer 


1903 
1903 


Edwin F. Wood 


Assistant Treasurer ... 


iQns 


w. c. mils, M. sc : 


Curator and Libitiriaa " if)C:! 









PAST OFFICERS. 

The following have served as Presidents of the Society since its organiza- 
tion: Allen G. Thiirman, Francis C. Sessions, Rutherford B. Hayes, and Roe- 
liff Brinkerhoff. 



Mr. A. A. Graham occupied the office of secretary from the organiza- 
tion of the society, March 13, 1885, until December, 1893, when ill health 
compelled him to remove West. He died in Albuquerque, N. M., in Feb- 
ruary, 1896. 

Mr. E. O. Randall was elected assistant secretary in December, 1893, 
to act as secretary in the absence of Mr. Graham. At the annual meet- 
ing of the trustees February 20, 1894, Mr. Randall was elected associate 
secretary, and February 19, 1895, was electee secretary, which office he 
has since held. 



WORK OF THE SOCIETY. 

The society has an Archaeological Museum in Orton Hall, Ohio State 
University, in which there is a collection of 50,000 specimens of the relics 
and antiquities of the Mound Builders and later Indians. It has a valu- 
able library numbering hundreds of volumes pertaining mainly to the his- 
tory of Ohio. The Society publishes each year an annual volume of ma- 
terial concerning the history, archaeology and biography of the state. It has 
published eleven such volumes, averaging 400 pages to the volume, also 
an Archaeological History of Ohio. The Society is the custodian of Ft. 
Ancient, Warren county, and Serpent Mound in Adams county. Each 
summer it sends out a corps of explorers for the purpose of examining 
the prehistoric mounds and making permanent record of the discoveries 
made therein. 



THE STATE AGENT FOR WAR CLAIMS VS. UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT. 



THE office of Ohio State Agent for War Claims was created to 
properly present and prosecute the claims of Ohio against the 
general government for money expended^ in the raising and 
equipping of Ohio Volunteers entering the service of the United 
Sf^^*'^ 'O ^'C ill tne Civil VVar, 1861-1865. Prior to 1880 the duties of 
'said office was entrusted to the Adjutant and Quartermaster General of 
the State. Ohio expended on the account of the government during the 
Civil War in round numbers $6,000,000, and of the large sum this office 
•has collected and returned all save $200,000. For money expended on 
the account of the Spanish War Ohio has been equally fortunate in the 
settlement of the claim against the general government — having expended 
upward of $450,000, all of which has been reimbursed save $17,000 yet 
unsettled. The appointment of War Claim Agent is made by the Gov- 
ernor. Since 1880 the appointment as agent has been given to W. O. 
Telford, and his service has been continuous to the year 1904. Prior 
thereto he was employed upon similar duty in the office of the Adjutant 
General of Ohio. His total services as Claim Agent have extended over 
a quarter of a century. 

The following is a list of Soldiers' Claini Agents and Pay Agents for 
war expenditures on account of the general government: 

B. P. Baker, 1862; A. B. Lyman, 1862; , James E. Lewis, 1862; J. C. Wet- 
more, 1862; Hiram Beall. 18^3; F. W. Bingham, 1863; R. E. Cox, 1863; Jonathan 
Cranor, 1863; Weston Flint. 1863; J. C. Todd, 1863; L. R. Brownell, 1864; D. K. 
Cady, 1864; Vesalius Horr, 1864; John Karr, 1864; R. L. Stewart, 1864; D. R. 
Taylor, 1864; W. G. Taylor, 1864; Warren Clark, 1864. 



(648) 



PART FOUR. 



THE JUDICIARY OF THE TERRITORIAL AND STATE 
GOVERNMENT IN OHIO. 



(640 



TABLE OF CONTENTS— PART FOUR. 



PAGE. t,|| 

Commendation of the Judiciary 651 * f 

Biographical Sketches of Present Judges of the Supreme Court of Ohio 654 |!;i 

The Supreme Court of the State of Ohio 652 j 

Judges of the Territorial Courts of the Northwest Territory (1787-1802) 661 

Judges of the Supreme Court of the State of Ohio (1802-1851) 663 

Judges of the Supreme Court of Ohio Under th,e Constitution of 1851 668 ' 

The Supreme Court Commissions 675 

The Supreme Court Law Library 676 

The Reporter of the Supreme Court 681 

The Clerk of the Supreme Court 684 

The Circuit Courts of Ohio 686 

The Courts of Common Pleas 692 

The Courts of Common Pleas Since 1851 ' 712 



(650) 



AN EXECUTIVE TRIBUTE TO THE JUDICIARY OF OHIO. 



WHILE engaged in a search through the legislative journals of f 

Ohio for data for the Ohio Hundred Year Book (1901) of I 

which this publication is a continuation, the following ex- 1; 

pressive paragraph was found in the annual address of Gov- | 

crrioi Joseph Vance to uit General Assembly, of Ohio, December 13, 1^ 

1836: I 

"I have again and again, whilst on business in the eastern cities, J| 

heard our judiciary spoken of in terms that made me proud that I was 3 

a citizen of Ohio. 'No collusion or fraud, sir,' says an eminent merchant | 

of one of our eastern cities, 'can stand before your judiciary.' This is I 

the character, gentlemen, that causes capital to seek employment here ; \ 

this is the character that gives security to our rights, and value to our ^ ; 

property; and to these combined causes, are to be attributed a large por- 'y 

tion of that flowing prosperity that is felt throughout every portion of 
our commonwealth." . 

Ohio was but a trifle over 33 years old as a state when a pioneer 
governor spoke to a pioneer general assembly in these glowing terms of 
a pioneer judiciary ; in the years since 1836 Ohio has continued to owe 
to the Judiciary of the state the security and character which attracted 
attention in the early years of statehood. There are many jewels hidden i , 

in those old legislative journals; this is but one of them. j|| 

E. Howard Gilkey, ■ ; 

» Law Librarian. 



(651) 



THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF OHIO. 
(Membership July, 1904.) 



WILLIAM T. SPEAR, Chief Justice. 



JUDGES. 



William Z. Davis, John A. Shauck, James (L. Pbice, 

William B. Cbew. Auous'^ts N. ^rrAr^rr^s 



ORGANIZATION. 



THE Supreme Court of the State of Ohio as at present constituted 
consists of six judges who are elected for six years, the term of 
one judge expiring each year. This court is divided into two 
divisions of three judges each, the first division consisting of 
the Chief Justice and the third and fifth judge in the order of the expira- 
tion of their terms, and the second division consists of the remaining 
three. 

When the judges comprising either division divide as to the decision 
in a cause before it, the cause shall be reserved for decision by the full 
court; and when different causes involving the same question are before 
the respective divisions at the same time, such causes shall also be re- 
served for decision by the full court. If the whole court be divided 
evenly as to the decision in any cause, the judgment of the lower court 
shall be entered as affirmed, and such decision shall be held to be the law 
as to all such questions in other causes until overruled by a majority of 
all the judges. And when the members of the court, in any matter of 
original jurisdiction, divide evenly on any question or questions therein, 
the determination of the members with whom the chief justice votes shall 
be held to be the judgment of the court. 

LOCATION. 

The Court Rooms, Consultation Rooms and Judges' Offices occupy 
the entire second floor of the Judiciary Building of the State Capitol. 



(662) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 653 

The Supreme Court of the State of Ohio. 

WEEKLY COURT CALENDAR. 

For the mutual convenience of the court and of parties in suit before 
it, the following rule in practice is observed : 
Mondays — Reserved for consultation. 
Tuesdays — Reserved for decisions of the Court. 
Wednesdays — Reserved for the hearing of oral arguments. 
Thursdays — Reserved for hearing motions. 
Fridays — Reserved for the hearing of oral arguments. 
Saturdavs— Reserved for consultation. 







'^ / .. 


1 * 






•, . \ ^.^~ 




jxy 


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WILLIAM T. SPEAR. 



(654) 



William T. Spear, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, was born June 3, 
1834, in Warren, Ohio, from whence came several of Ohio's distinguished judges. 
His father, Edward Spear, also a judge, was a native of Pennsylvania, of Scotch 
descent; his mother, whose lineage is traced back to colonial times, came from 
Norwich, Connecticut. His parents came to Ohio, settling at Warren in the 
year 1819. 

Mr. Spear received a common school education in the excellent union 
schools of Ohio, supplemented by a most valuable experience at the printer's 
trade. After serving an apprenticeship upon the "Trumbull Whig and Trans- 
script," published at Warren, he went to New York City, where he was employed 
in the office of the New York "Herald," and thereafter became a compositor, 
and later a proofreader, in the publishing house of the Appletons. 

The value of the practical lessons thus derived, laying as they did a solid 
foundation for important duties which he was called upon to perform in after 
life, can hardly be estimated. Perhaps no pursuit quickens the powers of con- 
ception more than the craft of the printer, and especially has the experience 
herein outiiii"'! beeo of Htrvir*^ ;o the ^udere in the p:cr?ra,tioTi of j^Hicial 
opinions. Says one distinguished in the craft: "Heme has uttered a sneer 
at the husk and shell of learning, but the best bread is made from the whole 
meal, and includes the 'shorts' and the 'middlings' as well as the fine flour. If 
every lawyer, physician, and clergyman were to spend six months at the 'case' 
before entering upon his profession, he would find, even in that short time of 
labor, a useful and fitting preparation for such literary tasks as may afterwards- 
devolve upon him." 

The young printer appreciated his calling, but growing tired of the confine- 
ment of the printing office, and having imbibed an ambition for the law, he re- 
turned to Warren, and at once began to learn something of the practical side of 
the profession of his choice, by service as deputy clerk of the Probate and 
Common Pleas Courts of Trumbull County. He served in these capacities for 
several years, devoting his spare hours, in the meantime, to the study of law 
under the direction of Hon. Jacob D. Cox» since Governor of Ohio, but then of 
the Trumbull County bar, later Dean of the Cincinnati Law School, and father 
of many lawyers. This preparation was followed by a course in Harvard Law 
School, where Mr. Spear was graduated in 1859. Being thus equipped by reason 
of his practical theoretical training, and ready to enter the field of contest, and 
having returned to Warren, where he was admitted to the bar of Ohio, he at 
once became a member of the firm of Cox &Ratliff. Later he was associated 
in practice with Hon. John C. Hutchins, now of the Court of Common Pleas of 
Cuyahoga County. In 1871 he was elected Prosecuting Attorney for Trumbull 
County, serving two terms, and Solicitor of his native city for two terms; and 
for several years he was engaged in the practice with C. A. Harrington, Esq., 
the firm enjoying a lucrative business. Soon after laying down the duties of 
those minor positions, Mr. Spear was elected Judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas, the duties of which office he entered upon in 1878. He was re-elected at 
the expiration of his first term, but did not complete the second term, because 
of his election to the Supreme Court, which occurred in 1885. He has since 
been three times elected to succeed himself as a member of the Supreme Court, 
became Chief Justice in 1892, 1897 and 1904, and was renominated to succeed 
himself upon the Supreme Bench, for the fourth time by the Republican state 
convention in May, 1904. 



(655) 



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WILLIAM Z. DAVIS. 



William Z. Davis was born in the village of Loydsville, Belmont County, 
Ohio, June 10, 1839. He is of Virginia descent. His father, Dr. Bushrod 
Washington Davis, was a native of Loudon County, Virginia, and descendant 
of the revolutionary stock in the Old Dominion. His mother nee Miss Harriet 
Hatcher, of Belmont County, was also a member of a Virginia family. He was 
educated in the public schools and in private academy; has been a life-long 
student, and was for many years a member of the American Microscopical So- 
ciety, withdrawing only because pressure of bjsiness duties interf erred with 
scientific experiment; served out a three months' enlistment in the 4th Ohio 
Regiment, during the civil war, and afterwards served in the 96th Ohio Reg- 
iment, UDtil physically disabled and honorably discharged during the Vicks- 
burg campaign; in the meantime was admitted to the bar; and after coming 
out of thT military service, and upon regaining his health he entered upon 
the practice of the law; almost from the beginning was recognized as a leader 
at the bar, and enjoyed a large practice, extending into all the state and federal 
courts. The suggestion of his name for the ofl&ce of Judge of the Supreme 
Court of Ohio was received with remarkable enthusiasm by lawyers of all 
political parties throughout the state; was nominated by the Republican party 
in June, 1899, as its candidate for that office, and was elected in November of 
that year, up to which time he had never held an elective office. On the 10th day 
of January, 1900, he was appointed by Governor Nash to fill a vacancy on the 
Supreme bench caused by the resignation of Judge Joseph P. Bradbury, who had 
resigned the day before; on February 9, 1900, he entered upon the regular term for 
which he had been elected in the precedin^j November. Ji'revious to his election 
to the Supreme Court Judge Davis never served upon the bench; he has, however, 
already been accredited high rank among the Supreme Judges of Ohio. His 
opinions are conspicuous for their conciseness and clearness of statement, and 
their legal ability and soundness. He will enter upon his first term as Chief 
Justice on the 9th of February, 1905. 

(656) 



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JOHN A. SHAUCK. 



John A. Sliauck was bom on a farm near Johnsville, Richland County, Ohio, 
March 26, 1841; descendant from German stock; ancestors on his father's side 
emigrating from the fatherland and settling in America before the American 
Revolution. He obtained his early education in a private school and the public 
schools of Johnsville. In 1866 he graduate^d in the classical course from Otter- 
bein University, Westerville, Ohio. He attended the law school of the Univer- 
sity of Michigan, graduating from the same in 1867. He entered upon the gen- 
eral practice of the law at Dayton, Ohio, continuing the same until 1884 when 
he was elected upon the Republican ticket to the Second Circuit Court. He was 
re-elected Judge of the Circuit Court in 1889. At the Republican convention held 
in Columbus, June, 1894, Judge Shauck was nominated for the office of Supreme 
Judge. He was elected in the following fall and took his seat February 9, 1895. 
to serve for a full term of six years. Judge Shauck was Chief Justice of the 
Supreme Court of Ohio in 1900, during which year he was re-elected for the 
full term of six years ending February 9, 1907. He will be Chief Justice for 
the second term beginning February 9, 1906. 



42— B. A. 



(667) 



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JAMES L. PRICE. 



James L. Price is a native of Carroll County, where he was born near the 
village of New Hagerstown, He is the son of Benjamin and Nancy Price, who 
lived to a ripe old age. 

Hi£' early years were spent on the farm. After the advantages of the com- 
mon sciiools he acquired a thorough academic education, and while preparing 
for the study of the law, taught one term of common school in Harrison County, 
near Adena, and a second term at New Hagerstown, after which his law studies 
were pursued in the office of Eckley & Shober, at Carrollton, O. Mr. Price was 
admitted to the bar at Cadiz, and opened an office in Carrollton, where he prac- 
ticed his profession until the spring of 1865. He was elected and served one 
term as Prosecuting Attorney and at its close moved to Van Wert, a thriving 
county scat in the then new northwestern section of Ohio, where he formed 
a partnership with Judge I. D. Clark, which relation continued for about two 
years. 

In 1868 he was elected Prosecuting Attorney of Van Wert County, and 
served three terms in succession. In the rising northwest, which was then 
in its transient stage, he acquired a large practice, extending into the surround- 
ing counties. Seeing the rapid growth of Lima, its fine railroad facilities, and 
its promise of a great business future, Mr. Price removed to that city in the 
year 1833, where he has since resided. 

In 189* the Republicans of the Third Judicial circuit ventured to nominate 
"a candidate for judge of the circuit court, and while it was then and always 
since has been, strongly Democratic, they succeeded in electing Judge Price by 
over 3,900 plurality. 

The six years' service on the circuit bench was a large contributing factor 
in his nomination for Judge of the Supreme Court. He was elected on the 
Republican state ticket in November, 1901, and took his seat in the court Feb- 
ruary 9, 1902, succeeding Thad. A. Minshall, Esq., whose term expired on that 
day. 

(658) 



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4. 



WILLIAM B. CREW. 



Judse William B. Crew was bom at Chesterfield, Morgan County, Ohio, 
April 1, 1852; educated in public schools and at Westtown College, Penna. (a 
college urder the management of the Society of Friends); admitted to the bar 
by Supreme Court of Ohio, 1873; graduated from the Ohio State and Union Law 
College, Cleveland, Ohio, in 1874; elected Prosecuting Attorney of Morgan 
County, 1876; elected member of Ohio legislature, 1889; elected Judge of Court 
of Common Pleas for the 1st Subdivision of the 8th judicial district of Ohio 1891; 
re-elected 1896 and again re-elected 1901; nominated for Judge of Supreme Court 
of Ohio by Republican state convention held at Cleveland inMay, 1902; appointed by 
Republican state convention held at Cleveland in May, 1902; appointed by 
Governor Nash July 19, 1902, to fill vacancy on Supreme Court bench caused by 
death of Judge Marshall J. Williams. He was elected both for the long and 
short terms, in November, 1902, and will complete his present term of service 
in February, 1909. 



(669) 



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AUGUSTUS N. SUMMERS. 



Augustus Neander Summers was born in Shelby, Richland County, Ohio, 
June 13, 1856. He is one of nine children born to the Rev. Daniel Summers 
and Louisa Hine, his wife. He graduated from Wittenberg College, at Spring- 
field, in 1879; was admitted to the bar in 1881; elected city solicitor of Spring- 
field in 1885, and re-elected in 1887 and 1889; was elected one of the judges of 
the Circuit Court for the Second Circuit, in 1894, and re-elected in 1900; was 
elected one of the judges of the Supreme Court in 1903 and entered upon the 
discharge of the duties of the office February 9, 1904. Judge Summers was mar- 
ried to Miss Nellie Thomas, daughter of the Hon. John H. Thomas, of Spring- 
field, in 1887. They have three children, two sons and a daughter. 



(660) 



HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE SUPREME COURT. 

PRELIMINARY ORGANIZATION. 

THE judges; of the TERRITORIAL COURTS OF THE 
NORTHWEST TERRITORY. (1787-1802.) 



THE first judicial system to be inaugurated in that part of the United 
Stales which is iiow kuovvii as the State 01 C-'i*'^ vvri^ ;'.<^. put 
in operation by the ''Ordinance of 1787" by which the ''terri- 
tory northwest of the River Ohio'' was set apart as a separate 
governmental unit, and a form of local government provided for it by 
the Congress. By a reference to Section 4 of the ordinance, which is 
printed in Part One of this volume, it will be seen that it was provided 
that there should be "appointed a court, to consist of three judges, any 
two of whom to form a court, who shall have a common law jurisdiction, 
and reside in the district, and have therein a freehold estate, in five hun- 
dred acres of land, while in the exercise of their offices ; and their com- 
mission shall continue in force during good behavior." These judges, 
with the governor, were to select from the civil and criminal laws of the 
original states such laws as they deemed suitable for the territory, and 
were given the power to promulgate such laws, and to enforce them, 
until they should be amended or repealed by a general assembly to be later 
organized according to the provisions of the ordinance tmder which they 
were appointed. 

In accordance with this provision of the Ordinance, Congress did, 
on the i6th day of October, 1787, elect as judges for the Northwest 
Territory : Samuel Holden Parsons, John Armstrong, and James Mitchell 
Vamum. 

In the place or Mr. Armstrong, who declined the appointment. 
Congress appointed on the 19th day of February, 1788, Mr. John Cleves 
Symmes. 

The first Territorial Judges (in 1787-8) were therefore, Samuel 
Holden Parsons, James Mitchell Varnum, John Cleves Symmes. 

The salaries of the judges were fixed by Congress in an act bearing 
the date October 8, 1787, at $800 per annum. 

President George Washington, in a message to the Senate of the 
United States, bearing the date of New York, August 18, 1789, nominates 

(661) 



662 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. ^ f 

. Historical Sketch of the Judges of the Supreme Court. f 

: ^; 

to be judges of the Northwest Territory ''in accordance with the law re- \ 
establishing the government of the Northwest Territory," Samuel Holden l 
Parsons, John Cleves Symmes, and William Barton. I 

Mr. Barton, who was appointed vice Judge Varnum, who had died 1 
the preceding February, himself declined the appointment, and on the ', 
8th of September the Senate completed the reorganization of the court 
• by confirming the nomination of George Turner, an associate justice. The 
court thus constituted in 1789, and acting under the Constitution of the 
United States, consisted of the Honorable Judges Samuel Holden Parsons, ; 
John Cleves Symmes, George Turner. | 

Judge Parsons, then Chief Justice, was drowned in November, 1789, \ 
while returri!ij^ from a treaty with thy Lidlano of Ihc vVestciu Reserve, : 

and the President nominated as his successor on the bench, Rufus Put- ; 
nam, of Marietta, whose nomination was promptly confirmed. ] 

The court as thus organized with Judges John Cleves Symmes, 
George Turner, Rufus Putnam, served from 1790 to 1796, when Judge 
Putnam was appointed to the office of Surveyor General by President 
Washington, who, in the same message to' the Senate, nominated Joseph 
Oilman to the Judgeship thus made vacant. The nominations were con- 
firmed. 

In 1798 Judge Turner resigned and was succeeded by Return 
Jonathan Meigs, Jr., whose appointment was confirmed February 12, 
1798. The court as thus constituted, consisting of Judges John Cleves 
Symmes, Joseph Gilman and Return J. Meigs, Jr., continued to serve, until 
the admission of the state into the Union in 1803, and therefore, until 
the organization of the Supreme Court of Ohio. This Court (of the 
Northwest Territory) held its session alternately at Detroit, Vincennes, 
Cincinnati and Marietta. 

.Note. 1. — It is worthy of notice in this connection that the Territorial Gov- 
ernment was set up by Congress in October, 1787, but that the first settlement 
in Ohio occurred on the site of the city of Marietta in the following April (1788). 
In the absence of the Governor, and Judges, who were to form the law-giving 
power, and until their arrival, Col. Return J. Meigs, Sr., drafted a code of reg- 
ulations on common foolscap, which he tacked to the blazed trunk of a large 
oak, where it was read and endorsed by all the settlers. History does not re- 
cord a single infraction of those rules. The Governor, with a majority of the 
court, arrived at Marietta two months later, and set up the official government 
of the Territory. 

Note 2. — Upon the admission of the state into the Union in 1803, and the 
dissolution of the Territorial Court. Congress by an act passed in February, 
1803, provided that a District Court for the District of Ohio, to consist of one 
judge, should be established at Chillicothe. 

Note 3. — By an act of May, 1800, the original Northwest Territory had been 
divided into eastern and western divisions, and an additional court created for 
the Indiana or western division, at Saint Vincennes, the court for the eastern 
division remaining at Chillicothe. 



JUDGES OF THE SUPREME COURT OF OHIO UNDER THE 
FIRST CONSTITUTION (1802-1851). 



UNDER the Constitution of 1802 the number of Supreme Court 
Judges was the same as under the Territorial form of govern- 
ment, three, with the power vested in the general assembly to 
authorize the selection of an additional judge at its discretion. 

The tenure of office was fixed at seven years, or such part thereof 
as the judge was well behaved. The salaries of the judges were fixed at 
not to exceed une uiOuaaud dollars per annum. 

Under these provisions of the constitution and the laws, the Gen- 
eral Assembly elected on April 2, 1803, as the First Supreme Court of 
the State of Ohio, Samuel Huntington (then the Senator from Trum- 
bull County), Return Jonathan Meigs, Jr., (then a member of the Terri- 
torial Court), and William Spriggs (of Jefferson County). 

With this establishment of a Supreme Cout in Ohio, a search of 
official records discloses the following to have been the personnel of that 
court which has reflected a lasting honor on the judiciary whose repre- 
sentatives they were, and on the state to whom they paid affectionate 
fealty. 

1803 — Samuel Huntington, Return Jonathan Meigs, Jr., William 
.Spriggs. 

1804 — Samuel Huntington, Return Jonathan Meigs, Jr., William 
Spriggs. 

Judge Meigs resigned December, 1804, to accept commission in 
the U. S. Army as Colonel and Commander of the Department of the 
Missouri. 

1805 — Samuel Huntington, Daniel Symmes (vice Meigs), William 
Spriggs. 

1806 — Samuel Huntington, Daniel Symmes, William Spriggs (to 
April). 

Judge Sprigg resigned in April and was succeeded by Senator 
George Tod, of Trumbull County, who was appointed to the vacancy 
by Governor Tiffin — and was afterward elected to the seat by the General 
Assembly, January i, 1807. 

In 1807 the Supreme Court consisted of Judges Samuel Huntington, 
Daniel Symmes and George Tod. 

In 1808 Judge Symmes resigned (January 9) and was succeeded 
by William Spriggs (February 13). Return Jonathan Meigs, Jr., having 

(663) 



■ ■^'if^if^ '-^Ji^'vw.*'" "i?'^^"- ■>''■ 



664 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

Historical Sketch of the Jtidges of the Supreme Court. 

been declared ineligible to the office of Governor of Ohio, to which he 
had been elected the previous October, was elected an additional Judge 
of the Supreme Court on the 13th of February by the joint session of 
the General Assembly which also elected his colleague, Mr. Sprigg, to 
succeed Judge Symmes, who had resigned to accept the presidential ap- 
pointment of Registrar of Land at Cincinnati. Owing to these changes 
the court, after February 13, was composed of Judges Samuel Hunting- 
ton, William Sprigg, George Tod, R. J. Meigs, Jr. 

The membership of the court remained as above until in December, 
when Judge Huntington resigned to become Governor of Ohio. He was 
inaugurated December 12. The House of Representatives had preferred 
charges early in liu: Srnr^v •...<..nth (December) against Judges Huntington 
and Tqd, of the Supreme Court, and Judge Calvin Pease, presiding judge 
of the Common Pleas Court of the 3d District, for having, by certain 
decisions, set aside the act extending the jurisdiction of justices of the 
peace. Governor Huntington was not tried on these charges, but his 
associates were brought before the Senate, sitting as a High Court of 
Impeachment, and were acquitted. 

In 1809, Judge Huntington having become Governor, and Judge 
Meigs having resigned to become United States Senator from Ohio, the 
Governor, in the message announcing these vacancies on the bench (Jan- 
uary 31) recommends the abolishment of the fourth judgeship for the 
reason that it creates two courts of two judges each, which sitting at 
different parts of the state in riding the circuit, tend to disagreement in^ 
decisions, and consequent confusion. Despite this recommendation of 
the Governor, the Legislature elected (February 17) Thomas Scott 
(Chief Clerk of the Senate) to succeed Judge Huntington, and Thomas 
Morris (a member of the House of Representatives) to succeed Judge 
Meigs as an additional Judge. This created a court of four members, in- 
cluding Judges William Sprigg, George Tod, Thomas Scott and Thomas 
Morris. 

Judge ^lorris failing to qualify as judge, the General Assembly 
abolished the additional judgeship the following session (1810). 

In 1810, the first period of seven years having expired under the 
state constitution of 1802, the General Assembly, on February 10, met in 
joint session of the two houses and elected a new Supreme Court which 
served without interruption until 181 5. This court consisted of Thomas 
Scott (to succeed himself) ; William W. Irwin, of Fairfield County; and 
Ethan Allen Brown, of Hamilton County. 

In 1816 the General Assembly was called upon to elect successors 
to Judges Scott and Irwin who had resigned, and accordingly met in joint 
session on the 17th day of February, and elected to the Supreme Court, 



/ 
THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 665 

Historical Sketch of the Judges of the Supreme Court. 

Messrs. Jessup N. Couch, of Ross County; John McLean, of Warren 
County; and an additional judge in Calvin Pease, of Trumbull County. 

The Supreme Court was thus increased to four members: Ethan 
Allen Brown, Jessup N. Couch, John McLean, and Calvin Pease. 

In 1817 the re-election of Judge Brown to succeed himself continued 
the membership of the court as constituted the previous year, and this 
membership w^as unbroken until the resignation of Judge Brown in De- 
cember, 181 8, to become Governor of Ohio. On the 30th day of January, 
1819, the General Assembly elected Peter Hitchcock, of Geauga County, 
to the vacancy thus created. 

From 1819 to 1821 the judges of the Supreme Court were: Jessup N. 
Couch, John McLean, Calvin Pease and Peter Hitchcock. 

In 1821, the death of Judge Couch led to the election of Jacob Bur- 
nett, of Hamilton County, one of the conspicuous figures in the Territorial 
Council and in the early history of Ohio, as his successor. The court 
thus constituted, being again changed in 1822 by the resignation of Judge 
McLean, Charles R. Sherman, of Fairfield County, was elected to suc- 
ceed him on the nth day of January, 1823, at which election the General 
Assembly also re-elected Judges Pease and Burnett. 

From 1822 to 1829 the Judges of the Supreme Court were: Calvin 
P^ase, Peter Hitchcock, Jacob Burnett and Charles R. Sherman. 

In 1828 Judge Burnett resigned (December 11) and as his successor 
the General Assembly elected (February 6, 1829) Joshua Collett, of 
Warren County. The judges for 1829 being Calvin Pease, Peter 
Hitchcock, Charles R. Sherman, and Joshua Collett. 

In 1830 the General Assembly elected the following judges of the 
Supreme Court: January 30, Elijah Hay ward, vic>: Judge Pease, term 
expired; February i, John Milton Goodenow, vice Judge Sherman, 
deceased ; the court thus consisting of Judges Peter Hitchcock, Joshua 
Collett, Elijah Hay ward and John Milton Goodenow. 

During the summer of 1830 the court was divided into two sections, 
sitting in separate localities in the state (under an act of the previous 
winter), but the illness of Judges Goodenow and Hayward, who finally : 

resigned before the close of the year, deprived the Miami River counties | 

and those of central Ohio of the usual court. An attempt to hold a special ( 

session in Columbus, in October, resulted in the coming together of but 
two of the judges, who, deciding that they were not a quorum of the court 
and could neither sit as a court or legally adjourn, agreed to "separate," 
which they did, and nothing was done with the fifty cases on the docket. 
(See Governor's Message.) Henry Brush was appointed by the Governor 
during the year 1830 to succeed Judge Goodenow, resigned; no appoint- 
ment being made to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation (No- i 
vember 6) of Judge Hayward. \ 



666 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

Historical Sketch of the Judges of the Supreme Court. 

In December, 1830, the Supreme Court Judges were: Peter Hitch- 
cock, Joshua ColTett, Henry Brush, and one vacancy caused by the resig- 
nation of Judge Hayward. 

On the 1 8th of December the General Assembly elected a successor 
to Judge Hayward in the person of Ebenezer Lane, of Huron County, 
and on the 29th of the month elected John C. Wright, of Jefferson County, 
to succeed Judge Brush, who was not a candidate before the General 
Assembly. Judge Lane took his seat at once; Judge Wright, on the ad- 
journment of the legislature. 

In 1831'and 1832 the membership of the Supreme Court remained: 
Peter Hitchcock, Joshua CoUett, Ebenezer Lane, and John C. Wright. 

Judge Hitchcock's tc<ai exniring on .V-e ^th cl Fcbrucr}', 1833, 
there was a spirited contest in the General Assembly over the election of 
his successor. The election being ordered for the i6th of December 
(1832), on that day the assembly met in joint session, but after casting 
seven ballots, on all of which Reuben Wood, of Cuyahoga County, led, 
with Judge Hitchcock second and Benjamin Tappan third, the session 
dissolved without an election and the Senate returned to its chamber. 
The assembly was called together by another resolution on the next day 
(17th), and after twelve more ballots, Reuben Wood was declared to 
have been elected by a majority of one vote. 

Several days later the correctness of the count was challenged by a 
joint resolution and an investigation of the count was ordered, but the 
title of Judge Wood to his seat was not disturbed by this agitation. 

The court for 1833-1835 was composed of Judges Joshua, Collett, 
Ebenezer Lane, John C. Wright and Reuben Wood. 

On. February 2, 1835, ^^^ Governor reported the resignation of 
elected, on the fourth ballot, ex-Judge Hitchcock, at that time Senator 
from Geauga County and Speaker of the Senate, to succeed him. In this 
contest, Senator Anthony, of Clark County, was Judge Hitchcock's 
principal competitor for the Judgeship and was (March 6) elected to 
succeed him as Speaker of the Senate. Judge Hitchcock resigned as 
Speaker on that day. 

From March, 1835, to February 10, 1836, the court consisted of 
Judges Lane, Wright, Wood and Hitchcock. 

Frederick Grimke, of Ross County, was elected on January 30, 1836, 
to succeed Judge CoUett^ whose term expired on the loth of February. 
By the re-election of Judge Lane for the period of seven years from the 
iSth day of December, 1837, and of Judge Wood, in 1839, the court as 
constituted in 1836 continued without interruption until 1842, viz.: Eben- 
ezer Lane, Reuben Wood, Peter Hitchcock, and Frederick Grimke. 

Matthew Birchard, of Trumbull County, was elected by the General 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 667 

Historical Sketch of the Judges of the Supreme Court. 

Assembly on January 15, 1842, to succeed Judge Hitchcock, whose term 
expired in February of that year, and Nathaniel C. Reed, of Hamilton 
County, was elected on the 5th of March, to succeed Judge Grimke, re- 
signed. The court thus constituted, from March, 1842, to December, 1844, 
was composed of Judges Ebenezer Lane, Reuben Wood, Matthew 
Birchard, and Nathaniel C. Reed. 

In December, 1844, the term of Judge Lane expired. He was 
promptly re-elected by the General Assembly oh the 5th of the month, 
but remained on the bench only during the session of the court in Bank, 
when he resigned. His successor was elected on the 27th of the same 
month (December), in the person of ex- Judge Peter Hitchcock. The 
aciion of tlic General Acsambly in re-electing Judge Lane to succeed 
himself in 1836 and 1844 was, with the exception of the re-election of 
Judge Wood, in 1839, contrary to the usual refusal of the assembly to 
grant consecutive terms to the members of the Supreme Court. 

The members of the Supreme Court in the years 1845 ^.nd 1846 were 
Judges Reuben Wood, Matthew Birchard, Nathaniel C. Reed, and Peter 
Hitchcock. 

On the 15th day of January, 1847, the General Assembly elected 
Edward Avery, of Wayne County, to succeed Judge Wood (term ex- 
piring), although the Judge was a candidate for re-election. From Feb- 
ruary, 1847, to February, 1849, the membership of the court was : Judges 
Matthew Birchard, Nathaniel C. Reed, Peter Hitchcock, and Edward 
Avery. 

On the 22d day of February, 1849, the General Assembly elected 
as members of the Supreme Court : Rufus P. Spalding, of Summit County, 
for seven years from March 5, to succeed Judge Reed, resigned; and 
William B. Caldwell, of Hamilton County, for seven years from March 
7, to succeed Judge Birchard, term expired. 

The court for 1849- 1850, consisted of Judges Hitchcock, Avery, 
Spalding, and Caldwell. 

The last change in the court prior to the enforcement of the present 
constitution of Ohio was occasioned by the resignation of Judge Avery, 
and the election of his successor in the person of Rufus P. Ranney, of 
Trumbull County, on the 17th of March, 1851. The court served as thus 
constituted until ''the second Monday in February, 1852," when the official 
term of the new officers elected under the constitution began. The mem- 
bership of the court from February*, 185 1, to February, 1852, was Judges 
Hitchcock, Spalding, Caldwell, and Ranney. 



668 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

Historical Sketch of the Judges of the Supreme Court. 

JUDGES OF THE SUPREME COURT OF OHIO UNDER THE CONSTITUTION OF 1 85 1 

V t 

The constitution of 185 1 contains the following provisions for the 
continuance of the authority of the Supreme Court : 

Sec. 11. Schedule. Suits pending in the Supreme Court in bank shall be 
transferred to the Supreme Court provided for in this Constitution, and be pro- 
ceeded in according to law. 

The personnel of the Supreme Court of Ohio has been, consecutively, 
as given below for the years named : 

1852. On the 9th day of February, 1852, the then Supreme Court, 
which had been elected by the General Assembly under the old constitu- 
tion, and con^^isting" of Ttidp^es Peter Hitchcock, Rufus P. Spalding, Wil- 
liam B. Caldwell, and Rufus P. Ranney, passed out of existence, and a 
new court, elected by the people of Ohio at the previous election in Octo- 
ber, came on the bench in the persons of Judges William B. Caldwell, of 
Hamilton County (re-elected) ; Rufus P. Ranney, of Trumbull County 
(re-elected) ; Thomas W. Hartley, of Richland County; John A. Corwin, 
of Champaign County ; and Allen G. Thurman, of Ross County. 

On the organization of the court, the judges drew lots for the length 
of their terms, the lot resulting : For one year. Judge Caldwell ; for two 
years, Judge Bartley; for three years, Judge Corwin; for four years. 
Judge Thurman; and for five years (the length of the regular term 
under the new constitution), Judge Ranney.* Judge Caldwell was re- 
elected in 1852, and Judge Bartley was re-elected in 1853, so the court 
remained as installed in February, 1852, until December, 1854, with the 
following membership: Judges Caldwell, Ranney, Bartley, Corwin, and 
Thurman. 

1 854- 1 85 5. Judge Corwin resigned in December, 1854, and was 
succeeded by Robert B. Warden, of Franklin County, who was appointed 
to the vacancy and served until February 9, 1855, when he was succeeded 
by Joseph R. Swan, of Franklin County, who was elected to the seat. 

Judge Caldwell also resigned in the December term of 1854, and 
was succeeded by William Kennon, of Belmont County, who was ap- 
pointed to fill the vacancy and then elected at the October election, 1854, 
to succeed himself. 

The court for the year 1854 consisted of Judges Caldwell, Ranney, 
Corwin, Bartley, and Thurman, until the second division of the Decem- 
ber term ; and of Judges Ranney, Bartley, Thurman, Warden, and Kennon, 
from that time until February 9, 1855. 

1855- 1856. Judge Swan took his seat on the bench as the suc- 
cessor of Judge Warden and Judge Corwin (as explained above) on the 
9th day of February, 1855, the court consisting of Judges Ranney, Bart- 
ley, Thurman, Kennon, and Swan. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 669 

Historical Sketch of the Judges of the Supreme Court. 

1856. Judge Kennon served to the adjourned session in March, 

1856, as did Judge Thurman; the terms of each expiring at that time. 
They were succeeded by Judges Jacob Brinkerhoff, of Richland County, 
and Charfes C. Convers, of Muskingum County, who had been elected the 
previous October. Judge Convers resigned in May on account of ill 
health, never having taken his seat on the bench ; he was succeeded by 
Ozias Bowen, of Marion County, who was appointed to fill the vacancy 
and elected to succeed himself in October following. 

The court from February 9 to May 15, consisted of Judges Ran- 
ney, Bartley, Swan, Brinkerhoff, and Convers; and From May 15 to 
February 9, 1857, of Judges Ranney, Bartley, Swan, Brinkerhoff, and 
Bowen. 

1857. Josiah Scott, of Butler County, was elected to succeed Judge 
R. Ranney, in October, 1856, and took his seat February 15, 1857, the 
court being composed of Judges Bartley, Swan, Brinkerhoff, Bowen and 
Scott. 

1858. Milton Sutlift*, of Trumbull County, was elected in October, 

1857, to succeed Judge Bowen, and took his seat February 9, 1858, the 
court consisting of Judges Bartley, Swan, Brinkerhoff, Scott, and Sutliff. 

1859. William Y. Peck, of Scioto County, was elected in October, ; 

1858, to succeed Judge Bartley, and took his seat February 9, 1859, the 
court consisting of Judges Swan, Brinkerhoff, Scott, Sutliff, and Peck. 

Judge Swan, then Chief Justice, resigned in November, and Wil- 
liam Y. Gholson, of Hamilton County, who had been elected in Octo- 
ber to a seat in the court, was appointed to succeed him. He took his j 
seat November 8, and entered on his regular tern the 9th of February, | 
i860. I 

The members of the court from November, 1859, to February, 1863, • j 
were Judges Brinkerhoff, Scott, Sutliff, Peck, and Gholson. 

Judge Brinkerhoff was re-elected in i860, and Judge Scott was re- j 

elected in 186 1. I 

1863. Ex- Judge Rufus P. Ranney was elected in October, 1862, j 

to succeed Judge Sutliff, and took his seat on the 9th day of February, 1863 ; ; 

the court from this date to December 12th consisting of Judges Brinker- | 

hoff, Scott, Peck, Gholson, and Ranney. j 

On the nth of December, 1863, Judge Gholson resigned, and • 

Horace Wilder, of Ashtabula County, was appointed for his unexpired ] 

term. Judge Wilder was elected to succeed himself in October, 1864. ; 

Hocking Hunter, of Fairfield County, was elected to succeed Judge Peck 1 

in October, 1863, and took his seat on February 9, 1864, only to resign * 

the same day. 

William White, of Clark County, was appointed to the vacancy oc- | 



670 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

Historical Sketch of the Judges of th^ Supreme Court. 



casioned by the resignation of Judge Hunter, and was elected in October, 2 
1864, for the unexpired term. |j 

Luther Day, of Portage County, was elected in October, 1864, to i 

succeed Judge Wilder, and took his seat February 9, 1865. * i! 

The membership of the court during the years 1863-1865, was there- j 

fore; I 

December 12, 1863, to February 9, 1864: Judges Brinkerhoff, Scott, | 

Peck, Ranney, and Wilder. 

February 9, 1864: Judges Brinkerhoff, Scott, Ranney, Wilder and 
Hunter. 

February 10, 1864: Judges Brinkerhoff, Scott, Ranney. Wilder, ^'-'d 
White. 

February 9, 1865: Judges Brinkerhoff, Scott, Ranney, White and 
Day. 

Judge Ranney resigned on the 23d of February, 1865, and his suc- 
cessor was appointed in the person of John Welch, of Athens County, 
who was elected in October following for the unexpired term. 

February 23, 1865, to February 9, 1871, the court was composed of 
Judges Brinkerhoff, Scott, White, Day and Welch. 

February 9, 1871. - George W. Mcllvaine, of Tuscarawas County, 
who had been elected in October to succeed Judge Brinkerhoff, came 
' upon the bench and the court was thus composed of Judges Scott, Welch, 
White, Day and Mcllvaine. 

February 9, 1872. William H. West, of Logan County, elected to 
succeed Judge Scott, came upon the bench, the court then consisting of 
Judges Welch, White, Day, Mcllvaine, and Wesi . 

Judge West resigned in 1873 and was succeeded by Walter F. Stone, 
of Erie County, who was appointed by the Governor, and elected in 
October to fill the unexpired term. He in turn resigned in September, 
1874, and was succeeded by George Rex, of Wayne County, who was ap- 
pointed by the Governor, and then elected by the people to fill the unex- 
pired term of Judge West. 

The re-election of Judge Welch in October, 1872, of Judge White 
in October, 1873, and the election of William J. Gillmore, of Preble 
County to succeed Judge Day in October, 1874, led to the following 
changes in the personnel of the court in the years named : 

In 1873 the court was composed of Judges White, Day, Mcllvaine, 
West, Stone and Welch. 

In 1874 of Judges Day, Mcllvaine, Stone, Rex, Welch, and 
White. 

In 1875 of Judges Mcllvaine, Rex, Welch, White, and Gillmore. 

In 1876 of Judges Rex, Welch, White, Gillmore, and Mcllvaine. 
Judge Mcllvaine was re-elected in October, 1875. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 671 

Historical Sketch of the Judges of the Supreme Court. 

In October, 1876, W. W. Boynton, of Lorain County, was elected 
to succeed Judge Rex, and took his seat February 9, 1877, and in Octo- 
ber, 1877, John W. Okey, of FrankUn County, was elected to succeed 
Judge Welch. 

Judge White was re-elected in October, 1878, and in the following 
year William W. Johnston, of Lawrence County, was elected to succeed 
Judge Gillmore. Judge Mcllvaine was re-elected in October, 1880, and 
in November, 1881, Judge Boynton resigned, the Governor appointing 
as his successor for the unexpired term until the next February, Nicholas 
Longworth, of Hamilton County, who had been elected for the full term 
of five years, ? month before the resignation of Judge Boynton. ^ 

The personnel of the court trom February 9, lo//, Lv^ iebiUCiry 9, 
1882,. was as follows : 

February 9, 1877- 1878: Judges Welch, White, Gillmore, Mcllvaine, 
and Boynton. 

February 9, 1878-1879: Judges White, Gillmore, Mcllvaine, Boynton, 
and Okey. ■ ■ ^ 

February 9, 1879-1880: Judges Gillmore, Mcllvaine, Boynton, Okey 
and White. 

February 9, 1 880-1 881 : Judges Mcllvaine, Boynton, Okey, White, 
and Johnson. 

February 9, 1881-1882: Judges Boynton (Longworth), Okey, White, 
Johnson, and Mcllvaine. 

February 9, 1882-1883: Judges Okey, White, Johnson, Mcllvaine, 
and Longworth. 

Judge Okey was re-elected in October, 1882, but the resignation of 
Judge Longworth and the death of Judge White, both occurring in 
March, 1883, created a number of changes in the court in that year. 
John H. Doyle, of Lucas County, was appointed by the Governor to suc- 
ceed Judge Longworth, and took his seat in the court on the loth day \ 
of March. Martin. D. Follett, of Washington County, was, however, | 
elected to fill the vacancy in October, and qualified on the 8th day of \ 
December, Judge Doyle retiring. Judge White, who had served in the • 
court for over 19 years, died on the 12th day of March in the same year, \ 
and William H. Upson, of Summit County, was appointed by the Gov- j 
emor as his successor. He took his seat on the 14th of March, but ; 
Selwyn N. Owen, of Williams County, having been elected in October ! 
for the unexpired te^, qualified on the 8th of December, Judge Upson i 
retiring. 

The court during this year (1883) was composed of the following 
membership : 

Febniary 9 to March 9: Judges White, Johnson, Mcllvaine, Long- i 

worth and Okey. . j 



672- THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

Historical Sketch of the Judges of the Supreme Court. 

March lo to March 12: Judges White, Johnston, Mcllvaine, Doyle, 
and Okey. 

March 14 to December 7: Judges Upson, Johnson, McDvaine, Doyle, j 
and Okey. i 

December 8 to February 9, 1884: Judges Owen, Johnston, Mcllvaine, 
FoUett, and Okey. f 

February 9, 1884, to February 9, 1885 : J^^lges Johnson, Mcllvaine, ;| 
Okey, FoUett, and Owen. ! 

Februar>' 9, to July 25; 1885 : Judges Mcllvaine, Okey, Follett, Owen, 
and Johnson (re-elected). >j 

August 20 to December 15, 1885: Judges Mcllvaine, Atherton, Fol- }| 
leit, Owen, and joiinson. 

December 16, 1885, to February 9, 1886: Judges Mcllvaine, Follett, 
Spear, Owen and Johnson. 

The death of Judge Okey on the 25th day of July, 1885, created 
a vacancy in the court which was filled by the appointment of Gibson 
Atherton, of Licking County, who took his seat on the 20th day of August. 
The October elections resulted in the election of William T. Spear, of 
Trumbull County, to fill the unexpired term of Judge Okey, and he 
qualified and took his seat on the i6th day of December, Judge Atherton 
retiring. At the same election Thaddeus A. Minshall, of Ross County, 
was elected for the full term of five years to succeed Judge Mcllvaine, 
and these two members of the court have, by repeated re-elections by 
the people, been continued on the bench of the Supreme Court to the pres- 
ent time. Judge Johnson resigned November 9, 1886, and Franklin J. 
Dickman, of Cuyahoga County, was appointed to fill the vacancy until 
the next general election. He took his seat November 16. In October 
previous, Marshall J. Williams, of Fayette County, was elected to suc- 
ceed Judge Follett. In 1887 Judge Spear was re-elected for a full tenn 
and in 1888 Joseph P. Bradbury, of Gallia County, was elected to suc- 
ceed Judge Owen. Judge Dickman was re-elected in 1889, Judge Minshall 
was re-elected in 1890 and Judge Williams in 1891. In the elections of 
1892, under a new law, by which the membership of the court was in- 
creased from five members to six, and the terms of office from five years 
to six, two members of the court were elected in the persons of Judge 
Spear for the long term of six years and Jacob F. Burket, of Hancock 
County, for five years. Judge Bradbury was re-elected in 1893 ; John 
A. Shauck, of Montgomery County, was elected in October, 1894, to suc- 
ceed Judge Dickman. From 1894 to 1899 the sitting judges were re- 
elected to succeed themselves without exception, and consequently no 
changes occurred in the personnel of the court. In November, 1899, 
William Z. Davis, of Marion County, was elected to succeed Judge 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 673 

Historical Sketch of the Judges of the Supreme Court, 

Bradbury, who resigned January lo, 1900, a month before the expiration 
of his term. Judge-elect Davis was appointed to succeed him, and thus 
went on the bench a month eariier than the time for which he had been 
elected. In November, 1900, Judge Shauck was re-elected and entered 
on his present term February 9, 1901. The personnel of the Supreme 
Court of Ohio for the period between February 9, 1886,, and February 9, 
1901, (a period of fifteen years) was, therefore: 

February 9, to November 9, 1886: Judges Owen, C. J., Follett, 
Spear, Johnson, and Minshall. 

November 10, 1886, to February 9, 1887: Judges Owen, C. J., Follett, 
Dickman, Spear and Minshall. 

February 9, 1887, to February 9, 1888: Judges Owen, C. j., Dick- 
man, Spear, Minshall, and Williams. 

February 9, 1888, to February 9, 1889: Judges Owen, C. J., Dickman, 
Minshall, Spear and Williams. 

February 9, 1899, to February 9, 1890: Judges Minshall, C. J., Dick- 
man, Spear, Williams and Bradbury. 

February 9, 1890, to February 9, 1891 : Judges Minshall, C. J., Wil- 
liams, Spear, Bradbury, and Dickman. 

February 9, 1891, to February 9, 1892: Judges Williams, C. J., Spear, 
Bradbury, Dickman and Minshall. 

February 9, 1892, to February 9, 1893: Judges Spear, C. J., Brad- 
bury, Dickman, Minshall and Williams. 

February 9, 1893, to February 9, 1894: Judges Bradbury, C. J., 
Dickman, Minshall, Williams, Burket, and Spear. 

February 9, 1894, to Februar>' 9, 1895: Judges Dickman, C. J., 
Minshall, Williams, Burket, Spear, and Bradbury. 

February 9, 1895, to February 9, 1896: Judges Minshall, C. J., Wil- 
liams, Burket, Spear, Bradbury and Shauck. 

February 9, 1896, to February 9, 1897: Judges Williams, C. J., 
Burket, Spear, Bradbury, Shauck, and Minshall. 

February 9, 1897, to February 9, 1898 : Judges Burket, C. J., Spear, 
Bradbury, Shauck, Minshall, and Williams. 

February 9, 1898, to February 9, 1899: Judges Spear, C. J., Brad- 
bury, Shauck, Minshall, Williams, and Burket. 

February 9, 1899, to January 10, 1900: Judges Bradbury, C. J., 
Shauck, Minshall, Williams, Burket, and Spear. 

January 10, 1900, to February 9, 1900: Judges Shauck, C. J., Min- 
shall, Williams, Burket, Spear and Davis (by appointment). 

February 9, 1900, to February 9, 1901 : Judges Shauck, C. J., 
Minshall, Williams, Burket, Spear, and Davis (by election). 

February 9, 1901, to February 9, 1902 : Judges Minshall, C. J., Wil- 
liams, Burket, Spear, Davis and Shauck. 

U— B. A. 



674 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Historical Sketch of the Judges of the Supreme Court. 

In November, 1901, James L. Price, of Allen County, Chief Justice 

of the Circuit Courts of Ohio, was elected to the Supreme Court to sue- 1 

ceed Judge Minshall, and took his seat February 9, 1902. Chief Justice I 

Williams died in July, 1902, and on the 19th of the month Governor I 

Nash appointed to the vacancy Judge William B. Crew, of Morgan j 

County, who was> the candidate for Judge of the Supreme Court on the j 

Republican State ticket, and who was in November, 1902, elected to sue- | 

ceed himself for the full term. | 

In November, 1902, Judge Augustus N. Summers of the Circuit 

Court was elected to succeed Judge Jacob F. Burket, who retired February \ 

9f 1904- ;! 

The personnel of the Supreme Court from February 9, 1901, to date 
of publication, was as follows: 

February 9, to July 7, 1902 : Judges Williams, C. J., Burket, Spear, 
Davis, Shauck and Price. 

August 21, 1902, to February 9, 1904: Judges Burket, C. J., Spear, 
Davis, Shauck, Price and Crew. 

February 9, 1904, to February 9, 1905, Judges Spear, C. J., Davis, 
Schauck, Price, Crew and Summers. 



THE SUPREME COURT COMMISSIONS. 



THE power of the General Assembly to assist in disposing of the 
work before the Supreme Court of Ohio by the formation of 
"Supreme Court Commissions" (Section 21, Article IV), has 
been invoked twice since the adoption of the present Constitu- 
tion of Ohio. The appointment of the members of this commission has 
been vested in the Governor in both instances. 

THE COMMISSION OF 1876. 

t 

On the 2d day of February, 1876, the Governor appointed as such 
Supreme Court Commission, to serve for three years, Josiah Scott, of 
Crawford County; William W. Johnson, of Lawrence County; D. Thew 
Wright, of Hamilton County ; Richard A. Harrison, of Franklin County ; 
Henry C. Whitman, of Hamilton County; and Luther Day, of Portage 
County. Mr. Harrison refused to accept the appointment and Thomas Q. 
Ashbum, of Clermont County, was appointed in his stead, and took his 
seat on the bench on the i6th of March, 1878. 

This commission sat until the 2d day of February, 1879, ^s an 
auxiliary to the Supreme Court, and assisted in bringing up the docket 
which had fallen far behind the reasonable time for trial. 

' THE COMMISSION OF 1883. 

In 1883, the Governor again appointed a commission of five mem- 
bers under an enabling act of the General Assembly, and this commis- 
sion began its work on the 17th day of April, 1883, ^^<^ continued on the 
bench for the period of two years. The commission of 1883 consisted 
of Moses M. Granger, of Muskingum County, C. J., Geo. K. Nash, of 
Franklin County; Franklin J. DIckman, of Cuyahoga County; Charles 
D. Martin, of Fairfield County ; and John McCauley, of Seneca County. 
This commission adjourned April 16, 1885. 



WS) 



OFFICERS OF THE SUPREME COURT AND LAW LIBRARY. 



.\ 



i' ^va|^"jw.«fy^ 



"J 







3 ■ 




ELLIOT HOWARD GILKEY. 

^[ABSHAL OF THE SUPREME COURT AND LAW LIBBARIAN. 



(676) 



The Supreme Court of Ohio before its adjournment in June, 1904, elected 
Elliot Howard Gilkey, of Franklin County, to be Marshal and Librarian of the 
court to succeed himself, he having been promoted to that office from the posi- 
tion of First Assistant Librarian the previous October, to fill the unexpired term 
occasioned by the death of Frank N. Beebe. 

Mr. Gilkey was born in Warren, Trumbull County, Ohio, February 8, 1857, 
the son of Sheldon Elliot Gilkey and Emma Roberts Gilkey, both of New Eng- 
land parentage. The father entered the Union army and was shot to death in 
the battle of "The Wilderness," May, 1864, leaving the son an orphan at the age 
of seven years. He was admitted to the Ohio Soldiers' Orphans' Home at Xenia 
in January, 1870, from Cleveland, and discharged in June, 1 874, af^^er having b<»en 
permitted to serve two winters as a page in the Ohio Senate. His elcctiou a,s 
Journal Clerk in the Senate in 1876 at the age of eighteen years led him to 
select Columbus as the scene of his future efforts, both to secure employment 
and to win the friends which are so necessary to the success in life of any man. 
No man is sufficient unto himself; the man most utterly alone is he who in 
midst of a great city knows within his own soul that he merits no friends; 
Crusoe on his island is in Paradise in comparison. Leaving school at the age 
of 17, from the necessity of graduation from the Home on reaching the age limit, 
Mr. Gilkey was prevented from pursuing an education beyond the Senior High 
School year. After leaving the Home he spent the summer of 1874 in private 
study in Cleveland, preparatory to entering the law school at Ann Arbor, a 
plan which was reluctantly abandoned from stern necessity. It was the failure 
to succeed in this ambition which led him to come to Columbus and seek the 
Journal Clerkship in the Senate in 1876, to which reference has been made. 
His subsequent education has been obtained by private study out of business 
hours. He has read law as a matter of general information, but has never 
taken the full course necessary to admission to the bar; he expects to do this, j J 
both as a further qualification for the duties now imposed upon him and for 
its educational attractions. He is a lover of books and of book making. In 
1900 he was selected to get out a revision of the Manual of Legislative Practice 
in the General Assembly; and also to compile the centennial edition of the 
Ohio Hundred Year Book, the compilations and historical sketches of the latter 
being later reprinted in the series of which this volume is a part. While en- 
gaged in this work the former Marshal and Librarian of the Supreme Court 
expressed a desire to secure his services as First Assistant Law Librarian, and 
following this unsolicited and unexpected expression of semi-professional ap- 
preciation, successful application to the Judges of the Supreme Court was made 
for the appointment which was received July 1, 1901. His election to succeed 
Mr. Beebe after three years' service in the department is taken as the highest 
endorsement of his fitness for the work. 

Mr. Gilkey was married January 24, 1884, to Miss Florence Virginia Reed, 
of Springfield, Ohio, and they have three children. The family residence is on 
North Broadway, r 



(677) 



678 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Officers of the Supreme Court and Law Library. 



The Marshal of the Supreme Court is also hbrarian of the Law 
Librar}'- of the Supreme Court; he is the chief executive officer of the 
court, is under bond for the. care and safekeeping of all the books, furni- 
ture and property of the department, and is the crier of the court and the 
officer in charge of all the rooms, halls and offices assigned to the depart- 
ment. (Sections 423-4 R. S. of Ohio.) The duties of Law Librarian 
consume practically all of the Marshal's time, and for this 'reason his 
office is located in the library rather than adjacent to the court rooms. 



ROSTER OF OFFICERS OF THE SUPREME COURT AND LAW LIBRARY. 

SEPTEMBER 1, 1904. 



Name. 


Title. 


Term. 


E. Howard Gilkey. . 

John Wm. Shaw 

A« W. Buckmaster 


Marshal and Librarian 

Asst, Librarian and Bookkeeper. 
First Deputy Marshal 


Three years. 
Pleasure of the Court. 
Pleasure of the Court 


L. McCallister 


Second Deputy Marshal 


Pleasure of the Court 


C C Barrows . . 


Assistant Librarian 


Pleasure of the Couit 


W W McDonald 


Third Deoutv Marshal 


Pleasure of the Court 


Fred H Wolf . . 


SteTio2fraDh.Gr 


Three years. 
Three years. 


Perry W. Heacock. . . 


S5tftno2fraDliGr 





(Note — The Clerk of Court and the Supreme Court Reporter are independent 
of this department.) 



it. I 



HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE SUPREME COURT LAW LIBRARY. 

The law books forming a part of the State Library were taken to 
the rooms assigned for the use of the Supreme Court and Law Library 
in the present Capitol building as soon as said rooms were ready for 
occupancy. There are no data obtainable showing just when this change 
was made, but it was about 1858. At this time the number of volumes 
could not have exceeded a couple of thousand. In 1866, a count showed 
about 2,500 volumes. The Library was first in charge of the messenger 
of the Supreme Court, who was assigned the duty of Hbrarian. 

At this time there were two officers of the Court — a crier and 
messenger. Owing to the illness of the messenger during the greater 
portion of the year of his service, the crier of the court acted as Hbrarian, 
and furnished an assistant who was compensated under an arrangement 
with the messenger. In 1867, an act was passed providing for the ap- 
pointment of a law librarian, taking effect February 9, 1867, and the 
positions of crier and messenger of the Supreme Court were abolished, 
the law librarian being made ex-officio crier of the court, said crier to 
furnish an assistant 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 679 



\ Historical Sketch of the Supreme Court Law Library. 

For a number of years the listing of the volumes being added to 
the Law Library were taken as part of the State Library, and the State 
Library figures given of the number of the volumes enrolled included 
all those which had been set apart as the Law Library of the Supreme 
Court and additions thereto. This was discontinued early in the seven- 
ties, and the first record kept, showing additions to the Law Library 
were made in 1873. From this time on more attention was given the 
subject of books, and in 1875 the library had grown to nearly four 
thousand volumes. In 1880, when the first catalogue was made, the 
library contained about seven thousand five hundred volumes, and at the 
time of this writing (March i, 1901) the library counts out a little over 
twenty thousand voiumes. 

The first Messenger and Librarian was Richard Riordan, who served 
about two years. He was succeeded by Herman Ruess, in i860, who 
served until February 11, 1866. James H. Beebe was Acting Crier of 
the Supreme Court, appointed by the Supreme Court April 6, 1865, ^^^ 
re-appointed February 11, 1866, at which time he took charge substantially 
of the Law Library, On February 16, 1867, a law was passed creating 
the office of Law Librarian, who, ex-officio, should be the crier of the 
court. James H. Beebe served in this capacity until his death, July 12, 
1880. Frank N. Beebe, who had been serving as an assistant to his 
father, was appointed Law Librarian, and succeeded his father in charge 
of the department, July 13, 1880, and served continuously until his death 
September 2y, 1904. 

The present incumbent was promoted from Assistant Librarian Octo- 
ber 3, 1903, to fill the vacancy caused by Mr. Beebe's death, and served 
out the unexpired term. He was re-elected and installed in charge of the 
department for the full term of three years, July i, 1904. 

NAMES OF LIBRARIANS. 



Name. 


Term of Service. 


Richard Riordan 


1858 to 1860. 


Herman Ruess 


1860 to February 11, 1866. 


♦James H Beebe 


February 11, 1866, to July 12. 1880. 


tPrank N Beebe 


July 13, 1880, to September 27, 1904. 


E Howard Gilkev 


October 3, 1903 — Incumbent. 







♦Died July 12. 1880. 
tDied September 27, 1903. 



680 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Historical Sketch of the Supreme Court Law Library. 



NAMES OF ASSISTANT LIBRARIANS. 



Name. 



Term of Service. 



Frank N. Beebe 

S. A. Decker 

James M. Bell 

Geo. A. Bateson . . . 
Edgar B. Kinkead. 
James L. Hampton. 
tHartzell Caldwell. 
§E. Howard Gilkey,. 
Jno. Wm. Sbu.7.-. .. 
Charles C. Barrows 



February 11, 1866, to July 12, 1880. 
July. 13, 1880, to August 14, 1881. • 
August 15, 1881, to January 14, 1885. 
January 15, 1885, to March 31, 1888. 
April 1, 1888, to February 1, 1892. 
March 1, 1892, to January 14, 1896. 
January 15, 1896, to July 1, 1901. 
.July 1, 1^01, to '^^totcr 2, 1002. 
CclvLoi X, i90x — incumbent. 
October 3, 1903— Incumbent. 



•J'iV 



JElected First Deputy Marshal. 
fPromoted Marshal and Librarian. 



NAMES OF DEPUTY MARSHALS. 



Name. 



Term of Service. 



Hartzell Caldwell. . 
A. W. Buckmaster. 
Louis McCallister. . 
Sherman A. Cuneo 
Wm. W. McDonald. 



July 1, 1901, to August 1, 1902. 
October 1, 1901 — Incumbent. 
July 1, 1902— Incumbent. 
August 1, 1902, to August 1, 1903. 
October 3, 1903— Incumbent. 



ili 



n 



THE REPORTER OF THE SUPREME COURT. 





^' 



i\ 



^ i 



EMILIUS O. RANDALL. 






% 



^^. 



i 




Emilius O. Randall, born 1850, in Richfield, Summit County, son of Harriet 
Newton Oviatt and David Austin Randall. Three great-grandfathers fought for 
American independence in the Revolution. Attended public schools, Columbus, 
O. Prepared for college, Phillips Academ3% Andover, Mass. (1869-70). Graduated 
Ph. B. Cornell University (1874). Graduate course in history and literature 
(two years) Cornell and Europe. Graduate in College of Law, LL. B. and LL. 
M., Ohio State University (1892). Admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court 
of Ohio (1890). Professor and lecturer in law, O. S. U., since 1894. Official 
Reporter of the Supreme Court since 1895. Edited and published eighteen 
volumes decisions of the court. Trustee Ohio State Archaeological and Historical 
Society and Secretary since 1893. Edited and published eleven volumes of the 
Society's historical publications. Editor Society's Quarterly. Associate Editor 
"Bench and Bar of Ohio" (1897). Author "History of the Zoar Society," and 
many pamphlets in literary and historical subjects. President Columbus Board 
of Trade (1887). Member Columbus Board of Education (1888-91). Trustee 
Columbus Public Library since 1885. Member American Historical Associa- 
tion; Society of American Authors: American Bar Association; American 
Library Association; Society of the Sons of the American Revolution; (Presi- 
dent State Society, 1901), Ohio State Bar Association; Ohio State Library Asso- 
ciation; (Vice-President. 1900). Delegate from the 12th Congressional (Ohio) 
district to Republican National Convention. Chicago, June 20. 21, 1904; dele- 
gate at large from Ohio for Sons of American Revolution to S. A. R. National 
Convention at St, Louis, June 15, 16, 1904. 



(681) 



l: 



682 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

Reporter of the Supreme Court, 

HISTORY OF THE OFFICE OF THE SUPREME COURT REPORTER. 

February 2^, 1816, the State Legislature for the first time (14 O. 
L., 310) made recognition of the necessity on the part of the Supreme 
Court for putting in permanent form and properly preserving its opinions 
accompanying its decisions. January 20, 1823, the legislature amended 
(21 O. L., 9) the previous act and provided "That the said judges shall 
appoint a Reporter who shall report all decisions made at said sessions 
in Columbus and such other important' decisions as he may be directed 
by said judges to report, and cause the same to be published as soon as 
may be conveniently done after such sessions." ^ 

Aftei* the ?doption of. the new constil-iition I'lSs') tlse General 
Assembly enacted, section 8, chapter 2>^ (S. & C, 379) that the Supreme 
Court should appoint a Reporter whose term of office should continue for 
three years, and giving special directions as to the reports of the briefs 
of counsel upon the points made and the authorities cited. From time 
to time thereafter acts were passed by the General Assembly regulating 
the methods of publications, sale and distribution of the reports. Under 
existing legislation the Reporter is appointed by the judges of the court 
for a term not to exceed three years, at a stipulated salary. The reports 
are published as a private enterprise by the publisher upon a contract 
tnade in behalf of the state by the reporter, form and style of the volume 
and retail maximum price to the public being determined by statute. 
Neither the state nor the Reporter has any pecuniary interest in the 
reports. 

Since the creation of the office fourteen different appointees, includ- 
ing the present incumbent, have discharged the duties of Reporter for the 
Court. 

Up to the time of the adoption of the Constitution of 185 1, the 
official Reporters of the Supreme Court were appointed by a joint reso- 
lution of the General Assembly notwithstanding section 6 of the law 
enacted by the legislature January 20, 1823, which reads: "That the 
said judges (Supreme) shall appoint a Reporter, who shall report all 
decisions made at said sessions in Columbus and such other important 
decisions as may be directed by said judges to report, and cause the 
same to be published as soon as may conveniently be done after such 
session." (21 O. L., 9.) Under the present Constitution, the reporters 
have been appointed by the Supreme Court, and serve during the statutory 
term of three years. 

The names of the reporters, together with their terms of service, 
and the "State or Ohio State Reports" issued by them is given in the 
following tabulated statement : 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



683 



Reporter of the Supreme Court. 



NAMES OF SUPREME COURT REPORTERS. 



Name. 



Term of Service. 



Serial Number Reports Issued, 



Charles Hammond 


1821-1840 


Vols. 1-9, Ohio Reports. 
Vol. 10, Ohio Reports. 
Vols. 11-13, Ohio Reports. 
Vols. 14-19, Ohio Reports. 
Vol. 20, Ohio Reports. 
Vol. 1, Ohio State Reports. 


P B Wilcox 


1840-1841 


E M Stanton .... 


1842-1844 


Hiram Griswold 

William Lawrence 


1845-1851 (June) 

1851-1852 


George McCook 

Robert B. Warden 


1852-1853 


1853-1854 


J. H. Smith 

Leander J. Critchfield.. 

Moses M. Granger 

E. L. DeWitt 

George B. Okey. 

Levi J. Burgess 

Emilius 0. Randall 


laHr.-lSb^ , . - - , 

1854-1855 


Voir. 2. 3, :. Ohio S^atc "R-r^^^s. 
Vol 3 Ohio State Reports. 


1855-1871 

1871-1873 


Vols. 5-21, Ohio State Reports. 
Vols 22-23 Ohio State Reports. 


1874-1885 


Vols 24-42 Ohio State Reports. 


188.5-1888 


Vols 43-45 Ohio State Reports. 


1SS8-1895 


Vols 46-51 Ohio State Reports. 


1895— Incumbent 


Vols. 52-70, Ohio State Reports. 



CLERK OF THE SUPREME COURT. 



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f fl-iilifrr 111 i'ri ^t^'i^::»aJ:^--^it»*ii^^-*'-.^-^'^»>^^^^^^ 




LAWSON E. EMERSON. 



Lawi on E. Emerson was born in Belmont County, September 25, 1863. His 
education was secured in the common schools, the Barnesville High School and 
at Valparaiso, Ind., Normal School. He taught for several years in his native 
county before deciding upon the law as his life pursuit. He read law with Cap- 
tain Lorenzo Danford and graduated at the Cincinnati Law School in the class 
of 1889. He was selected as deputy clerk of the courts of Belmont County in 
1890 and served with Henry M. Davies for six years. In 1895 Mr. Emerson was 
elected clerk of the courts of Belmont County, and his administration was so 
satisfactory that he was re-elected in 1898. The entire twelve years which he 
gave to the office, first as deputy and later as clerk, was marked by signal 
ability in the discharge of its duties. All of the attorneys of the Belmont bar 
pronounced him one of the most efficient and capable clerks they ever came in 
contact with. 

He is married, with an excellent wife and two sons living. His mother is 
still living at Bethesda, near where he was born, but his father, William Emer- 
son, one of the successful farmers of the county, died about six years age, leav- 
ing a competency for the widow and family. 

Mr. Emerson is but 41 years of age, but is a young man of wide experience 
in court affairs and of well known capacity. He is specially fitted for the posi- 
tion which he is now holding and his three years' administration of the office 
of Clerk of the Supreme Court has given universal satisfaction throughout the 
state. He was renominated for a second term June 18, 1904. 



(684) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



685 



Clerk of the Supreme Court, 



DUTIES OF THE CLERK. 

The purpose of this department is to afford a place of record for 
all files, orders, judgments, proceedings, etc., of the Supreme Court and 
the Supreme Court Commission when in service. The Clerk's office is 
required to make and preserve these records, and the Clerk is the cus- 
todian of "all files, papers, orders, judgments and decrees, and all books 
pertaining thereto, and he shall make up all dockets and issue all needful 
writs and processes. He shall also keep a record of all applicants for ad- 
mission to the bar, all admissions to practice law in Ohio, and shall be 
in charge of the semi-annual examinations of students for such admis- 
sioii cluCl issuc all certiii"?^^^- of admission. He shall also act as Clerk of 
the Supreme Court Commission." 

The clerical force of the office February, 1902, consisted of: 



Name. 




Term Expires. 



Lawson E. Emerson 

J. G. Obermeyre 

Andrew S. Iddings.. 

Ellen C. Taylor 

Joseph Fossett 



Clerk 

Chief Deputy 

Second Deputy 

Corresponding Clerk 
Messenger 



February, 1905. 
Pleasure of Clerk. 
Pleasure of Clerk. 
Pleasure of Clerk. 
Pleasure of Clerk. 



SUPREME COURT CLERKS. 

Prior to the enactment of March 30, 1865 (62 O. L., 69), the Clerk 
of the Courts of Franklin County, Ohio, was ex-officio clerk of the 
Supreme Court, being represented, as a rule, by a deputy. Pursuant to 
the act above referred to, Rodney Foos was elected Clerk of the Supreme 
Court in 1865, and served until 1875, nine years. 

Arnold Green was Clerk for one term of three years, 1875-1878. 

Richard J. Fanning was Clerk for one term of three years, 1878- 
1881. . 

Dwight Crowell was Clerk for one term of three years, 1881-1884. 

J. W. Cruikshank was Clerk for one term of three years, 1884- 
1887. 

Urban H. Hester was Clerk for two terms, six years, 1887-1893. 

Josiah B. Allen was Clerk for three terms, nine years, 1893- 1902. 

Lawson E. Emerson, the present incumbent, has been Clerk since 
February 3, 1902. 



THE CIRCUIT COURTS OF OHIO. 
(created in 1883.) 



THE Circuit Courts of Ohio were created by the following amended 
provisions in the Constitution of 185 1: 
Section 6, Article IV. The Circuit Court shall have like 
original jurisdiction with the Supreme Court, and such appellate 
jurisdiction as may be provided by law. Such courts shall be composed 
of such number of judges as may be provided by l^^v-, cuid shall be held 
in each county at least once in each year. The number of circuits and 
the boundaries thereof shall be prescribed by law. Such judges shall be 
elected in each circuit, by the electors thereof, and at such time and for 
such term as may be prescribed by law, and the same number shall be 
elected to each circuit. Each judge shall be competent to exercise his 
judicial powers in any circuit. The General Assembly may change, from 
time to time, the number of boundaries of the circuits. [As amended 
October 9, 1883 ; 80 v. 382.] 

FIRST SUBDIVISION OF OHIO INTO CIRCUITS^ 1 884. 

By an act passed by the General Assembly April 14, 1884, the 
Judicial Circuits were constituted of seven groups of counties : 

FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 

• Hamilton, Qermont, Butler, Warren and Clinton Counties. 

SECONP JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 

I 

Preble, Darke, Shelby, Miami, Montgomery, Champaign, Clark, 
Greene, Fayette, Madison and Franklin Counties. 

THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 

Mercer, Van Wert, Paulding, Defiance, Williams, Fulton, Henry, 
Putnam, Allen, Auglaize, Wood, Hancock, Hardin, Logan, Union, Sen- 
eca, Marion, Wyandot and Crawford Counties. 

FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 

Brown, Adams, Highland, Pickaway, Ross, Pike, Scioto, Lawrence, 
Gallia, Jackson, Meigs, Vinton, Hocking, Athens, Washington, )and 
Monroe counties. 

(686) 



V 

V. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 687 

Judges of the Circuit Courts. 



FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 

Morrow, Richland, Ashland, Knox, Licking, Fairfield, Perry, Mor- 
gan, Muskingum, Coshocton, Holmes, Wayne, Stark, Tuscarawas and 
Delaware Counties. 

SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 

Lucas, Ottawa, Sandusky, Erie, Huron, Lorain, Medina, Summit 
and Cuyahoga Counties. 

' ; SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. \ 

Lake, Ashtabula, Geauga, Trumbull, Portage, Mahoning, Coium- 
biana, Carroll, Jefferson, Plarrison, Guernsey, Belmont, and Noble 
counties. 



SECOND SUBDIVISION OF OHIO INTO CIRCUITS. 

By an act of March 21, 1887, the state was redistricted by the Gen- 
eral Assembly into eight Judicial Circuits, as follows : . ] 

FIRST JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. ' \ 

\ 

^ Hamilton, Qermont, Butler, Warren and Clinton Counties. \ 

> SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 

Preble, Darke, Shelby, Miami, Montgomery, Champaign, Clarke, 
Greene, Fayette, Madison and Franklin Couiities. \ 

\ 

THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 

Mercer, Van Wert, Paulding, Defiance, Henry, Putnam, Allen, 
Auglaize, Hancock, Hardin, Logan, Union, Seneca, Marion, Wyandot 
and Crawford counties. 

FOURTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 

Brown, Adams, Highland, Pickaway, Ross, Pike, Scioto, Lawrence, 
Gallia, Jackson, Meigs, Vinton, Hocking, Athens, Washington and Mon- 
roe Counties. 

Monroe County was transferred from the fourth to the seventh cir- 
cuit in 1894. 



688 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Circuit Court, 



FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 

Morrow, Richland, Ashland, Knox, Licking, Fairfield, Perry, Mor- 
gan, Muskingum, Coshocton, Holmes, Wayne, Stark, Tuscarawas and | 
Delaware Counties. 

SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 

Williams, Fulton, Wood, Lucas, Ottawa, Sandusky, Erie and Huron 
Counties. 

SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 

Lake, Ashtabula, Geauga, Trumbull, Portage, Mahoning, Colum- 
biana, Carroll, Jefferson, Harrison, Guernsey, Belmont and Noble 
Counties. 

Monroe County was added to this circuit in 1894. 

EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT. 

Cuyahoga, Summit, Medina and Lorain Counties. 



«: 



The first election of Circuit Judges was held in October, 1884, and 
the first sitting of the several Circuit Courts was fixed for the 9th day 
of February, 1885. The Judges are elected in alternate years, one Judge 
in each circuit for a term of six years. The salary is six thousand dol- 
lars per annum. 



CHIEF JUSTICES OF THE CIRCUIT COURTS IN OHIO. 



Years. 


Name. 


Residence. 


Circuit. 


1885-6.... 


MarshaU J. Williams 

James M. Smith 


Washins^ton C. H 


Second. 


1887-8. 


Lebanon 


First. 


1889-1890 


George R. Haynes 

Gilbert H. Stewart 

Milton L. Clark 

Charles C. Shearer 

James L. Price 

John C. Hale 


Toledo 


Sixth. 


1891-4 : 


Columbus. : . 


Second. 


1895 


Chillicothe 


Fourth. 


1896-7 


Xenia. . . 


Second. 


1898-1901 
1901-1902 


Lima 

Cleveland 


Third. 
Eighth. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



689 



Judges of the Circuit Court. 



NAMES OF CIRCUIT JUDGES IN OHIO. 

FIRST CIRCUIT. 



Name. 


Politics. 


Residence 


Tenn_of Service. 


Joseph Cox 


Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 


Cincinnati. . 
Lebanon . . . 

Batavia 

Cincinnati. . 
Cincinnati.. 


Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1899. 


James M. Smith 

♦Peter F. Swing 

♦WiUiam S. Giffin 

♦Ferdinand Jelke, Jr 


Feb. 9. 1885, to Feb. 8, 1901. 
Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1909. 
Feb. 9, 1899, to Feb. 8, 1911. 
Feb. 9, 1901, to Feb. 8, 1907. 



♦Incumbent. 



SECOND CIRCUIT. 



Name. 


Politics. 


Residence. 


Tenn of Service. 


Marshall J. WiUiams. . . 

Gilbert H. Stewart 

I John A. Shauck 

Charles C. Shearer 

I I Aug. N. Summers 

♦♦James 1. Allread: 

fCharles W. Dustin 

♦Harrison Wilson : 

♦Theodore Sulhvan 


Republican 

Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 


Washington 

C. H 

Columbus . . 

Dayton 

Xenia 

Springfield . 
Greenville. . 
Dayton .... 

Sidney 

Troy 


Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1887. 
Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1895. 
Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1895. 
Feb. 9, 1887, to Feb. 8, 1899. 
Feb. 9, 1895, to Feb. 8, 1907. 
Feb. 9, 1895, to Nov. 15, 1895 
Feb. 9, 1904, to Feb. 8, 1907. 
Nov.16,1895, to Feb. 8, 1909. 
Feb. 9, 1899, to Feb. 8, 1911. 



♦Incumbent. 

1 1 Elected Judge of the Suprerme Court. 

♦♦Vice Shauck. 

fVice Summers. 

THIRD CIRCUIT. 



Name. 


PoUtics. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


Thomas Beer 


Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Republican 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Democrat 

Repubhcan 

Republican 


Bucyrus. . . 
Ottawa. . . . 
Kenton. . . . 

Celina 

Lima 

Tiffin 

Bucyrus. . . 

Marion 

St. Marys.. 
Bucyrus. . . 

Findlay 


Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1893. 


John J. Moore 


Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1895. 


Henry W.Seney 

James H. Dav 


Feb. 9, 1885, resig. Sept. 7, 1896. 
Feb. 9, 1893, to Feb. 8. 1905. 


James L. Pnce 

John K. Rohn 

lEbenezer Finley 

' Oaleb H. Norris 

William T. Mooney 

fEdward Vollrath 

♦Silas E. Hurin 


Feb. 9, 1895, to Feb. 8, 1901. 
Sept. 8, 1890, to Nov. 16, 1896. 
Nov. 17, 1896, to Feb. 8, 1897. 
Feb. 9, 1897, to Feb. 8, 1909. 
Feb. 9, 1901, to Feb. 8, 1907. 
Until successor is elected and 

qualified, 
Feb. 8, 1911. 



♦Incumbent. 



1 1 Vice Seney, resigned. 
tVi< "' 



^ice Mooney, deceased. 



44— B. A. 



690 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Circuit Court. 



Names of Circuit Judges in Ohio — Continued. 

FOURTH CIRCUIT. 



Name. 


Politics. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


♦Thomas Cherrington.. . 

J. P. Bradbury- 

Milton L. Clarke 

Daniel A. Russell 

Hiram L. Sibley 

♦Thomas A. Jones 

♦Festus Walters 


Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 

n-. 


Ironton 

Pomeroy. . . 
Chillicothe. 
Pomeroy. . . 
Marietta. . . 
Jackson. . . . 
Circleville. . 


Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1911. 
Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1889. 
Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1897. 
Feb. 9, 1889, to Feb. 8, 1901. 
Feb. 9, 1897, to Feb. 8, 1903. 
Feb. 8, 1901, to Feb. 8, 1907. 
Feb. 8, l^Oa. tw Fel*. 8, i909. 



♦Incumbent. 



FIFTH CIRCUIT. 



Name. 


Politics. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


John W. Albaugh 


Republican 


Canton. . . . 


Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1893. 


Charles Follett 


Democrat 


Newark. . . . 


Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1895. 


John W. Jenner. ..:.... 


Democrat 


Mansfield. . 


Feb. 9, 1885, resig. Oct. 5, 1895. 


Julius C. Pomerene 


Democrat 


Coshocton.. 


Feb. 9, 1893, died Jan., 1898. 


John J. Adams 


Republican 


Zanesville . 


Feb. 9, 1895, to Feb. 8, 1901. 


1 George E. Baldwin.. . 
Charles H. Kibler 


Republican 


Canton. . . . 


Oct. 5, 1895, to Nov. 17, 1895. 


Republican 


Newark. . . . 


Nov. 18, 1895, to Feb. 8, 1897. 


Silas M. Douglass 


Democrat 


Mansfield. . 


Feb. 9, 1897, to Feb. 8, 1903. 


♦♦Martin L. Smvser. . . . 


Democrat 


Wooster. . . 


Jan. 14, 1898, to Nov. 15, 1898 


♦♦John M. Svvartz 


Democrat 


Newark. . . . 


Nov. 16, 1898, to Feb. 8, 1899. 


Rich. M. Vorhees 


Democrat 


Coshocton.. 


Feb. 9, 1899, to Feb. 8, 1905. 


♦M. H. Donahue 


Democrat 


New Lex- 








ington. . . 


Feb. 9, 1901, to Feb. 8, 1907. 


♦Thos. J. McCarty 


Republican 


Canton. . . . 


Feb. 9, 1903, to Feb. 8, 1909. 


♦Frank Taggart 


Republican 


Wooster. . . 


Feb. 9, 1905, to Feb. 9, 1911. 



♦Incumbent. 

I I Appointed vice Jenner, resigned. 

♦♦Vice Pomerene, deceased. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



691 



Judges of the Circuit Court. 



Names of Circuit Judges in Ohio — Concluded. 
SIXTH circuit. 



i! J 



Name. 


Politics. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


William H. Upson 


Republican 


Akron 


Feb. 9, 1885, transferred to 8th 

District. 
Feb. 9, 1885, transferred to 8th 


Charles C. Baldwin 


Republican 


Cleveland. . 








District. 


♦George R. Haynes 


Republican 


Toledo 


Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1909. 


Charles S. Bentley 


Republican. 


Bryan 


Feb. 9, 1888, to Feb. 8, 1895. 


CL^^.lesK. S...:biicr.... 


DciDOriiit 


Toleuu 


^"b. 9. 1SS8. died i«97 


Edmund B. King 


Republican 


SanausKy. . 


reu. 9, iS95, i-esig. Oci. 9, '99 


*||Robert S. Parkef,_. 


Republican 


Bowling 








Green 


March 11, 1897, to Feb. 8, 1911. 


♦rLinnW. HuU 


Republican 


Sandusky. . 


Oct. 10, 1899, to Feb. 8, 1907. 



♦Incumbent. 

I I Appointjed and elected to succeed King, resigned. 

♦fVice Scribner, deceased. 



SEVENTH circuit. 



Name. 


Politics. 


[Residence. 


Term of Service. 


*PeterA. Laubie 

William H. Frazier 

H.B.Woodbury 

♦Jerome B. Burrows.. . . 
♦John M. Cook 


Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 


Salem 

Caldwell... 
Jefferson . . . 
Painesville . 
Steub'nviUe 


Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1911. 
Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1901. 
P^eb. 9, 1885, died Dec, 1895. 
Dec. 30, 1895, to Feb. 8, 1909. 
Feb. 9, 1901, to Feb. 8, 1907. 



i:>r 



♦Incumbent. 



EIGHTH judicial CIRCUIT. 



Name. 



Politics. 



Residence. 



Term of Service. 



William H. Upson. . 
Chas. C. Baldwin. . . 
Hugh J. Caldwell... 
JohnC. Hale....... 

♦Ulysses L. Marvnn.. 

♦Louis H. Winch 

♦Frederick A. Henry 



Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 
Republican 



Akron Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8, 1S93. 



Cleveland. 
Cleveland . 
Cleveland . 
AkruH .... 
Cleveland . 
Cleveland . 



Feb. 9, 1885, to Feb. 8. 1901. 
Feb. 9, 1888 to Feb. 8, 1903. 
Feb. 9, 1893. to Feb. 8, 1905. 
Feb. 18. 1895, to Feb.. 1907. 
Feb. 9, 1893, to Fob. 1909. 
Feb. 9, 1905, to Feb. 9, 1911. 



^Incumbent. 



THE COURTS OF COMMON PLEAS. 



REGARDING these courts the Constitution of 1802 contained the 
following provision : 
Article III, Section 3. The several Courts of Common 
Pleas shall consist of a President and Associate Judges. The 
state shall be divided, by law, into three circuits : there shall be appointed 
in each circuit a President of the courts, who, during his continuation in 
office, shall reside therein. There shall be appointed in each county not 
more than three nor less than two Associate Judges, who, duruig tneir 
continuance in office, .shall reside therein. The President and Associate 
Judges in their respective counties, any three of whom shall be a quorum, 
shall compose the Court of Common Pleas ; which court shall have com- 
mon law and chancery jurisdiction in all such cases as shall be directed 
by law : provided, that nothing here contained shall be construed to pre- 
vent the Legislature from increasing the number of circuits and Presi- 
dents after the term of five years (et seq.). 

The Judges under this provision of the first Constitution were elected 
by the General Assembly, and, under the subsequent acts of that body, 
were as follows : 



ELECTED APRIL 1, 1802. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

Calvin Pease Eastern. 

WyllyB Silliman Middle. 

Francis Dimlavy — Western. 



ELECTED APRIL 6, 1802. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Joseph Darlington Adams. 

David Eddy Adams. 

Hosea Moore Adams. 

David Vance Belmont. 

David Lockwood Belmont. 

James Alexander Belmont. 

James Dunn Butler. 

John Greer Butler. 

John Kitchel Butler.. 

Philip Catch Clermont. 

John Wood .Clermont. 



Name, County. 

Ambrose Ransom Clermont. 

William Smith Columbiana. 

Henry Back aan Columbiana. 

Robert Simmison Columbiana, 

fWilliam W. Irwin .Fairfield. 

Samuel Carpenter Fairfield. 

Daniel Vanmeter Fairfield. 

John Dill Franklin. 

David Jamison .Franklin. 

Joseph Foos Franklin. 

Robert Saff ord GaUia. 

Brewster Higley Gallia. 

G. W. Putnam Gallia. 

Benjamin Whiteman Greene. 

James Barrett Greene. 

William Maxwell Greene. 

Michael Jones Hamilton. 

Luke Foster Hamilton. 

James Silvers Hamilton. 

James Pritchard Jefferson. 

Philip Cabell Jefferson. 

Jacob Martin Jefferson. 

Benjamin Archer Montgomery'. 

Isaac Spinning Montgomei^'. 

John Ewing Montgomery. 

Reuben Abrams Ross. 

(692) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



693 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED APRIL 6, 1802— Concluded. 

Name. County. 

William Patton Ross. 

Felix Renick Ross. 

John Collins .Scioto. 

Joseph Lucas Scioto. 

Thomas Leviney Scioto. 

John Wol worth Trumbull. 

Calvin Austin Trumbull. 

Aaron Wheeler Trumbull, 

Jacob DeLowe Warren. 

William James Warren. 

Ignatius Brown - Warren.. 

Griffen Green Washington. 

Dudley Woor'hridge. Washington. 

Joseph Bueii Wasiiui^oii. 

flmpeached for "neglect of duties," 
January, 6. 1806. . . 



ELECTED FEBRUARY 16, 1804. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County 

David Har\'^ey .Muskingum. 

John Campbell Muskingum. 

William Wells Muskingum. 

Needham Perry, vice Dar- 

hngton, resigned. .-. Adams. 

Jos. Trautman, vice Max- 
well, resigned Greene. 

Jacob Reeder, vice James, 

resigned Warren. 

Silas B nt, Jr., vice Wood- 
bridge, resigned •. . . .Washington 

Joseph Barker, vice BueU, 

resigned Washington. 



APPOINTMENTS BY THE 
GOVENOR, 1804. 

PRESIDENT JUDGE. 

Name. Circuit. 

Levin Beet, vice Silliman, -n 

resigned Middle. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

♦Jesse Fulton, vice WeUs, 

resigned Muskingum. 



Name. Coimty. 

*Ezekiel Deming, vice Wells, 

resigned Washington. 

♦Richard McBride, vice 

Harvey, resigned Muskingum. 

♦Matthew Nimmo vice 

Jones,resigned Hamilton. 

♦Thomas Patton, vice 

Pritchard, resigned Jefferson. 

signed Ross. 

♦Isaac Cook, vice Renick, 

resigned Ross, 

♦Samuel S. Reed, vice 

Sweeney, res j ned Scioto 

♦Elected Feb. 7, 1805. . 



ELECTED FEBRUARY 7, 1805. 

PRESIDENT JUDGE. 

Name. Circuit. 

fRobert F. Slaughter, vice 

Silliman, resigned Middle. 

flmpeached for neglect of duty, January 
28, 1807. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County 

Seth Carhart, vice Camp- 
bell Muskingum. 

James Armstrong, vice 
Patton, resigned 



ELECTED FEBRUARY 21, 1805. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

William Jackson Athens. 

Jebiel Gregory Athens. 

Sylvanus Ames Athens. 

John Reynolds Champa gn. 

John Runyan Champaign. 

Samuel McCullough Champaign. 

Joshua Davidson Highland. 

Jonathan Berriman Highland. 

Richard Evans Highland. 

Henry Weaver, vice Kitchell 

deceased Butler. 

Wm. Mitchell, vice Carhart, 

declined (ineligible) Muskingum. 



694 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas, 



ELECTED JANUARY 20, 1806. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Abel Miller Athens. 

Alexander Stedman Athens. 

Celedon Symmes Butler. 

Aaron Wheeler Geauga. 

Jesse Phelps Geauga. 

John Walworth Geauga. 

John Kinsman Trumbull. 

Turkand Kirtland Trumbull. 

Henry Abrams , . Fairfield. 

Jacob Burton Fairfield. 

Joshua Grover Greene, 

David Houston Greene. 



ELECTED JANUARY I, 1807 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. Coimty 

Joseph Buell, re-elected. . . .Washington. 
Peter Burr Warren. 



Name. County. 

Will'am Thompson, vice Diel, 

resigned Franklin. 

Thomas Hicks, vice Abrams, 
deceased Ross. 

William Barbee Miami. 

Eljah Hatch Athens. 

John Moroney Preble. 

James J. Nisbit Preble. 

John C. Irvin Preble. 

Moses Bixley Delaware. 

Thomas Brown Delaware. 

Josiah Kinney Delaware. 

Timothy Rose.. Licking. . 

William Taylor.. . Licking. 

Alexander Holmes . Ti-^ViV<^ 

John Mills. Anox. 

William Farquhar. Knox. 

WiUiam Gass Knox. 

John Hacken waller. Tuscarawas. 

James Clark Tuscarawas. 

Christian Deardorf Tuscarawas. 

Aaron Norton Portage. 

Amzi Al water Portage. 

Willam Whetmore Portage. 



ELECTED JANUARY, 31, 1807. 

PRESIDENT JUDGE. 

Name. Circuit. 

Levin Beet, vice Slaughter, 

removed . Middle. 

ASSOCIATE JUBGES. 

Name. County 

Hallem Hempsted ..Washington. 

David Hoover Miami 

John Garrard Miami. 

John H. Crawford Miami. 

ELECTED FEBRUARY 13, 1808. 

PRESIDENT JUDGE. 

Name. Circuit. 

William Wilson. . ......... .Fourth (NeW 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

John Master, vice Nimmo 

(Nimms) Resig Hamilton. 



ELECTED FEBRUARY 17, 1809. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Henry Smith Licking. 

Aquilla Carr Tuscarawas. 

John Morris Clermont. 

John Guthridgii Champaign. 

Greorge Atterholt Columbiana. 

Benjamin Carpenter :. . .Delaware. 

Emanuel Carpenter. Fairfield. 

Isaac Minor Franklin. 

John Kerr Gallia. 

Nehemiah King Geauga. 

James Snowden ......' Greene. 

William Kindle Scioto. 



ELECTED FEBRUARY 10, 1810. 

■ PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

♦John Thompson Middle. 

Benjamin Ruggles Western. 

♦Impeached and tried by the Senate and 
acquitted (January, 1811). 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



695 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



_ ELECTED FEBRUARY 15 1810. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Moses Baird , .Adams. 

Needham Parry Adams. 

Andrew Living:ston Adariis. 

James Alexander Belmont. 

John Patterson Belmont. 

John Wiley Belmont. 

Ezekiel Ball.' Butler. 

Daniel Milliken .'. .Butler.. 

Robert Lytle Butler. 

Philip Gatch Clermont. 

Alexnnder Blftir . Clermont. 

Juotepix Campl^cil ^."'^rxaont. 

Jesse Hughes Clinton. 

Peter Burr Clinton 

Thomas Hinkson Clinton. 

George Atterholt Columbiana. 

George Brown Columbiana. 

William Smith Columbiana. 

Augustus Gilbert Cuyahoga. 

Nathan Perry Cuyahoga. 

Timothy Doane. Cuyahoga. 

Henry Abrams Fairfield. 

Samuel Carpenter Fairfield. 

James Quinn '.::... .Fairfield. 

James Mooney .Fayette. 

Anthony Potts ............. Fayette. 

William Blackmore. ....:... Fayette. 

William Read : ; . Franklin. 

Robert Shannon. ..... .Franklin. 

Alex. Morrison, Jr .Franklin. 

Robert Safford ...... . . . . . . Gallia 

Joseph Fletcher. .......;. .Gallia. 

FuUer Elliott Gallia 

Ebenezer Merry, vice King .Geauga. 

James Snowden .Greene. 

Samuel Kyle. .Greene. 

David Huston. .... . . . . .... Greene. , 

Robert Spear. . . : Guernsey 

Thomas B. Ivirkpatrick Guernsey. 

Jacob Gombar Guernsey. 

Stephen Wood . . . ; Hamilton.' 

Aaron Goforth. Hamilton. 

James Silvers Hamilton. 

Thomas Patton Jefferson. 

Andrew Anderson Jefferson. 

Joseph McKee ......... Jefferson. 

James Colvil, vice Gass.. . . .KJiox. 

David Mitchell .Madison. 

Isaac Minor Madison. 

Saml Baske\'ille Madison. 

Isaac Spinning . .MontgomerJ^ 

Abner Gerard Montgomery. 

William George Montgomery. 

Thomas Barr Pickaway. 

William Seymour Pickaway. 

Jacob Shoemaker Pickaway. 

Sam'l Fordward, vice White- 
more ... . . .Portage. 



Name. County. 

Thomas Heeks Ross. 

Isaac Cook Ross. 

James Armstrong Ross. 

William Russell Scioto. 

Charles T. Watson Scioto. 

John Collins Scioto. 

.Ephraim Quimby Trumbull. 

Robert Hughes Trumbull. 

Hermon Canfield Trumbull. 

Ezekiel Deming Washington. 

Paul Fearing Washington. 

Thomas Lord Washington. 



ELECTED JANUARY 27, 1811. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Aaron Wheeler Ashtabula. 

Solomon Griswold Ashtabula. 

Ebenezer Hewing Ashtabula.. 

George McManus Clinton 

Isaac Evans Coshocton. 

William Mitchell Coshocton. 

Henry Snider Fayette. 

Abraham Tappan Geauga. 

Vene Stone , Geauga. 

Edward W. Tapper .Gallia. 

James Clark , . . . . Hamilton. 

James Pritchard Jefferson. 

John Mills .Knox. 

John Arbuckle Madison. 

Samuel Sullivan Muskingum. 

Conrad Roth •. » .Tuscarawas. 



ELECTED DECEMBER 4, 1811. 

ASSOICATE JUDGE. 

Name. ' County. 

Thomas CampbeU, vice 

Pritchard, resigned Jefferson. 

ELECTED FEBURARY 20, 1812. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Orris Clapp Geauga. 

.Jacob Hanes Greene. , 

John Boyd Highland. 

Nathaniel Pope Highland. 

Sainiiol Bell Highland. 

Jesse Fulton Muskingum. 

Samuel Sullivan , . . . . .Muskingum. 

David Findlay .Muskingum. 



696 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



1 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED FEBRUARY 20, 1812— 
Concluded. 

Name. County. 

Abner Dooley Preble. 

John Harris Stark. 

Robert F, Capples Tuscarawas. 

Christian Smith Wayne. 

John Cisna Wayne. 

David Kempton Wayne. 



ELECTED DECEMBER 12, 1812. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGE. 

Name. County. 

Alex. ^Dtchell, vice Moroney, 
resigned. Preble. 



ELECTED FEBRUARY 5, 1814. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Job Dining. Adams. 

Ebenezer Currier Athens. 

Ellas Lee Cuyahoga. 

Erastus Miles Cuyahoga. 

James Moores Jefferson. 

John Herod Knox. 

William Haines Li( king. 

John Gerrard M ami. 

John H. Crawford M ami. 

James Blue M ami. 

Abner Gerrard. . Montcromer.t 

Ebenezer Buckingham Musk.ngum. 

George Clark Stark.. 



ELECTED FEBRUARY 4, 1815. 



ELECTED DECEMBER 21, 1812. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County 

Jacob Young, viceFauqua- 

har, resigned Knox. 

Lewis Vail, vice Mitchell, 

resigned Coshocton. 

ELECTED FEBRUARY 6. 1813. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. ' County. 

Syvlanus Ames. Athens. 

Jehiel Gregory Athens. 

Abraham Tappan Geauga. 

Vene Stone Geauga. 

Nathan Fiddler Licking. 

Thomas Coulter Richland. 

Peter Kinney Richland. 

William Gass Richland. 

Samuel Crull. Scioto 



ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. Coimty. 

Benjamin Robinson Coshocton. 

Jos^ah McKinney Delaware. 

Ezek'el Brown Delaware. 

Dav^d Marks Delaware. 

William Reed. : Franklin. 

David Huston Greene. 

Ebenezer Merry Huron. 

Almon Ruggles Huron. 

Jabez Wrght Huron. 

Samuel McElroy Jefferson. 

Abraham Darling Ejiox. 

John Trimble ICnox. 

John Woodnej : . . . . M ami. 

Levin Okey Monroe. 

John Jones Monroe. 

Isaac Atkinson Monroe. 

Stephen C. Smith Muskingum. 

Daniel Stilwell Muskingum. 

Samuel Henry Pike. 

Enos Prater Pike. 

George Corwine Pike. 

Alva Day. Portage. 

Samuel King Portage. 

Eli as Harman Portage. 

John J. Nisbit.. : .Preble. 

Christian Deardorf Tuscarawas. 



ELECTED DECEMBER 13, 1813. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES 

Name. County. 

Thomas Rogers Gallia. 

James MrClure Richland. 

Henry Laffer Tuscarawas 



ELECTED JANUARY 27, 1816. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Samuel Coulter Stark. 

William Henry Stark. 



i 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



697 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED FEBRUARY 25, 1816. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

George Lord Third. 

Benjamin Tappan Fifth. 

Orris Parish Sixth. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Joseph Anderson Belmont. 

John Reynolds Champaign. 

David P. Fmney Coshocton. 

Elnathan Scofield Fairfield. 

Robert Safford Gallia. 

George W. Barrere Highland. 

Stephen Meeker Huron. 

David Paul Jackson. 

William Givens Jackson. 

Hugh Poor Jackson. 

Anthony Petzer Lickmg. 

Henry Smith .Licking. 

Jacob Romaine Preble. 

ELECTED DECEMBER 5, 1816. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGE. 

Name County. 

Alexander McBeth. Champaign. 

ELECTED DECEMBER 12, 1816 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. Coimty. 

Samuel G. Fleumten Franklin. 

Ezra Sprague Huron. 

ELECTED JANUARY 18, 1817. 

* PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

Joseph H. Crane First. 

John Thompson Second. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Moses Baird Adams. 

Andrew Livingston Adams. 

Edward Bryson Belmont. 



Name. County. 

John Wiley Belmont. 

Jesse Hughes Clinton. 

George McManus Clnton. 

Aaron Sewell Clinton. 

David Smith Franklin. . 

Fuller Elliott Gallia. 

Thomas Henderson Guernsey. 

William France Guernsey. 

James Leiper Guernsey. 

Othniel Looker Hamilton 

James Silvers Ham Iton. 

Andrew Anderson Jefferson. 

James Moores Jefferson. 

WilLam Seymour Pickaway. 

Thomas Barr Pickaway. 

Jacob Sijv.-emakei , ricliivV/ay. 

James Armstrong Ross . 

Isaac Cook Ross. 

Thomas Hicks.. I^oss. 

Ignatius Brown Warren. 

Jacob DeLowe : . . . .Warren. 

Matthias Convin Warren. 



ELECTED JANUARY 25, 1817. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Nehemiah King. Ashtabula. 

Henry Weaver Butler. 

Robert Taylor Butler. 

Joseph N. Campbell Clermont. 

Alexander Blair Clermont. 

John Monis Clermont. 

William Smith Columbiana. 

George Brown Columbiana. 

John J. Bow man Columbiana. 

Joseph H. F;gman Coshocton. 

John H. Strong Cuyahoga 

John Purviance Darke. 

James Rush Darke. 

Enos Terry Darke. 

David Swazy Fairfield. 

John Augustus Fairfield. 

James Mooney Fayette. 

Thomas McGarrah Fayette. 

Battell Hamison Fayette, 

Samuel Kyleo Greene. 

John Davison Lawrence. 

William Miller Lawrence. 

Gabriel Kerr Lawrence. 

Henry Smith Licking. 

David Mitchell Madison. 

James Curry Madison. 

Samuel Baskeville Madison. 

Philip Gunckel Montgomey. 

Isaac Spinning Montgomery. 

Herman Canfield Trumbull. 

Ehpriam Quinby Trumbull. 

Robert Hughes Trumbull. 

Ezekiel Deming Washington. 

John Sharp Washington. 

Henry Jolly Washington. 



■i'»-'. ii^pM^*^'- 



698 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



II 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED JANUARY 27, 1818. 

PRESIDENT JUDGE. 

Name. Circuit. 

Joshua CoUett Sevfenth 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Robert Linzee Athens. 

Solomon Griswold .Ashtabula. 

Eliphalet Austin Ashtabula. 

Joseph N. Campbell BrowTi. 

William AnJc. scr. . , Bro v*rr. 

James Moore Bro\Mi. 

Samuel Hill Champaign. 

Joseph Tatman Clark. 

Joseph Layton Clark. 

Daniel McKinnon Clark. 

Philip Gatch Clermont. ■ 

Thomas Johnston Coshocton. 

Samuel Hughes Delaware. 

William Burke Hamilton. 

Matthew Simpson Harrison. 

Thomas Pullen Hocking. 

Abraham Pilcher Hocking. 

Ben j. Beadle. . . ; Hocking. 

Moses H. Gregg Highland. 

John Shelby .'. Logan. 

Levi Garwood Logan. 

James McElvain Logan. 

Zacariah Davis Licking. 

Joseph Harris Medina. 

Frederick Bro\\Ti Medina. 

Isaac Welton Hedina. 

David Beck with Perry. 

John Mr Mullin Perry. 

Chas. C. Wood : Perry. 

Samuel Reed Pike. 

Joseph Gardner Ross. 

Nicholas Neighbor Tuscarawas. 

ELECTED FEBRUARY 6, 1819. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

Ezra Osbom Eighth. 

George P. Torfence Ninth. 

ASSOIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

John Runyan Champaign. 

Peter Casey Coshocton. 

Mordecai Chalfant Coshocton. 

Thomas Cord. — ... Cuyahoga. 



Name. County, . 

Joseph Fletcher Galia. 

Robert B. Parkma.n Geauga. 

John Clark Greene. 

Alexander Harrison Harrison. 

John Boyd Highland. 

David Mitchell Jackson. 

James C. Phelps Meigs. 

Horatio Strong Meigs. 

Fuller Elliott '. Meigs. 

Wm. B. Young Morgan. 

William Reynolds Morgan. 

Shebesiah Clark Morgan. 

Robert Mitchell Muskingum. 

David Findlay Muskingum . 

Peter Vanansdal .... Prehle. 

S;iTr>M«i ^larshall Shelby. 

Wm. W. Coocil Shelby. 

Robert Huston. Shelbv. 

Reuben S. Clark Trumbull. 

John Nimmon Wayne. 

David McConnaughy WajTie. 

Thomas Townsend Wayne. 



ELECTED DURING SESSION 
OF 1820. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Sylvanus Ames Athens. 

James Smith. Champaign. 

Abner Lord Franklin. 

John W. Scott Geauga. 

Vene Stone Geauga. 

Solomon Kingsbury Geauga. 

Peter Bell Hamilton 

John McCollough Harrison. 

John McCurdy Harrison. 

Jacob Young Knox. 

Joseph Brown Knox. 

Stephen Chapman Knox. 

Noah Fiddler Licking. 

Thomas Gw^iine.. Madison. 

Isaac Houseman Madison. . . 

John Wilson Miami. 

James Steele.. Montgomery', 

Robert Beatty Richland.. 

Wm. Patterson Richland. 

David Harold Sandusky. 

Alex. Morrison .Sandusky. 

Israel Herrington .Sanbusky. 

Samuel Crull Scioto. 

Samuel Clark Stark. 

David Mitchell Union. 

Wm. Gabriel Union. 

Michael Hathaway Union. 

Peter G. Oliver. . . . , Wood 

Horatio Conant Wood. 

Samuel Vance Wood. 



% 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



699 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED DURING SESSION OF 1821. 



ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 



Name. 



Cbuntv. 



Job Dinning. Adams. 

Thomas Kirker Adams. 

Ebenezer Currier Athens. 

George Fithian. Champaign. 

George Johnston Coshocton. 

Samuel Williamson Cuyahoga. 

Jacob Deitrick Fairfield 

Thomas Rogers Gallia. 

Gresham M. Peters Hocking. 

Timothy Baker Huron. 

Elisha P, Green ... Lawrence. 

James McPherson. Logan. 

William Lewis Madison. 

Samuel Culbertson Madison. 

George Byrn Meigs. 

Thomas Adams Miami. 

John Reynolds Muskingum. 

Isaac Osbom Richland. ' 

Jeremiah Everett , Sandusky. 

Charles B. Fitch Sanduskv. 

Thomas Hufford Stark. 

Henry Laffer Tuscarawas. 

William Rayen. . . . , Trumbull. 

John Patton Wayne. 



ELECTED FEBRUARY 4, 1822. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Robert Mori son Adams. 

Josiah Mc Kinney Delaware. 

Wm. S. Drake Delaware. 

Edward Livingston .Franklin. 

David Huston Greene. 

Nathaniel Davidson Lawrence 

■ Robert Smith Logan. 

John Arbuckle Madison. 

Asa Coleman Miami. 

Isaae Atkinson. Monroe. 

Theophilus Minor Monroe. 

Humphrey Finch Monroe. 

Robert McConnell Muskingum. 

Enos Prather Pike. 

Levi Hodges Pike. 

Elias Harman. Portage. 

Alva Day Portage. 

Walter Buell Preble. . 

Henry Monfort Preble. 

Jacques Hubbert Sandusky. 

George Stidger Stark. 

Christian Deardorf. . Tuscarawas. 

James Curry Union. 

Daniel Hubble Wood. 



ELECTED JANUARY 11, 1823. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

George Tod .Third. 

Jeremiah H. Halleck Fifth. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGE. 

Name. County. 

Samuel R. Miller. . . . : Hamilton 

ELECTEL? jAN' - -,;^.Y ^2, i823. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Alexander Armstrong Belmont. 

Robert Anderson Butler. 

William White Brown. 

John Kerr Franklin. 

Robert Safford. Gallia. 

John Holcomb Gallia. 

Geo. W. Barrare.. . . . . .Highland. 

Jos. Swearingen Highland . 

Robert S. Southgate .Huron. 

Hugh Poor . Jackson. 

Wm. Givens Jackson . 

Noah M. Brunson Medina. 

Abel Larkin Meigs. 

Peter Grow • • : • .Meigs. 

Wm. Dawes Morgan. 

Daniel Fulton . Morgan. 

Thomas I. James . Muskingum. 

John Hollister Wood. 

Wm. Pratt .Wood. 

Walter CouHer. .......... .Wood. 

ELECTED SESSION OF 1824. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Alexander Livingston Adams. 

Amos Kellogg Ashtabula. 

John Riley. '. Belmont. 

Edward Bryson Belmont. 

Henry Weavea Butler. 

Robert Taylor Butler. 

John Beatty Clermont. 

Alex. Blair Clermont. 

John Pollock Clermont. 

James Dakin .Clinton. 

Aaron Sewell Clinton. 

Jesse Hughes Clinton. 



700 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



1 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1824r— 

Concluded. 

Name. County. 

A. R. Colwell Champaign. 

Jno. J. Bowman Columbiana. 

George Endling Columbiana. 

Thos. Creighton Columbiana. 

Henry M. Mote Coshocton. 

Henry Grim Coshocton. 

Isaac M. Morgan Cuyahoga. 

Enos Terry Darke. 

James Rush Darke. 

John Briggs Darke 

Aaron Buttles Franklin. 

Samuel G. Flenniken Franklin. 

Joseph S. Gillispie Fayette. 

Wade Loofborrow Fa^'?***'. 

TnoS. McGa^lctii . .Fayette. 

Sam Kyle Greene. 

G«orge Metcalf Guernsey. 

Wm. Frame Guernsey. 

Elijah Beale Guernsey. 

Patrick Smith Hamilton. 

Ezra Sprague Huron. 

James Wilson ..Jefferson. 

Alexander Anderson Jefferson. 

Elijah Frampton Lawrence. 

Wm. Miller , . . Lawrence. 

Samuel Bancroft Licking 

Alex. Holmes Licking. 

Henry Brown Lorain. 

Moses Eldred Lorain. 

Fred K. Hamlin Lorain. 

Greorge Linson Madison. 

D. H. Beardsley Marion. 

Wm. Holmes. .\ Marion. 

John Greave Mercer. 

Nathaniel Low Mercer. 

Jas. Walcutt Mercer. 

Isaac S,>inning Montgomery 

Philip Gunckel Montgomery. 

Thos. Barr Pickway. 

Wm. Florence Pickaway. 

David Kinnear Pickaway 

Presley Moiris Ross. 

James McClintock Ross. 

Matthew Clark Seneca. 

Wm. Cornell Seneca. 

Jno. Hulbert Seneca. 

David Mitchell Scioto. 

Wm. Powers Scioto. 

Thomas Cummings Tuscarawas. 

Willis Pearson Warren. 

George Homsberger Warren. 

Jacob Idlman Warren. ^ 

Geo. Keisling Warren. 

Dudley Woodbridge Washington. 

W. Curtis Washington. 

Enaxmander Warner Washington. 

Henry P. Wilcox Washington. 

Wm. Goodfellow Wayne. 

Pearce Evans Williams. . 

John Perkins Williams. 

Robert Shirley Williams. 

Robert Forsythe Wood. 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1825. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name County. 

Titus Hays Ashtabula. 

Thomas Smith Ashtabula. 

Robert Linzie Athens. 

Josiah Dillon Belmont. 

Wm. Anderson Brown. 

Robert Brackenbridge Brown. . 

James Finalay Brown. 

Samuel Holt. : Champaign. 

Joseph Layton Clark. 

Daniel McKinnon. Clark. 

Ira Pag-e . . .Ci"-!: 

Nchcn;^L .ililoi^. Cuyahoga 

David Prince Delaware. 

Benj. M. Pratt Hamilton. 

Joseph Bingham Harrison. 

Jacob D. Lutz Hocking. 

Joseph Whipple Hocking. 

George Luke Holmes. . 

Peter Casey Holmes. . 

Wm. Hutchinson Holmes. 

David Paine Jackson. 

William O'Bannion: Licking. 

Levi Garwood Logan 

Frederick Brown Medina. 

John French Medina. 

James Greer Mercer. 

Thomas Scott Mercer. 

Amos B. Jones Monroe. 

Enoch B. Merriman.. Marion. 

Thomas Davis Perry. 

Charles C. Hood Perry. 

William Hampton Pike. 

Samuel Reed Pike. 

John Bailhache Ross. 

James Justice Sandusky. 

Joel Strawn Sandusky. 

John Collins : Scioto. 

Nicholas Neighbor Tuscarawas. 

John Cotton Washington. 



ELECTED JANUARY 27, 1826. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. Coimty. 

Jonathan Gregory Ashtabula. 

Edmund Dow Athens. 

Mordecai Chalfant. : Coshocton. 

John B. French Crawford. 

Enoch B. Merriman Crawford. 

John Carey Crawford. 

David Purviance Darke. 

Joseph Jones Fayette. ' 

John Clark Greene. 

David Tullis Guernsey. 

David Campbell Harrison. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



701 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED JANUARY 27, 1826— 
Concluded. 

Name. County. 

John Boyd Highland. 

John Manning Mercer. 

Francis Scott Morgan. 

Benjamin Maltby Montgomery. 

Robert Mitchell Muskmgum. 

Everet Richman Perry. 

Peter Vanansdal Preble. 

David Henry Shelby. 

John Huston Shelby. 

John Lenox Shelby. 

Leicester King TrumbulL 

Henry Laffler. . . Tuscarawas. 

Robert Nelson UniCi.. 

Michael H. Johnson Warren. 

Hezekiah BisseU Wayne. 

Frederick Crippen Wayne. 



ELECTED JANUARY 22, 1827. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. * 

Elijah Hatch Athens. 

Daniel MiUiken . . , . : Butler. . 

William Runkle : Champaign. 

William Fithian Champaign. 

James Smith Champaign. 

Jacob Smith Crawford. 

George Adams Darke 

James B. Webster: Fayette. 

John Hubbard Geauga. 

Asa Cowle; Geauga. 

Daniel Kex-r Geauga. 

Enos Woodruff Hamilton 

John McCuUoch Harrison. 

Benjamin Beadle Hocking. 

James McGibney Knox. 

Abner Ayres Knox. 

Anthony Banning Ejaox. 

Nathaniel Pritchard.. , :. . . .Lawrence. 

Isaac Houseman Madison. 

Alson Norton Marion. 

Wdham B. Hedges Mercer. 

John Wilson : Miami. 

James Fenner Miami. 

James Steele Montgomery. 

Elkanha Richardson Portage. 

John Barnes : Pike. 

William Patterson R chland. 

W. M. Riddle : Richland.i 

Elisha W. Howland Sandusky. 

William Oldfield Scioto. 

Wdliam Christmas Stark. 

James Clark Stark. 

James Curry Union 

William Gabriel Union. 



ELECTED JANUARY, 1828. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

John Kincaid Adams. 

John Knox Butler. 

Thomas Johnson Coshocton. 

Samuel Williamson Cuyahoga. 

Jacob N. Deitrick Fairfield. 

Thomas Rogers Gallia. 

Wdliam Skinner Guernsey. 

Turner G. Brown Guernsey. 

Peter Bell Hamilton. 

Ebenezer Hancock Hancock. 

WiUiam Kinnis. : Hancock.^. . 

Abrahnm Huff Hancock.. 

A tiXiOOxAr .A-^ci-.-^.-w.. . . ........ ^ rxV' ■ 

James Stephenson : Jackson. 

James McPherson. . . : Logan. 

Neil Nye Meigs. 

Thomas Adams Miami. 

Edwin Putnam Muskingum. 

Isaac Osborn Richland. 

John Kryder Stark. 

EM Baldwin Trumbull. 

Ambrose Rice Wood. 



ELECTED JANUARY, 1829. 



PRESIDENT JUDGES. 



Name. 



Circuit. 



George B. Holt First. 

Alexander Harper Fourth. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Robert Morrison.. : Adams. 

Abel Carev : Crawford. 

William S. Drake Delaware. 

Hosea Williams Delaware. 

William McElvaine Franklin. 

David Boggs Gallia. 

David Huston Greene. 

John McBean Harrison. 

Thomas George.. . : Jefferson. 

Reuben Kelley. : Lawrence. 

William Taylor. : Licking. 

Robert Smith. : Logan. 

John Arbuckle Madison. 

Theophilus Miner Monroe. 

George P. Depeyster. : Portage. 

Elias Harmon Portage. 

James McClung. . . : Preble. 

Simuel Lizziard Preble. 

Samuel Swearingen Ross. 

Joseph Hostetter Stark. 

Amos Williams Union. 

Benjamin Leavel: Williams. 

Elisha Scribner *. . . .Williams. 



1 



702 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED JANURY, 1830. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 



Name. 



Circuit. 



Reuben Wood .Third. 

Jeremiah Hallock Fifth. 

Frederick Grimke Sixth. 



ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

George Sharp Belmont. 

Joel Collins Butler. 

Jnaior^ Tlo'-'^rt'-vn . * '.-avvford. 

John Holcomb Gallia. 

Moses Patterson Highland. 

John Matthews Highland 

John Wright, Jr Hocking. 

Frederick N. Fowler Huron. 

John James Jackson. 

Isaac E. James Marion. 

Robert Smith. : Medina. 

Abel Larkin.. . : Meigs. 

John Armstrong. , Mercer. 

Joseph C. Lynn. . . . : Morgan. 

Robert McConnell Morgan. 

David McGarey Morgan. 

Matthew McElhenney Muskingum. 

Benjamin Daniels.. Pike. 

John Denny Preble. 

Samuel Crull Scioto 

Joseph Barker Washington. 

Freeman Evans Williams. 

William Preston Williams. 

Aaron SpoiTord. . : Wood. 

James Wolcott Wood. 



ELECTED JANUARY, 183L 
» 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

James Crozier, Jr Allen. 

William Watt. . : Allen. 

Christopher Wood ^. . .Allen. 

Jame Alexander, Jr Belmont. 

David Johnson Brown. 

Obediah Horr Champaign. 

Robert HajTies Clermont. 

John Pollock. : Clermont. 

Israel Whittaker.. . : Clermont. 

James Daken Clinton. 

Jesse Hughes Clinton. 

Aaron Sewell Clinton. 

Watrous Usher Cuyahoga. 

James Rush.. . :.^ Darke. 

Jacob Jameson Fayette. 



Name. County. 

Aurora Buttles Franklin. 

Samuel G. Flennicken Franklin. 

Samuel Kyle Greene. 

Henry H. Wilcoxen . Huron. 

Herman Ely Lorain. 

Josiah Harris : Lorain. 

Eber W. Hubbard .Lorain 

George Linson Madison. 

Sanford S. Bennet . : Marion. 

Henry Hippie Montgomery. 

Jeremiah Hollister Monroe. 

James Wilson Perry. 

Isaac Cook Ross. 

James McClintock Ross. 

Benjamin Pittinger : Seneca. 

Jacques Hulbert Seneca. 

Selden Greaves Seneca. 

Richard Hayes Trumbull. 

Thomas Cummings Tuscarawas 

Ignatius Brown Warren. s 

Myllys Pierson : Warren. 

Walter Curies Washington. 

James Robinson Wayne. 

C. Parker Paine Williams. 

Robert Shirley : Wilhams. 

William Bigger Wood. 



ELECTED JANUARY, 1832. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Luther Spelman Ashtabula. 

Robert Brackenridge Brown. 

Hugh B. Pa\^le. Brown. 

Daniel McKinndn .Clark. 

James Perrin Clark. 

John Emery Clermont. 

Simeon Fuller Cuyahoga. 

Ezra Griswold Delaware. 

Will.am Thompson Guernsey. 

Thomas Bingham Harrison. 

Thomas Shane Holmes. 

Thomas Liggett Holmes 

Seth Hunt Holmes. 

John Turk Huron. 

David Mitchell Jackson. 

James Wilson Jefferson. 

Wm. O'Bannion Licking. 

Levi Garwood Logan. 

John Newton Medina. 

John Linn Medina. 

Allen Pardee Medina. 

Joseph Greer Mercer. 

Amos B. Jones Monroe. 

John Lmn Monroe. 

Will.am McClure Perry. 

Thomas King : Perr>\ 

WiHiam Hampton Pike. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



703 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED JANUARY, 

Concluded. 



1832- 



Name. County. 

Samuel Reed Pike. 

Henry Moufort Preble. 

James Justice Sandusky. 

Luther Porter . .Sandusky. 

William Givens Scioto. 

Agreen Ingraham Seneca. 

William Heniy Stark. 

Peter Williams Tuscarawas. 

John Cotton Washington. 



ELECTED JANUARY, 1833. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Greuit. 

Matthew Birchard Third. 

Thomas Irwin Eighth. 

John W. Goodenow Ninth. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Ashbel Dart Ashtabula. 

George Poe Crawford. 

David Ewing Fairfield. 

James Carothers Fayette. 

Joseph Fletcher GaUia. 

Wm. McCloud Hardin. 

Solomon Goss. . : Hardin. 

Joseph Dowdell.. Harrison. 

Hugh Smart : Highland. 

John Manning Mercer. 

William Blockson. . : Muskingum. 

Benjamin Jackson Richland. 

Robert Price Trumbull. 

Reason Pritchard Tuscarawas, 

Robert Nelson : Union. 

Michael H. Johnson W^arren. 



^ ELECTED J.AN'UARY, 1834. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

John W. Price Tenth. 

Ezra Dean Eleventh. 

Joseph R. Swan Twelth. 

Samson Mason Twelfth. 

Noah H. SwajTie Twelfth. 



ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Daniel Milliken Butler. 

Ehsha E. Berry Champaign. 

David Markley Champaign. 

James Sharp Fayette. 

Stewart Spear .Guernsey. 

John Burgoyne Hamilton. 

James E. Huston Hardin. 

Robert Maxwell. : . .Harrison. 

Abner Ayres . : Knox. 

James Elliott Knox. 

Eli MiUer Knox. 

Nathaniel Davison Lawrence 

Francis Wells Lorain. 

Thomas J. Anderson Marion. 

Stacy Taylor Mercer, 

Benjamin Ayres . . : Miami. 

Francis Johnston Miami. 

Thomas Winters .Miami. 

Thomas Winters Montgomery. 

Charles Summer Portage. 

Wm, Cochran . : Putnam. 

Henry Morris Putnam. 

Silas McClish Putnam. 

Daniel J. Swinney Richland. 

Jacob Nyse Sandusky. 

Joseph Moore Scioto. 

Harmon Stidger. Stark. 



ELECTED JANUARY, 1835. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. . Circuit. 

David K. Este Ninth. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name' County. 

Joseph Eylar Adams. 

Squire -Litt ell Butler. 

Thomas Johnston Coshocton. 

James L. Retilley Coshocton. 

Hugh Welch Crawford 

Josiah Barber Cuyahoga. 

Joseph Stuckey Fairfield. 

Thomas Rogers Gallia. 

Turner G. Bro^^'n Guernsey. 

Wm. Skinner Guernsey 

John Baldwin Hancock. 

Ebenezer Wilson Hancock. 

Proteus AVheeler Hardin. 

David J. Carey ' Henry. 

Pierce Evans Henry. 

Reuben Wright . Henr>'. 

Timothy Baker .' Huron. 



704 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED JANUARY, 1835— Concluded 
Name. County. 

Moses Farwell Huron. 

Robert C. Strothers Huron. 

Reuben Culvers Hocking. 

Samuel Culbertson Holmes. 

James Stephenson Jackson. 

Charles McCoy Lawrence. 

Abraham Elder Logan. 

Abner Snoddy Logan. 

Ozias Lang Lorain. 

Orson M. Oviatt Medma. 

Henry L. Osborn Meigs. 

Wm. Wilson Miami. 

Edwin Putnam Muskingum. 

Robert Martin.. . "'^^"ble. 

r^icuAcio Aiidicw'S. nichland. 

Eleazer Abbott Union. 

John Hart Warren. 

James Cowen Warren. 



ELECTED JANUARY. 1836. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

Benjamin Hinkson First. 

Corrmgton W. Searles Fourth 

John H. Keith Sixth. 

Wm. L. Helfenstien Seventh. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

David C. Vance Adams. 

James Campbell Belmont. 

Fergus Anderson Butler. 

Samuel Knisely Crawford. 

Andrew Taylor Crawford. 

John Brundage Delaware. 

John Lugenbeel Delaware . 

Adam Read Franklin. 

Daniel Martin Greene. 

Wdliam Roller Hancock. 

Albert Patterson Harrison. 

Robert D. Selley H ghland. 

James Dempsey Jackson. 

John S. Cook Jefferson. 

Reuben Kelly Lawrence. 

WiU.am Taylor : . . .L.cking. 

Nathan Bend Madison. 

Robert L nzee. , Mercer. 

Charles Campbell Perry. 

John Hines Pike. 

George Corwin Pike. 

Ira Selby Portage. 

Jacob Lewis Portage. 

Peter Loutzenheiser. Stark. 

Israel S. Lappin Tuscarawas. 

James W. GillespiOl% Williams. 

WilUam Fowler Wood. 



ELECTED JANUARY, 1837. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

Van R. Humphrey Third. 

George W. Belden Fifth. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Benjamin Evans Brown. 

Charles Flago Champaign. 

James Dallas Champaign. 

Jno. Taylor, Jr Champaign. 

George McMahan , Clermont. 

Samuel Hill Clermont. 

Morris R. Crew Clinton . 

Abraham Howe Clinton. 

Wm. Armstrong Columbiana. 

Anderson H. Hughes Gallia. 

Robert Armstrong Galla. 

John Wright, Jr Hocking. 

Benjamin Summers. Huron. 

John Baldwin Lucas , 

George Gray Marion. 

Philo Welton Medina. 

Allen V. Mudbury Mercer. 

John C. Bestow Meigs. 

Erastus Haskins Morgan. 

Robert McConneU Morgan. 

Jos. D. L.nn Morgan. 

George Ollmger Montgomery. 

James Jeffenes Muskingum. 

Richard H. Tomlin Scioto. 

Jacob M.ller Stark. 

Jos. Darker, Sr Washington. 

Foreman Evans W.lliams. 

Aurora Spofford Wood. 



ELECTED JANUARY, 1838. 

PRESIDENT JUDGE. 

Name. Circuit. 

Ozias Brown Second. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Joseph Hoover Allen. 

Charles Levering Allen. 

John Jam.son Allen. . 

James M. Bloss Ashtabula. 

George Walker Athens. 

William C. Kirker Belmont. 

John R. Lemon Clark. 

Wm. G. Serviss Clark. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



705 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED JANUARY, 1838-€oncluded 

Name. County. 

Elijah Larkin Clermont. 

George McMannis Clinton. 

George Endley Columbiana. 

Daniel Harbaugh Columbiana. 

Daniel Warren Cuyahoga. 

Frederick Whittlesey Cuyahoga. 

John Graybill Fairfield. 

Joel F. Bereman Fayette. 

Christian Heyl FrankUn. 

Henry Moore Hamilton. 

Thomas Vaughn Jackson. 

Samuel Bancroft Licking. 

Daniel Johns Lorain. 

John Burdan Lucas. 

James Walcutt Lucas. 

Jeremiah Hollister Monroe. 

Joshua Brown Perry. 

Jacob Bonsor Ross. 

James McClintock, Sr Ross. 

Francis Freeman Trumbull. 

Oliver R. Lo\'ing Washington. 

George WeUhouse Wayne. 

Nathaniel P. Adams Williams. 

Benjamin Grifiin Williams. 

Joshua Watkins Williams. 

Abner Stacey Williams. 

Chas. C. Waterhouse Williams. 

David Ladd Wood. 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1839. 

PKESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

Nathaniel C. Read Ninth 

Emory D. Potter Thirteenth. 



ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Walter M. Blake Ashtabula. 

Jonathan Warner Ashtabula. 

Richard BroAvn Clark. 

Richard Ayres Hamilton 

Israel Brown Hamilton. 

John Hanna Harrison. 

Peter Croco Holmes. 

Jacob Vohres Holmes. 

Samuel McNary Jefferson. 

Richard C. Davis I^ox. 

Levi J. Haughey Licking. 

Joseph Robb Logan. 

Stephen M. Sergeant Medina 

David Hays Mercer. 

Robert Green Monroe. 

David Kirkbride Monroe. 



Name. County. 

John McGinley Perry. 

Nicholas H. Perry Perry. 

Isaac McCracken Putnam. 

Henry C. Bnsh Sandusky. 

Isaac Knapp Sandusky. 

George Overmeyer, Sr Sandusky. 

Abijah Batterson Scioto. 

John Cassill Union. 

Nicholas Hathaway Union. 

John Cotton Washington. 

James Colby Williams. 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1840. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

John E. Hanna Eighth. 

John W. Willey. Fourteenth. 

William Kennon. . .* Fifteenth 



ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 



Name. 



Countv. 



Micah Wood Brown. 

George Reynolds Carroll. 

Robert George Carroll. 

John Crawford Coshocton. 

George Adams Darke. 

James Hayes Darke. 

Newberry York Darke. 

David Ewing Fairfield. 

Jacob Jaraeson Fayette. 

Neri Wright Geauga. 

John P. Basley '. . Geauga. 

Jos. W. Brackett Geauga. 

Henry Adams Hardm . 

David Gocdin Green. 

Simeon Dunn Holmes. 

Thomas xirnold.. Huron. 

Frederick Sears Huron. 

Abijah Ives Jackson. 

George Burris Lake. 

William C. Matthews Lake. 

Zenas Blish Lake. 

Curtis Scovel Lawrence. 

Nathaniel Davison Lawrence. 

Gabiel Slaughter Logan. 

Isaac Jones ^[adison. 

John Bartram Marion. 

William Eyies Medina. 

Allen Pardee Medina. 

John Shelby Montgomeiy. 

William Cooper Muskingum. 

Samuel Holllnshead Ottawa. 

Robert Ivirk Ottawa. 

Galbreath Stewart Ottawa. 



45— B. A. 



^706 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1840— 
Concluded. 

Name. County. 

Jolin Hudson Paulding. 

Oilman C. Mudgett Paulding. 

Charles McAllister Pike. 

Jeremiah Moult on .Portage. 

David R. Paige Portage. 

Peter Shideler Preble. 

Jesse Edgerton Richland. 

Tighlman Rittenhouse. ...Ross. 

Robert K. Dubios Summit. 

Charles Summer Summit. 

Hu^h R. Caldwell Summit. 

William R,rter • . .TiumLull. 

Isaac N. Roberts Tuscarawas. 

Silas Strong Union. 

Joseph Gleason Van Wert. 

Reuben James .Williams. 

Christopher Stroule Williams. 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1841. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

Owen T. Fishback Tenth. 

Jacob Parker Eleventh. 

Joseph R. Swan Twelfth. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Isaac Barker Athens. 

Nehemiah Wade Butler. ' 

James O'Connor Butler. 

Elish C. Berry Champaign. 

John Hunt Clark. 

Robert Crav.ford Coshocton. 

James Carothers Fayette. 

Robert Marshall Guernsey. 

Conrad W. Shaw Hardin. 

Thomas Lee Harrison. 

Samuel Morehead Harrison. 

Alexander Craig Henry. 

WiUiam Bevans ,Knox. 

Isaac N. Richardson Knox. 

Thomaii J. Anderson Marion. 

Jno. C. Winans Miami. 

Moses G. Mitchr.i Miami. 

James Steel Montgomery. 

Charles G. Swaine Montgomery. 

John Cox Putnam. 

Ferdinad C. Fitch Putnam. 

Alpheus Mclntyre Sandusky. 

Charles Mount.^ , .Van Wert. 

William D. Haymaker. . . . ; .Williams 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1842. 

PRESIDENT JUDGE. 

° Name. Circuit. 

Benjamin Bissell Fourteenth. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

James Eyler Adams. 

G. M. Hazen Belmont. 

William Wilkins Belmont. 

Jabab Roller Columbiana. 

Benjamin R. Shaw.. . Coshocton. 

Hugh Welch Crawford. 

Asher M. Coe . .Cuyahoga. 

Joseph Stuckey. . . Fairfield. 

Joseph W. Ross Gallia. 

Robert Reed Guernsey . 

Zadoc Davis Guernsey. 

John E^ing Hancock. 

Jonathan Cessna Hardin. 

Albert V. Stebbins Henry. 

Henry Leonard Henry. 

Eli Barker Hocking. 

James Spencer Hocking. 

Albert G. Sutton Huron. 

Asa Dudley Jackson. 

Daniel Martin Licking. 

William Hoge Logan. 

Joseph L. Whilton Lorain. 

Alviah Hibbard Lucas . 

Francis L. Nichols Lucas. 

Jacob Gerard Madison. ' 

J. L. Hinman Medina. 

William Ledlie Meigs. 

John Smeltzer Miami. 

William Durbin Morgan. 

Jesse W. Stone Morgan. 

Jacob P. Springer Muskingum. 

John Heck Perry. 

Samuel Reed Pike. 

Robert Martin Preble. 

Silas McClish Putnam . 

Francis Andrews Richland. 

John Church Trumbull. 

James R, Smith Union. 

Daniel Grain Warren. 

Richard Parcell Warren. 

Jonathan B. Taylor Williams. 



ELECTED AUGUST 6, 1842. 

PRESIDENT JCEOE, 

Name. . Circuit. 

William B. CaldweU Ninth. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



707 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas, 



ELECTED AUGUST 6, 1842— Concluded 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

John Sherman Ashtabula. 

Benfamin F. Avery Geauga. 

Robert Moore Hamilton. 

Luke Draper Lucas. 

William Gill Pickaway. 

Hugh Gambel Richland. 

Juo. W. Green Wood Stark. 

Christian Myers Union. 

Sunaner Knight Wood. 

Guy Morgan Wood. 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1842-3. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 



Name. 



Circuit. 



George B. Holt First. 

Corrington W. Searles Fourth. 

John H. Keith Sixth. 

EUjah Vance Seventh. 



ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

William Robbins Adams. 

Jesse Barton Belmont. 

Andrew Failor ; . . Crawford 

Samuel Knisely Crawford. 

Marshall L. Griffin .Delaware. 

William G. Norris Delaware. 

William McClung Fairfield. 

George Luce Greene. 

William Roller Hancock, 

Robert D. Lilley Highland. 

Frederick Sears Huron. 

Ezra Stewart Huron. 

William McDonald Jefferson. 

Benjamin Johnson Lawrence. 

Benjamin F. Ulyers Licking. 

WilUam T. Rowe Madison. 

Robert Lingee Mercer. 

Nathan Sales Paulding. 

Jonathan Foster Portage. 

Thomas B. Selby Portage. 

Andrew Lugeunbeel Seneca. 

Isaac H. Bracken Shelby. 

James S. Kelly Stark. 

Samuel Schrantz Stark. 

Israel S. Lappin. Tuscarawas, 

Jacob Hines. Van Wert. 

Thomas Kent , Williams. 

Francis Caruthers Wood. 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1844.- 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

Eben Newton Third.. 

John Pierce Fifths . / 

Myron H. Tilden Thirteenth. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. . - County.. 

Joseph Stableton Brown. 

James Dallas Champaign. 

John Owens Oii£mp?:gr 

John Beatty Clermont 

Thomas Sheldon Clermont. 

Jesse Hughes, Jr Clinton. 

Isaac Thomburg Clinton. 

David F. Walker Clinton. 

John A. Lazell Franklin. . 

Moses R. Matthews Gallia. 

Daniel G. Whitton Gallia. 

John Powell Henry. 

John Eckman Highland. 

PhiHp W. Sparger Highland. 

David Johnson Hocking. 

Samuel Frey Marion. 

John L. Clark Medina. 

Samuel Bradbury Meigs. 

Henry L. Osbom Meigs. 

Allen V. Medbury Mercer. 

Amos Irwnn. : Montgomery. 

Elias Matthews Montgomery. 

James L. Gage Morgan. 

Horatio J. Cox! Muskingum.. 

William Palter Scioto. 

Samuel Gamble Shelby. 

John Tomlinson, . Van Wert. 

Joseph Barker Washington. 

ELECTED SESSION OF 1845. 
(December 5, 1844.) 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

Ozias BrowTi Second. 

Patrick G. Goode Sixteenth. 



ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Robert A. Fulton Athens. 

John Kay Brown. 

Henry Martin Brown. 



7Q8 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



1 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1845— 
Concluded. 

Name. County. 

Thomas Cummings Carroll. 

John Ebersole Carroll. 

John R. Lemon Clark. 

William G. Services Clark. 

Elijah Larkin Clermont. 

Robert Morrison Clermont. 

Robert Musgrove Crawford. 

Thomas M. Kelly Cuyahoga, 

Andrew C. Bigelow Defiance. 

William O. Ensign Defiance. 

Samuel S. Gear Defiance. 

Moors FanN'ell Erie. 

Josiah Tracy Erie. 

John W. Brooks Erie. 

George W. Choate Erie. 

Gideon Martin Fairfield. 

Daniel McLean Fayette. 

Christian Heyl Franklin. 

John Landes Franklin. 

Daniel Martin Greene. 

John A. Wiseman Hamilton. 

Thomas Vaughn Jackson. 

John T. Leslie Jefferson. 

Benjamin W. Brice Licking. 

Daniel T. Baldwin Lorain. 

Henry Reed Lucas. 

John Thrasher Lucas. 

James Wilkinson Lucas. 

Patrick McLene Madison. 

John M. Parks Mercer. 

William Barbee Miami. 

Michael Cassady Montgomery. 

Ezekiel Rice Ottawa. 

William B. ThraU Pickaway. 

John E. Van Meter Pickaway! 

William Hall Preble. 

Ohver Lo\'ing Ross. 

Thomas Orr Ross. 

Owens T. Reves Ross. 

William ToU Seneca. 

Henry Ebert Seneca. 

Frederick Kinsman Trumbull. 

Samuel U. Bissell Wayne. 

Payne C. Parker Williams. 

Benjamin Olney Wood. 

George W. Leith Wyandot. 

William Brown Wyandot. 



ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. / County. 

Edmund Ingmand Ashland. 

John P. Resnor.. Ashland. 

George H. Stewart .Ashland. 

Lynde Jones Ashtabula. 

Samuel Elliott Coshocton. 

James S. Greer Defiance. 

Almon Stark Delaware. 

Charles Standart Erie. 

David Aikin Geauga. 

James Saffin Hamilton. 

Daniel Baldwin Hardin. 

James Maxwell. .- Harrison. 

Edward Hall Holmes. 

Set. A. llunt ilulincs. 

John Cooke Jefferson. 

William McCreary Knox. 

Noah Z. McColloch Logan. 

Samuel Bingham Mahoning. 

James Brownlee Mahoning. 

Charles Castle Medina. 

Justin Hamilton Mercer. 

David Simpson Mercer. 

John Davenport Monroe. 

Thomas Weston Monroe. 

David Marian Ottawa. 

Joseph G. Wiseman.. Perry. 

Patrick McDonald. .Perry. 

Robert Shirley '. . .Paulding. 

James Gardner Preble. 

George S. Kiner Putnam. 

Jonathan A. Sackett Putnam. 

Allen G. Miller Richland. 

Frederick Chapman Sandusky. 

Jesse S. Olmstead Sandusky. 

Edward Cranston Scioto. 

Hardesty Wa\ker Shelby. 

James R. Foid Summit. 

Sylvester S. Thomas Summit. 

James Hazlitt Stark. 

Asa R. Haines, Jr. ...:.. .Trumbull. 

Edward Spear Trumbull. 

James Patrick Tuscarawas. 

James Cowan Warren. 

James Wallace Washington, 

John Colton Washington. 

Abner Ayres Williams. 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1846. 

PRESIDENT JUDGE. 

Name. . Circuit. 

James^L. Horbect.. Twelfth. 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1847. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

Benjamin F. Wade Third. 

Richard StiUwell Fourth. 

Arius Nye Eighth. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



709 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas, 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1847— 
Concluded. 

ASSOaATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Chester Stow Ashtabula. 

Isaac Curey Brown. 

Jeremiah Marston Butler. 

John S. Hunter Carroll. 

John Dellenbaugh Columbiana. 

James Le Retilley Coshocton. 

John Armstrong Darke. 

Josiah D. Fairer , Darke. 

Thos. C. Brawley Darke. 

James Manary Fayette. 

Lester Taylor Geauga. 

John P. Powers Geauga. 

John Darnell Holmes. 

William W. Branch Lake. 

Aaron Wilcox Lake. 

Jonathan Lapham Lake. 

Andrew Dempsey Lawrence. 

Salmon Reckard^ Lawrence. 

William H. McKinnon Logan. 

Henry Hosmer Medina. 

Josiah Piper Medina. 

Nathaniel Sheperd Morgan. 

Jonathan W. Smith Ottawa. 

Mathew McCrea Pickaway. 

Robert W. McClean Pike. 

George Porter Pike. 

Isaac Swift Portage. 

Joseph Blacker Ross. 

John Hoy Summit. 

Levi Phelps Union. 

Bial Stedman Washington. 

Neal McCoy Wayne. 

Smith Orr Wayne. 



Name. County. 

Nehemiah Wade Butler. 

William Patrick .Champaign. 

Abraham D. Mereness Clark. 

Zalunma Phelps Erie. 

John M. Tubbs Erie. 

James Crothers Fayette. 

Robert Marshall Guernsey. 

William Boggs Harrison. 

William McFarland Harrison. 

Amos Cole Henry. 

Reuben Culver Hocking. 

Frederick Wickham Huron. 

Benjamin H. Taylor Knox. 

Neeto Harris Lake. 

WillipTTi Hunter .Licking. 

Peter Kelly Logan. 

George Sibley Lorain 

Benj. Perkins Lorain. 

Thomas Jones Madison. 

John Merrill Marion. 

Thos. J. Anderson .Marion. 

William McDaniel Mercer. 

Moses G. Mitchell Miami. 

David H. Morris Miami. 

Charles G. Swain Montgomery. 

Ensch B. Kinsel Morgan. 

Richard House Morgan. 

Stephen T. Cunard Morgan. 

Wallace W. Bierce Pickaway. 

Alex. Barr Richland. 

Alpheus Mclntyre Sandusky. 

John Zimmerman Seneca. 

Samuel CruU Scioto. 

Levi Phelps Union. 

Absolam Brey Van Wert. 

Wm. R. Putnam, Jr Washington. 

Nathaniel P. Blinn Wood. 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1848. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1849. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 



Name. 



Circuit. 



George Collins Tenth. 

Levi Cox .Eleventh. 

William V. Peck Seventeenth. 

George B. Way Eighteenth. 



Charles H. Brough Ninth. 

Philemon Bliss Fourteenth. 



ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 



ASSOCTATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. 

Daniel W. Brown Ashland. 

Isaac Barker i^thens. 

George W. Holbrook Auglaize. 

John McLean Auglaize. 

David Simpson Auglaize. 

Charles K. Smith Butler. 



Name. County. 

Thomas Foster Adams. 

Thos. G. Lockhart Adams. 

John C. Meyers Ashland. 

William Walters Belmont. 

William Wilkins Belmont. 

Benjamin R. Shaw Coshocton. 

Robert Lee Crawford . 

Quintius F. Ackins Cuyahoga. 



710 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED SESSION OFil849r- 
CJoncluded. 

. Name. County. 

Bfinj. Northup Cuyahoga. 

Elias Perry. Fairfield. 

John W. Ross .Gallia. . 

Barton F. Aveiy Geauga. 

.William Mills Greene. 

Zadoc Davis Guernsey. 

Robert Reed Guernsey. 

Robert Moore Hamilton. 

Michael Price Hancock. 

John Cooper Hancoc. 

John Goodin Hardin. 

Samuel B. Jones Henry. 

Robert Wright Hocking. 

Patrick Murdock Jackson. 

David Robb Logan. 

William Day Lorain. 

William McAboy .Meigs. 

George W. Radebaugh ^Mercer. 

Oliver H. Kiser Morgan. 

Alex. McConnell Morgan. 

Jacob P. Springer Muskingum. 

George Kistler Perry. 

Sooy Smith Pickaway. 

Charles McClloister Pike. 

John W. Walters Putnam. 

Ezekial Chew Richland. 

David McColloch Richland. 

Thomas Blackburn Stark. 

James R. Smith Union. 

Wm. W. Wood Union. 

James Swart .Wayne. 

Rezin B. Edwards Warren 

Richard Parcell Warren. 

William'M. Stubbs Williams. 



ELECTED SESSIOH OF 1850. 

PRESIDENT JUDUES' 



Name. 



Circuit. 



John Beers First. 

Henry C. Whitman. Sixth. 

John Probasco, Jr Seventh. 

Robert B. Warden Ninth. 

James Stewart Nineteenth. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

Name. County. . 

Robert McMaster. ........ .Belmont. 

John Trabor , Butler. 

James W. Laughlin Carroll. 

Oliver Clark Clark. 

Jame? Stewart .... . . . . ." . . .Crawford 

Caleb Howard Delaware. 



-Name. County. 

• 

Frederick Avery Delaware. 

Wm. McClung Fairfield. 

Sdcrates H. Cately Fulton. 

Alfred C. Hough Fulton. 

John Kendall Fulton. 

Nathaniel Leggett Fulton. 

Franklin Carel. Gallia. 

Daniel Campbell Hardin. 

John Duval, Sr. Highland. 

Samuel Foot. .' Huron. 

Seth C. Parker. Huron. 

Samuel D. Hunter Jefferson. 

Eber D. Howe Lake, 

Benj. Johnson Lawrence. 

John Newton ,..'.... J ,fi-wT^r\ce. 

Elizur Abbott Licking. . 

Edward Fitzgerald. ........ Madison. 

John W. Simpkins Madison. 

Fletcher W. Pratt .Madison. 

Robert P.^Brown. Montgbmery. 

Jacob D. Lutz. Pickaway. 

John Sharp Pike. 

Thomas Daugherty Pike. 

Isaac Brayton Portage. 

Luther L. Brown Portage. 

Samuel Haff ord Sandusky. 

Jacob P. Noel. ............ Scioto. 

Joseph Cummins. Shelby. 

Andrew Lugenbeel Seneca. 

Peter Loutzenheiser Stark. 

Peter Vorhes Summit. 

Jacob G. WiU .Vinton. 

Jarius Curtis Wood. 

Hugh Welch .Wyandot. 

ELECTED SESSION OF ,1851. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Name. Circuit. 

John Pierce Fifth. 

Archibald G. Brown Eighth. 

Ralph S. Hart Twentieth. 



, . , ASSOCIATE" JUDGES. 

, Name. County. 

William S. Denning Ashtabula. 

Nathan Roots Athens. 

Robert E. Carothers Belmont. 

Benjamin Seels Brown. 

Edward L. Morgan. Champaign. 

.John West .Champaign. 

John Buchanan. . Clermont. 

Jonathan Johnson. ....... .Clermont. 

.Tudson Jacqua. Darke. 

Nathan M. Landis.. Defiance. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 711 

Judges of the Courts of Common Pleas. 



ELECTED SESSION OF 1851— Name. County. 

Concluded. 

George N. Kemp Lawrence. 



i Name. County. Geo. M. Adams Lucas. 

Samuel Irey Marion. 

Samuel B. Caldwell Erie. Samuel Bradbury Meigs. !i 

James Beaty Fayette. Henry L. Osbom Meigs. !i 

William T. Martin Franklin. Amos Irwin Montgomery. | 

Abraham M. Flickinger. . . . Fulton. Horatio J. Cox Muskingum. { 

Moses R. Matthews Gallia. Joshua Robinson .Ross. | 

Robert Carter Gallia. Henry C. Birsch Seneca. f 

Levi Sampson Hancock. William A. Carey Shelby. | 

John Knapp Henry. Joseph Kaler Vinton. j! 

Nathaniel A. Delaplane Highland. David Richmond Vinton. | 

Thomas D. Barry .Highland. Joseph Barker Washington. 

David Dresback Hocking. Gilbert Beech Wood. 



1 



THE COURTS OF COMMON PLEAS SINCE 1851. 



THE Constitution of 1851 contained the following provisions by 
which the state was permanently subdivided into Common Pleas 
Districts, and these again divided into three subdistricts each, 
and the election of the Judges of these courts vested in the 
people of the subdivision instead of in the General Assembly as hereto- 
fore. ^ 

Article, 4, Scctioii S. The Stcice sliaii be aividea into nine Common Pleas 
Districts of which the county of Hamilton shall constitute one, of compact ter- 
ritory and bounded by county lines, and each of said districts, consisting of 
three or more counties, shall be subdivided into three parts of compact' terri- 
tory, and bounded by county lines, and as nearly equal in population as prac- 
ticable; in each of which one Judge of the Court of Common Pleas for said 
district, and residing therein, shall be elected by the electors of said sub- 
division. Courts of Common Pleas shall be held by one or more of these judges 
in every county in the district, as often as may be provided by law; and more 
than one court, or sitting thereof, may be held at the same time in each district. 

Artcile 4, Section 4. The jurisdiction of the Courts of Common Pleas, and 
of the Judges thereof, shall be fixed by law. (See Const. 1802, Art. Ill, §§3, 
4, 5, 6.) 

The first election for Judges under the new Constitution was held 
on the second Tuesday of October, 185 1. The term of the old Judges 
and Clerks was extended by Section 4 of the Schedule, to the 2d Mon- 
day of February, 1852, at which the new Judges began their tf^rms of 
office. . 



COMMON PLEAS DISTRICTS IN OHIO IN 1851, AS AT PRESENT 

CONSTITUTED. 

THE FIRST DISTRICT. THE THIRD DISTRICT. 



Hamilton County (no subdivision.)^ 



THE SECOND DISTRICT. 

Counties. Subdivison. 
Butler First. 



Counties. Subdivision. 

Shelby, Auglaize, Allen and 
Mercer First. 

Putnam and Henry Second. 

Defiance, Fulton, Paulding, 
Van Wert and Williams. .Third. 



THE FOURTH DISTRICT. 

Counties. Subdivision. 



Miami, Champaign, Preble, Lucas, Ottawa, Sandusky, 

Darke and Clark Second. Erie and Huron First. 

Montgomery", Warren, Clin- Lorain, Medina and Summit Second. 

ton and Greene Third. Cuyahoga Third. 

(712) 



; rtns »« tmrnmufk-m 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



713 



Common Pleas Districts in Ohio. 



THE FIFTH DISTRICT. 

Counties. Subdivision. 

Clermont and Brown First. 

Highland, Madison, Pick- 
away, Ross and Fayette. , Second. 
Franklin Third. 

THE SIXTH DISTRICT. 

Counties. Subdivision. 

Licking, Knox and Dela- 
ware First. 

laoxiovv, ni^^liland aAd Ash- 
land Second. 

Wayne, Holmes and Cos- 
hocton .Third. 

, THE SEVENTH DISTRICT. 

Counties. Subdivision. 

Pemr, Athens Monroe and 
Washington First. 

Fairfield, Gallia, Hocking, 

Meigs and Vinton Second. 

Adams, Jackson, Lawrence, 
Pike and Scioto Third. 



THE EIGHTH DISTRICT. 

Counties. Subdivision. 

Guernsey, Noble, Muskin- 
gum and Morgan First. 

Belmont Second. 

Jefferson, Harrison and Tus- 
carawas Third. 



THE NINTH DISTRICT. 

Counties. Subdivision. 

Stark, CarroU and Colum- 
biana First. 

Trumbull, Portage and Ma- 
honing Second, 

Geauga, Lake and Ashtabula Third. 



THE TENTH DISTRICT. 

Counties. Subdivision. 

Hancock, Hardin, Seneca, 
and Wood First. 

Crawford, Marion and Wy- 
andot Second. 

Logan and Union Third. 



714 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 185 1- 1906. 

JUDGES OF THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS, 1851-1901. 
First District. 



1 



Name of Judges. 



Residence. 



Term of Service. 



Avery, William L 

Bates, Clement 

Buchwalter, M. L 

Burnett, Jacob J. . , 

Carter, A. G. W 

Collins, Isaac 

Connor, John S 

Cox, Joseph 

Cross, Nelson » . . 

Davis, David 

Caldwell, Jno. A 

Evans, Charles 

Force, Manning F 

Harmon, Judson 

Headington, Nicholas, 

Howard, C 

Huston, Alexander B. 

Jelke, Ferdinand, Jr. . 

Johnston, Robert A. . 

Kumler, PhilH 

Littleford, WiUiam H 

Longworth, Nicholas. 

Mallon, Patrick 

Matthews, Stanley R. 
Matthews, Stanley. . . 

Matthews, Stanley. . . 

Maxwell, Samuel N. . 

Moore, Fred W 



Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cinc'Tinati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati . 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 



February, 1871. Resigned Octo- 
ber, 1884. 

December, 1888, to December, 
1898. 

February, 1882, to February 
1897. 

Noverrilicr, iC71. l^ Ibbruary, 
1882. 

February, 1852, to February, 1862 

October, 1859, (vice Oliver), to 
February, 1862. 

February, 1882, to February, 
1887. 

February, 1867, to February 
1882 

May, 1854 (vice Stallo), to Oc- 
tober, 1854. 

February, 1897, to February, 
1902. 

February, 1902, to February, 
1907. Incumbent. 

February, 1887, to February, 
1897. 

February, 1867, to February', 
1877. 

Commissioned October, 1875. Un- 
seated. 

February, 1862, to Februarv, 
1867. 

December, 1893, to December 
1903. 

October, 1884 (vice Avery), to 
February, 1887. 

February, 1897. Resigned Feb- 
ruary, 1901. 

November, 1876, to November, 
1886. 

February, 1887, to February-, 
1897. 

February, 1901, (vice Jelke). In- 
cumbent. 

February, 1877, to February', 
1882. 

February, 1857. 

February, 1884. 

January, 1852, Resigned com- 
mission. 

December, 1883, to December, 
1888 

February, 1882, to February, 
1892. 

December, 1878, to December, 
1883. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



715 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 185 1 -1906. 

Judges op the Court op Common Pleas — Continued. 
First District — Concluded. 



Name of Judges. 



Residence. 



Term of Ser^ce. 



Murdock, Charles C 

Murphy, John P 

Oliver, Melanchton W. . 

Oliver, Melanchton W. . 
Outcait, Miller 

Parker, James , 

Pfleger, Otto 

Piatt, Don 

Robertson, Charles D. . 

Sayler, John R 

Shroder, Jacob 

Smith, Fayette 

Smith, Samuel, Jr , 

Spiegel, Fred S , 

Stallo, John B 

Swing, James B 

Van Horn, Washington 
Warden, Robert B. . . . , 

Wilson, Moses F 

Woodruff, Edward 

Wright, D. Thew, Jr. . 



Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 
Oino5.«^HU. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 
Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 

Cincinnati. 



February, 1862, to February, 
1877. 

February, 1897. Incumbent. 

February, 1857. Resigned Octo- 
ber, 1859. 

February, 1862. 



Dev 



.hpr ■'SS^ *0 "'^^ 



rber. 



1893. 
May, 1854, (vice Woodruff). 
December, 1898. Incuinbent. 
April, 1852, (vice Warden), to 

October, 1852. 
December, 1883, to December, 

1888. 
February, 1892, to February, 

1897. 
February, 1887, to February, 

1892. 
December, 1878, to December, 

1883. 
February, 1897. Incumbent. 
February, 1897. Incumbent. 
February, 1852 (vice Matthews), 

Resigned May, 1854. 
December, 1903. Incumbent. 
October, 1854 [vice Cross. 
February, 1852. Resigned April 

1852. 
February, 1892, to February, 

1897. 
November, 1852 (vice Piatt). 

Resigned May, 1854. 
December, 1893, to December, 

1898. 



Second District. 



Name of Judges. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


AUen WiUiam . . . 




January, 1886 (vice Meeker), to 

February, 1867. 
May, 1903, to May, 1908. Incum- 


Allread, Jas. I 


Greenville 


Baldwin, William H 


bent. 
February, 1855 (vice Rogers), to 
October, 1855. 
IFebruary, 1874, to'February, 
1879. 


Barlow, Moses 


Xenia 







716 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



w 



Judges of the Cotirt^of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 

Judges op the Court op Common Pleas — Continued. 
Second District — Continued. 



Name of Judges. 


[Residence. 


Term of Service. 


Belden. Edsrar A 


Hamilton 


February, 1902, to February, 

1907. Incumbent. 
November, 1896, to November, 


Brown, Orrin Britt 


Dayton 


Bursress. Georsre D 


Trov 


1906. 
February, 1877. Died December, 

1877. 
Febniary, 1855 (vice; lla^xics), 

to October, 1857. 
May, 1893, to May, 1898. 
December, 1895, to February 8, 

1907. Incumbent. 
May, 1898. 

February, 1867. Died 1872. 
April, 1875, to May, 1890. 
February, 1892. Died September 

1895. 
July, 1896. 

July, 1886, to July, 1896. 
November, 1871, to November, 

1896. 
November, 1894, to November, 


Clark James 




Clark, John C 


Greenville 

Lebanon. '. 


Clark Milton . 


Cole, Henry M 


Greenville 


Corwin, Ichabod . . : 


Urbana \ 


Doan, Azariah W 


Wilmington 

Lebanon 


Dilatush, Walter A 


Dustin Charles W 


Dayton 


Dwver Dennis. 


Davton 


Elliott, Henderson 


Dayton 


Usher, Elam 


Eaton 


Fulton. R. C 


Urbana 


1909. Incumbent. 
December, 1872 (vice Corwin), to 

February, 1877. 
November, 1889, to November, 


Geiger, Levi 


Urbana....: 


Giffen, William S 


Hamilton 


1894. 
November, 1892 (vice Vande- 

veer.) 
liTay, 1879, to May, 1884. 
Iiovember, 1858 (vice Clark), to 


Gilmore, James A 


Eaton 


Gilmore, William J 


Eaton 


Gilmore, WiUiam J 


Eaton 


February, 1862. 

December, 1866. Resigned Jan- 
uary, 1875. 

Anril. 1875 


Goode, James S 




Hagan, Francis M 


Springfield 




Harlan, Robert B 




October, 1855 (vice Baldwin). 

February, 1852, to February, 
1857. 

February, 1852. Resigned Feb- 
ruary, 1855. 

February, 1879, to February, 
1889. 

November 1894. 


Hart, Ralph S. 




Hawes, James E 




Haynes, Abner 


Xenia 


Heiserman, C. Benjamin 


Urbana 


Hume, Alex. F 


Hamilton 

Hamilton 


January, 1860, to January, 1865. 
January, 1875 (vice Gilmore), to 

February, 1887. 
February, 1889. 
November 1896 to November 


Hume, Alex. F 


Jones, Walter D 


Pi qua 


Kumler, Alvin W 


Dayton 


Kyle, Charles H 


Xenia ... 


1906. Incumbent. 
February, 1905. 
May, 1868. Resigned October. 

1872. 


McKenny, John C 


Greenville 







♦Unexpired term, C. B. Heiserman,^resigned. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



717 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 

Judges of the Court op Common Pleas — Continued. 
Second District — Concluded. 



Name of Judges. 



Residence. 



Term of Service. 



Meeker, David L. 



Meeker, David L — 
Meeker, David L — 
♦Middleton, Evan P. 



Miller, John C. . 
Mower, Jacob K. 



Munger, Edward H. 



Neilan, John F. . . . 
O'NeaU, Joseph W. 



Parsons, Ebenezer. 

Pope, Leroy 

Rogers, William A. 
Runyan, J. A 



Savage, William W. . 

Sater, John W 

Scroggy, Thomas E. 

Sloan, Felix G 

Smith, George T.... 



Smith, Horace L. 
Smith, James M. 



Snediker, Edward T 

Stanley, George W , 

Sullivan, Theodore , 

Van Der Veer, Ferdinand . 

VanPeet, David B 

•Warnock, W. R 



White, Charles R. 
White, William.., 



WiUiams, Henry H. 

Wilson, John L 

Wilson, Waiiam M. 
Winans, James J. . , 
Wright, Calvin D.. 



Dayton. 



Dayton. . . 
Greenville. 
Urbana. . . 



Springfield . 
Springfield. 



Xenia . 



Hamilton . 
Lebanon.. 



Wilmington. 



Lebanon. 



Wilmington, 
Greenville. . . 
Xenia 



Wilmington. 



Xenia... 
Lebanon. 



Dayton 

Lebanon 

Troy 

Hamilton . . . 
Wilmington . 
Urbana 



Springfield . 



Troy.... 
Lebanon. 



Troy. 



February, 1861. Resigned Janu- 
ary, 1866. 

October, 1872, to May, 1883. 

May, 1885, to May, 1893. 

November, , to November, 

1909. Incumbent. 

December, ISOO, "^c O-t'^ht^r^ iQOO 

October, 190U (.vice Miller),' In- 
cumbent. 

, 1868, (vice Winans), 

to February, 1872. 

February, 1897. Incumbent. 

February, 1885, to February, 
1891. 

February, 1857, to February, 
1867. 

February, 1869, to February, 
1874. 

February, 1852. Resigned Feb- 
ruary, 1855. 

, (vice O'Neall), to 

February, 1892. 

May, 1900. 

May, 1883, to May, 1888. 

February, 1899, to February 
1904. 

May, 1905, to May, 1910. 

February, 1859, to February, 
1869. 

Februay, 1889, to February, 
1899. 

February, 1872. Resigned Feb- 
ruary, 1885. 

Expires July, 1906. 

October, 1895, to December, 1895 

February, 1892. Resigned 1899. 

February, 1887. Died 1892. 

May, 1890, to May, 1900. 

November, 1879, to November, 
1889. 

May, 1885. Died, 1890. 

February, 1857. Resigned Feb- 



ruary, 1864. 

ecemt 

1882. 



try, II 
mber. 



December, 1877, to February, 



February, 1885 (vice Smith), to 

October, 1885. 
October, 1857 (vice Clark), to 

November, 1858. 
February, 1861 (vice White), to 

February, 1808. 
February, 1882, to February, 
1892. 



718 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



1 



Jtcdges of the Court of. Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 
Judges op the Court op Common Pleas— Continued. 

THIRD DISTRICT. 



Name of Judges. 



Residence. 



Tenn of Service. 



Armstrong, S. A. 



Beer, Thomas 

Bowersox, Charles A. 

Davis, William D 

Day, James H 



Dodge, Henry H. . 
Donnelly, Michael. 



Cole, Henry M. . . 
Cole, Philander B. 



Conklin, Jacob S 

Cunningham, W. H . . 

Glenn, Hiram C 

Handy, William H.. 
Hall, Lawrence. . . . . . 

Hubbard, WiUiamH. 

Hughes, Charles M. . . 



Jackson, Abner M. 
Killitts, John M. , 



Latty, Alex. S 

Latty, Alex. S 

Lawrence, William M. 
Mackenzie, James. . . . 



♦Mathers, Hugh T. . 
Matthias, Edward S. 



Metcalf, Benjamin F. 
Metcalf, Benjamin F. 

Mooney, W. T 

Moore, John J 



Mott, Chester R. 
Owen, Selwyn V, 



Palmer, John K. 



Celina. 



Bucyrus . 
Bryan. . . 
Sioney. . 
Celip? = . 



Perrysburg. 
Napoleon.. 



Napoleon . . 
Marysville . 



Stdney : . 
Lima 



Van Wert. 
Wauseon. 



Defiance. 
Lima 



Bucyrus . : , 
Bryan. . . . , 



Defiance. 
Defiance. 



Lima. 



Sidney. . . 
Van Wert. 



Lima 

Lima 

St. Marys. 
Ottawa. . . 



Upper Sandusky. . . . 
Bryan 



January, 1889, to January, 1909. 

Incumbent. 
November, 1874 (to 10th Dist.) 
December, 1883, to October, 1884 
February, 1901. 
February. i«80 "RAsiorned Sep- 

February, 1878 (to 10th Dist.) 

May, 1899, to May, 1909. Incum- 
bent. 

May, 1899, to February, 1904. 

February, 1872, to February, 
1877. 

October, 1864 (vice Lawrence), 
to February, 1872. 

February, 1899, to ^February, 
1909. Incumbent. 

October, 1892 (vice Day), to De- 
cember, 1892. 

February, 1885. 

February, 1852, to Februaiy, 
1857. 

February, 1897, to February, 
1907. Incumbent. 

February, 1879, to February, 
1889. 

, 1872. 

February, 1905, to February, 
1910. 

February, 1857, to February, 
1862. 

February, 1872, to February, 
1877. 

February, 1857. Resigned Octo- 
ber, 1864. 

February, 1869, to February, 
1879. 

, to February, 1910. 

February, 1905, to February',' 
1910. 

February, 1852, to Februarv', 
1857. 

November, 1858. Died March' 
1865. 

December, 1892, to Februar>% 
1901. 

May, 1879. Resigned February', 
1885. 

, 1871. 

February, 1877. Resigned Feb- 
ruary, 1883. 

February, 1852, to February, 
1857. 



♦Unexpired term, W. T. Mooney, resigned. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



719 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 

Judges of the Court of Common Pleas — Continued. 
• Thikd DiSTRici' — Concluded. 



Name of Judges. 


' Residence. 


Term of Service. 


Phelps, Edwin M 


St. Marys. 


May, 1869. 

May, 1868, to May, 1878. 
February, 1877 (to 10th Dist.) 
February, 1889, to February, 

1899. 
March, 1865, (vice Metcalf), to 

November, 1865. 
October, 1857, (10th Dist.) 
May, 1894, to May, 1899. 
February, 1892, to February 1897 


Pillars, James 

Porter, John L 

Riclye, John E 


Tiffin 

Marysville 

Lima. 

Lima 

Wauseon 

Paulding 


Rose, 0..W ...... 

Seney, George E 

Sheets, John M 


Snook, Wilson H 


Sutphen, Silas T 

Whitelev M. C ... 


Defiance 


October, 1884, to February-, 1892. 
February, 1857, to February, 
1862. 


" 


■ • 



fourth district. 



Name of Judges. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


Barber Gershom 


Cleveland. 


November, 1875, to November 


Barber Jason A 


Toledo 

Cleveland 


1885. 
February, 1897, to Februarv, 


Beacon M W ... 


1907. Incumbent. 

January, 1903, to L908. Incum- 
bent. 

February, 1902, to 1907. Incum- 
bent. 

February, 1857, to February, 
1862. 

September, 1882. 


Babcock W A 




Bishop, Jesse P. 

Blondin E J 




Cleveland 


Bolton Thomas F 


Elyria 

Fremont 


February, 1857, to February, 


Boynton, Washington W 

Buckland, Horace S 

Burke Stevenson 


1867. 

February, 1869 (vice Burke), to 
February, 1877. 

May, 1896, to May, 1906. Incum- 
bent. 

February, 1862. Resigned Janu- 


Cadwell, Darius 

Canfield, WiUiam H 

CarDenter James 


Cleveland 


ary, 1862. 
February, 1874, to February, 
1884. 


' 


February, 1857, to February, 

1862. 
November, 1905, to November, 


Chapman, H. B 


East Cleveland 


Ooffinberry, James M 

Collins, William A 


1910. 


Toledo 


February, 1870, to February, 




1875. 



720 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 

Judges of the Court op Common Pleas — Continued. 
Fourth District — Continued. 



Name of Judges. 



Residence. 



Tenri of Service. 



Commanger, D. H. 



DeUenbaugh, F. E. 
Dewett, James L. . 
Dissette, T. K 



Doyle, John H. 
Fitch, John . . . . 



Foote, Horace. 



Finefrock, Thomas P. 
Ford,S.S 



French, James J. 



Green, Edwin P. 
Greene, John L. 



Hale, John C . . . 
Hamilton, E. T. 



Hamilton, Edwin M. 
Harmon, Guilbert. . . 
Hay den, George 



Haynes, George R. 
Heisley, John W. . . 



Humphreyville, Samuel. 



Hull, Lynn W.... 
Hutchins, John C. 



Huston, Alex. B . 
Jones, James M. 



Jones, James M. . . 
Keeler, Harvey R. 



Kelly, Malcolm 

Kennedy, Thomas M. 



Kinkade, R. R. . . . 
Kohler, Jacob A. . . 
Lamson, Alfred W. 
Lane, William G. . . 



Toledo. 



Cleveland. 
Sandusky. 
Cleveland. 



Cleveland. 



Fremont. 
Cleveand 



Akron. . . 
Fremont. 



Elyria 

Cleveland. 



Toledo. 
Medina. 



Toledo. . . 
Cleveland. 



Sandusky. 
Cleveland. 



Cleveland. 
Cleveland. 
Cleveland. 



Port Clinton. 
Cleveland. . . 



Toledo. . . 
Akron. . . . 
Cleveland. 
Sandusky. 



. . . . , 1882, (vice Doyle), 

to October, 1889. 
April, 1895, to December, 1901. 
February, 1887. Died, 1890. 
December, 1894, to Deceftiber, 

1904. 

OotobH*. :;<^/M 10 , 1882* 

November, 1854, to , 

1870. 
February, 1854, to February, 

1874. 
October, 1874, to October, 1879. 
November, 1900, to November, 

1910. Incumbent. 
October, 1874 (v-ice Seney), to 

October, 1875. 
October, 1883. Resigned 1891. 
October, 1861 (vice Worcester), 

January, 1864. 
February, 1877. Resigned Sep- 
tember, 1883. 
November, 1875, to November, 

1895. 

October,* 1899. 

January, 1901, to January, 1906. 

Incumbent. 
November, 1883. 
November, 1885, to February', 

1889. 
February, 1852, to February, 

1857. 
February, 1897. Resigned 1899. 
November, 1892, to November, 

1895. 

November, 1875, to November, 
1880. 

February, 1882, to February, 
1887. 

November, 1905, to November,, 
1910. 

February, 1892. 

January, 1903, to 1908. Incum- 
bent. 

February, 1900, to February, 
1910. Incumbent. 

May, 1896, to May, 1906. Incum- 
bent. 

November, 1885, to November, 
1900. 

February, 1873 (vice Stone), to 
December, 1877. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



l2l 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 

Judges op the Court of Common Pleas — Continued. 
Fourth District — Continued. 



Name of Judges. 



Residence. 



Term of Service. 



Lawrence, James. 



Lemmon, R. C. . 
Lemon, John M. . 
Lewis, George W. 



Lock-^nod, Will' 9m F. 



Logue, J. T... 
Mackey, John 



Marvin, Ulysses L. 



McClure, Samuel W. 
McKinney, Henry. . . 



McMaith, Jesse H. . 

Mills, Grayson 

Morris, Lindley W. 

NefiF,W.B 

Noble, Conway 



Nye, David J. . 
Ong, Walter C. 

Otis, Luci'TS B. 



Payne, Robert T 

Pennewell, Charles E. 
Pennewell, Charles E. 



Phillips, George L. 

Pike, Lewis H 

Pratt, Charles 

Prentiss, Samuel. . 



Pugsley, Isaac P. 
Reed, Charles S.. 



Rouse, Birdseye W. 
Sanders, William B. 



Schwan, George H. 
Seney, Joshua R. . . 



Cleveland. 



Toledo. 
Clyde. . 
Medina. 



Toledo. 



Cleveland. 
Sandusky. 



Akron. 



Akron. . . . 
Cleveland. 

Geveland. 

Sandusky. 

Toledo. . . 

Cleveland. 

Cleveland. 



Eljrria 

Cleveland. 



Cleveland. 
Norwalk. . 
Norwalk. . 



Cleveland. 
Toledo. . . 
Toledo. . . 
Cleveland. 



Toledo. . . 
Sandusky. 



Toledo. 
Toledo. 



Cleveland. 
Cleveland. 



January, 1903, to 1908. Incum- 
bent. 

October, 1874, to February, 1895. 

May, 1886, to November, 1887. 

September, 1883 (vice Hale), to 
February, 1892. 

November, 1878. to Noveniber, 

November, 1895. Died, 1900. 
May, 1880 (vice Watson), to Feb- 
ruary, 1887. 
May, 1883 (vice Tibballs), to Oc- 
tober, 1883. 
May, 1871, to May, 1876. 
November, 1880, to . . 

1888. 
November, 1875, to November, 

1880. 
— , 1890, (vice DeWitt), to 

February, 1892. 
October, 1894, to October, 1909. 

Incumbent. 
November, 1895, to November, 

1905. Incumbent. 
November, 1887, to November, 

1897. 
February, 1892. 
February, 1894, to February, 

1899. 
February, 1852, to February, 

1857. 
May, 1869, to May, 1874. 
October, 1869, to October, 1874. 
October, 1892, to November, 

1892. 
January, 1901 (vice Wing), 

Incumbent. 
November, 1883, to November, 

1888. 
February, 1895, to February, 

1900. 
February, 1867, to February, 

1882. 
November, 1888. Incumbent. 
November, 1899, to February, 

1907. Incumbent. 
May, 1876, to May, 1881. 
May, 1871. Resigned October, 

1874. 
December, 1904, to December, 

1909. Incumbent. 
February', 1888. Resigned De- 
cember, 1889. 



46— B. A. 



I 



722 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 

Jxjdges^op^the^CourtJof^Common]^Plbas — Continued. 
Fourth District — Concluded. 



Name of Judges. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


Sherwood, WiUiam E 

Solders, George B 


Cleveland 


January, 1890. Died, October, 

1892. 
February, 1889, to February 

1899. 
February, 1852, to February, 

1857. 
November^ "IRQC, +0 Voyember, 

19Go. Incumbent. 
December, 1866. Resigned Feb- 
ruary, 1873. 
February, 1899, to February, 

1909. Incumbent. 
February, 1857, to February, 

1867. 
May, 1876, to October, 1883. 
November, 1903, to 1908. In- 


1 Cleveland 


Starkweather, Samuel 

Stone Carlos M 




Cleveland - . . . , , 


Stone, Walter F 


Sandusky 

Cleveland 


Strimple, Theo. L 


Taylor, Sebastian 




TibbaJls, Newell D 


Akron 


Tilden, D. H 


Cleveland 

Toledo 


Tyler, Julian H 


cumbent. 

November, 1903, to 1908. In- 
cumbent. 

December, 1890 (\'ice Greene), 
May, 1896. 

February, 1902 to February, 
1907. 

February, 1876. Died, 1880. 

February, 1902, to 1907. 


Voris Alvan C 


Toledo 


Washburn, Garence G 

Watson, Cooper K 

Webber, Amos R 


Elyria 


Sandusky 


Elyria 

Toledo 


Wickham, Charles P 


May, 1881, to May, 1886. 

February, 1891, to February, 
1907. Incumbent. 

November, 1880. Resigned Sep- 
tember, 1882. 

November, 1900, to January, 
1901. 

January, 1859. Resigned Octo- 
ber, 1861. 


Wildman, Samuel A 


Norwalk 


Williamson, Samuel F 


Cleveland 


Wing, x^rancis J 


Cleveland 


Worcester, Samuel T 







PIPTH DISTRICT. 



Name of Judges. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


Abemathy, Isaac N 

Ashbum, Thomas 


Circleville 


February, 1890, to February 

1895. 
February. 1869. Resigned March, 

1876. 
May, 1893. Incumbent. 
February, 1852, to February 

1862. 


Batavia 


Badger, Dewitt C 


Columbus. : 


Bates. James L. '. . 









THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



\n 



723 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 185 1 -1906. 

Judges op the Court of Common Pleas — Continued. 
Fifth District — Continued. 



Name of Judges. 



Residence. 



Term of Service. 



Bigger, Thomas M 

Bingham, Ed^an F 

Briggs, Robert M 

ColUngs, Henry 

Courtwright, Samuel W. 

Cowen, Allen T 

Davis, Frank 

Dickey, Alfred S 

Dillon, Edmond B 

Douglas, J. C 

Dresbach, Charles 

Duncan, Thomas J 

Durflinger, S. W 

Evans, Eli P 

Evans,. Mark C 

Evans, William Edgar. . 

Gray, Thomas M 

Green, John L 

Green, John L 

Gregg, Ace. 

EGdy, Joseph 

Huggins, Henry M 

Lincoln, George 

Loudon, D.W.C 

Markley, John M 

Maynard, H. B 

IVIinshall, Thaddeus A. . . 

Newby, Cyrus 

Norris, Shepard F 

Olds, Joseph 

Parrott, John S 

Pugh, David F 

RathmeU, Frank 

Safford, William H 

Sloan, James 



Columbus 

Columbus.: 

Manchester 

Circleville 

Batavia 

New Richmond 

Lyndon 

Columbus 

Chillicothe 

Circleville 

Columbus.: 

London 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Chillicothe 

Washington C. H. . . 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Washington C. H... 

Washmgton C. H . . . 
Hillsborough 

London 

Georgetown 

Georgetown 

Washington C. H . . . 
Chillicothe 

Hillsboro 

Circleville 

Batavia 

Columbus 

Columbus 

Chillicothe 



February, 1897, to February, 

1907. Incumbent. 
May, 1873, to April, 1887. 
October, 1858, to October, 1863. 
February, 1892, to February, 

1897. 
May, 187^^, to May, 1880. 
October, 1876, to Octoijcr, ioSS. 
October, 1888, to October, 1898. 
January, 1858 (vice Sloan), to 

February, 1872. 
May, 1903—1908. Incumbent. 
February, 1894. Incumbent. 
February, 1905, to February, 

1910. Incumbent. 
February, 1887, to February, 

1897. 
February, 1904, to February, 

1909. Incumbent. 
May, 1S78. Incumbent. 
May, 1903—1908. Incumbent. 
January, 1886, to February, 1894. 
February, 1874, to January, 1876. 
February, 1852. Resigned, 1857. 
February, 1867, to February, 

1882. 
November, 1880. Died, April, 

1894. 
February, 1899. Incumbent. 
February, 1882, to February, 



1892. 

February, 

1890. 



1880, to February, 



, 1881, to February, 

1892. 
February, 1897, to February, 

1907. Incumbent. 
April, 1894, to Febmary, 1899. 
October, 1876. Resigned Janu- 
ary, 1886. 
February, 1892, to February, 

1907. Incumbent. 
February, 1852, to February, 

1862. 
May, 1868, to May, 1873. 
October, 1898, to October, 1908. 

Incumbent. 
April, 1887, to May, 189S. 
May, 1903—1908. Incumbent. 
February, 1809, to February, 

1874. 
January, 1857 (vice Green). Re- 
5 signed, 1858. 



724 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



1 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 

Judges op the Court of Common Pleas — Continued. 
Fifth District — Concluded. 



Name of Judges. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


Steele, Samuel F 


Hillsboro 

Georgetown 


February, 1872, to February, 

1882. 
June, 1871, to June, 1881. 


Tarbell, David 


Thompson, James H 

Van Meter, John M 

Walters, Festus 


October, 1881, to February, 1882. 
January, 1876, to October, 187G. 
February, 1895. Incumbent. 
February, 1904, to February, 

1909. Incumbent. 
May, 1898. Incumbent. 
February, 1882, to February, 

1887. 


ChiUicothe 

Circleville 

ChiUicothe 

■ 

Columbus 

Columbus 


Wiggins, Willis H 


Williams, Curtis C 


Wylie, Hawley J 





SIXTH DISTRICT. 



Name of Judges. 



Residence. 



Term of Service. 



Adams, John.. :. 
Beebe, Judson A. 



Brumbach, Jefferson. 
Buckingham, Jerome. 

Buckingham, Jerome. 
Campbell, Robert M. . 



Coyner, George. 



Dickey, Jabez . . . 
Dickey, Moses R. 



Dirlam, Darius 

Downing, Joseph H, 
Dowell, Edward S.. 

Duncan, Thomas E. 

Duncan, Thomas E. 

Dunn, Andrew K:. . 

Eason, Samuel B. . , 



Follett, Charles. 
Finch, Sherman. 



Mt. Vernon. 
Mansfield. :. 



Newark. 



Newark. 
Ashland , 



Delaware . 



Mt. Gilead. 
Mansfield . . 



Mansfield. 



Wooster. . . 
Mt. Gilead. 
Mt. Gilead. 



Wooster. 
Newark. . 



February, 1872, to February, 
1882. 

October, 1873. Died, Septem- 
ber, 1874. 

February, 1867, to October, 1869. 

October, 1869, (vice Brumbach), 
to October, 1870. 

April, 1888, to April, 1893. 

February, 1899, to February', 
1909. Incumbent. 

February, 1902—1907. Incum- 
bent, 

October, 1882, to February, 1889. 

February, 1877. Resigned Feb- 
ruary, 1882. 

February, 1872, to February, 

1907. Incumbent. 
December, 1866. 5 days. 
, 1888, to November, 

1896. 

April, 1882, to October, 1882. Re- 
signed, September, 1876. 

February, 1892, to February, 
1899. 

September, 1876, to February, 
1877. 

February, 1898, to February', 

1908. Incumbent. 
October, 1870, to February, 1877. 
February, 1857, to February, 

1862. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



725 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 

Judges of the Court of Common Pleas — Continued. 
Sixth District — Concluded. 



Name of Judges. 



Residence. 



Term of Service. 



Geddes, George W 

Geddes, George W 

Gill, John S 

Given, William 

Hunter, Samuel M. . . . 

Hurd, RoUinC 

Irvine, Clark 

Jones, John David : . . . 
Jones, Thomas C 

Kenny, Thomas J. : . . . 

May, Manuel . : 

Maxwell, John T 

McCray, H. L..... ... 

McElroy, Charles H.:. 

Nicholas, John D 

Osbom, William. : 

Parsons, Charles C, Sr 

Pomerine, Celsus 

Reed, William 

Sample, William 

Seward, Chas.W...:.. 

Stewart, James 

Stilwell, Wellington:. . 

Taggart, Frank 

Vorrhes, Carolus F 

Waight, JohnB..:. ... 

Welker, Martin 

Wickham, Emmet M. : 
Wolfe, Norman M..:.. 



Mansfield.. 
Mansfield. : 
Delaware. . 

Newark 

Mt. Vernon 

Newark 

Delaware. . 

Ashland:. . 

Mansfield.. 
Millersburg. 

Ashland. . . 

Delaware. . 

Wooster. :. 

Ashland . . . 
Wooster. . . 

Millersburg. 

Millersburg. 

Newark 

Millersburg. 

Millersburg. 
Mt. Vernon 

Delaware.. 
Mansfield.. 



February, 1857. Resigned Oc- 
tober, 1866. 
December, 1868, to November, 

1873. 
February, 1892, to February, 

1897. 
February, 1869, to February, 

1864. 
February, 1877, to February, 

1887. 
February, 1852, to February 

1857. 
February, 1887, to February 

1892. 
February, 1897. Incumbent. 
February, 1862, to February 

1872. 
September, 1874 (vice Beebe) 

Died, April 1882. 
October, 1882, to February, 1892. 
February, 1897, to February, 

1907. Incumbent. 
November, 1888, (vice Dickey), 

to February, 1894. 
February, 1882, to February, 

1892. 
February, 1887, to February, 

1897. 
October, 1866, to February, 1872. 
February, 1877, to February, 

1888. 
November, 1897, to February, 

1898. 
February, 1857. 

cember, 1866. 
February, 1852, to February, 

1857. 
February, 1902—1907. 

bent. 
February, 1883, to , 

1888. 
February, 1867, to February, 

1877. 
December, 1896 (vice Dowell), 

to November, 1897. 
February, 1878, to February, 

1883. 
February, 1892, to February, 

1897. 
February, 1852, to February, 

1857. 
February, 1897. Incumbent. 
February, 1892. Incumbent. 



Resigned De- 



Incum- 



i 



726 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 
Judges op the Court of Common Pleas — Continued. 

SEVENTH DISTRICT, 



Name of Judges. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


Bannon, James W 


Portsmouth 

Pomeroy...: 

Logan 


October, 1884, to Februarj^ 1887. 

October, 1875. Resigned, Janu- 
ary, 1885. November, 1905, to 
November, 1910. 

November, 1887, to November, 


Bradbury, Joseph P 

Bright, Samuel H 






1888. 



Coiiins, Henr> 

Cart right, John 

Coultrap, Henry W. . 

Crain, Martin 

Dean, E. V 

DeSteigner, Rudolph. 

Dever, Noah J 

DuHadway, Porter. . . 
Ewing, Philomen B . . 

Freisner, John S 

Groghan, James R. . . 

Guthrie, Erastus A. . . 
Harper, John J 

Hastings, \V. K 

Hebard, David B 

Hufifman, Joseph G. . 

James, William D 

Johnson, William W. , 
Johnston, James E. . . 

Jones, David W 

Knowles, Samuel S. . . 
Loomis, William B. . . 
Martin, George E : . . . 

Middleton, W. H 

Milner, John C 

McCleary, Charies W. 

Nash, Simeon 

Peck, William V 

Plants, Tobias A 



Maxicueotei. . . . 

McArthur 

Ironton 

Athens 

Portsmouth.... 
Jackson 

Logan 

Athens : 

Portsmouth 

Jackson 

New Lexington. 

Waveriy 

Ironton 

Gallipolis 

Marietta 

Marietta 

Lancaster. : . . . . 

Waveriy 

Portsmouth 

Lancaster.:. . . . 

Pomeroy 



rebiuaiy, i6y<. iiicumDent. 
February, 1875, (vice Guthrie), 

to October, 1884. 
January, 1895. Incumbent. 
October, 1867, to Februarj', 1872. 
September, 1884, to October, 

1884. 
February, 1885, to February, 

1897. 
February, 1887, to February, 

1897. 
February, 1874. 
March, 1862, (\dce Whitman), 

to November, 1862. 
December, 1879. 

September, 1866, to November, 
■ 1866. 

February, 1865, to October, 1875. 
February, 1872, to February, 

1882 
March, 1872, to February, 1874. 
January, 1875, (vice Plants), to 

October, 1875. . 
December, 1889. Died, February, 

1896. 
February, 1894, to February, 

1899. 
February, 1859, to March. 1872. 
February, 1896, (vice Huffman), 

to November, 1896. 
July, 1898, to July, 1908. In- 
cumbent. 
October, 1875, to Julv, 1S83. 
July, 1868, to July, 1873. 
December, 19Q4, to December, 

1909. Incumbent. 
February, 1899, to February'-, 

1909. Incumbent. 
February, 1897, to Februarj', 

1907. Incumbent. 
August, 1900, (vice Slough), to 

November, 1900. 
February, 1852, to Februarv, 

1862. 
February, 1852, to Febniarj', 

1859. 
July, 1873. Resigned, 1875. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



727 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 

Judges of the Court of Common Pleas — Continued. 
Seventh District — Concluded. 



Name of Judges. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


Pyle, John T 


New Lexington 

Lancaster 


February, 1905, to February, 

1910. Incumbent. 
November, 1900. November, 


Reeves, John G 


RusseU, F. C 


Pomeroy 

Marietta 


1907. Incumbent. 
January, 1885, (vice Bradbury), 

to October. 1885. 
July, 1583, io Jaiiiicirj/, 1^1}7. 
November, 1888. Died, August, 

1900. 
February, 1882, to October, 1884. 
, 1869. 


Sibley, Hiram L 


Slough, Tall 


Lancaster 


Thompson, Albert C 

Towne, Henry \ 


Portsmouth 

Portsmouth.. : 

Jackson 


Tripp, James M 


February, 1879, to February, 

1894. 
November, 1862, (vice Ewing), 

to August, 1866. 
February, 1862, to February, 

1865. 
February, 1852. Resigned, 

March, 1862. 
February, 1897, to February, 

1907. Incumbent. 
October, 1866. Died, November, 


Van Trump, Philaelph 

Welch, John 




Whitman, Henry C 

Wood, John M 




Athens .• 


Wright, Silas H 


Logan 


Wright, 0. W. H 


Logan 


1887. 
December, 1899. Incumbent. 







eighth district. 



Name of Judges. 



Residence. 



Term of Service. 



Alexander, Robert J. 



BaU, WiUiam H 

Bostwick, Samuel W. 

CampbeU, J. W 

Carvers, Charles C. . . 



Chambers, Robert E. 



Chambers, William. . 
Cowen, Daniel D. F, 



Crew, William B. 
Evans, Ezra E, . . 



Evans, Nathan. 



ZanesviUe. 
Zanesville. 



St. Clairsville. 
Caldwell 



McConnelsville. 



February, 1852, to February, 
1857. 

August. 1879, to August, 1884. 

October, 1885, to February, 1862. 

October, 1S84, to February, 1892. 

October, 1854, (vice Hanna). 

. Resigned, October, 1855. 

February, 1872, to February, 
1877. 

February, 1892. Incumbent. 

September, 1865, (vice Oakey), 3 
months. 

February, 1892. 

February, 1862. Resigned, De- 
cember, 1866. 

February, 1859, to February, 
1864. 



728 



. 1 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 

Judges op the Court op Common Pleas — Continued. 
Eighth District — Concluded. 



Name of Judges. 



Residence. 



Term of Service. 



Frazier, Alfred A. . . 
Frazier, William H. . 
Granger, Moses M. . . 

TT T , _ r -^ 

Hanna, John E. . :. . 
HoUings worth, J. W. 
Jewett, Thomas L. . . 
Kelly, St. Clair. .... 

Kelly, St. Qair 

Kennedy, . . . 



Kennon, William, Jr. 



Mackey, Justus H. 
Mansfield, John A. 
Marsh, Lucius P . . 



McIIvains, George W. 
Means, Thomas 



Miller, John H..... 
Munson, Gilbert D. 
Okey, John W.:... 



Okey, William.:. . . 
Patrick, James, Jr. 



Pearce, John S. . . . 
Phillips, George L. 
Richards, Reese G. 



Sauers, Enos S 

Searles, Corrington W. 
Shotwell, Walter G. . . . 

Stillwell, Richard 

Way, John S 

Wood, Frederick W. . . 



Zanesville.. : 

Zanesville.. : 

Zanesville 

isew Philadelphia. 



St. Clairsville. 



August, 1899, to August, 1909. In- 
cumbent. . 

October, 1871. Resigned, De- 
cember, 1885. 

December, 1866, (vice Evans), 
Resigned, October, 1871. 

February, 1882, to February, 
1892. 

September, 1854, (vice Stillwell), 
1 month. 

February, 1897, to February, 
1907. Incumbent. 

February, 1852. Resigned, Oc- 
tober, 1854. 

November, 1871, (vice Way), 
February, 1872. 

February, 1882, to February, 
1887. 

February, 1902, to February, 
1907. Incumbent. 

November, 1865, (vice Oakey), 
Resigned, October, 1867. 

April, 1902—1907. Incumbent. 

February, 1892. Incumbent. 

October, 1856, (vice Searles), to 
February, 1862. 

February, 1862. Resigned Janu- 
ary, 1871. 

October, 1854, (vice Jewett), to 
October, 1855. 

January, 1871, to February, 1877. 
Zanesville | August, 1894, to August, 1899. 

February, 1857. Ptesigned, Au- 



St. Clairsville.. 
St. Clairsville. . 
McConnelsville 



Caldwell.... 
Steuben ville 
Zanesville. . . 



New Philadelphia. . 



Steubenville. 



Woodsfield. : 

New Philadelphia. . 



Cadiz 

Zanesville. . . 
Steubenville. 



New Philadelphia. 



Cadiz. 



Woodsfield 

McConnelsville. 



gust, 1865. 
ebri 



February, 1877, to February, 
1882. 

February, 1877, to February, 
1882 

April, 1882, to April, 1892. 

August, 1884, to August, 1894. 

February, 1902—1907. Incum- 
bent. 

September, 1899, to November, 
1899. 

October, 1855, (vice Carvers), to 
October, 1856. 

November, 1899, to November, 
1907. Incumbent, 

February', 1852. Resigned Sep- 
tember, 1854. 

October, 1867, (vice Kennon). 
Died, November, 1871. 

August, 1869, to August, 1874. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



729 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 
Judges op the Court of Common Pleas — Continued. 

NINTH DISTRICT. 



Name of Judges. 



Residence. 



Term of Service. 



Ambler, Jacob A 

Ambler, Ralph S 

ArreU, George F 

Belden, George W. . . : . 

Billingsly, Nathan B . . 

Cadwell, James P 

Canfield, Delos W 

Canfield, Delos W.:... 
Canfield, Milton C 

Chaffee, Norman L. . . . 

Church, John W 

Clark, John 

Conant, Philo B 

Day, Luther 

Day, William R 

Frease, Joseph 

Gillmer, Thomas I . . . . 
Glidden, Chaw E 

Glidden, Chaw E 

Hall, Theodore 

Harter, Henry W 

Hitchcock, Reuben 

Hoffman, Benjamin F 

Hole, Warren W. .... , 

Howland, William P. , 

Hoyt, ThaddeusE.... 

Johnson, George F. . . . 
Johnston, Joseph R. . , 

Kennedy, James B. . . . 
Lambie, Peter A. 



Salem. 

CarroUton. . . 
Youngstcwn, 

Lisbon 

Jefferson 

Chardon . . : . 

Chardon 

Chardon 

Jefferson — 

Ravenna — 

Ravenna 

Canton 

Canton. :. . . 

Warren. .... 
Warren 

Warren 

Ashtabula. . 

Canton 

Salem. : 

Jefferson.. :. 

Jefferson 

Ravenna 

Youngstown. 

Youngstown. 
Salem .:.... 



October, 1859, (vice Potter), to 
February, 1867. 

, 1900, (vice Taylor), 

to April, 1906. Incumbent. 

September, 1880, to February, 
1887. 

February, i852. Resigned, Octo- 
ber, 1855. 

April, 1893. Resigned, Decem- 
ber, 1895. 

January, 1900. Incumbent. 

October, 1875, to February, 1877. 

February, 1885. Died 1900. 

February, 1872. Died, February, 
1875. 

February, 1862, to February, 
1872. 

February, 1859, to February, 
1864. 

October, 1855, (vice Belden), to 
February, 1857. 

November, 1868, to November, 
1878. 

February, 1852, to February, 
1857. 

April, 1868. Resigned, Decem- 
ber, 1886. 

February, 1867, to February, 
18^7. 

December, 1886. Incumbent. 

February, 1862, to February, 
1867. 

October, 1871, to February, 1872. 

February, 1903, to February, 
1908. Incumbent. 

Febmary, 1902—1907. Incum- 
bent. 

February, 1852. Resigned, Feb- 
ruary, 1855. 

February, 1857, to February, 
1862. 

November, 1900, to November, 
1910. Incumbent. 

February, 1892. Died, Januarv, 
1900. 

September, 1884, to October, 
1884. 

April, 1893. Incumbent. 

February, 1887, to February, 
1897. 

February, 1897. Resigned, 1899. 

November, 1875, to February, 
1885. 



730 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 

Judges op the Court of Common Pleas — Continued. 
Ninth District — Concluded. 



lil 



Name of Judges. 



Residence. 



Term of Service. 



Lee, Esubius. 



MeCarty, Thomas T. 
Metcalf, WiUisS..:. 



Meyer, Seraphim 

Nichols, William A.: 

Pease, Anson 

Potter, Lyman W. . . 

Raley, Robert 

Roberts, E. E: 

Robinson, George F . 
Rogers, Disney : . . . . 



Servis, Francis C. . . 
Sherman, Laban S. 

Spear, William T. . 

Smith, Philip M. . . 



Taylor, Ezra B. . 
Taylor, Laac H. . 
Theyes, Albert A. 



Tuttle, George ]VL . . . 
Wallace, Jonathan H. 
WUder, EliT 



Wilder, Horace ........ 

Woodbury, Hamilton B. 



Canton . . 
Chardon . 

Canton . . 



Canton . 



Carrollton. . . 

Warren 

Ravennal . . . 
Youngstown. 



Canfield . 
Jefferson. 



Warren. . . 
Wells viUe. 



Warren.:. , 
Carrollton. 
Warren. . . 



Warren. 



Jefferson. 



rcLruary, 



February, 1875, (vice Canfield), 
to October, 1875. 

February, 1892. Incumbent. 

February, 1900—1910. Incum- 
bent. 

T^^^bruar^r IS?'^, 
iS92. 

October, 1885, to November, 
1895. 

February, 1882, to February', 
1892. 

February, 1857. Resigned, Octo- 
ber, 1859. 

November, 1887. Died, October, 
1889. 

November, 1903, to November, 

- 1908. Incumbent. 

April, 1888, to April, 1908. In- 
cumbent. 

September, 1899, to September, 
1907. Incumbent. 

February, 1877, to March, 1877. 

February, 1877, to February-, 
1892. 

October, 1878. Resigned, Feb- 
ruary, 1886. 

December, 1895, (vice Billings- 
ley), to November, 1890. 

March, 1877. Resigned, 1880. 

October, 1889. Resigned, 1901. 

February, 1886, (vice Spear), to 
December, 1886. 

February, 1867, to Januarv. 1872. 

February, 1885, to October, 1885 

April, 1855, (vice Hitchcock), to 
October, 1855. 

October, 1885, to Februarv-, 1862. 

January, 1876, to Februar^', 1885 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



731-^73^ 



Judges of the Court of Common Pleas, 1851-1906. 
Judges op the Court of Common Pleas — Concluded. 

TENTH DISTRICT. 

Created January 7, 1879. 



Name of Judges. 


Residence. 


Term of Service. 


Beer, Thomas 

Dodee. Henrv H 


Bucyrus : 


(From 3rd Dist.) Resigned, Oc- 
tober, 1884. 

(From 3rd Dist.) February, 1888. 

February, 1897, to February, 
1907. Incumbent. 

May, 1898, to 1910. Incumbent. 

April, 1898, to April, 1908. In- 
cumbent. 

February, 1890, to February, 
1895. 

February, 1872, to August, 1874. 

February, 1900 to 1905. 

February, 1880, to February, 
1885. 

February, 1895, to February, 
1905. 

February, 1867, to February, 
1872. 

October, 1884, to February, 1897. 


Perrvsburg 


Dow, Duncar ... . . . . . 

Duncan, William F. . . : 


BeUefontaine 

Findlay. . . : 


Fries, Edward M..: 

Jackson, Abner M. : 


North Baltimore 

Kenton 

Kenton. : 


Jackson, Abner M 


Lemert, Chas. C 


Kenton 


McCauley, John 

Melhom, Charles M 


Tiffin..: 


Kenton 


Mott, Chester R 




Norris, Caleb H 


Marion 


Pendleton, George F 

Pillars, James 


Findlay 


, 1883, to February, 

1890. 
May, 1868, to May, 1878. 




Plants, Jacob S 






Porter, John L. 


Marysville 


(From 3rd Dist.) Februar>^ 1882, 


Price, John A 


BeUefontaine 

Tiffin 


February, 1882, to February, 


Ridgley, John H 


1897. 
May, 1888, to May, 1893. 


Schafenberger, J. W 

Schroth, George E 


Tiffin. 


May, 1893, to May, 1903. 


Tiffin. : 


May, 1898, to May, 1908. Incum- 


Smalley, Allen C. . . 


Upper Sandusky 

Kenton . . 


bent. 
April, 1890, to April, 1900. 


Strong, Luther M 


April, 1883, to October, 1883. 


Tavlor, Frank 


North Baltimore 

Bucyrus 


April, 1898, to April, 1903. 


Tobias, James C 


February, 1897, to February 


Young, Boston G: 


Manon 


1907. Incumbent. 
April, 1900, to April, 1910. In- 






cumbent. 



, ■ III 



PART FIVE. 



UNITED STATES OFFICIALS FROM OHIO. 



(733) 



1 )lM,9 

i 



TABLE OF CONTENTS— PART FIVE. 



PAGE. 

The Presidents of the United States from Ohio , . 735 

Members of the Cabinet from Ohio 736 

Judges of the United States Supreme Court from Ohio 736 

Senators of the United States from Ohio 737 

Representatives in Congress from Ohio 740 



734) 



THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES FROM OHIO. 



DURING the first half century' of her existence, the new state 
furnished but one President of the United States, but he a man 
typical of the "Ohio spirit" and a popular leader of civilizing 
influences throughout the new Northwest. In the latter half 
of the century or, since the close of the civil war, every successful candi- 
date for the Presidency upon the Republican ticket; in fact, every man 
save one, who has been elected to the Presidency from 1864 ^o 1901 ; 
every President since Lincoln, excepting only Grover Cleveland of New 
York, has been a resident, or a former resident of Ohio. Two 01 Lue 
number died in office: William Henry Harrison and James A. Garfield. 
Every one of the illustrious group had won their spurs on the field of 
battle for the Union, and had sharpened their lances in the halls of the 
Congress of the United States and w^ere men of wide statesmanship 
and national reputation prior to their elevation to the highest office in 
the gift of the American people. 

The country has signally honored Ohio in selecting her sons to 
guide the destinies of the Great Republic ; Ohio has given of her best and 
truest whenever and wherever possible to give. The name of him who 
now sits President of this Republic from Ohio, is not the least among 
the number of men thus elevated in public duty, conspicuous figures 
before the world. (See note.) 



PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES FROM OHIO. 

William H. Harrison .Elected November, 1840 

Rutherford B. Hayes Elected November, 1876 

James A. Garfield Elected November, 1880 

William McKinley Elected November, 1896-1900 

Ulysses S. Grant (Born in Ohio, Elected from Illinois), November, 1868-1872 

Benjamin Harrison (Born in Ohio, Elected from Indiana), November, 1888 

See Biographical Notes of Presidents Hayes, Garfield and McKinley, Part One. 






^^':ir 



MEMBERS OF THE CABINET FROM OHIO. 



Name of Officer. 


Department of State. 


Presidency. 


Return J. Meigs, Jr 

John M'Lean . . . 


Postmaster General: 

Postmaster General 

Postmaster General 

Secretary of the Treasury . 
Secretary of the Treasury . 
Secretary of the Treasury . 
Secretary of the Treasury . 
Secretary of the Treasury . 
Secretary of the Interior. . . 
SecretArv of the Interior 
Secrclai/ oi uic iutciior . . 
Secretary of War 


Madison and 

Monroe. . . . 
Lincoln and J( 

Harrison. . . . 
Fillmore. . . . 
Lincoln. . . . 

Hayes 

Harrison. . . . 
Taylor. . . . 
Gr'^rt _ . , 

Grant. ; 

Lincoln 

Grant 

Grant 

Buchanan. . . 
Johnston. . . . 

Grant 

Cleveland. . . 
McKinley. . . 
McKinley. . . 
Roosevelt. . . 


Monroe, 
. . . (1814-1823). 

. . . (1823-1828). 
)hnston, 
. . . . (1864-18G6) 

(1841) 

....(1850-1853) 
. . . . (1861-1804) 
....(1877-1881) 
....(1889-1892) 
- (1849) 
(1869) 


"William Dennison, Jr. . . 

Thomas Ewing 

Thomas Corwin 

Salmon P. Chase. : 

John Sherman 

Charles Foster 


Thomas Ewing 

Jacob D. Cox 


Cr.-lumbas « 'eiiino 

Edwin M. Stanton .... 


....(1870-1875) 
(1862-1865) 


William T. Sherman. . . . 
Alphonso Taft. 


Sec'y of War (ad interim) . . 
Secretary of War 


(1869) 

(1876) 


Edwin M. Stanton 

Henry Stanberry 

Alphonso Taft 

Judson Harmon 


Attorney-General 

Attorney-General 

Attorney-General 

Attorney-General 


. ...(1860-1861) 

....(1866-1868) 

....(1876-1877) 

. . . (1895-1897) 


John Sherman 


Secretary of State 

Secretary of State 

Secretary of War 


. . . . (1897-189S) 


WiUiam R. Dav 

William H. Taft: 


. . . . (1898-1900) 
. . . (1904 ) 









JUDGES OF THE UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT FROM OHIO. 



Name. 



Rank. 



Term of 
Service. 



Length of 
Service. 



John McLean.. :. . . 
Noah H. Swayne. . . 
Salmon P. Chase. . . 
Morrison R. Waite , 
Stanley Matthews. . 
William R. Day. . . 



19th in appointment 
32d in appointment. 

Chief Justice 

Chief Justice. ..:.... 
41st in appointment 



1829-1861 
1861-1869 
1864-1873 

1874-1888 
1881-1889 
1903 



32 years . 
20 years. 

9 years. 
14 years. 

8 years. 



Died 1861. 
Retired 1869 
Died 1873. 
Died 1888. 
Died 1889. 



(736) 



SENATORS OF THE UNITED STATES FROM OHIO. 



THE representation from Ohio in the Senate of the United States 
began with the election by the General Assembly, in joint ses- 
- sion in the hall of the House of Representatives, Chillicothe, 
on the first day of April, 1803, of two senators from Ohio in 
the persons of John Smith of Hamilton County, and Thomas Worthing- 
ton of Ross County. The term of Senator Worthington expired on the 
4th of March, 1807, and to succeed him, the General Assembly in the 
jiLLiiidiy pic^^ediiig, elected GGvernor Edward Tiffin. By a resolution 
of December 20, 1806, the Assembly requested Senator John Smith to 
"either resign his seat in the Senate of the United States, or to proceed 
at once to his post." The resignation followed in 1808, and Judge Return 
J. Meigs, Jr., of the Supreme Court, was elected to succeed him and was 
also re-elected to succeed himself, in a joint session of the two houses of 
the Assembly held on the 12th day of December, 1808. Senator Smith 
had served with distinction as a member of the territorial legislature, 
and is highly spoken of by the venerable Judge Burnett in his Notes on 
the Northwest Territory. His resignation was brought about by his 
supposed sympathy with the conspiracy of Aaron Burr. 

Thomas Worthington was returned to the senate by the General 
Assembly in 1810 to succeed Senator Meigs, who had resigned to accept 
the office of Governor of the state. 

With this beginning of her representation in the councils of "the 
highest legislative body known in history," Ohio has since been repre- 
sented in that body by men who have stood for the best and broadest 
type of aggressive Americanism. The membership in the Senate of the 
United States from Ohio has been as follows : 

SENATORS FROM OHIO, 1803-1903. 



Year. 



Names of Senators. 



County. 



Date of Election. 



1803-1807 
1807-1808 

1809 

1809-1810 



/Thomas Worthington. 

1 John Smith 

J John Smith 

\Edward Tiffin 

Edward Tiffin: 

Return J. Meigs, Jr. . 

Stanley Griswold.. . :. 



Return J. Meigs, Jr. 



Ross : 

Hamilton. . 
Hamilton. . 

Ross 

Ross 

Washingt'n 
Cuyahoga. . 

Washingt'n 



April, 1 1803. 
April 1, 1803. 
April 1, 1803. 
January', 1807. 
Januarv', 1807. 
December 12, 1808. 
Appointed vice Tiffin 

signed. 
December 12, 1SC8. 



(737) 



47— B. A, 



738 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



1 



Senators of the United States from Ohio. 



Senators from Ohio — Continued. 



Year. 



Names of Senators. 



County. 



Date of Election. 



1810 

1811-1813 
1813-1814 
1815 



1815-1819 
1819-1821 
1822-1825 

1825-1829 
1829-1831 

1831-1833 

1833-1837 

1837-1839 
1839-1845 
1845-1849 
1849-1851 
1851-1855 
1855-1860 
1860 



1861-1869 



1869-1877 



fAlexander Campbell. 



[Return J. Meigs, Jr. . 
/Alexander Campbell. . 
\Thomas Worthington. 

Jeremiah Morrow. . . . 



Thomas Worthington. 
■Jeremiah Morrow. . . . 
Joseph Kerr 



Benjamin Ruggles. 



/Jeremiah Morrow. . , 

1 Benjamin Ruggles. . 
/Benjamin Ruggles. . 
IWiUiam A. Trimble, 
J Benjamin Ruggles. , 
\Ethan Allen Brown . 



/Benjamin Ruggles 

1 William Henry Harrison . 

/Benjamin Ruggles 

\Jacob Burnet 



/Benjamin Ruggles. 
\Thomas Ewing ... 



/Thomas Ewing. 
\Thomas Morris . 



/Thomas Morris 

William Allen 

William Allen ..... 
IBenjamin Tappan.. 
fWiUiam Allen 

Thomas Corwin. . . . 

Thomas Corwin. :. . 
1 Salmon P. Chase. . . 
/Salmon P. Chase. . . 
1 Benjamin F. Wade. 
/Benjamin F. Wade 
1 George E. Pugh — 
/Benjamin F. Wade. 
\Salmon P. Chase. : . 



/Benjamin F. Wade. 
\John Sherman 



/John Sherman 

\Allen G. Thurman. 



Brown. 



Washingt'n 
Brown 



Warren 

Rn^'i.. . . . . 

Warren. . . . 

Ross . . 



Belmont. , 

Warren. : . 
Belmont. . 



Highland. 
Hamilton. 



Hamilton. 
Hamilton. 



Fairfield. . 
f 

Clermont. , 

Clermont . . 
Ross: 



Jefferson. . 
Warren. . . , 



Hamilton. 
Ashtabula. 



Hamilton. 
Hamilton. 



Richland. 



December 8, 1809, vice 

Griswold. 
December 12, 1808. 
December 8, 1809. 
December 15, 1810, vice 

Meigs. 
February 6, 1813, vice 

Campbell. 
December IZ. ISIC. 
February, 6, 1813. 
December 10, 1814, vice 

Worthington. 
February 4, 1815, vice 

Kerr. 
February, 6, 1813. 
February 6, 1815. 

January 20, 1820. 

January 3, 1822, vice 
Trimble, deceased. 

January 1825, vice Brown 

December 10, 1828, vice 
Harrison. 

January, 1831, vice Bur- 
net. 

December 15, 1832, vice 

Ruggles. 
December 15, 1832. 
January 18, 1837. 

December 20, 1838. 

December 5, 1844. 

February 22, 1849. 

March 15, 1851. 

March 4, 1854. 



Februarv 2, 1860. Re- 
signea to enter cabinet 



id to 
of President Lincoln. 



Franklin. 



March 21, 1861, vice Chase 
resigned. 

January 15, 1868. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



739 



Senators of the United States from Ohio. 



Senators from Ohio — Concluded. 



Year. 


Names of Senators. 


County. 


Date of Election. 




. 

/Allen G. Thurman 

\Stanley Matthews 






1877-1879 


Hamilton. . 


March 20, 1877, vice Sher- 




/Allen G. Thurman 


man. Resigned to enter 
cabinet of President 
Hayes. 


1879-1881 
1881 


\George H. Pendleton. : 

'Georse H. Pendleton 




Hamilton. . 

T 1 , 

j-.t*Ai.>^ 

Richland. . 


January 15, 1878. ^ ' 




John Sherman 


clined December 23. 
January 18, 1881, vice 
Garfield. 




George H. Pendleton 

\John Sherman 


1881-1885 








/John Sherman ...... 






1885-1891 


IHenrv^B. Pa^-ne 

/John Sherman. 


Cuyahoga. . 
Richland. . 
Allen 

Hamilton. . 
Cuyahoga. . 


January 15, 1884. 


1891-1897 


\Calvin S. Brice 


January, 15, 1900. ■ 

Resigned March 3, to en- 
ter the cabinet of Pres- 
ident McKinley. 

January 15, 1896. 

Appointed vice Sherman. 




[John Sherman 


1897 


Joseph Benson Foraker 

Marcus A. Hanna 




Joseph Benson Foraker 

Marcus A. Hanna 

■Joseph Benson Foraker 

Marcus A. Hanna. . : 


1898-1903 




Elected to succeed himself 






for the short term and 
the full term, January 
* 12, 1898. 






Elected to succeed himself 


1904 


1 
Charles F. Dick. 




January 16, 1904, for 
the term ending March 
4, 1911. Died February 
15, 1904. 
Elected to succeed Mracus 


1 

1 






A. Hanna for the term 
ending March 4, 1905, 
and also for the full term 
ending March 4, 1911. 



-'•'"^^li 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS FROM OHIO. 



THE representation from Ohio in the Congress, is regulated as to 
locaUties by the action of the General Assembly, in apportion- 
ing the state into congressional districts from time to time on 
the ratio of population fixed by th(' Congress for that purpose. 
From 1803 to 181 2 Ohio had but one congressional district and but one 
representative in the person of Jeremiah Alorrow, afterward Governor of 
the State, and TT. S. Senator. From 18 13 to 1823 the state was divided 
into SIX congressional districts ; from 1823 to 1833 there were 14 dis- 
tricts; from 1833 to 1843 there were 19 districts; from 1843 to 1903 
the present number, 21. In the following tables which give the mem- 
bership in the National House of Representatives from Ohio during the 
first hundred years of statehood, it will be noticed that in the several 
re-arrangements of the districts which have occurred by legislative au- 
thority the numerical numbers have been held in succession by widely 
separated sections of the state, and that members of Congress who are 
well-known residents in one locality seem to have represented territory 
outside their supposed residence district. These apparent discrepancies 
are caused by the legislative re-arrangement and re-numbering of the 
several districts from time to time. With this borne in mind, the follow- 
ing tables will be found a convenient record of "the gentlemen from 
Ohio" who have played no insignificant part in the history of these 
United States, and many of whom are celebrated figures in general 
history. 

TERRITORIAL DELEGATES IN CONGRESS. 



Delegates. 



Circuit. 



♦William Henr\' Harrison (1799-1800). 

William McMillan (1800 ) 

Paul Fearing (1801-1802) 



Hamilton. 
Hamilton . . 
Washington. 



♦Resigned to become Governor of the Indian Territory. 
From 1803 to 1812 Ohio had but one Representative in Congress — Jeremiah Morrow. 



(740) 



FIRST DISTRICT. 



Hamilton County— First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, 
Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Eighteenth, Twenty-sixth, Twenty- 
seventh, and Thirty-first Wards of the city of Cincinnati, Anderson, Columbia, 
Spencer, Sycamore and Symmes townships, and Bond Hill, Carthage, East Car- 



thage, West — Norwood, Ivanhoe, Norwood, West, St. 
nard South, precincts of Mill Creek Township. 



Bernard, North and St. Ber- 




NICHOLAS LONGWORTH, of Cincinnati. 



Nicholas Longworth, Republican, was born November 5, 1869. He is a son 
of the late Judge Nicholas Longworth, grandson of the late Joseph Longworth. 
who endowed the Cincinnati Art School, and great-grandson of Nicholas Long- 
worth, one of the early residents of Cincinnati. Was educated in Cincinnati, 
entered Harvard University, and was graduated therefrom in 1891. After spend- 
ing a year at the Cincinnati Law School he studied for a year at the Harvard 
Law School, and the following year was graduated from the Cincinati Law School 
and admitted to the bar. 

He was candidate for the legislature in 1897, on the Republican ticket and 
defeated with the rest of the ticket. Was again a candidate in 1899, and was 
elected, being one of the three Republicans who were elected to the legislature 
in that year, the other two being Harry M. Hofflieimer and the Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor, Carl L. Nippert. Was a member of the Republican state executive com- 
mittee in the last presidential campaign, and is now a member of that body. Ls 
a member of the Blaine Club and of the Stamina Republican League. Elected 
to State Senate November, 1901, by 14,000 majority. 

(741) 



742 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. f| 

._>-__^ ■- __^ "iif' 

Representatives in Congress from Ohio. •:• : 



Was chairman of the committee on Taxation, and a member of the standing 
committees on County Affairs, Judiciary, Municipal Corporations, Privileges and 
Elections, Public Expenditures, Soldiers' and Sailors' Home, and State Buildings. 

Was author of the Bond Law to enable municipalities to issue bonds in con- 
formity with the decisions of the Supreme Court relative to classification; of the 
law providing a method for voting on constitutional amendments and of a num- 
ber of measures relating to taxation. 

Shortly after the close of the regular session of the General Assembly was 
appointed by Governor Nash, together with the Honorable Wade H. Ellis, now 
Attorney General of Ohio, to draft the new municipal code and introduced that 
measure at the extraordinary session of the General Assembly called by the 
Governor. Was chairman of the conference committee to adjust differences be- 
tween the House and the Senate; was nominated for Congress from the First 
District of Ohio during the extraordinary session and elected by fifteen thousand 
plurality; was a member of the Republican state executive committee the fol- 
lowing year and chairman of the speakers' bureau. Is a member of the committee 
on Foreign Affairs q.nd P^nsi^^r.'^. in the uational Houco cf Pit^i>re«'-uiH' -ves; is 
the membei tioni Oliio on liie liepubucan congressional committee and a member 
of the executive committ of that body; was rnominated for Congress on May 7th 
without opposition. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



743 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE FIRST DISTRICT. 




1813-1814 


13th 


1815-1816 


14th 


1817-1818 


15th 


1819-1820 


16th 


1821-1822 


17th 


1823-1824 


18th 


182.'>-1826 


19th 


lOOT lOOu 


^0' '' 


1829-1830 


21st 


1831-1832 


22d 


1833-1834 


23cl 


1835-1836 


24th 


1837-1838 


25th 


1839-1840 


26th 


1841-1842 


27th 


1843-1844 


28th 


1845-1846 


29th 


1847-1848 


30th 


1849-1850 


31st.: 


1851-1852 


32d 


1853-1854 


33d 


1855-1856 


34th 


1857-1858 


35th 


1859-1860 


36th 


1861-1862 


37th 


1863-1864 


38th 


1865-1866 


39th 


1867-1868 


40th 


1869-1870 


41st 


1871-1872 


42d 


1873-1874 


43d 


1875-1876 


44th 


1877-1878 


45th 


1879-1880 


46th 


1881-1882 


47th 


1883-1884 


48th 


1885-1886 


49th 


1887-1888 


'50th 


1888-1890 


51st 


1891-1892 


52d 


1893-1894 


53d 


1895-1896 


54th 


1897-1898 


55th 


1899-1900 


56th 


1901-1902 


57th 


1903-1904 


58th 



John McLean 

/John McLean. . : 

\WilUani Henry Harrison 

William Henry Harrison 

Th-mas R. Ross 

Thomas R. Ross 

James W. Gazley 

James Findlay. . : 

JoTY.Ms TTirnllay 

James Findlay 

James Findlav. . : 

Robert T. Lytle 

Bellamy Storer 

Alexander Duncan 

Alexander Duncan 

Nathaniel G. Pendleton. 

Alexander Duncan 

James J. Faran 

James J. Faran 

David T. Disney 

David T. Disney , . . 

David T. Disney 

Timothy C. Day 

Geo. H. Pendleton 

Geo. H. Pendleton 

Geo. H. Pendleton 

Geo. H. Pendleton : 

Benjamin Eggleston 

Benjamin Eggleston. : . . . 

Peter W. Strader 

/Aaron F. Perry . . : 

\Ozro J. Dodds 

Milton Sayler 

Milton Sayler 

Milton Sayler 

Benjamin Butterworth. , 

Benjamin Butterworth. . 

John F. Follett 

Benjamin Butterworth. . 

Benjamin Butterworth. . 

Benjamin Butterworth. . 

Bellamy Storer 

Bellamy Storer 

Charles P. Taft 

William B. Shattuc 

William B. Shattuc 

William B. Shattuc 

Nicholas Longworth 



Warren. 

Warren. 

Hamilton, 

Hamilton. 

Warren. 

Warren. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton.' 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 



SECOND DISTRICT. 



T^ -ij — ~n," ' -"r} ' "'m 



$^»/H'T-^ ' #iigM^'^ ^^Wi w^r^mhM'A ' WW i-i^mm 



'"-MP ^_ 






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X / 




1 



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M^-. .^.J:3&>.^^%<^&^^\jj(.^A^^.:^ ^..i-iS^-^S^a^^^ '^,i«&£-.iBt^ ^,%r.aSKg^<»^- 



HERMAN P. GOEBEL. Cincinnati. 



Herman P. Goebel. M. C, Second District, Ohio, was born in Cincinnati, 
April 5, 1853; received his education in the public schools of that city; grad- 
uated from the Cincinnati Law School. 

Mr. Goebel was elected a member of the House of Representatives of Ohio 
in 1875; he was elected Judge of the Probate Court of Hamilton County, in 1884, 
and re-elected in 1887; was elected to the 58th Congress by a very large majority. 
and unanimously renominated to the 59th Congress. Judge Goebel is in active 
practice of the law in Cincinnati. 



(7-14) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



715 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE SECOND DISTRICT. 



Years. 




Name. 



County. 



1813-1814 


13th. 


1815-1816 


14th. ..... 


1817-1818 


15th 


1819-1820 


16th 


1821-1822 


17th 


1823-1824 


18th 


1825-1826 


19th 


1827-1828 


20th 


1829-1830 


21st 


1831-1832 


22d 


1833-1834 


23d 


1835-1836 


24th 


1837-1838 


25th 


1839-1840 


26th 


1841-1842 


27th 


1843-1844 


28th 


1845-1846 


29th 


1847-1848 


30th 


1849-18.50 


31st 


1851-1852 


32d 


1853-1854 


33d 


1855-1856 


,34th 


1857-1858 


35th 


1859-1860 


36th 


1861-1862 


37th 


1863-1864 


38 th 


1867-1868 


40th 


1869-1870 


41st 


1871-1872 


42d 


1873-1874 


43d 


1875-1876 


44th 


1877-1878 


45th 


1879-1880 


46th 


1881-1882 


47th 


1883-1884 


48th 


1885-1886 


49th 


1887-1888 


50th 


1889-1890 


51st 


1891-1892 


52d 


1893-1894 


53d 


1895-1896 


54th 


1897-1898 


55th 


1899-1900 


56th 


1901-1902 


57th 


1903-1904 


58th 



John Alexander. .:....; 

John Alexander 

John W. Campbell 

John W, Campbell 

John W. Campbell 

Thomas R. Ross 

John Woods 

John Woods 

James Shields 

Thomas Corwin 

Taylor Webster 

Taylor Webster 

Taylor Webster.. 

John B. Weller 

John B. Weller 

John B. Weller 

Francis A. Cunningham. 

David Fisher 

Lewis D. Campbell 

Lewis D. Campbell 

John Scott Harrison.. . . 

John Scott Harrison. . . . 

William S. Gravesbeck. 

John A. Gurley 

John A. Gurley 

Alexander Long 

/Rutherford B. Hayes. . . 
\Samuel F. Carey 

Job E. Stevenson 

Job E. Stevenson 

Henry B. Banning 

Henrj^ B. Banning 

Henry B. Banning 

Thomas L. Young 

Thomas L. Young 

Isaac M. Jordan 

Charles E. Brown 

Charles E. Brown 

John A. Caldwell...:... 

John A. Caldwell 

John A. Caldwell 

Jacob H, Bromwell 

Jacob H. Bromwell 

Jacob H. Bromwell 

Jacob H. Bromwell.. . . . 

Herman P. Goebel 



Greene. * 

Greene. 

Adams. 

Adams. 

Adams. 

Warren. 

Butler. 

Butler. 

Butler. 

Wan en. 

Butler. 

Butler. 

Butler. 

Butler. 

Butler. 

Butler. 

Preble. 

Clinton. 

Butler. 

Butler. 

Hamilton 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 

Hamilton. 



THIRD DISTRICT. 
Counties — Butler, Montgomery and Preble. 



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r 




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m^^k. 



.^g„ . ^fei&^.. .,^^^',rTfin"rHiiif 



ROBERT M. NEVIN, Dayton, Ohio. 



Robert M. Nevin. born in Highland County, Ohio, May 5, 1850; went through 
the high school at Hillsboro, Ohio, and from there to the Ohio Wesleyan Univer- 
sity, from which institution he graduated in 1868; moved to Dayton, Ohio, where 
he has resided ever since; read law with Conover and Craighead, and was ad- 
mitted to practice in May, 1871; in 1871 was elected Prosecuting Attorney of 
Montgomery County, Ohio: in 1896 was unanimously chosen by the Republicans 
of the Third Ohio District as the nominee for Congress; was defeated at the en- 
suing election by Hon. John L. Brenner. Democrat, by a majority of 101, though 
the district had previously gone Democratic as much as 3,000; in 1900 was again 
chosen as the Republican nominee from the Third District and was this time 
elected by a majority of 154 over his opponent, Hon. N. F. Bickley; has for many 
years gone as a delegate from his county to Republican state conventions; has 
twice served as chairman of state conventions and has always taken an active 
interest in state politics: in 1902 was again elected to the Fifty-eighth Congress 
having 5,855 plurality over his opponent, Hon. Thos. A. Seltz, of Montgomery 
County. 



(746) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



747 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE THIRD DISTRICT. 



Years. 



1813-1814 
1815-1816 
1817-1818 
1819-1820 
1821-1822 
1823-1824 
1S25-1S?^ 
18'iiV-l»2s 
1829-1830 
1831-1832 
1833-1834 
1835-1836 
1837-1838 
1839-1840 
1841-1842 
1843-1844 
1845-1846 
1847-1848 
1849-1850 
1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 

1857-1858 
1859-1860 
1861-1862 
1863-1864 
1865-1866 
1867-1868 
1869-1870 
1871-1872 
1873-1874 
1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1879-1880 
1881-1882 
1883-1884 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1899-1890 
1891-1892 

1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



Congress. 



Name. 



13th. 
14th. 
loth. 
16th. 
17th. 
18th. 

2uixi. 
21st.. 
22d.. 
23d.. 
24th. 
25th. 
26th. 
27th. 
2Sth. 
29th. 
30th. 
31st.. 
32d.. 
33d.. 
34th. 

35th. 
36th. 
37th. 
38th. 
39th. 
40th. 
41st., 
42d.. 
43d.. 
44th. 
45th. 
46th. 
47th. 
48th. 
49th. 
50th. 
51st. 
52d., 

53d. 

54th. 

55th. 

56th. 

57th. 

58th. 



/Duncan McArthur 

\ William Creighton, Jr 

William Creighton, Jr 

Levi Barber 

Henry Bush 

Levi Barber 

William McLean 

William McLean 

WillicAiu McLean 

Joseph H. Crane 

Joseph H. Crane 

Joseph H. Crane 

Joseph H. Crane 

Patrick G. Goode 

Patrick G. Goode 

Patrick G. Goode 

Robert C. Schenck. : 

Robert C. Schenck 

Robert C. Schenck. : 

Robert C. Schenck 

Hiram Bell. . : 

Lewis D. Campbell 

Lewis D. Campbell 

/Lewis D. Campbell 

\Clement L. Vallandingham, 

Clement L. Vallandingham 

Clement L. Vallandingham 

Robert C. Schenck 

Robert C. Schenck , 

Robert C. Schenck 

Robert C. Schenck 

Lewis D. Campbell 

John Quincy Smith 

John S. Savage 

Mills Gardner 

John A. McMahon 

Henry L. Morey 

Robert Maynard jVIurray. . . 

James E. Campbell , 

E.S.Williams 

E. S.Williams 

George W. Houk 

/George W. Houk. . : 

\Paul J. Sorg 

Paul J. Sorg 

John L. Brenner 

John L. Brenner 

' Robert M. Nevin 

IRobert M. Nevin 



County. 



Ross. 
Ross. 



Washington. 
Ross. 

Washington. 
Miami. 
Miami. 
Miami. 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Shelby. 
Shelby. 
Shelby. 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Darke. 
Butler. 
Butler. 
Butler. 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Butler. 
Chnton. 
Clinton. 
Clinton. 
Montgomery 
Butler. 
Miami. 
Butler. 
Miami. 
Miami. 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 
Butler. 
Butler. 
Montgomery 
Montgomery- 
Montgomery 
Montgomery 






: 



FOURTH DISTRICT. 
Counties — Allen, Auglaize, Darke, Mercer and Shelby. 






JfeA^r ^ffM'^ 




Amt..^'iai^.ff*4A ■■^ •^liifiKwiaft aaaSi 



HARVEY C. GARBER, Greenville, Ohio. 



Harvey C. Garber was born July 16, 1865, at Hill Grove, Darke County, Ohio; 
educated in the Greenville public schools; entered the service of the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company as telegraph operator; then became manager of the 
Western Union Telegraph Company. 

Mr. Garber was elected to the Ohio General Assembly in 1889, in which 
body he was the youngest member and was re-elected in 1891. He was super- 
intendent of the Central Union Telephone Company for Ohio, and later was the 
Assistant General Solicitor for the same company, with offices in Chicago and 
Columbus. He was vice-chairman of the Democratic central committee in 1900, 
and chairman of the committee on permanent organization the following year. 
In 1902 he was nominated and elected to the Fifty-eighth Congress; was also 
chairman in this year of the Democratic executive committee. In 1904 Mr. 
Garber was renominated for Congress and re-elected chairman of the Democratic 
state executive committee. He has always resided in Greenville. 



(748) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



749 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE FOURTH DISTRICT. 



Years. 



Congress. 



Name. 



County. 



1813-1814 
1815-1816 
1817-1818 
1819-1820 
1821-1822 
1823-1824 
1825-1826 
1827-1828 
182y-1830 
1831-1832 
1833-1834 
1835-1836 
1837-1838 

1839-1840 
1841-1842 
1843-1844 
1845-1846 
1847-1848 
1849-1850 
1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
1857-1858 
1859-1860 
1861-1862 
1863-1864 
1865-1866 
1867-1868 
1869-1870 
1871-1872 
1873-1874 
1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1879-1880 
1881-1882 
1883-1884 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1889-1890 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



13th. . 
14th. . 
15th. . 
16th. . 
17th. . 
18th. . 
19th. . 
20th. . 

22d... 
23d. . . 
24th. . 
25th. . 

26th. . 
27th. . 
28th. . 
29th. . 
30th. . 
31st... 
32d... 
33d... 
34th. . 
35th. . 
36th. . 
37th. . 
38th. . 
39th. . 
40th. , 
41st... 
42d... 
43d. . . 
44th. . 
45th. . 
46th. . 
47th. . 
48th. . 
49th. . 
50th. . 
51st... 
52d... 
53d... 
54th. . 
55th. . 
56th. . 
57th. . 
58th. . 



James Caldwell 

James Caldwell 

Samuel Herrick 

Samuel Herrick 

David Chambers. . . . 

Joseph Vance 

Joseph Vanee 

Joseph Vance 

Jost^ph VM,,ce. , . , , . 

Joseph Vance 

Thomas Corwin 

Thomas Corwin.. . . . 

Thomas Corwin 

/Thomas Corwin 

\ Jeremiah Morrow. . . 

Jeremiah Morrow. . . 

Joseph Vance 

Joseph Vance 

Richard S. Canby — 

Moses B. Corwin. . . . 

Benjamin Stanton. . 

Mathias H. Nichols.. 

Mathias H. Nichols. . 

Mathias H. Nichols.. 

William Allen 

William Allen ...... 

John F. Mc Kinney. . 

William Lawrence. . . 

William Lawrence. . . 

William Lawrence. . . 

John F. McKinney. . 

Lewis B. Gunkel. . . . 

John A. McMahon. . 

John A. McMahon. . 

J. Warren Keifer 

Emanuel Schultz 

Benjamin LeFevre. . 

Charles M. Anderson 

S. S. Yoder 

S. S. Yoder 

M. M. Gantz 

Ferd. C. Layton .... 

Ferd. C. Layton . . . . 

George A. Marshall. . 

Robert B. Gordon. . . 

Robert B. Gordon... 

Harvey C. Garber. . . 



Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Muskingum. 

Muskingum . 

Muskingum . 

Champaign. 

Champaign. 

Champaign. 

Ch:ir:"7?.ign. 

Unampaign. 

Warren. 

Warren. 

Warren. 

Warren. 

Warren. 

Warren. 

Champaign. 

Champaign. 

Logan. 

Champaign. 

Logan. 

AUen. 

Allen. 

AUen. 

Darke. 

Darke. 

Miami. 

Logan. 

Logan. 

Logan. 

Miami. 

Montgomery'' 

Montgomery 

Montgomery 

Clark. 

Montgomery 

Shelby. 

Darke. 

Allen. 

Allen. 

Miami. 

Auglaize. 

Auglaize. 

Auglaize. 

Auglaize. 

Auglaize. 

Darke. 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 
Counties — Defiance, Henry, Paulding, Putnam, Van Wert and Williams. 




JOHN S. SNOOK, Paulding, Ohio. 



John S.^ Snook, Democratic Representative from this district, was bom 
December 18, 1862, on a farm in Carryall Township, near Antwerp, Ohio; he is 
the son of William N. and Martha Snook; attended the Antwerp schools, from 
which he graduated in 1881; in the following year entered the Ohio Wesleyan 
University, at Delaware, Ohio, and attended the school for three years; on leav- 
ing college he took up the study of law under the instruction of Judge Wilson 
H. Snook, with whom he spent two years; he then entered the Law School of 
the Cincinnati College, from which he graduated in June, 1887; commenced the 
practice of law at Antwerp, moving to Paulding in 1890, at which place he now 
resides; in 1891 he was married to Edith May Wells, of Crawford County, Pa.; 
in 1900 was elected to represent the Fifth Ohio District in Congress, and was 
re-elected In 1902. 



(760) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



751 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE FIFTH DISTRICT. 



Years. 



Congress. 



Name. 



County. 



1813-1814 


13th 


1815-1816 


14th 


1817-1818 


15th 


1819-1820 


16th 


1821-1822 


17th 


1823-1824 


18th 


1825-1826 


19th 


1827-1828 


20th 


1829-1830 


21st 


1831-1832 


22d: 


1833-1834 


23d 


1835-1836 


24th 


1837-1838 


25th 


1839-1840 


26th 


1841-1842 


27th 


1843-1844 


28th 


1845-1846 


29th 


1847-1848 


30th. . . . . . 


1849-1850 


31st 


1851-1852 


32d 


1853-1854 


33d 


1855-1856 


34th 


1857-1858 


35th 


1859-1860 


36th 


1861-1862 


37th 


1863-1864 


38th 


1865-1866 


39th 


1867-1868 


40th 


1869-1870 


41st 


1871-1872 


42d: 


1873-1874 


43d 


1875-1876 


44th 


1877-1878 


45th 


1879-1880 


46th 


1881-1882 


47th 


1883-1884 


48th 


1885-1886 


49th 


1887-1888 


50th 


1889-1890 


51st.: 


1891-1892 


52d 


1893-1894 


53d 


1895-1896 


54th 


1897-1898 


55th 


1899-1900 


56th 


1901-1902 


57th 


1903-1904 


58th 



James Kilboume 

James Kilboume 

Philemon Beecher. . 
Philemon Beecher.. 

Joseph Vance 

John W. Campbell. 
John W. Campbell . 

William Russell 

William Russell 

William Russell. . , 
Thomas L. Hamer. 
Thomas L. Hamer. 
Thomas L. Hamer. 
William Doane. . . , 
William Doane .... 
Emery D. Potter. . . 

William Sa^vyer 

WilUam Sawyer 

Emery D. Potter. . . 
Alfred P. Edgerton. 
Alfred P. Edgerton. 

Richard Mott 

Richard Mott 

James M. Ashley. . . 
James M. Ashley. . . 
Francis C. LeBlond. 
Francis C. LeBlond. 
William Mungen . . . 
William Mungen . . . 
Charles N. Lamison 
Charles N. Lamison 
Americus V. Rice. 
Americus V. Rice. . 
Benjamin LeFevre. 
Benjamin LeFevre. 

George E. Seney 

Benjamin LeFevre'. 

George E. Seney 

George E. Seney 

Ferd. C. Layton . . . , 
Dennis D. Donovan 
Francis B. DeWitt. 
David Meekison. . . . 
David Meekison. . . , 

John S. Snook 

John S. Snook 



Franklin. 
Franklin. 
Fairfield. 
Fairfield. 
Champaign. 
Adams 
Adams .J 
Adams. 
Adams. 
Adami:. 
BroTvn. , 
Brown. 
Brown. 
Clermont.] 
Clermont. 
Lucas. 
Mercer. 
Mercer. 
Lucas. 
Defiance. 
Defiance. 
Lucas. 
Lucas. 
Lucas. 
Lucas. 
Mercer. 
Mercer. 
Hancock. 
Hancock. 
Allen. 
AUen. 
Putnam. 
, Putnam. 
Shelby. ^ 
Shelby. ^ 
Seneca. ' 
Shelby. , 
Seneca. ___ 
Seneca. 
Auglaize. 
Henry. 
Paulding. J 
Henrj'. 
Henrj'. _^ 
Paulding. 
Paulding. , 



li 



lii 



SIXTH DISTRICT. 
Counties — Brown, Clermont, Clinton, Greene, Highland and Warren. 




CHARLES Q. HILDEBRANT, Wil:^-iisgton, Ohio. 



Charles Q. Hildebrant, Republican, of this district in thre House of Repre- 
sentatives, was born October 17, 1864 ; was educated in the public schools and 
was ashore time at the Ohio State University; elected Clerk of Courts of Clinton 
County in 1890; re-elected in 1893, and again in 1896; elected a member of the 
o7th Congress in November, 1900, and to 58th in 1902; married Adda J. Hains, 
October 14, 188G, and have three children. 



(752) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL AN-NALS OF OHIO. 



763 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE SIXTH DISTRICT. 



Years. 



Congress. 



Nair^e. 



County. 



1813-1814 

1815-1816 
1817-1818 
1819-1820 
1821-1822 
1823- 1£24 
1825-1826 

1827-1828 
1829-1830 
1831-1832 
1833-1834 
1835-1836 
1837-1838 
1839-1840 
1841-1842 
1843-1844 
1845-1846 
1847-1848 

1849-1850 

1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
1857-1858 
1859-1860 
1861-1862 
1863-1864 
1865-1866 
1867-1868 
1869-1870 
1871-1872 
1873-1874 
1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1879-1880 
1881-1882 
1883-1884 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1889-1890 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



13th. 

14th. 
15th. 
16th. 
17th. 
ICth 
19th. 

20th. 

21st. 

22d. 

23d. 

24th. 

25th. 

26th. 

27th. 

28th. 

29th. 

30th. 



31st. 



32d.. 

33d. , 

34th. 

35th. 

36th. 

37th. 

3Sth. 

39th. 

40th. 

41st. 

42d:. 

43d., 

44th. 

45th. 

46th. 

47th. 

48th. 

49th. 

50th. 

51st. 

52d. 

53d. 

54th. 

55th. 

56th. 

57th. 

58th. 



rJohn S. Edwards 

I Rezin Beall 

[David Clendenen 

David Clendenen. . , : . . 

Peter Hitchcock: 

John Sloan. : 

John Sloan 

I>\in??Ti McArthur. . . . 

Jonn Thompson 

/William Creighton, Jr. 
\ Francis Muhlenburg. . . 

William Creighton, Jr. 

William Creighton, Jr. 

Samuel F. Vinton 

Samuel F. Vinton 

Calvary Morris 

Calvary Morris 

Calvarv' Morris 

Henry St. John 

Henry St. John 

. Rudolphus Dickenson . 

Rudolphus Dickenson. 

Amos E. Wood 

[John Bell 

Frederick W. Green. . . 

Andrew Ellison , . . 

Jonas R. Emrie 

Joseph R. Cockerill 

WiUiam Howard 

Chilton A. White 

Chilton A. White 

Reader W. Clark..:... 

Reader W. Clark 

John A. Smith 

John A. Smith. . : 

Isaac R. Sherwood. . :. 

Frank H. Hurd 

Jacob D. Cox 

WiUiam D.Hill. 

James M. Ritchie 

WiUiam D. HiU 

WiUiam D. Hill 

M. M. Boothman.. . :. . 

M. M. Boothman 

Denis D. Donovan. . . . 

George W. Hulick 

George W. Hulick.. :. . 

Seth W. Brown 

Seth W. Brown 

Charles Q. Hildebrant: 

Charles Q. Hildebrant. 



TrumbuU. 

Wayne. 

Trumbull. 

TrumbuU. 

Geauga. 

Wayne. 

Wayne. 

Ross. 

Columbiana. 

Ross. 

Pickaway. 

Ross. 

Ross. 

GaUia. 

GaUia. 

Athens. 

Athens. 

Athens. 

Seneca. 

Seneca. 

Sanduskj% 

SanduskJ^ 

Sandusky. 

Sandusky. 

Seneca. 

Brown. 

Highland. 

Adams. 

Clermont. 

Bro^Mi. 

Bro^n. 

Clermont. 

Clermont. 

Highland. 

Highland. 

Williams. 

Lucas. 

Lucas. 

Defiance. 

Lucas. 

Defiance. 

Defiance. 

WiUiams. 

WiUiams. 

Henrj'. 

Clermont. 

Clermont. 

Warren. 

Warren. 

Clinton. 

Clinton. 



■t ! 



4S— B. A. 



11 



SEVENTH DISTRICT. 
Counties — Clark, Fayette, Madison, Miami and Pickaway. 










I >^*^ 



'**##^' 



■V 






V 



It:: 



THOMAS B. KYLE. Tkoy, Ohio, 




I 
ll; 



1^ 
i;: 



Thomas B. Kyle, Republican, of Troy, was born in Troy, Ohio, March 10, 
1856, and has lived there all his life; is the son of Lieutenant Barton S. Kyle, of 
the 71st O. V. I., who was killed at the battle of Shiloh, August 6, 1862; was ad- 
mitted to the practice of law in June, 1884; was elected Prosecuting Attorney of 
Miami County, 1890, and again in 1893, serving two full terms; graduated in the 
public schools of Troy in 1873, and attended Dartmouth College, being a member 
of the class of 1881; was married at LeGrand, Iowa, December, 1883, to Lettie E. 
Benedict, and have two children. Member of the 57th and 58th Congresses. 



(764) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



755 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE SEVENTH DISTRICT. 



Years. 


Congress. 


Name. 


County. 


1823-1824 


18th 

19th 

20th. . . . 

.21st 

22d 

23d 

24th 

25th 

'J'Jtn 

27th 

28th 

29th 

30th 

31st 

32d 

33d 

34th 

35th 

36th 

37th 

38th 

39th 

40th 

41st 

42d 

43d 

44th 

45th 

46th 

47th 

48th 

49th 

50th 

51st 

52d 

53d 

54th. / . . . . 

55th 

56th 

57th 

58th 


Samuel F. Vinton 


Gallia 


1825-1826 


Samuel F. Vinton 


Gallia 


1827-1828 


Samuel F. Vinton 


Gallia 


1829-1830 


Samuel F. Vinton. . . '. 


GaJha 


1831-1832 


Samuel F. Vinton 


Gallia 


1833-1834 


William Allen 


Ross 


1835-1836 


William Key Bond ; .'. . 


Ross J 


1837-1838 


William Kev Pond 


Ross 


18oy-1840 
1841-1842 


vv -iiiam Key ^--id. 

William Russell 


Adams 


1843 1844 


Joseph J. iVIcDowell 


Highland. 
Highland. 
Brown 


1845-1846 


Joseph J. McDowell. : 




/Thomas L. Hamer 


1847-1848 


\ Jonathan D. Morris 


Clermont 


1849-1850 


Jonathan D. Morris 


Clermont 


1851-1852 


Nelson Barrare 


Adams 


1853-1854 


Aaron Harlan 


Greene 


1855-1856 


Aaron Harlan . 


Greene 


1857-1858 


Aaron Harlan 


Greene 


1859-1860 


Thomas Corwin. : 


W^arren 




/Thomas Corwin 


Warren. 


1861-1862 


\Richard A. 'Harrison 


Madison. 


1863-1864 


Samuel S. Cox. : 


Franklin 


1865-1866 


Samuel Shellabarger 


Clark. 


1867-1868 


Samuel Shellabarger 


Clark. 


1869-1870 


James J. Winans 


Greene. 


1871-1872 


Samuel Shellabarger 


Clark. 


1873-1874 


Lawrence T. Neal 


Ross. 


1875-1876 


Lawrence T. Neal 


Ross. 


1877-1878 


Henry L. Dickev. . . : 


Highland. 
Lucas. 


1879-18 ^0 


Frank H. Hurd." 


1881-1882 


John P. Leedom . : 


Adams. 




/Henry L. Morev 


Butler 


1883-1884 


\ James E. Campbell. . : 


Butler; 


1885-1886 


George E. Seney 


Seneca 


1887-1888 


James E. Campbell 


Butler 


1889-1890 


Henry L. Morev 


Butler. 


1891-1892 


William E. Havnes 


Sandusky. 
Madison. 


1893-1894 


George W. W ilson '. 


1895-1896 


George W. Wilson 


Madison. 


1897-1898 


Walter L. Weaver 


Clark. 


1899-1900 


Walter L. Weaver 


Clark. 


1901-1902 


Thoms B. Kvle. . : 


Miami. 


1903-1904 


Thomas B. Kyle 


Miami. 









V: 






EIGHTH DISTRICT. 
Counties — Champaign, Delaware, Hancock, Hardin, Logan and Union. 




>^^^ 



:^J ^ 





WILLIAM R. WARNOCK. Urbana, Ohio 



William R. Warnock, Republican, of Urbana, is the son of Rev. David and 
Sarah Hitt Warnock; was born at Urbana, Ohio, August 29, 1838; by teaching and 
other employment he secured an education at the Ohio Wesleyan University, at 
Delaware, Ohio,where he graduated in July, 1861; he recruited a company and was 
commissioned as Captain and with his company was assigned to the 95th Reg- 
iment, O. V. I., in July, 1862; after one year's service he was made Major of the 
Regiment and for gallant and meritorious services at the battle of Nashville, 
Tenn., December 15 and 16. 1864, was breveted Lieutenant-Colonel and was de- 
tailed as Chief of Staff for the Eastern District of Mississippi, in which position 
he served until August, 1865. when he was mustered out of the service; during 
the three years and two months of his service he was never absent from his reg- 
iment, except on one short leave of twenty days, and participated in every march, 
skirmish and battle in which his regiment was engaged; at one time while mak- 
ing a charge with his regiment he had a horse killed under him and at another 
time was slightly wounded in the right ear; at the close of the war he returned 
to Urbana and resumed the study of law and was admitted to practice in May, 
1866; in the fall of 1867 was elected Prosecuting Attorney of Champaign County, 
Ohio, and served two terms; in 1875 was elected to represent his district in the 
Senate of Ohio, and served in 1876-7; was elected Judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas in 1879, and re-elected in :^884, and served as such Judge from 1879-1889. 
when he returned to the practice of law; at the November election of 1900 he was 
elected to represent the Eighth Ohio District in the national Congress, and was 
re-elected in 1902; married to Kathryn Murray, August 20, 18G8, and have three 
children. 



(766) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



757 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROxM THE EIGHTH DIStRICT 



Years. 



Congress. 



Name. 



1823-1824 
182S-1826 
1827-1828 
1829-1830 
1831-1832 
1833-1834 
1835-1836 
1837-1838 
183y-1840 
1841-1842 
1843-1844 
1845-1846 
1847-1848 
1849-1850 
1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
1857-1858 
1859-1860 
1861-1862 
1863-1864 
1865-1866 
1867-1868 
1869-1870 
1871-1872 
1873-1874 
1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1879-1880 
1881-1882 
1883-18P4 
1885-18.06 
1887-1888 
1889-1890 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



18th. 
19th. 
20th. 
21st.. 
22d.. 
23d.. 
24th. 
25th. 

27th! 
28th. 
29th. 
30th. 
31st.. 
32d:. 
33d.. 
34th. 
35th. 
30th. 
37th. 
38th. 
39th. 
40th. 
41st.. 
42d.. 
43d.. 
44th. 
45th. 
46th. 
47th. 
48th. 
49th. 
50th. 
51st.: 
52d.. 
53d.. 
54th. 
55th. 
56th. 
57th. 
58th. 



County. 



William Wilson 

William Wilson ... . . , 

William Wilson. ...... 

William Stanberry . . , 
William Stanberry . . . 
■Jeremiah McLene. ... 

Jeremiah McLene . . . . , 

Joseph Ridgeway 

Joseph Ridgeway 

John I. Van Meter. . . . 
Allen G. Thurman. . . . 

John L. Taylor 

John L. Taylor 

John L. Taylor 

Moses B. Corwin. 

Benjamin Stanton. . . , 
Benjamin Stanton. . . , 
Benjamin Stanton. . . . 
Samuel Shellabarger. . 

William Johnson 

James R. Hubbell 

Cornelius S. Hamilton 

John Beatty 

John Beatty , 

William Lawrence 

William Lawrence. . . . , 

J. Warren Keifer 

Ebenezer B. Finley 

J. Warren Keifer 

J. Warren Keifer 

John Little 

Robert P. Kennedy. . 
Robert P. Kennedy. . . 

D. D. Hare 

Luther M. Strong. ... 
Luther M. Strong. . . , 
Archibald Ly brand. . 
Archibald Lybrand. . . 
William R. Wamock. 
William R.Wamock. 



Licking. 

Licking. 

Licking. 

Licking. 

Licking. 

Franklin. 

FrankUn. 

Franklin. 

Franklin. 

Pike. 

Ross. 

Ross. 

Ross. 

Ross. 

Champaign. 

Logan. 

Logan. 

Logan. 

Clark. 

Richland. 

Delaware. 

Union. 

Morrow 

Morrow. 

Logan. 

Logan. 

Clark. 

Crawford. 

Clark. 

Clark. 

Greene. 

Logan. 

Logan. 

Wyandot. 

Wyandot. 

Wyandot. 

Delaware. 

Delaware. 

Champaign. 

Champaign, 



"""^ 



NINTH DISTRICT. 
Counties — Lucas, Fulton, Ottawa and Wood. 



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JAMES H. SOUTHARD, Toledo, Ohio. 

James Harding Southard, Republican, of Toledo, was born on a farm in 
Washington Township, Lucas County, Ohio, January 20, 1851; is the son of Sam- 
uel and Charlotte Southard; Samuel Southard came to this country from Devon- 
shire, England, about 1833, and located in Lucas County, where he has since 
resided; Charlotte Southard came to Lucas County from central New York with 
■her parents at a later date. He attended Hopewell district school, Toledo public 
schools and studied at Adritn, Michigan, and Oberlin, Ohio, preparatory to enter 
Cornell University, where he graduated in 1874; began to study law in 1875, 
and was admitted to practice in 1877; in 1822 was appointed Assistant Prosecut- 
ing Attorney of Lucas County; afterwards was twice elected Prosecuting Attorney 
of said county and served in that office six years; was elected to the Fifty-fourth 
Fifty-fifth, Fifty-sixth, Fifty-seventh and Fifty-eighth Congresses and is renom- 
inated for the Fifty-ninth Congress. 



(768) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



759 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE NINTH DISTRICT. 



Years. 



Congress. 



Name. 



County. 



1823-1824 
1825-1826 
1827-1828 
1829-1830 
1831-1832 
1833-1834 
1835-1836 
1837 1838 
1839-1840 
1841-1842 
1843-1844 
1845-1846 
1847-1848 
1849-1850 
1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
1857-1858 
1859-1860 
1861-1862 
1863-1864 
1865-1866 
1867-1868 
1869-1870 
1871-1872 
1873-1874 
1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1879-1880 
1881-1882 
1883-1854 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1889-1890 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



18th, 
19th 
20th 
21st. 
22d. 
23d. 
24th 

26th 
27th 
28th 
29th 
30th 
31st. 
32d. 
33d. 
34th 
35th 
36th 
37th 
38th 
39th 
4Qth, 
'41st. 
42d. 
43d: 
44th, 
45th 
46th, 
47th, 
48th, 
49th. 
50th, 
51st. 
52d: 
53d. 
54th, 
55th 
56th 
57th, 
58th, 



Philemon Beecher 

Philemon Beecher 

Philemon Beecher 

WiUiam W. Irwin. . . . 

William W. Irwin 

John Chaney 

Joh Chaney 

Tnhv Chp^P"^ ....... 

^V liiiam Me Jiil 

WiUiam MediU 

Elias Florence 

Augustus L. Perrill. . . 
Thomas O. Edwards.. 

Edson B. Olds 

Edson B. Olds 

Frederick W. Green . . 
Cooper K. Watson . . . 
Lawrence W. Hall. . . 

John Carey 

Warren P. Noble. . . 

Warren P. Noble 

Ralph P. Buckland... 
Ralph P. Buckland. . . 
Edward F. Dickinson. 

Charles Foster 

James W. Robinson. . 
Early F. Poppleton. . 

John S. Jones 

George L. Converse. . 
James S. Robinson. . . 
James S. Robinson. . . 
William C. Cooper. . . . 
William C. Cooper. . . 
William C. Cooper. . . 
Joseph H. Outhwaite. 
Byron F. Ritchie. . . . 
James H. Southard. . . 
James H. Southard. . . 
James H. Southard.. . 
James H. Southard. . . 
James H. Southard. . . 



Fairfield. 
Fairfield. 
Fairfield. 
Fairfield. 
Fairfield. 
Fairfield, 
Fairfield. 
Fairfield. 

Fairfield. 

Pickaway. 

Pickaway. 

Fairfield. 

Pickaway. 

Pickaway. 

Seneca. 

Seneca. 

Crawford. 

Wyandot. 

Seneca. 

Seneca. 

Sandusky. 

Sandusky. 

Sandusky. 

Seneca. 

Union. 

Delaware. 

Delaware. 

Franklin. 

Hardin. 

Hardin. 

Knox. 

Knox. 

Knox. 



Lucas. 
Lucas. 
Lucas. 
Lucas. 
Lucas. 



/\ 



1 

II?: 



TENTH DISTRICT. 
Counties — Adams, Gallia, Jackson, Lawrence, Pike and Scioto. 



STEPHEN A. MORGAN, Oak Hill, Ohio. 

Stephen Morgan, Republican, of Oak Hill, was born in Jackson County, Ohio. 
January 25, 1854; was reared on a farm and educated in the country schools, at 
Worthington and Lebanon, Ohio; taught in the public schools of Jackson County 
for a number of years; was School Examiner for nine years and principal of the 
Oak Hill schools for fifteen years; was elected to the Fifty-sixth, Fifty-seventh 
and Fifty-eighth Congresses. 



(760) 



iiii 

■'1 

"i 



-#««'»;:'*v' 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



761 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE TENTH DISTRICT. 




1823-1824 
1825^1826 
1827-1828 
1829-1830 
1831-1832 
1833-1834 
1835-1836 
1837-1838 
1839-1540 
1841-1842 
1843-1844 
1845^1846 
1847-1848 
1849-1850 
1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
1857-1858 
1859-1860 
1861-1862 
1863-1864 
1865-1866 
1867-1868 
1869-1870 
1871-1872 
1873-1874 
1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1879-1880 
1881-1882 
1883-1884 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1889-1900 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



ISth. 
19th. 
20th. 
21st. 
t22d. 
23d. 
24th. 
25th. 

2Gin 

27th. 

28th. 

29th. 

30th. 

31st. 

32d. 

33d. 

34th. 

35th. 

36th. 

37th. 

38th. 

39th. 

40th. 

41st. 

42d. 

43d. 

44th. 

45th. 

46th. 

47th. 

48th. 

49th. 

50th. 

51st. 

52d. 

53d. 

54th. 

55th. 

56th. 

57th. 

5Sth. 



John Patterson .... 
Thomas Shannon . . 
John Davenport . . . 

WiUiam Kennon 

Wilham Kennon 

Joseph Vance 

Samson Mason 

Samson Mason.. . . 
niimsoii Mafao'ii. .... 

Samson Mason 

Alfred P. Stone. . . . 
Columbus Delano . . 
Danial Duncan. , . . 
Charles Sweet zer. . . 
Charles Sweetzer. . . 
John L. Taylor. . . . 
Oscar F. Moore. . . . 

Joseph Miller 

Carey A. Trimble . . 
Carey A. Trimble. . 
James M. Ashley. . .' 
James M. Ashley. . . 
James M. Ashley. . . 
Erasmus D. Peck. . 
Erasmus D. Peck. . 

Charles Foster 

Charles Foster 

Charles Foster 

Thomas Ewing .... 

John B. Rice 

Frank H. Hurd. . . . 

Jacob Romeis 

Jacob Romeis 

William E. Haynes. 
Robert E. Doane. . 
Hezekiah S. Bundy. 
Lucien J. Fenton. . 
Lucien J. Fenton. . 
Stephen Moro;an. . 
Stephen Morgan. . . 
Stephen Morgan . . . 



Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Champaign. 

Clark. 

Clark. ^ 

CbrV 

Clark. 

Franklin. 

Knox. 

Licking. 

Delaware. 

Delaware. 

Ross. 

Scioto. 

Ross. 



Lucas. 

Lucas. 

Lucas. 

Wood. 

Wood. 

Seneca. 

Seneca. 

Seneca. 

Fairfield. 

Sandusky. 

Lucas. 

Lucas. 

Lucas. 

Sandusky. 

CHnton. 

Jackson. 



Jackson. 
Jackson. 
Jackson. 



ELEVENTH DISTRICT. 
Counties — ^Athens, Fairfield, Hocking, Meigs, Perry, Ross and Vinton. 



r. 



/. 




CHARLES H. GROSVENOR, Athens, Ohio. 



Charles Henry Grosvenor, Republican, of Athens, was born at Pomfret, 
Windham County, Conn., September 20, 1833; his grandfather was Col. Thomas 
Grosvenor, of the Second Connecticut Regiment in the Revolution, and his father 
was Major Peter Grosvenor, who served in the Tenth Connecticut Regiment in 
the War of 1812; his father carried him from Connecticut to Ohio in May, 1838, 
but there was no school house near where he settled until he was fourteen years 
old, when he attended a few terms in a country school house in Athens County, 
Ohio; taught school and studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1857; was chair- 
man of the executive committee of the Ohio State Bar Association from its or- 
ganization for many years; served in the Union Army in the Eighteenth Ohio 
Volunteers from July, 1861, to November, 18G5; was Major, Lieutenant-Colonel, 
Col. and Brevet Brigadier-General of Volunteers, commanding a brigade at the 
battle of Nashville, in December, 1864; has held divers township and village 
offices; was a member of the state House of Representatives of Ohio, 1874-1878, 
serving as Speaker of the House for two years; was presidential elector for the 
Fifteenth District of Ohio in 1872. and was chosen to carry the electoral vote of 
the state to Washington; was' presidential elector at large in 1880; was a member 
of the Board of Trustees of the Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home, at 
iXenIa, Ohio, from April, 1880-1888, and president of the board for five years; 
was elected to the Forty-ninth, Fiftieth, Fifty-first, Fifty-third, Fifty-fourth and 
Fifty-fifth, Fifty-sixth, Fifty-seventh and Fifty-eighth Congresses. He was a 
delegate at large to the national convention at St. Louis, which nominated Wil- 
liam McKinley, and re-elected to the same position to the convention in Philadel- 
phia that renominated McKinley. In the Fifty-eighth Congress he is a member 
of the committee on Rules, the committee of Ways and Means, and is chairman 
of the committee on Merchant Marine and Fisheries. 

(762)j . .._ - ^ 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



763 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE ELEVENTH DISTRICT. 



I "1 
Years. 



Congress. 



[ [ Name. 



1823^1824 
1825-1826 
1827-1828 
1829-1830 
1831-1832 
1833-1834 
1835-1836 
1837-1838 
1839-1840 
1841-1842 
1843-1844 
1845-1846 
1847-1848 
1849-1850 
1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
1857-1858 
1859-1860 
1861-1862 
1863-1864 
1865-1866 
1867-1868 
1869-1870 
1871-1872 
1873-1874 
1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1879-1880 
1881-1882 
1883-1884 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1889-1890 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



18th. 

19th. 

20th. 

21st., 

22d:. 

23d.. 

24th. 

25th. 

26th. 

27th. 

28th. 

2gth. 

30th. 

31st. 

32d. 

33d. 

34th. 

35th. 

36th. 

37th. 

38th. 

39th. 

40th. 

41st. 

42d. 

43d: 

44th. 

45th, 

46th. 

47th. 

48th. 

49th. 

50th, 

51st. 

52d. 

53d. 

54th 

55th 

56th 

57th 

58th 



John C.Wright 

John C. Wright 

John C. Wrgiht 

Humphrey H. Leavitt 
Humphrey H. Leavitt 

James M. Bell 

William Kennon 

James Alexander, Jr.. 

Isaac Parish 

Benjamin S. Cowan. . 

Jacob Brinkerhoff 

Jacob Brinkerhoff 

John K. Miller....... 

JohnK. MiUer 

George H. Busby .... 

Thomas Ritchey 

Valentine B. Horton. 
Valentine B. Horton. 

Charies D. Martin 

Valentine B. Horton. 
Wells A. Hutchins . . . 
Hezekiah S, Bundy. . 

John T.Wilson 

JohnT. Wilson...... 

JohnT. Wilson 

Hezekiah S. Bundy. . 

John L. Vance 

Henry S. Neal 

Henry L. Dickey 

Henry S. Neal 

John W. McCormick. . 

W. W. Ellsbuiy 

Albert C. Thompson. . 
Albert C. Thompson. . 
John M. Pattison .... 
Charles H. Grosvenor. 
Charles H. Grosvenor. 
Charles H. Grosvenor. 
Charles H. Grosvenor. 
Charles H. Grosvenor, 
Charles H. Grosvenor 



County. 



Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Guernsey. 

Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Gucmse3- 

Bebnont. 

Richland. 

Richland. 

Knox. 

Knox. 

Marion. 

Perry. 

Meigs. 

Meigs. 

Fairfield. 

Meigs. 

Scioto. 

Jackson. 

Adams 

Adams. 

Adams. 

Jackson. 

Gallia. 

Lawrence. 

Highland. 

Lawrence. 

GaUia. 

Brown. 

Scioto. 

Scioto. 

Clermont. 

Athens. 

Athens. 

Athens. 

Athens. 

Athens. 

Athens. 



TWELFTH DISTRICT. 
Franklin County. 



-/^•^ »->*•' ¥>''SA*«i»<-'V 



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I 



D. C. BADGER, Columbus, Oh.o. 



^\4 



Dewitt C. Badger. Democratic Representative frum this district, was born 
in Madison County, Ohio, in 1858. He worked on a farm and attended district 
school until 17 years of age, when he taught school until he saved enough to 
pay for two terms at Bloomingburg Academy, and a short term at Mt. Union 
College. 

Upon his admission to the bar by the Supreme Court of Ohio, in :!881, he 
began the practice of the law at London. In 1882 he was elected Prosecuting 
Attorney of Madison County, on the Democratic ticket; in 1893, Judge of the 
Common Pleas Court and re-elected in 1897. In 1899 Mr. Badger was the Dem- 
ocratic candidate for Judge of the Supreme Court of Ohio. In 1902 he was 
elected to Congress from the 12th district. 

Mr. Badger has been successful as a practicing attorney, and has been en- 
gaged in many important cases in the various courts of this state. He is now 
associated in the practice with D. B, Ulrey, under the firm name of Badger & 
Ulrey, at Columbus. 

Judge Badger is a man of strong personality, and good common sense. In 
1885 he was married to his present wife, and has three children. 



(764) 



,^i^V^.UiU»>^.• > 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



765 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE TWELFTH DISTRICT. 



Years. 



Congress. 



Name. 



County. 



1823-1824 
1825-1826 
1827-1828 
1829-1830 
1831-1832 
1833-1834 
1835-1836 

1839-1840 
1841-1842 
1843-1844 
1845-1846 
1847-1848 
1849-1850 
1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
1857-1858 
1859-1860 
1861-1862 
1863-1864 
1865-1866 
1867-1868 
1869-1870 
1871-1872 
1873-1874 
1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1879-1880 
1881-1882 
1883-1884 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1889-1890 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



18th. 
19th. 
20th. 
21st. 
22d. 
23d: 
24th. 
25t]i. 
26th. 
27th. 
28th. 
29th. 
30th. 
31st. 
32d. 
3.3d. 
34th. 
35th. 
36th. 
37th. 
38th. 
39th, 
40th. 
41st. 
42d. 
43d. 
44th. 
45th. 
46th. 
47th. 
4Sth. 
49th. 
50th. 
51st. 
52d. 
53d. 
54th. 
55th. 
56th. 
57th. 
58th, 



John Sloan , 

John Sloan 

John Sloan 

John Thompson , 

John Thompson 

Robert Mitchell 

Elias Howell . . 

Ak"'r.'"r''ir Harper 

Jonathan Taylor 

Joshua Mathiot 

Samuel F. Vinton 

Samuel F. Vinton 

Samuel F. Vinton. . . . . 

Samuel F. Vinton 

John Welch 

Edson B. Olds 

Samuel Galloway , 

Samuel S. Cox. .'. , 

Samuel S. Cox 

Samuel S. Cox , 

William E. Finck. . . .*. 

William E. Finck 

Philadelph Van Trump 
Philadelph Van Trump 
Philadelph Van Trump 

Hugh J. Jewett 

Ansel T. Walling , 

Thomas Ewing 

Henry S. Neal 

George L. Converse. . . 

Alphonso Hart 

A. C. Thompson 

Jacob J. Pugsley 

Jacob J. Pugsley , 

William H. Enochs 

Jos. H. Outhwaite. . . . , 

David K. Watson , 

John J. Lentz 

John J. Lentz 

Emmett Thompkins 

D. C. Badger 



Wayne. 
Wayne. 
Wayne. 
Columbiana. 
Columbiana. 
Muskingum . 
Licking. 
Muskingum . 
Licking. 
Licking. 
Gallia. 
Gallia. 
Gallia. 
Gallia. 
Athens. 
Pickaway. 
Franklin. 
FrankUn. 
•Franklin. 
Franklin. 
Perry. 
Perry. 
Fairfield. 
Fairfield. 
Fairfield. 
Franklin. 
Pickaway. 
Fairfield. 
Lawrence. 
Franklin. 
Highland. 
Scioto. 
Highland. 
Highland. 
Lawrence. 
Franklin. 
Frankhn. 
FrankHn. 
Franklin. 
Franklin. 
Franklin. 



li^ 



J' I 



^ 



THIRTEENTH DISTRICT. 
Counties — Crawford, Erie, Marion, Sandusky, Seneca and Wyandot 




AMOS HENRY JACKSON. 



Amos Henry Jackson, Republican, of Fremont, was born in Delaware County, 
New York, near the village of Franklin, May^ 10, 18^7; in 1854 moved with his 
l)arents to Gibson, Steuben County, N. Y., where he attended the village school 
until 1862, when the family moved to a farm near Corning, N. Y., where he 
worked with his father until 1866. About this time he was seized with the spirit 
of the day among lads of his age, "a burning desire to go west;" and having up 
to this time managed to accumulate about $500, taking this fund with him he 
started across the continent landing first in St. Louis, While waiting for a train 
at this point he fell asleep in the railroad station and when he awoke he found 
himself minus his roll of cash, which prevented him from going farther west 
and compelled him to take employment at whatever he could find. For a time 
he found work on some bridge building, but soon after started out for himself 
in the street-vending business, which he continued to follow very successfully 
until 1882, when he engaged in the manufacture of muslin and flannelette gar- 
ments for men, women and children, with factories at Fremont, Sandusky, Tiffin 
and Clyde, Ohio; is president of the Jackson Knife & Shear Company, of Fre- 
mont; was elected mayor, of Fremont in 1897, and re-elected in 1899, serving 
two terms; was married November 28, 1872, to Miss Mary Sharp, of Fremont, 
and they have three daughters; was elected to the Fifty-eighth Congress, receiv- 
ing 22,496 to 22,169 for James A. Norton, Democrat, 441 for Hewson L. Peeke. 
Prohibitionist, and 402 for Charles R. Martin, Socialist Labor. In this Congress 
Jie served on the committee on Patents, and the committee on Manufactures. 



(766) 



rHE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



767 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE THIRTEENTH DISTRICT. 



Years. 



Congress. 



Name. 



County. 



1823-1824 
1825-1826 
1827-1828 
1829-1830 
1831-1832 
1833-1834 
1835-1836 
1837-1838 
1839-^SiO 
1841-1842 
1843-1844 
1845-1846 
1847-1848 
1849-1850 
1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
1857-1858 
1859-1860 
1861-1862 
1863-1864 
1865-1866 
1867-1868 
1869-1870 
1871-1872 
1873-1874 
1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1879-1880 
1881-1882 
1883-1884 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1889-1890 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



18th. 

19th. 

20th. 

21st., 

22d. 

23d:, 

24th. 

25th. 

26th. 

27th! 

28th. 

29th. 

30th. 

31st. 

32d. 

33d. 

34th. 

35th. 

36th. 

37th. 

38th. 

39th. 

40th. 

41st. 

42d: 

43d. 

44th. 

45th. 

46th. 

47th. 

48th. 

49th. 

50th. 

51st. 

52d. 

53d. 

54th. 

55th. 

56th. 

57th. 

58th. 



Ehsha Whittlesey 

Elisha Whittlesey 

Elisha Whittlesey 

Elisha Whittlesey 

Elisha Whittlesey 

David Spangler 

David Spangler 

Daniel F. Leadbetter. . 
Dunicl F. Leadbetter.. 

James 3lattheTv-s 

Perley B. Johnson. . . . 

Isaac Parish 

Thomas Richey 

William A. Whittlesey. 

James M. Gaylord 

WiUiam D. Lindsey:. . 

John Sherman 

John Sherman 

John Sherman 

Samuel T. Worcester. . 

JohnO'Neil 

Columbus Delano 

George W. IMorgan 

George W. Morgan . . . 

George W. Morgan 

Milton I. Southard 

Milton I. Southard 

Milton I. Southard 

Adoniram J. Warner. . 

Gibson Atherton 

George L. Converse. . . 
Jos. H. Outhwaite. . . . 
Jos. H. Outhwaite. . . . 
Jos. H. Outhwaite. . . . 

Irvine Dungan 

Darius D. Hare 

Stephen D. Harris. . . . 

James A. Norton 

James A. Norton 

James A. Norton 

A. H. Jackson 



Trumbull. 

Trumbull. 

Trumbull. 

Trumbull. 

Trumbull. 

Coshocton. 

Coshocton. 

Holmes. ^ 

Holincs. 

Cosnocton 

Morgan. 

Guernsey. 

Perry. 

Washington. 

Morgan. 

Erie. 

Richland. 

Richland. 

Richland. 

Huron. 

Muskingum. 

Rnox. 

Knox. 

Knox. 

Knox. 

Muskingum . 

Muskingum. 

Muskingum . 

Washington. 

Licking, 

Franklin. 

Franklin. 

Franklin. 

Franklin. 

Jackson. 

Wyandot. 

Seneca. 
Seneca. 
Seneca. 
Sandusky. 



•'*'«^l. 



I 

■- ^ ■ I; 

Counties — ^Ashland, Huron, Knox, Lorain, Morrow and Richland. ' j { i 



AMOS R. WEBER. 



Amos R. Webber, Congressman Fourteenth District, was born January 21, 
1852, in Hinckley, Ohio. He was educated in the public schools of that place 
and in Baldwin University, from which institution he graduated; was admitted 
to the bar in Medina, Ohio, as a student of the firm of Blake, Woodward & 
Lewis; opened an office in Elyria, Ohio, in 1S9G; was Prosecuting Attorney for 
two terms. Mr. Webber was elected to the Common Pleas bench in 1901, which 
position he now holds. He is now the Republican nominee of the Fourteenth 
District for Congress. He married Ida E. Finch. 



(768) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



769 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE FOURTEENTH DISTRICT. 




1823-1824 
1825-1826 
1827-1828 
1829-1830 
1831-1832 
1833-1834 
1835-1836 
1837-1838 
1839-1810 
1841-1842 
1843-1844 
1845-184G 
1847-1848 
1849-1850 
1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
1857-1858 
1859-1860 
1861-1862 
1863-1864 
1865-1866 
1867-1868 
1869-1870 
1871-1872 
1873-1874 
.1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1879-1880 
1881-1882 
1883-1884 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1889-1890 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 

1904 

1903-1904 



18th. 
19th. 
20th. 
21st. 
22d: 
23d: 
24th. 
25th. 
26fh. 
27 tn. 
28th. 
29th. 
30th. 
31st. 
32d. 
33d. 
34th. 
35th. 
36th. 
37th. 
38th. 
39th. 
40th. 
41st. 
42d: 
43d. 
44th. 
45th. 
46th. 
47th. 
48th, 
49th, 
50th. 
51st. 
52d. 
53d. 
54th, 
55th, 
56th, 
57th, 
57th, 
58th 



Mordecai Bartley 

Mordecai Bartley 

Mordecai Bartley 

Mordecai Bartley 

Eleutheros Cook 

William Patterson 

William Patterson 

William H. Hunter. . . . . . 

(Tior^rp-p Sweney 

Georji,e Sweney. . . . f. . . . 
Alexander J. Harper, Jr. 
Alexander J. Harper, Jr. 

Nathan Evans 

Nathan Evans 

Alexander Harper, Jr 

Harvey H. Johnson 

Philemon Bliss 

Philemon Bliss 

Harrison G. Blake 

Harrison G. Blake 

George Bliss 



Martin Welker , 

Martin Welker. . , . . . 

James Monroe 

John Berry , 

Jacob P. Cowan. . . 
Ebenezer B. Finley. 
Gibson Atherton. . . 
George W. Geddes . 
George W. Geddes , 
C. H. Grosvenor. . . 
Chas. P. Wickham. 
Chas. P. Wickham. , 
James W. Owens. . . 
Michael D. Harter. 
Winfield S. Kerr. . . 
WinfieldS. Kerr... 
Wmfield S. Kerr. . . 
William W. Skiles.. 

A. R. Webber 

A. R. Webber 



Richland. 

Richland. 

Richland. 

Richland. 

Huron. 

Richland. 

Richland. 

Huron. 

Crawford. 

Crawford. 

Muskingum . 

Muskingum . 

Guernsey. 

Guernsey. 

Muskingum . 

Ashland. 

Lorain. 

Lorain. 

Medina. 

Medina. 

Portage. 



Wayne. 

Wayne. 

Lorain. 

Wyandot. 

Ashland. 

Crawford. 

Licking. 

Richland. 

Richland. 

Athens. 

Huron. 

Huron. 

Licking. . 

Richland. 



Shelby. 
Lorain. 
Lorain. 



\''% 



40— B. A. 



HENRY C. VAN VOORHIS, Zanesville, Ohio. 

Henry Clay Van Voorhis, Republican, of Zanesville, was born in Licking 
Township, Muskingum County, Ohio, May 11, 1852; was educated in the public 
schools and at Dennison University; was admitted to the bar in 1874; was chair- 
man of the Republican county committee from 1879 to 1884; was a delegate to 
the Republif^an national convention at Chicago in 1884; was elected to the Fifty- 
third, Fifty-fourth, Fifty-fifth, Fifty-sixth Congresses, and re-elected to the Fifty- 
seventh and Fifty-eighth Congresses. 



FIFTEENTH niSTTTTCT - - ifj: 

h\ I, 

Counties — Guernsey, Morgan, Muskingum, Noble and Washington. ] i 



(770) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



771 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE FIFTEENTH DISTRICT. 



Years. 



Congress. 



Name. 



County. 



1833-1834 
1835-1836 
1837-1838 
1839-1840 
1841-1842 
1843-1844 
1845-1846 
1847 -1S4« 
i84y-l85o 
1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
1857-1858 
1859-1860 
1861-1862 
1863-1864 
1865-1866 
1867-1868 
1869-1870 
1871-1872 
1873-1874 
1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1879-1880 
1881-1882 
1883-1884 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1889-1890 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



23d. 
24th. 
25th. 
26th. 
27th. 
2Sth. 
29th. 
30t>^ 
31si. 
32d. 
33d. 
34th. 
35th. 
36th. 
37th. 
3Sth. 
39th. 
40th. 
41st. 
42d. 
43d. 
44th. 
45th. 
46th. 
47th. 
48th. 
49th. 
50th. 
51st. 
52d. 
-53d. 
54th. 
55th. 
56th. 
57th. 
58th. 



Jonathan Sloan 

Jonathan Sloan 

John W.Allen 

John W.Allen 

Benjamin S. Cowan 

Joseph Morris 

Joseph Morris 

William Kennen, Jr 

Wiliiaii^ 1^'. Hunter 

William F. Hunter 

William R. Sapp 

William R. Sapp 

Joseph Burns . 

A\'illiam Helmick . 

Robert H. Nugen 

James R. Morris 

Tobias A. Plants : . 

Tobias A. Plants 

El'akim H. Moore 

William P. Sprague 

William P. Sprague 

Nelson H. Van Vorhes. .'. 

Nelson H. Van Vorhes 

George W. Geddes 

Rufus R. Dawes 

Adoniram J. Warner 

Beriah Wilkins 

Chas. H. Gorsvenor 4 

Chas. H. Goi-svenor 

Michael D. Harter 

H. C. Van Voorhis 

H. C. Van Voorhis 

H. C. Van Voorhis 

H. C. Van Voorhis 

H. C. Van Voorhis 

H. C. Van Voorhis 



Portage. 

Portage. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Belmont. 

Monroe. 

Monroe. 

Belmont. 

Monroe. 

Monroe. 

Knox. 

Knox. 

Coshocton. 

Tuscarawas . 

Tuscarawas . 

Meigs. 

Athens. 

Morgan. 

Morgan. 

Athens. 

Athens. 

Athens. 

Richland. 

Washington. 

Washington. 

Tuscarawas . 

Athens. 

Athens. 

Richland. 

Muskingum . 

Muskingum . 

Muskingum. 

Muskingum . 

Muskingum . 

Muskingum . 



i:| 



SIXTEENTH DISTRICT. 
Counties — Belmont, Carroll, Harrison, Jefferson and MonroP. 



pi' 

I- 



CAPELL L. WEEMS, St. Clairsville, Ohio. 11' 

Capell L. Weems, Republican, of St. Clairsville, was born at Whigville, Noble 
County, Ohio, July 7, 1860; received a common school and academic education; 
began teaching school at sixteen and taught and superintended village schools 
until commencing the practice of law; studied law under the firm of Daizell & 
McGinnis, at Caldwell, Ohio; was admitted to the bar October, 1881; formed part- i ; 

nership for the practice of law with J. M. McGinnis at Caldwell, Ohio, April, 1; 

1883; was nominated on the Republican ticket in Noble County for Prosecuting j 

Attorney in 1884, and was elected for a term of three years; in 1887 and before j' 

the expiration of term as Prosecuting Attorney, was nominated and elected • || 
Representative from Noble County in the lower House of the General Assembly j' 

of Ohio: served one term; was a member of the Judiciary committee and was ! 

appointed and served as a member of the special joint committee of the two ! 

Houses which prepared the. constitutional amendments, which were submitted ; 

to the people of Ohio in 1890; declined a renomination and removed to Cleve- |: 

land, where he resided one year; in 189Q removed to St. Clairsville* in 1893 ij 

was elected Prosecuting Attorney of Belmont County and was re-elected in 1896, 1 : 

serving six years in that capacity; in 1903 was nominated by the Reoublicans i- 

of the 16th Congressional District of Ohio to fill the unexpired term of one year \ \ 

and four months in the 58th Congress caused by the resignation of the Hon. I 

J. J. Gill; was elected and took his seat November 9, 1903; was reD'^minated | 

for the 59th Congress; he is a member of the Elks, Masons and Knights of j 

Pythias. 



(772) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



773 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE SIXTEENTH DISTRICT. 



Years. 




Name. 



County. 



1833-1834 


23d 


1835-1836 


24th 


1837-1838 


25th 


1839-1840 


26th 


1841-1842 


27th 


1843-1844 


28th 


1S45-1S!« 


2Q+b 


l»4/-18-i» 


bum 


1849-1850 


31st 


1851-1852 


32d 


1853-1854 


33d 


1855-1856 


34th 


1857-1858 


35th 


1859-1860 


36th 


1861-1862 


37th 


1863-1864 


38th 


1865-1866 


39th 


1867-1868 


40th 


1869-1870 


41st 


1871-1872 


42d 


1873-1874 


43d 


1875-1876 


44th 


1877-1878 


45th 


1879-1880 


46th 


1881-1882 


47th 


1883-1884 


48th 


1885-1886 


49th 


1887-1888 


50th 


1889-1890 


51st 


1891-1892 


52d.: 


1893-1894 


53d 


1895-1896 


54th 


1897-1898 


55th 


1899-1900 


56th 


1901-1902 


57th 


1903-1904 


58th 



Elisha Whittlesey 

Elisha Whittlesey 

/Elisha Whittlesey 

\ Joshua R. Giddings. . . 

Joshua R. Giddings. . , 

Joshua R. Giddings . . . 

James Matthews 

Tohr. F). Cummins 

Joim D. Cummins 

Moses Hoagland 

John Johnson 

Edward Ball 

Edward Ball 

Cydnor B. Tompkins . . 

Cvdnor B. Tompkins. 

William P. Cutler. . . . 

Jospeh W. White 

John A. Bingham. . . , 

John A. Bingham. . . . . 

Eliakin H. Moore:. . . . 

John A." Bingham 

Lorenzo Danford 

Lorenzo Danford 

Lorenzo Danford 

WiUiam McKinley, Jr. 
/Jonathan T. Updegraff 
\ Joseph D. Taylor 

Beriah Wilkins ....... 

George W. Geddes .... 

Beriah Wilkins . , 

James W, Owens. ^. 

Lewis P. Ohliger. ..'.,. 

/John G, Warwick 

\ Albert J. Pearson .... 

Lorenzo Danford 

Lorenzo Danford 

Joseph J. Gill 

Joseph J. Gill 

Capell L. Weems . . 



Trumbull. 

Trumbull. 

Trumbull. 

Ashtabula. 

Ashtabula. 

Ashtabula. 

Coshocton. 

Columbiana. 

Columbiana. 

Holmes. . 

Coshocton, 

Muskingum . 

Muskingum . 

Morgan. 

Morgan. 

Washington. 

Guernsey. 

Harrison. 

Harrison. 

Athens. 

Harrison. 

Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Stark. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Guernsey. 

Tuscarawas . 

Richland. 

Tuscarawas . 

Licking. 

Stark. 

Stark. 

Stark. 

Stark. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Belmont. 



- SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT. 
Counties — Coshocton, Holmes, Licking, Tuscarawas and Wayne. 









%:- 



L 



itfiW-Wfcrf- ,A.f,'ir ''^'rMli}L%',tJ>h(.i^'<i?f', 



^':^.■^^.'ati.^^^1:,.-^1il^.^.l^t^^^A,,.£>l^atei^ 



JOHN W. CASSINGHAM, Coshoctox, Ohio. 



John W. Cassingham, Democrat, of Coshocton, born June 22, 1840, and re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of that place; was married November 
5, 1863, to Caroline Lamberson; was Deputy Treasurer of his county from 1S57- 
1868, and served as County Auditor from 1880-1887. besides filling several minor 
local offices; was engaged in mercantile and coal mining operations, prior to 
1880, and since then in operating coal mines and in the manufacture of paer, the 
latter business ceasing in 189:3. His interest in the public affairs of the town 
has always been great, having been Trustee of the Public Library, since its 
organization, and also a member of the board of education from 1S8G to the pres- 
ent time, he is president of the Commercial National Bank of Coshocton; his 
means are now largely invested in farm property, although he is somewhat in- 
terested in coal mining tnd manufacturing; was delgate to the national Demo- 
cratic convention at Chicago in 1896, and was elected to the Fifty-seventh Con- 
gress, receiving 26,275 votes, and re-elected to the 58th Congress, receiving 
19,573 votes. 



(774) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



775 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE SEVENTEENTH DISTRICT. 



Years. 



Conojess. 



Name. 



County. 



1833-1834 
1835-1836 

1837-1838 
1839-1840 
1841-1842 
1843-1844 
1845-1846 
1847-1S48 
1849-1850 
1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
1857-1858 
1859-1860 
^861-1 862 
1863-1864 
1865-1866 
1867-1868 
1869-1870 
1871-1872 
1873-1874 
1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1879-1880 

1881-1882 
1883-1884 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1889-1890 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



23d. 
24th, 

25th. 
26th. 
27th. 
28th. 
29th 
30th, 
31st. 
32d. 
33d. 
34th. 
3oth. 
36th. 
37th. 
38th. 
39th. 
40th. 
41st. 
42d. 
43d. 
44th. 
45th. 
46th. 

47th. 
48th. 
49th. 
50th. 
51st. 
52d. 
53d. 
54th. 
55th. 
56th. 
57th. 
58th. 



John Thompson. . . . . . 

John Thompson 

/Andrew W. Loomis. . . 
\Chas. D. Coffin 

John Hastings 

John Hastings 

Will'am McCausIin. . . . 

George Fries . . 

George Fna^ 

Joseph Cable 

Joseph Cable 

Wilson Shannon 

Chas. J. Albright ' 

William Lawrence 

Thomas C. Theaker. . . 

James R. Morris 

Ephraim R. Erkley. . . 

Ephraim R. Eckley . . . 

Ephraim R. Eckley . . . 

Jacob A. Ambler 

Jacob A. Ambler 

Laurin D. Woodworth. 



William McKinley, Jr. 

James Monroe 

/William McKinley, Jr. 
\ Jonathan H. Wallace. 

Joseph D. Taylor. . . . . 

A. J. Warner. . .' 

Joseph D. Taylor 

Joseph D. Taylor 

Andrew J. Pearson. . . . 

J. A. D. Richards 

Addison S. McClure. . . 

John A. McDowell . . . , 

John A. McDowell . . . , 

John W. Cassingham . , 

John W. Cassingham. 



Columbiana. 

Cohimbiana. 

Columbiana. 

Columbiana. 

Columbiana. 

Columbiana. 

Columbi^ana. 

Columbiana. 

Co^"*'r'"."<na. 

Carroll. 

Carroll. 

Belmont. 

Guernsey. 

Guernsey. 

Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Carroll. 

Carroll. 

Carroll. 

Columbiana. 

Columbiana. 

Mahoning. 

Stark. 

Lorain. 

Stark. 

Columbiana. 

Columbiana. 

Guernsey. 

Washington. 

Washington. 

Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Belmont. 

Coshocton. 

Coshocton. 



"l'' 



EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT. 
Counties — Columbiana, Mahoning and Stark. 



m 



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1mm^ik»mikiit^»^m<m^M]^«iMis* ^Smrm, '\l ..itomn;^ • ,r,Hit1i'rys;£.3yiiiMi 



JAMES KENNEDY, Youxgstown, Ohio. 



James Kennedy, Republican, was born on the 3d day of December, 1853, in 
Poland Township, Mahoning County, Ohio; prepared for college at Poland Union 
Seminary; graduated from Westminister College in 1876, thereafter entered 
the law oflfice of General T. W. Sanderson, studied law in his office and was 
admitted to the practice of the law in the spring of 1879. Mr. Kennedy was en- 
gaged in the active practice of the law until elected to the 58th Congress; was 
renominated to the 59th Congress. 



(776) 



-58- 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



777 



Representatives hi Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE EIGHTEENTH DISTRICT. 



Years. 



Congress. 



Name. 



1833-1834 
1835-1836 
1837-1838 
1839-1840 
1841-1842 
1843-1844 
1845-1846 
1847-1848 
1849-1850 
1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
1857-1858 
1859-1860 
1861-1862 
1863-1864 
1865-1866 
1867-1868 
1869-1870 
1871-1872 
1873-1874 
1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1879-1880 
.1881-1882 
1883-1884 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1889-1890 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



23d.. 

24th. 

25th. 

26th. 

27th. 

28th. 

29th. 

30tb 

31st.. 

32d.. 

33d.. 

34th. 

35th. 

36th. 

37th. 

38th. 

39th. 

40th. 

41st.. 

42d:. 

43d.. 

44th. 

45th. 

46th. 

47th. 

48th. 

49th. 

50th. 

51st.: 

52d.. 

53d:. 

54th. 

55th. 

56th. 

57th. 

58th. 



Benjamin Jones 

Benjamin Jones 

Matthias Shepler 

David A. Starkweather 

Ezra Dean 

Ezra Dean 

David A. Starkweather. 

Samuel J '^hm _ , 

David Iv. Cixii<si. 

David K. Carter . 

George Bliss 

Benjamin F. Leiter 

Benjamin F. Leiter 

Sidney Edgerton 

Sidney Edgerton 

Rufus P. Spaulding. . . . 
Ruf us P. Spaulding . . . . 
Rufus P. Spaulding. . . . 

William H. Upson 

William H. Upson 

James Monroe 

James Monroe 

James Monroe 

Jonathan T. Updegraff. 

Addison S. McClure 

William McKinley, Jr. . 

Isaac H. Taylor 

William McKinley, Jr. . 
William McKinley, Jr. . 

Joseph D. Taylor 

George P. Ikirt 

Robert W. Tayler 

Robet W. Tayler 

Robert W. Tavler 

Robert W. Tavler 

James Kennedy 



County. 



Wayne. 

Wayne. 

Stark. 

Stark. 

Stark. 

Stark. 

Stark. 

Stark. 

stark. 

Portage. 

Stark. 

Stark. 

Summit. 

Summit. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Summit. 

Summit. 

Lorain. 

Lorain. 

Lorain. 

Jefferson. 

Wayne. 

Stark. 

Carroll. 

Stark. 

Stark. 

Guernsey. 

Guernsey. 

Columbiana. 

Columbiana. 

Columbiana. 

Columbiana. 

Mahoning. 



Ji. 



NINETEENTH DISTRICT. 
Counties — Ashtabula, Geauga, Portage, Summit, Trumbull. 



"f-'^'^i^^?**"— 






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WILLIAM AUBERY THOMAS. 



W. Aubery Thomas, Republican, of Niles, is one of the best known young 
manufacturers of Ohio. He is 38 years old, a graduate of Niles High school, at- 
tended Mt. Union College two years preparatory for Rennselaer Polytechnic 
Institute at Troy, N. Y., where he took a course in chemistry and assaying 
especially as they apply to metallurgy of iron, steel and fuels. His first exper- 
ience in the manufacturing world was as chemist for and later manager of the 
blast furnace of the Thomas Furnace Co., in Niles. Subsequently he became 
identified with other enterprises including Thomas Furnace Co., of Milwaukee, 
Wis., Niles Boiler Co., and Niles Fire Brick Co. He was nominated for short 
and long terms in Congress at the convention in Warren, May 11, 1904. Mr. 
Thomas, though a young man, had been active in Republican circles throughout 
the district for nearly twenty years. 



ill' 



m 



(778) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



779 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE NINETEENTH DISTRICT. 



Years. 



Consrress. 



Name. 



1833-1834 
1835-1836 

1837-183a 

1839-1840 

1841-1842 

1843-1844 

1845-1846 

1847-1848 

1849-1850 

1851-1852 

1853-1854 

1855-1856 

1857-1858 

1859-1860 

1861-1862 

1863-1864 

1865-1866 

1867-1868 

1869-1870 

1871-1872 

1873-1874 

1875-1876 

1877-1878 

1879-1880 

1881-1882 

1883-1884 

1885-1886 

1887-1888 

1889-1890 ' 

1891-1892 

1893-1894 

1895-1896 

1897-1898 

1899-1900 

1901-1902 

1903-1904 



23d. 
24th. 

25th. 

26th. 

27th. 

28th. 

29tb 

30th. 

31st. 

32d. 

33d. 

34th. 

35th. 

36th. 

37th. 

38th. 

39th. 

40th. 

41st. 

42d. 

43d. 

44th. 

45th. 

46th. 

47th. 

48th. 

49th. 

50th. 

51st. 

52d: 

53d. 

54th. 

55th. 

56th, 

57th. 

58th. 



County. 



/Humphrey H. Leavitt 

\Daniel K Igore 

Daniel K.lgore 

/Henry Swearengen 

\Daniel Kilgore 

Henrj' Swearengen , . . 

Samuel Stokeley 

Daniel R. TJden 

^•J^^.)e] R. Tiitlen 

John Crowell 

John Crowell ! 

Eben Newton. 

Edward Wade 

Edward Wade. 

Edward Wade 

Edward Wade* 

Albert G. Riddle 

James A. Garfield . 

James A. Garfield 

James A. Garfield 

James A. Garfield 

James A. Garfield 

James A. Garfield. 

James A. Garfield 

James A. Garfield 

James A. Garfield 

JEzra B. Tavlor. . . 

Ezra B. Taylor 

Ezra B. Taylor 

Ezra B. Taylor 

Ezra B. Tavlor 

Ezra B. Taylor 

Stephen A. Northway 

Stephen A. Northway 

Stephen A. Northway 

Chas. Dick 

Chas. Dick 

/Chas. Dick 

\William Aubrey Thomas 



Jefferson. 

Harrison. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Jefferson. 

Portage. - 

Pc ""^ '' "■'^ 

Truiabuii. 

Trumbull. 

Mahoning. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Portage. 

Portage. 

Portage 

Portage. 

Portage. 

Portage. 

Portage. 

Portage. 

Portage. 

Trumbull. 

Trumbull. 

Trumbull. 

Trumbull. 

Trumbull. 

Trumbull. 



Summit. 
Summit. 
Summit. 
Trumbull. 



.«-*-W^r^^. 



TWENTIETH DISTRICT. 

Counties — Lake, Medina, and the townships of Bedford, Breckville, Brook- 
lyn, Chagrin Falls, Dover, East Cleveland, Euclid, Independence, Mayfield, New- 
burg, Olmstead, Oran.2:e, Parma, Rockport, Royalton, Solon, Strongsville and 
Warrensville, of Cuyahoga County, and Twenty-sixtth, Twenty-eighth, Twentv- 
ninth. Thirtieth, Thirty-first, Thirty-second, Thirty-third, Thirty-fourth, Thirty- 
fifth, Thirty-sixth, Thirty-seventh, Thirty-eighth, Thirty-ninth, Fortieth and 
Forty-first Wards of the city of Cleveland. 



p P!i!gppi«lj^^ i iM^'gf^ypy: i i^ 






li'i^hii^ 







JACOB A. BE IDLER. Willoughby, Ohio. 



Jacob A. Beidler, -Republican, of Willoughby, was born in Chester County, 
Pa., November 2, 1852; was educated in the country schools of that vicinity, 
and attended Lockes Seminary, at Norristown, Pa., for four years, after which 
time he moved to Ohio and started in the coal business and is still engaged 
as coal operator; was elected to the Fifty-seventh Congress, and re-elected to 
the Fifty-eighth Congress, reciving 20,523 votes, to 1G,885 for Charles A. Kohl, 
Democrat, 568 for Joseph N. Scholes, Prohibitionist, 815 for W. R. Krumroy, 
Socialist, and 377 for John Kircser, Socialist Labor. 



(780) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



781 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE TWENTIETH DISTRICT. 



Years. 



Congress. 



Name. 



County. 



1843-1844 
1845-1846 
1847-1848 
1849-1850 
1851.-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
1857-1858 
185^1860 
1861-1862 
1873-1874 
1875-1876 
1877-1878 
1S79-18S0 
1881-1882 
1883-1884 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1889-1890 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



28th. 
29th. 
30th. 
31st. 
32d: 
33d. 
34th. 
35th. 
36th, 
37th, 
43d: 
44th. 
45th. 
46th. 
47th, 
48th. 
49th. 
50th. 
51st. 
52d: 
53d: 
54th. 
55th. 
56th, 
57th, 
58th. 



Joshua R. Giddings . . 
Joshua R. Giddings . . 
Joshua R. Giddings . . 
Joshua R. Giddings . . 
Joshua R. Giddings . . 
Joshua R. Giddings . . , 
Joshua R. Giddings . , 
Joshua R. Giddings . , 

John Hutchins 

John Hutchins 

John Hutchins 

Henrj'- B. Payne 

Amos Townsend. . . . 
Amos Townsend ..... 
Amos Townsend .... 

David R. Paige 

William McKinley, Jr. 

George W. Grouse 

Martin L. Smyser 

Vincent A. Tavlor 

WiUiam J. White.... 
Chfton B. Beach..... 

Chfton B. Beach 

Fremont O. Phillips.. 

Jacob A. Beidler 

Jacob A. Beidler 



Ashtabula. 

Ashtabula. 

Ashtabula. 

Ashtabula. 

Ashtabula. 

Ashtabula. 

Ashtabula. 

Ashtabula. 

Trumbull. 

ifumbaii. 

Trumbull. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Sununit. 

Stark. 

Summit. 

Wayne. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahogo. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Medina. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 



1 



TWENTY-FIRST DISTRICT. 

County of Cuyahoga — First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh. 
Eighth, Ninth, Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Six- 
teenth, Seventeenth, Eighteenth, Nineteenth, Twentieth, Twenty-first, Twenty- 
second, Twenty-third. Twenty-fourth, Twenty-fifth and Twenty-seventh Wards of 
the city of Cleveland. 



p i^fiip i y i '^ i MgM^y. i t^ ^|if »^if4 '^^ ■ ■^ ' Myf^ 



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liitiiiinir'iri-i r.i u^m^^\,%sN^ 






THEODORE E. BURTON, Cleveland, Ohio. 



Theodore E. Burton, Republican, of Cleveland, was bom at Jefferson, Ash- 
tabula County, Ohio, December 20, 1851; studied at Grand River Institute, 
Austinburg, Ohio, at Iowa College, Grinnell, Iowa, and at Oberlin College, from 
which last institution he graduated in 1872; began the practice of law at 
Cleveland in 1875; was a member of the Fifty-first Congress, but was defeated 
for re-election in 1890; was elected to the Fifty-fourth, Fifty-fifth, Fifty-sixth. 
and Fifty-seventh Congresses; also re-elected to the Fifty-eigth Congress. He 
was the author of a work published in 1902, entitled "Financial Crises and 
Periods of Industrial and Commercial Depression." 



(782) 



THE. BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



783. 



'tsi- 



Representatives in Congress from Ohio. 



MEMBERS FROM THE TWENTY-FIRST DISTRICT. 



Years. 



Congress. 



Name. 



County. 



1843-1844 
1845-1846 
1847-1848 
1849-1850 
1851-1852 
1853-1854 
1855-1856 
j857-i;;."S 
1859-1860 
1861-1862 
1883-1884 
1885-1886 
1887-1888 
1889-1890 
1891-1892 
1893-1894 
1895-1896 
1897-1898 
1899-1900 
1901-1902 
1903-1904 



28th. 
29th, 
30th. 
31th, 
32d: 
33d. 
34th, 
3.»iii, 
36th, 
37th, 
48th, 
49th, 
50th, 
51st. 
52d. 
53d. 
54th. 
55th. 
56th. 
57th. 
58th. 



/Henry R. Brinkerhoff. 
\Edward S. Hamlin. . . 

Joseph M. Root 

Joseph M. Root 

Joseph M. Root 

Norton S. Townsend. . 

Andrew Stuart 

John A. Bingham 

Jc^L A. Bingham 

John A. Bingham 

John A. Bingham . . . 

Martin A. Foran 

Martin A. Foran 

Martin A. Foran . 

Theodore E. Burton. 

Tom L. Johnson 

Tom L. Johnson 

Theodore E. Burton.. 

Theodore E. Burton. . 

Theodore E. Burton. . 

Theodore E. Burton. . 

Theodore E. Burton. . 



Huron. 

Lorain. 

Huron. 

Huron. 

Huron. 

Lorain. 

Jefferson. 

Harrison. 

Harrison. 

Harrison. 

Harrison. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 

Cuyahoga. 






PART SIX 



COUNTIES, CITIES AND VILLAGES OF THE 
STATE OF OHIO. 



I 



\ 



(785) 



50-.B. A. 



II 



TABLE OF CONTENTS— PART SIX. 



. PAGE. 

Counties of Ohio, giving Date of Erection, Organization, Etc 787 

Population of Ohio by Counties During and at the Close of the First Cen- 
tury of State History (1802-1901) 790 

Population of Ohio by Counties (1880-1900) 792 

Population of the Incorporated Cities, Towns, Villages and Hamlets of Ohio 

(1890-1900) 795 

Population of the Principal Cities of Ohio (1810-1900) 814 



(786) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



787 



A Table of the Counties of Ohio, Etc. 



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788 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



A Table of the Counties of Ohio, Etc. 



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THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



789 



A Table of the Counties of Ohio, Etc. 



i I" .A 1 . 1% 

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POPULATION OF OHIO BY COUNTIES DURING AND AT THE 
. CLOSE OF THE FIRST CENTURY OF STATE HISTORY. 

1802 — 1 90 1. 
(Compiled from the Twelfth Census of the United States.) 



THE first census of that part of the United States which is now the 
State of Ohio, was taken in 1800, under the government of the 
Northwest Territory. For purposes of comparison by decades, 
the census of 1800 is treated as though it was under the present 
gOvtiiiiiieiiL, but it shouia be remembered that the "Wayne County" of 
1800, is not identical with the "Wayne County" of 1900, but was the 
early century name for Northwestern Ohio and the State of Michigan. 
It should also be remembered that in 1800 Hamilton County covered 
the whole western part of the present state up to the present site of the 
city of Lima; that Trumbull, Jefferson, and Washington Counties cov- 
ered the territory from the present site of fronton on the Ohio river up 
the Ohio river and almost to the lake ; that the central part of Ohio from 
the river to Upper Sandusky comprised the counties of Adams, Ross, 
and Tuscarawas, with the northwestern quarter of the present state 
joined with Michigan, under the name of Wayne County. The State of 
Ohio was organized by the adoption of its first constitution at Chillicothe, 
November 29, 1802. 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF POPULATION FROM lSOO-1900. 



Census Years. 


Population. 


Increase. 




Numher. 


Per cent. 


1900 


4,157,545 

3,672,316 

3,198,062 

2,665,260 

2,339,511 

1,980,329 

1,519,467 

937,903 

581,295 

230,760 

45,365 


485,229 
474,254 
532,802 
325,749 
359.182 
460,862 
581,564 
356,608 
350.535 
185.395 


13.2 


1890 


14.8 


1880 


20.0 


1870 


13.9 


I860 -. 


18.1 


1850 

1840 


30.3 
62.0 


1830 


61.3 


1820 


151.9 


1810 


408.7 


1800 






• 



(790) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 791 

Population of Ohio by Counties, Etc. 

The population of the state in 1900 is 4,157,545 as compared with 
the population in 1890 of 3,672,316, representing an increase during the 
last ten years of 485,229, or 13.2 percent. This rate of increase is slightly 
less than that for the decade immediately preceding, when it was 14.8 
percent, although the numerical increase is somewhat greater. During 
the earlier decades of the century the state increased in population rap- 
idly, but the greatest numerical increase (581,564) occurred in the decade 
from 1830 to 1840. Since 1850 the development of the state in population 
has been comparatively steady. 

The population of Ohio in 1900 is more than ninety-one times as 
large as that given for 1800, the census taken two years before it became 
a state. 

The total land surface of Ohio is, approxiir.ately, 40,76c square 
miles, the average number of persons to the square mile at the censuses 
of 1890 and 1900 being as follows: 1890, 90.1 ; 1900, 102.0. 



792 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



i 



Population of Ohio by Counties, Etc. 



O 
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8 



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<;<; -<fflmpqo ooooo oi^^uPG Qa;=i;ii&H ti^^ocjau 






THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



793 



Population of Ohio by Counties, Etc. 






C^CO-HOOO h-QCO-^O Ot^CSO-* OOGOO-^iO •-^OiCOSiO 

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►^WhJhJ^ h:)^^?;?^ SSS^.S SSS??^ ;2;opi,PhPl, fui,?^a.3i 



794 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Population of Ohio by Counties, Etc. 









lO t^ iM C^ 

ooocot>. 



o 
o. 
o 

o 



■*«CCCO<N CCT}<rt"*(M (M rH (N ■* 



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OJiOCO'* 
l>CCiOiO 



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CO ' 



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^00 



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ooot>'-^_o_ »n 

■^'iM'od'OCO' «o" 



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«O00t^ 



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Tf (MO) 
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POPULATION OF THE CITIES OF OHIO. 



Name. 




Population, 
1900. 



Akron 

Alliance 

Ashtabula 

Bellaire 

Belief ontaine . . 
Bo'^ling Green. 

Bucyrus 

Cambridge. . . . 
Canal Dover. . . 

Canton 

Chillicothe. . . . 

Cincinnati 

Circleville 

Cleveland. . . . . 

Columbus 

Conneaut 

Coshocton 

Dayton 

Defiance 

Delaware. . 

East Liverpool 

Elyria 

Findlay 

Fostoria 

Fremont 

Gallon. 

Gallipolis 

Glenville 

Greenville. . . . . 

Hamilton 

Ironton 

Kenton 

Lancaster 

Lima 

Lorain 

Mansfield 

Marietta 

Marion 

Martin's Ferry 

Massillon 

Middletown 

Mt. Vernon. . . . 



Summit 

Stark......... 

Ashtabula. .". . 

Belmont 

Logan 

Wood 

Orawtora 

Guernsey 

Tuscarawas. . . 

Stark.. 

Ross 

Hamilton 

Pickaway 

Cuyahoga 

Franklin 

Ashtabula. . . . 
Coshocton. . . . 
Montgomery . . 

Defiance 

Delaware 

Columbiana. .. 

Lorain 

Hancock 

Seneca 

Sandusky 

Crawford 

Gallia 

Cuyahoga 

Darke 

Butler 

Lawrence 

Hardin 

Fairfield.. 

Allen 

Lorain 

Richland 

Washington. . . 

Marion 

Belmont 

Stark 

Butler 

Knox 

(795) ' 



42,728 

8,974 

12,949 

9,912 

6,649 

5.067 

6,o60 

8,241 

5,422 

30,667 

12,976 

325,902 

6,991 

381,768 

125,560 

7,133 

6,473 

85,333 

7,579 

7,940 

16,485 

8,791 

17,613 

7,730 

8,439 

7,282 

5,432 

5,588 

5,501 

23,914 

11,868 

6,852 

8,991 

21,723 

16,028 

17,640 

13,348 

11,862 

7,760 

11,944 

9,215 

6,633 



796 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Population of the Cities of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE CITIES OF OHIO— Concluded. 



. Name. 


County. 


Population,"" 
1900. 


Nelson ville 

Newark 

Newburg 

New Philadelphia 

Niles 

Norwalk 

Norwood 

Painesville 

Piqua 

Portsmouth 

St. Marys 

Salem 

Sandusky 

Sidney 

Springfield 


• 

Athens 

Licking 

Cuyahoga 

Tuscarawas 

Trumbull 

Huron , 

Hamilton 

Lake 

Miami 

Scioto 

Auglaize 

Columbiana 

Erie 

Shelby 

Clark 

Jefferson 

Seneca 

Lucas 

Miami 

Champaign.; 

Van Wert. . . .... 


5,421 

'^^ 18,157 

^^ 5,909 

'T 6,213 

[7,468 

7,0/'! 

6,480 

5,024 

12,172 

17,870 

5,359 

igf r 7,582 

19,664 

5,688 

38,253 

14,349 

10,989 

131,822 

5,881 

6,808 

6,422 

8,529 

5,751 

8,045 

6,146 

6,063 

8,696 

44,885 

23,538 


Steubenville 

Tiffin 

Toledo 

Troy 

Urbana 

Van Wert... 


Warren 

Washington C. H 

Wellston 

Wellsville 

Wooster. 

Xenia 

Youngtsown 

Zanesville 


Trumbull 

Fayette 

Jackson 

Columbiana 

Wayne 

Greene . . . ^ 

Mahoning 

Muskingum 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO. 



Name. 



County. 



Population. 
1900. 



Aberdeen. 

Ada 

Adamsville 

Addyson 

Adelphi. ...... 

Albany 

Alexandria 

Alger 

Allentown 

Alvordton 

Andover 

Anna 

Amelia 

Ames ville 

Ansonia 

Antioch 

Antwerp 

Applecreek 

Arcadia 

Arcanum. 

Archbold. 

Arlington 

Arlington Heights 

Arnetts ville 

Ashland 

Ashley 

Ashville 

Athalia 

Athens 

Attica 

Bainbridge 

Bairdstown 

Baltimore 

Barberton 

Barnes ville 

BarnhilL 

Batavia , 

Batesville , 

Bay 

Beach City. ..... 

Bealls ville 

Beaver 



Brown 

Hardin 

Muskingum. 
Hamilton. . . 

Ross 

Aihens 

Licking 

Hardin 

Allen 

Williams. . . . 
Ashtabula. . 

Shelby 

Clermont . . . 

Athens 

Darke 

Monroe 

Paulding 

Wayne 

Hancock.. . . 

Darke 

Fulton 

Hancock.. . . 
Hamilton. . . 

Greene 

Ashland. . . . 
Delaware. . . 
Pickaway . . 
LawTence . . . 

Athens 

Seneca 

Ross 

Wood 

Fairfield . . . . 
Summit. . . , 
Belmont. . . . 
Tuscarawas 
Clermont . . , 

Noble 

Cuyahoga. . 
Stark...... 

Monroe .... 

Pike 



711 

2,576 

201 

1,513 

' 516 

548 

420 

462 

123 

482 

815 

451 

* 

* 

676 
212^ 

1,206 
387 
425 

1,225 
958 
738 
360 
157 

4,087 
700 
654 
346 

3,066 
694 
954 
298 
460 

4,354 

3,721 
811 

1,029 

312 

* 

364 
554 
262 



(797) 



I' 



798 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ^ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 



Name. 




Population, 
1900 



Beaver Dam. . . 

Bedford ? 

Bellebrook . . . . 
Belle Center. . . 

Belleville 

Belle vue 

Belmont 

Belmore 

Belpre 

Beloit 

Benton Ridge. . 

Berea 

Berlin Heights 

Bethel 

Bettsville 

Beverly 

Blakeslee 

Blake's Mills... 
Blanchester. . . 
Bloomdale. . . . 
Bloomingburg . 
Bloomville . . . . 

Bluffton 

Bond Hill 

Boston 

Botkins 

Bourne ville 

Bowerston. . . . 

Boliver 

Bowersville 

Bradford 

Bradner. 

Bremen 

Bridgeport . . . . 

Brilliant 

Brink Haven. . 

Brookside 

Brookville 

Braughton . . . . 

Bryan 

Buckeye City. . 

Buckland 

Burbank. . 



Allen 

Cuyahoga. 

Greene 

Logan 

Richland. 

Huron, and Sandusky. 

Belmont 

Putnam 

Washington 

Mahoning. 

Hancock.. 

Cuyahoga. 

Erie 

Clermont 

Seneca 

Washington 

Williams 

Tuscarawas 

Clinton 

Wood 

Fayette 

Seneca 

Allen .. 

Hamilton 

Clermont 

Shelby 

Ross 

Harrison 

Tuscarawas 

Greene 

Miami 

Wood 

Fairfield 

Belmont 

Jefferson 

Knox 

Belmont 

Montgomery 

Paulding 

Williams 

Knox 

Auglaize 

Wayne 



477 

1,486 

352 

962 

s05" 

4,101 

422 

334 

* 

* 

359 
2,500 
625 
850 
492 
712 

239 

* 

1,788 

740 

636 

819 

1,783 

1,081 

260 

420 

356 

526 

* 

370 

1,254 

1,148 

466 

3,963 

646 

250 

249 

869 

226 

3,131 

247 

* 

325 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



799 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 



Name. 




Burton 

Butler 

Butler ville 

Bloomfield 

Byesville 

Cadiz 

Calais 

Caldwell 

Caledonia 

Camden 

Canal Fulton 

Canal Winchester. 

Canfield 

Cannelville 

Cardington 

Carey 

Carlisle 

Carroll 

Carrollton 

Carthage 

Casstown 

Catawba 

CecU 

Cedarville 

Celina 

Centerburg 

Centerville 

Chagrin Falls 

Chambersburg. . . . 

Chardon 

Chatfield 

Chester Hill 

Chesterville 

Chicago Junction. . 

Chickasaw 

Clarington 

Clarksburg 

Clarks ville 

Cleveland Heights 

Cleves 

Clifton 

Clinton 

Clover dale 



Geauga 

Harrison. . . . 

Warren 

Jefferson. . . . 
Guernsey. . . 
Harrison.. . . 

Monroe 

Noble.' 

Marion 

Preble 

Stark 

Franklin 

Mahoning.. . 
Muskingum. 

Morrow 

Wyandot. . . 

Lorain 

Fairfield 

Carroll .... 
Hamilton. . . 

Miami 

Clark....... 

Paulding 

Greene 

Mercer 

Knox 

Montgomery 
Cuyahoga. . . 

Gallia 

Geauga 

Crawford . . . 
Hamilton. . . 

Morrow 

Huron 

Mercer 

Monroe 

Ross 

Clinton 

Hamilton. . . 
Hamilton. . . 

Huron 

Putnam .... 



Population, 
' 1900. 



727 

567 

125 

* 

1,267 

114 
927 
682 
905 

1,172 
662 
672 
281 

1,354 

1,816 
164 
223 

1,271 

2,559 
262 
231 
326 

1,189 

2,815 
706 
198 

1,586 
169 

1,360 
298 
480 
230 

2,348 
310 
905 
551 
465 
* 

1,328 
262 

186 

* 



'"""^ 



800 


THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 


Population of the Villages of Ohio. 


POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 



Name. 



County. 



Clyde 

Coalgrove 

Coalton 

Cold water 

College Corner . . . . 

Colle^- Hill 

CoUinwood 

Columbiana 

Columbus Grove. , 
Commercial Point 

Congress 

Continental 

Convoy 

Coolville 

Copley 

Corning 

Cortland 

Corwin 

Covington 

Crestline 

Creston 

Cridersville 

Crooksville 

Crown City 

Cumberland 

Custar 

Cuyahoga Falls. . 

Cygnet 

Dalton 

Danville 

Darby ville 

Deavertown 

Deerfield 

Deersville 

Degraff. ........ 

Delhi 

Delroy 

Delphos 

Delta 

Dennison 

Deshler 

Dexter City 

Dillon vale 



Sandusky 

Lawrence 

Jackson 

Mercer 

Preble 

Hamilton 

Cuyahoga 

Columbiana 

Putnam 

Pickaway 

Wayne 

Putnam 

Van Wert 

Athens 

Summit 

Perry 

Trumbull.. 

Warren 

Miami 

Crawford 

Wayne 

Auglaize 

Perry. 

Gallia *. . . 

Guernsey 

Wood 

Summit 

Wood 

Wayne 

Knox 

Pickaway 

Morgan 

Portage 

Harrison 

Logan 

Hamilton 

Carroll 

Van Wert and Allen. 

Fulton 

Tuscarawas 

Henry 

Noble 

Jefferson 



Population, 
1900. 



2,515 

1,191 

1,625 

627 

378 

1,104 

3,639 

1,339 

1,935 

245 

198 

1,104 

690 

315 

243 

1,401 

620 

131 

1,791 

3,282 

893 

581 

835 

284 

618 

293 

3,186 

896 

666 

298 

250 

154 

484 

256 

1,150 

829 

400 

4,517 

1,230 

3,763 

1,628 

278 

* 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



801 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 




Donaldsville. . . . 
Doylestown. . . . 

Dresden 

Dublin 

Duncan's Falls. . 
Dunkirk. . . . . 

Dupont 

East Cleveland. 
East Palestine.. 

Eaton 

Edgerton 

Edison 

Edon...' 

Eldorado 

Elgin 

Elida 

Elmore 

Elmwood Place. 

Empire 

Enon 

Evanston 

Fairfield 

Fairpoint 

FairpcTt 

Fairview 

Farmers ville 

Fayette 

Fayette ville 

Felicity 

Fernbank 

Five Points 

Fletcher 

Florida 

Flushing 

Forest 

Fort Jennings. . 
Fort Recovery. 

Frankfort . . 

Franklin 

Frazeysburg 

Fredericksburg. 
Fredericktown. , 
Freeport 



\ " 



aark 

Wayne. . . . . 
Muskingum. 
Franklin. . . . 
Muskingum. 
Hardin. . _ . 
Pufcnam .... 
Cuyahoga. . . 
Columbiana. 

Preble 

Williams. . . . 

Morrow 

Williams. . . . 

Preble 

Van Wert. . . 

Allen 

Ottawa.. . . . 
Hamilton. .. 

Jefferson 

Clark 

Hamilton. .. 

Greene 

Pickaway. . . 

Lake 

Guernsey. . . 
Montgomery 

Fulton 

Brown 

Clermont . . . 
Hamilton . . . 
Pickaway. . . 

Miami 

Henry 

Belmont 

Hardin 

Putnam 

Mercer 

Ross 

Warren 

Muskingum. 

Wayne 

Knox 

Harrison 



200 
1,057 
1,600 

275 
* 

L222 

370 

2,757 

2,493 

3,155 

1,043 

347 

740 

358 

208 

440 

1,025 

2,532 

295 

1,716 

312 

2,073 
291 
440 
886 
323 
695 
310 
176 
375 
276 
653 

1,155 
322 

1,097 
717 

2,724 
730 
511 
890 
690 



61>-B. A. 



802 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 



Name. 




Population, 
1900. 



Freeport 

Gahanna 

Gambler 

Garrett sville. . . . 

Geneva 

Gencc. . . . . . . 

Georgetown . . . . 

Germantown. . . 

Gettysburg 

Gibsonburg 

Gilboa 

Girard 

Gaun 

Geyer 

Glandorf 

Glendale 

Glenmont 

Glouster 

Gnadenhutten. . 

Gordon 

Grafton 

Grand Rapids. . 

Granville 

Grays ville 

Greencamp 

Greenfield 

Green Spring. . . 
Greenwich. . . ; . . 

Grove City 

Groveport 

Grover 

Grover Hill 

Hamden 

Hamersville . . . . 

Hamler 

Hanging Rock. , 

Hanover 

Hanoverton. . . . 
Harlem Springs 

Harrisburg 

Harrison 

Harris ville 

Harrod 



Wood 

Franklin 

Knox 

Portage.. 

Ashtabula 

Ottawa 

Brown 

Montgomery 

Dtarke 

Sandusky 

Putnam 

Trumbull 

Knox 

Auglaize 

Putnam 

Hamilton 

Holmes 

Athens 

Tuscarawas 

Darke 

Lorain 

Wood 

Licking 

Monroe 

Marion 

Highland 

Seneca and Sandusky. 

Huron 

Franklin 

Franklin 

Paulding 

Vinton 

Brown 

Henry 

Lawrence 

Licking 

Columbiana 

Carroll 

Franklin 

Hamilton 

Harrison 

Allen 



815 

276 

751 
1,145 
2,342 

824 
1,529 
1,702 

246 
1,791 

346 

2,630 

* 

* 

749 
1,545 

209 
2,155 

547 

* 

1,098 
549 

1,425 
174 
369 

3,979 
816 
849 
656 
519 
308 
655 
838 
242 
574 
665 
314 

399 
* 

247 

1,456 

250 

370 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



803 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 



Name. 




Population, 
1900. 



Hartford 

Hartwell 

Harveysburg . . 

Haskins 

Haviland 

Hayesville 

Hebron 

Hemlock 

Hicks ville 

Higginsport . . . 

Hilliard 

Hillsboro 

Hiram 

Holgate 

HollansBurg. . . 
Holmesville. . . 
Holmes City. . . 

Hopedale 

Hoytsville 

Hubbard 

Hudson 

Huntsville 

Hunters ville. . . 

Huron 

Hyde Park.... 

Irondale 

Independence. . 

Ithica 

Jackson 

Jacksonboro. . . 
Jackson Center. 
Jacksonville . . . 
Jamestown .... 

Jefferson 

Jeffersonville . . 

Jenera. 

Jeromeville. . . . 

Jerry City 

Jerusalem 

Jewett. 

Johnstown .... 
Junction City. . 
Kalida 



Licking. . . 
Hamilton . 
Warren.. . 
Wood. . . . 
Paulding. . 
Ashland. . 
Licking. . . 
Perry. . , . 
Defiance. . 

Brown 

Franklin. . 
Highland . 
Portage. . . 
Henry . . . 
Darke .... 
Holmes. . . 
Hamilton. 
Harrison. . 
Wood.... 
Trumbull. 
Summit. . 
Logan. . . . 
Miami. . . . 

Erie 

Hamilton. 
Jefferson. . 
Cuyahoga. 

Darke 

Jackson. . 
Butler. . . . 
Shelby. . . 
Athens . . . 
Greene . . . 
Ashtabula, 
Fayette. . . 
Hancock.. 
Ashland. . 
Wood. . . . 
Monroe. . . 
Harrison.. 
Licking, . . 
Perry. . . . 
Putnam . . 



414 
1,833 
435 
449 
186 

455 
581 

2,520 
650 
376 

4,535 
659 

1,237 
275 
304 
868 
365 
431 

1,230 

983 

408 

* 

1,708 

1,691 

1,136 
* 

113 

4,672 

77 

644 

1,047 

1,205 

1,319 

790 

237 

308 

555 

245 

743 

638 

443 

622 



804 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 



'%■ Name. 




Population, 
1900. 



Kelley's Island 

Kennedy Heights . . . . 

Kent 

Kettlerville 

Killbuck 

Kimbalton. 

Kingston 

Kirby 

Kossuth 

Lafayette 

LaGrange 

Lakeview 

Lakewood 

LaRue 

Latty 

Laura 

Laurel ville 

Lebanon 

Leesburg 

Leesville 

Lees ville Cross Roads, 

Leetonia 

Leipsic. , 

Lewisbuig 

Lewisville 

Lexington 

Liberty Center 

Limaville 

Linndale 

Lindsey 

Lisbon 

Lithopolis 

Little Sandusky 

Lockington 

Lockbourne 

Lockland. 

Lodi 

Logan 

London 

Loramie 

Loudon ville 

Louisville 

Loveland 



Erie 

Hamilton 

Portage 

Shelby •, 

Holmes 

'Uucrnse"" 

Ross 

Wyandot , 

Auglaize. , 

Allen 

Lorain 

Cuyahoga. , 

Cuyahoga 

Marion , 

Paulding , 

Miami , 

Hocking , 

Warren , 

Highland , 

Carroll. . .^ 

Crawford .' , 

Columbiana , 

Putnam 

Preble :..., 

Monroe , 

Richland 

Henry , 

Stark 

Cuyahoga , 

Sandusky 

Columbiana 

Fairfield 

Wyandot 

Shelby 

Franklin 

Hamilton , 

Medina -. . . . , 

Hocking , 

Madison , 

Shelby 

Ashland 

Stark 

Clermont and Warren 



1,174 
209 

4,541 
145 
370 

735 
187 
153 
316 
528 
553 

3,355 
997 

' 444 
378 
450 

2,867 
783 
269 
178 

2,744 

1,726 
560 
170 
448 
606 
156 
* 

614 
3,330 
358 
181 
210 
* 

2,695 
846 
3,480 
3,511 
444 
1,581 
1,374 
1,260 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



805 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 



Name. 




Poyulation, 
1900. 



Lowell 

Lowell ville 

Lower Salem . . . . 

Lucas 

Lynchburg 

Lyons 

Mc Arthur 

McClure 

McComb 

McConnelsville. . . 

McGuffey . . . 

Macksburg 

Madison 

Madison ville 

Magnetic Springs. 

Magnolia 

Ma ne ville 

Malinta 

Malta 

Malvern 

Manchester 

Mantua. 

Marble Cliff 

Marblehead 

Marengo 

Marice City 

Marseilles . -. 

Marshaleville. . . . 
Martinsburg . . . . 

Martinsville 

Marysville 

Mason 

Maumee 

Mechanicsburg. . . 

Medina 

Melrose 

Mendon 

Mentor 

Metamora 

Miamisburg 

Middlepoint 

Middleport 

Middleburg 



Washington. 
Mahoning. . . 
Washington. 
Richland. . . 
Highland. . . 

Fulton 

Vinton 

Henry 

Hancock.. . . 

Morgan 

Hardin 

Washington. 
Lake ....... 

Hamilton. . . 

Union 

Stark....... 

Warren 

Henry 

Morgan 

Carroll 

Adams 

Portage 

Franklin 

Ottawa 

Jefferson. . . . 
Putnam .... 
Wyandot . . . 

Wayne 

Knox 

Clinton . 

Union 

Warren 

Lucas 

Champaign. . 

Medina 

Paulding 

Mercer 

Lake 

Fulton 

Montgomery 
Van Wert. . . 

Meigs 

Logan 



381 
1,137 
190 
306 
907 
* 

941 
660 

1,195 

1,825 
452 
448 
768 

3,140 
194 
431 
288 
357 
845 
709 

2,003 
743 

997 
242 

251 

357 

238 

338 

3,048 

629 

1,856 

1,617 

2,232 

383 

599 

624 

263 

3,941 

604 

2,799 



806 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 



jiI::vvName. 




Population, 
1900. 



Midland 

Midvale 

Midway 

Mifflin 

Milan 

Milford 

Milford Center. . 

Milbury 

Milledgeville. . . . 
Miller City... .. 

Millersburg 

Milton Center. . . 
Miltonsburg. . . . 

Milton 

Mineral City. . . . 
Mineral Ridge . : 

Minerva 

Mingo Junction. 
Minster. ....... 

Monroe ville 

Montezuma 

Montpelier 

Morristown 

Morrow 

Moscow 

Mt. Airy 

Mt. Blanchard . . 

Mt. Cory 

Mt. Eatoji 

Mt. Gilead 

Mt. Healthy. . . . 

Mt. Oreb 

Mt. Pleasant 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Victory. . . . 
Mt. Washington 
Murray City. . . . 
Mutual. ....... 

Napoleon 

Nashville 

Navarre 

Nevada 

Neville 



Clinton 

Tuscarawas 

Guernsey 

Ashland 

Erie 

Clermont 

Union . . . , 

Wood 

Fayette 

Putnam 

Holmes 

Wood 

Monroe 

Mahoning 

Tuscarawas ..... 

Trumbull 

Carroll and Stark 

Jefferson 

Auglaize 

Huron 

Mercer . 

Williams 

Belmont 

Warren 

Clermont 

Hamilton 

Hancock.. ...... 

Hancock 

Wayne 

Morrow 

Hamilton 

Brown 

Jefferson 

Madison 

Hardin 

Hamilton 

Hocking 

Champaign 

Henry 

Holmes 

Stark 

Wyandot 

Clermont 



338 

491 
274 
185 
653 

1.14P 
682 
284 
201 
163 

1,998 

325 

130 

* 

1,220 

831 

1,200 

2,954 

1,465 

1,211 

317 

1,869 

350 

869 

475 

400 

456 

312 

232 

1,528 

1,354 

561 

626 

986 

734 

781 

1,118 

163 

3,639 

766 

963 

889 

265 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



807 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 




Population, 
1900. 



New Albany 

New Alexandria. . . 

New Athens 

New Bloomington 

New Bremen 

NeT^' Carlisle. . . 
New Comerstown. 

New Concord 

New Waterf ord . . . 

New Holland 

New Knoxville 

New Lebanon 

New Lebanon 

New Lexington. . . 
New Lexington. . . 

New London 

New Madison 

New Matamoras. . 

New Paris '. . 

New Petersburg. . . 
New Richmond. . . 

New Riegel 

New Salem 

New Si raitsville. . . 

New Vienna 

New Washington. , 

Newton Falls 

Ney. 

North Amherst . . . 
North Baltimore . . 

North Bend 

North Lewisburg. . 
North Robinson.. 

Norwich 

Nottingham 

Oak Harbor. . . . . , 
Oak Hill......... 

Oakley 

Oakwood 

Oberlin 

Ohio City 

Olmstead Falls 

Orangeville 



Franklin. 

Jefferson 

Harrison 

Marion 

Auglaize 

Clark 

luscarawas 

Muskingum 

Columbiana 

Pickaway and Fayette, 

Auglaize 

Montgomery 

Miami 

Highland 

Perry 

Huron 

Darke 

Washington 

Preble 

Highland 

Clermont 

Seneca 

Fairfield , 

Perry 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Trumbull 

Defiance 

Lorain 

Wood 

Hamilton 

Champaign 

Crawford 

Muskingum 

Cuyahoga 

Ottawa 

Jackson 

Hamilton 

Paulding 

Lorain 

Van Wert 

Cuyahoga 

Trumbull..... 



224 
* 

435 

399 
1,318 

§95 
2,6^9 

675 
* 

692 

436 

145 

224 

265 

1,701 

1,180 

590 

817 

790 

* 

1,916 
298 
180 

2,302 
805 
824 
732 
289 

1,758 

3,561 
532 
846 
200 
253 
939 

1,631 
825 
528 
342 

4,082 
862 
330 



808 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 



Name. 




Population, 
1900. 



Orville 

Osborn 

Osgood 

Osnaburg 

Ostrander 

Ottaw5^ ... . . .. . 

Ottoviue 

Otway 

Oxford.... 

Palestine 

Pandora 

Pataskala 

Patterson .......' 

Paulding 

Payne 

Patriot 

Peebles 

Pemberville 

Peninsula 

Perrysburg 

Perrysville 

Phillipsburg 

Pickerington 

Piketon 

Pioneer 

Plain City 

Plainfield 

Pleasant City. . . . 
Pleasant Hill. . . . 
Pleasant Ridge. . 

Pleasantville 

Plymouth 

Poland 

Polk 

Pomeroy 

Portage 

Port Clinton 

Port Jefferson. . . 
Port Washington. 

Port William 

Proctorville 

Prospect 

Put-in-Pay 



Wayne 

Greene 

Darke 

Stark 

Delaware 

Putnam 

Putnam 

Scioto 

Butler 

Pickaway 

Putnam 

Licking 

Hardin 

Paulding 

Paulding 

Gallia 

Adams 

Wood 

Summit 

Wood 

Ashland 

Montgomery 

Fairfield... 

Pike. 

Williams 

Madison and Union. 

Coshocton 

Guernsey 

Miami 

Hamilton 

Fairfield 

Richland and Huron 

Mahoning 

Ashland 

Meigs 

Wood 

Ottawa 

Shelby 

Tuscarawas 

Clinton 

Lawrence 

Marion 

Ottawa 



1,901 
948 
224 

'558 
401 

2,322 
369 
274 

2,009 
210 
409 
675 
219 

2,080 

1,336 
* 

763 
1,081 

579 
1,766 

513 
* 

263 
625 
603 

1,432 
255 

1,006 
557 
953 
501 

1,154 
370 
232 

4,639 
546 

2,450 
355 
424 
200 
523 
983 
317 



i 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



809 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 




Quaker City.. 

Quincy.'. 

Racine.. . . . . . 

Rarden 

Ravenna 

Rawson 

Reading 

Rendville 

Republic 

Reynoldsburg 
Richmond. . . . 
Richmond.. . . 

Richwood 

Ridgeway. . . . 

Ripley 

Rising Sun. . . 
Riverside. . . . 
Rochester. . . . 

Rockcreek 

Rockford 

Rockport. . . . 
Rocky Ridge. 
Rocky River. 

Rogers 

Rome 

Roseville 

Rossville 

Rushsylvania. 
Rushville. . . . 
Russellville. . . 

Sabina 

St. Bernard. . 
St. Clairsville. 
St. Henry. . . . 

St. John 

St. Louisville. 

St. Paris 

Salesville 

Salineville. . . . 
Sarahsville. . . 
Savannah. . . . 

Scio 

Sciotoville 



Guernsey 

Logan 

Meigs 

Scioto 

Portage 

Hancock 

Hamilton , 

Perry , 

Seneca , 

Franklin 

Jefferson , 

Lake , 

Union 

Hardin and Logan 

Brown , 

Wood 

Hamilton , 

Lorain 

Ashtabula 

Cuyahoga ,. . . 

Cuyahoga 

Ottawa 

Cuyahoga • , 

Columbiana 

Adams 

Muskingum 

Darke 

Logan c . 

Fairfield 

Brown 

Clinton 

Hamilton 

Belmont 

Mercer 

Auglaize 

Licking 

Champaign 

Guernsey 

Columbiana 

Noble 

Ashland 

Harrison 

Scioto 



Population, 
1900. 



878 
642 
327 
443 

4,003 
473 

3,076 
790 
656 
339 
373 
332 

1,640 
447 

2,248 

660 

* 

167 

478 
1,207 
2,038 

414 
1,319 

287 

1,207 

251 

552 

257 

394 

1,481 

3,384 

1,210 

* 

* 

285 
1,222 

286 
2,353 

279 

290 

1,214 

* 



810 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



I 
POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 



Name. 



County. 



Population, 
1900. 



Scott 

Sebring 

Senecaville 

Seven Mile 

Seville 

Shane's Crossing. 

Shanes ville 

Shawnee 

Shelby 

Sherrods ville. . . . 

Sherwood 

Shiloh 

Shreve 

Sinking Spring. . . 

Smithfield 

Smithville 

Somerset 

Somerville . 

South Bloomfield, 
South Brooklyn.. 
South Charleston. 

South Point 

South Solon 

South Salem 

South \/ebster. . . 
South Zanesville. 

Sparta 

Spencerville 

Springboro 

Spring H lis 

Spring Valley. . . . 

Stockport 

Strasburg 

Struthers 

Stryker 

Sugar Creek 

Sugar Grove 

Summerfield 

Summerford 

Sunbury. ....... 

Swanton 

Sycamore 

Syl vania 



Van Wert and Paulding. 

Mahoning 

Guernsey 

Butler. 

Medina 

Mercer 

Tuscarawas. 

Perry 

Richland 

Carroll. 

Defiance 

Richland 

Wayne 

Highland 

Jefferson. 

Wayne 

Perry 

Butler ^ 

Pickaway 

Cuyahoga 

Clark 

Lawrence 

Madison 

Ross 

Scioto 

Muskingum 

Morrow 

Allen 

Warren 

Champaign 

Greene 

Morgan 

Stark 

Mahoning '. 

Williams 

Tuscarawas 

Fairfield 

Noble 

Madison 

Delaware 

Fulton .. 

Wyandot 

Lucas 



547 
387 
623 
256 
^02 
* 
* 

2,966 

4,685 

926 

455 

597 

1,043 

238 

503 

474 

1,124 

300 

223 

2,343 

1,096 

281 

319 

264 

445 

* 

215 
1,874 
433 
157 
522 
376 

461 

* 

1,206 

* 

350 

511 

* 

464 

887 
853 
617 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



811 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 




Syracuse 

Tarlton 

Taylors ville. . . . 
Terrace Park. . . 

Thorn 

Tippecano^. . . 

Tiro 

Thorn ville 

Tontogany 

Toronto 

Trenton 

Trotwood 

Trimble 

Tuscarawas 

Uhrichs ville . . . . 

Union City 

Uniopolis 

Uniontown 

Unionville 

Upper Sandusky 

Utica 

Van Buren 

Vandalia 

Vanlue 

Venedocia 

Vermilion 

Versailles 

Vienna 

Vinton 

Wads worth 

Waldo 

Wapakoneta.. . . 

Warsaw 

Washington. . . . 
Washingt on ville 

Water ville 

Wauseon 

Waverly 

Waynesburg. . . . 
Waynesfield .... 
Waynesville .... 

Webster 

Wellington 



Meigs 

Pickaway , 

Muskingum , 

Clermont , 

Mahoning 

Miami 

Crawford , 

Perry 

Wood 

Jefferson 

Tuscarawas 

Montgomery 

Athens . 

Tuscarawas 

Tuscarawas 

Darke 

Auglaize 

Belmont 

Union 

Wyandot 

Licking 

Hancock 

Montgomery 

Hancock 

Van Wert 

Erie... 

Darke 

Clark 

Gallia 

Medina 

Marion 

Auglaize 

Coshocton 

Guernsey 

Mahoning and Columbiana 

Lucas 

Fulton 

Pike 

Stark 

Auglaize 

Warren. . 

Darke 

Lorain 



388 
543 
290 
374 
1,703 
293 
* 

352 
3,526 

* 

387 

625 

412 

4,582 

1,282 

* 

245 

259 

3,355 

826 

367 

2-84 

356 

199 

1,184 

1,478 

* 

304 

1,764 

278 

3,915 

458 

374 

1,092 

703 

2,148 

1,854 

613 

542 

723 

204 

2,094 



812 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Continued. 



Name. 




Population, 
1900. 



West Alexandria. 

West Cairo 

West Carrollton. . 

West Chester 

West Cleveland. . 

West Elkton 

West Lafayette . . 

Westen Star 

Westerville 

West Farmington 
West Jefferson. . . 
West Leipsic. . . . 
West Liberty. . . . 
West Manchester. 
West Mansfield . . 
West Middleburg. 
West Millgrove. . 

West Milton 

Weston 

West Rushville . . 

West Salem 

West Union 

West Unity 

West Wheeling. . 

Westwood 

Wharton. , , 

White House. . . . 

Wilkesville 

Williamsburg. . . . 
Williamsport .... 

Willoughby 

Willshire , 

Wilmington 

Wilmot 

Winchester 

Winchester 

Windham 

Winton Place 

Woodsfield 

Woodstock 

Woodville 

Worthington 

Wren 



Preble 

Allen 

Montgomery 

Butler 

Cuyahoga.. . 

Preble 

Coshocton. . 
Summit. . . . 

Franklin 

Trumbull... 
Madison. . . . 
Putnam .... 

Logan 

Preble 

Logan 

Logan 

Wood 

Miami 

Wood 

Fairfield 

Wayne 

Adams 

Williams. . . . 
Belmont. . . . 
Hamilton. . . 

Wyandot 

Lucas 

Vinton 

Clermont . . . 
Pickaway. . . 

Lake 

Van Wert 

Clinton , 

Stark 

Preble 

Adams 

Portage 

Hamilton. . . . 

Monroe 

Champaign.. 

Sandusky 

Franklin 

Van Wert.... 



740 
338 

987 
* 
* 

* 

148 

1,462 

516 

803 

346 

1,236 

384 

875 

288 

236 

904 

953 

161 

656 

1,033 

897 

444 

* 

439 
621 
223 

1,002 
547 

1,753 
560 

3,613 
354 
375 
796 
283 

1,219 

1,801 
325 
831 
443 
242 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



813 



Population of the Villages of Ohio. 



POPULATION OF THE VILLAGES OF OHIO— Concluded. 



• 

Name. 


County. 


Population, 
1900.' 


Wyoming 

Yellow Springs 

Yorkshire 

Zaleski 


Hamilton. 

Greene 

Darke 

Vinton 

Logan 

Tuscarawas 


1,450 

1,371 
* 

577 


Zanesfield 

Zoar , , . . , 


278 
290 



* Population not given in census. 



814 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Population of the Principal Cities of Ohio, 1810-1900. 



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1850. j 1840. 


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1900. 


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cgc-laB'S^S 
■ i3 5.9-2 o d a.~ => 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Population of the Principal Cities of Ohio, i8 10-1900. 

All of the above named cities received marked accessions to their 
population during- the last ten years, preceding the census of 1900, those 
having increased by the largest percentage being Toledo, 61.9 percent; 
Akron, 54.8 percent; Cleveland, 46.1 percent; and Columbus, 42.4 per- 
cent. Largest numerical gains during the decade are found in Cleveland, 
Toledo and Columbus. With a single exception in one decade each of 
these cities has increased in population steadily, but the rate of growth 
has been irregular and has shown no uniform trend of change. For 
Cincinnati, Cleveland and Springfield, however, that rate since 1870 has 
steadily declined, a change in harmony with the usual tendency of large 
urban centers. 



PART SEVEN 



STATE INSTITUTIONS AND COMMISSIONS. 



(817) 
62— B. A. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS— PART SEVEN. 



PAGE. 

The Ohio Capitol Buildings 819 

The Ohio State Board of Agriculture v 821 

Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station at Wooster 828 

•T^^c Athens Sitatc ila::pit..l 832 

The Cleveland State Hospital 835 

The Columbus State Hospital .' 838 

The Dayton State Hospital : 842 

The Longview State Hospital 846 

The Toledo State Hospital * 853 

The Massillon Srate Hospital 855 

The Institution for the Education of the Blind 856 

The Institution for Deaf Mutes 859 

Institution for Feeble-Minded Youth 862 

The Hospital for Epileptics 865 

The Boys' Industrial School 868 

The Girls' Industrial Home 870 

The Ohio Penitentiary 872 

The Ohio Reformatory (Mansfield) 878 

Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Home (Sandusky) 880 

The Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home 884 

Ohio State University 888 

The Ohio University (Athens) 891 

Miami University 896 

The Wilberforce University 899 



(818) 



THE OHIO CAPITOL BUILDINGS. 



THE Capitol Buildings of the State of Ohio stand in the principal 
square in the city of Columbus, in a park containing over ten 
acres of well cultivated lawns and native forestry, on land which 
was given to the state by the proprietors of the town site, in 
1812. The name "Columbus" was selected for the town and bestowed 
upon it by the General Assembly at a later date. 

The illustrations on the frontispece give some idea of the style of 
building but fall far short, in dignity and point of finish, of doing justice 
to either the old Capitol Building or die new Departmeni; ul J Ubtlcc. 

The original "State House," erected by the grantors of the public 
grounds on condition that Columbus — then unsettled — should be chosen 
for the Captital of Ohio, — was a series or row of brick buildings on High 
street, beginning at State street and running north along the present 
property to a point about halfway to the present west entrance to the 
"State House yard." These structures were burned Sunday morning, 
February i, 1852. The old Capitol Building, as it is now called, was 
begun in April, 1839, and was partially completed and dedicated in Janu- 
ary, 1857. The comer stone was laid July 4, 1839. The building was 
finished in 1861 and was a useful rendezvous for troops gathering for 
service in the Union Army during the Civil War. The Department of 
Justice Building was built under an act of the 73rd General Assembly, 
adjoining the old Capitol at the terrace on the east. It thus occupies the 
Third street front of the Capitol grounds and, being of similar architecture 
to its predecessor, adds to, rather than detracts from the simple beauty 
of the structure. 

As an illustration of the advance in structural science a comparison 
of the two methods of building is interesting. The original structure 
was begun in 1838, and finished in 1861. Deducting for time consumed 
in numberless interruptions, the time actually spent in the building of it, 
was fifteen years; the cost $1,360,000; the labor was that of idle convicts 
from the Penitentiar}^ ; the material, dressed limestone from state quarries 
west of the city. The new building was authorized in 1898 ; comer stone 
was laid February 16, 1899, and on the ist of September, 1901, the sev- 
eral departments assigned to this building are taking possession of their 
beautiful quarters. The exterior of the new building is of dressed lime- 
stone; the trusses are of steel. The ?ctual time of building was three 
3^ears, the cost $450,000, and' the foot-space of public offices equal to 
about one-half that of the main building. The old building is 304 feet 
in its longest dimensions (north and south) and 184 feet wide (east and 

(819) 



820 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Ohio Capitol Buildings. 

west, covering about two acres of ground. The height from the ground 
to outside pinnacle of the central dome is 128 feet; from floor of the 
rotunda to the eye of this dome is 120 feet; from floor of the rotunda to 
the upper skylight is 136 feet The diameter of the rotunda floor is 64 
feet '5 inches and the floor contains 4,892 pieces of marble. The cupola 
surrounding the dome (which was never completed as originally de- 
signed) is 75 feet in diameter. There are 53 rooms in the Capitol Build- 
ing. The new Department of Justice or Law Building is 220 feet north 
and south by 100 feet east and west and contains three full stories and a 
clear story on the east side. The rotunda is finished in marble and taste- 
fully decorated, with an architectural effect said to be unequalled in the 
west. The building contains 55 rooms and was priuiiirily ivAtu-Jizi, zz 
the name implies, to house the Supreme Court, the Clerk of the Court, 
the Supreme Court Library, and the Attorney General's department. 
These departments occupy practically all of the second and third floors, 
the first story being devoted to the departments of Agriculture, Health, 
Insurance and Public Works. 



I 



THE OHIO STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE. 



THE Ohio State Board of Agriculture was created by an act of the 
General Assembly, passed February 27, 1846. The Board con- 
sists of ten members, two being elected each year for a period 
of five years. The office of the Board — Department of Agricul- 
ture — is in the State House, the Secretary being the chief officer. The 
Secretary, Assistant Secretary, Veterinarians, Inspectors, Chemists, Sta- 
tisticians, Librarians and clerks constitute an official force of more than 
twenty ocoplc, constantly on duty. 

The department has an extensive agricultural library of about seven 
thousand volumes, and through regular exchanges, receipt of govern- 
ment documents, gifts, purchases, etc., it is rapidly growing. These 
books and documents are available for reference to all who wish to use 
them. 

The annual Ohio State Fair is conducted under the management of 
the Board. The first fair was held in Cincinnati, October 5-7, 1850, and 
a fair has been held each year since that time, except 1888, when the 
Ohio Centennial took its place. From 1850 until 1874 the fair was held 
in the principal cities of the state, the cities offering the greatest induce- 
ments, in the way of financial aid, securing it. In 1874 the Board con- 
cluded to establish the fair permanently and centrally at the Capital of the 
state. The grounds of the Franklin County Agricultural Society (now 
Franklin Park), were rented until 1886, when the fair was transferred 
to grounds just north of the city, which the Board had purchased three 
years previously. These Fair Grounds, which contain one hundred and 
fifteen acres, have been beautifully ornamented by lakes, trees, shrubs, 
etc., and fine buildings have been erected for the various classes of ex- 
hibits, at a cost of several hundred thousand dollars. 

The live stock buildings are the largest and best in the country. The 
horse building is three hundred and thirty-two feet square and will ac- 
commodate over five hundred horses ; and in addition to this, there are 
barns provided for speed and fancy horses. The cattle, sheep, and swine 
buildings are a little smaller than the horse building, but are similar to 
it in all details and have ample accommodations for immense exhibits. 

These structures are brick and stone, with slate roofs. Broad, clean 
walks extend through all the buildings, and visitors can view the animals 
in their stalls and pens, with the same degree of comfort that is ex- 
perienced in passing through the buildings wherein are exhibited the dis- 
plays of manufactured articles, merchandise, art, etc. 

(821) 



822 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

. The Ohio State Board of Agrictiltttre. 

The State Fair has increased each year since being established on 
permanent grounds, until now it is recognized as a great Industrial Ex- 
position, and important State Institution. To meet the annually increas- 
ing demands of exhibitors, additional buildings have been required and 
supplied, and many new departments have been created to systematize 
the exhibits and give ample educational facilities. The annual exhibi- 
tions are conducted strictly along educational lines, and the people are 
thus benefitted and the various industries of the state increased and 
strengthened. 

In 1880 the system of crop reporting was inaugurated by the Board, 
with a corps of about eight hundred volunteer reporters, reports being 
made quarterly; since that time the number of correspondents has :i.i...jt 
doubled, the scope of the work has been enlarged and for a number of 
years the publication has been issued monthly. 

In 188 1 a law was passed by the General Assembly charging the Sec- 
retary of the Board with the duty of licensing the sale of commercial 
fertilizers in the state, and also sampling and analyzing the same, and 
publishing the results for general distribution. This work has been 
successfully pursued by the secretary and the results have been very 
satisfactory, both to consumers of commercial fertilizers and to manu- 
facturers of the same. The work has grown gradually, from small be- 
ginnings, until now a very large business is done and a considerable 
force is employed in the inspection, chemical analysis, etc. 

In the winter of 1880-81 the Board entered upon the work of hold- 
ing farmers' institutes, and twenty-seven successful meetings were held 
that winter. The number increased gradually until 1889-90, when sixty- 
two meetings were held. During the winter of 1890-91 the General 
Assembly, recognizing the value of farmers' institutes to the agriculturists 
of the state, passed a law making liberal provision for their support, thus 
enabling the Board to largely increase its work in this direction. In 
1890-91 one hundred and twenty-four institutes were established and held 
by the Board ; each season since the demand for institutes has increased 
quite beyond the means provided. 

On May 7, 1902, the General Assembly passed an act creating the 
Ohio State Board of Agriculture the Board of Live Stock Commissioners. 
The Board organized, by selecting the same officers as those serving the 
State Board of Agriculture, and appointed Dr. Paul Fischer, of Colum- 
bus, State Veterinarian. The work of the Division was entered upon at 
once and has been actively prosecuted since. 

The General Assembly enacted a law on May 10, 1902, transferring 
the work of inspecting nurseries and orchards from the Ohio Agricultural 
Experiment Station to the Department of Agriculture. The work was 
taken tip promptly. Mr. A. F. Burgess was appointed Chief Inspector 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



823 



The Ohio State Board of Agriculture. 



and several Assistant Inspectors were also appointed; all being actively 
engaged in the work of the Division at the present time. 

In 1904 the General Assembly enacted a law to "regulate the sale 
of commercial feed stuffs in Ohio," which law makes it the duty of the 
Secretary of the State Board of Agriculture to inspect and analyze com- 
mercial feed stuffs, to issue license for their sale, publish a report of 
analyses, and prosecute for violation of the law. 



LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE OHIO STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE 
FROM THE ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD TO DATE. 

(NOTE. — ^The law creating the State Board of Agriculture, passed in 1846, provided 
for fihy three mprr.Lcrs a2.d ■".r'^^'d them. The act was amended in 1847, reducing the 
number of members to ten. Five members were elected each year for a term of two 
years until 1898, when the law was so amended as to provide for the election of two 
members each year for a term of five years.) 



Names. 



Year of 
Service. 


1 Residence. 


1846 


Jefferson County. 


1846 


Seneca County. 


1846 


Greene County 


1846 


Coshocton County. 


1846 


Fairfield County. 


1846 


Trumbull County. 


1846 


Butler County 


1846 


Hancock County. 


1846 


Pickaway County. 


1846 


Erie County. 


1846 


Muskingum County. 


1846 


Pickaway County. 


1846 


Lawrence County. 


1846 


Putnam County. 


1846 


Delaware County. 


1846 


Champaign County. 


1846 


Miami County. 


1846 


Perry County. 


1846 


Portage County. 


1846 


Mahoning County. 


1846 


Preble County. 


1846 


Athens County. 


1846 


Browii County. 


1846 


Tuscarawas County. 


1846 


Harrison County. 


1846 . 


Jefferson County. 


1846 


Columbiana County. 


1846 


Lake County. 


1846 


Paulding County. 


1846 


Crawford County. 


1846 


Belmont County. 


1846 


Summit County. 


1846 


Montgomery County 


1846 


Washington Count v. 


1846 


Ross County. 


1846 


Stark County. 


1846 


Belmont County. 


1846 


Fairfield County. 



John B. Bayless 

Henry C. Brish. . . . 
Frederick Bonner. . 

Joseph Bums 

John Chaney 

G. W. Cowden 

Absalom Dun 

John Eckels 

Elias Florence 

John Fuller 

Geo. W. Gibbons. . . 

William Gill 

H. N. GiHett 

L. C. Goble 

David Gregory .... 

Anson Howard 

John Johnson 

Aaron Johnson .... 
Greenbury Keen . . . 

Billius Kirtland 

Newton Larsh 

Liba Lindley 

Jas. Loudon 

John McElderry . . . 

Wm. McFadden 

Beatty ^McFarland . 

John Martin 

Isaac Moore 

Oilman C. Mudgett. 

Samuel Myers 

Isaac Neiswanger . . 

Simon Perkins 

Henry Protzman. . . 
W. R. Putman, Jr. 

Felix Renick 

Jas. L. Reynolds. . . 

Benj. Ruggles 

Sam'l Spangler .... 



824 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Ohio State Board of Agriculture. 



MEMBERS OF THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE.— Continued. 



Names. 



David Stevens 

Abraham Studdebaker. 

Dowty Utter 

John I. Vanmeter 

Richard Warner 

Jesse Wilson 

J.^M. Millikin 

J. T. Pugsley 

Allen Trimble 

M. L. Sullivant 

Sam'l Medary 

Darius Lapham 

Arthur Watts 

J. P. Kirtland 

A. E. Strickle 

M. B. Bateham 

John Codding 

C. Springer 

J. M. Edwards 

J. G. Gest 

F. R. EUiott 

J. T. Pugsley 

S. Halloway 

William Case 

Philo Adams 

R. W. Musgrave 

R. W. Steele 

William H. Ladd 

D. Mcintosh 

J. T. Worthington .... 

Joseph Sullivant ; 

John K. Greene 

James L. Cox 

B. Stedman 

Alexander Waddle .... 

Abel ICnira 

Lucien Buttles 

G. W. Baker 

John M. Milliken 

Luther Smith 

Thomas S. Webb 

Norton S. Townshend . 

L. Q. Rawson 

James M. Trimble 

John Reber 

D. E. Gardner 

William Dewitt 

C. W. Potwin 

T. C. Jones 

Henry B. Perkins 

David Taylor 

Jacob Egbert 

Nelson J. Tumey 

D. McMillan 

W. R. Putnam 

William F. Greer 



Inclusive. 

Service, 

Years oi 



PostoflBice. 



1846 
1846 
1846 
1846 
1846 
1846 
1846 
1846 
1846 .'>1 
1846-53 
1846-53 
1846-50 
1846-52 
1846-48 
1846-49 
1847-51 
1847-49 
1848-52 
1848-52 
1848-54 
1849-51 
1850-51 
1850-51 
1852-53 
1852-53 
1852-57 
1853-56 
1853-56 
1853-54 
1853-56 
1854-55 
1854-57 
1854-55 
1854-57 
1855-60 
1855-58 
1856-59 
1856-57 
1857-62 
1857-58 
1857-58 
1858-63 
1858-59 
1858-61 
1858-61 
1859-64 
1859-64 
1859-62 
1860-67 
1860-63 
1861-66 
1862-63 
1862-69 
1863-70 
1863-64 
1864-67 



Richland County. 
Darke County. 
Clermont County. 
Pike County. 
Medina County. 
Shelby County. 
Hamilton. 
Convenience. 

Columbus. 
Columbus. 
Cincinnati. 
Chillicothe. 
Cleveland. 
Wilmington. 
Columbus. 
Granger. 
Meadow Farm. 
.Canfield. 
Spring Valley. 
Cleveland. 
Convenience. 
St. Clairsville. 
Cleveland. 
Huron. 

Sulphur Springs. 
Dayton. 
Richmond. 
Shalersville. 
ChiUicothe. 
Columbus. 
Cincinnati. 
Zanesville. 
Cleveland. 
South Charleston. 
Cherry Valley. 
Columbus. 
Marietta. 
Hamilton. 
West Liberty. 
Massillon. 
Avon. 
Fremont. 
Hillsboro. 
Lancaster. 
Toledo. 
Cleveland. 
Zanesville. 
Delaware. 
Warren. 
Columbus. 
Lebanon. 
Circleville. 
Xenia. 
Marietta. 
Painesville. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



825 



The Ohio State Board of Agriculture. 



MEMBERS OF THE STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE.— Continued. 




James FiiUington .... 
William B. McClung. . 

James W. Ross 

R. R. Donnelly 

James Buckingham. . . 

J. Park Alexander 

Norton S. Townshend 

William Lang 

D. C. Pvichmou'J 

R. P. Cannon 

James B. Jamison. . . . 

L. G. Delano 

L. B. Sprague 

Simpson Hannount . . 

John A. Warder 

W. S. Hickox 

B. W. Carlisle 

Justus C. Stephens . . . 

JohnM. Pugh 

L. B. Wing 

Russell C. Thompson. 
Leo Weltz 

D. L. Pope 

Charles Smith 

E. T. Stickney 

A. E. Stone 

Peter Murphy 

W. N. Cowden 

R. Baker 

Arvine C. Wales 

R. H. Hay man 

O. P. Chai.ey 

C. D. Bailey 

J. C. Levering 

William S. Foster. . . . 

L. B. Harris 

J. H. Brigham 

L. N. Bonham 

H. Talcott 

N. A. Sims 

T. P. Shields 

John Pow 

S. H. Hurst . 

J. J. Sullivan 

Joseph H. Terrell. . . . 

J. G. RusseU 

H. G. Tryon 

J. M. Black 

A. H. Kling 

H. S. Grimes 

A. J. Clark 

W. W. Miller 

J. W. PoUock 

N. Ohmer 

L. G. Ely 

E. L. Hinman 



Inclusive. 




Service, 


Postoffice. 


Years of 


* 


1864-69 


Irwin Station. 


1864-71 


Troy. i 


1865-70 


Perrysburg. ' 


1865-68 


Wooster. ! 


1865-72 


Zanesville. ! 


1867-70 


Akron. • 


1868-69 


Avon. . 1 


1868-71 


Tiffin. ! 


1869-74 


Sanduskv. ' i 


lOt\J—iiJ 


A^rcrc. 1! 


1870-77 


Cadiz. . 1 


1870-75 


Chillicothe. i 


1871-76 


Springfield. j 


1871-76 


New Philadelphia. jf 


1871-76 


Cleves. ji 


1872-73 


Mansfield. ji 


1872-79 


Hooker's Station. |: 


1873-74 


Kenton. j 


1874-79 


Columbus. j: 


1875-80 


Newark. ij 


1875-76 


Sylvania. 


1876-83 


Wilmington. ,! 


1876-81 


Welshfield. i; 


1877-80 


Marion. ■! 


1877-78 


Republic. ;j 


1877-78 


Gallipolis. .[ ' 


1877-80 


Hughes' Station. 


1878-83 


Quaker City. 


1879-82 


Elyria. T 


1879-82 


Massillon. ! 


1880-81 


Portsmouth. ' 1 


1880-82 


Canal Winchester. ; 1 


1881-88 


Gallipolis: .'; i 


1881-86 


Levering. |: ; 


1881-38 


Urbana. j j 


1882-87 


Upper Sandusky. i: j 


1882-89 


Delta. i; ! 


1883-86 


Oxford. \\ I 


1883-87 


Jefferson. j L 


1883-85 


Columbus. '■ 


1884-87 


Watkins. i jj 


1884-89 


Salem, i i| 


1884-89 


Chillicothe. ! 
Millersburg. j 


1887-88 


1887-88 


New Vienna. |' ; 


1887-90 


Mt. Gilead. |. 


1888-91 


Willoughby. ^ 


1888-90 


Hanover. j 


1889-96 


Marion. i 


1889-90 


Portsmouth. |i 


1889-98 


Cambridge. j' 


1889-94 


Castalia. j 


1890-93 


Cedarville. j. , 


1890-95 


Davton. i j 


1890-91 


West Unity. ' 


1890-93 


Columbus. i j 



826 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Ohio State Board of Agriculture. 



MEMBETIS OF THK STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE.— Concluded. 



Names. 



Inclusive. 
Service, 
Years of 



Postoffice. 



J. C. Bower 

George Lewis. . . . 
Chester BordwelL 

F. A. Derthick... 
J. T. Robinson. . . 

G. Liggett 

J. H. Pringle 

E. C. EUis 

Chester Bordwell. 

L. G.Ely 

H. S. Grimes.... 

Albert Hale 

J. S. Stuckey.... 
S.H. Ellis 

D. J. Green 

B. P. Baldwin... 
Samuel Taylor. . . 
T. E. Cromley... 
T. L.Calvert.... 

Wm. Miller 

J. L. Carpenter. . 

C. H. Ganson 

A. P. Sandles. . . . 
R. O. Hinsdale . . 
L. P. Bailey 

E. L. Lybarger. . 



1891-98 

1891-94 

1892-93 

1892-95 

1894-97 

1894r-1901 

1894-95 

1895-98 

1895-1901 

189(>-1900 

1896-1900 

1896-99 

1897-1903 

1898-99 

1899-1902 

1899-1903 

1899 

1900 

1900 

1901 

1901 

1902 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1904 



Athens. 

Van Wert. 

Batavia. 

Mantua. 

Rockaway. 

Watkins. 

Cardington. 

Crestvue. 

i ayette. 

Portsmouth. 

Mogadore. 

Van Wert. 

Waynes ville. 

Renrock. 

Tiger. 

Grove City. 

Ashville. 

Selma. 

Gypsum. 

Carpenter. 

Urbana. 

Ottawa. 

Wadsworth. 

Tacoma. 

Spring Mountain. 



!TO> 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



827 



The Ohio State Board of Agriculture. 


LIST OF OFFICERS OF THE OHIO STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE, 
FROM ITS ORGANIZATION TO DATE. 


Y'r. 


President. 


Treasurer. 


Secretary. 



1846 
1847 
1848 
1849 
1850 
1851 
1852 
1853 
1854 
1855 
185t> 
1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 
1861 
1862 
1863 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1869 
1870 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 



Allen Trimble 

Same 

Same 

M. L. Sullivant 

Same 

Same 

Arthur Watts 

Samuel Medary 

R. W. Musgrave 

J. T. Worthington 

Wiliiair? H. Lac*-- , . . . . 

Alexander Waddle 

John M. Milikin 

N. S. Townshend 

Alexander Waddle 

Darwin E. Gardner.., 

Thomas C. Jones 

N. S. Townshend 

Nelson J. Turney 

Same 

Wm. B. McClung 

Daniel McMillan 

James Fullington 

Same 

James W. Ross 

William Lang 

James Buckingham. . . 

Lincoln G. Delano 

Same 

R. P. Cannon 

S. Harmount 

J. B. Jamison 

J M. Pugh 

E. W. Carlisle 

L. B. Wing 

D. L. Pope 

R. Baker 

W. N. Cowden 

W. S. Foster 

C. D. Bailey 

L. N. Bonham 

J. H. Brigham 

John Pow 

Same 

J. G. Russell 

J. M. Black 

A. H. Kling 

J. W. Pollock 

W. W. Miller...: 

A. J. Clark 

J. C. Bower 

J. T. Robinson 

C. Bordwell 

L. G. Ely 

H. S. Grimes 

J. S. Stuckey 

Samuel Taylor 

T. E. Cromley 

J. L. Carpenter 



M. L. Sullivant 

Same 

Same . . ^ . 

Samuel Medary 

Same 

Same 

Same 

M. L. Sullivant 

Joseph Sullivant. . . 
Same 

L'uci^n Buttles 

Same 

Same . . . . 
Same 

Chas. W. Potwin... 
Same ^ . . . 

David Taylor. ..... 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Jas. Buckingham. . . 

Same 

Same 

J. Park Alexander. 

Jas. Buckingham... 

Simp'n Harmount. . 

Same 

Same 

Same 

J. M. Pugh 

Same 

L. B. Wing 

Same 

D. L. Pope 

Leo. Weltz 

W. N. Cowden 

L. B. Harris 

Same 

J. C. Levering 

L. B. Harris 

Same 

J. G. Russell 

Same 

A. H. Kling 

Same 

W. W. Miller 

Same . . . , 

F. A. Derthick 

Same 

A. J. Clark 

J. C. Bowor 

Same 

H. S. Grimes 

L. G. Ely 

G. Liggett 

T. L. Calvert 

Same . . . . 
Same 



Samuel Medary. .. 
M. B. Bateham 

Same . . . 

Same 

Same 
W. W. Mather 

Same 
Geo. Sprague 

Same 

Same 

Sa^*^ 
J. xi. Kiippai u 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same . . . 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same . . . 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

J. W. Fleming 

W. I! Chamberlain, 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 
L. N. Bonham 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 
W. W. Miller 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 

Same 



I I 



OHIO AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION AT 

WOOSTER. 



THE Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station was established by an 
act of the General Assembly, passed April 17, 1882; its object 
being, as recited in this act, ''for the benefit of the interests of 
practical and scientific agriculture, and for the development of 
the vast agricultural resources of the State." The station never had any 
organic connection with the State University, but it was at first located 
at that institution, a few acres of land being set apart for its use and the 
Professor cf Ilorr'r.uit...^ i*i the University being made its first Director, 
this office being transferred to the Professor of Agriculture at a later 
date. 

In 1887 the National Congress passed an act now known as "the 
Hatch act," appropriating $15,000 annually to each state and territory 
for the establishment of Agricultural Experiment Stations, these stations 
to be organized in connection with the colleges which had been or might 
be established under what is popularly known as the ''agricultural college 
act of 1862," except that, in states which had previously established agri- 
cultural experiment stations separate from such colleges, permission was 
given to devote the appropriation to such separate stations. 

This course was followed in Ohio, and the experiment Station was 
re-organized, Charles E. Thorne being made Director, and the major 
part of the University farm being assigned to the use of the Station. 

The rapid growth of the City of Columbus around the University 
soon showed that the time must come when its lands would become too 
valuable to be used for purposes of agriculture, and the permanent and 
largely increased income now assured to the Station made it seem neces- 
sary that it should be so established that its w^ork might be continued 
indefinitely without interruption. The General Assembly therefore passed 
an act authorizing the several counties of the state to issue bonds for the 
purchase of lands and the erection of buildings for the use of the Station 
•and to bid for its location. Several counties immediately took action 
under this law, and the offer of $85,000, made by Wayne county, was 
accepted by the Board of Control of the Station ; the bonds were sold, 
several adjoining farms, lying near the city of Wooster, were purchased 
and the erection of buildings was at once commenced. 

A dissatisfied citizen of Wayne county afterward brought suit to con- 
test the constitutionality of the law under which the county had thus 
bonded itself. The common pleas and circuit courts both declared the 
law valid, but these decisions were reversed in the Supreme Court, on 

(828) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 829 

Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station at Wooster. 

the ground that the people of that part of the state were taxed for the 
support of an institution intended for the benefit of the whole state (see 
Constitution of Ohio), and it was held that the incidental benefits derived 
from the proximity of the Station were no justification for the extra 
taxation for its support. This decision seriously interrupted the work of 
the Station, but after about two years the General Assembly assumed 
the payment of the bonds and has since made provision for the comple- 
tion of the buildings necessary for the Station's work. These comprise 
the Administration Building and Chemical Laboratory, which is built in 
fire-proof construction of the yellowish sandstone found on the Station 
farm; a block of greenhouses, Sox 115 feet, with stone offices in front; 
a small biological laboratory; four large b?rns and ^ number of smaller 
ones ; a fully equipped creamery, and seven dwellings. The Station owns 
470 acres of land, in which it has laid about 26 miles of tile drains. It 
has planted about 20 acres in orchards, in which more than 700 varieties 
of fruit are now in bearing. It has about 70 pure bred cattle, of six 
different breeds, and similar flocks of pure bred sheep. 

'As originally organized, the board of control of the Station consisted 
of the Governor of the State, three persons appointed by him, and the 
person whom these should select as the director of the Station. At the 
request of Governor Nash the 75th General Assembly so modified this 
law as to relieve the Governor and the director from membership in the 
board. At the same time the law was so amended as to place the manage- 
ment of the Station distinctly in the hands of the director, subject to 
general regulations made by the board of control, thus following the 
practice of the state in the management of all its public institutions. 

Under the amended law the Governor appointed as members of the 
board of control, Hon. Friend Whittlesey, Aiva Agee, D. D. White, O. 
E. Bradfute and D. L. Sampson. This new board organized March 3rd, 
and at their request the. General Assembly transferred the work of orchard 
and nursery inspection to the State Board of Agriculture, thus relieving 
the Experiment Station from all police work and leaving it free to devote 
its energies wholly to scientific research in agriculture. 

The work of the Station is now organized in four departments: (i) 
Executive; (2) Agricultural; (3) Horticultural, and (4) Department of 
Plant Physiology and Pathology. Within the Executive Department are 
organized Sections of Entomology and Chemistry, each department and 
section being in charge of a specialist. 



830 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station at Wooster. 



— % 



MEMBERS OF BOARD OF CONTROL, WITH TERM OF SERVICE. 



Name. 


Term of Service. 


W. I. Chamberlain 


1882 — 1884 


Nicholas Ohmer . . 


1882 — 1887 


Emmett Mix 


1882 — 1885 


W. N. Cowden 


1885—1888. 


J. C. Stevens • 


1887—1899. 


S.H.Ellis 


1887—1895. 


J. H. Brigham 


1884 — 1887. 


J. Li. Mcllvaine 


1888 — ">8Q1 


R. H. Warder 


1891 — 1902 


J. T. Robinson 


1895 — 1902 


L. M. Strong 


1899 — 1902 


Friend Whittlesey 


1902—1903. 


Alva Agee 


1902 — Incumbent 


D. D. White 


1902 — Incumbent 


0. E. Bradf ute 


1902 — Incumbent 


D. L. Sampson 


1902 — Incumbent 


F. A. Derthick 


1903 — Incumbent. 







DIRECTORS, WITH TERM OF SERVICE. 



Name. 



Term of Service. 



William R. Lazenby . . 
Norton S. Townshend 
Charles E. Thome... 



1882—1886. 
1886—1887. 
1887— Incumbent. 



THE PRESENT ORGANIZATION OF THE OHIO AGRICULTURAL 
EXPERIMENT STATION. 




Alva Agee 

D. D. White.. 
O. E. Bradfute 
D. L. Sampson. 
F. A. Derthick. 



Wooster. 

Castalia. 

Xenia. 

Cincinnati. 

Mantua. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



831 



Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station at Wooster. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 



Name. 



Office. 



D. D. White... 
O. E. Bradfute. 
D. L. Sampson. 



President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 



STATION STAFF. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Office. 


Charles E. Thome, M. A. S. 
William J. Green 


Wooster 

Wooster 

w ooster 

Wooster 

Wooster 

Washington C.H 

Wooster 

Wooster 

Wooster 

Wooster 

Wooster 

Wooster 

Wooster 

Strongsville 

Germantown .... 

Carpenter 

Wooster 

Wooster 

Wooster 

y« ooster 


Director. 

Horticulturist and Vice-Director. 


Augustine D. Selby, B. Sc. 
C G. Williams 


Botanist. 
Agriculturist. 


John W. Ames, B. Sc 

L H Goddard 


Chemist. 
Experimentalist. 


William H. Kramer 

Clarence W. Waid, B. Sc. 

J. S. Houser, B. Sc 

J. M. Van Hook, A. M 

F H Ballou 


Bursar. 

Assistant Horticulturist. 
Assistant Entomologist. 
Assistant Botanist. 
Assistant Horticulturist. 


William Holmes 


Farm Foreman. 


Charlf R A Patton 


Assistant Foreman and Meteorologist 


i:^award Mohn 

Henry M. Wachter 

Lewis Schultz 


Supt. Northeastern Test-Farm. 
Supt. Southwestern Test-Farm. 
Foreman Southeastern Test-Farm. 


Carv Welty 


Mechanic. 


Faye Blayney 

Marv M Lee 


Mai'ing Clerk. 
Stenographer. 


Prank W Glass 


Printer. 







THE ATHENS STATE HOSPriAL. 



THE Athens State Hospital was under the process of construction 
from 1868 until January 9, 1874, when the first patients were 
admitted. The first two admissions to the institution were Thos. 
Armstrong and Daniel Femaw. Mr. Armstrong died within 
a few months and Mr. Fernaw has been until now an inmate of the in- 
stitution. 

Dr. Richard Gundry was made Superintendent of Construction in 
June, 1872, and remained Superintendent until the 15th of December, 
1876, when he resipnecJ Jo assume the superintendency of the newly con- 
structed asylum at Columbus. Upon the resignation of Dr. Gundry the 
superintendency of the institution devolved upon the senior assistant 
physician. Dr. Thos. Blackstone, now of Circleville, Ohio, who managed 
its affairs discreetly and faithfully. On the i6th of January, 1877, Dr. 
C. L. Wilson, of Indianapolis, Ind., was chosen to fill the vacancy. He 
being declared ineligible by the Supreme Court, Dr. H. C. Rutter was 
elected by the board of trustees to fill the vacancy. Dr. Rutter was then 
a resident of Bellefontaine, Ohio. The next superintendent was Dr. P. 
H. Clarke, of IMeigs county. Dr. Holden, of Zanesville, was then ap- 
pointed to succeed Dr. Clarke. On the 6th of May, 1880, Dr. H. C. 
Rutter was re-appointed and he resigned his position in February, 1881, 
and Dr. A. B. Richardson was elected to fill the vacancy. Dr. Richardson 
resigned the superintendency April 17, 1890, and Dr. W. P. Crumbacker 
was appointed to the place. Dr. Crumbacker resigned May 19, 1892, 
and Dr. C. O. Dunlap was appointed. He resigned June i, 1896, and 
Dr. E. H. Rorick was appointed to fill his place. While it can be said 
that the Athens State Hospital never had an inefficient superintendent it 
will be noticed on the other hand that two of the superintendents (Dr. 
Gundry and Dr. Richardson) attained a national reputation in their line 
of work. 

The original capacity of the institution was only 572, but by new 
arrangements and some additions to the buildings the capacity has been 
enlarged to 813. The greatest number of patients ever in the institution 
at one time, which has been during the present year, was 1,012. The in- 
stitution is surrounded by grounds which are both spacious and beauti- 
ful, containing walks, drives, gardens, and artificial lakes, abutting on 
the south bank of the beautiful Hocking river. 

The present officers of the institution are: Board of Trustees — Dr. 
S. B. Lightner, Sabina, President; Virgil C. Lowry, Wm. H. Williams, 
Columbus; John Kaiser, Marietta, and J. P. Bradbury, Pomeroy. Resi- 

(832) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Athens State Hospital. 



833 



dent officers— E. H. Rorick, M. D., Superintendent; Milo Wilson, M. 
D., Assistant Physician ; Frank R. Lord, M. D., Assistant Physician, and 
Thos. L. Baxter, M. D., Assistant Physician; Kirk Kennedy, Steward; 
Geo. DeCamp, Storekeeper; Mary P. Rorick, Matron. 

TRUSTEES OF THE ATHENS STATE HOSPITAL. 
1872-1876. 1880-1884. 



Name. 



W. E Davis, President. 

E. H. Moore 

H. S. Bundy 

Levi T. Schofield, Arch, 



Residence. 



Cincinnati. 
Athens. 
Hamden. 
Cleveland. 



Name. 



H. M. Horton, Pres 

John E. Hanna 

S. W. Pickering 

Theo. F. Davis 

Dr. G. W. Boerstler... 



Residence. 



Meig-s County. 
Morgan County. 
Athens County. 
Washington Co. 
Fairfield Co. 



1876-1877. 



1885-1887. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Dr. Wm. Waddle, Pres 

Dr. Henry West 

P. B. Buell , 

Charles A. Cable 

Dr. H. M. Lash 



Ross County. 
Belmont Co. 
Washington Co. 
Athens County. 
Athens County. 



1877-1878. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Dr. Wm. Waddle, Pres 

P. B. Buell 

Charles A. Cable 

H. M. Horton 

Dr. A. B. Frame 



Ross County. 
Washington Co. 
Athens County. 
Meigs County. 
Athens County. 



1878-1880. 



Name. 



Isaac Stanley, President 

A. M. McMillan 

Dr. A. Bell 

John Schreiner 

S. S. Pursell 



Residence. 



Athens County. 
Washington Co. 
Musicingum Co. 
Meigs County. 
Hocking Co. 



Name. 



Residence. 



♦John M. Amos, Pres . . 

H. M. Horton 

Theo. F. Davis 

Dr. G. W. Boerstler 

John Ackley 



Noble County, 
Meigs County. 
Washington Ca 
Fairfield Co. 
Athens County. 



•Mr. Amos succeeded Mr, Hanna, and 
Mr. Ackley succeeded Mr. Pickering, in 
1884. . 

1887-1889. 



Name. 



H. M. Horton 

D. M. Barrett, Pres 

Theo. F. Davis 

Dr. H. M. Lash 

Dr. John Lanns 



Residence. 



Barrett's Mills. 

Pomeroy. 

Marietta. 

Athens. 

Gallipolis. 



1889-1890. 



Name. 



Dr. H. M. Lash, Pres. 

Theo. F. Davis , 

Capt. J. W. Delvy ... 

D. Q. Morrow 

John C. Hutsinplllar ., 



Residence. 



Athens. 
Marietta. 
Mo Arthur. 
Hillsboro. 
Gallipolis. 



68— B. A. 



834 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Athens State Hospital. 



TRUSTEES OF THE ATHENS STATE HOSPITALr— Concluded. 
1890-1892. 1897-1898. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Dr. H. M. Lash, Pres.. 

TUT "Pk TiOTTxa 


Athens. 
Marietta. 


John C. Hutsinpillar 


Gallipolis. 
McArthur. 


n Da-vid. 


Jackson. 







1892-1895. 



Name. 



♦J. C. Hutsinpillar, Pres 

W. D. Devol 

G David 

W. W. Merrick 

T. W. Moore 



Residence. 



Gallipolis. 

Marietta. 

Jackson. 

Pomeroy. 

Marietta. 



•Elected State Senator, succeeded by 
H. C. Johnson. 



1895-1897. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Name. 



T. W. Moore, President 

G. David 

HoUis C. Johnson 

John N. Hayman 

*George D. Cole 

tVir&il C. Lowery 



Residence. 



Marietta. 

Jackson. 

Gallipolis. 

Middleport. 

Waverly. 

Logan. 



♦Resigned after service of three months, 
1896, on account of sickness in family. 
tSucceeding Cole, resigned. 

1898-1901. 



Name. 



John N. Hayman, Pres 

$G. David 

Virgil C. Lowery 

Dr. S. B. Lightner 

John W Barger 

UWm. H. Williams 



Residence. 



Middleport. 

Jackson. 

Logan. 

Sabina. 

Waverly. 

Columbus. 



tTerm expired, 1889, after nine years' 
continuous service. 

llSucceeding G. David, 1899. 

1902. 



T. W. Moore, Pres 

•W. D. Devol 

G. David 

1|W. W. Merrick .. 
Hollis C. Johnson . 



Marietta. 
Marietta. 
Jackson. 
Pomeroy. 
Gallipolis. 



♦Term expired April, 1896. Succeeded 
Nov., 1896, by Geo. S. Coll. 

IJDied Oct. 30, 1896. Succeeded by 
John N. Hayman. 



Name. 



Dr. S. B. Lightner, Pres 

Virgil C. Lowery 

Wm. H. Williams 

John Kaiser 

J. P. Bradbury 



Residence. 



Sabina. 

Logan. 

Columbus. 

Marietta. 

Pomeroy. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Virgil C. Lowry, President Logan 

Wm. H. Williams Columbus 

John Kaiser Marietta 

J. P. Bradbury Pomeroy 

John W. Gregg Waverly 

RESIDENT OFFICERS. 

E. H. Rorick, :M. D '. Superintendent 

Milo Wilson, M. D , . . Assistant Physician 

Frank R. Lord. M. D Assistant Physician 

Thos. L. Baxter, M. D Assistant Physician 

W. A. Souders Steward 

B. J. Morris Storekeeper 

Mary P. Rorick Matron 



i.f,?¥^ -r...^ ^f^S-f jf?:,; -Jii-ll-rriitf'i 



THE CLEVELAND STATE HOSPITAL. 



THE Cleveland State Hospital, with a capacity of one hundred and 
two, was opened March 5, 1855, by Dr. L. Firestone, with about 
fifty patients, whose disabilities required the attention of but 
one assistant physician. The district consisted of twenty-two 
counties, embracing about one-third of the state. The institution steadily 
increased in size and number of patients until September, 1872, when it 
was almost entirely destroyed by fire. But few lives were lost, however, 
and the patients numbering /Some three hundred, were temporarily 
quartered ui the other public ii^stitutions of tht, cit} and otatc. x\xi act 
providing for the re-construction of the building was passed March 18, 
1873, and work was begun immediately. It was not completed, however, 
until January, 1875. Some years later the building was enlarged by the 
addition of six wards, and in 1893 two convalescent cottages were added, 
making our present capacity one thousand. 

Eighteen hundred and ninety-six and 1897 saw the construction of 
a beautiful amusement hall on the grounds of the institution. It has a 
seating capacity of eight hundred, the basement being fitted up with an 
improved system of bathing, lecture room, tailor shop, barber shop, etc. 
ReHgious services are conducted in the hall on Sunday, and a dance, in 
which both patients and employes participate, on Wednesday night of 
each week. 

In 1897 the congregate dining room was opened, in which six hun- 
dred patients are fed three times daily, during which time music is 
renderec by the orchestra. 

As the years rolled by, customs changed and the city built up, the 
footprints of Time were nowhere more clearly marked than in the State 
Hospital. From the old-fashioned "Lunatic Asylum" it has slowly but 
surely developed into one of the most modern and well-appointed insti- 
tutions of the country. We now have our own electric light plant, ice 
manufactory, training school for nurses, detention hospital, and in fact 
all the conveniences and appliances of modern times that tend to further 
the solving of the great problem of caring for the insane. In the mean- 
time, owing to the rapid increase of the population of both the city and 
state, and the corresponding increase in the number of insane to be cared 
for, other institutions of a like nature have been erected in the state, in 
consequence of which the Cleveland State Hospital district now embraces 
but six counties, which gives a daily average of eleven hundred patients. 

Cleveland township, in which the Cleveland State Hospital is situated, 
was not at the time of the opening of the institution a part of the City 

(835) 



836 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Cleveland State Hospital, 



of Cleveland, but constituted what was then a part of the village of 
Newburgs, an incorporation separate and apart from the city. Since that 
time, however, Newburgh has been annexed to the city, and at the pres- 
ent time the southern city limit lies quite a distance south of the insti- 
tution. 

The Hospital is situated on an elevated piece of land hi the southern 
part of the township, the grounds occupying ninety-eight acres, the 
greater part of which is laid out in park. The stately building with its 
solemn grey stone walls can be seen for several miles, and is a noted 
landmark. 

SUPERINTENDENTS. 



Name. 


Term of Service. 


L. Firestone 

R. C. Hopkins 

Jacob Laisy 

O. C. Kendrick 

W. W. Wythes 


March, 1855, to August, 1856. 
August, 185G, to December, 1857. 
December, 1857, to October, 1858. 
October, 1858, to November, 18G4. 
November, 18G4, to August, 18G5. 


Bryon Stanton 


August, 18G5, to November, 18G8. 


J M. Lewis 


November, 18G8, to April. 1874. 
April, 1874, to January, 1876. 
January, 1876, to January, 1891. 
January, 1891, to August, 1891. 
August, 1891, to November, 1899. 
November, 1899, . 


Lew Slusser 

Jamin Stroner 


C. B. Chesher .- 


H. C. Eyman 


Adams B Howard 







STEWARDS. 



Name. 


Term of Service. 


E. H. Doolittle 

R. Chamberlain 


March, 1855, to November, 1857. 
November 1857 to November 185S. 


Anson W. Pond 

George B. Weaver 

John C. Sheets 


November, 1858, to November, 1SG5. 
November, 1865, to November, 1868. 
November, 1868, to November, 187:'. 


Chas. W. Diehl 

S. K. Stage 

A. M. Parrish 


November, 1873, to November, 1889. 
November, 1889, to INIay, 1892. 
May 1892 to October 1896. 


Thos. Austin. . . ." 


October, 1890, . 







THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



837 



The Cleveland State Hospital. 



PRESENT OFFICERS. 



Name. 


Office. 


Date of 
Appointment. 


Adams B. Howard 


Superintendent 

Assistant Ptiysician 


November 1899 


James F. Kelly 


December 1897 


Katherine R. Moses 


Assistant Physician 


July, 1900. 
October, 1901. 
April, 1903. 
October 1896 


C. O. Jaster 

K S West 


Assistant Physician 

Assistant Physician 

Steward 


Thomas Austin 


B. E. Binkley 


Storekeeper 


June 1899 


Mrs. Adams B. Howard 


Matron 


November '^1902 









MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 





Date of 


Residence 




Date of 


Residence 


Names. 


Appoint- 




Names. 


Appoint- 






ment. 


(County.) 




ment. 


(County.) 


J. H. Seymour 


1856 


Columbiana 


James Barnett 


1878 


Cuyahoga 


John F. Morse 


1856 


Lake 


A. McGregor 


1878 


Stark 


T.iif»i«>n Swift 


1856 


Cuyahoga 

Lorain 

Cuyahoga 


D L Wadsworth 


1878 




L. D. Griswold 


1856 
1856 


J. H. Wade 


1879 
1879 


Cuyahoga 
Cuyahoga 


P. L. Ruggles 


A. T. Winslow 




1856 




J. W.Fitch 


1880 


Cuyahoga 
Cuyahoga 


Hiram Griswold 


1856 


Cuyahoga 


James Barnett 


1880 


I. Long Cassels 

Isaac Brayton 


1856 


Cuyahoga 


Wm. M. Beebe 


1880 


Summit 


1856 


Cuyahoga 


H. E. Mussey 


1880 


Lorain 




1856 
1857 


Cuyahoga 
Columbiana 


J. W. Fitch 


1880 
1880 


Cuyahoga 
Lorain 


Jacob Heaton 


Sidney S. Warner 


Chas. Hickox 


1857 

1858 


Cuyahoga 
Cuyahoga 
Wayne 


John Tod 


1881 
1882 


Cuyahoga 
Summit 


Harvey Rice 


Wm, M Beebe 


Geo Rex 


1858 


James C. Johnson 


1883 


Medina 


Lorenzo Whiting 


1858 


Stark 


E. D. Burton 


1884 


Cuyahoga 


Charles R. Pierce 


1858 


Summit. 


I^obert S. Shields 

Ralph K. Paige 


1884 


Stark 


Wra. C. E',rl 


1858 


Lucas 


1885 


Lake 




1860 


Cuyahoga 




1885 . 


Wayne 


Ferd. Klugel 


1862 


D. L. King 

John Tod 


1886 


Charles C. Cook 


1863 
1862 


Mahoning 
Mahoning 


1886 

1887 




Robert Montgomery . 


D. L. King 


Summit 


Stephen H. Pitkin 


1864 


Summit 


H.W.Curtis 


1887 


Cuyahoga 


Alex. Steele 


1866 
1866 


Lorain 

Cuyahoga 

Cuyahoga 


James C. Johnson 

John C. Beatty 

C. N. Schmick 


1888 
1889 


Medina 


W H Pric*- . . 


Portage 
Columbiana 


AUeyne Maynard 


1867 


1890 


Chas. B. Lockwood. . . 


1868 


Cuyahoga 


Ralph K. Paige 


1890 


Lake 


John Hutchins 


1868 


Trumbull 


J. M. Waterman 


1890 


Cuyahoga 


Morrison R. Waite .... 


1870 


Lucas 


W.S. Hough 


1890 


Summit 


Jonas D. Cat tell 


1872 


Columbiana 


C. N. Schmick 


1891 


Columbiana 


Julian Harman 


1872 


Trumbull 


Ralph K. Paige 


1892 


Lake 


Oscar White 


1874 


Lucas 


H. B, Perkins 


1892 


Trumbull 


Jabez W. Fitch. ...... 


1874 


Cuyahoga 


G. D. Gessaman 


1892 


Mahoning 




1874 
1874 


Ashtabula 
Tuscarawas 


J S Ellen 


1894 
1S95 


Lake 


Joseph Shngluff 


C. N. Schmick 


Columbiana 


James Barnett 


1874 


Cuyahoga 


D. S. Gardner 


:S96 


Stark 


Leander Firestone , . . 


1875 


Wayne 


G. E. Baldwin 


1900 


Stark 


James Barnett 


1876 
1876 
1876 


Cuyahoga 
Cuyahoga 
Lake 


Samuel Weil 


1900 
1900 
1901 


Mahoning 


J. W. Fitoh 


J T. Kelly 




Geo. W. Steele 


Jacob Perkins 


Trumbull 


Sidney S. Warner 


1876 


Lorain 


N.P.Nichols 


1902 


Medina 


Stephen H. Pitkin 


1876 


Summit 


W. H. Smiley 


1902 


Trumbull 


James Barnett 


1877 


Cuyahoga 


Geo. L. Fordyce 


1903 


Mahoning 


J. W. Fitch 


1878 
1878 


Cuyahoga 
Summit 








John F. Perry 









THE COLUMBUS STATE HOSPITAL. 



THE ''Lunatic Asylum of Ohio" was organized by Act of the Thirty- 
fourth General Assembly, passed March 5, 1835, sixty-two years 
ago, and Samuel Parsons, William M. Awl and Samuel F. Mac- 
Cracken were appointed Directors. 

These Directors selected a tract of land about one mile east and north 
of the State House, in Columbus, comprising thirty acres. This tract 
fronted south on what is now East Broad street, and the western boundary 
was near what is now Washington avenue. 

During ilie nt^i ihree yc^rs they erected a l>uiiding on these giounds, 
at a cost of about sixty-one thousand ($61,000) dollars. 

The institution accommodated one hundred and twenty patients, and 
was the first institution for the treatment of the insane organized west 
of the Alleghenies. A very fair representation of the building is given 
on the second page, which is a copy of a painting made by an inmate 
of the asylum, and the original of which is still in the possession 
of the present Hospital. 

On May 21, 1838, William M. Awl, M. D., of Columbus, was elected 
Medical Superintendent by the Trustees, and the first patient was re- 
ceived on November 30 of that year. 

The building was two hundred and ninety-five feet in length and 
contained one hundred and fifty-three single rooms. The Directors 
apologized for the apparently extravagant size by saying that it would be 
required in a few years. Yet it was the only asylum the state then had. 
Now — 900-1-2 — the state has accommodations for more than seven 
thousand five hundred patients in the several "State Hospitals" at Cleve- 
land, Columbus, Dayton, Longview, Massiilon and Toledo, and every 
institution is crowded to its full capacity. 

Dr. Awl was in charge as Superintendent until 1850, a period of 
twelve years, when he was succeeded by Samuel H. Smith, M. D. He 
was succeeded in 1852 by E. Kendrick, M. D., and he by George E. 
Eels, M. D., in June, 1854. On August i, 1855, Dr. Richard Gundry. 
who later became so prominent in the care of the insane in Ohio and 
the United States, was appointed assistant Physician. 

In July, 1856, Dr. R. Hills, of Delaware, was appointed Superin- 
tendent. He held the position for several years, and was succeeded by 
Dr. William L. Peck. 

On the evening of November 18, 1868, the asylum caught fire, and 
was almost wholly destroyed. There were three hundred and fourteen 
patients in the asylum, and six were suffocated by the smoke before they 

(838) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 839 

The Colimibtis State Hospital. 

could be rescued. The others were removed to the asylums at Cleveland, 
Dayton and Cincinnati, which had been built since this one was organized. 

On April 2^, 1869, an Act was passed by the Legislature authorizing 
the re-building of the asylum on the old grounds, and contracts were let 
September 23, 1869, and work was begun on the foundation October 24th 
of that year. Winter soon stopped the work, however, and during the. 
ensuing session of the Legislature, on the i8th of April, 1870, a bill was 
passed authorizing the sale of the old tract and the purchase of a new site 
to contain three hundred acres of land. 

Governor R. B. Hayes, State Treasurer S. S. Warner, and Attorney 
General F. B. Pond were appointed a Commission to sell the old site and 
to purch?<5e a new one. They were required to sell the old site at a price 
not less than $200,000, and to purchase a new site of not less than three 
hundred acres at a cost of not to exceed $100,000. 

The Commission reported in favor of the purchase of three hundred 
acres from Wm. S. Sullivant, on the high lands west of Columbus and 
across the Scioto valley, paying therefor two hundred and fifty dollars 
per acre. 

The Trustees took charge of this tract, which is the present site of the 
Hospital, on May 5, 1870. The site of the old building was determined 
upon, work was begun under the old contracts, which had been trans- 
ferred to the new site, and the conier-stone was laid on July 4th of that 
year. 

The institution was finally completed on July 4, 1877, just seven 
years from the laying of the corner-stone, on July 4, 1870. 

The total cost of construction at the time of the opening was $1,520,- 
980.45 — at the time of writing (1901) the cost of construction has ex- 
ceeded $2,000,000. 

The first patient was admitted into the new Hospital on August 23, 
1877, ^^^ t^^s patient is still an inmate of the institution, twenty years 
later. 

The Hospital, as completed, stands on an elevated plateau about three 
miles west of High street, on the north side of Broad street, facing 
almost directly east. It consists of a central Administration Building and 
two wings, of four sections each, and a rear wing. The lateral wings 
and the Administration Building have a lineal frontage of about 1.200 
feet, and the rear wing and Administration Building have a depth of 
about 800 feet. It is nearly all four stories in height, and the distance 
around the foundation walls is about one and one-quarter miles. The 
building, when opened, accommodated eight hundred and fifty-trwo' 
.patients. In the wings for the patients there were four hundred single 
rooms and one hundred and sixteen associated dormitories for the use 
of patients. There were twenty-eight wards from 120 to 180 feet in 



04U 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Columbus State Hospital. 



length, and each ward contained bath, lavatory, water-closet, clothing 
room and two rooms for attendants. 

During the last two years the Hospital has added to its capacity 
two cottages. These buildings are situated in a grove on the hospital 
grounds just a short distance west of the main institution. Together 
they will accommodate about 200 or 225 patients. 

One of these buildings for the chronic insane was named for Dr. 
VVm. W. Awl, the first superintendent of an asylum for the insane in 
the state of Ohio. This building is intended for the treatment of the 
incurable cases. 

"Greer" cottage is situated a short distance west of "Awl" and is 
named for Hon. H. H. Greer, President of the Board of Trustees of this 
institution. It is cxpcctcJ to treat only the acute and curable cases in 
this cottage. At present these cottages are being fitted up and when they 
are occupied the entire capacity of the hospital will be close to 1,600 
patients. v 

THE COLUMBUS STATE HOSPITAL. 
ROSTER OF OFFICERS. 

SUPERINTENDENTS. 



Name. 


Term of Service. 


William M. Awl, M. D 


May 21, 1838, to July 1, 1850. 
July 1, 1850, to June 1, 1852. 
Junel, 1852, to July 1, 1854. 
July 1, 1854, to July 1. 1856. 
July 1, 1856, to Jan. 1, 1865. 
Jan. 1, 1865, to Nov. 18, 1868. 


Samuel H. Smith, M. D. . . : 


Elijah Kendrick, M. D. : 


Geo. E. Eels, M. D. . : 


R. Hills, M. D 


*William L. Peck, M. D 


Richard Gundry, M. D. . . : 


(Nov. 18, 1868, asylum bumed.) 
January 1, 1877, to May 1, 1878. 
May 1, 1878, to March 15, 1881. 
March, 15, 1881, to Nov. 15, 1883. 


L. Firestone, M. D 


H C. Rutter, M. D 


T. R. Potter, M. D 


Nov. 15, 1883, to April 15, 1884. 


C M Finch M. D 


April 15, 1884, to Mav 15, 1888. 
May 15, 1888, to April 15, 1890. 
April 15, 1890, to March 10, 1891. 
March, 10, 1891, to April 15, 1892. 
April 15, 1892, to Mav 1, 1898. 
May 1, 1898, to October 19, 1902. - 
October 23 1902 incumbent. 


Jno. W. McMiUen, M.'D 

D. A. Morse, M. D.... 

J.H.Ayers,M. D.: 

A. B. Richardson, M. D 

tEucrene G CarDentGr M. D, 


Georffe Stocton M. D. : . ... 







*Dr. Peck prepared the plans for the central wing of the present building and acted 
Resident Architect until legislated out of office March 31, 1874. 
fDeceased suceeded by George Stockton, M. D., Oct. 23, 1902. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



841 



The Columbus State Hospital. 



BOARD OP TRUSTEES. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Hon. H. H. Greer, President 


Mt. Vernon. 


Hon. M. B. Bushnell 


Mansfield . 


Hon. H. F. Southard 


Zanesville . 


Hon. John G. Roberts 


Elida. 


Hon. Thomas B. Black. . ; 


Kenton. 







PRESIDENT OFFICERS. 



Name. 




George Stockton, M. D 

George T. Harding, Jr., M. D, 

Earle E. Gaver, M. D 

Guy H. WiUiams, M. D 

W. W. Richardson, M. D 

Isabel D. Bradley, M. D 

Angus Mclver, M. D 

O. L. Anderson 

Miner T. Hines 

Mrs. Ida Raymond 



Superintendent. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician.- 
Pathologist. 
Medical Interne. 
Steward 
Storekeeper. 
Matron. 



THE DAYTON STATE HOSPITAL. 



THE DAYTON DISTRICT comprises ten counties, viz.: Mont- 
gomery, Brown, Butler, Darke, Greene, Miami, Preble, Shelby, 
Warren and Clermont. The Dayton State Hospital was first 
occupied September, 1855, with a capacity of 162, known as the 
Southern Ohio Lunatic Asylum. In the year 1875, it was changed to 
Western Ohio Hospital for the Insane; in 1877, to the Dayton Hospital 
for the Insane; in 1878, to the Dayton Asylum for the Insane, and in 
1894, to the Dayton State Hospital. The hospital is located on a hill 
southeast nf the c'>y nf Daytcr?, adjuiiiini> the corT:ai<itii«^i tw .'hV-. from 
the court house. It is on the congregate plan, consisting of the admin- 
istration building, four stories in height, and the wards on either side 
three stories in height. 

The original building contained six wards, three on either side. of the 
administration building, with a capacity of 164. In 1861, the capacity 
of the Hospital was increased to 600 by the addition of six wards on each 
side. In 1891 it was again enlarged by the addition of congregate dining 
rooms, one on each side, which increased the capacity 170, giving us a 
total capacity at this time of 770. 

The Hospital at this time has a frontage of 940 feet, and is uniformly 
three stories in height, except the administration building, which is four 
stories and surmounted by a cupola. The state property consists of about 
300 acres, 40 acres of which are in lawn ; also four artificial lakes, which 
are about four acres in extent. 

The Hospital is controlled by a board of five trustees, appointed by 
the Governor, whose tenure of office is five years ; the term of one trustee 
expiring each year. 

The annual expenditure for the support of the Hospital is about 
$150,000.00. 

Two- detached cottages of 100 capacity each have this year been 
erected. 

A complete new steam and power building is now under construc- 
tion. 



(842) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



843 



The Dayton State Hospital. 



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844 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Dayton State Hospital. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS. 



Year. 


Name. 


County 


Year. 


Name. 


County. 


1862-63 


H. Jewett 


Montgomery 

Montgomery 

Preble 

Darke. 

Montgomery 

Montgomery 

Montgomery 

Preble. 

Warren. 

Clark. 

Darke. 

Montgomery 

Montgomery 

Preble. 

Warren. 

Darke. 

Clark. 

Montgomery 

Darke. 

Clark. 

Warren. 

Preble. 

Montgomery 

Montgomery 

Darke. 

Clark. 

Preble. 

Warren. 

Montgomery 

Darke. 

Clark. 

Preble. 

Warren. 

Montgomery 

Montgomery 

Darke . 

Clark. 

Warren. 

Montgomery 

Logan. 

Montgomery 

Darke. 

Clark. 

Warren. 

Montgomery 

Logan 

Montgomery 

Darke. 

Clark. 

Warren . 

Montgomery 

Logan 

Montgomery 

Warren. 

Montgomery 


1874-75 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1875-76 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1876-77 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1877-78 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1878-79 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1880-81 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1882-83 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1884-85 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
1885-86 
• 1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1886-87 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1887-88 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1889-90 
1891 . . 


E. B. Harrison 

A. G. McBumey 

E. B. Harrison 

Thomas Legler 

A. G. McBumey. . . 

W.H. Manning 

N. R. Wyman 

C. M. Godfrey 

W. J. Conklin 

A. G. McBumey 

W. H. Manning 

C. M. Godfrey 

N. R. Wyman 

W. J. Conklin 

Thomas D. Styles... 

C. M. Godfrey 

H. Schoenfeldt 

Job E. Owens 

L. G. Gould 

Joseph Clegg . : 

C.M.Godfrey 

Jacob Chambers .... 

J. D. Kemp 

S. A. Baxter 

S. A. Baxter 

Joseph Clegg 

CM. Godfrey 

J. D. Kemp 

J. M. MiUikin..;.... 

Joseph Clegg 

S. A. Baxter 

C. M. Godfrey ..... 

Peter Murphy 

J. Linxweiler 

C. M. Godfrey 

S. A. Baxter 

Joseph Clegg 

Peter Murphy 

J. Linxweiler 

Peter Murphy 

Joseph Clegg 

C.M.Godfrey 

S. A. Baxter 

J. Linxweiler 

S. A. Baxter 

H. L. Morey 

Joseph Clegg 

C. M. Godfrey 

J. Linxweiler 

J. Linxweiler 

Joseph Clegg 

C. M. Godfrey 

H. L. Morey 

C.D.Wright 

I. N.Walker 


Henry. 
Warren . 
Henry. 
Montgomop,' 
Warren. 


1862-63 
1862-63 
1862-63 


G. W. Rogers 

Lurton Dunham. . . . 
I N Gard 


1862-63 
1864 65 


Jefferson Patterson. 
H. Jewett 


1864-65 
1864-65 
1864-65 
1846-65 
1846-65 


G. W. Rogers 

L. Dunham 

James Scott 

A. Waddle 

G N. Gard 


Shelby. • 
Putnam 

Warren. 
Montgomery- 


1866-67 


H Jewett 


1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1866-67 
1868-69 


G. W. Rogers 

L. Dunham 

James Scott 

J.N. Gard 

A. Waddle 

H. Jewett 


Shelby. 

Montgomerv- 

Darke. 

Putnam 

Montgomerv 

Butler. 


1868-69 


I. N. Gard 


Preble. 


1868-69 


A Waddle 


Montgomery 

Putnam 

Preble. 

Montgomcr\' 

Allen. 


1868-69 
1868-69 
1868-69 
1869-70 


James Scott 

L. Dunham 

G. W. Rogers 

H Jewett 


1869-70 
1869-70 
186Q-70 


I. N. Gard 

A. Waddle 

Tj Dunhan 


Allen. 

Montgomer}- 

Putnam. 


1869-70 
1869-70 
1870-71 


A. G. McBumey.... 

G.W.Rogers 

I N. Gard 


Montgomer}' 

Butler. 

Montgomerv 


1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 
1870-71 


A. Waddle 

L. Dunham 

A. G. McBumey. . . 
John Davis 


Allen. 
Putnam. 
Butler. 
Montgomerv' 


1870-71 
1871-72 


G. W. Rogers 

I N Gard 


Putnam. 
Allen. 


1871-72 


A Waddle 


Montgomerv' 


1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1871-72 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 
1872-73 


A. G. McBumey.... 

John Davis 

R. P. Kennedy 

G. W. Rogers 

I. N. Gnrd 

A. Waddle 

A. G. McBumey. . . 
John Davis 


Butler. 

Montgomerv- 

Butler. 

Montgomery 

Putnam. 

Allen. 

Montgomer}' 

Men. 


1872-73 
1872-73 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 
1873-74 


R. P. Kennedy 

G. W. Rogers 

I. N. Gard 

A. Waddle 

A. G. McBumey. . . 
John Davis 


Butler 

Montgomer}' 

Putnam. 

Montgomery 

Montgomer}' 

Montgon^ery 


1873-74 
1873-74 
1874-75 
1874-75 


R. P. Kennedy 

G. W. Rogers 

A. G. McBumey. . . 
Thomas A. Legler. . . 


Putnam 
Butler. 
Miami 
Warren. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



845 



The Dayton State Hospital. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OP MANAGERS— Concluded. 



Year. 


Name. 


County. 


Year. 


Name. 


County. 


1891 . . 


I. T. Cummins 


Greene. 


1896 . . 


Thomas A Burns. . . 


Darke. 


1891 . . 


Peter Murphy 


Butler. 


1896 . . 


George H. Smith 

Frank W.Whitaker. 


Greene. 


1891 . . 


Frank J. McCormick 


Montgomery 


1896 . . 


Butler. 


1891 . . 


C.F.Brooks 


Preble. 


1897 . . 


F. W. Whitaker. . . . 


Butler. 


1892 . . 


Peter Murphy 


Butler. 


1897 . . 


Oscar Sheppard 


Preble. 


1892 . . 


1. N.Walker 


Warren. 


1897 . . 


Thomas A. Burns. . . 


Darke. 


1892 . . 


Frank J. McCormick 


Montgomery 


1897 . . 


George H. Smith 


Greene. 


1892 . . 


Oscar Sheppard 

J. H. Wolford 


Preble. 


1897 . . 


L N.Walker 


, Warren. 


1892 . . 


Greene. 


1898 . . 


W. W. Koa,.i 


Loj^'^n. 


1893 . . 


Oscar Sheppard 


Preble. 


1898 . . 


Thomas A. Bums. . . 


Darke. 


1893 . . 


Frank J. McCormick 


Montgomery 


1898 . . 


George H. Smith 


Greene. 


1893 . . 


J. H. Wolford 


Greene 


1898 . . 


L N.Walker 


Walrren. 


1893 . . 


I. N. Walker 


Warren. 


1898 . . 


F. W. Whitaker. . . . 


Butler. . 


1893 . . 


Peter Murphy 

Frank J. ]\IcCormick 


Butler. 


1899 


Thomas A. Bums. , . 


Darke. 


1894 . . 


Montgomery 


1899 . . 


George H. Smith 


Greene. 


1894 . . 


J. H. Wolford 


Greene. 


1899 . . 


1. N.Walker 


. Warren. 


1894 . , 


I. N. Walker 


Warren. 


1899 . . 


F. W.Whitaker.... 


Butler. 


1894 . . 


Peter Murphy 


Butler. 


1899 . . 


W.W. Roach 


Logan. 


1894 . . 


Oscar Sheppard 


Preble. 


1902 . . 


H. L. Morey 


Butler. 


1895 . . 


J. H. Wolford 


Greene. 


1902 . . 


A. N.Wilson 


Darke. 


1895 . . 


I.N.Walker 


Warren. 


1902 . . 


C. R. Gilmore 


Preble. 


1895 . . 


Peter Murphy 


Butler. 


1902 . . 


George Little 


Greene. 


1895 . . 


Oscar Sheppard 


Preble. 


1902 . . 


T. P.Linn 


Franklin. 


1895 . . 


Thomas A. Bums. . . 


Darke. 


1903 . . 


Geo. P. Sohngen. . . . 


Butler. 


1896 . . 


1. N.Walker 


Warren. 


1903 . . 


C.C. Shearer 


Greene. 


1896 . . 


Oscar Sheppard 


Preble. 









THE LONGVIEW STATE HOSPITAL. 



THIS Asylum is one of the notable charities of Hamilton county, for 
which the State of Ohio makes annual appropriations. It is 
the outgrowth of a combination of circumstances which have 
determined its peculiar legal status. It has been the subject of 
more than thirty years of contention, and its history is that of a great 
political wrong; and an account of its establishment, growth and present 
condition might not be uninteresting to the general public. • 

The first asylum for the insane erected in Ohio was built in Cincin- 
nati, under ai* act of Uie Legislature, pc:.Socd Jauuaiy :^2, 1821, entitled, 
"an Act establishing a Commercial Hospital and Lunatic Asylum for the 
state of Ohio." 

By the terms of this enactment the trustees of Cincinnati township 
were to furnish a site for said institution, containing not less than four 
acres of land, within one mile of the public landing on the Ohio river, 
and erect the necessary buildings (which were to be of brick) for the 
safe-keeping, comfort and medical treatment of such idiots, lunatics and 
insane persons of this state as might be brought to it for these j)urposes. 
The trustees were to receive certain compensation for the care of such 
patients, to be paid by the county sending the same, if paupers, or by the 
friends or guardians, if the patients had estates. 

In addition, the trustees were required to admit and care for, free 
of charge, all boatmen belonging to boats owned by citizens of Ohio or 
to boats of the citizens of other states which provided hospital accommo- 
dations tc boatmen of this state. They were also required to receive 
into said institution, and care for, all the paupers of Cincinnati town- 
ship. 

The institution was to be known as "The Commercial Hospital and 
. Lunatic Asylum of Ohio." The state donated, for the purpose of assist- 
ing in the erection of said asylum, $10,000 in depreciated or uncurrent 
bank bills then in the state treasury, from which were realized $3,500 in 
specie. 

The Commercial Hospital and Lunatic Asylum of Ohio was the 
parent institution from which afterwards sprung the Orphan Asylum, the 
City Infirmary, the Cincinnati Hospital and Longview Asylum. It 
was the beginning, on the part of the state, which has led to the establish- 
ment of the great benevolent institutions of which every citizen of Ohio 
is justly proud. 

The legislature, on March 7, 1835, authorized the purchase of land 
for a lunatic asylum, and at the next session authorized the erection of 

(846) 



' H^^<^pifi>,%-^^^ 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 847 

The Longview State Hospital. 

an asylum for the insane on the land recently purchased for that purpose 
at Columbus. Said institution was to be known as the Lunatic Asylum 
of Ohio. On ^March 9, 1838, an act was passed, entitled, "an act to pro- 
vide for the safe-keeping of idiots, lunatics or insane persons, the man- 
agement of their affairs and for other purposes," which required all per- 
sons found to be lunatics to be sent to the Ohio Lunatic Asylum, and 
repealing all acts and parts of acts inconsistent with the provision of said 
act. Thus the Cincinnati Hospital and Lunatic Asylum of Ohio ceased ' 
to be a state institution on March 9, 1838, although the name remained 
till March 11, 1861, when it was changed to Commercial Hospital of Cin- 
cinnati. 

The state afterwards built two additional hospitals for the insane, 
one at Dayton and the other in the northern part of Ohio, and on April 
7, 1856, the legislature passed "an act to provide for the uniform gov-- 
ernment and better regulation of the lunatic asylums of the state and llie 
care of idiots and insane," which divided the state into three districts, 
known as the Northern, Central and Southern Districts. Hamilton 
county, together with thirteen other counties, constituted the Southern 
District, the asylum for which was located at Dayton, but, on.Marcli 10, 
1857, the legislature passed an act making Hamilton county a separate 
district for lunatic asylum purposes, and providing for the erection and 
government of an asylum therein, and that the commissioners shall cause 
all the insane of the county to be placed in such asylum when completed. 
The act further provided that the inmates of the asylum be supported and 
the salaries of its officers paid from "a fund consisting of all the money 
raised in the county of Hamilton by county tax for the support of idiots, 
lunatics and insane persons, and of such appropriations as shall be made 
by the state for the support of curable lunatics in said asylum, equal to 
the amount annually raised by taxation from the county of Hamilton for 
the support of lunatic asylums in the state." An act of April 28, 1873, 
which repealed the provision of the act of 1857J and substituted in its | 
place a law which provided that Hamilton county should receive, for the | 
support of Longview Asylum, a sum which should bear such a proportion | 
to the entire appropriations for the support of the curable insane of the . i 
state as the population of Hamilton county bears to the population of the j 
state outside of said county. 

The injustice of the law of 1873 has been so apparent that no Gen- 
eral Assembly since 1880 has insisted on its enforcement. In the years !; 
1880 to 1883, both inclusive, the legislature appropriated $10,000 each 
year in excess of the amount due under the statute of 1873. Since 1883 
the legislature has wholly disregarded the rule of 1873, and has appro- j, 
priated to Longview gross sums, in the same manner that appropriations ij 
were made to the other asylums. . j 



'3^tXl '"^^i 'W^pi--^ 






848 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Longview State Hospital. 

The care of the insane in Hamilton county is an- exception to the 
general system of the state, and for more than twenty years spasmodic 
efforts have been made on the part of the state to acquire the ownership 
and control of Longview, and to make it part of the state system, but 
to no practical end. 

A new building to accommodate two hundred and fifty patients has 
been constructed by the county of Hamilton at an expense of $100,000.00. 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF LONGVIEW HOSPITAL. 

The Eo«i*d of Diieci«'rs 01 Long^^iew conslbts of live nienmers, two 
of whom are appointed by the Governor, and one each by the Common 
Pleas Court, the Probate Judge and the County Commissioners. They 
hold office for five years, and are not removable except for cause, which 
gives the board a fixed tenure, and makes it free from sudden political 
changes. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



819 



The Longviciv State Hospital. 



TABLE OF DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS OF LONGVIEW ASYLUM, FROM DATE OF ORGAN- 
IZATION (JUNE 14, 1859) TO OCTOBER 31. 1900. 



Year. 



Directors. 



Superintendent. 



Assistant Physicians. 



Steward. 



1860^ 



1861^ 



1862 



1863^ 



1864 



1865 



1866 



1867 



1868 



1869 



1870 



1871 



1872 



J. L. Vattier... 
John Burgoyne . 
T. F. Eckert.... 



1873 



John Burgoyne 
W. F. Eckert 
C. G. Comegys 



T. F. Eckert, Pres. 
C. G. Comegys. ... 
John Bu"To«'...^, . 



te, Pres. . ."I 

3 ••••! 



C. G. Comegys, Pres. ... 1 

John BurgojTie \ 

M. E. Reeves J 

John Burgoyne, Pres. . . ") 

M. E. Reeves } 

John F. Torrence J 



M. E. Reeves, Pres. 
John F. Torrence. . 
John Burgoyne .... 



John F. Torrence, Pres 

John Burgoyne 

Jos. Seifert , 



John Burgoyne, Pres. 

John F. Torrence 

Jos. Seifert 

Henry Kessler 

Joshua H. Bates 

John K. Green 



John Burgoyne, Pres. 

John F. Torrence 

Jos. Seifert 

Henry Kessler 

Josfiua H. Bates, Sec. 
Joh I K. Green 



John Burgoyne, Pres. 

John F. Torrence 

Jos. Seifert 

Henry Kessler 

Joshua H. Bates, Sec. 
John K. Green 



John Burgoyne, Pres. 

John F, Torrence 

Jos, Seifert 

Joshua H. Bates Sec 

John K. Green 

A. D. BuUock 



Jno. F. Torrence, Pres. 

Jos. Seifert 

Joshua H. Bates, Sec. 

John K. Green 

A. D. Bullock 

John W. Herron 



Pres. 



Jno. F. Torrence, 

Jos. Siefert 

Joshua H. Bates, Sec 

John K. Green 

A. D. Bullock 

John W. Herron 



Jos. Siefert, Pres. 
Joshua H. Bates.. 
Jno. K. Green.. . 
John W. Herron . 
Paul Reinlein. . . . 
. M. T. Carey. Sec. 
54--B. A. 



O. M. Langdon, M. D. 
O. M. Langdon, M. D. 
O. M. Langd'^n, M. D. 
O. M. Langdon, M. D. 
O. M. Langdon, M. D. 
O. M. Langdon, M. D.. 
O. M. Langdon, M. D. 

O. M. Langdon.M. D. 
O. M. Langdon, M. D. 
O. M. Langdon, M. D. 
0. M. Langdon, M. D. 

J. T. Webb, M. D 

J. T.Webb. M.D.. .. 



B. C. Ludlow, M. D. 



W, H.McReynoIds,M.D. 



R. T. Thorbum 



R. T. Thorbum. 



J. T Webb, M. D 



W. H. McReynoIds,M.D. 1 R. T Thorbum. 
R. T. Thorbum. 



J. A. HaU, M. D.. . 
J. W. Mocks, M. D 



J. A. HaU, M. D 

J. A. HaU, M. D. ..... 

Jai.H. Denny, M. D. 

J.A; HaU, M.D. ...... 



T. T. Kearney, M. D 



A. P. Courtright, M. D. . 



A. P. Courtright, M. D. . 



H. E. Foote. M. D. . . . 
A. P. Courtright, M. D. 



Wm. Rashig, M. D 

Wm. H. DeWitt, M. D. 

Lyman Wolfe. M. D. . . 
Wm. H. DeWitt, M. D. 

Lyman Wolfe, M. D. . . . 
Wm. H. DeWitt. M. D. 



R. T. Thorburn. 



R. T. Thorbum. 



R. T. Thorbum. 



R. T. Thorbum. 



R. T. Thorbum. 



R. T. Thorbum. 



R. T. Thorburn. 



A. M. Robinson, 



A. M. Robinson, 



A. M. Robinson. 



I 



I 



850 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Longview State Hospital. 



DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS OF LONGVIEW ASYLUM— Continued. 



Year. 



Directors. 



1874 
1875 



1876 

1877' 

1878 

1879 

l88oJ 

1881 
1882 

1883 

1884 

1885] 



John K. Green, Pres, 

Joshua H. Bates 

Jos. Seifert 

Paul Reinlein 

M. T. Carey, Sec 

|Tho3. F. Eckert 



M. T. Carey. Pres. . 
Joshua H. Bates . . . 

Jos. Seifert 

Paul Reinlein, Sec. 
Thomas F. Eckert. 
John K. Green 



Superintendent. 



Joshua H Bates, Pres. 

M. T. Carey, Sec 

Jos. Seifert 

Thos. F. Eckert 

Jno. K. Green 

Wm. P. Wallace , 



Jos. Seifert, Pres. 
M. T. Carey, Sec. 
Jno. K. Green.. . 
Wm. P. Wallace . 
L. L. Armstrong. 
D. W. Belding. . . 



John C. Morris, Pres. . . 
James F. Chalfant, Sec. 
H. D. Peck 

A. J. Mvillane 

B. Roth 

H. D. Peck, Pres 

James F. Chalfant, Sec. 

A. J. Mullane 

B. Roth 

C.S. Muscroft 

Jas. F. Chalfant, Pres. . 

A. J. Mullane, Sec 

B. Roth 

C. S. Muscroft 

W.P. Hulbert 



Peter A. White, Pres. . 
Jaa. F. Chalfant, Sec, 

B. Roth 

C. S. Misscroft 

B. Roth, Pres 

James F. Chalfant, Sec. 

C. S. Muscroft 

W.P. Hulbert 

Peter A. White 



C. S. Muscroft, Pres. . . 
James F. Chalfant, Sec. 

Peter A. White 

W. P. Hulbert 

John Zumstein 



W. P. Hulbert, Pres.. 

Peter A. White 

John Zumstein 

May Fechheimer, Sec. 
Theo. Marsh 



Theo. Marsh, Pres 

Peter A. White 

John Zumstein 

May Fechheimer, Sec. 
W.J. Coppock. 



Peter A. White, Pres. . . 
May Fechheimer, Sec. . . 

John Zumstein 

W.J. Coppock 

Theo. Marsh 



W. H. Bunker, M. D. 



W. H. Bunker, M. D. 



W. H. Bunker, M. D. 



W. H. Bvmker. M. D. 



C. A. Miller, M.D.... 



Assistant Physicians. 



Steward. 



Wm. H. DeWitt, M. D. 
Lyman Wolfe M. D. . . 

Wm. H. DeWitt, M. D. 
S. I. Mock, M. D. 



"■] 



C. A. Miller, M. D. 



C. A. Miller. M.D. 



C. A. MiUer, M. D. 
W. P. Hubbert... 



...I 



Wm. H. DeWitt, M. D. 1 
S. LMockM. D / 



A. M. Robinson, 



A. M. Robinson 



E. M. Burgoyne. 



Wm. H. DeWitt, M. D. ] 
).I.Mcck.M.D I, IE. M. Burgoyne 



Jno. H. Samuel, M. D. 
F. F. Bellman, 



Jno. H. Samuel, M. D. 
F. F. Hellman. 



[, M.D. 1 
M.D. ./ 

el, m! D. I 
I. M. D.. .J 



C. A. MiUer, M. D.... 



C. A. Miller, M. D. 



C. A. Miller, M. D. 



J. M. RatUff, M. D 

Geo. T. Greer. M. D. . . . 
A. N. Ellis, M. D 



J. M. Ratliflf. M. D I 

i;i F.W.Harmon tl 

J. M. RatlifiF, M. D.. 
F. W. Harmon, 



J. M. RatUfF, M. D, 
F. W. Harmon 



.M.D. ./ 

LD I 

. M. D.../ 



C. A. Miller.M. D. . . 



■■( 



C. A. Miller, M. D. 



J. M. Rathff, M. D "I 

F. W. Harmon, M. D. . . j' 

J. M. RatUflF, M. D... 
F. W. Harmon 



J. M. Ratliff, M. D.. 
F. W. Harmon 



^ 1 

K. D...J 

"^ 1 

M.D... J 



W. H. Rowe. 



W. H. Rowe. 



A. V. Stewart. 



A. V. Stewart. 



A. V. Stewart. 



A. V. Stewart. 



H. Milton Foss. 



H. Milton Foss. 



H. Milton Foaa. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



851 



The Longview State Hospital. 



DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS OF LONG\^EW ASYLUM— Continued. 



Ve»r. 



Directors. 



Superintendent. 



Assistant Physicians. 



Steward. 



18S7 



John Zumstein, Pres.. 
May Fechheimer, Sec. 

W. J. Coppock 

Theo. Marsh 

John A. ICreis 



May Fechheimer, Pres. 

W.J. Coppock 

Theo. Marsh 

John A. Kreis Sec 

John Zumstein 



f I W .T. Copnock, Pres. 



IS89 



1891 



IS95 



1896 



1S97 



1S99 



John A. Kreis, Sec . 

John Zumstein 

Chas. Fleischmann. 
H.H.Tatem 



H. H. Tatem, Pres. 
Jno. A. Kreis, Sec. , 

John Zumstein 

Chas. Fleischmann . , 
W. J. Coppock 



Jno. A. Kreis, Pi^es. 

Jno; Zumstein 

Chas. Fleischmann . 

W. J. Coppock 

H.H.Tatem, Sec. 



John Zumstein, Pres. 
Chas. Fleischmann. . . 

W. J. Coppock 

H.H.Tatem, Soc... 
W. H. CampbeU 



Chas. Fleischmann, Pres . 

W. T. Coppock 

H.H.Tatem, Sec 

W. H. CampbeU 

John Zumstein 



W. J. Coppock, Pres. . 

H. H. Tatem 

W. H. Campbell, Sec 

.John Zumstein 

Chas. Fleischmann . . . 



H. H. Tatem, Pres. . 
W. H. Campbell, Sec 

John Zxmistein 

Chas. Fleischmann. . . 
W. J. Coppock 



John Zumstein, Pres. 
Chas. H. Smith, Sec. 
Chas. Fleischmann. . , 

W. J. Coppock 

W.H. CampbeU 



John Zumstein, Pres. 
Chas. H. Smith, Sec. 
Chajg. Fleischmann . . 

W. J. Coppock , 

Sam'l Hunt 



John Zumstein, Pres. 
Chas, H. Smith, Sec. 

W.J. Coppock' 

Samuel Hunt 

E. T. Sprague , 



, M. D. ..| 



C. A. Miller, 



C. A. MiUer, M. D... 



C. A. MiUer, 



M. D....J 



C. A. MiUer. M. D.. 



F. W. Harmon 



M.D. I 



F. W. Harmon, M. Df 



J. M. RatU£F, M. D.... 
F. W. Harmon, 



M. D...J 



F. W. Harmon, M. D . .1 
Shelby Mmnaugh, M.D. J 



F. W. Harmon, M. D. . .1 
Shelby Mumaugh, 



F. W. Harmon, M. D 
Shelby Mumaugh 



J. M. RatUff, M. D 

Shelby Mumaugh, 



LD..."1 
. M. D./ 

D...| 

M. Dj 

, M, D.j 



F. W. Harmon 



F. W. Harmon 



F. W. Harmon 



F. W. Harmon, M 



,M.D. I 

.M.D.I 

M.D. J 

. M. D.j 



F. W. Harmon 



F. W. Harmon, M. D . 



J. M. RatUfif. M. D 1 

Shelby Mumaugh, MJ)./ 



J. M. RatUff. M. D. 
W. C. Kendig, 



*J. M. RatUff, M. D. .. 
W. C. Kendig. 
tF. M. Anderson, 



W.C. Kendig, M.D.... 
F. M. Anderson, M. 



W. C. Kendig. M. D 
F. M. Anderson 



M.D....J 

, M. D. ..] 
. M. D.... 
3on, M.D. J 

"■■■] 

M.D. J 



W. C. Kendig. M. D. . 
F. M. Anderson, M. D. 



W. C. Kendig, M. D. . . . ] 
Anderson, M. D. \ 
Mann, M.D J 



f W.C.I 

A\ *F. M. 

I tJ.w. 



H. Milton Foss. 



I H. MUton Foss. 



H. Milton Foss. 



H. Milton Fosa. 



H. Milton Foss. 



H. Milton Foss. 



H. Milton Foss. 



H. Milton Foss 



H. Milton Foss. 



H. Milton Foss. 



H. Milton Foss. 



H. MUton Foss. 



•Died Oct, 5, 1899. 

•Resigned October 15, to go to Dayton Hospital. 

•Resigned March 1. 1899. tVice Anderson. 



tVice RatUff. 



852 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Longview State Hospital. 



DIRECTORS AND OFFICERS OF LONGVIEW ASYLUM— Concluded. 



Year 



Directors. 



Superintendent. 



Assistant Physicians. 



Stewan: 



1900 



1801 



1902^ 



1903 



John Zumstein, Pres. . . . ] 
Chas. H, Smith, Sec. . . [ 

W. J. Coppock \ 

Samuel Hunt I 

E. T. Sprague J 

John Zumstein, Pres 1 

Chas. H. Smith, Sec, . . 

W. J. Coppock 

Samuel Hunt 

E. T. Sprague J 



John Zumstein. Pres. 

i nn>. ri Smith S"<" 

W. J. Coppock. 

E. T. Sprague 

Herman P. Goebel . . . 



John Zumstein, Pres. 
Chas. H. Smith, Sec. 

W. J, Coppock 

E. T. Sprague 

Herman P. Goebel . . . 



F. W. Harmon, M. D. 



F. W. Harmon, M. D. 



F. W. Harmon, M. D. 



F. W. Harmon, M. D. 



W. C. Kendig, M. D. 
J. W. Mann, M. D. . . 

W. C. Kendig, M. D. 
J. W.Mann, M.D.. 

W. C. Kendig. M. D. 
J. W. Mann, M. D. . 

] W. C. Kendig. M. D. 
J.W. Mann, M. D... 



Milton I ijC 



Milton I- .^< 



H. Milton F 



H. MUton F. 



THE TOLEDO STATE HOSPITAL. 



THE Toledo State Hospital is built upon the cottage system. Its 
plan of constrution was a radical departure from the structures 
then in use for the care of the insane, incorporating "the most 
advanced thought upon the subject. The idea originated with 
General Brinkerhoff, of the Board of State Charities, who favored the 
erection of a new asylum in Northwestern Ohio. 

The whole question of location and plans was undertaken by a com- 
mission, of which Governor Foster was president. Dr. Byers was secre- 
tary, and General Brinkerhoff was a -member. 

This Institution was opened on January 6th, 1888, and had a capacity 
for 1,000 patients. There are now 1,689 patients in the Institution. When 
the buildings that are now being remodeled and enlarged are completed 
there will be ample room for 1,700 patients. There have been admitted in 
all 3,411 women; 4,048 men. There are 23 cottages, 2 buildings for in- 
firm patients, 2 buildings for disturbed wards and two hospital build- 
ings. The ornamental grounds comprise about 1 10 acres. There are 
some 5 miles of drives, about 6 acres of artificial lakes and 300 acres are 
cultivated for farm and garden. 

Dr. H. A. Tobey has been the superintendent of this model institu- 
tion from the opening in 1888, with the exception of one year, under 
Governor Campbell, when the institution was superintended' by Dr. 
Tupper. 

A large portion of the success of this hospital is due to the efforts 
of ex-Governor Foster, who, in addition to being a member of the originrd 
committee on location of the hospital, was a member of the board of 
trustees from the day it was opened to patients until the day of his dcatli. 
It is said of him that when a cabinet portfolio was tendered him at Wash- 
ington, D. C, that had it come to the question of resigning the trustee- 
^ ship of this hospital or refusing to become a cabinet officer, he would 
never have been President Harrison's secretary of the treasury. 



(853) 



854 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Toledo State Hospital. 



OFFICERS. 



Name. 



Office. 



H. A. Tobey, M. D 
Nelson H. Young. . 

F. D. Femeau 

F. J. Latshaw 

Mary Ketring 

C. C. Kirk 

B. C. Unkrick 

W. D. Wilcox 

C. W. Dniitt 



Superintendent. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Steward 



ROSTER OF TRUSTEES— 1884-1904. 



Name. 



Term of Service. 



Residence. 



Wm. E. Haynes 

Jno. W. Fuller 

Jno. W. Nelson 

Geo. L. Johnson 

Chas. Foster, (Ex-Gov.) 
Robt. G. Pennington . . . 

D. W. H. Howard 

J. H. Doyle 

Park< Foster 

Samuel D. Houpt 

S. A. Baxter 

Jno. B. Rice 

G. P. Campbell 

A. Borman 

Henry Rohrs 

W. W. Sutton 

Wm. Geyser 

Samuel M. Heller 

L. C. Cole 

D. L. Cockley 

D. N. Powell 

W. H. Begg 

J. C. Campbell 

C. B. Wilcox 

Henry P. Stentz 



1884-1890. 
1884-1891. 
1884-1887. 
1884-1888. 
1884-1904. 
1884-1889. 
1887-1888. 
1888-1891. 
1888-1899. 
1888-1895. 
1888-1897. 
1889-1890. 
1890-1900. 
1890-1894. 
1891-1896, 
1891-1894 
1892-1900 
1900-1905 
1897-1907 
1894-1904 
1896-1900 
1900-1906 
1903-1909 
1904-1908 
1902-1904 



Fremont. 

Toledo. 

Bryan. 

Toledo. 

Fostoria. 

Tiffin. 

Wauseon. 

Toledo. 

Elyria. 

Findlay. 

Lima. 

Toledo. 

Tedrow. 

Glandorf. 

Napoleon. 

Ottawa. 

Swan ton. 

Napoleon. 

Bowling Green. 

Shelby. 

Ottawa. 

Columbus Grove. 

Columbus. 

Sandusky. 

Monroeville. 



THE MASSILLON STATE HOSPITAL. 



ON March 31, 1892, was passed a bill authorizing the appoint- 
ment of a commission to select a site for the building of a new- 
institution, to be known as the Eastern Ohio Insane Asylum, 
now the Massillon State Hospital. The commission was ap- 
pointed by Governor McKinley very shortly after the passage of the 
bill, and consisted of Dr. A. B. Richardson, Columbus ; George R. Davis, 
Wapakoneta, and Dr. C. W. King, Dayton. This commission selected a 
site two miles south of Massillon, Stark county, Ohio, and on November 
3otIi. .-^ime year th** Q^yi^^rtnr appointed a board of trustees, conformatoty 
with the law establishing the institution. This building board consisted 
of Rob't Sherrard, Jr., Steubenville ; S. J. McMahon, Cambridge; Wm. 
H. MuUins, Salem; Dr. A. B. Richardson, Columbus; Dr. H. C. Eyman, 
Cleveland. Under the supervision of this building board a dining-room 
building, a kitchen and bakery building, a store house, a boiler house, a 
power house, a carpenter shop, a laundry building, a hospital building, an 
infirmary building, a superintendent's residence, a steward's residence 
and seven cottages were constructed. 

The institution now has a capacity of 1,450 patients. In 1894 Mr. Mul- 
Hns resigned and was succeeded by B. F. Perry, of Jefferson. In 1895 ^^^• 
Sherrard died ; his place was filled by the appointment of Mr. D. J. Sin- 
clair, of Steubenville. In February, 1897, ^r. Eyman was succeeded 
by Dr. E. G. Carpenter, of Cleveland, Mr. Sinclair by George D. Cope- 
land, of Marion. In April, 1898, Dr. A. B. Richardson was elected super- 
intendent and Dr. A. B. Howard, of Cuyahoga Falls, was appointed his 
successor on the board. In October, 1899, Dr. A. B. Richardson resigned 
his position as superintendent and Dr. H. C. Eyman, of Cleveland, was 
appointed his successor. In April, 1900, the board was changed from a 
building board to an operating board with the following members : Mr. 
S. J. McMahon, Cambridge; Mr. George D. Copeland, Marion; Mr. J. 
B. Zerbe, Cleveland ; Dr. John E. Russell, Mt. Vernon. 
The following is a list of the present officers : 



Name. 



Office. 



Henry C. Eyman 

S. O. Latimer 

E. C. Brown 

J. M. McGeorge 

C. L. Harmer ^ 

D. E. Harris 

J. D. O'Brien 

M. M. Dumble 

Mrs. H. C. Eyman 

(855) 



Superintendent. 
Steward. 

Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Assistant Physician. 
Storekeeper. 
Matron. 



"^,iH i 



THE INSTITUTION FOR THE EDUCATION OF THE BLIND. 



THE Ohio Institution for the Education of the Blind was founded 
by act of the Legislature in 1837. It was fourth in order of 
establishment in the United States. In 1839 the first building 
was occupied. This structure cost the state $34,409 and was 
designed to accommodate sixty pupils. The present house was occupied 
May 21, 1874. This building cost at first, exclusive of additions, $358,- 
477.92 and was intended to accommodate three hundred pupils. Later 
additions have been made increasing its capacity. The first year in the 
history of the institution there were eleven pupils enrolled. Last year 



there were 339 



Mv-ari' 



c;. 



scaulxbhiiient 01 the mstitution, 



^y years ago, 2,341 pupils have been enrolled. 

The cost of maintenance from the beginning to November 15, 1900, 
was $1,828,390.32. Probably $600,000 have been invested in permanent 
buildings and improvements, making a total expenditure of about $2,- 
428,390.00. 

The average cost to the state for each pupil has been about $1,179.00. 

This institution is a School for the Education of the Blind, not an 
Asylum, and it has been the endeavor of the management of the institu- 
tion to keep this object before the public and not allow the institution 
to become an infirmary. .^ 

PRESENT TRUSTEES. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Charles Flumerfelt 

H. P. Grouse 

Eugene Cox 

Joseph Beichele 

Alfred Robinson, Secretary 



Old Fort. O. 
Toledo, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Canton, O. 
Ironton, O. 



The chief officers of the institution are : G. L. Smead, Superin- 
tendent ; R. W. Bell, Steward. 

At present there are 24 teachers emlpoyed in the institution ; 11 
the Literary Department, 9 in Music, and 4 in the Industrial Depart 
ment. 



in 



(856) 



■ ..f. ■ 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



857 



The Institution for the Education of the Blind. 

OHIO STATE SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND. 
LIST OF SUPERINTENDENTS. 



Name. 



Term of Service. 



A. W. Penniman . 
William Chapin... 
George McMillen. 
Ruf us E. Harte . . . 

Dr. A. D. Lord 

G. L. Smead 

Henry Snyder. . . . 

]!?r ^ 1*. Fi'l'^'i'^^i 
C.H. Miller.. .... 

Dr. S. S. Burrows 
R. W. Wallace... 
G. L. Smead 



1837-39, 184G-47. 

1839-4G. 

1847-52. 

1852-5G. 

185G-G8. 

18G8-85. 

1885, .G months. 

1885-8G, 1890-92. 

188G-90. 

1892-9G. 

189G-1900. 

1900-04. * 



LIST OF TRUSTEES AND SUPERINTENDENTS— 1837-1901. 



Name. 


Term of Service. 


Residence. 


James Hosre 


1836-1851 




N. H. Swayne . . j 


183G-1845 




Wm. W. Awl 


1836-1840 




John A. Brvan 


1840-1842 




M. J. Guilbert 


1844-1847 




"Wth ArmstronsT . ....... 


1846-1851 




John ^V Anderson 


1846-1854. .. 


Columbus 


Samuel McClelland 


1856-1865 




Joseph McElvain 


1846-1849 




J. R. Scroggs 

A. P. Stone 

F C Kelton 


1846-1849 




1849 

1850-1851 




S. M. Smith 


1850 

1850-1851 




Richard Warner 


Medina County. 
Franklin County. 
Hamilton Countv. 


Thomas Sparrow 

E. K. Chamberlain 


1S52-1853 

1852-1855 


Geo. E. Eels 

E C Root 


1852 

1852-1853 


Fairfield County. 
Ashtabula Countv. 


Heinrv Wilson 


1852-1855 


Franklin Countv. 


John Gre^nl^af 


1852-1855 


Franklin Countv. 


David Robb 


1852-1855 


Union Countv. 


Hiram B. Smith 


1853-1855 


Meigs County. 


Thomas C. Mitchell 


1853-1855 


Preble Countv. 


S. H Webb 


1853-1854 


Cuvahoga Countv 


John McCook 


1854-1855 


Columbiana County. 
Fairfield County. 


Oliver H. Perry 

R. R. Sloan 


1854-1855 


1856-1858 


Knox County. 


John Greiner 


1856-1860 


Franklin County. 



858 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL 'ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Institution for the Education of the Blind. 



LIST OF TRUSTEES AND SUPERINTENDENTS— Concluded. 



Name. 


Term of Service. 


Residence. 


Edward Jordan 


1859-1861 


Scioto County. 
Columbus. 


F. C. Sessions 


1861-1873 


Royal Taylor 


1862-1864 


Cuyahoga County. 
Cleveland. 


Stillman Witt 


1865-1870 


Henry C. Noble 


1866-1877 


Columbus. 

Warren. 

Springfield. 


Harmon Austin 


1 878-1 88J? 


John H. Rogers 


1870-1873 


C. Blaser 


1878-1879 


Waverly. ^ 
T Oil Jen. 
Columbus. 


John G. Dunn 


1871-1877........... 

lS74-i8 < b 


Thomas Bci^^-Ja , = 


B. F. Martin 


1877 

1878-1879 


Columbus. 
Newark. 


W. R. Wing 


Joseph Falkenbach 


1878-1879 




J. C. English 

S. D. Houpt. '. 


1880 

1878-1883 


Columbus. 
Findlay. 
Columbus. 
Ashland. 


James Poindexter 


1880-1883 


E. T. Drayton 


1880-1887 


Samuel Thompson 


1881-1883 


Columbus. 


J. H. Hudson 


188^5-1893 


Sandusky. 
Wellington. 
Ripley. 
Coliimbus 


D. L. Wadsworth 


1884-1889 


J. S. Atwood 


1884-1891 


Edward Pagels 


1885-1890 


H. C. Drinkle 


1887-1892 


TjaTipa'=!tpr 


J. H. Hudson 


1884-1894 


Sandusky. 
Bowling Green. 


J. R. Hankey 


1889-1904 


D. McAllister 


1884-1895 


Charles Flumerfelt 


1898-1903 


Old Fort 


A. D. Marsh 


1890-1898 


Celina. 


H. P. Crouse 


1894-1904 


Toledo 


Leroy C. Sedgwick 


1892-1897 


Martin's Ferry. 
Canton 


Joseph Biechle 


1892-1905 


George W. Hayes 


1890-1901 


Cincinnati. 


Charles iloose 


1890-1898 


Oak Harbor. 


Alfred Robinson 


1897-1902 


Ironton 


Eugene Cox 


1901 


Cincinnati. 









! . f. 

^1! 



■'■"'^^-V '^ 



-»-«,..' &»V(I«*.. 



THE INSTITUTION FOR THE EDUCATION OF THE DEAF. 



THE Ohio Institution for the Education of the ^ Deaf and Dumb is 
'located at Columbus, Ohio. The first legislation for founding 
this institution was had in 1827. In 1829 the school was opened 
in rented property on the corner of Broad and High streets with 
one pupil. In 1834 the first building on the present site was dedicated 
and the school transferred to it. From 1862 to 1867 the large and com- 
modious building now occupied was erected and was intended to accom- 
modate three hundred and fifty deaf children, besides officers, teachers 
and employes, hi 1898 2 -'A '99 the capacii-v was Inrr^csed by ^i"^^ erec- 
tion of the school building, one of the finest in the world. The total 
amount of money expended for grounds and buildings is approximately 
$450,000. Three thousand two hundred and sixty-seven deaf children 
have been pupils in this school. The attendance is something over five 
hundred. Forty-one teachers are engaged and seventy officers and em- 
ployes. The annual appropriations for maintenance are approximately 
$20,000. 

SUPERINTENDENTS. 



Names. 


Term of Service. 


Name. 


Term of Service. 


Horatio Nelson Hubbell 


1827-1837. 

1851-1852. . 

1852-1863. 

1863-1866. 

1866-1880. 

1880-1882. 


Amasa Pratt 


1883-1890 


Josiah Addison Gary 


James Wilton Knott 

Stephen Russell Clark 

William Stuart Eagleson 

John TVilliam Jones . . . . '. 


1890-1892. 
189 2-1 894 


Georg Ludington Weed 

Gilbert Otis Fay 


1894-1895. 
1895, Incumbent 


Charles Strong Perry 







LIST OP TRUSTEES. 



Name. 


Appointed. 


Retired. 


Residence. 


Hon. Gustavus Swan 


1827 

1827 

1827 

1827 

1S11 

1827 

1827 

1827 

1829 


1836 

1836 

1834 

1834 

1830 

1830 

1836 

1837 

1836 


Columbus. 


Rev James Hose 


Columbus. 


Hon Thomas Ewine: 


Lancaster. 


Rev. William Graham 

Rev. William Burton 

Hon. John H. James 

Thomas D. Webb, Esq 

Hon. Samson Mason 

Nathaniel McLean, Esq 


Chillicothe. 

Circleville. 

Urbana. 

Warren. 

Springfield. 

Columbus. 



(859) 



860 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Institution for the Education of the Deaf, 



_ I 



LIST OF TRUSTEES— Continued. 



Name. 



Micheal L. Sullivant, Esq, 

Henry Brown, Esq 

Rev. William Preston 

Dr. L. Goodale 

Dr. Samuel Parsons 

Col. William Doherty 

R.' W. McCoy, Esq 

Dr. Robert Thompson 

P. B. Wilcox, Esq 

f '!nT XT, l-r *^\*rp,y n? 

Asahel Chittenden, Esq. .. 

CoL P. H. Olmstead 

William Miner, Esq 

Jeremiah Warden, Esq . . . 

John Peterson, Esq 

Bela Latham, Esq 

G. W. Slocum, Esq 

Thomas Kennedy, Esq 

Elias Grave, Esq 

Col. John McElvain 

Col. Moses Jewett 

Rev. H. L. Hitchcock 

Rev. C. F. Schaeffer 

Col. Samuel Medary 

Hon. J. R. Swan 

Hon. A. P. Stone 

Rev. David Whitcomb 

Rev. A. F. Dobb 

Samuel McClelland, Esq.. 

George Cole, Esq 

Peter Hayden, Esq 

S. D. Preston, Esq 

Henry Wilson, Esq 

John Greenleaf, Esq 

C. K. Cuckler, Esq 

Dr. George Eels 

Dr. E. K. Chamberlain... 

Richard Warner, Esq 

Ezekiel C. Root, Esq 

Rufus E. Harte, Esq 

Hiram B. Smith, Esq 

David Robb, Esq 

Thomas C. Mitchell, Esq.. 

John McCook, Esq 

Oliver H. Perry , 

Henr>' Miller. Esq 

Theodore Comstock, Esq. . 

Judge W. W. Bierce 

Dr. James H. Coulter 

C. W. Potwin, Esq 

C. P. L. Butler, Esq 

Gen. Kent Jarvis 

Hon. Samuel Galloway 

Henry F. Booth, Esq 

James S. Abbott, Esq 



Appointed. 



Retired. 



Residence. 



1829 


1830 


Franklinton. 


1829 


1836 


Columbus. 


1830 


1841 


Columbus. 


1830 


1835 


Columbus. 


1830 


1838 


Columbus. 


1830 


1832 


Columbus. 


1832 


1849 


Columbus. 


1833 


1844 


Columbus. 


1833 


1840 


Columbus. 


183G 


1842 


Columbus. 


1836 


1845 


Columbus. 


1836 


1839 


Columbus. 


1837 


1840 


Columbus. 


1837 


1840 


Springfield. 


1837 


1840 


Columbus. 


1838 


1846 


Columbus. 


1839 


1841 


Columbus. 


1840 


1846 


Columbus. 


1840 


1846 


Columbus. 


1840 


1843 


Columbus. 


1840 


1843 


Columbus. 


1841 


1852 


Columbus. 


1842 


1845 


Columbus. 


1S42 


1845 


Columbus. 


1843 


1845 


Columbus. 


1843 


1846 


Columbus. 


1844 


1846 


Columbus. 


1845 


1847 


Columbus. 


1845 


1846 


Columbus. 


1845 


1846 


Columbus. 


1846 


1846 


Columbus. 


1846 


1852 


Columbus. 


1852 


1856 


Columbus. 


1852 


1856 


Columbus. 


1852 


1852 


Athens. 


1852 


1854 


Lancaster. 


1852 


1853 


Cincinnati. 


1852 


1854 


Sharon. 


1852 


1856 


Ashtabula. 


1852 


1852 


Marietta. 


1853 


1856 


Pomeroy. 


1853 


1856 


Marysville. 


1853 


1856 


New Westerville. . 


1854 


1856 


Columbus. 


1854 


1856 


Fairfield. 


1856 


1858 


Columbus. 


1856 


1860 


Columbus. 


1856 


1862 


Circleville. 


1858 


1866 


Columbus. 


1858 


1866 


Columbus. 


1860 


1866 


Columbus. 


1862 


1S74 


Siark County. 


1866 


1872 


Franklin County. 


1866 


1876 


Franklin County. 


1872 


1875 


Franklin County. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



861 



The Institution for the Education of the Deaf. 



LIST OF TRUSTEES— Concluded. 



Name. 



Appointed. 



Retired. 



Residence, 



Hon. A. T. Walling 

Philemon Hess 

Samuel Taylor 

L. L. Lambom 

Gen. Samuel Thomas.. 

John Cooke 

B. L. Hinman , 

Jacob Rohrheimer 

F. C. Sessions 

Gen. W. S. Jones 

J. S. Savage 

Dr. C. M. Finch 

Hon. A. H. Moss 

Hon. James Scott 

Samuel Thompson, Esq 

Jonathan S. Hare 

J. Cherryholmes 

Dr. Nelson Obetz , 

Gen. R. R. Dawes 

Fred W. Herbst 

Gen. I. M. Kirby 

Dr. J. A. Sterrett 

T. P. Evans 

Samuel A. Kinnear 

J. S. Hare 

George Hamilton 

W. A. Gibson , 

R. B. Heller 

Judge Geo. P. Tyler 

Robt. P. Kennedy 

Wm. L. McElroy 

Geo. W. Glover 

Jacob Cahn 

Carl Norpell 

Frank Tyler 

Jas. G. Hickox 



1874 

1875 

1877 

1878 

1878 

1878 

1878 

1878 

1880 

1880 

1880 

1880 

1880 

1883 

1883 

1883 

1883 

1885 

1886 

1886 

1S89 

1888 

1890 

1890 

1890 

1892 

1892 

1893 

1895 

189? 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1903 

1904 



1877. 
1878. 
1878. 
1880. 
1880. 
1880. 
1880. 
1880. 
1883. 
J1885. 
11883. 
|l883, 
1883. 
1888. 
1885. 
1886. 
1892. 
1886. 
1890. 
1890. 
1893. 
1893. 
1895. 
1894. 
1892. 
1899. 



Pickaway County. 
Franklin County. 
Logan County. 
Stark County. 
Franklin County. 
Belmont County. 
Franklin County. 
Cuyahoga County. 



. autViiU ov 



unty 



1898. 



1897. 
1900. 
1903. 
1904. 



Pike County. 
Clinton County. 
Scioto County. 
Erie County. 
Warren County 
Franklin County. 
Wyandot County. 
Holmes County. 
Franklin County. 
Washington County. 
Franklin County. 
Wyandot County. 
Miami County. 
Montgomery County. 
Franklin County. 
Wyandot County. 
Columbiana County. 
Wyandot County. 
Henr>' County. 
Brown County. 
Logan County. 
Knox County. 
Harrison County. 
Ashland County. 
Licking County. 
Monroe County. 
Wood County. 



f -ij*ie'i-aS'8 «.--<-.■ J'M 



INSTITUTION FOR FEEBLE-MINDED YOUTH. 



THIS Institution was established by law April 17, 1857. The pre- 
liminary work was commenced in 1840 by Dr. N. S. Townshend, 
who, while pursuing his medical studies in Paris, became inter- 
ested in the labors of Seguin, Itard and others in behalf of the 
class. In 1853 Dr. Townshend, then a member of the Ohio Senate, so 
interested Governor Medill in the results of his observations and studies 
abroad, that he devoted a portion of his message to the General Assembly 
to the subject. That part of the message relating to the subject was 
referred to a ^^k .t « o^^'wktfiQ, of which Dr. Townshend was chairman. 
The committee made a report, detailing what had been done for this class. 
A bill was then introduced for the establishment of an institution, but did 
not pass. At the session of 1857, Hon. Herrman Canfield introduced in 
the Senate a bill to establish an Asylum for Idiots, which passed both 
Houses and became a law April 17, 1857. Governor Chase appointed 
William Dennison, Norton S. Townshend and Asher Cook, Trustees. 
Upon organization of the Board, Mr. Dennison was made chairman ; Dr. 
Townshend, secretary, and Dr. R. J. Patterson, superintendent. The 
Board rented the buildings on East Main street, now occupied as the 
"Home for the Friendless." The institution was opened with nine pupils. 
The number was increased to fifteen at the date of the first report. The 
rented premises were occupied until 1868, the number of pupils averaging, 
after the first two years, between forty and fifty. The office of assistant 
superintendent was created in 1859, and Dr. G. A. Doren w^as appointed 
to that position. In i860, the superintendent. Dr. Patterson, resigned, 
and Dr. Doren was elected superintendent by the Board of Trustees, and 
has continued in that position since, now forty-two years. 

After closely observing the operations of the institution and their 
results, the Legislature, in 1864, provided for the permanent establish- 
ment of the institution, authorizing buildings upon a suitable site for the 
accommodation of two hundred pupils. This provision was made during 
the strenuous days of the Civil War, and was a strong endorsement of 
the value of the institution, as well as a valued acknowledgment of the 
performance of duty under the trying conditions of the War. The new 
buildings were occupied in August, 1868, the number of inmates soon 
reaching three hundred. The practical value of the institution being 
demonstrated, additions were made, from year to year, until the i8th of 
November, 1881, when over six hundred children were accommodated, 
and when the main buildings were destroyed by fire, happily, without 
loss of life, or even injury, to any of the inmates, officers or employes. So 

(862) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



863 



Institution for Feehle-Minded Youth. 



anxious were parents and guardians that their children and wards should 
not lose any of the benefits of the institution, that only one hundred of 
the inmates could be sent to their homes, the balance being crowded into 
the buildings that escaped destruction. The operations of the institution 
were conducted, during the three years of rebuilding, at great disad- 
vantage, from want of room and facilities for the proper care and train- 
ing of the inmates. This was relieved by the occupation of the new 
buildings in 1884. In this case, fireproof buildings were constructed on 
the sites of those destroyed by fire, and fireproof outside stairways provided 
for all* buildings that escaped destruction. Other buildings have been 
added since 1884, until the number accommodated in 1900 was 1,100, 
when the Legislature, recognizing the duty of providing agcinst the in 
crease of this unfortunate class, by placing them under such restrictions 
as will prevent them multiplying their kind, provided for a permanent 
home, where the use of such industrial power as they possess may be 
exercised in their own support. Authority was given to purchase a farm, 
not to exceed 1,500 nor less than 1,000 acres in extent, where they are to 
be kept through life, thus lessening the increase from that source. About 
1,200 acres have been secured, where the males of this class will be pro- 
vided with a home and such employment as will come within the range 
of their capacities. The employment will be mainly such as furnished 
by the farm, gardening, stock-raising and horticultural pursuits. The 
females are to be provided for at the home institution, where they can 
be better protected, as well as usefully employed in domestic occupations. 
Buildings are now being constructed to accommodate about four hun- 
dred of each sex of the Custodial Class, and, when completed, will restore 
the old department to its original purpose and duties — "to furnish special 
means of improvement to that portion of our youth who are so deficient 
in mind, or have such marked peculiarities and eccentricities of intellect 
as to deprive them of the benefits of other educational institutions and 
ordinary methods of instruction." 



PRESENT OFFICERS. 



' Name. 


^5 


Title. 


G. A. Doren. M. D. 

George Evans 

Mrs. N. L. Doren. 
Miss H. F. Purple 


I860 
1S84 
1860 
1858 


Supt 

Fin. Officer. 

Supt of Sch'ls 

Matron. 



PAST OFFICERS. 





Name. 


C<t) 


Title. 


R. Patterson, M. D. 
W. L. Hughes 


1857 
1881 


Supt. 

Fin. Officer. 



864 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Institution for Fcchle-Minded ' Youth. 



TRUSTEES. 



- 






Name. 


< 


County. 


Wm. Dennison, Jr. 


1857 


Franklin. 


Asher Cook 


1857 


Wood. 


N. S. Townshend.. 


1857 


Lorain. 


Wm. Dennison, Jr 


1S58 


Franklin. 


Herman Canfield . 


1858 


Medina. 


Asher Cook 


1859 


Wood. 


Wm. E. Ida 


1S59 


Franklin. 


N. S. Townshend.. 


1860 


Lorain. 


H. Canfield 


1861 


Medina. 


Jno. A. Lutz 


1S61 


Pickaway. 


i-ccfci iriitchcock. .. 


1S62 


Geauga. 


M. S. Townshend.. 


1863 


Lorain. 


Jno. A. Lutz 


1864 


Pickaway. 


Peter Hitchcock . . 


1865 


Geauga. 


N, S. Townshend. . 


1866 


Lorain. 


Jno. A. Lutz 


1867 


Pickaway. 


Peter Hitchcock . . 


1868 


Geauga, 


N. S. Townshend.. 


1869 


Lorain. 


Jno. A. Lutz 


1870 


Pickaway. 


Peter Hitchcock .. 


1871 


Geauga. 


N. S. Townshend. . 


1872 


Franklin. 


Jno. A. Lutz 


1873 


Pickaway. 


John A. Shank... 


1874 


Hamilton. 


N. S. Townshend.. 


1875 


Franklin. 


Jno. A. Lutz 


1876 


Pickaway. 


Peter Hitchcock . . 


1877 


Geauga. 


John A. Shank 


1878 


Hamilton. 


J. K. Rukenbrod.. 


1878 


Columbiana, 


J. M. Montgomery 


1878 


Franklin. 


John A. Shank 


1879 


Hamilton. 


J. K. Rukenbrod., 


1880 


Columbiana. 


J. M. Holmes 


1880 


Harrison. 


John A. Shank ... 


1880 


Hamilton. 


Geo. W. Monypeny 


1880 


Franklin. 


Aaron Wilcox 


1880 


Lake. 


J. K. Rukenbrod.. 


1881 


Columbiana. 


B. B. Woodbury.. 


1881 


Geauga. 


J. M. Holmes 


1882 


Harrison. 


M. A. Daugherty. 


1S82 


Franklin. 


Silas A. Conrad... 


1883 


Stark. 


Ross J. Alexander 


1884 


Belmont. 


A. McGregor 


1884 


Stark. 


B. B. Woodbury... 


1S85 


Geauga. 


Edward Squire . . 


1886 


Defiance. 


J. N. Williams... 


1887 


Huron. 


Ross J. Alexander 


1887 


Belmont. 


Robert Mehaff ey . . 


1887 


Allen. 


Silas A. Conrad .. 


1888 


Stark. 


George H. Ford . . . 


1888 


Geauga 


Robert Mehaff ey... 


1SS9 


Allen. 


William Reed 


1890 


Ross. 


J. B. Worley 


1890 


Highland. 


Edward Squire . . . 


1891 


Defiance. 


Jno. E. Bruce 


1891 


Hamilton. 


Jno. A. Williamson 


1892 


Huron. 


Silas A. Conrad... 


1893 


Stark. 


Robert Mehaff ey.. 


1894 


Allen. 


Edward Squire . . 


1S95 


Defiance. 


William E.Haynes. 


1895 


Sandusky. 


J. Park Alexander 


1896 


Summit. 


Jno. A. Williamson 


1897 


Huron. 


Silas A. Conrad... 


1897 


Stark. 


A. P. Baldwin ... 


1898 


Summit. 


Charles P. Griflin. 


1898 


Lucas. 


Robert Mehaff ey... 


1899 


Allen. 


William E. Haynos 


1900 


Sandusky. 


James J. Hooker.. 


1899 


Hamilton. 


Boyd Vincent 


1900 


Hamilton 


Robert Mehaffey .. 


1904 


Allen. 


C. L. Allen 


1904 


Fulton. 



M. 



THE HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS. 



THE Ohio Hospital for Epileptics at Gallipolis is the pioneer of its 
kind in the United States. 
The problem of providing proper accommodations for 
epileptics, especially for those with unsound or defective minds, 
has engrossed the attention of persons interested in nervous and mental 
diseases for m.any years. In Ohio, as far back as 1879, a bill for the 
establishment of a separate institution for their accommodation and 
treatment almost became a law, passing: one branch of the legislature. 
Not, however, until 1890 was a law enabled providing lor ihc Cocabli^h- 
ment of a colony for epileptics and epileptic insane. All epileptics resident 
in- Ohio are eligible for admission to this institution, up to the measure 
of its capacity, each ^county being entitled to a number proportionate to 
its population. No discrimination is made on account of mental condi- 
tion, age or sex. 

The buildings, as originally planned, consisted of stone cottages 
having a capacity of fifty beds each, located symmetrically about a group 
of executive buildings and connected by tunnels with a central power 
station, which was to furnish heat and light for all ; and a central kitchen 
and bakery, flanked by two congregate dining-rooms, one for each sex. 
The whole group, with estimated accommodations for one thousand 
patients, was planned so compactly as to cover scarcely more than twenty- 
five acres, leaving the balance of one himdred acres of the original tract 
for ornamentation and gardens. The wisdom of this plan was seriously 
questioned, and subsequent experience and events have led to an entire 
modification of it, so far as practicable. Of the original thirty-six build- 
ings, only thirteen have been built as designed. The location and design 
of six others was materially changed. One hundred and twenty-five ad- 
ditional acres of land were purchased, and a cottage for the insane con- 
structed at a distance of one-third mile from the original group. Other 
buildings, projected for the future, are to be much farther away, their 
precise location depending upon the possibilities in the selection and 
purchase of land, which may or may not adjoin the tract now owned by 
the state. 

Another tract of one hundred and ten acres of farm land has been 
purchased, on which a group of cottages will be erected, and in which 
the husbandmen among the male patients will be accommodated. This 
land adjoins the sewage-disposal beds of the hospital, and it is intended 
to utilize the sewage for fertilizing the farm. Recently ( 1904) another 
one hundred acres of Ohio River bottom land has been acquired, which 

(865) 
&6— B. A. 



866 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Hospital for Epileptics. 

brings the institution to an acreage of five hundred and fifty. It is pur- 
posed to expand the institution in the future by erecting small, home- 
like cottages for small and selected groups of patients, leaving the large 
central cottages with their common kitchen and congregate dining rooms 
for the accommodation of more advanced cases of epilepsy and for the 
infirmary class of inmates. A new style of architecture has been decided 
upon, by which it is believed the monotony of the present symmetrical 
groups of large stone cottages can be relieved. 

A board of construction was appointed in 1890, which consisted of 
James E. Neal, of Hamilton; John L. Vance, of GallipoHs; George H. 
Bunnell, of Sidney ; Lewis Slusser, of Canton. , 

The colony \vas opened for thti reception of patiento rNOvcmuci, X093. 
Twelve residence cottages with accommodations for 40 to 80 inmates 
each, and one combined laundry and cottage with room for 70 patients 
comprise the central group. A building for infirm women with room 
for 80 beds has recently been opened. The advanced insane epileptics 
are cared for in a large 200-inmate building about one-third of a mile 
from the central group. In process of completion ( 1904) there are five 
small, artistic, homelike houses comprising the new Male Colonists' 
Group, with quarters for .15 to 40 patients each, every house being inde- 
pendent so far as heating facilities, dining-room, and kitchen are con- 
cerned. A Farm House for 40 men has been erected in a suitable spot 
in the midst of the 200 acres of river bottom farm; and a 40-inmate 
cottage for girls is also nearly ready for occupancy. When all the build- 
ings now under way shall have been completed, the institution will have 
accommodations for 1,200 patients. Besides the cottages, the hospital 
comprises one school house; two industrial buildings, each containing 
eight large, w^ell-lighted and well-ventilated rooms, accommodating 
twenty-five patients in many of the manual mdustries followed; one 
kitchen and bakery building; one ice machine and cold storage building, 
with a capacity of eighteen tons daily; two large congregate dining- 
rooms; one boiler, power, and electric light station; one waterworks 
building, and one administration building. The cost of the buildings 
up to tlie time when those under way' shall have been completed, will 
be $605,000. 

A pathological laboratory in which researches into the nature, cause, 
and prevention of epilepsy are carried forward, has been a feature of this 
institution for the past eight years. Through the scientific studies pur- 
sued in this laboratory and published to the medical, profession the Ohio 
Hospital for Epileptics has achieved international fame. The medical 
profession of Ohio, and of the United States, is deeply interested in 
seeing this important work encouraged and properly supported, since it 
is realized that by this method alone can the mysteries as to the nature, 



^f.-'r-f'ct, $Xf^< 



•"■•*»s>?»-!ifr 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



867 



The Hospital for Epileptics. 



cause, treatment, and prevention of epilepsy be solved. The investiga- 
tions pursued by the scientific staff in this laboratory have already dis- 
closed some very important facts relative to the cause and prevention of 
epilepsy. 

Many of the patients came from almshouses, many from the lower 
walks of life, and were uncouth in their manners and dress, filthy in their 
habits, and rude in their conversation. The improvements most noticed 
by visitors has been the wonderful change in their deportment. The 
results of the colony regime and treatment as shown by the recovery of 
suitable cases have been very gratifying. Especially good results have been 
attained with cases of recent epilepsy, particularly among the children. 
ll^glciiic «.id dietary measures with a regulation of the habits are em- 
ployed, and strictly medicinal treatment is assigned to a secondary place. 
The education of the children and youth is carefully looked after in the 
excellent schools of the colony. 

LIST OF TRUSTEES, OHIO HOSPITAL FOR EPILEPTICS, 1891-1902. 



Name. 



Term of Service. 



Residence. 



C. C. Wait 

James E. Neal 

Dr. T. M. Gaumer 

Dr. Lewis Slusser 

James D. Brown . . ., 

John M. Sweeney 

E. S. Wilson 

George W. McCook 

George K. Nash 

L F. Mack 

O. B. Gould 

F. F. Graves 

Daniel H. Sowers 

Curtis V. Harris 

Dr. P. Maxwell Foshay. 

Harry J. Hoover 

H. A. Marting 

Alex Renick 




Columbus. 
Hamilton. 
Urbana. 

Athens. 

Wooster. 

Ironton. 

Steubenville. 

Columbus. 

Sandusky. 

Wellston. 

Toledo. 

Columbus. 

Athens. 

Cleveland. 

Newark. 

Ironton. 

Chillicothe. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS, 1904. 



A. P. Ohlmacher, M. D Superintendent 

Ralph W. Holmes, M. D First Assistant Physician. 

William H. Pritchard, M. D Assistant Physician. 

Walter H. Buhlig. M. D Assistant Physician and Resident Pathologist 

E. B. Morrison. M. D Assistant Physician. 

Arthur G. Helmick, M. D Assistant Physician. 

Henry C. Barnes Steward 

Fred Rougher Storekeeper 

Mrs. A. P. Ohlmacher Matron. 



i^-^Hii .nmjf 



THE BOYS' INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



THE Boys' Industrial School is Ohio's reformatory for juvenile 
male offenders. It is six miles south of Lancaster, Fairfield 
county, on the Hocking Hills. The state owns 1,210 acres of 
land in this pisturesque region, and the boys are taught agricul- 
ture and horticulture to the extent of producing all the vegetables and 
fruit that the institution consumes. The institution is organized on the 
cottage or segregate system, is not surrounded by walls, and is entirely 
free from bolts, bars or other suggestions of restraint. It was the first 
pen?' ^rstitfition m .inicri^ct t^ iiiake the "open system" experiment, and 
so successfully was it operated that twenty-eight states have used the 
Lancaster school as a model. There are now 920 boys confined in the 
school for offenses against the statutes. These boys range in age from 
10 to 21 years and are serving indeterminate sentences. When received 
at the School they are charged with demerits corresponding in number 
to the nature of the crime. These demerits must be cancelled by ex- 
emplary deportment in school and shop, before release. When released, 
a boy is on parole and can be returned for misconduct at any time be- 
fore he reaches his majority. 

The boys are required to attend school one-half of each day, and are 
in shop or on the farm the other half. There are many trades schools 
where the boys are taught useful mechanical knowledge and at the same 
time contribute to the comfort and support of their fellows. Chief among 
these trades are blacksmithing, floriculture, tailoring, baking, printing, 
carpentering, telegraphy, stenography, brickmaking, shoe-making, dairy- 
ing, cooking, etc. They also operate the steam, cold storage and electric 
plants, the bam, laundry and poultry plant. A boy band of forty-two 
pieces is maintained, and the school is organized into a regiment of three 
battalions, under instructions of a competent military man. Music and 
physical culture are also features of the training. 



(8C8) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



869 



The Boys' Industrial School. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Charles Reemelin 

J. A. Foote 

J. D. Ladd.... 

Geo. E. Howe 

B. W. Chidlaw 

John M. Pugh 

H. J. Reinmund , 

Jacob Cherryholmes. 

Charles Maines 

Lewis Miller 

John D. Martin 

John Hunter 

Geo. W. Gardner 

John B. Jones 

Mills Gardner , 

W. L. Rigby 

B. Eason 

B. W. Chidlaw.. 

John G. Reeves 

S. D. Houpt 

J. K. Rukenbrod 

J. H. Ayres 

D. H. Boldridge. 

W. W. Luckey 

C. A. Phelps 

J. D. Brown 

Wm. Beatty 

B. S. Wydman 

John G. Reeves 

O. W. H. Wright 

Daniel Wolf 

John F. White 

J. J. Pugsley 

Thaddeus E. Cromley 
Malcolm Jennings . . . 

E. W. Poe 

John L. Vance 

R. E. Jones 

R. S. Warner 



Hamilton. 

Cuyahoga. 

Jefferson. 

Lake. 

Hamilton. 

Franklin. 

Fairfield. 

Holmes. 

Logan. 

Suiiiriiit. 

Fairfield. 

Stark. 

Cuyahoga. 

Licking. 

Fayette. 

Fairfield. 

Wayne. 

Hamilton. 

Fairfield. 

Hancock. 

Columbiana. 

Champaign. 

Gallia. 

Fairfield. 

Auglaize. 

Athens. 

Lucas. 

Hamilton. 

Fairfield. 

Hocking. 

Hamilton. 

Hocking. 

Highland. 

Pickaway. 

Franklin. 

Franklin. 

Gallia. 

Franklin. 

Franklin. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

R. S. Warner, President Columbus. 

Wm. Beatty Toledo. 

J. J. Pugsley Hillsboro. 

Wm. J. Akers Cleveland. 

John L. Vance Gallipolis. 

C. B. Adams Superintendent and Secretary. 

W. N. Hilles Steward. 



THE GIRLS' INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



LOCATION. 



THE home it situated ten miles southwest of Delaware, with which 
it is connected by good pikes and long distance telephone. It I 

is four and one-half miles from Hyatts, six from Powell on | 

the Columbus, Hocking Valley and Toledo Railroad; and eight 1 

miles from Arnold on the Toledo division of the Ohio Central Lines. The .: 

two latter stations are connected with the home by telephone, and ^all ] 

are easily accessible at all seasons of the year because of th? ei'cellcnt 
pikes. 

FARM. ' 

The farm comprises one hundred and eighty-nine acres on the west 
bank of the Scioto River. It > is beautifully situated in an unusually 
healthful location. The grounds around the buildings are adorned with 
shade trees, a large portion of which are of the original growth. 

The celebrated White Sulphur Spring furnishes an abundant sup- 
ply of excellent water which is used for domestic purposes. ii,ooo gal- 
lons of water per hour flow constantly from a vein more than one. hun- 
dred feet below the marble basin from which it overflows. 

BUILDINGS. 

The buildings consist of the Administration, or Central Building, in 
which reside the Superintendent and family, the Clerk, Director of Music, 
Superintendent of Schools, Assistant Matron, and a Housekeeper; eight 
cottages, a school building, and a hospital. The latter is a valuable ac- 
quisition to the institution, furnishing commodious quarters for all hospital 
purposes and complete isolation for inmates affected with contagious ' 
diseases. In each cottage an Assistant Matron, Teacher and House- 
keeper, with from thirty-five to fifty inmates, reside. Total number of 
inmates May 15, 1904, 307. 



(870) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



871 



The Girls' Industrial Home. 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF MANAGERS. 



4 

.3 • 
1 


Name. 


Coimty. 


"6 
.2 

! 

< 


Name. 


Coxmty. 


1869 


Stanley Matthews 


Hamilton 

Delaware. 

Muskingum 

Delaware 

Lucas 

Miami 

Erie 

Delaware 

Delaware 

Marion 

Delaware 

Miami 

Crawford 

1 *»iHware 

Delaware 

Erie 

Union 

Delaware 

Wayne 

Delaware 

Champaign 

Delaware 

Union 

Wayne 

Delaware 

Sandusky 

Wood 

Wyandot 

Marion 

Coshocton 


1884 
1885 
1886 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1894 
1894 
1895 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1902 

1903 
1904 


F.H. ThomhiU 

Wm. Batchelor 


Union 


1869 


Frederick Merrick 


Coshocton 


1869 


M. D. Leggett 


Geo. A. Hay 




1869 


Abram Thompson 


J. W. Watkins 


Delaware 


1869 


Claude Waggoner 


B. H. Milliken 




1870 


Wm. M. Garvey 


J. K. PoUard. . 


Adflm«^ 


1872 


M. F. Cawdrey 


F. H. ThomhiU 




187,S 


Frederick Merrick 


W. W PenneU. 


Brown 


1874 


Vandyke Stayman ■. . . 

J. K. Newcomer 


B. Tristram 


Marion 


1875 




Coshocton ■ 


1876 


Henry C. Houston 

B. H. Milliken 




1877 


Wm. M. Garvey 


Fayette 


1g7^ 


H B. Kellv 

F. '-'. Sp*-—'"^, . 

J. W. Wattins 

S. D. West 

F. H. ThomhiU 

R. R. Henderson 

John Mc Sweeney 

Jno. D. Watkins 


L. H. WilUams 




1r^>To 


M. E. Stamats 


Union 


1878 


M. E. Stamats 


Union 


1878 


I. N. Hathaway ... . . 


Geauga 


1878 


T. E. Hoyt 


Ashtabula 


1878 
1879 


T. E. Hoyt 

J. C. Beatty 


Ashtabula 
Portage 


1880 


B. H. MiUiken 

J. V. Roudebush 


Fayette 


1880 


R. D. Williams 




1880 


R. R. Henderson 

F. H. Thornhill... 


M. E. Stamats 




1880 


B. Tri'stram 


Marion 


1881 


James Curry 

J. W. Watkins 


T. E. Hoyt 


Ashtabula 


1881 


J. C. Beatty 




1881 


Amos Woodward 


Frank C. Hubbard 

Geo. B. Christian, Jr., to 

finish term of B. Tristram 
Fred C Buel 




188?. 


E. W. Merry 




1883 
1883 


R. D. Dumm 

B. Tristram 


Marion 
Carroll 


1884 


Wm. Batchelor 


Geo. B. Chistian, Jr 











PRESENT OFFICERS OF THE HOME. 



Name. 




Residence. 



T. F. Dye 

Mrs. T. F. Dye 

Miss Birdine C. Stanley 
Miss Elizabeth Qiiaife.. 

Miss Sarah L. Balfe 

Chas. F. Tally 

Sidney Moore 

W. F. Whitlock, M. D. . , 



Superintendent 

Matron 

Superintendent of Schools 

Clerk and Librarian 

Director of Music 

Physician 

Financial Officer 

Chaplain 



Meigs County. 
Meigs County. 
Hardin County. 
Lucas County. 
Lucas County. 
Delaware County. 
Delaware County. 
Delaware County. 



THE OHIO PENITENTIARY. 



THE Ohio Penitentiary covers 26 acres within the walls. About 
two. acres outside the prison proper are occupied by offices, the i 

Deputy Warden's residence, store rooms, barn and stables. The !i;: j 

prison Hself is walled on three sides, the fourth being 1 1; j 

wholly absorbed by cell houses, offices and the Warden's home. This 1 1; ' 

side presents an imposing front, aboiit 800 feet in length, on Spring \ 

street, facing the Scioto river, with the street and outer buildings be- \ 

tween it and that stream, and a wide fringe of green lawn before it that 1 

in summer is beautified bv pprterjes of uowcrs end -^y^A*^^ ]jy Tine trees. 1 

The cell houses and offices form a continuous building- from the south- Iji, 

east to the southwest gate, in which are more than 1,600 cells, about 600 if, 

of these being provided with beds for two inmates, the remainder being |i| 

too small to receive more than one each. The Female Department, which |;| 

abuts on the southeast gate, is somewhat advanced toward the street |i:! 

beyond the frontal line of the main prison, and reaches to the public side- li'', 

walk. It contains 46 cells. \\ 

The walls are dominated by towers at short distances apart, and of \ \ 

which there are eleven. Within the enclosure is a small manufacturing 3 ) 

city, comprising the shops of The Columbus Bolt Works, The George | \ 

B. Sprague Cigar Co., C. S. Reynolds & Co., The E. B. Lanman Co., | ij 

The P. Hayden Saddlery Hardware Co., The National Broom Co., The |;| 

Brown-Hinman & Huntington Co., and the Columbus Hollow Ware Co., I ;; 

all private corporations that contract with the state, through the Board \ \ 

of Managers, for the labor of prisoners, at specified prices for able-bodied j ';• 

and infinii men, respectively, and in many instances paying to the pris- \\ 

oners certain agreed amounts for all work produced beyond an appointed \ ! 

task. The total amount earned by such overwork and paid in to the ac- \ \ 

count of the men who have earned it averages about $2,500 per year. i^ 

These contracts employ about 1,000 prisoners. In addition to the labor ] 

utilized by these enterprises, the state employs about 700 men in the i 

manufacture of the prisoners' clothing, the care of their sleeping quarters, 
repairs to buildings, the preparation of food, the management of the gas ■ 

works, the care of the inside park and other grounds, and in the general \ 

administration of the mural city with its sixteen hundred (1,600) popula- \ 

tion. A tour of inspection more than repays the visitors, who come in 
great numbers. The number of visitors is increasing yearly, as the people 
realize more and more that an interesting development of modern ideas 
relative to the protection of society and the reformation of the criminal 
may be seen in its various phases from day to day. Since 1834, when 

(872) 



,-^^. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 873 

The Ohio Penitentiary. 

the present prison was first occupied — or, rather, that rudimentary por- 
tion of it that is now known as the West Hall — an anny of more than 
35,500 prisoners has passed through its portals, as prisoners. The male 
prisoners, imtil a few years ago, wore the old regulation striped uniform 
of the convict. The striped clothing is now used only as a temporary 
garb of punishment. 

The walled city has been swept by pestilence but once in its history. 
In 1849, the cholera raged here, and 121 prisoners died within twelve 
months, exacting the life of every third man among the prisoners. Now 
the death rate has fallen from 55 to 36 in one year. 

There is a finely appointed and well equipped hospital on the inside 
t?;rourxd5, but it ic more ;^c?.ntily inhabited than has been the case for 
years. Since the present administration has assumed control a reform 
has been introduced into the Penitentiary that has. lessened the number 
of patients, halved the death rate, and removed the source of a danger- 
ous discontent. That improvement is a change in the dietary, which the 
present directorate of this great institution has adopted and made a suc- 
cess, showing that economy and humanity go hand in hand. It has saved 
lives, the cost of medicine, the price of enforced idleness and loss from 
poor work. It has also contributed much to the improved good feeling 
and morality of the prisoners. 

.THE MORAL, RELIGIOUS AND EDUCATIONAL WORK 

of the prison is carried on through the library, Sunday-school, prayer- 
meetings, Bible classes and preaching services, under the care of the Chap- 
lain, and a night school under the care of a teacher employed from the 
outside. While the rules of the prison forbid sectarianism, they also 
provide that a prisoner desiring to have instruction in his particular faith 
may be accommodated by the Warden. Under this provision Roman 
Catholic Church services are held by a priest in the Catholic chapel every 
Sunday morning. 

THE PRISON BUILDINGS 

are old and inadequate. The cells are of heavy stone walls, that admit 
but little light and only poor ventilation. What is worse is that the 
penitentiary is badly located. For several years the subject of disposing 
of this property, and securing a new sight, in a suburb of Columbus. 
and erecting new and up-to-date buildings, with sanitary features, has 
been agitated, but nothing done. It is important that a commission should 
be appointed to take this matter in hand and push it to a consummation. 



874 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Ohio Penitentiary. 



PENITENTIARY BOARD OF MANAGERS. 

The Board of Managers of the Ohio Penitentiary consists of five 
members. Near the beginning of his administration, in February, 1900, 
Hon. Governor Nash appointed to this high and responsible position the 
following gentlemen : 

Hon. Aaron Wagoner, of Akron, Ohio, who was a Union soldier in 
the Civil War, and has had much experience . in financial and business 
administrations, having been Auditor of Summit County, Ohio, and 
Cashier of one of the banks of Akron. Captain Wagoner is well ac- 
credited with being a careful and painstaking financier, and has looked 
well to the financial interest of the penitentiary since his appointment. 

The Hon. Coleman Gillilan was aiho a Union soldier m the civil 
War, and since his retirement from the Army has had an extensive busi- 
ness experience and acquaintance, having traveled very widely in his 
commercial relations. Captain Gillilan's business experience has made 
him a valuable adviser of the business affairs of the penitentiary, and he 
shares with the other members of the board the credit of the improved 
business conditions prevailing in the institution. Captain Gillilan resides 
at Portsmouth, Ohio. 

Hon. McEldin Dunn, of Bellefontaine, O., by his well-balanced 
judgment, and fair discriminating habit of mind, added to his experience 
as a prosperous farmer and manufacturer, has shown eminent fitness for 
the responsible office he has filled with advantage to the state since his 
appointment. 

Hon. a. J. Sheppard, of Zanesville, Ohio, has combined for a num- 
ber of years with his profession as a lawyer, manufacturing and commer- 
cial business. He is familiarly spoken of as the lawyer of the Board, but 
his eminence as an attorney does not detract from his value as a practical 
business man. 

The Hon. Harry S. Griffith, of Mt. Giiead, Ohio, is the junior 
member of the Board of Managers, and combines with personal energy 
that maturity of judgment and careful attention to business which give 
distinction and success to men of affairs. Mr. Griffith is the editor and 
publisher of the Morrozv County Sentinel, which is one of the leading 
papers of the state. To these gentlemen is committed not only the man- 
. agement of the business aft'airs of the Ohio Penitentiary, but the caring 
for the hundreds of men and women who are continually passing through 
the prison, and are released under their direction either by discharge or 
parole. The attention they have given to the welfare of the prison popu- 
lation has secured for them the gratitude of the prisoners. The good 
judgment of the managers in appointing Mr. William N. Darby, 
Warden, was attested by his kindly and careful administration of the 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 875 

The Ohio Penitentiary, 

affairs of the prison, but in June, 1903, Mr. Darby resigned and Mr. E. 
A. Hershey became Warden. Warden Hershey is a native of Ohio, and 
is a practical business man. He has served as Clerk of the Court of 
Summit County, has been prominently connected with the commercial, 
banking and political affairs of that county for many years. 

The Board, as now organized, is officered by Hon. A. J. Sheppard, 
President, and Mr. Frank Cook, Secretary. Mr. Cook is a native of 
Ohio, and when appointed was and still is a resident of Mansfield, Ohio. 
He is well known throughout the state. Mr. Cook has evidenced capabil- 
ity, devotion and tact in his work as Secretary. He is widely known over 
the state as an active and intelligent citizen. 

L. H. Wells, the Deputy W-'^t-den, is very familiar with orison affaiVs, 
having been Assistant Deputy VVarden unaer tne Cotnn AamimsiraLlon. 
Mr. Wells was an officer in the Union Army in the Civil War, and 
afterwards discharged efficiently the duties of Assistant United States 
Marshal in the Northern District of Ohio, and of Sheriff of Hardin 
County, O. 

The Assistant Deputy Warden, Carey A. Long, comes from Highland 
County, where he was formerly a school teacher, and later Deputy 
Sheriff, and Court Bailiff*. He is accredited as having been active as a 
member of the Republican Committee of Highland County. 

Mr. C. B. Shook, chief clerk of the penitentiary, was the Assistant 
of his predecessor, and is thoroughly familiar with the duties of his 
office. He was formerly a teacher, and takes a personal interest in pub- 
lic, as well as prison affairs. 

Rev. David Judson Starr, D. D., the Chaplain of the prison, is a 
native of Ohio, and for many years has been Presiding Elder and pastor 
of churches in Cincinnati. He has had considerable experience in re- 
ligious work among all classes of people, having been at one time City 
Missionary in Cincinnati. The Chaplain is also the Librarian of the in- 
stitution. 

Mr. C. E. Wilcox, the Steward, is a man of experience in mercantile 
affairs, in which he has acquired abilities for the duties of his office. 

Doctor Wells Teachnor, M. D., is the chief physician of the prison, 
with Doctor John M. Thomas, M. D., and Doctor Byron Palmer, M. D., 
as his assistants. 

Mr. T. M. Brannon, Post-Master of the prison mails, was appointed 
from Union County, where he had rendered valuable services as County 
Commissioner, and is a man of public affairs. Mr. Brannon was mainly 
instrumental in establishing a Children's Home in Union Coounty. 

M. E. Fomshell, Superintendent of printing, was appointed from 
Camden, Preble County, where he was formerly editor of a local paper. 

Mr. John Davis, Superintendent of Bertillon Department, is one of 



876 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Ohio Penitentiary. 



the skilled men in his profession. He has in his keeping the measurL- 
ments, photographs, and historical accounts of those who have been in- 
mates of the penitentiary. 

H. B. Robinson, Superintendent of Construction, is a practical 
mechanic and builder appointed from Summit County. 

Mr. James E. Robinson, Superintendent of Subsistence, was ap- 
pointed to his office after the death of Mr. AIcAvoy, in June, 1902. Air. 
Robinson is a native of Ohio, and was formerly Sheriff of Union County. 

Mr. Harry S. Ogle, Superintendent of the State-Shop, has been 
identified with the administration of the prison for a number of years, 
in several capacities. He is familiar with the duties of his present 
position 

Prof. W. P. Donohoo, Superintendent of the Prison Night-School, 
is from Highland County, where he held several positions in his pro- 
fession as a school teacher. 

Other officers of the prison appear in the following table : 

ROSTER OF OFFICERS, 1902. 
BOARD OF MANAGERS. 



Name. 



Residence. 



McEldin Dun, President, 

Coleman Gillilan 

Harry S. Griffith 

Arthir J. Sheppard 

Aarou Wagoner. .- 

Frank Cook, Secretary . . 



Portsmouth. 

Bellefontaine. 

Mt. Gilead. 

Zanesville. 

Akron. 

Ohio Penitentiary. 



OFFICERS. 



Name. 


Office. 


Residence. 


Wm N. Darbv 


Warden 

Deputy Warden 


Belmont County. 


L. H. Wells 


Hardin County. 


C. A. Long 


Assistant Deputy Warden. . 

Clerk 

Assistant Clerk 


Hi2;hland Countv. 


C. B. Shook 


Pickaway County. 


M. ' A. Karshner ' 


Franklin Countv. 


C. E. Wilcox 


Steward 


Ross County. 


W. W. Harris 


Storekeeper 


Ashtabula County. 


Wells Teachnor 


Physician 


Scioto Countv. 


J. M. Thomas 


Assistant Physician (day) . . 
Assistant Physician (night) 


Marion County. 


Byron Palmer 


Franklin County. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



877 



The Ohio Penitentiary. 



OFFICERS— Concluded. 



Name. 




Residence. 



David J. Starr. . ; 

Thomas M. Brannan . . 

R. E. Jones 

Arthur Griner 

J. E. Robinson 

Harry S. Ogle 

W. F. Bryant 

J. W. Beaird 

M. E. Fornshell 

J. E. Da-y:.^. 

Samuel Cain 

George A. Wood 

W. H. Chandler 

O. B. Randall 

C. B. Slack 

H. B. Robinson 

C. A. Harden 

Mrs. E. M. Armstrong, 
Mrs. Mattie C. Brown 
Miss Delia McMaster. . 



Chaplain 

Postmaster 

Supt. piece Price 

Clerk in Piece Price Office. 
Superintendent Subsistence. 

Supt. State Shop 

Supt. Transfers and Halls . . 

Superintendent Yards 

Superintendent Printing. . . . 

SvF^-. Bort^iloii 

Hospital Quai Lt;niitiaLci 

Captain Night Watch 

Captain Guard Room (day). 
Captain Guard Room (night 

Superintendent Schools 

Supt. Construction 

Supt. Gas and Elect. Light.. 

Matron 

Assistant Matron 

Stenographer 



Hamilton County. 
Union County. 
Lawrence County. 
Muskingum County. 
Franklin County. 
Noble County. 
Guernsey County. 
Ashland County. 
Preble County. ^^ 

Hocking County. 
Periy uoiinty. 
Greene County. 
Logan County. 
Jackson County. 
Licking County. 
Summit County. 
Coshocton County. 
Hamilton County. 
Lucas County. 
Meigs County. 



ROSTER OF WARDENS, 1834—1902. 



Name. 



Term 
of Service. 



Nathaniel Medbury . 
W. B. Van Hook . . . . 

Richard Stadden 

John PattisoiA 

Laurin Dewey 

Samuel Atkinson 

D. W. Brown 

A. G. Dimmock 

Samuel Wilson 

J, B. Buttle 

John Ewing 

L. G. Van Styke . . . . 

John A. Prentice 

Nathaniel Merion . . . 
John A. Prentice . . . . 
Charles C. Walcutt .. 

Raymond Burr 

G. S. Innis 

John G. Grove 

J. B. McWhorter 

B. F. Dyer 

Noah Thomas 

Isaac Petrie 

E. G. Coffin 

B. F. Dyer 

C. C. James 

E. G. Coffin 

Wm. N. Darby 

♦Edward A. Hershey 



1834 
1838 
1841 
1843 
1846 
1851 
1851 
1852 
1854 
1855 
1856 
1858 
1860 
1862 
1864 
1866 
1869 
1872 
1875 
1878 
1879 
1880 
1884 
1886 
1890. 
1892. 
1896 
1900 
1903 



•1838. 
■1841. 
•1843. 
■1846. 
•1850. 

•1852, 
•1854. 
•1855. 
■1856. 
■1858. 
■1860. 
•1862. 
■1864. 
•1866. 
•1869. 
•1872. 
•1875. 
•1878. 
■1879. 
•1880. 
•1884. 
•1886. 
•1890. 
1892. 
•1896. 
•1900. 
•1903. 



•Incumbent. 



THE OHIO REFORMATORY. 



THE law creating this institution was enacted April 12, 1884; corner- 
stone was laid in '86, Hon. J. B. Foraker, Governor. The west 
wing and administration departments were not completed for 
'occupancy until September 18, '96, when 150 prisoners were 
brought from Columbus. 

The object of this institution is reformatory. Inmates are supposed 
to be first offenders, are admitted for all crimes except murder in the 
first degree, between the ages of 16 and 30. Male persons only are ad- 
mitted. There are three grades : first, second and tiiird. When inmates 
are admitted they are placed in the second grade ; if their conduct justifies 
at the expiraj:ion of six months, they are promoted to the first grade, in 
which they remain for a second six months, when, if their conduct jus- 
tifies, they are recommended to the Board of Managers for parole. With 
the consent of the Board of Managers they go out and remain the wards 
of the state under the supervision of the institution for one year, when, 
if their conduct justifies, they are fully discharged, and restored to citizen- 
ship by the Governor. Inmates are reduced to the third grade from either 
the first or second for punishment for certain misdemeanors. 

They receive an indeterminate sentence from the court and the length 
of time they remain here is governed largely by their conduct, and is ex- 
clusively in the hands of the Superintendent and the Board of Managers. 
They can be released at the expiration of the minimum time prescribed 
by law for the crime committed, or can be retained until the maximum 
time has expired. 

They are required to attend school and learn such trades as it is 
possible to teach them under the limited conditions now existing. It is 
expected, however, within the next few years shops will be erected and 
trades taught to these boys, so that when they go out, they will be able 
to make an honest living. 

Following is a list of the members of the Board of Managers since 
the institution began : ' , ■ 



(878 



.,i**.ia^'ii:W# 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



879 



The Ohio Reformatory (MansHeld), 



BOARD OF MANAGERS, 1884—1900. 




1884. 
1884. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
188G. 
1887. 
1888. 
1 8.RP . 
1889. 
1890. 
1890. 
1890. 
1890. 
1890. 
1890. 
1890. 
1891. 
1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1894. 
1896. 
1897. 
1898. 
1898. 
1899. 
1899. 
1900. 
1900. 
1901. 
1901. 
1901. 
1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1904. 
1904. 



F. M. Marriott 

Jno. M. Pugh 

Jno. Q. Smith 

F. M. Marriott 

W. R. Phipps 

B. F. Crawford \ 

Wm. Monaghan 

Wm. J. Elliott 

T^. -r. Ci-av/fojd 

C. L. Poorman 

F. M, Marriott 

Wm. B. Burnett 

L. F. Limbert 

E. H. Keiser 

Geo. C. Washburn 

F. M. Marriott 

B. F. Crawford. . .'. 

L. F. Limbert 

Edgar G. Pocock 

Lee S. Lake 

F. M. Marriott 

S. P. Wolcott 

J. D. Beaird 

R. W. C. Gregg 

H. Apthorp 

R. W. C. Gregg 

F. F. Thomas 

R. W. C. Gregg 

H. H. McFadden 

S. P. Wolcott 

H. L. Ferneding. 

W. A. Korns 

W. S. Rogers 

T. F. Dye 

G. W. C. Perry 

H. L. Ferneding 

H. B. Coates 

Orland H. Bare 

Judson Vincent 



Delaware County. 
Franklin County. 
Clinton County. 
Delaware County. 
Hamilton County. 
Richland County. ^ 
Miami County. 
Franklin County. 
Richland County. 
Belmont County. 
Delaware County. 
Clark County. 
Darke County. 
Richland County. 
Lorain County. 
Delaware County. 
Richland County. 
Darke County. 
Franklin County. 
Licking County. 
Delaware County. 
Portage County. 
Ashland County. 
Clermont County. 
Ashtabula County. 
Clermont County. 
Lorain County. 
Clermont County. 
Jefferson County. 
Portage County. 
Montgomery County. 
Tuscarawas County. 
Auglaize County. 
Meigs County. 
Ross County. 
Montgomery County. 
Stark County. 
Brown County. 
Knox County. 



I', 



OHIO SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' HOME. 



TO provide for the establishment of this institution the General As- 
sembly passed an act April 30, 1886. 
To carry out the provision of the act, Governor Foraker, 
in April, 1886, appointed as trustees Hon. Isaac F. Mack, R. 
B. Brown, Thos. F. Dill, Wm. P. Orr and Thos B. Paxton. The board 
organized on June 3, and elected I. F. Mack president, and R. B. Brown 
secretary. During the summer a number of places were visited and care- 
fully looked over. A site three miles from Sandusky was finally seler^^^d 
as the best place to locate the Home. H. C. Lindsey, of ZanesvUle, was 
chosen architect, and he at once prepared plans for the buildings. Herman 
Haerline, of Cincinnati, was employed as landscape gardener, and the 
work of improvement of grounds and construction of buildings was at 
once commenced. 

On July II, 1888, the corner-stone of the administration building 
was laid by Judge O'Neill, Commander of the Department of Ohio Grand 
Army of the Republic, in the presence of Governor Foraker and a large 
assemblage of Ohio citizens; in the fall of 1888 the Trustees appointed 
the following officers: General M. F. Force, of Cincinnati, Com- 
mandant; Capt. A. M. Anderson, Delaware, O., Adjutant; Col. E. J. 
Blount, Cincinnati, O., Quartermaster ; Dr. S. C Rannells, Vinton county, 
Surgeon ; Mrs. Sarah J. Price. Mansfield, O., Matron, who entered upon 
the discharge of their duties in October, and the Home was opened on 
November 19, with seventeen members. The annual report for the year 
ending November 15, 1889. shows that 716 men aad been admitted dur- 
ing the first year. 

In March, 1898, Col. R. B. Brown, after twelve years' continuous 
service as a member of the Board of Trustees, resigned the office, and 
Col. J. W. R. Cline, of Springfield, was appointed to fill the vacancy. 

On May 8, 1899, the state and the Plome sustained a great loss in 
the death of Gen. M. F. Force, the Commandant. The Board of Trustees 
ordered spread upon the minutes the following testimonial on his death : 

"This Board will leave to others the task of writing suitable obituary for the 
distinguished dead, but we desire to preserve on our own records some testi- 
monial of our appreciation of the eminent services rendered by Gen. Force for 
this institution. He was indeed the father of the Home. 

"General Force had achieved renown as a soldier and jurist before being 
called upon to assume the great responsibility of organizing this Home and 
placing it as we all desired, first among the soldiers' homes of this nation. 

"By unanimous voice of the Board he was tendered the position of Com- 
mandant before the Home was opened. He accepted the responsibility and 
came with his devoted wife to prepare for the re)D€<ptionJ of those who should 

(880) 



\ r: '>'r0. mm- ??? ^^f0^f^< 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. * 881 

The Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Home (Sandusky). 

seek the support and protection of the institution, and as. he often expressed 
it, not to make a military camp, but a home for his unfortunate comrades. His 
high character and intelligent zeal insured success from the first. 

"With him charity and kindness went hand in hand with judgment and 
discipline. He was ever ready to hear the most humble petition, and while 
keeping up a high moral standard for the Home he loved and encouraged the 
weak and unfortunate. 

"His resourceful mmd gave to the Home steady improvement and his spot- 
less life protected it from scandal. His zeal and devotion were unbounded, and 
it was a merciful Providence that permitted him to live to see the full fruition 
of his hopes, and to be comforted by the assurance of the national inspector 
that the home of which he was Commandant had found first place among the 
homes of the land. 

"We shall miss him at our Board meetings, and wait in vain for him in 
our councils, but we shall cherish his memory. with love and gratitude. 

"To" Mrs. Force and her son we extend our profound sympathy and assure 
them that wherever they may go they will bear with them the best wishes of 
every mciuber cf this Board. " 

At the meeting of the Board on May 17, Capt. A. M. Anderson was 
appointed Commandant, and C. A. Reeser, of Springfield, was appointed 
Adjutant. 

The first of January, 1899, found the new hospital completed, which 
gives the home the most complete structure of its kind of any institution 
in the country. Seven trained lady nurses were employed^ to look after 
and care for the sick and suffering old men. Two years' experience has 
shown that these ladies have added wonderfully to the comfort and wel- 
fare of the sick. 

. The Home started in on the new century with an overcrowded house. 
Number present, January 15, 1,391; on the rolls, 1,621; average number 
present for the year ending November 15, 1900, 1,216; cost per capita for 
current expense, clothing, officers' salaries and trustees' expenses, $151.15 ; 
of which the general government pays $100.00, leaving a cost to the state 
of ozAy $51.15 per annum to comfortably house, clothe, feed and give 
medical attention to these old soldiers. Since the Home was opened in 
November, 1888, forty-eight hundred and eighty-five (4,885) men have 
been admitted and cared for. The Home is largely indebted to the Grand 
Army of the Republic and the Woman's Relief Corps for generous dona- 
tions of books, magazines and papers for the library, and hospital sup- 
plies of jelHes, fruits, cushions and other articles. 

The entire cost of building and permanent improvements, amounts 
to ^57>^^3-72- 

On April 18, 1901; Gen. A. M. x\nderson died of heart failure. He 
died the death of one beloved by the gods, for it was instantaneous. He 
was an honest and honorable man, and a conscientious and efficient 
officer. He had the love and respect of the members of the Home. 

The Board of Trustees selected in his place Thomas M. Anderson, 
a retired general officer of the army, and a Major-General of Volunteers. 
He is a native of Ohio, and before the War of the Rebellion was prac- 

56— B. A. 



882 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Home (Sandusky). 

ticing law in Cincinnati. When Sumter was fired on he enUsted as a 
private in the Sixth Ohio Vokinteer Infantry. Having been transferred 
to the regular establishment he was made a Alajor-General in the Span- 
ish-American War, and commanded a division of the Eighth Army Corps 
in the Philippine campaigns. He is a Grand Army of the Republic man, 
a Companion of the Loyal Legion, and has attained the thirty-third 
degree in the A. & A. S. Rite. 

He assumed the duties of Commandant on May 6, 1901. Under his 
administration a number of improvements have been made by reason of 
liberal appropriations of the General Assembly. A sewage disposal plant 
has been constructed on the most approved scientific principles. More 
methodical method? have been introduced in the management of the 
Home and it is now pronounced by the government inspectors to be the 
best institution of its kind in the country. 

The average membership last year, 1903, was 1,258. The greatest 
nwmber present, 1,436, was in Januar}', 1904. 

The officers and Board of Trustees are tabulated below : 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Capt. J. L. Cameron 

Gen. W. P. Orr, President... 
Gen. Thos. T. Dill, Secretary 

Col. J. J. Sullivan 

Col. F. .G. Cross 



Marysville. 

Piqua. 

Mansfield. 

Cleveland. 

Cincinnati. 



OFFICERS OF THE HOME. 



Name. 



Office. 



Gen. T. M. Anderson 

Capt. Wheeler 

Capt. Daniel Du2:an. 
Major J. T. Haynes . . 
Rev. W. M. Haines. . . 
Mrs. Mary L. Fuller 



Commandant. 

Adjutant. 

Quartermaster. 

Surgeon. 

Chaplain. 

Matron. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



883 



The Ohio Soldiers and Sailors Home (Sandusky). 

Col. J. J. Sullivan is a leading financier of Cleveland, and President 
of a number of banks in Northern Ohio. He was Sergeant of the Third 
Independent Battery, Ohio Light Artillery. 

Dr. F. G. Cross, President of the Bankers' Life Insurance Company, 
of Cincinnati. He v^as a Lieutenant in Company "K," 85th Indiana Vol- 
unteer Infantry. He is now a member of the Cincinnati School Board. . 

The President of the Board' is Col. J. L. Cameron, Corporal Com- 
pany "C," 12th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, now a leading attorney of Union 
county. 

The Secretary of the Board is Gen. Thos. T. Dill, Sergeant-Major of 
the i6th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.' He was at one time Adjutant Gen- 
eral of the state. He is a leading citizen of Mans^.:^:^^ O'lio 

The average age of the members is 68 years. Among the inmates are 
eight Mexican War veterans and 18 Spanish- American War soldiers. 

The per capita cost of maintenance for the year was $158.08. The 
expenditure was $203,905.43. Approximately two-thirds of this was 
from the general government. 

General T. M. Anderson resigned as Commandant May 31st, 1904, 
and was succeeded by Col. J. W. R. Cline, of Springfield, Ohio, June ist, 
1904. 



HOME OF THE OHIO SOLDIERS, SAILORS, MARINES, THEIR WIVES, 
MOTHERS AND WIDOWS AND ARMY NURSES. 

TRUSTEES. 



Name and Address. 



Appointed. 



Term Expires. 



S. A. Wildman, Norwalk, Huron County 
J. Coby Winans, Troy, Miami County.... 
A. J. Pearson, Woodsfield, Monroe Co., 
A. C. Yengling, Salem, Columbiana County 
G. F. Robinson, Wash. C. H., Fayette Co 



May 27, 1904 
May 27, 1904 
May 27, 1904 
May 27, 1904 
May 27, 1904 



May 2G, 1905. 
May 2G, 190G. 
May 26. 1907. 
May ?6, 1908. 
May 26. 1909. 



THE OHIO SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' ORPHANS' HOME. 



IN the summer of 1869 the attention of the survivors of the civil war 
was called to the large number of fatherless children in Ohio, who 
were made so by the enormous gift of Ohio men to the Union Army. 
Every hamlet and township possessed its quota of soldiers' orphans, 
while in the larger cities the number of children rendered fatherless by 
the war was so great as to be particularly noticeable to the public spirited 
men and women who, having served in or in behalf of the Union Army 
when in the field, found themselves unwilling to rest from their labors 
until every possible step had been taken to heal the woui;ds of tual; notable 
conflict. The members of the Grand Army of the Republic in Ohio took 
up the matter of providing a home for these orphans, those ex-soldiers 
who were already prominent in the affairs of the state, taking the lead 
in the agitation of the subject which followed; Chaplain G. W. Collier, 
Gen. J. Warren Keifer, Gen. Wm. H. Gibson, Hon. Lewis B. Gunckel, 
Lieut.-Gov. John C. Lee, Hon. John Sherrnan, Mrs. Lucy Webb Hayes ; 
Messrs. Millen, McMillen, Lester Arnold, Capt. McDowell, and others 
of the city of Xenia, being prominently identified with the early days of 
the Home. In September, 1869, a two-story building in the city of Xenia 
was rented by the Grand Army officials, and converted by temporary 
wooden partitions, stairways and halls, into crowded accommodations for 
possibly fifty children. Funds were raised from public and private 
sources, principally by Chaplain Collier, who canvassed the state and 
addressed churches, Sunday schools. Grand Army meetings and private 
individuals, and children were admitted as fast a- accommodations for 
them could be provided. The citizens of Xenia and of Greene county 
were genuinely interested in the movement, and spared no pains to make 
it a success. A room in the High School Building, of Xenia, was set 
apart for the children of the Home by the board of education, thus pro- 
viding immediate school privileges, and the Court House Park was voted 
to their use by the city and county officers, thus providing a convenient 
♦and well-kept playground. The citizens presented the Home with 100 
acres of ground, afterwards increased to about 300 acres by purchase 
of the State of Ohio, on which the present institution was afterward 
located by the state, and the county commissioners of Greene county, 
during that winter, voted six thousand dollars toward the current ex- 
penses of the Home to prevent the children from feeling the reduced con- 
dition to which the treasury of the Grand Army had been depleted by the 
expense of opening and operating an institution of such a character. 
The loyalty and public spirit of the men and women of Greene county 

(884) 



THE BIOGRArHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. SSI 

The Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home. 

during the war was repeated in their efforts in behalf of the orphans oi 
the war. In the winter of 1870,. with about 75 children in the Home, an 
appeal was made to the General Assembly to adopt the children as wards 
of the state, and to take over the property of the Home and make it a 
state institution. A committee from the General Assembly visited the 
children, who were assembled in the City Hall in Xenia, inspected the 
temporary quarters in town, and the property belonging to the Home 
just outside the city limits to the southeast, and returned to Columbus 
in favor of the proposition. The committee was addressed on behalf oi 
the children by a Master Gilkey, who was then a boy twelve years old, 
having been admitted to the Home from Trumbull county in January of 
that year. 

In April of 1870 the Home passed under the control of the state, and 
its removal from Xenia to its present location on the old Pelham farm, 
was accomplished in September, the work of construction having been 
pushed sufficiently to accommodate the children then in attendance. The 
doors were thrown open to new pupils, and as soon as the transfer from 
the city to the farm was effected, and from September, 1870, to the pres- 
ent time, there has never been an hour when there were not more ap- 
plicants for admission than could possibly be received. 

It is a matter of course that the requirements for admission should 
be changed with changing conditions. In 1870 no children were entitled 
to admission but those whose fathers were killed in action, or had since 
died from wounds or the disabilities of war. The lapse of time scxjn 
rendered this class of children ineligible from age-limit, and the doors 
were then opened successively to those whose fathers being ex-soldiers 
had died from any cause; to those whose mothers had died, the father 
being an ex-soldier, and unable to properly care for his children ; to the 
children of ex-soldiers, whose parents being alive were not able to care 
for them ; to the children and orphans residing in Ohio of such soldiers 
and sailors who have died or may hereafter die by reason of wounds 
received or disease contracted while serving in the military or naval 
forces of the United States. 

In 1870 the instruction consisted of the usual school course with 
some outdoor labor; in 1875 industrial pursuits were added to the school 
course, and to the number of industries then inaugurated there have been 
constant additions, aggregating twenty-three, as the science of manual 
training has grown more familiar to the educator. In the Home was 
thus established far in advance of similar public institutions, a Manual 
Training School, supported by public funds for public uses. The Home 
is the largest institution of its kind in the world, and has a long history 
of active educational work. Graduates from its schools are filling honor- 
able positions in the civil, political, financial, military, and naval depart- 



886 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



The Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home. 

inents of American life. It has been frequently said that in all America 
it would be hard to find a spot more hallowed to the memory of American 
Soldiery, more filled with the stirring influences of patriotic devotion to 
country and to the country's flag; more typical of the peace and honor 
which follow from the defense of Rights and Liberty, than among the 
scenes and experiences which surround the home and school life of the 
900 pupils of the Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home at Xenia. 
From an old photograph, made in 1872, the illustration was taken 
which heads this article, and, on the back of this old photograph is given 
the names of the men who were appointed by the Governor of Ohio to 
take over the Home from the Grand Army in April, 1870, and mould it 
into a state institution. Thev are: 



', \ 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 1870—1874. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Gen. R. P. Buckland 

Gen. James Barnett 

Gen. J. Warren Keif er . . 

Barnabas Burns 

Gen. Manning F. Force. 

Gen. John S. Jones 

A. Trader 



Fremont. 

Cleveland. 

Springfield. 

Mansfield. 

Cincinnati. 

Delaware. 

Xenia. 



SUPERINTENDENT 1870—1874. 
Pr. L. D. Griswold, Medical Dept. U. S. V Elyria. 



The annual report for 1902 gives the following official roster: 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Dr. H. C. Houston, President ' ". Urbana 

Col. D. Q. Morrow, Secretary Hillsboro 

Gapt. P. H. Dowling " Toledo 

Gen. J. W. Keifer Springfield 

J. C. Roland < Cleveland 

Gen. Charles L. Young Superintendent 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



887 



The Ohio Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' Home. 



OFFICERS. 



Name. 


Offices. 


Gen. Charles L. Young 


Superintendent. 


Thomas J. Collins 

Mrs. Cora Day Young 

Warren C. Hewitt, M. D 

Thomas A. Edwards 


Financial Officer. 
Physician. 
Supt. of Schools. 
Matron. 







The Home employes thirty-six cottage matrons, thirty-two teachers 
in the regular course, fourteen foremen of industrial branches and trades 
and gives a home and instruction to about 950 children in average attend- 
ance. 



OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY. 



IN 1878 the legislature passed "An act to reorganize and change the 
name of the Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College and to re- 
peal certain acts therein mentioned." The act provided that the in- 
stitution should be thereafter designated as "The Ohio State Univers- 
ity." Up to this time but one appropriation had been made by the State 
for the support of the institution. With the reorganization came the 
larger and broader view of the State's relation to public education, and 
since that time the Ohio S^ate University has shared with M,hct- ^n,;.;v 
educational institutions a more generous support by the State. 

The governing body of the institution is a Board of Trustees, ap- 
pointed by the Governor of the State and confirmed by the Senate, for 
terms of seven years as provided in the law organizing the University. 
The original endowment has been supplemented, and the objects of the 
University promoted, by a permanent annual grant from the United 
States, under an act of 1890, by special appropriations of the General 
Assembly; and in 1891, by a permanent annual grant from the State, 
which grant was doubled by the legislature of 1896. In accordance with 
the spirit of law under which it is organized, the University aims to 
furnish ample facilities for education in the liberal and industrial arts, 
the sciences and the languages, and for thorough technical and profession- 
al study of agriculture, engineering in its various departments, veterin- 
ary medicine, pharmacy and law. Through the aid which has been re- 
ceived from the United States and from the State, it is enabled to offer 
its privileges, with a slight charge for inciden^l expenses, to all persons 
of either sex who are qualified for admission. 

The University is situated within the corporate limits of the city of 
Columbus, two miles north of the Union depo":, and about three miles 
from the State Capitol. The University grounds v^onsist of three hundred 
and forty-five acres, bounded east and west by High Street, and the 
Olentangy river, respectively. The western port'on, about 235 acres, 
is devoted to agricultural and horticultural purpos-^s, and is under the 
management of the College of Agriculture and Domestic Science. The 
eastern portion is occupied by the principal University buildings, campus, 
athletic and drill grounds, a park-like meadow, and a few acres of 
primitive forest. 

The grounds are laid out with care, ornamented with trees, shrubs 
and flower beds; and are so managed as to illustrate the instruction in 
Botany, Horticulture, Forestry, Landscape Gardening and Floriculture. 

(888) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 889 

Ohio State University. 

The University has eighteen buildings devoted to instruction, one 
Boiler House, one Power House, two Dormitories, six residences, and 
some farm buildings. These buildings represent an investment for con- 
struction of about eight hundred thousand dollars. The equipment 
and apparatus amount to about one hundred and seventy thousand dol- 
lars. The land now occupied as a site with the farm is valued at one 
million five hundred thousand dollars. 

The Ohio State University is divided into six colleges, as follows : 

(i.) The College of Agriculture and Domestic Science consists 
of those departments represented in the course leading to the degrees 
of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, Bachelor of Science in Horticul- 
ture and Forestry, and Bachelor of Science in Domestic Economy, and in 
the Course in Dairying. 

(2.) The College of Arts, Philosophy and Science consists of those 
departments represented in the courses leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, Bachelor of Philosophy, and Bachelor of Science; and in the 
Courses Preparatory to Law and to Journalism. 

(3.) The College of Engineering consists of those " departments 
represented in the courses leading to the degrees of Civil Engineer, En- 
gineer of Mines, Engineer of Mines and Ceramics, Mechanical Engineer, 
Mechanical Engineer in Electrical Engineering, and Bachelor of Science 
in Industrial Arts, Bachelor of Science in Chemistry or in Metallurgy; 
in the Course in Architecture, in the Short Course in Clay- Working and 
Ceramics, and in the Short Course in Mining. 

(4.) The College of Law consists of those departments represented 
in the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Law^s. 

(5.) The College of Pharmacy consists of those departments repre- 
sented in the courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy, and in the Short Course in Pharmacy. 

(6.) The College of Veterinary Medicine consists of those depart- 
ments represented in the course leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Veterinary Medicine, and to a certificate of Veterinary Surgeon. 

Each college is under the direction of its own Faculty, which has 
power to act in all matters pertaining to the work of students in that col- 
lege. . 



890 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Ohio State University. 



'\\ 



BOARD TRUSTEES, 1900—1901. 



Name. 


Residence. 


Term Expires. 


Paul Jones 


Columbus 

Columbus 

Chillicothe -. . . 


May, 1905. 
May, 190G. 
May, 1907. 
May, 1908. 


Oscar T. Corson 

John T. Mack 


David M. Massie 


Sanduskv 


Myron T. Herrick 


Cleveland 


May, 1909. 
May, 1909. 


George K. Nash 


Columbus 


Guy W. Mallon 

J. /McLain Smith 


Cincinnati 

Dayton 


May, 1910. 
May, 1911.^ 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

Paul Jones President 

J. McLain Smith Vice President 

Alexis Cope Secretary 

Louis Kiesewetter Treasurer 



Executive. 

J. McLain Smith 
Paul Jones 
Guy W. Mallon 



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD. 

Farm. Finance. 



J. McLain Smith 
Oscar T. Corson 
John T. Mack 



D. M. Massie 
Guy W. Mallon 
Paul Jones 



Paur Jones 



FACULTY AND COURSES OF STUDY. 

Oscar T. Corson John T. Mack 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, 1902-1903. 

William Oxley Thompson President. 

Alexis Cope Secretary Board of Trustees and Bursar. 

. W. C. McCracken Chief Engineer. 

Katherine H. Duncan Executive Clerk. 

Edith D. Cockins Registrar. 

Carl E. Steeb Accountant. 



THE OHIO UNIVERSITY. 



THE history of the Ohio University antedates that of the State of 
Ohio nearly two decades. The ordinance providing for its 
existence and support was passed by Congress, acting under 
the "Articles of Confederation," July 13, 1787, in the city of 
New York. The leading spirit in the movement was Manasseh Cutler, 
a native of Connecticut, and a graduate of Yale of the class of 1765. In 
accordance with the spirit of his time he proposed to endow an institu- 
tion for higher education with a grant of land. As there was a super- 
^buiidancc cf l;*:^^', ?n<- ?s ihe t.ountry was pretty sure to fill up rapidly, 
such an endowment was supposed to be the most stable and almost sure to 
increase greatly in value: The history of many land grants .for educa- 
tion shows, however, that while the expectation of increase in value has 
realized, the increase rarely accrued to the pecuniary advantage of the 
beneficiary. To this general statement the Ohio University forms no ex- 
ception. 

Among the ordinances enacted for the Northwest Territory, there 
was one providing that "no more than two complete townships should be 
given perpetually for the purpose of a University, to be laid off by the 
purchaser or purchasers as near the center as may be (so that the same 
shall be of good land), to be applied to the intended object by the Legis- 
lature of the State." In 1795 the lands to be devoted to the support of 
the University were located. The townships were numbers eight and 
nine in the fourteenth range, now Athens and Alexander in Athens county. 
The first families removed to them in 1797, and settled near the present 
site of the town of Athens, the seat of the University. Two years later 
the Territorial Legislature appointed three commissioners "to lay off 
in the most suitable place within the township, a town plat, which should 
contain a square for the college; also, lots suitable for house-lots and 
gardens for a president, professors, tutors, etc., bordering on, or en- 
circled by spacious commons, and such a number of town lots adjoining 
the said commons and out-lots as they think will be for the advantage of 
the University." 

In the same year Dr. Cutler sent his draft of an act of incorporation 
for the University. In this draft he said among other things, "Forty or 
fifty thousand dollars cannot be too high, as it must be applied to one 
of the most useful and important purposes to society and government." 
Passing over some intermediate legtslation, we find that the General 
Assembly of the new State that had just been admitted to the Union, 
])assed, in 1804, an act of which Section i gave to the institution its 

(891) 



892 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Ohio University. 



present name, the Ohio University, and defined its object to be "the In- 
■ struction of youth in all the various branches of liberal arts and sciences, 
the promotion of good education, virtue, religion, and morality, and the 
conferring of all the degrees and literary honors granted in similar in- 
stitutions/' 

Section 2 provided for the corporate existence of a Board of Trus- 
tees. Section 2 also provided "for the subdivision of college lands into 
tracts of not less than eighty acres nor more than one hundred and forty 
acres; the valuation of them by three disinterested and judicious free- 
. holders as in their original and unimproved state, and the leasing of the 
same for the term of ninety years, renewable forever, on a yearly rent 
of <5ix per certuin of the amount of the valuation so made by the said 
freeholders; and the land so leased shall be subject to a revaluation at the 
expiration of thirty-five years, and to another revaluation at the expira- 
tion of sixty years, from the commencement of the term of each lease, 
which revaluation shall be conducted and made on the principles of the 
first, and the lessee shall pay a yearly rent of six per centum on the 
amount of the valuation so to be made ; and forever thereafter at a yearly 
^ • rent equal to and not exceeding six per centum of the amount of a valua- 

t tion, to be made as aforesaid at the expiration of the term of ninety 

i years aforesaid. * * * Provided, always, That the corporation 

[: shall have power to demand a further yearly rent on the said lands and 

I tenements, not exceeding the amount of tax imposed on property of like 

j description by the State." 

\ The first building was erected on the northeast side of the present 

1 campus and known as the "Academy." It was of wood and has long since 

1 been torn down. The first building for collegiate purposes proper was 

[ ■ put up in 18 17. This is therefore the oldest structure of the kind in 

r the entire Northwest, if not west of the Alleghenies. It is three stories 

I high above the basement, and though somewhat remodeled twenty years 

I ' ago, is substantially the original building and is still in use. Twenty years 

1 later two additional buildings, also of brick, were put up. 

1 In 188 1, what was for a time known as the "Chapel Building" was 

1 " erected and subsequently removed to its present site to make room for 

' Ewing Hall, one of the largest of the University buildings. The Normal 
College Building is located about sixty-five feet from the west side of 
University Terrace and faces the east. Among other things held in mind 
in planning this building were its fitness for the work to be done in it, 
its sanitary and hygienic conditions, its fire-resisting quality, its safety 
in construction, and its architectural design showing art, culture, and re- 
finement. The main or central portion of the building was completed at 
a cost of $46,913.17, the contract price — there being no extras. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 893 

The Ohio University. 

The new Library Building, now in course of construction, will be 
ready for occupancy January i, 1905. The contract price is $32,311.17. 
Ample means for furnishing the building, when completed, are avail- 
able. 

Though the University was chartered in 1804 no instruction was 
given until 1809. In June, 1808, the Board laid out a course of instruc- 
tion which embraced "the English, Latin and Greek languages, mathemat- 
ics, rhetoric, logic, geography, natural and moral philosophy." One year 
later when the school was formally opened but three students presented 
themselves. This is not surprising when we consider the sparseness of 
population and the poverty of the newcomers on the soil of Ohio. It 
seemed 0. p:irai''?^ivHj schr-rxC. to establish a university before preparatory 
schools liad been provided, yet this has been the history of education from 
the remotest times^the higher has always preceded the lower, though the 
latter did not always appear. 

For some years the university had but one instructor, the Rev. Jacob 
Lindley, a graduate of Princeton. In 1812 Artemas Sawyer, a graduate 
of Harvard, was added as a second teacher, and six years later a third 
was added. 

The first graduate was Thomas Ewing, who was probably the first 
person to receive a college diploma in all Western America. This docu- 
ment was dated 18 15. The distinguished subsequent career of Mr. Ewing 
is well known. It is identified not only with the history of Ohio but with 
that of the nation. 

Enrollment statistics for the last six years are shown in the figures 
given herewith : 



Years. Males. Females. Totals. 

1899 224 166 390 

1900 231 210 441 

1901 214 191 .......... 405 

1902 223 186 419 

1903 306 245 551 

1904 433 400 33 



The increase in student attendance at the Summer School has been 
very marked. It may be seen from the following statistical statement : 



Years. Enrollment. 

1899 61 

1900 65 

1901 102 

1902 238 

1903 423 



^.sn,..^t„ 



894 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Ohio University. 

The revenues of the university were at first very small, but thrv 
would in time have increased to a respectable sum as the two townshipN 
above named contain nearly fifty thousand acres. Unfortunatelv ilu- 
legislature interfered to prevent the revaluation of its lands, notwithbtand 
ing the decisions of the various courts, so that the income from the n. n> 
dupHcate is and will remain at less than thirty-five hundred dollars per 
annum. This legislative Act of 1843 dealt the University a blow from 
which it has never fully recovered. The loss of revenue it caused may be 
estimated by the following statement : 

According to the decennial appraisement of 1900, the value of tin- 
land was, exclusive of improvements and inclusive of roadbeds of rail- 
roads^ $i;35'S^6i;;.oo. Six percent of this amount would give an annual 
income of $81,376.90. 

Toward the close of the seventies the legislature began to make 
annual appropriations for the support of the university, and in 1896 en- 
acted the so-called ''Sleeper Bill," w^hich gives it an annual revenue of 
over thirty-five thousand dollars. 

At the regular session of the General Assembly of Ohio held in 1902 
H. B. No. 369 — Mr. Seese — became a law. Its provisions place upon 
the authorities of the Ohio University, at Athens, and the Miami Uni- 
versity, at Oxford, the duty of organizing ''at their respective institu- 
tions a normal school which shall be co-ordinate with existing courses 
of instruction and shall be maintained in such a state of efficiency as to 
provide theoretical and practical training for all students desiring to pre- 
pare themselves for the work of teaching." 

The act further provides for a levy upon the grand list of the taxable 
property of the State of one-thirtieth of one mill upon each dollar of the 
valuation of such taxable property. This levy produces an annual in- 
come of $65,000, which is divided between the Ohio University and the 
Miami University in the ratio of seven to five. 

Acting in conformity with statutory provisions, the board of trustees 
of Ohio University, on March 25, 1902, declared by resolution its pur- 
pose to establish and maintain "The Normal College of Ohio University 
and to provide the necessary- teaching force, buildings and equii)meni 
therefor at the earliest practicable date. 

With the opening- of the fall term of the university, September 0. 
1902, the State Normal College began its existence, with a corps of 
capable instructors, tentative courses of study and an encouraging student 
attendance. Since the date of opening not less than 1,000 persons have 
received some kind of instruction in the college. Surely the wisdom <'t 
the estabUshment of such an agency for the better training of persons i'»r 
effective service in the public schools is in rapid process of vindication. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 895 

The Ohio University. 

Though the college has been giving instruction from 1809 under the 
charge successively of Rev. Jacob Lindley and Rev. James Irvine, its 
first president, as he is usually designated, was not elected until 1824, 
when Robert G. Wilson, a native of North Carolina, and a graduate of 
Dickinson College, was chosen to fill the position. His successor was 
the well known Dr. William H. McGuffey. For a few years, dating 
from 1845, owing to financial embarrassments, the institution was closed, 
but in 1848 it was re-opened under the presidency of Dr. Alfred Ryors. 
Dating from 1852, Dr. Solomon Howard was president for twenty years, 
and was succeeded by Dr. W. H. Scott. From 1883 to 1901, Dr. Charles 
W. Super was at the head of the institution with the exception of two 
years, 1896- 1898, w^hen the position was held b}^ Dr. Tco.^jc C^'^ok. The 
term of the present incumbent began July 18, 190 1. 

PRESIDENTS OF OHIO UNIVERSITY. 
Name. Date of Service. 

Rev. Jacob Lindley, A.M 1808-1822 

Rev. James Irvine, A.M 1822-1824 

Rev. Robert G. Wilson, D.D .1824-1839 

Rev. Wm. H. McGuffey, D.D., LL.D 1839-1843 

Rev. Alfred Ryors. D.D., LL. D 1843-1852 

Rev. Solomon Howard, D.D., LL.D. 1852-1872 

Rev. William H. Scott. A.M.. LL.D 1872-1883 

Charles W^ Super, Ph.D., LL.D .1883-189G 

Rev. Isaac Crook. D.D., LL. D 1896-1898 

Charles W. Super. Ph.D., LL.D 1898-1901 

Alston Ellis, Ph.D.. LL.D 1901- 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES. When 

Appointed. 

Hon. George W. Boyce, Cincinnati 1875 

Hon. V. C. Lowry, Logan 1885 

L. M. Jewett. Esq., Athens .; 1887 

R. E. Hamblin, Toledo 1890 

C. C. Davidson, A. M., Alliance 1891 

Prof. A. Leue, Ph. D., Cincinnati 1891 

Hon. Lucien J. Fenton, Winchester 1892 

J. E. Benson, Cleveland 1892 

E. J. Jones. Esq., Athens 1893 

J. M. Welch. Esq., Athens 1895 

J. P. Wood, Esq., Athens 189G 

F. C. Whiley, Lancaster 189G 

Albert Douglas, Esq., Chillicothe 1897 

Hon. H. W. Coultrap. McArthur 1897 

Thomas Blackstone. M. D., Circleville 1898 

Israel M. Foster, Esq.. Athens 1900 

T. R. Biddle, M. D.. Athens 1900 

Henry O'Bleness. Athens 1901 

J. B. Foraker, Jr., Cincinnati 1903 

Governor Myron T. Herrick Ex-Officio 

President Alston Ellis Ex-Offlcio 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

Alston Ellis President 

A. J. Frame ' Treasurer 

L. M. Jewett, Esq Secretary and Auditor 



f^K- ^^^?i rU''- ' ' .-^fr-knii^^'^f 



MIAMI UNIVERSITY. 



GREAT institutions grow. They are not born in a day. I{ is a 
part and a privilege of an American to feel a pride in America's 
historic foundations and institutions. In the document under 
which the great northwest territory was settled, we read: "Re- 
ligion, morality and knowledge being necessary to good government and 
the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall for- 
ever be encouraged." This sentence is the foundation of the educational 
policy of the states formed out of this territory. The John Cleves Symmes 
pnrrhoco in scuthwcsteixi Oaio, like the other grants made under this 
ordinance, laid permanently the foundation, for higher education. Out 
of this land grant grew Miami University. The trust was given to the 
State of Ohio and accepted in 1803, and by means of legislative action 
-buildings were erected and the school opened in 1816 as a preparatory 
school, and in 1824, as a college. The first class was graduated in 1826. 
Under the stimulus of the land grant, the spirit of the ordinance of 1787, 
the co-operation of the state and the rapid settlement of Miami county, 
the college flourished and soon became the most renowned west of the 
Alleghenies. The early settlers believing in the value of college educa- 
tion sent their sons there. These young men later became the men of 
affairs and took an active interest in every form of public life. During 
the war of the rebellion, Miami's graduates, almost to a man, were found 
enlisted or engaged in some form of public service. Many of these men 
are still hard at work, so that it has been said that Miami has more 
prominent men among her alumni than any other western college. A 
strong American sentiment permeates the every vein of the Miami student 
or graduate. Miami has been pre-eminently in her history, a college of 
public spirit. The student catches the spirit of patriotic devotion to the 
public welfare as a duty, and the graduate feels that he owes something 
to his country. College spirit has always been identical with a high idea 
'of citizenship. , 

Associated with this patriotic ideal, is the conviction that leaders 
should be men of scholarship and sound character. The management 
has never faltered in that belief that a college faculty should be men of 
unquestionable character and highest ability. The college education 
shows itself in a patriotic citizenship, genuine manliness, sound scholar- 
ship and liberal culture. Under this ideal more than a thousand men 
have been graduated, and many times that number have pursued their 
courses in part. 

(896) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 897 

Miami University. 

Miami University is owned and operated by the State of Ohio, and 
in recent years favorable legislative action has given the institution more 
vigorous life than ever before. One of the new buildings is the gift of 
the late Senator Brice, and bears his name. Another bears the name of 
HoQ. John W. Herron, of Cincinnati, whose long and able services to 
the University have only been equalled by his generosity. 

The chapel in the east wing of the main building has recently been 
enlarged and improved, and, in memory of Robert H. Bishop, Jr., for 
many years Professor of Latin in the University, named "Bishop Chapel." 

The Hbrary occupies a part of the second floor of the main building, 
and consists of some 20,000 volumes, among which many rare old editions 
may be found. 

By the Seese Law, passed by the Legislature ot Ohio in Ivlarch, ?^'v?, 
two State Normal Schools were established, one of these at Miami Uni- 
versity. The law provides for its maintenance by a special tax lev}- on 
the grand list of the taxable property of the state. 

In September, 1902, the Normal School was opened, and a large 
number of students enrolled. 

Provision is being made for the erection of a dormitory for the ac- 
commodation of the young women. 

• In June, 1902, the Rev. Guy Potter Benton was unanimously elected 
president, and inaugurated September, 1902. 

The location is as healthful as can be found, and comprises fifty- 
seven acres of the most beautiful campus to be found in the west. 

Miami has never been a large institution when measured by her 
numbers, nor has she ever aspired to be such, but she has been great when 
measured by her men. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Name. 


Office. 


Hon. John W. Hejron, LL. D 

Anna J. Bishop 

fi- A IVTcSiirelv 


President. 
Secretary. 
Treasurer. 







57— B. A. 



898 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Miami University. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Name. - 


Appointed. 


Term 
Expires. 


Hon. Nelson W. Evans Portsmouth 


1896 

189G 

1896 

1896 

1896 

1896 

1896 

1900 

1900 

1899 

1899 

1899 

1899 

1899 

1899 

1899 

1899 

1900 

1893 

1893 

1893 

1893 

1895...... 

1900 

1902 

1902 

1903 


... .1905 


John M. Withrow, M. D., Cincinnati 


1905 


Theophilus R. Kumler, Esq., Oxford 


1905 


Hon, Elam Fisher, Eaton 


1905 


Horace A. Irvin, Esq., Dayton 


1905 


Hon. Wm. S. Giffen, Hamilton 


1905 


Hon. John W. Herron, LLf. D., Cincinnati 


1905 


Ml. Oakey V. Pan is] i. r«M iniiTO!' . -. 

waiter S. Thomas, Esq., Troy 


1905 

1905 


Hon. Samuel F. Hunt, LL. D., Glendale 


1908 


Clark B. Montgomery Esq. Cincinnati 


1908 


Mr. James R. Patterson Oxford 


1908 


David R. Silver M. D. ' Sidney 


1908 


Rev Daniel H Evans D D Youngstown 


1908 


Francis M. Coppock, Esq. Cincinnati 


1908 


Alex C. Sands, Jr., Cincinnati : 


1908 


Henry C. Taylor, Esq. Columbus 


1908 


Mr. George R. Eastman, Dayton 


1908 


James E. Morey Esq., Hamilton 


1911 


Nelson Sayler Esq. Cincinnati 


.. 1911 


Rev. David R. Moore D. D. South Salem 


1911 


John N. VanDeman Esq. Dayton 


1911 


Walter L Tobey Esq. Hamilton 


1911 


Rev George H. Fullerton D. D , Springfield 


1911 


LvIg S Evans Esa Chillicothe 


1911 


William F. Eltzroth Esq., Lebanon 


1911 


Substitute— Rev. Elihu Simpson, D.D., Belief on taine . . 


1911 



j EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

i T. R. Kumler, Oxford- 

1 J. E. Morey Hamilton 

i J. R. Patterson Oxford 

: W. L. Tobey Hamilton 

\ O. V. Parrish Hamilton 



THE WILBERFORCE UNIVERSITY. 



THE Wilberforce University, located in Greene County, near Xenia, 
Ohio, cannot be considered one of the state educational institu- 
tions, except that it has been receiving state assistance in es- 
tablishing and maintaining an industrial department since 1887. 
The University is for colored youth, and affords an opportunity for ex- 
tending industrial training to colored youth, such as is not found in other 
institutions in the state. 

The following brief history of this institution is a matter of historical 
value : 

On September 28, 1853, the Cincinnati Conference of the M. E. 
Church selected a committee which recommended "the establishment of a 
literary institution of high order for the education of colored people gen- 
erally;" and in May, 1856, "Tawawa Springs," a beautiful summer resort 
in Greene county, Ohio, w^as purchased, and Wilberforce University was 
organized. By concurrent action, the M. E. and A. M. E. Conferences 
of Ohio entered into co-operation for the success of the University. It 
was incorporated August 30, 1856, and a board of twenty-four trustees 
selected, including Governor Salmon P. Chase, President R. S. Rust, Ash- 
land Keith, of the colored Baptist denomination, and D. A. Payne ; and the 
broad principle adopted that there shall never be any distinction among 
the trustees, faculty or students, on account of race, colar or creed. 

The University began its work in October, 1856, under Rev. M. P. 
Gaddis, as principal. He was succeeded by Professor James K. Parker, 
and he by Dr. Richard S. Rust, the first presidcut. During the first epoch, 
which terminated with the Civil War, the number of students, largely 
the children of Southern planters, varied from seventy to one hundred. 
Commendable progress was made in literary culture. The War closed 
the school, and the M. E. Church withdrew from the field. 

On March 10, 1863, D. A. Payne purchased the property for $10,000, 
and associated with himself James A. Shorter and Professor John G. 
Mitchell, in the re-organizing of the University. It is the oldest college 
for negroes in this country. Congress in 1870 appropriated $25,000; 
Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase bequeathed $10,000; the Charles Avery 
estate added $10,000, and the American Unitarian Association gave for 
lectures $6,000 to the University. 

On March 19, 1887, the Legislature of the State of Ohio came to 
our aid, helping us in establishing a Normal and Industrial Department, 
and is appropriating now $17,000 per annum to the University. On Janu- 
ary 9, 1894, President Cleveland detailed Lieutenant John H. Alexander, 

(899) 



nn'^. «^«* : 



900 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

The Wilherforce University. 

a West Point graduate, to organize and instruct the Military Department 
of Wilberforce University, and the United States government is still main- 
taining this department. At the breaking out of the Spanish-American 
War, Wilberforce furnished some of the best negro soldiers that went to 
the front, a number of whom are fighting for the flag in the Philippines 
today. 

The University has received from all sources since organization 
$513,202.80. Six thousand and six negro youths have attended the Uni- 
versity, most of them coming from the South. Two hundred and sixty- 
six have graduated from our literary courses, and are now preaching 
and teaching in^the South, striving to help solve the race question. Two 
hundred and ten have grad'aatcJ fiv^in dxc limusuial Depcii Linen i, and 
are now engaged in the useful trades. It is the pride of the University 
that it has always been the aim and object to contribute her full share 
to the intellectual, moral, physical, and industrial uplift of the negro, and 
thereby assist in removing the standing menace to our American institu- 
tions — the race problem. 

OFFICERS. 
Rev. Joshua H. Jones, A. M., D. D. President. 

OFFICERS BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

Rt. Rev. Abraham Grant, D. D President. 

Rt. Rev. B. T. Tanner, D. D '. Vice-President. 

Rev. Horace Talbert, A. M Secretary. 

Rev. James P. Maxwell Treasurer. 

j EXECUTIVE BOARD. 
I 

I Rt. Rev. B. W. Arnett, D. D., LL. D President. 

; Rev. J. Coleman, D. D Vice-President. 

1 W. A. Anderson, A. M., Rt. Rev. B. F. Lee, D. D., Ph. D.. 

I . Rev. Charles S. Smith. H. H. Holland, Esq., 

i Rev. Horace Talbert, A. M. 

NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 
Prof. Joseph P. Shorter, A. M Superintend'*"^ 

OFFICERS BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

W. A. Galloway President. 

B. W. Amett Vice-President. 

A. J. DeHart Secretary. 

J. P. Maxwell Treasurer. 



PART EIGHT, 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



(901) 



TABLE OF CONTENTS— PART EIGHT. 



PAGE. 

Hanna Memorial Exercises 903 

Ohio at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition 914 

Commissions 916 



(902) 



HANNA MEMORIAL EXERCISES. 



ON April 20, 1904, the two Houses of the 76th General Assembly 
met in the hall of the House of Representatives, in memory of 
the life and services of Senator Marcus A. Hanna. Senator 
Charles Dick was orator of the day and delivered the follow- 
ing eulogy : 

Mr. President and Members of the Seventy-sixth General Assembly: 

Marcus A. Hanna was born September 24, 1837, in New Lisbon, Colum- 
biana County, Ohio, and died i^ Washington, February 15, 1904, in the dis- 
charge of Ills duliGS ar. Sencitcr ^-":r-^ ^^'- ■"•5tiyr> 319, e 

Standing in the presence of this splendid representation of the citizenship 
of Ohio; impressed with the deep significance of this occasion, I am also re- 
minded of the importance of events that go to make up the history of our 
commonwealth, and the character of the people who have maintained her 
standing in the front rank of the States which constitute our glorious and im- 
perishable Union. In the light of these recollections, crowned with garlands, 
of achievement and duty well performed, stand the towering personalities of 
those sterling types of American manhood whose accomplishments during the 
last century have made the history of Ohio identical with that of the nation 
itself. 

It is by no accident that Ohio has furnished so many distinguished sons to 
the nation, including Presidents, statesmen, military chieftains, lawyers, edu- 
cators, authors, artists, inventors, scientists and captains of industry. The 
cause is found largely in the circumstances of her birth and development, and 
in the character of her early settlers. 

If, as has been said, God sifted the whole world to find men worthy the 
high calling of founding a new nation, ns truly may it be said that all the 
original States of the Federal Union contributed to the making of Ohio, the 
first State of the nineteenth century, the first new State formed out of national 
territory. Here converged nearly all the early lines of continental travel. 
Here came the Puritan and the Cavalier, the Scotch-Irish, and those of pure 
Tei tonic and Gallic blood; Lutheran, Presbyterian^ Catholic and Quaker. Con- 
necticut bounded the State on the north, and Massachusetts, New" Jersey and 
Virginia on the south. New York. Pennsylvania and other States furnished 
generous contributions to her population. 

Of the new States which preceded her into the Union after the Revolution. 
Vermont was the offspring of New York and New Hampshire. Kentucky of 
Virginia, and Tennessee of North Carolina. Ohio was the first State to which 
the entire Union contributed, the first national territory raised to statehood. 
All of the original States gave from their best citizenship to build up the first 
State carved out of the Northwest Territory. Massachusetts founded the first 
settlement at Marietta, Connecticut peopled the Western Reserve, a New 
Jersey colony laid the beginnings of Cincinnati, much of the best blood of the 
States was filtered through New York from New England, Pennsylvania was 
a liberal contributor, and Virginia reserved a large tract to which came many 
of her Revolutionary soldiers and their descendants. The abolition of slavery 
drew to Ohio some of the best blood of the far South. Here, therefore, came 
all nationalities and all creeds, and they found not tolerance merely but 
equality in the sight of the law. The early use of federal troops to repress 
Indian uprisings in the State accustomed her citizens to the exercise of 
national authority. This Indian warfare held captive in Ohio for a time the 
determined rush of Western migration. Thus time was given these diverse 
elements to coalesce into one harmonious whole, and to form a type of stal- 
wart, intensely patriotic Americans. 

(903) 



904 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 



Hanna Manorial Exercises. 



Ohio is the neck of the hour-glass through which passed nearly all the 
streams of early migrations following the star of empire. All early railroads 
joining the East and the West crossed her boundaries and her territory. These 
circumstances also wielded a powerful and beneficent influence on the new 
commonwealth. We were debtors to all the States east of the Alleghanies. a 
debt Ohio has fully paid by sending out a million of her own sons in all direc- 
tions. They have proved worthy of her, and have given her added fame in all 
quarters of our country. 

Pioneers are the sturdiest, the most enterprising and most daring. By 
such people was Ohio settled. Of such stock and under such surroundings was 
Senator Hanna born. He was a type of that mixture of elements so character- 
istic of his State. In him commingled manj'- diverse strains of ancestry. 

His ancestors were pioneers. They were among the more hardy and 

venturesome spirits of the older settlements who followed the frontier as it 

receded westward. In his family is to be found Scotch-Irish, Cavalier and 

Puritan, Presbyterian and Quaker stock. While his parents were residents of 

Ohio, they traced tbeir descent t^^ Vn'ginia and Coz.r'^cti'"ut. lie ^^l^^z cci:: 

bined the best blood of Isorth ana Soum. His entire life, nowever, belonged 

to his native State. His public school training, his brief college days, his years 

in business and in the public service were spent in Ohio or in full view of the 

i people of his native State. He was in every sense a true son of Ohio, and 

I ranks with the noblest of the glorious company who have been proud to call 

I her Mother. 

i It was not Mr. Hanna's fortune to be born in poverty, nor did affluence in 

i early years hinder his growth and development. He belonged to the great 

Y , middle class of fairly well-to-do Americans, who are richest perhaps in their 

j descent from long lines of sturdy, intelligent. God-fearing ancestors. 

■ The father was a country physician, who left a good practice in eastern 

; Ohio, and moved farther west, to Cleveland, then a town of fair promise, and 

engaged in merchandising because of the wider field it offered for achieving 

success. In his father's store the future Senator received his first training in 

\ business. The beginnings were small but prosperous. He spent a year in the 

I Western Reserve College, with what benefit to himself he declared he never 

felt certain, though he doubtless builded more wisely than he. knew. He served 

a brief enlistment in the Union armies. The years which immediately fol- 

1 lowed were years of commercial upbuilding and expansion. His training was 

\ in the problems which confront the man of large affairs. 

Thus he spent nearly a lifetime in business and with scarcely a thought 
for other matters. By his hard common sense he won the confidence of his 
associates ar^d was a leader among them. He had the tremendous personal 
force of an aggressive mentality. He was as stalwart in mind as he was in 
tody. His strength lay largely in the directness of his methods. He was a 
masterful man, possessing at all times definite aims in life. He saw with a 
clear eye, and was able by force of intellect and character to make other men 
' think as he did. He was a man who accomplished results, a leader who led. 
I His business methods were conservative. He was never a speculator, except 

as all business is a venture. He was constructive, but not a promoter. 
I He developed great executive ability and built up large business enter- 

I prises which survive him. He selected his lieutenants, apportioned the work, 
I directed in a general way without burdening his mind with details, and looked 
I with confidence for results. He did not have the patience for infinite detail. 
I but the greater power of conceiving and executing great undertakings. His 
success was the result of long years of preparation. He commanded success 
I because he deserved it. 

1 He was a man of great heart and a most liberal benefactor. Growing 

I wealth developed in him the kindlier and more humane side. He gave freely 
j and cheerfully, but modestly and without parade. His charity was discrimi- 
1 Dating. 

I He will be most missed by the numerous charities in his home city to which 

' he was a generous contributor. Churches and hospitals without regard to 
creed enjoyed his aid, and to the practical Christianity of the Salvation Army 
he was more than generous. 

His relations with large bodies of workming men as employer sometimes 
led to differences which promised to result in the clash of industrial strife. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 905 

Hanna Memorial Exercises. 



The militant spirit was always strong within him and the prospect of a contest 
usually inviting, but he soon saw the great economic waste in strikes and 
lockouts. He discovered they were unnecessary. By frank and honest deal- 
ings with each other, by mutual understandings, by fair concessions honorably 
lived up to he dwelt on terms of harmony with his employes. He trusted 
them and they trusted him and by neither was that confidence betrayed. He 
was devoted and loyal to the interests of those who worked for him and that 
devotion and that loyalty was nobly repaid., He learned that labor could be 
trusted, that its engagements were sacredly observed. In one of his late public 
speeches before a large body of working men, many of them his own laborers, 
he declared that if he had ever injured anyone in his employ he would resign 
his seat in the Senate. That statement to this day has gone unchallenged. He 
stood in the way of business consolidations which would have added to his 
wealth for fear they would injure men who had grown gray in his service. 
In times of great business depression and industrial unrest the men who 
worked for him stood by their posts, because they knew Mr. Hanna was al- 
ways fair and generous with them and was paying as fair wages as the busi- 
iioob j ustiticu. 

The social instincts were strong in Mr. Hanna. He delighted in the com- 
pany of his friends, in entertaining them around his own table., Their number 
Was legion and they represented all the varied interests of human life. In the 
social circle he was most affable and genial, a most companionable man. In 
all the relations of home life he was most lovable. He was always interested 
in public matters and enjoyed the friendship of many public men long before 
he became a figure in national politics. He was a friend of Sherman and took 
an active interest in his campaigns. He was a friend of Garfield and gave him 
generous assistance. The political relation, however, which most beautified 
his life was his devotion to McKinley, Their friendship was of long standing 
and the tie betwen them strengthened with the years. Each was great enough 
to recognize the greatness of the other. Both were masterful men, both were 
leaders, but their processes and their methods were entirely different, Hanna 
was the strong, forceful elder brother, but he yielded to and was influenced 
largely by the gentle strength and tactful guidance of the other. The blow of 
McKinley's death fell on him with crushing force. 

Mr. Hanna spent a full complement of years in business pursuits. He was 
the architect of his own fortune and achieved success because he earned it. 
At a time when most men who have engaged in manufacturing or commerce 
think to retire he entered upon his real life work. It was in the years devoted 
to business, however, that his talent developed, his great executive capacity. 

His daily life was wholesome and clean, his pleasures were simple, his 
tastes natural. He was a most useful man to his community, but his mettle 
was yet untried. At three score years it remained to be demonstrated that 
Mr. Hanna was a born leader of men, a political general of great skill, an 
orator aiid statesman of high rank. 

With the shrewdness and insight -born of long experience and success in 
business and his intimate acquaintance with conditions in the commercial 
world, he foresaw the possible promotion of McKinley and seized the opportune 
time to push his candidacy for the Presidency. With the same far-seeing 
vision which marked his judment in business affairs he predicted the elevation 
of his chosen leader. Politics became for a time the passion of his life; his 
devotion was unselfish and unwavering. He laid his plans far in advance and 
organized his forces with consummate skill. No detail was too minute to be 
overlooked. He won a signal victory against political leaders tried on many 
hard-fought battlefields. The victory he won in the precouvention campaign 
of 189G was so complete that it obscured the magnitude of the struggle. Suc- 
cess was so overwhelming that one was tempted to forget there had been a 
struggle. No man who participated therein, however, could make that mis- 
take. 

A political campaign followed which alarmed the country and made busi- 
ness interests anxious. More money was offered him for the purpose of wag- 
ing the contest than could be used. The statement of his expenditures, how- 
ever, could safely have been disclosed to the whole world. 

That campaign was essentially a campaign of education. His motto was. 
"Thousands for education and organization, not one dollar for corruption." He 



906 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

Hanna Memorial Exercises. 



brought into politics the straightforward, open methods of Uie upright, God- 
fearing American business man. If this was an innovation in American poli- 
tics, it was to the great advantage of politics and the country. He believed 
that a political campaign should be managed like any other reputable business 
undertaking. He was honest, sincere and frank and won the confidence of the 
country. He was loyal to the interests of the party workers who helped him 
win victories and their devotion to him was unfaltering. If he married busi- 
ness to politics, it was because he brought to politics the same honesty, direct- 
ness and straightforwardness essential to business success. This country need 
never fear commercialism in politics as long as commercialism stands for 
Senator Hanna's methods and practices. Business men had been in politics 
before, but the advent of this business man with his frank, open methods came 
as a surprise and something of a shock to many party workers. He was a 
captain of industry who commanded his lieutenants. He was accustomed to 
say to this man. go, and he went; to another man, come, and he came. 

He managed campaigns the same way, and the innovation was not at first 
entirely acceptable. The ways of political managers had been looked upon as 
devious and secret; their cominp:^ aud goings subtcrranca,ix aim i.gc"<,..v,. fje 
brought dayiight into uark plactr», ouuuucced nis first national campaign as he 
planned and carried on industrial undertakings. The stockholders always had 
access to the books. This is a commercial era, and if he brought business 
methods into politics, who will say it has not been to the great advantage of 
politics ? 

In the national campaign of 189G he came under the fierce glare of public 
opinion, and was immediately seized upon as a fitting target for unmeasured 
abuse and vilification. He was unknown to the general public, which is only 
too eager to believe evil of any public man. The cartoonist and the para- 
grapher exhausted their resources in holding him up to public contempt. These 
poisoned arrows could not pierce his armor. No man enjoys abuse, and Mr. 
Hanna suffered because he was not understood; but he went his way serene, 
calm, cheerful, and undisturbed. Kindlier feelings and a more generous appre- 
ciation succeeded to distrust and malignity. Vituperation and abuse recoiled 
from him. He outlived all calumny, and it was his good fortune to live to see 
I the shafts of malice blunted and turned back on his assailers. For eight years 

I the strong searchlight of infinite inquiry was focused upon him. but nothing 

mean or small was ever disclosed. The honesty of his life and the purity of 
his motives were admitted even by those who differed with him 'politically. 
His life was an open book, every page as clean as the first. 

The only political office Mr. Hanna ever held, except membership in the 
! school board of the city of his adoption, was a seat in the United States Senate. 

I President McKinley offered Mr. Hanna a place in his cabinet; this he declined. 

I He was appointed by Governor Bushnell to fill the vacancy caused by Senator 

j Sherman's appointment as Secretary of State^ and was endorsed by the State 

i convention of his party for election to the seat. He was still serving his first 

I full term and had been elected to another when his life was closed. The con- 

1 trast between the circumstances attending his two elections marks the prog- 

ress of popular knowledge of the man. In both campaigns he was endorsed 
by the Sta.te Convention of his party, the nearest approach perhaps to election 
to the Senate by direct vote of the people. At the first election the margin 
of party success was narrow, but apparently entirely sufficient, imtil faction 
raised its poisoned head within his own party. During the campaign there 
were no open evidences of the treachery that was working under cover. After 
the election the conspirators threw off the mask. It was a base plot against the 
will of the people regularly expressed. Men high in the confidence of the 
party and enjoying honors at its hands joined to defeat the expressed will of 
the people. There was no scheme too desperate to be resorted to. The in- 
tensity and bitterness of that struggle no one can appreciate who was not a 
part of it. It required an uprising of the people in their majesty and wrath 
to register the verdict which they had instructed at the polls. By resolutions 
and delegations and informally appointed committees they assailed those who 
were dallying with dishonor or were listening to golden-tongued tempters. The 
people spoke and in no uncertain terms. They did not speak in vain; Senator 
Hanna was elected by a majority of one vote and the State was spared the 
misfortune and worse of violated instructions and tainted honor. Six years 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 907 

Hanna Memorial Exercises. 

later he was a candidate for re-election. The State convention again declared 
him the nominee of his party. The difference between his two elections to the 
United States Senate indicates his siy years' growth in public regard. In that 
time he had become the unquestioned leader and idol of his party. He was the 
most sought for man on the stump for several campaigns. His meetings were 
thronged by enthusiastic followers. They were never larger or more enthusi- 
astic than in his last campaign. The result was an overwhelming personal 
triumph; he was returned to the United States Senate by the largest majority 
ever given in this body. You witnessed that triumph and know how gratifying 
it was to him. 

It is given to few men who have been reviled and persecuted as he was to 
enjoy such a complete reversal of sentiment and to close their days in the full 
sunlight of public confidence and esteem. Public sentiment seemed to desire 
to make atonement for its early injustice and so lavished upon him an ap- 
probation and affection which few Americans have enjoyed to so great a de- 
gree. All misunderstanding had passed away. His honesty and sincerity and 
purity of motives were recognized of all men. He had conquered all miscon- 
ception, and the years to come promised happiness without alloy, for hp hn.l 
won the universal regard and esteem of his leliow-meu. 

When Senator Hanna first entered the Capitol at Washington the atmos- 
phere had not been . cleared of suspicion, but his unassuming manner, his 
frankness and geniality soon dissipated all distrust and won the respect and 
cordial friendship of his colleagues, which in many cases ripened into deep 
affection. Some of his warmest friends were on the other side of the wall of 
party politics. He won his way to commanding inbflence there by the soundness 
of his judgment and the confidence he inspired. 

He was willing to do hard work. The large part he took in helping to 
frame the schedules of the Dingley tariff law is known to but comparatively 
- few. He rarely took part in debate, but when he did, he spoke with a full 
knowledge of his subject and with a force and earnestness which carried con- 
viction. 

His greatest legislative achievement was in changing a hostile majority 
against the Panama route for an isthmian canal into a decisive majority in its 
favor. The country was commited to another plan; the claims of another 
route had been written into party platforms, and he was told that his efforts 
would be futile. When he entered upon this contest few members of Congress 
agreed with him. He made a study of the subject with all his energy and 
gave it patient, painstaking eocamination. Having convinced himself, he 
started out to convince the Congress and the country. He made the contest 
with all the zeal and energy of his strong nature. When he spoke, it was the 
successful business man of large affairs who addressed his hearers upon a 
purely business proposition. His speech in the Senate of the United States 
was a most convincing presentation of the advantages of the Panama route. 
The country, as well as Congress, when the final judgment was reached, was 
converted to his views and no one longer seriously questions the soundness 
of that position. The canal will be built at Panama and will be his greatest 
monument. No more signal personal and legislative triumph has ever been 
won in the Congress of the United States. 

His courage never showed to greater advantage than in his efforts to 
upbuild an American merchant marine. Largely owing to his efforts a ship- 
ping bill passed the Senate but has never succeeded in the House of Repre- 
sentatives. Despite strong prejudice against the measure he was unfailing in 
his support. He believed the opposition was largely due to misunderstanding. 
He was challenged to advocate the measure in the last campaign in Ohio. 
i The challenge was boldly accepted. He presented his views fearlessly. The 

i result vindicated his judgment and his courage. The people do desire our 

flag restored to the seas. 

Senator Hanna was not merely a scholar; he was more than that; he was 
a thinker who did not permit others to think for him, and he put his best 
thoughts in his daily life. True, he held no diploma from college or academy, 
but he was graduated from the greater university of experience, whose lessons 
and teachings supplement all other education. 

Senator Hanna had no training in the art of public speaking. He never 
undertook an extended address until after he reached three score years. He 



908 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

Hanna Memorial Exercises. 

was not an orator in the sense that polished paragraph and stately languas^e 
^ " . makes an orator, and he never prepared a set speech. When first he attempted 
to speak in public he spoke haltingly and hesitatingly, but practice gave him 
power. He developed amazingly in the faculty of apt and forceful expression. 
Much speaking gave him ease and self-confidence. He developed the power that 
was within him and became a convincing speaker. He believed what he said 
and said it in a way that carried conviction. When he spoke it was from a 
full heart and a mind richly stored with his subject. He talked the speech of 
common, every-day life, the vernacular of the plain people; and he talked to 
them, not over them. He had the gift of homely phrase, and these phrases 
often crystalized into campaign cries. He used language to express thought, 
not to conceal it; speech was given him not to hide truth, but to proclaim it. 
Few public speakers have been more popular, have drawn larger audiences, or 
moved them more profoundly. So we may say that if oratory is the power of 
carrying conviction to the hearts of one's hearers and giving them a message 
which will endure, then Senator Hanna was an orator of no mean rank.^ 

It has been given to no other American to win as great fame as he did in 
the diverse field;:: of business a^'i p..ntic<5. or to vr^'^\e v^" >>:m-c'ir '^c i^/rt^ng a 
name in such a brief space of time. But Senator Hanna was not satisfied: his 
greatest ambition lay in another direction, and he will probably be remembered 
longest for the work he did in bringing labor and capital to a better under- 
standing of each other. The greatest good he did was w^hat he accomplished 
and tried to accomplish to solve the great industrial problem. His greatest 
service there lay in making labor and capital better acquainted. He w^as the 
great peacemaker. In this field there is no one to take his place, no one so 
high as he in the confidence of interests which oppose each other because they 
do not understand each other. He had accomplished much in this direction 
and was arranging to devote his energies and time to this magnificent object. 
No man was better qualified for the task than he, for he had been a large em- 
ployer of labor and had been most successful in maintaining friendly relations 
with his own employes. His first efforts toward conciliation were looked at 
with suspicion; men on both sides feared he had some ulterior end in view, 
that he sought some political advantage, but the sincerity of his motives could 
not long be doubted and his unselfish aim was soon understood by all. He- 
was as honest and frank in this field of activity as in everything else he un- 
dertook. He realized the folly of industrial warfare, and felt there was no more 
reason why labor and capital should quarrel than that the sacredness of the 
family ties should be broken by domestic quarrels. He helped to organize 
the Civic Federation, and was one of its leading spirits and most active and 
valuable members. The immense good he accomplished in reconciling labor 
differences is a story that has not yet been told. When it is fully known. Sena- 
tor Hanna will be recognized even more than now as one of the greatest 
I benefactors of his time. He was succeeding because he was frank and fair. 

1 because he was bringing labor and capitol into more intimate relations and 

I enabling them to understand each other. He was a man of wealth himself, 

[ but he never lost sympathy with labor. His interest in all his fellow-men 

! ' was genuine and sincere. No missionary ever went forth with higher ideals 

I for the service of mankind or with a truer love for his suffering brother than 

I actuated Senator Hanna in his crusade for a better understanding between 

I those interests which should go arm in arm with each other and which would 

I not be in conflict if they understood each other. 

I It is given to few men to complete the tasks set before them. Man's plans 

1 are not Often God's plans. Lincoln saw the end of armed strife, but it was not 

given his sublime patience to solve the trying problems which followed. We 
had not yet drunk the cup of bitterness to the dregs. McKinley saw the end 
of armed opposition to our national authority at the close of another war, but 
was taken away, leaving many vital problems unsolved. 

Mr. Hanna did much; few men did so much in such a brief term, but his 
greatest task lay before him. Business s^^ccess and political preferment be- 
■ came to him means to an end. He felt the necessity of saner methods for set- 
tling disputes between labor and capital. He devoted himself to the cause of 
industrial peace and Focial justice. To this great end he had consecrated the 
rest of his life, and had arranged his business affairs that they need no longer 
engage his attention. He repeatedly declared he would rather settle the labor 
problem than be President. 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 909 

Hanna Memorial Exercises. 



He had no secret longings for other political honors. He was not a candi- 
date for the Presidential nomination. He was great enough to put aside any 
such ambition and was never greater than in resisting the flattery of those 
who would have made him a national standard bearer. He refused to promise 
the use of his name in connection with it. The public will know but little of 
the great pressure brought to bear upon him to accept this crown, nor did he, 
like Caesar, refuse each time with less and less insistence. He was firm to 
the last, because he felt he was following the path in which his duty lay. He 
had given his word he would not be a candidate, and with the fidelity which 
distinguished his life he kept the faith. This, however, did not discourage the 
support of his friends nor dampen the enthusiasm which existed for him in 
all parts of the country. No American citizen ever yet, however, resisted the 
call of his party to be its candidate for President. Had he lived and taken 
his seat in the next National Convention of his party at the head of the dele- 
•gation from his own State, who can tell where the unbounded enthusiasm of 
his hosts of friends and admirers and the demands of the hour would have car- 
ried thai body? 

No man ever grew so rapidly in influence and power, and no man who 
entered politics so late in life ever rose so high. Success and high station 
in politics as a rule come only to those who have served an apprenticeship in 
lower places. 

He sprang full panoplied and equipped into the arena of national activity. 
We seek for comparisons, but none can be made because no man achieved so 
great success who was in public life so short a time as he was. No other man 
who wrought in the double field of industry and politics ever achieved so great 
a success in both. He applied the straightforward, honest methods of up- 
right business dealings to affairs of party and of State. The country was sur- 
prised, doubted, and then applauded. He revolutionized politics by putting it 
on a business basis. He interested business in politics to the distinct advant- 
age of the latter. 

He was distinctly the product of his day and generation, a typical Ameri- 
can of the latter part of the nineteenth century. He was constructive in poli- 
tics and in legislation as he was in business. He was interested in building 
up instead of tearing down. 

Mr. Hanna's response to his physicians' appeal to help them, made in his 
last illness, was characteristic of the man, "I'll do the best I can." He always 
did the best he could, always contended with all his might. He was the sturdy 
fighter who waged war not merely to win but to overwhelm his antagonist. 
While he did not seek such conflicts, he did not avoid them. Once involved. 
the martial spirit in him rose to battle pitch. He fought in the open, gave hard 
blows, and took them manfully. 

He fought to conquer and to conquer overwhelmingly, but truce declared 
and peace effected, he harbored no resentment and punished no enemies. He 
not merely forgave — he forgot. True, he was not satisfied with a narrow 
margin of victory; it must be decisive. Even when success was absolutely 
assured, he did not relax his efforts in the least. This feeling was misunder- 
stood and led to misconception, and was the great source of the excess of cari- 
cature from which he suffered. He needed only to be thoroughly known to be 
vindicated of all charges. 

Measure him from whatever point you choose, his sturdy honesty shines 
pre-eminent. The arts of the demagogue he scorned. He hated all shams and 
artifice,. He had no secret, dark-chamber method of achieving results. He 
did not win by intrigue. He worked in the open; his methods might at any 
time have been laid bare to the gaze of the world. There was no secret in 
his handling of men. He was honest, frank, sincere, sympathetic, friendly. 
He was direct in his methods and masterful in his dealings. His friendships 
were not confined within the narrow circle of party politics, for he gained the 
admiration and respect of those who would not agree with him. His honesty 
and sincerity no one could doubt. 

If he was devoted to any cause it was on account of its righteousness and 
justice, as he viewed it. He never concealed personal and selfish aims under 
the guise of advocating public measures. He was frank and open in his rela- 
tions to all legislation. He did not look to the shifting weather-vane of public 
opinion to find direction to guide his steps. What seemed right to him he 



910 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

Hanna Memorial Exercises. 



did. He never lacked the courage of his convictions. He was modest and 
unassuming; he never sought applause and never carried himself to be seen 
of men. lit; won no victories on the field of battle, he did not fill the seat of 
highest authority, but he was a pillar of the State. 

He was to a marked degree a well-balanced man, a man sane in all the 
relations of life. It follows that he was hopeful and optimistic. Cheerfulness 
and good nature were the very essence of his being. He bore with him at all 
times the atmosphere of love and sunshine. He was square, brave, and true, 
a great, tender-hearted manly man. No one was ever deceived by his bluffness 
of speech when the beaming eye and kindly smile belied the -sense of his 
words. The catholicity of his interests and sympathies was as boundless as 
his charities. He had some faults that are common to most men, but he pos- 
sessed virtues so rare as to challenge recognition and admiration. He was at 
all times a man of deep and abiding convictions of mind and heart. 

The enthusiasm and devotion he awakened are only possible to strong men. 
As he was loyal to others, so were his friends loyal to him. Those who knew 
him best loved him most. Thp Old Guard was not more faithful to Napoleon 
thRT! f^^v?t(?i' Hanna'G riieudci to iiim. 

No man who made so brief a passage across the theater of our national 
life ever left a stronger impress on his day and age in every walk of life in 
which he took an interest. It is too soon to determine his rightful place in 
the Valhalla of our national heroes, but it is certain that the impartial biog- 
rapher will record him a great party leader, a statesman of high rank, a patriot 
of purest loyalty. 

That I can not be mistaken in my estimate of this man is proven by some 
expressions of regard and affection spoken by his colleagues in the Senate. 

Senator Piatt, of Connecticut, said: 

♦ * * "when Marcus A. Hanna died all the people mourned with a grief 
that was deep and unfeigned. Something in his life and character had en- 
deared him to all classes. What that something was it is difficult to say, but 
we know it was given to but few men in this world to inspire such respect 
and affection as did our deceased comrade and brother." 

Senator Cullom, of Illinois, said: 

'|In the death of Senator Hanna one of the most remarkable men of our 
country has passed away. He had an extraordinary career, a career that chal- 
lenged the admiration of the people without regard to section or partisanship." 

Senator Fairbanks, of Indiana, said: 

"Marcus A. Hanna was one of the foremost Americans, one of the most 
eminent members of this great forum. He achieved place and power through 
no mere caprice of accident. He forged his way to the point of vantage oc- 
cupied when he laid down his responsibilities by the strength of his own genius 
and by virtue of arduous deeds done." 

Senator Elkins, of West Virginia, said: 

♦ * * "he became next to the President himself, the dominating force in 
party affairs, and after the death of his lamented friend unquestionably the 
most popular man in our business and national life." 

Sentor Depew, of New York, said: 

♦ * * "Hanna. the party organizer, the party leader, the President 
maker, the Senator and the statesman." 

Senator Daniel, of Virginia, said: 

"He was at the time of his death the most conspicuous and most in- 
fluential of the public men in the service of the country." 

Senator Kearns, of Utah, said: 

"His life is the ideal for which the youth of our country should strive. In 
his intercourse with men he was all that stands for sterling manhood, and 
he surrounded his home with a halo of purity and love." 
■Senator Blackburn, of Kentucky, said: 

"It is not more than just to say of him that at the end of his six or seven 
years of public service he held in greater measure than any living American 
statesman the confidence of all classes. He was a man of :^ufficient power 
and force to have made and left his impress upon any Senate that this 
country has ever known." 

Day upon day he grew in intellect, vigor and political strength, until 
he was the recognized leader of his party and a great Senator. In reaching 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. , 911 

Hanna Memorial Exercises. 



this eminence he never crawled an inch; he went there as the eagle goes to 
mountain top. Dignified but not ostentatious; franlv but not blunt; reserved 
but not austere; patient and laborious, he conquered all conditions; surmounted 
all obstacles, and survived all vicissitudes. Each day added to the charm 
of his manner, the force of his eloquence, the completeness of his logic, and his 
grasp upon public affairs. He became the wonder of his colleagues, while 
he attracted the admiration of his countrymen. 

As a citizen Mr. Hanna was in sympathy with all influences which tend 
to good citizenship. While he was keenly alive to merit the commendation 
of his fellow-citizens, his duty to the state was the dominating thought of his 
mind. He was sincere and courageous, and avoided the use of political art to 
secure his advancement. He walked among his people an able, modest, force- 
ful man, worthy the confidence of his fellow-men. His fidelity and honesty of 
purpose will ever invite the attention of the student of his marvelous career. 

Mr. Hanna was imbued with the genius of our institutions. His love of 
country was largely developed; his love of her institutions was still more so. 
Be believed cui fni^ii of govoT-i^ment met the needs of mankind, and was per- 
manent in its ability to develop human capabilities; that the principal degree 
was the foundation of genuine liberty; that it was the acme of human gov- 
ernmental intelligence. 

He worshipped law and the Author of law. Mr. Hanna had unbounded 
faith in the people; he sought their education that they might be better able to 
comprehend the duties of citizenship and to more fully understand the respon- 
sibilities which it imposed upon them. His aim was their education and 
honesty, fidelity, self-respect, courage, devotion and patriotism, that thereby 
they would not only be able to detect the unwholesome theories of the sophist, 
but the more dangerous methods of the demagogue, and courageously thwatr 
their purposes. 

Yesterday was the anniversary of the battle of Lexington and Concord; on 
that day the embattled farmers first fired the shot heard round the world, 
which marked the beginning of an armed conflict that was not to cease until 
a new state had been recognized among the family of nations — a state de- 
voted to liberty and the rights of man. Today we commemorate one who 
traced his descent from a brave soldier of that war, and who was himself 
in every fiber a patriot and a lover of his country, for Senator Hanna was an 
intensely patriotic American. He believed that Lexington and Bunker Hill 
were as heroic as Thermopylae; that Yorktown had greater infltience upon 
the progress of the world than Waterloo; that Sedan was far less significant 
than Gettysburg: that Magna Charta was not greater than the Declaration of 
Independence; that Washington and Lincoln and Garfield and Grant and :\Ic- 
Kinley were incomparably greater benefactors of the human race than Alex- 
ander and Caesar and Napoleon. 

He believed that the soldiers who followed Washington and Grant fought 
in causes holier than the Crusades and for principles as lasting as truth. He 
believed that the American flag stands today for the grandest story of prog- 
ress in the history of the world and for the greatest recorded triumphs of 
civilization for the highest intelligence and the loftiest purposes, for boundless 
opportunities, for the broadest liberty, personal, religious and political, for 
freedom, for justice, for education, for progress, for right and for righteous- 
ness; in short, that it stands for the best government among men. 

He believed that in the record for past success rested the assurance of the 
future progress of his country, and that Lincoln at Gettysburg delivered an 
eternal prophecy when he declared that "this Nation, conceived in liberty 
and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal, and that gov- 
ernment of the people, by the people and for the people shall not perish from 
the earth." 

My friends, these walls had scarcely ceased to echo the applause which 
greeted Senator Hanna's triumphant re-election to the T'nited States Senate. 
when there followed days of declining health and illness which did not at first 
alarm, but soon awakened fear of the final outcome. When he was stricken 
the people watched through saddened days and nights for news from his bod- 
side, where hope and despair alternated in quick succession. In a conflict with 
disease which brought out the courage and determination and hopefulness of 
the patient. Senator Hanna met an adversary he could not conquer. At last 
the end came. His mighty heart ceased to beat. Millions were in tears; a 
Nation mourned. 



912 ' t:6e biographical annals of ohio. 

Hanna Memorial Exercises. 



The President and Cabinet, Ambassadors, judges of the Supreme Court, 
Senators, Congressmen, generals, admirals, governors of States, legislators, 
State officials, municipal officers and captains of industry attended his funeral 
services. Manufacture in his native State paused; commerce and transporta- 
tion stood still; the busy hum of machinery and industry was hushed, the miner 
laid down his tools, labor in all callings ceased its work, and all men bowed 
their heads in memory of the man whose loss they mourned. The State had 
lost its first citizen, his party its acknowledged leader, the country a patriot 
and statesman. 

And so he passed away in the fullness of his influence and his powers, in 
the full possession of his splendid faculties, in the midst of a public career 
which gave promise of even larger usefulness, secure also in the knowledge 
that he was known and honored by his country; that all misunderstanding 
and misconception had passed away; looked up to by one vast set of interests 
as its shield and by another as its sincere friend and true adviser. 

In closing I place this wreath from a dear friend upon his resting place: 

We imo^ net v.liy -^r friend was taken away. 

God's ways are not our ways. 

His death made a vacancy which will remain unfilled. 

He left the example of his life — a rich heritage. 

The enduring love of his countrymen crowns his memory. 

As when some stately vessel sails away 

Full-rigged and masted for the wind and tide 

Beyond the curving confines of the day. 

Where cloud walls rise, and unseen perils hide; 

And when in silhouetted majesty 

She stands, full many statures of a man. 
Is seen her greatness and her symmetry — 

Her wondrous adaption for the plan, 

Till she has crossed the bar of human sight, , 

Where blend the boundaries of sea and sky; 

When all other craft seems small, and blight 
Of insignificance aggrieves the eye. 

So passed Mark Hanna to another world; 

So sailed his spirit, mighty, staunch and true; 
» Well-built and ready, with each sail unfurled, 

And with a world's best wishes for his crew. 

tf 
With freight of kindly deeds, beyond a price; 

Of patience, and unselfish simple good; 
Of charity, and willing sacrifice; 

Of love that made for common brotherhood. 

Would we could hear the greeting and acclaim 
Upon the other shore! From dome to dome 

Will ring the welcome to his honored name; 

So loved by all: "Mark Hanna, Welcome Home!'* 



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S. B. RANKIN. 



OHIO AT THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION. 



UNDER an Act passecT May 12th, 1902, by the General Assembl\' 
of the State of Ohio, the following named gentlemen were ap- 
pointed by Governor George K. Nash as Commissioners to the 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition : 

W. F. Burden Columbus 

L. E. Holden . . : Cleveland 

D. H. Moore .', Athens 

David Friedman Caldwell 

N. K. Kennon -...St. Clairsville 

M. K. Gantz Troy 

Hon. Edwin Hagenbuch ' Urbana, O. 

The Governor appointed S. B. Rankir. of South Charleston, Execu- 
tive Commissioner from Ohio. The Commission met soon after appoint- 
ment, and organized by electing W. F. Burdell President, and L. E. 
Holden, Vice-President. 

(914) 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 915 



Ohio at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 



• The plans of F. L. Packard, Architect, of Columbus, were accepted 
for an Ohio State Building to be erected on the Exposition grounds, 
and -contract let to the Smith & Eastman Company, of St. Louis, to build 
same according to plans adopted, and one of the most beautiful of all the 
State Buildings was erected as the home of Ohio Visitors, It is arranged 
and conducted for the comfort of its guests. Everything for their con- 
venience is provided. Besides a sitting and wash rooms for the ladies, 
a. clean, wholesome and quiet rest room, containing comfortable cots 
supplied with immaculate linen is ever ready for overtired women, and 
many there are who take advantage of this room. The gentlemen's side 
contains sitting and wash rooms. In the sitting room box couches are 
provided lor the coiuenicncc cf ti^ed ^-peri -specially rldeilr n:cn. In- 
stead of a rest room, a ''Den" or smoking room, in Dutch furnishings, is 
provided for the gentlemen. Comfortable writing rooms, well equipped 
with stationery at all times, are at the disposal of visitors. Other con- 
veniences as follows : Postoffice, Registration Book, enabling one to keep 
track of- friends and acquaintances. Check Room, wdiere articles of all 
kinds can be left without charge, Local and Long Distance Telephone, and 
an Information Bureau, where one can arrange for rooms, have arranged 
an itinerary for doing the Fair, and all kinds of information regarding 
the arrival and departure of trains, connections, etc. Uniformed Mes- 
sengers are always in attendance, to direct or accompany visitors unac- 
quainted with the grounds. On the second floor for the use of Clubs and 
Societies is a beautiful assembly room. In fact, everything for the com- 
fort and convenience of Ohio visitors has been studied and provided. The 
Ohio Building is admirably situated on what is known as the "Plateau 
of States," on a slight incline leading to the great Exhibition Palaces. 
Fine shade trees on three sides of the building. It faces a sloping grove, 
and in the rear, beautiful ''Forest Park" stretches far to the -eastward. 
The air at the building is therefore always pure and invigorating and 
the broad verandas, well supplied withvCasy chairs, afford a cool and re- 
freshing place of rest. The Commission arranged with Prof. Edward 
Orton, Jr., of the Ohio State University, for a Mineral Exhibit, with tlic 
result that Ohio's exhibit is one of the best in the Mines and Metallurgy 
Building, and the clay exhibit is considered one of the best on the grounds. 
This exhibit was collected and arranged under the guidance of Prof. 
Orton by Mr. Ellsworth Ogden, a pupil of the Ohio State University, 
who has had full charge of the exhibit. The State Archaeological and 
Historical Society has made some valuable discoveries lately in explor- 
ing the villages and graves of that strange and prehistoric people, the 
Mound Builders, and the display at the World's Fair is the largest and 
most interesting ever made by this organization. The exhibit is under 
the care of Prof. William C. Mills, of Columbus, Ohio. Ohio's repre- 



916 THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 

Ohio at the Louisiana Purchase Expositioji. 

sentation by private exhibitors is perhaps greater than any other. Her 
Coal, Iron and Oil, , as well as her Manufacturers take the lead, and 
justly makes proud Ohio visitors to. that greatest and most beautiful 
creation ever attempted by man, the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 



THE OHIO COMMISSION. 

Hon. Wm. F. Burdell, President *. Columbus, O. 

Hon. L. E. Holden, Vice-President Cleveland, O. 

Hon. S. B. Rankin, Executive Commissioner South Charleston, O. 

Hon. D. H. Moore Athens, O. 

Hon. Edwin Hagenbusch XJrbana, O. 

Hon. M. K. Gantz, Trov. O. 

Mr. Newell K. Kennon ^t. Cliiii bville, 0. 

Mr. David Friedman Caldwell, O. 

EMPLOYEES OF THE OHIO BUILDING. 

G. F. Mitchell, Custodian '. Marietta, O. 

Mrs. G. F. Mitchell. Housekeeper .Marietta, O. 

B. J. Ruetenik, Assistant to Executive Commissioner Cleveland, O. 

E. W. Bowers, Registrar Cleveland, O. 

Frank Johnson, Information Bureau Washington C, H., O. 

Alex! Nelson, Information Bureau Glouster, O. 

\, W. S. Cowan, Postmaster St. Clairsville, O. 

[ H. M. Crow, Asst. Postmaster Caldwell, O. 

i Simeon Gray, Check Room Caldwell, O. 

I George Hagenbuch, Check Room Urbana, O. 

1 Ellsworth Ogden, Mineral Exhibit Columbus, O. 

\ W. F. Gavin. Watchman Troy, O. 

I A. L. McFarland, W^atchman St. Clairsville, O. 

1 Frank Stevens, Messenger Shepardstown, O. 

\ W. E. Ketter. Messenger Marietta, O. 

; H. Nixon, Messenger St. Paris, O. 

B. Woodbury, :Messenger , Columbus, O. 

H. H. Sisson, Messenger Nelsohville, O. 

I Clifford Reichart, ?klessenger Troy, O. 

I Thomas Howard. Attendant Columbus, O. 

1 Mrs. Thomas Howard, Maid Columbus. O. 

j Edward Hawkins, Porter Urbana, O. 

\ Alfred Gibson, Porter. . : Troy, O. 

i. 

1 VICKSBURG MONUMENT COMMISSION. 

j ' • 

I Appointed. 

1 J. B. Allen, Athens September 29, 1900 

[ E. Z. Hays, Coshocton September 29, 1900 

W. P. Gault, Columbus September 29, 1900 

I Charles Hipp. St. Marys September 29, 1900 

James Kilbourne, Columbus January 6, 1902 

Wm. H. Rayner, Toledo May 27, 1903 

OHIO STATE BOARD OF UNIFORM STATE LAWS. 

S. S. Wheeler, Lima June G, 1902. to June 5. 1005 

Wm. E. Gushing, Cleveland June 5. 1903, to June 5, 1900 

Francis B. James, Cincinnati June 24, 1904 to June 5, 1907 



i 



THE BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF OHIO. 917 



I 



i 



i 



Ohio at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition. 



STATE TUBERCULOSIS COMMISSION. 

J. H. Outhwaite, Columbus : September IG, 1902 

Max Senior, Cincinnati ". September IG, 1902 

Chas. E. Slocum, Defiance September IG, 1902 

J. M. Rusk, McConnellsville September IG, 1902 

S. S. Knabenshue, Toledo September IG, 1902 

J. Warren Smith, Columbus September IG, 1902 

G. C. Ashmun, Cleveland September IG, 1902 



COMMISSION TO MARK POSITIONS OCCUPIED BY OHIO TROOPS ON 
BATTLEFIELD OF ANTIETAM. 

Appointed. 

Wells W. Miller, Castalia June 11, 1902 

p. H. KiLr^^>--]:, • '-ve^H,..!. . Jui... 11, 1902 

J. T. Moore, Barnesville June 11, 1902 

David Cunningham, Cadiz June 11, 1902 

E. T. Naylor, Tiffin December 5, 1903 



COMMITTEE TO REPORT ON FEASIBILITY AND DESIRABILITY OF THE 

STATE CALLING FOR, TREATING AND EDUCATING CRIPPLED 

AND DEFORMED CHILDREN. 

A. B. Voorhees, Cincinnati December 10, 1902 

Dr. E. C. Brush, Zanesville December 10, 1902 

Rev. John Hewitt, Columbus December 10, 1902 

Dr. Chas. E. Sawyer, Marion December 10, 1902 

A. L. Spitzer, Toledo December 10, 1902 



COMMISSION TO ASSIST OHIO ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SO- 
CIETY IN CONDUCTING OHIO CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 
OF OHIO INTO THE UNION AS A STATE. 

J. Warren Keifer, Springfield June 19, 1902 

Rush R. Sloan, Sandusky .June 19, 1902 

R. B. Cowen, Cincinnati June 19, 1902 

David S. Gray, Columbus June 19, 1902 

James Barnett, Cleveland June 19, 1902 

Charles M. Anderson, Greenville. June 19; 1902 

Robert W. ' Manley, Chillicothe June 23, 1902 



3596