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Full text of "Biographical directory of the tax-payers and voters of McHenry County : containing also a map of the county, a condensed history of the state of Illinois, an historical sketch of the county, its towns and villages, an abstract of everyday laws of the state, a business directory, officers of societies, lodges and public officers, a department of general information for farmers, dairymen, etc., etc"

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977-322 
B52 



HISTORY SURVEY, 
IIDHARY 






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.3 s 



Map of M? HENRT 

..K -v-^ v / f\ \AiAt ix i~~ r^ f 



BY C. WALKER 

R-6.E. 







COUNTY Illinois 



CO. CHICAGO. 




BIOGRAPHICAL DIRECTORY 



TAX-PAYERS AND VOTERS 



McHEKRY COUNTY; 



CONTAINING ALSO 



A Map of the County; a Condensed History of the State of Illinois ; 
an Historical Sketch of the County, its Towns and Villages; 
an Abstract of Every-day Laws of the State ; a Busi- 
ness Directory; Officers of Societies, Lodges 
and Public Officers ; a Department of 
General Information for Farmers, 
Dairymen, Etc., Etc. 



CHICAGO : 

C. WALKER & CO. 

1877. 



7, 3 



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1876, by 

C. WALKER &. CO., 

in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



CUtVEH, PAOE, HOYNE * CO., 



CONTENTS. 



IIISIOKH Al,. 

PAGES 

State of Illinois 5-29 

General History of McHenry County 77-89 



History of Algonquin Township., 
" Village of Algonquin.. 

Alden Township 

Burton Township 

Chemung Township... 

Village of Harvard 

Coral Township 

Dorr Township.. 



99 

City of Woodstock 100-105 

Dunham Township 105 

Grafton Township 106 

Greenwood Township 107 

Hebron Township 108 

Hartlauii Township 109 

Marengo Township 110 

McHenry Township 111-113 

Nunda Township 113-114 

Richmond Township 115-116 

Rtley Township 117 

Seneca Township 117-119 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 



Bills of Exchange and Promissory Notes- 
Interest 

Descent 

Wills and Estates of Deceased Persons 

Taxation 

Jurisdiction of Courts 

County Courts 

Limitation of Action 

Bights of Married Women 

Exemptions from Forced Sales 

Deeds and Mortgages 

Estray 

Game 

Weights and Measures 

Fences 



29 
29 
30 
31 
32 
32 
33 
33 
33 
34 
34 
35 
36 
36 

. 37-40 
Boads 40-43 



Marks and Brands.. 

Landlord and Tenant 

Of Subscriptions to Books 

Forms of Notes, Orders, Receipts, etc.. 

General Form of Agreement 

With Clerk for Services 

Bills of Sale , 

Bonds 

Chattel Mortgages 

Lease of Farms and Buildings 

" A House 

Landlord's Agreement 

Tenant's Agreement 

Nqtice to Quit 

Tenant's Notice of Leaving , 

Real Estate Mortgage 



43 
44 
46 
47 
48 
48 
49 
49 
50 
51 
52 
58 
S3 
53 
54 
54 



INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 

On Sheep and their History 60 

Long-wooled Sheep 61 

Short-wooled Sheep 62 

Wool Culture and Statistics 64-68 

Bees and Honey 68 



INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 

PAOK8 

Poultry 69 

Small Fruit Culture 70-74 

Fertilizers and Compost 74 

Milk 75-76 

Dairy Matters 339-346 

Miscellaneous Items 347-352 

TOWNSHIP DIRECTORIES. 

Algonquin 131-144 

Alden 146-154 

Burton 155-156 

Chemung 157-167 

Coral... 171-182 

Dorr 184-200 

Dunham 206-213 

Grafton 215-221 

Greenwood 224-231 

Hartland 233-241 

Hebron 241-249 

Marengo 251-270 

McHenry 274-287 

Nunda 291-302 

Richmond 305-316 

Riley 320-330 

Seneca 332-338 



BUSINESS DIRECTORIES. 

Algonquin 144-145 

Alden .. 154 

Big Foot 170 

Chemung 214 

Crystal Lake 145 

Greenwood 232 

Harvard 168-170 

Hebron - 250 

Huntley 222-223 

Johnsburg 290 

Lawrence 170 

Marengo 271-273 

McHenry 288-'290 

Nunda 303-304 

Richmond 317-318 

Ridgefield 205 

Union 183 

Woodstock 201-205 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



5ti 



Population of the United States 

Population of 50 principal cities 

Popvlation of Illinois by counties 57-58 

Population and area of principal countries 59 

Statistics of Agriculture 119 

Local Statistics 120-122 

Population of McHenry County by Townships... 123 

Nativity and Foreign Parentage 

Selected Nativity 

Postal Laws 

Value of Foreign Money 

County Officers 

Town Government 

Boards of Trustees 

Township Officers 126-127 

Lodges and Associations 128-130 

Map of County Opp. Title. 



123 
123 
M 

55 

1'24 
1-25 
125 



224O49 



PREFACE. 



rpHE useful design of a work like this will be evident to all who give it even a 
- casual inspection ; but the labor of preparing and completing it, the difficulties 
surmounted in gathering and compiling the facts, can scarcely be estimated by any one 
not experienced in similar undertakings* Oar intsntion has been not only to provide 
a convenient Directory, but als> to offer to our patrons a useful family book, which will 
be valuable not only to the present generation, but become more so to their descendants, 
in thus preserving, in a condensed form, the records of their families. In producing a 
fair and condensed History of McHenry County, it was our intention to call in person 
on the oldest settlers to obtain reliable information concerning the history, settlement 
and financial interests of each township. This plan was modified; circulars containing 
questions were distributed, in stead, to parties most capable of giving the facts. The 
part'es receiving the circulars were then visited by our historian, A. W. Cumin^s, Esq., 
and in many instances definite answers gained. We are sorry to say that in some cases 
an indifference or unwillingness to impart information was encountered, which accounts 
for the less complete history of some townships than others. 

We wish to thank other parties for their painstaking in collecting and forwarding 
items to the compiler. Among these are the Hon. Wm. A. McConuell, C. G. Getting and 
R.R.Crosby, of Richmond; Sidnev Disbrowand M. D. Hay, of Alden ; Hon. George 
Gage, of McHenry ; W. G. Billings, of Chemung ; James McMillan and Cameron Goff, of 
Nunda ; W. M. Jackson, of Coral; Geo. T. Kasson, of Woodstock; Dr. Wm. A. 
Nason, of Algonquin, who kindly loaned us a history of that village, prepared by himself; 
and John Brink, Esq., of Crystal Lake. In Greenwood, G. H. Garrison, A. W. 
Murphy and James Watson. For the facts regarding Harvard we are indebted to Mr. 
E. Ayer. To make the Township Directories as accurate and complete as was possible, 
we called to our assistance the different Assessors ; still, in a work of this extent, errors 
undoubtedly will occur, mostly in spelling of names. Even subscribers in giving their 
biographies have made mistakes in dates, too late discovered by them to be remedied. 
We have endeavored, leaving out the floating population, to give the name of each tax 
payer and voter. The information upon various subjects for farmers we have culled 
from the best sources. The Abstract of State Laws will be found valuable at all times. 
It would be impossible to make a work of this kind perfect. Neither could it be pub- 
lished without offense to some, whom it would have benefited. No claim to literary 
merit is made for this volume. It has necessarily been somewhat hurried in execution. 
Many facts, however, not before published will be found within its pages. 

We offer to our patrons this result of months of labor and outlay, in the hope that 
they will find it satisfactory. 



H I S T O E T 



STATE OF ILLINOIS. 



r I ^HE great and growing Commonwealth of Illinois possesses an area of 55,410 
square miles. It averages 150 miles in width and 400 in length, com- 
prising a latitude from Maine to North Carolina. Its variety of climate is 
manifold and attractive. A northern temperature derived from one of the 
largest fresh-water seas, which preserves from greatest extremes of heat and 
cold ; washed on its entire western length by the tide of the Father of Waters ; 
ameliorated on the eastern border by the spent airs of the Alleghanies, it is one 
of the most fertile and favored of all the United States of America. The 
health maps, drawn for the government, represent a remarkably superior record. 
A table land of 600 to 1,600 feet above the level of the sea, it is, at the present 
stages of civilization and cultivation, largely free from malarial diseases and 
consumption. 

The Delaware Indians designated this vast tract as the abode of Superior 
Men the Illini. Early French settlers rendered it Illinois. To the antiqua- 
rian of the future the double significance or construction of the word will con- 
vey more meaning, perhaps, than at present. 

The appellation, Illini, was, doubtless, most appropriate to the primitive in- 
habitants of the Prairie State. Their prowess was long a successful foil to their 
fierce Iroquois foes on one side, and the relentless Sacs and Foxes on the 
other. This brave division of the aborigines was long a powerful confederacy 
occupying the most accessible and fertile region in the Upper Valley of the 
Mississippi. The beautiful country seems to have been the especial envy of 
their enemies, and the cause of prolonged struggles rather than petty feuds or 
the provocations of warfare. The territory was finally wrested from them and 
they were gradually diminished. The tradition of "Starved Rock," on the 
Mississippi, commemorates their last brave resistance, where the remnant of the 
tribes starved because they would not surrender. 



6 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

The earliest European discoveries in Illinois date back over two hundred 
years. The middle of the seventeenth century brought French Canadian 
missionaries and fur traders into the Mississippi Valley. This was the cause, 
at a later period, of the establishment of the civil and religious power of France, 
from the foot of the Alleghanies to the Rocky Mountains, from the Gulf of St. 
Lawrence to the Gulf of Mexico. 

The dreamer and the conqueror of Florida, Hernando De Soto, had discov- 
ered the great river of the Western World, from Alabama's shore, three-fourths 
of a century previous to the founding of Quebec, in 1608, by the French. The 
Spanish adventurers, after burying their chief, De Soto, according to his direc- 
tions, in the Mississippi, left the wilderness, having made no settlement on their 
broken march from the coast of Florida to the river. 

In the condition found by the followers of De Soto the vast tract that they 
traversed remained, without farther exploration or settlement, until the Mis- 
sissippi was again discovered, in 1673, by two agents of the French Canadian 
Government, named Joliet and Marquette. These explorers were not, however, 
the first white travelers in Illinois, although the greater renown attaches to 
their expedition. In 1671, a man was sent by Talon as an agent of the Cana- 
dian Government, to call a convention of Indians at Green Bay. This man's 
name was Nicholas Perrot, and he made headquarters at Chicago. It was 
considered politic and advisable to secure all possible co-operation from the 
Indians before making an undertaking that their hostility might render 
totally disastrous. The pipe of peace and their friendship might afford 
assistance and success. Perrot called the Northwestern tribes into council 
and promised for the French Government its protection and advantages of 
commerce. . On arriving at Green Bay, he procured an escort of friendly 
Pottawattomies and a bark canoe and made his visit to Chicago. He was, 
doubtless, the first European who set foot on the soil of the future great 
State of the West, 

The story of Marquette and Joliet is well known. The former was a native 
of France, born in 1637, a Jesuit, a man of zealous devotion to the extension 
of Roman Catholicism among the American Indians. He was a man of rigid 
faith. Arriving in Canada, in 1666, he established a post at Sault Ste Marie 
two years later. 

He removed, the succeeding year, to La Pointe, in Lake Superior, where he 
taught a branch of the Hurons in the holy faith, till 1670. Then he went 
South and founded the mission at St. Ignace, on the Straits of Mackinac. Here 
he studied the language under a native teacher, and was joined, in the spring of 
1673, by Joliet. They then moved forward by way of Green Bay. the Fox 
and Wisconsin Rivers, and, subsequently, entered the Mississippi. They ex- 
plored it to the mouth of the Arkansas, and returned by way of the Illinois 
and Chicago Rivers to Lake Michigan. 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 7 

Marquette, on his way up the, Illinois, visited the village of the Kaskaskias, 
near the present Utica, in the county of La Salle. The next year, he returned 
and established the mission of the Immaculate Virgin Mary. This was the first 
mission founded in the Mississippi Valley and Illinois. He spent a winter in a 
hut on the Chicago River not far from its mouth. He died in Michigan on his 
way back to Green Bay, May 18, 1675. 

Other Jesuit missionaries previous to Marquette courageously braved the 
perils of the unknown wilderness of the Northwest. In 1672, Fathers Claude 
Allouez and Claude Dab Ion went from the mission at Green Bay through West- 
ern Wisconsin and Northern Illinois, among the Foxes, Mascoutins and Kick- 
apoos, partly the route afterward followed by Marquette. 



FIRST FRENCH OCCUPATION. 

The name of Robert Cavalier de la Salle is inseparably connected with the 
pioneer history of Illinois. Dr. J. W. Foster has styled him one of the grand- 
est characters that ever figured in American history ; a man capable of originat- 
ing the vastest schemes, and endowed with a will and a judgment capable of 
carrying them to successful results. He was born at Rouen, France, in 1643. 
He renounced a patrimony to enter a college of the Jesuits, separating from 
them afteiward and coming to Canada in 1666. He had a brother among the 
priests of St. Sulpice, who were the proprietors of Montreal. The Superior of 
the convent granted to La Salle a large tract at La Chine, not far from Mont- 
real, where he engaged in the fur trade. He outran all his competitors in 
commerce with the Indians, whom he awed by his daring and exploits of travel. 
In 1669, he visited the great Iroquois Confederacy, at Onondaga, New York 
State, and thence with guides explored the Ohio River to the Falls of Louis- 
ville. 

The occupation of territorial Illinois for the French was accomplished by 
La Salle in 1680, seven years after that of Marquette and Joliet. He con- 
structed a vessel named the Griffin, above Niagara Falls, and sailed to Green 
Bay. He passed from thence in canoes to the mouth of St. Joseph River, 
reached the Illinois, via the Kankakee, in January, 1680, and erected 
a fort at the lower end of Peoria Lake, where the city of Peoria now stands. 
He named this fort Orev&eaeur. The site of the ancient fort is still to 
be seen. 

From this point, the bold La Salle determined to descend the Mississippi to 
its mouth. He did not accomplish the feat until two years later. Returning 
to Fort Frontenac, to get material for rigging his vessel, he left Crevecoeur in 
charge of Tonti, his lieutenant, who was soon driven off by the Iroquois. 
These Indians devastated the settlement of the Illinois, leaving nothing but 



8 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

ruin in their way. On their return, La Salle and his company beheld a 
sight like the following picture from Davidson's History of Illinois : 

"At the great town of the Illinois they were appalled by the scene which 
opened to their view. No hunter appeared to break its death-like silence with 
a salutatory whoop of welcome. The plain Avas strewn with charred fragments 
of lodges, which had so recently swarmed with savage life and hilarity. Large 
numbers of skulls had been placed on the upper extremities of lodge poles, 
which had escaped the devouring flames. In the midst of these horrors was 
the rude fort of the spoilers. A near approach showed that the graves had 
been robbed of their bodies, and swarms of buzzards were discovered glutting 
their loathsome stomachs on the reeking corruption. The growing corn of the 
village had been cut down and burned, while the pits containing the products 
of previous years had been rifled, and their contents scattered. The suspected 
blow of the Iroquois had fallen with relentless fury." 

" Tonti had escaped. While passing down the lake in search of him and his 
men, La Salle discovered that the fort had been also destroyed. His partly 
constructed vessel remained on the stocks, but slightly injured. Not finding 
Tonti after continued search, he fastened to a tree a painting that pictured him- 
self and party sitting in a canoe, bearing a pipe of peace. To the picture was 
attached a letter addressed to Tonti." 

After fearful privations, Tonti had found shelter among the Pottowattomies 
at Green Bay. One of their friendly chiefs used to say there were "but three 
great captains in the world, himself, Tonti and La Salle." 

The singular genius of La Salle may better be understood by the following 
considerations : , 

Traders and missionaries, previous to his time, had no recourse to the 
Northwest, save by the Ottawa River of Canada. The insatiate hostility of the 
Iroquois along the lower lakes and Niagara River had closed this route to the 
upper lakes. Their commerce was carried on mainly by canoes, paddled along 
the Ottawa to Lake Nipissing, thence carried across the Portage to French 
River, descending it to Lake Huron. This exclusive Northwestern route for 
commerce in that early period was the means of establishing Jesuit missions 
in the region of the upper lakes. La Salle pondered and brought out the idea 
of opening a route by the Niagara River and the lower lakes to Canadian com- 
merce with sail vessels, and connection with the Mississippi. It was a magnifi- 
cent theory, and must have inspired him during many hardships in unsurpassed 
difficulties and great achievements. 

As a first step toward his object, he established himself on Lake Ontario, 
built and garrisoned Fort Frontenac, near the present city of Kingston, Canada. 
Here the French crown made him a grant of land, and provided a body of 
troops which enabled him to clear his passage to Niagara Falls, holding back 
the invading Iroquois. Successful in this, he deemed it safe to attempt another 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 9 

great and heretofore untried undertaking, that of advancing to the Falls with 
an outfit for building a ship to navigate on the lakes. All credit to his daring 
project, though the purpose was defeated by a combination of unfavorable cir- 
cumstances. The Jesuits were enemies of La Salle, because he had abandoned 
them and affiliated with a rival order; therefore they plotted against his 
designs. 

The trade of Lake Ontario, which otherwise would have flowed to Quebec, 
was under^the control of La Salle, at La Chine, and turned into the new chan- 
nels he projected ; this also excited the jealousy of the fur traders. While 
only bark canoes were paddled at snail's pace along the Ottawa, he was pre- 
paring to appropriate, in his own way, the trade currents and centers of the 
lakes and the Mississippi. The small traders were envious; treasonable revolt 
split the ranks of his own associates. All this ended in his assassination, pre- 
maturely cut off his great plans, and finished his achievements. He was shot 
by one of his men, on the 19th of March, 1687, near the mouth of Trinity 
River, in the valley of the Colorado. At the time of his murder, he was on 
his way to Illinois, having determined to travel the long distance on foot. 
Subsequent to this, he had explored a portion of New Mexico in search of silver 
mines, but met only disappointment. Returning to his colony of French 
emigrants, which he had conducted from their mother country to Illinois, he 
found them reduced to forty souls. 

In 1682, after leaving Fort Crevecoeur in charge of Tonti, he descended 
the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico. There he erected a standard, inscribed 
with the arms of France, and taking formal possession of the whole known 
valley, in the name of Louis XIV, the reigning sovereign, he named it 
LOUISIANA. He then proceeded to France, was appointed Governor of these 
possessions in the New World, and returned with his fleet and emigrants. 

Dr. Foster, whose words we have before quoted, remarks: " Had ample 
facilities been placed by the King of France at the disposal of Robert Cavalier 
de la Salle, the result of the colonization of this continent might have been 
different from what we now behold." 

EARLY PIONEER SETTLEMENTS. 

The old Indian Kaskaskia village on the Illinois River, in the county of 
La Salle, was the scene of a temporary settlement in 1682. It was called Fort 
St. Louis. A mission was connected with it, and, in 1690, it was altogether 
removed to Kaskaskia, on the river of that name, which empties into the 
Mississippi in St. Clair County. The settlement of Cahokia was also begun in 
the same year, and ranks as the oldest one in the State. 

It is supposed that the removal of the Kaskaskia mission was because the 
Chicago portage had been nearly abandoned, and in consideration of the dan- 



10 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

gerous route by Lake Michigan. Travelers and traders were entering the 
Mississippi via the Fox and Wisconsin Rivers. Let it be remembered that all 
the country south of the great lakes was called Louisiana by the French and 
their colonists. A removal of the settlement at Fort St. Louis, near to the 
Mississippi, was advisable in order to be near the line of travel from Canada to 
Louisiania. 

As early as 1721, the Jesuits had established a monastery and college at 
Kaskaskia. Before it passed from French rule, it became a townof two or 
three thousand inhabitants. For years afterward, it did not exceed fifteen 
hundred, and finally lessened, in 1773, under the British, to four hundred and 
fifty. 

While France ruled Louisiana, the population of whites and blacks num- 
bered not over ten thousand. In the region now comprising Indiana, trading 
posts were built at the principal villages of the Miamis, on the head waters of 
the Maumee, on the Wabash and the Piankeshaw villages at Post Vincennes. 

In all the territory of Louisiana, numerous settlements of more or less 
importance had been started. New Orleans was founded by Bienville in 1718, 
assisted or encouraged by the Mississippi Company. Antoine de Lamotte 
Cadillac founded Detroit in 1701. D'Iberville settled Biloxy, on Mobile Bay, 
in 1699. In 1730, the settlements throughout the area of the present Illinois 
comprised one hundred and forty French families, six hundred " converted 
Indians," numerous traders and temporary sojourners. 

Fort Chartres was built by M. de Boisbrant, a military officer, in 1718. 
He acted under command of Bienville, and under direction of the Mississppi 
Company. It was situated on the east bank of the great river, eighteen miles 
below Kaskaskia, and was the headquarters of the district of Illinois. In 
1765, the English flag first waved from this old fort, and Illinois became a 
possession of Great Britain. In 1779, after the declaration of independence, 
Col. George Robert Clark took it from the English, and Illinois became a part 
of Virginia. It was then known as Illinois County. All this territory was 
ceded to the General Government, to be divided'into States of Republican rights, 
sovereignly, freedom and independence. 

DEVELOPMENT OF THE STATE. 

The first Executive of Illinois, Governor Shadrach Bond, in his first 
annual message, urgently suggested the construction of the Illinois and Michi- 
gan Canal. In 1821, the Legislature appropriated $10,000 for surveying the 
route. Two engineers marked out the track and estimated the cost at $600,000 
or $700,000. It was eventually completed for the sum of $800,000. In 
1825, the Canal Company was incorporated, but no stock sold. In 1826, 
Congress gave 800,000 acres of land on the line of the construction. In 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 11 

1828, Commissioners were appointed, and, with a new survey and new 
estimates, the work was begun. In 1834-35, an able report on the whole 
matter was submitted by George Farquhar. This has been styled the ablest 
report ever made to a Western Legislature. It became a model for subsequent 
action. The work of the canal finally reached completion in 1848. Its immense 
cost proved a safe and profitable investment. The remark has been aptly 
made, " It was not built as a speculation, any more than a doctor is employed 
as a speculation." The treasury of the State has been annually enriched from 
its net returns to the sum of $111,000. 

One impetus of the construction of this canal was the unprecedented sale 
of town lots along its course, especially in Chicago. Adjoining States caught 
the fever. " It cut up men's farms without regard to locality, and cut up the 
purses of purchasers without regard to consequences." In Indiana alone the 
building lots sold might have accommodated every citizen of the Republic at 
that time. 

The Legislature of 1836-7 engaged in the speculation. They passed a 
code for internal improvement unsurpassed in designs for the good of a young 
State. One thousand three hundred miles of railroad were to be laid out and 
built a line crossing the State in all directions. The few counties not reached 
by the canal, railroad or any river were offered a compensation of $200,000 to 
be distributed freely among the people. The work was ordered to be started 
simultaneously on both ends of these railroads and rivers, and at each river 
crossing. Twelve million dollars were appropriated, and Commissioners in- 
structed to effect loans on the credit of the State. These stupendous plans 
appear more remarkable when it is remembered that in those early days the 
population was short of 400,000. Many counties scarcely were dotted with 
a cabin, and railroads were a new invention. 

But a serious misfortune now clouded the sky of internal improvement. 
The State Bank loaned its funds extensively to Godfrey, Gilman & Co., and 
other houses, in order to draw trade from St. Louis to Alton. They failed, 
and the bank went with them. 

Witness the changed aspects of 1840. A debt of $14,000,000 hanging 
over 480,000 inhabitants, only six small cities : Chicago, Springfield, Quincy, 
Alton, Galena and Nauvoo. The State's credit was gone, the treasury empty, 
and not money enough among all the population to disburse the interest of the 
debt one year. Providentially, a wise and honest Governor stood at the helm^ 
and steered safely beyond the rocks of repudiation. 

HISTORY OF THE "COMPACT OF 1787." 

Thomas Jefferson was an early emancipator. He was in favor of the exclusion 
of slavery from the territory ceded to the General Government by Virginia. As 
often as the question came up in Congress assembled, the sturdy President's theory 



12 HISTORV OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

was put down by the majority of Southern votes. Still Jefferson was earnestly 
trying to mark out a system of government for the Northwestern Territory. In 
July, 1787, an act was pending wherein the anti-slavery clause had been ex- 
cluded. Congress was convened in New York city. Rev. Dr. Manasseh Cut- 
ler, of Massachusetts, was pleading the interests of the Northwestern Territory. 
While the slavery concession to the South was deemed sufficient to carry the 
act, Massachusetts owned the territory of Maine, and wished to force it on the 
market. Dr. Cutler came, representing a company who were desirous of pur- 
chasing a tract of land included in Ohio. It was a speculation and for coloni- 
zation purposes. At this time, Government money rated eighteen cents on a 
dollar. This Company proposed to purchase 1,500,000 acres. Dr. Cutler 
represented a call for 5,500,000 acres. This was a tempting sale. It would ma- 
terially reduce the national debt. Jefferson's policy provided for the public credit. 

At this juncture, a remarkable man, in the person of Dr. Cutler, infused 
and turned the tide of events by which a vast and prolific empire in the rich 
States of Illinois, Ohio, Indiana, Wisconsin and Michigan became forever con- 
secrated to the honesty and prosperity of freedom. 

On this memorable July of 1787, in the legislative halls, the Southern mem- 
bers rallied around Dr. Cutler. He was, as history represents, a man of great 
parts and a courtly gentleman. He graduated at Yale, received his A. M. 
from Harvard and D. D. from Yale. He had taken degrees in three learned 
professions and published a scientific work on the examination of plants. His 
presence was commanding, his face comely and bold. He stood second tc- 
Franklin as a scientist of America. The Southern members declared him to be 
the most gentlemanly man of the North. 

Massachusetts was opposed to opening the Northwestern region. This 
sharpened the zeal of Virginia, and the South lauded Dr. Cutler. He dined 
with the English Minister and his guests, the Southern gentlemen. While he 
thus made friends with the South, enabling himself to command the situation, 
Massachusetts could not vote against him, because many of her constituents 
were personally interested in the Western speculation. 

Dr. Cutler, true to deep and noble convictions, drew up " one of the most 
compact and finished documents of wise statesmanship that has ever adorned 
any law book." 

Preceding the Federal Constitution, it was an immortal antecedent. The 
Constitution of Massachusetts, adopted three years before, in the "Articles of 
Compact" a title borrowed from Jefferson comprised the following marked 
points : 

1. The exclusion of slavery from the Territory forever. 

2. Provision for public schools, giving one township for a seminary, and 
f every section numbered 16 in each township ; that is, one-thirty-sixth of all 

the land, for public schools. 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 13 

3. A provision prohibiting the adoption of any constitution or the enact- 
ment of any law that should nullify pre-existing contracts. 

Be it forever remembered that this compact declared that " Religion, mo- 
rality and knowledge, being necessary to good government and the happiness of 
mankind, schools and the means of education shall always be encouraged." 

Dr. Cutler stood firm to his platform. He declared it was that or nothing 

- & ~ 

and that unless the land could be made desirable, it was not wanted. He then 
took his horse and buggy and drove to Philadelphia to join the Constitutional 
Convention. 

July 13, 1787, the bill was unanimously adopted. Every Southern mem- 
ber voted for it. Mr. Yates, of New York, was the only man who voted 
against it. The States voted as States and Yates lost his vote. The compact 
was safe beyond repeal. 

This act has been designated as being the salvation of the Republic and the 
death-blow to slavery's perpetuation. The South discovered their blunder and 
tried to repeal. In 1803, Congress referred it to a committee over which John 
Randolph presided. He declared the compact beyond repeal. 

Illinois proved to be a sanguinary field for the " irrespressible conflict." A 
prolonged struggle was necessary to preserve its soil inviolate for freedom. 

Southern portions of the State had been settled from the slave States. 
Their customs and institutions followed as a natural consequence. The north- 
ern parts of the State were populated from the North and East. Different 
sections opposed and disliked each other. Slavery was existing in the southern 
localities, and among the old French settlers. The seeds of hatred and pro- 
vincial contempt which germinated in rancorous perfection in the war of the 
rebellion of 1861, in those early days were self-sown in the breasts of Southern 
immigrants. On the other hand, the Northern settlers regarded the Southerners 
with a corresponding disrespect and dislike. Yankees were " a tricky, penuri- 
ous, peddling race, filling the country with tinware, brass clocks and wooden 
nutmegs." The Southerner was " a lean, lank, lazy being, burrowing in a hut, 
rioting in whisky, dirt and ignorance." This prejudice, tempered with some 
grains of truth, was a long time dispelling. Such a condition of scattered 
society offered but a poor reception for the compact of 1787. So powerful was 
their predilection for slavery, the French settlers were permitted to retain their 
slaves. Planters were allowed to move their slaves, provided they would give 
them the choice of freedom or years of bondage for their children until they 
reached thirty. If the slaves under these conditions chose freedom, they were 
required to leave the State within sixty days or be sold as fugitives. 

A bold effort was made to protect slavery in the State Constitution of 1817. 
It fell little short of success, and, in 1825, a convention was asked to make a 
new constitution. The scheme was tried again. The convention was defeated, 
but slaves were numbered in the census until 1850. 



14 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

From the year 1800 to 1818, the population of Illinois increased from 
12,282 to 45,000. In the latter year, the State Constitution was adopted, a 
star was added to the flag, and two votes to the Senate. 

Before the war of 1812, no -money circulated in the territory. Deer and 
coon skins were the medium. The issues of the State Bank, created by the 
Legislature in 1821, were notes in the likeness of bank bills. These were a 

O 7 

legal tender for everything, The bank was ordered to loan at any time, to the 
people, $100, on personal security, and larger sums on mortgages. A resolu- 
tion was passed requesting the Secretary of the United States Treasury to 
accept these notes for land. The French Lieutenant Governor, Col. Menard, 
resolved as follows : " Gentlemen of the Senate It is is moved and seconded 
dat de notes of dis bank be made land office money. All in favor of dat 
motion say aye ; all against it say no. It is decided in the affirmative. Now, 
gentlemen, I bet you one hundred dollar he never be land office money." 

MATERIAL RESOURCES OF THE STATE. 

Illinois takes the lead in the agricultural race, in the number of acres under 
the plow, viz. : 25,000,000. Its soil is mostly a black sandy loam from six 
inches to sixty feet thick. On the American bottoms it has been cultivated 
one hundred and fifty years with no renewal. Around the old French towns 
. it has grown corn without cessation or replenishing for as many years. Every 
plant that grows in the tropical and temperate zones will flourish within the 
borders of the Prairie State. The mineral wealth is enormous and varied. 

Coal, lead, iron, copper, zinc, fire clay, cuma clay, common brick clay, 
varieties of building stone, sand, gravel, mineral paints, are all in rich store 
for the support of her advancing civilization. 

KING COAL. 

Four-fifths of the surface of the State is underlaid with the coal measures 
of geology. It has been estimated in recent surveys that this vast deposit 
ranges from forty to seventy feet thick. Forty-one thousand square miles has 
been named as the amount of coal fields in Illinois. This single item in the 
catalogue of her natural productions falls below appreciation in figures. The 
magnitude of such wealth is incomprehensible. Future millions of mankind 
are to be blest by these provisions of the Creator long before human beneficia- 
ries existed. 

Compare this coal -ted with other great carboniferous deposits of the earth, 
and a nearer understanding of its superior importance will be reached : 

In our own land, Virginia has 20,000 square miles of coal ; Pennsylvania, 
16,000 ; Ohio, 12,000. 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 15 

Great Britain has 12,000 ; France, 1,719 ; Spain, 3,000 ; Belgium, 578. 
Illinois comprises about twice as many square miles as all these countries com- 
bined, and one-seventh of all the known fields on this continent lies within the 
bounds of this State. Her aggregate of co'al, sold for one-seventh of a cent per 
ton, would pay the national debt. At the present rate of consumption, the coal 
deposits of England will be exhausted in 250 years. Then she must extend 
her dominion or import her fuel. At the same rate of consumption, the coal in 
Illinois would last 120,000 years. 

ANNUAL PRODUCTS. 

Illinois has for many years produced more wheat than any other State in 
the Union. In 1875, she raised 130,000,000 bushels of corn. This is one- 
sixth of all the corn product of the Union. Two million seven hundred and 
forty-seven thousand tons -of hay was harvested nearly one-tenth of all the hay 
gathered in the United States. The hay of Illinois is equivalent to the cotton 
crop of Louisiana. Her farm implements are valued at $211,000,000 ; her live 
stock is only outvalued by that of the Empire State. In 1875, she had 
25,000,000 hogs and packed 2,113,845, nearly one-half of all packed in the 
United States. The whole world is the market for the pork of the West, and 
the demand is increasing. The working classes of Europe are partial to Amer- 
ican cured bacon and hams. 

An apt writer has thus grouped the excellencies and advantages of the 
Prairie State : 

" Depth and richness of soil ; per cent, of good ground ; acres of improved 
land ; large farms ; number of farmers ; amount of wheat, corn, oats and honey 
produced ; value of animals for slaughter ; number of hogs ; amount of pork ; 
number of horses three times as many as Kentucky, the horse State." 

This State is only second in many other great interests. Here are some of 
the most important : Value of farm implements and products, of live stock and 
tons of coal mined. Her educational advantages and interests are superior. 
She has a permanent school fund only second to any other State. She pub- 
lishes great numbers of books, maps and newspapers. 

The shipping of this State ranks next to the metropolitan port New York. 

Illinois is third in colleges, teachers and schools; cattle, lead, hay, flax, 
sorghum and beeswax. 

She is fourth in population, in children enrolled for public schools, in law 
schools, butter, potatoes and carriages. 

She is fifth in value of real and personal property, in theological seminaries 
and colleges exclusively for women, in milk sold, in boots and shoes manufac- 
tured, and in book-binding. 

She is seventh in the production of wood, though the twelfth in area. 
Some forests have been planted, and now more wood and timber are growing' 



16 HISTOBY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

than the land produced thirty years ago. This is a matter for farmers to con- 
sider. The dearth of wood, of shade, forest and fruit trees on some of the 
most valuable prairie farms, might, in a few years, with moderate expense and 
little care, be obviated. A few acres less of wheat would, in many instances, 
secure more vigorous health to the families, more pleasure to the eye, more 
fruit, more comfort for the cattle. The farmer may cultivate his tastes for the 
beautiful and refined, with his acres, and make a home for his children that 
will aid in developing the finer qualities of mind and heart, and thus in no 
wise necessarily unfit them for the sphere in which they were born. Honest 
labor, rewarding toil, homely industry, may band with gentleness of soul, love 
of the beautiful and polish of manners ; and all these may unite to form the 
true nature's gentleman or gentlewoman. 

Illinois has completed 6,759 miles of railroad, worth $636,458,000; 3,245 
engines and 61,712 cars are in use; these would make a train long enough to 
cover one-tenth of all the roads in the State. Stations are five miles apart. 
More than two-thirds of the land is within five miles of a railroad. Last year, 
15,795,000 passengers were carried 36J miles. This is equal to taking the 
entire population twice across the State. A large financial interest is merged 
in the Illinois Central Railroad. It was incorporated in 1850. The State 
gave each alternate section, for six miles on each side, and doubled the price' of 
the remaining land. The road received 2,595,000 acres and pays to the State 
one-seventh of the gross receipts. The State received, in 1876, $35,000 ; has 
received, in all, $7,000,000. Annual receipts from the canal are $111,000. 

Illinois manufactures, annually, $205,000^000 worth of goods. This com- 
pares favorably with New York and Pennsylvania. From 1860 to 1870, her 
manufacturing establishments increased 300 per cent. ; capital employed, 350 
per cent. ; amount of product, 400 per cent. 

From these dry statistics, which are of incalculable interest as a measure- 
ment of agricultural, commercial and financial progress, turn to the contempla- 
tion of some of the 



GENERAL FEATURES OF THE STATE. 

From the eloquent Centennial oration, delivered by Dr. C. H. Fowler, at 
Philadelphia, by appointment of Governor Beveridge, we copy some fine para- 
graphs containing items of universal interest : 

" The great battles of history that have been determinative of dynasties 
and destinies have been strategical battles; chiefly the question of position. 
Thermopylae has been the war-cry of freemen for twenty-four centuries. It 
only tells how much there may be in position. All this advantage belongs to 
Illinois. It is in the heart of the greatest valley in the world, the vast region 
between the mountains a valley that could feed mankind for a thousand years. 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 17 

It is well on toward the center of the continent. It is in the great temperate 
belt, in which have been found nearly all the aggressive civilizations of history. 
It has sixty-five miles of frontage on the head of the lake. * * It has, 
altogether, 2,000 miles of water front, connecting with and running through, 
in all, about 12,000 miles of navigable water, including rivers and canals. 

"But this is not all. These waters are made most available by the fact that 
the lake and the State lie on the ridge running into the great valley from the 
east. Within cannon shot of the lake, the water runs from the lake to the 
gulf. The lake now empties at both ends one into the Atlantic and one into 
the Gulf of Mexico. The lake thus seems to hang over the land. This makes 
the dockage most serviceable: there are no steep banks to damage it. Both 
lake and river are made for use. The climate varies from Portland to Rich- 
mond ; it favors every product of the continent, including the tropics, with less 
than half a dozen exceptions. It produces^ every great nutriment of the 
world, except bananas and rice. It is hardly too much to say that it is the 
most productive spot known to civilization. With the soil full of bread and 
the earth full of minerals, with an upper surface full of food and an under 
layer of fuel, with perfect natural drainage and abundant springs and streams 
and navigable rivers, half way between the frosts of the north and the fruits 
of the south, within a day's ride of the great deposits of iron, coal, copper, 
lead, zinc, containing and controlling the great grain, cattle, pork and lumber 
markets of the world, it is not strange that Illinois has the advantage of position. 

" This advantage has been supplemented by the character of the population. 
In the early days, when Illinois was first admitted to the Union, her population 
were chiefly from Kentucky and Virginia. But, in the conflict of ideas concerning 
slavery, a strong tide of emigration came in from the East, and soon changed 
this composition. In 1870, her non-native population were from colder soils. 
New York furnished 133,290; Ohio gave 162,623; Pennsylvania sent on 
98,352 ; the entire South gave us only 206,734. In all her cities, and in all 
her German and Scandinavian and other foreign colonies, Illinois has only 
about one-fifth of her people of foreign birth. " 

MILITARY STRENGTH AND PATRIOTISM. 

From the time when the call of Governor Reynolds, in 1832-33, stimulated 
the pioneers of the State, and the people drove Blackhawk and his warriors across 
the Mississippi, until the memorable hour when Abraham Lincoln at the head 
of the nation said, "The country needs the sacrifice," Illinois has nobly conse- 
crated her sons to the vindication and defense of the country. They have been 
no laggards from the front, no cowards in the battles of the Republic. 

For the Mexican War that broke out in May, 1846, 8,370 men volunteered; 
only 3,720 could be accepted. In the war of the Rebellion, 256,000 men were 



18 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

enrolled for the State regiments, and through other States 290,000. This was 
a larger number than all the soldiers of the Federal Government during the 
war of the Revolution. The law of Congress only required men from twenty 
to forty-five years of age ; but Illinois sent them freely from eighteen to forty- 
five. The people were so eager to go they did not seek to correct the enroll- 
ment ; 20,844 were sent for ninety or one hundred days, for whom no credit 
was asked. Numbering one-thirteenth of the population of the loyal States, 
she sent regularly one-tenth of all the soldiers. Sherman marched forty-five 
regiments from Illinois in that grand sweep to the SEA. 

Illinois soldiers brought home 300 tattered flags. The first United States 
colors that were victoriously planted at Richmond was an Illinois flag. She 
sent nurses to every field and hospital to care for her sick and wounded. 

Among all her grand statesmen and immortal heroes, the name of the martyr 
President will glow as if every letter were a star of the first magnitude, through 
all centuries to come. 

Dr. Fowler says : " The analysis of Mr. Lincoln's character is difficult on 

i/ */ 

account of its symmetry. In this age, we look with admiration on his uncom- 
promising honesty. And well we may, for this saved us. Thousands through- 
out the length and breadth .of our country, who knew him only as 'Honest Old 
Abe,' voted for him on that account ; and wisely did they choose, for no other 
man could have carried us through the fearful night of the war. When his 
plans were too vast for our comprehension, and his faith in the cause too sub- 
lime for our participation ; when it was all night about us, and all dead before 
us, and all sad and desolate behind us ; when not one ray shone upon our cause ; 
when traitors were haughty and exultant at the South, and fierce and blas- 
phemous at the North ; when the loyal men here seemed almost in a minority : 
when the stoutest heart quailed, the bravest cheek paled ; when generals were 
defeating each other for place, and contractors leeching out the very heart's 
blood of the prostrate Republic ; when everything else had failed us, we looked 
at this calm, patient man standing like a rock in a storm, and said : ' Mr. 
Lincoln is honest and we can trust him still.' Holding to this single point 
with the energy of faith and despair, we held together, and, under God, he 
brought us through to victory. 

" His practical wisdom made him the wonder of all lands. With such cer- 
tainty did Mr. Lincoln follow causes to their ultimate effects, that his foresight 
of contingencies seemed almost prophetic. He is radiant with all the great virtues, 
and his memory shall shed a glory upon this age that shall fill the eyes of men as 
they look into history. Other men have excelled him in some point, but taken 
at all points, all in all, he stands head and shoulders above every other man of 
6,000 years. An administrator, he saved the nation in the perils of unpar- 
alleled civil war. A statesman, he justified his measures by their success. A 
philanthropist, he gave liberty to one race and salvation to another. A moral- 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 19 

ist, he bowed from the summit of human power at the foot of the Cross, and 
became a Christian. A mediator, he exercised mercy under the most absolute 
abeyance to law. A leader, he was no partizan. A commander, he was un- 
tainted with blood. A ruler in desperate times, he was unsullied with crime. 
A man, he has left no word of passion, no thought of malice, no trick of 
craft, no act of jealousy, no purpose of selfish ambition. Thus, perfected with- 
out a model, and without a peer, he was dropped into these troubled years to 
adorn and embellish all that is good and all that is great in our humanity, and to 
present to all coming time the representative of the divine idea of free govern- 
ment. It is not too much to say that away down in the future, when the 
republic has fallen from its niche in the wall of time ; when the great war itself 
shall have faded out in the distance, like a mist on the horizon ; when the 
Anglo-Saxon language shall be spoken only by the tongue of the stranger, then 
the generations looking this way shall see the great President as the supreme 
figure in this vortex of history." 

RELIGIOUS, EDUCATIONAL INTERESTS AND MORALS. 

,Dr. Fowler says the State was born of the missionary spirit. Rev. Mr. 
Wiley, pastor of a Scotch congregation in Randolph County, petitioned the 
Constitutional Convention of 1818 to recognize Jesus Christ as king, and the 
Scriptures as the only necessary guide and book of law. 

Rev. J. M. Peck was the first educated Protestant minister in the State. 
He was settled at Rock Spring, St. Glair County, in 1820. He published the 
first gazetteer of Illinois. The first College was started in 1828, in Lebanon, 
by the Methodist Episcopal Church, and named after Bishop McKendree. 
The next was Illinois College, at Jacksonville, in 1830, supported by the Pres- 
byterians. In' 1832, the Baptists established ShurtleiF College, at Alton. The 
Presbyterians built Knox College, at Galesburg, in 1838, and the Episcopalians 
Jubilee College, at Peoria, in 1847. The State can now boast of one well-en- 
dowed University the Northwestern, at Evanston, with its magnificent edifices, 
six colleges, ninety instructors, 1,000 students, and $1,500,000 endowment. 

Illinois owns $22,300,000 in church property, and has 4,298 church organi- 
zations. Nine million five hundred thousand copies of religious papers are 
issued annually in the State. 

The material resources of Illinois, vast as they are, are surpassed by educa- 
tional facilities and institutions. The compact of 1787 devoted, irrevocably, 
)ne-thirty-sixth of her soil to common schools ; and the first law inscribed 
upon the statutes, in 1818, gave three per cent, of all the rest to education. 

We have 11,050 schools, and by the old compact, there can be no legal 
interference with the Bible in the public schools. We have more volumes, in 
public libraries, than Massachusetts. Of the 44,500,000 volumes in the 



20 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

public libraries of the United States, one-thirteenth belong to Illinois. In 
neAvspapers, she stands fourth, with a yearly increase truly marvelous. In 1850, 
500,000 copies were issued; in. 1860, 27,590,000; in 1870, 113,140,000. 

In 1860, she had eighteen colleges and seminaries; 1870, eighty. 

There is but one record of a duel between citizens of Illinois on her own 
soil. Alphonso Stewart and William Bennett were the principals. The seconds 
agreed to make it a sham, and provide blanks. Stewart was in the secret. 
Bennett mistrusted, and, unobserved, slipped a bullet into his gun, and killed 
Stewart, then fled the State. Afterward, he was caught, convicted and hung. 
This terminated the use of the code of honor in Illinois. 

CHICAGO. 

"Queen city of the lakes and the prairies," positively, indeed, and com- 
mercially the marvel of the world. 

Through the greatest calamity of modern times, that destroyed her in a day, 
she arose like a miracle of resurrection, instinct with unparalleled energy, 
majestic with courage, beautiful and mighty. The youngest great city of the 
world. What is a Damascus of all the centuries in comparison with her to-day? 
What are the thousand years of Icelandic settlement, in comparison with Chi- 
cago's less than fifty? 

All cities shuddered, all lands trembled, all hearts suffered, when Chicago lay 
smouldering in the ashes of her unequaled prosperity. " To have struggled 
and suffered amid those fiery scenes is as distinguishing as to have fought at 
Thermopylae, or Salamis, or Hastings, or Waterloo, or Bunker Hill." 

In 1796, a mulatto from the West Indies, named Jean Baptiste Pointe au 
Sable, came here to trade with the Indians. John Kinzie was his successor, 
in 1804, the year in which Fort Dearborn was built. It remained only a 
trading post from that time, until the period of the Black Hawk war, in 1832. 
In 1833, the settlement about the fort Avas incorporated as a town. Voters 
were divided twelve voting for, one against it. Four years later, it became a 
city, embracing 560 acres. In 1869, it occupied 23,000. 

Grain was imported from the East, until 1837. The first exportation was 
made in 1839. A board of trade organized in 1848. It did not grow strong 
before 1855. Grain was sold by the wagon-load in the'street. At the present 
day, one-tenth af all the wheat grown in the United States is handled in 
Chicago. 

In 1854, the exports of grain from Chicago exceeded those of New York, 
doubled those of St. Petersburg, and the other largest grain markets of Europe. 

Chicago is, indisputably, the great railroad center of the world. Examine 
a complete map of the State, and see the eighteen trunk lines, exclusive of 
eastern connections. 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 21 

There are more than 10,000 miles of railroad tributary to this city. All 
these roads have centered here, by the instinct of capital. The city has never 
given a dollar to secure one of them. 



COMMERCIAL CHICAGO. 

The commerce of the city, in 1871, had reached $450,000,000. In 1875, 
it was double that. 

It is stated that one-half of our imported goods come directly to Chicago. 
Her banking capital is $24,431,000. Her wholesale business, in 1875, was 
$294,000,000. Notwithstanding the general depression throughout the country, 
a greater volume of business was transacted in 1876 than in any preceding 
year. The total trade of the city, for 1876, was measured by $652,000,000. 
It is a loss of eight-tenths of one per cent., in currency, from 1875, but a gain, 
if reckoned on a gold basis. Our manufacturers report $200,500,000 for the 
same year. 

Chicago is the commercial focus of the great Northwest. As the country 
prospers, so the city must thrive. The welfare of one depends on the other. 
If the farmer has poor crops, or receives but low prices for what he has to sell, 
he is less able to invest in luxuries or necessaries, and the city merchant and 
manufacturer miss the farmer's trade. 

With the single exception of hogs, the products of the farm commanded 
relatively low prices in 1876 ; but on the whole the produce trade compares 
favorably through the year with former years. The principal falling off was 
in wheat. 

Up to a very recent period, New York controlled nearly all the foreign 
trade of the United States, with much of that between the seaboard and the 
West. The prominent class in England and on the continent of Europe known 
as "importers," used to send their orders for wheat, flour and bacon to factors 
in New York, who filled those orders there, and insisted on having the produce 
of the West offered to them at their doors and nearly on their own terms. Now 
the majority of those foreign buyers have found that they can do far better to 
deal directly with the West, and are sending their orders to Chicago. Com- 
manding, as she does, a large part of the produce of the Northwest in the places 
where it is raised ; possessing the -ability to hold it in the country till wanted, 
and the facilities for storing it in immense quantities within her own limits ; the 
center of so vast a network of railroads, with a capital sufficient to control the 
movement in every stage, Chicago holds the key to the situation, and has 
literally forced the merchant princes of the Old World to come hither, as to 
the greatest primary market in the world. It is true she has powerful com- 
petitors in other countries, but that competition tends to enhance the im- 
portance of Chicago. 



22 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

The same arguments apply to the trade of the Eastern States, which used 
to be supplied mainly from New York. Now the bacon from Chicago goes 
directly South, and corn goes direct to the New England consumer without the 
intervention of New York merchants. It is found that the inspection systems 
of Chicago throw safeguards around the trade in grain, flour, pork and meats, 
which are worth more than the handling charges here. 

There are now nineteen elevators for the handling of grain in Chicago. 
In addition to these, there are immense storehouses for all kinds of produce. 
Four hundred and fifty pairs of hands are employed in the public grain eleva- 
tors, besides the inspectors and the men who move the cars on the track, etc. 

The pork trade was not so well controlled by capital through 1876 as 1875, 
Chicago packs as many hogs as Cincinnati, Louisville, St. Louis, Indianapolis 
and Milwaukee combined, and she has become the model for operations outside, 
as well as the center for provision trade. There is a strong tendency to con- 
centrate stocks here, where they will command the speculative and consuming 
trade of the world. 

There was'a decided increase in receipts of flour for 1876, viz. : 3,014,286 
barrels, against 2,625,883 barrels in 1875. The mills of the city have been 
running nearly to their full capacity all the year. The milling capacity of the 
West has greatly increased during the past few years. 

Kansas flours come here more sparingly now than they used to do. They 
are not as readily sold as those made in other sections ; they are good, but not 
white enough to suit the majority of trade. Recently Nebraska millers have 
sent flour to Chicago for the first time. The article is generally liked, and it 
meets with a ready sale. 

The average wholesale price for the year (1876) was about $4.75 per barrel 
for shipping extras, $5.75 on Minnesotas. 

The receipts of wheat, as reported by the Secretary of the Board of Trade, 
in 1876, were 17,491,057 bushels, against 24,206,370 bushels in 1875. The 
inspection into store, as reported by the State authorities, was 42,624 car loads, 
which, at 350 bushels to the car, would equal 14,918,400 bushels. The differ- 
ence between this and the Board of Trade report is due to grain consigned on 
track, and wheat billed through to Chicago. 

O O 

Receipts for oats were 12,654,621 bushels, against 12,916,428 in 1875, and 
shipments 11,688,471 bushels, against 10,277,134 bushels in same year. This 
falling off was owing to the relatively low prices during 1876, in addition to 
poor quality of the crop. 

The demand for rye was light through the greater part of 1876, while the 
volume offered for sale was unusually large. The receipts were fully doubled, 
being 1,401,121 against 699,583 bushels in 1875. Nearly all the distilleries 
of Chicago were closed during most of the year, and the shipments were greatly 
increased from those of 1875. 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 23 

The barley market has not yet recovered from the demoralization that set 
in after the panic of 1873, and the character of the crop has not tended to 
improve the trade. Receipts were 4,750,176 bushels in 1876 ; 3,107,297 
bushels in 1875. Shipments, 2.868,468 bushels, against 1,868,206 bushels the 
preceding year. 

The records of the Union Stock Yards and Transit Company show that 
the volume of business transacted there during the Centennial year was in ex- 
cess of any previous twelve months. The total arrival of cattle, hogs and sheep 
was 5,669,420 head, or 417,519 head more than reported for any former year. 
It is a well-known fact that in many of the live stocks of the country the busi- 
ness for 1876 was a decline from 1875. * 

1876 was more than ordinarily favorable for the dairy interest. The pro- 
duction in the West of butter and cheese was in excess of any former season. 
The healthy character of the butter trade Avas owing to the existence of a largely 
increased export demand. Receipts of cheese in Chicago were about 23,280,000 
pounds, against 12,000,000 pounds in 1875. Receipts of butter, 35,384,184 
pounds, against 30,243,247 pounds in 1875. 

The season closed with the West nearly cleared of wool. About 50,000 
pounds of old wool were brought into the new season. More Colorado wool 
was handled in Chicago in 1876 than any previous year. This city bids fair 
to be the great distributing center for the wool of Illinois and the surrounding 
territories. The quantity of California wool sold here is increasing. The 
Western consumption of wool is also increasing. 

The hay crop of 1876 was an average one in the West, and secured in ex- 
cellent condition. Timothy hay of the crop of 1875 sold at $8.50 to $14.00 ; 
prairie at $6.00 to $11.00. Timothy of 1876 has ruled steady at $8.00 to 
$11.50, and prairie at $5.50 to $8.00 per ton. 

We have enumerated these statistics of the commerce of Chicago and the 
Northwest, for the years 1875 and 1876, for convenient comparisons in the 
future. We do not expect to enlighten the patrons of this book by presenting 
all these details of figures, for the farmers of Illinois are not an ignorant class 
of people who neglect libraries and fail to patronize and read the newspapers of 
the day. 

VARIOUS ITEMS. 

Chicago now embraces thirty-six square miles and has thirty miles of water 
front besides the outside harbor of refuge of 400 acres, inclosed by a crib sea- 
wall. The water provided for the city from the lake is as pure as any in the 
world. It is received through two tunnels extending to a crib two miles from 
the shore. The supply is brought from thirty-five feet below the surface, and 
is always .clear and cold. The closest analysis detects no impurities in the 
water reservoirs. The first water- tunnel is five feet two inches in diameter, 



24 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

and two miles long. It can deliver 50,000,000 gallons per day. The second 
is seven feet in diameter and six miles long. It runs four miles under the city 
and can deliver 100,000,000 cf gallons per day. The water is distributed 
through 410 miles of water-mains. 

One-third of the city has been raised an average of eight feet, making the 
sewerage pitch 263 miles. In 1844, the streets were little better than quag- 
mires, and for years the reputation of the city for health> was anything but 
favorable. Now, it is emphatically one of the healthiest cities in the Union. 
Wooden block pavements were used in 1857. In 1840, water was delivered by 
peddlars in carts or by hand. Afterward, a twenty-five horse-poAver engine 
pushed it through hollow logs laid along the streets, till 1854, when it was car- 
ried into the houses by new works. 

The first fire-engine was used in 1835 ; the first steam fire-engine in 1859. 
Gas was used for lighting the city in 1850. The Young Men's Christian As- 
sociation was organized in 1858^ and horse railroads constructed in 1859. A 
museum was opened in 1863 ; the alarm telegraph adopted in 1864 ; the opera 
house built in 1865. 

THE MAILS. 

In 1831, the mail was taken twice a week from the city by a half-breed 
Indian, on foot, to Niles, Michigan. He brought back what news he could 
gather. In 1846, often only one mail a week went from and reached the young 
city. A post office was established in 1833. The Post Master nailed up old 
boot-legs on one side of his shop to serve as boxes for those who could afford to 
pay rent for them. The mail matter of Chicago has reached a daily average 
of 6,500 pounds. Its distribution to the territory immediately tributary to the 
city is seven times larger than the amount distributed in a corresponding region 
around St. Louis. 

CITY IMPROVEMENTS. 

The three grandest engineering exploits of the city have incalculably settled 
their advantages for the future. The construction of the tunnels under the 
lake was a glorious triumph of art and artisanship. The city, safely supplied 
with pure water above all contingences of failure, possesses one of the most im- 
portant elements of health and perpetuity mighty as an armed host. 

Whole squares at a time were lifted up several feet, on jack-screws, without 
interfering with the daily business conducted in the buildings. 

Mark Beaubien established a ferry over the river and put himself under 
bonds to carry all the citizens free for the privilege of charging strangers. 
Now twenty-four large bridges and two tunnels will convey both citizens and 
strangers "free" across the enlarged river. 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 25 

In 1833, the government expended $30,000 on the harbor, and then com- 
menced improvements on the river which have made it one of the curiosities 
of the country. It was once but a narrow, shallow stream that rippled over 
the sand into the lake. Now the largest ships are towed through the city 
branches by small tugs. It reminds travelers of the Thames in parts of London. 

The two great laws that aid the growth and fix the size of cities are helping 
Chicago. The extent of country for which it is a distributing and receiving 
center and the number of dealers that do this distributing are the workings 
of these laws. Monopolists only build up themselves. They never make 
cities. There is a vast region of mostly productive land west of this western 
metropolis, and trade tides flow eastward. 

No imaginary complications of human affairs can now picture Chicago as a 
Babylon of desert sands. She must, in the ordinary course of progress and 
civilization, remain the focus of countless centers of trade, travel and intelli- 
gence. There need be no more said of rivalry between Chicago and St. Louis 
or Cincinnati. These goodly cities are far enough away and near enough to 
preclude the probability of other great cities growing between them and Chicago. 

"Chicago,'* says Dr. Fowler, " is in the field almost alone, to handle the 
wealth of one-fourth of the territory of this great Republic. This strip of sea- 
coast divides its margins between Portland, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, 
Baltimore and Savannah, or some other great port to be created for the South 
in the next decade. But Chicago has a dozen empires casting their treasures 
into her lap. On a bed of coal that can run all the machinery of the world 
for five hundred centuries, in a garden that can feed the race by the thousand 
years, at the head of the lakes that give her a temperature as a summer resort 
equaled by no great city in the land, with a climate that insures the health of 
her citizens, surrounded by all the great deposits of natural wealth in mines and 
forests and herds, Chicago is the wonder of to-day, and will be the city of the 
future." * 

MASSACRE AT'FORT DEARBORN. 

During the war of 1812, Fort Dearborn became the theater of stirring 
events. The garrison consisted of fifty-four men under command of Captain 
Nathan Heald, assisted by Lieutenant Helm (son-in-law of Mrs. Kinzie) and 
Ensign Ronan. Dr. Voorhees was surgeon. The only residents at the post at 
that time were the wives of Captain Heald and Lieutenant Helm, and a few of 
the soldiers, Mr. Kinzie and his family, and a few Canadian voi/ageurs, with 
their wives and children. The soldiers and Mr. Kinzie were on most friendly 
terms with the Pottawattomies and Winnebagos, the principal tribes around 
them, but they could not win them from their attachment to the British. 

* The above from Dr. Fowler's oration as seen in Directory of De Kalb Co., published by H. F. Kett & Co., 
Chicago. 



26 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

One evening in April, 1812, Mr. Kinzie sat playing on his violin and his 
children were dancing to the music, when Mrs. Kinzie came rushing into the 
house, pale with terror, and exclaiming: "The Indians! the Indians!" 
w ' What ? Where? " eagerly inquired Mr. Kinzie. " Up at Lee's, killing and 
scalping," answered the frightened mother, who, when the alarm was given, 
was attending Mrs. Barnes (just confined), living not far off'. Mr. Kinzie and 
his family crossed^the river and took refuge in the fort, to which place Mrs. Barnes 
and her infant not a day old were safely conveyed. The rest of the inhabitants 
took shelter in the fort. This alarm was caused by a scalping party of Winne- 
bagoes, who hovered about the fort several days, when they disappeared, and 
for several weeks the inhabitants were undisturbed. 

On the 7th of August, 1812, General Hull, at Detroit, sent orders to Cap- 
tain Heald to evacuate Fort Dearborn, and to distribute all the United States 
property to the Indians in the neighborhood a most insane order. The Potta- 
wattomie chief, who brought the dispatch, had more wisdom than the command- 
ing general. He advised Captain Heald not to make the distribution. Said 
he : " Leave the fort and stores as they are, and let the Indians make distri- 
bution for themselves ; and while they are engaged in the business, the white 
people may escape to Fort Wayne. " 

Captain Heald held a council with the Indians on the afternoon of the 12th, 
iii which his officers refused to join, for they had been informed that treachery 
was designed that the Indians intended to murder the white people in the 
council, and then destroy those in the fort. Captain Heald, however, took the 
precaution to open a port hole displaying a cannon pointing directly upon the 
council, and by that means saved his life. 

Mr. Kinzie, who knew the Indians well, begged Captain Heald not to con- 
fide in their promises, nor distribute the arms and munitions among them, for it 
would only put power into their hands to destroy the whites. Acting upon this 
advice, Heald resolved to -withhold the munitions of war ; and on the night of 
the 13th, after the distribution of the other property had been made, the pow- 
der, ball and liquors were thrown into the river, the muskets broken up and 
destroyed. 

Black Partridge, a friendly chief, came to Captain Heald, and said : 
" Linden birds have been singing in my ears to-day : be careful on the march 
you are going to take." On that dark night, vigilant Indians had crept near 
the fort and discovered the destruction of their promised booty going on within. 
The next morning the powder was seen floating on the surface of the river. 
The savages were exasperated and made loud complaints and threats. 

On the following day, when preparations were making to leave the fort, and 
all the inmates were deeply impressed with a sense of impending danger, Capt. 
Wells, an uncle of Mrs. Heald, was discovered upon the Indian trail among the 
sand-hills on the borders of the lake, not far distant, with a band of mounted 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 27 

Miamis, of whose tribe lie was chief, having been adopted by the famous Miami 
warrior, Little Turtle. When news of Hull's surrender reached Fort Wayne, 
he had started with this force to assist Heald in defending Fort Dearborn. He 
was too late. Every means for its defense had been destroyed the night before, 
and arrangements were made for leaving the fort on the morning of the 15th. 

It was a warm, bright morning in the middle of August. Indications were 
positive that the savages intended to murder the white people ; and when they 
moved out of the southern gate of the fort, the march was like a funeral proces- 
sion. The band, feeling the solemnity of the occasion, struck up the Dead 
March in Saul. 

Capt. Wells, who had blackened his face with gun powder in token of his 
fate, took the lead with his band of Miamis, followed by Capt. Heald, with his 
wife by his side on horseback. Mr. Kinzie hoped by his personal influence to 
avert the impending blow, and therefore accompanied them, leaving his family 
in a boat in charge of a friendly Indian, to be taken to his trading station at the 
site of Niles, Michigan, in the event of his death. 

The procession moved slowly along the lake shore till they reached the sand- 
hills between the prairie and the beach, when the Pottawartomie escort, under 
the leadership of Blackbird, filed to the right, placing those hills between them 
and the white people. Wells, with his Miamis, had kept in the advance. 
They suddenly came rushing back, Wells exclaiming, " They are about to attack 
us ; form instantly. ' ' These words were quickly followed by a storm of bullets, 
which came whistling over the little hills which the treacherous savages had 
made the covert for their murderous attack. The white troops charged upon 
the Indians, drove them back to the prairie, and then the battle was waged 
between fifty-four soldiers, twelve civilians and three or four women (the cow- 
ardly Miamis having fled at the outset), against five hundred Indian warriors. 
The white people, hopeless, resolved to sell their lives as dearly as possible. 
Ensign Rorian wielded his weapon vigorously, even after falling upon his knees 
weak from the loss of blood. Capt. Wells, who was by the side of his niece, Mrs. 
Heald, when the conflict began, behaved with the greatest coolness and courage. 
He said to her, " We have not the slightest chance for life. We must part to 
meet no more in this world, (jfod bless you." And then he dashed forward. 
Seeing a young Avarrior, painted like a demon, climb into a wagon in which 
were twelve children, and tomahawk them all, he cried out, unmindful of his 
personal danger, " If that is your game, butchering women and children, I will 
kill too." He spurred his horse toward the Indian camp, where they had left 
their squaws and papooses, hotly pursued by swift-footed young warriors, who 
sent bullets whistling after him. One of these killed his horse and wounded 
him severely in the leg. With a yell the young braves rushed to make him their 
prisoner and reserve him for torture. He resolved not to be made a captive, 
and by the use of the most provoking epithets tried to induce them to kill him 



28 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

instantly. He called a fiery young chief a squaw, when the enraged warrior 
killed Wells instantly with his tomahawk, jumped upon his body, cut out his 
heart, and ate a portion of the warm morsel with savage delight ! 

In this fearful combat women bore a conspicuous part. Mrs. Heald was an 
excellent equestrian and an expert in the use of the rifle. She fought the sav- 
ages bravely, receiving several severe wounds. Though faint from the loss of 
blood, she managed to keep her saddle. A savage raised his tomahawk to kill 
her, when she looked him full in the face, and with a sweet smile and in a gentle 
voice said, in his own language, " Surely you will not kill a squaw ! " The 
arm of the savage fell, and the life of the heroic woman was saved. 

Mrs. Helm, the step-daughter of Mr. Kinzie, had an encounter with a stout 
Indian, who attempted to tomahawk her. Springing to one side, she received 
the glancing blow on her shoulder, and at the same instant seized the savage 
round the neck with her arms and endeavored to get hold of his scalping knife, 
which hung in a sheath at his breast. While she was thus struggling, she was 
dragged from her antagonist by another powerful Indian, who bore her, in spite 
of her struggles, to the margin of the lake and plunged her in. To her aston- 
ishment she was held by him so that she would not drown, and she soon per- 
ceived that she was in the hands of the friendly Black Partridge, who had saved 
her life. 

The wife of Sergeant Holt, a large and powerful woman, behaved as bravely 
as an Amazon. She rode a fine, high-spirited horse, which the Indians coveted, 
and several of them attacked her with the butts of their guns, for the purpose of 
dismounting her ; but she used the sword which she had snatched from her dis- 
abled husband so skillfully that she foiled them ; and, suddenly wheeling her 
horse, she dashed over the prairie, followed by the savages shouting, " The 
brave woman ! the brave woman ! Don't hurt her ! " They finally overtook her, 
and while she was fighting them in front, a powerful savage came up behind 
her, seized her by the neck and dragged her to the ground. Horse and woman 
were made captives. Mrs. Holt was a long time a captive among the Indians, 
but was afterward ransomed. 

In this sharp conflict two-thirds of the white people were slain and wounded, 
and all their horses, baggage and [ provisions were lost. Only twenty-eight 
straggling men now remained to fight five hundred Indians rendered furious by 
the sight of blood. They succeeded in breaking through the ranks of the 
murderers and gaining a slight eminence on the prairie near the oak woods. 
The Indians did not pursue, but gathered on their flanks, while the chiefs held 
a consultation on the sand-hills, and showed .signs of willingness to parley. It 
would have been madness on the part of the whites to renew the fight ; and so 
Capt. Heald went forward and met Blackbird on the open prairie, where terms 
of surrender were soon agreed upon. It was arranged that the white people 
should give up their arms to Blackbird, and that the survivors should become 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 29 

prisoners of war, to be exchanged for ransoms as soon as practicable. With 
this understanding, captives and captors started for the Indian camp near the 
fort, to which Mrs. Helm had been taken bleeding and suffering by Black 
Partridge, and had met her step-father and learned that her husband was safe. 
A new scene of horror was now opened at the Indian camp. The wounded, 
not being included in the terms of surrender, as it was interpreted by the 
Indians, and the British General, Proctor, having offered a liberal bounty for 
American scalps, delivered at Maiden, nearly all of the wounded men were 
killed and scalped, and the price of the trophies was afterward paid by the 
British Government. 

ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

BILLS OF EXCHANGE AND PROMISSORY NOTES. 

No promissory note, check, draft, bill of exchange, order, or note, nego- 
tiable instrument payable at sight, or on demand, or on presentment, shall be 
entitled to days of grace. All other bills of exchange, drafts or notes are 
entitled to three days of grace. All the above mentioned paper falling due on 
SUNDAY, NEW YEAR'S DAY, THE FOURTH OF JULY, CHRISTMAS, or any day 
appointed or recommended by the PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES or the 
GOVERNOR OF THE STATE as a da<y of FAST OR THANKSGIVING, shall be deemed 
as due on the day previous, and should two or more of these days come 
together, then such instrument shall be treated as due on the day previous to 
the FIRST OF SAID DAYS. No DEFENSE can be made against a negotiable 
instrument (ASSIGNED BEFORE DUE) in the hands of the assignee without notice, 
except FRAUD was used in obtaining the same. To hold an INDORSER, due 
diligence must be used BY SUIT, in collecting of the maker, unless suit would 
have been UNAVAILING. Notes payable to person named or to order, in order 
to absolutely TRANSFER TITLE, must be indorsed by the PAYEE. Notes payable 
to BEARER may be transferred by DELIVERY, and when so payable, every 
indorser thereon is held as a GUARANTOR OF PAYMENT unless otherwise ex- 
pressed. 

In computing interest or discount on negotiable instruments, a MONTH shall 
be considered a CALENDAR MONTH or TWELFTH of a year, and for less than a 
month, a day shall be figured a THIRTIETH part of a month. Notes only bear 
interest when so expressed, but after due they draw the legal interest, even if 
not stated. 

INTEREST. 

The legal rate of interest is six per cent. Parties may agree in WRITING 
on a rate not exceeding TEN per cent. If a rate of interest greater than ten 
per cent, is contracted for, it works a forfeiture of the ivhole of said interest, 
and only the principal can be recovered. 



30 HISTORY OF THE STATT OF ILLINOIS. 

DESCENT. 

When no will is made, the property of a deceased person is distributed as 
follows : 

First. To his or her children and their descendants, in equal parts ; the 
descendants of the deceased child or grandchild taking the share of their 
deceased parents in equal parts among them. 

Second. -When there is no child of the intestate, nor descendant of such 
child, and no widow or surviving husband, then to the parents, brothers or 
sisters of the deceased, and their descendants, in equal parts among them, 
allowing to each of the parents, if living, a child's part, or to the survivor of 
them if one be dead, a double portion ; and if there is no parent living, then to 
the brothers and sisters of the intestate, and their descendants. 

Third. When there is a widow or surviving husband, and no child or 
children, or descendants of a child or children of the intestate, then (after the 
payment of all just debts) one-half of the real estate and the whole of the 
personal estate shall descend to such widow or surviving husband as an absolute 
estate forever. 

Fourth. When there is a widow or a surviving husband, and also a child 
or children, or descendants of such child or children of the intestate, the widow 
or surviving husband shall receive, as his or her absolute personal estate, one- 
third of all the personal estate of the intestate. 

Fifth. If there is no child of the intestate, or descendant of such child, 
and no parent, brother or sister, or descendant of such parent, brother or sister, 
and no widow or surviving husband, then such estate shall descend in equal 
parts to the next of kin to the intestate, in equal degree (computing by the 
rules of the civil law), and there shall be no representation among collaterals, 
except with the descendants of brothers and sisters of the intestate; and in no 
case shall there be any distinction between the kindred of the whole and the 
half blood. 

Sixth. If any intestate leaves a widow or surviving husband and no 
kindred, his or her estate shall descend to such widow or surviving husband. 

WILLS AND ESTATES OF DECEASED PERSONS. 

No exact form of words is necessary in order to make a will good at law. 
Every male person of the age of 21 years, and every female of the age of 18 
years, of sound mind and memory, can make a valid will ; it must be in writing, 
signed by the testator or by some one in his or her presence and by his or her 
direction, and attested by two or more credible witnesses. Care should be 
taken that the witnesses are not .interested in the will. Persons knowing them- 
selves to have been named in the will or appointed executor must within thirty 
days of the death of deceased cause the will to be proved and recorded in the 
proper, county, or present it and refuse to accept; on failure to do so, are liable 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. . 31 

to forfeit the sum of $20 per month. Inventory to be made by executor or 
administrator within three months from date of letters testamentary or of 
administration. Executors' and administrators' compensation not to exceed 
six per cent, on amount of personal estate, and three per cent, on money 
realized from real estate, with such additional allowance as shall be reasonable 
for extra services. Appraisers' compensation, $2 per day. 

Notice requiring all claims to be presented against the estate shall be given 
by the executor or admininistrator WITHIN six MONTHS of being qualified. 
Any person having a claim and not presenting it at the time fixed by said 
notice is required to have summons issued notifying the executor or adminis- 
trator of his having filed his claim in court ; in such cases, the costs have to be 
paid by the claimant. CLAIMS should be filed within TWO YEARS from the 
time ADMINISTRATION is granted on an estate, as after that time they are for- 
ever barred, unless other estate is found that was not inventoried. MARRIED 

WOMEN, INFANTS, PERSONS INSANE, IMPRISONED Or without the UNITED 

STATES, in the employment of the UNITED STATES, or of THIS STATE, have 
TWO YEARS after their disabilities are removed to file claims. 

CLAIMS are classified and paid out of the estate in the following manner : 

First. Funeral expenses. 

Second. The widow's award, if there is a widow ; or children, if there are 
children, and no widow. 

Third. - Expenses attending the last illness, not including physician's bill. 

Fourth. Debts due the common school or township fund. 

Fifth. All expenses of proving the will and taking out letters testament- 
ary or administration, and settlement of the estate, and the physician's bill in 
the last illness of deceased. 

Sixth. Where the deceased has received money in trust for any purpose, 
his executor or administrator shall pay out of his estate the amount received 
and not accounted for. 

Seventh. All other debts and demands of whatsoever kind, without regard 
to quality or dignity, which shall be exhibited to the court within two years 
from the granting of letters. 

AWARD TO WIDOW AND CHILDREN, exclusive of debts and legacies or 
bequests, except funeral expenses : 

First. The family pictures and wearing apparel, jewels and ornaments of 
herself and minor children. 

Second. School books and the family library of the value of $100. 

Third. One sewing machine. 

Fourth. Necessary beds, bedsteads and bedding for herself and family. 

Fifth. The stoves and pipe used in the family, with the necessary cooking 
utensils, or, in case they have none, $50 in money. 

Sixth. Household and kitchen furniture to the value of $100. 



82 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

Seventh. One milch cow and calf for every four members of her family. 

Eighth. Two sheep for each member of her family and the fleeces taken 
from the same, and one horse, saddle and bridle. 

Ninth. Provisions for herself and family for one year. 

Tenth. Food for the stock above specified for six months. 

Eleventh. Fuel for herself and family for three months. 

Twelfth. One hundred dollars' worth of other property suited to her con- 
dition in life, to be selected by the widow. 

The widow, if she elects, may have in lieu of the said award, the same per- 
sonal property or money in place thereof as is or may be exempt from execu- 
tion or attachment against the head of a family. 

TAXES. 

The owners of real and personal property, on the first day of May in each 
year, are liable for the taxes thereon. 

Assessments should be completed before the fourth Monday in June, at 
which time the town board of review meets to examine assessments, hear objec- 
tions, and make such changes as ought to be made. The county board have 
also power to correct or change assessments. 

The tax books are placed in the hands of the Town Collector on or before 
the tenth day of December, who retains them until the tenth day of March 
following, when he is required to return them to the County Treasurer, who then 
collects all delinquent taxes. 

No costs accrue on real estate taxes till advertised, which takes place the 
first day of April, when three weeks' notice is required before judgment. 
Cost of advertising, twenty cents each tract of land, and ten cents each lot. 

Judgment is usually obtained at May term of County Court. Costs six 
cents each tract of land, and five cents each lot. Sale takes place in June. 
Costs in addition to those before mentioned, twenty-eight cents each tract of 
land, and twenty-seven cents each town lot. 

Real estate sold for taxes may be redeemed any time before the expiration 
of two years from the date of sale, by payment to the County Clerk of the 
amount for which it was sold, and twenty- five per cent, thereon if redeemed 
within six months, fifty per cent, if between six and twelve months, if between 
twelve and eighteen months seventy-five per cent., and if between eighteen 
months and two years one hundred per cent., and in addition, all subse- 
quent taxes paid by the purchaser, with ten per cent, interest thereon, also one 
dollar each tract if notice is given by the purchaser of the sale, and a fee of 
twenty-five cents to the clerk for his certificate. 

JURISDICTION OF COURTS. 

Justices have jurisdiction in all civil cases on contracts for the recovery of 
moneys for damages for injury to real property, or taking, detaining or injuring 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 38 

personal property ; for rent ; for all cases to recover damages done real or per- 
sonal property by railroad companies, in actions of replevin, and in actions for 
damages for fraud in the sale, purchase or exchange of personal property, when 
the amount claimed as due is not over $200. They have also jurisdiction in 
all cases for violation of the ordinances of cities, towns or villages. A Justice 
of the Peace may orally order an officer or a private person to arrest any one 
committing or attempting to commit a criminal offense. He also, upon com- 
plaints can issue his warrant for the arrest of any person accused of having 
committed a crime, and have him brought before him for examination. 

COUNTY COURTS 

Have jurisdiction in all matters of probate, settlement of estates of de- 
ceased persons, appointment of guardians and conservators, and settlement of 
their accounts ; all matters relating to apprentices ; proceedings for the collec- 
tion of taxes and assessments, and in proceedings of executions, administrators, 
guardians and conservators for the sale of real estate. In law casess theyjhave 
concurrent jurisdiction with Circuit Courts in all cases where Justices of Peace 
now have when the amount claimed shall not exceed $500, and in all criminal 
offenses where the punishment is not imprisonment in the penitentiary or death, 
but no appeal is allowed from Justices of the Peace to County Courts. 
Circuit Courts Have unlimited jurisdiction. 

LIMITATION OF ACTION. 

Accounts five years. Notes and written contracts ten years. Judgments 
twenty years. Partial payment or new promise in writing, within or after said 
period, will revive the debt. Absence from the State deducted, and when the 
cause of action is barred by the law of another State, it has the same effect 
here. Slander and libel, one "year. Personal injuries, two years. To recover 
land or make entry thereon, twenty years. Action to foreclose mortgage or 
trust deed, or make a sale, within ten years. 

All persons in possession of land, and paying taxes for seven consecutive 
years, with color of title, and all persons paying taxes for seven consecutive 
years, with color of title, on vacant land, shall be held to be the legal owners 
to the extent of their paper title. 

MARRIED WOMEN 

'May sue and be sued. Husband and wife not liable for each other's debts, 
either before or after marriage, but both are liable for expenses and education of 
the family. 

She may contract the same as if unmarried, except that, in a partnership 
business, she cannot, without consent of her husband, unless he has abandoned 
or deserted her, or is idiotic or insane, or confined in penitentiary ; she is enti- 
tled to and can recover her own earnings, but neither husband nor wife is end- 



34 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

tied to compensation for any services rendered for the other. At the death of 
the husband, in addition to widow's award, a married woman has a dower inter- 
est (one-third) in all real estate owned by her husband after their marriage, and 
which has not been released by her, and the husband has the same interest in 
the real estate of the wife at her death. 

KXEMPTIONS FROM FORCED SALE. 

HOME WORTH 1,000, AND PERSONAL PROPERTY. Lot of ground and 
buildings thereon, occupied as a residence by the debtor, being a householder 
and having a family, to the value of $1,000. Exemption continues after the 
death of the householder for the benefit of widow and family, some one of them 
occupying the homestead until youngest child shall become 21 years of age, and 
until death of widow. There is no exemption from sale for taxes, assessments, 
debt or liability incui'red for the purchase or improvement of said homestead. 
No release or waiver of exemption is valid, unless in writing, and subscribed 
by such householder and wife (if he have one), and acknowledged as convey- 
ances of real estate are required to be acknowledged. The following articles 
of personal property owned by the debtor are exempt from execution, writ of 
attachment and distress for rent : The necessary wearing apparel of every per- 
son ; one sewing machine ; the furniture, tools and implements necessary to 
carry on his trade or business, not exceeding $100 in value ; the implements or 
library of any professional man, not exceeding $100 in value ; materials and 
stock designed and procured for carrying on his trade or business, and intended 
to be used or wrought therein, not exceeding $100 in value; and, also, when 
the debtor is the head of a family and resides with the same, necessary beds, 
bedsteads and bedding, two stoves and pipe, necessary household furniture, not 
exceeding in value $100, one cow, calf, two swine, one yoke of oxen, or two 
horses in lieu thereof, worth not exceeding $200, with the harness therefor, 
necessary provisions and fuel for the use of the family three months, and neces- 
sary food for the stock hereinbefore exempted for the same time ; the Bibles, 
school books and family pictures ; the family library, cemetery lots, and rights of 
burial and tombs for the repositories of the dead ; one hundred dollars' worth 
of other property, suited to his condition in life, selected by the debtor. No 
personal property is exempt from sale for the wages of laborers or servants. 
Wages of a laborer who is head of a family cannot be garnisheed, except the 
sum due him is in excess of $25. 

DEEDS AND MORTGAGES. 

To be valid, there must be a valid consideration. Special care should be 
taken to have them signed, sealed, delivered and properly acknowledged, with 
the proper seal attached. Witnesses are not required. The acknowledgment 
must be made in this State before Master in Chancery, Notary Public, United 
States Commissioner, Circuit or County Clerk, Justice of the Peace or any 



HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 35 

Court of Record having a seal, or any Judge, Justice or Clerk of any such 
Court. When taken before a Notary Public or United States Commissioner, 
the same shall be attended by his official seal ; when taken before a Court or 
Clerk thereof, the same shall be attended by the seal of such Court, and when 
taken before a Justice of the Peace residing out of the county where the real 
estate to be conveyed lies, there shall be added a certificate of the County Clerk, 
under his seal of office, that he was a Justice of the Peace in the county at the 
time of taking the same. A deed is good without such certificate attached, but 
cannot be used in evidence unless such a certificate is produced or other com- 
petent evidence introduced. Acknowledgments made out of the State must 
either be executed according to the laws of this State, or there should be at- 
tached a certificate that it is in conformity with the laws of the State or country 
where executed. Where this is not done, the same may be proved by any other 
legal way. Acknowledgments where the homestead rights are to be waived 
must state as follows : " Including the release and waiver of the right of home- 
stead." 

Notaries Public can take acknowledgments anywhere in the State. 

Sheriffs, if authorized by the mortgagor of real or personal property in the 
mortgage, may sell the property mortgaged. 

In the case of the death of grantor or holder of the equity of redemption 
of real estate mortgaged or conveyed by deed of trust where equity of redemp- 
tion is waived and it contains power of sale, must be foreclosed in the same 
manner as a common mortgage in court. 

ESTRAYS. 

Horses, mules, asses, neat cattle, swine, sheep or goats found straying at any 
time during the year, in counties where such animals are not allowed to run at 
large, or between the last day of October and the 15th day of April in other 
counties, the owner thereof being unknown, may be taken up as estrays. 

No person not a householder in the county where estray is found can law- 
fully take up an estray, and then only upon or about his farm or place of resi- 
dence. Estrays should not be used before advertised, except animals giving 
milk, which may be milked for their benefit. 

Notices must be posted up within five (5) days in three (3) of the most pub- 
lic places in the town or precinct in which estray was found, giving the resi- 
dence of the taker up and a particular description of the estray. its age, color 
and marks natural and artificial and stating before what Justice of the Peace in 
such town or precinct and at what time, not less than ten (10) nor more than 
fifteen (15) days from the time of posting such notices, he will apply to have 
the estray appraised. 

A copy of suck notice should be filed by the taker up with the Town Clerk, 
whose duty it is to enter the same at large, in a book kept by him for that 
purpose. 



86 HISTORY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS. 

If the owner of estray shall not have appeared and proved ownership and 
taking the same away, first paying the taker up his reasonable charges for tak- 
ing up, keeping and advertising the same, the taker up shall appear before the 
Justice of the Peace mentioned in above mentioned notice and make an affidavit 
as required by law. 

As the affidavit has to be made before the Justice and all other steps as to 
appraisement, etc., are before him, who is familiar-there with, they are, there- 
fore, omitted here. 

Any person taking up an estray in any other place than about or upon his 
farm or residence, or without complying with the law, shall forfeit and pay a 
fine of ten dollars with costs. 

Ordinary diligence is required in taking care of estrays, but in case they 
die or get away the taker is not liable for the same. 

GAME. 

It is unlawful to hunt, kill or in any manner interfere with deer, wild turkey, 
prairie chicken, partridge or pheasants between the first day of January and 
the fifteenth day of August ; or any quail between t he first day of January 
and the first day of October ; or any woodcock, between the first day of Janu- 
ary and the first day of July ; or any wild goose, duck, Wilson snipe, brandt 
or other water fowl between the fifteenth day of April and the fifteenth day of 
Aug^ist in each, and every year. Penalty : Fine not less than $10 nor more 
than $25 and costs of suit, and shall stand committed to county jail until fine 
is paid, but not exceeding ten days. 

It is unlawful to hunt with gun, dog or net, within the enclosed grounds or 
lands of another, without permission. Penalty : Fine not less than $3 and not 
exceeding $100, to be paid into school fund. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Whenever any of the following articles shall be contracted for, or sold or 
delivered, and no special contract or agreement shall be made to the contrary, 
the weight per bushel shall be as follows, to-wit : 

Potuufo. 

Buckwheat 52 

Coarse salt 50 

Barley 48 

Corn meal 48 

Castor beans , 46 

Timothy seed 45 

Hemp seed v 44 

Malt 38 

Dried peaches 33 

Oats 32 

Dried apples 24 

Bran 20 

Blue grass seed 14 

Hair (plastering) 8 



Pounds. 

Stone coal 80 

Unslaked lime 80 

Corn in the ear 70 

Wheat 60 

Irish potatoes 60 

White beans 60 

Clover seed (JO 

Onions 57 

Shelled corn 56 

Rye 56 

Flax seed 56 

Sweet Potatoes 55 

Turnips 55 

Fine salt 55 

Penalty for giving less than the above standard is double the amount of property wrongfully not given and ten 
dollars addition thereto. 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 37 



FENCES. 

Fence Viewers. In counties under township organization, the Town Assessor 
and Commissioners of Highways shall be ex officio Fence Viewers in their 
respective towns. In counties not under township organization, the County 
Board, at their annual meeting in December, shall appoint three Fence Viewers 
in each precinct, who shall hold their office for one year and until their suc- 
cessors are appointed. 

What Lawful Fence. Fences four and one-half feet high, and in good 
repair, consisting of rails, timber, boards, stone, hedges, or whatever the Fence 
Viewers of the town or precinct, where the same shall lie, shall consider 
equivalent thereto, shall be deemed legal and sufficient fences; provided, that 
in counties under township organization the electors at any annual town meet- 
ing may determine what shall constitute a legal fence in the town and in 
counties not under township organization, the power to regulate the height of 
fences shall be vested in the County Board. 

Division Fences. Where two or more persons shall have lands adjoining, 
each of them shall make and maintain a just proportion of the division fence 
between them, except the owner of either of the adjoining lands shall choose to 
let such land lie open; provided, that where owners of adjoining lands, by 
mutual agreement, have heretofore built, or may hereafter build their respective 
portions of a partition fence, it shall not be lawful for either to remove his part 
of said fence, so long as he may crop or use such land for farm purposes, or 
without giving the other party one year's notice in writing of his intentions to 
move his portion of the fence. 

When Lands Inclosed Contribution. When any person shall have chosen 
to let his land lie open, if he shall afterward inclose the same, or if any owner 
of land adjoining upon the inclosure of another shall inclose the same upon 
the inclosure of another, he shall refund to the owner of the adjoining lands a 
just proportion of the value, at that time, of any division fence that shall have 
been made by such adjoining owner, if the same shall be a ditch or hedge, and 
if the same be not a ditch or hedge, he shall immediately build his proportion 
of such division fence or refund to said adjoining owner a just proportion of 
the value, at that time, of such fence. 

Value of Fence, etc., Ascertained. The value of such fence and the pro- 
portion thereof to be paid by such person, and the proportion of the division 
fence to be made and maintained by him in case of his inclosing his land, shall 
be determined by two Fence Viewers of the town, in counties under township 
organization, and, in other counties, by any two Fence Viewers of the precinct. 

Neglect to Repair and Rebuild. If any person neglect to repair or rebuild 
a division fence or portion thereof, which he ought to maintain, any two Fence 
Viewers of the town or precinct, as the case may be, shall, on complaint by' 



38 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

the party aggrieved, after giving due notice to each party, examine such fence, 
and if they deem the same to be insufficient, they shall so notify the delinquent 
party and direct him to repair or rebuild the same within such time as they 
may deem reasonable. 

Disputes Settled. If disputes arise between the owners of adjoining lands 
concerning the proportion of fence to be made or maintained by either of them, 
such disputes shall be settled by any two of the Fence Viewers of the town or 
precinct, as the case may be, and in such cases it shall be the duty of the two 
Fence Viewers to distinctly mark and define the proportion of the fence to be 
made or maintained by each. 

Choice of Viewers Notice. When any of the above mentioned matters shall 
be submitted to Fence Viewers, each party shall choose one, and if either 
neglect, after eight days' notice in writing to make such choice, the other party 
may select both, and for all purposes of notice under this act, it shall be suffi- 
cient to notify the tenant or person in possession of said adjoining premises, 
when the owner thereof is not a resident of the town in which such fences are 
situated. 

Viewing Fence Disagreement. The two Fence Viewers so chosen shall ex- 
amine the premises, and hear the allegations of the parties. In cases of their 
disagreement, they shall select another Fence Viewer to act with them, and the 
decision of any two of them shall be final upon the parties for such dispute, 
and upon all parties holding under them. 

Decision. The decision of the Fence Viewers shall be reduced to writing ; 
shall contain a description of the fence, and of the proportion to be maintained 
by each, and their decision upon any other point in dispute between the parties 
submitted to them as aforesaid ; and shall be forthwith filed in the office of the 
Town Clerk, or in the office of the County Clerk in counties which shall not 
have adopted township organization. 

Neglect Damages. If any person who is liable to contribute to the erec- 
tion or reparation of a division fence shall neglect or refuse to make or repair 
his proportion of such fence, the party injured, after giving sixty days' notice, 
in writing, that a new fence should be erected, or ten days' notice, in writing, 
that the reparation of such fence is necessary, may make or repair the same 
at the expense of the party so neglecting or refusing, to be recovered from him 
with costs of suit, and the party so neglecting or refusing, after notice in 
writing, shall be liable to the party injured for all damages which shall thereby 
accrue, to be determined by any two Fence Viewers selected as above provided ; 
and the Fence Viewers shall reduce their appraisement of damages to writing, 
and sign the same. 

Making and Repairing Fences Destroyed. Whenever a division fence shall 

be injured or destroyed by fires, floods or other casualty, the person bound to 

make and repair such fence, or any part thereof, shall make or repair the same 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 39 

or his just proportion thereof, within ten days after he shall be thereto required 
by any person interested therein, such requisition to be in writing, and signed 
by the party making the same. 

Refusing to Make or Repair. If such person shall neglect or refuse to 
make or repair his proportion of such fence for the period of ten days after 
such request, the party injured may make or repair the same at the expense of 
party so refusing or neglecting, to be recovered with costs of suit. 

Removal of Division Fence. If any person is disposed to remove a divi- 
sion fence or part thereof, owned by him, and suffer his lands to lie open, after 
having just given the adjoining owner one year's notice in writing of his inten- 
tion so to do, he may, at any time thereafter, remove the same, unless such ad- 
joining owner shall previously cause the value of said fence to be ascertained 
by Fence Viewers, selected as hereinbefore provided, and pay or tender the same 
to such person. 

Removal Without Notice. If any such fence shall be removed without such 
notice, the party removing the same shall pay to the party injured all such 
damages as he may thereby sustain, so be recovered with costs of suit. 

Mistake in Locating fence. When a person has made a fence on an in- 
closure, which afterward, on making division lines, is found to be on the land 
of another, and the same has occurred through mistake, such first person may 
enter on the land of the other and remove his fence and material, within six 
months after such line has been run. 

When Removal may not be Made. But such fence shall not be removed if it 
was made of material taken from the land on which it is built, until the party 
pays or tenders to the owner of the land the value of such material, to be ascer- 
tained by the Fence Viewers ; nor shall a fence be removed at a time when the 
removal will throw open or expose the crops of the other party, but it shall be 
removed within a reasonable time after the crops are secured, although the six 
months above specified have passed. 

Viewers may Examine Witnesses, etc. Fence Viewers may examine witnesses 
on any and all questions submitted to them, and either of such Fence Viewers 
shall have power to issue subpoenas for and administer oaths to such witnesses. 

Fees. Fence Viewers shall be entitled to one dollar and fifty cents per day 
each, for the time necessarily spent as above provided, to be paid in the first 
instance by the party requiring the services ; and all expenses of the view shall 
be borne equally between the parties, except in case of view to appraise dam- 
ages for neglect or refusal to make or maintain a just proportion of a division 
fence, in which case the costs of view shall be paid by the party in default, and 
may be recovered as part of the damages assessed. 

Trespass Damages. If any horse, mule or ass, or any neat cattle, hogs or 
sheep, or other domestic animals, shall break into any person's inclosure. the 
fence being good and sufficient, the owner of such animal or animals shall be 



40 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS 

liable in an action of trespass, to make good all damages to the owner or occu- 
pier of the inclosure. This section shall not be construed to require such fence, 
in order to maintain an action done by animals running at large contrary to 
law. 

Damay. s Peasant Rescue. If any such animal or animals shall break 
into an inclosure surrounded by a fence of the height and sufficiency prescribed 
by this act, or shall be wrongfully upon the premises of another, the owner or 
occupier of such inclosure or premises may take into possession such animal or 
animals trespassing, and keep the same until damages, with reasonable charges 
for keeping and feeding, and all costs of suit be paid, to be recovered in any 
court of competent jurisdiction ; and any person who shall take or rescue any 
such animal so taken up from the possession of the taker up, without his con- 
sent, shall be liable to a fine of not less than three nor more than five dollars 
for each of such animals so rescued, to be recovered on complaint before any 
Justice of the Peace of the county where such offense shall be committed, for 
the use of the school fund of the proper county. Provided, that within twenty- 
four hours after taking such animal into his possession, he shall give notice to 
the owner thereof, if known, or if unknown, he shall post notices at some pub- 
lic place near the premises. 

ROADS. 

Pel-sons traveling in any kind of vehicle must seasonably turn to the right 
of the center of the road, so as to permit such carriage to pass without inter- 
fering or interrupting, under the penalty of five dollars for every neglect or 
offense, to be recovered by the party injured. This shall not be construed to 
apply to any case, unless some injury to persons or property shall have occurred, 
nor in a case where it is impracticable, from the nature of the ground, for the 
driver to turn to the right. The owner of any carriage running upon any 
road in this State for the conveyance of passengers, who shall employ or con- 
tinue in his employment, any person, as driver, who is addicted to drunken- 
ness or the excessive use of spirituous liquors, after he shall have had notice 
of the same, shall forfeit at the rate of five dollars per day for all the time 
thereafter he shall have kept him in his employ, and if any driver, whilst 
actually employed in Driving any such carriage, shall be guilty of intoxication 
to such a degree as to endanger the safety of the passengers, it shall be the 
duty of the owner, on receiving written notice of the fact, signed^by any one 
of said passengers and certified by him on oath, forthwith to discharge such 
driver. If the owner, however, shall have such driver in his employ within 
three months after receipt of such notice, he shall forfeit five dollars per day 
for the time he shall keep said driver in his employ. 

No person driving any carriages on any public highway or turnpike road 
shall run his horses or carriages upon any occasion or for any purpose, under a 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 41 

penalty of a fine not exceeding $10 or imprisonment not exceeding sixty days, 
at the discretion of the court. 

Horses attached to any carriage used to convey passengers for hire must 
be made fast with a sufficient halter, rope or chain or the lines placed in the 
hands of some other person before the driver leaves them for any purpose. 
For violation of the above, each driver shall forfeit $20, to be recovered 
by action, to be commenced within six months. The owners, also, of any 
carriage running upon any public highway for the conveyance of passengers 
are liable, jointly and severally, to the party injured in all cases for injuries 
and damages done by a driver while driving such carriage, to any person or 
the property of any person, and whenever the act occasioning such injury or 
damage be willful, negligent or otherwise, in the same manner that such driver 
would be liable. The term carriage, as used, means any carriage or vehicle 
used for the transportation of passengers or goods or either of them. 

The Commissioners of Highways in the several towns in this State have 
the care and superintendence of highways and bridges therein. They have the 
power necessary to repair roads and bridges, to lay and establish roads, 'regu- 
late roads already laid out, to alter, vacate and to divide their respective towns 
into so many road districts as they shall deem convenient; such division to be 
made annually, and at least ten days before the annual town meeting. They 
shall also cause to be erected and kept in repair, at the forks or crossing place 
of the most important public roads, a post and guide-boards, with plain inscrip- 
tions thereon in letters and figures, giving directions and distances to the most 
noted places to which such road may lead; also to prevent thistles, burdock, 
cockleburs, mustard, yellow dock, Indian mallow and jimson weed from seeding, 
and to extirpate the same as far as practicable, and to prevent all rank growth 
of vegetation in the public highway, as far as the same may obstruct public 
travel, and in their discretion, they may erect watering places for public use for 
watering teams at such points as may be deemed advisable. 

Every able-bodied male inhabitant, being above the age of 21 and under 
the age of 50 (excepting paupers, idiots, lunatics and such others as are exempt 
by law), is required to labor on the highways in their respective road districts, 
not less than one or more than three days in each and every year. Three 
days' notice must be given by the Overseer of the time and place he requires 
such road labor to be done and with what implements. But no person shall be 
required to work on any highway other than in the district in which he resides. 
Any person may commute for such labor by paying at the rate of $1.50 per day, 
if done within the three days' notice : after that time, if he shall refuse to 
commute, at the rate of $2.00 per day. Any person liable for work on high- 
ways who shall have been assessed two days or more, and who shall not have 
commuted for his assessment, may be required to furnish a team or a cart, 
wagon or plow, with a pair of horses or oxen and a man to manage them, for 



42 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

which he shall be entitled to a credit of two days for each day's service there- 
with. Eight hours is a day's work on the roads, and there is a penalty of twen- 
ty-five cents an hour against any person or substitute who shall neglect or refuse 
to perform such labor. Any person, after appearing, who shall remain idle or 
not work faithfully, or hinder others from working, forfeits to the town the sum 
of $2.00. 

Every person so assessed and duly notified, who shall not commute, and who 
shall refuse or neglect to appear, shall forfeit to the town, for every day's refusal 
or neglect, the sum of $2.00 ; if he was required to furnish a team, carriage, 
man or implement, and shall refuse or neglect to comply, he shall be fined as 
follows : 

First. For wholly failing to comply, $4.00 for each day. 

Second. For omitting to furnish a pair of horses or oxen, $1.50 for 
each day. 

Third. For omitting to furnish a man to manage team, $2.00 for each day. 

Fourth. For omitting to furnish a wagon, cart or plow, 75 cents for each 
day. 

Any person who shall injure or obstruct a public road by felling a tree or 
trees upon the same, or by placing or leaving any obstruction, or by encroach- 
ing upon the same with any fence or by plowing or digging any ditch or other 
opening or by turning a current of water so as to saturate or wash the same, or 
shall leave the cutting of any hedge thereupon for more than five days, shall 
forfeit not Jess than $3 nor more than $10, and in case of placing any obstruc- 
tion, an additional sum not exceeding $3 per day for every day he shall permit 
the same to remain after being ordered to remove the same by any of the Com- 
missioners of Highways, except where a person lawfully fells a tree for use and 
will immediately remove the same, nor any person through whose land a public 
road may pass, who shall desire to drain his- land, and shall give due notice to 
the Commissioners of such intention, or where any Commissioners or Overseers 
of Highways, after giving seasonable notice to the owners, may remove any such 
fence or obstruction, fill up any such ditch or excavation and recover the nec- 
essary cost from such owner or other person, to be collected before any Justice 
of the Peace having jurisdiction. Any person owning, using or occupying lands 
on both sides of any public highway may make a crossing under said highway to 
let his cattle or other domestic animals cross said road ; provided, he shall erect, at 
his own expense, a good and substantial bridge, with secure railings, with an 
embankment of easy grade on either side, the bridge not to be less than sixteen 
feet wide, to be approved by Commissioners of Highways. The Commissioners 
estimate and assess the highway labor and road tax. The road tax on real and 
personal property cannot exceed forty cents on each hundred dollars' worth. The 
labor or road tax in villages, towns or cities is paid over to the corporate authori- 
ties of such for the improvement of streets, roads and bridges within their 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 43 

limits. Commissioners' compensation, $1.50 per day. The Treasurer, who is 
one of their number, is entitled to two per cent, on all moneys he may receive 
and pay out. 

Overseers. Their duties are to repair and keep in order the highways in 
their districts, to warn persons to work out their road tax at such time and 
place as they think proper ; to collect fines and commutation money, and 
execute all lawful orders of the Commissioners of Highways ; also make a list, 
within sixteen days after their election, of the names of all inhabitants in his 
road district liable to work on highways. For refusal to perform any of his 
duties, he is liable to a fine of $10. The compensation of Overseers is $1.50 
a day, the number of days to be audited by the Highway Commissioners. 

As all township and county officers are familiar with their duties, it is only 
intended to give the points of the law that the public should be familiar with. 
The manner of laying out, altering or vacating roads, etc. will not be here 
stated, as it would require more space than is contemplated in a work of this 
kind. It is sufficient to state that the first step is by petition, addressed to the 
Commissioners, setting out what is prayed for, giving the names of the owners 
of lands, if known if not known, so state over which the road is to pass, giv- 
ing the general course, its place of beginning and where it terminates. It re- 
quires not less than twelve freeholders residing within three miles of the road, 
who shall sign the petition. Public roads must not be less than fifty feet wide, 
nor more than sixty feet wide. Roads not exceeding two miles in length, if 
petitioned for, may be laid out not less than forty feet. Private roads for pri- 
vate and public use may be laid out of the width of three rods, on petition of 
the person directly interested ; the damage occasioned thereby shall be paid by 
the premises benefited thereby, and before the road is opened. If not opened 
in two years, the order shall be considered rescinded. Commissioners, in 
their discretion, may permit persons who live on or have private roads to work 
out their road tax thereon. Public roads must be opened in five days from 
date of filing order of location, or be deemed vacated. 

MARKS AND BRANDS. 

How Cattle may be Marked. Every person in this State who hath cattle, 
horses, hogs, sheep or goats may have an ear-mark and brand, and but one of 
each, which shall be different from the ear-mark and brand of his neighbors, 
which ear-mark and brand may be recorded by the County Clerk of the county 
where such cattle, horses, hogs, sheep or goats shall be. 

Book Record Fee Examination of Books. It shall be the duty of the 
County Clerks in the respective counties of this State to keep a well-bound 
book, in which they shall record the marks and brands of each individual who 
may apply to them for that purpose, for which they shall be entitled to demand 
and receive the sum of fifteen cents, and the book in which the same are re- 



44 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

corded shall be open to the examination of every citizen of the county at all 
reasonable office hours, free of charge. 

Book Prima Facie Evidence. If any dispute shall arise about any ear- 
mark or brand, it shall be decided by reference to the book of marks and brands, 
kept by the County Clerk, but such book shall be prima facie evidence only. 

Purchaser Rebranding Certificate. Any person purchasing or acquiring 
horses, cattle, hogs, sheep or goats, when he brands or marks the same in his 
brand or mark, after the acquisition of the same, may do it in the presence of 
one or more of his neighbors, who are authorized to certify to the fact of the 
marking or branding being done, when done, and in what brand or mark the 
same were previously, and in what brand or mark they were rebranded or re- 
marked. Such certificate shall not be deemed evidence of property in the 
animal branded, but only prima facie evidence of the facts therein certified to. 

LANDLORD AND TENANT. 

The owner of lands or his executors and administrators may sue for and 
recover rent therefor in any of the following cases : 

First. When rent is due and in arrear on a lease for life or lives. 

Second. When lands are held and occupied by any person without any 
special agreement for rent. 

Third. When possession is obtained under an agreement, written or 
verbal, for the purchase of the premises and before deed given, the right to 
possession is terminated by forfeiture or non-compliance with the agreement, 
and possession is wrongfully refused or neglected to be given upon demand 
in writing by the party entitled thereto ; provided, that all payments made by 
the vendee or his representatives or assigns may be set off against such rent. 

Fourth. When land has been sold upon a judgment or a decree of court, 
when the party to such judgment or decree or person holding under him wrong- 
fully refuses or neglects to surrender possession of the same, after demand in 
writing by the person entitled to the possession. 

Fifth. When the lands have been sold upon a mortgage or trust deed and 
the mortgagor or grantor or person holding under him wrongfully refuses or 
neglects to surrender possession of the same, after demand in writing by the 
person entitled to the possession. 

If any tenant or tenants for life or any person who shall come into posses- 
sion of any lands, etc., from or under collusion with such tenants, shall willfully 
hold over any lands, etc., after the expiration of such term and after demand 
made in writing for the possession thereof, is liable to double the yearly value 
of the lands, etc. 

A tenancy from year to year requires sixty days' notice to terminate the 
same at the end of the year. Notice may be given at any time within four 
months preceding the last sixty days of the year. 



ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 45 

A tenancy by the month or any other term less than one year, where the 
tenant holds over without special agreement, the landlord may terminate the 
tenancy by thirty days' notice in writing. 

After rent is due, the landlord may notify the tenant in writing that, unless 
payment is made within not less than five days after the service, his lease 
will be terminated. If the rent is not paid within the time mentioned, the 
landlord may consider the lease ended. When default is made in any of the 
terms of a lease, it shall not be necessary to give more than ten days' notice, 
and the same may be terminated on giving such notice to quit at any time after 
such default in any of the terms of such lease ; which notice may be substan- 
tially in the following form, viz. : 

To : You are hereby notified that in consequence of your default 

in (here insert the character of the default), of the premises now occupied by 
you, being, etc. (here describe the premises), I have elected to determine your 
lease, and you are hereby notified to quit and deliver up possession of the same 
to me within ten days of this date (dated, etc.). 

The above to be signed by the lessor or his agent, and no other notice or 
demand of possession or termination of such tenancy shall be necessary. 

Any demand may be made or notice served by delivering a written or 
printed or partly written and printed copy thereof to the tenant, or by leaving 
the same with some person above the age*of twelve years residing on or in pos- 
sion of the premises, and in case no one is in the actual possession of said 
premises, then by posting the same on the premises. 

When the tenancy is for a certain period, and the term expires by the terms 
of the lease, the tenant is then bound to surrender possession, and no notice to 
quit or demand of possession is necessary. 

Distress for Rent. In all cases of distress for rent, the landlord or his 
agent or attorney may seize for rent any personal property of his tenant that 
may be found in the county where such tenant resides ; but the property of any 
other person, although it may be found on the premises, is not liable. 

A copy of the distress warrant, together with an inventory, should be at once 
filed with some Justice of the Peace, if not over $200, and if above that sum, 
with the Clerk of a court of record of competent jurisdiction. Property may 
be released by the party executing a satisfactory bond for double the amount. 

The landlord may distrain the personal goods of the tenant any time within 
six months after the expiration of the term of the lease, or when terminated. 

When the rent is payable wholly or in part in specific articles of property, 
or products of the premises, or labor, the landlord may distrain for the value of 
such articles, products or labor. 

Landlords have a lien upon the crops grown or growing upon the demised 
premises for the rent thereof, and also for the faithful performance of the terms 
of the lease. 



46 ABSTRACT OF ILLINOIS STATE LAWS. 

Landlords have the same right to enforce their liens against the sith-lessee or 
assignee, as they have against the tenant to whom the premises were demised. 

When a tenant abandons or removes from the premises, or any part thereof, 
the landlord or his agent or attorney may seize upon any grain or other crops 
growing upon the premises, or part thereof abandoned, whether the rent is due 
or not. If such grain or other crops, or any part thereof, is not fully grown or 
matured, the landlord or his agent or attorney shall cause the same to be properly 
cultivated and harvested or gathered, and may sell and dispose of .the same and 
apply the proceeds, so far as may be necessary to compensate him for his labor 
and expenses, and to pay the rent. The tenant may, at any time before sale of 
the property so seized, redeem the same by tendering the rent and reasonable 
compensation for work done, or he may replevy the same. 

Exemption. The same articles of personal property, which are by law ex- 
empt from execution, except the crops grown or growing upon the demised 
premises, are also exempt from distress for rent. 

SUGGESTIONS TO THOSE PURCHASING BOOKS BY SUBSCRIPTION. 

The business of publishing by subscription having so often been brought 
into disrepute by agents making representations and declarations not authorized 
by the publisher, in order to prevent that as much as possible, and that there 
may be a more general knowledge of the relation such agents bear to their prin- 
cipal, and the law governing such cases, the following statement is made : 

A subscription is in the rfature of a contract of mutual promises, by which 
the subscriber agrees to pay a certain sum for the work described ; the con- 
sideration is concurrent that the publisher shall publish the book named, 
and deliver the same, for which the subscriber is to pay the price named. 
The nature and character of the work is described in the prospectus and 
by the sample shown. These should be carefully examined before subscribing, 
as they are the basis and consideration of the promise to pay, and not the too 
often exaggerated statements of the agent, who is merely employed to solicit 
subscriptions, for which he is usually paid a commission for each subscriber, 
and has no authority to change or alter the conditions upon which the subscrip- 
tions are authorized to be made by the publisher. Should the agent assume to 
agree to make the subscription conditional, or modify or change the agreement 
of the publisher, as set out by prospectus and sample, in order to bind the prin- 
cipal, the subscriber should see that such conditions or changes are stated over 
or in connection with his signature, so that the publisher may have notice of 
the same. 

All persons making contracts in reference to matters of this kind, or any 
other business, should remember that the law as to written contracts is, that 
they cannot be varied, altered or rescinded verbally, but, if done at all, must be 
done in writing. It is, therefore, important that all persons contemplating sub- 



BUSINESS FORMS. 47 

scribing should distinctly understand that all talk before or after the subscription 
is made is not admissible as evidence, and is no part of the contract. 

Persons employed to solicit subscriptions are known to the trade as canvassers. 
They are agents appointed to do a particular business in a prescribed mode, and 
have no authority to do it in any other way to the prejudice of their principal, 
nor can they bind their principal in any other matter. They cannot collect 
money nor agree that payment may be made in anything else but money. They 
cannot extend the time of payment beyond the time of delivery, nor bind 
their principal for the payment of expenses incurred in their business. 

It would save a great deal of trouble, and often serious loss, if persons, be- 
fore signing their names to any subscription book, or any written instrument, 
would examine carefully what it is ; if they cannot read themselves, should cull 
on some one disinterested who can. 

BUSINESS FORMS. 

NOTES. 

Form of note is legal worded in the simplest way, so that the amount and 
time of payment are mentioned : 
$100. Chicago, 111., Nov. 10, 1876. 

Six months from date, I promise to pay E. A. Hyde, or order, One 
Hundred Dollars, for value received. F. G. FOSTER. 

A note to be payable in anything else than money needs only the facts 
substituted for money in the above form. 

ORDERS. 

Orders should be worded simply thus : 
Mr. M. J. Pike : Chicago, Nov. 10, 1876. 

Please pay to E. Felt Twenty-five Dollars, and charge to 

L. T. MERRIAM. 

RECEIPTS. 

Receipts should always state when received, and what for : 
$100. Chicago, Nov. 10, 1876. 

Received of J. S. Buckley One Hundred Dollars, for services rendered in 
digging his well at Woodstock, on account. W. G. BLACK. 

If receipt is in full, it should be so stated. 

BILLS OF PURCHASE. 

Marengo. 111., Nov. 10, 1876. 
J. L. Deem Bought of L. Wentworth. 

5 bushels of seed wheat, at $1.50 $7 50 

2 seamless sacks, " 0.30 060 

$8 10 
Received payment. L. WENTWORTH. 



48 BUSINESS FORMS. 

ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT. 

An agreement is where one party promises to another to do a certain thing 
in a certain time for a stipulated sum. Good business men always reduce an 
agreement to writing, which nearly always saves misunderstandings and trouble. 
No particular form is necessary, but the facts must be clearly and explicitly 
stated, and there must, to make it valid, be a reasonable consideration. 

GENERAL FORM OF AGREEMENT. 

This agreement, made the second day of October, 1876, between John 
Jones, of Aurora, County of Kane, State of Illinois, of the first part, and 
Henry Baker, of the same place, of the second part 

Witnesseth, that the said John Jones, in consideration of the agreement of 
the party of the second part, hereinafter contained, contracts and agrees to and 
with the said Henry Baker that he will, deliver, in good and marketable con- 
dition, at the village of Batavia, 111., during the month of November, of this 
year, one hundred tons of prairie hay, in the following lots, and at the following 
specified times, namely: Twenty-five tons by the seventh of November, twenty- 
five tons additional by the fourteenth of the month, twenty-five tons more by 
the twenty-first, and the entire one hundred tons to be all delivered by the 
thirtieth of November. 

And the said Henry Baker, in consideration of the prompt fulfillment of 
this contract, on the part of the party of the first part, contracts to and agrees 
with the said John Jones to pay for said hay five dollars per ton, for each ton 
as soon as delivered. 

In case of failure of agreement by either of the parties hereto, it is hereby 
stipulated and agreed that the party so failing shall pay to the other one 
hundred dollars, as fixed and settled damages. 

In witness whereof, we have hereunto set our hands the day and year first 
above written. JOHN JONES, 

HENRY BAKER. 

AGREEMENT WITH CLERK FOR SERVICES. 

This agreement, made the first day of May, one thousand eight hundred 
and seventy-six, between William Bell, of Chicago, County of Cook, State of 
Illinois, party of the first part, and George Davis, of Englewood, County of 
Cook, State of Illinois, party of the second part 

Witnesseth, that said George Davis agrees faithfully and diligently to work 
as clerk and salesman for the said William Bell, for and during the space of one 
year from the date hereof, should both live such length of time, without absent- 
ing himself from his occupation ; during which time he, the said Davis, in the 
store of said Bell, of Chicago, will carefully and honestly attend, doing and 
performing all duties as clerk and salesman aforesaid, in accordance and in all 
respects as directed and desired by the said Bell. 



BUSINESS FORMS. 49 

In consideration of which services, so to be rendered by the said Davis, the 
said Bell agrees to pay to said Davis the annual sum of one thousand dollars, 
payable in twelve equal monthly payments, each upon the last day of each 
month ; provided that all dues for days of absence from business by said Davis 
shall be deducted from the sum otherwise by the agreement due and payable by 
the said Bell to the said Davis. 

Witness our hands. WILLIAM BELL. 

GEORGE DAVIS. 
BILLS OF SALE. 

A bill of sale is a written agreement to another party, for a consideration to 
convey his right and interest in the personal property. The purchaser must 
take actual possession of the property. Juries have power to determine upon 
the fairness or unfairness of a bill of sale. 

COMMON FORM OF BILL OF SALE. 

Know all men by this instrument, that I, John Conn, of Princeton, Illinois, 
of the first part, for and in consideration of five hundred and ten dollars, to 
me paid by David Grady, of the same place, of the second part, the receipt 
whereof is hereby acknowledged, have sold and by this instrument do convey 
unto the said Grady, party of the second part, his executors, administrators and 
assigns, my undivided half of ten acres of corn, now growing on the farm of 
Thomas Hart, in the town above mentioned ; one pair of horses, sixteen sheep, 
and five cows, belonging to me, and in my possession at the farm aforesaid; to 
have and to hold the same unto the party of the second part, his executors and 
assigns, forever. And I do, for myself and legal representatives, agree with 
the said party of the second part, and his legal representatives, to warrant and 
defend the sale of the afore-mentioned property and chattels unto the said party 
of the second part, and his legal representatives, against all and every person 
whatsoever. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto affixed my hand, this tenth day of 
October, one thousand eight hundred and seventy-six. JOHN CONN. 

BONDS. 

A bond is a written admission on the part of the maker, in which he pledges 
a certain sum to another, at a certain time. 

COMMON FORM OF BOND. 

Know all men by this instrument, that I, Jacob Hiner, of Watseka, Iro- 
quois County, State of Illinois, am firmly bound unto Peter Hickok, of the 
place aforesaid, in the sum of five hundred dollars, to be paid to the said Peter 
Hickok, or his legal representatives; to which payment, to be made, I bind 
myself, or my legal representatives, by this instrument. 

Sealed with my seal, and dated this second day of November, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-four. 



50 BUSINESS FORMS. 

The condition of this bond is such that if I, Jacob Hiner, my heirs, admin- 
istrators or executors, shall promptly pay the sum of two hundred and fifty 
dollars in three equal annual payments from the date hereof, with annual 
interest, then the above obligation to be of no effect; otherwise to be in full 
full force and valid. 
Sealed and delivered in JACOB HINER. [L. s.] 

presence of 
FRANK HOGAN. 

CHATTEL MORTGAGES. 

A chattel mortgage is a mortgage on personal property for payment of a 
certain sum of money, to hold the property against debts of other creditors. 
The mortgage must describe the property, and must be acknowledged before a 
Justice of the Peace in the township or precinct where the mortgagee resides, 
and entered upon his docket, and must be recorded in the Recorder's office of 
the county. 

GENERAL FORM OF CHATTEL MORTGAGE. 

This indenture, made and entered into this first day of January, in the 
year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seventy-five, between John 
Lane, of the town of Geneseo, in the County of Henry, and State of Illinois, 
party of the first part, and Paul Lake, of the same town, county and State, 
party of the second part. 

Witnesseth, that the said party of the first part, for and in consideration of 
the sum of one thousand dollars, in hand paid, the receipt whereof is hereby 
acknowledged, does hereby grant, sell, convey and confirm unto the said party 
of the second part, his heirs and assigns forever, all and singular the following 
described goods and chattels, to wit: 

Two three-year old roan-colored horses, one Burdett organ, No. 987, one 
Brussels carpet, 15x20 feet in size, one marble-top center table, one Home Com- 
fort cooking stove, No. 8, one black walnut bureau with mirror attached, one 
set of parlor chairs (six in number), upholstered in green rep, with lounge 
corresponding with same in style and color of upholstery, now in possession of 
said Lane, at No. 4 Prairie Ave., Geneseo, 111. ; 

Together with all and singular the appurtenances thereunto belonging, 
or in any wise appertaining; to have and to hold the above described goods 
and chattels, unto the said party of the second part, his heirs and assigns, 
forever. 

Provided, always, and these presents are upon this express condition, that 
if the said John Lane, his heirs, executors, administrators or assigns, shall, on 
or before the first day of January, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and 
seventy-six, pay, or cause to be paid, to the said Paul Lake, or his lawful 
attorney or attorneys, heirs, executors, administrators or assigns, the sum of 



BUSINESS FORMS. 51 

one thousand dollars, together with the interest that may accrue thereon, at the 
rate of ten per cent, per annum, from the first day of January, A. D. one 
thousand eight hundred and seventy-five, until paid, according to the tenor of 
one promissory note, bearing even date herewith, for the payment of said sum of 
money, that then and from thenceforth, these presents, and everything herein 
contained, shall cease, and be null and void, anything herein contained to the 
contrary notwithstanding. 

Provided, also, that the said John Lane may retain the possession of and 
have the use of said goods and chattels until the day of payment aforesaid; 
and also, at his own expense, shall keep said goods and chattels; and also at 
the expiration of said time of payment, if said sum of money, together with 
the interest as aforesaid, shall not be paid, shall deliver up said goods and chat- 
tels, in good condition, to said Paul Lake, or his heirs, executors, administrators 
or assigns. 

And provided, also, that if default in payment as aforesaid, by said party 
of the first part, shall be made, or if said party of the second part shall, at any 
time before said promissory note becomes due, feel himself unsafe or insecure, 
that then the said party of the second part, or his attorney, agent, assigns, or 
heirs, executors or administrators, shall have the right to take possession of 
said goods and chattels, wherever they may or can be found, and sell the same 
at public or private sale, to the highest bidder for cash in hand, after giving 
ten days' notice of the time and place of said sale, together with a description 
of the goods and chattels to be sold, by at least four advertisements, posted up 
in public places in the vicinity where said sale is to take place, and proceed to 
make the sum of money and interest promised as aforesaid, together with all 
reasonable costs, charges and expenses in so doing; and if there shall be any 
overplus, shall pay the same without delay to the said party of the first part, 
or his legal representatives. 

In testimony whereof, the said party of the first part has hereunto set his 
hand and affixed his seal, the day and year first above written. 
Signed, sealed and delivered in JOHN LANE. [L. s.] 

presence of 
R. B. HAYES. 

LEASE OF FAEM AND BUILDINGS THEREON. 

This indenture, made this second day of June, 1875, between David Parker, 
of the Town of Bisbee, State .of Illinois, of the first part, and John Moore, of 
the same place, of the second part, 

Witnesseth, that the said David Parker, for and in consideration of the 
covenants hereinafter mentioned and reserved, on the part of the said John 
Moore, his executors, administrators and assigns, to be paid, kept and 
performed, hath let, and by these presents doth grant, demise and let, 



52 BUSINESS FORMS. 

unto the said John Moore, his executors, administrators and assigns, all that 
parcel of land situate in Bisbee aforesaid, bounded and described as follows, 

to wit : 

\Here, describe the land.] 

Together with all the appurtenances appertaining thereto. To have and to 
hold the said premises, with appurtenances thereto belonging, unto the said 
Moore, his executors, administrators and assigns, for the term of five years, 
from the first day of October next following, at a yearly rent of six hundred 
dollars, to be paid in equal payments, semi-annually, as long as said buildings 
are in good tenantable condition. 

And the said Moore, by these presents, covenants and agrees to pay all 
taxes and assessments, and keep in repair all hedges, ditches, rail and other 
fences (the said David Parker, his heirs, assigns and administrators, to furnish 
all timber, brick, tile and other materials necessary for such repairs). 

Said Moore further covenants and agrees to apply to said land, in a farmer- 
like manner, all manure and compost accumulating upon said farm, and 
cultivate all the arable land in a husbandmanlike manner, according to the 
usual custom among farmers in the neighborhood; he also agrees to trim 
the hedges at a reasonable t^me, preventing injury from cattle to such 
hedges, and to all fruit and other trees on the said premises. That he will 
seed down with clover and timothy seed twenty acres yearly of arable land, 
plowing the same number of acres each spring of land now in grass, and 
hitherto unbroken. 

It is further agreed, that if the said Moore shall fail to perform the whole 
or any one of the above mentioned covenants, then and in that case the said 
David Parker may declare this lease terminated, by giving three months' notice 
of the same, prior to the first of October of any year, and may distrain any 
part of the stock, goods or chattels, or other property in possession of said 
Moore, for sufficient to compensate for the non-performance of the above written 
covenants, the same to be determined, and amounts so to be paid to be deter- 
mined, by three arbitrators, chosen as follows: Each of the parties to this 
instrument to choose one, and the two so chosen to select a third; the decision 
of said arbitrators to be final. 

In witness whereof, we have hereto set our hands and seals. 
Signed, sealed, and delivered DAVID PARKER. [L. s.] 

in presence of JOHN MOORE. [L. s.] 

JAMES WALDRON. 

FORM OF LEASE OF A HOUSE. 

This instrument, made the first day of October, 1875, witnesseth that 
Albert Ward, of Yorkville, County of Kendall, State of Illinois, hath rented 
from John Shafer, of Logansport aforesaid, the dwelling and lot No. 13 Ohio 



BUSINESS FORMS. 53 

Street, situated in said City of Yorkville, for five years from the above date, at 
the yearly rental of three hundred dollars, payable monthly, on the first day of 
each month, in advance, at the residence of said John Shafer. 

At the expiration of sa^id above mentioned term, the said Ward agrees to 
give the said Shafer peaceable possession of the said dwelling, in as good con- 
dition as when taken, ordinary wear and casualties excepted. 

In witness whereof, we place our hands and seals the day and year aforesaid. 
Signed, sealed and delivered ALBERT WARD. [L. s.] 

in presence of JOHN SHAFER. [L. s.] 

WILLIAM PIERCE, 

Notary Public. ' 

LANDLORD'S AGREEMENT. 

This certifies that I have let and rented, this first day of January, 1876, 
unto Jacob Smith, my house and lot, No. 15 Erie Street, in the City of Chicago, 
State of Illinois, and its appurtenances ; he to have the free and uninterrupted 
occupation thereof for one year from this date, at the yearly rental of two 
hundred dollars, to be paid monthly in advance ; rent to cease if destroyed by 
fire, or otherwise made untenantable. ALPHA PIPER. 

TENANT'S AGREEMENT. 

This certifies that I have hired and taken from Alpha Piper his house and 
lot, No. 18 Erie Street, in the City of Chicago, State of Illinois, with appur- 
tenances thereto belonging, for one year, to commence this day, at a yearly 
rental of two hundred dollars, to be paid monthly in advance, unless said 
house becomes untenantable from fire or other causes, in which case rent ceases ; 
and I further agree to give and yield said premises one year from this first day 
of January, 1876, in as good condition as now, ordinary wear and damage by 
the elements excepted. 

Given under my hand this day. JACOB SMITH. 

NOTICE TO QUIT. 

To E. D. LYON, 

Sir: Please observe that the term of one year, for which the house and 
land, situated at No. 8 Indiana Street, and now occupied by you, were rented 
to you, expired on the first day of October, 1875, and as I desire to repossess 
said premises, you are hereby requested and required to vacate the same. 

Respectfully yours, 

A. E. LAW. 
Lincoln, Neb., October 4, 1875. 



54 BUSINESS FORMS. 

TENANT'S NOTICE OF LEAVING. 

Dear Sir : The premises I now occupy as your tenant, at No. 8 Indiana 
Street, I shall vacate on the first day of November, 1875. You will please 
take notice accordingly. 

Dated this tenth day of October, 1875. E. D. LYON. 

To A. E. LAW, Esq. 

REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE TO SECURE PAYMENT OF MONEY. 

This indenture, made this sixteenth day of May, in the year of our Lord 
one thousand eight hundred and seventy-two, between William Nash, of Peoria, 
County of Peoria, and State of Illinois, and Olive, his wife, party of the first 
part, and Edward Roach, party of the second part. 

Whereas, the said party of the first part is justly indebted to the said party 
of the second part, in the sum of two thousand dollars, secured to be paid by 
two certain promissory notes (bearing even date herewith), the one due and pay- 
able at the Second National Bank, in Peoria, Illinois, with interest, on the 
sixteenth day of May, in the year one thousand eight hundred and seventy- 
three; the other due and payable at the Second National Bank, at Peoria, 
Illinois, with interest, on the sixteenth day of May, in the year one thousand 
eight hundred and seventy-four. 

Now, therefore, this indenture witnesseth, that the said party of the first 
part, for the better securing the payment of the money aforesaid, with interest 
thereon, according to the tenor and effect of the two said promissory notes 
above mentioned; and, also, in consideration of the further sum of one dollar 
to them in hand paid by the said party of the second part, at the delivery of 
these presents, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, have granted, 
bargained, sold and conveyed, and by these presents do grant, bargain, sell 
and convey, unto the said party of the second part, his heirs and assigns, 
forever, all that certain parcel of land, situate, etc. 

[Describing the premises.^ 

To have and to hold the same, together with all and singular the tenements, 
hereditaments, privileges and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise 
appertaining. And, also, all the estate, interest and claim whatsoever, in law 
as well as in equity, which the party of the first part have in and to the premises 
hereby conveyed, unto the said party of the second part, his heirs and assigns, 
and to their only proper use, benefit and behoof. And the said William Nash, 
and Olive, his wife, party of the first part, hereby expressly waive, relinquish, 
release and convey unto the said party of the second part, his heirs, executors, 
administrators and assigns, all right, title, claim, interest and benefit whatever, 
in and to the above described premises, and each and every part thereof, which 
is given by or results from all laws of this State pertaining to the exemption of 
homesteads. 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 55 

Provided always, and these presents are upon this express condition, that if 
the said party of the first part, their heirs, executors or administrators, shall 
well and truly pay, or cause to be paid, to the said party of the second part, 
his heirs, executors, administrators or assigns, the aforesaid sums of money, 
with such interest thereon, at the time and in the manner specified in the above 
mentioned promissory notes, according to the true intent and meaning thereof, 
then in that case, these presents and everything herein expressed shall be 
absolutely null and void. 

In witness whereof, the said party of the first part hereunto set their hands 
and seals the day and year first above written. 

Signed, sealed and delivered in presence of WILLIAM NASH. [L. s.] 

JAMES KEMP, OLIVE NASH. [L. s.] 

J. C. CARR. 

RATES OF POSTAGE. 

LETTERS. Letters go to any part of the United States for three cents per 
half ounce, or fraction thereof, if prepaid. Unpaid letters are sent to the 
Dead Letter Office, at Washington. 

NEWSPAPERS. Publishers are now required to prepay all postage on news- 
papers ; only one copy to each actual subscriber residing within the county in 
which the same is published goes free through the mails. 

MISCELLANEOUS MATTER OF THE THIRD CLASS. Books, unsealed circulars, 
maps, prints, engravings, music, cards, photographs, types, cuttings, roots, seeds, 
merchandise, metals, ores and minerals, one cent per two ounces, or fraction 
thereof, which must be prepaid. 

MONEY ORDERS. Money orders can be obtained only at designated Money 
Order Offices. Money can be sent to any part of the country with absolute 
safety, by obtaining a Money Order, for which the fees are : Not exceeding 
$15, 10 cents; over $15, and not exceeding $30, 15 cents; over $30, and not 
exceeding $40, 20 cents; over $40, and not exceeding $50, 25 cents. No 
order issued for more than $50. 

POST ITEMS. It costs 10 cents extra, besides the regular postage, to register 
a letter. Letters may be registered at any Post Office. 

VALUE OF FOREIGN. MONEY. 

ON A GOLD BASIS. 

Pound Sterling, of England $4.84 Florin, of Austria $ .48 

Guinea, " 5.05 Doubloon, of Spain (1800) 15.54 

Crown, 1.21 Real, " 05 

Shilling, " 22 Five Rubles, of Russia 3.95 

Napoleon, of France 3.84 Ruble, " 75 

Five Francs, " 93 , Franc, of Belgium.., 18A 

Franc, " 18i Ducat, of Bavaria 2.27 

Thaler, of Saxony 68 Franc, of Switzerland 18J 

Guilder, of Netherlands 40 Crown, of Tuscany 1.05J 

Ducat, of Austria 2.28 



56 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



STATISTICS OF POPULATION. 



POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATKS. 



POPULATION OF FIFTY PRINCIPAL CITIES. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 


Total 
Population 


CITIES. 


Aggregate 
Population 




996,992 


New York, N. Y 


942 292 




484,471 


Philadelphia, Pa 


674 022 




560 247 


Brooklyn, N Y 


396 (199 




537,454 


St. Louis, Mo 


310864 




125,015 


Chicago, 111 


298,977 


Florida 


187,748 


Baltimore, Md 


267,364 




1,184,109 


Boston, Mass 


250 526 


Illinois 


2,539,891 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


216 239 




1,680,637 


New Orleans, La '. 


191,418 




1,191,792 


San Francisco, Cal 


149,473 




364.399 


Buffalo, N. Y 


117714 




1,321,011 


Washington, D. C 


109 109 




726,915 


Newark, N. J 


105,059 




626.915 




100 753 




780,894 


Cleveland, Ohio 


92 829 




1,457,351 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


86,076 




1 184 059 


Jersey City. N J 


82546 




439,706 


Detroit, Mich 


79577 




827,902 


Milwaukee, Wis 


71 440 




1,721,295 


Albany, N. Y 


69,422 


Nebraska 


122,993 


Providence, R. I 


68,904 




42491 


Rochester, N. Y 


62386 




318,300 




53180 




906,096 


Richmond, Va 


51,038 




4,382 759 




50 840 




1,071,361 


Charleston, S. C 


48,95fi 


Ohio 


2,665,260 




48,244 




90923 


Troy N Y 


46466 




3,521,791 




43051 


Rhode Island 


217,353 




41,105 




705606 




40928 




1 258 520 




40226 


Texas 


818,679 




39,634 


Vermont 


'330,551 




37,180 


Virginia 


1,225 163 




35092 


West Virginia 


442 014 




33930 




1,054,670 




33579 








32 260 


Total States 


38,113 253 




32034 






Toledo Ohio 


31 584 




9 658 


Portland Me 


31 413 


Colorado 


39864 




31274 


Dakota 


14 181 




30841 


District of Columbia 


131,700 


Dayton, Ohio 


30,473 


Idaho 


14999 




28921 


Montana 


20595 


Utica N Y 


28804 


New Mexico 


91,874 




28323 


Utah 


86786 




28235 


Washington 


23955 




28 233 


Wyoming 


9 118 


Fall River Mass 


26766 










Total Territories 


442730 














Total United States 


' 38.555.983 







MISCELLANEBUS INFORMATION. 



57 



POPULATION OF ILLINOIS BY COUNTIES. 



AGGREGATE. 




1870. 


1860. 


1850. 1840. 


1830. 


182O. 


Adams 56362 


41323 
4707 
9815 
11678 
9938 
26426 
5144 
11733 
11325 
14629 
. 10492 
14987 
9336 
10941 
14203 
144954 

11551 
8311 
19086 
10820 
7140 
14701 
16925 
5454 
7816 
11189 
1979 
9393 
33338 
8055 
16093 
10379 
9915 
29061 
3759 
iJSOl 
20660 
12325 
9589 
8364 
12965 
12051 
27225 
9342 
30062 
15412 
13074 
28663 
18257 
48332 
9214 
17651 
11637 
14272 


26508 
2484 
6144 
7624 
7198 
8841 
3231 
4586 
7253 
2649 
3203 
9532 
4289 
5139 
9335 
43385 

7135 
3718 
7540 
5002 


14476 
3313 
5060 
1705 
4183 
3067 
1741 
1023 
2981 
1475 
1878 
7453 
3228 
3718 
9616 
10201 

4422 


2186 
1390 
3124 




Alexander 10564 


626 
2931 


Bond 13152 


Boone 12942 


Brown 12205 


I 


Bureau 32415 




Calhoun , > 6562 


1090 




Carroll 16705 




Cass 11580 






Champaign 32737 







Christian 20363 






Clark 18719 


3940 
755 
2330 


931 


Clay . 15875 


Clinton 16285 




Coles 25235 




Cook 349966 




Crawford 13889 


* 
3117 


*23 
2999 


Cumberland 12223 


De Kalb 23265 


1697 
3247 






De Witt 14768 






Douglas 13484 






Du Page 16685 


9290 
10692 
3524 
3799 
8075 


3535 
8225 
3070 
1675 
6328 






Edgar 21450 


4071 
1649 




Edwards > 7565 


3444 


Effingham . 15653 


Fayette 19638 


2704 




Ford 9103 




Fianklin 12652 


5681 
22508 
5448 
12429 
3023 
6362 
14652 
2887 
4612 
3807 
4149 
5862 
3220 
8109 
7354 
18604 
4114 
16702 


3682 
13142 
10760 
11951 


4083 
1841 
7405 
7674 


1763 


Fulton 38291 


Gnllatin 11134 


3155 


Greene 20277 


Grundy 14938 




Hamilton 13014 


3945 
9946 
1378 


2616 
483 




Hancock 35935 




Hardin 5113 




Henderson 12582 






Henry 35506 


1260 
1695 
3566 
1472 
5762 
4535 
6180 
3626 
6501 


41 




Iroquois i 25782 




Jackson 19634 


1828 


1542 


Jasper... 11234 


Jefferson 17864 


2555 


691 


Jersey 15054 


Jo Daviess 27820 


2111 
1596 




Johnson 11248 


843 




Kane 39091 


Kankakee . 24352 




Kendall 12399 


7730 
13279 
14226 
17815 
6121 
5292 
1553 
5128 




Knox 39522 


7060 
2634 
9348 
7092 
2035 
759 
2333 


274 




Lake 21014 




La Salle 60792 






Lawrence 12533 


3668 




Lee 27171 




Livingston. ... 31471 






Logan.., 23053 







58 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



POPULATION OF ILLINOIS CONTINUED. 



AGGREGATE. 





187O. 


I860. 


1850. 


184O. 


183O. 


1820. 


Macon 


26481 


13738 


3988 


3039 


1122 




Macoupin 


3272(3 


24602 


12355 


7926 


1990 




Aladison 


44131 


31251 


20441 


14433 


6221 


13550 


Marion 


20622 


12739 


6720 


4742 


2125 






16950 


13437 


5180 


1849 






Mason 


16184 


10931 


5921 








M assac 


9581 


6213 


4092 








McDonough 


26509 


20069 


7616 


5308 


ib) 




McHenry 


23762 


22089 


14978 


2578 






McLean 


53988 


28772 


10163 


6565 






Menard 


11735 


9584 


6349 


4431 






Mercer 


18769 


15042 


5246 


2352 


26 




Monroe , 


12982 


12832 


7679 


4481 


2000 


*21 
1516 


M on t "'omery 


25314 


13979 


6277 


4490 


2953 




M organ . 


28463 


22112 


16064 


19547 


12714 




Moult rie 


10385 


6385 


3234 








Ogle .. 


27492 


22888 


10020 


3479 






Peoria 


47540 


36601 


17547 


6153 


(c) 




Perry 


13723 


9552 


5278 


3222 


1215 




Piatt 


10953 


6127 


1606 








Pike 


30768 


27249 


18819 


11728 


2396 




Pope 


11437 


6742 


3975 


4094 


3316 


2610 


Pulaski 


8752 


3943 


2265 








Putnam 


6280 


5587 


3924 


2131 


c!310 




Randolph 


20859 


17205 


11079 


7944 


4429 


3942 


Richland 


12803 


9711 


4012 








Rock Island 


29783 


21005 


6937' 


2610 






Saline 


12714 


9331 


5588 










46352 


32274 


19228 


14716 


12960 




Schuyler 


17419 


14684 


10573 


6972 


62959 




Scott 


10530 


9069 


7914 


6216 






Shelby 


25476 


14613 


7807 


6659 


2972 




Stark 


10751 


9004 


3710 


1573 






St. Clair 


51068 


37694 


20180 


' 13631 


7078 


*5 
5248 


Stephenson 


30608 


25112 


11666 


2800 






Tazewell 


27903 


21470 


12052 


7221 


4716 




Union 


16518 


11181 


7615 


5524 


3239 


236 


Vermilion 


30388 


19800 


11492 


9303 


5836 




Wabash 


8841 


7313 


4690 


4240 


2710 




Warren .... 


23174 


18336 


8176 


6739 


308 




Washington 


17599 


13731 


6953 


481C 


1675 


1517 


Wayne 


19758 


12223 


6825 


5133 


2553 


1114 


White, 


16846 


12403 


8925 


791S 


6091 


4828 


Whiteside 


27503 


18737 


5361 


2514 






Will 


43013 


29321 


16703 


10167 








1732S 


12205 


7216 


4457 






Winnebago 


29301 


J 44'.l 


11773 


460 






Woodford* 


1895C 


13282 


4415 




. 


















Total... 


2539891 


1711951 


851470 


47618? 


157445 


*49 
55162 



MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION. 



59 



POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES. 



STATES AND 
TERRITORIES. 


Square 
Miles. 


POPULATION. 


R. R. 

1872. 


Area in 

STATES AND g quare 

TERRITORIES. Miles. 


POPULATION. 


Miles 
R. R. 

1872. 


1870. 


1875. 


1870. | 1875. 


States. 
Alabama 


50,722 
52,198 
188,981 
4,674 
2,120 
59,268 
58,000 
55,410 
33,809 
55,045 
81,318 
37,600 
41,346 
31,776 
11,184 
7,800 
56,451 
83,531 
47,156 
65,350 
75,995 
112,090 
9,280 
8,320 
47,000 
50,704 
39,964 


996,992 
484,471 
560,247 
537,454 
125,015 
187,748 
1,184,109 
2,539,891 
1,680,637 
1,191,792 
364,399 
1'321,011 
726,915 
626,915 
780,894 
1,457,351 
1,184,059 
439,706 
827,922 
1,721,295 
123,993 
42,941 
318,300 
906,096 
4,382,759 
1,071,361 
2,665,260 




1,671 
25 
1,013 
820 
227 
466 
2,108 
5,904 
3,529 
3,160 
1.76H 
1,123 
539 
871 
820 
1,606 
2,235 
1,612 
990 
2,580 
828' 
593 
790 
1,265 
4,470 
1.190 
3,740 


Stales. 


46,000 
1,306 
29,385 
45,600 
237,504 
10,212 
40,904 
23,000 
53,924 


3,521,791 
217,353 
705,606 
1,258,520 
818,579 
330,551 
1,225,163 
442,014 
1,054,670 




5,113 
136 
1,201 
1,520 
865 
675 
1,490 
485 
1,725 








258,239 
925,145 








Connecticut 




Tennessee 
Texas 


Delaware 




Florida 












Virginia 
West Virginia 




Illinois 




Indiana 
Iowa 


1,350,644 

528,349 


Wisconsin 
Total States 




Kansas 


1,950,171 

113,916 
104,500 
147,490 
60 
90,932 
143,776 
121,201 
80,056 
69,344 
93,107 


38,113,253 

9,658 
39,864 
14,181 
131,700 
14,999 
20,595 
91,874 
86,786 
23,955 
9,118 




59,587 




Territories. 






857,039 


Maine 


Maryland 








392 


Massachusetts 


1,651,912 
1,334,031 
598,429 


Dakota 




Michigan* 


Dist. of Columbia 






Minnesota 






Mississippi 








Missouri 


246,280 
52,540 


New Mexico. 
Utah 






Nebraska 




375 


Nevada 






New Hampshire 






498 




1,026,502 
4,705,208 


Total Territories 




New York 


965,032 


442,730 




1,265 


North Carolina 
Ohio 


Aggregate of U. S 




2.915,203 


38,555,983 


0,000,000 


60,852 


* Last Census of Michigan taken in 1874. 




* Included in the Railroad Mileage of Maryland. 



PRINCIPAL COUNTRIES OF THE WORLD. POPULATION AND AREA. 



COUNTRIES. 


Population. ^ ate of 
Census. 


Area in 
Square 
Miles. 


Inhabitants 
to Square 
Mile. 


CAPITALS. 


Population. 


China 


446,500,000 
226,817,108 
81,925,400 
38,925,600 
36,469,800 
35,904,400 
34,785,300 
31,817,100 
29,906,092 
27,439,921 
16,642,000 
10,000,000 
16,464,000 
9,173,000 
5,921,100 
5,000,f)00 
5,021,300 
4,861,400 
3,995,200 
3,688,300 
3,000,000 
2,000,000 
1,669,100 
2,500,000 
2,000,000 
1,812,000 
1,818,500 
1,784,700 
1,500,000 
1,461,400 
1,457,900 
1,180,000 
1,300,000 
1,000,000 
823,138 
718,000 
600,000 
572,000 
350,000 
300,000 
350,000 
136,000 
165.000 
62.950 


1871 
1871 
1871 
1870 
1866 
1869 
1871 
1871 
1871 
1871 
1867 

1869 
1870 
1870 
1869 
1871 
1868 
1870 
1870 
1869 
1870 
1871 

1869 
1871 
1870 

1871 
1870 
1871 

1871 

1871 
1871 

1871 
1871 
1871 

i'870 


3,741,846 
4,677,432 
8,003,778 
2,603,884 
204,091 
240,348 
149,399 
121,315 
160,207 
118,847 
195,775 
3,253,029 
672,21 
761,526 
292,871 
635,964 
11,373 
29,292 
34,494 
12,680 ' 
357,157 
132,616 
15,992 
471,838 
497,321 
871,848 
7,533 
14,753 
368,238 
5,912 
19,353 
40,879 
218,928 
63,787 
2,969 
9,576 
7,335 
10,205 
58,171 
66,722 
47,092 
17,827 
21,505 
7.633 


119.3 
48.6 
10.2 
7.78 
178.7 
149.4 
232.8 
262.3 
187. 
230.9 
85. 
3.07 
24.4 


Pekin 


1,648,800 
3,251,800 
667,000 
108,199 
1,825,300 
833,900 
1,554,900 
3,251,800 
825,400 
244,484 
332,000 
420,000 
1,075,000 
210,300 
136,900 
120,000 
314,100 
169,500 
224,063 
90,100 
45,000 
115,400 
36,000 
160,100 
25,000 
177,800 
91,600 
162,042 
47,000 
36,600 
43,400 
40,000 
70,000 
48,000 
30,000 
3,000 
15,000 
20,000 
10,000 
44,500 
12,000 
20,000 
2,000 
7,633 


British Empire 








United States with Alaska 




France 




Austria and Hungary 




Japan 


Yeddo 


Great Britain and Ireland 




Berlin 


Italy 




Spain 




Brazil 
Turkey 










20. 
7.8 
441.5 
165.9 
115.8 
290.9 
8.4 
15.1 
166.9 
5.3 
4. 
2.1 
241.4 
120.9 
4.2 
247. 
75.3 
28.9 
5.9 
15.6 
277. 
74.9 
81.8 
56. 
6. 
6.5 
7.4 
7.6 
7.7 
80. 




Persia 








Bavaria 








Holland 




New Grenada 




Chili 




Switzerland 




Peru 














Stuttgart 






Venezuela 
Baden 
















Quito 






Hesse 












Hayti 




















Costa Rica 




Hawaii .... 


Honolulu .... 



60 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 

GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 

SHEEP AND THEIR HISTORY. 

With the exception of the dog, there is no one of the brute creation which 
exhibits the diversity of size, color, covering and general appearance which 
characterizes the sheep, and none which occupies a wider range of climate or 
subsists on a greater variety of food. 

In every latitude, between the equator and the arctic, he ranges over the 
sterile mountains and through the fertile valleys. He feeds on every species of 
edible forage, the cultivated -grasses, cereals and roots ; he browses on aromatic 
and bitter herbs ; he crops the leaves and bark from the stunted forest shrubs 
and the pungent resinous evergreens. His coat is sometimes long and coarse, 
like the Lincolnshire ; short and hairy like those of Madagascar ; soft and 
furry like the Angola, or fine and spiral like the silken Saxon. His color, either 
pure or fancifully mixed, varies from the black or white of our own country, to 
every shade of brown, dun, buff or gray. 

With the earliest records of man we have mention of sheep. Abel was a 
keeper of sheep. Abraham and his descendants as well as most of the patri- 
archs were shepherds. Job had fourteen thousand sheep. Of Rachel it is 
said, "She came with her father's sheep, for she kept them." The seven 
daughters of the Priest of Midian " came and drew water for their father's 
flocks." Moses "kept the flocks of Jethro, his father-in-law ;" and David was 
a keeper of sheep ; and to the shepherds of Judea, watching their flocks at night, 
was announced their Savior's birth. 

Emblematic of purity, they have been used as sacrifices in the religious exer- 
cises of the earlier ages ; while the writers of all nations and creeds have dwelt 
with pleasure upon their virtues. 

Sheep formed the principal wealth of the Hebrew patriarch, and the term 
pecus (cattle), of the Latins, whence was derived jfecunia, wealth, was applied 
especially to them. It is generally believed that the fable of the Argonauts and 
the " Golden Fleece" rests with the facts connected with the first importation 
of sheep into Greece. And the old Spanish proverb, " Whereon the foot of 
the sheep treads the land is turned to gold," evinces an early appreciation of a 
concomitant to sheep raising which is quite overlooked by our farmers in their 
estimate of the value of sheep. 

A knowledge of the effects of breeding was early known to the race, as is 
shown in the Scriptural history of Jacob, and mention is frequently made by 
profane writers. 

The signs of a good ram are concisely laid down by Varro, by Virgil, in 
his third Georgic, and by Columella ; and though the Spanish nobility were 
looked upon with wonder in giving two hundred ducats for a ram. yet Strabo 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 61 

assures us that in his day (under Tiberius), they gave more than three times 
that sum for one of the breed of the " Coraxi," a Pontiac nation, believed to 
have the finest fleece in the world. 

The greatest recorded improvers in sheep in ancient times were Lucius Colum- 
ella and his uncle, Marcus Columella, who are reported to have crossed a variety 
from Africa with the breeds of Tarentum and sent the offspring to Spain. There 
they throve remarkably, attracting the attention of other nations to whom they 
were from time to time exported, and became the progenitors of all the finest 
breeds at present existing. The King of Spain, about the year 1800, presented 
the Elector of Saxony with a small flock of Merinos, and from these came the 
fine Saxony breeds for which Germany is famous. 

The first sheep were introduced into the United States at Jamestown, Va., 
from England, in 1609. About the year 1625, they were introduced into New 
York and Massachusetts. In 1676, they were spoken of as being " abundant 
in New England," and in 1790, it is said, flocks were numerous in New York. 
The first Merino sheep sent to this country, it is said, were smuggled out of 
Spain in 1793, but they were not preserved for breeding. 

Between 1801 and 1808, several pairs were imported by enterprising Ameri- 
cans ; but the French invasion of Spain and consequent sale of several of the 
largest flocks enabled the United States to obtain several thousand of the most 
improved breeds of Spanish sheep. 

The first Saxon Merinos were brought over in the year 1823 ; and for sev- 
eral years following they were extensively introduced. They were at one time 
quite popular, but other breeds proving more remunerative they have almost 
disappeared, and but few pure bloods can now be found in this country. 

It is a fact, perhaps not generally known, that Washington imported prob- 
ably the first iniproved breeds of English sheep introduced into this country ; 
and that from his stock was obtained, by Mr. Ouster, by crossing a Persian ram 
with Bakewell ewes, the Arlington "Long Wooled Sheep,!' mentioned by Mr. 
Livingston in his essay on sheep, published in 1809. 

Sheep are divided into Long Wooled, Short Wooled and Cross-bred the 
latter being obtained by crossing the long and short wooled sheep, either for the 
purpose of modifying the character of the fleece or improving the condition of 
the mutton. 

LONG WOOLED SHEEP. 

Among the long wooled sheep are the following : Lincoln, Leicester, Cots- 
wold, Romney Marsh and Oxford Downs, all of which have been introduced 
into this country from England, where, by careful and judicious breeding, the 
peculiar characteristics of each have been obtained. 

The Lincoln is probably the heaviest bodied sheep. They have been greatly 
improved during the past century, and from 1862 to 1870 carried off most of 



62 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 

the prizes for long wooled sheep in England. It is popular for crossing with 
other breeds. It is a sheep requiring rich soil and careful attention. A 
few have been introduced here from Canada. 

The Leicester. This breed was brought to its great perfection by Mr. 
Robert Bakewell, of Leicestershire, England, who. by a course of careful 
breeding, begun in 1755, obtained an animal which had established such a 
reputation in 1781) that he obtained over $6,000 for the use of three rams. 
They are a large sheep, mature early, and shear about seven pounds. They 
are not a hardy sheep. They require proper food, careful shelter and skillful 
treatment to be kept in good condition. 

The Cotswold.* "The Cotswold has an ancient history. It is said to have 
been introduced into England from Spain by Eleanora, Queen of Henry II, 
of England, in the twelfth century. Although there is nothing more than 
tradition to support this, yet there is some corroboration of it in the fact that 
in Spain there has long existed, and is now a breed of coarse, long wool sheep, 
not unlike the original Cotswolds in some respects. It is known, however, that 
in fifty years after this early date the wool of the Cotswold sheep was a source 
of material wealth and was jealously guarded by law." 

They are a large breed of sheep, producing a fleece about eight inches in 
length, and weighing from eight to ten pounds. They have been extensively 
introduced here, and full-blooded animals can be obtained in almost every State 
east of the Mississippi. 

The Romney Marsh. Its home is in the county of Kent, where it thrives 
on the low lands. It is a hardy animal, and will stand severe weather and poor 
treatment better than most breeds. Its fleece, which weighs from eight to ten 
pounds, is long and glossy, and much sought after by continental manufac- 
turers of mohair and alpaca goods. 

Oxford Downs are a cross between the Cotswold and Hampshire Downs. 
They are said to produce a fleece of better quality than the Cotswolds, and to 
thrive in some localities better than their progenitors. They have only recently 
become prominent in England, and have therefore not been introduced to any 
extent in this country. 

SHORT WOOLED SHEEP. 

The Southdown is perhaps the best known sheep on account of its superior 
mutton. It has been brought to its present perfection by careful attention 
during a long continued series of years. It derives its name from the Downs 
upon which it feeds a range of low hill* gradually descending to the sea 
shore, containing a dry soil covered with a rich but dense herbage. It has 
inhabited this section from the earliest times, but has been greatly improved 
during the past century. It has become thoroughly acclimated in America. 

* Shepherd's Manual, by Henry Stewart, published by Orange Judd & Co., New York. 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 63 

They are very hardy, keeping up their condition on moderate pasturage, and 
readily adapting themselves to the different systems of farming in which they 
are situated. They fatten early, and the meat commands the highest price in 
market. The fleece, which closely covers the body, produces a valuable cloth- 
ing wool. 

The Cheviots derive their name from the hills upon which they are found, 
and by some are supposed to date their origin back to the times of the Spanish 
Armada, on the supposition that they swam to the shore, and escaped to the 
hills when the ships were sunk. The original stock has been greatly improved, 
and are now an excellent mutton sheep, at the same time producing a fair 
fleece of medium wool. 

The Merino, which we have before noticed, is the predominant breed in this 
country. During the past half century it has been judiciously bred here and 
so successfully as to obtain an individuality of its own. So favorable a reputa- 
tion has it obtained that rams have been sent to Australia to improve the fine 
flocks there. 

The French Merino has been introduced here in past years. It is an ex- 
cellent sheep, but hardly hardy enough to withstand the rigors of our climate. 
Its origin is as follows : In 1786, a small flock was imported from Spain and 
placed at Rambouillet, near Paris, France. In the course of fifty years, they 
had so improved as to be considered by many superior to the parent stock, both 
on account of size of sheep and improvement in staple of wool. 

It is not possible, in the limits of such a short article as this must necessarily 
be, to give a description of the crossbreeds, although judicious crossing is, per- 
haps, one of the most important points in the business of sheep raising. We 
cannot do better than to quote the remarks of Mr. Stewart, in the "Shepherd's 
Manual," upon the subject of breeding: 

" Breed for some well understood object. Learn and know the character 
of every ewe and ram in the flock. Remember that the male gives his impress 
upon the progeny most strongly. Purity of blood in the male is an absolute 
necessity. 

"It is cheaper to pay a fair price for good rams to a capable breeder who 
makes production of breeding animals his business, than to attempt to raise one's 
own breeding stock. 

" Animals that are not pure blood when coupled tend toward reversion to 
the inferior stock rather than progression to the superior. 

" Animals, as sheep, that are easily improved favorably, as easily retrograde; 
the rule Works both ways. 

" To feed well is the co-efficient of breeding well ; without good feeding, good 
breeding is of no avail. Breeding lays the foundation, feeding builds upon that. 

" The first cross is the most effective, the next is but half as effective and 
so on in the fractions J, |-, f , |, f^-, ff , etc. Unity is approached by dimin- 



64 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 

ishing quantities, and is thus never reached, so the higher we breed the less ad- 
vance is made in proportion." I 

The sheep industry must continue to increase in this country ; for, aside 
from the constantly enlarging demand for lambs and mutton, the home consump- 
tion of wool will insure a fair profit. 

Our manufactories, though at present suffering from the dullness of the times, 
are yet well appointed ; and we possess, in most branches of woolen manufac- 
tures, equal skill with .the English. Labor is not much higher, while fuel is de- 
cidedly cheaper here, and the advantage in this respect is likely to become, from 
year to year, more and more in our favor. The statement that wool-growing 
does not pay is not well-founded. And we think that if farmers would give the 
proper care and attention to this industry for a series of years, they would be 
satisfied as to the correctness of our views. 

From the following statement, it will be seen that, although the most of our 
flocks are of no well-defined character, such as the English. French, German 
or Spanish, yet the returns from the wool are even now greater than in those 
countries and, also, in some of the colonies into which they have been intro- 

Pounds of Wool Price per Annual Revenue 

COUNTRY. per Sheep. Pound of Wool. per Sheep. 

Great Britain 4.7 25 cents. $117 

Australasia 4.1 37 " 1 61 

Cape of Good Hope 3.2 33 " 105 

Germany 2.1 41 " 85 

France 3.0 18 " 54 

Spain 3.5 41 " 1 45 

United States 5.0 40 " 200 

We take pleasure in quoting from a paper written by John L. Bowes & Bro., 
English wool merchants, upon the subject of American wool: 

"The estimate of wool clipped in the United States during the past 
year (1875) was 193,000,000 of pounds against 178,000,000 in 1874, and 
175,160,146 and 163,000,000 in the four years preceding that ; we regret we 
are not in a position to give detailed information as to the quantities of each 
class produced ; but we can say that the varied climate of that country admits 
and encourages the growth of nearly every description, from the purest Merino 
to the commonest carpet wool ; no better delaine wool is grown in any part of 
the world than in the United States ; bright haired wools, also, grow there to 
perfection, and the cultivation of the Angora goat has recently been essayed 
with a fair amount of success. It only requires the adoption of an enlightened 
fiscal policy to secure for the wool-growers of the United States the reward due 
to their success in this branch of industry, a success due equally to their abil- 
ity and to the climatic advantages of which they are possessed." 

This is the language of a concern whose interests are entirely with foreign 
wools and ought to have weight with those who, owing, to small returns, slaugh- 
ter their sheep when wool is slow of sale. 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 65 

The wool production of the whole world is estimated by Mr. H. C. Gary at 
1,800,000,000 Ibs., of which twenty-five per cent., as we see by statistics below, 
is grown in Australasia, Cape of Good Hope and River Plate : 

1875. 1874. 1873. 1872. 1871. 

Australasia 244,500,000 ft>s. 222,500,000 fcs. 190,250,000 fts. 181,750,000 fts. 185,750,000 fts. 

Cape of Good Hope 49,000,000 " 49,000,000 " 47,500,000 " 55,750,000 " 48,000,000 " 

River Plate 201,500,000 " 207,000,000 " 232,500,000 " 210,500,000 " 195,250,000 " 

From the foregoing table, it will be seen that there has been a marked 
increase in the production of wool in these countries in five years, particularly 
in Australasia. In our own country, there has not been any gain in the States 
east of the Mississippi during this period, but in California and Texas 
and in the Territories, there has been a rapid increase in the production 
of wool. In California, the increase being nearly, if not quite, one hundred 
per cent. ; the product being over 43,000,000 fts. in 1875. The number 
of sheep in Colorado, according to census, was (1870) 120,000. It is 
now estimated at over a million, and in the other Territories the increase is 
four-fold. 

We had expected to have given a statement of the growth of our woolen 
manufactories in connection with this article, but want of space forbids. We 
will merely remark that, notwithstanding the fact that forty to fifty per cent, 
of our woolen machinery is idle, yet the consumption is so great that we are 
obliged to import nearly seventy-five million of pounds of foreign wool in addi- 
tion to our own production to supply our wants. 

As it may not be uninteresting to our readers to know the price at which 
wool has ruled in this country, we append the following quotations from "The 
Practical Shepherd : " 

"From 1801 to 1807, wool bore low prices in this country; in 1807 and 
1808, it rose to about $2 per ft. and so continued throughout the war of 1812, 
some choice lots fetching $2.50 per ft. When our infant manufacturers were 
overthrown, at the close of the war, in 1815, it again sank to a low price and 
so remained until the tariff of 1824 was enacted." 

Value of fine wool in market from 1824 to 1855: 

1824. 1825. 1826. 1827. 1828. 1829. 1830. 1831. 



January 


60 


60 


55 


37 


40 


55 


40 


70 ' 


July 


70 


65 


35 


36 


48 


45 


62 


75 




1832. 


1833. 


'1834. 


1835. 


1836. 


1837. 


1838. 


1839. 


January 


65 


57 


70 


60 


65 


70 


50 


65 


July 


, 50 


62 


60 


65 


70 


63 


45 


58 




1840. 


1841. 


1842. 


1843. 


1844. 


1845. 


1846. 


1847. 


January 


50 


52 


48 


35 


37 


45 


40 


47 


July 


46 


50 


43 


35 


45 


40 


38 


47 




1848. 


1849. 


1850. 


1851. 


1852. 


1853. 


1854. 


1855. 


January 


45 


33 


47 


45 


42 


58 


53 


40 


July 


38 


40 


45 


47 


45 


60 


45 


50 



1857. 


1858. 


1859. 


1860. 


1861. 


1862. 


65 


45 


72 


62 x 


54 


56 


60 


45 


62 


58 


40 


60 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


107 


78 


70 


65 


70 


65 


86 


80 


70 


65 


65 


57 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 




77 


73 


65 


60 


48 




85 


53 


57 


56 


33 





66 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 

From the Annual Wool Circular of Messrs. Mauger & Avery, wool com- 
mission merchants, 149 Duane street, New York, we extract quotations of 

prices to date : 

1856. 
January 46 

July 47 

1864. 

January 78 

July 115 

1871. 

January 60 

July 75 

The average price of domestic fleece wool in the United States, from 1827 
to 1861, was for fine, 50. 3c. ; for medium, 42.8c. ; and for coarse, 35. 5c. ; 
average price for four years, from 1861 to 1866 (during the war), for fleeces, 
63 to 83c. ; for culled, 56 to 61c. ; average price for ten years, from 1866 to 
1875, inclusive, for fleeces, 44.4c. to 66. 6c. ; for culled, 34.2c. to 55. 7c. 

In conclusion, we would give the views of a person familiar with the wool 
trade whose candid opinion we have asked and which we think will be of service 
to our growers : 

" If you wish to be successful in growing wool, procure the best sheep, give 
them proper feed and shelter and the care and the attention they deserve. It does 
not matter much what the breed may be, if they can stand the climate. Long, 
combing wooled sheep produce the most valuable fleeces, particularly crosses 
between Cotswold, Liecester and Merino, but they must be carefully tended 
or else they become poor. Just at that portion of the wool attached to the skin 
a contraction of the fiber takes place, the staple is weakened at that point 
and the value of the fleece lessens from ten to fifty per cent. The Merino, more 
or less pure, is found in every neighborhood and is, perhaps, the predominant 
class in this country. In market it is graded according to blood in the follow- 
ing classifications : Full blood or XX ; three-quarter blood or X ; half blood 
or No. 1 ; quarter blood or No. 2. The value of the different quarters de- 
pends largely upon Fashion, who, by her demand for different styles of 
.goods, calls for various grades of wools, sometimes for very fine, again for lower 
grades, and frequently for long, lustrous wools. This is a fact that farmers should 
take into consideration and not slaughter their flock of a certain breed, because 
for one year, or perhaps two or three years, the price of that class of wool has 
been low. In a short time the demand for that grade will be renewed and full 
prices be obtained. 

" Farmers should be careful in putting up their fleeces. It is not material, as 
far as value of wool is concerned, whether it is washed or unwashed, provided the 
sheep are tagged in the spring, as the difference in price is compensated for by 
the increased weight of the unwashed wool. It is a mistake to suppose that 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 67 

fleeces can be put up poorly washed or stuffed with unwashed and for a series of 
years to advantage. We know that unscrupulous buyers, in their desire to buy 
all the wool they can within their limited price, will frequently pay as much for 
faulty as for choice wools, but if the growers only hold out for the difference in 
favor of their honestly handled wool, they will get it. Unfortunately they are 
too apt to follow the practice of their less honorable neighbor, and the whole 
section becomes, in a few years, noted for the shrinkage of the fleeces, buyers 
refuse to purchase these, except at low prices, which are unremunerative to 
growers, who then slaughter their sheep and thus put an end to a branch of 
farming which might prove a source of revenue yearly. 

" Now, as to time of selling. It has been truly said "that the time to sell is 
when everybody wants to buy," and of nothing is this axiom more true than of 
wool. In the summer, after a price has been established and all the dealers 
and manufacturers' agents are seeking for wool, eagerly competing to get the 
amount they require, then is the time to sell. 

"If you will look back over the quotations for fifty-two years, comparing 
prices in July of one year with the price in January following, you will see 
that in twenty-two years the price advanced during the period between July 
and January. In twenty-two years it declined, and eight years there was no 
change in the quotations during that period, which proves that, as a rule, it is 
better to sell soon after shearing than to hold for higher prices until the next 
year. 

"Now, as to best manner of selling wool. The custom, at present, is either 
for the manufacturer to send out an agent to buy, or, as is more generally the 
case, the local speculator buys up what he can in his neighborhood and ships it 
to the East to be sold on commission, paying five to six per cent, for selling. 
There is no question but what considerable profit is made by middle men, which 
might be divided between grower and manufacturer, if the standard of the 
flocks and care in washing and putting up wools were better. In Australia, at the 
Cape of Good Hope, and, in fact, all countries, the large clips are known by 
the owner's name; they have a well-known standard and are bought and sold 
year after year upon mere description, frequently without being seen. Yet, in 
this "progressive," "enlightened" country, there is so little ambition (or is it 
lack of honor) among our wool growers* that they will not put their names to 
their fleeces, because, in too many instances, they would very much prefer not 
to acknowledge them. When, if, by care, they had really produced a superior 
article, the fleeces might have gone into consumers' hands with their producer's 
name attached. Their merits would have been recognized, the grower sought 
out and contracts made year after year for the purchase at full market value. 



* With the exception of a few clips in California and Texas and some, perhaps, in the Territories, the wool of the 
Mormon community is shipped in bales, every one of which has the brand Z. C. M. I. Zion Cooperative Mercantile 
Institution. 



68 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 

Some attempts have been made by. farmers to bring themselves in direct 
communication with consumers by shipping their wool to agents in the East. 
John Brown, who was afterward executed for inciting the insurrection at 
Harper's Ferry, endeavored to act in such a capacity at Springfield, Mass., 
many years ago, but, for some reason or other, it did not succeed. Recently, 
some of the Granger organizations in different States have shipped the wool of 
its members to market, but the irregularity of the clips has made it difficult to 
give entire satisfaction to all. 

BEES AND HONEY. 

Bees are native to many lands. The Italian bee has been imported and 
crossed with our. stock, but no perceptible improvement has resulted. 

We are enabled to present the following items gathered from various and 
reliable sources : 

California promises to become the greatest honey-producing country. Re- 
ports of the superiority of its product are almost discouraging to bee culture 
elsewhere in this country. 

The Japanese, in their own land, are, perhaps, equally successful with cul- 
turists of bees in Italy. 

In the Japan exhibits at the Centennial, there was a picture representing 
some Japs engaged in straining honey into vases. The hives were pictured in 
oblong boxes fastened to the sides of dwellings. 

Great Britain exhibited straw hives with an aperture in the apex, over which 
was turned a glass dish for the reception of surplus honey. 

Bees have their natural enemies in moths and bee-eating birds, called the 
King Bird, which is not the King Fisher. It is smaller, more resembling the 
Phoebe or Pewee. 

The Langstroth hive, whose patent has expired, is reported the best from 
many authorities. Its advantage over others is a shallow construction. High 
or upright hives invite the moths. None are free from their intrusion. Con- 
struct shallow frames, not over eight inches deep or sixteen inches long. Set 
them horizontally in the low hive. From these bees will dislodge and remove 
worms as fast as hatched. In the upright mode of setting frames, the distance 
is too great, compelling the bees to cross the comb, thus allowing the worm to 
lodge and start its web, which the bee is not strong enough to remove. Surplus 
boxes on top of the honey board, five by six inches, with glass on the front end, 
are indispensable. Don't remove these till well-finished by the wax-caps made 
by the unerring little artisans. Early morning is the best time to remove filled 
boxes. Place in a dark room and the lingering bees will all leave in a few 
hours if you set the door slightly ajar. Then paste a cloth over the entrance 
to exclude flies and ants. 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 69 

Some bee-culturists denounce bee-houses. Dark, ventilated cellars or a corner 
of an out-house, suitably prepared by partitions and air-circulation, have been 
very successfully used. Mice must, of course, be excluded. 

With any arrangement, be sure to watch for moths. 

The principal hive used in California is the Langstroth. There is one called 
the Harbison hive, wherein the frames, instead of being suspended, are held up 
at an exact distance from each other, one of the uprights being prolonged, rest- 
ing in a mortise on the bottom board. The top and back sides are movable. 
The surplus honey is all above the frames. The Langstroth hive, so generally 
in use, is expensive and bulky and should be discarded or modified by having a 
movable bottom board, cover, upper and lower story one and the same thing. 
Then there is the objection before mentioned, too, the moth plague. 

For wintering colonies or swarms, a report from the Michigan College 
Apiary, for 1876, offers some good suggestions. The colonies were all removed 
from the cellar once in January, once in March, temporarily, for purifying 
flight. They were not removed to the summer stands till the middle of April. 
All but one, composed of old bees, came through the winter in good condition. 
Those kept breeding into October consumed all the pollen. This lack was 
supplied by feeding during the last of April. Soon as the bees could fly in 
suitable weather, they would not touch the meal. Syrup was sparingly fed till 
fruit trees were in bloom. During the summer they were not allowed to swarm, 
but were divided. Three colonies were lost by their going off, which would 
have been prevented had the queen's wings been previously clipped. All have 
since been slightly cut. 

Basswood, locust, crab-apple trees and shad-bush are surrounding the 
grounds of this apiary. Evergreens are also set out for wind-break and shades 
for bees. Grapevines, yellow trefoil clover, mignonette, black mustard, borage, 
buckwheat, sunflowers, are all honey-favoring plants and good to cultivate 
around the hives of bees. 

ABOUT POULTRY. 

Does it pay to keep hens? is a question no farmer ought ever to ask. 
If it does not pay for marketable purposes, it is certainly valuable to every 
family to have eggs and fowls for a healthful variation of diet. Pecuniary 
profits from raising fowls are very uncertain. Without some degree of care 
in giving food and providing for cleanliness, no profit can be secured. 
Domestic birds are often infested with lice, which prevents their prosperity or 
kills them. 

Sulphur, scattered freely about their perches, is a good preventive; or 
whitewash, made of caustic lime, spread over the building used for their shelter. 
All hens are destructive to grain fields. It is not always profitable to let them 
roam over farm or garden when crops are in progress of ripening. 



70 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 

There is greater requirement for feed in the largest breeds. A preference 
for common fowls has been expressed by persons of experience in raising. It 
is said the black Leghorn breed is better. The hens are almost perpetual 
layers and not disposed to set. It is argued by some that if fowls are fed well 
they can. at any time, be turned into the garden without material damage. 
Owners must be their own judges of this. It is certain that they will pick up 
bugs and worms which are destructive to fruit and grain. Medium sized fowls 
are better foragers than the larger breeds, and are, therefore, better searchers 
for farm pests. 

Fowls need a variety of food, both for the flavor of their flesh when cooked, 
and the richness and tone of their eggs. When they are limited to small pens, 
scraps of meat from the table, leaves of vegetables and bread crumbs should be 
given them. If necessary, deprive the pigs of pieces from the table; fowls 
need them most. If they are satisfied with their food, they will seldom peck off 
each other's feathers. No one particular 'kind of food is "best." Raw and 
cooked meals mixed prevent clogging. Much grain should not be given the 
young ones, except the last at night, when it will tempt a hearty meal, and re- 
main in the crop to give support through the night. Wheat, or other tempting 
grain, should not be given just after soft food. It will kill delicate breeds, 
often when the cause' is unknown. Cooked and raw meals of different kinds 
may, with advantage, be mixed with minced grass. A quantity may be thus 
kept fresh and cool through the day. Bone dust, valuable for large breeds, 
should be added to soft food : one-tenth to one-twentieth of the dry meal, or it 
may be first boiled, and the meal mixed with the soup. Fresh water and lime 
are indispensable. For merely your own use, do not keep too many hens. 
Kill off the old ones every year ; save the pullets. In this way you will have 
more eggs. Give your fowls warm quarters in winter, else they will not lay. 



SMALL FRUIT CULTIVATION. 

THE STBAWBERRY. 



In some localities of the Northern States, a winter protection is beneficial^ 
if not needful. Some of the most successful growers protect their beds every 
autumn. A larger crop is certain to follow by so doing. The embryo fruit- 
buds are formed in the fall, therefore frequent and sudden changes of tempera- 
ture will often weaken, if not destroy, them. Where plants are covered with snow 
all winter, other protection is not so essential as where there is little snow, with 
frequent freezing and thawing. A covering of straw, hay or leaves to the 
depth of one or two inches is sufficient. Frozen plants thawed in the shade 
are less injured than when exposed fully to light. If protection does 
slightly retard the blooming, the plants may develop faster after starting than 
if unprotected- 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 71 

The strawberry is mostly exempt from disease. Blight from sudden changes 
of weather, mildew of leaves in warm, wet weather or a kind of rust are its 
chief dangers. It is often injured by the larvae of insects. Sometimes the roots 
suffer from the wire worm, and the leaves from the rose slug. Hand picking, 
or the use of lime, is the surest method of destroying the slugs. Thorough 
cultivation is the most effective for the worm. The plant louse, or green fly, 
attacks the roots when the soil is loose about them; they choke, the growth. 
Flour of sulphur scattered among the leaves is a good preventive of the green 
fly's ravages, and also attacks of the red spider. 

No kind of soil is equally adapted to all varieties of the strawberry. Deep, 
rich, sandy loam has been most recommended. It is, perhaps, the best, as a 
rule. A light sand or heavy clay may be brought into condition to produce 
fine berries, but a deep soil, light or heavy, is required by the strawberry. 
When the soil is naturally very wet, it requires uhderdraining. There are 
few farms where deep plowing would not make the soil suitable for strawberry 
beds. 

Too many acres and too little care is the common cause of failure in fruit 
culture. Old plants seldom bear as large berries as young ones. Plants that 
have been stimulated will rarely last more than two or three years. It is safe 
not to expect more than two crops, and to make new beds on fresh soil every 
year or two. 

Varieties. It is premised that varieties of a Western origin generally 
produce the largest, softest and most acid fruit. The best known of these 
are : Austin, Iowa, Downer's Prolific, Green Prolific, General Scott and 
Victory. The well known Early Scarlet is an Eastern variety, also the 
favorite Wilson. 

It is well not to be too sanguine of the value of new seedlings. They often 
appear better the first season than afterward. It is easy to originate varieties, 
but to secure one superior or equal to the best already in market is not so 



By observation and inquiry the very best varieties may be procured. Let 
the purchaser, however, not forget the botanical distinction of perfect or stami- 
nate and pistillate flowers. The former will bear fruit without the proximity 
of pistillate plants, while the latter alone will not. It is best to seek the 
plants of perfect varieties. 



THE RASPBERRY. 



Cultivation by roots and root cuttings is the best method for the raspberry. 
From the seed is only desirable to produce new varieties. Its natural manner 
of propagation is by suckers. Some cultivated varieties give suckers sparingly; 
others start them abundantly. Any plant that naturally produces suckers 
from the roots may be propagated by cuttings of the same. 



72 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 



DIRECTIONS. 



Take up the roots when the plants have ceased to grow, the latter part of 
summer ; cut them into lengths of from one to three inches. Have some boxes 
with holes bored in the bottom ; place a layer of straw over the holes ; put on 
an inch or two of soil ; over this a layer of roots ; again the soil, and layers 
of roots, until the box is full. Bury the boxes, when filled, on a dry knoll 
or slight elevation in the garden ; bank them up with soil ; cover them so 
deeply that the roots cannot freeze, and cover the whole with boards, to shed 
water. If the ground is wet, a small excavation should be made at a point 
that will be under the center of each box. 

As early in the spring as the weather will permit, take out the roots and 
plant them in rich soil, the pieces about four inches apart, in drills, covering 
two to four inches, according to the nature of the soil. If it be a heavy one, 
two inches will suffice. The best way is to place the drills not more than two 
feet apart, and cultivate entirely with the hoe or fork. 

Very little pruning is necessary for the raspberry. In general field culture, 
none is given except, after fruiting, to cut close to the ground all the old canes. 
It is, however, best in the spring to prune the bearing canes. The principal 
as well as the lateral ones should be shortened about one-third. The fruit will 
in consequence be much larger, and the yield quite as large. 

The usual plan is to train the plants to stakes, but many are dispensing 
with artificial aids, and, by close pruning, endeavoring to make them self-sus- 
taining. Laying down the plants and covering them with soil is the simplest 
and cheapest way of protecting for winter. Although the raspberry is so hardy, 
a fuller crop may be thus gained. Two men can rapidly bend down the plants, 
all in one direction, and throw a showel of earth on them. Afterward, a plow 
must be passed along on each side, turning the soil over them. This should 
not be done until cold weather is at hand. In the spring, take up the canes by 
passing a fork under them, gently lifting them from the covering. Ten to 
fourteen years is about the average duration, under good culture. 



BLACKBERRY. 



There are but a few native species worthy of the attention of fruit growers. 
A variety called the Dorchester is one of the best. The berries are large, 
sweet and rich, flavored like the wild blackberry. It ripens early. 

The Holcomb, introduced at Granby, Connecticut, is similar to the Dor- 
chester. It continues in fruit several weeks. 

The New Rochelle, or Seaton's Mammoth Lawton, is an universal favorite. 
The fruit becomes moderately sweet several days after it turns black. A strong 
grower and very productive. It begins to ripen rather late, and continues a long 
time ; but, unless the soil is moist around the roots, many of the late berries will 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 73 

not mature. More room should be given than for raspberries. Stakes or trel- 
lises are necessary for support of the shrubs. 

The entire crop of Wilson's Early matures in about two weeks. A rather 
dry soil is preferable to one very moist. It should not be as rich as for rasp- 
berries. Pinch off the terminal shoots the last of August to check the growth. 



THE CURRANT. 



The currant is highly valued in culinary preparations. It possesses, as a 
plant, great vitality, and will grow in almost any soil or region, while to bring 
jt to a high state of perfection, good culture and deep, rich soil are required. 
It thrives better in heavy loam than in light sandy soil. Manure, of almost any 
kind, may be applied to it. Currant bushes in the fence corners, or choked 
with grass, will bear fruit from year to year, but more and larger clusters will 
follow careful training. 

The young plants should be set out and grown singly a few feet apart, the 
shoots be shortened or removed, to give the bush regular shape. The fruit 
comes mainly from the wood several years old. When a branch has borne two 
or three crops, it is best to clip it. Young wood will bear finer fruit than that 
very old. The air and sun should have free access to all the twigs. Dead 
branches should be cut off every year. Pinch off the ends of growing buds, 
during the summer, to make them more stocky and enlarge the fruit. The 
plants may b.e trained in single stems. The clump or bush form is less trouble 
and most natural to the currant. There is danger to the single stems from the 
currant borer. If one gets into it, the plant is destroyed. 

In making cuttings for propagation, every hollow stem should be examined 
for borers. The currant worm is the most destructive insect. The moths ap- 
pearing in July depositing eggs on currant and gooseberry alike. English 
gardeners dust the plants and worms with powdered white hellebore. The 
remedy has been effectually used in this country. 

Foreign varieties are generally superior to our native ones. Of these the 
Attractor, yellowish white ; the Cherry, largest red currant ; Versailles, very 
large, considered, by some, better flavored than the cherry ; Holland Long 
Grape ; Red Dutch ; Victoria ; White Dutch and Black English are all su- 
perior. 

THE CHERRY. 

The cherry belongs to another class of fruits, and is a general favorite. 
Our native species have not been improved by cultivation. Old fashioned 
cherries, in the garden borders of Eastern farmers, were left to their own in- 
clinations of growth. In some seasons the trees, unpruned and totally uncared 
for, would be loaded with ripe fruit in mid-summer enough for birds and boys 
and other people. Whoever remembers the rare, sweet Black Cherry of those 
times will desire none better among the varieties of later introduction. 



74 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 

Like all other fruits cultivated in the North temperate zone, the yield is 
more certain and prolific, if the trees are dug about, pruned and manured. 
Dwarf cherry trees promise, in time, to become popular. At present, growers 
in this country have made little effort in this direction. 

FERTILIZERS AND COMPOST. 

Persons who have the management of farms often erroneously suppose that 
the plentiful use of fertilizing sjubstances is the only condition necessary for the 
growth of a good crop, while little attention is given to the condition of the 
ground or the preparation of the manure. 

There is a suitable season as well as appropriate methods to be em- 
ployed in the use of all kinds of fertilizers. Fixed rules, however, cannot be 
applicable to all circumstances. If the substance be of the nitrogenous class, 
as ammonia, the discretion of the person must be used in the selection of the 
most economical method for storing it up and having it ready for use at the time 
it may be demanded. For this purpose, some kind of soil, or the compost 
heap, in most cases, will be most advantageous. A manure that possesses 
peculiar value when well-employed may be nearly wasted by lack of regard to 
several considerations. 

Farm-yard manure of the best quality, when scattered on the surface of a 
field, merely at a convenient time, or without regard to the proper season, or 
when the crop requires it, will be likely to be wasted. That it may serve 
its best purpose, it must be brought into such relations with the soil that 
the ammonia it contains may be stored up for the crop and imparted to its 
growth. 

Ammonia is very volatile readily carried away in the atmosphere. It 
should, therefore, be preserved from waste. The materials of some soils are 
often most appropriate for this purpose. As ammonia is lighter than the at- 
mosphere, there must be some method for retaining it. Dry clay is the best 
substance for this purpose. 

Guano, more than yard manure, is liable to be impaired and wasted. It, is 
naturally incapable of acting as a retainer of ammonia. It is also important 
that they should not be covered so deep as to prevent the liberation of am- 
monia. 

The farmer, in the first place, should study the adaptability of his soil to 
the proposed crop and supply it with what is most desirable as fertilizing agents. 
This can be done to a large extent from the compost heap which' all should keep 
prepared. It may be made of ingredients generally to be found about any 
farm. A muck or marl bed, ashes, chip dirt, bones, leaves, dead animals, refuse from 
slaughter-houses, woolen or paper-mills, night soil, barn-yard manure, plaster, 
lime, refuse salt, old brine, hen manure, soap suds, soot, etc. these can all be 
utilized. Animal manures act as a ferment, and the decomposition that takes 



GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 75 

place reduces the whole to uniform consistence. Without mixture with other 
substances, the tendency of animal manures is to a too rapid fermentation. They 
may become mouldy and burn up. The addition of manure to the heap is 
necessary. It requires occasional turning and intermixing, so that the whole 
mass may become thoroughly mixed. It is not good policy to apply composted 
manures to fields indiscriminately. 

A soil well-supplied with humus is often benefited by lime and other stimu- 
lants. Light and sandy soils require carbon and potash. Heavy, stiff and cold 
clays require carbonaceous and animal manures and silicates, to improve their 
mechanical condition. 

Compost heaps are a part of the farmer's capital. They deserve more at- 
tention than is usually given to them, especially in the Western States. As the 
country grows older and the soil is depleted, it must be a more prominent agency 
for supporting the land. 

MILK. 

The process of fermentation of milk, in the manufacture of butter and 
cheese, is an interesting one to science, and of great importance to dairymen. 

The myriads of animals or animalculi, that float in the atmosphere, cannot 
exist in a temperature below the freezing or above the boiling point. They 
must eat, like larger animals. Instead of devouring milk, as the cat does, the 
animalcules make their home in it, and the vessels that hold it. As soon as 
the milk is taken from the cow, myriads of them alight on the surface, and 
devour its nutritious elements. They multiply rapidly, and eat all the time. 
Here is the main source of success or failure in making good butter. If milk 
is kept in unclean vessels, or allowed to stand but a few hours, its quality, and 
that of the butter and cheese made from it, will be impaired in proportion to, 
the time it is exposed to even a moderately warm atmosphere. This may 
occur, before the fermentation gives evidence of souring. 

Milk, then, cannot be kept safely in vessels not perfectly clean and pure. 
Its temperature should be immediately cooled, until it approaches the freezing 
point, even though the cream rises more slowly. There is often too much 
haste in securing the cream, provided the milk is kept in a cool place. Forcing 
cream to rise by immediate heat, bringing the milk, as soon as strained, to 
almost a scalding point, has been' successfully tried, the results being a large 
proportion of cream, and very sweet butter. Churning sweet milk with the 
sour cream has been practiced to some extent, but seems not to have become 
a universally popular process. It is generally believed, by butter makers, 
that the sooner it will "come," in the churn, the better it will be, if skil- 
fully managed afterward. The careful and conscientious observer will gain 
much valuable knowledge in this, as well as all other arts and processes, by 
experience. 



76 GENERAL INFORMATION FOR FARMERS. 

Cheese is subject to the deleterious action of animalcules, as spoken of 
above. The peculiar flavor of old cheese, which many people prize, is owing 
to the excrement of these insects. They make it their home, but do not de- 
stroy it, like the larger pest of the cheese fly. 

VAEIOUS ITEMS OF INTEREST. 

The best way to free potatoes in the cellar from sprouts is to put three 
pecks or a bushel in a barrel and skake them briskly till these sprouts are 
broken off. This covers them with moisture that prevents their wilting and 
keeps them fresh longer than if sprouted by hand. It is well to keep a few 
potatoes, a bushel in a barrel, shaking them frequently. 

A new mash for horses is now in use. Take two quarts of oats, one of 
bran, a half pint of flax seed, place the oats first in the stable-bucket, place 
over it the linseed, add boiling water, then the bran, covering the mixture with 
thick cloth, allowing it to rest five hours, then stir up well. One feed per day 
is sufficient. It is easily digested and is adapted to young animals, giving sub- 
stance to their frames and volume rather than height. 

Old pork barrels, whether tainted or not, should be cleansed before using 
for new pork. A peck of strong wood ashes, a couple of pails of water, standing 
a day or two in a barrel, then scoured with a stiff broom, will effectually clean 
them. Rinse in cold water, then pour boiling water down the sides. 

FEEDING RATIONS FOR MILK AND BUTTER. 
What is the most economical daily ration for a cow in milk ? 

There are various rations that are about equally good. If the object is milk 
only, the following is good and cheap : 

15 pounds corn stalks, cut and steamed. 

5 " hay, " " 

5 " cabbage, " " 

10 " sugar beets, pulped or steamed. 

Total, 35 pounds. 

This ration should not cost over eleven or twelve cents a day, including labor 
and coal for steaming. If butter is the object in view, it may be changed as 
follows : 

10 pounds corn stalks, cut and steamed, 
5 " corn meal, " " 

4 " meadow hay, " " 

5 " cabbage, " " 

5 " sugar beets, pulped or steamed. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



SETTLEMENTS within the limits of this county commenced along the Fox 
^ River and on the military road from Chicago to Green Bay, in 1834, 
Algonquin being entitled to the honor of the oldest inhabitant. These first 
settlers came from Virginia, and it was appropriate that the " Mother of 
Presidents," herself the oldest settled of the English colonies, should perform 
the same office for this county that their ancestors had for Virginia. 

The Blackhawk War had just ended, the Indian title had been extinguished, 
and the country, to those brought up among the mountains of Virginia, was 
beauty itself. They were in search of something better, and surely they need 
look no further. Here was a deep and inexhaustible soil ready for the plow, 
and, within easy range, timber along the streams not such as they had left 
behind them, but amply sufficient for buildings and fences. 

The land had not been surveyed, but that made little difference to them ; they 
could and did make their claims by mutual consent, and waited till the man 
with the compass should put in an appearance. 

THE VIRGINIA SETTLEMENT. 

In 1835, Christopher Walkup, James Dufield, John McClure, Christopher 
McClure, William Hartman, John L. Gibson and John Gillilan came from 
Western Virginia and located in the eastern part of the town of Dorr, since 
that time known as the "Virginia Settlement." John Gillilan, preferring to 
be near the water, made his claim where he now resides. 

These men were the real pioneers of the county, and for that reason deserve 
more than a passing notice ; but it is chiefly on account of their true Southern 
hospitality to all new comers, to whom their latch-string always hung out, and 
who were always welcome to all the assistance they could render through money, 
men and teams, that they are gratefully remembered by those who had occasion 
to claim their aid or hospitality. 

Christopher Walkup, John McClure and John L. Gibson have taken their 
final emigration, while the others are as ready as ever to welcome the stranger 
to the best the house affords. 



78 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

Of all these places, Christopher Walkup's was perhaps the most noted, 
as he held several of the offices of Justice of the Peace and Sheriff of the 
County. He was the father of the late lamented Josiah Walkup, of Crystal 
Lake Crossing. The elder Mr. Walkup died about six years ago, at the age 
of eighty. John McClure died in Kansas, and John L. Gibson at his resi- 
dence in Ridgefield. 

These "old settlers" are passing away, and as we shall never have any 
more, it is well that their memory be embalmed in history as it is in the memory 
of those who in that early day were forced to put their hospitality to the test ; 
and if one of them was ever found wanting, the instance has not come to 
light. 

These Virginians brought with them the local customs of the place whence 
they came, where one was not thought to have made a visit unless he had come 
with the entire family, and spent at least one night- beneath the roof of his 
host. The march of improvement has changed all this, but still their memory 
is green; and many are now living who have cause to remember the Virginia 
Settlement. 

Pleasant Grove, now Marengo, came next in order, in 1835, after which 
time it were of little use to essay the settlement in the order of time. 

Deer, wolves, foxes and other animals at that time roamed over these 
prairies and through the openings, as many and free as the Indian, and no great 
exertion was necessary to procure meat for the table ; indeed, the temptation 
was too great, so that much more was killed than was needed for the necessi- 
ties of the settler. The men hunted the deer during the day, and the wolves 
hunted the sheep and pigs during the night. In 1844. the people of McHenry 
County thought to rid themselves of the wolves by a grand hunt, in which they 
would surround a large tract of land with a skirmish line, armed with any- 
thing that would make a noise, drive the animals into the center of their noisy 
circle, there to slaughter them at their leisure. The hunters found their meet- 
ing place on section six, Seneca Township ; and although they had corralled 
about sixty deer, all but one of which were allowed to escape, they bagged a 
wolf and a fox. This was the first and last hunt of the kind ever held in the 
county. 

ORGANIZATION. 

During the session of 1836-7, the Legislature passed an act setting off 
from Cook the territory now included in McHenry and Lake Counties, under 
the former name, which was given in honor of an officer of that name who, in 
the Sac War, marched through the Territory on his way to Fort Atkinson. 

In May, 1837, the county seat was located at McHenry, which had been 
chosen by Commissioners appointed by the Legislature, Crystal Lake, Half 
Day, Fort Hill and Independence Grove, now Libertyville, competing with 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 79 

McHenry for that honor. John Coville,"of Bloomington, Peter Cohen and 
Peter Pruyne, of Cook County, examined the different points, and after mature 
consideration, taking into account that the. first-named point was near the geo- 
graphical center of the territory, and not a bad location in other respects, de- 
creed accordingly. McHenry County then contained thirty Congressional 
Townships, being bounded on the east by the Lake, on the south by Cook, on 
the west by Boone, organized about the same time, and on the north by Wis- 
consin, then a Territory. It was about equally divided between timber and 
prairie, was well watered by creeks and rivers, not to mention the two dozen 
lakes, large and small, that then supplied and still supply an abundance of fish. 

On the first day of June, 1837, at the store of Hiram Kennicott, near Half 
Day, the first election of county officers was held. The vote was not large, 
the total being 138, and the three County Comissioners chosen were Charles 
H. Bartlett, Mathias Mason and Solomon Norton. Henry B. Steele was 
chosen Sheriff; Michael McGuire, Coroner; Seth Washburn, Recorder; Chas. 
E. Moore, County Surveyor; the Commissioners appointed Hamilton Dennison, 
of Half Day, for Clerk, and Andrew S. Wells, of the same place, Treasurer. 
These Commissioners held their first court at McHenry, June 5, 1837, to organ- 
ize the county, their first order being an approval of the Clerk's bond; their 
second, the appointment of a Treasurer; and third, dividing the county into 
precincts, or magistrate districts; which being done, the county machinery was 
in running order. The court then proceeded to divide the territory into precincts 
or magistrate districts, ; the first, called Fox Precinct, included all the territory in 
the then County of McHenry lying west and two miles east of Fox River, which, 
as will be seen, comprised a trifle more than is now within this county. The 
election was held at McHenry ; Christy G. Wheeler, Wm. L. Way and John 
V. McLane were appointed Judges of Election ; H. N. Owen and B. B. Brown, 
Clerks; and at the first election held July 3d, 1837, Wm. H. Buck and Wm. 
L. Way were elected Justices of the Peace. 

Lake County appears to have had a monopoly of precincts, having four, 
named respectively, Oak, Lake, Indian Creek and Abingdon ; the first hold- 
ing an election at the residence of William Dwyer, Isaac Hickox, Arthur Pat- 
terson and Benjamin Marks being Judges of Election ; in the second, the 
voting was done at the house of Samuel P. Ransome, the Judges being Jere- 
miah Porter, Emsley Sunderland and Edward Jenkins ; Seth Washburne's 
house was made the voting place in the third, John G. Ragan, Richard Steele and 
Andrew S. Wells receiving the tickets ; and in the fourth, the house of Thomas 
McClure was where the Justices and Constables were elected, Jared Gage, 
Willard Jones and Samuel Brooks being Judges. Two Justices and a like 
number of Constables were elected in each precinct. 



80 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



COURT OF CLAIMS. 

The County being now organized, immigrants poured in as fast as ox-teams 
could bring them, but as the Government surveyor had not yet made his appear- 
ance, each man could only choose prairie or timber solely, stake out his "claim " 
or plow around it if he had a plow to do it with, put up his cabin and consider 
himself at home, although, according to Henry.: Clay, the whole mass formed 
"a lawless band of squatters." 

The human disposition being the same then as now, it became necessary to 
provide some mode of proving and recording those claims, as a security against 
those disposed to "jump." Accordingly, the settlers formed themselves into an 
association for mutual protection, organizing a sort of " Court of Claims." In 
pursuance of this object, the territory was divided into " claim districts." 
Each district was then sub divided into sub-districts, in each of which three 
Commissioners were appointed to record claims and hear and determine all con- 
tests in that regard. These claims, when recorded, became evidence of title. 
It does not appear that these Claim Commissioners had much to do with what is 
now McHenry County, but so well did they perform their duty in the Lake 
precincts that but little trouble arose and that was easily and quietly adjusted. 
The survey of the land comprised in the county proceeded from the third 
principal meridian eastward, reaching the west range (5) in 1838, and finish- 
ing Lake County four years later, when these courts of claims, being no longer 
needed, ceased to exist. 

These immigrants were a neighborly set, coming, as they sometimes did, in 
strings of six to eight covered wagons, the inmates of which were seeking to 
better their condition by putting to some use the immense waste of timber and 
prairie stretching away on every side as far as the range of human vision. 
The difficulty of choice was increased by the extent of unoccupied beautiful 
country, still they could not wander on forever ; they must h^,ve land, water 
and timber, the last all-important to them, as the first thing to be provided was 
shelter. The spot having been selected and claims satisfactorily adjusted, they 
formed themselves into a co-operative society for the purpose of house-building, 
putting up the first house for him who seemed to them to stand the most in 
need of shelter. Thus, in a short time, all were provided with such dwellings 
at the materials at hand afforded. 

Mills, log school-houses and villages soon made their appearance, and if 
unlike in that respect to those who, in December, 1620, left the Mayflower for 
the bleak coast of New England, they brought no minister with them, that 
necessary element of civilized society was not long behind, preaching in barns, 
schools and private houses to audiences more attentive if less fashionable than 
now, and finding beneath every "shake" roof a hearty welcome to the table 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 81 

^ 

and no less hearty one to the " shake down " for the night, unless the host 
was provided with that rarity in those days, a spare bed. 

Their rate of taxation was one per cent, on the following schedule : Slaves 
or indentured or registered negro or mulatto servants, stock in trade, horses, 
mules, asses, and neat cattle above three years of age, swine, lumber, and one 
horse wagons, clocks, watches, etc., but never a bit of bank or railroad stock, 
piano or silver ware. The tax of 1837 realized $370.86. 

Among the curiosities of*ancient legislation is a tavern license of 1837, 
the license costing eight dollars, and that the landlord might not swindle his 
thirsty customers, the Board established the following prices for liquors : 
Brandy, rum or gin, pints, 25 cents ; wine, 37J ; whisky, 12J ; beer or cider, 
the same ; meals, 37 J ; lodging, 12 J : while a span of horses could chew hay 
all night, for 25 cents. Those were halcyon times, but we have no record that 
the men and women of that day were all driftikards, the secret of which may 
have been that the shilling for the pint of whisky was as difficult to get at that 
day as it is to obtain enough to pay for the same quantity now. They had one 
advantage of us in that they were in the most blissful ignorance of the 
" crooked." 

DIVISION OF THE COUNTY. 

The Legislature of 1838-9 passed an act dividing the then County of 
McHenry into two unequal parts, the present county to retain Ranges 5, 6, 7, 
8, and the west third of Range 9, the remainder to constitute the new county 
which was to be called Lake. In pursuance of the authority given by this act, 
in 1839, the new county was organized, since which time each county has its 
own history. 

LOCATING COUNTY SEAT. 

The object in view in dividing Range 9, so as to leave one-third of it in this 
county appears to heve been that McHenry might still be the county seat, but 
being so much to one side the people became dissatisfied, and the Legislature, 
during the session of 18423, passed an act authorizing the people to select anew 
site for the county seat. 

The election was held the August following, and Centerville (now Wood- 
stock) having the majority, the County Commissioners' Court in September fol- 
lowing, by proclamation, declared the seat of justice removed to that place, 
which was done on the 23d of September, 1844, and the Legislature, at its next 
session, changed the name to that which it now bears. 

The court house, built in 1844, stood a little south of the center of the 
public square, and subserved the ends of justice, till the night of the 4th of 
July, 1858, when it was destroyed by fire. The present fine building having 
been erected, in 1857, at a cost of $40,000. 



82 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

The first highway run through the county was the State road running from 
the Indiana State line through Lockport, Naperville, Du Page, Warrenville, 
Dundee, Woodstock and theflce to Madison. The act passed the Legislature 
in 1837 and the road was located by William Smith, of Will, I. M. Warren, of 
Cook, and Zeba S. Beardsley, of McHenry County. 

Cook County having preferred a claim against McHenry for expenses 
incurred by Cook, on account of McHenry, previous to the creation of the 
latter county, and Lake being in a similar manner indebted to McHenry, by 
act of the Legislature, in 1843, a Commissioner was appointed to inquire into 
and adjust the matter, when it was found that this county was indebted to Cook 
in the sum of $750,. and Joseph Wood, of Lake, with J. H. Johnson, of Mc- 
Henry, having ascertained that Lake owed us precisely the same sum, the mat- 
ter was settled by Lake paying Cook. In these days such a strange coincidence 
would be deemed worthy of examination by a committee. 

In 1840, the census showed that from 1837, when the first vote was cast, 
and from which the population was estimated at 500, the population had 
increased to 2,578, and the county contained thirteen mills and manufacturing 
establishments. 

The nearest market being Chicago, and the only means of reaching that 
muddy town being by wagon, hauled, for the most part, by oxen over the exe- 
crable prairie roads, the trip occupying three days at the shortest, and the prices 
of all kinds of produce being what would, at this day, be thought too insignifi- 
cant to pay for planting, sowing or feeding, it is no wonder that the seller 
frequently returned from market no richer than he went. Thirty to forty cents 
a bushel for wheat, and that was the only article that they were sure of selling 
at any price, would scarcely pay, even though the produce of that cerial was as 
high as forty-five bushels to the acre. Twenty teams in line thus going to 
market with their only staple was no uncommon sight. 

At the first election (1838) for Member of the Legislature, .the Whig and 
Democratic parties put their candidates in the field, but the Democratic party 
being then greatly in the ascendant, Dr. Richard Murphy, the Democratic 
nominee, distanced Giles Spring, of 'the other party. The district, at that 
time, consisted of Cook, Will, Du Page and McHenry Counties, and the first 
representative from this county, after the 'division, was Hon. Wm. M. Jackson, 
also a Democrat and still living at Union, in the township of Coral. 

FIRST COURTS. 

The Circuit Court of McHenry County held its first session at the county 
seat, on May 10th, 1838, John Pearson, of the Seventh Judicial Circuit, pre- 
siding. The first State's Attorney was Alonzo Huntington; Sheriff, Henry 
B. Steele ; Clerk, A. B. Wynkoop ; and the first Grand Jury consisted of the 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 83 

following named gentlemen, several of whom are still living: Andrew S. 
Wells, C. H. Bartlett, Martin Shields, Phineas Sherman, Thomas McClure, 
Rufus Saules, Linley S. Wood, Christy G. Wheeler, John Deggins, Moody B. 
Barley, Christopher Walkup, Isaac H. Loyd, Jeremiah Porter, Willard Jones, 
Leonard Gage, Daniel Winters, Richard Steele, Alden Harvey, Luke Hale, 
Amos Diamond, Aaron Randall, Elisha Clark, R. R. Crosby, and Charles 
Bartlett, who was Foreman. 

The Petit Jurors were as follows: Wm. Easton, Dr. J. H. Foster, John 
A. Mills, Theron Parsons, Abijah S. Bernard, Samuel Walker, Russell Dig- 
gins, Samuel Terwilliger, E. F. Farnum, Timothy B. Titcomb, John Herrick, 
John Hicks, Erastus Houghton, Nelson Darling, John McOmber, Eli W. 
Brigham, Uriah Cottle, Abraham Vincent, Burley Hunt and Wm. Irwin. 

Upon attendance at that term of court were the following named attor- 
neys: E. W. Cassay, J. C. Newkirk, Nathan Allen, Kimball, Horace 

Butler, James M. Strode, Alonzo Huntington and Giles Spring. 

THE PRESS. 

In 1846, it was seen that the county must have a newspaper, so Mr. 
Josiah Dwight started the ''Illinois Republican" which, under his manage- 
ment, was conducted for a few years, when it suspended, and the Woodstock 
Democrat, first published by F. D. Austin, in 1848, shared the same fate in 
1856. The year previous to the closing of the Democrat, the first number of 
the Woodstock Sentinel made its appearance, as a joint stock company, having 
been projected by Convers & Tappen, who were, at that time, the managers of 
the newly formed Republican party. 

It appears that Convers procured the attendance of J. R. Giddings, of 
Ashtabula County, Ohio, at a political meeting in Woodstock, at which time, 
and during the speech of the Ohio statesman, the question arose as to the name 
of the new party, when F. J. Mansfield stretched over the speaker's head a 
long paper, bearing, in large type, the word "Republican." The name was 
accepted, and the establishment of the Sentinel followed as the logical result of 
the new party organization. 

In 1856, it was in the hands of Franks & Son, who sold out in the spring 
of the next year, to A. E. & W. E. Smith, they running it till 1866. Sapp 
& Richardson became its proprietors, to be, in their turn, succeeded by Wm. 
E. Smith, in 1869, and in 1873, G. S. Southworth became editor and propri- 
etor. It has always been a Republican paper, and the leading one of the 
county. 

In 1856, E. W. Smith and M. L. Joslyn started a campaign paper called 
the Argus, which did not long survive the election. 

Next came the Woodstock Democrat, under the editorial management of F. 
D. Austin, but, not being well sustained, soon went under, and in 1861 the 



84 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

Union was issued from Phoenix Hall, and shared the fate of its predecessor. 
The Harvard Independent was started in 1864, which for the past few years 
has been in the hands of McLaughlin & Leland. Three years later the Ma- 
rengo Republican was established, which has been run almost continuously by 
J. B. Babcock. 

The New Era was established in the fall of 1873, by Ringland & Price, as 
a Grange paper. The latter named gentleman was connected with it but a 
short time, since when it has been owned and conducted at Woodstock and 
Nunda by its present proprietor. 

Next, in order of time, follows the Plaindealer, published at McHenry, by 
J. Van Slyke, who commenced its publication a little more than one year ago 
(in 1875), and the Richmond Gazette, now in the last half of its first year 
(1876), was first issued by H. B. Begim, who subsequently took in G. S. Utter, 
when, the former dying, the latter took in Dr. S. F. Bennett, and it is now 
under the management of Bennett & Utter. 

It will be perceived that the county is abundantly supplied with local papers, 
all Republican with the exception above noted. Nothing short of an intelli- 
gent, reading people could keep so many alive. 

THE AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

This Society was organized twenty-five years ago, and bought ten acres of 
land a little east of town, outside the corporation. This land was bought of 
James B. Church, May 18, 1855. The Society then borrowed, of the county 
one thousand dollars, giving a mortgage on the land. The land finally passed 
into possession of the county, the Society taking a perpetual lease for the 
same. In February, 1869, eight acres more, on the north side, were bought of 
Daniel Joslyn, at $900. Finding itself still within too narrow limits, in De- 
cember, 1873, a lease of five acres on the east was obtained for three years, 
with the privilege of purchase, and, the lease having expired, the land has been 
purchased for $1,000 ; so the Society now has twenty-three acres, with nothing 
to prevent indefinite expansion eastward. 

The old buildings proving inadequate and inconvenient, in 1872 the present 
fine hall was erected, at a cost of $2,000, while for stock, ample stalls, stables, 
sheds and pens exist. 

Three years ago, at the suggestion of the President, Mr. James Crow, an 
attempt was made to pay off the debt by selling life membership tickets at $120 
each. About one hundred were sold, but, owing to various circumstances, 
there still exists a debt of about $2,000. 

About one year ago, Marengo made an attempt to organize a second society 
in the county, but their first meeting was not so successful as to warrant any 
great outlay in that direction. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 85 

THE DAIRY BUSINESS. 

The dairy business takes the lead in farm products, there being, in the 
county, no less than twenty cheese and butter factories in operation, the most 
of them making both, while several confine their operations to butter alone, 
and a smaller number to cheese alone. 

The first factory was built in 1866, in the township of Hebron, by R. W. 
& W. H. Stewart. About the same time, Dr. R. R. Stone built one at Rich- 
mond, and recently, D. E. Wood & Go., at Huntley, have put up the largest 
factory in the county. There are about twenty-seven or twenty-eight all told, 
but some of them are closed. 

The number of cows connected with these factories is from 12,000 to 
15,000, and the total product of milk is probably 30,000,000 pounds, of which 
3,000,000 is made into cheese, producing about $300,000 per year; and the 
receipts for butter are about one-third as much. 

Of milk otherwise disposed of, about 1,000,000 pounds is shipped to Chi- 
cago in eight-gallon cans, this producing about $10,000 a year. The above, 
including milk used at home and fed to stock, would make the value of this 
product alone about $700,000. 

The heaviest operator in the factory line is Dr. R. R. Stone, of Richmond, 
who now controls about one-fourth of that business in the county. 

WAR RECORD, 

During the war of the Rebellion, Me Henry County responded promptly 
to every call of the government ; the number of men furnished being 2,533, 
which is just three less than the number required, but as many enlisted in the 
Irish Legion, who do not appear upon the records of the county, the number 
must have been in excess of that given. It has been found impossible to 
ascertain the precise number who went from each township, for the reason that 
men who belonged in one township were frequently credited to another, because 
enlisting there, it being the custom to consider a man as belonging where he 
was enrolled. 

The county issued bounty orders, to the amount of $260,000, of which 
about $90,000 remains outstanding. Part of these orders drew ten and part 
eight per cent., but last year (1876) they were, by order of the Board of Super- 
visors, funded into eight per cent. 

EDUCATIONAL INTERESTS. 

Progress from the log school house, with its puncheon floor and slab seats, 
has been as rapid as in any other county in the State. School edifices of frame, 
brick and stone have superseded the log expediency, while a system of supervi- 



86 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

sion has largely increased the efficiency of teachers, and in the various cities and 
villages of the county, the graded system has been introduced. From the first 
schools of Wm. M. Jackson, in Coral, in 1838 to 1875, the school houses have 
increased to 150, while the number of pupils, according to the census of 1870, 
was 11,890, of whom 7,000 were enrolled. The amount paid teachers was 
$43.000 in 1874. The number of female teachers, during the last twenty 
years, has doubled, while the number of male teachers has increased but one- 
seventh. The average daily attendance is about one-half of the school census, 
or 5,995, being about two-thirds of the enrollment. 

Formerly the county made ample provision for school supervision, appointing 
Carlisle Hastings to the office of School Commissioner in 1840, but under the 
new school law, the duties of the School Superintendent are. limited to making 
an annual report to the State Superintendent, apportioning the public money, 
loaning the county funds, examining teachers and visiting schools when required 
by school officers, he receiving four dollars a day when engaged in his official 
duties. 

In the fall of 1874, at Nunda, the teachers organized a County Association 
for mutual improvement. It meets monthly, numbers fifty members, and is in 
a flourishing condition. 

The county has twenty-two school libraries, the best one being at Richmond. 

THE TEACHERS' INSTITUTE 

Was organized by Rev. R. K. Todd, during the first year of his first term as 
School Commissioner. It was held in the old court house, continued for one 
week, had an aggregate attendance of one hundred and fifty, much exceeding 
the expectations of the presiding officer, who, in conducting the exercises, was 
assisted by several of the citizens of the town. This was in the fall of 1849, 
and each fall, during his term, a similar meeting was held, but during the reign 
of his successor the interest dwindled until A. W. Smith, on assuming the office 
in 1855, had some difficulty in re-awakening the teachers' dormant interest in 
this means of improvement. His institutes were held for two weeks, and at 
his third meeting, in the fall of 1850, a constitution was adopted, and the Insti- 
tute began to assume a permanent form. Mr. Smith was the first to go outside 
the county for instruction to the members, he having, at his second gathering, 
the State Superintendent. 

School Commissioner Hutchinson was succeeded, in 1855, by Asa W. 
Smith, Esq., who shall be allowed to tell his own story : 

"In the fall of 1855, I was elected School Commissioner, and, upon accept- 
ing the office, found it to be one of my legal duties to visit schools fifty days in 
a year, with a compensation of $2 a day. There were at that time somewhat 
over two hundred schools in the county. Notwithstanding it was ' big work 
and small pay,' I resolved to undertake the task, which was performed by visit- 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 87 

ing two schools daily, and lecturing at night in the most convenient place for 
the accommodation of the two districts thus visited. 

" In October, 1856, the present organization known as the McHenry 
County Teachers' Institute was formed. 

" In 1857, we had the most successful and interesting Institute of my time as 
an active member thereof. It was quite generally attended by the best teachers 
of the county, among whom were Rev. R. K. Todd, John A. Parrish, S. F. 
Bennett, Theodore Mead, M. F. Ellsworth, two Misses Thomas, Miss Jewett, 
Miss Achsee Smith, Miss Thompson, Miss H. S. Corey, Mrs. C. M. Smith 
and many others." 

The records of the Institute referred to by Mr. Smith cannot be found since 
the election of G. S. Southworth, into whose hands they never came ; so the 
McHenry County Teachers' Institute is without a regular organization, further 
than may be necessary to hold one meeting. 

Since 1857, the Institute has not met regularly, except during the terms of 
A. Brown, A. J. Kingman, G. S. Southworth and the present incumbent, Wm. 
Nickle. Its meetings have generally been held in Woodstock, but sometimes 
they have gone to McHenry, Richmond and Nunda. 

The Woodstock University of Rev. R. K. Todd grew out of the necessities 
of the people, who, feeling their need of a better education than could be had in 
the public schools of the county, as early as 1848 began to urge him to open a 
school. He finally consented ; and, from himself and wife as teachers, the 
school grew into the second hundred and the teachers were multiplied by four. 
A suitable building was erected on his lot, a little east of his residence, arid, with 
150 students, school had been in operation for about twelve weeks when, in the 
early part of the winter of 1861, he was called up in the night to see his school 
building become a heap of smouldering ashes. 

His loss was about $7,000, and, feeling sure that he had no enemy who could 
do that, and, being equally certain that the fire could not have been the work 
of accident, inquiry was set on foot and the deed traced to one Cosgrove, who 
accused another person of having hired him to do the deed. This other person 
proved to be one to whom Mr. Todd, when School Commissioner, had refused 
a certificate on the ground of moral character ; but, being too adroit in cover- 
ing up his tracks, he could not be convicted. Cosgrove, however, was sent to 
prison for six years, but was pardoned out at the end of two, and moved to Will 
County. The real criminal has never been heard from since the trial. 

At the fire, or immediately after its occurrence, Mr. Todd promised to open 
his school again within ten days, in the basement of the then unfinished Pres- 
byterian Church, which was done. The school was continued there till 1867, 
when it was moved into a newly built addition to his residence, where it still 
continues, but, for several years, has been foV boys only. 

The University was incorporated a short time previous to the fire. 



88 HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



ICE BUSINESS. 

Crystal Lake ice has such a reputation for coolness and clearness, that the 
people of Chicago would not care to dispense with it ; and no history of Mc- 
Henry County would be complete that did not give some account of it, which, 
through the kindness of John Brink, Esq., we are enabled to do: 

The Crystal Lake Ice Company, consisting of Joy, Frisbie and others, was 
organized in 1855, and put up some 7,000 to 9,000 tons of ice, which Joy sold 
in the city. The ensuing year, Joy & Frisbie had the concern entirely on their 
own hands, and, from that time to 1860, shipped yearly 10,800 tons. The 
houses were burned that year and, till 1868, Crystal Lake ice was unknown in 
Chicago ; but Joy, Smith and others organized another company, putting up 
and selling ice for the ensuing six years, when the Fire King closed them out a 
second time. 

During these six years, the company put up and sold about the same quan- 
tity yearly that had been done by the company burnt out in 1860. From 
1869 to 1873, the lake had a rest, the only ice cut being for private use or 
sent into Chicago by the carload, probably 2,000 tons yearly ; then C. S. and 
J. H. Dole got possession of the lake, and, in the winter of 1878-4, they put 
up and filled six ice houses, each having a capacity of 1,250 tons, or 7,500 
tons, besides shipping to different places 8,000 tons more a total of 10,500 
tons. The next winter the number of their ice houses was increased to eight, 
capable of holding 12,000 tons, whilst, during that winter, 7,000 tons was 
shipped, making 19,000 in all. In the winter of 18756, they filled their 
houses and shipped 1,200 carloads, making, altogether, 26,400 tons. This fall 
they are putting up four more buildings near the others, the new ones being 
38x148 feet and thirty feet high. This will give them twelve ice houses, to 
fill which they are putting in an engine of twenty-five horse power. 

These new ice houses will hold an aggregate of 14,416 tons, which, added 
to the capacity of the old ones, gives a total of 26,416 tons, the amount that 
will be put up this winter and, probably, half as much shipped. These houses 
are situated at the south end of the lake, near the outlet, in a beautiful grove, 
and are fenced in with a tight board fence eight feet high. 

Of course, a business that has, in so short a time, grown to so large pro- 
portions has not yet arrived at its maximum, and we may look to see those ice 
houses doubled in number within the next ten years, unless Chicago should 
cease to grow or contrive some better way to keep themselves cool and preserve 
their meats during the hot weather. The ice harvest gives employment to 
many who, but for that, coming, as it 'does, when there is nothing else to do, 
would go idle and want for the luxuries, if not for the necessaries of life. 



HISTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 89 



RAILROADS. 
/ 

In 1855-6, the C. N-W. Ry, then called the Chicago, St. Paul & Fond 
du Lac, was built through the county, and its effect was greatly to stimulate 
business, legitimate and illegitimate. Every village traversed by the road was 
destined to be a city, and corner lots went up to fabulous prices. People have 
now learned that means of transportation alone do not build up a town ; to do 
that, requires bodies to be fed, lodged and clothed. 

The Fox River Valley, now the Elgin & State Line, was built at the same 
time by a different company, but never having been a paying investment, has 
been absorbed by the Chicago & North- Western. 

The Galena & Chicago Union Railroad was built in 1854. It is now the 
Galena Division of the Chicago & North- Western Railway, and has three depots 
in the county one at Huntley, one at Union, and one at Marengo. And the 
Rockford & Kenosha first began to run trains in 1861. It forms part of the 
same corporation, and has a depot at each of the following named places : Hebron, 
Alden and Chemung. 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 



ALGONQUIN, TOWNSHIP 43, RANGE 8. 

This appears to have been settled the first in the county. Samuel Gillilan, 
in 1834, coming from Virginia and settling on Section 23, where his widow, 
Mrs. Margaret Gillilan, and her son Richard now reside. John Gillilan came 
soon after, locating on the other side of the river and about the same distance 
from the present village. In 1836, Mr. A. N. Beardsley settled on Crystal 
Lake Prairie, Beman Crandall also making his claim about the same time. Z. 
Beardsley, Najah Beardsley and Mr. Lanphier, Isaac and William King, 
Wesley Hickox, William Powell and father. Dr. Plumleigh, Esq. Chunn, Nelson 
Thomas, the Crabtrees, at Carey Station. From that time to 1839, when H. 
B. Throop located on Section 10, and was several times County Commissioner. 
In 1841, John Brink came with his compass and chain, since which time the 
county has never been without a County Surveyor. In 1836 or 1837, a Dr. 
Cornish settled near Algonquin, and looked after the health of the early and 
later settlers. 

A log school house was built in the village of Crystal Lake in 1838, and the 
first school of twenty pupils was taught by Miss Hannah Beardsley, now Mrs. 
Hannah Wallace. The second term was under the rule of Frederick Joslyn, 
now of Woodstock. 

The Baptist denomination, in 1842, built the first church in the township, 
at Crystal Lake, their first pastor being Rev. A. Pease. Rev. L. S. Walker, 
of the M. E. Church, preached the first sermon, at the house of A. W. Beards- 
ley. Nathan Jewett and Elder Wheeler also officiated. In 1840, Rev. Seth 
Barnes preached the gospel according to Universalism. There are now five 
churches in Crystal Lake Congregationalist, Baptist, Episcopal, Free Meth- 
odist and Lutheran, while at Algonquin village there are two, Episcopal and 
Congregationalist, the former in charge of Rev. Peter Arvedson, who settled 
there in 1842. The village of Caryhas also a Free Methodist Church. These 
church buildings are estimated to have cost $19,500. 

The Congregationalists at Crystal Lake have a membership of 105 ; the 
Baptists, 60 ; and the Free Methodists, 80. The Lutherans, under the pas- 
torate of Rev. H. G. Smith, have 150. 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 91 

Near Chunn's Creek, the Catholics have a church, principally Bohemians, 
with 100 members. 

Benjamin Douglas and Col. Huffman erected the first saw-mill, in 1839, on 
Crystal Lake outlet, about three-quarters of a mile from the lake. A saw-mill 
was built- at Algonquin village, in 1842, by A. Dawson, and another was built 
in 1840 on Chunn Creek, five miles northeast of Algonquin, by 'Squire Chunn, 
and Job Toles, in company with a Mr. Northrop, put up a grist-mill on the same 
creek in 1862. In 1848, a grist-mill was erected by Burger & Cornish, on 
the outlet of Crystal Lake, on the Cornish farm. The grist-mill at Algonquin, 
on the east side of the river, was commenced by A. Dawson and finished in 
1849 by Henry Petrie. The only brick-mill in the township is on Crystal 
Lake outlet, at Algonquin, and was built in 1850, by Dr. Thomas Plumleigh, 
at an estimated cost of $12,000. The saw mills are gone, but the grist mills 1 
are still in full blast and doing a good business. The frame mill is now owned 
by Peacock Bros. ; the brick-mill by Messrs. Marshall; that on the outlet by 
T. Richards, and the one on Chunn Creek by George Jayne. 

The father of the dairy business is Daniel Mitchell, who, some years ago, 
commenced sending his milk to Chicago. He now milks about forty-two cows. 
There are many more dairy men, 'whose names must be omitted for want of 
space. Milk is the leading product of the town, about half being shipped to 
Chicago and the remainder carried to the cheese factory at the village, which 
was put up in 1874 by Dr. Stone, of Richmond. 

Crystal Lake is the oldest village, having been laid out in 1839 or 1840, 
and the next was Algonquin, Gary coming in last, in 1854. 

A. W. Beardsley set out the first orchard at Crystal Lake, but there is no 
nursery in the town. This town, too, is the happy possessor of the only library 
in the township, which is a circulating one of some 200 volumes. 

Crystal Lake, being the oldest village, must have had the first store, and we 
find that in 1840 or thereabouts, Mr. Anar offered goods for sale across the 
counter in that town. 

The early history of this town, as told by the pioneers, contains many an 
incident giving color to the suspicion that the timber along the river formed a 
good hiding place for horse thieves, and the inaccessibility of Bogus Island 
made it equally a resort for counterfeiters, and it is said that it was in ferreting 
out that nest of outlaws Allen Pinkerton first gave evidence of those talents 
that have since made him famous. There are rumors, too, of an insurrection 
among the hands engaged in building the F. V. R. R., in which something 
more powerful than moral suasion was used, but the thing is too dim and vague 
to form part of this record. 

Algonquin contains a great variety of soil, with its timber, prairies and 
bottom land, making it about equally adapted to grain or stock. In the latter, 
C. S. Dole, of Crystal Lake, has as fine a lot of horses and cattle as can be 



!2 . TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

found in the State. He keeps thoroughbred stock only ; and the ice-houses on 
the lake show how much it costs to keep Chicago cool during the summer 
months. B. Carpenter, James Crow and T. H. Ashton also keep some fine 
stock ; and Elijah Birch never fails to carry off the premiums on Leicester 
sheep. 

Crystal Lake has one hotel, kept by T. G. Aston, and there is one at Algon- 
quin, kept by Charles Pingry ; and the first tavern at the Lake was opened by 
Lyman King ; the first at Algonquin, by Eli Henderson ; David Weaver care& 
for the traveling public at Gary. 

The first child born in the township was Wm. H. Beardsley, son of A. H. 
and Mary Beardsley ; born in 1837. 

CRYSTAL LAKE VILLAGE. 

Crystal Lake has three stores, all of pretty much the same character, except 
that Hill keeps drugs, Marlow & Fitch, hardware, and Buckholtz & Dydeman 
dry goods and groceries only. At Algonquin they have a like number, 
Tomisky keeping dry goods and groceries, Chappel & Furgeson the same, Peter 
& Helm sell hardware, and Mr. Chunn keeps drugs. James Nish keeps the 
only store at Gary. 

VILLAGE OF ALGONQUIN. 

The village of Algonquin is pleasantly situated in the irregular valley 
formed by the junction of Crystal Lake Outlet with Fox River. It is the 
mcst picturesque village in the county ; the river, the bluffs and the narrow 
valley combining to give the place a striking and attractive appearance. 

At the time of its settlement, the Indian trail across the river at the ford 
was still visible, and the plow still turns up quantities of those implements so 
well known to relic hunters arrow heads, stone hatchets and the chisel-shaped 
stone they used in skinning game. Indian graves abound, many of which 
have been opened. 

The village was first known as Cornish Ferry, from the doctor of that name, 
living near. Later a vote of the people changed the name to Osceola, but upon 
learning that there was already one town of that name, the matter was left to 
Mr. Edwards, a large property holder of the town, who having once owned a 
boat by the name of Algonquin, gave that name to the rising town. 

This township is crossed in a northerly and southerly direction by the 
Elgin & State Line R. R., formerly the F. V. R. R., then as the Fox River 
branch of the Galena & Chicago Union, but being finally absorbed by the C. & 
N. W. R. R., received its present name. 

The cheese and butter factory at the village produces daily about 75 pounds 
of butter and 500 pounds of cheese, giving a yearly product of 27,000 pounds 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. ( ,i3 

of the former, and 182,500 pounds of the latter ; to effect which the milk of 
some 500 cows is daily passed through their weighing can. In addition to the 
above, the milk of near 1,500 cows goes to Chicago daily, in eight-gallon cans. 
In 1875, the amount so shipped was 584,000 gallons, at a net price to the 
dairyman of 12J cents per gallon. 

It is estimated by good judges that at least one-half a million dollars is 
invested in this business in the farms marketing their produce at Algonquin. 
In addition to the stores mentioned above as being in the township, this village 
has two wagon shops, three blacksmith shops, and a factory for milk cans that 
turns out about 400 yearly, at five dollars each. 

The water power of Fox River at this point is estimated at 100, not one- 
fourth of which is used by the mill at the east end of the bridge. Here is an 
abundance of power that needs nothing but capital and brains to put wheels' 
in motion and develop wealth. 

ALDEN, TOWNSHIP 46, RANGE 6. 

In the fall of 1836, Nathan and Darius Disbrow made a claim where the 
village of Alden now stands, on Section 15. In 1838, their father, Asahel 
Disbrow, followed, and, at about the same time, came Joel Brandon, H. Bash- 
ford, Ransom Parish, T. B. Wakeman and D. Rider, all of whom came from 
Greene County, New York. 

A log school house was put up in 1841, a few rods from where the depot 
now stands, and school opened by Miss Clarissa Nelson, whose charge consisted 
of nine pupils. This shows that, in common with the early settlers of the 
other towns, they had not forgotten their training. It was the school first, then 
the church. 

The first religious society organized in the township, and the only one now 
possessing a place of worship, was that of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in 
1838, at which time it could boast of a total of nine members just equal, in 
point of numbers, to Miss Nelson's school. The Pastor's name was Rev. L. S. 
Walker. In 1861, this society, at a cost of about $1,600, built themselves a 
church, which still stands, but has recently been repaired and frescoed, so that 
it is comfortable and pleasing to worshipers. 

While the men, under direction' of the society, were at work at the building 
for they thought they could do it cheaper themselves than to let out the job 
they neglected to prepare for wind, and a thunder storm leveled the uncovered 
frame to the ground. This second framing and raising added so much to the 
cost that, upon completing the structure, the society found itself near $800 in 
debt, to clear which, an excursion, by railroad, to Rockford was undertaken, 
and, as the Ninety-fifth regiment was encamped there at the time and this was 
the pioneer excursion, the society came out ahead. 



!4 TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

The Presbyterians, in 1861, formed themselves into a society, but were too 
few to build a church, nor did they keep up the organization more than ten 
years. 

A steam mill for grinding feed, the only one in the township, was built by 
one Thompson, in 1873. 

The Rockford & Kenosha Railroad crosses the township in an irregular 
curve from the southwest corner of the northwest quarter of Section 31, to the 
northeast corner of Section 13, making about eight miles of road, with one 
depot at Alden, which was built in 1861, W. W. Wedgewood being the first 
Station Agent. 

Alden has one cheese factory, which was built in 1870, and disposes of the 
milk of 300 to 500 cows, according to the season and time of year. 

The early settlers, being from York State, could not forget the fruit so 
familiar to their boyhood, and we find that, in 1848, a Mr. Easton planted a 
nursery to supply the demand for apple trees. The only nursery now in the 
township is owned by Mr. Wedgewood; it consists chiefly of apple trees and 
has been in operation about four years. The first apple seeds were planted 
by Sidney Disbrow, in 1838, and the trees thus produced are still living and 
flourishing. 

Alden has no public library and no village, except the one above mentioned. 

Of course these settlers had wants which they could not supply from the 
products of their farms, and P. W. Lake, in 1848, opened a general store in 
the building now occupied by Mr. Greo. B. Andrews, and where a store has 
been continued from that date. 

The first post office was opened in 1844, with Frank Wedgewood for Post- 
master. It was called Wedgewood, but finally changed to Alden. 

Two years before the advent of the mail carrier, James Wedgewood saw the 
need of a blacksmith shop and erected his forge. At the present time two 
anvils are kept busy in the village. 

At the time of the establishment of the post office, T. B. Wakeman was the 
only as he was the first Justice of Peace, and belonged to Chemung Precinct. 

Had it not been for the prairie wolves, which at that time Avere plentiful, 
Alden might have gone without mutton some years longer than they did, and 
it is believed to be the only instance in the history of Illinois, at least, where 
wolves have had any hand in the importation or the exportation of sheep, but 
in 1839 Mr. Asahel Disbrow saved seven sheep from the wolves. Where they 
came from was unknoAvn, but the wolves were certainly driving them. A few 
days afterward a Mr.' Stafford, from Bigfoot, in the northeast corner of the 
county, called at Disbrow's and claimed the sheep, which the latter bought of 
him, and thenceforth wool and mutton figured among the staple productions of 
Alden. 

At present, Sidney Disbrow is the only Notary Public in the township. 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 95 

The source of the Nippersink is found in this township, in Mud Lake, a 
small sheet of water on the line between Sections 14 and 15, the lake itself 
having three inlets, the longest being from the southwest. The Kishwaukee 
also has its origin here on Sections 23 and 26, and the Piskasaw on the west 
side by three of its branches. 

BURTON, TOWNSHIP 46, RANGE 9. 

The first settlement in Burton was made on the Neversink Creek and En- 
glish Prairie by Jacob and Samuel Jackson, Robert and Francis Richardson, 
Thomas and Richard Wray, and John Sanburn, in 1836 or '37, and they soon 
built a log school house on the creek, where William Stearns taught the first 
school of fifteen scholars. A church was soon after (in 1872) built by the 
MetTiodists, at Spring Grove. At that time, the membership did not number 
more than ten, and the name of the first pastor was Bundock. 

In 1845, Blivins, Stillson & Co. built a grist-mill, that is still in operation. 

The town has one cheese factory, that takes the milk of some two hundred 
cows. 

In 1845, John E. Mann opened a store at Spring Grove, the only village 
and post office in the township. 

Burton is the smallest township in the county, consisting of the west third 
of Range 9, and having but twelve sections. The reason for this appears to be 
that, at the time of the adoption of township organization, it was left to the 
qualified voters on the fraction, to say whether they would form part of Rich- 
mond, and the majority were for having a town of their own. 

Small as it is, Burton has a creek of its own, crossing the south end in a 
diagonal direction toward the Fox River, and it will have a railroad when the 
C. & P., so long ago surveyed, shall be in running order. 

CHEMUNG, TOWNSHIP 45, RANGE 5. 

Chemung was settled in 1836 by Geo. Trumbull, Marcus Wheeler and Wes- 
ley Diggins, following in 1839-9, Alonzo Riley and Wmr. Hart making their 
claims about the same time. 

Some time, from 1840 to 1845, Wm. Sewer built a saw-mill which finally 
became a flouring-mill also, and,' in 1853, Mr. Myer built the stone mill in 
Chemung village, now owned by the Sandersons, in which was placed the run- 
ning gear of the old Sewer mill. This mill is now running and doing a large 
business in the manufacture of buckwheat flour for the Chicago market. 

Elections in this township were first held in the village of Lawrence, but 
the voting place was subsequently moved to Chemung and thence to Harvard. 
The first precinct was composed of Lawrence and Chemung, the voting being 
done at Jackman's. 



96 TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

This was in the palmy days of Jackson Democracy ; and Whigs were not 
very numerous, but the five of them, including W. G. Billings, at present Col- 
lector of Internal Revenue ; Hay den Hutchinson and C. R. Brown, just enough 
for a caucus, kept up the party organization till they finally carried the county. 

The first church in this township was erected by the Presbyterians, at 
Chemung village, and the first school house was built in Dolp Hutchinson's 
district, on Section 24 ; the next, at Ayer's Corners, and the third at Lawrence. 
The old church was, in 1873, replaced by a new one, and the old meeting 
house moved down town two blocks, now doing duty as a tin shop. 

David Baker, in 1845, owned a place of trade in the village of Chemung, 
and the old store is still one of its institutions, having changed hands several 
times. Ten years after Baker commenced business, S. L. Puffer opened the 
brick store, where he still continues. 

Chemung Township is well watered by the Piskasaw and its three branches 
which, flowing in a southwest, south, and southeast direction, unite on Sections 
32 and 33. The main stream, after turning the wheel of the Sanderson Mill, 
leaves the township a little west of the village. This township is traversed by 
two railroads, the C. & N. W. R. R. and the R. & K. Railroad. 

The village of Lawrence is on Section 27, and was settled in 1855, the depot 
being built in 1856. Bixby & Conklin first offered goods for sale, but their 
monopoly was broken by the opening of three more stores, as all residents 
seemed to think that Lawrence, having a railroad, would take the wind out of 
the sails of Chemung and become the leading village in the township. G. F. 
Kasson and G. Blakeslee next began business, soon after which Mr. Kasson 
sold out to Mr. Blakeslee, who was subsequently burnt out. 

The village was named after Lawrence Bixby, its first merchant ; and Har- 
vard, after Harvard, Mass. 

In 1857, a steam flouring mill was set in operation, but shortly after the 
enterprise was abandoned. 

VILLAGE .OF HARVARD. 

The land occupied by the city of Harvard was claimed by Wesley Diggins 
in the spring of 1838. After making some little improvement, he sold a por- 
tion of it to William Carmack, who disposed a part of his purchase to Asahel 
Brainard, and he sold to Amos Page and others, by whom, about the time the 
railroad was built, the town of Harvard was platted and named. Located in 
the southeast corner of Chemung, it secures, almost without a rival, the trade 
of Chemung, Alden, Dunham and Hartland, beside no small part of Boone 
County, and being a railroad junction also, there was a time when it was 
thought by her citizens that Harvard might eclipse the county seat. 

Harvard is the junior town of Chemung, and, like many other juniors, it 
has absorbed the substance of the seniors till it almost rivals the county seat in 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 97 

size, containing five dry goods stores, four groceries, one boot and shoe store, 
two mixed stores of clothing, boots and shoes, two drug stores, two hardware 
stores, eight saloons, two livery stables, two bakeries, three confectioneries, two 
clothing stores, two jewelry stores, two furniture stores, one photograph gallery, 
three hotels, one bank, five doctors, two lawyers, two harness shops, one 
flouring-mill, one planing-mill, sash and blind factory, three milliner shops, one 
dentist, one news depot, two barber shops, two malt houses, one cheese factory, 
four blacksmith shops, three wagon shops, one paint shop, one car-repair shop, 
three meat markets, one agricultural warehouse, three churches and a school 
house. 

The first public house was that now known as Ayer's Hotel, first opened 
by its present proprietor in 1856. It is much the largest house of the kind in 
the county and its reputation is second to none in the Northwest. It is close 
to the railway track, and, as three trains each day stop there for dinner, there 
is no lack of boarders. This house has thirty commercial rooms and its dining 
room will seat one hundred and fifty persons at once. The Walker House, a 
little farther up the street, is also a first-class hotel, having been in business 
but little less time than the former. 

Harvard has several brick stores, but none large enough to be dignified 
with the name of block. The first was built in 1863, and is occupied by the 
bank of J. C. Crumb. Ayer's Hall was built in 1867 ; Tahey's in 1868; two 
in 1870, one in 1875, and one last year just finished. 

The steam flouring mill was built by Mr. Wood, in 1865, and as it now 
exists has cost about $15,000. It has all the business that the owner could 
desire. 

Her two malt houses were erected in 1873 by "Ed." Ayer, one having a 
capacity of 30,000, the other 60,000 bushels yearly. They are kept running 
the most of the time. To use up some of this malt, a brewery was opened last 
fall, in the northeast part of the town, with a capital of about $5,000 ; so 
Harvard can drink her own beer. 

Another establishment of some note js the planing and wagon shop of N. 
E. Blake & Co., which was opened in 1868, the investment at this time amount- 
ing to about $15,000. The wagons made at this shop are well and widely 
known, especially the one called the Platform Spring Wagon. 

Her first store dates no further back than 1857, it having been opened by 
Holden Julius in a building that stood on the lot now occupied by the bank, 
which was opened in 1868. The first school house was built in 1859, of 
brick, since which time additions of wood have been made till the building 
ranks nexl to its more pretentious rival at the county seat, containing as it does 
eight rooms, and having an enrollment of 450. 

The great artery that nourishes Harvard is the C. & N. W. R. R., which 
has in this small town nine miles of side track, a round-house with stalls for 



98 TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

eighteen iron horses, and the various machinery necessary for a large repair 
shop. The round-house alone furnishes employment for forty hands, the black- 
smith shop eight, and eight to ten in the wood repair line. 

All trains or cars shipped from Minnesota or Baraboo to Milwaukee have 
to be made up here. In one month, last year, 9,918 cars were left here to be 
made up into trains. Some days, as many as thirty trains are received, and it 
is no uncommon sight to see thirty engines in town at one time. Harvard is 
the headquarters for all division men to Baraboo. About 125 railroad men 
work here constantly, the coal sheds alone employing 30 men ; the engines 
consuming 1,500 tons a month, and the company pays out here about $8,000 
a month ; no small item for the support of so small a town. The village was 
chartered in 1868. The first church was built by the Methodists in 1859, then 
followed the Presbyterians in 1867 or 1868, the Catholics in 1865, and the 
Congregationalists in 1870. Harvard has an Association, Y. M. C. A., 
of about sixty members, in a flourishing condition, but no public library, how- 
ever. Mr. " Ed." Ayer has a very fine private library of one thousand volumes. 
The town has a good hall fitted with stage, curtains and all the paraphernalia 
of a theater, and the Harvard Dramatic Club furnish amateur theatricals of a 
high order of merit. 

CORAL, TOWNSHIP 43, RANGE 6. 

This township was originally named Pleasant Grove, and the first settlers 
were John Hamilton, James Van Vliet, Richard Simpkins, Lowell Vasey and 
Wm. M Jackson, all of whom, and some more, came in 1835 and 1836. Very 
near the same time a settlement was made at Harmony, and when the county 
was surveyed and divided into townships, these early settlers found themselves 
in different towns. 

The first school was opened in 1837 by Caroline Cobbs (afterward Mrs. 
Philander Spencer), but the school house was not put up till 1839, when Wm. 
M. Jackson was engaged as teacher, a.nd greenbacks not having been invented, 
but rails being in good demand, it was agreed that he should teach four months, 
and to pay him for his services his employers were to split for him one thousand 
rails for each month's teaching. The school house was of logs 20x28, was 
built on Section 8, and stood till S. K. Bartholomew became a teacher, when, at 
the close of his term, it was torn down by the scholars in a frolic. 

As usual in church building, the Methodists took the initiative, erecting one 
at Harmony costing about $2,000. The Congregationalists next built one at 
Union, and they were followed by the Universalists, who, in partnership with the 
Masonic Lodge of Union, put up the stone ^building now used by the Free 
Methodists below and the Masons above. Upon the erection of the stone school 
house at Union, in 1867, the frame building was used for a wagon shop till, a 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 99 

year or two since, it passed into the hands of the Adventists, who fitted it up as 
a place of worship, and hold meetings there occasionally. 

The Galena & Chicago Union Railroad was built in 1854, entering Coral on 
Section 13, near the southeast corner, running in a diagonal direction and pass- 
ing out near the northwest corner of Section 5. 

The oldest village is Coral, but Union is the larger. 

A nursery was planted at Coral quite early, but finally moved to Marengo. 

The only public library is at Union, and consists of about two hundred vol- 
umes. It was raised and is kept in existence, without difficulty, by subscrip- 
tion. 

Fillmore & Anderson opened the first store at Coral. This store was sub- 
sequently burned and not rebuilt. At present, Coral Post Office has one small 
store, and Union two very fair ones for so small a place. 

In 1837, the first post office was established in charge of Mr. Jackson, it be- 
ing the only one on the route between Chicago and Galena, and Mrs. Jackson 
opened the first mail that came to the county. It first came on horseback once 
a week, till the fall of that year, when a two-horse wagon became necessary, 
and, in 1838, the wagon gave way to a stylish coach. 

The mail was not assorted as now, but thrown into a bag holding about two 
bushels. This was thrown from the coach and carried into the house, over- 
hauled by emptying the contents and assorting, put back into the bag and re- 
turned to the coach in just eight minutes. The next post office was established 
at Garden Prairie, in 1812. 

Coral is watered by a branch of the Kishwaukee and one or two smaller 
creeks have their origin in the south and west. 

It has two cheese factories and creameries combined, one of which was 
erected in 1874, on Section 34, by D. E. Wood, and is operated by him, manu- 
facturing, yearly, 300,000 pounds of cheese and 60,000 pounds of butter. Con- 
nected with this is a steam mill for grinding feed ; one run of stone ; capacity, 
forty bushels an hour. The other is owned by a stock company, in Section 29, 
of which Sherman Bartholomew is agent, manufacturing 100,000 pounds of 
cheese and 20,000 pounds of butter annually. 

DORR, TOWNSHIP 44, RANGE 7. 

The first settlement in this township was that mentioned elsewhere, under 
the head of the <l Virginia Settlement," in 1835, out of which grew the village 
of Ridgefield, at which place the first Presbyterian church was built. 

The town itself, aside from Woodstock, has not much of a history, contain- 
ing, as it does, but one cheese factory and no other manufacturing establishment. 
This factory was built, in 1870, by a joint stock company, who operated it 
three years, when, meeting with losses, it was closed, and has not been re-opened. 



100 TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

It stands on the farm of Henry Dufield, about half a mile east of Woodstock, 
and near Dufield's Lake, which supplies the ice for the brewery of Arnold, 
Zimrner & Co. and the city of Woodstock. 

Unlike most of the towns, Dorr contains no prairie, her soil having been 
originally covered with oak openings, and the land being mostly clay. Water 
is afforded by a branch of Hanley Creek that crosses the northeast corner, on 
Sections 1 and 2, in a general southeasterly direction, and a branch of the 
Kiswaukee rises on Section 17, about two miles south of Woodstock (which is 
on Sections 5, 6, 7 and 8), and enters Grafton from Section 35 ; and another 
branch of the same creek takes its rise on Section 28, leaving the town on 
Section 32. 

The Chicago & Northwestern Railway enters this township about the middle 
of the east line of Section 25, takes a course almost due northwest, passing 
through Ridgefield (on Section 24) and Woodstock ; then leaving, about the 
middle of the north line of Section 6, making about seven miles of track. 

This town has two Presbyterian churches, one at Ridgefield, built in 1873, 
and the brick church at Woodstock, built in 1854 ; two Catholic churches, one 
on Section 34, a wooden building, and the one built in Woodstock, in 1854, of 
brick ; one Methodist, one Congregational, one Baptist and one Universalist 
church, the latter not having been regularly used for three years. 

In 1843, the county seat was changed from McHenry to Woodstock, and 
the act permitting that change having required, as conditions, that the place 
receiving the most votes for the county seat should donate two acres of land for 
a public square, and build upon that square as good a court house as the one 
then in use at McHenry, Woodstock complied with these conditions, and in 
1844 the records were moved into the new court house. 

WOODSTOCK. 

The first settlers on the land now included in the city were Alvin Judd, 
James M. Judd, George C. Dean, Robert Metcalf, Henry M. Waite, Joel H. 
Johnson, E. I. Smith and Wm. Beach. 

The first store was opened in 1845, in the house of E. I. Smith, now owned 
by Levi Cowdry, and occupied by Mr. Wainwright, It was kept by Ithram Tay- 
lor till the stores in town drew away the custom. The first to open a store in 
" Centreville" were A. W. Fuller and I. R. Lyon, in the building owned by 
John Bunker, burned in October, 1871. This store was ready for business in 
1848, and continued till their new brick store, now owned by M. D. Hoy, was 
built, in 1851. 

The county seat being without offices for the county officers, with the ex- 
ception of Sheriff, who had his office and residence in the court house, the 
Commissioners let to H. M. Waite & Co. the job of putting up a suitable 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 101 

building, to be of eight feet brick walls. The walls being up, the contractors, 
unable to persuade the Commissioners to put on the other story, finally agreed 
to pay the County $600 for the privilege of putting up the second story them- 
selves, which being done, the Commissioners took it off their hands, and the 
result was that the building known as the " Old Rat Hole," so called because, 
the people having nicknamed the county officers "rats," it was natural that 
their offices should be called " rat holes." The brick for this building and the 
brick house near the pickle factory, built about the same time by a brother of 
Nelson Norton, were made by Cattle Dufields and Clinton Murphy, now of 
Abingdon, on the corner now occupied by Uncle Joe Thompson. 

Fuller & Lyon having opened the ball with a substantial brick store, R. G. 
Schryver put up the one now owned by Thos. Solverson, and Enos W. Smith 
the next one west. In 1851, the south side was swept off clean by a fire that 
burnt out Ira Trowbridge, Alonzo Anderson, Jacob Petries and the Wood- 
stock Argus, in which office the fire originated. Trowbridge rebuilt the next 
year. Anderson put up "The Woodstock House," C. B. Durfee the "Green 
Front Drug Store," where he opened the first bank, J. H. Johnson the one 

now owned by the Salisburys, and Duffield the stores of Choate and 

Thomas. 

Alvin Judd, "in the brave days of old," had a small house on the northeast 
corner of the square, where he kept a sort of tavern, the concern being too 
small for a hotel. This was built in 1844; but before he got his pre-emption 
made legal, F. S. Smith, of McHenry, bought Judd's forty acres of the Gov- 
ernment, thinking to oust Judd, but J. H. Johnson drew up a bill and sent to 
Congress, which, being passed, legalized Judd's pre-emption and blocked that 
game. Judd sold, in 1855, to Mr. Trail, who moved the house to the spot so 
long occupied by the "Exchange," put up the main part, and Woodstock had 
a respectable hotel. About two years after, he sold out to Kent. 

The American House was then put up on the west side of the square, and 
kept successfully by G. H. Griffing, White and McMasters. The Waverly 
House was built by Roswell Enos, in 1856. He had two lots, worth, at that 
time, about $7 each ; and he put up a cheap house, which finally fell into the 
hands of Leander Church for the small sum of $15. Church enlarged it in 
1857, and called it the "Waverly." 

In 1847, the first school house was built on the present school lot, and the 
school being opened, it soon became necessary to double its capacity. That 
old building was sold in 1866, one-half of it now being used as a blacksmith, 
wagon and paint shop, in the rear of John Donnelly's store and in 1867, the 
present fine school building was erected at a cost of $40,000, the number of 
pupils being but a little short of four hundred. 

The old court house becoming inadequate to the county business, in 1857 
it was superseded by the new building, costing about the same as the school 



102 TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

house. It speaks for itself, nor need any citizen of the county to feel ashamed 
of it. 

Large quantities of wheat being raised in that early day, a storehouse 
became a necessity, out of which grew the brick structure now owned by 
Ec'kert & Hickox. It was put up in 1854, by M. W. Hunt, Fuller & Lyon, 
and in June, 1855, when the first train came through on the broad gauge, the 
warehouse contained wheat enough to load several such trains as were run at 
that time. The wheat having been moved, the gauge of the road was imme- 
diately changed. 

The old Barrow's planing mill, too, has its history. In 1845, H. M. 
Waite and his partner, thinking that a flax-mill would be a paying investment, 
bought of Alonzo Diggins, at Brookdale, his hotel barn, moved it to Wood- 
stock, set it down where it stood for so many years, and finding, after a year's 
trial, that flax did not pay large dividends, turned it into a planing-mill. The 
old mill has changed hands many times, having again taken a change of base to 
the east of the foundry. 

A tannery, too, must be built, and, in 1853, Swartwout & Enoch erected 
one just east of where Neil Donnelly's house now stands. In digging the 
well, which was four feet square, the workmen came to the top of a tamarack 
tree, and, following down as they dug, finally took it out by the roots, the trunk 
being sixteen feet long. The tannery never amounted to much ; it went into 
the hands of one Maryatt, of Wisconsin, and was finally burned down in 1862 
or 1863. 

Another of the early institutions of Woodstock was the steam saw-mill of 
Enos W. Smith, put up in 1852, run about four years and closed, but not until 
it had used up a large number of oak logs. 

The Quinlan grist-mill was erected by Cornelius and Jerry Quinlan in 
1845-6, but never was a paying investment, and, upon the opening of Phoenix 
mill, three years since, the old brick mill was closed. 

The store now occupied by E. E. Thomas & Son was first opened by A. 
W. Tappan & Co. in 1855. Convers, the brother-in-law of Tappan, being 
one of the foremost men in organizing the Republican party the ensuing year. 

The most important trial that took place in the old court house was that of 
Davis and Taylor Driscoll for the murder of Campbell, in Lee County, in 
1843. 

At that time, the entire northern part of the State was infested with an 
organized gang of horse thieves and counterfeiters, who gave the settlers so 
much trouble that they were compelled to organize themselves into a band of 
" Regulators," and the organization elected Campbell, of Lee County, for their 
Captain. He made it so warm for these gentry that his death was resolved 
upon, and the two young Driscolls were selected, by lot, to put him out of the 
way, which they did by calling him to his door in the afternoon, in broad day- 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 103 

light, and shooting him down in his own yard, after which they rode leisurely 
away, but not without being seen by young Campbell, then about sixteen years 
of age. This young man, in giving his testimony at the trial, identified young 
Driscoll, then but little older than himself and with whom he was well ac- 
quainted, saying that he would have shot him at the time had not his <mn 
missed fire. Driscoll, who sat near, said to the witness: " You would not have 
shot me, would you ?" and Campbell replied: "Yes, I would; and will now, 
if I ever catch you outside of the court-room." The witness was rebuked by 
the court and the trial proceeded, but resulted in one of those mysterious ver- 
dicts that sometimes startle a community by their evident injustice, and the 
Driscolls were set at liberty. One of them afterward met his death at the hand 
of some avenger, but the people of Winnebago and Boone Counties captured 
several of the gang, including the old man Driscoll, organized a court on the 
open prairie, with "Judge Lynch" on the bench, and this time they did not 
get off so easily, two being hung and two shot within fifteen minutes. These 
summary proceedings caused the emigration of about thirty families from the 
county, nor did they return, with, perhaps, two exceptions. 

Henry Eckert and P. C. Teeple, thinking that Woodstock ought to support 
a foundry, in 1866 erected the building since purchased and enlarged by L. H. 
S. Barrows. Mr. Barrows has enlarged on every side, and has now the largest 
and most complete establishment of the kind in the county. 

Before the removal of the county seat to Woodstock, John Burtschy built a 
small brewery on the Quinlan farm, nearly opposite the farm house of "Len" 
Burtschy, in Greenwood. This was soon after moved to the eastern part of 
Woodstock, and, after a year or two, again moved to the lot now occupied by 
the residence of Francis Forrest, Esq., near the barn of the old Woodstock 
House. This building was destroyed by fire in 1854, and it was only by the most 
strenuous exertions that the barn itself was saved. Mr. Burtschy then purchased 
of Rich & McCahill the house now occupied by Mr. Zimmer, and, building 
an addition for the purpose, again commenced the manufacture of beer. John 
Burtschy dying, the property fell into the hands of "Len" Burtschy in 1857, 
who, in 1859, sold out to one Martin, the latter, after about a year, disposing 
of one-half the concern to George Greble. The property then was trans- 
ferred from and among Fink, Arnold and Gibhart, till finally, in 1867, Jacob 
Zimmer bought of Gibhart one-half, and, Arnold buying the other half, the 
firm became, in 1867, Arnold & Zimmer. Henry Harmon then bought one- 
third, since which time (1868) it has been owned by the three last mentioned. 
The capital invested is estimated at $75,000. They make their own malt, of 
which it requires three and one-half bushels for a barrel, and produce annually 
about 4,500 barrels of beer, upon which the Government tax is $1 each. 

This firm now own the ice-houses at Dufield's Lake, which supply their 
two houses at the brewery, as well ; they having put up this winter 1,800 



104 TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

tons of ice. The first ice house at the Lake was built in 1855 by Haas & 
Griffing. 

Of the industries of Woodstock one more remains to be noticed the pickle 
factory. A stock company was organized in the fall of 1873, with $50,000 
capital. 

The building being ready, a Mr. Hopkins came from the East with the best 
of recommendations, and carried on business swimmingly till pay day, when 
the bottom fell out. 

The Directors then leased the factory for five years to Heinz, Noble & Co., 
of Pittsburgh, the integrity and business capacity of this firm being above 
suspicion. More money was raised, a new engine put in, vinegar machines set 
up, two additions built and the number of tubs doubled. Cucumbers, cauli- 
flowers and cabbage were produced and turned over to the Nobles till the pay- 
ments became due, when this firm, too, collapsed. 

Last year the factory was operated in two ways ; some of the growers hav- 
ing their cucumbers put up for themselves, and others selling to John Wheat, 
Esq., at forty cents a bushel. This venture proving successful, it is purposed to 
plant 500 acres in 1877. 

In August, 1872, the east side of the square, from the " Rat Hole" to the 
next street north, was burnt out, entailing heavy loss upon many, including T. 
Whitson & Sons, in whose hardware store the fire originated, there being no 
doubt as to its being the work of an incendiary. The fire removed the old 
wooden row to make way for the present fine brick block, it having all being 
rebuilt except the store of Richmond & Bird, at the north end, and nearly 
all the same year. 

Among the notable men of Woodstock may be mentioned William Sloan, 
who came in 1844, who bought on the west side of town, planted a nursery, 
and, taking an active part in the organization and construction of the Chicago, 
St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad, became its President. He was accidentally 
killed in Chicago, while witnessing the operation of putting up the first line of 
telegraph in that city. 

James H. Slavin, another of our lawyers, while living, was acknowledged to 
have no superior in the county in the line of his profession, but seems to have 
been generally misunderstood. He always discouraged litigation and would not 
touch a suit that he was satisfied had its origin in spite. His death occurred 
from a chronic malady in 1875. 

Lawrence S. Church was another who figured largely as a lawyer, finally 
becoming Colonel, and a member of the Constitutional Convention, of which he 
proved one of ablest thinkers. He died in July. 1870. Of all the lawyers 
that have done business in Woodstock, probably Wm. Kerr had the most friends, 
the fewest enemies and the most influence with a jury, although he was not an 
orator. He was buried with Masonic honors in 1866. 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 105 

Of living business or professional men it is not our purpose to speak ; they 
have not yet passed into history ; but there are now four dry goods stores, eight 
groceries, two hotels, two banks, two hardware stores, three drug stores, two 
jewelry stores, two boot and shoe stores, two millinery stores, six blacksmith 
shops, one wagon shop, two lumber yards, two flouring mills, two newspapers, 
seven lawyers, six doctors, six ministers, one furniture store, one tobacconist, 
three livery stables, a general machine shop and foundry, three meat markets, 
three harness shops, two dentists, one academy, two photograph galleries, three 
machine men, and one feed, salt and lime store. Population about 2,400. 

Woodstock is an incorporated city. It is supposed that the city owes but 
little, if any, debt. The corporation covers but one square mile; there is one 
fire engine, two wells and two reservoirs in the square, and Woodstock bids fan- 
to extend her limits and double her population. 

Two years ago this winter, the young people of Woodstock organized a 
Dramatic Association, with J. H. Earlie as stage manager. It has brought 
out, with great success, no less than twelve different plays. All the scenery 
and furniture is owned by the association. 

The park is ornamented with a beautiful spring house, built three years 
ago, at a cost of $600, where, during the summer months, may be found an 
abundance of the best water. 



0. 



The first settlers in this township were J. N. Jerome and 0. C. Diggins, 
who came in 1836. In 1837, Messrs. A. Joslyn, R. Latham, Joseph Diggins, 
Robert Walton, S. J. Dunham and Joseph and Thomas Metcalf. 

In 1840, a log school house was built by School District No. 1, on Section 
1, and a school immediately opened. 

The first and only church in the township was erected at what is known as 
County Line, by the Methodists ; and the first preacher was Rev. P. M. Huffman, 
who still lives near the church. The building cost about $2,000. 

Dunham contains no store, mill, blacksmith shop or post office, but in an 
early day, Cyrus Allen had a plow factory in the southeast part of the town, 
when manufacturers' agents were not so plenty as now; but he ceased the 
manufacture some years ago, and nothing of the kind is now carried on, except 
by J. A. Wood, who makes, upon his own farm, a washing machine of his own 
patent. His factory is about two miles south of Chemung. 

There are about two miles of railroad in the township, the Chicago & North- 
western crossing the northeast, and the Rockford & Kenosha the northwest 

O ' 

corner, each at about the same angle. 

Rush Creek, a branch of the Kishwaukee, crosses the township from 
north-east to southwest, passing out on Section 34, and the Piskasaw 



106 TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

crosses the northwest corner in about the same general direction, so it is well 
watered. 

In 1874, a cheese factory was built on Section 3, in School District No. 3, 
and is still in operation. Latham Corners once had a store, but its existence was 
a brief one : and at this time, Dunham has no public place of any kind, elec- 
tions being held in school houses, for want of a better place. 

This township is better adapted to stock than grain ; many sheep being 
kept, the owners of which have lost more by the ravages of dogs than any 
other township in the county. 

GRAFTON, TOWNSHIP 43, RANGE 7. 

This is one of the oldest settled townships in the county, but as we have not 
succeeded in g3tting any facts of its early history of the old settlers, although 
having an abundance of promises, it is impossible to go very extensively into 
details concerning its early history. 

. It contains a large proportion of low, wet land about the central parts, hence 
is better adapted to stock than to grain, and, like the neighboring towns of Coral 
and Algonquin, the leading industry among the farmers is the dairy business, 
the village of Huntley possessing the largest factory in the county, as well as 
in the United States, which factory was erected in the winter of 1875, of wood, 
and stands close to the railroad, by D. E. Wood & Co., manufacturing yearly 
600,000 Ibs. of cheese and 100,000 Ibs. of butter ; cheese at an average price 
of 10 cts. a Ib. and butter at an average price of 35 cts. They have also a 
factory of stone and wood on Section 10, built in 1874, manufacturing yearly 
150,000 Ibs. of cheese and 30,000 Ibs. of butter. The products of these fac- 
tories are shipped to all the markets of the world. The first cheese factory 
was built in Huntley, in 1866, by R. W. & W. H. Stewart, the building still 
standing, although unoccupied. 

About one-fourth of Section 1 is covered by the west half of Crystal Lake, 
while Sections 2, 3, 4, 8 and 6 are traversed by the Kishwaukee, the south 
branch of which rises on Section 11, crosses the northwest corner of Section 
14, and runs through Sections 15, 16, 17 and 7. Another and smaller branch 
crosses Sections 32, 30 and 19. 

The township has one railroad, the Galena Division of the C. & N. W. R. R., 
which enters between Sections 33 and 34, running northwest through Sections 
20 and 19, making about nine miles of track. 

The village of Huntley was but a short time in reaching its present 
dimensions, but like other towns in the county has grown but little in the past 
eight years. The population is largely "foreign." 

In the spring of 1875, the neatest school building in the county was erected, 
at Huntley, and strangers are shown to the school house as the institution of 
which they are proud, and well they may be. 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 107 

The village contains one hotel and several small stores, besides the usual sup- 
ply of mechanics, but no manufactories are carried on there except the two 
cheese factories and a mill that works up flax straw into tow. This township 
has greatly improved within the past five years. 

GREENWOOD, TOWNSHIP 45, RANGE 7, EAST OF THIRD PRIN- 
CIPAL MERIDIAN. 

The earliest settlers in this township were Lewis Boone, Henry Westerman, 
Oliver and Alden Stone, Elijah Slafton, who brought a family of two or three 
children, and James Watson, these all making their claims in 1837. Boone 
made his claim, like some in Hartland, rather large, including both timber and 
prairie ; but, in the dispute which followed, Boone took the law into his own 
hands, demolishing a cabin, which one McCollum had erected on a part of his 
(Boone's) claim, and, not .content with that, chopped the logs in two ; then, 
meeting McCollum, accused him of trying to jump his claim. The quarrel 
ended in a fight, in which Boone came out with flying colors. The settlers 
took sides, and the vanquished Mack, with his clan, waylaid the Boones, and 
got even, so far as a field fight and a victory could make it so. But the matter 
was not allowed to rest there, and, at the first opportunity, these parties carried 
the case into court, Boone vs. McCollum stanidng first on the docket of the 
first County Court. 

Section 35 claims the honor of furnishing a site for the first school house, it 
having been built in 1843, near the residence of William D. Given. The first 
school, of fifteen pupils, was taught by Miss Melinda Pease, of Crystal Lake. 

The Methodists took the lead in church building, erecting one, in 1848, 
upon the site of the first school house. It may be as well to state here that 
preaching in that meeting house was discontinued^ some years ago, and, in 1875, 
it was taken down, brought to Woodstock and converted into sheds to shelter 
the horses of those who worship in the M. E. Church, of that place. 

The first preacher in that church was N. Jewett, but in the township he 
had been preceded by a Baptist minister, Rev. Joel Wheeler, whose places of 
worship were school houses or private dwellings. At present, two denomina- 
tions of Christians hold meetings in the township ; the Presbyterians, with a 
membership of about 23 and a church building estimated to have cost $2,000, 
and the Baptists, with a house of worship, also in the village of Greenwood, 
built in 1873, costing about $3,000, and a membership of about 50. 

In 1841, W. Lake built a saw-mill on Section 11, for which the Nippersink 
furnished the motive power. This mill has done its duty, but remains as a relic 
of ancient times, making the village of Greenwood more picturesque, if not 
more beautiful. Next, Toles & Brown about one mile below built another saw- 
mill, and in 1845, the same firm erected the first grist-mill, costing about $5,000. 



108 TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

This was burned in 1862, and Job Toles, just below the old lake saw-mill, in 
1847, put up a second grist-mill, which is still doing a good business, estimated 
at $4,000 to $6,000 yearly. 

Abbott & Thompson, in 1848, erected the first cheese-factory in the town- 
ship, and dispose of the milk furnished by one hundred and fifty to two hundred 
cows, and put upon the market annually from ninety to one hundred thousand 
pounds of cheese. It is now manufacturing butter and cheese, under the name 
of 0. C. Thompson & Co. In 1870, Job Toles erected the second cheese fac- 
tory near his grist-mill, and after running it one or two seasons, leased to the 
firm above mentioned, who now monopolize the butter and cheese business in 
this town. 

The village of Greenwood was first laid out in 1842, and lots added to in 
1845. It contended for the honor of having the county seat when it was re- 
moved from McHenry in 1843 ; but, owing to the want of proper stimulus, to 
wit, railroad or manufactures, has made little growth in the past fifteen years. 

In 1854-55, Weller & Hamilton planted several acres to apple trees, and 
Greenwood had a nursery which continued for several years, Hamilton finally 
selling out and moving to Ridgefield, and Weller closing out the business. At 
present Garrison Brothers carry on the business of fruit and ornamental trees, 
garden seeds and flowers. They are doing a large and increasing business. 
The first orchard was set by Andrew Murphy, on Queen Ann Prairie, in 1842, 
the trees being brought from Lockport, Will County. That orchard is now dead, 
but the one raised by him from the seed still flourishes, and furnishes Mr. 
Murphy with an abundance of good apples. 

The first store was opened at Boone's Mill by a Mr. Lockwood, about 1847, 
who soon moved away, being succeeded by the store built by C. M. Goodsell, at 
Greenwood village, which, although frequently changing hands, still exists in 
the hands of J. J. Philbrick. Goodsell was very successful after the retirement 
of his partner, Simmons, who is now an attorney at law in Geneva. 

Whether fortunately or otherwise, Greenwood can boast of but one mile of 
railroad, the Chicago & North- Western, running across the southwest corner of 
the township ; but in the matter of mounds, mention must be made of several 
on Section 10, near the Nippersink. Some of them have been opened, and 
were found to contain human remains and instruments of domestic use, supposed 
to be the work of the Mound Builders. 

HEBRON, TOWNSHIP 46, RANGE 8. 

This township was first settled in 1836-7, by J. H. Giddings, Geo. W. Gid- 
dings, Eli W. Brigham, C. and John Adams and Mrs. Tryon, who was, for some 
time, the only woman in the township, and, as a matter of course, her house 
became a general resort for the bachelors thereabout who could sing, so Sunday 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 109 

was generally spent at the Tryon house in one general musical entertainment, 
at one of which the subject of naming the township was introduced, when, at 
the suggestion of that lady, that as A Hebron" was a good tune, it being a 
favorite of hers, it could not fail to be a good name for the town ; the hint was 
taken, and soon the christening took place, which was upon the occasion, when 
Charles H. had bought a hog, made it passably fat, and the lard being tried 
out, Mrs. Tryon, in the endeavor to treat her friends to one of the old home 
comforts, undertook the task of frying cakes for the crowd. It is said, that 
she must have made more than a bushel, as the company took them as they 
came from the spider. That was the first and only fried cake christening in 
the county. 

J. H. Giddings built the first frame, and Eli W. Brigham the first log 
house in the township; the former being still inhabited by its builder. 

The farmers of Hebron believe in cows, as their six cheese factories attest, 
the heaviest operators in that line being W. H. & R. W. Stewart, whose fac- 
tory is located on Section 27, about two miles south of Hebron Station ; the 
others being on Sections 9, 10, 17, 23 and 30. 

One branch of the Nippersink rises in a point on Section 28, entering the 
main stream in Greenwood, while the main part traverses the west portion of 
the township in a southeast direction, crossing Sections 18, 19, 30 and 32, and 
a third small stream rises on the farm of E. W. Brigham, Section 6, crosses 8, 
5 and 4, entering Wisconsin from Section 3. This stream has its source about 
one-fourth of a mile from the main stream of the Nippersink, which flows 
southward and then westward. Goose Lake lies within its limits, being partly 
on Sections 10 and 11. 

The Rockford & Kenosha Railroad traverses the township in a direction 
nearly east and west, crossing Sections 12, 11, 10 and 9, running the remain- 
der of the distance on the line between Sections 8 and 17, 7 and 18, making 
about six and one-half miles of track. 

The timber of this township is in the northwest, west and southeast, the 
rest being prairie. The town is well adapted to any kind of produce that can 
be cultivated in the county. 

^here is but one church, that being located at the Station, and being owned 
by the Presbyterians. 

HARTLAND, TOWNSHIP 45, NORTH RANGE 6. 

It was settled in 1836 by George Stratton, P. W. Tower and a man named 
Smith, who, among the first and later settlers, was known by the soubriquet of 
"Whisky" Smith. 

Hartland was settled almost exclusively by Irish Catholics. The first church 
was built in 1840, on the site now occupied by a large brick building, one of 



110 TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

the largest in the county. The first Catholic priest was Father St. Paule. who 
came in 1840, now Bishop of Vincennes, Indiana. The officiating priest is 
Father Egan. 

In 1841-2, these Catholic Irish evinced their interest in education by build- 
ing a log school house on the spot now occupied by the residence of S. McGhee, 
Section 36, and opened a school. 

The township being well-timbered, a saw-mill seemed necessary, and the 
want was supplied by Wesley Diggins, on Section 20, the power being furnished 
by the Kishwaukee Creek, which crosses this township in a direction nearly 
north and south, entering on Section 3 and passing out on Section 32. The 
mill was at the forks of the road, and, a store being opened there in 1845, the 
place received the name of Brookdale, but the mill has rotted down, the store 
was discontinued in 1848 : in fact, the name alone remains of what once gave 
promise of a city. Somewhere here, between 1842 and 1844, one Cosgrove 
opened a store at " Oliver's Corners," but it was closed after about a year and 
a half. At present, the town contains no store or saloon, its nearest trading 
points being Woodstock and Harvard. 

The township is traversed in a northwesterly and southeasterly direction by 
the Chicago & North- Western Railway. No depot was built in Hartland till this 
season, near Deep Cut, the depot being named Kishwaukee, and it is probable 
that the merchant and mechanic will not long overlook so fine an opportunity 
of building a village in Hartland. 

As in some other townships of the county, a few of the first settlers made 
their claims before the land was surveyed. These claims gave rise to many dis- 
putes, to settle which, meetings were held, attended by men with arms in their 
hands, ready, if necessary, to maintain rights by force. All disagreements 
were finally adjusted without spilling blood or creating feud. 

Hartland is about equally adapted to grain or stock. 

It contains neither post office nor tavern. 

MARENGO, TOWNSHIP 44, RANGE 5. 

Calvin Spencer first came into this township in 1835, but was not long 
alone ; A. B. Coon, C. Spouable, R. Simpkins, John Belden, Mr. Dunham 
and Dr. W. B. Mason following soon after, the last named being probably the 
first physician in the county. The first store was put up in 1838 by Charles 
Hibbard, the next in 1842 by Frank Safford and G. T. Kasson, the latter sell- 
ing out to his partner at the end of the year. 

Mr. Southwood, a Baptist minister, came in 1836 and preached the first ser- 
mon in the vicinity, and the first death was that of the mother of Calvin 
Spencer, who died about two weeks after their settlement. Dr. Mason lived 
till 1847. 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. Ill 

This is one of the wealthiest township in the county, containing, as it does, 
one of the largest villages, which is situated on Sections 35 and 36, and for 
taste in private residences it is ahead of anything else in the county. Its 
leading lawyer, A. B. Coon, one of its earliest settlers, is also one of the most 
prominent men in the county and is counted the best technical lawyer at the 
bar of our Circuit Court. 

This town, too, depends upon the Kishwaukee for its water and its tax for 
bridge money, the river running eastwardly across Sections 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 
and 30, on the east of which it is joined by Rush Creek from the northeast 
after flowing through Sections 4, 9, 17, 20 and 19 ; so the town may be said to 
be well watered. 

As to transportation, the Galena Division of the C. & N. W. furnishes all 
that is necessary, entering the town on the east side and a little south of the 
middle of the line of Section 36, and running northwesterly till a little below 
the line between Sections 26 and 35, whence it crosses the township in a direct 
west course, making about 6i miles of road. 

The farmers of Marengo do not appear to have been afflicted with the " milk 
fever" to an alarming extent, and the town contains no factory for butter or 
cheese, but contains something that no other township does, and that is a stone 
quarry on Section 31, which has furnished the stone for the school houses at 
Marengo and Union, besides one or two smaller buildings of the same class. 
The nursery business appears to lead all others right about the village, there 
being two large nurseries beside several smaller ones. 

The village of Marengo nearly divides the 'honors of first settlement with 
Crystal Lake and Algonquin. It is situated in the southeast corner of the 
township, hence is about equally accessible as a market for Riley, Coral, Seneca 
and Marengo. It contains a wind-mill factory, an excellent steam flouring 
mill, a commodious stone school building, containing seven school rooms and an 
enrollment of about 350 pupils ; not only these, but her people take much more 
than ordinary interest in the progress of their school. They have one news- 
paper, the Republican, six churches, three hotels, one planing mill, two livery 
stables, three dry goods stores, ten groceries, two banks (one of them National), 
two boot and shoe stores, two drug stores and six doctors to prescribe the drugs; 
two jewelry stores, two lumber yards, two lawyers, which certainly speaks well 
for the town, and four ministers. ' Marengo once had a carriage factory 'that 
was carried on quite extensively by one Skinner, and some carriages are still 
made there. 

McHENRY, TOWNSHIP 45, RANGE 8. 

George and John Boone made claims in this township in April, 1836, Will- 
iam McCollum in July, and J. and H. L. McLean later in the same year. In 



112 TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

1837 came Wesley Ladd, Solomon Morey in 1839. Ira Colby in 1840, and 
John W. Smith in 1843. 

Of all the townships in the county, this is the best watered, having, in the 
northeast, about one-half of Pestaqua Lake, in the southeast a little more than 
one-half of Lily Lake, with McCollum's Lake near the center. The Fox River, 
the two branches of Boone Creek, a branch of the Nippersink in the northwest, 
and the main stream crossing the northeast corner of Section 5, Range 9, beside 
several smaller creeks, give an abundance of sport to the angler and no little 
labor for the bridge builder. ^ 

This water power is made available at McHenry village by compelling 
Boone Creek to turn the wheels of two flouring-mills, and drive the machinery 
of a planing mill, while the river itself, by the means of the steamers it bears 
upon its bosom, is made to contribute to the amusement of seekers after pleasure 
during the heat of summer. 

The people of this township have seven places of worship, which would 
seem to be ample for all who choose to attend church. The M. E. Church at 
Ringwood is the oldest, having been built in 1855 ; but the most expensive one 
is that at Johnsburg, it having cost nearly $40,000, nor is it yet completed. 
This is for the German Catholics, McHenry having a very large percentage of 
German in her population. The congregation numbers about 1,200, and the 
officiating priest is the Rev. H. M. Fugers. The Irish Catholics also have a 
church, but not so large, and located at McHenry village, where are also a 
Baptist, Methodist and a Universalist church. 

The Universalists do not pretend to hold regular meetings, while the mem- 
bership of the other two is not large, but the Catholic Church is well attended. 

Although apparently so well adapted to the milk business, there is but little 
done in that line beyond shipping milk to Chicago. Considerable attention is 
given to sheep raising. 

Like Algonquin and Nunda, McHenry has one-third of Range 9, making 
48 sections, and giving the township the greatest variety of soil to be found in 
the county. Although she can boast of no large prairie, she has plenty of 
timber. 

The village of McHenry, from 1837 to 1844, had the honor of being th<? 
shire town of McHenry County, and when Lake was set off it was the in- 
fluence of this little burg that procured the line to be run so as to retain the 
west half of Range 9, in order that she might still be the " Hub" of the county, 
but 

"The best laid schemes of mice and men 
Gang aft agleg." 

So, although having the advantage of a possible water power that might make 
her a second Lowell, the voters consulted their own convenience only- in 
making their selection. 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 113 

Boone Creek divides the village into two parts, called Old McHenry and 
Gagetown, the latter of which, having the depot and the railroad, has outgrown 
the town by the river, as seems to have been the case elsewhere. 

Two years ago, Gagetown built a pickle factory, which is the only one in the 
county that pulled through 1875, without closing according to law. 

The Old Town has a fine brick school house. 

Being convenient to the Fox River lakes by steamer and to Chicago bv 
rail, it has become a great resort for pleasure and fishing parties during the 
summer, spring and autumn. A drive of four miles lands you at Pistaqua 
Lake, or a steamer takes you there by water, and the fisherman or hunter who. 
in the proper season, cannot enjoy himself there must be hard to suit. Its 
citizens are American, Germans and Irish or their descendants. It has five 
dry goods stores, three groceries, one machine shop, three hardware and two 
drug stores, one lumber yard, three hotels, one jeweler, three doctors, six saloons, 
two implement warehouses, one brick yard, where bricks of the best quality are 
made by machinery, one furniture store, two livery stables, three harness shops, 
and will soon have the third flouring mill in operation. Here also was located 
for several years the wagon factory of Hon. Richard Bishop, which, from a 
small beginning, grew till the Bishop wagon was known all over the West, but, 
in the height 'of his prosperity, the fire closed him out in 1874. The wagon 
shop has not been rebuilt, but the building erected on the ruins is used by Mr. 
Bishop's son as a depot of agricultural implements. 

NUNDA, TOWNSHIP 44, RANGE 8 AND OF 9. 

The first settler in Nunda was Benjamin McOmber, who, in 1&36. built his 
house on Section 6, where he lived until his death. Cameron Goff came in 
1837, and still resides upon the land first taken up by him. George Stickney, 
Samuel Terwilliger, George T. Beckley and others settled in the northwest 
part of the township, and in the southeast Abram Vincent, Dewitt Brady and 
others. 

Near the center of Section 18, a little west of C. GofTs, in 1838, the first 
log school house was built, and Amanda McOmber first opened school within 
its walls, having five pupils in charge. 

This township was without a place of worship till 1867, when the Methodist 
Church at Crystal Lake was taken down and moved to Nunda, where it was 
occupied till 1874, when a new one was built at an estimated cost of $3,000. 
The name of the first pastor was Tilton. In 1863, Elder Lovelace organized a 
society of Disciples at the village. 

In 1844, James and Samuel McMillan, seeing a demand for a saw-mill, and 
having the necessary water power, erected one on Section 22, and sawed 
logs till 1863, when it was turned into a grist-mill at an expense of $6,000 to 
$7,000, and is still running. 



114 TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

A carding-mill was built, in 1846, in the north part of the town, by Mr. 
Truesdell, on Boone Creek, but not paying, was discontinued after two years. 

The first flouring-mill was put up by T. J. Ferguson, in 1856, costing, prob- 
ably, $6,000. 

The only manufactory in the town is the Crystal Lake Pickling and Can- 
ning Works, started in 1872, by William Archdeacon. This establishment 
carried on a large business and, under the stimulus thus given it, the popula- 
tion of Nunda village doubled in two years. In 1874, it was turned into a stock 
company, with a capital of $300,000, and owing, probably, to the general de- 
pression in business in J 875, it went into the hands of a receiver, but, having 
done a small business the present season, it is probable that the enterprise 
which promised so much for that region will not be abandoned. 

Nunda has two railroads, both of them having been built through the town 
in the same year. The Chicago & North- Western Railway enters the township 
near the southwest corner of Section 33, running in a northwesterly direction, 
and passing out near the middle of the west side of Section 30. The Elgin & 
State Line crosses the township line a few rods west of the former, traverses 
Sections 33, 28, 21, 16, 9, a corner of 10, and in its exit c*uts the north line of 
Section 3 about 100 rods west of its east line, this and the Chicago & North- 
Western together having about nine miles of main track in the township, and 
one depot common to both at Crystal Lake Crossing. 

The first depot was shipped from Chicago, ready-made, on a flat car, in 
1856, and set carefully down near where the two roads crossed. At that time, 
Nunda village was not thought of. This depot was for the accommodation of 
the railroads and, not being very well ballasted, it was feared that the prairie 
winds might blow it away, to prevent which, it was stayed with guy-ropes fas- 
tened to stakes driven into the ground. The Fox River Valley Railroad built 
a substantial depot near the center of Section 16, but finally removed it. 

Nunda has two cheese and butter factories and one for cheese alone, alto- 
gether using the milk of six to seven hundred cows. The village of Nunda is 
the only one in the township, and one Reed opened a store there in 1855. The 
log building first erected for a school house, however, had the honor of being 
the first store in the township, which was owned by E. M. Sever. 

This township is the best watered of any in the county except McHenry, 
being traversed from north to south, in its eastern half, by Fox River, contain- 
ing two lakes Griswold's and Lake Defiance and half of Lily Lake, besides 
numerous small creeks, of which the largest is Stickney's Run, which furnishes 
water-power for two grist-mills. It is well adapted to grain or stock, and, con- 
taining all of Township 44, Range 8 and one-third of Range 9 ; has forty-eight 
squaremiles. Hanley Creek crosses the northwest corner of the township in a 
northeasterly course. 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 115 



RICHMOND, TOWNSHIP 46, RANGE 8. 

It was during Martin Van Buren's term, on the 15th of May, 1837, that 
Mr. A. McConnell and Charles A. Noyes pitched their tents upon the soil of 
Richmond, with the intention of becoming citizens of Illinois ; then came John 
Purdy, who bought part of Noyes' claim. Alexander, David and William 
Gardner followed, settling the next year on Section 26, and began the march 
of improvement by^putting up a saw-mill on the Nippersink. In 1839, Stephen 
Pardee, Briggs Thomas and Jonathan Ineson made their claims and the Gard- 
ners sold a part of their water power, on the Nippersink, to Henry White and 
his son, John W., Avho, in 1840, erected the first flouring-mill in the county. 
These settlers, having come from a land of school houses, in the summer of 
1839, built one of logs on the claim of William A. McConnell and called it 
Montalona school house, after the name of their first post oifice, whose Post- 
master, William A. McConnell, received his commission from Amos Kendall, 
Van Buren's Postmaster General from 1837 to 1840. ' The second school house 
was built at Solon, in October, 1842, and Charles Knapp managed forty pupils 
the first year. 

Richmond village has the honor of constructing the first house of worship, 
which was a union affair between the Methodists and Congregationalists, Rev. 
N. Jewett being the first Pastor. The date of this building is unknown, nor 
how long it was so used, but the town now has four church buildings, owned 
respectively by the Catholics, Methodists, Baptists and Congregationalists; 
none of them being very strong in numbers. The aggregate cost of these 
buildings is, probably, $10,000. 

The saw-mill, above mentioned as built by the Gardners, who were assisted 
by the Mansfield brothers, finally fell into the hands - of the Whites, who found 
that it was not in the right place, so it had to be moved to the north side of the 
creek, and the same parties, in 1840, built a flouring-mill at Solon, which is 
said to have been the first grist-mill in the county. In 1844, C. G. Cotting 
and John Purdy, under the firm name of Cotting & Purdy, at an expense of 
$6,000, put up the mill at Richmond, now owned by Cole, Cooley & Co. 
Cotting & Purdy, after seven years, dissolved partnership, the business being 
continued by Cotting for thirteen' years more, when it was bought by James 
Bacon & Son. This mill is now worth $20,000. They have recently put in 
a steam engine, so as to run the mill independent of the creek, if necessary. 
Robert S. Turner is now engaged in the erection of a third flouring-mill in the 
town and will soon be ready for business. 

Two railroads cross this township, the Rockford & Kenosha crossing Sec- 
tion 6 in a northeast and southwest direction. The Elgin & State Line was 
built to Richmond in 1855. It enters the south side of the township, parallel 



116 TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

to and almost identical with but a little west of the line between Sections 32 
and 33, thence to Richmond village, whence it bears to the west, leaving the 
State about one-third of a mile west of the east line of Section 5. This town 
has about seven and a half miles of railroad. The first train was run across 
the Nippersink, to where the depot now stands, on the 26th of November, 1855. 
That depot was rather a diminutive affair and was long since replaced by the 
present building. Hon. William A. McConnell is one of the Directors of this 
road. 

One-half mile west of the village may be found the pioneer cheese factory of 
McHenry County, which was built by Wm. A. McConnell. It is of wood, 
30x112 feet, two stories high, is still running and making more cheese than any 
other in the county. At Spring Grove, near the east line of the town, is 
another similar structure ; in fact, the dairy business is the leading interest of 
the town. 

Cotting & Purdy built the first store at Richmond, in 1844, which they 
rented to the firm of Hale, Lee & Lay, of Kenosha, Wis., who put in a large 
stock, in charge of Edwin A. Lay. They traded here seven years, then went 
to Chicago. Previous to this time, in May, 1842, R. R. Crosby opened a store 
at Solon, Leverett Steele being afterward associated with him. This Steele 
was the first Postmaster at Solon. 

The village of Richmond was laid out by Cotting & Purdy in 1844, and 
Solon about the same time. The former has a very fine school library, of four 
hundred volumes, which is well cared for, and shows that it is useful as well as 
ornamental. 

At the time of the settlement, game, consisting of geese, ducks, grouse and 
deer, was abundant, while the Nippersink furnished plenty of fish to those who 
loved the rod. The north and the south branches of this creek unite near the 
center of Section 27, a little southwest of Solon, whence it flows nearly east 
into Burton, thence southeast into the northeast corner of McHenry, finally 
finding its way into Fox River. 

This town is well adapted to stock, and the creek affords a fine water power. 

John Purdy was the first Justice of the Peace, who was succeeded by R. R. 
Crosby. 

The village of Richmond has a graded school, of three rooms, and its repu- 
tation is good. 

Elder Joel Wheeler, now of McHenry, preached the first sermon in the 
township, in July, 1838, and, in October following, L. S. Walker came from 
the M. E. Church Conference and formed the first Methodist class. 

The first birth occurred in the family of John Purdy, on July 4, 1838, and 
was a girl. The first death was in the same familv and the second son, who 

v 

died August 19, 1839, aged 21 years. 



TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 117 

RILEY, TOWNSHIP 43, RANGE 5. 

This township was settled from 1836 to 1843 by T. W. Cobb, Roswell Bates, 
N. E. Barnes, Jenkins Underwood and Osborn, and, in 1845, they built on 
the north part of the town a frame school house, showing that these settlers, 
too, came from a land where education was deemed as necessary as dollars. 

Having plenty of facilities in adjoining townships, they have erected no 
church within their limits ; the population being almost equally divided between 
the Methodist and Congregationalist denominations, who hold their meetings in 
the various school houses, of which at present there are eight. 

The dairy business forms quite an item in the industries of this town, about 
thirty of its farmers being engaged in some branch of the milk business, and 
the town has one cheese factory. 

Riley has many good orchards that produce an abundance of apples and 
cherries, but there are no nurseries in the township, Marengo being able to 
supply all wants of that kind. 

In early times, Riley had a store kept by H. G. Hastings, but now Marengo 
is handy enough for all practical purposes. 

This township is well adapted to either grain or stock, and several of the 
large farmers have turned their attention to fattening steers for the Chicago 
market. 

About three-fourths of her soil is prairie and one-fourth timber. 

Riley possesses one improvement that she can boast of, but manifests no dis- 
position to do so, and that is a Town House. The other towns do their busi- 
ness on election days in school houses and halls. 

Though not so well watered as some of the towns, it possesses one stream 
of water called Coon Creek, the two branches of which unite on Section 
22, near the Town House and cheese factory, thence flowing northwest and 
passing out into Boone County about the middle of the west line of Section 6. 

SENECA, TOWNSHIP 44, RANGE 6. 

Wm. Deitz, Mr. Dickerson, Spencer Flanders, Jasper Havens, Levi 
Morsey and Joseph Hanna, from Virginia, made claims in and about Franklin- 
ville in 1835-36, and that same fall the settlers put up a frame school house a 
little west of the site of the present one in that hamlet. Mr. Albro was the 
first settler of Franklinville in 1836. 

The school house, in 1845, was followed by the church, the Methodists 
erecting the house in 1849 which now stands a little north of the corners, and 
the next year the first funeral was held there upon the death of Mrs. Ellis, the 
mother of Mrs. Geo. T. Kasson. No other denomination has a house of wor- 
ship in tbis township or holds regular meetings. 



118 TOWNSHIP HISTORIES. 

In 1839, a Mr. Lockwood opened a store at the corners, and the ensuing 
year exchanged with Mr. Robinson, of Geneva. Robinson was succeeded by 
Hurley Wayne in 1843, who, after about six months, took in Geo. T. Kasson. 
This firm continued about a year, when Kasson sold out to his partner, and in 
company with Mr. U. T. Hyde, opened the second store, which was soon sold 
out to Mr. Allen, when Kasson and Hyde put up a third store building. 
Franklinville, at that time, giving promise of a lively town. 

In 1843, through the efforts of John Wentworth (Long John) then Congress- 
man from this district, the place was named Belden, and had a post office, Syl- 
vester Mead being the first Postmaster. The name for the post office came 
about in this way : A law of Congress had established a mail route from Marengo 
to Woodstock, via John Belden's, who lived near the south branch of the Kish- 
waukee, and Long John coming to Franklinville, saw the germ of a future city 
and said to the crowd in the store, " Why, you ought to have a post office here." 
That was not disputed, but the route, by way of Belden's, seemed to be in the 
way. Wentworth cut the Gordian knot by the remark, " Why noc call this 
Belden Post Office ?" The thing was done, and Franklinville had a Postmaster 
till about 1866, when it was discontinued. The name Franklinville was given 
to the town in honor of Mr. Franklin Stringer. As Postmaster, Mead was suc- 
ceeded by H. Wayne, and he by G. T. Kasson. 

A Mr. White and family came into this township, from one of the Car- 
olinas, in 1835 or '36, and settled on Section 29, where soon after White & 
Son put up a saw-mill at the confluence of the middle and north branches of the 
Kishwaukee. It is not now in operation ; but shortly afterward, Geo. Smith 
& Son erected a flour and saw-mill on the main stream of the same creek, on 
Section 30, which is still . doing a good business under the name of Geo. Smith 

& Co. Another saw-mill was built at Anderson's, by Graves, in 1844. 

It was a kind of partnership concern, by which A. W. Anderson furnished the 
site and the engine, Graves building the mill. 

Dairying is a leading business, in this township, the first cheese factory hav- 
ing been built by Jackson & , at Franklinville, in 1868 since moved a 

little south, and now owned by Dr. Stone, of Richmond. About one year ago, 
a feed store was put in7 and the concern now makes butter, cheese and grinds 
feed. The next year, Bigelow put up the second factory on his farm, about a 
mile west of Franklinville, and after doing business a few years, leased the farm 
and factory to I. Boies, of Marengo. It has/ for the past two years, been 
managed by his two nephews as a butter factory, exclusively. Beside these 
two there are several private daries, among the largest of which are those of 
H. Foote, on Section 25, and C. G. Perkins, on Section 24. 

Seneca, in literary matters, takes no second place, the ladies having, several 
years since, organized themselves into a Literary Society that meets semi- 
monthly at the house of one of its members, the object of the society being to 



STATISTICS OF AGRICULTURE. 



119 



procure good reading as cheaply as may be. There are now in their library 
152 volumes, but they have had many more, it being their custom to sell off the 
old books at auction, when they are no longer in demand by the members, and 
thus get money for a new supply. School District No. 2 also has a library of 
eighty-five volumes. 

As an illustration of the difference in prices between that time, 1836 to 1850, 
and this, it is said, by those who dealt at Franklinville (whose surname, for a 
long time, was Snarltown), that Wayne could buy all the eggs and butter he 
wanted at five cents a dozen for the former and ten cents a pound for the latter, 
in trade, while corn brought but twelve and a half cents a bushel, in barter. 

In putting down the rebellion, Seneca took sea active part, one family, named 
Penmen, within the limits of the township, sending every member, to wit : father, 
mother, four sons, daughter and son-in-law. What is still more wonderful, they 
all returned in safety. But the crowning glory of the town took place on the 
Fourth of July, 1876, when Mayor Donnelly, having offered a flag to the town- 
ship bringing in the largest delegation to the W T oodstock celebration, Seneca 
brought in nearly eight hundred and captured the prize. 



STATISTICS OF AGRICULTURE, U. S. CENSUS, 1870. 



TOWNSHIPS. 


Improved 
Lauds. 


Value of 
Farms and 
Farming 
Implements. 


Value of 
Live Stock. 


Value of 
all 
Productions 


Indian 
Corn. 




Ac'e-. 


Dollars. 


Dollars. 


Dollan. 


Bushel*. 




6,058 


337,560 


61,550 


104,955 


33,820 


Algonquin 


17.045 


1,274,634 


202,929 


326,082 


85,084 


Chemung 


8,455 


509,665 


73 519 


111,372 


42,000 


Coral 


20,704 


543,508 


145,909 


209,795 


64,775 


Dorr 


13,850 


758,742 


128,298 


155,414 


45,217 




10,466 


652,399 


95,987 


147,473 


46,295 


Grafton 


15,571 


686,349 


130,765 


184,535 


45,540 


Greenwood 


ll,6- r .7 


729,813 


112,566 


172,301 


48,744 


Hartland 


8,538 


522,905 


94,530 


161,286 


48,145 


H ebron 


17,033 


815,518 


136,529 


257,759 


102,150 


Marengo 


20,592 


933,763 


150,282 


220,411 


78,884 


McHenry 


) 3,602 


992,337 


142,680 


313,355 


167,305 


Nunda 


17,266 


1,128,264 


178,709 


273,083 


83,731 




10 313 


727,033 


105,417 


188,335 


84,880 


Riley 


18,216 


681,576 


142,250 


207,778 


76,982 


Seneca.. . 


17,846 


819,108 


135,498 


185,198 


66,693 



120 



LOCAL STATISTICS. 



LOCAL STATISTICS. 



1855. 

Assessed value of real estate $2,821,508 00 

' " personal property 1,106,955 00 

" " railroads 197,566 00 

Total '. $6,947,537 00 

PERSONAL PROPERTY. NO. AMOUNT. 

Horses 5,324 $207,386 00 

Neat cattle .". 25,824 313,561 00 

Mules and asses 36 1,450 00 

Sheep 24,049 32,025 00 

Hogs 12,500 16,626 00 

Carriages and wagons .- 2,422 62,560 00 

Clocks and watches 2,110 7,285 00 

Pianos 18 2,160 00 

Goods and merchandise 92,280 00 

Bankers' stock 300 00 

Manufactured articles 6,500 00 

Moneys and credits 256,449 00 

Bonds, stocks, etc 4,151 00 

Unenumerated property 88,028 00 

Total * .'. $1,106,955 00 

I860. 

Assessed value of real estate $2.672,665 00 

" " personal property 752,66600 

" " railroads 307,708 17 

Total $3,733,039 17 

PERSONAL PROPERTY. NO. AMOUNT. 

Horses 6,147 $218,354 00 

Neat cattle 25,951 185,398 00 

Mules and asses 60 1,761 00 

Sheep 19,357 19,789 00 

Hogs 9,847 10,013 00 

Carriages and wagons 3,195 49,105 00 

Clocks and watches 3,105 7,299 00 

Pianos 69 5,610 00 

Goods and merchandise 57,233 00 

Bankers' and brokers' stock 5,000 00 

Manufactured articles 6,022 00 

Moneys and credits 118,360 00 

Unenumerated articles 73,369 00 

Total :.... $752,666 00 



LOCAL STATISTICS. 



121 



865. 

Assessed value of real estate $2,245,705 00 

" " railroads 406,620 00 

" " personal property 959,408 00 

Total $3,592,581 00 

PERSONAL PROPERTY. NO. AMOUNT. 

Horses 9,897 $281,750 00 

Cattle 23,935 165,553 00 

Mulesand asses 114 3,163 00 

Sheep 60,914 84,773 00 

Hogs 11,946 19,607 00 

Carriages and wagons 3,489 56,625 00 

Clocks and watches 3,618 7,025 00 

Pianos 106 7,108 00 

Goods and merchandise 64,277 00 

Manufactured articles 1,850 00 

Moneys and credits 155,423 00 

Value of moneys in bonds, bank shares, etc 18,722 00 

Unenumerated property 94,208 00 

Total $959,409 00 

187O. 

Assessed value of real estate $2,026,548 00 

" railroads 391,663 00 

" " personal property 849,70900 

town lots 348,279 00 

Total $3,616,169 00 

PERSONAL PROPERTY. NO. AMOUNT. 

Horses 10,666 $250,045 00 

Cattle 28,289 210,123 00 

Mulesand asses 188 4,611 00 

Sheep 50,650 124,165 00 

Hogs ; 17,198 28,784 00 

Carriages and wagons 3,614 43,454 00 

Clock and watches 3,231 4,711 00 

Pianos 101 5,415 00 

Total... $876,397 00 



122 



LOCAL STATISTICS. 



1875. 

Assessed value of real estate $7, 540, 926 00 

" personal property 2,821,031 00 

" " railroads 507,590 00 



Total $10,869,547 00 

PERSONAL PROPERTY. NO. AMOUNT. 

Horses 10,733 $502,368 00 

Cattle 34,961 593,954 00 

Mules ; 211 10,267 00 

Sheep .....45,523 86,207 00 

Hogs '.... .17,578 58,626 00 

Steam engines and boilers 13 7,010 00 

Fire and burglar proof safes 36 2,940 00 

Billiard and bagatelle tables 30 2,175 00 

Carriages and wagons 4,669 128,334 00 

Watches and clocks 3,721 11,929 00 

Sewing and knitting machines 1,856 39,784 00 

Piano fortes 156 16,060 00 

Melodeons and organs 409 19,842 00 

Franchises 500 00 

Steamboats and water craft 2 25 00 

Merchandise 272,830 00 

Manufactured articles 40,450 00 

Manufactured tools and machinery 9,433 00 

Agricultural implements and machinery 64,377 00 

Plated ware 1,101 00 

Diamonds and jewelry 45 00 

Bankers' and brokers' money, etc 2,000 00 

Credits 850 00 

Money other than bankers' 266,856 00 

Credits 454,572 00 

Bonds and stocks 4,808 00 

Shares in National banks 80,000 00 

Property of corporations not enumerated 2,450 00 

Household and office property 1,010 00 

Investments in real estate and improvements 117,818 00 

Shares, stocks, State and National banks 4,365 00 

All other property 23,017 00 

Total assessed value unenumerated property 135,974 00 

The population of the county in 1840 2,578 

" " 1850 1 14,975 

" " " 1860 22,085 

1870 23,688 

And estimated at present time 1876 26,000 

It will be seen that the population has increased from 200, in 1837, to 26,000 in 1876, and 
that this county stands among the most populous counties in the State, while the increase in the 
assessment of taxable property has run up from $370, in 1837, to $10,869,547, in 1875 in 
thirty-eight years. 



POPULATION OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



123 



POPULATION OF McHENRY COUNTY BY TOWNSHIPS. 

UNITED STATES CENSUS, 1870. 





Total. 


1870. 


1860. 1850. 


Native. Foreign. 


White. 


Colored. 


White. 


Colored. 


White. 


Col'd. 


Alden 


722 
2157 


609 
1573 


113 
584 


722 
2156 




945 
1987 




780 

1455 
1006 
333 
763 
1139 
928 




Algonquin 


1 










Burton 


281 


201 


80 


281 




329 
































Chemung ; 


2222 
1120 
1345 
2681 
1574 
999 
1361 
925 
1037 
930 
2253 
1327 
1988 
1548 
1404 
882 
1027 


1845 
920 
1170 
2179 
1255 
754 
1020 
759 
678 
841 
1991 
1209 
1531 
1248 
1115 
746 
874 


377 
200 
175 
502 
319 
245 
341 
166 
359 
89 
262 
118 
457 
300 
289 
136 
153 


2198 
1102 
1339 
2670 
1563 
999 
1359 
924 
1036 
929 
2242 
1317 
1983 
1548 
1403 
882 
1027 


24 
18 
6 
11 
11 


1633 






Harvard 








Coral 


1266 
2386 
1827 
981 
1073 
1048 
978 
900 
2008 
1119 
2042 
1321 
1377 
801 
1010 


2 

1 


977 


3 


Dorr (i)... 


Woodstock 






Dunham (AN 








Grafton 


2 
1 
1 

1 
11 
10 
5 




446 
884 
968 
731 
1030 




Greenwood 












Hebron 






Marengo 






Marengo 






McH.enry 




1176 








Richmond 


1 


1 


1078 
445 
836 




Riley 




Seneca 

















(y) In 1860, name changed from Brooklyn to Nunda. 
(A) In 1860, " " " Byron to Dunham. 

(i) In 1860, " " " Center to Dorr. 



NATIVITY AND FOREIGN PARENTAGE. 



Native. 



1870. 
.19,134 



Foreign born 4,628 

Both parents foreign 10,427 

Having foreign father...'. 9,995 

Having foreign mother 9,677 

Having foreign father and mother 9,245 



1860. 
17,828 
4,261 



SELECTED NATIVITY. 



NATIVE. 

Born in the State 10,214 

Ohio 448 

New York 4,790 

Pennsylvania '.. 560 

Indiana 96 

Kentucky 24 



16,132 



FOREIGN. 

British America 382 

England and Wales 713 

Ireland 1,661 

Scotland 207 

Germany 1,187 

France 160 

Sweden and Norway 172 

Switzerland 11 

Bohemia 90 

Holland 11 

Denmark 23 

4,617 



124 COUNTY OFFICERS. 



McHENRY COUNTY. 



T. D. MURPHY, Circuit Court Judge. 

First Term. Second Monday in January. 
Second Term. Second Monday in May. 
Third Term. Fourth Monday in September. 

B. N. SMITH, . County Court Judge. 

Probate Matters. Third Monday of every month. 

COUNTY OFFICERS. 

P. WHITNEY, County Clerk. 

JAMES NISH, . . . Treasurer. 

J. P. CHEEVER, Attorney. 

E. E. RICHARDS, . . . . . . . . Circuit Clerk. 

WILLIAM NICKLE, Supt. of Schools. 

JOHN BRINK, . Surveyor. 

D. A STEDMAN, Sheriff. 

JOHN S. CUMMINGS, Coroner. 



COUNTY SUPERVISORS. 

IRA E. SEARLS, Riley. 

Z. E. GOODRICH, Marengo. 

R. M. PATRICK, ........ Village of Marengo. 

0. C. DIGGINS, . Dunham. 

JAMES THOMPSON, . Chemung. 

HENRY BAKER, . Village of Harvard. 

R. 0. SOUTHMAYD, Alden. 

R. D. COONEY, Hartland. 

CHARLES 0. PARSONS, Seneca. 

CALVIN GILBERT, . . . Coral. 

D. E. WOOD, -... . Grafton. 

M. L. JOSLYN, , Dorr. 

GEO. H. GARRISON, . . . . . . . . . Greenwood. 

SAMUEL W. BROWN, Hebron. 

MARCUS FOOTE, . . Richmond. 

JOSEPH COOLEY, '. Burton. 

JOHN M. SMITH, McHeriry. 

B. F. PECK, Nunda. 

C. F. DIKE, : Algonquin. 



TOWN GOVERNMENT. 125 



TOWN GOVERNMENT. 



McHENRY COUNTY CITY OF WOODSTOCK. 

NEILL DONNELLY, Mayor ; D. C. GREEN, A. K. BUNKER, CHARLES 
SCHRYVER, Aldermen, South Ward; A. DICKERSON, FREDERICK REN- 
ICH, HENRY WAITE, Aldermen, North Ward ; T. L. MAKER, City Clerk ; J. 
J. MURPHY, Treasurer. 



BOARDS OF TRUSTEES VILLAGE CORPORATIONS. 

MARENGO. 

R. M. PATRICK, President ; J. W. GREEN, M. D., A. J. SHURTLIFF, S. 
H. CUSSEY, ALFRED CORSON ; G. V. WELLS, Clerk; A. P. ABBOTT, 

Treasurer. 

HARVARD. 

HENRY BAKER, President; JOHN W. GROESBECK, W. WELLINGTON, 
G. H. SMITH, JAMES THOMPSON ; J. B. LYON, Clerk ; B. A. WADE, 
Treasurer. 

HUNTLEY. 

JACKSON WOOD, President ; JOSEPH HANCOCK, DAVID WILLIAMS, 
A. BLANCHARD, J. F. SPALDING, JOHN WELTZINE ; B. F. ELLIS, Clerk. 

RICHMOND. 

G. P. WODELL, President; DR. S. F. BENNETT, J. C. SMITH, JOHN 
HOLIAN, GEO. PURDY, J. V. ALDRICH ; J. W. HAYTHORN, Clerk; A. R. 
ALEXANDER, Treasurer. 

McHENRY. 

RICHARD BISHOP, President; S. SEARLES, JACOB STOREY, AN- 
THONY WEBER, EDWARD HANLEY, WM. WELCH ; HENRY COLBY. 
Treasurer ; MICHAEL KELTER, Clerk. 

NUNDA. 

(Incorporated Jan. 26, 1874.) 

J. P. VERMYLIA, President; 0. MANSFIELD, E. BECKLEY, C. H. STONE, 
N. BEARDSLEY, J. DARBY ; R. G. BENTON, Clerk ; D. C. MALLORY, 

Treasurer. 

CRYSTAL LAKE. 

W. BUTLER, President; L. D. LOWELL, JOHN BUCKHOLZ, THOMAS 
LEONARD, WM. MILLER, S. S. ROLLINS ; WM. H. BEARDSLEY, Clerk ; 
W. B. FITCH, Treasurer. 



126 TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 



TOWNSHIP OFFICERS OF McHENRY COUNTY, 1876. 

* RILEY TOWNSHIP. 

THOMAS DIMON, T. J. EDKIN, Justices of the Peace ; IRA E. SEARLS, Su- 
pervisor ; T. H. GRAVES, Town Clerk ; P. S. GRIFFITH, Assessor ; JOHN DE 
YARMOND, Collector. 

MARENGO TOWNSHIP. 

GUSTAVUS V. WELLS, ALDEN JEWETT, Justices of the Peace ; Z. E. 
GOODRICH, Supervisor; G. V. WELLS, Town Clerk; GEORGE D. BELDIN, 
Assessor ; W. W. NORRIS, Collector. 

DUNHAM TOWNSHIP. 

0. H. THOMPSON, WM. G. BILLINGS, Justices of the Peace ; 0. C. DIG- 
GINS, Supervisor ; L. M. LILLIBRIDGE, Town Clerk ; W. G. BILLINGS, As- 
sessor ; F. C. WELLS, Collector. 

CHEMUNG TOWNSHIP. 

CHARLES ARMSTRONG, J. G. CALLENDER, Justices of the Peace; JAMES 
THOMPSON, Supervisor; JOHN B. LYON, Town Clerk; CHARLES ARM- 
STRONG, Assessor ; LOT P. SMITH, Collector. 

ALDEN TOWNSHIP. 

WM. H. NO YES, WM. H. CONKLIN, Justices of the Peace ; R. 0. SOUTH- 
MAYD, Supervisor ; W. H. NO YES, Town Clerk ; SAMUEL CUTTER, Assessor ; 
HENRY WETLAUFER, Collector. 

HARTLAND TOWNSHIP. 

WM. G. CONKLIN, NICHOLAS GRADY, Justices of the Peace ; R. D. COO- 
NEY, Supervisor ; P. J. NOLAN, Town Clerk ; TIMOTHY MURPHY, Assessor ; 
JOSEPH O'LEARY, Collector. 

SENECA TOWNSHIP. 

J. G. CHASE, U. T. HYDE, Justices of the Peace ; CHAS. 0. PARSONS, Super- 
visor ; WM. M. TURNER, Town Clerk ; LYMAN W. SHELDON, Assessor ; JOHN 
McBROOM, Collector. 

CORAL TOWNSHIP. 

J. A. READ, VOLNEY OWEN, Justices of the Peace ; CALVIN GILBERT, 
Supervisor ; CHARLES N. STODDARD, Town Clerk ; C. HASTINGS, Assessor ; 
ALONZO S. PEAK, Collector. 

GRAFTON TOWNSHIP. 

GEORGE VAN VALKENBURG, JOHN COSTIGAN, Justices of the Peace ; 
D. E. WOOD, Supervisor ; J. P. SKEELS, Town Clerk ; G. D. TORRANCE, 
Assessor ; B. F. ELLIS, Collector. 



TOWNSHIP OFFICERS. 127 

DORR TOWNSHIP. 

EDMUND BALDWIN, MINOR LOCKWOOD, Justices of the Peace ; M. L. 
JOSLYN, Supervisor; EDMUND BALDWIN, Town Clerk; JOHN D. SHORT, 
Assessor ; WM. H. COWLIN, Collector. 

GREENWOOD TOWNSHIP. 

A. C. THOMPSON, Justice of the Peace; GEO. H. GARRISON. Supervisor; 
ADAM WESTERMAN, Town Clerk; W. N. WILLIS, Assessor; SEBREAN 
BALDWIN, Collector. 

HEBRON TOWNSHIP. 

HENRY W. MEAD, S. W. BROWN, Justices of the Peace; SAM'L W. 
BROWN, Supervisor; HENRY W. MEAD, Town Clerk; HAMLIN FENNER, 
Assessor; HIRAM ROWE, Collector. 

RICHMOND TOWNSHIP. 

WM. A. McCONNELL, HENRY HORNBY, Justices of the Peace; MARCUS 
FOOTE, Supervisor; A. R. ALEXANDER, Town Clerk; WM. L. TURNER, 
Assessor; JAMES BACON, Collector. 

BURTON TOWNSHIP. 

CHAS. MEAD, Justice of the Peace; JOSEPH COOLEY, Supervisor; WM. 
SLATER, Town Clerk; WM. PIERCE, Assessor; ROB'T THOMPSON, Collector. 

McHENRY TOWNSHIP. 

J. B. PERRY, HOMER WATTLES, Justices of the Peace; JOHN M. SMITH, 
Supervisor; HENRY COLBY, Town Clerk; JOHN HUEMANN, Assessor; 
PETER ROTHERMEL, Collector. 

NUNDA TOWNSHIP. 

D. C. MALLORY, CHESTER SHALES, Justices of the Peace; B. F. PECK, 
Supervisor; JOHN MORTON, Town Clerk; JOHN DORAN, Assessor; R. J. 
SUTTON, Collector. 

ALGONQUIN TOWNSHIP. 

JAS. PHILP, BENJAMIN CARPENTER, Justices of the Peace; C. F. 
DIKE, Supervisor; HENRY KEYES, Town Clerk; JOHN BRINK, Assessor; 
GEORGE DODD, Collector. 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 

E. DAYTON, village of Marengo ; JABEZ R. WELLS, JOHN B. LYON, village 
of Harvard; JAS. G. TEMPLETON, village of Huntley; JAS. B. CHURCH, 
city of Woodstock ; D. A. POTTER, village of Richmond ; JOHN M. SMITH, 
village of McHenry; A. A. PETTIBONE, village of Nunda. 



128 LODGES AND ASSOCIATIONS. 



LODGES AND ASSOCIATIONS. 



McHENRY COUNTY. 

St. Mark's Lodge, No. 63, A., F. and A. M., organized Sept. 20, 1847. First 
Officers: John F. Gray, W. M. ; Luke Coon, S. W. ; Calvin Searles, J. W. ; Jonathan 
Kimball, Treasurer ; Henry Petrie, Secretary ; Jonathan Bliss, S. D. ; George W. 
Dana, J. D. ; Silas Chatfield, Tyler ; Cornelius Lansing and Nicholas Terrell, Stewards. 
Officers, 1876 : Edwin E. Thomas, W. M. ; Geo. L. Sherwood, S. W. ; Edwin Whit- 
son, J. W. ; A. L. Salisbury, Treasurer; S. Brink, Secretary ; A. F. McGhee, S. D. ; F. 
M. Buell, J. D. ; J. Petrie, Tyler. Meets on 1st and 3d Tuesdays in each month, at 
Masonic Hall, Woodstock. 

Woodstock, Chapter, No. 36, R. A. M., chartered October 3, 1857. First Officers: 
John D. Pierce, M. E. H. P. ; Elzapahan I. Smith, K. ; Benj. Carter, S. Officers, 
1876 : E. E. Thomas, M. E. H. P. ; A. L. Salisbury, K. ; W. H. Stewart, S. ; A. F. 
McGhee, C. H. ; B. N. Smith, P. S. ; F. Renich, R. A. C. ; J. A. Parrish, 3d V. ; J. 
P. Zimpleman, 2d V. ; C. N. Kendall, 1st V. ; J. Petrie, Tyler. Meets on 2d and 4th 
Mondays of each month, at Masonic Hall, Woodstock. 

Calvary Commandery, No. 25, organized October 22d, 1867. First Officers: 
E. W. Smith, Eminent Commander ; J. J. Murphy, Generalissimo ; Holbert Nick- 
erson, Captain General ; John S. Wheat, Prelate; Benj. F. Church, S. W. ; Edwin E. 
Thomas, J. W. ; James Northrup, Treasurer ; John S. Medlar, Recorder ; Alex. L. 
Salisbury, Standard Bearer; Leander Church, Sword Bearer. Officers, 1876: E. E. 
Thomas, E. C. ; G. B. Southworth, G. ; E. E. Richards, Captain General ; R. K. Todd, 
Prelate ; W. H. Sanford, S. W. ; G. L. Sherwood, J. W. ; Alex McNaughton, S. K. B ; 
R. Diesel, S. W. ; M. Church, W. ; C. A. Given, Capt. of G. Meets at Masonic Hall, 
on 2d and 4th Thursdays of each month, at Woodstock. 

Harvard Lodge No. 309, A., F. and A. M., organized March 15, 1859. First 
Officers, elected December 19, 1859: T. B. Wakeman, W. M. ; A. E. Axtel, S. W. ; 
Joseph E. Crumb, J. W. ; Benj. Lowell, Treasurer ; A. J. Burbank, Secretary; H. B. 
Minier, S. D. ; Hiram Jackson, J. D. ; Geo. F. Crawford and Holland Norton, Stew- 
ards ; G. H. Sherwood, Tyler. Officers, 1876: L. P. Smith, W. M. ; Aremus Cov- 
entry, S. W. ; J. W. Groesbeck, J. W. ; Wm. B. Walker, Treasurer; P. Wilkinson, 
Secretary ; P. L. Russell, S. D. ; A. M. Leeland, J. D. ; J. B. Rosecrantz, Chaplain ; 
Wm. N. Merritt and Abijah F. Barrett, Stewards ; Wm. N. Grovesteen, Tyler. Meets 
on the 1st and 3d Mondays of each month, at Masonic Hall, Harvard. 

Harvard Chapter No. 91, R. A. M., was organized October 5, 1866. First 
Officers: J. G. Callender, H. P.; H. B. Minier, K. ; Holland Norton, S. Officers, 
1876: J. B. Rosecrantz, H. P. ; B. A. Wade, K. ; J. W. Groesbeck, S. ; J. C. Crumb, 
Treasurer; H. C. Crumb, Secretary; D. W. Downs, C. H. ; L. P. Smith, P. S. ; R. 



LODGES AND ASSOCIATIONS. 129 

Coventry, R. A. C. ; E. Smith, M. 3d V. ; P. L. Russell, M. 2d V.; W. H. 
Williams, M. 1st V. ; W. H. Grobenstein, Tyler. Meets on 2d and 4th Tuesdays of 
each month, at Masonic Hall, Harvard. 

Richmond Lodge, No. 143, A., F. and A. M., organized October 2, 1854. First 
Officers: C. G. Cotting, W. M. ; Dr. R. F. Bennett, S. W. ; George M. Leach, J. 
W. ; Wm. A. McConnell, Treasurer ; Asa F. Bennett, Secretary. Officers, 1876 : 
Geo. B. Carpenter, W. M. ; J. McConnell, S. W. ; A. R. Alexander, J. W. ; Wm. A. 
McConnell, Treasurer ; C. G. Cotting, Secretary ; G. P. Wodell, S. D. ; J. A. Ratnour, 
J. D. ; Wm. Parsons, Tyler. Meets on Monday on or betore full moon and second 
Monday thereafter at Richmond. 

Hebron Lodge, No. 604, A., F. and A. M., organized July 15, 1868. First 
Officers : H. W. Mead, W. M. ; James Erckenbrack, S. W. ; M. S. Goodsell, J. W. ; 
David Rowe, Treasurer ; George Colburn, Secretary ; D. A. Clarey, S. D. ; Henry Rowe, 
J. D. ; W. S. Erckenbrack, Tyler. Officers, 1876 : D. A. Clarey, W. M. ; Henry 
Housholder, S. W. ; W. H. Noyes, J. W. ; David Rowe, Treasurer ; D. S. Blodgett, 
Secretary ; Frank Rowe, S. D. ; John Woodberry, J. D. ; Wm. Chapman, S. S. ; H. 
W. Noyes, J. S. ; D. K. Smith, Tyler. 

Orion Lodge, No. 358, A., F. and A. M., organized November 23, 1859. First 
Officers : P. M. Frisbie, W. M. ; H. Wayne, S. W. ; S. A. Randall, J. W. ; N. C. 
Gardner, Treasurer; P. B. Smith, Secretary; Wm. Tonipkins, S. D. ; H. W. Belden, 
J. D. ; N. C. Gardner, S. S. ; E. W. Fillmore, J. S. ; Cyrus Ladd, Tyler. Officers, 
'1876: N. C. Gardner, W. M. ; H. W. Belden, S. W. ; J.F. Prowse, J. W. ; Amos 
Capron, Treasurer ; F. S. Sheldon, Secretary ; J. D. Bliss, S. D. ; A. Andrew, J. D. ; 
Wm. J. Fillmore, S. S. ; H. J. Bright, J. S. ; Orson Petingale, Tyler. Meets Wednes- 
day evening on or before full moon in each month at Union. 

Lansing Chapter, No. 73, R. A. M., organized October 27, 1864. First Officers: 
H. P. Stockton, H. P.; G. V. Wells, K.; A. G. Simons, S.; M. L. Utter, C. H.; - 
Van Annan, R. A. C. ; H. A. Buck, G. M. 3d V. ; A. Lewis, G. M. 2d V. ; Willliam 
Tompkins, G. M. 1st V. ; M. White, Tyler. Officers, 1876 : Ira R. Curtiss, H. P. ; 
W. Avery, K. ; J. W. Green, S. ; G. V. Wells, Treasurer; I. L. James, Secretary ; P. T. 
Parkhurst, C. H. ; J. B. Babcock, P. S. ; W. J. Casely, R. A. C. ; G. Crego, G. M. 3d 
V. ; P. L. Wells, G. M. 2d V. ; H. M. Fillmore, G. M. 1st V. ; T. Demon, Tyler. Meets 
second Wednesday evening in each month, at Masonic Hall, Marengo. 

Marengo Lodge, No. 138, A., F. and A. M., organized March 3, 1853. First 
Officers: J. W. Green, W. M.; C. D. Cannon, S. W.; R. B. Simpkins, J. W. pro 
tern.; E. A. Guilbert, Secretary pro tern. ; N. Terrill, S. D. pro tern.; D. Hammer, J. 
D. pro tern.; D. Barren, Tyler, pro tern. Officers, 1876: J. W. Green, W. M. ; Ira R. 
Curtiss, S. W.; P. T. Parkhurst. J. W.; G. V. Wells, Treasurer; S. J. James, Sec- 
retary; L. A. Hovey, S. D. ; 0. I. Searles, J; D. ; W. H. Sanders, Tyler. Meets 1st. 
and 3d Wednesdays in each month in Masonic Hall, Marengo. 



130 LODGES AND ASSOCIATIONS. 

McHenry Lodge, No. 158, A., F. and A. M., organized 1854. First Officers: Z. 
W. Burnham, W. M. ; J. R. Mack, S. W. ; H. N. Owen, J. W. ; George Gage, Treas- 
urer; Horace Burton, Secretary; A. H. Nixon, S. D. ; G. W. Burnham, J. D. ; Wni. 
R. Willard, S. S.; A. McCulley, J. S.; Abner Mack, Tyler. Officers, 1876: Smith 
Searles, W. M. ; J. M. Smith, S. W. ; Philo D. Smith, J. W. ; Albert Hibbard, 
Treasurer; Chas. Morey, Secretary; Rollin Wait, S. D. ; Pulaski Allen, J. D. ; H. 
Colby, Tyler. Meets every two weeks, on Saturday evening before the full moon, at Mc- 
Henry. 

Algonquin Lodge, No. 256, A., F. and A. M., chartered October 6, 1858. First 
Officers: Sam'l A. French, W. M. ; Wm. Henry, S. W. ; Thos. Plumleigh, J. W. ; A. 
S. Thomas, Treasurer; S. D. Pease, Secretary; James Philp, S. D. ; J. J. Sears, J. D.; 
R. R. Sherwood, Tyler. Officers, 1876 : Wm. A. Nason, W. M. ; J. C. Bennett, S. 
W.; Wm. H. Earlie, J. W. ; C. C. Chunn, Treasurer; J. Peter, Secretary; J. D. 
Terenson, Jr., S. D. ; Wm. Stewart, J. D. ; J. Adamek, Tyler. Meets 1st and 3d 
Wednesdays of each month in Masonic Hall, Algonquin. 

Chemung Lodge, No. 326, A. F. and A. M., chartered Oct. 5, 1859. First Officers: 
Alpheus March, W. M. ; W. G. Billings, S. W. ; J. A. Woods, J. W. Consolidated 
with Bonus Lodge, No. 258, Boone County, Dec. 30, 1861, and newly chartered as 
Chemung Lodge, No. 258: W. G. Billings, W. M. ; J. G. Callender, S. W. ; J. A. 
Woods, J. W.' Officers, 1876: W. G. Billings, W. M. ; A. J. Alderman, S. W. ; 
Jacob Barth, J. W. 

Nunda Lodge, No. 169, A. F. and A. M., organized Oct. 2, 1855. First Officers: 
J. R. Mack, W. M. ; W. R. Willard, S. W. ; H. Green, J. W. ; G. A. Palmer, Treasurer ;' 
N. Buck, Secretary ; 0. Mansfield, S. D. ; M. H. Buck, J. D. ; S. A. French, S. S. ; 
J. Barthell, J. S. ; W. H. Huffman, Tyler. Officers, 1876: J. H. Palmer, W. M. ; 
Orrin Mansfield, S. W. ; Charles H. Stone, J. W. ; William Hill, Treasurer ; John 
Morton, Secretary ; Walter B. Fitch, S. D. ; Cecil C. Pettibone, J. D. ; Charles 
H. Lanning, S. S. ; Joseph H. Wilbur, J. S. ; Ole Arnesen, Tyler. Meets 2d and 4th 
Saturdays in each month at Masonic Hall, Nunda. 

Guardian Lodge, No. 60, 1. 0. 0. F. Officers for 1876 : George Bachman, N. G. ; 
Jacob Iuhn, V. G. ; Richard Roessler, Secretary ; Jacob Schwamb, Treasurer ; Richard 
Roessler, Representative. Appointed Officers : Jacob Kropp, Ward. ; Chris. Hausauer, 
Cond. ; H. Schneider, Jun. Guard. ; Ole Blome, R. S. N. G. ; Henry Munzer, L. S. N. G. ; 
Michael Eckert, R. S. V. G. ; Daniel Plocher, L. S. V. G. ; Michael Schneider, R. 
S. I. ; Alois Dreyer, L. S. S. ; Chas. Retterer, P. G. ; R. J. Os.man, D. G. M. Meets 
every Monday, at Odd Fellows' Hall, Choate's Block, Woodstock. 

Woodstock Division, No. 998, Sons of Temperance,' organized December, 1874. 
Officers, 1876 : L. H. S. Barrows, W. P. ; J. E. Jones, P. W. P. ; Mrs. A. B. Sheets,' 
W. A. ; A. B. Sheets, R. S. ; Jennie Lemmers, Asst. R. S. ; C. Barrows, F. S. ; H. 
T. Nettleton, Chaplain ; Chas. Haas, Cond. ; Maggie McLain, Asst. Cond. ; Aggie Mc- 
.Lain, I. S. ; George Skinner, 0. S. Meets every Friday evening, at Thomas' Hall, 
Woodstock. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 

DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



ALGONQUIN TOWNSHIP. 

ABBOTT, A. C., Farmer and Mechanic, n. w. Sec. 17; Cary P. 0. ; born in 
Chautauqua Co., N. Y. 1826 ; owns 66 acres of land ; value $2,300 ; been Justice 
of Peace ; was one year in Union Army, One Hundred and Forty-Seventh 111. Vol. 
Inf. Married Melissa Wheeler, of Cortland Co., N. Y., in 1847, who was born 
1826 ; had eight children, five boys and three girls ; lost two boys and one girl. 

ABBOTT, SANDY, Carpenter, Sec. 17 ; Cary P. 0. 

ADAMS, JOHN, Laborer ; Algonquin. 

ADAMEK, FRANK, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

ADAMEK, JOSEPH, Carriage Maker ; Algonquin ; born in Bohemia, 1834 ; 
came to America, 1852, and to McHenry Co., 1871. Married Bartha Dvorak, of 
Barrington, 1860 ; Mrs. Adamek is a native of '.Bohemia; has six children, three 
boys and three girls. 

AHRENS, FRED., Laborer ; Algonquin. 
ALLASON, ISAAC, Laborer ; Algonquin. 
ALLEN, CHAS., Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 
ALLEN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Cary P. 0. 

ARVEDSON, REV. PETER, Pastor of Episcopal Church, Sec. 22 ; Algon- 
quin P. 0. ; born in Sweden, 1822; came to America, 1841, and to Algonquin, 
1842 ; owns 50 acres land ; valued $3,750. Married Hannah Adelia Cornish, grand- 
daughter of Andrew Cornish, M. D. ; one of the first settlers of McHenry Co., 
Sept. 4th, 1848 ; had twelve children, five boys and seven girls ; eleven now living. 

ALMERDER, , Wood Carver ; Crystal Lake. 

ASHTON, L. C., Lives with father ; Crystal Lake. 

ASHTON, T. H., Proprietor Crystal Lake House, Crystal Lake ; born in Orleans 
Co., N. Y., 1815 ; came West, 1855 ; settled in Cuba, Lake Co. Ill ; lived there ten 
years ; came to this county, 1866 ; owns Blocks 1 and 9, Crystal Lake. Married 
Hulda Chase, 1839 ; born in Monroe Co. N. Y., 1819 ; had nine children, four 
boys and five girls ; two boys and one girl dead. 

AYELS WORTH, J., Laborer; Crystal Lake. 
BALDWIN, JAMES, Retired ; Crystal Lake. 
BALDWIN, J. A., School Teacher ; Crystal Lake. 
BALESTY, CHARLES, Laborer ; Algonquin. 
BALESTY, PAT., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Algonquin P. 0. 
BANNISTER, J., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Nunda P. 0. 



132 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

BEARDSLEY, A. W., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
BENTHUSEN, HENRY, Blacksmith ; Algonquin. 
BEDFORD, JOHN, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 
BEARDSLEY, W. H., Engineer ; Crystal Lake. 
BENNETT, J. C., Laborer ; Algonquin. 
BEARDSLEY, Z., Retired; Crystal Lake. 

BENSON, E. H. v Farmer, n. w. Sec. 21, Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Chautauqua 
Co., N. Y., 1832 ; came to this county, 1855 ; owns 380 acres land ; value $15,200 ; 
been Town Supervisor two years; is School Trustee at present. Married Alvira 
Miller, daughter of Jessie F. Miller, of Algonquin, in 1861 ; had five children, 
three boys and two girls ; one boy dead. 

BENSON, W. P., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Algonquin P. O. 

BENTLEY, B. B., Physician ; Algonquin. 

BERGIN, JOHN. Farmer, Sec. 8, R. 9 ; Cary Station P. 0. 

BERKLEY, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

BINK, CHARLES, Laborer ; Algonquin. 

BIRKLE, CHARLES, Farmer, n. w. Sec. 36; Algonquin P. 0.; born in 
Baden, Germany, 1839; came to America 1862, and to this Co. the same year; 
owns 98 acres land; value $45 per acre. Married Meno Grouse, 1862 ; she was 
born in Germany, 1838 ; has five children, three bojs and two girls. Republican 
Lutheran. 

BLONNER, A M Farmer, Sec. 17, R. 9 ; Barrington P. 0. ; born in Germany, 
1823; came to this Co. 1864; owns 100 acres land; value $3,000. Married 
Cathrina Blony, a native of Germany, 1846 ; had four children, three boys and 
one girl. 

BOOK, CHARLES, Laborer ; Algonquin. 

BOBBIN, J. F., Farmer, Sec. 7, R. 9 ; Cary P. 0. 

BOND, G. W. S., Laborer; Algonquin. 

BOWERS, C. A., Laborer; Algonquin. 

BOURK, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

BOHL, JOHN, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

BOHL, THEODORE, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

BOHARSHET, FRANK, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

BOWERS, A. L., Laborer ; Algonquin. 

BOLAN, CHARLES, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

BOHARSHET, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 24; Algonquin P. 0. 

BOORS, F., Laborer, Nunda. 

BRANNON, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 8, R. 9 ; Cary P. O. 

BRINK, H. J., Laborer, Algonquin. 

BRATZLER, CHARLES, Farmer, n. e. Sec. 36 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in 
Baden, Germany, 1828 ; came to America, 1851, and to this county, 1853 ; is School 
Director at the present time. Married Christina Deuchler, 1853; she was born in 
Germany, 1831 ; has six children, five boys and one girl. Republican ; Methodist. 

BRATZLER, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 31, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 
BRINK, ABRAM, Carpenter; Algonquin. 

BRINK, JOHN, County Surveyor, Justice of the Peace and Notary Public ; 
Crystal Lake; born in Ontario Co., N. Y., January 12, 1811 ; came to McHenry 
County in 1841 ; owns Lots 9 and 10 in Block 10, Crystal Lake; has been County 
Sheriff, also Assessor, 20 years. Married Kate A., daughter of Billings Throop, of 
Hartland, Windsor Co., Vt., March 5, 1840 ; had two children, girls ; one dead. 
Republican. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 133 

BROWN, S. R., SR., Farmer, Sec. 6, R. 9 ; Gary P. 0. 

BROWN, FRANK, Laborer; Ateonquin. 

BROWN, M., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

BROWN, S. R., JR., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Gary P. 0. 

BROWN, W. C., Laborer ; Algonquin. 

BUEHLER, JOSEPH, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

BUCK, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

BUCK, A., Retired ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

BUEHLER, JOHN, Shoemaker ; Crystal Lake. 

BUCK, SILAS, Mechanic and Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

BUCK, E., Farmer, Section 16 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

BUTLER, J. B. Farmer and Mechanic, Sec. 2 ; Nunda P. 0. 

BUTLER, WILLIAM. Retired Merchant; Nunda. 

BURKHOLTZ, JOHN, General Merchant ; Crystal Lake. 

BUTLER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Nunda P. 0. 

BERNARD, E. C., Lives with J. B. Butler, Section 2 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

BUSHNELL, R., Farmer, Sec. 19; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

CADWELL, B., SEN., Pensioner, Sec. 19; Crystal Lake. 

CADWELL, S. B., Lives with his father, Sec. 19 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

CADWELL, B., JR., Farmer, Sec. 19, Crystal Lake P. 0. 

CARPENTER, B., Farmer and Stock Raiser; Crystal Lake. 

CARY, DANIEL, Laborer ; Cary Station. 

CHAMPLIN, WILLIAM, Laborer ; Cary Station. 

CHANDLER, HENRY, Lives with his father, Sec. 34 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

CHANDLER, S., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

CHRISTINSON, S., Laborer ; Nunda. 

CHUNN, C. C., Druggist and Postmaster of Algonquin ; born in Union Co., Ind., 
1824 ; came to this county 1837 ; owns village Lots 4 and 9, Block 8, Algonquin, 
value of property $5,000 ; been Road Commissioner six years, School Trustee six 
years and School Director twelve years. Had two wives : first, E. A. Goodrich, 1858, 
five children ; second wife, C. M. Flanner, 1870, of De Kalb Co., Ind., four 
children. 

CHAPELL, S. S., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Crystal Lake P. O. 

CHURCH, L. M., Renter S. S. Gates, Sec. 8, R. 9 ; Cary P. 0. 

CHAPELL, E. C., Station Agent; Algonquin. 

CHAPELL, GEORGE, Merchant: Algonquin. 

CLAPSATTLE, J. E., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

CLOW, DAVID, Farmer and Steamboatman, Sec. 5 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

CLOW, J. M., Steamboat Mate ; Crystal Lake. 

CLOW, DELOS, Farmer, lives with father, Sec. 5 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

CLOW, FRED., Farmer, Sec. 5 . Crystal Lake P. 0. 

CONOVER, J. L., SEN., Farmer and Mechanic, Sec. 18 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

CLEARMAN, CHARLES, Laborer; Algonquin. 

COLLINS, C. J., Farmer, Sec. 7-, R. 9 ; Gary P. 0. ; born Jefferson Co., N. Y., 
1833 ; owns 40 acres of land, value $2,000 ; is School Director at present. Had 
two wives : first wife, Julia Coss, of Algonquin, formerly of New York ; second 
wife, Alice Corkin, of Cary, born 1850. 

COLLINS, SAMUEL, Laborer ; Cary Station. 
COLBOW, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Algonquin P. 0. 
CONOVER, J. L., JR. ; Laborer, Crystal Lake. 

CORL, H. D., Farmer, n. w. Sec. 33 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Schenectady Co., 
N. Y., 1814: came to this county 1848 ; owns 90 acres land, value $4,500. 



134 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

Married Mary Ann Schryver, of Manlius, N. Y., 1841 ; had seven children, four 
boys and three girls ; one boy served two years in Union Army, and died immedi- 
ately on his return home. 

CORKINS, PAT'K, Laborer ; Gary Station. 
COSS, WILLIAM, Laborer ; Carey Station. 
COX, C. C., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Cary P. 0. 
COX, F., Farmer, with father, Sec. 11 ; Cary P. 0. 

CRABTREE, E. K., Farmer, Sec. 7, R. 9; Cary P. 0. ; born in Alleghany Co., 
N. Y., 1837 ; came to this county 1840 ; owns 120 acres land, value $5, 400. Served 
three years in Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. Married Ella D. Heath, of Elgin, 111., 
1868 ; had one son. Republican ; Free Methodist. 

CRABTREE, GEORGE, Farmer, Sees. 7 and 5, R. 9 ; Cary Township. 

CRABTREE, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 7, R. 9 ; Cary P. 0. ; born in Alleghany 
Co., N. Y., 1823; came to this county 1840 ; owns 252 acres of land, value $11,500 ; 
been School Commissioner twelve years. Married Betsy Hubbard in 1848, who 
was born in Cattaraugus Co., N. Y. ; had two children, one boy and one girl ; son 
dead. Republican ; Free Thinker. 

CRABTREE, WILLIAM, Farmer, s. e. Sec. 6, Range 9 ; Cary P. 0. ; born 
in Alleghany Co., N. Y., 1827 ; came to this county 1840 ; owns 189 acres of land, 
value $45 per acre ; is School Trustee at present. Married Betsey Weaver, who 
was born in Oswego, N. Y., 1853 ; had six children, two boys and four girls, two 
girls dead. Republican ; Free Thinker. 

CRANEY, DAVID E.. Railroad Mechanic, Sec. 18, R. 9 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

CRABTREE, 0. S., Laborer ; Cary Station. 

CROWLEY, PATRICK, Laborer ; Cary Station. 

CROW, JAMES, Gardener, Sec. 6 ; Cary P. 0. 

CUSHMAX, J.. Laborer; Cary Station. 

DAGELMAN, A., Merchant ; Crystal Lake. 

DENNIS, D,, JR., Laborer ; Cary Station. 

DAILY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Cary P. 0. 

DIKE, GEORGE, Retired ; Crystal Lake. 

DAYH ARSH, HARLEY, Farmer, n. w. Sec. 13 ; Cary P. 0. ; born in Madi- 
son Co., N. Y., 1852 ; came to this county 1856 ; owns 104 acres of land, value 
$4,160. Married Nellie Hitchcock, of Algonquin, 1873; has one child. 

DERICKS,' HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 25; Algonquin P. O. 

DIKE, W. W., C. F. & C. E., Farmers, Sec. 17 ; Crystal Lake P. O. 

DILLY, J., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

DILLY, C. E., Farmer, with father, Sec. 3 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

DODD, AMBROSE, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

DODGE, J. L., Farmer, n. e. cor. Sec. 1 ; Cary P. 0. ; born in Boston, Mass., 
1851 ; came to this county 1867 ; owns 155 acres of land, value $50 per acre ; is 
School Director at present. Married Mary P. Snow, of Cambridge, Mass., 1871 ; 
has three children, two boys and one girl. Republican ; Spiritualist. 

DOLE, C. S., Farmer, Stock Raiser, Grain Dealer and Ice Dealer, Sees. 6 and 7 ; Crys- 
tal Lake P. 0. 

DODD, GEO. E., Farmer, Sec. 8, R. 9 ; Cary P. 0. 
DOLAN, JOHN, Laborer ; Algonquin. 
DOLAN, PHILIP, Laborer ; Cary Station. 
DONOVAN, JAMES, Laborer; Algonquin. 
DONOVAN, GEORGE, Laborer ; Cary Station. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 135 

DUNN, GEORGE, Laborer; Algonquin. 

DUNN, JOHN, Laborer ; Gary Station. 

DUENSING, FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

DUFFY, D. A., Sportsman; Crystal Lake. 

DYGERT, H. P., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

DUNN, DENNIS, Farmer and R. R. Employe, Sec. 13 ; Gary P. 0. 

EARLEY, G. W., Retired; Algonquin. 

EELLS, L. S., Farmer, Sec. 17,"R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

EHLERS, ADOLPH, R. R. Section Boss ; Cary Station. 

ENENSON, THOMAS, Shoemaker; Algonquin. 

ERICKSON, P., Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

ESTERGREN, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in 
Sweden, 1817 ; came to America 1841, and to this county 1844 ; owns 172 acres 
of land, value $8,600 ; is School Direc r or, and has been fifteen years ; is also Road 
Commissioner. Married Frederika Adolphina Grandahl in 1856, who is a native 
of Sweden ; has had three children, one boy and two girls. 

ESTERGREEN, I , Lives on S. S. Gates' farm, Sec. 15 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

EXTROM, PETER, Laborer, Crystal Lake. 

FITCH. W. B., Merchant ; Crystal Lake. 

FERGUSON, J. D., Sr., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

FERGUSON, J. D., Jr., Merchant ; Algonquin. 

FOLTZ, FREDERICK, Laborer; Algonquin. 

FOLTZ, FRANK, Mechanic; Algonquin. 

FOLTZ, HENRY, Laborer; Algonquin. 

FORN, FRANK, Laborer; Algonquin. 

FORBES, M., Mechanic; Crystal Lake. 

FORD, PARK J., Gardener ; Crystal Lake. 

FORD, V. N., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Algonquin P. O. ; born in Algonquin ; owns 73 
acres of land, value $5,800 ; has been Town Collector; was non-commissioned offi- 
cer of Co. I, Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf., three years. His mother, Mrs. Lucy B. 
Ford, widow, was born in Essex Co., Vt., and came to McHenry Co. 1841 ; had 
four children, three boys and one girl ; two boys served three years each in Union 
Army ; H. B. and V. N. Ford. H. B. Ford served 'in Co. H, Thirty-sixth 111. 

TT- I T P 

Vol. Inf. 

i?nTm TI w rt i tm vi, P *-i -r i t .MW ,WAHTWAfl) 

l^ORD, H. H., Blacksmith, L/rystal Lake. 

T?r\T>T\ TTT^l\JT>V T U n i 1 T 1 

FORD, HENRI, Laborer; Crystal Lake. 

T7r\T>r\ TTI A T? -A. i. o in iH'i-Ani'.d i'.-it."eu.l-ww iifl-N ,1 

FORD, E. A., Farmer, with mother, Sec. 29 ; Algonquin P. 0. 
FOSTER, S. F., Farmer, Sec. 19; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

PRARY, G. S., Farmer, e. ben. Sec. 14 ; Cary P. O. ; born in Cattaraugus Co., X. 
Y., 1829 ; came to county 1843 ; owns 360 acres of land, value, $14,400 ; is School 
Trustee at present. Married Elizabeth Crabtree, of Alleghany Co., N. Y., 1854 ; 
she was born 1832 ; has three children. girls. 

, O 

GATES, WILLIAM D., Son of S. S. Gates, of Crystal Lake ; was born in 
Ashland, Ohio, 1852; came to this county the same year, with his parents; his 
mother, Sylvia D. Gates, widow of S. S. Gates, daughter of Jabez Day, of Worces- 
ter Co., Mass. Married S. S. Gates Nov. 13, 1844 ; had five children, two boys and 
three girls ; one son, Sunnier E., served three years in Union army ; was captured 

1 1 T M 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 ' 

arid imprisoned in Libby three months, then carried to hospital. 

GENUNG, D., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Nunda P. 0. 
GIBBS, H. F., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
GEER, ERASTUS, Farmer, Sec. 9 : Crystal Lake P. 0- 



136 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

GEER, WILLIAM, Lightning Rod Peddler, Sec. 9 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
GEER, ROBERT, Lightning Rod Peddler, Sec. 9 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

GILLIL AN, MARGARET, s. e. Sec. 23 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Poca- 

hontas Co., Va., 1797 ; came to this county, 1834; owns 216 acres of land, value, 

$11,000; had nine children, three sons and six daughters; lost two sons and 

' three daughters. She is the widow of Samuel Gillilan, who died in 18 J7 ; they 

were the first settlers in Algonquin ; Methodist. 

GILLILAN, R., Farmer, Sec. 27; Algonquin P. 0. 
GILLILAN, QUINCEY, Laborer, with father ; Algonquin P. 0. 

GILLILAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Greenbrier 
Co., W. Va. ; caine to this county in 1835 ; was one of the first settlers of Algon- 
quin ; owns 800 acres of land, value, $32,000 ; has been Constable, Supervisor, 
Justice of the Peace, etc. Had two wives; first, Susan Crabtree, married in 1841 ; 
one child ; second, Belinda Clauson, of Cook Co., 111. ; married 1845 ; six children, 
four living. 

'GOODMAN, THOMAS, Blacksmith; Crystal Lake. 
GOODMAN, P., Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 
GOODMAN; JOSEPH, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 
GORAM, DAVID, Farmer of S. S. Gates, Sec. 4 ; Nunda, P. 0. 
GOODWIN, V. C., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Gary P. 0. 
GOODWIN, A., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Cary P. 0. 
GOLDERMAN, FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 25, on H. Plinka's farm ; Algonquin 

P. 0. 
GOODRICH, S., Farmer, with father, Sec. 29, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

GOODRICH, IRA C., Farmer, s. w. Sec. 20 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Chau- 
tauqua Co., N. Y., in 1821 ; came West to Cook Co., 1834 ; lived there four years; 
then came to Kane Co.; lived there six years; then to this county in 1843; 
been School Director twelve years and Road Master fifteen years. Married Miss 
D. J. West, of Elgin, 111., 1843, formerly of Madison Co., N. Y. ; had five children, 
three boys and two girls, one boy dead. Republican. 

GRANTHAN, J., Farmer ; Algonquin P. 0. 
GREEN, C. H., Farmer. Sec. 10 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

GRANTHAN, WM., Farmer, n. e. cor. Sec. 1 ; Cary P. 0. ; born in England, 
1833; came to America 1869, and to this county in 1871. Married Fannie Biel 
in 1854, who was born in England also ; she died August, 1876 ; has eleven children, 
six boys and five girls. Rep. ; Free Methodist. 

GREEN, DEFOREST, Farmer, with father, Sec. 10 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
GRIMES, FRANK, Farmer, Sec. 10; Nunda P. 0. 
GRIMES, RUSSELL, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Algonquin P. 0. 
GUDKA, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 19, R. 9; Algonquin P. 0. 
HAMILTON. HARVEY, Laborer; Algonquin. 
HAGAR, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 30, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 
HAMILTON, MINARD, lives with father, Sec. 14; Cary P. 0. 
HANDRACK, WILLIAM, House Carpenter ; Crystal Lake. 
HAMILTON, A., Blacksmith and Wagon Maker; Algonquin. 

HAMILTON, S. H., Farmer, s. e. Sec. 14 ; Cary P. 0. ; born in Montgomery 
Co., N. Y., 1814; came to this county in 1860; owns 260 acres of land, value 
810,400. Married Eliza McGinnis, of Fairfield, Vt., 1838, who was born 1816; 
had eight children, five boys and three girls ; one son, J. Hamilton, served as Cap- 
tain of Co. G, Fifty-second Reg. 111. Vol. Inf. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 137 

HARRIMAN, J., Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 
HARBACK, N. B., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
HARBACK, WM., DR., Physician; Algonquin. 
HARTQUIST, A. A., Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Algonquin P. 0. 
HARVEY, GEORGE, Miller; Algonquin. 

HARBACK, D. D., Farmer, s. e. Sec. 1 ; Cary P. 0. ; born in Herkimer Co., N. Y., 
1818; came to this county in 1842; owns 77 acres of land, valuation $3,850; 
been Road Commissioner two years and School Director two years. Married 
Mariah Haven, of Algonquin, in 1847, who was born in Wyoming Co., N. Y. ; had 
one child. Republican ; Free Methodist. 

HAYES, C. W., M. D., Physician and Surgeon ; Crystal Lake. 

HERRIMAN., F., Laborer ; Algonquin. 

HAY, S. C., REV., Minister Congregational Church ; Crystal Lake. 

HALBERTON, JAMES, Pump Maker ; Crystal Lake. 

HEAD, HARVEY, Laborer; Algonquin. 

HEIDEMAN, HENRY, Miller; Algonquin. 

HELM, JOHN, Merchant ; Algonquin. 

HILL, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 6, R. 9 ; Cary P. 0. 

HENK, HENRY. Farmer, s. w. Sec. 36; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Leuzerne, Ger- 
many, in 1835; came to America in 1854, and settled in Cook Co.; lived there five 
years and then came to this county, 1859 ; owns 130 acres of land, valued at $5,200. 
Married Caroline Haase, in 1863, who was born in Hanover, Germany ; has five 
children, two boys and three girls. 

HILBERT, JACOB, Farmer of L. D. Lowell, Sec. 7 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

HICKOK, S. R., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Cary P. 0. 

HICKOK, PRESTON, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

HILL, WILLIAM, General Merchant ; Crystal Lake. 

HICKOK, LUTHER, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

HOUGHTALING, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 18, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

HOUGHTALING, F., Laborer ; Algonquin. 

HOUGHTALING, JOSEPH, Laborer, with his father ; Algonquin. 

HOWELL, A. G., Farmer, Sec. 17, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

HUBBARD, H. B., Stock Dealer ; Algonquin. 

HUNTLEY, ALBERT, Farmer, Sec. 32, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

HUNTLEY, C., Farmer, Sec. 32, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

HUNTLEY, ALMA M., Mrs., Sec. 32, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; widow o f 
Stephen M. Huntley, who was born in Chenango Co., N. Y., who died January 27' 
1872 ; was daughter of Cornelius Carman, of Tompkins Co., N. Y. ; born in 1814 5 
came to this county in 1847 ; estate consists of 137 acres, valued at $6,850. Mar- 
ried in 1832 ; had eight children, seven boys and one girl. Had three boys in the 
Union army ; one son, David Huntley, was killed in the battle of Vicksburg; Wm. 
Huntley was shot through the neck in the battle of Corinth. 

HUNTLEY, M. S., Farmer, Sec. 32, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

HUNTER, ANDREW, Farmer of Mrs. Hill, Sec. 15 ; Cary P. 0. 

HUNTER, JOSEPH, Constable ; Crystal Lake. 

HUNTER, ALEX., Mechanic, Crystal Lake. 

INGERSOL, C. T., House Carpenter ; Crystal Lake. 

IRWIN, GEORGE, Mason ; Crystal Lake. 

JAYNE, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

JAYNE, G. D., Miller, Sec. 19, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0.; born in Lake Co., Ill, in 
1840 ; owns 27 acres of land and mill privilege ; value of property, $8,000 ; served one 



138 DIRECTORY OF McHEXRY COUNTY. 

year in the Fifty-second 111. Vol. Cav. Married Elizabeth A. Morey, of Algonquin, 
in 1862 ; had eight children, two boys and six girls ; one boy and two girls are dead. 
Democrat ; Free Thinker. 

JOHNSON, J. A., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Gary P. 0. 

JAYNE, E. S., Farmer, n. w. Sec. 29, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Steubeu 
Co., N. Y., in 1836 ; came to this county in 1864; owns 160 acres of land, valued 
at $7,200 ; has been seven years School Director. Married Hattie Houghtaling, of 
Ely, Lake Co., 111. ; has three children, two boys and one girl. Democrat ; Free 
Thinker. 

JACKMAN, R. D., Farmer, Sec. 8 Crystal Lake P. 0. 
JACK MAN, J. R., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
JONES, J. M., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

JOHNSTON, B. E., Farmer, s. e. Sec. 18, R. 9 ; Cary P. 0. ; born in Franklin Co., 
Penn., 1828 ; came to this County, 1843 ; owns 110 acres land ; value $60 per acre. 
His mother, Julia A. Johnston, lives with him. 

KAMMINE, CARL, Laborer; Crystal Lake. 

KENDREW, WILLIAM, Laborer ; Nunda. 

KEE, \V. L., Laborer; Algonquin. 

KEE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

KEE, ROBERT, Farmer of J. D. Ferguson, Sec. 33 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

KEE, W. M., Laborer; Algonquin. 

KEE, JAMES, Farmer, n. w. Sec. 32, Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Ireland, 1814; 
came to America 1831, and to this county, 1849 ; owns 214 acres land ; value $13,500 ; 
has been School Director several terms, is also at present. Married Rachel Morton, 
of N. Y. City, 1836 ; had twelve children, eight boys and four girls; two boys 
dead ; one boy served three years in Union Army. 

KEIZER, CHARLES, Cabinet Maker ; Crystal Lake. 

KEYES, A., Gardener ; Crystal Lake. 

KELLY, W. C., Farmer, Sec. 30, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

KELLY, JOSEPH, Laborer ; Algonquin. 

KELLY, ORLANDO, Laborer ; Algonquin. 

KELLY, FEILANDO, Laborer ; Algonquin. 

KERN, DAVID, Mechanic ; Algonquin. 

KETCHUM, F. E., Laborer ; Algonquin. 

KEYES, HENRY, Mechanic and Town Clerk ; Algonquin. 

KEYES, F. V., Laborer ; Algonquin. 

KING, ISAAC, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

KING, C., Farmer for S. S. Gates, Sec. 9 ; Crystal Lake, P. 0. 

KLINCK, J. S., Farmer ; Algonquin. 

KLINCK, J. F., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

KNOLL, C. D., Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

KNOX, WILLIAM, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

KOBS, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

KRAMPER, PETER, Farmer ; Algonquin. 

KRITCKA, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sea 17, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

KRUGEL, JOHN, Laborer ; Algonquin. 

KROPSKA, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 17, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

KRUSE, CHARLES, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

LADE, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Cary P. 0. 

LADE, SAMUEL, Laborer ; Algonquin. 

LAMPHUR, L., Blacksmith; Crystal Lake. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 139 

LANNING, G., Laborer; Crystal Lake. 

LANNING, CHAS. H., Blacksmith ; Crystal Lake. 

LEONARD, JOHN, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

LEONARD, THOMAS, Iceman for C. D. Dole ; Crystal Lake. 

LEONARD, J. W., Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

LINDSAY, HENRY, Laborer ; Gary Station. 

LOCKWOOD, J., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

LOCK WOOD, L., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Cary P. 0. 

LORD, C. F., Horse Dealer ; Crystal Lake. 

LONG, JOHN, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

LOWELL, L. D., M. D., Physician and Surgeon ; Crystal Lake. 

LUKASH, ALBERT, Farmer, Sec. 20, R. 9 ; Gary P. 0. 

LUND, J. H., Laborer ; Algonquin. 

LYE, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; -Crystal Lake P. 0. 

MAGEE, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 30, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

M AGEE, DAVID, Farmer ; Algonquin. 

MARSHALL, GEORGE, Miller ; Algonquin. 

MARLOW, J. W., Merchant; Crystal Lake. 

McCOLLUM, CHARLES, U. S. Mail Carrier ; Crystal Lake. 

McCLUNG, EDWARD, Laborer ; Algonquin. 

MCDONALDS, J., Laborer; Nunda. 

MCDONALDS, M., Laborer; Nunda. 

McGRAW. JOHN, Laborer ; Algonquin. 

McKAY, D. D., Laborer ; Algonquin. 

McKAY, THOMAS, Farmer of J. Pyatt, Sec. 28; Algonquin P. 0. 

McKEE, R. B., Farmer; Algonquin P. 0. 

McMANNAMAN, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 8, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

McNABB, J., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

McNITT, JAMES, Laborer; Algonquin. 

McNITT, VOL., Laborer; Algonquin. 

McNETT, LEVI, Farmer, n. e. Sec. 18 ; Cary, P. ; born in Oswego Co., N. 
Y., in 1832 ; owns 208 acres of land, valued at $7,500 ; came to this county in 
1849. Married Sarah Jane Wavvison in 1854, who was born in Caledonia Co., Vt., 
in 1836 ; had six children, three boys and three girls ; one girl dead. Republican ; 
Free Methodist. 

McNITT, CHARLES, Laborer ; Gary Station. 

MILLER, REV. Minister of Free Methodist Church; Crystal Lake. 

MILLER, J. F., Lives with E. H. Benson; Algonquin. 

MILLER, AUGUST, Laborer ; Cary Station. 

MILLER, WILLIAM, Wagon and Carriage Maker ; Crystal Lake. 

MINARD, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 23; Algonquin P. 0. 

MITCHELL, W. W., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

MINARD, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

MORLEY, BENJAMIN, Laborer;. Algonquin. 

MITCHEL, DAVID, Farmer and breeder of blooded stock. Sec. 33 ; Algonquin 
P. 0. ; born Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1832; came to America in 1851, and to this 
county in 1855. Owns 278 acres of land, value $14,000. Married Jane Barr, of 
Ayrshire, Scotland, in 1851 ; she was born in 1829 ; had five children, one boy and 
four girls. 

MIXBOWER, FRANK, Farmer, Sec. 24; Algonquin P. 0. 

MORTON, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Algonquin P. O. 

MORTON, EDWARD, SR.. Farmef, Sec. 32 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

MORTON, EDWARD, JR., Farmer, with his father, Sec. 32 ; Algonquin P. 0. 



140 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

MORTON, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

MORTON, C. W., Laborer; Algonquin. 

MORRISON, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 17, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

MORRISON, FRANK, Laborer ; Gary Station. 

MORRIS, T. L., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Nunda P. 0. 

MORRIS, W. P., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Nunda P. 0. 

MUNSHAW, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

MUNSHAW, WILLIAM. Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

NASH, SETH, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

NASON, WM. A., M. D., Physician ; Algonquin ; born in Hallowell, Maine, 
June 21, 1842; came to this county in 1868; owns lot on which he resides; 
was Acting Assistant Surgeon in Virginia, serving at the Gordonsville Hospital, and 
also at Yorktown ; Dr. Nason has one of the finest collections of natural history in 
Northern Illinois. Married Miss Anna Goodson, of Algonquin, June 29, 1874; 
she was born in Dundee Township. 

OGBIN, W. H., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

OGBIN, THOMAS, lives with father, Sec. 22 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

O'NEIL, OWEN, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

PADDOCK, R., SR., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

PADDOCK, R., JR., Laborer, Sec. 5 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

PADDOCK, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 7, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

PADDOCK, T. H., Laborer ; Gary Station. 

PADDOCK, R. A., Farmer, with father, Sec. 7, R. 9 ; Gary P. 0. 

PADDOCK, C. A., Laborer; Algonquin. 

PADDOCK, C. E., Farmer, n. w. Sec. 7, R. 9 ; Gary P. 0. ; born Monroe Co., 
N. Y., 1822 ; came to this county 1843 ; owns 133 acres of land, value $6,000 ; 
been Road Commissioner twelve years. Married Elvira Humphrey, of Tioga Co., 
N. Y., in 1847 ; born 1827 ; had thirteen children, six boys and seven girls; lost 
three boys and two girls. Independent ; Disciple. 

PARKHURST, A., Laborer; Algonquin. 

PARSONS, L. M., School Teacher ; Cary Station. 

PARSONS, P. E., Farmer, Sec. 8, R. 9 ; Cary P. 0. 

PARSONS, W. M., Laborer; Cary Station. 

PATCH, W. H., Painter ; Crystal Lake. 

PATTERSON, DAVID and JAMES, Farmers for H. Lye, Sec. 4 ; Crystal Lake 

P.O. 

PATTERSON, JAMES, Laborer; Algonquin. 
MURPHY, J. J., Station Agent ; Cary. 

PEACOCK, GEO. M., Miller; Algonquin; born in Cook Co., 111., 1848; 
came to this county in 1869 ; owns the Mill, Lot and Water Privilege. 

PEASE, EPHRAIM, Farmer, Sec. 5 , Crystal Lake P. 0. 
PECK, E., Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 
PEELER, GEORGE, SR., Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 
PEELER, GEORGE, JR., Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 
PERRY, F. A., Farmer, Sec. 32; Algonquin P. 0. 

PERKINS, A. J., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. ; born in Livingston 
Co., N. Y., 1830 ; came to McHenry Co., 1853 ; lived in the county 
twenty-three years. Married Julia Buok, of Chemung, N. Y., who died in 1874; 
married Martha Wallace, of Hampshire Co., Mass., 1875 ; had nine children by 
first wife Ellen, Alice, Efiie, Charles, Frank, Lawrence, Fannie, Willie and 
Feloy ; Martha Wallace had two, Willie and Helen Wallace. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 141 



PETERS, JOHN, Hardware Merchant ; Algonquin. 
PETTIBONE, J. T., Farmer. Sec. 10 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
PETTIBONE, GEORGE, Farmer, with father, Sec. 10 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
PETTIBONE, C. E., Farmer, Section 4 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
PINGRY, CHARLES, Laborer; Nunda. 

PPLAWM, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Baden, Ger- 
many, 1839 ; came to America in 1865, and to this county the same year ; owns 
72 acres of land, value $45 per acre. Married Elizabeth Frye, 1868, who was born 
in Germany also ; had six children, three boys and three girls. Republican ; 
Methodist. 

PHILLIPS, HOWARD, Works father's farm, Sec. 27 ; Algonquin P. 0. 
PHILP, JAMES, Money Lender, Real Estate Dealer; Algonquin. 

PHILLIPS, ROBERT, Farmer, s. e. Sec. 27 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Bucks 
Co., Penn., June 1, 1797; came to this county in 1848 ; owns 150 acres of land, 
value $9,000 ; has been School Director three years. Married Naomi Garrison, of 
Hunterdon Co., N. J., 1831, who was born 1806; had six children, three boys and 
three girls, one girl dead. Republican ; Spiritualist. 

PHILLIPS, WILLET, Farmer, s. e. Sec. 27 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Bucks 
Co., Penn., 1834 ; came to this county 1848. Married Melinda Balch, of Genesee 
Co., N. Y., 1861, who was born 1835; had four children two girls and two boys; 
living, Nettie E. and Fred E. Phillips; one girl and one boy dead. Republican; 
Spiritualist. 

PINNEY, JOHN, Laborer; Algonquin. 

PIATT, GEORGE, Blacksmith ; Crystal Lake. 

PLONER, JOHN, Laborer ; Algonquin. 

PORTER, H. L., Painter; Crystal Lake. 

POMEROY, E. Q., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

POWELL, J. N., Butcher; Crystal Lake. 

POWERS, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 18, R. 9 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

PRICE, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

PRICE, SAMUEL, JR., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

RASMESSER, R., Laborer; Algonquin. 

RATHBURN, W. S., Mechanic ; Crystal Lake. 

RAPE, MICHAEL, Laborer; Crystal Lake. 

RATTRAY, WILLIAM, Farmer, s. e. Sec. 33 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in 
Perthshire, Scotland, 1828 ; came to America 1865 and to this county the same 
year ; owns 68 acres of land, value, $3,400. Married Mary Ann Roberts, of For- 
farshire, Scotland, 1872 ; has two children boys. Mrs. Rattray was born 1836. 

REED, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
REED, E., Farmer, with father, Sec. 18 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
RICHARDS, FREDERICK, Miller, Sec. 28 ; Algonquin P. 0. 
RITT, CARL, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 
RIM, L. C., DR., Dentist; Crystal Lake. 
RINEHART, J., Laborer and Thresher ; Crystal Lake. 

ROBINSON, JAMES B., Mechanic ; Crystal Lake ; born in Rutland Co., Vt., 
1836; came to this county 1845 ; was Lieutenant in One Hundred and Forty-first 
Rea;. 111. Vol. Inf. Married Miss Julia E. Reed, daughter of Simeon Reed, of 
Pawlet, Vt., October 29, 1868. 

ROSE, J., Laborer; Crystal Lake. 

ROSE, HERMAN, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 



142 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

i 

ROSENTHAL, HENRY, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

ROSENTHAL, FREDERICK. Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

ROSENCRANTZ, A., Farmer for B. Hill, Sec. 14 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

SALAWAY, JAMES, Butcher ; Algonquin. 

SCHROEDER, CHARLES, Farmer for Mrs. Allen, Sec. 23; Algonquin P. 0. 

SALISBURY. J. W.. Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

SAN FORD, E. B., Mason; Crystal .Lake. 

SCHMiDT, J. G., Mechanic; Cary Station. 

SCHMIDT, S. F., Laborer; Cary Station. 

SCHMIDT, G., Mechanic; Cary Station. 

SEEBER, S., Laborer; Algonquin. 

SEARS, J. L., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

SEEBERT, S. G., Farmer, Sec. 13; Cary P. 0. 

SEEBERT, LEYI, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Cary Station P. 0. 

SEYMOUR, E., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

SEYMOUR, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

SHERWOOD, R. R., Retired ; Algonquin. 

SHALES, J., Laborer; Algonquin. 

SHELLY, FRANK, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

SHALES, JACOB, Shoemaker ; Nunda. 

SHEPARD, H. B., Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Cary Station P. 0. 

SHERWOOD, J. A., Farmer and Auctioneer, Sec. 30 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

SHEPARD, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

SHIELDS, WILLIAM, Laborer; Nunda. 

SHUFELDT, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Algonquin P. 0. 

SIMONS, A. J., Mason ; Crystal Lake. 

SMITH, S. J., Retired ; Cary Station. 

SIPE, LEWIS, Laborer ; Algonquin. 

SMITH, ALICE B., Mrs., Sec. 15 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Orange Co., N. 
Y., 1820 ; came to Illinois in 1848, and to this county in 1871 ; owns 80 acres of 
land; value of property, $6,000 ; widow of J. T. Smith, who died in 1857. Mrs. 
S. is a Unitarian. 

SMITH, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Algonquin P. 0. 
SMITH, CHAS. W., Painter ; Crystal Lake. 
SMITH, CHARLES, Laborer; Nunda. 
SMITH, ANDY, Laborer; Crystal Lake. 

SMITH, L. P., Farmer, n. w. Sec. 13 ; Cary P. 0. ; born in Cattaraugus Co., N. 
Y., in 1840; came to this county in 1842; owns 250 acres of land, value $10,- 
000. Married Miss Elizabeth Buck, of Algonquin Township, who was born in 
Chemung Co., N. Y. ; had four children ; two boys and two girls. Republican. 
S. J. Smith, his father, lives with. him ; born in 1816. 

SNOOK, J., Butcher; Algonquin. 
SORN, JOHN, Laborer ; Algonquin. 
SPARAWK, B. K., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Nunda P. 0. 
SPRAGUE, EDWARD, Thresher ; Cary Station. 
SPRAGUE, HENRY, Laborer ; Cary Station. 
STEWART, D., Laborer; Algonquin. 
STIEN, ANDREW, Shoemaker ; Crystal Lake. 
STEPHENS, J. M., Laborer ; Algonquin. 
STEWART, A., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Algonquin P. 0. 
STOTT, LEWIS, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
STRANUK, JOHN, Laborer ; Cary Station. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 143 

SUCHY, PRANK, Farmer, s. e. Sec. 25 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Bohemia, 
in 1823; came to America in 1852, and to this county the same year; owns 116 
acres of land ; value, $45 per acre. Married Katy Puiner in 1848, who was born 
in Bohemia ; had nine children, two boys and seven girls ; one boy and a girl dead. 
Republican. 

SUCHY, ALBERT, Farmer, n. w. Sec. 30 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Bohemia 
in 1823; came to America in 1853, and settled in Chicago; lived there six years, 
then came to this county ia 1859; owns 106 acres of land; value, $45 per acre. 
Married Ann Adamek in 1856 ; she was born in Bohemia in 1838 ; had five boys 
and five girls. Republican. 

SUND, CARL, Mechanic ; Nunda. 
SWEET, CHARLES, Laborer ; Algonquin. 

THOMAS, LA P., Farmer, n. e. Sec. 13 ; Cary P. 0. ; born in Genesee Co., N. 
Y., in 1823; came to this county in 1839; owns 400 acres of land; value, $10,- 
000 ; been Road Commissioner four years. Married Arvilla French, of Steuben 
Co., N. Y., in 1846, who was born in .1826 ; had five children, three boys and two 
girls ; one girl dead. Spiritualist. 

THOMPSON, E., Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

THOMPSON, A., Farmer, Sec. 8 : Crystal Lake P. 0. 

THOMPSON, G. W., Farmer, Renter of F. Cox's, Sec. 9 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

THOMPSON, FRED'K, Laborer, with father, Sec. 9 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

TIFFANY, P., Laborer; Crystal Lake. 

TOPEL, HENRY, Mechanic ; Crystal Lake. 

TOMISKY, P., Merchant; Algonquin ; born in Bohemia in 1841 ; came to Amer- 
ica in 1854; owns village Lot No. 1, Block 9. Married Kathrine Dvorak, a native 
of Bohemia, in 1863 ; she was born in 1843 : -had six children, three boys and three 
girls. Born Annie, 1864 ; John, 1867 ; Joseph, 1869 ; Mary, 1870 ; Nettie, 
1873 ; Frank, 1874. 

TRASNUK, FRANK, Laborer; Algonquin. 
TUBES, HENRY, Mechanic ; Algonquin. 
TUBES, ALBERT, Laborer; Algonquin. 
VANALLEN, A., Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 
VOLGER, HENRY, Laborer; Algonquin. 

WANDERVACEK, JOSEPH, Harness Maker ; Algonquin ; born in Bohemia, 
1830 ; came to America 1855, and to this county 1865 ; owns village lot. Married 
Mary Dvorak, 1852 ; she was born in Bohemia, 1829 ; had four children, two boys 
and two girls. 

WALARS, PETER, Laborer; Algonquin. 

WHITE, JOHN E., Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 

WALLACE, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Nunda P. 0. 

WATSON, JAMES, Farmer (renter of W! H. Ruggles), Sec. 11 ; Nunda P. 0. 

WEAVER, A. L., Farmer, n. e. Sec. 13; Cary P. 0. ; born in Jefferson Co., N. Y., 
1834; came to this county 1847 ; owns 184 acres of land, value $9,200 ; has been 
Road Commissioner, Constable, etc. Married Lucy R. Coss, 1860, born 1836 ; has 
five children, three boys and two girls. Republican. 

WEAVER, DAVID, Hotel Keeper; Algonquin. 

WEST, M. S. M., Farmer, n. e. Sec. 12, R. 8 ; Cary P. 0. ; born in Genesee-Co., 
N. Y., 1827 ; came to this county 1850 ; owns 80 acres of land, value $5,000. 
Married Debora D. Crabtree, of Algonquin, who was born in Alleghany Co., N. Y., 
1832; had two children, girls. Republican; Free Methodist. 



144 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



WILBER. SILAS, Lives with son, J. H. Wilber ; Crystal Lake. 

WEWERKA, PRANK, Farmer, n. w. Sec. 7 ; Cary P. 0. ; born at Prague, 
Bohemia, 1842 ; came to America 1860, and to this county 1874. Married Ellen 
Robinson, of Louisville, Ky., 1864, who was born 1847 ; had four children, two 
boys and two girls. Republican; Catholic. 

WHITE, J. M., Farmer, Sec. 16; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
WHITE, CHARLES, Laborer ; Crystal Lake. 
WHITTAKER, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Crystal Lake P. Q. 
WILBER, J. H., Harness Maker ; Crystal Lake. 

WIENKE, JOSEPH, Farmer, n. w. Sec. 25 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Ger- 
many, 1831 ; came to America 1861 and settled in Cook Co. ; came to this county 
1864 ; owns 200 acres of land, value $9,000 ; has been School Director six years, 
and is at present. Married Mary Giester in 1858, who was born in Germany 1829 ; 
has two children, one boy and one girl ; lost two children. Republican ; Lutheran. 

WILLIAMS, E. D., Butcher, Crystal Lake. 
WILLIAMS, C. E., Butcher; Algonquin. 
WILSON, J. B., Vinegar Mfr. ; Nunda. 
WRANCK, MICHAEL, Laborer; Algonquin. 



ALGONQUIN BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



ALGONQUIN RIVER MILLS 

Guarantee the Best Work in County, and all 

Work Done Promptly. 
G. M. PEACOCK, PROPRIETOR. 



F. TOMISKY, 

General Merchandise, Dry Goois, Groceries, 

HATS, CAPS, BOOTS AND SHOES, 

And Everything usually found in a Country Store. Our 

Stock is always Complete. 



C. C. CHUNN, 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery and Fancy Articles, 

Patent Medicines, Pure Wines and Liquors for Medicinal 

Purposes, and all articles usually kept hy Druggist. 
Physicians' Prescrip'ns carefully compounded at all hours. 



W. A. MASON, M. D., 



C. D. JAYNE, 

I L L IE IR,, 

Section 19, Range 9, 
ALGONQUIN P. O. 



JOSEPH WANDERVACEK, 

Harness IVtaker, 

Makes all kinds of Single, Double, Light and Heavy, and 

all kinds of work belonging to the trade. 
All Work Warranted. 



CRYSTAL LAKE HOUSE, 

T. H. ASHTON, Proprietor, 
CRYSTAL LAKE. 



JOSEPH ADAMEK, 

Carriage Manufacturer, 



JAMES NISH, 

GENERAL MERCHANT, 

CARY STATION. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 145 



ALGONQUIN BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

BENTLEY, B. B., Physician. 

CHAPELL & FERGUSON, General Merchants. 

ENENSON, THOMAS, Shoemaker. 

HARBACK, WILLIAM, Physician. 

HELM, JOHN & PETER, General Merchants. 

HAMILTON, A., Blacksmith and Wagon Maker. 

HARVEY & MARSHALL, Millers. 

SNOOK, J., Butcher. 

WEAVER, DAVID, Hotel Keeper. 

WILLIAMS, C. E, Butcher. 



CRYSTAL LAKE BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

BUCKHOLTZ & DAGELMANN, General Merchants. 

BUEHLER, JOHN, Shoemaker. 

DOLE, C. S., Ice and Grain Dealer. 

FITCH & MARLOW, General Merchants. 

FORD, H. H., Blacksmith. 

HAYES, C. W., M. D., Physician and Surgeon. 

HILL, WILLIAM, General Merchant. 

KEIZER, CHARLES, Cabinet Maker. 

LANNING & PRATT, Blacksmith. 

LOWELL, L. D., M. D., Physician and Surgeon. 

MILLER, WILLIAM, Wagon and Carriage Maker. 

STEIN, ANDREW, Shoemaker. 

WILBER, J. H., Harness Maker. . 

WILLIAMS, E. D., Meat Market. 



146 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



ALDEN TOWNSHIP. 

ANDREWS, GEORGE B., General Merchant ; Alden ; born in New Wind- 
sor, Orange Co., N. Y., April 8, 1832 ; came to McHeury County, June 7, 1859 ; 
value of property, $7,000 ; has been Postmaster sixteen years, Justice of the Peace 
four years and Town Collector one year. Married Julia A. Avery, of Ravenna,0hio , 
June 7, 1860 ; she was born September 7, 1838. 

ANDREWS, C. R., Clerk for G. B. Andrews ; Alden. 
AUSTIN, E. N., Carpenter and Joiner, Sec. 15 ; Alden P. 0. 
BATES, GRANVILLE, Farmer, Sec. 13 : Alden P. 0. 
BARNES, T. H., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Big Foot P. O. 
BENNETT, L. A., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Alden P. 0. 
BELLOWS, SIMEON, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Big Foot P. 0. 
BOMBARD, ALFRED, Farmer, Sec, 9 ; Alden P. 0. 

BOMBARD, ALFRED, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Alden P. 0. ; born in Vermont, 
August 30, 1834 ; came to McHenry County about 1854 or 1855 ; owns 152 acres 
of land, valued at $40 per acre ; has been and is School Director. Married Sarah 
A. Drew, of Steuben Co., N. Y., December 18, 1862; she was born August 25, 
1836 ; has three children, two sons and a daughter. Members of the M. E. Church 
of Alden. 

BOMBARD, MOSES, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Big Foot P. 0. 
BORDWELL, FRANKLIN, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Alden P. 0. 
BORDWELL, D., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Big Foot P. 0. 
BORDWELL, L. J., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Alden P. 0. 

BORDWELL, D., Farmer. Sec. 5 ; Big Foot P. 0. ; born in Alden, Erie Co., N. 
Y., January 15, 1826 ; came to McHenry County about 1844; owns 365 acres of 
land, valued at $35 per acre ; has been School Director several years. Married Jane 
Burns, of Yates Co., N. Y., November 13, 1849 ; she was born August 12, 1823 ; 
had six children, four boys and two girls four sonsand one daughter living. Mem- 
bers of the M. E. Church. 

BOTTLEMY, FREDERICK, Renter of G. McQuade, Sec. 9 ; Alden P. 0. 

BOTLEMY, FRED., Farmer, (Renter on G. McQuade's farm, Sec. 9) ; Alden 
P, 0. ; born in Walworth Co., Wis., December 31, 1846 ; came to McHenry County 
in 1870; value of property, $700. Married Augusta Behling, of Pommern, Ger- 
many, December 21, 1869 ; she was born September 29, 1854 ; has one daughter. 

BRANDON, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Alden P. 0. 
BRINES, EMELINE, MRS., Widow of Joseph Brines ; Alden. 
BROWN, E., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Big Foot P'. 0. 
BROWN, A. M., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Alden P. 0. 

BROWN, ALONZO, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Alden P. 0. ; born in Chemung Town- 
ship, McHenry Co., Ill, April 9, 1848; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $35 per 
acre. Married Justina Barnes, of Long Island, January 31st, 1868 ; she was born 
February 9, 1846 ; had three children, boys, two living. 

CAMPBELL, ELIAS, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Alden P. 0. 
CLARK, N. H., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. 
CASH, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Harvard P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 147 

CARBARY, JOHN H., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Alden P. 0. ; born in Jersey City, 
N. J., July 25, 1848; came to McHenry County in 1863; owns 20 acres of land, 
valued at $25 per acre. Married Margaret E. LaBrec, of Alden Township, McHenry 
Co., 111., November 12, 1873 ; she was born July 3, 1853 ; has two sons, both living. 
Members of the Catholic Church. 

CASH, ROBERT, Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 30 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Bel- 
fast, Ireland, July 12, 1815 ; came to the United States in 1826, and to McHenry 
County in 1845 ; owns 220 acres, of land, valued at $35 per acre. Married Phebe 
Robins, of Brown. Schoharie Co., N. Y., September 14, 1847 ; she was born June 
8, 1818 ; had five children, boys, all living. Mrs. Cash is a member of the Seventh 
Day Adventists. 

CLARK, FRANCIS, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Harvard P. 0. 
CLAWSON, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Alden P. 0. 

CLARK, N. H., Farmer. Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Alden Township, Mc- 
Henry County, June 8, 1842; owns an undivided interest in 100 acres of land, 
valued at $30 per acre. Married Martha Holister, of Walworth Township, Walworth 
Co., Wis., July 4, 1871 ; she was born May 20, 1853 ; had two children, one son 
and one daughter, both living. 

CLARK, FRANCIS, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Fermanagh, 
Ireland, February 12, 1808 ; came to United States in 1831, and to McHenry 
County in 1855 ; owns 300 acres of land ; value $33 per acre. Married Catherine 
Nolan, of Fermanagh, Ireland, July 15, 1830 ; she was born May 8, 1806 ; had 
seven children, five sons and two daughters ; five sons and one daughter living. 
Catholics. 

CLAWSON, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Alden P. 0. ; born in Indiana, De- 
cember 29, 1826 ; came to McHenry Co., January, 1870 ; owns 14 acres of land, 
value $35 per acre. Married Amanda Helm, of Cayuga Co., N. Y., September 29, 
1868 ; she was born September 17, 1839 ; has four children, two sons and two 
daughters, all living. 

CLENDENING, J. M., Minister of M. E. Church of Alden and Big Foot; Par- 
sonage, Sec. 7 ; Big Foot P. 0, ; born in Henry Co., 111., April 27, 1840 ; came to 
McHenry County, October, 1875 ; was Chaplain of Ninety-sixth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf., 
for eight months ; resigned on account of ill health, but afterward was appointed 
Second Lieutenaut Co. F, Fifteenth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf., and promoted to Captain. 
Married Olive A. Wells, of Jo Daviess Co., 111., August 28, 1861 ; she was born 
January 21, 1840 ; had five children, one son and four daughters ; one son and 
three daughters living ; his father, J. M. Clendening, is now with him ; is 74 
years old. 

COLLINS, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. 
COLLINS, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harvard P. 0. 
CONKLIN, W. H., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Alden P. 0. 
COPELAND, H. W., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Alden P. 0. 
CORNUE, D. A., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Alden P. 0. 

CORNUE, DANIEL A., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 2 ; Alden P. 0. ; born 
in Montgomery Co., N. Y., November 18, 1819 ; came to McHenry Co.. spring of 
1847 ; owns 285 acres of land, value $45 per acre ; has been School Director for 
several years. Married Sarah J. Olmstead, of Avoca, Steuben Co., N. Y., January 
12, 1848 ; she was born November 20, 1827 ; had five children, 'three sons and two 
daughters, all living. Members of Presbyterian Church of Lynn and Hebron. 

CRANE, NATHANIEL, Farmer, and Minister of M. E. Church, Sec. 20; 
Harvard P. 0. ; born in Scipio, Cayuaga Co., N. Y., February 25, 1811 ; came to 



148 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

McHenry County, May, 1855 ; owns 67 acres of land, value $2,500 ; has been 
School Director for several years ; had two sons in the Union Army ; one son, A. 
E. Crane, who contracted a disease while in defense of his country, from which he 
died in 1874. Married Julia A. Ely, of Owego, Tioga Co., N. Y., May 30, 1831 ; 
she was born July 24, 1813 ; had nine children, six sons and three daughters ; two 
sons dead. Methodists. Mr. Crane has been a member of the Official Board of 
the M. E. Church for 40 years. 

CRANE, NATHANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Harvard P. 0. 

CUTTER, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 15, Alden P. 0. ; born in Groton, Tomp- 
kins Co., N. Y., March 17, 1826 ; came to McHenry County, 1856 ; owns 180 
acres of land, value $7,200 ; has been Town Clerk three years, Town Treasurer 
three years, and Assessor four years ; was Second Lieutenant Co. C, Ninety-fifth 
Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. Married Mrs. Helen Cutter, of Alden, McHenry County, 111., 
December 21, 1867 ; no children. 

DAVIS, C. P., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. 
DAY, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Alden P. 0. 

DAVIS, C. P., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in New 
Haven, Oswego Co., N. Y., September 9, 1824 ; came to McHenry County, April 
1867 ; owns 80 acres of land; value $50 per acre. Married Martha P. Ackerman, 
of Pillar Point, Jefferson County, N. Y., February 5, 1855 ; she was born April 2, 
1829 ; had four children, one by his first wife ; three by second marriage, three 
living ; two daughters and one son. 

DISBROW, LUCAS, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Alden P. 0. 
D1SBROW, ORRIN, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Alden P. 0. 
DISBROW, LEVI, Farmer, Sec. 14; Alden P. 0. 
DISBROW, SIDNEY, Farmer, Sec. 14; Alden P. 0. 
DISBROW, NATHAN, Retired; Sec. 14; Alden P. 0. 
DOLING, PAT., Renter of J. McElroy, Sec. 33 ; Harvard P. 0. 
DOMINY, HANNAH, MRS., Widow of N., Sec. 14; P. 0. 

DURKEE, OEL B., Farmer, Sec. 36; Alden P.O.; born in Pittsfield, Rutland Co., 
Vt., June 6, 1808; came to McHenry Co., 1846; owns 40 acres of land, value 
$1,600. Married Harriet Baird, of Rutland Co., Vt., 1835, who died 1843 ; had 
two children. Married Catherine Begun (second wife) of Ohio, April, 1843 ; had 
two children, all living. 

DURKEE, G. F., Farmer, Sec. 36; Alden P. 0. 
DUTTON, J. R., Farmer, Sec. 23; Alden P. O. 

DUVALL, JOHN, Farmer (Renter on V. La 1 Brec estate, Sec. 4) ; Alden P. 0. ; 
born in Quebec, Canada, July 6, 1834 ; came to MeHenry Co., 1855 ; value of 
property $500. Married Roselle La Brec, of Long Island, June, 1856 ; she was 
born September, 1844 ; has eight children, all living. 

DYER, WM. L., Farmer, Sec. 16; Alden P. 0. 
DYER, N. C., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Alden P. 0. 
EARLE, G. A., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Alden P. 0. 

EARL, GEORGE, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 11 ; Hebron P. 0. ; born in 
Kent, England, July 4, 1825 ; came to the United States in 1850, and to McHenry 
Co. the same year; owns 160 acres of land, value $35 per acre; has been School 
Director for several years. Married Emma Dawn, of Kent, England, April 22, 1850 ; 
she was born November 26, 1822 ; had three children, one daughter and two sons ; 
one daughter and one son living. The family are members of the M. E. Church, of 
Aldeu. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 149 

EASTON, BENJAMIN, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Aldeu P. 0. 

EVANS, HANNAH, Mrs., Widow of Stephen Evans, who died July 9, 1872; 
residence Section 8 ; Alden P. 0. Mrs. Evans was born in Palmyra, Mass., about 
April 14, 1791 ; owns 80 acres of land, value $30 per acre. Had nine children, 
seven sous and two daughters, all dead. She is a member of the Baptist Church of 
Big Foot. 

FAY, LUCINDA, MRS., Widow of J. Fay, Sec. 20; Alden P. 0. 

FENTON, WILLIAM, Farmer, Section 34 ; Alden P. 0. 

FERRIS, SYLVANUS, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Alden P. 0. 

FINK, LEWIS. Farmer, Sec 23 ; Alden P. 0. ' 

FINK, JOHN, Laborer ; Alden. 

FINK, PETER, Retired, Sec. 16 ; Alden P. 0. 

FINK, MARTIN, Works farm for W. H. Rector, Sec. 16; Alden P. 0. 

FINK, HALSEY, Renter of James O'Brien, Sec. 14; Alden P. 0. 

FINK, MARCUS, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Alden P. 0. 

FINK, JOHNSON, Renter of T. D. Hale, Sec. 27 ; Alden P. 0. 

FOOTE, J. C., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Alden P. O. 

FREDINBURG, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Alden P. 0. 

FREEMAN, NANCY J., Mrs., Widow of W. R. Freeman, who died March 
26, 1871, residence Sec. 21 ; Alden P. 0. She was born in Greene Co., N. Y., 
October 25, 1838 ; value of property $2,000. Had seven children, five sons and two 
daughters ; two sons and two daughters living. 

GAFFNEY, OWEN, Renter of J. Madden, Sec. 36 ; Alden P. 0. 

GATES, J. E., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Alden P. 0. 

GILBERT, E., Works for J. D. Knickerbocker, Sec. 3 ; Alden P. 0. 

GLASS, ELIAS, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Alden P. 0. 

GLEASON, R. D., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Alden P. 0. 

GLEASON, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Alden P. 0. 

GROESBECK, W. H., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sees. 2 and 3 ; Alden P. O. 
Born in Schaghticoke Tp., N. Y., July 31, 1830 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1860 ; owns 
230 acres of land, value $40 per acre ; was Supervisor two terms. Married Josephine 
Udell (second wife), of Alden, December 27, 1860 ; she was born February 22, 1839, 
has three children, daughters, all living. Mrs. Groesbeck is a member of the Pres- 
byterian Church, of Hebron. 

GROESBECK, V. K., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Alden P. 0. 

GROESBECK, V. K., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 1 ; Hebron P. 0. ; born in 
Rome, Oneida Co., N. Y., April 26, 1843 ; came to McHenry Co. October, 1869 ; 
owns 140 acres of land, value $35 per acre ; was private Co. C, Ninety-fifth Regt. 
111. Vol. Inf., three years. Married Ruth S. Sperry, of Hebron Tp., McHenry Co., 
111., October 3, 1865 ; she was born July 20, 1844 ; had four children, two sons and 
two daughters ; one son and two daughters living. 

HARRIS, ISAAC, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Alden P. 0. 
HAWKINS, J. B. & S. S., Farmers, Sec. 6 ; Big Foot P. 0. 
HOLLAND, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Alden P. 0. 

JEROME, N. C., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Mil- 
ton, Franklin Co., Vt., April 8, 1830 ; came to McHenry Co. in the spring of 1836; 
owns 140 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; was School Director several years. 
Married Harriet E. Blodget. of Concord, Erie Co., N. Y., December 25, 1852; she 
was born Nov. 14, 1833; had four children, one son and two daughters living. 

JILES, CORNELIUS, MRS., widow of C. N. Jiles, Alden. 



150 DIRECTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY. 

JOHNSON, D. B., Fanner, Sec. 15 ; Alden P. 0. ; born in North Harpersfield, 
Delaware Co.. N. Y., Jan. 14, 1827 ; came to McHenry Co. April, 1874; owns 20 
acres of land ; was in the engineer corps during the rebellion ; enlisted in Co. A, 
First Regt, N. Y. Vol. Inf. Married Mary A. Abby, of East Bloomfield, Ontario 
Co., N. Y., September 28, 1852 ; she was born November 30, 1831 ; has one child 
a daughter. , 

KEATING, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Harvard P. 0. 

KEATING, THOMAS, SR., Farmer, Sec. 28. ; Harvard P. 0. 

KEATING, THOMAS, JR., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Harvard P. O. 

KINGSLEY, C. L., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Alden P. 0. 

KING, CATHARINE M., Mrs., widow of Henry King, resides Sec. 12; 
Hebron P. 0. ; Mrs. King was born in Buffalo, Erie Co., N. Y., May 28, 1826 ; 
came to McHenry Co., July 5, 1845 ; owns 40i acres of land, value $50 per acre. 
Married Henry King, January 1, 1846; he was born in Salem, Washington Co., 
N. Y., March 13, 1820, and died March 7, 1871 ; had ten children three sons and 
seven daughters ; six daughters and one son living ; had one son, John Henry, who 
was a private in Co. F, Ninety-fifth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf., two years and two months ; 
William J. died March 5, 1867, aged five months and eleven days ; Cyrus A. died 
November 22, 1870, aged one year and one month. 

KNICKERBOCKER, I. D. ; Farmer, Sec. 3; Alden P. 0. 

KIRK, J., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Lincolnshire, England, April, 
1824 ; came to the United States in 1850 and to McHenry Co. in 1866 ; owns 80 
acres of land ; value, $35 per acre. Married Mary Mabbot, of Lincolnshire, Eng- 
land. July 27, 1849 ; she was born June 17, 1828 ; had eight children ; five living. 
Members of Methodist Episcopal Church, of Harvard. 

KNICKERBOCKER, I. D., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 3 ; Alden P. 0. ; 

born in Milan, Duchess Co., Vt., October 23, 1837 ; came to McHenry Co. July 3, 

1844 ; owns 180 acres of land, value $35 per acre. 
LA BREC, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Alden P. 0. 
LANGAN, J., Renter of L. D. Hale, Sec. 34 ; Alden P. 0. 
LATTER, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Alden P. 0. 
LAUGHLIN, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Harvard P. 0. 
LEO, MAURICE, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Alden P. 0. 
LORDEN, P., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Alden P. 0. 
LUCIA, ELI, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Alden P. 0. 
MADDEN, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harvard P. 0. 
MADDEN. PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harvard P. 0. 
MANLEY, H. F., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Alden P. 0. 
MASE, MARY MRS., widow of H. Mase, Sec. 14 ; Alden P. 0. 
Me BRIDE, MAHLON, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Alden P. 0. 
McGUIRE, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Alden P. 0. 
McLEAN, T. B., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Alden P. 0. 
McLEAN, HAZ ELTON, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Alden P. 0. 
McLEAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Alden P. O. 
McLEAN, HENRY, Laborer ; Alden. 
MERCHANT, J. W., Farmer, Sec. 24; Alden P. 0. 

MERRY, W. S., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 8 ; Alden P. 0. ; born in Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., September 24, 1836 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1849 ; owns 160 acres 
of land, value $35 per acre ; has been School Director and Town Collector ; was 
Private in Co. C, Ninety-fifth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. Married Pleiades Wilkinson, of 
Hinckley Township, Madison Co.. Ohio, March 20, 1860 ; she was born February 
27, 1836. Has four children one son and three daughters ; his father, Ely G. 
Merry, is living with him, aged sixty-five. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 151 



MICKLE, N. J., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Big Foot P. 0. ; born in New York January 
11, 1835; came to Wai worth Co., Wis., in 1847 and to McHenry Co. in 1875; 
owns 229 acres of land ; value, $35 per acre. Married Elsie Brandow, of Steuben 
Co., N. Y.. January 1, 1858 ; she was born February 17, 1838 ; has two children 
one son and one daughter. 

MOCKLER, M., Farmer, Sec. 30; Harvard P. 0.; born in Ireland, 1823; came 
to United States in 1843 and to McHenry Co. in 1849 ; owns 140 acres of land, 
value $40 per acre. Married Margai-et Ward, of County Gemway, Ireland ; had 
eight children four sons and four daughters ; one son and one daughter dead. 
Members of the Catholic Church, of Harvard. 

MOCKLER, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Harvard P. 0. 

MOCKLER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Harvard P. 0. 

MODE, FREDERICK, Works for 0. Disbrow, Sec. 13 ; Alden P. 0. 

MOODY, WILLIAM, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 7 ; Big Foot P. 0. ; born 
in Lincolnshire, England, Feb. 22, 1816 ; came to McHenry Co., 1856; owns 255 
acres of land, value $40 per acre. Married Agnes Masser, of Yorkshire, England, 
June 3, 1858 ; she was born Jan. 25, 1815 ; had two children, sons, both dead. 
Members of M. E. Church. 

MORGAN, C. F., SB., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Alden P. 0. 
MORGAN, C. F., JR., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Alden P. 0. 
MORRISSEY, TERRY, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; P. 0. 

MUNCH, JOSEPH, Boot and Shoemaker ; Alden ; born in Baden, Germany, 
January 9, 1846 ; came to United States, May, 1867, and to McHenry County, 
August 18, 1876. Married Franziska Nikolaus, of Baden, Germany, Feb. 6, 1872 ; 
she was born April 15, 1850 ; has two children, boys. German Catholic. 

NICHOLS, R. A., Carpenter, Sec. 20 ; Harvard P. 0. 
NICHOLS, P. A., Lives with mother, Sec. 20 ; Harvard P. 0. 

NICHOLS, JAMES M , Farmer, Carpenter and Joiner, Sec. 20 ; Harvard P. 
0.; born in Booneville, Oneida Co., N. Y., April 28, 1828 ; came to McHenry Co. 
in spring of 1865 ; owns 160 acres of land, value $35 per acre. Married Polly A. 
Austin, of Binghamton, Chenango Co., N. Y., Nov. 1, 1849; she was born Octo- 
ber 22, 1831 ; had five children, four living. Members of M. E. Church, Harvard. 

NOLAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Alden P. 0. 
NOYES, W. H., Depot Agent; Alden. 
O'BRIEN, M., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Alden P. 0. 
O'HALLORAN, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Alden P. 0. 
O'NEIL, DENNIS, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harvard P. 0. 
ORDWAY, HIRAM, Laborer, Sec. 15 ; Alden P. 0. 

PAYNTER, H. H., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Lennox, Berk 
shire Co., Mass., September 14, 1832 ; came to McHenry Co., 1856 ; owns 160 
acres of land, value $30 per acre : was private in Co. A, Ninety-fifth Regt. 111. Vol. 
Inf. Married Sallie Spencer, of Seneca Co., Ohio, March 18, 1860 ; she was born 
December 4, 1832 ; has two children, both living. Mrs. Paynter is a member of 
the Baptist Church. 

PETERS, C., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Alden P. 0. 
QUIGLEY, MALACHAI, Farmer, Sec. 36; Alden P. 0. 
RECTOR, W. H., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Alden P. 0. 
RECTOR, AMOS, Laborer; Alden. 
RECTOR, G. S., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Alden P. 0. 
RILEY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 19; Harvard P. 0. 



152 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

RING, DENNIS, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harvard P. 0. 
RICHARDSON, A., Laborer, Sec. 15 : Alden P. 0. 
ROBINSON, W. S., Farmer, Sec. 14 : Alden P. 0. 
ROGERS, D. P., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Alden P. 0. 
RUSHTON, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Alden P. 0. 
RYDER, G. D., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Alden P. 0. 
RYDER, TIMOTHY, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Alden P. 0. 

RYDER, G D., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Harvard P. O. ; born in Oswego Co., N. Y., 
August 27, 1827 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1836 ; owns 103 acres of land, value 
$40 per acre ; has been School Director several terms. Married Mrs. Norah C. 
Bucklin, of Wooster Co., Mass, (widow of Edgar A. Bucklin), May 1, 1866 ; she 
was born January 22, 1830 ; had three children by first wife. 

SCOTT, WILLIAM, Renter of W. L. Dyer, Sec. 24 ; Alden P. 0. 
SCANLIN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Harvard P. 0. 
SCOTT, W. J., Works on farm of H. W. Copeland, Sec. 21 ; Alden P. 0. 
SLATER, FRANK, Cheese Manufacturer, Sec. 15 ; Alden P. 0. 
SOPER, J. M., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Alden P. 0. 

SOPER, ISIC, Farmer, Sees. 9 and 10; Alden P. 0.; born in Monmouth Co, 
N. J., December 17, 1797; came to McHenry Co. in 1863; owns 160 acres of 
land, valued at $35 per acre. Married Phoebe Pennington, of Bridge Tp., Essex Co., 
N. J.. March 25, 1819; she was born September 1, 1795; had ten children, six 
girls and four boys ; four daughters and four sons living. Member of the M. E. 
Church of Alden. 

SOPER, J. S., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Alden P. O. 
SOPER, I. M., Retired Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Alden P. 0. 

SOPER, I. M., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Alden P. 0. ; born in Wayne Co., N. Y., July 
10, 1829 ; came to McHenry Co. in November, 1867 ; owns 80 acres of land, valued 
at $2,400. Married Harriet Stacy, of Ogden, Monroe Co., N. Y., January 30, 1865 ; 
she was born October 12, 1833 ; has four children, three sons and one daughter. 
Members of Wesleyan Church, of Wheaton. 

SOPER, SAMUEL W., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Alden P. 0. ; born in Macedon, Wayne 
Co., N. Y. June 21, 1830 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1864 ; owns 70 acres of land, valued 
at $30 per acre. Married Eliza Van Valkenburg, of Lockport, Niagara Co., N. Y., 
June 21, 1852 ; she was born April 14, 1833 ; has two children, a son and a daughter. 
Members of the M. E. Church of Alden. 

SOIJTHMAYD, P. 0., Farmer, Sec. 8; Big Foot P. 0. 
STEVENS, J. B., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Big Foot P. 0. 
STEVENSON, R. B., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Harvard P. 0. 

STEVENS, JOHN B., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sees. 7 and 18 ; Big Foot P. 
0. ; born in Harbor Creek, Erie Co., Pa., November 2, 1847 ; came to McHenry Co. 
in 1863 ; owns 200 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre ; has been School Director. 
Married Elizabeth Pierce, of Walworth Tp., Walworth Co., Wis., January 1, 1868; 
she was born August 13, 1848 ; has two children, sons. Members of the Episcopal 
Church. 

STEVENSON, R. B., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Pennsylvania 
June 8, 1832; came to McHenry Co. in the fall of 1868; owns 40 acres of land, 
valued at $40 per acre. Married Emma Bascoui, of Milton, Vt., Oct. 17, 1861 ; 
she was born September 15, 1841 ; had three children, all living. 

SULLIVAN, DANIEL. SR.. Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harvard P. 0. 
SULLIVAN, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Harvard P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 153 

SULLIVAN, DANIEL, JR., Farmer, Sec. 33; Harvard P.O. 

SYLVESTER, JOSEPH, Farmer (Renter on H. Earl's farm), Sec. 1 ; Hebron 
P. 0. ; born in Elizabeth Tp., Canada West, June 15, 1834 ; came to McHenry Co. 
in January, 1872 ; owns personal property valued at $600. Married Rebecca Wynn, 
of Montague, Canada West, April 19, 1862 ; she was born June 16, 1834 ; has two 
children, daughters. She is an Episcopalian. 

TEEPLE, T. M., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Alden P. 0. 

THOMAS, URIAH, Works for H. Manly, Sec. 35 ; Alden P. 0. 

TULIP, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Alden P. 0. ; born in St. Lawrence Co., N. 
Y., February 5, 1823 ; came to McHenry Co. in May, 1854 ; owns 82 acres of land, 
valued at $35 per acre ; was private in Co. C, Ninety-fifth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. Mar- 
ried Rosella Poquet, of Canada East, December 26, 1844 ; she was born February 9, 
1854; had six children, boys; two living. 

UDELL, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Alden P. 0. 
UDELL, AS AD, Farmer, Sec. 23; Alden P. 0. 
UDELL, 0. J., Farmer, Sec. 19, Alden P. 0. 
UDELL, ALBY, Farmer, Sec. 17, Alden P. 0. 

VANNESS, C., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Alden, P. 0. ; born in Albany Co., N. Y., July 
6, 1844 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1846 ; went to Iowa in 1865 ; lived there until 
1872, when he returned to this county ; owns 79 acres of land, valued at $25 
per acre ; was private, teamster, of the Tenth Tennessee Regiment for five months. 
Married Julia La Brec, widow of Victor La Brec, of New York, July 16, 1865 ; she 
was born November 16, 1843 ; has four children, three sons and one daughter, all 
living. 

VAN WOERT, DAVID, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Alden P. 0. 

WALLACE, J. D., Blacksmith, Sec. 15 ; Alden P. 0. 

WALTON, W. B., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Big Foot P. 0. 

WEDGWOOD, WM. W., Farmer ; Alden. 

WEDGWOOD, FRANCIS, Retired Farmer; Alden. 

WEDGWOOD, P. W., Farmer, Alden ; born in Parsonsfield, York Co., Maine, 
May 17, 1808; lived in Oswego Co., N. Y., 10 years; came to McHenry Co. in 
October, 1842 ; has been Postmaster 7 years, also Constable 12 years ; laid out 
the village of Alden. Married Parmelia A. Vorce, of Oswego Co., N. Y., February 
17, 1834 ; had three children William, Henry and Everett all living. 

WEDGWOOD, W. W., Farmer and Nurseryman, Alden; born in Oswego Co., 
N. Y., May 16, 1835 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1842; owns 200 acres of land 
in McHenry Co., and 640 acres in Iowa; was First Lieut. Co. "C," Ninety-fifth 
Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. Married Helen Easton, of Alden, McHenry Co., April 10, 
1862 ; had five children ; four living. 

WETLAUFER, HENRY, JR., Farmer, Sec. 18; Alden P. 0. 
WILSON, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Alden P. 0. 

WETLA.UFER, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Prussia, 
Germany, March 22, 1811; came to United States in 1836, and to McHenry 
Co. in 1857 ; owns 90 acres of land, value $25 per acre. Married Elizabeth 
Raymer, of Prussia, in winter of 1836; she was born April 22, 1810, and died 
October 19, 1868 ; had seven children, four sons and three daughters ; has two sons 
and three daughters living ; one son was killed in the war of the Rebellion. Mem- 
ber of Congregational Church of Harvard. 

WEIGHTMAN, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Big Foot P. 0. 
WETLAUFER, HENRY, SR., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Alden P. 0. 



154 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

WETER, MARGARET A., Mrs., Widow of James H. Weter, resides Sec. 
10 ; AldenP. 0. ; born in Ghent, Columbia Co., N. Y., December 20, 1837 ; came 
to McHenry Co., April 15, 1853; lives with her father. Her husband, James 
H. Weter, was born May 23, 1830, in Palmyra, Wayne Co., N. Y. He was 
Private of Co. L, Fifteenth Regt. N. Y. Cav. : was taken prisoner in Shenandoah 
Valley, and died in prison, at Melon, Georgia, October 31, 18(34. They were mar- 
ried December 4, 1856 ; had five children, three sons and two daughters, all living. 
She is a Methodist. 

WOOD, J. W., Retired, Sec. 14; Alden P. 0. 

WOOD, JAMES, General Blacksmith ; Alden P. 0. ; born in Geauga Co., Ohio, 
October 26, 1819 ; came to McHenry Co., September, 1842 ; value of property 
$2,000. Married Eva. E. Groesbeck, of New York, July 24, 1856; she was born 
February 25, 1825 ; had five children four living. Mrs. Wood is a Presbyterian. 
He was School Director, in Alden, for 14 years. 

WORDEN, C. B., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Alden P. 0. ; born in Marlbro Township, 
Windom Co., Vermont, October 10, 1818; came to McHenry Co. in March, 
1859 ; owns 100 acres of land ; value $35 per acre. Married Miss L. D. Orvis, of 
Malbro Township, Windom Co., Vermont, November 28, 1849. She was born 
August 6, 1824 ; had eleven children four sons and seven daughters ; one son and 
one daughter dead. 

WRIGHT, MOSES, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Alden P. 0. 



ALDEN BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



CEO. B. ANDREWS, 

GENERAL MERCHANT, 



JOSEPH MUNCH, 

BOOT & SHOEMAKER, 



L 3D HE JCsT. ^L L ID IE IST- 

JAMES WOOD, 

General Blacksmith, 

> 3E N. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 155 



BURTON TOWNSHIP. 

BAUTES, LEONARD, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 
BROADLEY, WM. H., Farmer, Sec. 19; Spring Grove P. 0. 
BROADLEY, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Spring Grove P. O. 
BROADLEY, E., MRS., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 
CAREY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 
CLAXTON, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

COLE, FRANKLIN, Farmer, Sec. 30; Blivins' Mills P. 0.; born in New 
Chester, Merrimack Co., N. H., in 1835 ; came to this town in 1840 ; owns 400 
acres of land ; has been Supervisor one year ; is at present School Director. Mar- 
ried Emily M. Stevens, of N. Y., in 1860; had five children, four boys and one girl. 
Republican. 

COOLEY, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

COULMAN, J. B., Lives on J. H. Cooley's farm, Sec. 7 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

COULMAN, G. H., Lives on farm of R. B. Cole, Sec. 7 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

EARING, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

HALDEMAN, DENNIS, Mechanic ; Spring Grove. 

HATCH, F. L., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

HEANEY, JOHN, Capitalist; Spring Grove. 

HENNING, FREDERICK, Lives on the farm of C. R. Wray, Sec. 7 ; Spring Grove 

P.O. 
HOFFMAN, PHILLIP, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

HOFFMAN, AARON, Farmer, Sec. 31, Burton Township ; Blivins' Mills P. 0.; 
born in Somerset Co., Penn., October 1, 1824; came to Michigan in 1831, and to 
this State and present locality, June 6, 1836 ; owns 433 acres of land ; value of 
property, $30,000 ; has held only local offices ; was Captain in the Volunteer service 
in Colorado, for the suppression of Indian troubles. Married Isabella Cole, June 
3, 185-1; she was born in Somerset Co., Penn., September 16, 1826; has four 
children living : Senereta, born September 25, 1854 ; Mark F., born February 16, 
1859 ; Phillip Gordon, born March 21, .1865, and William Dighton, born April 16, 
1872. 

HOFFMAN, ALBERT, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

HOOPER, JOHN, Lives on M. H. Cole's farm, Sec. 17 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

JACKSON, ADAM, Farmer for L. Hatch, Sec. 29 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

KIMBALL, E. G., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

LANYEN, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

LANYEN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

LAWSON, IRA and FRANK, Farmers, Sec. 19 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

LAWSON, STEPHEN, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

LICHTY, DANIEL, Mechanic ; Spring Grove. 

McGUIRE, MARTIN, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

MEAD, CHARLES, Postmaster and Justice of the Peace; Spring Grove. 

MOTLEY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

MOW ATT, T. C., Miller ; Spring Grove. 

PEACOCK, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

PEACOCK, WILLIAM, Renter, Sec. 5 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 



156 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

PIERCE, WILLIAM, Mechanic, Sec. 29 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

PIERCE, MARVEL, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

PIERCE, S. W., Lives with father, Sec. 20 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

RICHARDSON, F. G., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

ROWEN, HUBERT, Former, Sec. 31 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

SANBORN, J. W., Farmer. Sec. 17 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

SANBORN, MEHITABLE, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

SHAFER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

SLATER, WILLIAM, Farmer and Town Clerk, Sec. 29 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

STEVENS, ORRTN, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Spring Grove P. O. 

STEVENS, ESTHER, Farmer, Sec. 20; Spring Grove P. 0. 

STEVENS, ANDREW, Lives with father, Sec. 20 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

STEVENS, MERRILL, Farmer, Sec. 20; Spring Grove P. 0. 

STEVENS, WILLIAM, Lives with father, Sec. 20 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

STEVENS, B. A., Farmer, Sec. 20; Spring Grove P. 0. 

SWEET, CHANCEY, Capitalist, Sec. 30 ; Spring Grove P. O. 

TAYLOR, H. H., Lives on Vokes farm, Sec. 8 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

THOMPSON, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

TWEED, ROBERT, General Merchant, Spring Grove. 

WARD, JOHN, Lives on farm of S. Lawson, Sec. 8 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

WATTS, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

WESTPHAL, HENRY, Lives on J. Gary's farm, Sec. 29 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 

WESTLAKE, JAMES, Cheese Manufacturer, Spring Grove. 

WEBER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Johnsburg P. 0. ; born in Prussia, Ger- 
many, 1822 ; came to America, 1849, and to this town the same year ; owns 80 
acres of land. Married Anna Mary Muhldor, of Germany, in 1850 ; has five chil- 
dren, two boys and three girls. Democrat ; Catholic. 

WILSON, WYMAN, General Merchant, Spring Grove. 

WRIGHT, ALBERT, Lives on R. B. Cole's farm, Sec. 7 ; Spring Grove P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 157 



CHEMUNG TOWNSHIP. 

ALLEN, HOLLIS, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Lawrence P. 0. 

ALEXANDER, F. M., Millwright ; Harvard. 

ALEXANDMR, JOHN, Mason ; Chemung. 

ANDERSON, J. L., Postmaster and Commission Merchant ; Lawrence. 

ANDERSON, A. A., Carpenter and Joiner; Division st., Harvard. 

ARMSTRONG, CHARLES, Justice of the Peace and Collector since 1862 ; 
Harvard; born in Lime. New London Co., Conn., January 11, 1815; resided in 
Big Foot Prairie, Wis., six years; came to this county in 1846 ; owns 163 acres of 
land ; value of property, $8,000 ; was in the Commissary Department and also 
Orderly Sergeant Co. C, Ninety-fifth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. Married Lucretia Lake 
(first wife), of Montgomery Co., New York, October 16, 1836, who died October 
29, 1865. Married Mary Louisa Lake (second wife), October 24, 1866, of Big Foot 
Prairie, Wis. ; has four children by second wife two boys and two girls. 

ARNOLD, R., Shoemaker ; Harvard. 

AYER, E. G., Proprietor of Ayer House; Harvard; born in Haverhill, Mass., 
July 13, 1813 ; settled in Kenosha, Wis., in 1836 ; moved from thence to Big Foot 
Prairie in 1846 ; thence came to Harvard February, 1856. Married Mary D. Tit- 
comb in 1835, at Dedham. Mass ; she was born in Massachusetts in 1813 ; had 
seven children, all living: Mary (who was the first. white child born in Kenosha 
Co., Wis.), Annie, Edward, Julia, Hem?y, Hattie and Eva. Mr. Ayer purchased 
the land and laid out the town of Harvard in the spring of 1856. 

AYER, ED. E., Contractor of Railroad Materials and Maltster ; Harvard ; born in 
Kenosha, Wis., Nov. 16, 1841 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1856 ; went from there to 
California in 1860 ; enlisted in Co. E, First California Cav., and served in Lower 
California, Arizona and New Mexico ; then returned to McHenry Co. in 1864. 
Married Emma A. Burbank September 16, 1865 ; she was born in New Hampshire, 
November 25, 1845 ; has one child ^Lizzie, born November. 28, 1866. Mr. Ayer 
is President of Harvard Malt Co. 

AXTELL, A. E., General Merchant ; Harvard ; born in Friendship, Allegany 
Co.. N. Y., February 6, 1825 ; came to Boone Co., TIL, in 1852 and was engaged 
in business in Russellville four years, then came to Harvard in 1856 ; has been Post- 
master at Harvard for nine years, from 1866 to 1876. Married Mary M. Lambert 
December 10, 1846 : she was born in Friendship, Allegany Co., N. Y., December 
12, 1827 ; has one child Frank F., born October 29, 1847. 

BAGLEY, J. H., Lumber Merchant ; resides at Harvard ; born in Gorham, On- 
tario Co., N. Y., August 22, 1824 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1851 and was engaged 
in lumber and grain business, in the town of Marengo, sixteen years, then moved 
to Harvard, where he now resides ; he has been President of Board of Trustees of 
Marengo two terms. Married Margaret Waddell, January 16, 1850 ; she was born 
in PouJtney, Steuben Co., N. Y., October 28, 1826 ; had seven children three boys 
and four girls; one boy Winslow F., died April 8, 1863; six living: Lue, Annie, 
John H., Elmer E., Mary and Margaret F. 

BAILEY, HARMON, Stone Mason ; Harvard. 
BAKER, HENRY, Grain Dealer ; Harvard. 



158 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

BAKER, J. M., Butcher; Harvard. 
BAKER, D. W., Capitalist ; Harvard. 

B ALDOCK, MATTHEW, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Lawrence P. 0. ; born in Lincoln- 
shire, England, July 4, 1816 ; came to this county December, 1853 ; owns 63 acres 
of land. Married Lucian Coy in 1843, who was born in Lincolnshire, England, 
November 19, 1823 ; has six children. 

BALDOCK, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Sharon P. 0. 

BALLARD, GEORGE, Baggage-master, C. & N. W. R. R. ; Harvard. 

BATTIS, STERLING, Retired ; Chemung. 

BANNER, H. W., Farmer, Sec. 8; Sharon P. 0. 

BARRETT, A., Railroad Conductor ; Ayer st, Harvard. 

BARTH, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Chemung P. 0. ; born in Buffalo, N. Y., 
January 22, 1846 ; came to this county in 1867 ; owns 150 acres of land. Married 
Mary E. Egleston October 14, 1860, who was born in Lancaster, N. Y., November 
6, 1842 ; has two children Willis, born August 26, 1862, and George W., born 
February 17, 1874. 

BARLOW, IRA, Carpenter and Joiner ; Harvard. 

BEEL, WILLIAM, Retired ; Brainard st., Harvard. 

BECK, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Chemung P. 

BENJAMIN, HENRY, Retired ; Cor. Summer and Eastman sts., Harvard. 

BENTLEY, D. H., Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Big Foot P. 0. 

BENTLEY, CHRISTIANA MRS., widow, Sec. 12 ; Big Foot P. 0. 

BIGSBY, JOHN, Tin Peddler ; Lawrence. 

BIRD, LUKE, Farmer ; Sec. 7 ; Sharon P. 0. 

BINGHAM, A. C., Physician ; Brainard and Johnson sts., Harvard. 

BILLS, I. G., Farmer, Sec. 26.; Lawrence P. 0. 

BOODLE, FRANK, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Harvard P. 0. 

BOODLE, THOMAS, Laborer; Harvard. 

BLACKMAN, C. S., Commission Merchant; Harvard. 

BLACKMAN, H. .C., MRS., Widow; Diggins st., Harvard. 

BLAKE, N. E., Wagon Manufacturer ; Harvard. 

BLAKE, J. C., Wagon Manufacturer ; Harvard. 

BLANDEN, ZENO, Grain Dealer ; Ayer st., Harvard. 

BRIGHTENFELDT, ALBERT, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Chemung P. 0. 

BREEN, ANN, Widow ; Chemung. 

BREEN, MICHAEL, Renter of Wm. Alvord, Sec. 15 ; Lawrence P. 0. 

BROWN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Chemung P. 0. ; born in Cavan Co., Ire- 
land, 1816; came to this country 1853; owns 80 acres of land. Married Sarah 
Crosier in 1840, who was born in Cavan Co., Ireland, 1815 ; has five children. 

BROWN, B. S., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Lawrence P. 0. 
BROWN, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Sharon P. 0. 
BROWN, C. R., Farmer, Diggins St., Harvard. 
BROWN, JOHN, Laborer ; Sec. 13 ; Big Foot P. 0. 
BROWN, WM. A., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Lawrence P. 0. 

BUHMEYER, DANIEL, Cigar Manufacturer, Harvard ; born in Cologne, on 
Rhine, Germany, January 14, 1840 ; came to United States 1854 ; lived in New Jer- 
sey four years, and worked at the cigar trade ; lived then ten years in Chicago : 
then moved to Whitewater, Wis., and was there five and a half years in manufac- 
turing cigars; then came to McHenry Co. in 1876. Married Mary Delancy, 
1864 ; she was born in Aurora. 111. ; has four children, Minnie, Carrie, William and 
Mary. Mr. Buhmeyer carries on quite extensively the manufacture of cigars at 
Harvard. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENBY COUNTY. 159 

BURTON, BILLINGS, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Sharon P. 0. * 

BURCHEDT, ERNEST, Farmer, Sec. 19; Sharon P. 0. 
BURDETT, THOMAS, Blacksmith ; Harvard. 
BURTON, PHILIP, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Sharon P. 0. 

BURR, OSCAR, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Chemung P. 0. ; born in Jefferson Co., N. 
Y., 1834 ; came to this county December, 1845 ; owns 80 acres of land. Married 
Cynthia Shultz, October, 1862, who was born in New York, September, 1843 ; has 
two children. 

BURTON, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Sharon P. 0. 
BURTON, C. H., Lives with father, Sec. 18 ; Sharon P. 0. 
BURTON, ORLANDO, Lives with father, Sec. 18 ; Sharon P. 0. 
CALLIGAN, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Chemung P. 0. 
CARPENTER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Chemung P. 0. 
CARPENTER, PETER, Carpenter and Joiner ; Front st., Harvard. 
CAMPBELL, DAVID, Retired ; Chemung. 
CARPENTER, JAMES, Carpenter and Joiner ; Harvard. 
CAUGHLIN, JERRY, Blacksmith ; Harvard. 
CARPENTER, DANIEL, Shoemaker ; Harvard. 

CHEEVER, J. P., Attorney at Law. Harvard ; born in Walworth, Wis., August 
5, 1845 ; came to this State July, 1869, and to Harvard same year ; graduated in 
Law Department of Madison University, Wisconsin, 1869 ; commenced practice of 
law in Harvard. 1869 ; elected State's Attorney of McHenry Co. 1872 ; has 
been Town Clerk several terms, member of Board of Trustees of Harvard one term. 
Married Miss Frank Allen, December 6, 1870 ; she was born in N. Y. State, Madi- 
son Co.; has two children; Walter bora December 27, 1871, and Edward born 
March 28, 1876. 

CHILSON, DAVID, Huckster ; Harvard. 

CLARKE, C, R., Lumber Merchant; Brainard st., Harvard. 

COVENTRY, DAVID, Farmer. Sec. 23; Harvard P. 0. 

CLARKE, WILLIAM, Blacksmith ; Harvard. 

CONN, A. J., Farmer. Sec. 32 ; Chemung P. 0. 

COLE. DAVID, Farmer and Thresher; Chemung. 

CONN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 29; Chemung P. 0.; born in Mona'ghan Co., 
Ireland, 1820 ; came to this county in 1862 ; owns 135 acres of land. Married 
Sarah E. Day, September, 1867, who was born in Boone Co., Illinois, 1851 ; has 
two children living. 

CONN, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Chemung P. 0. 

COE, H..B., School Teacher, Harvard. 

COLBY, JOSEPH, Laborer, Harvard. 

COVENTRY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Harvard P. 0. 

CONE, WILBUR, Laborer, Lawrence. 

COOK, REUBEN, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Chemung P. 0. ; born in Delaware Co., 
Ohio, February 15, 1820 ; came to this county, 1856 ; owns 20 acres of land. Mar- 
ried Jane Mansfield, March, 1856, who was born in England in 1819 ; no children. 

CORNUE, U. W., Drayman ; Church st., Harvard. 
CORNUE, G. V., Clerk ; Church st., Harvard. 
CRAMER, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 14; Harvard P. 0. 
CRUMB, J. C., Banker; Ayer st., Harvard. 
CURRY, G- J., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Chemung P. 0. 
DAILY, JAMES, Railroad Laborer; Harvard. 
DAVIS, ROBERT,' Farmer ; Ayer St., Harvard. 



160 DIRECTORY OF.McHENRY COUNTY. 

DANlftLS, NANCY, Widow, Sec. 7 ; Sharon P. 0. 
DANIELS, FREEMAN, Lives with mother, Sec. 7 ; Sharon P. 0. 
DAYH ARST, JOHN, Hotel Keeper ; Harvard. 
DEAN. SILAS, Farmer and Thresher ; Chemung. 
DEN 10, MARCELLUS, Railroad Engineer; Harvard. 
DOWNS, MARY, MRS., Widow, Sec. 32 ; Chemung P. 0. 
DIGGINS, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Harvard P. 0. 
DULLUM, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Harvard P. 0. 
DUTTON, ALLEN, Sec. 23 ; Lawrence P. 0. 
DUTTON, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Lawrence P. 0. 
DUTTON, ORRIN J., SR M Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Lawrence P. 0- 
DUTTON, ORRIN, JR., Farmer, Sec. 23; Lawrence P. 0. 

ENGLE, RICHARD, Baker, Harvard ; born in Nearstine, Hesse Darmstadt, 
Germany, July 23, 1836 ; came to United States in 1854 ; lived in Kenosha, Wis., 
twelve years, then came tj McHenry Co., 1865 ; was member of First Wis. 
Vol. Inf., with Col. Starkweather. Married Margaret Leat, September 28, 1855 ; she 
was born in Framersheim, Breis Alyee, Hesse Darmstadt, January 6, 1836 ; had 
six children, four boys and two girls three dead, Eddy, Maggie and Charlie ; three 
living, Katie, Willie and Richard, all born in Kenosha, Wis. 

ERICKSON, S., Blacksmith ; Harvard. 

FAY, C. L., Farmer; Lawrence. 

PICK, JONAS, Renter of J. Logue, Sec. 36 ; Harvard P. 0. 

FILKINS, JANE, MRS., Widow; Washington St., Harvard. 

FOX, S. D., Farmer, Chemung. 

FLEMING, JOHN, Wagon Maker; Ayer st., Harvard. 

FREEMAN, S. A., Renter of J. Sutherland, Sec. 19; Sharon P. 0. 

FREESE, CHRISTIAN, Railroad Employe ; Harvard. 

FREESE, GODFREY, Railroad Employe ; Harvard. 

FROTHINGHAM, CHARLES, Railroad Engineer ; Harvard. 

GARDNER, JANE, MRS., Widow; Church st., Harvard. 

GARDNER. ROBERT, Farmer; Church and Division sts., Harvard. 

GEORGE, J. C., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Harvard P. 0. 

GEORGE, CHARLES, Farmer and Physician, Sec. 13; Harvard P. 0. 

GHENSHAW, FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Chemung P. 0. ; born in 
Germany, February 25, 1823; came to this county February, 1859 ; married Caro- 
line Bokoy in 1853, who was born in Germany, July 2, 1823 ; no children. 

CIILLIS, H. W., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Lawrence P. 0. 
GILLIS, N. B., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Lawrence P. 0. 

GILLIS, W. H., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Lawrence P. 0. ; born Orange Co-., N. Y., 
March 31, 1846; came to this county in 1848. Married Ellen Langdon January 
1, 1867, who was born in Boone Co., 111., May 1, 1850 ; has three children Arthur, 
born March 26, 1868 ; Cora, born March 7, 1872, and Elmer, born September 20, 
1876. 

GLOVER, JOHN, Carpenter and Joiner ; Harvard. 

GOGGIN, EDWARD, Farmer; Harvard. 

GOGGIN, ELIZABETH, MRS., Widow; South st., Harvard. 

GOODKNECHT, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Sharon P. 0. 

GOULD, H. S., Farmer; Lawrence. 

GOODAIR, H., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Lawrence P. 0. 

GRADY, THOMAS, Renter of P. McElroy, Sec. 16 ; Lawrence P. 0. 

GROESBECK, GEORGE, Drayman ; Church st., Harvard. 

GROVESTEEN, W., Butcher, Harvard. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 161 

GROESBECK, JOHN W., Druggist; Harvard; born in Wayne Co., N. Y. ; 
came to this county in 1861 ; has been County Coroner, and is now Alderman of 
the village of Harvard, 111., and was appointed Postmaster in 1876 ; Assistant 
Surgeon Eighty-first 111. Inf. Regt. : graduated at Rush Medical College, Chicago, 
111., January 24, 1866. 

HAGERMAN, C. E., Blacksmith and Wagon Maker : Big Foot P. 0. 

H AWVER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Big Foot P. 0. 

HALL, DUANE, Lumber Merchant, boards at Mrs. Thompson's, Harvard. 

HALLESY, PATRICK, Railroad employe ; Harvard. 

HAMMOND, DANIEL, Laborer; Harvard. 

HANCOCK, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Big Foot P. 0. 

HARPER, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Chemung P. 0. ; born in Fermoner 
Co., Ireland, in 1829 ; came to this county in 1858 ; owns 167 acres of laud. 
Married Mary A. Mack in 1860, who was born in Antrim Co., Ireland, in 1842 ; 
has three children living. 

HART, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Harvard P. 0. 

HART, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Harvard P. 0. 

HAWVER, MONROE, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Sharon P. 0. 

HAHN, LEWIS, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Sharon P. 0. 

HAWVER, J. F., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Big Foot P. 0. 

HAWVER, CHRISTIANA, MRS., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Big Foot P. 0. 

HAWVER, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Big Foot P. 0. 

HAWVER, P. D., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Big Foot P. 0. 

HAYES, EDWARD, Carpenter and Joiner ; Harvard. 

HEFNER, GEORGE, Barber; Harvard. 

HELM, N. B., Hardware Merchant ; resides Church st., Harvard. 

HERITAGE, CLARKSON, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Lawrence P. 0. 

HERITAGE, H., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Lawrence P. 0. 

HILDRETH, OSCAR, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Sharon P. 0. 

HICKOK, ALONZO E., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Chemung P. 0. ; born in Chit- 
tenden Co., Vt., August 14, 1822; came to this county in August, 1874; owns 
200 acres of land. Married Maritte Sanford January, 1844, who was born in 
Chittenden Co., Vt., September 7, 1824 ; has seven children. 

HINER, JACOB, Railroad Employe; Harvard. 

HILL, S., Keeper of Billiard Hall ; Ayer st., Harvard. 

HILL, F. A.. Painter; Park st., Harvard. 

HILDRETH, EPHRAIM, Farmer, Sec. 12; Big Foot P. 0. 

HOGAN, FRANK, Railroad Employe ; South st., Harvard. 

HOLMES, THOMAS, Railroad Employe ; Harvard. 

HOLDEN, CHARLES, Blacksmith; Chemung. 

HORTON, 0. W., Retired; resides cor. Church and Hunt sts., Harvard. 

HOWE, ALLEN, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; -Lawrence P. 0. 

HUEBNER, JOHN, Brewer; Harvard. 

HUNTLEY, MARTIN, Fanner, Sec. 3; Sharon P. 0.; born in Chemung 
Township, July 23, 1848; owns 100 acres of land; value of property, $5,000. 
Married Phylura Ayers, of Walworth. Wis., February 16, 1873. 

HUNTLEY, ELIJAH, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Big Foot P. 0. 
HUNTLEY, J., Retired ; boards at Walker's Hotel. Harvard. 
HUFFMAN, P. M.. Physician and Surgeon; Harvard. 
HUNT. CHARLES. Hardware Merchant; Ayer St.. Harvard. 
HUNTLEY, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Big Foot P. 0. 



162 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

HTJBBELL, R. G., Laborer ; Big Foot P. 0. 
HUCHINSON, D. P., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Harvard P. 0. 
HULBERT, ELENOR, MRS., Widow; Chemung. 
IAYNES, DAVID, Retired ; resides on Jefferson st., Harvard. 
JOHNSON, A. A., MRS., Widow ; resides on Front st., Harvard. 
JOHNSON, ELLEN, MRS., Widow ; resides on Church st., Harvard. 
JOHNSON, ISAAC, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Big Foot P. 0. 
JORDAN, LEWIS, Farmer, Sec. 12; Big Foot P. 0. 
JOSLYN, H. L., MRS., Widow ; Division st, Harvard. 
JOHNSON, C. M., Physician and Surgeon ; Front st., Harvard. 
KALIA, WILLIAM, Farmer ; Chemung. 
KEELER, L. B., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Big Foot P. 0. 

KEENAN, STEPHEN, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Chemung P. 0. ; born in Troran 
Co., Ireland, in 1832; came to this county in 1851 ; owns 80 acres of land. , 
Married Ann Donough, September 2, 1856, who was born in Troran Co.. Ireland, 
in 1834; has two children ; Patrick, born March 14, 1860, and Ellen, born January 
11,1863. 

KENNEDY, P. H., Farmer, Sec. 10; Lawrence P. 0. 
KERR, A., Farmer, Sec. 30; Chemung P. 0. 
KINNEY, MOSES, Retired ; Brainard st., Harvard. 

KENNEDY, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec, 5 ; Sharon P. 0. ; born in Down Co., 
Ireland, Dec. 24, 1806 ; came to this county May 27, 1846 ; owns 40 acres of land. 
Married Ann Seward, December 25, 1856, who was born in Delaware Co., N. Y., 
February 14, 1804 ; no children. 

KING, THOMAS, Section R. R. Boss ; Harvard. 

KING, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Hadley, N. Y., 
August 1, 1815; came to this county in April, 1860 ; owns 114 acres of land. 
Married Diana Kelley, February 23, 1837, who was born in Chautauqua Co., N. Y.. 
April 22, 1815 ; has three children. 

OZER, SOPHIE, MRS., Widow, Sec. 8; Sharon P. 0. 
tQZER, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Sharon P. 0. 
EQZER, MORRIS, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Sharon P. 0. 

KING, JOHN W., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Chautauqua Co., 
N. Y., August 20, 1840 ; came to this county in 1860 ; owns 130 acres of land. 
Married Louis Hutchinson, August 17, 1865, who was born in Cleveland, Ohio, 
April 30, 1847 ; has three children. 

LAKE, BEARDSLEY, Lumber Merchant ; Hart St., Harvard. 

LA BREC, JOSEPH. Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Big Foot P. 0. 

LAKE, LEVI, Retired Merchant ; Washington st., Harvard. 

LANE, JOHN, Retired Farmer;' Lawrence. 

LAWTON, ANDREW, Lives on H. Cramer's farm, Sec. 13 ; Harvard P. 0. 

LAW, A. E., Maltster ; Summer st., Harvard. 

LAKE, M., Liveryman ; Front st., Harvard. 

LAKE, C. W., R. R. Express Messenger ; Harvard. 

LANDON, J., Carpenter and Joiner ; Harvard. 

LELAND, J. M., State Weigher ; Jefferson st., Harvard. 

LEVITT, G. H., Farmer, renter-of J. Paul, Sec. 31 ; Capron P. 0. 

LELAND, ALBERT M., Editor Harvard Independent, Harvard; born in 
Bristol, Kenosha Co., Wis., January 1, 1851 ; came to McHenry Co. 1865 ; value 
of property $3,000. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 163 

LEONARD, MATTHEW, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Chemung P. 0. ; born in Car- 
lew Co., Ireland, 1816 ; came to this county in 1855 ; owns 40 acres of land. Mar- 
ried Johanna O'Brien 1849, who was born in Carlew Co., Ireland, 1838; has five 
children living. 

LEWIS, HENRY, Renter of D. H. Bentley, Sec. 12; Big Foot P. 0. 
LEONARD, JAMES, R. R. Employe; Harvard. 
LEWIS, J. 0., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Big Foot P. 0. 
LILLIE, LEVI, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Sharon P. 0. 
LITTLE, JAMES, Laborer; Chemung. 

LINES, EDWIN A., General Merchant, Harvard ; born in Augusta, Oneida 
Co., N. Y., February 9, 1833 ; came to this county in 1853 ; value of property 
$2,500. Married Helen A. Simonds, December 14, 1859, who was born in Frank- 
linville, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y. 

LIVINGSTON, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Sharon P. 0. 

LOCK WOOD, L., Capitalist ; Diggins St., Harvard. 

LOGUE, JAMES, R. R. Tie Dealer; Front st.. Harvard. 

LUTHER, CHARLES, R. R. Engineer ; Harvard. 

LYON, J. B., Attorney at Law and Town Clerk ; Harvard. 

MANSFIELD, JOHN, Painter ; Washington st., Harvard. 

MAXON, W. J., General Merchant; Chemung. 

MAXON, E. D., General Merchant ; Chemung. 

MARSHALL, MARGARET, MRS., Widow ; Hart st., Harvard. 

MARSRALL, T. P., Hardware Merchant ; residence Hart st., Harvard. 

McCARTY, DANIEL, Carpenter and Joiner ; Harvard. 

MARSHALL, ROBERT, Hardware Dealer ; Ayer st., Harvard. 

MASON, LOWELL, R. R. Mail Agent ; Harvard. 

McC ARN, PETER, Carpenter and Joiner ; Harvard. 

McCLOUD, JAMES, Shoemaker; Harvard. 

McCAULEY, THOMAS, Drayman ; South st., Harvard. 

McCONKEY, JAMES, Retired Farmer ; Division st., Harvard. 

McDONALD, P., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Harvard P. 0. 

McELROY, LEWIS, Superintendent C. & N. W. Switch Yard; Harvard. 

McGEE, OWEN, Farmer; Brainard st., Harvard. 

MCLAUGHLIN, HUGH, Retired Farmer ; Minnie st., Harvard. 

McNALLY, BARNEY, R, R. Employe; Harvard. 

McNALLY, WILLIAM, Laborer; Lawrence. 

McPHERSON, C. D., Carpenter and Joiner ; Washington and Division sts* Harvard. 

MERRITT, WILLIAM, R. R. Conductor ; Division st., Harvard. 

MILLS, S. G. W., General Merchant ; Big Foot P. 0. 

MILLER, JOHN, Merchant Tailor; Chemung. 

MOSHER, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Sharon P. 0. 

MILLER, FREDERICK, Wagon Maker; Big Foot P. 0. 

MINIER, H. B., Grocer, Harvard ; born in Big Flats, Chemung Co., N. Y., June 
27, 1833; came to McHenry Co. in 1858. Married Julia Ayer, August 8, 1860, 
who was born in Kenosha, Wis., September 29, 1843 ; has one child, Mamie, born 
in Harvard, January 23, 1863. Mr. Minier lived in Boone, Boone Co., Iowa, nine 
years, and returned to Harvard in April, 1876, and is now engaged in the Fancy 
Grocery and Crockery business. 

MONTGOMERY, JOHN, Railroad Conductor, Division st., Harvard. 
MOORE, THOMAS, Renter of C. McGee's, Sec. 29 ; Chemung P. 0. 
MORSE, 0. C., Farmer and Paper Peddler, Sec. 33 ; Harvard P. 0. 
MORTON, N. B., Capitalist ; Johnson st., Harvard. 



164 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

NASH, G. M., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Sharon P. 0. 
NASH, SIDNEY, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Sharon P. 0. 
NEARING, F. S.. Liquor Dealer; Front st, Harvard. 
NIEWERTH BROS., Masons; Washington st., Harvard. 
NOYCE, H. J., Cheese Manufacturer, Sec. 15 ; Harvard P. 0. 
O'BRIEN, MARTIN, Section Boss C. & N. W. Ry. ; Harvard. 
O'BRIEN, WILLIAM, Carpenter and Joiner; University st., Harvard. 
O'CONNOR, PETER, Laborer ; Park st., Harvard. 

OLBRICH, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Lawrence P. 0. ; born in Germany, July 
25, 1838; came to this county in August, 1858; owns 50 acres of land. Married 
Mary C. Weitzel, January 17, 1871, who was born in Germany, September 10, 
1845 ; seven children William, born June 26, 1859 ; Elizabeth, January 18, 1861 ; 
Mary, October 19, 1862 ; Augusta, April 22, 1865 ; Ottielle, May 12, 1868 ; John, 
June 8, 1873 ; and Jacob was born June 8, 1876. 

O'RILEY. MICHAEL. Laborer; Harvard. 

OTTMAN. MATHEW, Laborer; Diggins st., Harvard. 

PARKHURST, GEORGE, Carpenter and Joiner; Ayer st.. Harvard. 

PARKER, S. S., Farmer ; Brainard and Johnson sts., Harvard. 

PATTERSON, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Chemung P. 0. 

PARKHURST, EMILY, MRS., Widow ; Park st., Harvard. 

PATTERSON, R., Baker ; Harvard. 

PAULSON, JONAS, Foreman Railroad Blacksmith Shop; Ayer st., Harvard. 

PAUL, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Chemung P. 0. 

PAUL, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Chemung P. 0. 

PEASE, RANDALL, Railroad Employe ; University st,, Harvard. 

PEASE, ASA, Retired Farmer; Brainard st, Harvard. 

PERKINS. ROYAL, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Sharon P. 0. 

PICKLEY, D. E., Farmer, Sec. 4; Big Foot P. O. 

PHELPS, J. M., Farmer, Sec. 9; Sharon P. 0. ; born in Montgomery Co., N. Y., 
May 15, 1844; came to this county in 1874. Married Emma Dyke, March 6, 
1875, who was born in New York State, June, 1844; has two children Ada and 
Tiney. 

PHILLIPS, ADAM, Grain Dealer ; Brainard and Eastman sts., Harvard. 

PIERCE, JAMES, Stone Mason ; Harvard. 

PIERCE, GILBERT, Renter of E. G. Ayer's, Sec. 15 ; Harvard P. 0. 

PIERCE* FRANKLIN, Proprietor Steam Flour Mill ; boards at Walker's Hotel, 

Harvard. 

PIERCE, ALPHA, Laborer; Harvard. 
PIPER, ELIZABETH MRS., Widow, Sec. 18 ; Sharon P. 0. 
POWERS, RICHARD, Saloon Keeper ; Ayer st., Harvard. 

POWERS, ESCO, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Homer, Ohio, 
June, 1851; came to this county in 1872. Married Eva Brown, April 8. 1873, 
who was born in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., March 18. 1852; has one child, Lewis, 
born February 28, 1875. 

POWERS, R., Harness Maker; Harvard. 

POWERS, M. J., Harness Maker; Harvard ; born in Dunham Township, McHenry 
Co., June 2. 1847; has been engaged in harness business from 1866 ; moved west 
to Tama Co., Iowa, and engaged in business there three years. Married Lydia 
Powell (first wife), of Tama Co., Iowa, August, 1873, who died in Harvard. April 
10, 1874, leaving one daughter, Bessie, born in Harvard, April 1, 1874. Married 
Fannie Fern (second wife), February 29, 1876; she was born in Oshkosh. Wis. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 165 

PRICE, WILLIAM, Railroad Conductor ; Division St., Harvard. 
PURINGTON, J., Railroad Conductor; Church st., Harvard. 
QUIGLEY, JOHN, Laborer; Division st., Harvard. 
QUIRK, WILLIAM, Yard Master, C. & N. W. Ry. ; Harvard. 
RATHBONE, WILLIAM, Harness Maker ; Harvard. 
RANDT. FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Sharon P. 0. 
RECTOR, EDWIN, Clerk for W. C. Wellington ; Harvard. 
REARDON, M., Railroad Employe ; Harvard. 
REARDON, ANDREW, Blacksmith ; Harvard. 
RICHARSON, P. T., Laborer; Front st., Harvard. 

REYNOLDS, E. S., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Lawrence P. 0. ; born in Addison Co., Vt., 
December 4, 1812 ; came to this county in May, 1839 ; own 160 acres of land. 
Married Mary E. Smith February 17, 1843, who was born in Hancock, Mass., De- 
cember, 1819 ; has two children ; G. W., born in June, 1846, and James N., born 
in 1851. 

ROACH, P., Laborer and Well Digger ; Harvard. 
ROCKWELL, JAMES, Drayman ; Ayer st., Harvard. 

ROACHE, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Lawrence P. 0. ; born in Mayo Co., 
Ireland, in 1827; came to this country April 11, 1856; owns 120 acres of land. 
Married Kate Whelan February 28, 1855, who was born in Carlew Co., Ireland, in 
in 1831 ; has one child, Henry, born December 15, 1855. 

ROGERS, J. W., Farmer, Sec. 13; Harvard P. 0. 

ROSE, PETER, Laborer ; Chemung. 

ROSENCRANTZ, J. B., Capitalist ; Church st., Harvard. 

RUGGLES, C. H., Farmer, Sec. 21, Lawrence P. 0. 

RYAN, JAMES, Laborer; Blackmail st., Harvard. 

RYAN, THOMAS, Lives on J. Thompson's farm, Sec. 22 ; Lawrence P. 0. 

RYAN, DANIEL, Blacksmith ; Johnson st., Harvard. 

RYLAND, ELIZABETH, MRS., Widow; Front st,, Harvard. 

SALNAVE, NORMAN, Laborer ; Harvard. 

SALISBURY, ALVA, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Big Foot P. 0. 

SANDERS, AMMI, Drayman ; Washington st., Harvard. 

SAUNDERS, P. E., Hardware Merchant; Division st., Harvard. 

SCHULZ, CARL P., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Chemung P. 0. ; born in Germany, Jan- 
uary 4, 1821.; came to this county in 1861 ; owns 80 acres of land. Married Caro- 
line Fredericks in 1849, who was born in Germany February 21, 1821'; has five 
children living. 

SCHEUETKA, HENRY. Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Harvard P. 0. 
SEELEY, LYMAN, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Big Foot P. 0. 
SHAVER, ABRAHAM, Retired Farmer; Lawrence. 
SHANAHAN. CON., Railroad Employe ; Harvard. 
SHATZLER, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 13; Harvard P. 0. 
SHIPPIE, L. J. ; Commissioner of Highway ; Lawrence. 
SHUFELDT, P. D., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Big Foot P. 0. 
SHOIJLER, ELI, Farmer; Chemung. 

SHUFELDT, B., Works J. K. Howell's farm ; Big Foot P. 0. 
SINDERSON, C. H., Miller ; Chemung. 

SLOCUM, H. W., Farmer; Lives in Chemung Village ; born in Elizabethtown, 
N. J., in 1814; his father removed to Tompkins Co., N. Y., the same year; lived 
there until 1859, then removed to Spencer, Tioga Co., N. Y., lived there seven years, 
then came to this county in 1866 ; owns 50 acres of land ; value of property, $3,000 ; 



166 ' DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

held the offices of Constable and Collector before coming here. Married MarylM. 
Adams November 5, 1838 ; she was born in Danby, Tompkins Co., N. Y. ; had three 
children, one boy and two girls. 

SMITH, CAROLINE, MRS., Widow, Sec. 24 ; Harvard P. 0. 
SLAWSON, H. H., Farmer; Lawrence. 
SMITH, A. M., Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Harvard P. 0. 
SMITH, FRANK, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Harvard P. 0. 
SMITH, L. P., Town Collector ; Simmer st., Harvard. 
SMITH, G. R., Maltster; residence, Ayer st., Harvard. 
SMITH, AMANDA, MRS., Widow ; Jefferson st., Harvard. 
SNOW, ASA, Works farm of S. S. Parker ; Chemung P. 0. 
SOLE, R., Railroad Conductor ; Division st., Harvard. 
SOOTHELL, JOSEPH, Carpenter and Joiner; Hart st., Harvard. 
SPOONER, E., Carpenter and Joiner ; Harvard. 
STAFFORD, J. J., Carpenter and Joiner; Ayer st., Harvard. 
STOKER, A., Railroad Employe ; Harvard. 
STORCH, LEWIS, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Chemung P. 0. 
SULLIVAN, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Lawrence P. 0. 
SWEET, PETER, Lives on father's farm, Sec. 36 ; Harvard P. 0. 
SWEENEY, JOSEPH, Liveryman ; Ayer st., Harvard. 
SWEENEY, PATRICK, Dry Goods Merchant; Ayer st, Harvard. 
SWEENEY, JOHN, Dry Goods Merchant; Ayer St., Harvard. 
SWEET, SAMUEL, Farmer ; Jefferson st., Harvard. 
THOMPSON, JAMES, Stock Dealer ; Front st., Harvard. 
THOMPSON, J. C., Retired Farmer; Lawrence. 
THOMPSON, W. G., Police Constable ; Harvard. 
THOMPSON, ALBERT, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Lawrence P. 0. 
THOMPSON, A. M., Farmer, Sec. 34; Harvard P. M. 

THOMPSON, ORLANDO H., Farmer, Sees. 25 and 5 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born 
in Hamilton, Madison Co., New York, September 26, 1820 ; came to this county 
August 31, 1845; owns 80 acres of land; value of property, $4,000; has been 
Town Clerk of Dunham Township, also Justice of the Peace. Married Eliza Max- 
well, of Oneonta, Otsego Co., New York, July 3, 1844 ; has nine children, five 
boys and four girls, two boys and three girls living. 

THOMPSON, LUKE, MRS., Widow ; Division st., Harvard. 
TITCOMB, E. M., General Merchant ; resides on Church st., Harvard. 
TITCOMB, J. P., Merchant; resides on Church st., Harvard. 
TOOKER, GEORGE, Renter of C. A. Hoschild, Sec. 1 ; Big Foot P. 0. 
TOOKER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Harvard P. 0. 
TOOKER, EMMET, Carpenter and Joiner ; Minnie St., Harvard. 
TOWNE, M. M., Financial Agent of E. G. Ayer, Ayer's Hotel, Harvard. 
TYMESSON, E., Retired Farmer ; Church and Jefferson sts., Harvard. 
TYLER, FRANK, Carpenter and Joiner ; Harvard. 
TYLER, F., Carpenter and Joiner; Harvard. 
VERICK, HENRY, Laborer ; Harvard. 
WAITE, JOHN, Farmer. Sec, 8 ; Sharon P. 0. 

WALKER, E., & SON, Proprietors of Walker House, Harvard. Mr. E. 
Walker has been in the hotel business for forty years. 

WALKER, W. B., Proprietor of Walker House, Harvard. 
WALLACE, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 30; Chemung P. 0. 
WALTERS, DAVID, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Chemung P. 0. 
WAKELY, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 13; Harvard P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 167 

WAKELY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Harvard P. 0. 
WALTERS, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Chemung P. 0. 
WELLINGTON, W. C., Grocer ; resides on Brainard st., Harvard. 

WEITZEL, FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Lawrence P. 0. ; born in Ger- 
many, January, 1810; came to this county, 1858; owns 132 acres of land. Mar- 
ried Henrietta Gaberil in 1835, who was born in Germany in 1813; has two 
children, Christina, born May 18, 1839, and Mary C., born September 10, 1845. 

WELCH, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Sharon P. 0. 

WHEELER. HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Sharon P. 0. 

WETLAUFER, WILLIAM, Renter of D. P. Hutchinson, Sec. 24 ; Harvard P O 

WETZEL, FREDK, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Sharon P. 0. 

WETTSTEIN, HERMANN, Jeweler, Harvard ; born in Barmen, Elberfeld, 
Prussia, February 14, 1840 ; came to this county April, 1873 ; value of property, 
$4,000. Married Harriet P. Collier, May, 1867 ; she was born in Rock Co., Wis. ; 
has one child, a girl. 

WHEELER, A. L., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Sharon P. 0. 

WHITMARSH, LEWIS, Carpenter and Joiner ; Front st., Harvard. 

WHITE, JAMES, Blacksmith ; Diggins st., Harvard. 

WILSON, FREEMAN, Agent American Express Co. ; Brainard st., Harvard. 

WIGGINS, T. H., Tailor ; Ayer St., Harvard. 

WIGGINS, GEORGE, Tailor ; Ayer st., Harvard. 

WILKINSON, C. M., Druggist ; Harvard ; born in McHenry Co., April 21, 
1849 ; has been engaged in drug business in Harvard eight years. 

WILKINSON, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Big Foot P. 0. 

WILKINSON, C. M., Druggist ; Brainard and Johnston sts., Harvard. 

WILKINSON, PHILO, Town Constable ; Diggins and Jefferson sts., Harvard. 

WILLIAMS, JOHN, Carpenter and Joiner, Johnson St., Harvard. 

WILLIS, ROBERT, Stock Dealer, Ayer st., Harvard. . 

WILLIAMS, FRANK, Harness Maker, Ayer st., Harvard. 

WILLIAMS, R. J., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Chemung P. 0. 

WOOD, G. H., Proprietor Steam Flour Mill ; residence Washington and Jefferson 

sts., Harvard. 

WOOD, JAMES, Renter on S. Paul's Farm, Sec. 31 ; Chemung P. 0. 
WOOSTER, GEORGE, Retired Farmer ; Chemung. 
WOOSTER, W. I., Painter ; Burnett st., Harvard. 
WORT, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 13; Harvard P. O. 
WYANT, L. B., Furniture Dealer ; Residence Brainard st., Harvard. 
YOUNG, W. H., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Sharon P. 0. 
ZASCHAK, HENRY, Liquor Dealer ; Ayer and Front sts., Harvard. 



168 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



HARVARD BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



CHAS. ARMSTRONG, 

Justice of the Peace, 



Street. 



AVER HOUSE, 

E, G, Ayer, Proprietor, 

Ayer Street, near Depot. 



CROESBECK & WILKINSON, 

DRUGGISTS, 

Paints, Oils, Books, Stationery, &c., &c., 

-A-YER, STR,EET. 



HARVARD INDEPENDENT, 

GARDNER & KNOX, 

Proprietors, 

A.YEK, STS/EET. 



A. E. AXTELL, 

EXCHANGE OFFICE, 

ALSO, 

DEALER IN GENERAL MERCHANDISE, 

Street. 



LINES BROS., 

BOOTS, SHOES & CLOTHING 



Ayer Street. 



ED. E. AYER, 

Contractor of R, R, Supplies, 



OFFICE, 



STK.EET. 



H. B. MINIER, 

Grocery and Crockery Ware, 

Ayer Street, near Depot. 



DAN. BUHMEYER, 

Havana and Domestic Cigars, 

Pipes, Chewing and Smoking Tobacco, 

STREET. 



M. J. POWERS, 

Saddles, Bridles and Collars, 



J. P. CHEEVER, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

-A_3rer Street. 



Ayer Street. 



WALKER HOUSE, 

E, Walker & Son, Proprietors, 

Ayer Street, near Depot. 



RICHARD ENGLE, 

Bakery and Confectionery, 

Ayer Street. 



HERMAN WETTSTEIN, 

WATCHMAKER & JEWELER, 

And Dealer in Watches and Silver Ware, 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 169 



HARVARD BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

ALLOTT & THOMPSON, Meat Market, Ayer st. 

AMERICAN EXPRESS COMPANY, Near Depot. 

BLAKE, N. E., & SON, Wagon Manufacturers, Ayer st. 

BINGHAM, A. C., Physician, Brainard and Johnson sts. 

BURBANK, LAW & CO.. Malt House, Eastman st. 

BRAINARD & GILBERT, Dry Goods, Ayer st. 

BELLOWS, J. N.. Shoemaker, Ayer st. 

BELL, ALFRED, Baker, Ayer st. 

BRIGHTENFELDT, HENRY, Shoemaker, Ayer st. 

BURBANK, G. A., Photographer, Ayer st. 

CLARKE, C. R., Lumber Merchant, Brainard st. 

CLARKE, WM. M., Blacksmith, Ayer st. 

CHURCH, R., Ready-made Clothing, Ayer st. 

CLARKE, S. A., Barber, Ayer st. 

CARPENTER, GEO., Boots and Shoes, Ayer st. 

CARPENTER & HILL, Billiard Hall, Ayer st. 

CULLEN, JOHN, Blacksmith, Ayerst. 

CALLENDER, J. G., Insurance Agent and Justice of the Peace. 

CRUMB, J. C., Banker, Ayer st. 

DOOLITTLE, A. L., Planing Mill, Ayer st. 

FISH, HARRIET E., Millinery, Ayer st. 

FLEMING, JOHN, Wagon Maker, Ayer st. 

GEORGE, WM., Warehouse and Grain Dealer. 

GEORGE, L. E., Tailor, Brainard st. 

HALL & CRUMB, Lumber Dealers, Page st. 

HEFNER, GEORGE, Barber, Ayer st. 

HOWE, ANNA, Millinery, Ayer st. 

HARVARD, HOUSE, John Dayharsh, Proprietor, Ayer st. 

HUNT & HELM, Hardware Merchants, Ayer st. 

HUFFMAN, P. M., Physician. 

HAYES, J. L., Liquor Dealer, Ayer st. 

HOSCHILD, C. A. Furniture Dealer, Ayer st. 

HARVARD MALT CO., Office Harvard Bank, Ayer st. 

JANVRIN, FRANK, Meat Market, Ayer st. 

JOHNSON, C. M., Physician and Surgeon, Front st. 

LEESEN, THOMAS, Blacksmith, Ayer st. 

LAKE & CLARK, Lumber Dealers, near Railroad. 

LACHER, LEWIS, Gunsmith, Ayer st. 

LAKE & PHITTEPLACE, Livery Stable, Front st. 

LEASONT, P. V., Cooper Shop, Ayer st. 

LEONARD, N., Merchant Tailor, Ayer st. 

LYON, J. B., Attorney at Law, Ayer St., 



170 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. * 

MARSHALL, SANDERS & MARSHALL, Hardware Dealers, Ayer at, 

MADDEN, JAMES, Liquor Dealer, Ayer st. 

MERRY, J. G., General Merchant, Ayer st. 

MAXWELL, JAMES, Carpenter and House Builder, Diggins st. 

MULLIGAN, WM., Blacksmith, Ayer st. 

MALONEY, THOS., Saloon Keeper, Ayer st. 

NEARING, F. S., Saloon Keeper, Front st. 

0' CONNER, JOHN, Saloon Keeper, Ayer st. 

O'BRIEN, WM., General Merchandise, Front st. 

POWERS, RICH'D, Saloon, Ayer st. 

PIERCE, FRANKLIN, Steam Flour Mill. 

ROHAN, PATK., Saloon Keeper, Ayer st, 

RICHARDSON, S., Druggist, Ayer st. 

RATHBURN, A. E., MRS., Millinery, Ayer st. 

RASMUS, JOHN, Wagon Manufacturer, Division st. 

SHAVER, JACOB, Boots and Shoes, Ayer st. 

SULLIVAN, JEREMIAH, Grocer, Ayer st, 

SWEENEY BROS. & CO., General Merchants, Front and Ayer sts. 

STOLLER, JOSEPH, Dry Goods, Ayer st. 

SWEENEY & LAKE, Livery Stable, Ayer st. 

SMITH, EZRA, Blacksmith and Wagon Maker, Ayer st. 

SHERBURNE, J. C., Jeweler, Ayer st. 

TITCOMBE, & SON, General Merchandise, Ayer st. 

THOMPSON, W., Police Constable. 

VAN WIE, L., Boots and Shoes, Ayer st. 

WOOD, H., & CO., Steam Mill, and Warehouse, near Railroad. 

WILSON, GUY, Dry Goods, Ayer st. 

W AGAR, G. R. , House and Sign Painter. Ayer st. 

WADE. B. A., Physician, Front and Johnson sts. 

WIGGINS, THOS.. Tailor, Ayer st. 

WELLINGTON, W. C., Grocer, Brainard and Ayer sts. 

WOODRUFF, U. T., Physician, Church st. 

WYANT, L. B., Furniture, Ayer st. 

ZASCHAK, HENRY, Saloon Keeper, Ayer st. 

LAWRENCE BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

ANDERSON. J. L., Commission Merchant. 
BOYD, WM. L., Blacksmith. 
PAGE, HERBERT, Confectioner. 



HAGERMAN. C. E., Blacksmith and Wagon Maker. 
MILLS, S. G. W.. General Merchandise. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 171 



CORAL TOWNSHIP. 

AUSTIN, REUBEN, Farmer and Dairy, Sec. 7 ; Ceral P. 0. ; born in White- 
hall, Washington Co., N. Y., September 6, 1814; came to McHenry Co. in April, 
1864 ; owns 80 acres of land ; property valued at $5,500 ; has been School Director 
eleven years. Married Eveline Derry, of Vermont, September, 1843 ; has seven 
children living. 

ADAMS, E. L., Laborer ; Union. 

ADAMS, ALEX. 0., Farmer and Postmaster, Sec. 33 ; Harmony P. 0. 

AHKENS, FRED, Renter of G. Van Valkenburgh, Sec. 24 ; Huntley P. 0. 

ANDREWS, J. H., Laborer; Union. 

ALLEN, FRANCIS, Produce Dealer ; Union. 

ANDREWS, ALONZO, Laborer ; Union. 

ANDREWS, GEORGE, Laborer ; Union. 

AXTELL, E. M., Farmer, Sec 32 ; Harmony P. 0. 

ASHMAN SARAH, MRS., widow of J. H. ; Union. 

BACKUS, JOHN, Laborer, Sec. 6 ; Coral P. 0. 

BAHRE, CHRISTIAN, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Harmony P. 0. 

BALLARD, NATHANIEL, Renter of Mrs. Butler, Sec. 35 ; Huntley P. 0. 

BANNER, GEORGE P., Farmer and Dairy, Sees. 15 and 22 ; Union P. 0. ; 
born in England, August 30, 1838 ; came to the United States in 1841 and to Mc- 
Henry Co. in the fall of 1865 ; owns 155 acres of land ; value of property, $7,000 ; 
was Corporal in Co. B, Eighth 111. Cav. Married Philancy Lord, of Bath, Steuben 
Co., N. Y., October 27, 1858 ; has one child. i 

BARBER, LESTER, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Harmony P. 0. 
BARBER, S. L., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Huntley P. 0. 
BARBER, LEVI, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Huntley P. 0. 
BARTHOLOMEW, S. R., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Harmony P. 0. 
BARTHOLOMEW, RUSH, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harmony P. 0. 

BEEBE, AUGUSTUS, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Coral P. 0. ; was born in Manchester, 
Bennington Co., Vt., October 16, 1839 ; came to McHenry Co. July 4, 1845 ; owns 
house and lot in village of Coral, valued at $500 ; was Sergeant in Co. K, One 
Hundred and Twenty-seventh Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. Married Harriet Oakley, of 
Willimantic, Conn., July 3, 1865 ; has four children. 

BEEBE, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Coral P. 0. 
BETTS, HENRY, Laborer, Sec. 30 ; Harmony P. 0. 
BLISS, JOHN D., Laborer, Union. 
BOIES, W. A., & CO., Farmers, Sec. 6 ; Marengo P. 0. 

BOWEN, FRANK, Farmer and Dairy, Sees. 8 and 17 ; Coral P. 0. ; born in 

Richmond, Ontario Co., N. Y., August 5, 1820 ; came to McHenry Co. October 18, 
1840 ; owns 50 acres of land ; value of property, $3,500 ; was School Director two 
years and Road Commissioner one year. Married Mary P. Ripley, of Harland, 
Niagara Co., N. Y., January 27, 1838 ; had five children ; three living. 

BORCHERT, WILHELM, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Coral P. 0. 
BOWLEY, J. M., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harmony P. 0. 
BRADFORD, E. P., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Coral P. 0. 



172 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

BRAND, DAVID, Farmer, Carpenter and Joiner, Sec. 18; Coral P. 0. ; born in 
Golanger, Essex, England, December 17, 1814; came to Lawrence, Mass., 1855, 
and to Chicago, 111., in 1856, and to McHenry Co. in April, 1868 ; owns 40 acres 
of land, valued at $2,000. Married Martha Wardley, of Orsett, Essex, England, 
in May, 1841 ; had nine children; eight living. 

BRIDGES, ELVIN, Physician and Farmer, n. w. Sec. 19 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born 
in Truxton, Cortland Co.. N. Y., June 29, 1821 ; came to McHenry Co. July 
3, 1840 ; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre. Married Alvira Mus- 
grove, of Alleghany Co., Pa., May 2, 1868; has nine children in family. 

BRIGHT, H. J., Mason; Union. 

BRIDGES, P. E., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Riley Township, 
McHenry Co., 111., October 1, 1842 (is a renter) ; value of property $300. Mar- 
ried Lou E. Homan, of New York, February 10, 1869 ; has three children. 

BROWN, TURNER M., Farmer, formerly a Mason, Sec. 15; Coral P.O.: 
born in Danbury, Rutland Co., Vt., November 3, 1808 ; came to McHenry Co. 
in October, 1843 ; owns 155 acres of land ; value of property $8,500 ; was School 
Director several terms in Coral Township. Married Juliet Lockwood. of North 
Springfield. Windsor, Co., Vt., November 3, 1840, who was born September 13, 
1825 ; had nine children, five living. 

BROWN, AMASA W., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Union P. 0. ; born in Coral Town- 
ship, McHenry Co., 111., September 30, 1846 ; owns 40 acres of land ; value of 
property $1,600. Married Mariah L. Jackson, of Hartland Township, McHenry 
Co., 111., July. 3, 1866, who was born September 23, 1846 ; had five children, four 
living. 

BULARD, S. H., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Coral P. 0. 
BUTTS, A. H., Farmer, Sec. 3; Union P. 0. 

BUTLAR, JULIA, Mrs., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Huntley P. 0. ; widow of Mor- 
gan Butlar, who died May 21, 1872; she was born in Onondaga Co., N. Y., Feb- 
ruary 5, 1806 ; came 10 McHenry Co. in May, 1843 ; owns 120 acres of land, 
valued at $45 per acre. Married Morgan Butlar, February 17, 1824 ; had five 
children, four living. 

CADY, B., Farmer. Sec. 8; Marengo P. O. ; born in Farmington, Ontario Co., 
N. Y., September 27, 1807 ; came to Illinois in 1855, and to McHenry Co. in 
1861 ; owns 45 acres of land; value of property $3,000; has been School Director 
and Road Commissioner several years. Married Sophia Prescott, of Vershire, Vt., 
in 1858 ; has three children living. 

CAHILL, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Union P. 0. 
CAHOON, C. H., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Union P. 0. 

CALBOW, JOACHIM, Farmer, Sec. 17, Coral P. 0. ; born in Prussia, Ger- 
many, June 15,1834; came to the United States in 1861, and to McHenry 
Co. September. 1,1864; owns 90 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre. Mar- 
ried Minnie Selle, of Prussia, Germany, September 7, 1861 ; had six children, five 
living. 

CAPRON, AMOS, Agent; Union. 

CAPRON, NERI, Farmer ; Union. 

CARVENER, JAMES, Laborer, Sec. 34 ; Harmony P. 0. 

CARR, FRANK, Farmer. Sec. 17 ; Coral P. 0. 

CHITE, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Union P. 0. 

CHURCH, JOHN "R., Farmer and Dairy, Sec. 25 ; Huntley P. 0. ; born in 
Allegany Co., N. Y., October 17, 1829 ; came to McHenry Co. April 29, 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 173 

1845 ; owns 120 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre ; was Township Collector and 
Constable two years in Grafton ; was Sergeant Co. I, Ninety-fifth 111. Inf. Married 
Mary J. Beardsley, of New York, February 27, 1851, who was born May 26, 1835; 
had eight children, seven living. 

CLARK, 0. G., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Coral P. O. 
CLARK. CHARLES, Wagon Maker, Sec. 8 ; Coral P. 0. 
CLARK, E. A.,. Dairyman, Sec. 32 ; Harmony P. 0. 
CLASON, CHARLES, Peddler, Sec. 19 ; Harmony P. O. 
CLEAVER, MARY A., Postmistress, Sec. 8 ; Coral P. 0. 

CLEAVER, HENRY, Farmer and Merchant, in village of Coral ; born in Lon- 
don, Eng., August 30, 1823; came to McHenry Co. in October, 1869; prop- 
erty valued at $500. Married Mary A. Jones, of Manchester, Eng., August 4, 
1859 ; she is at present Postmistress of Coral ; has two children, both living. 

COLGROVE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Union P. 0. ; born in Fletcher, Ver- 
mont, February 16, 1803; came to McHenry Co. in June, 1856; owns 30 
acres, valued at $40 per acre ; had two sons in Co. E, Ninety-fifth 111. Inf. ; one 
son, John Wesley, died in Memphis, Tenn., January 24, 1862. Married Lucia 
Fillmore, of Rutland Co., Vermont, Feb. 23, 1826 ; had four children, two living. 

COLGROVE, URI L., 'Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Union P. 0. ; born in Ellisburg, Jef- 
ferson Co., N. Y., August 6, 1833 ; came to McHenry Co. September 1,- 
1856 ; owns 20 acres of land, property valued at $2,000 ; was private in Co. E, 
Ninety-fifth 111. Inf. Married Julia Moulton, of Jefferson Co., N. Y., Dec. 31, 
1 853 ; she was born December 4, 1 833 ; had four children, three living. Free 
Methodist. 

COLVER, C. W., Laborer, Sec. 7 ; Coral P. O. 
CONDON, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 7; Marengo P. 0. 
CONDON, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. 
CULMAN, WILLIAM, Laborer, Sec. 34 ; Harmony P. 0. 
CURTIS, J. F., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Coral P. 0. 
CURTIS, FRANK, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Marengo P. 0. 
CURTIS, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Coral P.O. 

CURTIS, WILLIAM W., Farmer and Dairy, s. w. Sec. 15 and 22; Union P. 
0.; born in Mount Morris, Livingston Co., N. Y., January 31, 1849; came to 
McHenry Co. November, 5, 1856; owns 100 acres of land, value of property 
$4,500. Unmarried. 

DAKE, ISAIAH, Farmer, Rentero n D. Geer's Farm, Sec. 24 ; Huntley P. 0. ; 
born in Stowe Township, Lamoille Co., Vermont, October 20, 1839 ; came to Kane 
Co. in 1854, went to Wisconsin in 1855, and came to McHenry Co. May 5, 1874 ; 
was private in Co. E, Thirtieth Wis. Inf. Married Isabella B. Sargent, of Med- 
way, Mass., March 10, 1861. Had five children, four living. 

DAKE, ISIC B., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Huntley P. 0. ; born in Waterbury, Wash- 
ington Co., Vermont, March 19, 1835 ; came to Kane Co. in October, 1854, and 
to McHenry Co. in March, 1855 ; value of property $500 ; has been School 
Director. Married Kizie Geer, of Springfield, Erie Co., Pa., April 22, 1858. Has 
three children. 

DARLING, THOMAS. Farmer; Union. 
DAVIS, DAVID, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Huntley P. 0. 

DEA.N, HENRY, Farmer and Dairy, Sec. 27; Renter of Fred. Manshack ; 
Huntley P. O. ; born in Maryland, Otsego Co., N. Y., September 3, 1845 ; came to 
McHenry Co. in 1846 ; value of property $700 ; private in Co. M, Ninth 111. Cav. 



174 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

Married Ellen E. Williams, of Coral Township, McHenry Co., 111., November 24, 
1869 ; she was born February 3, 1851. Has three children. 

DEAN, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Huntley P. 0. ; born in Kent, England, 
October 27, 1812 ; came to Saratoga Co., N. Y., in 1829, then to Otsego Co. N. Y., 
and to McHenry Co. in May, 1841 ; owns 120 acres of land, valued at $35 per 
acre. Married Mary Brooks, of Kent, England, December 25, 1844; she was born 
April 17, 1816. and died December 7, 1876 ; had eight children, six living. 
She was a member of the M. E. Church of Harmony. Mr. Dean was School 
Director for a term of years. 

DERRY, NELSON W., Blacksmith; Union. 

DE WOLF, A. E., Farmer, Sec. 18, Marengo P. 0. 

DERRY, ADIN, Agent; Union. 

DOCKSTADER, H. S., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Union P. 0. 

DRAKE, REUBEN, Farmer and Dairy, Section 16 ; Union P. 0. ; born in Onon- 
daga Co., N. Y., February 12, 1822 ; came to McHenry Co. May 5th, 1847 ; owns 
124 acres of land, valued at $5,000. Married Mary Jane Wright, of Oneida Co., 
N. Y., February 25, 1849 ; had five children, four living. 

DRUSE, EVELINE C., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Coral P. 0. ; widow of Hiram 
Druse, who died in 1871 ; she was born in Ontario Co., N. Y., June 20, 1829 ; 
her mother is now living with her at the advanced age of 89 years : they went to 
Canada in 1831, and came to McHenry Co., in November, 1838; owns 126 acres 
of land, valued at $40 per acre ; has eleven children, all living. 

DUNHAM, ALFRED, Farmer, Sec. 8, Coral P. 0. 

DUNHAM, H. E., Miss, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Coral P. 0. 

DUNHAM, ARTEMAS, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Coral P. 0. 

DURKEE, ALBERT, Carpenter ; Union. 

DURKEE, E. R., Mrs., Widow of M.. Durkee, who was born September 28, 
1812, and died October 3, 1874. She was born in Burke, Caledonia Co., Vt., 
September 28, 1811 ; Resides Sec. 13; Huntley P. 0. \ came to Cook Co., 111., in 
1830, and to McHenry Co., March 10, 1856 ; owns 155 acres of land, valued at 
$40 per acre. Was married January 1, 1839; had seven children five living; 
had one son, Giles M. Durkee, private Co. E, Ninety-fifth 111. Inf. 

EDDY, H. C., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Harmony P. 0. 

EDDY, JOHN, Farmer, s. w. Sec. 27 ; Harmony P. 0. ; born in England, July 
21, 1821 ; came to McHenry Co., May 30, 1837 ; owns 346 acres of land; value 
of property $20,000 ; was School Director and Trustee one year ; Sheriff, two 
years ; was Captain Co. " E," Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. for three years. Married 
Elizabeth Smalldridge, of England, July 15, 1849 ; has had five children four 
living. 

ELLIS, MARCUS, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Union P. 0. 
FARNUM, MELVIN, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Coral P. 0. 
FREER, EDGAR, Laborer, Sec. 30 ; Harmony P. 0. 
FILLMORE, W. J., Wagon Maker ; Union. 

FILLMORE, EDMUND W., Proprietor Union Hotel ; Union McHenry Co., 
111. ; born in Middletown, Rutland Co., Vt., March 26, 1812 ; came to 
McHeury Co. May 27, 1847 ; was the first Constable and Collector of Coral 
after township organization ; was Township Clerk and Postmaster five years ; was 
Quartermaster of Co. E, Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. Married Laura A. Sew- 
ard, of Middletown, Vt., January 5. 1837 ; had five children two living. 

FRENCH, WALTER, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Union P. 0. 
FRENCH, FRANK, Renter of A. Dunham's, See. 5; Union P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 175 

FRTNK, J. M., Farmer and Dairy, also manufacturer of Agricultural Boilers : 
Marengo P. 0. ; born in Marlboro, Vt.. July 7, 1821 ; came to McHenry 
Co. May 1, 1839; owns 305 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre ; has been 
Township Assessor and Collector for a term of years ; made the first assessment of 
Coral Township. Married Prudence Bridges, of Chenango Co.. N. Y.. August 18, 
1846 ; has four children. 

GARDNER, N. C., Postmaster ; Union. 

GEER, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 24; Huntley P. 0.; born in Warrensburg. 
Warren Co., N. Y., January 10. 1813 ; went to Penn.in 1817 ; came to Kane Co., 
111., in 1853, and to McHenry Co. in March. 1854 ; owns 190 acres of land, valued 
at $50 per acre. Married Miss M. Geer, of Warrensburg, Warren Co., N. Y., 
November 18, 1835. She was born May 22, 1809; had two children one living. 

GILKERSON, THOMAS, Nurseryman, Sec. 6 ; Marengo P. 0. 

GILBERT, CALVIN, Farmer, n. w. Sec. 5 ; Union P. 0. ; born in Washington 
Co. N. Y., January 2, 1819; came to McHenry Co. in June, 1854 ; owns 100 
acres of land, value $6,000 ; was Notary Public twenty-one years ; is, at present, 
Township Supervisor. Married Sarah James, of Seneca Township, McHenry Co., 
in February, 1858; has, four children all livibg. 

GRANNISS, A. W., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Coral P. 0. ; born in Litchfield, Litchfield 
Co., Conn., September 28, 1802; came to McHenry Co. in April, 1857 ; owns 
18 acres of land ; value of property, $2,000. Married Susan Stoddard, of Mid- 
dletown, Vt., August 11, 1839.. She was born March 10, 1800; have no 
children. Mrs. Granniss came from Bridgeport to McHenry Co. 

GREEN, DANIEL, Farmer ; Union. 
GRENNON, MILES, Blaoksmith ; Union. 
GRIFFIN, JOHN, Farmer. Sec. 29 : Harmony P. 0. 
GRIMES, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Huntley P. 0. 
GRIMES, S. L., Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Huntley P. 0. 

GRIMES, SAMUEL, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sees. 25 and 26 ; Huntley P. 
0. ; born in Washington Co., Pa.. July 20. 1796 ; came to McHenry Co., 
September 17, 1846 ; owns 200 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre. Married 
Mehitabel Quick, of Columbiana Co., 0., in 1830. She was born August 14, 
1804 ; had eleven children ten living. 

GRIMES, SOLOMON, Farmer, Sec. 26 : Huntley P. 0. 

GRIFFITH, ALPHEUS, Mason ; Union. 

GROVER, ALANSON, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Harmony P. 0. ; born in Machias. 
Cattaraugus Co., N. Y., April 26, 1820; came to McHenry Co. in March, 1865 ; 
owns 80 acres of land ; value of property, $4,500. Married Nancy VanVleet. of 
New York, June 29, 1843. She was born March 11, 1816 ; had nine children 
six living. Are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of Harmony. 

HAM, HENRY, Farmer, s. e. Sec. 19 ; Coral P. 0. ; born in Kenosha Co., 
Wis., August 13, 1843 ; came to McHenry Co., April 1, 1855 ; owns five 
acres of land, valued at $50 per acre ; is renter on Warner's farm, Sec. 8 ; was 
private in Co. D. Fifteenth 111. Vol. Inf. ; married Nancy E. Boyden. of Green, 
Chenango Co., N. Y., April 11, 1864 ; has four children. 

HAM, MARY A., Mrs., Farmer and Dairy ; widow of G. Ham. who died De- 
cember 1, 1861 ; Sec. 9; Union P. 0. ; she was born in Eastport, Washington Co., 
Me., August 5, 1824 ; came to Canada, 1837, and to McHenry Co., 1847 ; 
owns eighty acres of land; value of property $4,500; married G. Ham, of Duchess 
Co., N. Y., March 4, 1850 ; had four children, three living. 



176 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

HARRINGTON, H. L., Farmer; Union. 

HARRINGTON, JAMES H., Railroading busines ; Union . P. 0. ; born in 
Oswego Co., N. ., November 12, 1846; came to McHeary Co., November 
23, 1864; value of property, $800; was in Co. H, One Hundred and Forty- 
first 111. Vol. Inf.. Married Sarah M. Clark, of Coral Township, McHenry Co., 
August 1, 1868 ; has four children. 

HASEM AN, W. M., Farmer and Stock Raiser (renter of P. M. Donnel), Sec. 22 ; 
Huntley P. 0. ; born in Co >k Co , Illinois, August 20, 1850 ; came to McHenry 
County, April 21, 1874; value of property, $3,000. Married Anna Hitzaman, of 
Cook Co., 111., October 12, 1873 ; had two children, both dead. 

HASTINGS, CARLISLE, Farmer and Stock Raiser ; Sec. 18 ; Coral P. 0. ; 
born in Suffield, Hartford Co., Conn., April 25, 1815 ; came to McHenry 
Co. in June, 1839; owns 160 acres of land; property valued at $10,000 ; was 
School Commissioner four years, County Commissioner three years and Sheriff two 
years ; at present Township Assessor of Coral. Married Hannah Granger, of Suf- 
field, Hartford Co., Conn., October 29, 1838; she was born August 9, 1817; 
had nine children, eight living. 

HATCH, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Harmony P. 0. 
HATCH, OLIVE, MRS., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Harmony P. 0. 
HAVENS, E. F., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Union P. 0. 
HEATH, CARLTON, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Union P. 0. 
HEATH, A., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Union P. 0. 

HEATH, B. C., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Union P. 0. ; born in Concord, Erie Co., Pa., 
January 6, 1843; came to McHenry Co., June 7, 1845; owns eighty 
acres of land, valued at $1,100. Married Mary P. Case., of Keokuk, Iowa, October 
4, 1866 ; she was born May 10, 1848 ; has three children living. 

HEATH, ELISHA, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Union P. 0. ; born in Sandersfield, Mass., 
February, 1804; came to McHenry Co., June 7, 1845; owns 212 acres 
of land, valued .at $40 per acre; had one son, S. R. Heath, in Co. A, 
Ninety-fifth 111. Inf., who died at Lake Providence, while in defense of his country, 
April 29, 1863. Married Laura Rowe. of Hebron, Washington Co., N. Y., 
April 22, 1857 ; has three children. Mr. Heath lived two years in Portland, N. 
Y, fourteen years in Erie Co., Pa., before coming to McHenry County ; was Scbool 
Director. 

HEMMER, GEORGE. Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Huntley P. 0. 

HITCHCOX, ASAHAL, Renter of Mrs. Adams, Sec. 36 ; Huntley P. 0. 

HITCHCOX, A. B., Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Huntley P. 0. 

HOAGLAND, AMOS, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Coral P. 0. 

HOUSTON, C. F., Depot Agent ; Union. 

HOVEY, ALVIN, Agent, Sec. 8 ; Coral P. 0. 

HOWE, WILLIAM, Renter of H. J. Lock wood, Sec. 1 ; Union P. 0. 

HOWE, DAVID, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Union P. 0. 

HOXSIE, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Union P. 0. 

HOYLE, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 15; Coral P. 0. 

HUNTINGDON. CALVIN, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Coral P. -0. 

JACKSON, WM. M., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Union P. 0. 

JACKSON, GEORGE, Farmer and Dairy, Sec. 22 ; Union P. 0. ; Born in 
Yorkshire, England, December 2. 1803 ; came to this country in June, 1819, and 
to Cook Co. in May, 1834, to McHenry Co. April 15, 1842 ; owns 110 acres of 
land; value of prjperty, $5,500 ; was School Director in the county for twenty 
years. Married Mariah L. Hill, of Chatham, Middlesex Co., Conn., April 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 177 

I 

28, 1836. She was born November 28, 1815; had ten children, five living; had 
three sons in the Union army; their oldest son, George G., was killed at Chicka- 
mauga. Are members of the M. E. Church, at Franklinville. 

JACKSON, WM. M., Farmer, s. w. Sec. 4; Union P. 0. ; born in Essex Co., 
N. J., October 2, 1810 ; came to McHenry Co. September, 1836 ; owns 
twenty-two acres of land, valued at $1,400 ; has been County Commissioner three 
years, Deputy Marshal one year, Representative in the State Legislature four years, 
Postmaster four years, Register in Land Office, Chicago, fpur years, and School 
Trustee and Director twenty-eight years. Married Sarah L. Hampton, of Waterloo, 
Seneca Co., N. Y., January 26, 1832 ; had six children, four living. 

JAMES, FRANCIS, Farmer, Sec. 13, Union P. 0. 
JOB, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 33, Harmony P. 0. 

JOB, JOHN, Sr., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Huntley P. 0. ; born in Devonshire, England, 
in 1810 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1836 ; owns 120 acres of land, valued at $40 
per acre ; was School Director two years. Married Hester Shinn, of Burlington Co., 
N. J., January 1, 1867; she was born October 7, 1804; she had ten children by 
first marriage, five living ; he had nine children by first marriage, six living. 

JORDAN, J. W. P., Clergyman, Sec. 33; Harmony P. 0. 
KEELER, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 11; Union P. O. 

KEELEY, THOMAS, Farmer and Dairy, s. e. Sec. 6 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in 
Silverhale, Loud Co., Ireland, December 24, 1826 ; came to New York in 1848, and 
to McHenry Co. in September, 1859; owns 23 acres of land; property valued at 
$1,400. Married Eliza Shegog, of Armaross, Ireland, September 15, 1862 ; has three 
children. 

KILTZ, J. J., Farmer Sec. 11 ; Union P. 0. i 

KINES, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Union P. 0. 

KITTINGER, DAVID, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Union P. 0. 

KIMBALL, TRUMAN, Cooper, Sec. 8 ; Coral P. 0. 

KIMBERLY, ADAM, Farmer ; Union. 

KNOOP, AUGUST, Laborer, Sec. 8 ; Coral P. 0. 

KUHN, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Union P. 0. 

KUNKELMAN, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 12; Union P.O. 

LAURIE, J. W., Renter of Mrs. L. Parkhurst, Sec. 11 ; Union P. 0. 

LAMKE, FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Union P. 0. 

LAWSON, BENJAMIN, Laborer; Sec. 34; Harmony P.O. 

LOCKWOOD, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Harmony P. 0. 

LOCKWOOD, H. M., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Harmony P. O. 

LOCKWOOD, H. J., Carpenter, Sec. 3 ; Union P. 0. 

LOCKWOOD, C. W., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Union P. 0. 

LOOMIS, SETH, Farmer and Stock Raiser, n. w. Sec. 6 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born 
Canton, Bradford Co., Pa., October 23, 1803; came to McHenry Co. in September, 
1846 ; owns 140 acres of land, valued at $60 per acre. Married Harriet Simpkins, 
of Towanda Bradford Co., Pa. ; she died May 10, 1842 ; had nine children, three 
living. 

LOOMIS, H., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Marengo P. 0. 

LORD, SHERWOOD, Farmer ; Union. 

LUCAS, J. H., Shoemaker; Union. 

MADISON, T., & SON, Farmers; Union. 

MADDICK, ELIZABETH, Farmer, Sec. 28; Harmony P. 0. 

MARSH, SUSAN A, Mrs., Farmer and Dairy, widow of N. B. Marsh, who 
died December 17, 1872; Sec. 25; Huntley P. 0.; born in Augusta, Corral Co.,0., 



178 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

August 16, 1832 ; came to McHenry Co., September 1. 1845 ; owns 174 acres of 
land ; value of property $10,000. Was married December 13, 1851 ; has five chil- 
dren, all living. Are members of the Baptist Church. 

MARSH, GEORGE N., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Huntley P. 0. 

MARSH, EPHRAIM N.. Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Harmony P. 0. 

MARSHALL, JOHN, Farmer; Union. 

MARVIN, S. T., & BRO., Renters of Mrs. Kate Edwards, Sec. 30 ; Harmony P. 0. 

MARTIN, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Milford, Otsego 
Co., N. Y.. April 4, 1817 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1857 ; owns 200 acres of land, 
valued at $40 per acre. Married Esther Perry, of Cayuga Co., N. Y., February, 
1869 ; has one child. 







MASON, ISAAC H., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Union P. 0. 
MASON. ANSEL, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Union P. 0. 
McCALL, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Union P. 0. 
McDOWELL. SAMUEL, Farmer. Sec. 15 ; Union P. 0. 
McHABEN, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Harmony P. 0. 
McKINLEY, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Huntley P. 0. 
METCALF, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Marengo P. 0. 
MORGAN, CHARLES, Laborer ; Union. 

MISKEY, HERMANN, Farmer (Renter), Sec. 18 ; Coral P. 0. ; born in Sta- 
tien, Germany, April 19, 1844 ; came to the United States in 1866, and to McHenry 
Co. in 1876. Married Henrietta H. Shark, of Statien, Germany, September 18, 
1875 ; she was born August 13, 1838 ; has one child. 

MORRIS, SAMUEL R., Farmer, Sec. 33; Harmony P. 0. 
MULLIS. JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Harmony P. 0. 
MORRIS, E. R., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Harmony P. 0. 
MOORE, T. L., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harmony, P. 0. 
MORRIS, W. P., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Harmony P. 0. 
NICOL, OTTO, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Huntley P. 0. 

NICKERSON, STEPHEN, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Coral P. ; born in Tompkins 
Co., N. Y., May 26, 1826 ; came to McHenry Co. in July, 1846 ; owns 121 acres 
of land ; value of property, $5,000 ; was School Director several years. Married 
Margaret Bright, of Seneca, McHenry Co., 111., May 14, 1849 ; has four children, 
all living. 

NIEMANN, JOACHIM, Farmer and Dairy, Sec. 27 ; Harmony P. 0. ; born in 
Mecklenburgh, Germany, November 25, 1817 ; came to this country June 5, 1866, 
and to McHenry Co. in March, 1867 ; owns 90 acres of land ; value of property, 
$5,000. Married Elizabeth Bauch, of Mecklenburg, Germany, June 5, 1856 ; she 
was born December 30, 1815 ; had two children, one living. 

NISH, JOHN, Renter of A. Young, Sec. 14; Union P. 0. 
OCOCK, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Huntley P. 0. 
OCOCK, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Harmony, P. 0. 
OCOCK, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Harmony P. 0. 
OCOCK, THOMAS A., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Harmony P. 0. 
O'REILY, WILLIAM, Sec. 12; Union P. 0. 

OSBORN, WILSON, Farmer and Dairy, Sees. 19 and 20; Coral P. 0. ; born in 
Ira, Cayuga Co., N. Y., June 27, 1836; came to McHenry Co., in June, 1843 ; 
ownes 95 acres of land ; value of property, $4,500. Married Angeline Hotchkiss, 
of Greene, Chenango Co., N. Y., March 11, 1855; she was born September 25, 
1833; had six children, four living. Mr. Osborn was School Director three years. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 179 

OWEN, VOLNEY, Attorney at Law, Sec. 30 ; Harmony P. 0. 
PALMER, ROBERT C., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Harmony P. 0. 
PATCHIN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Union P. 0. 
PEAK, A. S., Farmer, Sec. 30; Harmony P. 0. 
PEAK, A. M., Farmer, Sec. 9; Union P. 0. 
PECAR, WILLIAM, Carpenter; Union. 

PEAK, CHRISTOPHER, Farmer and Dairy, Sec. 30 ; Harmony P. 0. ; born 
in Schoharie Co., N. Y., January 15, 1807; came to McHenry Co. in the spring of 
1846 ; owns 120 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre. Married Elizabeth Colgrove, 
of Montgomery Co., N. Y., July 4, 1832; she was born May 1, 1811; had nine 
children, four living; had one son, A. S. Peak, private Co. B, Seventeenth 111. Cav. 
Are members of the M. E. Church. Mr. Peak was School Director a term of years. 

PERKINS, E. E., Farmer, Sec. ; Union P. 0. 

PETERS, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 16; Coral P. 0. 

PETTINGILL & DERRY, Blacksmiths; Union. 

PHILLIPS, S. H., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; P. 0. 

PIKE, EZRA, Laborer; Union. 

PLAQQUMIER, C., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Harmony P. 0. 

PLATT, E. J., Sec. 3 ; Union P. 0. 

PROWSE, J. F., Wagon Maker ; Union. 

PUTNAM, C. W., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Harmony P. 0. 

READ, J. A., General Merchant; Union. 

ROOD, ANNA, MRS., Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Union P. 0. 

ROGERS, O. C., Farmer and Dairy of twenty-nine cows, n. w. Sec. 5 ; Marengo P. 
0. ; born in Coral Township, McHenry Co., 111., December 13, 1840 ; owns 107 
acres of land, valued at $60 per acre ; was Sergeant in Co. E, Ninety-fifth Regt. 111. 
Inf. Married Eliza Wheeton, of Canada West, February 22, 1866 ; has three chil- 
dren. 

ROGERS. ORSON P., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Middletown, 
Rutland Co., Vt., July 21, 1814; came to McHenry Co. March 16, 1836; is the 
oldest settler in Coral Township ; owns 20 acres of land ; property valued at $5,000 ; 
was Assessor five years and Road Commissioner two years. Married Mary Smith, 
of Granville, Washington Co., N. Y., June 12, 1838; had five children ; all living; 
taught the first school in Marengo in the winter of 1838-9, and the second school 
in Coral 1839 ; had one son in the Union army. 

ROSS, C. L., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Union P. O. 

ROSS, WILLIAM S., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Coral P. 0. 

ROSS, JANE E., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Union P. 0. 

ROSS, THADDEUS G., Renter of G. Hoxie, Sec. 4 ; Union P. 0. 

ROSS, GEORGE W., Farmer and Dairy, Sec. 16; Coral P. 0.; born in Pen- 
field, Monroe Co., N. Y., August 29, 1821 ; came to McHenry Co. in June, 1843; 
owns 198 acres of land; property valued at $10,000; has been School Director a 
term of years. Married Elizabeth Bowen, of Perry, Genesee Co., N. Y., June 25, 
1847; she was born August 27, 1827; had seven children, six living; Mrs. Ross 
came to this county in 1840. 

ROSS, FRANCIS J., Farmer and Dairy, Sees. 15 and 16; Union P. 0.; born 
in Coral Township, McHenry Co., 111.. October 20, 1852 ; is renter on G. Holyles' 
farm. Married Isabella Freeman, of Marengo, McHenry Co., 111., January 19, 
1875 ; she was born November 28, 1854 ; no children. 

RUGH J. M., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Huntley P. O. ; born in Blairsville, Indiana Co., 
Penn.' September 7, 1832 ; came to Ashtabula Co., Ohio, in about 1845, from there 



180 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

to Kane Co. in 1854, and to McHenry Co. on April 1, 1855; owns 145 acres of 
land, valued at $7,000. Married Jennie L. Walker, of Webster, Washtenaw Co., 
Mich., September 22, 1869 ; she was born September 3, 1839 ; has three children, 
all living. 

SALMON, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Union P. 0. 
SAGAR, WILLIAM H., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Harmony P. 0. 

SCHNEIDER, JOSEPH, Farmer and Dairy of sixteen cows, Sec. 5 ; Union P. 
0. ; born in Beinheim, Alsace, France, September 5, 1839 ; came to the United 
States November 9, 1855, and to McHenry Co. May 28, 1858 ; owns 80 acres of 
land j valuation of property, $5,500 ; was Corporal in Co. A, Ninety-fifth 111. Inf. 
Married Magdalena Mary, of Beinheim, Alsace, France, January 2, 1867 ; she was 
born July 4, 1846 ; had four children, three living. 

SEANDER, JAMES, Farmer; Union. 

SEVVELL. THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Coral P. 0. 

SEWARD, E. H., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Marengo P. 0. 

SHELDON, ALLEN, Farmer ; Union. 

SHELDON, WILLIAM A., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harmony P. 0. 

SHELDON, E. L., Physician ; Union. 

SHELDON, H. S., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Union P. 0. 

SHELDON, F. H., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Union P. 0. 

SHERWIN, WILMOT, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Union P. 0. 

SHERWIN, A. & A., General Merchants ; Union. 

SMALLRIDGE, J. H., Renter of E Maddock. Sec. 28; Harmony P. 0. 

SMITH, JOHN M., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Union P. 0. ; born in Sunderland, En- 
gland, June 4, 1HOO; came to McHenry Co. in 1849 ; owns 12 acres of land; value 
of property, $1,200 ; was a sailor for thirty-six years on American waters ; had four 
sons in the Union army. Married Mary Morang, of Eastport, Me., in August, 
1824 ; she died in 1859 ; had eleven children, nine living. 

SMITH, JAMES H., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Union P. 0. 

SMITH, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Union P. 0. 

SMITH, S. A., Lightning Rod Dealer ; Union. 

SPRAGUE, C. W., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Harmony P. 0. 

SRILL, JOHN, Laborer ; Union. 

SRILL, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Union P. 0. 

ST. JOHN, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harmony P. 0. 

STEVENS, C. C. & W. J., Farmers, Sec. 29; Harmony P. 0. 

STODDARD, CHAS. N., Farmer, Stock Raiser and Dairy, n. e. Sec. 7 ; Coral 
P. 0. ; born in Middletown, Rutland Co., Vt,, March 11, 1813; came to McHenry 
Co. June 1, 1854; owns 113 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; has filled 
a number of town offices in Coral Township ; had one son in Co. E, Ninety-fifth 111. 
Inf., and his oldest son was South on the Christian Commission during the Rebell- 
ion. Married Eliza L. Hopkins, of Amenia, Duchess Co., N. Y., January 29, 
1837, who was born December 11, 1815; her mother is living with her, at the 
advanced age of 80 years ; has two children living. Are members of the M. E. 
Church. 

STOXEN, HENRY, Farmer, Stock Raiser and Dairy, Sec. 29 ; Harmony P. 0. ; 
bo,n in Hanover, Germany^ July 30, 1820; came to the United States in 1857, 
and to McHenry Co. March 18, 1874; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $35 
per acre. Married Sophia Dralle, of Hanover, Germany. January 19, 1851, who 
was born August 16, 1830 ; had nine children, seven living. Protestants. 

TABOR, PARDON, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Union P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 181 

TANNER, ORLANDO, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Marengo P. 0. 

TANNER, O. S., Farmer and Dairyman; has 65 to 70 cows; residence Sec. 6; 
Marengo P. 0. ; born in Poultney, Rutland Co., Vt., November 20, 1823 ; came to 
McHenry Co. October 20, 1850 ; owns 27ti acres of land, valued at $65 per 
acre ; was elected Assessor of Coral Township in 1876, and resigned. Married 
Mary Atwater, of Wills, Rutland Co., Vt., December 25, 1846 ; had seven children, 
six living. 

TOMKINS, WILLIAM, Clergyman; Union. 
TUTTLE, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Coral P. 0. 
THOMPSON, AHIRA, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harmony P. 0. 
TIES, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harmony P. 0. 
VAN VLEET, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Harmony P. 0. 
VAN VLEET, NATHAN, Farmer, Sec, 32 ; Harmony P. 0. 

VOSS, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Harmony P. 0. ; born in Brandenburg, 
Germany, November 17, 1830 ; came to Cook Co., 111., in 1869, and to McHenry 
Co. December 13, 1875 ; owns 75 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre. Mar- 
ried Mary Chade, of Brandenburg, Germany, September 3, 1859 ; had seven chil- 
dren, two living. 

VROOMAN, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Coral P. 0. 
WARNER, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Coral P. 0. 

WARNER, LORING, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 19 ; Coral P. 0. ; born in 
Coral Township, McHenry Co., 111., June 24, 1854 ; owns 120 acres of land; value 
of property $6,000. Married Florence Nickerson, of Coral Township, McHenry 
Co., 111., November 18, 1874, who was born January 15, 1856 ; no children. 

WARNER, WALTER, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 19; Coral P. 0.; born 
in Chenango Co., N. Y., December 19, 1813 ; came to Ashtabula Co., Ohio, 1826, 
and to La Porte, Ind., 1837, and to Coral Township, McHenry Co., May 1, 1840 ; 
owns 80 acres of hind ; value of property $4,000. Married Mary Thompson, of 
Vermont, June 11, 1843, who died April 16, 1870; had four children, two living; 
was School Director a term of years. 

WATERMAN, SPENCER, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Union P. 0. 
WAYNE, ELLEN, MRS., widow of Harley ; Union. 

WEAVER, JACOB, Farmer, Stock Raiser and Dairy, Sec. 14 ; Huntley P. 0., 
McHenry Co. ; born in Ellisburg, Jefferson Co., N. Y., February, 22, 1820 ; came 
to Batavia in 1862, and to McHenry Co. March 28, 1870 ; owns 240 acres of land, 
valued at $10,000 ; was School Director three years. Married Mrs. Elizabeth Mason, 
of Herkimer, Herkimer Co., N. Y., December 29, 1853, who was born May 20, 
1830 ; had eight children, seven living. 

WEBER, FREDERICK, Farmer; Union. 

WEBER, IRA, Farmer, n. e.. Sec. 17 ; Coral P. 0. ; born in Chautauqua Co., 
N. Y., December 3, 1832 ; came to McHenry Co. in February, 1856 ; owns 40 acres 
of land, valued at $40 per acre ; was private in Co. E, Ninety-fifth 111. Inf. Mar- 
ried Caroline Bowen, of Coral Township, McHenry Co., 111., August 20, 1863 ; had 
three children, none of them living. 

WILBUR, SARAH ANN, MRS., Widow of M., Sec. 9 ; Union P. 0. 

WILCOX, C. A., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 20 ; Coral P. 0. ; born in Onondaga 
Co., N. Y., December 25, 1822; came to McHenry Co., April 3, 1857 ; owns 665 
acres of land, valued at $21,000 ; has been Poor Master four years, and Town As- 
sessor one year. Married Susan A. Smith, of Columbia Co. N. Y., June 19, 1844; 



182 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

has three children ; owns, also, one-tenth interest in Coral Butter and Cheese Asso- 
ciation. 

WILKINS, HENRY, Blacksmith, Sec. 34; Harmony P. 0. 
WILLIAMS, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Huntley P. 0. 

WILLIAMS, JAMES, Farmer and Dairy, Sec. 35 ; Huntley P. (). ; born in 
Cardiganshire, Wales, February 15, 1819 ; came to the United States in 1838, and 
to McHenry Co. June 12, 1850 ; owns 430 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre ; has 
been School Director, Poor Master and Road Commissioner for several years in Coral 
Township. Married Jemima Morgan, of Cardiganshire, AVales, July 24, 1865 ; she 
was born July 25, 1815 ; had ten children, six living. He is a member of the Con- 
gregational Church. 

WILLIAMS, THOMAS, Farmer and Dairy, Sec. 35 ; Huntley P. 0. ; born in 
^Cardiganshire, Wales, February 13, 1817 ; came to this country in 1849, and to Mc- 
Henry Co., June 1, 1850 ; owns 220 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre ; has no 
family. 

WINN, HENRY, Farmer, Stock Raiser and Dairy, Sec. 10 ; Union P. 0. ; born 
in Westfield, Pa., January 7, 1837 ; went to New York in 1841 ; came to McHenry 
Co. September 14, 1853 ; owns 40 acres of land ; value of property, $2,000. Mar- 
ried Adeline Carpenter, of Meadville, Pa., May 10, 1856; she was born June 30, 
1839 ; had three children, two living. Are members of the Free Methodist Church 
of Union. 

WOOD, CORNELIUS, Farmer, Sec. 16; Coral P. 0. ; born in the City of Cork, 
Ireland, January 1, 1823 ; came to the United States in 1852, and to McHenry Co. 
in April, 1854 ; owns 84 acres of land, valued $35 per acre. Married Mariah Bloun- 
dan, of Galway, Ireland, in March, 1858; she died December 26, 1871 ; has six 
children living. 

WRESCHE, CHRISTOPHER, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Harmony P. 0. 
YOUNG, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Union P. 0. 
ZELLER, LOUIS, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Union P. O. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 183 



UNION BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



HENRY CLEAVER, UNION HOTEL, 

GENERAL MERCHANT, E, W, FILLMORE, Proprietor, 

UNION. 



ELVIN BRIDGES, 



si:< no> 19. 



UNION BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

CLARK, CHARLES, Wagon Maker, Coral. 

CORAL CHEESE AND BUTTER ASSOCIATION, Coral. 

DERRY, NELSON W., Blacksmith, Union. 

GRENNON, MILES, Blacksmith, Union. 

KIMBALL, TRUMAN, Cooper, Coral. 

LUCAS, J. H., Shoemaker, Union. 

PECOR, WILLIAM, Carpenter, Union. 

PETTINGILL & DERRY, Blacksmiths, Union. 

READ, J. A., General Merchant, Union. 

SHERWIN, A. & A., General Merchant, Union. 

SHELDON, E. L., Physician and Surgeon, Union. 

WILKINS, HENRY, Blacksmith, Sec. 34. 



1.84 DIRECTORY OF McHENHY COUNTY. 



DORR TOWNSHIP. 

ALLEN, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Oxfordshire, 
England, September 12, 1826 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1840 ; owns 180 acres of 
lind. Married Elizabeth Grates July 4, 1857 ; she was born in New York, February 
3, 1840, and came to this county in the fall of 1856 ; has five children. 

ALLEN, H. P., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Madison Co., N. Y., 
February 26, 1839 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1840 ; owns 100 acres of land. Mar- 
ried Louisa J. Hope in 1866, who was born in Richmond, 111., in 1848 ; has one child. 

ALLEN, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in England in 
1796 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1840 ; owns 80 acres of land. Married Mary Will- 
iams in England in 1818, who was born in Wheatley, Oxfordshire, England, in 1799 ; 
had eleven children, three living. 

ABBOTT, HOMER, Butcher, Clayst. ; residence, Calhoun st., Woodstock. 

ALBRIGHT, FREDERICK, Laborer ; Woodstock. 

ANDERSON, ANDREW, Farmer, Sec. 18; Woodstock P. 0. 

ANDERSON, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 18; Woodstock P.O. 

ARNOLD, FREDERIC, Brewer; residence, Madison st., Woodstock. 

ANDERSON, N. C., Painter ; Van Buren st., Woodstock. 

ARMSTRONG, JOHN, Farmer; Woodstock. 

ASMUS, CHARLES, Restaurant Keeper; Van Buren st., Woodstock. 

AUSTIN, I. A., Liveryman, Jefferson st. ; residence, E. Jackson st., Woodstock. 

AUSTIN, W. B., Dealer in Machinery, Main st. ; residence, South st., Woodstock. 

AUSTIN, PASCO, Hardware Dealer, Cass st. ; residence, Judd st., Woodstock. 

AUSTIN, A. L., Hardware Dealer, Cass st. ; residence, Judd st., Woodstock. 

AUSTIN, WILLIAM, Carpenter and Joiner ; Woodstock. 

AUSTIN, WILLIAM, 2d, Carpenter and Joiner ; Woodstock. 

AUSTIN, B. S., Clerk for J. C. Choate ; Woodstock. 

BACHMAN, GEORGE, Butcher ; Woodstock. 

BAILEY, D. B., Farmer; Calhoun st., Woodstock. 

BALDWIN, EDMUND, Justice of the Peace, Conveyancer and Collector; 
Woodstock ; born in Hinesburgh, Chittenden Co., Vermont, February 17, 1807 ; 
lived in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., twenty-nine years; engaged in tanning leather, 
and shoe business sixteen years ; was also Justice of the Peace and Supervisor six 
years ; came to McHenry Co. 1859. Married Polly M. Alden, of Lester, Addison 
Co., Vermont, March 14, 1827 ; had nine children, six living. 

BALDWIN, I. E., Farmer, Sec. 10; Woodstock, P. 0. 

BARBER, OS1U3RNE, Farmer, Sec. 8; Woodstock P. 0. 

BADGER, AUSTIN, County Recorder ; Woodstock; born in Alden, Erie Co., 
N. Y., 1834 ; came to McHenry Co. in October, 1848; has been Constable, Town 
Collector and Deputy Sheriff of Chemung Township, also Sheriff' of McHenry Co. 
four years. Married Miss L. Smith, of McIIeury village, April, 1852 ; has one 
son, born in 1859. 

BARBER, J. N., Mechanic; Chemung st., Woodstock. 

BARROWS, G. T., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BARROWS, L. H. S., Proprietor of Foundry, Machine Shop and Planing 
Mills; Woodstock; born in Columbus, Chenango, Co., N. Y., October 8, 1826; 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 185 

came to McHenry Co. October, 1847 ; has been Collector in Greenwood Township 
one year ; taught school eight years in the county ; was member of Co. A, Fifteenth 
Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. ; after battle of Shiioh, was detailed for hospital duty in Mound 
City, and then discharged on account of disability, and since that time has been in 
present business in Woodstock. Married Emily S. Parker August 2, 1852 ; she 
was born in Bristol, Ontario Co.. N. Y., January 9, 1833 ; had six children, two boys 
and four girls ; one boy, Joseph, dead ; Mary 0., Cornelia A., Charles S., Rose 
Etta and Sarah E. living. 

BARTLETT, F. H., Butcher; Main st., Woodstock. 

BARTLETT, HARRY, Butcher; Woodstock. 

BEST, EDWIN, Works for father, Sec. 32 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BENTLEY, G. W., Farmer; Calhoun st,, Woodstock. 

BELCHER, A. C., Dentist ; South st., Woodstock. 

BEST, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BEARDSLEY, THEODORE, Painter; Madison st., Woodstock. 

BETZER, C. S., Works for Wm. Montgomery. Sec. 9 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BELL, THOS. S., Clerk in Farmers' Bank; Woodstock. 

BEACH, G. S., Liveryman ; Main st. Woodstock. 

BENNETT, EDWIN, Physician ; Clay st., Woodstock. 

BIDWELL, A., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Chemung Co., N. 
Y., in 1825; came to this county in 1848; owns 170 acres of land. Married Ellen 
S. Merchant in November, 1859; who was born in Oneida Co., N. Y., in 1835 ; 
had six children, four living. 

BIRD, E. R., Harness Maker; Woodstock; born in Chautauqua Co., N. Y., town 
of Westfield, August 19, 1829 ; engaged in harness making and mining in Cali- 
fornia twelve years, and in prospecting for silver mines in Nevada, then came to 
McHenry Co> in 1866. Married Clara A. Smith September 26, 1867; she 
was born in Warren ville, DuPage Co., 111., December 9, 1841 ; has one child, 
Frederick J., born April 27, 1875. 

BLAKESLEE, G., Merchant, Clay st. ; resides Madison st., Woodstock. 

BLOCKER, DANIEL, Laborer; Woodstock. 

BLAKESLEE, J. B., Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

BLAKESLEE, NELSON, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BLACK, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

BLAIR, DANIEL, Mechanic ; Calhoun st, Woodstock. 

BLOSSOM, E. W., Jeweler ; Woodstock ; born in Batavia, Genesee Co., N. Y., 
September 10, 1839 ; engaged in business in Lyons, Iowa, and Jefferson, Wis., as 
Jeweler; then came to McHenry Co. February 27, 1868; enlisted in Rochester, 
N. Y., in Co. C, Third N. Y. Cav., and after service of seventeen months was pro- 
moted to Second Lieutenant of same company ; mustered out May 4, 1863 ; 
assisted then in raising Co. D, First, N. Y. Vol. Cav., and served as First Lieu- 
tenant until mustered out, August 1, 1865. Married Julia Peck, September 26, 
1864 ; she was born in Brockport, N. Y., April 9, 1845. 

BLOM, OLE, Tailor; Woodstock: 

BOURNE, ANDREW, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BUCKHOUSE, JOHN, Laborer; Woodstock. 

BRINK, SIMEON, Carpenter and Joiner; Clay st., Woodstock. 

BRUSH, G. I., Sewing Machine Aeent ; Woodstock. 

BROWN, ALVIN, Mechanic, Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. O. 

BROWN, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born September 22, 
1854, at Auburn, Fayette Co., la. ; owns 80 acres of land. Married Fannie E. 
Sullivan, December 28, 1875 ; she was born in Wisconsin, January 10, 1860. 

BRYAN, THOS. S., Laborer; Calhoun st., Woodstock. 



186 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

BROPHY, C. A., Agent McCormick Reapers, etc.; Woodstock. 
BROWN, RUFUS, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
BROWN, MATHER, Lives with his father. Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
BURBANK, ELIJAH, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. O. 
BUCHARD, J. F., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BUNKER, JOHN, Woodstock ; born in Poughkeepsie, Dutchess Co., N. Y., No- 
vember 1, 1803; came to McHenry Co. in the spring of 1844; was formerly a 
merchant in Woodstock for twenty years ; was also Assessor and Justice of the Peace, 
and is at present Township Treasurer and has been such at different times for ten 
years. Married Urania Tuttle, September 18, 1825 ; she was born in Wolcott, Conn., 
November 20, 1806 ; had thirteen children, six sons and seven daughters ; one son, 
Alvin S., fell at the battle of Stone River, Tenn., Dec. 31, 1862, aged 20 years, 10 
mouths and 9 days ; one daughter, Jane, died December 8, 1848 ; eleven children 
living, George R., Lucia L. and Lucy A. (twins), Ezekiel H., Dwight, Melvin, Clar- 
issa, Harriet M., Amos K., Susannah and Mary. Mr. Bunker is a grandson of 
Bunker, formerly owner of " Bunker Hill," Boston, and from whom it de- 
rives its name. 

BUTTON, J. C., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Ridgefield P. ; born in Nunda, N. Y., in 
1820; came to this county in 1844; owns 500 acres of land. Married Roxana 
Thompson, in the spring of 1844, who was born in Coldrain, Mass., in 1820 ; had 
seven children, two living; Emma L., aged 30; and Ruby F., aged 12. 

BUNKER, GEO. K., General Merchant; Van Buren St., res. Jackson St., Woodstock. 

BUNKER, A. K.. General Merchant; Public Square, Woodstock. 

BUSKIRK, L. K., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

BUCK, W. H., Homoeopathic Physician ; Woodstock. 

CAFREY, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

CASSEL, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

CAMPBELL, ROBERT, R. R. Watchman ; Woodstock. 

CASKEY, A., Billiard Saloon Keeper; Public Square, Woodstock. 

CARR, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

CARPENTER, JEREMIAH, Laborer, Sec. 18 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

CAMPEN, TIMOTHY, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

CALLINAN, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

CAMPBELL, S. H., Renter of S. S. Gates, Sec. 36 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

CHOLLAR, A. L., Bowling Alley Keeper ; Woodstock. 

CHURCH, RICHARD, Milkman; Woodstock. 

CLARK, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

CLARK, G. D., Harness Maker; Calhoun st., Woodstock. 

CHURCH, J. B., Justice of the Peace ; Court House, Woodstock. 

CHURCH. B. F., Mail Agent. C. & N. W. R, R.; Jefferson st, Woodstock. 

CHURCH, M., MRS., Milliner; Clay st., Woodstock. 

CHOATE, J. C., Merchant ; Van Buren st., Woodstock. 

CHURCH, MALACHI, Woodstock ; born in Cortland Co., N. Y., August 4, 
1825 ; came to Woodstock in the spring of 1851 ; has been Sheriff of McHenry Co. 
four years, up to 1877. Married Miss L. E. Harper, of Cleveland, Ohio. 

CLARK, ANTHONY, Laborer; Woodstock. 

CLARK, GEORGE, Mason, Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

CLARK, ROBERT, Harnessmaker : Woodstock. 

CLARK, MICHAEL. Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

CONNEL, PATRICK, Laborer; Woodstock. 

COLTON, MORGAN, Daguerrean Artist ; Main st., Woodstock. 

CONNER, THOMAS, Section Boss. C. &. N. W. R. R.; Woodstock. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. . 187 

COWLIN, WM. H., Shoe Dealer; Front st., Woodstock. 
COLLIER. PETER, Mason ; Woodstock. 
COWLIN, A. B., Grocer; Main st., Woodstock. 
CORLET, JOHN, Carpenter and Joiner ; Woodstock. 
COQUELETTE. FRANK, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
COUSE, ANDREW, Farmer; McHenry st., Woodstock. 
COONEY, THOMAS, Grocer; Cass st,, Woodstock. 
CONLEY, MARK, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
COX, JAMES, Pastor of Baptist Church ; Woodstock. 
CRAWFORD, NEWCOMB, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
CROWLEY, TIMOTHY, Shoemaker ; Jackson st., Woodstock. 
CROWLEY, DENNIS, Laborer ; Woodstock. 

CUMINS, A. W., Teacher and Short Hand Reporter; Woodstock; born in 
Onondaga Co., N. Y., September 22, 1830 ; lived in Lenawee Co., Mich., from 
1849 to 1858; came to McHenry Co. in April, 1858; was Sergeant Fifteenth 
Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. three years; taken prisoner at Ackworth, Ga., October, 1864, 
and confined in Andersonville prison seven months ; since that time, has been 
engaged in teaching and reporting ; is, at present, President of Teachers' Associ- 
ation, of McHenry Co. Married Caroline Mauger, December 6, 1854; she was 
born in Lenawee Co., Mich., June 22, 1834 ; has two children ; Lettie, born Novem- 
ber 18, 1856, and William P., born Jan. 4, 1858. 

CURTIS, E., Carpenter and Joiner ; Woodstock. 

CURTIS, CHARLES, Daguerrean Artist ; Woodstock. 

CURTIS, B. W., Carpenter and Joiner ; Woodstock. 

DACY, L. J , Dealer in Agricultural Implements ; Woodstock. 

DAVIS, HARVEY, Painter; Chemung st., Woodstock. 

DARRELL, JOHN, Baggage Master C. & N. W. Ry. ; Clay st., Woodstock. 

DAVIS, A. F., General Merchant ; Ridgefield. 

DACY, JOHN, Mason, Clay st., Woodstock. 

DAVIS, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Wales, Decem- 
ber 15, 1848 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1860. Married Elizabeth Corrl in Sep- 
tember, 1869, who was born in Dundee, 1852 ; had three children ; two living. 

DAVIS, L. H., M. D., Physician and Surgeon ; Woodstock ; born in Onondaga 
Co., N. Y., June 13, 1822. Married Eliza C. Delemater in 1844, who was born in 
Kingston. N. Y., in 1822 ; has three children. Came to McHenry Co. in 1854. 

DEOGEL, RUDOLPH, Furniture Dealer ; Woodstock. 

DICKINSON, ALONZO, Proprietor Bowling Alley ; Madison st., Woodstock. 

DIGGINS, NELSON, Carpenter and Joiner ; Chemung st , Woodstock. 

DICKINSON, CHARLES, Boot and Shoe Dealer ; Woodstock. 

DIBBLE, J. H.. Farmer, Sec. 14; Woodstock P. 0. 

DIXON, WILLIAM, Laborer, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

DODGE, F. C., Railroad Contractor ; Woodstock. 

DOMEYER, FRED'K. Harness Maker; Woodstock. 

DONNELLY, JOHN, JR., Law Student; Woodstock. 

DONNELLY, FRANK, Clerk for Neill Donnelly ; Woodstock. 

DONNELLY, J., 2d, Laborer ; Woodstock. 

DONNELLY, FRANK, Clerk for Neill Donnelly ; Woodstock. 

DONNELLY, J., 2d, Laborer ; Woodstock. 

DONNELLY. JOHN, Saloon Keeper ; Woodstock. 

DONNELLY, NEILL, General Merchant; Woodstock; born in Killamuck, 
County of Derry, Ireland, May 12, 1816 ; came to United States in 1833, and to 
McHenry Co. in June, 1838 ; has been Coroner one term, County Sheriff one 



188 . DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

term. President of Board of Trustees one term, and Mayor of Woodstock two terms, 
and is such at present. Married Mary McElroy, June, 1837 ; she was born in Boston, 
1819; had ten children, six girls and four boys; one boy and three girls dead, 
Catherine, Adeline and John ; six living, Elizabeth A., Mary Jane, Lucinda, Frank- 
lin P., Charles H. and Hugh T. D. 

DRE YER, ALVIS, Proprietor of Laundry ; Woodstock ; born in Switzerland, 
March 11. 1855 ; came to United States in October, 1872, and to McHenry Co. in 
November, 1873. 

DURFEE, JAS. H., Express Agent; Cass st., Woodstock. 
DUFF [ELD, JOHN, Farms for father, Sec. 7 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
DUFFIELD, J. G., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
DUFFIELD, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 13; Ridgefield P. 0. 

DUFFIELD, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Randolph 
Co., West Va., in 1803; came to this Co. in 1846.; owns 140 acres of land. 
Married Annie Given (first wife), of Virginia, in 1823. Married Laura Sturde- 
vant (second wife) in 1851, of Connecticut ; had nine children ; six living. 

DUFIELD, F. OSCAR, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 4 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; 
born in Braxton Co., W. Va., in 1839 ; came to this county in 1846 ; owns 100 
acres of land. Married Miss F. Frame in 1863, who was born in Nicholas Co., W. 
Va., in 1843 ; has two children. 

DUFFIELD, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

DUFFY, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in May Co., 
Ireland, 1819 ; came to McHenry Co., 1846 ; owns 130 acres of land. Married 
Bridget Holand in 1852 ; she was born in Galway Co., Ireland; 1831 ; had seven 
children, four living. 

DWIGHT, JOSIAH, Deputy Circuit Clerk ; Huntley st., Woodstock. 

DWIGHT, W. H., Boot and Shoe Dealer ; Woodstock ; born in McHenry Co. 
March 15, 1845. Married Maggie H. Burton, April 10, 1872 ; she was born in 
Albany,, New York ; had one child, Bessie H., who died August 16, 1874. 

DYER, OWEN, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

EASTWOOD, MARTIN, Farmer ; Madison st., Woodstock. 

EARLY, J. H., Tinner; Madison st., Woodstock, 

ECKERT, H. W., Mechanic ; Madison st., Woodstock. 

ECKLER, DAVID, Painter; McHenry st., Woodstock. 

ECKERT, MICHAEL S., Blacksmith ; Washington st., Woodstock. 

ECKERT, M. G., Teamster ; Washington st., Woodstock. 

ECKERT. JACOB, Warehouseman and Shipper ; Madison st., Woodstock. 

ECKERT; GEORGE, Clerk with I. T. & A. L. Salisbury, Lake st., Woodstock. 

EDWARDS, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Scotland, 
February 25, 1817 ; came to McHenry Co., March 1, 1871. Married Annie Wat- 
son, May 27, 1855, who was born in Scotland. September, 1827 ; had seven children, 
six living. 

EDWARDS, WILLIAM, Tailor ; Hutchinson st., Woodstock. 

ELLIS, L. W., Retired Miller ; Woodstock. 

ELLISON, ALONZO, Carpenter and Joiner ; Madison St., Woodstock. 

ERCANBRACK, E. W., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Johns- 
town, Fulton Co., N. Y. ; came to this county in 1858 ; owns 120 acres of land. 
Married Mary Starr in March, 1871, who was born in McHenry Co. ; has three 
children, John E., four years old, Geo. D., two years old, Frank S., eight months. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 189 

FAIRCHILD, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
FELLOWS, J. H., Teamster; Clay st., Woodstock. 
FELT, ELAM, Traveling Agent ; Clay st., Woodstock. 
FREDERIC, PHILIP. Laborer ; Woodstock. 
FILWEBBER, GEORGE. Farmer, Sec 19 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

FERN, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Otsego Co., 
N. Y., November 17, 1832; came to McHenry Co. May 25, 1857; owns 364 
acres of land. Married Betsy Waldron, January 12, 1869, who was born in Otsego 
Co., N. Y., August 15, 1845 ; has four children. 

FEATHERSTONE, MICHAEL, Laborer; Woodstock. 

FRIEND, M. D., Laborer ; Woodstock. 

FITZPATRICK, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

FfELD, A. F., Station Agent ; Clay st., Woodstock. 

FISHER, E. EMERY, REV., Pastor Presbyterian Church ; South st., Woodstock. 

FLAVIN, MICHAEL, Blacksmith ; Woodstock. 

FLEMING, JAMES, Laborer; Woodstock. 

FOREMAN, WESTON, Farmer, Sec. 7; Wood-stock P. 0. 

FORREST, FRANCIS, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

FOSTER, WILEY, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

FOREST, SIBLEY, Boot and Shoe Dealer ; Woodstock. 

FORREST, J. S., Boot and Shoe Dealer; Woodstock; born in Richmond, 
McHenry Co., December 14, 1849. Married Helen C. Barrows, September 24, 
1873; she was born in Greenwood Township, McHenry Co., September 20, 1849 ; 
has one child, Francis G., born May 17, 1875. 

FRAME, J. A., Farmer; Woodstock P. 0. 

FRAME, NORMAN, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

FURNEY, R. J., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

FURER. EDWARD, Stock Dealer; Madison st., Woodstock'. 

GALLAGHER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

GALLAGHER, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

GATES, L. J., Hardware Dealer ; resides on South st., Woodstock. 

GILMORE, 0. H., Attorney at Law; Clay st,, Woodstock. 

GIBBONS, JOHN, Laborer; Woodstock. 

GILES, ALLEN, Grocer; Main st., Woodstock. 

GIBBONS, ANDREW, Tailor ; Woodstock. 

GLENNON, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

GOFF, DAVID, Farmer; Ridgefield. 

GLENNON, EDWARD, Printer ; Woodstock. 

GOULD, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Woodstock P. O. ; born in Bennington Co., Vt., 
in 1824; came to McHenry Co., 1855. Married Johanna Phettleplace, No- 
vember, 14, 1846, who was born in Berkshire Co., Mass., 1849; has two children. 

GREEN, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

GREGORY, S. 0., Farmer, Sec. 22; Woodstock P. 0. 

GREGORY, W. H., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

GREEN, PATRICK, Laborer ; Woodstock. 

GRACE, WILLIAM, Laborer ; Woodstock. 

GRAVES, H. A., Barber ; Clay st., Woodstock 

GREEN, WILLIS H., Farmer ; Woodstock. 

GRIFFENY, FREDERICK,. Laborer; Woodstock. 

GREEN, D. C., Physician and Surgeon ; Calhoun St., Woodstock. 

GRIDER, J,, Cigar Manufacturer, with A. Renich ; Woodstock. 

GUNDEE, J., Cigar Manufacturer, with A. Renich ; Woodstock. 



190 . DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

GREEN, ROBERT, 2D, Well Digger ; Woodstock. 

HAAS, MARTIN, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HANOFORD, AARON, Carpenter and Joiner; South st., Woodstock. 

HANOFORD, FRANK, Teamster ; South St., Woodstock. 

HANLY, PATRICK, Laborer ; Wookstock. 

HARBISON, WILLIAM, Pound Master ; McHenry st., Woodstock. 

HARBISON, WILLIAM, JR., Laborer ; Woodstock. 

HARBISON, HENRY, Laborer; Woodstock. 

HARMON, HENRY, Brewer; Woodstock. 

HARTMAN, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 25; Ridgefield P. 0. 

HARTMAN, J. G., Wagon Maker ; Ridgefield. 

HARTMAN, L. H., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

HARTMAN, ISAAC, General Merchant; Ridgefield. 

HAWLEY, R., Carpenter and Joiner, Sec. 18; Woodstock P. 0. 

HAYNOR, A. P., Carpenter and Joiner; South st., Woodstock. 

HAYS, TIMOTHY, Laborer; Woodstock. 

HAYS, TIMOTHY, JR., Laborer; Woodstock. 

HAWLEY, M. E., Telegraph Operator; Woodstock. 

HENNESY, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HILL, JOSIAH, Carpenter and Joiner ; Woodstock. 

HICKOX, MARK, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HIGGINS, BART, Mason ; McHenry st., Woodstock. 

HITCHCOCK, 0. A., Farmer ; Jackson st., Woodstock. 

HOY, M. D., General Merchant ; Cass st., Woodstock. 

HOLCOMB, ASA, Farmer, Sec. 32; Woodstock P. 0.; born in Fort Ann, 
Washington Co., in 1804 ; came to this county in 1846 ; owns 90 acres of land. 
Married Phoebe Ann Thurber in 1835, who was born in Fort Ann, Washington 
Co. ; had seven children, one living. 

HOY, L., Druggist ; Judd st., Woodstock. 

HOY, GEORGE, Merchant : Huntley st., Woodstock. 

HOY, FREMONT, Deputy County Clerk ; Huntley st., Woodstock. 

HOYT, J. L., Retired ; Chemung. st., Woodstock. 

HOYT, JAY, Proprietor of Restaurant ; Woodstock. 

HOYT, J. L., Retired Shoe Dealer ; Woodstock. 

HUGHES, EDWARD, Depot Baggage Master ; Woodstock. 

HUNT, THOMAS, Butcher ; Woodstock. 

KURD, SLOCUM, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HURTH, L. G., Farmer ; Woodstock. 

HURD, REUBEN, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Chenango Co., 
N. Y., in 1819 ; came to this county in 1844; owns 200 acres of land. Married 
Abigail Thompson in September, 1845, who was born in Orange Co., Vt., in 1816 ; 
has four children. 

HUTCHINS, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

IRWIN, CHARLES E., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

IVERSON, IVER, Teamster ; Woodstock. 

IRISH, J. A., Mason ; Clay st., Woodstock. 

IRISH, CHARLES, Mason ; Woodstock. 

IRISH, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

IRISH, JAMES M., Mason, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

ISRAEL, MORRIS, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Germany in 
1827 ; came to this county in 1871 ; owns 160 acres of land. Married Sophia 
Leopold in 1848, who was born in Germany in 1828 ; has six children. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 191 

JACKSON, ELIJAH, Farmer ; Woodstock. 
JACOBS, NORMAN, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
JACOB, GEORGE, Farmer ; Woodstock. 

JEFFERSON, R. C., Real Estate and Loan Broker ; Woodstock ; born in Gaines- 
ville, Wyoming Co., N. Y., April 24, .1843 ; came to McHenry Co. in December, 
1866 ; has been Mayor of Woodstock, elected 1875 ; resigned 1876 ; was also 
member of Town Council; served in late war in Co. A, First N. Y, Dragoons. 
Married Genevieve Church, January 21, 1868 ; she was born in McHenry Co. No- 
vember 28, 1845 ; has four children Cyrus, Rufus, Lawrence and Isadore. 

JEWETT, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 22; Woodstock P. O. 

JEWETT, E. C., Clerk First National Bank; resides Taylor St., Woodstock. 

JEWETT, FRANK, Laborer ; Woodstock. 

JEWETT, W. P., Farmer; Douglas st,, Woodstock. 

JONES, V. E., Liveryman, Sec. 4 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

JEWETT, WALTER P., Jr., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in 
Bennington Co., Vt., November 18, 1835 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1844 ; owns 
20 acres of land ; was in the Fifteenth 111. Vol. Inf. Married Miss R. A. Mont- 
gomery, 1858, who was born in Virginia, February 1836 ; has one child. 

JOHNSON, JAMES, Lake Captain ; Woodstock. 

JOHNSON, JOHN, Laborer ; Woodstock. 

JONES, L. H., works in Pickle Factory ; resides Taylor st., Woodstock. 

JONES, J. E., Mason ; Woodstock. 

JOHNSON, J. H., Born in Woodstock, Windsor Co., Vt. March 17, 1817; came 
to Illinois in September, 183G ; was Deputy Clerk of Circuit Court in 1838-9, 
also Clerk of Circuit Court from July 4, 1840, to December, 1856 ; studied law, 
and admitted to practice in 1851 ; was also Probate Justice and Clerk of County 
Commissioners ; was Director of C. & N. W. R. R., and was engaged on the line 
between Chicago and Oshkosh, soliciting subscriptions to the stock, and securing 
the right of way and purchasing timber lands, until June, 1858. Been married three 
times ; had four children, one living ; present wife was Maria Richmond, of Che- 
nango Co., N. Y. 

JOSLYN, M. L., Attorney at Law, Woodstock ; born in Livingston Co., N. Y., 
September 10, 1826 ; came to McHenry Co. in November, 1838; owns 20 acres of 
land and MaSonic Hall Block, Woodstock ; was Presidential Elector in 1856 on 
the Buchanan ticket ; was in the Legislature one term, in 1865 ; was Supervisor for 
twenty years ; also elected to the State Senate, in 1876, for four years. Married 
Mary Robinson, December 25, 1862. who was born in Pawlet, Vt., 1838 ; has two 
children. 

JOSLYN, F. C., Laborer ; Madison st., Woodstock. 
JUDD, DWIGHT, Horse Dealer ; Woodstock. 

JUDD, ALVIN, Flour and Feed Dealer, Woodstock; born in Chester, Mass., 
March 29, 1800 ; came to the State in 1836, and to this county in 1837. Married 
Eliza White in 1822, who was born in South Hadley, Mass., 1802 ; had ten chil- 
dren, six living. 

KASSON, G. T., Nurseryman ; Jackson st., Woodstock. 
KASSON, JAMES, Clerk for E. A. Murphy & Co. ; Woodstock. 
KELTZ, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
KIMBALL, FRANK, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
KEELER. PATRICK, Laborer; Ridgefield. 
KELLY, L. D., Mechanic; Ridgefield. 



192 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

KENDALL, C. N., Dentist: Clay St., Woodstock. 

KTMBALL, JAMES, Mason; South st., Woodstock. 

KIMBERLY, JUDD, Carpenter and Joiner ; Main st., Woodstock. 

KINGMAN, A. J., Map Agent; Madison st., Woodstock. 

KIRK, JOHN A., Milk Dealer ; Madison st., Woodstock. 

KLINCK, L. B., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

KLINE. VV. L., Principal of Public School ; Throop St., Woodstock. 

KNAPP, JARED, Farmer, Sec. 18; Woodstock P. O. 

KNAPP, IRA, Mechanic; Ridgefield. 

KNEBUSH, CHARLES, Laborer, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

KNIGHT, MORGAN, Farmer; Woodstock. 

KNIGHT, MAC, Laborer ; Woodstock. 

KNAPP, WOOLSEY, Farmer; Woodstock. 

KNUDTSON, G., Laborer; Woodstock. 

KNUDTSON, ERICK, Laborer; Woodstock. 

KNEBUSH. WILLIAM, R. R. Section Boss; Woodstock. 

KOPPLER, LOUIS, Saloon Keeper : Throop st., Woodstock. 

KOPPLER, CHAS., Saloon Keeper ; Main st., Woodstock. 

KUHN, JACOB, Blacksmith; Woodstock. 

LAIRY, PATRICK, Laborer; Woodstock. 

LAMB, E. M., Retired; Washington st., Woodstock. 

LAWSON, 0. H., Works for father, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

LAWSON, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

LAMBERT, MARTIN, Wagon Maker; Woodstock. 

LEWIS, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

LEMMERS, C. F., Carpenter and Joiner ; Taylor st., Woodstock. 

LINDSAY, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

LINDSAY, WILLIAM, R. R. Watchman ; Woodstock. 

LINDSAY, ARCHIBALD, Farmer; Woodstock. 

LINK, BARNEY, Farmer ; Jackson st., Woodstock. 

LOCKWOOD, M., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

LOSEY, JOSEPH, Farmer and Mason, Sec. 18 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

LOSEE, CHARLES, Boot and Shoe Dealer ; Woodstock. 

LOUNSBURY, M. M., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

LUNNEY, JAMES, Saloon Keeper; Woodstock. 

LYONS, MILES H., Farmer, Sec. 33; Woodstock P. 0. ; feorn in Mayo Co., 
Ireland, in 1835 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1856 ; owns 80 acres of land. Mar- 
ried Ellen Clark November 13, 1855 ; she was born in Mayo Co., Ireland, in 1836 ; 
has thirteen children. 

MACOMBER, JOB A., Farmer, Sec. 12; Woodstock P. 0.; born in Mont- 
gomery Co., N. Y., Feb. 13, 1810 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1836 ; owns 43 acres 
of land. Married Maria Frank in 1861, who was born in New York in 1817 ; no 
children. 

MANSFIELD, GEORGE, Night Police ; Jackson st., Woodstock. 

MARROW, OWEN, Farmer, Sec. 28; Woodstock P. 0. 

MATHONEY, J. M., Daguerreotypist, Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MARCUS, FREDERICK, Saloon Keeper; Calhoun st., Woodstock. 

MALZER, A., Butcher ; Woodstock. 

MAHER, THOMAS, Harness Maker and City Clerk ; Woodstock. 

MATTHEWS. GEORGE, Laborer; W-odstock. 

MARTIN, A. A., Traveling Agent; E. Jackson st., Woods:ock. 

McBROOM, THOMAS, Works father's farm, Sec. 16 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

McBROOM, WILLIAM. Farmer, Sec. 16; Woodstock P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 193 

McCAHILL, M. H., Shoemaker; Clay st., Woodstock. 

McCONNEL, A. B., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in McHenry 
Co. February, 1839 ; owns 340 acres of land. Married Hattie S. Potter, Feb- 
ruary, 1861, who was born in Whitehall, N. Y., July, 1839 ; has five children. 

McGHEE, JAMES, Laborer; Woodstock. 

McGHEE, A. F., Clerk; Cass st., Woodstock. 

McNULTY, HUGH, Laborer; Woodstock. 

McNAUGHTON, A., Railroad Engineer; Woodstock. 

McNETT, S., Boot and Shoe Dealer ; Woodstock. 

McLAREN, J. A., Farmer ; Huntley st., Woodstock. 

McMAHON, JOHN, JR., Laborer; Woodstock. 

McMANUS, JOHN, Tailor ; residence Throop st., Woodstock. 

MclNTOSH, STEPHEN, Laborer, Sec. 4 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

McMAHON, PETER, Laborer; Woodstock. 

MEAD, CHARLES, Carpenter and Joiner, Sec. 8; Woodstock. 

MEDLER, J. S., Daguerrean Artist; resides Dean st., Woodstock. 

MILLER, CALVIN, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock. 

MILLER, DAVID, Farmer ; Lake St., Woodstock. 

MILLER, JASON, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MILLER, F. E., News Dealer; residence Madison st., Woodstock. 

MONTGOMERY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MONTGOMERY, ARCHIBALD, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MORSE, ALBERT, Farmer, Sec. 24; Ridgefield P. 0. 

MORSE, SAMUEL, Farmer and Physician, Sec. 24 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

MONROE, JAMES, Railroad Agent ; Ridgefield. 

MONROE, WILLIAM, Clerk with father ; Ridgefield. 

MORLEY, M. M., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Ridgefield P. 0. ; born in Cayuga Co., N. Y., 
1834 ; came to McHenry Co. July, 1870 ; owns 158 acres of land. Married Mary 
J. Paine, October, 1871, who was born in Cayuga Co., N. Y., 1843; no children. 

MORSE, SHERMAN, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 
MULLEN, J. M., General Merchant ; resides on Judd st., Woodstock. 
MURPHY, A. R., Druggist ; resides on Dean st., Woodstock. 
MUNGER, J. C., Carpenter and Joiner; Jackson St., Woodstock. 
MUDD, W. A., Physician ; Public Square, Woodstock. 

MURPHY, THEO. D., Hon., Judge of the Second Judicial Circuit since 1862; 
born in Virginia June 12, 1826; came to McHenry Co., July 18, 1845; was 
County Judge of McHenry Co. four years ; was elected Judge of the Circuit Court 
three terms, for six years each ; in May, 1875, formed a copartnership with Hon. R. 
Bishop for the purpose of banking in Woodstock, in which business he is at this 
time engaged, in addition to his duties as Judge. Married Mary E. Prouty Novem- 
ber 13, 1851, in McHenry; she was born in Middlebury, Addison Co., Vt. ; had 
three children Otis J., born July 26, 1852, died November 19, 1870 ; Edwin D., 
born June 29, 1854; Alice M., -born March 19, 1861. 

MURPHY, A. J., Farmer; Ridgefield. 

MURPHY, W., Farmer; Ridgefield. 

MURPHY, EDWARD, Farmer ; Ridgefield. 

MURPHY, JNO. J., President First National Bank; Woodstock. 

MURPHY, E. A, Dry Goods Merchant ; resides on Judd st., Woodstock. 

MURPHY, P. W., Dentist; Woodstock. 

MULDOON, PATRICK, Farmer Sec. 6; Woodstock P. O. 

NEIMAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

NELSON, NEIL, Laborer ; Woodstock. 



194 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

NETTLETON, H. T., Cabinet Maker ; South st., Woodstock. 

NEWMAN, S. L., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

NEWTON, A., REV., Pastor M. E. Church ; resides on South st., Woodstock. 

NISH, JAMES, County Treasurer, Woodstock ; residence, Gary Station ; born in 
Wigtonshire, Scotland. May 3, 1824; came to Illinois in 1851 ; purchased a store in 
Gary, McHenry Co., 1855 ; opened a general store in the spring of 1856, under the 
name of J. Nish & Bro., and continued the same to March, 1873; was appointed 
Postmaster the same year ; was Town Clerk one year and served five years at differ- 
ent times as Supervisor of Algonquin Township ; was elected County Treasurer 
in November, 1875, for two years ; enlisted August 9, 1862, and raised a company in 
Algonquin and Grafton Townships ; was mustered into the United States Volunteer 
Service, at Ruckford, as Captain Co. I, Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. ; mustered out at 
Springfield September 21, 1865. Married Caroline A. Dorrington (first wife), of 
Chicago, December 12, 1853, who was killed by lighting October 1, 1857, leaving 
two children Elizabeth J., born April 11, 1855, died Novembers, 1872, and John 
D., born April 8, 1857. Married Sarah R. Smith (second wife) November 12, 
1865 ; has two children Elizabeth J., born March 28, 1868, and Auri M., born 
April 6, 1871. 

NORTON, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in County of 
Made, Ireland, 1830 ; came to this county in 1851 ; owns 85 acres of land. Mar- 
ried Bridget Connolly 1871, who was born in County of Monohan, Ireland, 1846. 
and came to this county 1871 ; has seven children. 

NORTON, NELSON, Lumber Dealer; resides on Madison st., Woodstock. 
NORTON, STEDM AN, Lumber Dealer ; resides on Madison st., Woodstock. 
NORTHROP, JAMES, Physician and Surgeon ; Woodstock. 
NOTTINGHAM, J., Farmer; Woodstock. 

NORTH COTT, T. C., REV., Pastor Congregational Church ; boards on Jackson St., 
Woodstock. 

NORTH WAY, L. C., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Madison Co., 
N. Y., June 20, 1810 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1868 ; owns 67 acres of land. 
Married Mahala Cadwell January 1, 1843, who was born in Madison Co., N. Y., in 
1818; has three children. 

O'CONNOR, EUGENE, Machine Agent; Calhoun st., Woodstock. 
O'BRIEN, JAMES, Works for E. R. Caskey ; Woodstock. 
O'BRIEN, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
OLESON, DAVID, Laborer ; Woodstock. 
OLMSTEAD, E. T., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
ORMSBY, C. H., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 
ORMSBY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 
OSMAN, R. J., Carpenter; Woodstock. 
PAGE, L. S., Conductor; Clay st., Woodstock. 
PARKER, J. F., Farmer ; Clay st., Woodstock. 
PAYNE, WALDO, Farmer ; Madison st., Woodstock. 
PARRISH, JOHN A., Attorney at Law ; Clay st., Woodstock. 

PAINE, N. M., Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Ridgefield P. O. ; born in Cayuga Co., N. Y., in 
1844 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1865 ; wa Sergeant in the One Hundred and 
Eleventh N. Y. Vol. Inf. Married Francis A. Paine April 4, 1876, who was born in 
Cayuga Co., N. Y., in 1846. 

PARKER, WILLIAM, Blacksmith; Woodstock. 

PARKER, J. C., Retired Farmer; boards Chemung st., Woodstock. 

PEASE, ASA, Mechanic; Chemung st, Woodstock. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 195 

PENDLETON, HUBBARD, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

PETERSON, AARON, Shoemaker ; Woodstock. 

PETERSON, SEVER, Shoemaker; Wooodstock. 

PETRIE, JOSEPH, Shoemaker; Huntley st,, Woodstock. 

PHELPS, G. W., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

PIKE, CALVIN, Carpenter and Joiner; Woodstock. 

PRATT, E. W., Farmer, Sec, 8, Woodstock P. 0. 

PRATT, GEORGE; Blacksmith; residence, Madison st, Woodstock. 

PRATT, FRANK, Printer; Woodstock. 

PUGH, REES, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

PRATT, H. L., Medical Student ; Woodstock. 

QUIGLEY, MRS., Dressmaker ; north side Public Square, Woodstock. 

QUINLAN, C., Miller ; residence, Throop st., Woodstock. 

QUINN, JOHN, Teamster ; Chemung st,, Woodstock. 

RIEBER, JOHN, Laborer ; Chemung st., Woodstock. 

REED, A., Boot and Shoe Dealer ; Woodstock. 

REED, A., Mrs., Milliner and Dressmaker ; Woodstock. 

RENICH, FRED., Cigar Manufacturer ; Woodstock ; born in Berne, Switzerland, 
March 19, 1842 ; came to the United States in September, 1864 ; entered the Union 
Army the same winter as private of Co. L. Ninth Regt. 111. Cavalry, and served one 
year ; then started in the cigar business in Chicago, and was burnt out in the summer 
of 1866; came to McHenry Co. in January, 1867; is Alderman of the City of 
Woodstock. Married his first wife, Elizabeth Stein, July 26, 1866, who died Octo- 
ber 24, 1867, in Woodstock ; she was born in Chicago ; married his second wife, 
Kate Stein, September 22, 1871 ; she was also born in Chicago ; had four children, 
one boy by the first wife, born dead, and two boys, respectively five and one and one- 
. half years of age, by his second wife. Mr. Renich has built up and carries on a 
large business in the manufacture of cigars. 

RETTERER, CHRISTIAN, Retired ; Main st., Woodstock. 

RETTERER, Charles, Blacksmith ; Woodstock. 

RICHMOND, E. H., Propr. Richmond House ; Woodstock. 

RICHARDS, JERRY, Produce Dealer ; Woodstock. 

RICHARDS, CORYDON, Musician ; Cass st., Woodstock. 

RICHARDS, ERASTUS, Deputy Circuit Clerk ; residence, Madison st., Woodstock. 

RICHARDS, T. J., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in 1802 at Plain- 
field, Mass. ; came to this county in 1839 ; owns 146 acres land. Married Lorinda 
P. Haven in 18o6, who was born in Norage, N. Y. ; has five children. 

RICHARDS, E. EMORY, Abstract Clerk and Clerk of Circuit Court; Wood- 
stock; born in Norfolk Co., Mass., February 12, 1838; came to this county June 
12, 1852 ; was a member of the Fifteenth 111. Vol. Inf. ; was President of the Board 
of Trustees, of Woodstock, one term, also Alderman one term ; was elected, in 1876, 
Clerk of the Circuit Court for four years. Married Francis A. Wait July 19, 1864 ; 
she was born in McHenry Co. ; -no children. 

RIDER, THOMAS W., Farmer ; Woodstock. 

RIDER, E. D., Livery Stable Keeper ; residence Madison st., Woodstock. 

RILEY, MATTHEW, Cooper; Chemung st,, Woodstock. 

RILEY, JAMES, Cooper ; Chemung st., Woodstock. 

RINGLAND, W. D., Editor and Publisher Woodstock New Era; Woodstock; 
born in Amherst, Loraine Co., Ohio, June 19, 1839 ; came to McHenry Co. 1865 ; 
value of property $5,000 ; was a merchant at Algonquin seven years. Married 
Amanda Matthews, of Geaugo Co., Ohio, in October, 1866 ; has four children. 



196 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

RING, D. T., Shoemaker ; residence Chemung St., Woodstock. 

ROBINSON, D. W., Money and Real Estate Broker; res. Jackson St., Woodstock. 

ROBINSON, WM. B., Laborer; Woodstock. 

ROGERSON, OLE, Carpenter and Joiner ; Woodstock. 

ROGERS, JOHN, Laborer; Woodstock. 

ROONEY, PATRICK, Laborer ; Chemung st., Richmond. 

ROONEY, JAMES, Laborer ; Chemung st., Richmond. 

ROONEY, MICHAEL, Laborer; Woodstock. 

ROSSLER, RICHARD, Tin Peddler ; Chemung st., Woodstock. 

ROSSALL, RICHARD, R. R. Employe ; E. Jackson st., Woodstock. 

ROWLEY, STEPHEN, Laborer; Woodstock. 

RUSSELL, GEO. W., Machine Agent ; Woodstock. 

RYAN, JOHN, Laborer; Chemung st., Woodstock. 

RYDER, T. J., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

SALISBURY, I. T. & A. L., General Merchants; Woodstock. I. T. was 
born in Carthage, Jefferson Co., N. Y., March 5, 1830 ; came to McHenry Co. in 
1860 ; married Susan E. Arnold June 16, 1852, who died in Woodstock January 
22, 1873 ; she was bora in Norwich, Chenango Co., N. Y., November 15, 1830 ; no 
children. A. L. was born in Carthage, Jefferson Co., N. Y., October 15, 1826 ; 
came to McHenry Co. in fall of 1863 ; married Sophronia Crandall, May 9, 1847, 
who was born in Watertown, Jefferson Co., N. Y., in November, 1826 ; has four 
children, Emma S., George W., Mattie E. and Albert W. 

SALISBURY, GEO. W., Architect and Sketcher ; Madison st., Woodstock. 

SAUNDERS, J. D., Mason ; Woodstock. 

SANFORD, HUD., Laborer; Woodstock. 

SANFORD, W. H., Merchant Tailor ; Woodstock ; born in the city of New 
York July 23. 1827; came to McHenry Co. January 1, 1858; was Alderman in 
1871 ; equipped Co. A, Fifteenth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf., purchasing materials and 
making the uniforms inside of two weeks. Married Mary Jackson, December 24, 
1848, who was born in Somerstown, N. Y., September 7, 1825; has six children, 
five boys and one girl. 

SANFORD, STANLEY, Farmer; Woodstock. 

SANDO, WILLIAM, Renter of C. Duffield, Sec. 18; Woodstock P. 0. 

SAWYER, WM., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 27 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in 
Grafton Co., N. H., 1805; came to this county in 1851 ; owns 277 acres of land. 
Married Savilla Hayes in 1838, who was born in Orange Co., Vt., 1806 ; had two 
children, one living, Helen Gorham, 35 years old. 

SCHRYVER, J. L., Farmer, Sec. 11; Woodstock P. 0. 
SCRANTON, L. W., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
SCHRYVER, R. G., Boss Mechanic ; Clay st., Woodstock. 
SCHRYVER, CHARLES, Carpenter and Joiner; Huntley St., Woodstock. 
SCHRYVER', FREDERICK, Laborer; Huntley st., Woodstock. 
SCHRIVER, LEVI. Laborer, Huntley st., Woodstock. 
SCHWAMP, JACOB, Laborer; McHenry st., Woodstock. 
SCHENCK, JACOB, Laborer; Woodstock. 

SCOTT, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Scotland in 
1816; came to this country in 1840; came to this county in 1853; owns 80 acres 
of land. Married Jennette Lindsey in 1854, who was born in Scotland and came 
to this country in 1838 ; had four children, three living. 

SCOTT, JOHN, Fanner, Sec. 18; Woodstock P. 0.; born in Scotland in 1810; 
came to this country in 1869. Married Agnes Muir, 1836, who was born in Scot- 
land, 1814 ; has eleven children, all living. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 197 

SCOTT, ANDREW, Farmer ; Woodstock; born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, Janu- 
ary 1, 1822 ; came to United States in 1840 and to McHenry Co. in 1842. Mar- 
ried Sarah A. Spooner, March 26, 1844 ; she was born in State of Vermont ; had 
eight children five girls and three boys ; William. Henry and James died ; Alice, 
Anna, Mary, Mariah, Metella and John living. 

SELLERS, CHARLES, Farmer ; South st., Woodstock. 
SESSIONS, ALBERT, Farmer; South st., Woodstock. 

SEYMOUR, W. M., Agent of the Wheeler & Wilson Sewing Machine ; residence 
and P. 0.. Woodstock ; born in Westchester Co., N. Y., March 29, 1844 ; came to 
McHenry Co. July 29, 1874. Married Mary E. Diggins, of Woodstock, 111., July 
29, 1875. 

SHERWOOD, G. N., City Weigher ; Woodstock. 

SHEETS, A. B., Wagon Maker ; South st., Woodstock. 

SHORT, JOHN D., Assessor and City Weigher; resides Jackson st., Woodstock. 

SHEARER, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 16; Woodstock P. 0. 

SHERWOOD, GEORGE L., Proprietor of Waverly House; Woodstock; born 
in McDonough, Chenango Co., N. Y., May 1, 1836 ; came to McHenry Co. in the 
spring of 1853. Married Emily A. Wait, December 1, 1857, who was born in 
Crystal Lake, July 28, 1840 ; has one child, Helen, born September 28, 1858. 

SHERMAN, WILLIAM, Carpenter and Joiner ; Woodstock. 

SHERMAN, M., Jeweler ; Woodstock ; born in Tompkins Co., N. Y., April 25, 
1840 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1844. Married Sarah Emma Vale, March 16, 
1871 ; she was born in St. Thomas, county of Elgin, Canada, June 30, 1851 ; had 
two children, one girl and one boy; the daughter, Cynthia Ann, born October 13, 
1872, died August 28, 1873 ; son living, Marvin V., born March 28,, 1875. 

SHORT, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

SHOLTZ, JOHN, Farmer ; born in Germany in 1837 ; came to this county in 
1862. Married Dora Seal in 1859, who was born in Germany in 1832 ; has seven 
children. 

SIMMONS, R. P., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

SKINNER, W. H., Farmer; Fremont st., Woodbtock. 

SKINNER, ALFRED, School Teacher ; Woodstock. 

SLOCUM, IRA., Stock Dealer; resides Jackson st., Woodstock. 

SLY, A., Painter ; Woodstock. 

SMITH, FRANK L., Sal >on Keeper ; resides Clay st., Woodstock. 

SMITH, THOMAS, Laborer ; Fremont st., Woodstock. 

SMITH, EZRA B., Clerk ; Ridgefield. 

SMITH, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

SMITH, B. N., Attorney at Law and Judge of County Court ; resides Throop St., 
Woodstock. 

SMITH, L. P., Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

SMITH, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

SMITH, ASA W., Postmaster and Attorney at Law ; Woodstock. 

SMITH, JOSEPH, Farmer, Seu. 19 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

SNYDER, ADAM, Tailor, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

SNYDER, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Northumberland 
Co., Penn., in 1825 ; came to McHenry Co. May 14, 1850 ; owns 148 acres of 
land ; has been Road Commissioner nine years. Married S. Parks, January, 1853, 
who was born in Boston, Mass., 1835 ; has one child, Charles, eighteen years of age. 

SOLVERSON, THOMAS, Real Estate and Loan Broker ; Prairie st., Woodstock. 



198 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

SONDERICKER, PETER, Tailor ; Calhoun st, Woodstock. 

SOUTHWORTH, G. S., Editor and Publisher Woodstock Sentinel, Woodstock ; 
born in Orange Co., Vt., January 26, 1835 ; came to McHenry Co., 1858 ; 
value of property, $6,000 ; was County Superintendent of Schools four years ; was 
Quartermaster of the Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. Married Sarah Z. Miller, of Al- 
gonquin, McHenry Co., October 31, 1860 ; has three children. 

SOUTHWORTH, JOHN M., Attorney at Law, Woodstock ; born at Brad- 
ford, Orange Co., Vt., May 21, 1839 ; came to Illinois February, 1857, and to 
McHenry Co. 1858 ; entered the Seventh Regfc. 111. Inf., the first regiment organi- 
zed in the State on April 19, 1861, and onthtvlSth of September, 1861, he entered 
the Eighth 111. Cav. as Lieutenant Co. H ; served upward of five years, leaving the 
army with the rank of Major; in fall of 1866, elected Sheriff of McHenry Co. ; in 
fall of 1868, elected Clerk of Circuit Court of said county ; in June, 1873, com- 
menced the practice of law at Woodstock ; August, 1873, was appointed by the 
Governor Commissioner of the Illinois State Penitentiary, which position he now 
holds. 

SPOONER, PERRY. Horse Dealer ; Woodstock. 
SPOONER, ISAAC, Drayman ; Calhoun st., Woodstock. 
STEVENS, G. B., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
STARR, J. J. W., Farmer, Woodstock. 

STEDMAN, D. A., County Sheriff, Woodstock ; born in Chautauqua Co., N. 
Y., August 22, 1836; came to McHenry Co. November, 1854; has been Consta- 
ble two terms, 1858 and 1874; was elected County Sheriff November, 1876; busi- 
ness has been that of a carpenter ; was Superintendent in the construction of the 
Illinois Industrial University, Champaign, also Superintendent of University Shops, 
1&72-3 ;* was member of Co. E, Ninety-fifth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. Married Emily 
M. Lawrence, July 22, 1857; she was born in Allegany Co., N. Y., Town of 
Cuba, August 24, 1838 ; no children. 

STONE, A. E., Blacksmith; Woodstock. 

STEWART, W. H., Farmer, Jackson st., Woodstock. 

STILL, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

ST. CLAIR, J. C., Farmer, Sec. 15; Woodstock P. 0. 

STONE, E. E., Druggist ; Residence South st., Woodstock. 

STONE, G. F., Druggist; Residence South st., Woodstock. 

STONE, HENRY, Shoemaker ; Woodstock. 

STONER, W. H., Boarding House Keeper ; Woodstock P. 0. 

STONER, EZRA, Works father's farm, Sec. 17 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

TAYLOR, ALPHEUS, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

THOMAS, C. G., Merchant, Woodstock. 

THOMPSON, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

THOMAS, EDWIN E., General Merchant, Woodstock; born in Middleburg, 
N. Y., December 19, 1823 ; came to McHenry Co. 1837 ; has been County Sher- 
iff two terms, 1859-'60 and 1864-'65 ; also School Director and member of 
Board of Education ; twenty years in different points in the county. Married 
Naomi R. Patterson, January 1, 1845 ; she was born in Bethany, N. Y., July 13, 
1827 ; had four children, three boys and one girl ; one son died May 19, 1876 ; 
those living, Charles G., born October 18, 1845 ; Earl D., born January 3, 1847, 
and Cora E., born July, 1851. 

THOMPSON, WILBER, Works father's farm, Sec, 4; Woodstock P. 0. 
THOMPSON, 0. G., Retired; Woodstock. 
TOLES, JOB, Miller ; Woodstock. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 199 

TERWILLIGER, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
TERWILLIGER, B. H., Farmer, Sec. 12; Woodstock P. 0. 

TODD, R. K., Principal of Todd's Seminary for boys, Woodstock ; born in Row- 
ley, Mass., October 14, 1815; came to McHcnry Co. July, 1847; graduated at 
Princeton College, New Jersey, 1842, and in Theological Seminary of same, 1847; 
was Pastor of First Presbyterian Church of Woodstock for eighteen years, and for 
four years Superintendent of Schools of McHenry Co. Married Martha C. Clover, 
June 23, 1 847 ; she was born in New York City ; had three sons, one living, Henry 
A., now Professor of Modern Languages in Princeton College, New Jersey. 

TONY, JOHN, Wagon Maker ; Woodstock. 

TOWER, JAMES, Blacksmith; Washington at., Woodstock. 

TOFT, R. E., Carpenter and Joiner ; Woodstock. 

TRIPP, DANIEL, Harness Maker ; residence Hay ward st., Woodstock. 

TRUAX, DAYTON, Lives with S. 0. Gregory, Sec. 22 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

VANCUREN, J. H., Law Student; residence, Madison st., Woodstock. 

VANCUREN, SABINE, Constable; Madison st., Woodstock. 

W^AIT, H. M., Engineer and Gunsmith ; Woodstock ; born in Genesee Co., N. Y., 
town of Darien, September 11, 1810 ; came to Illinois in 1836, and to McHenry Co. 
in 1840 ; has been Sheriff two terms, from 1842 to 1846, and County Commis- 
sioner two years. Married Narina King January 8, 1833, in Alexander, Genesee 
Co., N. Y. ; she was born in same place, June, 1811 ; has two daughters Emma 
A., wife of G. L. Sherwood, and Francis A., wife of E. E. Richards. Mr. Wait 
built the county building about 1844, known as the " Rat Hole," still standing ; he 
also built and kept hotel at Crystal Lake in 1846, now known as the "Crystal Lake 
House." 

WALKUP, WM. P., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Ridgefield P. 0. ; born in Frankfort, 
Va. ; came to this county in 1835; owns 210 acres of land. Married Eliza L. 
White in 1848, who was born in Bond Co., 111., in 1823 ; had three children; one 
living Lowell A., twenty-six years of age. 

WATSON, H. L., Drayman ; Calhoun St., Woodstock. 
WATERMAN, G. W., Farmer, Sec. 19; Woodstock P. 0. 
WATERMAN, N. K., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
WEBBER, PETER, Chair Maker; Woodstock. 
WEINKE, CHARLES, Mason, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
WEIR, HIRAM, Shoemaker ; Woodstock. 

WHEAT, JOHN S., Druggist; Woodstock; born in Grafton, Grafton Co., 
N. H., March 9, 1822 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1852, and was engaged eighteen 
years in the construction of the C. & N. W. Ry. , and as Road Master of same ; was 
President of Board of Trustees, and afterward first Mayor of Woodstock, under 
township organizations, in 1873; also member of Board of Education four years. 
Married Amanda M. Church January 3, 1865 ; she was born in Wellington, 
Lorain Co., 0., August 17, 1837; has three children; John K. born Augusts. 
1856; Mabel H. born October 18, 1861, and Allie M. born January 15, 1870. 

WHEELER, BAINBRIDGE, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

WHEELER, ADOLPHUS, Farmer, Sec. 23; Ridgefield P. 0.; born in 
Cortland Co., N. Y. ; came to this county in 1843 ; owns 80 acres of land. Mar- 
ried Miss S. Robinson June 10, 1865,who was born in Indiana in 1848 ; has four chil- 
dren ; Merick nine years, Cora seven years, Henry five years and Mary three years. 

WHITETHORNE, THOMAS, Laborer; Woodstock. 
WHITSON, OSCAR, Hardware Dealer ; Woodstock. 



200 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

WHITSON, EDWIN, Hardware Dealer; Woodstock. 

WHITSON, THOMAS, Dealer in Hardware and Stoves; Woodstock; born in 
Queens Co.. N. Y., May 15, 1811 ; came to Waukegan in fall of 1848, engaged in 
business there until 1854, when he moved to Woodstock and bought out the firm of 
Moore & Van Dyke (grocers aad hardware dealers). He sold out in 1856, and 
ever since has carried on the tin and hardware business. Married Hannah P. 
Bouttell February 2, 1833; she was born in Boston, Mass., July, 1815. 

WHITETHORNE, PETER, Laborer ; Woodstock. 

WHITNEY, P., Clerk of the County Court; Woodstock; born in Fort Ann, 
Washington Co., N. Y., June 13, 1830 ; came to Richmond, McHenry Co., in 
1849 ; owns 232 acres of land. Married Harriet A. Fenner, November 29, 1857 ; 
she was born in Rensselaer Co., N. Y., in 1834; had six children; three living 
Mary, Hamlin and Sarah ; three dead. 

WILEY, W. H., Engineer, works for J. Toles ; residence, Fremont st., Woodstock. 

WILSON, SILUS, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

WILSON, HENRY, Farmer ; Woodstock. 

WRIGHT, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

WRIGHT, B. F., Expressman; Woodstock. 

WOODARD, L. M., Carpenter and Joiner, Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

WOODARD, 0. P., Carpenter and Joiner ; Woodstock. 

YOUNG, HENRY. Marble Dealer ; residence, Main St., Woodstock. 

YOUNG, JOHN, Blacksmith; Woodstock. 

YOUNG, GEO. W., Carpenter and Joiner ; Huntley st., Woodstock. 

YOUNG, L. J., Clerk; Madison st., Woodstock. 

YULE, J. G., Laborer; Woodstock. 

ZEIRKE, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

ZIMMERMANN. JACOB, Brewer; Woodstock. 

ZIMPLEMAN, JOHN, Clerk for Hoy & Son; resides Madison st., Woodstock. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



201 



WOODSTOCK BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



E. BALDWIN, 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, 

NORTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 

BUNKER & BROS., 

GENERAL MERCHANTS, 

SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



J. H. BAGLEY, 

Lumber, Lath and Shingles, 

CLAY ST., OPPOSITE DEPOT. 



L. H. S. BARROWS, 

Foundry and Machine Shop, 

CLAY AND CHURCH STS. 



FARMERS' BANK 

OF 

MURPHY & BISHOP, 

NORTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



E. E. RICHARDS, 

ABSTRACT OFFICE 

COURT HOTJSF;. 



FRED. RENICH, 

Manufacturer of Cigars, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, 
EAST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



W. H. SANFORD, 

MERCHANTTAILOR, 

EAST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE, 



E. R. BIRD, 

Harness, Saddles and Collars, 



I. T. & A. L. SALISBURY, 

GENERAL MERCHANTS, 

SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE 



E. W. BLOSSOM, 



EAST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



M. SHERMAN, 

CTZEWIE LZEIR,, 

NORTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



R. BISHOP, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

NORTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



J. M. SOUTHWORTH, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

EAST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



ALOIS DREYER, 

LAUN DRY 



W. M. SEYMOUR, 

^A.a-EITT 

TOEELEU ' SEICHINE5 



202 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



WOODSTOCK BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



DWICHT & FORREST, 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 

Established 1865. 
NORTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



NEILL DONNELLY, 

GENERAL MERCHANT, 

WEST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



R. C. JEFFERSON, 

Real Estate and Loan Office, 

MASONIC BLOCK. 



M. L. JOSLYN, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

NORTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



EDWIN E. THOMAS, 

GENERAL MERCHANT, 

SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



ALVIN JUDD, 

FLOUR AND FEED DEALER 

WASHINGTON ST. 

"WOODSTOCK SENTINEL," 

G. S. SOUTHWORTH, 

EDITOR AND PROP'R, 
NORTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



JAMES NISH, 

GENERAL MERCHANT, 

GARY STATION. 



JOHN S. WHEAT, 

ZDIR/TJO-OIST, 

SOUTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



H. M. WAIT, 

GKCJ 1ST S UVC I T HI, 

CLAY AND HUTCHINS STS. 



T. WHITSON & SONS, 

STOVES AND mm 

EAST SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



WAVERLY HOUSE, 

G. L. SHERWOOD, - - Prop'r, 

CLAY STREET. 



'WOODSTOCK NEW ERA," 

W. D. RINGLAND, 

EDITOR AND PROP'R. 
DACY'S BLOCK. 



T. F. COONEY, 

Q-DR/OOIEIR/XIES, 

NORTH SIDE PUBLIC SQUARE. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 203 



WOODSTOCK BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

AMERICAN EXPRESS CO., J. H. DURFEE, Agent, Cass st. 

ARNOLD & HARMON, Brewers. 

AUSTIN & SON, Hardware Dealers, Cass st. 

AUSTIN, J. A., Livery Stable, Jefferson st. 

AUSTIN, W. B., Dealer in Machinery, Main st. 

ANDERSON, N. C., Painter, Van Buren st. 

ASMUS & HOYT, Restaurant, Van Buren st. 

BACHMAN & ABBOTT, Meat Market, Clay st. 

BARTLETT, F. H., Meat Market, Main st. 

BELCHER, A. C., Dentist, Van Buren st. 

BENNETT, EDWIN, Physician and Surgeon, Clay st. ' 

BEACH & JONES, Livery Stable, Main st. 

BLAKESLEE & BUNKER, General Merchants, Clay st. 

BRINK, SIMON, Carpenter and Joiner. 

BROPHY, C. A., Agent for McCormick's Reapers, Cass and Clay st. 

BUCK, W. H., Homoeopathic Physician, Clay st. 

CASKEY, A., Saloon and Billiard Hall, Cass st. 

CHOATE, J. C., General Merchant, Van Buren st. 

CHURCH, JAS. B., Justice of the Peace, Court House. 

CHURCH M., MRS., Milliner and Dressmaker, Clay st. 

COLTON & CURTIS, Daguerrean Gallery, Main st. 

CHOLLAR, A. L., Bowling Alley, Clay st. 

COONEY, THOMAS, Grocer, Cass st. 

COWLIN, A. B., Grocer, Main st. 

DACY, T. J., Dealer in Agricultural Implements, Washington and Clay sts. 

DEIZEL, RUDOLPH, Furniture Dealer, Cass st. 

DICKINSON, CHARLES, Boot and Shoe Dealer, Clay st. 

DICKINSON, A., Bowling Alley, Clay st. 

DONNELLY, JOHN, Saloon, Court House st. 

ECKLER, DAVID, Painter. 

ECKERT & RICHARDS, Warehousemen and Shippers, Clay st. 



204 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK, Neill Donnelly, President ; J. J. Murphy, Cashier ; 

cor. E. Jackson st. 

PURER & SLOCUM, Stock Buyers. 
GILES, ALLEN, Grocer, Main st. 
GILMORE & COON, Attorneys at Law, Main st. 
GRAVES, H. A., Barber, Clay st. 
GREEN, D. C., Physician and Surgeon, Van Buren st. 
HOY, M. D. & SON, General Merchants, Cass st. 
KASSON, G. T., Nursery, Jackson st. 
KENDALL, C. N., Dentist, Clay st. 
LUNNEY, JAMES, Saloon, Van Buren st. 
MARCUS, F., Saloon, Clay st. 
MILLER, F. E., News Dealer, Cass st. 
MILLS, MBS., Dressmaker, Clay and Cass sts. 
MURPHY, E. A. & CO., General Merchants, Clay st. 
MURPHY & HOY, Druggists, Cass and Clay sts. 
MORRIS, W. P., Books and Stationery, Clay st. 
MEDLAR, J. S., Daguerrean Gallery, Cass st. 
McMANUS, JOHN, Tailor, Cass st. 
McNETT & LOSEE. Boot and Shoe Dealers, Clay st. 
MALZER, A., Meat Market, Clay st. 
MURPHY, P. W., Dentist, North Side Public Square. 
MUDD, W. A., Physician and Surgeon, Cass st. 
NORTON & SON, Lumber Dealers, Clay st. 

NORTHROP, JAMES, Physician and Surgeon, Jackson and Jefferson sts. 
PARRISH, JOHN A., Attorney at Law, Masonic Hall, Clay st. 
PRATT, GEORGE, Blacksmith, Church st. 
QUIGLEY, MRS., Dressmaker, Cass st. 
REED, A., Boot and Shoe Dealer, Clay st. 
RETTERER, CHARLES, Blacksmith, Jackson st. 
RICHMOND HOUSE, E. H. Richmond, Proprietor, Clay st. 
RIDER, E. D., Livery Stable, Calhoun st. 
RING, D. T., Shoemaker. 

REED, A., MRS., Millinery and Dressmaker, Clay st. 
SHORT, JOHN D., Weigher City Scales. 
SHERWOOD, G. N., City Scales, Chemung st. 
SMITH, B. N., Attorney at Law and County Judge. Cass st. 
SMITH, FRANK L. Restaurant, Clay st. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

STONE & SON, Druggist, Clay st. 

STONE, A. E., Blacksmith, Cass st. 

TOLES, JOB, Grist Mill, Van Buren and Dean sts, 

TONY, JOHN, Wagon Manufacturer, Van Buren st. 

TRIPP, DANIEL, Harness Maker, Clay st. 

YOUNG, HENRY, Dealer in Marble, Main st. 

YOUNG, JOHN, Blacksmith, Main st. 



DAVIS, A. F., General Merchant. 
HARTMAN, J. G., Wagon Maker. 
HARTMAN, ISAAC, General Merchant. 



206 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



DUNHAM TOWNSHIP. 

ALLEN, W\ L., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Harvard P. O. ; was born in Dunham Town- 
ship, in 1846 ; owns 80 acres of land. Married Ines Smith, in 1868 ; she was 
horn in Chemung Township, this county ; had two children, girls. His mother, Mrs. 
Cyrus Allen, resides on Sec. 35; owns 180 acres of land; had eight children, six 
boys and two girls; one son, Morris H. Allen, served in the Fifteenth Regt. 111., 
Vol. Inf., was wounded in the battle of Shiloh. Mrs. Allen was born in Onondaga 
Co., N. Y., in 1812 ; married in 1836. Mr. Allen died in 1870. 

ALDERMAN, A. J., Farmer and Constable, Sec. 9 ; Chemung P. 0. 
AUSTIN, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harvard P. 0. 
ALEXANDER, E., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Harvard P. 0. 
BARRETT, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Harvard P. 0. 
BARRETT. JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Harvard P. 0. 
BACKUS, LYMAN, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Harvard P. 0. 
BENNETT, A. H., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Capron P. 0. 
BARRY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Harvard P. 0. 
BECK, R. J., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Chemung P. O. 

BARROWS, DEXTER, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Hetford, 
Orange Co., Vt., November 4, 1814 ; came to this town in 1840 ; owns 320 acres 
of land ; was Supervisor eight years ; during and after the war was a member of 
the body called County Commissioners, before each town did business for itself. 
Married Olive E. Simpson, September 22, 1840 ; she was born in Greenland, Rock- 
ingham Co., N. H., May 1, 1822 ; had eight children, seven boys and one girl ; two 
sons, G. M. D. and Darwin A. Barrows, served in the Union army ; G. M, D. Bar- 
rows died while connected with the Red River expedition. 

BARROWS, A. J., Farmer, Sec.2 ; Harvard P. 0. 
BARROWS, DARVIN, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Chemung P. 0. 
BENNEWIES, C., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Harvard P. 0. 
BEEBE, C. A., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Chemung P. 0. 

BILLINGS, W. G., Lives in Chemung Village, Dunham Township; born in 
Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., June 14, 1822 ; came to this county in the fall 
of 1845 ; owns 120 acres of land ; value of property, $2,500 ; is United States Dept. 
Revenue Collector ; been Deputy Sheriff, Constable, Justice of the Peace, Town 
Treasurer, etc. ; was First Lieut, in One Hundred and Forty-Second Regt., 
afterward Captain in One Hundred and Fifty Third Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. Mar- 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 207 

ried Fanny R. Everest, November 2, 1842 ; she was born in Pierpoint, St. Lawrence 
Co., N. Y. ; had seven children, three boys and four girls ; only three children now 
living. 

BRAINARD, A., Farmer, Sec. 1, Harvard P. 0. 

BREEN, PETER, Laborer, Sec. 15 ; Harvard P. 0. 

BRICKLEY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. O. 

BRICKLEY, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Harvard P. 0. 

BRICKLEY, JOHN C., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Harvard P. 0. 

BRICKLEY, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Harvard P. 0. 

BRICKLEY, J. L., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Harvard P. 0. 

BOSWORTH, F. H., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Chemung P. 0. 

BRICKLEY, M., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Harvard P. 0. 

BRUCE, DONALD, Lives on farm of W. Heath, Sec. 19 ; Chemung P. 0. 

BUTTS, SILAS, Lives with Mrs. Carmack, Sec. 12 ; Harvard P. 0. 

BO WEN, W. M., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Chemung P. 0. 

BUTTS, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Harvard P. 0. 

BUTTS, HENRY, Laborer, Sec. 1 ; Harvard P. 0. 

CARMACK, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Harvard P. 0. 

CARPENTER, LORR1N, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Harvard P. 0. 

CARPENTER, ELI, Lives with his father, Sec. 3 ; Harvard P. 0. 

CARROLL, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Capron P. O. 

CONCANNON, L., Tenant on D. Wilbur's farm, Sec. 14 ; Harvard P. 0. 

CAVANAGH, J.. Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Chemung P. 0. 

CAVENACK, ABRAM, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Crawford 
Co., Pa.; moved to Michigan in 1831, to Indiana in 1833 and came to this town 
in 1840 ; owns 558 acres of land, two miles from Harvard ; has been Justice of the 
Peace, Collector, School and Road Commissioner, etc. Married Caroline Niemerth, 
in 1866, who was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1837 ; had three children, one 
boy and two girls. 

CHAPIN, H. B., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Harvard P. 0. 
CHASE, ALVA, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Harvard P. 0. 

CHASE, S. L., Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Williamsburg, Canada, 
in 1831 ; came to this town October 28, 1843 ; owns 230 acres of land. Married 
Hannah D. Thomas in 1855 ; she was born in Russell, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., in 
1831 ; had two children, one boy and one girl. 

CARMACK, ABRAM, Farmer, Sec. 11; Harvard P.O.; born in Hudson, 
Columbia Co., N. Y., in 1806 ; came to this town in 1846; owns 320 acres of land. 
Married Laura Decker, October 1, 1828; she was born in Columbia Co., N. Y. ; 
had eight children, four boys and three girls ; lost one girl. 

COLLINS. JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 29; Harvard P. 0. 
COLLINS, W. H., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Harvard P. 0. 
COLLINS, M., MRS., Widow of C. Collins, Sec. 28 ; Harvard P. O. 
COLLINS, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Harvard P. 0. 



208 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

COLLINS, TIMOTHY, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Harvard P. 0. 

COLLINS, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Formana Co.. 
Ireland, June 6, 1816 ; lived five years in Scotland, previous to coming to America 
in the spring of 1846 ; came to this town in 1869 ; owns 160 acres of land. Mar- 
ried Catherine Kennedy in 1835 ; she was born in the same town where Mr. Collins 
was ; had nine children, six boys and three girls ; only three boys living. 

COOK, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Harvard P. 0. 
CRAIG, ROBERT, Laborer, Sec. 5 ; Chemung P. 0. 
CROSS, WILLIS, Laborer, Sec. 15; Harvard P. 0. 
CUNNINGHAM, F., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harvard P. 0. 
CLEARY, MORRIS, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. 
DEGRAW, G. W., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Chemung P. 0. 
DODGE, E., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Harvard P. 0. 

DE GROAT, PAT., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Porton, Lower 
Canada, in 1809; came to Indiana in 1837; lived there one year, then came 
to this town; owns 120 acres of land. Married Lucy Smith in November, 1834, 
who was born in Vermont, but resided, at the time of her marriage, at Brosier, N. 
Y. ; she died in 1852 ; had seven children, three boys and four girls ; only one son 
and two daughters now living. John De Groat, his son, was killed at the battle of 
Vicksburg. 

GE GROAT, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Harvard P. 0. 
DIXON, PETER, MRS., Widow of Peter, Sec. 23 ; Harvard P. 0. 
DENNING, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec: 26; Harvard P. 0. 

DIGGINS, O. C.. Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Franklin Co., N. Y., 
May 20, 1823 ; came to this town in March, 1837 ; owns 411 acres of land; is Su- 
pervisor at present, and has been seven years. Married Jcannette Stewart in Decem- 
ber, 1846 ; she was born in Edinburgh, Scotland ; had seven children, four boys and 
three girls ; his father, John Diggins, was the first settler in Dunham Tp. 0. C. 
Diggins and brother built the first log cabin in the vicinity. 

DIGGINS, FRANKLIN, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Weathers- 
field, Windsor Co., Vt. ; came to this county in the fall of 1835, and to this town in 
1841 ; owns 130 acres of land one and one-half miles from Harvard. Had two 
wives ; the first, Lucinda Owns, of Franklin Co., Vt. ; married his second wife, Ellen 
Blodget, in 1850 ; she was of Alden Tp., in this county ; had six children, three by 
the first and three by the second wife. 

DIXON, EDWIN, Lives with his mother, Sec. 23 ; Harvard P. O. 
DONOVAN, M., Farmer, Sec. 32; Harvard P. 0. 
DAY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 5; Chemung P. O. 
DONOVAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harvard P. O. 
DONOVAN, JERRY, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Harvard P. 0. 
DOWNS, D., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Harvard P. 0. 
DOWNS, R., Farmer, Sec. 16; Harvard P. 0. 
DENO, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Harvard P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 209 

DOWNS, D. W., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Malone, Franklin Co., 
N. Y., 1829 ; came to this town in 1842 ; owns 100 acres of land one mile from 
Harvard. Married Livonia Butterfield, February, 1856, who was born in Rush- 
ford, Allegany Co., N. Y. ; had four children two boys and two girls ; lost one 
girl, oldest; children Ella A., born December 9, 1856 ; Clarence M., born August 
3, 1858 ; Lydia M., born August 14, I860 ; Harry A., born November 26, 1866. 

DOWNS, DAVID, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Columbia Co., N. 
Y., 1806; came to this town in 1846; owns 320 acres of land. Married Laura 
Decker, October 1, 1828; she was born in same town; had eight children four 
boys and four girls ; lost one girl. 

ESMOND, ISAAC, Laborer, Sec. 19 ; Chemung P. 0. 
ESMOND, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Capron P. 0. 
FILLMORE, H. G., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Harvard P. 0. 
FINNEY, A. I., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Harvard P. 0. 
FINNEY, THOMAS, JR., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Harvard P. 0. 

FINNEY, THOMAS, Mr?., Sec. 1 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Washington Co., 
Mo., in 1813. Married Mr. Thomas Finney, 1832, who was born in Allegheny 
Co., Penn., in 1806 ; he was one of the first settlers of Dunham Township ; came 
to this town in April, 1840 ; the estate consists of 238 acres of land one mile from 
Harvard ; they had seven children two boys and five girls ; only one son and two 
daughters living ; Mr. Finney built the first frame house on Cold Spring Prairie. 

FITZER, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Chemung P. 0. 

FITZER, P., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Chemung village and P. 0. ; born in New Jersey 
in 1824 ; came to this town in 1866 ; owns 102 acres of land and is Justice of the 
Peace at present. Married Isabella Slocum in 1858 ; she was born in Tompkins 
Co., N. Y., in 1840 ; had four children two boys and two girls. 

FOX, DAVID, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Capron P. 0. 
PLANNER, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Capron P. 0. 
FURLONG, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Harvard P. 0. 
GALVIN, JOHN, Farmer. Sec. 26 ; Harvard P. 0. 
GAY, JOHN, MRS., widow of John, Sec. 23 ; Harvard P. 0. 

GOODSELL, JOSIAH C., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Mount 
Pleasant, Wayne Co., Pa., April, 1829 ; came to this county in March, 1842 ; 
owns 142 acres of land. Married Medora Slawson, December 22, 1860; she was 
born in Salem, Chautauqua Co., N. Y. 

GRADY, JOHN, Laborer, Sec. 25 ; Harvard P. 0. 

GRADY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Harvard P. 0. 

GROSKINSKY, P. J., Farmer, Sec. 12; Harvard P. O. 

GROSKINSKY, J., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Harvard P. O. 

GARDNER, W. P., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Harvard P. 0. 

GUTH, FRANCIS, lives on farm of R. Welch, Sec. 25 ; Harvard P. 0. 

HALLISSAY, JERRY, MRS., Widow, Sec. 21 ; Harvard P. 0. 



210 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

HAWLEY, JERRY, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Harvard P. 0. 

HARD, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Marengo P. 0. 

HEFRON, D., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Harvard P. 0. 

HEATH, E. E., Telegraph Operator, Sec. 19 ; Chemung P. 0. 

HIGGINS, S., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Harvard P. 0. 

HYNDMAN, ALEX., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Chemung P. 0. 

HOLLIDAY, THOMAS, tenant of J. F. Moore, Sec. 8 ; Harvard P. 0. 

HUBBELL, E. C., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Harvard P. 0. 

HUBBELL, F. L., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Harvard P. 0. 

HUBBELL, M. A., Farmer, Sec. 23; Harvard P. 0. 

HUBBELL, B ARSLE Y, Farmer, Section 23 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Meigs 
Co., Ohio, February 3, 1806 ; came to this county in 1853 ; owns 120 acres of land. 
Married Eliza Bellows, October 9, 1828, who was born in Washington Co., Ohio, 
1805 ; had nine children, six boys and three girls ; two boys, Marcus A. and Alonzo 
D., served three years each in the Union Army, without returning once during the 
time ; Marcus A. was a member of the Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf., and Alonzo D. of 
the Twenty-seventh Iowa Regt. Mr. Hubbcll's boys are all farmers and his girls 
are all real estate owners. 

JACKMAN, P. P., Farmer, Sec. 3; Harvard P.O.; born in Franklin Co., 
N. Y. ; came to this town with his parents in 1838 ; owns 191 acres of land, 
one mile from Harvard, Married Miss R. A. Jones, who was born in Dunham 
Township ; has two .girls. F. P. Jackman is son of Jonathan Jackman, one of the 
pioneers of Dunham. 

JEROME. J. M., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Franklin Co., Vt., 
January, 1807 ; Mr. Jerome was one of the first four who came to this town ; he 
came in July, 1836, made his claim, and brought his family the next year; owns 
280 acres of land, one-half mile from Harvard. Married Clarinda Clark, December 
27, 1830, who was born in Fairfax, Franklin Co., Vt., 1811 ; had two children, one 
boy and one girl ; girl died when small. 

KAPLINGER, F., Tenant of Wm. Thompson, Sec. 10 ; Harvard P. 0. 
KUSICK, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Harvard P. 0. 
KING, HIRAM, Carpenter and Joiner ; Harvard P. 0. 
LASHBROOK, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Harvard P. 0. 
LASHBROOK, MOSES, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Harvard P. 0. 
LANNING, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 35; Harvard P. 0. 
LASHBROOK, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Harvard P. 0. 
LEE, DAVID, Tenant of W. Heath, Sec. 19; Chemung P. 0. 
LAMPSON, W. C., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Harvard P. 0. 
LEVITT, DAVID, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Harvard P. 0. 
LIMKIE, F., Tenant of W. C. Lampson, Sec. 10 ; Harvard P. O. 
LILLIBRIDGE, L. M., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Harvard P. 0. 

LILLIBRIDGE, O. P., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Wayne Co., 
Pa., June 3, 1816 ; came to this county in 1837, and settled in Marengo ; lived 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 211 

there until 1846, and then came to this town ; owns 91 acres of land, one and one- 
half miles from Harvard. Married Mahala Smith in 1844, who was born in Charles- 
town, Saratogo Co., N. Y. ; had three children, one boy and two girls ; both girls 
are dead. 

MAHER, D., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Harvard P. 0. 
MAXWELL, J., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Harvard P. 0. 
McBIRNEY, S., Tenant of Wm. Wallace, Sec. 5 ; Chemung P. 0. 
McCOMB, A., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Harvard P. 0. 
McCOMB, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Harvard P. 0. 
McCOMB, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Harvard P. 0. 
MCQUILLAN, H., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Chemung P. 0. 
McQUILLAN, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 18, Chemung P. 0. 
MILLERICK, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. 
MUNGER, MILO, Cheese Mfr., Sec. 36 ; Harvard P. 0. 

MOORE, JONATHAN P.,, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Harvard P. 0.; born in Thet- 
ford, Orange Co.., Vt., 1808 ; came to Kane Co. in 1837, lived there two years, and 
then came to this town in the spring of 1840; owns 387 acres of land. Mar- 
ried Mariah Barrows in 1834, who was born in Thetford, Orange Co., Vt., also, 
in 1811. 

MOORE, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Harvard P. O. 
NIHEN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Harvard P. 0. 
NEWMAN, F., Brick Maker, Sec. 1 ; Harvard P. 0. 
NICHOLS, S., Farmer, Sec. 6; Chemung P. 0. 
O'BRIEN, J. G., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Harvard P. 0. 
O'BRIEN, J. C., Farmer, See. 32 ; Harvard P. 0. 
O'LEARY, CORNELIUS, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Harvard P. 0. 
O'CONNOR, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Harvard P. 0. 
PEAVY, CHAS. H., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Harvard P. 0. 

PENNINGTON, WILLIAM, .Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Chemung P. 0. ; born in 
County of Armagh, Ireland, 1824 ; came to America 1848, and to this town 1856; 
owns 300 acres land. Married present wife, Margaret Beck, 1869 ; she had four 
children. Mr. P. had two boys by first wife. 

PHELPS, B. W., Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Harvard P. 0. 

PHELPS, BENJAMIN, Farmer and Stone Mason ; Sec. 12 ; Harvard P. 0. 

POWERS, MAURICE, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. 

PALMER, W. N., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Harvard P. 0. 

REID, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 18; Chemung P. 0. 

RANDALL, M. E., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Harvard P. 0. 

ROSENCRANS, WILLETE, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Harvard P. 0. 

ROACH, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Harvard P. 0. 

RUSSELL, P. L.. Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Harvard P. O. 

RYAN, R., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Chemung P. 0. 

SEARS, H. J., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Harvard P. 0. 



212 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

SEARS, HIRAM, Lives with father, Sec. 33; Harvard P. 0. 
SHUTE, JOACHIM, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Harvard P. 0. 
SHIELDS, D. MRS., Widow, Sec. 11 ; Harvard P. 0. 
SINTON, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Chemung P. 0. 
SINTON, DAVID, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Chemung P. 0. 
SINNAMON. WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Chemung P. O. 
SINDERSON, J. J., Miller, Sec. 5 ; Chemung P. 0. 
SNOWDEN, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Harvard P. 0. 

SNOWDEN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Armagh Co., 
Ireland, August, 1817; came to America 1839, and to this town the same year, 
living on the same land he first bought. Married Orphia M. Allen, 1845 ; she was 
born in Bradford Co., Pa.; had three children, two boys and one girl. 

STEVENSON, J. W., Farmer, Sec. 19; Chemung P. 0. 

STEVENSON, AUCHROM, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Chemung P. O. ; born in 
the County of Armagh, Ireland, August, 1812; came to America 1840, and settled 
in Livingston Co., N. Y. ; lived there four years ; came to this town 1844 ; 
owns 200 acres land. Married Jane Littiinore, September, 1838 ; she was born in 
the same county where Mr. Stevenson lived ; had four boys ; one son, 'James Ste- 
venson, served three years in Union Army in Co. E, Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. ; was 
wounded in the battle of Vicksburg; names of others, Thomas J., David and 
Hugh B. 

SWEENEY, MICHAEL F. } Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Harvard P. O. 

STERNS, 0. T., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Capron P. 0. 

SULLIVAN, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Harvard P. 0. 

SULLIVAN, T., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Harvard P. 0. 

TWELVES, M., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Capron P. O. 

WAITE, J. C., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Harvard P. 0. 

WALLACE, ANN, MRS., Widow of James, Sec. 5 ; Chemung P. 0. 

WALKER, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Capron P. 0. ; born in Armagh Co., 
Ireland, 1832; came to America 1849, and to this town in same year; owns 180 
acres land. Married Sarah Jane McQuillian, January 7, 1864; she was born in 
Dunham Township, March 25, 1844 ; had four children : Elizabeth Jane, born 
June 7, 1866; Sarah, born August 20, 1871 ; Mary,November 22, 1872, and George 
Irwin, December 26, 1875. 

WALKER, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 18; Chemung P. 0. ; born in County of 
Armagh, Ireland, 1841 ; came to America 1849, and to this town the same year ; 
lives on the same place he first settled on; owns 120 acres land. Married Jane 
McNalley, 1867, who was born in Chicago, 1852 ; had one girl. 

WELLS, JONATHAN, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Harvard P. O. 
WELLS, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Harvard, P. 0. 
WELLS, JOHN, MRS., Widow, Sec. 26 ; Harvard P. 0. 
WELLS, F. C., Lives with mother, Sec. 26 ; Harvard P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 213 

WHIPPLE, VIRGIL H., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Franklin 
Co., Mass., town of New Salem, March 27, 1810 ; came to the town of Dunham, 
1844; owns 160 acres of land two and a half miles from Harvard. Married Jane 
Durant March 14, 1848 ; she was born in Dearborn Co., Ind. ; had nine children 
four boys and five girls ; lost two boys and one girl. 

WHITMOS, C., Farmer, Sec. 13; Harvard P. 0. 

WHITE, NATHANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 36; Marengo P. 0.; born in Ireland, 
1826 ; lived in New York twenty-five years ; came to this town in 1855 ; came to 
America when five years old ; owns 160 acres of land. Married Phoebe E. Face, 
1859 ; had three children, two boys and one girl. 

WILSON, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Harvard P. 0. 
WARD, DENNIS, Farmer, Sec. 4; Chemung P. 0. 
WILBUR, D., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Harvard P. 0. 
WOOD, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Chemung P. 0. 

WOOD, J. A., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Chemung P. 0.; born in Kent' Co., C. W., 1818 ; 
came to Porter Co., Ind., in 1836 ; lived there three years ; came to this county in 
1846 ; owns 200 acres of land two miles from Chemung depot ; been Supervisor, 
Road Commissioner, etc. Married Sarah Thompson in 1840, who was born in 
Brockville, C. W. ; had five children four boys and one girl ; one son, Israel Wood, 
served in the Union Army, in Co. E, Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. 

WORTHINGTON, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Tyrone 
Co., Ireland, 1820 ; came to America in 1848, and settled in Chester Co., Pa. ; lived 
lived there two years ; lived in England ten years previous to coming to America ; 
owns 480 acres of land Married Ellen Gourly 1847 ; she was born in the County 
of Down, Ireland ; had ten children, three boys and seven girls. 

YOUNG, G. S., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Oneida Co., N. Y., 
1836 ; came to Wisconsin when eight years old ; came to this town in the spring of 
1867 ; owns 150 acres of land. Married Abba Bartlett in 1864 ; she was born in 
New York City ; had three children all boys. 



214 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



CHEMUNG BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

BECK, R. J., Stone Mason. 

CHASE, WARREN, Physician. 

HUTCHINSON, E. E., MRS., Millinery. 

HOLDEN, 0., Blacksmith. 

MASON, J. N. Cheese Manufacturer. 

MAXON BROS., General Merchandise. 

MILLER, JOHN, Tailor. 

PUFFER, S. L., Druggist and General Merchandise. 

ROSE, WM., Blacksmith. 

SITZER, DANIEL S., Hardware Dealer. 

SIMMONS, B. W., Shoemaker. 

SINDERSON, JOSEPH, Grist Mill. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 215 



GRAFTON TOWNSHIP. 

ANDRUS, G. W., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Huntley P. 0. 

ANDRUS, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Huntley P. 0. 

BABCOCK, I., Cabinet Maker ; Huntley. 

BALLARD, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Huntley P. 0. 

BALLARD, URSULA, Widow ; Huntley. 

BERG, MARTIN, Saloon Keeper ; Huntley. 

BLACKMAN, WILLTAM, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Huntley P. 0. 

BLANCHARD, A., Retired Farmer; Huntley. 

BLIDE, DANIEL, Renter of T. Huntley's, Sec. 28 ; Huntley P. 0. 

ROWERS, SEYMOUR, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Huntley P. 0. 

BRENAN," JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Huntley P. 0. 

BROWN, H. B., Butcher ; Huntley. 

BURNS, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Huntley P. 0. 

BURTON, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

BUTLER, 0. F., Stock Buyer ; Huntley. 

CAVENY. THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Huntley P. 0. 

CHAPMAN, D., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Huntley P. 0. 

CASERMAN, SAMUEL. Farmer, n. w. Sec. 27 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. ; born in 
Switzerland in 1826; came to America in 1855; lived one year in New Jersey, 
then moved to Kane Co. ; came to this county in 1874 ; owns 80 acres of land, 
value $60 per acre. Married Margaret Wapp in 1863 ; she was born in Switzer- 
land ; had three children two boys and one girl. Republican ; Calvinist. 

CLARK, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
CLARK, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Huntley P. 0. 

COMINS, STEWART, Proprietor Huntley House ; Huntley ; born in Truxton. 
Cortland Co., N. Y.. in 1822 ; came to Rutland, Kane Co., 1838 ; lived there three 
years, then came to this county ; owns 531 acres of land, value $45 per acre. 
Married Matilda Daniels in 1855. who was born in Hammond, St. Lawrence Co., 
N. Y., in 1832 ; has three children two boys and one girl ; Nina, Warren and 
Orville. Independent; Spiritualist. 

CONLEY, OWEN, JR., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Huntley P. 0. 
CONLEY, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Huntley P. 0. 
COKELY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
CONNOVER, J. S., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Huntley P. 0. 
CONLEY. THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Huntley P. 0. 



216 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

CONLEY, OWEN, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Huntley P. 0. 
CORLISS, D., Retired Merchant ; Huntley. 
COSTIGAN, M., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Huntley P. 0. 
COSTIGAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Huntley P. 0. 
COYNE, M., JR., Carpenter and Joiner ; Huntley. 
COYNE, ANDREW, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Huntley P. 0. 
COYNE, HUGH, Farmer. Sec. 4 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
CROWLEY, W. S., Laborer ; Huntley. 
CRIMAN, FRED'K, Laborer ; Huntley. 

CUMMINGS, WILLIARD ; Huntley ; born in Truxton, Cortland Co., N. 
Y., in 1836 ; came to Kane Co. in 1838 ; lived there three years, then came to this 
county in 1841 ; owns 300 acres of land, value $50 per acre; served three years 
and eight months in the Recruiting Service. Married (first wife) Mary E. Hal- 
bert in 1866 ; had one child, Mary E. (dead). Married (second wife) Clara A. 
Toney in 1870 ; she had three children Edward E., Alice L. and John J. Toney. 

DAIN, F. 0., Shoemaker ; Huntley. 
DALBY, JOSEPH, Money Lender ; Huutley. 
DAVIS, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Huntley P. 0. 
DAVIS, JANE, Widow, Sec. 5 ; Huntley P. 0. 
DARLING, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Huntley P. 0. 
DEVINE, WILLIAM, General Merchant ; Huntley. 
DISBROW, A. M., Wagon Maker ; Huntley. 
DONAHUE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Huntley P. 0. 
DUFFY, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Huntley P. 0. 
DUFFY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Huntley P. 0. 

DUFFY, PATRICK, Shoemaker; Huntley; was born in 1825, in Sligo Co., 
Ireland ; came to this county in 1846. Married Bridget Norton January 24, 1858, 
who was born in Mayo Co., Ireland, and came to this county in 1847 ; has five chil- 
dren. 

EDWARDS, D., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Huntley P. 0. 

ENGLE, LOUIS, Renter of G. Van Valkenburg, Sec. 7; Huntley P. 0. 

ELLIS, B. F., Butcher and Town Collector; Huntley. 

ELSTON, JOSIAH, Farmer, s. e. Sec. 26 ; Huntley P. ; born in Cayuga Co., 
N. Y., in 1817 ; came to this county in 1858 ; lived two years in Kane Co., previous 
to coming here; owns 100 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre. Married Sarah 
Pert iii 1854 ; she was born in Tioga Co., N. Y. ; had one son. Republican ; Con- 
gregationalist. 

EVANS, DAVID, Lives with his father, Sec. 30 ; Huntley P. 0. 
EVANS, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Huntley P. 0. 

EVANS, J. J., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; born in Cardigan, Wales, in 1824 ; came to America 
in 1849, and settled in Madison Co., N. Y. ; lived there six years, then came to this 
county in 1855 ; owns 117 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre ; served one year in 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 217 

the One Hundred and Fifty-third Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. Married Ann Williams in 
1849, who was born in Wales ; had six children, two boys and four girls ; lost three 
girls. Republican ; Congregationalist. 

FARLEY. M., Farmer. Sec. 31 ; Huntley P. 0. 
FELGENHOWER, JOHN, Laborer ; Huntley. 
FENWICK, THOMAS, Blacksmith, Huntley. 
FERRIS, T. R., Druggist and Grocer, Huntley. 
' FITZPATRICK, M., Renter of T. Keating, Sec. 11 ; Huntley P. 0. 
FORTHRESHER, S., Saloon Keeper ; Huntley. 
FITZGERALD, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Huntley P. 0. 
FOSTER, A., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
FOX, .OSCAR, Lives with his mother, Sec. 2 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
FOX, E., MRS., Widow, Sec. 2 ; Crystal Lake P.O. 
FRANK, HENRY, Renter of Wm. Wells, Sec, 27 ; Huntley P. 0. 
GANNON, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Huntley P. 0. 
GANNON, JOHN. Renter of J. S. Huntley, Sec. 22 ; Huntley P. 0. 
GANNON, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Huntley P. 0. 
GARRY, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Huntley P. O. 
GILE, CYRUS, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Huntley P. O. 
GIBBS, ALBERT, Farm'er; Huntley. 
GLAZIER, D.. Harness Maker ; Huntley. 
GLAZIER, F. J., Harness Maker ; Huntley. 
GLASS, PHILIP, Laborer , Huntley. 
GOODMAN, F., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Huntley P. 0. 
GRIFFITH, 0. K., Physician and Surgeon ; Huntley. 
GRITZER, JOHN, Renter of L. D. Kelly, Sec. 21 ; Huntley P. 0. 

GRINLEY, THO MAS, Farmer and Mason ; Huntley ; born in Warwarsing, 
Ulster Co., N. Y., in 1822 ; came to De Kalb Co. in 1855, then to this county in 
1857 ; owns 120 acres of land valued at $55 per acre ; served three years and three 
months in the Eighth 111. Cav. Married Melissa Terwilliger in 1843 ; had six 
children, two boys and four girls ; lost one girl. Republican ; Free Thinker. 

HACKETT, WILLIAM M., Wagon Maker , Huntley. 
HADLEY, R., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Huntley P. 0. 

HAIGHT, SANFORD, Dealer in Agricultural Implements ; Huntley. 
HAIGHT, CHARLES H., Retired Merchant ; Huntley. 
HANNAFORD, T. M., Carpenter and Joiner ; Huntley. 
HAFFEY, H., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Huntley P. 0. 
HARRISON, L., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
HANCOCK, JOSEPH, Railroad Section Boss ; Huntley. 
HASSETT, ELLEN, MRS., Widow, Huntley. 
HEAD, W. H., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Huntley P. 0. 

HEINEMANN, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Huntley P. 0. ; born in Hanover, 
Germany, in 1824; came to America in 1855 ; owns 160 acres of laad, valued at 



218 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNT Y. 

$30 per acre; settled in Barrington, then came to this county, 1871. Married 
Caroline Fehrman, in 1857 ; she was born in Hanover, Germany ; has seven chil- 
dren three girls and four boys. Democrat ; Lutheran. 

HELLEGAS, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 10; Crystal Lake P. O. 

HELLEGAS, ELIJAH, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

HETTINGER, ANDREW, Renter of T. S. Huntley, Sec. 21 ; Huntley P. 0. 

HIBBARD, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

HICKEY, PATRICK, Laborer ; Huntley. 

HUBBARD, 0. S., MRS., Widow ; Huntley. 

HUGHES, MARGARET, MRS., Widow, Sec. 6 ; Huntley P. 0. 

HUNTLEY, T. S., Farmer, Sec. 28; Huntley P. O. 

HOOKER, CHARLES, Renter of A. B. Brinkerhoof, Sec. 25 ; Huntley P. 0. 

HOOKER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Huntley P. 0. 

JAMES, JOSEPH, Renter of Mrs. W. Cummings, Sec. 8 ; Huntley P. 0. 

JOHNSON, F. A., Mason ; Huntley. 

JOBE, JOHN, Farmer; Huntley. 

JUDGE, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Huntley, P. O. 

KEATING, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 18; P. 0. 

KELLY, J. G., Blacksmith ; Huntley. 

KELLY, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. ' 

KELLY, TIMOTHY, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

KELLY, R. M., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Huntley P. 0. 

KELLY, M. J., Tailor ; Huntley. 

KENYAN, HENRY, Farmer of Sawyer & Tait, Sec. 33 ; Huntley P. O. 

LATTIMER, LORENZO, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Huntley P. 0. 

LAWSON, JAMES, JR., Sec. 4; Crystal Lake P. O. 

LAWSON, JOHN, Farmer Sec. 10 ; Huntley P. 0. 

LEACH, N. E., Principal of Public School ; Huntley. 

LEONARD, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Huntley P. O. 

LOZIER, H., Blacksmith ; Huntley. 

LUTES, CHARLES, Renter of J. Evans, Sec. 26 ; Huntley P. 0. 

M ALONE, CORNELIUS, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Huntley P. 0. 

MARTIN, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Huntley P. 0. 

MARSHALL, JAMES, Farmer, n. e. Sec. 36 ; Algonquin P. 0. ; born in Stir- 
lingshire, Scotland, in 1830 ; came to America in 1850, and settled in Kane County, 
lived there ten years; came to this county in 1860; owns 170 acres of land, valued 
at $5,950. Married Mary E. Dygert, of Algonquin Township, in 1863 ; had six 
children, three boys and three girls ; lost one boy and one girl. Republican ; Pres- 
byterian. 

M ALONE, CHRISTIAN, Renter of E. Keating, Sec. 14 ; Crystal Lake P. O. 
MASON, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Huntley P. 0. 
MASON, 0. W., Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Huntley P. 0. 
MASON, 0. P., Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Huntley P. 0. 
McCOY, A., Farmer. Sec. 5 ; Huntley P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 219 

McFARLAND, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Huntley P. 0. 
McGAKY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
McSHEH AN, PHILLIP, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Huntley P. 0. 
McSHEHAN, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Huntley P. O. 
MILLER, PETER, Stone Mason ; Huntley P. 0. 
MOFFATT, MATHER, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 
MOUNTAIN, HENRY, Renter of M. Keating, Sec. 16 ; Huntley P. 0. 
MOUNTAIN, ANN, MRS., Widow of James, Sec. 10 ; Huntley P. 0. 

NASH, A. W., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Huntley P. 0. ; born in Madison Co., N. Y., 1819 ; 
came to McHenry Co. in April, 1866 ; owns 183 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre. 
Married Lucy Ann Towey in 1844, who was born in Plainfield, Hampshire Co., 
Mass., in 1826 ; had four children, three living, Horace W., born 1854, Norman W., 
born 1863, and Lucian B., born 1865. Republican ; Congregationalist. 

NORTON, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Huntley P. 0. 

NORTHRUP, A. J., Farmer, Sec. 18; Huntley. 

OAKLEY, A. R., Mechanic; Huntley. 

OAKS, J. H., Farmer ; Huntley. 

PARSONS, T. L., Depot Agent and Telegraph Operator ; Huntley. ' 

PARKS, M. J., Traveling Agent ; Huntley. 

PARSONS, R. F., R. R. Employe ; Huntley. 

PARSONS, E. W., R. R. Employe; Huntley. 

PENDLETON, C. M., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. ; born in Ticon- 

deroga, N. Y., 1817 ; came to McHenry Co. 1842 ; owns 160 acres of land, value, 
$10,000 ; has been Justice of the Peace, Assessor and Highway Commissioner. 
Married Eliza Taylor, August 1, 1844, who was born in Springfield, Vt. ; had five 
children, three living. 

PETERS, FREDERICK, Renter of W. Burgess, Sec. 22 ; Huntley P. 0. 

PETERS, CHRISTIAN, Renter of W. Burgess, Sec. 22 ; Huntley P. 0. 

PIERCE, M. A., MRS., Widow ; Huntley. 

PITCHER, WM., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Huntley P. 0. 

PORTER, B. M., Money Lender; Huntley. 

PURVEY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Huntley P. 0. 

RAMSDELL, N., Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Huntley P. 0. 

RILEY, JOHN. Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Huntley P. O. 

ROBB, E. J., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Huntley P. 0. 

ROWE, BENJAMIN, Hotel Keeper; Huntley. 

RODDETZ, C., Farmer, n. w. Sec. 23 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. ; born in Germany in 

1826 ; came to America 1863, and to this county 1864 ; owns 80 acres of land, 
valued at $45 per acre. Married Annie Grosklouse 1861, who was born in Ger- 
many ; had six children, three boys and three girls; one boy dead. Democrat; 
Lutheran. 

SASS, FREDERICK, Renter of J. H. Oakes, Sec. 29 ; Huntley P. 0. 
SAWYER, W. G., Lumber Dealer and Manufacturer of Flax ; Huntley. 



220 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

SCH AFFNER, PHILIP, Miller ; residence Huntley. 
SCHERMERHORN, T. B., Hardware Dealer; Huntley. 
SCHERMERHORN, W., Retired; Huntley. 
SCHLENSKER, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Huntley P. 0. 
SCHUYLER, J. J., Farmer, Sec. 8; Huntley P. 0. 

SCHROEDER, H., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Huntley P. 0. ; bom in Hanover, Ger- 
many, 1831 ; came to America in October, 1854, and to St. Louis; lived there two 
years; came to this county 1859 ; owns 180 acres of land, valued at $55 per acre; 
is School Director, and has been two years. Married Dora Duensing, of Hanover, 
Germany. 185G ; had nine children, three boys and six girls. Democrat; Lutheran. 

SCHROEDER, FREDERICK, Renter of W. Whittemore, Sec. 30 ; Huntley P. 0. 

SCHROEDER, LOUIS, Renter of W. Whittemore, Sec. 30 ; Huntley P. 0. 

SCHROEDER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Huntley P. 0. 

SCHROEDER, CHRISTIAN, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Huntley P. 0. 

SHAPLEY, C. B., Carpenter. Sec. 31 ; Huntley P. 0. 

SHALES, A. C., Renter of J. M. Southworth, Sec. 1 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

SINNETT, HENRY, Farmer, n. e. Sec. 27 ; Huntley P. 0. ; born in Mont- 
gomery Co., N. Y., 1828; came to this county 1854 ; lived in Cook Co. fourteen 
years, since then balance of time in this county ; owns 160 acres of land, valued at 
$50 per acre. Married Jane E. Van Wormer in 1851, who was born in Montgom- 
ery Co., N. Y. ; had five children, two boys and three girls, all living. Democrat : 
Free Thinker. 

SMITH, C. M., Liveryman and Produce Dealer ; Huntley. 

SMITH. H. A., General Merchant; Huntley. 

SKEELS, J. P., General Merchant ; Huntley. 

SMITH, THOMAS, Retired Farmer ; Huntley. 

SOUTHWORTH, J. M., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. 

SPICER, N. N., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Huntley P. 0. 

SPALDING, J. P., Proprietor of Huntley Flouring Mills ; Huntley ; born in 
Steuben Co., N. Y., 1844; came to this town in October, 1875; served in Third 
Regt. Colorado Vols., fighting Indians; one of the Board of Directors of Huntley 
corporation. Married Adelaide E. Anderson, of Chicago, in 1866 ; has four chil- 
dren one boy and three girls. Republican. 

SYRON, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Huntley P. O. 

TAFT, L. A., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Huntley P. 0. 

TAIT, WILLIAM, Manufacturer of Flax and Lumber Dealer ; Huntley. 

TEMPLETON, J. G., Justice of the Peace ; Huntley. 

TORRANCE, G. D., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Crystal Lake P. 0. ; born in Steuben Co., 
N. Y., January 14, 1823 ; came to Lake Co. in 1845 and to McHenry Co. in 
January, 1869 ; owns 190 acres of land, value $35 per acre ; has been Road Com- 
missioner three years and Assessor two terms. Married Samantha M. Huson in 
1846, who was born in Yates Co., N. Y. ; had. four children ; three living Francis 
E., George L. and Jennie V. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 221 

TROST, JOHN, Laborer ; Huntley. 

TURNER, R. W., Physician and Surgeon ; Huntley. 

TURNER, D. S., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Huntley P. 0. 

USBORNE, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Huntley P. 0. 

VAN LUVEN, STEPHEN, Liveryman ; Huntley. 

VAN LUVEN, GEO. W., Carpenter and Joiner; Huntley. 

VAN VALKENBURG, GEORGE, Retired ; Huntley. 

WALES, JOHN, Cheese Manufacturer, Sec. 10 ; Huntley P. 0. 

WELTZIEN, J. T., Cheese Manufacturer ; Huntley. 

WELTZIEN, JOHN, Renter of C. S. and W. Cummings, Sec. 18 ; Huntley P. 0. 

WELLS, JACOB, Retired ; Huntley P. 0. 

WELTZEIN, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Huntley P. 0. ; born in Mecklen- 
burg, Germany, in 1819 ; came to America in 1857 and to this county the same 
year; owns 160 acres of land, value $50 per acre. Married Rachael Schroeder, 
who was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, in 1826 ; has seven children three boys 
and four girls. Republican ; Lutheran. 

WHITTEMORE, W., Farmer; Sec. 30; Huntley P. 0. 

WILLIAMS, D. M., General Merchant ; Huntley. 

WILCOX, W. B., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; resides in Chicago. 

WINNIE, J. L., Farmer; resides in Huntley. 

WINNIE, JAMES, Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 34 ; Huntley P. 0. 

WINNIE, J. M., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 35 ; Huntley P. 0. 

WOOD, J., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Huntley P. 0. 

WOOD, D. E., Manufacturer of Butter and Cheese ; Huntley ; born in Herkimer 
Co., N. Y , Dec. 16, 1846 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1866 ; was engaged in cheese 
business in Herkimer Co., N. Y. ; has also operated cheese factories at Richmond, 
Belvidere and Garden Prairie, Boone Co. ; value of property, $25,000 ; elected 
Town Supervisor in 1876 ; has been Village Trustee two terms and School Director 
three years. Married Josephine Smith, March 23, 1870, who was born in Otsego 
Co., N. Y., October 22, 1850; has two children Lillian, born October 6, 1871, 
and Fannie, born December 25, 1875. 

YORK, LUTHER, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Huntley P. O. 
ZENK, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Huntley P. 0. 
ZIMMERMANN, FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Huntley P. 0. 



222 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



HUNTLEY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



PATRICK DUFFY, 



HUNTLEY HOUSE, 

STEWART COMINS, 

PROPRIETOR. 



HUNTLEY FLOURING MILLS, 



T. 



PROPRIETOR. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 223 



HUNTLEY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

BERG, MARTIN, Saloon Keeper. 

BABCOCK, I., Cabinet Maker. 
CUMMINGS BROS. & HAIGHT, Dealers in Agricultural Implements. 

DAIN, F. 0., Shoemaker. 

DEVINE & SKEELS, General Merchants. 

DISBROW, A. M., Wagon Maker. 

ELLIS, B. F., Meat Market. 

FERRIS, F. R., Druggist. ' 
tiFENWICK, THOMAS, Blacksmith. 

FORTHRESHER, S., Saloon Keeper. 

GRIFFITH, 0. K., Physician and Surgeon. 

GLAZIER & BRO., Harness Makers. 

HACKETT, WM. M., Wagon Maker. 

HAIGHT & WILLIAMS, General Merchants. 

KELLY, J. G., Blacksmith. 

KELLY, M. J., Tailor. 

ROWE, BENJAMIN, Hotel Keeper. 

SMITH, C. M., Livery and Produce Dealer. 

SMITH, H. A.. General Merchant. 

SCHEMERHORN, T. B., Hardware Dealer. 

TAIT & SAWYER, Manufacturers of Flax, Lumber and Produce Dealers. 

TURNER, R. W., Physician and Surgeon. 

TEMPLETON, J. G., Justice of the Peace. 

VAN LUVEN, STEPHEN, Livery and Feed Stable. 

VAN LUVEN, GEORGE W., Carpenter and Joiner. 

WILLIAMS, D. M., General Merchant. 

WOOD & WELTZIEN, Cheese Manufacturers. 



224 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



GREENWOOD TOWNSHIP. 

ABBOTT, GEORGE, Farmer and Stock Dealer, n. w. corner Sec. 26; Wood- 
stock P. 0. ; born May 30, 1820, in town of Chester, N. Y. ; moved to Mayfield, 
Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, when three years old ; came to McHenry Co. June 11, 1845 ; 
owns 684 acres of land ; valuation of property $33,650 ; was Assessor two years. 
Married Emeransa L. Tanner December 25, 1844 ; she was born June 21, 1822, iu 
Chester, Geauga Co., Ohio ; had three children. 

ADAMS, G. E., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
ANDERSON, OLE, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Woodstock P. O. 
ALLEN, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
ALDEN, B., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
AUSTIN & THOMPSON, Farmers, Sec. 5 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

BAKER, WM. A., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in Greenwood, Mc- 
Henry Co., 111., April 22, 1851 ; owns 85 acres of land; valuation of property, $2,- 
500 ; always lived on Section 15. Married Helen D. Howell November 1, 1852, in 
Munson, Geauga Co., Ohio ; has one child. 

BAIRD, G. W., Lives on L. Ellsworth's farm, Sec. 34 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BARBER, J. N., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. O. 

BALDWIN, S., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

BARNARD, ENSLEY, Lives with father, Sec. 12 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

BAKER, G. L., Mrs., Residence, Sec. 15 ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in Washing- 
ton Co., N. Y., June 2, 1825. Was married to Benjamin Baker June 12, 1848, in 
Ft. Ann, N. Y. ; came to McHenry Co. July 4, 1848. Mr. Baker died September 
12, 1868. Have had five children. Her mother, who is 94 years old, lives with 
her, and has for eighteen years ; she is in good health. Valuation of property. $8,- 
000. 

BARNARD, GEO., Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in Bradford Co.. 
Pa., October 4, 1823 ; came to McHenry Co. December, 1839 ; owns a farm of 124 
acres ; valuation of property, $8,000 ; volunteered in the Ninety-fifth 111. Inf. in 
1864 ; served one year under Captain C. H. Tryon. Married Ruth N. Yates iu 
Solon, November 4, 1848 ; she was born April 1, 1828. in Cayuga Co.. N. Y. ; had 
five children, one dead. 

BASSLER. JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
BEATTY, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

BIGHAM, WM., Farmer, Sec. 35; Greenwood P. 0.; born May 11, 1833, in 
town of Half Moon, Saratoga Co., N. Y. ; came to McHenry Co. in the fall of 1853 ; 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 225 

owns 80 acres of land ; valuation of property, $5,500. Married Harriett M. Cole 
December 26, 1854, in Greenwood ; she was born September 7, 1836, in Westford, 
Otsego Co., N. Y. ; had three children. 

BLIGH, C. H., Eenter of J. Yoles, Sec. 12 ; Greenwood P. O. 
BOON, LEWIS, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

BORDEN, J. E., Mrs., Farmer ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in Manchester, En- 
gland, July 29, 1824 ; came to America 1828, and to McHenry Co. in 1850 ; owns 
40 acres of land ; valuation of property, $3,000. Married J. E. Borden March 19, 
1846, in Bristol Co., Mass. ; he was born June 20, 1824 ; was killed by his team 
running away, July 2, 1874. Her maiden name was Sarah A. Hames ; had two 
children. 

BORDEN, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

BRAMAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

BRADY, FRANCIS, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BRYAN, S. T., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BRONSON, D. H., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BURNELL, D., Lives on farm of G. King, Sec. 13 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

BURKE, FRANCIS, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BURKE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

BURKE, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 19; Woodstock P. 0. 

BURKE, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec 5 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BURTCHEY, FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

CASE, S. SCOTT, Renter of R. C. Jefferson, Sec. 30 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

CARR, WRIGHT, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

CARR, THOS. S., Renter of J. Eckert, Sec. 26 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

CHEESBORO, 0. P., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Ostend P. 0. 

CHARLES, J. D., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

CLARK, P. W., Farmer, Sec. 24; Woodstock P. 0. 

CLARK, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Woodstock P. O. 

CORKILL, MARY, MRS., Widow of Thomas, Sec. 36 ; Ostend P. 0. 

COLE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

COLLEY, J. B., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

COW, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

COWDRY, LEVI, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

CRUIKSHANK, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

DAILEY, PELEG, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in Greenwich, 
Washington Co., N. Y., August 5, 1823 ; came to McHenry Co. November 13, 1868 ; 
owns 124 acres of land; valuation of property, $8,000 ; was in Sixteenth New York 
Heavy Artillery eighteen months. Married Polly Ann Dake, of Fort Ann, Wash- 
ington Co., N. Y., April 20, 1846 ; she was born June 23, 1826 ; had ten children, 
nine living. 

DASSOW, J. P., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
DAWSON. JAMES, Blacksmith, Sec. 3 ; Greenwood P. 0. 



226 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

DAILEY, HENRY, Renter of G. H: Garrison, Sec. 3 ; Greenwood P. O. 
DE CLERG, J. F., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
DIKE, ABIAL, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

DOUGLAS, E. A., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in Niagara Co., N. 
Y., December 8, 1824 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1842 ; owns 328 acres ; valuation 
of property, $15,000. Married Clarissa Parker, June 25, 1852 ; she was born Au- 
gust 22, 1830, in Ontario Co. N. Y. ; had five children. 

ECKERT, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
ECKERT, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
ELLSWORTH, LEWIS, Farmer, Sec. 34; Woodstock P. O. 
ELLSWORTH, W. W., Renter of B. Ellsworth, Sec. 25 ; Woodstock P. O. 
ERCANBRACK, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

FREEMAN, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Greenwood P. O. ; born in St. Law- 
rence Co., N. Y., June 28, 1837 ; came to McHenry Co. May, 1849 ; owns 140 
acres ; value of property, $6,000 ; held the office of Collector one year ; volunteered 
August 9, 1852, in Co. H, Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. under Captain C. H. Tryon ; served 
three years and one month ; held the office of Commissary Sergeant. Married 
Sarah A. Howard, May 3, 1866 ; she was born March 2, 1846, in Westmoreland 
Co., N. H. ; had four children. 

PREY, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Woodstock P. O. ; born in France, March 28, 
1831 ; came to America June 28, 1845 ; owns a farm of 274 acres ; valuation of 
property, $16,000. Married Elizabeth Sondrecker, December 28, 1847, in Janes- 
ville, Wis. ; she was born August 11, 1836 ; came to McHenry Co. when eight 
years old, with her parents ; has nine children. 

FREY, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

FOSDICK, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

FOSDICK, MILAN, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Woodstock P. O. 

FORTH, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 12; Greenwood?. 0. 

FORREST, J. S., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

FINCH, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

FLOOD, OWEN, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

GARRISON, J. M., Cheese and Butter Manufacturer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. O. 

GARRISON, J. H. & 0., Farmers, Sees. 11 and 12 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

GARRISON, G. H., Farmer, s. w. Sec. 3 ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in Washing- 
ton Co., N. Y., October 24, 1827 ; came to McHenry Co. October, 1843 ; owns 
240 acres; valuation of property, $14,000; Supervisor thirteen years, School 
Trustee three years, School Treasurer four years. Married Susan E. Nealey in 
Greenwood, October 18, 1849 ; she was bora April, 7, 1831 ; had three children. 

GARRISON, J. H., Farmer and Nurseryman ; Greenwood ; was born in Rensselaer 
Co., N. Y., June 14, 1835; came to McHenry Co. May 17, 1848; valuation of 
property, $3,748 ; School Director three years, Town Clerk one year, Collector one 
year. Married Carrie S. Lawrence, in Greenwood, April 10, 1860 ; had two chil- 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 227 

dren, one living; her maiden name was Carrie S. Paine; born in Westmoreland, 
Chester Co., N. H., June 29, 1837. His mother, Mrs. Sarah Garrison, is living 
with him ; born in Oneida Co., N. Y., June 16, 1816 ; was married to Noah H. 
Garrison, October 29, 1834, in Schodack, Rensselaer Co., N. Y. ; he was born June 
12, 1813, and died January 22, 1861, at the age of 47 years, 7 months and 10 days ; 
had two children. 

GARRISON, O., Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in Rensselaer Co., N. 
Y., July 16, 1841 ; came to McHenry Co. May 17, 1848 ; owns one-half interest in 
farm on Sees. 11, 12 and 13 ; value of property, $3,748 ; School Director six years. 
Married Malinda M. Boone, April 6, 1870 ; she was born in Buffalo, N. Y., Sep- 
tember 16, 1843; had two children; was married to Adelbert Boone, September 
16, 1866, who died October 6, 1867, aged 24 years 5 months; her maiden name 
was Porter ; her mother, Mrs. Betsy M. Porter, lives with her ; she was born in 
Rochester, Vt., October 9, 1820. Mr. Porter died February 26, 1852 ; was born 
in Powlet, Vt., March 9, 1819. 

GAINOR, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood, P. 0. 
GERRY, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

GEROULD, H. M., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in Bradford Co., 
Pa., April 26, 1831 ; came to McHenry Co. March 13, 1855; owns 193 acres of 
land ; valuation of property, $10,000 ; School Director four years. Married Caro- 
line Blackman, January 12, 1855, in Pa. ; she was born November 6, 1821 ; was mar- 
ried to Hiram Blackman, June 13, 1842, in Pennsylvania. ; he died December 19 
1850, in California; her maiden name was Caroline Ayer; had two children; her 
mother is living with her, aged 83 years ; she was born in Norwich Co., Conn., in 
1793, left Connecticut when 3 years old. 

GIVEN, M. J., Renter of F. Short, Sec. 19 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

GIVEN, WM. B., Lives with father, Sec. 35 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

GIVEN. W. D., Farmer, Sec. 35; Woodstock P. 0.; born in Bath Co., Va., near 
the Warm Springs, January 11, 1818; came to McHenry Co. in 1839; owns 191 
acres of land; value of property, $11,000; Road Commissioner four years, School 
Trustee two years: Married Rachel B. Slaven, May 31, 1838, who was born in 
Pendleton Co., Va., June 9, 1817, and died January 4, 1868; had seven children ; 
then married Martha G. Lynch, November 7, 1869, who was born December 21, 
1824. 

GIVEN, A. C., Renter of F. Forrest,. Sec. 32 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
GODDARD, R. M., Mechanic, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
HARLEGSON, LARS, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock Pi 0. 
HARRISON, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 1, Greenwood P. 0. 

H ARTWELL, J. L., Farmer ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in Sullivan Co., N. Y., 
September 6, 1818 ; came to McHenry Co. in Junfe, 1845 ; owns 158 acres of land; 
valuation of property, $9,500. Married Mary Jane McCannon, in Greenwood, No- 
vember 24, 1858; she was born in Butler Co., Pa., October 1, 1835; has had 
four children. 



228 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

HART, WM. B., Farmer, Sec. 11; Greenwood P. 0. 

HAUSMAN, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HERDKLOTZ, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 22 : Woodstock P. 0. 

HERDKLOTZ, WM. H., Renter of Bryan estate, Sec. 20 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HERDKLOTZ, PETER, JR., Fanner, Sec. 16 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HERDKLOTZ, P. J., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HERDKLOTZ, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HERDKLOTZ, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; P. O. 

HERDKLOTZ, M., JR., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HERRINGTON, WM. C., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

HIBBARD, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Chicago. 

HOWARD, MAT., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HOTCHKISS ; G. W., Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

HOWELL, CARY, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

HOWARD, L. F., Farmer, Sec. 16; Greenwood P. 0. 

HOUSNOR, CHRIS., Renter of J. Hibbard, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

JONES, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

KING, G. H., Farmer, Sec. 13; Greenwood P. 0. 

LAWSON, NELS, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

LEONARD, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec, 17 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

LUMLEY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

MAGOON, S., Works farm of G. Abbott, Sec. 35 ; Ostend P. 0. 

MANSFIELD, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

MARBLE, C., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. O. 

MATTHEWS, EDWIN, Works for H. N. Thompson, Sec. 27 : Woodstock P. 0. 

McCANNAN, J., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

McCANNAN, L. W., Lives with W. H. Wilcox, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. O. 

Me CUE, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

MERCHANT, C. H., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

MILLER, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

MINTZER, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MINTZER, H., JR., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MOSES, GAD, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

MURPHY, P. W., Lives with father, A. W., Sec. 23 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MURPHY, E. H., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

MURPHY, O. J., Farmer, Sees. 22 and 23 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Nicholas 
Co., Va., December 22, 1814 ; came to McHenry Co., November 20, 1838 ; owns a 
farm of 232? acres of land ; value of property, $14,500 ; was elected School Direc- 
tor, the first, in District No. 4, over thirty years ago. Married Emma Chenoweth, 
of Randolph Co., West Va., August 11, 1842; she was born October 24, 1819; 
had seven children six living. 

MURPHY, A. W., Farmer, Fruit Grower and Dealer, Sec. 23 ; Woodstock P. 
0.; born in Nicholas Co., West Va., April 3, 1816; left Braxton Co., Va., and 
came to McHenry Co., November 20, 1838; owns 266 2 acres of land ; valuation 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 229 

of property, $35,500 ; Constable two years, School Director twelve years. Married 
Caroline M. Squairs October 10, 1839 ; she was born in West Va., June 16, 1822 ; 
came to McHenry Co., May 29, 1840; had ten children eight living; always 
lived on Sec. 23. 

NEWMAN, A. S., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
NOLAN, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

PARKER, JOSEPH, Farmer, s. w. Sec. 2 ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in East 
Bloomfield, Ontario Co., N. Y., July 6, 1811 ; came to McHenry Co. in August, 
1854 ; owns 161 acres; value of property, $11,000 ; Highway Commissioner three 
years, School Director six years. Married Mary Curtis in Ontario Co., N. Y., 
January 27, 1833 ; she was born May 18, U311 ; had nine children four boys and 
five girls. David Benjamin Parker was in Co. H, Ninety-fifth 111. Inf., under Cap- 
tain C. H. Tryon. Died November 6, 1870. 

PEATT, Ij. B., Farmer and Money Lender, Sec. 14 ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in 
Westchester Co., N. Y., February 16, 1810 ; came to McHenry Co. in October, 
1844 ; bought a farm of L. Boon, of 237 acres; valuation of property, $24,000 ; 
was School Director twelve years. Married Margaret A. Whiston, February 22, 
1852, in Racine, Wis. ; she was born May 1, 1825, in Deerfield, Oneida Co., N. 
Y. ; have had seven children three boys and four girls ; one boy and one girl dead. 
Has always lived on Sec. 14. 

PETERSON, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

PETERSON, LEWIS L., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in Norway, 
February 15, 1831 ; came to America in July, 1843, and to McHenry Co. August 
28, 1843; owns 218 acres of land; valuation of property, $12,000. Married 
Martha Oliveson in Greenwood, .Lz'y 7, 1851 ; she was born June 26, 1832, in 
Norway ; had seven children ; one girl died December 30, 1872 ; she was four 
years old. 

PHILBRICK, J. J., General Merchant ; Greenwood. 
PIERCE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
POPE, FRED'K, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
PRATT, ZETOLES, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
QUINLAN, JERRY, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
RANDOLPH, JOEL, Farmer. Sec. 36 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
RATHEY, JABEZ, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Greenwood P. O. 
RAYCRAFT, J. W., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
RILEY, MATTHEW, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
ROBERTS, C. E., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
RYDER, CASSANDRA, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
RYDER, W. H., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
SHORT, F. L., Farmer, Sec. 19; Woodstock P. 0. 
SINGER, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
SIDES, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
SINGER, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Woodstock P. 0. 



230 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

SINGER, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
SMITH, DWIGHT, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
SMITH, F. L., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
SNYDER, BARBARA, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
SNYDER, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Woodstock P. 0. . 
SONDERICKER, H., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

SONDERICKER, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 27; Woodstock P. O. ; born 
August 27, 1827, in France; came to McHenry Co. in 1845 ; owns 124 acres of 
land ; was School Director nine years. Married Henrietta Buehler, March 18, 1852, 
in Woodstock ; she was born in Prussia July 4, 1831 ; had five children, four living. 

STEVENS, ARISTIDES, Farmer, Seb. 12; Greenwood P. 0. 
STEPHENSON, A. 0., Renter of J. Yole, Sec. 13; Greenwood P. 0. 
STEWART, WILLIAM D., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
STRONG, S. G., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
SULLIVAN, PATRICK, Farmer,' Sec. 31 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
SULLIVAN, GEORGE, Lives with S. Magoon, Sec. 35 ; Ostend P. 0. 
SULLIVAN, DENNIS, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
THOMAS, A. W., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Ostend P. 0. 
THOMAS, JULIUS, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Ostend P. 0. 

THOMPSON, A. C., Farmer and Butter and Cheese Manufacturer, n. e. Sec. 27 ; 
Woodstock P.O.; born in Orange Co., Vt., February 9, 1820 ; moved with his 
parents to Ashtabula Co., 0., in 1821, and to McHenry Co. in 1842; owns 256 
acres of land ; value of property, $20,000 ; held the office of Justice of Peace two 
years in McHenry, and twelve years in Greenwood ; Supervisor two years, Assessor 
two years, and School Trustee fourteen years. Married Mary Jane Nealey January 
21, 1847, of Milton, Norfolk Co., Mass. ; she was born March 25, 1829 ; had seven 
children ; her mother, Mrs. Susan Nealy, lives with her ; born in Roxbury, Mass., 
Februrry 24, 1811 ; came to McHenry Co. January 24, 1838 ; always lived on Sec. 
27, Township 45. 

THOMPSON, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

THOMPSON, A. C., & CO., Cheese Manufacturers, Sec. 26; Woodstock P. 0. 

THOMPSON, H. N., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

TOLES, JOB, Fanner, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. O. 

TOWN, NATHAN, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

WARNER, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

WASHBURN, A. W., Mechanic, Sec. 11 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

WATSON, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

WESSON, J. E., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

WESTERMAN, WILLIAM, Lives with his father, Sec. 15 ; Greenwood P. O. 

WEIDRICH, FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

WESTERMAN, J. J., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

WESTERMAN, ADAM, Renter, B. Baker's Estate, Sec. 15 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

WHITTIER, R. R., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Greenwood A. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 231 

WILCOX, W. H., Farmer, and Carpenter and Joiner, Sec. 11, Tp. 45 ; Greenwood 
P. 0. ; born in Henrietta, Monroe Co., N. Y., December 3, 1818 ; came to Me- ' 
Henry Co. in March, 1856 ; value of property, $2,000 ; was Collector two years. 
Married Sarah A. Parker September 3. 1844, of Bloomfield. N. J. ; she died Feb- 
ruary 16, 1873 ; had ten children ; only five living. 

WILLIS, WILLIAM N., Farmer and Surveyor. Sec. 35 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; 
born in Leyden. Franklin Co., Mass., November 18, 1819 ; came to Oonondaga Co. 
in 1832, to Canaan, Wayne Co., 0., in 1836, then to McHenry Co. in 1846 ; owns 97 
acres of land ; has been Road Commissioner three years, and Assessor sixteen years. 
Married Mary Hinard April 7, 1846, who was born in Adams Co., Pa., February 14, 
1822 ; had eight children ; six living. 

WILLIS, C. N., Lives with father, Sec, 35 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

WILSON, WILLIAM & SAMUEL, Farmers, n. e. Sec. 3 ; Greenwood P. 
0. ; born in Ogdensburg, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., August 16, 1836, and October 
16,1833; came to McHenry Co. April 15, 1869; their father came October 3, 
1869, and died October 15, 1874 ; own a farm of 246 acres ; valuation of property, 
$15,000. Samuel married Fannie Boyd, June 15, 1869, who was born October 
17, 1848 ; had three children. William married Letitia Boyd, March 31, 1869, 
who died February 3, 1876 ; had three children. Their mother lives with them, in 
her 66th year ; she was born in Ireland, 1810 ; had eleven children, nine living. 

WOOD, HIRAM J., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Greenwood P. 0. ; born in Conquest, Ca- 
yuga Co., N. Y,, May 19, 1838; came to McHenry Co. October 16, 1874; owns 
102 acres of land ; valuation of property, $14,000 : was Postmaster in Conquest, N. 
Y., three years ; held the office of Supervisor when he left Conquest. Married 
Martha Alden, June 1, 1864, who was born in Potsdam, St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., 
March 6, 1838 ; has one child. 

WRIGHT, BYRON J., Lives on Burton Wright's farm, Sec! 33 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
WRIGHT, LEROY, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

WRIGHT, BURTON, Farmer and Stock Dealer, n. w. Sec. 34 ; Woodstock 
P. 0. ; born in Munson, Geauga Co., Ohio, March 15, 1829 ; came to McHenry Co. 
May 10, 1869 ; owns 433 acres of land ; valuation of property, $19,500 ; has been 
Assessor two years. Married Sophia Byrum, March 23, 1849, of Geauga Co., Ohio, 
who died February 19, 1861 ; had three children. Married Hulda Coon, of Rush, 
Jo Daviess Co., 111., March 8, 1863, who was born in Crawford Co., Ohio, Sep- 
tember 24, 1837 ; had two children. 



232 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



GREENWOOD BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

DAWSON, JAMES, Blacksmith. 

GARRISON, J. M., Cheese and Butter Manufacturer. 

PHILBRICK, J. J., General Merchant. 

THOMPSON, A. C., & CO., Cheese and Butter Manufacturers. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 233 



HARTLAND TOWNSHIP. 

ALLEN, WM. B., Farmer, Sec. 26; Woodstock P.O. 
ALLEN, J. C., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
AUSTIN, C. J., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
AUSTIN, E., Rents farm of Darling, Sec. 34 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BARRETT, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in County Cork, 
Ireland, 1806; came to. this county in 1842; owns 146 acres of land. Married 
Margaret Shields in 1853, who was born in County Galway, Ireland, 1817 ; has 
six children living. 

BARRY, PETER, Renter of farm of E. Goggin, Sec. 8 ; Harvard P. 0. 
BARRY, DAVID, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
BASSETT, WM., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

BAUDER, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 7; Harvard P. 0.; born in Montgomery 
Co., N. Y., January 22, 1816 ; came to this county in March, 1865 ; owns 10 
acres of land. Married Nancy M. Purdy, November 7, 1841, who was born in the 
State of New York, October 10, 1825 ; has six children living. 

BRADY, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Harvard P. 0. 

BURKE, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 18; Harvard P. 0. ; born in County Mayo, 
Ireland, 1839 ; came to this country in 1868 ; owns 120 acres of land. Married 
Hannah Harrity in 1867, who was born in County Mayo, Ireland, 1847 ; had five 
children, two living. 

BUTTS, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Harvard P. 0. 
CARMACK, GEORGE, Renter, Sec. 6 ; Harvard P. 0. 

CARROLL, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Woodstock P.O. ; born in County Limerick, 
Ireland, 1821 ; came to McHenry 1853; owns 220 acres of land. Married Ann 
Dalunty in 1854, who was born in County Kilkenny, Ireland, 1822, and died in 
McHenry Co. in 1868 ; has seven children. 

CAUGHLIN, A., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Cork Co., Ireland, 
1836 ; came to this county in 1851 ; owns 60 acres of land. Married Catharine 
Toomey in September, 1862, who was born in Cork Co., Ireland, in 1841 ; has six 
children living. 

CAVIN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Woodstock P. O. 
GATING, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Harvard P. 0. 
COKELY, DAVID, Farmer, Sec. 29 ;. Woodstock P. 0. 



234 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

COKELY, DENNIS, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
COLBY, E. G., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Harvard P. 0. 

COLLINS, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in county of Cork, 
Ireland, May, 1799 ; came to this county in 1844. Married Hannora Murphy in 
1823. who was born in Cork Co. in 1794 and died in 1862; has three children 
living. 

COLLINS, TIMOTHY, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in county of 
Cork, Ireland, in 1841 ; came to this county in 1861. Married Mary Haley in 
1868 ; she was born in Illinois in 1843 ; has three children. 

CONKLIN, WILLIAM G., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in 
Cayuga Co., N. Y., April 2, 1830 ; came to this county in 1854 ; owns 180 acres 
of land ; has been Deputy Postmaster of the town of Hartland for three years, 
Road Commissioner nine years ; acted as Justice of the Peace five years. Married 
Hannah C. Bliss in January, 1854, who was born in Broome Co., N. Y., December 
4. 1834 ; had seven children, six living. 

CONNER, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Harvard P. 0. 
CONARTY, M., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Harvard P. 0. 

COONEY, R. D., & BROS., Farmers, Sec. 24 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; they own 
710 acres of land; R. D. Cooney was born in Columbia Co., N. Y., October 4, 
1845; came to McHenry Co. in 1846 ; has been Town Collector one year, Justice 
of the Peace four years and Supervisor seven years ; one of nine brothers ; ' two 
dead ; all born in McHenry Co. ; their father, Martin Cooney, was born in County 
Galway, Ireland, in 1814, and came to this county in 1844 and died in 1866. He 
married Mary McKenna, of the county of Monaghan, Ireland, December 21, 1843. 

CRAIGHEAD, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. O. ; born in Forfar 
Co., Scotland, June 20, 1813; came to this county in May, 1855 ; owns 92 acres 
of land. Married Elizabeth West, January 19, 1838 ; she was born in Forfar Co., 
Scotland, February 14, 1820 ; has five children living. 

CRATON, JOHANNA, Sec. 7 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in county of Kerry, 
Ireland, in 1836 ; came to this county in 1855 ; owns 40 acres of land. Married 
in 1855 ; has one child, Richard, born in 1859. 

CURRY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 10; Harvard P. 0.; born in county of Kerry, 
Ireland, in 1816 ; came to this county in 1874. Married Mary Long in 1856, who 
was born in county of Cork, Ireland, in 1820; have two children Johanna, born 
in 1848, and Ellen, born in 1856. 

CROWLEY, CHARLES, Fanner, Sec. 5 ; Harvard P. O. ;.born in county of 
Cork, Ireland, in 1826 ; came to this county in 1858 ; owns 39 acres of land. 
Married Ellen Murray in 1854, who was born in county of Cork, Ireland, in 1831 ; 
has ten children living. 

DACY, JERRY, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in county of Cork, Ire- 
land, in 1823; came to this county in 1855; owns 40 acres of land. Married 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 235 

Hannah O'Neil in 1855, who was born in county of Cork, Ireland ; had ten chil- 
dren, eight living. 

DACY, M., MRS., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. 

DELHARTY, WILLIAM, Tenant of M. Madden, Sec. 5 ; Harvard P. 0. 

DEMING, HOMER, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Hartland Town- 
ship, McHenry Co., in 1845 ; owns 10 acres of land. Married Rosanna Bauder, 
September 4, 1866, who was born in Erie Co., N. Y., June 17, 1843 ; has three 
children C. Frederick, born April 8, 1864; Edna L., born November 19, 1869, 
and Alice C., born May 6, 1875. 

DESMOND, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
DESMOND, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

DEVITT, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Cook Co., 111., in 
1840; came to this county in 1836; owns 80 acres of land. Married Fannie 
Kelly in 1861, who was born in county of Cork, Ireland, in 1844 ; has six children 
living. 

DONAHUE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 10; Harvard P. 0.; born in county of 
Kerry, Ireland, in 1826 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1853. Married Mary Sullivan 
in 1849; she was born in county of Kerry, Ireland, in 1833; had thirteen chil- 
dren , eleven living. 

DRISCOLL, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
DUGGAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
DUFFY, OWEN, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
DUGGAN, WILLIAM, SB., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
DUGGAN, WM. JR., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Harvard P. 0. 
EGAN, H., MRS., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
EPPEL, FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
EVANS, WALTER, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

FERGUSON, WM., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Harvard P.O.; born in Louisville, Ky., 
January 1, 1855 ; came to this county June, 1876. 

FORREST, ROBERT, Farmer-, Sec. 33 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
GALISE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

GAPPNEY, FELIX, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Alden P. 0. ; born in Cavan-Co., Ire- 
land, May, 1843 ; came to McHenry Co. 1852. Married Ellen Brady, July, 1863 ; 
she was born in Lynn, Mass., in 1844 ; has five children. 

GILLISPY, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Mayo 
Co., Ireland, J.838 ; came to this county in 1865. Married Mary Mockler, in 1869; 
she was born in Pennsylvania, in 1841 ; has four children. 

GLANCY, EDWARD, Lives on farm of Wm. Lambert, Sec. 21 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

GLASBY, THOS., Renter of J. Reardon, Sec. 10 ; Harvard P. 0. 

GOGGIN, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Harvard P. 0. 

GRADY, N., Farmer and Justice of the Peace, Sec. 32 ; Woodstock P. 0. 



236 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

GRIEBES, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Woodstock P. O. 

G-UTH, GEORGE, Farmer and Commissioner of Highways, Sec. 28; Wood- 
stock P. 0. 

GUTH, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Germany, October, 
16, 1802 ; came to this county 1851 ; owns 120 acres of land. Married Tairasea 
Ralf in 1828, who was born in Germany in 1808; had eleven children, nine 
living. 

HALLISY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
HALEY, DENNIS, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. 
HAKES, H. G., Renter of H. Harman, Sec. 34 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
HALEY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
HAMMOND, N. B., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Harvard P. 0. 

HAMMOND, JAMES U., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Susque- 
hanna Co., N. Y., January 19, 1824; came to this county in 1866 ; owns 10 acres of 
land. Married Arminda Wooldridge, June, 1847, who was born in Cayuga Co., N. 
Y., 1832 ; had twelve children, eight living. 

HARRISON, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
HEATON, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
HAYES, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Harvard P. 0. 
HAYES, OWEN, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Harvard P. 0. 
HAYES, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
HICKEY, MARTIN, Farmer (Renter), Sec. 12 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
HOAR, MORRIS, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Harvard P. 0. 
HOOD, ANDREW, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstoock P. 0. 

HOWARD, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Clare Co., 
Ireland, 1819 ; came to McHenry Co. November, 1849 ; owns 40 acres of land. 
Married Mary Fleming, July, 1852 ; she was born in Monnerher Co. Ireland, 1816 ; 
has five children. 

HUGHES, C. M., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Dutchess Co., 
N. Y., August 23, 1811 ; came to this county in the spring of 1846 ; owns 100 
acres of land. Married Betsey Shimmens Nov. 14, 1860, who was born in the Isle 
of Man August 26, 1826 ; one child. Corral M., born May 15, 1864. 

HUGH-ES, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Harvard P. 0. 
HURLEY, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Harvard P. 0. 
JOHNSTON, J. C., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
KANE, HUGH, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
KANE, FRANK, Farmer, Sec. 13; Woodstock P. 0. 
KANE, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 13; Woodstock P. 0. 

KANE, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 9; Harvard P. 0.; born in Cork Co, Ire- 
land, 1836 ; came to this county in 1856 ; owns 116 acres of land. Married Nancy 
Sullivan in 1860 ; she was born in Hartland Township, McHenry Co., 111., in 1846 ; 
has seven children. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 237 

MICHAEL, KELIHEN, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Harvard P. 0.; born in Kerry Co., 
Ireland, in 1816 ; came to this county in 1849 ; owns 40 acres of land. Married 
Ellen Conners in 1845, who was born in Kerry Co., Ireland, in 1823 ; had eight 
children, six living. 

KEEFE, A., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Kilkenny Co., Ireland, 
1831 ; came to this county in 1856. Married Bridget Davis January, 1858, who 
*was born in Kilkenny Co., Ireland, in 1835 ; has nine children living. 

KENNEDY, JOHN A., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Bank 
St., New York City, March 21, 1821 ; at that time and for some years after there 
were farmers adjoining Bank St., on the north ; came to this county in September, 
1843 ; owns 236 -ffl$ acres of land. Married Louisa Smith September 13, 1846, 
who was born in New York State August 4, 1828 ; ten children living; my father, 
Duncan Kennedy, was a merchant in New York City and New Orleans ; he was 
married to Margaret Stayley, August 11, 1809, by the Rev. Mr. Fen wick ; George 
Stayley, father of Margaret Stayley, married to Ann Gemmel, by Rev. Mr. Rankin, 
September, 1790. 

KING, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Galway Co., Ireland, 
1824 ; came to this county in 1856 ; owns 80 acres of land. Married Eliza 
O'Brien in 1851, who was born in Sligo Co., Ireland, in 1826 ; has six children. 

KING, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Galway Co., Ireland, 
in 1826 ; came to this county in 1874. Married Hannah Tulley in 1856, who was 
born in Galway Co., Ireland, in 1840 ; had eight children, six living. 

LEONARD, TIMOTHY, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
LAWLER, T. & M., Farmers, Sec. 20 ; Harvard P. 0. 
LEHY, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Harvard P. 0. 

LONG, JERRY, Farmer, Sec. 4; Harvard P. 0.; born in Cork Co., Ireland, 
in 1823; came to this county in 1856; owns 40 acres of land. Married Mar- 
garet Callahan in 1836, who was born in Cork Co., Ireland, in 1798; no 
children. 

LONG, DENNIS, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Harvard P. O. ; born in Cork Co., Ireland 
in 1823 ; owns 260 acres of land. Married Mary King October 1852, who was 
in Cork County, Ireland, in 1826 ; has eight children. 

LONG, DENNIS, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Cork Co., Ire- 
land, in 1804 ; came to this county in 1840 ; owns 149 acres of land. Married 
Ellen Carney in 1821, who was born in Cork Co., Ireland in 1804; has five 
children. 

LOVE, WILLIAM, Renter of E. Murphy, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. O. 
LUSH, I. S., Farmer Sec. 6 ; Harvard P. 0. 
MACK, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Harvard P. 0. 

MAGUIRE, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Fermanagh 
Co., Ireland, in 1820 ; came to this county in 1850 ; owns 120 acres of land. Mar- 



238 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

ried Mary McConnell in 1859, who was born in Fermanagh Co., Ireland, in 1831 ; 
had seven children, five living. 

MAHAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Made Co., Ireland, 
in 1808; came to this county in 1844; owns 90 acres of land. Married Mary 
Dully in 1839, who was born in Longford Co., Ireland, in 1808 ; has seven 
children. 

M ASSE Y, JOHN, Renter of J. Gating, Sec. 5 ; Harvard P. 0. 
MCCARTHY, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Harvard P. 0. 
MCCARTHY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Harvard P. O. 
McAULEY, JAMES, Renter of Stone, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
McCABE, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MCCARTHY, FLORENCE, Farmer, Sec. 18; Woodstock P.O.; born in 
Kerry Co., Ireland, in September, 1805 ; came to this county in 1850 ; owns 160 
acres of land. Married Eliza Morrthy in 1864, who was born in Kerry Co., Ireland, in 
1838 ; had two children. 

MCCARTHY, J. C., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Woodstock P. ; born in County Kerry, 
Ireland, June 3, 1834 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1847 ; owns 240 acres of land ; value 
of property, $6,000 ; went to California in 1854, and returned to McHenry Co. in 
1866. Married Mary Du Harte, July 18, 1872; who was born in Cinhm, Cleas, 
France ; has three children. 

McCAULEY, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Fermanagh 
Co., Ireland, in 1823 ; came to this county in 1865. Married Margaret Leonard in 
1854, who was born in Fermanagh Co., Ireland, in 1828 ; has twelve children living. 

McELROY, JOHN, Railroader, Sec. 15 ; Harvard P. 0. 
McGUIRE, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Harvard P. 0. 
McGEE, S., Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
McGUIRE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

McGEE, DENNIS, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in McHenry Co. 
April 16, 1846; owns 40 acres of land. Married Sarah Gillies November 3, 1875, 
who was born in McHenry Co. February 23, 1847. 

MILES, JOHN, Renter of Mrs. Wall, Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
MULLINS, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Harvard P. 0. 
MULDOON, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
MULLINS, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
MURPHY, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. 
MURPHY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Harvard P. 0. 
MURPHY, JERRY, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Harvard P. 0. 
NEWMAN, G. W., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Harvard P. 0. 
NEWMAN, ALEX., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
NEWMAN, GRANVILLE, Farmer, See. 6 ; Harvard P. 0. 
NIHAN, JERRY, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. 
NIHAN, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 239 

NOLAN, MARY D., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

NOLAN, THOMAS C., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Hartland, 
McHenry Co., in 1855 ; Patrick B. Nolan, father of Thomas C., came to this county 
in 1843 ; owns 250 acres of land. Married Mary Nolan in 1843, who was born in 
County Fermanagh. Ireland ; had nine children ; eight living. 



NOLEN, T. B., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

NOLEN, D. MARY, MRS., Widow of P. Nolen, Sec. 14 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

NOLEN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Harvard P. 0. 

NOLEN, T. L., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0.; born in County Fermanagh, 
Ireland, in 1816; came to McHenry Co. in 1836; owns 160 acres.of land. Mar 1 
ried Catherine McGee in 1847 ; she was born in County Fermanagh, Ireland, in 1826 ; 
has four children. 

NUGENT, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Harvard P. 0. 

O'BRIEN, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Kings Co., 
Ireland, in 1826 ; came to this county in 1864; owns 40 acres of land. Married 
Mary Maguire in 1867, who wasjxmi in Fermanagh Co., Ireland, in 1841 ; has one 
child. 

O'CONNOR, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Harvard P. 0. 
O'BRIEN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Harvard P. 0. 
O'LEARY, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Harvard P. 0. 

O'LE &RY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Tippe- 
rary Co., Ireland, in 1803 ; came to this county in 1836 ; owns 120 acres of land. 
Married Hannora Dwyer in 1829, who was born in Tipperary Co., Ireland ; had 
twelve children five living. 

O'NEIL, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Harvard P. 0. 

OSBORNE, 0. A., Farmer and Broom Maker, Sec. 36 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

PERLET, A., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Canada, March 27, 1844 ; 
came to this county October 1, 1874 ; owns 73 acres of land. Married Mary Col- 
lins September 6, 1863, who was born in Scotland, January, 1845 ; had three chil- 
dren ; William L., born November 17, 1865; M. Fletcher, born March 2, 1869, and 
J. Franklin, born July 24, 1872. 

PHILPS, LIBBENS, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Harvard P. 0. 
PIERCE, J. S., Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
QUINLAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 26. ; Woodstock P. 0. 
QUINLAN, DENNIS, JR., Farmer, Sec. 22; Woodstock P. O. 
QUINLAN, M.; Lives with mother, Sec. 23 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
QUINLAN, H., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
QUINLAN, DENNIS, SR., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
QUINN, M. F., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Harvard P. 0. 
QUINN, John, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Harvard P. 0. 
RAFTER, THOMAS, Lives with M. O'Leajy, See. 2 ; Alden P. 0. 
ROE, PHILO, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Woodstock P. 0. 



240 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

RIORDEN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in County of Kerry, 
Ireland, in 1830; came to this county in 1855; owns 80 acres of land. Married 
Johanna Conner in 1855, who was born in Kerry Co., Ireland, in 1862 ; no children. 

RIORDEN, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Kerry Co., 
Ireland, 1826; came to McHenry Co. in 1870. Married Catherine Sullivan in 
1865 ; she was born in Cork Co., Ireland, in 1831 ; has six children. 

SCHOFF, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

SC*ULLY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

SCOTT, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Harvard P. 0. 

SCHWAMB, ANDREW, Lives on farm of (). W. Curtis, Sec. 34 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

SCHULTZ, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Germany, 
October 27, 1831 ; came to this county June 22, 1876; owns 120 acres of land. 
Married Wilimina Schmidt July 19, 1864, who was born in Germany June 11, 
1859 ; has two children. 

SHE AH AN, DENNIS, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Cork Co., 
Ireland, in 1826; came to this county in 1853 ; owns 80 acres of land. Married 
Mary McCarthy in 1858, who was born in Cork Co., Ireland, in 1836 ; has seven 
children living. 

SHEAHAN, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 7; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Cork Co., 
Ireland, in 1834 ; came to this county in 1853 ; owns 80 acres of land ; married 
Margaret Barrett in 1864, who was born in Lockport, 111., in 1842 ; has five children. 

SHEAHAN, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Cork Co., 
Ireland, in 1816 ; came to this county in 1836 ; owns 80 acres of land. Married 
Margaret Moran in 1841, who was born in Kerry Co., Ireland, 1816 ; no children. 

SPLAIN, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Cork Co., Ireland, 
1824 ; came to this county in 1857 ; owns 30 acres of land. Married Eliza Barry 
in 1851, who was born in Cork Co., Ireland, 1824; no children. 

STUPPEL, BENJAMIN, Lives on farm of D. Barry, Sec. 28 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
SULLIVAN, J. D., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Harvard P. O. 
SULLIVAN, C., Lives with father. Sec. 19 ; Harvard P. 0. 

SULLIVAN, DENNIS, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Cork Co., 
Ireland, in 1829 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1865. Married Marry Hennessy in 
1858, who was born in Cork Co., Ireland, 1833 ; has six children. 

SULLIVAN, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 16; Harvard P. 0.; born in Hartland 
Township, McHenry Co., October 15,1843; owns 200 acres of land. Married 
Elizabeth McCarthy, January 19, 1864, who was born in Buffalo, N. Y., 1843 ; has 
five children. 

SULLIVAN, MAURICE, Farmer, Sec. 16; Harvard P.O.; born in Kerry 
Co., Ireland, 1813 ; came to McHenry Co. 1840; owns 120 acres of land. Mar- 
ried Ellen Sullivan in 1835, who was born in Kerry Co., Ireland, in 1813 ; has five 
children. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 241 

SULLIVAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Cork Co., 
Ireland, in November, 1825 ; came to McHenry Co. in June, 1857 ; owns 158 acres 
of land. Married Catharine McCarthy in September, 1857, who was born in Cork 
Co., Ireland, 1826 ; has four children. 

SWEENEY, D., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Harvard P. 0. ; born in Cork Co., Ireland, in 
1834; came to McHenry Co. May 20, 1869 ; owns 20 acres of land. Married Mary 
Donnovan in 1864, who was born in Cork Co., Ireland, in 1846 ; had seven chil- 
dren, four living. 

TARNOW, WILLIAM, Lives on farm of F. & M. Lawler, Sec. 21 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

TOOMEY, TIMOTHY, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Harvard P. 0.; born in Cork Co., 
Ireland, 1813 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1857; owns 60 acres of land. Married 
Bridget Connell in 1846, who was born in Cork Co., Ireland, 1826 ; has four chil- 
dren living. 

WALLACE. THOM IS, Lives on farm of Jos. Boh, Sec. 28 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

WELCH, DAVID, Farmer, Sec. 19; Harvard P. 0. 

WELCH, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 30; Harvard P. 0. 

WELCH, H., MRS., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Harvard P. 0. 

WILLIAMS, H., Farmer, Sec. 13; Woodstock P. 0. 

WHOLAHAN, M., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Woodstock P. 0. 



242 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



HEBRON TOWNSHIP. 

ADAMS, C. 8., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Hebron P. 0. 
ALEXANDER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Richmond P. 0. 
ANDREWS, S. G., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Richmond P. 0. 
ARCHIBALD, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Richmond P. 0. 
AUSTIN, R. L., Lives with father, Sec. 30 ; Greenwood P. 0- 
AUSTIN, R. H., Lives with father, Sec. 30 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
AUSTIN, W. M., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
AUSTIN, RUFUS, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
AYRES, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 16; Hebron P. 0. 
BAIRD, FRANKLIN, Farmer. Sec. 30 ; Hebron P. 0. 
BENEDICT, H. E., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Hebron P. 0. 
BEGUN, V. R., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Hebron P. O. 
BEGUN, RUSSELL, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Hebron P. 0. 

BENEDICT, H. E., Farmer, n. e. Sec. 23 ; Richmond P. 0, ; born in Madison 
Co., N. Y., April 29, 1842; came to McHenry Co., February 15, 1871; owns a 
farm of 160 acres; valuation of property, $7,000; volunteered in the Thirty-third 
Regt. Wis. Inf., under Captain Walter Cook ; served three years. Married Hattie 
E. Gibbs, in Randall, Wis. ; she was born May 30, 1845 ; had three children. 

BLODGETT, D. S., Harness Maker ; Hebron. 
BOYD, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
BRIGHAM, E. M., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Hebron P. 0. 
BRIGHAM, E. W., Blacksmith ; Hebron. 
BROWN, J. F., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Hebron P. 0. 
BRUSH, WALTER, Laborer ; Hebron. 
BROWN, G. W., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
BROWN, S. W. & J. S., Farmers, Sec. 25 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

BROWN, J. F., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Hebron P. 0. ; born in Dutchess Co., Dover 
Plains, N. Y., November 7, 1842; owns 80 acres; valuation of property, $7,500; 
came to McHenry Co. in the fall of 1850. Married Eveline Rotnour, in Genoa, 
Wis., November 22, 1855; she was born July 15, 1845, in Manlius, N. Y. ; had 
three children, two living. 

BROWN, S. W., Farmer, Justice of the Peace, Deputy Surveyor and Notary 
Public of McHenry Co., Sec. 25 ; Greenwood P. 0. ; owns 200 acres ; born in 
Rockingham Co., N. H., April 27, 1811 ; came to McHenry Co. May 3, 1849 ; 
Justice of the Peace twenty-five years, Supervisor six years, Assessor one year and 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 243 

Collector one year. Married Sophia Cogswell, of Boscawen, N. H., August 18, 
1840 ; she was born June 9, 1822, in Boscawen, N. H. ; had four children. 

BROUGHTON, S. 0., Blacksmith ; Hebron. 
BROUGHTON, WM. 0., Blacksmith ; Hebron. 
BUCHANAN, EDWIN, Farmer, Sec. 18; Hebron P. 0. 
BURGER, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

BURGETT, JAMES, Farmer, n. e. Sec. 2 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born November 
11, 1829, in Steuben Co., N. Y. ; came to McHenry Co. December 22, 1854 ; owns 
260 acres; valuation of property, $15,000 ; School Director six years ; was in Cali- 
fornia four years ; returned 1854 to McHenry Co. Married Edna Ann Harrison, 
January 1, 1855, in Bloomfield, Wis. ; she was born in Climax Co., Mich., May 3, 
1838 ; had eight children, five boys and three girls. 

CARNEY, MARTHA, Widow, Sec. 16 ; Hebron P. 0. 
CASTERLIN, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Hebron P. 0. 
CHARLES, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Hebron P. 0. 

CHAPMAN, WM., Blacksmith ; Hebron ; was born in Lincolnshire, England, 
December 16, 1833 ; came to America in the spring of 1849 ; settled in Racine, 
Wis., with his parents ; came to McHenry Co. in spring of 1863 ; valuation of 
property, $3,500. Married Hiliam Newberry, in Lynn, Walworth Co., Wis., Octo- 
ber 31, 1856 ; she was born in New York, November 23, 1834 ; had five children ; 
she died May 10, 1876. Mr. Chapman has worked at blacksmithing ever since he was 
12 years old. 

CLARK, HAZLEWOOD, Farmer, Sec. 13; Richmond P. 0. 
CLARY, D. A., Renter of S. W. Mead, Sec. 9 ; Hebron P. 0. 
CLOTHIER, W. M., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Richmond P. 0. 
COAKLEY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Richmond P. 0. 
COFFEY, T. W., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
COUCH, W. H., Renter of A. Martin, Sec. 24 ; Richmond P. 0. 
COLE, MELVIN J., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Hebron P. 0. 
CONNELL, THOMAS, Farmer,- Sec. 28 ; Hebron P. 0. 

CONN, GEO. W., Farmer and Cheese Manufacturer, Sec. 10 ; Hebron P. 0. ; born 
in Marlow, N. H., May 27, 1834 ; moved with his parents to Massachusetts, when 
one year of age ; came to McHenry Co., March 22, 1861 ; owns 240 acres ; valu- 
ation of property, $11,000. Married Frances E. Cole, November 15, 1856; she 
was born in Cheshire, Mass. ; had one child. Married Lina C. Woolfrom (second 
wife), in Lanesborough, Mass.; have had five children. 

COVELL, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Richmond P. O. 

COVELL, JAMES M., Lives with his father, Sec. 1 ; Richmond P. 0. 

COWEN, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Richmond P. 0. 

DEZELL, ARCHIBALD, Lives on J. Whiston's farm, Sec. 23; Greenwood P. 0. 
DENNISON, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Richmond P. 0. 
DIKE, H. S., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Hebrou P. 0. 



244 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

EAMES, G. B., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Richmond P. 0. 
EARL, HENRY, Farmer; Hebron. 
EHLE, H. G., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Hebron P. 0. 
EHLE, C. W., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Hebron P. 0. 
ELLIS, IRA, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Hebron P. 0. 

ERCENBRACK, W. S., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; born in Montgomery Co., N. Y., July 
11, 1827 ; came to McHenry Co. March 15, 1859 ; owns 455 acres of land ; valua- 
tion of property, $28,000 ; Road Commissioner twelve years, School Director fifteen 
years. Married Melissa E. Grovisteene, September 5, 1846, in Beloit, Wis. ; she 
was born in Montgomery Co., N. Y., July 7, 1829 ; have had six children, five liv- 
ing. 

FENNER, H., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born in Greene Co., N. Y., Jan- 
uary 8, 1828 ; lived in Orleans Co., N. Y., five years ; came to McHenry Co. in the 
spring of 1846 ; owns 149 acres ; valuation of property, $9,500 ; has been Road 
Commissioner three years and Assessor one year. Married Phebe Allen Hodges, a 
descendant of Ethan Allen), in Genoa, Wis., February 23, 1859 ; she was born 
in Dorset, Vt., June 22, 1832 ; have had three children. 

FISHER, CURTIS E., Renter of L. D. Seaman, Sec. 10 ; Hebron P. 0. 

FOREMAN, JOSIAH, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

FOREMAN, AUSTIN, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

GATES, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Hebron P. 0. 

GATES, H. M., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Hebron P. 0. 

GATES, NELSON, Renter of G. Gates, Sec. 18 ; Hebron P. 0. 

GATES, J. & W. H. D., Renters of V. B. Phillips, Sec. 17 ; Hebron P. 0. 

GIDDINGS, JOSIAH H., Farmer, n. e. Sec. 7 ; Hebron P. 0. ; born in 
Bakersfield, Franklin Co., Vt., August 2, 1805 ; moved to DuPage Co., 111., 1832 
and to McHenry Co. in June, 1836 ; owns 160 acres ; valuation of property, $12,- 
000 ; Supervisor five years ; was a volunteer during the Black Hawk war, in 1832. 
Married Alvira Stevens (first wife), February 6, 1832 ; she was born in Enosburg, 
Vt., August 3, 1809 ; died August 24, 1835 ; had three children, one living. Mar- 
ried Hannah Gilbert (second wife), of Bakersfield, Vt. ; she was born September 
16, 1810 ; died March 24, 1867; had seven children, six living. Married Emily 
J. Sales (third wife), June 6, 1875 ; she was born January 24, 1826, in Floyd, 
Oneida Co., N. Y. 

GLASS, LYMAN, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Hebron P. 0. 
GLASS, W. L., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Hebron P. 0. 
GOODSELL, W. S., General Merchant; Hebron. 
GOOKIN, 0. H. P., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Richmond P. 0. 
GRATTON, F. E., Lives with Mrs. Carney, Sec. 16 ; Hebron P. 0. 

GRATTON, E. O.,Dr,, Hebron, 111.; born in Sandy Creek, Oneida Co., N. Y., 
May 24, 1827 ; came to McHenry Co., January 27, 1866 ; valuation of property, 
$7,500 ; volunteer in the army during the Rebellion ; served in the Mississippi 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 245 

Army, in the Medical Department, for three years and seven days. Married Caro- 
line Walton, of Mansfield, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y., May 29, 1848; she was born 
October 5, 1828 ; had six children. 

HAWTHORNE, ISAIAH, Fanner, Sec. 23 ; Richmond P. 0. 

HAWTHORNE, ISAAC, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Richmond P. 0. 

HAWLEY,. ALLEN, Farmer, Sec. 19; Hebron P. 0. 

HENDRICKSON, W. B., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Richmond P. 0. 

HODGE, BENJ., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Richmond P. 0. 

HOPKINS, E., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Hebron P. 0. 

HOLMES, THOMAS, Renter of F. Jones, Sec. 15 ; Hebron P. 0. 

HOPKINS, JOEL, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Hebron P. 0. 

HOPKINS, N. A., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Hebron P. 0. 

HOUSEHOLDER, H. L., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Hebron P. 0. 

HOWE, W. D., Lives on farm of J. F. Parker, Sec. 35 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

HUFF, FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 36; Greenwood P.O. 

HUNT, G. W., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

JONES, LAURA A., Mrs., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Hebron P. 0. ; born in Wyoming 
Co., N. Y., October 24, 1838 ; came to McHenry Co. in February, 1869 ; owns 110 
acres of land ; valuation of property, $6,000. She married William Manly, Febru- 
ary 26, 1861 ; he was born in Vermont, June 27, 1825, died March 14, 1871; had 
four children; Second marriage, Abraham Jones, September 15,1875; born in 
England, May 19, 1833 ; came to America in 1853. Her maiden- name was Laura 
Foster. 

KANE, W. R., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Hebron P. 0. 

KASPROWEZ, WILLIAM, On farm of W. B. Maly, Sec. 32 ; Hebron P. 0. 

KEEPSIE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Richmond P. 0. 

LEACH, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Hebron P. 0. 

LEE, WILLIAM D., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

LEE, L. A., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Hebron P. 0. 

MANLEY, M. F., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Hebron P. 0- 

MANSFIELD, L. F., Physician and Surgeon, Hebron. 

MARVIN, JESSE, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Hebron P. 0. 

MARKHAM, G. W., On farm of H. G. Ehle, Sec. 8 ; Hebron P. 0. 

MASON, N. H., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Richmond P. 0. 

MASON, A. N., On farm of J. Mason, Sec. 13 ; Richmond P. 0. 

MEAD, C. L., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Hebron P. 0. 

MERRICK, H. M., MRS., Widow, Sec. 14 ; Richmond, P. 0. 

MORGAN, AUGUST, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Richmond P. 0. 

MEAD, H. W., Farmer, Railroad Station Agent, Cheese Manufacturer and Lumber 
Dealer, s. w. Sec. 9 ; Hebron ; born in Sandy Creek, Oswego Co., N. Y., May 10, 
1823; came to Richmond, McHenry Co., October 31, 1844, and since 1853 has 
lived at Hebron or Mead Station ; owns 450 acres of land ; valuation of property, 
$30.000 : was Supervisor one year, Justice of the Peace eighteen years, Town Clerk, 



246 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

eighteen years, Town Treasurer thirteen years. Married Ann M. Turner January 
22, 1862, in Lynn, Wis. ; she was born December 7, 1828 ; had three children, two 
living. 

NICKOLS, CHARLES, Renter of J. Adams, Sec. 7 ; Hebron P. 0. 
NIVER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Hebron P. 0. 
PARKER, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Greenwood P. 0. 
PAXON, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Richmond P. 0. 
PHILLIPS, C. L , Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Hebron P. 0. 
PHILLIPS, 0. F., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Hebron P. 0. 
PHILLIPS, IRA B., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Hebron P. 0. 
PHILLIPS, E. R., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Hebron P. 0. 
PIERCE, G. F., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Hebron P. 0. 

PIERCE, JOHN, Farmer, s. e. Sec. 8 ;. Hebron P. 0. ; born in Troupsburgh, N. 
Y., May 10, 1834 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1846 ; owns farm of 390 acres ; valuation 
of property, $27,000. Married Ellen Hyde, April 26, 1857, in Lyonsdale, Wis. ; 
she was born March 19, 1833 ; has two children. 

PIERCE, LYMAN, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Hebron P. 0. 

PIERCE, ZENAS, Retired Farmer ; Hebron. 

PROWTY, H. M., Farmer, Sec. 14 Hebron P, 0. 

ROWE, HENRY, Shoemaker ; Hebron. 

ROWE, DAVID, Carpenter ; Hebron. 

ROWE, AARON, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Hebron P. 0. 

ROWE, HIRAM, Carpenter ; Hebron. 

ROWE, SANFORD, Renter of F. Jones, Sec. 14 ; Richmond P. O. 

ROWE, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Hebron P. 0. 

RYAN, J. A.; Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Richmond P. 0. 

SAWYER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Hebron P. 0. ; born in Colerain, Frank- 
lin Co., Mass., March 29, 1805; owns 200 acres of land; valuation of property, 
$12,500. Married Alvira King, in Salem, N. Y., February 16, 1835; she was 
born January 14, 1803, in Dorset, Vt. ; he moved to Aurora, 111., in 1835 and to 
McHenry Co. in 1843 ; had five children, two living ; had five grandchildren, one 
living ; his daughter and husband are living with them. Mr. and Mrs. P. S. Lines 
had four children, all dead. 

SEAMAN, E. W., Carpenter ; Hebron. 

SEAMAN, G. W., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Hebron P. 0. 

SEAMAN, L. D., Retired Farmer ; Hebron. 

SEAMAN, L. B., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Hebron P. 0. 

SLAVEN, MATTHEW, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Greenwood P. 0. 

SMITH, E. W., Farmer, Sec. 13; Richmond P. 0. 

SLATER, HORACE, CarpenU-r ; Hebron. 

SLATER, A. B., Laborer ; Hebron. 

SMITH, D. K., Wagon Maker ; Hebron. 

SMITH, CHAS. F., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Richmond P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 247 

SMITH, E. W., Farmer, n. e. Sec. 13 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born in Waitsfield, 
Vt., May 11, 1813; came to McHenry Co. in June, 1838; owns 160 acres of 
land; valuation of property, , $1 3,000 ; worked at blacksmithing the first fifteen 
years of his stay in the county ; his first job was to sharpen a breaking plow for 
Lewis Burnan, on an iron wedge, drove in a stump, for an anvil, and the plow was 
heated by barks and blown by the winds of heaven ; the job was well done ; was 
Deputy Sheriff six years. Married Hannah Lamphire, April 14. 1848 ; she was 
born January 13, 1828, in New York ; had three children. 

SNYDER, ISAAC, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Richmond P. 0. 
SPOONER, I. R., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Hebron P. 0. 

SOPER, I. W., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Hebron P. 0. ; born in Macedon, Wayne Co., 
N. Y., January 21, 1822 ; went to Lockport, Niagara Co., when eleven years of age 
and to McHenry Co. in the fall of 1849 ; valuation of property, $4,000 ; was Town 
Trustee three years and School Director eight years. Married Polly L. Trowbridge, 
March 18, 1847 ; she was born December 5, 1824, in Alden, Erie Co., N. Y. ; has 
two children, both boys H. M. Soper, born March 17, 1850, a graduate of national 
elocution, oratory and philosophy, and D. W. Soper, born July 25, 1854 ; both 
have taught school for several years. 

SPERRY, HANNAH M., Mrs., Farmer, Sec. 7; Hebron P. 0.; born in 
Dover, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio., January 10, 1818 ; came to McHenry Co. in October, 
1843; owns a farm of 200 acres; valuation of property, $16,000. Married Shel- 
don Sperry, September 24, 1843 ; he was born in Dover, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, No- 
vember 4, 1819; died September 11, 1872; had six children, three living; her 
maiden name was Hannah M. Lilly. 

STACKSEN, JOHN, Railroad Employe ; Hebron. 
STEWART, JAMES E, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Hebron P. 0. 
STEWART, ORANGE, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Hebron P. 0. 
STEWART, A. B., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Hebron P. 0. 
STEWART, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 28; Hebron P. 0. 

STEWART, SAMUEL, Farmer, n. w. Sec. 30 ; Hebron P. 0. ; born in 
Rome, Oueida Co., N. Y., January 26, 1804; came to McHenry Co. in October, 
1846; owns 79 acres of land; valuation of property, $5,000; was School Director 
nine years. Married Emily Hawley, March 18, 1828; she was born in Shasburg, 
Vt., July 30, 1809 ; had nine children and twenty-eight grandchildren (two dead) 
and six great-grandchildren ; in all, forty-five offspring. 

STEWART, R. B., Cheese Manufacturer, Sec. 27 ; Hebron P. 0. 

STONE, JOSEPH, Farmer and Money Lender, Hebron P. 0. ; born in Poultney, 
Steuben Co., N. Y., April 21, 1817 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1846; valuation of 
property, including money, $6,600 ; was School Trustee twelve years. Married 
Betsy Hutches, September 18, 1839, in Poultney, Steuben Co., N. Y. ; she was 
born April 11, 1817, in Poultney, Steuben Co., N. Y. ; had six children, three 
living ; has six grandchildren. 



248 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

STONE, J. B., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Richmond P. 0. 

STONE, G. B., Farmer, Sec. 18; Hebron P. 0.; born in SteubeifCo., N. Y., 
August 1, J844; came to McHenry Co. in 1846; owns a farm of 92 2 acres; 
valuation of property, $10,000. Married Gettie Wilcox, May 11, 1868; born 
October 4, 1843, in Jacksonville, Vt. ; moved to Brattleboro, Vt., when eleven 
years of age and to McLean Co., 111., in 1864, and to McHenry Co. in 1868; had 
three children. 

STRATTON, ELMER, Renter of R. Carney, Sec. IT ; Hebron P. 0. 
SUMNER, H. A., MRS., Widow of J. B., Sec. 29; Hebron P. 0. 

STREET, C. & S. G., Farmers, s. e. Sec. 10 ; Hebron P. 0. ; C. Street was born in 
West Springfield Co., Mass., January 29, 1797. Married Dolly Brown, of Peru, 
Mass., April 16, 1825, in Pownal, Vt. ; had four children, two living. Came to 
McHenry Co. in 1865; value of property, in Minnesota, $4,000. S. G. Street 
was born in Barre, Orleans Co., N. Y., January 12, 1828. Married Mary D. San- 
ford, April 22, 1851 ; came to McHenry Co. March 28, 1854; owns 200 acres with 
his father ; value of property, $13,500; had five children, four living; was School 
Director nine years. 

SWAN, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Hebron P. 0. 
SWAN, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 2; Richmond P. 0. 

SWAN, EUGENE M., Farmer, n. w. Sec. 11 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born in Rome, 
Oneida Co., N. Y., December 25, 1836 ; came to McHenry Co. in the fall of 1848 ; 
owns 125 acres of land. Married Harriet E. Alexander, November 23, 1865, in 
Genoa, Wis., who was born in Concord, N. H., January 18, 1846; had three 
children. 

TOWER, WM., Farmer, s. e. Sec. 7 ; Hebron P. 0. ; born in Washington Co., 
Mass., May 20, 1802; moved to Chenango Co., N. Y., in 1804, and to Wis- 
consin in August, 1840, and to McHenry Co. May 8, 1847 ; owns 160 acres of 
land; valuation of property, $16,569. Married Diana Sackett, September 7, 1831, 
who was born in Chenango Co., N. Y., May 25, 1810 ; had two children, one living ; 
have three grandchildren. 

THAYER, C. H., Farmer, Sec. 32; Hebron P. 0. 
THOMAS, GEORGE, Laborer, Sec. 5 ; Hebron P. 0. 
TROW, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Richmond P. 0. 
TRYON, C. H., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Richmond P. 0. 
TRYON, FRED. C., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Richmond P. 0. 
TURNER, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Hebron P. 0. 

TYLER, ALPHONSO, Farmer, Sec. 9; Hebron P. 0. ; born in Oswego Co., 
N. Y,, August 10, 1811 ; came to McHenry Co. May 19, 1847 ; owns 139 acres of 
land in McHenry Co., and 359 in Black Hawk Co., Iowa ; valuation of property, 
$17,500 ; was Supervisor one year, Road Commissioner three years, Collector four 
years and Constable three years. Married Catharine Rickard in Oswego, N. Y., 
October 14,1832, who was born May 22, 1815, in Albany Co., N. Y. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 249 

VAN DERKAR, MELISSA, MRS., Widow of C. S., Sec. 27 ; Hebron P. 0. 
VOGAL, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Richmond P. 0. 
WALTERS, AUGUST, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Richmond P. 0. 
WELBON, P. J., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Hebron P. 0. 
WHITE, CHARLES, Railroad Employe ; Hebron. 

WILCOX, ALFRED, Farmer, s. w. Sec. 12 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born in Her- 

kimer Co., N. Y., December 8, 1832 ; came to McHeury Co. in June, 1844; owns 
80 acres of land ; value of property, $4,500 in McHenry Co., and $2,000 in real 
estate in Minnesota, Married Mary E. Martin in Lynn, Wis., February 23, 1861, 
who was- born February 22, 1836, in Berkshire Co., Mass. ; had two children. 

WILCOX, H. M., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Hebron P. 0. 
WOODBURY, W. H., Farmer Sec. 18 ; Hebron P. 0. 

WICKHAM, GEO. S., Farmer, n. e. Sec. 12 ; Hebron P. 0. ; born in Wash- 
ington Co., N. Y., January 12, 1819 ; moved to Onondaga Co., N. Y., with his 
parents in 1826 ; lumbered it in Oswego Co. for four years, and came to McHenry 
Co. June 20, 1846 ; owns 405 acres of land; value of property, $40,000. ; School 
Trustee ten years. Married Fannie Palmer, in Oswego Co., N. Y., November 22, 
1844, who was born June 5, 1828, in Coxsackie, Greene Co., N. Y. ; had eleven 
children, ten living. 

WOOLFROM, P. H., Renter of. Mrs. Pierce, Sec. 17 ; Hebron P. 0. 
YOUNG, Z. H., Farmer, Sec 10; Hebron P.O. 

YOUNG, G. H., Farmer, n. e. Sec. 29; Hebron P. 0.; born in Sherburne, 
Chenango Co., N. Y., May 25, 1829; moved to Sturgis, St. Joseph Co., Mich., in 
1856, and to McHenry Co. October 22, 1869 ; owns 200 acres of land; valuation 
of property, $9,000. Married Susan Cook, October 20, 1853, in Sherburne, N. Y., 
who was born March 12, 1832, in North Goar, Lower Canada ; had three children, 
two living. 



250 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 



HEBRON BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



WILLIAM CHAPMAN, 

BLACKSMITH AND 

General Repair Shop, 



DR. E. O. GRATTON, 

Physician and Surgeon. 



HEBRON BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

BOUGHTON, S. 0. & WM. 0., Blacksmiths. 
CHAPMAN, WILLIAM, Blacksmith. 
GOODSELL, W. S., General Merchant. 
MANSFIELD, S. F., Physician. 
ROWE, HIRAM, Carpenter. 
ROWE, HENRY, Shoemaker. 
ROWE, DAVID, Carpenter. 
SMITH, D. K., Wagon Maker. 
SLATER, HORACE, Carpenter. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 251 



MARENGO TOWNSHIP. 

ADAMS, JEROME, Laborer ; State st., Marengo. 

ADAMS, GEO. B., Broker ; Main st., Marengo. 

ADAMS, J. Q., Dentist ; State and Washington sts., Marengo. 

ALDERMAN, CHARLES, Laborer ; Mormon st., Marengo. 

ALDERMAN, F. W., Laborer ; Mormon st., Marengo. 

ALLEN, MARTIN, Laborer ; Main st., Marengo. 

ANDERSON, WILLIAM, Proprietor Commercial Hotel; Main and State ste. 

Marengo. 

ANDREWS, R. K., Carpenter; Prairie st,, Marengo. 
ANDERSON, ADOLPHUS, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 
ANDERSON, IRA H., Carpenter ; Deitz st., Marengo. 
ANDERSON, OSCAR, Laborer; Marengo Township. 
ANDERSON, DAVID, Retired Farmer; Washington st., Marengo. 
ANDERSON, C. B., Laborer; Mormon st., Marengo. 
ANDERSON, CHARLES, Laborer ; Marengo Township, 
ANDREWS, A. D., Laborer ;. Main st, Marengo. 

ANDREWS, SILAS, Laborer ; Mormon st., Marengo. , 

ANDREWS, EDWARD, Laborer; State st., Marengo. 
AVERY, CHARLES E., Laborer; Marengo Township. 
AVERY, G. L., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Marengo P. 0. 
AVERY, WILLIAM, Depot Agent ; Hall st., Marengo. 

BAILEY, A. W., Commercial Traveler for twenty-five years, ten years from 
Philadelphia and fifteen years from Chicago ; born in Georgetown, Chenango Co., 
N. Y., May 2, 1820 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1856 ; owns house and lot and prop- 
erty in Iowa. Married GHorana S. Fosket, of Utica, N. Y., 1843, who died 1853 ; 
married Mary E. Ostrander, of Dunkirk, N. Y., 1856 ; had three children, the 
youngest dead. 

BAILEY, ORRIN, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Marengo P. 0. 

BABCOCK, J. B., Publisher of Marengo Republican; State and Prairie sts., 

Marengo. 

BAILEY, M. B., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BAILEY, A. H., Carpenter; State st., Marengo. 
BAILEY, A. W., Runner; State st., Marengo. 
BARNES, ERVIN, Laborer ; Main st., Marengo. 
BALLARD, GEORGE, Laborer; Main st., Marengo. 



252 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

BAZIER, JOSEPH, Shoemaker; State st, Marengo. 
BARTLETT, HORACE, Carpenter ; Mormon St., Marengo. 
BARBER, JOSEPH, Shoemaker ; Washington st., Marengo. 
BALLARD, EDWARD, Laborer; Deitz st., Marengo. 
BARNES, E. N., Insurance Agent; State and Main sts., Marengo. 
BEAN, JOHN, Laborer ; Washington st., Marengo. 
BENNETT, A. J., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. 
BENNETT, MILO, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BENJAMIN, WILLIAM, Laborer ; Main st,, Marengo. 
BELLOWS, CHARLES, Laborer ; Taylor st., Marengo. 
BELDIN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BELDIN, J. T., Jeweler ; State st., Marengo. 
BELDIN, GEO. D., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BISHOP, H. L., Retired Farmer; Main st., Marengo. 
BOGANRIEF, GEORGE, Blacksmith ; Deitz st., Marengo. 
BOOMER, ALBERT, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Marengo P. 0. 

BOOMER, ORRIS, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Ellisburgh, Jef- 
ferson Co., N. Y., October 10, 1822 ; came to McHenry Co. first in 1846 ; 
went to Missouri in fall of 1864, lived there eight years, when they returned to this 
county ; owns 201 acres of land 120 acres in Missouri, value $35 per acre, and 81 
acres in this county, value $50 per aore. Married Permelia Mericle, of Chautauqua 
Co., N. Y., November 23, 1858 ; had five children, all living. 

BOYINGTON, DANIEL, Drayman ; Taylor st., Marengo. 

BOGANRIEF, DANIEL, Blacksmith ; Washington st,, Marengo. 

BOYINGTON, A. J., Insurance Agent; State st., Marengo. 

BOYLE, PATRICK, Laborer; Prairie st,, Marengo. 

BOYLE, JOHN, Laborer ; Prairie st., Marengo. 

BOYCE, AMOS, Retired Farmer ; Main st., Marengo. 

BOYCE, H. G., Laborer ; Marengo Township. 

BOYCE, A. M., Laborer (Renter) ; Marengo Township. 

BLAIR, L. L., Laborer; Forest st., Marengo. 

BLAIR, WILLIAM, Carpenter ; Forest st., Marengo. 

BLANCHARD, WILLIAM, Carpenter ; Washington st,, Marengo. 

BLAIR, HERBERT, Laborer; Forest St., Marengo. 

BLOODGOOD, WILLIARD, Boot and Shoe Dealer ; State st., Marengo. 

BLOSSOM, 0. P., Forest st., Marengo. 

BRICKLEY, PAT'K, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Marengo P. 0. 

BRICKLEY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Marengo P. 0. 

BRICKLEY, TIMOTHY, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 

BRIGGS, JOHN C., Moulder; Main st., Marengo. 

BROUGHTON, EBEN, Laborer; Ann st., Marengo. 

BRONSON, A., Laborer; Jackson st., Marengo. 

BRIGHT, THOMAS, Manufacturer of Pumps and Wind-mills ; Prairie st., Marengo. 

BUCK, NELSON, Manufacturer of Pumps and Wind-mills ; Railroad st., Marengo. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 253 

BUCK, G. L., Proprietor Pacific Hotel; State st., Marengo. 
BULARD, J. H., Jeweler; Ann and Main sts., Marengo. 

BURGIN, JAMES, Merchant; Marengo; born in Bradford, Vt., November 13^ 
1818; came to Marengo April 8, 1858. Married Mary Jane Greno, of Lebanon, 
N. H., May 8, 1846 ; she died August 18, 1849 ; had one girl ; died December 3, 
1875, at the age of 28. Married Sarah E. Lumbard, of McGalway, Maine, 
November 8, 1850; she had five children; one boy died August 22, 1872, 
at the age of 20 years and 6 months ; one girl died May 2, 1859, at the age 
of 1 year and 6 months ; has three girls living. 

BURKE, WILLIAM, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 

BUMPSTED, EDWARD, Proprietor of Weigh Scales ; Prairie st., Marengo. 

BUMPSTED, JAS. E., Weigh Scales ; Prairie st., Marengo. 

BURT, ALBERT, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 

BURT, JAMES, Laborer ; Main st., Marengo. 

BURT, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Marengo P. 0. 

BURT, HENRY, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 4 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in 
Marengo Township, October 18, 1851 ; owns 100 acres of land (prairie), valued at 
$30 per acre. Unmarried. 

CARPENTER, C. L., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Marengo P. 0. 

CAD WELL, E. S., Dealer in Drive Wells, Iron Pumps of all descriptions, Wind- 
mills of six .different patents, Wood Pumps and Gas Pipe, also Patentee of the Well 
Auger ; Wells bored and tiled to order ; Augers for sale ; all orders left at my res- 
idence, in Marengo; born in Union Grove, Racine Co., Wis., March 24, 1846; 
came to McHenry Co. in 1854 ; owns property at Crystal Lake Prairie, also North 
Prairie and Woodstock, and house and lot in Marengo. Married Mattie Smith, of 
Marengo, May 8, 1873. 

CARMON, A. G., Machinist; Taylor st., Marengo. 
CARVER, L. P., Laborer; Marengo Township. 

CAD Y, E., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Saratoga Co., N. Y., January 
15, 1815 ; came to McHenry Co. May 9, 1863 ; owns 107 acres of land. Married 
Paulina Jennings, October 11, 1840 ; she was born in Salisbury, Herkimer Co., N. 
Y. ; had six children three living. 

CARMACK, W. A., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in 
LaPorte Co., Ind., February 15, 1837 ; came to McHenry Co. in September 1842 ; 
owns 116 acres of land, value $35 per acre ; was Town Collector in I860-' 61, of 
Dunham Township. Married Charlotte D. Robinson, of Geneva, Wis., June 11, 
1861 ; she was born September 7, 1840 ; has three children, all living; are mem- 
bers of the Universalist Church, Union, McHenry Co. ; he is also a member of the 
Masonic order. 

CHAPMAN, RALPH, Clerk; Main st., Marengo. 
CHURCH, I. B., Laborer; Marengo Township. 
CHAPPEL, J. A., Mason; Ann st., Marengo. 



254 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

CHATFIELD, S. P., Retired Farmer ; Main st., Marengo. 

CLAREY, CORNELIUS, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Marengo P. 0. 

CLARK, C. G., JR. ; Main st., Marengo. 

CLARK, JOHN ; Ann st., Marengo. 

CLARK, C. G., Boot and Shoe Dealer ; Main st., Marengo. 

COLEMAN, J. R., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. 

COONEY, DANIEL, Railroad Employe ; Railroad st., Marengo. 

COLLINS, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Marengo P. 0. 

COLLINS, JAMES, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 

COLLINS, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Cork, Ireland, 
in December, 1819 ; came to America in 1849 and to McHenry Co. in October, 
1854; owns 41 f acres of land ; value of property, $1,000. Unmarried. 

COL WELL, LEVI, Laborer ; State St., Marengo. 
COLEMAN, CHARLES, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 
COQUALETTE, C. A., Main st., Marengo. 

COLLOSKY, JOHN, Stonequarryman, Sec. 31 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. ; born in 
Prussia, Germany, November 14, 1829 ; came to the United States in 1842, and to 
McHenry Co. in 186b. Married Mary Georgen, of Prussia, Germany, April 8, 
1847 ; she was born August 24, 1823 ; had ten children, four living. German 
Catholics. 

CONNVILLE, ISADORE, Laborer; Ann st., Marengo. 

COON, A. B., Attorney at Law, Marengo ; born in Towanda, Bradford Co., Pa., 
February 12, 1815; came to McHenry Co. in October, 1835; has lived in the State 
ever since; opened a law office in Marengo in 1845; owns property in Marengo; 
was Master in Chancery of McHenry Co. from spring of 1846 until fall of 1862, 
State's Attorney, Thirteenth Circuit, in 1851-2, and 1860-64, Provost Marshal of 
Congressional District from May, 1863, to October, 1865, Register in Bankruptcy 
from June, 1867, until the present time, and has been Supervisor of the township 
for seven years. Married Harriet A. Daman, of Ohio, May 11, 1846 ; she was 
born February 14, 1829 ; had three children, two living. Mrs. Coon is a member 
of the Free Methodist Church, of Marengo. Mr. Coon is a straight Republican; 
during the year 1848-50, followed surveying in McHenry Co. and vicinity ; he is 
the youngest of twenty-one children, by one mother. 

CORSON, ALFRED, Marble Dealer; State st., Marengo. . 
COWEEN, J. M., Laborer, Marengo Township. 
CRANDALL, W. W., Insurance Agent ; State st., Marengo. 
CRANDALL, JULIUS, School Teacher ; Forest st., Marengo. 
CRANDALL, EGBERT, Mason ; Forest st., Marengo. 
CRANDALL, H. A., Mason ; Forest st., Marengo. 
CRANDALL, S. S., Meat Market ; State st., Marengo. 
CREGO, CHARLES, Clerk ; Main st., Marengo. 
CREGO, CHARLES, Retired Farmer; Washington st., Marengo. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 255 

CREGO, GEORGE, Proprietor of Livery, Feed and Sale Stable; Marengo ; 
born in Truxton Township, Cortland Co., N. Y., June 4, 1832 ; came to Mc- 
Henry Co in December, 1838 ; owns property in Marengo. Married Hannah 
Parkhurst (second wife), of Syracuse, Onondaga Co., N. Y., July 2, 1873; she was 
born in 1833 ; had four children, three by first marriage and one by second mar- 
riage ; Mrs. Crego has two children living by first marriage ; she is a member of the 
First Baptist Church, of Marengo. 

CRISSEY, SHERMAN A., Dealer in Harness and Hardware; Main st., Marengo. 
CRISSEY, SYLVANUS, Boot and Shoe Dealer ; State St., Marengo. 
GROSSMAN, MATHEW, Laborer ; Garden Prairie P. 0. 
CROOKER, WM. S., Runner ; Taylor st., Marengo. 
CROWLEY, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Marengo P. 0. 

CROWLEY, P., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in County Cork, Ireland, No- 
vember, 1816 ; came to the United States 1837, and to McHenry Co. November 
15, 1846 ; owns 122 acres of land, valued at $28 per acre. Married Mary McCarty, 
of County Cork, Ireland, November 26, 1842 ; had eleven children, nine living. Mem- 
bers of Catholic Church at Harvard. 

CROWLEY, TIMOTHY, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in County Cork, 
Ireland, 1809 ; came to United States 1837, and to McHenry Co. 1845 ; owns 160 
acres of land, valued at $25 per acre. Married Mary O'Brien of County Cork, Ireland, 
March 27, 1842 ; had three children, all living. 

CROWLEY, JEREMIAH, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in County 
Cork, Ireland, November, 1816 ; came to United States 1837, and to McHenry Co., 
April, 1845 ; owns 120 acres of land, valued at $25 per acre. Married Ellen O'Brien, 
of County Cork, Ireland, February, 1846 ; had thirteen children, twelve living. Mem- 
bers of the Catholic Church at Marengo. 

CRUMB, DARIUS, Lumber Dealer, Main st., Marengo. 
CURTISS, IRAR., Attorney at Law; State st., Marengo. 
DAKE, HENRY, Retired Farmer; Taylor st., Marengo. 

D AKE, CHARLES H., Farmer and Blacksmith, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born 
in St. Ann, Washington Co., N. Y., August 27, 1831 ; came to McHenry Co. May 
22, 1846 ; owns 140 acres of land; value of property, $4,800 ; is School Director. 
Married Elizabeth Anderson, of Northern Ohio, June 7, 1859 ; she was born Octo- 
ber 14, 1836 ; has six children, all living. 

DAUGHERTY, WILLIAM, Boot and Shoe Dealer ; State st., Marengo. 

DAYTON, E., Retired; Ann st., Marengo. 

DAYTON, E., Justice of the Peace ; Ann st., Marengo. 

DAVIS, CHARLES, Laborer; Main st., Marengo. 

DEITZ, P. W., Retired Farmer; Main st,, Marengo. 

DEITZ, JAS. H., Machinist; State st., Marengo. 

DEITZ, WM., Main st., Marengo. 

DEITZ, A. J., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Marengo P. 0. 



256 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNT*. 

DEITZ, J. H., Machinist ; Marengo ; born ia Milford, Otsego Co.. N. Y., December 
31, 1835; came to McHenry C.>. March 10, 1855 ; owns house and two acres of 
land ; value of property, $3,000. Married Caroline E. Sponable, in Marengo, April, 
1862 ; had five children, two dead. 

DBNEEN, WM., Farmer, Sec, 10 ; Marengo P. O. 

DENNEEN, MAURICE, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Marengo P. 0.; born in County Cork, 
Ireland, November, 20, 1798; came to United States in April, 1837, and to 
McHenry Co. May 6, 1846 ; owns 40 acres of land, value $30 per acre. Married 
Bridget Barry, of Cork. Ireland, in 1835 ; had seven children, four living. 

DEYO, C. B., Well Driver; State st,, Marengo. 

DINEEN, TIMOTHY, Farmer and Stock Raiser; Sec. 10; Marengo P. 0. ; 
born in Indiana, January 7, 1847 ; came to McHenry Co. twenty-six years ago ; 
owns 80 acres of land, value $40 per acre. Married Mary Hallisey, February, 
1870; she was born in Hartland Township, McHenry Co., 1846; has three chil- 
dren, Katie C., John E. and Mary E. 

DOLE, G-EO. G-., Laborer ; Marengo Township. 
DOOLEY, JAMES, Laborer; State st., Marengo. 

DOLE, GEORGE J., farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 18 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. ; 
born in Wilmot, Merrimack Co., N. H., August 14, 1832; came to Winnebago Co. 
1868, and to McHenry Co. March, 1876; owns 80 acres of land, value $40 per 
acre. Married Lucinda Taylor, of Meredith, N. H., September 5, 1852 ; she was 
born April 19, 1830 ; has two children, both living, one boy and one girl. Mem- 
bers of Free Will Baptist Church. 

D WAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. ; born in County Tipperary, 
Ireland ; came to the United States 1851, and to McHenry Co. 1868; owns 67f 
acres of land, value $35 per acre ; was School Director several years. Married 
Ellen McGraw, of County of Carlow, Ireland, April, 1858 ; had six children, all 
living. Members of Catholic Church at Marengo. 

EASTON, ANDREW, Laborer ; State st., Marengo. 
EASTON, EDWARD, Retired Farmer ; Jackson st., Marengo. 
EDWARDS, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Marengo P. 0. 
EDWARDS, C. Y., Nurseryman ; Washington st., Marengo. 
ELLISON, JAMES, Poultry Dealer ; Washington st., Marengo. 
FANNING, W. D., REV., Minister Independent Church ; Main St., Marengo. 
FARNUM, WILLIAM, Teamster; Washington st., Marengo. 
FARNUM, WILLIS, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 
FANNER, H. E., Blacksmith ; Ann st., Marengo. 
FANNER, EMERSON, Blacksmith ; Deitz st., Marengo. 
FELLOWS, A. R., Retired; Washington st., Marengo. 
FELLOWS, JESSE, Retired Farmer; Washington st., Marengo. 

PENTON, ZALMON, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Concord, Erie 
Co., N. Y., March 23, 1826; came to McHenry Co. May 1, 1855; owns 80 acres 



DIRECTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY. 257 

of land, valued at $38 per acre. Married Mariah A. Pond (second wife), of Ches- 
ter Co., N. EL, November 7, 1865; she was born January 3, 1844; Mrs. Susana 
Fenton, his first wife, died Sept. 22, 1863 ; had seven children by first wife, five of 
them living, and seven by second wife, five living. 

FENTON, D. L., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 17; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Erie 
Co., N. Y., July 22, 1825 ; came to McHenry Co. July 4, 1847 ; owns 160 acres of. 
land, valued at $40 per acre ; was School Director for ten years. Married Acta 
Olcott. of Greene Co., N. Y., February 1, 1846 ; she was born July 30, 1824 ; had 
six children, five living. 

FENTON, ZINA, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. 
FILLMORE, WALTER, Laborer; Taylor st, Marengo. 
FIFIELD, MOSES, Retired ; Main st., Marengo. 
FILLMORE, CHARLES, SR., Washington St., Marengo. 
FILLMORE, C. P., Printer; State f-t., Marengo. 
FILLMORE, LUTHER, Retired ; Taylor st., Marengo. 
FILLMORE, H. M., Furniture Dealer; Washington st, Marengo. 
'FITZPATRICK, EDWARD, Laborer ; Prairie st., Marengo. 
FOLEY, JOHN, Retired Farmer ; Prairie st., Marengo. 
FORD, E. E., Retired Farmer ; Washington st., 
FORD, JOHN, Laborer ; Deitz st., Marengo. 

FREEMAN, HANNAH M., Mrs., Widow of J. H. Freeman, who died April 
24, 1868 ; he was born August 3, 1821 ; she was born in New York, January 11, 
1823; came to McHenry Co. in June, 1843; resides in Marengo village, owns 
property there. Was married January 31, 1847 ; has three children living. 

FRINK, S. R., Teamster; Main st., Marengo. 
FULLER, L. M., Retired Farmer ; Prairie St., Marengo. 
FULLER, WALTER, Baker; Ann st., Marengo. 
FULTON, I. H., Retired; Washington st., Marengo. 

FYFE, WILLIAM, Farmer ; resides with P. Pringle, Sec. 23 ; Mareugo P. 0. ; 
born in Scotland, May 6, 1836 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1869. Married Mary 
Brown, May 28, 1869 ; she was born in "Scotland, in 1846 ; has three children liv- 
ing, Isabella B., Jane A. and William H.; Margaret N. died November 12, 1870. 

GLASS, N., Laborer ; Main st., Marengo. 
GOCHEY, J. A., Blacksmith ; State st., Marengo. 
GOODSPEED, H. S., Carpenter ; Main st., Marengo. 
GOODRICH, Z. E., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Marengo P. 0. 
GOODRICH, E. J., Furniture Dealer ; State st., Marengo. 
GOULD, J. P., Laborer; Prairie st., Marengo. 
GREEN, J. W., DR., Physician ; State st, Marengo. 
GREEN. JOHN, Stone Mason ; Forest st, Marengo. 

GRIEBEL, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0.; born in Visenburg, France, 
in June, 1822 ; came to the United States and McHenry Co. in September, 1854; 



258 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

owns 220 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre. Married Catherine Heess, of Visen- 
burg, France, September 1, 1854 ; she was born February 13, 1835 ; has four chil- 
dren, all living. 

GRIFFIN, JOSEPH, Grocer; State St., Marengo. 
GROVER, EUGENE, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Marengo P. 0. 

GROVER, EUGENE P., Farmer, n. w. Sec. 10 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in 
Willoughby, Lake Co., Ohio, September 11, 184G ; came to McHenry Co. in 1865 ; 
agent of Enos Grove, owner of 280 acres of land. Married Vesta Seger, in Ma- 
rengo, February 12, 1868; she was born in Gaines. Orleans Co., N. Y. ; has two 
children, one boy and one girl. 

GROVER, DEWITT C., Farmer, Sec. 10; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Willoughby. 
Lake Co., Ohio, April 12, 1828 ; came to McHenry Co. in spring of 1861 ; owns 
220 acres of land, value $30 per acre. Married Matilda Williams, of Clarkson Co., 
N. Y., February 21, 1867 ; she was born October 27, 1832; had six children, five 
living. 

HAGAR, ABNER, Physician ; Main st., Marengo. 
HARMON, MOSES, Poultry Dealer ; Mormon st, Marengo. 
HANCE, CHARLES, Carpenter ; Main st., Marengo. 
HANCE, THOMAS, Laborer ; Main st., Marengo. 
HAMILTON, C. H., Laborer; Marengo Township. 
HARMON, GEORGE, Shoemaker ; Washington st., Marengo. 
HANCE, JOHN, Grocer ; Main st., Marengo. 
HANCE, BURNHAM, Laborer, State st., Marengo. 

HANCE, THOMAS, Farmer and Stone Mason (Renter), Sec. 33; Marengo 
P. 0. ; born in Seneca Co., Ohio, January 27, 1833 ; came to McHenry Co. in 
fall of 1837 ; owns property in the village of Marengo, value $3,000. Married 
Mariah Bennett, of Marengo Township, McHenry Co., 111., October 3, 1858 ; she 
was born April 15, 1840 ; has two children. Members of the Free Methodist 
Church of Marengo. 

HARRIS, JOSEPHUS, Laborer; Ann st., Marengo. 
HARRIS, C. W., Laborer; Main st., Marengo. 
HARRIS, A. J., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Marengo. P. 0. 
HARRIS, S., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Marengo P. 0. 
HART, HARVEY, Laborer ; State st., Marengo. 

HART, B. S., Small Fruit Grower; Marengo; born in Van Buren, Onondaga Co., 
N. Y., August 18, 1823 ; came to Marengo June 23, 1853 ; owns 16 acres of land, 
value $3,000 ; was member of Co. A, Ninety-fifth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf., acted as cook 
for company and also at headquarters. Married Harriet L. Fryre, of Scrouple, 
Oswego Co., N. Y., November 8, 1847 ; she was born in Princeton, Albany Co., 
N. Y., September 17, 1827 ; had ten children, six boys and four girls ; one boy and 
two girls dead. 

HAVENS, JASPER, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Marengo P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 259 

HAVENS, WM. H., Farmer (Renter), Sec. 16 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Ben- 
ton, Yates Co., N. Y., May 26, 1841 ; came to Boone Co., 111., in November, 1843, 
and to McHenry Co. in 1876 ; was private in Co. I, Thirty-seventh Regt. 111. Vol. 
Inf , four years and four months. Married Martha A. Peck, of Hastings, Oswego 
Co., N. Y., August 30, 1871; she was born July 3, 1837; had three children, 
none living. 

HAZLETT, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 3; Marengo P. 0. 
HEATH, E. L., Retired Farmer; Washington st., Marengo. 
HELD, JOSEPH, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 

HELD, MAGNUS, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 11 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in 
Kenigsee Schwarzburg, Rudolstadt, Prussia. September 6, 1827 ; came to United 
States October 5, 1840, and to McHenry Co. May 4, 1852 ; owns 200 acres of 
land, value $36 per acre. Married Rachael Gray, of Belfast, Ireland, July 16, 1850 ; 
she was born May 12, 1835 ; has thirteen children, all living. 

HENDRICKSON, U. D., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Marengo P. 0. 
HENDRICKSON, A., Laborer ; Marengo Township. 
HERELEY, DANIEL, SR., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Marengo P. 0. 
HENRY, JOHN K., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Marengo P. 0. 
HERELEY, DANIEL, JR., Grocer ; State st., Marengo. 
HERELEY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Marengo P. 0. 
HERRICK, DENNIS, Shoemaker; Main'st., Marengo. 

HERELEY, MICHEL, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Cork, Ire- 
land, April 1, 1823 ; came to this country in 1836, and to McHenry Co., in 1869 ; 
owns 80 acres of land, value of property $2,200. Married Helen Carter, of Cork, 
Ireland, April 5, 1841 ; she was born in 1826 ; had eleven children, nine living. 

\. 

HEWITT, D. W., Teamster ; Main st., Marengo. 

HEZLIP, WILLIAM, Clerk ; Marengo ; born in Youngstown, Ohio ; came to 
McHenry Co. August, 1871. Married Mary J. McDonald, of Schenectady, N. Y., 
October, 1864 ; has four children. Democrat ; Free Thinker. 

HICKS, NELSON, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 
HILLS, CALVIN, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Marengo P. 0. 
HILLS, LUTHER, Farmer, Sec. 22; Marengo P. 0. 
HINLEY, WILLIAM, Horse Dealer ; Marengo Township. 

HINDES, J. C., Dealer in Improved Tubular Drive Wells, Iron Pumps of all kinds ; 
also agent for several different kinds of Wind Mills ; Marengo ; born in Bridgport, 
Addison Co., Vt., December 21, 1831; came to McHenry Co. in August, 1868; 
owns house and lot. Married C. S. Rice in Elgin, Kane Co., November 2, 1867 ; 
she was born in Holland, Erie Co., N. Y., January 15, 1840. 

HOWE, E. E., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Marengo P. 0. 
HOVEY, H. H., Insurance Agent; Main st., Marengo. 
HOVEY, L. A., Butcher; Main St., Marengo. 
HOWE, CHAS. B., Stock Buyer; Marengo P. 0. 



260 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

HOWARD, MORTIMER, Farmer and Carpenter, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. ; 
born in Cork, Ireland, August 10, 1828 ; came to America in 1849, and to Mc- 
Henry Co. in November, 1859 ; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $2,500. Mar- 
ried Else Burchel, of Castle Lowman, Ireland, December 5, 1853 ; had thirteen chil- 
dren, ten living. Member of Catholic Church of Marengo. 

HOWE, ELISHA N., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sees. 20, 21 ; Marengo P. 0. ; 
born in Canaan, Litchfield Co., Conn., February 21, 1803 ; came to McHenry Co., 
May 24, 1845 ; owns 240 acres of land valued at $40 per acre. Married Harriet 
Porter, of Waterbury New Haven Co., Conn., October 17, 1844; she was born Sep- 
tember 15, 1806. She has been a member of the Baptist Church for many years ; had 
eight children four living. 

HUBBARD, A. P., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Marengo P. 0. 
HUBER, PHILIP, Laborer ; Marengo Tp. 

HUBBARD, ORREN, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Cayuga Co., N. 
Y., June 21, 1831 ; came to McHenry Co. in October, 1848; owns 90 acres of land, 
valued at $35 per acre ; private of Co. A, Ninety-fifth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. Married 
Mrs. Jane Cupen, November 29, 1871, widow of A. D. Cupen ; she was born Jan- 
uary 7, 1832 ; had four children, three living, by first marriage ; none by the second 
marriage ; have one adopted child. 

HUNTINGDON, CALVIN, Retired Farmer; Main at., Marengo. 

HUNT, WILLIAM, Hostler, Washington st., Marengo. 

HULETT, WARREN, Carpenter; Main st., Marengo. 

HURLEY, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 

HUNGERFORD, GEORGE, Physician ; Main st., Marengo. 

HURLEY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 

HUFF, C. W., Retired Farmer ; Main st., Marengo. 

HUTCHINSON, JOHN, REV., Minister Presbyterian Church ; Prairie st., Marengo. 

HYDE, JOSEPH, Laborer ; Main st., Marengo. 

IRVING, J. C., Retired Farmer ; Main st., Marengo. 

INGERSOLL, C. W., Grain Buyer, Dealer in Seed, etc., and Shipper, Marengo ; 
born in the town of Evans, Erie Co., N. Y., November 14, 1829 ; came to Ma- 
rengo in 1858; member of Board of Corporation Trustees two years; was First 
Lieutenant of Co. F, One Hundred and Forty-first Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. Married 
Martha E. Wemham, in Marengo, January 24, 1865 ; had four children, one boy 
and three girls ; one girl dead. 

JACKSON, R. T., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. 
JACKSON, B. S., Laborer; Marengo Township. 
JAMES, S. J., Clerk; State st, Marengo. 
JAMESON, DAVID, Carpenter ; Forest St., Marengo. 
JENKINS, BENJAMIN, Laborer ; State st, Marengo. 
JENKINS, ADELBERT, Well Driver ; Forest st., Marengo. 
JEWETT, ALDEN, Justice of the Peace; Washington st., Marengo. 
JOHNSON, DAVID, Stock Buyer ; Main st, Marengo. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 261 

JONES, A., SR.. Horse Dealer; Railroad st., Marengo. 
KELLEY, FRANK, Laborer ; Main st., Marengo. 

KELLE Y, C. E , Proprietor of Marengo Foundry and Machine Shop ; also Man- 
ufacturer of Wood and Iron Pumps of all kinds ; also Horse Powers from one horse 
to three horses, and Three-Horse Engines ; born in Canada West June 7, 1834 ; 
came to McHenry Co. in 1861. Married Sarah Cofthorn, of Canada West, Septem- 
ber 2, 1855 ; has six children. 

KENDEIGH, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Marengo P. 0. 
KENNEDAY, JOHN, Shoemaker ; Taylor st., Marengo. 
KENNADY, M., Laborer ; Marengo Township. 
KEENEY, W. S., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Marengo P. 0. 

KEENEY, H. B., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 21 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born Man- 
chester, Hartford Co., Conn., January 18,1811 ; came to McHenry Co. in March, 
1858 ; owns 200 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre. Married Mary Munson, of Sto- 
nington, Conn., August 10, 1817 ; had ten children, eight living; his son, E. H. 
Keeney, was a private in Co. K, Sixty-fifth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf., and another son, D. 
A. Keeney, was a private in Co. K, Seventeenth Regt. 111. Cav. 

KIMBALL, ALANSON, Depot Watchman ; Taylor st., Marengo. 
KING, AUGUSTUS, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Marengo P. 0. 
KING, HENRY, Retired Farmer; Railroad st., Marengo. 

KNAPP, EZRA. O., Butcher, Marengo ;. born in Marengo January 8, 1838 ; owns 
31 acres of land, one mile from Marengo ; value of property, $3,500 ; was a mem- 
ber of the Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf., under Col. Avery; was in twenty-one battles 
and at the siege of Vickburg ; was Brigade Butcher one year. Married Elizabeth 
Wise. April 28, 1861 ; had four children Hearma A., born July 19, 1866; Ezra 
0., born December 18, 1870, died January 24, 1871 ; George H., born March 1, 
1873, and Laura S., born April 4, 1876. 

KNAPP, JUSTIN, Laborer ; State st., Marengo. 
KNOWLES, HENRY, Stock Buyer ; Main st., Marengo. 
KNOWLTON, 0. V., Cabinet Maker ; Washington st., Marengo. 
LAWRENCE, D. W., Liquor Agent; Prairie st., Marengo. 
LAMBDEN, JOHN, Harness Maker; Forest st., Marengo. 
LEWIS, WM. J., Clerk ; State st., Marengo. 
LIPPETT, J. B., Marble Dealer ; State St., Marengo. 
LESTER, HENRY, Laborer ; Main st., Marengo. 
LEWIS, JAMES L., Lumber Dealer ; State st., Marengo. 
LESTER, J. F., Joiner ; Main st., Marengo. 
LEVOY, ISAAC, Poultry Dealer ; State st., Marengo. 
LINCOLN, OMER H., School Teacher, Sec. 15 ; Marengo P. 0. 
LOMBARD, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Marengo P. 0. 
LINCOLN, APOLLOS, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Marengo P. 0. 
LINCOLN, SAMUEL, School Teacher, Sec. 15 ; Marengo P. 0. 
LOOMER, TIMOTHY, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Marengo P. 0. 



262 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

LOOMEB, M. H., School Teacher; Marengo Township. 
LOMBARD, ELBERT, Clerk, Sec. 33 ; Marengo P. 0. 
LONDON, AL., Laborer; Main St., Marengo. 
LYON, N. C., Laborer; State st., Marengo. 
MANSFIELD, A. G., Tinner ; Deitz st., Marengo. 

MANLE Y, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 1 1 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in County Mayo, 
Ireland, 1816 ; came to the United States in 1848, and to McHenry Co. in fall of 
1856 ; owns 120 acres of land, valued at $30 per acre. Married Bridget Manley, 
of County Mayo, Ireland, 1849 ; had seven children, three living. Are members of 
Catholic Church, Marengo. 

MAECK, R. Y., Clerk; Main st., Marengo. ' 
MARCH, JOHN, Retired Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Marengo P. 0. 
MARKE3, MONROE, Laborer ; Washington st., Marengo. 
MARKES, R. M., Laborer; Mormon st., Marengo. 
MARVIN, HIRAM, Laborer; Washington st., Marengo. 

MARCH, MARY A., Mrs., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in North- 
east Township, Erie Co., Pa., October 8. 1819; came to McHenry Co. in April, 
1865; owns 70 acres of land ; valuation of property, $5,000. Married Steven Hen- 
drickson (first husband), October 3, 1841, who died December 21, 1855. Married 
John March (present husband), November 10, 1863. Has seven children by first 
marriage, four living. Mr. March had ten children, six living. No children by 
present marriage. 

McAULIFF, EDWARD, Harness Maker ; Main st., Marengo. 

MCCARTY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Cork, Ireland, in 
1815 ; came to America in 1843, and to McHenry Co. in 1854 ; owns 41 f acres of 
land, value $1,000. Married Margaret Collins, of Cork, Ireland, in 1854; had two 
children none living. 

McDONALD, FRANK, Laborer ; Railroad st., Marengo. 
McGLASHER, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Marengo P. O. 
McDONALD, MICHAEL, Teamster ; Railroad St., Marengo. 
McGOVERN, JOHN, Grocer; State st., Marengo. 
McINTYRE, MORGAN, Horse Dealer; Washington st., Marengo. 
McKENNEY, E. F., Prairie st., Marengo. 
MEAD, FRED'K, Insurance Agent; Washington st., Marengo. 
MERRILL, E. R., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Marengo P. 0. 
MERRIMAN, ELISHA, Farmer, Sec. 32; Marengo P. 0. 
MERRIMAN, E. S., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Marengo P. 0. 
MORRIS, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Belvidere P. 0. 
MOORE, PATRICK, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 
MORRIS, DAVID, Laborer; State st., Marcn-o. 
MILLKR, CHRISTIAN, Farmer, Sec. 18; Mareng , P. 0. 
MILLER, EZRA, Laborer; State st., Marengo. 
MILLER, J. D., Painter; State st., Marengo. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 268 

MILLER, REUBEN, Barber; State st., Marcngo. 

MILES, WALLACE, Carpenter ; State st., Marengo. 

MESICK, WM. H., Physician ; Main st., Marengo. 

MILES, H. 0., Carpenter; State st,, Marengo. 

MILES, JOHN, Wagon Maker; State st., Marengo. 

MITCHELL, NASH, Retired ; Ann st., Marengo. 

MUNGER, GEORGE, Tobacconist; State st., Marengo. 

MURPHY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Marengo P. 0. 

MURPHY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Marengo P. 0. 

MURPHY, THOMAS, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 

MURPHY, JAMES, Laborer; Marengo Township. 

NICHOLS, HARVEY, Blacksmith ; Deitz st., Marengo. 

NICHOLS, LEWIS, Laborer ; Deitz st., Marengo. 

NICHOLS, CHARLES, Laborer; Deitz st., Marengo. 

NICKERSON, A., Harness Maker; State St., Marengo. 

NOBLE, JOHN, Laborer; Deitz st., Marengo. 

NOLAN, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Marengo P. 0. 

NOLAN, EDWIN, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Marengo P. 0. 

NOLAN, SMITH, Laborer ; State st., Marengo. 

NORLAN, JOHN, Wagon Maker ; Forest st., Marengo. 

NORTON, AUREMUS, Retired Farmer ; Prairie st., Marengo. 

NORRIS, WM. M., Nurseryman ; Main st., Marengo. 

NORRIS, W. W., Grocer; State st., Marengo. 

OAKLEY, G. W., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Marengo P. 0. 

OAKLEY, S. B., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Marengo P. 0. 

O'BRIEN, WILLIAM, Grocer ; State st., Marengo. 

O'CONNOR, DANIEL, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 

OCOCK, FRANK, Harness Maker; State st., Marengo. 

O'CONNER, EUGENE, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Harvard P. O. 

O'LEARY, J. M., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 

O'LEARY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 

OLCOTT, ROSWELL, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Marengo P. 0. 

OLCOTT, CARLOS, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Marengo P. O. 

OSTRANDER, J. B., Traveling Agent; Taylor st., Marcngo. 

OSTERHOUT, JOHN, Farmer ; Railroad st., Marengo P. 0. 

OWEN, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Marcngo P. 0. 

PARKER, B. S., Dry Goods Merchant ; State st., Marengo. 

PARKHURST, 0. R., Coal and Wood Dealer ; State st., Marengo. 

PARKHURST, 0. T., Boot and Shoe Dealer; State st., Marengo. 

PARKHURST, JOHN, Retired Farmer; Main st., Marengo. 

PARKER, WALTER, Farmer, Sec. 14; Marengo P. 0. 

PATRICK, ALFRED, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 25 ; Marengo P. 0. 

PAY, R. P., Painter; State st,, Marengo. 

PATRICK, R. M., Merchant; State st., Marengo. 

PATRICK, ELIAS, Merchant ; State st., Marengo. 



264 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

PATRICK, F. W., Merchant; State st., Marengo. 
PATRICK, H. E., Merchant; State st., Marengo. 

PAYN, SMITH, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Garden Prairie P. 0., Boone Co., 111. ; born in 
Greenbush, Rensselaer Co., N. Y., May 18, 1803; came to Boone Co., Ill , in May, 
1855, and to McHenry Co. in March, 1872 ; owns 44 acres of land, value $40 per 
acre. Married Anna Crank, of Dutchess Co., N. Y., September 30, 1824 ; she 
was born May 1, 1807; has four children, all living. Members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, of Garden Prairie. 

PEASE, C. W., Cooper ; Marengo ; born in LaPorte Co., Ind., January 22, 
1849 ; came to McHenry Co. in April, 1854 ; owns 60 acres of land in Wisconsin; 
value of property, $1,200. Married Hattie Markey, March 18, 1875, at Onarga, 
111. ; has one child. 

PEASE, CALVIN, Farmer, Sec. 6; Garden Prairie P. 0. 
PEASE, CLINTON, Farmer Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. O. 
PEASE, D. H., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 

PEASE, H., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. ; born in Townsend, Huron 
Co., 0., February 24, 1825; went from Ohio to Michigan, about the year 1838 ; 
came to McHenry Co. in the spring of 1844 ; owns 80 acres of land, value $35 
per acre. Married Samantha Morris, of Michigan, March 21, 1854; she was born 
September 21, 1835; has four children, all living. Methodists. 

PEASE, LUCY A., Mrs., Widow of E. A. Pease, who died April 6, 1864 ; 
residence, Marengo; he was born in Franklin Co., Vt., September 22, 1810; she 
was born in Highland Co., 0., August 14, 1818; came to Marengo May 3, 1836, 
and has lived in the county ever since ; owns town property, value $1,500 ; had one 
son, Merwin Pease, Private in Co. C, Ninety-fifth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf., who was 
killed in front of Vicksburg, while in defense of his country, May 22, 1863. Mrs. 
Pease was married March 24, 1 836 ; had seve"n children three sons and four 
daughters ; two sons and four daughters living. Mrs. Pease is a member of the 
M. E. Church, of Marengo. 

PECK, DANIEL E., Nurseryman; Washington st., Marengo. 
PERSONS, P. L., Furniture Dealer ; State st., Marengo. 
PERKINS, S. J., Laborer ; State st.. Marengo. 
PETERS, A. C., Hog Buyer ; Prairie st., Marengo. 
PETTENGILL, WILLIAM, Laborer ; Taylor st., Marengo. 
PETTENGILL, GEORGE, Laborer; Washington st., Marengo. 
PHINNEY, D. P., Paints and Oils ; Washington st., Marengo. 
PHILLIPS, WM. S., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Marengo P. O. 
PIERCE, A. A., Blacksmith; State st., Marengo. 
PLATT, S. L., Photographer ; State St., Marengo. 
PORTER, THOS. W., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. 
POYER, M. W., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Marengo P. 0. 
POYER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec/20; Marengo P. 0. 
POYER, D. W., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Marengo P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 265 

POYER, JOHN H., Retired Farmer; Railroad st., Marengo. 
PRAY, FRANK J., Carpenter; Main st., Marengo. 
PRESCOTT, C. W., Nurseryman ; Main st., Marengo. 

PRINGLE, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Marengo P. O. ; born in Berwickshire, 
in the Parish of Dunce, Scotland, in April, 1813 ; came to United States in 1836, 
and to McHenry Co. in March, 1848 ; owns 165 acres of land, value $50 per acre; 
was School Director two years. Married Jenette Staley, December 10, 1846 ; she 
was born in Florida, Schenectady Co., N. Y., November 3, 1816 ; has three children 
all living. Members of Presbyterian Church of Marengo. 

PRINGLE, PATTERSON, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 23 ; Marengo P. 0. 

PRINGLE, JOHN P., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Marengo P. 0. 

PRINGLE, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Marengo P. 0. 

PRINGLE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 23; Marengo P. 0. 

RANDALL, W. S., Laborer; Mormon st., Marengo. 

REDPATH, ALEX., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Marengo P. 0. . 

REDPATH. ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Marengo P. 6. 

RENWICK, WM. H., Laborer; Maremo Township. 

RENWICK, J. R., Laborer; Marengo Township. 

RENWICK, WALTER, Farmer, Sec. 34; Marengo P. 0. 

RENWICK, GEO. F., Hardware Dealer; State St., Marengo. 

RICHARDSON, A., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Elstead, N. H., 
December 18, 1806; c^me to McHenry Co. in October, 1855 ; owns 85 acres of 
land, value $50 per acre. Married Eliza A. Siger, of Shorem, Vt., October 9, 
1852; she was born March 26, 1814; are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Marengo ; has one child living ; had one son, who died in the hospital, 
at Springfield, Mo., during the Rebellion. 

RILEY, B., Farmer, Dairyman and Stock Raiser, Sec. 11 ; Marengo P. O. ; born 
in Ireland in 1825; came to America twenty-five years ago, and to McHenry Co. 
about twenty-three years ago ; owns 200 acres of land, value f 25 per acre ; was 
School Director three years. Married Mary Burchell in 1855 ; she was born in 
Ireland in 1835 ; has eight children living Timothy, Michael, Thomas, Barthol- 
omew, John, Henry, William and Edward. 

RILEY, JERRY, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Marengo P. 0. 
RILEY, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Marengo P. 0. 
ROBB, CHARLES, Stock Buyer; Prairie st., Marengo. 
RODERICK, J. M., Laborer; Marengo Township. 
ROGERS, CHARLES, Laborer ; Main st., Marengo. 
ROSS, ROGER, Laborer ; Taylor st., Marengo. 
ROSE, PETER, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 
ROWE, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Marengo P. 0. 
ROWE, R. F., Laborer; Marengo Township. 
ROWE, R. G., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Marengo P. 0. 
ROGERS, J. S., Nurseryman ; Main st., Marengo. 



266 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

ROWLAND, SAMUEL, Pension Agent; Main st., Mareugo. 
RYAN, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 

RYDER, ALMON A., Hotel and Livery Stable ; Marengo ; born in town of 
Alden, McHenry Co, April 22, 1843; owns a hotel. Married Minorca Hog- 
obaum in Marengo, February 11, 1873 ; no children. 

S AFFORD, FRANK, Retired ; Main st., Marengo. 
SANDERS, WH. H., Harness Maker; State st., Marengo. 
SAMPTER, GEORGE, Clothier ; State st., Marengo. 
SANDERS, GEO. W., Jeweler; State st., Marengo. 
SCHWAGER, AUGUSTUS, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Marengo P. 0. 
SCOTT, R. D., Dealer in Pianos ; Deitz st., Marengo. 
SEARS, H. A., Laborer ; Garden Prairie P. 0. 

SEARS, Z. W., Farmer, Stock Raiser and Dairyman ; Garden Prairie P. 0. ; born 
in Bristol, Ontario Co., N. Y., February 4, 1812 ; came to McHenry Co. October, 
1839 ; owns 520 acres of land, value $50 per acre ; has a large stone quarry on 
farm. Married Louisa J. Harris, of Sheldon, Genesee Co., N. Y., November 19, 
1846 ; she was born December 4, 1826 ; had four children. Members of Congre- 
gational Church of Garden Prairie. 

SHUTLEFF, A. J., Stock Buyer; Main st,, Marengo. 
SHANNELL, JEFF., Laborer; Deitz st., Marengo. 
SHERMAN, 0. G., Photographer; State st., Marengo. 
SHEARER, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Marengo P. 0. 
SHEARER, CHARLES, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 
SHEARER, MARVIN, Farmer, Sec. 34; Marengo P. 0. 

SHILLINGTON, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in County 
Loraine, Ireland, 1816; came 10 United States 1843, and to McHenry Co. 1865 ; 
owns 111 acres of land, value $40 per acre. Married Ellen Kelley (second wife), 
of Roscommon, Ireland, November 16, 1861 ; has four children, all living. Mem- 
bers of Catholic Church of Marengo. 

SIMONS, JULIUS, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Marengo P. 0. 
SIMONS, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Marengo P. 0. 
SIMONS, FRANK, Laborer ; Marengo Township. 
SIMONS, C. D., Laborer ; Marengo Township. 

SIMPKINS, G. K., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. ; born in Coral Town- 
ship, McHenry Co., September 23, 1842 ; owns 80 acres of land, value $50 per 
acre ; has a stone quarry of 20 acres. Married Mary E. Pierce, of East Durham, 
Greene Co., N. Y., December 3, 1872; she was born July 18, 1853; has three 
children, two girls and one boy. 

SKINNER, E. B., Carriage Maker; State st., Marengo. 
SMITH, WARREN, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Marengo P. 0. 
SMITH, A. E., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. 
SMITH, HULETT, Insurance Agent; Main st., Marengo. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 267 

SMITH, JOEL, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Marengo P. 0. 

SMITH, P. B., Merchant; State st., Marengo. 

SMITH, FRED. A., Manufacturer of Wind Mills; State St., Marengo. 

SMITH, E. K , Law Student; State st., Marengo. ^ 

SPENCER, LEROY, Laborer ; Main st, Marengo. 

SPENCER, CALVIN, Farmer ; Marengo ; born in Cayuga Co., N. Y., October 
6, 1807 ; came to McHenry Co. September 14, 1835 ; made the first claim same 
day to land now the village of Marengo ; owns 160 acres of land, value $8,000 ; 
has been member of Board of Trustees four years. Married Mary Ann Hance, in 
Seneca Co., Ohio, February 18, 1828 ; has seven children ; kept hotel, also, from 
1836 to 1842. 

SPITZ ER, ANDREW, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Marengo P. 0. 
SPLAIN, MORRIS, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. 
SPONABLE, GEO. W., Farmer ; Washington st., Marengo. 
SPERRY, ANSON, Attorney at Law ; Prairie st., Marengo. 

SPILLANE. M., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Cork, Ireland, May, 
1830; came to America 1842, and to McHenry Co. November 25, 1854; owns 
40 acres of land ; value, $30 per acre. Married . Hanora Noonan, of Cork, Ire- 
land, November 8, 1854 ; had ten children, all living. Catholic. 

STEARNES. LUTHER, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. 

STEDMAN, D. A., Joiner; Prairie st., Marengo. 

STETSON, M. B., Clerk; State st., Marengo. 

STONE, 0. B., REV., Baptist Minister; Prairie st, Marengo. 

STEWART, A. D., Farmer, Sec. 24; Marengo P. 0. 

STEWART, WM. C., Druggist and Postmaster; State st., Marengo. 

STEWART, JANE, Mrs., Residence, Sec. 24 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in En- 
gland, in 1800 ; came to America 1836, and to McHenry Co. 1839 ; owns 280 acres 
of land, value $50 per acre ; has seven children living, Elizabeth, Jennette, Alex- 
ander, Stephen, John A., Win. H. and Kate. 

STRICKLAND, CHARLES, Writing Master ; Railroad st., Marengo. 

STYRES, WILLIAM, Laborer ; State st., Marengo. 

STULL, THOS. W., Physician ; State st., Marengo. 

STULL, JOEL, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Marengo P. 0. 

STULL, LEFLER, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Marengo P. 0. 

STYRES, ABRAHAM, Laborer ; State st., Marengo. 

STONE, CHARLES, Painter ; Prairie st, Marengo. 

SULLIVAN, WILLIAM, Painter ; Prairie St., Marengo. 

SWAIN, ISAAC, Farmer Sec. 19 ; Garden Prairie P. O. 

SWAIN, LOT, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. 

SWAIN, WILLARD, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. 

SYLVESTER, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. 

TALBOTT, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Marengo P. 0. 

TAYLOR, FRANK, Painter; Prairie st, Marengo. 



268 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

THOMPSON, WM. M., Laborer; Marengo Township. 
TEEPLE, J. C., Lumber Dealer ; State st., Marengo. 
THOMPSON, WM., Grocer; Main st., Marengo. 

TrfORNE, HENRY M., Farmer, Sec. 33; Marengo P.O.; born in Canada, 
March 27, 1820 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1840 ; owns 320 acres of land. Married 
C. M. Cobb, daughter of W. Cobb, of Cazenovia, Madison Co., N. Y., February 26, 
1845 : has two children. 

THORNE, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 33; Marengo P.O. 
TREAT, W. A., Hardware Dealer; State st., Marengo. 
TOBIN, CORNELIUS, Laborer; State st., Marengo. 
TRUESDELL, B. W., Laborer; Main st., Marengo. 

TRIP, O. A., Farmer, Sees. 6 and 7 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. ; born in Boone Co., 111., 
September 20, 1846 ; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre. Married Sarah 
M. Isbell, of Washington Co., Mo., September 28, 1873 ; she was born March 15, 
1848; has two children, both living. Mrs. Tripp moved to California when two 
years old and remained there eleven years, then went to Nevada and remained there 
until married, when they came to this State. 

VAIL, J. I.. Dry Goods Clerk ; State st., Marengo. 

VAN DERVEER, WM., Dry Goods Clerk ; State st., Marengo. 

VAIL, E. P., Dealer in Butter, Eggs and Cheese ; Marengo ; born in Middletown, 
Rutland Co., Vt., February 15, 1834 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1855 ; owns house 
and lot. Married Caroline Bassett, of Cortland, Cortland Co., N. Y., October 23, 
1860 ; had one boy, since dead. 

VAIL, ANSON, Constable; Washington st., Marengo. 
VAIL, E. J., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Marengo P. 0. 
VAIL, A. I., Horse Dealer; Main st., Marengo. 
VAN ALSTYN, E. B., Grocer ; State st., Marengo. 
VAN ALSTYN, CHARLES, Clerk ; State st., Marengo. 
VASEY, WILLIAM, Farmer ; Main st., Marengo. 
VAUGHTER, J. G., Retired ; Main st., Marengo. 
VENARD, JOHN, Horse Doctor ; State st., Marengo. 
WAGER, RUBEN, Retired ; Washington st., Marengo. 
WARE, GEORGE, Carpenter ; State St., Marengo. 
WALLING, ALEX., Blacksmith; State st, Marengo. 
WASHBURN, SILAS, Laborer ; State st., Marengo. 
WARREN, J. F., Lumber Dealer ; State st., Marengo. 

WASHBURN, NELSON, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Otsego 
Co., N. Y., January 9, 1836; came to McHenry Co. in 1862 ; rents the Hutchin- 
son estate. Married Isabella Sawyer, in 1866 ; she was born in Stockbridge, Vt., 
February 27, 1837 ; has four children living. 

WATENPAUCH, ISAAC, Retired Farmer ; Railroad st., Marengo. 
WARE. CHARLES, Carpenter ; State st., Marengo. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. . 269 

WEAVER, JAMES J., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. ; 
born in Holmesville, Holmes Co., Ohio, May 15, 1839 ; came to McHenry Co. in 
fall of 1845 ; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $2,500 ; was private in Co. A, Fif- 
teenth Regt. 111. Inf., eighteen months. Married Melissa J. Pease, of Marengo, 
McHenry Co., 111., November 17, 1864; she was born December 10, 1839; had 
five children, four living. 

WEBB, F., Carpenter ; State St., Marengo. 

WEEKS, GEO. R., Boot and Shoe Dealer ; State and Main sts., Marengo. 

WELCH, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Marengo P. 0. . 

WELCH, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Marengo P. 0. 

WELCH, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 12; Marengo P. 0. 

WELCH, DANIEL, Laborer; State st, Marengo. 

WELLS, J. T., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Railroad st., Marengo. 

WELLS, P. L., Miller ; Prairie st., Marengo. 



G. V., President of First National Bank ; Marengo ; born in Jefferson 
Co., N. Y., June 22, 1808 ; came to McHenry Co. May 16, 1858 ; value of pYoperty 
$11,000 ; has been Justice of the Peace fifteen years, also Town and Corporation 
Clerk five years. Married Matilda Warner, of Orleans Co., N. Y., December 31, 
1829 ; had four children, two dead and two living. 

WERNHAM, S. C., Physician ; Prairie st., Marengo. 
WELLS, RICHARD, Laborer; State st., Marengo.: 
WEST, ROSCOE, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Marengo P. 0. 

WEST, W. E., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 3 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Madi- 
son Co., Ohio, August 4, 1823, came to Elgin, III, 1836, and to McHenry Co. 
February 25, 1876 ; owns 200 acres of land, value $50 per acre ; was member of 
Co. B, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf. Married Arvilla Lewis, 
of Stockholm, March 8, 1855 ; she was born February 8, 1831 ; has two children, 
both members of M. E. Church. 

WHITE, R. G., Agricultura Implement Dealer ; State st., Marengo. 
WHITE, R. A., Retired Farmer; Main st., Marengo. 

WHITE, MARCUS, Farmer, Sees. 30 and 31 ; Garden Prairie P. 0., Boone 
Co. ; born in Orange Co., N. Y., December 28, 1803 ; came to McHenry Co. June, 
1839 ; owns 425 acres of land, value $50 per acre. Married Elizabeth McConnell 
January 26, 1826, who died March 4, 1860. Married Mrs. Fannie M. Woods 
(second wife), of Montague, Mass., February 7, 1865 ; he had]three children by first 
marriage, one living ; she had three by first marriage, one living. 

WILLIAMS, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. 
WILLARD, A., Laborer ; Mormon st., Marengo. 
WILLARD, R., Laborer ; Mormon st., Marengo. 
WILSON, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Marengo P. 0. 
WILSON, CHARLES, Laborer; Marengo Township. 



270 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

WOLLEBEN, A. R., Traveling Agent ; State st., Marengo. 
WOOD, W. D., Telegraph Operator (Depot) ; State st, Marengo. 
WOODARD, J. M., Retired ; Main st., Marengo. 
WOODRUFF, JESSE, Farmer, Sec. 11, Marengo P. 0. 
WOODARD, H. L., Laborer; Prairie st., Marengo. 
WOODARD, LORIN, Nurseryman ; Main st., Marengo. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



271 



MARENGO BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



FIEST NATIONAL BANK, 

G. V. MILLS, President, 

K. M. PATRICK, Cashier, 

ST-A-TE ST. 



JAMES BURCIN, 



STATE ST. 



J. H. DEITZ, 

MACHINE SHOP, 



STATE ST. 



C. W. INCERSOLL, 

Grain Buyer, Shipper, etc., 

DEALER IN SEEDS, ETC., 
ST. 



A. B. COON, 

ATTORNEY AT LA, 



STATE ST. 



J. C. HINDES, 

IMPROYED DRIVE WELL, IRON PUMPS 

AND WIND-MILLS, 
RAILROAD STREET, 



E. P. VAIL, 

DEALER IN 

BUTTER, EGGS and CHEESE 



STATE ST. 



C. E. KELLEY, 

Foundry and Machine Shop, Wood and 
Iron Pumps, Horse Powers 

and Engines, 
RAILROAD STREET. 



GEORGE GRECO, 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable, 



EZRA O. KNAPP, 

MEAT MARKET, 



PRAIRIE ST. 



STATE ST. 



E. S. CALDWELL, 

Drive Wells, Iron and Wood Pumps, Wind- 
Mills, Gas Pipe, Patentee of the Well 
Auger; Wells Bored and Filled. 

RAILROAD ST. 



CHARLES W. PEASE, 



STATE ST. 



RYDER'S HOTEL, 

A. A. RYDER, Proprietor, 

State and. Prairie Streets. 



272 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



MARENGO BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

ABBOTT, W. P., & SON, General Merchants, cor. State and Prairie sts. 

ADAMS, J. Q., Dentist, Stats and Washington sts. 

BELDIN, J. T., Jeweler, State st. 

BLOODGOOD, WILLARD, Boots and Shoes, State st. 

BULARD, J. H., Jeweler, Ann and Main sts. 

CASELY, & ABBOTT, Furniture Dealers, State st. 

CORSON, ALFRED, Marble Yard, State st. 

CRISSEY S. A., Harness and Hardware, Main st. 

CURTISS, IRA R., Attorney at Law, State st. 

CLARK, C. G., Boots and Shoes, Main st. 

CRANDALL, H. A., Mason, Forest st. 

CRUMB, DARIUS, Lumber Yard, Main st. 

DAUGHERTY, WILLIAM, Boots and Shoes, State st. 

EDWARDS, C. Y., Nursery, Washington st. 

GOCHEY, J. A., Blacksmith, State st. 

GREEN, J. W., Physician and Surgeon, State st. 

GOODRICH, E. J., Furniture Dealer, State st. 

GRIFFIN, JOSEPH, Grocer, State st. 

HANCE, JOHN, Grocer, Main st. 

HAGAR, ABNER, DR., Physician and Surgeon, Main st. 

HERELEY, DANIEL, JR., Grocer, State st. 

HOVEY & WILSON, Meat Market, Main st. 

HUNGERFORD, GEORGE, Physician and Surgeon, Main st. 

McGOVERN & O'BRIEN, Grocers, State st. 

MESICK, WM. H., Physician and Surgeon, Main st. 

MUNGER, GEORGE, Tobacconist. State st. 

NORRIS, W. W., Grocer, State st. 

PATRICK, R. M. & F. W., & Co., Dry Goods, Drugs and Groceries, State st. 

PARKHURST, P. T., Boots and Shoes, State st. 

PECK, DANIEL E., Nursery, Washington st. 

PARKER & SMITH, Dry Goods and Groceries, State st. 



DIRECTORY OF McIIENRY COUNTY. 273 

PHINNEY, D. P., Paints and Oils, Washington st. 

REN WICK, GEO. F., Hardware, State st. 

RYDER, A. A., Proprietor Ryder's Hotel, State and Prairie sts. 

SCOTT, R. D., Musical Instruments, Organs, Pianos, etc., Deitz st. 

SHERMAN, C. G., Photograph Gallery, State st. 

SKINNER, E. B., Carriage Maker, State st. 

SANDERS, GEO. W., Jeweler, State st. 

SAMPTER, GEO., Merchant Tailor, State st. 

STULL, THOMAS W., Physician and Surgeon, State st. 

TREAT, WARREN A., Hardware, State st. 

THOMPSON, WM., Grocer, Main st. 

VAN ALSTYN, E. B., Grocer, State st. 

WARREN & PEEPLE, Lumber Dealers, State st. 

WEEKES, GEO. R.. Boots and Shoes, State and Main sts. 

WELLS, P. L., Miller, Prairie st. 



274 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



McHENRY TOWNSHIP. 

ABBOTT, ADELBERT, Farmer, Sec. 19; Ostend P. 0. 

ABBOTT, F. A., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

ADAMS, NICHOLAS, Lives with his son Matthias, Sec. 12 ; McHenry P. 0. 

ADAMS, CASTOR, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; McHenry P. 0. 

ADAMS, MATTHIAS, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; McHenry P. 0. 

ADAMS, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 7, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

BALDWIN, S. W., School Teacher ; McIIenry. 

B ARKENHAZEN, AUGUST, Laborer ; Johnsburg. 

BARNEY, J. F., Stone Mason and Plasterer ; Ringwood. 

BARNEY, C. E., Laborer ; Ringwood. 

BASSETT, J. E., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Ostend P. 0. 

BASSETT, W., Lives with his father, Sec. 30 ; Ostend P. 0. 

BARBIAN, NICHOLAS, Cooper ; McHenry. 

BOOMER, A. P., Bridge Builder ; W. McHenry. 

BECKER, JACOB, Merchant Tailor and Gents' Furnishing Goods ; McHenry ; 
born in New Shasburg, Prussia, September 8, 1848 ; came to the United States in 
1867 ; settled at Fond du Lac July 16, 1867 ; moved to Kenosha July 8, 1871, and 
to McHenry March 14, 1876 ; was foreman of Hook and Ladder Co. in Kenosha, 
in 1874. Married Lizzie Wagner September 8, 1874, who was born in Fleisheim, 
Prussia ; has two children Lizzie, born in Kenosha June 28, 1875 ; and Gertrude, 
born in MoHenry October 12, 1876. 

BECKWITH, CHAUNCEY, Farmer; W. McHenry. 

BECKWITH, FANNIE A., Widow of Ira ; W. McHenry. 

BECKWITH, GEORGE, Farmer ; W. McHenry. 

BEERS, E. A., Physician ; McHenry. 

BENTFIELD, JOSEPH, Boot and Shoe Dealer; McHenry. 

BENALKIN, MARG ARETHA, Widow, Sec. 24 ; McHenry P. 0. 

BENALKIN, HENRY, Laborer ; McHenry P. 0. 

BENTES, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 13; Johnsburg P. 0. 

BENTES, STEPHEN, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

BEST, FRANCIS, Baker; McHenry. 

BIEHLER, THEODORE, Wagon and Carriage Maker; Johnsburg. 

BISHOP, JACOB, Stone Mason and Plasterer ; McHenry. 

BISHOP, R., Attorney at Law and Banker ; McHenry ; born in Gainesville, Wyo- 
ming Co., N. Y., November 16, 1824; worked as blacksmith twenty years; came to 



t 
DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 275 

McIIenry Co. in 1844 ; owns 1,000 acres of land ; owner of tho Fox River Valley 
Flouring Mills at Me Henry ; one-half owner of Farmers' Bank, Woodstock, and 
manufacturer of all kinds of Farming Implements ; has been Supervisor thirteen 
years, and member of the Twenty-eighth General Assembly. Married Mary Morris 
in McHenry, October, 6, 1849, who was born in Yates Co., N. Y., March 13, 1827 ; 
has two children Ormis, born in McHenry in 1851, and Lola, born August 13, 
1855. 

BISHOP, 0., Hardware and Agricultural Implement Dealer ; McHenry. 

BLECK, NICHOLAS, Blacksmith; Ringwood. 

BLECK, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; McHenry P. 0. 

BLECK, MATTHIAS, JR., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; McHenry P. 0. 

BLECK & BROS., Furniture Dealers ; McHenry. 

BLECK, J. A., Farmer, Sec. 13; Johnsburg. 

BLECK, MATTHIAS, SR., Farmer, Sec. 23; McHenry P. 0. 

BLECK, P. W., General Merchant ; McHenry. 

BOHER, JOSEPH, Laborer; McIIenry. 

BOUSLETT, LEONARD, Dry Goods Merchant; Johnsburg. 

BOUSLETT, JACOB, Saloon Keeper ; McHenry. 

BOYLE, MARTIN, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; McHenry P. 0. 

BRAHAN, MICHAEL, Laborer; W. McHenry. 

BRESEE, EDSON, Superintendent Pickle Factory ; McHenry. 

BREYER, FREDERICK, Teamster; W. McIIenry. 

BRIFIELD, BERNARD, Farmer, Sjc. 29, R. 9 ; McIIenry P. 0. 

BROWN, CHARLES, Farmer, s. e. Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Auburn, 
Fayette Co., la., September 22, 1854 ; owns 80 acres of land. Married Fannie E. 
Sullivan December 28, 1875, who was born in Wisconsin January 10, 1860. 

BROWN, H. F., Physician ; McHenry. 
BROTT, SIMON D., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Ostend P. O. 
BUCKLIN. GEO. A., General Merchant ; McIIenry. 
BUCK, JOSEPH, Saloon Keeper and Farmer ; McHenry. 

BTJCKLAND, R. A., Cheese Manufacturer and Nurseryman, Ringwood ; born in 
Brandon, Rutland Co., Vt., February 22, 1827 ; came to Kane Co. in 1849, and to 
McHenry Co. in 1854 ; worked in Engineering Department of Fox River Valley 
Railroad four years ; then removed to Wisconsin, and returned to McHenry Co. in 
18G6. Married Laura E. Smith, of Smith Corners, McIIenry Co., in February, 
1855, who died in June, 1839; 'had four children, all living. Married Harriet 
Pike, of Plymouth, N. II., in August, 1871. 

BUESSER, ELIZABETH, MRS., Widow of Henry, Sec. 13; Johnsburg P. 0. 

BUGNER, JOHN, Farmer; Juhnsburg. 

BUGNER, MARTIN, Laborer; Johnsburg. 

BUGBEE, ORSON, Clerk of P.rry & Martin; McIIenry. 

BUSS, BERNARD. Depot Agent C. & N. W. R. R. ; McHenry. 

BUTLER, RICHARD, Laboicr ; W. McHenry. 



276 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

CARR, WM. D., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

CARR, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

CARR, JABEZ, Farmer, Sec. 4; Ringwood P. 0. 

CARR, R. H., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Ringwood P. O. 

CARR, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec; 8 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

CARTER, C. S., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

CHARLES, CHARLES, Saloon Keeper ; Johnsburg. 

CHASE, JOSHUA, Carpenter ; Ringwood. 

CHASE, ELI F., Farmer ; Ringwood. 

CHASE, H. J., Lives with father, Joshua ; Ringwood. 

CHASE, MINARD M., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

CLARK, CHARLES E., Steamboatman ; McHenry. 

CLAXTON, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 31, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

CLEARY, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; McHenry P. 0. 

COATS, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

COATS, JOHN, Lives on farm of G. Swazey, Sec. 4 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

COLBY, HENRY, Druggist and Town Clerk; McHenry. 

COLBY, N. S., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; McHenry P. 0. 

COLBY, ALLAN P., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; McHenry P. 0. 

COLBY, WALLACE, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; McHenry P. 0. 

COLBY, PAGE, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; McHenry P. 0. * 

COLBY, WILLIARD, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; McHenry P. 0. 

COLBY, GEO. W., Lives with father, Sec. 23; McHenry P. 0. 

COLBY, CHAS. E., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 22 ; McHenry P. 0. ; born 
in McHenry Township, September 14, 1844; lived in county ever since ; owns 176f 
acres of land. Married Arminda F. Talbott, in Nunda Township, McHenry Co., 
December 25, 1864, who was born in Lake Co., February 19, 1845 ; has two chil- 
dren Fred. T., born October 24, 1865, and Caroline M., born February 2, 1876. 

COLEMAN, FRANZ, Farmer, Sec. 20, Range 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

COLEM AN, MATTHIAS, Laborer ; McHenry. 

COLYER, SHELDON, Miller; McHenry. 

COVILL, SIMON, Lives with father, Sec. 31, Range 9; McHenry P. 0. 

COVILL, WM. S., Farmer, Sec. 31, Range 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

CRABTREE, 0. C., Blacksmith; W. McHenry. 

CRISTY, JOS. W., General Merchant and Postmaster; Ringwood. 

CURTIS, C. B., Farmer and Proprietor Pickle Factory ; McHenry. 

CURTIS, GEORGE, Laborer ; McHenry. 

CUSTER, HOB ART, Laborer ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

DANNY, L., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; McHenry P. 0. 

DATES, L., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Ringwood P. O. 

DAVIS, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; W. McHenry. 

DAYMENT, THOMAS, Miller ; W. McHenry. 

DEAS, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; McHenry P. 0. 

DEGEN, NICHOLAS, Farmer ; Johnsburg P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 277 

DIETRICH, THpMAS, Farmer, Sec. 30, R. 9 ; McHcnry P. O. 

DODGE, SOLOMON, Farmer and Mechanic ; Ringwood ; born in Johnson, 
Lamoille Co., Vt., April 20, 1811 ; came to this county in October, 1844; owns 
25 acres in Ringwood. Married Mary A. Halsy, September 19, 1869, of English. 
Prairie, McHenry Co., September 8, 1840 ; has one child, Edmund Herbert Dodge, 
born May 23, 1873. 

DODGE, AMOS, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Ringwood P. 0. 
DODGE, ERWIN, works with father, Sec. 4; Ringwood P. 0. 
DODGE, WILLIAM, works with father, Sec. 4 ; Ringwood P. 0. 
DRAPER, JOSEPH, Blacksmith and Carpenter ; W. McHenry. 
DUFIELD, J. A., Sewing Machine Agent; W. McHenry. 
DUNN, J. L., Farmer, Sec. 33; McHenry P. 0. 
DYER, ERWIN, Laborer ; W. McHenry. 
EDWARDS, ROYAL, Carpenter and Joiner ; McHenry. 
ELLIS, F. J., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

ELDRIDGE, C. T., Produce and Stock Dealer ; McHenry P. 0. ; born in Ran- 
dall, Kenosha Co., Wis., June 15, 1841 ; came to this county April 1, 1874 ; owns 
village lot ; was in First Wisconsin Heavy Artillery. Married L. M. Carpenter, 
April 12, 1870, who was born in Goshen, Hampshire Co., Mass., August 31, 1843, 
and came to Wisconsin when five years old ; had three children George Archie, 
born January 31, 1871; Lottie A., born October 2. 1872, died April 9, 1874, and 
Harry, born April 11, 1875. 

ELLSWORTH, F. B. ; W. McHenry P. 0. 
ENGELN, MATTHIAS, Gunsmith ; McHenry. 
EVANSON, JOHN, General Merchant ; W. McHenry. 
EVERSON, - - General Merchant ; McHenry. 

FEGERS, H. M., Rev., Johnsburg ; born in Prussia, April 18, 1843 ; came to 
McHenry Co. February 27, 1869; graduated in the "University of St. Mary's of 
the Lake," Chicago, in 1867, and in the Seminary of St. Francis, Milwaukee, in 
1868 ; ordained Clergyman of the Catholic Church January 29, 1869. 

FESTERS, J. B., Farmer, Sec. 20, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
FISHER, AUGUST, Butcher ; McHenry. 
FISHER, WILLIAM, Butcher; McHenry. 
FLUSKEY, J. S., Harness Maker; McHenry. 
FORTH, WM., JR., Labour; Ringwood P. 0. 
FORD, B. A., Photographer ; McHeury P. 0. 
FRANCISCO, CHAUNCEY, Stone Mason ; McHenry. 
FRANCISCO, S., MRS., Widow, Sec. 31 ; Ostend P. 0. 
FRANC fSCO, LYMAN, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Ostend P. 0. 
FRANCISCO, JOHN, Farmer: Ostend P. 0. 
FRANCISCO, ALBERT. Farmer; Ostend P. 0. 
FRANCISCO, LEVI, Farmer; Ostend P. O. 



278 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNT*. 

FRANCISCO, LUCIAN, Manufacturer of Carriages, Wagons and Farming 
Implements; W. McHenry ; born near Ann Arbor, Mich., July 28, 1827; came 
to this county in 1847 ; owns 247 acres of land, and three lots in town. Married 
Julia Kimball, December 1, 1861 ; born September 19, 1843; had seven children, 
six living Martha Jane, September 27, 1863; Jason, April 3, 1865 /, Alonzo 
Beda, March 12, 1867; Eva, October 19,1869; Rosa Luvilla, September 18, 
1870; Willie Guy, September 1, 1872, and Tamason, August 19, 1874, died 
August 29, 1875. 

FRENCH, CHARLES, Laborer ; Ringwood P. 0. 

FRETT, WILLIAM F., Farmer, Sec. 7, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

FRETT, ALBANY, Carpenter and Joiner ; McHenry P. 0. 

FRIZER, JOHN, Laborer; Ringwood P. 0. 

FRIEND, STEPHEN H., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Ostend P. 0. 

FRIEND, JOHN, Sa., Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

FRIEND, KATHARINA, Widow, Sec. 1 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

FRIEND, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 6, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

FRIEND, NICHOLAS, Farmer, Sec. 6, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

FRIEND, PETER] Farmer, Sec. 19, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

FRIEND, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 19, R. 9; Johnsburg P. 0. 

FRIEND, J. F., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

FRIEND, MATTHIAS. Sa., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

FRIEND, N. L., Farmer,Sec. 12 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

FRIEND, STEPHEN, 2D, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Johnsburg P. O. 

FRIEND, MATTHEW N., Farmer, Sec. 7,R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

FRIEND, JOSEPH, Sa., Carpenter and Joiner, Sec. 14 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

GAGE, GEORGE, Surveyor; McHenry; born in Litchfield, Herkimer Co., N. 
J., August 30, 1813 ; came to Illinois in May, 1835 ; settled at Gage's Luke, Mc- 
Henry Co. (now Lake Co.), November, 1835 ; County Surveyor, Representative 
and Senator in State Legislature. Married Martha Persis Heald, July 4, 1838 ; 
she was born in Frankfort, Herkimer Co., N. Y., October 7, 1817 ; has four chil- 
dren Alsina, born October 5, 1839; Ellen, May 31, 1844; Maria, May 2, 1847, 
and Georgia, May 7, 1849 ; all married, living near home. 

GIBSON, RILEY, Farmer, Sec, 32, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 
GIFFORD, J. C., Fanner, Sec. 27 ; McHenry P. 0. 
GIESLER, PHILIP, General Merchant ; Johnsburg. 
GILBERT, B., Grocer and Crockery Merchant ; W. McHenry. 
GILBERT, A. B., Druggist ; W. McHenry. 
GILLIS, JOSEPH, Saloon Keeper ; McHenry. 

GRANGER, F. K., Attorney at Law aud General Merchant ; McHenry ; born 
in Sodus Township, Wayne Co., N. Y., May 16, 1832; came to McHen'y Co. in 
1855 ; member of the Twenty-eighth, Twenty-ninth and Thirtieth General Assem- 
bly, and reflected to Legislature at Presidential election of 1876 ; had four children 
by second wife Ada Augusta, Alciion Case, Charles Henry and Edwin Parsons. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 279 

GREGORY, H. S., Harness Maker; McHenry. 

GRISWOLD, E., Farmer; McHenry. 

GREEN, JOHN, Farmer ; Ringwood P. 0. 

GRtSWOLD, W. G., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

HABART, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Ostend P. 0. 

HALL, E. F., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

HALL, CLARK, Lives with father, Sec. 19 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

HALPIN, THOMAS, Laborer ; McHenry. 

HALL, DAVID, Lives with father, Sec. 19 ; Ringwood P. 0. * 

HANLEY, S. B., Miller; W. McHenry. 

HANLEY, E. J., Brakeman ; W. McHenry. 

H ANLEY, A. H., Farmer, Miller and Brickmaker, Sec. 34; McHenry P. 0. ; born 
at Olean, Cattaraugus Co., N. Y., August 23, 1816 ; lived in Hector, Tompkins Co., 
N. Y., until 1836 ; came to McHenry Co. March 7, 1837, all the way by wagon, 
then 20 years of age ; owns 760 acres of land. Married Susan Sherman, October 
3, 1841 ; she was born December 15, 1819 ; had five children Emma, born July 
30, 1842, lived thirty days ; Samuel Benson, August 29, 1843 ; George Hamilton, 
May 9, 1846; John Edwin, January 16, 1849; Daniel Francis, November 22 
1863 ; sons living on the farm. 

HARRISON, WM. H., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Ringwood P. 0. 
HARRISON, JOHN, Farmer and Capitalist ; Ringwood. 
HARRISON, CHARLES, Depot Agent ; Ringwood. 
HARSH, ISAAC, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Ringwood P. 0. 
HAUPRICH, PHILIP, Blacksmith ; McHenry. 
HAWKINS, WILLIAM, Harness Maker ; McHenry. 

HEB ARD, F. A., Carpenter and Joiner ; McHenry ; born in Ulster Township, 
Bradford Co., Pa., January 31, 1816 ; came to this county October 3, 1846; owns 
three acres in McHenry. Married Eliza E. Tuttle, October 12, 1842, who was born 
March 31, 1814, and died in Brown Co., Minn., August 12, 1861 ; had two children 
NizzaD., born August 15, 1850 ; Florence J., September 20, 1834, died October 
10, 1854. Married Mrs, Mary A. Plummer, July 12, 1862 (maiden name Fisher), 
who was born in Charlotte, Me., May 17, 1825. Eldest daughter married R. 
Holly. 

HEIN, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 5, R, 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
HEIN, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; McHenry P. 0. 
HENNER, J. P.^ Farmer, Sec. 14 ; McHenry P. 0. 
HENNER, MATTHIAS, Saloon Keeper; Johnsburg. 
HERBES, JOHN, Brewer ; McHenry. 
HESS, NICHOLAS, SR., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
HETZEL, JACOB, Barber ; McHenry. 
HINES, J. S., Farmer ; W. McHenry. 

HOB ART, ELIZA A., Mrs., Widow, Sec. 30 ; Ostend P. 0. Married Lucius 
J. Hobart, April 6, 1847 ; born Feb. 12, 1822 and died October 9, 1869. She was 



280 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

born in Yorkshire, England, March 27, 1827 ; came to this country June 17, 1836, 
with her father Matthew and mother Sarah Carr ; owns 157 acres of land ; has six 
children, two married, the rest living with mother. 

HOGAN, THOMAS, Laborer ; W. McHenry. 

HOGAN, JOHN, Miller ; McHenry. 

HOLMES, H. D., Laborer; McHenry. 

HOLMES, H. N., Carpenter and Wagon Maker; McHenry. 

HOLMES. N. L., Laborer; McHenry. 

HOWlRD, CHESTER, Trapper and Hunter; McHenry. 

HOWARD, ORLANDO J., Physician ; McHenry ; born in Madison Co., N. Y., 
October 12, 181G ; came to McHenry Co. January 6, 1867 ; owns fourlots and resi- 
dence and store, valued at $4,000 ; was Postmaster in Ohio, under Abraham Lin- 
coln's Administration. Married Juliet Gould, of Hopkinton, St. Lawrence Co., 
N. Y.. February 14, 1836 ; had six children. Married Rebecca C. Hamilton, of 
Hartford, Conn., April 15, 1875. 

HOWE, EUGENE, Clerk for J. Storey; McHenry. 
HOWE, EDGAR, Saloon Keeper; McHenry. 
HOWE, A. L., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; McHenry P. 0. 
HOWE, J. L., Farmer, Sec. 36 ; McHenry P. 0. 

HUEMANN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 24; McHenry P.O.; born in Coblentz, 
Prussia, August 7, 1827 ; came to the United States November 15, 1851, and to 
McHenry Co. June 23, 1852 ; owns 120 acres of land, valued at $4,500 ; has been 
Town Collector two years, and Assessor five years. Married Margaret Smith, of 
Coblentz, Prussia, September 14, 1854; had ten children, all living. 

HUTSON, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; McHenry P. 0. 
INGALS, D. F., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Ringwood P. 0. 
INGALS, A. 0., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Ostend P. 0. 
JACOBS, JOHN, Farmer; Johnsburg P. 0. 
JECKS, WM. A., Lives with father, Sec. 29 ; McHenry P. 0. 
JECKS, ISAAC, Farmer; Sec. 29; McHenry P. 0. 
JORDAN, CHAS. B., Clerk for Perry & Martin ; McHenry. 
JUNG, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; McHenry P. 0. 
JUNG, FRANK, Farmer and Teacher; Johnsburg P. 0. 
JUNGEN, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
JUSTEN, NICHOLAS, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; McHenry P. 0. 
JUSTEN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 18, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
KAMP. PETER, Mason and Farmer, Sec. 14; Johnsburg P. 0. 
KARGES, JOHN, Proprietor of McHenry House ; McHenry. 
KEHR, MATTHIAS, Farmer, Sec. 7, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
KERNEBECK, B, H., Farmer, Sec. 20, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
KERNEBECK, J. B., Farmer, Sec. 20, R. 9 ; Johnsburg, P. 0. 
KELTER, MICHAEL, Carpenter and Joiner ; McHenry. 
KIMBALL, FRANK, Laborer ; McHenry. 



DIRECTORY OF MoIIENRY COUNTY. 281 

KISGEN, HENRY, Carpenter and Joiner ; McHenry. 

KING, JACOB, Farmer ; McHenry P. 0. 

KLEIN, WM., Farmer, Sec. 18, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

KLAPPERICK, P. H., Farmer, Sec. 7, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

KNOX, THOMAS, Saloon Keeper ; McHenry. 

KRETSHMER, FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 5, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

KUHNARD, CHARLES, General Merchant ; Johnsburg. 

LADD, J. C., 'Lives with father. Sec. 3 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

LADD, WESLEY, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Ringwood P. 0. ; born in Hebron, Grafton 
Co., N. H., December 5, 1810 ; his grandparents were the first settlers of New 
Hampshire; his mother's name was Pike; came to this county July, 1837, and 
lives where first located ; owns over 400 acres of land as homestead. Married Caro- 
line Colburn, September 27, 1846 ; born in same town April 7, 1811 ; died Octo- 
ber 1, 1853 ; had two children, James C., born August 12, 1847, and Frederica E., 
April 3, 1849. Married Phoebe Haley, July 2, 1854 ; born in Byron, Genesee 
Co., N. Y., November 6, 1827 ; had six children Amelia S., born July 2, 1855 ; 
Nellie C., November 2, 1856 ; Carrie C., October 10, 1858 ; Anna E., December 13, 
1860 lived twelve days; Elma E., February 27, 1862; Mary A., March, 1865. 

LAWRENCE, 0. L., Laborer ; Ringwood. 
LAWRENCE, JOSEPH, Laborer ; Ringwood. 
LAUGH AM, WILLIAM, Stock Dealer ; Ringwood. 

LATTER, NICOLAS, Merchant Tailor and Gents' Furnishing Goods (of the 
firm of Lauer & Becker) ; McHenry ; born in Chicago, August 9, 1849 ; moved to 
Kenosha, 1856 ; came to McHenry March 14, 1876 ; has worked at tailoring for 
ten years. Married Lizzie Robling, September 28, 1871, who was born in Keno- 
sha, January 28, 1851 ; has one child, Berndiena, born in Kenosha. Wis., Decem- 
ber 6, 1875. 

LENZEN JOHN, Farmer and General Produce Merchant ; McHenry ; born in 
Prussia, April 8, 1843; came to this county 1852. Married Adelheid K. Kony, 
May 15, 1862, who was born in Prussia, March 13, 1844, and died May 11, 1876 ; 
had five children Benjamin, born April 21, 1863 ; John A., October 11, 1866; An- 
nie, March 23, 1869, who died November 21, 1870; John Martin, May 18, 1871, 
who died May 20, 1871, and Maggie, born February 7, 1873. Married Mary 
Friend, September 22, 1876, who was born in Prussia, December 18, 1855. 

LIEKEIN, PETER, Jeweler ; McHenry. 
LINCOLN, ADDISON, Laborer ; McHenry. 
LUFF, H. D., Proprietor Fox River Flouring Mills. 
LUG, MATTHIAS, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
LUMLEY, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Ringwood P. 0. 
LUMLEY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Ringwood P. 0. 
LYNCH, JAMES, Painter ; W. McHenry. 
MADOLE, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Ringwood P. 0. 
MARTIN, A. A.. General Merchant ; McHenry. 



282 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

MAYES, F. G., Merchant Tailor ; McHenry. 

MAY, GERTRUDE, Mas., Widow. Sec. 18. R. 9 : Johnsburg P. 0. 

MAY, MARTIN, Blacksmith; Johnsburg. 

MAY, JOHN, Lives on farm of Mrs. Benalkin. Sec. 24; Johnsburg. 

MAYERS, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 5, R. 9 ; Johnsbury P. 0. 

MADDEN, HENRY, Harness Maker ; McHenry. 

McOMBER, JOHN, SR., Carpenter and Joiner ; McHenry. 

McCRARY. A. C., Carpenter and Joiner; W. McHenry. 

MCLEAN, H. W., Farmer, Sec. 22; McHenry P. 0. ; born in Columbia Co., N. 
Y., March 10, 1809; came to McHenry Co. in September, 1836; owns 120 acres 
of land, valued at $6,000 ; located the town of Oswego, Kendall Co.. 111. ; made the 
first claim, in 1836, to land now McHenry. Married Ursula Northrup, of McHeury 
Township, May 17. 1849 ; had six children ; one dead. 

McLEAN, W. A., Lives with his father, Sec. 22 ; McHenry P. 0. 
McOMBER H. M., Clerk of 0. Bishop; McHenry. 
McDONALD, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; W. McHenry. 

MEAD, H. C., Stock Raiser and Dairyman, Sec. 28; McHenry P. 0.; born in 
Pittsford, Vt., July 31, 1839 ; came to this county in 1844 ; owns 204 acres of 
land ; commenced a course of study at Woodstock University in 1859 ; at the break- 
ing out of the Rebellion, enlisted in Co. A, Fifteenth Regt. 111. Vol. Inf., and served 
three years. Married Lozett A. Kennedy, daughter of Andrew and Laura Kennedy, 
September 27, 1864, who was born in Richmond/ McHenry Co., September 23, 
1842 ; had five children Willie H., born October 6, 1865 ; Earl Leorr, December 
21, 1867 ; Hattie L., May 27, 1870, and Leon and Lillian (twins), born November 

4, 1872, and died August 22, 1873, and September 14, 1873. His father, William 

5. Mead, was born in Pittsford, Vt., April 30, 1809, and died in McHenry April 
17, 1876 ; came to this county in 1844 ; was Captain of Independent Rifle Company, 
Pittsford, Vt., five years. Married Lucretia Kimball in 1835, who was born in 
Kingston, Vt.. June 26, 1812 ; had three children Harriet, born September 26, 
1836 ; Frank, May 25, 1843, and H. C. 

MERCHANT, GEORGE E., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Ringwood P. 0. 
MICHAELS, SIMON, General Merchant; Johnsburg. 
MICHAELS, JOSEPH, Farmer ; Johnsburg. 
MILLER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 5, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
MILLER, MARIA, Farmer, Sec. 18, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
MILLER, JACOB, 2D, Farmer, Sec. 29, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
MILLER, HENRY, Marble Dealer, Johnsburg. 
MILLER, JACOB, SK., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
MOREY, C. H., Insurance Agent, McHenry. 
MILLER, J. A., Farmer, Sec. 13; Johnsburg P. 0. 
MOLITOR, NICHOLAS, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
MOLITOR, JOHN, Lives with his father, Sec. 13 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
MORRISON, JAS. E., Physician and Surgeon ; W. McHenry. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 283 

MOSES, WILLIAM, Clerk for P. D. Smith ; McHenry. 
MORSE, L., Farmer ; McHenry P. 0. 
MYERS, JOSEPH, Farmer ; Ringwood P. 0. 
MYERS, ANTON, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Johnsburg P. 0. . 
NARDQUIST, G., Blacksmith ; McHenry. 
NASH, J. F., School Teacher; McHenry. 
NELL, HENRY, Farmer ; Johnsburg. 
NETT, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
NICKLE, WILLIAM, School Teacher ; Ringwood P. 0. 
NICHOLS, H. H., Laborer ; McHenry. 
NIESSEN, MARTIN, Postmaster ; Johnsburg. 
NOONEN, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Ringwood P. 0. 
NORTON, WILLIAM, Laborer ; McHenry. 
NOURSE, JAMES E , Farmer, Sec. 21 ; McHenry P. 0. 
OEFLING, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
OWEN, O. W., Watchmaker and Organ Dealer ; McHenry. 

OWEN, M. EDWIN; born in Sangerfield, Oneida Co., N. Y., May 27, 1821 ; 
removed to village of McHenry, June 11, 1838 ; with brothers, built the Fox River 
Valley Flour Mills in 1852. Married Amy V. Warner, April 2, 1854; she died 
March 30, 1872, leaving seven children Geo. Washington, born August 4, 1855 ; 
Oliver Norton, June 1, 1857 ; Mary Laura, July 1, 1859 ; Edwin Warner, Decem- 
ber 6, 1861; Charles Starr, September 23, 1863; Lewis Hunn, March 3, 1868; 
Amy Cornelia, September 18, 1871 ; McHenry P. 0. 

OWEN, GEORGE, lives with father, E. M. ; McHenry. 
PAGE, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; McHenry P. 0. 
PAGE, FRANK, lives with his father, Sec. 33 ; McHenry P. 0. 
PALMER, JOSEPH, Boot and Shoe Dealer ; Johnsburg. 
PARKER, FRANK, with father Winslow Parker ; W. McHenry. 

PARKER, WINSLOW, Hotel Keeper; McHenry; born in Collins, Erie Co., 
N. Y., July 3, 1823 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1845. Married Eliza Sherman, 
October 8, 1848, who was born March 10, 1828, in Shrewsbury, Rutland Co., Vt. ; 
had six children Frank A., born August 28, 1849 ; Theresa, January 22, 1852; 
Sarah Eliza, November 10, 1855; Virginia R., June 3, 1858; Nettie, September 
10, 1866, and died January 5, 1868, and Willie J., March 4, and died. 

PERRY, JAMES B., Justice of the. Peace ; Mc*Henry. 
PERKINS, EDWIN, Carpenter and Joiner; McHenry. 
PHALON, PATRICK. Farmer, Sec. 35 ; McHenry P. 0. 
PITZEN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 17, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
POTTER, SIMON, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Ringwood P. 0. 
PULFERMACKER, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Johnsburg P. O. 
RAINTHORPE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Ringwood P. 0. 
RAINTHORPE, BENJ., lives with father, Sec. 10 ; Ringwood P. 0. 
ROGMONT, STEPHEN, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; McHenry P. 0. 



284 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

RALSTON, JOHN, Farmer, s. w. Sec. 34; McHenry P. 0.; born in Philadel- 
phia, Pa., October 16, 1834; came to this county in March, 1856 ; owns 86 acres 
of land. Married Celesta Bresce, of Pittsford, Vt., at McHenry, September 27, 
1859, who was born May 30, 1834; she came to this county in 1854; had five 
children Thomas E., born October 17, 1860, died September 21, 1861 ; Carlton 
F., born March 28, 1862 ; Annie J., born May 9, 1864 ; Viola C., born March 29, 
1868 died February 27, 1869 ; John C., born March 23, 1875. 

ROSS, MICHAEL, Marble Worker ; Johnsburg. 
ROTHERMEL, JACOB, Saloon Keeper ; Johnsburg. 
ROTHERMEL, PETER, Carpenter and Builder ; Johnsburg. 
ROTHERMEL, GEORGE, Carriage Maker ; McHenry. 
ROUSE, CHARLES, Barber ; W. McHenry. 
ROWEN, HELENA J., Widow, Sec. 9, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
SABBEL, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
SAYLER, J. R., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 32 ; McHenry P. 0. 
SCHAEFFER, PETER, Lives with father, Sec. 9, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
SCHAEFFER, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; McHenry P. 0. 
SCHAEFFER, J. P., Farmer, Sec. 9, R. 9; Johnsburg P. 0. 
SCHAEFFER, PHILIP, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
SCHAEFFER, MATTHIAS, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
SCHAEFFER, NICHOLAS, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
SCHEID, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
SCHEID, PETER, Blacksmith ; Johnsburg. 
SCHNEIDER, NICHOLAS, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
SCHNOR, FRITZ, Shoemaker ; W. McHenry. 
SCHRIMER, WILLIAM, Laborer ; W. McHenry. 
SCHRIMER, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 19; Johnsburg P. 0. 
SCHRIMER, GEORGE, Saloon and Restaurant Keeper ; W. McHenry. 
SEEBER, GARRETT, Farmer and Carpenter ; W. McHenry. 
SHERMAN, S. S., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; McHenry P. 0. 
SHERBURNE, R. H., Farmer, Sec. 18; Ring-wood P. 0. 
SHOEMAKER, JOHN F., Farmer and Tailor, Sec. 1 ; Johnsburg P. O. 
SHOEMAKER, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
SHOEMAKER, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 18, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
SHUNEMAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 29, R. 9 ; Johasburg P. 0. 
SHIMELS, MATTHIAS, Farmer ; McHenry. 
SIMMONS, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 16; Ringwood P. 0. 

SIMMONS, SAMUEL, Farmer; Ringwood; born in Chittenden, Rutland Co., 
Vt., October 12, 1801 ; came to this county in 1855; owned 360 acres of land; 
sold all but 6 acres in Ringwood and 36 acres of old farm ; valuation of property, 
$12,000 ; Class Leader, Steward and Trustee of M. E. Church for fifty years. 
Married Lucy Parrish, of Chittenden, Vt,, March 27, 1825, who died December 2, 
1873 ; had six children, four living. 

SIMPSON, R., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Ringwood P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 285 

SIMPSON, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

SLAFTER, D. E., Laborer; McHenry. 

SMITH, W. V., Carpenter and Joiner ; W. McHenry. 

SMITH, J. J., Lives with his father, Sherman; McHenry. 

SMITH, JACOB F., Farmer, Sec. 24; Johnsburg P. 0. 

SMITH, JOHN P., Farmer, Sec. 30, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

SMITH, PETER, Lives on farm of J. Smith, Sec. 6, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

SMITH, JOHN F., Farmer, Sec. 6, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

SMITH, FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; McHenry P. 0. 

SMITH, JACOB, SR., Farmer, Sec. 6, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

SMITH, MARTIN, Farmer, Sec. 18, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

SMITH, STEPHEN M., Farmer/Sec. 19, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

SMITH, JOHN W., Farmer, Sec. 16; Ringwood P. 0.; born in Johnston, 
Franklin, now Lamoille, Co., Vt., July 12, 1806 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1841 ; 
owns 1,100 acres of land ; has been Supervisor one year, and Postmaster. Married 
Clarissa C. Clemmons, of Hyde Park, Vt., in November, 1825 ; had ten children, 
four living. Married Lyntha A. Griswold, of Johnston, Lamoille Co., Vt., in 1850 ; 
had six children, all living. Has been a dealer in general merchandise. 

SMITH, JOHN A., Farmer, Sec. 30, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

SMITH, FRANK, Farmer, Sec. 13, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

SMITH, JOHN M., Hardware Dealer and Postmaster; McHenry. 

SMITH, D. S , Wool Buyer; McHenry. 

SMITH, PHILO .D., General Merchant ; McHenry. 

SMITH, F. B., Lives on farm of G. W. Smith, Sec. 16 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

SMITH, WILLIAM L., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

SMITH, AARON, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

SMITH, HARRISON C., Lumber and Produce Merchant; McHenry; born 
in Johnson, Lamoille Co., Vt., April 1, 1837 ; came to this county in 1840 ; has 
been Supervisor. Married Alsena Gage, October 5, 1858, who was born in Lake 
Co., 111., October 5, 1839 ; has six children George, born July 27, 1859 ; Marian, 
April 18, 1861; Henry, September 24, 1862; Hattie, June 7,1864; Martha, 
November 16, 1867, and Alsena, November 12, 1876. 

SOMERS, G. A., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

SOMERS, EDWARD, Farmer, with his father, Sec. 29 ; Ringwood P. O. 

SOMERS, CLARENCE, Lives with father, Sec. 29 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

STEBBINS, R. L., Tinner and Clerk of J. M. Smith ; McHenry. 

STEFFENS, LEONARD, Boot and Shoe Maker ; Johnsburg. 

STEGMAN, CHRISTOFF, Laborer ; McHenry. 

STEVENSON, SHERMAN, Farmer (Renter), Sec. 8 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

STEVENS, N. D., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Ringwood P. < >. 

STEVENS, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

STILLING, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 30, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. L 

STILLING, HENRY, Lives with father, Sec. 30, R. 9j Johnsburg P. 0. 



286 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

STODDARD, L., General Merchant ; McHenry. 

STOCK, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 29, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 

STOCKER, SAMUEL, Farmer ; McHenry P. 0. 

STURDEVANT, JOHN, Merchant and Carpenter ; W. McHenry. 

STORY, JACOB, Hardware Merchant ; McHenry. 

SUTTON, PHILIP, 3D, Farmer (Renter), Sec. 28; McHenry P. 0. 

SUTTON, JAMES, Farmer ; W. McHenry. 

SUTTON, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; McHenry P. 0. 

SUTTON, EDWARD, Laborer ; McHenry. 

SWAN, HENRY, Farmer, Sec 5 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

SWAN, A. G., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 7 ; Ringwood P. 0. ; born in Rome, 
Oneida Co., N. Y., June 18, 1836 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1849 ; lived in Min- 
nesota six years ; owns 193 acres of land. Married Achsah M. Chandler, of Anns- 
ville, Oneida Co., N. Y., November 25, 1867 ; had four children, three living 
Earl, Edith M. and Ralph B. 

TANNER, HARVEY, Farmer and Postmaster, Sec. 19 ; Ostend P. 0. ; born 
Chester Township, Hampden Co., Mass., July 9, 1799 ; came to Ohio in 1814, and 
to this county in July, 1844 ; owns 200 acres of land. Married Catharine D. Hart, 
of Brandon, Rutland Co., Vt., February 8, 1859 ; has five children. 

TERENCE, A. F., Dealer in Horses ; McHenry P. 0. 
TENYEN, BERNARD, Farmer, Sec. 20, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
TILTON, W. F., Blacksmith ; McHenry. 
THELEN, STEPHEN, Shoemaker ; Johnsburg. 
THELEN, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 18, R. 9 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
THOMAS, WILLIAM H., Farmer, Sec. 26 ; McHenry P. 0. 
THOMAS, ANDREW, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; McHenry P. 0. 
THOMPSON, E. H., Farmer (Renter), Sec. 29 ; McHenry P. 0. 
TONGE, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
THURRELL, JOHN, Stone Mason and Plasterer ; McHenry. 

THURLWELL, RUTH A., Mrs., Lives on s. e. Sec. 31, R. 9 ; McHenry 
P. 0. ; born in Athens, Steuben Co., N. Y., August 5, 1842. Married Andrew 
E. Wells, August 19, 1860, who was born in Ontario Co., N. Y., September 6, 
1827, and died February 8, 1875; had three children Byron, born June 21, 
1862, died May 20, 1864; Jencks Peter, born February 22, 1864; Clarence A., 
born June 15, 1871. Married John Thurlwell, July 22, 1876, who was born in 
Yorkshire, England, April 22, 1827. 

UPHOFF, ALBERT, Farmer, Sec. 32, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 
VASEY, J. E., Farmer; Ringwood P. 0. 

VAN SLYKE, J., Publisher and Editor of McHenry Plaindeakr ; born in St. 
Lawrence Co., N. Y., August 21, 1837; came to McHenry Co. in 1870; was 
Captain in the army. Married Rachel Mills, of St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., November 
28, 1858 ; has four children. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 287 

VALENTINE, FRANK, Adopted son of R. Simpson; Ringwood. 

WEBER, MATTHIAS, Laborer ; McHenry. 

WAITE, LEWIS, Carpenter and Joiner; McHenry. 

WALCH, WILLIAM, Harness Maker ; McHenry. 

WALKER, S. H., Farmer and Capitalist; Ringwood. 

WATERMAN, L. H., Farmer, Sec. 2; Ringwood P. 0. 

WALKINGTON, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

WALSH, THOS., Clerk for P. D. Smith ; McHenry. 

WAGNER, B. E., Farmer, Sec. 31, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

WAGNER, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 32, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

WATERMAN, WALTER, lives with father, Sec. 2 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

WATTLES, HOMER, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; McHenry P. 0. 

WEBER, ANTON, Blacksmith ; McHenry. 

WEBER, HOBART, Laborer ; McHenry. 

WEBER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; McHenry P. 0. 

WELCH, J. F., works in Pickle Factory ; W. McHenry. 

WELCH, JOSEPH, Laborer; McHenry. 

WELCH, MARTIN, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; W. McHenry P. 0. 

WENDEL, ERNEST, Carpenter and Joiner ; McHenry. 

WHEELER, E. S., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; McHenry P. 0. 

WHEELER, HINTON, Laborer; McHenry. 

WHIGHTM AN, HENRY E., Livery Stable Keeper ; McHenry. 

WHIGHTMAN, MARY, MRS., Widow ; McHenry. 

WHITING, FREEMAN, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 17 ; Ringwood P. 
0. ; born in Johnston, Vt., January 8, 1822 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1844 ; 
owns 520 acres of land. Married Lucy Smith, of Johnston, Vt., January 8, 1850 ; 
has four chifdren Delbert A., Laura, Lillian and Abby ; all living. 

WHITING, A. 0., Farmer, Sec. 20; McHenry P. 0. 
WILSON, D. C., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; McHenry P. 0. 
WINKELS, NICHOLAS, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Johnsburg P. 0. 
WINKELS, MICHAEL, Farmer ; Johnsburg. 

WIEDEMANN, JOSEPH, Cheese Manufacturer; McHenry; born in 
Kempton, Bavaria, March 19, 1837 ; came to the United States in 1860, and to 
this county March 18, 1874 ; owns property where he resides. Married Anna 
Wiedemann in Chicago, February 29, 1869, who was born in Augsburg, Bavaria, 
June 27, 1843 ; has three children M. Barbara, born September 5, 1872 ; John 
Carl, born July 20, 1874, and F. Theodore, born March 20, 1876. 

WIRFS, CASPER, Saloon Keeper ; W. McHenry. 

WOODRUFF, W. C., Works on farm of F. Whiting, Sec. 17 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

WRIGHT, ROBERT, Shoemaker ; McHenry. 

WRIGHT, ISRAEL, Farmer, Sec. 27; McHenry P. 0. 



288 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



McHENRY BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



R. BISHOP, 

PROPRIETOR OF 

FOX RIVER VALLEY FLODRING-MILLS 

And Manufacturer of all kinds of 

IIMCPI^EMEIVTS. 



PARKER HOUSE, 

fe SO1V, 

PROPRIETORS. 



E. F.*ELDRIDGE, 

PRODUCE AND STOCK DEALER. 



GEORGE CAGE, 



LUCIAN FRANCISCO, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

CARRIAGES, WAGONS 

AND 
IMPLEMENTS. 



F. A. HEBARD, 



STJIR^ZEYOIR,. CARPENTER AND JOINER, 



F. K. GRANGER, 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

AND 
MERCHANT. 



McHENRY PLAINDEALER, 

J. VAN SLYKE, 
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER. 



OELANDO J, HOWARD, M, D,, 
PHYSICIAN. 



JOSEPH WIEDEMANN, 



R. A. BUCKLAND, 

Ctese Mannfactnrer ani Nurseryman, 

RIN G- AVOO3D. 



JOHN LENZEN, 



HANLEY & SONS, 

MILLERS AND BEIGE MAKERS. 



H. C. SMITH, 



GENERAL PRODUCE. LUMBER AND PRODUCE. 




NEAR DEPOT, 
D IE -A. Ij IE K, S I3ST 



Ready-made Olothiog, Hats and daps and licnts' FurDishiog Goods. 



ALL WOKK WARRANTED. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 289 



McHENRY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

BISHOP, JACOB, Stone Mason and Plasterer. 

BOUSLETT, JACOB, Saloon Keeper. 

BEERS, E. A., Physician and Surgeon. 

BUCK, JOSEPH, Saloon Keeper. 

BLECK BROS., Furniture Dealers. 

BLECK & BENTFIELD, General Merchants. 

BUCKLIN & STEVENS, General Merchants ; W. McHenry. 

BEST, FRANCIS, Bakery. 

BROWN, H. F., Physician. 

COLBY, HENRY, Druggist, 

DRAPER, JOSEPH, Blacksmith and Carpenter. 

ENGELN, MATTHIAS. Gunsmith. 

FISHER BROS., Meat Market. 

GILBERT, B., Grocer and Confectioner ; W. McHenry. 

GILBERT, A. B., Druggist ; W. McHenry. 

HERBES, JOHN, Brewery. 

KNOX, THOS., Saloon Keeper. 

LIEKEIN, PETER, Jeweler. 

LANSING, JOHN, General Merchant and Dealer in Stock ; W. McHenry. 

McHENRY HOUSE, John Karges, Proprietor. 

MA YES, F. G., Merchant Tailor. 

NARDQUIST & WEBER, Blacksmiths. 

PERRY & MARTIN, General Merchants. 

PERKINS, EDWIN, Carpenter and Joiner. 

ROTHERMEL, GEORGE, Carriage Maker. 

SCHRIMER, GEORGE, Saloon and Restaurant ; W. McHenry. 

SMITH, J. M., Hardware Merchant; W. McHenry. 

SMITH & SNYDER, Lumber Dealers ; W. McHenry. 

SMITH. PHILO D., General Merchant. 

SEARLES, S., MRS., Millinery. 

STODDARD, L., General Merchant. 



290 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

STORY, JACOB, Hardware Merchant. 

WAITE, LEWIS, Carpenter and Joiner. 

WRIGHT, ROBERT, Boot and Shoemaker. 

WHIGHTMAN, HENRY, Livery Stable. 

WIRFS, CASPER, Saloon and Restaurant ; W. McHenry. 

WALCH, WILLIAM., Harness Maker. 



JOHNSBURG BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 

BOUSLETT, LEONARD, Dry Goods Merchant. 
CHARLES, CHARLES, Saloon Keeper. 
HENNER, MATTHIAS, Saloon Keeper. 
KUHNARD, CHARLES, General Merchant. 
MILLER, HENRY, Dealer in Marble. 
MAY, MARTIN, Blacksmith. 
MICHAELS, SIMON, General Merchant. 
PALMER, JOSEPH, Shoemaker. 
ROTHERMEL, JACOB, Saloon Keeper. 
STEFFENS, LEONARD, Boots and Shoes. 
THELEN, STEPHEN, Boots and Shoes. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 291 



NUNDA TOWNSHIP. 

ADAMS, BERNARD, Farmer, n. w. Sec. 5; Volo P. 0.; born in the town- 
ship of Grant, Lake Co., 111., February 24, 1850; came to McHenry Co. March 
15, 1876 ; is a renter ; value of property, $500. Married Margaret Cossmar, of Ger- 
many, December 30, 1874 ; has one child. 

ALLENSBY, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 8, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

AMES, GEORGE W., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Nunda P. 0. ; born in Wauconda, 
Lake Co., 111. ; came to McHenry Co. in September, 1857 ; owns 63 acres of land, 
valued at $40 per acre ; was Private in Co. I, Fifty-second 111. Vol. Inf. Married 
Eliza A. McMillan, of Nunda, McHenry Co., 111., October 12, 1870; has three 
children. 

ANDRUS, GROVE, Farmer, s. w. Sec. 15 ; Nunda P. 0. ; born in Hartford 
Co., Conn., September 21, 1800 ; came to Livingston Co., N. Y., in 1831, and to 
McHenry Co. in November, 1841 ; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre. 
Married Sarah Geirhart, of Allegany Co , N. Y., October 14, 1832 ; had eight chil- 
dren, three living. 

ANDREWS, ROBERT P., lives on father's farm, Sec. 30, R. 9 ; Nunda P. 0. 
ANDREWS, 0. L., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Nunda P. 0. 
ANDREWS, J. F.. Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Nunda P. 0. 
ANDREWS, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Barreville P. O. 
BAIRD, JAS., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Barreville P. 0. 

BALLOU, EMORY, M. D., Physician and Surgeon; Nunda ; born in Mon- 
roe, Franklin Co., Mass. ; came to McHenry Co. in 1849. Married Emily A. 
Butler, of Nunda, June 16, 1864 ; has four children. 

BARNES, LEMAN, Cooper ; Nunda. 
BARNES, WILLIAM, Cooper; Nunda. 
BAY, H. R., Retired Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Nunda P. 0. 
BEACH, L. H., Farmer, Sec. 29, R. 9 ; Wauconda P. 0. 
BEARDSLEY, 0., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Nunda P. 0. 
BEARDSLEY, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Nunda P. 0. 
BEARDSLEY, NOYAH, Insurance Agent; Nunda. 
BEARDSLEY, J. P., Dealer in Agricultural Implements; Nunda. 
BECKLEY, EDGAR, Lumber Merchant (farm in Sec. 20) ; Nunda. 

BECKLEY, GORDON L., Farmer and Dairyman, n. e. Sec. 20; Nunda 
P. 0. ; born in Waterbury, New Haven Co., Conn., October 17, 1788 ; served in the 



292 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

war of 1812; came to McHenry Co. in August, 1838; owns 150 acres of land, 
valued at $50 per acre; was Postmaster six years. Jkfarried Phebe Barnes, of 
Southington, Hartford Co., Conn., October 25, 1815; had eleven children, four 
living. 

BECKLEY, J. E., Farmer; Nunda; born in Granby, Conn., April 11, 1826; 
came to McHenry Co. in August, 1838 ; owns 170 acres of land on Sec. 20, R. 8 ; 
valuation of property, $10,000 ; was Captain of Co. D, Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. 
Married Emma C. Mack, of Delaware Co., N. Y., March 16, 1835; has seven 
children. 

BECKLEY, LUCIENS, Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Nunda P. 0. 

BE HAN, H., Farmer, Sec. 32, R. 9 ; Nunda P. 0. 

BE HAN, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 30, R. 9 ; Nunda P. 0. 

BEHAN, MARY, Mrs., Resides in s. w. Sec. 30 ; Nunda P. O. ; widow of 
Cornelius Behan, who died May 12, 1843; she was born in Charleston, S. C., Feb- 
ruary 14, 1803; came to Naperville, 111., in 1843, and to McHenry Co. in 1844; 
owns 227 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre ; was married to Cornelius Behan in 
Boston, Mass., May 1, 1840 ; had four children, three living. 

BENTHUSEN, L., Blacksmith ; Nunda. 
BERNSTEIN, A. M., Cooper ; Nunda. 

BENTON, R. G., Fancy Grocer and Confectioner and Baker ; Nunda ; born in 
Guilford, New Haven Co., Conn., September 27, 1827 ; came to McHenry Co. No- 
vember 22, 1860 ; owns 190 acres of land on Sees. 34 and 35; valuation of prop- 
erty, $12,000 ; was Town Assessor three years. Married Lydia A. Armstrong, of 
Pultney, Steuben Co.. N. Y., January 24, 1855 ; had eight children, six living. 

BOLGER, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; McHenry P. 0. 

BOWMAN, CHARLES, Tenant on R. G. Benton's farm, Sec. 34 ; Nunda P. 0. 

BROWN, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Nunda P. 0. 

BROWN, M. F., Farmer, Sec. 8; Nunda 'P. O. 

BRYANT, NELSON, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Nunda P. 0. 

BRYANT, H. M., Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Nunda P. O. 

BRYANT, EDWARD, Carpenter; Nunda P. 0. 

BRYANT, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Nunda P. 0. 

BRYANT, FREDERICK, Farmer, Sec. 26; Nunda P. 0. 

BUCK, R., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Nunda P. 0. 

BUCK, C. M., Express Agent; Nunda P. 0. 

BUCK, ALFRED, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Nunda P. 0. 

BUCK, ALBERT, Barber and Dealer in Tobacco and Cigars ; Nunda ; born in 
Denmark. February 16, 1854 ; came to this country in June, 1869, and to McHenry 
Co. in April, 1874. Unmarried. 

BUELL, A. J., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Nunda P. 0. 

BURTON, H., No. 2, Works W. H. Mudgett's farm, Sec. 17, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

BURTON, S. L., Farmer, Sec. 29, R. 9 ; Wauconda P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 293 

BURTON, HORACE, Farmer, Sec. 17, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 
CAMPBELL, J. W., Dry Goods Merchant; Nunda. 
CAMPBELL, S., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Nunda P. 0. 
CHAMBERLAIN, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 28; Nunda P. 0. 
CHITTENDEN, L., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Nunda P. 0. 
CLARK, ALVA, Shoemaker ; Nunda. 
CLARK, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Barreville P. 0.' 

CLARK, WILLIAM, Farmer and Stock Raiser, s. e. Sec. 29 ; Wauconda P. 
O. ; born in Lincolnshire, England, November 8, 1820; came to McHenry Co. 
September 22,1850; owns 192 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre. Married 
Eliza Walmsley, of Lincolnshire, England. May 16, 1842 ; had nine children 
six living. 

CLARK, A. M., Manufacturer of Boots and Shoes ; Nunda ; born in Underbill, 
Vt., June 23, 1842 ; came to this county in 1856 ; valuation of property, $300 ; 
was Musician in Co. D, Fifteenth 111. Vol. Inf. Married Louisa Ramsdell, of Graf- 
ton, McHenry Co., September 5, 1866 ; has one child. 

CLEARY, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; McHenry P. 0. 
CLARY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; McHenry P. 0. 
CLEMENS, C., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; McHenry P. 0. 
CLEMENS, J. C., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; McHenry P. 0. 
COLBY, C., Farmer, Sec. 13; McHenry P. 0. 
COLBY, A. H., Farmer, Sec. 13; McHenry P. 0. 
CONNELLY, A., MRS., Widow, Sec 7; McHenry P. 0. 
CON WAY, M., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; McHenry P. 0. 
COURTNEY, 0., Farmer, Sec. 32, R. 9 ; Wauconda P. 0. 
COX, J. H. & G., Farmers, Sec. 19 ; Barreville P. 0. 
CUMNEY, F., Miller, Sec. 26 ; Barreville P. 0. 
DEGRUSHE, J. N., Constable, Nunda. 
DIKE, A. J., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 
DILLEY, H., Farmer, See. 27; Nunda P. 0. 
DOHERTY, J., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 
DOHERTY, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; McHenry P. 0. 
DOLBEER, H. T., Farmer, Sec. 8, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 
DORAN, F. B., Farmer, Sec. 17; Nunda P. 0. 

DO RAN, JOHN H., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 10 ; McHenry P. 0. ; born 
in Kendall Co., 111., October 12, 1841 ; came to McHenry Co. in May, 1853 ; owns 414 
acres of land, valued at $50 per acre; is at present Town Assessor; was private in 
Co. D, Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. Married Frances Flanders, of Janesville, Wia., 
Nov. 13, 1867 ; has one child. 

DOW, WILLIAM, Shoemaker; Nunda. 

DURKEE, J. R., Farmer, n. w. Sec. 5 ; McHenry P. 0. ; born in Windsor Co., 
Vt., December 21, 1808 ; came to Cook Co. in 1841, and to McHenry Co. in 1855 ; 



294 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

105 acres of land; value of property, $5,000. Married Christina Rollins, of Chit- 
tendon, Vt., February 27, 1837 ; has six children, all living. 

DURLA.ND, C. C., Machinist, s. w. Sec. 22; Nunda P. 0. ; bora in Orange Co., 
N. Y., February 29, 1820 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1846 ; owns 72 acres of land ; 
value of property, $3,000. Married Caroline Wheaton, of Auburn, N. Y.,in 1851 ; 
has one child. 

DWELLEY, H., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; McHenry P. 0. 
DYGERT, A., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Nunda P. O. 
EAKER, J. W., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Nunda P. 0. 
ELGEA, P., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Nunda P. 0. 
ELLSWORTH, J)., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Nunda P. 0. 
ELLSWORTH, CHARLES, Liveryman ; Nunda. 
ELLSWORTH, H. J., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Nunda P. 0. 
ENSIGN NELSON, Farmer, Sec. 5, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 
ERICKSON, B., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Barreville P. 0. 
ERWIN, H., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; McHenry P. 0. 
FEATHERLY, B. P., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Nunda P. 0. 
FLANDERS, E., MRS., Widow Sec. 16 ; Nunda P. 0. 
FITZSIMMONS, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Barreville P. 0. 
F1TZSIMMONS, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Barreville P. 0. 
FITZSIMMONS, M. H., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Barreville P. 0. 
FITZSIMMONS, M. J., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Barreville P. 0. 
FLANDERS, L., Farmer, Sec. 15; Nunda P. 0. 
FLEMMING, J., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Barreville P. 0. 
FLEMMING, M. R., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Barreville P. 0. 
FLEMMING, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Barreville P. 0. 
FLUSKEY, P., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; McHenry P. 0. 
FLUSKEY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 4; McHenry P. 0. 
FRISBIE, BRYAN, Farmer, Sec. 6, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 
FRISBIE, C. E., Farmer, Sec. 32; Nunda P. 0. 
FRISBIE, M., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; McHenry P. 0. 
FRISBIE, ELLEN, MRS., Widow, Sec. 2 ; McHenry P. 0. 
GIBSON, J., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Nunda P. 0. 
GILBERT, G., Farmer, Sec, 17 ; Nunda P. 0. 
GIVENS, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 7, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

GOFF, CAMERAN, Farmer and Stock Raiser, s. e. Sec. 17 and 18 ; Nunda P. 
0. ; born in Steuben Co., N. Y., June 8, 1813 ; came to McHenry Co. October 5, 
1837 ; owns 200 acres of land, valued at $10,000. Married Lydia Morse, of Os- 
wego Co., N. Y., March 1, 1831 ; had six children, two living William W. was the 
first white child born in the town. Mr. Goff built the first brick house in McHenry 
Co. in 1847. 

GOODWIN, JOHN, Farmer and Stock Raiser, s. e. Sec. 36 ; Nunda P. 0. ; 
born in Pittston, Luzerne Co., Pa., July 2, 1825 ; came to McHenry Co. in October, 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 295 

1853; owns 237 acres of land. Married Sabra C. Chase, of Auburn, N. Y., Feb- 
ruary 10, 1852; has four children. The family are members of the First Baptist 
Church of Crystal Lake. 

GOFF, W. W., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Nunda P. 0. 

GRACY, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Nunda P. 0. 

GRACY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Nunda P. 0. 

HAIGHT, W. W., Laborer ; Nunda. 

HALE, 0. M., Farmer, Sec. 20, R. 9 ; Wauconda P. 0. 

HALE, M., MRS., Widow, See 20, R. 9 ; Wauconda P. 0. 

HANSON, J. P., Laborer ; Nunda, 

HARRISON, F., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

HARRISON, W. H., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

HARDER, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Barreville P. 0. 

HARRISON, C. W., Lives on farm of C. M. Watson, Sec. 4 ; McHenry P.O. 

HALL, R. H., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Nunda P. 0. 

HATHMAN, W. W., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Nunda P. 0. 

HAMILTON, W. T., Hardware Merchant ; Nunda. 

HEALY, J., Farmer and Trapper on Boomer Estate, Sec. 36; Gary Station. 

HELM, M., Merchant ; Nunda. 

HENDERSON, J., Works R. Baxter's Farm, Sec. 19, R. 9 ; Barreville P. 0. 

HENDERSON, WILLIAM, Farm hand, Sec. 25 ; Barreville P. 0. 

HENDERSON, ANDREW, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sees. 25 and 30 ; Bar- 
reville P. O. ; born in Denny, Sterlingshire, Scotland, December 15, 1817 ; came to 
Rhode Island in 1839, and to Du Page Co., Illinois, 1842, and to McHenry Co. in 
December, 1844; owns 165 acres of land, valued at $35 per acre ; was private in 
Co. D, Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. Married Anna Young, of Denny, Sterlingshire, 
Scotland, October, 1842 ; had eleven children, eight living. 

HENRY, CORNELIUS, Blacksmith; Nunda; born in Franklin Co., N. Y., 
October 4, 1828 ; came from New York to Ash tabula Co., Ohio"; remained two 
years ; went from there to Crawford Co., Pa., and was there two years ; went to 
Greene Co., Wis., and to Iowa ; from Iowa to this county in June, 1866. Married 
Mary Brink, of New York, October 3, 1869 ; had nine children, five living. 

HICKOK. B. R., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

HORN, G. W., Physician ; Nunda 

HOLCOMB, D. V., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Nunda P. 0. 

HOFFMAN, W. H., Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Nunda P. O. ; born in Livingston Co., 
N. Y.. June 20, 1827 ; came to McHenry Co. November 1, 1838 ; owns 348 acres 
of land ; was Justice of the Peace four years and Road Commissioner two years, is 
now Town Trustee ; was First Lieutenant Co. D. Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. Mar- 
ried Mary Starkweather, of Livingston Co., N. Y., October 5, 1851 ; has three 
children. 

HUBBARD, E., Farmer, Sec. 5, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 
HUFFMAN, D. 8., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Nunda P. 0. 



296 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

HUFFMAN, P. M., Farmer and Stock Raiser, w. Sec. 25 and 35 ; Nunda P. 0. ; 
born in Auburn, Cayuga Co., N. Y., March 5, 1821 ; came to McHenry Co. No- 
vember 1, 1838; owns 210 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre ; was Constable 
six years, Town Collector one year, School Trustee six years. Married Alethia Tur- 
ner, of Ypsilanti, Washtenaw Co., Mich., Dec. 25, 1844; has three children. 

HUFFMAN, J. F., Farmer, Sec. 34; Nunda P. O. 
HUNT, E. H., Farmer, Sec. 17; Nunda P. 0. 
HUNT, G., Carpenter ; Nunda. 
HURLBURT, M. M., Harness Maker ; Nunda. 
HYATT, a. R., Hotel Keeper ; Nunda. 

INGERSOLL, JACOB, Farmer., s. Sec. 11; Nunda P.O.; born in Dutchess 
Co., N. Y., October 19, 1801 ; came to McHenry Co. in the spring of 1837 ; owns 60 
acres of land, valued at $40 per acre ; has filled town and school offices for a num- 
ber of years. Married Laura Ward, of Rutland, Vt., December 19, 1827 ; has one 
child. The above farm for sale. 

JACOBS. C., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; McHenry P. 0. 
JACKSON, WILLIAM, Farmer ; Nunda. 

JAMES, WILLIAM, Farmer, s. e. Sec. 21 ; Nunda P. 0. (is a renter); born in 
Pembrokeshire, England, March 20, 1800 ; came from England to Cook Co., 111., 
in 1868, and to McHenry Co. in 1871. Married Elizabeth Wilkins, of Pembroke- 
shire, England, in December, 1841 ; had four children, two living. 

JOHNSON, AUGUST, Laborer ; Nunda P. 0. 

KELLY, L. D., Carriage manufacturer, Nunda; born in Plymouth, Grafton Co.,N. 
H., November 24. 1830 ; went to Boston, Mass., in 1843, and came to McHenry Co. 
October 26, 1847 ; went to California in 1850, remained there nine years ; from 
thence to Texas, was there one year and returned to McHenry Co. in 1860 ; owns 
250 acres of land; value of property, $10,000; was Captain Co. A, Fifteenth 111. 
Inf., two years, and then Captain Co. G, Seventeenth 111. Cav., until the close of the 
war. Married Lizzie F. Montgomery, of Woodstock, McHenry Co , 111., in July, 
1 868 ; has four children. 

KELLER, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Nunda P. 0. ; born in Luzerne Co., Pa., 
September 6, 1821 ; came to McHenry Co., in January, 1855 ; owns 320 acres of 
land, valued at $50 per acre. Married Sarah C. Schales, of Luzerne Co., P., March 
3, 1854; has five children. 

KENNEDY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; McHenry P. 0. 
KENNEALY, JAS., Works his father's farm, Sec. 12 ; McHenry P. 0. 
KINDREW, H., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Barreville P. 0. 
KIMBALL, J. W., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; McHenry P. 0. 
KITTLE, J., Farmer, Sec. 18, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 
KNOX, E., Farmer, Sec. 2 ; McHenry P. 0. 
KNOX, JOHN, Farmer, Sec.15 ; Barreville P. 0. 
LOVELACE, WM. S., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Nunda P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 297 

LONG, H., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; McHenry P. 0. 

MACK, J. R., Farmer, w. Sec. 17 ; Nunda P. 0. ; born in Harpersfield, Delaware 
Co., N. Y., March 29, 1817 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1845 ; owns 179 acres of 
land ; value of property, $2,500 ; was County Assessor one year, and Supervisor two 
years. Married Ruth Barnes in August, 1840, who died in Pennsylvania in 1844. 
Married Henrietta Reynolds, March 10, 1863, who was born in Livingston, Steuben 
Co., N. Y., in January, 1834 ; has six children. 

MAGOON, H., Liveryman ; Nunda. 
MALLORY. J. M., General Merchant ; Nunda. 
MALLORY, D. C., General Merchant; Nunda. 
MANSFIELD, 0., Carpenter; Nunda. 
MATTHEWS, E. F., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Barreville P. 0. 
MATTHEWS, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Nunda P. 0. 
MATTHEWS, E., MRS., Widow, Sec. 35; Nunda P. 0. 
MAXHAM, E., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Nunda P. 0. 
McCOLLTIM, WESTON, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; McHenry P. 0. 
McCOLLUM, A. R., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; McHenry P. 0. 
McCOLLUM, AURA, Teamster ; Nunda. 
McCLURE, DANIEL, Showman ; Nunda. 

MCDONALD, WILLAM, Billiard Hail ; Nunda. 

McMILLAN, S., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Nunda P. 0. 

McMILLAN, W. M.. Tenant on Widow Green Estate, Sec. 21 ; Nunda P. 0. 

McMILLAN, A. J., Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Nunda P. 0. 

McMILLAN, E. J., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Nunda P. 0. 

McMILLAN, A. T., Farmer, Sec. 15; Nunda P. 0. 

McMILLAN, JAMES, Farmer, and formerly a Miller, Sec. 22 ; Nunda P. 0. ; 
born in Scheuectady Co., N. Y., February 8, 1809; came to Plainfield, 111., 1837, 
and to McHenry Co. May 1, 1839; was the first Town Clerk in Nunda; was Su- 
pervisor three years. Married Perlina Buck, of Wayne Co., N. Y., October 2, 
1836 ; had five children, two living. 

McNETT, W., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Cary Station P. 0. 

McNISH, A., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Barreville P. 0. 

McWHORTER, J., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Barreville P. 0. 

McWHORTER, THOS., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Barreville P. 0. 

McWHORTER, WILLIAM, Works his father's farm, Sec. 25 ; Barreville P. 0. 

MILLER, J., Painter; Nunda. 

MINK, A., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

MORLEY, WILLIAM, Farmer and Stock Raiser, n. w. Sec. 20 ; Wauconda P. 
0. ; born in Nottinghamshire, Eng., December 4, 1812 ; came from England to 
Canada in 1840 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1859 ; owns 140 acres of land, valued 
at $5,000. Married Isabella C. Grant, of Katinshire, Scotland, April 21, 1845 ; had 
fourteen .children, all living ; had two sons in the army. Farm for sale. 

MORTON, JAS., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Barreville P. 0. 



298 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

MORTON, JOHN, School Teacher, Sec. 30, R. 9 ; Nunda P. 0. ; born in 
Nunda Township. McHenry Co., May 5, 1850 ; is now Town Clerk ; has taught 
school five years. 

MUDGET, W. H., Farmer, Sec. 17, R. 9; McHenry P. 0. 
MUDGET, J. H., SR., Farmer, Sec. 17, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 
MUDGET, J. H., JR., Laborer ; Barreville P. 0. 

MUDGET, JOHN H., Farmer, n. w. Sec. 17 ; McHenry P. 0. ; born in Frank- 
lin Co., Vt., January 13, 1802 ; came to McHenry Co. from Kane Co., in February, 
1839 ; owns 170 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre ; was Assessor three years, 
and Road Commissioner two years. Married Laurinda Hill, of Fairfield, Franklin 
Co.,-Vt., January 11, 1827 ; had nine children five living. 

MUNCH, L., Miller; Barreville. 
MURFITT, ROBERT, Watchmaker ; Nunda. 
MUSGROVE, A. & W., Farmers, Sec. 11 ; McHenry P. 0. 
NEALIN, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; McHenry P. 0. 

NELSON, JOHN, Meat Market ; Nunda ; born in Fairview, Erie Co., Pa., Octo- 
ber 15, 1828 ; came to McHenry Co. in March, 1855 ; was private in Co. D, 
Ninety-fifth 111. Inf. Married Mary Ann Furgesen, of Erie Co., Pa., February 18, 
1852 ; two children both living. 

NORTON, MICHAEL (new resident), Sec. 30, R. 9 ; Barreville P. 0. 

PAINE, J. L., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Nunda P. 0. 

PAINE, E. P., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Nunda P. 0. 

PALMER, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Nunda P. 0. 

PALMER, G. A., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Nunda P. 0. 

PARKER, L. A., Farmer, Sec. 8, R. 9 ; McHenry P. O. 

PARKER, C. D., Farmer, Sec. 8, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. ; born in Wilna, Jeffer- 
son Co., N. Y. ; came to this county May 10, 1847 ; owns 40 acres of land; has 
been Road Master ; was Corporal of Co. D, Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. Married 
Mary Smith, of St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., April 12, 1869 ; has two children 
Charles Henry, born June 25, 1860, and Edgar Ray, May 13, 1863. 

PARKS, W. D., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

PARKS, G. E., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; McHenry P. 0. 

PARKS, C. H., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; McHenry P. 0. 

PARSLEY, JOHN, Works on father's farm, Sec. 19, R. 9 ; Barreville P. 0. 

PARSLEY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 19, R. 9 ; Barreville P. 0. 

PATTERSON, C. C., Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Nunda P. 0. 

PECK, M., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; McHenry P. 0. 

PECK, B. F., Farmer, Sec. 10 ; McHenry P. 0. 

PECK, O. M., Farmer, s. Sec. 36 ; born in Brecksville, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio. July 
24, 1842 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1863 (is a renter) ; has been Clerk of the Town 
Board. Married Lucy McMullen, of Dorr Township, McHenry Co., 111., July 19, 
1865 ; has four children. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 299 

PECK, W. R., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Nunda P. O. 
PERKINS, E. C., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; McHenry P. 0. 
PETERSON, 0. P., Laborer (Crystal Lake) ; Nunda P. 0. 
PETTIBONE, A. A., Police Magistrate ; Nunda. 

PHALIN, THOMAS, Farmer and Stock 'Raiser, n. e. Sec. 10 ; McHenry P. 0.; 
born in Linster, Kilkenny, Ireland, November 1, 1830; came to this country in 
July, 1852, and from Vermont to Chicago in January, 1852, and to McHenry Co. 
in July, 1855 ; owns 297 acres of land, valued at 850 per acre. Married Ellen 
Frisby, of Linster, Ireland, May 3, 1855 ; has seven children five girls and two 
boys. 

PHILP, ROB'T, General Blacksmith ; Nunda (village) ; born in Cornwall Co., 
England, June 4, 1834; .came to McHenry Co. October 1, 1855; valuation of 
property, $5,000 ; has been President and Treasurer of the Town Board ; was in 
Quartermaster's Department during the Rebellion. Married Jane Hoskin, of Corn- 
wall Co., England, June 11, 1866 ; had five children four living. 

POWERS, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Nunda P. 0. 
POWERS, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Nunda P. 0. 
QUINN, J., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; McHenry P. 0. 

READING, MARY, Mrs., Widow of John V. Reading, Sec. 5 ; McHenry 
P. 0. ; he was born in Warren, N. J., November 4, 1815 ; she was born in Tioga 
Co., N. Y., January 14, 1827 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1855 ; owns 80 acres of 
land; valuation, $5,500. Married January 28, 1855 ; has four children. 

RICHARDSON, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 5 (employe) ; Volo P. 0. ; born in 
Lake Co., 111., October 23, 1856 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1869 ; is a single man. 

RILEY, R., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; McHenry P. 0. 

RINKIE, JOHN, Works Wilcox Bros', farm, Sec. 13 ; Barreville P. 0. 

ROBINSON, A. J., Works his father's farm, Sec. 13 ; Barreville P. 0. 

ROBINSON, J. A., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Barreville P. 0. 

ROCKAFELLOW, S., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Nunda P. 0. 

ROGERS, M. B., Miller, Sec. 22 ; Nunda P. 0. 

ROLLINS, S. S., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Nunda P. 0. 

ROTHGERBER, R. R., General Merchant; Nunda. 

ROWLEY, D., MRS., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Nunda P. 0. 

ROWLEY, MILLARD, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Nunda P. 0. 

ROWLEY, C. E., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Nunda P. 0. 

ROWLEY, F., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Nunda P. 0. 

ROWSON, T., Farmer, Sec. 32, R. 9 ; Nunda P. 0. 

RYAN, M., Farmer, Sec. 7, R. 9 ; McHenry P. O. 

SALISBURY, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

SCHALES, DELBERT L., Farmer, s. Sec. 11 (Renter) ; Barreville P. 0. ; 
born in McHenry Co., Ill, January 9, 1851. Married Philetta Crombwell, of 
Nunda, McHenry Co., January 1, 1874; has one child. 



300 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

SEEBER, J. H., Well Digger; Nunda. 

SHELDON, JAMES. Teacher; Xunda. 

SHEPHERD, S. S., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Barreville P. 0. 

SHOEMAKER, W.. Tobacconist; Nunda. 

SHALES, C., Postmaster ; Barreville. 

SIMPSON, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

SKINNER, HIRAM D., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sees. 23 and 14 ; Barre- 
ville P. 0. ; born in Ontario Co., N. Y., April 18, 1818 ; came to Indiana May 9, 
1845, and to McHenry Co. April 18, 1866 ; owns 120 acres of land; valuation of 
property, 07,000. Married Mary M. Brown, of Mt. Morris, Livingston Co., N. Y., 
September 20, 1842 ; had eleven children, ten living ; one son, Myron F. Skinner, 
died at Chattanooga, Tenn., in defense of his country, June 18, 1864; was a mem- 
ber of Co. D, Thirtieth Ind. Vol. 

SMITH, S., Farmer, Sec. 5, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

SNYDER, ANTHONY, Farmer, Sec. 5, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. ; born in Tagh- 
anick, Columbia Co., N. Y., March 3, 1812 ; came to this county in October, 1845 ; 
owns 420 acres of land ; has been Road Master. Married Christina Miller October 
25, 1834, who was born in same town November, 13, 1815 ; has one child, Catharine 
Mary, born July 12, 1837. Married H. T. Dolbeer, who had four children Laura 
C., born in March, 1861 ; Lydia Ann, September, 17, 1863 ; Ida May, March 15, 
1868, and Mary Elizabeth, November 5, 1864. 

STEELE, RICHARD, Farmer and Stock Raiser, s. e. Sec. 36 ; Nunda P. 0. ; 
born in Dumfrieshire, Scotland, August 14, 1832 ; caine to New York in 1854, and 
to McHenry Co. in October, 1855 ; then lived in Missouri eleven years ; owns 240 
acres of land, valued at $50 per acre ; has a dairy of forty cows, and one of the best 
barns in the town of Nunda. 

STILL, ABRAHAM, Farmer, n. w. Sec. 6 ; McHenry P. 0. ; born in England, 
February 17, 1844 ; came to McHenry Co. 1853 ; owns 100 acres of land, value of 
property $5,000 ; was saddler of the Seventeenth 111. Vol. Inf. Married Adelaide 
Hickox, of McHenry Co., October 3, 1869, who was born 1850 ; has three children. 

STICKNEY, GEORGE, Farmer and Fruit Grower, Sec. 20 ; Nunda P. ; 
born in Jeffrey, Cheshire Co., New Hampshire, June 26, 1809 ; came to McHenry 
Co. in December, 1835 ; owns 26 acres of land, value of property $10,000 ; was School 
Director sixteen years. Married Sylvia M. Beckley, of Granby, Hartford Co., 
Conn., Nov. 27, 1839 ; had nine children, three living. 

STEWART, WM. & JAMES, Farmers, Sec. 14 ; Barreville P. 0. 

SWAIN, C., Artist, Sec. 17 ; Nunda P. O. 

STONE, C. H., Wagon Maker ; Nunda. 

ST. CLAIR, WILLIAM, Station Agent C. & N. W. R. R. ; Nunda. 

SUTTON, ROBERT J., Farmer, n. e. Sec 1 ; McHenry P. 0.; born in McHenry 
Township, March 29, 1848; owns 80 acres of land ; is School Director, District 
No. 13, also Town Collector. Married Bridget Knox December 25, 1872. who was 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 301 

born in Ireland June 24, 1849 ; has two children Mary, born September 26, 1874, 
and Michael, December 24, 1875. 

TERWILLIGER, F. B., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; McHenry P. 0. 

TERWILLIGER, SAMUEL, Farmer and Dairyman, e. Sec. 7 ; Ridgefield 
P. 0. ; born in Little Falls, Herkimer Co., N. Y., June 25, 1798 ; came to Mc- 
Henry Co. June 28, 1836 ; owns 235 acres of land; valuation of property $12,000. 
Married Laura Chamberlain, of Broome Co., N. Y., August 29, 1823 ; had ten 
children ; five living. 

THOMPSON, T., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Barreville P. 0. 
THOMPSON, W. S., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Barreville P. 0. 
THOMPSON, R., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; McHenry P. 0. 
TYRRELL, J., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; McHenry P. 0. 
VANNATTA, IRA, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Barreville P. 0. 

VERMILYA, J. P., Livery and Feed Stable, Nunda; born in Albany Co., N. 
Y., October 6, 1813; came to Lake Co., 111., in 1854, and to McHenry in 1865 ; 
valuation of property $25,000. Married Mariah Bogardus, of Albany Co., N. Y., 
March 21, 1841 ; she died October 2, 1876 ; had six children ; their oldest son, 
Edgar Vermilya, died in Fort Donelson, in defense of his country, June 9, 1865 ; 
was member of the Second 111. Light Artillery. 

VOSBURG, B. D., Artist ; Nunda. 

WALLACE, C., Farmer, Sec. 31; Nunda P. 0. 

WATTLES, R. M., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Nunda P. 0. 

WALSH, P., Farmer, SCQ. 2 ; McHenry P. 0. 

WALSH, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; McHenry P. 0. 

WALKUP, L. W., General Merchant ; Nunda. 

WARNER, L. E., Drayman ; Nunda. 

WALKUP, MARY J., Farmer, Sec. 32. Nunda P. 0. 

WARNER, D. B., Hardware Merchant and Postmaster ; Nunda. 

WATSON & CO., Druggists ; Nunda. 

WAMSLEY, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 7, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

WARD, S., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; McHenry P. 0. 

WARNER, C. E., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Nunda P. 0. 

WATROUS, J. S., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Ridgefield P. 0. 

WEBSTER, J. Z., Farmer, Sec. 17, R. 9 ; McHenry P. O. 

WELCH, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 18, R. 9 ; McHenry P. O. 

WELLS, I., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; McHenry P. 0. 

WERTZ, THEODORE, Farmer, Sec. 5, R. 9 ; McHenry P. 0. 

WHEATON, EMORY P., Farmer, n. e. Sec. 22 ; Nunda P. 0. ; born in 
Cayuga Co., N. Y., May 14, 1800 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1850 ; oVns one-half 
of 100 acres of land. Married Laura C. Paine, of Markton, Baine Co., Va., No- 
vember 3, 1824; has two children. 

WHEATON, F. J., Plasterer and Bricklayer, Sec. 29 ; Nunda P. 0. 



302 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

WHEATON, FRANK, Mason, Sec. 29 ; Nunda P. 0. 
WHEELER, F., Lives on S. S. Gates' estate, Sec. 25 ; Nunda P. 0. 
WHISTON, J., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Nunda P. 0. 
WESTFALL, F., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; McHenry P. 0. 
WHITNEY, A. D., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; McHenry P. 0. 
WICKER, A. E., MRS., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Barreville P. 0. 

WILLARD, WILLIAM R., Farmer and Stock Raiser and Dairyman ; n. Sec. 
26 ; Barreville P. O. ; born in Sherbrook, Canada East, March 3, 1819 ; came to 
Kane Co. in 1836, and to McHenry Co. in April, 1844; owns 360 acres of land, 
valued at $40 per acre ; was Road Commissioner one year. Married Mary Wild, 
November 7, 1840, who was born in England, November 24, 1821 ; has four chil- 
dren living. 

WILLEY, 0., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Nunda P. 0. 

WILLEY, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Nunda P. 0. 

WILSON, H. M., Teamster ; Nunda. 

WINGATE, R. J., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Barreville P. 0. 

WORDEN, H. C., Farmer, Sec. 29, R. 9 ; Wauconda P. 0. 

YOUNG, F., Tinner; Nunda. 

ZIMMERMANN, CARL, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Nunda P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 



303 



NUNDA BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



EMORY BALLOU, M. D., 

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 



A. M. CLARK, 

^MAIiTTJFA.CTTTS/EE, OS 1 

Boots and Shoes. 



BECKLEY & HENRY, 



JOHN NELSON, 



BLACKSMITHS. MEAT MARKET. 



R. C. BENTON, 



BAKEK AND CONFECTIONER. 



L. D. KELLY, 

Carriage Manufacturer. 



ROBERT PHILP, 



And Dealer in Tobacco and Cigars. 



J. P. VERMILYA, 

LIVERY AND FEED STABLE. 



\ 



304 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



NUNDA BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

BECKLEY & CO, Lumber Merchants. 

CRYSTAL LAKE PICKLING AND PRESERVING WORKS. 

DOW, WILLIAM, Shoemaker. 

ELLSWORTH & MAGOON, Livery and Sale Stable. 

HELM, M., & CO., General Merchants. 

HYATT HOUSE, G. R. Hyatt, Proprietor. 

HORN, G. W., Physician and Surgeon. 

HORN, G. W., & CO., Druggists. 

MALLORY, J. M. & D. C., General Merchants. 

MCDONALD, WILLIAM, Billiard Hail. 

McMILLAN FLOUR MILLS, M. B. Rogers, Proprietor. 

PATTERSON FLOUR MILLS, L. Munch, Proprietor, Barreville. 

PETTIBONE, A. A., Police Magistrate. 

ROTHGERBER, R. R., General Merchant. 

STONE, C. H., Wagon Maker. 

SHALES, JACOB, Shoemaker. 

SHOEMAKER, W., Tobacconist. 

WATSON & CO., Druggists. 

WALKUP, L. W., General Merchant. 

WAINER & HAMILTON, Hardware and Stoves. 

WILSON, J. B., Dealer in Vinegar. 



L 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 305 



RICHMOND TOWNSHIP. 

ABBOTT, E. F., MRS., Widow ; Solon Mills. 
ANDREWS, GEO., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 
ELLEN, JESSE, Farmer and Stock Dealer, Sec. 3 ; Richmond P. 0. 

ALDRICH, JAMES V., Merchant, Richmond, McHenry Co., 111.; born in 
Kalamazoo, Mich., June 26, 1837 ; came to this county December 25, 1847, at the 
age of 10 ; lived in McHenry Co. two years, and worked with father in Owen & 
Bros', flouring mill; was once elected Justice of the Peace, but resigned on account 
of other business. Married Nellie Sackett, November 20, 1870, who died Novem- 
ber 22, 1871 ; had one child, Ella Wray, which lived but two weeks. Married 
Mary Ercenbrack, of Beloit, Wis., August 30, 1873 ; has one child, Harold Wayne 
Aldrich. Is now in the mercantile business ; never voted anything but Republican 
ticket ; is a Hayes and Wheeler and Lathrop man, and believes he is doing that 
which is for the best interest of his conscience and his country. 

ALEXANDER, A. R., Druggist, Richmond ; born in Middletown, Mass. Mar- 
ried December 11, 1872. 

ALEX AIM DER, JESSE, Farmer, Sec. 7; born in Goffstown, Merrimack Co., 
N. H., 1808 ; went to Massachusetts, and lived there twenty-five years ; came to this 
town in December, 1857 ; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre. Married 
Eliza Ann Borlett in 1837, who was born in Newton Falls, Mass. ; had four chil- 
dren, three boys and one girl ; one son living. 

ALF, GEORGE, Shoemaker ; Richmond. 

ANDREWS, ALLEN W., Lives with G. Andrews, Sec. 24; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 

ANDERSON, THOS., Laborer, Sec. 11 ; Richmond P. 0. . f 

ANDERSON, ROBERT, Laborer; Sec. 11 ; Richmond P. 0. 

ANTHONY, WM. P., Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Richmond P. 0. 

AUSTIN, A. L., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Richmond P. 0. 

ARP, AUGUST, Farmer, Sec: 2; Richmond P. 0.; born in Mecklenburg, 
Schwerin, Germany, 1835 ; owns 55 acres of land, valued at $2,200. Married 
Christina Bordier in 1856, who was born in Mecklenburg, also, 1827 ; had ten 
children, nine boys and one girl William, Otto Minhard, Ottealia, Charley, Robert, 
Henry, John, Fredie and August. 

ASHTON; JAS., Laborer ; Richmond. 

BACON, JAS., Miller and Town Collector ; Richmond. 

BACON, LYMAN, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Richmond P. 0. 



306 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

BACON, CHAS. D., Lives on farm of H. Shinkle, Sec. 22 ; Richmond P. 0. 

BANTELL, HORACE, Tinner ; Richmond. 

BECK, WM. P., Farmer, Sec. 14; Richmond P. 0. 

BECK, JOHN A., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Richmond P. 0. 

BEEDEN, JOSEPH, Nurseryman ; Richmond. 

BEEDEN, THOS., Nurseryman ; Richmond. 

BENNETT, FREDERICK, Clerk, with Cole, Cooley & Co. ; Richmond. 

BE ATT Y, THOS., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Richmond P. 0. 

BELL, JOHN W., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

BELL, JOHN B., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Solon Mills P. O. 

BELLAMY, BARTON, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

BENNETT, S. F., Physician and Surgeon ; Richmond. 

BENNETT, JOSEPH, Clerk for Smith, Aldrich & Haythorne ; Richmond. 

BILLINGS, JOHN, Butcher ; Richmond. 

BOGART, CORNELIUS, Retired ; Richmond. 

BOGART, ADRIAN, Laborer; Richmond. 

BOG ART, JOHN, Laborer ; Richmond. 

BONNER, ALFRED, Wagon Maker; Richmond. 

BOOTH, H. K., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Richmond P. 0. 

BOUTELL, DANIEL, Carpenter and Joiner ; Richmond. 

BOWER, THOMAS, Proprietor of Billiard Hall ; Richmond ; born in Chicago, 
December 8, 1853; came to McHenry Co. 1856. 

BOWER, ELIJAH, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born, in Derbyshire, 
England, 1837 ; came to America 1846, and to this county 1856 ; owns 340 acres 
land, valued at 313,600. Married Elizabeth Reed, 1850 ; she was born in Leeds, 
England, 1830 ; had three children, one boy and two girls ; lost one girl. 
Democrat. 

BROWN, JOHN G., Carpenter and Joiner ; Richmond. 
BROWN, ALANSON L., Constable ; Richmond. 
BURROWS, J. S., Attorney at Law ; Richmond. 
BURROWS, S. P., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Richmond P. 0. 
BUSKIN, PHILIP, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Richmond P. 0. 
CAIN, PETER, Blacksmith ; Richmond. 
CAIN, ROBERT, Laborer ; Richmond. 
CAIN, JOHN, Laborer ; Richmond. 
CAIRNS, REBECCA, MRS., Widow, Sec. 13; Richmond P. 0. 

CAIN, JOHN, Railroader, Richmond, 111. ; born in Warren Co., Ohio, June 28, 
1854 ; came to Wisconsin, 1855, and to this county 1865. 

CARPENTER, G. B., Harness Maker ; Richmond. 
CARPENTER, L. L., MRS., Milliner ; Richmond. 
CARPENTER, JAMES, Carpenter; Richmond. 
CHRISTIAN, H. J., Farmer, Sec. 26; Solon Mills P. 0. 
CHUNEY, JERRY, Saloon Keeper and Furniture Dealer ; Richmond. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 307 

CHEVILLON, H. L., Barber ; Richmond, 111. ; born in St. Louis, Mo., May 
6, 1858 ; came to this town 1876. 

COATES, GEORGE, Lives with G. W. Truesdell, Sec. 26 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

COATES, CLARK A., Farmer and Thresher, Sec. 11 ; Richmond P. 0. 

COATES, NANCY, MRS., Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Richmond P. 0. 

COATES, DWIGHT M., Laborer ; Richmond. 

COLE, R. B., Miller; Richmond. 

COLE, A. E., Lives with S. Cole, Sec. 23 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

COLE, MARTIN, Farmer ; Solon Mills. 

COLE, SEYMOUR, Farmer and Blacksmith, Sec. 23 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

COLBY, JAS. F., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Richmond P. 0. 

COLLISON, FRED., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Richmond P. 0. 

COLE, M. H., Farmer and Speculator; Richmond. 

COOLEY, WM. H., Miller; Richmond. 

CORKELL, JAS., Harness Maker ; Solon. 

CORLETT, R. E., Lives with J. Corlett, Sec 25 ; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 

CORLETT, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 25; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 

COQUILLETTE. JAMES, Lives with M. B. Thomas, Sec. 8; Richmond P. 0. 

COTTING, C. G., Millwright; Richmond; born in Ashburnham, Worcester Co., 
Mass., June 30, 1804 ; came to Chicago, in February, 1836 ; removed to Wisconsin, 
lived there until March, 1844, then came to Richmond and has lived there ever since. 
Married Sally Dike, of Huntington, Vt., October 27, 1829 ; had five children, four 
now living, three girls and one boy. 

COTTING, SPENCER, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Richmond P. 0. 
COULMAN, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Richmond P. 0. 
COULMAN, J. C., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Richmond P. 0. 
COULMAN, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Richmond P. 0. 
CRANE, J. C., Lives with J. M. Crane, Sec. 24; Blivens' Mills, P. 0. 
CROPLEY, ELLIOTT, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Richmond P. 0. 
CROPLEY, WALTER, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 
CROSS, DANIEL, Laborer ; Richmond. 
CROSSEN, HUGH, Laborer ; Richmond. 

CROSBY, RENSSELAER R., Formerly a Merchant, Sec. 26 ; born in Hart- 
ford, Conn., January 8, 1809 ; came west in July, 1833 ; removed to McHenry Co. 
in September, 1837, to Sec. 1, T. 44 N. ; removed to Solon Mills, in May, 1842, 
been there most of the time since ; valuation of property, $10,000 ; been Post- 
master several years, Supervisor, one year, of Hichmond, held several minor offices, 
Justice of the Peace twelve years or more. Married Louisa Johonnott, born at 
Barre, Vt., September 13, 1814; married at Barre, Vt., October 16,1836; no 
children. 

DAVEY, ASHER, Late of U. S. Army; Solon Mills. 

DEIGN AL, C. & R., Works farm of J. H. Gale, Sec. 7 ; Richmond P. 0. 

DERMONTj ALEX., Tenant of R. L. Turner, Sec. 14 ; Richmond P. 0. 



308 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

DERMONT, JOHN, Lives with A. Dermont, Sec. 14; Richmond P. 0. 

DRAKE, WILLIAM, Retired Miller ; Richmond. 

DOWNING, JAMES L., Furniture Dealer; Richmond. 

DULEY, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 31, Richmond P. 0. 

E ARNGEY, SAMUEL, Pastor of M. E. Church ; Richmond ; born in Ireland. 

EARRING, GEORGE, Dealer in Horses ; Richmond. 

EGGLESTON, CHANCEY, Works farm of H. Warner, Sec. 6 ; Richmond P. 0. 

ENGELS, NICHOLAS, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 

ELDREDGE, S. F., MRS., Widow of Daniel; Richmond. 

ELDREDGE, G. W., Speculator; Richmond; born in Kenosha Co., Wis., August 
21, 1843; came to this town in March, 1868; owns five acres of village property. 
Married Lydia Foote, in February, 1864, who was born in Fairfield, Ohio ; had two 
boys. Republican. 

EMMONS, LUTHER, Gardner ; Richmond. 

ETTEN, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

FAIRCHILD, C. H., Works farm of S. H. Walker, Sec. 32 ; Richmond P. 0. 

FISHER, THOMAS, Grocer ; Richmond. 

FITZSIMMONS, TERRY, Laborer ; Richmond. 

FOLEY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Richmond P. 0. 

FOOTE, MARCUS, Attorney at Law and Supervisor; Richmond. 

FORD, LAUREN, Laborer ; Richmond. 

POSTER, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Richmond P. 0. ; bom in Yorkshire, 
England, 1808 ; came to America in 1830, and settled in Canada ; lived there six 
years ; then removed to New York State, lived there nine years ; came to this town 
in 1844 ; owns 125 acres of land. Married Ann Wiley, 1835, who was born in 
Yorkshire ; had ten children, six boys and four girls ; four boys served in the army 
altogether ten years, Samuel, Charles William, George and Frederick ; Charles 
William died in the service. 

FOSTER, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Richmond P. 0. 

FOSTER, FRED. H., Farms for Wm.*Foster, Sec. 10 ; Richmond P. 0. 

FOSTER, SAMUEL, Railroad Engineer ; Richmond. 

FOSTER, PRANK, Hotel Keeper ; Richmond ; born in New York State, July 
31, 1842 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1870. 

FREMMING, WILLIAM, Works Estate of H. Gibbs, Sec. 30; Richmond P. 0. 
FRIEND, L., MRS., Widow of Leonard, Sec. 35 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 
FRESHNER, BENJ., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 
FRIEND, MATHIAS S., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Blivens' Mills, P. 0. 
FRIEND, JOSEPH H, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 
FROTHINGHAM, SAMUEL, Retired, lives with J. McCoimell ; Richmond. 
FULLER, RUSSELL, Retired Farmer ; Richmond. 

GALE, SAMUEL G., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Richmond P. 0. : bornin Hillsboro Co., 
N. H., 1808 ; came to Ohio in 1842, lived there thirteen years ; came to this town 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 309 

October, 1855; owns 129 acres of land, value $55 per acre. Married Louisa L. 
Alexander, of Hillsboro Co., N. H., 1832 ; had seven children, five boys and two 
girls ; lost three boys and two girls ; three boys served in the Union Army Lewis 
E., John A. and Charles H ; Lewis E. was shot in the battle of Guntown, was 
taken prisoner and died in prison at Mobile. 

GARDNER, ALEX., Farmer; Solon Mills. 
GARDNER, WM., Farmer, Carpenter and Joiner ; Solon Mills 
GARDNER, ROBERT; Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 
GARVER, JOHN, Shoemaker ; Richmond. 

GAVETT, SIDNEY, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born in Argyle, Wash- 
ington Co., N. Y., 1812 ; came to this town 1856 ; owns 110 acres of land, two 
miles from town. Married Margaret Redding in 1853, who was born in Dublin, 
Ireland, and came to this country when small ; had two girls, Clara and Anna 
Mary. 

GIBBS, C. H., Formerly Proprietor of Richmond House ; came to Richmond in 
1843, and lived here until his death in 1875; he was born in Bethel, Windsor Co., 
N. Y., Jan. 22, 1807 ; value of property, $60,000. Mr. Gibbs married Sarah En- 
sign, of Stillwater, Saratoga Co:, N. Y., June 22, 1834 ; Mrs. Gibbs resided at the 
time of her marriage at Warsaw, Wyoming Co., N. Y. ; had three children, one 
boy and two girls, all now dead. 

GIBBS, SARAH, MRS., Widow of Herman Gibbs ; Richmond. 

GILLESPIE, D., MRS., Tailoress ; Richmond. 

GOODH AND, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

GREELEY, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 10; Richmond P. 0. 

GREEN, CLARA, MRS., Dressmaker ; Richmond. 

HALDERMAN, MILTON, Laborer; Richmond. 

HALDERMAN, J. A., Farms for A. Truesdell, Sec. 35 ; Ringwood P. 0. 

HALDERMAN, JOHN, SR., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Richmond P. 0. 

HALDERMAN, MARSH, Farmer with J. Halderman, Sec. 14; Richmond P. 0. 

HALDERMAN, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Richmond P. O. 

HARNESS, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Richmond P. 0. 

HARNESS, GEORGE & GILDEN, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

HARNESS, PEET, Farmer Sec. 32 ; Richmond P. 0. 

HARNESS, JAMES, Lives with George and Gilden Harness, Sec. 22 ; Solon Mills 

P. 0. 
HASTINGS, H. M., Works farm for A. Gardner, Sec. 20; Richmond P. 0. 

HASTINGS, COURTLAND A., Farmer ; Richmond P. 0. ; born in Cort- 
land Co., N. Y., January 5, 1850 ; came to Walworth Co., Wis., in 1858, and to 
this county in 1872. Married Frances Hoffman, February 11, 1876, who was born 
at Spring Grove, Burton Township, October 9. 1858. 

HATCH, LEWIS, Farmer, Sec. 8; English Prairie P. 0.; born in Hebron, 
Washington Co., N. Y., April 20, 1814; came to Burton Township in 1837 ; owns 
1 ,000 acres of land ; has been Supervisor, and is at present School Trustee. Married 



310 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

Mandana Cole in 1844, who was born in New Chester, Merrimac Co., N. H. ; had 
five children, four boys and one girl one boy dead. Republican. 

HAYTHORNE, J. W., General Merchant ; Richmond. 

HESSELGRAVE, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 14; Richmond P. 0. 

HENDRICKS, JOHN, Sewing Machine Agent Blivens' Mills. 

HICKS, MILAN, Hardware and Agricultural Implement Dealer ; Richmond. 

HILL, GEORGE, Mason and Plasterer ; Richmond. 

HOCKENMIDLER, JOHN. Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 

HODGE, WILLIAM H., Laborer ; Solon Mills. 

HODGE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Richmond P. 0. 

HODGE, JAMES T, Laborer; Solon Mills. 

HOGLE, CHARLES, Cooper ; Richmond. 

HOLIAN, JOHN, Produce Dealer ; Richmond. 

HOGLE, S. L., Cooper ; Richmond. 

HORNBY, HENRY, Farmer and Cancer Doctor ; Solon Mills P. 0. ; born in 

Orby, Lincolnshire, England, in 1832 ; came to this town in 1855 ; owns ninety-one 
acres of land ; has been Assessor two years, Road Commissioner six years, Justice 
of the Peace six years. Married Rebecca Bellainy, March 19, 1856, who was born 
in Orby, England ; had eight children, five boys and three girls Mary Adella, died 
July 5, 1859 ; Mary A., born July 20, 1860 ; John William, January 24, 1862 ; 
Sylvia, August 17, 1865 ; Birt, December 4, 1867 ; Henry W., June 4, 1870 ; 
Epton B., November 25, 1872 ; Edgar 0., March 14, 1875, all born in Mc- 
Henry Co. 

HOWE, A. J., Shoemaker ; Richmond. 
HOWE, L. W., Blacksmith ; Richmond. 
HOWDEN, ANDREW, Saloon Keeper ; Richmond. 

HOWDEN, JOSEPH, Farmer, Resides on Sec. 11 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born in 
Yorkshire, England, February, 1839 ; came to America in 1843, and to this county 
the same year ; owns forty acres of land, valued at $2,000. Married Mary Robert- 
shau, in 1872, whose maiden name was Slater ; she was born in Yorkshire, En- 
gland, also ; she has one child. 

HUFF, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Richmond P. 0. 

HUGG, EDMOND, Cheese and Butter Manufacturer -/Richmond. 

HUGG, FELIX, Laborer; Richmond. 

HUNTER, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Richmond P. 0. 

HYDE, JOSIAH, SR., DR., Physician ; Richmond. 

HYDE, J. H,, Druggist ; Richmond. 

IMESON, JONATHAN, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Richmond P. 0. 

JOHOMETT, E. S., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

JOHOMETT, RENSSELAER, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

JOHOMETT, ASA, Farmer, Sec. 23; Solon Mills P. 0. 

JOHOMETT, ROBERT, Blacksmith ; Richmond. 

JONES, WALTER, Salesman, with J. Cluney, Furniture Dealer ; Richmond. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 311 

KATNER, AUGUST, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 
KANE, ROBERT, Laborer ; Richmond. 
KEWLEY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec, 33 ; Richmond P. 0. 
KELLY, WILLIAM, Tailor ; Richmond. 
KILBURN, WILLIAM, Retired ; Richmond. 
KILBURN, HEMAN, Teamster and Thresher ; Richmond. 
KILBURN, DANIEL, Teamster and Thresher ; Richmond. 
KLINE, J. H., Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 

KRUMPEN, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 2; Richmond P.O.; born in Prussia, 
Germany, 1821 ; came to America in 1852, and to this county in 1855 ; owns 45 
acres of land, valued at $1,800. Married Catherine Held in 1854, who was born 
in Prussia, also; has nine children, four boys and five girls. Democrat; Catholic. 

LAWSON, RICHARD, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Richmond P. 0. 

LAWSON, EUGENE, Farmer and Speculator ; Sec. 33 ; Richmond P. 0. 

LEGGETT, JAMES, Wagon Maker ; Richmond. 

LUMLEY, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Richmond P. 0. 

MARSH, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Richmond P. 0. 

MARTIN, BENJ. C., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 7 ; Richmond P. 0. 

MARTIN, A. S., Butcher ; Richmond. 

MARTIN, L. L., Farmer, Sec, 9 ; Richmond P. 0. 

MAYO, J. M., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Richmond P. 0. 

MAY, JOHN M., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

MAY, NICHOLAS, Teacher and Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 

MARVIN, J. J., Clerk ; Richmond. 

McCLELLAN, GEO. R., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born in 
Byron, Genesee Co., N. Y., in 1836; came West to Kenosha Co., Wis., and lived 
there twenty years ; came to this county in 1860 ; owns 100 acres of land, valued 
at $4,000 ; is School Director at present and has been six years. Married Ann 
Eliza Earing in 1857, who was born in Fabius, Onondaga Co. N. Y. ; had four 
children, three girls and one boy Celona E., Hattie A., Edna L. and Hurpurt E. 
McClellan. Republican. 

McCONNELL, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 17; Richmond P. 0.; born in this 
town March 3, 1842; owns 520 acres; value of property, $25,000. Married Susan 
Cushman, of Vermont, November 15, 1865 ; had four children, three living two 
girls and one boy. 

McCONNELL, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 8; Richmond P. 0.; born in this town, 
July 8. 1842; owns 300 acres of land; value of property, $20,000. Married Mary 
Frothingham, of Concord, N. H., November 5, 1868 ; had three children, lost one. 

McCONNELL, WM. A., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born in Williams- 
port, Lycoming Co., Pa. ; came to Michigan in 1836, and to Richmond in 1837 ; 
owns 1,300 acres of land; value of property, $50,000 ; held the offices of Postmaster 
six years, Justice of the Peace thirty-five years, County Commissioner two terms, 
Associate Judge sixteen years, member of State Board of Equalization one term and 



312 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

Member of General Assembly one term. Married Elizabeth Bodine, of Muncy, 
Lycoming Co., Pa., January 18, 1838 ; has three boys. 

McLANE, C. 0., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Richmond P. 0. 

McLELLAN, R. G., Dealer in Agricultural Implements ; Richmond. 

MEAD, J. N., Hardware Merchant; Richmond. 

MEAD, ISAAC, Retired; Richmond. 

MEEKER, J. 0., Blacksmith; Richmond. 

MEAD, F. TV., Carriage and Wagon Manufacturer ; Richmond ; born in Pittsfqrd, 
Rutland Co., Vt., May 25, 1843 ; came to this county in 1844 ; lived on a farm 
until I860, then worked at blacksmithing, in Ringwood, McHenry Township, eight 
years; came to Richmond September 17, 1875 ; value of property, $5,000; was in 
Battery M, First 111. Light Artillery three years. Married Emma A. Colby, of 
McHenry, January 1, 1866, who was born July 5, 1847 ; had five children Carrie 
A., born October 12, 1866; Myrtie E., August 12, 1869; Lora A., October 19, 
1871 ; Lynn B., born October 23, 1874, died March 15, 1875, and William Ray, 
born April 30, 1876. 

MERRILL, JOHN, Carpenter and Joiner ; Solon Mills P. 0. 
MILLER, MATHIAS, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 
MOTLEY, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Richmond P. 0. 
MOTLEY, WM., JR , Farms for J. Reed, Sec. 12 ; Richmond P. 0. 
MONEAR, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Solon Mills P 0. 
MONEAR, WALLACE, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 
MOORE, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 
MOON, GEO. J., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Richmond P. 0. 
MULLIN, THOMAS, Clerk, with Cole/Bower & Waugh; Richmond. 
MURPHY, SARAH, MRS., Widow of John ; Richmond. 

MYERS, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born in Columbia, Her- 
kimer Co., N. Y., in 1825 ; lived there until 18 years old ; came to this town with 
his parents (of whom his mother is now living) in 1844 ; owns 220 acres of land- 
Married (first wife) Margaret Snell, who died in 1867. Married (second wife) Har- 
riet Kilgore, of Madison Co., 0., in 1868, who came to this town when four years 
old ; has four children by first wife Albertie, born 1853 ; Emma, born 1858 ; 
John D., 1863 ; Mattie, 1867. 

NASON, J. 0., Jeweler; Richmond. 

NEIL, JOSEPH, Shoemaker ; Richmond. 

NEWMAN, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 

NORTHRUP, WILLARD, Farmer and Miller, Sec. 31 ; Richmond P. 0. 

NOBLE, MAJOR, JR., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Richmond P. 0. 

NEWMAN, J. C., Tailor; Richmond. 

ORVIS, SAM'L L., Farmer, Sec 24; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 

OSMOND, GEORGE, SR., Farms for R. F. Bennett, Sec. 16; Richmond P. 0. 

ORR, THOMAS, Laborer; Richmond. 

OVERTON, J. S., Farmer and Stock Dealer, Sec. 23 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 313 

OVERTON, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

PACKER, FRANK, Painter ; Richmond. 

PARSONS, WILLIAM, Farms for P. Whitney, Sec. 16; Richmond P. O. 

PARSONS, FRTCD'K, Farms for P. Whitney, Sec. 16 ; Richmond P. 0. 

PEASE, GEO. D.. Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Richmond P. 0. 

PETERSON, F., MRS.,. Widow of Lewis; Richmond. 

PETTINGILL, A. M., Farmer ; Richmond. 

PHILLIPS, A. D., Agent Wilson Sewing Machine Co. ; Richmond. 

PIERCE, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Richmond P. 0. 

POTTER, C. B., MRS., Widow of Stephen ; Richmond. 

POTTER, D. A.; SR., Postmaster and Insurance Agent; Richmond. 

POTTER, D. A., JR., General Merchant; Richmond. 

PRICE, H. B., Dentist ; Richmond ; born in Morrisville, N. Y. ; came to McHenry 
Co, in 1872. Married Eva Spalding, of Waukegan, Lake Co., 111., August 31. 1876. 

PRICKET, HENRY, Retired, Sec. 33, Richmond P. 0. 
PURDY, ANGELINE, MRS, Widow of Wiiliam; Richmond. 

PURDY, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born in Dutchess Co., 
N. Y., February 1, 1826 ; came to Will Co. in 1837, and to this county in 1838 ; 
owns 130 acres of land; value of property, $10,000. Married Amanda E. Fisher, 
of Worcester, 0., July 9, 1863 ; had three children, two boys and one girl. 

RANDALL, A. & W., Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Richmond P. 0. 

RANDALL, RUFUS, Farmer; Richmond. 

RANSON, MARY, MRS., Widow of Alonzo; Richmond. 

READING, WM. A., Farmer, Sec. ,24; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 

READING, M. D., Farmer with E. M. Stockton, Sec. 27 ; Solon Mills. 

READING, HORACE, Farmer for Charles Weller, Sec. 22 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

READ, R. H., Miller ; Richmond. 

REED, SAMUEL B., Tenant for Wm. Reed, Sec. 30 ; Richmond P. 0. 

REED, JOHN, Farmer and Butcher ; Richmond. 

REED, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Richmond P. 0. 

REEDER, C. S., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Richmond. 

REEDER, ANDREW, Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 16 ; Richmond P. 0. 

RICHARDSON, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; English Prairie P. 0. ; born in 
Yorkshire, England; came to America in 1834, and to this county in 1836; lived 
during the time in Milwaukee, three years ; owns 360 acres, valued at $30 per acre ; 
has been Supervisor, Justice of the Peace, Assessor, Road Commissioner, and is at 
present School Trustee. Married Eleanor J. James, of London, England, in 1843 ; 
had thirteen children, seven boys and six girls ; three boys dead. Democrat ; Epis- 
copalian. 

REYNOLDS, JOHN, Blacksmith ; Richmond. 

RICHARDSON, FRANCIS, Farmer and Mason, Sec. 10 ; Richmond P. 0. 

RICHARDSON, J. H., Tenant of J. B. Smallwood, Sec. 11 ; Richmond. 



314 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

ROBBINS, JAMES. Farmer and Dealer in Agricultural Implements; Solon 
Mills P. 0.; born in Richland, N. Y., August 1, 1826; came west inl 844; 
has been Constable three years, School Director sixteen years, Supervisor one year, 
Deputy Sheriff three years, Justice of the Peace five years, Collector one year, As- 
sessor one year. Married Mary Aldrich. of Michigan, November 1, 1856; had 
seven children, four boys and three girls. 

ROBINSON, JERRY, Railroad Agent ; Richmond. 
ROBINSON, MARTIN, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Richmond P. 0. 
ROTNOUR, J. A., Retired Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Richmond P. 0. 
ROTNOUR, SANFORD, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Richmond P. 0. 
ROWSON, PLANT, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Blivens' Mills P. O. 
ROWSON, WILLIAM, Retired Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 
SAYLES, SUMNER, Thresher ; Richmond. 
SAYLES, WM. P., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Richmond P. 0. 
SAYLES, WASHINGTON, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Richmond P. 0. 
SCHRAEDER, FRITZ, Railroad Employe ; Richmond. 

SCOTT, MOSES, Farmer and Steamboatman ; residence McHenry ; born in Her- 
kimer Co., N. Y., August 17, 1806 ; came West in 1835, and to this county in 1874. 
Married Chloe Ripley, February 7, 1829, who died in 1832. New York was her 
native State ; no children. 

SHELDON, THOMAS R., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Richmond P. 0. 

SHERMAN, ALONZO, Carpenter and Joiner ; Richmond. 

SHERMAN, E. J., Livery Stable Keeper ; Richmond. 

SILL, LUCIUS, Laborer ; Richmond. 

SILL, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Richmond P, 0. 

SILL, JOHN, Farmers, Sec 13 ; Richmond P. 0. 

SIBLEY, ROBERT, Retired ; Richmond. 

SKILLICORN, JOHN, Mason and Farmer ; Solon Mills. 

SKINKLE, MARY, Owns farm, Sec. 21 ; Richmond P. 0. 

SKINKLE, PERRY G., Agricultural Implement Dealer ; Richmond. 

SKINKLE, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Richmond P. 0. 

SLITER, NICHOLAS, Tenant of S. F. Bennett, Sec. 25 ; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 

SMITH, MATHEW, Farmer with J. S. Overton, Sec. 23 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

SMITH, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Richmond P. 0. 

SMITH, JOHN C., General Merchant ; Richmond. 

SPENCER, JOHN, Tenant of G. McConnell, Sec. 17 ; Richmond P. O. 

SPONHOLG, AUGUST, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Richmond P. O. 

STEPHENS, FRED'K, Laborer; Richmond. 

STEPHENS, S. M., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Richmond P. 0. 

STEVENS, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Richmond P. 0. 

STEVENS, MALTBY, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Richmond P. 0. 

STEWART, JUDD, Farmer, Sec. 19; Richmond P. 0. 

STEWART, DAVID C., Retired Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Richmond P. 0. 

STEWART, GEO. VV., Farmer and Thresher, Sec. 29 ; Richmond P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 315 

STEWART, C. F., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Richmond P. 0. 

STOCKTON, EDW. M., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Richmond P. 0. 

STRAIN, PETER, Laborer ; Richmond. 

SUMNER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 18; Richmond P. 0. 

SUTTON, WM., SR., Retired ; Solon Mills. 

SUTTON, JOHN, Carpenter and Joiner ; Solon Mills. 

SUTTON, MASON, Laborer ; Solon Mills. 

TEFFT, CLARK H., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Richmond P. 0. 

TEFFT, CHARLES, Lives with C. H. Tefft, Sec. 13 ; Richmond P. 0. 

THOMAS, BRIGGS, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born in German Flats, 
Herkimer Co., N. Y., October 10, 1800 ; came to Milwaukee, Wis., in 1835, and 
to this town in 1837 ; owns 440 acres of land ; valuation of property $20,000 ; 
been Road Commissioner four years, Assessor one year. Married Amy Mason, of 
Adams, Berkshire Co., Mass., who died November 23, 1870 ; married Mariah 
Mason, of New Lebanon, Columbia Co., N. Y., September 5, 1871 ; had seven 
children ; lost two boys and one girl. 

THOMAS, M. B., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Richmond P. 0. ; born in Richmond, McHenry 
Co., 111., December 13, 1842 ; owns 168 acres of land; value of property, $10,000. 
Married December 16, 1860, Katie Rowe, of Hebron, McHenry Co., 111. ; she was 
born in Onondaga Co., N. Y. ; has two girls. 

TOYNTON, GEORGE, Farms for J. S. Overton, Sec. 23 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

TOYNTON, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Richmond P. 0. 

TRUESDELL, ADELAIDE, Owns farm, Sec. 35 ; Solon JVIills P. 0. 

TREBLE, Henry, Drayman; Richmond. 

TRUAX, JACOB, Laborer ; Richmond. 

THOMAS, CHARLES, Tenant of F. H. Fellow, Sec. 6 ; Richmond P. 0. 

THOMAS, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Richmond P. 0. 

THOMPSON, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Richmond P. 0. 

THOMPSON, DYER, Laborer ; Richmond. 

TODD, ROBERT, Laborer ; Richmond. 

TUPPER, JOHN, R. R. Laborer ; Richmond. 

TUPPER, LEWIS, R. R. Laborer ; Richmond. 

TURNER, JEANETTE A., MRS., Widow of Geo. E., Sec. 24; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 

TURNER, CHAS. L., Tenant of Wm. Gardener, Sec. 27 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

TURNER, ROBEBT L., Farmer and Proprietor Solon Mills ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

TURNER, MARY, MRS., Widow of William, Sec. 13 ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

TURNER, HENRY E., Farmer ; Solon Mills P. 0. 

UTTER, G. S., Printer and Publisher of Richmond Gazette, Richmond, McHenry 
Co., 111. ; born in Penn Yan, N. Y., 1835 ; served in the Fortieth Wis. Vols. ; wife's 
maiden name Fannie Ware. 

VYSE, JOHN, Painter ; Richmond. 

WAGONER, MATHIAS, JR., Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Blivens' Mills P. 0. 

WALKINGTON, JOHN, Farms with H. Marsh, Sec. 19 ; Richmond P. 0. 



316 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 

WANNEMAKER, DANIEL, Wagon Maker; Richmond. 

WANNEMAKER, SCOTT, Carriage Painter ; Richmond. 

WARD, SILAS, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Richmond P. 0. 

WARD, S. R., DR., Physician ; Richmond. 

WATTERS, HENRY, Retired ; resides with J. Hodge ; Richmond. 

WATTERS, ISAAC, Laborer ; Solon Mills. 

WAUGH, JAMES, Produce and Stock Dealer ; Richmond. 

WELCH, STEPHEN, Laborer; Richmond. 

WEEKS, EBEN, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Richmond P. 0. 

WEEKS, DANIEL, Retired Farmer ; Richmond. 

WEST, JOHN, Dealer in Harness, Boots and Shoes ; Richmond. 

WELLER, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Solon Mills P. 0. ; born in Herki- 
mer Co., N. Y., January, 1813 ; came to this county May, 1839 ; lived two years 
in Lake Co. during the time ; owns 80 acres land, value $6,000. Married Jane 
Moses, of Hartford, Conn., March 17, 1817 ; had six children, three living. 

WEIDRICK, PETER, Tenant of S. H. Walker, Sec. 29 ; Richmond P. 0. 

WINN, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Richmond P. 0. 

WHISTON, SEYMOUR, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Richmond P. 0. 

WHITE, CHRISTOPHER, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Richmond P. 0. 

WHITE, FRANCIS, Farmer, with C. White, Sec. 14 ; Richmond P. 0. 

WILSON, THOS. H., Proprietor of Billiard Hall; Richmond. 

WILSON, OTIS, Keeper of Billiard Hall'; Richmond. 

WILSON, HARVEY, Retired Farmer ; Richmond. 

WINN, ROBERT, Lives with J. Winn, Sec. 1 ; Richmond P. O. 

WOODLIFFE, GEORGE, Laborer ; Solon Mills. 

WODELL, GEORGE P., Photographer ; Richmond. 

WODELL, G. P., MRS., Milliner ; Richmond. 

WOOSTER, J. C., Retired; Solon Mills. 

WRAY, RICHARD, Farmer and Breeder of Blooded Stock, Sec. 10; Richmond 
P. 0. ; born in Yorkshire, England, in 1814 ; came to America in 1833 and settled 
in White Pigeon, Mich. ; lived there three years, then removed to English Prairie, 
Burton Township ; lived there until 1867, then removed to where he now lives ; 
owns 510 acres of land, a part of which he preempted and still owns. Married 
Jane Archdale in 1841 ; she was born in Womersley, Yorkshire, England, in 1824 ; 
had six children two boys and four girls ; lost one boy. 

YOUNG, EDWIN R., Principal Richmond Public School ; Richmond. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



317 



RICHMOND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



ALEXANDER & HYDE, 

DRUGS, MEDICINES, 

PAINTS ANB OILS. 



FRANK FOSTER, 

Hotel Keeper and Auctioneer. 



H. L. CHEVILLON, 
BARBER. 



C. W. ELDREDGE, 

DEALER IN 

LIVE STOCK, WOOL, POULTRY, 

GRAIN, SEEDS, Etc. 



THOS. BOWER, 

BILLIARD HALL. 



F. W. MEAD, 

Successor to B. SIBLEY, 

CARRIAGE & WAGON MAWACTHRER. 

SMITH, ALDRIOH & HAYTHORNE, 

GENERAL MERCHANTS. 

RICHMOND GAZETTE, 

G. S. UTTER, 



EDITOR AND PUBLISHER. 



H. B. PRICE, 

IDE3STTIST, 

"Will do all "Work pertaining to my Profession in a skillful and 

workmanlike manner according to the latest 

improved methods. 

H. HORNBY, 

CANCER DOCTOR, 



318 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



RICHMOND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

ALF, GEORGE, Shoemaker. 

BENNETT, S. F., Physician and Surgeon. 

CHUNEY, JERRY, Furniture Dealer and Saloon Keeper. 

COLE, COOLEY & CO., Proprietors Richmond Mills. 

FOSTER, FRANK, Proprietor Richmond House. 

FISHER, THOMAS, Grocery. 

FOOTE, MARCUS, Attorney at Law. 

GILLESPIE, D., MRS., Tailoress. . 

GREEN, CLARA, MRS., Dressmaker. 

HALL, C. F., General Merchant. 

HOGLE, S. L., Cooper. 

HICKS, MILAN, Hardware and Agricultural Implement Dealer. 

HOWE, A. J., Shoemaker. 

HYDE, JOSIAH, SR., Physician and Surgeon. 

McLELLAN, R. G., Agricultural Implement Dealer. 

MARTIN, A. S., Meat Market. 

MEEKER, J. 0., Blacksmith. 

NEWMAN, J. C., Tailor. 

NASON, J. 0., Jeweler. 

POTTER, D. A., SR., Ihsurance Agent and Postmaster. 

POTTER, D. A., JR., General Merchant. 

PRICE, H. B., Dentist. 

PHILLIPS, A. D., Agent Wheeler & Wilson Sewing Machines. 

REED, JOHN, Meat Market. 

SHERMAN, ALONZO, Carpenter and Joiner. 

SHERMAN, E. J., Livery Stable. 

WARD, SAMUEL R., Physician and Surgeon. 

WEST, JOHN, Boots, Shoes and Harness. 

WILSON, THOS. H., Billiard Hall. 

WODELL, GEO. P., Photograph Gallery. 

WILSON, OTIS, Billiard Hall. 

WODELL, G. P., MRS., Millinery. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 319 



SPRING GROVE BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

MEAD, CHARLES, Justice of the Peace and Postmaster. 
TWEED, ROBERT, General Merchant. 
WESTLAKE, JAMES, Cheese Manufacturer. 
WILSON, WYMAN, General Merchant. 



320 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY 



RILEY TOWNSHIP. 

ANDERSON, ANDERS, Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Sweden ; 
came to this county in 1869 ; rents 120 acres of land. Unmarried. 

ASHCflAFT, J. B., Thresher, Sec. 25 ; Marengo P. 0. 
AXTELL, EUGENE, Laborer, Sec. 16 ; Marengo P. O. 
AXTELL, H. U., Farmer, Sec. 16; Marengo P. 0. 
BARNARD, GEORGE, Lives with father, Sec. 18; Belvidere P. 0. 
BARNARD, WALTER, Lives with father, Sec. 18 ; Belvidere P. 0. 
BARNES, ADDNEY, Lives with father, Sec. 13 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BARNES, ALBERT, Lives with father, Sec. 13 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BARNES, D. A., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BARBER, HORACE, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BARBER, A., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 27 ; S. Riley P. 0. 
BARBER, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Marengo P. 0. 

BARBER, H. S., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 8; Marengo P. 0.; born in 
DeKalb Co., 111., October 26, 1848 ; came to this county in 1870 ; rents 186 acres 
of land. Married Francis A. Jarvis, March 20, 1872, who was born in New York 
State in 1852 ; has one child, Lucy Mabel. 

BATES, MARCUS, Lives with father, Sec. 3 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BATES. J. N., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 4 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BENCOTER, C., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Marengo P. 0. 

BENNETT, JOHN, Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 29 ; South Riley P. 0. ; born 
in Lycoming Co., Pa., July 9, 1820 ; came to this county in 1868 ; rents 230 acres 
of land. Married Lavina Coarson in 1848, who was born in Lycoming Co., Pa. ; 
has six children Harriet, Celestia, Adeline, Clara Bell, Monford and Willie C. 

BENNETT, F. H., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 3 ; S. Riley P. 0. 
BENSON, W. S., Fruit Raiser, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 

BLACKPORD, THOMAS, Farmer, n. w. Sec. 19 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in 
Boone Co., 111., 1845 ; came to this county in 1875 ; rents 160 acres of land ; value 
of property. $1,500. Married Anna Lawman, of Spring, Boone Co., 111., December 
23, 1871 ; has one child. 

BOUGHTON, GRANT, Laborer, Sec. 14 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BRAINARD, JOSEPH, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 18 ; Belvidere P. 0. 
BRINKYER, H., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 11 ; Belvidere P. 0. 
BROTZMAN, JOHN, Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 23 ; Marengo P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 321 

BROTZMAN & ROGERS, Cheese Factory and Creamery, Sec. 22 ; Marengo 
P. 0. ; established in 1865 ; value of property, $3,500. 

BROTZMAN, N., Proprietor of Riley Cheese Factory, Sec. 22 ; Marengo P. 0. ; 
born in Geauga Co., Ohio; came to this county in 1871 ; owns 40 acres of land, 
valued at $40 per acre ; was a member of the Ninth Ohio Independent Battery. 
Married Martha J. Proctor, of Geanga Co., Ohio, in 1864 ; has two children, Ida 
and Earl. 

BROKAW, J. J., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 30 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BROWN, THOS., Laborer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BROWN, MATTHEW, Laborer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BROWN, ELIZA, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 26 ; Marengo P. 0. 

BUCK, GEORGE, Farmer, Stock Raiser and Dairyman, Sec. 34 ; S. Riley P. 0. ; 
born in Lycoming Co., Pa., January 15, 1825 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1855 ; 
owns 91 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre; enlisted in Ninety-fifth 111. Vol. Inf. 
and was rejected on account of physical disability. Married Elizabeth Milledge in 
1870, who was born in Ohio in 1831 ; has three children, Emma Nelson and 
Edward. 

BUCK, ISAAC, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 32 ; S. Riley P. 0. 
BURKHART, HENRY, Farmer and Wagon Maker, Sec. 27 ; S. Riley P. 0. 
BURKHART, J. R., Farmer and Carpenter, Sec. 35 ; S. Riley P. 0. 

n 

CADY, ALFRED, Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 26 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in 
Salisbury, Herkimer Co., N. Y. ; came to McHenry Co. May 10, 1861 ; owns 112 
acres of land, valued at $6,000. Married H. Mary Edwards, October 13, 1869, 
who was born in Greenfield, Saratoga Co., N. Y., September 30, 1845; has two 
children, Ruby May and William Carleton. House was destroyed by fire in 1875, 
and the new frame house now occupies the old site ; value, $2,000. 

CALCHAN, JOHN, Weaver, Sec. 11 ; Marengo P. 0. 
CAMPBELL, JAMES, Nurseryman, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. 
CASS, J., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 

C ARR, DARIUS, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in New York ; came to 
McHenry Co. in 1857 ; owns 72 acres of land, valued at $60 per acre. Married 
Thankful Spencer in 1830 ; has nine children. 

CLAPP, M., Farmer and Teacher, Sec. 26 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Bridgewater, 
Vt., in 1823 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1861 ; owns 50 acres of land, valued at 
$40 per acre ; has been School Director one term ; served in Co. E, Ninety-fifth 111. 
Vol. Inf. Married Marietta Bailey, October 15, 1849, who was born in Erie Co., 
Pa., April 17, 1826 ; has four children living Mary M., Jones M., Corydon and 
Cordlinn. 

CLOSSON, A. S., Laborer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 

COARSON, GEO., Farmer and Stock Grower, Sec. 21 ; Marengo P. 0. 

CO ARSON, J. 0., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Marengo P. 0. 

COARSON, J. B., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Marengo P. 0. 



322 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

COUNTRYMAN, H., Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Marengo P. 0. 

CRANE, GEORGE, Farmer, n. e. Sec. 9 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Surrey 
England ; came to this county March 1, 1876 ; rents farm of R. M. Patrick ; value 
of property $500. Married Susan Wynn February 8, 1873, of Benton Co., Mo. ; 
has two children. 

CRISSEY, J. N., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 10; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Chau- 
tauqua Co., N. Y. ; came to this county September 19, 1854 ; owns 335 acres 
of land, value $50 per acre ; has been Commissioner and Overseer of the Poor. 
Married Emily Jenkins, of Niagara Co., N. Y., March 13, 1856 ; has five children. 

DIMON, THOMAS, Nurseryman and Fruit Grower, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 
DOLBY, R., Farmer and Stock Dealer, Sec. 35 ; Marengo P. 0. 

DOWNING, JOHN B., Blacksmith, Sec. 23 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Lyco- 
ming Co., Pa., December 16, 1848 ; came to this county in 1873 ; owns blacksmith 
shop, value $500. Married Levina J. Dykens, of Williamsport, Lycoming Co., Pa., 
1870 ; has two children, Thomas David and Sadie J. 

DRAKE, E., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Marengo P. 0. 

DRIVER, ROBERT, Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 16 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in 
Hilgay, Norfolk, England ; came to this county in 1856 ; rents 200 acres of laud, 
value of property $3,000. Married Caroline Francis Robb November 11, 1866 ; 
has four children. 

DUFFY, E., Laborer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. O. 
DUNHAM, GEORGE, Laborer, Sec. 9 ; Marengo P. 0. 

DUNHAM, GEORGE H., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 9 ; Marengo P. 0. ; 
born in Rome, N. Y., January 4, 1848; came to this county in 1869. Married 
Sarah M. Tracy February 25, 1873, who was born in Coral Township, McHenry 
Co., February 6. 1851 ; has three children Bertha G., Alice L. and Henry. 

DUNWOODY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 26 ; Marengo Township. 
DUNBAR, M. C., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; S. Riley P. 0. 

EDKIN, THOMAS J., Gunsmith, Sec. 27 ; Riley P. 0. ; born in New York 
City February 2, 1808; came to this county March 23, 1866 ; owns 100 acres of 
land, value $50 per acre ; is Justice of the Peace and Postmaster of South Riley : 
been Collector one term. Married Hannah Coarson, of Muncy, Lyoming Co., Pa., 
February 5, 1834 ; has three children living Elizabeth, George and Lucretia. 

EDWARDS, J. W., Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. 
ELDRIDGE, M. S., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Marengo P. 0. 

FAY, F. B., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 11 ; Marengo P. O. ; born in Jefferson 
Co., N. Y., April 5, 1832, came to McHenry Co. November, 1853 ; owns 264 
acres of land, value $40 per acre. Married Amy D. Jenkins, of Niagara Co., N. Y., 
September 15, 1849 ; has three children. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 323 

FELLOWS, E. R., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 28 ; Marengo P. 0. 
FELLOWS, J. H., Medical Student, Sec. 28 ; Marengo P. 0. 

FBINK, PHILO E., Farmer, Renter of G. Richardson ; Marengo P. 0. ; born 
in McHenry Co. March 11, 1854 ; is equal heir with brother in mother's estate of 
174 acres, value $7,000. Unmarried. 

GEHRKE, WILLIAM, Laborer, Sec. 15; Marengo P. 0. 

GILLILAN, J., Farmer, Sec. 24; Marengo P. 0. 

GOODSILL, C., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; S. Riley P. 0. 

GRAVES, FRANK, Farmer and Stock Dealer, Sec. 14 ; Marengo, P. 

GRAVES, JULIA, Widow of H. B. Graves, Sec. 14 ;. Marengo P. 0. ; she was 

born in Antwerp, Jefferson Co., N. Y. ; came to this county in 1860 ; owns 286 
acres of land, value $.50 per acre. She was married in 1850 ; her maiden name 
was Julia Fay ; has three children. 

GRAY, THOMAS L., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 26 ; Marengo P. 0. ; 
born in Ulster Co., N. Y., September 12, 1842 ; came to this county in 1865 ; owns 
160 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre ; has been School Director five years ; was 
in the army three years Co. D, Twentieth N. Y. Vol. Inf. ; honorably discharged 
and unscathed. Married Marcia St. John December 3, 1866, who was born in Gar- 
den Prairie, Boone Co., 111., December 13, 1846 ; has five children, all living 
Chester V., Price L., Bellemane, Mildred and Thomas L. 

GREEN, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; S. Ripley P. 0. 
GRIFFIN, E., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; S. Ripley P. 0. 

GRIFFITH, P. S., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 24; Marengo P. 0.; born in 
Geauga Co., 0., October 20, 1830 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1844 ; owns 330 acres 
of land, valued at $13,000 ; has been Township Treasurer twelve years, Town As- 
sessor five years, also Collector two years. Married Asenid St. John, of Mosey Tp., 
Canada, October 19, 1856; has four children living Kate S., Flora A., Cora W. 
and Mary E. 

GUEKOW, FREDERICK, Farmer and Dairyman; Genoa P. 0., DeKalb Co.; 
born in Germany January 18, 1845 ; came to this county in 1874; rents 120 acres 
of land. Married Caroline Kneebus in 1871, who was born in Germany ; has three 
children Minnie, William and Augusts 

HADSALL, CHARLES, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 28 ; S. Riley P. 0. ; 
born in McHenry Co. March 13, 1853 ; always lived in this county ; works his 
father's farm. Married Florence Kitchen October 20, 1875, who was born in Ly- 
coming Co., Pa., March 26, 1858 ; no children. 

HADSALL, JOHN, Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 28 ; S. Riley P. 0. ; born in Mc- 
Henry Co. September 9, 1848 ; always lived in this county ; works his father's farm. 
Married Celestia Bennett September 9, 1874, who was born in Lycoming Co., Pa., 
in 1851 ; no children. 



324 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

HACKLEY, ROCKWOOD & CO., Farmers and Dairymen, Sec. 14 ; Marengo P. 0. 

HADSALL, E., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; S. Riley P. 0. 

HASTINGS, D. C., Physician and Surgeon, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. 

HALL, RICHARD, Dairy Produce, Sec. 15 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Massa- 
chusetts; came to this county in 1876 ; owns 226 acres of land, valued at $50 per 
acre. Married Elizabeth Line, of Banbury, England, Christinas, 1867 ; has three 
children. 

HENRY, T. W., Farmer, Sec. 3; Marengo P. 0. 

HENRY, EUGENE, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Marengo P. 0. 

HENRY, B. F., Farmer and Thresher, Sec. 24 ; Marengo P. 0. 

HEWITT, D., Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 

HEWSTON, THOMAS, Farmer and Dairyman (Renter), Sec. 16 ; Marengo P. 0. 

HOOF & DE YARMOND, Farmers and Dairymen, Sec. 23 ; Marengo P. 0. 

HOOF, JOHN" B., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 24 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in 
Lycoming Co., September 30, 1848 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1868 ; rents 156 acres of 
land. Married Emma J. De Yarmohd March 9, 1873, who was born in Michigan April 
10, 1849 ; has two children Mattie W., and infant not named. ' 

HOTCHKISS, FRANCIS L., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 25 ; Marengo P. 
0. ; owns 90 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre, in this county, and 40 acres in 
Iowa; born in Chenango Co., N. Y., September 17, 1846; unmarried. 

HUNDLEY, W. H., Farmer and Mason, Sec. 35 ; S. Riley P. 0. ; born in Vir- 
ginia January 9, 1821 came to Illinois in 1843, and to this county in 1875 ; rents 
40 acres of land of G. Eichle. Married his first wife, Eliza J. Macus ; had two 
children Joseph M. and Minie ; married his second wife, Mildred A. Huntley, Oc- 
tober 8, 1873, who was born in Virginia in 1843. 

INKOW, F., Farmer, Sec. 32; Ney.P. O. 
IRWIN, HENRY, Laborer, Sec. 17 ; Marengo P. 0. 
JAMES, JOHN, Laborer, Sec. 12 ; Marengo P. 0. 
JONES, M. E., Laborer, Sec. 3 ; Marengo P. 0. 
KEARNEY, JOHN, Ditcher, Sec. 5 ; Marengo P. 0. 
KELLEY, THOMAS, Farmer, Sec. 15; Marengo P. 0. 
KNAPP, E. 0., Poultry and Stock Dealer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 
KROUSE, CARL., Laborer, Sec. 14 ; Marengo P. 0. 

LEVOY, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. ; bora in Sc. Lawrence Co., N. 
Y., February 8, 1822 ; came to McHenry Co. 1861 ; owns 24 acres, value $1,000. 
Married Isabel Yule, of Glasgow, Scotland, April 5, 1834 ; had twelve children, 
two dead. 

MACKEY, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Marengo P. 0. 
MALLORY, W. B., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 24 ; Marengo P. 0. 
McBENNETT, P., Farmer and Laborer, Sec. 11 ; Marengo P. 0. 
McCUE, SAMUEL, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. 
McCUE, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 325 

McCUE, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. O. 

McDONELL, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Ireland, 
1839 ; came to America 1855, and to this county 1866 ; owns 19r acres of land, 
value $1,000. Married Ann Campbell, of Ireland, 1861 ; lias five children living 
Mary, Kate, John, Will and Alexander. 

McGOVERN, HUGH, Laborer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 

McKEOWN, MARY, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. 

MoKEOWN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Marengo P. 0. 

McKEOWN, J. F., Farmer, Sec, 18 ; Marengo P. 0. 

McKEOWN, FELIX, Farmer, Sec. 19; Marengo P. 0. 

MERRILL, J. B., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 16 ; Marengo P. 0. 

MERRILL, F. H., Farmer, Sec, 3.; Marengo P. 0. 

MERRILL, LEVI, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Marengo P. 0. 

MERRITT, ORRIN, Farmer and Ship Carpenter, Sec. 30 ; Marengo P. 0. 

MET CALF, M. C., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Montville, Geauga 
Co., Ohio ; came to this county 1844 ; owns 135 acres of land, value $50 per acre. 
Married Jane Elizabeth Cobb, of Cazenovia. Madison Co., N. Y., February, 1851 ; 
has four children. 

METCALF, GILBERT, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 24 ; Marengo P. 0. ; 
born in Geauga Co., Ohio, April 4, 1822; came to this county 1845; owns 101 
acres of land, value $60 per acre. Married Louis Hotchkiss (since died), 1852 ; 
she was born in Connecticut; has two children living Viola C. and Franz D. 

METCALP, M. B., Dairyman; Sec. 12; Marengo P. 0., born in Montville, 
Geauga Co., Ohio ; came to this county 1845 ; owns 200 acres of land, value $60 
per acre ; School Trustee. Married Susan West Rockwood, of New York City, 
June 8, 1859 ; has five children, 

MILLER, C. C., DR., Teacher and Fruit Grower, Sec. 2; Marengo P. 0. 

NICKEL, GOTTLIP, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born 'in Germany, 1837; 
came to this country in 1862; owns 110 acres of land, value $40 per acre. Mar- 
ried Lizzie Wemann, of Germany, 1863; has six children. 

OSBORN, E. R., Horse Dealer, Sec. 14 ; Marengo P. 0. 
OSBORNE, ANNA, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Marengo P. 0. 
OSBORNE, OTIS, Farmer, Sec. 15 Marengo P. 0. 

OTTO, FREDERICK, Farmer and Stock Raiser (Mason by trade), Sec. 12; 
Marengo P. 0. ; born in Germany, November 15, 1825 ; came to America twenty- 
two years ago, June 14, and to McHenry Co. twenty-one years ago ; owns 105 acres 
of land, value $40 per acre ; has been Road Master one year. Married first wife, 
Sophia Cook, of Chicago, 1844 ; second wife, Hannah Nicol, of Belvidere, native of 
Europe, April 21, 1860; has five children living Albert, Mena, Frederick, 
Matilda and Mary ; four dead. 



326 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTS. 

PATTERSON, WILLIAM, Farmer and Dairyman (formerly Carpenter and 
Joiner), Sec. 33; Genoa P. 0.; born in Meadville, Crawford Co., Pa., September 
21, 1827 ; came to this county in 1845 ; owns 140 acres of land, valued at $7,000. 
Married Lucy A. Buck, November 20, 1855, who was born in Lycoming Co., Pa., 
in 1826 ; has four children living Louisa E., Joseph H., Elizabeth A. and 
William Clinton; new barn burnt, September, 1876, loss, $1,800; new barn built 
same year, cost $ 1 ,000. 

PATTERSON, DAVID, Farmer, Dairyman and Stock Raiser, Sec. 23 ; Ney 
P. 0., DeKalb Co.; born in Crawford Co., Pa., October 13, 1825; came to this 
State in 1845 ; have always lived here, except six years in DeKalb Co. ; owns 160 
acres of land, valued at $8,000. Married Elccta Burgell, in 1863, who was born in 
Buffalo, N. Y., in 1845 ; has four children living Caroline, Arthur D., Robert and 
Ralph. 

PHILLIPS, A. B., Laborer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 

PLUMB, RUSSEL, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Chautauqua Co., 
Pa., November 19, 1840 ; came to this county about 1856 ; owns fifteen acres of 
land, worth $700. Unmarried. 

POLLOCK, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 3; Marengo P. 0.; born in Kentucky; 
came to McHenry Co. in October, 1875 ; rents 100 acres of land. Married Laurelia 
Shearer, in Marengo, 111., September 7, 1873 ; has two children. 

POTTER, ALMON, Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 27 ; South Riley P. 0. ; born 
in Sheldon, Wyoming Co., N. Y., November 5, 1818; came to Kane Co., 111., in 
1840 ; came to this county about twenty-five years ago ; owns 109 acres of land, 
valued at $50 per acre ; has been Road Commissioner two terms, and Town Trustee ; 
is now School Director. Married Martha Fields, in 1856, who was born in Ohio; 
has three children, Leon H., Bennie A. and Nellie M. 

POWERS, WARREN & GARRITT, Hop Raisers and Threshers, Sec. 1 ; Marengo 

P. 0. 

POWERS, J. M., Hop Raiser, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 
RAINIE, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Garden Prairie P. 0. 
RANSLEY, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 19; Garden Prairie P. 0. 
RATFIELD, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Marengo P. 0. 
RATFIELD, W. N.. Lives with father, Sec. 21 ; Marengo P. 0. 
REYNOLDS, D. C., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 25 ; Marengo P. 0. 
RICHARDSON, GEORGE, Farmer and Stock Dealer, Sec. 27 ;' Riley P. 0. 
ROBB, A., Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Marengo P. 0. 
ROBB, G. A., Farmer and Stock Dealer, Sec. 8 ; Marengo P. 0. 
ROGERS, A. P., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 30 ; Marengo P. 0. 

ROGERS, J. H., Proprietor of Riley Cheese Factory, Sec. 22 ; Marengo P. 0. ; 
born in Sullivan Co., Pa., 1846 ; came to this county in July, 1875 ; equal partner 
in cheese factory; value of property, $1,800; was in Co. D, Seventh Pa. Cav. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 827 

Married Alvesta Buck, June 14, 1875, who was born in Lycoming Co., Pa.; has 
one child, Charles H. 

SEANOR, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Marengo P. 0. 
SEARLES, J. E., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Marengo P. 0. 
SEARS, ANDREW, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Marengo P. 0. 

SEARS, M. P., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Bristol, Ontario Co., 
N. Y.; came to this county in 1839 ; owns 257 acres of land, value $50 per acre. 
Married Marie J. Tracy, of Canandaigua, Ontario Co., N. Y., April 24, 1839. 

SEARS, A. H., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 24 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Me-' 
Henry Co. May 21, 1852 ; always resided here; owns 100 acres of land, and leases 
eighty acres in addition ; value, $50 per acre. Unmarried. 

SEARS, A. V., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 23 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Ontario 
Co., N. Y., March 15, 1809 ; came to this county in 1838 ; owns 260 acres of land, 
valued at $50 per acre. Married Sarah Harris, of New York State, October 23, 
. 1845 ; has six children, all living Persus, Emma, Adelbert, Susie, Cora and Fred- 
erick. 

SE ARLS, O. I., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 28 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Riley 
Tp., October 9, 1853 ; always lived here ; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $50 per 
acre. Unmarried. 

SELLERS, B. F., Blacksmith, Sec. 22; Marengo P. 0. 

SHEHAN, PATRICK, Poultry and Stock Dealer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. O. 

SHIPMAN, ISAAC, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Ney P. 0. 

SILVIUS, BURR, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Riley P. 0. 

SILVIUS, ORRIN, Farmer, Sec. 31 ; Riley P. 0. 

SIMPSON BROS., Fanners and Stock Dealers, Sec. 20 ; Marengo P. O. 

SISSON, FRANK, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Marengo P. 0. 

SISSON, ALLEN, Farmer, n. w. Sec. 11 ; Marengo P. 0.; born in Otsego Co., 
N. Y., January 15, 1818 ; owns 292 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre. Mar 7 
ried Laura Ann Wisner (first wife), of Ripley, Chautauqua Co., N. Y., December 
15, 1845; had six children. Married Julia A. Babcock (second wife), of Westford, 
Otsego Co., N. Y., February 19, 1863; had four children. 

SMA.LLRIDGE, ROBERT, Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 35; Marengo, P. 0.; 
born in England, July 4, 1819 ; came to America in 1832, and to this county in 
in 1866 ; owns 76 acres of land, valued at $45 per acre ; enlisted in the army and 
was rejected on account of physical disability. Married Sally A. Bird, November 
11, 1841, who was born in Cayuga Co., N. Y., in 1824; has one child living, 
James H. 

SMITH, HENRY, Farmer and Fruit Grower, Sec. 12 ; Marengo P. 0. 
SOUTHWICK, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. 

STANLEY, G. H., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 31 ; Geneva P. 0. ; born in 
Smyrna, Chenango Co., N. Y., August 29, 1829 ; came to Illinois in July, 1845, and to 



328 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

this county in I860 ; owns farm of 200 acres, valued at $10,000. Married Mary 
A. Fall, in May, 1858, who was born in Morgan Co., Ohio, March 15, 1839 ; has 
one child, Newton H. Has a grove of five acres of maple and willow. 

8PARR, A., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Marengo P. 0. 
STARKWEATHER, J., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Mareugo P. 0. 
STONER, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Marengo P. 0. 
STORM, H. D., Farmer and Thresher, Sec. 24; Marengo P. 0. 

STEVENS, H. H., Farmer and Dairyman, Inventor of Stevens' Draught Equal- 
izers, Sec. 20 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Niagara Co., N. Y., September 2, 1828 ; 
came to this county in March, 1855 ; owns 80 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre. 
Married Lucy D. Wattles, in 1853, born in the State of New York ; has five chil- 
dren Steward H., Louis A., Julius F., Luella J., and Thaddeus Q. 

ST. JOHN, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 14; Marengo P. 0.; born in St. Thomas, 
Canada; came here in 1850; owns 120 acres of land, valued at $50 per acre. 
Married Adelia Searl, of Lake Co., Ohio, in 1857 ; has two children. 

TAYLOR, ASHER, Farmer, Dairyman and Practical Cheese Maker, Sec. 22 ; 
Marengo P. 0.; born in Ly coming Co., Pa., October 5, 1851 ; came to this county 
to live in 1871 ; owns 13 acres of land, valued at $55 per acre. Married Mary E. 
Harding, of Lycoming Coi, Pa., in October, 1875. 

TAYLOR, D. MRS., Gardener, Sec. 22 ; Marengo P. 0. 
TITUS, GEORGE, Lives with father, Sec. 33 ; Ney P. 0. 

TITUS, W. J., Farmer, Dairyman and Stock Raiser, Sec. 33 ; Ney P. 0., DeKalb Co. ; 
born in Hopewell, Mercer Co., N. J., August 10, 1832 ; came to this county Sep- 
tember 19, 1869 ; owns 160 acres of land, valued at $8,000. Married Harriet S. 
Hepburn, of Ewing, Mercer Co., N. J., September 25, 1852 ; has five children 
living Emma L., George W., Edward H., Sarah R., and William A. 

TOWNSEND, HENRY, Laborer, Sec. 26 ; Marengo P. 0. 
TRIPP, ANDREW, Farmer and Thresher, Sec. 34 ; Riley P. 0. 

TRIPP, JOHN, Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 19; Marengo P. 0.; born in 
Boone Co., 111., February 22, 1844; owns 200 acres of land, value $40 per acre; 
was Road Master one term. Unmarried. 

TROUT, GEORGE W., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 32 ; Geneva P. 0. ; born 
in Allen Co., Ind., January 23, 1850 ; came to this county in 1866 ; rents 80 acres 
of land. Marritd Elizabeth Radfield, October 12, 1874, who was born in Illinois 
October 8, 1855 ; has one child Arthur. 

UNDERWOOD, HENRY, Farmer and Stock Dealer, Sec. 22 ; Marengo P. 0. 

WALLACE, JOHN H., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 8 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born 
in County Armagh, Ireland, in 1820 ; came to America in 1849, and to McHeury 
Co. in 1856 ; owns 260 acres of land, value $30 per acre. Married Ann Morton, 
of City Armagh, Ireland, in 1848 ; has four children Mary J., William H., Anna 
E. and Sarah E. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 329 

WALLACE, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Marengo P. 0. 

WALLACE, JOHN, Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 18; Marengo P. 0. ; born in 
Scotland, October 5, 1844 ; came to America in 1855, and to McHenry Co. in 1860 ; 
owns 220 acres of land, value $40 per acre ; has been Road Master one term ; was 
in the United States Army three years ; wounded and discharged in 1866. Married 
Mary J. Wallace, July 4, 1868, who was born in New York City October 15, 1849 ; 
has two children Robert and William. 

WARD, JOHN, Poultry and Stock Dealer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 
WARD, HIRAM, Lives with father, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 
WHEELER, N., Lives with son, Sec. 27 ; Marengo P. 0. 
WHEELER, CHARLES, Farmer, Sec. 3; Marengo P. 0. 
WHITE, JAMES, Farmer and Stock Dealer, Sec. 20 ; Marengo P. 0. 

WHEELON, CHARLES, Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 34 ; South Riley P. 0. ; 
born in Canada, March 1, 1821 ; came to this county March 27, 1857; owns 160 
acres of land, value $45 per acre. Married Mary Marshall in November, 1841, who 
was born in Canada; has seven children, all living Albert, Thomas A., Eliza, John 
M., Samuel H., Rebecca and George W. 

WHEELER, N. J., Farmer, Dairyman and Stock Raiser, Sec. 27 ; Marengo P. 
0. ; born in Province of New Brunswick in 1841 ; came to Kane Co. in 1844, and 
to this county in April, 1876 ; owns 80 acres of land, value $30 per acre ; served 
two years in One Hundred and Forty-first 111. Vol. Inf. ; was Quartermaster, Ser- 
geant and Quartermaster of One Hundred and Fifty-third 111. Vol. Inf. Married 
Delia Peaslee, November 28, who was born in New York State in 1844 ; has one 
child Leonard. 

WHITE, A. J., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Belvidere, Boone Co., 
111., in 1852 ; came to this county in 1862 ; rents a farm of James White of 38 
acres. Married Mary E. Grandy April 14, 1875, who was born in Du Page Co., 111., 

in 1853. 

f 
WILLIAMSON, ALEX., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 29 ; Marengo P. 0. 

WILLIAMS, ROBERT, Laborer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 
WILLIAMS, V. C., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 35 ; Riley P. 0. 
WILLIAMS, A. J., Fanner and Stock Raiser, Sec. 35 ; Riley P. 0. 
WILSON, ALBERT, Lives with father, Sec. 19 ; Marengo P. 0. 

WILSON, W. H., Farmer and Stock Raiser, Sec. 19 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in 
Canada, April 2, 1840 ; came to this county in 1846 ; owns 80 acres of land, value 
$50 per acre. Married Susanna M. Durham, of Davenport, Delaware Co., N. Y., 
in 1862 ; has six children Herman 0., Thomas G., Prudence R., Forest H. and 
Charles G. 

WILSON, A. T., Farmer, Stock Raiser and Fruit Grower principally apples of 
the finest varieties, amounting to one thousand bushels for distribution per year, 
Sec. 19 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Canada, February 7, 1810 ; came to this country 
about 1846; owns 80 acres of land, value $4,000; was School Director five years. 



330 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

Married (first wife) in 1833, and second wife in 1871 ; has ten children living 
Mary A., Catherine M., Charles C., William H.. Melinda M., John W., Prudence 
A., Harriet L., Thomas A. and Clara M. 

WISE, SAMUEL, Laborer, Sec. 1 ; Marengo P. 0. 

WOODWORTH, JACOB, Dr., Dairy Produce, Sec. 2 ; Marengo P. 0. ; 
born in Steuben Co., N. Y., in 1824 ; came to this county in 1865 ; owns 200 
acres of land, beautifully situated, high state of cultivation, and with choice improve- 
ments; valued at $70 per acre. Married Ellen Douglas Bird, of Detroit, Mich., 
April 8, 1850 ; has four children. 

WYLDE, J. W., Farmer and Dairyman, Sec. 29 ; S. Riley P. 0. ; born in Boone 
Co., 111., October 20, 1852 ; came to this county in spring of 1876 ; rents 240 acres 
of land. Married Belle Mackey, June 23, 1875, who was born in Lycoming Co., 
Pa., in 1854 ; no children. 

ZIMMER, P. G., Farmer, Sec. 20 ; Marengo P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 331 



RILEY BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 
J. B. DOWNING, 



Riley Township, Section 23, Four Corners. 



ROBERT SMALLDRIDCE 

IHI.A.S 

A FARM OF SEVENTY-SIX ACRES, 

Section 35, Rlley Township, of 

Highly Improved and Naturally Fertile Land, For Sale, Buildings Good, 

Three good Wells of Water ; also good Bearing Orchard. 



RILEY CHEESE AND BUTTER FACTORY 

MANUFACTURES ANNUALLY 

80,000 Ibs. of Cheese and 6,000 Ibs. of Butter. 

BROTZMAN & ROGERS, Proprietors, 

SEOTTO3ST 32, 



H. H. STEVENS' 

DRAUGHT EQUALIZERS! 

MAREBTGO POST OFFICE. 

Read What the Farmers Say Who Have Used Them. 

GENEVA, De Kalb Co., 111., 1874. 
H. H. STEVENS: 

DEAR SIR I have used your Three- Horse Equalizer, attached to the Briggs & 
Enoch Sulky Plow, for some time. I could not be induced to do without it. The 
horses can be brought so much nearer the Plow that it diminishes the draught very 
much, and in backing or turning around the horses will never step over traces, and 
there are no singletrees to bang the horses' legs. I think 'I have saved feed enough to 
more than pay for the Equalizer in doing my fall plowing, aside from the comparative 
elastic step of the horses and the increased amount of plowed ground per day as a 
consequence. J- J- KUNZLER. 



332 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 



SENECA TOWNSHIP. 

ALLBER, ORRIN, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
ANDERSON, A. W., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
BAIN, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Ireland, November 

14, 1816 ; came to this county in 1854; owns 96 J acres of land. Married Jennette 

Brynan in 1854, who was born in Scotland in 1817 ; have no children. 
BARNES, THOS., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
BARNES, C. H., Dry Goods Jobber and Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Marengo P. 0. 
BASS, E. N. & 0. W., Farmers, Sec. 16'; Union P. 0. 
BAYERD, J. A., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
BASSETT, HARVEY, Cooper and Farmer, Sec. 18; Marengo P. 0. ; born in 

Rensselaer Co., N. Y., November 27, 1834 ; came to this county in fall of 1871 ; 

owns 54 jr acres of land. Married Mary Coonrad, July 2, 1854, who was born in 

Rensselaer Co., N. Y., April 30, 1836 ; had six children. 
BEAM, A. L., Laborer, Sec. 22 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
BEAM, A. R., Cooper, Sec. 22 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
BEAN, WM. K., Farmer, Sec. 30 : Marengo P. 0. ; born in Merrimack Co., 

N. H., April 22, 1833 ; came to this county in 1843; owns 126 acres of land. 

Married Philena Mead, December 31, 1857, who was born in Otsego Co., N. Y., 

July 4, 1836 ; has six children. 
BELDIN, H. W., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Union P. 0. 
BEAUMONT, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
BIGELOW, TIMOTHY, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Union P. 0. 
BIGELOW, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Union P. 0. 
BIGELOW, CHAUNCEY, Farmer, Sec. 22; Woodstock P. 0. 

BIGELOW, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Union P. 0. ; born in Ontario Co., 
N. Y., March 13, 1849 ; owns 80 acres of land. Married Marcia Brown in March, 
1876, who was born in New York State in 1852. 

BISHOP, HARRISON, Farmer, Sec. 33; Union P. 0. ; born in Essex Co., 
N. Y., June 12, 1814; came to McHenry Co. in 1840; owns 200 acres of land. 
Married Susan Brown, January 1, 1844, who was born in Wayne Co., N. Y., Janu- 
ary 29, 1826 ; had seven children, five living. 

BISHOP, EDWARD, Lives with father, Sec. 33 ; Union P. 0. 

BOICE & BIGELOW, Farmers and Butter Manufacturers, Sec. 21 ; Union P. 0. 

BORCHARDT, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 11; Woodstock P. 0.; born in 
Germany, January 3, 1843; came to McHenry Co. in 1868. Married Conradine 
Borchardt, June 14, 1870, who was born in Germany, October 14, 1850, and came 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 333 

to this county in 1857 : has four children ; her mother, Henrietta Borchardt, 
mother of Conradine Borchardt, was born in Germany, April 2, 1 808 ; came to this 
county in 1857. 

BRIGHT, THOMAS & ELLEN, Farmers, Sec. 32 ; Marengo P. 0. 

BROCK, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Marengo P. 0. 

BUTTERFIELD, MERRICK, Farmer, Sec. 30 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in 
Windsor Co., Vt., December 18, 1819; came to this county in 1855; owns 177 
acres of land. Married Eliza S. Phinney, March 1C, 1862, who was born in Chau- 
tauqua Co., N. Y., September 11, 1836 ; has one child. 

CHASE, J. G., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
CHESNUT, T. W., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
CLARK, A. H., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Union P. O. 
CLARK, L., Farmer. Sec. 32 ; Union P. 0. 
CLARK, COLLINS, Teamster, Sec. 22; Union P. 0. 
COLESON, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
COLLINS, C., Lives with T. Thurg, Sec. 5 ; Marengo P. 0. 

COLLINS, J., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Ireland in 1803 ; came to 
McHenry Co. April 1, 1866; owns 20 acres of land. Married Catharine O'Brien 
in 1837. who was born in Ireland in 1810 ; had six children. 

COOK, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
COOK, T. M., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Union P. 0. 
COONROD, DARIUS, Farmer, Sec. 18 ; Marengo P. O. 
CARR, DENNIS, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
DEITZ, G. W., Farmer, Sec. 23; Woodstock P. 0. 
DEITZ, ALBERT, Mechanic, Sec. 23 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
DEWEY, F. R., Lives with father, Sec. 29 ; Marengo P. 0. 
DEWEY, E. B., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Marengo P. 0. 
DICKERSON, SILAS, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
DICKERSON, Z., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

DICKERSON, MORRIS, Farmer, s. e. Sec. 12 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in 
Ohio in 1820 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1837 ; owns 120 acres of land, valued at 
$4,800 ; was in the army nineteen months. Married Lydia N. Huff, from Michi- 
gan, January 14, 1847 ; she was born in 1829 ; has three children living, one dead. 

DIGGINS, R., Farmer, Sec. 19 ; Marengo P. 0. 

DIGGINS, FRANK, Lives with father, Sec. 19, Marengo P. 0. 

DILLENBACH, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

DIMMEL, LOUIS, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in France, Septem- 
ber 23, 1848 ; came to this county in 1848 ; owns 132 J acres of land. 

DUKE, G. B., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. O. 
DUNMELL, L., Mas., Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
DUNNING, S. N., Farmer, Sec. 16; Woodstock P. 0. 
EASTMAN, A., Renter of F. Weber. Sec. 35 ; Union P. 0. 
EASTMAN, LEONARD, Renter of J. Thompson, Sec. 35 ; Union P. 0. 



334 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

EDDY, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 12 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

EGGLESTON, J., Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Union P. 0. 

EPPEL, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 3; Woodstock P. 0.; born in France Nov. 13, 
1831 ; came to McHenry Co. in March, 1855 ; owns 180 acres of land. Married 
Kate Koch March 13, 1867, who was born in Wisconsin, January, 1846 ; has two 
children. 

FARR, S. M., Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Union P. 0. 

FLANDERS, GEORGE, Works farm of S. Flanders, Sec. 28 ; Union P. 0. 

FLANDERS, AARON, Farmer, Sec. 23; Woodstock P. 0. 

FLANDERS, SPENCER, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Niagara 
Co., N. Y., December 31, 1818 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1837 ; owns 300 acres 
of land. Married Sophia Wiffin April 21, 1869 ; she was born in England January 
28, 1834; has one child. 

POOTE, CHARLES, Carpenter, Sec. 13; Woodstock P. 0.; born in Kenosha 
Co., Wis., November 25, 1831 ; came to McHenry Co. in November, 1872. Mar- 
ried Ella Silliman September 5, 1873 ; she was born in McHenry Co., 111., March 
20, 1851 ; has two children. 

FOOT, H. M., Farmer and Blacksmith, Sec. 14 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

FOOT, HOOKER, Works the Armour Estate ; Woodstock P. 0. 

FRISBIE, P. M., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Union P. 0. 

FRISBIE, FREDERICK, Lives with father, Sec. 35 ; Union P. 0. 

FRISBIE, EVELINE, Lives with father, Sec. 35 ; Union P. 0. 

PULLER, J. E., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in De Kalb Co., 111., 
February 20, 1850; came to this county in 1860. Married Angelina Buck 
November 25, 1874, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1851. 

GILE, HENRY, Renter of R. B. White, Sec. 28 ; Union P. 0. 

GILLIS, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

GOODRICH, G. W., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Union P. 0. 

GRAVES, 0. R., MRS., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Marengo P. 0. 

GRAVES, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Marengo P. 0. 

GUTH, JACOB, JR., Sec. 26 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

GUILD, HENRY, Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Kane Co., 111., 
January 3, 1848; came to McHenry Co. April, 1876. Married Philana Warne 
December 1, 1870; she was born in Du Page Co., 111., August 11, 1849; has 
two children. 

HALL, LESTER, Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HARRINGTON, J., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HAMMER, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Union P. 0. 

HEGART, J. C., Farmer, Sec. 25 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HARMON, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 1; Woodstock P.O.; born in Kings 
Co., 1816; came to McHenry Co. in 1843; owns 260 acres of land. Married Ann 
Quinn Brown, August 24, 1841, who was born in Kings Co., 1816 ; had thirteen 
children, ten living. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 335 

HILL, C. S., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Marengo P. 0. 
HICKS, G. W., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
HOWE, EDWIN, Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Union P. 0. 

HOLDEN, WILLIAM, Farmer, s. w. Sec. 11; Woodstock P. 0.; born in 
Lincolnshire, England, 1835 ; been in county since 1858. Married Eliza Cook, of 
Lincolnshire, England, in 1854 ; has eight children. 

HUBER, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Woodstock P. O. 
HUFF, HIRAM, Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
HURLEY, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

HUBER, JACOB, Farmer, Sec. 3 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in France, April 29, 
1828 ; came to this county in 1853 ; owns 170 acres of land. Married Catharine 
Dininiel. August 15, 1865, who was born in France, in February, 1828 ; has one 
child. 

HYDE, N. T., Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
JACKSON, WM. B., Mechanic, Sec. 32 ; Union P. 0. 
JAMES, MRS., & SON, Farmers, Sec. 32 ; Union P. 0. 
JOHNSON, R. A., Farmer, Sec. 24; Woodstock P. 0. 
JOSLYN, W. W., Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Woodstock P. O. 
JOSLYN, OSGOOD, Farmer, Sec. 16; Marengo P. 0. 

KENELY, TIMOTHY, Farmer, See. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Ireland, in 
1834; came to McHenry Co. in 1850; owns 91 acres of land. Married Joahau 
Nihan, January 6, 1859, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1837 ; has six children. 

KIM BALL, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 23; Woodstock P. 0. 
KING, A. J., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Union P. 0. 
KNAPP, E., Mechanic, Sec. 9 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

KLINE, ISRAEL, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Lancaster Co., 
Pa., October 14, 1831 ; came to McHenry Co. April 14, 1876; owns 71 acres of 
land. Married Barbara Ann Notestine, August 29, 1858 ; has twelve children. 

LLOYD, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 16 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

LOUDERBECK, Z., Farmer, Sec. 32 ; Union P. 0. 

LOUNSBURY, SAMUEL, Works J. Barnes' farm, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

McAULIFPE, J., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Limerick Co., 
Ireland, in 1823; came to this county in June, 1849; owns 120 acres of land. 
Married Mary O'Brien, who was born in Limerick Co., Ireland, in 1837 ; has seven 
children. 

McBROOM, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 15 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MCCARTY, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Ireland, 
November 9, 1836 ; came to this county in October, 1872. Married Hannah 
Lantry, November, 1858; she was born in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., April, 
1842 ; has seven children. 

McDOWELL, S. C., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Marengo P. 0. 
McDOWELL, W. J., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Union P. 0. 



336 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

McDOUGALL, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Scot- 
land May 26, 1852 ; came to. McHenry Co. in spring of 1869 ; owns 20 acres of 
land ; has three children. 

MCDOWELL, WM. J., Farmer, Sec. 27 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in St. Lawrence 
Co., N. Y., May 31, 1845 ; came to McHenry Co. March 1, 1875 ; owns 157 acres 
of land. Married Alice E. Sperry November 25, 1869; she was born in Portage 
Co., 0., April 8, 1850; has three children. 

McGEE, TEKRENCE, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Wooodstock P. 0. 

McGEE, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

McLEAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MCLAUGHLIN, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 36 Union P. 0. 

MEAD, L. L., Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Union P. 0. 

MEAD, MARCUS, Farmer, Sec. 21 ; Union P. 0. 

MEAD, A. B., Farmer, Sec.' 23 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MEAD, 0. P., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MILLER, CHRISTIAN, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MILLS, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 26; Union P. 0. 

MITCHELL, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

MOLLOHON, GEORGE R., Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in 
, Braxton Co., W. Va,, May 10, 1849; came to McHenry Co. February 26,1872. 
Married Rebecca J. Fox November 20, 1870 ; she was born in Braxton Co., W. Va. ; 
has one child. 

MORRIS, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Marengo P. 0. . 

MURRY, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 1 ; Woodstock P. 0, 

MULLER, CHRISTIAN, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in France 
March 24, 1831 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1847 ; owns 100 acres of land. Mar- 
ried Christina Weitzel March 24, 1861, who was born in Pennsylvania, May 18, 
1839 ; has four children. 

MURLEY, C., Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Ireland, in 1816 ; came 
to America in 1859, and to McHenry Co. in the spring of 1866 ; owns 20 acres of 
land. Mairied Hanora Sullivan, September H, 1849. who was born in Ireland in 
1826; has four children. 

MUZZY, J. N., Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Union P. 0. 

NEW, JOHN, Renter R. C. Jefferson, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

NIHAN, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Marengo P. 0. 

NIHAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Marengo. P. 0. 

NUGKNT, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 4 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

O'BRIEN, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

O'BRIEN, JAMES, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Marengo P. 0. 

PARK, P. G., Farmer, Sec. 29 ; Marengo P. 0. 

PARSONS, C. 0., Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

PARSONS, LORENZO, Farmer, Sec. 5 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

PERKINS, C. G., Farmer, Sec. 24; Woodstock P. 0. 

RAIRDON, L. A., Farmer, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0. 



DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 337 

RICHARDS, T. McD., Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

RICH, CALEB, Farmer and Butter Maker, n. e. Sec. 27 ; Marengo P. 0. ; boru 
in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., 1824 ; came to McHenry Co. in 1843 ; owns 80 acres 
of land ; value of property, $5,000 ; was First Lieutenant Elgin Artillery Co. Mar- 
ried Arta J. Hines, of Rensselaer Co., N. Y., in July 1852 ; had five children. 

ROBINSON, H., MRS., Farmer, Sec. 23 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

ROBINSON, H. W., Mechanic, Sec. 23 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

RUSSELL, MATTHEW, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. 

RUSSELL, MICHAEL, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. 

SANFORD, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 16; Marengo P. 0. 

SANFORD, NELSON, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; 'Woodstock P. 0. 

SCHOFF, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

SCHNYDER, GEORGE, Renter of N. Feame, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

SHELDON, F. L., Farmer, Sec. 36 ; Union P. O. 

SHELDON, DANIEL, Farmer, Sec. 35 ; Union P. 0. 

SHELDON, L. W., Farmer, Sec. 34 ; Union P. 0. ; born in Steuben Co., N. Y., 
July 30, 1830 ; came to McHenry Co. June 1, 1842 ; owns 355 acres of land, value 
$20,000 ; has been Town Collector one year, Clerk two years, Assessor two years, 
Justice of the Peace four years and Supervisor three years. Married Mary Deitz, 
of Otsego Co., N. Y., January 7, 1857 ; had three children ; two living M. Esther 
and Lyman D. 

SILLIMAN, STILES, Farmer, Sec. 24; Woodstock P. 0.; born in Otsego 
Co., N. Y., November 10, 1824 ; came to McHenry Co. May 23, 1850 ; owns 170 
acres of land. Married Martha Burnside, November, 1847 ; she was born in Otsego 
Co., N. Y., December 27, 1820 ; has four children. 

SMITH, GEORGE, & CO., Millers, Sec. 30 ; Marengo P. 0. 

SMITH, ROBERT, Farmer, Sec. 30; Marengo P. 0. 

SMITH, JOSEPH, Farmer, Sec. 24; Woodstock P. 0. 

SOUTHWORTH, LYDIA, MRS., Widow J. W. Sec. 27 ; Union P. 0. 

STAFFORD, J. P., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
.STANDISH, BENJAMIN, Farmer, Sec. 19; Marengo P. 0. 

STEVENS, EDWARD, Farmer, Sec. 33 ; Union P. 0. 

STEWART, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 9 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

STILLWELL, CHARLES, Renter of H. Bishop, Sec. 33 ; Union P. 0. 

STRATTON, CHARLES, Works for C. H. Barnes, Sec. 30 ; Marengo P. 0. 

SULLIVAN, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 7 ; Marengo P. 0. 

SULLIVAN, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Marengo P. 0. 

SULLIVAN, PATRICK, Farmer, Sec. 6 ; Marengo P. 0. ; born in Ireland, in 
1809; came to McHenry Co. in 1853; owns 106! acres of land. Married Mar- 
garet Sullivan in 1847, who was born in Ireland in 1829 ; had ten children, eight 
living. 

TALCOTT, M. N., Carriage Maker and Blacksmith; Franklinville ; born in 
Washington Co., Waightfield, 1833; came to this county 1871 ; value of property, 
$1,500 ; was member of Ninety-second N. Y. Vols. ; Regimental Steward. Mar- 



338 DIRECTORY OF McHENRY COUNTY. 

ried Sarah Griffith, of Broome Co., N. Y., August 1, 1876 ; had three children by 

first wife. 

TAYLOR, PARSON, Farmer, Sec. 19; MarengoP. 0. 
THOMPSON, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
THOMPSON, DEWEY, Farmer, Sec. 10 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
TOWIG, TIMOTHY, Farmer, Sec. 5; Marengo P. 0. 
THOMAS, ADELBERT, Farmer, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
THOMAS, SUSAN, MBS., Widow of Alfred, Sec. 13 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
TURNER, ORSANUS, Veterinary Surgeon, Sec. 11 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
WALKER, GEORGE, Farmer, Sec. 22 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
WALLACE BROS., Farmers, Sec. 25 ; Woodstock P. 
WARREN, J. F., Mechanic, Sec. 29 ; Marengo P. 0. 
WEBBER, C. N., Farmer, Sec. 14 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
WEITZELL, PETER, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Woodstock P. 0. 
WILCOX, HOMER, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

WHEELER, M. G., Mrs., residence, Sec. 12 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; Widow of S. P. 
Wheeler, who died February 20, 1876 ; he was born in Rutland Co., Vt., in 1838 ; 
came to this county in 1856; owns 40 acres of land, valued at $1,600. Mrs. 
Wheeler was Miss M. J. Dufield, of Nicholas Co., Va. ; married in 1860 ; has five 
children. 

WILCOX, WILLIAM, Farmer, Sec. 2 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Rensselaer 
Co., N. Y., June 27, 1818; came to McHenry Co. in March, 1868; owns 40 
acres of land. Married Jane S. Parker, in 1839, who was born in Bennington, Vt., 
in 1820 ; had nine children, five living. 

WILCOX, HOMER W., Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Benning- 
ton Co., Vt.. December 14, 1846 ; came to McHenry Co. in spring of 1851. Mar- 
ried Miss E. Truax, December 30, 1865 ; she was born in St. Lawrence Co., N. Y., 
March 10, 1845 ; has three children. 

WILCOX, JOHN Q., Farmer, Sec. 17 ; Woodstock P. 0. ; born in Bennington 
Co., Vt., May 7, 1847 ; came to McHenry Co. in the spring of 1851 ; owns 40 
acres of land. Married Aurilla Parks, July 21, 1866 ; she was born in Du Page Co., 
Ill, July 23, 1843 ; has four children. 

WILCOX, JOHN, Farmer, Sec. 8 ; Woodstock P. 0. 

WOLCOTT, J. F., Farmer, Sec. 28 ; Union P. 0. 

ZELLER, G. W., Farmer, Sec. 24 ; Woodstock P. 0. 



M. N. T ALCOTT, 

CARRIAGE MAKER AND BLACKSMITH, 



FRANKMtfVIL.I.E. 



DAIRY MATTERS. 



THE AYRSHIRE. 

The Ayrshire cows are justly celebrated throughout this country and Great 
Britain for their excellent dairy purposes. Though the most recent in their 
origin, they are pretty distinct from other Scotch and English races. In color, 
the pure Ayrshires are generally red and' white, spotted or mottled, not roan, like 
many of the Short-horns, but often presenting a bright contrast of colors. 
The head is small, fine and clean. The face is long and narrow at the muzzle, 
with a sprightly, yet generally mild expression. The eye is small, smart and 
lively. The horns are short and slightly twisted upward, set wide apart at the 
roots. The neck is thin. The body is enlarging from fore to hind quarters. 
The back is straight and narrow, but broad across the loin. The ribs are 
rather flat. The joints are rather loose and open. The hind quarters are thin. 
The teats of the cow are of medium size, and set wide apart. The milk veins 
are always very prominent and generally well developed. 

On the whole, the Ayrshires are good-looking, but want some of the sym- 
metry and aptitude to fatten which characterize the Short-horn, and which is 
supposed to have built up this valuable breed on the basis of the original stock 
of the county of Ayr, a county extending along the eastern shore of the Frith 
of Clyde, in the southwestern part of Scotland, and divided into three districts, 
known as Carrick, Cunningham and Kyle; the first famous as the lordship of 
Robert Bruce, the last for the production of this, one of the most remarkable 
dairy breed of cows in the world. These cattle are naturally hardy and active 
and capable of enduring severe winters and of easily regaining condition with 
the return of spring and good feed. They have been known to produce over 
ten gallons of milk in a day. 

It is the opinion of good breeders that a high-bred Short- horn bull and a 
large-sized Ayrshire cow will produce a calf which will come to maturity earlier 
and attain greater weight and sell for more money than a pure-bred Ayrshire. 
This cross, with feeding froni the start, may be sold fat at two or three years 
old, the improvement being especially seen in the early maturity and the size. 

In this cross with the Short-horn, the form becomes ordinarily more sym- 
metrical, while there is, perhaps, little risk of lessening the milking quality of 



340 DAIRY MATTERS. 

the offspring, if sufficient regard is paid to the selection of the individual ani- 
mals to breed from. 

The Ayrshire unites to a greater degree than other breeds the supposed 
incompatible qualities of yielding a great deal of milk arid beef. 

LENGTH OF TIME COWS SHOULD BE MILKED. 

About five months after calving, there is a great difference in the quality of 
a cow's milk as compared with that of one lately calved. The milk of a cow 
newly calved not only contains more butter, but the butter exists in larger 
globules and is more easily churned than afterward. After five or six months, 
the cream is much smaller in quantity, but it changes in character ; the globules 
are very small and exist as an emulsion with the milk rather than as a separate 
part of it. In the souring of milk, alcohol is formed by the decomposition of 
the sugar of milk; the alcohol forms .an emulsion with the cream, and as this 
is butter in the churn, it foams up and froths over, but makes no butter. Hence 
the reason why it takes so much longer to churn late in the fall and in early 
winter than in the spring. When this season occurs and the cream froths up 
in the churn and butter will not come, patience ceases to be a virtue, for it is 
useless. The craam might as well go into cakes ami puddings or be thrown to 
the hogs. 

COWS FOR THE BUTTER DAIRY. 

Frank K. Hall, of Sugar Grove, 111., says : 

I have recently made some tests for the purpose of determining the rela- 
tive value of my cows for a butter dairy. I am convinced that farmers too 
often simply guess at the value of their cows for this purpose, and do not 
always give honor where honor is due, and sometimes allow a cow a place in the 
barn which ought to be in the beef barrel. 

On the 27th day of December we saved the milk of each cow by itself, 
setting it in separate pans and at the usual depth. The milk was heated after 
setting twelve hours, and skimmed when thirty-six hours old. Milk, cream 
and butter were carefully weighed. 

My herd numbers but six cows, as follows : 

No. 1. Thoroughbred Jersey, ten years old ; weight about seven hundred 
pounds ; came in last May ; due to come in again next April ; average time of 
going dry, two weeks. 

No. 2. Thoroughbred Jersey, two years old last spring ; weight about 
seven hundred and fifty pounds ; came in last September ; due to come in again 
next June. 

No. 3. Probably a full blood Jersey, nine years old ; weight nine hundred 
and seventy-five pounds ; came in last August ; due to come in again next 
.June ; average time of going dry, two weeks. 



DAIRY MATTERS. 



341 



No. 4. A Jersey and Ayrshire cross, six years old ; weight nine hundred 
and fifty pounds ; came in last April, due to come in next June ; average time 
of going dry, two weeks. 

No. 5. A half blood grade Jersey, two years old last spring ; weight about 
seven hundred and fifty pounds ; came in last September ; due to come in next 
June. 

No. 6. A common cow, six years old ; weight about nine hundred and 
fifty pounds; carne in, last July; due to come in again next June; average 
time of going dry, nearly three months. 

The cows have been fed and treated alike, except that the heifers have not 
had quite as much grain as the old cows. They have had all the tame hay and 
corn fodder they would eat, and two bushel baskets of soft corn (some sweet 
corn), and one and one-half bushels of beets per day. 

The results of the tests are as follows : 







MILK. 


PER CENT. 
CREAM. 


BUTTER. 


PER CENT. 
BUTTER. 


NO. i ; 


11 


Itis 15 oz 


10 5 


12 2 oz 


6 4 


No. 2 


17 


2 " 


10 


16 3 


6 


No. 3 . . 


17 


9 " 


9 2 


16 6 


5 9 


No. 4 


1C 


2 " 


8 6 


13 1 


5 2 


No. 5 


12 


15 " 


8 4 


10 7 


5 2 


No. 6 


18 




84 


13 9 


48 















It will be seen that cow No. 6 gives the most milk, and is by far the poorest 
cow in the herd, since she goes dry nearly three months each year, and only 
4.8 per cent, of her milk is butter. 

Cow No. 3 made last July, just one month before dropping her calf, one 
and one-fourth pounds of butter per day. She now makes more than one pound 
per day. Therefore I think it safe to say that cow No. 3 will make 365 pounds 
of butter every 365 days, while cow No. 6 will not make 250 pounds. 
Now if butter is worth twenty-five cents per pound, cow No. 3 makes $91.25 
worth of butter per year, while cow No. 6 makes but $62.50 worth, provided 
the feed and labor of caring for the cow costs $60. Cow No. 3 gives a profit 
of $31.25 ; cow No. 6 gives a profit of $2.50. 

Problem : If cow No. 6 is worth $40, how much is cow No. 3 worth ? 

On December 20, milk drawn from each of these cows (Nos. 3 and 6) was 
placed in glass tubes twenty-one inches long. In twenty hours after setting, 
the cream line of No. 3's milk was plainly visible, and all the cream had 
evidently reached the top of the milk, while the same state of things did not 
exist in the other tube, until the milk was more than thirty-six hours old. 
Therefore. I infer that the difference between the per cents, of butter and cream 
would be much larger in summer than in winter. 



342 DAIRY MATTERS. 

In making this test, the butter was weighed before salting, and salted at 
the rate of one ounce of salt for each pound of butter. After standing twenty- 
four hours, it was worked the second time, and weighed again. The weights 
given in the table are the weights after salting. 

RAISING CALVES FOR THE DAIRY. 

On this subject, Mr. Willard, of the Rural New Yorker, has the following: 

There are various opinions in reference to the best and cheapest manner of 
raising calves. We believe the best results are obtained by giving the calf 
generous treatment from first to last. A poor, stunted and half-starved calf 
will never be able to reach that standard of excellence that it would, had a 
more liberal allowance of food been made during its earliest days. If a calf 
gets a fair start on milk, its food may be changed to whey by adding a porridge 
of oatmeal, oil-cake, buckwheat flour, or something of this kind, to supply the 
necessary constituents lacking in the whey. We have sometimes seen good 
calves raised on a small quantity of milk, by adding the liquor from steeped 
hay. Where conveniences are had for steeping hay, and only a small quantity 
of milk can be had, this plan may be resorted to. but if good, sweet whey can 
be obtained, the porridge, or oat-meal or oil-cake will require less labor in its 
preparation, and is easier to be regulated as to the quantity required. 

In butter dairies, good calves can be raised on skimmed milk. Almost 
every farmer has some peculiar notion of his own, in regard to the manner of 
raising calves ; but the great and general fault in management is a scanty 
allowance of nutritious food in the early stages of growth. It is important 
that the young animal be kept in a growing, vigorous condition, so that when 
cold weather approaches in the fall and early winter, it will be able to meet the 
exigencies of change in climate with good feed and care, and without special 
nursing to bring it through the rigors of winter. It pays well to do the work 
thoroughly and in the best manner at first, since, if this omitted, no after treat- 
ment will be able to wholly counteract neglect and starvation in the early stages 
of growth. 

The importance of growing good dairy stock cannot be too strongly urged 
upon the dairy farmers of the State at this time. The difficulty of getting good 
stock, by selecting from droves brought from a distance, is so great that the 
raising of stock on the farm where it is to be used is now almost imperative, if 
a good and profitable herd is desired. Calves should be selected from deep 
milking animals, and if these have been crossed with thorough-bred bulls of 
good milking families, the chances are almost certain that the calf will make a 
good cow. 



DAIRY MATTERS. 343 

CONCERNING THE EAR MARKS OF BUTTER COWS. 

Hon. John Shattuck, a noted butter dairyman of Chenango Co., N. Y., 
said at the late convention of the New York State Dairymen's Association, that 
he had found the color on the inside of the ear to be one infallible guide in the 

selection of a good butter cow. If the skin on the inside of the ear is of a rich 

a 

yellow color, the cow was sure to give a good quality of milk ; that is, milk 
rich in butter. He said in all his experience he had never known this sign to 
fail. 

Mr. J. W. North, in the Maine Farmer, gives some further information 
concerning the subject. He observes that cows producing very high colored 
butter have a large amount of the ear secretion, in many instances the whole 
internal surface being covered with a thick, orange-colored, oily matter ; on the 
other hand, the light-colored butter makers present a scanty, thin and pale yel- 
low secretion, in some cases found only at the bottom of the ear. His theory 
is, that every animal has the power of secreting a certain amount of this yellow 
pigment. If the quantity be sufficiently large, secretion will take place freely 
in the mammary glands, the ear and skin. If, however, the production be lim- 
ited, the tendency may be wholly toward the milk glands and ear, causing the 
animal to exhibit a pink hide, or the skin may be almost the sole avenue of 
escape from the body, the butter, in consequence, being light, colored ; or there 
may be so little coloring matter evolved as to furnish none to the skin, and a 
very scanty supply to the ear and milk. In selecting Jersey cows, in order to 
judge in regard to the color of their butter, he recommends the ear to be in- 
spected. 

Dr. Sturtevant, in his recent address before the Connecticut State Board of 
Agriculture, alluded to this color of the ear in selecting cows, but he thought 
some caution should be observed in clearing away the secretion that may have 
accumulated on the skin, so that the true color of the skin on the inside of the 
ear may be seen. Otherwise the accumulated secretion, if taken for the true 
color of the skin on the inside of the ear, would deceive, as it might be darker, 
or exhibit a deeper color than that of the true skin. He regarded the color of 
the ear as a good guide in respect to the color of the butter which the cow 
would yield. 

REARING YOUNG CALVES. 

A gentleman of Plattsburg, Mo., states : 

As regards the merit of the various plans of keeping calves, we are averse 
to tieing calves by the neck. It cramps their motions, and deprives them of 
that freedom of action which is so conducive to health, and growth. By 
restraining motion, they will no doubt sooner acquire condition ; but for stock 
calves this is of less importance, than strength acquired by moderate exercise 



344 DAIRY MATTERS. 

within limited space within a crib. As to a number of calves within the same 
loose box. though certainly having liberty to move, they have also liberty to 
suck one another, a propensity inveterate in calves. The ears, navel, scrotum 
a/id teats suffer by this dirty habit ; and there is no preventing it after it has 
been acquired as long as two calves remain together. Upon the whole, we 
prefer the separate crib to each calf, sparred to allow it to see its neighbors, and 
it is then in as much company as to remove the idea of loneliness. The separa- 
tion, at all evants, prevents the abominable habit of sucking ; and such cribs 
are as useful when calves are suckled by the cows as when brought up by hand. 
In regard to bringing up calves by suckling, there is no question it is the 
best way, provided the calf has always free access to the cow which is support- 
ing it ; but we are doubtful of the superiority of suckling over feeding by hand, 
when the calf is only allowed to go to the cow at stated times. It saves the 
trouble of milking the cows and giving the milk to the calves ; but a saving of 
trouble is of no importance compared to rearing young stock well. An objec- 
t-ion to suckling exists when one cow brings up two calves at a time, that the 
quantity of milk received by each calf is unknown, and the fastest sucker will 
take the largest share. True, they are both brought up ; but are they brought 
up as well as when the quantity of milk drank is known to be sufficient for the 
support of each ? The milk becomes scarcer, too, as the calves get older, in- 
stead of becoming more plentiful, as it should be. The objection to partial 
suckling is, that a cow suckling a calf does not allow milking afterward with 
the hand in a kindly manner, as every cow prefers being sucked to being 
milked by the hand. Unless, therefore, cows are kept for the purpose of suck- 
ling throughout the season, they become troublesome to milk with the hand 
after the calves are weaned. Usually, one cow suckles two calves ; and a cow 
that has calved early may suckle two sets, or four calves, or at least three, in 
the season. When brought up by hand, it is reckoned that each cow shall 
support two calves, the calves beyond their own being taken from cows whose 
milk is wanted for other purposes, or being purchased from those who do not 
bring up calves. In this way ten cows will support at least twenty calves, and 
maybe twenty-five. 

OIL-CAKE FOR MILCH COWS. 

A correspondent of the Toledo Farm Journal gives the benefit of his ex- 
perience as follows: Dairymen in this vicinity, where continued feeding of 
milch cows is requisite from five to seven months of the year, who have not 
tested the virtue of oil-cake as an economizer in fodder, can scarce believe how 
profitable its results are, especially during long, cold, severe winters. Owning 
about forty cows several years since, all of which were stabled during the win- 
ter season, the writer's attention was called to the value of cotton-seed oil as an 
economizer of fodder, and a trial was given it, a ton or two being purchased at 



DAIRY MATTERS. 345 

St. Louis and shipped to Toledo in January. Several bushels were thrown 
into a barrel, which was then filled with water, and when the oil-cake had be- 
come dissolved, about a quart of the fluid was poured over the quantity of 
middlings, cut hay, or whatever fodder was given each animal at one feeding, 
great care being taken not to give too much, in order not to cloy the appetite 
a result which follows if caution is not observed in this respect. The conse- 
quence was that the cows grew sleek, were perfectly healthy, gave more milk 
and required far less food than before a very desirable result at that time, as 
the winter proved a long one and feeding had to be kept up until the middle of 
May. 

So long as I continued to remain engaged in the dairy business, I never 
again gave up the use of oil-cake, although it became difficult to obtain the 
cotton-seed oil-cake, and I tried linseed oil-cake, using it in the same manner, 
with good results, although I prefer the former, but would always use the latter 
when that is not obtainable. When fodder is scarce and dear, the value of this 
experiment is great, indeed, especially in winter, and I would advise all who 
are engaged in the production of milk for city markets to give it a fair trial, 
well convinced they will not regret it. So far as regards an increase in the 
quantity of cream, I cannot say from experience, though it is alleged to pro- 
duce cream of better quality and of increased quantity. Those who sell milk 
and keep cows for this purpose cannot fail to derive great benefit from the use 
of oil-cake in the manner above described, as it is saving of money, while it 
also serves as an aid in making it. 

NEATNESS IN MAKING BUTTER. 

It is admitted by butter makers of extensive experience that impurities and 
noxious odors in the atmosphere, where cream is rising, will injure the flavor of 
the butter. We recollect that a neighbor killed a skunk, more than one hun- 
dred rods distant, and the offensive and pungent odor from that dead animal 
was wafted during the entire day toward the pantry in which there were several 
pans of milk. The butter made of that cream tasted so offensively of the odor 
of that skunk that it could not be used for culinary purposes. X. A. Willard 
writes on this subject that "when milkers are allowed to come directly from 
the stable to the milk room, it will be impossible to keep the latter place sweet 
and clean for the time being." 

There are hundreds of butter makers, we are aware, to whom the impor- 
tance of this single point cannot be too strongly urged, since they often consider 
many little things of this kind, in regard to dairy management, too insignificant 
to merit attention. But in butter making, the observance of little things is 
often the great secret of success. 

There is no doubt that immense quantities of poor butter are made from the 
milk set in improper places. The kitchen pantry, the living room and the cellar 



346 DAIRY MATTERS. 

used to store vegetables and other family supplies will impart peculiar taints to 
the milk and cream, in such a degree as to be destructive to flavor, even though 
the butter in other respects be skillfully handled. Dairy rooms so situated as 
to catch the odor from the pig sty, the cess pool or other decomposing filth 
cannot be used for making good butter. There should be a freedom from filth 
and impurities of every description about the milk house, and the milk should 
be delivered by the milkers in an ante-room, or some point outside the milk 
room, and from thence conveyed to the place where it is to be set for cream. 
In this way the fumes and the litter from the stable may be kept from the 
milk room. 

The causes of poor butter are various, the most important of which are lack 
of cleanliness, the want of proper dairy utensils, the need of a good dairy room 
or place for setting the milk, neglect in manipulating the cream at the right 
time, unskillful working, packing and storing the butter, and, finally, lack of 
knowledge in a part or whole of the processes required for making a prime 
article. 



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. 



CANNING FRUIT. 

When fruit is heated in open vessels, and the air is full of delicious aroma, 
your fruit is fast losing its best quality. This is why it is best to fill the jars 
with fruit before cooking. Another reason why it is best to heat in jars, you 
avoid crushing, and the liquor is rich and clear. In canning peaches or pears, 
it is very satisfactory if you have retained the small or broken pieces for present 
consumption, and only filled your cans with large and shapely quarters. The 
same with grapes and berries. If you wish to realize the exquisite flavor of each 
fruit, do not spoil it with poor sugar. It is a good way to put what nice white 
sugar you wish to use through the day into the porcelain kettle in the morning, 
with a little water, and bring it to boil and skim it, and when your bottles or 
jars of fruit have been heated, fill up with the hot syrup. For lack of anything 
better, take a large copper wash boiler, place a piece of straw matting or two 
thicknesses of paper over the bottom, and then arrange the cans, as many as it 
will hold, and keep upright. You may need some twigs beneath and around 
them to keep all'firm and in place. Fill with warm water to the necks of the 
jars, cover them with lids and put on the boiler-cover to keep in the steam. 
Berries need but a few minutes of boiling heat. By this method, if you do 
leave them a trifle too long, they are not spoiled by being boiled to pieces. 
Green corn is very nice cooked with sliced ripe potatoes, two or three hours, 
slowly, on the back of the stove, and seasoned with sweet cream, salt and pepper 
when warmed for the table. Corn and tomatoes are better when cooked in the 
porcelain kettle, and should be canned and sealed up in bright tin cans. 

THE VALUE OF A DUST BATH FOR ANIMALS. 

The almost indispensable necessity of an ample supply of dust for animals in 
winter is understood by very few stock growers. All sorts of animals delight 
in a dust bath. Chickens that have easy and continual access to it will never 
be troubled with vermin, either in their houses or on their bodies. Cattle de- 
light to stand in a dusty road, scraping it up with their fore feet and flinging it 
over their backs. The cheapest and most effectual cure for lice on cattle is to 



348 MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. 

scatter a quart of perfectly dry dust along the spine, from the horns to the 
tail. In winter, when they cannot get it, many animals become covered with 
vermin. 

MEASURING GRAIN IN A BOX OR CRIB. 

To get the cubical contents of any room, box, bin or crib, in feet, multiply 
the length, breadth and depth together. Each of these cubic feet contains 
1,728 inches. A bushel contains 2.150 cubic inches. Divide 1.T28 into 2.150, 
and we have 1,244. Divide the cubical contents in feet of any space by 1,244, 
and the quotient will be the number of bushels it will contain. For instance, a 
crib 20 feet square and 10 feet deep will contain 4.000 by 1,244, and we have 
3,215 and a fraction, which is the number of bushels of shelled corn that the 
crib will hold. But, for all practical purposes, 1.244 is equal to 1.25, or one 
and a quarter, which is simply five quarters, and to divide by five- quarters is to 
multiply by 4 and divide by 5, or which is the same as multiplying by 8 and 
dividing by 10, or cutting oft' one figure to the right. Hence, when the cubical 
contents in feet are known, multiply by 4 and divide by 5, or multiply by 8 and 
divide by 10, and we have the contents in bushels. If a barrel be 3 or 5 bushels, 
multiply by 3 or 5, as the case may be. 

TO DESTROY STUMPS. 

Some one, not long ago, started the idea that sulphuric acid would totally 
destroy stumps. An auger hole was to be bored in the top, filled with sulphuric 
acid, and plugged. In a day or two the stump would be eaten up, even to the 
very roots. The experiment was tried and failed, only a portion of the stump, 
at the top, being affected. The following method is recommended by the Scien- 
tific American : In the autumn, bore a hole one to two inches in diameter, ac- 
cording to the girth of the stump, vertically in the center of the latter, and 
about eighteen inches deep. Put into it from one to two ounces saltpeter ; fill 
the whole with water and plug up close. In the ensuing spring take out the 
plug and pour in about one-half gill of kerosene oil and ignite it. The stump 
will smoulder away without blazing to the very extremity of the roots, leaving 
nothing but ashes. 

HOUSEHOLD MEASURES. 

As all families are not provided with scales and weights, referring to ingre- 
dients in general use by every housewife, the following information may be use- 
ful : Wheat flour, 1 pound i* 1 quart ; Indian meal, 1 pound 2 ounces is 1 
quart ; butter, when soft, 1 pound 1 ounce is 1 quart ; loaf sugar, broken, 1 
pound is 1 quart ; white sugar, powdered, 1 pound 1 ounce is 1 quart ; best 
brown sugar, 1 pound 2 ounces is 1 quart ; eggs, 'average size, 10 eggs are 1 
pound ; 16 large tablespoonfuls are J pint, 8 are 1 gill, 4, | gill, etc. 



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. 349 

CEMENT FOR CRACKED HOOFS. 

Mr. Defay has discovered a preparation by means of which sand cracks or 
fractures in hoof or horn may be durably cemented up. Even pieces of iron 
can be securely joined together by its means. The only precaution necessary 
for its successful application is the careful removal of all grease by spirits of 
sal ammonia, sulphide of carbon or ether. Mr. Defay makes no secret of its 
composition, which is as follows : Take one part of coarsely powdered gum- 
ammoniacum and two parts gutta-percha, in pieces the size of a hazel nut. Put 
them in a tin-lined vessel over a slow fire, and stir constantly until thoroughly 
mixed. Before the thick, resinous mass gets cold, mold it into sticks like seal- 
ing wax. The cement will keep for years, and when required for use it is only 
necessary to cut off a sufficient quantity and re-melt it immediately before ap- 
plication. English Live Stock Journal. 

TO CURE AND KEEP PORK. 

To have pork keep well for a long time, it is not only necessary to have 
good, sweet, wholesome pork to begin with, a clean, tight barrel, plenty of pure, 
clean, coarse salt, and a cool place for keeping it when packed. Pork will keep 
a year and longer, if it is first cut in pieces of uniform width, and the pieces, 
containing the most lean, separated from the rest, as it contains more blood to 
discolor the brine ; besides, it takes brine more readily and will soon become as 
hard as old salt beef. Then procure a tight, clean oak barrel ; scatter salt over 
the bottom to the depth of about one-half an inch, then, having cut the pork in 
strips of nearly uniform width, pack them on edge, with the rind next to the 
barrel, and follow round until the bottom is covered by a layer of strips so even 
and solid that no single piece can raise without bringing up the whole layer. 
Then fill up the interstices with salt, and spread it a half inch thick over the 
top layer ; then pack another layer in the same way till the cask is full, or the 
pork all packed. On the top layer place enough clean, flat stones to keep it 
from floating after the brine is added. The brine may be added at once, or left 
a day or two, without the weather be too warm, then it should be added at once, 
as soon as the meat is cool. Old brine is as good as new, if it is perfectly 
sweet, but no better. 

9 THE CLASSIFICATION OF HIDES. 

At the National Convention of Tanners and Dealers in Hides and Leather, 
held in Philadelphia in October, the following rules for the classification of 
hides were unanimously adopted, and will therefore control the action of the 
whole trade, until otherwise ordered : 

1. All hides having one or more grubs shall be thrown out and classed as 
damaged. 



350 MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. 

2. All hides and skins cut and scored on the flesh shall be thrown out and 
classed as damaged. 

3. All hides for currying purposes, having one or more brands, shall be 
thrown out and classed as No. 2 hides. 

4. All hides sold for sole leather, having more than one brand, shall be 
thrown out and classed as No. 2 hides. 

5. All harness hides, visibly damaged by hook or horn marks on the grain, 
shall be classed as No. 2 harness hides. 

6. In the vocabulary of this trade, one letter, figure or mark constitutes a 
brand on a hide, and cattle raisers, in their own interest, are requested to make 
their brands of one letter or mark as small as possible, and so located upon and 
down the leg, as to produce the least possible injury to the hide. 

7. The above rules concerning cuts, scores, grubs and brands shall be 
applied to all transactions in dried hides, as well as to those that are fresh or 
salted ; also to imported as. well as to domestic hides. 

8. All calfskins shall have the sinews taken out, or proper tare allowed for 
the same ; the minimum weight of untrimmed skins shall be 8 pounds, and the 
maximum weight shall be 15 pounds this classification to be applied strictly 
to calfskins, with no application to long hair summer kips, which shall 
not be considered calfskins. Trimmed calfskins, with heads off, shall be 1J 
pounds less weight ; veal kips shall be classed as plump ; milk calfskins, 15 to 
25 pounds, in the season, shall be classed as short hair kip. 

9. A green trimmed hide is a hide clear of horns, bones of all kinds, flesh, 
sinews, blood, manure or other offal. 

10. Green salted hides shall be considered in good merchantable condition, 
when the same are fully cured or preserved with salt, and well cured of their 
animal juices, ^and free from all salt and superfluous wet in the hair or on the 
flesh, or so made by proper tare, when bought and sold. 

11. Any watered hide, or one which has any material put upon it except 
salt, for strictly curing purposes, shall not be considered in a merchantable con- 
dition, and all sales of hides made in such condition shall be considered fraud- 
ulent, unless the condition be made known to the purchaser previous to the sale. 

12. Hides cut at the throat shall be classed unmerchantable, provided the 
gash extends more than one-fourth across the hide. 

A GOOD WASH FOR ROOSTS, * 

To be applied once or twice a week, will be found in kerosene or crude petro- 
leum. This should be applied with a coarse sponge or common paint brush, in 
the early day time, so that it will soak into the perches or dry off, compara- 
tively, before the fowls go to roost. This effectually destroys the lice upon the 
perches and the strong fumes that remain after application for a. time aid in 
driving vermin from the bodies of the fowls during the night. Care should be 



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. 351 

taken in not using this powerful- agent too generously. But if judiciously ap- 
plied to roosts, and to the insides and bottoms of laying boxes, its advantages 
will quickly be realized by those who have never tried this experiment to rid 
their fowls of the annoyance of this hen-house pest, which so rapidly generates 
in the interior of poultry buildings, especially in our warmer months. 

CAKED BAGS IN COWS. 

A correspondent in the Cincinnati G-azette says, for caked bags in cows, 
get ten cents' worth of dry iodine ; fill a cup with good fresh lard and stir in 
the iodine till it is thoroughly mixed ; let it stand for a day or night ; stir it 
again and rub it in with the hand frequently, and a cure is certain. Whoever 
employs the violent remedies should understand that they may do more than is 
desired. Iodine affects the secretions powerfully, and causes the absorption of 
tumors and abnormal growths ; may it not also cause a decrease in the secretion 
of milk ? We have found that persistent rubbing and kneading was better than 
anything else. If the bag be very tender, as it often is, gives a teaspoonful of 
tincture of arnica in water, and rub tlie same diluted with twice as much water 
upon the bag, to take out the soreness. 

SMALL HOGS. 

Some sensible breeder of swine writes: "There is not one single advantage 
to be claimed in large hogs. There never was a monster hog which did not 
make the man who raised him pay for every pound he weighed. They don't 
furnish an ounce of meat gratis, but charge full price for every atom of their 
carcass. When slaughtered, it takes a long time to get one cool to the marrow 
bone, and when the hams are put in salt it is troublesome to finish them to the 
center. Four hundred pounds' live weight is as large as hogs should be, in 
order to make good bacon. Beyond this size, there is a loss somewhere 
either .the feeder, the butcher or consumer is beaten, and as a general thing 
every one who has anything to do with the big hog will find, if he observes 
closely, that they are not so profitable as the smooth, little hog of only 350 
pounds' weight. Small head, with little, upright ears, and legs and feet 
delicate to perfection, are marks which indicate the greatest amount of flesh 
for any given amount of food consumed, and more rapidly draw the attention 
of the butcher. 

CRIBBING IN HORSES. 

Cribbing is caused, in the first place, by some foreign substance being 
pressed between the teeth, or by the front teeth growing too close together, 
thus causing pain. The horse, to avoid this, instinctively pulls at any hard 
substance, thus spreading the points of the teeth, and by that means affording 
temporary relief. To remedy this fault, it is only necessary to saw between 



352 MISCEELANEOUS ITEMS. 

the teeth with a very thin saw ; this relieves the teeth of all side pressure, and 
effectually ends the trouble. The gulping of wind and the gurgling in the 
throat are effects that will cease with the removal of the cause. 

TO KEEP EGGS. 

A Canada farmer tells us how he does it : " I take a tub of any size and 
put a layer of conmon salt about an inch deep in the bottom. Then grease the 
eggs with butter and place them in the salt with the small end down, so that 
they will not touch the wood of the tub nor each other ; then fill the vacancies 
with salt and cover them again about an inch deep, as before ; then place an- 
other layer of eggs, then salt alternately, till the tub is filled, then cover the top 
with salt and put them where they will not freeze. I have kept eggs in this 
manner from September till April, as good as fresh eggs. The grease on the 
shell keeps the salt from penetrating, thereby keeping the eggs fresh, while the 
saving qualities of the salt keep them from becoming putrid. This recipe is 
both cheap and good, as the salt can be fed to cattle afterward." 

As persistent and profitable producers of eggs, hens which are a cross between 
a game-cock and a black Spanish hen are strongly recommended by an English 
breeder. He says they are small and black, but they yield average-sized eggs, 
never desire to set, and seldom cease to lay even for a day, except at molting- 
time. 



THE PRAIRIE FARMER 



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