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Full text of "Biographical and genealogical record of La Salle and Grundy counties, Illinois"

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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 



RECORD 



OF 



La Salle and Grundy Counties 



ILLINOIS 



ILLUSTRATED 



x^oi^xjtimh:; ii 



CHICAGO 
THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1900 






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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD 



MRS. AARON TYLER HARFORD. 

C RANGES (DEWEY) HARFORD, widow of the late Aaron Tyler 
Harford, of Verona, is a representative of one of the leading pioneer 
families of Grundy county, Illinois. The ancestors of both Mr. and Mrs. 
Harford, in both the paternal and maternal lines, were of sterling English 
stock. They were of a race w hich has been foremost in America in found- 
ing our free institutions and in settling and developing our country. The 
first of this family of Harfords in America was a pioneer in Westchester 
county, New York; and Ephraim Harford, grandfather of Aaron Tyler Har- 
ford, was a farmer there. 

Harry Harford, a son of Ephraim and father of Aaron Tyler Harford, 
was bom in Westchester count) , New York, April 3, 1780. He was a soldier 
in the United States Army in the war of 181 2-14, and was captured by the 
British and confined for a considerable time on a prison ship. His wife, 
Peggie Maria Tyler, whom he married in Westchester county, was born 
there March 3. 1798, and was a first cousin of John Tyler, president of the 
United States. Their children were born and named as follows: Lewis T., 
1815; Loretta. March 13, 1816: Sarah McDonald, 1817; Elizabeth Cecilia. 
1818 (died April 28, 1895); Ghauncey. 1819; Altie, 1821; Aaron J.. 1822 (died 
July 15, 1899): ]\Iargaret F., 1823 (died December 25, 1876); John, 1824; 
William H., 1827; Frederick C, 1830; Peter Fleming, 1832; Mary, 1834 
(died young); Catherine, 1837; and Joseph. 

Harry Harford, who was a w^ell-read and observant man, and who was 
m early life a school teacher, lived on his farm in Westchester county. New 
York, until about 1840. when he removed to Illinois. He traded his New 
York farm for one hundred arid sixty acres of land in Kendall county, four 
miles east of Lisbon. With his son, Aaron Tyler, he came out from New 
York one year in advance of the rest of his family, and, as the land was un- 
improved and without a house, the two lived in their wagon during their first 
winter in the state. They made preparations for the family and the others 
came the next spring, making the journey with horses from the Hudson 

4111 

544096 



402 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

river, in New York. Mr. Harford improved this property and lived on it 
until, late in life, he sold it and removed to California, where he lived, retired 
from business, and died on Christmas, 1874, at the home of his daughter, 
Mrs. Catherine I^I. Biter. He was a man of strong character and broad 
views, a member of no church, a Democrat in politics, an honest man whose 
rule in life was .the golden rule. His wife, Peggie Maria (Tyler) Harford, 
died in 1882. 

Aaron Tyler Harford, a son of Harry and Peggie Maria (Tyler) Har- 
ford, was bom at South Salem, Westchester county. New York, July 2, 
1822. He divided his time in boyhood between farm work and attendance 
at the public school. He was really the first of the family in Illinois. Harry 
Harford exchanged farms with one ^^liller, an old Westchester county ac- 
quaintance who had come out some years before, and Aaron was sent ahead 
to "spy out the land" and report his impressions to his father before the deal 
was concluded. He came and saw and was conquered by the charms and 
manifest advantages of Illinois, and it was mainly through his influence that 
his father was induced to come west. Aaron lived with his parents on this 
farm some years after their settlement. He married Frances Dewey, at the 
homestead of her father in Vienna township, Grundy county, November i, 
1847, and settled on new land at Lisbon, Kendall county, Illinois, within the 
present limits of White Willow township. 

Frances Dewey, who became the wife and is now the widow of Aaron 
Tyler Harford, was bom in Ketton, Rutlandshire, England, December 4, 
1825, a daughter of John, Jr., and Mary (Welbom) Dewey. John Dewey, 
Jr., was a son of John and Sarah (Ma^son) Dewey. John Dewey. Sr., was 
a farmer, a man of good ability, who brought up his family in the faith of the 
Church of England. Besides John, Jr., his children were Sarah, Eliza, Will- 
iam and Mary. John Dewey, Jr., was bom November 9, 1802, at his 
father's homestead, Sutton, Lincolnshire Fens, and was educated for a mer- 
cantile career; but he also acquired a knowledge of milling, and, liking the 
business, bought a wind-power gristmill in Rutlandshire and devoted himself 
with much success to its operation. There he met, wooed and won ^lary 
Welbom, and they were married in the form prescribed by the Church of 
England. Mary Welbom was born at Woolsthorpe, December 30, 1802, 
a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Jenkinson) Welborn. 

The Welborns had been settled in Lincolnshire for many generations. 
Thomas Welbom leased of the Duke of Rutland a farm for ninety-nine 
years and lived on it from his marriage until his death, February 12, 1839, at 
the age of eighty-three years. He was a substantial farmer and stock-raiser, 
a man of integrity and good business ability. His children were born and 
named as follows: Mary, December 30, 1802; Ann, November 11, 1805; 




^cy^<;2^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 403 

Prances, February 12, 1808; Thomas, Alay i, 181 1; Richard, August 2, 1814. 
Frances and Thomas were drowned in childhood in a canal near their home. 
Mrs. Harford has a good recollection of the Welborns and Deweys in Eng- 
land, as she did not leave her native land until after her eleventh birthday, 
and the scenes, incidents and environments of her childhood are vividly im- 
pressed upon her mind. They were industrious, progressive, well-to-do, 
God-fearing and reliable men and women, and their descendants in America 
do them honor. 

John Dewey, Jr., Mrs. Harford's father, ran his mill at Ketton four years 
after his marriage. He then sold it, and, having good education and busi- 
ness ability, was for four years an assistant surveyor on a canal. Then he 
was for a like period a bookkeeper at Grenthan, Lincolnshire, in the office of 
the Grenthan and Nottingham canal. While Mr. Dewey was in the last 
position his wife became interested in LaSalle county, Illinois, which was 
represented in the letters of her sister, who had married John Beeson and had 
settled there on a new farm, as "a land flowing with milk and honey," figura- 
tively speaking; and the more she heard and talked about Illinois the more 
intense grew her desire to come here. Her husband could not venture to 
give up his position and trust fortune in an unknown land, but he permitted 
her to come over, with their children, while he worked on, with the under- 
standing that she would return or he would join them in America, as she 
might advise later. 

That was more than sixty years ago, in the days of sailing vessels, stage 
coaches and canals, and in England Illinois was popularly supposed to be as 
yet in the domain of the wild Indian and the wild beast, and such an under- 
taking as Mrs. Dewey proposed was regarded as a difficult and dangerous 
one even for a man. But she was a woman of intelligence and of the stock 
from which the best pioneers have come, and she would not be dissuaded 
from her purpose. She made great preparation for the journey, and pray- 
ers were offered in the church for her safe guidance and delivery from all 
perils at her journey's end. She set down in an English almanac of that 
year the dates of the principal events of her journey, and from them we learn 
that she left Woolsthorpe, the home of her father, April 12, 1837, and trav- 
eled by canal to Nottingham, and thence by way of the rivers Trent and Mer- 
sey to Liverpool, whence she sailed, April 18, in the ship Gai'rick, an old- 
fashioned sailing vessel, but new and stanch and on her first voyage. It 
was not until five weeks later that she landed in New York. The voyage 
had much of the time been a tempestuous one, and she and her two children, 
with the other passengers, had more than once been tied to their berths to 
prevent their being thrown about Ijy the pitching vessel and injured by vio- 
lent contact with objects near. 



404 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

After remaining a week in New York they set out for Illinois, going up 
the Hudson to Albany by the steamer Swift Shore, from Albany to Buffalo 
by way of the Erie canal, by lake steamer from Buffalo to Detroit, and there 
waited five days for a "connecting" steamer to Chicago, which was com- 
manded by Captain Cotton. From. Chicago to Ottawa they made the jour- 
ney by stage. A Methodist camp-meeting was in session at Ottawa, and, 
being a Methodist, Mrs. Dewey found friends at once, who took her and 
her children to Deer Park township, where her sister lived. On the way 
they stopped over night. June 26, 1837, at Brown's tavern, the first log house 
they had slept in to that date. The next morning they arrived at Beeson's, 
and were entertained by Mrs. Dewey's sister. 

Mrs. Dewe}^ wrote her husband such glowing accounts of Illinois that he 
came over in 1838. In 1839 and 1840 he rented land of Jesse Newport, the 
pioneer of !\lazon township, Grundy county. After that he rented land three 
years of Jonah Newport, brother of Jesse. At the expiration of that time 
he had saved money enough to buy eighty acres where his daughter, Mrs. 
Harford lives, of the United States Government, at a dollar and a quarter 
an acre. On this land was a beautiful grove named Paver's Grove, in honor 
of a pioneer settler in that vicinity, and otherwise it promised to be an attrac- 
tive and desirable homestead. He improved it and added to it until the 
place contained one hundred and sixty acres of fine farming land. He built 
upon it a dwelling substantial and costly for the time and locality, which is 
now a part of a more modern residence. He prospered and became a 
well-to-do fanner and stockman, with cattle ranging for miles in either direc- 
tion over the prairies. He was a good business man, a good neighbor, and a 
good Democrat, industrious, frugal, upright and generous, who died Janu- 
ary 15, 1882, aged about seventy-eight years. His children were Frances, 
born December 4, 1825, at Ketton, England: and Thomas Welborn. bom 
May 31, 1827, at Woolsthori>e. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Tyler Harford lived only during the first winter 
of their married life on the place Mr. Harford took up at Lisbon (now- in 
White Willow township, Kendall county, Illinois), on which he had built a 
house before his marriage. Thereafter they lived at the Dewey homestead 
for two years, until Mr. Harford bought eighty acres of government land 
adjoining the Dewey homestead on the south, which he improved by build- 
ing a log house and otherwise, and occupied it for four years. Then. Mrs. 
Harford's mother having died, Mrs. Harford inherited a portion of the 
Dewey homestead and Mr. Harford purchased another portion, and they 
moved there: and there Mr. Harford lived out the remainder of his days 
and there his widow still lives. 

Mr. Harford was a man of broad mind and independent views, and tol- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 405 

eraiit of the views of others, Iiowever much they might have dift'ered from 
his own. He took great interest in liberal religion, and was one of the 
founders of the Universalist ciiurch.at \'erona, and for many years one of 
its deacons, and from its organization to his death one of its most liberal sup- 
porters. He was a great reader and possessed a remarkable memory, and 
his stock of historical, scientific, technical and general information was ex- 
traordinary. He was an original abolitionist, a Republican and later a 
Greenbacker. His business ability was of a hig"h order, and, assisted by his 
wife, w ho inherited from her mother as well as from her father a vigorous 
and practical character, he accumulated a handsome property, including four 
hundred and eighty acres of farm land in Illinois, besides fifteen thousand 
acres of valuable land in .-\labama, which he owneil in company with his son 
Frederick. His widow's present fine residence was built in 1879, and her 
home place is one of the finest farming properties in Grundy county. Situ- 
ated near a beautiful grove and surrounded by charming woodland scenery, 
this model home is one of the "show places" in this part of Illinois. 

Mr. Harford died July 15, 1899. Following are the names and dates 
of birth ol his children: Cornelia D., August 9, 1848; Mary, February 4, 
1850 (died June 4. 1851): Fannie May, November 24. 1852; Frederick, Sep- 
tember 27, 1854; Addison, March 14, 1857 (died May 25, 1S75); Olive, July 
7, 1861 (died June 7, 1870): and Ellen, April 12, 1864. Their hospitable 
home contains many evidences of her culture and good taste. Mrs. Har- 
ford is of uncommon business ability for a woman. Her brother, Thomas 
Welborn Dewey, in 1850, went by way of the isthmus to California, and died 
there at the age of twenty-three, as the result of exposure at Acapulco, 
Mexico, where he was landed with other passengers, the captain putting 
them ashore without their consent, that he might carry out other plans. 



JUDGE A. R. JORDAN. 

For the fourth term Alvah R. Jordan is serving as county judge of 
Grundy county, and the fact of his re-election stands as unmistakable evi- 
dence of his marked ability in the line of his chosen calling. The judge 
upon the bench must possess not only a wide, comprehensive and accurate 
knowledge of the law but must also^ add to this urbanity, tact and keen dis- 
cernment, and above all he must have the power of putting aside all personal 
prejudice and feeling that his decisions may be utterly without bias, — exclu- 
sively the embodiment of justice. In all these particulars Judge Jordan has 
shown himself well qualified for the office, and is now serving his thirteenth 
year upon the bench of the county court. He is a man of strong individual- 



4o6 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

ity and marked mentality, and has been an honor to the profession which has 
honored him. 

Air. Jordan is a native of the Pine Tree state, his birth having occurred in 
Kennebec county, Maine, on the 13th of December, 1843. 'I's parents being 
Samuel and Philena (Dow) Jordan. On the paternal side he is of English 
lineage, while on the maternal side he is of Scotch-Irish descent. The an- 
cestry of the Jordan family can be traced back to the Rev. Samuel Jordan, 
the first Episcopal clergyman of Falmouth, Maine, who left his home in 
Devon, England in 1640, in order to carrv' the gospel tidings to the colonists 
of the New World. He took up his abode in Falmouth, now Portland, 
Maine, and other of his kinsmen came at the same time and settled along the 
coast of New England. His descendants lived in the Pine Tree state for 
many generations, and there Samuel Jordan was born and reared. Having 
arrived at years of maturity, he married Miss Philena Dow, who was bom 
in Windham, New Hampshire. Her father was of English descent, but on 
the maternal side she vras of Scotch-Irish lineage. Her mother was Betsey 
Morrison, a lineal descendant of Samuel E. Morrison, who was a lieutenant 
in a company of New Hampshire troops at the capture of Lewisburg. She 
was also directly descended from Mathew- Thornton, a signer of the Declara- 
tion of Independence. Many are the descendants of these first American 
ancestors, and not a few have become prominent in business, professional 
and political life in various sections of the United States. In 1854 Judge 
Jordan's parents came to the west, locating in Morris, Illinois, where they 
spent the residue of their days. The father's death occurred in 1885, and 
the mother passed away five years previously. They were the parents of 
but two children, the daughter, Elizabeth H., having died in childhood. 

Judge Jordan is therefore the only survivor of the family. He was only 
ten years of age when he accompanied his parents on their removal to Mor- 
ris, and here he attended the public schools and also continued his studies 
under the private direction of Professor H. K. Trask. who was the principal 
of the Morris public schools. In i860 he entered Union college, in the 
sophomore year, and was pursuing his collegiate course when the civil war 
was inaugurated. Feeling that his chief duty was to his country, in Au- 
gust, 1861, he laid aside his text-books and joined the "boys in blue" of Com- 
pany G, Thirty-sixth Illinois Infantry, as a private. He was made the fourth 
corporal and thus ser^-ed until November, 1861, when he was discharged on 
account of a broken ankle. In the spring of 1862, however, he re-entered 
the serxnce and was commissioned second lieutenant of Company I, Sixty- 
ninth Illinois Infantn,-. The regiment enlisted for a term of three months 
and on the expiration of that time was regularly discharged. 

Mr. Jordan then went to Central City, Colorado, where he worked in 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 407 

the mines and also taught the first public school ever conducted in that state. 
He there joined the Third Colorado Cavalry and was present at the Sand 
creek Indian massacre. On the expiration of his term of service in 1865 he 
returned to Morris, Illinois, and shortly afterward removed to Council BlufYs, 
Iowa, where he remained two years. On the expiration of that period he 
again came to Morris, and entered upon the practice of law, in which pro- 
fession he has since risen to high rank. He has informed himself thorough- 
ly concerning the principles of jurisprudence, and at the bar he won many 
notable forensic triumphs in important litigated cases. His correct reason- 
ing, his logical deductions, his accuracy in applying the points of law to the 
facts in controversy, all gained him prominence and won him a large client- 
age. He therefore conducted a successful private practice until elected to 
the bench, and since his elevation to the seat of justice he has won still higher 
honors by his ability in discharging the important duties of his high office. 
In politics the Judge has always been a stanch Republican, and on that ticket 
he has several times been chosen for positions of public trust and responsi- 
bility. The first office to which he was elected was that of state's attorney, 
in 1872, and so ably did he discharge his duties that he was re-elected in 1876. 
In 1882 he was elected county judge for a term of four years, and then re- 
sumed the practice of law, but in 1890 again became a candidate and by suc- 
cessive elections has since been continued in the office, so that he is now 
serving his thirteenth year upon the bench. In 1898 he was elected as an 
independent candidate, and the large vote which he received plainly indi- 
cated the confidence reposed in his ability and in his worth as a man. Upon 
the bench he has won a most enviable reputation and gained the commenda- 
tion of the bar as well as the general public. 

In 1869 the Judge was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Sarah D. Parmelee, a 
daughter of Charles D. Parmelee, of Morris, Illinois. Their pleasant home 
in Morris is celebrated for its hospitality, and the Judge and his wife occupy a 
very enviable position in social circles. He belongs to the Grand Army of 
the Republic, and in his religious belief is a Unitarian. In early life he had 
no special advantages of wealth or influence tO' aid him, and his progress 
has therefore resulted from individual merit. He is a man of marked in- 
tellectuality, of keen discemment, and of broad human sympathies and every- 
where commands the respect which is always accorded genuine worth. 



WILLIAM HOGE. 



In the days when Scotland was sending many of its brave men to Amer- 
ica to aid in the settlement of the New World, there came to this country an 
ancestor of our subject. The first of the name to arrive in the United 



4o8 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

States was William Hoge, wiio left the land of hills and heather and crossed 
the Atlantic in the seventeenth century. He married Barbara Hume, and 
their descendants are now widely scattered over the country. The great- 
grandfather of our subject also bore the name of William Hoge, and was bom 
in Pennsylvania, the first representative of the family to become identified 
with the Society of Friends, having joined that quiet Qiristian people and 
lived an honorable, upright life, conmianding the respect of all with whom 
he came in contact. In 1754 he removed to V'irginia, where he reared his 
family of seven children, namely : Solomon, James, Wilham. Joseph, 
George, Zebulon and Nancy. Of these, Solomon Hoge was united in mar- 
riage to Maiy Nichols, and among their children was Joshua Hoge, the 
father of our subject. He wedded Miss Mary Poole, and unto them, on the 
5th of July, 1801, in Loudoun county, Virginia, was born the son to whom 
they gave the name of William, a name that has frequently occurred in dif- 
ferent generations of the family. 

William Hoge spent his youth on his father's farm in the Old Domin- 
ion, and pursued his education in a little log school-house such as was com- 
mon at that day, where the "three R's" constituted the curriculum, namely, 
readin', 'ritin' and 'rithmetic. In November, 1826, when about twenty- 
six years of age, he married Rachel Bowles, and in 1829 came to the west, 
in company with his father, on a prospecting trip. The journey was made 
on horseback, by way of Indianapolis and Covington, Indiana, to the site of 
the present city of Joliet, Illinois. Mr. Hoge, of this review, brought with 
him two thousand dollars, which belonged to his father and which he in- 
vested in canal lands that were then surveyed and upon the market. He 
selected a section and a half of choice prairie land bordering on Nettle creek, 
in what is now Grundy county. This purchase gave him timber, water and 
prairie, and provided him with cheap transportation by way of the canal and 
Illinois river to l)oth Chicago and St. Louis. As a commission for making 
the purchase, his father gave him his choice of any quarter section of the 
land, and after he had made his selection he returned to Virginia. A year 
later he removed the family to his new possessions, reaching his destination 
in the latter part of October, 1831. A great Pennsylvania wagon, drawn by 
four horses, carried his household effects, while his wife and their children, 
accompanied by a young lady, who was a cousin of his wife, rode in a cov- 
ered buggy drawn by two horses. His brother Solomon also accompanied 
him in order to aid him in establishing a home in the western wilds, and thus 
they m.ade the long, tedious journey wliich. consumed seven weeks. Hur- 
riedly a log cabin was constructed, and in that primitive home the family re- 
sided for several years. It was the second cabin built within the present 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 409 

limits of Grundv county, a fact wliicli indicates tlie wild and unsettled condi- 
tion of this region. 

In May, 1832, the Sac war occurred, and Mr. Hoge, together with the 
other white settlers in the locality, fled with his family to Ottawa, but his 
home'was unmolested by the red men, who thus showed their gratitude for 
the kindness which he had recently done one of their number. Not knowing 
his place would be safe, however, he took his wife and children to Ottawa and 
assisted in building- a rude log fort for protection against the Indians. The 
whole family afterward went to Pekin, Illinois, and remained there until the 
latter part of August, 1832, when he deemed it safe to return. 

They once more took up their abode in their pioneer home, and the 
w^ork of developing the land then l>egan in earnest, and though there were 
many hardships and trials to be borne, the labor was steadily prosecuted and 
in time the fields yielded bounteous harvests. As his financial resources in- 
creased, Mr. Hoge was enabled to extend the boundaries of his farm by the 
purchase of other lands, and he also carried on cattle-raising. Corn was his 
principal crop, and the sale of cattle added greatly to his income, so that, as 
a result of his energy and ability in the two branches of his business, he be- 
came a prosperous man. He had great assistance from his nine children, 
five sons and four daughters, wdio grew up around him, and abl_\- aided him 
in the work of the field and of the household. 

In 1843 Ml"- Hoge was called upon to m.ourn the loss of his wife, whose 
death occurred in that year, and during the rebellion his son Hendley was 
killed in the battle of Franklin, Tennessee. This was a great blow to him, 
but did not deter him from the faitliful performance of his duty. He realized 
the disadvantage under which he labored, owing to the limited opportunities 
of education which he had received in youth, and was always a firm friend 
of the public schools. In 1834 lie erected at his own expense the first school- 
house in Grundy county. It was a log cabin, twelve by fourteen feet, with 
clap-board roof, and situated a few rods from his home, and still standing. 
There Marie Southworth, afterward Mrs. Whitney, taught the first school 
in the county, and thus Mr. Hoge provided educational privileges for his 
children and for the other young people of the neighborhood. He was 
always a stanch Republican in politics from the organization of the party, 
but aside from casting his ballot in support of the men and measures of his 
choice, he took no active part in political aff^airs, save in the discharge of the 
duties of several local offices. His interest was centered in his family and 
his business, and he had therefore no political ambition. He was devoted 
to his wife and children, and considered no laI:)or too great that would en- 
hance their welfare or promote their happiness. In religious belief he was 
a Deist, believing that one could best serve God by sendng his fellow men. 



410 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

He was universally respected, for his life was useful and honorable. He 
passed away June 22, 1884, leaving to his family not only a large estate but 
that good name Avhich is rather to be chosen than great riches. His sterling 
character, his fidelity to duty, his devotion to friends and family made his 
example one well worthy of emulation. As an honored pioneer he well de- 
serves mention in this volume, and no history- of Grundy county would be 
complete without the record of his life. 



JOSHUA HOGE. SR. 

Joshua Hoge is one of the oldest living settlers of Grundy county, hav- 
ing spent his entire life in this locality. However, he was born in Tazewell 
county, Illinois, June 6, 1832, during a brief absence of his parents, William 
and Rachel (Bowles) Hoge. who had fled from Grundy county to avoid the 
dangers of the Black Hawk war. Returning to the old homestead in Au- 
gust of that year, he was reared in Nettle Creek township, amid the wild 
scenes of the frontier, and with the family shared in the trials and hardships 
of pioneer life. Farming was conducted in a primitive manner with crude 
machinery, but the energy and perseverance of the settlers enabled them to 
convert the wild lands into rich and productive fields. Mr. Hoge assisted 
in the arduous task of improving the farm and remained thereon until 
twenty-eight years of age, when he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth 
Gregg, who was bom in Belmont Count)-, Ohio. 

The young couple began their domestic life upon a farm in Grundy 
county, and for many years he was actively identified with the agricultural 
interests of the community, achieving remarkable success in his undertakings. 
Indolence and idleness are utterly foreign to his nature, while his chief char- 
acteristics are perseverance and energy. This enabled him to augment his 
possessions year by year, and to-day he is the owner of four hundred acres 
of rich and arable land, from which he derives a good income. In 1898 he 
left the farm and removed to ^Morris, where he has since made his home, 
occupying a spacious and modern residence, which is one of the most attrac- 
tive homes in the city. There he is spending his declining days, surrounded 
by all the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. 

Unto IMr. and ^Irs. Hoge have been bom two sons. — Arthur A., and 
William M.. — who are living on their father's farm and are well-known agri- 
culturists of the county. The one daughter of the family, Charrie Belle, 
died at the age of fourteen years. Mr. Hoge and his family have long been 
prominent people of the community, sharing the high regard of friends and 
neighbors, for their many excellencies of character commend them to the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 411 

confidence and esteem of all. Mr. Hoge has never taken an active part in 
politics, preferring to devote his time and energies to his business interests, 
in which he has met with ver>' creditable success. His life stajids in exempli- 
fication of the fact that prosperity comes not from chance but is the result 
of earnest, consecutive efrorts. As one of the pioneers of the community 
he is also deserving of mention in this volume. He has witnessed almost 
the entire growth of Grundy county, has been an interested spectator of its 
advancement, and has borne his part in the work of progress and improve- 
ment. As a citizen he is loyal and public-spirited, and withholds his support 
from no measure intended to enhance the general welfare. 



GEORGE ROBINSON. 



Back to Connecticut in the old colonial days Mr. Robinson traces his 
ancestr)% for the founder of the family in America was among those who 
aided in laying the foundation of the Charter Oak state. Isaac Robinson, 
his grandfather, was born in Connecticut, on the river of that name, and was 
a farmer by occupation. During the Revolutionary war he served as en- 
sign, an office now equivalent to that of second lieutenant, and loyally aided 
the colonists in their struggle for independence, remaining in the army until 
the British troops were forced to withdraw from American soil. He mar- 
ried Miss Sarah Dow, an own cousin of the celebrated Lorenzo Dow. They 
first located on a farm in Connecticut and then moved to New York in early 
pioneer days, and there he died, about 1813, between the ages of sixty and 
seventy years. He was a member of the Methodist church and a man of 
sterling character. His children were Don Alonzo, Zenas, Wesley, Isaac, 
Solomon, Polly, Esther, Millie and Phoebe. 

Don Alonzo Robinson, the father of our subject, was boni on the 
Connecticut river, February 5, 1787. He enjoyed such educational privi- 
leges as were afforded in the schools of New York state at that time, and as 
he was an apt student he acquired a comprehensive knowledge that well 
fitted him for life's practical duties. He became a school-teacher and fol- 
lowed that pursuit throughout his life. He was largely self-educated, 
however, for he always continued his reading and study and was constantly 
adding to his broad fund of information. When a boy he accompanied his 
parents on their removal to Courtland county. New York, being at the time 
about seven years of age. In the Empire state he wedded I\Iiss Nancy Cam- 
rneron, a sister of Rev. William Cammeron, who was a native of Scotland, 
and was a Methodist minister. The following children were born unto 
them: William Francis, who was born January 4, 1816, and Nancy, who 



412 BIOGRAPHICAL AM) GliXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

was born February 19, 1821. The mother died in Chenango county, New 
York, and the fatlier afterward married Miss P>etsey Conick. who was born 
in Courtland county. May 3. 1802, a daugliter of W'ilham and Martha Conick. 
Her fatlier was a native of New England and served in a Vermont regiment 
throughout the war for independence, being at one time under the direct 
command of General Washington. He took up his abode in Courtland 
county, New York, thus becoming one of the pioneer settlers who secured 
and improved a farm in the midst of the forest. He afterward sold that 
property and went to Chenango county. New York, where he lived a retired 
life. He died in Chenango county in 1838, at the age of eighty-four years. 
His children were Robert, John. Peter. James. Sallie, Betsey and Polly. 

After their marriage Don Alonzo Robinson and his wife located on a 
farm in Chenango county. New York, where he engaged in teaching school 
through the winter months, his attention being given to the labors of the field 
and meadow through the summer months. In 1837 he went with his family 
to Seneca county. New York, where he continued teaching and farming 
until his removal to Michigan in 1844. He settled in Kalamazoo county, 
and in 1856 he came to Illinois. He was then well advanced in years, and 
made his home with his son Charles until his death, which occurred Feb- 
ruary 13, 1871. He was a Methodist in religious faith and served as a class 
leader in church. In the Empire state he served for many years as justice 
of the peace and was one of the school directors of his district. He lived an 
upright and honorable life and was highly respected by all who knew him. 
The children of his second marriage were James, born March 30, 1823; 
George, November 13, 1824; Fletcher, ]\[ay 4. 1826; ]\Iary, November 13, 
1834: Charles, April 12, 1836; and John, January 22, 1838. All of this fam- 
ily were born in Chenango county, save Esther, who was bom in Seneca 
county. New York, May 12, 1843. The mother, Mrs. Betsey Robinson, 
died in Mazon township. Grundy count\-. at the home of her son, Charles, 
September 23, 1880, and was a member of the Methodist church. 

George Robinson, whose name introduces this review, was born in 
Chenango county. New York, November 13, 1824, and pursued his educa- 
tion in the schools of Seneca county, whither he removed with his parents 
when thirteen years of age. Verv^ early in life he began to work as a farm 
hand, and at the age of nineteen years he removed to Michigan, where he 
was employed in that capacity. In 1849 ^^'^ ^^'^s one of the gold-seekers who 
went to California, making" the long and arduous journey across the plains. 
He proceeded westward by railroad to Niles. Michigan, then by stage to 
Michigan City, crossing the lake on a steamer to Chicago. From there he 
went by the Frink & Walker line of stages to Rock Island, Illinois, thence 
down the Mississippi river to St. Louis. Missouri, and then proceeded by 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 413 

steamer up the Missouri to St. Joseph. \\'hen he left home he took with 
him his "carpet-l>ag" containing his clothing', and in his purse had one liun- 
dred dollars. On the boat between St. Louis and St. Joseph he met a fellow- 
traveler to the gold mines, William McKenny. of Ohio, who had an outfit 
consisting of oxen, a huge wagon, provisions and other necessary supplies. 
Mr. Robinson made a bargain with Mr. McKemiy to join iiis party to drive 
the oxen and cook. He was also to pay fifty dollars down and on reaching 
California fifty dollars more; but on reaching. the Humboldt river he ob- 
tained a chance to drive oxen for a Mr. Bedford, from Kentucky, who was 
accompanied by his family and who had two wagons and five yoke of oxen. 
They took the Lassen route to Lassen's ranch, California, crossing- the Mis- 
souri river at St. Joseph on the loth of May, 1849. '^^''^ train consisted of 
thirty-seven huge covered wagons, each drawn by from three to six yoke 
of oxen and containing j^rovisions and supplies to last for several months. 
There were one hundred and twenty armed men in the party under the com- 
mand of Captain King, who had served in the Mexican war. They were 
five months and four days jn reaching Lassen's ranch on the Sacramento 
river, one hundred miles above Sacramento city. It was a great sight. — this 
almost interminable roatl across the plains for thousands of miles; and 
throughout the greater part of the time caravans of gold-seekers with out- 
fits similar to their own could be seen to the front or rear. Along the trail 
between St. Joseph and the Rocky Mountains there were many American 
adventurers and gold-seekers, all armed in case of an attack from hostile In- 
dians, or murderous Mormons who, at Mountain Meadow, under the leader- 
ship of the infamous John D. Lee, massacred one of the largest bands of 
emigrants that ever crossed the plains. In the party were many women 
and children, and all were put to death without mercy, with the exception 
of a few of the little children whomi the Mormons believed were too young to 
tell the story; but the impression remained strong on their minds and the 
awful tale was told, and many years later Lee was hung for his crimes. 

The train with which Mr. Robinson traveled saw a number of bands 
of Indians, but were unmolested. They visited a Sioux village on the 
Platte river, and Mr. Robinson, having some trinkets which he had bought 
for the purpose of trading with the Indians, left the wagon to make the ex- 
chang-e. He found the village deserted by all of the Indian men, who were 
out hunting, and he traded to some extent with the squaws, however. He 
discovered that his wagon train had passed out of sight and so hastened to 
overtake them. A short time afterward an Indian appeared and tried to 
take from him a handkercliief which lie wore around his neck. This he 
would not allow, whereupon the Indian drew his knife and made signs that 
he would cut his throat. Thus threatened, and having no arms. Mr. Robin- 



414 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

son was obliged to surrender the coveted article. On reaching the wagons 
soon afterward he missed a buffalo robe, and, seeing some squaws near by, 
making off with the stolen property, he recovered his robe and drove them 
away. However, the Indians as a rule were friendly, for the caravans were 
too numerous and the emigrants too well armed to allow them to make an 
attack. 

Another incident concerning ^Ir. Robinson's trip across the plains oc- 
curred when they forded the Platte river, meeting there a band of Sioux In- 
dians. They were dressed in skins with all of the paraphernalia of savage 
life, and, seated on ponies, they rode with the train five miles, having held 
a counsel with the whites and smoked the pipe of peace. Afterward their 
train passed through their village, and Air. Robinson and several of the 
younger men stopped to trade with the redskins. He saw the Indians in 
all their savage wildness, but his experiences on the way left him with many 
memories which he now cherishes. 

Mr. Robinson was only twenty-four years old when he crossed the great 
plains, and, although he walked the entire distance and was often footsore 
and weary, his health remained good; and soon after reaching Lassen's 
ranch, on the Sacramento river, he went to Sacramento city, one hundred 
miles, on a pony which he had found disabled while crossing the plains. He 
secured employment with a man who conducted a "hotel" for the miners 
in a big tent at Drytown on Dry creek, forty miles east of Sacramento city, 
receiving three hundred dollars per month for his ser^-ices. There he 
worked for a month, after which he engaged in gold mining on Dry creek 
for a few weeks. He was then taken ill and after two months, being very 
weak and unable to work, he secured transportation to Sacramento cit}\ 
paying an ounce of gold (sixteen dollars) for the distance of fort} miles, and 
finally obtained shelter in the Crescent City Hotel. When well enough he 
worked for his board until able to earn wages. He then engaged in hay- 
making on the Sacramento river, at ten dollars per day. So many men 
were in the gold mines that help could not be obtained at what we would 
call reasonable prices for other kinds of labor. Subsequently Mr. Robinson 
engaged in gold-mining in Nevada county, California, and was afterward 
employed at ranching and teaming. He returned to the state by way of the 
Nicaragua route across Lake Nicaragua, making that journey at the time 
the celebrated filibuster chief. Walker, and his band were making raids in 
the Central American states. A company of these filibusters had been on 
the boat from San Francisco, but they left the vessel at San Juan del Norte, 
on the Pacific coast. The two hundred and fifty passengers rode on mules 
twelve miles, almost entirely without arms, to San Juan del Sur, on Lake 
Nicaragua. In the market place they bought supplies from the natives, and 



. BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 415 

■while thus busily engaged a company of Nicaraguan soldiers came up and 
"fired upon them, killing five before they made a pretense of discovering that 
the passengers were not filibusters. It was found that the belts of the five 
-who had been killed were cut and that their money had been taken from them. 
On Lake Nicaragua the boat was fired on at the head of the San Juan river, 
and turned back; and it was some time before it entered the port of Grenada, 
about thirty miles distant, where the United States had an American consul. 
However, after many hardships and varied experiences, Mr. Robinson 
reached his home in Kalamazoo, Michigan, in November, 1855. 

Immediately afterward he came to Kankakee county, Illinois, where he 
engaged in farm work. He was married in that county on the 21st of April, 
1858, to Miss Maryette Dickinson, who was born April 5, 1829, in Connecti- 
cut, at Simsbury, Hartford county. She is a daughter of Lewis and Avilla 
(Case) Dickinson, both representatives of old colonial Puritan families of 
Connecticut. Her father was born in that state, March 9, 1799, and died in 
Kankakee county, Illinois, March 4, 1876. He was a farmer and traveling 
salesman, and traveled throughout the southern states selling clocks for thirty 
winters, and during the summer time he lived on the farm with his family 
and gave his attention to agricultural pursuits. He had but one brother, 
who died at the age of twenty-five years, and no sisters. He was married in 
Simsbury, Connecticut, August 28, 1821, tO' Avilla Alden Case, and after 
their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson located on a farm, making a substan- 
tial and comfortable home at Simsbury Connecticut. Their children were 
Mary J., born April 25, 1825; Janette R., February 11, 1827; Maryette, April 
5, 1829; Selah, April 13, 1833; Luke T., January 8, 1835; Timothy C, March 
19, 1837; and Anna H., April 6, 1841. Mr. Dickinson was a member of the 
Connecticut state legislature and a prominent and enterprising man. He 
was greatly respected for his sound judgment, and as a result of many years' 
faithful service he was always known as Squire Dickinson. Of strong in- 
telligence and force of character, he was well fitted for leadership, and 
through his extensive travels he gained much practical knowledge and ex- 
perience. He and his wife were members of the Baptist church, and were 
people of the highest respectability, enjoying the confidence and good will 
of all who knew them. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Robinson located in Pilot township, 
Kankakee county, on a farm of one hundred and twenty acres, which was 
tut little improved. A small tract had been plowed and a small shanty built. 
There they lived for three years, at the end of which time Mr. Robinson sold 
the property and rented land in Will county for three years. He then came 
to Felix township, Grundy county, in the spring of 1865, and purchased 
eighty acres of land upon which some improvements had been made. He 



4i6 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

conducted the work of developing that farm until 1871, when he removed 
to Wauponsee township and purchased eighty acres of land, which he placed 
under a high state of cultivation. There he energetically and successfully 
carried on agricultural pursuits until March, 1892, when he retired from ac- 
tive life, taking up his abode in the village of Mazon. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robinson have been born the following children : 
Willie, born March 18, 1859; Arthur L., February 27, 1862: Nettie. January 
22, 1868; ami Jessie, January i. 1870. Mr. and Mrs. Robinson are members 
of the Methodist church, in which he has sen-ed as a class leader and steward 
for several years. In politics he is a Democrat, and was a justice of the peace 
of Felix township for six years, while, in Washington township, he held the 
same office for two years, and was also a township clerk of Kankakee county; 
and he ever discharged his duties with promptness and faithfulness. His 
life has l)een one of industrv and enterprise, and in his younger days he 
I)assed through many stirring scenes and through many hardships, but now 
in the evening of life he is quietlv resting in the enjoyment of the fruits of his 
former toil. 



GEORGE E. WHEELER. 

George E. Wheeler, of Mazon, Illinois, is one of the prominent and 
influential citizens of Grundy county, where he is also one of the most sub- 
stantial and prosperous farmers. The Wheeler family, of which he is a repre- 
sentative, comes of the old Puritan New England stock. The remote founders 
of the family in America came from England in the days of Puritan emigra- 
tion from that country. The following account of the genealogy of the 
family is taken from a memorandum left by the late Henry H. Wheeler, father 
of George E. Wheeler. 

Thomas Wheeler, the great-great-grandfather of the immediate subject 
of this sketch, was the first of the name of whom we have any record. He 
died while returning from the French and Indian war at Fite Miller tavern, 
near Pine Plains, Columbia county. New York, September i, 1757. He is 
believed to have had a brother Solomon and they are thought to have lived 
at Woodbury, Connecticut, until 1749. Seth Wheeler,, a son of Thomas 
and great-grandfather of George E. Wheeler, was born February 22, 1749, 
and was a captain in the patriot ser\'ice in the Revolutionan,- war. He mar- 
ried Mary Treadwell, born November 23, 1751, and they had children, 
as follows: Thomas, born September i, 1770: Ashbell. born August 17, 
1772; Seth. Jr., born September 3, 1776; Mary, born September 25, 1778, 
who married S. Truesdale; Thomas, born January 31. 1781: Sarah, born 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 417 

June 10. 1783, who married John Truesdale; Lucy, born February 13, 1786, 
who married John Gilbert: Stephen, born June 6, 1789, died May 9, 1861, 
aged seventy-one years, eleven months and three days; Solomon, born July 
25, 1793. died May 7, 1852. Myron Wheeler, a son of Seth, Jr., married 
Catherine Roe and was killed in the battle of Buena Vista in the Mexican 
war. Stephen, a son of Seth Wheeler, born June 6, 1789, was married 
March 30, 1818, to Maria Powers, born October 20, 1795, and their chil- 
dren were as follows: Henry Harrison, born January 28, 1820; Mary, 
born March 8, 1822: Frederick Powers, born June 4, 1824; Richard Nelson, 
born FebruarA- 21, 1826; John, born March 25, 1828: Frances, born April 
10, 1830, who died Februan,- 18, 1832; Caroline F., born February i, 1832, 
and died January 28, 1889; Sarah J., born September 28, 1834, who died 
March 14, 1835; Franklin, born February 20, 1836, who died November 24, 
1863: Sarah J., born July 16. 1840; Helen D. (twin of Sarah J.) who mar- 
ried Edward C. Moody, November 26, 1862. and died June 24. 1879. Stephen 
died May 9, 1861. ^Maria, his wife, Januarj' 4, 1875. Henr>' Harrison 
Wheeler (a son of Stephen and IMaria (Powers) Wheeler and Amanda 
R. Simmons were married October 16, 1849: Richard N. Wheeler and Lucy 
J. Wilson were married March 30, 1851; Sarah J. Wheeler and George W. 
Mersereau were married November 10, 1861. 

Maria Powers, who married Stephen Wheeler, was the daughter of 
Frederick Powers, who was born March 31, 1765. and died December 21. 
183 1. He married Ruth Pennoyer, who was born February 25, 1767, and 
died July 16, 1853. The children of Frederick and Ruth (Pennoyer) Powers 
were as follows: Lucy, born October 4, 1779. who died October 2, 1803; 
David, born May 30, 1791, who died August 24, 1849; Talbot, born August 
28, 1793. who died November 28. 1874: Maria, born October 20, 1795, 
who died June 4, 1875: Julia A., born May 18. 1797. who died June 6, 1875; 
George, born December 27. 1798, who died September 21, 1803: Caroline 
F., born March 3, 1801, who died November 9, 1888: Lydia, born September 
16, 1802, who died June 19, 1883: William, born August 27, 1804, who died 
September 30, 1805; Frances W., born December 22, 1806: Charlotte J., 
born December 22, 1810. Stephen Wheeler, grandfather of George E. 
Wheeler, became a farmer, but in early life was a carpenter. He owned a 
farm of two hundred acres in Broome county. New York, where he died. 
Henry H. Wheeler, a son of Stephen and Maria (Powers) Wheeler, was 
born in Dutchess county. New York, January 28, 1820. He received a 
good education for the time, primarily in the common schools, and finish- 
ing his studies at a seminary located on his father's farm in which his 
father was a stockholder. Mr. Wheeler was throughout his life a wide 
reader of good books and kept well up with the times. He married, in 



4iS BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Broome county. New York, October i6, 1849, Amanda Simmons, who 
was born October 6, 1822, in Dutchess county, New York, a daughter of 
William and Qarissa (Roe) Simmons. William Simmons was born August 
7, 1785, in Dutchess county. New York. He was the son of Nicholas 
Simmons, of sturdy Holland-Dutch stock, and the grandson of Peter Sim- 
mons, who came from Holland in the eighteenth century and settled in the 
northern part of Dutchess county, or possibly in the adjoining county of 
Columbia, New York. 

Nicholas Simmons married Katrina Snyder, also of Holland-Dutch 
stock and born on the farm adjoining his father's. They had ten children — 
four boys and six girls — named Katrina, William, Henry, Anna, John, 
Charity, Hannah, Betsy, Polly and Anthony. Nicholas Simmons lived to 
be nearly eighty years old and died in Broome county. New York. In 
politics he was a Democrat. William Simmons, the father of Mrs. Henry 
H. Wheeler, was a soldier in the United States Army in the war of 1812 
and came near death from yellow fever while in the service. He was a 
prosperous farmer, entirely a self-made man of upright character and a re- 
markable physical constitution. He was twice married, the first time to 
Clarissa Roe, in 1813, in the town of North East, Dutchess county. New 
York, where she was born March 7, 1794, a daughter of Silas and ]\Iercy 
(Harv-ey) Roe. They settled on the Roe farm in Dutchess county, and 
lived there about ten years, and there she died September 13, 1827. For 
his second wife he married Wealthy Roe, her cousin, who bore him two 
daughters: Clarissa, December 8, 1832; and Laura, December 31, 1833. 
By the first wife (Clarissa Roe) there were born five children. The eldest 
of these, Har\-ey R., bom September 29, 1814. married Almira Marsh, who 
died January 2, 1889. They had two children who lived: Eugene W., born 
in 1840; and Rollin, born in 1846. Edward, the second son of William and 
Clarissa (Roe) Simmons, was born April 14, 1816, and was twice married, 
first to Harriet Winchell. His second wife was Sarah (Mead) Trowbridge. 
There were two children by the first marriage: Alfred, who lived to be 
twenty-two years of age; and James, who died when two years old. 

Of Edward Simmons more than a passing notice should be given. 
He lives at Millerton, Dutchess county. New York, near where he was 
born, and is one of the oldest lawyers in that part of the state, having reached 
the venerable age of eighty-three years. He is distinguished for his prom- 
inence at the bar, his educational work and for long activity in public af- 
fairs. In the winter of 1832-3, he began teaching school in Lime Rock, 
Connecticut, and from that time until 1848 he followed that occupation 
with marked success. In 1838-9 he taught a school of a high grade at Greene, 
Chenango county. New York, and from there went to Great Barrington, 




e^HJ^yy (7^ "71^^.4^/^^^ 






CZn^^^£L^9^<J_C^ <^/(y 



x;%^^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 419 

Massachusetts, teaching Latin and Greek and the higher English branches. 
In 1843 ^s returned to Miilerton and with Alexander Winchell, afterward 
prominent as a geologist and long a conspicuous member of the faculty 
of the University of Michigan, opened a private school. ]\Ir. Simmons 
built the store in Miilerton now occupied by James Finch, and engaged 
in a general merchandise business there, which he conducted twenty-five 
years and then transferred to Mr. Finch, who had been his clerk for fifteen 
years. In 1867 ]Mr. Simmons was admitted to the bar. He has been a suc- 
cessful lawyer and is a member of the New York State Bar Association and 
still gives some attention to legal matters. He was the financial secretary 
of the New York state constitutional convention in 1867, of which William 
A. Wheeler was the president and Samuel J. Tilden, Horace Greeley and 
other well known men of the time were members. He filled the ofilice of 
supervisor for five terms, and was the chairman of the board for one term, 
and he was a member of the committee which appeared before the state 
board of assessors and secured a reduction in the assessment of Dutchess 
county, which in three years saved the tax-payers two hundred thousand 
dollars. He is an advocate of good schools and favors every local im- 
provement. Politically he was a free-soil Democrat in early years, but voted 
for Fremont in 1856, and since that time has been a Republican. He has 
been a member of the Baptist church for sixty-four years, and is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity. (The above sketch of Edward W. Simmons was 
taken from a Dutchess county (New York) newspaper.) 

Julia A., a daughter of William and Clarissa (Roe) Simmons, was 
born Februarys 5, 18 19, married Lewis W. Barnes and died in September, 
185 1, leaving a daughter, Eva Julia, born August 27, 1846. Amanda, an- 
other of their daughters, who married Henry H. W'heeler, will be noticed 
more at length further on. James Barlow Simmons, the fifth and last 
in the family, was born April 17, 1827, and married Marj' Stephens, and 
they were the parents of Dr. Robert Stephens Simmons. William Sim- 
mons, the father of the above mentioned children, died in Dutchess county, 
New York, July 14, 1868. Silas Roe, the father of Clarissa (Roe) Simmons, 
was an Englishman and a man of means, who owned a farm at North East, 
Dutchess county, which contained three hundred acres valued at one hun- 
dred dollars an acre. He died on the place, at a venerable age. His children 
were Uzziel, Annie, Jeduthun, Laura, Julia, Caroline, Amos, Clarissa, Ly- 
man, Harvey, Harmon, Julia, Alvah and Amanda. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. Wheeler, parents of George E. Wheeler, moved 
to Ilhnois in May, 1850, not long after their marriage. They came to 
Chicago by way of the lakes, and thence penetrated the state as far as 
Morris. They settled on the farm where the immediate subject of the 



420 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

sketch now lives, then consisting of one hundred and sixty acres, on which 
had been Iniilt a double log house. A small crop had been put in. Mr. 
Wheeler paid five hundred dollars for the place and improved it and made 
it a good home farm. In political opinion he was a stanch Republican, 
and one of the original members of the party, having voted for John C. 
Fremont. As a citizen he was honored, respected, and influential in the 
township. A friend of good schools, he was for many years a member of 
the board of education; and he also held the ofTice of assessor in his town- 
ship. In early life he was inclined to military affairs and held the office 
of lieutenant in a militia company in New York. He was one of the re- 
spected pioneers of Grundy county because of his strong, fearless, out- 
spoken character and his upright and straightforward treatment of every 
one. .\n old neighbor said of him: "He was always honest and fair. 
He was independent in thought and always frank in his expression of his 
views." Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. Wheeler were the parents of three chil- 
dren : George E., born February 20, 1851; Elmer E., born September 18, 
i860, who died JNIarch 13. 1862: and Clara May. born January 20. 1863. 
Mr. \\'heeler died January 2j. 1897, at his residence in Morris, where he had 
lived since May, 1873. r^Irs. Wheeler is yet living, a venerable lady of 
excellent memory and much beloved for her high character. Their daugh- 
ter, Clara May, married Abraham J. Neff, January 21, 1891, and has two 
children: ]\Iae A., born in 1891: Paul A., born in 1892: and Dorothy, born 
in 1899. 

George E. Wheeler is one of the oldest continuous residents of Grundy 
county. He was born on the W heeler homestead in Mazon townshi]). where 
he now lives, and was brought ui) to farming among the pioneers and can 
well remember many of them. His education was obtained in the com- 
mon schools of the county. In the fail of 1869 he was given a certificate 
as a school-teacher, bv the late Hiram C. Goold. then county superintendent 
of schools. He taught school four winters, working the remainder of the 
vear on the farm. Having received Ins education and taught in the schools 
of his neighborhood he fullv realizes the necessit}' of better schools, so 
that the youth wlio has to acquire an education in this manner may have 
everv opportunity. He is in favor of paying liberal wages to teachers, — 
enough to secure the highest ability, so that all the preparaton*' branches 
and even some of the higher courses might be tauglit in the home schools. 
He has been a school trustee for ten years. He married. October 11. 1871. 
in Good Farm town.ship. Grundy county, Illinois. Mary J. Keepers, who 
was born March 16, 1854. in Guernsey county, Ohio, a daughter of Israel 
J. and Mary (Kimble) Keepers. Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler settled on the 
Wheeler homestead and bv steadv thrift and industry have prospered and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 421 

now own a fine and fertile farm and most attractive homestead. Their 
home place consists of two hundred acres, and their other farm, in the 
same section, contains one hundred and twenty acres. Mr. Wheeler has 
ser\^ed his fellow townsmen as supervisor well and faithfully. 

The following is an extract from the Morris Herald : "He (Mr. Wheeler) 
was first elected in 1885, serving- two terms. He was again elected in the 
spring of 1889, and he lias served continuously, succeeding himself, since 
that time. He has been chairman of the board during five years of this 
long service. In politics he is always a Republican." 

When Mr. Wheeler first became a member of the board of supervisors, 
a levy of fort}' thousand dollars was required to pay running expenses and 
indebtedness. He lias seen a business policy developed, and has helped 
develop it, until this has been materially reduced. At one time county 
officers were allowed to retain all the fees of their offices, and in one case 
this amounted to three thousand seven hundred and fifty dollars per annum. 
Mr. Wheeler was an advocate, and aided in the adoption, of such legislation 
by the board as to allow officers a reasonable salary for services, and pro- 
viding for an accounting of fees earned to the county. He occupies an 
enviable place in the esteem of the people of Grundy county, owing to his 
services in securing favorable action toward the care of the poor of the 
county by one person. It was Mr. Wheeler who wrote and presented the 
resolution to the board, which was adopted, providing for the appointment 
of a county agent for the poor. He has long been of the opinion, from 
his actual knowledge of the work, that better relief could be afforded in this 
matter, and more economically, under the supervision of one person, and the 
people at large better protected. There seems little question now of the 
wisdom of Mr. Wheeler's foresight. It has created a reform which has 
saved the people thousands of dollars a year, and yet has taken care of 
every needy case of want or sufTering in the county, weeding out impostors 
and others who preferred to accept a public charity rather than work. In 
matters of reform Mr. Wheeler is sometimes termed radical, yet his years 
of experience have proven of great value to the people at large, and the 
measures he has advocated, as a rule, have resulted satisfactorily. 

Mr. Wheeler is the president of the Vienna Township Mutual Insurance 
Company, which is chartered to do business in the townships of Vienna. 
Highland. Norman. Good Farm, Mazon and Wauponsee. The company 
has over six hundred thousand dollars in policies in force and he has been 
one of its nine directors of the company for many years. He also is an 
earnest advocate of good roads and believes in the policy of beginning at 
once to improve the roads and doing as much as is consistent with the 
means at hand and in a practical and economical manner. No man is more 



422 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

favorably regarded in Grundy county than George E. Wheeler, and he has- 
fairly won the high esteem in which he is held by his honest ettorts in be- 
half of the people. 

The children of George E. and Mary J. (Keepers) Wheeler are Effie 
Pearl, born ]\Iarch 1 1, 1877. and \'ernon. born July 23, 1886. Mrs. Wheeler 
and her daughter are members of the Baptist church. 

Samuel Keepers, a great-grandfather of Mrs. George E. \Mieeler, of 
the old colonial stock, was the owner of a good farm in Chester county, 
Pennsylvania, wliere he lived and died. He married Ann Hayes, of Penn- 
sylvania, and had children as follows: John, Joseph H., Kate, Elizabeth 
and Jane. After his death his wife (Ann) married again and had one 
daughter, Ann. Joseph H. Keepers, a son of Samuel and grandfather of 
Mrs. George E. Wheeler, was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania. He 
married, in that county, Hannah P. Jordan and they moved to western 
Pennsylvania and settled in Beaver county. About 1830 they moved ta 
Guernsey county. Ohio, with teams. There he was a pioneer and be- 
came a sulistantial farmer. A member of the Baptist church, he was 
a straightforward, honorable man of the highest Christian character. His 
children were Phoebe A., \\'illiam, Sarah J., Israel J.. Joseph, ]\Iary E., 
Hannah M., Philena and Henrietta. Mrs. Joseph H. Keeoers died April 
28, 1873, aged sixty-eight, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Hannah M. 
Warnock, in Iroquois county, Illinois. Mr. Keepers died in Guernsey 
county, Ohio, December 6, 184.2, scarcely past middle age. 

Israel Jordan Keepers, the father of Mrs. Wheeler, went with his 
parents to Guernsey county, Ohio, in 1830, when he was about seven years 
old. There he received a good common-school education and mamed, 
in Jefferson township, August 22, 1850. Mary Kimble, a daughter of Adam 
and Ann Marie (Hufifman) Kimble. Adam was the son of Nathan and 
Betsy (Davis) Kimble. Nathan Kimble was born in Germany. He came 
to America, settled in New Jersey and served his adopted country seven 
years and six months in the Revolutionary war. He afterward located in 
\\'ashington county, Pennsylvania. From there he came to Guernsey 
county, Ohio, as a pioneer in 1810. and took up and improved government 
land. He died in 1824 and is buried in Jefferson township, Guernsey 
county. He was elected a justice of the peace in 1816 and was the first to 
hold that office in Guernsey county. In 18 17 he was the chairman of 
the meeting to organize Jefferson township. Nathan Kimble"s children 
were Adam, William, ^\'ashington, Robert, Jane and ilary. His first 
wife, Betsy, nee Davis, died in Guernsey county, Ohio, and he married 
Rebecca , and their children were Nathan George, Cyrus, Ma- 
tilda, and Sarah A. Nathan Kimble's farm was known as Congress Field 



^ 








7y> 




•^Hl^ 




iM. 



CaAM ^Oul/c 



UA^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 423 

and Avas a tine property. In the early Indian troubles the family frequently 
took refuge in a rude blockhouse which stood close by their cabin. Mr. 
Kimble had a claim to land near Winchester, Ohio, by virtue of a soldier's 
warrant for his services in the Revolutionary war. 

Adam Kimble, Nathan Kimble's oldest child, was born in New Jersey, 
in 1794, and married Ann Marie HutTman, who was born October 15, 
1800, and died in 1878. She was of sturdy Pennsylvania-Dutch stock, a 
daughter of John and Betsy (McClellan) HutTman, natives of that state. 
John Huffman was a pioneer in Guernsey county, Ohio, before 1800, from 
"The Glades" of Washington county, Pennsylvania. The HufYmans were 
originally from Germany. John Huffman cleared his forest farm and be- 
came a well-to-do and substantial farmer. He lived to be about seventy 
years old and died in Ohio, a member of the Presbyterian church. John 
and Elizabeth (McClellan) Huffman were the parents of children named 
George, Joseph, Abraham, Benjamin, John, Elizabeth and Mary. Adam 
Kimble was a soldier in the war of 181 2. After his marriage to Ann Marie 
Huffman he settled in Jefferson township, Guernsey county, Ohio, and 
owned in time the tine property called Congress Field, besides much other 
land, and was considered well off. His children were Elizabeth, Rebecca, 
Delilah, Davis, Huffman, William, Jane, Mary, Sallie, Eliza, Nancy, George, 
Nathan and Robert. The latter died in infancy. All the others lived to 
grow up. Nancy died, aged twenty-two years. The others, eight of whom 
are living, all reared families. Adam Kimble died January 4, 1862, as the 
result of a fall the previous New Year's eve. His wife lived to be seventy- 
eight years old. They were members of the Baptist church. Israel J. 
Keepers settled in Guernsey county, Ohio, on the old Keepers home prop- 
erty, which consisted of two hundred and twenty-five acres of land and a saw- 
mill, which he owned in partnership with his brother Joseph. In September, 
1864, he enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Seventy-sixth Regiment 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for three years or during the war, and was hon- 
orably discharged at the close of the struggle. His regiment was stationed at 
Nashville, Tennessee. 

He came to Grundy county, Illinois, and settled in Good Farm township 
in 1866, and bought one hundred and twenty-three acres of land. This 
farm was well improved and he lived on it until 1883. At that time he 
bought another farm in the same township but never occupied it as a resi- 
dence. He retired in 1884 and for some years lived at Gardner, Illinois. He 
died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Carrie Taylor, at Mazon, Illinois, 
October 3, 1892, aged about sixty-three years. He was a member of the 
Baptist church, in which he was for many years an elder, and his official 
place in the church was filled by his son, William I. Politically he was a 



424 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

stanch Republican. A friend of education, he was long a school director, 
and he was a much trusted man of fine business capacity and was the ad- 
ministrator of several estates and executor of a number of wills. His chil- 
<lren are William I., Mary J., Joseph H.. Caroline, Hannah ]vlyrtle and 
Olive W. Mrs. Keepers, his widow, who was born June 17, 1831, is a lady of 
intelligence and greatly beloved by all for her many good qualities of head 
and heart. It is said of her that '"she is a mother to all." This is true es- 
pecially in times of sickness and trouble. Her home is now with her chil- 
dren. 



ALANSON D. SMITH, M. D. 

For twenty-nine years Dr. Smith has engaged in the practice of medicine 
in Morris, and through this period his skill and ability has been so marked 
as to win him recognition as one of the most careful and conscientious repre- 
sentatives of the profession in Grundy count}-. He has been a close and 
painstaking student all his life. There is no calling or business which imposes 
greater responsibility upon its followers, for life and death are in the hands 
■of the physician. An unskillful operation, a tlrug wrongly administered may 
take from man that which he prizes most — life, and the public accords 
its patronage only to those who merit and deserve its confidence. For the 
past nine vears, he has devoted a good deal of time to the study ant! treatment 
of the drug habits, namely: the opium, liquor and tobacco habits. By his 
methods of treatment patients addicted to those drugs are easily and 
promptl)- cured, without any suffering or ill after eft'ects; the craving removed 
and the health restored, for those using those drugs to excess are both 
mentally and physically diseased: that being the cause of their inability 
to discontinue their use, until their health is restored and the poisons elim- 
inated from tke system. The large practice which Dr. Smith enjoys is there- 
fore an indication of his abilit}- and attests his high rank in the medical 
fraternity. 

Dr. Smith was born near ^^'atertown. Jeft'erson county. New York, 
August 2, 1845. His parents, Eleazer and Maria (Derby) Smith, were 
natives of \^ermont. the father bom in Rutland, September 21. 1807, the 
mother in Huntington. August 28. 181 5. Nathan Smith, great-grandfather 
of the Doctor, was a native of Connecticut and served two vears as a soldier 
in the French and Indian war. from 1755 to 1757. Prior to the Revolution 
he removed to the Green Mountain state, where as captain of a company 
he joined the forces of Colonel Ethan Allen soon after the battle of Lexing- 
ton. He aided in the capture of Fort Ticonderoga early in the struggle for 
independence and remained in the army with Colonel Allen during the war. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 425 

The Doctor's maternal grandfather was also a colonial soldier during the 
Revolutionary war, and her father served during the second war with Eng- 
land — the war of 181 2. The parents of Dr. Smith were married in New 
York, where the father conducted a farm and dairy until 1854, at which time 
they came to Illinois. They first located near Marseilles, but purchasing 
a farm in Saratoga township, Grundy county, they took up their abode 
there April i. 1856. There the father carried on agricultural pursuits until 
his death, which occurred June 21, 1886, in the seventy-ninth year of his 
age. His witlow is still living and now resides with a daughter in Iowa. 
This worthy couple were the parents of eight sons and two daughters : Charles 
C, a resident of Joliet, Illinois; Edwin R., who was killed by a Confederate 
sharpshooter while, as lieutenant, he was directing a squad engaged in 
digging trenches at Petersburg, Virginia, August 12, 1864: Peter B., who 
died Januani- 15, 1864, at Chattanooga, Tennessee, while serving in the 
Union army in Captain Cogswell's battery, from Ottawa, Illinois; William 
I-I., a resident of Gardner, Illinois: Walter S., of Morris, who loyally served 
his countr}' in the Civil war and died in 1888; George F., who also wore the 
blue in the struggle to preserve the Union and is now a resident and news- 
paper publisher of Keosauqua, Iowa; Frank E., who makes his home in 
the Hawkeye state; and our subject. The daughters are Mrs. Laura J. 
Davis and Emma A., of Iowa. 

Alanson D. Smith is the sixth son of this family. During his boyhood 
he accompanied his parents to Illinois and was reared on the home farm 
where he remained until seventeen years of age, when he left the parental 
roof in order to attend scliool. He acquired a fair education and learned 
telegraphv, which he followed for four years, being stationed at Polo, Illinois. 
Having determined to enter professional life, however, he began the study 
of medicine while serving as telegraph operator, and later continued his 
studies in Morris with Dr. John N. Freeman as his preceptor. Later he 
went to Brookhn, New York, and became a student in the Long Island 
College hospital, subsequently entering the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of the City of New York, in which institution he was graduated 
in 1870. 

Thus prepared for his chosen calling, in April, 1870, Dr. Smith located 
in Dwight, Illinois, having an office with Dr. Keeley, after practicing a short 
time with an uncle in his native county and state. In the meantime. Dr. 
Freeman had moved to Brooklyn, New York, and was succeeded by Dr. 
S. C. \\'hite, who, becoming dissatisfied, induced Dr. Smith to come to 
Morris and take his place in the office where he studied, in July following, 
where he has practiced medicine continuously since, having now been in 
practice in Morris longer than any of the physicians connected with the 



426 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

medical fraternity there. Thus it was that our subject became identified 
with the medical fraternity of Grundy county in 1870. From the beginning 
he has enjoyed a large and lucrative practice and has made judicious invest- 
ment of his capital, now owning valualjle property interests in Morris. So- 
cially he is a Master ]\Iason, and in politics he is a Republican. His life 
has been well spent in devotion to the duties that have devolved upon him, 
and he is accounted one of the highly respected citizens of his community. 



ABRAHAM HOLDERMAN. 

One of the pioneers of Grundy county, Abraham Holderman was for 
many years connected with the interests of this section of the state, and 
at all times bore his part in the work of progress, improvement and advance- 
ment. He also met with success in his business undertakings and became 
one of the extensive land-owners of the community. In all life's relations 
he commanded the respect of those with whom he was associated and no 
liiston,' of the agricultural interests of Grundy county would be complete 
without the record of his life. 

He was born in Ross county, Ohio, January 22, 1822, and was a son 
of Abraham and Charlotte (O'Neal) Holderman. His father was a Penn- 
sylvania Dutchman and his mother was of Irish lineage. The former was 
born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, and when eighteen years of age 
removed to Ross county, Ohio, where he was married. Seven sons and 
seven daughters were born of this union, and eleven of the family grew to 
years of maturitv, while ten of the number were married and reared families 
of their own. The father was a prosperous man who extensively engaged 
in farming and stock-raising in Ohio, but, desiring to try his fortune in a 
district farther west, he came to Illinois on a prospecting tour in July, 1831. 
Selecting land in this state, he then returned to Ohio and in the fall of 1831 
brought his family to Illinois, settling at what is now known as Holderman's 
Grove. This was a year before the Black Hawk war. When the Indians 
began hostilities against the white people, in order that his family might 
escape the danger which threatened them he hastened with them to Ottawa 
and on to Pekin, Illinois, where he remained till peace was once more re- 
stored. In August, 1832, they returned to> their home in LaSalle county, 
and through the exercise of his excellent business ability and unflagging 
industry he became a large landholder. He followed farming and stock- 
raising throughout his entire life and was one of the worthy pioneer settlers 
who aided in laying the foundations for the present prosperity in Grundy 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 42^ 

county. He was a well-known citizen, greatly respected by liis many 
friends. 

Abraham Holderman, whose name introduces this review, was only 
nine rears of age when he accompanied his parents to Illinois, where he 
was reared amid the wild scenes of the frontier, enduring the usual hard- 
ships and trials which fall to the lot of the pioneer settlers. During his 
boyhood he assisted in the arduous task of the development of the new 
farm and when twenty-three years of age he began farming on his own 
account. At that time his father gave him a plow and harness and the use 
of all the land he could work, with the admonition, "Earn your own money 
and you will know how to prize it; but if you want any help at any time 
come to me." Borrowing seven hundred dollars of William Hoge, after- 
ward his father-in-law. Mr. Holderman joined his brother Barton in the 
operation of a farm of two hundred and forty acres in the town of Felix — 
property owned by the father. At the end of two years the brothers divided 
the profits, and Mr. Holderman, of this review, found himself in possession 
of eighteen hundred dollars. He was then married, on the 4th of May, 1847, 
to Miss Mary E. Hoge, daughter of William and Rachel Hoge. She was 
born in Loudoun county, Virginia, August 17, 1827, and with her parents 
came to Grundy county in the fall of 1831. She was to her husband a 
faithfid companion and helpmeet and their home was brightened and blessed 
bv the presence of five children, namely : A. J., Albert H., Martha J., Landy 
S. and Samuel D. 

In 1849 ^^'''- Holderman removed to Erriemia township, Grundy county, 
locating upon a quarter section of land which he had purchased at three dol- 
lars per acre. He at once began to develop and cultivate his tract and soon 
transformed it into rich and fertile fields. He also carried on stock-raising 
and was ver>- prosperous in his undertakings, winning a high degree of 
.success. From year to year, as his financial resources increased, he added 
to his possessions until he became one of the largest landholders in the state. 
He also continued stock-raising on an extensive scale and was recognized 
as one of the leading representatives in these lines of business in central 
Illinois. His business methods were so honorable that he enjoyed the con- 
fidence and good will of all, and the most envious could not grudge him 
his success, so worthily had it been acquired. 

Mr. Holderman exercised his right of franchise in support of the men 
and measures of the Republican party, but took no active part in political 
affairs aside from holding a few minor oi^ces, the most important of which 
was that of town supervisor. He preferred to devote his energies to the 
business which fully occupied his time and to which he ga\'e his attention 
up to the time of his death. His demise was the result of an accident, being 



428 BIOCKAFHICAL ASD GES EALOGICAL RECORD. 

thrown from a buggy and so injured tliat he died November 27, 1887. He 
was hospitable and social by nature, i)rogressi\e as a citizen, liberal in support 
of all measures for the pnblic good and was uniformly respected. His widow 
still survives him and at this writing is residing on the old homestead — an 
estimable lady whose many excellent qualities obtained her a large circle of 
friends. 



JOHN HOLDERMAN. 

There is no better blood in the mixture which animates the men and 
women of America than that of Pennsylvania; and no sturdier men, no nobler 
women, have come to the west than those who found their way over the 
mountains to Ohio and scattered over her sister states. One of the most 
noteworthy and most respectaljle representatives of this good old stock in 
Grundy county, was the man whose name heads this sketch. 

Mr. Holdemian, who during his life here was a farmer and stock-raiser 
on section 12, Goose Lake township, this county, was bom in Montgomery 
county, Ohio, in 1827, the third child of John Holdermaii, a native of Penn- 
sylvania, who married Elizabeth Blickenstaft, a daughter of Jacob and Mary 
(Crull) Blickenstaff, of Mar)lan(l. His father was a farmer of Vandalia, 
Montgomery county, Ohio, and died there in 1850; his mother died in 
Kansas, about twenty-five years later. John and Elizabeth (Blickenstaff) 
Holderman had ten children, of whom only John and Elizabeth are living. 
INIary married John Patty, of Montgomery county, Ohio, and died at Pleas- 
ant Hill, Aliami county, that state. She was the mother of three children, 
one of whom is living. Magdalene died unmarried at Battle Creek, Michi- 
gan. Jacob lived in Grundy county, Illinois, for eight or nine years and 
moved to Kansas, where he died. He married Charlotte Smith and they 
had six children, four of whom are living. Elizabeth is living, unmarried, 
at Emporia, Kansas. Elliott R. was a banker, farmer and cattle-raiser at 
Emporia, where he died, in which city also Daniel W. completed his days on 
earth. He married Carrie Rand, and afterward Hannah M. Gracey. Lavina 
died at the age of six years. David lived to be over ten years. Harriet, 
who died at the age of thirty-four years, was the wife of Dr. Kemp, of Day- 
ton, Ohio, and bore him a son, named Charles H. 

John Holderman, the subject of this notice, remained in his native town 
in Montgomer>' county, Ohio, until he was twenty-one years of age, then 
removed to Nol>le county, Indiana, and lived there a short time, and in 
1852 came to Grundy county, settling in Felix, now Goose Lake, township, 
on the farm which he occupied until his death, Januarv- 8, 1900, from a 
disease of the heart. Here for forty-eight years he was engaged in farming 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 429 

and stock-raising, accumulating z. large amount of property. His residence 
was one of the best of its class in the county. His methods of dealing were 
honorable and his success was most worthily won. His character so strongly 
commended him to his fellow townsmen that he was twice elected supervisor 
of Goose Lake township: and he served also in the office of commissioner. 
He was married in i860, to Phebe Patty, a daughter of James and 
Margaret (Beck) Patty, of Montgomery county, Ohio. James Patty died 
at his home in Ohio, in March, 1896, aged eighty-three years. His wife 
survives, still living in Montgomery county, Ohio, at the advanced age 
of eighty-eight. This worthy couple had four sons and six daughters, of 
whom three sons and one daughter are deceased. John and Phebe (Patty) 
Holderman have had seven children, all of whom were born in Goose Lake 
township, and whose names are JMargaret Elizabeth, John Franklin, Mars- 
Bell, James Edward, Phebe Ella, Martha Harriet and Charles Elliott. Eliz- 
abeth married Willis Caldwell, of Broken Bow. Nebraska, and has children 
named Eva Phebe. Ray Holderman. John Willis and Gaius George. John 
F. is living, unmarried, on the old homestead. ]Mars- B. holds the office 
of county superintendent of public schools of Grundy county, Illinois, per- 
forming its duties ably and conscientiously and to the satisfaction of teachers, 
school officials, pupils and parents. P. Ella developed a decided talent for 
music, received a musical education and is at this time a successful teacher 
of music in Chicago. M. Harriet is a teacher of public-school music and 
drawing. James E. died at the age of sixteen years; and Charles E. died 
in childhood. The children who have been brought up in this family are 
an honor to their parents, and such a legacy of intelligence and good intent 
left by the parents is better to the world than millions in money. Mr. 
Holderman, the father, must have had great satisfaction in the evening of his 
life in the contemplation of his success in his career, and the testimony given 
by his neighbors in various ways verify this estimate of his character. His 
remains were buried in Evergreen cemetery at Morris, Illinois, a place sacred 
to many departed friends of the family. ]\Irs. Holderman survives to enjoy 
a while longer in this life the result of the glorious prestige left by her 
honored husband and also that which she has herself established by her faith- 
ful service in the obligations of life that devolved upon her. 



BARTON HOLDERMAN. 

In pioneer days this g-entlenian came to Illinois and through the period 
of early development of this section of the state he was actively identified 
with the work of progress and improvement. His name is thus inseparably 



430 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

connected with the history of Grundy county, and it is with pleasure tliat 
we present the record of his career to the readers of this vohnne. 

A native of Ohio, he was born in Ross county, June i, 1816, and ched 
in Mississippi about 1893. His father was Abraham Holderman, a pioneer 
settler of Kendall county, Illinois. Our subject spent his early boyhood 
days in the Badger state and with his parents came to Illinois in 1831, the 
family locating in Kendall county, where he attained his majority. He 
married Miss Charity White, a daughter of Silas White, who came from 
Pennsylvania to LaSalle county, Illinois. They began their domestic life 
in Felix township, Gnmdy count}-, where ]Mr. Holderman carried on agricul- 
tural pursuits until 185 1. Attracted by the discovery of gold on the Pacific 
slope, he crossed the plains to California, where he engaged in prospect- 
ing and mining for two years. On the expiration of that period he returned 
to Grundy county and in 1853 removed his family to ^lissouri, locating on 
a farm in Bates county. His first wife had died in 1849, leaving three 
children, namely: Harriet Amanda, wife of Lewis Adams, now of Okla- 
homa; Samuel, deceased; and William B. In 1853 Barton Holderman 
wedded Alice Adams and they became the parents of two children, of whom 
one is now living, John II., a resident of Lyon county. Kansas. The mother 
died in Missouri about 1855, and again Mr. Holderman was married, Jane 
Feely becoming his wife. They had three children, who are still living — 
Artie Jane, Norrice Dyson and Addie Alay. About 1890 ]\Ir. Holderman 
removed with, his family to Mississippi and was identified with the agricul- 
tural interests of that state until his death. His widow now makes her 
home there. 

William Bvron Holdennan, who now represents the family in Grundy 
county and is a leading and influential citizen of ]\Iorris, was born in Grundy 
county, September 21, 1848, and at the age of five years accompanied his 
father on his removal to Missouri. There he was reared on a farm and 
acquired his education in the common schools. Having arrived at man's 
estate, he was married, in Missouri, in 1871, to Miss Ruth Pyatt, who was 
born in Kendall 'county, Illinois. Four children grace their union — Cynthia 
Jane, Martha Belle, Laura Caroline and Harriet Gertrude. 

In 1872 Mr. Holderman returned to Grundy county and secured a 
farm, continuing to work it until 1888, when he removed to Morris. In 
September, 1895, he purchased an interest in the "Grundy County Grocery 
Store" and has since been engaged in the grocery business. In Septem- 
ber, 1898, he became the sole proprietor and is now conducting a large 
store, well supplied with a complete line of staple and fancy groceries. His 
business methods are honorable and commend him to the confidence of all. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 431 

By his earnest desire to please and his marked ener,^y he has secured a 
hberal patronage wliich brings him a good income. He exercises his riglit 
of franchise in tlie support of the men and measures of the Democratic 
party. 



SAMUEL D. HOLDERMAN. 

A son of Abraliam and INIary E. (Hoge) Holderman. the gentleman 
whose name heads this sketch was born in Grundy county, July 21, 1865. 
In the public schools he obtained his preliminary education, which was 
supplemented by study in the Morris Normal, and thus well fitted for the 
practical duties of life he entered upon his business career as a farmer. 
During his boyhood he had become familiar with all the duties and labors 
that fall to the lot of the agriculturist, and throughout his career he has 
engaged in the work of the fields. Everj'thing about his place is neat and 
attractive in appearance. He occupies the old homestead, which is en- 
deared to him by the associations of his boyhood as well as those of his 
later years. As a farmer he is wide awake and practical, and the well tilled 
fields and substantial buildings indicate his careful supervision and his thrift 
and enterprise. Success has already attended him in his efforts and will 
doubtless bring to him still further financial reward in the future. 

In 1896 was celebrated the marriage of Samuel D. Holderman and 
Miss Mae E. Wilcox, a daughter of Dr. George G. Wilcox, of Seneca, Illinois. 
The young couple have made many friends in this locality and enjoy the 
hospitality of many of the best homes in this section of the county. In his 
political views !Mr. Holderman is a Republican, warmly espousing the prin- 
ciples of the party. He is now serving as town supervisor, and the efficient 
and prompt manner in which he discharges his duty has won him the com- 
mendation of the public. 



FRANK SYKES. 



An example of the progressive, practical young farmer of this period 
may be found in the person of Fra,nk Sykes, a well known and highly re- 
spected citizen of Grundy county. He is a son of Thomas H. and Betty 
(Crver) Sykes, whose sketch may be foimd elsewhere in this work, together 
with a history of the family. The young man was reared on a farm in 
Wauponsee township and in the town of Morris, Grundy county, and from 
his boyhood has been thoroughly familiar with the details of agriculture. 
When arrivinsr at man's estate he decided to follow the calling to which 



432 BIOGRAl'llICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

his father had devoted his life, and by strict appHcation to business and 
adherence to the systematic methods which had been inculcated in him 
in youth he has prospered. He now resides upon a portion of the old family 
homestead in \\'auponsee township, and has made substantial improvements 
upon the place. In addition to beinof a successful farmer, he is an excellent 
natural mechanic and practical engineer. During the harvesting season he 
operates a corn-sheller and threshing machine, thus earning a snug little 
sum each year, which he carefully invests. 

Mr. Sykes obtained a liberal education in the public schools of this 
county, and by reading and observation has continually widened his mental 
horizon ever since the completion of his studies. He is well posted on the 
important political issues of the day and uses his franchise in favor of the 
platform and nominees of the Republican party. In every way he endeavors 
to maintain good government, and while he never neglects his own biisiness 
affairs he finds time to perform the duties which he believes he owes to the 
public antl his own community in particular. 

He was united in marriage, Februar}- 28, 1899, to. Clara Crellin. a 
daughter of Thomas H. and Angela (Weldon) Crellin, well known, estimable 
citizens of this county. The young couple have a pleasant home and the 
sincere good wishes of a large circle of friends for their future happiness 
and prosperity. 



HON. GEORGE W. ARMSTRONG. 

"Wash" Armstrong, as he is called by all who know him, is the second 
son of Joseph and Elsie Armstrong and was born upon their farm on the 
east fork of the Licking, in Licking county, Ohio. December 11. 1812. and 
came to Illinois with his mother and family in the spring of 183 1 and lo- 
cated upon the farm where he still resides, in 1833. A part of this farm 
lies in Grundy county and the balance in LaSalle county, and his residence 
is in the latter. His father was bom in the county of Fermanagh in the 
north of Ireland and came to the United States with his father's family in 
1789 and settled in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, when but ten years old; 
and his mother, whose maiden name was Strawn (she being a sister of the 
late Jacob Strawn, the early cattle king of the west), was of Pennsylvania 
Quaker stock. 

This branch of the iVrmstrongs are of Scotch descent and crossed over 
the channel dividing Scotland and Ireland in the sixteenth century. The 
origin of the name Armstrong, according to the family tradition, sprang 
from the heroic and daring act of one Fairbeon, w^ho was the armorer to 
one of the early kings of Scotland, whose horse was killed in battle with 




^^. 






/^^ ^ ^ £., /^-is^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 433 

the British, falling upon and breaking one of the king's legs, thus impris- 
oning him, when Fairbeon, seeing the imminent danger of his sovereign, cut 
his way through the British lines and rescued him, then passing one arm 
around the king's body under his arms, with his sword in the other hand, 
and the king being supplied with a second sword, they fought their way to 
safety. Whereupon Fairbeon was created and dubbed Knight of the Strong 
Arm, but subsequently changed to Armstrong; and the king conferred upon 
him a castle with a large territory on the south, border of Scotland, with a 
coat-of-arms which consisted of three uplifted hands, each holding a drawn 
sword, emblematic of the heroism of Fairbeon. This is substantially the 
tradition of the origin of the "Armstrongs of the Border,"' which became a 
powerful clan in the south of Scotland. 

The subject of this sketch, though untaught, is far from being un- 
lettered in point of education. In the broader meaning of the word he is a 
master, but his mastery is self-acciuired and self-taught. His school days 
were few indeed, but the light of the dip tallow candle and the bark of the 
shell-bark hickory of evenings supplied the place of the log-cabin school- 
house of his school age. True he never studied English grammar or the 
higher mathematics, nor did he ever read novels or fool away his time over 
hction. History, philosophy, chemistry, astronomy and political economy 
were his special favorites. Though not a professor of religion, he seldom 
if ever used profane or obscene language; nor did he ever use tobacco in 
any form, and was never known to play a game of cards or any other game 
of chance. Fond of music, yet he never could sing; and we doubt whether he 
could tell the difference between Auld Lang Syne and Old Hundred; and 
we have often heard him say that all his dancing was done under the in- 
tfuence of a switch — in his mother's hand ! He never had the inclination to 
hunt, fish, plav ball, wrestle or indulge in any other boyish sports or amuse- 
ments; hence he was called the "Old Man Armstrong," even when he had not 
passed his 'teens. A born mechanic, he always, from the time he was a 
dozen years old, could make almost anything in wood, iron or leather, 
and at the age of sixteen he ran the leading machinery of his father's woolen 
factory; and when eighteen years old he became the general manager of 
the entire factor)-. 

On the TOth of Alarch, 1S35, he was united in marriage with Aliss 
Nancv Green, of Morgan county. Illinois, who was a helpmate in every 
sense of that word and ably assisted him in educating and raising his seven 
sons and two daughters. All of them are still living except their oldest son, 
John G., who was a lawyer but drifted into the newspaper business as corre- 
spondent and editor, was generally known by his nom de plume "Bemus," 
and died at his home in Ottawa in 1890. Their other children are William. 



434 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

who was a captain in tlie war of the RebelHon and now Hves in Colorado: Rev. 
Julius C, who is the general superintendent of city missions of the Con- 
gregational churches of Chicago; Eliza R.. the wife of William Crotty, Esq., 
of Burlington, Kansas; Joseph L., who lives on the old homestead; Marshall 
N., a prominent lawyer of Ottawa, Illinois; Susan I., the wife of L. B. 
Laughlin, of South Dakota; James E., the principal of the Englewood high 
school of Chicago; and Charles G., who is the state electrician and engineer 
and lives in Chicago, and is one of the leading electricians of the United 
States. 

During the early settlement of northern Illinois there were no saw- 
mills within a radius of fifty miles of Mr. Armstrong's residence and all the 
lumber used was hauled overland from Chicago. This induced Mr. Arm- 
strong to erect a sawmill on the \\'au]5ecan at the point where the present 
bridge now stands — at the crossing of that creek on the ri\er road — in 1836. 
Immediately west of this mill-site and upon the west bank of the Waupecan, 
the late Augustus H. Owen and Jacob Claypool laid out a town and called 
it Hidalgo. Here Mr. Armstrong erected a double log cabin and occupied 
it as a store and a dwelling, and he also built a log cabin for a blacksmith 
shop. But the Waupecan proved to be a thunder-shower stream, and the 
name was too big for the town to carry; hence he left both to "innocuous 
desuetude" and went to canal-digging at Utica, Illinois, in 1837, remov- 
ing his stock of dry goods and blacksmith tools, together with his family, 
to that place. His canal contract was rock excavation, amounting to sev- 
eral hundred thousand dollars. Upon the completion of this work he 
returned to his farm and has remained tliere continuously ever since. He 
assisted in laying out the original town of Morris, as well as Chapin's 
addition to the town of Morris, and has been the owner of a large number 
of lots therein, as shown by the records. When the work on the Morris 
bridge was stopped for want of funds his individual note brought the needed 
money. So, too, with the old Hopkin's house; his money built it and he 
was compelled to take the title as security. He was the first president of the 
Morris Bridge Company, as well as the Seneca Bridge Company. 

His legislative ser\'ice began by his election as a representative from 
Grundy and LaSalle counties in 1844, and he is the only survivor of that body 
of seventy-five members. His next experience as a lawmaker was as a 
delegate from said Grundy and LaSalle counties in the constitutional con- 
vention of 1847, of which body of eminent men he and Governor Palmer 
are the only survivors. He was again a member of the house of repre- 
sentatives several sessions up to 1878. A ready and forceful debater and 
the universally admitted best parliamentarian of the state, he was a leader 
of every session of the legislature of which he was a member. Though 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 435 

a stanch Democrat, he was quite as popular with his poHtical opponents 
as with his own party, because he was always courteous and eminently 
fair in his action upon all questions with all parties, though firm and what 
was deemed "a good fighter." He represented his town of Brookfield in 
the board of supervisors of LaSalle county over twenty years and was the 
chairman thereof some sixteen years, and was the chairman of the court- 
house and jail building committee, who erected the present county building 
in Ottawa. He was also the agent who secured the right of way for the 
Seneca & Kankakee Railroad and was the Democratic nominee against the 
late Owen Lovejoy for congress in 1858, but was defeated. 

A peacemaker and general arbitrator of all neighborhood difficulties all 
his life, and so sympathetic for others' wants, that he has paid out fortunes 
as bondsman and endorser of other men's obligations; yet he managed to 
keep his farm and educate his children and still have a competence; and 
though in his eighty-eighth year his small, lithe body stands as erect as when 
but twenty-one years old. If he ever had an enemy he was a silent one, for 
we never heard a single word against him or his motives. His wife crossed 
the silent river some seven years ago, and, his life work being finished, 
he is simply waiting for the summons to follow her to the home of the silent. 
Meanwhile' — 

"Earth's hold on him grows slighter. 
And the heavy burdens lighter. 
And the dawn immortal brighter, 
Everv da v." 



ALBERT E. HOGE. 



Few citizens of Nettle Creek township are better known or more justly 
esteemed than A. E. Hoge, who has been a life-long resident in this neigh- 
borhood, and actively associated with its upbuilding and development from 
his early years. Quiet and retiring in disposition, yet not without a strong 
force of character, he has led a simple, unpretentious life as a matter of 
choice, and has never been remiss in the performance of his duties as a patriot 
and neighbor, as a relative and friend. 

The birth of this worthy citizen took place on the old family homestead 
belonging to his parents, February 2, 1840. The latter, William and Rachel 
Hoge, who are represented elsewhere in this work, were among the pioneers 
of Nettle Creek township, and the Hoge family, in particular, has played 
a very important part in the founding and maintaining of Grundy county, 



436 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

which in many respects now ranks among the foremost counties of this 
great state. 

When a mere boy, Albert E. Hoge was initiated into the arduous duties 
of tlie western fanner, and the habits of industry and perseverance in any- 
thing which he undertook having been strongly ingrained in his nature, 
he has clung to them in later life. He has never resided elsewhere than on 
a portion of his father's estate, and, as he was next to the youngest of nine 
children, he was looked to for advice and assistance long after the elder 
members of the family had fiown from the home nest and founded homes 
of their own. His elementary education was gained in the district schools, 
and the old log building in wliich he spent many a wear}- hour mastering 
the intricacies of the "three R's" is yet standing on a comer of his present 
farm. This historic school-house, which enjoys the honor of being the 
oldest school-house in Grundy county, was dubbed in later years by an irrev- 
ent generation "Woodvilie College." 

Besides carrying on general farming and raising the usual line of crops 
common to this region, Mr. Hoge has been engaged for years in the raising 
and feeding of live stock, and lias met with gratifying financial success in 
this undertaking. He has never married, though all of his eight brothers 
and sisters set him an example otherwise. His personal expenses thus 
being small, he has invested his means in landed estates to the extent of 
about one thousand acres. In fact, his homestead comprises nine hundred 
and sixty-one acres, in one body, finely improved, and considered as good 
land as can be found in the county. Within the past few years he has given 
up some of his active cares to others, but still supervises the management 
of his large property. His ice-house, which was built in 1S57, is the oldest 
one in Grundy county, and, with the exception of three winters, there has 
not been a season since its completion that it has not been filled to its full 
capacity with ice. Our subject's home is comfortable and pleasant, a large 
selection of books, magazines and papers adding to its attractiveness. In 
political opinions he is a Republican, but he is in no sense a politician, and 
frequently has declined to accept official positions, when they have been 
urged upon him. 



HENDLEY HOGE. 



For years an honored resident of Nettle Creek township, Grundy 
county, but now of Morris, ]Mr. Hendley Hoge has frequently been called 
upon by his fellow citizens to officiate in local of^ces of responsibility aiul 
trust; and though he has always strongly preferred to remain in the private 
walks of life, he has sacrificed his personal wishes in fa\-or of his friends, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. AZ7 

lias tlioroughly justified their good opinion as to liis ability and integrity. 
Identified from his earliest recollections \\'\\\\ agricultural pin"suits, he is 
heartily in sympath_\- with the farmer and is considered a practical exponent 
of the progressive agriculturist of the period. 

The birth of Hcndley Hoge occurred in Nettle Creek township, July 
14, 1840, and for twent\-five vears he remained on his father's old homestead. 
After his marriage he removed to his present fine farm, which is situated in 
his native township, and, as the years passed, his industry and excellent 
business management were rewarded by increasing wealth. He now owns 
seven hundred acres of splendid farm land in this county, and a quarter sec- 
tion in Champaign county, besides having given to each of his children a 
hundred and sixty acre farm. Good improvements are to be fotmd upon his 
homestead, and e\-erything is conducted in a careful, systematic manner, 
worthy of emulation. During the present year Air. Hoge erected a modern 
and excellent residence in Morris. 

Air. Hoge is a gentleman possessing a broad mind and liberal education, 
as, after completing the course of study prescribed in the schools of his 
nati\e place, it was his privilege to attend college at Ypsilanti, Michigan, 
and in later life he has endca\ored to keep abreast of the times in every 
possible manner. A Republican in politics, he cast his first presidential 
ballot in favor of Abraham Lincoln, and ever since has been faithful to the 
principles of his party. He has acted in the capacities of township assessor 
and township supen-isor. and gave general satisfaction to all concerned. 

The marriage of Mr. Hoge and Virginia Silcott was celebrated Decem- 
ber 15, 1864. They have two children, Edgar S., who married Anna An- 
derson and resides in Champaign county, this state, and Laura M., wdio is 
the wife of Fred L. Stevens, of Morris, Illinois. Mrs. Hoge is a daughter 
of Craven and Elizabeth Silcott, both of w horn were natives of Virginia. 



LANDY S. HOGE. 



The family of w Inch this gentleman is a representative is so well known 
throughout Grundy county that he needs no special introduction to the 
readers of this volume. A son of Samuel and Matilda (Holderman) Hoge, 
he was born in Nettle Creek township, Grundy county, on the 2d of Feb- 
ruary. 1864. His boyhood days were spent on the home farm and he early 
became familiar with the labors of field and meadow. His preliminary edu- 
cation was acquired in the common schools and was supplemented by a 
course in the Morris Normal. He now owns the old homestead which be- 
longed to his parents and resided there until the fall of 1899, when he re- 



438 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

moved to Morris, his present place of residence. Since attaining liis 
majority he has always carried on agricultural pursuits and yet owns large 
landed interests, his property yielding to him a good income. 

In 1888 Mr. Hoge was imited in marriage to ]\Iiss Maggie, a 
daughter of John McCambridge, and their union has been blessed with three 
children — Hildegarde, Zitta and Uneze. Mr. Hoge gives his political sup- 
port to the Republican party and is interested in its success, yet has never 
aspired to public office. He is a representative business man and citizen, 
and in business affairs is energetic, prompt and notably reliable. Tireless 
energ^^ keen discernment, honesty of purpose, a genius for devising and 
executing the right thing at the right time, joined to every-day common 
sense — these are the chief characteristics of the man. 



WILLIAM M. HOGE. 



Though a young man, only a few years past his majority, William ]\I. 
Hoge, of Nettle Creek township, is enjoying a measure of success that the 
majority of men, even a decade or more his senior, would be glad to possess. 
The energy and determination he has always manifested in business affairs 
have brought their just reward, and as high principles animate him in all 
his dealings he commands the respect of all of his neighbors antl ac- 
quaintances. 

The birth of William ]\I. Hoge occurred on the old homestead owned 
by his parents, July 24, 1869. The histoiy of that worthy couple, Joshua 
and Elizabeth (Gregg) Hoge, is printed elsewhere in this work. The entire 
life of our subject has been spent on the old home place. In his boyhood 
he attended the schools of this district, and later supplemented his education 
by a course of study in the Morris Normal. 

Endowed with a natural talent for mechanics, Mr. Hoge has become 
a practical engineer, and for the past tweh'e years has operated a traction 
engine during the threshing season. In this manner he has added not a 
little to his income and has been enabled to institute many valuable improve- 
ments on his farm, which is one of the most desirable pieces of property 
in this section of the county. 

Like his forefathers, Mr. Hoge has no aspirations to public office, but is 
a loyal Republican. Fraternally, he is identified with the Knights of Pythias, 
the Knights of the Globe, the IModern Woodmen of America and the Rath- 
bone Sisters. He was married in 1891, to Bertha Munson, and the young 
couple's pleasant home is brightened by the presence of one child, Robert 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 439 

Burton, who was born August 7, 1S92. They have numerous friends and 
are representative citizens of their community. 



ISAAC HOGE. 



In the annals of Grundy county the name wliich our subject bears is 
frequently found, and the important place which he and his family have 
held since the days of the pioneer in this region is too generally recognized 
to need special mention. One of the marked characteristics of his race is a 
cordial hospitality, well worthy of the old Virginian people, among whom 
his ancestors were classed, perhaps less than a century ago. He possesses the 
ambition and enterprise of the foremost men of this stirring age, and stands 
for progress and public spirit in his own conununity. 

The birth of Isaac Hoge occurred July 25, 1850, in this county, his 
parents being Samuel and Matilda (Holderman) Hoge, well known and 
highly esteemed agriculturists. When he had arrived at a suitable age, 
our subject commenced attending the local schools, there laying the foun- 
dations of his education. Subsequently he entered Lombard University, 
at Galesburg, Illinois, and in due course of time was graduated in the scien- 
tific department of that honored institution of learning. Desiring to further 
qualify himself for the active business of life, the young man then went to 
Chicago, where he was a student in Bryant & Stratton's Commercial Col- 
lege for a period. 

His thorough preparation for his future being now linished, young 
Hoge returned home and resumed the farm duties to which he had been 
accustomed since his boyhood. For a number of years he carried on stock- 
feeding, upon an extensive scale, but at present he devotes himself more 
exclusively to regular farming. Gradually, as fortune favored him, he 
invested in land, until he is now the possessor of eighteen hundred acres 
of valuable land, with excellent improvements. In public matters he never 
fails to manifest the interest that every true American should feel, and in 
local affairs he uses his franchise in favor of the best man, regardless of party. 
In national elections he is a strong Republican. For twelve years he acted 
in the capacity of supervisor ol his township, giving general satisfaction to 
his constituents and neighbors. 

The first wife of Mr. Hoge, to whom he was united in marriage in 1874. 
was Miss Alary Peacock. She died in 1887, leaving five children to mourn 
her loss, namely : Elma, Mary AL, Margaret, Edna and Charles, all of whom 
are living upon the old homestead with our subject. Landy S., the youngest 
child, died in infancy. In 1889 Mr. Hoge married Mrs. Laura Watters, a 



440 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

daughter of Hiram and Sarali Thayer, wlio were natives of New York state. 
Three children have blessed this union — Mildred. Mina and Isaac. Jr. The 
family residence is modern and comfortable in all of its appointments, and 
generous hospitality abounds within its walls. 



WILLIAM ELDER ARMSTRONG. 

The name of no man living or dead is so intimately connected with and 
interwoven in the early history of Grundy county and the city of Morris as 
that of William E. Armstrong, from its inception, birth and christening 
to the time of his death. He was the third son of Joseph and Elsie (nee 
Strawn) Armstrong, and was born upon the farm of his parents in Lick- 
ing county. Ohio. October 25. 1814. and died while visiting his mother 
at her farm home, in the town of Deer Park. LaSalle countv. Illinois. No- 
vember 2. 1850. He was a man of untiring energy and indomitable will 
power, and though slightly above medium size he was a giant in physical 
strength and intellect. While educated in the broader sense of the word, 
his school days were few and confined to the neighborhood log school- 
house, where the entire course of studies was embraced in the boy's "three 
R's" — '"Reading. 'Riting and Tvithmetic." His labor was confined to the 
farm and the raising and caring for stock. He was a famous speller and 
attended every spelling-school of the vicinity, and was always first choice. 

He came to Illinois with his mother and six brothers, in April, 1831, 
and located first near where Lacon. Illinois, now stands, and in August of 
that year they located in what is now the town of Deer Park, in LaSalle 
county, where he remained until reaching his majority. When volunteers 
were called for to defend the women and children of the pioneers from the 
bloody tomahawk of the merciless savage in the Black Hawk war of 1832, 
he was among the first to respond, though but seventeen years old. and was 
accepted and mustered into service in Captain McFadden's company, and 
performed much dangerous scouting duty and remained in the service until 
that war was over. 

In the month of November. 1835. by the assistance of his mother, he and 
his younger brother. Joel W.. purchased a stock of dry goods located in 
South Ottawa and converted it into a general store. As the country was 
rapidly filling up, the demand for. and sale of, such goods became very 
good and the venture was a grand financial success. He was united in 
marriage with Miss Sarah Ann, a daughter of the late Judge Joel Strawn, 
on the 6th day of February. 1836. and immediately commenced housekeep- 
ing in South Ottawa. To them were born two daughters: Jemima E., now 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 44i 

the wife of James S. Doolittle, of Chatsworth. Illinois: and Emma D., now 
the wife of Georg-e Hardy, of Goodland, Indiana. His wife died in 1847 
and was buried in the family lot in the Ottawa cemeter)- and by her side 
sleep the remains of her husband. She was a most estimable woman as wife, 
mother, neighbor and friend. 

The business of the Armstrong firm soon increased to such a degree that 
a larg'er store room must be had. hence they erected a large wooden build- 
ing near the Sulphur Spring in South Ottawa, which was then the prin- 
cipal part of that town, using- a part for their store and the balance for a 
hotel: and I\lr. Armstrong obtained a charter from the legislature to run a 
ferry across the Illinois river at that place; and as their freight bills were 
heavy — for they Ijought nearly all their goods in St. Louis — they built a 
steamboat, which they christened "The Ottawa." It was a stern-wheeler 
of light draft and proved a failure: it was run aground near Starved Rock 
and never raised. Thus Captain Armstrong lost his boat and title of captain, 
for he was too much of a man to carry the name "Captain." He seldom 
spoke of his steamboat adventure after leaving- it sunk in the river, but 
turned his attention from steamboating to canal-building and became the 
contractor for the construction of several miles of the Illinois & Michigan 
Canal, at the letting of contracts, in the spring of 1837. His contracts were 
scattered from Utica in LaSalle count}- to Morris in Grundy county. Having 
finished up his canal contracts at Ottawa, Buffalo Rock and Utica, he 
turned his attention to his two sections at or near where Morris now 
stands. 

But the distance from Ottawa to the north and east lines of LaSalle 
county impressed him strongly of the desirability of a division of the then 
enormously large county of LaSalle: and upon conferring- with the late Jacob 
Claypool and other leading men he learned that several efforts had been 
made in that direction, all of which had failed for want of definiteness. He 
thereupon determined to petition the state legislature for two new counties, 
one to be taken from the east side of LaSalle county, to be called Grundy, 
in honor of the late Felix Grundy, of Tennessee, and the other to be taken 
from the north side of the county, to be called Kendall, in honor of Amos 
Kendall, late postmaster-general. Having prepared such a petition in the fall 
of 1840, he was ably assisted in their circulation liy his elder brother. Hon. 
George W. Armstrong, and the late L. W. Claypool and others. Having 
obtained the signatures of nearly every legal voter in the districts to be 
affected, he personally took them to Springfield when the legislature con- 
vened that winter and presented them to that body, which granted the prayer 
of the petition by the passage of the act creating these two counties: and the 
act became a law on the 17th of February, 1841. This enactment provided 



442 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

for the holding- of an election at the house of Columbus Pinney on section- 
7, township 33, range 7, better known as "Castle Dangerous," on the fourth 
Monday in May, 1841, for county officers. 

Mr. Armstrong moved his family from Ottawa to where Morris now 
stands in March of that year, and occupied a double log cabin standing 
where the gas works now are, and begun active work on his canal con- 
tracts here. He became a candidate for sheriff at that election but was 
defeated by the late Isaac Hoge, who declined to cjualify; and at a special 
election held for that ofifice in the following November Mr. Armstrong was 
elected to that position and re-elected several times thereafter, practically 
without opposition. The shrievalty was by far the best county office, for he 
was ex-ofificio collector of all the taxes. 

Under the act creating Grundy county the seat of justice was required 
to be located upon canal land and upon the line of said canal, and Messrs. 
W. B. Burnett (chief engineer of the canal). Rufus S. Duryea, of Yorkville, 
and Mr. Armstrong were appointed commissioners to act in conjunction 
with the then three canal commissioners to locate such seat of justice. 
These commissioners met soon after their appointment and upon exam- 
ination found but two points eligible — sections 7 and 9, township 33, range 
7. Section 9 is centrally located, while section 7 is two miles west of the cen- 
ter of the county from east to west. But a small portion of section 9 Hes 
on the canal line or north of the Illinois river, while section 7 is nearly all 
north of the river. Hence the canal commissioners voted for section 
7, while the other three voted for section 9. In point of elevation and 
adjoining country, section 9 is vastly superior to section 7. Thus the 
commissioners were in a deadlock until General Thornton was succeeded 
by Hon. Isaac N. Morris, who after viewing the two places voted in favor 
of section 9, which settled the question and the county seat; and upon 
motion of Mr. Armstrong it was named Morris, in honor of his vote. The 
final decision was not reached until April 12, 1842. Thus from the fourth 
Monday in May, 1841, to the 12th of April, 1842, Grundy county was with- 
out a seat of justice. In the meantime court was held at Mr. Armstrong's 
cabin home, and all the county officers located their offices there, and Mr. 
Armstrong established and ran a ferry across the river at that point. He 
also erected at his own private cost a wooden building for a court-house, 
and a fairly good-sized building for a hotel, which he named Grundy Hotel. 
This he occupied and operated himself. This hotel furnished food and lodg- 
ing to many of the leading men of Illinois of that period, among whom were 
Lincoln, Douglas, Ford, Reynolds, Wentworth and Judges Young, Smith, 
Henderson, Caton, David Davis, etc. 

Upon his last canal contracts Mr. Armstrong lost nearly everything, on 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 443 

account of the depreciation in value of what was known as canal scrip, which 
he was compelled to take at their face value for the work he did. This scrip 
declined in commercial value as low as twenty-eight cents to the dollar! 

They were printed on the back of the defunct State Bank of Illinois' 
bills after cutting off the names of the president and cashier. The following 
is a literal copy of one of these due bills or canal scrip : 

"V CANAL INDEBTEDNESS. 5. 

No. 28. 

"Due from the Board of Commissioners of the Illinois and Michigan 
''Canal for work done on said canal, Five Dollars, which they promise to 
"pay the bearer of this when funds are provided for that purpose. 

"Lockport, Feby. ist, 1842. 

"J. Manning, Secretary. Jacob Fry, Act. Com." 

No funds were provided to pay these state obligations until long after 
Mr. Armstrong's death, notwithstanding the state was legally bound to re- 
deem every dollar of their pledges with interest from and after their presenta- 
tion. Trusting and relying upon the fulfillment of these promises, he prose- 
cuted his contract to completion, taking the canal scrip at par for his work 
and paying his men in good money for their labor, thus losing over seventy 
cents upon every dollar he received ! In this way was he robbed without 
redress, save through legislative enactment, which he sought in vain. He 
was forced to dispose of his canal scrip as best he could for the money to 
pay his labor, etc. He finally brought suit against the state, but the case 
was continued time and time again. Sick of the law's delay, and broken 
down with vexation, the end came as before stated. 

Taken all in all, he was the finest specimen of physical and mental 
manhood we ever knew. Quick to perceive and prompt to act, he could 
devise ways and means to accomplish the most stupendous results when 
other men would yield in despair. Whatever he attempted to do, he did, if 
within the power of mortal man to do it, yet he was so kindly-hearted and 
of such a loving disposition that every child who knew him would clamber 
all over him. He was a born leader of men and his influence was so great 
among the people of his county that he was known far and near as the "Em- 
peror of Grundy." 



HENRY STOCKER. 



From the Fatherland came the ancestors of this gentleman. Promi- 
nently connected with affairs in Germany, they at length determined to seek 
a home in America and some of the present representatives of the name are 



444 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD ULXliALOGJCAL RECORD. 

now among tlie leading citizens of Grundy comity. Henry Stocker was 1)orn 
in Chicago. July 21, 1856, a son of (ieorge and Ellen (Diehl) Stocker. His 
father was a native of Baden, Cjermany. born October 28. 1828. and in 1849 
crossed the Atlantic to the new world. Before his emigration he had 
learned the cooper's trade, and on arriving in this country he secured work 
in a cooperage establishment in Xcw ^'ork city, but believing he would 
find better opportunities for ad\ancement in the west he located in Chicago, 
where he became a foreman in the cooper shop of the Lill & Diversy Brew- 
ing Company. He remained with that firm until 1857, when he came to 
Morris. Two months after his arrival in Chicago ^Mr. Stocker sent for his 
parents, two brothers and a sister, who took passage in a vessel that was 
wrecked ot¥ the coast of the West Indies. The members of the Stocker 
familv were among those saved, and with others they reached the isle of 
Nassau in their lifeboats. Subsequently a passing vessel carried them to 
Charleston, South Carolina, and later they came to Illinois. Members of 
the Stocker family had taken part in the Baden revolution and for this 
reason nnich of their property was confiscated by the German government. 
It was this which had led them to seek a home in America. They left the 
Fatherland with little of this world's riches, and when they were shipwrecked 
they lost nearly all that had remained to them. The grandparents of our 
subject with their two sons and daughter joined their son George in Chicago 
and with him came to Morris, where they spent their last days. Their son 
Charles enlisted in the Union army during the Civil war and was killed 
at the battle of Jonesboro. William Stocker, the other son, also joined the 
armv and returned home with shattered health, which resulted in his death 
in 1874. The daughter married a Mr. Singer, and a few years ago her 
death occurred in Peoria, Illinois. George Stocker. the father of our subject, 
was married in Chicago, in 1855, to Ellen Diehl, who was born in Dannstadt, 
Germany in 1832, and now resides in Morris with her son Heniw. having 
been left a widow July 14, 1887. Mr. Stocker became a member of Star 
Lodge, Xo. y-,, I. O. O. F.. on the 22d of January, 1864, and also belonged 
to the German Gesang- \*erein. Unto George and Ellen Stocker were born 
the following children : Henry; William, who died in 1887: Louis, of Joliet: 
Carrie, wife of J. D. Owen, of JNIorris; and Teanie, wife of William Lacard, 
of Big Grove. 

Henry Stocker was educated in the public scliools of Alorris, and early 
in life became a clerk and bookkeeper for the shoe and harness firm of W'oelfel 
& Span', doing' business on Washington street, Morris, in the store now 
occupied by the firm of Sparr & Stocker. Gradually our subject mastered the 
business, and in 1884, forming a partnership with William Sparr, succeeded 
the firm of Woelfel & Sparr, by purchase, and under the firm name of Sparr 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 445 

& Stocker they have since successfully conducted the store. They now 
have a large trade and well merit the success which has come to them. 

When twenty-four years of age Mr. Stocker was elected alderman of 
the city, in which capacity he ably served for four jears. He has also been 
city treasurer for two years, was chief of the fire department for ten years, 
and for the past nine years has been the township school treasurer. He 
is accounted one of the representative citizens of Morris, whose deep interest 
in the welfare of the place has been manifested in his efficient service in its 
behalf. A leading, zealous member of the ^Masonic fraternity, he belongs 
to Cedar Lodge, No. 124, F. & A. ]M., of which he has been master; Orient 
Chapter, No. 31, R. A. ]\I., of which he has been high priest; Blaney Com- 
mandery. No. 5, K. T.. of which he has been eminent conmiander; Medina 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine, of Chicago, and Laurel Chapter, O. E. S. In 
his life he exemplifies the humane and benevolent principles of the fraternity 
and is a leading member of the ]\L'isonic order in Morris. During his long 
residence here he has become widely known and now occupies an enviable 
position in social, political and business circles. 



OLIVER DIX. 



The subject of this sketch died Feliruary 16, 1900, aged seventy-eight 
years, one month and eleven days, passing quietly and peacefully away on 
the home farm which he had entered from the government April 10, 1847. 
He was well preserved and continued in active business until the early part 
of 1899. His great activity during life should put to shame many a younger 
man who, grown weaiy of the struggles and trials of life, leaves to others 
burdens that he should bear. INIr. Dix began life a poor boy, met with many 
hardships and experienced many dit^culties, but in pursuance of a determined 
purpose and well laid plajis steadih' worked his way upward until his ex- 
tensive realty holdings of eight hundred acres became the monument of his 
active and useful life. 

Oliver Dix was born in Oneida county, New York, January 5, 1822, a 
son of Ara and Lydia (Richards) Dix. His. paternal grandfather, Charles 
Dix. was a native of Connecticut and was of Welsh descent. By trade he 
was a tanner and followed that pursuit through his entire life. He remove<l 
from his native state to Oneida county, New York, where his death occurred 
some years afterward. Ara Dix was born in Connecticut, July 14, 1793. 
and here spent his boyhood days learning the shoemaker's trade. He 
accompanied his father to the Empire state, where throughout his business 
career he followed the pursuit with which he had become familiar during 



446 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

his minority. He died September 4, 1826, leaving a widow and son, Oliver, 
who was the only child of their union. Mrs. Dix was born June 18. 1792, 
and died September 21, 1881. After the death of her first husband she 
became the wife of J. E. Waterman, of New York, and in 1837 they left that 
state and removed westward to Kendall county, Illinois. There Mr. Water- 
man located on a farm which he made his home until his death. After the 
marriage of her son Oliver, ^Irs. \\'aterman became an inmate of his home 
and there received loving, filial care and attention until her demise. 

Between the ages of five and fifteen years, Oliver Dix spent con- 
siderable time in the school-room at Vernon, New York. He then accom- 
panied his father to Kendall county, Illinois, and remained on the farm 
assisting his stepfather in the cultivation of the fields until twenty-one years 
of age, when he started out in life for himself. He would rent ten or twenty 
acres of land of a farmer of the locality and till his fields through the summer 
months, while in the winter he engaged in teaching. Thus he accumulated 
money enough to buy some oxen and such farming implements as were in 
use at that day, after which he began breaking prairie for the neighbors. 
In the fall, when the work of cultivating the fields was over, he would 
borrow oxen and do more work in breaking prairie. On one occasion he 
was employed by John Gray to break some prairie land in Grundy county, 
and with his four yoke of oxen he traveled to the place where he was to 
prosecute his labors. As there were no houses in the locality he had to take 
with him enough food to furnish his own meals. He would make his bed 
under the plow-beam and thus he slept until his life was endangered by the 
wolves that were then quite numerous in the neighborhood ! This com- 
pelled him to change his lodging place to the wagon-bed. In going to and 
from the field of labor he had nothing to guide him but some stakes which 
he had previously placed upon the line of his journey, or perhaps a small 
tree now and then would serve as a landmark. When he had completed 
the arduous task he returned to Kendall county and harvested his sum- 
mer crops. 

However, in the meantime, Oliver Dix, being well pleased with the 
land in Grundy county, had determined to seek a home here. Accordingly 
the following spring he returned and purchased a tract of wild prairie from 
the government. Not a furrow had been turned nor an improvement made 
upon the place, but with characteristic energy he began its development 
and in the course of time the well tilled fields yielded to him the ripe golden 
grain. He is perhaps the only purchaser of land from the government who 
lived upon the original purchase until the present year. W'ith the passing 
years he continued the task of tilling the soil and improving his place, being 
actively connected with the agricultural interests of the county until 1899, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 447 

when he turned the management of the farm over to his youngest son. He 
had from time to time added to his land possessions until his real estate 
aggregated eiglit hundred acres. 

In 1848 Mr. Dix was united in marriage to Aliss Lydia Wing, a daughter 
of Thomas Wing, of Illinois. Their children are as follows: Ara W., who 
married Mary- E. Caldwell, and lives in Nettle Creek township, Grundy 
county; Orville E., of Iroquois county, who married Elizabeth Riggs, and 
-after her death married Mrs. Matilda Harvey. The mother of these sons 
died in 1858. Mr. Dix afterward wedded Louisa S. McKinzie, a daughter 
of William and Sophia (Spillman) McKinzie, a native of IMaryland, and 
the children of this union are: Lydia B., the wife of J. W. Johnson, of 
Wauponsee township; William O., who married Jennet Wilson and lives in 
Nettle Creek township; Etta M., the ^vife of William Caldwell, of Erinna 
township; Susan Louella, the wife of William C. West, of Kendall county; 
and George R., who married Maude A. Tinsman, and runs the home farm. 

In politics Mr. Dix was a Republican, and in religious faith a Methodist. 
He was one of the honored and esteemed citizens of his adopted county, 
for his life was ever such as to merit the public regard. He certainly deserved 
great credit for his success and justly won the proud American title of a 
self-made man. 



HENRY C. CLAYPOOL. 

This gentleman is the popular postmaster of ^lorris. More than half a 
century ago his father held the same office, and no student of the history of 
Grundy county can carry his investigations far in its records without be- 
coming cognizant of the fact that the Claypool family has been one of prom- 
inence and influence in the conmnmity. 

He whose name introduces this review was born in Grundy county, on 
the 31st of March, 1852. After attending the public schools he graduated 
at the Morris Classical Institute, and later was a student in a business col- 
lege; but during much of his youth his time and attention were devoted to 
the labors of the farm. He carried on agricultural pursuits till thirty years 
of age, after which he filled the office of deputy county clerk for four years. 
He then became manager of the Chieago Fire-proofing Company, with 
which he was connected for a considerable period, and for eight years was 
the cashier of the Coleman Hardware Company. In March, 1898, he was 
appointed postmaster of Morris, taking possession of the office on the ist 
of April. He is popular with its patrons, owing to his uniform courtesy 
and obliging disposition, and is a worthy representative of the govern- 
ment. 



448 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

In 1873 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Claypool and Miss Annie 
M. Brown, and they now have a daughter, named Carrie M. Their house- 
hold is noted for its hospitality and the family enjoy the warm regard of a 
large circle of friends. Mr. Claypool is a member of the Globe Mutual 
Benefit Association, and in politics has been a stanch Republican since cast- 
ing his first presidential vote for R. B. Hayes. On attaining his majority 
he was elected supervisor of W'auponsee township and held that position till 
1882, when he removed to the city. In 1893 he was elected the city clerk of 
Morris and held that position for three successive terms, his administration 
of its afTairs being prompt, reliable and businesslike. Of the ^lasonic fra- 
ternity he is a very prominent member, having taken the initiatory degree 
in Cedar Lodge, No. 124, F. & A. M.. in which for three years he served as 
master. He also belongs to Orient Chapter, No. 31, R. A. M., in which 
he has been a high priest; the Blaney Commandeni\ No. 5, K. T., and the 
Laurel Chapter. No. 145, O. E. S. His entire life has been passed in Grundy 
county, where he has a very wide acquaintance and enjoys the friendship 
of many who have known him from boyhood — a fact which indicates that 
his career has been an honorable and upright one. 



HON. PERRY A. ARMSTRONG. 

The gentleman who constitutes the subject of this brief sketch was born 
in Licking county. Ohio, April 15. 1823. and came to Illinois with his mother 
and brothers in the spring of 183 1. He is the seventh son of Joseph and 
Elsie Armstrong. His early opportunities for an education were poor, but 
he possessed an inquiring mind and retentive memor}' and acquired a fairly 
good but not classic education at the Granville (Illinois) Academy and Illi- 
nois College, paying his way by working Saturdays and teaching school 
and laboring at farm work during vacations. 

The day he was twenty years old he came to Morris with the intention 
of making it his home. Like Japheth in search of a father, he came on foot 
and alone and "across lots," carrying all his worldly goods (which included 
Blackstone's Commentaries) in a cotton bandana handkerchief, and two 
smooth Mexican quarters in his pocket, expecting to make law his profes- 
sion; but an accident happened to him, from which he narrowly escaped 
with his life, being thrown in the Illinois river by the sinking of a ferry-boat 
while trjing to fern,- a lot of cattle over the river at Morris, which resulted 
in a severe attack of typhoid fever. After lying in bed at the Grundy hotel 
several weeks, he was taken overland upon a feather bed in a wagon to the 
home of his mother in LaSalle countv. where he remained until able to re- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 449^ 

sume study, and then returned to Granville Academy, Putnam county, to 
finish his preparation to enter Illinois College at Jacksonville; and in Septem- 
ber of that year he matriculated in that college as a sophomore; but, his 
health failing, he spent only two years in college and then returned to Mor- 
ris, in the fall of 1845. where he opened a general or countn,- store and was 
appointed postmaster; and at the spring election for school trustee, 1846, 
he was elected one of the trustees of township 33. range 7, and was made 
president of the board. 

When Governor Ford issued his proclamation of May 25, 1846, for vol- 
unteers for the ?\Iexican war, Mr. Armstrong was the first to respond, and 
raised a company, which elected him captain; but, owing to our not having a 
daily mail, the report of its organization, though immediately mailed, did not 
reach the adjutant general's office at Springfield until after the report of 
Judge Dickey's company of Ottawa, though orgainzed one day later, had 
been received and his company accepted, which filled the quota of Illinois 
volunteers. Hence the Morris company was disbanded, and all the military 
honor Captain Armstrong acquired was the naked commission as captain 
oi the Gnuidy county militia, which cost him much time and money in or- 
ganizing and drilling a lot of stalwart men, chiefly composed of canal hands. 
That commission, as well as the title of captain, has long been lost and for- 
gotten. 

On the 2 1st of December, 1846, Captain Armstrong was united in mar- 
riage with Miss ]\Ian- J. Borbidge, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, a lady of 
refinement and education as well as a devout Christian, who ably assisted 
her husband and Dr. Hand in organizing the first Sabbath-school in Morris: 
and, being the best Biblical scholar, she took charge of the Bible class. To 
them were born four sons: Fidelius H.. who died in infancy; Qiarles Dale, 
an elocutionist and ventriloquist, who was killed at Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
December 26, 1899; Elwood, who is a prominent physician and railroad sur- 
geon at Greenleaf, Kansas; and William E.. shipping clerk for the Piano 
Harvester Company. The first wife died of consumption September 4. 1862, 
and on the 23d of August, 1863, the Captain was married to Airs. Malina J. 
Eldredge, of Piano, Illinois, who still survives, and has been the mother 
of three sons: Lewis W., who died in infancy; Frank N.. a physician and 
surgeon of Richmond, Illinois, and Perry A., Jr., who is a dentist of Chicago. 

In 1847 Mr. Armstrong was one of the Illinois delegates to the river 
and harbor convention, where Mr. Lincoln and he were committee-men from 
Illinois upon permanent organization. He favored "Tom" Corwin, of Ohio, 
while Mr. Lincoln was for Edward Bates, of Missouri. Mr. Armstrong 
was the first supervisor of the town of Morris; was elected justice of the 
peace in 1849; ^^'^s a clerk in the oftnce of the auditor of public accounts dur- 



450 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

ing the winter of 1850-51 and drew the charter of tlie Rock Island, LaSalle 
& Chicago Railroad, now the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad, also 
of the Chicago. Burlington & Ouincy Railroad, and the Illinois Central 
Railroad, and made the selections of the government land which inured to 
said railroad under the congressional act; and then went upon the survey 
of the Rock Island, LaSalle & Chicago Railroad as assistant engineer in 
1851, and ran its experimental levels from Joliet to Ottawa and from Tiskilwa 
to Geneseo, and then went to the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy and ran 
the level from Galesburg to Pond Creek, now Sheffield; but on discovering 
that there was not enough money in the treasury to pay one month's salary 
he resigned and came home, and was appointed swamp-land commissioner 
of Gnmdy county, to select and sell the unsold government lands that should 
fall within the meaning of the swamp-land act of congress of September 28, 
1850. By personal surveys and inspection he secured the title to about three 
thousand acres, which he subsequently sold for several thousand dollars, 
which went into the county treasury. 

At the November election, 1853. he was elected clerk of the county 
court and re-elected in 1857, and in 1862 he was elected to the constitutional 
convention from LaSalle, Livingston and Grundy counties without oppo- 
sition, and to the legislature from Grundy and Will, in 1863, and again in 
1872, from DeKalb, Kendall and Grundy counties, without opposition, and 
served on the judiciary, judicial department and railroad committees in the 
latter session ; and was the author of our present common-law jurisdiction of 
county courts, and the law of escheats and our jury law, with many amend- 
ments to our criminal code, road and bridge and other laws; and was on the 
Seymour ticket in 1868. 

Captain Armstrong was the grand master of the grand lodge of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows of the state of Illinois in 1856-57. and 
grand representative to the sovereign grand lodge of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows of the United States for 1858 and 1859. 

He was an active supporter of the government in the war of the Re- 
bellion and assisted in the organization of soldiers, making war speeches 
all over the surrounding country as a war Democrat and was a personal 
friend of Mr. Lincoln and Senator Douglas, both of whom he has enter- 
tained at his home in Morris, and in turn he was entertained by them at 
their homes in Springfield, Illinois. In the winter of 1851, Mr. Lincoln and 
he alternating, read the entire works of Sir Walter Scott. In the fall of 
1863 he engaged in the purchase of horses for the army and continued at that 
until the close of the war. He was admitted to the bar in 1863. entering 
into partnership with Judge Benjamin Olin, now of Joliet, under the firm 
name of Olin & Armstrong, which was the leading law firm for several 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 451 

years. Mr. Olin withdrew from the firm in 1870, locating in JoHet. In 1876 
Mr. Armstrong- was appointed master in chancery of Gnmdy county, and 
held that office for twenty-two consecutive years. He was the secretary of 
the school board nine years and also secretary of the board of trustees of 
the Illinois Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary for nine years, and president 
of the board of directors of the Morris Cemeteiy Association seventeen years, 
during which time Evergreen cemetery emerged from obscurity to a first- 
class cemetery. He is the dean of the Morris bar and the oldest Master 
Mason and Past Master, Royal Arch Mason, and past high priest, Knight 
Templar and past commander, and was deputy grand commander of the 
grand commandery of the state of Illinois in 1863 and is the oldest thirty- 
third degree Mason of this state, in date of membership. 

Though he never had any pecuniary interest in a newspaper, he has 
conducted the political column of several during presidential campaigns and 
is the author of The Sauks and of Black Hawk War; and has written many 
poems, which have been published, among which are a Child's Inquiry, 
What is Heaven, and a Funeral Dirge to General Grant, and the disappoint- 
ment of Judge Carter's little son Allan over his failure to grasp a ray of light, 
etc. But his master poem is a Greeting tO' the Pioneers of Northern Illinois, 
which has not yet been published. He was always an admirer of nature and 
an enthusiastic geologist, and has shipped tO' the Smithsonian Institution at 
Washington city within the last year over three tons of fossil botany of his 
own collection, and he has been the historian of Grundy county from its 
birth up to the present time. For many years he personally knew every citi- 
zen in the county, even to his Christian name. 



LAWRENCE W. CLAYPOOL. 

Almost from the earliest development of Grundy county the name of 
Claypool has been inseparably interwoven in its history, and its representatives 
have ever been men of sterling worth and have labored earnestly and effect- 
ively for the substantial development and progress of the locality. For 
many years Lawrence W. Claypool has been identified with the interests 
of this section of the state and left the impress of his individuality upon the 
material improvement as well as upon the social and public life of the com- 
munity. He was born in Brown county, Ohio, June 4, 1819, and was of 
English lineage. 

The earhest record of the family extant indicates that about 1645, Sir 
James Claypool. of England, married a daughter of Oliver Cromwell. Some 
years later two brothers of the same family crossed the Atlantic from England 



452 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

to America, taking up their residence in Virginia. One subsequently left 
the Old Dominion for Pennsylvania and cast in his lot Avith the colony that 
with William Penn laid the foundation of the Keystone state. It was either 
he or his descendant, James C. Claypool, who was a signing witness to the 
Penn charter in 1682. His descendants have spelled the name Claypole. 

The other brother remained in Virginia, where his son, William Clay- 
pool, was born about 1690. He lived to the extraordinary age of one hun- 
dred and two years, and had a family of three sons — George, John and 
James. The last named was born about 1730, and lie had three sons whom 
he reverently named Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. He was General Wash- 
ington's commissary for eastern Virginia and was a most loyal advocate 
of the cause of liberty. His son, Abraham, removed to Chillicothe, Ohio, 
in 1799, and became prominent in the early history of that state, ser\-ing 
for several years in the senate. He had six sons and five daughters, the 
second son being Jacob Claypool, who was born in Virginia in 1788 and 
became a resident of Brown county. Ohio. He manifested a spirit of patriot- 
ism by his sen-ice in the war of 181 2 and was ever recognized as a man of 
sterling character and worth. He married Nancy Ballard, a lady of Quaker 
parentage froni' North Carolina, and they had twO' sons — Perry A. and 
Lawrence W. The former was born in Belmont county. Ohio, June 5. 181 5. 
and died in Grundy county, Illinois, October 13, 1846. In 1834 Jacob Clay- 
pool removed with his family to the western frontier, taking up his abode 
in what is now Wauponsee townshi]'. Grundv countx'. Illinois. He secured 
for himself and his sons a large tract of land and became a wealthy citizen 
and a prominent representative of the agricultural interests of the county. 
His abilitv led to his selection for a niunber oi important offices and he 
served as the first county commissioner, was also the probate judge of the 
county, and held other ])osiiions of trust and responsibility. He died in 1876, 
at the age of eighty-eight years. 

Lawrence \V. Claypool, his son, was a yoiuli of fifteen years when he 
accompanied his parents on their removal to Grundy county. He attended 
the schools for only a])out eleven months, j^ursuing his studies in a little 
log school-house in Ohio, but be was a man of strong mentalitv. and through 
obser\'ation and reading became well informed. In 1841. when not yet 
twenty-two years of age. he was elected the recorder of deeds for Grundy 
county and served until 1847. In the meantime he became the first post- 
master of the town of Morris, holding the position from 1842 till 1845. In 
1848 he received the appointment of assistant agent of the canal lands and 
served in that capacity until all the land was sold, retiring from the position 
in i860. He was also the town supervisor and a member of the school 
board for many years, and at all times discharged his duties with a prompt- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 453 

ness and fidelity that won him the commendation of all concerned. Of the 
Union cause he was a faithful and loyal adherent. During the Civil war he 
was a very active and prominent worker in raising volunteers and providing 
sanitary supplies. In his early life he was afflicted with white-swelling in 
his right leg, rendering him physically incapacitated for active military ser- 
vice in the field during the great conflict. With the changed conditions 
and feeling of the time he changed his political adherency, being first a 
Whig, then an Abolitionist, afterward a member of the Free-soil party and on 
the organization of the Republican party he became one of its stanch ad- 
vocates. 

On the 15th of November, 1849, Mr. Clay pool was united in marriage 
to Miss Caroline B. Palmer, a daughter of John Palmer, of Ottawa, one of 
the pioneer settlers of LaSalle county, \\ho in June, 1833. traveled across 
the country from Warren county, New York, to the Prairie state. Mrs. 
Claypool was born in New York, March 12, 1831, and died in. Morris, in Feb- 
ruary, 1890. Eight children were born of their union, but only one is now- 
living — Henry C. ]\Ir. Claypool was called tO' his final rest in 1893. He 
spent his last days ii: IMorris and was a most highly esteemed citizen, re- 
spected and honored by all who knew him. Of firm convictions, he was 
unwavering in his support of whatever he believed to be right, and his in- 
tegrity was above question. He was faithful in friendship, loyal in citizen- 
ship, reliable in business and devoted to his home and family. His record 
is one well worthv of emulation. 



FRANK A. JOHNSON. 

Frank A. Johnson, one of the leading merchants of Morris, was born on 
a farm in Grundy county, February 22, 1872. He is a graduate of the Mor- 
ris high school and received his business training in Bryant & Stratton's 
Business college, of Chicago. He then put to the practical test the knowl- 
edge he had acquired by accepting a position in the wholesale dry-goods 
house of J. V. Farwell & Company, of that city, but after a brief time he 
returned to Morris, where for a year and a half he acted as salesman in the 
dry-goods store of Henry H. Baum. When that period was ended he spent 
five months in his father's store, and in September, 1893, returned to Chi- 
cago, where for a year and a half he was in the employ of the United States 
Express Company. In February, 1895, he again returned to Morris to work 
m his father's store, and in May following was admitted to a partnership in 
the business under the name of Peter A. Johnson & Sons, dealers in hard- 
ware, farm implements and carriages. The father established this store in 



454 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

1882. It is now under the management of Frank A. Johnson, and his carefuf 
supervision, keen discernment and executive force are bringing to it an 
excellent success. The firm now enjoys the largest trade in its line in the 
county, and the store is fully ecjuipped with everything found in a first-class 
establishment. 

In 1896 was celebrated the marriage of Frank A. Johnson and Laura A. 
Williams, and they now have an interesting little son, Ralph. Mr. John- 
son exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of 
the Republican party, but has never sought political preferment for himself. 
Socially he is connected with the Knights of the Globe, and both lie and his 
wife hokl membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. The hospital- 
ity of the best homes of Morris is freely extended them, and they fully merit 
the high regard in which they are uniformly held. 



JOHN E. CLAYPOOL. • 

A representative of one of the oldest families of Grundy county, John 
E. Claypool is now engaged in farming in W'auponsee township. He was 
bom in that township, in 1868, on the farm occupied by his father before 
moving to the old homestead, his parents being John and Elizabeth (Hume) 
Claypool. His great-grandfather, Jacob Claypool, was a pioneer settler 
there and removed from Ohio to Illinois in 1834. He secured a grant of 
land from the government which still remains in the possession of his de- 
scendants, and throughout the remainder of his life was connected with 
the agricultural interests of Grundy county. His son, Perry A. Claypool, 
was born in Brown county, Ohio, June 5, 1815, and with his parents came 
to the west. He was a man of great energy, strong determination and 
much force of character, and in the community where he resided was recog- 
nized as a leading and influential citizen. At the age of twenty years he was 
married in his native county to Miss Mary Halstead, who also was born 
in the Buckeye slate. In 1847 he was instantly killed by the kick of a horse, 
leaving a wife and four children. At that time he was holding a responsible 
position as assessor and treasurer of Grundy county, and in the discharge 
of his duties manifested the promptness and fidelity which were numbered 
among his chief characteristics. 

John Claypool, the father of our subject, was born on the old faniilv 
homestead in Wauponsee township in 1837, being the third white child 
born in Grundy county. He wa^s reared on the farm and upon attaining 
his majority he purchased and located en a tract of land in Wauponsee 
township, where he made his home till the death of his grandfather, when 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 455 

he returned to the old family homestead, there remaining throughout the 
residue of his days. He received his education in the country schools, but 
was a man of marked intellectuality and through his own efforts gained a 
broad general knowledge, and in his young days engaged in teaching school. 
His political support was given to the Republican party and he was an active 
and loyal advocate of its doctrines. He held a number of township offices 
and for several years faithfully discharged the duties of township supervisor. 
His death occurred in 1886, but his widow still survives and is living in 
Morris. 

John E. Claypool is indebted to the common schools of the neighbor- 
hood for the educational privileges he received. His training at farm labor 
was not meager and from an early age he was familiar with the duties and 
tasks which fall to the lot of the agriculturist. He Has always engaged 
in farming and is now living at the old place, occupying the brick dwelling 
that was erected by Jacob Qaypool, the bricks used therein being made 
from clay obtained upon the farm. This is the oldest brick dwelling in the 
county, but is still in a state of good preservation. The farm is rich and 
highly cultivated, the well tilled fields yielding to the owner a golden tribute 
for the care and labor bestowed upon them. 

In 1891 Mr. Claypool was united in marriage to Miss Eva May Harney, 
a daughter of Daniel Harney, of LaSalle county. To them were born five 
children — Charlotte E., Daniel E., Jennie B., Pearl M. and Victoria May. 
In his political views Mr. Claypool is a Republican, but has never sought or 
desired office, preferring to devote his time and energies to his business inter- 
ests. His methods of farming are progressive and commend themselves 
to all wide-awake and enterprising agriculturists. He is both widely and 
favorably known in the county where his entire life has been passed and has 
a large circle of friends. 



SAMUEL E. STOUGH. 

Samuel E. Stough, now the judge of the thirteenth circuit and a man 
well known throughout the state of Illinois, has for more than two decades 
been an honored citizen of Morris. 

Judge Stough is a native of the Buckeye state. He was born in Wil- 
liams county, Ohio, September 2, 1852, a son of J. S. Stough, a physician. 
In 1858 Dr. Stough moved with his family to Waterloo, Indiana, and it was 
there that Samuel E. was reared. His education, begun in the public schools 
of Waterloo, was carried for\vard at Springfield, Ohio, and later at Ann 
Arbor, Michigan. In the University of Michigan he pursued the study of 



456 BIOGRAPHICAL A.\'D GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Jaw, and is a graduate of the law department of that institution with the 
class of 1877. Immediately after his graduation he came to Illinois and lo- 
cated at Morris, where he began his professional career, a career which has 
been marked by signal success. He has served three terms as state's attor- 
ney, having been elected to the office in 1888, 1892 and 1896. and in 1897 
he was honored by election to the office of judge of the thirteenth circuit, 
receiving these favors at the hands of the Republican party, of which he 
has always been an ardent supporter. The Judge maintains a fraternal re- 
lation with the Knights of Pythias. 

He was married in 1892 to ^liss Jennie Garrett, and they are the par- 
ents of three children. 



DR. A. F. HAND. 



Dr. A. F. Hand, deceased, the pioneer physician of Morris. Illinois, was 
born in Shoreham. \"ermont. July 11. 1816. and at an early age came west 
to Illinois. He received his education in the Illinois College, of which insti- 
tution he was a graduate with the class of 1844. Two years later, in 1847, 
he came to Morris and here began his professional career, a career which 
covered a period of forty years and which was one marked by signal success. 
Dr. Hand was recognized not only as a skillful and successful physician but 
also as a gentleman in every sense of the word, and he enjoyed the confidence 
and respect of all who knew him. He died June 15, 1890, at the age of 
seventv-three vears. eleven months and four davs. 



JULIUS C. ARMSTRONG. 

Julius C. Armstrong. D. D.. the third son of George W. and Xancy 
(Green) Armstrong, was born at the old homestead in the eastern part of La- 
Salle county, Illinois, on the iSth of August, 1840. He worked on the farm 
in the summers and attended the district school in the winters until his 
eighteenth year, when he was sent to Morris, Illinois, to a high school, where 
he studied, with some intervals at home or teaching school, until he was of 
age. 

A year after the breaking out of the great civil war he entered the army 
as a volunteer in behalf of his countr}-. He left his home in July. 1862. and 
Avas mustered into the United States Army in September, and served for three 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 457 

years in Company D of the Ninety-first Infantry Volunteers. He was ab- 
sent from his company a part of the fall of that year, on account of sickness, 
and thereby escaped capture with his regiment by the Confederate General 
John Morgan. Joining his company at Benton Barracks, Missouri, in De- 
cember, he was employed as a clerk in the office of the provost marshal of 
St. Louis until the exchange of his regiment in the summer of 1863. They 
were then sent to General Grant's command, arri\ing just after the capture 
of \'icksburg. They were too late to participate in the siege, but in time to 
relieve a part of General Sherman's command sent to drive General Johnston 
out of the state. Guard duty was done here and at Port Hudson, with an 
occasional pursuit of detachments of the Confederate troops out in cjuest of 
forage or to harass our movements. 

In September, 1863, a considerable force of United States troops under 
the command of General Gordon Granger established a camp at Morganza 
Bend, below Port Hudson on the ^Mississippi river, to prevent the Confed- 
erates from shipping cattle and other supplies across the river from Texas. 
Several severe skirmishes occurred with portions of General Dick Taylor's 
armv. in some of which Air. Armstrong's company participated. During 
this time Mr. Armstrong was the standard-bearer of his regiment. 

The capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson and the elimination of the 
armies of Generals Johnston and Gardner from the Confederate forces, to- 
gether with the precipitate retreat of General Johnston after the fall of \'icks- 
burg, left General Grant without occupation. Something more important 
than skirmishes with small foraging parties was needed to crush the rebel- 
lion. General Grant's troops were therefore shipped to CarroUton. Louisi- 
ana, and sent across the Gulf of Mexico with an army to seize Brazos island 
and Brownsville. Texas, two points of great value to the Confederates for 
the export of cotton and the import of arms and ammunition. 

As soon as the expetlition had accomplished its purpose all but one 
brigade of the corps was returned to New Orleans for the ill-starred expedi- 
tion up the Red river. The Ninety-first Regiment, with its brigade, was 
left behind to garrison Brazos island until the following Christmas, when it 
also was shipped to New Orleans to increase the army gathered there to 
move on Mobile. Alabama. The troops in strong force under the command 
of General E. R. S. Canby left New Orleans in February. 1864, and landed 
near Fort IMorgan, on the east side of Mobile bay. and. marching- from that 
point, invested Spanish Fort and Blakely, two strongly fortified forts, form- 
ing a part of the defenses of the city of Mobile. Spanish Fort was evacu- 
ated after a close siege of twelve days, the Confederates leaving in such haste 
that a large amount of annnunition. many small arms and all their cannon 
fell into our hands, together with some three hundred prisoners. Blakely 



458 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

was then stormed and captured, with considerable loss of life, the prisoners 
numbering several thousand. The loss of the two forts and the men and 
arms with which they were garrisoned left the Confederates no recourse but 
to abandon the city. 

The army of General Canby was then shipped across the bay and entered 
the city without opposition, on the 8th of April. 1865. Without stopping 
the army was sent northward in pursuit of the retreating Confederates, over- 
taking their rear guard three or four miles from the city at a small railroad 
station. Two of Mr. Armstrong's comrades fell by his side as his company 
charged at a run across a burning bridge. This proved to be the last blood 
shed by any of his company before the collapse of the rebellion. After a 
few days the troops marched northward to the Tombigbee river and con- 
structed a fort and placed cannon in position to prevent the escape of Gen- 
eral Taylor's gimboats. An expedition was then planned and started to 
strike the Confederates in the rear, at Selma, Alabama. After a few miles 
of marching the troops were turned back with a flag of truce, sent with the 
information that the greatest rebellion of all history had suddenly become a 
thing of the past. The troops were then returned to Mobile by water, using 
for their transportation General Taylor's captured gunboats. In conspicu- 
ous letters on captured ambulances and army wagons on the boats were the 
words, "General Dick Taylor never surrenders." The professor in charge 
of the steam calliope on one of these boats played at the request of his captors 
"Dixie." "Way Down South in the Land of Cotton," and other southern airs, 
and then with the remark, "I haven't played them for so long a time I am 
afraid I have forgotten how," "Yankee Doodle," "Star Spangled Banner" 
and "Hail Columbia." 

The troops were sent to their respective states and mustered out of ser- 
vice as rapidly as possible, Mr. Armstrong arriving at his home in July, 1865. 
He was appointed sergeant in September, when mustered into the ser\'ice, 
and promoted to be first sergeant in September, 1864, and brevetted second 
lieutenant at the close of the war. This office would have been conferred 
nearly a year earlier had not the depletion of his company by disease and 
death limited the number of commissioned officers to two. 

After his discharge Mr. Armstrong returned to his home and was mar- 
ried to Hattie Vanelia, the oldest daughter of Mr. Henry B. Goodrich, a 
farmer living in Grundy county, Illinois, five miles south of Morris, the 
county seat of that county. The following year he rented the farm of his 
father-in-law and later he purchased a part of the fami, bviilding a house and 
barn and buying stock and tools with the expectation of devoting himself to 
farming. 

He was elected a deacon of the Congregational church in the neighbor- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 459 

hood and superintendent of its Sunday-school, delivered addresses in that 
part of the county at various Sunday-school gatherings, and began thereby, 
as it proved, his life work as a minister of the gospel. He sold his farm in 
1871, returning to the plan formed and given up before the war. He took 
his family in September of that year to Chicago and entered upon a course of 
theological study in the Chicago^ Theological Seminary and completed his 
course in the spring of 1874. While pursuing his studies he preached for a 
time at \\'alnut, in Bureau county, Illinois, and also at East Waupansie, this 
state, and in February, 1873, began preaching at Lyonsville, fifteen miles 
west of Chicago; and on concluding his studies at the seminary was installed 
as pastor of that church. During the nearly ten years that he preached for 
this church he conducted a Sunday afternoon sei-vice at Western Springs for 
over five years, and later returned to this field and organized a Congregation- 
al church of fifty members as the result, in part, of his previous labors there. 
He preached also at Lyons, a town five miles east of Lyonsville, and organ- 
ized a church there of twenty-five members. Later he began an afternoon 
service at La Grange and organized a church there of thirty-five members. 
Grounds were purchased and a building erected for the last named church, at 
a cost of four thousand five hundred dollars. 

In the spring of 1882 a unanimous call came from the Congregational 
churches of Chicago to accept the position of "Superintendent of Mission 
Work" in the city of Chicago. While his church refused to accept his resig- 
nation they agreed to spare him for the new work provided a council of the 
churches should decide that such a step was best. He began his labors 
in the new^ field in August. 1882, and in the following December was made 
the superintendent of the Chicago City Missionary Society on its organiza- 
tion, and he has continued to superintend its work to the present time, nearly 
eighteen years. 

About four hundred thousand dollars have been gathered and expended 
in organizing and supporting the missions and churches under the society's 
care. Thirty to forty missionaries and visitors are employed and missions 
are cared for all over the city. When the work was begun there were seven- 
teen Congregational churches in the area now covered by the city, and there 
are now seventy-seven Congregational churches in the city, all but twenty- 
seven of which were formed by the aid of this organization. Seven thousand 
five hundred church members have been gathered into these new churches 
and over fifteen thousand children cared for in their Sunday-schools. Thirty 
young ministers have been raised up in these churches for the Christian min- 
istry. The value of the property held by these churches exceeds four hun- 
dred and fifty thousand dollars. 

yir. Armstrong was the registrar of the Chicago Association of Congre- 



46o BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

gational Churches from April, 1880, to April, 1886. He was one of the in- 
corporators of the Ministerial Relief Society, an organization formed to aid 
indigent and aged ministers and their families within the state of Illinois. 
For some years he was its secretary and treasurer, and he is still on its board 
of direction. He has been a member of the board of directors of the Chi- 
cago Theological Seminary for twelve years, and has been the secretary of 
the executive committee of the board for the same length of time. He re- 
ceived the honoraiy degree of Bachelor of Divinity from the seminary at his 
graduation, and the degree of Doctor of Divinity from Wheaton college in 
1898. 

Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong have three children. Arthur Henry, the old- 
est, graduated at Beloit College, and, choosing his father's profession, gradu- 
ated also at the Theological Seminary. He organized the W'aveland Avenue 
Congregational Church of Chicago six years ago, and is still its pastor. 
Grounds have been purchased and a building erected under his direction, and 
a membership of over two hundred has been gathered under his pastorate. 
He was married to Miss Kate Schultz in 1895. Anna, the second child, has 
made a name for herself as an artist in water colors, and as a decorator of 
china. She draws her own designs from nature. She instructs teachers 
and supplies nature studies by correspondence throughout the country. She 
was married in 1898 to Dr. T. S. Green, a practicing physician and surgeon 
on the south side of the city. Mrs. Green continues her chosen profession, 
however, and is an enthusiastic ai^tist. Julius Roy, the youngest child, is in 
tlie Armour Institute of Technology, fitting himself to be an electrical engi- 
neer. 



PETER A. JOHNSON. 

Starting out in life for himself when only twelve years of age, Peter .A. 
Johnson steadily worked his way upward, reaching a prominent position in 
commercial circles in Morris. Difihculties were in his way, but he overcame 
them by determined purpose, resolute will and untiring energy, and became 
one of the substantial citizens of Gnuuly county. In all his transactions he 
has alwavs followed the most honorable methods, and Inisiness integrity is 
synonymous with his name. 

Tslr. Johnson is one of tlie worthy citizens that Sweden has furnished 
to the new world, his birth liaving occurred in that kingdom on the 24th 
of March, 1843. His parents were John and Hannah Johnson, both natives 
of Sweden, and in the spring of 1853 they started for the United States, but 
on the voyage tlie father and two of the sons died of cholera. The mother 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 461 

and the remaining children — John G., WilHam C. Daniel O., Louise. Anna 
and Peter A. — all reached New York in safety and came direct to Grundy 
county, Illinois, where the boys were bound out. Peter A. Johnson en- 
tered the ser\'ice of a farmer by the name of Gorham. but soon afterward, 
at the age of twelve years, he ran away and started out upon an independent 
career. From that time on he depended solely upon his own exertions, and 
whatever success he has achieved in life may be attributed to his well directed 
efforts. In his youth he worked as a farm hand in Grundy county, and at 
the age of eighteen years, prompted by a spirit of patriotism, he responded 
to the country's call for troops to aid in crushing out the rebelHon, joining 
•Company D, Thirty-sixth Illinois Infantry, under Captain W. P. Pierce. He 
served for three years and three months, participating in mmierous both' con- 
tested engagements, including the battles of Pea Ridge, Shiloh, Perryville, 
Stone River, and Chickamauga. In the last named he sustained a wound 
in the ankle which resulted in a permanent injury. His wound was par- 
tially dressed on the battle-field and there he remained uncared for until the 
seventh day, when he was sent tO' the hospital, and later to a hospital at 
Quincy, Illinois, and was never again able to engage in active service on the 
field. Previous to this time he was always found at his post of duty, faith- 
fully defending the old flag and the cause it represented. 

While in Quincy Mr. Johnson was married, on the "th of May, 1864, 
to Miss Elizabeth Claypool, daughter of Perry A. Claypool. She was born 
in Grundy county, August 18, 1845. After his marriage Mr. Johnson be- 
gan farming in Wauponsee township, where he carried on agricultural pur- 
suits until 1882. He was very diligent, practical in his methods and 
progressive in all departments of farm work, and the well tilled fields yielded 
to him a golden tribute in return for the care and labor he bestowed upon 
them. On retiring from his farming he took up his residence in Morris, 
where he engaged in the agricultural implement and carriage business. 
From the beginning he prospered in the new imdertaking and enlarged his 
stock to meet the constantly growing demands of his trade. Later on he 
admitted his sons to a partnership in the business, under the firm style of 
Peter A. Johnson & Sons, and this house now enjoys a leading trade in its 
line in Morris. The business is now under the control of his son, Frank 
A. Johnson, and the liberal patronage the firm receives is well merited. 

Unto Peter and Elizabeth Johnson have been born four children, name- 
ly: Perry A., Frederick S., Frank A. and Nellie M. Mr. Johnson is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which his wife also belongs. 
He also belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic and gives his political 
support to the Republican party. As a citizen he has ever been progressive <^ 



and pulilic-spirited, an<l in days nf peace manifesting the same loyalty to tli^ 



c<^ 



•^ # / 



462 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

flag that marked his militarj- service on the battle-fields of the south. His 
success in business matters has been ver}- creditable and he enjoys the respect 
and confidence of all who know him. 



JOHN WINTERBOTTOM. 

Those sturdy English traits which constitute an element of strength and 
excellence in our American character are exemplified in the subject of this 
sketch, who until his recent retirement from active farming and removal to 
the city of Morris was a farmer on section 17, Goose Lake township, Grundy 
county. 

John Winterbottom was born in Lancashire, England, June 30, 1842, 
a son of William and Martha (Booth) Winterbottom and a grandson of 
James \\"interbottom, who fought at the battle of Waterloo. William Win- 
terbottom, also a native of Lancashire, England, was bom in 1821. He 
came to the United States many years ago and settled near Lisbon, Ken- 
dall county, Illinois, where he was a prominent and successful farmer until 
his death, which occurred in Kansas in 1874. His wife, also born in Lan- 
cashire, England, in 1821, died in England, at the age of seventy-five years. 
Three of their children are living: John, the first born, James and William. 
Three daughters, named Elizabeth, Eliza and Ellen, died in England when 
very young. James and William remained in England. James, who is the 
superintendent of a large system of chemical works in London, is married 
and has children. William, who is an artist and a member of the Royal 
Artists' Society and has attained eminence in his profession, lives with his 
wife and children in London. 

John Winterbottom obtained his education at the place of his birth in 
Lancashire, England, and came to America at the age of seventeen, arriv- 
ing at Morris, Illinois, April 12, 1859. For a few years he was employed 
on the farm of his uncle, Joseph Wild, in Nettle Creek township. In 1870 
he removed to the city of Morris, where he opened a machine and gunsmith's 
shop on Liberty street, which he conducted successfully for nearly a quarter 
of a centur}'. Mr. Winterbottom then removed to his farm of five hundred 
and sixty acres in section 17, Goose Lake township, and again took up farm- 
ing. A man of influence and of sound judgment he gained the confidence 
of his fellow townsmen to such a degree that he was elected a justice of the 
peace and the president of the school board of his township and a taistee of 
Oak Ridge cemetery. 

\\'hen the country of his adoption needed men who would risk their 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 463 

lives in its defense at the time of our civil war, Mr. Winterbottom responded 
to the call promptly and patriotically. He enlisted in Company I, Sixty- 
ninth Regiment, Illinois \'olunteer Infanir\-, and when the term ol his ser- 
vice e.xpired re-enlisted in the One Hundred and Thirty-eighth Regiment, 
Illinois \'olunteer Infantry. He participated in the battles and campaigns 
in which those organizations took part and proved himself in every way 
a brave and true soldier, devoted to the flag under which he had found 
citizenship and prosperity. 

Though he has been for most of his life a busy man, Mr. Winterbottom 
has found time to keep himself in touch with the progress of the world, 
especially in the department of mechanical science; and he has been a con- 
stant reader of the best mechanical journals. He is also a student of natural 
history and is an amateur astronomer of no mean attainments. 

Mr. Winterbottom married Marj- Williams, December 20, 1876. Miss 
Williams was a daughter of Jacob and Ann Williams, of Felix township, 
Grundy county, both natives of Wales. Jacob Williams was born August 
23, 1820, and died at Morris, this county. His wife was born August 20, 
1819, and died in Grundy county, April 21, 1873. They had seven children, 
only one of whom is living. Of these, Henry was bom in Wales and died in 
infancy; Mary, who married Mr. Winterbottom, died at their farm in Goose 
Lake township, July 26, 1898, and is buried at St. George's cemetery, at 
Morris, where she was a member and a liberal supporter of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and a constant attendant at its services; George, who 
was bom and died in Grundy county, married Miss Adelia White, of Feli.x 
township, and they had one child, Anna; Emma, born in Grundy coimty, is 
the wife of Edward Robinson, a retired farmer of Kansas City, Missouri; 
Maggie w'as born in Grundy county and died there, aged twenty-one: and 
John, a native of Grundy county, died there aged about twenty. All 
of the family who are deceased except Mrs. Winterbottom lie buried in Oak 
Ridge cemetery, Feli.x township, Grundy county. 

Five children, all of whom are living, were born to John and Mary 
(Williams) Winterbottom. They are here mentioned in the order of their 
birth : William R., born October 30, 1877, lives on and manages his father's 
farm in Goose Lake township, Grundy county; Russell W., born August 
31, 1880. is an engineer, but is now farming on his father's farm; Martha 
Ann, born September 22, 1883, is a member of her father's household, as 
are also Emma L., born August 23, 1886, and Maggie J., bom July 3, 1889. 

Mr. Winterbottom is a self-made man, the stepping-stones to whose 
success have been honesty, industry, thrift and perseverance. He early 
realized the value of a good reputation for moral and commercial integrity, 
and as his instincts were all good he easily won such a reputation and has 



464 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

retained it through all the vicissitudes of life, as a citizen, as a soldier and as 
a public official. His straightforward career has entitled him richly to the 
full measure of good fortune, which has crowned his endeavors, and he is 
passing his closing vears honored and respected by all who know him. 



GEORGE W. ZIXXGREBE. 

The story of the struggles antl triumphs of a self-made man is always 
an interesting one, and it is instructive as well. In a broad sense it has been 
told many times, but the circumstances of life are so various that it can never 
be told twice alike, and it always possesses the element of novelty in some 
of its details. Among the self-made men in Grundy county there are few 
more highly regarded than the man whose name appears above; there is 
none whose honest and triumphant fight for success is more worthy of emula- 
tion. 

George W. Zinngrebe, one of the most respected citizens and substantial 
farmers of Good Farm township, Grundy county, Illinois, was born at 
Germerate, Hesse-Cassel, Germany, June 17, 1833. His father, George 
Zinngrebe, was an honest, industrious, well-to-do farmer, descended from 
old German stock, who marrietl Mary Zinngrebe (not of a family related to 
his), and was killed by an accident in August, 1836, when his son George 
W. was little more than three years old. Two of his children died in in- 
fancy, Henrj' died at the age of nineteen and Elizabeth at the age of eleven. 
None survived except George \V., the suliject of this sketch, who w-as 
reared by liis mother and went to school from the time he was six years 
old until he was fourteen, part of his time having been devoted to Bible 
reading. He began to work out at farm labor at sixteen years of age. His 
mother had married Glaus Zinngrebe when George W. was six years old, 
but there were no children by this marriage. The boy had worked hard, 
receiving at most, however, only eight dollars per year; but he saved his 
wages and upon the death of his mother, at the age of fifty-three years, he 
received a little money from her property, — about enough to pay his passage 
to America; and he sailed from Bremen Haven for Quebec, in the ship 
Swallow, May 10, 1852, when he was about nineteen years old. The ship was 
forty-two days on the water, and the voyage was as tedious as it was long. 
From Quebec he came west by rail to Chicago, where he arrived July 18, 
1852. He had two companions, George KLstner and Glaus Baker, who had 
been his neighbor boys in Prussia, and at Chicago they found German 
friends. George W. left Chicago within a week after his arrival and went 
twelve miles west of that city and worked at farm labor nine months. He 
was later employed in Chicago one season in a brick-yard, and then went 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 465 

to Kankakee county. Illinois, and worked two years as a farm laborer, and 
then in Grundy county with another man until he engaged in farming in 
Will county, where he was thus employed for two years. 

March 23, 1856, at Chicago, Mr. Zinngrebe married Henne Alsassar, 
born at Hirrlingen, Wurtemberg, Germany. December 15. 1834. a daughter 
of John and Emrencer (Beider) Alsassar. Her parents were of old German 
families and her father was a blacksmith. He came with his family to Amer- 
ica about 1855, located in Ohio and became a prosperous farmer there, own- 
ing one hundred acres of land and a blacksmith shop near his home. He 
was a Catholic in religious affiliation, and died after having lived an indus- 
trious and profitable life. His children were named Mary, Lizzie, Henne, 
Susannah, Mary 2d and Frederica. 

After his marriage George W. Zinngrebe settled in Will county, Illi- 
nois, on a rented farm near the town of Florence, and lived there two years. 
He then went to Livingston county, Illinois, and rented land three years in 
Nevada township. From there he came to his present farm, which he rented 
two years. He was then able to buy forty acres of the place, then wild 
land, and shortly afterward he bought sixty acres more, the improvements 
on which inckuled a small house. He gradually improved the farm by 
his hard work and industry, and added to his holdings until he owns two 
hundred and eighty acres, a large and valuable farm, on which he has built 
substantial and attractive buildings, and is one of the most prosperous farm- 
ers in the county. 

The children of George W. antl Henne (Alsassar) Zinngrebe are John, 
Theodore, Emma, Susannah, Lizzie and Mary. Mrs. Zinngrebe. who was a 
member of the Evangelical church, died August 14, 1882, aged about forty- 
seven years. She was an industrious woman, a good housekeeper and pos- 
sessed many virtues which made her a model wife, mother and neighbor. 
Mr. Zinngrebe also is a member of the Evangelical church and has been 
one of its trustees for many years, and was long one of its class-leaders. He 
helped to build its house of worship and has always assisted liberally toward 
its support. In politics he is a stanch Republican, but is not an office-seeker 
or active political worker. 

In 1877 Mr. Zinngrebe met with a painful and serious accident while 
threshing. His right foot was caught in the tumbling-rod of the thresher- 
power, and his leg was broken in two places, and consequently he was laid up 
for four months and permanently crippled. But he has not let this af- 
fliction make him unhappy. He has always been a hard-working, prudent 
and thrifty man, a man of honesty and high character, and there is little in 
his life to cause him regret. He is entirely a self-made man, having had 
but thirty-five cents when he arrived in Chicago. He owes his elevation 



466 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

entirely to his own efforts. He has always lieen a tirni believer in the efficacy 
of hard and persistent work and has demonstrated its value in his own suc- 
cessful life and its material achievements. 



SAMUEL SUFFERN. 



In its pioneer period Illinois was fortunate in having among its incom- 
ing citizens many men of means and business ability and experience, who 
put themselves at the head of various movements and enterprises, and were 
largely instrumental in hastening the work of settlement, improvement and 
development. Grundy county had some such citizens in the '40s and '50s, 
and none of them was more prominent or more useful in his sphere than the 
well remembered gentleman whose name is above. 

Samuel Suffern was a native of Ireland and came tO' this country when 
he was very young and settled in New York, near Syracuse, and for some 
years was engaged successfully in mercantile business and contracting. In 
1849 he went to California, where he engaged in mining and farming for a 
period of five years, and in the spring of 1855 he came to Illinois and settled 
in Felix township, where he remained until his death, which occurred at liis 
home on section 35, October 19, 1893., He devoted himself largely to 
farming and stock-raising, and by his industry and careful attention to busi- 
ness soon acquired a large property. He laid out the present town of Suf- 
fern in Felix township, and erected many of its residences and business 
buildings. 

Mr. Suffern was married at Morris, Illinois, to Ellen Smead, a daughter 
of George Smead, of that place, and they had five cliildren, four of whom are 
living, who were named in the order of their birth Maiy, Mattie, Isabelle, 
William G. and Annie E. Mary was born in Grundy county, and is the 
wife of John Trotter, a proininent merchant of Felix township, to whom she 
has borne five children. Mattie was born in Grundy county, and died in 
Felix township about 1882. She was the wife of John Trotter, the husband 
now of her sister Mary, and left no children. Isabelle and Annie E. live in 
Chicago, where they have established a home with their mother at its head. 

W^illiam G. Suffern, only son of Samuel and Ellen (Smead) Suffern, was 
bom in Felix township, Grundy county, Illinois, December 8, 1864, and has 
lived much of his life on the family homestead. He attended the public 
schools of Felix township and took a commercial course in a Chicago busi- 
ness college. For some years he was a hardware merchant at La Grange 
and Coal City, Illinois. At Coal City he held the office of village clerk. He 
was married December 25. 1890. to Maiy C. Penn, daughter of John and 
Elizabeth Penn, of Coal City. Illinois, and they have four children: Ellen, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 467 

liorn at Coal City, Illinois, September 18, 1892; Ethel, born at Coal City, 
Illinois, June 2, 1894; Winnifred, born in Felix township, Grnndy county, 
March 22, 1896: and Samuel, born in Felix township, January 16, 1898. Mr. 
■Suffern is one of the most enterprising young men of his township and 
county. Politically he is a Democrat, and he takes an intelligent and pa- 
triotic interest in all questions of public importance. 

Samuel Suffern was a man of much force of character and of a progres- 
sive spirit, which not only made him a very successful pioneer but developed 
him to meet all emergencies and to be thoroughly master of the situation as 
time brought changed conditions, more important interests and new and 
unlooked-for responsibilities. He came to help settle the country, and he 
did his part in the work of primitive improvement and then built a town, 
not a large one certainly, but important for the time and place, which bears 
his name and will stand as a lasting and ever-growing monument to his en- 
terprise and public spirit. He helped tO' make history, and history will 
preserve to coming generations the record of his achievements. 



LEANDER A. PEACOCK. 

Born on the 17th of June, 1851, in Grundy county, educated in the 
public schools of Morris, and a life-long resident of this county, Leander A. 
Peacock is justly entitled to a place among her pioneers and representative 
citizens, and we take pleasure in presenting to his numerous friends and ac- 
quaintances the following sketch of himself and family : 

The father of our subject, Alexander R. Peacock, a native of England, 
came to America when young, and, after passing some years in Canada, oc- 
cupied in agriculture, he removed to Grundy county, Illinois, in 1837, the 
entire journey being made by teams. Here he continued to till the soil, as 
formerly, and had improved a good homestead when death cut short his 
labors. Januarv 15, 1855. His wife, whom he had married in Canada, was 
Mary Stuart in her girlhood, a daughter of David and Margary (Fife) Stuart. 
She survived him many years, her death taking place at the home of her 
daughter, Mrs. Yoeman, of Huntley, Iowa, on the 13th of April, 1899. 

Leander A. Peacock is one of eleven children, the others being named 
as follows: William, born in Canada in 1836, was a farmer of Iroquois 
county, Illinois, until his death, in 1890, when he left a widow, formerly 
Mary Yoeman, a native of New York, and two children, — Philip and Cora; 
Margary, born December 6, 1843, married John M. Yoeman, a dealer in real 
estate in Huntley, Iowa, and their children are named respectively Elmer, 
Birtren, James, Levern and George (deceased); David, born March 18, 1842, 



468 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

became a farmer in Grundy county, served three years in the war of the 
rebelHon in the Ninety-first IIHnois Volunteer Infantry, returned home in 
July, 1865, in poor health, and died in 1869, unmarried: Edward, born in 
1845, '" this county, and now a farmer of Vesta, Nebraska, married Mary 
Truelock, of Knox county, Illinois, and in 1877 she died, leaving two chil- 
dren, — Frank and Mary; Margaret, born in this county, July 4, 1847. t>e- 
came the wife of Thomas J. Truelock, now a retired farmer of Primghar, 
Iowa; Andrew, a native of this county, bom June 17, 185 1, and twin brother 
of our subject, married Mary, daughter of Charles Noble, a farmer, and the 
only child of this worthy couple. Nellie, died at Morris, July 5, 1890; James, 
born December 27, 1852, is unmarried, and is engaged in farming at St. 
Francis, Kansas; Mary R.. born December 26. 1854, died September 15, 
1889, in Nettle Creek township, the wife of Isaac Hoge, a prosperous farmer 
of that locality (see his sketch), and the mother of six children; John, born 
in this county. August 7, 1838, died in infancy, and Elizabeth, bom January 
25, 1850, also died in infancy. 

When he attained mature years, Leander A. Peacock concluded to fol- 
low his father's calling, in which he had been trained judiciously from boy- 
hood, — that of farming, — ^and he has certainly met with success in his chosen 
occupation. His home for several years has been on section 5, town 
33, range 7, Erianna township, where he settled soon after his marriage. 
Here he owns one hundred and si.xty acres of well-improved land, constitut- 
ing one of the most valuable farms in the township. He has held various 
local offices, such as that of commissioner of highways and supervisor, and 
at present is serving his townsmen as treasurer, school director and justice 
of the peace. His ability and broad knowledge of men and aiTairs render 
him a verv suitable person on whom to call when matters of moment are at 
stake, and he has ever manifested great devotion to the interests of the 
public. 

On the 1st of November, 1876, Mr. Peacock married Emma, daughter 
of George Towsley, a prosperous farmer of Canada. She has one brother 
and one sister. The brother, George E., is a successful famier of Nettle 
Creek township. His wife was Mary Hoge, a daughter of Hendley and a 
niece of James B. Hoge, of Saratoga township. Mr. and Mrs. Towsley 
had five children, of whom Lena, George and Gertrude are living. The 
sister of Mrs. Peacock is Mrs. Sarah Briggs. 

Eleven children w-ere born to Mr. and Mrs. Peacock, and the family 
circle is still unbroken by death. Iva, born August 11, 1877, and unmarried, 
resides in Nettle Creek township, where her nativity occurred; Alfred, bom 
September 25, 1878, and unmarried, is a successful fanner. The younger 
children are all at home, and those of the number who can be of assistance 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 469 

on the farm or in the houseliold aid their parents and attend school. They 
are named as follows: Ada, born Januai-)- 7, 1880; Lila, August 18, 1881; 
Adelbert, March 2;^, 1883; Chester, October 24. 1885; Irvin, September 26, 
1887; Ray, April 3, 1889; Charles, September 28, 1891; Clifford, February 
2, 1893; and Gladys, September 23, 1894. The four younger children were 
bom in Erianna township, while the others are natives of Nettle Creek town- 
ship. 



JOHN W. TELFER. 



John W. Telfer, a prominent citizen of Saratoga township. Grundy 
county, is a native of Edinburgh, Scotland, his Ijirth having occurred May 
27, 1843. His parents, James and Margaret (Wilson) Telfer, also of Scot- 
land, emigrated to the United States. The father, in company with a 
brother, Alexander, put down the first shaft and mined the first coal ever 
taken out of Grundy county, it being shipped by canal to Chicago. The 
shaft referred to was on the old Peacock farm in Morris township. This 
was the commencement of an industry which has resulted in great wealth 
to the people of this section of the state, and employment has been afforded 
quite an army of workmen. James Telfer. on coming to this country, settled 
in California, and afterAvard located in Saratoga towaiship, Grundy county. 
He was highly respected by all who knew him, and died in Saratoga town- 
ship; but his widow is still living, and though in her eightieth year enjoys 
excellent health, and reads and sews without the aid of glasses. She was 
the youngest of twenty children, and, with the exception of one brother, 
Alexander, of Scotland, now eighty-four years of age, is the only sur\-ivor of 
their family. At present she is making her home with the subject of this 
sketch. Her only daughter, Agnes, who died in this township about twelve 
years ago, was the wife of William Gray. Their only child, Margaret, be- 
came the wife of Robert Blair, of Saratoga township, and three children bless 
their union, namely : Agnes, George and Euphemia. 

The early education of John W. Telfer was acquired in his native town, 
and at the close of the civil war in the United States he, in company with his 
parents, concluded to come to America. Since arriving here he has been 
actively interested in mining operations, and at the same time has success- 
fully carried on a farm, his present home being located upon section 34, Sara- 
toga township. Recently he has sunk a new coal shaft not far from the old 
one and now is developing the mine, which promises to be one of the best 
in this locality. He has expressly avoided politics, in the sense of office- 



470 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

seeking, and only because he is specially interested in the cause of education 
did he consent to act as a school director for two terms, or six years. 

On the 14th of December, 1866, John W. Telfer was united in marriage 
to Jane, daughter of Thomas and Katherine ^MacAlpin, both natives of Scot- 
land. She had three brothers and three sisters, namely : Frederick, a sta- 
tionar}- engineer of Chicago; William, after serving in the British army for 
twenty-one years, died in England, leaving one son; Alexander, who was a 
soldier in the English service for seven years, and came to the United States 
in 1866, was killed on the railroad in Grundy county; Margaret, who mar- 
ried James Ronaldson, of Scotland, died in Edinburgh in 1890, and left five 
sons and three daughters to mourn her loss; Jessie is the wife of James 
Brown, a plumber in Chicago, and of their eight children six are now liv- 
ing; and Maggie married John Duncan, a native of Scotland. He died in 
Morris, Illinois, and she, with their five sons and two daughters, sur\-ive. 

To the marriage of our subject and \\ife eleven children were born, 
and not one of the family circle has been called away by death. Katherine, 
born in 1867, is the wife of Frederick Flanders, a brick manufacturer in Con- 
over, \'ilas county. Wisconsin, and their two children are John and Lillian. 
James, born in 1869, is a molder by trade, employed in the Coleman Hard- 
ware Company's shops at Morris. Illinois. He chose for his wife Alice, 
the daughter of Henry Ohlendorf. of ^lorris, and they ha\e two children, 
John and Louisa. Margaret, bom in 1871, married John Larsness, a 
farmer of Felix township, Grundy county, and their only child is named 
Genie. McKenzie, born in 1873, is an engineer at Conover, Wisconsin; 
Frederick, bom in 1875. also lives in Morris. William, born ^lay i, 1877, 
resides at home and assists his father in mining. Gideon, born August 9, 
1879, Ernest, October 23, 1881, Agnes, ]\Iarch 23, 1883, Thomas, April 19, 
1885, and Harrison, November 4, 1887, are still living with their parents, 
and are being given good educational advantages and training in citizen- 
ship. 



HALVER OSMONSEN. 

The career of Halver Osmonsen is well worthy of emulation by the 
generation now entering upon the cares and responsibilities of life. Arriv- 
ing in this country a stranger, in 1849, the year of the great gold excitement, 
he might have followed in the footsteps of that horde of adventurers who, 
wisely or imwisely, were wending their perilous way toward the setting sun, 
determined to reap a golden harvest within a year or two, but, coming of 



/^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 47i 

the steady, hard-working race of Norsemen, he preferred the old, well-tried 
paths of industry, knowing that it is ever the safest and surest way to wealth, 
— "by the sweat of the brow," the tilling of the soil. The result of his wis- 
dom and perseverance will be referred to below, where a sketch of his life 
appears: 

Born in Norway, May 22, 1825, a son of honest. God-fearing farmers, 
Halver Osmonsen passed his youth in the various activities common to his 
country, a limited education being afforded him in the schools of his local- 
ity. In 1847 his parents, Halver and Mary Osmonsen, emigrated to Amer- 
ica, and two years later the young man decided to try his fortunes in the 
New World also, and landed in New York city July 3, 1849. The father 
settled in LaSalle county, where he died during the first year of the great 
civil war. He was survived by his wife, who died at the home of her son, 
our subject, at the ripe age of four-score years. ^ Of their eight children five 
died in Norway, namely: Osmon, Sorn, Julia, Madala and Christian. 
Three are living, namely : Christian, the second, of Alorris, Illinois, now in 
his sixty-fifth year; Sorn, a retired farmer of Newark, Illinois; and Halver. 

During the first years of his residence in Illinois our subject dwelt in 
Morris and in the neighborhood of Lisbon, and although he had little or 
no means at first, he soon saved a good sum, by economy and wise manage- 
ment. After farming near Lisbon for eight years, he bought a place of sixty 
acres, which he improved and then sold at a fair profit. Coming to Grundy 
county, he purchased the farm which he still carries on, his home being on 
section 9, Saratoga township. At various times he has invested in land, 
and now* owns over two sections, renting five farms to responsible tenants. 
He takes connnendable pride in keeping his dwellings in good repair, and 
everything about his homestead is neat and attractive in appearance. In 
addition to the farm lands which he owns, over one thousand acres, he also 
owns a handsome residence in the town of Morris; and he is also the proprie- 
tor of two substantial houses in Chicago, leasing them at good rates. 

Mr. Osmonsen's success, as shown by the facts stated above, needs no 
special commentary, as it speaks for itself, but at the same time it may be 
pointed out to the younger members of the community that they may 
prosper in the same degree in their life work, if they only put their shoulder 
to the wheel, as he has done. Nor, in the multiplicity of his private inter- 
ests, has he neglected his public duties. He served for six years as high- 
way commissioner, and during his term of office many important improve- 
ments were made, such as the erecting of several new bridges. He espouses 
the Republican cause, and is faithful to all of his obligations as a citizen. As 
might be expected, he is an earnest church worker, and the Lutheran chapel, 
which stands on the southeastern corner of his farm, was erected upon 



472 



/ iOGRAPHICAL AS 



ALOGICAL RECORD. 



ground wliirh he donated for the 
ganized, nerirly a quarter of a 
and besides contributing genei 
eraliy given of his means towaici 
Just h^ilf a century ago, w 
Engeri Olson, a native of Norw 
of two sons, — Oliver H. and I) 
life's highway together. Mrs. ( 
November 2y, 1893, and on the ^ 
Ingeri Fosse, a daughter of Sore: 
Osmonsen's farms in Saratoga t^. 
already mentioned, — Oliver H., — 
1850, and on the ist of March, 1 
bom June 10, 1852, a daughter oi 
younger son of Mr. Osni<insen, was b' 
of Samuel Craig, a farmer of Nettk 
Morris, Illinois. 



:. Since the congregation was or- 

he has been one of the deacons, 

td the church buildinc; he has lib- 

•nance of fhf work hcie. 

..(.>unty, Mr. Osmonscn married 

1822. They became the parents 

■v: forty-four years they pursued 

was summoned to her reward 

•i-mber, 1894, our subject wedded 

':nie Fosse, who rent one of Mr. 

The older son of our subject, 

ui Kendall county, January 14, 

icd Susan A. Johnson, who was 

:-.i Annie Jo Ole, the 

;2, married '1\.., '^■■.•^ A^'or 

ownship, and 1. 



I. GOOLD. 



Indelibly engraved f . 
name of Charles H. Gooli; 
tive of the business interest 
life, actuated by unselfish • 

death he left not only a ha;'. 

career was in many respects one 
county would be complete witho- 

Charles H. Goold was bcr- ■ 
July 16, 1818. His father. > 
county, New York, and during thi 
died. At a ver}' tender age he \\, 
port. In the common schools he r 
an academic education, to whici 
i'xperience, close observation and 
iith he went to Genesee couti'.\ 
'1 1 mercantile establishment, v : 
Ic of sfoods, which he sd 



;na. 
■'f^- his first visit to Mo 
engaged in the con- 



■t the histor}' of Grundy county is the 

tv-five years was a leading representa- 

:s was a pure, honorable and useful 

: by sound principles, and at his 

It also an untarnished name. His 

I'.ulation, and no record of the 

it of his life. 

, Monroe county, Ne^v^Vork, 
i, Sr., removed to Ontario 
if our subject the mother 
\vn resources for sup- 
' inn, and completed 
ih rough business 
i,"- m iater years. During 
' "c he accepted a clerk- 
rill 1 84 1. He then 
^■^an, Illinois, Mis- 



it h a friend 
id Michi- 



:| 




-^ — zr-^L-t^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 473 

gan canal. Returning to New York, Mr. Goold was united in marriage 
in Batavia of that state, late in 1846, to Miss Laura Adelia Baker, who was 
born in Connecticut but was reared in New York — a lady of education and 
culture. In the following year, accompanied by his bride, he again came to 
Morris, not with the express purpose of making this city his home, how- 
ever. He engaged in business here and as his operations proved successful 
and his relations became extended he finally decided to remain, and in 1870 
erected a palatial brick residence, which stands as a monument to his enter- 
prise and progressive spirit. He was a pioneer grain dealer and dry-goods 
merchant of Morris, and in connection with John P. Chapin he erected, 1849, 
the first warehouse and store of any resiiectable size in Morris. 

Disposing of his mercantile interests in 185 1, Mr. Goold turned his atten- 
tion to the real-estate business and insurance. He issued the first policy in 
Morris and for many years did a most extensive business in both departments 
of the work. Many transfers of real estate were made by him, involving vast 
sums of money, and through his activity in this regard the substantial 
improvement and permanent development of the county was greatly aug- 
mented. His judgment was rarely, if ever, at fault, and his extraordinary 
discernment and unswerving integrity in all business transactions secured 
for him the public confidence and a very^ large patronage. Thus he grew 
wealthy, amassing a handsome fortune, and though he started out in life 
without capital he died a rich man. Through the legitimate channels of busi- 
ness he met with success, energy and business discernment being the salient 
features of his prosperity. In 1864 he was one of the organizers of the 
Grundy County National Bank, and from that time was contin- 
ually one of the directors. In 1871 he was made its president, 
filling that position until his death, which occurred June 22, 
1892. To his ability and management the success of the institution was at- 
tributable, aufl as the result of his efforts it took rank among the most sub- 
stantial financial concerns in this part of the state. 

In manner Charles H. Goold was quiet and reserved and perha])s was 
not fully understood by many. His friends, however, recognizing his good- 
ness of heart, his fidelity to principle and his manly conduct, had for him 
the highest admiration and respect. He had great sympathy for his fellow 
men and was liberal to those in need of aid, yet lived in strict obedience to 
the scriptural mandate, "When thou doest alms let not thy right hand know 
what thy left hand doeth." He was a thirty-second degree Mason, belonging 
to the Chicago Consistory. For many years he and his estimable wife 
regularly attended the services of the Congregational church. When his 
life's labors were ended his remains were laid to rest in Evergreen ceme- 
tery at Morris, in a beautiful mausoleum erected by his widow in loving 



474 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

remembrance of one whose life was so long closely interwoven with her own 
and whom to know was to esteem and honor. 



JEREMIAH COLLINS. 

Among the early settlers of Grundy county few are better known and 
none are more generally beloved and honored than is Jeremiah Collins. 
Coming here when the country was almost entirely wild, he has witnessed 
its marvelous development and has performed his full share toward its pros- 
perity. By long continued industry and careful business management he 
accumulated a comfortable fortune, and still, though now nearing four- 
score years in age, attends to his farm work and supervises all of his finan- 
cial afifairs. 

The Collins family are of the sturdy old New England stock, and our 
subject's father, Joshua Collins, was born September 4, 1779, in Rhode 
Island. In 1834 he decided to try his fortunes in what was then the far west, 
— Illinois, — and here he founded a permanent home, bearing the privations of 
a frontier life with the fortitude of his Pilgrim forefathers. He was nobly 
aided in his struggles to gain a foothold in the new countr\- by his devoted 
wife, Margaret Rowe, whom he had married November 12, 1808. She was 
a native of Rhinebeck, New York, born October 27, 1790, and her death 
occurred September 3, 1839. Joshua Collins followed her to the better 
land within two years, his death taking place August 27, 1841. 

They were the parents of nine children, of whom Jeremiah is the only 
survivor. Theron was born ]\Iarch 13, 1810. Philip, born July 31, 1812, 
married Ann Stuart, August 31, 1845. Margaret, born March i, 1815. be- 
came the wife of Wesley Blaisdell, of New York state. George was born 
February 20, 1817; Joshua and Jeremiah, our subject, twins, were born Sep- 
tember 19, 1820. Catherine, born October 29, 1823. wedded Nelson Platte, 
of Plattville, Illinois, and died March 10, 1846. Edward, born April 30, 
1829, died September 27, 1839. Franklin, born January 30, 1835. resided 
at Plattville, this state, and died there March 22. 1845. 

Jeremiah Collins received his early education in the Empire state. He 
was a lad of fourteen when he came west with his parents, and for si.xty- 
five years he has made his dwelling place in Grundy county. He cut and 
hauled the first load of logs used in the construction of the first log house 
erected in the village of Morris. This was the home of John Cryder, and 
was situated on the hill just south of the present gas-house. Mr. Collins 
also took the first load of wheat from Au Sable township to Chicago, in 
August, 1841. His father was in very poor health, and it became necessary 
to procure some medicine and supplies from Chicago. Therefore, with 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 475. 

thirty-two bushels of wheat, tramped out on the barn floor by himself and 
brother Joshua and his horses, young Collins started for the city of future 
greatness, and after he had made the purchases he desired, was returning, 
but ere he reached home the sad news came to him that his father had died. 
About two years afterward the young man married and settled on a farm of 
his own, where he has steadily engaged in agriculture. His home is a com- 
modious tAvo-story frame dwelling, with various conveniences, and is finely 
situated, being placed upon the highest elevation upon his property. For 
three terms he has been the supervisor of his township, and at all times he 
has been depended upon by his neighbors to do all within his power in the 
promotion of good schools, good roads and good government. 

The wife of Mr. Collins' early manhood was Hannah Mary, daughter 
of Michael and Eva Cryder, of Pennsylvania. Their marriage took place 
in 1843, and in 1845 Mrs. Collins died, as did their infant son, Phillip Henrj'. 
Several years passed away and at length our subject wedded Margaret W. 
Widney, the ceremony which united their destinies being performed No- 
vember 16, 1853. She is a daughter of John and jNIarv' Widney, of Kendall 
county, Illinois. The father, a well-to-do farmer, caine to this state in 1845 
from Miami county, Ohio, and died January 3, 1879, having survived his 
wife a short time, as her death occurred August 27, 1877. Their eldest 
child, Thomas, resides in Chicago; their second son, George, is in Mobile, 
Alabama; Mary is the w'ife of H. C. Henderson, of Morris, Illinois; Margaret 
\V. is the next in order of birth; Rachel is the wife of John T. Van Dalsen 
(formerly of Au Sable township), who died in September, 1857; Joseph, 
deceased, was a farmer of Kendall county, this state; John J., deceased, also 
was a farmer of that county; and Luanna JM. died in infancy. 

Three children came to bless the union of Mr. and Mrs. Collins, namely : 
Joshua Rowe, Hannah Mary and Oscar Eugene. Hannah Mar\% the only 
daughter, who was born May 15, 1857, died May 13, 1881. Joshua 
Rowe, born November 13, 1854, in Saratoga township, as were the others, 
is a farmer of this vicinity. He married Annie Holroyd, and has one son, 
Frank W. Oscar Eugene, born August 3, i860, married Alice Holroyd, a 
sister of Mrs. Joshua R. Collins, October 18, 1888, and they, too, are engaged 
in agricultural pursuits in this neighborhood. 



MADISON G. HAYMOND. 

Among the retired farmers and worthy citizens of Morris, Grundy 
county, Illinois, is Madison G. Haymond. 

The Haymonds have for many generations been residents of this coun- 
try. Edward Haymond, the grandfather of Aladison G., was born in V^ir- 



476 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

ginia. of German descent, and in Vire^inia he lived and died, acting- the part 
of an industrious, upriglit citizen in times of peace and during the Revohi- 
tionary struggle serving as a brave soldier in the patriot army. He was 
the father of four sons, viz. : John, whose life was passed in Virginia; Hijah, 
who moved to Illinois in 1837 ^'i"^! settled in Kendall county, near Newark, 
where he spent his life as a farmer, and died; Owen, who was a blacksmith 
by trade, and came west at an early day, spent some time in Kendall county, 
Illinois, and then moved to Ogden, Utah, where he died a few years ago at 
an advanced age; and William, who was born in Virginia in 1807, and 
when a young- man emigrated to Indiana,, and located in Shelby county. 
There he was married to Miss Anna Griffin, a native of Kentucky. After a 
few years' residence in Indiana they came to Kendall county, Illinois, land- 
ing here June 3, 1837, and settling on a farm near Newark. Here he was 
engaged in agricultural pursuits until about 1865, when he moved to Nor- 
man township, Grundy county, where he died in 1873. After his death his 
widow returned to Indiana and died in Pulaski county, that state, in i8gi, 
at the age of seventy years. They were the parents of twelve children, a 
record of whom is as follows; Thomas E., for many years a successful 
farmer of Nom-ian township, Grundy county, died in 1S72; James L., a 
lumber dealer of Kankakee, Illinois, who died in 1897; Frances E., who mar- 
ried a Mr. Osborn and died in Iroquois county, Illinois, in 1898; Madison 
G., whose name appears at the head of this sketch; John W., who was a 
member of the Ninety-first Illinois Regiment in the civil war, removed to 
Tennessee soon after the war and ten years later to Asheville, North Caro- 
lina, where he now resides; AVilliam C., who served in the One Hundred 
and Twenty-seventh Illinois Regiment in the civil war. and is a resident of 
Francisville, Indiana, engaged in the grain and lumber business; Margaret 
A., the wife of Nelson Gale, resides in Kansas; Surilda Jane, who died in 
Indiana at the age of thirty-five years; Man,' E.. who died in Grundy county, 
Illinois, about nine years ago; Amanda, who died at the age of fourteen years, 
in Kendall county, Illinois; Sarah E., wife of John Pruitt, is a resident of 
Pulaski county, Indiana; and Alpheus, of Kansas. 

Madison G. Haymond was born in Shelby county, Indiana, November 
9, 1836, and was nine months old when his parents moved to Kendal! county, 
Illinois. On his father's farm in Kendall county he lived until twenty years 
old, when he came to Grundy county, where he has since resided. For six 
years he farmed rented land here and then he purchased an eighty-acre form 
in Vienna township. As he was prospered he made additional land pur- 
chases until he became the owner of two hundred and forty-two acres of 
land in this township, all fine farming land, well improved, with two com- 
fortable houses and two substantial barns thereon. He resided on his farm 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 477 

until January 15, 1899, when he retired from active hfe and moved to 
Morris. 

Mr. Haymond was married in 1861 to Eliza M. Pangburn, a native 
of Syracuse, New York. She died in 1895, at the age of fifty-two years. 
The fruits of this marriage were two children : Freddie, who died in in- 
fancy, and Katie ^I., the wife of C. G. Donahue, a hardware merchant of 
Morris, Illinois. 

Mr. Haymond received the degrees of the Masonic lodge many years 
ago and retains his membership in that ancient and honored order. Politi- 
cally he is a Democrat, ami for a number of years has served in local office. 
Eighteen years he was a commissioner, and at this writing he is the super- 
visor of Vienna township. 



CONSTANTINE G. DONAHUE. 

Constantine G. Donahue, son-in-law of the gentleman whose sketch 
precedes this, Madison G. Haymond, is a hardware merchant of Morris, 
and one of the enterprising business men of the town. 

Mr. Donahue, as the name suggests, is of Irish descent. His father, 
Patrick Donahue, was born on the Emerald Isle in 182 1, and was first mar- 
ried in his native land, the marriage resulting in the birth of three children, 
— Mary, Jennie and Annie, — whom he brought with him to the United 
States in 1851, his wife having died in Ireland previous tO' that date. They 
settled in Utica, New York, where he was subsequently married to Miss 
Ellen Gilna, a native of the same county in which he was born, — Longford. 
She survives him and now resides with her son in Chicago, her age at this 
writing being seventy-seven years. After a short residence in Utica, Pat- 
rick Donahue removed with his family to Bennington, Vermont, where he 
worked at the potter's trade, which he had learned in Ireland. They re- 
mained at Bennington until about 1859, when they came to Grundy county, 
Illinois. Subsequently they lived two years in Michigan, but returned to 
Grundy county and located in Vienna township, where he died in 1868. 
The children of his second marriage are as follows: John T., a lawyer of 
Chicago; Constantine G., whose name introduces this sketch; Peter, on the 
home farm in Vienna township, Grundy county; Rose, who is married and 
is a resident of Chicago; Tillie, residing in Chicago with her brother, John 
T. ; and Michael, deceased. 

Constantine G. Donahue was born in Bennington, Vermont, June 24, 
1857, was eleven years old when his father died, and for ten years 
thereafter worked on a farm by the month, and after he reached his me- 



478 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

jority was for six or seven years engaged in farming on rented land. He 
spent one season in Nebraska and Dakota, In 1887 he engaged in the 
farming implement business in the town of Wauponsee, Grundy county, 
where he remained until November, 1898. That year he closed out his 
business there and with Albert Newport bought out Jacob Geisen, of Mor- 
ris, and under the firm name of Donahue & Newport has since conducted a 
hardware and agricultural implement business at this place. 

Mr. Donahue was married in January, 1897, to Miss Katie Haymond, 
who is referred to in the above sketch. Fraternally Mr. Donahue is a 
Knight of Pythias. 



GEORGE H. WEITZ. 



The town of Stockdale stands as a monument to the enterprise and 
business ability of this gentleman, who has conducted one of its leading in- 
dustries and who has been prominently connected with its official interests. 
He is now a member of the well-known firm of W. A. Remington & Com- 
pany, and since 1894 has been a partner in the sheep industry at this place, 
although from its establishment here he acted as manager. 

A native of Illinois, he was bom in Geneseo, Henry county, on the- 17th 
of September, 1865, his parents being Conrad and ?vlary (Horchler) Weitz. 
Both parents were natives of Germany, the former born in Saxony and the 
latter in Hessen-Darmstadt. The father was reared upon a farm in the land 
of his birth, and when about twenty-seven years of age was married there. 
Subsequently he determined to try his fortune in America, and in 1853 
crossed the broad Atlantic to the New World, taking up his residence in St. 
Louis, Missouri. The same year, however, he made his way up the lUi- 
nois river and located in Ottawa, where he spent one year. On the expira- 
tion of that period he removed to Geneseo, Illinois, in 1854, and there en- 
gaged in contracting and building. He became actively identified with the 
building interests of that locality, and many of the substantial structures of 
the city and surrounding country stand as monuments to his skill and abil- 
ity. He died April 9, 1896, at the age of seventy years, his birth occurring 
on the 9th of April, 1826. His widow still resides in Geneseo, having 
reached the age of three-score years and ten. Their children are Hannah, 
the wife of John Young, of Wabash county, Indiana; Lewis, of Geneseo; 
Emma, the wife of William Kenney, of Chicago; William, who is living in 
Geneseo; and George H., who completes the list. 

In taking up the personal history of George H. Weitz we present to our 
readers the record of one who is widely and favorably known in Grundy 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 479 

county, and his life in many respects is well worthy of emulation. Although 
a young business man, he has already attained a success that may well be 
envied by those whose years far outnumber his own. He was reared in 
Geneseo, and in the common schools obtained his education. For twenty 
years he has been connected with the stock-breeding industries. In 1876 
he entered the employ of J. Galaghan & Comipany, of which W. A. Reming- 
ton was then the junior partner. The relation between these two gentle- 
men has since continued, !Mr. W'eitz remaining in Mr. Remington's em- 
ploy until 1895, when he was admitted to partnership in the business. 
He resided in Geneseo until 1894, since which time he has made his home 
in Stockdale. They began business here July 12. i8go, feeding sheep for 
the market and preparing them for shipment. Their sheep barns have a 
capacity of fourteen thousand head, and their sales are extensive, bringing 
a handsome financial return. They are also partners in the Floral Fertilizer 
Companv, which has recently been organized for the purpose of manufac- 
turing fertilizing materials. Between October, 1898, and July, 1899, they 
fed one hundred and fifty thousand sheep, purchasing these animals in the 
northwest and shipping them to Stockdale, where they are fattened for the 
market. They are then sold to Chicago dealers, and the extent of the busi- 
ness has made it one of the leading industries in this section of the state. 

In 1889 Mr. Weitz was united in marriage to Miss Maria Hauschild, of 
Geneseo, and they now have two children, — Henry and Mae, who are twins. 
Their friends are numbered among the best citizens of the community, and 
they enjoy the hospitality of the leading homes in this section of the county. 

Mr. Weitz is a member of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has at- 
tained the Knight Templar degree. Not only has he been prominently con- 
nected with the business interests of Stockdale, but in other lines also has 
he contributed to its advancement. He is serving as the postmaster, hav- 
ing filled the position since the establishment of the office, on the 29th of 
November, 1897. Mr. Weitz is a public-spirited and progressive man and 
gives his support to all measures calculated to promote the material, social, 
educational and moral welfare of the community. Prosperity has attended 
his efforts in business, and the qualities which have insured his success are 
keen discernment, marked executive ability and indefatigable energy. 



JOSHUA HOGE, JR. 

\ 

Among the native citizens of Grundy county is Mr. Hoge, whose birth 

occurred upon the old family homestead, July 25, 1850, his parents being 

Samuel and Matilda (Holderman) Hoge, whose sketch appears elsewhere in 



48o BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

this volume. As soon as he was old enough to handle the plow he began 
work in the fields and soon became familiar with all the duties and labors 
that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. Throughout his active business 
career he has engaged in farming and in stock-raising, but in 1898 he retired 
from the farm and removed to Morris, where he now resides. He has pur- 
chased cattle quite extensively in Illinois and other states, and engaged in 
feeding and marketing them, in early days, in New York and other eastern 
markets, but later in Chicago. He sustains an unassailable reputation in 
business circles by reason of his straightforward dealing and unquestioned 
integrity. , j 

In 1876 was celebrated the marriage of i\Ir. Hoge and ^liss Laura 
Ouigley. a native of Pennsylvania. Their union was blessed with two chil- 
dren : Samuel and Eva M.: but the wife and mother was called to her 
final rest April 2, 1896. Eva M., the daughter, passed away in death Oc- 
tober 7, 1899. October 4, 1899, I\Ir. Hoge married Mrs. Mary J. Peacock, 
nee Noble. In his political views Mr. Hoge is a stalwart Republican, warm- 
ly advocating the principles of his party, but has never sought or desired pub- 
lic ofifice. preferring to devote his energies entirely to his business interests, 
in which he has met with very creditable and gratifying success. He is a 
worthy representative of an honored pioneer family, and is accounted one of 
Grundv countv's valued native citizens. 



GEORGE WATERS. 



George Waters, Mazon, Illinois, is one of the substantial farmers and 
respected citizens of Mazon township, of which he is a native and in which 
his father was one of the earliest pioneers. George Waters is a son of W'ill- 
iam and Bathena (Booth) Waters. William Waters was born August 12, 
1818, in London, England, a son of William Waters, Sr., who came to 
America in 1833. He left England February 6, 1833, and landed at New 
York April 11, 1833, bringing his family, except his son William, who had 
come over a few years earlier. The elder William Waters was a stone- 
mason and became a contractor in stone work on the ^lichigan canal, and 
constructed many of the docks along the canal, notably those at Joliet. 
His children were William, John. James, Elijah, Robert and Ann. 

William Waters, Jr., a son of William Waters. Sr.. and the father of 
George Waters, left home in 1828, when he was about ten years of age, 
and crossed the Atlantic ocean with his uncle, William Atkins, and his fam- 
ily. William Atkins, who had married his father's sister, settled on Hickory 
creek, three miles southeast of Joliet, Illinois, and there passed his remain- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 481 

ing days. He improved a farm and became well known as an enterpris- 
ing and public-spirited citizen. William Waters, Jr., lived with Mr. Atkins 
for some jears, and when a young man went to Vermilion county, Indiana, 
eighteen miles north of Terre Haute. There he married Bathena Booth, 
and they settled in Vermilion county. Indiana, and lived with her mother, 
who had married a Mr. Hiddle. It should be stated that her mother's 
estate eventually went to the Hiddle heirs. 

William Waters came to Grundy county, Illinois, in 1846, and located 
wild land, which he entered in 1847, and here he settled and made improve- 
ments. That pioneer farm of forty acres is a part of the larger farm which 
his son George now owns and operates. To this he added forty acres, 
more of wild land, which he purchased at a dollar and a quarter an acre. Mr. 
Waters made the first improvement and built the first log cabin on the east 
side of the middle branch of the Mazon, or Brewster's slough, as it is called. 
He soon put the land under a good state of cultivation and erected substantial 
pioneer buildings. He was a well-known citizen and respected pioneer 
farmer. In politics he was a Douglas or war Democrat. His children were : 
Jane, who died May 12, 1862, aged sixteen years, one month and twenty- 
five days; Henry; Jonas and George, twins; and W'illiam and Susan died in 
infancy. By thrift and industry Mr. Waters added to this land, and at his 
death owned one hundred and thirty-seven acres. He died September 14, 
1861. aged forty-three years, one month and three days, as the result of an 
accident. Bathena, the wife of William W'aters, died March 18, 1856, aged 
thirty-five years, four months and eight days. 

George Waters, the immediate subject of this sketch, was born on the 
old homestead where he now lives, February 22, 185 1. He received a good 
common-school education, and learned farming thoroughly. He prospered 
by industry and good management and became a substantial citizen, and 
during recent years has been engaged somewhat extensively in the grain 
business. He is a trusted citizen of his township, and for nine years filled 
the office of road commissioner to the entire satisfaction of the people. In 
political opinion he is a Republican. He was married December i, 1872, 
in old Mazon, to Sarah Johnston, born April 5, 1852, on the George ]\Iiers 
farm in Mazon township, a daughter of Matthew and Mary J. (Preston) 
Johnston. Matthew Johnston was from Pennsylvania and married in 
Guernsey county, Ohio, Mary J. Preston. He settled in Ohio, where he 
worked at his trade of bricklayer, and in 185 1 moved to Illinois and settled 
in Mazon township. He afterward bought a farm in Good Farm township, 
where he owns three hundred and sixty acres, and became a prosperous 
farmer and well-to-do citizen. His children are William, Andrew, Alary, 
Hattie (who died an infant), Sarah, Finley, John, Charles, Belle and Nellie. 



482 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Mr. Johnston and his wife are both members of the Methodist church, and 
he is a Republican in politics. He has retired from active life and is living 
in Mazon, where he is respected as a public-spirited and helpful citizen. He 
has always been an upright and valued member of the community and has 
reared an excellent family. After their marriage George Waters and his wife 
remained on the old homestead, and here he has passed all his life since, and 
will doubtless end his days. He has been deservedly prosperous and now 
owns four hundred and seventy-eight acres of fine farm land and is regarded 
as one of the most substantial farmers of his township. 

To George and Sarah (Johnston) Waters have been born two children : 
Berton, born July i, 1877; and Ethel I., born December 28, 1885, and died 
January 27, 1892, aged about six years. 

Mr. Waters is a public-spirited man and is interested in all measures 
tending to the public good, and is especially desirous that good roads shall 
be secured and maintained throughout the country, and is willing to do his 
part toward the accomplishment of this end. He has through life main- 
tained a high character, and is well known for reliability and capability as a 
practical business man. 



WILLIA-M .AIERRIA:\I. 



It is always of interest to investigate the cause of success, to learn what 
has proiluced prosperity. In the history of this gentleman we have recorded 
the life of one who is truly a self-made man, for he started out in life empty- 
handed and steadily worked his way upward, overcoming the obstacles in 
his path by determined purpose and ultimately acquiring a handsome com- 
petence which has enabled him to live retired. 

He was born November 19, 1829, in Jetl'erson county, Xew "^'ork. a son 
of Archibald and Polh' (Buhall) Merriam, both of whom were natives of New 
York. His father died when William was only six years of age, but he 
resided in Jefiferson county until nineteen years of age, spending a part of 
the time in his mother's home. Early in life, however, he began to provide 
for his own maintenance and learned the trades of cabinet-making and 
painting. In 1848 he arrived in the west, locating first at Somonauk. He 
afterward worked on the farm by the month for a year, and then going to 
Joliet he secured a position on a canal boat as bowsman. He had only six 
dollars at the time of his arrival in Illinois and had made the journey to the 
west upon borrowed money. On the canal boat he mastered all the various 
duties in connection with its operation and for one and a half years he 
steered a freight boat. That boat was consigned to John P. Chapin, of Chi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 483 

■cago, and he entered his employ, a connection tliat was continued for seven 
years, during which time he served on various boats, including the Queen 
of Johet, Grand Turk, Charter Oak, Woodford, and the J. D. Harmon, and 
then became owner of a boat of his own cahed the Bill Merriam. This he 
ran for two years, at the end of which time he sold a half interest, and in 
i860 he sold the other half. The following year he purchased eighty acres 
of land in W'auponsee township and turned his attention to farming, which 
he carried on until 1884. In the operation of his land he displayed great in- 
dustry and enterprise", and as a result of his careful management and busi- 
ness ability he became the owner of a very valuable and productive farm. 
He made his home there vmtil 1884, when he took up his abode in Morris, 
but he still owns two hundred and eighty acres of land, from which he de- 
rives a good income. 

In Grundy county, in 1854, Mr. Merriam was united in marriage to 
Miss Ruble S. Lyons, also a native of the Empire state, and a daughter of 
Vernon and Mariah (Taylor) Lyons, who removed from Philadelphia, New 
York, to Kendall county, Illinois, in 1847, locating about six miles east of 
Lisbon. Ten years later they came to Morris, where they spent their re- 
maining days, the father passing away in 1872, at the age of sixty-three 
years. He was a farmer by occupation, but also followed carpentering. 
Mrs. Merriam is the only survivor of her father's family. Our subject and 
his wife have no children of their own, but reared an adopted daughter, 
Hattie (Bowen) Merriam. wife of William H. Slater, of Kansas. Mrs. 
Merriam is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. Merriam is 
a supporter of that organization. In politics he is a Republican, and has 
served as road commissioner, but has never been an office-seeker, preferring 
to devote his time and energies to his business interests, in which he has 
met with ven,- creditable success. His life has been one of activity, but he 
is now living in retirement and enjoying the rest which he has truly earned 
and richly deserves. 



JAMES E. ARMSTRONG. 

One of the most prominent educators connected with the public schools 
■of Illinois is James E. Armstrong, who is now principal of the Englewood 
high school. His marked ability has gained him prestige, for his scholarly 
attainments are supplemented by superior ability in imparting clearly and 
concisely to others the knowledge he has acquired. \\\t\\ a just apprecia- 
tion of the importance of his work he has given to it the most earnest 
thought, study and investigation, and his methods are therefore progressive 



484 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and intensely practical, serving as an excellent preparation for the duties of 
life. 

Mr. Armstrong is one of Illinois' native sons, his birth having occurred 
in LaSalle county, on the 30th of November, 1855. Like so many of the 
most prominent men in professional circles, his boyhood days were spent 
upon the farm, and the work of field and meadow gave to him the strong 
physical development needed in carrying on his labors in later life. He 
followed the plow and assisted in the harvesting through the summer months, 
while in the winter season he pursued his education in the district schools. 
At the age of nineteen he was employed to teach the school which he had 
attended up to that time, and, though younger than many of his pupils, he 
was so successful in the work that he was again employed to teach that school 
through the following winter. During those two winter months the lash, 
which had formerly been considered as essential in the matter of education 
as the text-books or blackboard, was banished. The excellent results which 
attended his work in the district school determined his future career. ^^'ith 
the money earned during the first winter he paid his expenses while attending 
the village high school in Marseilles during the spring and fall months, and 
with the money earned during his second season of teaching he entered upon 
a college course in the University of Illinois. He was graduated in the class 
of 1881 with such high honors that lie was made instructor in mathematics 
in that institution the following year. After a year's service he was elected 
princi])al of a village school in Arlington Heights, Cook county, where he 
remained for three years, during which time he greatly advanced the stand- 
ard of the schools there. 

On the expiration of that period he resigned in order to accept a posi- 
tion in the Lake high school of Chicago, as instructor in sciences. In that 
school he established the first chemical laboraton' in the Chicago high 
schools in which the pupils performed the work. During his services there 
he and a fellow teacher wrote and published Armstrong & Norton's Chemical 
Laboratory Guide, the book now being used in high schools throughout the 
country. In 1889 he was appointed principal of the Lake high school, and 
two years later was transferred to the Englewood high school, which position 
he still fills. This school ranks second in size in Chicago, and if ranked by 
honors taken in prizes for scholarships, essays, orations, athletic banners and 
ai^t displays it would stand first. Professor Armstrong is in close touch with 
the work done in every department of the school, and is ever ready and will- 
ing to aid teachers and pupils that intellectual progress may be carried still 
further forward. Advancement is the watchword of the school, and the 
thoroughness and proficiency of the work well qualifies the students for the 
practical duties which may devolve upon them in the active affairs of life. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 485 

The habits of thoroughness and mental concentration which are there formed 
may prove important elements in their careers after leaving the school-room, 
and it is because Professor Armstrong regards education as the preparation 
for life that his school has been so successful. He attributes his success 
largely to his training on the farm, where as a boy he had to learn to be inde- 
pendent. A maxim then instilled into his mind was, "When a thing gets out 
of order fix it," and another was, "Save everything: if it is not good for one 
purpose save it for another." These principles have largely influenced his 
career as an educator and in a great degree have been the means of winning 
for him the high position which he now occupies in educational circles. 

In the year 1892 Professor Armstrong was elected on the state ticket as 
a trustee of the University of Illinois. In this capacity he served for six 
years, taking a prominent part in conducting the affairs of the school. As 
the chairman of the committee he secured for the university its able president, 
Dr. A. S. Draper. It was also due to his efforts that the College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons of Chicago and the Chicago College of Pharmacy be- 
came departments of the university. He was honored by the position of 
president of the board of trustees of the university during the year 1897-8, 
and his wise counsel and effective labors resulted in raising its standard of 
education higher than ever before. 

Professor Armstrong was married July 12, 1883, to Miss Clara A. Clark, 
a daughter of Lucius Clark, of Marseilles. They now have two children, — 
Grace C. and Charles H. Their home is the center of a cultured society cir- 
cle, and their friends are many in the section of the city where they live. 
Professor Armstrong is a man of broad humanitarian principles, and a deep 
and personal interest in the welfare of his pupils has been one of the strong 
elements in his success as an educator. 



CHARLES G. ARMSTRONG. 

In a profession where advancement is dependent upon knowledge and 
skill, success is achieved only through individual merit. It is a wise provis- 
ion of nature that learning cannot be inherited, that we enter this world on an 
equal intellectual basis, and therefore are dependent upon our own labors 
and application for the learning which fits us for life's practical duties. Each 
individual masters the same rudiments of knowledge as all others, and when 
this is accomplished it will then be found that he has developed the ability 
to carry his labors still farther along special lines, fitting him for a particular 
work. It is true that with only an elementary education some may enter 
certain lines of business and attain success, or by inheritance or influence 



486 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

secure control of a prosperous enterprise; but in professional life progress 
and success depend solely upon the efforts of the individual, — his close appli- 
cation, his mastery of scientific principles and his ability to apply them to the 
affairs of life. 

Greater credit is therefore due one who owes his prosperous and enviable 
business standing to his own labors, as does Mr. Armstrong, who is num- 
bered among the most capable electrical engineers in the entire country. 
Steadily he has advanced step by step until he has long since left the ranks 
of the many to stand among the successful few. and material evidences of his 
marked ability are seen in some of the finest buildings throughout the land. 
He has his office and maintains his residence in Chicago, but as consulting 
electrical engineer he has traveled throughout the greater part of the Union, 
and has gained a reputation scarcely second to any in the country. 

Charles Goold Armstrong is one of the "native sons" of whom LaSalle 
county, Illinois, has every reason to be proud. He was born there August 
23. 1858, and in the public schools acquired his preliminary education. His 
boyhood days were spent upon the home farm, and he early became familiar 
with the labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. His early school 
training was supplemented by a course in the University of Illinois, at Cham- 
paign, having made his own way through college, thus showing forth the 
elemental strength of his character, which in later yeai"S has enabled him to 
work his way steadily upward. 

For two years after leaving the university Mr. Armstrong was engaged 
in the drug business, and then devoted three years to civil engineering. 
Since that time he has given his entire attention to electrical engineering, 
and in 1890 opened an office in Chicago. During the ten years which have 
come and gone from the time he first began business in Chicago he has served 
as consulting electrical engineer in connection with the equipment of many of 
the finest buildings in the city and throughout the countn,-. He served in that 
capacity for the Auditorium, the Schiller Theater, the Great Northern Thea- 
ter and the Stock Exchange Building, of Chicago; the Union Trust Building 
and the St. Nicholas Hotel, in St. Louis; the Commercial Building of Louis- 
ville, Kentucky; the City Hall, the Milwaukee Public Library and the Pabst 
power plant, of Milwaukee, \\'isconsin; the plant of the Marquette Placer 
Mining Company, in central Colorado; the Guarantee Building, in Buffalo, 
New York; the Grand Central Depot and the Union Loan & Investment 
Company Building, in New York city; and the St. Anthony Falls Water 
Power Company, at Minneapolis, having an electrical plant of ten thousand 
horse power, this power being transmitted ten miles. — a marvelous piece of 
electrical engineering. These serve to indicate the marked ability of Mr. 
Armstrong, whose close study of electricity and his thorough understanding 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 487 

of its uses have made him one of the leaders in his profession in the United 
States. 

In 1 88 1 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Armstrong and Miss 
Frances Lowrj', a daughter of Colonel Francis Lowry, who was the com- 
mander of the One Hundred and Seventh Regiment of Illinois Volunteers 
during the civil war, and w^as killed at the battle of Franklin, Tennessee. To 
Mr. and ISlrs. Armstrong have been born four children : Florence, Frances, 
Clara and Charlotte. In his political views Mr. Armstrong is a Republican. 
Socially he is connected with the Union League Chib of Chicago. His own 
life, in its splendid success, illustrates most clearly the opportunities which 
this land, unhampered by caste or class, offers to those who really desire ad- 
vancement. His social qualities, courtesy and kindly manner have won him 
many friends, and the circle of his acquaintances is very extensive. 



JOHN GLENNAN. 



John Glennan was born October 10, 1840, in the city of London, a son 
of Tames and ^lary (O'Brien) Glennan. His parents were both natives of 
Ireland, but left that country at the time of the rebellion there and sought 
a home in London. About 1843 they emigrated to Canada, where they 
spent one year, going thence to Chicago, where Mr. Glennan left his family 
while he proceeded to Morris and erected here a little log cabin. On its 
completion he brought his wife and children to the humble little home which 
he had prepared, and thus at an early day the subject of this review became 
identified with the city which is yet his home. His father was a black- 
smith and machinist by trade, and spent the remainder of his life in Morris, 
his death occurring in 1855. His wife, long surviving him, passed away in 
1892. Only two children were born to them: John, whose name intro- 
duces this review; and Dr. Michael Glennan, who is now living in Ludlow, 
Champaign county, Illinois. 

John Glennan was only three years of age when his parents crossed the 
Atlantic to the New World. He accompanied them on their various re- 
movals, and at the age of thirteen he began to earn his own living by serving 
an apprenticeship to the carpenter and joiner's trade. In a few years he 
had fairly mastered the business, becoming an expert workman, and has 
since followed that vocation, doing considerable contract work. Thus he 
has been actively connected with the building interests of Morris and has 
aided greatly in its substantial development and improvement. 

In 1862 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Glennan and Miss Mary 
Maxim, a daughter of John Maxim, of Morris, and to them have been 



488 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

l>orn eight cliildren, namely: Mary Theressa, who is Hving in Joliet, Illi- 
nois; James, at home; John, deceased; Jnlia, who is also with her parents; 
John, who has passed away; Maggie and Michael, who are still at their par- 
ental home; and Edward, deceased. Mr. Glennan and his family are com- 
municants of the Roman Catholic church, and in politics he is a Democrat, 
but he has had neither time nor inclination for public office. His residence 
in Morris covers more than half a century. He was a pupil in the first 
school here, and has ever been interested in the welfare and progress of the 
city, giving his support to many measures which he believes will prove a 
public good. 



JONAS WATERS. 



Jonas Waters, son of William and Bathenia (Booth) Waters, was born 
February 22, 1851, on his father's old homestead in Mazon township, 
Grundy county, Illinois, and is a twin brother of George Waters, a biograph- 
ical sketch of whom appears in this work. He attended the public schools 
and was, in a very practical way, instructed in all that pertains to successful 
farming. He was married December 3, 1871, in Gardner, Illinois, to Miss 
Alvaretta Whitesel, who was born in JefYerson county, Pennsylvania, May 
18, 1853, a daughter of John N. and Susan (Truby) Whitesel and a grand- 
daughter of Jonathan and Susan (Wensel) Whitesel, of Pennsylvania Dutch 
stock. Jonathan Whitesel was a tanner and pioneer in Armstrong county, 
Pennsylvania, where he settled in the woods, cleared up a farm, built a saw- 
mill and operated both the farm and the sawmill and prospered very satis- 
factorily. He married September 17, 1815, and his children were named 
John N., Elizabeth, Susan, James P., Diana, Catherine, Jonathan and Mary 
E. He was a man of strong religious opinion and of high moral character, 
a Presbyterian and a Democrat. He died July i, 1875, aged eighty-five 
years, having been a widower since July i, 1854. His father came to Penn- 
sylvania in early days and died aged ninety-three. 

John N. Whitesel was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, 
March 30, 1816, and his educational advantages were limited to those af- 
forded by the common schools. He married Susan Truby, October 6, 
1842. Miss Truby was born in Jefiferson county, Pennsylvania, a daughter 
of Christopher and Elizabeth (McCoy) Truby, of Pennsylvania Dutch extrac- 
tion, who had other children named James, John and Margaret, who died 
many years ago. Mr Truby died when about seventy years of age. They 
were devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church. John N. White- 
sel settled on his father's homestead in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 489 

and farmed and operated the sawmill on the place for many years. In 1867 
he came to Illinois, bringing his family with him, and on the first day of 
April located at Gardner, Grundy county, Illinois. Not long afterward he 
settled in Good Farm township, Grundy county, on eighty acres of land, 
which he improved and on which he lived until 1883, when he removed to 
Adams county, Nebraska, and settled on an improved farm of two hun- 
dred and forty acres, where he died December 30, 1891, aged seventy-five 
years and nine months. He was a Democrat and a Presbyterian, a man of 
public spirit, especially devoted to the common schools, for many years a 
school commissioner and long an elder in his church. He was held in high 
esteem by his fellow citizens, and died regretted by all who knew him. His 
children, all born in Pennsylvania, were as follows. Mary E. ; Lobana C. ; 
Jonathan L. ; Johanna, who died in Pennsylvania, aged eight years; Alvar- 
etta; James P., who died in Pennsylvania, aged six years; Christopher T.; 
John E. ; and William C. Mary E. was the only one of the surviving chil- 
dren of Mr. Whitesel who did not come west with him. She had married 
Isaac Wible and located in Pennsylvania. 

Jonas Waters and his wife settled in Mazon township, in 1872, on one 
hundred and twenty acres of land which Mr. Waters rented. They removed 
to their farm in Maine township, March 8, 1876. The place then consisted 
of eighty-six acres under considerable improvement. By hard work and 
good management Mr. Waters has added to his acreage until it has ex- 
panded to three hundred and twenty-nine acres. In 1895 he built a tasteful 
two-story residence, wdiich bears many evidences of refinement and is one 
of the model homes of the township. In all the years of struggle which 
have thus brought their substantial reward to Mr. Waters he has been ably 
assisted by his faithful and helpful wife, who has proven herself a helpmeet 
to him in the best sense of the term. Recently Mr. Waters has erected a 
very pleasant residence in the village of Mazon, and is now living retired 
there, enjoying the rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves. 

Mr. Waters is a prominent Republican and a member of the Repub- 
lican central committee of Grundy county. He was for three years town 
trustee, is a justice of the peace and has been for thirteen years a member 
of the district school board. His interest in education impels him to do 
everything in his power to improve the standard of the public schools. He 
has won the success of the self-made man and has a right to be proud of 
what he has achieved. No man in his township has a higher reputation for 
uprightness and integrity and all of the other attributes of the good and 
useful citizen. He began the battle of life aggressively at the age of eighteen 
and has fought a tireless and winning fight. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jonas Waters have two sons, — Clarence B., born May 



49° BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

27, 1876, and Ollin W.. born March 8, 1889, and they brought up from child- 
hood Mrs. Waters' niece. Clara A. Whitesel, daughter of Lobana C. White- 
sel. whom they educated and treated in every respect as if she had been their 
own daughter, and who is now the wife of William Spence, a well-known 
Grundy county farmer. Their home is a pleasant one, characterized by 
refinement, and is presided over by Mrs. Waters in a manner well calculated 
to impress the visitor with its generous hospitality. 

It will be interesting in this connection to note something of the history 
of Clarence Waters, who is now operating the farm belonging to his father, 
Jonas W'aters. He was reared under the parental roof, enjoying such privi- 
leges, opportunities and pleasures as are usually afforded to farmer lads. 
He was married January 25, 1900, in Norman township, Grundy county, to 
Miss Jessie May Renne, and thus became connected with another of the 
old and distinguished pioneer families. Her grandfather is one of the few 
remaining pioneers of Grundy county, his residence here dating from 1848. 
He was born March 11, 1812, at Cairo, Greene county. New York, son of 
James and Sarah (Smith) Renne. His father was the son of John Renne, 
who was twice married, his second wife being Miss EfYie W'ood. John 
Renne was born in 1735, in Rennes. France. He and his two brothers 
crossed the Atlantic to Canada at an early day. The brothers afterward 
returned to France, and it was reported that they were drowned. John 
Renne was captured in 1759 in the war against France and brought to Con- 
necticut. He settled at Tower Hill, in Dutchess county. New York, 
locating on a farm, and later removed with a company of pioneers to Greene 
county. New York, making the journey with ox carts. There he developed 
a new farm. He had three children, — Samuel, Peter and Sally, — by his 
first wife. Tlie mother died in Connecticut, and he afterward wedded Miss 
Efifie W^ood, their children being James. John, Richard, Stephen, Polly, 
Phoebe, Susan and Lucy. John Renne died and is buried in Greene county, 
New York. He owned there two hundred acres of land and was a substan- 
tial agriculturist and an upright citizen. For many years he served as a 
deacon in the Presbyterian church and died in that faith. May 14, 1822. 

James Renne, great-grandfather of Mrs. Waters, was born at Tower 
Hill. New York, in 1773, and during his early boyhood accompanied his 
parents to Greene county, that state, where he became a farmer. He in- 
herited a portion of the old homestead and purchased the remainder. He 
married Miss Sally Smith, of Greene county, and their children were Smith, 
Horace, Justin, James. George, Eleanor, Effie, Emeline, Lucy A. and Sarah 
J. Mr. Renne resided on his farm in Greene county until his death in 1830. 
He was a man of sterling worth and greatly respected. He held the office 
of justice of the peace for several years and was the administrator of several 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 491 

estates. He was frequently called upon to arbitrate difficulties, for his jus- 
tice was one of his strongest characteristics. For forty years his decisions 
as justice of the peace were not reversed. He was a man of excellent legal 
attainments and acquired his success through his own efforts. He owned a 
good farm of one hundred and seventy-five acres and his capable manage- 
ment of his farming operations brought to him a comfortable competence. 

Justin Renne, the grandfather of Mrs. Waters, obtained a good edu- 
cation, pursuing a high school course. He was reared to the work of the 
farm, but for a time followed the sea and later worked at tanning, stone- 
cutting and bridge building. He also engaged in boating on the Hudson 
river when a young man. He was married in Greene county, New York, 
October 3, 1837, to Miss Maria Hinchman, who was born at Rhinebeck, 
Dutchess county, New York, August 23, 1809, a daughter of Obadiah 
Hinchman. Her father was of English descent, was born in Long Island, 
was a mechanic by trade and died in the Empire state. His children were 
William. ]\Iaria, Jane. John. Alfred. Sarah and Elizabeth. After their mar- 
riage Mr. and INIrs. Justin Renne located on the old Renne homestead, a 
part of which he inherited. There they resided until their emigration west- 
ward. He engaged in business as a stone-mason, did much bridge-building 
and became a very skillful mechanic, taking many contracts for the stone- 
work on bridges along the line of the New York and New Haven Railroad, 
receiving as high as four dollars per day for his services, which was con- 
sidered excellent wages at that time. In 1848 he removed to Illinois,, 
making the journey by way of the Hudson river, the Erie canal and Lake 
Erie to Detroit, thence by Lake Michigan to Chicago. He first settled in 
that city, but did no business there. In June, 1848, he came by way of 
the Illinois and Michigan canal to Morris on the first boat that ran through 
to Rock Island. In July he located upon the present farm, then a tract of 
wild land, and on the 14th of September, 1849, purchased the property, 
consisting of one hundred acres, which he has transformed into a very 
fertile and valuable tract. He was one of the early constables of Grundy 
county, and served in that capacity from 1849 until 1876. He was also 
the first supervisor of \'ienna township, hokling the position for eight vears 
after its organization. He is a man of excellent judgment and much natural 
ability, and has long been regarded as one of the valued citizens and honored 
pioneers of Grundy county. In politics he is a stanch Democrat. His 
children are Ferdinand, George, Jerome, Isabel, Douglass and Horace, all 
born in the Empire state. 

George C. Renne, the father of Mrs. Clarence B. Waters, and a son ol 
Justin Renne. was born in New York. February 23, 1840, and was about 
eight years old when he came with his parents to Illinois, where he was 



492 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

reared upon the pioneer farm. He acquired a common-school education, 
and during the civil war he joined the army as a private in Compan}^ D, 
Seventy-second Illinois Infantry, with which he served for three years. He 
participated in a number of battles, including the siege of Vicksburg. Be- 
coming disabled, he was in the hospital for a time and never fully recovered, 
but rejoined his regiment and again took part in active service. After the 
war he returned to Grundy county and was married November 5, 1867, in 
Norman township, to Harriet M. Allen, who was born in New Hampshire, 
May II, 1846, a daughter of Rodney Allen. They have two children, — 
Lorena E., who was born September 23, 1870, and Jessie M., born July 24, 
1873. The former was married February 2, 1898, to George W. Smith, a 
hardware merchant at Smithshire, Illinois. The latter is the wife of Clar- 
ence B. Waters. Mr. Renne still resides upon his farm and is a progressive 
agriculturist of the community. His wife and daughter are members of 
the Universalist church, and the family is one of prominence in the commu- 
nity. In politics he is a stanch Republican, and has served in several town- 
ship offices, including that of township clerk. He was a very loyal soldier 
during the war of the rebellion and is a highly respected citizen. Mr. and 
Mrs. Clarence B. Waters reside upon the old Waters homestead, for his 
parents are living in Mazon, where his father, Jonas Waters, has recently 
erected a tasteful, modern residence. He purchased seven lots there and is 
now spending his days in quiet retirement from business, while his son 
Clarence operates the home fami. managing affairs with signal ability. 



ALLEN F. :\IALLORY. 



If those who claim that fortune has favored certain individuals above 
others w'ill but investigate the cause of success and failure, it will be found 
that the former is largely due to the improvement of opportunity, the latter 
to the neglect of it. Fortunate environments encompass nearly ever}" man at 
some stage in his career, but the strong man and the successful man is he 
who realizes that the proper moment has come, that the present and not the 
future holds his opportunity. The man who makes use of the Now and not 
the To Be is the one who passes on the highway of life others who started 
out ahead of him and reaches the goal of prosperity far in advance of them. 
It is this quality in Mr. Mallorj- that has made him a leader in the business 
world and won him a name in connection with the hotel interests that is 
known throughout the state. 

Mr. Mallory was born in Ohio City, now West Qeveland, Ohio, on the 
6th of November. 1840, opening his eyes to the light of day in the family 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 493 

home on Pearl street. His parents were Hiram and Plioebe (Hall) iNIal- 
\oT\. In the "rocked-ribbed" countr}- of Wales the family originated, the 
ancestry being traced back to Bigor Mallory, who came from Wales to 
America, locating in Connecticut. The grandfather of our subject was 
Isaac Mallory, a native also of that state, whence he removed to Chautau- 
qua county. New York. Hiram ]Mallory, the father of Allen F., was born 
in Chautauqua county, and afterward removed westward to Ohio. He 
was eighteen }-ears of age when he left the parental fireside and started out 
in life on his own account. Making his way to Cleveland, he there gained 
his first experience in connection with the operation of canal boats. He 
became the general passenger agent for the boats plying on the Ohio canal, 
and was holding that position when, by reason of the introduction of rail- 
roads, the canal boat business became unprofitable and was suspended. He 
had been a resident of Cleveland but a short time when he returned to New 
York, and there married Phoebe Hall, who was born in Westfield, of the 
Empire state, and was of English lineage. She lived only three years after 
her marriage. Her health failing her, ]Mr. Mallory took her back to her 
native town, hoping that she would be benefited thereby, but her death oc- 
curred in 1848. She left three children: Allen F.; Frank, of Nebraska; 
and Viola, now the wife of F. H. Green, of Chicago. All were born in West 
Cleveland, Ohio. After the death of his first wife the father married Jean- 
ette Barnes, who died in Morris in 1854. In the same year he wedded Mrs. 
Hannah Howard, a sister of the late Judge W. Hopkins. She was the first 
milliner of Morris, and the old shop which she occupied is still standing, just 
opposite the Hotel Commercial. She is still living, her home being now- in 
Chicago. 

Hiram ]\Iallory became a resident of Morris in 1852. He had but 
recently met with financial reverses in Cleveland and came to this city a 
poor man. Not long afterward he became interested in canal-boating, 
which he followed up to the time of his death. He also engaged in farming 
and grain dealing. For several years he bought grain in the old "red ware- 
house" on Canal street, and was a very energetic and enterprising man. He 
met with several reverses in his business career, yet at the time of his death 
he was the possessor of a comfortable competence. His life was honorable, 
his disposition genial, and he won the respect and friendship of all with 
whom he came in contact. Socially he was a Mason. His political rela- 
tions were necessarily changed as new issues arose before the people, and 
after giving his support to the ^^'hig party for a time he became a stanch 
Abolitionist. When the Republican party was formed to prevent the fur- 
ther extension of slaver}' he joined its ranks and was one of its loyal sup- 
porters until his death, which occurred in Morris in 1872. At his death 



494 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

the community lost one of its best citizens, for he had been an important 
factor in the commercial life of the community, and was at all times loyal to 
the best interests of the place. 

Allen F. Mallory, whose name introduces this review, has had a check- 
ered career, and yet by determined purpose he has worked his way upward 
and now occupies a leading position amonsf the prominent business men of 
Morris. He was only eig^ht years of age when his mother died. He spent 
the five succeeding years in Ohio and then came to Morris, where he received 
the motherl)^ attention of his father's third wife, a most excellent woman. 
His education was obtained in the public schools, but his pri\ileges were 
somewhat limited, for soon after his arrival in this city he entered the print- 
ing ofifice of the Morris Yeoman, the first paper printed in the town. After 
working at the trade for ten months he was taken ill. suffering an attack of 
typhoid fever. Upon recovery he resumed work in the ottice, but about six 
months later was again ill with the same disease. This ended his experi- 
ence in connection with journalistic interests. In later life he had a third 
attack of typhoid fever, a most unusual occurrence, but what is more re- 
markable his health was not impaired beyond the time the fever lasted. On 
leaving the printing ofifice Mr. Mallon,- secured a position in a machine shop, 
where he was employed for a year, after which he spent one year as a clerk 
in the grocery store of M. R. Keller. In the spring of 1861 he became con- 
nected with canal-boating, but when hostilities were inaugurated between 
the north and south he put aside all personal considerations and enterefl the 
Union service. 

In Chicago, in the old ■'^^'igwam■' building in which Lincoln was first 
nominated for the presidency, was organized, in July, 1861, the Chicago 
Light Artillery Company, commanded by Captain Busteed. It was this 
company which Mr. Mallory joined, and A\-ith his command went to A\'ash- 
ington. District of Columbia, where they were armed and drilled; but the 
war department discovered some questionable conduct on the part of the 
ofificers of the Chicago Light Artillery, which, in consequence, was dis- 
banded. The privates, however, were given the privilege of joining any 
convenient regiment. The First New York Infantrj' reached Washington 
at that time and the private soldiers from Grundy county, thirty-five in 
number, joined Battery B, First Regiment of Light Artillery, New York 
Volunteers. Mr. Mallor}- became a member of Battery B, and was mus- 
tered in as a bugler. September 9, 1861, for a tenn of three years. On the 
22(1 of February". 1864, he veteranized and was again enrolled in the same 
batter}- to serve three years or during the war, being discharged at Elmira, 
New York, June 18. 1865, after hostilities had ceased. Robert E. Rogers, 
then the captain of his company, on signing his discharge, placed upon the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 495 

paper the following: "Allen F. Mallon- is an excellent and trustworthy sol- 
dier. He has participated in the following; hattles : Fair Oaks. \'irg-inia, 
June I, 1862; battles in front of Richmond. \'irginia, June i to June 29; 
Peach Orchard, Virginia, June 29, 1862: Savage Station, Virginia, June 29; 
White Oak Swamp, June 30; Malvern Plill. July i; Second Bull Run, Au- 
gust 30; Antietam, Maryland, September 17; Fredericksburg, Virginia, 
December 11-13, 1862; Chancellorsville. Virginia, ]\Iay i, 2, 3, 1863; Gettys- 
burg, July I, 2, 3, 1863: Mine Run, November 30, 1863; \\'ilderness, Vir- 
ginia. ]\Iay 5, 6, 1864; Spottsylvania Court House, May 18, 1864; North 
Anna River, May 23; Bethesda Church, June i : Cold Harbor, June 3; Peters- 
burg, June 17 to August 16; W'eldon Railroad, Virginia, August 18, 19, 21, 
1864; and all battles from March 28 to the surrender of Lee's army April 
9, 1865. At the battle of Gettysburg Mr. Mallon,- was wounded in the head. 
He was sent to the hospital in Wilmington. Delaware, but three months 
later rejoined his command. He was a valiant soldier, always loyal to the 
old flag and the cause it represented, and on many a southern battle-field he 
displayed great braver}-. He was one of the organizers of the fifth Grand 
Army post in the United States, but on account of political struggles this 
post was relieved of its charter, and he is now a member of Dar%-eaux Post, 
of Morris. 

While in the army Mr. Mallory sent money back home, and with this 
his father purchased a canal-boat. Upon his return in July, 1865. he took 
charge of the boat, which he conducted through a season and then began 
working in Morris. The following spring he again took charge of the boat, 
but in June he sold it and went to Chicago, where he engaged in the gro- 
cery business, at No. 61 Milwaukee avenue, under the firm name of A. F. 
Mallorv' & Brother. For a year he conducted that store, and then again 
engaged in canal-boating for a short time. In November, 1867, he pur- 
chased a grocer}' stock in Chicago, shipped it to IMorris, and for eighteen 
years was one of the successful grocery merchants of this city, enjoying a 
large and profitable trade. On the expiration of that period he went to 
Kankakee, Illinois, where he purchased a hotel and conducted it four years. 
He still owns and manages the Hotel Commercial at Kankakee, an excellent 
hostelry supplied with all modern improvements. In 1889 he purchased 
the old Hanna & LeRoy business block in Morris, remodeled it and con- 
verted it into a modern hotel of fifty rooms. This was opened on the 31st 
of December, 1889. It also is called by the name of Hotel Commercial, as 
is the Kankakee house. Each contains fifty rooms, and both hotels are 
successfully managed by ^Ir. ^Mallory and his wife, v.'ho, like him, possesses 
excellent business ability. In this connection our subject has become 
known throughout the state. He has the genial disposition and kindly 



496 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

manner so necessary to a successful hotel proprietor, and with a sincere in- 
terest in the comfort and welfare of his guests he has so conducted his hotel 
as to win a large support from the traveling public. 

Mrs. Mallor\' bore the maiden name of Hanna Hopkins. She is a 
niece of \V. T. Hopkins, by whom she was reared. Their marriage was 
celebrated in 1865, and they now have three living children: William H., 
Annie and George. Another son, Nobbie, died at the age of six years. 
Mrs. Mallor}' is a lady of great force of character, and to her able manage- 
ment and wise counsel Mr. Mallory contributes not a little of his success. 

Our subject is an active Mason. In politics he is an ardent Republican, 
but has never sought or desired the honors or emoluments of public office. 
In his business career he has met with the success which comes as the re- 
ward of earnest purpose and well-laid plans, carefully executed. He has 
met with many difificulties, but has overcome these by unfaltering industry, 
and to-day is known as one of the most substantial as well as one of the 
most valued citizens of Grundy county. The straightforward methods he 
has always followed commend him. to the confidence of his fellow men, and 
have made him well worthy the trust reposed in him. His many excellencies 
of character have gained him a large circle of friends, and he well deserves 
honorable mention in connection with the historv of ^lorris. 



MILTON S. DEWEY, 



Milton S. Dewey is an enterprising grain merchant of Mazon. where 
he successfully controls a large and extensive business that brings to him 
excellent financial returns. He has been the architect of his own fortune 
and has builded wisely and well, the foundation of his prosperity being- 
indefatigable labor. The spirit of self-help is the source of all genuine worth, 
and depending upon his own efforts and placing his reliance in the substan- 
tial qualities of energy and perseverance, he has steadily worked his way 
upward. 

I\Ir. Dewey was born in Boonville, Oneida county. New York, June i, 
1855, and is a son of Sylvester H. and Melissa A. (Fisk) Dewey. It is be- 
lieved that the family is of French lineage, but the line of descent in America 
is authentic, being easily traced back to Thomas Dewey, the oldest son of 
Thomas, the founder, who sailed from Sandwich, England, for the New 
World. For genealogy see sketch of Sylvester H. Dewey. 

Sylvester Har\-ey Dewey, the father of our subject, is a resident of 
Grundy county and is represented on another page of this work. His son, 
Milton S., whose name introduces this review, was about four months of 




\Jhj^yt^av\y jl /)x^ty^ 




c/Ho^>i^/e>->U^ tyVi ^>,X<x^iC^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 497 

. . il 

age when brought by his parents to Illinois in 1855. He obtained his edu- 
cation in the common schools and also attended a select high school in 
Morris for three winters. He early assisted in the labors of the farm, and 
began working for himself at the age of sixteen years, renting land from 
his father, to whom he paid the same rental that any one else would have 
done. For two years, from 1874 until 1876, he was associated with his 
father in business in Morris as a dealer in agricultural implements, after 
which he returned to the farm, renting land in Mazon township, four miles 
northeast of the village of Mazon, the tract comprising one hundred and 
sixty acres. During the six years in which he resided upon it he improved 
it with substantial farm buildings and then came to Mazon, where he em- 
barked in the grain business in connection with his father, Sylvester H. 
Dewey, the partnership continuing for eight years and four months, at the 
end of which time he purchased his father's interest. He has since been 
numbered among the leading grain merchants of this county and has pros- 
pered far beyond his expectations, yet his success is the merited reward of his 
own labor. When he began business the elevator was very small, but his 
increased trade demanded enlarged facilities, and the present elevator is 
five times its original capacity, which was fifteen thousand bushels. Its 
present capacity is eighty thousand, and it is by far the largest elevator in 
]\Iazon. Mr. Dewey annually handles from two to three hundred thousand 
bushels of grain, dealing mostly in corn and oats, and is one of the most 
extensive buyers in this part of the county. He is also the oldest grain 
merchant in Mazon, his connection with this branch of business covering a 
period of fourteen years. He is well known in trade circles and in the farm- 
ing community, and is a man of irreproachable integrity, very reliable in 
all his dealings and transactions. His investments have been judiciously 
made, and in addition to the elevator in Mazon he owns eight hundred acres 
of land in Sherman county, Nebraska, together with seventy acres in Oneida 
county. New York, and four hundred acres in Mazon and Wauponsee town- 
ships, Grundy county. In his political views Mr. Dewey is a Republican, 
imfaltering in his advocacy of party principles. He has held the office of 
justice of the peace for fifteen years, and his decisions are strictly fair and 
impartial, his judgments being unbiased by fear or favor. He was for eigh- 
teen years a member of the school board and has served as its president. Fra- 
ternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias of Mazon, in which he 
has held the ofifice of prelate. 

On the 27th of February, 1878, in Wauponsee township, Grundy 
county, Mr. Dewey was united in marriage to Margaret M. Dewey, who 
was born March 17, 1858,- a daughter of Joseph and Sarah (Whitlock) 
Dewey. She is also descended from Thomas Dewey, the original American 



498 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

■■ - ■ 5 
emigrant in this country, and to our subject and his wife have l^een born 
seven children, namely: Melissa, December 7, 1879; Henry Eugene, Sep- 
tember 2, 1882: Mabel, November 8, 1884: Flora May, June 2, 1886; William 
Arthur, May 30, 1888; Alice Estella, February 21, 1892; and Ernest Adel- 
bert, who was born January 15. 1896, and died on the 7th of January, 1897. 

It will be interesting in this connection to note the line of descent from 
Thomas Dewey to Mrs. Dewey, for we have before traced the line from 
the same ancestors to our subject. Jedediah Dewey, youngest son of 
Thomas, the founder, was born December 15, 1647, married Sarah Orton, 
and died November 20, 171 1. Their son. Daniel, was born in March, 1680, 
and died in 17 17. He was married September 17, 1706, to Catherine Beck- 
ley, and they had two children, one of whom was Daniel Dewey, Jr., whose 
birth occurred in 1707. He was married in 1732 to Rebecca Curtis and 
had five children, including David Dewey, who was born March 16, 1732, 
and died in August, 1814. He was married in 1755, to Esther Dunham, and 
they had six children. One of the number was again named Daniel Dewey, 
and he became the grandfather of Mrs. Milton S. Dewey. Her father was 
Joseph Dewey, and thus the line of descent is traced down. 

Daniel Dewey, her grandfather, was born in 1773 and became a miner, 
working in iron mines. Although not an enlisted soldier, he participated in 
the battle of Lake Champlain in the war of 181 2 and was always known as 
a patriotic citizen. He married Lucretia Pangburn and they became the 
parents of twelve children, namely : Polly, Betsy, Rhocla, Eliza, Amos, 
Sallie, Moses, Phoebe, Fannie, John. Jane and Joseph. The father of these 
children died in Washington county. New York, when about seventy years 
of age. He and his wife and most of their children were members of the 
Methodist church. She was a daughter of John Pangburn, one of the Revo- 
lutionary heroes. 

Joseph Dewey, the father of Mrs. Milton S. Dewey, was born in \\'ash- 
ington county, New York, September 30, 1825, and died March 5, 1892. 
He was married January 29, 1852, to Sarah Whitlock, a daughter of William 
W. Whitlock. She was born in Washington county, New York, January 
^5> 1835. After their marriage Joseph Dewey and his wife located on a 
farm in Washington county. New York, but subsequently he sold that 
property and in i860 removed to Illinois, taking up his abode in Norman 
township, Grundy county. After eighteen years he removed to Wauponsee 
township and purchased eighty acres of land, which had been improved to 
some extent. There he made a good home and farm, his death occurring 
there at the age of sixty-seven years. In politics he was a stanch Repub- 
lican and in religious belief a Methodist. An industrious man of sterling 
worth, he was highly respected by all who knew him. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 499 

His wife, who bore the maiden name of Sarali W'hitlock, was a daughter 
of W'iUiam and Nancy (Dugan) Whitlock. Her father was born in Wash- 
ington county. New York, in the town of Day, about 1818, and was of 
Pennsylvania Dutch Hneage. By trade lie was a stone-mason, and also 
followed agricultural pursuits. In his native county he married Nancy 
Dugan, a daughter of Arthur and Sallie Dugan. Mr. Whitlock worked at 
his trade of a stone-mason in the town of Day, Washington county. New 
York, for many years. There his wife died when about sixty-two years 
of age. She was a member of the Presbyterian church and a woman of 
many virtues. Mr. Whitlock also belonged to that church. Their children 
were: Sarah, born January 15, 1835; William J., born June 5, 1837; Jane, 
born June 25. 1839: and Arthur, born July 4. 1841. After the death of his 
first wife Mr. Whitlock was again married, Jeanette Gorley being the lady 
of his choice. She was born in Scotland and when seventeen years of age 
she came to America, where she engaged in school-teaching. After his 
second marriage Mr. Whitlock purchased a farm in \Vashington county, 
New York, and there made his home until his retirement from active busi- 
ness life, when he took u]) his abode in Salem, New York. 
There he died at the age of seventy years. Joseph Dewey and 
his wife were the parents of the following named: Nancy R., born January 
10, 1853; Mary, June 6, 1856: Margaret M., March 14, 1858: William John, 
April 7. i860; Annie L., February 17, 1862; Amos Arthur, September 21, 
1865; Jennie H., February 6, 1869; Estella, August 22, 1871; and Lizzie, 
August 18, 1874. All are yet living and all are married with the exception of 
Estella, who makes her home with her mother. After the death of her first 
husband Mrs. Dewey became the wife of Delos W^right, and with him is 
now living in Grundy county. She possesses a remarkable memory and 
furnished nearly all of the facts for these records of Daniel and Joseph Dewey 
and of the Whitlock family. 



JOSEPH ASHTON. 

Joseph Ashton, who passed to his reward February 27, 1897, was for 
about half a century numbered among the representative citizens of Grundy 
county. Coming here in pioneer days, he thenceforth was intimately asso- 
ciated with the upbuilding and development of this section of the state, and 
never failed to do his entire duty as a loyal, patriotic American, upholding 
the law and good government, and using his influence for the maintenance 
of excellent schools, churches and all institutions which benefit a commu- 
Tiity. 



500 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

His father, John Ashton, was a native of England, and at an early age- 
he was left an orphan, to struggle with life's problems as well as he could. 
He was bound out to learn the trade of hatter, and followed that calling 
for some years in the British Isle. At length he determined to seek a home 
and fortune in the United States, and soon after arriving in Philadelphia 
he obtained a position as foreman in a large factory where cloth was manu- 
factured. This responsible place he continued to fill acceptably for several 
years, and in 1850 he came west to Illinois. Locating upon a good farm in 
Kendall county, he remained there, occupied in the cultivation of the place 
until his death in 1878. His wife, whose maiden name w^as Betsy Shaw, had 
departed this life about a year previously, in 1877. 

The birth of Joseph Ashton occurred in Delaware county, Pennsylvania, 
in 1829, and he was reared in the Quaker City. There he found employ- 
ment as a weaver in the facton' where his father was foreman, and continued 
industriously engaged in this trade until he was nineteen years of age. In 
185 1 he concluded to come to Illinois, and for three years after his arrival 
here he carried on farming in Nettle Creek township, Grundy county. He 
then purchased a homestead in Wauponsee township, and devoted the re- 
mainder of his life to. its improvement and cultivation, meeting with success 
in his laudable ambition. He had no aspirations to publicity and prefen-ed 
the quiet of the home circle and the society of his own family, though he was 
friendly and kind to all of his acquaintances and ever ready to lend to them 
a helping hand. Politically he was a Republican, believing finnly in the su- 
periority of his party. His life was well rounded and complete, his chief 
ambitions fulfilled and his duties nobly done, when he was called upon to 
lay aside his burdens. He is sur\-ived by his devoted wife, Mrs. Rachel 
(Hager) Ashton, who was born in Illinois, June 12, 1844, and is making a 
home for her two sons. Her only daughter, Sarah Levina. is deceased. 

William Ashton, elder son of our subject and wife, was born in this 
county, November i, 1865, and was reared in the usual vocations of farmers' 
boys. When he arrived at a suitable age he commenced attending the dis- 
trict school, and later it was his privilege to pursue a three-year course in 
the Morris Normal. Then, returning to the parental farm, he dutifully 
gave his time and services to his father, in the care of the homestead. As 
he was but little more than nineteen years of age at the time of his father's 
death, unusual responsibilities were necessarily thrust upon him, but he 
proved equal to the task and has won the approbation of all for the manly 
way in which he has discharged his duties. 

John A. Ashton. the younger son of Joseph and Rachel Ashton, was 
born December 23, 1870, on the old homestead in Wauponsee township, 
where he is yet dwelling with his mother and brother. From his youth he 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 501 

lias been accustomed to the routine of farm work, and now he is justly ac- 
counted one of the practical and successful agriculturists of the neighbor- 
hood. With the exception of one year, 1885, when he lived in the village 
of IMorris in order to attend school, his entire life has been passed at his 
birthplace. He possesses a good education and is a reliable citizen, highly 
esteemed by the old friends and acquaintances of a lifetime. In company 
with his brother he carries on a fann of one hundred and ninety-eight acres, 
taking great pride in keeping everything in an orderly manner. A modem 
house, with all of the essential conveniences of this decade, was erected by the 
family on the place in 1897. 



WILLIAM GAY. 



The history of Grundy county would be incomplete without the record 
■of this gentleman, who is the oldest resident of Wauponsee township. He 
was bom in Connecticut, April 20, 1820, and is the son of Robert and Julia 
Ann (Crowell) Gay, both of whom were also natives of the Nutmeg state and 
were of English origin. The father was a molder In- trade and resided on a 
small fann. 

William Gay acquired his education in the public schools of his native 
state, and at a very early age was left an orphan. When a youth of fifteen 
lie went to Brooklyn to learn the carpenter and joiner's trade, remaining in 
that city for five years. Subsequently he removed to Orange county. New 
York, where he followed his chosen vocation for three years and then 
started westward, eventually arriving at Southport, Wisconsin. He Avas not 
pleased with that section of country, however, and returned to- Palmyra, 
Wayne county. New York, where he remained for one season. At the ex- 
piration of that period he again came west, this time making his way to Chi- 
cago, where he became superintendent of the erection of some large build- 
ings for an extensive manufacturing company. When that task was com- 
pleted he secured a position as overseer in the carpentering department in 
the works of Peter W. Gates & Company, where he continued for three 
years. He next went down the Illinois river for the fimi of Munn & Scott, 
and was engaged in the milling business, which he followed for about three 
years. When that time had passed he sold out and came direct to Grundy 
county, in 1854, settling on a farm which formed a part of his present fine 
homestead. For many years he engaged in the tilling of the soil and trans- 
formed his land into richly cultivated fields which yielded to him a golden 
tribute for the care and labor he bestowed upon them. He was thus actively 
■connected with agricultural interests until 1894, when he retired to private 



502 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD CEXHALOGICAL RECORD. 

life. g:iving his farm over to the management of his son. He also owns some 
valuable business property in Morris and is accounted one of the substantial 
citizens of the community, a position lie has attained as the direct result of his 
own well directed efforts. 

In 1856 Mr. Gay was united in marriage to Miss Mary Matilda Gulick, 
a daughter of Adam and Anna (Tecla) Gulick. Her father was a native of 
Strassburg, Germany, and his wife was born in Bailystock, Poland. Kirs. 
Gay's birth occurred in Goshen, Orange county. New York, in 1823, and 
she was educated in the village schools of that town. They have but one 
child, Willis Russell. ]\Ir. Gay is a stanch Republican in politics, but while 
taking a deep interest in the success and growth of his party he never sought 
ot^ce. His is an honorable old age, in which he receives the veneration and 
respect which should ever be accorded those of advanced yeai^. His life 
has been industrious and upright, and in its evening he can look back over 
the past without regret. 



WILLIS R. GAY. 



The only son of William and ]\latnda Gay, Willis R. Gay was born 
April 24, 1858. in Wauponsee township, where he has spent his entire life. 
The district schools near the old homestead aft'orded him his preliminary edu- 
cational privileges, which were supplemented by a course in the high school 
of Morris. On the 30th of September, 1885, he married Miss Eslie Brown, 
a daughter of Captain Edwin Brown, of Kendall county, Illinois. Their 
home is blessed with the presence of two children — INIabel Theressa and 
Charles Willis. 

In 1894 Mr. Gay assumed the management of his father's farm, which 
he has since successfully conducted and the neat appearance of the well 
tilled fields indicates his industry and his careful supervision. He is also 
extensively engaged in stock-raising and is also well known throughout the 
western states as a leading stock-dealer. He and his father own together 
seven hundred acres of fine land, which is highly improved. Energy is per- 
haps his most marked characteristic and has been a means of giving him a 
standing in agricultural circles second to none in Grundy county. 



OBADIAH XADEN. 



There is something in the spirit of the American government and of the 
American nation which wins the loyal support of almost all of its adopted 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 503 

sons. Its freedom from monarchical rule, its advantage for progress and 
improvement, unhampered by caste, seem to call forth the best efforts of 
those who come here to seek homes; and, encouraged by the example of 
many self-reliant and self-made men, they rise by their own labors, becom- 
ing faithful and valiant citizens, and often reaching positions of prominence. 

There arrived in Grundy county in 1846 a young man destined to win 
success and gain for himself an honorable name in Inisiness circles. He 
was a native of England, his birth occurring in Staffordshire, four miles 
from Buckston, June 5, 1829, his parents being Samuel and Martha (Millner) 
Naden. They had nine sons and three daughters, as follows : Noah, James, 
John, Samuel, Thomas, Isaac, Henry, Philip, Obadiah, Sarah, Rebecca and 
Marv". 

In 1844 John came to the United States, and, being well pleased with 
the country and the opportunities it offered, he wrote favorable accounts 
to his parents, who crossed the Atlantic in 1846, locating in Big Grove 
township, Kendall county. Illinois. In 1848 another son. Samuel Naden, 
also became a resident of the United States. The father settled four miles 
from Lisbon, and there devotefl his energies to agricultural pursuits, but 
was not long permitted to enjoy his new home, his death occurring in 1848. 
His wife survived him many years, passing away in 1866. In England the 
entire family worked in a print manufactory. Obadiah entered that factory 
when only six years of age, and was there employed until his seventeenth 
year, at which time he accompanied his parents to the United States. He 
was then capable of doing twentv different kinds of work in the factory, but 
he never received more than seven shillings per week in compensation for 
his ser\-ices, and other laborers in the mill were as poorly paid. It is no 
wonder, then, that the family sought a home in the new world, where they 
could earn better wages and where advancement was more certain. 

In this country Mr. Naden, of this review, has always followed farming. 
He began agricultural pursuits for himself by working land on shares, his 
mother acting as his housekeeper until his marriage in 1856. For four years 
he cultivated rented land, and during that time was enabled to save one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars. He also owned a team and six young colts. With 
his money he made a partial payment upon a quarter section of fine farm- 
ing land in Plattville, Kendall county, Illinois. With characteristic energy 
he began the development of the farm and the task of clearing it of all in- 
debtedness. His energv' and economy enabled him soon to do this, and 
prosperity has steadily attended his efforts, so that his financial resources 
Iiave increased and he has added to his farm until it now comprises three 
hundred and eighty acres of rich and valuable land. It is under a high state 
of cultivation, the well tilled fields yielding to him a golden tribute in return 



504 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

for the care and labor he bestows upon it. He also has a quarter section of 
land in Iroquois county, Illinois, and three hundred and twenty acres in 
Indiana. He has met with some reverses, but his determined purpose has 
enabled him to overcome all obstacles and work his way steadily upward. 
On the 14th of August, 1881, a disastrous fire destroyed all of his barns 
and considerable produce and grain, together with some stock and farm 
implements, but the following year he erected new buildings, and soon after- 
ward gave his farm over to the management of his sons, since which time 
he has lived retired in Morris. 

In 1856 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Naden and Miss Jane Green, 
who was born in Liverpool, England. December 24, 1833, and in 1855 came 
to the United States with her brother, George, who is now a practicing 
physician of Aurora, Illinois. To Mr. and Mrs. Naden have been born the 
following children: Samuel J., a farmer of Iowa; Martha, the wife of Omer 
Smith, of Hoopeston, Illinois; Mary, the wife of Perry A. Johnson; Walter, 
who died at the age of twelve years; James and Stanley, who are working 
their father's farm; Lida, the wife of J. W. Challacombe, stenographer and 
bookkeeper for the Woelfel tannery in Morris; and Burt, at home. The 
parents are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church and enjoy 
the high regard of all with whom they have been brought in contact. 

In 1868 Mr. Naden visited England, and in 1898, accompanied by his 
wife, he again crossed the Atlantic to the land of his birth, where they spent 
many pleasant hours amid the scenes of their childhood and renewing ac- 
quaintances of their youth. Mr. Naden has been fortunate in his business 
affairs, and his success is due to his own energy and not to circumstances. 
He has labored earnestly and indefatigably, and success withholds not its 
rew^ards from those who dilig-ently seek. He is a public-spirited citizen, and 
in his support of measures for the general good he has shown that he has 
become a true American in thought and interests. 



JOHN KNOX ELY, 



There can be no reading more edifying to the younger generation of 
the residents of any county than truthful accounts of the lives and experiences 
of the pioneers who planted the seeds of civiHzation within its Hmits, and 
of men of hope and pluck and perseverance who were in the van in the 
later march of development. It is to record the deeds and virtues of such 
men that this sketch is prepared; and if it does justice to John Knox Ely, 
his predecessors and contemporaries, the writer's task will have been ful- 
filled. 




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7 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 505 

John Knox Ely, of j\Iazon, Illinois, one of the representative citizens of 
Grundy county and a prominent business man and farmer of Mazon town- 
ship, was born in Oneida county. New York, December 2, 1837, a son of 
James G. and Rebecca (Knox) Ely. The Ely family is of sterling English 
stock, its founders in America having been early colonial settlers of New 
Jersey. John Ely, the grandfather of our subject, was a native of New 
Jersey and was married in that commonwealth. He settled and lived out 
his days in the town of Western, Oneida county, New York, where he was a 
stock farmer and owned a considerable amount of property. He lived to the 
venerable age of eighty years, was a Democrat in his politics and a prom- 
inent man in his community. His children were Henry, David, James G., 
George, Frank, Elvira, Lydia and Louisa. 

James G. Ely, a son of John, was bom in New Jersey, September 25, 
1807, received a common-school education and became a farmer, and while 
yet young went with his father to Oneida comity, New York, and married 
there, July 4, 1826, Fanny Hunt, who was born March 12, 1809. Their 
children were Martha, William, Ann and Harriet. Mr. Ely settled on land 
which was a part of his father's estate and lived there many years. His wife 
died July 2, 1835, and he married the second time, January i, 1837, in 
Oneida county. New York, Rebecca E. Knox, born near Perth Amboy, New 
Jersey, May 4, 1807, a daughter of Joseph and Rebecca (Karr) Knox. Her 
father, Joseph Knox, was a planter and slave-owner, but, believing in human 
liberty in its broadest sense, eventually freed his slaves. John Knox Ely 
has a silver spoon formerly belonging to the Karr family, marked with the 
initials S. K., for Samuel Karr, the grandfather of his mother. Joseph Knox 
and wife were the parents of Nelson, Samuel, Sylvanus, Eliza, Ruth, Rebecca 
and Mary. James G. Ely, the father of our subject, moved with his family 
to Illinois in 1844, making the journey by way of the Erie canal to Buffalo 
and the lakes to Chicago, and thence by teams to Lisbon, Kendall county, 
Illinois. From, the early part of May to June 4 was the period he con- 
sumed in reaching his destination. He at once bought an improved farm of 
eighty acres, and died July 3, only a month after his arrival. In politics he 
was a Democrat. He was an industrious and straightforward man who 
commanded the highest respect, and he reared an excellent family. 

John Knox Ely was only seven years old when he came with his 
parents to Kendall county. He received his education in the common schools 
and at Mount Morris Seminary, at Mount Morris, Ogle county, this state, 
at the latter of which he was duly graduated. He engaged in school-teaching 
in LaSalle and Grundy counties, being thus employed for several 
years. 

August 12, 1862, at Chicago, he enlisted as a private in the Eighty- 



506 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

eighth Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantn*, to serve three years or dur- 
ing the war. ami he sen-ed until honorably discharged on account of wounds 
received in battle at Peach Tree Creek, Georgia, July 20, 1864. He took 
part in the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge and Resaca, 
and he was slightly wounded in the engagement last mentioned. He was 
also in the Atlanta campaign when the Union troops were under fire four 
months, and participated in the battles of Buzzards' Roost, Adairsville, New 
Hope Church, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain. Lost Mountain and Peach Tree 
Creek, in the last of which he was struck in the right side by a piece of con- 
cussion shell and injured seriously. He was taken to a field hospital, and 
after two weeks moved to Chattanooga and thence to Nashville and confined 
in the hospital about two and a half months. 

He then went home on a furlough, being incapacitated for arduous duty. 
He was always an active soldier, always on duty in all the campaigns, marches, 
battles and skirmishes in which his regiment was engaged, and did his full 
duty promptly and cheerfully. He was promoted for meritorious services, 
to be corporal and then duty sergeant and afterward orderly sergeant; and 
he was one of the men selected for General Rosecrans' regiment to be called 
The Roll of Honor; but that regiment was never formed. After recovering 
from his wounds he was detailed to the United States secret service and 
stationed at Nashville till the close of the war, and after the war he returned 
to Illinois. 

When he was at home on a furlough Mr. Ely married, at Vinton, Iowa, 
September 5, 1864, Lovina J. Mossman, who was bom April 13, 1845, i" 
Mercer county, Ohio, a daughter of William Mossman and Mary nee Thomp- 
son. William Mossman was born in Pennsylvania, February 28, 1801, and 
was of Scotch-Irish descent. In early life he was a school-teacher, particu- 
larly skilled in mathematics. Later he became a farmer. He married, in 
Pennsylvania, Mary Thompson, who was born in Maryland, November 10, 
1815, a daughter of Aquila Thompson, of Scotch descent. After their mar- 
riage Mr. and Mrs. Mossman lived for a time in Pennsylvania and then 
moved to Ohio, where Mr. Mossman was a farmer. About 1845 ^^^ey moved 
to Grundy county, Illinois, settling in Nettle Creek township, where Mr. 
Mossman bought an improved fami of eighty acres, upon which they lived 
until 1855, when he went to Benton county, Iowa, and bought prairie land, 
but settled in the town of Urbana. He died in Vinton, Iowa, aged about 
eighty-seven years. He was a man of excellent mind and well educated, 
and held town offices so creditably that his judgment was respected by the 
people. He was an old-line Whig and an Abolitionist, and was one of the 
founders of the Republican party in Benton county, Iowa, and afterward 
acted and voted with that party as long as he lived. He was a member ot 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 507 

the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he was a class-leader tor many 
years. His children were Francis A., James C, George W., William H , 
Sarah E., Mary V., Lovina J., Aqiiila P., David C, Winfield W. and Ella. 
Mr. Mossman had four sons in the civil war, — Francis, George, William 
and Aquila. Francis and George were in the Thirty-sixth Regiment, Illi- 
nois Volunteer Infantry, and Francis veteranized, serving four years, and 
was in many battles. George also veteranized and saw four years of service 
and was mustered out a major, having been promoted from the rmik of 
corporal. William was a private in the One Hundred and Forty-sixth 
Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served about one year, when 
he was honorably discharged, on account of sickness, and died soon after- 
ward. Aquila P. was in the Eighth Regiment of the Iowa Volunteer In- 
fantry, in which he enlisted and serv^ed eighteen months, until the regiment 
was discharged. 

After his marriage John Knox Ely continued to reside in Nettle Creek 
township, Grundy county, on land which he and his mother had entered 
in 1847, an<^l where he lived until he was twenty-five years old. After his: 
return from the war he lived there two years, and in 1868 he moved upon 
two hundred acres of improved land, which he bought in the same town- 
ship. He resided there until 1876, and then moved to Mazon township and 
settled on his present property, consisting of three hundred and twenty acres 
of fine land. This farm he greatly improved. His children are: Ruble 
Maude, born February 8, 1867; Lena Grace, October 21, 1868; Mary Re- 
becca, June 18, 1870; Nellie Virginia, February 23, 1872; John Maurice, 
January 2, 1874; William Ray, May 29, 1879; and Hamlin Mossman, No- 
vember II, 1882, — all born in Grundy county. Parents and children are 
all members of the Congregational church, in which body Mr. Ely has 
held the offices of church trustee and treasurer. 

Politically Mr. Ely is a Republican, and, being an honored citizen of 
his township, he has from time to time held all the township offices, except- 
ing that of road commissioner. He was twice elected to the general as- 
sembly of Illinois by heavy majorities, and he filled the responsible position 
of representative of the people with great credit to himself and satisfactorily 
to his constituents. He is a Mason of Orient Chapter, No. 46, R. A. M., 
and of Blaney Commandery, No. 5, K. T., of Morris, Illinois. He and Mrs. 
Ely are both members of the Eastern Star Chapter, of which she is the 
chaplain. The children of John Knox and Lovina (Mossman) Ely are all 
well trained intellectually, each having enjoyed ample opportunities for 
higher education. 

In conclusion and in general we can say that Mr. Ely is a man of broad 
and independent views and a fearless advocate of what he believes to be 



5o8 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

right. He is \try popular and justly noted for his stanch honesty of char- 
acter. His family is one of the representative families of the county. 



A]\IOS E. CALDWELL. 

More than two-score years have passed since A. B. Caldwell cast in 
liis lot with the people of Illinois, and though he has met with serious re- 
verses at times he has never regretted his choice of a home. Both he arni 
his forefathers have been pioneers, the family having progressed westward 
as the country became thickly settled, and their labors have accrued more to 
those taking their places than to their individual selves. They have man- 
fully stood for their country and comnnmity, performing disinterested acts 
and contributing liberally of their time and means for the general wel- 
fare. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, William Caldwell, was a native 
of Pennsylvania. He removed to Ohio in 1808, and, buying land of the 
government, improved the property, and died there in 18 15. He was sur- 
vived by his wife, whose death took place in 1822. His son John, the father 
•of A. B. Caldwell, was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, in the 
opening year of the century. He was consequently a lad of eight years when 
his father removed to Pickaway county, Ohio, and in that portion of the 
Buckeye state he passed the remainder of his life. He raised large quan- 
tities of wheat upon his farm, and, after having it ground, he shipped it by 
the river route to New Orleans. As he ha.d learned the trade of cooper, 
he manufactured his own barrels, and thus his profits were not inconsiderable. 
He died at the ripe age of eighty-four years, in 1884, respected and loved 
by a large circle of friends. The famous John C. Calhoun was a protege 
of the Caldwell family. The mother of A. B. Caldwell was Elizabeth Mon- 
nett in her girlhood, her father being Isaac Monnett, of German extraction. 

The birth of the gentleman whose name heads this sketch took place in 
Pickaway county, Ohio, December 17, 1833. Reared on his father's fami, 
"he continued to make his home there until he reached his twenty-fourth year, 
when he came to this state. Locating upon a farm in Iroquois county, he 
industriously tilled and improved the place until it became one of the finest 
in that section. He was the first person in the township to use tile for 
draining the land, and from a wilderness he saw the locality developed into 
a rich and productive region. In 1886 he went to California, on account of 
the failing health of his wife, and for seven years he dwelt with his family 
in that beautiful land of sunshine and flowers. At length he returned to 
"his birthplace, and, having attended to the settling of his father's estate 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 509 

and remaining there, altogether, a year and a half, he came back to Illinois. 
Since that time he has lived in the town of Seneca, though some of his busi- 
ness interests are elsewhere in the county. He owns and operates a grain 
elevator in Nomian township, and, in addition to this, he carries on a small 
grocery and is the postmaster at Langham. In 1898 he had the misfortune 
to lose his elevator, which was entirely destroyed by fire, but he immediately 
commenced the building of another one, much more substantial and modern 
than the first. Business enterprise and wisely directed endeavor have been 
the means of his success, as well as the absolute integrity and fairness which 
have characterized his dealings at all times. Education has found a sincere 
champion in him, and in his early manhood he taught school in winter, 
while he engaged in farming during the summer season. Politically he uses 
his ballot in favor of the Republican party. 

The first marriage of Mr. Caldwell was solemnized in 1859, ^'^'ss Mar- 
garet Pineo becoming his bride. She was a daughter of George Pineo, of 
Illinois, and by her. marriage she w-as the mother of one child, Eva, now 
the wife of Charles G. Watkins, of Cleveland, Ohio. Mrs. Caldwell died ia 
1863, and three years later our subject wedded Miss Lovenia Holmes, the 
daughter of the Rev. Jacob M. Holmes, of Marion, Ohio. Their eldest-born, 
Mamie, is deceased; Nellie is the wife of Dr. J. Lincoln Rogers, of Los 
Angeles, California; Albertus died when in his twentieth year, in California; 
Fred is now a student in the Northwestern University; and Charlie died 
at the age of three years. The wife and mother was summoned to the better 
land in 1887. 

The lady who now bears the name of our subject was united to hin.i. 
in wedlock, October 24, 1895. Her maiden name was Miss Lydia A. George, 
and at the time of her marriage she was a teacher in the high schools of 
Circleville, Ohio, where she had been engaged in educational work for about 
a quarter of a century. Both Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and are active workers in rehgious and benevo- 
lent enterprises. 



HENRY WATERS. 



To write of the life of Henry Waters is, necessarily, to write history,, 
for he is descended from those who' made history in Grundy county and 
elsewhere and has had much to do' with the making of the history of Mazon' 
township during the last third of a century. 

Henry Waters, one of the most respected citizens and substantial farm- 
ers of Mazon township, Grundy county, Illinois, was bom on his father's: 
farm in Mazon township, April 13, 1849, ^ son of William and Betheusia: 



5IO BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

(Booth) \\aters. He gained a common-school education and by hard work 
and study prepared himself for the career of a fanner. December 28. 1868, 
at Morris, Illinois, he married Terressa H. Booth, born in Bazetta township. 
Trumbull county, Ohio. Xovember 19. 1839, ^ daughter of Moses and Mvra 
(Hubble) Booth. 

Aloses Booth was born in Connecticut, was educated in the public 
schools and became a farmer. When a young man he settled in Trumbull 
county, where he met and won for his wife Miss Myra Hubble, who had 
come to that county from New Haven. Connecticut. After their marriage 
Mr. and Mrs. Booth settled in Trumbull county, Ohio, on a farm of eighty 
acres of land cleared from the woods, and he became one of the pioneer 
farmers of that county. They were both members of the Presbyterian 
church. Their children were George \\'.. and Emma, who became the wife 
of Robert Briscoe. Mr. Bootli died and Mrs. Booth married for her second 
husband Elson Reed, to whom she bore no children. Mrs. Reed came to 
Illinois when well advanced in years and died in Braceville. Grundy countv, 
at the home of her son. George \\'. Mr. Booth was a widower when he 
met Miss Hubble, and by his previous marriage, to a }iliss Judson, had 
children named Truman, Samuel, Moses. Laura, Eliza, and another daughter 
Avho married a i\Ir. Long. 

The lady who became ]\Irs. Henry Waters came to Illinois when she 
was fourteen years of age with a relative. Mrs. Catherine Trumbo. and lived 
two vears in LaSalle county, near Ottawa. She then returned to Ohio, but 
came again to Illinois with the same relative four years later and located 
at Morris, where she met and married Mr. W^aters. After their marriage 
Mr. and Mrs. Waters settled on a part of the old Waters homestead, which is 
included in the farm of one hundred and twenty acres on which they now 
live. To Mr. and Mrs. Waters children named as follows have been born, 
in the order here indicated: Emma M.. bom January 24. 1871; Ida Allie, 
born October 18. 1876: Alta May, bom Xovember 16, 1878, died September 
7, 1880; and Rosa Mabel, born April 5, 1881; Emma was married Septem- 
ber 12. 1888. to Clavton H. Nichols, a farmer of Mount Auburn. Iowa; 
they have five children — Ira M., Qarence H.. Frank. Albert and Elsie: 
Ida Allie was married October 21, 1896. to Ray Woods, a famier of Good 
Farm township, Gmndy county, and they have one child, named Mett.T 
Pearl. Mrs. Waters is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and is 
a consistent example of Christian character. 

In politics Mr. Waters is a stanch Republican. He is a public-spirited 
citizen, alive to every question affecting the general welfare, and is a friend 
of education who has proved his devotion by twenty-five years' service as a 
member of the school board. His daughter, Emma, received a good edu- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 511 

cation and was for a time a school-teacher. Ida Alhe attended high school 
at I\I orris and taught school in Mazon township five years. Rosa Mabel 
is attending the Gardner high school and is fitting herself to teach. The 
entire family is one of the most respected in ^Nlazon township. Mr. \\'aters 
is well known for his integrit}-. his industry and his friendly and helpful 
disposition. He is an entirely self-made man, having accumulated his prop- 
erty by his own unaided exertions. He descends from the pioneer stock 
of Grundy county, his father having been one of the first settlers, and is, in 
the best sense, a representative of the class which has given to Illinois her 
best and most useful citizens. 



SAMUEL M. UNDERWOOD. 

One of the most popular business houses in Morris is the Revolution 
grocery, of which this gentleman is the proprietor. He is a self-made man 
wlio. without any extraordinary family or pecuniary assistance at the com- 
mencement of life, has battled earnestly and energetically, and by indom- 
itable courage and integrity has achieved both character and a competence. 
His success is certainly well merited and numbers him among the substantial 
citizens of the community. 

In Chautauqua county. New York, Samuel M. Underwood was born, 
June 25, 1849, li's parents being Samuel N. and Augusta (Whitney) Under- 
wood, the former a native of the Empire state and the latter of Vermont. 
Both parents were of English lineage and their marriage was celebrated in 
New York, where they resided until 1859, when they came to Illinois, locat- 
ing in Gardner. His father was a hotel manager of that place and remained 
in the business there for many years, but at length removed to Kankakee 
county, Illinois, where his last days were spent. He died in 1884, after 
which his widow made her home with our subject until called to her final 
rest in 1894. This worthy couple were the parents of two children : Charles 
C, now a general merchant of Gardner, and Samuel M. In the state of his 
nativity Mr. Underwood, of this review, spent the first ten years of his life 
and then accompanied his parents to Grundy county. His preliminary edu- 
cation, acquired in the schools of Gardner, was supplemented by a 
two-years' course in Eureka College. After leaving that institution he ac- 
cepted a clerical position in a general store in Pontiac, which was the be- 
ginning of a successful connection with mercantile interests. 

For five years he held that position, during which time he became fa- 
miliar with business methods and then returned to Gardner, where he occu- 
pied a position as salesman for a short time and then became the proprietor 



512 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

of the old hotel which his father had conducted for many years. Xot long 
afterward, however, he disposed of that property and remo\ed to Kansas, 
where he spent two years devoting- his time to farming and to traveling 
as the representative of a nursery firm. Subsequently he was engaged in 
clerking for five years for A. F. Alallory, a merchant of Morris, and in 1883 
he purchased a grocery stock and established the well known Revolution 
grocery and provision store of Morris. In this line of business he has been 
ven,- successful, having a well equipped store and enjoying a large and con- 
stantly increasing patronage. His efforts, however, have not been confined 
alone to this line, for he was one of the organizers of the Morris Floral 
Company, which was formed in 1893, and re-organized and incorporated in 
1897, with a capital stock of fifteen thousand dollars. Of this company Mr. 
Underwood was president and treasurer. The Morris Floral Company is 
looked upon with pride by the citizens of the county seat. Its plant, situ- 
ated one and a half miles east of the city, is a model in its line and its 
products are shipped to many sections of the United States and Canada. 
The business has constantly grown and yields gratifying results to its or- 
ganizers. 

Mr. Undenvood is a member of the ^Modern Woodmen of America, 
of the American Order of United Workmen, and of the Patriarchal Circle. 
Whatever success he has attained in life is the direct result of his own en- 
terprise and capable management. He enjoys an excellent reputation as a 
business man and through diligence and perseverance he has steadily ad- 
vanced in the fields of com.merce till he now occupies a prominent position 
among the leading representatives of the business interests in Morris. 



SAMUEL HOGE. 



The name of Hoge is so inseparably connected with the history of 
Grundy county that this work would be incomplete without the record of 
its representatives, and he whose name heads tliis sketch was one of the 
honored pioneers and for many years a most prominent citizen of the com- 
munity. He came to the county when its lands were wild and uncultivated 
and when the work of progress and improvement had scarcely been begun. 
A native of Fauquier county, Virginia, he was born October 28, 1805, 
and died in Grundy county, Illinois, March 13, 188 1. In early colonial days 
the family was founded in America, its first representative in this country 
being William Hoge. who came from Scotland during the seventeenth cen- 
tury and took up his residence in Pennsylvania. The name has since been 
variously spelled as Hog. Hogg, Hoag, Hogue and Hoge. William Hoge 




X 



■£• 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 513 

married Barbara Hume, a relative of the celebrated historian of that name. 
Their son William was the first of the name to become identified with the 
Society of Friends. In 1754 he remoA'ed from Pennsylvania to Virginia, 
and there reared his seven children, namely : Solomon, James, William, 
Joseph. George. Zebulon and Nancy. Of these, Solomon was twice mar- 
ried and was the father of eighteen children. He first wedded Ann Rol- 
lins and to them were born Sarah, Joseph, David (who died in infancy), 
Solomon, David (the second of the name), Ann, Isaac, Mary, Hannah, 
Jane and Rebecca. For his second wife the father chose Mary Nicols, and 
their children were: Lydia, William, Joshua, George, Margery, Jesse and 
Amy. Of this family Joshua Hoge was born in Loudoun county, Virginia, 
February 8, 1779, and died April 25, 1854. He married Mary Poole, by 
whom he had ten children : William, Rebecca, Samuel, Amy, Solomon, 
Mary, Isaac Stanley Singleton, Lucinda, xAnn and Amanda. The last named 
is the only survivor of this family. 

Samuel Hoge. who was a member of this family and who is the imme- 
diate subject of this review, spent his early youth in the place of his nativity 
and worked on the old homestead farm until he had attained his majority, 
when his father gave him one thousand dollars, and with that amount he 
started west in company with his brother-in-law, Hendley Greggs. They 
went to Belmont county, Ohio, where they engaged in merchandising, Mr. 
Hoge continuing in the store until the fall of 1834, when he sold his interest 
to Mr. Greggs, and came to Grundy county, Illinois, where his brother 
William had located some time previously. He brought with hini a capital 
of two thousand dollars, which he invested in government land, his first 
purchase being a quarter section in the Illinois river valley, about three miles, 
west of Morris. He erected thereon a log cabin and began life in true pioneer 
style. Soon afterward he entered a section of land at the head of the timber 
tract on Nettle creek, west of his brother William's farm. For five years he 
made his home in William's family, but on the 23d of August, 1839, he mar- 
ried Matilda, daughter of Abram Holderman, Sr., and began housekeeping 
in a rather large and respectable hewed log house near Morris, which was 
used for a residence for more than forty years, and ser\ed as a stopping place 
for many travelers between Ottawa and Chicago. 

Erecting a better home on the land on Nettle creek, Mr. Hoge removed 
to that place in 1840 and entered upon a useful and active career as an agri- 
culturist. He was a man of robust health, strong and rugged, and possessed 
sound judgment and excellent tact. He was very persevering and his habits 
in life were exceptionally pure. His earnest and indefatigable labors brought 
to him success, and in his undertakings he prospered, accumulating a hand- 
some property. He never sold a foot of his land, but added to it from time 



514 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

to time as liis financial resources increased, until he was the owner of nearly 
six thousand acres. At the death of her father his wife became the owner of 
five hundred and sixty acres, and by inheritance from her brother Dyson 
received two hundred and seventy-five acres. At his death Mr. Hoge left 
to his family a very valuable estate, and, more than that, the priceless heritage 
of an untarnished name. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hoge were born fifteen children, of whom the following 
grew to years of maturity: Hendley: Charlotte; Jane: Abram, who died in 
the Union army during the civil war: Joshua and Isaac, twins; George, Lina 
M., Charles C. and Landy S. The mother of these children was called to her 
final rest February 14, 1898, having survived her husband about seventeen 
years. They were laid to rest in a private cemetery upon their farm, where 
many of their relatives have been interred. They were people of the high- 
est respectability, who enjoyed the confidence and esteem of their friends 
in an unlimited degree. Throughout the period of its pioneer development 
Mr. Hoge was connected with Grundy county, and ever bore his part in 
the work of advancement and upbuilding. His death was a loss to the com- 
munitv, but his memorv is enshrined in the hearts of all who knew him. 



CHARLES W". JOHXSOX. 

Charles \\'. Johnson, the sheriff of Grundy county, is a native of Morris, 
the town in which he lives, and dates his birth December 19, 1855. His par- 
ents, Frederick and Emily E. (McCullough) Johnson, were natives re- 
spectively of Delaware county, Xew York, and Erie county, Pennsylvania, 
and through them Charles W. traces his origin to four different nationalities, 
his father being of German and Scotch descent and his mother of Welsh 
and Irish. Frederick Johnson and his wife were married in Pennsylvania. 
From that state they came west to Illinois and for three years resided in 
Kendall county. At the end of that time, in 1844, they came to Grundy 
county and located in Morris. Mr. Johnson was actively identified with the 
early histor}- of this place. He helped to build the canal and railroad here, 
and was for a time a captain on the canal. For some time he ran a dray line 
and was superintendent of streets. His death occurred in 1883, and his wife 
died a year later. In their family were eight children, of whom five are now 
living, among them Charles \\'. 

Charles W. Johnson received his education in the public schools of his 
native town. For some time he was interested in the same line of business 
in which his father was engaged, namely, draying and superintending of 
streets, and for two years he conducted a restaurant in Iowa. Severing his 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 515 

connection with the restaurant husiness, lie returned to Morris and has 
ii ''ed here ever since. For twenty-six years he has been a member of the 
IMorris fire department. He was deputy sherilt a year and a half, and in 
November, 1898, was elected on the Republican ticket to the office of 
sheriff, which he has since filled, siiowing himself a capable and efficient 
officer. 

Air. Johnson was married June 13, 1875, in Gardner, Illinois, to Miss 
■ Kittie C. Waters, daughter of James Waters, an old settler of the county, 
now deceased. They have five children, viz. : Stella M., Jessie Belle, Hazel 
Dell, Georg-e C. and Alton E. Fraternally Mr. Johnson is identified with 
the I. O. O^. F. 



GEORGE M. BUCKLIN. 

George M. Bucklin, one of the enterprising publishers of The Sentinel, 
Morris, Illinois, is a native of this state, having been born in Will county, 
■October 8, 1859. He lived in Kankakee, Illinois, until he was ten years 
old and at that time his parents moved to Michigan and settled in Flower- 
field, St. Joseph county. He was reared and educated in Michigan and 
remained there until March, 189J, when he went to Nebraska. In the winter 
of 1895-6 he returned to Illinois and entered the employ of Bucklin & Son, 
publishers of the daily and weekly Sentinel. October i, 1896, in company 
with A. H. Hilliker, he was placed in charge of the paper, which they have 
since operated, having some time since purchased the plant. Both being 
enterprising men, up-to-date in methods of journalism and with plenty of 
pluck and push, they are meeting with deserved success. 

Mr. Bucklin is a man of family. He was first married in Michigan, 
March 27, 1881, to Miss Anna L. Hoover, who died Januar}' 14, 1892, 
leaving two children — Ora E. and Anna G. June 21, 1899, Mr. Bucklin 
married for his present wife Miss Alice R. Turner, of Morris. 



ALBION H. HILLIKER. 

The subject of this sketch, Albion H. Hilliker, one of the promising 
young men of his town, is a member of the firm of Bucklin & Hilliker, 
publishers of The Sentinel, a daily and weekly newspaper issued at Morris, 
Illinois. He has been identified with a printing-office since his early boy- 
hood and has occupied bis present position as one of the publishers of the 
above named paper for two years. 

Mr. Hilliker was born in Kankakee, Illinois, January 10, 1870, and 



5i6 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

received liis education in the schools of that place, passing through the 
various school grades up to and including the tenth year, each year obtain- 
ing high averages in his studies. During the first four years of his school life 
he was neither absent nor tardy, and the record of his fifth year was broken 
only by a three weeks' illness. Naturally of a quiet and steady disposition 
and with the influence of a Christian mother, he formed correct habits that 
have contributed tO' his present success. At an early age he became a mem- 
ber of the Christian church. He learned the printer's trade while yet a boy. 
His first knowledge of this trade he picked up in an office owned by the 
father of one of his schoolmates. He held good positions in all of the Kan- 
kakee offices, remaining in his native town until December 5, 1895, when 
he came to Morris to occupy the position of foreman at the Sentinel ofiice. 
September i, 1897, he, in company with G. M. Bucklin, took charge of 
the plant and on June i, 1899, they purchased it of S. D. Bucklin. Under 
the present management the paper has increased in circulation and has 
otherwise prospered. 

On Wednesday, October 25. 1899, Mr. Hilliker was united in marriage 
to Miss Bertha M. Baum, daughter of the late Henrv Baum, Sr., of [Morris. 



CHARLES B. MOORE. 

Charles B. Moore, a member of the Morris Lumber Company, of ^Mor- 
ris. Illinois, has been engaged in his present line of business for the past 
twelve years, and since 1894 has been a resident of Morris. 

Mr. Moore is a native of Illinois, born in Rock Island, June 2, 1859, a 
son of Daniel G. and Maria M. (Weiser) Moore. Daniel G. Moore was a 
native of Ohio, and his wife of Pennsylvania. They came west with their 
respective families when quite young and were reared and married at Rock 
Island. When their son, Charles B., was a year old they removed to a 
farm in Bureau county, Illinois, and lived there until he was twelve, their 
next move being to the town of Sheffield, Illinois, where the parents lived 
for twenty years. They are now residents of Iowa. 

Charles B. spent the most of his school-boy days in Sheffield, and is a 
graduate of the high school at that place, with which institution he was 
subsequently connected as teacher. After finishing his high-school course, 
he was for three years employed as a teacher in the grammar school of 
Sheffield, one year as assistant principal in the high school and three years 
as principal. In June, 1887, he went to Nebraska and located at Arcadia, 
where he turned his attention to the lumber business, a business with which 
he has since been connected. He spent seven years in Nebraska, at various 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 517 

points, and from there in 1894 returned to Illinois and took up his abode in 
Morris. Here he entered into a partnership with J. H. Pattison, with whom 
he was associated until December, 1897, when Mr. Pattison sold out to 
Mr. Moore and Mr. Fred L. Stephen, who constitute the Morris Lumber 
Compau}-, and who are doing a prosperous business. 

Mr. Moore was married in Sheffield, in 1884, to Miss Annie L. Howard, 
and they have an interesting family of three little daughters. Mr. Moore 
harmonizes with the Republican party and maintains fraternal relations with 
the Knights of Pythias and Knights of the Glote. 



WILLIAM R. ALLAN. 

There is probably no better indication of the enterprise and business 
interests of a town than its hotels, and the Carson House, of which Mr. 
Allan is proprietor, is representative of the enterprising spirit which dom- 
inates Morris. This is one of the best hotels in central Illinois, receiving 
from the public a liberal and well merited patronage. Its proprietor is a 
genial, courteous gentleman who commands the respect of all with whom 
he comes in contact. He was born in Scotland, June 16, 1848, in Newton 
Grange, in the county of Edinburg, his parents being- David and Elizabeth 
(Telfert) Allan, also natives of that land. In 1879 they crossed the Atlantic 
to the United States, spending their last days in Morris. They had four 
sons and two daughters. 

In the public schools William R. Allan obtained his education, but his 
advantages were very meager, as he began to earn his own living at the early 
age of seven years. Extensive reading, however, together with wide ex- 
perience in the practical affairs of life, has made him a well informed man. 
At the age of seven he began working in the mines of Scotland and was 
largely employed in that division of labor till twenty-two years of age, when, 
in 1870, he sailed for America, believing that he might benefit his financial 
condition in a land where ambition and energy are not fettered by caste or 
class. Landing in New York, he came at once to Morris and for a year 
was engaged in coal-mining. On the expiration of that period he joined his 
eldest brother, David Allan, in leasing mines at Morris, operating the same 
for three years. He was then engaged in merchandising for twelve con- 
secutive years, and on the expiration of that period carried on farming for 
two years in Iroquois county, Illinois. Subsequently he removed to Ottawa, 
where he conducted a restaurant for about seven months, and in 1888 he 
came to Morris, where he assumed the management of the Carson House. 
A contemporary publication has said : "The Carson House enjoys the repu- 



5i8 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOCICAL RECORD. 

tation of being one of the best hotels in this section of the country. Every- 
thing from cehar to attic is clean, cozy and homelike. The rooms are large 
and comfortable and you coukl not ask for any better accommodation in any 
city than you get at this hotel, the tables being supplied with each and every 
delicacy that the mind of an expert 'chef can devise, and served by a corps 
of polite and attentive waiters. For more than eleven years Mr. Allan has 
been its proprietor and is well known to the traveling public. He is very 
popular among traveling salesmen and has won many friends among that 
class of business men." 

On the 22d of September, 1875, Mr. Allan was united in marriage to 
Miss Janet B. Patrick, a native of Maryland, and of Scotch parentage. They 
have five children: Thomas A. N., David Alexander, William R., Lillie J. 
and Roy Carson. Mr. Allan is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and is also a very prominent Mason, taking the initiatory degrees 
in 1878. when on a visit to his old home in Scotland. A year later he joined 
Cedar Lodge, No. 124, F. & A. M., of Morris, and has since taken the 
Royal Arch and Knight Templar degrees, belongs to Orient Chapter, No. 
31, R. A. M., and Blaney Commandery, No. 5, K. T. He has attained the 
thirty-second degree of the Scottish rite in Oriental Consistory, is a Noble of 
the Mystic Shrine and belongs to Laurel Chapter, No. 145, O. E. S. A 
worthy exemplar of this ancient craft, his life is in perfect harmony with its 
humane and fraternal teachings. His wife is also a member of the Eastern 
Star. His political support is given to the Republican party, but he has 
neither time nor inclination for public office, preferring to devote his ener- 
gies to the conduct of the Carson House, which he has made one of the 
most popular hostelries in this section of the state. He certainly deserves 
great credit, for at the tender age of seven years he started out in life for 
himself. The difficulties and obstacles impeded his progress, but he has 
overcome these by determined purpose, steadily working his way upward 
to a position of affluence. 



JOHN M. VANDERPOOL. 

Forty-two years have passed since this esteemed citizen of Grundy 
county came to this section of Illinois, and during the long interval he has 
watched the progress and development which has placed this locality upon 
a par with the other counties in the great commonwealth. During the 
greater part of the time he has devoted his energies to agricultural pursuits, 
and by close application to business and untiring energy has won a hand- 
some competence. His life has been a quiet and unassuming one. yet he be- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 519 

longs to that class of reliable citizens who are true to their duty to thern- 
sehes. to their neighbors and to their country, and it is such men who form 
the bulwarks of the Union. 

Mr. Vanderpool is a native of the Empire state, his birth occurring in 
Rochester, New York, July 18, 1824. His parents were William and Isabella 

(Johnson) Vanderpool, and his grandparents were John and • 

Vanderpool, all natives of New York. His grandfather was of Holland de- 
scent, and was born in the city of Albany in the eighteenth century. Through- 
out his life he carried on agricultural pursuits, and also maintained his 
residence in the state of his nativity. His children were Abraham, Charles, 
Henry, Margaret, Peggy, Katie and Polly, and the eldest died at the age of 
ninety-nine years. 

William Vanderpool, the father of our subject, was reared on the old 
family homestead in New York, and in early life learned the shoemaker's 
trade. In accordance with the customs of those times he would travel from 
liouse to house through the country making shoes for the inmates of the 
various homes and doing such repair work in his line as was necessary. He 
followed his chosen vocation until his removal to Wisconsin, when he located 
upon a farm, wdiich he made his home until his death. His wife was of 
English lineage. She died in 1826, and later he married Jemimah Buens- 
coat. The children of the first union were Isabella, now deceased; Eliza- 
beth, who is living in Wisconsin; John M.; and Mary, who also has passed 
away. By the second marriage were born five children — George, Abraham, 
and Harriet, who are living in Wisconsin; William, deceased; and Gertrude, 
who also makes her home in the Badger state. John M. Vanderpool spent 
his boyhood days in the usual manner of farmer lads of tlrat period. At a 
very early age he began working by the day and was thus employed until 
eighteen years of age, when he learned the trade of carriage-smith, following 
that pursuit for fourteen years. He spent eight years in Vermont, as a 
general blacksmith, and in 1857 came to Illinois, locating on a farm in 
Grundy county. He followed his trade, however, until 1859, when he turned 
his attention to agricultural pursuits, being closely and actively identified 
with the farming interests of the county until 1895, when he put aside all 
business cares and retired to private life. He is now living in Norman 
township, Grundy county, and is the owner of three hundred and five acres 
of the richest land of central Illinois. The greater part of it is under a 
high state of cultivation, and the rental therefrom brings to him a good in- 
come. 

Mr. Vanderpool has been twice married. In 185 1 he wedded Mrs. 
Phean (Brooks) Lazier, and to them was born a daughter, who was named 
Frances Anna. The mother died in 1854, and in 1856 Mr. Vanderpool 



520 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

wedded Maria Rockwood, a daughter of Samuel and Susan (Colvin) Rock- 
wood, natives of \^ermont. Their children are Frances Anna, wife of 
Henry Winsor, a resident of Vienna township, Grundy county; Herbert 
M., who married Cora Hull and is living in Norman township; Wilber W., 
who married Anna Smith and resides in Wauponsee township; and George 
R., who married Jennie Davis and is living in the same township. 

Mr. Vanderpool is the only Prohibitionist residing in Norman township, 
yet is a true and loyal advocate of his party. The cause of temperance has 
long found in him a stanch supporter, and believing the question of the liquor 
traffic to be one of the most important issues before the people he votes for 
the party which advocates its abolishment. He and his wife are consistent 
and faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and are genial, 
kindly people who have the warm regard of a large circle of friends. Mr. 
Vanderpool has been successful in his business endeavors, and the prosperity 
which he has gained is well merited, for it comes as the result of activity in 
business and the careful direction of his affairs. Although now well ad- 
vanced in years, few would suppose that he has passed the seventy-fifth 
milestone on life's journey, for he possesses the vigor of one much younger, 
and takes an interest in the events of to-day usually found in a man in his 
prime. 



JOHN ANTIS, M. D. 



The pioneer physician of any county, the first physician to locate per- 
manently within its limits, and who practiced medicine among the original 
pioneers, riding horseback over the prairies and visiting the sick in the rude 
cabins of the early settlers, is an important figure in local history. Dr. Antis, 
one of the best-known early settlers in Grundy county, was born in Mont- 
gomery county. New York, March 17, 181 7, a son of John L and Catherine 
(Durkey) Antis. The Antis family was of the old Holland-Dutch stock 
which settled New York. The grandfather of Dr. Antis was John Antis, 
who spoke the language of his native Holland. He was a farmer and land- 
holder, and a soldier in our Revolutionary war. His children were John 
L, Margaret, Henry, James and Conrad. Mr. Antis died at an advanced age 
in New York state. 

John I. Antis, the father of the immediate subject of this sketch, was 
born in New York state and married in Montgomery county, New York, 
to Catherine Durkey, of New England ancestry. Mr. Antis was a blacksmith 
by trade, of the town of Root, Montgomery county, New York, and there 
he passed his active life; and in his old age he came to Morris, Illinois, to 
live with his son. Dr. Antis, and here, both he and his wife died. In politics 




^/^t dv^ J"^-/^ 






BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 521 

he was a Democrat, and in every relation of his life he showed himself an 
industrious and upright citizen and won universal respect. 

Dr. Antis received a good common-school education, studied medicine 
with Dr. Amos Reed as preceptor at Root, Montgomery county, New York, 
and gained the degree of Medical Doctor at a medical cohege at Fairfield, 
Herkimer county, same state. Dr. Antis began the practice of medicine at 
North Brookfield, Madison county. New York, where he remained three 
years. He then practiced his profession three years in Allegany county, 
that state. In 1845 he came to Morris, Illinois, and resumed the practice of 
medicine in the then pioneer settlement, where no physician had located 
permanently before hinT, though one or two doctors from Indiana had tarried 
there briefly. The entire community had only just begun to develop and 
the few scattered settlements clustered about the groves and water courses. 
The prairie lands were wild, wet and unbroken, and few people believed 
that they would ever be settled. The wolves were numerous and could be 
heard howling at any time of night and large herds of deer wandered at 
will over the prairies. While the pioneers were a hardy race of people, there 
was a great deal of sickness in this vicinity, malaria being the principal cause 
of disease. There were no supplies of medicine to be obtained at Morris, 
and Dr. Antis has traveled to Ottawa and Joliet, making the long, lonely 
journey on horseback to procure medicines, especially quinine, for which 
he paid frequently seven dollars per ounce. He had a large practice and 
for a long time was the only physician at Morris, and he was known among 
the pioneers far and wide. There were no roads across the prairies in those 
days and in a wet season the mud was something terrible. There being 
no fences, the Doctor rode across the prairies on horseback and often found 
the sloughs almost impassable. 

Dr. Antis married Nancy A. Sweet, of North Brookfield, Madison 
county. New York. She was a daughter of Samuel G. Sweet, and her father 
was a well-to-do farmer. His children were Mary, Nancy, Phillip, John, 
Jeremy and Benjamin. Mr. Sweet died an old man, at North Brookfield, 
New York. The Doctor came alone to Morris, in the spring of 1845, and 
his wife came out during the summer of that year. Their children were 
Eudora A. and Mary. Mrs. Antis, a woman of many virtues, lived to be 
seventy-two years of age, and died on their home farm in Mazon township, 
in 1889. The Doctor practiced medicine for many years, and was the best 
known among the pioneer physicians of the county. In the early days, 
about 1848, a serious accident occurred to Charles Huston. In pulling his 
gun out of a sled in which he was traveling he discharged the gun and 
the charge of buckshot passed through his arm above the elbow, shatterino- 
and tearing away the bone and solid flesh for nearly two inches and making 



5.22 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

a large hole in the arm. It was a terrible wound. At that time the Doctor' 
had no regular case of surgical instruments and to this fact is probably due 
the salvation of the arm, as, had he been provided with the facilities, the 
Doctor would have amputated it according to the usual practice in ;Mmilar 
cases. It was with many misgivings and greatly against his judgment that 
he set to work to tr>' to heal the wound and save the arm; but by skillful 
and careful treatment through several weeks the wound was entirely healed 
and the arm saved, and it proved to be for Mr. Huston a good and service- 
able arm which he could manage almost as well as before the injury, and 
continued to do so until his death a few years since. In 1850 Dr. .Xntis 
bought his present farm in Mazon township, then consisting of one hundred 
and sixty acres. He has added to it and now owns one of the finest farms 
in the township, consisting of two hundred and forty acres of fine land. 
After the civil war he moved to his farm and has since made it his home. 

The Doctor was one of the early gold-seekers to California, crossing 
the great plains in 1849 and mining for gold at Trinity for two years. In 
politics he is a stanch Democrat. He is an honored citizen of the county and 
has held the oflice of mayor of Morris several times and has been supervisor 
of his township. A man of broad mind, a clear thinker, of independent 
views and strong character, he has manifested much determination, and, like 
most pioneers, he is noted for his sturdy honesty. He has an iron constitu- 
tion, and at eighty-two years of age he is a strong, hearty and well-preserved 
man. 



AUSTIN E. PALMER, M. D. 

One of the successful medical practitioners of Morris is Dr. A. E. 
Palmer, who was born in Wyoming county. New York, November 9, 1846. 
He is a son of Elisha and Eliza (Miner) Palmer, both of whom were natives 
of Stonington, Connecticut, and were representatives of old New England 
families. Walter Palmer, a gentleman of English birth, was the progenitor 
of the family in America. 

The Doctor spent his boyhood days in the Empire state and assisted 
in the labors of the home farm until nineteen years of age; but, not desiring 
to follow the plow throughout his entire life, he determined to engage in 
the practice of medicine. He completed his education in Middlebury Acad- 
emy, where he was graduated in 1866. He then entered Bellevue Medical 
College and on the completion of a thorough course was graduated in that 
institution in 1869. He at once came to Grundy county, Illinois, and for a 
few months made his home in Braceville, after which he spent six years in 
Mazon. In 1876 he came to Morris, where for almost a quarter of a century 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 523:. 

he has engaged in the practice of medicine, meeting with excellent success. 
He is a close student and has carried his investigations beyond those of the 
average practitioner. His rare skill and ability have gained him a liberal 
patronage and won him prestige as a member of the medical fraternity. He 
is now a representative of the LaSalle County and Illinois State Medical .So- 
cieties, and the American Medical Association. 

In 1871 Dr. Palmer was united in marriage to Eva M. Isham, a daughter 
of Edward Isham, one of the early settlers of Mazon township, Grundy 
county. Three children have been bom to them : Frank, who is a graduate 
of the Chicago ^Medical College and is now practicing in Gardner, Illinois; 
Jessie and Louise. The Doctor is a Knight Templar Mason, and is a stal- 
wart Republican in politics, being recognized as one of the leaders of the 
party in his county. He served for four years as mayor of Morris and his 
administration was beneficial and progressive, for he advocated all measures 
calculated to improve the city and advance its material welfare. While he 
was serving as mayor the Morris water-works were constructed, the under- 
taking receiving the Doctor's earnest support. He gives his aid and co-oper- 
ation to all movements calculated to prove a public benefit and is accounted 
one of the representative men of Morris. 



JAMES B. DAWSON. 

This gentleman is accounted one of the successful merchants of Morris, 
as the elements necessary to a successful business career are numbered among 
his leading characteristics. He is wide-awake, energetic and diligent, and 
above all he is reliable in all his trade transactions. 

Mr. Dawson was born in Scotland, December 26, 1850, and on the 
paternal side is of Irish lineage, while on the maternal side he is of Scotch 
descent. His parents were John and Agnes (Stewart) Dawson, and their 
children were William, Agnes, John and Margaret, all now deceased; Fannie; 
Mary; Charlotte: Charles, deceased; and James B. The daughters went tO' 
Australia in early life and Fannie died in that country. Mary, however, 
resides in ^Melbourne, Australia, and Charlotte is living in Wellington, New 
Zealand. In the spring of 1864 Charles Dawson came to the United States 
and in the fall of the same year his brothers, John and James B., also arrived 
in the new world. They spent a short time together in Pennsylvania and 
then separated, each starting out to seek his fortune. Shortly after the sons- 
emigrated to the United States the parents also came and located in Lime- 
town, Pennsylvania, where the father's death occurred five years later. The 
mother then joined her son, James, in Missouri and spent her last days in. 



,524 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

that state. In 1867 William Dawson also came to this country and both he 
and his brother, John, died in Pennsylvania. 

James B. Dawson was a lad of fourteen years when he crossed the 
Atlantic and from that lime has been dependent entirely upon his own re- 
sources, so that he desen'es great credit for the success he has achieved. 
His educational privileges were very limited, but from early youth he mani- 
fested a strong love of books, and through private study and the perusal of 
books and papers, combined with a broad experience in the afifairs of life, 
he has become a well informed man. For several years he was engaged 
in lead and coal mining in Missouri, and for one term he pursued the study of 
medicine in the St. Louis Medical College; but not finding the profession 
entirely to his taste he left that institution and in 1877 located at Wadsworth, 
Illinois, where he engaged in the drug and grocer}' business. He removed 
from that town to Morris in 1884 and has since engaged in merchandising 
here, carn,-ing a large line of groceries, drugs and toilet articles. He has 
been ver\- successful in his business and is now enjoying a large and profitable 
trade. 

While in Wadsworth Mr. Dawson was married, in 1880, to Miss Mary 
A. Sutherland, a native of Scotland, and three cliildren honor their union — 
John, Mabel and Mamie. In politics Mr. Dawson is a Republican, unwaver- 
ing in his support of the principles of the party. In the spring of 1899 he was 
elected a member of the board of aldermen in Morris and is now serving in 
that position. Fraternally he is a Master Mason. Quick of apprehension, 
he mastered the intricate affairs of business life and steadily worked his way 
upward, gaining a comfortable competence and at the same time meriting 
the respect and admiration of his fellow men. His career both public and 
private is marked by the strictest integrity and faithfulness to ever\- trast 
reposed in him. 

CRONIN BROTHERS. 

Thomas M. and Daniel J. Cronin are twin brothers, and were born on 
the old homestead in Saratoga township, Grundy county, IlHnois, Novem- 
ber 25, 185 1, their parents being James and Ellen (nee Donaven) Cronin, 
both of whom were natives of county Cork, Ireland, the father bom in 
1793 and the mother in 1813. They came to Prescott, Canada, where they 
resided for more than a year, and next removed to Florida, later to New 
Orleans, and thence by way of the Mississippi and Illinois rivers to LaSalle, 
IlHnois, and on to Ottawa, which latter place they reached in 1844, and 
here they resided for a short time. The father secured a contract for con- 
-structing a section of the Illinois and Michigan canal immediately west of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 525 

Morris, and on the completion of the work he entered one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in what is now Saratoga township, Gnnidy county, the 
same being secured from tlie land commissioners and known as canal land. 
James Cronin located upon that tract and engaged in farming and made 
his home there until his death. He did not live many years to enjoy his 
new home, for his death occurred in October, 1855, when he had arrived at 
the age of sixty-twO' years. He left a widow and six children, the latter 
being: Mary, now Mrs. Dunn, of South Dakota; James, also of South Da- 
kota; Ellen, now Mrs. Wilder, of Iowa; Lizzie, now Mrs. Curren, of Indian 
Territor)-; Thomas M. and Daniel J. The mother long sur^-ived her husband 
and from 1867 until her death in 1894 was a resident of Morris, residing with 
her sons, Thomas and Daniel. Many of the older citizens of Morris hold her 
in affectionate remembrance. She was a devoted Catholic and reared 
her children in the faith of that church. 

Thomas M. and Daniel J. Cronin were born and reared upon the old 
homestead in Saratoga township, which property they still own. Their edu- 
cation was obtained in the Morris public schools at winter terms. During 
the summer months they worked early and late on their mother's farm. 
Their natures being identical in many ways, ambition and honesty prevailing, 
they early determined to hew their way to more than the life of a farmer, 
and in 1867 Daniel chose the trade of carriage-painting, in which, applying 
himself dihgently, he soon became an expert, working in the meantime in 
the larger shops of Chicago and other cities throughout the Union. Thomas 
the same year, 1867, started to learn the trade of tinner, at which he worked 
many years, becoming a skillful workman. By frugality the brothers in time 
had accumulated a few hundred dollars, and in September of 1882 they 
established their present business in Morris. They opened a hardware store 
on the corner of Liberty and JefTerson streets, in a small room and with a 
small stock. But they applied themselves closely to their work, selling 
goods as recommended, and doing all jobbing work in a first-class manner. 
Their trade began to increase little by little; the shelves became the recep- 
tacles of more and a better class of goods, and the list of customers became 
larger. Their store-room became too small for their trade, and a happy 
thought dawned upon them. L. Gebhard was erecting an elegant three- 
story business block, and they leased the middle store-room, and now. with 
a small beginning in 1882, they have succeeded so admirably as to possess 
one of the finest equipped and best stocked hardware stores in the state. 
They carry a full line of hardware, farm implements and carriages, and trans- 
act a large volume of business. True merit wins every time, and here is an 
apt illustration of the fact. Whatever you buy of the Cronin Brothers, you 
may feel confident will be as recommended by them. 



526 BIOGRAPHICAL AND (^EXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

The brothers are both supporters of the Democratic party, but only 
Thomas has given much attention to political work. He served for five 
years as an alderman, and in 1889 was apjiointed the mayor of Morris to 
fill an unexpired term. In 1890 he was elected for the full term and in 1892 
was re-elected, filling the position altogether for five consecutive years. His 
administration was progressive and he conducted the afl'airs of the city on 
business-like principles and was careful to suppress all movements that might 
prove detrimental and advanced all measures calculated to enhance the 
public good. Daniel Cronin is a member of the Knights of Pythias. Both 
brothers are widely and favorably known throughout Grundy county. They 
bear such strong resemblance to each other that even friends of many years' 
standing often find it dif^cult to distinguish them. Their business interest? 
have ever been conducted with the utmost harmony and they certainly de- 
serve great credit for the success w^hich has been achieved by their own 
efforts. Their honorable methods have won them an unassailable reputation, 
and as representative business men of Morris they certainlv deserve mention 
in this volume. 



MRS. CLARISSA A. LINN. 

Long a resident of Grundy county, and widely and favorably known, 
Mrs. Clarissa A. Linn well deser\-es mention in its history. She resides in 
\\ auponsee township and is the owner of one of the valuable farms in this' 
section of Illinois, where her husband carried on agricultural pursuits for 
many years. Her parents were Moses and Catherine (Sitterley) Pangboni. 
of Albany county. New York. In 1855 she became the wife of Peter Bradt, 
a representative of one of the oldest .American families, his ancestrj' being 
traced back to Andrew Bradt. whO' in the year 1650 left Holland, the land 
of his birth, and crossed the Atlantic to the new world. He took up his 
abode in the New York colony, where he followed farming, aiding in open- 
ing up that wild and undeveloped region to the influence of civilization. 
The old brick residence which he erected and which was used as a rendez- 
vous by the settlers in the French and Indian war, is still standing, in a good 
state of preservation. In 1690, when the treacherous Indians made their 
way to the locality in which he resided and massacred many of the people 
there, he was among the number who lost their lives. That event occurred 
in February. 1690. and is known in history as the great Schenectady mas- 
sacre. His wife at that time took her infant son, Aaron, and wrapping him 
in a shawl hid him under a brush fence and thus saved his life. He lived to 
become one of the most prominent and worthy farmers of the Mohawk val- 
ley. He traded with the Indians and became the possessor of a tract of land 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 527 

in that rich vallev, eight miles wide and sixteen miles long. In order to 
secure a legal ownership he went direct to King George III, of England, 
and obtained from that monarch a title to his possessions. He was also 
the owner of the entire town of Princeton, situated just north of Schenec- 
tady township. His son, Samuel A. Bradt, was born in the Empire state 
and was the next in the line of direct descent. Samuel became the father 
of a son whom he called Samuel and wiio was also one of the leading agri- 
culturists in this section of New York, owning and operating five hundred 
acres of land. At the time when the second war with England was inau- 
gurated, however, he joined the American army and lost his life in that ser- 
vice. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mariah Springer, was also a 
native of New York. Their son, Frederick Bradt, became a carpenter and 
builder and followed that occupation in New York throughout his entire 
life. He was bom in Rotterdam, New York, in 1830, and after arriving 
at years of maturity wedded Christiana Sitterley, also a native of Rotter- 
dam. 

It was their son, Peter, who became the first husband of Mrs. Linn, their 
marriage occurring in 1855. Peter Bradt was a carpenter and church builder 
and was connected with the building interests of the Empire state until 1855, 
when he came to Illinois, locating in Morris, where he followed contracting 
until 1 86 1. In that year he enlisted in the three-months service as a member 
of Company C, Eleventh Illinois Infantry, and at the expiration of his term 
he re-enlisted, joining the "boys in lilue" of Company G, Thirty-sixth Regi- 
ment of Illinois Volunteers, and with that command he sen-ed until the 
close of the war and was then mustered out in the spring of 1865. At the 
battle of Murfreesboro he was wounded and taken prisoner, and on account 
of his health he was given leave by the Confederate commander to return 
to his home. As soon as he was able, however, he rejoined his regiment, 
and at the battle of Stone River he was again wounded and again taken pris- 
oner. The penalty of taking up arms again after once having been taken pris- 
oner and not lawfully exchanged was death, and Mr. Bradt, knowing this and 
not being certain as to whether he had been exchanged during the time that 
he was ill and at home, went to prison a second time, under the name of 
P. A. Johnson. He was sent to Libby prison and his nephew, Frederick 
Bradt, is in possession of the razor and shears to which he attributed the 
saving of his life, for he used them in tonsorial work during his incarceration 
and therebv made money enough to keep him from starving. His barber 
chair was formed from an old sugar iiogshead. Mr. Bradt remained in 
prison until the close of the war, when he was exchanged and with an hon- 
orable militar>' record returned to his home. He then resumed contracting 
and building, and the last church which he erected was the house of worship 



528 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

for the Methodists at Wauponsee. He died in December, 1873, leaving a 
son, Benjamin, who died the following year. The other son of the family, 
James, had passed away in 1864. 

In 1874 Mrs. Bradt was again married, becoming the wife of Alexander 
Linn, a son of Moses and Nancy (Spear) Linn, of Pennsylvania. His mother 
was an own cousin of James Buchanan. His father was born in Washing- 
ton county, Pennsylvania, August 7, 1823, and was reared on one of the 
finest farms in that section of the Keystone state. He received a good edu- 
cation in the schools of Pennsylvania and under the direction of his mother, 
who was at one time a teacher in Jefferson College. About 1868 he came 
to Illinois, locating on a farm in \Vauponsee township, which is now the 
home of Mrs. Linn, and there throughout the remainder of his life he carried 
on agricultural pursuits. He was one of the leading and influential citizens 
of the community, was a progressive farmer and accumulated considerable 
wealth before his death, which occurred in September, 1881. He left to 
his widow a handsome property. Their only child, Alexander, Jr., died at the 
age of four years. 

Mrs. Linn still resides at the old home and is the owner of one of the 
finest farms in Grundy county, and her possessions supply her with the 
comforts and many of the luxuries of life, and she enjoys the friendship of 
many of the best people of the community. After the death of her husband 
she rented her farm until 1888, when her nephew, Frederick Bradt, assumed 
its management. A year later he was joined in his work by his brother, 
Jerome Bradt. They were sons of Martin and Catharine (Wood) Bradt. 
They successfully engaged in general farming and stock-raising, relieving 
their aunt of all responsibility of the farm. But Jerome Bradt died ^larch 
28, 1900, at Morris, at the age of thirty-one years. At the time of his death 
her father was the proud possessor of the coat-of-arms of the original 
progenitor, Andrew Bradt, emblematic of his military career in Holland. 
This treasured heirloom is still in possession of the family of Martin Bradt. 



JOSEPH HUTCHINGS. 

In no part of our country has the self-made man been more in evidence 
or more influential upon the development of all the interests around him 
than in Illinois. Grundy county has, in all stages of its history, been bene- 
fited by numbering among her citizens many such men, and none of this class 
among the farmers of the county has made a more creditable record than the 
gentleman whose name constitutes the title of this article. 

Joseph Hutchings, Wauponsee, Grundy county, a substantial farmer 




^At^^, f%^y^^^^^2^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 529 

and representative citizen, was born at Ropsley, Lincolnshire, England. Oc- 
tober 26, 1827, a son of William and Mary (Rawlings) Hutchings. William 
Hutchings was born in Rutland, England, a son of John Hutchings, a 
farmer. \\'illiam Hutchings was always a farmer. He married, in Rops- 
ley, Mary Rawlings, a daughter of John and Mary Rawlings, and continued 
his residence at Ropsley. His children were William, Sarah, Mary Ann, 
Joseph. John, Edward, Frederick, Arthur and Elizabeth. William Hutch- 
ings and wife were both members of the Church of England. He died in 
England, October 12, 1859, aged about sixty-five years. He was a hard- 
working, industrious man. His children, except Frederick, Edward and 
Joseph, all remained in England. Joseph received but a limited education. 
Farming, however, he thoroughly learned, and he came to America when be- 
tween twenty-three and twenty-four years of age. Embarking at Liverpool, 
February 27, 1851, in the good ship Fides, a sailing vessel, he was seven 
weeks on the voyage to New York, where he arrived April 12 following, after 
a very stormy passage, in which the ship lost its rudder and drifted out of its 
course. He worked on a farm in the town of Rinebeck. on the Hudson 
river, that summer, and in the fall of 1851 went to western New York and 
worked on a farm sixteen miles west of Buffalo until November, 1855. when 
he came to Illinois, making the journey by rail. 

He was married in Buffalo. New York, November 4, 1855, to Bridget 
Clark, born December 25, 1823, in the parish of Drumard, Sligo county, 
Ireland, a daughter of James and Winifred (O'Dowd) Clark. The family 
of Qarks to which James Clark belonged have li\-ed in that part of Ireland for 
centuries. His wife was from the neighboring parish of Screen. 

James Clark and wife, who were the parents of two daughters, Mary 
and Bridget, were members of the Catholic church, and were respected for 
their uprightness and good character. Both died in Ireland. Bridget 
■Clark, then seventeen, left her native land in the summer of 1850. sailing from 
Sligo, Ireland, to Liverpool, England, and from Liverpool for Quebec, and 
was five weeks on the voyage. She went from Quebec to Montreal and 
thence to Buffalo, New York. Her sister Mary had come to America about 
three years before, and was living in New Jersey. They had an uncle, 
Dennis O'Dowd, living in Buffalo, with whom Bridget lived five years, until 
her marriage, at twenty-two years of age. 

After marriage Mr. and Mrs. Hutchings came to Grundy county and 
settled in Norman township, where he rented land of Marion Lloyd, a pio- 
neer of this county and a substantial farmer of Vienna township. Mr. 
Hutchings worked the farm on shares, saved his money, and in 1861 
bought eighty acres of his present farm, which was partly improved, but 
had no buildings. He prospered by enterprise and industry and added to 



530 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

his land until he now owns four hundred and forty acres of fine farm land, 
with excellent improvements. Mr. Hatchings and his wife both worked 
hard and with great diligence to gain their property. They built a two- 
story frame residence in 1886 and have built other substantial farm 
buildings, and they now have one of the best properties and most pleasant 
homesteads in Vienna township. Their children are Francis Marion, born- 
November 4, 1856; ]\Iary Elizabeth, born September 29, 1859; Margaret 
Winifred, born Februar\- 9, 1863. died December 6, 1881 ; John Joseph, born 
April 27, 1866; and James W'.. born February 2, 187 1. 

Mrs. Hutchings and their children are members of the Catholic church 
and Mr. Hutchings is an attendant upon its ser\-ices. In politics ]\Ir. Hutch- 
ings is a stanch Democrat. He has made his way to fortune by economy and 
strict attention to business, and through his busy career has been aided im- 
measurably by his faithful, prudent and energetic wife, who shared with 
him the hardships of a pioneer life with patience and cheerfulness. When 
they came to the county the country was new. There were few settlements, 
the land was unimproved, a good deal of it was submerged during the whole 
or a portion of the year, and malaria and consequent sickness could not be 
avoided. Facilities for trade and exchange were few and the settlers had to 
accommodate one another in many ways not dreamed of by residents in these 
days of development and general prosperity. The many friends of Mr. and 
Mrs. Hutchings rejoice that they have been spared to each other and to the 
community and to the peaceful and leisurely enjoyment of the fruits of their 
well-doing. 



'&• 



JOHN BOX.\R. 

Among the worthy citizens that Scotland has furnished to the new world 
is John Bonar, who is now successfully engaged in the clothing business in. 
Morris. He was born in Clackmannanshire, Scotland, August 30, 1842, 
and is a son of James and !Mary (Shepard) Bonar. representatives of old 
Scotch families. They lived and died in their native land, where the 
father engaged in coal-mining, being mine boss at one coal mine for twenty- 
one years. He died at the age of forty-eight, and his wife passed away at 
the age of sixty-seven. The}- were the parents of six sons and seven daugh- 
ters. 

John Bonar obtained a limited education in the land of his nativity 
and at the early age of nine years he began to earn his own hving, working 
in the coal mines. He followed that pursuit for some time, and before leav- 
ing Scotland he was married. In 1867. hoping to better his financial con- 
dition in the new world, he sailed to the United States, and on landing in- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 531 

New York made his way directly to Morris. He was identified with the 
coal-mining interests of this locality for about seventeen years and was then 
made mine inspector of Grundy county, holding the position for three years. 
At the expiration of that period he was appointed deputy sherifT, serving for 
four years under Sheriff John Schroder. In August, 1891, he entered 
the mercantile ranks and has since been engaged in the clothing business 
as the senior member of the firm of John Bonar & Son. They have a com- 
modious store, well stocked with a fine line of goods, and from the public 
are receiving a liberal patronage. 

]Mr. Bonar was married in Scotland in 1862 to Margaret Patterson, 
who also was of Scottish birth and ancestry. Three children were there born 
to them: Christina, who was married in 1887 to Henry [Matters and then 
removed to Nebraska, where she died in the first year of her married life; 
James B., who is the manager of Wile Brothers' clothing store in Morris; 
and Alexander, who is associated with his father in business. Nine months 
after his arrival in America Mr. Bonar sent for his wife and three children, 
and in this country eight children have been added to the family circle, but 
three of them are now deceased. The five still living are Jane, a teacher 
in Morris high school; John, Mary, Thomas and Nellie, who are yet at their 
parental home. 

In his political views Mr. Bonar is a stalwart Republican, and exercises 
his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the party and 
does all in his power to promote its growth and insure its success. Socially 
he is a representative of the Knights of Pythias fraternity. He and iiis 
wife are members of the Presbyterian church and the family are numbered 
among the most favorably known citizens of Morris. Mr. Bonar has justly 
won the proud title of a self-made man. He started out in life at a very 
tender age and in his youth experienced many hardships and difficulties, 
but he possessed strong determination and resolute purpose, which enabled 
him to overcome many of the obstacles in his path. His hope of more rap- 
idly acquiring a competence in America has been fully realized and he is 
accounted one of the substantial merchants of his adopted city. 



J. D. McKEEN. 



J. D. McKeen, a liveryman of Morris, Illinois, is among the younger 
representative business men of the town, and is a native son of Grundy 
county. 

^Ir. ]\IcKeen was born May 31, 1874, a son of Isaiah H. and Louisa 
(Hupp) McKeen, and a grandson of the pioneer James McKeen. James 



532 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

^IcKeen was a Pennsylvanian who came out to Illinois in the early history 
of this state, settled in Grundy county, and built the first house in Morris. 
He has long since passed away. His widow, now a venerable woman of 
ninety-six years, one of the oldest residents of the county, resides with her 
son Isaiah H. McKeen. Isaiah H. JMcKeen is one of the respected farmers 
of Erienna township, and with the exception of four years, when he was 
€ngag-ed in the livery business at Morris, his life has been devoted to agri- 
cultural pursuits. His wife was born in LaSalle county, this state, of wdiich 
place her parents were early settlers. 

In 1896, when Isaiah H. McKeen retired from the livery business and 
returned to his farm, he was succeeded in business by his son J. D., who has 
since conducted the establishment successfully. 

J. D. McKeen was married, February 26, 1896, to Miss Cora Matteson, 
daughter of Storey and Jennie Matteson, and they have two children — Jerald 
and Meta. 

Mr. McKeen has fraternal relations with the Knights of Pythias and 
the Modem Woodmen of America. 



WILLIAM D. LLOYD. 

For forty-three years William DeLand Lloyd has been a resident of 
Illinois and is numbered among the pioneer settlers of this section of the 
state, and has therefore witnessed much of the growth and development of 
Morris county and has ever borne his part in the work of progress. He has 
seen the wild lands transformed into beautiful homes and farms, while ham- 
lets have become cities and all the evidences of an advanced civilization have 
replaced the primitive forms of pioneer life. 

Mr. Lloyd was born on a farm in Oneida county. New York, March 
28, 1825, and is a son of William Rily and Lucy (DeLand) Lloyd. The father 
was bom in Massachusetts, April 15, 1798, and died in Kendall county, Illi- 
nois, February 16, 1876. On the 22d of October, 1823, he married Miss 
DeLand, whose birth occurred in Oneida county. New York, July 10, 1798, 
and who died in Chautauqua county, that state, June 10, 1832. The Lloyd 
family is of Welsh origin and at an early day was planted on American soil, 
since which time its representatives have resided in Massachusetts. Mrs. 
Lloyd was probably of French lineage. She died when her son William, her 
only child, was about seven years of age, and the father afterward married 
Elizabeth Ransom, by whom he had four sons, namely: Nelson R., a resi- 
dent of Chicago; Clinton R.. who died in Dakota in 1897; Henry Harrison, 
also of Chicago; and Cyrus B., a farmer of Kendall county, Illinois. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 533 

When William D. Lloyd was about a year old his parents removed to 
Chautauqua county, New York, where he spent his boyhood days upon a 
farm. At the age of fifteen he left the parental roof and from that time has 
been dependent upon his own resources. His educational privileges were 
limited and he had neither wealth nor influential friends to aid him. His 
wages, too, were given to his father until he was twenty-two years of age. 
His home was scarcely a pleasant place of residence to him after his father's 
second marriage, but his love for his parent was very strong, as is indicated 
by his bringing the money which he had earned to his father. He worked 
as a farm hand by the month for several years, and in 1853 resolved to 
carr}- on agricultural pursuits on his own account. Accordingly he pur- 
chased a iarm of two hundred and twenty acres, at twenty dollars per acre, 
but he went in debt for this, and later could not meet the payments; so he 
decided to try his fortune in the west. In the fall of 1856 he arrived in 
Illinois, locating in Kendall coimty, where for seven years he operated land 
on the shares. In the meantime he purchased eighty acres of land at thirty- 
five dollars per acre, and during the seven-years' period he not only cleared 
it of all indebtedness but also accumulated one thousand dollars additional. 
His life has been one of great industry, and he prosecuted his labors with 
unremitting diligence until about 1888, when he removed to Morris, where 
he has since lived retired. In his business dealings he was quite successful 
and a year after paying for his first eighty acres he purchased seventy-five 
acres, transforming the entire amount into a valuable farm which he recently 
sold for sixty-eight dollars per acre. He is now seventy-five years of age but 
still enjoys good health and has the figure of a man of much younger years. 
He is five feet nine inches in height and his average weight is about one 
hundred and sixty pounds, but at the present time he weighs two hundred 
pounds. 

On the 5th of January, 1853, Mr. Lloyd married Julia A. Abbott, a 
(laughter of Samuel W. and Ursula (Bryan) Abbott. Her father was born 
in Camden, Oneida county, New York, October 27, 1808, and died in Clin- 
ton, New York, December 28, 1892. He was the son of Nehemiah Ab- 
bott, who was born in Plymouth, Connecticut. Ursula Bryan was horn 
January 23, 1809, in Camden, Oneida county. New York, and her marriage 
occurred May 21, 1829. Her father was Benjamin Bryan, a native of 
\Vatertown, Connecticut. Since November, 1893, Mrs. Abbott has re- 
sided with her daughter, Mrs. Lloyd, and in her family were the following 
children: Rhoda A., Samuel T., Sophrona, Abigail, Ursula, Julian, John, 
Asahel and Roderick. By her marriage Mrs. Abbott became the mother of 
five children: Julia Atwater, born November 14, 1830; Sidney M., Newall 
J., Alary A. and Wayne G. The eldest son, Sidney ^l. Abbott, enlisted in 



534 BIOGRAPHICAL A.YD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

the Union army during the civil war and \vas killed in November, 1863, 
while making the ascent at Mission Ridge. Newall J. was also one of the 
loyal "boys in blue" and served throughout the struggle between the north 
and the south as a member of Company D, Tliirty-sixth Illinois Infantry. 
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd are Herbert W., who was born July 28, 
1859, and died September 11, 1863; Maynard W., who was born Septem- 
ber 18, 1862, and died September 28, 1863; Lucy DeLand, who was born 
November 8. 1864, and is the wife of Janies Hubbard, of Plattville, Ken- 
dall county, by whom she has five children: Ida Clayton, deceased; Arthur 
\\'., Myrtle D., Luella U. and Uriah. Elva Abbott Lloyd, who was born 
February 22, 1870, married G. W. Elerding, of Morris, by whom she has a 
son, Frank Abbott Elerding. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd are members of the Congregational church, and 
in his political faith Mr. Lloyd is Republican, but has never sought or desired 
office, his time and energies being devoted to his business interests, in which 
he has attained a creditable success. The record of such a man is well 
worthy of emulation and contains many valuable lessons which may be 
profitably followed. He has demonstrated the truth of the saying that suc- 
cess is not a matter of genius, but the reward of earnest labor directed or 
guided by practical common sense. He is now living retired in Morris, 
enjoying the fruits of his former toil and surrounded by his many friends, 
who esteem him highly for his sterling worth. 



SALEM IRONS. 



Some of the best blood in Illinois flows in the veins of Salem Irons, 
who is descended from emigrants and pioneers of the highest character and 
most edifying memory. He is one of Mazon township's well-to-do fanners 
and most highly respected citizens, and in his own life has to a degree re- 
peated the struggles and triumphs of his ancestors. All of his American 
progenitors were New England colonists, and the great Roger Williams 
himself contributed to the life current which animates his character. 

The remote founders of the Irons family came from England in the 
Puritan emigration to Massachusetts bay in the origin of that colony. The 
first of the name of whom there is any record was Matthew Irons, who 
married Annie Brown, of Boston, Massachusetts, and died in 1661. The 
following is the genealogy of the family: Samuel Irons, son of Matthew, 
was baptized November 25, 1650, married Sarah Belcher, September 13, 
1677, and died September 25, 1690. Sarah Belcher died August 26, 1693. 
Samuel Irons, born IMarch 17, 1680. married Sarah Whipple May 3, 1709, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 535 

3nd died September 30, 1720. Sarah married again and her second hus- 
band was Jolm Warner. Samuel Irons, born October 10, 1718, married, 
about 1740, Hannah Waterman, a daughter of Resolved and Mercy (Wil- 
liams) Watemian and a granddaughter of Roger Williams, and died No- 
vember 27, 1793. Hannah died July 13, 1806. The children of Samuel and 
Hannah Irons were born at the following dates: Samuel, May 22, 1740; 
Resolved, May 17, 1743; Sarah, October 24, 1745; Mercy, April 26, 1748; 
Stephen, May 23, 1751 ; Hannah, April 22, 1754; Samuel, February 16, 1757; 
Lydia, May 13, 1759, and Mary, July 31, 1763. Resolved married Amy 
Dexter and lived in Gloucester, Rhode Island. Sarah married an Aldrich. 
IVIercy married a Warner. Stephen married Sarah Tinkham, of Gloucester, 
Rhode Island. Hannah married Thomas Field, of Scituate, Rhode Island. 
Lydia married Thomas Whipple, of Providence, same state. Mary married 
Asa Steere, of Providence. 

Samuel Irons, born February 16, 1757, married Huldah Colwell, a 
daughter of Joseph and Amy Colwell. and they were the grandparents of 
the immediate subject of this sketch. Samuel died November 2, 181 5. 
Huldah died November 5, 1823. The children of Samuel and Huldah (Col- 
Avell) Irons were bom as follows: Candice, July 20, 1782; Amasa, Febru- 
ary 8, 1784; Amy, August 11. 1785; Lydia, October 21, 1787; Colwell, 
September 19, 1789; Betsy, July 25, 1791; James, July 16, 1793; Samuel, 
May 25, 1795: Nathan, May 19, 1797; Paris, October 16, 1799; and Huldah, 
Februar)' 3, 1802. The father of these children owned and lived on a farm 
in the town of Gloucester, Rhode Island, which remains in the ownership 
of the Irons family to this day. It is a good farm of two hundred acres, 
Avith excellent improvements. Huldah, the wife of Samuel Irons, was not 
only the granddaughter of Roger Williams but was also descended from 
Joshua Windsor, who- emigrated to America and settled in Providence in 
1638. 

James Irons, the father of Salem Irons, was born July 16, 1793, at 
the old homestead in Gloucester. He gained an old-fashioned New England 
common-school education and an intimate knowledge of farming, and mar- 
ried Phebe Steere, born in Gloucester, a daughter of Jeremiah and Phebe 
Steere. The Steeres were of English ancestr}' and old colonial settlers of 
Rhode Island. Jeremiah Steere was a substantial and respected farmer of 
Gloucester, where he died at an advanced age; and his children were Potter, 
Jeremiah, Miranda, Salinda, Asenath, Betsy and Mary. James Irons, after 
his marriage, settled in Charlton, Worcester county, Massachusetts, on a 
farm of one hundred and fifty acres which- he bought and on which he had 
a good home. Later he lived in Rhode Island. His children were William 
H., Salem, James, Sarah, John and Leander. In politics Mr. Irons was an 



536 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

original Republican, but was previously a Democrat. He was a man of ex- 
cellent constitution and of good habits, and well known for his honesty and 
integrity of character, and he reared excellent and respected children. 
When about seventy years of age he came to Illinois and made his home 
with his son Salem until he died, November 12, 1882, aged over eighty-nine 
years. 

Salem Irons was born November 18, 1824, at Charlton, Massachusetts. 
He received such a common-school education as was available in his day 
and was reared on the farm and learned the carpenter's trade in Rhode 
Island, where his father moved when Salem was about fifteen years old, 
and where the family lived many years. He was married in Killingly, 
Connecticut, July 5, 1846, to Harriet Yeaw, born in Scituate. Rhode Island, 
October 11, 1824, a daughter of Henry and Alma (Knight) Yeaw. The 
Yeaws were an old colonial family. Henry Yeaw was born at Scituate, a 
son of David Yeaw*, and was a stone and brick mason by trade, and passed 
all his days in Scituate. The children were Amasa. Harriet, Theophilus, 
Rufus. Henn.-, Mary A.. ]klaria. Alma and Albert, the last mentioned of 
whom died young. Henry Yeaw was in moderate circumstances, industri- 
ous, hard-working, and in every sense a good citizen, whose children were 
an honor to the community. He lived to be fifty-two years old and died at 
Scituate. 

After their marriage Mr. and ^Irs. Salem Irons li\-ed three years in Prov- 
idence, Rhode Island, where he followed carpentering. They then moved 
to Scituate, Rhode Island, and lived there one year and aftenvard lived a 
year on a farm at Gloucester. In March, 1853. they moved to Illinois, mak- 
ing the journey by steamer to New York city and thence by rail to Wheaton, 
DuPage county, Illinois, where Mr. Irons worked at carpentering for two 
years. They moved to ]Morris in 1855 and Mr. Irons did carpenter work 
there also. In 1857 they settled on their present farm, which then consisted 
of one hundred acres of fine farm land, for which Mr. Irons paid twenty-five 
dollars per acre, trading one hundred and sixty acres of Iowa land in the 
deal. The farm had but little improvement on it and Mr. Irons, by industn.- 
and thrift, gradually improved it. erecting excellent farm buildings, and now 
has one of the finest homesteads in this part of the county. The children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Irons were bom and named as follows : Henry Augustus, 
June 14, 1850; Phebe Maria. ^lav 4, 1855; and Clara Isabel, October 26, 
1858. 

In politics Mr. Irons is a stanch Republican and he has voted that 
ticket since the organization of the party. He is a public-spirited man, who 
favors good roads and all useful improvements. He has held the office of 
road commissioner for more than twenty years and has proved an et¥icient 




^/hJyL-eM^ (T(D. ^W^v^ 




y/k<eJ^u.hG^ At. ^iA^rtn/ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 537 

and capable official. Mr. Irons had three brothers in the great civil war, — 
William H., John and Leander. William H. and John were in the Thirty- 
sixth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and were in many battles, among 
them those at Stone River, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge and Resaca. They 
were in the Atlanta campaign and took part in engagements at Buzzards' 
Roost, Adairsville, New Hope Church, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain, Lost 
Mountain and Peach Tree Creek. Leander was the commissary sergeant 
of his company in the Seventy-sixth Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 
\\'hile in active service he was thrown from his horse and his leg was broken, 
and he was honorably discharged on account of this disability. 

Salem Irons has been a substantial citizen of this county for many years 
and is well known for sturdy industn', lionesty of purpose and high moral 
character. He is entirely a self-made man, having accumulated his property 
by his own exertions, and, aided by his faithful wife, has reared children of 
which they may well be proud. Now in his declining years he enjoys the 
peaceful and substantial rewaxd of well-doing and takes not a little pleasure 
in going, in memory, over the changing scenes of his long and busy life, 
which cover the period of our advancement from primitive conditions to 
the development of the end of the nineteenth century. 



SYLVESTER H. DEWEY. 

Sylvester H. Dewey is a representative of one of the pioneer families of 
Grundy county and is descended from sterling Puritan ancestry, of the same 
family to which belongs the famous Admiral Dewey. It is believed that 
the family is of French origin, tradition declaring that ancestors lived in 
Flanders and that the town of Douai, France, was named in their honor. 
When William the Conqueror journeyed into England he was accompanied 
by representatives of the name, who located in Lincolnshire, northeast of 
London. There is also a tradition that the family is of Welsh origin. In 
Burk's Heraldry, however, it is said that the name Dewey was originally De 
la Wey, and it is believed that the ancestors who went to England with 
William the Conqueror bore that name, which finally was changed to its 
present form, Dewey. 

The line of descent in America is easily traced back to Thomas Dewey, 
who sailed from Sandwich, England, and this fact leads to the further belief 
that he was of French Huguenot extraction. His descendants even in the 
second generation were millers, carpenters and millwrights. In the second 
generation the sons of Israel were weavers and tailors, which is strong evi- 
dence in support of the opinion. As a family the Deweys were sober, hon- 



538 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

est, industrious and long-lived people, and were ever in the van of progress, 
and were jjarticularly noted for their loyalty and bravery. ]\Iany repre- 
sentati\cs of the name served in the Revolutionar)' army and have been lead- 
ers in the work of settling the wild and unimproved regions of the west. At 
a later date many have attained prominence in professional life. Thomas 
Dewey, the founder of the branch in America to which our subject belongs, 
was a dissenter from the Church of England, and with the Puritans came 
to the colony of Massachusetts between the years 1630 and 1633. He first 
located in Dorchester, Massachusetts, where he was enrolled and took the 
oath of a freeman May 14, 1634. He owned land, a record of land granted 
to him being made February 28, 1640. His property comprised a tract of 
seven acres and additional lots, and to these he added by purchase. He died 
intestate, and an inventory of his estate is given in the genealogy of the 
Dewey family. He was married ]March 22, 1639, at Windsor, Connecticut, 
to Frances, widow of Joseph Clark, and after his death Mrs. Dewey was 
married again, her third husband being George Philips. Their children 
were: Thomas E., born February 16, 1640; Josiah, who was baptized Oc- 
tober 10, 1641; Anna, who was baptized October 15, 1643; Israel, bom Sep- 
tember 25, 1645; and Jedediah, boni December 15, 1647. The children were 
all born in Windsor, Connecticut, and all were married. 

Thomas Dewey, the representative of the second generation in direct 
line to our subject, was born in Windsor, Connecticut, December 16, 1640, 
and died April 27, 1690, at the age of fifty years. He was a miller and fanner 
in Little River district, and resided at Windsor, Connecticut, as late as Jan- 
uary 8, 1660. As he had there paid six shillings he was seated in the long 
seats in the meeting-house. According to the old records he removed to 
Northampton, Massachusetts, where, on the 12th of November, 1662, he 
was granted a home lot of four acres upon the condition that he make im- 
provements upon it within a year. He was also granted another tract of 
twelve acres in the same place, and at his new home he engaged in the milling 
"business. In August, 1666, he removed to Waranock, then a part of Spring- 
field, where he was a landholder and one of the leading citizens. He was 
instrumental in building a dam and mill at that place and took an active 
part in public affairs. He served as a cornet in a New Hampshire troop, 
was a representative to Boston in 1677-9 and a selectman from 1677 to 1686. 
He was also licensed by the court to keep a public house or hotel. At Dor- 
chester, Massachusetts, he married Constance Hawes, daughter of Richard 
and Ann Hawes, who came to Massachusetts in the ship Freelove, under 
command of Captain Gibbs, in 1635. The children of Thomas and Ann 
(Hawes) Dewey were: Thomas E., born at Northampton, Massachusetts, 
March 26, 1664; Adijah, born at Northampton, March 5. 1666; Mary, born 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 539 

at Northampton, January 28, 1668; Samuel, born June 25, 1670, in W^est- 
field, Massachusetts; Hannah, born in Westfield, Fel^niary 21, 1672; Eliza- 
beth, born in Westfield, January 16, 1676, and died February 27, 1682: 
James, born in Westfield, July 3, 1678: Abigail, born in \\'estfield, February 
14, 1681; James, born November 12, 1683, and died May 5, 1686; and Israel, 
born in Westfield, July 9, 1686. 

Captain Adijah Dewey, the son of Thomas Dewey, 2d, was born at 
Northampton, Massachusetts, March 5, 1666, and died March 24, 1742, in 
W'estfield, at the age of seventy-six years. He was a very influential man 
of that locality, as is shown by various town records. He was a surveyor 
of the bridge at Millbrook, county surveyor in 1693, constable in 1697 and 
tithing man in 1702. He commanded a company of fifty men in Hampshire 
county, Massachusetts, and saw eight weeks' service, being ordered to the 
relief of Deerfield and other towns. From 1730 until 1740 he filled the 
ofifice of selectman. He was married in 1688 to Sarah, a daughter of John 
and Mary (Ashley) Root, and his children were: Thomas, who was born 
January 9, 1691; Adijah, September 30, 1693: Sarah, March 17, 
1696; Esther, January 20, 1698; Mary, September 18, 1701; Abi- 
gail, January 28, 1703; Bethiah, August 11, 1706; Ann, March 22, 1719; 
and Moses, January 6, 171 5. All w-ere married. 

Adijah Dewey, son of Captain Adijah Dewey, was born in Westfield, 
Massachusetts, September 30, 1693, and died there January 31, 1753, at 
the age of fifty-nine years. He was a saddler by trade. On the nth of 
January, 1733, he wedded Mercy Ashley, a daughter of David and Mary 
(Dewey) Ashley, and their children are: Ashbel, born April 23, 1734; 
Medad, November 18, 1736; Bethiah, September 22, 1739; Mercy, born 
April II, 1743, and died December 28, 1764, at the age of twenty-one; and 
Hadley, who was married in 1761 to Stephen Goodman. 

Medad Dewey, son of Adijah Dewey, 2d, was born November 18, 1736,. 
in Westfield, Massachusetts, and there died December 31, 1760, in the 
twenty-fifth year of his age. He was a farmer, and in 1751 he settled a 
few miles south of Westfield, on a place owned by Charles Dewey. He 
was married December 8, 1738, to Elizabeth Noble, a daughter of Thomas 
and Sarah (Root) Noble. They had two children : Solomon, who was 
born November 7, 1758; and Medad. 

Medad Dewey, son of Medad Dewey, Sr., was born in Westfield, De- 
cember 20, 1760, and died April 15, 1849, at Leyden, New York, wdien 
nearly ninety years of age. He followed farming in Little River district, 
near Westfield, and in 1800 removed with his family to the Mohawk valley, 
arriving in Leyden, New York, after a journey of two weeks. His goods 
were hauled on an ox sled. He was one of the patriots of the Revolution, 



540 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

serving as a private in the command of Captain Preserved Leonards and 
Colonel Elijah Porter, and was in the defense of New London, Connecti- 
cut, when it was attacked by the British army commanded by Benedict 
Arnold. He married Tryphena Roberts, who was born in 1769, of Welsh 
parentage, and died in Leyden, New York, January, 1839, at the age of 
seventy years. Their children, born in Westfield, Massachusetts, were: 
Bethiah, born November 19, 1789; Elizabeth, August i, 1791: Almira, 
August II, 1793; Harvey, February 17, 1795; and Edmund, Octoljer 14, 
1799; and in Leyden, New York, Lemuel, in October, 1804. 

Harvey Dewey, a son of Medad Dewey, 2d, and the father of our sub- 
ject, was born in Westfield, Massachusetts, February 17, 1795, and died 
July 17, 1876, at the age of eighty-one years. He was only five years old 
when his parents removed to Leyden, New York. He made farming his 
life work and became the possessor of his father's old homestead, to which 
he added until he owned two hundred and forty acres, becoming one of the 
prosperous men, as well as one of the influential citizens, of his day. For 
several years he was assessor of Leyden, and for many years he served as a 
deacon in the Boonville Baptist church. He became a soldier in the war 
of 1812. and was in the action at Sackett's Harb.or. About 1820 he mar- 
ried Jerusha Jenks, a daughter of Joel and Lucy (Holbrook) Jenks. She 
was born in Leyden, New York, June 27, 1803, and there died June 14, 
1873, when nearly seventy years of age. Their children were: Sylvester 
Harvey, born August 14, 1821; Lester Scott, March 2y, 1823; Samantha, 
March 26, 1825; Alexander, August 16, 1828; Chester Gay. February 2, 
1831 ; Eli Judson, July 17, 1835; Angeline Lodice, January 4, 1839: Madison 
Medad, who was born January 30, 1843, and died February 12, 1848: Cassius 
Delos, who was born November 2, 1845; ^"d Caius Carlos, born on the same 
day, a twin brother of Cassius Delos, The family has always been celebrated 
^for its marked loyalty and valor, and both Cassius and Caius were soldiers 
in the civil war. The latter, who was a fifer of Company L One Hundred 
and Seventeenth New York Infantry, died September 11. 1863, at the age 
of seventeen years, his death occurring at Foley island, Charleston harbor, 
from fever brought on by exposure in the long march. Two of Samantha's 
sons, Walter and Marius, were also numbered among the "boys in blue," 
and three of the sons of Lemuel Dewey were soldiers in that war. 

Sylvester Han-ey Dewey was born at Leyden, New York, August 14, 
182 1. He received the usual common-school education and afterward at- 
tended an academy at Lowville for one and a half terms. Subsequently 
he spent a year in the Freewill Baptist Seminary, in Clinton, and his studious 
habits and close application gained him broad general knowledge. His in- 
terest in educational matters, his extensive reading and his experience in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 541 

practical affairs of life have greatly added to his wisdom, and he is to-day one 
of the best informed men of the county. For a number of years in early life he 
engaged in teaching, entering upon that work in Lewis county, New York. 
After coming to Illinois he taught for two winters, and during the civil war 
he spent three winters as an instructor in the school-room. He had the 
ability to impart clearly and concisely to others the knowledge that he had 
acquired and was numbered among the leading educators of that time. 

While in his native town Mr. Dewey was married, December 30, 1847, 
to Melissa Porter, who died February 19, 1849, at about the age of twenty- 
four years. Mr. Dewey was aftenvard married, on the 28th day of May, 
185 1, to Melissa A. Fisk, of Boonville, New York, a daughter of James 
and Eleanor (Pitcher) Fisk. She was born November 23, 1828, in Boon- 
ville, New York. Her father, James Fisk, was born in Scituate, Rhode 
Island, his father being Job Fisk. The Fisks were of English descent, the 
family having been founded in Rhode Island prior to the Revolutionary 
war. Job Fisk made farming his life work and he was married in early 
manhood. His children were : Jemimah, James, Thomas, Althea, Job and 
Rebecca. The father of these children died at the home of his son James in 
Boonville. 

James Fisk, the father of Mrs. Dewey, was born in Scituate, Rhode 
Island, February 3, 177 1- He was married December 25, 1800, to Rhobe 
Leach, who was born December 25, 1781. She died April 18, 1802, leav- 
ing a daughter Rhobe, who was born March 11, 1802, was married in 1818 
■and died in November, 1824. After the death of his first wife James Fisk 
was married, in 1803, to Frances (Blackmore) Leach, who was l:)orn in 1786. 
Their children were: John Leach, who was born January 9, 1804, was 
married February 6, 1825, and died in March, 1867. Elvira, who was born 
November 6, 1805, was married January 23, 1825, to Noah Nelson, and died 
August 12, 1870. Charles Blackmore, born September i, 1806, died at 
Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, in 1876; and Louisa, born September 19. 1808, 
was married March 11, 1827, to Erastus Franklin. In 1813 James Fisk was 
a third time married, his union being with Eleanor Pitcher, who was born 
February 2, 1795, and died January 15, 1849. Her father, Daniel Pitcher, 
was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, January 30, 1762, and died April 
18, 1844. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Eleanor Burt, was born 
in South Springfield, Massachusetts, October 20, 1762, and died October 
20, 1849. Their children were: Elijah, who was born March 11, 1787, and 
died January 9, 1842; Chloe, who was born October 30, 1787, and died July 
31, 1863; Clarissa, who was born September 3, 1790, and died March 6, 1859; 
Daniel, who was born February 18, 1792, and died May 7, 1854; Noah, 
Avho was born June 12, 1793, and died November 24, 1874; Eleanor, wife 



542 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

of Mr. Fisk, was born February 2, 1795, and died January 15, 1844: Aruna, 
who was born June 11, 1796, and died December 2/, 1871; Achsah, who 
was born June 27, 1798, and died July 3. 1878: Betliuel, who was born March 
II, 1800, and died February 17, 1848; Conklin. who was born October 27, 
1801. and died May 8, 1875; Samuel, who was born December 30, 1803, 
and died April 30, 1804; and Spencer, who was born July 20, 1805, and died 
April II, 1877. Daniel Pitcher, the father of these children, was a resident 
of Westiield, Massachusetts, and a farmer and landholder. His life was an 
industrious and upright one, and he was highly respected by all who knew 
him. 

In the year 1803 James Fisk had removed from Rhode Island to Boon- 
ville, Oneida county. New York, making the journey with an ox sled, and 
spending between four and five weeks on the way. He settled on new land 
in the midst of the forest, and made there a good home. It was after his ar- 
rival in Xew York that he was a third time married, Eleanor Pitcher be- 
coming his wife. The children of their union were : Chloe, who was born 
February 6, 1814, and was married in 1835 to Fordice ]\I. Rogers, her death 
occurring ]\Iay 22. 1859: James, born January 13, 1816, married Barbara 
Belanger, and after her death was married to Betsey Pool, on the 15th of 
Januan,-, 1845, his death occurring April 9, 1849; Rebecca Ruth, born July 
5, 1818, was married in January, 1838, to Benjamin Nelson, and died April 
29, 1847; Job W., born October 4. 1819, was married to Emily H. Pitcher, 
and after her death wedded Sarah E. Pitcher; Achsah O., born October 15, 
1821, was married in January, 1841, to Horace Pitcher, who died May 27, 
1844, and she afterward wedded Stephen Murphy, whose death occurred in 
April. 1885. while she survived until June 30, 1899; Elijah Pitcher, born Sep- 
tember 20. 1823, was married February 28, 1865. to Harriette P. Jackson, 
who died August i, 1898. and he passed away January 15. 1890: Jeremiah, 
born September 17, 1825. was married June 8, 1852, to ]\Iargaret Comstock, 
and died December 26, 1878, his wife's death occurring April 8, 1867; 
Melissa A., bom November 23, 1828, is the wife of Sylvester H. Dewey, 
whose name begins this review, and Milton Eri, Ijorn December 3, 1830. was 
married September 17, i860, to Anna S. TratTurn, and died June 9, 1876. 

After his marriage Sylvester H. Dewey, whose name heads this sketch, 
located on a partly improved farm of two hundred acres three miles west 
of Boonville, New York. About four years later he sold that property and 
in 1855 came by rail to Illinois, leaving home on the 15th of June. He 
also visited Wisconsin and then returned to New York, and in October of 
the same year lirought his family to this state, reaching his destination on 
the 27th of October. He purchased eighty acres of land where Verona 
now stands, paying four hundred and fifty dollars for the same. It was a 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 543- 

wild tract, but with characteristic energy he began its cultivation and erected 
f^ood buildings thereon. After living on his farm for four years he removed 
to Mazon township and purchased two hundred and twenty acres, which he 
placed under a high state of cultivation. He has prospered, as a result of un- 
tiring industry, economy and capable management, and as his financial 
resources have increased he has extended the boundaries of his farm until it 
comprises five hundred and forty acres. He was actively identified with' 
agricultural interests until 1873, when he removed to ]Morris and engaged in 
the agricultural implement and grain business. There he remained for four 
years, after which he returned to the home farm, but two years later he re- 
moved to the village of Mazon and once more began dealing in agricultural 
implements and grain. He has always been a very energetic and active 
business man and has handled farming land quite extensively. He now has 
a ven,' liberal patronage and makes extensive deals in both branches of his 
business. He has always been noted for his straightforward and honorable 
course in life, and his integrity in all trade transactions is above question. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Dewey have been born the following children: 
Ellen Melissa, born in Leyden, New York, May 30, 1852, was married in 
Morris, Illinois, November 26, 1874. to Horace H. Overocker, whose birth 
occurred in Oneida county. New York, September 28, 1849. They had one 
child. Burton H., who was born in Mazon, December 16, 1865. He was 
married in his native town, on the ist of June, 1897, to Ivy Rigall, whose 
birth occurred in Mazon, June 15, 1879, and by whom he has two children, 
Vernon, born December 19, 1897; and Veda Overocker, who was born in 
Mazon, December 27, 1898. 

Alice Eliza Dewey, the second child of Sylvester and ]\Ielissa Dewey, 
was born in Leyden, February 8, 1854, and was married in Mazon, Decem- 
ber 12, 1878, to Daniel Webster Francis, whose birth occurred in Chester 
county, Pennsylvania, December 12, 1848. Their children are: Arthur 
D., born in Cedar Springs, Michigan, April 24, 1880; Laura D., born Au- 
gust 18, 1 88 1, in Mazon; Myrtle D., born in Mazon. March 28, 1883; and 
Harry D., born in Mazon. January 13. 1883. 

Milton Sylvester Dewey. 3d, was born in Leyden, New York, June i, 
1855. He was married in Wauponsee, February 2y, 1878. to Margaret 
Dewey, who was born in Washington county. New York, March 16, 1858. 
Their children are: Sarah Melissa, born in Mazon, December 7, 1879; 
Henry Eugene, in Mazon, September 2. 1882; Mable, in Mazon, November 
9, 1884: Flora Mary, June 28, 1886; William Arthur, ]\Iay 30, 1S8S; Alice 
Estella, February 21. 1892: and Ernest Albert, January 15, 1896. 

Mary Jerusha, the fourth of the family, was born in \'ienna. Illinois, 
May 15. 1857. and was graduated in the Morris Normal and Scientific 



544 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

School, June i6, 1881. Lester Scott, born in Vienna, December 6, 1859, 
was married in Morris, Illinois, December 31, 1879, to Asenath Eudora 
Smith, whose birth occurred April 11, 1861. Their children are: Jessie, 
born in Mazon, October 5, 1880: Charles, born in Mazon, November 6, 
1881; Walter, born in Bentora, Nebraska, April 28, 1883; and Flora May, 
born in Bentora, December 18, 1884. Flora Angelina, the youngest mem- 
ber of the Dewey family, was born in Mazon, August 21, 1863, and was 
graduated in the Morris Normal and Scientific School on the i6th of June, 
188 1. The two youngest children are both deceased. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Dewey, whose name introduces this re- 
view, was formerly an Abolitionist and voted for John P. Hale, the first 
Abolition candidate for the presidency. When the Republican party was 
formed to prevent the further extension of slavery he joined its ranks, sup- 
porting John C. Fremont and Abraham Lincoln. He has always been a 
strong advocate of the cause of temperance, and was one of the organizers 
of the Prohibition party in Grundy county. He voted for William J. Bryan 
and free silver in 1896, but otherwise supported the candidates of the Pro- 
hibition party. He is one of the valued and esteemed residents of Grundy 
county. In an early day he served as the clerk of Vienna township and 
as the supervisor, and for many years was the supervisor of Mazon town- 
ship. In 1872 he was elected a member of the state board of equalization, 
and during his four years' service proved an efficient and capable member 
of the board. He was the chairman of one of the principal committees con- 
trolling its laws in the division which included Chicago. He was also a 
member of the committee on tangible taxable property of railroads, and at 
an early day he served as the chairman of the Republican congressional 
district for two years. He is a man of strong mentality, who has made a close 
and thorough study of economical, political and governmental problems. 
He has also been an extensive reader and is very familiar with historical 
and standard works of the best current literature. In early life he took a 
very active interest in promoting literary lyceums and debating societies, 
and was a member of several of those organizations. While in Morris he 
served as president of the Public Library Association, and at all times he 
has endeavored to promote the intellectual welfare of his community. His 
wife is a very prominent member of the Woman's Christian Temperance 
Union of Mazon and one of its efficient workers, having filled the office of 
president for some time. Both Mr. and Mrs. Dewey were for many years 
members of the Baptist church. He joined the church in Boonville, New 
York, when about sixteen years of age. and later served as the superin- 
tendent of the Sunday-school. His wife joined the church when about 
twentv-tliree years of age, and they were both active workers in the organi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 545 

zation, ]\Irs. Dewey serving as teacher during- the superintendency of her 
husband. Tliey liave botli become much more liberal in their religious 
views, their opinions on such questions being in harmony with the Unitarian 
doctrine. About 1866 Mrs. Dewey and her oldest girls, Ellen M. and 
Alice E., joined the Baptist church in Morris. They took their letters 
when they wished to join elsewhere, Mrs. Dewey hers when the family 
moved back to their old home in Mazon in 1877. There is no Baptist church 
in ]\Iazon, so Mrs. Dewey has attended the Methodist Episcopal church since 
the family moved to the village of Mazon, in IMarch, 1880. They con- 
tribute liberally to all movements which are calculated to advance human- 
itarian principles and which will prove a benefit to the intellectual, social 
and moral welfare of the community. 



THOMAS CARSON. 



It has surely been not uninteresting to observe, in the series of bio- 
graphical sketches appearing in this volume, the varying nationality, origin 
and early environments of men who have made their way to positions of 
prominence and success. In no better way can we gain a conception of 
the diverse elements which have entered into our social, professional and 
commercial life, and which were imparted to the future American type, 
features which cannot be conjectured at the present time. Scotland has 
furnished her quota of men of worth who have contributed to the improve- 
ment and development of the country, becoming reliable and trustworthy 
citizens. Of this number Mr. Carson is a representative. 

He was born in the land of hills and heather. February 9, 1827, his 
parents being William and Grace (Maxwell) Carson. The father was a 
coal operator and for many years engaged in mining, spending his entire 
life in the land of his nativity. He was twice married, and the children of 
the first union were John, who died in Cincinnati, Ohio; David, who died in 
Scotland; Robert, who died in Iroquois county, Illinois; William, who died 
in Scotland; Elizabeth and Grace, who passed away in Scotland; James, 
whose death occurred in Virginia; Man*-, twin sister o£ our subject, now re- 
siding in Scotland; and Bryce, who makes his home in Virginia. After 
the death of his first wife the father was again married, and by the second 
union had a son. Alexander, who also died in Scotland. 

In early life Thomas Carson, of this review, engaged in mining, and 
was also employed as an engineer. In 1851. when twenty-four years of age, 
he came to the United States and making his way to Cincinnati secured 
employment in the water-works there. Later he worked in the new court- 



546 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

house in Cincinnati, his task being to pnncli and prepare the iron used in the 
construction of the building. Subsequently he removed to a little town 
near Youngstown. Ohio, where he was employed in an iron smelter. 

Mr. Carson first visited Morris in 1856, but afterward returned to 
Youngstown. and in 1857 again came to Morris, where he has since made 
his home. Here he became interested in coal-mining, operating the mines 
under a lease for several years. In 1861 he was married, and soon afterward 
he and his wife opened a hotel near the depot known as the Carson House. 
This they successfully conducted for more than thirty years, and their un- 
tiring industry and capable management brought them prosperity. lu 
his mining operations Mr. Carson was also successful, and about ten years 
ago, placing the hotel in charge of his son-in-law. William R. Allan, he re- 
tired from active business life to enjoy through his remaining days the rest 
which he has so tn.ily earned. 

Mrs. Carson bore the maiden name of Jane Sharp. She. too. was a 
native of Scotland, born ^lay 26. 1826. Her parents. William and Janet 
(Banks) Sharp, spent their entire lives in Scotland. She was married, in 
that country, to Andrew Patrick, and in 1849 they came to the United 
States. Soon after estabhshing their home in ^lorris ^Ir. Patrick died. 
There was one child born of that union, a daughter, Janet B.. now the wife 
of William Allan, the proprietor of the Carson House. 

In politics ]\Ir. Carson is a stanch Republican and has frequently been 
selected for important offices, but has always declined, preferring to devote 
his time and energies to the business interests. His wife belongs to the 
Presbyterian church, which they both attend regularly, contributing liberally 
to its support. Mr. Carson started out in life a poor man. but with the 
assistance of his estimable wife, who has indeed proved a helpmeet to him, 
he has steadily worked his way upward to a position of affluence. His busi- 
ness interests enabled him to form a wide acquaintance, with which his 
circle of friends is almost co-extensive. In manner genial, in disposition 
kindlv, he won the regard of all with whom he came in contact and as a rep- 
resentative citizen of Morris he well deserves mention in this volume. 



ALFRED MITTIXG. 



The prosperity of a community depends upon its commercial interests, 
and the representative men of a town are those who are foremost in pro- 
moting its business affairs. Their energy and enterprise not only brings to 
them individual success but also enhances the general welfare, and thus 
thev mav be termed public benefactors. There are in all communities 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 547 

certain business interests which are not only a credit to the town but are 
also a matter of pride to its citizens, and such a one is that now controlled 
by Mr. Mitting, the well-known secretary and business manager of the 
Morris Floral Company. He first came to this city in 1876, and established 
his permanent residence here in 1893. 

He was born in Tunbridge Wells, Kent county, England, March 4, 
1858, and his parents, Robert and Lydia (Piper) Mitting, were both repre- 
sentatives of old English families. For many years his father has been en- 
gaged in flower culture, and at this writing, in 1900, is numbered among 
the leading florists of Ashurst, Kent, England. Thus in early life our 
subject became familiar with the business, gaining a thorough practical 
knowledge of the best methods of cultivation of plants. His ability in this 
tlirection lias been the means of bringing to the Morris Floral Company 
the splendid success which has attended their enterprise. The school privil- 
eges which Mr. flitting received in his youth were \ery limited, but to the 
knowledge gained in the school-room he has added by reading, observation 
and experience till he is now a well informed man. He was trained to habits- 
of industry, economy and perseverance, and the development of such traits 
in his character have made him a splendid business man and have enabled 
him to successfully carry forward the \'arious business undertakings with 
which he has been connected. 

\t the age of eighteen years Mr. IMitting came to America, at which 
time his uncle, Moses Britt, was residing upon a farm near Morris. Mak- 
ing his way to Grundy county he worked upon his uncle's farm for two 
years and then entered the employ of the late Judge Hopkins as a gardener 
and coachman. In August, 1879, he sustained a sunstroke and his health 
being- thereby impaired he returned to England, where he remained till 
1 88 1. However, he had become greatly attached to the United States, and 
believing that this country afforded better opportunities than the Old 
World he once more boarded a western-bound steamer that brought him 
to American shores. After annving in Morris he rented land of his uncle 
and engaged in gardening for one season. Through the succeeding two 
years he carried on general farming on rented land near Morris, and then 
spent four years in a flouring-mill in Newton, Kansas. At the expiration 
of that period he returned to Morris, where he engaged in farming on 
rented land through several summer seasons, while in the winter months 
he worked in flouring mills in Independence, Missouri ; Kewatwen, Canada ; 
Galveston, Texas; and Muskegon and Howland, Michigan. 

On the 4th of March, 1893, he became a permanent resident of Morris. 
and since that year has been identified with the floral interests of this citv. 
On the 7tli of August the Morris Floral Company was organized bv A. 



548 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXP.ALOCICAL RECORD. 

Mitting, S. M. Underwood, C. D. Britt and Anna Goodenougli. Tliey began 
business on Canal street within the Hmits of the city and from the first success 
attended their enterprise. In April. 1897, the capital stock of the company- 
was increased from one thousand and fifty dollars to fifteen thousand dollars, 
and six acres of land were purchased just east of the city limits, whereon a 
larger plant has been constructed consisting of a splendid greenhouse, with 
twenty thousand sc^uare feet under glass and well arranged rooms for office, 
storage and packing purposes. On the east side is a boiler-house, a brick 
building twenty-eight by thirty-five feet, equipped with two large boilers 
to heat the plant. Over ten thousand feet of pipe conveys the steam to the 
different departments, and a fine artesian well supplies the water for the 
plant, while in addition there are two large cisterns containing the rain- 
water from the roofs. A fine fish-pond has been arranged on the grounds 
and is supplied with water from the overflow of the well and cisterns. Grav- 
eled driveways have been constructed, and the entire plant is a model of its 
kind, being perfect in every department. Mr. Underwood is the president 
and treasurer of the company, while Mr. Mitting is secretary and manager. 
The latter is not only an excellent florist but is also a practica' business 
man, and under his direction the company has enjoyed a steady increase of 
business from the beginning. They supply the city retail demands, but out- 
side of Morris sell only to^ the wholesale trade, the yearly output being 
about one million plants, which are purchased by florists throughout the 
United States and Canada, and the company sustains a most enviable reputa- 
tion on account of its reHability and the hardiness and excellent condition 
of the plants. 

In 1890 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Mitting and Miss Ellen 
Griggs, a daughter of Jacob Griggs, one of the pioneer settlers of Morris. 
They now liave one child, Ernest De Roo. 

Mr. Mitting's hope of benefiting his financial condition in the New 
World has been more than realized, for he has not only secured a good 
living but has also acquired a handsome competence that numbers him 
among the substantial citizens of Morris. It is always a matter of satisfaction 
to know that success follows such honorable efforts as he has put forth, 
and to record the history of one whose example may well lie followed by the 
younger generation. 



ALBERT H. HOLDERMAN. 

For more than ten years the subject of this sketch. Albert H. Holder- 
man, has been one of the sulistantial and respected citizens of the town of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 549 

Morris, Illinois, he ha\ing- moved here in 1888 from his farm a few miles 
distant. 

Mr. Holderman is a nati\e of LaSalle county, Illinois, ha\ing been 
born near Seneca, April 19, 1856, and is a son of Abram and Mary E. (Hoge) 
Holderman. During his childhood his parents removed to Erienna town- 
ship, Grundy county, and his boyhood days were passed on his father's farm, 
his educational advantages being limited to the country schools. Farming 
has been his life occupation, lie is the owner of considerable land, and 
resided on his farm until his removal to Morris, as above stated. 

Mr. Holderman was married in 1884 to Miss Jennie Newport, a (laugh- 
ter of Addison and Julia (Nelson) Newport. Their union has been blessed in 
the birtii of two children, — Charie and Ray, aged respectively thirteen and 
ten years. 

The Republican party has received Mr. Holderman's support since he 
became a voter. He is, however, in no sense of the word a politician. 



LEWIS SEEGAR. 



Lewis Seegar, one of the prominent farmers of Good Farm township, 
Grundy county, Illinois, enjoys the distinction of having been one of those 
patriotic German-born citizens of the United States who at the time of our 
civil war risked his life in defense of the flag of his adopted country. The 
same warm, stirring Gemian blood that made him a successful pioneer in a 
foreign land made him a good soldier, and it has animated him for a life 
struggle which has resulted in honor and good fortune. 

Born in the village of Schimmershausen, Hesse-Cassel, August 27, 1838, 
he is a son of Henry Seegar, a native of Hesse-Cassel, who owned a farm of 
one hundred acres in Germany and was otherwise a well-to-do man. Henry 
Seegar was married twice, first to a Miss Plighing, who was the mother of 
five children : August, Annie, Lewis, Charles and Lizzie. Charles and 
Lizzie died young. Mrs. Seegar died in Gemiany, in 1841, when Lewis 
was Ijut three years old. For his second wife Mr. Seegar married Elizabeth 
Hildebrand, who bore him children named Lizzie, Minnie, Philip and Will- 
iam. Mr. Seegar, who was a lifelong meml)er of the Reformed church, 
was a son of Lndwig Seegar, a farmer who owned the Seegar home farm 
in Germany, which he bought witli his owm earnings, having been left with 
but one dollar as an inheritance. Henry Seegar, the father of Lewis, was 
pretty well educated, and in recognition of his excellent judgment he was 
made a magistrate. He came to America in 1856, bringing his family with 
liim. They sailed from Bremen Haven about the middle of May, and 



550 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

landed in New York. July 4. They came by rail to Joliet and Mr. Seegar 
made the journey on foot to Kankakee county, Illinois, to see Mr. Shafer. 
an old friend, who lived there. .Mr. Seegar bought one hundred and sixty 
acres of wild prairie land near Norton, but lived on it only a few years, set- 
tling later in Franklin county, Iowa, on one hundred and sixty acres of land 
which he improved, and lived upon until his death, which occurred ten 
years later, about 1880, when lie was aged about seventy-five years. He 
was a hard-working, enterprising, straightforward man. a Republican in 
politics, and in every sense of the term a good citizen. He had two sons in 
the federal arm_\- in our great war of the states, — Lewis and August, both in 
Company I, Seventy-sixth Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Au- 
gust served three years and was in all the battles of his regiment. 

Lewis Seegar was brought up on a fami in Germany and was nineteen 
years of age when he came to America with his father, and has many inter- 
esting reminiscences of the journey. He found employment at farm work 
at Norton, Kankakee county, Illinois, for \Mlliam L'nz, with whom he re- 
mained five years. He enlisted for service in the L'nited States Army at 
Kankakee, Illinois, and was enrolled January 29, 1864, as private of Com- 
pany I, Seventy-sixth Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry, for three 
years or during the war, and was honorably discharged August 18, 1865, 
at St. Louis, Missouri. He saw service in \'irginia. Louisiana, Florida and 
Alabama, and took part in the fightin.g at \'icksburg. previous to its sur- 
render, July 4. 1863. Champion Hills, Jackson's Cross Roads. Mississippi, 
Blakely, Alabama, and Port Hudson, Louisiana, July 8, 1863. He was 
twice grazed by bullets. — by one across the face, and another tore the cloth- 
ing over his stomach, at the battle of Jackson's Cross Roads. Mr. Seegar 
was always an active soldier and was in all the campaigns, marches, battles 
and skirmishes of his regiment vrhile in the service. He was sick with fever 
in the hospital at St. Louis for three weeks. After the war he returned to 
Kankakee county and fanned for himself for one year. 

I\Ir. Seegar married, December 28, 1867, in Good Farm township, 
Margaret Haag, the widow of George Haag, nee Margaret Mier, born ]\Iay 
25, 1836, at \\'alkersdorf, Bion. Germany. Mrs. Seegar came to America in 
1852 with her mother. ]\Irs. Barbara ISIier, and her sister Lena, who later 
married Henry Numan, a substantial farmer of Grundy county. They sailed 
from Havre, France, in the good ship Barbara Morris, and were six weeks 
on the voyage to New York, from which city they came directly to Grundy 
county, Illinois. When Barbara was nineteen years old, in 1S55, she mar- 
ried George Haag and they had children named Mar\% Lena, Amelia, Fritz 
and John. Mr. Haag, who was a well-to-do farmer, owning one hundred 
and twenty acres of land, died August 14, 1866. He was a member of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 551 

Tlvang-elical church. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Seegar hved on 
the Haag farm until 1876, when they moved to their present farm, consist- 
ing of one hundred ami twenty acres, to which they have added by hard 
work, industry' and good judgment until they now have an excellent farm 
of two hundred acres. Their children are Lizzie, Annie, Minnie, George 
and Frank. Mr. and Mrs. Seegar are both devout members of the Chris- 
tian Catholic church. 

In 1893 Mr. Seegar had two paralytic strokes and as a result he was 
helpless two years and had many dangerous spasms. The regular physicians 
did him no good, and he states that his condition grew so serious that he 
almost gave up in despair, when about three years ago he was entirely cured 
by his faith in Jesus Christ, through the teachings and prayers of John Alex- 
ander Dowie, of Chicago. This is one of the most remarkable cures on 
record and Mr. Seegar believes it to be of the same nature of those wrought 
by Jesus when he was on earth. Mr. Seegar was believed to be in a dying 
condition when, by faith alone, as he verily believes, he was entirely cured, 
and he is to-day a well, strong man for his age. He is a substantial farmer, 
a good citizen and a man of unquestionable veracity. His faithful wife and his 
family are truthful witnesses of his restoration to health, as are many of 
his neighbors, and all who know him rejoice at his deliverance, whether 
inclined to question its means or not. His life has been a busy and a useful 
■one, and its successes have been won by honest effort. Such a man could 
hardly be spared by the community, for he has long occupied a place in it 
which it would be hard to fill. Mrs. Seegar has been a true helpmeet to him 
in every sense of the term, and they and their children are held in the highest 
esteem by all who know them. 



WH.LIAM STEPHEN. 



To indulge in prolix encomium of a life which was eminently one of 
subjective modesty would be palpably incongruous, even though the record 
of good accomplished, of kindly deeds performed, and of high relative pre- 
cedence attained might seem to justify the utterance of the glowing eulogy. 
He to whom this memoir is dedicated was a man who "stood four-square 
to every wind that blows," who was possessed with marked ability and who 
was vitally instinct with the deeper human sympathies; and yet who, dur- 
ing his long and useful life, avoided everything that partook of the nature of 
display or notoriety; and in this s])irit would the biographist wish to have 
his utterances construed. For many years William Stephen was a well- 
Tcnown agriculturist of Grundy county, and on retiring to private life became 



552 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

closely identified with the better interests of Morris, where he was known 
and honored as a vahied citizen. 

Of sturdy Scotch-Presbyterian stock. WiUiam Stephen was born upon 
his father's fami in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, May 26, 181 7, and during his 
youth assisted in the development and cultivation of the fields. This prac- 
tical training- afterward stood liim in good stead, when farming became the 
occupation whereby he sought a livelihood. His early educational privi- 
leges were such as were afforded by the common schools, but he early mani- 
fested a love of books, being especially fond of history. He also became 
greatly interested in the book of books, the Bible, from the reading of which 
he imbibed deep and well-founded religious impressions. He united with 
the church in youth and soon thereafter determined to prepare himself for 
the ministrv. For several years he bent his strong will and splendid en- 
ergies in that direction. He acquired a fair knowledge of the Latin and 
Greek languages and stored his mind with a fund of information that would 
have enabled him to expound clearly the truths of the Bible, but he be- 
came satisfied that nature had not designed him for the ministry on account 
of a lack of fluency in his utterances. He therefore abandoned his plan 
and apprenticed himself to a grocer, with whom he remained until twenty 
years of age. 

At that time, acting on the advice of the late George Smith, for many 
vears a leading banker of Chicago, Mr. Stephen came to the United States, 
arriving in Chicago. July i. 1837, to find that Mr. Smith had returned to 
Scotland on a visit. His disappointment on not finding his friend was very 
great, but, fortified bv strong resolution and inflexible will power, which 
never cowed in the presence of apparent danger or hardships, he started 
out to make his way in the Xew ^^'orld unaided. He arrived in Lisbon, 
Kendall county, Illinois, July 8, 1837, friendless and poor, but soon secured 
work by the month and accumulated the means wherewith to purchase 
what was then known as a prairie team, — fourteen yoke of oxen, that is, a 
sufficient number of oxen to draw a prairie plow through the virgin soil. 
He then engaged in breaking prairie for others, and in that manner made his 
start in life. As a companion and helpmeet on life's journey he chose Miss 
Margaret Watemian, the wedding being celebrated February 27, 1843. He 
then began farming in Kendall county, and as the result of his industry and 
enterprise he came into possession of a large farm at Big Grove, which he 
transformed into rich and fertile fields. He successfully operated it for a 
number of years, and in 1869 purchased the fine farm now occupied bv his 
.son. Charles M.. two miles northwest of Morris, and took possession there- 
of, but still retained his Kendall county farm. His health partially failing.. 




CJw.oJtZ'Ji^-^-^^'^. a. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 553 

he resolved to lay aside the more arduous cares of business life and removed 
to Morris, where he lived retired until called to the home beyond. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen was blessed with the following 
children: William I., now a resident of Omaha, Nebraska; Hester E., de- 
ceased: Amelia A., deceased wife of Aaron Howe; ^Merritt J., of Morris; Ella 
P., the widow of C. G. Collins, of Omaha; Charles M., who is farming on 
the old homestead near Morris; Ada H., who died at the age of fourteen; 
Helen I., the wife of A. E. Cagwin, of Chicago: Mrs. Hettie J. Page, of 
Omaha: and Fred L., of Morris. 

In the days of his vigorous manhood Mv. Ste]5hen eschewed politics and 
would never accept ofifice other than assessor, commissioner of highways, 
school director, etc. After coming tO' Morris he served for several years as 
justice of the peace, school director and alderman, discharging his duties 
with marked promptness and fidelity. Though reared in the Presbyterian 
faith he never liked its church government, and in 1854 united with the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which his wife had been a member from the 
age of fifteen years. He was from that time until his death most active in 
its work and contributed not a little to its upbuilding. He served as a 
class-leader, as a superintendent or teacher in the Sunday-school, as trus- 
tee, and at all times did everything in his power to promote the cause of 
Christianitv among men. His character was above reproach, and he was 
held in the greatest respect by his neighbors. His word was as good as 
any bond that was ever solemnized by signature or seal, and his integrity 
was unassailable. 

"His life was noble, anil the elements 

So mixed in him that nature might stand up 

And say to all the world, 'This was a man.' " 

\ 
Mr. Stephen died May iS, i88g, and his widow, who was born in New 

York in 1825, survived him a little more than a decade, passing away in death 

in February, 1900. She was ever a faithful companion and helpmeet, and 

was loved and esteemed bv all who knew her. 



MYRON CURTIS STURTEVANT, M. D. 

For more than a quarter of a century Dr. Sturtevant has engaged 
in the practice of medicine in ]\Iorris. and his success is attributable to his 
thorough understanding of the principles of medicine and to his ability in 
administering the various medicinal remedies in relief of the suffering of his 
patients. The Doctor is a native of Massachusetts, his birth having oc- 



554 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

curred in Lowell. January 12. 1835. His parents were Cyrus and Rhoda 
(Harsey) Sturtevant, the former a native of Maine and the latter of Vermont. 
Both were representatives of old English families, but the father was of 
Holland lineage, while the mother was of English descent. Cyrus Sturtevant 
made carpentering Ws life work. In 1838 he removed with his family from 
the Bay state to Cleveland, Ohio, where for a number of years he conducted 
a lumber-yard and operated a planing-mill. 

The Doctor was a mere child when he accompanied his parents to the 
west. He was making good progress in school when his father's planing- 
mill burned, and such was the financial loss to the family that he was obliged 
to abandon his studies and enter business life. He had attended Oberlin 
College and Cleveland University, and had taken two courses in the Home- 
opathic Medical College of Cleveland. In 1855 his parents decided to come 
to Illinois and accordingly took up their abode in Wheaton, but his father 
was in poor health and did not remain long in the city, soon removing to 
a fami in Ogle county, Illinois. In the family were two children, the Doctor 
and a sister, Jennie L. From Ogle county, the parents removed to Wis- 
consin, and there the daughter was married to Rev. Asher W. Curtis, who 
was located in Crete, Nebraska. At that time Mr. and Mrs. Cyrus Sturte- 
vant also went to Crete, Nebraska, where the father's death occurred. Tlie 
mother afterward accompanied her daughter to Raleigh, North Carolina, 
to which place Mr. Curtis was called by the church of his denomination. 
In that city Mrs. Sturtevant died, but ^Irs. Curtis is still living there. 

The Doctor accompanied his parents on their various removals until 
after they went to Nebraska, when he decided to return to Cleveland and 
again entered the Western Homeopathic Medical College of that place. Com- 
pleting a thorough course of study, he was graduated in that institution in 
the class of 1866. He had practiced medicine in Ogle county for a short 
time before he returned to the medical college, and after his graduation he 
located in Emerald Grove, Rock county, Wisconsin, where he engaged in 
practice for about seven years. It was in the year 1872 that Dr. Sturtevant 
came to Morris, where he has since resided and now enjoys a large and 
lucrative practice, and is accorded a leading place in the ranks of the medical 
fraternity. He holds a membership in both the Illinois State Homeopathic 
Medical Society and the American Institute of Homeopathy. 

In 1859 tl^s Doctor was united in marriage to Miss Pearlie E. Boynton. 
Their only child, Wilbur, died at the age of twenty-four years. The Doctor 
and his wife hold a membership in the Congregational church and take an 
active part in its work, doing all in their power to promote its interests. In 
social circles they hold an enviable position, and their own home is noted for 
its generous hospitality. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 555 

FRED L. STEPHEN. 

Fred L. Stephen, a member of the Morris Lumber Company, is one of 
tlie native sons of IlHnois, his birth having occurred in Kendall county on 
the 19th of June. 1864. His youth was spent on his father's farm, and to 
the common-school system of the county he is indebted for the educational 
privileges which he received. On entering upon his business career he 
became a butcher and for three years conducted a store in Morris. In the 
latter part of 1897 he became a member of the Morris Lumber Company, 
the partners in which are Fred L. Stephen and C. B. Moore. They have 
a large lumber-yard and receive from the public a liberal patronage, which 
is well merited, for their business methods are honorable, and it is their earn- 
est desire to please their customers. 

In 1888 was celebrated the marriage of ]Mr. Stephen and ?kliss Laura 
Hoge, of Morris, and their union has been blessed with one daughter, named 
\'ivian. "Sir. Stephen votes with the Republican party, and is a Mason, hav- 
ing attained the Knight Templar degree in the fraternity. As a business 
man he is wide-awake, progressive and enterprising, and by the careful con- 
duct of his interests has secured a creditable success and will no doubt gain 
greater prosperity in the future. 



JOHN RAY. 

John Ray, who is engaged in the livery business at Morris. Illinois, is a 
German by birth, but was reared and educated in this country, and is 
thoroughly identified with American interests. A brief sketch of his life is 
as follows : 

John Ray was born in Germany, June 16, 1846, a son of William and 
Annetta (Stine) Ray. His parents emigrated with their family to this 
countrj' in 185 1 and made their first settlement in Allegany county. New 
York, where they resided until October, 1853. At that time they came west 
to Grundy county, Illinois, and located on a farm in Felix township. Here 
they made their home for a number of years up to 1894, when they removed 
to Will county, Illinois. At the latter place the father died, in 1895, at 
the age of seventy-three years. He had been a farmer all his life, was suc- 
cessful in his operations, and by his honorable and upright life won the con- 
fidence and respect of all who knew him. The wife and mother is still living, 
a resident of ^lorris. Their family consists of two sons and two daughters. 

At the time the Ray family removed to Grundy county, Illinois, John 
•vvas a boy of eight years. He was reared on his father's farm and was him- 



556 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

self engaged in farming operations until he was twenty-six years of age. 
Then he turned his attention to merchandising, in Diamond, where he was 
in business three years, at the end of that time selling out to the Chicago, 
Wilmington Coal & ^lanufacturing Company, and for the next seven years 
and a half managed the store for them. At the end of that time he went to 
Braidwood, where he was engaged in business until the fall of 1898. Sep- 
tember 5 of that year he came to Morris and has since conducted his present 
livery business. 

Mr. Ray was married in 1870 to Miss Mary Reardon. a daughter of 
Captain William Reardon. They have had one child, a daughter, that died 
at the age of nine years. 

For a period of twenty-four years Mr. Ray has been identified with the 
Masonic order. He has received the various degrees of that ancient order 
up to and including that of Knight Templar. His political affiliations are 
with the Republican party. 



MERRITT J. STEPHEN. 

Merritt J. Stephen was born .August 2. 1849, i" Kendall county, Illi- 
nois. His father, William Stephen, is now deceased. His boyhood days 
were spent in the usual manner of farmer lads, his time being devoted to the 
labor of the fields, in studying in the common schools and in the pleasures 
of the play-ground. On attaining his majority he resolved to try his fortune 
in the west and went to Denver, Colorado, where he spent two years. At 
the expiration of that period he returned to Morris, where he was engaged in 
the live-stock business for five or six years. He then went to Omaha. Ne- 
braska, where he engaged in the same business for about six years. Again 
coming to Morris, he has since made his home in this city. 

Mr. Stephen gives his political support to the Republican party, and is 
a prominent Mason, having attained the Knight Templar degree. He is 
also a member of the Mystic Shrine, and is highly esteemed in the craft as 
well as in business and social circles. 



F. S. SCHOENLEBER, ^^I. S. A., D. O., D. V. S. 

One of the most efficient and capable representatives of his profession is 
Dr. Schoenleber. who is now engaged in practice in Morris. He was born 
in Allen township, LaSalle county, Illinois, August 6, 1862, and is a son of 
Jacob and Louisa (Saemisch) Schoenleber. His parents were natives of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 557 

Germany, but were married in Livingston county, Illinois, and located in 
Allen township, where the father became a prosperous farmer. He died at 
the age of seventy-one years, in 1896, but his widow still survives and is 
now living in Ransom, Illinois. They became the parents of six children 
who grew to years of maturity: Lewis K., Julia, Alary A., Francis S., John 
J. and Emma L. The youngest son is now deceased. 

The Doctor was reared on his father's farm, and in the public schools 
acquired his preliminary education, which was supplemented by study in 
the Alorris Normal. He afterward engaged in teaching- for two years in 
Nettle Creek township, Grundy county. He then entered the Iowa State 
Agricultural College, at Ames, where he was graduated in 1885. He also 
took a post-graduate degree in the same institution in 1887; and his ability 
and standing are indicated by the fact that in 1885 he was appointed by the 
board of trustees to the position of farm foreman. He had previously 
won high rank as an educator, having been principal of the Ransom schools 
in 1884-85, while at the time of his graduation in the agricultural college 
he was holding the position of professor of German and natural science in 
the Norton Normal and Scientific Academy at Wilton Junction, Iowa. 
Three months after his graduation he resigned that position in order to 
accept the one proffered him by his alma mater. In 1888 he became asso- 
ciate editor of the Orange Judd Farmer, one of the leading agricultural 
journals of the country, published in Chicago, — which journal was founded 
by Orange Judd, also the founder of the American Agriculturist. Dr. 
Schoenleber continued his connection with that paper until 1890, and during 
the winter of 1889-90 he took a course in the Chicago Veterinary College, 
in which he was graduated. In the spring of 1890 the Doctor came to 
Morris, where he has practiced veterinary surgery; but during a portion of 
the years 1890-91 he was in Montgomery, Alabama. In 1896 he was ap- 
pointed to the chair of anatomy and histology in McKillip's Veterinary Col- 
lege, of Chicago, which position he now holds, and in that institution he 
has also been dean since 1897. For the past two years he has been assistant 
state veterinarian, and his marked ability has gained him a rank second to 
none in the circles of the profession. In the winter of 1898-99, in order to 
gain a still greater knowledge of the science of medicine, he pursued the 
sophomore course in Bennett Medical College, of Chicago. 

In 1 89 1 Dr. Schoenleber formed a partnership with G. R. Savage and 
opened a livery stable in Morris. The following year he purchased his part- 
ner's interest and has since conducted the business alone. In 1895 he 
erected a new stable and built an addition to it in 1899, and now has a fine 
large barn. In 1898 he leased this to John Ray. In August, 1899, he was 
offered the position of dean of the veterinary school of the National Medical 



558 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

University, at Ciiica^o. Resigning his position at the McKillip College, he 
took up the work of organizing the above school, at the same time taking his 
junior year in the medical school of the university, with the course in oste- 
opathy, thus investigating the different systems of medicine, — allopathic, 
homeopathic, eclectic and osteopathic. He is also registered in Illinois as 
an osteopath. 

In 1892 the Doctor married Lillian M. Aliller, a daughter of T. \V. 
and Abbie Miller, of Grundy county. He is quite active in social circles, 
being a Knights Templar Mason, a member of the Knights of the Globe, 
tlie Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In 
his professional career he has achieved most gratifying success, steadily 
working his way upward until he ranks among the foremost representatives 
of the profession of veterinary surgery. In manner he is pleasant and genial 
and his many excellent qualities have endeared him to a large circle of 
friends and acquaintances. 



HENRY NEWMAN. 



The man whose name appears above has in his busy and useful career 
demonstrated the value of self-reliance. He began life without capital: he 
earned capital and put it to good use. He improved opportunity after op- 
portunity as it presented itself and rose from poverty to affluence, from ob- 
scurity to prominence in the community. He fought a good fight, and 
he fought it gallantly and persistently and won a victory over every obstacle 
that he encountered. 

Henry Newman, of Au Sable township, Grundy county, who is num- 
bered among the well-known German-American citizens of this county, was 
I)orn at Hesse-Darmstadt. Germany, January 6, 1825, a son of John New- 
man, who was the father of three sons and two daughters, of whom Henry 
is the only one who came to America and is the only one now living. His 
brothers were named Casper and Louis Newman. The subject of this 
notice grew to manhood in his native country, and in accordance with the 
requirements in Germany he served three years in the army. His army 
career was during the troublous times of 1848 and 1849, in which German 
history was made with great rapidity. 

In 1850 Mr. Newman left his native land for America. Landing at the 
port of New York, he went thence to Buffalo, in the same state, where he 
remained for a time, working at whatever he found to do. From Bufifalo he 
continued his way westward, going to Cleveland by way of Lake Erie and 
thence to Fort Wavne, Indiana. There he had a chance to work on the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 559^ 

railroad at fifty cents a day and board, or seventy-five cents and board him- 
self. He chose the latter proposition and remained there nntil tiie follow- 
ing spring, when he continued his travels westward, with Chicago as his 
objective point. 

That was half a century ago, and Chicago, now a great city, was but a 
small town, over which Mr. Newman says he could have traveled in half a 
day. But Chicago had no attractions for the young man, and he soon made 
his way out into the country and down to the vicinity of his place of settle- 
ment. He kept at work until he had accumulated money enough to buy 
some land, and in 1864 he settled on his present farm in Grundy county. 

In March, 1854, Mr. Newman was married to Miss Rose Anna Magda- 
lena Hirsch, who was born in Germany, where her father died, and who came 
to America with her mother and sister in 1852. Mr. and Mrs. Newman 
have had seven children, five of whom, named as follows, are living: 
Mary, George, Henry E., Lizzie Ann, and Carrie M. Their children who 
died were named Adeline and John. 

Mr. Newman began life poor, and, as has been seen, he purchased his 
first land with money that he earned by manual labor. He now has a fine 
farm and is one of the substantial farmers of Au Sable township. He has an 
intelligent and esteemed family, all members of which are members of the 
Au Sable Methodist Episcopal church, to the support of which and of all its 
interests he has long been a liberal contributor. There is no local movement 
that in his opinion tends to enhance the general welfare that he does not 
indorse and aid to the extent of his ability. His kindliness is apparent to 
all who know him and more than one person has found in him such a "friend 
in need" as is truly a "friend indeed." 



URIAH C. DAVIS. 



The mercantile interests of Morris are well represented by Uriah C. 
Davis, furniture dealer and undertaker. He owns and conducts a large and 
well-equipped store and possesses the essential characteristics of a success- 
ful business career. A native of Kendall county, Illinois, he was born 
November 15, 1852, and is a son of Phineas Davis, a retired farmer now re- 
siding in Morris. The father was born in Livingston county. New York, 
January 24, 1827, and in 1847, when twenty years of age, came to Illinois, 
locating in Kendall county, where he purchased a farm upon which he made 
his home for twenty-seven years. In 1874 he took up his abo<le in Morris, 
and is now accounted one of the respected citizens of this place. He was 
married January 22, 1848. to ALiria L. Phipps, who was born in New Jer- 



56o BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

sey in 1822 and died in 1879, leaving two sons, — James and Uriah C. In 
1881 the father again married, his second union being with Sally C. Frasee, 
W'idow of Barnard Frasee. 

Upon the homestead farm Uriah C. Davis spent the days of his boy- 
hood and youth, and as soon as old enough to handle the plow began to 
assist in the improvement of the fields and in the cultivation of the crops. 
He was provided with excellent educational privileges and is a graduate of 
both the Fowler Institute and the ^Morris Normal. He also attended the 
Illinois State Normal for a time and successfully engaged in teaching for 
four years, being principal of the Alazon schools for two and a half years. 
In 1 88 1, however, he abandoned that profession and embarked in his present 
business in partnership with W. R. Cody. In 1885 his brother, James L., 
purchased an interest in the business, and in 1887 the Davis brothers bought 
out the interest of Mr. Cody. This partnership was continued till 1892, 
when our subject became sole proprietor. He has conducted his store with 
signal success, having a large and complete stock of furniture of modern 
design, calculated to meet the varied tastes of the public. He has built up 
an excellent trade and also has a hberal patronage in the undertaking de- 
partment. He is a graduate of two schools for embalming, the Sullivan and 
the Hoenschau. He is regarded as the most skilled undertaker in Morris. 

In 1881 Mr. Davis was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Nellie F. Cody, and 
their union has been blest with three children : Edith. \\'illiam and Ralph. 
In his political views Mr. Davis is a Republican, and for four years sensed as 
an alderman of the city. He is now the secretary of the Morris Commer- 
cial Club, is an official member of the Methodist church and belongs to the 
order of Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
In all the relations of life he is true to every duty devolving upon him. and 
his career has been an upright and honorable one. The success which he 
Tias achieved has been gained by close application to business combined with 
sound judgment and capable management. He is regarded as one of the 
leading and influential citizens of his adopted county, and it is with pleasure 
that we present the record of his life to our readers. 



THOMAS H. HALL. 



Among the most loyal of the citizens of Morris are many who are 
numbered among the native sons of Illinois. This number includes Mr. Hall, 
an enterprising dn,'-goods merchant, w'ho was born in the city which is still 
his home. December 17, 1862. His parents, Francis and Margaret (Rankin) 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 561 

Hall, were both natives of Scotland. In the year 1855 the father came to 
the United States, and was married in Sycamore, Illinois. 

Thomas H. Hall was reared in Morris and to its public-school system 
he is indebted for his education. He entered upon his business career as 
a grocer's clerk at the age of eighteen, but soon accepted the position of 
salesman in the dry-goods store of C. S. Beach & Sons, where he remained 
for six years, a most trusted and faithful employe. During that time he 
-applied himself most diligently to the work, mastering the business in every 
detail; and when, in connection with George Winsor, on the ist of May, 
1886, he bought out his employers, he was well fitted to carry on the store. 
Under the firm name of Winsor & Hall, the dry-goods business was conducted 
until the ist of March, 1890, when Air. Hall became sole proprietor. He 
has since been alone in business and to-day he ranks among the leading 
merchants of his native town, being the owner of a large double store which 
is fully stocked with dry-goods, notions and carpets. In 1892 he added a 
millinery department and each branch of the business receives a liberal pa- 
tronage. 

An important event in the life of Air. Hall occurred in the spring of 
1892, when was celebrated his marriage to Lena Gebhard, a daughter of 
Louis Gebhard, of Alorris. They have a pleasant home and enjoy the friend- 
ship of many of the best citizens of Grundy county. Air. Hall is a member 
of the Knights of Pythias fraternity. He has taken no active part in political 
afifairs, preferring to devote his energies to his business interests, in which 
he is meeting with a ven,- creditable success. He commands the public con- 
fidence by his straightforward methods and his uniform courtesy, and there- 
fore receives the public patronage. 



JOHN C. HORRIE. 

John C. Horrie is numbered among the active and enterprising busi- 
ness men of Morris, and the success he has achieved in life is due entirely 
to his own well directed efiforts. He was born in this city, Januarys 23, 
1865, his parents being James and Catherine (Anderson) Horrie. His father 
was born on the 0.~kney islands, oft' Scotland, September 27, 1827, and in 
his native land was reared and educated, there serving an apprenticeship 
of four years at the blacksmith trade. On attaining his majority, he deter- 
mined to try his fortune in the New World, hoping thereby to better his 
financial condition in this land which affords superior advantages to young 
men of ambition and determination. Accordingly he crossed the Atlantic 
and in 1848 took up his residence in Alorris, where he began business as 



562 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

a blacksmitli and carriage manufacturer, continuing- active operations in 
that line until within a few days of his death, which occurred October n. 
1896. His shop was located on Canal street and is now owned and operated 
by his son, Robert C. 

On the 20th of August, 1850, James Horrie was united in marriage to 
Catherine Anderson, also a native of Scotland, born February 20, 1828. She 
is now residing in Morris and has attained her seventy-second year. By 
her marriage she became the mother of eight children, namely: James A.; 
Jane, the widow of W. C. Handwork: Robert C; Joseph W.; Catherine A.: 
William J.; John C: and Minnie, the wife of Claud Magner. In early life 
the parents of these children became members of the Presbyterian church 
and always took an active part in its work and upbuilding. They com- 
manded the respect of all who knew them and had a large circle of friends 
in Morris and Grundy county. 

John C. Horrie spent his Iwyhood days under the parental roof, his 
time being occupied with play and work and with study in the public schools. 
In his youth he learned the jewelry business, which he has followed in 
his own interest since 1891. He has a good store, well equipped with 
everything found in a first-class establishment of the kind; and the excellent 
line of goods wdiich he carries, together with his fair dealing and uniform 
courtesy, has secured to him a verj' liberal patronage. He now has the 
largest trade in Morris and his success is the legitimate reward of his labors. 

In his political views Mr. Horrie has always been a Democrat, and at 
the age of twenty-one years was elected alderman of the Third ward, the 
largest ward in the city. Socially he is a Royal Arch and Knight Templar 
Mason, and is a member of the Knights of Pythias fraternity. In 1895 was 
celebrated his marriage to Miss Annie L. Zaljriskie of St. Charles. Illinois. 
He is a popular citizen, public-spirited and progressive, and hi the com- 
munity where his entire life has been passed has gained a large circle of 
friends. 



ORION R. HICHT. 



The prosperous town of Morris, Illinois, has its share of enter- 
prising business men. and occupying a representative position among them 
is Orion R. Hight. personal mention of wboni is of interest in this work by 
reason of his being both a veteran of the civil war and a leading citizen of 
the town in which he lives. 

Orion R. Hight was born in Steuben county. New York. December 
13. 1835. ''^'''<' 's descended from English ancestors who were among the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 563 

early settlers of New Jersey. It was in colonial days that the Hight family 
was established on the Atlantic coast, and from New Jersey they have scat- 
tered to various portions of the United States. John Nicholas Hight, the 
grandfather of Orion R., was born in Bedminster, New Jersey, January 9, 
1756. and died in Steuben county. New York, October 15, 1850. He and 
his wife, whose maiden name was Hannah Savidge, were the parents of a 
large family of children, including the following: David, Deborah, Betsey, 
William S., Nicholas, Annie, Susanna and Rachel S.. and two daughters 
that (lied in infancy. William S. Hight was born in New Jersey, January 
16, 1787, and died in New York, April 24, 1855. His wife, nee Phebe Wil- 
son, was a native of Long Island. Their children in order of birth were as 
follows: Sarah Ann, deceased; Nicholas F., deceased; Jeannette, deceased; 
Nancy, deceased: Barclay, deceased: John N., of Schuyler county. New 
York: Susan, deceased; Mary C, a resident of Michigan: Orion R., the direct 
subject of this sketch; and Rachel, a resident of Michigan. 

Orion R. Hight spent the first twenty-one years of his life in his native 
county in the Empire state. His educational advantages did not extend be- 
yond the common schools, and when he started out in life on his own ac- 
count he had no financial assistance. At the age of twenty-one he went to 
Michigan, where he remained sixteen years, and whence, January i. 1873, 
he came to Morris, Illinois, which has since been his home. When a youth 
he learned the trade of shoemaker, beginning the same at the age of fifteen 
and becoming a fine workman, and after his location in Michigan he was for 
a time engaged in the shoe business and later kept a hotel. In Morris he 
opened a shoe store and dealt in shoes exclusively from the time of his loca- 
tion here until 1882, since which time he has kept a general store. His 
career as a Inisiness man has been successful. As already stated, he started 
out in life a poor young man, and that he has made a success in life and 
accumulated a competency is due to his own industiw and good manage- 
ment. 

At the time the civil war was inaugurated i\Ir. Hight was a resident of 
Michigan. His father had been a soldier in the war of 1812 and partici- 
pated in the battle of Black Rock: and his grandfather, a Revolutionary sol- 
dier, had fought on the Princeton battle-fields: and when the civil-war cloud 
gathered and burst upon the country Orion R. Hight, with the patriotism of 
his forefathers, offered his services to the Union. He enlisted October 14, 

1861, in Company H, Twelfth Michigan Volunteer Infantry, as a private, 
was mustered in as second sergeant; and was honorably discharged July ir, 

1862. Among the battles in which he participated was that of Shiloli. 

Mr. Hight was married July 4, 1857, at Lawton, Michigan, to Elizabeth 
M. Smith, a native of Wavne county, that state, and to them have been 



564 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

born three children, two of whom are deceased. Their son, Orion R.. Jr., 
was born in 1865. 

Mr. Hight casts his vote and influence with the Republican party, and 
is identified with the Grand Army of the Republic. He has been a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows for a period of thirty-eight years 
and has been prominently identified with Oddfellowship, having passed all 
the chairs in his local lodge and served oflicially in the grand lodge of the 
state. 



TOHX XELSOX. 



For a third of a century- John Nelson has been a resident of Grundy 
county, and through the greater part of that period has been associated with 
its commercial interests, but is now' li%'ing retired from the active cares of 
business life. Success is not a matter of genius or of chance, but results 
from earnest application, steadfast purpose and unfaltering industry, — all 
of which are numbered among- the characteristics of ^Ir. Nelson. It was 
those qualities which brought to him his comfortable surroundings and w'on 
him his present position among the substantial citizens of Morris. 

I\Ir. Nelson came to Grundy county in 1866 from Belmont county, Ohio, 
where he was born IMarch 4, 1819, upon a farm about two and one-half 
miles west of Wheeling. West Mrginia. His parents, Robert and ]\Iary S. 
(McGregor) Nelson, were of Scotch lineage. The former was born in 
Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and the latter near Baltimore, Maryland. 
The paternal grandfather of our subject was an early settler of Wheeling 
and a man of considerable prominence, his name appearing on the petition 
to the governor of \'irginia for the incorporation of Wheeling as a village. 
The parents of our subject were married in Belmont county, Ohio, in 1817, 
and there spent the residue of their days, the father developing a good farm 
in the midst of the wilderness and transforming the wnld land into richly 
cultivated fields. Of the nine children in his family only two are now living, 
— John and Robert. — the latter residing on the old homestead in the Buck- 
eye state. These sons were the eldest of the family, and the younger mem- 
bers wiio are now deceased are Elizabeth, Mathew, Thomas, Alexander, 
Franklin, Margaret and James. 

Upon the old homestead farm John Nelson spent his boyhood days, 
w-orking in field and meadow^ through the summer months, w^hile in the win- 
ter season he pursued his education in the public schools. He assisted in 
the farm work until twenty-five years of age, when he went to Bridgeport, 
Ohio, and engaged in the lumber business, carrying on operations there in 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 565 

that line until 1866, when he sold his lumber-yard and came to Morris. 
Here he resumed business in the same line, and was a successful lumber 
merchant of Grundy county until 1887, when he retired to private life. Dur- 
ing this period he was associated with several partners, and throughout his 
connection u-ith the lumber trade he enjoyed a good business and met with 
prosperity. His business methods commended him to the confidence and 
respect of the public, and his name was a synonym for commercial integrity. 

In Bridgeport, Ohio, Mr. Nelson was married, in 1856, wedding Helen 
Adams, who bore him a daughter, Gertrude L., and passed away in death in 
1858. Soon after his arrival in Morris Mr. Nelson was united in marriage 
to Miss Elizabeth T. Campbell, and there were born two daughters. — Mary 
C. and Emeline M. The latter is the wife of Dr. W. E. Walsh, of Morris. 
Mrs. Nelson, a most estimable lady, was called to her final rest in 1890. 

Mr. Nelson has never aspired to political honors, preferring to devote 
his energies to his business interests; yet he has always kept well informed 
on the issues and questions of the day, being thereby enabled to give an 
intelligent support to the political principles in which he believes are con- 
tained the best elements of government. He cast his first presidential vote 
for William Henry Harrison, and supported the ^^'hig party until the or- 
ganization of the Republican party, when he joined its ranks. He has voted 
at fifteen presidential elections and has ever had the courage of his convic- 
tions. In early manhood he became a member of the Presbyterian church 
and has lived a consistent Christian life in harmony with his belief and pro- 
fessions. The sterling qualities of an uprig^ht character have brought to 
him the trust and friendship of many with whom he has come in contact, 
and he well deserves mention among the honored and representative citi- 
zens of his adopted country. 



J. N. BUNNELL. 



One of the representative citizens of Morris is the gentleman whose 
name introduces this review, and who in his business and political associa- 
tions has won the respect and confidence of the entire community. Many of 
the strongest characters of the nation have come from New England, and it 
is an indisputable fact that no other section of the country has shown more 
ingenuity, enterprise and diligence than are found in the New England por- 
tion of this republic. 

Mr. Bunnell is a native of New England and possesses the sterling traits 
of character which distinguish his fellow citizens of that most civilized sec- 
tion of Christendom. He was born in Colebrook, Litchfield countv. Con- 



S66 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

necticnt, September 5, 1827, his parents being- Willis and Elizabeth (Harger) 
Bunnell. They also were natives of Connecticut, were married there and 
made their home in the Nutmeg state until about 1844, when they removed 
to Delhi. Delaware county, New York, and there they spent their remaining 
days. Both have now passed away. They had a son and daughter, J. N. 
and Elizabeth, the latter now a widow, residing in New York city. 

Mr. Bunnell, of this sketch, acquired an academic education, and at the 
age of twenty-five years was graduated at Berkshire Medical College, at 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts; but, preferring to enter upon a career in the com- 
mercial world, he never actively engaged in the practice of medicine. Going 
to New York city he became a salesman in a wholesale milliner}' establish- 
ment, and later entered the employ of a book house. Following this he 
was a member of the publishing firm of Bunnell & Price, which remained 
in business two years, when a fire destroyed their entire store. Their loss 
was so great that they could not resume business. During its existence the 
firm owned and published the New York Pickayune. a humorous sheet, 
which they sold just previous to the fire. For a short time after this dis- 
aster Mr. Bunnell operated under a contract, handling all the newspapers 
of New York which were sold in California. This was before the era of 
railroads to the Pacific coast and papers were shipped by way of Panama 
every two weeks. From his youth ]\Ir. Bunnell has displayed considerable 
mechanical ability, turning wood and doing job work in that line in Con- 
necticut. In that business he continued for about fifteen years, and in 1861 
he secured a government contract to furnish gun-stocks. The life of the 
contract was two years, during which time he faithfully fulfilled his part and 
received for the goods one hundred thousand dollars. His next venture, 
however, was an unprofitable one. He organized a stock company, think- 
ing to conduct the wood-turning business on a much larger scale, but the 
stockholders were unprincipled and forced him out of the business. 

He then returned to New York city, where he was variously employed 
for a considerable time. He acted as superintendent of agencies for Con- 
necticut as the representative of the Equitable Life Insurance Company. 
\\"ith headquarters at Hartford, and later held a similar connection with the 
Globe Life Insurance Company, his territory being Massachusetts, with 
Boston as his headquarters. Through the succeeding five vears Mr. Bun- 
nell, in connection with a partner, conducted a jeweln,- business in Newark, 
New Jersey, but the adventure was attended with indifferent success. 

Entering the employ of the Straw Lumber Company, of New York 
city, Mr. Bunnell was sent to Lawrence. Kansas, in charge of the company's 
factory at that place. Six months later, in 1884. acting on the advice of Mr. 
Bunnell, the factory was removed to Long Island City, and later a factory 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 567 

was built at Cohoes. New York, of which he was made the manager. In 
1887 he entered tlie employ of the Allen Paper Car Wheel Company, of 
Xew York, which sent him to Morris, Illinois, placing him in charge of its 
factory at this place. This position he held for twelve years, or until the 
factory was closed in i8gg. In the spring of 1898 the Morris plumbing es- 
tablishment of Bunnell & McNanly was opened and our subject is now in 
the plumbing and heating business. The firm receives a liberal patronage 
and their trade is now quite extensive. 

^Ir. Btinnell has been twice married. In 1858 he married Mary 
Beecher. who was a member of a branch of the Henry Ward Beecher family, 
and a native of Connecticut. She died in 1891. leaving a son. Charles B., 
an artist of considerable ability, residing in Roseville. Xew Jersey. In 
1892 Mr. Bunnell was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Eliza 
]\Iarsh, of Newark. New Jersey. In his political views he has always been 
a stanch Republican in his allegiance to the party and its principles. While 
in Connecticut he was elected to the state legislature, in the fall of i860, 
and during his sei^'ice the assembly voted two million dollars for the prose- 
cution of the war. He has been an active factor in local political interests 
in Morris, served as a member of the city council for five years, and in the 
spring of 1897 was elected mayor for a two-years term. His administration 
was progressive and businesslike, and he has ever exercised his official pre- 
rogatives to advance the welfare and progress of the city. While servin.g 
as a member of the Morris city council Mr. Bunnell was very active and un- 
tiring in his efforts to secure water-works for Morris: served as the chair- 
man of the water-works committee, and, being a prime mover in the effort. 
much credit is due him for securmg to the city its present magnificent water- 
works. Fraternally he is a Knight Templar Mason and enjoys the high 
regard of his brethren of the craft. His business career has been a checkered 
one, yet through it all he has maintained an unassailable reputation for in- 
tegrity and straightforward dealing. His pleasant, genial manner has won 
him many friends, and he is accounted one of the popular citizens of Grundy 
coimtv. 



JOHN B. SCHRODER. 

No one in Grimdy county has so long held the office of sheriff as John 
B. Schroder, which fact stands in unmistakable evidence of his capability and 
fidelity to duty. Utterly fearless in the discharge of the obligations devolv- 
ing upon him, he performed every task readily and resolutely and his ser- 
vice won the highest commendation. It brought a sense of safety to the 
law-abiding citizens and of terror to the law-breakers, and continually he 



568 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

was chosen for the office till his length of service exceeded that of any other 
incumbent. 

Mr. Schroder is a native of Germany and manifests the marked charac- 
teristics of the Teutonic race, being persevering, intelligent and faithful in 
all things. He was born in Manheim, Baden, Germany, March 23, 1832. 
His parents, Adam and Eva (Mansengab) Schroder, spent their entire lives 
in the Fatherland, the latter dying at the age of forty years, the former at 
the age of eighty-four years. By occupation he was a farmer and followed 
that pursuit in support of his family. His five children were Elizabeth, 
IMargaret, Barbara, Nicholas and John B. Nicholas came to the United 
States in 1852, and now resides in Kansas. 

John B. Schroder was reared in Germany and acquired a good educa- 
tion in the common schools. Eor five years he served in the German army 
as a cavalryman, and for three years of that period was riding instructor. As 
a member of the military organization of the Fatherland he took part in 
many public celebrations. At length he determined to try his fortune in 
America, and in 1855, bidding adieu to home and friends, he sailed for the 
New World, joining his brother in Elgin, Kane county, Illinois. There he 
opened a harness shop, having learned the trade in the land of his nativity. 
In 1858 he and his brother went to Pike's Peak in search of gold. He 
started with one thousand and five hundred dollars and returned with 
twenty dollars, so that the trip was not a very profitable one to him. He 
made the journey by way of Atchison. Kansas, whence he proceeded to his 
destination with an ox team and wagon. 

Upon his return to Illinois in 1859, ]\Ir. Schroder located in Grundy 
county, where he has since made his home. He took up his abode in 
Minooka, where he opened a harness shop, which he conducted until 1866. 
During the war he served as deputy sheriff and constable, and in that ca- 
pacity did much to aid the government to locate deserters. In 1866 he was 
elected county sheriff on the Republican ticket and served for two years. 
The law forbidding a man to ser\'e immediately a second term, he retired 
from office in 1868, but in 1870 was again elected, and, the law having in the 
meantime been changed, was re-elected for each successive term till 1880. 
In that year he went to Kansas, where he purchased a large farm, but after 
running it for a year he sold it and returned to Illinois. For one year he 
remained in Chicago and then again came to Morris, where he conducted a 
harness shop for about two years. In 1886, 1888, 1894 and 1896 he was 
again elected sheriflf, thus holding the office altogether twenty years. His 
ser\-ice was often dangerous, but at no time did he shrink from the faithful 
discharge of his duty. On the 17th of October, 1890, he hanged one James 
Maxwell for murder. In 1867 he went to Maine, where he secured a mur- 





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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 569. 

derer, three years after the deed had been committed, spending forty days 
in locating the man in the Pine Tree state. This and many other occur- 
rences brought him an excellent reputation, and people of all parties com- 
mended his efTficiency and ability. 

In 1858 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Schroder and Miss Jose- 
phine Fessler, who was bom in France. They have three children : John 
B., of San Francisco, California: Josephine, the wife of John H. Francis, Jr., 
of Peoria; and Adelheit, the wife of William Gebhardt, of Morris. The chil- 
dren were provided with excellent educational privileges, and the daughters 
are especially proficient in music, being fine vocalists. In his political affilia- 
tions Mr. Schroder has always been a stanch Republican. He belongs to 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and since 1866 has been a repre- 
sentati\-e of the Masonic fraternity, in which he has attained the Knight 
Templar degree. For forty years he has resided in Grundy county, and per- 
haps no man within its borders is more widely or favorably known. He well 
deserves mention in this volume, and with pleasure we present the record of 
his life to our readers. 



JACOB M. GRIGGS. 
There are few residents of Grundy county whose arrival within its bor- 
ders antedates that of Mr. Griggs, for through fifty-three years he has- 
made his home here and has been actively associated with the business in- 
terests which contribute to the material prosperity and welfare of the county. 
He was born in Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, on the 12th of 
April, 1829, his parents being Peter and Catherine (Moore) Griggs, who- 
also were, natives of the Keystone state, the father being of English lineage, 
while the mother was of Dutch descent. The grandfather of our subject was 
John Griggs, a native of Philadelphia, and the great-grandfather was Dr. 
John Griggs, who' was born in England and became the founder of the 
family in the New World. He crossed the Atlantic to the United States, 
taking up his residence in Philadelphia, and the various generations of the 
family since that time have been represented in the Keystone state. Peter 
Griggs, the father of our subject, was a farmer by occupation, and in 1836 
he made his way westward to Grundy county, pre-empting canal land, on a 
part of which is now located the present town of Morris. He then returned 
to the east, and the following year brought his family to the new home. He 
lived less than ten years after his removal to this county, but his wife sur- 
vived man}- years, passing away at the verj- advanced age of eighty-four. 
She was a seconrl time married. Jacob M. was the second in order of birth 
in a family of eight children, six of whom reached years of maturity, namely:: 
Mary, Jacob M., Priscilla. John, Henry and Wilson. 



SJO BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Mr. Grig-gs. of this review, was only eight years of age when Iiis parents 
came to Grundy county, where he has resided continuously since. He was 
reared amid the wild scenes of the frontier, and with the family experienced 
all the hardships and trials incident to frontier life. He obtained his edu- 
cation in the district schools and attended the first public school held in 
Morris, his teacher being his aunt. Miss Eliza Griggs. He also aided in 
building the second house in Morris. Through the years of his minority he 
assisted in the work of the home farm, and after arriving at man's estate 
he began farming on his own account. He has always carried on agricul- 
tural pursuits, although interested at various times for brief periods in other 
business enterprises, including the manufacture of tiling, the grocery business 
and general teaming. Farming, however, has been his chief occupation in 
life, and through his close application, untiring industry and capable man- 
agement he has met with ver}' creditable success and is now the owner 
of three valuable farms, two being- located in Grundy county, while one 
is situated in Iowa. He also owns considerable town property. He cer- 
tainly deserves great credit for the success which he has achieved in life, and 
has justly won the proud American title of a self-made man. 

In 1861 Mr. Griggs was united in marriage to Miss Emma E. Cochran, 
who was bom in Xew York and came to Grundy county during her early 
girlhood with her parents, Samuel and Hannah Cochran. Mr. and Mrs. 
Griggs now have eight children, namely: Siegle A., Henry Beeclier, Helen 
Jeanette, Minnie May, Bert Watson. Archie Ray, Grace G. and Lillie Mabel. 

In early life Mr. Griggs served as constable and town collector. In 
politics he has long been a supporter of the Republican party, which he 
upholds by his ballot at each election. He is also a persistent temperance 
worker, and has "fought whisky" for fifty-three years. His labors have been 
earnest and effective in this direction, and at all times he has given his 
support to measures and movements which he believes will prove of public 
benefit. He has now reached the Psalmist's span of three-score years and 
ten, yet is still actively connected with business affairs. He has witnessed 
almost the entire grow-th and development of Grundy county, and as one 
of its honored pioneer settlers he well deserves representation in this \olume, 
being the oldest settler alive to-day in Morris. 



JOHN TUNIS VAN DOLSON. 

More than sixty years ago the subject of this sketch, then a lad oi six- 
teen vears, came to Grundv countv, and he is entitled to rank not onlv with 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 571 

those who liave lived long' in the county l)ut as well with its oldest citizens in 
point of years. 

John Tunis \'an Dolson was born in Albany county. New York. April 
5, 1822. He is descended in both the paternal and maternal lines from Hol- 
land ancestry, that entered into the famous Dutch colony of New York, the 
history^ of which constitutes an interesting part of the colonial history of the 
Empire state. The old Dutch spelling of the name was Van Dalfsen. De- 
scendants of these old Dutch families may well be proud of their ancestry, 
for no class of American citizens can boast of a more worth)- and honorable 
lineage. 

Mr. \'an Dolson's father was Tunis \^an Dolson. and his mother's 
maiden name was Elizabetli Ten Eyck. The latter died when her son was 
but a child of six or seven years, he being the youngest of live children. — 
three daughters and two sons. The daughters, who are now all dead, be- 
came residents of Illinois. They were Charlotte Amelia, who became the 
wife of Ephraim Bronk; Gamtie. w-ho married Theron Collins and died in 
Kansas man}^ years ago; and Elizabeth Ann. who became the wife of Will- 
iam H. Perkins. The subject of this biography and his brother Conrad 
\'an Dolson are the only surA iving members of the family. The latter, now 
ninety years old, is a resident of Chicago. A son, however, James \V.. was 
born of the second marriage of the father, and he lives in the state of New 
York. 

John Tunis Van Dolson lived in his native state until he was sixteen 
years old. and in 1838 came to Illinois with his sister, Elizabeth Ann, who 
had before that time married i\Ir. Perkins. They came directly to Au Sable 
township. Grundy county, and ^Ir. Van Dolson remained at the home of his 
sister till the following spring, when he went to Kendall. Kendall county, 
Illinois, W'here his brother-in-law, Ephraim Bronk. was living, and staid with 
him about a year and a half, when he returned to Au Sable and for seven 
years worked on the farm of his brother-in-law. William Perkins. In the 
meantime he had purchased the quarter section of land on which he now 
lives, and rented the same to another party, not having suf^cient capital to 
farm it himself, and for a time he worked as a hired hand for the man to 
whom he rented the place. 

December 7, 1848, he was married to Miss Rachel W'idney, who died 
September 11, 1858, leaving two children: Mary E.. born September 16, 
1849. 'low the wife of William Smith, of Gardner, Illinois; and \\'illiam, bom 
Mav 1 1, 1857, who resides near the home of his father. The Widney family, 
of which Mrs. Van Dolson was a member, trace their Dutch ancestry liack 
several hundred years. A remote ancestor, as a colonel, accompanied the 
armv of William HI. Prince of Orange, from Holland to Ireland in 1688. 



572 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

The grandparents of Mrs. Van Dolson were John and Mary Widney, who 
emigrated to America and settled in Pennsylvania, and removed thence 
to Miami county, Ohio. February 4, 1864, Mr. Van Dolson was married 
to his present estimable wife, who was Miss Elizabeth Ross, born in Ohio, 
April I, 1835, a daughter of Charles and Sarah Ross, natives of Virginia 
and Pennsylvania, respectively, and examples of true American nobility. 
Immediately after his first marriage, Mr. Van Dolson settled on his farm, 
and there he has since lived. Pie has prospered financially and is numbered 
Avith the solid citizens of the county. He has always taken a commendable 
interest in the moral and material growth of the community in which he 
lives and has ever been held in the highest esteem. He was a member of 
the board of county commissioners for many years, and during his service 
in that capacity his acts were ever characterized by honest conviction of 
duty and the best interests of his township and county. 

Politically Mr. Van Dolson was by birthright a Democrat, and in his 
earlier voting days affiliated with that party. , Since the Republican party 
came into being, however, he has been identified with it. He possesses 
strong prohibition principles, opposing the sale of liquor in all forms. While 
connected with no church organization, he aims to be governed in his daily 
walk of life by Christian principle, and is liberal in his support of religious 
work. Mrs. Van Dolson is a member of the Congregational church. 

Air. and Mrs. Van Dolson have a pleasant home and are surrounded 
by all the comforts of life, and are everywhere recognized as highly esteemed 
citizens of Grundy county. Their farm is well improved and well stocked 
and is supplied with all modern devices for successful cultivation. Every- 
thing about it is strictly up-to-date and the place gives evidence everywhere 
and in everv wav of being in the hands of a careful and skillful farmer. 



JOSEPH A. WILSON. 

Few men are more prominent or more widely known in the enter- 
prising city of Morris than Mr. Wilson. He has been an important factor in 
business circles and his popularity is w"ell deser\'ed, as in him are embraced 
the characteristics of an unbending integrity, and an unabating energy and 
industry that never flag. He is public-spirited and thoroughly interested 
in whatever tends to promote the moral, intellectual and material welfare 
of Morris. He is now serving as the mayor of the city, and his adminis- 
tration is very acceptable to the people, being progressive, practical and 
beneficial. 

Mr. Wilson was born in Putnam county. Illinois, Februar}' 20, 1850,. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 573 

his parents being Jonathan and Ehna C. (Hoyle) Wilson. The father was 
born in Union county, Kentucky, in 1809, and was a son of Thornton Wil- 
son, also a native of that state and a representative of an old Virginia family 
of Scotch origin. When twenty-one years of age Jonathan Wilson came 
to Illinois, taking up his residence in Putnam county, where he married 
Miss Hoyle, whose birth occurred in Belmont county, Ohio, in 1820. Dur- 
ing her girlhood she removed to Putnanx county with her parents, who 
were of English lineage. In 1850 Jonathan Wilson came with his family 
to Grundy county, where he carried on farming- and stock-raising, meeting 
with a fair degree of success in his undertaking. He served in the Black 
Hawk war in 1832. and was actively identified with the pioneer interests 
of the state. In his political affiliations he was a Whig until the organiza- 
tion of the Republican party, when he joined its ranks. Through her re- 
ligious faith, his wife was connected with the Society of Friends. This 
Avorthy couple became the parents of ten children : William A., who died in 
1872; Edith E.; Mary E., who died in 1875; Joseph A.; Oliver T., who died 
in infancy: Sabina M.; Edward F., who died in 1897; Marshall B., of Morris; 
Charles E., who died in 1893; and Orvil T., also a resident of Morris. The 
father of this family was called te his final rest in 1887, and the mother's 
death occurred in Morris in 1899. 

Mr. Wilson, whose name begins this sketch, came to Grundy county 
during his infancy and was reared upon his father's farm, early becoming fa- 
miliar with all the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. 
He continued to operate the farm until 1881, at which time he became a 
resident of Morris, but though he left the homestead he has since been 
actively connected with agricultural and stock-dealing interests. He owns 
several farms and is one of the most extensive stock-dealers in this section 
of the country, his business having assumed extensive proportions, yielding 
to him an excellent income, and his prosperity is well merited. 

On the 5th of March, 1879, Mr. Wilson was happily married to Miss 
Hattie E. Collins, a daughter of Joshua and Harriet (Cryder) Collins, who 
were early settlers of Grundy county. They now have two children — Edna 
M. and Jay C. Mrs. Wilson is a faithful member of the Congregational 
church, and is a lady of culture to whom the hospitality of the best homes of 
Morris is extended. In politics Mr. Wilson is a Republican, having always 
given an unfaltering support to the principles of his party. He has served 
as township supervisor, has been a member of the city council of Morris, and 
in the spring of 1899 was elected mayor. The reins of the city government 
were thus placed in competent hands, for he is a public-spirited man, deeply 
interested in the upbuilding and substantial development of the city. He 
-does all in his power to promote its interests, and in his official course has 



574 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

won uniform commendation. His business record is above reproach, aiid 
as a man and citizen he is held in the lushest esteem bv all who know him. 



WINFIELD S. PIERCE. 

On the roster of Grundy county ofificials is found the name of Mr. Pierce, 
for he is efficiently serv'ing' as the county clerk. He was born in Wyoming 
county. New York, August 7, 1852, his parents being Carey and Mercy 
(Warren) Pierce, both of whom were natives of the Empire state, and were 
of Scotch lineage. Their ancestors settled first in Masachusetts, and later 
representatives of the family removed to western New York, early in 1800. 
In that section of the coimtry Mr. Buell. the great-grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was celebrated far and wide as an Indian fighter. It was in the-year 
1854 that Carey Pierce and his wife came to Illinois, taking up their resi- 
dence upon a farm in Highland township. Grundy county, where the father 
devoted his time and attention to agricultural pursuits until his death. He 
died in 1896. at the age of seventy-one years, and his wife passed away in 
1871, at the age of forty-four years. They were the parents of four children, 
as follows: W. S., of this review: Warren, a farmer of Plankinton, Dakota: 
Lorin, who is engaged in the milling business in Michigan: and Elmer E.. 
a grain inspector of Joliet, Illinois. 

\Y. S. Pierce spent the days of his boyhood upon the home farm and 
acquired his education in the schools of the neighborhood. At the age of 
seventeen he left the parental roof and started out upon an independent busi- 
ness career by learning telegraphy. He was afterward employed in Streator, 
Illinois, as a bill clerk, and for three years was the manager of the business 
of the Western Union Telegraph Company, and the agent for the United 
States Express Company, at that place. In 1876 he removed to Verona. 
Illinois, where he engaged in the grain business, but that undertaking did 
not prove a profitable one and in 1878 he failed in business there, but after- 
ward continued to deal in grain at that point, with the exception of a period 
of five months, with good success, until 1896, when he sold his interest. Two 
years previously he had been called to public office by the ballots of the 
Republican voters of Grundy county, being elected county clerk. He dis- 
charged his duties so acceptably and promptly that he was re-elected in 
1898 without opposition in his own party. He is most careful and systematic 
in his work, and his ability and faithfulness have gained him the commenda- 
tion of all concerned. Although in office, he is not entirely separated from 
connection with the conmiercial interests, being a stockholder in the Morris 
Grain Company, which was organized in 1893. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. $75 

In the year 1875 Mr. Pierce was united in marriage to Miss Ellen L. 
Ward, who died in 1891, leaving- three children, namely: Envin. who is 
the manager of the Grundy County Telegraph Comjjany: Ilda M., the wife 
of Clare E. Godfrey, who is serving- as deputy county clerk: and Carl, at 
home. In 1892 Mr. Pierce was again married. Miss Carrie Martin becom- 
ing his wife. They have two children — Corinne and Bernice. Mr. Pierce 
has spent almost his entire life in Gnmdy county and among his stanchest 
friends are those who have known him from boyhood. His long retention 
in office is an indication of his reliability and able sen-ice, and Grundy 
county numbers him among its most valued officers. 



GEORGE E. TOWSLEY. 

George E. Towsley, now one of the substantial agriculturists of Grundy 
county, is a self-made man, having won an honored place in society and hav- 
ing accumulated a competence unaided by friends or relatives. He has 
conquered more obstacles than commonly fall to the lot of young men. and 
has grown strong and self-reliant l)y the struggles he made in those con- 
quests. 

A nati\'e of New York state, George E. Towsley was born on the 9th 
of March, 1863, on a farm in Hamilton county. He is a son of George and 
Sophia (Shipman) Towsley, both of whom were of Canadian birth. The 
father came across the border into the United States about 1850, and. lo- 
cating on a homestead in the county just mentioned, continued to pursue 
liis chosen calling, that of farming, until his death, in 1864. His wile did 
not long survive him. as she passed into the silent land in 1867, and thus 
the subject of this sketch was left an orphan at the tender ag-e of four years. 
He was adopted by Amos Dunning, who, though reasonably kind to the 
lad, of course did not have the love and consideration for him that onlv a 
parent can feel toward his own children. The boy attended school to some 
extent, but it was made plain to him that it should be his chief business in 
life to perform as n.nich labor on the farm as it was possible for him to ilo. 
He sturdily endeavored to please, his foster father until he was twenty years 
of age, when he was nothing loth to begin an independent career. 

Believing that better opportunities could be found in the west, he de- 
cided to try his fortunes in Illinois, and the year 1883 witnessed his arri\al 
in Grundy county. Here he worked industriously upon farms for four 
years, carefully husbanding his earnings, after which he rented a farm for 
a period of three years. In 1890 he bought a tract of land in Nettle Creek 
township, his present home place, and since that time he has gi\-en his whole 



576 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

time and energy toward the cultivation and beautifying of the farm, which is 
considered one of the best and most desirable in the township. 

]\Ir. Towsley has never been an aspirant to political honors, for he 
much prefers to lead a quiet, independent life. He uses his franchise in 
favor of the Republican party and its nominees, and fraternally is identified 
with the Knights of the Globe. He is a good citizen and carries out in his 
daily life the high principles which should animate every one who enjoys 
the blessings and protection afiforded by the stars and stripes. 

Nine years ago, in 1890, ]\Ir. Towsley chose Olive M. Hoge to be the 
sharer of his joys and sorrows, their marriage being celebrated in this town- 
ship. She is a daughter of Hendley and Sarah (LaSalle) Hoge, the former 
of whom gave his life for the Union in the great Civil war. The history of 
the family may be found elsewhere in this work. Five children have been 
born to our subject and wife, namely: Lena May, whose birth occurred 
Way 10, 1891; George Hendley, April 19, 1893; Gertrude Alberta, Septem- 
ber II, 1896; Beulah Pearl, born January 15, 1898, and died September 22, 
following; and Ivy, born April 17, 1899. 



FREDERICK S. JOHNSON. 

This gentleman is serving as clerk of the circuit court, and is a well 
known resident of }*Iorris and Grundy county. He was born in the city 
which is still his home on the 19th of July, 1867, and is a son of Peter A. 
Johnson, one of the early settlers of the community. His father followed 
farming during the youth of Frederick, who was in consequence reared 
upon the old homestead farm and attended the common schools of the 
neighborhood. His preliminarj- education, however, was supplemented by a 
course in ;Morris high school, where he was graduated at the age of twenty 
years. Subsequently he pursued a course in Br>-ant & Stratton's Business 
College, of Chicago, and thus well fitted for the practical duties of life he 
entered upon his business career. On the ist of October, 1889, he became 
deputy county clerk and acceptably filled that office until April, 1893, when 
he went to Chicago and for one year acted as a bookkeeper in the large music 
house of Lyon & Healy. In January, 1894, he returned to :\Iorris and be- 
came associated with his father and brothers in the agricultural business, 
from which he retired in 1896, being elected in that year to the ofifice of 
circuit-court clerk as the Republican candidate. He is the present incum- 
bent, his term expiring in 1900. By virtue of the office he also serves as 
the county recorder. He is very exact and prompt in the discharge of his 
• duties, and has won the approval of all concerned. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. S77 

On the 23d of November, 1892, Mr. Johnson married Miss Carrie J., 
a daughter of Jacob Gorich, of Morris, and their union has been blessed 
with one child, Freda L. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are members of the Pres- 
byterian church, and he also belongs to the Knights of Pythias, the Sons 
of Veterans, the Knights of the Globe, and in the Masonic fraternity has 
attained the Knight Templar degree. Since casting his first presidential 
vote he has supported the men and measures of the Republican party and is 
an active factor in political circles. His laudable ambition and enterprise 
have brought him success, and he is numbered among the representative men 
of his native town. 



WILLIAM L. SACKETT. 

Mr. Sackett is distinctively American; so were his ancestors, both lineal 
and collateral, for generations. His father, Loren Sackett, is a direct de- 
scendant of the Sackvilles, the English branch of the family, which for many 
years has been prominent in official and mercantile circles in England. The 
mother, Sarah (Downey) Sackett, is a lineal descendant of a family that was 
prominent in Ireland and that has figured conspicuously in events which 
go to form the history of the Emerald Isle. Representatives of both the 
paternal and maternal ancestry played a prominent part in the early history 
of America. They were members of the Pilgrim band and lovers of religious 
liberty and independence. The ancestors are found among the few that em- 
barked on the Mayflower when it made its famous voyage to the New World 
to carry the little band of settlers who were to lay the foundation for the 
development of New England. They sought here liberty to worship God 
after the promptings of their conscience, and throughout the colonial epoch 
members of both families were concerned with the important interests which 
go to form the records of that period of our national history. When the 
British tyranny became unendurable and the colonists resolved to throw 
off all allegiance to the mother country, members of the family were among 
those early on the field of battle and also in the deliberations in the halls 
of the continental congress. The subject of this sketch is a great-grandson 
of Lieutenant Adnah Sackett, who was a volunteer soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary war, serving as first lieutenant in Captain Sackett's (Seventh) Com- 
pany of Colonel John Moseley's Third Hampshire County (Massachusetts) 
Regiment. The name of Sackett figures prominently in the records of the 
Revolutionarj' war, and several of the family were engaged with Wash- 
ington in his campaigns, two being upon the immediate staff of the father 
•of his country'. 



578 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Loren Sackett, the father of our subject, was a boy of nine years at the 
time of the outbreak of the war of 1812. He took an active interest in the 
Mexican war, and gave close attention to the events which led up to and at- 
tended the Civil war, but was too old to join the army. Two of his sons, 
however, sen-ed with the boys in blue, William Henry becoming the captain 
of Company I, Eleventh Connecticut Volunteers, serving until the last en- 
gagement of his regiment before Petersburg, in 1865, when he was killed on 
the field of battle. The other son, Joseph T., was a member of Company 
C, Thirteenth Illinois Infantry. He enlisted as a corporal, but for gallantry 
on the field of battle at Ringgold Gap was brevetted captain. This event 
concerning the preservation of the colors of the regiment is a matter of com- 
ment in the state reports. 

William Loren Sackett, whose name introduces this review, was bom 
at Holyoke, Massachusetts, in the early '60s, and at the age of three years 
was taken by his parents to Springfield, that state, where he lived until 
about eight years of age. As the result of death and sickness the family 
became scattered, and William L. made his way westward to live with an 
older brother, then located in Amboy, Illinois, to which place the father 
came after some years of travel in search of health, his death occurring in 
Amboy. Through the winter months William L. Sackett was allowed the 
privilege of attending the country schools, and during the summer months 
he worked upon the farm, herding cattle or doing anything else that he 
could find to do in order to help pay his way. A few years later he went 
to Hartford, Connecticut, to live with a sister, and there enjoyed the benefits 
of a grammar-school education and studied during one or two terms in a 
preliminary class of the Hartford high school. The circumstances of the 
family at that time, however, would not permit of his graduation, and he 
secured a position in a small job printing ofifice, where he was able to earn 
enough to pay for his board and clothing. During the winter, as oppor- 
tunity offered, he attended a night school and was thus engaged until his 
strength failed. After a long and nearly fatal illness he went to Dakota, 
in 1 88 1, spending a year upon a ranch, his labors bringing him his livelihood 
and at the same time greatly benefiting his health. The ranch was situated 
in the vicinity of the Sioux and Brule Indian resen-ations. Upon recov- 
ering his health, Mr. Sackett returned to Illinois, in 1881, locating in Spring- 
field. There he again began work at the printer's trade, accepting a position 
in a job office. Subsequently he turned his attention to newspaper work, 
and was for a time a reporter for the State Journal at Springfield. Subse- 
quently he ser\'ed as the business manager of other publications and finally 
became night editor of the Journal, in which capacity he served until the 
paper w-as sold and reorganized in 1884. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 579 

During this time Mr. Sackett had become a stenographic writer, and 
on severing his connection with the State Journal he became the capitol 
correspondent for the Chicago Tribune. He later served upon the staff of 
the Chicago Herald, the New York Tribune, the Philadelphia Press, St. 
Louis Globe-Democrat and other papers. In this way he became actively 
interested in political affairs, formed the acquaintance of many prominent 
statesmen and politicians and numbers among his friends some of the most 
eminent men of the day. He served for some time in the capacity of private 
secretary to Governor John R. Tanner, who at that time was the state 
treasurer and political manager for Senator Cullom. He was also at one 
time private secretary for Cullom, three or four years for Chief Justice 
Simeon P. Shope, of the state supreme court, and for seven vears for Attor- 
ney General Hunt. While thus engaged he was complimented by being 
selected by Governor Richard J. Oglesby as his confidential assistant in the 
disposition of the trying appeals for clemency made in behalf of the con- 
demned Chicago anarchists, and was highly complimented by the governor 
in an autograph letter upon his success in outwitting the hundreds of news- 
paper correspondents and getting information of the governors denial of 
the plea for pardon to the officials in Chicago ten hours before it became 
known in Springfield, that proper provision might be made to frustrate any 
plans for assailing the county jail and rescuing the anarchists. Mr. Sackett 
also aided Attorney-General Hunt in the preparation and hearing of this 
case on its appeal to the United States supreme court at Washington. 

While in Springfield, in 1887, he became acquainted with and married 
Miss Ida I. Brown, a young lady of culture and many admirable qualities. 
As a result of this marriage two children have been born, Loren B. and 
Edwin, aged respectively eleven and two years. 

Mr. Sackett has been engaged in various lines of newspaper and mer- 
cantile work and railroading, and for a number of years has been active and 
prominent in state politics, being an uncompromising Republican and a 
fearless, open fighter. In the McKinley campaign of 1896 he was named 
by acclamation as the presidential elector for the eighth congressional 
district, with nearly twenty thousand Republican majority. In 1891 he came 
to Morris and purchased the Morris Herald. It has been a stanch and un- 
compromising Republican paper under his management, and is a journal that 
is a credit to the city. It has always been conducted upon the broader ideas 
gained by its publisher when identified with metropolitan papers, directing 
its criticisms as an impersonal advocate of the people, regardless of the 
personal beliefs of the individuaJs associated with it. This idea of journalism 
was new to the constituency of the paper, and many looked upon it askance 
as a type of personality. Those who knew Mr. Sackett best, however, long 



58o BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

ago learned that no matter wliat liis paper said he frequently did not enter- 
tain the same views personally, and personally he is ever ready to meet his 
friends or opponents with the best of feeling, regardless of newspaper com- 
ment. It is not dif^cidt to find numerous critics who will say that, no 
matter what else they may think, under the direction of its present publisher 
the paper is always outspoken upon every proposition, and that it does 
much by its policy to curb the vicious and promote the best interests of 
the city. 



ALMERON K. KNAPP. 

The able man of afifairs whose name is above has been the most promi- 
nent business man in Minooka, Grundy county, since 1865, and he conducts 
the grain, lumber and banking business of the town. He is a native of the 
Empire state, having been born in Chenango county. New York, in 1836, 
and is of New England lineage. Simeon Knapp, his father, was bom in Con- 
necticut and went to New York state while yet a young man and there mar- 
ried Caroline Root. 

When Almeron K. Knapp was a mere lad the family removed to Steu- 
ben county. New York, and located near Bath, one of the two seats of 
justice of that county, and there Simeon Knapp died at the age of sixty-five 
years. His wife survived him a number of years. Young Almeron received 
his primary education in the public schools near his home and later took 
an academic course. He then entered upon a business career and had con- 
siderable experience in merchandising before he came w'est. He located in 
Illinois in 1865, and was married, at Lockport, to Miss Pamelia Griswold, 
who came from Connecticut to Illinois in 1836. 

Minooka is the distributing point for an extensive and rich tributary 
territory, a country of large and productive farms and of successful business 
enterprises of all kinds. Mr. Knapp was not long in acquiring a monopoly 
of the grain trade at this point, and his business in that line is an extensive 
one, his grain shipments amounting to about seven hundred thousand 
bushels annually. He handles large quantities of lumber, and the financial 
department of his enterprise brings him in close touch with the business 
interests in all directions round about Minooka. 

Not only is Mr. Knapp a successful business man but he is also a public- 
spirited man, a most estimable citizen, and he possesses in an eminent degree 
the esteem and confidence of all who know him. His liberality in the support 
of church interests and public enterprises having for their object the best 
interests of the community is recognized by all. 

Politically Mr. Knapp is a thoroughgoing RepubHcan, though he cast 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 581 

his first vote for Stephen A. Douglas, the great war Democrat. He is 
not personally a seeker for political preferment, but exerts a not uncertain 
influence upon local political affairs. He was made a Mason many years 
ago and has advanced to the thirty-second degree, becoming a Sublime 
Prince of the Royal Secret, Ineft'able Degrees of the Scottish rite. Mr. 
Knapp's only surviving brother, George Knapp, is a well-to-do farmer living 
in Steuben county, New York. He has three sisters. 



STEPHANAS W. FURR. 

Stephanas W. Furr, one of Grundy county's most enterprising business 
men, is of French de.'-cent, his grandfather, Enoch Furr, having been bom 
and reared in France. At about the time of the Revolutionary war he emi- 
grated to America and settled in Loudoun county, Virginia, where he was 
successfully engaged in farming until shortly before his death, which event 
took place when he was one hundred and four years of age. 

Lewton Furr, the father of our subject, was born in 1797, in the Old 
Dominion. He remained with his parents until he attained his majority, 
when he married Pleasant Matthews and started upon his independent career. 
Renting a farm in Loudoun county, he cultivated the place for ten years, 
and then moved to Frederick county, same state, where he purchased a good 
homestead. In 1854 he sold out and came to LaSalle county, Illinois. Here 
he continued his agricultural labors until death released him from his cares, 
in 1870. His wife, after surviving him about thirteen years, passed to her 
reward February 2j, 1883. They were the parents of twelve children, of 
whom Agnes, the eldest, died in infancy; Richard, Elizabeth, Squire, Mar- 
garet and Pleasant are deceased; Newton lives in Morris, Illinois; Chapman 
and Sylvanas W. reside in Livingston county, this state; Mary's home is near 
Marion. Indiana; S. W., our subject: and Martha died December 27,. 1899. 

The birth of S. W. Furr occurred in Frederick county, Virginia, Sep- 
tember 13, 1837, and in 1854, when he was in his eighteenth year, he came 
to this state, and for five years aided his father in placing his new farm under 
cultivation. In the spring of i860 he married and embarked in agriculture 
upon his own account, living in LaSalle county for four years and in Liv- 
ingston county for five years. Since 1869 he has carried on a farm in Grundy 
county, it being a part of the estate of his father-in-law. There are two hun- 
dred and forty acres in his homestead, all well improved and productive. 
Mr. Furr is a practical farmer, industrious and enterprising, and by judicious 
management he has become well-to-do. He follows in the political foot- 



582 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

steps of his father, being an ardent Democrat, l5ut he has never sought nor 
accepted office. 

The marriage of Mr. Furr and Mary, the daughter of John and Mafy 
Gray, both of whom were natives of Scotland, took place in the spring of 
i860. Six sons and five daughters were bom to our subject and wife, 
namely: Ida P., who married Ira \\'est and lives in Kendall county; James 
R., who wedded Josie Johnson and makes his home in De Kalb county; 
George N., of this county, whose wife formerly was Flora ISIoseman; Mattje 
J., the wife of John Woodward, of Mississippi; j\Iary Josephine, the wife of 
Martin Anderson, of De Kalb county; Belle, deceased; ^Margaret V., who 
married Martin Seal and lives in the old Gray home in Nettle Creek town- 
ship; and the names of the four youngest boys, living at home, are John F., 
William S., Francis W. and Robert A. 



ROBERT SYKES. 



Grundy county is fortunate in possessing so many enterprising young 
agriculturists, and numbered among the progressive farmers of Wauponsee 
township stands Robert Sykes. He is a native of Morris, his birth having 
occurred April 7, 1871, and his early years were passed upon the home- 
stead of his parents, Thomas H. and Betty (Cryer) Sykes, whose history is 
printed up>on another page of this work. 

As soon as he was old enough to be of any assistance to his parents, 
Robert Sykes commenced working on the farm and before he was twenty 
years of age he was thoroughly familiar with every detail of agriculture. 
High principles of conduct were early instilled into his mind, and in the 
public schools of his home district he acquired a liberal education. In 
later years he has constantly broadened his mental vision by reading and 
study, and obsenation and experience have conduced toward the same end. 
It was his privilege to attend the nomial school at Morris for about two 
years, and educational affairs are matters of deep interest to him. as they 
should be to every true, progressive ^American. 

Since arriving at maturity, Robert Sykes has devoted his whole atten- 
tion to the management of his father's fami. and for some time he has in- 
depyendently cultivated a portion of the property, where he has his home. 
In all of his manly struggles for a competence he is aided by his estimable 
wife, a lady of refinement and rare womanly qualities. It was on the 28th 
of June. 1898, that the marriage of Mr. Sykes and Izora Heather, daughter 
of James and Emma (Wellman) Heather, of this county, was celebrated. 

In his political standing Mr. Sykes is a Republican. He has no desire 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 583 

to officiate in public capacities, and is not a politician in the ordinary sense 
of the word, but he has well grounded convictions upon the duties of the 
citizens of this great republic, and faithfully adheres to his high principles. 



FRANK N. HULL. 



Frank N. Hull, the proprietor and publisher of the IMorris Post, was 
born in Morris, Illinois, October 26, 1864, his parents being Birdsey B. 
and Cynthia (Crumb) Hull. His father was born in Ohio, March 29, 1834, 
and died in Morris, March 14, 1894. He was a son of Samuel and Abigail 
(Pardee) Hull, and with his parents came to Morris in 1847, making the 
journey across the country. Having arrived at years of maturity he married 
Miss Cynthia Crumb, a daughter of Ambrose and Polly Crumb, who re- 
moved from New York to Illinois in 1846, taking up their abode in Morris. 

Frank N. Hull was one of a family of nine children, but only four are 
now living. His entire life has been passed in Morris, and to its pubhc 
school system he is indebted for the educational advantages he received. 
At the age of seventeen he began learning the printer's trade and diligently 
applied himself to the mastery of the business. In July, 1889, he joined 
Messrs. Kutz and Murray in the establishment of the Morris Post. In 1891 
Mr. Kutz sold out, and in 1894 Mr. Murray also sold his interest, Mr. Hull 
thus becoming sole proprietor. He has since conducted the publication of 
the Post and issued both a daily and weekly edition. He has made his 
journal one of the best in this section of the state. It is a clean, bright and 
entertaining sheet, devoted to the local interests of Morris and Grundy 
county, and has a large circulation, of which it is justly deserving. This 
renders it a good advertising medium and the advertising patronage of the 
paper is large and adds materially to the income which the owner derives 
therefrom. 

On the 1st of January, 1891, Mr. Hull was united in marriage to Miss 
Helen L., a daughter of H. D. Hitchcock and Mary J. (Cutting) Hitch- 
cock. Her father was a native of Champlain county, New York, and her 
mother of Westport, Essex county, that state. In 1867 Mr. Hitchcock came 
to Morris and for some years was numbered among its prominent citizens. 
He served as deputy clerk of Grundy county for four years, and in 1877 was 
elected county clerk, which position he was filling at the time of his death, 
April 7, 1880. His son, W. D. Hitchcock, served as his deputy and after 
his father's death was elected to fill out the unexpired term. In 1891 he 
became a resident of Denver, Colorado. Mrs. Hull was born in Champlain 
county. New York, in 1864. Since the establishment of the Post she has 



584 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

been her husband's able assistant in its management and has contributed 
in no small degree to its success. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hull are numbered 
among the valued and popular citizens of this community and have a very- 
large circle of friends. 



SMITH DE LA MATTER. 

In pioneer days Smith De La Matter came to Maine township, then 
Braceville township, and through many years has been prominently identi- 
fied with its agricultural interests. He is descended from an old French 
Huguenot family, but for many generations its representatives have found 
homes in America. Isaac De La ^Matter, the grandfather of our subject, 
was a cooper by trade and resided in Dutchess county, New York, for 
many years. In old age he removed to Canada, where he spent his last 
days with his son Martin. His children were Seymour, Smith, Martin, 
Cornelia and Elizabeth. 

Martin De La Matter, the father of our subject, was born in Dutchess 
county. New York, September 8, 1795. received a common-school educa- 
tion and early became familiar with the labors of the farm. When a 
young man he removed to Canboro. Canada, and was there married, No- 
vember 3, 1818, to Sabina Smith, who was born in New York, August 6, 
1797, a daughter of Matthew and Mary (Wright) Smith. Her father was 
born April 4, 1773. and died in Ontario, August 16. 1834. Her mother 
was bom March 18, 1777, and died February 2. 1846. They were married 
April 29, 1795, and had sixteen children: Ezra, who was born in New 
York, January 16, 1796, was married and had nine children and died 
January 16, 1864: Sabina, born August 6. 1797. had nine children and 
died February 9, 1835; Ferrand, born in New York, July 26, 1799, had nine 
children and died in Michigan, March 19, 1875; ^lartha, born in Port 
Erie, Canada, September 17, 1801, had six children and died January 11, 
1867; Sabrin, born in Canboro, Ontario, June 17, 1803, had nine children; 
Matthew, born April 8, 1805, in Ontario, and died September 2, 1871; an 
infant, who died unnamed; Mary, born in Canboro, Ontario. August 31, 
1807, had seven children and died May 3, 1848; Joel, born September 25, 
1809. in Canboro, Ontario, had two children and died October 12, 1832; 
Phoebe, born in Ontario, November 19. 181 1, had eleven children and 
died November 8, 1873; Seth K.. born in Canboro, August 2, 1814. had 
three children: Elizabeth, born in Canboro, April 26, 181 6, had six chil- 
dren and died March 22. 1868: James W., born in Canboro, July 26, 1818, 
had one child and died October 30. 1898: Isaac, born July 31, 1819, had one 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 585, 

child; Wesley, born in Canboro, April 5, 1822, had three children and 
died July 20, 1872; and Margaret, born in Canboro, April 18, 1825, had 
six children and died July 6, 1861. The father of these children was a 
millwright by trade, and with his family removed from New York to 
Ontario, Canada, in 1800. About 1802 he located on a farm at Canboro, 
purchasing a tract of land and building thereon a mill. He settled in 
the midst of the primeval forest, cleared away the trees and developed 
rich and fertile fields, becoming one of the substantial and well known 
citizens of the community. His children settled around him and the 
family was one of prominence there. In his religious belief he was a 
Methodist and died in that faith in Canboro, at a very advanced age. 

After his marriage Martin De La Matter located on a farm at Can- 
boro, where they lived for some years and then removed to Pelham, On- 
tario, now in Welland county, and there he purchased and improved a 
farm, securing two hundred acres of land, from which he cleared the trees. 
When it was placed under cultivation additional crops were planted and 
soon abundant harvests rewarded his labors. Ultimately he became one 
of the prosperous as well as enterprising farmers of his community. He 
and his wife were members of the Methodist church, in which he served 
as a class-leader, and to the support of the church he made liberal con- 
tributions and in his life he manifested its teachings. He held a number 
of township offices, and at the time of the Canadian rebellion served as a 
sergeant, being stationed at Fort Erie. By his marriage to Sabina Smith 
he had the following children : Cyrus, who was born in Canboro, Sep- 
tember 10, 1820, and died February 27, 1890; Ryan A., who was born May 
5. 1822. and died May 16, 1827; Eben T-. who was born April 17, 1824; 
Cornelia, who was born December 10, 1825, and died October 25, 1863; 
Smith, who was born May 26, 1827; Ferrand, born May 25, 1830, and died 
September 5. 1831; Peter M., who was born in Pelham, February 14, 1833; 
and Martin, who was born December 13, 1834, and died March 26, 1835. 
The mother of these children died in Pelham, February 10, 1835, and on 
the 15th of September, of the same year, Mr. De La Matter was married 
in Pelham to Mary AL Vanderburgh. She was born in Ontario, June 20, 
1806, and died September 11, 1885, and was of Dutch lineage. The 
children of this union are : Sabina, who was born in Pelham, June 2y, 
1836; Henry, born July 23, 1838; Ira, born January 29, 1840: Robert H., 
who was born March 19. 1842. and died June 4, 1899; Isaac, who was 
born March 24. 1S45. and died July 3. 1869; Mary E., who was born 
March 13. 1847, and died January 18, 1867: and Frances E., born Feb- 
ruary 28, 1850. The father of these children died in Pelham. December 
19, 1874. He was a leading and influential citizen of the community,- 



586 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

whose upright life commended him to the confidence and respect of all 
with whom he came in contact. He reared a highly respected family, 
and the children of his second marriage all received college educations. 
Robert H. became a physician: Henry is a teacher in the high school: Ira 
was educated for the bar: and Isaac also prepared for the legal profession 
but died in early manhood. 

Smith De La Matter, the subject of this review, acquired his educa- 
tion in the common schools of Pelham and early became familiar with 
the work of the farm, assisting in the work of field and meadow through- 
out the summer months. He aided his father in the cultivation of the 
homestead until twenty-two years of age, and in 1849 he came to Illinois, 
locating in Millington. on the Fox river. There he was employed as a 
farm hand by his uncle, Seymour, and afterward worked in a wagon shop. 
In 1854 he returned to Canada, where he worked at the millwright's trade 
in Pelham and other towns. He was married in Manchester. New York. 
April 30, 1859, to Margaret A. Marron. who was born in Belfast, Ireland. 
May 6, 1832, and was of English and Scotch lineage, her parents being 
James and Catherine (McGrain) Marron. Her father was the only son 
of a wealthy man. His wife was a daughter of William and Ellen Mc- 
Grain, the former a merchant of Edinburg, Scotland, in which city he died. 
James Marron and his wife died in early life, leaving their daughter Mar- 
garet an orphan at the age of three years. She lived with her uncle, William 
McGrain, in Edinburg, Scotland, until eight years of age, when she ac- 
companied him on his emigration to America. Three years later he re- 
turned to the land of hills and heather, leaving Margaret to the care of 
his friend. William Aikens, and soon after his arrival in Scotland Mr. Mc- 
Grain died. Unto our subject and his wife have been bom three chil- 
dren: James, who was born February 29. i860, and died on the same 
day: Truman M.. who was born March 14, 1861: and Martin S., who was 
born September 8, 1863, and died May 2, 1869. 

In May, 1869, Mr. and Mrs. De La Matter came to Illinois and pur- 
chased eighty acres of wild land in Maine township, Grundy county, paying 
four hundred dollars for the tract. This amount he had saved from the 
proceeds of his own labor, and upon the new farm he began life in the 
west. Long years of untiring activity followed, in which he greatly im- 
proved his property, erecting a pleasant home and substantial outbuildings 
and adding other accessories and conveniences of a model farm. He has 
also extended the boundaries of his property until the homestead now 
comprises one hundred and sixty acres, and in addition to this he owns 
two hundred acres of rich and fertile land in Greenville township, all under 
a high state of cultivation. All of the improvements upon the place .stand 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 587 

as monuments to his thrift and enterprise, for his possessions have been 
acquired entirely through his well directed ettorts. His activity in the 
affairs of life has brought to him a handsome competence and his example 
should serve to encourage others who are forced to enter upon a business 
career empty-handed, for America ofYers unlimited possibilities to her citi- 
zens if they be possessed of energy, ambition and resolution. 

His son, Truman M.. has operated the farm for a number of years. 
He acquired his preliminary education in the district schools and after- 
ward attended the high school of Normal, Illinois. Subsequently he en- 
gaged in teaching in Maine township, but has had charge of his father's 
property for some time, thus relieving Mr. De La Matter of much care 
and labor. He was married, in Maine township, March 14, 1895. to Jennie 
M. Williams, who was born in Cook county. Illinois. March 9. 1866. and 
is a daughter of Edmund J. and Mary (James) Williams. Her father was 
born in Manchester. England, December 4, 1833, and received a common- 
school education. In 1852, when nineteen years of age, he crossed the 
Atlantic to New York and resided in the Empire state for two years. He 
was married in that state, January i, 1856, to Mary James, who was born 
in Manchester. England, March 4, 1835. ^nd came to America on the 
same ship in which Mr. Williams took passage. She died March 12, 1900, 
in Gardner, from the efifects of an accident. Their children were as follows : 
Mary E., bom April 14, 1857, in Cook county, Illinois, died July 22, 1893; 
George H, was born in the same county, February 18, 1859; John B., born 
January 8, 1864. died January 18, 1891 ; Jennie M. was born March 9, 
1866, in Cook county; Ida B. was born in the same county May 5, 1868: 
Andrew J. was born in Kankakee county, Illinois, August 3, 1869; Albert 
was born October 15, 1872; Lillie L. was born May 12, 1874, and died 
November 2y, 1890; and Fred, born January 22, 1876, died in childhood. 
Soon after his marriage Mr. Williams removed to Cook county, Illinois, 
locating on land in Norton township. In February, 1868, he removed to 
Kankakee county, Illinois, locating on a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres there. He prospered, becoming one of the substantial farmers of 
the community. In 1869 he took up his abode in Gardner, Illinois, and 
from there removed to Mazon township, where he purchased two hundred 
and eighty acres of land, upon which he lived for some years. He then 
returned to Gardner, where he now resides. His wife was a lady of many 
virtues and her death was deeply deplored by her family and a large circle 
of friends. Mr. Williams has always lived an industrious and upright life 
and is respected by all who know him. In his political views Truman 
M. De La Matter is independent. He is an honored member of the order 
of Knights of Pythias of Gardner and has filled all of its offices, including 



588 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

that of chancellor. He is also connected with the Modern Woodmen of 
America and in his local camp has served as venerable counselor. A 
practical farmer and well known citizen, he is straightforward in his deal- 
ings and honorable in all life's relations. 



JAMES ^lEAD. 



The self-made man is everywhere the leading citizen. People take to 
him, and when he has once established his right to be so called good fortune 
seldom deserts him. Grundy county, Illinois, has many self-made men and 
Au Sable township has its proportion of them, one of the best known of 
whom is the man whose name forms the title to this sketch. 

James [Mead, one of the early settlers and well known citizens of 
Au Sable township, was bom in Kerrv% Ireland. His father was Michael 
;Mead and his mother's maiden name was Kate Heffern. They both died 
when their son, James, was a child, though he was old enough to remember 
them distinctly. They left four children, three sons and a daughter. The 
other sons were named John and Patrick, and the daughter was named 
Anna. James was the oldest of the family and the only one who came to 
America. When he was about fourteen years old he crossed the ocean with 
an aunt, his mother's sister, and went directly to Louisville, Kentucky, 
where he remained about three years. In 1855 he came to ^Minooka, Grundy 
county, Illinois, and has been a resident of this county ever since. 

Mv. Mead married Miss IMaria Briscoe, who comes from a well know-n 
early family of Grundy county, and [Mr. and Mrs. Mead have been blessed 
with nine children — three sons and six daughters, named as follows in the 
order of their birth : :\Iary Ellen. Eliza. James. Annie. Maggie, Nicholas, 
Katie, Agnes and Frank. 

Mr. [Mead came to America a poor boy, with no parents on whom to 
depend ; but he went to work with a determination to succeed in life. He 
has a fine farm, and it is not too much to say that he is one of the substan- 
tial citizens of Au Sable township. He has ever been esteemed as an honest, 
upright man and possesses the respect of his fellow citizens. He and all 
the members of his family are worthy members of the Catholic church. 



FREDERICK BURKHARDT. 

Illinois owes much to her German population, which has long been 
large, influential and helpful to public prosperity. Among the German set- 
tlers in Grundy county no family is more favorably known than the Burk- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 589 

hardts, of whom Frederick Burkhardt, of Good. Farm township, is a worthy- 
representative. 

Frederick Burkhardt was born at Bion. Bavaria, Germany, March 5, 
1830, a son of Leonard Burkhardt, a well-to-do farmer who owned forty- 
one acres of good land and whose first wife bore him children named ^Nlar- 
garet, Barbara, Michael, Leonard, Christian, Hans, Frederick, Andrew, 
Christina, Mary, Martin and Sophia. The mother of these children died 
and he married again, but had no offspring by his second wife. He died on 
his place at sixty-five, leaving an enviable reputation as a man of honor and 
ability. He served his country in the capacity of a teamster during an in- 
teresting portion of the Thirty Years' war, and was a consistent member of 
the Lutheran church. 

Frederick Burkhardt was reared to the arduous but health-giving and 
morality-encouraging work of the farm, attending the public schools from 
the time he was six years old until he was thirteen, with good results, for 
he was a diligent student, and was well educated in the Bible. When he 
left school he began to work out at farm labor and learned to mow with a 
scythe, to cut grain with a sickle and to thresh with a flail. He was thus 
employed until he was twenty years old, and even then could get for a whole 
year's sen^ice but ten dollars in cash, with no allowance for clothing. Not- 
withstanding his paltry wages he was able to save a little money and his 
father helped him tO' some more, and he was thus enabled to seek fortune in 
America in better environments and under more favorable circumstances. 
He left Bremen Haven on board a sailing vessel. May 10, 1850. antl made a 
voyage to New York which consumed twenty-eight days, and upon his 
arrival was quarantined for three days more, there having been some cases of 
small-pox on board. He was thus a full month on the water. 

He came at once to Illinois, making his way to BufTalo by the way of 
the Erie canal, thence to Chicago by lake steamer, thence to Oswego, Iven- 
dall county, Illinois, where his brothers, Michael and Leonard, and John 
Hahn, his sister Barbara's husband, had settled with their families. Later all 
his other brothers and sisters came over from Germany and settled in Illi- 
nois. Mr. Burkhardt began his active career in America as a farm laborer 
and later was employed in a tavern at Oswego. July 15, 1853, he married 
Mary Frehwirtd, whose parents were Leonard and Barbara Frehwirtd. 
He owned forty acres of land in Bion, Bavaria, where he lived out his 
days and died at the age of seventy years, more or less. In 1852 the widow 
of Leonard F. came to^ the United States with her brother Frederick and 
settled at Oswego, Illinois, sailing from Havre to New York and making the 
journey from New York to Oswego, Illinois, in the manner then in vogue. 
In August, 1853, four or five weeks after her marriage to Mr. Burkhardt, 



590 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

they located on Mr. Burkhardt's present farm, in Good Farm township, not 
far from Dwight. The homestead then consisted of eighty acres of Prairie 
land, absolutely wild and unimproved. When it is stated that this land was 
not only improved and put under cultivation but also that, by subsequent 
purchases, it has grown to be a valuable tract of eight hundred and eighty 
acres of fine farm land, some adequate idea of Mr. Burkhardt's industry, 
economy and excellent business ability will be afiforded the reader. The 
home farm is provided with a substantial frame house and large and fine 
barns and out-buildings. Mr. and Mrs. Burkhardt both worked hard, early 
and late, both planned and both saved, and the means by which Mr. Burk- 
hardt became one of the largest land-owners of Good Farm township were 
such as have advanced honest and industrious Gentians, and others as well, 
ever since the beginning of general settlement in the middle west. When 
he arrived at his brother's in Oswego, after that long and memorable journey 
from the Fatherland, he had but one dollar left, and during the first five 
months in America he worked for six dollars a month and literally saved all 
his wages, carrying his economy to the point of mending his own clothing, 
until he married. As he began to prosper he continued his saving and never 
had any money for whisky, tobacco or foolish recreation. He had no time 
for anything but work, and he worked with a will and to good purpose. 
His career is an illustration of what may be accomplished in this country by 
a man of determined purpose, with hard work, careful economy and good 
management. Mr. Burkhardt had no aid but his careful, thrifty and indus- 
trious wife, and together they have acquired a handsome property, the value 
of which approximates one hundred thousand dollars. 

Mr. and Mrs. Burkhardt are members and liberal supporters of the 
Evangelical church, and Mr. Burkhardt has for many years been a church 
trustee. In politics Mr. Burkhardt has always been a stanch Republican, 
and it is a matter of local history that he was one of the original Republicans 
of Good Farm township. The following facts concerning the children of 
this worthy couple will be found of interest in this connection : Barbara, 
the first born, died in infancy. Amos died at the age of thirteen years. 
Others were named John Andrew, John Frederick, Thomas, William, Bar- 
bara, Caroline, Sophia and Mina. 



SOLOMON HOGE. 



One of the remarkable characters of Grundy county was Solomon Hoge, 
who, after an exceedingly busy and eventful life, passed to his reward a few 
y,?ars ago. His memorv is enshrined in the hearts of a host of his lifelong 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 591 

frienc's and acquaintances, many of whom will take pleasure in perusing the 
story of his career. 

The birth of Solomon Hoge took place in Virginia, October 18, 1809. 
His parents were Joshua and Mary (Poole) Hoge. Farming and stock- 
raising were the chief occupations of his early manhood and prime, and by 
industry and economy he amassed a competence before he decidetl to come 
to Illinois. It was in 1870 that he permanently located in Saratoga town- 
ship, and here he spent the declining days of his life, loved and honored for 
what he had accomplished, and for the fortitude with which he had met and 
overcome the obstacles in his pathway. That he was recognized as one 
of exceptional ability, judgment and resource was manifested in many ways, 
and in this connection a quotation from the "History of the Sauks and Black- 
hawk W^ar," written and published by Perry A. Armstrong, of Morris, Illi- 
nois, in 1887, may be 'of interest. In referring to the excitement and alarm 
existing at that time at Ottawa, Illinois, he says : "Captain Solomon Hoge, 
now one of Grundy county's prominent citizens, put in his appearance. He 
is a man of cool courage, fine presence and a born leader of men, and had 
been captain in the Virginia militia. His quiet demeanor and sensible ques- 
tions as to the cause of the alarm were such as to gain the confidence of all. 
Captain Stadden at once resigned all kind of leadership to Captain Hoge, 
who, as if by magic, brought out of chaos, confidence; out of doubt and fear, 
security. First, viewing his surroundings, he selected his guards, went with 
them to their places, told them what to do. and how to do, assured them 
that they were in no present danger, and that they would be relieved at such 
an hour by others. In this way he returned confidence to the wavering, 
and converted cowards into good soldiers, that, too, in a few minutes' time. 
But all this precaution and excitement were without cause, for there were 
no hostile Indians near Ottawa. After Captain Hoge took command of 
these settlers no further alarms occurred, and the people felt perfectly se- 
cure. Such is the influence that one cool-headed, brave man can exert over 
an excited and badly frightened community." 

The marriage of Solomon Hoge and Sarah Bashaw, who survives him. 
was solemnized March 17, 1872. She is a daughter of Robert H. Bashaw, 
who was born in Virginia, August 5, 1823, and whose death occurred at the 
residence of his daughter, Mrs. Hoge, January 26, 1896. Her mother, 
whose maiden name was Virginia Rector, was born in 1832 and departed 
this life June 30. 1872. The only child born to Solomon and Sarah Hoge 
is Herman Hoge, now on the old homestead with his mother. His birth- 
place was in Saratoga township, the date of the event being May 20, 1875. 
The happy, successful life of our subject came t6 an end at his home. May 
30, 1892, he then being eighty-two years, seven months and twelve days 



592 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

old. \\'i(hin his lifetime, which almost spanned this wonderful century, he 
witnessed the progress of his beloved land from a country little esteemed or 
consi(]ered among the powerful nations of the world to a first place in the 
councils of the globe, and, as he was a true patriot, he had no greater pleasure 
than that of tracing the epochs of its growth. Personally he performed his 
full share as a citizen toward this desirable end, and coming generations shall 
find his name inscribed among the founders of Illinois and the United States. 



WILLIAM B. HADDEN. 

i 
From sterling Scotch ancestry Mr. Hadden is descended, and some 

of the leading characteristics of that race are manifest in his honorable 
business career. Thomas Hadden, the original American ancestor,"left 
the land of hills and heather for the New World, taking up his abode in 
New Jersey during the early settlement of the colonies. The records show 
that he was a resident of Woodbridge, New Jersey, in 1727, and that he 
died there in 1783. He was a carpenter by trade and a Quaker in religious 
faith, taking an active part in the administration of the affairs of the 
Society of Friends. He was also prominent in village afifairs, serving as 
commissioner of highways and as overseer of the poor for many years. 
In the year 1727 he married Margaret Fitz Randolph, the wedding taking 
place in Woodbridge, New Jersey. - After her death he wedded Margaret 
Vanquellen, of Bloomfield. She was a widow and the wedding was cele- 
brated in 1750. Afterward he was again married, his third wife, Mrs. 
Catherine Hadden, surviving him. His children were all born of the first 
marriage and were: Elizabeth, who married William Smith in 1753; Mary, 
who became the wife of Thomas Brown in 1754 and afterward married 
Mr. Dobbs; Nathaniel; Joseph; Thomas, who married Annabel Crowell 
in 1758; Margaret, who married John Hurd in 1757: and I\Iartha, who 
became the wife of Nathaniel Loofburrow. The father of these children 
was disowned by the Quakers in 1750, on account of his marriage to 
Margaret Vanquellen, who was an Episcopalian. 

Thomas Hadden, the son of Thomas and Margaret Hadden, was born 
in Woodbridge, New Jersey, in 1736, and was the great-grandfather of 
our subject. He spent his entire life in his native town and was there 
married in 1736 to Annabel Crowell. During the Revolutionary war he 
joined the Colonial forces and fought for the independence of the nation 
as a member of the First Regiment of Middlesex militia, state of New 
Jersey. At the time of his death, which occurred September 2, 1778. he was 
serving as a lieutenant colonel in that command. The regiment took 




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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 593 

part in the battles of Monmouth and Trenton and endured all the hard- 
ships of the memorable winter of 1777 at Valley Forge. His remains were 
interred in the cemetery at Woodbridge, New Jersey, and his wife died 
there many years later, passing away July 28, 1821. Their children were: 
Thomas, who was born June 24. 1761, wedded Mary Baker and died July 
30, 1803. Nathaniel, who was born June 8, 1765, and died November 
18, 1842, was married first to Mahala Marsh and in 1808 wedded Sarah 
Marsh Brown, while on the 13th of July, 1819, having also lost his second 
wife, he wedded Mary Halsey Marsh. Crowell, who was born March 8, 
1768. and died September 11, 1833, is one of the heroes of the Revolution. 
He married his first wife, Elizabeth, in 1791, and after her demise he 
married Anna May. Christian, who was born March 8, 1775, and died 
February 6, 1840, was married in 1791 to William Harrison. Thomas 
Hadden, the third of the name, was the grandfather of our subject. He 
was born in Woodbridge, New Jersey, and wedded Mary Baker. Their 
children were as follows: John, who was born September 8, 1781, was 
married in 1808 to Rebekah Brown and died August 8, 1862. Catherine, 
who was born Februarj' 9, 1783, became the wife of Henry Hale and died 
October 15, 1831. Ephraim, who was bom March 30, 1784, was married 
in 1810 to Isabel Manning Harriott and died March 6, 1872. Matthias, 
who was born April 5, 1786, died December 29, 1814. Cornelius, who was 
born May 2, 1789, died October 22, 1793. Jacob, who was born May 
18, 1791, was married in 1816 to Sally Ayres and died December 22, 1871. 
Thomas, who was born June i, 1794, died June 30, 1833. Cornelius, who 
was born April 16, 1798, and died February 27, 1895, first married Eliza- 
beth Spencer and in 1850 wedded Mary Spencer Bennett. Mary, who 
was born January 16, 1801, and died April 8, 1879, was married in 1825 to 
Uzziah Bloodgood. The father of these children was a substantial farmer 
of Woodbridge, New Jersey, where he owned a well improved tract of 
land and a good home. There he died July 30, 1803, and his wife passed 
away September 6, 1842. He served as a soldier in the war of 18 12, and 
was always loyal to his duties of citizenship. His homestead is still in the 
possession of his descendants. 

Cornelius Hadden, the father of our subject, was born in Woodbridge, 
New Jersey, April 16, 1798, obtained a good education for that day, be- 
came a well informed man and possessed excellent business judgment. He 
was reared as a farmer, but in early life became a ship carpenter, working 
for the ship-building firm of Brown & Bell. When a young man he went 
to Athens, New York, establishing his home at that place. Twice married, 
he first wedded Elizabeth Spencer, who died in Athens nineteen years 
after their marriage. He then wedded her sister, Mary P. (Spencer) 



594 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Bennett, who was born at Albany, New York, August 6, 1813. The 
Spencers were probably of Holland lineage. The children of the second 
marriage were : Charles H.. born February 26, 1852; and William B., 
who was born July 13, 1854. Cornelius Hadden followed ship-building at 
Athens, on the Hudson river, for many years, prospering in his under- 
takings and becoming a substantial citizen. He was for some years in 
partnership with William H. 3.Iorton, and the firm not only carried on 
operations on an extensive scale along the line of ship-building, but also 
engaged in merchandising. 

On the 2d of May, 1861, Mr. Hadden arrived at Morris, Illinois, and a 
few days later settled on what is known as ^he Hadden homestead, having 
purchased the land in 1857. It was then a wild tract of one hundred and 
sixty acres, on which a log cabin had been built and a few acres had been 
broken. It was pleasantly situated on Waupecan creek and is well tim- 
bered. I\Ir. Hadden improved the property by developing the fields and 
erecting good buildings. At one time he was the owner of one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Iowa, but sold that and spent his last days on 
his Illinois farm, where he died January 27, 1895. He was a man of 
excellent judgment, of retentive memory, and was well informed on all 
general topics. His sterling characteristics made him highly respected. In 
politics he was a Jacksonian Democrat and he was very firm in upholding 
his honest convictions. 

William B. Hadden. whose name introduces this review, was born in 
Athens, New York, July 13, 1854, and with his parents came to Illinois 
when about seven years of age. He has therefore witnessed much of the 
growth and development of Grundy county. He obtained his education 
in the common schools, and through the summer months assisted in the 
work of field and meadow. Not long after attaining his majority he was 
married, in Morris, Illinois, January 26, 1876, by Rev. John Arthur ]Mont- 
gotnery. to Laura Frances Allison, who was born in Stark county. Illinois, 
December 3, 1856, and is the daughter of Hiram and Elizabeth (Mann) 
Allison. Her paternal grandparents were John and Elizabeth (Stewart) 
Allison, the former an Ohio farmer of Scotch-Irish descent. His parents 
were James and Barbara Allison, and the former is the first of the name 
of whom we have record. John Allison died in the Buckeye state. He 
was a soldier in the war of 1812, enlisting at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. He 
served for two hundred and seventy-four days under the command of Cap- 
tain Coulson and Colonel Free. He and his wife located in Belmont county. 
Ohio, in early pioneer days. He married Elizabeth Stewart, who was born 
June 28, 1800. Their children were James. Jebsel, John, Hiram. George, 
Susan and Rebecca. The mother of these children was a daughter of Jesse 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 595 

and Mary Stewart. Her father was born October 12, 1777, and died Octo- 
ber 8, 1846. His wife was born Marcli 12, 1762. Their cliildren were 
EHzabeth, Rebecca, Alatilda, Mary and James P. Jesse Stewart removed 
to Tuscarawas county, Ohio, in 1844, having for some time previous lived 
in Marietta, that state. 

He was living there at the time of the breaking out of the war of 
1812. Responding to tlie country's call for troops, he enlisted under Cap- 
tain Van Horn with the attachment that went northeast to Lake Cham- 
plain and thence by the Niagara route to Lake Erie. He participated in 
the battle on Lake Erie, under Commodore Penw, September 9, 1813. 
He was the great-grandfather of Mrs. Hadden. Hiram Allison was born 
in Ohio, December 3, 1825, attended the common schools and was married 
in Morristown, Belmont county, Ohio, by Alexander Ewing, to Elizabeth 
ALinn, who was born in Bedford county, Pennsyhania, INIarch 4, 1832, 
and is a daughter of Samuel and Catherine (Elerick) Mann. Her father 
conducted a tavern at the foot of the Alleghany mountains, and there died 
in middle life. His wife was of sturdy Pennsylvania Dutch stock. They 
had seven children, namely: John, David, George, Holdridge, Mary, 
Catherine and Elizabeth. Hiram Allison was a carpenter by trade, who 
in 1852 came to Illinois and purchased one hundred and sixty acres in 
Stark county. Not a furrow had been turned or an improvement made 
upon the place, but he carefully developed it and after some years re- 
moved to Sedalia, Missouri, where he spent nine years. He then returned 
to Grundy county, where he carried on farming for some time, but is 
now living retired in St. Clairsville, Ohio, at the venerable age of seventy- 
five years, his toil in former years enabling him at the present time to rest 
in the enjoyment of a comfortable competence. His wife died at the home 
of her daughter, Mrs. Hadden, July 29, 1889. Their children were: Cath- 
erine Elizabeth, who was born January 12, 1849; Clara Agnes, who was 
born December 16, 1850; John W., born December 25, 1852; Hiram D., 
born March 15, 1855; Laura F., born December 3, 1856; Joseph A., born 
June 13, 1858; James L., born May 18, i860; William O., born June 18, 
1862; Margaret J., born March 29, 1864; and Samuel A., born July 7, 
1868. 

Mr. Hadden has remained upon the old homestead and has made 
many excellent improvements on the place. In 1896 he erected a large 
and commodious residence, in the modern style of architecture, and the 
home is tastefully furnished and pervaded with an air of culture and re- 
finement. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Hadden has been blessed with 
the following named: Lena Belle, who was born October 9, 1877, and 
died June 13, 1878; William M., born April 22, 1879; Samuel C, born 



596 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

July 15, 1882; and Gardie A., who was born May 27, 1889, and died June 2, 
1890. Mrs. Hadden and her sons are members of the Congregational 
church, and in his political views Mr. Hadden is a Jeffersonian Democrat. 
The cause of education finds in him a warm friend, and he has served as a 
member of the school board in his district for one term and is at present 
school trustee. He has lately been elected to the office of highway com- 
missioner. Fraternally he is a Mason, belonging to Mazon Lodge, No. 
826. He also holds membership with the Modern Woodmen camp at 
Wauponsee, being now venerable counsel. A well known and represen- 
tative citizen and a man of unblemished character, he enjoys the respect 
and confidence, of all with whom he has been brought in contact, and his 
genial and pleasant disposition has made him very popular and has gained 
him many warm friends. 



JAMES B. HOGE. 



The Hoge family, of w-hich the subject of this article is a sterling rep- 
resentative, came to Illinois from Virginia in the early times of this state, 
and from that time until the present ha\-e been noted for patriotism and all 
of the other qualities which constitute loyal citizens. William Hoge, the 
father of our subject, was a native of the Old Dominion, where he occupied a 
distinguished place, being a gentleman of wealth and influence, but, wisely 
foreseeing the possibilities of the great w^est, he determined to cast in his 
lot with the people of Illinois, and, settling in Grundy county, he spent the 
leniainder of his useful life on these prairies. 

His son, James B. Hoge, born May 6, 1834, was the first white child 
born within the limits of Grundy county. He attended the district schools 
and worked upon his father's farm until he reached his majority, when he 
purchased eighty acres of land in Saratoga township and embarked in agri- 
culture upon his own responsibility. His home is located on the southeast 
quarter section of section 19, and numerous improvements and modern con- 
veniences have been added by him to the place from time to time, thus 
rendering it one of the most desirable tracts of land in the county. He and 
his estimable wife have reared their children in noble principles, and they 
have reason to be proud of the manner in which they are meeting the respon- 
sibilities of life. 

The marriage of James B. Hoge and Eliza J. Hatcher, of Belmont 
county, Ohio, was celebrated March 20, i860. She is one of the seven chil- 
dren of Elijah and Jane (Craig) Hatcher, the others being named as follows: 
Noah J., a wealthy farmer of Lloydsville, Ohio; Rebecca and Rachel, the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 597 

latter the widow of Joseph Pancoast, are residents of Belmont county, Ohio; 
John, a retired farmer, married Mary Jane, daughter of Isaac Hoge, Sr., of 
Grundy county, Illinois; Sarah is the wife of Leander Moore, a prosperous 
farmer of Sheridan, Iowa; and Cecelia married Charles Pickering, who is a 
retired farmer of St. Clairsville, Ohio. 

Seven children blessed the union of our subject and wife, and three of 
the number are yet living at home. William E. was born December 13, 
i860, and at present is engaged in business in Chicago. For a wife he chose 
Harriet Dillon, of Tarkio, Missouri, and their children are: Alverda Hazel, 
Lucy Eliza and James Wilbur. John F., the second son, born December 13, 
1862, is now employed as a reporter for the Los Angeles (California) Her- 
ald. Lucy, born March 4, 1866, departed this life June 29, 1868. Harry 
S.. whose birth took place October 7, 1868, married Millie Kay, of Morris, 
Illinois, and they have two promising little sons, Frank Thomas and W' alter 
Talmadge. The family dwell upon a farm adjoining the old homestead be- 
longing to our subject. Florence C, born December 11, 1870; Minnie L., 
born June 29, 1876; and Fred J., born September 11, 1878, aid their parents 
in the work of the household and farm, and, like their elder brothers and 
sisters, are respected and esteemed by all who know them. 



MARSHALL B. WILSON. 

Marshall B. Wilson, who owns and occupies one of the beautiful homes 
of Morris, Illinois, is largely interested in agricultural pursuits and for some 
years has dealt extensively in stock. As a representative citizen of his 
county, a sketch of his life is of interest in this connection, and is as follows : 

Marshall B. Wilson was born in Vienna township, Grundy county, Illi- 
nois, March 11, 1859, a son of Jonathan and Elma C. (Hoyle) Wilson, to 
whom further reference is made in the biography of Joseph A. Wilson in 
this work. Mr. Wilson was reared on the farm and remained at the home 
place until he was twenty-two years of age, the last few years of that time 
being in partnership with his father. At the age of twenty-two he began 
farming on his own responsibility, in Vienna township, this county, and 
subsequently removed to Erienna township, where he resided until Febru- 
ary 20, 1892, since which time he has lived at his present home in Morris. 
He has the control of fourteen hundred acres of fine farming land, the farm- 
ing operations of which he superintends, and for some years he has dealt ex- 
tensively in stock, making a specialty of the cattle business. 

Mr. Wilson was married February 20, 1884, to Martha Jane Holder- 
man, a daughter of Abraham Holderman, one of the respected citizens of 



598 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Grundy county. Their union has been blessed in the birth of four children, 
namely: Mary, who died in the summer of 1899. at the age of fourteen 
years; Abbie; Grace, who died in childhood: and Ella Bird. 

Mr. Wilson has always manifested a public spirit that is commendable. 
He affiliates with the Republican party, and while he has never been an as- 
pirant for ofificial honors he has performed with credit the public service that 
has devolved upon him. At this writing he is the assistant supervisor of 
Morris township. Also he has served on the Morris board of education. 
Fraternally he is identified with the IMasonic order, being a Knight Templar. 



WILLIAMS! \V. :\rMANN. 

Probably the oldest physician in point of years of practice in Grundy 
county is Dr. William W. McMann, of Gardner. He settled in the town 
in 1864 and engaged in the practice of his profession, in which he has con- 
tinued to the present time, during a period of thirty-six years. 

He was born in what is now the state of West Virginia, in 1838. His 
father, James McMann, was a native of the same state; and his mother, 
whose maiden name was Alary Lee, was descended from one branch of the 
family of that name that produced the famous General Robert E. Lee, of 
the southern Confederacy, and the Lees of Revolutionar}- fame. Our sub- 
ject was a boy when brought to Ohio by his pai"ents, who later removed to 
Noble county, Indiana, where they passed the remainder of their lives. He 
receixed a common-school education and began the study of medicine under 
the preceptorship of Dr. George W. Carr, of Noble county, Indiana, who 
was for some time his preceptor. At the time of the breaking out of the 
war of the rebellion he was a student in the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia. 

His college course was interrupted by his determination to enter the 
army, and on President Lincoln's call for seventy-five thousand volunteers, 
in i86i, like many another patriotic young man, he threw aside his books to 
enter th.e service of his country. The first call for troops having been for a 
period of three months, he enlisted for that time in Company A, McClellan's 
Dragoons, under Captain Barker, of Chicago; August i, of that year, he re- 
enlisted in the same command, with which he served until the spring of 1862, 
when he was detailed to the medical department for hospital service at Gen- 
eral Stoneman's headquarters, as acting assistant surgeon under Dr. Mc- 
Mullen. He rejoined his regiment just before the severe battle at Williams- 
burg, \'irginia. in which he was wounded, being shot in the left hand and 
wrist. The duties upon which he entered after his recover}^ in the medical 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 599 

and surgical department of the service were of greater value to him than 
would have been several courses of lectures in a medical college, and the 
value of the practical knowledge he there obtained has been illustrated in 
a most successful professional career. The Doctor was sent to the hospital 
at Bnjad and Cherry streets, Philadelphia, Pennsjdvania, and after the re- 
covery from his wound he acted as assistant surgeon for several months, 
and acted in same capacity in the convalescent camp, Alexandria, Virginia, 
several months. 

In 1864 the Doctor left the service of the United States and soon after- 
ward located at Gardner, Grundy county, Illinois, where he immediately 
entered upon a most successful practice, and he has long occupied a high 
place in the medical profession of this part of Illinois. An ideal family 
physician, he has the confidence of the public in a remarkable degree. Be- 
sides being so successful in his medical and surgical practice. Dr. McMann 
is a good l)usiness man and has accumulated a competency. In politics he 
is a Republican. He is a Royal Arch ^Nlason and a Knight of Pythias. 

Dr. McMann has been twice married. For his first wife he chose Eliza 
Jane Atkinson. His present wife, whom he married October 11, 1888, was 
Libbie Jones, a native of Ohio. By his first marriage he has a daughter, 
named !\Iaud Magnolia, who is now the wife of Edwin Wymer, M. D., of 
Chicago, Illinois. The Doctor is a lover of home and home interests, and 
everything that pertains to the development and prosperity of the commu- 
nity in which he lives has his generous and substantial support. He is no 
less public-spirited than patriotic, and his friendly sympathies have endeared 
him to all with whom he has come in intimate contact; and those who know 
him best like him best, for thev know him as a friend; 



REUBEN SHERMAN HURD. 

When the northern section of Illinois was still in the period of its pioneer 
development, when its lands were wild and the work of civilization was 
being begun by those who were tO' play an acti\-e part in the progress and 
improvement of the state, Reuben S. Hurd came to the west. He was 
born in Oneida county. New York, February 12, 1815, a son of Reuben 
and Amanda (Parker) Hurd. natives of Connecticut. In their family of 
ten children he was the fifth in order of birth. Upon his father's farm he 
Avas reared, and in 1838, at the age of twenty-three, he came to Illinois, 
locating one hundred and eight acres of land in Kendall county. Later he 
returned to New York and married Sophronia S. Keith. With his wife he 



6oo BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

returned to Kendall county, where he carried on agricultural pursuits until 
1866, when his wife died. 

The following year he sold his farm and took up his residence in Morris. 
He was a successful agriculturist and although he was in very limited cir- 
cumstances when he emigrated to the west he possessed a very desirable 
competence on his retirement from labor. His unfailing energy, strong 
determination and marked enterprise enabled him to so conduct his busi- 
ness affairs that he secured excellent financial returns. In the fall of 1867 
he was again married, his second union being with Miss Minnie A. Hale. 
For fifteen years thereafter he and his wife traveled in various parts of the 
United States, hoping to benefit his health through change of scene. They 
have always made Morris their home, however, and are widely and favorably 
known in this city. 



GEORGE PRESTON. 



The fitting reward of a well spent and active business career is an 
honored retirement from labor in which one has opportunity to enjoy the 
fruits of former toil. Such an opportunity has been vouchsafed to Mr. 
Preston, one of the pioneer settlers and substantial citizens of Grundy 
county, who is now living retired in ]\Iazon. He has attained the age of 
seventy-seven years and has the veneration and respect which sliould ever 
be accorded to those who have reached the downward slope of life. He 
was born September 22, 1822, in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, his parents 
being Elijah and Martha (Wheatley) Preston. His father was a son of 
William and Zuba (Sweet) Preston. The grandfather was a native of 
Vermont and by occupation a farmer. In early pioneer days he went to 
Ohio, making the journey by boat a part of the way. In old age he lo- 
cated in Tuscarawas county, on the farm owned by his son Elijah, and 
there spent his remaining days, his death occurring at the age of sixty- 
three years. He was a very industrious and energetic man and belonged 
to that class of pioneers who have laid the foundation for the present 
prosperity of our country. His children were: Elijah, William, Oliver, 
John, James, Sallie, Betsey, Polly and Zuba. 

Elijah Preston, the father of our subject, was born in Vermont. April 
16, 1799, and received such educational privileges as were afforded by 
the common schools of that time. He was reared upon a farm, and 
when about sixteen years of age accompanied his father on his removal 
to Ohio, the first location of the family being made on the Ohio river, 
not far from Pittsburg. Elijah Preston early became familiar with the 





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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 6oi 

arduous task of developing new land and throughout his Hfe engaged in 
the tilling of the soil. He was married in Virginia to Martha Wheatley, 
a native of the Green Mountain state, born October 3, 1799, and a daughter 
of George Wheatley. Her father was a Virginian by birth and for some 
time resided in West Virginia, not far from the Ohio river or from the 
city of Wheeling. By occupation he was a miller. In the '50s he came 
to Illinois, locating just across the river from St. Louis, and his death 
occurred in East St. Louis, when he had attained the age of seventy-one 
years. His life was characterized by marked industry. His children were : 
George, born September 22, 1822; William, November 6, 1825; Samuel, 
John, Elijah, Nancy, Ann, Martha, Mary, Sarah and Jane. 

After his marriage Elijah Preston located in Tuscarawas county, 
Ohio, on a tract of one hundred and sixty acres of timber land. By hard 
work and close application he cleared his fields and made a good pioneer 
home, to which he added by additional purchase until he was the owner 
of one hundred and eighty acres. About 1834, however, he sold that prop- 
erty and removed to Guernsey county, Ohio, where he purchased an 
improved farm, upon which he lived until 185 1, when he disposed of that 
and came to Grundy county, Illinois. Here he secured one hundred and 
sixty acres of partly improved land in Mazon township, a small amount 
of the land having been broken and a little cabin erected thereon. A week 
later Mr. Preston went by canal to Chicago and purchased lumber with 
which to build a barn and also to enlarge his house. He returned a week 
later and was then taken ill with cholera and died after fifteen days. Both 
he and his wife were consistent and faithful members of the Methodist 
church in early life but afterward joined the United Brethren church. Mr. 
Preston ser\'ed as a class-leader in Ohio and was actively interested in 
whatever tended to advance the cause of Christianity. His life was one 
of activity and through his enterprising eft'orts he acquired a good home. 
In politics he was an old-line Whig in early life and when the subject of 
slavery became the dominant issue he joined the Abolition party. 

From the old family Bible the following record of the children is ob- 
tained : George, the eldest son, was born September 22, 1822, and was 
married April 30, 1840, to Elizabeth Carnes. William, born November 
6, 1825, was married May 18, 1847, to Phebe Randal. James D., born 
May 7, 1828, was married March 23, 1848, to Elizabeth Huffman. Jane, 
born December 8, 1830, became the wife of William Keepers on the 19th 
of May, 1847. Sarah, born November 3, 1832, was married March 27. 
185 1, to Alexander Lotta. Elijah, born January 4, 1835, died March 26, 
1848. Finley, born March 22, 1837, died February 20, 1855. Martha Ann, 
born May 9, 1839, was married November 15, 1855, to George Paxton and 



•6o2 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

died December 17, 1867. Asbury, born November 21, 1841, was a sol- 
dier of the civil war. He went to the front with an Illinois regiment and 
died at Vicksburg during the service. Albert, born July 15, 1846, was 
also a soldier and died in Streator, Illinois, December 8, 1879. The father 
of these children died August 15. 185 1. In the old Wheatley family Bible 
the following record is given: George Wheatley, Sr., was born Septem- 
ber 2, 1775, and died April 22, 1845. Jane Nelson Wheatley, his wife, 
was born January 4, 1778, and died October 3, 1829. Their children were: 
Ann. who was called Nancy, was born November 5, 1797: Martha was 
born October 3. 1799; John, December 7. 1801, and died June 21, 1818; 
Mary was born June 20, 1804; Sarah, February 3, 1806; Warren was born 
March 19, 1803, and died August 23, 1849; Samuel was born May 16, 1810; 
William, June 3, 1812; Jane, August i, 1814; George was born Novem- 
ber 22, 1816, and died March i, 1841 ; John Nelson was born March 23, 
1819; and Eliza P., June 22, 1821. 

George Preston, whose name introduces this review, received a limited 
education in the subscription schools. His boyhood days were spent on 
the farm and at the age of twelve years he accompanied his parents on 
their removal to Guernsey county, Ohio, driving a four-horse team on 
the journey. He married Elizabeth Games, of that county, and as he was 
only eighteen years of age and his bride was about the same age, their 
parents objected to their marriage. Determining, however, to unite their 
destinies without delay, they took the opportunity when their respective 
fathers were attending court to run away, and, crossing the line into West 
\'irginia, where no license was required, they were there married. Mrs. 
Preston was born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, her father. John Carnes, 
being one of its pioneers. He afterward removed to Hocking county, 
Ohio. His children were: John. William, Matilda, Elizabeth, Mary, 
Isabel, Caroline and Margaret. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Preston three children 
Avere born: William C., born April 4, 1846; Mary, born July 20, 1852; and 
George W., born June 7, 1855. 

The young couple had begun their domestic life upon his father's old 
homestead farm in Tuscarawas county, where they remained for eight 
years. On the 3d of June, 1851, they started for Illinois and arrived at 
Coal City, Grundy county, on the 2d of July. Mr. Preston had two 
brothers, William and James, who were then living in the town. The 
joufney was made with horses and the jiarty numbered five difYerent 
families who had been neighbors in Guernsey county, Ohio, and had come 
to the west to seek their fortunes. Elijah Preston, the father of our sub- 
ject, with his family, was of the party, together with Abraham Carter and 
William Keepers, who were accompanied by their respective families. At 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 603 

night they would camp out by the wayside, sleeping in their wagons, and 
the trip proved a very pleasant one until the last night, when a hard rain 
and wind storm occurred. Previous to that there had been but one slight 
shower. After reaching Grundy county Mr. Preston established his home 
in Good Farm township, where he rented land for two years. He then 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres, a wild tract of prairie land upon 
which not a furrow had been turned or an improvement made, but with 
characteristic energy, however, he developed and adtled to it until he had 
four hundred and eighty acres of rich, valuable land, all under a high state 
of cultivation and all in Good Farm township. He erected thereon sub- 
stantial buildings and made many excellent improvements. Indolence and 
idleness formed no part of his nature and his untiring efforts brought to 
him prosperity which enabled him, after many years of active toil, to put 
aside all business cares. His first serious trouble in his new home was the 
death of his wife. She was born March 21, 1823, and passed away De- 
cember 22, 1857, after fourteen years of happy married life, their wedding 
having been celebrated April 23. 1840. Mr. Preston was again married, in 
old Mazon, his second imion being with Jane Johnston, who was born 
in Richland county, Ohio, April 13, 1823, a daughter of Andrew and I\Iary 
(Thompson) Johnston. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Preston were members of the Congregational 
church and in politics he is a Republican. He has always taken a deep 
interest in everything pertaining to the welfare and progress of the com- 
munity and has always advocated good roads. In 1882 he purchased prop- 
€rty in Mazon and to each of his three children he gave eighty acres of 
land. He is one of the owners of the opera house in Mazon and is in com- 
fortable circumstances. All who know him esteem him for his sterling 
worth, and his career has been characterized by energy, perseverance and 
good management and above all by honorable dealing. 



LUKE HALE, M. D. 



One of the pioneer representatives of the medical profession in Morris 
is Dr. Luke Hale, and the older citizens of Grundy county yet remember 
him as a man of ability in the line of his chosen calling and as a citizen whose 
upright life commended him to their confidence and regard. He was bom in 
the old Granite state on the 8th of October, 1796, and after preparing for 
the medical profession Isegan practicing in Brandon, Vermont. At length 
he determined to seek a home in the west, believing an excellent opening 
was afiforded in this new but rapidly developing country. Accordingly he 



6o4 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

took up his abode in i^IcHenn,- county, in 1836. upon a farm on which the 
town of Ringwood was afterward built. In 1842 he removed to Dundee, 
Kane county, IlHnois, where he successfully engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine until 1857. A year later he arrived in ^Morris, and here he engaged in 
the prosecution of his profession until his death. His knowledge of the 
science of medicine was thorough and accurate for that day, and he received 
and merited a liberal patronage. 

The Doctor was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Amelia Clifford, a 
native of Connecticut, and their children were as follows: Anna Eliza B., 
the wife of Dr. Rosencranz, of Elgin; Dr. Roscoe L., now a druggist of Se- 
dalia. Missouri: Minnie A., the wife of R. S. Hurd, of Morris: William C; 
Martin B., who resides in Morris: and Fannie A., who became the wife of 
W. J. Copp, of Hamilton. Canada. Of these children only Mrs. Hurd and 
Martin B. Hale now reside in Morris. They are both highly respected 
citizens, and the lady is an active member of the Congregational church. 
The mother died in Morris in 1873. She was an ardent advocate of abolition 
principles and rendered effective assistance to the fleeing slaves who were 
making their way northward on the "underground railroad." She was a 
iaily of many admirable qualities and characteristics, and, like Dr. Hale, 
she enjoyed the friendship and high regard of many of the citizens of Morris 
and the surrounding country. 



TOHN BARTON. 



The number of residents of Grundy county of English nativity is not 
large, but in this county, as elsewhere, residents of English birth have de- 
monstrated their capacity for good citizenship. The Englishman is usually 
enterprising, and he is always intelligent, liberal and patriotic. He is imbued 
with the same spirit of progressiveness that animates his cousin, the Yan- 
kee, and readily and cordially joins hands with the latter in the work of 
civilization and dexelopment. John Barton, of Gardner, Grundy county, 
Illinois, has illustrated this fact in his every-day life and proven it by his 
success. Proud that he is an Englishman. — for when you look the world 
ever you come to the conclusion that it is a good thing to be an English- 
man, — he is no less proud that he is an American also, — an American in 
progressiveness, in patriotism, in love for humanity. 

He first saw the light in Lincolnshire, England, one day in 1844. His 
father, Samuel Barton, never came to this country. Francis, a brother, came 
previously, and is now living at \\'heaton. Illinois. John was educated in 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 605 

his native England and learned the trade of milling. In 1871 he came to 
America, and. making his way west to Illinois, located at Keithsburg, in 
Mercer connty, where he lived four years, and after that he engaged in 
farming near that village. In 1881 he became a resident at Gardner, and 
until 1888 was employed by Louis Germain in the operation of the machinery 
of the elevator at that place. 

Mr. Barton was the assessor of Greenfield township from 1891 to 1897, 
inclusive. He has been a justice of the peace since 1892 and notary public 
since 1893. He is a local preacher of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
in the year immediately preceding his coming to Gardner he was the pastor 
of a church near Bushnell, Illinois. He still occasionally fills appointments. 
In his political affiliations he is a Republican. His public spirit has caused 
him to take an interest in many movements planned for the good of the 
public, and he is regarded as a worthy and most useful citizen. As a Chris- 
tian and a preacher of the word of God, he naturally feels a deep interest in 
all religious work, which he aids so far as possible whenever opportunity 
is presented. The moral example of his life is of high utility in the commu- 
nitv, and as a public ofhcial he perhaps exemplifies the highest conception 
of official integrity and faithfulness as brilliantly as any public functionary 
in the country. 

In 1872 Mr. Barton was married, at Keithsburg, Illinois, to Miss Emma 
Ball. Mr. and Mrs. Barton have five children, — one son and four daugh- 
ters, — named as follows: George, Mary, Lizzie, Lottie and Lulu. All 
of them except the youngest are graduates of the high school at Gardner. 
George has been bookkeeper for the Gardner-Wilmington Coal Company 
since 1893. 



LEWIS P. LOTT. 



The name of Lewis P. Lott well deserves a prominent place in the pages 
■of the history of Grundy county, for during the eariier years of his residence 
in Morris he was an active factor in the business life of the city and later 
held many offices to which he was called by his fellow townsmen, who recog- 
nized his worth and ability and felt that the confidence that they reposed 
in him would never be betrayed. More than fourteen years have passed 
since his life's labors were ended, but his memory is cherished by all who 
knew him, and the record of his career is a credit to the county of his adop- 
tion. 

Mr. Lott was numbered among the native sons of the Empire state, his 
liirth having occurred in Covert, in Seneca county, New York, August 5, 



6o6 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

1813. His parents were Zephaniah and Permilla (Phelps) Lott, the former 
of Holland lineage and the latter of English descent. The family is noted 
for longevity, the paternal grandfather of our subject having died at the 
extreme old age of one hundred and four years, while his wife passed away 
at the age of one hundred and six years. Zephaniah Lott was bom in 
Pennsylvania in 1775, and in early life removed to New York, where he 
was married. The fondness for home and the dislike of removing to a 
new locality led to his remaining upon one farm for sixty years. He died 
in 1855, at the age of eighty years, and his wife, who was born in Connecti- 
cut in 1780, died in 1863, at the age of eighty-three years. This worthy 
couple were the parents of thirteen children. 

In the common schools of his native state Lewis P. Lott pursued his 
education till his fourteenth year, when he went tO' Canandaigua. New York, 
where he learnetl the printer's trade, spending six years at that place. At 
the expiration of that period, in 1832, he removed to Cleveland, Ohio, and 
there worked for two years as a journeyman printer, after which he formed 
a partnership with his friend A. S. Sanford and opened a general book and 
stationery store and job printing office. For several years they conducted 
a flourishing business, but in 1842 Mr. Lott sold out and removed to Kirt- 
land. Ohio, where he engaged in manufacturing pumps, pails, tubs, house- 
hold furniture and other wooden ware. This business was attended with 
indifferent success, and after carr)'ing on his operations along that line for 
two and a half years he sold out and went to Warren, Ohio, where he was 
engaged in general merchandising. In the latter venture he prospered, but 
in 1846 his store was destroyed by fire, which led to his removal to Racine, 
Wisconsin, where he engaged in merchandising for two years. 

Mr. Lott removed for the last time in the spring of 1848. when he took 
up his abode in Morris, bringing with him his stock of general merchan- 
dise. Here he opened a store and successfully conducted the same until 
i860, when he sold out to his partner, Horace Hulburd. He then retired 
from business with a competency that he had accjuired through his own 
efforts. From an early age he depended solely upon his labors for what- 
ever he had and by continuous industry', economy and well-directed labor 
he was enabled to save some money, each year augmenting- his capital as a re- 
sult of his earnest labors. Indolence and idleness were utterly foreign to his 
nature, and although he retired from the commercial world he was not con- 
tent to have no care and in consequence accepted the position of deputy 
circuit court clerk, in which capacity he efficiently served for eight years, 
managing the affairs of the office with skill and discrimination. Possessed 
of unusual business tact and ability, every business with which he became 
connected rapidly assumed an orderly, systematic and prosperous condition. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. O07 

He invested his capital from time to time in real estate and tlnis became 
an extensive owner of farm lands, the management of which largely occu- 
pied his time through his later years. However, he was frequently forced 
to serve his fellow citizens in various positions of trust. In 1856 he was 
elected chairman of the board of supervisors and served for three years. 
For about fifteen years he served as a member of the board of aldermen 
and exercised his ofificial prerogatives to promote the substantial develop- 
ment and improvement of the city. In 1870 he was elected justice of the 
peace, in which office he served until his death, administering its afTairs with 
an impartial hand. As the treasurer of the school board he successfully 
controlled the financial interests of education for several years. 

In Cleveland, Ohio, on the 22d of February, 1844, Mr. Lott was united 
in marriage to Miss Delia Lloyd Clark, who was born in Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, September 29, 1821. Her parents removed to Cleveland, Oliio, 
in 1839, where they spent the residue of their days. Mrs. Lott survives 
her husband and resides at her home in Morris with her only living son, 
Edward L. Lott. She is still in possession of good health and has always 
been an active worker in the church and in charitable organizations. Her 
kindly manner has won her the love of many friends and all who know her 
esteem her highly. To Mr. and Mrs. Lott were born four sons, two of 
whom died in infancy, while Frank Clark died in his fourteenth year. 

The eldest son, Edward L. Lott. is now living with his mother in 
Morris, and for several years has superintended the affairs connected with 
his father's estate. Formerly he was engaged in the drug business, having 
a store in Grand Tower, Illinois, for fourteen years, while for five years he 
conducted a drug store in Morris. His honorable dealing and trustworthi- 
ness have gained him an enviable position in business circles, and is a valued 
resident of the community. 

Mr. Lott, of this sketch, also held a membership in the Masonic order, 
having attained the Knight Templar degree and held almost every office 
in the lodge, chapter and commandery. For several years he was a promi- 
nent Odd Fellow, but for some time prior to his death was a demitted mem- 
ber. In early life he gave his political support to the Whig party, was after- 
ward an Abolitionist and Free-soiler. and when the Republican party was 
formed to prevent the further extension of slavery he joined its ranks and 
was one of its heartiest advocates throughout the remainder of his life. 
Although he held office several years they came to him unsought, being 
given him in recognition of his fitness for public trusts. Endowed by na- 
ture with sound judgment and an accurate, discriminating mind, he never 
feared that laborious attention to business so necessary to achieve success, 
and this unusual quality was ever guided by a sense of moral right which 



'6o8 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

would tolerate the employment onl\- of such means as would bear the most 
rigid examination, antl by a fairness of intention that neither sought nor 
required disguise. 



WILLIAM C. HASKIXS. 

One of the most venerable and worthy citizens of Good Farm town- 
.ship is William Cunningham Haskins, who was born April 26, 1818, in 
Delaware county. Ohio, the son of Jeremiah and Mary (Butler) Haskins. 
The father was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth Haskins and the family 
is of sterling English Puritan stock. The original American ancestors lo- 
cated on ^lartha's Vineyard, on the Massachusetts coast, and at a later 
day settled in the Berkshire hills in the Bay state. Thomas Haskins, the 
grandfather of our subject, was a farmer in Hampshire county, ^Massa- 
chusetts. They had three children : Elizabeth, Hannah and Thomas. His 
entire life was spent in the Bay state, where he died when about fifty years 
of age. He had a brother who served in the Revolutionan,- war and was 
shot in the forehead in a battle near Boston, his death resulting instantly. 

Jeremiah Haskins, the father of our subject, was born in Hampshire 
county, Massachusetts, on the i6th of December, 1792, and when a young 
man he emigrated westward to Dayton. Ohio, the state being then on the 
wild western frontier. At the time of the second war with England he en- 
tered the ser\-ice, loyally defending his country in that struggle. He was 
one of the army surrounded by General Hall at Detroit, and in Delaware 
county, Ohio, he married Miss Mar)' Butler, who was born in Berkshire 
county, Massachusetts, May 26, 1793, a daughter of Jethro and Rebecca 
(Dunham) Butler. Jethro Butler was of English Puritan descent and was 
born in Massachusetts. In early life he went to sea, sailing on a number 
of whaling voyages to the polar regions. In later life he became a pros- 
perous farmer in Berkshire county, Massachusetts. He lived to a vener- 
able age, dying on the old homestead where his wife also spent her last 
days. Their children were Jethro, Daniel, David, Cornelius, Levi, George, 
Mary, Sarah, Lydia, Persis, Rebecca, Ruth and Lucinda. After his marriage. 
Jeremiah Haskins located on a farm in Delaware county, Ohio, be- 
coming the owner of two hundred and seventy-one acres of land, nearly 
all of which he bought for three dollars per acre at a very early period in 
the development of the county. He prospered in his undertakings and was 
the possessor of a comfortable competence at the time of his death, which 
occurred December 6, 1869, when he had passed the eightieth milestone on 
life's journey. He was a member of the Baptist church, a devout Christian 
gentleman, and for more than thirty years ser\'ed as a deacon. His early 



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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 609 

political support was given to the Whig party and later he became a stanch 
Republican. For ten years he held the office of justice of the peace. His 
life was honorable, upright and industrious and he was a pioneer of sterling 
worth and integrity. His children were James, Butler and William C. 

The last named obtained a good common-school education for that 
■day, was reared to farm life and when about twenty-three years of age, in 
Delaware county, on the 3d of December, 1840, was married to Miss Martha 
W. Eaton, whose birth occurred December 6, 1823. Her parents were 
David and Mary (Roloson) Eaton. Her father was born in Huntingdon 
•county, Pennsylvania, November 4, 1798, and was a son of Joseph aufl 
Bathsheba (Sackett) Eaton, the former a son of David and a grandson of 
John Eaton. The last named was a son of Joseph Eaton, and his father, 
who also bore the name of John Eaton, was the founder of the family in 
America, coming to this country from Wales in 1686 and settling in Penn- 
syh-ania. Joseph Eaton became one of the pioneers of Delaware county, 
Ohio, where he located in 1805, when a young man. Here he cleared and 
■developed a fine farm and from time to time extended its boundaries by 
.additional purchases until he was the owner of twelve hundred acres. He 
became both a wealthy and prominent citizen of his community and gave to 
■each of his sons a farm. In the Baptist church he held membership and 
filled the office of deacon. He was the first man elected to the position of 
surveyor of Delaware county, was three times a member of the state legis- 
lature and for many years was a justice of the peace. His ability well quali- 
fied him for positions of prominence and he was a recognized leader in the 
thought and action concerning the welfare of his state and county, being a 
thorough student of economics and public questions. He died in 1825, at 
the age of fifty-two years, and his community lost one of its most prominent 
representatives. His children were : Isaac, James, George, David, Joseph, 
Ruth. Mary, Martha and Annie. Three of the sons of Joseph Eaton were 
ministers of the Baptist church, Isaac. George and Joseph. The first named 
Avas also a farmer of Iowa and had six sons in the civil war. George was for 
a time president of Hamilton College, in New York, and went to the Holy 
Land, visiting Jerusalem in the interest of his church. Joseph was president 
of the College at Murfreesboro. Tennessee, and was also an editor. 

David Eaton, the father of Mrs. Haskins, spent a portion of his boy- 
hood in Pennsylvania, and in 1805 went with his parents to the Buckeye 
state. He wedded Mary Roloson, who was born in Wantage township, Sus- 
sex county, New Jersey, January 16, 1800, a daughter of John antl Lydia 
(Van Sickle) Roloson. Her father was a cooper by trade, and, on removing 
to Ohio, located in Pickaway county, whence he went to Delaware county. 
Avhere he developed a farm of one hundred acres, making his home there 



6io BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

until his death, which occurred after he had reached the advanced age of over 
one hundred years. His children were Jacob and Joseph, twins; Levi; Joel; 
Mary; Eliza and Irene. After their marriage David Eaton and his wife 
located on a farm of one hundred and ten acres, much of which he placed 
under a high state of cultivation, transforming it into a valuable tract of land, 
whereon he remained until his death, which occurred at the comparatively 
early age of thirty-seven years. He was a member of the Baptist church 
and was a good citizen. He had but two children. — Martha \V. and Eliza 
J. Thus it will be seen that the present generation of the Haskins family 
are descended from honored colonial families, largely of Puritan origin. 
Several representatives of the name were patriots of the Revolutionarv war 
and others left the impress of their individuality upon many of the events 
affecting the welfare of the state and nation. 

Mr. and Mrs. Haskins began their domestic life in Delaware county, on 
a farm of one hundred and seventy-six acres, of which eighty acres had been 
placed under the plow. He cleared thirty acres of the remainder, erected a 
residence and otherwise improved the farm, making it a valuable property. 
He there resided from 1840 until 1865. when he came to Illinois, taking up 
his abode near Gardner. Grundy county. For a number of years he carried 
on agricultural pursuits in that locality, and in 1879 purchased his present 
property, consisting of eighty acres of valuable land, all of which was broken, 
with the exception of a ten-acre tract. \\'illiam Haskins, assisted by his 
son Jeremiah, greatly improved the farm and erected commodious and sub- 
stantial buildings, and now he has one of the most desirable and attractive 
places in this section of the state. 

The children of I\Ir. and Mrs. William Haskins are Jeremiah Eaton, 
who was born October 11. 1841, and Eliza Jane, born November 13. 1848. 
Mrs. Haskins and her daughter are members of the Baptist church, with 
which denomination she has been identified since 1843. Mr. Haskins is not 
a communicant, but contributes liberally to the support of the church and 
takes an active interest in its work. 

In politics he is a stanch Republican. His first presidential vote was 
cast for William Henry Harrison in the famous log-cabin and hard-cider 
campaign. He also voted for John Charles Fremont, the first Republican 
candidate for the presidency, and for the immortal Lincoln. His allegiance 
to the party has been unwavering since its organization, and he has done 
all in his power to promote its growth and secure its success. In 1888 he 
served as the assessor of the township, and has been a member of the school 
board. He has always sustained a high reputation as a moral and temperate 
man. whose integrity is above question and whose upright life is well worthy 
of emulation. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 6ii 

Jeremiah E. Haskins. his son, was born in Delaware county, Ohio, 
October ii, 1841, and acquired a good common-school education. Through- 
out his business career he has carried on agricultural pursuits. Since 1865 
he has been. identified with the farming interests of Illinois, having come to 
this state with his parents. He was married December 27, 1897, in Morris, 
Illinois, to Mary Ellen Lewis, who was born on the ist of August, 1877, in 
England, a daughter of Richard and Winifred (Williams) Lewis. Her 
father came to America in 1878 and engaged in mining in Braidwood. He 
then settled near Braceville, Ohio, on a farm, where he is yet living. His 
children are Mary E., Jane Ann and Matthew. In politics Mr. Lewis is a 
Republican. Mr. and Mrs. Haskins have one child, Martha A., who was 
born February 17, 1899. Jeremiah Haskins is a substantial farmer, who 
carefully conducts his business affairs and has thus become the possessor 
of a valuable property. He holds membership in the Baptist church, is 
serving as one of its trustees, and in politics is a Republican. 

Eliza Jane Haskins, the daughter of William C. Haskins, was married 
April 24, 1866, to Thomas H. Glover, who is a merchant of Joplin, Missouri. 
Their children are Claud T., Florence E., Cora J., Edna Pearl and Boyd H. 



ENOS FIELD. 



In the way of modern improvements Morris. Illinois, is not behind her 
sister towns of the state, and among these improvements is its electric-light 
plant, of which it has just reason to be proud. The Field Electric Light Com- 
l)any, which operates this plant, was incorporated in 1891, with a capital 
stock of thirty thousand dollars, and on October 2d of that year the plant 
was put in successful operation. The prime mover and organizer of the 
above-named company was Captain Enos Field. He is still actively inter- 
ested in it, and is regarded as one of the most enterprising and public- 
spirited citizens of the town. Briefly, a sketch of his life is as follows : 

Enos Field was born in Windom Center, New York, August 15, 1834, 
am' traces his ancestry back from the same source from which the dis- 
tinguished Cyrus W. Field sprang. The parents of Enos Field were Cyrus 
and Alalissa (Clark) Field. The latter was born in Connecticut, August 15, 
1806, a daughter of Jordan Clark, who was of English descent, and it is 
supposed was a native of Connecticut. Cyrus Field was born in New York 
state in June, 1806. They were married in 1828; in 1837 moved to Dela- 
ware county, Ohio, and in 1845 came to Illinois, locating at Ottawa, LaSalle 
conntv. Both died at this place, Mr. Field in 1885 and his wife in 1886. 
Their children were as follows: Anna; Evander, who died in 1872; Enos. 



6l2 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

whose name introduces this sketch; Emily, deceased; Norton, deceased; and 
Chapman, who was killed in the army during the civil war. 

The father of these children was by trade a carpenter, at which he 
worked in early life, but later turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, 
whicii he followed for a number of years. Politically he was an old-line 
Whig up to the tinie the Republican party was organized, after which he 
gave his support to it. W'iien the civil war came on he and two of his sons 
ofTercd their sen-ices to the Union. He was a member of the Fifty-third 
Illinois Infantry; was a participant in the battle of Shiloh, and was in the 
service six or eight montlis, at the end of that time being honorably dis- 
charged on account of ill health, he lia\ing contracted a chronic disease in 
the army. One son, Norton, was in the One Hundred and Fourth Illi- 
nois Infantry, and Chapman first entered the sen-ice as a member of the 
Twenty-sixth Illinois Infantry, later re-enlisting at St. Louis in the Marine 
Brigade on tlie "Autocrat," and meeting death bravely at the siege of \'icks- 
burg. 

When Enos Field was a boy he was bound out at Cincinnati to a tailor 
for a term of se\-en years, and remained with him three years of that time. 
In the meantime the family had moved to Illinois, as already stated, and in 
the fall of 1847 Cyrus Field returned to Cincinnati and brought his son Enos 
home with him. Here the youth was for some time engaged in farm work. 
From 1854 to 1881 Mr. Field's interests were chiefly on the canal. He 
\\as the owner of a steamer and barges which he ran for a number of years, 
and it was while he was thus engaged that he received the title of captain. 
In this business he got his start in the financial world. In the meantime he 
spent some months in Texas and Tennessee in railroad construction work, 
and was thus occupied in the former state at the time the civil war broke 
out. He retired from boating in 1881, and the next eleven years was en- 
gaged in the saloon business in Wilmington, Illinois. At that place he had 
a third interest in the Electric Light and Power Company, which he sold 
just previous to his removal to Morris and his investment in the electric- 
hght plant at this place. He has resided here since August 28, 1891. 

Mr. Field was married January i, 187 1, to Miss Theresa IMead, a na- 
tive of Twelve-Mile Grove, Illinois, and they have had four children, namely : 
Roy, interested in business with his father; Allie, who died at the age of nine 
years; Frank, who died at the age of two and a half years; and Bessie. 



JOHN J. BRINCKERHOFF, M. D. 

It is said "Gray hairs are honorable." but gray hairs do not necessarily 
imply a monopoly by those they adorn of all the wisdom in the walk of life 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 613 

to which sucli persons belong'. This is tlie age of the young man, especially 
in professional circles, as is illustrated liy the career of Dr. John J. Brinck- 
erhoff, of Minooka, who, although one of the younger members of the medi- 
cal profession, has already taken a prominent place in the ranks of the fra- 
ternity in Grund_\- county, Illinois, notwithstanding he located at Minooka 
as late as 1897. 

Doctor Brinckerhoff is a native of Illinois, having been born in Will 
county, January 18, 1869, a son of John BrinckerhoiY, who was born at 
W'atervliet, New York. The latter was a son of IMartin Brinckerhoff, who 
Avas one of the pioneers of W'ill county, Illinois. John Brinckerhoff mar- 
ried Rebecca Breckinridge, a native of Canada. Martin Brinckerhoff, a 
brother of John, was a soldier in the war of the rebellion and died in the 
service. 

Dr. Brinckerhoff' is one of six brothers, the two oldest of whom are also 
physicians, viz. : Dr. C. E. Brinckerhoff, of Chicago, Illinois, and Dr. G. E. 
Brinckerhoff, of Oakland, California. Martin S. is next in order of birth, 
followed in the sequence of their names by Dr. John J., subject of this sketch; 
Howard H.; Gertrude R., and Elmer E., the youngest. 

Dr. Brinckerhoff received his early education at the public schools and 
at Joliet high school. In 1889 he entered the University of Michigan at 
Ann Arbor, where he did regular work for four years, receiving, in 1893, 
from that instittition the degree of Ph. B. For a year thereafter he was 
engaged in teaching, and in 1894 took his first course of medical lectures at 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Chicago, from which institution 
he was graduated in the class of 1897, with the degree of M. D. ; and soon 
afterward he located at Minooka and engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession. In 1898 he established a drug store, which he'has developed into 
a mercantile success. 

November 10, 1897, Dr. Brinckerhoff' was married to Miss Julia 
Scheibe, a native of Lockport, Illinois. He is a member of the Order of 
Modern Woodmen and of the Court of Honor. Possessed of a thorough 
literary and professional education, of winning manners and exemplary busi- 
ness methods, public-spirited to an extraordinary degree, he is achieving a 
thorough and permanent success and making friends among all classes of 
people. 



EDWARD L. CLOVER. 

Among the practitioners of the bar at Morris is this gentleman, who 
has gained prestige in the legal profession. He is a western man by birth, 
training and preference, and possesses the true western spirit of diligence 



6i4 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and enterprise, a spirit whicli has enabled many men to rise rapidly from 
humble positions to places of considerable prominence. 

Mr. Clover was born in Hardin county, Iowa, January 25, 1861, and 
is a son of Gerettus and Susan D. (Maddox) Clover. The father was bom in 
Indiana and was a son of John Clover, who was a native of Pennsylvania, 
and became a pioneer of Grundy county, Illinois, settling on eighty acres of 
land in Highland township, where he carried on agricultural pursuits until 
his death. He located in the midst of a tract of timberland, his nearest 
neighbor being at that time four miles distant. With the pioneer develop- 
ment of the county lie was actively identified, and in an early day he served 
as a county commissioner. He had eighteen children, but Gerettus is the 
only one now living in Gnmdy county, he being a resident of Gardner. He 
accompanied his parents in their removal to Illinois and was married in 1855, 
in Iowa, to ^liss Susan D. Maddox. He aftenvard removed to Kansas 
and later returned to the Hawkeye state, where he was living at the time of 
his enlistment in the Union anny. In 1862 he joined the boys in blue of 
Company E, Sixteenth Iowa Infantry, and for thirty-seven months loyally- 
followed the old flag and fought for the cause it represented. When the 
war was over he located on a fann near ]\Iazon, Grundy county, where he 
made his home until 1879, when he removed to Oswego, Kansas. Three 
years later, in 1882, he returned to Illinois and has since lived a retired life in 
Gardner, being one of the respected citizens of that locality. 

E. L. Clover, whose name introduces this review, was reared in Iowa, 
Kansas and Illinois. He spent his boyhootl tlays on the farm and in the 
common schools acquired his preliminary education, which was supple- 
mented by four months' study in a private school and six months" study in a 
high school in Kansas. Subsequently he studied law and on the 26th of 
November, 1881, when twenty years of age, was admitted to the bar. He 
did not at once engage in practice, however, but devoted his energies to 
school-teaching. For six months he had charge of a country school and 
then joined his parents in Gardner, where he engaged in teaching for one 
term. He was also employed for one term as a teacher in I\Iazon, and after 
his marriage he formed a partnership with his brother, Thomas F.. for the 
practice of law in Braceville, Illinois. In September, 1885. when his father 
was made the postmaster of Gardner, he became the deputy and filled that 
position until February, 1886, when he removed to Morris. Here he served 
as the deputy*postmaster until March, 1887, and on the fifteenth of that 
month he opened a law oftice, since which time he has been accounted one 
of the leading representatives of the profession in this city. In April, 1887, 
he was elected the city attorney and discharged his duties so ably that he 
was continued in the office for three successive terms. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 615 

I\Ir. Clover was united in marriage, May 20, 1884, to Jessie M. Coles, 
•of Grundy county, and their union has been blessed with one daughter, 
Inez T- Mr. Clover is a Democrat in his political affiliations, and socially 
he is a Master Mason and a member of the Sons of Veterans. He was a 
candidate for judge of the thirteenth judicial district, in 1897, and though 
■defeated he reduced the usual Republican majority from seven thousand 
to two thousand — a fact which indicates his personal popularity and the 
confidence which his fellow citizens have in his professional ability. His 
devotion to his clients' interests is proverbial, and he prepares his cases with 
such thoroughness and precision that he seldom fails to win the verdict de- 
sired, and with most of the important litigation of the county he is therefore 
connected. 



THOMAS H. SYKES. 



No more capable official could have been selected to manage the interests 
■of the poor farm in Grundy county than Thomas Herbert Sykes, who since 
1882 has been in charge and has made it a model farm in every respect. 
He is not only an enterprising agriculturist, but is a capable business man 
and in the care of the inmates of the farm has the greatest regard for sani- 
tation and comfort, his treatment of the poor being both kindly and just. 

Mr. Sykes is a native of England, his birth having occurred in Lanca- 
shire, August 2, 1840, his parents being Joseph and Lydia (Whitehead) 
Sykes, who were also natives of England. In the public and night schools 
of that country our subject acquired his education, and in 1865, when twenty- 
five years of age, bade farewell to the land of his birth and sailed for America. 
He spent a few days in New York city and then went to Pottsville, Penn- 
svlvania, but not being pleased with that locality, he resumed his westward 
journey and took up his abode in Morris. By occupation he was a coal- 
miner and followed that pursuit till 1882, becoming the owner of a mine 
which he operated on a moderate scale. In that year he was selected to take 
charge of the poor farm and agreed to give it one year's trial. During that 
time he so ably managed its interests that he was urged to continue in the 
position and has since been in charge. In his farming operations he follows 
the most progressive methods, and the well tilled fields and cultivated gar- 
dens yield good returns for his labor. He undertook the work of remodel- 
ing and beautifying the place, and his untiring efforts and excellent ideas 
■soon wrought very desirable changes. He graded the yard, planted flowers, 
remodeled the house and enlarged it In' building additions. The large 
<linino--room, kitchen and present sitting-room for the women were all 



6i6 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

planned an<l l)nilt under liis direction, while numerous smaller improvements 
add to the homelike appearance of the i>lace. contributing to the comfort of 
the inmates. Mrs. Sykes personally superintends the kitchen and the cuisine 
and her economy and well formed plans have contributed not a httle to the 
success which has attended the farm under the management of her hus- 
band. 

In 1862 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Sykes and Miss Betty Cryer, 
who has indeed been to him a faithful companion and helpmeet. She was 
born in Englantl and her parents, \\"illiam and Ann Cryer. were both natives 
of Lancastershire. The children of Mr. and Airs. Sykes are Edwin, now 
deceased; Lydia, wife of Charles Wood. \Yho is living in Mazon, Illinois; 
Ellen, deceased; Robert, who is married and resides in \\'auponsee town- 
ship, Grundy county; ]Mary Anna, wife of James Wood, of Wauponsee 
township; Frank, who is married and is a resident farmer of the same town- 
ship; Charles Edward, who is married and resides at home; \\'illiam, de- 
ceased; and Myrtle Ivy, who also is living with her parents. 

In his political affiliations Air. Sykes is a Republican. He belongs to 
the Alethodist Episcopal church and his life is characterized by earnest 
Christiati principles and conduct. In his business he has met with credit- 
able success and is now the owner of two hundred and sixty acres of fine 
land in Wauponsee township. He is one of the most capable county officials, 
and no more worthy incumbent has ever occupied the position of superin- 
tendent of the poor farm. He possesses excellent executive ability, sound 
judgment and indefatigable industry — cjualities which have made him a 
most commendable and painstaking public official. 



WILLIAM T. HOPKINS. 

William T. Hopkins, deceased, was one of the founders and builders of 
Morris and a prominent character in the history of the city and of Grundy 
county. He was born in Lincoln county. j\Iaine, October 5, 1819. His 
]jarents were David and Esther (Trask) Hopkins, both natives of Maine. 
His father, a farmer by occupation, was born in 1779 and died in Maine 
in i860; and his wife was born in 1781 and died also in Maine, in 1872. 
These parents had had five daughters and nine sons. 

Of the sons, William T., the sixth, was educated in his native state, and 
studied law at Bangor. He came to Morris. Illinois, in 1849, and was ad- 
mitted to the bar here in 1850, and at once began the practice of law, in which 
he continued tlie rest of his life. He was a strong lawyer and possessed 
an analytical mind. His knowledge of the law was profound, and his earnest 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 6i1 

and conscientious handling of matters professional made him of strong 
influence at the bar. For a brief time (from 1853 to 1855) he also followed 
merchandising- in Morris. He held several positions of honor and trust and 
did as much for the up-building of Morris as any man who ever lived in 
the place. He served one term as superintendent of pulilic instruction, 
and was ever a strong friend of both school and church. In the early years 
of his residence in Morris he taught vocal music a great deal, and was a 
leader of singers. For years he sang in the Baptist church choir. In 
1863-4-5 he was the president of the Sanitary and Christian Commission for 
his district. He became an ardent supporter of the Republican party at the 
very birth of that organization, and was a member of the first convention 
that organized the Republican party in Illinois, and ever afterward bore 
conspicuous part in politics. He was an intimate friend of President Lincoln 
from 1850 to the time of the latter's death, and was at the convention at 
Chicago that nominated Mr. Lincoln for the presidency, in i860. In 1864 
he was one of the electors on the Republican ticket, which cast the vote 
of Illinois for Abraham Lincoln for president. When Mr. Lincoln came 
to Morris he was always entertained by Mr. Hopkins. In 1861 Mr. Hop- 
kins was elected the judge of the Grundy county court, and he served in 
this ofifice one term. In 1864 he was elected a representative to the legis- 
lature from Grundy county for two years, and in 1865 and 1866 served as 
general agent for the internal-revenue department of the United States. 
Judge Hopkins went out in the three-months" service in the civil war. He 
raised a Grundy county company, known as the "Grundy Tigers," was made 
its captain, and it was a component part of the Eleventh Illinois Regiment. 

While a member of the state legislature. Judge Hopkins was instru- 
mental in securing the necessary legislation for constructing the bridge 
across the Illinois river at Morris. He built the old Hopkins House at 
Morris, the first good hotel erected in that town, and it was a good one, too. 
It was the best hotel in the northern portion of Illinois, at that time, outside 
of Chicago. 

Judee Hopkins was also prominent in ^Masonic circles. He was a Royal 
Arch and Council degree Mason, and held many of the oflices of the fra- 
ternity. 

He was married in Maine, in 1846, to Clara H., a daughter of Simon 
Prescott. She was born in Maine, September 20, 1824, and survived him 
onlv a few years. Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins had no children of their own, but 
thev reared two nieces — Hannah Hopkins, who is now the wife of .\llen F. 
Mallory, of Morris; and Nora J. .\bbott. now deceased. Mr. Hopkins and 
wife were members of the Baptist church, and for many years numbered 
among the prominent citizens of Morris. Perhaps no other citizen whO' 



-6i8 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

lived in Morris was ever held in higher esteem hy his fellow-citizens than was 
Judge \\'illiain T. Hopkins. 



LY.MAN BEECHER RAY. 

Eyman Beecher Ray, the lieutenant governor of Illinois from 1888 to 
1892, is a native of the Green Mountain state. He was born in Hinesburg, 
Chittenilen county, \'ermont, August 17, 1831, and was reared and edu- 
cated in his native state, receiving only the advantage of a public-school and 
academic education. His parents were born and passed all their lives in 
\'ermont. 

In 1852, about the time he reached his majority, Mr. Ray came west 
to Illinois and engaged in teaching school, an occupation he followed until 
1855. That vear he came to ^lorris, and, with a limited capital, opened a 
general store, which he subsequently merged into a dry-goods establish- 
ment, and here he conducted a successful business until 1888, when he re- 
tired, still maintaining his residence in Morris. 

Mr. Ray was one of the organizers of the Republican party in Grundy 
county, and his political career may be said to date from that ti'^ne, he hav- 
ing ever since taken a deep interest in public affairs. In 1873-4 he served 
in the lower house of the Illinois state legislature, from 1882 to 1886 was 
a member of the senate, and from 1888 to 1892 he was lieutenant governor 
of the state. 

Mr. Ray was married, at INIorris, in 1858, to Miss Julia X. Reading, 
daughter of James N. Reading, and to them was given an only daughter, 
Julia E. 



JAAIES N. READING. 

James N. Reading, deceased, was a native of Hamden, New Jersey, the 
son and eldest child of Joseph Reading, and was prepared for college at 
the Princeton Academy, then entered Nassau Hall in 1827, and graduated 
in 1829. taking the fifth honor in a class of twenty-six; studied law in Tren- 
ton; was admitted to the bar in 1832, and became a counselor at law in 
1836. In 1835 he married Sarah C. A. Southard. From 1832 to 1850 he 
practiced law in Flemington, fifteen of which years he was prosecuting attor- 
ney for Hunterdon county. 

In 1850 he left New Jersey and removed to Jefferson county, Missouri, 
and for two years was the president of a leading mining company. In the 
fall of 1853 he became a resident of IMorris, Grundy county. He was 



BIOGRAPHICAL .4.VZ? GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 619 

elected a member of the state legislature of Illinois in the fall of 1856, and 
tilled the position for two years, and then officiated as the clerk of the 
circuit court, tilling a vacancy. During the civil war he was deputy United 
States marshal for Grundy county, and also United States commissioner. 
In 1865 he was elected the county judge, which position he held for twelve 
years, and then declined re-election, thereafter practicing law in Morris. He 
was an able lawyer and jurist, and a man of sterling ciualities. 



THOMAS PHILLIPS. 



Thomas Phillips, a grain merchant of Morris, Illinois, has been a resi- 
dent of this place for more than three decades and all these years has in 
A'arious wavs been prominently identified with the interests of the town. 

Mr. Phillips is a Canadian by birth. He was born in Montreal, Canada, 
September 23, 1836, and spent his youthful days at his native place. At 
the age of sixteen years he started out in life for himself, coming over to 
the United States and at Chateaugay, New York, accepting a position as 
clerk in a mercantile establishment. Going west, he spent six years in 
California, and in 1868 returned to Illinois and settled in Morris, and here 
he has since that date been engaged in the grain business on Canal street. 



JOSEPH H. PATTISON. 

Joseph H. Pattison, a retired citizen of Morris, Illinois, dates his birth 
in Clermont county, Ohio, August 22, 1840, and is a son of William and 
Martha (Halsted) Pattison, both natives of Ohio. In 1842 the Pattison 
family came to Illinois and settled in Wauponsee township, Grundy county, 
where, on a fami. the parents spent the rest of their lives and died, the 
mother dying in 1850, at the age of thirty-seven years; the father, in 1882, 
at the age of seventy-seven. 

Joseph H. was only two years old when he was brought to Grundy 
county, and here he has ever since lived, with the exception of one year, 
1863. he spent in California. He was engaged in farming in Wauponsee 
township until 1891, when he moved to Morris, and here for seven years he 
was interested in the lumber business. Since disposing of his lumber business 
he has been retired. 

Mr. Pattison has at different times been honored with official position 
and has rendered his township and county valued service. He has filled the 
.offices of township collector and supervisor, serving in the latter about ten 



620 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

years: and from 1877. for a period of nine years, he was the treasurer of 
Grundy county. Fraternally he is a Master Mason. 

;\Ir. Pattison has been twice married. In 1867 he wedded Jennie Stru- 
ble, whose life was happily blended with his until her death in 1885. His 
present wife, whose maiden name was .\llie Hall, he married in 1887. 



JAMES CUXXEA. 

James Cunnea emigrated to the United States in 1846. In Ireland, his 
native land, he was a storekeeper. Upon coming to America he settled in 
Will county. Illinois, and engaged in dairy farming. A few years later he re- 
moved to Grundy county, where the rest of his life was spent, engaged 
in banking at Morris for a number of years. Mr, Cunnea died in 1884, at 
the age of seventy-four years, well known and highly respected by all. He 
and his wife, whose maiden name was Ann I. Gluckin, were the parents 
of the following children, viz. : John. James. Thomas. George. Ann. Kate, 
Maria and Isabelle. All are living except James and Isabelle. The latter, 
who was the mother director of the Sisters of the Holy Cross. South Bend, 
Indiana, died in 1893. George and his sister, Kate, reside in a beautiful 
home in Morris, where they are identified with the First National Bank. 
Of the named children, Maria is the wife of John McCambridge, a well- 
known citizen of Morris. 



JOSEPH H. PETTIT. 

Joseph H. Pettit, who is engaged in the abstract and loan business at 
Morris, Illinois, has been identified with this place since his boyhood and is 
ranked with its leading citizens. 

Mr. Pettit was bom in Hunterdon county. New Jersey. For ten or 
twelve years he clerked in a general store in Morris, in 1870 and 1871 was 
the cashier in the Grundy County National Bank, and then for four years 
was engaged in the hardware business, with a partner. In 1878 he was ap- 
pointed the clerk of the circuit court and recorder, in which office he served 
by appointment and election nine years and as deputy ten years. Since 
severing his connection with this office he has devoted his attention to the 
abstract and loan business. 

Mr. Pettit has always been a stanch Republican. Fraternally he is a 
Mason, having advanced through the various degrees of the order up to and 
including the Knight Templar. Also he is a member of the G. A. R. At the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 621 

very beginning of the civil war, in April. 1861, he enlisted as a private in 
Company H, Third New Jersey Volunteer Infantr}-. and served until the 
expiration of his tenn of enlistment in August of that year, when he was 
honorably discharged and returned to Morris. 

Air. Pettit was married in Grundy county, in 1873, to Miss Myra jSIassey, 
and thev have one child living — Murriel. 



PHILIP R. SOUTHCOMB. 

March 6, 1850, in Devonshire, England, was born P. R. Southcomb, 
of Morris. Illinois, a well-known citizen and popular liveryman of this place. 
Although a native of England. ^Ir. Southcomb does not remember his 
native land, for in 1852, at the age of two years, he was brought to this 
country by his parents, Anthony and Jane (Rock) Southcomb. both of 
English birth. 

Arrived in this country, the Southcomb family settled in Kendall county, 
Illinois, and the father, being dependent upon his daily toil for the sup- 
port of his family, worked at first at whatever he could find to do. The 
greater part of his life, however, has been devoted to agricultural pursuits, 
and he is now. 1900. a resident of Livingston county, Illinois, to which 
place he moved in 1869. His wife, the mother of our subject, died several 
years ago. 

P. R. Southcomb received a common-school education in his youth and 
at an early age began hustling for himself, starting out in life with no capital 
except willing hands. Nearly all his life has been spent in the livery business 
and he has been engaged in this line of business in Morris longer than has 
any other man in the town now doing business here. His first livery ex- 
perience was at Gardner, Illinois, where he joined his brother, John, who 
had opened an establishment there. Later John Southcomb came to Morris 
and engaged in the same business here, and in January, 1877, P. R. also 
came to JMorris, the two again becoming partners. They conducted the 
business together until the death of John, which occurred in 1881, at which 
time P. R. became sole proprietor of the establishment, and has so con- 
tinued. In his livery barn are found the best horses and carriages that can be 
secured in Morris. He is honorable and upright in all his business trans- 
actions, and withal genial and accommodating, and as a liveryman his career 
has been a successful one. In addition to owning his livery establishment, 
he has a pleasant cottage home. 

Mr. Southcomb was married in 1878 to IMiss Ida E. Spencer, daughter 



622 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

of George F. Spencer, and they have two sons, Harr}- Philip and Leslie 
Spencer. 

In politics ]\lr. Southcomh has always supportetl the principles of the 
Republican party. He has fraternal relations with the Masonic order, the 
I. O. O. F. and the Knights of the Globe. 



ALEXANDER MILLER. 

Alexander IMiller, deceased, was born at Galloway, New York, April 
8, 1817, and died in Alorris, Illinois, March 2, 1897. The Miller family 
of wliich he was a representati\'e had for many generations been residents of 
the Empire state. 

When a young man Alexander Miller went to New York city and for a 
few years was a broker on Wall street. From New York he went to Buffalo, 
where, in company with E. K. Bruce and others, he built a ship and oper- 
ated several lake vessels, and at one time he and his partners owned all the 
boats on the Erie canal. Financial failure followed, and he came west in 
1859, joining his son, Harry L.. who' had located in ]\Iorris, Illinois, several 
years before and had bought and was running mills on the canal. And 
we may state in passing that these mills were subsequently sold to Nels 
]\Iorris, who, with others, converted them into a distillery. Alexander ^Miller 
had traded for lands in the west, to which he subsequently added until 
he became the owner of one thousand five hundred acres of farming land. In 
the meantime he and his son, Harry L., bought the old plow factory of Good- 
rich & Company, which they operated for a period of twenty-five years, at 
the end of tliat time suspending business. During the rest of his life the 
senior ]\Ir. Miller devoted his time ami attention to looking after his landed 
estate. His was an active, useful life. He was a stanch Republican and an 
enterprising, public-spirited man. interested in all that pertained to the gen- 
eral welfare of his community, and he had the respect of all who knew him. 
In New York, at the age of twenty-four years, he married Cynthia Lovette, 
of Schenectady, New York, whose life was happily blended with his for a 
number of years, until her death in October, 1887. They were the parents 
of the following named children: Harry L., who has already been referred 
to in this sketch and who died in Chicago in 1897; Mary M., of Buffalo, 
New York: Harriet S.. deceased: William ^I., of Chicago; Fannie L., de- 
ceased: Frank C, of Minooka, Illinois; and Chauncey A. 

Chauncey A. Miller was born in Buft'alo, New York. April 22, 1858, and 
was educated in the public schools of Morris and the Northwestern College 
at Naperville, Illinois, being a student in the last named institution for three 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 623 

years. Then for two years he was with Field & Leiter, of Chicago, following 
which he spent eight years as a traveling representative for the Challenge 
Corn Planter Company, of Grand Haven, Michigan. At the end of this time 
he engaged in the agricultural-implement business with his brother, Harry 
L. Miller, at Morris, where Chauncey A. has always maintained his home. 
After the brothers had been in partnership a few years Harry L. sold his 
interest to Chauncey A. and the latter has since conducted the business 
alone, dealing in farm machinery, vehicles and bicycles, and having a large 
trade that extends over a wide territory surrounding Morris. 

Chauncey A. Miller was married in 1881 to Miss Alice H. Whitney, 
daughter of Professor John C. Whitney, and they have two sons — \\'hitney 
C. and Raymond N. 

Mr. Miller is a member of the board of education of Morris and has 
served three years as the town clerk. He is a Republican and a member of 
the K. of P. and M. W. of A. 



SAMUEL M. HOENSHELL. 

The efficient county treasurer of Grundy county is one of Illinois' native 
sons, and he commands the highest regard by reason of his sterling worth 
and fidelity to duty. His birth occurred in Nettle Creek township, Grundy 
county, June 17, 1867, his parents being Samuel M. and Christina (Waltz) 
Hoenshell. His father was born in Pennsylvania, and was of German 
lineage. About i860 he came to Gnmdy county, where he married Miss 
Waltz, who was born in Germany, and came to this country during her 
childhood with her parents, who located in the Keystone state, whence they 
came to Grundy county about i860. i\Ir. Hoenshell devoted his energies 
to agricultural pursuits throughout his entire life, his death occurring in 
1874. He left three children: Nora. Lillie, and Samuel M., the last two 
being twins. After the death of her first husband, the mother married 
again, becoming the wife of Joseph Dawson, a retired farmer, residing in 
Morris. 

Upon the homestead farm Samuel M. Hoenshell spent his boyhood 
days and early became familiar with all the duties and labors that fall to the 
lot of the agriculturist. His preliminary^ education was obtained in the 
public schools and later he was a student in Valparaiso, Indiana, and in 
Geneseo, Illinois. At the age of eighteen years, an accident caused the 
loss of his left arm. which was caught in a corn-sheller. This somewhat 
hampering him in farm work, he has devoted his energies largely to profes- 
sional labors, and at the age of twenty years he began teaching. For seven 



■624 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

years he was accounted one of tlie successful educators in Grundy county, 
having the faculty of imparting clearly and readily to others the knowledge 
he had acquired. In the fall of 1894 he was appointed deputy county treas- 
urer, and so acceptably discharged his duties during his four-years term 
of service in that capacity that he was elected the county treasurer in 1898. 
Although the youngest nominee on the ticket, he received the largest ma- 
jority, which was a merited compliment to his personal worth and ability. No 
trust reposed in him has ever been betrayed and he is deservedly popular 
in the locality where he has so long- made his home. Socially he is connected 
with the Knights of the Globe. 

Februar}' 21. 1900. Air. Hoenshell married Miss Jessie Johnson, a daugh- 
ter of Charles W. Johnson, the sheritT of Grundy county. 



EDWIN H. ROBINSON. 

Edwin H. Robinson, one of the substantial and highly respected citizens 
of Maine township, is descended from sterling Huguenot ancestry. His 
remote ancestors were witnesses of the massacre of St. Bartholomew, ami on 
account of religious persecution fled to England in 1772. From the progen- 
itor of the family in England ^\'illiam Robinson was descended, and he was 
married on the 6th of February, 1799, to jNIary Taylor, of Oxfordshire, 
England. She was of old English stock, and the family were land-owners 
and farmers, having four hundred acres in Oxfordshire. Unto William and 
Mary (Taylor) Robinson were born the following children: William D., 
whose birth occurred December i, 1799: John, born March 21, 1802; 
Samuel, January 16, 1805: Elizabeth, September 15, 1806; Anna, December 
3, 1807: Edward, March 29. 1810; and Frances Johanna, November 15, 
181 3. The father of these children was a wood-carver to the crown of Eng- 
land. He was born and reared in London, obtained a good education in 
the French Huguenot College of London, and at the time of the invasion of 
Napoleon he was a member of the Home Guard. He held membership in 
the Church of England and died in London at the age of forty-four years. 
He was a man of upright Christian character and sterling worth. 

John Robinson, his son. and the father of our subject, was born at St. 
Ann's Court, on Great Russia street, in London. March 21. 1802. received 
a liberal education and was graduated in the French Huguenot College in 
the metropolis. In his early youth he learned the wood-carver's business, 
and for many years followed that pursuit, meeting with good success. He 
was married at Box Hill, in county Surrey, England, August 13, 1833, to 





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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 625 

Elizabeth Hays, whose birth occurred near Bristol, in Gloucestershire. April 
7. 18 12. She was a daughter of John Hays, a carpenter and freeholder, who 
lived to be eighty-nine years of age, and died near his birthplace. His 
first wife died in early womanhood, and he was afterward married again. 
The children of the first union were : Elizabeth. Charlotte, Samuel, and 
several others whose names are not remembered. After the death of her 
mother Elizabeth Hays lived with her sister Charlotte, who had married 
Richard Teast. a well-known ship-builder of Bristol. England, who made his 
home in London. After their marriage John Robinson and his wife sailed 
from London, on the 28th of October, 1833, for New York, and after a 
voyage of seven weeks arrived in the American metropolis, on the nth of 
December. 1833. They remained in that city until June, 1834, Mr. Robin- 
son spending his time in looking over the country in search of a suitable 
location. 

He finally took up his residence at Dublin, in Franklin county, Ohio, in 
June, 1834, and in the following August purchased a farm, comprising four 
hundred acres of land which was covered with a heavy growth of timber. 
Bears and wild turkeys had their haunts in the wooded districts, and the work 
of civilization seemed scarcely begun in that section of the state. Mr. Rob- 
inson, however, began the development of his farm, and with characteristic 
energy prosecuted his labors, continuing the work until he had a good home 
there. In March, 1853, he removed to Union county. Ohio, where he pur- 
chased two hundred acres of unimproved land, devoting his time and atten- 
tion to its development and improvement until his death, which occurred 
December 12. 1893. Mr. Robinson was a man of broad scholarly attainments 
and superior scientific knowledge, being well known in the scientific world. 
He was a friend and associate of Louis Agassiz. Asa Gray and many otlier 
leading scientists connected with Harvard College. He classified and 
wrote the history of "The Habits of Mosses." culled by Dr. Kane in his Arctic 
expedition. Mr. Robinson also collected and classified the Fungi of Ohio, 
making accurate drawings of the same. He made a complete collection 
of the fishes and reptiles of Ohio, which he delivered to Professor Agassiz 
in their natural state. He was a skilled wood-carver and did much fine work 
from models, many specimens of which are on exhibition in the state house 
at Columbus. He entertained liberal religious views, and in politics he was 
an old-line Whig in early life. aiUocating firmly the aljolition of slax'ery. 
He became one of the original supporters of the Republican party. His 
farm home was a station on the underground railroad ami furnished shelter 
for many fugitive slaves escaping on their way to the north. He was one 
of nature's noblemen. His life was ever actuated by strong humanitarian 
principles, his sympathy was as broad as the universe and his intellectual 



626 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

attainment made him the friend and companion of the most eminent scien- 
tific men of the nation. 

The children of John Robinson were : Edwin Hays, who was l)orn 
April II. 1834; Alfred John, who was born July 24, 1836; Reubens \\'illiam, 
who was born April 8, 1839, and died April 29, 1897; Arthur Saul, who was 
born November 9, 1841; Marv' C. T., who was born February 11, 1843; 
Edward, born February 13. 1845: and Guido. born March 17. 1848. IMrs. 
Robinson was an excellent painter, not only of landscapes and other scenes 
but also of portraits. 

Edwin H. Robinson, whose name introduces this review, was born in 
the city of Brooklyn, New York, April 11, 1834, and during his infancy was 
taken by his parents to Ohio. His childhood days were spent in the Buck- 
eye state, and, though the school system was still in a primitive condition, 
he received excellent educational training under his father. His youth was 
spent on the farm, and he not only gained a coinprehensive literary and 
scientific knowledge, but was also trained to habits of industry, gaining a 
practical understanding of the methods of planting and cultivating cereals. 
When twenty-four years of age he was married, in Delaware county, Ohio, 
on the i6th of September, 1858, to Lucinda Hill, who was born June 4, 
1835, a daughter of John A. and Esther (Marsh) Hill. Her father was born 
in Westmoreland county. Pennsylvania, August 4, 1793. and was a son of 
Stephen and Marian (Martin) Hill. The former was a son of Stephen Hill, 
Sr.. who served as a soldier in the war of the Revolution, and was descended 
from a Pennsylvania Dutch family that was founded in America bv German 
ancestors at an early day. Stephen Hill was the owner of a large farm in 
Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and in his later life he went to Dela- 
ware county, Ohio, with his son Stephen and there died, at the age of ninety- 
six years. Stephen Hill, Jr.. the grandfather of Mrs. Robinson, was born in 
Westmoreland county Pennsyh'ania, and married ^larian ^lartin, also a 
representative of one of the old colonial families that were founded in Penn- 
sylvania when the Indians outnuml^ered the white settlers in that state. In 
1811 Stephen Hill and his family remo\-ed to a farm in Delaware county,. 
Ohio, becoming pioneer settlers of that locality, where he secured eleven 
hundred acres of land. He gave a farm to each of his children and was in- 
strumental in clearing a large tract of land, thus advancing the work of 
civilization. He and a number of his famil_\- are Ijuried on the old home- 
stead in a private cemetery. He was a Methodist in religious faith and a 
man whose upright life commended him to the confidence of all. His 
death occurred in 1840. His children were: Joseph V., George David, 
John H., Stephen, Benjamin, Josiah, Betsey, Richard and Sallie. Two of 
the sons. Joseph and George, served their country in the war of 18 12. 





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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 627 

John H. Hill, the father of j\Irs. Robinson, was born in Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, August 4, 1793, and when fourteen years of age ac- 
companied his father to Delaware county, Ohio, where he was reared upon 
a farm. He was married in Franklin county, that state, October 18, 182 1, 
to Esther Marsh, who was born in Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 13, 1799, a daughter of Benjamin and Martha (Bates) Marsh. Her 
father was a representative of an old New Hampshire family of English 
origin, and took up his residence in Ohio at an early day. He became a 
prosperous farmer, although by trade he was a carpenter. His death oc- 
curred in 1799. The Bates family, to which his wife belonged, was founded 
in the Empire state at an early day. After his marriage John Hill and his 
wife located on land in Concord township, Delaware county, Ohio, where lie 
had two hundred acres. This he cleared from heavy timber, transforming 
it into richly cultivated fields. He built and operated a sawmill, engaging 
in the manufacture of lumber in connection with his agricultural pursuits. 
In the Universalist church he held membership, and politically he af^liated 
with the Whig party, becoming a Republican on the organization of that 
party. He lived to the venerable age of eighty-four years, liis death occur- 
ring in Hardin county, Ohio, in 1877. He was twice married, his children 
all being born of the first union. They were: Joseph D., born August 
26, 1822; Matthew B., May 22, 1824; Henry D., December 15, 1825; Clar- 
inda, a twin sister of Henry; Almira, March 3, 1827; Claud, March 2, 1829; 
Alary J., February 5, 1830; Sarah, November 30, 1832; Lucinda, June 4, 
1835; William, November 2, 1838; Hugh M., December 7, 1841; and Esther 
C, February 13, 1846. All of the twelve children are living excepting 
Almira, who died at the age of ten years, and Esther, who died December 
20, 1854. 

After their marriage Air. and Mrs. Robinson located in Union county, 
Ohio, on a farm of one hundrefl and twenty acres, which was covered with 
heavy timber. It required arduous labor to prepare this for the plow, but 
he cleared away the trees and made a good home, residing there for six 
years. In 1865 he came to Grundy county, and on the 21st of March of 
that year took up his abode on the farm which is now his home, a tract of 
one hundred and sixty acres. The place was unimproved save that an old 
house had been built thereon. Mr. Robinson began the work of develop- 
ment with characteristic energy, and has prosecuted his labors so untiringly 
that he has one of the best improved farms in the township at this time. He 
owns two hundred and forty-five acres of rich land, the greater part of which 
is under cultivation, yielding to him a golden tribute in return for his care 
and labor. He has erected a substantial two-story frame residence and has 
built good barns and outbuildings. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Robinson 



628 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

has l)een blessed with two children: Alfred D.. born July 24, 1859, and 
^\'illiam R., born September 23, 1863, both natives of Union county, Ohio. 

In his political views Mr. Robinson is a stalwart Repubhcan. having 
supported that party since John C. Fremont was its first candidate. He 
served as school trustee for nineteen years, and the cause of education has 
found in him a warm friend, whose labors in behalf of its advancement have 
been most effective and beneficial. For three years he served as assessor 
and for two years as supervisor, discharging- his duties in a most creditalile 
manner. He is known as a progressive and public-spirited citizen and has 
given his active co-operation to all movements calculated to advance the 
general welfare. He was instrumental in naming the township of Maine, 
and has ever done all in his power to promote its upbuilding and progress. 
His life has been characterized by uprightness in all business and social rela- 
tions, and he well deserves mention among the representative men of the 
coimtv. 



CONRAD ELERDINXi. 

The industrial interests of Grundy county are well represented by 
this gentleman, who is now engaged in the manufacture of rolled oats in 
Morris. Success has attended his business career, resulting not from a 
combination of fortunate circumstances or from aid of influential friends, 
but coming as the result of continued endeavor, resolute will and honorable 
dealing, and while his life has not been marked by striking events his history 
yet contains valuable lessons, for it is that of one who has ever been true to 
his duty to himself, his fellow men and his country. 

Mr. Elerding is a native of LaSalle county, where his birth occurred 
December 15. 1844: and his father. Henry Elerding. was born in the prin- 
cipality of Westphalia. Germany. September 9. 1805. and like his father was 
a miller by occupation. During the stormy days succeeding the estab- 
lishment of French rule in \\'estphalia by Napoleon I. and while Henry 
was still an infant, his father was called to active military service and so 
distinguished himself on the field of battle that he was rewarded with a 
medal of honor by King Gerome I. — a distinction that has been conferred 
upon but few. But war brought its hardships to the families of the soldiers. 
for the land was over-ridden by the troops. The sufiferings and privations of 
those terrible days of the boyhood of Henry Elerding were such as to be 
long remembered. The family property, although not confiscated, was de- 
stroyed by fire and the lifetime work of his father was thus lost. 

Under great disadvantages Henrj^ Elerding secured an education while 
working in the mill. At length he determined to try his fortune in .Vmerica, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 629 

and at the age of twenty-seven sailed to the Xew World. After a voyage 
of sixty-eight days he arrived in New York city, November i, 1832. without 
a dollar. \\'orking his passage to Troy, New York, he secured there a 
position as a wheelwright, but soon after, learning of better opportunities 
ill the west, he started on foot for Detroit. Michigan. At length he reached 
his destination, where he learned for the first time of the hamlet which was 
to become the future metropolis of the Mississip]ii valley. Chicago at that 
time contained a population of only one hundred and fifty, and with the 
little town he became identified May 30, 1834. While there he formed 
the acciuaintnnce of Judge Caton. who advised him to go to LaSalle county, 
and, acting upon that suggestion, Mr. Elerding there erected and operated 
the first .sawmill on the Fox river, its location being one mile north of the 
present site of Sheridan. There he also built a gristmill, and at that place 
a mill is still oi)erated by his nephew. Mr. Elerding remained in LaSalle 
county until 1858, when in the fall of that year he came to Morris, where 
he erected a gristmill, which he conducted till 1869, when he was succeeded 
by his son, Conrad. He was a very successful business man and his inde- 
fatigable energy and capable management brought tii him a handsome com- 
petence. 

In 1838 Henr}- Elerding was united in marriage to Mary Ann Hollen- 
back, who was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, a daughter of Clark 
Hollenback, a pioneer settler of Kendall county, Illinois. She died in 1882 
and was buried in Millington, this state. Of their union were born ten 
children: Melissa, William H. and Sarah, all deceased; Conrad, of this 
sketch; Louise; Annis, who has also passed away; George B.; Charles F. ; 
Edward H.; and Wesley, deceased. Conrad Elerding was educated in the 
public schools, learned the miller's trade under the direction of his father and 
in 1869 succeeded to the ownership of the mill in Morris. He thoroughly 
mastered the business in all its details in early life and during the passing- 
years has kept in touch with the progress and improvement that have been 
made in the business. He has a well equipped plant, supplied with excel- 
lent machinery, and since 1889 he has been engaged exclusively in the 
manufacture of rolled oats. His patronage has steadily increased until it 
has now assumed extensive proportions and yields to him a handsome in- 
come, the i)roduct of his mill reaching many markets, including England 
and continental Europe. 

In 1876 Mr. Elerding was united in marriage to Mrs. Eliza J. Elerding, 
the widow of -his brother, William H. She was a daughter of John P. and 
Rebecca (Stone) Ridings, natives of Virginia. Her father was a descendant 
of Peter Ridings, the first representative of the family in America, who 
sailed from England and took up his abode in the Old Dominion. In 1859 



630 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Mrs. Elerding's parents came to Grundy county, where she has since made 
her home. By her first marriage she has one child, George W., who mar- 
ried Elva A. Lloyd and has one child, a son. Frank Lloyd, aged three years. 
This child represents the fourth generation of the Elerdings in America. 

For many years the subject of this review has been a resident of Morris, 
where he is highly esteemed for his sterling worth. Prosperity has attended 
his efforts in industrial lines, and so honorably has it lieen won that even the 
most envious cannot grudge him his success. 



ORVILLE T. WILSON. 

Orville T. Wilson, secretary of the Morris Grain Company, of Morris, 
Illinois, is one of the enterprising business men of the town, where he has 
resided for the past four years. Briefly, the facts in regard to his life are 
as follows : 

Orville T. Wilson is a son of Jonathan and Elma C. (Hoyle) Wilson, 
highly respected citizens of Grundy county, Illinois; and was born on his 
father's farm in this county. June 15, 1868. He was engaged in farming 
from his early youth until 1895, when he left the farm and came to Morris. 
From February, 1895. until October, 1897, he was a member of the lumber 
firm of J. H. Pattison & Company. In the meantime, in 1895, he became 
associated with others in the organization of the Morris Grain Company, 
and in the fall of 1897, having sold his lumber interests, he assumed the active 
duties of secretary of the company he had helped to organize and which is 
now doing a prosperous business. / 

Mr. Wilson has a wife and three children. He was married in 1893 to 
Miss Alice M. Pattison, daughter of J. H. Pattison, and their children, in 
order of birth, are Grace, Jennie Elma and Lois. 

Politicallv Mr. Wilson is a stanch Republican, active in the support 
of his party. Public-snirited and enterprising, he is regarded as one of the 
leading young business men of the town. Fraternally he is identified with 
the Knights of Pythias. 



E. B. TAMES. 



Among the pioneers of Grundy county none is more w'orthy of repre- 
sentation in this volume than the gentleman whose naine forms the caption 
of this article. Through the long years which have passed since his arrival in 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 631 

the community he lias witnessed wonderful changes, having seen tlie wild 
lantl transformed into rich farms, while hamlets have grown into thriving 
towns, supplied with the various business enterprises which contribute to 
the g'eneral prosperity of the public. The inventions and enterprises which 
are indicative of civilization ha\e been introduced one by one, and through 
the efforts of the representative citizens the county has taken rank among 
the leading counties of this great commonwealth. At all times Mr. James 
has been deeply interested in the growth of the locality and has withheld 
his support from no measures which have been intended for the pul)lic 
good. 

A native of Ohio, he was born in Hamilton county, November 19, 
18.24, ^"d at the age of ten years went to Rush county, Indiana, where he 
was employed as a farm hand for eight years. At the expiration of that 
period he came to Illinois, locating in Kendall county, where he worked 
by the day and month for a time and then began farming on his own ac- 
count on rented land, which he operated for about five years. He then 
came to Grundy county and settled on section 25, Norman township, where 
he rented a farm for two years. Later he took a claim which he afterward 
purchased, and as his financial resources increased he added tO' his landed 
possessions from time to time until he is now the owner of six hundred and 
eighteen acres of fine land. He came to this country a poor boy and by 
determined purpose and unflagging industrv he has overcome the difticulties 
and hardships that fell to his lot and has wrested from the hand of fate a 
comfortable competence. For fifty-two years he has resided on the farm 
which is now his home, his first place of residence being a primitive log 
cabin, which in 1850 was destroyed by fire, together with all its contents. 
He replaced it with a rude frame building, but now he has a commodious 
and substantial residence, together with good barns and other buildings for 
the shelter of grain and stock. He was very unfortunate in an attempt to 
raise horses, but was very successful in his other stock-dealing venttu'es. 
Thus it will be seen that success has not always smiled upon him, yet he 
has persevered and his labors have ultimately brought to him a desirable and 
merited reward. 

In 1844 i\Ir. James was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Pyatt, a 
daughter of John and I^Iargaret (Elder) Pyatt, the former a native of Virginia 
and the latter of Pennsylvania. Their children are John Wesley, who died 
in the army during the civil war; Charity, who also has passed away; Emily 
E., who is the wife of \\'. H. Benson, a resident of Norman township, 
Grundv county, Huldena, deceased; Sarah F., the wife of John Whitten, 
a resident of Norman township: M. F., wdio married Myra Marks and is 
living in Kansas; and ]Mary A., the wife of C. R. Flanders, a resident of 



632 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Harvey, Illinois. The mother of these children died in 1863, and Mr. James 
afterward married Sarah P. Evans, a daughter of Francis Evans, of Illinois. 
They have but one child. Dr. Robert L., who married Jessie Butler, and is a 
practicing physician at Blue Island, Illinois. 

In his political views Mr. James is a stalwart Republican, who warmly 
advocates the principles of his party, for he believes that its platform em- 
bodies the best views of government. He has held a number of local offices, 
including that of supervisor, in which he acceptably served four years. He 
is an earnest worker and faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and is a man whom to know is to respect and honor. His success is indeed 
creditable and his life is an illustration of what may be accomplished through 
determined and continued labor. 



OLE J. XELSON. 

.\mong the well-known representatives of business interests in Morris 
is this gentleman, who is connected with the fire and life insurance business 
of this city. He is also well known as an official, for during a period of 
seventeen years he has represented his township on the county board of 
supervisors, of which he is now the chairman. In life's relations his conduct 
has been such as to gain him the respect and confidence of those with whom 
he has been associated. Energetic, prompt and reliable in business affairs, 
he has gained the well deserved success which is the result of tireless energy 
and keen discrimination. 

Mr. Nelson is a native of Norway, his birth having occurred in the land 
of the "midnig-ht sun" on the 22d of January. 1847. His parents were John 
and Anna (Oleson) Nelson, and with them he came to the United States 
in 1858, locating upon a farm near Lisbon, Kendall county. Illinois. There 
the father carried on agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred in 
1879, when he had attained the age of sixty-four years. In 1886 Mrs. Nel- 
son departed this life, being then in the sixty-sixth year of her age. 

Ole J. Nelson was the second in order of birth in their family of ten 
children. His boyhood days were passed in the usual manner of farm lads 
of that period. He assisted in the work of field and meadow and in the 
winter months he attended the public schools. He was only eleven years 
of age when the family arrived in Illinois. His educational privileges were 
somewhat limited, but through the avenue of books and papers and through 
the experience gained in a practical business career he has gathered a useful 
fund of information, and is indeed a well-informed man. He jnirsued a 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 633 

course in the local business college in Morris, and was then well-eciuipped 
for the practical duties of life. 

At the early age of sixteen years he offered his services to the govern- 
ment in defense of the Union, and joined the "boys in blue" of Company 
H, One liundred and Thirty-eighth Illinois Infantry. The date of his en- 
listment was April 14, 1864, and the term one hundred days. He served 
for more than five months in Missouri and Kansas, and with an honorable 
military record was mustered out. Although so young he displayed the 
\-alor and loyalty of many a time-tried veteran, and he now maintains pleas- 
ant relations with his army comrades through his membership in Darveaux 
Post, No. 329, G. A. R., of which he has served as the commander. 

After his return from the war Mr. Nelson engaged in farming for a year, 
and then turned his attention to merchandising in jNIorris. For six years 
he occupied a clerical position with the grain company on Canal street, and 
in 1874 formed a partnership with his brother, Nels J. Nelson, in the grain 
business, which he continued until iSgi. In that year their warehouse was 
destroved by tire, and their losses were so great as to compel them to retire 
trom the grain trade. Our subject then turned his attention to the fire and 
life insurance business, in which he has met with pleasing success. He is 
one of the able representatives of that enterprise in this section of the state 
and has written a large amount of business, wdiich has gained him the con- 
fidence and commendation of the company. 

In 1872 Mr. Nelson was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth A. Erick- 
•son. and to them have been born two daughters, Ettie and Josephine. Their 
pleasant home in Morris is the center of a cultured society circle, and their 
household is noted for its gracious hospitality. In politics Mr. Nelson is a 
stanch Republican, unswerving in his support of the principles of the party 
which stood by the Union in the civil war, which has ever upheld American 
institutions and industries, and which is now advocating the policy of the 
McKinley administration and the sovereignty of our flag upon foreign soil. 
He is prominent in political circles, and his worth and ability have occasioned 
his election to various of^ces of trust and responsibility. He served six 
years as city alderman, being- elected to that position in 1877. In 1883 
he was elected township supervisor and discharged his duties so ably that 
he has since been continued in the office — a period of seventeen consecutive 
years. This record is hardlv equaled in the city, an indication of his fidelity 
to duty and his prompt and able sen-ice. He is now the president of the 
board of Grundy county supervisors, and by virtue of this position he was 
made the chairman of the board of review in 1899. He has a membership 
in the Masonic fraternity, and has attained the degree of Knight Templar. 
Throughout his life he has manifested the qualities which characterize the 



•634 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

people of the Norwegian nation, being energetic, reliable and persevering. 
These elements have brought to him success and won him the high regard 
of his fellow men. 



JAMES E. WILLS. 

Upon a farm near Coal City James E. Wills makes his home and is re- 
garded as one of the substantial farmers and leading and influential citizens 
of Maine township. He was born in this township, July i, 1857, his par- 
ents being Lawrence and Isabel (Honebon) Wills. It is thought that both 
the Wills and Honebon families have large fortunes in Englanil. The 
grandmother of our subject was an heir to one hundred and fifty thousand 
pounds, but never received the money, being cheated out of it by a lawyer. 
It is also believed that a large fortune belonging to the Wills is in the English 
court of chancery. One of the ancestors of our subject was a naval officer 
to whom large amounts of prize money was due for some captures which 
he assisted in making. The grandfather of our subject was a seafaring man, 
antl his son, Lawrence Wills, was born in Chardstock, Somersetshire, Eng- 
land, May 24, 1824. He obtained a common-school education and in early 
life began farming. He was married in his native county to Isabel Hone- 
bon, who was born in Somersetshire, February 7, 181 5. They began their 
domestic life there and for a few years Mr. Wills followed farming, after 
which he emigrated to America, in 1848, taking passage on a sailing vessel 
which weighed anchor at Liverpool. Three months later he landed at New 
York, and by way of the lakes he proceeded to Chicago and thence to Ken- 
dall county, Illinois, where he rented land. In 1854 he came to Grundy 
county, locating in what is now Maine township. Here he purchased forty 
acres of the farm upon which our subject now resides. It was then but 
little improved, but he made a good home and extended the boundaries of 
his farm from time to time until it comprised four hundred acres of rich and 
arable land. His life was one of untiring industry and his years of honest 
labor brought to him a handsome competence. His political support was 
given the Republican party. In their nati\e land Mr. and Mrs. Wills were 
members of the Church of England, but after coming to America united 
with the Methodist church. The father died July 3, 1S93, at the age of 
seventy-two years, and the mother in 1888. They were parents of six chil- 
dren: Sylvia, Fanny, Barbara, William, Isaac and James E., all natives of 
Somersetshire, England, excepting the last two. 

James E. Wills, of this review, is indebted to the common-school sys- 
tem for the educational privileges which he enjoyed and was reared to farm 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 635 

life. He was married in Maine township, on the 20th of February, 1881, 
to Miss Mary L. Hill, who was born in Delaware county, Ohio, October 7, 
i860, and is a daughter of Henry D. and Maria (Stahnan) Hill, the former 
a son of Adam Hill and a native of Delaware county, Ohio, where he was 
born December 15, 1826. He, too, made farming his life work, and in his 
native county he wedded Maria S. Stalman, who was born in Adams county, 
Pennsylvania, September 8. 1834. Her parents were Henry Louis and 
Maria Sophia (Miller) Stalman. Her father was born in Hamburg, Ger- 
many, and there learned the shoemaker's trade. After arriving at years of 
maturity he wedded Maria S. Miller, also a native of Germany, and in 1833 
they crossed the Atlantic to America, taking up their abode in Adams county, 
Pennsylvania, where he followed the shoemaker's trade. Later they re- 
sided in Licking county, Ohio, and afterward removed to Delaware county, 
locating twenty miles north of Columbus on a small farm, where Mr. Stal- 
man died, at the age of eighty-one years, and his wife at the age of seventy- 
seven. They were members of the United Brethren church and were peo- 
ple of the highest respectability. 

After his marriage Mr. Hill located in Delaware county, Ohio, making 
his home upon a small farm until his removal to Grundy county, Illinois, 
in 1864. For a year he resided in Mazon township, and then purchased land 
in what is now Maine township^ — a tract of eighty acres — to which he after- 
ward added forty acres. This place he improved, making a good home, and 
his enterprising efforts gained him a place among the substantial farmers 
and reliable citizens of his community. He died January 26, 1900, when 
about seventy-four years of age. His children were Clara, John, Mary, Joel 
B., Edward, Joseph, Louis, Delmar, who died at the age of twenty-two 
years, Thomas and Martha. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Wills spent two years upon the farm 
which is now their home and then moved to Good Farm township. Mr. 
Wills rented one hundred and sixty acres of land there. They returned to 
the Wills homestead in 1890, he having inherited eighty acres of his father's 
estate. As the years passed and his capital was augmented Mr. Wills has 
increased his landed possessions until he now owns about three hundred 
and twenty acres in Maine township, together with a well-improved farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres in Butler county, Kansas. While his career 
has been a prosperous one. his success has come as the result of many hours 
of hard labor, week in and week out. His steady application and careful 
management have been the factors in his prosperity, and his competence is 
therefore well merited. 

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Wills are: Wesley, Lewis, Clarence, 
Earl, Ray, James, Jesse, John and Inez Marie, the only daughter. In his 



636 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

political views Mr. Wills is a Republican, and has served as a member of the 
school board and as highway commissioner. Both he and his wife enjoy 
the warm regard of many friends and are numbered among the leading citi- 
zens of their community. 



MATTHEW JOHNSTON. 

Matthew Johnston, whose long and active useful life is well worthy of 
emulation and who is accounted one of the leading citizens of Mazon. was 
born in Uniontown, Fayette county. Pennsylvania. June 27, 1821, his par- 
ents being Andrew and Mar}- (Thompson) Johnston. The father was a 
native of Pennsylvania and a son of William Johnston, whose birth occurred 
in Ireland. The grandfather was probably of Scotch-Irish lineage, and in 
his religious faith was a Presbyterian. Andrew Johnston was born in Fay- 
ette county, Pennsylvania, and worked as a teamster in the days when 
freight was transported by means of horse power. He married Mary 
Thompson, also of Fayette county, and to them were born the following 
children : William, Matthew, Jane. Lorrimer, Sidney, Ann and Sarah. 
Leaving the county of his nativity, Andrew Johnston removed with his fam- 
ily to Richland county, Ohio, becoming one of the pioneer residents of that 
locality. There he followed farming and freighting until his death, his 
demise occurring when he was thirty-five years of age, while making one 
of his trips. His widow sur\-ived him until eighty-two years of age, mak- 
ing her home with her son Matthew, in Grundy county, Illinois. 

Matthew Johnston was only about a year and a half old when his par- 
ents removed to Richland county, Ohio. He received a limited education 
in the public schools, but was not yet eight years of age at the time of his 
father's death. He then went to live with an uncle. \\'illiam Thompson, with 
whom he remained until seventeen years of age. wlien he went to Union- 
town. Pennsylvania, to learn the brick-mason's trade. He served a three- 
years apprenticeship under \\'illiam Meredith, receiving at various times 
four, five and six dollars per month. When he had thoroughly mastered the 
business he returned to Guernsey county, Ohio, where he worked at his 
trade for six years, after which he spent six years in Jefiferson county, Ohio, 
following the same pursuit. 

On the 19th of April, 1842, in Guernsey county. Air. Johnston was 
united in marriage to Miss Mary Jane Preston, who was born September 
6, 1824, in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, a daughter of William and Annie (Car- 
son) Preston. Her paternal grandparents were William and Zubah (Sweet) 
Preston : the former was born in \'ermont, near Lake Champlain. and was 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 637 

descended from English ancestors who located in America in colonial days. 
By occupation he was a farmer, and at an early period in the pioneer epoch of 
Ohio he removed to Tuscarawas county. His children were Elijah, Sarah, 
Mary, John, Oliver, Elizabeth, James and Zubah. William - Preston, Jr., 
was reared upon a farm and was married in Tuscarawas county to Annie 
Carson, a daughter of Andrew and Jane Carson, the former of French line- 
age and the latter of Holland-Dutch descent. Andrew Carson was a farmer 
and tanner, and removed to Sandusky, Ohio, locating upon a farm, where 
he died at an advanced age. His children were Zachariah, John, Samuel, 
Andrew, Margaret, Jane and Annie. For a number of years William Pres- 
ton, Jr., resided in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, but afterward removed to 
Hancock county, that state. Their daughter, Mrs. Johnston, however, was 
born in the former county. By her marriage she became the mother of ten 
children: William, the oldest, born April 9, 1843, i" Guernsey county, was 
a soldier in the civil war. He enlisted at Mazon in August, 1862, as a mem- 
ber of Company D, One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Illinois Infantry, 
under Captain Chandler, for three years or during the war, continuing at 
the front until honorably discharged on the 5th of June, 1865. He par- 
ticipated in the battles of Lookout Mountain, Vicksburg, the Atlanta cam- 
paign and the memorable march to the sea under Sherman. He is now 
living in York county, Nebraska. The other children of the family are 
Andrew C, who was born in Guernsey county, April 28, 1845; Mary A., 
born October 9, 1847, i" Jefferson county, Ohio; Harriet M., born July 4, 
1850, and died in 185 1; Sarah M., born April 5, 1853, in Mazon township, 
Grundy county, Illinois; Finley P., born March 4, 1856; John F., born July 
2, i860; Charles S., born April i, 1862; Clara B., bom September 20, 1864, 
in Mazon township; and Nellie A., born January 28, 1868. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Johnston, of this review, located in 
Guernsey county, Ohio, where he worked at his trade and erected many 
substantial buildings, including the Catholic church in Washington, Ohio, 
and many good residences. In 1847 '^^ removed to Jefferson county, Ohio, 
locating on a farm. In 1852 he came to Illinois, taking up his residence in 
Mazon township, Grundy county, a mile south of the village of Mazon. 
There he successfully followed farming for some time. He bought land 
and became the owner of a valuable property, which he continued to culti- 
vate until 1884, when he removed to Mazon. In the village he purchased 
a comfortable residence, and has since practically lived a retired life, although 
he has been the promoter of various enterprises which have contributed 
to the welfare of the town, and was one of the builders of the opera house, 
'of which he is still one of the proprietors. His wife has for many years 
heen a member of the Methodist church and he contributes to its support. 



638 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

In politics, Air. Johnston is a stalwart Republican, served as supervisor for 
three terms, as assessor for nine years and as a member of the school board 
for four years, discharging the duties in a most prompt and able manner. 



THOMAS LAYMON. 



For more than a third of a century Thomas Lamon has resided 
upon his present farm in Maine township, Grundy county, locating here 
soon after his return from the war, for at the time when hostilities were in 
progress between the north and the south he went forth in defense of the 
Union and valiantly followed the old flag. He is descended from colonial 
ancestry that resided in Tennessee and were of German and Irish lineage. 
His paternal grandparents, Abraham and Elizabeth (Goodpaster) Laymon, 
were natives of Tennessee, whence they removed to Clermont county, Ohio, 
in early pioneer days. They had a family of ten children, namely : James 
M., Elias, David, Will. Cynthia, John, Rachel, Frank, Cornelius and Jesse. 

James AI. Laymon. the father of our subject, was born in Clermont 
county, Ohio, September 4, 1807, and received such educational privileges 
as could be obtained in the subscription schools of that day. His training 
at farm work, however, was not meager, for in youth he began work in the 
fields and became familiar with all the duties that fall to the lot of the agri- 
culturist. He was married in 1825 to Mary Sloan, a daughter of George 
and ]\Iary (Storey) Sloan, natives of Pennsylvania and the parents of seven 
children, as follows : Nellie, Thomas, Mary, Margaret, John, William and 
Maria. Mr. and Mrs. Sloan were both members of the Methodist church, 
and the father carried on agricultural pursuits in Clermont county, Ohio. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Laymon located on a farm in that 
countv. whence they removed to Indiana, settling near Crawfordsville. where 
they carried on agricultural pursuits for about four years and then went to 
Bartholomew county, that state. Subsequently they became residents of 
Miami county, Indiana, where the father purchased three hundred and 
twenty acres of heavily timbered land, upon which no home had then been 
erected. This was about 1835. Mr. Laymon cleared one hundred and 
sixty acres of his land, erected substantial buildings, planted a large orchard 
and made a good pioneer home. He was afterward cheated out of this 
property by a dishonorable banker who got him to exchange it for worthless 
Iowa land. In 1856 he removed to Lee county, Illinois, where he purchased 
eighty acres, improving the farm until 1859, when he came to Grundy 
county and purchased a quarter section in Braceville township. To the 
improvement and development of that tract he devoted his energies until 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 639 

his death, and was regarded as one of the most industrious and enterprising 
farmers of the neighborhood. Unto him and his wife were born tifteen chil- 
dren, nine of whom reached years of maturity, namely : George, Eliza- 
beth, Abraham, Will, John, Thomas, David, Martha and Lida J. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Laymon were members of the Methodist church, and in politics 
he was a Democrat in early life, but in i860 supported Abraham Lincoln 
and afterward voted the Republican ticket. His life was straightforward 
and honorable, and he reached the good old age of eighty-six years, passing 
away upon the home farm, February 4, 1890. His wife died January 3, 
1894, at the age of eighty-seven years. 

Thomas Laymon, whose name introduces this review, was the fifth 
child of his father's family and was born in Bartholomew county, Indiana, 
May 15, 1846. His educational privileges were limited. He attended a 
subscription school for three months, but otherwise is self-educated. He 
began work on the farm when very young and aided in the labors of the 
field until after the inauguration of the great civil war, when, in the eleventh 
ward of Chicago, on the 7th of October, 1864, he enlisted for three years. 
He was then only eighteen years of age. After serving for a year, however, 
the war ended and he was honorably discharged in Chicago, July 12, 1865, 
having in the meantime been promoted to the rank of corporal for meritori- 
ous conduct. He participated in the battle of Stone River and in the sec- 
ond battle at Franklin, which was one of the most hotly contested of the 
war. He was also in the engagement at Nashville, Tennessee. At one 
time he was quite ill, but did not go to the hospital, and throughout his 
service was always loyal to the old flag and the cause it represented, doing 
his duty promptly and cheerfully. He also had two brothers in the war. 
Abraham C. served for three years as a private of Company C, Forty-seventh 
Indiana Infantry, and participated in many battles, his death occurring soon 
after the war from the efifects of hardships endured. John was a private of 
the One Hundredth Illinois Infantry and served for about ten months. 
When the country no longer needed his aid Mr. Laymon, of this review, 
returned to Braceville township and for a year operated a rented farm. He 
was married April 10. 1866, to Esther Alorrison, who was born November 
9, 1836, in Peoria, Illinois, and was a widow at the time of her marriage to 
Mr. Laymon. She is a lady of culture and refinement. Her father, Elias 
Colwell, was a farmer and pioneer of Peoria county, Illinois, whither he 
removed from Stark county, Ohio. His children were Louisa, Esther and 
Melissa. The second daughter was married to William Morrison, a farmer 
of Grundy county, Illinois, and they became the parents of two children, 
Eliza A. and Hannah, both of whom are now living. ]\Ir. Lavmon lost his 
first wife October 13, 1896, and in Chicago, on the 24th of Januarv, 1899, 



640 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

he wedded Allie J. Ellyson, who was bom March 4, 1866, in Petersburg, 
Virginia, a daughter of James F. and Jane (Rolfe) Ellyson. Her father was 
born at Dinwiddie, Virginia, and was of English descent. He was a well- 
educated man and a coachmaker by occupation. He died at the age of 
thirty-five years, during the infancy of his daughter. He had been a soldier 
in the Confederate service during the civil war, and his death resulted from 
the hardships which he had endured. In his family were two daughters, 
Allie J. and Josephine, the latter the wife of J. O. Smith, of Raleigh, North 
Carolina. Airs. Laymon was reared in Petersburg, Virginia, by her mother 
and was educated in the city schools. In later years she made her home 
witli her sister, Airs. Smith, of Raleigh, North Carolina, and afterward came 
to Illinois. 

In 1866 Mr. Laymon purchased his present farm, which he has greatly 
improved, erecting a tasteful and commodious residence and substantial out- 
buildings. He has one daughter, Elva J., now the wife of D. R. Anderson, 
a lawyer of Morris, and they have one child, Ray. In his political views 
Mr. Laymon is a Republican, and he is an honored member of the Grand 
Army Post at Gardner. Illinois. Straightforward in business and indus- 
trious and enterprising, he has through his carefully managed affairs won 
a comfortable competence. He and his wife reside on the old homestead 
and the household is noted for its gracious hospitality. 



ABRAHAM C. CARTER. 

Among the honored pioneers who aided in the development and im- 
provement of Grundy county in the days of its early settlement none is 
more worthy of representation in this volume than Abraham C. Carter. 
Though deceased, the influence of his honorable and upright life and the 
memorv of his industrious career is stdl felt by those who knew him. His 
life was quiet and uneventful in a manner, yet at all times he was found faith- 
ful to his duty, and was one of the most respected citizens of Mazon town- 
ship. 

A native of the Buckeye state, his birth occurred in Belmont county, 
Ohio. October 17, 1818. his parents being Henry and Sarah (Cuppy) Carter. 
His father was a pioneer of Belmont county, removing to that place from 
Marvland. He was born about twenty miles from the city of Baltimore, 
and in that locality spent the days of his youth. He married Aliss Cuppy. 
and four children were born to them, namely: Ann. Rachel, Henry and 
Abraham. Mr. Carter died in Ohio, and his widow afterward became the 
wife of Mr. Tavlor. bv whom she had two children. — David and Margaret. 




(Jh,^.yi)CLA:^(lJ^^ 




m j9, ^c^^. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 641 

Abraham C. Carter spent his boyhood days in the county of his nativity 
and received there a hmited education, his school privileges, however, being 
somewhat meager. When very young he learned the glass-blower's trade, 
at Wheeling, Virginia. After arriving at years of maturity he was mar- 
ried, in Guernsey county, Ohio, November 2~, 1844, to Margaret Ann Pres- 
ton, wiio was born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, June 14, 1826. Her parents 
were William and Ann (Carson) Preston, and the former was a son of Will- 
iam Preston, who was of English descent, his birth having occurred in 
Canada. He married Zuby Sweet, and their children were Elijah, Oliver, 
John, Sarah, William, James, Zuby and Mary. The family removed from 
Canada to the United States, for Mr. Preston would not swear allegiance 
to the British crown. They became pioneer settlers of Tuscarawas, Ohio, 
where he followed the cooper's trade, which he had learned in early life. 
W'illiam Preston, Jr., the father of Mrs. Carter, took up his abode in Tus- 
carawas, Ohio, after his marriage, and there two children were born to them, 
— Mary Jane and Margaret Ann. The mother died when twenty-seven 
years of age, and the father afterward married Barbara Richardson. During 
the civil war he loyally responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting 
in an Ohio regiment. After the battle of Fort Donelson, in which he par- 
ticipated, he was taken ill and sent to the hospital in Mound City, Illinois, 
but died before reaching home. His patriotic spirit was most marked. He 
was more than sixty years of age when he entered the service, and would 
have been exempt from military duty had he not ardently desired to aid in 
the defense of the Union. His death occurred when he was about sixty-three 
years of age. 

Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Carter began their domestic life in Guernsey 
county, Ohio, upon a rented farm, and in 185 1 came to Illinois, making the 
journey by wagon. They left their home on the 3d of June and on the 27th 
of the same month arrived in Mazon township, Grundy county. They iirst 
located at old Mazon, and later Mr. Carter purchased one hundred and five 
acres of partially improved land, upon which was a small frame house. By 
thrift and industry he added to his property until the home farm comprises 
three hundred and fifty-four acres. The well tilled fields and neat appearance 
of the place always indicate the careful supervision of the owner, who from 
time to time made substantial improvements upon his land, converting it into 
one of the best farms in this section of the state. In 1867 the little pioneer 
home was replaced by a more commodious and substantial residence, and the 
necessary barns and outbuildings were added. Throughout his life Mr. 
Carter was a man of industry and energy, and his practical and progressive 
methods brought to him the success which he well merited. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Carter was blessed with the following 



642 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

children: Melvin, born in Guernsey county, Ohio, November 17, 1845; 
Sarah M., born in Guernsey county, March 2y, 1849; Martha A., who was 
born October 21, 1851, in Illinois, and died on the 24th of December, 1854; 
Lora and Flora, twins, born in Illinois, March 29, 1854; x\manda J., born 
August 27, 1857; Douglas P., born June 29, i860; William H., born Febru- 
ary 6, 1863; Amos A., born March 11, 1865; and Frank B., born August 17, 
1867. 

Mr. Carter was a member of the Methodist church, which he joined 
when twenty-four years of age. His life was in harmony with his professions, 
and by his financial support and active efforts he materially advanced the 
cause of the church in his locality. In politics he was a stanch Democrat, 
and served as a supervisor of highways and commissioner. All who knew 
him respected him for his sterling worth, his honesty in business and his 
faithfulness to his family and friends. He died in Mazon township, March 
2, 1876, and the community thereby lost one of its most respected citizens. 
Mrs. Carter has been a life-long member of the Methodist church, with 
which she became identified in Ohio, when fifteen years of age. She is 
one of the well-known pioneer ladies of Grundy county, and her many ex- 
cellencies of character have won her high regard. She has also been an 
earnest member of the cliurch, a devoted mother, and one who could be relied 
upon when sympathy and aid were needed by the poor and distressed. Her 
son, William H, Carter, is now managing the home farm. He is recognized 
as one of the reliable agriculturists of Mazon township, and is known as a 
young man of excellent character. He owns one hundred and sixty acres 
of good land, and his well-directed efforts in business are bringing him 
creditable success. 



JOSEPH F. BURLEIGH. 

There is no man better known in Grundy county than Joseph Franklin 
Burleigh, to whom is due the credit of advancing the material prosperity of 
this section of the state in no small degree. He has devoted many years 
of his well-spent life te producing and developing a distinct and superior 
breed of cattle, which are now rapidly being introduced into all parts of the 
United States, and also into other countries. He is the founder of one of the 
original herds of American polled Durham cattle and has done more to 
improve the splendid breed of cattle than any other one man in the country. 
His work in behalf of stock-raisers has made him a public benefactor, for his 
labors have resulted not to his individual good alone but have also been of 
great benefit to the farming community throughout the nation. 

Mr. Burleigh descended from sterling English stock that was founded 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 643 

in Massachusetts during colonial days, his Puritan ancestors being among 
the pioneers of the old Bay state. The name has been spelled in many 
ways, Giles Birdly being the founder of the family in America. Many 
changes have occurred in orthography, a very common spelling being Bur- 
lev. Giles Birdly was a commoner in the English town of Ipswich, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1664. He became a planter and for eight years resided on 
Brooke street. His will was recorded in Essex county, Massachusetts, in 
the Registry of Probate, volume i, dated July i, 1668. He makes bequests 
to his wife, Elizabeth, and after her death the property is to be transferred 
to their eldest son, Andrew. He also mentions his sons James and John. 
His children are as follows, and constitute the second generation of the 
family in America: Andrew, who was born in Ipswich, INIassachusetts, 
September 5, 1657. and died February i, 17 18: James, who was born Feb- 
ruary 10. 1659, and died in Exeter, New Hampshire, about 1721: Giles, 
who was born July 13, 1662; and John, who was born July 13, 1664, and 
died February 27, 1681. 

James Burleigh is in the line of direct descent to our subject. His wife 
also bore the name of Elizabeth, and their children were of the third genera- 
tion, the record being: William, who was born in Ipswich, Massachusetts, 
February 27, 1693; Joseph, born in Ipswich, April 6, 1695; Thomas, born in 
Ipswich in April, 1697; James, born in Exeter, New Hampshire, in April, 
1699; Josiah, born in Exeter, in 1701; and Giles, born in Exeter. New 
Hampshire, in 1703. Through the youngest, Giles Burleigh, the line of 
descent is traced down. He married Elizabeth Joy, and their children were 
Moses, Anna, Joseph, Elizabeth, Sarah and Lidia. From Moses Burleigh 
and his wife Ann descends the fifth generation. Their children were : 
Moses, who was born in Newmarket, New Hampshire; John, who was born 
in Newmarket and was a soldier in the Revolutionary war; Molly; Rebecca; 
Nancy; Phebe, and Betsey. Of this family John became one of the valiant 
heroes in the war for independence and afterward located in Salisbury, New 
Hampshire, where he died. His children were Joseph, who went to sea 
when young and is believed to have been lost on one of his voyages; John, 
Hannah and Sally. 

Of this family John Burleigh was born April 26, 1789, and was married 
December 28, 1808, to Sarah, a daughter of Moses and Sarah (Stevens) Fel- 
lows, of Salisbury, Merrimac county. New Hampshire. She was born 
December 4, 1793, and died at Livonia, New York, July 18, 1865. John 
Burleigh served a regular apprenticeship at the carpenter and joiner's trade, 
becoming familiar with the business in all its branches from the time the 
timber was cut in the forest until it was placed in the most elaborate stair- 
cases, or in other positions recjuiring superior skill. He followed his trade 



644 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

until the infirmities of old age compelled him to retire to his farm near 
Livonia, where he died May 27, i86fi. In 18 16, the year memorable for its 
intense coldness, he removed from Salisbury, New Hampshire, to Livonia, 
with his wife and two small children, together with his brother-in-law, John 
Turrill, and Elizabeth, his wife, making the journey of five hundred miles 
in a covered wagon draw n by two horses. They were about four weeks on 
the way, and on reaching their destination Mr. Burleigh sold his horses and 
wagon, purchased some tools and then built a house for Jesse Blake, the 
building still standing in a good state of preservation. In that new country 
dwellings were not numerous and he was obliged to move his family into a 
log school-house, which proved a warm and comfortable home. They used 
the joiner's bench for a bedstead at night and the tool chest for a table until 
Mr. Burleigh could make those articles and other furniture. During his 
active business career he built some of the best houses in Livingston county, 
and was a well-known pioneer of sterling characteristics. 

His wife was a lady of much prominence, possessing indomitable cour- 
age and fortitude, and to her husband she was a faithful helpmate. She 
could shear the wool from the sheep, card, spin and weave it into cloth and 
then fashion it into any desired garment. Many stories are told of her 
courage and love of justice, among them her protection to the crippled son 
of a neighbor. The little lad, then only about twelve years of age, was fre- 
quentlv cruelly beaten by his drunken father. Mrs. Burleigh several times in- 
terfered, and being large and strong would make the drunken father desist. 
The man, however, disliked her on account of her interference, and at one 
time came to her house to attack her, but she readily protected herself with 
a red-hot fire shovel. At another time, when the man had cruelly mis- 
treated his crippled son, she and his sister Elizabeth went to his place, threw 
him down, and while one held him the other applied a stout hickory goad 
with both hands until he begged for mercy, promising to whip his son no 
more, a promise which he kept as long as he lived. 

The children of John and Sarah (Fellows) Burleigh were of the seventh 
generation, as follows: John L.. who was born in Salisbury, New Hamp- 
shire, November 17, 181 1, and died in Avon, New York, August 31, 1893: 
Catherine, who was born in Salisbury, April 12, 1814, and died in Livonia, 
New York, August 30, 1869; Harriet, who was born in Livonia, May 17, 
181 8, and died in Kane, Pennsylvania. February 18, 1889: Joseph Franklin, 
who was born in Livonia. March 24, 1824: and Elizabeth Ann Maria, who 
was born in Livonia, February 12. 1829. The father of this family was a 
member of the Congregational church, as was his wife. In politics he was 
a Jeft'ersonian Democrat, and was a stanch Union man during the civil war. 
His sterling characteristics made him much respected by all who knew him. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 645 

On the maternal side Joseph Franklin Burleigh is a representative of 
the Fellows family of old colonial stock. Three brothers of the name came 
from England, one settling in Connecticut, one at Cambridge, Massachusetts, 
and the third at what was Ipscon, Massachusetts, and from the last named, 
Sarah Fellows, the mother of our subject, was descended. His name was 
Ebenezer and his children were John, Abigail, Moses, Ebenezer, Joseph, 
Benjamin, Anna and Elizabeth. The son John was born at Kingston, New 
Hampshire, April 27, 1720, and was married March 6, 1746, to Elizabeth 
Blaisdell, of that place. She died at Kingston, in July, 1766, and he after- 
ward married Mary (Tucker) Kenniston. In 1766 he removed to Salis- 
bury, New Hampshire, where he engaged in carpentering, being one of the 
first representatives of that trade to settle in the town. He died in 1812, at 
the age of ninety-two years. His children by his first marriage were : 
David; Adonijah; Hezekiah; Ebenezer, who was born at Kingston, New 
Hampshire, December 16, 1753, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, 
and died in Charleston, Massachusetts; Moses, who also was one of the Revo- 
lutionary heroes; Sarah; Betsey; John and Hannah. The children of the 
second marriage were Richard, Daniel and Isaiah. 

Moses Fellows was the representative of the family in the third genera- 
tion. He was born at Kingston, New Hampshire, August 9, 1755, and when 
the colonies attempted to throw off the yoke of British tyranny he aided in 
the struggle for independence. He was married May 20, 1782, to Sarah 
Stevens, of Plaistow, New Hampshire, who was born November 26, 1762, 
and died in Salisbury, July 18, 1863, at the very advanced age of one hun- 
dred years and eight months. 

He enlisted in the Continental Army Alay 10, 1775, at Salisbury, and 
immediately went to Medford, Massachusetts, taking part in the battle of 
Bunker Hill on the 17th of June, when a ball fired by the British cut off 
the end of his powder horn, thus spilling his last charge of powder. Having 
no ball he fired his ramrod and thus killed a British soldier. He was after- 
ward stationed at Winter Hill, Massachusetts, until the 8th of September, 
when he went to Cambridge, Massachusetts, in Captain Dearborn's com- 
pany to join an expedition which was to go to the Kennebec river, under 
General Benedict Arnold, and through the wilderness, and make an attack 
on Quebec. The army provisions became exhausted and great suffering 
ensued. After the battle of Quebec, in which the Americans were defeated, 
they went to Montreal, and Mr. Fellows enlisted for three and a half months, 
returning home on the expiration of that period. In April, 1777. he re- 
enlisted in Captain Gray's company for three years and went to Ticonderoga, 
where he kept garrison until the 6th of July, when he went to Fort Ann and 
was in the battle of Block House. Later he went with his company to Fort 



•■546 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Edward, thence to Mount Independence, and was in the battle of Benning-- 
ton, August i6. 1777. Subsequently he was taken ill with fever and ague, 
and was sent to the hospital at Albany, New York. He left there about 
the middle of October for Stillwater and fought against Burgoyne in the 
battle near Saratoga. He then went to Fish Hill and White Marsh, and 
after joining' General \\'ashington's army marched to \^alley Forge, where 
they spent the awful winter of 1777-8. enduring the most terrible sufifering. 
In the spring he was with the army at the crossing- of the Delaware river 
and proceeded on the march through the Jerseys and participated in the 
battle of Monmouth. There Mr. Fellows captured a British soldier with his 
horse and equipments, and for his meritorious conduct on this and other oc- 
casions he was promoted to the rank of sergeant. For some time he was 
ill in the hospital at Tarrytown. as the eftect of the march to \\'hite Plains. 
After his recovery he was in General Sullivan's army and went on the raid 
against the Indians and Tories in the western part of New York. On Au- 
gust 29, 1779, he participated in the battle of Chemung, and then marched 
with the regiment from Conesus lake in Livingston county to the Genesee 
river, thence in an easterly direction, destroying forty Indian villages and 
fifty thousand bushels of corn. He was honorably discharged at West 
Point, April 20, 1780, and returned to his home in Salisbury, where he car- 
ried on agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred January- 30, 
1846, when he was ninety years of age. His wife lived to be over one hun- 
dred years old. 

The children of Moses and Sarah (Stevens) Fellows were as follows: 
Hezekiah, who died in infancy; Hezekiah, Moses, Reuben, Ebenezer, James 
S., Sarah, Samuel, Elizabeth, Polly, Pamelia, Adonijah and Pierce. Sarah, 
the eldest daughter of this Revolutionary hero, was the mother of our sub- 
ject. It will thus be seen that I\Ir. Burleigh is descended from good old 
Revolutionary stock on both sides of the family, and that his ancestors were 
among the founders of the nation. 

Joseph Franklin Burleigh received his education in the common schools 
and in the Lima Seminary, in Livingston county. New York. He afterward 
taught school for two years in his native state. During the greater part of 
his life he has given his attention to farming and stock-raising. He en- 
gaged in the book business for a time, and was with several of the leading 
publishing houses, including D. Appleton & Company and A. S. Barnes & 
Company, of New York. He represented the latter firm for a long period, 
introducing their school-books in various sections of the country. He trav- 
eled throughout the L'nited States and was a very successful salesman, 
enjoying the confidence and unlimited regard of the house which he repre- 
sented. He was married October 28, 1847. to Hannah J. Maynard, of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 647 

Williamson, New York. She was born February 5, 1826, and died in 
Livonia, New York, August 9, 1854, leaving a daughter, Ella J., who was 
born in Livonia, on the 26th of June of that year. On the 27th of August, 
1856. Mr. Burleigh wedded Susan D. Underwood, of Adrian, Michigan. 
She was born in Williamson, Wayne county. New York, March 27, 1831, a 
daughter of Daniel and Chloe (Durfee) Underwood. The Underwoods 
were also old colonial stock of English descent and of Quaker faith. The 
Durfees also were Quakers, from the ]\Iohawk \'alley. Daniel Underwood 
was a tanner by trade, and for many years was a respected citizen of Wil- 
liamson, New York. In 1857 he removed to Grundy county, Illinois, locat- 
ing on land in Wauponsee township, where he improved a farm, becoming 
a well-known pioneer and substantial citizen. He was one of the original 
members of the Abolition party and one of the founders of the Republican 
party in this locality, supporting its first candidate, John C. Fremont. In 
religious faith he, too, was a Quaker. His children were Susan D., Stephen 
D., Carrie, Catherine and Merritt. In old age the parents went to Lake 
■City, Minnesota, and lived with their youngest son until death. Mr. Un- 
derwood was well advanced in years at the time of his demise, and his wife 
reached the ripe old age of eighty years. They were people of high moral 
character and Christian worth. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Burleigh located in Livonia, New 
York, and he continued to represent A. S. Barnes & Company on the road 
until the spring of 1858, when he came to Grundy county, Illinois, establish- 
ing a home in Mazon, and taught school through the winter. In the fall of 
1859 he settled on one hundred and sixty acres of land in Mazon township, 
and improved the farm from the wild prairie, all excepting iifty-six acres, 
which had previously been plowed. As a result of his industry and thrift he 
prospered and added to his land until he owned two hundred and forty-one 
acres — a valuable tract upon which he erected many substantial farm build- 
ings. His land is well drained with over four miles of tiling, and the farm 
is now a very valuable property. Mr. Burleigh has always taken an active 
interest in fine stock, and the advantage of breeding hornless cattle was early 
impressed upon his mind, especially if possessed of the excellent qualities 
of Durham short-horn cattle. In the year i860 he became the owner of a 
polled bull, sired by a full-blooded short-horn; dam unknown, but supposed 
to be of Durham blood, as the bull showed the Durham characteristics well 
developed. This bull was bred to grade Durham cows, and their polled 
progeny were bred to short-horn bulls for several generations; and in 1880 
I\Ir. Burleigh had saved only five of his best polled cows. A strong preju- 
dice existed against "mooly" cattle among cattle dealers when he com- 
menced breeding this herd, and red polled and polled Aberdeen cattle were 



648 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

scarcely known in this country, the English Red Polled Herd Book being- 
started only in 1874. 

In the many advantages of polled stock, however, experience has 
demonstrated the fact that horns must go. The editor of the Prairie Farmer, 
in the issue of June 22, 1889, wrote: "Mr. J. F. Burleigh is probably the 
first breeder who systematically attempted to breed the horns off the short- 
horns. This was twenty-five years ago. By careful selection he says he now 
has his herd so bred that no vestige of horns appears. In doing this he has 
bred his herd to two different strains, one possessing the milk-giving quali- 
ties, for which the short-horns were celebrated, and the other holding the 
distinctive characteristics and early maturity for which the short-horns have 
later become celebrated. Special care and attention has also been given in 
prolonging the milk-giving qualities, so that the herd are now noted for 
giving milk well up to the time of calving. The herd is gentle and orderly in 
its disposition; the color mostly red and red roan. The bulls used in the 
herd for the past eight years were blood red, and their sires red. The 
potency of the polled blood is now so strongly fi.xed and so potent to deliver 
that a young bull sold to Gilbert Gowe\-, of Gardner, Illinois, got all his 
calves hornless from horned cows, some twenty in number." 

Mr. Burleigh was one of the eight founders of the American Breeders' 
Association, which was organized to keep this valuable stock pure and to 
import it and place it before the people. This society has published two 
editions of this herd book, in which this stock is registered. For many years 
I\Ir. Burleigh was associated with his son. A. E. Burleigh, but retired from 
the business in 1894, selling his interest to his son, C. I. Burleigh, the enter- 
prise being now conducted by A. E. and C. I. Burleigh. He was appointed 
president of the American Polled Breeders' Association at the meeting held 
in Chicago in 1889, but resigned in favor of Dr. Crane, of Tippecanoe City, 
Ohio. Mr. Burleigh had a fine exhibition of polled Durham cattle at the 
World's Columbian Exposition and received several premiums under the 
firm name of J. F. & A. E. Burleigh. 

The children of Mr. Burleigh by his second wife are: Arthur E.. who 
was born in Mazon, July 24, i860, and was married March i, 1888, to Tamie 
L. Doud. He is a very successful farmer and cattle dealer. Alice Gertrude, 
born in Mazon, July 4, 1862, was married February 11, 1890, to Hurbert 
R. Tubbs. who is now head bookkeeper in a bank at Boonville, Xew York. 
Ida Josephine, born in Mazon, December 6. 1S63, was married April 15, 
1886, to Robert H. Dew-ey, who was born in Xew York, I\Iay 28. 1862, and 
was a successful farmer and breeder of polled Durham cattle. He was 
associated with J. F. & A. E. Burleigh in the exhibit at the World's Fair and 
received a number of premiums. He died in Mazon, May 21. 1899. He 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 649- 

was straightforward in ail liis business dealings and highly respected in all 
life's relations. Air. Dewey was one of the founders of the Grundy County 
Farmers' Institute and its first secretary, which position he held until his 
death. He was a justice of the peace and school teacher. His widow, a 
member of the Congregational church, still resides on the homestead. She 
inherited the courageous spirit of her grandmother Burleigh, and on one 
occasion, when a tramp became insolent, although she was sick in bed. she 
directed her servant girl to shoot him if he made any further trouble. Tlie 
tramp threw stones at the house and broke out windows, and the girl fired 
and shot iiini. He went away, but returned the same night and set a barn 
afire. Charles Irving, the youngest member of the family, was born in 
Mazon, April 22, 1870, and was married November 8, 1894, to Clara May 
Hill. He and his brother succeeded their father in the stock-breeding busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Burleigh, of this review, has always been an active and enterprising 
business man and a public-spirited citizen, identified with the best interests 
of Grundy county. During the civil war he was the supervisor of Mazon 
township for three years and assisted in raising the quota of soldiers for the 
township, so that no draft was made. He was a justice of the peace for 
twenty years, an assessor for three years, and throughout a long period a 
member of the school board, the cause of education finding in him a warm 
friend. He was also nominated in the convention for the state legislature, 
but in the election was defeated by one vote. In politics he was originally 
a Democrat, casting his first ballot for Martin Van Buren, but later he be- 
came one of the founders of the Republican part)' in Grundy county and 
voted for its first candidate, John C. Fremont, in New York state. Both 
he and his wife are members of the Congregational church, in which he has 
held the office of church trustee. He is one of the most respected and 
sterling citizens of this community, and no history of Grundy county would 
be complete without the record of his life. 



CHESTER G. DEWEY. 

An investigation into the history of Grundy county will disclose the fact 
that the Dewey family has been prominent in connection with the advance- 
ment and progress of this section of the state, so that their history forms 
an essential part of the annals of the county. Chester G. Dewey was born 
in Leyden, New York, February 2, 1831, his parents being Harvey and 
Jerusha (Jencks) Dewey. In his youth he obtained a good common-school 
education and through the summer months worked on the farm. When 



^650 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

young he also learned the carpenter's trade and was employed as a journey- 
man for some time. 

At the age of twenty-four years he was married in Boonville, Oneida 
county, New York, to Maria K. Hall, the wedding being celebrated Novem- 
ber 16, 1855. The lady was born in Leyden, New York, and is a daughter 
of Jonathan and Sarah (Jencks) Hall. When this country was still num- 
bered among the colonial possessions of Great Britain, her ancestors took up 
their abode in the New World. Dr. Isaac Hall, the great-grandfather of 
Mrs. Dewey, was a prominent physician of Connecticut, and his son Isaac 
was born in that state. The grandfather was twice married, and after the 
death of his first wife removed to Leyden, Lewis county. New York, where 
he was again married. The children of his first union were Isaac, Jonathan, 
Abijah, Mary, Elizabeth, Sarah, and Phoebe; and by his second wife one son, 
named Joseph. Jonathan Hall, the father of Mrs. Dewey, was born in 
Connecticut, about 1776, and became one of the founders of the town of 
Leyden. He was married, in Connecticut, to Miss Hawley, by whom he 
had two children — Jehiel and Daniel. The mother died and Mr. Hall was 
again married, in Leyden, New York, to Sarah Jencks, a native of New 
England, whose birth occurred about 1790. He was a farmer by occupa- 
tion and cleared a tract of land in Lewis county, developing there a good 
farm of three hundred acres. He was one of the substantial and respected 
citizens of the community and for some time served as a member of the 
board of selectmen. His death occurred in February, 1841, when he had 
reached the age of sixty-five years. Both he and his wife were members 
of the Baptist church. In their family were the following children: Mary, 
Abigail, Jonathan, Sarah. Isaac. Julia, \\'illiam. Phoebe. Eunice. Newton and 
^laria. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Dewey took up their abode in Ley- 
den, where he owned a good farm. He afterward sold that property, how- 
ever, and removed to Mexico, Oswego county, where he owned a valuable 
dairy farm of one hundred and four acres, and where he remained until his 
emigration to the west. His home was blessed with the presence of the 
following children : Harvey N., born December 6, 1856; Estella S.. born Sep- 
tember 8, 1858; Robert H., born May 8, 1862, and died May 21, 1899: Helen 
E., born August 4, 1864; Fred H. and Frank H., twins, born February 10. 
1869. but the latter died June 2, 1876; Charles H., born May 28, 1871, and 
died November 16, 1879; Jessie M., born July 31, 1877, and died in March, 
1880. The second child, Estella. is now the wife of E. W. Walworth, a farmer 
in Mazon township, and their children are Lena, Roy, Mae, Jessie. Edward, 
Ralph and Stanton. Robert H., also a farmer, married Ida Burleigh, and 
their children are Chester. Carrie and Marion. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 651 

In 1897 Mr. and Mrs. Dewey removed to Mazon, Illinois, where they 
are now living a retired life. They are members of the Baptist church, and 
while in Mexico, New York, Mr. Dewey held ofifice in the church for a num- 
ber of years. He cast his first presidential vote for John C. Fremont and 
was a Republican for some time, afterward became a Prohibitionist, antl in 
1896 gave his support to William J. Bryan. His life has been one of indus- 
try, and his close application to business and his capable management have 
brought to him creditable success. 



DELOS WRIGHT. 



On the roll of early settlers of Grundy county appears the name of Delos 
Wright, whose ancestry may be traced back through several generations 
until we find that the family history began at the time of the early colonial 
settlement of New England by the Puritans. Israel Wright, the father of 
our subject, was born near Boston, Massachusetts, and was a son of one of 
the patriot farmers who abandoned the plow in order to aid in the struggle 
for independence. He obtained such educational privileges as were afforded 
at that day in the common schools and became a farmer. Like his father, 
fie was a patriot and served his country as a soldier in the war of 1812, par- 
ticipating in the battle of Sackett's Harbor. He was married in Oneida 
county. New York, to Miss Betsey Gridley, a native of Connecticut, and a 
daughter of Job and Mary (Porter) Gridley. Her father was also one of 
the Revolutionary heroes, and both the Gridley and Porter families were 
established in Connecticut in early colonial days. Job Gridley was a mem- 
ber of the fourth generation of the family in America, his father being 
Samuel Gridley, a son of Thomas, whose father, Thomas Gridlev, Sr., estab- 
lished a home in Hartford, Connecticut, and thus planted the family upon 
American soil. The ancestral history in England has been traced back to 
1200 A. D. 

Three brothers of the name came from England to America, probably 
from Essexshire, between the years 1630 and 1633. Samuel Gridley died 
soon after his arrival, at or near Boston, leaving no descendants. Richard 
Gridley remained at Boston, where he was admitted as a freeman on the ist 
of April, 1634. In 1658 he was a member of the Boston Artillery Company, 
and afterward became its captain. He died in that city, about 1674. His 
children were Mary, Sarah, Hannah, Return, Believe, Tremble and Joseph. 
Thomas Gridley, the third brother, went to Hartford, Connecticut, with 
Rev. Thomas Hooker and his followers, where, in 1639, he was one of one 
hundred and twenty-seven landholders. He was there married, September 
29, 1644, to Miss Mary Seymour, a daughter of Richard Sevmour. He died 



652 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

about 1655, at Hartford. His children were Samuel, Thomas and Mary. 
These sons of Thomas Gridley became two of the original eighty-four pro- 
prietors of Farmington, Connecticut. Nearly all of the people living in the 
United States by the name of Gridley have descended from the Hartford 
ancestor. 

Job Gridley, the grandfather of Mr. Wright, had five children : Sybil, 
Betsey, Reuben, Thomas and Samuel. He removed to Oneida county. New 
York, becoming one of the pioneer settlers, and there in the midst of the 
forest near Clinton he developed a good farm, upon which he spent his 
remaining days, dying at an advanced age. 

When a young man Israel Wright, the father of our subject, removed 
to Oneida county. New York, where he followed farming. He married 
Miss Betsey Gridley when she was nineteen years of age. He, too, devel- 
oped a farm in the midst of the forest, but in 1847 l^ft the east, removing 
to Lawrence county, Illinois, where he purchased land of the government. 
That tract was also in its primitive condition, but he succeeded in transform- 
ing it into richly cultivated fields. He was an old-line W hig in politics, a 
member of the Methodist church, and died when more than eighty years 
of age. His children were Sewell, Ursula, Prudence, Russell, Betsey, 
Ambrose, Orin, Armenas, Delos and Armena, who died in childhood. 

Delos Wright was born in Oneida county, at Clinton, New York, Janu- 
ary 4, .1821, obtained a common-school education, and, with his father, be- 
came a resident of Lawrence county, Illinois, in 1847. For twenty years 
he worked at the carpenter's trade. About 1848 he took up his abode in 
Kendall county, Illinois, and was there married, July 3, 185 1, to Miss Mary 
Hick, born May 11, 1832, a native of Turin, Lewis county. New York, and a 
daughter of Richard and Agnes (Schank) Hick. Her father was a well- 
known man and a local Methodist minister. He was born in England and 
in early life came to America. In Turin he married Miss Agnes Schank, 
who was of sturdy Holland Dutch descent. About 1850 he removed to 
Lisbon, Kendall county, Illinois, where he engaged in preaching the gospel 
and farming. There he died when about the age of sixty years. His chil- 
dren were Ruth, Ann, Agnes, Laura, Mar}', Richard, Richardson, John and 
Hester. 

After the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Wright they located near Lisbon, 
Illinois, where he purchased eighty acres of land from the government, at a 
dollar and a quarter per acre. This was in Nettle Creek township. Of 
this tract of wild prairie he improved a farm, which he rented, in the mean- 
time working at his trade of carpentering in Lisbon and Morris. Subse- 
quently he sold his land and removed to Reading, Livingston county, Illi- 
nois, in 1853. There he again purchased government land, at a dollar and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 653 

a quarter an acre, and developed a good farm, upon which he Hved for ten 
years, when he sold that property and removed to Fairbury, where he con- 
ducted a furniture store for six years. In 1877 he took up his abode in 
Verona, lUinois, where he again embarked in the furniture business until 
1891. Through the four succeeding years he was a furniture dealer of 
Mazon and his business afifairs were creditably and successfully conducted. 

In 1895 Mr. Wright was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who 
died in Mazon on the loth of July of that year. She was a member of the 
Methodist church and lived an earnest Christian life. Her children were : 
Elizabeth, born August 20, 1852; William A., born September 14, 1854; 
Ellery, born March 7, 1857; Josephine, born December 11, 1861; and Albert 
G., born April 15, 1868. Mr. Wright was again married April 29, 1896, in 
Mazon, his second union being with Mrs. Sarah Dewey, the widow of 
Joseph Dewey. She was born in Washington county. New York, January 
15, 1835, a daughter of \\'illiam and Nancy (Dugan) Whitlock. Her father 
was a native of the town of Day, Washington county, born about 1818, and 
was of Pennsylvania Dutch lineage. He was a farmer and stone-mason, and 
in Washington county. New York, he married Miss Nancy Dugan, a 
daughter of Arthur and Sallie Dugan. Mr. Whitlock lived in the town of 
Day and followed his trade for many years. There his first wife, who was 
a consistent member of the Presbyterian church, died at the age of sixty-two 
years. Their children were Sarah, born January 15, 1835; William J., born 
June 5, 1837; Jane, born June 25, 1839; and Arthur, born July 4, 1841. 
For his second wife Mr. Whitlock chose Janette Gorley, who was born in 
Scotland and came to America when seventeen years of age. In early life 
she engaged in teaching. After his second marriage Mr. Whitlock pur- 
chased and located upon a farm, but later resided in Salem, New York, 
where his second wife died. He passed away when about seventy years 
of age. respected by all who knew him. 

Mrs. Wright was reared in Washington county, New York, received a 
common education and was married January 29, 1852, in Washington 
county, New York, when about seventeen years of age, to Joseph Dewey, 
Avho was born September 30, 1825, in Greenwich, same county. His par- 
ents were Daniel and Lucretia (Pangborn) Dewey, and their children were 
Polly, Betsey, Rhoda, Eliza, Amos, Sallie, Moses, Phoebe, Fannie, John, 
Jane, and Joseph. The father died in Washington county. New York, 
when about seventy years of age. As a private citizen he took part in the 
battle of Lake Champlain. Both he and his wife were members of the 
Methodist church, as were a number of their children. He belonged to one 
of the old colonial families and was a descendant of Thomas Dewey, the 
founder of the family in America. Joseph Dewey, his son and the first 



654 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

husband of Mrs. Wright, located on a farm after his marriage and resided 
in the Empire state until i860, when he sold his property and removed to 
Norman township, Grundy county, Illinois. After eighteen years he took 
up his abode in W'auponsee township and purchased a farm of eighty acres 
of improved land. There he died when sixty-seven years of age. He was 
a member of the Methodist church and was an industrious and highly re- 
spected citizen. His political support was given the Republican party, and 
his children were: Nancy R., born January 10. 1853; Mary, June 6, 1856; 
Maggie, born March 14, 1858; John, born April 17, i860; Annie L., Feb- 
ruary 17, 1862; Arthur A., September 21, 1865; Jennie, September 16, 1869; 
Estella, August 21, 1871; and Lizzie, August 18, 1874. All are living, and 
all are married with the exception of Estella, who is a young lady at home. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wright are now living quietly at their pleasant home and have 
many friends in Grundy county, where they are numbered among the most 
highly respected citizens. Through an active business career our subject 
conducted his affairs carefully and systematically, and his sound judgment 
and close application brought to him a handsome competence, which now 
enables him to live retired. 



JOHN W^\TERS. 

The purpose of a biographical history is to set forth the accurate record 
of the lives of those men who have taken an appreciable part in the agri- 
cultural, commercial, literary or religious development of the community. 
Macaulay has said that "the history of a nation is best told in the lives of 
its people," and it is this fact that has led us to determine upon the publish- 
ing of the records of the leading citizens of Grundy county, showing in what 
way they have taken part in the substantial growth and development of this 
portion of the state. Mr. W^aters, of this review, was one of the pioneer set- 
tlers of Maine township and since his arrival here has ever borne his part in 
the work of progress and improvement, so that he is to-day numbered among 
the valued residents of the county. 

Mr. Waters' family is of English lineage. William Waters, the grand- 
father of our subject, was a stone-mason by trade and reared a number of 
children, which included Joseph and William, both of whom came to Amer- 
ica; Elizabeth, wife of Mr. Sargeant; and Ann, who became the wife of Mr. 
Atkins. The daughters also crossed the Atlantic to the New World. The 
father of our subject was born in London, England, and received such edu- 
cational advantages as the common schools of the time afforded. He 
learned the stone-mason's trade of his father, and was married in England 
to Miss Ann James, whose birth occurred in that land. Thev became the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 655 

parents of \^'illiam, Mary Ann, Elijah, John, James and Robert Waters, all 
of whom were born in the mother country with the exception of James and 
Robert, whose birth occurred in the city of Joliet, Illinois. In March, 1825, 
the father came to the New World, sailing from Liverpool to New York, 
where he arrived after a voyage of six weeks. Later his wife came to the 
United States, and her last days were spent in the home of one of the chil- 
dren in Cleveland, Ohio. Mr. Waters went direct to Cleveland, Ohio, 
where he worked at the stone-mason's trade for about seven years, when 
he removed to Athens, Illinois, becoming a contractor on the Illinois and 
Michigan canal. He afterward built roads at Joliet, and while thus engaged 
his death occurred, about the year 1850. He was an industrious, enter- 
prising man, respected by all, and both he and his wife were consistent mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church. He passed away when about fifty-five 
years of age. 

John Waters, v.hose name introduces this review, was born in London, 
England, May i, 1822, and was nearly three years of age when he came 
with his parents to America. He obtained a common-school education, 
and in early life worked at the stone-mason's trade. In 1849 he came to 
Grundy county and purchased forty acres of land of Robert Gibson, who 
had purchased the same from the United States government. The tract 
was located in what was then Braceville township, but is now Maine town- 
ship. As a companion and helpmeet on life's journey he chose Barbara 
Misner, and they were married in 1852. The lady was born July 19, 1833, 
in Rush county, Indiana, a daughter of Christopher and ]\Iary (Barber) 
Misner. Her father was of German descent and was born in Dearborn 
county, Indiana, December 16, 1804. His father, Henry Misner, was a 
pioneer of that locality and one of the heroes of the Revolution. (See 
sketch of John H. Misner.) He was buried at'Millington, Illinois, where a 
monument has recently been erected to his memory by the Society of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution. His children were Henry Fletcher, 
Christopher, Lewis. John, Harrison, Elijah, Elisha, Betsy and Serena. 
Christopher Misner, the father of Mrs. Waters, wedded Mary Barber in 
Rush county, Indiana, October 4, 1830. She was born in Cumberland 
county, Kentucky, October 15, 1806, and belonged to one of the old colonial 
families. Mr. and Mrs. Misner located in Rush county, Indiana, and after 
the birth of two of their children they removed to Wabash countv, Illinois. 
A few years later, however, they returned to Rush county, but in a short 
time took up their abode in LaSalle county, Illinois, in that portion which is 
now included within Mazon township, Grundy county. About 1850 he 
removed to the old homestead in what is now Maine township, there securing 
forty acres of land, which he developed into a good farm. His death oc- 



■656 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

curred May 7, 1857, when he had attained the age of fifty-three years. He 
was a member of the Protestant Methodist church and took an active part 
in its work and ser\-ed as one of the class-leaders. His wife reached the 
venerable age of eighty-two years and died at the home of our subject. In 
their family were seven children: Sarah Ann. Barbara F.. Simeon. Merritt. 
Zama. Murray and Zachariah. 

After their marriage Mr. and }vlrs. \\'aters located upon the farm, which 
has since been his home. By their marriage they had five children : Mary 
F., born March 4, 1854; Malinda, February 25, 1855; Ella F., March 4. 1857; 
William C. December 28. 1859; and Merritt F., September 23. 1861. The 
mother died March 24. 1862, and on the 21st of September of that year Mr. 
Waters married Zama Misner. a sister of his first wife. Their children are 
Arnold E., born May 20, 1863; Cynthia, who was born August 12, 1866, and 
died December 3, 1879; Eva M., born May 6, 1868; Lora M., born May 27, 
1871; and Martha B., born March 15. 1874. 

Mr. Waters is a stalwart Jacksonian Democrat, unswerving in his sup- 
port of the principles of the party. For ten or twelve years he served as 
highway commissioner and his long continuance in the office well indicates 
his fidelity to duty. He is a man of straightforward independence of char- 
acter and an honored pioneer. For half a century he has resided in Grundy 
county, and has not only witnessed its growth and development, but has 
borne his part in the work of substantial improvement. His business efforts 
ha\e been crowned with a fair degree of success, so that he is now the pos- 
sessor of a comfortable competence. 



RICHARD RAMSAY. 



It is good to write of the deeds of good and true men. and it is good 
to read of them. howe\'er unskillfully they may be presented. 'Tt is not all 
of life to live," and, having li\ed and died, Richard Ramsay's influence re- 
mains and his family do not mourn him in solitude, for with their grief is 
mingled the sympathy of the entire community. Humanity is the poorer 
by the passing away of a noble man. and Braceville. Grundy county. Illinois, 
and all of its surrounding country suffered an irreparable loss. January 16, 
1898. when Richard Ramsay died. 

Richard Ramsay was born in Durham, England, November 22, 1842. 
He attended school until his eleventh year, when by the death of his father 
he was thrown on his own resources. His father before him was a mine 
manager, and Richard naturally gravitated toward the mines, where he 
became not only a practical but a more than ordinarily thoughtful and ob- 




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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 657 

servant workman, and was noticeable for his skill and good judgment. He 
Avas the second born of seven children and had four brothers and two sisters, 
and his brothers all became mine owners or operators, or both. The eldest, 
\\'illiam Taylor Ramsay, resides at Whatcheer, Iowa. He was the first of the 
family who came to America. George H. is a resident of Oskaloosa, Iowa. 
Joseph H. lives at Des JMoines. John also resides at Oskaloosa and is both 
mine owner and superintendent. The sisters are Margaret, who became the 
wife of Richard Watters, and Marv Ann, who married Newrick Longstaff; 
and they are both deceased. 

Mr. Ramsay came to America in 1863, with his widowed mother and 
other members of his family. His thorough familiarity with coal-mining 
led him to turn his attention to the coal fields of Illinois. He stopped for 
a short time at ^Morris, but soon went to Pekin, Illinois, where he was em- 
ployed in the mines. In 1870 he took charge of a mine in Streator, but in 
1873, during the big strike, was removed by the same company to Braid- 
wood, to take charge of their mine there, his good judgment and wise 
methods of management having been already in evidence with his em- 
ployers. 

In 1881 Mr. Ramsay accepted the position of superintendent of the 
large mines of the Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway Company, at Braceville, 
Illinois, which position he held with honor to himself and profit to the com- 
pany from that time until he died. These mines under his management ad- 
vanced to first place in the state for hoisting capacity and daily output. 

This condition was made possible by inventions of Air. Ramsay's, which 
made some radical changes in hoisting and loading coal into cars. One of 
these was the self-dumping hoisting buckets, by the use of which all mining 
cars remain at the bottom of the shaft, instead of being hoisted to the surface 
to be unloaded. The Hungarian steam shovel is another, which will unload 
a ton of coal, in the extreme ends of a box car, as fast as it can be run down 
the chutes. Still another is the high dump for dirt, all of which, with manv 
others, were the productions of his fertile brain. Mr. Ramsay was a safe 
and thoughtful superintendent, who had at heart not only the welfare of the 
company but also of the men, — such a man as neither employer nor employe 
could afford to part company with. 

At the time of his death, Mr. Ramsay was the president of the Illinois 
State Board of Examiners for Mine Inspectors and Mine Managers, which 
position he was filling for the second term of appointment. He was re- 
quested to accept this position in 1891 by the state board organized to inquire 
into the character and pass on the qualifications of candidates for appoint- 
ment as state inspectors of mines. His work in this capacity was ever gov- 
■erned by a strong sense of justice. He began as a coal-miner and had been 



658 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

for twenty-seven years actively engaged in the management and de\'elopment 
of coal properties, and he fully understood all questions attecting the mutual 
relations of owners, operators and laborers in that field of enterprise; and 
when he died the coal operators of Illinois lost a safe counselor and the miners 
of Illinois a true friend. He was the president, also, of the Illinois Mining 
Institute and of the Braceville Bank. He took an abiding interest in every- 
thing pertaining to the growth of Braceville and the welfare of its people, and 
was in many ways a reliable friend of the town. 

Richard Ramsay was married August 15, 1867, to Aliss Mary Ann 
Bailey, of Morris, Illinois. Mrs. Ramsay, who still resides at her home in 
Braceville, was born in Staffordshire, England, February 13, 1850, and came 
to America when but seven and a half years old with her parents, Zethan 
and Sarah (Evans) Bailey, the first mentioned of whom is dead. ]\Irs. 
Ramsay was one of fourteen children, six of whom, named as follows, are 
living: ]\Irs. Ramsay, INIrs. Sarah Fox, William H., Zethan, Richard L., 
and Airs. Laura L. Lewis. Among those who have passed away were 
George, James and Airs. Clara Stewart, who died at the age of eighteen 
years. Others died in early childhood. Richard Ramsay and his wife be- 
came the parents of ten children, six sons and four daughters, named as 
follows in the order of their nativity: Zethan B., William, Sarah Ann (the 
wife of Richard W. Varley), Jerome. Laura (the wife of James H. Cumings, 
of Aurora, Illinois), Clara Al. (the wife of Wade Eversole, of Joliet, Illinois), 
Richard, John B., George H. and Elsie E. 

Air. Ramsay was not a member of any church, but he was a liberal con- 
tributor to the support of more than one. As a citizen he was public-spirited 
and benevolent, as a friend he was cheerful, warm-hearted and true; and as 
a husband and father he was loving and indulgent. In his political prefer- 
ences he was a Republican. 

Such in brief is the story of the busy and useful life of Richard Ramsay, 
whose name was known and respected everywhere in the coal fields of Amer- 
ica. The universal esteem in which he was held was evidenced not more 
by the one thousand and five hundred to two thousand people who attended 
his funeral than bv the sadness of his townsmen as they went silently about 
the streets of the town while the man who had done so much for its develop- 
ment lay dead. His burial senice was in charge of the blue lodge of the 
Masonic fraternity, of which he had been a member, assisted by the com- 
mandery of Knights Templar of Joliet, and the Modern Woodmen of Brace- 
ville. The Miners' Union also attended in a body. The floral offerings 
were not only beautiful and abundant, but very suggestive, that of the Mod- 
ern Woodmen having been a large shield, betokening the sheltering protec- 
tion of their order; from the four remaining brothers a wheel with five spokes. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 659 

one of which was broken; from his children, a bleeding heart; and others 
brought many fully as suggestive. The service was not only beautiful but 
also simple and impressive. 



DAVIS R. DOUD. 



There are few personal reminiscences presented in this work more in- 
teresting than those which follow. They include the recollections as boy 
and man of one wjio has had the experience of a pioneer and those of the 
enterprising citizen in the later period of development, and in a way they 
comprise the whole history of civilization from early settlement to the present 
time. 

Davis R. Doud was born June 29, 1826, in Braceville, Trumbull county, 
Ohio, a son of Alvah and Martha (Rogers) Doud. His father was born in 
Connecticut, February 22, 1790, a son of Jesse and Lydia (Shipman) Doud. 
Jesse Doud died in Milton, Trumbull county, Ohio. His wife, a native 
of Connecticut, died in Lordstown, same county, in 1839 or 1840. Martha 
Rogers, the wife of Alvah Doud and mother of Davis R. Doud, was a 
daughter of Davis Rogers (in honor of whom the immediate subject of this 
sketch was named), whose wife was a Miss ]\Iiner. Mrs. Doud was born in 
Connecticut, and her family claim descent from Rev. John Rogers, who 
was burned at the stake, at Smithfield, England, February 4, 1555, for his 
religion. Her grandfather on the maternal side was Jonathan Miner. Her 
great-grandfather in the paternal line was Jonathan Rogers, a descendant of 
one of three brothers who came early from England. She had six brothers 
and two sisters. Alvah Doud had six sisters and two brothers. Davis R. 
Doud has seen one of his mother's brothers and five of his father's sisters and 
one of his brothers. 

Alvah Doud went early in life to New York state and was married 
July 28, 181 1. He emigrated to Ohio some time between 1816 and 1820, 
where he lived until his death, which occurred at Braceville, Trumbull 
county, Ohio, February 2y, 1839. His wife survived until June 3, 1869, and 
died in Morris, Grundy county, Illinois. Their son Davis R. Doud has 
given the following information about his brothers and sisters : Alvah was 
born April 22, 1813, in Presto:?. Chenango county. New York; Hannah, in 
Preston, Chenango county, New York, February 28, 1815; Jesse, in Oxford, 
same county, October 8, 1816; Lydia, in Braceville, Trumbull county, Ohio, 
April 10, 1820; Chloe, also in Braceville, June 19, 1822; Israel, in Trumbull 
county, Ohio, May 12, 1824; Fayette, in the same county, October 10, 
1828; Martha, also in that county, October 19, 1830. 



66o BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Davis R. Doud's first recollection of life is of rebelling against a switch- 
ing he says he did not deserve, at the age of two years. His next is of a 
memorable ride, at five, on a sheep, which ended on his being thrown oft. 
He used the sheep as a substitute for a fiery, untamed steed which he had 
been unable to secure. Somewhat later some men working for his father 
gave him cider brandy and laughed at his wild talk and his attempts to walk 
a crack ! The brutality of this performance was fully appreciated by his 
mother, who broke the brandy bottles in the wood-yard and rebuked the 
men. All through life when a thought of his mother's action has come to 
him, Mr. Doud has blessed her memory. At six he says he told his first 
lie ! Those who know him say he has told few since. He admired a lovely 
plume which nodded at the top of his brother's militia training cap, and 
tore it oft' and threw it out of the window, then went out and pretended to 
find it and laid claim to it. He has other interesting reminiscences of his 
childhood and his boyhood. \\'hen he was about six years old he went to 
his eldest sister's, at Warren, Ohio, and while there took many surreptitious 
rides on a horse she forbade him to use. One day some of his playmates 
scared the horse and it threw him off and created such a commotion that 
his sister was apprised of his disobedience. She whipped him and he fought, 
as she testified, "like a bear!" Later he was permitted to ride a beauti- 
ful spotted horse to and from the pasture, half a mile from the house, morn- 
ing and night, and he often speaks of the pleasure this privilege gave him. 
He has a vivid recollection of the hanging at Warren, in 1833, of a man 
named Gardner, for the murder of Marie Buel, his stepdaughter. About 
1S56 Elder Mack, a prominent preacher in that district in the early days, 
told him that he preached Gardner's funeral sermon from the text: "Give 
an account now of thy stewardship, for thou mayest be no longer steward." 

Young Doud passed much of his time then and later in fishing along 
the Mahoning river, which washed one side of his father's farm, and in hunt- 
ing in the woods in the vicinity of his home. About 1836 he went with his 
father to Ravenna, Ohio, to witness the hanging of a man named David 
Maquiston for the murder of the assassin's brother's wife's sister. In later 
years he heard that Maquiston's father, just before his death, confessed to 
the commission of the crime. About 1837 Alvah Doud contracted to con- 
struct half a section of the Ohio and Pennsylvania canal, on a cross-cut from 
Ravenna, Ohio, to Beaver, Pennsylvania, and in company with one Henry 
Smith took another contract to construct five locks at Quinby Hill, in War- 
ren township, on the same canal. He sold his interest in the lock contract 
in a short time, however. This canal ran through his farm and during its 
excavation at that point Davis R. Doud worked on it as occasion favored, 
though his father did not live to finish his contract. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 66i 

June 19, 1845, ■^\"ith John Booth and George King, young Doud emi- 
grated from Ohio to Ihinois. They walked a part of the way to Cleveland 
and there took passage on a steamboat for Chicago, where they arrived 
June 28. Mr. Doud states that he could then have visited every business 
place in the town in two hours. That same day they engaged passage for 
Bristol, Kendall county, Illinois, where Mr. King left the other two to join 
his brother in DeKalb county. Young Doud went to Booth's relations near 
Georgetown, Kendall county, and was for a time employed in the harvest 
fields and at other farm work. The next September he returned via the 
lakes to his old home to see his mother and other relatives. In October 
following, in company with his brother Israel, he started again for Illinois, 
driving with a horse and buggy through to Georgetown and thence to 
Ottawa. From Ottawa they went to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, driving most 
of the way along the lake shore, and thence inland as far as the site of 
Rochester, Wisconsin, at and near which were then only four log houses. 
They soon returned to Illinois and bought a wagon shop a few miles below 
Aurora, and were soon in active business. They soon sold out, however, 
and started westward on foot. They went as far as Rockford and thence 
down the Rock river to Grand Detour, Ogle county, where they remained 
through the winter. There young Doud became acquainted with John 
Deere, of agricultural machinery notoriety, whose son, then only about nine 
years old, was prominent in connection with the World's Columbian Ex- 
position at Chicago in 1893. I" the following spring (J846) young Doud 
went to a point on the Fox river near Long Grove, Kendall county, where 
he was employed by Jacob Pope until, about four months later, he was 
taken ill with fever and ague. 

July 3 following, in company with John Booth, he came to Mazon, in 
Grundy county, to visit his sister and Booth's brother, who had, a few 
months before, moved there from Ohio. There was sickness in the neigh- 
borhood and some of the children of the two families had died and others 
were ill. July 4 they crossed Mazon creek and found on the site of Dwight 
and Gardner and between the two branches of Mazon creek only five log 
houses, and two of them were vacant. In the fall of 1846, in company with 
Edward and Oliver Booth and their wives, young Doud set out to visit their 
relatives at Big Grove, about twenty-five miles distant. Their convevance 
was a four-ox team and a rude wagon, and it was necessary to cross the 
Illinois river below the present bridge on the road to Morris. The young 
man had crossed there before and knew that near the southern shore the 
stream was dangerously deep, and he insisted that as a measure of safety the 
women should cross in a canoe belonging to Jacob Claypool, which was 
secured near the ferry or fording by a chain. Against the protests of the 



€62 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

two Booths he loosened tlie canoe and con\'eyed the women to the opposite 
shore, and the oxen became frightened and one yoke of tliem turned around 
and the wagon-box floated off, and, altogether, the men encountered much 
difhculty and no little danger in crossing. It was not convenient for Davis 
to return the boat and he did not do so. and has ever since believed that, 
though he took the canoe without authority, the end justified the means, 
for he thinks his precaution that day saved the two women from an untimely 
death. In 1850, when Mr. Doud and Mr. Claypool were both members of the 
board of supervisors, Mr. Doud related to him the incident of the canoe and 
Mr. Claypool had no recollection of having missed the craft at that time. 

Mr. Doud spent the fall and winter of 1846-47 with Mr. John Cook and 
West Mattock, near Long Grove, and with Owen Murray and his mother, 
north of old Mazon. In the spring he went back to his old Ohio home and 
there, his health having failed somewhat, devoted himself for a year or more 
to peddling. During that period he made the acquaintance of a worthy 
Christian young lady named Margaret Patterson, whom he married in the 
fall of 1847 and who died about two and a half months later. July 22, 1848, 
he married Tamar Easton and brought her to Illinois and settled on gov- 
ernment land in what is now Braceville township, Grundy county. This 
was the family home until the spring of 1891, when Mr. Doud located at 
Gardner, where he now lives. For one year (1882-1883) Mr. and ^Irs. 
Doud lived in Evanston, near Chicago, in order the better to educate some 
of their children at the Northwestern University. Mrs. Doud died March 
I, 1885, deeply regretted by all who knew her. She bore her husband ten 
children, six of whom grew to maturity and five of whom are now living. 
Alexander Lee, the eldest, was born January 11, 1851; Florrilla A., was born 
October 8, 1855; Frank RolHn was born August 27, 1859; Amos Rogers 
was born February 9, 1862; Tamar Lucinda was born September 28, 1867; 
Harriet Luella was born May 29, 1864, and died October i, 1883; and four 
others of their children died in infancy. September 6, 1888, Mr. Doud mar- 
ried Mrs. Mary Tinsman, a daughter of Isaac and Mary Showalter, born 
in Wayne county, Ohio, in 1851, who has borne him two daughters: Flor- 
ence M., June 4, 1890, and Hattie J., August 5. 1891. It was in the spring 
of 1850 that Mr. Doud buried his first-born in the \\'heeler cemetery, in 
which he erected the first gravestone, though a few persons had been buried 
there before. 

Mr. Doud remembers the winter of 1848-9 as one in which there was 
much snow. It fell in November and lay on the ground until March, nearly 
two feet deep, with a heavy crust on top, which prevented breaking new 
tracks. On account of the hardness and the sharpness of the surface deer 
were unable to escape from hunters and an unusual number were killed. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 663 

Early in 1850, under tlie township organization act, Braceville township was 
iormed and it was named by ^Ir. Doud, who was elected its first supervisor, 
in honor of Braceville, Trumbull county, Ohio, his birthplace and his place 
of residence until he was nineteen. Mr. Doud has a vivid recollection of 
the day (February 22) in the winter of 1854, when the first train ever reached 
the Mississippi river, over the Chicago & Rock Island Railway. On that 
day he braved a great danger and escaped almost miraculously from what 
seemed certain destruction. On a trip to Iowa with William Jenkins and 
another man, they crossed the Mississippi on the ice with a team of horses 
and a wagon. Returning by way of Davenport they recrossed the river 
between that point and Rock Island on the day in question, and in so doing 
came near going down to watery graves. The ice had softened by reason of 
recent warm weather, but thousands of people were going l)ack and forth 
on foot without any apparent danger. Mr. Doud and Mr. Jenkins believed 
that they could cross safely by taking over one horse at a time. The horse 
they set out with broke through several times and was rescued by Messrs. 
Doud and Jenkins and others only with the greatest difficulty. In the 
final struggle to reach the shore, Mr. Doud got upon thin ice, which broke 
under his weight two steps after he advanced upon it. At the third step 
he struck solid ice, and with great exertion arose from his sinking position. 
Then, throwing the line by which he had been guiding the horse over the 
animal's back, he permitted it to go on without restraint. It reached the 
shore, but not until it again broke partially through the ice. Persons ac- 
quainted with the river stated that the channel was deeper and the current 
Avas stronger than anywhere else at that point. In 1896 Mr. Doud, who is 
something of an artist in his way, painted some representations of dift'erent 
scenes in this memorable adventure, which are objects of much interest 
to those who visit him. 

In 1856 Mr. Doud was licensed to preach by the Protestant Methodist 
church. He was elected a lay delegate soon after to attend conference at 
Henry, Illinois. His brother, Fayette, also a preacher of the same denom- 
ination, was employed to preach on a circuit that extended from near the 
Illinois river, a few miles below Morris, to some distance west of Kankakee 
by way of Horse creek, and Mr. Doud preached on this circuit also, the 
two laboring together to save souls and extend the dominion of Christ. Rev. 
Fayette Doud died at his home at Ferris, Illinois, July 29, 1891. Jesse 
Doud, another of Mr. Doud's brothers, was a minister of the gospel for 
•many years. He died at Sycamore, Illinois, June 16, 1875. 

Mr. Doud has traveled a good deal in the United States and Canada, 
and has, at different times, traveled more than four thousand miles to see 
and comfort sick relations. With his wife he paid a visit to his old Ohio 



664 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

home in 1851, and he went there again about 1864. The season of 1873 was 
dry and crops were poor and Mr. Doud had more stock on his farm than he 
could feed properly, and he took some of his horses and some belonging 
to another to Rockland, Maine, making the journey across the St. Clair 
river and through Canada, and returned through the New England and 
Middle States, well satisfied with his venture, after a stay of five weeks in 
the east. In 1880, with his sister, Chloe Booth, and her daughter, he visited 
his brother, Israel, in Iowa, and there met his sister, j\Iartha Booth, from 
Kansas. While on this trip he went on a cattle-purchasing expedition with 
his brother's son, and had a never-to-be-forgotten experience as a lonely 
cattle herder on the plains sitting on his horse from dawn till evening two 
days. In 1881 he again went to Iowa, this time to bring back his wife, who 
had become ill at her brother's there while returning from Kansas. After 
his removal to Evanston, Illinois, in 1882, he went to Kansas to see his sister 
and her daughter, who were both sick, and while at Topeka had pleasant 
interviews with ex-Governors Click and St. John and visited the various 
departments in the state-house. In the winter of 1886 he went to Denver, 
Colorado, to see his sick grandchildren. One had died before he left home, 
and he arrived in time to see and talk with two others, who passed away 
soon afterward. Many more details of the good and busy life of this patriotic 
and useful citizen might be given, but enough has been related to enable 
those who read between the lines to form a just estimate of his noble char- 
acter and high purposes in life. 



PETER E. ERICKSOX. 

When President Lincoln issued his call for troops to aid in defense of 
the Union, men started for the front from the workshop, the field, the oftice 
and the store. Every walk of life was represented, and the united efforts 
of these brave men resulted in placing the Union on a firmer basis than ever 
before. Mr. Erickson was one who, prompted by a spirit of patriotism, 
offered his services to his adopted country and followed the starry banner 
until it was victoriously planted in the capital of the southern Confederacy. 

He is a native of the land of the Midnight Sun, his birth having occurred 
in Bergen, Norway. March 10, 1844. His parents were }klads and Sarah 
(Lee) Erickson. The father was born in Xordfjord, Norway, on the ist 
of Januar}', 181 5, and his father was Erick Erickson. The former was con- 
nected with the mercantile interests in Bergen, being foreman in a wholesale 
store there. He was also the proprietor of a brewery. His wife, Sarah Lee, 
was a daughter of Peter Lee, who served as a soldier in the war between 
Sweden and Norway. While still residing in the old country Mads Erickson 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 665. 

and his wife became the parents of the following children: Peter E., Susan 
E., Andrew M., Sophia and Eli. All of the children came to America. Mr. 
Erickson continued to reside in Bergen for many years, but in i8go crossed 
the Atlantic in order to live with his children, who had located here. He 
was a representative and enterprising business man and a good citizen, and 
he and his wife were consistent members of the Lutheran church. He died 
in Chicago, at an advanced age. 

Peter Emil Erickson, the subject of this review, obtained a good edu- 
cation in the schools of Bergen and in early life worked in his father's 
brewery. In i860, when about sixteen years of age, he crossed the briny 
deep to the New World, sailing from Bergen to Quebec, where he landed 
after a voyage of twenty-one days, which was considered very quick time. 
He had been a passenger on the good ship Norge, under the command of 
Captain Jetmonson, reaching Quebec in the latter part of May. He im- 
mediately proceeded by rail to Chicago and thence to Beloit, Wisconsin, 
where he lived with his uncle, I. C. Alested, a farmer. While there he at- 
tended school for three months to learn the English language. Subsequently 
he engaged in farming and the following spring went to Chicago. After 
sailing upon the Great Lakes for a short time he removed to Morris, Illinois, 
and in that locality was employed at farm labor. 

In the meantime hostilities between the north and south had been 
continued until the country was precipitated into civil war, and on the ist 
of March, 1862, Mr. Erickson responded to the call for aid, enlisting at 
Morris as a private of Company H, Fifty-third Illinois Infantry, under the 
command of Captain McClenehan. He was to serve for three years or during 
the war and at the close of the struggle he was honorably discharged; but 
he, however, re-enlisted as a veteran at Hebron, Mississippi, in the spring 
of 1864. After the surrender of Lee and hostilities were over, he received 
an honorable discharge and was mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky. The 
regiment, however, was disbanded at Chicago, in 1865. He participated 
in the battle of Pittsburg Landing, the siege of Vicksburg and was in the 
Atlanta campaign, being under fire for four months. He was also with 
General Sherman on his celebrated march to the sea. While at Jackson, 
Mississippi, where the regiment lost heavily, he was taken prisoner, but 
was soon released and took part in the march to Washington and the 
grand review in the capital city. He participated in many hard-fought 
battles and received slight wounds and cuts in his clothing, but was not 
seriously injured. Ever found at his post of duty, he loyally defended the 
old flag and throughout the days of peace he has been as true to his coun- 
try as when he wore the blue. 

When the war was ended Mr. Erickson returned to Wisconsin to see 



■666 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

his uncle and then came to Morris, Illinois, ^vhere he engaged in farm labor. 
In 1867 he rented land in Greenville township, near Gardner, and began 
farming on his own account. On the 30th of May. 1869. at Gardner, he mar- 
ried Celia M. Olsen, who was born in Bergen. Norway, July 15, 1849, a 
daughter of Xeils and Susan (Olsen) Olsen. Her father was a merchant of 
Bergen and in 1858 came to the United States, first establishing his home 
in \\'isconsin, whence he came to Illinois in the early '60s. He then located 
in Morris, where he followed various business pursuits. He was a member 
of the Lutheran church and lived to an advanced age. In his later life 
he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of wild land in Greenville town- 
ship, placed it under a high state of cultivation and extended the boundaries 
of his farm by the purchase of forty acres additional. His well directed 
labors, careful management and enterprise enabled him to work his way 
steadily upward and he became one of the well-to-do farmers of the com- 
munity. During the civil war he served for three years with the Sixteenth 
Illinois Cavalry, and previous to that time responded to the call for three- 
months men. On one occasion he was injured by being thrown from a 
horse, and was sent to Chicago, where he served with the invalid corps 
engaged in guarding prisoners. No land has ever furnished more loyal citi- 
zens proportionally to this republic than Norway, and among this number 
may be classed Mr. Olsen, who was a faithful defender of the Union cause. 
His children were Ole, Ben, Celia and Josephine. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Erickson located on a farm in Green- 
field township. Grundy county, but afterward removed to Montgomery 
county. Iowa, where he purchased eighty acres of wild land, which he trans- 
formed into a good farm, erecting substantial buildings and making other 
improvements. After four years, however, he sold that property and re- 
moved to Kearney county, Nebraska, where he took up his homestead 
claim, residing thereon for two years. On the expiration of that period he 
returned to Greenfield township, Grundy county. Illinois, where he rented 
land until 1890. when he purchased his present farm, comprising one hundred 
and twenty acres. But few improvements had been made at that time, 
and there were no buildings or trees, but his efforts have wrought great 
changes and he now has a very desirable country home. The residence 
is neat and pleasant, good barns and outbuildings furnish shelter for grain 
and stock and the latest improved machinery is used in the cultivation of 
the fields. 

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Erickson has been blessed with the follow- 
ing children : Neils E., Severn E.. Susan J., John, Andrew, Emil, Eliza, 
■Cornelius and Sarah. Two others. Sarah and Martin, died in early child- 
hood. In his political views Mr. Erickson is a Republican and in religious 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 667 

iaith he is a Lutheran. He belongs to Sedgwick Post, G. A. R., of Gardner, 
-and among his army comrades delights in recalling reminiscences of the 
old days around the camj) fires upon the tented fields. He deserves great 
credit for the success he has gained in life, for he started out empty-handed 
and has worked his way steadily upward, overcoming many obstacles and 
difBculties. He is now numbered among the substantial farmers of Grundy 
county, and as such is well known to the residents of this section of the 
state. 



W. D. HOWLAXD. 



In taking up the personal history of Mr. Howland we present to our 
readers the life record of a worthy representative of an honored pioneer 
family of Grundy county. The Howlands are of sturdy New England 
stock, and the family was founded in America in early colonial days. It is 
thought that the original ancestor in this country was John Howland, who 
crossed the Atlantic in the Mayflower, but this is not definitely known. How- 
ever, it is an authentic fact that the present generation descended from one 
■of the old colonial families of Massachusetts. Asaph Howland, the grand- 
father of our subject, was born at Brandon, Vermont, and was a soldier 
in the war of 1812. In the Green Mountain state he was married, and 
the following children were born of the union: PhiHnda; Polly; Miranda, 
who died in early womanhood: Asahel, Warner, Stephen and Lorenzo. 
The grandfather of our subject was a shoemaker by trade and a very in- 
dustrious and highly respected man. In 1825 he removed to Wayne county. 
New York, and there died when about seventy-five years of age. 

Stephen Howland, the father of our subject, was born in Brandon, 
Vermont, August 8, 1806, and acquired a common-school education. When 
nineteen years of age he removed to Wayne county. New York, and w^as 
there employed as a farm hand for some time. When about thirty years 
of age he was married, in Cato, New York, on the 2d of October, 1836, to 
Catherine Bosworth, who was born March 3, 1817, in Westfield, Massa- 
chusetts. Her father, Caleb Bosworth, was born about 1792 and was a 
son of Caleb Bosworth. Sr., a shoemaker by trade, who through his well 
directed efforts became a wealthy man, owning considerable real estate. He 
was descended from old Puritan ancestry of Massachusetts, the family 
having been established on American soil during an early epoch in 
colonial development. Caleb Bosworth, Sr.. died in Westfield, Massachu- 
setts, in the year 1819. He was a gentleman of the old school and a 
man of sterling worth who won the high respect and confidence of all 
who knew him. His children were Henry, Caleb, Howard, Margaret and 



668 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Sophia. Caleb Bosworth, Jr.. inherited land from his father in Westfield, 
Massachusetts. In early manhood he wedded Mittie Dewey, a native of 
Westfield and a daughter of Timothy and Asenath (Sexton) Dewey. Her 
father belonged to an old New England family of English lineage, was a 
wealthy farmer and a man of excellent character whose quiet and unos- 
tentatious life gained him the respect of all with whom he came in contact. 
He assisted all of his children in getting a good start in business life, and 
died at Westfield, Massachusetts, when about ninety years of age. He was 
the father of eleven children, namely: Clarissa, John, Charles, Abigail, 
Sally, Timothy, Larcomb, Mittie, Daniel, James and Rowland. 

After the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Howland they took up their abode 
in Cato, New York, where he conducted an iron foundry and also engaged 
in the manufacture of potash for some time. On selling his interests there 
he removed to Greene county. New York, and was engaged in merchandising 
in the village of Red Creek. In July, 1855, he visited Illinois and purchased 
a farm in Grundy county. The following year he came with his family to his 
new home, making the journey across Lake Ontario and by rail from Ham- 
ilton to Chicago. The land upon which he located was wild and unim- 
proved, but was pleasantly situated on the banks of the Mazon creek, and 
comprised a tract of two hundred and forty acres, capable of high cultiva- 
tion. With characteristic energy ^Ir. Howland began the work of trans- 
forming it into rich and productive fields, and successfully prosecuted his 
labors until February 15, 1864, when he was called to his final rest. He 
was a good business man, very energetic and industrious, but had not 
had time to clear the farm of all indebtedness when death claimed him. 
In politics he was a Democrat, and was a man ever true to his honest con- 
victions. After her husband's death ^Irs. Howland remained upon the farm 
for two years and then rented the property for some time, while she resided 
in Newark in order that her children might avail themselves of the edu- 
cational privileges there afYorded. Later she returned to the farm, and 
through her energy, patient industry, good management and thrift she 
cleared the property of all indebtedness and was prospered in her business 
affairs. She built a substantial and tasteful residence, good barns and other 
necessary outbuildings, drained the farm and has now one of the best prop- 
erties in the township. She is a woman of strong character, of marked' 
intelligence and very progressive, and certainly deserves great credit for what 
she has accomplished in life, having not only won financial success but also 
reared a family of children that have been a credit to her name. In addition 
to the homestead she now owns eighty acres of land, in Livingston county. 
She is now a well preserved old lady of eighty-three years, who enjoys the 
esteem and love of all with whom she has been brought in contact. Her chil- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 669 

dren are: Poll_v Jane, who was born j\lay 18. 1838: Mola D., who was liorn 
February 8, 1840; Edward B., born January 20, 1842; Charles W., born 
October 7, 1844; S. Emmet, born October 13, 1845; Catherine I., born 
November 29, 1847: Frank F.. born January 3, 185 1 ; Lilhan, born December 
31, 1857; and Mittie D., born December 21, 1862. All were born in Xew 
York with the exception of the last two, who are natives of Illinois. 

W. D. Rowland, whose name introduces this review, acquired his edu- 
cation in the common schools near the old homestead and in the schools of 
Gardner. He has made farming his life work, and remaining upon the old 
homestead has cared for his mother's property, having conducted this farm 
since he was fifteen years of age. For the past seventeen years he has rented 
it. He has been to his aged mother a most dutiful and affectionate son, 
thus repaying her for the care and devotion which she bestowed upon him in 
his early years. JMr. Howland has been twice married. He first wedded 
Huldah Sutton, and to them has been born one son, Harry D. After the 
death of his first wife he wedded her sister, Susan M. Sutton, who was born 
December i, 1858, and is a daughter of Henry B. and Catherine A. (Camp- 
bell) Sutton. They have two children — Henry Ernest and Catherine Emma. 

After his marriage J\Ir. Howland brought his bride to the old home 
place, and throughout his business career has carefully managed the property, 
thereby deriving from it a good income. His methods of farming are pro- 
gressive and enterprising, and his labors have resulted in bringing to him 
a creditable success. He is a man of high moral character whose trust- 
worthiness in business and in all life's relations is well known to all with 
whom he has been brought in contact. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He has held the oflice of school trustee and 
commissioner of highways, and has been a very capable official, discharging 
his duties with promptness and fidelity. 

Charles W., a son of W. D. and Catherine (Bosworth) Howland, served 
in the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh Regiment of Illinois Volunteers 
during the civil war and participated in the siege of Vicksburg. He worked 
on the great trench which was dug to the Alississippi, and while thus en- 
gaged was taken ill. After ten months spent in the south he was sent home, 
and he died October 28, 1863. 



WILLIAM MARSHALL. 

All honor that belongs to the pioneer belongs to the man whose name 
is above, and to his father, a man of enterprise who, in a certain field, set 
ihe wheels of business going at one of Grundy county's centers of enter- 
prise. Prominent among the living, well known pioneers of Grundy county, 



670 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Illinois, is William Marshall, of Braceville, who dates his coming to the 
county back to July, 1855; and few now living in the county have been here 
so long as he. Mr. Marshall was born in Canada, December 25, 1839. 
His parents were Dr. John and Mary (Dunlap) Marshall. The former was born 
in England and the latter in the north of Ireland, but both came to Canada 
in early life. The parents of Dr. Marshall died in England. The parents 
of Mary (Dunlap) ^larshall died in Canada. 

When the subject of this notice was a boy, the family removed from 
Canada to the state of Xew York, and lived for some time at Homellsville, 
Steuben county. The family came to Grundy county in 1854 and Dr. 
^larshall erected the first store building in the village of Gardner. Dr. 
^Marshall was the first physician who located at that village. He was a 
believer in the Hydropathic system of treating diseases and while residing 
in Homellsville, Xew York, previous to coming to Illinois, he erected 
and operated a water-cure establishment. He made a trip to England, be- 
fore coming west, to visit the scene of his birth. 

As the pioneer merchant at Gardner, Dr. Marshall met with success 
and he continued in business there until about i860, when with his family 
he removed to Missouri, where he died in the autumn of the same year. 
The death of the husband and father resulted in the return of the family 
to Grundy county in the spring of 1861. The mother died a few years later. 
Their children are: \\'illiam; ^largaret, widow of Dr. Anthony de Xor- 
mandie, who was in the Union service in the war of the rebellion and later 
practiced his profession in Braceville for many years, until his death in 1895; 
^lary, who died three years ago, unmarried; and Caroline Eggleston, of 
Hartford, Connecticut. 

^^'il]iam Marshall, except for a brief interval, has resided in Grundy 
county since he was fifteen years old. In early life he followed agricultural 
pursuits and for twenty-two years was employed as a mercantile clerk. For 
several years past he has been engaged successfully in the coal trade at 
Braceville. Mrs. Marshall was formerly Miss ^Marion Gumming. Mr. and 
Mrs. Marshall had two children: Mamie, who died, aged two years: and 
Edward ^Marshall; and three grandchildren — Leonard, Hobart and Lillian. 

Mr. Marshall is one of the few citizens now living in Grundy county who 
came here forty-five years ago. He remembers when everything was primi- 
tive and crude and has seen the country develop from a state of nature to its 
present condition of advanced prosperity. During all his residence in the 
county he has enjoyed the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens. In his 
political affiliations he is a Republican. All his ideas as to public questions 
inclined him in his early manhood to ally himself with that party and. as 
he has estimated and understood its work in all the years of its history, he 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 671 

has never seen any reason to renounce his allegiance to it. Since he began to 
have a part and an interest in the development of Bracevilie he has given 
his hearty and liberal support to every movement, religious, political or 
industrial, tending to the enhancement of the welfare of the people of the 
town. 



JAMES LONG. 

Ireland has contributed to Grundy county some of her most prominent 
pioneers and most honored and substantial citizens. Among the well known 
Irish residents of Au Sable township is James Long. Mr. Long is a native 
of county Tipperary, Ireland, where he was born December 16, 1838. His 
father, Thomas Long, was the first of the family to come to America. In 
1845 the mother and her seven children followed the husband and father 
across the ocean to the land of the free. 

The family settled in the town of \'an Buren, Onondaga county. Xew 
York, and there the mother died. James Long came to Illinois after his 
mother's death and later the father came west and made his home with 
his son, James, until his death, which occurred in 1896. One son, William, 
was a soldier in the war of the rebellion and was killed in action. 

Mr. Long has a good farm of sixty-four acres, and is esteemed as a 
citizen of more than common character and prominence. He married ]Miss 
]\Iary Cornelius, and their marriage has been blessed by the birth of two 
sons: William, a resident of Chicago, Illinois; and Charles, who lives in 
New Orleans, Louisiana. Mrs. Long is a daughter of Charles Cornelius, 
who was born in county Kings, Ireland, shortly after the death of his 
father. His mother died when he was young and he came to the United 
States with an uncle and lived in Cincinnati, Ohio, for some time and was- 
there employed on public works until he came to Will county, Illinois, 
and secured employment in the construction of the canal. He saved his 
money and purchased land in Channahon township. Will county, on which he 
settled and which became his homestead and there he spent the remainder 
of his life. He married Kate Dun, born in Queens county. Ireland, who 
died in 1865, and survived her until August, 1898, when he died at the age 
of about seventy-eight years. They became the parents of five children, three 
of whom are living: James Cornelius, who lives on the old homestead; 
Eliza, wife of Daniel Fisher; and Mrs. Long, the oldest of the family. The 
two who died were Kate, who became the wife of Michael Hanlon ; and 
John, who died when about eighteen years old. Mr. Cornelius was a well 
known and estimable citizen and all members of his family are connected 
with the Catholic church. 



■6j2 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Mr. Long is a man of much public spirit who favors good roads, good 
crops and good Hving, and beheves that real success can be obtained only 
under a liberal government of the people, for the people and by the people, 
and he strives patriotically to encourage such a government in every way 
at his command. 



ALEXANDER CAMERON. 

Alexander Cameron, deceased, came to Grundy county in pioneer 
days, and as the result of his untiring industry and capable management in 
business afi'airs he became one of the substantial farmers of ^Maine township. 
He was born in Scotland, near Glasgow, on the I2th of April, 1820. his 
parents being William and Jean Cameron. His father, an agriculturist in. 
Scotland, in 1833 came to America, taking up his residence near Peoria. Illi- 
nois, where he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land, there carry- 
ing on agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred in 1864. when 
he had attained an advanced age. His wife died March 2, 1867. They were 
both consistent members of the Methodist church, and he was a straight- 
forward, honorable man who enjoyed the respect and esteem of all with 
whom he came in contact. 

Alexander Cameron, the subject of this review, was about thirteen years 
of age when he came to America with his father's family. He soon began 
work as a farm hand in Peoria county, and for eight years was in the employ 
of Henry Stillman, a fact which plainly indicates his fidelity to the interests 
of his employer. He was married June 3, 1846. in Peoria, to Julia A. Mor- 
rison, who was born March 28. 1825, in Atlas, Pike county, Illinois, in a new 
brick school-house which had never been used for educational purposes, 
and in which her parents had taken up their abode for the winter, it making 
them a warm and comfortable residence. She is a daughter of William H. 
and Barbara A. (Usong) Morrison. Her father was an Englishman from 
Yorkshire, and when a young man came to America, taking up his abode in 
Illinois. He was married in Athens. Pike county, to Barbara Usong. whose 
birth occurred in Cincinnati, Ohio, and who was a daughter of Daniel and 
Mary Catherine (Criss) Usong. Her father, Daniel Usong, was born in 
Germany, and when a young man came with his father to America. He 
was one of a familv of twelve children and a location was made in Maryland. 
After their marriage Daniel Usong and his wife removed to Cincinnati at an 
early period in the development of that state, and there Mr. Usong owned 
one hundred and sixty acres of land, which is now within the corporation 
limits of the municipality. He was a millwright by trade, and followed that 
pursuit in Ohio until his removal to Pike county. Illinois, in company with 





yUjLcA. ^^^ . ^^^^^->iz^^<r-2^^ . 



j^^ /^^/^-*^- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 673 

iour Ross brothers, who brought their respective famihes to this state. Dan- 
iel Usong took up his abode on a tract of wild land, which he cultivated for 
some time. Subsec[uently he removed to Peoria county, Illinois, where he 
entered one hundred and sixty acres of land, part of which was prairie and 
part timber land. There he made a good home and continued his farm 
Vvork until well advanced in years. He died on the old family homestead in 
that county and the community mourned the loss of one of its valued repre- 
sentatives. In religious belief he was connected with the ^Methodist church. 
His children were Jacob, Daniel, John, Ann, Antis and Mary, .\fter the 
death of her first husband Mrs. ^Morrison married Ira Ackly. a farmer of 
Peoria county, Illinois, living on the Kickapoo prairie. They afterward 
removed to Marseilles, Illinois. Mrs. Ackly finally died at the residence of 
Mr. Cameron, our subject. By that marriage there was one daughter, 
Lydia, who became the wife of Lewis Olmsted, who was a farmer of LaSalle 
county. Their children were: Ralph: Sever, who died at the age of seven 
years: Volney; and George. Mrs. Olmsted died in February, 18S5, in \\'al- 
nut Grove, Missouri. Her second son was married December 25, 1890, in 
Knox county. Indiana, and is a farmer of Grundy county. His children are : 
Ira; Perry and Webster, twins: Edna J.: Nora; and Christina, who died in 
infancy. October 22, 1899. \\'illiam H. ]\Iorrison. a brother of Mrs. Cam- 
eron, married Esther Colville. of Peoria county, and was a farmer by occupa- 
tion. He took up his abode in Braceville township. Grundy county, but died 
in early manhood, on the 12th of June, 1858. Their children were Eliza 
Ann and Henrietta, who married John ^laxwell. by whom she has one 
■child, Maud. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. [Morrison located in Pittstield, Pike 
county. Illinois, and the former carried on agricultural pursuits, placing his 
land under a high state of cultivation. While on an expedition to secure 
rnore land he died at Spoon Grove, Illinois. His wife lived to an advanced 
age and spent her last days in the home of Mrs. Cameron, being called to 
her final rest while in Grundy county, at the age of seventy years. She 
was a member of the Christian church and a lady of manv virtues. Their 
children were William, Henry and Julia. 

Mr. and iMrs. Cameron began their domestic life in LaSalle county, 
Avhere he purchased eighty acres of land, of which only ten acres had been 
improved. He at once continued the work of clearing the remainder, turn- 
ing the first furrow on many an acre. He made a good home, which con- 
tinued to be his place of residence for two years, and in 1856 he came to 
Grundy county and purchased the one hundred and sixty acres of land upon 
which his widow now resides. As his financial resources increased he added 
to this until he owned two hundred and forty acres. This he greatly im- 



674 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

proved, placing the fields under a high state of cultivation and adding to his 
place all of the accessories and conveniences of a model farm. He possessed 
the sterling qualities of his Scotch ancestry, being resolute, determined and 
persevering, and these qualities insured him creditable success. His busi- 
ness affairs were conducted in a most honorable manner, and he won the 
high regard and confidence of all with whom he was brought in contact. In 
politics Mr. Cameron was an old-line Whig imtil the dissolution of the party, 
when he joined the ranks of the new Republican party, casting his vote for 
Fremont in 1856. He was widely known for his thrift and industry and his 
sterling honesty, and was regarded as a loyal friend and neighbor. When 
he passed away he left not only to his widow a comfortable competence but 
also the priceless heritage of a good name, for over the record of his life there 
falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil. 

Mrs. Cameron still survives her husband and is living on the old home- 
stead which he improved; but she has recently sold her farm to Christopher 
Mulhall, who is a practical farmer and an industrious and upright man. His 
sister, JNIiss Elizabeth ]\Iulhall, is his housekeeper, and Mrs. Cameron has a 
comfortable home with them. She is familiar with much of the pioneer his- 
tory of this section of Illinois, having gone to Pike county with her parents at 
a very early age. She was eight years of age at the time of the Black Hawk 
war, and can well remember hearing the news of the capture of the famous 
Indian chieftain. She can also recall many interesting stories of pioneer life 
and of the experiences of those early times when the cabin homes of the set- 
tlers were long distances apart and when the greater portion of the land was 
still in its primitive condition. She has an excellent memory, and thus her 
conversation is enriched by many reminiscences of her girlhood. Her life 
has been indeed one of activity and industry, and to her husband she always 
proved an excellent helpmate. She was reared by her mother to the work 
of the home, and was taught to spin flax and wool and weave the thread into 
garments. After her marriage she not only performed the work of the house 
but also assisted in much of the outdoor work, including the milking of the 
cows. She was renowned for her dairy products, which always commanded 
an excellent price on the market. Now well advanced in years, she is liv- 
ing upon the old homestead and receives the respect and friendship of all 
who know her. 



WILLIAM W. HILL. 



For almost forty years William W. Hill has resided in Grundy county 
and is therefore numbered among its early settlers. His labors have also 
won him a place among the substantial farmers of the neighborhood, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 675 

as a leading citizen he is entitled to representation in the history of this sec- 
tion of the state. He was born in Delaware county, Ohio, November 21, 
1838, and is a son of John A. and Esther (]\Iarsh) Hill. He represents the 
old colonial Hill family of Vermont, from which state representatives of 
the name removed in an early day to Pennsylvania. The family is of English 
lineage. Stephen Hill, the grandfather of our subject, was born in the 
Green Mountain state, and it is believed that he served his country as a 
soldier in the Revolution. On leaving Vermont he went to Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, and was one of its pioneer settlers. His wife, Betsy 
Hill, was also a native of New England, and in that section of the country 
they were married. They located upon a tract of land in Westmoreland 
county, establishing a home in the midst of the forest. There the grand- 
father owned between ten and eleven hundred acres and improved an ex- 
cellent farm, having an orchard of forty acres, from the product of which 
he annually made peach brandy. His children, all born in Pennsylvania, 
were Joseph, George, David, John A., Stephen, Benjamin, Joshua, Sarah, 
Richard and Betsy. Stephen Hill resided in Westmoreland county for about 
thirty years and then removed to Delaware county, Ohio, at the time when 
there were only two settlements within its borders. The entire country 
was an unbroken wilderness covered with heavy timber, and the forests 
were the haunts of deer, foxes, wolves, wild-cats and much wild game. 
The turkeys and deer destroyed the corn crops so that they had to be 
watched. The entire family went armed, for the rifle was a necessary im- 
plement. All of the sons were expert hunters, and Stephen Hill was noted 
for his accuracy with the gun. In this way they secured much of the meat 
for the table, and their other food was largely grown upon the farm. While 
in Pennsylvania Mr. Hill had been the owner of a number of slaves which 
he freed before going to Ohio, but two of his negroes, however, accompa- 
nied him and lived with him in the Buckeye state. In religious belief Stephen 
Hill was a Universalist, and a man of unquestioned honesty and integrity 
in all the afifairs of life. He gave to each of his children farms, and thus 
enabled them to secure a good start in life. He died in Delaware county, 
Ohio, at the age of eighty-four years, and his wife passed away in Ohio at 
about the same age. 

John A. Hill, the father of our subject, was liorn in Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, and received good educational privileges for that 
day. He became a school-teacher and singing master, and all of the family 
possessed musical talent. He was married in Delaware county, Ohio, to 
Esther Marsh, who was born in Genesee county, Xew York, a daughter of 
Benjamin and Sarah Alarsh. Her father was probably a native of Cayuga 
county, of the Empire state, and his father was one of the pioneers of that 



676 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

locality, whither he removed from Marylaiul. He was a native of England 
and was of English lineage. On leaving the east Benjamin Marsh took up 
his abode in Delaware county, Ohio, casting in his lot with its pioneer 
settlers. He became one of the extensive farmers of that section and gave 
to each of his sons one hundred and twenty acres of land and to his daughters 
eighty acres each. A well known pioneer, he took an active part in re- 
claiming Delaware county for the purpose of civilization, and was one of 
the honored pioneers who laid the foundation for its present prosperity. In 
religious belief he was a Presbyterian and a man of high moral character. 
He lived to the venerable age of eighty-five years, and his wife was eighty- 
four years at the time when she was called to the home beyond, both dying 
on the farmstead in Delaware county. Their children were Josiah, Joel, 
Benjamin. John, William, Esther, Sarah, Lucinda and Clarinda. 

John A. Hill, the father of our subject, located upon a part of the old 
hoinestead after his marriage, his share of the estate being one hundred 
and sixty acres. Clearing away the heavy timber he improved an excellent 
property and built upon his place a sawmill, which he successfully operated 
for thirty years. He was one of the prominent residents of the neighbor- 
hood, and through his capable management of business affairs acquired a 
comfortable competence. His fellow townsmen, recognizing his worth and 
abihty, frequently called him to public office, and he was one of the honored 
citizens of the community. In religious faith he was a Presbyterian. His 
first wife died in 1854. Their children were Joseph D.. Henry D., ^^'illiam 
\V., Hugh M., Martha, Clarinda, Mary J.. Sarah. Lucinda A., Alniira, who 
died at the age of four years, and Catherine. All were born in Delaware 
county. Mr. Hill was again married, but there were no children by the second 
wife. In the pioneer days when wild game of many kinds abounded in the 
forests of Delaware county, he became an expert shot. It is said that he 
killed as many as five hundred deer. His accuracy of aim enabled him 
to bring down almost everything at which he fired, and he won such an en- 
viaTjle reputation as a huntsman that Indians in the neighborhood greatly 
desired to gain possession of his gun. One big specimen of the red race, 
whenever he saw Mr. Hill in the woods, would sound his turkey call, and 
when Mr. Hill approached would say "Swap, swap." After many years' 
residence in Delaware county Mr. Hill sold his property there and pur- 
chased land in Hardin county, Ohio — an improved farm upon which he 
spent his remaining days. He died when about eighty-three years of age, 
and his remains were interred on the old family homestead in Delaware 
county. 

William W. Hill, whose name begins this record, was born in Delaware 
county and reared amid the wild scenes of pioneer life. He obtained a 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 677' 

good common-school education, and on attaining his majority removed to 
IlHnois, reaching Morris on the 13th of April, 1859. His brother, Joseph 
D. Hill, was then living in Mazon township, and having entered land there 
in 1844 ^vas the owner of valuable farms. William worked for his brother 
for one year and then returned to Delaware county, Ohio, where he carried 
on agricultural pursuits for a year. He was married there, on the loth 
of September, 1861, to Thirza A. Lea, who was born in Westchester county, 
New York, October 11, 1844, a daughter of Benjamin and Thirza (Holmes) 
Lea. 

Her father was born in Kidderminster, Worcestershire, England, January 
9, 1807, obtained a good common-school education, and became a carpet- 
weaver. He had a sister, Ann, who married John Harris and settled in New 
York. His brother, William, went to the East Indies during the war there 
and has never been heard from since that time. Benjamin Lea was married 
in England when about twenty-four years of age, to Thirza Holmes, and 
the following day they started for America, sailing from Liverpool for New 
York, where they arrived after a voyage of seven weeks. Mr. Lea settled 
at West Farms, now a part of New York city, and became a foreman in 
the carpet factory. In 1848 he took up his abode on a farm in Morrow 
county, Ohio, where he purchased one hundred acres of partially improved 
land. He tinished the work of clearing the property and made a good 
home. Subsequently he traded it for a farm of one hundred and eighty- 
four acres in Delaware county, Ohio, four miles from Ashley, and clearing 
the trees from that tract he transformed the wild land into richly cultivated 
fields and erected two houses and substantial barns. He made a specialty of 
raising sheep on an extensive scale, and was a prosperous and successful 
agriculturist. He had had no experience at farm work when he came to this 
country, but his practical ideas and sound judgment enabled him to readily 
master the principles of the work and to become an excellent manager and 
successful business man. His undaunted integrity of character made him 
highly respected by all. Both he and his wife held membership in the Pres- 
byterian church and were very regular in their attendance at its services. 
His political support was given to the Republican party, and during the 
civil war he was a stanch advocate of the Union cause. In his family were the 
following children : George; John, who died at the age of nineteen; Alexan- 
der, Thomas, Adella U. and Thirza A. The first named responded to the 
country's call for troops, becoming a member of the Ninety-sixth Ohio In- 
fantry, from which he was transferred to the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth 
Ohio, continuing with that command until the close of hostilities. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Hill rented land three miles from 
Ashley, Delaware county, Ohio, making their home at that place for one 



678 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

year, whence they came to Ilhnois, in November, 1863. Our subject then 
rented a farm in Mazon township, and after eight years purchased land in 
Braceville township, becoming the owner of a tract of eighty acres of raw 
prairie, upon which not a furrow had been turned nor an improvement made. 
He bought eighty acres more, and sold the place and moved to the present 
farm. He has now one hundred and sixty acres of valuable land, well 
timbered and well watered by Mazon creek. He placed his fields under a 
high state of cultivation and garners rich harvests as the reward of his 
labors. By the assistance of his estimable wife, who has been indeed a faith- 
ful helpmate to him. he has become the possessor of a comfortable com- 
petence, and they have a very pleasant home situated on the banks of the 
Mazon, at Willmington Ford. Their union has been blessed with the fol- 
lowing children: George; William, who died at the age of nineteen )-ears; 
Mary; Belle; Allen G.; Lucinda; Mary; Charles A.; Frank; Richard; Row- 
land; and Winnie. In his political views Mr. Hill is a supporter of Republican 
principles. His life has been one of industry, crowned with the reward which 
ever follows judicious industry. He and his wife enjoy the warm friend- 
ship of a large circle of acquaintances. 



SAMUEL HOGE. 



This gentleman is now connected with the business interests of Chicago, 
but is well known in the town of Stockdale and county of Grundy. For 
some time he was an enterprising member of the Stockdale Grain Com- 
pany. 

A native of Erienna township, this county, he was born on the 12th 
of August, 1877, and is a son of Joshua Hoge, a well known citizen of the 
county and prominently connected with business aftairs here. On his father's 
farm he spent his boyhood days, becoming familiar with the labors and 
duties which fall to the lot of the agriculturist. His preliminary education 
was acquired in the public schools of Morris, and subsequently he continued 
his studies in the University of Grinnell, Iowa, and in Ottawa, Illinois, where 
he took a commercial course. 

In the fall of 1897, when the Stockdale Grain Company was estab- 
lished, he became one of its members and continued to devote his energies to 
its successful conduct until April, 1900, when he sold out. The company 
does a large grain business at Stockdale and also conducts its general store. 
Before disposing of his interests there, Mr. Hoge, on the 2d of October, 1899, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 679 

■entered into partnership with George H. Pliillips in the commission broker- 
age business on the Ciiicago Board of Trade, with his office at No. 232 Rialto 
building. He is a young man of marked industry and of keen discernment, 
and undoubtedly a successful future awaits him. 



ROBERT D. MENOUGH. 

Robert D. Menough was a representative of one of the pioneer families 
of Grundy county and actively connected with its agricultural interests. 
His highly improved farm indicates his careful supervision" and his practical 
and progressive spirit. For more than half a century the family had been 
found in this locality. Hiram B. Alenough, the grandfather of our subject, 
was a son of one of the pioneers of southern Indiana, his birth having oc- 
curred in Frankfort, Kentucky, December 25, 1812, and was of French 
lineage. At a very early day his parents crossed the Ohio river into the 
Hoosier state on account of Indian troubles in Kentucky, and were early 
settlers of Vincennes, Indiana. Colonel John L. Menough, a brother of 
Hiram B. Menough, was captured by the Delaware Indians in 181 1, being 
taken from his farm near Vincennes, but was soon after recaptured. He 
served his country in various public capacities for many years and his long 
and useful life was terminated in June, 1879, when he was called to the home 
ieyond. 

Hiram B. ^lenough was wedded in Lebanon, Indiana, October 4, 1832, 
to Miss Martha Patlock, who was born in South Carolina, November 29. 
1813. With his family he came to Grundy county, Illinois, in the spring 
of 1844, taking up his residence in Mazon township, at a time when its set- 
tlements were widely scattered. They located one and one-half miles south- 
east of ]\Iazon on a tract of wild prairie and there Mr. Menough spent his 
remaining days. His children were as follows : Robert, who married Harriet 
Rowen; Elizabeth, who married Charles Nance; James, who wedded Louisa 
McKean; Martha, wife of Henry Baird; and Thareby, the w-ife of William 
Howell. The father of these children was a Democrat in his political affilia- 
tions and a sterling pioneer settler who did all in his power to aid the de- 
velopment and substantial improvement of the community. He was among 
those who laid the foundation of the present prosperity and progress of the 
county. He died August 25, 1899, at the advanced age of eighty-seven 
years. 

Robert Delone Menough was born in Washington county, Indiana, July 
21, 1823, and received the usual common-school education afforded to the 



68o BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

farmers" boys of tlie west at that time. He came to Illinois with his parents 
in the spring of 1844, when about eleven years of age, and was here reared 
amid the wild scenes of the frontier. On the 24th of July, 1856, he married 
Harriet J. Rowen, who was born December 4, 1833, a daughter of David and 
Martha Rowen. Her father was born in Pennsylvania and was a farmer 
and local minister of the ]\Iethodist church. On leaving his native state he 
removed to Ohio, where he was married, and in 1844 he took up his resi- 
dence near Olney, Illinois, whence he came to Grundy county, e'stabHshing his 
home near Mazon. He was a well known pioneer Methodist minister who 
preached the gospel in many districts of the state, carrying the glad tidings of 
great joy to the frontier settlers. In politics he was a Republican, joining the 
party on its organization. He died in 1861. when about fifty years of age. His 
children were Harriet. AlcClure, Irving, Eliza and Edwin. Two of his sons, 
McClure and Irving, were soldiers in the civil war. 

.\t the time of his marriage Robert D. Alenough located on his present 
farm in }iIazon township. This he cleared and improved, and to the original 
tract of one hundred and sixty acres he added until he now has a valuable 
property of two hundred and forty acres. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. 
Menough was blessed with the following children: Lora E., born August 
I, 1857: Ora L., born August 2y. 1859: Laura E., born March 18. 1861; 
Lida B., born June 3, 1863; James M., born March 12, 1865; Robert R., 
born May 24, 1867; Louella A., born September i, 1869; Hiram A., born 
October 21, 1873: and Volney W., born November 18, 1871. Two of the 
number are now deceased, Ora L. having passed away November 28, 1884, 
while Volney W. died April 25, 1899. Lora E. was married in 1895 to James 
Hanson, a farmer of Minnesota. Laura A. is the wife of Joseph Horrie. 
of Morris, and their children are Lalla Rookh, Harold and Massie. Lida B. 
is the wife of Thaddeus Gillespie and they have a son, named Parks. James 
M. wedded Gertrude Murray, by whom he had three children — Robert, Rol- 
lin and Gail — and their home is in Mazon. Robert R., Louella A. and 
Hiram are still living on the old homestead, and the two sons are practical 
and enterprising farmers and stock-raisers. The children have all been pro- 
vided with good educational privileges. Some of the sons are graduates of 
the Commercial College of Kankakee, and Louella A. has been for seven 
years a teacher in the schools of Grundy county, while Lora and Lida 
were also successful teachers. Both Mr. and Mrs. Menough were members 
of the Methodist church, and in politics, he was a Democrat. He died 
April 20, 1884. and his wife passed away September 18. 1897. They were 
people of sterling worth whose many excellencies of character won for them 
the confidence and respect of all who knew them. In their death the 
community lost two of its best citizens, and their family mourned the loss of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 681 

father and mother who had been most devoted to their interests and untiring 
in their efforts to promote their welfare. 



HUGH M. HILL. 



For more than a third of a century Hugh M. Hill has been a resident 
of Grundy county, and is one of the substantial agriculturists of Maine town- 
ship. His entire life has been devoted to the work of the farm, and in his 
career he has at all times manifested those sterling qualities of enterprise, 
industry and honesty which lead to success and win the respect and confi- 
dence of people of worth. 

Mr. Hill was born in Delaware county, Ohio, December 7, 1841, a son 
of John A. and Esther (Marsh) Hill. His grandfather, Stephen Hill, was 
a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, and was of Pennsylvania 
Dutch lineage. In pioneer days in that county Stephen Hill, Sr., the great- 
grandfather of our subject, cleared a good farm of two hundred and fifty 
acres in the midst of the forest and made a comfortable home for his family. 
On leaving the Keystone state Stephen Hill, Jr., the grandfather, took up his 
abode in Concord township, Delaware county, Ohio, where he purchased 
eleven hundred acres of land. That was at a period of development in the 
history of Delaware county and land could be bought for a nominal price. 
He cleared much of the tract which he purchased, making a good pioneer 
home, and as the years passed by he gave one hundred and twenty acres of 
land to each of his sons and sixty acres each to his daughters. In the 
family were eight children, namely: Joseph, George, Adam, Stephen, Ben- 
jamin, Joshua, Sarah, and Betsy. His son Joseph bored a deep well for 
salt, and when he had reached a depth of one hundred and forty feet dis- 
covered a famous sulphur spring, which has made the place known as a 
watering resort. It is situated about ten miles north of the city of Delaware. 
Stephen Hill spent his remaining days upon the homestead farm in Dela- 
ware county, where he died at the age of ninety-six years. He was a 
well-known pioneer citizen of the community, having taken up his abode 
there when Indians were still in the neighborhood, but he always treated 
them kindly and found that they gave him their friendship in return. He 
was a noted hunter and skillful marksman, and his trusty rifle brought down 
excellent game. Upon his farm he erected a large stone residence, his chil- 
dren all remaining at home until they were married and went to homes 
of their own. The family was one of the most prominent pioneer families 
of Delaware county. Mr. and Mrs. Hill were consistent members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and were the friends of progress along all lines. 
Mr. Hill was particularly well educated for his day, and several of his sons- 



«682 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

became school teachers. In Pennsylvania he had been a slave owner and 
brought two of his slaves with him to Ohio, where he gave them their free- 
dom. One of them, William Utter, afterward became a successful barber 
of Columbus, Ohio, where he lived for many years. In the death of Stephen 
Hill, Delaware county lost one of its most reliable, enterprising and honored 
pioneer citizens. 

John A. Hill, the father of our subject, was born in Westmoreland 
county, Pennsylvania, near the Monongahela river, remaining in that local- 
ity until seventeen years of age. He went with his father's family to Dela- 
ware county, Ohio, and there became celebrated for his skill as a marksman. 
He often entered into contests with the Indians, and on many occasions 
demonstrated that he was a better shot than they. They often hunted 
together and the Indians frequently did him a good turn. All kinds of 
wild game could be secured during the days of his early residence in Dela- 
ware county and he killed as many as seventeen deer in a single week. 
Becoming one of the pioneer farmers of the community, he operated one 
hundred and twenty acres of the old Hill farm given him by his father, and 
his enterprising efforts brought to him creditable success. He married 
Esther Marsh, who was born in New York and was a representative of an old 
English family, her father being Benjamin Marsh, who removed from the 
Empire state to Delaware county, Ohio, in pioneer days. Here he bought 
one hundred and fifty acres of land, becoming one of the leading agricul- 
turists of the neighborhood. He died in Delaware county, Ohio, at the 
age of seventy-four years, and in his death the community lost a citizen 
of the highest respectability. He long held membership with the Methodist 
church, in which he was a class-leader. He played exceedingly well on the 
fife, and during the civil war he often played for the soldiers. His children 
were Josiah, Joel, William. John, Esther and Martha, who married John 
Swain, of Ohio. 

After his marriage John A. Hill located on the farm given him by his 
father and performed the arduous task of clearing away the trees, developing 
the wild land into richly cultivated fields. His home was blessed with the 
presence of the following children : Joseph, ^Martha. Henry D. and Clarinda 
(twins), Jane, Sarah, Lucinda. Lucy, William, Hugh M. and Esther, all of 
whom were born on the old homestead in Delaware county. The mother of 
this family died in 1855, and ^Ir. Hill afterward wedded ]\Iary Goodwin. 
He sold the old homestead farm in Delaware county and purchased a small 
timber farm in Kenton county, Ohio, upon which he spent his remaining 
days, his death occurring at the age of eighty-five. He was a straightfor- 
ward, honorable man and a good citizen and reared an excellent family. 

Hugh M. Hill, the subject of this review, first opened his eyes to the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 683 

light of day on the old family homestead in Delaware county. He was 
reared upon the farm and in his youth became famihar with the arduous 
task of clearing and developing land, his labors in that direction making him 
a skillful woodsman. When a small boy he commenced work in a sugar 
camp, which comprised twenty-seven acres, the manufacture of maple sugar 
and molasses being one of the principal departments of the farm work. His 
labors there, however, prevented him from attending school in the early 
spring time and his educational privileges were therefore very limited. In 
1863, when twenty-one years of age, with his brother William he came to 
Illinois, making the journey by team. He arrived in the month of October, 
after fourteen and a half days spent upon the way. and went to the home 
of his brother Joseph, who was living at Sulphur Springs, in what is now 
Maine township. For a time he engaged in farm work. He was married 
January 21, 1868, in Braceville township, Grundy county, to Miss Rosenah 
Mary Fry, who was born September 9, 1845, in Dorsetshire, England, her 
parents being Henry and Betsy (Stevens) Fry. Her father was born in 
Dorsetshire, England, August 4. 1820, and was a son of John and Emily 
Fry, also natives of that land, in which they spent their entire lives. John 
Fry followed farming and carpentering in Dorsetshire, and by means of the 
dual occupation supported his family, which numbered five children, name- 
ly : John, Thomas, Emily, William and Henry. The last named was reared 
upon the home farm, learned the baker's trade, and in his native county mar- 
ried Betsy Stevens, who was born in England and was a daughter of Samuel 
and Mary Stevens. Her father was a well-to-do farmer, and in his last 
years lived retired, his income being sufficient to supply him with all the 
necessaries and many of the luxuries of life. The property of the Stevens 
family was quite extensive, but none of it came into possession of the rep- 
resentatives of the name in America. The children of Samuel Stevens were 
Mary Ann, Eliza, Amelia, Betsy, ^Martha, Isabel, Samuel and Stephen. 
The last named died in England. Henry Fry, the father of IMrs. Hill, car- 
ried on farming in Dorsetshire for some time after his marriage, and five 
children were born of the union in that country, namely: Mary R.; Harriet 
E., who died at the age of two years; Isabel; Emily and Julia E. In 1856 
Mr. Fry came to America, taking passage in Liverpool on the sailing vessel 
Calhoon, which dropped anchor in the harbor of New York in the latter part 
of June, after a voyage of four weeks, which was considered a remarkably 
quick passage at that time. He immediately continued his journey to 
Kendall county, where he arrived July 3, 1856, making his way to the home 
of Mrs. jSIary A. Mabey, a sister of Mrs. Fry, who had located in Kendall 
county four years previous. There a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fry, Isabel 
Emily, died three days later. Her death resulted from scarlet fever con- 



684 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

tracted on the voyage. Mr. Fry purchased eighty acres of land across the 
road from the farm, upon which E. H. Robinson now resides. A small 
house had been built and a tract was fenced, but otherwise no improvements 
had been made, and with characteristic energy Mr. Fry began its further 
development. Subsequently he purchased eighty acres of the farm upon 
which Mr. Hill now resides, and an eighty-acre tract adjoining his home 
property, so that his landed possessions aggregated two hundred and forty 
acres. In his undertaking he prospered, becoming one of the successful 
farmers and extensive cattle dealers of the community, but on account of 
lameness his labors were hampered. He had no son to aid him. so that his 
daughters worked on the farm, and the united efforts of the family resulted 
in securing a very comfortable home. Mr. Fry was a member of the 
Methodist church and in politics was a Republican. He died February 22, 

1874. at the age of fifty-three years, leaving to his family a good estate and 
an untarnished name. After his marriage Mr. Hill located on the farm 
where he now resides, renting the property of yir. Fry for five years. After 
his father-in-law's death he lived upon his farm for a year and then returned 
to his present home. By hard work and unflagging enterprise he has great- 
ly improved the property, has drained it with tiling and has extended the 
boundaries of the farm from time to time until he is now the owner of two 
hundred acres of rich and arable land. The place is improved with com- 
fortable and substantial buildings, and all the accessories of a model farm 
are there found. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Hill has been blessed with the following 
children: Julia Ellen, born November 17. 1868; Giles A., born December 
6, 1870; Mary J., born December 20, 1872; Alfred, who was born March 29, 

1875. and died September 7, 1894; Amelia, born June 12, 1878; Edwin, 
born March 17, 1881: and Henry and Emily, twins, born April 28, 1884. 
Mrs. Hill is a member of the Methodist church and Mr. Hill contributes 
of his means to its support. In politics he is a Republican, unswerving in 
his advocacy of the principles of the party. His life has been one of indus- 
try and honesty, and he certainly deserves great credit for the success which 
he has achieved and which has resulted from his capable management and 
unfailing industry. He is widely known among the residents of Maine 
township and enjoys the respect of his fellow citizens. 



OWEN H. FULLER. 



During the colonial epoch in the American history there came to the 
shores of New England a sturdy band of Puritans, who crossed the Atlantic 
in the Mayflower, and among the number were two brothers, Samuel and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 685 

Edward Fuller, who were signers of the famous compact drawn by the 
colonists who had braved the dangers of the ocean voyage in order to enjoy 
religious liberties in the New World. It is from these brothers that many 
representatives of the name of Fuller are descended. Matthew Fuller, the 
grandfather of our subject, was born in Massachusetts, in 1768, and became 
a cooper by trade. After his marriage he located in Salisbury, Connecti- 
cut, and about 1808 removed to New York, locating in Tully, Onondaga 
county, where he carried on farming. He secured there a tract of timber 
land and cleared the same, transforming it into richly cultivated fields, 
which yielded him good harvests in return for his labor. Upon that farm 
he spent his remaining days, dying in i860, at the venerable age of ninety- 
two years. He served as a soldier in the war of 1S12, and with a militia 
company was on his way to Plattsburg when news was received that the 
battle there had been fought and won. He was a man of iron constitution, 
of strong principles and of strict morality, commanding the respect of all 
who knew him. His children were Matthew. Augustus, Albert, Hiram, 
Austin, Philena, Edward, Harlow, Permelia and Ruth. 

Hiram Fuller, the father of our subject, was born December 31, 1803. 
at Salisbury, Connecticut, and was afforded the usual common-school privi- 
leges of the day. In Onondaga county. New York, about 1825, he mar- 
ried Mary Ann Owen, who was born in Saratoga county, that state, on 
the 9th of January, 1806, a daughter of Elijah and Mehitable (Nash) Owen. 
Her father was a son of Jonathan Owen, one of the officers in the American 
army during the war of the Revolution. The family was founded in :Massa- 
chusetts in colonial days, and representatives of the name became pioneer 
settlers of Saratoga county. New York. Elijah Owen, the maternal grand- 
father of our subject, died in middle life. His children were Permelia, 
Amanda, Sophia, Lydia, Mary Ann, Augustus and Alexander K. Elijah 
Owen was a substantial farmer and respected citizen, who constructed a part 
of the Erie Canal under contract. At an early period in the development of 
Onondaga county. New York, he removed to that locality. 

After his marriage Hiram Fuller located in Onondaga county, and there 
resided upon a farm for about eleven years, coming to Illinois in 1839. On 
the loth of May of that year he and his family left their home in the Empire 
state, proceeding by team to Syracuse, thence by canal to BufYalo, by the 
Great Lakes to Chicago, and by team to Mazon, where they arrived on the 
31st of May, 1839. Here i\Ir. Fuller secured a tract of wild land and im- 
proved a farm, upon which he remained until 1855, when he took up his 
residence in the village of old Mazon, where he engaged in general mer- 
chandising. For many years he and his wife were members of the Methodist 
church, and their lives were in harmony with their professions. His political 



686 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

support was given the Democracy, and he held several local offices, includ- 
ing that of township clerk. He was also justice of the peace for many years, 
and discharged his duties with marked promptness and fidelity. His chil- 
dren were: Elizabeth, born November 2t,, 1828; Owen H., born January 
19. 1834; Velasco L., born May 10, 1836; and Orville C, born April 10, 1850. 
Mr. Fuller died in Mazon, April 17, 1872, when about sixty-eight years of 
age, and in his death the community lost one of its valued citizens. 

Owen H. Fuller, whose name introduces this record, was born in 
Onondaga county. New York, January 19, 1834. and pursued his education 
in Illinois, attending the subscription schools. His advantages in that 
direction, however, were rather limited, but experience, obser\'ation and 
reading made him a well-informed man. He was only five years of age 
at the time of the removal of the family to the west, and he can well remem- 
ber the journey, and also has a vivid recollection of his labors on the home 
farm. Subsequently he learned the carriage-maker's trade and, after his 
marriage, he located on a farm of sixty acres in Mazon township. 

He was only twenty years of age wiien, on the 31st of July, 1853, 
he wedded Miss \\'eltha Isham, who was born in St. George, Vermont, Oc- 
tober 23, 1836, a daughter of Gursham and Eliza Ann (Sanford) Isham. 
Her grandfather, Jehiel Isham, was born in X'ermont. was a farmer by occu- 
pation, and served his country in the war of 1812. He had his belt shot off 
at the battle of Plattsburg. After his marriage he located upon a farm near 
Williston. and afterward made his home at St. George, ten miles from Bur- 
lington, Vermont. He was a substantial agriculturist of the Green Moun- 
tain state, industrious, enterprising and progressive. He lived to be about 
ninety years of age and was accounted one of the most respected citizens 
of his community. His children were all born in Williston, \'ermont. and 
were named as follows: Henry, Ebbins, Silas, Ezra, Amasa, Elias, William. 
Gursham, Cassius, Sophia. Sallie, Docia and Eunice. 

Gursham Isham. the father of Mrs. Fuller, was born in Williston, \'er- 
mont, on the 31st of March. 1801. received the usual privileges of pioneer 
days, and was reared upon the home farm. He also learned the mason's 
trade. On the 9th of September, 1822. in Charlotte, Vermont, he married 
Miss Eliza Sanford. who was born in that city, February 22, 1802, her par- 
ents being Zachariah and Lydia Sanford. Her father was a tanner and 
shoemaker by trade, and lived upon a farm. He was also a representative 
of one of the old Vermont families. Removing to the Empire state, he took 
up his abode in St. Lawrence county about 1821. becoming one of the pio- 
neer settlers. There he cleared and developed a good farm near the town 
of Canton and became a substantial agriculturist of the community. In 1843 
he removed to McHenry county, Illinois, making his home with his two 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 687 

sons, Stanley and Xelson Sanford. There he passed his remaining days, 
his death occurring when he was about eighty-seven years of age. His wife 
died when about ninety years of age. They were both members of the 
Methodist church and people of the highest respectability. Their children 
were Lorana, Aurilla, Betsey, Sally, Samantha. Hepsey, Eliza, }»Iinerva, 
Polly, Clark, Israel, Stanley, Nelson, one who died in childhood and one 
whose name is not remembered. Nearly all reached the age of maturity, 
were married and reared families of their own. 

Gursham Isham, the father of Airs. Fuller, took up his abode in Williston, 
\'ermont, living upon his father's farm for a time. He afterward made his 
home in St. George, \'ermont, until his removal to St. Lawrence county. 
New York, in 1823. He cast in his lot with the early settlers of that local- 
ity, but in 1826 returned to St. George. Some years later, however, about 
1838, he again went to St. Lawrence county, where he purchased a tract 
of land covered with heavy timber, only a small portion having been cleared. 
This farm was located in Canton township, and thereon he made his home 
until 1844, when he disposed of his business interests in the east and removed 
to Illinois in the fall of that year, making the journey with teams and 
wagons. His son-in-law, Richard Fuller, who had married Cornelia Isham, 
was with them. The party were six weeks in making the journey to Mc- 
Henry county. They camped by the wayside, the women sleeping in the 
wagons, and they cooked their food over a camp fire in the usual pioneer 
style of the times. Mr. Isham rented land in McHenry county, Illinois, for 
one year, and in 1846 came to Mazon township, Grundy county, settling a 
mile east of the present site of the village of Mazon. There he pre-empted 
one hundred and sixty acres of land, for which he paid a dollar and a quarter 
per acre. It was a tract of wild prairie, but he made there a good pioneer 
home and for many years maintained his residence on that farm. He then 
sold the property and bought one hundred and twenty acres of school land 
near the center of Mazon township. Some years later he retired from busi- 
ness life and lived in Mazon village until his death, which occurred October 
8, 1877, when he was seventy-six years of age. His wife died March 8, 
1896, at the advanced age of ninety-four. She was a member of the Metho- 
dist church and a woman of many virtues. Air. Isham was in politics an 
old-line Whig until the dissolution of that party, when he joined the Re- 
publican party. The children of this worthy couple were : Cornelia, born 
in Chittenden county, Vermont, September i. 1823: Albert, born in St. 
Lawrence county. New York, in April, 1825; Edward, born in Chittendert 
county, Vermont. January 15, 1828; Michael, born in Chittenden county, 
June 7, 1829; Zachariah, born in that county, February 11, 1831; Lydia, 
born in the same county. May 15, 1834; Weltha, born in Chittenden county,. 



■688 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

October 23, 1836; Jehiel, born in Chittenden county, October 18, 1838; 
Clarinda. born in St. Lawrence county. New York. October 5, 1842. All 
of the cliiildren were married with the exception of Sallie A. and Eliza, both 
of whom died in early life. 

In order to give the history of the Sanford family to which Mrs. Isham 
belonged we publish the following article which occurred in the St. Law- 
rence, New York, Plaindealer: 

"Russell, New York, October. 1875. 
"Editor Plaindealer: — 

"I noted in your paper of September loth an account of the death of 
Mrs. Sallie Bachellor, of Pierpont, a sister of my mother. Perhaps a few 
lines in regard to who she was may be interesting to some of your readers. 
She was the widow of Samuel Bachellor, who died in Canton, New York, 
several years ago, and the daughter of Zachariah and Lydia Sanford, who 
came from Charlotte, Vermont, in 182 1, with their family, settling in Can- 
ton, New York, where they remained until 1843, when they removed to 
Seneca, McHenry county, Illinois, with three of their sons, Israel, Nelson 
and Stanley. They traveled the whole distance by land, the father and 
mother driving in an open buggy and the sons and their families traveling 
in covered wagons. They stopped one week in Ohio to rest. They were 
then eighty years of age. They arrived at their destination in their usual 
good health. Her father planted a peach orchard soon after their arrival 
and lived to eat peaches that grew on his trees. They were the parents of 
fifteen children, one of whom died, but fourteen lived to rear families of 
their own. Their parents were very pious people and were members of the 
Methodist church. By their good example and precepts they had the 
pleasure of seeing thirteen of their children members of the church, twelve 
joining the church of their parents" choice, the other, Mrs. Sallie Bachellor, 
lieing a close-communion Baptist. They were very industrious and tem- 
perate, and the husband supported his family by his trade, being a tanner, 
currier and shoemaker. The wife, whose hands were never idle, sat at the 
old family loom weaving her ten yards of cloth in one day or spinning wool 
and tow at the great wlieel, or sat singing at the little wheel spinning linen 
from the flax on the distaf¥ with both hands, as her wheel filled two spools 
at the same time, thus doing two days' work in one. All of the children 
were taught to work wMiile young, the sons helping their father, while the 
daughters were taught to spin, weave, sew, knit and do general housework, 
each having their allotted task. When they had finished their day's work 
all gathered around their evening meal, after which they all joined in the 
singing (the parents being good singers, the children were taught to sing). 
After the singing followed the evening prayer, led by the father, before 
retiring for the night. There was formed in that family circle a tie which 
has never been broken, except by death. There were at that time one 
hundred and seventy-five of their descendants, thirteen of their children and 
•one hundred and fifty-seven of their grand and great-grandchildren. Their 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 689 

oldest son lived to be eighty years old, and the second seventy-nine. One 
daughter died, having been the mother of six children. On the ist of 
February, 1874, there were still living eleven of the children. Mrs. Hepsi- 
bah BarlDar died in February, 1874, in Massachusetts, at the age of eighty- 
five years. Mrs. Sallie Bachellor died September 5, 1874, aged eighty-three 
years and ten months. There are nine children still living (1875), the oldest 
is eighty-eight and the youngest sixty-six. The united age of those still 
living is six hundred and eighty-one years. Their father and mother were 
aged respectively eighty-seven and ninety years when they died. The 
record is correct and true, as I have the old family record lying before me 
while I write, and my mother is sitting beside me as prompter. She is 
seventy-one years old and enjoys the best of health and her mental faculties 
are unimpaired. She is the youngest of seven daughters in a row, six of 
whom are still living, three in St. Lawrence county, New York, — Mrs. 
Aurilla Olin, of Canton; Mrs. Samantha Lincoln, of Sabin Corners; and 
Mrs. Minerva Crary, of Pierpont. All attended Mrs. Sallie Bachellor's 
funeral in Pierpont, September 6th. Mrs. Marcia A. Royce." 



To return to the family of Gursham Isham, father of Mrs. Fuller, we 
note that he was a farmer of St. George, Vermont, but removed from the 
Green Mountain state to St. Lawrence county. New York, whence he came 
to Illinois in 1844, settling in McHenry county. T\Vo years later, in 1846, 
he came to Mazon township, Grundy county, where he spent his remaining 
days. A tract of wild land he transformed into a rich farm and became one 
of the successful agriculturists of the community. During his boyhood he 
witnessed from an adjoining hill the battle of Plattsburg, one of the most 
important engagements of the war of 1812. His political support was given 
the Whig party, and on its dissolution he joined the ranks of the Republican 
party. 

The land upon which Mr. Fuller located at the time of his marriage 
was a tract of wild prairie, on which not a furrow had been turned or an 
improvement made, but he at once began its development and soon trans- 
formed a portion of it into rich fields. . On selling that property he engaged 
in the manufacture of wagons in old Mazon, carrying on the business for 
fifteen years. In 1875 he began dealing in coal and lumber, and in 1878 
he enlarged the field of his operations by the purchase and sale of grain. In 
this enterprise he was associated with A. O. Murry from December, 1875, 
until 1883. The firm did an extensive business, its members being the first 
to engage in operations along those lines in Mazon. In the spring of 1876 
Mr. Murry built the present elevator and Mr. Fuller purchased the property 
in 1883. He became one of the best known men in his line of business in 
Grundy county, and successfully carried on operations on an extensive scale 
until 1896, when he sold out to his son, Olney B., who still conducts the 



690 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

business. Air. Fuller has since lived retired, enjoying the rest which lie has 
truly earned and richly deserves. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Fuller have been born the following children : Olney 
B., born December 18, i860, was married October 25, 1883, to Josie Wright, 
whose birth occurred in Ancona, Illinois, December 11. 1861. Their chil- 
dren are Earl D., born April i, 1885: Ray E., born May 30, 1887; and Carrie 
Feme, born January 23, 1893. -'^'ta A., born November i, 1863. is the 
wife of O. S. Mner, a farmer of blazon township, and their children are 
Flossie and Fred. R. Dale, born December 10, 1865, married Lulu Kelt- 
ner, by whom he has three children, Ethal, Hazel and Eulalia. He is now 
engaged in the grain business. Olin M., born December 30, 1867, died in 
August, 1887, at the age of twenty years. Erlan G., bom December 25, 
1875, 's a graduate of the medical department of the Northwestern Uni- 
versity at Chicago, Illinois, and is now a practicing physician of Chicago. 

In his political afifiliations Mr. Fuller is a stanch Democrat, and his 
fellow townsmen, recognizing his worth and ability, elected him justice of the 
peace, in which position he served for three years. He has also been notary 
public and village president five terms. He has prospered in his business 
affairs, his industry, sagacity and capable management winning him success. 
He sustains a high reputation for reliability and is known as an enterprising 
and loyal citizen, who gives his support to every measure which he believes 
will prove of public good. Mrs. Fuller is a member of the Alethodist 
church, and a pioneer mother of many virtues. 



WILLIAM D. BRIDEL. 

The specific history of the west was made by the pioneers; it was em- 
blematically emblazoned on the forest trees by the strength of sturdy arms 
and gleaming ax, and written on the surface of the earth by the primitix'e 
plow. These were strong men and true that came to found the empire of 
the west — these hardy settlers who builded their rude domiciles, grappled 
Avith the giants of the forest, and from the sylvan wilds evolved the fertile and 
productive fields which have these many years been furrowed by the plow- 
share and traversed by rejoicing harvest hands. The red man in his motley 
garb stalked through the dim, woody avenues, and the wild beasts disputed 
his dominion. The trackless prairie was made to yield its tribute under the 
effective endeavors of the pioneer, and slowly but surely were laid the stead- 
fast foundations upon which has been builded the magnificent superstructure 
of an opulent and enlightened commonwealth. To establish a home under 
such surroundings, and to cope with the many privations and hardships 




^g^ f ^yu.M^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 691 

Avhich were the inevitable concomitants, demanded invincible courage and 
fortitude, strong hearts and willing hands. All these were characteristics of 
the pioneers, whose names and deeds should be held in perpetual reverence 
by those who enjoy the fruits of their toil. 

]\Ir. Bridel is numbered among the early settlers of Grundy county who 
took up their abode in Maine township at an early day. He was born in 
Southchard, Somersetshire, England, June 5. 1826, and is a son of Robert 
and Mary (Diment) Bridel. His paternal grandfather, Richard Bridel, was 
a cooper by trade and owned a small property in England, consisting of a 
home, his shop and about five acres of orchard and meadow land. His in- 
dustry brought to him a comfortable competence and he lived to a ripe old 
age, his death occurring when he had passed the ninetieth milestone on life's 
journey. By his first marriage he had two sons, John and Richard, and by 
his second union he had a son and daughter, Robert and Rachel. 

Robert Bridel, the father of our subject, was born in Somersetshire, 
about 1805, and received a common-school education. Lender his father's 
direction he learned the cooper's trade in early life and followed that busi- 
ness in his native land. In the county of his birth he married Mary Diment, 
wdio was born in Somersetshire, and by their marriage they became the 
parents of the following named: William D.; Richard; Mary, who died in 
England when about six years of age; Isabel; Mary, the second of that name; 
Rachel; Robert; and a daughter, Alice, who died, aged about nine years, 
\vhen on the journey to Kendall county, Illinois, having been bitten by a 
rattlesnake. 

In 1841 Mr. Bridel determined to seek a home in the New World and 
secured passage on the sailing vessel Europe, which weighed anchor in the 
harbor at Liverpool, and after a voyage of six weeks and three days reached 
New York city, and Mr. Bridel made his first location in Plymouth, Luzerne 
county, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in farming. About five years later 
he came to Illinois, by canal and steamboat, locating in Kendall county, Oc- 
tober 14, 1846. He secured one hundred and one acres of government land, 
which he transformed into a good farm. Later he came to Grundy county, 
but did not sell his farm in Kendall county. His wife died in 1858, in what 
was then Braceville township but is now Maine township, and her death was 
widely mourned, for she was a woman of many virtues, having the respect 
and friendship of all who knew her. Mr. Bridel afterward returned to Ken- 
dall county, where he was again married, to Alice Sutliff, a widow, but by 
the second union he had no children. His death occurred in that county, 
when he was aljout eighty-two years of age. 

William D. Bridel obtained a common-school education in England, 
and when about fifteen years of age accompanied his parents on their journey 



692 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

across tlie briny deep. He remained with his fatlier until he had attained 
his majority, when he entered eighty acres of government land in Kendall 
county, Illinois, ten miles south of Oswego, and began farming on his own 
account. In 1854, however, he came to Grundy county and purchased 
three hundred and twenty-one and a half acres of land, at five dollars per 
acre. It is well watered by Mazon creek and is a rich and arable tract, which 
returns to the owner a good tribute for the care and cultivation he bestows 
upon it. He erected a comfortable and commodious residence, made other 
needed improvements and engaged in raising horses, cattle, hogs and grain. 
His thorough understanding of his business, his capable management and 
close application enabled him to win prosperity. During the early years of 
his business career his sister Rachel acted as his housekeeper, but when 
thirty-six years of age, in April. 1862. he was married, in Maine township, 
Grundy county, to Caroline R. Towns, who was born in Kendall county, 
Illinois, a daughter of Aaron and IMary (Green) Towns. Her father was 
an early settler in Kendall county, and also took up his abode in Grundy 
county at an early period of its development. He was a native of New 
York state and was of New England ancestry. His children were Joshua, 
Edward, William, Sarah, Caroline and Clarinda. ^Ir. Towns died in this 
township at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Bridel, with whom he had 
made his home for fifteen years. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Bridel have been born 
the following children: \\'illiam H.. born in 1863: Mary R.. 1865: George 
W., 1867; Robert, April 21, 1869: Lillie E., August 11, 1876; and a daugh- 
ter, Belle, who died when about seven months of age. 

Our subject has successfully engaged in farming operations and is to- 
day the owner of a valuable and productive farm, comprising three hundred 
and twenty-one and a half acres of the rich land of central Illinois. In 
politics he is a Democrat, and he has held the oftice of school director, but 
has never sought or desired political preferment, wishing rather to give his 
entire time and attention to his business interests, in which he has met with 
creditable success. 



GEORGE W. BOOTH. 

George W. Booth, now living a retired life in Gardner, was for many 
years actively connected with the business interests of Grundy county, 
making a specialty of the breeding of fine stock. He was also connected 
with the banking business in Onaga, Kansas, for a time. Hi^ birth occurred 
on a farm on the Western Reserve in Trumbull county, Ohio. He is descended 
from one of the old colonial families of Puritan stock, his ancestors being 
among the first settlers around Massachusetts Bay, coming to this country 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 693 

■between 1630 and 1635. The grandfather of our subject was a farmer of 
Litchfield county, Connecticut, and was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. 
He participated in the battle of Bunker Hill. The story goes that he was 
plowing in the field with his little nine-year-old son, Moses, when news 
was brought to him of the advance of the British. He was at that time 
driving a yoke of oxen across the field, but he immediately removed the 
oxen from the plow, and, leaving them standing in the furrow, started with his 
little son to the scene of activity, expecting to place the boy in some secure 
spot. This he did not do, however, and Moses Booth accompanied his father 
to the field where the patriot army succeeded in checking the advance of 
the British, and although they met defeat it was a defeat which amounted 
to a victory. This story of the manner in which he took part in the battle 
of Bunker Hill was often told by Moses Booth to his children in his old 
age. One of his brothers was killed at the battle of Bunker Hill. 

Moses Booth was a farmer and was married in Litchfield, Connecticut, 
to Sarah Judson, by whom his children were Truman, Moses, Samuel, 
and several others whose names are now forgotten. In 1825 Mr., Booth re- 
moved to the Western Reserve in Ohio, locating on land in Trumbull county, 
-where he cleared a fine farm, upon which he spent his remaining days. 
His first wife died in Ohio and he afterward wedded Myra Hubbell, who 
was born in New Haven, Connecticut, probably at Bridgeport. Her father, 
Elijah Hubbell, was a soldier of the war of 18 12, and was the father of 
Charles P. Hubbell, a well known carriage manufacturer and business man of 
Bridgeport. Among his other children were Levi; Silas Liberty, who was 
killed in the Seminole Indian war in Florida, when Colonel Dade and his com- 
mand were massacred; Harriet; and a daughter, Lucy, who became the 
wife of ISIr. Dorman. Elijah Hubbell, the father, followed the blacksmith's 
trade in Connecticut and died in that state at an advanced age. His wife 
lived to the venerable age of ninety years. 

After his marriage, Moses Booth made his home in Trumbull county, 
Ohio, and he and his wife were members of the Presbyterian church there 
and were most highly respected citizens. He lived to be eighty-nine years 
of age and passed away on the old homestead, in February, 1856. In 
politics he was an old-line Whig and afterward became a supporter of the 
Free-Soil party. Straightforward in all his business dealings and of up- 
right character, he was greatly respected as a man and a citizen. His wife 
long survived him and passed away in July. 1882. She was a lady of many 
virtues and enjoyed the warm regard of all who knew her. The children 
of Moses and Myra (Hubbell) Booth, were George W.; Terressa, the wife of 
Henry Waters; and Emma, the wife of Robert Brisco. 

George W. Booth, whose name introduces this review, was born on 



694 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

the 13th of January, 1837, in Trumbull county, Ohio. He acquired a com- 
mon-school education and has since added greatly to his fund of knowledge 
by practical experience in the business world and through reading and 
observation. He has also been a great reader of newspapers and of standard 
literature. \\"hen twenty years of age he left home and began farming on 
his own account. He soon became a cattle drover on the Western Reserve, 
in Ohio, being in the employ of F. N. Andrews, one of the most extensive 
cattle dealers in this section of the state. 

As a companion and helpmeet on life's journey, ]\Ir. Booth chose IMiss 
Caroline Rainey, the wedding being celebrated in Howland, Trumbull county, 
Ohio. The lady was born in that county in 1838, and is a daughter of 
William Rainey, whose birth occurred in Ireland. He was of Scotch-Irish 
descent and a farmer by occupation. Unto i\Ir. and Mrs. Booth were born 
two children, but one died in infancy. The other, Mary, married Lyman 
Hawley, and died in 1888, leaving two daughters — Maud and Edith. 

In April. 1863, Mr. Booth removed to LaSalle county, Illinois, where 
he conducted a stock farm owned by Elias Trumbo. He managed that 
farm for about five years, but in the latter part of 1868 removed to Brace- 
ville township, now Maine township. A few years later he bought the farm 
which is now owned and occupied by Lyman Hawley. That place he re- 
claimed from the wilderness, placing it under a high state of cultivation and 
erected a substantial dwelling thereon. He was extensively engaged in 
stock-raising, making a specialty of the breeding of Durham short-horn 
cattle and Poland China hogs. He was very successful in the business and be- 
came well known in Illinois and the surrounding states as an extensive and 
successful stock-raiser, feeder and shipper. For about nine years he was 
associated in business with Lyman Hawley. Improving the farm, he also 
added to it from time to time until he became the owner of two hundred 
and twenty acres of rich land, which he carefully cultivated and improved, 
making it a very valuable property. In 1886 his nephew, O. J. Booth, who 
was engaged in a private banking business, died in Onaga, Kansas, and 
Mr. Booth, of this review, was called upon to settle his estate, which was val- 
ued at sixty thousand dollars. Mr. Booth discharged his duties to the 
utmost satisfaction of all concerned, and, while in the west, he became a 
partner in the Onaga City Bank, in which he served as assistant cashier for 
some years. He still retains his ownership in the bank, although he is not 
now actively connected with its business management. 

Mrs. Booth died December 18, 1891, in Onaga. She was a member of 
the Baptist church and a lady of many virtues, highly esteemed by her 
friends. On the 6th of September, 1893. in Joliet. Illinois, Islr. Booth was 
again married, his second union being with Harriet L. Hunt, of ]\Iontpelier, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 695 

\'ermont, a sister of ]\Irs. Lyman Hawiey. 3.1r. and Mrs. Booth spent the 
first three years of their married hfe in Onaga, Kansas, but are now resi- 
dents of Gardner. In poHtics he is a stalwart Republican, becoming one 
of the earliest supporters of the party, his first ballot being cast for Abraham 
Lincoln. He served as chairman of the board of county supervisors for 
many years and is still one of its members. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Masonic Lodge of Gardner, and his wife is a member of the Episco- 
pal church. His has been an active, useful and honorable career, character- 
ized by loyalty to every manly principle and to those duties which go to 
make up good citizenship. He has steadily ad\anced to his present enviable 
position in social circles, but he started out in life empty-handed. 



HIRAM JONES. 



Hiram Jones, a veteran of the civil war and an intelligent and enter- 
prising farmer of Greenfield township, Grundy county, was born in Somer- 
set county, Maine, at the town of Athens, ilay 4, 1840, his parents being 
Thomas J. and Harriet (Small) Jones. The paternal grandparents were 
Samuel and Eleanor (Gray) Jones. The grandfather was a native of the 
Pine Tree state and served his country as a soldier during the war of 1812. 
By occupation he was a farmer and owned a valuable tract in Brighton, 
Maine. He was three times married, his first union being with Eleanor 
Gray. They had a son, Thomas J., and a daughter who lived to mature 
years. After the death of his first wife Mr. Jones was again married, and 
the children of the second union were Calvin, William and Eleanor. His 
third wife bore the maiden name of Olive Wiggins, and their children were 
Olive, Hannah, Orrin and Charles. The father died in Maine, after passing 
the ninetieth milestone on life's journey. 

Thomas J. Jones, the father of our subject, was born in Somerset county, 
Maine, and became a farmer by occupation. In his native state he wedded 
Harriet Small, whose birth occurred in the Pine Tree state, and who was 
a daughter of Nathan and Susan (Corson) Small. Her father was a farmer 
by occupation, and, enlisting for service in the war of 1812, was stationed 
at Edgecomb, on the coast of Maine. Later he became a substantial farmer 
and respected citizen. He died on his farm in Somerset county, when more 
than eighty years of age. His children were: Alvin, Cushman, Nathan, 
Harrison, Franklin, Susan, Phoebe. Harriet and Lois. After their marriage 
Mr. and Mrs. Jones began their domestic life upon a farm in Somerset 
county, Maine, and for some years they lived near Athens. Somerset county, 
j\Iaine. and there died aged about fifty-si.x years. His political support was 



696 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

given the Democracy, and lie was a man whose sterHng quahties gained 
him the respect and confidence of his fellow men. His children were : 
Freeman, Henry, Hiram. Frank, Jefferson, Mary, Ann and Paulina. Two 
of the sons, Henry and Hiram, were soldiers in the civil war. The former 
served for three years and was a corporal of Company G, Thirty-sixth Illi- 
nois Infantry. He participated in many battles, but escaped without in- 
juries, and was honorably discharged at the close of his three-years term. 

Hiram Jones, whose name introduces this review, was born May 4, 
1840. He was also trained to habits of industry and economy on the home 
farm, and early became familiar with all the duties and labors of field and 
meadow. After the inauguration of the civil war, when it w-as found that 
the south was not easily quelled, he joined the Union army at Athens, 
Maine, when twenty-three years of age, enlisting on the 20th of July, 1863, 
as a private of Company E, Seventeenth Maine Infantry, under command of 
Captain Sawyer. With that regiment he served until honorably discharged 
at Augusta, Maine, July 10, 1865, but on account of sickness was held until 
the 1 6th of October following. He served with the Army of the Potomac 
and participated in the battles of Locust Grove, Culpeper Court House, 
Bermuda, James River, North Ann River, Cold Harbor, the Wilderness, 
and the several engagements in front of Petersburg. This list includes some 
of the most hotly contested engagements of the war. On account of ill- 
ness he was sent to City Point hospital, where he remained for about four 
weeks, being then sent to a hospital in \\'ashington, where he continued 
for three weeks. For thirty days he remained at home on a furlough, and 
on the expiration of that time he received an extension of thirty days, con- 
tinuing at home until discharged. He was always found at his post of duty 
and took part in all the campaigns, marches, battles and skirmishes of his 
regiment until illness prevented further duty. The hardships of war un- 
dermined his health, and he has never fully recovered. 

Mr. Jones was married in Bingham, Maine, August 20, 1863, just be- 
fore his enlistment. Miss Hannah Collins becoming his wife. She was born 
in Athens, Maine, October 28, 1839. and is a daughter of David and Abigail 
(Nichols) Collins. Her father belonged to an old New England family 
and was a son of Thomas and Nancy (Jewell) Collins, the former a native 
of New Hampshire. He served his couiUry as a soldier in the war of 1812. 
In the old Granite state he wedded Miss Jewell and they became the parents 
of six children, namely: Calvin, Johnson, Franklin. Phoebe. Lydia, and 
David. Thomas Collins was a farnjer of Somerset county, Maine, where 
his father had located when the country was new and developed a farm in 
the midst of the forest. He died in the Pine Tree state when about sixty- 
three vears of age. David Collins, the father of ^Nlrs. Jones, was born in 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 697 

Somerset county, about 1812, and became a farmer and blacksmith. He 
married Abigail Nichols, whose birth occurred in Monmouth. Maine, in 
1807. They then located on a farm in Athens, where they spent the re- 
mainder of their days. Their children were : Sarah, Hannah, Almatia, 
Phoebe and Darius. The father was a member of the Advent church and the 
mother of the Methodist church. 

After his marriage Mr. Jones enlisted in the army, his wife remaining 
in Athens until his return. In December, 1867, they came to Illinois and 
rented land in the northern part of Highland township. Grundy county, for 
seven years, after which Mr. Jones purchased a tract of eighty acres in 
Greenfield township, in 1875. This was the nucleus of his present valuable 
property. As the result of his industry, economy and careful management 
he has year by year added to his possessions, and has now one of the valu- 
able farms of the community. He owns two hundred acres of rich and 
arable land, upon which he has erected large and commodious farm build- 
ings, his residence being a two-story frame structure. The home of our 
subject and his wife has been blessed with six children: Leland E., a 
farmer of Grundy county, married Rose E. Bennett, and they have one 
child, Harley; Bertram P., an insurance agent of Kankakee, Illinois, mar- 
ried Minnie Petrow and they have two children, Eveline and ^^'arner: Alillie 
B. is the wife of William Lees, a farmer of Greenfield township, by whom 
she has one child. Alta: and Byron C., Luella ]\I. and Annie E. are still at 
home. 

In politics Mr. Jones is a stanch Republican, giving an invincible sup- 
port to the principles of the party. The cause of education has always found 
in him a warm friend, and during fourteen years service as school director he 
"has largely promoted the welfare and efifectiveness of the schools through 
the employment of good teachers and has encouraged all progressive 
methods. He is a public-spirited man who gives a generous support to all 
measures which he believes will prove of public benefit. During the civil 
war he was a loyal and faithful soldier, has reared an excellent family and 
lias worked his way upward to a place among the prosperous farmers of his 
neighborhood. 



EDWARD C. CRAGG. 



Edward C. Cragg, a resident farmer of \\'auponsee township, Grundy 
county, was born in Indiana, August 17, 1864, and is a son of Martin and 
Helen N. (Cavelly) Cragg, both of whom were natives of Grundy county. 

The subject of this review was educated in the country schools and in 
the high school at Gardner, this county, where he pursued his studies for 



698 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

two years. His training at farm labor was not meager, for as soon as old 
enough to handle the plow he began to assist his father in the cultivation of 
the fields. He remained upon the old homestead until 1894, managing 
the property, on which he raised garden vegetables and the cereals best 
adapted to this climate. 

In that year Mr. Cragg was united in marriage to Miss Laura Shier, 
a daughter of Nicholas and Mary (Dunlavey) Shier, of Grundy county. 
The following year they removed to the farm in Mazon township, where they 
remained until 1S97. Mr. Cragg then purchased his present farm and has 
since devoted his energies to its cultivation. During the summer season 
he acted as a thresher and corn-sheller, and in this way added materially to 
his income. He is practical and progressive in his methods of farming, and 
these qualities have brought to him quite a gratifying success. The home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Cragg has been blessed with one child, Helen ]\Iay, who 
was born in May, 1898. In politics ]Mr. Cragg is a Republican, having sup- 
ported that party ever since attaining his majority. He advocates all meas- 
ures for the public good, but has never sought political ofifice, preferring to 
devote his time and energies to agricultural pursuits that he may thus provide 
a good living and comfortable home for himself and family. 



OLNEY B. FULLER. 



One of the busy, energetic and enterprising men of Mazon is Olney 
B. Fuller, a very successful grain merchant, whose well-directed efforts are 
bringing to him creditable prosperity in the world of trade. He was born 
in this town, on the i8th of December, i860, and is a son of Owen and 
Weltha (Isham) Fuller, whose history is given on another page of this work. 
He was reared in the usual manner of farmer lads, obtaining his education 
in the common schools of the neighborhood and in the normal school at 
Morris, where he pursued a commercial course for one term, his instructor 
being the now eminent Judge Orrin Carter, of Chicago. His business train- 
ing was received under the direction of his father, a grain and lumber mer- 
chant, and when young he was noted for his industry and close application 
to his business duties. Their trade relation was maintained for a number 
of years, but in 1897 Mr. Fuller, of this review, purchased his father's inter- 
est and has since conducted the business alone, meeting with very creditable 
and enviable success. He is a well-known grain dealer and enjoys a splendid 
record for integrity and straightforward dealing. The volume of his busi- 
ness is constantly increasing and he now handles grain on an extensive scale, 
making large shipments. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 699^ 

On the 25th of October, 1883, Mr. Fuller was united in marriage to 
Miss Josie Wright, whose birth occurred in Ancona, Illinois, on the nth of 
December, 1861, her father being Delos Wright, whose sketch appears else- 
where in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Fuller now have three interesting chil- 
dren: Earl D., who was born April i, 1885; Ray E., who was born May 
30, 1887; and Carrie Feme, who was born January 23, 1893. 

In his political views Mr. Fuller is independent, supporting the men 
whom he thinks best qualified for ofifice, regardless of party affiliations. 
Fraternally he is a Mason, belonging to the blue lodge at Mazon and the 
chapter at Morris. He is also a member of the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica and holds membership with the Royal Neighbors. A friend of temper- 
ance and morality, he favors all public enterprises and movements that are 
calculated to prove of general good. He is especially interested in the cause 
of education and has served as a member of the school board for six con- 
secutive years. During his incumbency the new and substantial school 
building was erected, he giving an earnest support to the work. He is still 
serving on the board and is also a member of the board of village trustees. 
He does a large share of the grain business in this section of Grundy county, 
owning one of the elevators in, Mazon. He stands deservedly high as a man 
and as a citizen. He and his wife enjoy the warm regard of many friends 
in social life. They occupy a very tasteful and beautiful residence, which 
was erected in 1899, in modern style of architecture. It is an ornament tO' 
the town and is noted for its hospitality. Courteous, genial, well informed, 
alert and enterprising, Mr. Fuller stands to-day as one of the leading repre- 
sentative men of Mazon — a man who is a power in his community. 



JOHN C. WFIITMORE. 

John C. Whitmore has long been connected with the development and 
progress of Grundy county. He is numbered among the leading agricul- 
turists and pioneer settlers, and as the years have passed he has taken cog- 
nizance of the needs of the county, giving his support to all measures which 
he believes to be of public benefit. Such a course has made him known as 
one of the representative citizens of his community, and it is therefore witlr 
pleasure that we present the record of his life to our readers. 

The Whitmores are of old Puritan ancestry and were among the early 
settlers of New England. Stephen Whitmore, the grandfather of our sub- 
ject, was a farmer of Middletown, Connecticut. Ev his first marriage his 
children were Stephen and Mabel. For his second wife he married a Miss 
Clark, and to them was born a son, Daniel C. The grandfather was one- 



700 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

of the soldiers of the Revolutionary war and valiantly aided in the struggle 
for independence. He died at ]\Iiddleto\vn, Connecticut. 

Daniel C. Whitmore. the father of our subject, was born at Middletown, 
and received such educational privileges as the common schools of that day 
afforded. At the age of twenty years he became a sailor and followed the 
sea for seven years, his trips being made mostly from Boston to the West 
Indies. He was married in Middletown, Connecticut, to Sarah Roberts, 
a native of the Charter Oak state, and a daughter of Comfort Roberts. 
Their children were : Lucy A., who was born in Middletown, April 6, 1830; 
John C, born also in Middletown; Stephen, born in Summit county, Ohio; 
and Albert and Alary E., who were natives of Charleston, Ohio. It was the 
year 1833 that witnessed the arrival of Daniel C. Whitmore and his family in 
Ohio. The year previous he visited this state in order to secure a location, 
and on the trip rode on the first railroad ever constructed in the United 
States. When he went with his family in 1833, however, the trip was made 
by wagon. He took up his abode in Summit county, Ohio, and resided at 
Silver Lake for one year, living with his father-in-law. Comfort Roberts, 
who had settled there some time before. His home was near Cuyahoga 
Falls, in Summit county, and there he lies buried. He was a well-known 
pioneer and a man of the highest respectability. 

In 1834 Daniel C. Whitmore removed to Charleston, Portage county, 
Ohio, locating on a tract of land of one hundred acres in the midst of the for- 
est. There he cleared a farm and made a good home, but in 1841 removed to 
Middlefield, Geauga county, where he purchased land, again becoming the 
owner of a heavily timbered tract. Cutting down the trees and grubbing 
up the stumps, he at length placed his land under a condition of cultivation 
and made a good home, which continued to be his place of abode until 1851, 
■when he removed to Coshocton county, Ohio. A year later he went to 
Wood county, where he again purchased a farm in the midst of the forest. 
After living there some years he sold that property and cleared another 
farm in the same county. Subsequently he took up his abode in North 
Star township, Gratiot county, Michigan, and again purchased land in the 
Avoods. Clearing and improving a farm, he made his home thereon until his 
death, which occurred at the venerable age of eighty-two years. He was 
a man of very strong constitution. When a sailor he was twice shipwrecked 
and endured many hardships, and after becoming identified with farming 
interests he endured all the trials and ditificulties experienced by pioneer set- 
tlers. He was never ill in his life until over fifty years of age, and after that 
endured but little sickness. His first wife died at Charleston, Ohio, in 
February, 1839. She was a worthy pioneer woman of many virtues and 
had a large circle of friends. In 1840 Mr. Whitmore was again married, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 701 

his second union being with Betsy E. Phillips. Their children were : 
Sarah, Emma, Daniel, Warren, Maria, Charles, Emerson and Helen. Mr. 
Whitmore was a typical pioneer, strong and vigorous, and at all times 
reliable and honest. In politics he was a Republican and in religious faith 
was a Baptist. 

John C. Whitmore, whose name introduces this record, was born in 
Middletown, Connecticut, April 25, 183 1, and was three years old when his 
parents removed to Ohio. At the age of ten he became a resident of 
Geauga county, that state, and in the public schools he acquired a limited 
education, for his attentlance at school was necessarily cut short, as his ser- 
vices were needed in the development of the home farm. He attended school 
only three winters, but he studied at home as opportunity afforded and thus 
gained a practical English education. He was reared to agricultural pur- 
suits, and throughout his entire life has followed that calling. He worked 
with his father until he had attained his majority, after which he was em- 
ployed for four seasons as a farm hand in Summit and Geauga counties, Ohio. 
In 1854, at the age of twenty-four years, he came to Illinois, making the 
journey by railroad to Morris. He purchased eighty acres of land in Mazon 
township, one mile north of the village, paying five dollars per acre for the 
wild prairie. He had carefully saved the money which he had earned in 
Ohio and had four hundred dollars with which to purchase his farm. For 
a time he worked at farm labor in Livingston county and then returned to 
Grundy county, where he was employed for two years, after which he began 
the operation of his own land. 

Mr. Whitmore has been twice married. On the 26th of August, 1859, 
in Mazon township, he wedded Emma Siterly, a widow whose maiden name 
was Underwood. She was born in Pomfret, Connecticut, a daughter of 
Lester and Hulda (Medbury) Underwood. The Underwoods and Med- 
burys were both old colonial families. Lester Underwood was a farmer and 
carpenter, who in pioneer times removed to Illinois. He first located at 
Wheaton and afterward came to Grundy county, where he purchased a 
farm north of Mazon, becoming one of the substantial pioneer agriculturists 
of the community. Pie had but one child, Emma, who first married Silas 
Siterlv, who died soon afterward. Mr. Underwood died in Ottawa, Illinois, 
in the prime of life. 

After their marriage ]Mr. and ]Mrs. Whitmore located in Mazon town- 
ship, two miles north of the village, and there lived for one year. They then 
took up their abode upon a farm a mile and a quarter west of the village- 
and afterward lived in Ottawa, where ]\Ir. Whitmore engaged in teaming for 
eighteen months. He then returned to Mazon township and settled upon the 
farm, which he purchased of his father-in-law, Mr. Underwood. This was a 



;702 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

tract of one hundred and twenty acres, which up to that time had never been 
improved, but by hard work and untiring labor he developed a good prop- 
erty. 

While living there his first wife died, on the 13th of March, 1S77. She 
was born December 19, 1839, ^^'^s a member of the Congregational church 
and a woman of many virtues. Their children were: Hattie E., born in 
Ottawa, November 19, 1862; and Harry C, born on the home farm, Octo- 
ber 7, 1866. He served as a soldier in the Spanish-American war for the 
liberation of Cuba, enlisting as a private in May, 1898, in Indianola, Ne- 
braska, becoming a member of Company L, Third Nebraska Regiment, 
under command of Colonel W. J. Bryan. He was in Camp Cuba Libre, at 
Jacksonville, Florida, and at Savannah, and sailed for Cuba, January i, 
1899, being stationed seventeen miles from Havana. He was promoted to 
the rank of corporal and quartermaster sergeant, and returned in good health 
May 13, 1899. Mr. Whitmore was again married, June 6, 1882, in Brook- 
field, New York, the lady of his choice being Mrs. Mary M. Moore, the 
widow of Frank O. Moore. She was born April 2, 1839, in North Brook- 
field, New York, and was a daughter of Joseph H. and Mary J. (Sweet) 
Blanding. Her father was born in Connecticut, September 22, 1803, ob- 
tained a common-school education and was a farmer. Tradition says that 
the Blandings were originally of French origin. The name was probably 
De Blandin and the ancestors lived in either the province of Alsace or Lor- 
raine. They were Huguenots and had that firm integrity and inflexible 
adherence to their religious faith which marked the Protestants of that day. 
During the wars of Spain, France and the Netherlands in the sixteenth cen- 
tury — between 1545 and 1567 — members of the Blanding family with thous- 
ands of others were exiled and driven from France. They found refuge in 
England and in 1640 we have a record of three brothers of the name, Ralph, 
William and John, whose family homestead was at Upton on the Severn in 
Worcestershire, England. Ralph remained unmarried and devoted his life 
to literature. John was in command of His Majesty's ship. Lion, of London, 
and William came to America, becoming the progenitor of the Blanding 
family in this country. It was about the year 1640 that he and his wife, 
Phebe, crossed the Atlantic from Upton on the Severn and settled in Boston. 
They became members of "The First Church of Boston" and several chil- 
dren were born to them. The father died June 15, 1662, and his widow 
was afterward licensed to keep an inn in the town. He was a member of 
the grand inquest of the colony from 1643 until 1648 and was deputy of 
the Plymouth courts from 1646 to 165 1. His son, William Blanding, Jr., 
-emigrated to Rehoboth, Massachusetts, about 1660 and was married to 
Bethia Wheaton, September 4, 1674. The numerous descendants of William 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 703 

Blanding, of Boston, are now scattered all over the country. William, the 
second, left a sum of money to the town of Rehoboth, about 1675, to carry 
out an expedition against the Narraganset Indians, which fact was men- 
tioned in the town records of May, 1680. William and Bethia (Wheaton) 
Blanding were the parents of seven children. 

One of this number was also given the name of William and repre- 
sented the family of the third generation. He was married in October, 1708, 
to Elizabeth Perry and they had seven children, including William Blanding, 
the fourth of the name. He was married on December 25, 1740, to Sarah 
ChafTee and by their union there were born seven children. One of their 
sons, Christopher, was a colonel in the civil war, but the line of descent 
came down through another William Blanding, who was of the fifth gener- 
ation. He was married July 5, 1772, to Lydia Ormsbee and they were the 
parents of nine children. George Ebenezer, of the sixth generation, was 
married August 29, 1773, to Nancy Wheeler, by whom he had six children, 
and after her death was married March 5, 1788, to Elizabeth Ingalls, by 
whom he had seven children, namely: Nancy, who was born February 6, 
1789; James, born in 1790; Franklin, born in April, 1791; Elizabeth, born 
April 8, 1793; Rachel, born April 30, 1795; William, born April 11, 1797, 
and Lois, born July 13, 1799. The Blandings have always been noted for 
their loyalty and patriotism and the family was represented by various mem- 
bers in the Revolutionary war, including Noah, Lamech and Daniel, grand- 
sons of William Blanding of the third generation. Four sons of William 
Blanding of the fourth generation were also Revolutionary soldiers, namely : 
Ebenezer, William, Shubal and Christopher. There were also others, some 
of whom held official rank and the family was likewise represented in the 
war of 1 81 2 and in the civil war. 

Franklin Blanding, the representative of the family of the seventh gen- 
eration, was the grandfather of our subject. He married Nancy Holbrook 
and was a shoemaker by trade. He removed to the Empire state, and for 
many years was a resident of East Hamilton, New York, where he died at 
the age of sixty-eight years. His children were: Joseph H., Franklin, Wil- 
liam, Adolphus, Oscar, Freeman, Jefferson, Nancy, Eliza, Lucina, Amanda 
and Mary. The father of these children was a Universalist in his religious 
belief. He possessed a strong mind, a natural sense of justice, and was a 
man of strong convictions and independent character. In politics he was a 
Democrat. 

Joseph H. Blanding, the father of Mrs. Whitmore, accompanied his 
father on the removal to New York. He was married in North Brookfield, 
that state, to Mary J. Sweet, a native of that town and a daughter of Samuel 
G. and Sally (Stetson) Sweet. After their marriage ]\Ir. and Mrs. Blanding 



704 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

took up their abode on a farm in North Brookfield. Their children were 
Man,- AI. and Marion J. After the death of his first wife Mr. Blanding was 
married, in North Brookfield, to Lucy M. Beebe, and their children all died 
in early life. In 1849 Joseph H. Blanding removed to Grundy county, 
Illinois, locating in Vienna township, where he engaged in farming for a 
year and a half. He then returned to the Empire state and was engaged in 
the cultivation and sale of hops. He became one of the substantial citizens 
of the community and made for himself a good home. He was a man of 
broad and liberal views and an honored and valued citizen. His political 
support was given the Democracy. He died in 1885, at the age of seventy- 
two years. 

After his second marriage Mr. Whitmore continued upon the old home- 
stead, living there with his second wife for seventeen years. He made sub- 
stantial improvements upon the place, erected commodious and tasteful 
buildings, planted a good orchard and developed and improved one of the 
most desirable country homes in Grundy county. His wife was first married 
to Frank O. Moore, at New Beriin, Otsego county. New York, October 
30, 1862. He was a farmer and owned a tract of land in Eaton, Madison 
county, New York, where he lived until failing health caused his removal 
to North Brookfield, where he died at the age of forty-two years. !Mr. and 
Mrs. Moore were the parents of one daughter, Marian F. Frank O. Moore 
was previously married to Hattie Duncan, and there was one child by this 
marriage — Hattie E. Moore. In February, 1899, our subject and his wife 
left the farm and removed to Mazon, where he purchased a pleasant resi- 
dence. They are now comfortably installed in their new home and are re- 
garded as sterling citizens of the community. Their friends in the county 
are many, and their many excellent characteristics have gained for them the 
confidence and good will of all with whom they have come in contact. Mr. 
Whitmore's retirement from labor gave him a well merited rest, for through 
many long years he was actively connected with the agricultural affairs 
of the county and was an industrious and indefatigable worker. His well 
directed and honorable efforts brought to him a handsome competence that 
now supplies him with all of the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. 



JAMES McCALL. 



The business of mining seems to be a good developer of manhood and 
of men. There have been some shining examples of this, and in all of the 
coal fields of America there have been many, less conspicuous individually, 
but in the aggregate confirming this statement incontrovertibly. In nearly 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 705 

every mining town in Illinois men have come to the front in public affairs. 
They have made their advent in the towns and earned their living and won 
the respect of their fellow citizens as wielders of the pick and shovel. Such 
a progressive miner is the gentleman whose name appears above. 

James McCall, justice of the peace at Braceville, Illinois, and a well 
known citizen of Grundy county, was born in county Antrim, in the north 
of Ireland, July 8, 1838. a son of William and Alice (Lindsay) McCall. His 
parents never came to America, but lived and died in Ireland. His maternal 
grandmother, Agnes Loughen, came to America when she was ninety years 
of age, to spend her last days with her children, all of whom had come across 
the ocean except her daughter, Mrs. McCall. She died at the home of her 
son, Samuel Lindsay, at Cherry Valley, New York, at the great age of one 
hundred and eight years. 

When the subject of this sketch was about fourteen years old, he went 
to Scotland and engaged in coal mining and continued in that occupation 
there until 1865. He married Mary English in 1863. In 1865, thinking 
to better his condition, he determined to come to America. He accord- 
ingly crossed the Atlantic to Nova Scotia, and for two years was steward on 
a vessel called the King of Tyre. His wife had remained in Scotland, and in 
1867 he returned to that country. But in 1879 he came back, and went 
to Morris Run, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in his former 
business of coal mining. He removed thence to Coal Creek, Fountain 
county, Indiana, and from there in 1880 to Braceville, Grundy county, where 
he has since resided, and where for some years he was employed in the coal 
mines. 

Mr. ]\IcCall has served as justice of the peace since 1896 and has dis- 
charged his duties with honor and credit. In his native country he belonged to 
the Conservative or Tory party in politics and since coming to America he 
has affiliated with the Democratic party, with which he has been in full ac- 
cord. In all ways he commands the respect of his fellow citizens. He has 
shown himself industrious, honest, persevering and capable in business af- 
fairs. Every trust confided to him has been met so well and faithfully as to 
increase the esteem in which he has always been held by those who have 
known him and been familiar with his opportunities and the manner in which 
he has improved them. 

Mr. and Mrs. McCall have seven children, two sons and five daughters; 
the eldest daughter, Jane, is the wife of George Gray. Alice is the wife of 
George Powers. Mamie is the wife of Lewis Ackerman. The other daugh- 
ters are Lizzie and Agnes. The sons are named James and David McCall. 
Two other sons, William and Samuel, are dead. David McCall is a brakeman 
on the Northwestern Railroad. In a wreck of a freight train, caused by 



7o6 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

the breaking of a wheel, sixteen cars telescoped, and David was thrown 
from the head car of the train over the top of a telegraph pole, and after this 
high flight and heavy fall, escaped with but few bruises. It was a marvelous 
escape, especially as he weighs one hundred and seventy-five pounds. So- 
cially the McCalls are favorites wherever they are known. Of sterling char- 
acter which inspires confidence, they possess a hearty geniality that is 
winning and exhibit a real sympathy for the troubles of others that has 
won them numerous friends. 



GEORGE H. CRAGG. 



Cause and effect find exemplification in the life of George H. Cragg, 
who owes his success to his own industry, enterprise and capable manage- 
ment. These qualities never fail to bring but one result. It is possible 
not to win prosperity when one of them is lacking, but the possessor of all 
these cannot fail to gain prosperity. It is in this manner that Mr. Cragg 
has become one of the successful agriculturists of Maine township, where 
he owns a valuable farm of one hundred and forty acres. 

John Cragg. his father, was born in Cheshire. England, March 6. 1803. 
and when about twenty years of age crossed the Atlantic to Xew Jersey. In 
the mother country he had served a long apprenticeship in the machinist's 
trade and had become an expert workman, being able to handle all kinds 
of tools. He worked at his trade in Xew Jersey, thus becoming identified 
with the business life of the Xew \\'orld. In Bergen county, that state, he 
married Agnes Litchult, who was born January 7. 1813. in Bergen county, 
and was of Holland lineage, the family having been founded in Xew Jersey 
in early colonial days. For a number of years John Cragg followed his trade 
in that state, and on account of his health finally left the east, removing to 
Illinois in 1832. He took up his residence in Ottawa, but after a few months 
went to St. Louis, where he worked at his trade. Soon afterward he re- 
turned to Ottawa, where he was employed as a machinist until 1834, when 
he came to Grundy county, locating on a farm which is now the home of our 
subject, in Maine township, which was then a part of Braceville township. 
He entered the land from the government, securing three hundred and 
twenty acres, which he purchased at the land sale in Chicago for a dollar and 
a quarter per acre. He had then been settled on his land between one and 
two years. Xot a furrow had been turned nor an improvement made on 
the place, but with characteristic energy. he began to develop the farm, 
cleared away the timber and placed the fields under a very high state of 
cultivation. In the first year of his arrival here he built a log cabin, which is 





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BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 707 

still standing as one of the landmarks of pioneer days. It is the only log 
cabin built in that epoch which still remains to indicate the onwartl march of 
civilization. By thrift and industry Mr. Cragg secured a good home, be- 
coming one of the prosperous farmers of his community. His children were 
Edward, who was born in New Jersey, September 13, 1830; Joseph, who 
was bom May 31, 1833, in St. Louis; Martin, who was born on the pioneer 
homestead, January 21, 1836; Charles, born Alarch 6, 1838; George H., 
born April 5, 1840; Frances L., born May 26, 1843: and John N., born Janu- 
ary II, 1853, on the old homestead. Mr. Cragg was an old-line Whig in 
his political aliiliations and hekl the offices of township clerk, trustee, and 
justice of the peace. The first election of the township was held in his 
cabin and he was intimately associated with pioneer events which form the 
early history of the county. He died on the old family homestead, October 
9, 1853, and his wife passed away in Gardner, Illinois, April 27, 1895. She 
was a member of the Methodist church and a lady greatly esteemed for her 
many excellencies of character. 

George H. Cragg first opened his eyes to the light of day April 5, 1840, 
in the old log cabin built by his father in pioneer days. He received such 
educational advantages as were afforded by the common schools of the 
neighborhood, and he also pursued his studies for a time in Mazon. His 
father, with a just appreciation of the need of an education, provided his 
children with the best opportunities he could af^'ord and was accustomed to 
employ a teacher to instruct the children in his own home. Our subject 
also spent six months as a student at Wilmington, Illinois. He also learned 
habits of industr\% perseverance and economy upon the home farm. His 
father died when George was thirteen years of age, and the following year 
he began earning his own livelihood as a farm hand. He inherited thirty- 
two acres of the old homestead and on that tract began farming on his own 
account. He was wedded February 17, 1861, in Chicago, to Rachel L. 
Bridel, who was born April 30, 1840, in England, a daughter of Robert and 
Mary (Diment) Bridel. To them have been born four children: Alice 
Mary, born October 14, 1862; Robert Nelson, born March 21, 1865, on the 
old homestead; Cora Belle, born in Morris, Illinois, October 20, 1867; and 
Emma Lilly, born October 12, 1870, on the old homestead. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cragg began their domestic life on the farm, where he 
remained until his enlistment in the civil war, February 25, 1865. He was 
enrolled at Joliet as a member of Company F, Fifty-sixth Illinois Infantry, 
and remained at the front until honorably discharged at Nashville, Tennes- 
see, on the i8th of May of the same year, on account of disabilitv. In April 
of that year he had been sent to the hospital, where he remained until his 
return to the north. Once more locating on a farm, he gave to it his time 



-08 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and attention until 1866, when he embarked in the grocery and butchering- 
business in Morris, Illinois, in company with Marshall Cassingham. under 
the firm name of Cassingham & Cragg. They enjoyed a good trade until 
1867, when Mr. Cragg sold his interest and returned to the old homestead, 
where he has since carried on agricultural pursuits. He is to-day the owner 
of one hundred and forty acres of valuable land, on which he has erected a 
substantial residence and good outbuildings. 

Mr. Cragg has given his political support to the Republican party since 
casting his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln in i860. He takes 
an active interest in the welfare and growth of the party and has served as a 
township trustee and as school. director, his labors being practical and eft'ec- 
tive in the promotion of the educational interests of the community. He is 
very systematic and enterprising in his farming operations, and his capable 
management and unflagging industry have brought to him very creditable 
and satisfactory success. Throughout his life he has been true to every 
manly principle, and his record is in many respects well worthy of emulation. 



W. E. HOM.\N. 



W. E. Roman is one of the practical business men and respected citizens 
of Maine township, devoting his energies to agricultural pursuits and to the 
purchase and sale of grain. When we examine into the life history of suc- 
cessful men to determine the secret of their prosperity we find that it is not 
the outcome of genius or talent, but is the direct result of unflagging in- 
dustry, guided by sound judgment and practical common sense. It is these 
qualities which have won ^Ir. Homan a place among the substantial residents 
of his community. 

A native of Ohio, he was born in Union county, on the iith of March, 
1863, his parents being William and Martha (Hill) Homan. He represents 
an old family of Virginia. The great-grandparents were Joseph and Mary 
Homan, and the former carried on wagon-making in Rockingham county, 
Virginia. Emigrating westward, he became one of the pioneers of Mus- 
kingum coimty, Ohio, and in Xashport he followed his trade, supporting his 
family in that way. Subsequently he removed to Delaware county, Ohio, 
where he also conducted a wagon shop for some years. He was a sub- 
stantial citizen whose well directed eftorts gained for him a good property. 
He was much respected for his sterling worth, and died at the age of eighty 
years, esteemed by all who knew him. His children were Jonathan, William, 
Elizabeth and Lvdia. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 709 

Joseph Hotnan, the grandfather of our subject, was born in Rockingham 
county, Virginia, in 1800, and was of German hneage. He learned the black- 
smith's trade in the Old Dominion and was married there to Martha Miller, 
who also was a native of Rockingham county, born in 1805. The Millers 
were of Irish descent. About 1833 Joseph Homan. Jr., moved to Mus- 
kingum county, Ohio, and while en route witnessed the remarkable phenom- 
enon of shooting stars which occurred that year. They made their journey 
westward with team and wagon, and one night took refuge in a school-house, 
in which place they saw the wonilerful astronomical display. Locating in 
Nashport, Mr. Homan continued his residence there for about five years, 
after which he removed to Licking county, Ohio, where he lived for ten 
years. On the expiration of that period he took up his residence in Dela- 
ware county, Ohio, where he purchased the farm upon which he spent his 
remaining days. He was a member of the Presbyterian church and in poli- 
tics was a Jacksonian Democrat. He held a number of township of^ces, 
discharging his duties with promptness and fidelity, and in the community 
where he lived was recognized as a man of sterling worth. In his family 
were the following named: William; Richard; Elizabeth A.; John, who was 
born in Virginia: \\'alter: Benjamin, who was born in Muskingum county, 
Ohio; Ira and Joseph, natives of Licking county, Ohio; and Allen, whose 
birth occurred in Delaware county, Ohio. 

Mr. Homan, the father of our subject, first opened his eyes to the light of 
day in Rockingham county, Virginia, in 1825, and was a lad of eight summers 
when the family removed to ^^luskingum county, Ohio, driving three two- 
horse teams hitched to huge covered wagons. He witnessed the falling 
stars before mentioned and never forgot the memorable sight, the hea\'ens 
being ablaze with the light of these meteors. He received a common-school 
education and in early life learned the carpenter's trade. He was married in 
Delaware county, Ohio, to Miss Martha Hill, a daughter of Adam Hill. 
They began their domestic life in that county, where Mr. Homan worked 
at his trade for some time, after which he removed with his family to L^nion 
county, where also he followed carpentering. In 1869 he came to Illinois, 
locating in Grundy county, upon a farm of one hundred and sixty acres of 
partially improved land. He continued the work of further developing and 
cultivating the fields, and lived upon that farm for many years. He was for 
four years a hardware merchant of Coal City, and spent a short time in 
Colorado on account of his health. After his return to Illinois he made 
preparations to remove to Kansas, and was engaged in merchandising in 
that state for one year. He then returned to the old home farm in Grundy 
-county, upon which he spent his remaining days, his death occurring August 
II, 1898, He exercised his right of franchise in support of the men and 



710 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

measures of the Democracy, and by popular ballot was appointed to fill a 
number of township positions. He held to the religious faith of the fam- 
ily, being a member of the Presbyterian church. He was long recognized as 
a substantial farmer and respected citizen of Grundy county. 

Mr. Homan of this review is the youngest of three children, the others 
being Joseph and Emma. He received the usual common-school advantages 
and was reared to farm life. Later he engaged in merchandising in Coal 
City, in connection with his father, and went with him to Kansas, where 
also they conducted a store for one year. Upon the return to Grundy county 
he resumed the work of the farm, and has since devoted his energies to the 
care and cultivation of its fields. His property is the okl family homestead, 
a very valuable tract of land. He is also engaged in the grain business at 
Gorman, for Fuller & Keltner. having carried on operations along that Hne 
since 1898. 

On the 24th of November. 1S87. in Osborne, Kansas, was celebrated 
the marriage of Mr. Homan and Miss Libbie De Puy, who was born in 
Xew York, December 29. 1867. Her grandfather. John De Puy. was born 
in Orange county. New York, and was descended from French Huguenot 
ancestry, who located in the Empire state in colonial days. He married 
Caroline Russell, who was of Scotch descent and whose mother belonged 
to the De Witt family. John De Puy was a wagon-maker by trade and 
followed that pursuit in order to support his family. For many years he 
resided in Accord, New York, and died in Newburg. that state, at the age of 
eighty-four years. He was a member of the Methodist church and lived a 
consistent. Christian life. His children were Ann. Edgar, Alexander, Nancy, 
Jane, Elizabeth, Jacob, William, Blendinah, John, Thomas, Russell and 
Abel. Five of the sons. Jacob, William, Thomas. John and Russell, served 
in the civil war, all being members of New York regiments. Jacob par- 
ticipated in the battle of Bull Run and both he and William were killed in 
the service. John De Puy, the father of Mrs. Homan, was born in Accord, 
New York, Alarch 23, 1838, acquired a common-school education and 
learned the carpenter's trade. He is now a merchant and business man of 
considerable wealth. He removed to Kansas about 1875, locating in Glen 
Elder, where he was engaged in milling and general merchandising. He ' 
also dealt in real estate, with ot^ces in Kansas City, and was the owner 
of a large farm w-hich materially increased his income. He is now an act- 
ive and enterprising business man of Perry county, Missouri. A man of strong" 
force of character, of sound business judgment and incorruptible integrity, 
he well deserves the prosperity which has crowned his efforts. In his political 
affiliations he is a Republican. 

He was married in Newburg, New York, April 15, 1859, to Eleanor 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 711 

Polhamus, who was born in the Empire state and was a daughter of John 
Polhamus. Her father was of sturdy Holland Dutch ancestry and the fam- 
ily was established on American soil prior to the war of the Revolution. 
John Polhamus was born in New York city, became a sea captain and 
made many voyages. He had a brother who served in the United States navy 
during the war of 1812. His entire life was spent in New York and he died 
there, at the age of eighty-six years. His children were Eleanor and John, 
and the latter enlisted for service in a New York regiment during the civil 
war and was killed in battle. After his marriage John De Puy resided in 
Newburg, New York, where he engaged in carpentering and cabinet-making 
until the death of his first wife, in 1874. She was a member of the Methodist 
church and by her marriage became the mother of the following children : 
Blendinah, Elmer, Libbie, George, John and William. ]\Ir. De Puy was 
again married, April 7, 1889, his second union being with Etta iNIoffet. 
The wedding took place at Glen Elder, and their children are Russell, Emma, 
Mary and William. 

The marriage of Mr. and IMrs. Homan has been blessed with five 
children, four of whom are now living, namely: Bertha A., William, Rus- 
sell, Martha and Allen. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Homan located 
on the old homestead in Maine township, where they are still living. Their 
household is celebrated for its hospitality, which is enjoyed by their many 
friends. In politics ^Ir. Homan is independent, his last presidential vote 
being cast for William J. Bryan in 1896. His wife belongs to the Methodist 
Episcopal church. A practical business man, he has carried on his labors 
along well defined lines and is known to be strictly honorable in all trade 
transactions. His steriing qualities have gained him high regard, and as a 
representative citizen of Grundy county he well deserves mention in this 
volume. 



ABRAHAM STAMM. 



In a history of the representative farmers of Greenfield township, Grundy 
county, Abraham Stamm certainly deserves creditable mention, as he belongs 
to the class of honored American citizens who owe their prosperity entirely to 
their own well directed and honorable efiforts. He belongs to one of the old 
Pennsylvania Dutch families. His great-grandfather, Conrad Stamm, em- 
igrated to the New World from Hesse-Cassel. Germany, in an early day, 
being accompanied by his wife and two children, Daniel and John. The 
wife, however, died ere the voyage was completed, and with his two sons 
Mr. Stamm continued on his way to Beaver county, Pennsylvania, where 



712 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

he cleared a farm of two hundred acres in the midst of the forest, developing 
a good home there. In Germany he was connected with the Catholic church, 
but did not attend any church after arriving in America. He died in Beaver 
county, Pennsylvania, May 27, 1838, at the venerable age of eighty-one 
years, and was buried on his own homestead there. Our subject now has 
in his possession a rifle which belonged to Conrad Stamm. It was brought 
by him from Germany and is a well made fire-arm, with silver mountings, 
having been manufactured by Kramer, of Schmalkalden. Germany. 

Daniel Stamm. the grandfather of our subject, was about sixteen years 
of age when he accompanied his father to the Xew World. He, too. be- 
came a farmer, and was married in Beaver county, Pennsylvania, to Eliza- 
beth Shearer, who was born in the Keystone state. After their marriage 
they located on the old homestead, which had been developed by his father, 
and there Daniel Stamm passed his remaining days, his death occurring at 
the age of sixty-one. He was a substantial farmer and owned and success- 
fully operated two hundred acres of land. An industrious and hard-working 
man, his life was honorable and upright. He belonged to the Lutheran 
church and was respected by all who knew him. His children were : Conrad, 
Jacob, Daniel, Polly, Susan and Eliza. 

Jacob Stamm, the father of him whose name introduces this review, 
was born on the old family homestead in Pennsylvania, in September. 181 1. 
That property is still in the possession of descendants of the original Amer- 
ican emigrants. Jacob Stainm received very limited educational privileges, 
and became an enterprising business man. He learned the tanner's trade, 
which he followed for a year and then turned his attention to other pursuits. 
In 1836 he wedded Susan Ziegler. the ceremony being performed in Beaver 
county, Pennsylvania. The lady, however, was born in Bucks county, that 
state, March 31, 1810, a daughter of Christopher and Susanna (Shelly) 
Zieeler. Her father was a cabinet-maker and farmer who owned a valuable 
tract of land in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, where he married Miss Shelly. 
Subsequently he removed to Beaver county, when his daughter, Susanna, 
was six years old. He manufactured many coffins in those early days and 
was a well known citizen of Beaver county. \\'hen an old man he removed 
to Medina county, Ohio, to Hve with his son, Abraham. In religious belief 
he was a Mennonite and served as deacon of his church for many years. 
His death occurred in Medina county, when he had attained the very ad- 
vanced age of nearly ninety-eight years. His children were : Andrew, 
Abraham. Henry, Catherine, Susanna. Elizabeth and Deborah, who died 
in childhood. 

After his marriage Jacob Stamm located at Harmony. Butler county, 
Pennsvlvania. where he lived for one year and then removed to Evans City, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 713 

twenty-seven miles north of Pittsburg, where his father had purchased two 
hundred and twelve acres of land, having also a tract of six hundred acres 
in Muddy Creek township, Butler county, and two hundred acres in Middle- 
sex township, that county. This land he gave to his children, Jacob Stamm 
securing the tract of two hundred and twelve acres. Only a small portion 
had been cleared, the remainder having been covered with heavy timber. 
This land was purchased of Alexander Martin, who had entered it from 
the government. Clearing away the trees, Jacob Stamm developed a good 
farm, erected substantial buildings, and there spent his remaining days, 
his death occurring May 27, 1892, when he had attained the age of eighty 
j'ears. He was a member of the German Reformed church and in politics 
was originally a Democrat, but in 1864 supported Abraham Lincoln and 
\vas afterward a stanch Republican. He was known as a substantial farmer 
and became the owner of a valuable property of three hundred acres. His 
wife is still living on the old homestead and is past ninety years of age. 
She is a member of the Mennonite church and a woman of many virtues, 
whose life has indeed been well spent. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob 
Stamm were : Abraham, Solomon, Jacob, Deborah, Keziah, Elizabeth, 
Mary and Susanna. 

Abraham Stamm, whose name introduces this record, was born in 
Butler county, Pennsylvania, on the old homestead, June 25, 1838. He re- 
ceived the usual common-school education and was reared to agricultural 
pursuits. In 1866, at the age of twenty-eight years, he came to Illinois 
.and purchased 160 acres of unimproved prairie land in Good Farm 
township, of which he broke and fenced thirty acres. He never lived on the 
place, however, and on selling it he bought a cjuarter section south of 
Gardner. After a few years he also disposed of that property and purchased 
one hundred and sixty acres near where the school-house now stands on 
section 6. It was also a tract of undeveloped prairie, but his continuous 
work placed it under a high state of cultivation. It was to that farm that 
he took his bride, his marriage being celebrated in Grundy county, October 
7, 1869, when Miss Ellen Halteman became his wife. She was born in 
Miami county, Ohio, April 5, 1845, and is a daughter of Jacob and Sarah 
(Kitzmiller) Halteman. Her father was a native of Bucks county, Pennsyl- 
vania, who, having received the usual common-school training, turned his 
attention to farming. When a young man he accompanied his father to 
Miami county, Ohio, and there married Sarah, a daughter of Emanuel 
Kitzmiller. Their union was blessed with seven children, namely : David. 
Annie, Sarah, Ellen, Emma, Lucy and Caroline. Mr. Halteman removed 
to Illinois, and after residing in Lee county for some time spent a number of 
years in Perry county. About 1867 he came to Grundy county, where he 



714 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

purchased one hundred and twenty acres of improved land, making his home, 
however, in Gardner. His last days were spent in Smith county, Kansas, 
where he died in 1898, at the age of eighty years. In politics he was a Re- 
pul)lican and in religious belief was a Mennonite. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Stamm located on the farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres, which he still owns. Some time afterward he 
purchased forty-nine acres where Abraham Bookwalter now lives, and re- 
sided there for six years, when he sold that property and removed to the 
Parker farm in Greenfield township. In 1892 he took up his abode upon his 
present farm in Greenfield township, and is to-day one of the extensive 
land-owners of the community, having four hundred acres of fine farming 
land, upon which he has made excellent improvements. He is regarded 
as one of the substantial and progressive farmers of his neighborhood, and 
he certainly deserves great credit for the success which he has achieved. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Stamm were born six children : Jacob, Charles, Pliny, 
Clifford (who died in infancy), Ida and Chloe. In 1897 the family were 
called upon to mourn the loss of the wife and mother, who died September 
23. 1897. She was a lady of many virtues and was a consistent member 
of the Alethodist church. ]\Ir. Stamm also belongs to that church, in which 
he has served as a trustee and steward. He has managed his business inter- 
ests with great care and precision, and at all times his methods have been 
characterized by the strictest integrity. His honesty is above question and 
his word is as good as his bond in the community where he is known. 



BENJAMIN BOOKWALTER. 

Benjamin Bookwalter is a representative of one of the pioneer families 
of Greenville township and is regarded as one of the most substantial 
farmers of Grundy county. He is of Pennsylvania Dutch lineage, his an- 
cestors having been among the early settlers of Lancaster county. John 
Buchwalter was the grandfather of our subject, and since that time the 
orthography of the family name has been changed. He was born in Lancas- 
ter county, Pennsylvania, and was a farmer by occupation, owning and cul- 
tivating one hundred and twenty acres of land. A man of sterling honesty 
and high moral character, he took great interest in religious matters and 
was a member of the Mennonite church. He served as the tax collector of 
his township for many years, and was highly respected for his genuine 
worth and marked ability. His children were Benjamin, Abraham, Mattie, 
Christina, Elizabeth and Hester. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



/!> 



Abraham Buchwalter, the father of our subject, was born in Lancas- 
ter county, Pennsylvania, in February, 1794, twelve miles east of the city 
of Lancaster. He acquired the usual common-school education and added 
to his knowledge by his extensive reading in later years. He possessed 
an observing eye and retentive mind, and these qualities enabled him to- 
gain an excellent fund of knowledge. He, too, was a farmer by occupation, 
making that pursuit his life work. In Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, he 
married Elizabeth Witwer, whose birth occurred in that county. Her father 
was Rev. Witwer, a minister of the Mennonite church and a highly respected 
man who for many years devoted his energies to the work of the gospel. His 
services were especially demanded on the occasion of funerals, and his 
marked sympathy and broad acquaintance made him particularly capable in 
delivering addresses on such occasions. He was one of the best known 
Mennonite ministers of his day, and was also a wealthy farmer of Lancaster 
county, owning an extensive and valuable tract of land. He died in his 
native county in middle life. His children were Isaac, David, Benjamin, 
Michael, Daniel (who became a physician), Elizabeth and Barbara. 

After his marriage Abraham Buchwalter located on the old homestead 
farm near New Holland, where he lived for a number of years, removing 
to Mercer county, Pennsylvania, in 1843. There he purchased a farm 
of over four hundred acres, making his home thereon for about eight years, 
when he sold his property and bought three hundred acres of land, on 
which there was a flouring-mill. After three years spent on his property there 
he came to Illinois, in the spring of 1854, making the journey by rail. In 
the previous autumn he had started westward and had spent the winter of 
1853-4 in Elkhart county, Indiana, whence he came to Grundy county in 
the spring. Here he purchased three hundred and twenty acres of land, 
including the quarter section upon which our subject now resides and a tract 
of one hundred and sixty acres in Maine township. Forty acres of the land 
had been fenced and a small frame house had been erected, but otherwise 
there was no improvement upon the property. The country around was a 
wild and undeveloped prairie, on which wolves, deer, prairie chickens and 
quails were frequently killed. Mr. Buchwalter began improving his land, 
and his untiring industry enabled him to develop a good farm, upon which he 
spent his remaining days. He was one of the founders of the old Men- 
nonite church in this vicinity and served as one of its deacons for many years. 
In politics he was an old-line Whig, but severed his allegiance with that 
party in order to aid in the organization of the Republican party in this 
locality. He became a substantial and well known citizen as the result of his 
industry and honest effort. All who knew him esteemed him for his high 
moral character and his genuine worth. In his family were the following 



7i6 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

children: John, Mary. David, Samuel, Annie, Benjamin. Elizabeth, Michael, 
and one that died in infancy. All were born in Lancaster county. Pennsyl- 
vania, and during the civil war David entered the country's ser^-jce, remaining 
at the front for two years. 

Benjamin Bookwalter, the subject of this review, was born July 31, 
1 83 1, in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and has adopted the more modern 
method of spelling the family name. He acquired a good common-school edu- 
cation, and when about twelve years of age went with his parents by wagon to 
Mercer county, Pennsylvania. At the age of twenty-three he came to Illinois, 
arriving in Grundy county in April, 1854. He and his brother, Michael, 
drove two horses, hitched to a wagon, from Elkhart county, Indiana, spend- 
ing four days upon the way. He worked for his father through the follow- 
ing year and in the succeeding year, when his father retired from active 
business, Benjamin and his brother Michael assumed the management 
of the home farm, which they conducted for five years. After the marriage 
of our subject the brothers dissolved partnership, each engaging in business 
for himself. Benjamin took the old homestead of one hundred and sixty 
acres, and here he has since lived. He improved his farm, built a residence 
upon it and has made many other substantial improvements which add to 
the value and attractive appearance of the place. Through his own well- 
directed efforts and the capable assistance of his wife he has steadily pros- 
pered and is now the owner of six hundred and forty acres of fine farming 
land, all in one body. For many years he has been engaged in raising 
cattle and fine trotting horses, and has been the owner of some of the best 
horses in the state. 

On the 31st of October, 1858, Mr. Bookwalter was united in marriage 
to Miss Susan Barkey, and their children are: Emma L., born August 3. 
i860; Abraham L.. born ^March 28, 1862; and two who died in infancy. 
The mother's birth occurred in Butler county, Pennsylvania, October 12, 
1837, her parents being Enos and Eve (Ziegler) Barkey. Her father was 
born in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. October 20, 181 5. and the 
mother was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania. December 15, 18 14. They 
were married in Beaver county, that state, about 1835. Mrs. Barkev was 
a daughter of Christopher and Susanah (Shelley) Ziegler, natives of Bucks 
county, Pennsylvania, and representatives of good old Pennsylvania Dutch 
stock. Her father was for many years a deacon in the Mennonite church 
and was a most highly respected man. He lived to the advanced age of 
over ninety-eight years, and died in Mahoning county, Ohio. His children 
were Abraham. Andrew, Henry, Eve, Susan, Elizabeth, Catharine, and two 
who died in infancy. 

Enos Barkey was the son of Abraham and Elizabeth (Borneman) 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 717 

Barkey. His father was a native of Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, and 
a representative of one of the old Pennsylvania Dutch families. Through- 
out his life he followed the profession of school-teaching. His children 
were Henry, Daniel, Enos, John, Mary and Kate. Enos Barkey obtained 
a common-school education and took up his abode in Butler county, Penn- 
sylvania, whence he removed to Beaver county and later to Defiance county, 
Ohio. He worked at the shoemaker's trade in Independence, Ohio, for 
some years, and then removed to Elkhart county, Indiana, settling near the 
town of Elkhart, where he purchased eighty acres of timber land. There 
he built a home and made some improvements, but sold the farm and removed 
to Illinois in 1851. 

He settled in Mazon township, Grundy county, where he purchased 
sixty acres of wild land, upon which not a furrow had been turned or an 
improvement made, but his industry soon wrought a great transformation 
in its appearance. As his financial resources increased he bought more 
land and engaged in the cattle business, driving his cattle from Indiana, 
where he purchased them very cheaply. He prospered in his undertaking 
and continuously added to his land until he owned about nine hundred 
acres, becoming one of the wealthy farmers and energetic stock dealers of 
Grundy county. Straightforward in all his dealings and honest to a fault, 
he was highly respected by all who knew him. Removing to Nebraska, 
he located in Gage county about twenty years ago, and there purchased 
fifteen hundred acres of land, to the improvement of which he devoted his 
energies until his death, which occurred when he was about seventy-eight 
years of age. He left to his children a good property and the more desirable 
heritage of an honest name. In his old age he was a member of the Church 
of God. His children were: Daniel, who was born August 9, 1836, and 
died in infancy; Susan, born October 12, 1837; Mary, October 24, 1839; 
Judith, May 12, 1843; Zeigler, July 30, 1844; John Henry, ]\Iay 4, 1848; and 
Enos, November i, 1852. Enos Barkey, the father of Mrs. Bookwalter, 
died January 15, 1895, and his wife passed away j\Iarch 18, 1884. He was 
a stanch Republican in his political views, and an earnest advocate of the 
Union cause during the civil war. He had one son who joined the "boys 
in blue" and served throughout the war with an Illinois militia company, 
participating in a number of important engagements, but returned to his 
home in safety. 

Benjamin Bookwalter is a man well known in Grundy county for his 
sterling honesty and upright character. Besides the property which he now 
owns he has given to his children one hundred and sixty acres of land. In 
politics he was an old-line Whig until the dissolution of the party, when he 
joined the Republican party and voted for John C. Fremont and Abraham' 



7i8 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Lincoln. He is recognized as one of the substantial and valued citizens 
of his community and well deserves representation in this volume. 



FREDERICK SECK. 



The tales of battle have been a theme of song and story since the earliest 
ages, and the public ever yields its tribute of respect and admiration to the 
man who risks his life in defense of country or of principle. Mr. Seek is 
one of the honored veterans of the civil war who "wore the blue" and aided 
in the defense of the Union until the national government at Washington 
established its authority and the Confederates were overthrown. He was 
born in Baden, Germany, November 7, 1843. ^"^ i* ^ son of Michael and 
■Catherine (Boner) Seek. His father was also a native of Baden, where he 
owned and operated a sawmill. He had two brothers who sen-ed in the 
German army. In 1853 he started with his family for America, sailing from 
Havre, France, to New Orleans on the vessel Mercy, which reached the 
■Crescent City after a voyage of forty-eight days. Two days later Mr. Seek 
died of cholera, and eight days after their arrival Mr. Boner, the maternal 
grandfather of our subject, also died of the same disease. Mrs. Seek, with 
her three children, — Lena, Frederick and Michael. — came to Ottawa. Illi- 
nois, and a few years later she married Lawrence Duttenhoffer, a farmer, 
whose birth occurred in Germany. After his arrival in Illinois he took up 
his abode in what is now Rutland township, LaSalle county, upon a farm of 
one hundred acres. There he and his wife spent their remaining days, the 
mother of our subject dying in 1892, at a very advanced age. 

Frederick Seek was a lad of ten summers when he came with his parents 
to America. He had attended school in the Fatherland, where he had 
learned to read and write. As soon as his mother married he began work 
on his stepfather's farm and assisted in the cultivation and improvement of 
the place until after the inauguration of the civil war, when, prompted by 
a spirit of patriotism, he enlisted, in July, 1862, as a private in Company C, 
Eighty-eighth Illinois Infantry, or the Second Chicago Board of Trade Regi- 
ment, continuing at the front until honorably discharged at Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, in May, 1865. He participated in a number of important battles, 
-including the engagements at Perryville, Kentucky, Stone River, Tennes- 
see, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and the engagements of the famous 
Atlanta campaign. At the battle of Resaca he was shot in the forehead, 
his skull being fractured by the ball, and for some weeks thereafter he was 
forced to remain in the hospital. He rejoined his regiment at the battle 
of Kenesaw mountain, and was also in the engagements at Peach Tree creek 
and Jonesboro, after which his regiment joined General Thomas' command 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 719 

and participated in the hard-fought battles of FrankHn and Nashville. He 
was never taken prisoner and was always engaged in active service, with the 
exception of the few weeks spent in the hospital on account of his wounds. 
Loyally and cheerfully he performed his service for his country, following the 
old flag until it was planted in triumph in the capital of the southern Con- 
federacy. 

When the country no longer needed his service Mr. Seek returned to 
Illinois, where he resumed farming. He was married in Grundy county, 
October 10, 1866, to Miss Louisa Colwell, who was born November 22, 
1847, in Chillicothe, Illinois, her parents being Elias and Annie (Starkey) 
Colwell. Her father was born in Kentucky and was a representative of one 
of the colonial families, his grandfather having been a soldier in the Revo- 
lutionary war. A native of England, he had come to America when this 
country was still numbered among the colonial possessions of Great Britain. 
Robert Colwell, the father of Elias, was a soldier in the war of 1812, and 
was a pioneer of Kentucky. He married Esther Dornan. and their children 
were : Robert. Henry, John, Willie and Lucretia. 

Leaving Kentucky, Robert Colwell became one of the early settlers 
of Peoria county, Illinois, where he owned a good farm which he obtained 
from the government. His son, Elias Colwell, was born in Kentucky, and 
throughout his life engaged in farming. In Hocking county, Ohio, he mar- 
ried Hannah Starkey, and their children were Melissa, Esther, Louisa, and 
several who died in childhood. Elias Colwell also came to Illinois and se- 
cured a wild tract of land in Peoria county, transforming it into a richly 
developed farm. Subsequently he removed to Grundy county, where he 
made his home for a few years, and for a short time he was a resident of 
Livingston county. He then returned to Peoria county and died at the 
home of our subject, on the 26th of October, 1891. He was twice married, 
his second union being with Mary Deffenbaugh, by whom he had one son, 
Samuel. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Seek took up their abode on a farm in 
LaSalle county, where they remained two years, and in 1868 they removed 
to Grundy county, settling in what is now Maine township. Their present 
farm was purchased in 1869, a tract of eighty acres, on which Mr. Seek has 
made good improvements, adding thereto all the accessories and conven- 
iences of a model farm. His home has been blessed with six children : 
Lellie May, who was born in Grundy county, June 12, 1868; Frederick, who 
was born in Grundy county, September 7, 1869, and died October 27, 1889, 
at the age of twenty years: William H., who was born July 19, 1871 ; Minnie, 
born November 7, 1874; Louisa, born September 18, 1877; and Nathan, 
born June 29, 1879. 



720 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Mr. Seek is an honored and valued member of Sedgwick Post, No. 
305, G. A. R., and is the present commander, having filled the office for twa 
terms. He has also occupied other official positions therein. In politics 
he is a stalwart Republican, and has served on the school board nine years, 
during which time his labors and efforts have been very effective in promot- 
ing the cause of education. His thrift and energy are numbered among his 
most marked characteristics and have been the means of bringing to him a 
comfortable competence, so that he is now enabled to enjoy the comforts 
and many of the luxuries of life. As a citizen he is public-spirited and pro- 
gressive, withholding his support from no measure which he believes will 
advance the general good. 



CASSIUS C. EASTON. 



Cassius C. Easton is one of the substantial citizens of Maine township 
and the representative of a highly respected family. He was born in Farm- 
ington. Trumbull county, Ohio, March 21. 1845, his parents being Alex- 
ander and Rhoda (Plum) Easton. His father was born in Massachusetts, 
September 25, 1801, and was a son of Joseph Easton. who was descended 
from colonial Puritan ancestry, the family having been founded in ]\Iassa- 
chusetts at a very early period in its history. His children were John, James, 
Luman, Justus. Joseph. Alexander. Tamar, and one who wedded a Mr. 
Strong. There was also another, but the name is now forgotten. Alex- 
ander Easton, the father of our subject, was reared in the old Bay state, 
received a good common-school education antl early learned the trade of the 
carpenter and joiner. In his early years he became a local minister of the 
Methodist church and preached for a long period. 

He was three times married. — first to Hannah Lee. of Farmington, 
Ohio, by whom he had six children: Tamar, born July 10, 1830; Harriet, 
October 30. 1832; Mack. April 20, 1835; Alcinous, July 25, 1837; Marion, 
September 9. 1840; and Cyrus M., October 23. 1842. All of these children 
were born in Farmington, Ohio, where the mother's death occurred Decem- 
ber 7, 1843. ^I""- Easton was again married about 1844, i" Farmington, 
his second union being with Mrs. Rhoda Lee, the widowed daughter of 
Elisha Plum. Her father was a farmer and at an early day removed to Hills- 
dale. Michigan. By the second marriage of Mr. Easton there were but two 
children. Cassius C. and one who died in infancy. Their mother passed away 
in Farmington, Ohio. June 20, 1851. and Mr. Easton afterward married 
Eliza Hogan, of Brecksville. Ohio. He purchased land from the govern- 
ment at Farmington for a dollar and a quarter per acre and thus obtained one- 




yW yV^ (^ 6UiZ^-^ - 





iy Ou6/Ltnn^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. y2\ 

hundred acres, which he cleared from the wiUlerness, making a good home. 
He was well known as a pioneer settler and minister, and served as a delegate 
to the national convention, held in Pittsburg, of the Free-soilers, who nomi- 
nated John P. Hale and George W. Julian. He filled a number of local offi- 
ces of trust and was a much respected citizen. In 1868 he came to Illinois 
to make his home with his son Cassius and died twelve years later, at the 
age of sevent3^-nine. 

Cassius Clay Easton was reared in Farmington, Ohio. He received a 
good common-school education and at the age of sixteen years came to Illi- 
nois, having in the meantime learned the carpenter's trade of his father, who 
gave his set of tools to his son. Nix. Easton is especially successful in me- 
chanical lines and has done much carpenter work in the neighborhood. 
?Iere he followed both carpentering and farming in early life. He was 
married September 27, 1S66, in Mazon township, Grundy county, to Miss 
Mary Jane Spiller, who was born in Devonshire, England, May 19, 1849, ^ 
daughter of John and Joanna (Wakley) Spiller. Her father was born in 
Devonshire, England, November 28, 1808, obtained a good education, and 
during his boyhood followed farming. He was married in his native land 
to Joanna Wakley, whose birth occurred in Devonshire, England, and there 
they became the parents of eight children: Ann, who was born March 11, 
1840; William, April 19, 1842; Joel, November 26, 1843; Thomas, Febru- 
ary 20, 1845; Elizabeth, March 13, 1847; :\Iary J., :May 19, 1849; John, Feb- 
ruary 7, 185 1 ; and Ellen, July 24, 1853. 

Mr. Spiller came with his family to America in 1851, sailing from 
Liverpool to New York, where they arrived after a vovage of nine weeks and 
three days. He continued his westward journey to Kendall county, Illinois, 
where he worked on a farm. For a year he was very ill and his wife had a 
hard struggle to provide for the family, her children being all small at that 
time. After his recovery Mr. Spiller took up his work with renewed energy, 
and about 1861 succeeded in gaining some land in Mazon township. This 
he improved and also extended its boundaries until it comprised one hundred 
and sixty acres. He had a good house and lot in Gardner, and successfully 
carried on agricultural pursuits, being known as one of the reliable, indus- 
trious and progressive farmers of the neighborhood. During the civil war 
he was a strong Union man and his son William and his son-in-law, James 
Livingston, both served for three years in an Illinois regiment in order to 
maintain the supremacy of the national government at Washington. From 
the time of the organization of the party Mr. Spiller was a stalwart Repub- 
lican. He died at his home in Gardner, April 30, 1887, and his wife, who 
was a consistent member of the Methodist church, passed away February 3, 
1893. 



722 BIOGRAPHICAL A.\D GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Mr. and Mrs. Easton resided for a year after their marriage in Green- 
field township, Grnndy county, and then in Kankakee county, where he 
purchased one hundred acres of partially improved land, on which was a 
small "shanty." Through the succeeding six years he devoted his energies 
to the cultivation of his farm and built a good residence there. He then 
removed to Gardner, where he worked at his trade for two years, and in 
March, 1876, he came to his present home in Maine township, where he 
secured a tract of land of one hundred and twenty acres and by additional 
purchase became the owner of a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres. 
He also erected a substantial two-story frame residence and added all the 
other accessories and conveniences of a model farm and now has a very 
valuable property. He also owns one hundred and sixty acres of rich and 
arable land in Butler county, Kansas, which his son Addison is now occupy- 
ing. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Easton have been born four children : Addison 
Monroe was born in Greenfield township, Grundy county. January 2, 1868, 
educated in the common schools and high school of Gardner, and is now 
engaged in teaching in this county. He married Emma C. Wessel and with 
their two children. Hazel W. and Wendel A., they reside in Kansas. Rowland 
Joseph, born in Norton township, Kankakee county, Illinois, October 4, 
1 87 1, married Winnie Small and is living on a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres in Butler county, Kansas. Belle R. was born on the homestead, 
July 28, 1880; and Clift'ord C., June 14, 1885. They are still with their 
parents. Belle R. graduated at the district and high schools at Gardner, in 
1898, and is a young lady of refinement. 

In his political views Mr. Easton was a stalwart Re]nil)lican for some 
vears, and voted for Abraham Lincoln. He became one of the ardent Pro- 
hibitionists of his township, but in 1896 he cast his ballot for Bryan. He 
served on the school board for twelve years, acting as its secretary and 
president for a part of the time. He has always been a strong advocate of 
temperance principles, and is a man of high moral character, whose well- 
directed business efforts have brought him creditable success, for his reliab'e 
dealing has secured to him the unqualified regard of his fellow men. 



ALBERT BABCOCK. 



Albert Babcock, one of the veterans of the civil war and an honorel 
pioneer of Grundy county, has been a resident of this section of the state for 
more than half a century and is familiar with its history from the days when 
its wilds were traversed by deer and prairie chickens, and when the greater 
part of the land had not yet been reclaimed for the purposes of cultivation. 




.% 
















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I D.X<My 7X^ (^'yi;t-<LUnyL . 



^Jkg^^J. ^CXA 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 723 

The Babcocks are of sterling English descent, their ancestors being 
among the Puritans who came to the New World in colonial days. Seven 
brothers of the name sought homes in America and were among the earliest 
settlers of Stonington, Connecticut. Johnson Babcock, the great-grand- 
father of our subject, became one of the pioneers of the Empire state, and 
his son Johnson, the grandfather, was a farmer of Rensselaer county. New 
York, where he died between the years of 1820 and 1826. His wife bore 
the maiden name of Zilpha Green, and was a representative of the old colonial 
family of Greens that figured so conspicuously in connection with the colon- 
ial and Revolutionary history of this country. To this family belonged 
Nathaniel Greene, the famous American patriot and general in the war for 
independence. Unto Johnson and Zilpha (Green) Babcock were born eleven 
children, namely: Johnson, Hiram, Linas, Darias, George, Ransom. Ira, 
Matilda, Louisa, Fannie and one whose name is forgotten. 

Johnson Babcock, the father of our subject, was born August 12, 1800, 
in Rensselaer county, New York, acquired a good education in the schools 
of his native state and became a farmer. He was married October 29, 1826, 
in his native county, to Dorcas Messinger, a daughter of Daniel and Mary 
Messinger. The Messinger family are of Welsh origin. Daniel Messinger 
was born in 1769 and died November 13, 1838, in the Empire state, while 
his wife passed away February 14, 1828, at the age of forty-eight years. The 
names of their children now remembered are Dorcas, Lewis and Betsy. 

After his marriage Johnson Babcock, the father of our subject, took up 
his abode in New York, where he remained until 1831, when he emigrated to 
Ohio, locating in Cuyahoga county, where he purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of timber land. Clearing away the trees he placed the fields 
under cultivation and made a good pioneer home, but, selling his farm, he 
came to Illinois in the spring of 1846, renting land in the vicinity of Aurora 
for three years. In 1848 he purchased the farm upon which our subject now 
resides, and took up his abode thereon in April, 1849, residing there until 
his death. This tract comprised three hundred and twenty acres of wild 
prairie, which he bought of Stephen Davenport. When he settled on the 
land there were no buildings, and his first home was a log cabin, which he 
replaced by his present residence in 1854. As his land was broken and 
planted, good harvests rewarded his labors and he thus became the owner of 
an excellent farm. He was a well-known pioneer, much respected by all who 
knew him, and in early days his house became the home of land-seekers who 
sought locations on this western prairie. Being well acquainted with the 
country for miles around, he was often employed to locate land for others. 
The township had not been laid out at the time when he established his home 
here, his hoiise being the second one bujlt in Braceville township, in that 



724 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

portion which is now Maine township. Cattle drovers a'so visited his home 
when on tlieir way from Bloomington to Chicago, for he resided near the 
Hne of the old state road. 

In the work of pubHc improvement and progress he took an active inter- 
est. He was the first justice of the peace in his townsliip, and for many 
years held that otBce. He assisted in the organization of the township, the 
first meeting for the purpose being held at the home of John Cragg, which 
stood on the west bank of the river, where Milton Butler now resides. Later 
Mr. Babcock served as the supervisor of the township for some years, was 
also the township clerk and held other offices, discharging his duty with 
marked promptness and fidelity. For a number of years he was the town- 
ship treasurer, and the cause of education found in him a warm friend. His 
fellow townsmen placed great confidence in him, and he was universally 
respected by the pioneer settlers. In politics he was originally a Democrat, 
but became a Republican on the foundation of that party and voted for John 
C. Fremont. During the civil war he was a stanch advocate of the Union 
cause. His life was characterized by untlagging industry, and by his straight- 
forward dealing he commanded the confidence of all with whom he came 
in contact. He died in April, 1886, at the age of eighty-seven years. 

The children of Mr. and I\Irs. Johnson Babcock were as follows: Lucy, 
who was born in Rensselaer county, Xew York, July 13, 1827; Alartin R., 
]\Iay 22, 1828; John, July 20, 1829; Lewis, December 3, 1830; Hiram, April 
17, 1833; Henry F., November 17, 1S34; Mary L., August 25, 1836; Fred- 
erick J., October 29, 1837; Albert, June 6, 1839: Henry, December 17. 
1841; Eleanor, August 26, 1843: and Ralph, April 30, 1845. The first five 
children were born in Rensselaer county, Xew York, and the others in 
Cayuga county, that state. 

Three of the sons were soldiers in the civil war, namely : Frederick 
J., Albert and Ralph. Two of the sons-in-law, Dennis Harding and \\'illiam 
Spiller, were also numbered among the "boys in blue." Frederick J. en- 
listed for one year at Morris, Illinois, in August, 1864, as a member of Com- 
pany G, Thirty-sixth Illinois Infantry, and served for eleven months, when, 
the war having ended, he returned to his home in safety. Ralph, a private 
of Company E, Thirty-ninth Illinois Infantry, enlisted at Wilmington, Will 
county, Illinois, for three years, and served until killed in battle in front of 
Richmond, a ball piercing his head, causing instant death. Previous to this 
time he had participated in a number of battles. Dennis Harding enlisted 
in 1862 as a private in the Eighth Missouri Infantry for three years, and 
was honorably discharged in 1865 on account of wounds received in battle. 
He participated in several of the leading engagements, and on one occasion 
was shot through the hips. William Spiller enlisted at Morris, Illinois, in 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 725 

August, 1862. as a private in Company C. Seventy-sixth Illinois Infantry, 
to serve for three years, and he remained at the front until the expiration 
of his term, when he was honorably discharged. He participated in the 
siege of Vicksburg and the engagement at Blakely, Alabama, being in the 
last charge there, which was the last battle of the civil war. In this desperate 
charge seventeen of his company were either killed or wounded in ten min- 
utes! 

Albert Babcock, whose name introduces this review, was born in 
Cuyahoga county, Ohio, June 6, 1839, and was seven years of age when he 
came with his parents to Illinois. \\'hen a lad of ten years his father settled 
■on a farm in what is now Maine township. The work of civilization had but 
recently been begun and there were no schools in the neighborhood, so that 
Mr. Babcock's educational privileges were quite limited. His father, how- 
ever, employed a teacher, so that his children were instructed in their own 
home. For a short time .Albert Babcock attended the first district school 
in Rensselaer township, but experience, reading and observation have made 
him a well-informed and capable man. His memory serves to recall many 
interesting incidents of pioneer life. He can well remember the prairie 
scenes when the country for miles around was covered with grass, dotted 
here and there with bright flowers. He saw in the neighborhood the old 
Chief Shabbona, together with his wife and other members of the tribe, for 
they frequently passed through this section of the country on their way to 
their hunting grounds. The country and woods abounded in game, and 
Mazon creek with fish. Mr. Babcock has seen as many as seventy deer in a 
"herd; wild turkeys, prairie chickens and quails were very abundant; wolves and 
wild-cats were often seen in the timber: and otter were found on the banks 
of Mazon creek. The settlers lived in log cabins, crudely furnished, and 
Avorked hard in order to establish homes; but genuine hospitality reigned 
supreme and many pleasures were then enjoyed that are unknown at the 
present day. 

When a young man of twenty-three years Mr. Babcock enlisted at 
Morris, Illinois, on the 7th of August, 1862, becoming a private in Com- 
pany C, Seventy-sixth Illinois Infantry, to serve for three years, or during 
the war. On the expiration of his term he was honorably discharged at 
Galveston, Texas, on the 22d of July, 1865, and was mustered out at Chi- 
cago a month later. His duty called him to Kentucky, Missouri, Tennessee, 
Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana and Texas, and in the course of the three 
years he marched several thousand miles. He participated in many skirm- 
ishes, especially in Tennessee, was in the siege of Vicksburg for thirty-nine 
days and was present at its surrender, on the 4th of July, 1863. At the 
siege of Vicksburg he was taken ill and remained in the hospital for a week, 



726 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

after which he returned home, where he continued for fifteen months. When 
he had sufficiently recovered he returned to the army and joined his regi- 
ment at New Orleans in January, 1865. He also participated in the charge 
on the rebel earthworks that brought on a hand-to-hand fight, which re- 
sulted in the capture of the fort at Blakely, Alabama, and was the last battle 
of the civil war. His company carried the flag, and therefore received the 
hardest fire, seventeen men being killed and wounded within a few moments. 
Mr. Babcock was struck by a ball in a joint of his left foot. He served until 
the close of the war, when he returned to the farm in Braceville township. 

On the 6th of June, 1867, in Braceville township, Mr. Babcock was 
married to Elmira S. Stallman, who was born November 14. 1844, in Lick- 
ing county, Ohio, a daughter of Augustus C. and Lydia (HufYman) Stall- 
man. Her father was born in Germany and was a son of Henry L. and 
Sophia D. (Piim) Stallman. The rest of the children of Henry L. Stallman 
were born in this country. Henry Louis Stallman, the grandfather of Mrs. 
Babcock, was born in Germany, July 29, 1791, and married Sophia Piim, 
also a native of that country. Mr. Stallman was a participant in the famous 
battle of Waterloo, as a private under Prince William of Brunswick. He 
emigrated to America about 1834, and died July 27, 1870, in Delaware 
county, Ohio, nearly eighty years of age, a member of the United Brethren 
church, and his wife died July 22, 1873, aged nearly seventy-nine years. 
Their children were : Louisa, who married Jesse Holmes, and died Febru- 
ary 13, 1880, at the age of about fifty-six years; Ricca, who married Benja- 
min W'ollom, and died December 6, 1856, aged about twenty-nine years; 
Rebecca, who married Orrin Powers, and died in 1892, aged nearly fifty- 
eight years; Wilhelmina, who married Gideon Houser and died in 1863; 
Augustus C., the father of Mrs. Babcock; and Henry L. and Maria, twins. 
Henry L. Stallman, the son of Henry L., Sr., was a soldier in the civil war, 
as a private in Company H. of the Forty-fifth Regiment of the Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry, enlisting under the first call, for three months, and re-enlisting 
for three years, and served to the close of the war, participating in many 
battles. 

Augustus C. Stallman obtained a good common-school education, and 
in his later life was able to speak in several languages which he learned by 
carrying on business with people of different nationalities. In his youth he 
learned the shoemaker's trade and conducted a shop in Etna. Licking county, 
Ohio, for a time. Subsequently he engaged in merchandising, conducting 
a dr)--goods and merchant tailoring establishment in Coshocton. Ohio, where 
he met with good success in his undertakings. His last years were spent 
in Columbus, Ohio, where he died in 1897. His wife, Lydia (HuiTman) 
Stallman, was of Dutch lineage. In early life she was left an orphan and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 727 

was reared by Abraham Winters, a farmer of Licking county, Ohio. She 
had two brothers, Jacob and John, and a sister, Ann. Unto Augustus C. 
and Lydia (Hufifman) Stallman. in Licking county, Ohio, were born the fol- 
lowing children: Elmira S., born in Etna, November 14, 1844; Leah, born 
in Etna; John J. and Lyman E., twins; and Lewis H.. who was a soldier in 
the civil war, who served as a private in Company L, Second Ohio Infantry, 
and was mustered into the United States service February 9, 1864, for three 
years. His death occurred, however, on the i6th of August, the same year, 
in Charleston, Tennessee. Mrs. Stallman, who was a member of the United 
Brethren church and a lady of many virtues, died in Etna, Ohio, and Mr. 
Stallman was afterward married there to Miss Nancy Neff. Their children 
were Charles, William. Nettie. Frank, Kate and Jesse. The father of these 
children was a member of the Methodist church. He served as provost 
marshal at Columbus, Ohio, during the ci\il war. and was an energetic and 
successful business man, respected by all who knew him. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Babcock located upon their present 
farm in Maine township, Grundy county, where he owns one hundred and 
four and a half acres of land. Their children were Jesse, who was born on 
the farm November 13. 1869, and died in infancy; Minnie E., born January 
I, 1871; and Orrin E., born March 26, 1873. 

In his political views Mr. Babcock is a stanch Republican, having sup- 
ported that party since casting his first presidential vote for Abraham Lin- 
coln. He served as a member of the school board for three years, was the 
overseer of highways for several terms, and for two years has been a justice 
of the peace, being the present incumbent. Socially he is an honored mem- 
ber of Sedgwick Post, G. A. R., of Gardner, in which he has held the ofifice 
of chaplain, and of which he is now the junior vice commander. He also 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias fraternity of Mazon, and is a represent- 
ative pioneer citizen of Grundy county, who loyally served as a patriot during 
the civil war, and has at all times been as true to his duty to the country as 
when he followed the starry banner upon the southern battle-fields. In his 
business he has prospered and has ever commanded the respect and esteem 
of his fellow men because of his well-spent and honorable life. 



HENRY B. SUTTON. 



On the list of the leading and practical farmers of Braceville township is 
found the name of Henry B. Sutton, who was born May 15, 1828, in Sussex 
county. New Jersey, and is of French and English lineage. His parents 
were Nathan and Martha (Beardslee) Sutton. The father was born in New 



728 BIOGRAPHICAL A.\'D GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Jersey and was a son of a Revolutionarj- soldier, whose children were Lewis, 
Mark. Nathan and Polly. Nathan Sutton was a farmer and stock-buyer, 
and removed from New Jersey to Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, in 
1835. In 1859 he became a resident of Gardner, Grundy county, Illinois, 
living a retired life. He was married in New Jersey, November 12. 181 2, 
to ]\Iartha Beardslee, whose birth occurred in Sussex county. New Jersey, 
October 6, 1795. Their children were : Susan M., born November 8, 1813; 
John B., January 13. 1816; Edward L.. March 12. 1818; Phoebe Ann, March 
6. 1820; Nathaniel K., March 8. 1822; Sybil C.. April 20, 1824; Martha J.. 
March i, 1826; Henry B., May 15, 1828; Mark T.. June 6. 1830; Margaret 
F.. August 14. 1832; Albert D., July 4, 1836; William A.. November 6. 1838; 
and Huldah, May 13, 1841. The father was an industrious, enterprising 
man whose attention was given almost exclusively to his business affairs, 
and his honesty in all trade transactions won him high regard. He was 
born April 12. 1789. and died in Grundy county, March 30. 1879, when 
nearly ninety years of age. His wife passed away in Gardner, ]May 4, 1883, 
when about eighty-eight years of age. Both were members of the Presby- 
terian church, and Mr. Sutton gave his political support to the Democracy. 

Henry B. Sutton, whose name introduces this record, obtained a limited 
education in the district schools of Pennsylvania, to which state he removed 
with his parents during his early boyhood. When quite young he began 
work on a farm, and throughout his entire life he has been connected with 
agricultural pursuits. He was married October 26, 1856. in Susquehanna 
county, Pennsylvania, to Catherine A. Campbell, who was born January 9, 
1832. in Orange county. New York, a daughter of Jacob and Sophia (Wheel- 
er) Campbell. Her father was of Scotch descent, and was born May 28, 
1802, in New York. On the maternal side he was of Dutch lineage. After 
receiving meager education he learned the blacksmith's trade, and for many 
years he followed that pursuit. His death occurred in Orange county. New 
York, November 11, 1870. He was twice married, his first union being 
with Sophia \Mieeler. by whom he had the following children : John A., 
who was born November 9, 1827; Sarah E., January 8. 1830; Catherine A., 
January 9. 1832; Theodore W., November 13, 1836: and Lewis W.. March 
II, 1839. The mother died May 11, 1854, and the father afterward wedded 
Maria \\'heeler. His political support was given the Democracy, and in 
religious belief he was a Presbyterian. 

Mr. Sutton, whose name introduces this record, took up his abode 
upon rented land in Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, at the time of his 
marriage, but in December. 1862. he came to Grundy county. Illinois, rent- 
ing a farm in Greenville township for two years. In 1868 he purchased his 
present farm, becoming the owner of eighty acres, which he has placed under 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 729 

a good state of cultivation, the well tilled fields yielding to him an excellent 
tribute in return for the care and labor he bestows upon them. He and his 
wife have also reared excellent children, who do credit to their name : Susan 
M., who was born December i. 1858: Martha G., born November 5, i860, 
died I^Iay 23. 1873; Huldah. born January 7, 1863, married William D. How- 
land, a farmer of Grundy county, and they had one child, Harry; the 
mother died August 17, 1886, and Mr. Howland afterward wedded her sister, 
Susan M., by whom he has two children, — Ernest and Erma. Mary S., 
the next of the Sutton family, was born March 18, 1864. Sarah M. was 
born April 24. 1866, formerly lived with Mrs. Alexander Cameron for eight 
years, and by whom she was greatly trusted, having almost the entire charge 
of the business interests of Mrs. Cameron. John A., born March 31, 1868, 
married Eva Foster, and is an enterprising farmer of Kankakee county, Illi- 
nois. They have five children : Lester, Elsie, Roy, Veda and Henry. 

Mr. Sutton gives his political support to the men and measures of the 
Republican party, and is well informed on the issues of the day. He has 
never been an aspirant for office, however, preferring to devote his energies 
to his business af^'airs, in which he has met with creditable success. He 
follows very progressive methods in managing his farm and is one of Brace- 
ville township's progressive agriculturists, well deserving of representation in 
this volume. 



C. \V. BURROUGHS. 



One of the large land-owners and prosperous business men of Grundy 
county, C. W. Burroughs, comes from sterling Irish and German stock, his 
paternal grandfather, John Burroughs, having been a native of the Emerald 
Isle, while his maternal grandfather. Captain J. B. Shurman, was born in 
Germany. The former was a farmer by occupation, both in his native land 
and in Washington county. New York, where he located after coming to 
America, residing there until his death. The seafaring life which the worthy 
German captain led came to a sudden and extremely unpleasant end, the 
story being as follows : He was the captain of a ship which plied between 
his native land and the United States, and on one of these voyages the vessel 
was sunk in a terrible storm. Only six persons, including the gallant cap- 
tain, were saved, and they drifted on the ocean for six days, without food or 
anything to drink. When just on the verge of starvation one of the men, as 
a last resort, drew cuts to determine which of them should be killed in order 
to furnish food for the others ! Fate showed the captain favor in this dread- 
ful ordeal, and he was saved, but, needless to say, he had no further desire to 
follow the seas, and he was g!ad to settle ciuietly upon a farm in the Empire 



730 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

state. From tliat time until his death he carried on agricultural pursuits in 
the vicinity of Eagle Ridge. Xew York. 

John Burroughs, father of our subject, was reared on a farm in the 
Empire state, and early embarked in farming and dealing in live stock. He 
was remarkably successful, accumulating what was then considered a great 
fortune, but in 1850 he was so unfortunate as to lose sixty thousand dollars, 
through a forgery, and was thus left penniless. Two years later he bravely 
determined to try to establish himself again in business, and this time in 
the west; so he removed to Belvidere. Boone county, Illinois. He continued 
to manage a farm there for a few years, but death put an end to his ambitious 
labors and plans, both he and his wife dying in i860. He had married Sarah 
Shurman in New York state, and they had children. 

C. \V. Burroughs was born in Marshall county, Xew York. March 21, 
1836. \\'ith his father he removed to the west, and it was not imtil 1865 
that he came to Grundy county. Here he bought and located upon a part 
of his present farm in Xorman township, and. in addition to raising a large 
variety of crops, he has made a specialty of feeding live stock. In these 
lines of business he has met with something of the success which his father 
formerly achieved, and by judicious investments he has further increased 
his wealth. He now owns seven hundred and eighty-one acres of finely 
improved land, and has other valuable investments. 

In 1867 ^Ir. Burroughs married Mary E. McMurry. a daughter of 
Robert and Zada Mc^Iurry. natives of Xew York state. Their eldest child, 
Xellie M., is the wife of L. W. Claypool, and resides in Chicago. Dr. \V. M. 
Burroughs, the only son. is engaged in the practice of his profession in 
Chicago, where he has built up a large practice. Delia, the second daugh- 
ter of our subject, is the wife of J. H. Whitman, of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 
and Lillie, unmarried, now makes her home in Chicago. 



XELS L. NESS. 



Grand old Xorway has contributed many of the best citizens that .Amer- 
ica, and particularly Illinois and the great northwest, can boast. Almost 
without exception, the sons of that far-away land, upon their arrival in the 
United States, enroll themselves under the banner of the stars and stripes 
and loyally support the laws and institutions of this country, both in peace 
and in war. And it is a fact too well known to need pointing out. that 
there are no more honest, industrious and universally upright citizens, both 
in their native land and in the land of their adoption, than the strong, sturdy 
sons of Norwav. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 731 

The fatlier of our subject. Lars Ness, was a farmer in Norway, and there 
married Martha Ness. They had five children, of whom only one, the eldest, 
John L., still makes his home in the land of his birth. Anna, the only 
daughter, is the wife of John Felow. of Nettle Creek township, and the two 
youngest members of the family, Oliver and Ole. are deceased. In 1865 
Lars Ness and wife came to America, and thenceforth made their home with 
their son, Nels L. The mother departed this life in March, 1890, and the 
father died in September, 1892. 

The birth of Nels L. Ness occurred in Norway, July 25, 1833, and his 
education was such as the common schools afforded. He began to be of 
material assistance to his parents in the care of the farm when he was a 
mere child, and from that time until he was eighteen years of age he re- 
mained at home. The attractions of a sea life had always appealed to him, 
and at length he could no longer resist his inclination. Shipping aboard a 
vessel engaged in trade along the coasts of Norway, he continued to follow 
the calling of a sailor for fifteen years, during which time he became thor- 
oughly familiar with the ports of Sweden, Norway and Denmark, and all of 
the seas, bays and fiords of that celebrated region. In 1862 he crossed the 
Atlantic ocean, with a view to taking up his permanent residence here. Lik- 
ing the country, he stayed, and for about two years worked for farmers in 
Nettle Creek township. Then, for the ensuing eight years, he rented a farm, 
at the end of which period he had accumulated sufficient money to permit of 
his purchasing a homestead. This place, of which he became the owner in 
1872, comprises one hundred and sixty acres, is situated in Nettle Creek 
township, and has been his home ever since. 

In all of his struggles to gain a livelihood and competence Mr. Ness 
has been aided by his estimable wife, whose fortunes were united with his 
in 1 86 1. She formerly bore the name of Rachel Onvek, her parents being 
Jim and Mary Onvek, all natives of Norway. The union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Ness has been blessed with six children, named as follows: Ole, Jim, Lars, 
Nels, Mary and Oliver. Ole married Jane Thompson, who is deceased; Jim 
wedded Susie Hanson, and lives in Iowa; Mary, the wife of Hans S. Hanson, 
also is a resident of Iowa; Lars chose Leverine Hanson for his wife, and 
their home is near Lisbon, Illinois; and- Nels, who wedded Carrie Nelson, 
dwells in the same locality. The father is a Republican in politics, and re- 
ligiously he is a member of the Lutheran church. 

Oliver N. Ness, the youngest child of our subject, was born on this 
farm, on the 22d of December, 1876. He received a good education in the 
public schools of this neighborhood, and under his father's instruction 
mastered the details of agriculture. He has always resided upon the home 
farm, and is a practical business man. In 1896 he married Julia Gunder- 



732 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

son. a daughter of Gunner and Stena (Burson) Gunderson, natives of Nor- 
way. The father is still Viv'mg in this county, but the mother is deceased. 
One child, a little daughter. Ruth, was born to the young couple on the 24th 
•of July, 1898. 



HARRY E. SNYDER. 



The pioneer in business is as interesting a character as the pioneer in 
agriculture. There are many pioneer farmers to each pioneer man of afi'airs. 
and the business man often supplies advice to other classes of men which 
makes him an invaluable memlier of the community: and the sons of such 
pioneers who are able to take up the burden of enterprises raised to the 
plane of success represent the best business brain of this age of advancement. 

Harry E. Snyder, a grain merchant at Gardner, Grundy county, repre- 
-sents one of the oldest business interests of that town, he being the successor 
to his father, Chester K. Snyder, in the business which the latter had estab- 
lished in 1875. Among the representative men of Gardner and of Grundy 
■county who have passed away Chester K. Snyder was conspicuous. His 
residence at Gardner dated from 1854, the year the town was laid out and 
the Chicago and Alton Railroad was constructed to that point. He was 
therefore a pioneer of the town and no man was more closely identified with 
•early and later business interests than he. 

Chester K. Snyder was born in Wayne county, New York, April 23, 
1832. His parents were natives of the Empire state. His father, Amos 
Snyder, was born in 1801, and his death occurred in 1875. His mother, 
whose maiden name was Sally Enos. was born in 1806 and passed away in 
1873. Amos Snyder was a prominent man in the community in which he 
lived, and at one time was the county judge of Wayne county. Chester K. 
Snyder, the fifth in a family of six children, was educated in the public schools 
of his native place and at the age of nineteen years learned the business of 
telegraphy, and for a period of three years, immediately preceding his com- 
ing to Illinois, was telegraph operator in his native state, and also for a time 
in Canada and Kentucky. 

Soon, after his arrival in Gardner, in 1854, Mr. Snyder became the first 
railroad agent here and he was also the agent at Dwight and Williamsville. 
In 1857 he engaged in the lumber and grain business at Williamsville, but in 
1861 returned to Gardner and took up the cultivation of a farm that he had 
previously purchased. He continued farming and railroading until 1875, 
Avhen he engaged in the grain and lumber business at Gardner. He carried 
on this enterprise until he retired from active life in 1887. He died in April, 
1891. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 733. 

Mr. Snyder was a successful business man and in all respects a most 
useful citizen, patriotic and public-spirited to an unusual degree and gener- 
ously helpful to all worthy local interests. He was married November 17. 
1857, to Polly J. Holland, who was born in Cayuga county, New York, in 
May, 1836, and is still living. 

Harry E. Snyder, son of Chester K. and Polly J. (Holland) Snyder, 
and his father's successor in business, was born on his father's farm near 
Gardner, September 15, 1861. He was educated in the public schools at 
Gardner and at a business college at Chicago, Illinois. He engaged in 
business with his father, in 1882, under the firm name of C. K. Snyder &: 
Son. In 1887, upon the retirement of Chester K. Snyder from the busi- 
ness, his interests were purchased by Harry E. Snyder and Henry Leach. 
Harry E. Snyder became sole proprietor in 1897. Mr. Snyder married ^liss 
Laura Leese. and they have two children, named Ira and lone. 

There is no movement tending to the improvement of public interest 
that does not receive Mr. Snyder's prompt and earnest indorsement and 
helpful assistance, for he has inherited somewhat of his father's public spirit 
along with the business abiiitv, which has not only insured his own advance- 
ment but also contributed to that of the community at large. 



JOHN S. WATSON, M. D. 

The influence in anv community of the reputable and conscientious fam- 
ily phvsician is not an uncertain or a circumscribed one. The family doctor 
has more intimate re'ations with the people than any one else, not excepting 
even the clergyman. Among the well-known physicians and surgeons of 
Grundy county and of a large part of Illinois is Dr. John S. Watson, of 
?vIinooka. 

Doctor Watson was born at Ottawa, in the province of Ontario, Can- 
ada, in 1845. Ke grew to manhood in his native place and received a liberal 
literary education at McGill University, at Montreal. In 1865 he came to 
Chicago with his parents, and there the latter passed the rest of their lives. 
Dr. Watson is one of six children, comprising three brothers and three sis- 
ters. Southwell Watson, the oldest of the brothers, is a resident of Atlantic, 
Iowa. Joseph T. is a resident of Chicago, as are the three sisters. — Helen, 
Lydia and Fanny. For some time previous to the great Chicago fire Dr. 
Watson was engaged in the drug business in that city, partly as a prepara- 
tion for his medical education, and was a victim of that destructive conflagra- 
tion. The first course of medical lectures which he attended was at Rush 



734 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Medical College, which was followed by two more courses at Bennett Col- 
lege, at which institution he was graduated in the class of 1875. 

He began the practice of his profession in Chicago, but soon afterward 
located at Minooka and has for twenty-five years been the leading physician 
in that part of Grundy county and adjoining sections of bordering counties. 
His rides have covered a radius of many miles with Minooka as a center. 
His professional career has been a remarkably successful one and he occupies 
a place in the front rank of the physicians and surgeons of Illinois. In con- 
nection with his practice he manages a fine drug store at Minooka. 

Dr. Watson was married in Chicago, Illinois, in 1867, to Miss Anna 
Bell, of that city. They are the parents of five daughters, all of whom have 
been given excellent opportunities for culture and are accomplished ladies 
of many graces and the most substantial intellectual equipment. The eldest 
two. Franc and Lottie B., are graduates of the Northwestern University, and 
Lorine is a graduate of the school of oratory which is connected with the 
above mentioned institution. Mildred, the fourth in order of birth, is now a 
student of the university. Ethel, the youngest, is a pupil of the Minooka 
public school. 

Besides being a prominent physician. Dr. Watson is a successful busi- 
ness man, and is numbered with the substantial citizens of the county in a 
financial way. He is the owner of valuable town property and several fine 
farms. As a citizen he is helpful and enterprising, and personally as well as 
professionally is held in high esteem. He was made a Mason many years 
ago and is well advanced in the order. 



GEORGE HEROLD. 



George Herold is one of the substantial citizens of Mazon township 
and is a highly respected man. He was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 
the village of Ansbach, near Lerberg, April 28, 1823, his parents being 
Leonard and Amelia (Behaker) Herold. His father was a native of Bavaria, 
where the family had lived for many generations, as had his wife's people. 
He was a butcher by trade and his father-in-law followed the same pursuit. 
as did the grandfather of Mrs. Herold, it being the family trade of the 
Behakers. Leonard Herold was th« owner of some property, including a 
small farm. He had two brothers who served in the war with Napoleon. 
He was a hard-working, industrious man, respected for his sterling worth. 
He was a member of the Lutheran church. His death occurred in Bavaria. 
when he was about seventv-five vears of age. His children were Leonard, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 735 

Michael, John, George, Magdalene, Barbara and Margaret. Of this family 
George was the only one who came to America. 

George Herold, the subject of this sketch, acquired his education in 
the common schools and remained on his father's farm until thirteen years 
of age. When young he learned the butcher's trade and worked with his 
father until eighteen years of age, after which he worked for a Mr. Weber 
in his native city. On attaining his majority he began working at the 
butchering business in various Bavarian cities, including Wurtzberg, Kis- 
singen and Schweinfurt. Subsequently he returned to his old home for a short 
time and then came to America, when about thirty-one years of age, leaving 
Bremen in June, 1854, on the sailing vessel. Crown Prince, which, after a 
voyage of forty-nine days, dropped anchor in the harbor of New York. 
The passage was a stormy one, the ship being blown so far out of her course 
to the north that they saw icebergs and were almost caught in the ice. 
However, they reached the port of New York in August, 1854. 

Mr. Herold worked in a butcher shop in that city until March, 1855, 
when he made his way to Chicago, where he was employed in a similar 
capacity until 1857. In the fall of that year he made his way to Aurora, Illi- 
nois, where he formed a partnership and engaged in the butchering busi- 
ness. In the spring of 1858, however, he came to Morris, where he engaged 
in business along that line on his own account. In the spring of 1866 he 
removed to Braceville township, where he remained until 1894 or 1895, 
when he took up his abode upon his present farm, comprising eighty acres 
of rich land in Mazon township. He has prospered as the result of his unflag- 
ging industry and enterprise and the assistance of his wife, who has been 
indeed a capable iielpmeet to him. They now each own eighty acres of 
valuable land and have a comfortable home for their old age. 

Mr. Herold was married January 27, 1857, in Chicago, to Babeta Rein- 
lasoeder, who was born in Bavaria, February 20, 1826, in the same locality 
as her husband, a daughter of Leonard and Jacobina (Gier) Reinlasoeder. 
Her father was a butcher in Ansbach and both he and his wife were natives of 
that country, belonging to old Bavarian families. Their children were 
Jacobina, Hannah, Margaret and John, who came to America; and Fred- 
erick, who remained in Ansbach. In 1858 the father crossed the Atlantic, 
when sixty-nine years of age, accompanied by liis wife and daughter Mar- 
garet. Mrs. Herold had come to America in 1854, alone, and on reaching 
this countrv, her father made his home with her. as he was too old to do 
any business. He died on the farm upon which our subject resided in 
Braceville township, being then seventy-two years of age. He was a mem- 
ber of the Lutheran church and was always an industrious and upright 
man. He owned a small farm of twenty acres in Bavaria and reared a good 



736 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

family. His wife died at the age of seventy-five years, in the home of her 
son, John, in Good Farm township, Grundy county. As before stated, their 
daughter, Babeta, came to America alone, when twenty-seven years of age, 
sailing from Bremen in June. 1854. on the Dolphin, which reached New 
York after a voyage of forty-two days. She made her way to Chicago, 
where she secured work, there remaining until her marriage in 1857. The 
children of Mr. and ]\Irs. Herold are Jacobina. who was born January 21. 
1858, and died at the age of five years and six months; and Amelia, who 
was born March 10. 1863, and is the wife of L. Dujarrick, who works the 
home farm. They have two living children. Florence R. and Inez Emma. 
In their religious faith ^Ir. and Mrs. Herold are Lutherans, and in 
politics ^Ir. Herold is independent, but cast his last vote for W. J. Bryan and 
free silver. He and his wife have succeeded in securing a good home, al- 
though they came to America without capital and with no knowledge of the 
English language, and in the face of many difficulties they have steadily 
worked their way upward until they now have a comfortable competence. 
They certainly deserve great credit for their success and are entitled to the 
high regard which is given to them. 



ALLEX H. FOSTER. 



Among the veterans of the civil war who at the call for troops responded 
and went forth to battle for the Union is Allen Horton Foster, a highly re- 
spected citizen of Mazon township, Grundy county. His life record has 
indeed been an honorable one. characterized by fidelity to duty not only 
upon the battle-fields of the south but also in all the relations of his public 
and private career. It is believed that his ancestry on the paternal side is 
Scotch-Irish. The founders of the family in America came here in very early 
colonial days, and afterward became pioneers of Pennsylvania. Richard 
Foster, the first of whom we have authentic record, was a well-to-do farmer 
of Maryland. 

In 1 710 Basil Foster, one of his descendants, emigrated to the Key- 
stone state. In 1779 he and his family, together with twelve other families, 
met in Prince George county, ^Maryland, and signed a compact agreeing to 
penetrate the forests on the Broad Top mountains of Pennsylvania and make 
permanent settlements. In this colony were Richard and Benjamin Penn 
and Lewis Fluck. "the guide of 1776." together with other families. This 
little band of emigrants moved up the river to where the town of Saxton 
now stands and there built a block-house and surrounded the tract of land 
with a stockade. That same ground is now the site of the Fock'er cemeterv. 




<^j!6yi^. 7i^^ ej^>o£Z 




(7(Si Oji^x^m^jCX^ 'J^^LaJ^-^U^^ TV-^i'^^^i^zv 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 72,7 

W hen July. 1780. rolled around they had a considerable crop of grain to 
harvest and were engaged in that work on a certain Saturday on the 15th of 
July, 1780, when alarm was spread through the little colony by the sight of 
smoke arising from Shy Beaver block-house, six miles down the river. This 
was an indication that the Delaware Indians were on the war-path. An 
attack had been expected and by a code of signals the settlers were called to 
the Shoup block-house, and ere the dawn of Sunday. July 16, 1780. the 
twelve families that had made their way to the Juniata valley had started on 
their way back to Maryland. There were forty persons in the party. Seven 
years later, in 1787, the same twelve families and several other families in 
addition returned to the Juniata valley, and the Fosters pushed their way 
into the wilderness six miles southeast of where they had made their first 
settlement. In 1789 Basil Foster and his son, Richard L., built a hewed-Iog 
house in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, which has since sheltered six gen- 
erations of the family, and is still occupied. 

Richard L. Foster, one of the sons of Basil Foster and the grandfather 
of our subject, was born in Maryland. September 16, 1770, and was therefore 
about nine years of age at the time of the tirst emigration to Pennsylvania. 
\\ hen the settlers were driven from their new home through fear of the 
Indians he and Charity Johnson, then a little maiden of ten summers, were 
placed upon the same horse and thus traveled to the Potomac river. The 
little girl was born in Maryland, September 27. 1769. In the seven years 
which followed their return to their native state their friendship continued 
to grow, and ultimately ripened into love. In 1793 they were married by 
the famous Bishop Asbury of the Methodist church. Their union was 
blessed with the following children: Wealthy, born April 8, 1794, died in 
Bureau county, Illinois, in 1879; Sarah, born September 26, 1795, died in 
Bureau county, in 1885: Ephraim, born January 12, 1797, died in Fulton 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1877; Eli, born July 10, 1799, died in Grundy 
county, Illinois, in 1875; Richard, born August 29, 1801, died at Wallace, 
Knox county, Illinois, August 29, 1888; Lewis, born February 9, 1803, was 
living in Lucas county, Iowa, in 1888, but since that time has not been 
heard from; Thomas, born September 30, 1805, died in Bedford county, 
Pennsylvania, June 8, 1886; Ruth, born July 10, 1808, was living in Decatur 
county, Iowa, in 1888: Josiah. born Alarch 28. 1810. was living in Highland 
county, Ohio, in 1888; and Septimus, born October 2, 1813, was living in 
Fulton county, Pennsylvania, in 1888. After their marriage the parents of 
these children moved into the old log house in Pennsylvania that Richard 
L. Foster, the father, had erected. Richard Foster was renowned as a 
hunter, and many interesting stories have been told of his exploits. It is 
believed that both he and his father were in the battle of Bloody Run, Penn- 



738 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

sylvania. He lived to the venerable age of eighty-eight years, passing away 
November 30. 1853. ^vhile his wife died October 22, 1843. Many of their 
descendants are scattered throughout the United States, the representatives 
of the family being particularly numerous in Illinois. 

Eli Foster, the father of our subject, was born July 10. 1799, in Mary- 
land, became a pioneer carpenter and cabinet-maker of Pennsylvania, and 
was married in Bedford county, that state, April 29. 1827. to Catherine 
Steele. Tlieir marriage occurred where the original settlement of the family 
was made, on the Raystown branch of the Juniata river. The lady was 
born in that locality. April 24, 1810. The Steeles were an old Pennsylvania 
Dutch family, and the father was a pioneer of Bedford county, that state. 
where he cleared and developed a large farm and became a well-to-do agri- 
culturist. His children were: Jacob, a Dunkard minister, was the father 
of eleven children, and after giving to each one of them eight hundred acres 
of land he had eleven hundred acres left. He also owned a sawmill and grist- 
mill, and was a prominent and influential citizen, who enjoyed the confidence 
of the entire community. He transacted business for the entire neighbor- 
hood, and no trust reposed in him was ever betrayed. The other children 
of Mr. Steele were George, Solomon, Catherine and Lydia, all of whom be- 
came well-to-do farming people. 

Eli Foster and his wife, the parents of our subject, took up their abode 
in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, where the father worked at the trades of 
carpentering and cabinet-making. He conducted a shop for many years, 
manufacturing furniture and coffins. In 1840 he removed with his family to 
Highland county, Ohio, making the trip in the fall of that year with wagons. 
They were several days on the way. but at length took up their al:)ode in 
\'ienna. Highland county, where Mr. Foster conducted a cabinet-making 
shop for many years. His wife died in Ohio. January 14. 18S6. She was 
a lady of many virtues and a sincere member of the Methodist church. The 
children of that union were: Reuben, born January 5. 1828; Cyrus, born 
October 25, 1829; Lucinda, born October 31. 1831: Levi, born September 
23, 1833; Alfred L.. born March 8, 1836; Allen, born April 8, 1838, in Penn- 
sylvania, as were all those named above; George F.. born in Ohio. July 23. 
1840; Minerva, August 23. 1S42; and Sarah E.. July 5. 1844. After the 
death of his first wife Mr. Foster was again married, the wedding taking 
place in Highland county, Ohio, August 21. 1849. the lady of his choice being 
Mary Claypool. who was born November 30, 1819, and was the widow of 
Perry Claypool. Her maiden name was Halsted. The children of this mar- 
riage were: Juliana, who was born in 1853 and died October 8, 1854: 
and Catherine, born January 29. 1854. In 1849 Mr. Foster removed with 
his family to Illinois, making the journey with wagons and horses and reach- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 739 

ing his destination after three weeks of travel. He settled in W'auponsee 
township. Grundy county, and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of 
wild prairie land, which he improved, making a good pioneer home. He 
erected substantial buildings and transformed the wild tract into richly cul- 
tivated fields. His death occurred on that farm January 23, 1874, when he 
had attained the age of seventy-four years, six months and thirteen days. 
In his political views he was a Democrat, and held the of^ce of supervisor 
and other township positions. In religious faith he was a Methodist, and 
was well known as a highly respected citizen. 

Allen Horton Foster, the subject of this review, was born in Stoners- 
town, Pennsylvania, April 8, 1838, acquired a common-school education and 
was reared to farm life. He came with his father to Grundy county when a 
lad of ten vears, and can well remember the journey. They camped at night 
by the wayside in true pioneer style, sleeping in the wagons. There were 
three two-horse teams and three weeks had passed ere they reached their des- 
tination. Amid the wild scenes of .the frontier Mr. Foster was reared, and well 
can he remember the incidents of pioneer life. 

He aided in the work of the home farm until after the inauguration of 
the civil war. when, prompted by a spirit of patriotism, he joined the Union 
army, enlisting as a private at Morris, Illinois, August 10, 1862. He be- 
came the tenor drummer and afterward the base drummer of Company D, 
Ninety-first Illinois Infantry, under command of Captain E. J. Fosha. He 
served for three years and was honorably discharged at New Orleans, on the 
5th of June, 1865. The Ninety-first Illinois Infantry was organized at Camp 
Butler, Illinois, in August, 1862, by Colonel Henry M. Day, and was mus- 
tered in on the 8th of September, following. They left Camp Butler on the 
1st of October for the front and arrived at Shepherdsville, Kentucky, on 
tlie 7th of that month. They did scouting duty in that state, following 
Morgan's troops and guarding the Louisville & Nashville Railroad from the 
8th of October until the 20th of December. On the morning of the latter 
day the rebel general, John Morgan, appeared with his forces at Elizabeth- 
town, Kentucky, where the Ninety-first was then stationed, under the com- 
mand of Lieutenant Colonel Harry S. Smith. Three companies of the 
regiment had been detached and were captured the day before while guard- 
ing railroads elsewhere. The remainder of the regiment was armed with 
the old-fashioned flint-lock muskets, and as their ammunition was exhausted 
after a short engagement, at i 130 P. M., they were forced to surrender, seven 
men having been killed, while several were wounded. The rebel loss in 
killed and wounded exceeded two hundred. The Ninety-first was soon 
afterward paroled. On the 28th of December, 1862, its men scattered, mak- 
ing- their wav to Benton barracks, St. Louis, Missouri. Many of them 



740 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

returned home on short visits, but on the 28th of February. 1863, two- 
thirds of the regiment answered to roll call at Benton barracks and were 
given six months' pay. 

On the 5th of June of the same year they were exchanged and were 
furnished with new arms and equipments. In July they were stationed at 
Vicksburg where many were ill, while others died, the result of poisoned 
water which had been contaminated by the dead who had fallen in the 
memorable siege of Vicksburg. From the 25th of July until the 13th of 
August, 1863, the regiment engaged in scouting duty near Port Hudson, 
after which they were stationed at New Orleans, Louisiana, until Septem- 
ber 5, 1863. On the "th of that month they were engaged in battle with 
the enemy at Atchafalaya river, and on the following day succeeded in driv- 
ing the rebels across the river and captured two hundred prisoners. On 
the 23d of October the Xinety-first started for Texas, arriving at Point 
Isabel in that state on the 3d of November. On the 6th of the same month 
they started for Brownsville, Texas, and on the way were engaged in 
skirmishing with the enemy during the three-days march. On the 31st of 
December, 1863, the regiment made its famous raid, capturing Salt Lake, 
and on the 9th of January, 1864. they again arrived at Brownsville, after 
marching two hundred miles. On the nth of September of the same year 
the regiment was attacked by the enemy at Bagdad, on the Rio Grande 
river, and afterward took an active part in the siege and capture of Spanish 
Fort and Fort Blakely, The same command was also engaged in the 
skirmish with the enemy on Eight Alile creek, which was the last engage- 
ment on the Mississippi. Mr. Foster was ill in a hospital in Xew Orleans 
for a month. He was a loyal and faithful soldier, performing his duty 
promptly and cheerfully. He is now an honored member of the Grand 
Army Post at Morris. 

Returning to his home, Mr. Foster engaged in farming, and in Mazon, 
on the 1st of January, 1867, when twenty-eight years of age, was united 
in marriage to Miss Hattie Fuller, whose birth occurred December 28. 
1847. in Mazon township, one mile southeast of the village, her parents 
being William and Sarah (Royal) Fuller. Her father was born in Jefferson 
county, near LeRay, Xew York. February 21. 181 1. and was a son of Perley 
and Rebecca (Rogers) Fuller. Her great-grandfather was Porter Fuller. 
Avho was born in \'ermont and was of English descent. He removed to 
Xew York during the pioneer settlement of that state. The Fullers, how- 
ever, were representatives of an old colonial family connected with the 
Puritan emigrants, one of their ancestors having come from England with 
the Pilgrims in the Mayflower in 1620, when a settlement was effected at 
Plvmouth. Perlev Fuller was a farmer of Jefferson county, Xew York. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 741 

and there reared his family, his children being William. Rebecca, Almeda, 
Richard, Fannie, Julia. Hattie and Perley. All were born in the Empire 
state, after which the grandfather of Airs. Foster removed to Ohio, dying in 
Garrettsville. The year of his emigration westward was 1833. He settled 
upon a tract of heavily timbered land, and in the midst of the forest de- 
veloped a large and valuable farm, containing about five hundred acres. He 
served as a soldier in the war of 18 12 and was a member of the Presbyterian 
church. His wife died in 1874, at the age of eighty-one years. 

Their son, William Fuller, the father of Mrs. Foster, left his home in 
JS'ew York when about thirty years of age and removed to Chicago, where 
he lived for one year. He purchased an acre of land at Joliet, but came 
to Mazon, living with Owen Fuller for a year. He then purchased eighty 
acres of wild land in Mazon township, for a dollar and a quarter per acre, 
and paid for the property with money gained by splitting rails for thirty- 
seven and a half cents per hundred. On the 10th of January, 1846. in 
Mazon, he married Sarah Royal, who was born in Ohio, December 11, 
1824, a daughter of Charles and Mary Royal. Her father was of English 
lineage, a son of William Royal, who had come to this country from 
England. Leaving the Buckeye state. Charles Royal emigrated to Illinois 
and cast in his lot with the pioneer settlers of Mazon township. About 
1852 he removed to Oregon, crossing the plains with wagons, and died 
in the Sunset state when about seventy-eight years of age. His children 
were W'esley, John, Sarah, Eliza, Fletcher, William, ]\Iary, Elizabeth and 
James. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Fuller located upon his farm 
of eighty acres, and his business interests were successfully conducted. He 
prospered in his undertakings, becoming a substantial pioneer and the 
owner of a well improved and valuable farm of three hundred and sixty 
acres. He also gave to each of his children one hundred acres. These 
were: Hattie, now Mrs. Foster: Gilbert, who was born January 28, 1850: 
and Mary R., born August 10, 1855. In his religious views the father 
was liberal, but was a man of high probity, honorable in all life's relations. 
He died March 11, 1875, on the old homestead, when sixty-four years of 
.age. 

Mr. and Mrs. Foster began their domestic life in Mazon township, on 
a part of the Fuller homestead, and there lived until their removal to the 
village of Mazon, in 1897. He prospered in his business undertakings, 
being ably assisted by his wife, who proved to him a faithful and capable 
helpmate. He now owns three hundred and ten acres of land three-fourths 
of a mile east of the village and from his property derives a handsome 
income. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Foster was blessed with seven 
children, namely: Cora May, who was born May 19, 1868: Grace, born 



742 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

June 30, 1870; Blanche, born July 29, 1872; Pina, born January 11, 1874; 
Daisy, born July 4, 1876: Hattie, liorn May 9, 1881 : and Roy A., born June 
4, 1886. 

Mr. and Mrs. Foster are Methodists in religious faith and take an 
active interest in the upbuilding of the church in which they hold member- 
ship. In his political views he is a Democrat, but has never sought office, pre- 
ferring that his time and attention should be given to his business affairs, in 
which he has met with creditable and well merited success. He is now living- 
retired in Mazon. enjoying a well earned rest. Upon the battle-fields of 
the south he displayed his loyalty to the government, and at all times has 
been true to his duties of citizenship, taking an active interest in every- 
thing tending to promote the welfare of county, state and nation. 



LAZENBY WALKER. 



Lazenby Walker, deceased, was one of the brave soldiers of the civil 
war who upon the altar of his country laid down his life in defense of the 
Union. In response to President Lincoln's call be donned the "blue" and 
upon the battle-fields of the south manifested his patriotic spirit by his devo- 
tion to duty. He was a man of unblemished character, widely and favorably 
known in Grundy county at the time when he enlisted under the stars and 
stripes. He founded here an excellent family that is still represented by the 
widow and children. 

Mr. Walker was born in Monroe county, near Bellville, Ohio, June i, 
1825, and was a son of Robert and Harriet (Lazenby) Walker. The par- 
ents were natives of England, in which country they were married. The 
father became a local Methodist minister in Monroe county, Ohio, where 
he located with his family in early pioneer times. There he owned and 
operated a farm and for many years he also engaged in preaching the gospel. 
About 1849 he removed to Morris, Illinois, and after a short time he pur- 
chased a farm about a mile south of Mazon, a part of this property now 
being occupied by his grandson, Eddie Walker. Rev. Robert Walker con- 
tinued the work of the ministry and carried the "glad tidings of great joy" 
to the early pioneer settlers of Grundy county. He was largely instrumental 
in founding the Methodist churches of the county, and the influence of his 
life was as a grateful benediction to all who knew him. In his later year he 
retired from farming and removed to Morris, wliere he died at the advanced 
age of eighty years. His residence was always the home of the early pioneer 
circuit-riders, and his earnest devotion to the cause of Methodism was most 
effective in promoting the work of his church in this section of the state. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 743 

In his early life he gave his political support to the Whig party and later 
voted with the Republican party. His children were Lazenby, John, Will- 
iam W., Thomas and Mary L., wife of Thomas Widney, now of Chicago. 
Three of the sons, — Lazenby, William L. and Thomas, — were Union soldiers 
during the civil war. 

Lazenby Walker acquired a common-school education, was reared upon 
the home farm, and near Bellville, Monroe county, on the i8th of March, 
1852, was united in marriage to Miss Ann Clithero, who was born August 4, 
1829, near Bellville, her parents being John D. and Jemima (Rush) Clithero. 
Her father was born November 25, 1803, and was a son of John and Ann 
(Dixon) Clithero. Her grandfather was a native of Wales and was a shoe- 
maker by trade. After his marriage he came to America, bringing with him 
his family, and taking up his abode in Bellville, Ohio. In that locality he 
developed an excellent farm in the midst of the forest and made a good 
pioneer home, becoming a substantial citizen. He and his wife, Ann, were 
the parents of several children, but only two lived beyond infancy, and Mary 
died at the age of sixteen years. John, the other member of the family, 
became the father of Mrs. Walker. Her grandfather, John Clithero, Sr., 
was a member of the Methodist church and an industrious and highly re- 
spected pioneer citizen. He lived to old age and died in Bellville, Ohio. 
John D. Clithero, the father of Mrs. Walker, obtained a common-school 
education in the Buckeye state and was reared to agricultural pursuits. In 
Ohio, on the 7th of October, 1824, he married Jemima Rush, who was born 
in Pennsylvania, March 6, 1806, a daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Rush, 
who also were natives of the Keystone state. Her father was a farmer and 
became one of the pioneers of Monroe county, Ohio, where he cleared a 
farm in the midst of the heavy timber region. His home was a log cabin, 
and so wild was the country that it was no infrequent thing to hear wolves 
howling around their house at night. Mr. Rush held membership in the 
United Brethren church and was a man whose energy, enterprise and relia- 
bility made him a highly respected citizen of his community. He died in 
Monroe county, Ohio, near Antioch, when well advanced in years. His 
children were: John, Slater, Rachel, Elizabeth and Jemima. 

After their marriage John D. and Jemima Clithero located on a farm 
in the midst of the forest and energetically devoted his time and attention 
to the work of developing his land. He made an excellent pioneer home. 
All of his children were born in Ohio, and, with the exception of two who 
died in early life, all became a credit to the family. Selling his farm near 
Bellville, Mr. Clithero took up his abode near Woodsfield, in Monroe county, 
Ohio, where he purchased a large farm, upon which he lived for many years, 
his death there occurring March 9, 1880, when he had attained the age of 



744 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

seventy-nine years. A member of the Methodist church, he long served as 
class-leader, filling that position until advanced age prevented his regular 
attendance at the church services. For a number of years he was also a 
licensed exhorter in the church. Plain-spoken, straightforward in all his 
dealings, he carefully reared his children to have strict regard for truth 
and morality, and in these respects he set them an excellent example. His 
life was indeed an exemplary one and he enjoyed the esteem and confidence 
of all who knew him. In politics he was an old-line Whig until after the 
dissolution of the party, when he joined the ranks of the new Republican 
party. His wife, a most estimable lady, passed away June 19, 1881. This 
worthy couple were the parents of the following children : Joseph, who 
was born July 25, 1825, was married May 14, 1850, to Caroline Jones, and 
died July 8, 1896; Elizabeth, born May 25, 1827, was married December 13, 
1849, to Fletcher Starr, and died March 24, 1893; Ann, born August 4, 1829. 
was married March 18. 1852; John, born July 2, 1831: Isaac, born June 13, 
1835, was married March 8, 1857, to Sarah Taylor, who was born May 30, 
1835, and afterward he was a second time married, on the 28th of January, 
1869; Rachel, who was born May 20, 1837, died June 7, 1839; Edward, who 
was born May 18, 1839, was married in August, 1861; Jemima, who was 
born March 19, 1841. was married June 17, 1862. and died March 7, 1871: 
Ivy J., was born April 9, 1843; an infant, unnamed, died January 14, 1845, 
the day succeeding its birth; Citizen was born February i, 1846, and was 
married January 26, 1869; and Cyrus W., born December i. 1847, ^^"^s mar- 
ried September 6, 1877. Sarah Clithero was married November 6, 1856, 
to Samuel Gilmore, and died March 30, 1863. 

Lazenby Walker and his wife, Ann Clithero, located on a farm about 
a mile from Bellville, Ohio, renting land in Monroe county until they came 
to Illinois. On the 6th of December, 1S5S, they arrived in Morris and took 
up their abode in old Mazon, where they Hved for one year. In the spring of 
i860 Mr. Walker purchased eighty acres of land south of the village. — the 
farm upon which his son Eddie now resides. This was a tract of wild prairie, 
upon which not a furrow had been turned or an improvement made. He 
at once erected a home and began the improvement of the farm, but his 
labors were soon afterward interrupted by his enlistment as a private in the 
civil war. 

Feeling that his country needed his services and that it was his duty to 
aid in behalf of the Union, he enlisted at Morris, on the nth of August, 
1862, as a member of Company D, Ninety-fourth Illinois Infantry. He 
served for three years. He took part in a number of skirmisiies and was 
always found at his post, faithfully discharging any task assigned to him. 
Death came to him at Brownsville. Texas, on the 14th of December, 1863, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 745 

and his remains were laid in the soldiers' cemetery at Fort Brown. He died 
for his country, leaving to his family a record of an heroic and well-spent life. 
He was a member of the Methodist church, and all who knew him esteemeil 
him for his sterling worth. Upon the farm he was an industrious and hard- 
working man, and as a soldier he was noted for his accommodating disposi- 
tion, being ever ready to aid a comrade who was ill or in distress. He often 
took another's place on guard duty and thus won the love of all who wore 
the blue. 

The children of Mr. and Mrs. Walker were: William D., who was 
born January 7, 1853, and died when about six years of age; Isaac Benson, 
who was born January 18, 1855: Harriet Jane, born March 8, 1857, and died 
in infancy; Thomas Wilbur, born April 16, 1859; Eddie W., born October 
31, i860; and Oliver L., born December 8, 1863. After the enlistment of 
her husband Mrs. Walker took charge of the home farm and worked very 
hard to bring up her family and care for them. The children were small 
and the struggle was a very dif^cult one. However, she resolutely faced 
the conditions before her, and by her thrift, industry and good management 
succeeded in keeping her little ones together and in providing for them a 
comfortable home. At the time of the father's death but little improvement 
had been made upon the farm. Only a small payment had been made on 
the farm, and the mother was obliged to pay the entire amount agreed upon 
to perfect the title. Bravely she struggled on, supporting her family, pro- 
viding for them a good home and giving them a good common-school edu- 
cation. As their financial resources increased she purchased more land and 
added to the property until she owned a valuable tract of two hundred 
acres. Upon this she erected good farm buildings and thus liecame the 
owner of one of the most desirable properties in the township. She is one 
of the honored pioneer women of Grundy county, and certainly deserves 
great credit for what she accomplished in bringing up her family and provid- 
ing for them a comfortable home under such difficult circumstances. Her 
own educational privileges were limited, but she had a naturally bright and 
active mind and excellent business qualifications. When only twelve years 
of age she united with the Methodist church, of which she has since been a 
faithful and earnest member, doing all in her power to advance its work and 
rearing her children in the fear and admonition of the Lord. 

Thomas W. Walker, a son of Lazenby and Ann (Clithero) Walker, was 
reared in Grundy county upon the old home farm, and having arrived at 
years of maturity he was married, September 17, 1879, to Martha Preston, 
the wedding taking place in Good Farm township. She was born in Grundy 
county, May 20, 1861, her father being James Preston, a son of Elijah and 
Martha (Weakly) Preston. James Preston was a native of Tuscarawas 



~a('> biographical axd genealogical record. 

county, Ohio, ami was a farmer by occupation. He was married in Guern- 
sey county, Ohio, to Elizabeth Huffman, who was of sturdy Pennsylvania 
Dutch ancestry. In 1849 Mr. Preston removed with his family to Grundy 
county, Illinois, locating in Felix, where his father had purchased two hun- 
dred and forty acres of land. Upon this tract William and James Preston, 
brothers, established their home, and the latter improved the farm and 
added to it until he had two hundred and eighty acres of land. He was 
recognized as one of the valued and representative citizens of the commu- 
nity. Twice married, the children of his first marriage were: Eliza; Frank, 
who died at the age of fourteen years; Randolph; Sarah; Mary Adeline; and 
Martha. After the death of his first wife Mr. Preston wedded Rachel Martin, 
nee Bailey, and they had one son, James. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Walker began their domestic life upon the farm 
now occupied by Oliver Walker, and there they lived until the death of the 
wife, on the 17th of August, 1880. She was a woman of many virtues and a 
member of the Methodist church. Their only child was Maud M., who was 
born August 18, 1880, and was therefore only five days old at the time of 
her mother's death. Her grandmother, Mrs. Ann Walker, then took charge 
of her and has carefully reared and educated her. She is a graduate of the 
high school of Mazon and has enjoyed excellent musical advantages. She 
has taught music to some extent, but does not make it a business. A young 
lady of culture and refinement, she is a credit to the family and has brought 
many happy hours to the old homestead. For his second wife Thomas W. 
Walker chose Miss Florence Beckwith, the wedding being celebrated in 
Plainville, Will county, Illinois. After their marriage they resided for a 
few years in Plainville and then removed to oMazon, where Mr. Walker 
erected an attractive and substantial two-story brick residence. Their home 
has been blessed with the presence of one child, Albert Vernon. 

In his political views Mr. Walker is a stalwart Republican and has held 
the office of treasurer of the school board. He holds membership in the 
Methodist church, and is a public-spirited and progressive citizen who gives 
his aid and co-operation to all measures calculated to prove of benefit to his 
town, county and state. A practical business man, he has won success in 
his undertakings, and throughout an active business career his honorab'e 
efforts have gained for him the confidence of his fellow men. 



EDDIE W. WALKER. 

On the roll of enterprising farmers and stock-raisers of Grundy county 
appears the name of Eddie W. Walker, who is engaged in the cultivation 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 7A7 

of a valuable tract of laiul and the breeding of fine horses and cattle, his 
home being in Mazon township. He is a man of excellent education and 
well known as a progressive and public-spirited citizen. He was born in 
Mazon township, October 31, i860, and was reared to farm life. He began 
his education in the common schools of his district and afterward continued 
his studies in the commercial department of the normal school at Valparaiso, 
Indiana, in which he was graduated with the class of 1872. Subsequently he 
attended the normal college at Dixon, Illinois, and later engaged in teaching 
school in Mazon township. He was very successful in his labors as an 
educator and acted as the principal of the graded school in Mazon during 
the fall and winter of 1888. Altogether he taught school for eight winters, 
while during the summer season he engaged in agricultural pursuits. His 
labors in the school-room were very etTective and beneficial, for he had the 
ability to impart clearly and concisely to others the knowledge he had ac- 
quired. 

Mr. Walker was married September 25, 1885, in Gardner, Illinois, 
at the residence of the bride's parents, to Miss Myrtle H. Keepers, a daugh- 
ter of J. J. and Mary (Kimball) Keepers. She was born February 15, 1865, 
in Jefi'erson township, Guernsey county, Ohio, and was brought by her 
parents to Grundy county when only fourteen months old, the family locating 
in Good Farm township. She was therefore reared in Grundy county and 
in the common schools began her education, her early privileges being 
supplemented by study in the Morris Normal School through one winter 
and in the Gardner high school. She thus acquired a good education and 
when only seventeen years of age began teaching. For five terms prior 
to her marriage she followed teaching, with excellent success. She is a lady 
of superior culture and innate refinement, and to her husband has been a 
faithful companion and helpmate on life's journey. Mr. and Mrs. Walker 
began their domestic life upon the old homestead and Mr. Walker continued 
to rent land from his mother for about five years. On the division of 
the estate he received forty acres as his share, and to this he has added 
from time to time until he now owns one hundred and sixty acres of fine 
farming land, which he has improved with tile drainage and by excellent 
cultivation until he now has one of the most desirable farming properties in 
the community. He has erected upon the place good substantial buildings, 
and the well tilled fields give evidence of his careful supervision. He is a 
well known and prominent breeder of Percheron horses and short-horn 
Durham cattle. He is a well known dealer, having some very fine stock. 
A practical business man, his industry and enterprise have been salient 
features in his success, and to-day he stands among the well-to-do farmers 
of Grundv countv. 



748 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Walker have been born the following children: 
Floyde E., who was born July 24, 1886; J\lyr J., born ISIarch 26, 1890; 
•Ollie L., born May 16, 1892; and Dayre K., who was born July 13, 1897, and 
died February 8, 1898, at the age of seven months. 

The parents are both earnest Christian people. Mr. Walker belongs 
to the Methodist church, with which he united when fourteen years of age, 
.and his wife became a member of the Baptist church when twelve years of 
age. He has always taken an active interest in the cause of education and 
the public-school system finds in him a warm friend. He has done effective 
service in the interests of the schools while serving as director and trustee, 
and his co-operation has been given to many other movements and 
measures calculated to prove of public benefit. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Modern Woodmen of Mazon. Honorable in business, straight- 
forward in all life's relations, he commands the respect and esteem of his 
fellow men and is justly classified among the representative agriculturists 
of his community. 



TOHN H. COLES. 



The writer may be in error, but, having been for many years a close 
■observer of all sorts and conditions of men, and having to some extent 
studied the influence of occupation on character, he has long been of the 
opinion that the daily life of the shoemaker is conducive to thought. 
Thought is conducive to right understanding, and hence the fact that shoe- 
makers are exceptionally well informed upon all public questions would 
appear to require no further explanation. It should be understood, how- 
ever, that shoemakers who work in their own shops are referred to, shoe- 
makers who are masters of all parts of the trade, not "operatives" who do 
odd bits of shoemaking in big factories and know little about any other 
portions of the work. In his idle intervals the shoemaker reads, and while 
he works he thinks and argues, and he is usually able to give a good reason 
for any opinion he may advance. As a consequence his humble shop be- 
comes the center of local political discussion and is a point from which 
political opinion of a sensible type is disseminated throughout his neighbor- 
hood. Usually, as with the subject of this sketch, the shoemaker is entrusted 
with responsible ofiice. 

John H. Coles, notary public, justice of the peace and police justice, 
has been a resident of Gardner, Grundy county, Illinois, since 1857. He 
was born in Delaware county, Pennsylvania, February 5, 1822, and his 
father, Enoch Coles, was a native of Westchester county. New York. The 
family is of English origin and the original American ancestor came over in 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 749- 

1642. Two brothers came at that time and one of them settled in New 
York and the other in New Jersey, and from the former the subject of this 
notice descended. Enoch Coles was married to Margaret Henderson, a 
native of Delaware, and about 1818 he removed to Pennsylvania, where he 
lived out the remainder of his life. After her husband's death, the wife of 
Enoch Coles and the mother of John H. Coles removed to Germantown, 
Pennsylvania, where she died. 

John H. Coles was one of sixteen children, only seven of whom were 
living in 1899. He was reared, educated and married in Pennsylvania. His 
first wife, who was Mary Elizabeth Hart, died in Gardner in 1861. In 1863 
he was married to Mrs. Martha J. Dunmore, whose maiden name was Sut- 
ton. Mr. Coles was the father of five children by his first wife, three of whom 
are living; and four by his second wife, all of whom are living. The eldest 
by his first marriage now living is Mrs. Mary Van Dusen, of Pontiac, Illi- 
nois. The others are John Alfred, of Clay county, Kansas, and William F.,. 
of Ottumwa, Iowa. George and Henry, children by this marriage, are dead. 
The eldest by his second marriage is Elwood A., of Greenfield township. 
The second is Mrs. Jessie M. Clover, of Morris, Illinois. The others are- 
Herbert M. and Nathan E., both of Morris, Illinois. 

John H. Coles learned the trade of shoemaking of his father, who fol- 
lowed that trade as the business of his life, and has worked at it most of the 
time since. He has been a justice of the peace and police magistrate for 
nearly thirty years, was the first police magistrate of Gardner, the first presi- 
dent of the board of trustees of his town and has been town clerk for twenty- 
five years. He was the first notary public in Greenfield township and now 
has his ninth consecutive commission. Politically he has been a Repulilican 
since the organization of that party. All his life he has been a pronounced 
temperance man and he has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church since 1843. 



SAMPSON H. REDFIELD. 

Sampson Henry Redfield, one of the venerable and respected pioneer 
citizens of Mazon township, Grundy county, was born in Winchester, 
Worcester county, Massachusetts, January 9, 1814, a son of Sherman and 
Elsie (Warner) Redfield. Both the Warners and the Redfields were of the 
old New England Puritan stock, the remote founders of the families having 
come from England, at the time of the foundation of the Massachusetts 
colony. 

William Redfin — or Redfen, as the name was first spelled in America 
and which was gradually changed to Redfield — was the founder of this family 



750 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

in this country, coming from England between 1630 and 1639 and settling 
on the south side of Charles river, about six miles from Boston, one of the 
first to locate on that side of the river. But little is known of him, how- 
ever. From his son James the branch of Redfields with which we are con- 
cerned has descended. James learned the art of tanning in New London, 
Coimecticut, serving five years from April i, 1667, at which latter date he 
was si.xteen years of age. 

Theophilus, the eldest son of James, next in the line of descent to the 
relatives of our subject, learned the carpenter's trade, and probably settled 
at Killingworth, Connecticut, after becoming of age. He bought a home- 
stead, which was afterward named Clinton, and is now one of the pleasantest 
of those villages which border on Long Island sound. About 1717 or the 
the next year he purchased a tract of land of about a hundred and twenty 
acres on Chestnut Hill, North KillingAvorth, where several families of the 
name still reside, and here Theophilus passed his remaining days. He was 
known as Sergeant Redfield, was a member of a military company and of 
several town committees, and was a prominent citizen. He married Priscilla 
Greenel, or Greinel, who at the time was aged seventeen years: she was a 
daughter of Daniel and Lydia Greenel. The children were Daniel, Eliza- 
beth, Richard, Ebenezer, Lydia, Theophilus, Priscilla, Peleg, George, Will- 
iam, Josiah, Jane and James. — thirteen in all, and all of whom lived to have 
families of their own. From this stock are descended nine-tenths of those 
bearing the name of Redfield in this country. 

George Redfield, the sixth son of Theophilus, resided at Killingworth, 
Connecticut, and in 1750 married Trial Ward, of that place. She died in 
1762, and January 8. 1767, Mr. Redfield married Abigail Stone, who died 
April 15, 1769. He died at Killingworth, May 30, 1812, in his eighty- 
seventh year. His children were all by his first marriage, namely : 
Ambrose, born December 13, 1750; Jeremy, August 21, 1752; Sylvanus. 
December 30, 1754: Seth, January 17, 1757: Jane. December 19, 1759: and 
Peleg, May 14, 1762. 

Seth. the fourth son of George Redfield. the next in our line, resided 
at Killingworth until about 1800, when he removed to Claremont. New 
Hampshire. December 2. 1779, he married Sarah Pierson, a daughter of 
Samuel and Rachel Pierson, of Killingworth. She died at Claremont, Sep- 
tember 5, 1802, and he afterward married a widow named Parmalee, and 
returned to Killingworth, where he passed the remainder of his days. The 
children by his first v.-ife were Truman, born at Killingworth. September 
23, 1780, became a blacksmith and died at Guadaloupe, West Lidies, in 1801 : 
Seth, born also at KilHngworth, July 17. 1780, and died July iS. 1782; Sher- 
man, born June 26, 1783; Sheldon, June 24, 1785; Cleveland, October 6, 



BIOGRAPHICAL A.\D GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 751 

1787; Samuel Ashford, born July 23. 1790, became a sailor, was impressed 
by the British while in the Gulf of Mexico and escaped, and died in 1813, 
at Woodstock, Vermont; Anthony Chauncey, born October 7, 1791; Sarah, 
January 7, 1793, died August 28, 1795; Seth, born February 10, 1796; Mar- 
vin. February 16, 1799; and Clermont, born in 1800 and died in 1802. 
The children by the second wife were : Adeline, born at Claremont, New 
Hampshire, in 1804; William, born in 1806, moved west and became a 
ship-builder at Green Bay, Wisconsin. 

Sherman, the third son of Seth Redfield, and the father of our subject, 
was a gunsmith and blacksmith by trade, and married at Claremont, in 1805, 
Elsie Maria Warner, a daughter of Abijah and Elsie (Fuller) Warner, of Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. In 1814 he served as a musician in the war with Great 
Britain, under Captain Warren, and was in one battle. From Claremont 
he moved to Fitzwilliam, New York, afterward to Rochester, same state. 
and finally to Canton, same state, in 1820, where he died June 3, 1850, aged 
sixty-seven years. His children were Lola Almira, born April 12, 1806; 
Frances Maria, born November 3. 1808, and died October 12, 181 1; Sarah, 
born March 27, 181 1; Sampson Henry, born January 9, 1814; Elsie Maria, 
April 28. 1816: Orrin Sherman. October 6, 1819; and Emily, December 
29, 1824. Mr. Sherman Redfield and wife w'ere both members of the Meth- 
odist church. In politics he was a Democrat, and in his general character he 
was an industrious and highly respected citizen. 

Abijah Warner was also of the old Puritan stock and a soklier in the 
war of the Revolution. He married Ellen Fuller, a daughter of John Fuller, 
of the old New England stock, who was a shoemaker by trade and also a 
soldier in the Revolutionary war. Abijah Warner was a well known tavern- 
keeper in Winchester for many years. He moved to St. Lawrence county. 
New York, in 1820, and passed his remaining days on his farm in that county, 
where he died in 1832, a prominent and respected citizen. His children 
were Abijah, Elsie, Betsy, Sampson and Nathaniel. 

During our Revolutionary period the Redfield family took a prominent 
part in behalf of American independence, and the sons of George Redfield, 
the great-grandfather of our subject, were noted for their patriotism. Am- 
brose, the eldest son of Seth, was a corporal in 1775, in Captain Samuel 
Gates' company, which was a part of the Sixth Regiment, serving at the 
siege of Boston in General Putnam's brigade and in several other engage- 
ments. Jeremy Redfield. the second son of George, was a resident of 
Killingworth, was a fifer in that war. succeeded by his brother Peleg. The 
last mentioned entered the continental army as a fifer in 1777. at the age of 
sixteen years and rendered a long continued service. There were many 
Redfields in the Revolutionarv war and seven in the war of 1812. 



75^ BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Sampson Henry Redfield, the immediate subject of this notice, was 
six years old when his father went to Canton, New York. He received but 
very little education, there being no schools of any account in his day; but he 
learned the blacksmith's trade thoroughly with his father and afterwacd 
farming, having a natural love for agricultural life and being determined 
when young to become the owner of broad acres. Mr. Redfield married, in 
St. Lawrence county, New York, February 17, 1848, Mary Alaria Hutchin- 
son, who was born in Canton, New York, March 8, 1822, a daughter of 
William and Mary E. (Clark) Hutchinson. William Hutchinson was born 
in England in 1790. His father was a native of Ireland and his mother 
was an English lady. William came to America when young, leaving his 
native country on account of the severe military laws. He settled in Canton, 
New York, and there married Mary E. Clark, of New England Puritan 
stock, and bought a farm in St. Lawrence county, New York, where he 
passed all his remaining days and died in i860, aged about seventy years. 
Politically he was a Democrat and he was an industrious, much respected 
man. His children were IMary AL, Clark, Louisa, Ira and Laura. 

After marriage, ^Ir. and Mrs. Sampson H. Redfield lived near Canton, 
New York, where he bought seventy acres of land, until November, 1858, 
when they moved to Illinois. They made the journey by w^ay of the lakes 
to Chicago and drove from there to Grundy county and settled in Mazon 
township on forty acres of land which Mr. Redfield bought, for eighteen 
dollars an acre, upon which there were some improvements, including a small 
frame house. He set himself diligently to the task of improving this farm 
and putting it under cultivation, and he was so successful that he was enabled 
to add to his landed property by judicious investment of his savings until he 
now owns two hundred acres of as good and productive land as the sun ever 
warmed into fertility, with fine and ample buildings and the best appliances 
of all kinds. Mrs. Redfield died October 28, 1880, after having been long a 
member of the Methodist church, with which Mr. Redfield has been identified 
for forty-five years. He is a Democrat in politics, a strong temperance man 
and a citizen of the highest character. 

The children of Sampson Henry and Mary Maria (Hutchinson) Redfield 
are Mary E., ^ilalvina J., and Emily E. They all received an excellent edu- 
cation, acquired largely at the High School Institute, a select school in Mor- 
ris, and all became teachers. Mary E. has taught in the schools of Grundy 
county for ten years and has become known as an efficient and popular 
teacher. A lady of much energy and ability, she went to Dakota and taught 
school near Alexandria and took up a government land claim of one hundred 
and sixty acres in Douglas county. South Dakota, which she sold a few- 
years later for one thousand dollars. She returned and is now living on the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 753 

old homestead. She is a lady of excellent financial ability. Malvina J. 
married George Burnham, a farmer, and they had four children named Le- 
land R., Mabel M., Amanda L. and Ida E. Mrs. Burnham died aged about 
forty-four years. She was a teacher in Grundy county for several years. 
Emily E. married Joseph E. Keepers and he farms the homestead. Mrs. 
Keepers was also a school-teacher in Grundy county. 



RHONELLO G. THOMPSON. 

The Thompson family of which our subject is a representative was 
founded in New England in colonial days. His grandfather, James Thomp- 
son, was born in the Pine Tree state and was twice married, his first union 
being with Sarah Bacon. After her death he wedded Matilda Stiles, and 
both ladies were representatives of old New England families that were 
established in Maine at an early day. The children of the first union were : 
Timothy, a cooper and carpenter; Osgood; Samuel, who died in 1850; and 
James, who is still living on a farm in Maine. The mother died in 1832 and 
the father wedded Matilda Stiles, by whom he had six children : Sarah, wife 
of Benjamin Moody; Hannah J., wife of Robert Shaddock; John, a resident 
farmer of the Pine Tree state; Mary E., who is married and lives in Maine; 
Lydia, wife of Albert Small; and Arietta, who is married and lives in Maine. 
James Thompson removed to Athens, Maine, after his marriage and became 
a well-to-do and respected citizen of that locality, his death occurring there 
in 1865, when he had attained a venerable age. He held the ofifice of select- 
man and served as an officer in the war of 1812, while one of his sons became 
a member of a Maine regiment during the civil war. He was incarcerated 
in Andersonville prison. 

Osgood Thompson, the father of our subject, obtained the usual school 
privileges afforded in his native state at that time. He was born in Somer- 
set, Maine, December 30, 1821, and was married there on the i8th of De- 
cember, 1842, to Hannah W. VVentworth, whose birth occurred near 
Camden, Maine, June 2, 1823, a daughter of Reuben and Sarah Wentworth. 
Her father was descended from old New England Puritan ancestors who 
came from the mother country, where the family was one of prominence. 
Hon. John Wentworth, one of the prominent men of Chicago, is a member 
of the same family. Reuben Wentworth was a farmer near Camden, Maine, 
and was accounted one of the substantial citizens of the community. He 
lived to an advanced age, his death occurring in the Pine Tree state. His 
children were Enoch, John, Daniel, Joseph, Jane, Evangeline and Sarah. 

After his marriage Osgood Thompson located in Somerset county. 



754 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Maine, where he worked at his trade, maintaining his residence in Athens 
tlirough a long period. In early Hfe lie served as a captain in the old state 
militia, was a selectman of his town, and held other local offices. In April, 
1866, he came to Illinois, where in the following August he was joined by his 
family, who took up their abode on a farm in Highland township, Grundy 
county, upon which our subject now resides. The father rented the land at 
first, but afterward purchased it. It had been broken only the year previous 
to his arrival in the county, and all of the improvements upon it were placed 
there through his own efforts. The following year he purchased eighty 
acres of land in Wall township. Ford county, locating upon that property 
in 1870 and making it his home until his death. By additional purchase 
he extended his boundaries until it comprised one hundred and twenty acres. 
He improved that farm from the original prairie, erected good buildings 
thereon and made an excellent home, being regarded as an industrious and 
capable man, who was highly respected. He died September 23, 1898. at 
the age of seventy-seven years, and his wife passed away July 4, 1897. Both 
were consistent members of the Methodist church, and Mr. Thompson 
served as a class-leader for twenty-five years, and took an active part in 
promoting the growth and upbuilding of the congregation with which he 
was connected. A few years prior to his death he put aside business cares 
and took up his abode in Melvin, Ford county, where he owned a pleasant 
home. He served as a member of the town council and was an infiuential 
citizen of that locality, greatly respected for his sterling worth. His chil- 
dren, seven in number, were all born in Maine, namely: William H., born 
May 21, 1842; Frederick G., born March 29, 1844; Anna B., born November 
9, 1846: Rhonello G., born September 4, 1848; May F., born June 24, 1854; 
James S., born July 9, 1858; and Vion O., born May 16, 1862. • Of this 
family two of the sons, William and Fred, were members of the Seventh 
Maine Infantry during the civil war. They went to the front with Com- 
pany F, for three years, and at the close of that period were honorably dis- 
charged, having participated in many battles, including the engagements 
at Gettysburg and the Wilderness, where Frederick was wounded. 

Rhonello G. Thompson, whose name introduces this review, was born 
September 4, 1848, at Athens, Maine, and enjoyed the usual common-school 
privileges. He assisted in the working of his father's farm near his native 
town, and in 1866, when about nineteen years of age, came with his parents 
to Illinois. He was married when nearly twenty-two years of age in High- 
land township, Grundy county, to Alice Matilda Waite, the wedding being 
celebrated December 22,, 1869. The lady was born in that township March 
26, 1851, and is a daughter of Philip and Nancy (Bryant) Waite. Her 
father was born in New York, January 6. 1819, a son of Walter Waite, who 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 755 

represented one of the old New England families of English lineage, repre- 
sentatives of the name being pioneer settlers near Buffalo, New York. 
Walter Waite was a farmer by occupation, and with his family he removed 
to Kane county, IlHnois, where he died at about the age of fifty years. His 
children were Philip, Benjamin, Simon, Lydia, Clark and Hiram. Philip 
Waite, the father of Mrs. Thompson, was educated in the common schools, 
reared on a farm, and in 1842 removed to Ohio, where he was married No- 
vember 6, 1845, to Nancy Bryant, of Dresden, that state. Her father, 
Joseph Bryant, was a native of Virginia, and became one of the pioneer set- 
tlers of Muskingum county, Ohio, establishing his home in Dresden. By 
trade he was a tailor. His children were John, Martin, Letitia, Maria, Nancy 
and Matilda. 

Philip Waite and his wife located on a farm in Muskingum county, Ohio, 
and in 1849 came to Illinois, making the journey by team. They were six 
weeks upon the way and passed through Chicago when it was a mere village, 
Mr. Waite being oftered a tract of land in what is now the heart of the city 
in exchange for his team of horses. He refused the offer, however, and 
continued on his way to Mazon township, Grundy county. Not long after- 
ward he purchased land of the government in Highland township, a mile 
north and a mile west of the present home of our subject. This was wild 
prairie land upon which not a furrow had been turned or an improvement 
made, and not a house was in sight of their pioneer cabin. The country 
abounded in wild game, including deer, and venison was a frequent dish 
upon the family table. Mr. Waite prospered in his undertakings and added 
to his land until he became the owner of a valuable property of one hundred 
and ninety acres, all of which he placed under a high state of cultivation. 
He labored under many difficulties in his early settlement, but with charac- 
teristic determination conquered all obstacles. His horses were killed by 
lightning the first year and he was obliged to buy oxen. He also experi- 
enced the other hardships incident to the establishment of a home upon 
the frontier, but as the years passed by prosperity rewarded his labors. He 
was a member of the Universalist church and his wife belonged to the 
Christian church. An honorable and straightforward business man and a 
representative citizen, he was frequently called to public office, and for twenty 
years served as the supervisor of his township. His children were : Alvilda 
Maria, who was born March 10, 1842; Romanzo Walter, who was born in 
Muskingum county, Ohio, December 20, 1848; Alice M., who was born 
March 6, 1851, in Mazon township, Grundy county; Emma Caroline, Sep- 
tember II, 1853; Edna Bryant, January 11, 1855; and Newton John, No- 
vember II, 1858. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Thompson located on a farm in 



756 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Wall township, Ford county, but the following year returned to Highland 
township, Grundy county, and in April, 1871, purchased their present farm, 
then comprising eighty acres, partially improved. By thrift and industry 
Mr. Thompson has prospered and has added to his property until he now 
has one hundred and sixty acres of land, which is under a high state of culti- 
vation, constituting one of the finest farms in his township. In 1885 he 
erected an attractive residence and has erected other substantial buildings, 
which add to the value and attractive appearance of the place. The home 
has been blessed with three children : Edna C, who was born June 7, 1874, 
and died April 19, 1875; Charles Osgood, born April 19, 1876; and Leslie 
Eugene, born April 18, 1881. The elder son married Louie Greenwalt. of 
Buffalo, New York, who resides in Massillon, Ohio. They have one son. 
A'ernon R. 

Mr. Thompson has always followed farming, with the exception of a 
short time which he spent in Chicago, where he was engaged in the feed 
business in connection with his brother William. He still retains an interest 
in that store. In politics he is a Republican and fraternally he is cqnnected 
with the Knights of Pythias lodge of \'erona. 



CHARLES FILLMAN. 



On the list of Grundy county's substantial farmers appears the name 
of Charles Fillman, who is one of the practical and progressive agricul- 
turists of Good Farm township. He was born in Dwight, Livingston 
county, Illinois, August 28, i860, a son of Jacob and Mary Fillman. His 
father, Jacob Martin Fillman. was one of the early settlers of Good Farm 
township and a worthy representative of the Fatherland, whence have come 
so many of the substantial American settlers. He was born in Nassau, 
August 29, 1826, his parents being John George and Anna Sevilla (Stark) 
\'illman, for thus the name was spelled in Germany. The grandfather was 
a native of Germany, the family having for generations resided in that lo- 
calitv. John George Fillman was a miller by trade and resided in the 
city of Kaube. For some years he held membership in the Lutheran 
church, but afterward united with the Evangelical church. He owned a 
home and some horses and cattle and carried on farming on land which 
belonged to the town and was rented to the people for raising small crops. 
His death occurred in Germany, when he had attained the age of sixty- 
three years. His children were Nicholas, Christian, Henrietta, Philip. 
George and Jacob Martin. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 7S7 

The last named attended school hetween the ages of six and fourteen 
years, learned the blacksmith's trade in early life and came to America 
when twenty-seven years of age, sailing from Germany to Hull, England, 
and from Liverpool to America, arriving in New Orleans in November, 
1852. after a voyage of forty-two days. He then proceeded by steamer 
to St. Louis, where he lived for one year, devoting his energies to the 
blacksmith's trade. For his first week's work he received five dollars in 
gold. He was married in that city to Mary Eberhardt. and they became 
the parents of a daughter. Bertha. The mother died a short time after- 
ward, and from St. Louis Mr. Fillman removed to Ottawa. Illinois, where 
his daughter was reared by her maternal grandfather, Joseph Eberhardt. 
who is now deceased. Air. Fihman worked at the lilacksmith's trade from 
September 30. 1854. until February i, 1855, when he went to St. Paul 
on a prospecting tour. He located, however, in Galena, Illinois, where 
he followed b'acksmithing and wagon-making. Subsequently he spent some 
time in Elgin. Illinois, after which he went to Ottawa. He was married 
August 7, 1855, to Eva Maria Burger, of Morris. Illinois, who was born 
in the village of Kaudorf, Bavaria, on the 17th of June, 1834, and came 
to America in 185 1, with her brother, George S. Burger. They left Ham- 
burg on a new sailing vessel and from New York came to Illinois, locating 
in Good Farm township, Grundy county. 

After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Fillman located in Ottawa, where 
he worked at his trade until March 5, 1856, when he established a black- 
smith shop of his own at Marseilles, Illinois, being employed there until 
December 5, 1857. Subsequently he purchased a farm of forty acres in 
LaSalle county and in 1858 he bought a second tract in Good Farm town- 
ship, for which he paid ten dollars per acre. Removing to Dwight, he 
opened a blacksmith shop in which he carried on business for seven years. 
He then purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land just across the 
road from his present home. There were few improvements upon the 
place, yet he carried on the work of cultivation, making it his home for 
many years. As his financial resources increased he extended its boundaries 
from time to time until he owned six hundred acres, which came to him 
as the result of hard work and untiring thrift. By his second wife Mr. 
Fillman had the following children : George Stephen, born January 3, 1857; 
John William, born January ti, 1859, and died at the age of four years; 
Charles, born August 28, i860; Ludwig Leonard, born July 12, 1862; 
Catherine Marietta, born September 28, 1864; John Jacob, born January 
27, 1867; and Barbara Maria Louise, born October 25, 1869. The parents 
are members of the Lutheran church and he held the office of elder and 
church librarian. In politics he was a Democrat and for three years he 



758 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

served as the road commissioner for Good Farm township. He has led 
d very busy, industrious Hfe, earning his property by his own unaided 
efforts. His Hfe has ever been honorable and upright, characterized by 
common sense and good judgment in all private and public relations. He 
has never used either whisky or tobacco, and his career has been charac- 
terized by fidelity to those principles which ennoble and elevate men. 

In the common schools Charles Fillman, of this review, acquired his 
education and upon the home farm he was early trained to the work of 
field and meadow. At the age of twenty-three he was married, in Good 
Farm township, to Lizzie Klughardt, the wedding taking place April u, 
1883. She was born in Livingston county, Illinois, May 2, 1864, a daughter 
of Christian and Lavina (Burk) Klughardt. Her father was born in Ba- 
varia, April 23, 1836, and was a son of John and Katherine (Xarles) Klug- 
hardt. His father was born in the same locality, in 1808, and the ancestors 
had resided in Bavaria for many generations. John Klughardt was a shoe- 
maker by trade, and was married in his native town, the children of their 
union being Christian, Katherine, Julia. John, Mary, Emma and Leo. The 
father of these children came to America, bringing with him his wife and 
son, Christian, who was then three years old. He left his home in August, 
1839, sailed from Hamburg and after a stormy voyage of sixty-five days 
reached the harbor of New York in October. He made a settlement near 
Schenectady, Montgomery county. New York, where he followed shoe- 
making among the Holland Dutch of this locality, meeting w-ith prosper- 
ity during the five years in which he followed his trade there. On coming 
to Illinois he settled in Oswego township, Kendall county, where he pur- 
chased twenty-two acres of land, making his home there for nine years. 
He came to Good Farm township in July, 1853, settling on one hundred 
and sixty acres of wild land, which he improved and cultivated until his 
death, which occurred January 9. 1839. He was a member of the Methodist 
church, held the office of class-leader and was an upright and respected 
man. All of his children were born in America, with the exception of 
Christian Klughardt, wlx) was born in Bavaria. 

The lad attended school for one winter in New York and for eight 
winters in Oswego, Illinois, and in early life he became familiar with the 
work of farming, performing the arduous task of clearing the new land 
and preparing it for the plow. He was married to Louisa Burk. after 
which they located upon the old homestead in Good Farm township, still 
later removing to his present home. His wife is a daughter of Henry 
and Elizabeth (Smith) Burk. Her father was bom in Nassau, Germany, in 
1810, and was married in that country, where two children. Lavina and 
Adolph, were born of their union. He followed farming and carpentering 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 759 

until 1855, when he came to the United States. locating in Piano. Illinois, 
where he had a farm. In the fall of 1859 he came to Grundy county, pur- 
chasing eighty acres of land, transforming it into a good home. His life 
was one of honest toil, and his labors were ended in death when he had 
attained the age of seventy-three years. 

Christian Klughardt. the father-in-law of Mr. Fillman, located upon a 
part of his father's farm of eighty acres, in 1866. and placed the land under 
a high state of cultivation. His children were: Elizabeth, born May 2, 
1864; Mary, born April 16, 1866; Julia Matilda, born July 25. 1870; and 
George, born August 4, 1872. Mrs. Klughardt was a member of the 
Lutheran church, and died March 29, 1898. Mr. Klughardt, however, is 
still living and is an enterprising, straightforward farmer of Grundy county. 

After his marriage, Charles Fillman, of this review, located on an 
eighty-acre tract of land belonging to his father and has since operated 
this farm. He is to-day the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of 
land, improved with substantial buildings and all modern accessories and 
conveniences. He is successfully carrying on general farming and at the 
same time is a practical mechanic, possessing much mechanical ingenuity. 
He has invented a wagon-lifter, which is to lift a wagon loaded with corn 
from the fields and saves the hard labor of unloading. It is an excellent 
labor-saving device. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Fillman have been born the following children : 
Frederica Mary, born October 20, 1882; Ella Julia, born June 4. 1887; 
Annie Matilda, born December 2, 1888: Lillie Julia, born May 19, 1892: 
Franklin John, born November 25, 1896; and Leslie Arthur, born Feb- 
ruary 23, 1899. Three died in infancy. The parents are members of the 
Lutheran church, and in politics Mr. Fillman is a stanch Democrat. The 
cause of education finds in him a warm friend and for several terms he 
has served as a member of the board of education, acting as president of 
the board at the time a new school-house was erected, and it was through 
his efforts, largely, that this was secured and ecjuipped with modern ac- 
cessories and appointments. He is very public-spirited and progressive 
and withholds his support from no measure or movement which he be- 
lieves would be of public good. 



FRANK H. CLAPP. 



Frank H. Clapp. the son of Orrin and Aurelia (Belding) Clapp. was born 
February 4, 1862, on the old family homestead, and in the district school 



76o BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

acquired his preliminary education, which was supplemented by study in 
the normal school at Morris through one year. He then entered upon his 
business career as a clerk in Mazon in the general store owned by T. Rankin, 
and there he remained for about three years as a trusted employe of the 
house. His close application soon enabled him to master the business princi- 
ples and in 1883 he purchased a half interest in the business, at which time 
the firm name was changed to F. H. Clapp & Company. In 1887 Donald 
Rankin purchased an interest in the business and the firm name was changed 
to Clapp & Rankin. In 1889 these enterprising and progressive business 
men extended the field of their operations by adding a private banking 
business. In 1899 Mr. Gapp sold his interest in the mercantile department 
in order to devote his entire attention to banking and ndw does a general 
banking, insurance and real-estate business, and his institution is considered 
one of the most reliable financial concerns of the county, for he is known 
as a most trustworthy business man, straightforward in all his dealings, his 
efforts being guided by sound judgment and practical common sense. His 
is the only bank in Mazon and his patronage comes from a wide area. 

Mr. Clapp was married in November, 1885, in Mazon, to Miss Dora 
Riggall, who was born in Rockford, Illinois, a daughter of John and Harriet 
(Porter) Riggall. On the paternal side Mrs. Clapp was descended from 
English ancestors and on the maternal side is a representative of an old 
colonial Puritan New England family. Her father, John Riggall, was born 
at Hull, England, November 8, 1835, a son of John and Elizabeth (Fidler) 
Riggall. His father was born in Lincolnshire, in September, 1790, but 
though reared on a farm became a shoemaker. By his marriage to Elizabeth 
Fidler he had the following children: Sarah, born March 20, 1828: Miles, 
born in 1831: John, born in 1835: George, born in .August, 1838: and 
Thomas, born August 3, 1840. John Riggall. the father of Mrs. Clapp, 
came with his family to America in 1840, sailing from Liverpool, England, 
for New York, where they arrived in November, after a voyage of three 
months, on an old-fashioned sailing vessel. Mr. Riggall purchased a farm 
in Madison county. New York, and there passed his remaining days, his 
death occurring in 1866. when he had attained the age of seventy-six years. 
His wife died in 1874. at the age of seventy-eight. She was born in London, 
England, in 1796, and was a daughter of George Fidler. She held member- 
ship in the Methodist church. Mr. Riggall gave his support to the Repub- 
lican party. 

John Riggall, Jr., the father of Mrs. Clapp, was about five years old 
when brought by his parents to America, but he can well remember the voy- 
age. He pursued his education in the pioneer log school-house in Madison 
county, was reared upon a farm and was married in Albany, New York, to 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 761 

Harriet Porter, whose h\nh occurred July 25. 1844, at Northville, Fulton 
county, New York, a daughter of Hiram and Sarah (Gifford) Porter. The 
latter was born in April. 1804. in Fulton county, and the former was born 
in April, 1800. He was probably a native of Vermont and was descended 
from New England Puritan ancestry that located in that section of the coun- 
try in colonial days. His father was Felix Porter. Unto Hiram and Sarah 
(Gifford) Porter were born six children, namely: Sumner, George. Selah, 
Angeline, Elizabeth and Harriet. The father of this family owned and re- 
sided upon a farm and there died, at the venerable age of eighty years. He 
has two sons, Elias and Sumner, who were valiant soldiers in the civil war 
as members of the New York Infantry. The former was killed at the battle 
of Pine Bluff, Arkansas, but the latter, although he participated in a number, 
of engagements, escaped injury. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Riggall 
removed to Washtenaw county, Michigan, near Ann Arbor, where the 
father engaged in farming until 1866, when he removed to Rockford, Illinois. 
He there devoted his energies to the cultivation of hops. Subsequently he 
removed to Kansas and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in 
Saline county, making a number of valuable improvements upon the place 
during the five years that he maintained his residence there. On the expira- 
tion of that period he sold the property and returned to Madison county. 
New York, where he engaged in farming for a year. In the spring of 1876 
he took up his abode in Mazon, where he began business as a mason. He 
was also in the butchering business for six years, and was connected with 
the furniture and undertaking business for ten years. His life has been an en- 
terprising and industrious one, characterized by straightforward methods. 
In politics he is a Democrat and is accounted one of the valued citizens 
of his community. His children are Sarah, who was born in Michigan, Feb- 
ruary 14, 1863; Dora v., born near Rockford, Illinois, in August, 1866; 
Nellie, born near Rockford, Illinois, August 25, 1868; Algie, born in Saline 
county, Kansas, December 28, 1873: Isie, born in Madison county. New 
York, November 8, 1875; Ivy, born in Mazon, June 15, 1877; and Hattie, 
born July 27, 1881. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Clapp has been born a son, Gardie, whose birth 
occurred in Mazon, AugMSt 25, 1886. The parents enjoy the hospitality of 
the best homes in the community and their circle of friends is only limited 
by their circle of acquaintances. In his political views Mr. Qapp is a stanch 
Republican and fraternally is a prominent Mason, holding membership in 
Blaney Commandery, K. T., of Morris. He is also an unaffiliated Odd Fel- 
low. A practical and successful business man, great confidence is reposed in 
him on account of his conservative and safe methods. He has always main- 
tained a reputation as a man of unblemished character, strong integrity, 



762 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and a public-spirited citizen who witliholds his support from no measure or 
movement which he l:ielieves will prove of public benefit. 



LEMUEL SHORT. 



It is probable that there never lived in Grundy county a better example 
of the self-made man than the late Lemuel Short, of Goose Lake township, 
some account of whose useful and busy career it will be attempted to give 
in the following paragraphs. The life of such a man affords a useful lesson 
to young men of the rising generation and should form a part of such a 
.work as this, which is devoted to the lives and achievements of the men who 
have redeemed Illinois from a wilderness state and promoted its important 
interests and developed its natural resources until they have made it in many 
respects the leading state of the Union. 

Lemuel Short was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, August 
15, 1819, a son of James and Ellen (McFarland) Short, natives of the Key- 
stone state. In 1824, when he was about five years old, the family removed 
to a point within the present limits of Ashland county, Ohio, where his par- 
ents both died, his father in 1863. The summer of 1836 was spent by young 
Short, then seventeen years old, in Michigan. He returned to Ohio and 
remained there until 1838, when he emigrated to Illinois and located in 
Lake county, where he soon purchased a farm and busied himself with its 
improvement and in hunting and trapping. He managed his aflfairs with 
so much care and thrift that he soon paid for his land. 

In 1856 Mr. Short came to Grundy county and bought the property in 
Felix (now Goose Lake) township, where his widow now lives. He was 
industrious and enterprising, and possessed good judgment and business 
ability of a high order, and he accumulated property rapidly, and at the time 
of his death, wdiich occurred at his home in Goose Lake township, January 
13, 1895, he owned more than twenty-five hundred acres of farm land in 
Goose Lake township and a farm of three hundred and seventy-three acres 
in Lake county, and was one of the leading stock-raisers of the county. This 
property he gained by the most commendable methods. He gave strict 
attention to every detail of his business and accorded to everv man with 
whom he dealt the fullest rights and advantages in every transaction con- 
sistent with equity and good business practice. His success was won openly 
and in a fair fight with the world, and every one who knew him rejoiced 
with iiim in it. for all knew that it was richly deserved. Dying, he left not 
only wealth but the better heritage of a good name. 

December 31, 1845, when he was in his twenty-seventh year, Mr. Short 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 763 

married Sarah Burr, daughter of Warham and Nancy (Cummins) Burr, wlio 
was born in Shelby county, Indiana, February 10, 1826, and was then nine- 
teen years old. Her father was born in the state of New York and died in 
Will county, Illinois, September 6, 1861. Her mother was a native of Ohio 
and died in Will county, Illinois, March 31, 1862. Mr. and Mrs. Burr came 
to Illinois in 1833 from Shelby county, Indiana, and brought their daughter 
with them. Mrs. Short was then seven years old. 

Lemuel and Sarah (Burr) Short had children named as follows, in the 
sequence of their nativity : James was born in Will county, Illinois, No- 
vember 14. 1847. He married Frances M. Lattimer, June 11, 1874, and 
one child was born to them, July i, 1876, a daughter, who wa