Skip to main content

Full text of "Biographical and genealogical record of La Salle County, Illinois"

See other formats





L I E) R.AFLY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY 

or ILLINOIS 

977. 3E7 

B52 
V.2 



111. Hist, burvey 



^i 



NOTICE 

AT LEAST ONE OF THE EDGES OF THIS 
MAGAZINE HAS BEEN LEFT UNTRIMMED, 
BECAUSE OF AN EXTREMELY NARROW 
MARGIN. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL 



RECORD 



UF 



LA SALLE COUNTY 



ILLINOIS 



LLUSTRATED 



\^oi^x^j]\4e: II. 



CHICAGO 
THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1900 



7^ 



, J -^ 




THE LEWIS PUB.CD Cl<i 



o/^//^/VZ^ ^■^-i^.^-r.ii^- 







> 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



T 



THERON D. BREWSTER. 

HE visitor in Peru, Illinois, always has pointed out to him one of the 

time-honored old landmarks, a substantial and imposing brick resi- 
dence, two stories in height, and surrounded by w'ell kept grounds. This is 
the old Brewster home, which has stood here for almost three-score years, 
having been erected in 1841 by the gentleman whose name heads this article, 
one of the honored early settlers of this place. 

Coming from stanch Puritan stock, Mr. Brewster was born in Salis- 
bury, Litchfield county, Connecticut, February 29, 1812, being the eldest son 
of Daniel and Asenath (Canfield) Brewster, who were likewise natives of 
the same state. When he was sixteen years of age the mother of Theron D. 
Brewster died, and in December, 1835, the father also passed to his reward. 

In his youth our subject received thorough training as a farmer, his 
father being a successful agriculturist. His tastes did not lie in that direc- 
tion, however, and when he had completed his education in the academy at 
Westfield, Connecticut, he concluded to try his fortune in the w^est, sooner 
or later. In 1835 he came to Peru, where he accepted a clerical position, but 
at the end of six months he was summoned home to his father's deathbed 
and remained at the old homestead until the fall of 1836, adjusting the estate. 
The following year he laid out Ninawa addition to Peru, and commenced 
dealing in real estate, and in 1843 ^""^ embarked in the mercantile business 
here in partnership with Herman Baldwin, with whom he was associated 
three years. He then began dealing in grain, and, building a large ware- 
house on the bank of the Illinois river, carried on an extensive and remuner- 
ative business as a member of the firm of Brewster & Beebe. At the end of 
five years he retired, and for several years thereafter was in the dry-goods 
business, in company with E. Higgins. 

Many other local industries and enterprises received the support of 

Mr. Brewster. In 1856 he was the president of the stock company which 

jj ow-ned and sank the Peru coal shaft, which was worked with good results 

for about seventeen years. In 1852 the firm of T. D. Brewster & Company 

401 



284-^79 



402 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

was formed, and, buying out Messrs. Tuller, Pitts & Dodge, who had been 
manufacturing plows on a limited scale, and had conducted a small machine 
shop, the Peru City Plow Factory was established. He became the manager 
of the concern and remained at its helm until 1882, when, on account of his 
advanced age, he withdrew from its management. At that time (1882) the 
Qoncern was reorganized into a stock company and is now known as the 
Peru Plow & Wheel Company. His last years were especially devoted to 
the real-estate business, in which he had been interested throughout his 
career. He managed with great ability the sale of property which he bought 
of the heirs of his uncle, Lyman Brewster, a pioneer of this county, who 
owned much of the land upon which Peru now stands. 

Remarkably successful in all of his undertakings, no man was more inti- 
mately associated with the development and upbuilding of Peru. He was 
the first mayor of the city, elected in 1851. and re-elected in 1852 and again 
in 1854. As early as 1838 he held the office of town trustee and for several 
years served as a member of the board of education. He was a prime mover 
in securing to Peru the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad, and served 
as one of its first directors. He was an organizer of the First National Bank 
of Peru and served as its president during its existence of some twenty years. 
Beginning the battle of life empty-handed, he amassed a fortune by his 
excellent business methods, pluck and enterprise. Politically he was a strong 
Republican after the organization of that party. Though not a member of 
any religious body, he was most in sympathy with the Congregational de- 
nomination, and was liberal in its support. 

Mr. Brewster was twice married, the wife of his youth being ]\Iiss 
Phoebe ]\Iann, a native of Pennsylvania. Their union was solemnized in 
1844. and five years later she died, leaving a son and a daughter. For his 
second wife Mr. Brewster chose Miss Margaret Jones, of Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, and four of their children — two sons and two daughters — survive. 
Mourned by the friends and associates of a life-time, Mr. Brewster passed 
away at his home in Peru, March 2, 1897. 

Benjamin D. Brewster, son of Theron D. Brewster, who was so influen- 
tial in the founding of Peru, was born in this place November 24, 1864, a 
son by his father's second marriage. He was reared and educated here and 
later attended Bryant & Stratton's Business College, in Chicago, Illinois. 
After having mastered the course of commercial training afforded him in that 
institution he accepted a position as a traveling salesman for the Western 
Clock Manufacturing Company, of LaSalle, remaining with that firm for 
three years. Then, going to New York city, he spent two years there with 
the Time Stamp Company, and in 1893 returned to Peru. For the past 
five vears he has conducted the real-estate and loan business formerlv man- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 403 

aged by his father, and besides is interested in the Peru Plow & Wheel 
Company, being a director in the same. Since this concern became a stock 
company it has enjoyed remarkable prosperity and growth in the volume 
of business transacted, and long since was found to be entitled to rank 
among the leading industrial enterprises in this section of the country. A 
branch house was established some time ago in Council Bluffs, Iowa, it being 
known as the Peru Plow & Implement Company, and of this Mr. Brewster 
holds the place of secretary. He has inherited much of his father's business 
talent, and is a young man of sterling integrity of character, respected by all 
Avho know him. 



BENJAMIN M. HETHERINGTON. 

The only representative of his family in America, this respected citizen 
■of EaSalle was born in Ireland fifty-eight years ago. His parents, John and 
Ellen (Moynahan) Hetherington, passed their entire lives in the Emerald 
Isle, dying when our subject was young. 

Being an ambitious youth, Benjamin M. Hetherington decided to come 
to America, where he was confident that he would find better advantages, 
and in 1854 landed in Savannah, Georgia. He then spent about four years 
in visiting different parts of this country, and thus is a competent judge of 
the merits of the various localities. In 1858 he was married, in Jackson 
county, Wisconsin, to Mary, daughter of Michael and Kate (McDonald) 
Lawlor. They were natives of Ireland, who first settled in New Jersey upon 
their arrival in the. United States, and subsequently removed to Galena, 
Illinois, where Mrs. Hetherington was born. 

The year after his marriage INIr. Hetherington and wife became resi- 
dents of LaSalle, and thus for two-score years they have been identified 
with the welfare of this place. During this long period our subject has 
been connected with the coal-mining industry, and for many years has held 
the responsible position of mine manager of the Union coal shaft in LaSalle. 
To his ingenuity and constructive ability may be ascribed the two bridges 
built across the Illinois river at LaSalle and Utica. Recognized as a 
hard worker and a thoroughly competent man in his line, he commands 
the respect of all who are associated with him in any manner. 

For eighteen years Mr, Hetherington has been a member of the LaSalle 
board of aldermen, and in this ofiice has done much effectual work toward 
the upbuilding and improvement of the place. In his early manhood he 
cast in his lot with the Democratic party, but, being one who reads, studies 
and thinks for himself and has the courage of his convictions, he took issue 
with his late poHtical comrades in the last presidential campaign, fearlessly 



404 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

declaring himself for sound money. He went to the state convention in 
Chicago as a delegate to the Democratic convention that nominated the 
Hon. John M. Palmer for the ofifice of chief executive. Mr. Hetherington 
acted in the capacity of township supervisor for five years, and in other 
local offices has proved his genuine regard for the public advancement. 

The marriage of our subject and wife was blessed with twelve children, 
eight of whom are living. In the order of their birth they are named as 
follows: Margaret, John. Thomas, Mary, Kittie, Nora, Benjamin W. and 
Lawlor. The family belong to the Catholic church, and are actively con- 
nected with its work and benevolences. 



FREDERICK G. COOPER. 

Frederick G. Cooper, engineer of the city water-works at LaSalle, 
Illinois, w-as born at Lockport, this state, July 12, 1862, a son of Thomas 
and Christine (Bloom) Cooper and a grandson of Thomas Benton Cooper, 
who sprung from Quaker stock and whose place of nativity was in Penn- 
sylvania, about twenty miles from Philadelphia. His occupation was that 
of husbandry, and although a Quaker and a believer in peace yet he took 
up arms and fought in the war of 181 2. After his marriage he moved to 
the state of New York, where he died in early manhood, leaving a widow, 
who lived to be a very old lady, dying in the summer of 1892, and an only 
son. 

This son was Thomas Cooper, who was born in Nev; York, and moved 
to the state of Illinois some forty years ago, settling at LaSalle and making 
that his headquarters while he plied his vocation of boating on the Illinois 
river and the canal. He was united in marriage to Miss Christine Bloom, 
with whom he has lived in conjugal happiness many years and who is still 
the presiding genius of his home in Newton, Illinois. They have three 
children awaiting them in the better land and three who are spared to them 
here, viz.: Martha, wife of Charles Heagy, of LaSalle; Frederick G. and 
Lydia. Mrs. Cooper was a daughter of Peter Bloom, a shoemaker in 
Sweden, who was a soldier in the wars that were waged in that country 
and finally left there for America with his family. On the voyage over 
they suffered shipwreck and one of his daughters was lost. With the 
remaining children, two sons and one daughter (now Mrs. Cooper), he made 
his way to the inland country and settled in Henry county, Illinois, where 
he lived to be more than eighty-three years of age. 

Frederick G. Cooper received a public-school education, but early in 
life developed a fondness for machinery which culminated in a mastery of 
the trade to which he is devoted. When seventeen or eighteen years of age. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 405 

he began his apprenticeship as an engineer, and it was not long before he 
could take charge of an engine. For nine or more years he has been em- 
ployed in the water-works and electric-light plants of the city and takes a 
pardonable pride in his work. He was married August 23, 1888, to Miss 
Nellie Williams, a daughter of Captain E. L. and Lydia A. (Hyers) Williams. 
Three children, Thomas, Edwin and Lydia, have blessed their home. Mr. 
Cooper is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. In politics 
he does not incline to either party, being entirely independent of party 
influence and in all local elections voting for the candidate whom he thinks 
will best serve the interests of the people. 

Captain Edwin Lewis Williams, the father of Mrs. F. G. Cooper, was 
born in Darien, Connecticut, at which place his parents died after attaining 
an advanced age. The father, W'illiam Williams, was a native of Limerick, 
Ireland, while the mother, Phoebe, came from Holland. When a lad of 
about sixteen years, Edwin L. Williams came west and learned the trade of 
painter, at Toulon, Stark county, Illinois. He enlisted in Company F, 
Eighth Illinois Volunteers, at Pekin, and served four years, doing duty at 
Fort Donelson, Fort Henry and the siege of Vicksburg, and taking part 
in many skirmishes. He returned to his home in Pekin, on account of 
poor health, but his patriotic ardor was in no way dampened, and as soon 
as he recovered somewhat he raised another company. Company K, One 
Hundred and Forty-sixth Illinois, of which he was chosen captain. They 
were sent to Springfield, Illinois, where they did state service, and he was 
one of the body guards of the body of our martyr president, Lincoln, as it 
lay in state. After receiving his discharge he went to low-a, having previ- 
ously served as postmaster of Pekin, Illinois, and located at Mt. Ayr, 
where he filled the ofhces of deputy sheriff and city marshal from the year 
1872 to 1883. He was united in wedlock to Miss Lydia Hyers, a native 
of West Point, Lee county, Iowa, and a daughter of William B. and Eleanor 
(Waggoner) Hyers, a carpenter and cabinet-maker of that place. She was 
of Scotch descent, and one of seven children. After leaving Mt. Ayr, Mr. 
Williams took his family to Tazewell county, Illinois, locating in Spring 
Lake township, where he was scale master and assessor for several years, 
and W'here he died, in his fifty-ninth year, in 1893, loved and respected 
by all. 



JOSEPH ERTEL. 

Joseph Ertel, proprietor of the Eagle Mills and dealer in flour and all 
kinds of feed, Mendota, Illinois, is a young man who has worked his way 
to the front and who occupies a representative position among the business 



4o6 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

men of his town. Mr. Ertel was born in Austria, March 5, 1865, and was 
reared in his native land, learning there the miller's trade. In 1891 he took 
to himself a wife and on the same da}- of his marriage bade good-by to home 
and friends and native land and with his bride started for America. Upon 
his arrival in this country he came directly west to Iowa. After four weeks 
spent in Iowa City he located in Tomberg, Keokuk county, Iowa, and was 
there for two- years engaged in railroading, as a section hand. In 1893 he 
came to Mendota and secured employment in the Eagle Mills, then operated 
by Mr. Meisenbach, and remained with him one year. The next two years 
he was engaged in farming in Minnesota. Returning at the end of that 
time to Mendota, he took charge of the mills in which he had formerly 
been employed, and has since run them successfully. 

j\Ir. Ertel was married in the old country, as already stated, in 1891^ 
the lady of his choice being Mary Pesibel, and they are the parents of four 
children. Fraternally Mr. Ertel is identified with the A. O. U. W. 



CLYDE M. SNOW. 



Clyde M. Snow, one of the younger business men of Earlville. Illinois, 
is a son of Simeon Edward Snow, who was born in Shaftsbury, Vermont^ 
October 15, 1849. Mr. Snow's paternal grandparents were Reuben Russell 
Snow and Sarah (Mason) Snow. In tracing the genealogy of the family, we 
observe that Reuben R. Snow was a son of Simeon Snow, son of Reuben 
Snow, son of Eleazar Snow, son of William Snow, son of William Snow,. 
Sr., who was the parent tree of the family in America, coming from Lon- 
don, England, his native city, to New England, in 1635. He was then in 
his youth and was brought to this country as an apprentice. Reaching 
his majority, he married and settled in Massachusetts. Many have been 
his descendants, and they have been scattered to many of the states of the 
Union. Among them have numbered prominent professional and business 
men. Longevity is remarkable in the Snow family. Not a male descendant 
in direct line, reaching maturity, save one, has died under the age of eighty 
years. One died at the age of seventy-seven years. The paternal grand- 
father of our subject came from Vermont to Illinois in 1857 and located 
in Earlville, and here died in 1898, aged eighty-seven years. His occupa- 
tion was not confined to one vocation of life. Various pursuits he followed. 
In early life he was a tanner and in later Hfe a druggist, and to-day is best 
remembered in Earlville as a druggist. He was a member of the Vermont 
legislature in 1851. Only three of his children lived to a mature age, they 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 407 

being Emery and Zerina, who are now deceased, and S. E. Snow, the 
father of the immediate subject of this sketch. 

S. E. Snow was about seven years of age when his father came to 
Earlville, IlHnois, in which place he has ahvays made his home. For more 
than thirty years he has been continuously engaged in the manufacture of 
carriages, in blacksmithing and dealing in farm implements. His place of 
business was burned out in 1875, but he rebuilt and to-day has a fine brick 
structure for a business house, and is a prosperous business man. He com- 
menced his business career with a limited capital, has worked out his own 
success, and won his way to a position among the substantial and leading 
citizens of Earlville. In politics he is a Democrat, and fraternally a Master 
Mason. In 1867 S. E. Snow married Arabelle Warren, a native of Paw 
Paw, Illinois, and the subject of this biography, Clyde M. Snow, is their 
only child. 

Clyde M. Snow was born in Earlville, Illinois, March 9, 1868. He 
attended the public schools of Earlville, spent six months in a military 
academy at Oxford, IMaryland, and took a commercial course in Bryant & 
Stratton's Business College at Chicago. From boyhood he worked more or 
less with his father, and was devoting his time to the interest of his father's 
business when he was commissioned postmaster of Earlville, May i, 1894. 
For four years he acted in that capacity, rendering satisfactory service to 
the public. June 15, 1898, he became a member of the drug firm of Pool 
& Snow, of Earlville, and at this writing is engaged in the drug business. 
In politics Mr. Snow has been active as a Democrat. He is a Master Mason 
and also belongs to the Knights of the Globe. 



HARRY W. TODD. 



Harry W. Todd, the prosperous and well known grocer of LaSalle, was 
born on the Vermilion river, at Todd's Mills, near Vermilion, July 9, 1856. 
He is a son of Ira and Mary W. (Cushman) Todd. The family are of 
Scotch extraction, and the great-grandfather fought in the war of the 
Revolution. The grandfather, also named Ira Todd, came west in 1832 
and bought the mill at Todd's Mills. Previous to this he conducted mills at 
Jersey City, New Jersey; Cooperstown, New York; Northampton, Massa- 
chusetts; and Hartford, Connecticut. He was at the head of the milling 
company in St. Louis, a company which he helped to organize and which 
had formerly had its headquarters at Jersey City and Detroit. He died at 
Winona in his eighty-sixth year. 

Ira Todd, the father, was one of ten children, eight sons and two 



4o8 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

daughters, of whom but one is now living. That one is George Todd, of 
St. Louis, who is now in his eighty-fourth year and has resided in that 
city since 1835. He was an extensive manufacturer of mill machinery. 
Ira Todd remained at Todd's Mills until 1857, when he came to LaSalle and 
conducted a wholesale grocery house, at the same time operating a mill 
in Peru which was known as that of W. & I. Todd & Company. He was 
the victim of the "wildcat" currency and failed in business during the war 
as a result of that policy. He then opened a retail grocery in this city in 
company with J. S. Roberts, Calvin Wilson and Dr. J. C. Brown. Later he 
had charge of the books in the glass factory and the Oglesby Coal Com- 
pany's offices. After his son Harry opened his grocery store he assisted in 
that, retiring from active life a few years prior to his death. He was a 
•man of robust constitution and great endurance. He was a great reader in 
•all lines of importance to the public and a close Bible student. A man of 
■decided views, he formed his opinions after mature deliberation, and was 
not easily moved to change them. He was a Republican in former times 
and a great friend of Alexander Campbell, of LaSalle. He was also a 
friend and admirer of Abraham Lincoln. He later became a strong Pro- 
hibitionist. The mill first operated by him was the one his father purchased 
in 1832. Farmers used to bring their grist a distance of fifty miles and wait 
until it had been converted into flour or meal. 

He was married to Mary W. Cushman, a sister of the late Colonel 
Cushman, of Ottawa, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Todd were honored members 
of the Congregational church, in which he held the office of deacon for 
about twenty-five years. He was a native of Hartford, Connecticut, while 
his wife was from the state of Massachusetts. Three children were born 
to them, of whom two are living: George I. and Harry W., both of LaSalle. 
The father died January 25, 1899, after passing his seventy-sixth year. 
His wife died November 7, 1894, when in her seventieth year. The father of 
Mrs. Todd was Hercules Cushman, a native of the state of Massachusetts 
and of English descent. His grandfather came to America about the time 
the Mayflower brought the early Pilgrims. Hercules was a lawyer in his 
native state, where he died in middle life. He was twice married, the ladies 
being sisters named Washburn. He had three children, two daughters and 
one son. 

Harry W. Todd has made his home in LaSalle from the time he was 
brought here by his parents in 1857. Here he received his education. He 
was with E. B. Treat seven years, quitting his employment once to open 
a hardware store of his own. This was conducted but a short time when 
he returned to his former employer. He also engaged for a time in the 
wholesale and retail butter and egg business. In 1883 he opened his 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 409 

grocery store at 545 Marquette street, where he has since conducted it. 
He has a growing and prosperous business and endeavors to satisfy the 
wants of his many patrons. He is a RepubHcan in poHtics and is a member 
of the Congregational church society. He is also a member of the Knights 
and Ladies' Security. He has traveled extensively in the states and is a man 
of Dleasine: address and an intelligent converser. It has l^een forty-three 
years since he first made his home in LaSalle, and thirty-five years of the 
time have been spent in the old home at No. 1007 Marquette street. In 
November, 1899, Mr. Todd married Miss Neva L. Dimmitt, of Kansas 
Citv. Kansas. 



WILLIAM HARTH. 



The German-American citizens of the United States have always been 
numbered among her most loyal sons, and to their industry and energy 
and sound business enterprise much of the prosperity which this great 
nation enjoys may be justly attributed. One of the old and honored resi- 
dents of LaSalle county was William Harth, who lived his last years in 
retirement from active labors and cares, and for the last eleven years of 
his life made his home in Peru. He enjoyed the respect of the friends 
and neighbors who knew him for }'ears, some for almost half a century. 

The parents of the above named gentleman were Theodore and Ger- 
trude (Pfeld) Harth, both natives of Germany, their occupation being that 
of tillers of the soil. The father died when about sixty-three years of age, in 
183 1, and the mother, whose death took place in 1844, was then in her sixty- 
fourth year. They were both identified with the Catholic church. Both of 
the grandfathers of our subject were agriculturists and passed their whole 
lives in Germany. Grandfather Pfeld died suddenly, when in the full vigor 
of life, while engaged in plowing a field. His children were three in number. 
Christian Harth, a brother of our subject, is the only survivor of the parental 
family, as one by one their six sons and four daughters passed into the 
silent land. 

William Harth was born in the town of Kull, on the banks of the river 
Rhine, in Germany, March 12. 1821. His boyhood was quietly spent in the 
usual vocations of a farm and in attendance at the common schools. He 
continued to live at home until he reached man's estate, and in 1846 he 
decided to try his fortune in the United States. Almost immediately after 
his arrival in this country he settled in LaSalle county, Illinois, and, having 
purchased a quarter section of land in Eagle township, he proceeded to 
cultivate and improve his property. As the years rolled by he prospered and 
from time to time he added more land to his possessions until he owned five 



4IO BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

hundred and forty acres. In 1888 he left the homestead, and thereafter 
resided in Peru. As good opportunities presented themseh/es he disposed 
of his farms, and with abundant means for old age spent his days in well 
deserved rest and retirement. Thrift and industry were the secrets of his 
success, for he early learned the lesson that honest toil is the only safe and 
sure method of earning a livelihood and competence. In political affairs 
he was always an ally of the Democratic party. 

The marriage of William Harth and Katherine Henn. a daughter of 
Philip and Helena (June) Henn, was solemnized October 17, 1847. They 
have had four sons and six daughters, namely: John. Joseph, Elizabeth, 
Henry, Mary, Christina. Anna, Peter. ^Minnie and Sibella. John and 
Joseph live in Kansas. The latter chose for his wife Alary Shetzer and the 
former is also married. Elizabeth became the wife of William Laufenberg" 
and they live in Little Rock. Arkansas. Henry married Louisa Center and 
is a resident of Nebraska. Alary, who wedded John Smith, also lives in 
Nebraska, her home being in Hartwell. Anna, Airs. Frank Schinzel. is 
living in Leonora, Illinois. Peter married Ella Clampler and makes his 
home in Spring Valley. Illinois. Alinnie is the wife of Peter Aleisen, of 
Leonore, this state. Aliss Sibella, unmarried, took care of her parents 
during their last days. \Mlliam Harth and wife were devout members of 
the Catholic church, as were their ancestors before them for many gener- 
ations. 



HENRY E. SCHWEICKERT. 

This gentleman, a prominent business man of Peru, is a native of 
this place, his birth having occurred here August 24, 1863. He is one of 
the nine children of Vincent and Alary (W^ellner) Schweickert, who were 
born in Baden and in Rhein. Bavaria. Germany, respectively. Eor three 
years after his arrival in America, in 1853, Vincent Schweickert resided in 
Reading, Pennsylvania, where he found employm.ent at his trade of brick 
and stone mason and plasterer. He was married during his stay in that 
city, whence he came to Peru in 1856, and he and his estimable wife are 
still living in their comfortable home on the corner of Pike and Ninth 
streets. He was one of the five children of Jacob Schweickert, whose life 
was spent in Germany, death cutting short his career when he was but 
forty years of age. His business was the raising- of silk-worms and the 
bleaching or whitening of cloth. The father of Airs. Alary (Wellner) 
Schweickert served in the German army under Napoleon, and was a coal- 
miner by occupation. He died in his native land, at the ripe age of eighty- 
two vears. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 411 

Henry E. Schweickert and his six surviving brothers and sisters are 
all citizens of Peru. The former are named in order of birth: Charles, 
Jacob, Bertram and Francis Xavier. Mary is the wife of Peter Weyand, 
and Lizzie is Mrs. Frank Ellerbrock. In common with the others, our 
subject was a pupil in the public and parochial schools of Peru, his studies 
being completed in the high school here. At intervals he worked on farms 
in this county until he was twenty years old, when he began learning the 
brick and stone mason's trade. 

Ten years ago Henry E., Charles and Jacob Schweickert entered into 
partnership and carried on a contracting and building business for two 
years. Then our subject withdrew and conducted his affairs independently 
for seven years, and since 1898 has been associated with his brothers Jacob, 
Bertram, Francis X., and Frank Ellerbrock, under the firm name of 
Schweickert Brothers & Company. They do an extensive and paying busi- 
ness, and are winning a large share of the patronage of the public. 

On the 17th of May, 1887, Mr. Schweickert married Miss Lizzie 
Ellerbrock, a daughter of John William and Anna (Utendorf) Ellerbrock, 
Six children have been born to our subject and wife, namely: Vincent, 
Peter Phillip Maria, Henry Charles Anton Alexander, Mary Franciska,. 
Mary Hildegard and Mary Beatrice. 

Mr. and Mrs. Schweickert are members of the Catholic church, and 
he is connected with the fraternal orders of St. Joseph's Benevolent Society 
and the Catholic Order of Foresters. Politically, he is a Democrat. The 
pleasant home of the family was built by our subject in 1888. It stands on 
the corner of Pike and Tenth streets, an attractive residence section of 
the town, and near the home of the elder Schweickerts. 



OTTO T. PROELSS. 



Otto T. Proelss, foreman of the sulphuric-acid department of the 
Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Works, LaSalle, Illinois, came to this city 
October 12, 1889, started to work in the laboratory of the factory and for 
ten years has been in the employ of the establishment. 

Mr. Proelss was born in Viviez, France, August 9, 1870, a son of Dr. 
Otto and Anna (Eckhort) Proelss, both natives of Germany. Dr. Otto 
Proelss was educated at Heidelberg University, at which institution he 
graduated with the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. For twenty years he 
was the superintendent of the Gladblach Zinc Works, and held the position 
at the time of his death, in 1890. 

Otto T., the subject of this sketch, also had excellent educational 



412 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

advantages in his youth. He spent four years in the gymnasium at Frei- 
berg and later was a student in the gymnasium of Mulheim, where he 
completed his course. The father's occupation tended to lead the son into 
the zinc business, with which he became familiar in the old country, and in 
1889 he came to the United States to enter the employ of the Matthiessen 
& Hegeler Zinc Works, as above recorded. 

Mr. Proelss was married in 1894 to Miss Alvine, daughter of Charles 
Seepe, a prominent dry-goods merchant of Peru, Illinois. Charles Seepe is 
a native of Prussia, born near Ham, June 9, 1842, one of the seven children 
of Gerhard and Maria (Kemper) Seepe, both natives of Prussia. The 
family came to America in 1849 and settled at Peru, Illinois, where both 
parents died. Charles Seepe was reared in Peru from his seventh year and 
at fourteen became an apprentice at the dry-goods business. Since 1872 
he has been in business for himself. He was married October 23, 1864, 
to Miss Sophia Beckley, daughter of John Beckley, and to them were 
born three sons and six daughters, namely: Jennie, Julia (deceased), Clara, 
Alvine, Albert, Charles, Harrv, Etta and Edith. 



JAMES EDWARDS. 

James Edwards, the superintendent of the Peru Plow & Wheel Com- 
pany, is a native of England, having been born in Redruth, Cornwall, March 
16. 1848. This has been the birthplace of the Edwards family for several 
generations past, the great-great-great-grandfather of our subject having 
been wrecked on the Cornish coast between Perron and Portreath and lo- 
cated near the scene of the wreck, about two miles inland. Here the family 
remained and the different members were born down to the birth of our sub- 
ject, James Edwards. Since then the family have scattered until none of the 
name are left in that vicinity at the present day. 

James Edwards, the father of our subject, began when a boy to work 
in copper, tin, coal and iron. He became an engineer of ability and was in 
the employ of one firm. Sparrow & Son, for more than tvventy-seven years. 
He was united in marriage to Miss Grace Bowden, by whom he had three 
sons and three daughters, of whom James and William are the only survivors. 
Both parents were Wesleyan Methodists. The wife and mother died in 
1885, in her fifty-eighth year, and the November of the next year found the 
father in Chicago, where he made his home with his son James until his 
death, on May 29, 1890, at the age of sixty-six and one-half years. His father 
was William Edwards, a miner and engineer, and a member of the Home 
Guards militia during the Napoleon wars. He died at the age of fifty-seven, 





a4i^i£^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 413 

leaving six children. It was the great-grandfather of William who founded 
the family in Cornwall. The maternal grandfather of our subject was Will- 
iam Bowden, a native of Wendron, Cornwall, and a farmer. The Bowden 
family were large land-owners and prominent people. William was a soldier 
in the Home Guards during the peninsular wars, and held a number of 
township offices. He died at the age of eighty-four years, after rearing six 
children, — three sons and three daughters. 

When ten or twelve years old, James Edwards went to work in a 
pottery, and later entered the tin and copper mines at Cornwall, where he 
remained until he was fifteen. He has worked his own way in the world 
from that tender age, and is a ready sympathizer and helper of any young 
man who earnestly and industriously strives for advancement. When he was 
fifteen he began learning the trade of blacksmith, serving his time until he 
was twenty-one. Two years later he came to America and located in Indian- 
apolis, where he was in the employ of the Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati 
& Indianapolis Railroad for six months. He left them to accept a position 
as locomotive blacksmith in the Atlantic & Great Western shops at Gallon, 
Ohio. He w^as there four years and then returned to England, where he 
was in the employ of the Pendleton Iron Works, and later took charge of 
the iron works of Bradford & Son. Still later he was connected with the 
Manchester Carriage Company, and then opened a business of his own. 
He was in the crockery and glassware business for five or six years, but dis- 
posed of his stock in 1886, returning to America in July of that year. He 
stopped in Chicago and worked in the iron business with Harris & Wins- 
low, the Bab.cock Fire Engine Company, and R. T. Crane until 1890, when, 
in December, he came to Peru and took the superintendency of the Peru 
Plow & Steel Company, the position he still retains. This institution makes 
agricultural implements of nearly all descriptions and gives employment to 
a large force of men, nearly two hundred being given steady work. Al- 
though the superintendency of this plant is attended with great responsibility 
and care, Mr. Edwards maintains a calm and courteous manner that is 
unruffled by the little worries incident to business life. No doubt his great 
success and popularity are attributable in a great measure to the fact that 
his men appreciate his kindness and civility and are willing to make extra 
efforts to meet his wishes in all their work. 

Mr. Edwards was married August 20, 1872, to Miss Nannie Williams 
Bowden, daughter of John and Nannie (Williams) Bowden, of Cornwall. 
Ten children have been born to them, namely: John Harrison, deceased; 
William Henry, deceased; Grace Bowden. deceased; James, deceased; 
Emily; Charles; James, deceased; Gertrude; Nannie; and Henry. The 
children are living with their parents. Although ]\Ir. and Mrs. Edwards are 



414 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



not communicants of any church, they are beHevers in the Congregational 
doctrines and attend that church. He is a member of the Masonic order and 
both he and his wife are members of the Order of the Eastern Star. He also 
belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and is the worthy mas- 
ter of the Mystic \A'orkers of the World. Politically he is in sympathy with 
the Republicans. Mr. Edwards is temperate in his habits, never tasted 
beer or tobacco, and has made the golden rule the motto which has governed 
all his actions. 



VINAL H. HACKETT. 



Vinal Herbert Hackett, proprietor of a livery establishment at Men- 
■dota, Illinois, is a New-Englander by birth. He was born in Merrimack, 
New Hampshire, August 22, 1856. 

At nineteen he came west to Illinois and located at Dixon, where he 
resided for a period of ten years, the most of that time engaged in the 
livery business, with a partner. April 2, 1888, he came to Mendota, and 
has since been engaged in the livery business here, having a large estab- 
lishment and doing a prosperous business with the best class of trade. 



MICHAEL E. LOOS. 



Michael E. Loos, rolling-mill foreman for the Illinois Zinc Company, 
LaSalle. Illinois, is of German birth, but has been identified with this 
country since his early boyhood. He was born in Luxemburg, Germany, 
January 30, 1843, ^ son of Nicholas and Lena (Krier) Loos and one of a 
iamily of ten children. The Loos family left their native land in 1855 and 
after a successful voyage landed in this country, Illinois their objective 
point and their first place of settlement being in Ogle county. There the 
father died, in 1861, at the age of sixty-one years. The mother survived 
him until 1871, when she died in Freeport, at the age of seventy-two. 

At the time of their emigration to this country Michael E. was a boy 
of twelve years. His schooling was all obtained previous to that time, 
for after they settled in Illinois he was occupied in assisting his father in 
the work of the farm. However, he has always been a close observer and 
•great reader, and what he missed in school advantages he made up in home 
study, thus gaining a wide range of useful information. He continued the 
■occupation in which he was reared, that of farming, until 1866. In the 
meantime the civil war came on and he rendered his adopted country 
valiant service in the arm}-. He enlisted September 7, 1861, as a private 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 415 

in Company H, Thirty-fourth Illinois Infantry, and served as such until 
June 14, 1865, when he was promoted to the rank of second lieutenant. His 
first enlistment was for a term of three years, and at the end of that time 
he veteranized in the same company. He participated in the engagements 
at Pittsburg Landing, Corinth, the Atlanta campaign, and was with Sher- 
man on his memorable march to the sea. At the close of his service, July 
12, 1865, he was honorably discharged at Louisville, Kentucky, and re- 
turned home. He resumed farming at his old home, and farmed that season 
and the next, after which he moved to Freeport, Illinois, and turned his 
attention to railroading, first securing an engagement in the service of the 
Northw^estern Railroad Company, later was at El Paso, on the Illinois 
Central Railroad, and then went to Nebraska and took a homestead claim. 
In 1873 he located in LaSalle. Illinois, as car inspector for the Illinois 
Central Railroad, and two years later, in 1875, he entered the employ of 
the LaSalle Zinc Company, with which he remained until that company 
sold out to the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company. He then entered 
the employ of the latter, with which he remained until 1882. That year he 
became connected with the Illinois Zinc Company, and was made foreman 
of the rolling-mill department the following year, which position he has 
since filled. His long identity wath this concern is ample evidence of the 
value of his service and of his reliability. 

Mr. Loos was married in 1865 to Catherine Orth, and two children, 
William and Catherine, are the fruits of their union. 

Like most veterans of the Union army, Mr. Loos belongs to that 
popular organization, the Grand i\rmy of the Republic. Also he is identi- 
fied with the Modern Woodmen of America. He served one term as 
alderman of LaSalle, elected to the office by a Republican constituency. 
Religiously he and his family are Catholics. 



JOHN E. HAMPSON. 



John E. Hampson, a well known citizen of Farm Ridge township, La- 
Salle county, Illinois, dates his identification with this place from 1865. 
The record of his life and ancestry, briefly given, is as follows: 

John E. Flampson was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, Oc- 
tober 16, 1848, son of John B. Hampson, one of the venerable citizens of 
Farm Ridge, Illinois. John B. Hampson, also a native of Washington 
county, Pennsylvania, was born March 16, 1815, a son of Daniel and 
grandson of Joseph Hampson, the former a native of New Jersey. Joseph 
Hampson and wife, nee Hazen, were the parents of three children, — Lydia, 



4i6 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Harriet and Daniel. When Daniel was seven years of age the family home 
was changed from New Jersey to Pennsylvania, where he grew up and 
married Miss ]\Iary Biddle, also a native of New Jersey. She was a daugh- 
ter of Timothy Biddle, of that state. Daniel and Mary Hampson had nine 
children, four sons and five daughters, namely: John B., Catherine, Lucinda, 
Hannah, Ezekiel. Wiley, J\lary, Nancy and Thomas; and of this number 
John B. is the only one now living. The father died at the age of fifty-six 
years; the mother at seventy-six. In early life they were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, but later united with the Cumberland Pres- 
byterians, and Daniel Hampson was an elder in the church for a number 
of years. John B. Hampson married, in 1838, Miss Ruth Bane, a native 
of the same county in which he was born and a daughter of George and 
Rhoda (Clutter) Bane, both natives of Washington county, Pennsylvania. 
To John B. and Ruth Hampson were born four children, as follows: Mrs. 
Mary J. Oiler, who died in Washington county, Pennsylvania; Mrs. Charity 
Ann Berkhimer, of Humboldt, Iowa; John E., whose name initiates this 
review; and Joseph Alexander, of South Ottawa, Illinois. John B. Hamp- 
son, like his father before him, is identified with the Cumberland Presby- 
terian church and is an elder in the same. Politically he is a Republican. 

Returning now to John E. Hampson, we record that when he was a 
youth of seventeen years, in 1865, he came with his parents to Illinois. 
Farming has been his life work. He is the owner of one hundred and 
twenty acres of fine land in Farm Ridge township, devoted to general farm- 
ing and improved with good house, barn, orchard, etc. 

Mr. Hampson was married, February 24, 1874, to Miss Eliza Walley, a 
native of Illinois, born in Farm Ridge township, LaSalle county, daughter 
of Samuel and Eliza (Hera) Walley, the former a native of Chester county, 
Pennsylvania, who came to Illinois in 1841; the latter a native of Phila- 
delphia. Samuel Walley's family comprised the following members: Louisa, 
who died at the age of twenty years; Elias, a resident of Deer River, Minne- 
sota; John, a resident of Cedar county, Iowa; and Mrs. Hampson. Mrs. 
Walley died in 1871, at the age of forty-six years: Mr. Walley, in 1896 at 
the age of eighty-three years. They were Methodists. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hampson have seven children, namely: Lura B., wife of Charles E. Wood- 
ward, of Ottawa, IlHnois: Birdie ]M., wife of George Hopple, of Arling- 
ton, Nebraska; and Ethel, Ralph E.. Walter W., Nelly R. and Lloyd, at 
home. 

Mr. Hampson has always manifested an interest in public affairs, 
especially those of a local nature, and has ser\^ed acceptably in an official 
capacity. He is at this writing one of the township road commissioners, and 
for twentv years has been a member of the school board. He is politically 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 417 

a Republican and fraternally a Knight of Pythias. Frank and genial in 
manner, honorable and upright in all his dealings, he is a man who has the 
confidence and respect of all who know him. 



THOMAS IMUS. 



The venerable gentleman whose name heads this sketch and who 
resides at the corner of Fifth street and Second avenue. Mendota, Illinois, 
came here from the Green Mountain state in 1856, and has lived here ever 
since, an honored and respected citizen. He has marked the town's growth 
from its infancy. At the time he arrived it had only one store, that owned 
by Giles & Wells. He engaged in the marble business, which he conducted 
sucessfully until about 1880, when he sold out, having since that time lived 
retired from active business life. 

Thomas Imus was born in Bennington county, Vermont, in the town 
of Arlington, August 21, 181 5, a son of William and Annie (Rising) Imus, 
the former a native of London, England, and the latter of Sufifield, Connecti- 
cut. Six children composed their family, two sons and four daughters, all 
of whom have passed away except the subject of this sketch, who was 
the youngest. The father was a watchmaker by trade, which he followed 
in the early part of his life. He came to America in 1753, located in 
Sufifield, and subsequently removed to Bennington county, Vermont, where 
he became the owner of about one hundred and fifty acres of land and 
where he spent the rest of his life in agricultural pursuits. He died in 1830, 
at the age of ninety-six years. He was twice married. By his first wife, 
Lucy Buck, he had nine children, and by his second wife six, the subject 
of our sketch being one of the latter. The second wife was eighty-four 
years old at the time of her death. They were all Episcopalians. During 
the Revolutionary war William Imus was three times drafted into the 
service, but would not fight against his own country and relations, and 
each time hired a substitute. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject was William Imus. He was 
the father of four sons, and was a large property owner. He lived and 
died in England. The maternal grandfather also was an Englishman. 
He came to America in the eighteenth century, settled on a New England 
farm and devoted his energies to agricultural pursuits the rest of his life, 
and reached a ripe old age. 

Thomas Imus, the direct subject of this review, was reared on his fath- 
er's farm in Vermont, and after his father's death he began learning the 
marble-cutter's trade, being at that time twenty-one years of age. 



4i8 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

On the 28th of February, 1845, he married ]vliss Louisa Gleason, a 
daughter of Newton and Annis (Mixer) Gleason, and two children, a 
son and daughter, were born to them. The son, Newton, married Isabella 
Wyrick and lives in Mendota; they have one child, named Mable. The 
daughter, Mattie, is the wife of \\'illiam E. \Mxom, and they have one 
child, named Blossom. ]\Irs. Thomas Imus died August 2, 1894, at the 
age of seventy-three years. She was a devoted Christian and a member of 
the Baptist church. 

Mr. Imus has always been a temperance man, and in his younger years 
was a member of the Rechabites and the Good Templars. Also he was 
for years a member of the Masonic fraternity. His early political affiliation 
was with the Whig party, and when the Republican party was organized 
he identified himself with it and has since given it his support. For a 
number of years he was a school director in Mendota, and his influence has 
always been directed on the side of right and progress. Now in his old 
age he enjoys the confidence and esteem of his many friends in the town 
where he has lived for nearly half a century. 



JOSEPH REINHARDT. 

Hon. Joseph Reinhardt, of, Peru, LaSalle county, was a native of Ger- 
many, having been born in the town of Fulda, in Hesse, Prussia, January 
II, 1828. His parents, Conrad and Clara (Malkmas) Reinhardt, lived and 
died in Germany, where the father was a physician of ability. Joseph was 
the only son in the family who greiw to adult years and to him was accorded 
an excellent education. After receiving a liberal education in other 
branches, he entered the University at Jena, where he took a course in the 
agricultural department, preparing himself to prosecute intelligently that 
branch of labor. 

When twenty-four years of age he contracted marriage with Miss 
Bertha Brennemann, also a native of Prussia, and the same year, 1852, 
started foi the United States. Five children were born to them, who be- 
came honorable and useful citizens. They are: Adolph, a resident of 
Spring Valley; Emma, wife of Julius Brennemann, of Peru; Mary, wife 
of John G. Feldes, of Chicago; Helen, wife of C. W. Leimbach, of Chicago; 
and Lina, wife of E. J. Robinson, of Arkansas. The wife and mother passed 
to her reward August 2, 1887, after the family had made their home in 
Peru. When he first arrived in this country, Mr. Reinhardt settled on a 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Putnam county, Illinois, eight 
miles south of this city. There he lived and toiled for thirty-one years, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 419 

well knowing what it was to work, for he labored early and late, acknowl- 
edging no defeat and overcoming all obstacles that stood between himself 
and prosperity. With true German perseverance and pluck, he plowed 
his fields and prepared his seed, using not only his acquired knowledge, but 
his native shrewdness in preparing for the harvest, and was rewarded by 
being able to turn his abundant yield into money and land. In this way 
he continued until he had accumulated a large acreage, consisting of several 
farms in Putnam county. Owing to his good judgment, industry and fru- 
gality, he prospered far above the average, and much credit is due him for 
placing farming, in that community, on a broader and more scientific scale 
than it formerly occupied. After more than a quarter of a century of hard 
labor, he moved his family permanently to Peru, where he spent his last 
days in retirement from the arduous duties of active business life. 

He supported the cause of Republicanism and took a deep interest in 
all affairs of state and nation. Being a strong friend to education he was 
a prominent worker for that cause, serving as school director for many 
years. In 1870 he was elected to the Illinois legislature, serving two years, 
and in 1885 was elected to the state senate for four years from LaSalle 
county. Both in legislative halls and senate chamber he so discharged 
the duties devolving upon him as to receive the highest commendation and 
approbation. As a legislator, Mr. Reinhardt reflected credit on his con- 
stituents and won for himself a splendid reputation. After taking up his 
residence in Peru he was for several years a member of the school board 
and was a most active citizen in working for the public welfare. For years 
he was treasurer of the Peru Farmers' Insurance Company. His character 
was above reproach and the probity of his official life admits of no question. 
His death occurred October 22, 1899, in the seventy-second year of his life. 



DAN W. BOWEN. 



Dan W. Bowen, one of the leading farmers of Freedom township, 
LaSalle county, is a native of Berkshire county, Massachusetts, his birth 
having occurred July 22. 1842. The family w-as established in New England 
at a very early period, but the record has been lost, and all that is certainly 
known of its history refers no further back than to the grandfather of our 
subject. David Bowen. as was his name, was a native of the state of Massa- 
chusetts, where he pursued the quiet, industrious life of a tiller of the 
soil. His son William, the father of Dan W., was likewise born in the old 
Bay state, and was reared to the calling of his ancestors. For a com- 
panion and helpmate along the highway of life he chose Emeline Burt, and 
in 1854 they removed to Illinois. At first the home of the family was in 



420 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Earl township, whence they later removed to Meriden township. There 
the father, ,whose birth had occurred in 1817, died in 1895, after a resi- 
dence of two-score years in this state. The wife and mother departed this 
life in 1891. Their children comprised the following named: Julia, wife 
of Wellman Tisdale, of State Center, Iowa; Marian, deceased, formerly the 
wife of George W. Dumond; Dan W. ; Harriet and Gertrude, both of 
Earlville; Louise, wife of Jesse Reynolds, of Newton, Kansas; and Cora, 
wife of Duncan Dunn, of Freedom. Two children died in infancy, — Frank 
and Francis. 

Dan W. Bowen obtained a fair education in the district schools of his 
native state and Illinois, and was early initiated into the duties of farming. 
For several years after reaching man's estate he continued to live on the 
old homestead and shared the profits and losses of running the same, with 
his father. Then for two years he rented a farm in Freedom township, at 
the end of which period he returned to the old home, and for a dozen 
years or more was engaged in the cultivation of the farm. At length he 
purchased a homestead in Earl township, but. after operating it for a short 
time only, he rented the place, and in turn leased what is known as the 
David Davis farm, in Freedom township, where he has the advantage of 
a greater acreage, situated in one body. He has been quite successful in 
his undertakings, and enjoys the respect of all of his neighbors and acquaint- 
ances. 

During the war of the Rebellion, ]\Ir. Bowen, then a young man, was 
very anxious to offer his services in the defense of the Union, but deferred 
to the wishes of his father, who needed him on the farm, for he was an only 
son. At last, however, the elder man yielded to the wishes of the younger, 
and in September, 1864, our subject was duly enlisted in the ranks of the 
Federal army to serve for one year. He became a private of Company E, 
Fourth Illinois Cavalry, which was mustered out of the service in September, 
1865. During this last year of the great conflict the old and seasoned troops 
were the ones placed at the front, where their experience was needed, and 
the later-enlisted regiments were assigned to guard duty, and were posted 
on the outskirts of the main branches of the army. Thus Mr. Bowen did 
not take part in any of the great battles of the war, though he participated 
in some pretty sharp skirmishes with the enemy while he was stationed at 
or near Memphis, Vicksburg, Yazoo City, Natchez, and other points in the 
Mississippi valley. Returning home in the autumn of 1865, he resumed the 
peaceful vocations of life, and has striven to perform his entire duty as 
a citizen. 

In January, 1866, Mr. Bowen and Eliza, daughter of Samuel Smith, of 
Kendall county, Illinois, were united in marriage. She died in April, 1876, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 421 

leaving" three children, namely: Fred, who married Lydia Haslett and 
resides in Earlville; Elsie; and Josephine, wife of D. Franks, of Earlville. 
In January, 1879, Mr. Bowen married Gertrude L. Cook, and their five 
children are Gladys, Fay, Scott, Inez and Helen. Mrs. Bowen is a daughter 
of Lyman and Sarah Cook, who came from Meriden, Connecticut, to Earl 
township many years ago. 



JOHN BRAUN. 

A highly respected German-American citizen of Peru is he of whom 
this sketch is penned, his residence here dating back half a century. His 
paternal grandfather followed the same calling, that of tailor, in Germany, 
as does our subject. The latter's father, George Braun, who was one of 
six children, four of whom were sons, likewise was a tailor by trade, though 
he gave some attention to farming also. He was a soldier under the great 
general, Napoleon Bonaparte, and died when in the prime of manhood, 
aged about forty-nine years. His widow, whose maiden name was Kath- 
erina Diedewig, came to America in 1852, bringing with her their four 
younger children. For some time she made her home in Peru, and in 
1853 the dread scourge, cholera, swept her away. She was an only daughter, 
but had three or four brothers. Her father, who was a shoemaker by trade, 
died in Germany, at an advanced age. George Braun and wife were devout 
members of the Lutheran church, and were upright, honored citizens, as 
their ancestors were before them. 

John Braun of this sketch is the twin brother of Peter Braun, born 
April 15, 1819, in the village of Nieder Saulheim, on the river Rhine, in 
the province of Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany. His other brothers and 
sisters who grew to mature years were George; Andrew; Katherina, who 
married Jacob Kreis, and is now deceased; Appolonia, wife of Mr. Graeber, 
of Lawrence, Kansas; and Lorena, wife of Clemens Young, of Kansas. 

When he was young John Braun attended the public schools of his 
native land, and as soon as old enough he commenced learning his father's 
trade. In 1843 he came to the United States, and for one year lived among 
the Indians and forests of Washington county, Wisconsin. Then, going to 
Chicago, he worked at his trade for six years in that infant metropolis, 
and in 1850 came to Peru, which has been his abiding place ever since. 
At first he was employed as a journeyman, but in i860, growing a little 
more ambitious, he opened a shop of his own. The beginning of the civil 
war the following year, however, interfered materially with his business 
prospects, and he gave up his independent enterprise. For the next fifteen 
years he was employed as a cutter in tailoring establishments Here, but 



422 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

during the Centennial year he opened his store, which has been conducted 
ever since under the firm name of Braun & Son. It has enjoyed the patron- 
age of the leading citizens of Peru, and only first-class work and the best of 
material are confidently expected to emanate from this well known business 
house. Many minor concerns have waxed and waned since Braun & Son 
opened their shop, but their popularity has continued unabated, and they 
have always been kept very busy in meeting the demands of the trade. 

On the 2d of June, 1847, John Braun married Katherine, daughter of 
Adam Betz, and though this worthy couple celebrated their golden wedding 
anniversary two years ago they bid fair to live to enjoy many happy returns 
of the festal day. Since 185 1 they have resided on Center street, near the 
city hall, and are much attached to their home, around which the associ- 
ations of almost half a century cling. In religious faith they are Lutherans. 

Two of the eleven children born to John and Katherine Braun died in 
infancy. The eldest son, Charles A., who has been engaged in business 
with the father since early manhood, married Julia Van Horn, and has two 
children, — Ora and Fred. Elizabeth, the eldest daughter of our subject, 
is the wife of L. A. Williams, a well known Ottawa lawyer, secretary to 
the Old Settlers' Society, and they have two children, Charles and Lorena. 
George married Annie Wilson, and died about three years ago in New 
York city. Mary E., who is unmarried, is a teacher in the Engiewood 
(Illinois) schools. Fred W. married Mrs. Kate E. Standiford, and has one 
child, June Elizabeth. They reside in Los Angeles, California, where he 
is engaged in the wholesale drug business. John, his next younger brother, 
is employed by him in the drug store mentioned. John married Linda Hill, 
of Los Angeles, California. L. Gustav, the youngest of the children, is a 
mail-carrier in Chicago. He married Marian E. Van Sciver, and has two 
children, — Harold and Ida. Anna, wife of Frank Crawford, is the mother 
of four daughters, and is a resident of Lake Mills, Wisconsin. Emma mar- 
ried John Klinger and lives at the corner of Second and West streets, 
Peru. John Braun, our subject, and his sons, are afiiliated with the 
Democratic party. 



CHARLES A. BRAUN. 



An almost lifelong resident of Peru. Charles A. Braun is well known 
in this vicinity and bears an enviable reputation as a business man and 
citizen. He is devoted to the welfare of this place, doing all within his 
power to promote the cause of progress and good government. 

Of German ancestry, Mr. Braun has inherited many of the best qualities 
of the sons of the Fatherland. His sterling integrity, justice and general 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 423 

reliability, united with his business traits of industry and perseverance, have 
won for him the approbation of his associates and acquaintances. A son 
of John and Katherine (Betz) Braun, natives of Germany, Charles A. was 
born in the city of Chicago, Illinois, March 17, 1848. When he was two 
years old he was brought to Peru by his parents, and here he grew to man- 
hood. His education was obtained in the public schools and in the German 
Lutheran parochial school. During- the winter of 1865-6 he attended 
Bryant & Stratton's Business College in Chicago, thus gaining a practical 
knowledge of commercial methods. Prior to this, however, he had been 
employed by the dry-goods house of R. & A. D. Murray, and subsequently 
he worked for J. B. Lininger, who was in the same line of business in 
Peru. His next situation was as bookkeeper for the firm of Hank, Ream 
& Company (later knowai as C. J. Hank & Company), who were likewise in 
the dry-goods business. On the 7th of August, 1877, the young man 
started in business in partnership with his father, under the style of Braun 
& Son. They occupy fine quarters in Turner Hall building, carry a full 
line of furnishing goods and a well selected stock of material to be manu- 
factured into suits and overcoats of the latest fashion. The firm commands 
a large and remunerative custom, and numbers among its patrons many 
of the leading citizens of the town and locality. 

July 9, 1879, C. A. Braun married Miss Julia, daughter of John and 
Mary (Hibbs) Van Horn. They have a son and daughter, named re- 
spectively Ora and Fred. The family reside in a pleasant home at the corner 
of Grant and Second streets. Prior to his marriage, Mr. Braun traveled ex- 
tensively in various parts of the United States and Canada, and is well 
posted in matters of general interest. In his political faith he is a Demo- 
crat, and fraternally he belongs to the Mystic Workers of the World. His 
success in life has been well deser^'ed. and his example is one worthy of emu- 
lation. 



GEORGE PIOLLAND. 



George Holland, a hardware merchant of Mendota, was born in the 
city of Albany, New York, September 8, 1852, and is a son of Nicholas and 
Anna (Strausner) Holland, both natives of Germany, but residents of the 
state of New York at the time of their marriage. In 1856 they came to 
Mendota, where the father worked at his trade of plasterer and mason until 
his death, which occurred in his sixty-fourth year. Six children were 
born to them, George, Maggie, August, deceased, Hannah, deceased, 
Sophia and John. The mother is a resident of Chicago, making her home 
with a daughter. 



424 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

George Holland was but three years of age when his parents moved 
to this city, and it was here he received his education in the public schools. 
He began work at the age of fifteen as clerk in the hardware store of 
Hodge Brothers. Later he accepted a clerkship with Curtis & Rude, 
with whom he remained twenty-five years. In 1894 Air. Rude withdrew 
from the firm and his place was taken by Mr. Holland, who purchased the 
interest of Mr. Curtis in 1897, and now conducts the store under the name 
of Holland & Company, with Mr. Rude as a silent partner. He handles a 
general line of hardware and has worked up a fine trade, his courteous 
treatment of his customers making him a popular salesman, and his long 
experience giving him the advantage of knowing the wants of his patrons 
and the best fine of goods to place in stock. 

He was married in 1876 to Miss Ella Cooper, of Mendota, who has 
presented him with four children, two of whom are deceased. He is a 
Republican and was elected to the office of city clerk in 1S85, and has held 
the office continuously since, discharging the duties in an able and efficient 
manner. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Modern Woodmen of America, and is highly respected as well for his 
kindly bearing as for his honest and upright dealings, while his business 
record calls for the commendation of the business men. 



JOHN T. BULLING, M. D. 

No one in Peru, LaSalle county, has lived here as long, uninterruptedly, 
as has the honored old citizen whose name stands at the beginning of this 
sketch. Half a century ago he established himself in practice in this town, 
and though he is now four-score years of age many of his old friends and 
patients are urgent in their desire to retain his medical attendance whenever 
illness seizes upon them. He is still as ambitious and enterprising as are 
many men of half his years, and the invaluable experience he has acquired in 
a life-time of professional work would be to any young practitioner a treasure- 
house of wealth untold could the venerable physician's wisdom be trans- 
ferred. The only surviving charter members of the LaSalle County Medical 
Society are Drs. Milling and Hatheway. The former has always kept up 
his active relations with the society, and moreover has belonged to the med- 
ical organization of the state. His acquaintanceship is very extensive, and 
in scores of families his name has been a household word for the greater part 
of the existence of Peru, which town he has seen developed from a hamlet 
to a large and prosperous place. 

Nine children were born to John and Susan (Siddel) IMilling. and only 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 425 

three of the number survive, namely: Dr. MilHng, of this sketch; Jane, 
who resides at the old homestead in Ireland, and is now ninety-five years of 
age; and Elizabeth, also a resident of the parental home, and now in her 
eighty-sixth year. Their father, who was a farmer of county Louth, Ireland, 
died in 1823, when about seventy years of age, and their mother's death 
occurred the previous year. They were both Episcopalians in religious faith. 
The paternal grandfather of our subject, John Milling, was a physician also, 
and lived and died in the Emerald Isle. He had eleven children. Mrs. 
Susan Milling was one of three children, and her father, likewise, spent his 
whole life in Ireland. 

Dr. J. T. Milling was born in county Louth, Ireland, April 16, 1819. In 
his school-days he studied Latin and Greek, and chose his course with special 
reference to taking up medical work later. In accordance with the cus- 
tom of that time he graduated in the several departments of the Royal 
College of Surgeons, receiving separate diplomas from each branch. He 
was graduated in the surgical department in July, 1842, and in the general 
medical department in 1843. Entering the college in 1839, he was not 
deemed thoroughly competent to practice until he had spent four years in 
earnest study and hard work — rather of a contrast, so he found, to the 
loose methods in vogue on this continent, at the same time, when any man 
who had spent a few weeks or months in assisting an established physician 
might set up an office and practice of his own, if he chose to do so. It was 
in 1843 that Dr. Milling sailed to the United States, and, locating in Prince- 
ton, Bureau county, Illinois, he continued to practice there until 1849, when 
he became a permanent resident of Peru. For years his life was not an easy 
or desirable one, in many respects, for it meant to ride through all kinds of 
weather, far and near, across swamps and over roads of the worst possible 
description, to suffer hardships to which the modern practitioner is an utter 
stranger. He never neglected the call of the suffering, and rarely considered 
his own comfort or convenience. He endeared himself to hundreds, and his 
name has been spoken with love and reverence throughout this locality for 
years and years. 

The sharer of the Doctor's joys and sorrows for almost a half century, 
his devoted wife, formerly Elizabeth Leech, is still living and is the center 
of his home and affection. They were married on the loth of July, 1850, 
and became the parents of two beautiful daughters, both of whom were sum- 
moned to the better land when at the threshold of mature life. Mary 
Virginia died at twenty-three and Frances Elizabeth at eighteen. The par- 
ents of Mrs. Milling were John and Mary (Parr) Leech, natives of Dublin, 
Ireland, who came to America about 1795, when they w^ere children, and with 
their respective parents settled in the vicinity of Steubenville, Ohio. The 



426 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

latter were pioneers of Jefferson county, Ohio, and at death they were placed 
to rest in a country cemetery there. In early days John Leech belonged 
to the state militia of Ohio. About 1833 he came to Illinois and settled 
on the present site of Peoria, when the only structure there consisted of a 
fort. At the close of two years or so he went to Putnam county, where he 
died in 1839. His widow survived him, and died in 1880, at the advanced 
age of ninety-three years. 

From the time that he received the right of franchise in this, the land 
of his adoption, the Doctor has adhered to the Democratic party. For 
some four years he served as county coroner, and for two-score years he 
has been examiner for the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York. 
The home in which he and his loved wife have spent almost all of their 
happy married life was built in 1852, and thus is one of the oldest houses in 
the town or county. In the summer of 1895 occurred one of the pleasantest 
events in the quiet but laborious career of this worthy couple. They made a 
tour of Ireland, Scotland, England and Wales, visiting the old home of the 
Doctor in the Emerald Isle, and having a most enjoyable time generally. 
In religious creed he holds to the one in which he was reared, the Episcopal- 
ian, while Mrs. Milling's preference is for the Presbyterian church. 



THEODORE G. HERBERT. 

Theodore G. Herbert, of the firm of Herbert Brothers, proprietors of 
a meat market in Mendota, was born in Lee county, this state, near the 
town of Compton, July 31, 1864. The Herberts are of German origin. 
Mr. Herbert's parents, Andrew and Appolonia (Zach) Herbert, were both 
born in Germany, Hesse-Darmstadt being their native place. In their 
family were eleven children, seven sons and four daughters, of whom five 
are now living, three sons and two daughters, namely: Theodore G., the 
direct subject of this sketch; Andrew J., his partner; Benjamin, of Men- 
dota; Caroline, wife of Charley Beckett, of Mendota; and Emma Eliza- 
beth, wife of Henry Fike, residing two miles north of Mendota. Their 
father, a shoemaker by trade, emigrated to this country about the year 
1862 and first located at LaSalle. A short time afterward he moved to a 
place near Perkins' Grove. Lee county, all this time working at his trade. 
Next we find him engaged in farming, w-hich he continued up to 1895. He 
first rented eighty acres and later a larger tract, and for several years he 
carried on farming operations successfully. In 1894 he bought a home in 
Mendota, and has lived here ever since, retired. He and his w'ife were 
originally German Catholics, but for some years past have been identified 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 427 

with the German Evangehcal church. Politically he is a Republican, and 
at one time he served as the road commissioner of Lee county. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject was Andrew Herbert. He, 
too, was a native of Germany, and by trade he was a mason. He lived to 
the ripe age of eighty-five years. Of his children, three sons and four 
daughters, only two are now living, — Andrew and Margaret Becker. 
Grandmother Herbert was seventy-six when she died. The great-grand- 
father of our subject also was named Andrew Herbert. He was a farmer. 
Both he and his wife reached advanced age, he being ninety-six at the 
time of death and she seventy-four. 

The maternal grandfather of Mr. Herbert lived and died in Germany; 
served his time as a soldier in the army, and afterward worked at his trade, 
that of carpenter. Both he and his wife attained old age. Their only child 
was Mr. Herbert's mother. 

Theodore G. Herbert was reared to farm life in Lee county, Illinois, 
receiving his early education in the district school near his home and later 
attending a seminary in Aurora, Ilhnois. When he started out in life on his 
own account it was as a farm hand, working by the month, and after one 
year of this kind of service he rented eighty acres of land, which he culti- 
vated two years. At the end of this time, in 1890. he moved to Mendota 
and engaged in running a meat market in company with M. O. Larson, 
with whom he was associated two years, then buying out his partner and 
the next three years running the business alone. The following three 
years he had for a partner J. B. Kuney; and since then he and his brothers, 
Andrew and Benjamin, have been associated together under the firm name 
of Herbert Brothers. They have a nice shop and are doing a large business, 
meeting with the ^success which their enterprising efforts warrant. 

Mr. Herbert resides in a pleasant home on Twelfth street in Mendota. 
He was married on the 4th of F'ebruary, 1890, to Miss Emma E. Rupert, 
daughter of Andrew and Mary (Metzger) Rupert. They have four children, 
viz.: Hildah L., Rupert A., Theadore A. and John Robbins. All the family 
belong to the Evangelical church, and both he and his wife are identified 
with the Mystic Workers of the World, and he also belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen of America. Politically he is a Republican. 



THOMAS M. PAGE. 



The respected citizen of LaSalle, Illinois, whose name introduces this 
sketch was born in Frankfort, Franklin county, Kentucky, May 21, 1842, 
a son of Thomas S. and Jane B. (Julian) Page. He was born in New York 
city, April 19, 1800, only a few hours after the landing of his parents at 



428 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

that port from England, their native country. They made a settlement in 
Richmond, Virginia, where Thomas S. was reared. He moved to Ken- 
tucky and became a prominent man in that state. For a period of eighteen 
or twenty years he filled the office of auditor of state, of which of^fice he was 
the incumbent at the time the civil war broke out, and during the war he 
was in the adjutant general's office, as bookkeeper. Politically he was a 
Know-nothing and a Whig, and later a Republican. He died in Frankfort, 
Kentucky, in 1879. He was twice married, his second wife, Jane B., nee 
Julian, being the mother of Thomas M., the subject of this sketch. 

Thomas M. Page was reared in his native city, Frankfort, receiving 
a common-school education in the schools of that place. When the civil 
war came on he was a young man just emerging from his 'teens, and in 
the second year of the war, in September, 1862, he enlisted in Company C, 
Ninth Kentucky Cavalry, as a private, and when mustered into service was 
made second lieutenant by the adjutant general. As a member and of^cef 
of this command he served one year. He was in the advance at the battle 
of Perryville, and throughout his service he acted the part of the brave, 
true soldier. At the expiration of his term of enlistment, in 1863, he was 
honorably discharged and came to LaSalle, Illinois. For five or six years 
lie was in the employ of the Kentucky Coal Company, at LaSalle, following 
which service he was engaged in farming two years, returning then to the 
coal company. In 1871 he engaged as an employe of the Illinois Central 
Railroad Company, and for eleven years was ticket agent and car account- 
ant. After this he again turned his attention to farming, this time in 
Dakota, where he spent three years. Returning to LaSalle, he accepted 
a position as check clerk at the Illinois Central Railroad depot, which posi- 
tion he gave up in October, 1897. 

Mr. Page w'as married in LaSalle, in 1868, to Miss Mary Kate, daugh- 
ter of the late Dr. James C. Brown, of LaSalle. Seven children have been 
born to them, namely: Julian Day, Henry Brown (deceased), Anna Louise 
(deceased), Mary Elizabeth (deceased), Addison Thomas, Catherine and 
Annie Pauline. 

Politically Mr. Page is a Republican. In religious relations his family 
are identified with the Congregational church. 



SIMPSON CLARK. 



The aged resident of any community who has assisted in the develop- 
ment of the material blessings amid which he lives, and who has exerted 
an influence for good before the people about him, is always held in special 
•esteem. Such a man is the venerable Simpson Clark, of Mendota, Illinois. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 429 

now ninety-three years old, l)nt active, alert, full of good cheer and rich in 
interesting reminiscences. 

Simpson Clark was born March 12, 1806, in Thornton, Grafton county, 
New Hampshire, a son of John and Elizabeth (Enos) Clark, early resi- 
dents of Londonderry, Rockingham county, that state. John Clark was 
a Revolutionary soldier and he and his father served in the same company. 
He left the plow to go to war, and after American independence was assured 
he again became a farmer. He died at Thornton, New Hampshire, about 
1809. His wife died about 1856, aged eighty-nine years. They had eleven 
children, all of whom lived to manhood and womanhood. The tenth in 
order of birth was Simpson Clark, who was named Simpson in honor of his 
maternal grandmother's maiden name, and who is the only member of the 
family now living. At the time of his father's death he was about three 
years old. His mother kept him four years longer, until he was seven, and 
then he was given a home in the family of James Smith, of Squam Ridge, 
Grafton county, New Hampshire, in which he remained, getting a limited 
amount of schooling and living the life of a farmer's boy of all work until 
he was eighteen. He then went, a stranger, to seek his fortune in Boston, 
and for a time his experiences were discouraging; but at length he met a 
friend named Wheaton, who procured work for him of a farmer living just 
outside the city. After a few months he returned to New Hampshire and 
worked at cjuarrying and laying stone. Later he was employed at the 
United States navy-yard at Charlestown, Massachusetts, and helped to lay 
the foundations of the runways from which the Vermont was launched. 
From this work he went to Ouincy, Massachusetts, and was there employed 
in the stone yards for a time. For a number of years he lived in Boston 
and was a member of the city police force. Railway construction, on the 
line of the Connecticut River Railroad, next claimed his services, and he 
was stationed at New London. 

In 1829 Mr. Clark married Miss Matilda Vickery, daughter of Abra- 
ham and Rachel (McLinch) Vickery, of New Hampshire, and she bore 
him two children, named Chastina E. and Matilda L. Chastina E. Clark 
married Ivory Chick, a native of Maine. They had a son, named Ivory S. 
Chick. Ivory Chick died while on a visit to Maine in 1854. Matilda L. 
Clark married Nicholas Johnston and is now living, a widow, at Boulder, 
Colorado. She has six children, named Charles, Frank, Mary, Lizzie, 
George and Roy. 

In 1852 Mr. Clark, his wife and their daughter Matilda came west to 
LaSalle, Illinois, where Ivory Chick, husband of his daughter Chastina, 
had a contract for construction work on the Illinois Central Railroad, and 
had preceded them with his family. Mr. Clark was employed at railroad 



430 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

building for some time on a salary, and later did contract work on the 
Bureau Valley Railroad, toward Peoria. Returning to LaSalle he removed 
to Mendota in the fall of 1854, built a residence and remained there nine 
years. He then purchased a twenty-acre farm at Troy Grove and later 
added other land to it and farmed there successfully thirty years and then 
retired from active life and located at Mendota. Mrs. Clark died August 
15, 1892, aged eighty-one 3'ears and ten days. Mrs. Chick, his widowed 
daughter, had been a member of his family for many years and she then 
took the position which she has since held as the head of his household. 
Mr. and Mrs. Clark were reared under relig'ious influences, and though 
they never joined any denommation, were always in sympathy with the 
church. Since the death of his wife, however, Mr. Clark and also Mrs. 
Chick have united with the Baptist church, to which his younger daughter 
also belongs. 

Mr. Clark has always been a leader of many cjf the men with whom he 
has been associated. In Xew Hampshire he was captain of a militia com- 
pany four years. He was constable and deputy sheriff in LaSalle county 
before he moved to Troy Grove. Until 1896 he was a Democrat who 
never failed to vote for the nominees of his party; but at that time, influ- 
enced by his view of the financial question, then paramount, he cast his 
vote for "McKinley and sound money." An earnest, kind-hearted old 
gentleman, modest in his manners and social intercourse, he takes an 
interest in current events and converses well on all the important topics of 
the day. His nobility of character is always evident and he is in every 
way worthy of the affectionate regard in which he is held by numerous 
friends, some of them of many years' standing. He preserves in a wonder- 
ful degree the robust health and physical strength which characterized him 
in the prime of his manhood, and in good weather took especial delight, 
until a recent date, in dailv walks down town. 



JOHN J. LEHR. 



The subject of this sketch is a well known stock farmer of Farm 
Ridge township, LaSalle county, Illinois. He deals in fine stock, making 
a specialty of Jersey cattle, Poland-China hogs, and Oxford Down sheep, 
and takes a pride in the fact that his stock in point of quality is not excelled 
in the county. In 1893 he started his herd of Jerseys by buying the very 
best stock he could get, purchasing from the herds of Isaac Hodgson and 
Eli Bradford, prominent stockmen, and he now has twenty head of as 
fine Jersey cattle as can be found in LaSalle county. His farm, com- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 431 

prising one hundred and sixty acres, is located three miles west of Grand 
Ridge, and is one of the most desiral3le in the neighborhood, well improved 
with good buildings, fences, etc.. and conveniently arranged for success- 
fully carrying on both the stock business and general farming. 

Air. Lehr is a native of Illinois and was born forty-five years ago. 
He is of German parentage, both his father and mother having been born 
in Germanv. His father. Valentine Lehr. came to this country in early 
life, first locating at Ottawa. Illinois. He worked for some time on the 
old Illinois canal. By tr^de he was a carpenter, a first-class workman, and 
built many of the best houses in Farm Ridge, South Ottawa and Deer 
Park. He was married in Ottawa, and to him and his wife were born eight 
children, five of whom are living, namely: Matilda Hagie, of Grand Rapids 
township, LaSalle county, Illinois; John J., the subject of this sketch; 
William, who lives in Saunders county, Nebraska; Mary Hawk, "of Ottawa, 
Illinois; and Minnie Freeze, also of Ottawa. Godfrey died at the age of 
thirtv-eight years, leaving a widow and five children. The mother of 
this family died at the age of thirty-six years, and the father lived to be 
sixty-eight. Both were members of the Lutheran church, and in politics the 
father was a Republican. 

John J. Lehr was reared on a farm and received a common-school 
education. At the age of twenty-six years he was united in marriage to 
Elizabeth Berge, of Allen township, LaSalle county, daughter of George 
and Christena Berge. Mr. and Mrs. Lehr have had four children, — Christena 
and Louis J., aged respectively eighteen and thirteen years; and two who 
are deceased. 

Politically, like his father before him. Mr. Lehr is a Republican. He 
has served officially as township assessor, as commissioner for six years, 
and as a member of the school board, in the latter capacity eleven years, 
always performing his duty with promptness and fidelity. His life, in both 
public and private capacities has been such that he has gained the con- 
fidence and esteem of all with whom he has in anv wav been associated. 



CHARLES JACOB MITCHELL. 

The subject of this sketch is a member of the firm of Mitchell Brothers, 
large farmers of the township of Dimmick. LaSalle county, Illinois, and is 
a son of the late William Mitchell, for a number of years one of the promi- 
nent farmers of this state. 

William Mitchell was a native of Scotland, born in the year 1814, and 
when small came to America and took up his abode in Illinois, being among 
the pioneers of Dimmick township, LaSalle county. His early life was spent 



432 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

as a shepherd boy, his simple earnings supplying him with the necessaries 
of life. Finally by careful economy he acquired a tract of land, which he 
improved and which in time became a valuable farm. William Mitchell 
married Mary Wenner, daughter of Jacob Wenner, a German who settled 
in Dimmick township at an early day. Mrs. Mitchell is still living, at 
the age of sixty-nine years, — the age at which Mr. Mitchell died in 1883. 
The members composing their family are as follows: Elizabeth, wife of 
William Reed, of LaSalle, Illinois; W^illiam, a resident of Lawrence county, 
South Dakota, married Miss Edith Miner; Kat.e; James, a resident of 
Utica, Illinois, married Miss Bertha Bill; Minnie, wife of George A. Harts- 
horn, a prominent farmer of W'altham township. LaSalle county; Lena B., 
wife of the Hon. John Wylie, of Waltham; Charles J., whose name intro- 
duces this article; Henry J., engaged in the creamery business at Utica,. 
Illinois; Walter B., of Utica, Illinois, and a member of the firm referred 
to in the first paragraph; and Frank R., also a member of that firm. 

The Mitchells have political records as Republicans. Their father 
was the incumbent of many of the township offices, and his sons, like him, 
are public-spirited and enterprising men, who stand high in the estimation 
of the people of their respective localities. 

Charles J. Mitchell was born on his father's farm above referred to, 
October 18, 1868, and here he has always lived. He was educated in the 
academy at LaSalle and the Normal School at Valparaiso, Indiana, com- 
pleting his studies in the last named institution at the age of twenty-two. 
He then entered the employ of The Home Produce Meat Market in LaSalle, 
with which he was identified for a time, and since then he has been en- 
gaged in farming. In 1898 he and two of his brothers entered into a 
partnership under the firm name of Mitchell Brothers, for the operation of 
the Mitchell farm, one of the largest in the township and which is being 
successfully run as a stock farm, slaughtering and shipping being important 
features. 

Charles J. Mitchell is a Knight of Pythias and a member of the Mystic 
Workers. His lodge of Knights is "Old 53" of LaSalle. one of the im- 
portant lodges of the state and which has furnished some of the best 
Pvthians in Illinois. 



JOHN A. KINGS. 

Few citizens of LaSalle are better known or more generally esteemed 
than John A. Kings, who has made his home here for nearly three decades 
and has served in of^cial positions for a number of years, acquitting 
himself with abilitv and distinction. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 433 

He is a native of Richmond county, Staten Island, New York, his 
l3irth having occurred March 3, 1849. His parents, Garrett J. and Johanna 
(Schoemaker) Kings, were natives of Holland and came to the United 
States late in the '40s. They were married in this country, and in 1850 
removed from Staten Island to Passaic, New Jersey, and later came to 
Illinois, settling in Belvidere, Boone county, upon a farm. There the father 
died in 1870, at the age of seventy-one years. The wife and mother is still 
living, and though now in her eighty-fourth year is remarkably strong 
and well preserved. Their children were: John A.; Garrett H., of Sanborn, 
Iowa; Andrew J., of Mitchell, Dakota; and Theodore F., of Phoenix, Ari- 
zona. 

In his youth John A. Kings received a good public-school education. 
He continued to live on the old homestead and to assist his father until 
he was fifteen years of age. He then entered upon the business of rail- 
roading, and was thus employed until 1881. For several years after he 
came to LaSalle he was employed as section foreman, car inspector and 
yard-master for the Illinois Central Railroad Company. In 1881 he ac- 
cepted a position as carpenter with the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Com- 
pany, with which concern he remained until 1888. In May of that year 
he became a member of the LaSalle police force, and is still one of the 
guardians of the city's peace. He bears an excellent record, is faithful, 
prompt and ef^cient, and merits the good will which the citizens feel toward 
him. From 1884 to 1886 he was a member of the city council, and in 
1889 was elected to the office of justice of the peace. In 1893, and again 
in 1897, 'ic ^'^'^^ re-elected, and is still serving' in this important position. 

In 1874 Mr. Kings married Miss Mary D. Flynn, a native of Canada 
and of Irish lineage. Two sons and two daughters have blessed the union 
of this estimable couple, namely: Mary J.. Ellen Agnes, Francis J. and 
John. The family are Roman Catholic in their religious faith. They 
have a pleasant home and are highly esteemed by all who know them. 



FRANK M. CRANE. 



The Crane family, of which the subject of this sketch is a representa- 
tive, traces its origin to New England. There Albert Crane, the grand- 
father of Frank M., was liorn and thence he went to the Catskill regions 
of New York, where he followed the trade of blacksmith. Albert Crane, 
his son and the father of Frank ]\I., came from New York state to Illinpis 
in 1851 and settled on section 14, Dimmick township, LaSalle county, 
where he became a prosperous farmer and where he spent the rest of his 
life and died, his death occurring in 1894. His wife, ]\Iary Aiken, whom he 



434 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

married in his native state, died in 1876. Their children were the following" 
named: Miss Sarah Crane; Robert Crane, of Burlington, Kansas; Albert, 
Jr., who died in 1886; James Crane; Mary E., deceased wife of Thomas 
Gardiner; and Frank ]\1., the subject of this sketch. 

Frank M. Crane was born on his father's farm, March 4, 1853, and 
was here reared and received his education in the common schools. At the 
age of twenty he engaged in farming on his own account. Stock-raising 
became one of the chief features of his business, and it is still a source of no 
jimall revenue to him. He owns a farm of five hundred acres, desirably 
located and substantially improved. 

Mr. Crane was married December 15, 1886, to Miss jNIargaret J. Jack- 
son, daughter of John Jackson, of Troy Grove, Illinois; and the children 
in their family are Charles H., Howard A., Nelson J., Edith AI., Elsie and 
Aletha. 

The Crane family for the most part have been identified with the 
Democratic party and active in its support. In 1896, however, Frank i\I. 
supported the McKinley ticket in the belief that sure relief from long finan- 
cial depression lay in the triumph of the head of that ticket, and two 
years of its administration of public affairs have not served to convince him 
that he was mistaken in his judgment. For the last two years Mr. Crane 
has l)een a school director. 



= NICHOLAS CHARLES CUMMINGS. 

The well known gentleman whose name forms the heading of this 
sketch has Iieen a resident of ]\Iendota, Illinois, for a period of thirty-six 
years, and for more than twenty years was in business here as a dealer in 
groceries and boots and shoes. 

Nicholas Charles Cummings was born in Rensselaer county. New 
York, August 10, 185 1, a son of John and Almira (Craver) Cummings, 
natives of the same state. He is the younger of two children; his brother 
Eli died in Mendota in 1898. Their father was a farmer, who came to 
Illinois with his family in 1852 and located in Lee county ten miles north- 
east of ]Mendota, where he bought land and for eleven years carried on 
agricultural pursuits. In 1863 he came to Mendota, where he lived, retired, 
till his death, in 1899. His wife died in 1886. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Eli Cummings, was of English 
and Irish descent, was a farmer and lived and died in New York state, at 
the age of eighty years. In his family were eight sons and two daughters. 
Mr. Cummings' maternal grandfather, Nicholas Craver, was a native of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 435 

Pennsylvania and by trade a blacksmith. In the early '50s he came out 
to Illinois and bought a farm adjoining the one owned by the father of our 
subject, and lived there until about 1872, when he moved to Mendota; and 
here he died, at the age of eighty-five years. 

Nicholas C. Cummings was an infant when brought to Illinois by his 
parents, and the first twelve years of his life were spent on his father's 
farm, since then living in Mendota. He was educated in the public schools 
and the college at Mendota, and when he started out to make his own 
way in the world it was as a clerk in a grocery. In 1878 he engaged in the 
grocery business for himself, in Mendota, and later added also a stock of 
boots and shoes in connection with his groceries, doing a prosperous busi- 
ness in both lines until August 19, 1899, when he closed out the business. 

Mr. Cummings owns and occupies a pleasant home on the corner of 
Fourth avenue and Eighth street, which he built a number of years ago. 
He was married November 25, 1872, to Miss Mary Alice Gheer, a daughter 
of Levi and Nancy Gheer. Two sons were born to INIr. and Mrs. Cum- 
mings, namely: Arthur E. and Claude G. The former married Laura Roth, 
in 1895, and was superintendent for the Mendota Gas Company when he 
met with his death, by accident, being shot, the accident occurring as he 
was taking- a gun from his buggy. This sad affair happened October 13, 
1899. His age at the time of death was twenty-six years and a few days. 
Claude G., the second son, is twenty-four years of age and is an employe 
of the Mendota Electric Light Company. 

Mr. Cummings is a Republican and has always taken a commendable 

interest in public affairs, especially those of a local nature. For nine years 

he has been a director in the city schools of Mendota. He is a member of 

Lodge No. 293, I. O. O. F., and Camp No. 65, Modern Woodmen of 
America. 



BERTRAM SCHWEICKERT. 

This popular young business man of Peru is one of the younger sons 
of our well known citizen, Vincent Schweickert, who is represented else- 
where in this work. Born in this town on the 22d of June, 1872, our sub- 
ject has always been closely identified with the place, as child, youth and 
man, and the deepest interest is felt by him in all local affairs touching the 
good of the community. 

When he had arrived at a suitable age he entered the parochial schools, 
and acquired a liberal education. He was about sixteen years old when 
he obtained employment in a bakery, where he remained for about a year, 
but. not caring for the trade, he decided to adopt that of his father and 



436 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

elder brothers, and, to that end, commenced learning the business of laying 
brick and stone masonry. He has followed this calling ever since, and in 
1898 went into partnership with his brothers, Henry, Jacob, Francis X., 
and his brother-in-law, Frank Ellerbrock. This enterprising firm, which is 
now commanding a large share of the local contracts for brick and stone 
work for buildings and bridges, is known as Schweickert Brothers & 
Company. 

Bertram Schweickert resides in an attractive home on Ninth street, 
between Pike and Calhoun. The lady who presides here as wife, mother 
and hostess, was formerly Miss Mary Elizabeth Brinkmann, a daughter 
of Frank and Mary (Schumacher) Brinkmann. The ceremony which united 
the destinies of our subject and wife was performed in Ottawa, Putnam 
county, Ohio, on the 22d of April, 1896. Two sons bless their happy 
home, named respectively Ewald Vincent Frank and Lawrence Henry 
Thomas. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bertram Schweickert are members of the Catholic 
church. He belongs to the Catholic Order of Foresters; to St. Joseph's 
Benevolent Society; and to the Bricklayers and ]\Iasons' International 
Union, No. 11, of Illinois. In his political faith he is an uncompromising 
Democrat. 



ANDREW B. BREESE. 



Andrew Bray Breese, deceased, was one of the prominent men of Earl- 
ville, LaSalle county, where he had been engaged in the mercantile business 
for many years. He was a native of Newark, New Jersey, having been born 
April 29, 1824, and was a son of Bailey and Phoebe Breese, both of promi- 
nent New Jersey families. ]Mr. Breese was one of eleven children, five 
sons and six daughters. At the age of eighteen he came west with his par- 
ents, who settled in Paw Paw, this state, and about two years later moved to 
Grand Detour, where he entered upon his career as a dry goods merchant. 
Two years later he moved his store to Paw Paw, Illinois, and continued in 
the business there for fifteen years, when he came to Earlville and remained 
tmtil his death. He was a veteran dry goods man, having been engaged in 
this business for forty-nine years, and his prosperity was assured from the 
start. He was a man of keen perception, a close observer, and displayed an 
acuteness in business that augured well for his success. 

He was married in 1844 to Aliss ]\Iary E. Carber, a native of Brad- 
ford county, Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Jacob and Sabrina (Sweet) 
Carber. Jacob Carber and wife were natives of the state of New York, the 
former tracing his ancestry to Germany and the latter to England. He 




^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 437 

enlisted in the war of 181 2 at the age of seventeen years. He was well 
educated and taught school in the east during his early life, coming west 
about 1835 and settling in Scott county, Iowa, where he engaged in farming 
in the Mississippi bottom. Here he died, leaving two children, — Mrs. 
Breese and Andrew J. Carber, a farmer of Scott county, Iowa. Mrs. Breese 
was a school teacher in her early life, and it was while thus engaged in the 
vicinity of Paw Paw that ]\Ir. Breese made her acquaintance. Mr. Breese 
died December 18, 1891, after an illness of only three days' duration. His 
sudden death was a severe blow to the whole community, to whom the news 
came as a shock, and business and social circles alike felt the blow. He 
had a happy disposition and always looked on the bright side of life, while 
jovial good nature always made him a favorite in any social gathering. He 
was a Democrat in politics, but did not seek emoluments of ofifice. In re- 
ligion he had the comforting faith of the Universalist, and went to meet his 
Maker with the trust of a confiding child in a loving, all-wise and merciful 
Father. 

Mrs. Breese, his widow, resides in Earlville, and holds an interest in the 
business so successfully inaugurated by her husband. The firm is Breese & 
McKinney, the latter having bought an interest in the store soon after 
the death of Mr. Breese. 

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Breese was without issue, but an adopted 
daughter, Ruth May, now the wife of John Buchanan, of Chicago, was the 
recipient of their loving care and bounty, finding at their hearthstone a par- 
ent's care and affection. 



ALEXANDER C. FINKLER. 

Alexander C. Finkler, who is recognized as quite an important factor in 
the local pohtics of LaSalle county, is now serving as city clerk of LaSalle. 
He is one of the native sons of this place, his birth having occurred here 
February 16, 1869. Thus he is in the prime of early manhood and am- 
bition, and judging from what he has alread}' accomplished in his brief 
career he has a most promising future. 

Alexander Finkler, the father of the subject of this article, was born 
in Westphalia, Germany, and came to the United States with his parents 
when a young lad. His two brothers, Frank J. of Dixon, Illinois, and 
John A., who died at Streator, this county, and his only sister, ]\Iary, who 
became the wife of Isaac Robinson, of Peru, LaSalle county, were all born 
in America. The parents located at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, where they 
continued to reside until death. When he had arrived at man's estate, 
Alexander Finkler, Sr.. came to this count v, and after living at Peru for 



438 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

some time went to St. Louis, Missouri, where he was employed in the 
United States arsenal. In that city he formed the acquaintance of Miss 
Johanna McKnight, who was a native of Ireland. They were married in 
LaSalle, began their domestic life here, and their happy home was blessed 
with eight children, namely: A. C. ; Frank (who is deceased); Mary; 
Eliza; Margaret; Agnes; Josephine; and Emily. The father died in 1883, 
at the age of fifty-six years, at his home in Ottawa, where he had been 
living for fi\e years previously. His widow returned to LaSalle, where 
the greater part of her married life had been spent and where she is still 
a resident. 

With the exception of five years spent in Ottawa with the rest of the 
family, Alexander C. Finkler has always dwelt in LaSalle, and received his 
education in its public schools. He was a youth of fourteen when his 
father died, and he at once took up the more serious realities of life. His 
father had been for years engaged in the manufacture of soda-water, and 
with energy and wisdom far beyond what could be expected of such a 
child, young Alexander took up the reins of the business and successfully 
carried on the undertaking for eleven years, finally selling out in 1894. In 
the meantime he pursued a course of study in the Dixon (Illinois) Business 
College, in order more fully to ec^uip himself for his commercial career. 

For several years Mr. Finkler has been active in the Democratic party, 
and in 1893 he was honored by election to the office of city clerk of LaSalle. 
Two years later he was re-elected, and again in 1897 and 1899, now serving 
his fourth term in this capacity. In 1898 he was his party's candidate for 
the more responsible position of county clerk, and, with the rest of the 
nominees on that ticket, was defeated at election. 

In 1895 Mr. Finkler married Miss Xellie Lehan of LaSalle, and one 
child blesses their happy home, namely, Alexander. In his social relations 
Mr. Finkler belongs to the Knights of Pythias, the Alodern Woodmen of 
America, the Independent Order of Foresters, and the Turn Verein. Re- 
ligiously he and his wife are identified with the Catholic church. 



WILLIAM B. CHAP:\IAN. 

W^illiam Barber Chapman, a retired business man and one of the most 
substantial and respected citizens of LaSalle, Illinois, was born in Peters- 
burg, New York, February 25, 1828. He was one of seven children born 
to Moses and Lucinda (Collins) Chapman, namely: Moses, of Hutchinson, 
Kansas; Henry, a resident of Pasadena, California; \\'ealthy, the widow 
of Isaac DeVoe, of Seattle, Washington; William B., our subject; Lucinda 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 439 

Chapman, of Forest, Illinois; ]\Iary, widow of J. P. Knight, also of Forest; 
and Nettie, the wife of Henry Sloan, of Sidney, Washington. Both parents 
were natives of Springfield, ^Massachusetts, where they were married. The 
father learned the trade of blacksmith and carriage making-, which he 
followed. They lived for a time in Orleans, New York, and from that 
state came to Illinois by horses and wagon, reaching Putnam county, this 
state, on November 2, 1843. He purchased a farm near Hennepin, which 
was culti\ated by his sons, and upon which he lived until his forty-ninth 
year, at which time his death occurred. His wife reached the advanced 
age of seventy-one years. They were of the Baptist faith. He was a 
prominent man and held the office of justice of the peace in Orleans and 
was also count}- commissioner for many years. His father, Moses Chap- 
man, of English origin, was also a blacksmith and reached an extreme old 
age. living all his life in ^Massachusetts. He had a small number of chil- 
dren. Henry Collins, the maternal grandfather of our subject, was a mili- 
tary man and connected with the armory at Springfield, Massachusetts. 
He had a few children and died in his native state when past his ninetieth 
year. 

^^'illiam B. Chapman was reared on a farm, attending the common 
schools in the east, and then entered the academy at Granville. Illinois. 
He remained at home until 1853 and then came to LaSalle and entered the 
livery business, which he conducted for sixteen years. He then went to 
Forest. Livingston county, purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres, placed it in good cultivation, and remained on it for seventeen years, 
when he returned to this city and took charge of the land ofifice for the 
Union Pacific Railroad for eight or ten years. Since that time he has lived 
a life of retirement from business. He is a stalwart Republican and served 
under Eli Watterman four years as deputy sheriff of LaSalle county. He 
was married on December 2, 1857. to Miss Martha Foster, by whom he 
had four children, all of whom died in childhood. Mr. and Mrs. Chapman 
are liberal contributors toward the support of the Congregational church, 
of which organization ]Mrs. Chapman is a member. Mrs. Chapman is a 
lady of culture and refinement, having received the advantages of a 
superior education. She took a preparatory course at Granville Academy 
and then entered the Albion College, at Albion, Michigan, at which she 
graduated in the class of 1855. She was the youngest but one in a class of 
eleven. Her studies having included a business course, she took charge of 
her father's banking business and acted as his bookkeeper for several 
years after returning from school. 

As the parents of Mrs. Chapman were important factors in the early 
historv of LaSalle countv. a brief sketch of their career will here be ad- 



440 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

missible. Benjamin G. Foster was born in Barnard, Windsor county, Ver- 
mont, where he grew to adult years and married Charlotte M. Brown, a 
native of the village of Swanton, that state. He was a carpenter and con- 
tractor, and in 1836 came to Peru, LaSalle county, leaving his family in 
the east in the care of his wife, until a more convenient mode of trans- 
portation could be provided for them, and it was not until the fall of 1847 
that he saw his way to establishing them in this county. With true sturdi- 
ness of purpose, he at once began work at his trade and soon found steady 
employment. He erected nearly all the large, heavy buildings put up at 
that time, such as warehouses, elevators, stores, etc. Ho constructed the 
first coal shaft tower in LaSalle, afterward destroyed by fire, and built the 
first wagon bridge across the Illinois river at LaSalle. He employed a 
large force of men and made considerable money. He owned four proper- 
ties on Fifth, one on Wright and one on L'nion street. The residence 
now occupied by our subject was owned by Mr. Foster. He was identified 
with the Whigs, and latterly with the Republicans, but was too much occu- 
pied with his trade to allow his name to be used as a candidate for oftice. 
The only exception to this rule was when he was elected school director. 
He was a great friend to education and was a member of the first school 
board in LaSalle. He was a member of the Congregational church. Mrs. 
Foster, although a Baptist in faith, was not identified with any church. 
She was of English descent and died in her fifty-seventh year, December 4, 
1876. Mr. Foster survived her until September i, 1882, when he had 
reached his seventy-first year of life, joining her in the "city beautiful." 
An uncle of his. Colonel Joseph Foster, was a well known soldier in the 
war of the Revolution. 



GEORGE M. nXXELL, M. D. 

Dr. George ]\L Pinnell, of LaSalle, is a physician of extensive experi- 
ence and generaL information, and in his chosen specialty has met with 
unqualified success. He has traveled in all parts of this country and in 
Australia, has met many distinguished people, particularly those of his own 
profession, and is a most interesting speaker and converser. 

Born in Buchanan. Upshur county. West Virginia, February 16, 1840, 
the Doctor is a son of Dr. David S. and Catherine E. (Wolffenborger) 
Pinnell, both of whom were natives of the Old Dominion, representing 
respected Virginia families. Dr. David S. Pinnell, who was a well-to-do 
planter and slaveholder, was actively engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession for the exceptionally long period of fifty-four years. Four of his 
sons were prominent in the same calling, namely: Dr. P. F. Pinnell, of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 441 

West Virginia; Dr. N. W. Pinnell, of Ohio; Dr. D. S. Pinnell, Jr., of 
Wheeling, West Virginia, and the subject of this narrative. 

Thus it is evident that Dr. G. M. Pinnell comes of a family devoted 
to the healing of the "ills to which flesh is heir," all, moreover, men of 
versatile talent and fine education. Reared in his native town, our subject 
attended the schools of Morgantown, West Virginia, and after completing 
his literary and scientific studies began reading medicine under his father's 
instruction. At the end of four years of study and practice as his senior's 
assistant, he matriculated in the Western Reserve Medical College, at 
Cleveland, Ohio, where he was graduated in 1867. Two years later he 
accompanied his father to Melbourne, Australia, the latter having been 
appointed consul of the United States government at that city. There the 
young man spent four years more in preparation for his future work, and 
was graduated in the University of Melbourne in 1873. 

Returning to this country soon afterward Dr. Pinnell was married, in 
Pittslnirg, Pennsylvania, to Miss Cora Spindler. He located in the town 
of Flemington, West Virginia, where he estaljlished himself in practice, 
remaining there for about four or five years. WHiile pursuing his scientific 
investigations in Australia, in connection with medical work, he discovered 
a remedy for rheumatism, with which malady thousands of people in 
every land are afflicted. This remedy he has prepared and placed on the 
market under the name of "Dr. Pinnell's Vegetable Germicide Compound 
for Rheumatism," and for more than a score of years he has traveled, giving 
lectures on the subject of rheumatism, and treating patients who are 
afflicted with this painful and disabling disease. He has met with great 
success and thousands are deeply indebted to him and earnest in their 
praise of his methods. In December, 1897, he came to LaSalle, where he 
has since resided, and during the succeeding fourteen months he treated 
eight thousand three hundred and seventeen patients. There is no question 
in regard to the efficacy of the celebrated remedy which he uses, and his 
entire svstem and theories were far in advance of the times twentv vears 
ago, as he then advocated the germ or bacilli theory, which has since 
claimed the serious attention and acceptance of the scientific world. 



JOHN GIROLT. 

The subject of this sketch, John Girolt, a prosperous farmer of North- 
ville township, LaSalle county, Illinois, is an American by adoption and is 
thoroughly identified with the interests of this country, having fought for 
the old flag and the preservation of the Union in the dark days of civil 
war. 



442 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

John Girolt was born in Alsace-Lorraine, Germany (then France), 
January 21, 1839, a son of John and ]MagdaHne (Bolder) Girolt. In the 
Girolt family were five children, three sons and two daughters, all of whom 
are living, and in this country, except one son, deceased. The father died 
in Alsace-Lorraine, and after his death, in 1853, the widowed mother and 
her children came to America and settled in Xorthville township. LaSalle 
county. She died here in 1892. 

At the time of their emigration to this country John was a boy in his 
fourteenth year. He was reared to farm life, receiving only a common- 
school education. The war of the Rebellion coming on, he was not long in 
deciding to enter the service of his adopted countr}'. He enlisted in No- 
vember, 1 861, as a private in Company E, Fifty-eighth Illinois A'^olunteer 
Infantry, the fortunes of which he shared nine months. He was then trans- 
ferred to the First Missouri Light Artillery, Company H, and continued 
in the service until the close of the war, when, in June, 1865, he was hon- 
orably discharged, coming out of the army with the rank of corporal. He 
was made corporal during the Atlanta campaign. Among the important 
engagements in which he participated were the battles of Fort Donelson, 
Shiloh and Corinth. He was in the Atlanta campaign and with Sherman 
on his famous march to the sea, and the last action in which he took part 
was the battle of Bentonville, South Carolina, going thence to Washington, 
D. C, to the grand review of the victorious armies. 'Sir. Girolt is a 
member of Clayton Beardsley Post, Xo. 674, G. A. R., and politically har- 
monizes with the Republican party. 

At the close of the war he returned home and has ever since been 
engaged in farming in LaSalle county. He owns a fine farm of two hun- 
dred and thirty-five acres on the north liank of Fox river, in Xorthville 
township, and is successfully carrying on his farming operations. 

Mr. Girolt was married in 1867 to ]Miss Louisa Bernard, and they 
are the parents of five children. 



LOUIS WALDORF. 



Among the wealthier residents of ]\Iendota who have done a great 
deal for the city and whose money is extensively invested in home enter- 
prises, is the gentleman whose name stands at the head of this sketch. He 
is a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, and was born X^ovember 30, 
1848. His parents were Phillip and ^^largaret (Gud) Waldorf, both natives 
of the same province, where they were married and three of their children 
were born, — Margaret, Catherine and Louis. They emigrated to America 
in 1853. landing in X'ew York April 13. and at once came to this county 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 443 

and settled in Troy Grove, where the father engaged in farming until 1863, 
when he died in his forty-ninth year. Three children were born to them 
after locating in Troy Grove, — Phillip, William and Peter, — the first men- 
tioned residing on the old homestead and the two latter in Nebraska. 
Margaret married Ferdinand Kampf, a farmer of Troy Grove township, 
and Catherine is the wife of Edward Grube, of LaSalle. The mother 
reached her seventy-fourth year and sank to sleep in 1872. 

Mr. Waldorf was educated in the country schools and grew to man- 
hood on the farm, remaining there until he was twenty-one, when he came 
to Alendota and with his brother-in-law, Mr. Grube, went to manufacturing 
and wholesaling vinegar. The business was conducted until June, 1874, 
when Mr. Waldorf sold his interest in the concern to his partner, who dis- 
continued it in 1875, as it was not a profitable investment. In October, 
1874. he entered into a partnership with M. Abrahams, under the firm 
name of Abrahams & \\'aldorf, and engaged in the wholesale liquor busi- 
ness in this city. On the first of January, 1890, ^Ir. Waldorf purchased 
the interest of his partner and has since carried on the business alone. He 
has been very successful, disposing of large cjuantities of liquor, and from 
the modest beginning of two thousand dollars' capital the business has 
spread to its present gigantic proportions. He is an able business man and 
is regarded by the citizens as one of the shrewdest in this section of the 
state. Not only has he guarded his own interests with an eagle eye but 
has also worked for the municipality, and he has been the means of bring- 
ing much trade to the merchants of this city. He formerly held the position 
of vice president of the Mendota National Bank, of which he was one of 
the organizers, and is one of the foremost citizens of Mendota. He re- 
signed as vice president of the Alendota National Bank and sold his interest 
in the institution in September, 1899. 

In 1878 he was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Josephine Pitts, a native 
of Luxemburg, Germany. Four children have been the fruits of this 
union, — Lorena, Arthur, Rufus and Herbert. Lorena and Arthur are 
eraduates of the Blackstone hioh school, of ^lendota, and are remarkably 
bright pupils. Mrs. Waldorf was a teacher of German in the Blackstone 
schools of Mendota from 1873 to 1878 and as such made many friends both 
among parents and pupils. They are memljers of the German Lutheran 
church and contribute liberally to the cause of Christianity and the spread 
of the gospel. Their home is a model of elegance and refined taste. Little 
short of a mansion in architecture it pleases the eye of all who view its 
magnificence. Entering the heavy oak doors leading to the vestibule the 
same refined taste is apparent, everything being of the most elegant but 
unostentatious character. The vestibule is a spacious room with a mosaic 



444 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

floor and leads directly to the hall proper, which can also be used as a 
reception room and is a circular apartment ornamented with art glass of 
varied and beautiful tint. Passing to the left we enter the parlor and 
confront a large mirror built into the wall, the sides of which are green 
while the ceiling is frescoed with Mexican roses. The finish is birch with 
a mahogany finish, and in no part of the house has paint or paper been used, 
natural wood and fresco taking their places. In the rear of the sitting-room, 
which is finished in light oak with light blue frescoe and ceiling ornamented 
with morning-glories, is the dining-room, a beautiful creation in dark 
oak with paneled wainscoting. This, like the sitting-room, has a fire- 
place, and a handsome sideboard is built in the wall. A butler's pantry 
connects ^^■ith the kitchen, which is provided with all the conveniences 
known to modern housewifery. This floor has a pleasant bed-room, and 
each floor is supplied with an elegant bath-room, with onyx washstand, 
porcelain tubs, nickel fixtures, and floors and walls of pure white tile with 
delicate pink border. Hot and cold water, either hard or soft, can be had 
whenever needed; and not one point has been forgotten or neglected that 
would add to the comfort of the inmates. The wood-work of the entire 
second story is of highh- finished cypress, and the large, pleasant bed-rooms 
are situated on this floor, as is also the library. The room designed for 
the eldest daughter is peacock blue, with wild-rose ornaments, and is a 
dream of beauty. The furniture is in keeping with the building and har- 
monizes with the finish in each room. In the cellar is the laundry, heating 
plant, etc., and taken altogether it is one of the handsomest and most com- 
plete residences it has ever been our good fortune to see. 

On the close of the year 1899, Mr. Waldorf completed the building of 
a two-story business block, on the southwest corner of Illinois and Jeft'er- 
son streets in ]Mendota. The building is the most modern business block 
in ]\Iendota and is a model structure. Two store-rooms 30x85 feet, each 
with basements; and the second floor, devoted to office rooms, is heated 
throughout by steam, and has other con-\'eniences of excellency. The entire 
building is a monument to the enterprise of Mr. Waldorf. 

]\Ir. \\ aldorf is a Democrat and served as alderman for ten years. He 
is also a member of the board of education and a prominent member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



CHARLES CLEARY 



The career of an enterprising, honest business man is a matter of 
interest in any community, and when the public witnesses his gradual 
advancement and increasing prosperity it rejoices in his justlv won success. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 445 

During a period of more than a quarter of a century Charles Cleary has 
been engaged in business in LaSalle and has won the esteem and best 
wishes of all with whom he has had dealings. 

The paternal grandfather of, our subject, John Cleary, was a farmer in 
Ireland, and died when about sixty-live years of age, from injuries received 
in a runaway. Of his eight or nine children Peter, the father of Charles 
Cleary, was a gentleman of excellent education and general attainments. 
In his early manhood he was a school-teacher, and subsequently to his 
marriage he turned his attention to agriculture. He was a participant in 
one of the rebellions in Ireland, but was too great a lover of his country 
to ever leave her shores. He died December 28, 1896, at the advanced 
age of eighty-seven, and on the 17th of March, 1898, his faithful wife 
followed him to the grave, she being in her eighty-seventh year at the time 
of her death. In her girlhood she bore the name of Frances Flynn, and her 
father, Henry Flynn, lived and died in Ireland. He was a shepherd much 
of his life, and for a few years was a pilot in the employ of the government. 
Peter and Frances Cleary were members of the Catholic church and reared 
their children in the same faith. Of their three sons and eight daughters 
nine are yet living, namel)^: Maria, wife of Thomas Cardon of Easky, Ire- 
land; Ann, wife of John O'Donnell, of Culleen, Ireland; John, a resident 
of West Hartlepool, England; Charles; Kate, wife of Michael O'Leary, 
of Streator, Illinois; Frances, wife of James O'Leary, of the same town; 
Peter, of Joliet, Illinois; Jane, of Chicago; and Julia, Mrs. ]\Iichael Brady, 
of Culleen, Ireland. 

Charles Cleary was born in county Sligo, Ireland, April 3, 1851, and 
received a common-school education. He was but twelve years old when 
he commenced learning the grocery business, to which line he has devoted 
himself chiefly ever since. In 1872 he came to America and for seven 
months was employed in New York city. The same year he came west 
and lived in Utica, Illinois, until the fall, when he removed to LaSalle, and 
for about a year was in the employ of Matthiessen & Hegeler, in their zinc 
works. The following four years he worked in the coal mines, and at 
length he commenced clerking in the grocery owned by Mr. Cavanaugh. 
During the next ten months he thoroughly mastered the details of the 
business and finally became the manager. In 1879 he purchased ]\Ir. 
Cavanaugh's stock, and for several years carried on a grocery on First 
street, one block west of his present location, where he has been for the 
past fourteen years. 

In his political convictions, Mr. Cleary is rather independent, but 
inclines to the Democratic party. A friend to education, he is now serving 
for the ninth vear as a member of the school board. Sociallv, he is a 



446 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

member of the Royal Arcamim and the Court of Honor, He is strictly 
temperate in his habits, leaving all kinds of intoxicating liquor entirely 
alone, and in every respect his life is worthy to be held up as an example to 
the young. 

On the 1st of May, 1876, Mr. Cleary and Miss Annie, daughter of 
Thomas and Mary (Manly) Durkin, were united in wedlock. They have 
had seven children, but Annie Teressa and Teressa Annie died when 
young. Three daughters and two sons remain to brighten the home, 
namely: Mary A., Frances, Thomas H., Charles Vincent and Loretto. 
In 1889 Mr. Cleary purchased his comfortable residence, which is situ- 
ated at the corner of Fifth and Creve Coeur streets. 



JEREMIAH COLLINS. 



For almost half a century Jeremiah Collins, justice of the peace, has 
been a resident of LaSalle, and numbered among its honest, industrious, 
patriotic citizens. Believing thoroughly that "there is no royal road" to 
success, he faithfully and perseveringly worked at his trade, allowed himself 
to be led aside by no visionary schemes of wealth easily obtained, and 
now in his declining years he enjoys a competence and the feeling that he 
has performed his duty nobly and commendably. 

One of the sons of the Emerald Isle, Mr. Collins was born December 
15, 1834. His parents, Jeremiah and Ellen (Mahoney) Collins, emigrated 
with their family to the United States in 185 1, first locating in Pennsyl- 
vania, later removing to Indiana and finally taking up their permanent 
abode in LaSalle in 1852. Here they died, the father at the age of sixty- 
six vears, and the mother when in her seventy-fourth year. Their children 
were as follows: Mary, deceased; Frederick, deceased; Lawrence, who 
was a captain in the civil war, and died from the effects of disease con- 
tracted in the service; Jeremiah; John, who graduated in the Notre Dame 
(Indiana) Cohege, and took up the practice of law, but died during the 
war of the Rebellion; and James, who was associated in business with our 
subject for years. 

Jeremiah Collins, Jr., learned the blacksmith's trade of his father, 
who was one of the early workers in iron in LaSalle. In 1859 the young 
man, then twenty-five years of age, became imbued with the Pike's Peak 
excitement, and started for the west overland, making the tedious and 
dangerous trip across the plains in a wagon. He spent some time in the 
gold fields, but returned to this place with small reward for his pains, 
and with the steadfast determination to stick to his trade in the future and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 447 

to earn his bread "by the sweat of his face." Rarely was he absent from 
his shop, and his patrons came to rely upon him, and to no one else would 
they give their work. 

For eighteen years Mr. Collins served as a member of the LaSalle city 
school board, and he has always taken great interest in the education of 
the rising generation. Politically he is affiliated with no party, acting inde- 
pendently of party lines; and in 1897 he was elected justice of the peace for 
a term of four years. He is now acting in this position and is a capable, 
conscientious official, meeting his responsibilities to the satisfaction of all 
'concerned. For twelve years Mr. Collins served as a city alderman, being 
first elected to the office in 1864. 

In 1863 Mr. Collins was married, in this city, to Miss Mary McCarthy, 
a native of Ireland. She departed this life in 1874, and is survived by two 
daughters, namely: Mary and Ellen, who reside with their father, their 
home being at No. 1012 First street. Ellen is a successful teacher in the 
public grammar schools, and Mary is the mistress of the pretty and attrac- 
tive home. 



WILLIAM McELHENIE. 

William McElhenie, who probably has been longer engaged in the liv- 
ery business than any one in LaSalle county, is an esteemed citizen of the 
town of LaSalle. Fle is a native of Wayne county, Ohio, his birth having 
occurred September 2, 1846. He is of Scotch-Irish extraction, his ancestors 
having settled in the United States prior to the war of the Revolution. He 
is a son of William and grandson of Thomas McElhenie, of Pennsylvania. 
The former went to Ohio at an early day and there married Harriet Porter, 
a native of the Buckeye state, and daughter of John Porter, who- was born 
in Ireland, and was a pioneer settler in Ohio. In 1852 our subject's parents 
came to Illinois, and for four years resided in LaSalle, where he kept the 
Tremont Hotel, and subsequently the St. Charles Hotel; and then, going 
to Mendota, engaged in the grocery, grain and commission business. He 
was very successful and popular as a business man and had a host of 
friends among his fellow citizens. He died in 1863, at his home in Men- 
dota, aged fifty years, and his widow, who survived him, departed this 
life in LaSalle, in 1881, when she was in her sixty-sixth year. 

William McElhenie is the only one left of his father's family, his broth- 
ers, Thomas J. and Albert H., having passed away. He was but six years 
old when he was brought to this county, and his educational advantages 
were such as the public schools afforded. When in his fifteenth year he 
embarked in business as a news agent on trains, and continued in this 



448 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

calling until 1866. That year witnessed his permanent settlement in La- 
Salle, where he at first was interested in the transportation and expressing 
business. Then, quite naturally, he turned his attention to his present 
vocation, for which he seems specially adapted. He keeps a fine line of 
carriages and vehicles of various descriptions and a number of horses suit- 
able for driving or as saddle animals. 

Politically Mr. McElhenie is a Republican, and fraternally he belongs 
to the Knights of Pythias, the Royal Arcanum, and the Modern Woodmen 
of America. At the close of the civil war. on the 2d of May, 1865, Mr, 
McElhenie was married, in Chicago, to Miss Anna Maria Graham, who, 
like himself, was a native of Wayne county, Ohio. Five children, who are 
still living, bless the union of this worthy couple, and have been given 
excellent educational advantages and judicious training for the more 
serious duties of life. These five children are Arthur J., of Pittsburg, Kan- 
sas, holding a responsible position with a coal company; Jessie M., wife of 
Frank Russel Fields, of Denver, Colorado; Pearlie L., George L. and Elsie. 



OSCAR D. F. CONKEY. 



During a period of forty-five years this honored citizen of Mendota has 
been very actively associated with the development and prosperity of the 
place, which was a mere village when he came here and located in June, 
1854. When he first visited the place, the preceding November, there were 
but two buildings there. He aided the town in its early struggles, and has 
ever been its stanch friend and one of its most substantial and trusted citi- 
zens. 

The ancestors of Mr. Conkey, on the paternal side of the family, were 
natives of Ireland, but several generations of the name have lived in the 
United States. Silas Conkey, the grandfather of our subject, was born in 
Massachusetts, and died in middle life. His home was in Salem, Washing- 
ton county. New York. His widow, survived him, living to the extreme 
age of ninety-five years. They were the parents of five sons and three 
daughters. One of the sons. Colonel Adam Conkey, was the father of the 
subject of this sketch. He won his title while serving in the New York state 
militia, and he also was a participant in the war of 1812. His life was passed 
chiefly in Lewis county. New York, and his long and useful career of ninety- 
four years came to a close in 1884. He was a farmer by occupation and 
lived many years in Martinsburg, New York. His wife, Elizabeth (Lee) 
Conkey, had preceded him to the silent land about twenty years. She was 
one of several brothers and sisters who were born and reared upon a farm 




C9 i)^ Ai 



crvi^. 







CJ^^^^^^^, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 449 

in the Empire state, and was of English extraction. She was a devout mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church, and her noble Christian life was a power for 
good in the community where her lot was cast. Of her four sons and four 
daughters four are still living, namely: Amanda M., wife of D. D. Guiles, of 
Wellington, Kansas; Oscar D. F.; William F., of Iroquois, South Dakota; 
and Adelia M., now Mrs. Thomas Wilson, of Cleveland, Ohio. The others 
died in early life. 

The birth of Oscar D. F. Conkey took place in Martinsburg, Lewis 
county, New York, December i, 1821. He was reared in his native locality 
and supplemented a district-school education with a course in Lowville 
Academy. In 1843 he came to the west by way of Alilwaukee, and spent 
one winter in Milwaukee and two summers and a winter in Batavia, Illinois. 
He then went to Massillon, Stark county, Ohio, where he operated a line of 
boats on the canal until the fall of 1853. At that time he returned to the 
west on a prospecting tour, and, being pleased with the country around and 
about the present town of Mendota, decided to locate here. The Burling- 
ton railroad was then in course of construction. He purchased land and the 
following summer he brought his family and became a permanent resident of 
the place. The Burlington railroad was built through Mendota in the winter 
of 1853-4, and Air. Conkey embarked in the grain and general merchandis- 
ing business. For about three years after his arrival here he remained in 
the general merchandise business and then sold his interest therein. From 
1857 until 1888 he gave his entire attention to the buying, selling and ship- 
ping- of grain. He won success and a goodly fortune in the legitimate chan- 
nels of trade, and may justly be proud of his honorable record as a business 
man. At various times he has made judicious investments of the capital 
which was accumulated by his energy and zeal, and at present is interested 
in the coal business, which is carried on by his son, Harry, and is the treasurer 
of the Alendota, Troy Grove & Clarion Insurance Company. 

On the 8th of February, 185 1, Air. Conkey married Aliss Lucy Rex, and 
four children, all now dead, were born of their union. The oldest and 
youngest of the children, with their mother, were drowned in June, 1861, 
\\hen they were attempting to cross a creek near Troy Grove. The stream 
was much swollen by recent heavy rains, and the little party were com- 
pletely at the mercy of the flood. The second marriage of Air. Conkey 
was celebrated February 8, 1865, Aliss Elizabeth S. Eaken, a daughter of 
John Eaken, being his bride. Three sons were born to them, of whom 
George, the eldest, died in infancy; Arthur was summoned to the better land 
when about sixteen years of age; and Harry D. alone remains. He is en- 
gaged in the insurance business and also the coal business in Alendota, as 
previously noted, and is an enterprising, wide-awake young man, with a 



450 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

promising future. On April 19, 1899, he married ]\Iiss Elizabeth Wilson, 
of Mendota, daughter of M. Wilson, the present recorder of LaSalle county. 
Since 1855 Oscar D. F. Conkey has been a Master Mason, and he 
has many sincere friends in the fraternity. He and his estimable wife are 
active members of the Presbyterian church, he being a trustee and treasurer 
of the board of officers. For a number of years he has served as a member 
of the board of education, always upholding progressive methods. For 
years he acted as one of the city aldermen, and in his political convictions 
he is a stalwart Republican. 



MILROY A. McKEY 



The success of such men as Milroy A. McKey. of Mendota, is the 
result of the influence upon the affairs of life of all those traits of character 
and qualities of mind which lead to honesty, thoroughness and permanence. 
It is not the success which comes from fortunate speculation, but that which 
is the reward of long years of unwearying well-doing. He has been identi- 
fied with many of the leading enterprises of the city and county, and belongs 
to that class of representative American citizens who promote the public 
good while enhancing their individual prosperity. The extent and volume 
of his business may be indicated somewhat by a statement of his connec- 
tions with many important concerns. He is the president of the Mendota 
Gas Company; ex-president and now director of the LaSalle National 
Bank; vice-president of the Mendota National Bank; director of the First 
National Bank of Mendota, of the Creston National Bank, of Creston, 
Iowa, and the Earlville National Bank; and is extensively interested in 
real estate and in other first-class investments in Illinois and adjoining 
states. 

Mr. McKey is a native of Candor, Tioga county. New York, born 
May 4, 1825, and is descended from families which in dift'erent generations 
have furnished many prominent representatives to public life and business 
interests, and which in all periods of our national history have been patriotic 
and public-spirited to a degree that has made them leaders in the com- 
munities in which they have li\'ed. His grandfather, in the paternal line, 
was Alexander McKey, a native of Scotland, who came to the United States 
before the Revolution and located at Troy, New York, where at the time 
of the historic Indian massacre one of his sisters was captured by the 
savages and was ransomed by him for a barrel of whisky. His father, 
mother and other brothers and sisters were killed and their house burned. 
He was a weaver and farmer, and some time after the Revolution removed 
to Chemung county. New York, where he died when past the age of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 451 

seventy years. During the greater part of his hfe he was a devout member 
of the Presbyterian church. 

James Westbrook, Mr. McKey's maternal great-grandfather, hved in 
Chemung county. New York, where his death occurred when past the age 
of eighty years. The traditions of the family have it that he was six feet, 
four inches tall and massive in proportion, and that he was as brave as he 
was strong. He was a member of General Washington's staff and fought 
by his side during much of the struggle for American independence. His 
great-grandson has a cane which once belonged to James Westbrook, who 
on one occasion saved his life with it by warding off a blow aimed at him 
by a British soldier. Mr. Westbrook followed agricultural pursuits in 
times of peace, and was a large land-owner and an influential citizen. His 
ancestors came to this country from Holland. His son, James Westbrook, 
the grandfather of Mr. McKey, was born and died in Chemung county, 
New York. He was a slave-owner, and it is said that he emancipated his 
negroes but could not get rid of them because they liked him and depended 
upon him so much for everything that they would not leave him. His 
family was a numerous one, and his descendants are now widely scattered 
over the country. 

Alexander W. McKey, father of our subject, was born in Harpersfield, 
Delaware county. New York, became a school-teacher, and while pursuing 
that profession also studied medicine. After receiving his diploma he en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine in Candor, New York, and for forty years 
was the leading physician of that place. In 1864 he removed to Bureau 
county, Illinois, and later took up his abode in LaSalle county, his death 
'occurring in Troy Grove, April 5, 1876. The following day would have 
been the seventy-eighth anniversary of his birth. His widow died March 
15, 1877, in her seventy-seventh year. He served his fellow townsmen as 
postmaster and as supervisor, as well as in other local offices, and took 
a deep interest in the cause of public education, doing all in his power to 
promote the welfare of the schools. He kept a small stock of school- 
books in his house and gave them, as occasion presented, to the children 
of people who were too poor to buy them. His wife, Maria (Westbrook) 
McKey, was born in Newark, New York, and by her marriage became the 
mother of five children, four of whom are living: Milroy A.; Eliza Ann, wife 
of N. T. Moulton, of Wenona, Illinois; Laura Maria, widow of LaFayette 
L. Huson, of Viola, Illinois; and \\^illiam J., a well known resident of 
Princeton, Illinois. John A. McKey, brother of Dr. McKey and uncle of 
Milroy A. McKey, served his country as a soldier in the war of 18 12. 

Mr. McKey, of this review, was reared in his native town and acquired 
his education in the academy at Cortland and from a private tutor. 



452 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Subsequently he taught school for several terms in the vicinity of his home. 
In 1848, at the age of twenty-three, he came to Lamoille, Bureau county, 
Illinois, where he purchased two hundred and eighty acres of land. He 
then returned to the east, but in 1850 again came to Illinois and located 
at Lamoille, where he built a residence upon his land and then began the 
cultivation and improvement of the hitherto wild tract. In 185 1 he went 
again to New York and this time returned with a bride to Bureau county, 
in the spring of 1852. There he successfully carried on farming until the 
fall of 1 86 1, when he removed to Lamoille, and to Mendota in the fall 
of 1864. He had gradually become identified with business interests of 
importance in Mendota, and it was not long before he was a leader in the 
public affairs of the little city. He also became prominent in her city life, 
ably serving as mayor for four years, while for a number of years he was 
a member of the Bureau county board of supervisors and was one year its 
chairman. In politics he is an independent Democrat and wields the 
quiet but powerful influence of a sagacious and alert man of affairs in the 
ranks of his party. Socially he is a Master Mason and an Odd Fellow, 
and takes a helpful interest in everything pertaining to the welfare of those 
orders. 

On the 30th of March, 1852, Mr. McKey was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Frost, a daughter of Horton and Electa (Coryell) Frost. She 
died April 25, 1891, at the age of sixty-three years and sixteen days. She 
was a woman of many virtues, a devoted member of the Baptist church 
and an efTlicient assistant in many good works. On the 13th of January, 
1892, Mr. McKey married Mrs. Georgietta ]\IcKean, widow of Nathan 
Hubbard McKean and a daughter of Henry and Phoebe (Young) Fisher. 
Mrs. ]McKey is of Scotch and French lineage, and was born near the 
Bunker Hill monument, at Charlestown, Massachusetts. Her parents 
died in the east when she was very young, and she came west, being mar- 
ried in Brookiield, Missouri, to Nathan H. ]\IcKean, by whom she had two 
children, Georgia Adelaide and Frank Paine. Their daughter died at the 
age of thirteen years and eleven months. Frank P. ]McKean is now a 
bookkeeper in the First National Bank of ]Mendota. 

Mr. McKey is recognized as one of the most able business men of 
Mendota. His sagacity and foresight enabling him to make judicious 
investments, while his diligence, indomitable energy and undaunted perse- 
verance have won him a prosperity that numbers him among the most 
substantial citizens of the county, he has not only advanced his individual 
interests, but has done- much toward promoting the general welfare by 
encouraging trade and commerce. His career, both public and private, 
has been marked by the strictest integrity and faithfulness to every trust 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 453 

reposed in him. The record of his life is unclouded by shadow of wrong 
or suspicion of evil; he is known as an honorable man and a pleasant, 
social companion. 



ERNEST G. MASON. 



Among- the enterprising 3'oung farmers of Rutland township, LaSalle 
county, Illinois, who claim this county as their birthplace is the subject of 
this sketch, Ernest G. ]\Iason, whose post-ofhce address is Wedron. 

Mr. Mason was born December 9, 1867, a son of Daniel Mason, who 
has for years been one of the highly respected citizens of LaSalle county 
and who still resides on his farm. Daniel Mason was born in Dearborn 
county, Indiana, July 9, 1821, a son of Daniel Mason. Sr., who was a native 
of Pennsylvania and a veteran of the war of 1812. The younger Daniel 
Mason was reared and married in Indiana, the lady of his choice being 
Elizabeth Towsley, daughter of F. Towsley. The fruits of their union 
were ten children, five of whom are living at this writing, namely: Lucy, 
wife of Andrew Wenmer, the custodian of the state capitol at Lincoln, 
Nebraska; Mary, a resident of Wedron, Illinois; Jane, deceased, who mar- 
ried J. E. Hill, of Fairmount, Nebraska; Ernest G., whose name forms 
the heading of this sketch; and Charles A., of Rutland township, LaSalle 
county, Illinois. 

Ernest G. Mason spent his boyhood days not unlike other farmer 
boys, working on the farm in summer and in winter attending the public 
schools. December i, 1898, he married Miss Carrie Makeever, daughter of 
R. M. Makeever and wife Mary, nee Showers. He has an infant daughter, 
born October 17, 1899, by the name of Bessie Marie Mason. 

Mr. Mason is a public-spirited and wide-awake young man, interested 
in all that pertains to the general welfare of his locality. He has served two 
years on the school board. Politically he is a Democrat, and fraternally a 
Master Mason and a Modern Woodman, having his lodge membership at 
Marseilles. 



FRANCIS M. PARR. 



Francis Marion Parr, of Northville township, LaSalle county, Illinois, 
was born in this county June 10, 1845; a son of Thomas J. and Sarah Ann 
(Pitzer) Parr. 

Thomas J. Parr was born in Licking county, Ohio, March 13, 1815, 
and died in Dayton township, LaSalle county, Illinois, February 19, 1898. 
He was a son of Thomas Parr, who came witli his family to LaSalle county, 



454 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Illinois, in 1834, and settled in Dayton township. Sarah Ann (Pitzer) 
Parr was born in Licking county, Ohio, March 30. 181 5, and with her 
widowed mother and family came to LaSalle county, their arrival here 
dating October 16, 1831. They settled on the left bank of the Fox river, 
about nine miles above Ottawa, which was then a small village of only a 
few houses. Dayton was then a frontier fort. This was the year previous 
to the Black Hawk war. Here ]Miss Pitzer grew up and became the wife of 
Thomas J. Parr. She is still living, a resident of Dayton, now in her eighty- 
fifth year. Of their six children we record that Jesse X. married Anna 
Cain; Amanda E. married Xoah Brunk; Joseph B. married Sarah Knicker- 
bocker; Francis ]M. is the stibject of this sketch; ^Martha A. married Lyman 
Cole: and \\'illiam H. married Alary Ruger. 

Francis AL Parr was reared on the farm, and farming has been his 
life occupation. Soon after his marriage, which event occurred in 1868, he 
settled in Freedom township. Later he bought eighty acres of land in 
Serena township, to which he removed and where he lived several years. 
Disposing of that farm, he purchased one hundred and sixty acres in 
Xorthville township, where he has since lived. 

Mr. Parr was married December 31, 1868, to Aliss Julia Curyea, a 
native of Ohio, born July 23, 1843, ^^'^^^ ^ daughter of John and Lydia 
(Sager) Curyea. Her parents were natives of Mrginia, whence they went 
to Ohio in early life, and from there came in 1843 to Illinois, settling in 
Dayton township, LaSalle county, where Mr. Curyea o^vned the well known 
Curyea mill. Air. and Airs. Parr have two children, viz.: Ettie B., wife 
of Frank Jones, a farmer of Serena township, LaSalle county: and Jay C. 
Parr, who is engaged in farming with his father in Xorthville township. 
Jay C. Parr was born April 6, 1877, and in 1897 married Miss Jessie 
Dominy, daughter of J. Alartin Dominy and Rebecca J. (Aliller) Dominy, 
of Freedom township, LaSalle county. 



FREDERICK E. HOBERG. 

One of the most prominent members of the bar in LaSalle county, 
Illinois, is Frederick E. Hoberg, who resides in Peru, where he was born 
December 29, 1862. His parents were August William and Justine 
(Schlingmann) Hoberg, both natives of Prussia. Their marriage was 
solemnized in this country, the maiden having preceded her betiothed 
here by two years. He landed in America on the day that saw Franklin 
Pierce elected to the ot^ce of president. He came to Peru, where he was 
married, in 1853, and with the possible exception of two years has resided 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 455 

in LaSalle county ever since. Some fifteen years ago they moved to Pern, 
where thev are spending their declining years. Five of the ten children 
born to them are living at this time. They have been adherents of the 
Lutheran faith for many years. The father has been a mechanic and is 
well known throughout the county. He is a Democrat and for six years 
has filled the office of alderman of Peru. 

When Frederick E. Hoberg was a child his parents moved to Tonica, 
v\here they resided until he was fifteen, returning then, in 1878, to his 
native city. His education was received in the public schools, and at the 
age of fifteen he left school to accept a clerkship in a dry-goods store in 
Peru. He remained with this concern seven years, but his whole ambition 
was to enter the profession of law, and for this purpose he left his place as 
clerk to enter the law ofifice of H. M. Gallagher, of Peru, to study under 
hini. He was admitted to the bar in 1887 and began practicing in Peru 
the same year. It is said to be one of the most difficult things for a young 
man to enter upon any profession in his native city and make of it a success, 
that in order to obtain the smiles of the fickle goddess of fortune it is 
necessary to start where you are a comparative stranger; yet young Hoberg 
settled down amidst the people who had known him from childhood, and 
here proved the fallacy of the adage. His success was assured from the 
start, and for nine years he represented the city as attorney, in a manner 
that showed a thorough knowledge of the requirements of the office. A 
Democrat, he has l)een active in the work of helping that party to success, 
and has been called to fill a number of municipal offices in recognition of 
the fact that he ever holds the welfare of the community as of paramount 
importance. He has 1)een town and city clerk, a supervisor, and a member 
of the board of education, and in discharging" the duties incumbent upon 
liim has shown that the public confidence has not been misplaced. He is 
:: Knight Templar and also a Modern Woodman of America. In 1889 he 
was married to Miss Annie R. Knapp. of Peru, a most estimable lady. 
Five children have been born to them, one of whom is deceased. 



CHARLES ROHRER. 



Char'es Rohrer, who is engaged in general farming and stock-raising 
on section 9, Xorthville township, LaSalle county, has throughout his life 
1:)een connected with the agricultural interests of this communitv. He was 
born on section 8 of this townshiij, his i^arents being l^ouis and Lib (Smith) 
Rohrer. His father, now a resident of Sandwich, Illinois, was for many 
years a prominent citizen of Xorthville township. He was born in Alsace, 
Germany, January 6, 1837, and in 1845 came to America with his parents, 



456 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Joseph and Mary Ann (Harter) Rohrer. who located on the farm now 
occupied by the subject of this review, Charles Rohrer. There Joseph 
Rohrer carried on agricultural pursuits until his death, in 1858. He was 
the father of six children: John B., Rosalie, Louis, Celestia, Constantine 
aind one now deceased. On the 4th of July, 1857, Louis Rohrer was married 
to a daughter of Frederick and Amelia (Foster) Smith, who had seven chil- 
dren. , Her parents came to LaSalle county in 1834. Her father was born in 
Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany, August 6, 18 10, and was one of the honored 
pioneer settlers of this county. By the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Rohrer ten 
children were born, namely: Annie, Charles E., William J., Clara E., Fred- 
erick, Matilda J., Herbert C, Elizabeth, who died at the age of fifteen years, 
and two who died in early childhood. Mr. Rohrer, while residing in North- 
ville township, held several ofiices, including those of highway commissioner 
and supervisor. He finally removed to Sandwich and is now an esteemed 
resident of that city. 

Charles Rohrer, whose birth occurred IMarcli 3, 1861, was reared on 
the homestead farm and early trained to the duties of farm life, assisting 
in caring for the stock, in tilling the fields and harvesting the crops in the 
late autumn. He attended the district schools through the winter after 
crops w^ere all gathered, and gained a good practical English education. 
After attaining his majority he began farming on his own account, and has 
made it his life work. The w-aving fields of grain indicate his energy and 
diligence, and in addition to the cultivation of the various cereals adapted 
to this climate he raises considerable stock, and in both branches of his 
business is meeting with good success. 

On the 3d of September, 1885, Mr. Rohrer was united in marriage 
to Miss Adaline Bernard, a daughter of David Bernard, and their union 
has been blessed with seven children, namely: Edna, Louis, Lillie, Joann, 
David, and Edwin F. and Emma, twins, born October 27, 1899. 

In his political affiliations Mr. Rohrer is a Democrat, but has never 
been an ofiice-seeker, preferring to devote his time and energies to his 
business interests, in which he is meeting with a well merited prosperity. 
His life has been a quiet and uneventful one, but one true to all manly 
principles, and his native county numbers him among its valued citizens. 



HENRY ZOLPER. 



The substantial and well known citizen whose name heads this sketch — 
Kenry Zolper — is a contractor in brick and stone work at INIendota, where 
he resides in a modern residence of hi? own building, on Burlington street. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 457 

between Twelfth and Thirteenth avenues. A sketch of his Hfe is appropriate 
in this work, and is as follows: 

Henry Zolper, as the name indicates, is of German descent. He was 
born in Peru, Illinois, November 15, 1855, a son of Henry and Eva 
(Trecker) Zolper, natives of Germany. Their family is composed of four 
children, two sons and two daughters, as follows: Henry; Catherine, wife 
of jMat Reckinger; Elizabeth, wife of Christopher Burg; and Peter J. 
Henry is of the third generation that has followed the trade of brick and 
stone mason, both his father and grandfather before him having Ijeen 
masons. The father of our subject on coming to this country in 1852 
settled in Peru, Illinois, where he worked at his trade and did contracting 
until 1867, when he moved to Troy Grove, this state. There he passed the 
rest of his life and died in 1897, st the age of sixty-eight years. His first 
wife died in 1864. Some years later he married Miss Elizabeth Hernscheidt, 
but by her had no children. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject was Peter Zolper. As above 
stated, he was a brick and stone mason. He lived and died in Germany, 
and at the time of his death w-as sixty-two years of age. In his family were 
four children. 

The maternal grandfather also was named Peter. Peter Trecker was 
a German, a carpenter by trade, who came to America about 1852, and 
settled at Peru, Illinois, where he died at the age of seventy-two years. He 
had six children. 

Henry Zolper, the immediate subject of this review, lived in Peru until 
he was twelve years old, attending the parochial and public schools, and 
from that time on his youthful days were passed on the farm, his education 
being continued in the common schools. His mother died when he was 
nine years old and for nineteen years thereafter his father remained a 
widower. When he was fifteen young Henry began learning the trade of 
brick and stone mason, wdiich he has followed ever since. He moved to 
Mendota in February, 1898. Previous to this he had established a large 
business here and at other points in the county, doing all kinds of iM'ick 
and stone w-ork, and making a specialty of cement or manufactured stone 
sidew'alks. His business career thus far has been a successful one and he 
has accumulated valuable property. 

Mr. Zolper was married April 18, 1882, to Miss Mary Reck, daughter 
of Peter and Barbara (Kratz) Reck, natives of Germany and for many years 
farmers in Troy Grove township, LaSalle county, Illinois, their residence 
in this county dating from 1848. To Mr. and Mrs. Zolper were born three 
sons, Harry W., Joseph L. and Benedict J. Mrs. Zolper died in 1889, at 
the asre of thirtv-six vears. She was a devout member of the Catholic 



458 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

church, as also is ]\Ir. Zolper and as were his father and mother. ]\Ir. 
Zolper maintains fraternal relations with the Catholic Foresters, M. W. A. 
and the A. O. U. W. Politically he is a Republican. 



FRANK W. BEDARD. 



Frank AV. Bedard, of LaSalle, Illinois, is secretary and general man- 
ager of the Peru-LaSalle Gaslight and Power Company, and is one of the 
trustworth}', self-reliant men who figure largely in the prosperity and growth 
of the municipality in which they reside. He was ushered into this life in 
this citv. January 27, 1857, his parents being John and ]^Iary AI. (Chapin) 
Bedard. The grandfather, John Napoleon Bedard, was a native of France 
and later a resident of Ottawa, Canada, where he died in his sixtieth year. 
John N. Bedard, the father, was one of six children who grew to mature 
years. Wliile yet in his 'teens he made a visit to the Mississippi valley but 
returned to Canada, where he remained until 1853, when he took up his 
residence in LaSalle. He was in the railroad business and also bought 
grain, but later opened a grocery store which he conducted for several 
years. During the civil war he was on a gunboat on the Mississippi river, 
but was not enlisted, and remained but a short time. He was a tax collector 
here at one time. His death occurred in 1878, when he was but forty-five 
years old, and surviving him are his widow and six children. The children 
are: Frank \\\ ; Belle, wife of John W. Dugan, of LaSalle; Adelaide, 
the wife of Charles A\'ard, of Chicago; Charles, of LaSalle; George, of 
Boulder, Colorado; and Edith, wife of B. N. Rhodes, of this city. Mrs. 
Mary M. Bedard is a resident of LaSalle. She is a member of the Presby- 
terian church and a lady of noble Christian character. Her father, F. C. 
Chapin, was a native of New York, where he followed the trade of printer. 
He came west about the year 1853 and located at Toulon, where he worked 
at painting a short time and then came to LaSalle, dying in his eighty- 
eigiith year. He was of French and English stock and left seven children 
to perpetuate his memory. 

F. W. Bedard has always lived in LaSalle, attended the pul^lic schools 
when a boy, and here gained his business education. AA'lien lie was seven- 
teen he entered the gas works and may trul}" l:e said to ha\'e g'rown up with 
the plant. Becoming thoroughly conversant with every detail of the business 
he was placed in charge of the plant as superintendent about fourteen vears 
ago. and so acceptably were the duties of the office discharged that he was 
still farther honored a year ago, by being assigned to the office of secretary 
and general manager. This p'ant employs from ten to twenty men, and its 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 459 

interests are carefully looked after by ]\Ir. Bedard, who is very popular with 
those in his employ. 

He was united in marriage, November 26, 1885, to Aliss ^Margaret E. 
Lininger, daughter of Daniel and Emma (Slyder) Lininger. early settlers of 
Peru. ]Mr. Bedard is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and 
also of the Court of Honor. He has always given his support to the 
Republicans. During his forty-two years of life in LaSalle he has made a 
wide circle of acquaintances, all of whom hold him in the highest esteem. 



CHARLES HOSS. 



Charles Hoss, the popular cashier of the First National Bank of Earl- 
ville. LaSalle county, is one of the native sons of this county, his Ijirth 
having occurred in Troy Grove township, October 19, 1859. His ancestors 
were of sturdy German stock, and he possesses many of the qualities which 
have made the people of that nation great and honored. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject lived and died in Prussia, 
attaining a ripe age. He reared several children, one of whom was William, 
father of Charles Hoss. He learned the trade of weaver in the Fatherland, 
but after his arrival in the United States, in 1846, he devoted his attention 
to agriculture. Locating in Troy Grove township, LaSalle county, he 
entered eighty acres of land, which he improved and continued to culti- 
vate until well along in years. He departed this life at the old home, 
where he had passed so many happy years, January 25, 1899, when within 
two months of the eighty-fourth anniversary of his birth. His wife, Eliza- 
beth, died many years previously, in April 1870, at the age of forty-two 
years. They were Catholics originally, but in their later years became 
liberal in matters pertaining to religion. The father of ]\Irs. Hoss was 
John Bellinghausen, who came to this country from Prussia, and after living 
in Peru, Illinois, for a numljer of years passed to the silent land, at the age 
of seventy-six years. He was a carpenter by trade, and provided well for 
his large family. Two of his sons, Charles and John, were soldiers in the 
war of the rebellion, enlisting in the ranks. 

Charles Hoss is one of the six children born to his parents, the others 
being Theodore, Adolph, William. John and ^Minnie. \\'ith them he passed 
his early years on the homestead in Troy Grove township, a portion of his 
time being devoted to the acquisition of an education in the district schools. 
\\'hen in his thirteenth year he went to Peru, where he commenced clerk-, 
ing in a dry-goods store, and for ten years was thus employed. By this 
means he gained an excellent idea of business methods, and his stability 



46o BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and general trustworthiness were the foundations of his later success. When 
he was in his twenty-fifth year he was ofifered a position as a bookkeeper 
in the First National Bank of Peru, in which capacity he acted for about 
a year. Desiring to see something of the west, he went to various points in 
that great territory, but eventually returned and for six months was em- 
ployed in the Peru Plow Works. In 1885 he came to Earlville, and for 
nearly fifteen years he has been the cashier of the First National Bank of 
this city. 

In addition to this, Mr. Hoss has been interested in various local enter- 
prises, and is a truly patriotic citizen, in the best sense of the word. He 
has been the local agent for several fire-insurance companies, and is a notary 
public, as well. During the past four years he has been the city treasurer, 
and for one term he served as a member of the school board. In his po- 
litical views he is an ardent Republican. 

The marriage of Mr. Hoss and Miss ]\I. Bella Stilson, daughter of 
Samuel T. and Sarah T. (Lukens) Stilson, was celebrated October 25, 
1888. They have two children, Carl S. and Herman H. The family occupy 
a pleasant modern house, which was erected on Ottawa street by Mr. Hoss 
the year of his marriage. It stands upon land which was a part of the 
original homestead of Samuel T. Stilson, one of the worthy pioneers of 
this place. Mrs. Hoss is a member of the Methodist church, and, like her 
husband, is interested in everything which tends to elevate society and 
benefit humanitv. 



WILLIAM H. FRASER, M. D. 

William Halliday Fraser, M. D., one of the leading physicians of La- 
Salle for more than a quarter of a century, was born in the tow^n of Perth, 
in the county of Lanark, Canada, March 26, 1839, and is a son of Archibald 
and Mary (Halliday) Fraser. The paternal grandfather, James Fraser, was 
a house builder by occupation, and was a native of Inverness, Scotland. 
The family sprung from Norman-French antecedents and came to Scotland 
with William the Conqueror. The Frasers took a prominent part in the 
Scottish struggle for liberty. James Fraser died in Canada, leaving an only 
child, Archibald, the father of our subject. Archibald was a lad of ten years 
when his father moved from Scotland to Canada. Here he grew to man- 
hood, and tilled the soil until the age of thirty-nine years, when his career 
was cut short by accidental death. Surviving him are the wife, four sons and 
four daughters. The maiden name of his wife was Mary Halliday. She 
'also was a native of Scotland, and was five years of age when her parents 
established their home in Canada. Her father was chosen bv the Colonists 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 461 

and employed and paid by the British government to teach the Colonists in 
Canada. He was the only teacher in Canada paid by that government. 
He was sent out in 181 5, with three ship loads of colonists, who were sent 
to counteract the influence of the French in Canada. While they were en 
route the battle of ^Vaterloo was fought, and from that' time French power 
was on the wane, making it unnecessary to send more colonists. Grand- 
father Halliday passed his ninety-second year, and at his death left eight 
sons, four daughters and one hundred grandchildren, all living. Mrs. 
Fraser, the mother of our subject, is now in her ninetieth year and is still 
a resident of Canada. 

William Halliday Fraser was one of the younger members of the family. 
He passed his boyhood and youth on his father's farm and attended the 
country schools, his Grandfather Halliday being his first teacher. At the 
age of seventeen he went to Toronto to attend the Provincial Normal School, 
from which he graduated. When eighteen he received a class A normal- 
school provincial diploma. After spending four years in teaching he en- 
tered McGill university, Montreal, graduating in 1867 and going at once 
to Edinburgh, Scotland, to continue his medical studies. In the summer 
of that year he received his diploma from the Royal College of Surgeons, 
being the first from the Dominion of Canada to graduate from the institu- 
tion. Returning he located in Nova Scotia, opening an office in Liverpool, 
where he practiced two years, and then moved to Chicago, where he re- 
mained until after that city was swept by the great fire of 1871. The follow- 
ing summer was spent in the northern part of Canada, and then he again 
took up his residence in Illinois. In 1873 he came to LaSalle, where he 
has practiced since, and he enjoys an extended patronage, which embraces 
a large territory and has been most lucrative. He is painstaking and care- 
ful in diagnosis, skillful and efficient in practice, and brings a sympathetic 
heart to soothe the sufferer. 

Dr. Fraser was married in 1869 to Miss Lydia 'M. AA'atterman. of Mil- 
ton, Xova Scotia, whose ancestors came over in the Mayflower. Nine chil- 
dren, five sons and four daughters, have been born to them, and have been 
reared in accordance with the teachings of the Congregational church, of 
which the Doctor and his wife are members. These children are Halliday 
]Mary, wife of B. F. Pay, of INIankato, Minnesota; Caroline E., wife of Daniel 
W. Cole, of Melrose, Massachusetts; Millera L.. wife of ^^^ S. ^lason, of 
LaSalle. Illinois; W. A. Gordon Fraser, master mechanic at the Michigamme 
mines of the Cleveland Clift's Iron Company; Henry P. Fraser, United 
States Express messenger on the Rock Island road; and Edward S., Anna- 
bell. ^Malcolm and Kenneth, who are students. 

In politics the Doctor affiliates with the Republican party, but has given 



462 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

little time to politics, his attention being centered in his profession. He 
was made a ]\Iaster Mason in 1894. and became a member of the Scottish 
Clan in 1891. — Clan Fraser. of LaSalle. being named in his honor. In 1893 
he was made physician-in-chief of that order in the United States and Can- 
ada, an office which die has held e\'er since. He is a prominent member of 
the State and County ^^ledical Associations, and of the Eastern Illinois \'al- 
ley Medical Association. He comes from a family of remarkable longevity, 
and has the promise of many added years of usefulness in this community, 
where he has won the respect and esteem of every one. 



JACOB F. SCHWEICKERT. 



Among those who have literally, as well as figuratively, assisted in the 
building of Peru, the Scln\eickerts, father and sons, have played a ver\- 
important part. Their work is noted for thoroughness, reliability and 
durability, and throughout all this section of LaSalle countv examples of 
their handiwork may be seen. 

The subject of this sketch is a native of Peru, his birth ha\'ing occurred 
April 3. 1866. The history of his parents. \'incent and ]\Iaria Schweickert, 
esteemed citizens of this place, appears elsewhere in this volume. The bov- 
hood days of our subject passed uneventfully, his time being divided between 
attending the ])ublic or parochial schools and the accustomed recreations 
in which lads delight. When he was in his fifteenth vear he entered the 
employ of a farmer, and continued to give his attention to agriculture for 
lOur or five years. 

Having no special taste for farming, young Schweickert next began 
learning the stone-mason's trade, wliich his father had followed before 
him, and within a short period he became regularly engaged in Inisiness 
with his brothers Charles and Henr}' and his father. At present he is 
associated vith Charles A., Henr}- E.. Francis Xa\ier, and Bertram 
Schweickert. and his brother-in-law. Frank Ellerbrock. under the firm name 
of Schweickert Brothers & Company. They execute contracts for founda- 
tions for buildings and bridges, stone and brick work in general, plastering 
and for other work in similar lines. 

In the various fraternities, our subject is identified with the Inter- 
national Bricklayers & [Masons' Union, of America, and with the Coal 
Miners' Union; is a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters and St. 
Joseph's Benevolent Society. In his political belief he adheres to the 
principles of the Democratic party. 

September 24. 1889. in Springfield. Illinois. Mr. Schweickert married 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 463 

Miss Mary Magdalene, daughter of Peter and Christina (Schmidt) Mor- 
hauser. all natives of Germany, but since 1883 residents of the United 
States. For some years past the parents have owned and carried on a 
farm in the vicinity of Springfield. Of the five children born to our subject 
and his amiable wife, one. the youngest, Jacob, died when but eight months 
old. and those who' survive are named respectively Magdalene. Bertram, 
Frank and Margaret. The family reside in a pretty, modern brick house, 
built by Mr. Schweickert the year of his marriage. It is situated in one of 
the best residence sections of the city, at the corner of Pike and Ninth 
streets. In their religious creed. l)oth our subject and wife are Catholics, as 
were their fathers before them. 



CHARLES CARTER. 



One of the pioneer farmers of LaSalle county, Charles Carter has been 
a witness of its marvelous development, and from his boyhood has per- 
formed his full share of the work involved in its progress from a wild state to 
a condition of fruitfulness and prosperity in all lines. Honorable, true and 
just in all his dealings, he is respected and admired by all who are acquainted 
with him. and without exception the confidence of his neighbors is accorded 
him. 

The iurth of Charles Carter occurred in ^\'ayne county. New York. 
December 2^, 1837, and he was se\'en years old when l)rought by his 
parents, Asa and Hannah Carter,, to Will county, Illinois, whence three 
years later they removed to LaSalle county. Locating on the homestead, in 
Farm Ridge township, which is now owned l)y our subject, he grew to 
manhood here, assisting- in reducing the land to a proper state for cultiva- 
tion. In the days of his boyhood the old-fashioned plow was used, and 
scythes and cradles were employed in the place of the impro\'ed farm ma- 
chinery of to-day, which on every farm does away with the labor of several 
men in har\-est time. Such education as he recei\'ed was that which the 
district schools afforded. Now Mr. Carter owns three hundred and twenty 
acres of rich land, ^•alued at eighty dollars an acre, and rendered much more 
desirable by the excellent house, barns and other buildings which stand 
upon the place. Everything is kept in a neat manner, improvements are 
made whenever needed, and all bespeak the constant attention of the practical 
owner. 

In 1863 Mr. Carter married Miss Caroline Helm, who was l)orn in 
Brown county, Ohio, and reared in the Lutheran faith of her pious an- 
cestors. This marriage was blessed with one child, namely, Nettie, now 



464 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

the wife of F. A. Bangs, of Mobile, Alabama. But Mrs. Carter passed to her 
reward on high in 1865, and in 1866 Mr. Carter married Mary Lizzie 
Tole. and by this marriage there were six children, five of whom are living, 
as follows: Lillian, the wife of J. H. Rambler, of Calhoun county, Iowa; 
Clara B., the deceased wife of Robert Heath, of this township; Charles E., 
a resident of this locality; Earl, of Calhoun county, Iowa; and Woodford 
Royal and Rose Ethel, at their parental home. The mother of these chil- 
dren passed to her reward on high January 14, 1884, and subsequently Mr. 
Carter married Annie M. Albert, of Preble county, Ohio, and by this mar- 
riage there was one child, who was named Lewis Wilber and who died 
May I, 1894. 

Fraternally Mr. Carter is identified with Victor Lodge, No. 578, I. O. 
O. F., of Grand Ridge. He contributes toward the support of schools and 
churches, and upholds all worthy public enterprises which he deems of 
benefit to the people. Frank and jovial in disposition, he is very popular and 
is heartily welcomed wherever he goes. His right of franchise is used in 
favor of the nominees and principles of the Democratic party. 



GEORGE JUST. 



Every employer of men and every observant person in general has 
noticed that there are two totally different kinds of workers: those who 
perform, more or less grudgingly, the duties assigned as their share, think- 
ing most longingly of the time when freedom shall be theirs again; and 
that nmch rarer class, those whose work is a pleasure to them and who 
find their chief interest in figuring out some mechanical or financial prob- 
lem, and in their busy zeal find the hours of labor all too quickly slipping 
away. To the latter class belongs George Just, who for long years has been 
a faithful and trusted employe of the ]\Iatthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Com- 
pany, of LaSalle. 

A son of Adolph and Julia (Michaelis) Just, our subject was born in 
Ostrowo, province of Posen, Germany. December 7, 1843. The father, 
W'ho was a surveyor in the employ of the government, died in his native 
land when seventy-eight years of age, and the mother departed this life at 
the ripe age of eighty-one years. They had six children, three sons and 
three daughters, and George was next to the youngest of the family. 

In his boyhood George Just attended the public schools and gym- 
nasium for six years, gaining a fair education. When sixteen and a half 
years of age he went to Breslau, where, as a clerk in a grocery, he served 
a hard apprenticeship of four years. He received no wages during this 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 465 

period, and his only hours of freedom were from two to six o'clock of every 
fourth Sunday afternoon! He remained another year, receiving one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars and his board that year, and was allowed from two 
to ten o'clock in the afternoon and evening of alternate Sundays. Then 
he went to Berlin, where he learned the drug business, and spent a por- 
tion of his time in the mixing and compounding of paints. Here he was 
given two hundred dollars a year and his board, and had his evenir>gs after 
seven o'clock at night; but he was not content and finally persuaded his 
father to allow him to come to America. 

On the 17th of June, 1868. George Just embarked for New York city, 
where he spent three days and then continued his westward journey. Land- 
ing in Chicago, he searched for work for some ten days in vain, and was 
then advised to go to ]\Iineral Point, Wisconsin. There he was unable to 
obtain employment, and, bethinking himself of an acquaintance who was 
at Peru, Illinois, he wrote to him and was urged to come to this county. 
His father had given him two hundred dollars, but it had melted away for 
necessary expenses until he had but seventeen dollars left at the time that 
he applied to the firm of Matthiessen & Hegeler for a position as book- 
keeper. He had reached Peru and for a short time had worked at house 
and fence painting, but he wisely decided that it would be better for him 
to seek for steady employment in the service of a well established, pros- 
perous business concern. At first he was given a place as a shipping clerk, 
and at the end of eighteen months he was promoted to the more responsible 
post of night foreman in the rolling-mill. On the 5th of May, 1871, he 
was made general foreman of the rolling-mill department, and from that 
time until the present he has faithfully, punctually and creditably performed 
every duty devolving upon him. and no more trusted employe is on the 
pay-roll of the company. The habits of steadiness, sobriety and upright- 
ness in word and deed which were formed by him during his long and 
severe apprenticeship in Germany have been the habits of his entire life. 
During the thirty-one years of his connection with the zinc-works company 
he has taken not more than three weeks altogether for his own pleasure 
and recreation, and by frugality and wise use of his earnings has acquired 
a competence. 

In 1873 Mr. Just married Mrs. Bertha Fleischer, a widow with one 
child. Otto. Mrs. Just came to LaSalle in 1866. Her parents were Peter 
and Bertha ('Rose)Remmong. She was born in Stelle, Rhine, Germany, 
May 30, 1847. "^^'^s left motherless at ten years of age, and when fourteen 
came to America with a family the head of which. Mr. Pagenstecher, came 
to LaSalle to build the rolling mills for the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc 
Company. He was here five years, in completing the work. Mrs. 



466 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Just, came with the family as a maid in their service. In 1868 she was first 
married, by which union she had a son, now residing in Chicago, named Otto 
Fleischer. Mr. and Mrs. Just's daughter Harriet is the wife of Harry Eickoff, 
of Peru; and their other children are Julia and George. Their pleasant home 
is the abode of peace, content and happiness. 



WILLIAM J. SIEGLER. 

William J. Siegler, a rising young attorney of LaSalle, Illinois, is a man 
of push and energy whose untiring effort and perseverance have opened 
for him the doors of success at an age when the majority of young men 
are in college. He was born in this city, October 4, 1874. and is not yet 
twenty-six years old. although he has been' practicing his profession for 
almost two years and is accounted shrewd, logical and clear-sighted. His 
parents are Bartholomew and Helen (Heltenberg) Siegler, both natives of 
Germanv. In former years the father, a tinner by trade, was engaged in 
the hardware business in LaSalle, and subsequently served in the employ 
of the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, for over twenty years, in 
the capacity of tinner. Eor the last several years he has lived a retired life. 

\Mlliam J. Siegler was reared and educated in this city, attending the 
public schools. He then paid his own way through the St. Bede College, 
located near Peru, at which he graduated in 1894. He then turned to the 
study of law and entered the office of O'Conor, Duncan & Haskins, 
where he applied himself diligently to the task in hand and made rapid 
advancement. In the meantime, from ^larch until December, 1896, he 
served as deputy circuit clerk under Daniel A. Maher, of Ottawa. The 
following June he was admitted to the bar and two months later opened an 
office in LaSalle, where he has since prosecuted the practice of his pro- 
fession, steadily winning his way to the front ranks. In the spring of 1899 
Mr. Siegler was elected to the office of city attorney for LaSalle, an office 
he now holds, his services meeting with public approval. He is a member 
of the LaSalle Bar Association, and is an active partisan in the cause of 
Democracy. In religion he is a Roman Catholic. 



CHARLES A. FRANK. 



The business interests of Earlville, Ilhnois. have an important factor 
in the person of Charles A. Frank, proprietor of a bakery, restaurant and 
confectionery. 

Mr. Frank was born in Earl township, LaSalle county, IlHnois, April 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 467 

28, 1872. son of August H. and Ann (Cook) Frank, the former a native of 
Germany and the latter of Ireland. The Frank family is composed of three 
sons and five daughters, namely: Harriet, wife of Levi H. Norton, of 
Zearing, Iowa; Amanda, wife of John Norton, of the same place; Laura, 
of Chicago; Isadora, wife of E. Schwanz, of Somonauk, Illinois; 
Frederick W., of Paw Paw, Illinois; James D., of Earlville; Charles A., 
whose name introduces this sketch; and Mayme, of Earl township. 
August H. Frank, the father, was six years old when brought by 
his parents to America. For a number of years he lived in New 
York. By trade he is a carriage painter, at which he worked in the 
east, but on coming- to Illinois he turned his attention to farming, first 
working on his father's farm at Somonauk. In 1871 he came to LaSalle 
county and settled on a farm in Earl township, one mile north of Earlville, 
where he made his home a few years. For the past twenty-two years he 
has lived in Earlville. 

Frederick Frank, the grandfather of Charles A., served his time as a 
soldier in the German army, and after coming to this country devoted his 
attention to farming. He died near Somonauk, Illinois, at about the age 
of seventy years. His family was composed of five sons and one daughter. 
The maternal grandfather of our subject was William Cook. He died in 
Ireland, at an advanced age. 

Charles A. Frank was reared in Earlville from his fourth year, receiving 
his education in the public schools. In November, 1895, he engaged in his 
present business, opening a bakery, restaurant and confectionery, and for 
the past four years has done a prosperous business, keeping a neat and 
attractive establishment and catering to a good class of trade. 

As above stated, Mr. Frank has lived in Earlville ever since he was 
four years old, and it should be added that he has a host of friends wdio 
appreciate his many good qualities of heart and mind as well as his excellent 
meals and polite attention to patrons. Mr. Frank is a member of the 
I. O. O. F., and also belongs to the orders of Knights of the Globe and 
Modern Woodmen of America. Politicallv, like his father, he is a Democrat. 



HUDSON V. CHASE. 

Hudson V. Chase, the city clerk and police magistrate of Earlville, 
Illinois, lives on Ottawa street, and has been a resident of this place for 
fourteen years. A native of the Keystone state, he was born in Hones- 
dale, Pennsylvania, May 9, 1846, a son of Cyrus and Sophronia (Suydam) 
Chase, natives respectively of New Hampshire and Ne\v York. Their fam- 



468 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

ily comprised four sons and six daughters, of which number four are now 
living, namely: Isadora, widow of Alfred W. Kellogg, of Valparaiso, In- 
diana; Josephine L., also of Valparaiso; Cyrus Van Buren Chase, of Clay- 
ville. New York; and Hudson V., whose name introduces this sketch. 
The father was a manufacturer of v\-oolen goods in the east, and later car- 
ried on a wagon-making establishment in V'alparaiso, he having come west 
to Indiana in i860. He died in V^alparaiso in 1874, at the age of seventy- 
three years. His widow survived him about ten years and at the time of 
her death was eighty-three. Both were members of the Universalist church. 
He was a Republican and was at one time nominated for congress, but 
preferred not to enter public life and withdrew^ from the contest. 

Turning back to another generation, we find that the paternal grand- 
father of the subject of this sketch was named David Chase. He was of 
English descent, was a native of Massachusetts, and at the time of his death 
was eighty years of age. He was the father of six children. The maternal 
grandfather of Mr. Chase was a native of Holland. On coming to this 
country he located in New York, where he spent the rest of his life and died 
at a ripe old age. His was a remarkable family. Of his fourteen children 
all with one exception lived to be over eighty. 

Hudson V. Chase passed the first three years of his life in Pennsyl- 
vania. He then went with his parents to New York, where he lived until he 
was sixteen, the family home being in Oneida county. During this period 
he spent his winters attending the common schools. When he was sixteen 
he began working at the carpenter's trade in Valparaiso, and was thus occu- 
pied at the time the civil war broke out. In May, 1862, he enlisted in 
Company E, Fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, which became a part of 
the Army of the Cumberland, and he was in the service twenty-one months. 
Among the engagements in which he participated were the battles of Dand- 
ridge and Chickamauga and numerous skirmishes. 

The war over, Mr. Chase received an honorable discharge and returned 
to Valparaiso, and instead of resuming work at his trade he took up the 
study of law% diligently pursuing the same and being admitted to the bar in 
1866, and for a short time he practiced law in Valparaiso. About that time, 
however, the ministry seemed to have a great attraction for him, and, feeling 
called tO' preach, he left the bar for the pulpit, entering the ministry of the 
Universalist church. His first charge was at Franklin Grove, Illinois, where 
he preached one year. Afterward he was stationed at Dixon, this state, 
eight years; Cedar Rapids, Iowa, two years; Sycamore, Illinois, three 
years; and Earlville, Illinois, three years. At the end of this time he was 
threatened with nervous prostration, and rested for two or three years. 
His next work was to edit the Earlville Gazette, he being its first editor, a 



• BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 469 

position he filled two years. Since 1894 he has filled the positions of police 
magistrate and city clerk. 

On the 1st of May, 1866, he married Miss Addie Arundle. To them 
were born four children, — Isadore, Herman, Hudson and Evelyn, — all liv- 
ing and at home except Hudson, Avho died at the age of ten months. 

]\Ir. Chase belongs to McCullough Post, No. 475, G. A. R. He is a 
Republican. 



FRED A. KOEHLER. 



One of the leading carpenters, contractors and builders of Peru, LaSalle 
county, is Fred A. Koehler, a native of this place, his birth having occurred 
March 8, 1862. For nearly half a century his family has been identified 
with Peru and its business interests, aiding in local enterprises and ma- 
terially contributing to its growth and improvement. 

The parents of our subject were Albright and Elizabeth S. (Burkhart) 
Koehler, both of whom were born in Germany, the former in Michelstadt, 
Hessen, and the latter in Opergimper, Baden. Their marriage was cele- 
brated in Peru, in 1858. The former came to the United States in 1852, 
and within a year or two was followed by his parents. His father, George 
Koehler, was a physician, and for many years was successfully engaged 
in practice in Peru, Henry and Chicago, Illinois. About 1854 Albright 
Koehler came to Peru, where for several years, or until the civil war, he 
was a druggist, and on November 14, 1861, he enlisted as a private in the 
Union army, belonging to Company A, Fifty-third Regiment of Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry. He was soon promoted from the ranks, on account 
of his knowledge of drugs and medicine, to the more responsible post of 
assistant surgeon. In the fall of 1862 he was discharged from the army 
because of ill health. When he returned to Peru he turned his attention 
again to the drug business, spending periods of time at Mendota, Peoria, 
Henry and Wenona, Illinois, and then again returned to Peru and took up 
the painter's trade, and for a number of years was employed in that line. 
For a long- period he served as a justice of the peace, making a creditable 
record. A member of the Masonic fraternity and the Grand Army of the 
Republic, he stood high in the estimation of his comrades. He died De- 
cember I, 1891, aged fifty-three years, eight months and fifteen days. His 
widow, who was born August 8, 1838, and is still living, in Peru, came to 
this place in 185 1, with her parents, John and Mary Ann (Ehrlacher) Burk- 
hart. Her father was a mechanic, and died in Peru in 1857; and her 
mother lived many years thereafter, dying in 1881. Six children, of whom 
two are deceased, were born to Albrioht Koehler and wife, namelv: Louisa 



470 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

W., Fred A., George C. (deceased). Emma M. H. (deceased), Leopold W. 
and Minnie J. 

Our subject was reared in Peru and received a practical education in 
the public schools. When fourteen years of age he commenced serving an 
apprenticeship to the carpenter's trade, and spent three years in this man- 
ner. In 1885 he branched out in business on his own account, becoming 
a member of the firm of Utz, Sperber & Koehler. After continuing with 
his partners for some six or seven years he withdrew and since that time 
has conducted business alone. He has met with deserved success, and 
among the numerous buildings which stand as monuments of his skill 
here are the Masonic Temple, Turner Hall, the residences of C. Brunner, 
C. Nadler, and many other public and private structures which might be 
mentioned. Faithful, reliable and prompt in the execution of his contracts. 
he has won the high regard of his patrons and the good will of the citizens 
generally. 

Following his father's example, Air. Koehler is affiliated with the Dem- 
ocratic party, being quite independent in local politics, however. He is an 
honorary member of the Peru fire department and belongs to the Peru 
Rod & Gun Club, the society of the Turn Verein, and the Knights of 
Pythias. In 1882 he married Miss Elizabeth Wickert, of Peru, and of the 
five children who blessed their union two have been summoned to the silent 
land. The children's names are Elma, deceased; Fred \\.\ Edith, deceased; 
Walter and Irene. Mrs. Koehler's parents are August and Lena (Erb) 
Wickert, natives of Germanv. 



GEORGE CAMENISCH. 

George Camenisch is one of the younger business men of LaSalle. 
Illinois, who by close application and steady, frugal habits has built up an 
enviable reputation in the business world, and enjoys the respect and esteem 
of the entire community. He was born in this city, December 17. 1868, 
and has always made it his home. His father. David Camenisch, was a 
native of Switzerland, who came to America when about ten years of age 
and at Peoria enlisted in the L'nited States Army and served in the civil 
war as a soldier for four years. He was twice wounded, — at Champion Hill 
and Fort Donelson. After the war he located in LaSalle, about 1866, 
and, having learned the cigar-maker's trade before the war. he continued in 
the cigar business until his death, January 7, 1884, when he was in his 
forty-second year. He was married to Sophia Planner, a daughter of 
George Planner, a German who came to America many years ago and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 471 

settled in Pern, and whose last years were spent in the home of his grand- 
son, onr subject, where he died when about sixty-five years old. 

George Camenisch attended the public schools until he was fifteen 
years of age, when he learned the trade of a cornice-maker, following it 
ever since. In 1895 he started for himself and does a large amount 
of contract work, putting up all kinds of roofings, steel ceilings and cornices. 
He is a skillful and conscientious workman who takes pride in his work. 
December 6, 1893, he was married to Miss Selma Schneider, a daughter 
of Gustave and Edith (Kolbe) Schneider. They have two children, — Adolph 
and George. They have a cosy home on Fourth street, where their many 
friends find a hearty welcome. Mr, Camenisch is a member of the LaSalle 
Turnverein, and in politics a strong Republican. 



JAMES BROTHERTON, 

James Brotherton, city treasurer and highway commissioner of LaSalle, 
was born in this city November 10, 1856. His parents were Henry and 
Marcella (Dooley) Brotherton. The grandfather of our subject, Henry 
Brotherton, died in his native country, England, at the age of seventy years 
or more. He had a large number of children, many of whom came to 
England, and among them the father of our subject. He came to America 
some time during the '40s, locating in LaSalle and working at his trade, 
that of engineer, for several years in the Matthiessen-Hegeler Zinc Works. 
He afterward worked at Oglesby and was accidentally killed on the Illinois 
Central Railroad about the year 1880, when forty-five years of age. He 
married Marcella Dooley, a native of Ireland and a daughter of James 
Dooley, who died in that country at an advanced age, leaving four or five 
children. Mrs. Brotherton is a devout Roman Catholic. Her residence is 
in Spring Valley. Seven children were born to her, of whom six are now 
living, namely: Mary i\nn, wife of Charles McCarty, of Oglesby; this state; 
James; Alfred, of Dickey county. North Dakota; Drucilla, wife of Patrick 
Corcoran, of Spring Valley; Maggie, wife of William Doyle, of Spring 
Valley; and Katie, wife of Edward Doyle, of the same village. Their father 
served in the civil war under Captain Neddy. 

James Brotherton attended the parochial schools of his native town, 
and at the early age of thirteen began learning the trade of engineer. He 
followed this vocation until 1894, when he met with an accident in which 
he had the misfortune to lose two fingers. This incapacitated him for some 
time and he did not again take up his trade. He was the foreman of the 
street improvement for some time and then was made center police. In 
1893 ^''c ^^'^s elected a commissioner of highways, a position he still holds. 



472 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

In 1897 he was elected to the office of city treasurer and now performs the 
duties of both trusts in a manner highly satisfactory to his constituents. 

'Mr. Brotherton was united in marriage, September 19, 1887, to Miss 
Mary O'Day, daughter of Patrick and Ann (Flannagan) O'Day. They 
were early settlers in Peru, the father coming from Ireland and the mother 
from Brooklyn, Xew York. He was a coal miner in county Mayo, where 
his parents died. He married Ann Flannagan, whose parents died in 
Brooklyn, and five children were born to them, namely: Thomas O'Day, 
of Westville, Illinois; Katie, unmarried and living in Centralia; Nellie, 
unmarried and living in Streator; Annie, wife of John Pouk, also of 
Streator; and i\Irs. Brotherton. They were members of the Catholic church 
and both died in middle life. — she at the age of thirty-four, in 1882, and 
he at the age of forty-five, in 1893. 'Sir. and ]Mrs, Brotherton are mem- 
bers of the Catholic church and are highly esteemed in the community. 
He is a Democrat and contributes in no uncertain way to the success of 
the local ticket. He belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen 
and the 3*Iodern Woodmen of America. 



SAMUEL HASTINGS. 



For forty-five years Samuel Hastings has been numbered among the 
influential citizens and leading business men of Mendota, but is now living 
retired. As a representative of commercial circles he has borne an import- 
ant part in securing the material development and substantial progress of 
the city with which his family name has so long been interwoven. The 
substantial residence which is to-day his home, located at the corner of 
Monroe and Michigan streets, was erected by his father in 1854, and is thus 
one of the landmarks of the town. 

Samuel Hastings was born in ]\Ioorfield. Harrison county, Ohio, Sep- 
tember II, 1829, and traces his ancestry back to John Hastings, who was 
a native of Ireland, but of English descent. He came to the United States, 
locating in Harrison county, in 1822, and there continued his accustomed 
vocation of farming. His death occurred when he was about seventy-two 
years of age. His brothers. Thomas and James, accompanied him to this 
country, the former settling near Washington, Pennsylvania, while the latter 
became a resident of JelTerson county, Ohio. 

The Hon. John Hastings, a son of John Hastings, the emigrant, and 
the father of Samuel Hastings, of this review, was born in Inniskillen, Ire- 
land, and was one of five children. In 1822 he came to these hospitable 
shores with his father and for some time pursued his studies in a seminary 





{24M^youJL 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 473 

in ]\Ioiint Pleasant, Ohio, while later he engaged in teaching for several 
years. After his marriage he settled npon a farm which his father gave 
him. and a few years later embarked in the mercantile business near Cadiz, 
Ohio. After managing that enterprise with ability for a number of years 
he was nominated and elected to the state senate, where he served his 
constituents with credit for two terms. For a long period he was a justice 
of the peace, and in 1850 he held the office of census enumerator. In 1854 
he came to Illinois and was associated wdth his son Samuel in the dry goods 
and lumber business in Mendota until his death, which occurred September 
12, 1857, when he was fifty-three years of age. He married Miss Jane 
Knox. W'ho was born in Stribane, county Tyrone, Ireland, a daughter of 
Samuel Knox, a wealthy gentleman wdio w-as born and reared in Scotland 
and became connected w-ith agricultural pursuits. That he carried on an 
extensive business may be inferred from the fact that he employed thirty 
servants. About 181 7 he came to the United States, locating in Harrison 
county, Ohio, where he died at the age of seventy-six years. He was one 
of the typical "old-school" gentlemen, quiet and severe in manner and a 
strict Presbyterian in religious faith. For a number of years he was an 
elder in the church and took an active part in its work. Mrs. Jane Hastings, 
tog'ether with her five brothers and sisters, were reared in the same belief, 
Init in her later years she identified herself with the Methodist denomination, 
to which Mr. Hastings likewise belonged. She preceded her husband to the 
better land, dying January 9, 1855, when in her fiftieth year. 

Samuel Hastings, whose name introduces this review, is one of twelve 
children, seven of whom w^ere sons. The surviving members of the family 
are: Mary Ann, a resident of Lee county, Illinois; Jane, of Mendota; 
Mariah, widow of S. Newton Barton, who died during the civil war; Harry, 
of Lee county, Illinois; and James, of Seattle, Washington. They were 
reared upon the paternal homestead in Harrison county, Ohio, and in the 
town where their father carried on business, and were provided wath good 
educational advantages. John Hastings, the eldest brother of our subject, 
was associated with him in business in an early day, and died in Mendota, 
in 1858, at the age of thirty-two years. 

After he had completed the common-school course, Samuel Hastings 
entered the commercial college in Columbus. Ohio, where he obtained a 
knowledge of business forms and banking. In 1853 he came to Mendota, 
wdiile upon an inspecting tour seeking a settlement in a desirable location. 
Pleased with this town, he returned to his native state and the following- 
June, accompanied by other members of his father's household, took up his 
abode in the city which has since been his place of residence. He w'as as- 
sociated with his father in the dry-goods business uiuil the latter's death. 



474 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and afterward accepted a clerkship in the employ of W. T. Black, under the 
firm name of W. T. Black & Company. In 1867 Mr. Hastings withdrew, and 
as a member of the firm of W. F. Corbus & Company was engaged in the drug- 
business until 1876, when he bought out the interest of the senior partner 
and continued alone in the enterprise for eighteen years. In 1894 the firm 
became Hastings & Wylie by the admission of Robert A. Wylie to the busi- 
ness, and finally, in December, 1898, after this extremely long and successful 
commercial career, Mr. Hastings sold out his interest and has since practi- 
cally liVed a retired life. He owns a valuable farm of eighty acres situated 
about ten miles north of the town and has other property and investments 
w^hich yield good returns. 

In 1865 Mr. Hastings was appointed and afterward elected secretary 
and treasurer of the Mendota Cemetery Association, which was organized 
several years ago. but to him was left the task of systematizing the business. 
He has since continued in this ofiice, and to his ability and excellent business 
ideas may be largely attributed the development, extension and adorning of 
this beautiful city of the dead. During the war Mr. Hastings was an ardent 
w^orker in the Union League of America, which organization was formed to 
encourage loyalty to the Union and give aid and succor to the loyal citizens 
throughout the land and to further promote the general welfare of the pub- 
lic and to furnish such aid to the Union soldiers as they needed in the way 
of clothing, shelter, food and other supplies. In the interest of the league 
Mr. Hastings labored very actively and effectively, and was a warm friend 
of the Union cause. 

In his political affiliations he is a stalwart Republican, unswerving in 
the principles of the party. For years he has been a leading member of the 
Mendota Lodge, No. 176, F. and A. M.. Mendota Chapter, No. 79, R. A. 
M., and Bethany Commandery. No. 28, K. T. He and his sister, Jane K., 
live together in the old family residence, which has sheltered them for so 
many years. They have the care of two nephews, — Harry Hastings Wright 
and Roy Knox Wright, — whose parents are deceased. Miss Hastings is 
a lady of excellent education and amiable qualities, and an active member 
of the Methodist church. Both she and her brother have many friends, 
and are highly esteemed by all who enjoy their acquaintance. 



RALPH O. DUPEE. 



The Dupee family, so well known and highly esteemed in Earlville and 
LaSalle countv. is one of the honored early families of New England, 
it having been established in Boston in 1685 by Jean Dupuy (as the name 
was originally spelled), who fled from La Rochelle, France, his own loved 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 475 

country, to America, on account of the persecution of the Huguenots. 
His descendants continued to dwell in the land which had been such a 
kind foster mother to him, and in the opening year of this century Jacob 
Dupee was born in Boston. He learned the tailor's trade and during the 
last years of his life dwelt in Earlville and Chicago with his children, four 
of his sons having lived to maturity. He died in this town in 1879, when 
nearly four-score years of age. His wife was of Scotch-English extraction, 
one branch of her family dating back to the historic Mayflower. 

One of the sons just mentioned was Ralph Oscar Dupee. who was 
born in West Brookfield, Massachusetts, April 23, 1846, and was reared 
with his three elder brothers, — Charles A., for years one of the prominent 
lawyers of Chicago; Jacob A., of Earlville, with whom he was engaged in 
business for more than twenty years; and Henry H., for the past ten 
years a resident of Paola, Florida. The great civil war claimed the anxious 
attention of Ralph O. Dupee as he was approaching maturity, and though 
he was young he enlisted in the Forty-second Massachusetts Infantrv 
and served for four months, in the Arni}- of the Potomac, when the terrible 
conflict was finished. 

As early as 1854 one of the Dupee brothers came to the west, and as 
the years rolled away his example was followed by the other members 
of the family. After his army service, R. O. Dupee came to Illinois and 
for a period dwelt at Augusta. In 1867 he came to Earlville and entered 
into business with his brothers Jacob and Henry, the latter of whom with- 
drew from the firm in 1871, on account of poor health. The other brothers 
continued successfully engaged in the same enterprise imtil the death of 
Ralph O. Dupee, in the spring of 1895. He was the vice-president of 
the Earlville Bank for several years, and ^^•as the president of the board 
of education two terms. The patriotic spirit which led to his enlistment in 
the defense of the Union always governed him, and few are more sincere 
in desiring the welfare of the public and the land of freedom. He was an 
active member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and in his religious 
belief he adhered to the staunch old Congregational creed of his forefathers. 
During a period of years he served as the church clerk, treasurer, trustee 
and superintendent, and his place in the congreg'ation has indeed been 
hard to fill. The entire community felt that it had suft'ered an irreparable 
loss when he was so suddenly stricken, but his example and the ennobling 
influence of his manly life endures and will endure for many years to come. 
In all of his relations, in the business world, in the church and the Grand 
Army of the Republic, in the social and home circles, he was loved and 
admired for his truly superior qualities of mind and heart. His uniform 
courtesy and kindness, his generosity and considerateness. won the respect 



476 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

of the most casual acquaintance and endeared him forever to those who 
knew him intimately. His widow, whose maiden name was Sarah Cone, 
is still a resident of Earlville. She was born in Rhode Island and is of 
Scotch-English descent. Her father, Rev. William Cone, was a native of 
New Hampshire, and was a minister of the Methodist denomination. At a 
very early day he came to Illinois, where he preached the gospel until he 
was well advanced in years. He died in Earlville and left three children 
to mourn his loss. 

Mrs. Dupee, soon after her marriage, joined the Congregational church, 
and in church matters has ever taken an active interest. She is the mother 
of one daughter and three sons, namely: Ella, Walter R.. Frank W. and 
John. 



WALTER R. DUPEE. 



Walter Ralph Dupee, the son of Ralph O. and Sarah (Cone) Dupee, 
was born in Earlville, November 9, 1875, has passed his entire life here 
and is thoroughly identified with its welfare. He received a liberal educa- 
tion in the local public schools, and completed a thorough course of study 
in the higher branches of learning at the Beloit (Wisconsin) College. 
After the death of his father he returned home and at once sought to 
master the business which had been brought to such a successful standing 
by his father and uncle. He remained with his uncle in the business 
for two years, at the end of which time he became the sole proprietor and 
is now managing his affairs with marked ability. 

Following in the political footsteps of his respected father, he is a stanch 
Republican. Fraternally, he is connected with the Knights of the Globe, 
which lodge in Earlville was named in honor of his father, Ralph O. Dupee. 
He also belongs to the Phi Kappa Psi, of Beloit College. He is a member 
of the Congregational church, and is actively interested in all worthy 
religious and philanthropic enterprises. 



ANTON KELLENBACH. 

Anton Kellenbach, who was for many years one of Peru's influential 
business men, and is now living practically retired, is a native of Germany, 
his birth having occurred in Prussia, August 15, 1820. He is a son of 
Anton and Katherine (Schwartz) Kellenbach, and is the only survivor of 
the family, in which there were ten brothers and sisters. The father 
was a farmer by occupation, and but little is remembered of him by our 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 477 

subject, who was but four years of age at the time of the death of his 
senior. The wife and mother died when she was about seventy-five years 
of age. Both were Catholics in their rehgious faith. 

In his youth our subject was a student in the common schools of 
his native land, and later he learned the stone-mason's trade. In 1854 
he sailed for America, where he believed that greater opportunities for 
advancement awaited him, and since that year he has made his home in 
Peru. For a quarter of a century he was in the employ of the Rock Island 
Railroad Company, engaged in the construction of bridges. Then for 
several years he was variously employed, and for about three years past 
has taken charge of the stables of the Union Star Brewdng Company, of 
Peru. As a citizen his record has been exemplary, and he has been actively 
interested in the promotion of whatever he believed to be of permanent 
benefit to this community. In his political attitude he is a stanch Repub- 
lican. 

The marriage of IMr. Kellenbach and Miss Margaret Birkenbeuel was 
solemnized February 18, 1849, in Prussia. She is a daughter of Peter 
William and Anna Fay (Heinmann) Birkenbeuel. Ten children were born 
to our subject and wdfe — seven sons and three daughters — namely: William, 
Peter, Henry, Albert, William E., Henry, Lena, Emma, and two others. 
Only three of the number are now living, — Lena, William E. and Henry. 
Lena became the wife of H. AI. Gallagher, who was a prominent citizen 
of Peru, and whose death occurred some eleven years ago. They became 
the parents of three children, — Kate ]\Iurray, Harry Milton and William 
Hamilton. William E. Kellenbach is represented in the next article. He 
is a leading citizen of La Salle, is married and has four children, — Eddie, 
Lillie, Anabelle and Willie. Henry Kellenbach also is married, and has 
two children, — Henrietta and jMargaret. 



WILLIAM E. KELLENBACH. 

In any line of business, success comes to the conscientious worker and 
not to the undeserving: it comes as the direct reward of earnest, painstaking 
endeavor, of skill and well applied energy. Even in this day of sometimes 
suddenly acquired fortunes, it appears that the old decree in regard to 
winning one's bread by the "sweat of his face" is as much in force as ever, 
and that to the majority of men a livelihood must be earned by hard, 
honest toil. Thus it has been in the case of the subject of this article, 
who has manfully discharged his duties and thereby has won the regard 
of the public. 



478 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

The parents of William E. Kellenbach, Anton and Margaret (Birken- 
beuel) Kellenbach. are represented in the preceding article. Born in Peru, 
LaSalle county, September 22. 1861, our subject has passed his entire life 
in this section of the state. In attendance at the public schools of his 
native town the years sped away rapidly until he was about fifteen, when 
he began learning the blacksmith's trade, to which calling he has ever since 
devoted himself. In 1882 he opened a shop upon his own account, making 
a specialtv of fine horse-shoeing. In 1886 he came to LaSalle, where he 
established himself in business, his shop being at the corner of Joliet and 
Second streets. This immediate region is noted for the splendid race and 
drivinsf horses which are raised here, and Mr. Kellenbach has been fortu- 
nate in securing the business, or the major portion of it, of shoeing this 
fine stock. In his line he is an acknowledged expert, and by his skill in 
fitting the prope^" kind of shoes numerous defects of otherwise excellent 
horses are permanently overcome. 

For fourteen years Mr. Kellenbach has been actively connected with 
the fire departments of Peru and LaSalle. seven years in each place, and 
for the past two years has been the fire marshal of this city. Moreover, 
he is the superintendent of the city electric-light plant, and in both of these 
responsible positions is rendering the public effective service. He belongs 
to the Modern Woodmen of America, and to the Royal Arcanum, and in 
politics is a Democrat. 

On the 7th of December, 1882. the marriage of Mr. Kellenbach and 
Miss Anna Broemer. a daughter of George and Dora Broemer, was sol- 
emnized in Peru. Two sons and two daughters have blessed their union, 
namely: Edwin, Lillian, William and Anabelle. The family residence is 
pleasantly located at the corner of Third and Joliet streets, Mr. Kellenbach 
having purchased the property about two years ago. 



JACOB KUXEY. 



One of the venerable citizens of LaSalle county is Jacob Kuney, now 
living retired in the pretty town of Earlville. Though now well along in 
years, he comes of families noted for longevity, and doubtless will live to 
see manv rears of the new century so near at hand. Both of his grand- 
fathers were soldiers in the war of the Revolution, and patriotism has been 
a notable characteristic of all of his relatives. 

The Kunevs are of German descent, as the name indicates, but several 
generations have resided in America; and the grandfather of our subject, 
for whom he was named, was a Pennsylvania farmer, the father of a large 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 479 

family. Of these children, Samuel Knney. a native of the same state, was 
engaged in farming in Perry county, Pennsylvania, until his death, at 
the age of sixty-five years. His wife, Mary, daughter of Jacob Bergstresser, 
survived him, attaining the age of eighty-six years. She, too, was a Penn- 
sylvanian, though her father was a native of Germany. He was eighty- 
six years old at death, but his wife lived to be six months over one hun- 
dred years of age! For many years he served as the clerk of the county 
court, but the chief business of his life was agriculture. In religion the 
Kuneys were originally Lutherans, but later identified themselves with 
the Methodist church. Of the five sons and five daughters of Samuel and 
]\Iary Kuney, but three are now living, namely, our subject; Sarah, of 
Jackson. ^Minnesota, widow of John Bergstresser; and Daniel, of Baker, 
Kansas. 

The birth of Jacob Kuney took place in Perry county, Pennsylvania, 
November 29, 1816, and when twenty }ears of age he left home and went 
to Niagara county. New York. At the time of the Canadian rebellion he 
was called into miHtary service, but at the end of two weeks was allowed 
to resume his accustomed vocation. In 1838 he was married, and for a 
period was occupied in farming, later learning the blacksmith's trade, 
which he pursued about four years. In 1847 ^^^ went to Waukesha, Wis- 
consin, accompanied by his wife and three children. Locating near the 
town, he continued to reside there for twenty years, at the end of which 
time he sold his farm of three hundred and twenty acres and removing to 
Winneshiek county, Iowa, invested in one thousand acres of land. Two 
years later, in 1869, he divided six hundred acres of this tract among his 
children, and, selling the remainder, came to LaSalle county. Here he 
bought four hundred acres of land in Earl township, and subsequently 
disposing of this property he purchased a farm of one hundred and twenty 
acres situated about a mile north of Earlville. This place he still owns, 
though he rents it and makes his home in Earlville, in the enjoyment of well 
earned rest from toil. 

As previously noted, ]\Ir. Kuney was married in 1838, the lady of his 
choice being Miss Amanda, daughter of Joshua and Laodicea (Cotton) 
Slayton. Six children were born to our subject and wife. The eldest son, 
Cassius 'M. Clay, was graduated in the Bryant & Stratton Business Col- 
lege, and at seventeen years of age enlisted in the L'nion army, serving 
with distinguished bravery from the beginning to the close of the war of 
the Rebellion. He wedded Miss Ellen Guthrie and has five children, — Inez, 
Edith, Ralph, Carl and Max. The family is now living in Wasco, Oregon. 
Garrett Smith, the younger son, married ^liss Alice Boozle. and is a resi- 
dent of Earlville, his occupation being that of a farmer. He has five chil- 



48o BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

dren, — Perry, Cora, Harry, Mabel and Agnes. Mary, the oldest daughter 
of our subject, now living at White City, Kansas, is the' wife of Horace 
Harmon, and is the mother of four living sons, — Joseph, Horace, Guy and 
Ernest. Emeline, the second daughter, married Joseph Gauthie, of Wauke- 
sha, Wisconsin. Desire married ElHs T. White, of Earlville, and their chil- 
dren are Eria, Archie, Laura, Sadie, Radley, Clyde and Ralph. Josephine 
D. wedded Henry Boozle, a farmer, now of Des Moines, Iowa, and their 
children are: Grace, Angie, Kittie, Myrtle, Louise, John and Harry. Alto- 
gether, Mr. and Mrs. Kuney have thirty-nine grandchildren and thirty-one 
great-grandchildren; and it is a remarkable fact that of all their descendants 
onlv six have passed to the silent land. 

For many years Mr. and Mrs. Kuney have been devoted members of 
the Congregational church. Politically he is a Republican, and though he 
has never desired public of^ce he has served as township assessor four times, 
thrice in succession when he was living in Wisconsin, and once while in 
Earl township. In all of his relations with his fellow men, Mr. Kuney has 
been honorable and just, winning the respect of every one, and to his chil- 
dren he will leave what is better far than riches, the record of an exemplary 
life. 



THADDEUS RUDE. 



Thaddeus Rude, who for more than three decades has been one of the 
honored citizens of Mendota, was one of the sturdy frontiersmen who came 
to this state when it was a wilderness and paved the way for the civilization 
and prosperity of later years. Nobly did he perform his part in the develop- 
ment of its resources, and never for a moment has his interest in its future 
diminished or weakened. 

Mr. Rude is a fitting example of the self-made man, — one who by the 
inherent force of his character has acquired an enviable name and place 
among the business men and capitalists of his generation. Doubtless he is 
indebted largely to his upright New England ancestors for much of what is 
finest in his nature, and certainly the influences which were brought to bear 
upon him in the impressible days of his childhood cannot be overestimated. 
He was named in honor of his grandfather, Thaddeus Rude, who was of 
Scotch-Irish descent, and was born in Salem, Massachusetts, in which state 
many generations of his family had lived and died. His death took place 
when he was but little past the prime of life, the event occurring in Ash- 
field, Massachusetts, in 1826. Of his several children four grew to maturity. 
His widow survived him many years, dying when nearly ninety years of age. 
The maternal grandfather of our subject, David Vincent, a native of Cape 




c}f\C(C(c^U^^ -/^t^2^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 481 

Cod. was a hero of the RevoUitionary war, and was one of Washington's 
vaUant band of dauntless patriots who suffered the untold hardships of that 
dreadful winter at Valley Forge. In his early life he was a sailor, but his 
last years were quietly spent at Ashfield, his death taking place when he 
was seventy years of age. He had three daughters and several sons, the 
latter becoming substantial, respected business men, and one of the num- 
ber, John, serving in the ^Massachusetts legislature for two or three terms 
with credit. 

The parents of our subject were Thaddeus and Betsy (Vincent) Rude, 
both natives of the Bay state. The former was engaged in the clothing' 
business at Haydenville. New York, in his early manhood, and later turned 
his attention to agriculture, carrying on a farm in Franklin county, Massa- 
chusetts. Death cut short his career when he was in his prime, as he was 
but thirty-nine years of age when he died, in 1833. His widow survived 
him many years, and in 1856 came to Illinois. Thenceforth she resided at 
the home of her daughter Mary, in Bureau county, dying in 1886, at the 
extreme age of ninety-three. Mr. Rude was a man of prominence in his 
community, and at various times was called upon to serve in local offices, 
among others that of selectman. Both he and his honored wife w'ere active 
workers in the Congregational church, and always stood ready to support 
all enterprises which they deemed worthy. They were the parents of eight 
children, four of whom were sons. Those who survive are Thaddeus; Han- 
nah, wife of Rev. William ^vlcCulloch, of Red Oak, Iowa; Mary, widow 
of Lorenzo Whitney, of Williams Station, Illinois; David, of Mendota; and 
Harriet, wife of Joseph Hawks, of \\^illiams Station. 

The birth of Thaddeus Rude took place in Ashfield, Massachusetts, 
February 24, 1822. He was reared upon a farm, and with true Yankee spirit 
he mastered agriculture and kindred occupations. In 1849 he determined 
to seek a fortune in what then was the new west. Coming to Bureau 
county, Illinois, he bought eighty acres of prairie land, and within a short 
time disposed of that property, which was situated in Berlin township, and 
removed to La Moille township. There he purchased a quarter section of 
land for five hundred and forty dollars, and industriously set about increasing 
its desirability and value. The country was very wild, the deer coming 
and eating out of his corn cribs, and the wolves frequentl}^ howling upon 
the doorsteps of his house. In time, as he prospered, he added to his original 
homestead until it comprised four hundred acres, and in 1867 he sold the 
original quarter section for eleven thousand dollars. He then removed to 
this county, and since then has made his home in Mendota, where he is 
highly esteemed as a citizen of enterprise and true public spirit. For about 
three years he and his partner. Frederick Schroeder. were engaged in the 



482 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

grain business, and managed an elevator which they erected. Mendota 
was a great grain market at that time, much greater than it is to-day, and 
the firm did an extensive business. After selHng out his interest to Mr. 
Schroeder, Mr. Rude turned his attention to real estate, and for years has 
handled fine farm lands in this and other western states, meeting with suc- 
cess. At one time he owned land in five or six counties in Iowa, some 
four thousand acres altogether, and at present he has twenty-five hundred 
acres in the county of Hamilton alone. Beginning his business career in 
this slate with a capital of barely five hundred dollars, he gradually accu- 
mulated a fortune, by adherence to the recognized rules of legitimate trade, 
and is to-day a man of means and influence, — an example entirely worthy of 
being held up to the ambitious young man now starting out in commercial 
life. 

When a resident of Bureau county ]\Ir. Rude acted in the capacity of 
road commissioner, but aside from this he never has acted in official positions. 
He is an ardent Republican, and has endeavored to perform his entire duty 
as becomes a patriotic American, giving due attention to the great questions 
of the day. 

On the nth of January, 1844, the marriage of Thaddeus Rude and 
Keziah, daughter of Rufus and Keziah (Hall) Hall, was solemnized. She 
departed this life November 17, 1893, aged seventy-one years and four 
months. For almost half a century she had been a faithful helpmate, loyally 
aiding her husband in his early struggles to make a livelihood and place in 
the business world, and her memory is cherished by a host of her old friends. 
Religiously she was a Congregationalist. On the 2d of June, 1895, Mr. 
Rude and Mrs. Emily Fisher, widow of Clement Fisher, were united in 
wedlock. She is a daughter of Henry and Mary (Leatherby) Ham, natives 
of Somersetshire, England, and both now deceased. Mrs. Rude had four 
children by her first marriage, — three who died in infancy, and Carrie, wife 
of Charles Thelo, Jr., of ]\Iendota, Illinois. The latter have three children, — 
Eda, Earl and Fred. ]\Irs. Rude is a member of the Church of England, 
and is interested in all movements calculated to uplift and benefit humanity. 



JOHN OVER. 



The village of Leonore, LaSalle county, Illinois, includes among its 
leading and prosperous citizens the subject of this sketch, John Over, a 
Prussian by birth and an American by adoption. It was less than ten years 
ago that he left his native land, and since his arrival here we find him 
rushing into financial independence at a remarkable speed and succeeding 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 483 

in business at an age when most men have either made their stake or have 
retired from the arena in despair. 

John Over was 1)orn in the province of Prussia, February 28, 1858, 
the son of Henry Over, a farmer. Selecting the trade of carpenter, John 
served an apprenticeship therein and followed that branch of mechanics as 
a business while he remained in Prussia. Being influenced by relatives and 
friends who had come to this country, he decided to try his fortunes here, 
and accordingly, in company with Conrad Eschbach, he set sail from 
Bremen, Germany, in 1890, on the ill-fated steamship Elbe. Arrived in 
New York, he came west to Illinois, and the first two years of his residence 
here he spent in work at his trade. Then, w-ith a small capital, he began 
business as a merchant in Leonore. October i, 1892, was the date of his 
debut as a "kaufman," and the popularity of his place of business is a fact 
noted Ijy all who have in any way come in contact with it. 

Mr. Over is a man of family. He was married April 25, 1893, to Miss 
Anna Berninger, whose father, Alexander Berninger, was a Prussian emi- 
grant to LaSalle county. They have two children, — John and Alvis. 



GEORGE W. PITZER. 



Among the early settlers of LaSalle county, Illinois, was William Pit- 
zer, a native of Licking county, Ohio, who was born September 23, 1809, 
came west in 183 1 and took up his abode on the frontier. He was a son of 
Richard Pitzer, a major in the war of 1812 and a man noted for his bravery 
in battle. William Pitzer married Miss Sarah Kite, daughter of Adam Kite, 
a native of Ohio. She was born March 10, 1810. Their union was blessed 
in the birth of seven children, namely: Alva, a resident of South Dakota; 
George W., whose name forms the heading of this sketch; Jacob, a resident 
of Lyon county, Kansas; David, also of Lyon county, Kansas; Elizabeth, 
wife of Robert Lane, of Chebanse, Illinois; Julia, wife of B. F. Fuller, of Lyon 
county, Kansas, and Malinda J., wife of L. J. Grove, of Miller township, 
LaSalle county, Illinois, ^^'illiam Pitzer was a farmer all his life and lived 
to the ripe old age of seventy-four years, his death occurring January 19, 
1884, on his farm. His wife's death occurred ]\Iarch 21, 1887, also at the 
age of seventy-four years. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

George W. Pitzer was born in LaSalle county, Illinois, July 2y, 1837; 
was reared on his father's farm, and has always made this county his home 
and given his attention to agricultural pursuits. His present farm, a fine 
tract of two hundred acres, he purchased in 1889. This farm is one of 



484 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

the best improved and most highly cultivated in the locality, its general 
appearance at once giving evidence of the fact that its owner is a progres- 
sive, up-to-date farmer. 

The grandson of a valiant soldier, George Pitzer, when the civil war 
came on, showed his patriotism by offering his services to his countrv. He 
enlisted in 1862 and was assigned to the One Hundred and Fourth Illinois 
Infantry, under Colonel Moore and Lieutenant Hapeman, and served three 
years. He was in the battles of Chickamauga. Lookout Mountain and 
Missionary Ridge, and during his army life spent six months in hospital. 
At the close of the war he returned home and resumed farming. 

Mr. Pitzer was married in 1866 to Miss Elmira Grove, daughter of 
Joseph Grove, deceased (see sketch of Jesse Grove), and who previous to 
her marriage was a teacher. They are the parents of four children: Elma, 
wife of James McMichael; and Harry, ]\Iay and Earl, at home. 

Like most veterans of the civil war, ]\Ir. Pitzer is a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic. Politically he casts his vote and influence 
with the Democratic party. 



TERRY SIMMONS. 



For almost a quarter of a century Terry Simmons has been identified 
with the journalistic circle of LaSalle county, and in consequence is widely 
known. He is a gentleman of marked ability and wide information, is 
devoted to the best interests of the county and state, and uses his influence 
on behalf of good government and all that goes toward the elevation of his 
fellow-men. 

Several generations ago the ancestors of our subject emigrated from 
Scotland and Ireland to the United States, and his paternal grandfather, 
Morris Simmons, was a native of New^ York state. The birth of Terry 
Simmons occurred in Shabbona, De Kalb county, Illinois, September 26, 
1855. His parents, M. M. and Phylance (Terry) Simmons, were natives 
of the Empire state, and there were reared to maturity. They came to 
Illinois in 1835, and in 1870 removed to Marseilles. 

The school days of Terry Simmons were passed in the town of his 
Dirth, Leland and Marseilles. It was his privilege to attend Jennings Semi- 
nary at Aurora, Illinois, for some time, and upon the completion of his 
studies he was employed in the post-office here under D. H. Slagle, serving 
for six years as deputy. In the Centennial year he founded the Marseilles 
Plaindealer, and eighteen years later, November 28. 1894, purchased the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 485 

Seneca Record, both of which papers he has pubHshed ever since. They 
are issued weekly, on Fridays, and are extensively circulated throughout 
the county. Devoted first and foremost to the interests of their respective 
communities, county news and other information also find a place in their 
columns. Personally, Mr. Simmons is a Republican in national affairs, but 
is thoroughly independent in local elections, favoring the most suitable 
candidate and best principle, regardless of party lines. 

June 12, 1879, the marriage of Mr. Simmons and Miss Julia Thompson 
w^as celebrated at Leland, Illinois, and their union has been blessed with four 
sons and three daughters. Mrs. Simmons is a daughter of Henry and 
]\Iinnie Thompson, of Leland. 



FRANK E. STATES. 



A representative farmer of the younger class is Frank E. States, who 
owns and occupies the States homestead and farm on section 33, Miller 
township, LaSalle county, Marseilles being his post-office address. He 
was born in Grundy county, this state, December 31, 1863, and is descended 
from ancestors who were among the early settlers of Pennsylvania. Eman- 
uel States, his father, was born in P)edford county, Pennsylvania, May 6, 
1823, a son of Abraham and Rebecca States. The mother of our subject 
was before her marriage ]\Iiss Elenora Lysinger, and she was born Sep- 
tember 9, 1828, in Bedford county, Pennsylvania. Emanuel and Elenora 
States were the parents of twelve children, nine of whom are living at this 
writing, — six sons and three daughters. Their mother died April 9, 1876, 
and their father was married a second time, to Mrs. Eliza Coats, of Lewis 
county. New York, who died September 8, 1897, he surviving her till 
March 9, 1899, dying in the seventy-sixth year of his age. 

Frank E. States was a child two years of age when his parents moved 
from Grundy county to LaSalle county, and here he was reared, on his 
father's farm, dividing his boyhood days between working on the farm 
and attending the public schools. He now owns the home farm, a valual:)le 
tract of one hundred and sixty acres, on section 33 of Miller township. 
December 24, 1889, he was married to Miss Rhoda M. Drackley, who was 
born in this county August 28, 1867, a daughter of William and Cornelia 
H. (Gaige) Drackley. William Drackley was born in England May 22, 
1835. and his wife in Schenectady county, Xcav York. January 17, 1837, 
and are the parents of four children, — three sons and one daughter, — all 
of whom are living. :\Irs. States was reared on lier father's farm near 



486 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Seneca, LaSalle county, receiving a common-school education, and prior to 
her marriage was engaged in teaching school. 

Politically Mr. States is a Republican and at present a member of 
the school board of his district. 



BART SIEGLER. 



Bart Siegler, agent for the United States and American Express Com- 
panies at LaSalle, Illinois, was born in Sublette, LaSalle county, this state, 
December 12, 1864, a son of Bartholomew and Helen (Heltenberg) Siegler, 
both natives of Germany. When he was five years old his parents moved 
to LaSalle, and here he was reared and educated, having the benefit of the 
public schools. At the age of fifteen he left school and began hustling for 
himself. First his attention was directed to the tinner's trade, at which 
he worked about six years. Next he became driver for the L^nited States 
Express Company and two years later was given the position of express 
messenger for the same company, with the run out of Peoria. Later he 
was made night agent at the depot at Peoria, which position he filled one 
year, then being given day service. In July, 1894, he was sent liack to 
LaSalle, as agent for the company. In November, 1897, when the Amer- 
ican and United States Express Companies combined their business, he was 
retained in the service, doing the business for both, and this position he still 
fills. Mr. Siegler is an enterprising young business man, prompt and 
faithful in the discharge of his duties, and that his efficient services are 
appreciated by his employers is evidenced by his long continuance with 
them. 

In 1892 Mr. Siegler married Miss Katie Berghardt, and they have one 
child, Helen. He and his wife are members of the Roman Catholic church, 
and politically he is a Democrat, not, however, taking an active part in 
politics. 



HOSMER C. CHAPAIAX. 

The Chapmans are a family that have long been identified with LaSalle 
county, Illinois, and occupying a representative place among them is the 
subject of this sketch, Hosmer C. Chapman, who is engaged in farming 
in Miller township, Marseilles being his post-ofBce address. 

Hiram W. Chapman, the father of Hosmer C, was one of the pioneer 
settlers of the county. He was born in East Bloomfield, Ontario county. 
New York, lanuarv 16, 1824, son of Amasa Chapman and his wife, whose 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 487 

maiden name was Emily D. Cooley. She was born in Canandaigua, New 
York, July 4, 1799, and he in Hancock, Massachusetts, September 29, 1793. 
He died April 27, 1836, and she passed away April 30, 1842. 

Hiram A\'. Chapman grew to manhood in New York and was there 
married, January 23. 1849, the lady of his choice being Miss Ann E. Davis, 
daughter of Cornelius Davis. Mrs. Chapman was born and reared in 
Victor, Ontario county, New York, and was a woman of great strength of 
character. 

In 1854 she accompanied her husband to Illinois and the following 
year they purchased a farm in LaSalle county, its location being in Miller 
township, and here they reared their family and passed the rest of their 
lives. She died at the homestead in February, 1882, at the age of fifty- 
three years, and he survived her until March i, 1898, when he died at the 
age of seventy-four. Politically he was a Republican, interested in public 
affairs, and for a number of years served as a member of the school board 
and also filled other local ofiices. Mrs. Chapman was a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. They reared to maturity five children, four 
sons and one daughter, namely: George H., Hosmer C, Delia Lucina, 
Frank O. and Otis L. The daughter died in 1880, at the age of twenty-two 
years. 

Hosmer C. Chapman was born March 16, 1853, and was eighteen 
months old when his parents moved to Miller township, and consequently 
has never known any other home than this. He w^as reared on his father's 
farm, receiving his education in the schools of the district, and since he 
reached adult years he has carried on farming operations on his own ac- 
count. He has lived on his present farm nine years. This farm, known to 
many as the "Jesse Mick Farm," is well improved with modern residence 
and other good farm buildings, and its cultivated fie],ds and general appear- 
ance at once indicate that a prosperous, energetic man is at the head of its 
operations. 

Mr. Chapman was married February 14, 1878, to Miss Clara M. Snyder, 
of Manlius township, LaSalle county, daughter of John and Sarah (Petefish) 
Snyder, natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio, respectively. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Chapman were born two children, — Mabel June, born Alay 24, 1882. and 
Arthur Jay, born November 29, 1887. 

Mr. and Mrs. Snyder came to LaSalle county, Illinois, in 1854, and 
here spent the rest of their lives and died, his death occurring wdien he w'as 
sixt}'-four years of age: hers at seventy-four. Both were members of the 
Christian church. They were the parents of nine children, five of whom 
are now living, namely: Samuel, a veteran of the civil war, is now a resident 
of Springfield, Missouri: Mrs. Francis Battles, of Perry, Iowa: Maggie, 



488 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

wife of G. A. Willmarth, of Aliller township, LaSalle county; Clara M., wife 
of our subject; and John N., of Farnam, Dawson county, Nebraska. 

The deceased members of the family were: William, who was a soldier 
in the civil war, and who died in Dallas county, Iowa; Tabitha, who was 
the wife of C. N. Rolph, of Miller township; Sarah E., who was the wife of 
W. A. Harris, of Perry, Iowa; and Emma E., who was the wife of F. O. 
Chapman of Miller township, 

Mr. Chapman gives his support to the Republican party, and is now 
serving as a member of the school board. He is fraternally identified with 
the Modern Woodmen of America, having membership in Chapter No'. 
258, of Marseilles. 



OTIS L. CHAPMAN. 



Otis L. Chapman, whose farm is located on section 33, Miller township, 
LaSalle county, Illinois, is a native of the township in which he lives and 
is ranked with its respected and influential citizens. 

Mr. Chapman's father, Hiram Chapman, deceased, was a native of 
East Bloomfield, Ontario county. New A^ork, where he was born January 
16, 1824, the son of Amasa Chapman, a native of Hancock, Massachusetts. 
The latter was born September 29, 1793, and died April 27, 1836. His 
wife, who was before marriage Miss Emily D. Cooley, was born July 4, 
1799, and died April 30, 1842. They both lived and died in New York 
state. 

Their son Hiram grew to manhood in New York, and was there mar- 
ried, on January 23, 1849, the lady of his choice being Miss Ann E. Davis, 
daughter of Cornelius Davis, a native of New England. In 1854 the young- 
married couple cante west to Illinois and the following year settled in 
Miller township, LaSalle county, where they resided until death. She died 
at the age of fifty-three years and his age at death was seventy-four. 

They were the parents of seven children, and of these four sons and a 
daughter grew to maturity, namely: George H., of Odell, Illinois; Hos- 
mer C, of Miller township, LaSalle county; Delia Lucina, who died in 
1880, at the age of twenty-two years; Frank O., of Miller township; and 
Otis L. 

Otis L. Chapman was born, October 29, 1863. on his father's farm, 
and received his education in the public schools of the district. While at 
home he always found plenty to do, assisting in the farm work and the 
care of stock, his father having one of the largest stock farms in the county, 
and thus young Chapman early became so familiar with every detail of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 489 

the work that he was fitted to take charge of a farm of his own. He now has 
a large stock farm and is conducting his operations successfully. 

Mr. Chapman was married January 15, 1890, to Miss Martha Jane 
Hohensheli, daughter of Daniel and Catherine (Waltz) Flohenshell, of 
Grundy county, Illinois. They have three children, — William Henry, born 
March 11, 1891; Hiram Wesley, born February 23, 1892; and Delia 
Catherine, born April 8. 1895. 

Mr. Chapman is a Republican, and is at present serving as a member 
of the school board. 



JOHN D. HARBER. 



John D. Harber, an ex-soldier and prominent farmer of LaSalle county, 
Illinois, is a resident of Otter Creek township. He was born June 19, 
1847, in Champaign county, Ohio, and is a son of Elijah and Francis 
(Waller) Harber. The grandfather, Elisha Harber, Sr., resided in the state 
of Ohio, where the father of our subject was born and grew to manhood. 
Elisha, the grandfather, fought in the war of 1812, and died at the age of 
eighty years. The lady whom he married was formerly Miss Francis 
W^aller, a native of Logan county, Ohio. They had three sons and two 
daughters, John D., our subject, being the eldest. Franklyn, Mary Anne 
and Amandy Jane, the youngest child, are deceased. Elisha resides at Fort 
Madison, Iowa, Mary Anne Fordery in the state of Missouri, and Willard 
at Fort Madison. The father was a Democrat. He died in Indiana, at the 
age of sixty-seven years and his wife at the age of fifty-five. 

John D. Harber was educated in Indiana, about twenty-five miles 
from Fort Wayne, where he remained until the breaking out of the re- 
bellion. Although but sixteen years of age he at once enlisted in Company 
D, Captain McDonald, One Hundred and Twenty-ninth Indiana A^olun- 
teers, under Colonel Case, and for eighteen months saw active service, 
taking part in some sharp battles, among which were the battles of Kenesaw 
Mountain, Atlanta, Jonesboro, all in Georgia, and Franklin and Nash- 
ville, Tennessee. He received a severe wound in the hip and was honorably 
discharged in 1865, when he returned to his old home in Indiana. He has 
a kindly interest in the "boys in blue" who took part in that struggle, and 
they are sure of meeting a hearty welcome from him. Post No. 68, G. A. 
R., of Streator, Illinois, claims him as an honored member. 

He was married in 1867. in Whitley county, Indiana, to Miss Marilla 
Pimlot, a daughter of Joseph Pimlot. Five children have blessed their 
union, viz.: Wallace, who married Miss Hattie Hillison and resides in 



490 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

this township; and Arthur, who married Miss Ida Cooper and resides also 
in this township; Emma, the wife of Richard Hilgert, also of this town- 
ship; and Anna and Ralph. ]\Ir. Harber is a stanch Republican and takes 
a prominent part in the politics of his county. He was the efficient road 
commissioner of Otter Creek towaiship, for three years, and has done 
creditable work in improving the highways in a permanent manner; and he 
is the deputy sheriff of LaSalle county. He is quiet and retiring in disposi- 
tion rather than aggressive, and his many excellent traits of character have 
caused him to be highly esteemed. 

Joseph Pimlot was born in Chesterfield, England, and enlisted in the 
English army and was captured on Lake Erie, September lo, 1813, by 
Commodore Perry. After he was released as prisoner he moved to Akron. 
Ohio, where he was married, and to this union five children were born, — 
three sons and two daughters: The oldest son, Clark, and Stanton are 
deceased; Cary is now residing in Kansas; Melissa and Orpha, both 
deceased. By his marriage to Louisa Lockwood there have been three 
children, — Meralda and >\Iartha, deceased, and Greeley, who resides in 
Oklahoma. 



CHARLES STRUEVER. 

It is a fact freely conceded that America has no better citizens than those 
sons of the Fatherland wdio have cast in their lot w'ith the people of this 
country, becoming thoroughly identified with every institution, upholding 
our laws and w'orking for the good of the community in wdiich their home is 
made. Such a valued citizen is Charles Struever, a member of the firm of 
Struever & Son, of Peru, LaSalle county. 

Born in Gottingen, province of Hanover, Germany, July 15, 18 16, our 
subject is a son of George and Dorothea (Biel) Struever, both of whom were 
natives of the province of Hanover, Germany, where they passed their entire 
lives. The father was a forester by occupation, and for half a century was 
in the employ of a wealthy landholder, von Bodenhausen, whose extensive 
forests he looked after. He was honest, industrious and faithful to the in- 
terests of his employer, and was respected by all who were associated with 
him in any manner. He and his wife were members of the Lutheran church 
and reared their children in that faith. The father died about 1886, w'hen at 
an advanced age, and the mother departed this life in 1871. Of their four 
sons and four daughters but two are now living, — Charles and William, — 
the latter being a resident of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Those who have passed 
away are Augusta, who died unmarried; George, who died in the war of the 







C-''^^0£>/^'^^ tTv^^r^c^^^^^'-c^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 491 

rebellion; Sophia, who became the wife of Mr. Schimmelpfennig; Betty, 
who married a Mr. Scheidermann; Louis, whose widow still lives in Stras- 
bnrg-; and Jeannetta, who married a man named Annaker. 

Charles Struever obtained a liberal education in the common schools 
of his native land, and later received private instruction in special lines of 
study, and spent two years in Gottingen University. When he had arrived at 
his majoritv he was called home in order to draw cuts that it might be de- 
termined v.hether or not he was to serve for a period in the regular army, the 
result being that he was absolved. For six years he held a responsible 
position as overseer of a farm in Mecklenburg, after which he acted in a 
similar capacitv for ]\Iinister von Trott. While there he became acquainted 
with the late Mr. von Baumbach, of Milwaukee, who induced the young- 
man to accompany him to the United States, in 1849. Von Baumbach 
purchased a farm in the vicinity of Elyria, Ohio, in Lorain county, and his 
son, aided by Mr. Struever, attended to the cultivation of the place. At the 
end of t\\o years our subject removed to Wisconsin, where he bought a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Winnebago county, not far from 
Oshkosh. Subsequently he added another quarter section of land to his 
original farm, on which he made material improvements. Li 1854 he sold 
the property to Mr. von Baumbach, and soon afterward he came to Peru, 
where he has dwelt ever since, engaged in various enterprises. At first he 
carried on a grocery for a couple of years. Becoming local agent for the 
Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, in the purchase of coal lands, he 
bargained for several farms, and thus was initiated into his present line of 
business. For many years he has been one of the leading real-estate men of 
this section of the state, and he also represents most of the first-class insur- 
ance companies. 

Almost half a century ago Mr. Struever was united in marriage with 
Miss Mary Minthorn, who is still sharing his joys and sorrows. Their mar- 
riage was celebrated at Elyria, Ohio, September 17, 185 1, and they became 
the parents of two children, Doretta and Rudolph F. The daughter wedded 
Charles Bolster and lived on a farm at Sugar Grove, near Aurora. Illinois. 
She died, leaving a little son, who was taken to the home of our subject, but 
when he was about two years and a half old he was called away to the better 
land. Rudolph F. has been associated with his father in business for the 
past eleven years, and is an able young man. He married Miss Mary Hun- 
toon, and they have one child, Charles, named in honor of his grandfather. 

A few months after his coming to Peru Mr. Struever bought a house 
on Fifth avenue, and, since remodeling it, has now made it his home for 
about forty-five years. He is active as a Republican; was one of the first 
city marshals of Peru, and for four years served the public as county coroner. 



492 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Socially he has been a member of Mokena Lodge, No. 34, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, for many years. Though Lutherans in religious 
faith, Mr. and Mrs. Struever have not identified themselves with any church. 
They enjoy the friendship of all who know them, and few are better known 
in Peru. Mrs. Struever was born in Torringford, Litchfield county, Connec- 
ticut, February 15, 1828. Her parents were Hiram and Hulda (Cowles) 
Minthorn; father born in Torrington, Connecticut, of Holland ancestors, 
and her mother was born in Litchfield, same state, of English descent. 
When eight years of age her parents removed to Elyria, Ohio, where she 
was married. Mrs. Struever was a school teacher in early life, in Ohio for 
a time and in Peru five vears. 



JOHN J. VOHS. 



John J. V'ohs, who occupies the position of bookkeeper in the state 
department of the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, of LaSalle, Illi- 
nois, was born in Mineral Point, Wisconsin, May i, 1868, and is a son of 
Andrew and Elizabeth (Linz) Vohs. both natives of Germany and now 
residents of Galena, Illinois. J. J. Vohs left his parental home in 1884, 
coming to LaSalle. Illinois, where he entered the employ of the M. & H. 
Zinc Company. He was married in 1893, and had three children, two 
now living. 



GEORGE A. BENNETT. 

The history of Utica township would be incomplete should the name 
which begins this article be omitted, since for more than thirty vears he 
has been actively engaged in agricultural pursuits here, and has been fore- 
most in all movements tending toward the general prosperity of this 
locality. 

The father of our subject was William Bennett, who was born in Kent, 
Litchfield county, Connecticut, in 1809, a son of Stephen and Diana Ben- 
nett. The former also was a native of Litchfield county, and was of Scotch- 
English extraction. William Bennett chose for a wife Sarah, a daughter 
of Hiram Bronson. She was born in the same county, in the village of 
Warren, in 1813, and lived to the advanced age of eighty-six years, her 
death taking place in 1899. 

In 1852 William Bennett came with his family to LaSalle county and 
made a settlement in Deer Park township, upon a farm of eighty acres 
which he had purchased the preceding year. Later he bought one hundred 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 493 

and forty acres in Farm Ridge township. He was accounted one of the 
most progressive and prosperous farmers of Deer Park township, where 
he continued his residence till he died. His sterling qualities of heart and 
mind won for him the admiration and good will of his neighbors, and his 
death, March 22, 1868, was deeply mourned in the community and felt to 
be a public loss. His widow survived him more than thirty years, as 
previously stated, and she continued to dwell upon the old homestead up to 
thirteen years previous to her death, during which latter period she li\'ed 
with her daughter in Normal, Illinois. Ten children were born to this 
worthy couple. Those besides our subject were: Diana C. who married 
the Rev. A. S. Calkins, of Normal; Isaac H., of Deer Park; George A., of 
Utica; Henry F., a farmer of Deer Park township; Charles F., a resident 
of California; Edgar, of Mendota, Illinois; Edwin, of Iowa; Nelson G., 
of Livingston county, this state; and Emma, who died aged four years. 

The birth of George A. Bennett occurred in the town where his father 
and grandfather before him had been born. The date of this event was May 
25, 1837, and in his native town the lad acquired his elementary education. 
In 1852 he accompanied the family to this county, and until he arrived at 
his majority he continued to dwell at his parental home. After coming here 
he attended a district school at Bunker Hill for a period, and by private 
study and reading has kept abreast of the times. In his early manhood he 
was very industrious, methodical and economical, and thus made his first 
steps toward an independent fortune. In 1868 he bought one hundred and 
twenty-eight acres of land on section 4. Utica township, and later he pur- 
chased forty acres more, thus making his homestead a full quarter section in 
extent. During the years which have since rolled away he has made sub- 
stantial improvements, and now is the possessor of a model farm, with 
excellent buildings and conveniences in keeping with the progressive spirit 
of the age. 

In 1861 Mr. Bennett married Miss Semantha E. Shaver, of Rutland 
township, LaSalle county. She is a daughter of Ephraim and Mary Ellen 
(Mortin) Shaver. Ephraim Shaver was born in Rockingham county, \"ir- 
ginia, in 18 12, and was a son of George and Hannah (Sites) Shaver, of 
German extraction. Wdien a young man he went from his native state to 
Indiana, where he was married. In January. 1839, he came to LaSalle 
county and settled in Rutland township, where he died in 1888. His wife 
was a daughter of William and Mary (W^est) ]\Iortin. She died in 1896, 
aged seventy-six years. Ephraim Shaver and wife had the following chil- 
dren: Semantha E., George W., Mary L., Margert H.. Sybella N., Isadore 
E.. Delsena V., Levi Peter and Emily G. Mrs. Bennett was born in Rut- 
land, Illinois, in 1839. and prior to her marriage she was successfully en- 



494 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



\ 



sraoed in teaching scliool for about nine years. Emma L., the only dausrhter 
of our subject and Ayife, is the wife of George Sargent, of Deer Park, and 
their three children are ^^'ill3ur Henry, Jetta Naomi and King George. Dee 
A., the only son of Mr. Bennett, married Nancy Aiken and is an enterprising 
farmer. 

In his poHtical creed Mr. Bennett is a stanch Democrat, and fraternahy 
he is a member of \\'aUham Lodge, No. 384, F. & A. M. For eight years 
he \yas the president of the Home ^Mutual Insurance Company, of which 
organization he \yas a charter member. 



THOMAS WILSON. 



Thomas Wilson, deceased, was l^orn in Earl township, LaSalle county, 
Illinois, August 10. 1839. and died here January 17. 1885, at the age of 
forty-fiye years. He was a son of Osman John and Sarah Caroline (Thorn- 
ton) W^ilson. Reared on his father's farm in Earl townsliip. he chose the 
occupation of farming and followed it through life, meeting with success 
in his operations and being recognized as one of the leading agriculturists of 
his locality. After his marriage he moyed to his own farm, one hundred 
acres, on section 9, Earl township, ha\'ing built a home previous to his 
marriage, and there he passed the rest of his life and died. At the time 
of his death he and his wife together owned tv/o hundred and fifty acres. 
j\Ir. \\'ilson was a man well known and highly respected in his community. 
For a number of years he served his township as road commissioner. He 
was a Republican and a member of the G. A. R., — McCullough Post. No. 
59. During the civil war he enlisted, September 23, 1861, for a term of 
three years, as a private in Company I, Fourth Illinois Volunteer Cavalry, 
and was in the service nine months, at the end of that time being discharged, 
April 28, 1862, on account of physical disability. Among the engagements 
in which he participated was the battle of Pittsburg Landing. 

February 25, 1869, was consummated his marriage to Miss Mary 
Catherine Wood, daughter of Nicholas and Catherine Maria (Race) Wood, 
natives of New York state, he of English descent and she of Dutch. Their 
happy union was blessed in the birth of two sons and five daughters, namely: 
Cora Ann, Carrie Gertrude, Sarah Adaline, Charley Thomas, John Henry, 
Mary, and one that died in infancy. Carrie Gertrude is the wife of Edward 
R. Emory and resides near Baraboo, Wisconsin, and has one child, Orlou 
Viola. Sarah Adaline married W^ilford S. Elinn, and they also live near 
Baraboo. Mr. and Mrs. Flinn have one child, — Edith Mildred. Mrs. Wil- 
son and her other children reside at the home farm. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



495 



]Mrs. AMlson was one of six cliildren, — four sons and two daughters. — 
of whom four are now H\-ing, viz.: Isaac X., of Earh'ille, llHnois; Mrs. 
Mary C. Wilson; EHza, wife of John W. Stall; and Gordon Wood, of 
Nevada, Iowa. Their father, Nicholas W^ood, was a farmer. He came to 
Illinois in the spring of 1863, landing in LaSalle county on the 17th of 
April, and shortly after his arrival purchased one hundred and fifty acres 
of land two miles and a half northeast of Earlville, where he spent the rest 
of his life, and died in 1871, at the age of fifty-five years. His widow 
survives him. is now in the eighty-first year of her age, and resides in 
Earlville. She is a devoted member of the Baptist church, as also was her 
husband. Mrs. Wilson's grandfather, David AVood, died on the Conklin 
farm in LaSalle county, in 1843, ^^'^'1 advanced in years. He had a large 
family. He was twice married and was the father of three children by his 
first wife and fifteen by his second wife. Grandfather Race, Mrs. Wilson's 
grandfather on her mother's side, was a soldier in the war of 1812. He 
was a natiA-e of New York state. Grandmoth.er Race lived to the remark- 
able age of one hundred and one years, her death occurring in 1894. They 
were the parents of six children, all of whom are living. 



JAMES W. PARRISH. 

! 

James William Parrish, one of the most extensive farmers of the town- 
ship of Dimmick, LaSalle county, Illinois, is of Virginia birth and is 
descended from a line of farmers, his father and sfrandfather havino- been 
farmers in the Old Dominion. Great-grandfather Parrish was an English 
emigrant to this country. Josiah Parrish. the father of James \\\. was 
born in A'irginia in 1822, and died in Christian count}', Illinois, in February, 
1896. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Slonaker, died in \^irginia. 
In 1869 he came with his family to Illinois and settled in Dimmick town- 
ship, LaSalle county, and three years later they removed to Christian 
county, where his younger children were reared. His family comprised the 
following named members: Sarah, wife of Charles Vest, of Keyser, West 
Virginia; !Mollie, the wife of John Bailey, of Alineral county. West \w- 
ginia; Alargaret, wife of Ed. Witcraft, of Iowa; Benjamin, of Christian 
county. Illinois; Erank, a resident of ]\Iineral county. A\'est Virginia; 
George, of Christian county. Illinois; and James W., whose name intro- 
duces this sketch. 

James W. Parrish dates his birth in Alineral county. West Virginia. 
September 30. 1853, and was sixteen years old at the time of their removal 
to Illinois. Here at the age of twenty he started to make his own way in 



496 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

the world, engaging as a farm hand for Arthur Long at a salary of twenty 
dollars per month. Afterward he worked for several of the large farmers 
of the township and finally settled down with C. R. Brown, probably the 
most wealthy and influential farmer of the township, and during his experi- 
ence as a wage earner laid by each month a little sum. When he began 
farming independently he was in a measure prepared for it. He remained 
with Mr. Brown and undertook the management of his large estate. With 
the exception of a period spent on his ow^n farm, a half section of land in 
Nebraska, he has been a resident of the neighborhood where he married 
and made his first start. 

]\Ir. Parrish married ]\Iiss Clara Brown, only child of C. R. Brown. 
The children of this marriage are Arthur, Rollin and Gertie. 



JOHN E. MILLER. 

John E. Miller, one of the honored pioneers of Illinois, was born in 
Windham, Wilmington township, Vermont, and is the only survivor of a 
family which once numbered eleven members, six of the children being 
sons and three daughters. The parents, who were highly respected citizens, 
were Isaac and Lucy (Conant) Miller, natives of Massachusetts. They 
removed to the Green Mountain state, where they were interested in the 
management of a farm for many years. The father died on his homestead 
there when about three-score and ten years of age. He was born January 
28, 1782, and died May 29, 1850, aged sixty-eight years; and his wife, born 
February 15, 1787, preceded him to the silent land August 30, 1848, sixty- 
one years of age. They were L^niversalists in religious faith, and were noted 
for all of the qualities of the true Christian. 

The birth of John E. Miller took place December 7, 1826, and in his 
l^oyh.ood he attended the district schools of \\'ilmington township. He 
early mastered the details of agriculture and laid the foundations for a 
successful business career. He worked for neighbors for several years after 
attaining his majority, and at last concluded that he would try his fortunes 
in the west, about whose vast resources so much was then being said. 
Accordingly, in September, 185 1, he came to Illinois, and while looking 
around for a permanent location engaged in working for the pioneers. 
He was thus occupied for about a year, in the meantime buying one hun- 
dred and eighty acres of land in Clarion township. Bureau county. He 
then returned to Vermont on a visit, and remained there for a little over 
a vear. In the spring of 1853 he again came west and began cultivating" 
and improving his homestead, continuing to dwell there until 1865. That 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 497 

year he sold the farm aiul came to this county, where he invested his means 
in a quarter section of land in Mendota township. In 1874 he erected a 
handsome house here, at a cost of six thousand dollars, and in 1895 it was 
destroyed by fire. The same year, however, he built another residence, — - 
a larg-e, modern brick house, one of the most attract Inc homes in the county. 
Substantial barns, granaries and other farm buildings provide al)undance 
of accommodations for stock and the products of the farm, and everything 
about the place is kept up neatly and in a manner denoting thrift. About 
1893 ^Ir. ]\Iiller bought an eight}--acre farm adjoining his homestead, and 
no^^• owns and cultix'ates two hundred and forty acres. 

The marriage of Mr. Miller and Miss Elmina D. Ballon was solemnized 
Februar}- 28, 1856, and after more than two-score years of happiness to- 
gether the de\()ted wife and mother was summoned to the better land. 
She died .\ugust i, 1897, at the age of sixty-three years and ten months. 
Her loss is deeply felt in this community, and her noble example, and 
lo\ing, womanly sympathy and helpfulness is remembered b}' her friends, 
who were innumerable. She, as well as Mr. Miller, has long been identified 
with the Universalist faith, her parents, Asahel and Diantha (Fox) Ballon, 
have been deceased many years. 

To the union of our subject and ^vife four sons and a daughter were 
born: Martha E., whose birth occurred October i, 1857, died July 28. 1861 ; 
Loren C, born March 30, i860, died March 13, 1863; Frank H.. born 
March 21, 1862, married Alma R. Clark, by whom three children were 
born, — Lee, Grace and Frank; the father died in August, 1889; Dana E., 
born June 26, 1864, first wedded Sarah Taylor, and after her death Anna 
Taylor became his wife; they have one little daughter, Helen; and Eddie 
A., born in Mendota, March z"/, 1866, resides upon the eighty-acre farm 
adjoining his father's homestead. His wife was Miss May Lambert prior to 
their marriage. 

Politically J. E. Miller is a stalwart advocate of the Republican party 
platform and principles. He has served in the capacity of school director 
two terms. During a long period he was the treasurer and a director in 
the Farmers' Mutual Fire and Lightning Insurance Company, and other 
local concerns received his aid and influence. 



CLAUDE DISIER. 



The man who by industr}- and perseverance i)ro\-idcs liberall}' for his 
family and in addition lays by a sufficient store upon which to sul)sist when 
the frost of age shall have whitened his brow, is considered to be a person 
entitled to our admiration, and the pulilic hasten to do him honor. This is 



498 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

perfectly right, as it is refreshing to see a man who is not discouraged by 
every ill wind, who stands bravely to the front in the many battles with 
fortune, and is ever ready with his cry of ''Onward" when others falter and 
fall back. Such a man is Claude Disier, whom we are proud to call a citizen 
of our commonwealth. 

Like his ancestors for generations, he is a farmer and has made of 
the vocation something more than the mere drudgery that characterizes 
so many of the so-called farmers who appear to have no ambition beyond 
a mere hand-to-mouth existence. Mr. Disier was born in the agricultural 
districts of sunny France in November, 1827, was there educated and 
trained to farm work, his father and grandfather both being farmers in 
that country. He was a son of Francis and Catherine (Euteria) Disier. 
In 1856 he took passage at Havre on a sailing vessel bound for New York. 
Six weeks was consumed by the voyage across, the ship being the Amer- 
ican vessel, Happin. He spent a year in the city of New York and the 
following summer farmed at Cape Vincent. In November, 1857, he came 
to Ottawa, where he worked in the machine shops for a time and then 
purchased eighty acres of land in Waltham township. It was his endeavor 
to make this farm first-class in every respect, and so to cultivate it that it 
would yield him the greatest possible returns. Having started without 
means, he understood the value of good management and well directed 
energy and applied both to the work before him. He now owns two good 
farms, containing two hundred and eighty acres, within two miles of Ottawa. 
These farms are well improved and furnished with good houses, barns, and 
other necessary buildings, while the fertility of the soil has been so carefully 
looked after that they are among the most productive in the state. 

Mr. Disier has been twice married, his first wife being Miss Georgiana, 
daughter of George Sulzerberger. Four children were born to them, — 
Fanny, Emma, Sophia and George Ganiere. His second marriage was 
contracted February 27, 1865, and by this there was one son, Edouard, who 
died in 1895, leaving one child, Claude Disier. Mr. Disier has been an 
upright, honorable citizen, and is highly esteemed by his neighbors. 



WALLACE B. CORNISH. 

Wallace Bruce Cornish, night foreman in the rolling mills of the 
Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, LaSalle, is a native of the Empire 
state, born in Westkill, Greene county. January 22. 1843, ^ son of James 
Monroe Cornish aiid Henrietta (Bennett) Cornish, both natives of New 
York. Both his sfrandfathers were Englishmen and were among the earlv 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



499 



settlers of Greene county. Grandfather Cornish was Democratic in his polit- 
ical views, hut his son James M. was a Republican, as also is Wallace B. By 
trade James M. was a watchmaker. He lived and died in Greene county. 
New York, and some time after his death his widow moved to Chicago, 
where she is still living. 

Wallace B. Cornish was reared in Westkill and received a common- 
school education there. At the age of fifteen years he was thrown upon 
his own resources. He began the battle of life as a farm hand, working by 
the month, and this form of employment he followed for five or six years. 
In New York he married Asenath Schermehorne, and shortly after his 
marriage came west, locating in LaSalle, Illinois, in 1865, and at that time 
accepting a position as a clerk in a dry-goods store. He clerked for about 
six years, after which he entered the employ of the Matthiessen & Hegeler 
Zinc Company, as a bookkeeper. After filling the position of bookkeeper 
for about a year and a half, he was made night foreman of the rolling mills, 
and has continued in this position ever since. His long continuance in the 
employ of the zinc company is ample evidence that his service has been 
appreciated. All that he is and has accomplished in life has been achieved 
by diligent and persistent effort on his own part. 

Mr. Cornish holds a membership in the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen of America. 



I 



PAUL WASZKOWIAK. 

Paul Waszkowiak. a merchant of LaSalle, Illinois, is of Polish birth 
and early education. He was born in Poland, Germany, January 15, 1858, 
and is a son of John and Anna (Candeika) Waszkowiak. His father died in 
Poland in 1866, at the age of fifty-two years, and his mother is still living, 
a resident of this coimtry. To them were born the following children: 
John, Frank, Joe, Paul, ]Mary and Anton. Their son John came to this 
country and to LaSalle in 1870, the following year Frank came, and in 
1873 their widowed mother, with three of her children, — Paul, Mary and 
Anton, — also came to LaSalle. The mother, now seventy-four years of 
age, is still living in LaSalle. At the time of her coming to America her son 
Joe was in the German army. He joined the other members of the family 
here in 1875, and at this writing all of them, except Frank, reside in LaSalle. 

Paul, the subject of this sketch, was fifteen years old when he landed 
on American soil. He had gained a fair education in his native language, 
but after coming to this countrv never went to school. However, he has 
learned to read and write as well as speak the English language. Immedi- 
ately after he came to LaSalle he obtained employment as a horse driver in 



500 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

the yards of the ]\Iatthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, at a salary of one 
dollar and ten cents per day. Afterward he was given work in the furnace de- 
partment of the zinc works, at better wages, and for several vears held a posi- 
tion with the company. He saved his earnings and was therebv enabled to 
g'O into business for himself. This he did in the vear 1894. He engaged in 
the grocery and saloon lousiness, in which he has continued, achieving suc- 
cess, building up a good trade, and gaining for himself a splendid reputation 
as a business man. 

In 1879 ^Ir. W'aszkowiak was united in marriage to Miss Bozalija 
Siekieska. and to them have been born five sons and one daughter. He 
and his family are members of the Polish Catholic church, and he belongs 
to the Catholic Order of Foresters. 



SILAS W. WILLIAMS. 



The gentleman here named is a retired paper manufacturer and a ])rom- 
inent citizen of Streator. He was born in Albau}-, A'ermont. on March 
22, 1 84 1, a direct descendant of Roger Williams, of colonial fame, to wit: 
Roger ^^'illiams, Joseph, John. Nathaniel. James, James R.. Cvril, Silas W. 
The grandfather, James R., served in the Revolutionary war, and Darius, 
an uncle, was a soldier in the war of 1812. 

Cyril Williams was born in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1801, and 
was taken by his father, in change of residence, to Vermont in 1807. At 
the same time his grandfather emigrated to that state with them. Cvril 
Williams married Catherine A\'etherbee. of Fitchburg, Massachusetts, a 
daughter of Caleb ^^'etherbee and a granddaughter of Nathan ^^'etherbee 
and Elizabeth Dunton. also of the Bay state. Nathan \\>therbee was a 
minute man of the Re\olution. ]\Irs. Williams attained the remarkable age 
of ninety-three years. 

Silas ^^'. Williams was educated in the public schools of Caledonia 
county. \'ermont. and the Orleans Liberal Institute, of that state. In 
1869 he came to Ottawa, Illinois, and engaged in the manufacture of straw- 
board and straw wrapping paper. He afterward owned paper mills at Day- 
ton, IMarseilles and Streator, all in this county, in 1893 he sold out his 
paper-mill interests to the Columbia Straw Paper Company and retired from 
the manufacturing business, engaging in banking and real estate. He was 
a director of the City National bank, and was the president for some vears 
of the Young Alen's Christian Association. He has also filled the position 
of president of the board of education since 1896. He is an active member 
of the Streator Social Service Club, and also of the Streator Social Club, and 






L^^t^--V^-'^<-'i<:?>^?^- 



I 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. z^oi 



in his religious relations a member of the Park Presbyterian church, in 
\> hich he was for a number of years the president of the board of trustees. 
In politics he is a Democrat, with no ambitions for political ofifice. He 
has the broadness of character to vote for a Republican if he thinks that 
the public welfare will be best promoted thereby. 

In 1873 he married Catherine E. Worthingham, a daughter of Morri- 
son and Sarah Angeline (Barker) Worthingham. Her father was a lieu- 
tenant in the One Hundredth Illinois Regiment in the civil war. and was 
killed at the l^attle of Stone River near Murfreesboro. Tennessee. He was 
but nine vears old when brought to Canada l)y his father in his emigration 
from Enoiand, his native land. Shortlv after their arrival in America his 
father returned to England on business, and died there. Later the son 
came into the United States. Mrs. Williams' grandfather, Benjamin Barker, 
was in the war of 181 2. and her great-grandfather, Zenas Barker, served in 
the war of the Revolution. Her brother, Charles, served in our late war with 
Spain. Her grandmother was Catherine Goodrich, of Roxbury. Connecti- 
cut. The American Goodriches settled in Wethersfield, Connecticut, about 
1643. The familv in England can be traced to an ancestor who fought and 
fell in Harold's army at Hastings in 1066. 

Air. and Mrs. Williams have two children, — Alice Amelia and Blanche 
Catherine. 



WILLIAAI H. NORTON. 

William H. Norton, the superintendent and engineer of the Earlville 
water-works, was born in New Portland. Somerset county, ^Nlaine, October 
17, 1 83 1, a son of William G. and Elmira (Parker) Norton, both natives of 
the Pine Tree state. 

The Norton family is of English origin and was represented in New 
England at an early ])eriod in the history of this country. The Parkers are 
of .Scotch-Irish extraction. Both families were represented in the early 
wars of this country, Grandfather Norton serving in the war of i8t2 and 
Grandfather Parker in the Revolutionary war. 

William G. Norton and wife were the parents of the following named 
children: William H.. the immediate sul)ject oi this review; John P., 
deceased; Ruth P., deceased, was the first wife of W. R. Haight, of Earl- 
ville. Illinois; Octava E.. a widow residing in Jacksonville, Illinois; and 
Sybel, wife of F. H. Hall, the superintendent of the Blind Asylum at 
Jacksonville. Illinois. William (i. Norton left Elaine in the fall of 1849 and 
brought his family to Illinois, locating in Boone county, where they resided 
until the sjiring of 1851, when they removed to Freedom. LaSalle county. 



502 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 



In 1852 they came to Eaiiville, and here the parents spent the closing years 
of their Hves and died. 

In his yonth Wihiam H. Norton obtained a fair academical edncation, 
and when a yonng man engaged in teaching. He tanght his first school in 
the winter of 185 1-2. and for four or live years thereafter spent his time in 
the school-room as teacher. After his marriage, in 1854, Mr. Norton set- 
tled in Earlville, where he has since continnousl}' resided, with the exception 
•of four years, 1873 to 1877, when he lived in Aurora. Illinois. The first 
five years after his marriage he was engaged in farming, and from that 
turned his attention to the grain l)usiness, in \\hich he was occupied at 
the time the civil war came on. He enlisted April 22. 1861, in Company 
D. Twenty-third Illinois Infantry, as a private. This regiment was captured 
in September, 1861. at Lexington, ^Missouri, was paroled three days later 
and was discharged by the United States government. \\'hen it was after- 
ward reorganized ]\Ir. Norton did not enter it. He re-enlisted in August, 
1862, as a private in Company A, One Hundred and Fourth Illinois In- 
fantry, and served until November, 1864, when he was discharged on 
account of ill health. Prominent among the engagements in which he 
participated were the battles of Hartsville. Chickamauga and Missionary 
Ridge and the Atlanta campaign; and. like most veterans of the Union 
:army, he now maintains a membership in the Grand Army of the Repul)lic, 
being identified with McCulloch Post, No. 475. 

For two years* after his return from the army Mr. Norton was in such 
poor health that he was not in any lousiness. \Mien he recovered he was 
for several years engaged in the manufacture of shoes, and for several years 
following that was in the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy 
Railroad Company, being engaged in railroading while in Aurora. In 
1877 we find him dealing in agricultural implements, which he continued for 
seven years. In 1889 he was appointed the postmaster of Earlville, under 
President Harrison's administration, and served as such four years and 
seven months, until a change of administration caused his successor to be 
appointed. In early life he learned the business of stationary engineering, 
and has followed that, at intervals, when not otherwise occupied. Since 
May, 1896, he has held the position of superintendent and engineer of the 
Earlville water-works. INIr. Norton is an ardent Republican, and besides 
the ofifice above referred to he has been honored with other ofificial posi- 
tions. He has served as alderman, town clerk, town assessor, township 
trustee of schools and justice of the peace. He was elected to the last 
named office in 1898. 

Mr. Norton was first married, in 1854, to INIiss Harriet A. Smith. She 
died in 1874, leaving four children. — Lawrence J.. Finette. Harriet and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 503 

Maud. In 1878 he wedded Elizabeth Cook, his present companion. Their 
union has been blessed in the birth of two children. — \"ere and Blanch. 
The latter was drowned at the age of six years! 



JOHN B. PARK. 



John B. Park, a farmer and stock-raiser of Earl township, LaSalle 
county, was born in Greencamp, ]Marion county, Ohio, October 26, 1834, 
and is a son of Ira and ^Matilda (McNeal) Park. His father was a son of 
John Park and was born in the state of Massachusetts, but at the age of 
four or five years death robbed him of both parents and he was sent to 
Ohio, where he grew to man's estate and was married to Matilda McNeal. 
She was born in Ireland and was brought over to this country with her 
parents when she was a child of four and one-half years and was also reared 
in Ohio. Their marriage resulted in the birth of six children, namely, 
Elizabeth, John B., Sarah, Caroline, Levi \\\ and George F.,^ — all of whom 
are now dead but John B. and George F. They left Ohio during the year 
1837 and stopped one year in Holderman's Grove, Illinois, thence went to 
Paw Paw, this state, and two years later to Shabbona, DeKalb county. 
Here they took up their residence on the wild prairie lands of Illinois anfl 
made their home for many years, moving to Leland, Adams township, this 
county, in 1862. Here he kept a hotel for four years, and then bought a 
farm and began farming, residing in Leland two more years. He then 
removed to Shabbona and remained there about two years. Securing land 
in Earl township, LaSalle county, he was next engaged for six years in farm- 
ing in this township. A few years later he retired from the farm, and 
removed to Earlville, where he now resides. His wife died in 1893. 

John B. Park spent his early life in DeKalb county, where he received 
his education in the public schools and assisted his father on the farm. 
He continued to be his father's right-hand man for many years and remained 
in that county until 1870, when he came to LaSalle county and settled in 
Earl township on the 14th of February of that year, on a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, in section 14. He was an industrious, hard-working 
man, and his success in agriculture has been the result of energy and a 
well disciplined mind. Thinking to find a better price for the product of 
his farm he began raising stock, to which he fed his grain and hay, putting 
them on the market when in prime condition and realizing from their sale 
a much larger profit than would have been received from the raw material. 
Since then he has dealt largely in stock, finding that instead of impoverished 
land and ordinary crops he has a ^arm that yields a bountiful harvest and a 



504 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

neat income from the sleek herds always ready for the butcher. He is 
among the best agriculturists in this county and his ideas ha\'e been largely 
adopted by many of his neighbors. 

In 1858 he was joined in marriage to ]\Iiss Rosetta ]\Iarks. by whom he 
had the following children, viz.: Linton A\'., who married Gertrude Labee, 
a daughter of Richard Labee, of this township; he is a farmer here; L"a 
died at the age of two years; George died when two and one-half sunmiers 
had passed over his head; the fourth child died in infancy, as did Jennie E.; 
and the youngest was Eva ^I. Airs. Park was born in 'Xauvoo and was a 
daughter of LaFayette and ^Martha E. (Erost) Alarks, who were among the 
early settlers of DeKalb county, where they lived for many years. The 
father was born in the state of New York and the mother in Elaine. 

Air. Park is a Democrat and for a time ser\-ed as the deputy sheriff and 
tax collector of DeKalb county. He is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Eellows and the Masonic fraternity, and is a man who has won, the 
respect and esteem of all Ijy his upright, honorable bearing. His children 
were educated in Earlville and occupy a prominent place in the social 
circles of their home. 



SAAIUEL E. lOXES. 



Samuel Edward Jones, agent at Earlville. Illinois, for the Chicago, Bur- 
lington and Ouincy Railroad Company, lias held this position since Octoljer 
I. 1895. I^^ li^s been in the employ of this company since September, 1887. 
when, at the age of twenty, he began his railroad career. His lirst service 
was as a Ijill clerk in the freight office at Aurora. Illinois, a position he held 
from September. 1887, to July. 1888. He was then transferred to Xorth 
Aurora, as agent, and was there for a period of six months, after which he 
was made relief agent and as such was on the road for about a year and a 
half, relieving other agents at various stations. Next he was day operator 
at A\'estern Avenue Station, Chicago, six months, following ^^■hich he be- 
came station agent at Grand Ridge. Illinois, a position he filled for seven 
years, and from there being sent to his present place at Earhille. The fact 
that he has remained constantly for so long a period in the employ of the 
same railroad is ample evidence of his ability as station agent and operator. 

Air. Jones was born in Xew Salem. Pennsylvania, January 16. 1867, 
only son and one of a family of three children of William AI. and Alary J. 
(Harn) Jones, natives of Pennsylvania. In 1884 Air. Jones brought his 
familv west, seeking a change of location on account of the ill health of 
our subject, the family home being established at Grand Ridge. Illinois. 
Being of a delicate constitution in his boyhood, Samuel E. was kept away 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 505 

from school much of the time, and thus his eckicational advantages were 
limited. He is practically a self-made man. 

At Grand Ridge, in 1890, Mr. Jones married ]Miss Anna E. Lewis, 
who was born near that place. They are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Mr. Jones' parents still reside at Grand Ridge, Illinois. His father was 
a Union soldier in the civil war, serving as a private in Company C, One 
Hundred and Fourth Illinois Infantr}-, and while engaged in l)att]e at 
Missionary Ridge lost his left arm. 



STEPHEN J. MADDEN. 

A worthy representative of the honored pioneer families of LaSalle 
county. Mr. Madden was born in ^lendota. April 3, 1864. He spent his 
boyhootl days here, and having laid the foundation for a successful busi- 
ness career 1)y acquiring a ])ractical education he learned the machinist's 
trade in his father's machine shops and became a skilled workman. For a 
number of years he was in th.e employ of others, but in 1896 he opened a 
plumbing establishment of his own in Mendota and has since done a large 
business in this line, making a specialty of all kinds of steam and hot-water 
heating a]:)pliances and outfitting. He also takes contracts for plumbing, 
sewer and water works, and has succeeded in l)uilding up an excellent 
business. Soon after his father's death he succeeded to his father's interest 
in the firm of Donohue & ^^ladden, proprietors of the foundr\- and machine 
shops of Mendota. The firm name was unchanged, and now to the two 
branches of the business 'Sir. ]Madden, of this review, devotes all the time 
and attention which he cares to give to liusiness. Inherited al)ility doubt- 
less partially accounts for the success which he has won. and a better ex- 
ample than that afforded him by his honored father could not be found; 
but his own close application, his keen discernment and his untiring industry 
are unmistakable elements in his prosperity, without which inherited ability 
would haN'e been of no avail. 

The marriage of Stephen J. Madden and Miss Maggie Naughtin was 
celebrated on the 3d of September, 1890. Four children have blessed their 
union, namely: Paul. John. ?ylabel and Stella. Air. ]\laddcn and his family 
are communicants of the Catholic clnu-ch. and fraternall}" he is connected 
with the \Modern Woodmen of America, the Independent Order of For- 
esters and the Commercial Club. He has followed in his father's political 
footsteps and is a stalwart Democrat. His fellow townsmen lia\-e elected 
him to the ])osition of alderman and in that office he labored earnestly to 



5o6 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

secure needed improvements and to produce material advancement in 
Mendota. He supported measures toward securing good sidewalks, sewers, 
water-works and other good and substantial improvements, and at all times 
has labored to benefit the city in progressive lines. 



HOSEA FOOTE. 



Hosea Foote, one of the enterprising business men of Earlville, LaSalle 
county, is one of the honored pioneers of this state, his arrival in Illinois 
dating back fifty-five years. A witness of almost the entire development 
of the county, he has contributed his share toward its welfare, and is well 
and favorably known throughout this section. 

The parents of our subject were Nicholas Floyd and Catherine (Beagle) 
Foote, who were natives of New York state. The former was one of the 
five children of Isaac Foote, of English extraction, likewise born in the 
Empire state, and a farmer and lumljerman by occupation. His latter years 
were spent in Illinois, and his death took place upon the homestead of a 
son, south of Earlville. when he was in his eighty-sixth year. Mrs. Cath- 
erine (Beagle) Foote, who died in 1839, was a daughter of John Beagle, a 
farmer, whose birthplace was in New York state, and who was of Dutch 
ancestry. In 1833 Nicholas F. Foote and family removed to Steuben 
county, Pennsyh'ania. and eleven years later came to Illinois. For two 
and a half years they dwelt upon a farm situated a1)out tliree miles from 
Aurora, and then, coming to LaSalle county, they resided upon a farm of 
one hundred and twenty acres, in Earl township, three miles from Earlville. 
A few years prior to his death. ^Ir. Foote retired from active lal)or and 
made his home in Earlville, where he departed this life in July, 1893. in 
his eighty-ninth year. His second wife bore the maiden name of Mary 
Miner, and of the sons and daughters born to them four survive: Nancy, 
Lucinda, Martha and Almira. To the first marriage of Mr. Foote three 
sons and two daughters were born, but only Floyd and Hosea survive. 

Hosea Foote was born in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, January 15, 
1832. Thus he was twelve years of age when the family came to this 
prairie state, and in the district schools he completed his education. After 
leaving home upon attaining his majority, he worked for farmers bV the 
month for a period, after which he was employed for a number of years on 
the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy Railroad, as a foreman of construction 
of the road-bed, part of the time doing contract work. In 1858 he took 
charge of a sawmill near Freedom, and operated it for the proprietor for 
about three years. Afterward he was employed by Sutman & Lighthall, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



507 



of Earlville, for several years, and finally, in 1892, he purchased the sawmill 
here which was owned by Frank Atherton, and has managed it successfully 
ever since, also running a feed mill in connection. A public-spirited citizen, 
he takes a loyal interest in local enterprises. For two terms he served in 
the capacity of alderman, being elected on the Democratic ticket. 

On the 17th of March, 1855, ]Mr. Foote married Miss Isabel, daughter 
of Thomas and Isabel (Beggs) Holgate, and after about a quarter of a 
century of happy wedded life she was called to the home beyond. She was 
then forty-six years of age, a devoted member of the Methodist church. 
Of their five children, Charles H. died at the age of six months, and Mabel, 
who was the wife of Robert Horr, of Mendota, died when her baby girl, 
Mabel, was a week old. Etta is the wife of William Buck, of Earlville; 
and Alice, Mrs. Joseph Schrecengost, also of this town, has five children: 
May, Bert, Carl, lone and Ada. Floyd H., unmarried, is in the employ of 
his father. On the 7th of August, 1885, Hosea Foote wedded ]\Irs. Mary 
Bosard, widow of George L. Bosard and daughter of Cornelius and Fannie 
(Hammond) Beagle. The latter were natives of New York and Pennsyl- 
vania, respectively, the father, of Dutch extraction, having been born and 
reared in Broome county, and the mother in Tioga coimty. Both died 
when in their fiftieth vear, on the old farm in Tioga coiuitv, where thev 
had commenced keeping house, death separating them little more than a 
year. In religious faith he was a Baptist, while she was a Presljyterian, btit 
they were liberal enough to allow each other perfect freedom of opinion. 
His father, John Beagle, was a native of New York state, a farmer, and his 
death occurred when he was still in the prime of manhood. David Ham- 
mond, father of Mrs. Fannie Beagle, was a hero of the war for independence. 
He was born in Connecticut, followed farming as a means of livelihood and 
lived to pass the three-score and ten years spoken of by the Psalmist. ^Nlrs. 
Foote is one of eight children, of whom seven stu'vive. Kate is the wife of 
George Buckbee; Elsie is Airs. John Brimmer; Lizzie is unmarried; Fan- 
nie is the widow of Frank Dodge; Jennie is the wife of John Houck; and 
John Beagle is the only brother living. ]Mr. and ]\Irs. Foote are con- 
sistent members of the Methodist church and in their daily lives they strive 
to mirror the noble principles which they profess and in which they earnestly 
believe. 



MANLEY H. HORTOX. 

Manley H. Horton, Earlville, Illinois, was born in Savoy, Berkshire 
county, ^Massachusetts, February 10, 1843, a son of Ansel and Hannah 
(Thompson) Horton. His ancestors were among the early settlers of 



5oS BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

New Engiand. the Hortons being of Scotch descent and tlie Thompsons of 
English, and 1)oth his father and mother were 1)orn, lived and died in 
Massachusetts. Their family was composed of eight sons and three daugh- 
ters. 

His father a carpenter and builder, Manley H. in his youth learned that 
trade, working under his father. At the age of nineteen, laying down the 
hammer and the saw, he enlisted, September i. 1862, as a private in 
Company .V, Eorty-ninth Massachusetts Infantry, for a term of nine 
months, an.d \\as hc^norably discharged September i, 1863, havirig served 
three months more than his term of enlistment. Among the engagements 
in v;hich he participated were the siege of Port Hudson and the battles of 
Hudson I'lains and Donaldson^'ille. 

At the close of his army service young Horton returned to his home in 
Massachusetts and resumed work at his trade. In 1876 he came v>est to 
Illinois and located in Earlville. where he followed his trade live years, at 
the end of that time mo\-ing to a farm in Lee count}', this state, where he was 
engaged in agricultural pursuits ten years, and at the same time did some 
contract work in Iniilding. in 1891 he mo\ed to Marathon, lov.a, where he 
invested in land, liuying a cpiarter section, which he improved and subse- 
quently sold at a good profit. He also in\-ested in other lands there and 
bought a drug store in the town of Marathon, which is conducted by liis 
son-in-law. Mr. Horton made his home in Marathon until 1896. March 
1st of that year he returned to Earlville and has since resided here. The 
pleasant and attractive iKime he now occu})ies he erected in 1898. Recently 
he met with an accident which crippled his knee and he is now unable to 
do active work. 

Mr. Horton was married, in 1865, in Massachusetts, to Miss Emaline 
Carpenter, a native of the same town in which he was born and a repre- 
sentative of one of the old families of the place. She died in 1873, leaving 
three children. — Edna, Herbert, and Etta. In 1874 he married Mary A. 
Blood, a native of Cheshire, ^Massachusetts, and they have four children, — 
Howard, LeRoy, Imogene and Harry. 

]\Ir. Horton is politically a Republican and fraternally a ]\Iason. 



JOHN C. MADDEN. 



lohn C. Madden, deceased, was a pioneer citizen and highly respected 
business man of ]\Iendota. Illinois. He was born in Bandon. County Cork, 
Ireland. June 17, 1830, and was a son of Stephen and Hannorah (Hurley) 
]Madden. The father was a native of countv ^[eath, Ireland, born m the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 509 

last year of the eighteenth century, and his death occurred in Alendota 
about 1876. The subject of this review accompanied liis parents on their 
emioration to .America when a1)out four \-ears old. the fami!\- locating in 
Taunton, Massachusetts, where he passed his boyhood days. acc[uirino- a 
good connnon-school education. He also served an apprenticeship to the 
trades of carpenter and pattern-maker, thus thoroughly ec[uipping himself 
for a successful business career. He was reared under the parental roof and 
earl}- taught the imi)ortance of industry and perseverance in the affairs of 
life. The survi\ing children of his father's family are: Mrs. Peter Dono- 
hue. of Mendota; and Mrs. Chester Ste\'ens. of ^^^ichita. Kansas. 

Realizing that the Ijroad ])rairies of Illinois would pro\'e an ad\-an- 
tageous field of labor for ambitious young men Mr. Madden came to La- 
Salle count}- in 1832 and for se\'eral months devoted himself to the work 
of cari)entering and building. In the spring of 1853 he returned to Taun- 
ton. Massachusetts, and on the 4th of April of the same year was united 
in marriage, in St. Mary's Catholic church, of that city, to Miss Marv Sulli- 
van, who shared with him the joys and sorrows of life until he was called 
to the home beyond. Immediately after their marriage the young couple, 
accompanied by his ])arents. came to Illinois, taking up their residence upon 
a farm al)out four nn'les north of Mendota. 

There Mr. Madden remained until 1855. when he removed tu the city 
and became associated with others in the organization of the Eagle Manu- 
facturing Company formed for the purpose of manufacturing gang plows. 
The company was succeeded by another in which the leading stockholders 
were Mr. Madden, Peter Donohue, Warren Clark and William Rockford. 
In i860 this company sold its interests to the firm of Donohue & Madden, 
the latter gentlemen establishing a foundr}- and machine shop, in which 
they engaged in the manufacture of wagons and agricultural implements. 
The partnership was continued uninterruptedly and most harmoniously 
up to the time of Mr. Madden's death, and the business was one of marked 
success, for years being numbered among the substantial enterprises of the 
city. The firm of Donohue & Madden underwent no change after Mr. • 
Madden's death. sa\-e that his son Stephen J. succeeded to his interest in the 
business. 

Unto our subject and his wife, who was a native of Ireland, nine chil- 
dren were born, one of whom, Charles T. Madden, died recently. He served 
as postmaster of Mendota. and was well and favorably known. The surviv- 
ing children are: George H.. of the Germania Bank of Mendota; Stephen 
J., his father's successor in business; John F.. an attorney at law; Edward 
T.. a bank cashier; Mary, wife of A. H. Eagan. of Evansville; and Emma. 
Mrs. Madden also survives her husband, and is one of the most estimable 



510 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

ladies in the city, having a large circle of warm friends in the community 
where she has so long resided. 

]\fr. ]\Iadden passed away March i6, 1897, ^i""^^ ^"lis death was the cause 
of much sorrow in Mendota, as he was universally respected and liked here. 
In the management of his financial aft'airs he was very enterprising and 
successful, and his course was marked by the highest integrity. His em- 
ployes and associates in business had for him warm regard, and his genial 
and cheery manner and his strong and hearty sympathy with those in 
trouble won him lasting friends. He was a public-spirited citizen, always 
ready to assist in promoting laudable enterprises, and was a man of worth 
to the community. He served as alderman and as school trustee and in 
those official capacities sought to advance the welfare of the people whom 
he represented. His integrity was ever above question, and his memory 
will ever be cherished by those who enjoyed his friendship. 

"His life was noble and the elements 
So mixed in him that Nature might stand up 
And sav to all the world. 'This was a man.' " 



NORMAN J. GARY. 

Not often does it fall to the lot of a man, years before he has reached 
his prime, to occupy such responsible positions of trust as Norman J. Gary 
has held; but he has proved eminently worthy and capable of meeting every 
requirement of his difficult offices. Ambitious to succeed, he was ready for 
advancement when the opportunity presented itself, had faith in himself, 
and by faithful, persistent labor has managed to carry out the plans of his 
early manhood. 

Norman J. Gary is proud of the fact that he is a native son of Illinois, 
and that the major portion of his life has been spent in LaSalle county, to 
whose, interests his own are wedded. A son of Gharles A. and Mary J. 
(BlakesleeJ Gary, our subject was born in LaSalle, Illinois, June 2, 1855. In 
1868 he removed to Ghicago with his parents, and attended the schools 
of that city, his education being completed in Bryant & Stratton's Business 
Gollege. In 1872 he accepted a position in the office of James Glark, then 
at the head of what was known as the Utica Gement Association, in Ghi- 
cago. and continued with that firm for a period of fire years, establishing 
his value, his fidelity and interest in his employer's affairs. In 1878 he 
vielded to the advice of some of his friends and entered the wholesale house 
of Marshall Field, of Ghicago. remaining there but a year, however, and 
then returning, in 1879, to the employ of ^Ir. Glark in Utica. In 1883, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 511 

when the Utica HydrauHc Cement Company was organized, ]\Ir. Cary be- 
came one of the stockholders and was chosen as secretary and treasurer 
ot the new concern. In 1898 he was given similar positions in the Utica 
Cement Manufacturing Company, and in both of these now flourishing 
enterprises he retains his original offices. In 1888. when the (James) 
Clark's bank, of Utica, came into existence, Mr. Cary was chosen to serve as 
its cashier, and is still acting in that capacity, Mrs. M. J. Clark being president 
of the institution, as well as occupying the same office in the Utica Hydraulic 
Cement Company, and also the Utica ]\Ianufacturing Company. Mr. Cary 
is one of the directors in the bank, and to his judicious management must 
be attributed a large share of the success which has attended it from the 
first. 

An important event in the life of our subject was his marriage, March 
24, 1885, to Miss Manda ]\I. Collins, a daughter of Cassius A. and Mary J. 
(Sanger) Collins, of Utica. The elder child of Mr. and Mrs. Cary is Clar- 
ence C, born December 22, 1886, and now attending the University of 
Notre Dame at South Bend, Indiana. The younger son, Clark B., born 
'April 19, 1890, is a pupil in the public schools of Utica. 

Though not a politician in the sense of seeking or desiring public office, 
]\Ir. Cary takes a lively interest in local and national affairs, and uses his 
ballot and influence in favor of the Republican party. In the fraternities he 
ranks deservedly high. In the Masonic order he has taken the thirty- 
second degree, and is active in Acacia Lodge, Xo. 67, A. F. and A. M.; 
Peru Chapter, No. 60, R. A. ]\I.; Peru Council, No. 12, R. and S. M., 
and St. John's Commandery, No. 26. K. T., of Peru; and in 1893 was ad- 
mitted to the Oriental Consistory, at Chicago. He is also a member of 
Medina Temple, A. A. O. N. ]\I. S., also of Chicago. In these various 
organizations he has occupied many of the important offices; was conductor 
of the council from 1892 to 1893; and is at present thrice illustrious master 
of the council; was the worshipful master of Acacia Lodge from 1895 to 
1897; and was the eminent commander of St. John's Commandery from 
1897 to 1898 inclusive. In all of his relations with his fellow men, whether 
in business, society or the home circle, Mr. Cary is upright, true and just, 
winning the esteem and admiration of all who know him. 



ARTHUR J. HERRCKE. 

Arthur J. Herrcke, bookkeeper in charge of the purcliasing and dis- 
bursing department of the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, LaSalie, 
Illinois, was born in Prussia, Germany, May 6, 1861. 

He is a son of Ernest and Henrietta (\'on Wellatovski) Plerrcke, both 



512 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

natives of Danzig. Prussia, Germany. The father had in liis veins a mixture 
of German and Frencli l)lood. his paternal ancestors being purely German 
while on the maternal side they were French, some members of the family 
having gone from France to Germany in the time of the reign of Napoleon 
the Great. On his mother's side the immediate subject of this sketch is of 
Polish origin, his great-grandfather having l)een Graf A^on ^^'ellatovski. 
Arthur J. is the second of a family of four children, the others l)eing Charles, 
Robert and }^Iax. all natives of Germany. The mother with her children 
came to America in the year 1867. and joined the father in Janesville, Wis- 
consin, he ha\'ing come to this countr\- the pre\'ious vear. His original 
intention was to go to South America, but on cirri^•ing at Cuba he changed 
his plans and came to the United States, locating iirst in Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin. From there he went to Janesville and came thence to LaSalle, Illi- 
nois, in the year 1869. He came to LaSalle to take charge of the sales de- 
partment of the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, a position he held 
up to the time of his death, in May, 1885, at the age of fiftv-one years. His 
widow is still a resident of LaSalle. 

Arthur J. Herrcke was six years old when he was brought to America. 
He was reared in LaSalle. Illinois, and educated in its public schools. At 
the age of fourteen he entered the employ of the same company with which 
his father was connected, the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, and as 
messenger boy began his ser\'ice in this establishment. During the years 
he served as messenger boy he attended night sessions in a business col- 
lege and thus learned practical bookkeeping. That was from 1878 to 
1880. At the same time he had charge of the company's printing office. 
He was transferred from the messenger position to c^ne in the sales depart- 
ment, and was promoted to his present position, that of bookkeeper in 
charge of the purchasing and disbursing department, in 1886. His entire 
service with the company has been characterized b}' promptness and fidelity, 
and that his faithfulness has been appreciated is evidenced l)y his promotion 
and continuance with the same concern. 

Mr. Herrcke was married in LaSalle, in 1888, to Miss Adela Moeller, 
daughter of Frederick and Bertha Moeller. Her father was born in Saxony. 
Germanv, and when fourteen years of age was brought to this countrv bv 
his parents who located in Mineral Point, Wisconsin, whence they subse- 
quently came to LaSalle. Illinois. Mr. Moeller was a brother of Mrs. F. W. 
]\Iatthiessen. of LaSalle. Mrs. Herrcke's grandparents resided many years 
in LaSalle and her grandfather was an ore purchaser for the Matthiessen 
& Hegeler Zinc Company. Mrs. Herrcke's mother was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, of German parentage, and is the mother of eight children, two of 
whom are deceased: and she now resides in LaSalle. Mrs. Herrcke's father 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 513 

died in 1892. Her maternal grandfather, Fredrick Ehemann, went west 
during the gold excitement of 1849, prospered, returned home, and then 
went west again and was never heard from. It is believed he was murdered 
for his money, for he had a large sum. Mr. and Mrs. Herrcke have five 
children — Ernest, Otto, Hildagard, Ralph and Florence. Mr. Herrcke 
is a Repul)lican. 



JA^IES WOOL LARABEE. 

With particular pleasure we trace the history of this gallant hero of 
the great ci\il war, who gave some of the best years of his early man- 
hood to his country and to the preservation of that Union which is now 
indissolubly united in aims, ambitions and spirit. Success and wealth have 
come to him in later years as the just reward of honest toil and duties 
well performed, but the crown of his manhood ever has been his loyalty to 
his country in peace and war. 

The Larabees are of French extraction, and our subject's paternal 
grandfather, Willett Larabee, was a native of \^ermont, in which state he 
lived and was engaged in farming until his death, which event occurred 
when he was but forty years of age. Of his seven children, all but one of 
whom were sons, Willett, born two }-ears prior to the close of last century, 
became the father of James Wool Larabee. He followed agriculture, and 
at an early day removed to Xew York state, where he died in 1853. His 
first wife was a Miss Rachel Winton, by whom he had two children: 
Willett, now a resident of Nebraska, and Rachel, who married Daniel Van- 
dercarr and is deceased. The second wife bore the maiden name of Mary 
Wool, she being a daughter of James \A"ool, a native of Xew York state 
and a hero of the war for independence. He was a successful farmer and 
a man of influence in his community, e^"ery one calling him "L'ncle Jimmie." 
He lived to attain the advanced age of ninety-six years, his death taking- 
place in the Empire state. ^Irs. Aviary (Wool) Larabee was liorn in Xew 
York, and died in 1864. when in her sixty-sixth year. She was the mother 
of two children: James W.. of this sketch, and ^Mary. who l^ecame the 
wife of Timothy Carpenter and has passed to the silent land. \\ illett 
Larabee, Sr., was a member of the Methodist church, while his wife, who 
was a Baptist in creed, was identified with the Presbyterian church for 
some years. 

The birth of James W. Larabee occurred in Rensselaer county, Xew 
York, December 5. 1838. He learned farming in its varied forms, and in 
1855 came to LaSalle county, where he believed that he would find greater 
opportunities for making his own way in the world. His half-brother, 



514 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Willett, was living here, and the young man entered his employ, and con- 
tinued to work by the month for several years for him. Having accumu- 
lated a small amount of money by the time that the civil war broke out, 
he invested a part of it in a team and had negotiated for the renting of a 
tract of land preparatory to farming. The firing upon Fort Sumter awak- 
ened all of his patriotic ardor and indignation, and, abandoning all of his 
personal plans, he promptly responded to the president's first call for 
volunteers to check the rebellion. Enlisting in the three-months service, 
in Company H, Twelfth Illinois \"olunteer Infantry, he returned home 
at the expiration of his term, only to sell his team, adjust a few items 
in his affairs, and then to re-enlist in the Fifty-fifth Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, with which regiment he continued until the spring of 1864. He 
then veteranized and resumed his place in the ranks of the Fifty-fifth, 
serving until the close of the war. and being honorably discharged in Au- 
gust, 1865, after four years and five months of actual army life. He par- 
ticipated in many of the memorable and important campaigns of the war, 
taking part in the following named battles, among others: Shiloh, Corinth, 
luka, Memphis, Hernando, Grand Gulf, Arkansas Post, Haines' Bluff, 
Champion Hills, Black River and the famous siege of Yicksburg. He was 
wounded at Shiloh, in the right arm. and was again wounded at Mcks- 
burg. In the last named engagement he was one of the sixty brave sol- 
diers who volunteered to storm the fort, and thirty-one of whom w?re 
killed in making the heroic attempt. For this valorous feat he was pre- 
sented with a medal by the government, it bearing the simple Imt impres- 
sive sentence, "for conspicuous gallantry in action at A'icksburg. Mississippi, 
May 22, 1863." During his ser^■ice he was promoted from the ranks to 
the posts of corporal and sergeant. 

Upon returning from the southern battle-fields, Mr. Larabee re- 
sumed his interrupted labors as a farmer, and on the 9th of the following 
November, 1865. was united in marriage with ]\Iiss ]\Iary E. Haight, who 
has been a faithful helpmate. She is a daughter of S. J. and Lura (Miller) 
Haight. Seven children were born to our subject and wife, namely: Sam- 
uel John Flaight, James AV.. Jr.. Willett Ralph. Louis Benjamin, Mary E., 
Charles D. and one who died in infancy. S. J. H. Larabee married Miss 
Emma Lawrence, and is engaged in the practice of law in Chicago. J. W., 
Jr., married Almira Howard and has four children, namely: Goldie. Emma, 
Jimmie and Samuel. Willett R. married Ethel Barrett and has a son, 
Willett R. J. W.. Jr.. and Willett R. are both living in Lee county, and 
the younger children of our subject are yet at home. 

After his marriage, ]\Ir. Larabee rented a farm of ninety acres, and 
aided by his young wife proceeded to win a competence. At the end of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 515 

two years he was al)le to buy two linndred acres of his present farm, on 
section 4, Meriden township, which lie has since increased in extent to 
three hundred and twenty acres. His wife owns two hundred and eighty 
acres and thus their united possessions are six hundred acres. He raises 
good stock, horses, cattle and hogs, and is one of the successful farmers 
of this region. 

Politically Mr. Larabee has never allied himself to any party, as he 
prefers to be entirely independent. Both he and his wife are devoted mem- 
bers of the jMethodist Episcopal church, and of late years he has given his 
ballot to the Prohibition party candidates in national elections, as he believes 
that the liquor traffic is the paramount issue of the present day. Fraternally 
he is a member of the W. H. Thompson Post, G. A. R., of Paw Paw, 
Illinois. 



WILLIAM T. M'KINNEY. 

\\'illiam T. McKinney, a dry-goods merchant and one of the leading 
business men of the town of Earlville. Illinois, has been identified with the 
interests of this place for the past thirty-three years. He is a native of the 
Keystone state, born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, April 28, 1833, a son 
of William and Anna (McKitt) McKinney, who were born, lived and died 
in that county. The father was twice married and by his first wife had 
eleven children, of whom the subject of our sketch is one; by his second 
marrias:e there were four children. In his native countv, near the town 
of Lewistown, William T. was reared, and in the common schools of the 
neighborhood he received his earh- education. This was supplemented by 
three years and a half in a newspaper office, where he served an apprentice- 
ship, which was equal to a schooling to him. Afterward he went to Philadel- 
phia, where for over twelve years he was a compositor on a newspaper. He 
remained in Philadelphia tmtil 1866, that year coming west and taking 
up his abode in Earlville. 

In the meantime, al)out 1853, a brother of our subject, H. T. McKin- 
ney, familiarly known as Hank ]\IcKinney, had come to Illinois and obtained 
a clerkship at Earlville. Not long afterward he engaged in the general 
merchandise business on his own account, and for several years, until the 
fall of 1872, he conducted a successful business here. Since that date he 
has been a resident of Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

^^'hen William T. McKinney came to Earlville, !March 4, 1866, it was to 
accept a position as a bookkeeper and clerk in his brother's store. After- 
ward he clerked for A. B. Breese, and after the death of Mr. Breese, 
in the spring of 1892, Mr. ]\IcKinnev became a partner in the business 



5i6 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

witli Mrs. Breese. widow of his former employer, and since April 25th of 
that }"ear has had charge of the store. 

Mr. McKinney is a man of many estimable traits of character and 
during his long residence in Earhille has gained the confidence and esteem 
of all who ha^'e in an\- wav been associated with him. 



FRAXXIS CORLEY. 



Francis Corle}'. the first engineer of the LaSalle city water works and 
electric light plant, was born in Bureau county. Illinois, Xo^■emi3er 18. 1852, 
and is a son of Martin and Sarah (Bigelow) Corley. His father was a 
farmer who emigrated from the old country to America, coming by stage 
from Chicago, in 1841, to Bureau count}-, and locating near Arlington. 
At that time there was but one house between Arlington and Peru, and 
the nearest market was Chicago, to which place the grain was hauled 
by wagon. Droves of deer were a common sight on the prairies, and 
often the table of the frontiersman was graced b}' a dish of venison, a 
luxury unknown at this time. ]\Iartin Corley was industrious and frugal, 
and scKMi became prominent and well-to-do. At the time of his death, 
in 1873, lis ^"^"^s sixty-seven years of age, and owned five hundred and 
twenty acres of land. The country l)egan to be more thickly settled about 
this time and he was chosen as a highway commissioner, and in the early 
days was a tax collector. His wife was Sarah Bigelow. who was a natixe 
of A'ermont and whose ancestors were soldiers in the colonial and Revolu- 
tionary wars. One of her brothers. John Bigelow, a nati\'e of St. Albans, 
Vermont, was a large land-owner and died suddenly in Sacramento, Cali- 
fornia, in middle life, during his candidacy for the govern.orship of that 
state. 

Francis Corley was reared on his father's farm in Bureau county, and 
received such educational advantages as were to be derived from the 
district schools at that time. He remained at home, helping with the work 
until he was grown to manhood. In 1890 he came to LaSalle to accept 
the position of engineer in the City Electric Railway. December 2j, 
1887. he was married to Miss ^lary I. ]\IcGann. a daughter of Thomas 
and ?^Iary McGann. They have three children: A'ivian, Louisa and Thomas. 
Mr. and Mrs. Corley are members of the Roman Catholic church. He 
is a strong Democrat in his political beliefs and takes an active interest 
in the success of that party. Fraternally he belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen of America. His residence is at the intersection of Eleventh and 
]\Iarquette streets. LaSalle, where he has a comfortable home. Of his 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 517 

ten brothers and sisters, eight are stiH hving, three brothers having 
served through the RebelHon. They are: Daniel, a member of the First 
IlHnois Artillery, now a resident of Fremont, Nebraska; John, who 
served in the Seeond ^Missouri .\rtillery, and now is a citizen of Peru; 
Stephen, of the Ninety-third Illinois Infantry, is now a ^Montana ranch- 
man; Francis, the subject of this biography; Emma, wife of \\'. W. Grimes, 
of Denver. Colorado; Agnes, wife of Clinton Cassidy, of Arlington, Illi- 
nois; Miriam, wife of H. \\\ Loehr. of Hinsdale, this state; and ]\Iary, 
wife of Thomas McDonald, a resident of Corley, a town in Iowa, Shelby 
coun.tv, named in honor of the familv. 



E. J. LENZEN. 

Professor Aegidius Joseph Lenzen is the well known music dealer and 
able instructor in vocal and instrumental music, located at No. 191 7 Fourth 
street, Peru, LaSalle county, Illinois. He is a native of the beautiful 
Rhine country, having first seen the light of day in Liiiz, Germanv, May 
31, 1846. He- was one of seven children, four of whom are living, born 
to John C. and Anna Barbara (Nelles) Lenzen. These children are; 
Aegidius Joseph, our subject; Theressa. wife of Robert Mossbach; Aloysius 
C. and Henry. The 'father was a cooper by ^•ocation and plied his trade 
in his native countr}-, ha^•^ng learned it of his father, Henr}- Lenzen. who 
was also a cooper and died in Linz in 1802, leaving four sons and one daugh- 
ter. He was married to Anna B. Nelles, whose father was born on the 
opposite side of the Rhine, in France, and fought in the battle of \\'aterloo 
and was a private under the great Napoleon. Although he resided in 
the town of Koenigsfeldt. he owned considerable land and was well off. 
In 1857, John C. Lenzen came with his family to America and located in 
Peru, where he worked at his trade. In 1888 the wife and mother died, aged 
about sixty-two years. The following year he returned to the fatherland, 
where he died in 1S95. ^^ the age of seventy-one years. Both were mem- 
bers of the Catholic church and esteemed by every one who knew 
them. 

Professor Lenzen was a lad of eleven years when the famil}' sought a 
home in this country. His primary education was received in the schools 
of Germany, noted for their excellence. After coming here he attended 
the public scliools of Peru and later took private instructions under Pro- 
fessor Rheinhart. He first learned the cooper's trade, working at it until 
he was twenty-one. In 1869 he went with his parents on a farm and fol- 
lowed the life of an agriculturist for eight vears more. Tins work, however, 



5i8 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

was not congenial to his taste and he returned to town and turned his 
attention to music, for which lie was pecuHarly adapted. He taught voice 
culture and also gave instruction on the cornet and all kinds of instruments, 
making a specialty of bands. He also furnishes musical supplies and instru- 
ments to those wishing to purchase, and carries a nice line of these goods. 
He was united in marriage to Miss Teresa Kilduff. who has borne 
him six children — four sons and two daughters. These are Anna Lucile. 
Liszt Joseph, Verdi, Kent Anthony, Helen Teresa and Aloysius. The 
professor and his wife are members of the Catholic church, and he is a 
Republican politically. He has lived in Peru since 1857, or in the vicinity, 
and has made many friends here. Three years ago he purchased the pleas- 
ant home which he now occupies and where the casual visitor is sure of 
spending a delightful hour. 



ADOLPH F. HERZIG. 



Adolph F. Herzig. foreman in the machinists" department of the 
Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Works. LaSalle, is, like many of the employes 
of that establishment, a native of Oberhausen. Germany, born September 
3, 1858. a son of Adolph and ]\Iary (Kottenbach) Herzig. and one of a 
family of four children, whose names in order of birth are as follows: Adolph 
F. ; Otto, a machinist of Chicago; Ida, married and living in Chicago; and 
Evvald, also a machinist of Chicago. 

Adolph F. was reared in his native land, receiving there the rudiments 
of an education and learning the trade of machinist. For a time he was 
employed in a large steel works and later in the shipyard at \\^ilhelm's 
Haven. When a young man he left Germany, in order to avoid the army 
service required by law in that country, and came to America, landing in 
Baltimore. Maryland, February 22. 1879. From that city he immediately 
came west to Missouri and secured employment on a cattle ranch near 
Kansas City. He landed in this country without means and with but little 
education, knowing not a word of English, but during the year he spent 
in Missouri he learned to speak English and has since learned to read 
and write it; and while his advantages for schooling were limited he has 
in the broad school of experience picked up a fund of useful informa- 
tion. 

Mr. Herzig's brother Otto came to the United States in 1880 and 
secured employment in the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc ^^''orks in LaSalle. 
Illinois, and the same year Adolph F. joined him here and also entered the 
employ of this concern. \\"orking together and saving their money. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 519 

the brothers soon accumulated money enough to send for their parents, 
which they did in 1881. They came and settled in LaSalle, but soon after- 
ward removed to Chicago and there the father died, in 1885, at the age 
of fifty-three years. The mother then returned to LaSalle, where she 
now resides. 

Adolph F. Herzig has been continuously in the employ of the 
Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company since he came here with the excep- 
tion of two years, 1885 to 1887, during which time he ran a machine shop of 
his own in LaSalle. At the end of the two years, on resuming work with 
the company, he was made foreman, which position he has since filled. He 
has an excellent reputation both as a skilled machinist and as a trusted 
employe, and it may be added that his success in life is due to his own 
efforts. 

October 18, 1881, Mr. Herzig married Miss Kunigunda Seiwerth, of 
German birth and a native of his own town, and they have six children, 
viz.: Helena, Jacob, William, Adela, Adolph and Ferdinand. 

The family belong to the Roman Catholic church and Mr. Herzig is 
a pronounced Republican in politics. 



LEOPOLD C. JANZ. 



America can boast of no better or more patriotic citizens than those 
which Germany has furnished her, and in every community throughout 
the length and breadth of this great land the sons of the fatherland are 
aiding materially in the working out of the problems of our nation and are 
contributing loyally to her prosperity. One of the leading German-Ameri- 
can citizens of Peru, LaSalle county, is the gentleman whose name intro- 
duces this sketch. 

Born in Prussia, Germany, not far from the city of Jastrof, on the 
17th of May, 1854, Leopold C. Janz is a son of Charles and Charlotte 
(Stark) Janz. Both were natives of the same locality as our subject, and 
it was not until 1892 that they came to the United States, here to pass 
their declining years. The father was a carpenter by trade and followed 
that occupation until he was well along in years, and now is living retired, 
having amassed a competence. He came from a representative family, and 
his brother Martin held the responsible position of mayor of the town 
of Osofge. Both of the grandfathers of our subject lived and died in 
Germany. 

Li his boyhood Leopold C. Janz obtained an excellent education in 
the public schools of his native land, ^^'hen he was about fifteen years 



520 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



of age he began learning the shoemaker's trade, which he has followed 
ever since. In 1873. when in his twentieth year, he sailed westward to 
found a home and to dwell among the people of this great republic. Com- 
ing to Peru, he found employment at his trade, and worked for others until 
1882, when he embarked in business on his ow'U account, and has since 
carried on a flourishing trade, as a boot and shoe merchant. He uses 
his ballot in behalf of the Republican party and belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen of America. 

On the 22d of January, 1888, the marriage of '\h\ Janz and Miss 
Josephine Schubeker, a daughter of Joseph Schubeker, of Peru, was sol- 
emnized. They have three children — Charley, Joseph and Clara. Their 
comfortable home, which is situated on St. Louis street, is owned by the 
estimable couple. In religious belief ^Nlr. Janz is a Lutheran, while his 
wife is a Catholic. 



CHARLES BRUNNER. 



There is a lesson to ambitious and struggling young men in the story 
of the endeavors and triumphs of a leading manufacturer like Charles Brun- 
ner, of Peru, Illinois, who has made his way to a high position in the business 
world from a position of comparative helplessness and against formidable 
obstacles. 

Charles Brunner was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, March 5, 
1841, a son of August and Johanna (Roth) Brunner. who had three chil- 
dren, one of whom. Amelia, is dead, and another of whom, Hermann, is a 
well known brewer of Peru, Illinois. The elder Brunner, who was a machin- 
ist and foundryman, had the management of an extensive manufacturing 
establishment in Germany and never came to America. Charles left school 
at the age of fourteen and was employed by a mercantile establishment three 
years, and in 1858 came to America and spent a few months in and near 
New York city. Then, in the spring of 1859, he came west and located in 
Peru. He began his career in Peru as a dry-goods clerk for about three 
years. Then, in partnership with William Ranch, he engaged in the 
grocery trade, in which he continued successfully about three years and a 
half. He disposed of his interest in this business, and in 1868, with others, 
under the name of Foote, Brunner & Company, established a machine shop, 
foundry and boiler works in Peru. In 1874 Mr. Foote. one of his partners, 
died, and Mr. Norman Snow accjuired an interest in the business and the 
style of the firm was changed to Brunner »& Snow. In 1878 Mr. Snow 
sold his interest to j\Ir. Brunner and retired from the firm, which has since 
been known by Mr. Brunner's name alone. ]\Ir. Brunner has enlarged his 





'/^Z^^^^-'X-'t-T-^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 521 

plant from time to time as demands for increased manufacturing facilities 
have dictated, and his establishment is not only the only foundry and 
machine shop in Peru but is also one of the largest of its kind in the west. 
It comprises a foundry, machine shop and boiler works, fitted up for the 
manufacture of specialties, of which Mr. Brunner is patentee, including 
the Brunner gas and gasoline engines, pulleys, clutches, shafting, boxings, 
hangers, pumping jacks, power pumps and all kinds of elevator machinery, 
and the Acme and Brunner scales, of which Mr. Brunner is the inventor. 

]\Ir. Brunner was married in 1861 to Elizabeth Rausch, a native of 
Peru, and they have five children: Amelia, Sidonia, Lillie, Jennie and 
Fannie. He is an infiuential Republican and has been five times elected as 
alderman of Peru, a sufticient indication of his personal popularity, and has 
served in that capacity ten years with an eye single to the public interests. 
He is a member of the German Lutheran church. He was made a Mason 
nearly thirty years ago and has advanced to the degree of Knight Templar 
and is a Mystic Shriner. He is identified also with the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen and with the order of. Modern Woodmen of the World. 
He is a director in the company controlling the Peru Plow Works and in 
the LaSalle Pressed Brick Company, and is interested more or less inti- 
mately in other important industrial enterprises. 



MARTIX L. GRIFFITH. 



One of the prominent representatives of the journalistic profession 
in tliis section of the state is the gentleman whose name heads this brief 
notice, the well-known editor of The Gazette-Express, of Earlville, Illinois. 
He is numbered among the native sons of this state, his birth having 
occurred April 10. i860, at Farmer City (then Mount Pleasant), De Wht 
county. Illinois. His father, John Griffith, a veteran of the civil war. was 
born in Pickaway county, Ohio, and in early manhood married Aliss Ma- 
linda E. Clearwater, a native of Mount Pleasant, already mentioned, and 
a daughter of Nathan and 'Slavy AI. Clearwater, who came to this state from 
Indiana and were one of the first four white families to settle in that neigh- 
borhood. 

In 1879 ]\Iartin L. Griffith commenced learning the printer's trade 
in the ofiice of The Public Reaper, at Farmer City, and in 1885 pur- 
chased the plant, which he moved to Dana, Indiana, but sold it two years 
later. He went to Xorth Dakota in 1889 and was there engaged in news- 
paper work for himself two years, and for the same length of time worked 
in the state printing-oftice at Bismarck. He returned to Illinois in 1893 



522 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and the same year purchased The Gazette published at Earlville. Two 
years later the paper was consolidated with the Leland Express, owned 
by A. L. Hall, and the firm of Hall & Griffith conducted the paper known 
as the LaSalle County Gazette-Express; but on the 4th of February, 1899, 
Mr. Hall's interest was purchased by 'M. L. Griffith & Company, the com- 
pany being Dr. D. M. Vosburgh. The paper is now published by that 
firm, and is one of the leading journals of the county and a staunch sup- 
porter of Republican principles in politics. 

Mr. Griffith is an able newspaper man, is a good writer and has a 
thorough comprehension of every department of the work, so that he is 
conducting the paper with consummate skill and ability. He is unmar- 
ried. His mother, four brothers and one sister are still living. 



GEORGE HAFFELE. 



No one is more deserving of success than is the man who begins the 
battle of life empty-handed and by honest toil, continued through a long 
period, accumulates a competence. Such a task, with the additional care 
and responsibility of rearing several children to maturity, fitting them to 
take part in the struggle for a livelihood, is no light undertaking; and the 
one who has successfully performed these duties is worth}^ of sincere re- 
spect, as in the case of the subject of this article. 

George Hafifele, now living retired from business cares, in Peru, is 
a native of Alsace-Lorraine, his birth having occurred in April, 1836. He 
is a grandson of John Haft'ele, who was a carpenter b}' trade and lived 
and died in Germany. The parents of our subject were John and Kath- 
erine (Harmesser) Hafifele, both natives of Alsace-Lorraine. The mother 
was a daughter of Anton Harmesser. (She had a brother whose death 
was caused by the falling of a tree upon him.) Mrs. Haffele was one of 
six children, and by her marriage she became the mother of eight children, 
two of w^hom died in childhood, leaving two sons and four daughters. Our 
subject is the only survivor. The father, who did farming upon a small scale, 
died in Germany, in 1872, when sixty years of age. His wife departed 
this life some two years previously. 

After he had gained a fair general education and had mastered the 
various branches of farming, George Haffele decided to try his fortune in 
America. Crossing the ocean in 1866 he took up his residence in Henry 
county, Illinois, where he found employment with farmers. He was in- 
dustrious and economical, and the result was that he soon had a little 
capital which he invested in ten acres of land. To this he afterward added 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 523 

another ten-acre tract, then twenty acres more, and by this time he was 
prospering, and spnrred on to fresh efforts. As the years rolled by he 
was enabled to buy forty acres at one time, a farm of like size some time 
later, and finally eighty-five acres, thus making his possessions amount to 
over two hundred acres. On this homestead he reared his children and 
passed the prime of his life, winning the respect of his neighbors and ac- 
quaintances by his manly, upright conduct. He still owns the old place 
in Henrv county, it being cultivated and managed by his son-in-law, Robert 
Clemens. AVhile living there he did not neglect his duties as a citizen, 
and for fifteen years served in the capacity of school director. Until re- 
cently he has been firm in his allegiance to the principles of the Demo- 
cratic party, but since the issues of the last presidential campaign came up 
for the consideration of the people he has been independent of party 
lines. 

In October, 1869, Mr. Haffele and Mary Clemens, a daughter of 
George Clemens, were united in marriage. Lizzie, their eldest-born, is the 
wife of George Rhode, and resides in Mendota, Illinois. Alice is the wife 
of Robert Clemens and is living at the home of her childhood. They 
have two sons and a daughter, namely, Harry, George and Mary Magda- 
lene. In 1889 Mrs. Mary C. Haffele, who was a devout Catholic, died 
at her home in Henry county, aged forty-six years. In 1892 Mr. Haffele 
married Mrs. Dora Meyerhoff, widow of John Meyerhoff, and she died 
the following year. October 18, 1894, Mr. Haffele and Mrs. Magdalene 
Siler were united in marriage. She was the widow of George Siler, and 
their two children, Mary and Clara, are both deceased. Mrs. Haffele is 
a daughter of Sebastian and Maria Magdalene (Dole) Gebhart, who died 
in Germany in 1858 and 1855, respectively. She continued to reside in 
the Fatherland until 1870, when the attractions of America led her to seek 
a home upon these hospitable shores. Following in the faith of his ances- 
tors. Mr. Haffele is a Catholic, as is also his wife. 



CORNELIUS C. DWYER. 

Cornelius C. Dwyer, the genial and affable proprietor of the First 
Street butcher shop, at LaSalle. Illinois, was born at Arlington, Bureau 
county, this state, in 1863, a son of James and Mary (Murphy) Dwyer and 
a grandson of Cornelius Dwyer. His parents were natives of Ireland. His 
father was a farmer in the Emerald Isle and came to America about forty- 
five years ago. settling first in Ohio and later moving to Arlington, where 
thev still reside. Thev are both devout members of the Catholic church, 



524 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



and are highly respected citizens, the father holding a number of township 
of^ces. Thirteen children were born to them, of whom ten are living: 
Cornelius C, Frank, James, John, Augustus, Dennis. 3ilary. Adelia. Cath- 
erine and Tessie. 

Cornelius C. Dwyer attended the district school and remained on his 
father's farm until he was eighteen years old, when he began life for himself. 
He began by learning the butcher business in Arlington, and in 1886 
came to LaSalle. where he worked in the l)utcher shop of P. Stuart until 
1892, when he and his brother Augustus bought the business and con- 
tinued together two years. In 1894 Cornelius purchased his brother's in- 
terest and has since conducted the business alone. He has built up a 
large trade, his customers knowing that he is giving them meat from 
the best grade of cattle to be. procured. 

He was married June 28. 1893, to Miss Mary Morrissy. daughter of 
Larey and Mary Morrissy. This union resulted in the birth of two children: 
]\Iarion, who died at the age of ten months; and Dorothy. Mrs. Dwyer 
died March 9. 1897, a sincere member of the Catholic church, as is also 
Mr. Dwyer. He is also an honored member of the [Modern Woodmen 
and of the Court of Honor. He coincides with the Democratic party and 
takes an active interest in its prosperity. 



OTTO KIESELBACH. 



Otto Kieselbach. attorney at law and editor and proprietor of the Re- 
porter and the German Post, ]\Iendota, Illinois, is one of the leading spirits 
of tlie town in which he lives. 

]\Ir. Kieselbach is a German by birth and early association, and an 
American by adoption. He was born at Treptow on the Rega, Prussia, 
June 19, 1854, a son of Carl and Caroline (Jeske) Kieselbach and one 
of a family of nine children, four of whom lived to maturitv. namely: 
August, of Koenigsberg, Germany; Otto, whose name graces this sketch; 
Hermine, wife of William Reiff. of Stettin, Germany; and Louis, who lives 
near Stettin. Carl Kieselbach, the father, was a soldier with the Cuirassiers 
from 1836 to 1839. By occupation he was a contractor and builder, as 
also was his father before him. The latter, Gottfried Kieselbach, was in 
all the Napoleonic wars. He died in German}- at the age of fort^•-seven 
years. In his family were five children who lived to adult age. The ma- 
ternal grandfather of Otto Kieselbach was A\'illiam Jeske. who was a 
soldier under Napoleon, by occupation a farmer, and died in middle life, 
leaving six children. Carl Kieselbach died in 1896, at the age of seventy- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



525 



nine years; his widow is still livino-, making her home with her children and 
is now nearly eighty-fonr }ears of age. 

Otto Kieselbach lived in his native land until he was nearly seventeen 
years old, and received in his youth the advantage of a college education. 
Emigrating to America in June, 1871, he first located at Winona. Minnesota. 
In March, 1877, he came to Mendota, Illinois, and accepted a position as 
teacher of German in the city schools, which place he filled until 1881. In 
the meantime he took up the study of law, sul)sequently pursued his 
studies for a while at the Union College of Law, and in 1883 was admitted 
to the bar. The same year he formed a partnership with L. S. Seaman, 
both in law and the publishing business. This association lasted until 
November, 1887, when Mr. Seaman left Mendota. Mr. Kieselbach has 
since conducted the Reporter and the German Post alone, also engag- 
ing to a certain extent in the practice of law. He has been a Democrat 
since 1872. Always interested in educational matters and using his influ- 
ence to promote the growth and prosperity of the schools of his town, he is 
an important factor on the school board, of which he has served as a 
meml)er for the past nine years. 

Mr. Kieselbach belongs to Alemannia Lodge, I. O. O. F., of which he 
is past noble grand, and he is also identified with Mendota Camp, Mod- 
ern W'oodmen of America, and the Germania Society. 

He was married to Ottilie \^olk at Mendota. January 8, 1885. Her 
untimely death occurred July 17, 1891, and he was left with two children — 
Oswald and Clara. July 4, 1895, at Koenigsberg, Prussia, he wedded Elise 
Henschel, his present companion. 



ADAM SCHMITT. 



Adam Schmitt, of the clothing firm of Schmitt & Eickoff, of Peru, 
Illinois, was born in that city, INfarch 13, 1862, and is a son of Joseph and 
Apallonia (Jacobs) Schmitt, natives of Germany, where the grandparents 
of our subject died. Joseph Schmitt came to this country with his family 
in 1 86 1, and at first worked at whatever came to hand, and at length 
located in Peru and accepted position as a clerk in a grocery store, remain- 
ing with the firm for seventeen years. This line of business appealing 
strongly to him, he opened a store of his own on l^^'ourth street, which 
he still conducts, most successfnlh'. In religion he is a Catholic, as is his 
wife. 

.\dam Schmitt is, essentially, a product of Peru, having lived all his life 
here and received his education in her public and i)arochial schools. He 



526 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

was enterprising and ambitious as a youth, and at the age of fifteen he 
entered commercial hfe l)y securing a clerkship in a dry-goods store. This 
was afterward changed for a situation in a clothing store, where his engag- 
ing manner and polite attention assured his success. In 1887 he opened 
a clothing business, and has had the satisfaction of seeing it prosper year 
bv year under his skillful management, until to-day its prosperity and stabil- 
ity is second to none. In October. 1899, E. G. Eickoff bought an interest 
in the store and the style of the firm became Schmitt & Eickoff. He is a 
fine example of what can be accomplished by industry and perseverance, 
honesty and integrity. He was married October 28. 1890, to Miss Joseph- 
ine Hebel. daughter of Andrew and Caroline (Repp) Hebel. In anticipation 
of this event he had built a snug home on the corner of Fifth and Pike 
streets, to which he took his bride and where they still make their resi- 
dence. Their family circle has been increased by the birth of two children, 
Joseph and Apallonia. Mr. and IMrs. Schmitt are members of St. Joseph's 
Catholic church, and he also is a member of the Catholic Order of For- 
esters and St. Joseph's Benevolent Society. He is independent in politics, 
preferring to give his ^'Ote to the best man. 



PATRICK HAXLEY. 



Patrick Hanley. for many years justice of the peace of LaSalle. is 
Irish by birth and American from long residence and adoption. He was 
born in the county of Roscommon. Ireland. December 20, 1844. to Martin 
and Ellen (Igo) Flanley. and with them came to this country when a child 
of three years. He is one of a family of thirteen children, of whom three 
are living. The family settled in LaSalle in January, 1848, and Mr. Hanley 
has since considered that cit\' his home, although for a few vears his business 
called him away. It was here he received his education, attending the 
parochial and public schools, and learned the trade of tinsmith and plumber. 
At the age of fifteen he began to work for himself, engaged in a grocery 
store previous to learning his trade. He plied his craft many years, ten of 
them in St. Louis and other southern points. In 1873 he returned to this 
city and followed the business here until 1885, conducting a store of his 
own. He has also been engaged in the feed and grain business, and at 
one time had a clothing store. 

Mr. Hanley was married in 1877. ^^ Miss Eliza Hoar, of this city. 
Ten children have blessed their home and are being reared in accordance 
with the teachings of the Roman Catholic church, of which the parents 
are devout members. Mr. Hanlev has alwavs been an advocate of Demo- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 527 

cratic principles and gives that party his earnest support. He was fire 
marshal of LaSalle for two years, and in 1885 was elected to the office of 
justice of the peace. So well has he discharged the duties imposed upon 
him that he has been continued in that position ever since. It has always 
been his aim to temper justice with mercy to the end that the offender 
might be induced to forsake his evil ways and become an honorable citizen. 
In addition to his other duties, he is now deputy clerk of the county, and 
in this, as in his ofifice of justice, receives only commendation. 



FRANZ MEISENBACH. 



Franz Meisenbach was born on the Rhine, near Cologne, Germany, 
February 19, 1826. His parents never emigrated to this country. His 
father, also named Franz, was a tanner by trade, which art was learned also 
by him. At the age of twenty-three years our subject emigrated to the 
United States. He spent the first two years in St. Louis, Missouri, engaged 
in the trade of tanner and currier. In 185 1 he came to Peru, followed his 
trade there two years, then came to Mendota, just as this place was starting 
into existence, on the completion of the two great railroads to this point. 
He was therefore a pioneer here and one of the fathers of the city. 

The previous year, 1852, in Peru, he married Aliss Helen Reck, who 
was born in Germany and died in Mendota in 1876, aged forty-two years. 
She was brought to America by her parents when she was about eleven 
years of age. On his arri\'al here in Mendota Mr. jMeisenbach opened a 
hotel on what is now ]\Iain street and boarded the railroad men employed in 
the construction of the tracks. Later he entered mercantile business, in the 
lines of groceries, boots and shoes, clothing, dry goods, etc.. and for a short 
time also conducted a tannery, and in all was successful. He had meanwhile 
great ambition for the growth of the new town, and did much to enhance 
the value of property here. For the last twenty years of his life he was 
retired from active business. He established the first German newspaper 
in Mendota, or in LaSalle county — a paper Ijy the name of the Mendota 
Democrat, in the columns of which the doctrines of the great statesman 
Stephen A. Douglas were ably advocated. He continued to edit this paper 
to the time of his death, which occurred February 16, 1889. He was a 
very charitable man, a zealous friend of the church, though not a member, 
contributed to the erection of church buildings and was an exemplary citi- 
zen in all respects. His religious predilections were in faxor of the German 
Lutheran church. He was not an aspirant for office, though he served for 



528 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

three years as alderman in ^lenclota. Being a great reader, he was a well 
informed man. 

He had eleven children, namely: Helen, the first child born in Alen- 
dota. who is probably the oldest continuous resident of the city; Frank 
and Charles, twins, the former of whom died at the age of twenty-eight 
years and the latter at the age of thirty-eight; Laura, deceased; Emma, the 
wife of John Schmitz; Bertha; Emil, a resident of iMendota; Mathilda, the 
widow of R. S. Knouer; Louise, the wife of Robert W'ylie; and Otto and 
Henrietta, both of whom died in infancy. Frank married ]\Iinnie Grancow' 
and died leaving three children; and Charles was never married. 



AXTOX BIRKEXBECEL. 

Peru has l)een extremely fortunate in possessing citizens of high 
patriotism and fine business abilit}'. and among those whom she has hon- 
ored by electing to positions of public trust and responsibility none have 
])een better or more favorably known than the worthy German-American 
whose name appears at the beginning of this sketch of his career. 

Born near the village of Eitorf, Prussia, Germany. December i8, 1819, 
Anton Birkenbeuel was one of the thirteen children of Peter ^^'illiam and 
Sophia (Heimann) Birkenbeuel. His father was a mason and contractor 
in Ifis native land, and died on the ocean while on his way to the L'nited 
States, in 1854. when about fifty-six years of age. He was a man of good 
education, and, being a fine penman, his services were in great demand 
in Aarious local ofifices where a recorder's work was necessary. His father, 
who l)ore the Christian name of ^Matthias, was a farmer, and lived and died 
in Ciermany, his age at the time of his death being sixty-six years. Peter 
\\'illiam and Sophia Birkenbeuel were connected with the Catholic church. 
She died in 1848. when in the fiftieth year of her age. Her father. Anton 
Heimann, a farmer and a man of infiuence in his own community, died 
in Germany when he had reached the age of three-score and ten years. 
One brother and three sisters of our subject are still living, namely: Fred- 
erick, of Peru; ^Mary, widow of Andrew Traeger, of this place; Elizabeth, 
widow of August Tuxhorn, of Inman, Kansas; and Louisa, wife of Joseph 
Kuss, of Peoria. Another sister. ]\Irs. Anton Kellenbach, recently died 
at her home in Peru. 

Reared to hard and honest toil. Anton Birkenbeuel aided his father as a 
mason when he was a youth, and. with his brother Peter, served the re- 
c|uired time in the army. In 1847 ^^^ determined to seek his fortune in 
America. He came direct to Peru, where he lived all his after life save 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 529 

three years spent on a farm near Wenona, Illinois. For years Mr. Birken- 
beuel was a successful contractor. 

He early allied himself with the Republican party, to whose wise policy 
he attributed much of the prosperity which this country has enjoyed since 
the civil war. More than twenty years ago he was honored with the ofifices 
of township and city assessor, in which capacity he served faithfulh^ until 
his death. For two terms he officiated as township and city collector, 
and at one time was a member of the city council. A man of broad infor- 
mation and extended reading, he had no narrow view of life, its responsi- 
bilities and meaning, and in his earnest search for truth he cast aside the 
dogmas and theories with which his mind was formerly enthralled. He 
was a member of a German reading society, and found much pleasure in the 
companionship of men who read and thought for themselves. Fraternally 
he was identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows for many 
years. 

On the 5th of June, 1849, was consummated the marriage of Anton 
Birkenbeuel and Mary Katherine Hoss. This worthy couple, who trod 
the highway of life together for almost half a century, were among the 
oldest citizens of Peru, and few had more sincere friends. Four children 
blessed their home, but two of their little sons soon passed away, Frank 
dying when but three months old, and Arthur when in his fifth vear. 
Mary, who is unmarried, resides on the old homestead in Peru and cared 
for her parents in their declining years. William E. is engaged in the 
jewelry business in LaSalle and is prominent in business and political affairs. 

The parents of Mrs. Anton Birkenbeuel were Peter and Margaret 
(Kurenbach) Hoss. The former died in Germany, in 1830, when he was 
eighty years old, his life having been devoted to agriculture. His widow 
came to America, with her son Theodore and daughter Mar}^ Katherina, 
in 1846, and joined her two sons. William and Adolph, who had preceded 
them. She lived in the country, near Peru, for three years, and after her 
removal into the town, in 1849, she received the summons of the death angel, 
she then being in her sixty-ninth year. One of her daughters, Christina, 
died in Germany, and another, Elizabeth, widow of John Bellinghausen, 
has long resided in Peru. The brothers of Mrs. Birkenbeuel have passed 
away, one by one, the last to go being William, who died at Troy Grove, 
this county, January 24, 1899. aged eighty-four years. Mrs. Birkenbeuel 
died February 6, 1899, and Mr. Birkenbeuel lived not long thereafter, his 
death occurring October 26, 1899. 

The lives of Mr. and Mrs. Anton Birkenbeuel were quiet and com- 
paratively uneventful, but they endeavored to perform their duties faithfully, 
and in so doing they were free from regret and won the approval of their 



530 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

own consciences as well as the esteem of their associates. They left an 
honored and unsullied name to their posterity, and tender memories in the 
hearts of innumerable friends. 



GOTTLOB GMELICH. 



Gottlob Gmelich, late treasurer of LaSalle county and a man well 
known and universally respected, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, 
February 13, 1843. and when nine years of age accompanied his parents on 
their emigration to this country. They landed in LaSalle county, Illinois, 
in 1852, and from that time until his death, April 21. 1898, he made his 
home in Peru. His parents were Jacob and Barbara (Walter) Gmelich, 
and in their family were four daughters and two sons. 

Mr. Gmelich had but limited advantages for obtaining an education, 
the most of his schooling being before his tenth year. At fourteen he 
became an apprentice to a tinsmith, and thus was at work in the shop 
when he should have been in school. However, the broad school of experi- 
ence was open to him and in it he obtained a large fund of useful informa- 
tion as the years went by, being quick to observe and possessing a good 
memory, and he never failed to put his knowledge to the best use in his 
business life. Books and papers were a never failing source of interest to 
him. He worked at his trade until the outbreak of civil war, when he 
tendered his services in support of the Union. He enrolled his name on 
the volunteer list August i. 1861; rendezvoused at Camp Ellsworth, Chi- 
cago, Illinois, and was mustered into Company A, Forty-fourth 
Illinois Infantry, August 13, 1861, and went to the front. To give 
a detailed account of his army life would be to write a history of much of 
the civil war. Suffice it to say in this connection that he followed the for- 
tunes of his command, participating in the various actions in which it was 
engaged, until the battle of Resaca, where he was wounded in the knee by a 
rebel bullet. He was then placed in hospital at Jefferson and later at 
Ouincy, Illinois, and altogether was in hospital about three months. Dur- 
ing this time his three-years term of enlistment expired and he was honor- 
ably discharged, being mustered out September 15, 1864. He entered 
the army as a private and came out with the rank of corporal. 

Immediately after leaving the army, ^Ir. Gmelich returned to Peru 
and resumed work at his trade, which he continued until 1866. That year 
he engaged in business on his own account, dealing in tinware and stoves. 
He conducted a successful business for a number of years, until he was 
elected to the office of county treasurer in 1894, when he sold out in order 






■ty 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 531 

to give his whole time and attention to the duties of his office. It was 
while he was the incumbent of the treasurer's office that he died. 

Mr. Gmelich was a stanch Republican, active and interested in the 
success of his party and in the general w'elfare of his community. He filled 
other important official positions besides that of county treasurer. For six 
years he represented his ward as city alderman. In 1890 and again in 1891 
he \vas elected mayor of Peru, a position which for two terms he filled most 
acceptably. He was prominently identified with a number of fraternal 
organizations. He was a member of the G. A. R. and was the commander 
of his post; in the I. O. O. F. he filled all the chairs, and on several occasions 
as delegate represented his lodge in the state conventions of that order; 
was a member of the Modern Woodmen of America; and served as presi- 
dent of the Peru Turnverein. 

Mr. Gmelich w^as married, in Peru, in 1867, to Miss Josephine Schmidt, 
a daughter of Albin and Caroline (Conrod) Schmidt, natives of Germany. 
Mr. Schmidt was a baker and confectioner. Mrs. Gmelich was a child when 
she came with her parents to this coimtry, their first location being at 
Louisville, Kentucky, and from there in 1853 they came to Peru, Illinois. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Gmelich were born four children, — Lula, Jacob, Robert 
and Fred. Lula is the wife of Charles Penning, a clothier of Peru; Jacob, 
the eldest son, is with an uncle eng'aged in the confectionery business in 
Detroit, Michigan; and Robert is holding a clerical position in Peru. Mr. 
Gmelich, the father, was formerly a member of the German Lutheran 
Evangelical church, and Mrs. Gmelich was reared in the Cathohc faith. 
Their children are members of the Congregational church. 



THOMAS W. WATTS. 



The paternal grandfather of our subject was Edward L. Watts, a native 
of England, who, coming to the L^nited States in 1850, purchased a farm 
of about twenty-five acres in LaSalle county. There his wife died, many 
years ago, and in 1877 he removed to Peru, where he built a house and 
continued to reside until his death, in 1879, when he was in his eightieth 
year. 

One of the three children of this worthy couple was Edward W., born 
in London, England, in 1833. He learned the carpenter's trade and ob- 
tained a fair education in his youth, and was but seventeen when he sailed 
for America. Coming to this state, he worked in the town of Lamoille, 
Bureau county, for some time, after which he was employed upon a farm. 
Next he rented land for six or seven years, and by economy and well applied 



532 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

energy was enabled to buy a homestead of one hundred and ninety acres 
in Dimmick township, LaSahe county. To this he later added twenty-five 
acres, but ultimately sold ten acres to the LaSalle & Bureau County Belt 
Line Railroad. He is still living upon his place, keeps everything in 
fine condition, and is considered one of the most enterprising farmers of 
his community. He is interested in the cause of education, Ijeing a mem- 
ber of the district school board, and in political matters is an unflinching 
Republican. 

Edward W. Watts married Ann Raycraft, whose birth had occurred in 
Ireland, January 22, 1838. Her father, John Raycraft, came to this country 
from the Emerald Isle about 1856, and, after residing for a period in Wis- 
consin, lived with his children in Bureau, Lee and LaSalle counties, Illinois. 
Both he and his wife lived to advanced years, and their numerous children 
are to be found in widely separated states of this Union. Of the six sons 
and six daughters born to Edward W. and Ann Watts three are deceased; 
Edward, who died from the efi^ect of severe burns, when a child; and two 
other boys, who died in infancy. Martha is the widow of John Thompson, 
of LaSalle; Thomas W. is the subject of this sketch: Anna is the wife of 
John Bangert, of Chicago; Lida is the ^^ife of Gus. Jackley, of Penoea, 
Iowa; Frances married Walter Spanswick, of Ottawa, Illinois; George. Al- 
fred, Nellie and Mabel are still living at home. 

The birth of Thomas W. Watts took place near the present town of 
Ladd, Bureau county, Illinois, March i, 1861. When he was six years old 
he was taken by his parents to their new home in Dimmick township, La- 
Salle county. He received a district-school education, and after he had 
reached man's estate he had charge of the old homestead for about two 
years. Later he rented a farm in the vicinity, though he continued to live 
at home, and was prospering when all of his ambitious plans were over- 
turned. He was run over by a team and so seriously injured that he was 
practically an invalid for the next two years. When able to engage in 
active life again he became the agent for wire fencing, and in December, 
1894, came to Peru, where he purchased the livery business of George 
Snyder, on Water street. He built uj) a paying business, and in May, 
1898, erected a new livery stable on Fifth street. This he equipped with 
various kinds of vehicles, carriages, broughams and light road-carts, and is 
doing a good business. 

On the 22d of January, 1896, Mr. Watts married Rebecca M., daughter 
of Fred and Mona (Cox) Daft. The young couple have an attractive home 
on Fifth street near his livery, and two little ones — Cecil E. and Rebecca — 
brighten their home with their presence. In political matters Mr. Watts 
is a Republican, and before he left the township in which he was reared he 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 533 

served for three terms as a school director. Fraternally he belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias, the Odd Fellows, and the ^Mystic Workers of the World. 
Upright and just in all his dealings, he commands the respect and sincere 
regard of all with whom he is associated. 



EMERSON L. WHITNEY. 

^Ir. Whitney is the manager in charge of the publication known as 
"Our Hope and Life in Christ," issued by the W^estern Advent Christian 
Publication Association, of ]\Iendota. This periodical was brought from 
Minneapolis to Mendota in 1892, and Mr. Whitney has held his present 
position in connection with the concern ever since August, 1894. 

]\Ir. Whitney was born at Vanorin, Bureau county, this state, ]\larch 
18. 1862. His parents. Lysander and Roxanna (Viner) Whitney, were 
natives of Alassachusetts, of Berkshire county, and both were of old New 
England families from old England. After marriage they came west, about 
1854. locating upon a farm in Bureau county, where Mrs. Whitney died 
in 1882, aged sixty-two years, and Mr. Whitney died in Mendota, in 1897, 
at the age of seventy-six years. Both were Advent Christians, and in 
politics he was a Republican. 

Emerson L. \\diitney was reared to farm life and given a fair education 
in the country schools and at Bryant & Stratton's Business College in Chi- 
cago. In local office he has served for several years as a member of the 
educational board of Mendota College. In 1887 he was united in marriage 
with Miss Anna ]\Ioore, of Brodhead, Wisconsin, and they have two inter- 
esting children. 



ADOLPH HOSS. 



Adolph Hoss, who for the past eight years has been connected with the 
Peru State Bank and is now serving in the responsible position of cashier 
of that well and favorably known institution of LaSalle county, is one of 
the native sons of Peru, his Ijirth having occurred October 17, 1861. 

His parents, Adolph and ^Margaret (Wunder) Hoss. were natives of 
Bonn, Prussia, and the kingdom of Bavaria, respectively, and their marriage 
took place in the E^nited States. The paternal grandfather of our subject 
died in Germany, at an advanced age. and the maternal grandfather, Michael 
Wunder, who followed the trade of shoemaker in his native land, came to 
this country in 1840. Locating in LaSalle county at first, he later bought 
land in Bureau county, Illinois, and there was successfully occupied in 



534 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

agricultural pursuits for a long time. He reached the extreme age of ninety- 
one years. Mrs. JNIargaret Hoss, who was one of the three children of this 
patriarch, was married, in her early womanhood, to a ^iv. Teichmann. and 
they became the parents of three children, all of whom have passed away. 
Adolph Hoss, Sr., born in the year 1818, was one of five children, and 
spent his early years in Prussia, whence he sailed for the United States in 
1845. The succeeding year found him located in Peru, where he worked 
at his trade as a tailor, and for a period carried on a boarding-house and 
saloon. At the time of the great excitement over the discovery of gold 
on the Pacific coast, he walked the entire distance across the plains, and 
after passing a couple of years in the west returned home. Wlien the war of 
the Rebellion broke out, he enlisted as a private in Company A, Forty- 
fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and took part in the battles of Pea Ridge, 
Murfreesboro and many other important engagements. At the end of al- 
most two years of gallant service on behalf of his adopted country, he 
was honorably discharged, owing to physical disability, his papers being- 
dated in April, 1863. He died in 1882. and his widow in 1885 married John 
Weber, of Leonore, Illinois, where her death occurred in 1892, in her 
seventy-first year. 

The subject of this article. Adolph Hoss, only child of Adolph and 
Margaret Hoss, has lived in Peru nearly the whole of his life. After com- 
pleting his common-school education here he entered the LaSalle Business 
College, and there learned the principles of commerce. For several years 
thereafter he was employed as a clerk in the dry-goods house of A. D. Mur- 
ray, and later assumed the management of his father's business. Having l)een 
made a justice of the peace, he conducted the duties of that office and carried 
on a general insurance business. In 1891 he became assistant cashier of 
the Peru State Bank, and upon the 21st of January, 1899, was promoted 
to the cashiership. He is a member of the firm of Hoss & Loekle, insur- 
ance agents, and is secretary of the board of education. Politically he is 
independent, and fraternally he belongs to the Sons of Veterans. Gifted 
Avith an unusual talent for music, ]\Ir. Hoss was the leader of the famous 
Northwestern Light Guard Band of Peru for a number of years. 

The attractive home of Adolph Hoss is situated at the corner of First 
and Putnam streets. His first marriage took place October 25, 1882, at 
Mendota, Illinois, ]\Iiss Anna M., daughter of John Huelzer, becoming his 
bride. She died in 1885, aged twenty-four years, a member of the Catholic 
church. Two sons were born to this marriage — Gustav Adolph and ^^'illiam 
Henry, the latter dying in infancy. September 9, 1890, Mr. Hoss married 
at Secor, Illinois, Miss Emma M. Harseim, a daughter of Rudolph Har- 
seim, and one child blesses their union, Alberta ^lildred. ]\Irs. Hoss is 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



535 



identified with the German EvangeHcal church and is a well educated, cul- 
tured lady, who has many friends in this community. ]\Ir. Hoss also is 
very popular, and possesses marked talent as a financier and as a musi- 
cian. 



JOHN J. LARKIN, D. D. S. 

Undoubtedly more serious attention is being paid to the proper care 
and preservation of the teeth to-day than ever before; and whereas the 
science of dental surgery as practiced a few years ago was extremely crude 
and inadequate, it is making rapid strides towards perfection, and great 
things are already accomplished by it. The successful dentist must be an 
indefatigable student, keeping posted upon the methods of treatment used 
by the great specialists in the profession, and sparing himself no work or 
research which may redound to the good of his patients. 

Dr. John J. Larkin, who is specially qualified in the art of modern 
dentistry and is now engaged in practice in LaSalle, is a native of Streator, 
his birth having occurred May 27, 1870. His grandfathers were both 
natives of Ireland. His father's father, Edward Larkin, came to America 
many years ago, and his last years were spent in the vicinity of Streator, 
on his son's farm. He reared a number of children, and lived to attain 
the extreme age of ninety years. Jeffrey Conness, the maternal grand- 
father of the Doctor, was an early settler in the neighborhood of Streator, 
and was occupied in farming until his death, when about seventy-five years 
old. Some thirty-five or forty years ago the father of our subject, Thomas 
Larkin, came to the United States from his birthplace in the Emerald Isle, 
and made a permanent location near Streator. He occupied various town- 
ship offices and has been justly respected among his neighbors and ac- 
quaintances. He and his faithful wife are members of the Catholic church, 
and in that faith reared their children. The mother, whose maiden name 
was Delia Conness, is a native of Illinois. Of their six sons and four 
daughters, seven are now living, namely: Mrs. E. L. Cavanaugh, of Chi- 
cago; Edwin J., of San Antonio; Thomas W., of Chicago; Mrs. T. P. 
Halligan, of Chicago; Dr. John J., of LaSalle; Delia L. and Robert E., of 
Streator. 

The usual routine of work and play which falls to the lot of the 
farmer's boy was the experience of Dr. Larkin in his early years. The 
foundations of his education were gained in the district, common and high 
schools, supplemented by a course at St. Bede College. In 1896 he was 
graduated in the Northwestern University, of Evanston and Chicago. Illi- 
nois, where he had spent three years in the study of dentistry. (The dental 



536 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

department is conducted in the city of Chicago.) Coming to LaSalle, he 
opened an office and has since been successfully engaged in practice. When 
about twenty years of age he took a course in bookkeeping, which knowl- 
edge is not to be wasted, as he is thereby fitted to keep his accounts and 
transact business in a systematic manner. His office, situated at the 
corner of First and Gooding streets, is centrally located, and is equipped 
W'ith all of the necessary appliances of modern dentistry. 

On the 5th of November, 1898, Dr. Larkin married Miss Isabella M. 
Duncan, daughter of Hon. and ]\Irs. James Walter Duncan, whose home 
is chiefly in Chicago. Mr. Duncan at one time was a member of the Illinois 
senate. On November ist, 1899, a son, Walter Duncan Larkin, was born. 

In the fraternities, the Doctor belongs to the ]\Iodern Woodmen of 
America, the Mystic Workers of the World and the Catholic Order of 
Foresters. Politically he is affiliated with the Democratic party. Both 
himself and wife are identified with the Catholic church. They have a 
pretty home at the corner of Third and Joliet streets, in a pleasant residence 
section of the city. 



GEORGE A. ELLIOTT. 



Among the earlier merchants who contributed largely to the growth 
and prosperity of LaSalle, Illinois, is George A. Elliott, a retired citizen of 
that thriving little city. He was born in the northern part of Ireland, 
near the city of Dublin, on July 27, 1832. His parents were George and 
Fanny (Bourne) Elliott, who came to America in 1851. The father was a 
farmer by occupation in liis native country, although he held a number of 
offices under the English government, serving at one time as deputy sheriff 
of the county of Louth, Ireland, and later as assessor and tax collector. 
After bringing his family to this country he did not engage in business, but 
lived in retirement at LaSalle until his death in the fall of 1870, after hav- 
ing reached his seventy-second year. His wife was sixty-eight years of 
age at the time of her death, which occurred in 1868. They were both mem- 
bers of the church of England, and were worthy Christian people. Their 
family consisted of thirteen children, of whom nine reached adult years and 
six are still living. These are as follows: Fanny, a resident of Ireland; 
Eliza, widow of F. I. Foote, of this city: George A., our sul^ject; Harriet, 
wife of Jacob P. Bixler, of Augusta, Kansas; Joseph I., of Manitoba; and 
Charlotte, wife of Thomas Heathcote, who resides three miles north of 
LaSalle. Both the paternal and maternal grandparents were lifelong resi- 
dents of Ireland, the latter being a wealthy resident of Dublin, where he 
spent the evening of his life. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



537 



George A. Elliott was reared on his father's farm and given an educa- 
tion in the schools of Dulilin. A\'hen he was nineteen he came to America 
with his parents and has since l^een a resident of LaSalle, living here more 
than forty-eight years. He was industrious and energetic, always finding 
employment of some kind by which to earn his living. When the discov- 
ery was made that coal was to be had here for the digging, he was placed 
in the management of the mines at Hog's Back, the mining village three 
miles north of LaSalle. This he managed most successfully and then turned 
his attention to other business. He engaged in selling agricultural imple- 
ments, in 1862, at the corner of First and Joliet streets, and continued in 
that line of business for twenty-one years. In connection with this line of 
goods he handled feed and flour, finding these very profitable articles 
of commerce. He handled his affairs with success, but on account of 
failing health had to retire from active work in 1883, since when he has 
resided at Xo. 11 18 Creve Coeur street, LaSalle, in retirement from active 
business cares. 

On the 28th day of November. 1865, Mr. Elliott led to the altar Miss 
Jennett. daughter of Aaron and Xancy (Winters) Gunn. The parents of 
Mrs. Elliott were among the earliest settlers in this county. Her father was 
born in Massachusetts and her mother was a native of Ohio. Five chil- 
dren were born to Mr. and Mrs. Elliott, three of whom have been spared to 
bless the lives of their parents, while two were taken in their infancy, to 
''blossom in the garden of the Lord." The survi\ing children are: Francis 
B., a carpenter; Jessie B., who resides with her parents; and Harriet Eliza- 
beth, a bookkeeper who has been for several years employed in the office 
of the Electric Street Railway Company. Mr. Elliott affiliates with the 
Republican party, and shows an intelligent interest in both municipal and 
national affairs, but has never allowed himself to be drawn into the whirl- 
pool of politics. In religion l)oth he and his estimable wife are devout mem- 
bers of the Baptist church. 



SAMUEL G. DUDGEON. 

Just forty-five years ago Samuel Grant Dudgeon arrived in Alendota, 
where he has since been numbered among the most enterprising and public- 
spirited citizens. The best years of his manhood have been devoted to the 
upbuilding of this place. When it has prospered he has prospered, when 
it has suffered financial depression he has shared the burden, and at all times 
he has sought earnestly to perform his full duty toward the community with 
whose interests his own are linked. 

yir. Dudgeon comes of the sturdy Protestant Scotch-Irish stock, which 



538 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

is one of the best of the old-world race types, its strong traits being of 
especial value in this democratic country. His paternal grandfather, Rich- 
ard Dudgeon, was a native of Scotland, and for many years prior to his 
death he resided in the northern part of Ireland. He attained a ripe age, 
and died respected and mourned by all. One of his eight sons was Gail 
Grant Dudgeon, the father of our subject, born in county Donegal, Ire- 
land. He learned the shoemaker's trade, which he followed for some years 
after his arrival in America. His first location here was in Pittsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, whence he removed to Ohio and carried on the manufacture of 
boots and shoes in Wintersville. Later he executed a contract for a wagon 
road and then resided in Cadiz and Moorefield, Ohio. In 1857 he came 
to Mendota, where he was employed at his trade until his death in 1861, in 
his sixty-fourth year. He had married, in Ohio, Miss Aimis IMcConnell, a 
daughter of Samuel McConnell. a farmer, who though born in the Emerald 
Isle was of Scotch lineage. He died at his home in the Buckeye state 
when well along in years. Mrs. Dudgeon departed this life in 1865, at the 
age of sixty-five years. Both lierself and husband were faithful members 
of the Methodist church. 

Samuel G. Dudgeon was 1)orn in Jefferson county. Ohio, January 29, 
1 83 1, one of six children, four of whom were girls, and he now is the only 
survivor of the family. He passed his boyhood chiefly in the town of Moore- 
field, Harrison county, Ohio. Having learned the carpenter's trade by the 
time he was twenty, he proceeded to take up the burdens of life, and has 
since been actively occupied in various kinds of building and contracting. 
On the nth of May. 1854. he landed in ]\Iendota, and. being favorably 
impressed with the place, he decided to locate here. He found plenty of 
employment, and as the years rolled by specimens of his skill were to be 
seen upon every hand. In 1889 he opened a lumber-yard, which he is still 
successfully carrying on. Many of the substantial business blocks and 
houses of this town and vicinity were constructed by Mr. Dudgeon, whose 
work has been thoroughly satisfactory to all concerned. Honorable and 
exact in the fulfillment of his contracts, prompt and reliable in every 
respect, he enjoys the esteem of his fellow citizens. Great changes have 
come to pass in the town during his residence here, as may be judged Avhen 
it is stated that the first railroad through the place was not completed until 
some time after his arrival. 

Prior to the organization of the Republican party 'Mr. Dudgeon was 
allied wath the Whigs, and of later years has given his allegiance to the 
first-named party. In 1890 his fellow townsmen honored him by electing 
him to the mayoralty, where he served acceptably for two years. During 
a period of nine years he ofificiated as one of the city fathers, using his 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 539 

influence in the council for progress and advancement in all lines. He was 
the assessor and collector, also, acting for one year in each position. Fra- 
ternally he is a master Mason. 

In September, 1856, Mr. Dudgeon married Miss Mary Finley, a 
daughter of Alvin and Hannah Finley, and after nearly sixteen years had 
elapsed she was summoned to the silent land, in August, 1872. She was a 
member of the Methodist church, and possessed many admirable traits of 
disposition which endeared her to all. Of the six children born to this 
worthy couple. John A. married Mayme Wallace, and has two sons and 
a daughter, — Carrie, Samuel and John. Francis Grant married Annie 
Thelo, and has two children,— Oran and Pearl. Alice J. became the wife 
of Emil Otto, and their three sons are Edgar, Walter and Samuel. Charles 
W. wedded \^ie Freeland, by whom he has two children, — Gladys and 
Grant. Samuel O. married Sarah Lawrence and their little son is named 
Harold. Miss Carrie Belle, the youngest daughter of Mr. Dudgeon, is 
living at home. He was united in marriage with ]Mrs. Augusta C. Baum- 
bach in April, 1880. Mrs. Dudgeon, who is a daughter of Jacob and Au- 
gusta Stalil, was the wife of Dr. Baumbach in her early womanhood, and 
the only child of that union. Tillie. is now ]\Irs. W. P. Butler, of Bloom- 
ington. Mrs. Dudgeon is identified with the Methodist denomination. In 
1896 the beautiful residence of the family at the corner of Indiana and Jeffer- 
son streets was erected by our subject, and here, surrounded with the com- 
forts which his own industry has provided, he passes his happiest hours. 



GEORGE W. LEE. 



Thirty-six years ago, on the 21st of February, 1864. George ^^'. Lee 
was born in Utica township, and in this immediate vicinity his industrious. 
peaceful life has thus far Ijeen spent. His father. Dwight F. Lee, was a 
native of Connecticut, and after residing in LaSalle county for many years 
he was called to his reward, i-i June, 1883. at the age of sixty years. The 
wife and mother, whose maiden name was Isabella Piercy, was born in 
Eng'and, April 7, 1829, and when twelve years of age came to the Lnited 
States with her parents. James and Jane Piercy, who located upon a farm 
in Utica township, and there Mrs. Lee continued to dwell until her 



marriage. 



George ^^^ Lee is one of six children, his three brothers being: Gilbert, 
now a citizen of Harvey, Illinois; Walter, of McHenry county, this state; 
and John, of Utica. A sister, Nettie, became the wife of Edward Allin, of 
Marseilles, Illinois, and Nellie, the youngest of the family, resides in Utica. 



540 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Reared to agricnltural pursuits, George W. Lee decided to continue 
•in the pathway marked out for him, and surely has no occasion to regret his 
decision. He received a liberal public school education, and has increased 
his fund of knowledge by observation, experience and reading. Upon 
arriving at his eighteenth year, he started out to make his own independent 
way in the world, and at present is cultivating a snug little farm of twenty- 
seven acres, conveniently situated near the corporate limits of Utica. Mr. 
Lee rents a considerable amount of farm lands and carries on farming 
extensively, being one of the most successful farmers of Utica township. 
Li 1896 Mr. Lee was elected to serve as a highway commissioner, and in 
1899 was again called to occupy this important office. Fraternally he 
belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America. 

In 1887 Mr. Lee wedded Miss Achsa Leech, a daughter of Joseph and 
Prudence (Brown) Leech, of L'tica. ^NL^s. Lee died November 26, 1889, 
and left two sons, Warren and Du Fae, to mourn her loss. 



ARCHIBALD MEANS. 



Archibald ]\Ieans, deceased, a distinguished citizen of Peru, LaSalle 
couTity, for many years past, will long be remembered witli gratitude and 
affection by the people of this community as a friend of the ^^■orking man 
and the promoter of institutions which tended to elevate and upbuild 
the municipality. Shrewd and sagacious, he was at once an excellent 
finan.cier and a kind employer, gaining the earnest support and co-opera- 
tion of those in his employ to advance the interest of the institution for 
which he labored. 

He was born in Allegheny county. Pennsylvania. ]\Iarch 31. 1833. and 
traced his ancestry back to county Tyrone. Ireland, where his grandfather 
was born, in 1750. In lySj the attractions of the New A\'orld enticed him 
to America, causing him to settle in the state of Pennsylvania, where the 
father, William Cleans, was born September 15. 1803. William Means 
removed to Steubenville, Ohio, in 1836, and was engaged in the foundry 
business at that place for fourteen years. Abandoning that employment 
he gave his attention to agriculture until his death, which occurred in his 
sixty-eighth year. He was married in Allegheny county to ]\Iiss Nancy 
Dawson, February 11, 1832, and through her ]\Ir. ]VIeans traced his family 
tree as far back as 1656, when one Garret von Swearinger, a native of 
Holland, emigrated to America and located in New Castle, Delaware, and 
in 1664 moved to ]Vlaryland. Nancy Dawson was the immediate descend- 
ant of Nicholas and Verlinda (Blackmore) Dawson, her grandfather, Samuel 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 541 

Blackmore, Jr.. having come from his native land. England, and settled on 
a tract of land in Maryland which had been granted to his father by Lord 
Baltimore. This tract included the grounds on which stands the national 
capitol at Washington. The lives of these early settlers were filled with 
toil and privation; and the suffering and hardships endured by them in the 
wild, unbroken country, as they labored perseveringly in the wilderness to 
build their rude log huts and rear their families to lives of independence 
and industry, made possible the grand heritage of a free and independent 
nation. — America. 

To such antecedents Archibald Means owed his origin, and it is but 
natural that he should have inherited many of the predominant traits of 
their character. We will take a brief glance at his life from childhood. 
When a child of three years his parents moved to Steubenville. Ohio, where 
he grew to man's estate. He was given an academic education, but close 
application to study had undermined his health, never robust, and it was 
deemed advisable to try country air to perfect a cure. At the age of 
eighteen he engaged in farm work and continued it three years, until he 
reached his twenty-first birthday. He then went to Ashland. Kentucky, in 
1854. remaining there until 1861, employed in the bank of Thomas W. 
Means. This gentleman, although of the same name, was in no way related 
to our subject. 

His first presidential vote was cast for the Democratic candidate, 
James Buchanan, but his sympathies were soon enlisted in the cause of 
freedom and he became a strong supporter of the Republican party. He 
was one of five men in the precinct, and of eleven in his county, who cast 
their vote in i860 for Abraham Lincoln. During those troublous times 
it was dangerous for a man to express his allegiance to the federal govern- 
ment, as many of the southern states, among them Kentucky, counted 
it basest treason; and an opposition to slavery was often expressed at the 
expense of the life of the bold speaker. Mr. Means was known as a man 
who had the courage to fearlessly stand by any view he considered right, 
and he was a strong opposer of the laws of slavery, expressing himself 
freely on the subject. As soon as hostilities began Mr. Means tendered his 
services to the cause of the nation, and in June, 1861, began to recruit a 
company of Union soldiers from his district, which was known as Company 
E, Fourteenth Kentucky Infantry. Of this company he was elected, and 
afterward commissioned, captain, and at once he went with it to the front, 
where he served under General, then Colonel, Garfield against Humphrey 
Marshall, on the Big Sandy river, in January, 1862. His company was one 
of a number which formed the nucleus of what afterward became the East 
Tennessee troops, and consisted of seven regiments. \Miile acti\-elv en- 



542 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

gaged in service at the battle of Cumberland Gap, CapLaiii Means was 
taken seriously ill, granted a furlough and sent home to die, as his friends 
regretfully believed. However, under the tender nursing of a devoted 
mother he slowly recuperated and was able to return to the front of 
battle, where he was assigned to the staff of General A. J. Smith and given 
charge of the pontoon bridge at Cincinnati. His health again failing, with 
much regret he was obliged to tender his resignation, in October, 1862. 

After restoring his shattered health in some degree. Captain Means 
moved to Pittsburg, where he engaged in the iron business and later in 
the pottery manufacture in Manchester, Ohio. In 1871 he came to Peru in 
order to close out the zinc works here in the interest 01 the stockholders. 
The plant was then a small affair, which had never been conducted on a 
paying basis, and it had been thought useless to try to continue it. After 
looking it over Mr. Means decided that it could be made a paying invest- 
ment and at once set about putting his plans in operation. The Illinois 
Zinc Company was formed and Mr. ]\Ieans, one of the stockholders, was 
made A-ice-president and manager. He at once began to add improvements, 
doing this in a cautious manner, and increased the works, having the 
supreme satisfaction of seeing his plans materialize in financial success for 
the investors. This plant has assumed large proportions and is one which 
contributes in no small way to the prosperity of Peru, giving employment, 
as it does, to hundreds of workmen. As the promoter and successful manip- 
ulator of the scheme, !Mr. [Means proved himself a benefactor to the entire 
community, while his general bearing and conduct since he became a resi- 
dent of the city placed him in an enviable position among the l)usiness men 
and he was universally esteemed. 

Captain ]\Ieans was married three times, his first matrimonial alliance 
being with Isabella, daughter of Thomas \\\ ]\Ieans, who was born in Law- 
rence county, Ohio, and moved to Ashland. Kentucky. This marriage was 
contracted June 2, 1858, and five years later, on January 20, she died 
without issue. Three years passed when, on April 26, 1866, he led to the 
altar Sarah Jane, daughter of ^^'illiam Ellison, near Hanging Rock, Ohio. 
This union resulted in the birth of five children: Annie, who died in child- 
hood; William E. ; Archibald L., who died in August, 1898; Robert W., 
W'ho was drowned; and Sara. January 24, 1880, the mother of these 
children was called to her reward and Captain Means was once more left a 
widower. August 16, 1881, he joined his lot with Miss Jennie Schleich, a 
daughter of General Newton S. Schleich of Lancaster, Ohio, and to them 
one child was born, Alan Hay [Means. 

Our subject was an active worker in the E. X. Kirk Post, G. A. R., and 
served as commander of the same, and was also a member of the Illinois 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 543 

Commandery Military Order of the Loyal Legion, ^^llile president of the 
school board he made many opportunities to advance the cause of education, 
and indeed was always interested in the growth and welfare of the city. Al- 
though a Presbyterian in faith, he contributed to the support of the Con- 
gregational denomination in a most liberal manner, there being no Presby- 
terian church in Peru. He was benevolent when a worthy object was 
presented to his notice, although intolerant of shams. Industrious and 
progressive, with keen, sound judgment, and alert to wise suggestions, he 
was a rare acquisition to the commercial circles and a strong addition to 
what was best in society; and it is no wonder that his death, which occurred 
in Chicago May 22, 1898, while there for medical treatment, was felt a great 
loss by the community and by an endearing family. 



CHARLES K. HALVERSOxN. 

America can boast of no better or more patriotic citizens than those 
which Norway has furnished, and LaSalle county had no more worthy, 
industrious, honorable pioneer than the father of the subject of this narra- 
tive, who, with all of his sons, have been ready to do all within their power 
for this land, the land of their love and pride. 

Born near Christiania, Norway, in 1813, Knute Halverson continued 
to dwell in his native land until 1838, when he sailed for the west, believing 
that greater opportunities awaited him here. Landing in the harbor of 
New York, after a long, weary journey on the old-style sailing vessel of the 
period, he went to Chicago by way of the great lakes, and from that place, 
then a tiny hamlet comprised of a few^ rude cabins, he pursued his way on 
foot to LaSalle county. Beginning at the bottom rounds of the ladder 
leading to success, he worked at whatever he could find to do whereby he 
might earn an honest dollar, and frequently — for money was scarce among 
the settlers — had to accept farm produce or provisions in lieu of other 
payment. In 1840 he married Elizabeth Olson and settled upon a little 
farm. Years rolled by and in 1858 he was enabled to purchase the fine 
place known as the Halverson farm, in Adams township. Here he spent 
the remaining years of his life, respected by all who knew him, and at his 
death he left a valuable estate, accumulated solely by his thrift and good 
business talents. He was a true-blue Republican, and voted for every 
presidential candidate of his party from William H. Harrison to William 
McKinley. One of the organizers of the Lutheran church in his commu- 
nity, he held the ofBce of deacon and contributed liberally to the support of 
religious enterprises. 



544 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Charles K. Halverson is one of ten children, all but three of whom 
have entered the silent land. His brother Nels is a resident of this county; 
and the only surviving sister, Betsy, is the wife of S. M. Sanderson. Two 
brothers were heroes of the civil war, and their lives were sacrificed to their 
country. They were l)oth members of Company I. Eighty-second Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, which saw hard service in some of the important cam- 
paigns of the great civil conflict. Halver died of t3'phoid fever in the south, 
and Ole was killed during one the Virginia campaigns. 

The birth of Charles K. Halverson occurred May 28, 1854. He re- 
ceived good public-School advantages in his youth, and during the greater 
part of his life he has pursued the calling of his forefathers, agriculture. 
Hov\'ever, he was engaged in business in the town of Lee, Illinois, for a 
period of twelve years, in the meantime servdng as a justice of the peace 
and a police magistrate. In 1894 he sold out his interests in the store which 
he had conducted at Lee, and returned to the old homestead in Adams 
township, where he had been born and reared to maturity. By the exercise 
of the talents with which he was endowed by nature, he long ago placed 
himself above the need of anxiety respecting his financial affairs, and with 
faith in himself and the kindly Providence which has watched over his 
welfare he is quietly pursuing the even tenor of his way. 

On the 30th of September. 1875, Mr. Halverson wedded Martha, 
daughter of Sander H. Sanderson, of De Kalb county, Illinois. They have 
several children, namely: Curtis, whose education was recently finished at 
Steinman's College, in Dixon, Illinois; Mabel, Clara. Sander. Leslie, 
Walter and Edith. 

Following in the political footsteps of his father. Mr. Halverson is a 
loyal Republican. He and his wife and elder children are members of the 
Lutheran church, and active in its various departments of usefulness. 



IRA W. GOODELL. 



About a quarter of a century has elapsed since Ira W. Goodell first 
engaged in railroading, and since 1882 he has been closely associated with 
the local railroad interests of Peru. He is of English descent, his paternal 
grandfather, John Goodell. being a farmer of Oneida county. New York, 
subsequent to his arrival in this country, in 1835. He died there in 1883, 
at the extreme age of ninety-two years; and his wife also attained about 
the same age. They had three sons and six daughters. The maternal 
grandfather of our subject. Walter Olmstead. was a native of the Empire 
state, owned a paper-mill at \\^alesville for a number of years, and passed 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 545 

his entire life in that section of the United States, his death occurring when 
he was four-score years old. 

William Goodell, the father of our subject, was born in Lancastershire, 
England, and came to the United States when a child of seven or eight 
years. He lived in Oneida county. New York, until 1862, when he 
removed to Hillsdale county, Michigan. About 1870 he settled near Fre- 
mont, Steuben county, Indiana, where he lived until his death, in July, 
1888, wheal he was sixty-three years of age. His chief occupation was 
agriculture, though in connection with this he was engaged in teaming 
for a few years. He was not a member of the church, but led an upright, 
moral life, and was a thorough, practical believer in the Bible and the truths 
of Christianity. 

For a wife William Goodell chose Miss Fidelia Olmstead, whose l^irth- 
place was W'alesville, New York. She was one of three children, and, as 
the only daughter of a well-to-do mill-owner, she received good advantages. 
To William and Fidelia Goodell four sons and a daughter were born: two 
sons are deceased; Ella is the wife of Elroy J. Carpenter, of Angola, 
Indiana; Ray is a citizen of LaSalle, Illinois, and Ira W. completes the list. 
The mother, who is a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
has made her home in LaSalle for the past nine years. While yet a very 
young girl she was honored by being made postmistress at Walesville, 
New York, which position she retained for several years. 

Ira \\\ Goodell was born in W^alesville, New York, October 13. 1858, 
and accompanied the famih' in its various removals, working for his father 
on the farm until he was sixteen years of age. He managed to gain a fair 
education in the district and pul)lic schools of Michigan and Indiana, and 
in 1874 obtained employment in the freight office of the Fort Wayne & 
Jackson Railway Company at Fremont, remaining there for three years. 
Then, going to Pleasant Lake, he worked for the same company, and in 
1882 came to Peru. Here he found employment in. the service of 
the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Company, being in 
charge of their local coal shutes for about three years. Then, going to 
LaSalle, he served for the same company as car clerk, following which he 
was their cashier for two years. Since 1889 he has been located in Peru 
as chief clerk in the freight department of the same corporation. He is 
considered one of the most efficient and faithful of its employees, for he 
carefully consults the best interests of the company in all that he does. 

Socially Mr. Goodell belones to the Modern Woodmen of America 
and to the Mystic \\'orkers of the A\'orld. In his political l^elief he is a 
stanch Republican, as was his father before him. In 1889 Mr. Goodell 
built a comfortable modern house at No. 625 Creve Coeur street. LaSalle, 



546 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and makes his home there, although much of his time is necessarily spent 
in Peru. In both places he is very well known and stands high in the 
esteem of their citizens, being popular among his associates in railroad 
circles at the same time. June i6, 1886, a marriage ceremony was per- 
formed by which Miss Harriet Turner became the wife of our subject, and 
two children bless their union, namely: Cecil and Hazel. Mrs. Goodell's 
father, Henry Turner, was born in Germany, but her mother, Mrs. Isabel 
(Chapin) Turner, is a native of Illinois. 



ABRAM COTTEW. 



Xumi3ered among the well-to-do farmers and successful business men 
of Adams township, LaSalle county, is he of whom this biography is 
penned. He is one of the five children of John and Sarah (Young) Cottew, 
respected pioneers of this county. The father was a native of Kent county, 
England, born August 2, 1814, and his long, useful life was brought to a 
close August 29, 1892. His parents were poor, and he found it exceedingly 
diihcult to make a good living in his native isle, and for that reason he 
decided to try his fortunes in the land of promise, America. It was in 
1844 that he carried out this resolution, coming- the entire distance to 
Chicago by the water route, from New York city liy way of the canals and 
great lakes. In the Garden City, as Chicago has since been known, he 
hired a teamster to convey himself and family to LaSalle county. Here 
he bargained for a small tract of land, procured a yoke of oxen, and for 
some time provided for his loved ones by breaking prairie and other ardu- 
ous work for the settlers of the neighborhood. Industry and earnest effort 
always bring their reward, and in the course of time this worthy man be- 
came one of the substantial farmers of Adams township. During- the 
early years of his residence here he gave his ballot to the Democratic party; 
but when the great contest over the slavery question came on he trans- 
ferred his allegiance to the Republican party, which he thenceforth sup- 
ported. H[is wife was summoned first to the better land, her death occur- 
ring December 30, 1887. Their eldest son, AMlliam, enhsted in the Union 
army in the civil war, and died after the battle of Shiloh, in which he was 
actively engaged. The three daughters survive, namely: Harriet, wife of 
Walter Partridge, of Iowa; ^fary Ann, wife of Henry Shulz, of Otoe 
county, Nebraska; and Sarah A., ]\Irs. Edwin ]\Ioore, of Dawson county, 
Nebraska. 

Abram Cottew, born July i, 1848, has passed his entire life at his 
birthplace, the old farm in Adams township. Such education as he pos- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 547 

sesscb uas acquired in the district schools, and from his boyhood he has 
been famiHar with farming, in its various departments. Success has at- 
tended his eftorts, and his farm, comprising two hundred and fifty-two 
acres, in the southeastern corner of Adams township, is considered one of 
the most desirable in this locality. Following in the political footsteps 
of his father, he cast his first presidential ballot for Hayes, and is loyal to 
the principles which the Republican party maintains. 

The married life of Mr. Cottew was of brief duration. On the 22d of 
February, 1882, he wedded Emma Lett, whose death occurred March 16, 
1884, and their only child, Ethel, passed into the silent land October 10, 
1883. ]Mrs. Cottew was a daughter of Robert Lett, who was a native of 
Ireland but for some time after coming to America resided in Canada and 
spent his last years in this county. 



JEROME C. KOOXS. 

Probably no citizen of Peru is better known or more popular with 
the general public than is Jerome C. Koons, whose position as agent for 
the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad brings him into contact with 
multitudes daily. ^Moreover, he is one of the native sons of the town, and 
has passed his whole life here, winning the esteem of every one, both as 
boy and man. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject was of German descent. Born 
in Pennsylvania, he was reared in Ohio, and was a farmer by occupation. 
He reared a large family, and was a worthy, upright man. William Hicks, 
the maternal grandfather of our subject, was of English extraction and 
was a painter by trade. He removed from Xew York to Ohio, and finally 
came to Peru, where he died about 1855, at the age of seventy-two years. 

Joseph Koons, father of Jerome C, was born in the Buckeye state. 
About half a centurv ago he became a resident of Peru, where he was en- 
gaged in the jewelry business until 1895. thus being one of the oldest busi- 
ness men of the place in years of active enterprise. He was a stanch 
Republican, and served as an alderman for one term. Death summoned 
him to his reward, when he was in his seventy-third year, July 14, 1898. 
His widow, who survives him, is still making her home in Peru. She was 
a native of New York state, and bore the name of Harriet Hicks in her 
girlhood. Of her four children — three sons and a daughter — one is de- 
ceased, and the others are Jerome C, Edward and Carrie. 

Jerome C. Koons was born March 10, 1854, and after completing his 
public-school education he began learning telegraphy, with the railroad he 



548 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

is now employed by, and his first station was at Princeton. Missouri, where 
he remained for eight months. Then, returning to Peru, he was appointed 
operator liere and has filled the responsible position ever since. In 1887 
he was made ticket agent also, and is still serving as such. 

On the 9th of June. 1886. ]vlr. Koons married Helen AI. Gardner. 
Mr. and Mrs. Koons occupy a comfortable home on Fourth street, it having 
been erected by ]\Ir. Koons some six years ago. Mrs. Koons. who is a 
lady of good education and attainments, is a member of the Christian 
church, and is identified with the Order of the Eastern Star. Mr. Koons 
likewise belongs to the order mentioned, is a ]\Iason in high standing, 
being a member of St. John's Lodge. Xo. 13. A. F. & A. ]\I.; Peru Chap- 
ter. Xo. Go. R. A. AI.: and Peru Council, No. 12. R. & S. M.; and he 
is also connected with the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a stalwart 
Republican in his political \iews. and uses his l^allot in favor of all measures 
which he deems worthy of support. 



' JAMES CLARK. 

The specific history of the west was made by the pioneers: it was em- 
blazoned on the forest trees by the strength of sturdy arms and gleaming- 
ax. and written on the surface of the earth by the track of a primitive plow. 
These were strong men and true who came to found the empire of the 
west— these hardy settlers who builded their rude domiciles, grappled with 
the giants of the forest and from the svlvan wilds evolved the fertile and 
productive fields which have these many years l^een furrowed and refur- 
rowed by the plowshare. The red man. in his motley garb, stalked through 
the dim, woody avenues, and the wild beasts disputed his dominion. The 
trackless prairie was made to yield its tribute under the eft'ective endeav- 
ors of the pioneer, and slowly Imt surely were laid the steadfast foundations 
upon which has been builded the magnificent superstructure of an opulent 
and enlightened commonwealth. To establish a home amid such surround- 
ings, and to cope with the many privations and hardships which were the 
inevitable concomitants, demanded an invincible courage and fortitude, 
strong hearts and willing hands. All these were characteristics of the 
pioneers, whose names and deeds should be held in perpetual reverence 
by those who enjoy the fruits of their toil. 

People of the present end-of-the-century period can scarce realize the 
struggles and dangers which attended the early settlers; the heroism and 
self-sacrifice of lives passed upon the borders of civilization; the hardships 
endured, the difTficulties overcome. These tales of the early days read al- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 549 

most like a romance to those who have known only the modern prosperity 
and convenience. To the pioneer of the early days, far removed from the 
privileges and conveniences of city or town, the struggle for existence was a 
stern and hard one. and these men and women must have possessed wis- 
dom, immutahle energies and sterling worth of character as well as marked 
physical courage, when they thus voluntarily selected such a life and suc- 
cessfully fought its battles under such circumstances as prevailed in the 
w^est. 

The pioneers were not unaccustomed to more pleasing environments 
and to one who. like the subject of this memoir, came higher from the older 
civilization and the more perfectly developed and more consistent man- 
ners of life of an old English town, the radical change was one which must 
ha\"e l)een endured only by one who had the courage of his convictions 
and who, looking to the ultimate results, was willing to sow that others 
might reap, was wilHng to be an organizer, a builder and an institutor. 
To lames Clark is there particular congruity in directing attention in 
this connection, for he was one who lived and labored to goodly ends and 
who gained not only a position of distinctive prominence in the state 
which he had aided to develop, but who stood "four-scjuare to every wind 
that blows" and held the respect and esteem which is never denied to a 
man whose integrity and honor are beyond question. 

James Clark was born in Ashburnham parish, Sussex county, England, 
on the 9th of September, 181 1, being the son of James and Ann (Weston) 
Clark, the former of whom was a prosperous liveryman. Our stibject was 
reared in his native country, and was eventually apprenticed to learn the 
coach-maker's trade. He was a young man of alert mentality and ambitious 
natr.re, and his ambition soon began to strain at its fetters as he began 
to outline his plans for a career of usefulness and success. He became 
convinced that in America were offered better opportunities for advance- 
ment and for securing due returns from individual effort, and accordingly 
in 1830 he set sail from the land of his nativity and was soon en route to 
the United States. His voyage was uneventful, being marked by but one 
notable incident — the lime made in crossing the ocean being sixteen days 
and the l)oat being a sailing vessel. This lowered the time record of the 
day in a very considerable degree. He landed in New York city on the 
1 6th of April, 1830, with only one shilling in his pocket, and realizing his 
somewhat precarious situation as a stranger in a strange land he immedi- 
ately cast about for employment, having in the meantime pawned his over- 
coat in order to secure food and lodging. In a few days he secured a 
situation. recei\-ing in recompense for his services his board and lodging, 
but '?t the end of one month he had proved himself of sufficient value to his 



550 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

employer to insure him the additional pay of seventy-five cents per diem. 

The extent to which accident or circumstances may shape a man's 
career was soon given exemplification in the life of our subject. A Mrs. 
Luellum and two nieces came to New York from England, the eldest of 
the ladies having known [Nlr. Clark in his native parish. Upon her arrival 
here she made a successful efTort to find him, and thereupon prevailed upon 
him to accompany her to the west, where she wished to purchase a farm, 
having four hundred dollars which she desired to invest in this way. She 
agreed to pay Mr. Clark ten dollars per month and his expenses if he would 
go with her and advise her in regard to pre-empting a farm and assist her 
in its cultivation. The overtures were accepted by Mr. Clark, and, in com- 
pany with Mrs. Luellum and one of her nieces, he started for that section of 
the Union which was to figure as the scene of his earnest and successful 
endeavors. The other niece remained in New York, where she had se- 
cured a situation. The three made their way westward to Grafton, Lorain 
county, Ohio, and in the immediate vicinity Mrs. Luellum pre-empted one 
hundred and sixty acres of land. Mr. Clark staked out the claim and cut 
logs to build the primitive cabin which should serve as a home and shelter 
for the little party. While this work was being accomplished the ladies 
slept in their wagon and our subject took the "lower berth," that is, he 
made his bed beneath the wagon. After securing her farm Mrs. Luellum 
had only sufficient funds left to purchase a yoke of oxen, a cow, a pig and the 
most primitive farming implements. Under these conditions was instituted 
the work of clearing and cultivating the pioneer farm; but ill fortune at- 
tended the efforts of the members of the little household. Their stock was 
lost through an epidemic of scurvy, and they were reduced eventually to 
the direst financial extremity. Nothing daunted by the unpropitious out- 
look, young Clark proved himself a master of expedients. He cut down 
ten acres of timber, burned it into charcoal and for this produce found a 
ready sale, thus recuperating the resources of the family of which he was 
a member. During this time Mrs. Luellum had been unable to pay Clark 
his wages, and finally she offered to settle with him by transferring to him 
her right, title and interest in her pre-emption claim; and after receiving this 
he sold it for thirty dollars. After this he covered their wagon with un- 
bleached cotton and they prepared to utilize the same for continuing their 
journey further west. 

In September, 1830, Mr. Clark had been united in marriage to Mrs. 
Luellum's niece, Charlotte Sargent, and now. with his wife, two children, 
and Mrs. Luellum he started for Illinois. On the way he traded his oxen 
for a good team of horses, and with this superior equipment the party con- 
tinued their wav to Peoria, Illinois, where ]\Ir. Clark left his familv, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 551 

proceeded thence on horseback, to Utica township, where he paid a man 
named Croisar the sum of ten dollars to advise him as to eligible location 
where he might "squat" on government land, the result being that he 
located on section 4, Utica township. He then brought his family from 
Peoria and settled down to pioneer life. He operated a private stage line 
between Peoria and Utica and later from Utica to Chicago, and as this was 
the only method of transportation in the early days he made money through 
this enterprise. 

At the land sales in 1835 he effected the purchase of two hundred and 
forty acres, and from time to time added to the area of his possessions 
until he was the owner of two thousand four hundred acres of the most 
productive land in this section of the state. His first home in LaSalle 
county was a log house. In 1837 Mr. Clark took a contract on the con- 
struction of the Illinois & Michigan canal, his contract providing for the 
extending of the canal through two miles of solid rock. The work was 
completed in 1848. In 1845 he had erected a substantial and handsome 
residence, and this is still pointed out as one of the finest in this section of 
the state. 

A man of marked ability, indefatigable industry and utmost probity, it 
was but natural that Mr. Clark should soon become a man of distinctive prom- 
inence and influence in the community. He was the first postmaster of 
Utica, and was the incumbent in this ofifice for the long period of fourteen 
years. There had been established in Utica an enterprise for the manu- 
facture of cement to be used in the construction of the locks of the canal, 
the projectors of this undertaking having been George Steele and Hiram 
Norton, who had come hither from Canada but had conducted operations 
upon a very moderate scale. Mr. Clark purchased the cement works and in 
1845 began the manufacture of hydraulic cement. The investment proved 
a profitable one and constituted the nucleus of a large fortune which our 
subject acquired. The great industry, which he founded so many years 
ago, has grown to be one of the most extensive of the sort in the Union, 
from three to five hundred thousand barrels of cement being turned out each 
year. His wisdom and mature judgment were shown not alone in the estab- 
lishing of this enterprise, but also in conducting its affairs continuously 
toward the maximum of success, his business and executive ability having 
been of the most pronounced type. In 1883 Mr. Clark decided that it was 
expedient to expand the business facilities by the organization of a joint- 
stock company; and this was effected. He became president of the com- 
pany and N. J. Cary secretary and treasurer. The business was pushed 
forward with increased vigor and became, and still is, one of the most im- 
portant industries of the state. 



552 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Mr. Clark was the first agent of the Rock Island Railroad at Utica, 
and this position he retained until the time of his death. He was a mem- 
ber of the board of supervisors of the county for eleven years. During 
the war he was a member of the county committee, and in 1870 was granted 
distinguished honor and preferment in the gift of the people of LaSalle 
county, being elected to membership in the lower house of the state legis- 
lature. In this body he served as a member of the committee on canals 
and on three others of equal importance, bringing to bear in this capacity 
the same practical business ability and sturdy common sense which had 
characterized his career in private life, and he thus was a power in insuring 
wise legislation, gaining the hearty endorsement of his constituents, having 
been a stanch supporter of the Democratic party, while in his fraternal rela- 
tion he was prominently identified with the Masonic order. 

His wife, after having shared with him the trials and vicissitudes of 
pioneer life, and having seen her children well settled, was summoned 
into eternal rest on the 12th of August, 1877. She left two children to 
mourn her loss. In 1877 was consummated the marriage of Mr. Clark to 
Mary J. Cary, widow of Charles A. Cary. She was born in Jefferson 
count}^ New York, on Christmas day, 1833, and in 1843 she accompanied 
her father, a clergyman of the Latter Day Saints" church, to Illinois, and 
while living in Batavia was united in marriage to Mr. Cary, the date of this 
ceremonial having been in 1850. They became the parents of two children 
— Norman J. and Charles A. Cary. ]\Ir. Clark's second marriage proved 
a wise one in all that makes the marriage state beautiful and happy. His 
wife was a true helpnieet in every sense of the term, and by her tender 
solicitude and ministrations made his declining days happy and serene. 
His death occurred on the 2d of July, 1888. after a long life of prominence 
and uninterrupted progress. His pathway was ever upward, both in a 
spiritual and temporal sense. As this review shows, he was distinctively a 
self-made man, one of nature's noblemen whom no force of circumstances 
could prostrate or draw into obscurity. His friends were many, and on the 
list were numbered many of the representative men of the state, and his 
demise was the cause of widespread regret, while a community mourned the 
loss of one of its truest and best citizens. After liberally providing for 
his children he left the major portion of his large fortune to his widow. 

Mary Cary Clark is a remarkably gifted woman. She is a poetess 
of marked ability, and is also the author of prose works of a high standard 
of excellence. She possesses a brilliant intellectuality and a charming 
personality, being a woman of great spirituality and one who has made 
deep researches into the great truths of life. Such a woman could not but 
be an able and devoted helpmeet for even the most exalted of mankind. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 553 

and the affection existing" between ]\lr. and Mrs. Clark was a deep and 
abiding one. 

Mrs. Clark is an excellent business woman, as well as a brilliant writer, 
and during her husband's life she was his confidential adviser and helper 
in all his complicated business affairs, and he held her judgment and opin- 
ions in the highest estimation. Since his death she has ably carried on the 
business of the Utica Cement Works and has also worthily used the large 
fortune left her by her devoted husband. She still retains her abode in 
the beautiful Clark homestead, which is picturesquely located upon the 
bluff" overlooking the town of Utica. The home is a most attractive one 
and is a landmark for the surrounding country. Mrs. Clark enjoys the 
respect and admiration of the people of Utica and worthily bears the honors 
of an honored name. 



JOHN J. CASSIDY. 



The office of police magistrate is one requiring peculiar talents and 
close attention to details almost innumerable. It requires an intimate 
knowledge of human nature and a knowledge of the law that applies to 
police cases combined with the ability to decide quickly and with due re- 
gard for the just claims of all conflicting interests. There are some model 
police justices in the west and Police ]^Iagistrate Cassidy, of LaSalle, is 
one of them. LaSalle is his native town, and he was born November 29. 
1855, a son of Thomas and Rose (McGuire) Cassidy, who were descended 
from historic Irish families. Thomas Cassidy was born in New' York, a 
son of Francis Cassidy. a native of Ireland. At an early day in the history 
of LaSalle. Francis Cassidy. with his family, took up his residence there. 
He lived there many years, and died there at a ripe old age. His son 
Thomas, father of John J. Cassidy. has spent most of his life at LaSalle 
and is still living there, aged about eighty. He was formerly well and favora- 
bly known as a bridge builder and general building contractor. His wife. Rose 
McGuire, was born in Ireland. She bore him the following named children, 
who survive her: John J., Thomas, James. Maggie and Minnie — the latter 
the wife of Nelse Nelson. 

John J. Cassidy was reared in LaSalle and educated there at a Cath- 
olic institution called the Christian Brothers" School and favorably known 
for the excellent character of its educational work. At this institution he 
was graduated in 1871. His first experience in the business world was 
as a dry-goods clerk. In subsequent years his business experience was 
varied. He w^as at the head of a hotel enterprise at LaSalle longer than he 
devoted himself to any other one interest. 



554 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



In politics Mr. Cassidy is a Democrat and is in all ways active in the 
support of the principles and measures of his party. In local elections in 
LaSalle party lines are not closely drawn and it is only in national politics 
that strong partisanship is developed. In 1888 Mr. Cassidy was elected 
police magistrate of the city. He was re-elected to the same office in 1892 
and again in 1896, and is filling it at the present time in such a manner that 
his continuance in it is not even slightly problematical if he should consent 
to another re-election. He is one of LaSalle's public-spirited citizens, zeal- 
ous in all good works for the town and devoted to the best interests of its 
people. 



WILLIAM E. MEANS. 



William E. Means, assistant general manager of the Illinois Zinc 
Company at Peru, is a son of Archibald Means, elsewhere mentioned in this 
volume, and was born in Manchester, Adams county, Ohio, May 21. 1868. 
When he was but three years old he w^as brought by his parents to Peru, 
Illinois, where he was reared and has spent most of his life. He is a gradu- 
ate of the high school of this place and was for two years a student in the 
State University of Illinois. After leaving college he went to Chicago, 
where he spent one year in a wholesale hardware establishment. The next 
two years he was in the Merchants' National Bank of Chicago. Then, on 
June I, 1890, he accepted a position in the employ of the Illinois Zinc Com- 
pany of Peru, and as assistant general manager of the same continues in 
the service of this concern. 

Mr. Means was married June 29, 1892, to Jessie Waugh, daughter 
of Samuel W^augh, and to them have been born two children, one of whom, 
Marjorie, is living, the other having died in infancy. 

Politically, Mr. Means is a Republican, active and enthusiastic, and 
took a prominent part in the campaign of 1896. He is a thirty-second 
degree Mason and is identified with the Illinois Commandery of the 
Military Order of Loyal Legion. 



HENRY T. MOSEY 



Henry T. Mosey, Freedom, Illinois, is a son of Thomas T. Mosey and 
a nephew of Barto Thompson, two of the well known and most highly 
respected pioneers of the town of Freedom. He is one of a family of eight 
children, all enumerated in the sketch of Thomas T. Mosey. His only 
brother, Charles T. ]\Iosey. is a member of the firm of Klove & ]Mosey, 
hardware and implement dealers of Leland, Illinois. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 555 

Henry T. was born in the town of Freedom, Illinois, May 11. 1858. 
He received his early training on the farm and in the district school. After 
reaching his majority he assumed the role of farmer independent of par- 
ental assistance, which occupation he still follows and in which he finds 
contentment and a reasonable degree of prosperity. He resides on and 
owns the farm upon which he was born, ranks with the representative men 
of his township, and has the confidence and esteem of all who know him. 

Mr. Mosey was married January 17, 1888, to Miss Emma Quam, a sis- 
ter of John A. Ouam, of Sheridan, Illinois. Their union has been blessed 
in the birth of four children, namely: Earling, Omer, Ruth and Blanche. 

Mr. Mosey is a Republican. He cast his first presidential vote for the 
lamented Garfield, and has supported every candidate of his party since. 
He has served as a town collector and has just concluded a seven-years ser- 
vice as town assessor, and is serving his fifth year as surveyor for the Inde- 
pendent Farmers' Aid Company for Freedom "towaiship. 



BENJAMIN M. ETZLER, D. D. S. 

Nearly a quarter of a century ago Dr. Etzler began the practice of 
dentistry, and few, if any, are his superiors in this profession. During this 
period greater progress has been made in dental science than, perhaps, 
in any other field of professional endeavor, and the public has not been 
slow in demanding nothing but the best and most skilled work at the 
hands of the dentist. Desiring to keep thoroughly abreast of the times, 
Dr. Etzler has neglected no study or effort that would advance him in 
his chosen vocation, and has thus succeeded where many of his colleagues 
have failed. 

A native of Snyder county, Pennsylvania, born September 21, 1853, 
Benjamin M. Etzler is a son of Frank and Mary (Hartman) Etzler, whose 
five children included William W.; Sarah, Mrs. Wagner; Howard; and 
Jane, wife of Calvin Fryberger. The parents likewise were natives of the 
Keystone state, and there the mother departed this life in 1856. The 
following year the father came to Illinois, and settled on a farm in the 
vicinity of Freeport, Stephenson county, where he died in 1858, aged about 
thirty-eight years. Both he and his wife were valued members of the German 
Reformed church. His father, Benjamin Etzler, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania and passed his entire life in that state, his occupation being that of 
agriculture. The father of Mrs. Mary Etzler was Michael Hartman, like- 
wise a native of the Keystone state, and a shoemaker by trade. At an 



556 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

early day he came to Illinois and located upon a farm in Stephenson county, 
in which county he died when over seventy years of age. 

Dr. Etzler resided in Stephenson county until he reached his majority, 
obtaining a good education in the public schools. Later he took up the 
study of dentistry in Freeport, under the tutelage of Dr. Samuel Garber, 
and after having mastered the business he came to Peru in 1876, and 
opened an office. After practicing here for two years he went to LaSalle, 
where he passed three years. Then, going to Chicago, he remained in 
that city for seven years. 

Thus, b}' extended practice in every variety of dentistry he gained 
invaluable experience, and has steadily progressed. In 1889 he returned to 
LaSalle; thence he went to Freeport and in 1895 he resumed his inter- 
rupted practice in Peru. In all local aftairs of the place in which he makes 
his home he takes an interested part, doing his duty as a citizen and voter. 
His political preference is for the principles and nominees of the Repub- 
lican party. 

The marriage of Dr. Etzler and Miss Jennie Corwin was celebrated 
in 1894, at the home of the bride's father. H. S. Corwin, of Peru. Airs. 
Etzler is a lady of pleasing mental and social qualities, and she presides 
over her cozy home with grace and dignity. 



FRANK B. ZWICK. 



An enterprising, wide-awake young business man of LaSalle. Frank B. 
Zwick may be justly termed self-made and self-educated. Starting into 
business here a few years ago. he has steadily advanced financially and in 
every way. winning the respect and high esteem of all with whom he lias 
been associated or had dealings. 

A native of Germany, our subject is a son of Casimer and Anna 
(LoerkeJ Zwick. of the same country. The father emigrated to the United 
States in 1871 and in the spring of the following year sent for his family, 
who arrived in LaSalle April 22. The eldest daughter. Rosa, with her hus- 
band. John Waszkowiak, had located in this place in 1870. and it was 
largely through her influence that the others concluded to cast in their 
fortunes with the citizens of this state. Pauline, the second daughter, is 
now deceased, as are Anton and one who was born in this countv and 
died when young. Augusta is married. \\'ynoa. Casimer is a merchant 
in this city, and Anna is married and lives in Chicago. The parents are 
still living here, the father being seventy-six years of age and the mother 
in her sixty-seventh year. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 557 

When he was but eleven years of age, Frank B. Zwick was obliged 
to leave school, which he had attended but three years, and from that time 
to the present he has been one of the world's busv workers. He was four- 
teen and a half years old when the family came to the United States, and 
though he obtained a position in a general store in LaSalle soon after his 
arrival here he had no knowledge of English and had a very difficult ex- 
perience in being initiated into the language and customs of our people. 
He was bright and ambitious, and ere long had acquired familiarity with 
these necessary things. He now speaks, reads and writes English well, 
and is well posted in general affairs. For three years he worked in a gro- 
cery, after which he was employed in a cement works for two years. Then, 
for six months he was with the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, 
and subsequently with the Illinois Zinc Works. At length, in November. 
1883, he embarked in business for himself, opening a dry-goods and gentle- 
men's furnishing goods store. His capital was small at first, but his am- 
bitious undertaking has been very successful, and he has branched out 
quite extensively, keeping a well selected stock of goods and meriting the 
large patronage he enjoys. 

On the I2th of June, 1887, ~Mv. Zwick wrote his first fire-insurance 
policy, and since that time has been the local agent for about all of the 
leading fire-insurance companies in this countr}". He is active in the sup- 
port of the Democratic party. For a time he served as deputy county 
clerk; in 1890 he was made a notary public; the following year he was 
elected to the office of justice of the peace, and at the expiration of his 
term he was re-elected, and again, in 1897, was honored with the position. 
His marriage to Miss Julia Mathys was celebrated January 29, 1894. They 
belong to St. Hyacinth's Polish church, and. as both have musical talent, 
they give their services to the congregation, he '-"^-jdluo; the choir and his 
wife acting as organist. 



HARLEY G. HUPP. 



Among the younger class of farmers whose honest, earnest eft'orts are 
counting for the advancement of the agricultural interests of Northville 
township, LaSalle county, is the subject of this sketch, Harley G. Hupp, 
son of George C. Hupp, a highly respected citizen of tliis county, whose 
biographical sketch appears in this work. 

Harley G. Hupp was born in Serena township, this county, Decem- 
ber 25, 1867, and was reared on his father's farm, having the advantage 
of a liberal education. After completing his studies in the district school 
he was for a time a student in the Normal School at Geneseo, Illinois, and 



558 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

later took a commercial course in Bryant & Stratton's Business College at 
Chicago. Since leaving school he has been successfully engasred in farm- 
ing in Northville township and is classed with the prosperous young farm- 
ers of his vicinity. Like his father, ]\Ir. Hupp is a Republican. 

Mr. Hupp was married February 12, 1896, to Miss Effie M. Nichols, 
a native of Niagara county. New York. To them two cliildren have been 
born — Russel N. (deceased) and Earl Wesley. 



GEORGE C. HUPP. 



The substantial and respected farmer whose name introduces this 
sketch — George C. Hupp — has been identified with LaSalle county all his 
life and for nearly three decades has made his home on his present farm 
in Northville township. The record of his life, which includes honoral)le 
war ser\ice, is herewith presented: 

George C. Hupp was born in Serena township. LaSalle county, Illinois, 
June 9, 1836. His parents. John and ]\Iary (De Bolt) Hupp, were natives- 
of Virginia and Ohio, respectively, and were married in the latter state. 
Early in the year 1836 they came to Illinois and first made a settlement 
in the township of Serena, LaSalle county, where their son George was 
born, as already stated, and where they lived one year. The next year 
they removed to Adams township. John Hupp went to California in 1850, 
and as no news was received from him after 1853 it is believed that he 
died there about that time. His wife died in February, 1892, at the ad- 
vanced age of eighty-seven years. Their family comprised the following 
named members: Sedrick \\\. W^ilson, Havila S., A. Jane, Samantha, 
Stephen, George C, Riley E. and Louisa B. \Mlson went west with his 
father and was drowned. 

George C, the direct subject of this article, was reared on a farm and 
has followed farming all his life, with the exception of time spent in the 
Union army during the civil war. He enlisted in September, 1861, in Com- 
pany K, Eighth Illinois Cavalry, in 1863 re-enlisted for the rest of the 
period of the war, and accordingly his service lasted until the conflict was 
ended and peace restored. During the first three years of his service he 
held the rank of sergeant, was then promoted to the position of second 
lieutenant and later to that of first lieutenant, which rank he held at the 
time he was honorably discharged. July 17. 1865. He participated in a 
numl3er of prominent engagements, always bravely ready for duty, prompt 
to oljey or command, and at the end of the war came home with a record 
of which he may justly ever be proud. For a number of years he was a 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 559 

member of the G. A. R., but on account of his hearing faihng him he 
withdrew his membership. 

At the close of the war Mr. Hupp returned home and resumed farm- 
ing. Since 1871 he has resided on his present farm of two hundred and 
ninety-seven acres, in Northville township. In addition to this farm he 
has another tract of one hundred and twenty acres, making four hundred 
and seventeen in all, and has also given land to his children, assisting them 
to get a start in life. He gives his political support to the Republican 
party. 

]\Ir. Hupp was married in February, 1866. to Aliss Mary Jane Calla- 
gan. who was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, August 3, 1842, a daughter 
of \\'illiam and Jane (Flemming) Callagan. both natives of the north of 
Ireland. William Callagan was born September 9, 181 7, and died in Adams 
township, LaSalle county, Illinois, February 17, 1896. His wife, born Feb- 
ruary 2, 1813, is still living, making her home with her daughter, Mrs 
Hupp. They were married in Ireland and in 1839 came to the United 
States, settling first in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where they resided until 
1845, that year removing to Adams township, LaSalle county, Illinois. 
Their family comprised the following named children: Mary, Mary Jane, 
Anna, William. Samuel and Martha. All of this number are deceased ex- 
cept Mary Jane and William. Mr. and Mrs. Hupp's children are as fol- 
lows: Clara I., Harley G., William E. (deceased), Euretta M., Fred E. 
and Arthur C. 



WILLIS C. FARLEY. 



This popular merchant of Leland was born in the township of Adams, 
LaSalle county. May 13, 1866. a son of Christopher and Helen (Sanderson) 
Farley, natives of Norway. His father was born May 15. 1832, a son of 
Christopher and Julia Farley, who emigrated to America in 1842, settling 
in ?\Iuskego, Wisconsin. There the senior Christopher Farley died, and 
his wife, with her son Christopher (the father of our subject), in 1844 moved 
to LaSalle county, locating in Adams township. Here the junior 
Christopher followed farming, four years as a farm hand at four dollars a 
month, until he was enabled to make better arrangements. He married 
and continued in agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred Au- 
gust II. 1895. In politics he was a Republican. His widow is still living, 
in Leland. Their children were Esther, deceased; Matilda, also deceased; 
^^'^illis C, our subject; Llannah; Frank, living on the old homestead; Ed- 
ward and Alfred, who have been grocers in Leland ever since 1897. 

\\'illis C. was reared on a farm and educated at the country schools. 



56o BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

He left the farm in 1891 and entered the butchering business in Leland. 
Afterward selHng out he entered the clothing- business, in partnership with 
an uncle, under the firm name of Sanderson & Farley. His interest in this 
he sold out in the fall of 1894: but on January 26 following he purchased 
the business of his uncle and has eyer since conducted it alone. His stock 
embraces everything in the line of clothing, boots and shoes and gents' 
furnishing goods, and he has a nice stock and a large business. 

He was married in 1894 to Nettie Baker, a daughter of Ole Baker, of 
Pawpaw township, DeKalb county, this state, and they haye two children, 
— Fremont and Okley, — the latter of whom is deceased. Mr. Farley is a 
Lutheran and a Republican. 



THOMAS CULLEN. 



Numbered among the pioneers of LaSalle county is Thomas Cullen, 
of Adams township, now arrived at the venerable age of eighty-four years. 
He is the eldest child of James Cullen, who emigrated to the United States 
from Ireland in 1835, reaching New Orleans on the ist of Jime of that 
year. He was accompanied by his family, and had no definite place of 
location decided upon, and therefore stopped at different points on his way 
northward, up the valley of the Mississippi, working at his trade, that of 
blacksmith. It was not until 1846 that he finally arrived in LaSalle county, 
thenceforth to be his permanent place of abode. Buying the farm, in Adams 
township, now owned Ijy Ernest Suppes, he improved it and spent the rest 
of his active life there, his death occurring in 1879, when he was in his 
eighty-fourth year. One of his sons is the Hon. \\'i]liam Cullen, ex-con- 
gressman, of Ottawa, Illinois, and the second son, James Fleming Cullen. 
is deceased. The daughters were Catherine, the wife of James McNeal, of 
Redding, California; Margaret, wife of John Reed, both deceased; and 
Eliza, widow of Byron Braden. 

Born in the parish of Invers, county Donegal, Ireland, February 4, 
1816, Thomas Cullen was reared to young manhood in his native land. 
He was remarkably apt as a student and prided himself upon his memory. 
He was instructed in the catechism and was a very small boy when he was 
able to repeat as many as twelve chapters of the Bible, missing only a few 
words of the whole. It was a joke in the family that his mother hid an 
old dictionary which they possessed, in the fear that he would commit that 
to memory, also! The love for study and books which he then formed has 
never left him, and has been a source of great pleasure to him in all the 
past years. Very few of the really valuable works of history and fiction 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 561 

have been neglected by him, and many of the classics as well, have possessed 
deep interest for him. Religious and theological works were much read by 
him prior to his conversion to Christianity, and Clarke's Commentaries on 
Ecclesiastical History and the works of William Paley, D. D., had a great 
influence in forming his religious opinions. 

In Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, Mr. Cullen learned the business of build- 
ing locomotives, and followed that calling for a quarter of a century. About 
1837 he became convinced that he ought to devote some of his time to 
the spreading of the gospel of Christ, and for ten years thereafter he 
traveled through Pennsylvania, Ohio, Virginia and Illinois, preaching and 
doing whatever good he could. In 1847 ^"^^ returned to Adams township, 
where he has since resided, secure in the love and genuine esteem of 
neighbors and associates. In his political faith he has always adhered to 
the Democratic party, and strongly believes in the Jefifersonian principles. 
He is unalterably opposed to any form of aristocracy, and views with deep 
concern the concentration of wealth in the hands of the few. 

On the 1st of April, 1855, Mr. Cullen wedded Mary Lindsay, a daughter 
of Samuel Lindsay, who was of Scotch descent, and whose wife, Annie 
(Barnes) Lindsay, was a native of Steubenville, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Cullen 
have three children, namely: Benjamin, who married a Miss Guir and is 
managing the home farm; Jennie, who became the wife of William Smith; 
and William, a railroad engineer, of Chicago. Both Mr. and Mrs. Cullen 
are members of the Protestant Methodist church, and this venerable couple 
have long enjoyed the highest esteem and confidence of a wide acquaintance. 
Richest blessings of health, prosperity and happiness have been granted 
them, for which, with grateful hearts, they give thanks and praise to 
God. Devout Christians, their lives have been largely devoted to work 
in behalf of the Master, — Jesus Christ. Many happy years have been 
allotted them in this life, through the declining years of which they journey 
with unshaken faith in the hand of God to strengthen them in life, care 
for them in death and reward them with happiness, peace and rest in the 
great beyond. 



JOHN HILLIARD. 



This honored veteran of the great civil war and prominent citizen of 
Ottawa, LaSalle county, was born at Plattsburg, Clinton county. New 
York, November 2, 1838. His paternal grandfather, Joshua Hilliard, a 
native of Connecticut, was one of the heroes of the war for independence. 
He married a Miss Grinnell, likewise of Connecticut, and for a number of 
years thev dwelt in ^^ermont. It was in that state that the father of our 



562 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

subject, Anson Milliard, was born and reared. When a mere youth he 
removed to the Empire state, there passing the remainder of his life, and 
dying while in his prime, in 1856. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Amity Smith, was born in Montpelier, Vermont, and departed this life 
in 1849. 

Thus, when but eleven years of age, John Hilliard was deprived of the 
tender care of a mother, from whom he received training- in example and 
precept, resulting in high standards of action in his later life. Until the 
death of his father, he continued to live at the place of his birth, Platts- 
burg, in whose public schools he obtained a liberal education for that 
period. In 1858 he came to the prairie state and spent about a year in 
Ottawa and vicinity, then returning to his native town. 

When the war of the Rebellion broke out, John Hilliard was prompt 
in offering his services to the government. He enlisted in 1861 for a period 
of two years, in Company C, Sixteenth Regiment of the New York Vol- 
unteer Infantry, under command of Captain Frank Palmer and Colonel 
Davies. With his regiment he was ordered to the front in time to take 
part in the first battle of Bull Run, and subsequently participated in numer- 
ous minor engagements. In 1863 he was actively engaged in the battle of 
Fredericksburg, and was captured by the enemy, but exchanged at the end 
of ten days. At the close of his term of enlistment he was mustered out, 
at Albany, and granted an honorable discharge. 

In 1863, Mr. Hilliard returned to Ottawa, where for three years he was 
employed on the Illinois & Michigan canal, engaged in the transfer of farm 
produce from various points along the line to Chicago. In 1868 he en- 
tered into business relations with Andrew Hamilton, of Ottawa, under 
the firm name of Hamilton & Hilliard, and for ten years they were suc- 
cessfully engaged in the sale of flour and feed, lime and other products. 
At the end of the decade our subject sold his interest to his partner and 
bought a quarter section of land in Utica township. For four years 
he gave his entire attention to the cultivation and improvement of this 
property, and dealt more or less in live stock. A good opportunity present- 
ing itself for the disposal of his homestead, he sold the place, and returning 
to Ottawa again became a partner of Mr. Hamilton. This connection con- 
tinued for two years. For the second time he sold out and retired on 
account of failing health. He subsequently purchased a farm near the town 
of Utica, and here resided temporarily for two years, and in the fall of 1899 
returned to Ottawa, his present place of residence. 

Mr. Hilliard served for one term as an alderman, in Ottawa. In the 

'Grand Army of the Republic he belongs to Seth C. Earl Post, No. 156, 

of Ottawa. In the Masonic order he is identified with Occidental Lodge, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 563 

Ko. 40, A. F. & A. M., of this place. By his marriage to Miss Maria 
Hickling, a daughter of Thomas Hickling. Mr. HiUiard had one child, a 
daughter, who died when eight years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Hilliard have an 
adopted son, Hubert J. Hilliard, who now resides on ^Nlr. Hilliard's farm 
near Utica. 



ANDREW HEBEL. 



Andrew Hebel. the secretary and treasurer of the Peru Beer Company, 
and ex-mayor of Peru, was born in LaSalle, Illinois. Alay 13, 1865. His 
father. Andrew Hebel, was a well known pioneer brewer of LaSalle and 
Peru, and was a native of Bavaria, Germany, coming to the United States 
some time during the '50s. After visiting Milwaukee. St. Louis and other 
points, with a view to locating, he came to LaSalle, where he settled about 
i860. Here he married Miss Karolina Rapp, who came from Bavaria to 
LaSalle a few years later than ]Mr. Hebel. Five children were the fruits 
of this marriage — Andrew, Josephine, Caroline, Annie and Bertha. The 
father was a master brewer, having learned the trade in his native land, and 
after locating in LaSalle took charge of the brewing of the Eliel Brewing 
Company, remaining there nine years. In 1869 he moved to Peru and 
took charge of the old Peru Beer 'Company, a co-operative concern. Three 
years later he and Herman Brunner bought the plant and operated it 
under the name of Hebel & Brunner until his death in 1886. His wife still 
survives him. 

Andrew Heliel. our subject, was about four years old when his father 
became a resident of Peru, and he grew to manhood in this citv. He 
was given every facility for obtaining a good education in order that he 
might become a successful man of business. His primary training was 
received in the public schools of Peru and the high school, at which he 
graduated in 1880. He then attended the L'niversity of St. Louis for one 
year, and took a six-months course in the Bryant & Stratton Business Col- 
lege of Chicago to gain a practical idea of bookkeeping. To gain actual 
experience in the work he secured a position as bookkeeper in the office of 
Rand. McXally & Company, of Chicago, where he remained four vears, 
leaving there in the spring of 1886, at his father's request, to take charge of 
the latter's interest in the brewerv. At the death of his father he took charge 
of the office and became a partner, taking his father's interest and continu- 
ing the business under the old style for three years. In 1889 the firm was 
changed to a stock company, which was incorporated and known as thfe 
Peru Beer Company, with an invested capital of fifty thousand dollars, 
and at present the annual output is about fifteen thousand barrels. Th6 



564 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

officers elected were Herman Brunner. president; Andrew Hebel, secretary 
and treasurer; and Charles Herbold. superintendent. They have been con- 
tinued in that capacity ever since. They have made a special effort to pro- 
duce a pure, malt-and-hop beer, and are given credit for brewing a high 
grade. Their business has increased to such an extent that it was found 
necessary to enlarge their buildings, and they have just completed the erec- 
tion of a large stock house or cold-storage cellars, at a cost of thirty thous- 
and dollars. 

Mr. Hebel was united in marriage, in 1889, to IMiss Rose Cossmann, 
whose father was an iron-foundry man of Chicago. Five of the six chil- 
dren born to them are living. Mr. Hebel and wife are members of the 
Catholic church and are liberal contributors toward its support. He is a 
member of the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Catholic Knights of Amer- 
ica and other organizations. In politics he is a Democrat and was twice 
elected to the office of alderman without opposition. During his second 
term of office Mayor Rausch resigned and the council elected Mr. Hebel 
mayor pro tem. for the remainder of the term. At the election held in 
the following May he was elected mayor without opposition and held the 
trust for a further period of two years, declining re-election afterward on 
account of his business. 



THOMAS F. THOMPSON. 

The Scandinavian element in our great western population is a good 
one. The men from Sweden and Norway who have cast their lot with 
us have demonstrated their ability to seize upon the advantages of Amer- 
ican citizenship as practically and as patriotically as men "to the manor 
born." One of the most prominent Scandinavians in LaSalle county is 
Thomas F. Thompson, grain merchant and banker, at Leland, who has 
made his way to permanent success in life in the face of many obstacles. 

Thomas F. Thompson was born in Norway, September 7, 1832, and 
Avas brought to the United States by his parents in 1844. and the family 
found a home in Norway, Racine county, Wisconsin. His parents were 
Thomas T. Flattre and Isabella Thompson. His mother died in Norway, 
Wisconsin, and his father in Leland. LaSalle county. Illinois, where he 
located in 1853, though he later lived in Kansas for a time. 

Thomas F. Thompson remained at the family home in Norway. Wis- 
consin, until 1852, when he was twenty years old. and then he went to 
Chicago, where he remained two years. In 1854 he first came to Leland, 
where for two years he was in partnership with A. A. Klove. Disposing 
of his interests to Mr. Klove, he went to Atchison countv, Kansas, where 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 565 

he ran a sawmill two years. After his return to Leland he was for a time 
employed in the store of Hans Thompson. In 1861 Mr. Thompson and 
Thomas Iverson began to deal in grain at Leland and they continued the 
business with varying success until 1866, when Mr. Thompson disposed of 
his interest in it and was associated, for a time, with C. F. Okefield in the 
same business. He then removed to Crescent, Illinois, where • for eight 
years he was engaged in merchandising. Returning to Leland, he formed 
a partnership with Knute Buland and bought the grain business of Mr. 
Okefield, who had died just before that time. In 1883 Andrew Anderson 
bought Mr. Buland's interest in the business and the firm became Thompson 
& Anderson, under which style it exists at this time. Its banking depart- 
ment was added in J\Iay. 1896. 

Mr. Thompson is a Republican. He has served for his townsmen since 
1880 as town clerk and has filled several other important offices. He was 
confirmed in the Lutheran church more than fifty years ago. He married 
Miss Caroline Selter, a daughter of Ole T. Selter, June 19, 1861. Mrs. 
Thompson was a native of Norway and was brought to the United States 
when she was only about a year old. She bore Mr. Thompson ten children 
and died deeply regretted in 1886. Six of their children are living: Lewis 
T., Stanley O., Cora M., Nettie E., Jeannette O. and Charlotte T. Mr. 
Thompson has proven himself a public-spirited citizen, alive to the best inter- 
ests of his town, county and state and deeply interested in national affairs. 
There is no public movement affecting the weal of the people of LaSalle 
county in which he is not active and helpful. 



GABRIEL M. JAMESON. 

America can boast of no better, more patriotic citizens than the sons 
of old Norway, and Illinois and the great northwest recognize tliem as 
extremely important factors in the development and progress of this splen- 
did region. Almost without exception they are industrious, peaceable, law- 
abiding citizens, and in these respects few countries can compete with 
Norway. Prominent among the early settlers of LaSalle county were the 
Jamesons, who for more than thirty years have been numbered among the 
enterprising agriculturists of this flourishing section of the state. 

The father of the subject of this article was Sivert Jameson, a son 
of Gudman Jameson, and a native of the island of Skudesness, on the west- 
ern coast of Norway, born May 16, 1826. When he was twenty-seven 
years of age he married Rachel Christopherson, and to them were born 
the following named children: Gabriel M.; Rastus; Annie, wife of Knute 



566 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Holt, of Iowa; Maggie; Rachel, wife of Richard Thorgerson, of Chicago; 
Martha, who married John Watnem. of Dayton township, LaSaHe county; 
Laura, wife of B. Johnson, of Freedom; Olhe, bookkeeper for the firm of 
Skinner, Richards & Company, of Chicago: and Miss Nelfie. 

Until he was forty years of age, Sivert Jameson struggled to gain an 
honest livelihood for himself and family by farming and fishing, as was 
the custom of the people of his country. Largely through his own per- 
sistent efforts he obtained a little education, and, having given particular 
attention to the subject of the United States and its development, its re- 
sources and industrial conditions, he at length determined to seek a home 
in the land which ever has extended a warm welcome to the honest sons 
of toil. When he landed on these hospitable shores he was better versed 
in the politics and duties of citizens here than some of the native-born 
sons of the countrv. and he had made up his mind to uphold the laws and 
do all within his power to promote the prosperity of the nation. On the 
1st of June, 1866, with his six children, he stepped from the deck of the 
sailing vessel which had conveyed them from Stavanger, Norway, to Quebec, 
and thence proceeded by railroad to Chicago. There he remained for one 
month, and then went to Leland, Illinois, where he rented a house, and. 
having safely installed his family therein, he commenced working by the 
day, as his scanty funds were in need of replenishment. In the following- 
spring he rented an eighty-acre farm of Charles Wiley, who was so impressed 
by the industry and spirit of his tenant that he said to him one day that 
summer, "I want to sell you this farm;" and when ]\Ir. Jameson replied, 
"I am not able to pay for it," Mr. ^^'iley told him that he would sell the 
property for two hundred dollars in cash, and the remainder might be paid 
for on as easy terms as he desired. ]\Ir. Jameson accepted the condition, and, 
in due time the farm was deeded to him. After owning the place for eight 
-years he sold it to Theodore ]\IcClure, and purchased two hundred and 
forty acres in ^^'allace township, making a fine country home there. 

Gabriel M. Jameson was born near Stavanger, Norway, ]\Iarch 21, 
1852, and was a lad of fourteen when he came to LaSalle county. After 
learning the details of farming on the parental homestead, he worked for 
three vears bv the month, and with the carefullv saved earnings of this 
period later bought an eighty-acre tract of land from his father. There 
he began his independent family life and resided there until 1898, when he 
sold that property and bought the Rowe estate in Freedom township. He 
is improving this farm and is making a success of his business undertakings, 
as he g'enerally does. 

The first wife of Mr. Jameson was Amelia, daughter of Matthias Saw- 
yer. They were married in February, 1881, and in September, 1884, the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 567 

wife died, leaving two children — Raymond and Merton. In January, 1896, 
Mr. Jameson married Mary Thomson, a daughter of Thorn Thomson, 
and they became the parents of two children, Fremont and Marian. Mrs. 
Jameson was summoned to the silent land in August, 1898, and her loss has 
been deeplx" felt by all who had the pleasure of her acquaintance. 



BENJAMIN SPRINGSTEED. 

Benjamin Springsteed, of Serena township, LaSalle county, has a wide 
acquaintanceship in this section of the state and is highly esteemed by 
every one. He is a son of one of the sterling, rugged pioneers of this 
county, Hiram Springsteed, who settled here three-score years ago, in 
October, 1839, and thenceforward was associated with the welfare of this 
community. He was a native of Onondaga county, New York, born Oc- 
tober 16, 1 8 19. He had but limited educational advantages in his youth, 
but was a man of practical business ability, possessing sound common 
sense and good judgment. \Mien he was a lad of twelve or fourteen years 
he left his native state, lived four years in Ohio, and, going to the pine 
woods of Michigan, found employment in the forests. He worked very 
hard for the two years he was there, becoming noted for the number of 
rails which he could split in a day, and after coming to Illinois, in 1839, 
he was similarly occupied for some time, chiefly employed by a Mr. Borap, 
of Bureau county. Carefully husbanding his means, he was at length en- 
abled to purchase a quarter section of land from the government, and part of 
his original farm is now in the possession of Henry Harthan, of Adams 
township. Selling this homestead later, Mr. Springsteed invested his funds 
in a piece of timber land in Adams township, and subsequently he secured 
adjoining lands in Serena township. He cleared and improved his posses- 
sions, gave to each of his two eldest children a farm, and still owns five 
hundred and fifty acres. He hauled to the Chicago market one of the 
first loads of wheat that were hauled to Chicago, and he took it to Whiting's 
warehouse. During the gold excitement, in 1850. he went to the Pacific 
coast, crossing the plains, but was not of the fortunate few who reaped a 
fortune, and at the end of a year he returned home, by way of the isthmus 
of Panama, but little richer than when he started. He was very active 
in the support of the Democratic party and took an active interest in local 
affairs, though in no wise a politician. His death occurred in October, 1895. 

January 4, 1844, Hiram Springsteed married Maria, a daughter of 
Samuel Lett, and a sister of Benjamin Lett, the celebrated Canadian patriot 
and revolutionist who blew up the monument to General Brock and had a 



568 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

price set on his head by the British government. To Hiram and Maria 
Springsteed several children were born, and those surviving are: Riley, 
of Kansas City, Missouri; Mary, the wife of Joseph Nelson, of Serena; 
Hiram, a prominent farmer of Serena township; Benjamin; and Emma, the 
wife of Gus Grandgeorge, of Adams township. 

The birth of our subject, Benjamin Springsteed, took place upon the 
farm which is his present place of abode, the date of the event being June 
22, 1856. He received a fair district-school education, and early mastered 
the details of farming. Possessing the industrious spirit which animated his 
father, he has been justly successful, and is the owner of two hundred and 
twenty-seven acres of valuable, improved property. Politically he is a 
Democrat and takes an interest in the management of township matters 
as well as in the greater state and national issues. 

Joy and sorrow have come into the life of Mr. Springsteed. as to every 
one, and he has endeavored to act the manly, noble part, under all circum- 
stances. The lady who is his wife, and sharer of his fortunes, is a native 
of NeW' York state, and was visiting a cousin in Serena township when 
she made the acquaintance of her future husband. Her maiden name was 
Luna B. Nichols, her father being George Nichols, of Niagara county. New 
York. Mr. and Mrs. Springsteed were married July 26, 1888. Their eldest 
child, born in 1889, and named Mabel, was killed accidentally, April 4, 1899. 
Two daughters and three sons remain to cheer and brighten the home. 
Their names are given in order of their ages: Jessie Ellen. Harry Bryan, 
Vera Belle, Rilev G., and an unnamed babv. 



THOMAS T. MOSEY 



One of the pioneers of LaSalle county. Thomas T. Alosey. has been 
a citizen of this county for fifty-five years and has been actively interested 
in its upbuilding and progress. His life has been quiet and unmarked by so- 
called great events, but he has ever endeavored to perform his full duty 
toward his fellow men, and has found his chief pleasure in extending a help- 
ing hand to the poor and needy and in caring for his family. 

One of the native sons of Norway, Mr. Mosey inherited from a long 
line of worthy ancestors the sterling traits of character which he possesses 
in no unstinted measure. He was born August 21, 1827, was reared upon 
a farm, and was early instructed in the thrifty, industrious methods pursued 
by his father. The latter, Knute Mosey, emigrated to the United States 
with his family, in 1845, '^"'^l entered a tract of land from the government, 
in Freedom township, LaSalle county. During the scourge of cholera 



BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 569 

which swept away so many of the inhabitants of this country in 1849, ''""^ 
succumbed to the dread disease, as also did the wife and mother and their 
two daughters. 

Thomas T. ]\Iosey was thus left as the mainstay of the younger mem- 
bers of the family, and faithfully did he carry out the plans which had been 
made by the father. Having been thoroughly familiar with farming labor 
since his early years, he was equal to the task of carrying on the home- 
steady and continued to give his entire attention to agriculture for forty- 
three years. By that time, he had amassed a modest competence, and not 
being ambitious for wealth he took up his abode in Leland, where he has 
since dwelt. While a resident of Freedom township he served as a member 
of the school board for sixteen vears, and since cominsf to Leland he was 
one of the town councilmen for three years. Politically he is a stalwart 
Republican. In his church affiliations he is a Lutheran, and has of^ciated 
as deacon in his church. 

When a young man of twenty-three years, Mr. Mosey married Betsy 
Hanson, a daughter of Hans Hanson, of Adams township. They became 
the parents of eight children, namely: Sarah, the wife of the Rev. Gjertsen. 
of ^Minneapolis, ^Minnesota; Josephine, the wife of Dr. Laws, of Minne- 
apolis; Mary, the wife of the Rev. Guldbrandsen, of Blair, Wisconsin; 
Charles, a hardware merchant of Leland; Henry T., a farmer of this county; 
Hannah, the wife of Andrew Klove, of Leland; Lila and Esther, who are 
unmarried and are at home. The children have received an excellent edu- 
cation and are worthy citizens of the various communi:ies in which their 
lot is cast. 



AUGUST GERDING. 



August Gerding, photographer and one of the leading business men 
and enterprising citizens of Ottawa, was born in the city of Ottawa forty- 
two years ago. He is one of a family of ten children. He obtained the 
benefits of a liberal education in the public schools, and for over a cjuarter 
of a century he has devoted his time and energies to the art of photography, 
making steady improvement and keeping abreast of the spirit of the times. 
Rapid advances have been made in this useful profession, science being- 
pressed into the service, and great minds finding it worthy of their deep re- 
search and investigation. Li order to be a successful photographer in. these 
end-of-the-century days, one must be an artist, in addition to everything 
else, and here it is that the natural talent of ]Mr. Gerding especially asserts 
itself. Among his patrons may be found the representative citizens of 
Ottawa and vicinity, as his gallery, at the corner of Main and LaSalle 



570 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

streets, is reputed to be the best and most thoroughly equipped of all 
photographic establishments in this place. To the enlarging of photo- 
graphs and to the execution of crayon, pastel and water-color work, par- 
ticular attention is given, especially fine likenesses being guaranteed. 

The marriage of August Gerding and Miss Louise Scherer took place 
November 17, 1882. They have five children, named in order of birth as 
follows: Augusta, Fred, Othileo, Carl and Hubert. The family residence 
is a pleasant one, situated at No. 1021 West Webster street, on the west 
side of the town. Politically, Mr. Gerding is affiliated with the Democratic 
party. 



HORACE B. GEORGE. 



Horace B. George, a retired farmer and one of the oldest citizens of 
Leland, LaSalle county, was born in Jeft'erson county. New York, October 
28. 1824, and is a son of Gilman and Fannie (Bartlett) George. His father 
was born in \'ermont and the mother in New Hampshire, and both were 
descended from Puritan stock, their ancestors having come from England. 
They were married in New Hampshire and settled, about 1820. in Jefferson 
county, New York, where they followed farming and both ended their life. 
Their family consisted of the following- children: Horace B.. our sul)ject; 
Moses, deceased, and for more than thirt}' years an engineer on the Rock 
Island Railway; Harvey, who has been a farmer of Iowa for about thirty 
years; Mary Jane, deceased, who married I. A. Thompson, of \\'atertown, 
New York; and Daniel, who lived many years in Jefferson count}'. New 
York, but came to this county about three years before the civil war, enlisted 
in the Eighth Illinois Cavalry and died in Baltimore, Maryland, while in 
the service. 

Horace B. George was reared on a farm and received but a limited 
education as the facilities for attending school were very poor. He left 
home when twenty-one to learn the trade of miller, securing a place at 
Redwood in one of the mills. He came west in 1848, in the fall of that year 
locating in this county, where he has been a resident ever since, — more than 
fifty years. He first secured employment in a mill at Dayton, this county, 
where he remained at a good salary for fifteen years. He was a poor man 
when he came west and went on to California in 1852 during the gold 
excitement, making some money by the trip. He saved his earnings and 
invested in one hundred and sixty acres of land in Earl township, locating 
it with a warrant that cost him one hundred and fifty dollars and was 
signed by President Fillmore. He afterward added another eighty, for 
which he paid fifty dollars per acre. His brother first moved upon this land 






, (A u/^i-^. 



Jl" 



.^«!K» 




^'^\ 



f 







w. 



J • 



Ulyd^^ ^ ^^^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 571 

and improved it for him, and he moved upon it in 1863, and from that time 
until 1885 he continued to make this place his home. In 1885 he moved 
to the village of Leland and has since lived a retired life. 

Mr. George was married, while working in Dayton as a miller, in 1852, 
to Miss Elizabeth Stadden, a daughter of William and Judah (Daniels) 
Stadden, who came from Ohio to this county in 1829, and here Mrs. George 
was born four years later. Mrs. George's father was one of the early sher- 
iffs of LaSalle county and also served two terms in the state senate, 
and later as a member of a constitutional convention for the revision of the 
state constitution, and was also prominent in Masonry. He settled at 
Dayton, and there operated one of the first gristmills of the county. He 
was a prominent character in the early history of the county. Wo. record, 
however, that he died rather early in life, being only forty-live years of age 
at the time of his death. 

Mr. and ]Mrs. George were the parents of four children, one of whom 
died in early childhood. The other children were William, deceased, who 
was a hotel-keeper in Spring Mew, Nebraska, where he died in 1891, aged 
thirty-nine years; he married Hellen Target and left a daughter, iMyrtle; 
Ida B. married William G. Cove, a traveling salesman for Kimbark & Com- 
pany, of Chicago; and Edgar C. married Jennie Fluellen, and is living on 
the old homestead in Earl township. Like his father, Mr. George is a 
stanch Democrat, but has never l;)een an aspirant for political preferment. 
He has been honest and industrious and his life has been pure and simple, — 
one that will bear the closest scrutinv. 



JACOB C. JACOBSON. 

Jacob C. Jacobson, proprietor of a large general store at Leland, La- 
Salle county, was born in Haugesund. Xorway, April 16. 1835, and came 
to the L'nited States when in his twenty-second year. His parents. Chris- 
tian and Anna ]\I. Jacobson, lived and died in Norway. Four sons and one 
daughter were born to them, and they were educated and grew to adult 
years in their native land. They were farmers and there did Jacob spend 
the first fifteen years of his life. The following seven years was spent mostly 
at sea and one year he was a clerk in his nati^•e country, and he then took 
a sailing vessel for Quebec. From there he went by rail to Ottawa, Illinois, 
and in the month of July, 1857, reached Adams township, LaSalle county, 
where he went to work as a farm hand. He continued to work as a farm 
hand until 1864. when he moved into Leland and followed various employ- 
ments for the next ten years, — in the lumber-yard, clerking in a drug store 



-7^ BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



^/^ 



for four or live years and as a clerk in a dry-goods store. In 1874 he opened 
his general store in this city and ten years later took his son into partnership, 
and continued as J. C. Jacobson & Son. They handle a big stock of goods 
and have worked up a large trade, buying the building which they occupy 
in 1886, and also a good residence property. 

Mr. Jacobson was married in the fall of 1857 to Miss Cathaline M. 
Karlson. who came to America at the same time as did Mr. Jacobson. 
Their children are: Christian B., who is in partnership with his father, was 
married to Miss Emma Hansen, — by whom he has three children, — and 
was educated in Leland, afterward taking a course in the Bryant & Strat- 
ton Business College; he was brought up in the store and had an inherited 
as well as acquired talent for the mercantile business; Andrew M., who died 
at the age of eight years; and Jacob, who died in his twenty-ninth year. Mr. 
and Airs. Jacobson are earnest members of the Evangelical Lutheran church, 
as are the son and his family. He has held the office of secretary of the 
organization for a numl)er of years. He took out naturalization papers in 
1862 and since that time has cast his vote with the Republican party, also 
serving in a number of offices, such as township collector, president of the 
board of trustees for twenty years, treasurer of the school board, supervisor 
of the township and treasurer of Leland Cemetery Association for fifteen 
years. He has not forgotten the home of his youth and five times has he 
made a visit there, on one occasion spending a year there with his family. 
He is whole-souled and patriotic and represents a class of citizens who reflect 
credit upon their adopted country. 



AUSTIN SANDERSON, 



Austin Sanderson, one of the substantial and wealthy citizens of Leland, 
LaSalle county, was born in Norway, August 14. 1836, and was a son of 
Hely and Adalaide (Knutson) Sanderson, l^oth natives of that country. 
They were the parents of three sons and three daughters: Sander H., who 
died in 1881; Lavina. a resident of Leland: Knute, who died in 1899, 
aged sixty-nine years; Margaret, who died in 1897, aged sixty-one; Austin, 
our subject; and Ellen, of Leland. In 1843 they came to this country with 
their family, landing in ^Milwaukee, Wisconsin, from which place they went 
to Muskego, that state, and from there came to this county, to Earl town- 
ship, where ]\Irs. Sanderson had a brother residing, making the latter part 
of tlie journey on foot. The fatlier entered forty acres of government land 
in Earl township, upon which a small, rude house was built and into this 
the family moved and made their home. He purchased an adjoining forty 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



573 



and placed it all under cultivation, living upon it at his death in 1855, ^^ the 
age of sixty-one years. His widow continued to make her home on this 
property until 1887. when she joined her husband in the better land, after 
a long and useful life of eight}--four years. 

Austin Sanderson was seven years of age when the family came to this 
country, and he was reared to farm work, attending the common school 
during the short winter months. He worked with his father until the 
death of the latter and two years later he bought the old homestead, which 
he still owns, and has added adjoining land until it now contains one hun- 
dred and ninety acres. He has been a most successful farmer and has con- 
tinued to add to his possessions until he now owns seven hundred and 
seventy acres in Earl and Freedom townships, the Munson farm being 
one of the pieces. He has made most of his money by agriculture and kept 
at that business until 1891, when he moved to Leland and engaged in the 
clothing business for five years, under the firm name of Sanderson & Farley. 
He then sold out to his partner and the following 3^ear conducted a grocery 
in company with Martin Olson. He disposed of this business also and 
since then has not been actively engaged in any business. 

He is a stanch Republican and has been on the school board, using his 
best efforts to further the cause of education. During 1898-99 he was the 
president of the board of trustees. He has been a hard-working man and 
knows what a day's work is, never shirking the task before him, and only 
after years of toil did he consent to take life easier. He is a member of 
the Norwegian Evangelical church and a member of the building com- 
mittee when their beautiful house of worship was erected in Leland, and 
he was one of the most liberal contributors to the building fund. 



RALPH E. KEMBER. 



The farming industry of Serena township. LaSalle county, has in the 
subject of this sketch, Ralph E. Kember, an enterprising factor, — a young 
man upon whom early devolved the care of a farm and who has always 
proved himself equal to every emergency. 

Mr. Kember was born June 14, 1863, in the town of Serena, Illinois, a 
son of the well-known and much respected pioneer, William Kember. The 
feeble health of the latter caused him, while yet in the prime of life and while 
his son Ralph was a boy in his teens, to relinquish the active duties of the 
farm, and they naturally fell to the son, who. upon the father's death, be- 
came the head of the establishment. He was then nineteen. Two years 



574 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

later his mother died. He has continued to reside upon the home place 
and successfully conduct its operations, and has never been absent from 
home for any length of time except on two occasions, once making a trip 
to Michigan and at another time to Canada. His efforts as a farmer have 
met with that reward that wisdom and industry combined always bring, 
and he is thus ranked as one of the thrifty and successful men of his town- 
ship. 

Mr. Kember was married June 22, 1892, in Freedom, Illinois, to Ann 
E., a daughter of William Bolder and wife, nee Morsch. Mr. Bolder died 
some years ago, leaving the following named children: Herman; Mrs. 
Kember: Louise, wife of E. A. Stoetzel, of Chicago; and \\'ilHam Bolder, of 
Freedom. The w-idowed mother is also a resident of the village of Freedom. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kember have three children, namely: Belbert William, born 
August 31, 1893; Winnie Esther, born May 20, 1895; and Rachel Norma, 
born February 12, 1897. 

Mr. Kember is a member of the Republican party. At present he is 
the incumbent of the constable's office, and sees that peace and order are 
maintained in Serena. Both Mr. and ]\Irs. Kember are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, holding their membership at Zion Hill, 
Serena township; and he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. 



JOHN N. LEE. 

John Nathaniel Lee, the postmaster and leading merchant of the vil- 
lage of Triumph, LaSalle county, is a native of Betroit, Michigan, born 
May 24, 1843. His father, Joseph Lee, was an Englishman, born in the 
city of London in 1818. In 1836, at the age of eighteen, he left his native 
land and sought his fortune in America, stopping first in New York city. 
By trade he was a marble cutter. He did some fine work in New York 
and in the cemetery at Brooklyn. Also he worked on the capitol at Wash- 
ington, B. C. Finally he came west to Michigan and for a number of 
years made his home in Betroit. He died in Black River, New York, in 
1888. His wife, whose maiden name was Sarah Amesbury, is also deceased. 
Their children besides John N., the subject of this sketch, were as follows: 
Ann, who married James Fitzgerald: Sarah, who was twice married, her 
first husband being Oscar Kennedy and whose present husband is Henry 
Welch; Joseph, deceased; George, of Triumph, Illinois; William, deceased; 
Frank, of Beatrice, Nebraska; Mary, wife of Joseph Graves, of Black River, 
New York; and Agnes, deceased. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 575 

John X. Lee became self-supporting at an early age. When he was 
only seven years old he was an errand boy in a clothing establishment. 
At twelve years he became an apprentice to the painter's trade. Contact with 
the paints and oils being injurious to his health, he turned from this to 
the carpenter's trade, at which he served an apprenticeship of three years. 
He was working at the carpenter's bench when the civil war was inaugu- 
rated. Dropping the saw and hammer in August, 1862, he ofTered his ser- 
vices to his country, enlisting as a member of Company D, Tenth New 
York Volunteers, his brigade forming a part of the Army of the Potomac. 
He was a participant in much of the hard fighting of the war. While in 
the service he lost an eye and had his health shattered, the result being- 
much physical suffering during all the years which have followed. He 
was honorably discharged at Washington, D. C, February 21, 1865. 

At the close of the war Mr. Lee came to Illinois, and for a few years 
worked at his trade at Odell. He engaged then in selling goods, located 
one year in Streator. Illinois, and one year in Clinton, Iowa. Returning to 
Illinois, he settled in the village of Prairie Center, LaSalle county, where 
for a dozen years he conducted a successful business, dating from 1872. 
when he purchased the stock and good will of John Bowman. At the end 
of twelve years he sold out and went to Colorado for the benefit of his 
wife's health. She died December 20, 1886. In August, 1887, he opened a 
store in Triumph, and has since been the principal merchant of the village 
and done a successful business. 

Mr. Lee was married at Odell, Illinois, in 1866, to Miss Olive Moore, 
a daughter of Alvin Moore and wife, nee Russell, who were natives of the 
state of Maine. The fruits of their union were two children, namely: Guy, 
who married Amanda Wallace, and is a partner in the store with his father; 
and Eva Grace. Both son and daughter had good educational advantages, 
the former being a graduate of the Ottawa high school and a business col- 
lege at Holton, Kansas; while the latter was educated in the Illinois State 
Normal School. Mr. Lee's present wife was Mrs. Frances Norwood Tharp, 
whom he married at Hornellsville, New York, February 21, 1889. 

Politically ]\Ir. Lee is an ardent Republican. 



LEWIS T. THOMPSON. 

Lewis T. Thompson, one of the most prominent and substantial busi- 
ness men of Leland, LaSalle county, is a native of that village, having been 
born there August 5, 1866. He is a son of Thomas F. Thompson, a pioneer 
citizen here, and was reared to manhood and received his primary educa- 



576 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

tion in the public schools. He then accepted a clerkship in the hardware 
store of Hovda & Johnson, where he remained five }-ears. gaining much 
valuable experience, which was afterward turned to good account when he 
engaged in business for himself. He now felt that a commercial education 
was necessary for a successful business career, and went to Chicago, where 
he took a complete course in one of the best business colleges of that city. 
He then clerked for a short time for Stark Brothers, general merchants of 
Chicago, when he went to Pullman as head clerk in the hardware establish- 
* ment of L. H. Johnson. The grocery business appeared to ofifer induce- 
ments to a man who possessed push and energy to carry it on and he 
engaged in that for about two years, but finally sold out and secured a 
position with L. Franklin, of Franklin Park, with whom he remained until 
.1893, when he returned to the home of his childhood and opened a general 
store in partnership with Andrew Hayer. under the style of Hayer & 
Thompson. This partnership continued until 1896. when the business was 
disposed of and Mr. Thompson engaged in business by himself, opening a 
stock of general merchandise and adding furnace and plumbing material. 
He has worked up a lucrative business and has contributed materially to 
the prosperity of Leland in pushing his own trade. It is a matter of gratifi- 
cation that the city possesses a man whose business propensities and enter- 
prising spirit have brought it into the notice of the surrounding country 
and called here an outside trade that has added to the general prosperity. 
Mr. Thompson was married in the fall of 1889 to IMiss Linda Jacobson, 
a daughter of Thomas Jacobson, an old settler of this vicinity, and five 
children have been born to them, two of whom have been taken to the better 
world to await the happy reunion. Mr. Thompson is a Republican and has 
been on the county committee of that party, giving unstinted support to 
their success. He has been a member of the village board of trustees and 
was elected supervisor of Adams township in 1896, and re-elected in 1898. 
He is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, the ^Modern Wood- 
men of America and the Knights of the Globe. His prosperity has been 
accomplished by untiring perseverance and industry, combined with strict, 
honorable dealings, and has caused him to be regarded with admiration 
and respect by every one. 



STEPHEN D. ELWELL. 

Stephen Douglas Elwell. one of the enterprising citizens of the town 
of Serena, LaSalle county, was born in this place. November 4. 1859. The 
circumstances of his birth caused him to become identified with the farm 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. ^77 

from his infancy, and his early training was entirely rural. He spent two 
years in the Sugar Grove Normal School, in addition to his elementary 
training in the district school at home. This training furnished him with 
the proper equipment for meeting the affairs of life intelligently and with 
confidence. 

October 6, 1879, he was united in marriage to Minnie, the daughter of 
Adolph Mclnturf and wife, which latter couple was an early family in the 
settlement of Serena and came from Ohio. Mr. Elwell began life on the 
old homestead and his success the past twenty years has been such as to 
warrant him in feeling well satisfied with his efforts. His farm of more than 
two hundred acres is one of the prize farms on the west branch of the "Big 
Indian" and he keeps it in prime condition. 

To acquaint the reader with something concerning the family history 
of the subject at hand, it should be stated that the Elwells came to LaSalle 
county in 1841. The father was Samuel B. Elwell. who was 1)orn in Hard- 
wick, Massachusetts. July 24, 1821. His father (our subject's grandfather) 
was Stillman Elwell, and he moved his family to Iowa the same year that 
Samuel B. settled in Northville town, LaSalle county, Illinois. He died 
in Wright county, Iowa. In 1843 Samuel B. settled and improved the 
farm upon which our subject now resides and is there spending his declining 
years. William Elwell, of Charles City, Iowa, is a brother of Samuel B. 
Elwell, and Mrs. Sophia Brooks, a sister, died there. Samuel B. Elwell 
married, in LaSalle county, January i, 1846, Elizabeth Dolph. whose father, 
Orson Dolph, came from Crawford county, Pennsylvania, to LaSalle 
county. Three of the five children by this union are living, viz.: Dr. Mila 
B., who married Dr. Preston Sharp and with her husband resides and 
practices medicine in Madison, Wisconsin; Evaline, deceased, who married 
Elza Beardsley; Dr. Adaline, the wife of Arthur Portman, of Washington, 
D. C; Jessie C, deceased, who married Joe Gregg, of Freedom, Illinois, 
and Stephen D., our subject. Stephen D.'s children are Jed F., Fred H., 
Grace, Maud, Delbert. Myra and Clair. 

Early in life, Mr. Elwell demonstrated a fondness for music and was 
so infatuated with it that he took up its study, both vocal and instrumental. 
The violin possessed the greatest charm for him and he made himself master 
of the theory of correct execution and acquired a degree of excellence as 
a performer seldom found in the rural districts. He organized an orchestra 
of stringed instruments some years ago, which attained notoriety, and was 
in frequent demand in all the surrounding towns. 

Politically, Mr. Elwell is a Republican. His ancestors were Democrats 
until the civil war, but then even the patriotism of Stephen A. Douglas was 
no longer a panacea for the ills of Democracv. Mr. Elwell has filled 



578 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

nearly the whole list of town offices, is a frequent and regular attendant 
upon county conventions of his party and is regarded as one of the influential 
men of his town. 



WILLIAM P. WARREN. 

Among the representative citizens and leading farmers of Serena town- 
ship, LaSalle county, none perhaps is better known or more highly re- 
spected than the subject of this sketch. William Perry Warren. 

Mr. Warren is a son of one of the early pioneers of LaSalle county, 
Nathan Warren. Nathan Warren was born in the state of ]\Iaine, in the 
year 1806, a son of Samuel Warren, also a native of that state; emigrated to 
New York state with his parents when a child, and in 1836, accompanied by 
his family, came west to Illinois, making the journey hither by wagon, 
spending a month en route and landing in safety at his destination, Serena 
tow^nship, LaSalle county, October 20. He bought land from the govern- 
ment, in section 8, and here improved a farm and reared his family. Con- 
sidering the many obstacles he had to encounter incident to life in a new 
locality while he improved and cultivated his farm and supplied the wants 
of a family, his success was remarkable. He had little or no advantages for 
obtaininsT an education in his vouth. and it was not until he was the head of 
a family that he learned to read and write, then being taught to do so by 
his wife. Later in life a great reader, well informed on the topics of the 
day, and possessing a strong individuality, he became a potent factor in 
the pioneer locality. On all political matters he entertained decided views. 
The ^Morgan incident made him a radical anti-Mason man and the slavery 
Cjuestion found him on the side of the most intense abolitionists. \\'hen 
the Republican party was organized he identified himself with it and became 
one of the leading Republicans in Serena township, which from time to time 
he served in various official capacities, always promoting the best interests 
of the public. In every sense of the word he was a Christian gentleman, 
and was a member of the old "close communion" Baptist church. He died 
in Serena, in 1886. Of his family, we record that his first wife, whose maiden 
name was Lydia Baxter, was the daughter of Connecticut parents. She 
died in 1846. Subsequently he married Maria Lester. The children of the 
first marriage were named \\^illiam P., Fannie ]\I. and Lucien L. The 
dausfhter is married and lives in Ottawa, Illinois, and the son Lucien is a 
resident of Galesburg, this state. There were four daughters by the second 
marriage, all now deceased, namely: Laura and Emily; ]\Iary, the wife of 
Almon Bristol; and Florence, wife of Elmer Perkins. 

Returning now to the immediate subject of this sketch, William P. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 579 

Warren, we find that be was Ivorn in ^ladison county. New York. June 
28, 1828. and was eight years old wlien lie accompanied his parents to 
IlHnois. In the pioneer schools of the locality in which they settled he re- 
ceived his early training. He relates an incident of his experience as a 
school-boy calculated to undeceive the modern youth as to the actual 
conditions imder which the pioneer boys and girls of the west were edu- 
cated. Many of the early schools were kept in dwellings that had been 
abandoned or for any reason were unoccupied, and in this instance a double 
log house was being used liy the school. One night it rained and some 
roaming cattle took shelter on the porch connecting the two buildings. 
One of the animals found the leather latch-string and began chewing it, 
which caused the door to open, and in walked the cows and took posses- 
sion of the school-room! Books were scattered about tlie room and there 
were other evidences that cattle were not the tidiest housekeepers in the 
world. The puncheon floor had a passage through to the cellar and one 
of the cows found its way thither, where it was found by our subject the 
next mornino- when he went to school! The children of the closing days 
of the nineteenth century are scarcely able to imagine that very many such 
incidents, and even more laughable ones, actually occurred where now are 
to l)e found such modern and greatly superior accommodations and appli- 
ances for their instruction. 

On reaching manhood Mr. Warren continued in the occupation in 
which he had been reared, that of farming, and settled down to it in earnest 
after his return from the Pacific coast, whither he went in cjuest of gold. 
It was ]\Iarch 20, 1850, that he started for California. This journey he 
made across the plains, by caravan, and after five months of weary travel 
he landed in "Hangtown,"' now Placerville, California, where he 
began work as a prospector. \\'hile he flid not. in the language of the 
miner, "strike it rich," in the course of two years he got enough of the 
shining metal together to pay for a large piece of the land he now owns. 
He returned home by the wa}- of the Nicaragua route, purchased the partial 
swamp that is now so well improved and so tillable, and has been a suc- 
cessful farmer e\-er since. The prairies of Illinois in their wild state were full 
of "rattlers" and it was a continuous battle between the snake and tlie 
settler as to supremacy. The ground was rife with them in the spring, the 
fields were overrun with them in summer and the meadows were guarded 
by them in the autumn. While stacking wheat on a chilly day one season, 
these pests (having secreted there for warmth) would fall out of the bundles 
upon Mr. Warren's head or be thrown from the load by his father to be 
killed by the son, and on that particular day he killed twenty! He says 
he never let a snake get away that he saw, heard or smelled! 



58o BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Mr. Warren has ever been a Republican in politics, interested in the 
success of his party and the general good of his township and county. He 
has filled the of^ce of deputy county surveyor, which business he acquired 
while acting as assistant for Surveyor Brumback many years ago. He 
makes plans for bridges and other structures requiring" the services of a 
civil engineer, and has acquired an excellent reputation for his work in this 
line. 

During the latter part of the civil war Mr. \\'arren was in the Union 
armv ten months; was stationed at Mobile. Alabama, as a member of the 
Fortv-seventh Illinois Infantry, and saw the surrender of Fort Blakely. 
At the close of the war he received an honorable discharge and returned 
to his h-ome. 

At the age of twenty-six years Mr. Warren was united in marriage to 
Miss Delia A., daughter of Samuel Flint, of Ohio. She died ]\Iarch 7, 1893. 
To this union we record the birth of these children, namely: ^Marion A., 
the eldest; Horace, who married Lyda Roe; Geneva (deceased), who was 
the wife of John Woolsey; Lewis E., who married Helga Holmba; and 
Harry and Sherman, both single and still at home. In 1894 ^Ir. \\'arren 
married for a second wife Mrs. Louise Granteer, nee Dann. of Pennsyl- 
\'ania birth. 



TOHX GOEDTXER. 



For many years a resident of Alendota. Illinois, and prominently identi- 
fied with the financial interests of this city, is found the subject of this 
sketch, John Goedtner. As the name indicates, Mr. Goedtner is of German 
origin. He was born in ^^'allroth, biu'germeisterei Asbach, bezirk Coblenz, 
Germany, February 10, 1849. -^ ^^^'^ ^f John 'SI. and Margaretha (Erlen- 
born) Goedtner, and one of a family of eleven children, six sons and live 
daughters, only three of whom are now living, — John; Heinrich, of Buch- 
holz, Westerwald, Germany; and Anton, of ]\Iendota, Illinois. Both 
parents, farmers, lived and died in Germany, — the father in August, 1893, 
at the age of seventy-three years, and the mother in ]\Iay, 1895, at the ag"e 
of sixty-seven years. Both were Catholics. The father filled various 
minor offices in his town, and, as is the custom in that country, served a 
term in the army. During the war in Baden his command was called as a 
reserve, but immediately thereafter the war was declared at an end. Going 
back further in the history of the family, we find that the paternal grand- 
father of our subject was John Goedtner, also a farmer, who died in Ger- 



'. 35^-. 






BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 581 

manv, at the age of seventy-one years. His family was composed of five 
sons and one daughter. Tlie maternal grandfather of Mr. Goedtner was 
Kasper Erlenborn. He was a grocer, baker and tavern-keeper, and the 
government contractor to furnish bread to the starving poor during the 
famine of 1847 ^"<J 1849. His age also was seventy-one at the time of 
death, which occurred in 1871, at Mendota, Illinois, to which place he had 
come in 1858. In his family were eleven children. 

John Goedtner came to America in November, 1866, a youth in his 
'teens, equipped with a fair education and ambitious to make his way in 
the world. He came direct to Mendota, Illinois, and as a clerk entered the 
employ of his uncles, Anton, John ]\Iichael, Gottfried, Philip and Mark 
Erlenborn. His uncle Philip is the only one of these now living. At that 
time they were engaged in a grocery, crockery and saloon business, which 
they continued for several years, and in connection therewith they started 
the Germania Bank, in 1874. In the meantime, in 1873, the subject of 
our sketch went to Chicago, where he spent two years, the first six months 
as a student in Bryant and Stratton's Business College, and the second 
year as a bookkeeper for James S. Kirk & Company, soap manufacturers. 
Returning to Mendota in 1875. ^^^ ^^'^^ made cashier of the Germania Bank, 
which position he filled up to December, 1876, also during that time acting 
as general overseer in his uncle's store. In 1876, after his uncle Anton died, 
he became a partner in the bank with John M., the firm being Erlenborn 
& Goedtner until July i, 1877, when it was succeeded by Madden & 
Goedtner, the present firm style. 

Mr. Goedtner resides in a pleasant home on the corner of Washington 
street and Wisconsin avenue, in which block he has lived since 1879. He 
was married February 25, 1879, to Miss Mary L. Clinefelter, daughter of 
Einderan Clinefelter and wife, nee Jacobs. They have four children, xA.nna 
L., Ida M., Justin T. B. and Theresia. Both he and his wife are members 
of the Catholic church, and with a number of social and other organizations 
he is prominently identified. He is president of the Germania Society, and 
for a number of years from 1875 '^'^'^s its secretary. Also he is president of 
the Germania Gesang Verein. Politically, he harmonizes with the Demo- 
cratic party, and has served as city treasurer of Mendota, to which office 
he was elected for the fourth time and is at present deputy city treasurer. 
In 1894 he was nominated by acclamation for LaSalle county treasurer on 
the Democratic ticket, but was defeated for the office, his party being in the 
minoritv, but he made a creditable race, holding even more than the 
full strength of his party. An important enterprise of Mendota with 
which Mr. Goedtner is connected is the Mendota Light and Heat Com- 
pany, of which he is president. Much more might be said of the active, 



582 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

useful life of Mr. Goedtner, but enough has been given to indicate his 
position and standing, namely, in the front ranks of the leading citizens 
of his city and county. 



■W&^ 



RANSOM D. PALMER. 



Ranking with the representative farmers of Ophir township, LaSalle 
county, is found the gentleman with whose name we are pleased to intro- 
duce this re\'iew. Ransom Dunn Palmer. 

]\Ir. Palmer was born on the farm on which he now lives and which 
has always been his home, October 18, 1857. He was educated in the 
Englewood high school. After completing his four years" course in that 
institution he became actively identified with the management of the farm. 
His father becoming enfeebled more and more as age crept on. the responsi- 
bilities of the farming operations were finally all transferred to the son. 
Ransom D. 

Joseph Snow Palmer, the father of Ransom D., was born in \\'arsaw. 
New York, April 29. 1819. a son of Thomas and Rebecca (Snow) Palmer, 
w^ho emigrated from Xew York to Medina county, Ohio, in 1831. and to 
Kane county, Illinois, seven years later. In 1843 Joseph S. Palmer re- 
turned to Ohio and bought the old home place, but in the fall of that year 
sold it and came back to Illinois, settling then in LaSalle county. Decem- 
ber 15, 1845, l""^ married Cynthia Parker, who died in July, 1899, at their 
home in Ophir township, whither they had moved in the spring of 185 1. 
His death occurred June 2"/, 1892. Their children are as follows: ]\Irs. 
Azema Kimmey, of Chicago, Illinois: Rush H., of Miden, Nebraska: Ran- 
som D., w'hose name initiates this review: ]^Irs. Alma Smith, of Peoria, 
Illinois; and Dr. Enos E., of Ottawa, Illinois. Mrs. Cynthia Palmer was 
a daughter of Shepard and C. Zarina Parker, and w-as born in Lower Can- 
ada. Her parents removed to Ohio in the early part of the present century 
and died in Medina county, in 1846. Joseph S. Palmer was one of the 
foremost citizens of Ophir township, interested in all that tended to ad- 
vance the general welfare and material prosperity of his township and 
county. His industry and business foresight were amply rewarded by the 
acquirement of a large landed estate, and everybody within the scope of 
his acquaintance was glad to refer to him as a friend. Politically he was a 
Republican: religiously a Free-will Baptist. 

Ransom D. Palmer was married January 13, 1887, to Miss Nettie E. 
Cole, a daughter of Lawrence and Frances (Lowe) Cole. Mrs. Palmer 
is one of a family of five, her brothers and sisters being: Charles D. Cole, 
a commission merchant of Chicago: Edwin Cole, of Pomona, California; 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 583 

Mrs. Catherine Hickok, of Crown Point, New York; and Mrs. J. W. 
Phelps, of Cahfornia. Mr. and Mrs. Pahiier are the parents of three chil- 
dren: Horace E., Ina Frances and Kenneth Cole. 

Ransom D. Palmer is a counterpart of his father in all that contributes 
to good citizenship. He is successful to a marked degree in his vocation 
9.nd is an honor to the name he bears and a credit to the town and county in 
which he lives. A staunch Republican, he has done his part, as he. has been 
called upon, in matters of public interest, but is in no sense a seeker for pub- 
lic honors. 



CHARLES KEMBER. 



Charles Kember. of Serena township, LaSalle county, Illinois, is a son 
of the late William Kember. who was born in Kent county, England, at 
Chelseafield, in the year 18 13. The latter came to the United States in 
1840 with his wife, nee Sarah Castle, and settled in LaSalle county, Illinois. 
They were in poor circumstances but were by nature endowed with an 
industrious disposition and were impelled by a strong desire to acquire a 
home in this Mecca of the poor, and were rewarded for their labors with 
more than mere existence. Mr. Kember had no advantages for obtaining 
an education in his youth and it was not until after his marriage that he 
learned to read and cipher. In his later life, however, he gained a fair 
knowledge of books and papers, and he was a useful and trustworthy citi- 
zen. On his arrival in Illinois he bought a tract of cheap land, which 
"Uncle Sam" was then selling to home-seekers, and through frugal and 
industrious management paid for it, improved it, and subsequently added 
to its area, and at the time of his death he was the owner of a farm of 
two hundred and forty acres. When it is remembered that he was 
"freighted" into this county with an ox team, with only ten dollars in his 
pocket to stand between his family and actual destitution, his accumulations 
do not seem small. He soon became interested in the politics of his 
adopted country, and espoused the cause of the Republican party upon its 
organization, and while he was always interested in public affairs he never 
sought nor accepted office other than that of membership on the school 
board of his district. His first wife died in 1861 and some time afterward 
he married Rachel Brewer, who died in 1885. The children by his first 
marriage were William, who married Kate Reed, was four years in the 
federal army during the civil war, and died in 1889; Alfred, who married 
Miss C. Middleton. died in 1874: Charles, who is the subject proper of this 
sketch; and Albert J., who married Mary McAtee and now resides in 
Oklahoma. The children of the second marriage are Ralph E.; Ella, wife 



584 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

of Wilson W. Hupp; Mary, wife of Lincoln Knight, of Adams township; 
and Arthur T., of Serena township, who married Nellie Harthan. The 
father died in April, 1882. He had lived an honorable, upright and useful 
life and passed to the world beyond believing that "He who doeth all things 
well" would give him the reward that is promised the God-fearing man 
here below. 

Charles Kember was ushered into life in Serena township on the 226. 
of August, 1846. He passed his youth, as was the custom of the farm 
boys of his time, going to school in winter and following the plow in sum- 
mer. He remained at his parental home till past twenty-two years of age, 
when he was attracted to the west by the reports of the large and quick 
profits to be made in the stock business on the frontier. He located at 
Burlingame, Kansas, engaged in the cattle business, and for four years 
reaped a reasonable harvest from his ventures. At the end of that time he 
closed out his business and returned to the state of his birth to be near 
his father and to try his fortune with the money-makers of LaSalle county. 
He turned his attention to farming and soon began acquiring real estate. 
His has not been the fate of "the rolling stone" but rather of the rolling 
snowball. He now owns no less than six hundred acres in Serena town- 
ship, and his home place is one of the finest in LaSalle county. Also he has 
a large creamery in Serena township, which he is successfully operating. 

Mr. Kember was married in 1876 to a young lady whom he met while 
in business in Kansas — Miss Winnie Granteer. a daughter of the late Will- 
iam Granteer. Her mother is now the wife of W. P. W^arren, of Serena, 
Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Kember have three children. — Orville H.. Jesse E. 
and Elsie. 

Mr. Kember votes with the Republican party, has filled the office of 
township assessor and is at present the commissioner of highways and post- 
master of Serena. It is due to him that Serena township has more than 
fifty miles of gravel road, and it is also largely due to his efforts that the 
Republican organization in Serena has been so well preserved, for he has 
been a member of its advisory committee for fifteen years. 



MILTON E. BLANCHARD. M. D. 

Through two decades Dr. Blanchard has engaged in the practice of 
medicine in Marseilles and has won distinctive preferment as a representa- 
tive of the profession. His entire life has been passed in Illinois, his birth 
having occurred in Brookfield township. LaSalle county, on the 30th of 
September, 1852. His parents were Psalter S. and Phoebe (Thorp) 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 585 

Blanchard. His father was born near Rochester, New York, October 18. 
1800, and was married in that city to Miss Thorp, whose birth occurred 
June 14, 1816, and who was a daughter of James Thorp, a native of Genesee 
county, Michigan, and a farmer l^y occupation. Throughout his Hfe 
Psalter S. Blanchard carried on agricultural pursuits. He arrived in La- 
Salle county, Illinois, in 1847, ^'^'^^ purchased a farm on section 16, Brook- 
field township, devoting his energies to its cultivation and improvement 
until his death, which occurred on the 14th of March, 1868. In his family 
w-ere the following children: Adelaide L., Elizabeth, Emily, James S., 
Alba G., Achsah M., Milton E.. Eunice L. and David E., and all are living 
with the exception of Elizabeth and James. 

Dr. Blanchard spent his boyhood days on his father's farm and early 
became familiar with the work of the fields, following the plow and perform- 
ing other services incumbent upon those who engage in the tilling of the 
soil. In 1869, however, he left home and went to Remington, Indiana, 
where he was employed in a grain office. He was ambitious and energetic, 
and, desiring to acquire a better education than had hitherto been vouchsafed 
to him, he spent all his leisure time in study. In the winter of 1873-4 he 
engaged in teaching, and in 1875 joined his brother Alba in conducting a 
drug store, which they purchased, in Cornell, Illinois. In September of 
the same year Dr. Blanchard went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and entered the 
Eclectic Medical College, where he pursued his studies for two terms, after 
which he began the practice of medicine in Norway, LaSalle county. There 
he remained until September, 1877, when he re-entered college, and was 
graduated January 22, 1878. Immediately thereafter he went again to 
Norway and remained there until June, 1880, when he came to Marseilles. 
He has further perfected himself in his chosen calling by a post-graduate 
course in the Rush Medical College at Chicago, where he pursued his 
studies in 1893-4, and while there he was promoted as assistant to Professor 
Adolphus in the clinical chair of gynecology. His professional connection 
with Marseilles covers a period of twenty years, during which time he has 
demonstrated his ability to cope successfully with all sorts of disease. His 
superior skill and his devotion to the profession have won him a creditable 
place in its ranks, and he enjoys the regard of those who, like himself, are 
giving their energies to the healing art. His genial manner in the sick 
room, as well as his skill and ability, makes his visits very desirable. He 
is a member of the LaSalle County Medical Society and of the Illinois 
State Medical Society, and is a surgeon of the Chicago, Rock Island & 
Pacific Railroad Company, — which position he has held ever since 1890. 

' All his life he has manifested a deep interest in all that pertains to the 
welfare of the community, withholding his support from no movement 



586 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

which gives a net residt in favor of human welfare. Accordingly he has 
also been an active politician. A stanch Jeffersonian Democrat, in 1(892 
his party rewarded his zeal and fidelity b}' electing him the coroner of this 
g-reat conntv, which ofifice he filled with credit to the countv and honor to 
himself. He has also distinguished himself in the Masonic fraternity, hav- 
ing held an ofiice in Marseilles Lodge, No. 417, with the exception of one 
vear, for the past eighteen years. He has been elected worshipful master 
five times, and now occupies the chair, for the fourth time, of excellent 
high priest of Shabbona Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, at Ottawa. He is 
also thrice illustrious master of Oriental Council. Royal and Select Masters, 
at Ottawa, a member of Oriental Consistory, Sublime Princes of the Royal 
Secret, Chicago, and of Ottawa Commandery, No. 10. Knights Templar. 
In further social connection with the fraternity he is also a member of 
Medinah Temple of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Sfirine at Chicago. In active philanthropic connection with the order he 
is also a life member and a director of the Illinois Masonic Home for the 
Aged. 

Locally he has just completed one of the finest business blocks hi the 
city of Marseilles and now occupies it with a drug store and his offices. 

On the /th of November, 1874, the Doctor was married to Miss Ella 
M. Bartlett. a daughter of Charles E. and Maria S. (Virgil) Bartlett. She 
was born November 16, 1858, in Naperville, Illinois, and is now the mother 
of four children, namely: Florence, who was born August 15, 1875; ^"ivian 
M., born October 18, 1877: Alfa ^vl., born December 10, 1888: and John, 
born May 23, 1897. 

In all his professional, political and domestic relations the Doctor has 
manifested a trustworthy devotion and responsible skill, and so has won for 
himself a name and fame envied by all. 



WILLIAM CALLAGAN. 

It has been said that if the roll were called of the men who have won 
lasting fame as leaders of this grand republic, of those who have achieved 
great things in the domains of science and commerce, we should be wonder- 
fully surprised to find how large a proportion of these men were reared 
upon farms and shared in the arduous labors of the pioneer, clearing the 
land and preparing it for cultivation, growing strong in body and mind, 
while nourished l)y simple, wholesome country food and invigorated by the 
clear pure air. Thus it is not strange, after all, nor is it remarkable, that 
many return to mother nature and agriculture after a few years, more or 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 587 

less, spent in the feverish pursuits of wealth and honor, realizing that here 
alone is found true contentment. 

William Callagan, one of the progressive farmers of Adams township. 
LaSalle countv, has never aspired to a place in the l)usy world of commerce 
or public life, but has quietly and happily attended to the business of culti- 
vating his homestead and providing for the needs of his little family. He 
is a son of William Callagan, who was born in Ireland in 1820. of poor, 
but honest and upright parents. He learned a trade, and in 1845 came to 
the United States. Upon coming to LaSalle county he bought a tract of 
government land, and continued to improve and cultivate the place during 
his life-time. His career was that of an industrious, patriotic citizen, his 
chief ambition to do his duty in e\'ery way and to merit the good opinion of 
those who knew him. In his political convictions he was a stanch Repub- 
lican. He died in 1896, and is survived by his widow, whose maiden name 
was Jane Fleming, and by their three children, namely: Mrs. Mary Hupp, 
of Northville township; Mrs. Annie Madison, and the subject of this article. 

The latter was born January 13, 1848. in Adams township, and has 
spent his entire life here. His education consists of the knowledge gained 
in the schools of this district, together with the more practical learning of 
experience, reading and observation. Industry and well applied energy are 
the secrets of the success he has won, and now in the prime of life he is the 
owner of four hundred and thirty acres of valuable land in LaSalle county, 
and is accounted one of the leading agricidturists of this locality. Ampl}- 
abundant as are his means to support himself and family for the remainder 
of his days, he is not a lover of idleness, and has no desire to retire as long 
as he is blessed with health and strength. 

At the age of thirty-three years, December 2/, 1881, Mr. Callagan 
married Miss Eva, daughter of William Reed, of Sycamore, Illinois, and 
they have had born to them four children, namely: Ralph Jason, Rilla May, 
Lloyd Harrison and Cora Ann. Mr. Callagan and family are members 
of the Methodist church, he being one of the trustees of the congregation 
with which he is identified, and having served as superintendent of the 
Sundav-school. 



lOSEPH SHERMAN. 



Joseph Sherman, a prosperous farmer and stock-raiser of Northville 
township, LaSalle county, was born in the township in which he lives, 
September 20, 1846, a son of Stephen and Louise Sherman, natives of Ger- 
many, the former born in Prussia and the latter in Alsace-Lorraine. 
Stephen Sherman came to this country a young man, about the year 1839, 



588 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

having a brother John who had preceded him to this country and settled in 
IlHnois, — Northville township. LaSalle county, — when the Indians were 
yet plentiful through this section of the country. The mother of our sub- 
ject came to this country about the time the father did. They were mar- 
ried in Illinois, and afterward he pre-empted a tract of government land, 
one hundred and ninety-three acres, in Northville township, where they 
spent the rest of their lives and died, his death occurring in 1869. when he 
had attained the age of sixty-four years: hers in 1875. at the age of fifty- 
one. They were the parents of ten children, namely: Joseph; Sophia, de- 
ceased; Bosine, deceased; Elizabeth. Henry, Mary, Kate, Edward, infant, 
deceased, and Caroline Lawrence. In their religious faith the parents 
were' devout members of the Catholic church. 

Joseph Sherman has all his life continued in the occupation in which 
he was reared, and in his farming operations has been rewarded for his labor 
by a fair degree of success. While he carries on general farming he has 
always given more or less attention to stock-raising. 

In 1873, at the age of twenty-tive years. ^Ir. Sherman married ]Miss 
Louise Antoine. a native of Northville township and a daughter of Lawrence 
and Catherine Antoine, early settlers of this township, having come here 
from their native land, Alsace-Lorraine, Germany. Mr. and ^Mrs. Sherman 
have three children. — Lawrence. Clara and Henry. 

Mr. Sherman is identified with the church in which he was reared, and 
politically is a Democrat, supporting the same party as did his father. 
As to public position, he has filled the oftice of road commissioner. 



al:man a. clapsaddle. 

Alman A. Clapsaddle is a brilliant young attorney of Leland. Illinois, 
who is rapidly forcing his way to a prominent place among the legal fra- 
ternity of this county. He was born November 25, 1868, in De Kalb, 
De Kalb county, this state, and is a son of Andrew and ]\Iary (Ames) Clap- 
saddle, prominent residents of that county. 

Andrew Clapsaddle was of German origin, but the place of his nativity 
was Herkimer county. New York, whence he came to De Kalb county in 
1848. He had received a good education and the earlier years of his 
life were spent in teaching school, a vocation for which he was eminently 
fitted. Coming to this state he engaged in agricultural pursuits and it was 
while thus ene-ag-ed that he met ]Mrs. Marv Heustis. nee Ames, for whom 
a strong friendship was formed. Her parents were of Scotch-English 
descent and were early settlers of Stonington. Massachusetts, moving later 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 589 

to Otsego county, New York, where the daughter, Mary, was born. The 
friendship which sprung up between Andrew Clapsaddle and Mrs. Mary 
Heustis soon ripened into love and cuhninated in their marriage. A family 
of five children blessed their home, which was rudely broken by the death 
of the affectionate wife and mother in 1873. Left with a number of small 
children to care for, the father chose a second wife to preside over his house- 
hold and care for his little ones and was permitted to remain with them until 
they were grown to adult years. In 1894 he laid down the burdens of 
life and entered into the dreamless sleep that leads to life everlasting. 

Alman A. Clapsaddle was five years of age when he was bereft of his 
mother's love and care, but remained at home and grew to manhood on 
his father's farm. He assisted with the chores common to all farms and 
attended the country schools; but farm work did not appear congenial 
and he decided to enter a profession, choosing the legal as offering the 
greatest scope. He attended school at Leland and then entered Jennings 
Seminary at Aurora. Leaving school he became a teacher for four or five 
years, having in the meantime entered the office of ]\L T. Maloney, of 
Ottawa, with whom he studied two years and was admitted to the bar in 
June, 1892. He first practiced in Ottawa for one year and in 1893 came to 
Leland, where he has since been established and has worked up a good 
clientage. He has a large patronage among the better class of people and 
his skill in the treatment of the cases that come under his care has shown a 
surprising ability in one of his experience. 

Mr. Clapsaddle was married in 1890 to Miss Alinnie Potter, daughter 
of C. M. Potter, of Leland. and two children have been the fruits of their 
union, Reita M. and Janet A. He is a member of Leland Lodge, No. 558, 
F. & A. M., and Sandwich Chapter, No. 107, R. A. M. He is a Republican 
in his political views and is well posted on all the current events of the day. 
He has won the respect of the community l)y his conduct and general 
bearing and his friends predict for him a bright and prosperous future. 



ANDREW N. ANDERSON. 

The gentleman whom we here select as deserving special mention in a 
collection of biographical sketches of citizens of LaSalle count}-, is a l^anker 
at Leland. He was born in Adams township, this county, March 17, 1855, a 
son of Nelson and Ann (Ouam) x\nderson. His parents were both natives 
of Norway. He came to this country about 1845 ^"'-^ ^is wife in 1842. and 
were married in De Kalb county, Illinois, in which county they continued to 
reside for a short time, and then moved to Adams township, LaSalle county. 



590 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Nelson Anderson was a farmer by vocation and died in 1864. at the age of 
forty-four years; and his wife is still living, now aged sixty-eight years, and 
living on the old homestead in Adams township. Their six children were 
Sophia B.', ]\Iattie S., Lorinda S., Andrew N., John N.. and Nelsey M. All 
these are now deceased excepting onr subject and John N.. who is a farmer 
on the old homestead. 

Mr. Anderson of this sketch was reared to farm duties and educated 
at Leland; and he continued in agricultural pursuits in Adams township 
until he was thirty-two years of age. In the autumn of 1883 he and Thomas 
F. Thompson formed a partnership, he buying out Mr. Thompson's former 
partner. Air. Buland, in the grain business, ever since which time the firm 
name has been Thompson & Anderson, b-ankers and grain merchants. They 
established the Leland Bank in 1896, and are doing a safe and profitable 
business. 

yir. Anderson has been a resident of Leland ever since 1883. He has 
served as supervisor, is a Republican and a member of the Alethodist Epis- 
copal church. In 1884 he married Anna Void, who died in 1897. leaving 
three children — \'ira A., Xelson C. and Nieda J. 



CHARLES A. COULTER. 

Charles Alvin Coulter, the genial and accommodating postmaster of 
LaSalle, Illinois, has been a lifelong resident of this city, having been 
ushered into life here June 15, 1859. He is a son of Robert K. and Mary 
E. (Allinder) Coulter, well known substantial citizens of this city. The 
father was born September 22. 1822, in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, 
where he was educa'ted and learned the trade of painter. When twenty 
years of age he began work as a journeyman painter and later contracted 
work and painted many steamboats at Brownsville and Pittsburg. In 
1857 he came to LaSalle and opened a shop, soon acquiring the reputation 
of being a first-class house painter and decorator. He was married in 
Brownsville, Pennsylvania, to Aliss Mary E. Allinder, in 1851. Six chil- 
dren were born to them, namely: William G., Emily J., Charles A., John 
A. and two that are deceased. 

Charles A. Coulter attended, the public schools of LaSalle. finishing 
with a course in the high school. As his father was a painter and deco- 
rator of ability, it was not strange that the son should show a decided 
aptitude for the work and make it his vocation. For seventeen years he 
was the junior member of the firm of R. K. Coulter & Son. general painters 
and decorators. ]\Ir. Coulter was married in 1887 to ]\Iiss Lucy J. Brown, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 591 

daughter of N. R. Brown, one of the oldest citizens of Peru, lUinois. 
Charles A. Coulter has been prominently identified with the Republicans 
of LaSalle county since early youth and has contributed much toward the 
success of that party in his district. For seven years and a half he was a 
member of the city council, but resigned in 1894 in order that he might 
take his wife to Colorado, hoping the change would prove beneficial to 
her health. This hope was a delusive one and she passed away in October, 
1896, and was laid to rest in that state beside an infant son. Donald. With 
two little ones. Lucy M. and Robert G.. left to his fatherly care, he returned 
to his native city and once more took up the duties of life. On May 4. of 
the following year. 1897. '^^ ^^^^^ commissioned postmaster of LaSalle and 
has filled the of^ce most acceptably since. He is a Knight Templar Mason 
and stands high in the councils of that body, being the present worshipful 
master of Acacia Lodge. Xo. 67, A. F. & A. M.. of which he served as 
the same officer in the years 1886-7 ^"^^ '^• 



FRANK DALE. 



Frank Dale, deceased, was born in Yorkshire, England. January 2;^, 
181 2. and was struck and killed by a train in Leland. Illinois. September 4. 
1890. 

When a small child, in 1819. Mr. Dale came with his father. David Dale, 
and family, to this country, their settlement l^eing in Luzerne county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he was reared. In 1834 he went to Port Huron, Michigan, 
where he remained two years, thence coming to Illinois and first locating 
in De Kalb county, near Freeland, where he farmed and acquired consid- 
erable land. Disposing of his interests there, he removed to Somonauk, 
Illinois, in 1853, and established the first store in the town. In 1859 he came 
to Leland and engaged in the grain business, which he conducted for a period 
of ten }'ears. He then moved to a farm in De Kalb county, five miles north of 
Leland. and for seven }'ears carried on farming, after which he returned 
to Leland and lived retired up to the time of his death. 

Mr. Dale was a man of local prominence. For several years he was 
the president of the De Kalb County Old Settlers' Association. Politically 
he was a Republican, and for a time served as the president of the board of 
village trustees. For many years he was actively identified with the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, in which he was an ordained minister, and while he 
never had a regular charge he frequently preached, substituting his services 
for that of absent ministers. He was the youngest of a family of eight chil- 
dren and was the last to leave the scenes of this life. 



592 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Of Mr. Dale's family, we record that he was twice married, and by his 
first wife had a large number of children. August 17. 1833. he wedded 
Maria Webster, a daughter of John Webster, and for nearly forty years their 
lives were happily blended together, her death terminating the union August 
21, 1872. They were the parents of eleven children. The first rwo died 
in infancy, one died at the age of eight years, and eight are still living, namely: 
Clara, the wife of George Metcalf, of Oklahoma; Caroline, the wife of H. L. 
Bacon, of Chicago, Illinois; Mary E., the wife of \[. L. Watson, of Andale, 
Kansas; Susan E., the wife of John Beckwith, of Wichita, Kansas; Arthur 
H., of whom mention is made further on in this sketch; John W., of Wichita, 
Kansas; J. Frank, ex-chief justice of Oklahoma; and David M.. a district 
iudge residing in Sedgwick county, Kansas. December 7, 1873, ■Mr. Dale 
married Sarah E., the widow of Ira Kipp, who is now living with a daughter 
in Dawson, Minnesota. 

Arthur H. Dale, referred to al)Ove. was born in Luzerne county, Penn- 
sylvania, February 2, 1846, while his parents were making a brief sojourn 
there, that being his father's bovhood home; and in his infancv Arthur H. 
was brought to Illinois. At Somonauk he was reared and received a com- 
mon-school education, and later he took a six-months commercial course in 
a Chicago business college. In 1861 he engaged in the grain business at 
Leiand, with his father, their association continuing until the summer of 
1864, when young Dale enlisted in Company E, Eighty-ninth Illinois Volun- 
teer Infantry, as a recruit, and was in the Fourth Army Corps, under Gen- 
eral Thomas, remaining in the service until the close of the war, when he 
was honorably discharged. He was a participant in the battles of Franklin 
and Nashville, Tennessee. 

Returning to Leiand, Illinois, after the war, Mr. Dale again engaged 
in business with his father; was with him until 1870, and afterward was for a 
time alone in business there. Then he went to Plattsburg, Missouri, where 
he spent two years and a half, engaged in the hardware business. From 
Missouri he went to California, and after spending a year in the Golden state, 
near Sacramento, he returned to Leiand and engaged in the live-stock busi- 
ness, which he has since successfully conducted, owning a fine tract of land 
here. He was in the hardware trade for eight years in Leiand, just after his 
return from Missouri. 

Mr. Dale is a Republican, and has always shown a commendable interest 
in public affairs. He has served as road commissioner, having filled that 
office for some ten years; from 1893 to 1895 inclusive he was the assessor 
of Adams township, LaSalle county, and for the past twenty years has been 
a school director. Fraternally he is identified with the Masonic order, the 
Eastern Star, and the Knio;hts of the Globe. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 593 

He was married in December, 1874, to Louie H. Gedney, a (laughter of 
Henry E. Gedney, of Ottawa, Illinois. Mr. Gedney was the founder of the 
Ottawa Constitution, now the Republican-Times. 



GEORGE THOMAS FOREMAN. 

The subject of this sketch is one of the successful farmers of Adams 
township, LaSalle county, Sheridan his postoffice address. It was 
in Kent county, England, April 13, 1856, that he was born, a son of George 
and Emily (Nettlingham) Foreman. The Foreman family emigrated to this 
country in 1858. Coming west at once to Illinois, they settled on the Lyman 
farm, near the line between Serena and Freedom townships, LaSalle county, 
where they resided for a number of years. The parents and one daughter 
are now residents of Iroquois county, Illinois, and the father is now seventy 
years of age. Of their children we record that George Thomas, the subject 
of this sketch, is the eldest; Alfred married Annie King and resides in Iro- 
quois county; Ellen R., the wife of Anson Taylor, lives in Dodge county, 
Nebraska; Maggie, the wife of Melvin Sturdevant, resides in Birmingham, 
Alabama; Henry, who married Mary Sturdevant, is in Iroquois county; 
William E., who married Phoebe Carlock, is a resident of Minnesota; Albert 
R., also of Iroquois county, married Lavina Brandenburg; Walter, of Chi- 
cago; Lewis J., who married Mrs. Celia (Van Vleet) Elgin, and resides in 
Iroquois county; and Fannie S. resides in Watseka, Illinois, with her par- 
ents. 

George T. was reared in LaSalle county and received a limited education 
in the local schools. He remained with his parents and aided in the support 
of the home until he was twenty years of age. He then secured employ- 
ment as a farm hand in Adams township, and v,as thus occupied two or 
three years. Carefully saving his earnings, he acquired an interest in a 
threshing machine, of which he became manager, and while running the 
thresher made some money. In 1888 he went to work in the bridge de- 
partment of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, where he was em- 
ployed for two years. In 1890 he came to the old Cottew homestead, 
his father-in-law's home, and has since resided here. A man of energy and 
good management, he is meeting- with justly deserved success in his farming 
operations. 

Mr. Foreman was married March 13. 1883, to Miss Caroline, daughter 
of James and Harriet Cottew, early settlers of Adams township. Mr. Cot- 
tew died in 1894, at the age of seventy-seven years. He was a soldier in 
the civil war, a member of the First Illinois Regiment of Light Artillery, 



594 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



and was discharged from service on account of disability. Mr. and Mrs. 
Foreman have two children — Pearl S. and Allen R. — aged respectively four- 
teen and six years. 

Fraternally Mr. Foreman is identified with the Modern Woodmen of 
America, having his membership in Baker Camp, No. 4434. He is a Re- 
publican in his political affiliations. 



EDWARD A. NATTINGER. 

Probably one of the best known men in journalistic circles of northern 
Illinois is Edward A. Nattinger, of Ottawa, now^ connected with the Republi- 
can-Times of that flourishing city. He has occupied numerous important 
pubHc positions of trust and honor and stands high in political and frater- 
nal organizations. His ability and direction of affairs entrusted to him, 
and his worth and integrity, have won for him the friendship of all who have 
been associated with him in any manner. 

Born June 20, 1846, a son of J. G. Nattinger, who for many years was 
a leading merchant of Ottawa, the subject of this sketch claims this as his 
native town. In his boyhood he obtained a liberal education in the public 
and private schools of the place; but the excitement occasioned by the open- 
ing years of the great civil war interrupted his studies, and in the fall of 
1862 he ran away and enlisted as a bugler at Peoria, Illinois. Ere long 
he was promoted to the ranks and he served faithfully and gallantly until the 
close of the great conflict, being but nineteen years of age when he was 
granted an honorable discharge, August 5, 1865. The boy soldier's record is 
one well worthy of many who were twice his years in age; and, summed 
up in the briefest form, it may be stated thus: Participated in twelve battles 
of the war; was in numberless skirmishes; went on the long and exciting 
chase after John ]\Iorgan, who was at last captured near the Ohio-Penn- 
sylvania line; went on the several daring cavalry raids in Virginia, Ten- 
nessee, North Carolina and finally was made a prisoner on the Stoneman 
raid in Georgia, and suffered the horrors of the rebel prisons of Anderson- 
ville and Macon, Georgia, and Charleston and Florence, South Carolina. 

Resuming the paths of peace, young Nattinger went to Chicago and 
pursued a course in Bryant & Stratton's Business College and for some 
time was employed as a clerk in the Ottawa postoffice and in dry-goods and 
grocery houses. Then he began to learn the printer's trade, in the office 
of the Ottawa Republican, finishing in the Lyons (Iowa) Mirror office. 
By degrees he worked up, taking various positions, including those of re- 
porter and advertising solicitor, and started three Illinois journals — the Buda 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 595 

Enterprise, the Bradford Chronicle and the Wyoming Blade — running the 
whole number for three months himself. For six years he was the city 
editor of the Joliet Republican, Sun and Record; and in June, 1877, in 
partnership with Mr. Fletcher, he started the Ottawa Daily Times, the first 
daily established in this county of the ten now published. A few months 
later Mr. Fletcher retired from the business, and at the end of another 
year the weekly edition of the paper was established also. In 1890 the 
Times and the Republican were consolidated, F. M. Sapp, the editor of 
the Times, becoming the senior partner of the new organization. Needless 
to say, the Republican-Times is recognized as one of the representative 
papers not only of this county but also of the great state of Illinois, and 
the high standard which it always has maintained is steadily winning for 
itself friends among the most intelligent citizens. 

An influential factor in the Republican party of this section, Mr. Nat- 
tinger has been the secretary of the Young Men's Republican Club of Joliet, 
and has occupied like positions in the Will county and LaSalle county cen- 
tral committees of his party, and has been the president of the Young Men's 
Republican Club of Ottawa, and chairman of the town committee. From 
1890 to 1894 he was the postmaster of this place, serving under President 
Harrison's administration. 

Mr. Nattinger is a past commander of Seth C. Earl Post, No. 156, G. A. 
R.: is the chief of the staff of the department of Illinois, and aide-de-camp 
to the commander-in-chief; is the president of the Fourteenth Illinois Cavalry 
Regimental Association; a member of the committees having in charge the 
Illinois Soldiers' Home, the Illinois Soldiers' Orphans' Home and the Illinois 
Soldiers' Widows' Home. In the Masonic order he is identified with Occi- 
dental Lodge, No. 40, A. F. & A. M., and Shabbona Chapter, No. 37, R. A. 
M.; and of Mary E. Chapter, Order of the Eastern Star; and he is also 
associated with the Modern Woodmen of America, the Knights of Honor 
and the Ottawa Boat Club. 



HIRAM E. BAKER. 



Hiram Emmit Baker, of Dayton township, LaSalle county, is a promi- 
nent farmer and stock dealer and is entitled to more than a passing notice 
on the pages of this work, devoted as it is to a portrayal of the lives of the 
representative men and women of LaSalle county. 

Mr. Baker may well be termed a self-made man. He began life a poor 
boy, he toiled and saved, and his industry and good management have 
Ijrought hini the success he now enjoys. He was born in Clinton county, 



596 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

New York, February 4, 1848, the son of a farmer, and was reared and 
schooled in Plattsburg. His father, Daniel Baker, was born at I^hazy, 
New York, and died in LaSalle county, Illinois, in 1884. He and his wife, 
whose maiden name was Laura Card, were the parents of the following 
named children: James, of Allegan, Michigan; Martha, wife of Henry 
Miller, of Oakland, California; H. E.; George, of Iowa; Oscar, of Dayton 
township, LaSalle county; Charles, of Des Moines, Iowa; Susan, who mar- 
ried Gideon Ruger; and Nelson, a traveling salesman in Kentucky. 

H. E. Baker, on leaving school, entered the employ of a Mr. Benedict, 
a milkman, with whom he remained two years, beginning at a salary of 
ten dollars per month, and five years with I. S. Thorn. At the end of the 
seven years he had assisted his father to the extent of one hundred and thirty 
dollars and had six hundred dollars in the bank. He then married and rented 
his father-in-law's farm, which he ran four years, after which he was pre- 
vailed upon by Gabe Ruger, his wife's uncle, to emigrate to Illinois. Com- 
ing here in 1874, he was employed as the foreman on Mr. Ruger's farm, 
in which capacity he served two years, receiving four hundred dollars the 
first year and five hundred dollars the second. The third year he purchased 
eighty acres of land in Dayton township, the price being four thousand 
dollars. Half of this amount he paid down. The other half and five hun- 
dred dollars worth of stock he went in debt for, paying ten per cent interest 
on the money, and at the end of five years he had the farm paid for. Then, 
with the hope of bettering himself, he went to Greene county, Iowa, but 
returned to his former residence in Dayton township, after an absence of 
one year. He bought one hundred acres on the bluff, near Ottawa, at 
sixty-five dollars an acre, on five years' time; built a modern house and 
barn, and when the five years had elapsed his obligations had all been met. 
Still another tract of eighty acres he contracted for, at five thousand five hun- 
dred dollars, four thousand dollars of which consideration he received four 
years' time on with the usual results, prompt payment of principal and 
interest. The last addition he made to his property was the stock yards 
west of Ottawa, which he purchased from the Phelps estate. These yards 
he himself used for a time, while he was engaged in buying and shipping 
stock, but now has them leased. Such rapid accumulation of wealth among 
the farming classes where the products of the soil are depended upon solely 
to meet such investment expenses is remarkable, even wonderful; and the 
instances are rare where such good fortune attends so regularly and so 
persistently as in this one. 

Mr. Baker was married in 1870, at Plattsburg, New York, to Annie 
Ruger, a daughter of Gideon Ruger. The Ruger family is one of prominence 
in the townships of Serena and Dayton, where they are classed among the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 597 

most inclnstrious and progressive people of their respective localities. Mr. 
and Mrs. Baker have six children, namely: Sadie, Julius, Anna, Florence, 
Hiram E., Jr., and Glen. 

j\Ir. Baker affiliates with the Republican party and takes an active in- 
terest in local affairs. He has served as a member of the board of road 
commissioners, of which he was the treasurer. 



OSMAN MATTHIAS DANIELSON. 

The Danielson family has been prominent in the settlement and devel- 
opment of LaSalle county, coming here in pioneer days. Hard-working, up- 
right and just in all their dealings, they have merited the respect and confi- 
dence which have been lil)erally accorded them by neighbors and acquaint- 
ances. 

The father of our subject is Christopher Danielson, who was born in 
\'adla, Norway, January 4, 1834. and when one year old was brought to 
this country by his father, who settled in the vicinity of Norway, LaSalle 
county, and carried on a farm there until 1849, when he and his wife and all 
his children save Christopher fell victims to the cholera. When twenty-one, 
Christopher Danielson married Ann, daughter of Osman Thompson, a w^ell 
known farmer owning property near Big Indian, LaSalle county. She came 
with her father to the United States in 1835, ^vhen she was two years old. 
Durinsf his active life, Mr. Danielson carried on a fine farm near Leland, 
and became prosperous. In 1897 he retired and went to Lamoni, Iowa, 
where his sons, Daniel C. and Joseph, reside. His eldest son, Martin, has 
charge of the Old Folks' Home at Lamoni, an institution supported by the 
church of the Latter Day Saints. Another son, Edwin, born in 1869, is 
engaged in business with our subject, and David N. is a grain merchant, of 
Thompson, Illinois. The daughters are Bertha, wife of Lorenzo Hayer. of 
LaSalle county; Ida, Mrs. Charles Hayer; and Mary, Mrs. Andrew Gaard, 
of Sheridan, Illinois. 

O. M. Danielson was born in this county, November 15. 1863. After 
having completed his liberal public-school education he came to Leland 
and for a year was engaged in the grocery business. From his boyhood 
he had evinced great aptitude in the use of all kinds of tools, and he 
concluded to embark in the manufacture of wagons and carriages in Leland. 
Soon afterward, he commenced handling foreign-made vehicles, and added 
a stock of implements of various kinds. Success attended him from the 
first, and his excellent business methods won for him increasing popularity. 
In 1895 the firm of Danielson Brothers was organized, and a general hard- 



598 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

ware business was started, as well. For a few years the brothers operated 
the Leland electric-light plant, which our subject constructed for the town, 
but the expense attending the operation of this enterprise proved too great 
for the citizens and it was abandoned. 

On the 28th of February. 1885, the marriage of Mr. Danielson and 
Carrie, daughter of William Larson, was celebrated. They have had two 
children, but only Willis, who was born in 1887. is living. Mrs. Danielson's 
father was a successful farmer and an early settler in the vicinity of Wenona, 
Illinois. 

Our subject is a member of the church of Latter Day Saints. In his 
political faith Mr. Danielson is a Republican. He takes a i^atriotic interest 
in public affairs, and is highly esteemed by his customers and acquaintances 
in general. Now in the prime of manhood he has already achieved more 
than many men years his senior, and judgmg his future by his past he will 
be some dav a wealthv man. 



HENRY GATISS. 



Henry Gatiss, a prominent and popular grocer of LaSalle, was born 
in the county of Durham, England, March 21, 1839, and is a son of Henry 
and Sarah (Hunt) Gatiss. Llis grandfather, John Gatiss, died in England, 
his native home, at an advanced age, leaving a large family. His maternal 
grandfather also lived and died in that country. Henry Gatiss was the father 
of eight children, six sons and two daughters, as follows: John H., of 
Eagle River, Michigan; William, of Thetford, Ontario; Robert B., of Black 
Hawk county, Iowa; Thomas W., of Dimmick township, this county; Henry, 
our subject; Mary Ann, wife of William Dinsmore, of Earlville, this state; 
Richard E., of National City, California; and Sarah Jane, wife of Joseph 
Elliott, of Manitoba. The father was married a second time. Miss Jane 
Pickering becoming his wife, and to them were born nine children, of whom 
four are living. Those living are Joseph P., of Earlville, Illinois; Samuel R., 
of Manitoba; Sophia R., of Earlville. Illinois; and A\^alter, of the same 
place. The father of these children in early life was a shaft-sinker in his 
native land. In 1842 he came to the United States, landing in New York 
on July 4 of that year. He immediately went to Bradford county, Penn- 
sylvania, where he remained until 1856, engaged in mining for an English 
syndicate. He explored aiid opened up about twenty thousand acres of 
land for them, which he afterward sold. He then moved to LaSalle, Illinois, 
and was the superintendent of the coal shaft for some time, when he pur- 
chased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, some four and a half miles north 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 599 

of this city. He then spent his time in tilHng the soil until his death, which 
occurred in 1877, at the age of seventy-two years and ten months.- He 
served as a road commissioner for a number of terms. He was twice mar- 
ried; his first wife, the mother of our subject, died in 1850, when about 
forty-five years of age. 

Henry Gatiss, our subject, was but three years of age when his parents 
took up their residence in America. He attended the Pennsyb/ania schools 
and worked for his father until he was twenty-six years old. When he was 
seventeen they moved to LaSalle, where he has since hved with the 
exception of two years spent in Canada. Before making this trip he en- 
gaged in farming, but found the work unsuited to his liking. He then en- 
tered a grocery as clerk and met with such success in this line that in 1877, 
in partnership with his brother Richard, he purchased the stock of his em- 
ployer, the store being conducted conjointly by them until 1891, when 
Richard retired from the business, leaving Henry Gatiss the sole proprietor. 
In his twenty-two years' work as a grocer he has built up a large trade, 
his patronage extending many miles into the country. His strict honesty and 
integrity have won their confidence and made him warm friends through- 
out the entire county. 

Mr. Gatiss was united in the holy bonds of matrimony on the 25th 
of December, 1874, to Miss Margaret Nixon, a daughter of Hugh and 
Mary Ann (Robson) Nixon. Three children have blessed this union: Henry 
Milton; Stella May, who died at the age of two years and two months; and 
Mary. Both the children living are with their parents. Mrs. Gatiss and 
her daughter are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which 
they are zealous workers. Their residence is on Fifth street, where they 
have a pleasant, comfortable home and a house which they rent. Mr. Gatiss 
has been a resident of LaSalle for forty-three years. He is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity and in politics a Republican. 



DAVID SNELLING. 



This well known citizen and respected farmer of Adams township. La- 
Salle county, Illinois, is a native of Rutland township, this county, born 
June 26, 1848, and is a representative of one of the pioneer families of this 
locality. His parents were John and Rebecca Jane (Shaver) Snelling, the 
former a native of Virginia and the latter of Ohio. John Snelling, when quite 
small, was taken by his parents to Ohio, where he grew to manhood. When 
a young man, previous to his marriage, he came west to Illinois, then called 
the frontier, and located in LaSalle county. That was some time in the '30s. 



6oo BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Here he subsequently married Rebecca Shaver, a daughter of David Shaver, 
one of the first settlers of Rutland township, this county. Mrs. Snelling 
was born in 1821, was ten years old when brought by her parents to Illinois, 
and is still a resident of LaSalle county, her home being in Serena town- 
ship, where her husband settled on a farm a number of years ag"o. He died 
there in 1884, at the age of seventy-four years. They w^ere the parents of 
seven children, viz.: Nancy, Elizabeth (deceased). James, Olive (deceased), 
David, Annis and George. 

David Snelling received his early education in the country schools of 
his native county and then for two years was a student in Lombard Uni- 
versity, Galesburg, Illinois. On his return home from college he was for 
a short time engaged in teaching school. Farming, however, has been his 
life pursuit. After his marriage, which event occurred in 1879. he settled 
on his present farm, two hundred and sixty-seven acres, a part of which lies 
in the southwest corner of Adams township and the rest across the line in 
Serena township. In his farming operations he has been very successful, 
and is well known as one of the leading farmers of his locality. 

Mr. Snelling was married in 1879 to Miss Evaline Umphrey, and they 
have two children: Claudia, the wife of William Hoadley; and Maud. Mrs. 
Snelling's parents were Samuel and Sophia (Snelling) Umphrey, both natives 
of Ohio, who came to LaSalle county, Illinois, some thirty years ago and 
settled in Serena township; they are now residents of Earl township. Mrs. 
Snelling was born in Ohio and is the oldest of four children, namely: Mrs. 
Snelling, Anna (deceased), Charles, and Hattie. 



MILTON POPE. 



The ancestral history of Mr. Pope can be traced back to representa- 
tives of the Revolutionary period, including John Pope, who joined the 
colonial forces and fought for the independence of the nation. He was 
captured by the Tories and died while on his way home from the war, in 
1 78 1. His wife bore the maiden name of Sarah Atheran and was born 
on Martha's Vineyard, in 1725. Her parents were Solomon and Sarah 
(Skiff) Atheran, and her grandparents were Simon and Mary (Butler) 
Atheran. The next in the line of descent is Benjamin Pope, a son of John 
and Sarah Pope. He was born November 23, 1769, and in 1797 married 
Sarah Purcell, who was born on Martha's Vineyard, August 28, 1777. He 
died October 18, 1838, and his w-ife passed away January 12, 1848. 

George Pope, the father of our subject, was born in Lorain county, 
Ohio, December 21, 18 14, and in 1843 came from the Buckeye state to 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 6oi 

LaSalle county, locating near the town of ]\Ianlins in what is now Miller 
township. There he engaged in farming and stock-raising until his death, 
which occurred March 2, i860. He was industrious and successful and his 
enterprise and capable management brought to him a merited competence. 
He took a great interest in the newly organized Republican party and 
joined its ranks, stanchly supporting its principles. He married Miss 
Louisa R. Redington, a daughter of Harry and Lydia (Allen) Redington. 
Her father was a native of London, England, wdiere he was born April 3, 
1786, and his wife was born in Pennsylvania, December 14, 1793, and was 
of Welsh descent. He died November 18, 1848, and her death occurred on 
the 25th of April, 1836. Mrs. Pope was born in Girard, Erie county, Penn- 
sylvania, October 6, 1820, and with her parents removed to Lorain county, 
Ohio, in 1821. In December, 1840, she became the wife of George Pope 
and in 1843 ^^^^Y ^veiit to Cedar county, Iowa, but in August of the same 
year became residents of LaSalle county. Mr. Pope died in i860, and on 
Christmas day of 1861 his widow became the wife of John Brundage, a 
w'ealthy and respected citizen of Manlius township. He w^as born in Seneca 
county. New York, April 27, 1808, and came to LaSalle county about 1843, 
residing here until his death, which occurred September 7, 1891. Mrs. 
Brundage departed this life April 5, 1896, when in her seventy-sixth year. 
By her first marriage she had three children who lived to maturit)- and three 
who died in infancy. Alanson became a member of Company C, Eighty- 
eighth Illinois Infantry in the civil war, anrl v.hile at Camp Douglas on his 
way to the front was drowned in Lake Michigan. Milton is the next 
younger. Eva, the only daughter, is the wife of Charles G. Werner, of Ot- 
tawa. 

Milton Pope, of this review, was born in the township of Miller, LaSalle 
county, June 5, 1852, and spent the years of his l^oyhood in a manner com- 
mon to country lads, a portion of his time l^eing devoted to the acquisition 
of knowledge in the district schools of the period. Subsecjuently it was his 
privilege to attend school in Oberlin, Ohio, for about two years. Returning 
to his old home in LaSalle county he continued to follow' the occupation to 
which he had been reared until 1891, when he retired from active agricul- 
tural labors. He carried on farming along very progressive lines and man- 
aged his business affairs so capably that he won thereby very creditable and 
desirable success. At present he is the owner of about five hundred acres of 
fine farming land in LaSalle county and three hundred and twenty acres in 
Kansas. He is a director in the First National Bank of Ottawa, negotiates 
loans and attends to his other Imsiness interests. 

On the 24th of Novem])er, 1897, Mr. Pope married Miss Cora J. 
Pickens, of Ottawa, a daughter of James H. and Clementine L. Pickens, old 



6o2 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and respected citizens of that city. Her father is a grandson of Henry 
Pickens, who was born in Middleton, Massachusetts, June i8, 1785, and 
came to Otter Creek, LaSalle county, in 1839, accompanied by his wife, 
Mercy Pierce Pickens. He died in 1844, leaving a son, Jam.es, who married 
Ehza Chase. James Pickens and his wife came from Massachusetts to 
Illinois in 1838, traveling the entire distance in a wagon and accompanied 
by their aged grandmothers, Mrs. Abia Hathaway, who died a few years 
later, at the age of eighty-nine years. In 1848 James Pickens removed with 
his family from Otter Creek to Ottawa, where he died October 11, 1889, 
when almost eighty-one years of age, his birth having occurred December 
15. 1808. His son, James Henry Pickens, was l)orn in New Bedford, Massa- 
chusetts, August 16, 1834, and in December. 1856, married Clementine 
Lavelia Ashley, of Lakeville, ]\Iassachusetts. In the same winter he brought 
his young wife to Illinois, locating in Ottawa, where their children — Cora 
Justene and John Ashley — were born. Mrs. Clementine L. Pickens is a 
granddaughter of Xoah and Ruth (Pickens) Ashley. The former was born 
June 18, 1787, and the latter May 20, 1791. Their son, Silas P. Ashley, was 
born April 4, 1813. married Phebe Davis and died in April, 1897, leaving a 
daughter, Clementine L., who was born August 28. 1839, and is the mother 
of Islrs. Milton Pope. Cora Pickens, the esteemed wife of our subject, was 
born July 13, i860, in Ottawa, acquired a liberal education and is well quali- 
fied to grace any station in life to which she may be called. Mr. Pope is a 
member of Marseilles Lodge, Xo. 417, A. F. tS: A. M., Shabbona Chapter, 
No. 37, R. A. ]M., and Ottawa Commandery, No. 10, K. T. He and his wife 
enjoy the high regard of many warm friends, and all who pass beneath the 
portals of their pleasant home enjo}' there a most gracious hospitality 



OLIVER G. OAKLAND. 



Oliver G. Oakland enjoys the distinction of being the first settler and 
first merchant of the thriving little town of Baker. LaSalle county, Illinois, 
where he opened his general store in the fall of 1890. He was born in 
Adams township, this county, January 28. 1856, on his father's farm. His 
parents were Gunder A. and Seneva (Serhus) Oakland, both of whom were 
natives of Stavanger. Norway. The father was one of the first settlers in 
Adams township, where he bought government land and followed farming 
until 1864. when he disposed of this property and moved to the vicinity of 
Pontiac, where he died, in his eighty-fourth year, in 1887. In his earlv life 
in his native country he worked at the trade of a carpenter; and he was 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 603 

married in that country, but had lost his wife before coming to America. 
He was again married while residing in Mission township, this county, to 
Miss Seneva Serhus, by whom he had children. She now resides at 
Rowe, Illinois. 

Oliver G. Oakland was reared on a farm, having been eight years of 
age when his parents moved to Livingston county, where he grew up 
to an industrious manhood. At the age of seventeen he began to work 
for himself, hiring out to do farm work until he was twenty, when he rented 
a piece of gi'ound, which he cultivated. He continued to follow the pursuit 
of agricultural life until 1890, when he came to Baker and opened a general 
store in the depot, serving also as agent for the railway company, a position 
he still holds. His trade increased to such proportions that he was justified 
in erecting his present commodious store room, and it is still increasing. 
He began life as a poor man and by his own efforts has built up a neat 
competency, dealing honesth' and uprightly with all men and winning their 
respect and admiration for his strict lousiness methods. He was the manager 
of the elevator for five years and has been a busy, energetic man. 

Mr. Oakland was married in Livingston county, Illinois, in 1878, to 
Miss Mary Chew, who was born at Chillicothe, Illinois. They have three 
children — Jesse ]\I., Ella S., and Imus M. He is a Republican and held 
the postofifice from 1891 to 1897. giving general satisfaction to the patrons 
of the ofifice. He is a zealous member of the Norwegian EvangeHcal Luth- 
eran church. 



CHARLES B. WATTS. 



Charles Brown A\'atts, supervisor of Earl township and a wealthy and 
substantial farmer of LaSalle county. Illinois, was born October 12. 1848. 
on a farm some four miles south of Ottawa, this state, and' is a son of Phillip 
C. and Margaret Ann (Brown) AA'atts, who are among the oldest and most 
respected residents of this countv. 

Phillip C. Watts was born in Devonshire. England, Januarv 22, 1822, 
and came to America with an uncle at the age of sixteen, locating in Genesee 
county, New York, where he remained one year, and then came to this 
state and acted as a guard in the penitentiary at Alton for a few years. In 
1844 lie came to this county, settling at Ottawa, and in November. 1847. 
married Miss Margaret Ann Brown, by whom he had nine children, all of 
whom are living. They have prospered in their business and own the farm 
four miles south of Ottawa, and are well-to-do people. His wife was a 
daughter of Charles Brown, who came here in 1830, and she remembers 



6o4 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

the Black Hawk war and being driven into the fort at Ottawa. She tells 
of burning hickory wood to obtain saleratus and obtaining their meal by 
grinding corn. Her father entertained the Indian chief, Shabbona, but could 
never get that famous character to sleep in the house. The Brown family 
came here from New York, the journey being made by ox team and fifteen 
miles being considered a good day's travel. 

Charles Brown Watts Avas the eldest of nine children — seven sisters 
and two brothers — and was reared on a farm. He attended the country 
schools and then entered the high school of Ottawa and later attended the 
Normal School at Normal, Illinois. Returning from school he took up 
the occupation of farming and has been remarkably successful. Some 
twenty years ago he purchased farm lands in Nebraska, which he afterward 
disposed of at a profit, enabling him to purchase a tract of tine land in Earl 
township, containing three hundred and sixty acres. Mrs. Watts also owns 
a quarter section in Kansas and a house and four lots in the town of Earl. 
He has made a neat income from stock raising and is a farmer who uses 
both brawn and brain in his work. 

Mr. Watts w-as married in 1874 to Miss Anna Gillett, who was born 
on the farm upon which they now reside on June 13, 1850. They at once 
located on a farm in Livingston. county, owned by ^.Ir. Watts" father, and 
cultivated it for three years, moving, at the expiration of that time, in 1878, 
to the farm where they now live. The children born of this marriage were 
Clarence M., Harry W., Alice I.. William W.. Daisy, Archie T., and two — 
Grace and Margaret — that are dead. Mr. Watts is a Republican and has filled 
several minor offices, having been a school director nine or ten years and 
in 1898 was elected to the office of supervisor. He is a ^Master Mason, a 
Modern Woodman of America, and a Knight of the Globe, and is a man 
who makes many friends. 

The father of ^Irs. Watts was Thomas Gillett, who came to this state 
from New York in 1844. He was born in Kent, England. March 16, 181 1, 
and in 1842 came to the United States and located in Syracuse for two 
years, whence he came to this county and lived in Ottawa for about four 
years, when he rented a farm in Earl township, and the following year, 1849, 
married Miss Sarah Hoadley, who was born in England in 1809. They 
had grown up in the same neighborhood and in 1842 she came to America 
with her uncle, Henry Hoadley. Thomas Hoadley, a pioneer of Earl town- 
ship, was her brother. Thomas Gillett purchased a soldier's claim to one 
hundred and sixty acres of land in Earl township, on which he settled and 
which is now owned and occupied by Mrs. Watts and her family. He had 
l)ut two children: Anna (Mrs. Watts), and Thomas H., who died in Kansas, 
in 1879. In 1884 Mr. Gillett retired from the active duties of agricultural 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 605 

life and took up his residence in Earlville, where his wife died in 1889 and he 
in 1 89 1, both having attained to the advanced age of eighty years and having 
the love and respect of all with whom they came in contact. 



SMITH H. OLAISTEAD. 



Smith Rowland Olmstead, deceased, was one of the prominent and ster- 
ling citizens of Freedom township, where his entire life was passed. He 
came from one of the pioneer families of LaSalle county, and his name is 
indissolubiy connected with the history of this region. It stands for patriot- 
ism and public spirit, for industry and uprightness — in short, for all of the 
qualities which are embodied in the noblest citizens of this great common- 
wealth. His memory is tenderly kept in the hearts of scores of his old-time 
friends, and many of them will scan with deep interest the following outline 
of his career and tribute to his genuine worth. 

Sixty years ago Hiram D. Olmstead, the father of the subject of this 
memoir, removed from his former home in New York state to the wilds 
of LaSalle county. He located in the township of Freedom, and in 184-I. 
wedded Eleanor Harding, by whom three sons were born, namely: Charles 
H., Judson H., and Smith Howland. Hiram D. Olmstead, after a busy, 
useful life as an agriculturist, is now living retired, his home being in Ottawa, 
Illinois. 

The birth of Smith Howland Olmstead occurred on the parental home- 
stead in this township, July 8, 1850. He obtained a common-school edu- 
cation, and, with characteristic energy, mastered the varied details of farm- 
ing when he was a mere youth. He remained under the parental roof until 
his marriage, when he was twenty-five years of age, by which time he had 
laid the foundations of his future success. Aided by his thrifty, brave-hearted 
wife, he steadily prospered, and at the time of his death he left a large and 
valuable estate as the result of their united efforts. He not only was "not 
afraid of work" but he really enjoyed it; and he was so thoroughly in earnest 
in all of his plans that he imparted his enthusiasm and interest to all around 
him. It has been said that one of the secrets of success is "to be in love 
with your work;" and thus it proved in the case of Mr. Olmstead. How- 
ever great his interest in his personal undertakings, he never neglected his 
public duties, and his neighbors relied upon his thorough performance of 
whatever work was intrusted to him for the general welfare. Fie was a zeal- 
ous Republican, and held the ofifices of road commissioner and assessor and 
school director. His prominence in pul)lic and social afifairs of his locality 
was due to his well recognized qualities of worth, and his genial, friendly 



6o6 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

disposition, ^^•hich \von every one with whom circumstances brought him 
into acquaintanceship. When death stilled his noble heart he was in the 
prime of life, and the blow was deeply felt throughout the entire community. 
He entered into the silent land on the 17th of August, 1886, but a few weeks 
subsequently to the thirty-sixth anniversary of his birth. 

The widow of 'Mr. Olmstead was, like her husband, a native of Freedom 
township. Her parents were Seth F. and Elizabeth (Frye) Ford, the for- 
mer born in 1809 and the latter in 181 5, and both natives of Massachusetts. 
They came to this county in 1850 and located on the farm which is now 
owned bv Charles T. ]\Iosev. Five of their six children are living at this 
writing, namely: Fidelia, widow of J. J- Hutchinson, of Washington county, 
Kansas; Caroline, widow of Hartson E. Billings, of Washington 
county, Kansas; Myra S., wife of F. A. Barker, of Parsons. Kansas; Hattie 
F., ]\Irs. Olmstead; and Florence E.. ]\Irs. Isaac G. Parish, of this town- 
ship. 

]Mrs. Hattie F. Olmstead resided with her parents until her marriage, 
December 30, 1875. Of h^i" ^^'^ children two died in infancy and a daughter 
and two sons survive: ]\Iyra, the eldest, born in 1878, became the wife 
of William Gregg, November 20, 1897; Burton C, the elder son, was born 
in 1880, and wedded Olive, daughter of Lewis ^^^arren, of Serena town- 
ship, November 30, 1898; and Frank D.. the younger son, was born in 
1885, and, with his elder brother, is of great assistance to his mother in the 
management of the home farm. She has manifested marked ability and 
excellent judgment in the cultivation and maintenance of the homestead, 
and enjoys the respect of her neighbors, who regard her as a model farmer 
and financier. She has maintained the same interest in public affairs as 
did her lamented husband, and has served her locality as a school director 
for six years, being the only woman here who has had this responsibility 
and honor. She also belongs to the County Grange and to the Woman's 
Relief Corps, and is kind and helpful to the poor and needy. 



OLE J. KIRKHUS. 

Ole J. Kirkhus was born in Norway. September 24. 1850. a son of 
John and Elizabeth (Olson) Kirkhus, and one of a family of ten children. 
Of this family six are still living, three having died in infancy and one at 
the age of eighteen years. Three of the sons and one daughter 
reside in this country. The father was a farmer, and on a farm in his native 
land Ole J. spent his youthful days. 

j\Iay 18, 1869, before he reached his twentieth year, he bade good-by 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 607 

to home and friends and started for America, having borrowed the money 
with wdiich to pay his passage to this country. His father could have helped 
him at this time, but as the family was large and our subject was of an inde- 
pendent disposition, he preferred not to ask assistance at home. It is need- 
less to say that as soon as possible after he came to this country he repaid 
the debt. Landing at Quebec, he came thence by rail to Chicago and 
from there to Ottaw-a, wdiere he secured work as a farm hand. For three 
years he was engaged in farm work, as a wage-earner, and then in 1873 he 
married and settled on a rented farm in Adams township, LaSalle county, 
the one which he now owns and occupies. After renting this farm three 
years he removed to Earl township, in the same county, where he rented 
land and lived the next three years, then returning to the first farm, wdiich 
he bought in 1880 and where he has since lived. Here he owns one hundred 
and six acres, well improved and under an excellent state of cultivation, 
the result of his hard work and good management. 

Mr. Kirkhus married a woman of his own nationality, Isabelle Gunder- 
son, who came with her parents to America wdien she was six months old. 
Her father, Thomas Gunderson, was one of the early settlers of LaSalle 
county, Illinois, having located at an early day on the farm now owned 
and occupied by ]\Ir. Kirkhus. Mr. and Mrs. Kirkhus have six children. 

Politically Mr. Kirkhus is a Republican, and has served his district as 
a school director. He is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. 



U. N. THORNTON. 



U. N. Thornton, M. D., C. M., was born in Ontario, Durham county, 
Canada, July i, 1865, and worked his way from the position of a farmer 
lad. through college, up to his present enviable position among the most 
skillful and firmly established physicians of Leland, Illinois He is a son 
of Thomas and Susan (Powers) Thornton, and a grandson of John Thorn- 
ton. Thomas Thornton was born in Hull, Yorkshire, England, in 1822, and 
came to Canada with his parents when he was seven years old. There he 
grew- to manhood and became a tiller of the soil, following that as his prin- 
cipal occupation. He was married to Susan Powers, daughter of Nathaniel 
Powers, both of whom were born in Vermont, as were all their ancestors, 
whose nativity were in America. The family were started in this country by 
Thomas Powers (spelled Pouers), who left the parent trunk and settled 
in the New^ England States of America in 1643, having come from England. 
The father of Nathaniel Powers was a soldier of the Revolution. The mother 
of our subject died in 1880, at the age of fifty-four years. 



6o8 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

U. N. Thornton was the eleventh child in a family of twelve — six broth- 
ers and six sisters. His early years were spent on his father's farm and he 
then entered Albert College, at Belleville, Ontario, where he matriculated in 
the arts. He then began the study of medicine in the Trinity Medical School, 
of Toronto, from which he received a fellowship and graduated at the Uni- 
versity of Trinity College in 1887, with the degrees of M. D. and C. M. In 
the fall of that year he came to the states and opened an office at Rockford, 
Illinois, but remained only a short time, as a better location was offered at 
New Milford, this state, where he practiced four years. He was an assistant 
surgeon at the Rockford Sanitarium for three months, when he went to Chi- 
cago and practiced until December, 1892, and then located in Leland, where 
he has since been practicing, and has built up a large patronage among the 
better class, although his services are given alike to rich and poor. He is 
a general practitioner, preferring to keep up on all branches rather than 
to devote himself to one particular class of disease. 

He was married November 20, 1890, to Miss Augusta Dale, of Thorold, 
Canada. They have two children: Charles D., five years old, and Dorothy, 
aged two. He is a Republican and belongs to the Modern Woodmen of 
America, the Knights of the Globe and the Home Forum, and is a Royal 
Arch Mason. He also belongs to the LaSalle Medical Society and takes an 
active part in the deliberations of that organization. 



WILLIAM S. STERRETT, M. D. 

Dr. William S. Sterrett, a popular young physician of Marseilles, Illinois, 
comes of an honored, old southern family, his ancestors coming from Vir- 
ginia and Kentucky. His father, G. W. Sterrett, was born in Augusta county, 
Virginia, February 14, 1834. At the age of four, with his father, he removed 
to Monroe county, Missouri, where he has resided ever since. On March 
4, 1858, he was united in marriage to Miss Gorilla Price, of Monroe county, 
her parents coming from the "blue-grass region" of Kentucky. They be- 
came the parents of five children, namely: Eva. James G., William S.. J. 
Claudius, who died in his ninth year, and George W., Jr. The devoted wife 
and mother departed this life February 15, 1899, when in her sixtieth year. 
The father is still living, making his home in Monroe county, Missouri. 
He has always given his allegiance to the Democratic party, and has en- 
deavored to do his duty as a citizen and patriot under all circumstances. 

The birth of Dr. Sterrett occurred about thirty-three years ago. in 
Monroe county, Missouri, the date of the event being March 29, 1867. 
He passed his boyhood and youth in his native state, and received a liberal 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 609 

education in the public and high schools. Later he entered the University of 
Missouri, where he pursued a course of study, after which he engaged in 
teaching for some time. Ever ambitious and striving after greater knowl- 
edge and higher standing in the intellectual world, he next enrolled him- 
self as a student at the celebrated University of Virginia, where he spent 
two years in the study of medicine. Previous to entering the University 
of Virginia, he had given considerable attention to medicine, under the 
guidance of Dr. Thomas Chowning. of Hannibal, Missouri. In 1894 he 
graduated in medicine at Rush Medical College, of Chicago. He estabhshed 
an ofifice in the Masonic Block, in Marseilles, Illinois, and has since been 
actively engaged in the practice of his profession. He is a member of the 
LaSalle County Medical Society, the Illinois State Medical Society and is 
identified with the Knights of Pythias as well. 



JOHNO'DONNELL. 



On the I St of March, 1897, John O'Donnell was appointed to his present 
position as collector of the port of Ottawa, and entered upon the discharge 
of the responsible duties which devolve upon him in this capacity. He is 
popular and highly esteemed loy till who know him, and he is faithful, prompt 
and courteous as an ofTficial. 

For over half a century Jerry O'Donnell, the father of our subject, was 
a resident of Ottawa, and for many years was in the employ of the Chicago, 
Burlington & Ouincy Railroad Company. For his wife he chose Miss Jo- 
hanna White, and to them were born seven children — four sons and three 
daughters. The family have been numbered among the substantial citizens 
of Ottawa during the greater part of the existence of the town, and have 
been noted for a worthy public spirit and patriotism. Jerry O'Donnell died 
September 13, 1899, aged seventy-two years. 

The birth of John O'Donnell occurred in 1865, in Ottawa, and when 
he was a lad he acquired a practical business education in the common 
schools of this place. Wlien he had arrived at years of maturity he went to 
Chicago, and for some time was employed as a conductor on a street car. 
He became one of the most popular conductors on the road, and the cour- 
tesy which has ever been one of his marked traits was particularly grateful 
to those who journeyed to and from the commercial center. M. length, 
returning to Ottawa, he took a position in the Ottawa Bottle & Flint Glass 
Company's works, of which concern he was a shipping" clerk for ten years. 
Afterward he was made the assistant manager, which position he held until 
the company went out of business in 1895. 



6io BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

In 1889 Mr. O'Donnell wedded Miss }^Iinnie Kennedy, a daughter of 
Captain and ]\Irs. Julia Kennedy, the former now deceased. Two sons 
bless the happy home of our subject and wife, their names being respectively 
Leo and George. Politically ^Ir. O'Donnell is associated with the Repub- 
lican party, and in the fraternities he is the second lieutenant of the uniformed 
rank Knights of Pythias. 



JOHN KAXGLEY. 



The record of a man who started out to win a place for himself in the 
world, when a poor boy. almost alone and without friends, in a foreign land, 
and who, in spite of great obstacles and discouragements, persevered in the 
task he had set out before him, until he became wealthy and influential, is 
one which cannot fail to be of interest, and should spur the young to greater 
bravery and more steadfast principles of conduct. Such, in brief, is the sum- 
mary of the career of the late John Kangley, who was a highly esteemed 
citizen of Streator, LaSalle county. 

The birth of the subject of this memoir occurred in county Meath, Ire- 
land, in 1843. His parents were John and ^Mary Kangley, both of whom 
died when their son John was a mere child. The father was a man of more 
than ordinary attainments and education, and was successfully engaged in 
teaching at the time of his death. At eleven years of age John Kangley, Jr., 
left his native land to seek a new home in America, the land of promise. He 
accompanied a friend and came direct to Illinois, locating at first in Grundy 
county. He attended school to some extent after coming here, and ob- 
tained employment in the coal mines when quite young. He was indus- 
trious and economical* earnestly watching every opportunity for advance- 
ment, and the result was that ere many years had passed he had become a 
coal operator upon his own account. In 1869 he came to Streator, where 
he continued to make his home until his death. AMien the Star Coal Com- 
pany was organized, in 1880. he was made general manager of what is better 
known as the Kangley & Carbon Hill ]*iline. ]\Iany years later he retired 
from the active management of the mines, but continued to be one of the 
largest stockholders in the concern. For several years prior to his death he 
devoted his time to dealing in railroad stocks in Chicago and Xew York 
city and met with marked success in his speculations. 

In 1877 jMr. Kangley married ]\Iiss ]\Iary Lunney, of Ottawa, and of 
the eight children born to this worthy couple seven survive, Zita having died 
August 13, 1898. Minnie is a student in a Chicago college, and J. Arthur, 
the elder son, at present is attending Philips Exeter Academy in Xew 
Hampshire. Helen and Charles Vincent are in the Streator high school, 




: FW15 PUBLlBHinr r.r 





BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 6ii 

and Louise, Gertriule and Lucy complete the family. Mrs. Kangiey was 
born and reared in Ottawa, her parents, Thomas and Elizabeth Limney, 
being early settlers of that place, their residence there dating from 1852. 

In 1882 Mr. Kangiey erected his commodious and comfortable brick 
residence in Streator. Fraternally he belonged to Streator Lodge, No. 607, 
F. & A. M., and in political faith was a Republican. He enjoyed the 
sincere respect of those who had been associated with him in business or 
social relations, and his long and honorable commercial career justly entitled 
him to the love and admiration of our citizens. His death occurred June 8, 
1899, resulting from an attack of pneumonia. His final illness was of short 
duration and the community mourned the loss of one who had occupied a 
prominent position in business and social life, and whose high character had 
gained for him unreserved regard, while to his immediate family the bereave- 
ment came as the greatest of all possible, for in his home his many sterling 
qualities and his true kindliness and nobility had ever cast their beneficent 
light with never varying power. 



ANDREW W. MERS. 



Deer Park township, LaSalle county, Illinois, includes among its intel- 
ligent, thrifty and progressive farmers the subject of this sketch, Andrew W. 
Mers, who has been identified with this place since 1853, having been drawn 
hither at that time, as he says, "in close pursuit of a young lady who soon 
afterward became his wife."' After his arrival here he bought a small tract 
of land southeast of Vermillionville and began the work of developing a farm 
and, making a home. The land was then almost in its wild state and only 
a shell of a house was here to indicate that man had ever made it his abidine 
place. 

Mr. Mers came to Illinois direct from Kentucky, his native state. He 
was born in Fleming county, July 21, 1830, a son of Samuel Mers, a native 
of the same county, born in 1797. Samuel Mers spent his active life as a 
farmer, and died at Knightstown, Indiana, in 1862. He was a soldier of 
the United States in our second war with England, and inherited his mili- 
tary inclinations from his father, who was a patriot soldier of the American 
Revolution. The latter, also named Samuel, was born in Ireland, and was, 
it is thought, a recruit for Washington's army from the state of Virginia, 
and from that state entered Kentucky soon after the conclusion of his 
seven years of army service. 

The younger Samuel Alers married Tenna Plank, whose father was of 
German birth. She died in 1889, at the age of eighty-eight years. The 



6i2 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

children of Samuel and Tenna Mers were as follows: Margaret, deceased, 
was the wife of Henry Rice; Frederick, of Pleasant Hill, Missouri; John, who 
still resides in the home county in Kentucky; Elizabeth, deceased, was the 
wife of Henry Keal; Mary, now Mrs. William Beckner, of Rush county, 
Indiana; Evaline, the wife of Alfred Beckner, of the same county; and Andrew 
W.. whose name introduces this review. There were other children, that 
died in infancy. 

Andrew W. Mers spent his youth on his father's farm and received his 
education in the private schools near his home, attending only during the 
winter months. When about eighteen years of age he engaged regularly in 
farming for himself, and remained in his native state until lured away, as 
above recorded. Since he came into possession of his first tract of land 
Mr. Mers has increased the area of his farm to two hundred and six acres, 
all now nicely improved and well tilled, farming one of the few attractive 
places on the highway on which it is located. 

Mr. Mers was married in 1855, to Miss Mary Newell, a daughter of 
George Newell. The Newell family came to this state from Brown county, 
Ohio, in the year 1851. Mr. Newell was a native of Pennsylvania, born in 
1798. the son of an Irishman, and died in the town of Deer Park, in 1875. 
One of his children, .John H. Newell, is a retired farmer of Deer Park, 
residing with his son, George A., who is a most higdily esteemed and pros- 
perous farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Mers have two sons: Lawrence Webster 
and Charles D., both worthy citizens of their native town. 

Mr. Mers is well known as a Democrat. He has held, at some time, 
all the offices of his town, except that of supervisor, and is now a justice 
of the peace. A quarter of a century ago, when the Farm Ridge & Deer 
Park Mutual Fire Insurance Company was organized, Mr. Mers was one 
of its charter members; and of the thirty-one men whose names were on the 
charter he is one of six survivors. He has been a director of the company 
all these vears. 



M. E. DOUGHERTY 



Prominent among the rising young men of LaSalle county stands M. E. 
Dougherty, one of the native-born sons of Ottawa, in which city he has 
passed his entire life. His father, Michael Dougherty, was for thirty-five 
years, or until his death, an honored citizen of this place. For a companion 
and helpmeet on the journey of life he chose Miss Catharine Feeney, and to 
this worthy couple six children were born, two daughters and four sons, one 
of whom, P. J. Dougherty, is a well known printer of Ottawa. 

The birth of M. E. Dougherty occurred some thirty-one years ago, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 613 

in company with his brothers and sisters he attended the public schools when 
he reached a suitable age. He received a liberal education, and is thoroughly 
posted upon all of the current events and leading cjuestions of the day. In 
the spring of 1898 he \vas honored by being elected to the responsible 
office of town collector of Ottawa by his political friends, and has ably dis- 
charged the duties resting upon him, giving entire satisfaction to all con- 
cerned. He is well liked, personally, and enjoys the friendship of all who 
are well acquainted with him. 



MRS. CHARLOTTE L. WARREN. 

The lady whose name graces this sketch represents, in her position 
as a citizen, two of the prominent pioneer families of the township of Serena, 
LaSalle county, Illinois. Her father, the late venerable John Wright, brought 
his family to LaSalle county some time in the '50s, and her husband, the 
late Ruden Warren, was a son of that worthy citizen and guardian of the 
frontier, Daniel Warren, who came to this county from New York. 

John Wright, the father of Mrs. Warren, was a native of Suffolk county, 
England, his birth having occurred at Ipswich in the year 1807.. In his 
youth he had limited advantages for obtaining an education, but made the 
best of his opportunities and by close observation and general reading ac- 
quired a good store of useful information and became a useful citizen. After 
his conversion to Christianity he put away "worldly sins" and became an 
active and influential member of the Methodist Episcopal church, taking a 
prominent part in Sunday-school work. It was in 1849 that he came to 
America. He landed in Canada, his wife sick of cholera, and from Canada 
he came over into the United States, selecting a location in Vermont, where 
he made his home until 1855, farming, after working for a time at his trade 
in a blacksmith shop. In 1855, coming west to Illinois, he took up his 
residence in LaSalle county. Here he also engaged in farming and succeeded 
in providing his large family with all the necessities and comforts of life, 
though he never succeeded in accumulating property. He died in LaSalle 
county, in July, 1890; and his wife, whose maiden name was Rebecca Os- 
born, died at the same place a few vears later. Their children were: Hannah, 
wife of Thomas E. Earnsworth, of Silver City, New Mexico; Mary A., de- 
ceased wife of William Gillespie; Fannie, deceased; Lucy A., wife of John 
Townsend, of Ford county, Illinois; Maria, deceased wife of John Rogers; 
Charlotte L., whose name introduces this review; Fannie C. (2d), who mar- 
ried John Rogers, of southeastern Kansas; Eleanor, deceased wife of Brice 
Dick: and Silas M., who was born in Vermont October 5, 1855, and is a 
successful farmer of Serena.' 



6i4 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Mrs. Warren was born April 28, 1846, and August 13, 1862, was mar- 
ried to Ruden \\'arren. a native of Serena township, LaSalle county, Illinois, 
born December 31, 1840. They spent their married life on the farm where 
she still resides, and here their family was reared. I\Ir. Warren's youth was 
passed on his father's farm, and before he reached the age of twenty-two 
years he enlisted in the service of his country as a member of Battery C, 
First .Illinois Light Artillery, for a term of three years. His battery was 
in the department of the Tennessee and participated in some of the hard- 
fought battles of the civil war. When the battery was captured at Stone 
River Mr. Warren succeeded in making his escape. In the campaign 
around Chattanooga Mr. Warren was in poor health and was assigned to 
hospital guard duty. He was honorably discharged at Nashville at the 
close of the war, and returned home, shattered in health. Chronic disease 
contracted during the war was the cause of much suffering to him and no 
doubt shortened his days. He died in 1890. His life was spent as a farmer. 
He was progressive and successful and was ranked with the leading farm- 
ers of his locality. Politically he was an ardent Republican. 

Mr. Warren's parents, Daniel and Lucy (Skeels) Warren, were the 
parents of the following named children: Elizabeth, widow of Anthony 
Horr; Ardilla, deceased, was the wife of Henry Horr; Luther, deceased: 
Huron, of Lincoln, Nebraska; Ruden: and Lewis, a prominent farmer and 
worthy citizen of Serena township. 

The children of Ruden Warren and wife are: Herman ^^^, born April 
II, 1867; Myra E., October 8, 1876; and Silas H.. September 28, 1882. 

Mrs. Warren and her children are active members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 



WILLIS A. MARTIN. 



Willis Allen Martin, the popular merchant of Harding, is a son of Rich- 
ard Martin, the carpenter and builder. He was born in Freedom, January 21, 
1862, on a farm one mile east of the village of Harding, on what is known 
as the Sampson place. He was sparingly educated in the village school 
and learned the carpenter's trade of his father, beginning at the age of thir- 
teen years, following it about six years. If the brand of Dick Martin & 
Son was on all the buildings for which they are partly responsible, being con- 
nected with their construction, the improvement of the township could be 
more nearly judged. Having an opportunity to engage in a business not 
physically as hard, he accepted a position in the employ of S. U. Lawry, then 
the leading merchant of Harding, from whom he took his first lessons in 
commercial transactions. xAlthough Mr. Martin was only a boy in his ex- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 615 

perience, his employer said of him, ''He was never a boy Init always a man." 
Again he remarked, "He was as straight as a string and I would trust him 
with anything I possessed." About seven years after he entered this store 
as a clerk, his employer proposed a partnership to him, which was accepted 
and entered into, the same existing until some time in 1893, when he pur- 
chased his senior's interest in the concern and thus became the sole pro- 
prietor of the only store in the village of Harding. He was appointed the 
postmaster of the Freedom office, and has held the position through all the 
administrations since. He is a "gold Democrat," but that has been no legal 
or other barrier to his holding the office during a Republican administration 
of the nation. The best recommendation one can have for an appointment 
to the public service is honesty, capacity and adaptability for doing the work, 
and all these Mr. Martin possessed. The popularity of Harding, as a trading 
point, is due to the manner in which business is conducted in Martin's 
store, and to the further fact that it carries about everything that a well- 
regulated country home ever needs. Everybody is "Will" Martin's friend 
and all rejoice in his prosperity and aid him toward success. 

Our subject's father. Richard Martin, came to LaSalle county in 1856. 
He was born in Vermont, in 1830, and is still active at his trade. He mar- 
ried Minerva Allen, the daughter of Ethan Z. Allen, of New York state. 
The Aliens claim to be descended from the Aldens, who were passengers 
on the historic Mayflower; but the name was after^vard changed to "Allen." 
The genealogy of the family reveals this fact, and it was compiled some 
years ago, after many years of patient labor. 

Richard Martin's children were: Ethan Allen, a railway mail clerk: Ir- 
win L., a printer, of Grand Ridge; and Willis A., the last named being the 
first born. He was married in November, 1891, to Frankie, a daughter of 
James R. Walters, of Freedom. They have no children. 

Mr. Martin is that type of manhood, of whom the world has none too 
many. He is a good business man; a good citizen ever seeking to do the 
right for the right's sake. His general rule of life is to practice the golden 
rule. 



HENRY J. DAVIS. 

Among the worthy citizens that Wales has furnished to this country 
is the subject of this sketch, Henry Jenkins Davis, of Freedom, Illinois, who 
was born in Cardiganshire, Wales, ]\Iarch 18. 1830, a son of Samuel Davis. 
The latter brought his family of sons and daughters to the United States 
in 1 84 1, making the voyage from Liverpool England, to Castle Garden, 
New York, in the sailing vessel Batsford, which required four weeks to 



6i6 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

make the trip. From New York they went up the Hudson river to Albany, 
thence by canal to Buffalo, and to Newark, Ohio. Their first location was on 
a farm in Licking county, Ohio, nine miles west of the city of Newark, where 
they lived five years. Thomas Jenkins, one of the older sons, born in 
1818, left the parental roof in 1843, seeking a location on the fertile, frontier 
prairies of Illinois, whither David, his brother, had preceded him. He reached 
Chicago by boat and from there came on foot to Millington. In Green's 
mill, at Dayton, Illinois, he secured employment, and for nine years remained 
in Mr. Green's service. His acquaintance with the conditions and environ- 
ments of LaSalle county led him to advise the remainder of the family to 
come further west, and they arrived in Freedom in 1846. 

Samuel Davis, the father, was in limited circumstances, and as cheap as 
land was at that date he was unable to pay for more than a small tract. 
His farm was in section 5, Freedom township, and on it he spent the rest of 
his life, devoting his energies to its cultivation and improvement. He was 
twice married, his first wife being a Miss Jones; his second wife, her sister. 
Miss Eleanor Jones, who died in 1848. His children were as follows: Jen- 
kins Davis, who died in Iowa many years ago; Maria, the wife of Elias Jones, 
died in Ohio; John J., deceased; Thomas J., of the town of Ophir, Illinois; 
David J., deceased; Rachel, deceased, was the wife of William Williams; 
Henry J., whose name initiates this review; Evan J., of Iowa; Fred J., of 
Ottawa, Illinois; Mary, who first married George L. Kinney; he died in 1870, 
and she is now the wife of John Hoadley, and resides at Earlville, Illinois; 
with her lives her only daughter, Miss Georgie L. Kinney, at present em- 
ployed as bookkeeper; and Jane, wife of Plinn Bears. Chicago, Illinois. The 
father of these children died in 1859, at the age of seventy-seven years. 

Henry J. Davis received his education in the district schools of Licking 
county, Ohio, and LaSalle county, Illinois, and in the broad school of experi- 
ence. At nineteen he left home and became a wage-worker on farms, at the 
rate of fifty cents per day, among his employers being Mr. Hosford and John 
Llenderson, prominent farmers. With what he had saved from his earnings 
in four years he purchased a forty-acre tract of land. But he had no team 
and had to hire the soil broken. This cost him one dollar and fifty cents per 
acre, and it was not until the second year after the purchase that he obtained 
a crop. He continued to work and save and invest in land, and in a few 
years he found himself with a quarter and then a half section of land. While 
he was buying he was also improving, and at this writing there is pa'haps 
not a farm in LaSalle county that will excel his own in the cost of. improve- 
ments and the care and expense with which they are preserved. 

June 15, 1854, Mr. Davis married Miss Sarah Jane Crumpton, a daugh- 
ter of William Crumpton, who came from Maine to Illinois in an early day 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 617 

and became one of the pioneer settlers of LaSalle county. Mrs. Davis has a 
brother, Samuel Crumpton, who resides in Superior, Wisconsin. Of her 
sisters we record that Mrs. Ann Bangs resides in Chatsworth, Illinois; and 
Mrs. Charlotte Davis, wife of Thomas J. Davis, is a resident of Ophir town- 
ship, LaSalle county. Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. Davis began housekeeping 
in a primitive way, in keeping with their circumstances, and for a period of 
forty-five years their lives have been happily blended together. 

Mr. Davis is a Republican, but has never sought, nor would he accept, 
official position, his own private affairs requiring the whole of his attention. 
He believes in expansion, protection and all other doctrines that have made 
the United States prosperous and powerful. Both he and his wife are noted 
for their genial hospitality and are invariably referred to in the most gen- 
erous and complimentary terms. 



BARTO THOMPSON. 



Barto Thompson, of Freedom township, is a living example of that 
remarkable and wonderful prosperity that follows some of the sons of semi- 
illiterate, but industrious pioneers of a new country. He was born July 2"/. 
1836, in Christiansand stift. on a place called Mosey, in Norway. His parents 
were Knute Thompson Mosey and Sarah Thompson. At the age of eight 
years he emigrated with his parents to this country. His father had been 
mduced to take the southern route, with the intention of locating in Texas, 
but, on reaching New Orleans and learning of the advantages to be had in 
the north, changed his course and started up the JMississippi river. This 
trip was an experience of bitterness and suffering; their boat stuck on an 
island and they came near starving and freezing to death before they could be 
rescued! Then one of their companions, a generous fellow from the old 
country, fell overboard and was lost, and this threw a damper over the whole 
company. When they were released from the ice gorge the company hired 
another boat and arrived at Alton, Illinois, after a long voyage. The family 
came up the Illinois to Ottawa, and reached the town of Freedom nearly 
one year after their embarking in Norwa}'. 

After buying one hundred and sixty acres of land from the government, 
the hardships can better be imagined than told. It would require a small 
volume to relate all that took place to bar the settlement and progress of 
civilization and to add to the discomfiture of the white settlers in the west — 
First, their efTorts to reach their intended location; then their troubles while 
getting a cabin ready to shelter them from the beating storms. In this 
case their first house was a dug-out; and this filled with water when it rained; 



6i8 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

in winter snow obstructed its entrance; in hot weather its w-alls were filled 
with living reptiles; and there scarcely could have been a time when the 
family felt secure and happy. Through all this the family survived and lived 
with the will of their Maker in mind until the summer of 1849, when that 
terrible plague, the Asiatic cholera, called four of the family — father, mother 
and two sisters. Our subject and a brother, Thomas T. ]\Iosey, now of Le- 
land, Illinois, w'ere the only members of the family who survived. 

Being left an orphan at the age of thirteen, he had to make the best 
he could of the schools in winter and working in summer until he reached the 
age of twenty-one, when he commenced life for himself. At the age of 
twenty-three he married Tarbar Baker, a daughter of Halver Baker, who 
came to Freedom from Thelemarken, Norway, in 1854. They were blessed 
with four children. Charles M., who died March 30, 1895; Hattie J., the 
wife of Fred Mathieson, who is farming in Dayton township; Joseph E., also 
a farmer, in Freedom; and Sarah E., the wife of Professor L. H. Chally, of 
Red Wing, Minnesota. 

Mr. Thompson's success as a farmer has been all that could be desired, 
and as he acquired the means he added to his domains until he now owns 
tw'o as good farms as lie in LaSalle county — one in Freedom and one in 
Dayton township. 



GEORGE D. HILTABRAND. 

Though comparatively a young man, George D. Hiltabrand has already 
evinced that he possesses exceptional business and financial ability, and dur- 
ing the six years of his residence in Tonica, LaSalle county, he has been 
an untiring worker in the interests of the place — a fact thoroughly appre- 
ciated by its citizens. The standing of a town or community in the public 
opinion is a matter that should be of great concern to every inhabitant of 
the place, for true patriotism, like charity, should begin, though not end. 
at home. 

The grandfathers of our subject were numbered among the early 
pioneers of Illinois, and his relatives have borne an important part in the 
development of its resources. George Hiltabrand, his paternal grandfather, 
was a native of North Carolina, and lived in Tennessee prior to his removal 
to Magnolia township, Putnam county, Illinois, in 1827. His farm was lo- 
cated at a place known as Ox Bow, and there he resided until his death, which 
event occurred when he was nearly three-score and ten years of age. During 
the Black Hawk war he enlisted and served as a sergeant of his company. 
Jeremiah Hartenbower, the maternal grandfather, was born in Germany, 
came to America in the '20s. and about 1830 located in Putnam county. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 619 

Illinois, taking up some government land. Later he settled in Hennepin 
township, and in 1876 he departed this life at his home in the village of the 
same name. He had nine or more children and George Hiltabrand had 
eleven children, and their descendants are numerous and influential, both in 
this and in other states of the Union. 

Benjamin F. Hiltabrand, father of George D., was born in Putnam 
countv, where he was a successful farmer and stock-raiser for many years 
after arriving at manhood. In 1882 he came to LaSalle county, and during 
the next thirteen years he dwelt about a mile and a half west of the village of 
Lostant. He owns six tracts of eighty acres each in that locality, another 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres in that district, and about five hun- 
dred and seventy acres in Iowa, besides twenty acres in Putnam county. 
Since 1895 he has lived retired in Bloomington, Illinois. For some time 
he was the supervisor of Magnolia township, Putnam county; and in 
Hope township, this county, he served in the same capacity. Po- 
litically he is a Democrat, and religiously both he and his estimable wife 
are members of the Baptist church. In her girlhood she bore the name 
of Minerva Hartenbower, and, like her husband, she was born in Putnam 
county. They had six children, four of whom survive, namely: George D., 
Norman J.. Vera L., and Benjamin Franklin. 

The birth of George D. Hiltabrand occurred on the parental homestead 
near Magnolia, Putnam county. September 10, 1872. At ten years of age 
he came to this county, and, after finishing his district and village school 
education, he took a commercial course at the Dixon (Illinois) Business 
College and for about a year pursued his studies in the Northern IlHnois 
Normal School in the same town. Then, returning to his father's old home- 
stead, he continued the agricultural labors which have engrossed his time 
and attention, to a great extent, from his childhood. He is now engaged in 
the stock business, in partnership with his brother, Norman J., and they culti- 
vate a farm of three hundred and twenty acres. In 1893 our subject became 
assistant cashier of the Tonica Exchange Bank, and two years later he en- 
tered into partnership with John E. Hartenbower and Austin Hiltabrand, 
and for a year they were the proprietors of this now well known and suc- 
cessful banking institution. In 1896 Mr. Hiltabrand retired and the firm has 
since consisted of J. E. Hartenbower and George D. Hiltabrand. The latter 
owns considerable real estate and is interested in its sale and in the insurance 
business and other enterprises. 

In the multiplicity of his private business afifairs, Mr. Hiltabrand does 
not neglect his duties as a citizen, and at present he is serving as president 
of the board of trustees of Tonica. He is independent in politics, using his 
franchise for the nominees and principles which he deems worthy of sup- 



620 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

port regardless of party lines. Socially he belongs to Tonica Lodge, No. 364, 
F. & A. M., of which he is the present master; of Peru Chapter, No. 60, 
R. A. M.; Tonica Lodge, No. 298, L O. O. F.; and of Kaiser Camp, Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America. 

On the I2th of December, 1894, Mr Hiltabrand married Miss Lizzie, 
a daughter of Abraham and Sarah (Dixon) Phillips, and they have one 
child, Wendall K. Abraham Phillips is a native of Manchester, England, 
while his wife was born in Philadelphia. Pennsylvania. He came to this 
state about 1840 and was preceded here by his wife, who came west with 
her parents in 1838. Her mother dying when the little Sarah was but four 
years old, the latter was reared by a ]\Irs. Miriam Graves, who lived to the 
remarkable age of one hundred years. The paternal grandparents of Mrs. 
Phillips were James and Nancy Dixon, and her maternal grandparents were 
John and ]\Iary Woolsoncroft. James Dixon, a native of England, located 
in the neighborhood of Alagnolia, Illinois, about 1845, ^^'^^ ^^^ lived to be well 
along in years, while his wife w-as almost a century old at the time of her 
death. John Woolsoncroft, also a native of England, did not come to Amer- 
ica until he was past the prime of life, and his last years were spent in Put- 
nam county, Illinois, where he died at an advanced age. 



M. C. LANE. 



Among the venerable and well known citizens of Allen township, La- 
Salle county, Illinois, is M. C. Lane, who has been identified with the county 
since 1856. A resume of his life is as follows: 

M. C. Lane was born in Brown county, Ohio, February 9, 18 19, and is 
descended from English and Irish ancestors. The Lanes were English peo- 
ple and were among the first settlers of the Old Dominion. Elias Lane, the 
grandfather of M. C. was a Revolutionary soldier, born in 1755, and died in 
1820. The father, Elias Lane. Jr., was born in 1786. Elias Lane was reared 
on the Kentucky frontier and was there married to Miss Jane Neeper. 
daughter of John and Tabitha Neeper, who were of Irish descent. Elias 
and Jane Lane were the parents of a large number of children, of whom 
William H. and Emily Dow, residents of Nebraska, an_d the subject of our 
sketch, are living. One son. Thomas, went, in 1852, to California, where he 
w?as supposed to have died, as nothing has been heard from him since 1853. 
Two of the sons, Frank and Alexander, were L'nion soldiers in the Civil war 
and lost their lives in the army, Alexander's death resulting from wounds 
received in battle, and Frank dying of disease. The father of this family 
lived to the ripe age of ninety-one years, and died in Allen township, La- 




^.^. ^.^^^->^ 



, VX^ / 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 621 

Salle count}', Illinois, in October. 1877. The mother also died in Allen, 
her death having occurred in 1866, at the age of seventy years. 

On his father's farm and in his native county IM. C. Lane passed his 
boyhood days, receiving his education in the public schools and. when not 
in school assisting in the farm work. At the age of twenty-two he married, 
and the young couple went to housekeeping on a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres, the house on which contained only three rooms. He remained 
in Ohio until 185 1. when he moved his family to Illinois and settled in 
Putnam county. Here he remained until 1856, when he moved to Allen 
township, LaSalle county, where he was for many years actively engaged in 
farming operations, and where he owns a fine farm of four hundred acres, 
carefully cultivated, and improved with first-class buildings, included among 
which is his two thousand eight hundred-dollar residence and his large 
barn, 40x60 feet, with twenty-four-foot posts. 

Mr. Lane was married August 7, 1840. to Miss Amanda Evans, born 
December 23, 1820, a daughter of Benjamin Evans, and. like himself, a 
native of Brown county, Ohio. Their union was blessed in the birth of 
ten children, nameh": Marcus J., a soldier in the civil war. a member of 
Company D. One Hundred and Fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, Captain 
William H. Collins; j\Iary Hawk, of Doniphan. Nebraska; George, of 
Oklahoma, who also was in the civil war, a member of the Sixty-third 
Illinois Infantry; Eliza; Thomas, of Allen township; Eldoras, of Doniphan, 
Nebraska; Albert, of Aurora. Nebraska; Lincoln, at home: Joanna, wife 
of Oscar Folk of Rolfe, Iowa; and Ida. at home. Two, Amanda and 
Fremont, died in infancy. The mother died December 8, 1895, at the age 
of seventy-five years. 

Mr. Lane is politically a Republican, and throughout his long and 
useful life has always taken a laudable interest in public afTairs: and while 
he has never sought official honors he has frequently been called upon to 
fill local offices and in several capacities has served the township, faithfully 
and well. 



HELIA ARENTSEN, 



This citizen of the town of Freedom, LaSalle county, was the son of 
the late pioneer Thorbjorn Arentsen, who was born among the pine-clad hills 
of that most picturesque of all northern European countries — Norway — in 
Bergen, March 21, 18 12. To better his condition he emigrated to America, 
in 1836, just after his marriage, and worked at day labor in his new home 
in New York. He had led the life of a sailor in Norway, but came here to 
lay the foundation for something more to his liking, and to gain a freedom 



622 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

not once to be thought of in his native land. In his search for a spot to 
suit his fancy, he left the state of New York and by water came to Mus- 
kegon, Michigan, and from that point he wended his way overland to La- 
Salle countv, Illinois, bv ox team. He found himself twelve dollars in debt, 
l)ut by day labor he supported his family and repaid this sacred debt. How 
our subject came into possession of his first piece of American land may be 
of interest in this connection. There were two young Norwegians in this 
locality who wanted to become preachers. One of their chief qualifications 
was the possession of the proper garb of a broadcloth suit and a plug hat. 
This mantle neither of them had. Init one of them owned twenty acres of 
wild land; and ]\Ir. Arentsen had in his possession, left o\er from his days 
of greater prosperity and when his thoughts ran more to style, a Inroad- 
cloth suit and the coveted "tile;" and when it was proposed h\ the germinat- 
ing re\erend to swap the land for the clothes he lost no time in agreeing to 
do so. and the head of the Arentsen house became a freeholder of Free- 
dom township. He pursued his new occupation with renewed diligence 
and industry and made a success of it. His accumulations came somewhat 
slowly, but as they did come he found them in the form of additional area 
to his homestead, and when he died he was the owner of a large farm. 

Thorbjorn Arentsen was just the type of man that made life valuable in 
that early day. He was not endowed with selfishness; on the contrary, 
he had an unselfish interest in all his neighbors and was especially awake 
to the needs of those who were in distress. During the cholera scourge he 
aided in nursing the sick and buried the dead, thus unavoidably exposing him- 
self to the attacks of that deadly plague, with no thought of its possible conse- 
quences to him. \Yherever there was needed a word of encouragement to the 
stricken, or bit of comfort to the afflicted, he always had it ready, and his pres- 
ence did as much good as the old doctor's remedies. He was a Christian 
gentleman and prominent in the Lutheran church. He passed on to his re- 
ward September 14, 1889. His devoted wife, Caroline, died January 13, 
1888. Their children were: Cecelia, wife of Christ Olson, of Ottawa; Helia; 
Henry, who died in the army, during the civil war; he was in Company D, 
Second Artillery, and died April 26, 1863; Caroline, wife of Ole Thorson, of 
Freedom; David and Daniel Arentsen. 

Our subject, Helia Arentsen, was born in Perry, Wyoming county, 
New York, April 26, 1839, and was not favored with an excellent schooling, 
but had to be content with what he could obtain in the little "log seminary," 
as it was styled. However, he got sufflcient book knowledge to enable him 
to teach a district school one winter, but after that he became a farmer and 
held to that without interruption, except as to the period he served his 
country during the Rebellion. He came to Illinois with his parents in 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 623 

1844. x\ugust 25, 1861, he enlisted in Company D, Second Illinois Artillery, 
as a private. His regiment was a part of the Fifteenth Army Corps, and 
he served in the western army under General Logan, receiving his discharge 
September 24, 1864, at Nashville, Tennessee. 

Mr. Arentsen was married at Ottawa, Illinois, by Justice of the Peace 
Arthur Lockwood, to Julia Thompson, a sister of Andrew Thompson, of 
Leland, Illinois. After his marriage he began life with a team and wagon 
and the money he had saved from his salary as a soldier. He went to 
housekeeping on the spot where the handsome residence now stands and 
where he was the possessor of sixty acres of land. His prosperity was at- 
tested by his final ownership of one hundred and twenty acres, which he had 
made one of the most beautiful farms in all his township. He claimed to be 
nothins', if not a farmer. He filled a small town office or two, but he never 
permitted his friends to lead him off for political crumbs, when he knew 
his success lay in the soil. He was, however, a director on the school board 
for eighteen years. He was a stanch Republican. He died January 20, 1900, 
a great loss to the community. 

Of his family it may be added that his children are: Henry T., who is 
a prominent young Republican and a member of the advisory committee 
of the party for the town of Freedom; Joseph E. ; Clara R.; William T., with 
Reed & Co., of Ottawa; Annie C. a successful teacher of the county schools; 
Emma S.. a pupil at Dixon (Illinois) University; and Herbert L. 



SEYMOUR POTTER. 



The Potter family, which is worthily represented in LaSalle county l:)y 
the subject of this article, is one of the oldest and most highly respected in 
the United States, having been founded here by Nathanial Potter, a native 
of England, who emigrated to the New World in 1638. He located at 
Portsmouth, Rhode Island, where his son and grandson, named in his honor, 
were born. 

In tracing the ancestry of Seymour Potter it is found that he is a son 
of Darius and Susan (Bower) Potter, the former one of the ten children of 
Esec and Lucena (Curtis) Potter. Esec Potter, in turn, was a son of Job 
and Desire (Irish) Potter, and grandson of Nathaniel and Mary (Carr) Pot- 
ter. Nathaniel was a son of John and Mary Potter, grandson of Nathaniel 
and Elizabeth (Stokes) Potter, great-grandson of Nathaniel and Dorothy 
Potter, and great-great-grandson of the Nathaniel Potter who founded the 
family in New England. John Potter, his son Nathaniel and grandson Job, 
above mentioned, in the direct line of descent, were born and dwelt in the 



624 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

town of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, where they were highly esteemed citi- 
zens. Our subject's parents were both natives of New York state, the 
father born in Cayuga county and the mother in Tompkins county. Esec 
Potter had emigrated into the wilds of Cayuga county, cleared a small 
farm, and at first lived in a rude cabin, which he built of logs cut by himself 
in the surrounding forest. He cleared the timber and farmed days, and at 
night worked at blacksmithing. In time he developed a good farm, and 
there the rest of his useful life was passed. The maternal grandfather of 
our subject, on the other hand, was Adam Bower, who with his wife was a 
native of Pennsylvania, and was of German extraction. He settled in the 
Empire state at an early period, and was a neighbor of the Potter family 
there. 

In 184 1 Darius and Susan Potter removed to the west to found a new 
home, and, locating on section 26 in Northville township where our subject 
now resides, proceeded to improve a farm. The father did not live to carry 
out many of his plans, as he died in 1849, at the age of forty-five years, and 
his devoted and sorrowing wife did not long survive, as she, too, entered 
the silent land during the following year, her age at death being ribout 
forty-six years. They were the parents of a number of children, among 
whom were: Orange, Fannie, Annice, Theron, Seneca, Seymour, Jane, 
Sarah, Lydia Ann and Ellen. 

Seymour Potter was born July 20, 1834, in Tompkins county, New 
York, and was a child of seven years when he came to this county. Here he 
acquired a common-school education and laid the foundations of his future 
success. He has always resided on the old homestead where his parents set- 
tled in 1 84 1, buying the property of the other heirs, after the death of the 
mother. He has carried out the work of improvement inaugurated by his 
father, and possesses a very desirable homestead, as the result of his well 
directed labors. 

In 1866 Mr. Potter married Mary Elizabeth Pearson, who was born in 
the city of New Orleans. Her father died when she was an infant, and 
her mother came to live with her after her marriage, and died in the home 
of our subject. Mrs. Potter was summoned to the silent land in 1887, and 
left four children to mourn her loss, namely: ]\Iary T., Sarah A., Arthur S. 
and Eliza J. 

Mr. Potter is a public-spirited citizen, always ready to do all within 
his power to promote the welfare of the community. He has persistently 
declined official distinction and responsibility, preferring the quiet life of a 
private citizen, yet has neglected none of his duties toward the public. He 
uses his franchise in favor of Republican nominees, and takes a deep interest 
in the success of his party. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 625 

In December, 1899, Mr. Potter visited his birthplace and his parents' 
early homestead in New York, and renewed many old acquaintances, and 
learned much from the early pioneers there of his own family. Among those 
with whom he renewed acquaintance was Roswell Beardsley, of North Lan- 
sing, Tompkins county, New York, who was a neighbor of Mr. Potter's 
grandparents, both paternal and maternal, and which gentleman has been 
postmaster of North Lansing for the last seventy-two years, a remarkable 
and unequaled continuance in office as a postmaster. 



C. D. WILHELM. 



No more loyal American citizen can be found in Ottawa than this son 
of the German Fatherland; for though his affections cling tenderly to his 
birthplace he realizes the greater blessings and advantages which he now 
enjoys under this flourishing republic, and has instilled into the hearts of his 
children the same patriotism and love for the Union which he feels. 

Born in Hesse Cassel, Germany, in 1837, C. D. Wilhelm is one of the 
four children of George and Dora Wilhelm. His sister Dorothea is the wife 
of Lawrence Romer, of Ottawa, and his sister Elizabeth married A. Carver, 
while the youngest of the family, Gertrude, is unmarried. In his youth 
our subject was employed first in farming; then, for three years he served 
in the German army, in compliance with the law compelling able-bodied 
young men of that nation to give a certain period of time to the support 
of the military system. 

Li 1868 young Wilhelm took one of the most important steps of his 
career, for he decided to come to the United States. Sailing from Bremen, 
he landed in Baltimore, and thence proceeded to Chicago, where he spent 
some time. In 1868 he came to Ottawa, with whose business interests he has 
since been connected. He is now the proprietor of one of the largest and 
best equipped meat markets in the place, and, owing to the neatness of the 
shop, the courtesy and desire to please manifested by himself and his em- 
ployes, and on account of the strictly first-class meats which are to be found 
here at all times, he enjoys a large and representative patronage. 

The marriage of Mr. Wilhelm and Miss Julia Saulman was solemnized 
August 24, 1875, in this town. They have two sons, of whom they have 
reason to be proud — Walter W. and Fred C. — both of whom are now serv- 
ing as members of Company C, Third Regiment of Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, being under command of Colonel Bennett. When their country 
called for men in the late war with Spain, they immediately responded and 
accompanied their regiment to Camp Chickamauga. where they were drilled 



626 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and prepared for active duty in the lield should their services be required; 
but, greatly to their regret, they were not sent to Cuba, but were sent to 
Porto Rico, returning to Ottawa in November, 1898; but they suffered the 
numerous discomforts and hardships of camp life, just the same. Besides 
these sons, Mr. and jMrs. Wilhelm have two daughters, Gertrude and Doro- 
thea. 

In his poHtical relations Mr. AA'ilhelm is a stalwart Republican, and 
never fails in discharging his duty as a voter. He favors schools and churches, 
and all worthy public institutions and enterprises, and has a good word and 
helpful sympathy for the poor and unfortunate. 



MICHAEL DUFFY. 



Now over three-score and ten years of age, ^Michael Duffy is passing 
the evening of his life in quiet and contentment at his pleasant home in 
the northern part of Ottawa. For more than half a century he has dwelt 
in this immediate locality and has been a witness of wonderful changes, 
as the wild prairie blossomed into usefulness and beauty under the labor of 
man, as thriving villages sprang into existence, and the county was covered 
with a network of railroads, which afford easy transportation facilities to 
the farmer who desires to dispose of the products of his land in the adja- 
cent towns and cities. 

A son of^ James and Mary (Kennedy) Duft'y, our subject was born in 
county West ]\Ieath. Ireland, in 1827. His parents spent their entire lives in 
the Emerald Isle, their attention being given to agriculture. At an early 
age, Michael Duft'y had to take up the burdens of life, and until recently 
he kept busily at work, adding to his capital and steadily making improve- 
ments upon his farm. It was in 1844 that he concluded to come to the 
United States, and after a three-weeks vovas^e in a sailins: vessel he landed 
in New York city, whence he proceeded direct to Ottawa. A brother, 
Bernard, had come to this locality about two or more years previously, and 
made a purchase of land in their joint names. This property, three hun- 
dred acres, was not divided, but together the brothers carried on the home- 
stead harmoniously until the death of Bernard in 1895, fifty-one years from 
the time that they had first started to run the farm. Bernard was the only 
brother of our subject, and, as he remained unmarried, he made his home 
chiefiy with ^Michael Duft'y. The latter succeeded to the sole ownership 
of the homestead at the death of his brother, and now leases the place to 
responsible tenants. A substantial brick house, good barns and other farm 
buildings are to be found on the place, which is kept in a neat and thrifty 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 627 

manner. The farm is finely situated, being on the well kept graveled road 
leading from Ottawa to Utica. 

In political matters Mr. Duffy is a stanch friend of the Democratic 
party. He and all of his family are members of St. Patrick's Catholic church, 
of Ottawa. Thirty years ago he married iVIary Vork, of Ottaw-a township, 
and three children blessed their union, namely: James, who resides on 
the farm owned by the father; John, who is engaged in farming; and ]\Iary, 
who, since the death of the devoted wife and mother, in 1896, has been her 
father's housekeeper. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON TOWNSEND. 

The family of the Townsends is an ancient and honored one. It is very 
old in England and was early established in America by James Townsend 
and his two brothers, who came over together, James locating in ]\Iassa- 
chusetts, one in New York and one in Vermont. 

It was in the A^ermont line of the family that the ancestors of George 
Washington Townsend descended. Mr. Townsend's grandfather was Aaron 
Townsend. His son. Almond Townsend, father of George Washington 
Townsend, was born in AMndsor county, A^ermont, Januarv 26, 1803, 
and was a prosperous farmer and an extensive breeder of Alerino sheep. 
He married Elvira Butler, also a native of Windsor county, Vermont, a 
daughter of that well known man, Charles Butler, who was drowned in 
the Connecticut river. Mrs. Townsend was born in 181 1, and died April 
15, 1880. Mr. Townsend died April 16, 1885. Almond and Elvira (Butler) 
Townsend had seven children: Charles G., born April 30, 1834 (deceased); 
EugVne B., born June 13, 1836, died April 26, 1883; James A., born Febru- 
ary 8, 1838; Henry H.. born May 5, 1841; Carrie E., born April 12, 1843 
(deceased); George Washington, and one other whose name is not at 
hand. 

George \\'ashington Townsend was born in \\'indsor county, \'ermont, 
at the birthplace of his father and mother, April 10, 1847. He passed the 
first sixteen years of his life in Vermont, where he was sent to the district 
school and later to the Green Mountain Institute at South Woodstock. He 
supplemented the education thus obtained by a commercial course at East- 
man's Business College, at Poughkeepsie, New York. In 1865 he came west 
to LaSalle county, Illinois, and went from there to Grundy county and tar- 
ried a year at Morris. He then made a short visit to his native town. On 
his return he stopped at Morris for a short time and then went to Grinnell, 
Iow\a, and thence to Alonmouth, Illinois, w'here he located in 1861. For 
a time he did a thriving business in wooden eave-spouts. He abandoned 



628 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

this business to learn the tinners' trade. He remained at Monmouth and 
in Stark county, Illinois, until 1877, when he removed to Ottawa and en- 
gaged in the dairy business on an eighty-acre farm which he purchased in 
Ottawa township, two miles and a half north of the city. This place, known 
as the \\'^ade farm, he improved and stocked with thirty or forty cows and 
sold the milk they produced to a fine trade in Ottawa. He maintained this 
business on an extensive scale until 1897, and still keeps a few cows, more 
to have something to look after than for the profit there may 1)e in so small 
a trade. 

Mr. Townsend was married. December 19, 1892, to Miss Julia P. Judd, 
a native and resident of Wayne, Stark county, Illinois. He is a stanch 
Republican and has held the responsible position of treasurer of Ottawa 
high school for the past nine years. He has a fine residence, heated through- 
out by a modern hot-water system and provided with other up-to-date 
conveniences and luxuries. A library of fine and useful books attracts the 
attention of the visitor, but the presence of these is not necessary to suggest 
to any one who meets ]\Ir. Townsend that he is a man of high intelligence 
and a wide range of general information. 



CARLISLE M. POOL. 



Carlisle ]\I. Pool is a member of that large and popular family of Pools 
that settled in Freedom township, LaSalle county, at a very early day in the 
history of this section and have been prominently identified with it ever 
since. 

The Pools are of English origin. Joseph Pool and William, his son. 
grandfather and father of Carlisle M., were both born in Yorkshire, England, 
the former in 1798; the latter June 16, 1823. In 1830 Joseph Pool emi- 
grated with his family to the United States, locating first in Clinton county. 
New York. In 1846 he came west to Illinois, making the journey by canal 
and lake route, and selecting a location in Serena township, LaSalle county, 
where he bought a farm and soon took rank with the leading and success- 
ful farmers of the county. Here he lived and labored until his death, which 
occurred in 1874. Politically he was a Democrat, active and influential in 
local aft'airs. He and his wife were the paren.ts of the following named 
children: Thomas, Mathew, ^^'illiam, Mary E. (who married Gilbert Dom- 
iny), Joseph, George and Ann Eliza (who married Augustin Dominy). 

William Pool was seven years old at the time he came with his parents 
and other members of the family to America, and at the time of their re- 
moval from New York to Illinois was twentv-three. He was reared a 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 629 

farmer, receiving only limited educational advantages. In 1844, at the age 
of twenty-one, he came west on a prospecting tour and was so well pleased 
with LaSalle county that he decided to locate here. Hence the coming of 
the family a short time later. He was married May 28, 1846, just before 
they all started west, the lady of his choice being Sarah, daughter of David 
Smith, a \'ermont farmer. Of the Smith family we record that John Smith, 
the father of David, was born at Needham, Massachusetts, October 9, 1758. 
He fought in the battle of Lexington April 19, 1776, and w-as an artillery- 
man in the battles of Bunker Hill and Ticonderoga. His second enlistment 
was at West Point in 1779, and it is fair to presume he served through 
the war. He married Sarah Mastick in 1780, and died at Grafton, Vermont, 
in 1838. His children were Clarissa, Hannah, John, Sarah. Walter, Elijah, 
Nahum, Joseph, Nathan and David. David Smith, born in 1794, went to 
Plattsburg, New York, in 1812, and married Phebe McCreedy, August 2, 
1818. He died in 1837, and his widow in 1843. Their children were Sylvia, 
who married Benjamin Barber, died in 1846; Sarah, born July 13, 1825; 
Esther M., wife of Isaac Winters, died in 1857; Phebe, deceased; and Ann, 
a resident of Joliet, Illinois, is the widow of Benjamin Barber. 

William Pool and wife are the parents of the following named: Albert 
J., a prominent farmer and stockman of Ford county, Illinois, married Lucy 
Crook and has four children — Willie C, Harry A., Ralph W., and Ethel 
May. Arthur S., a resident of Freedom, Illinois, has been twice married, 
his first wife being Eliza Ball, and his second wife Hester Hinchman; Car- 
lisle 'M., born March 10, 1855; and Sarah, wife of J. W. Hall, of Eldon, 
Iowa; they have two children — Clarence L. and Lyle W. 

Carlisle M. Pool has thus far passed his life on the farm on which he 
was born. His opportunities for obtaining an education were limited to 
the district schools. Under his father's training and with experience as a 
teacher, he became a first-class farmer and has always taken a pride in 
keeping his place in the best condition. His farin and home are among 
the most attractive in the township, giving every evidence of the fact that 
the owner is a man of industry and careful management. He has always 
taken an active interest in the public affairs of his township and has ren- 
dered efficient service in some of its public offices. He comes from a line 
of Democrats, politically, but claims to be an independent during the events 
of the present time. He has been a town clerk and commissioner of high- 
ways. Fraternally he, as well as Albert and his father, is identified with 
the iMasonic order, having his membership in Freedom Lodge, No. 194. Al- 
bert and Carlisle have also taken the Chapter and Commandery degrees — 
Carlisle in Ottawa Chapter, No. 40, and Ottawa Commandery, No. 10. 

Carlisle M. Pool was married in 1885 to Louisa Fogg, who was born 



630 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Atignst 7, 1858, a daughter of Ezekiel Fogg, of Ottawa, Illinois. She has 
two brothers and two sisters: Dr. Charles Fogg, of \\'enona, Illinois; Lean- 
der Fogg, of Freedom, also in Illinois; Sophia, wife of Frank Smith, of Col- 
orado Springs, Colorado; and Anna ]\I., of Ottawa, this state. ]Mr. and 
Mrs. Pool have two children, a daughter and a son: Irene Bertha, born 
October 23, 1886; and Ernest Howard Carlisle, June 5, 1894. 



HENRY B. NEFF. 



The gentleman to whose life history we now direct attention — Henry 
B. NefT — was born in Franklin county, Indiana, October 14, 1821. a son 
of Ebenezer and Susanna (Buck) Xeff. pioneers of that place. 

Ebenezer Neff was a native of the Green ^Mountain state, being born 
in Vermont, August 4. 1790: was a pioneer of Indiana, and in 1835 left 
the "Hoosier" state for Illinois, coming to iMission Point, LaSalle county, 
Avhere he spent the rest of his life, dying ]\Iay 31, 1867. He was a farmer 
by occupation, always took an active part in the public afifairs of the 
community in which he li\-ed, and when the Republican party was organ- 
ized in LaSalle county became one of its ardent supporters. He was twice 
married. His first wife, nee Susanna Buck, was born October 2, 1784, and 
died in Franklin county, Indiana, July 25, 1823. Their children who grew 
to maturity were Daniel B., Betsey, Almira S., Olive, Isabelle P. and Henry 
B. ]\Ir. NeiT's second wife was before marriage ]^Iiss IMargaret Douglas. 
She was born July 12, 1799. and died December 9, 1871. The children of 
this union, that lived to adult age, were William B., Rachel, Sarah Bell, 
Janetta, Ellen, George and ^Margaret. 

Henry B. NefT was a boy in his "teens when he accompanied his father 
and family to Illinois. He was reared a farmer, receiving only a common- 
school education, and when he started out to make his own A\ay in the 
world it was as a poor young man with no capital save a willing hand and 
a determination to succeed. He engaged in farming in Kendall county, 
Illinois, was prosperous from the start, and as the years went by accumu- 
lated a large amount of property. He continued farming until 1882, when 
he moved to Ottawa, near which city he had a farm, and during the rest of 
his life his time was spent in looking after his property, loaning money, 
etc. He died in Ottawa, January 14, 1895. Politically, like his father, he 
was a stanch Republican, but never aspired to official honors. His religious 
creed was that of the Congregational church, of which he was a consistent 
member. 

]\Ir. NefT was married April 15. 1852. to i\Iiss ]\Iary J. Freeland, a 





)fom^i /y uf^fir 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 631 

native of Dearborn county, Indiana, born February 24, 1829, a daughter 
of Richard and Ellice (McMath) Freeland. Mr. and Mrs. Freeland were 
natives respectively of New York and Pennsylvania, were among the early 
settlers of Indiana and were married in that state. Their family consisted of 
the following named members: Mary J., John W., Samuel L., Ann Eliza 
and Ellice Augusta. In 1848 the Freeland home was changed from Indiana 
to Mission township, in LaSalle county, Illinois; and many years afterward 
to Troy Grove, this county, where the mother died. After the mother's 
death the father went to Champaign county, Illinois, where he passed the 
closing years of his life. Mr. and Mrs. Neff had no children, but adopted 
a daughter, Lillian \^., whom they reared as their own. Mrs. Nef¥ is a 
member of the Congregational church. 



GEORGE D. HILL. 



For some years Mr. Hill has been a prominent factor in the business 
circles of Grand Ridge, and at the present writing he is the popular and 
efficient mayor of the city, who, in his control of municipal affairs, follows 
a wise and progressive policy, resulting greatly to the benefit of the com- 
munity which he thus ofiicially represents. He is an enterprising man, loyal 
citizen, and at all times loyal and reliable in the discharge of the trusts and 
responsibilities devolving upon him. 

A native of Maine, Mr. Hill was born in Augusta, a son of John and 
Oral (Sutherland) Hill, who had seven children, three sons and four daugh- 
ters. The father, who was the proprietor of a shoe store, removed to Bement, 
Illinois, and thence to Streator, this state, where for a number of years he 
was successfully engaged in dealing in shoes. ]\Ir. Hill accompanied his 
parents to Illinois, and under the parental roof spent the days of his boy- 
hood and youth. He acquired a good education, well fitting him for the 
practical and responsible duties of life, and after attaining his majority he 
was engaged in business in Dana, Illinois, where he dealt in fruit for five 
years. On the expiration of that period he came to Grand Ridge and pur- 
chased of A. K. Knott & Company, of Ottawa, his present grain and coal 
business. Here he is enjoying a liberal patronage, which is steadily in- 
creasing. He has a very large elevator with a capacity of six hundred thous- 
and bushels of grain; and as Grand Ridge is located in the center of a rich 
farming district he carries on an extensive business, deriving therefrom a 
good income and at the same time furnishing an excellent* market for the 
grain producers of this region. 

In 1894, in Morris, Grundv countv, Illinois, Mv. Hill was united in 



632 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

marriage to ]\Iiss Martha Lindsay, a lady of superior education and culture. 
She was graduated in the State Normal School, and for some years prior 
to her marriage was a successful teacher. ]Mr. and ]^Irs. Hill have two 
children. May and Oral. The parents are members of the Methodist church 
and are numbered among the most prominent people of Grand Ridge, occu- 
pying a leading position in social circles and enjoying the hospitality of 
many of the best homes. In his political affiliations Mr. Hill is a Republican, 
and on that ticket was elected to the office which he is now filling so credit- 
ably to himself and satisfactorily to his constituents. Socially he is connected 
with several fraternal organizations. He is a Royal Arch Mason, and is also 
a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of 
Pythias fraternity. In manner he is frank and cordial, entirely free from 
ostentation and display, but his genuine worth at all times commands re- 
spect and in the community he has many warm friends. 



LEVI M. EATON. 



Levi 'M. Eaton, of Sheridan, Illinois, was born in Freeport, this state, 
April 4, 1848, a son of William and Eliza (Hunt) Eaton, the former a native 
of Cortland county. New York, the latter of Massachusetts, and both of 
English lineage. ^Mr. Eaton's maternal grandfather was a soldier in the 
Mexican war and sen-ed as a drummer. The snare drum used by him is now 
owned by Mr. Eaton, who is himself a fine drummer; and to this day it is 
as fine an instrument of its kind as can be found. 

]Mr. Eaton was reared on a farm, his only educational advantages in 
early life being those of the country school. In the broad school of ex- 
perience, however, he has acquired a large stock of useful information, and, 
being a good reader and a close observer, keeps himself well posted on the 
general topics of the day. He began the battle of life for himself at the 
age of seventeen years. At twenty-three he went west and had consider- 
able experience in mining. Afterward he spent three years in the iron mines 
of jSIichigan. In 1882 he returned to Freeport, his native town, and for 
several years thereafter his occupation varied. June 11, 1890, he started out 
on the road, with horse and wagon, selling Dr. Ward's Remedies, and in 
this business he has since continued with success. Dr. Ward's name and 
remedies are too well known to need further mention here. Suffice it to 
say that ^Mr. Eaton as a salesman in this line has met with more than or- 
dinary success. For several years he has resided in Sheridan, where he 
is well and favorably known. 






BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 633 

Mr. Eaton ^vas married, in 1884. to ]\Iiss Lena Olsen, and they have 
one daughter, named Eva J. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Home Forum and the Royal Circle. 



JOHN ARTHUR GUAM. 

There is no foreign element in our American nationality more valuable 
than that which comes from Norway. The land of the midnight sun has fur- 
nished to the United States many of its most prominent citizens, and its rep- 
resentatives are found in all the useful walks and vocations of life. The gen- 
tleman whose name heads this biographical record belongs to a worthy 
Norwegian family, although he is a native son of LaSalle county. He is now 
occupying a leading position in business circles, being a merchant and banker 
of Sheridan, where he exerts a wide and beneficent influence upon the com- 
mercial affairs of the place. 

Born on a farm in Mission township. May 24, 1854, he is a son of Ole 
A. and Gertrude (Osmunson) Quam, both of whom were natives of Nor- 
way. When thirteen years of age the former came to the United States 
with his parents, in 1843, the family settling in Mission township, LaSalle 
county, where John Arneson Quam, the grandfather of our subject, spent 
the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1880, when he had reached 
the age of eighty years. His wife, Rachel Quam, has also passed away. 
They were the parents of two sons and four daughters, but one son and 
two daughters are now deceased. Ole A. Quam and Gertrude Osmunson 
were married in LaSalle county. The latter came to the United States in 
1839, when five years of age. Her father died in Chicago soon after the 
arrival of the family in this country, and the mother moved to the town 
of ^Mission, LaSalle county, where she passed away six months later, leav- 
ing two little daughters, alone in a strange land, and without a known 
relative in the world! Here they grew to womanhood, and Gertrude mar- 
ried as above mentioned. By the union were born eight children, namely: 
Rebecca, John Arthur, Rachel, Isabelle, Bertha, Emma, Clara and Victor J. 
The parents continued to reside in LaSalle county until 1879 and then 
removed to Norway, Iowa, where they remained until 1896, since which 
time they have made their home in Ashland, Wisconsin. 

John Arthur Quam, the subject of this review, was reared in LaSalle 
county, and has here spent his entire life. He acquired his elementary edu- 
cation in the common schools and later pursued his studies in the schools 
of Aurora and in the Fowler Institute at Newark, Illinois. He left the 
farm at the age of twenty-one years and came to Sheridan, where he entered 



634 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

upon his business career as a general merchant, in partnership with Peter 
C. Berkland. This connection was continued for three years, when Mr. 
Ouam bought out his partner's interest, and since that time he has dealt 
exclusively in clothing and men's furnishing goods. His store is filled with a 
large and well selected stock of everything found in his line and he receives 
a liberal patronage. In 1884 he estabHshed a private banking business and 
in 1887 Robert Knapp became his partner in both branches, since which 
time operations have been carried on under the firm style of Quam & Knapp, 
merchants and bankers. 

In 1875 the subject of this review was united in marriage to Miss 
Amelia Nelson, a daughter of Peter C. and Sygne (Danielson) Nelson. Her 
father was born in New York and was a son of Cornelius Nelson, a native 
of Norway and one of the owners of and passenger on the "Norwegian May- 
flower," the sloop Restoration, which weighed anchor from Stavanger. Nor- 
way, on July 4, 1825, with fifty-two emigrants, and landed in New York, 
October 9, with fifty-three passengers. Cornelius Nelson settled in that city 
and his son was born in the Empire state. After the death of the grandfather 
of Mrs. Ouam, his widow and her children came west to LaSalle county, 
Illinois, in 1836, casting in their lot with the early settlers here. Mrs. Nel- 
son's death occurred in this county, at a ripe old age. Her son, Peter C. 
Nelson, was born January 20, 1830, and is believed to be the oldest living 
Norwegian born in America. He is now residing at Larned, Kansas. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Ouam have been born three children: Mabel, wife of Rev. J. 
M. Hibbish, of California; Vida and Hila. 

The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are 
numbered among the most prominent citizens of Sheridan. In politics Mr. 
Ouam is a stalwart Republican and for the past ten years has held the office 
of supervisor for Mission township. As a citizen he is progressive and gives 
a generous support to all measures calculated to prove of public benefit. 
In business he has been successful, and his reputation is unassailable, for 
his honesty is proverbial, and in all transactions he fully merits the confidence 
reposed in him. 



IA:\IES BRUCE. 



James Bruce, junior member of the firm of Bruce and Jamieson. and 
one of the promising young business men of Marseilles, LaSalle county, was 
born at Lockport, near Joliet, on September 2, 1872. and is a son of James 
and Jane (Stephens) Bruce. His parents were both natives of Scotland, the 
father having been born at Aberdeen in 1823. He came to America in 
1844 and located at Lockport. where he was a contractor in the stone c^uar- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 635 

ries of Joliet for many years. He died December 13, 1898, at Lockport. 
He was a son of George Bruce, of Scotland. The same vessel that brought 
him to this country also brought Jane Stephens, a daughter of Ebenezer 
Stephens, to whom he was united in marriage in this country. Of the live 
children born to them but three survive. 

James Bruce was the second child born in the family. He attended 
pul)lic school at Lockport, finishing with the high school, after which he 
took a course in a commercial college at Chicago. The following four 
years were spent assisting his father in his work connected with the stone 
quarries. In 1894 he came to Marseilles and formed a partnership with J. 
A. Jamieson and has since dealt in all kinds of grain, hard and soft coal, 
and built up a very profitable business. He is a straightforward, honorable 
man with whom it is a pleasure to do business. 

In 1895 he was joined in marriage to Miss Adlaine Richards, whose 
grandmother was a Miss Middleton and whose parents were Daniel and 
Catherine (Gould) Richards, of Boston, Massachusetts. Mr. Bruce is a mem- 
ber of the board of directors of the First National Bank, and is the trustee 
of his father's estate. 



JOSEPH FUTTERER. 



Among the zealous and influential workers in the Democratic party 
of LaSalle county, Joseph Futterer is acknowledged to be in the front ranks. 
His ability and valued assistance to the party received fitting recognition 
when, in 1892, he was honored by election to the responsible ofiice of 
supervisor. He served for two years — the full term — to the entire satisfac- 
tion of all concerned, and was then chosen by the vote of the majority for 
a second term. In 1898 he was again elected to the supervisorship, and is 
thus filling his third term. Not only in a puljlic capacity but also as a citi- 
zen in the private walks of life, he commands the respect and high regard 
of all with whom he has had dealings, and he has been engaged in business in 
Ottawa for many years. 

A native of Baden-Baden. Germany, born in 1852. Joseph Futterer 
spent the first years of his life in that fair land, and was a lad of about thir- 
teen years when, in 1865, he and his parents, Joseph and Rosa Futterer, 
bade adieu to all their old friends and associations and set sail for America, 
here to found a new home. In 1868 they settled in IMonroe county, ^^^is- 
consin, and on the homestead there, not far from the village of Sparta, 
the mother is still living. The father died some years ago, when in his 
sixtieth year. They had only one son, but were the parents of four daugh- 
ters. 



636 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Our subject received the benefits of a thorough training in both the 
German and Enghsh languages, and in his boyhood and youth acquired an 
intimate knowledge of the various duties connected with the proper manage- 
ment of a farm. In 1873 he came to Ottawa, where he has since made his 
home, while occupied in business transactions. By diligence and persever- 
ance in whatever he undertook he gradually amassed a competency, and 
he now has a good bank account and valuable property. Socially he is con- 
nected with the Knights of Pythias, the German Benevolent Society and 
several other fraternal organizations. 

In 1877 Mr. Futterer married Miss Theresa Schaeffer, of Ottawa. 
Nine children came to bless their happy home, but four of the number have 
passed to the silent land. Four promising sons and a daughter are left to 
the devoted parents, their names in order of birth being as follows: Fred, 
Charles, Alice, John and Ernest. 



WILLIAM COOPER. 



William Cooper, of Otter Creek township, LaSalle county, Illinois, is 
one of the well known and popular citizens of the county, and has the 
distinction of being a veteran of the civil war. While he fought for this 
country and is thoroughly an American at heart, ?\Ir. Cooper is not a native 
of the United States. He was born in the northern part of Ireland, No- 
vember II, 1842. His father, Edward Cooper, was a native of Ireland and 
a shoemaker by trade, following that pursuit in early life, but later turn- 
ing his attention to agricultural pursuits. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Jane Coughlin, was also a native of the Emerald Isle. When their son 
William was a boy of six years they emigrated with their family to this 
country, and settled at Salmon Falls, New Hampshire, where they lived for 
some time, after which they came to Illinois and took up their abode in 
LaSalle county. Edward Cooper died at the age of forty-five years. His 
widow, surviving him, is now eighty-five years of age and is a resident of 
Streator, Illinois. They were the parents of eight children, namely: Mrs. 
Maria Roberts, of Indiana; Mrs. Sarah Berry, of Rock Rapids, Iowa; John, 
of Otter Creek township, LaSalle county, who is given personal mention 
elsewhere in this work; William, whose name introduces this sketch; Rich- 
ard, who was a member of the Fifty-third Illinois Volunteers, under Gen- 
eral Grant, and was killed in the engagement at Vicksburg, Mississippi, in 
the civil war; Edward, of Streator, Illinois; ]\Irs. Jane Litts, of Stuart, Iowa; 
and Mrs. Lizzie Jones, of Otter Creek township. All of the four sons in 
this family volunteered in the Union army during the civil war, rendered 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 637 

faithful, courageous service, and one, as already stated, lost his life on the 
battlefield. Few families can show such a war record. 

William Cooper, with his brothers and sisters, was reared on the farm 
and educated in the public schools, and, as one of a large family in moder- 
ate circumstances, he was early taught industry and economy, and for a time 
he worked in a cotton factory. To his early training, indefatigable industry 
and his determination to succeed may be attributed the success he has at- 
tained in life. He is now the owner of a valuable farm in Otter Creek 
township, well improved and giving every evidence of successful man- 
agement on the part of the owner. 

During the civil war Mr. Cooper "donned the blue" and fought in 
defense of the Union. He enlisted in 1862 and went to the front, his name 
being enrolled on the 14th of August, among the members of Company F, 
One Flundred Fourth Illinois Volunteers, under command of Captain Mc- 
Kennan. Among the engagements in which he participated were the battles 
of Hartsville and Missionary Ridge. While in the service he was disabled 
by deafness of the left ear, and was honorably discharged in June, 1865, at 
Washington, D. C. 

In January, 1867, Mr. Cooper married Miss Mary Smith, daughter of 
Richard and Sarah (Booth) Smith, both natives of England. Mr. and Mrs. 
Cooper have had six children, all of whom are deceased. One of their 
daughters, Violet, married jMr. John Brock and died in May, 1893, leaving a 
child, Clarence William Brock, who is now eight years old and who resides 
with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Cooper. Mr. Cooper is a member 
of G. A. R. Post No. 68, at Streator, and is a loyal and public-spirited citizen 
whose faithfulness to duty is as marked as when he followed the stars and 
stripes upon the battlefields of the south. 



W. E. DOWNS. 



From the time that he arrived at his majority W. E. Downs has been 
one of the most zealous workers in the interests of the Democratic party 
in Ottawa. He was but twenty-five years old when, in the spring of 1893, 
he received the nomination and was elected to the office of alderman by 
his numerous party friends. In 1897 he was again chosen to represent the 
people in the city council, and was elected from the Third ward. He is 
still acting in that capacity, and now. as always, has the best interests of the 
public at heart. Progressive and in accord with the spirit of the times, he 
advocates public improvements and judicious expenditure of the people's 
money. 



638 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

One of the native sons of Ottawa, in which place he has passed his 
whole life, Mr. Downs is naturally proud of this enterprising Httle city, and 
is loyally anxious to promote its growth and prosperity. He was born in 
1868, and is a son of John Downs, an old and prominent citizen of this 
place. In his youth our subject attended the public schools and gained 
a practical business education. After leaving the school-room he obtained 
a position in the emplo}' of the Ottawa Electric Street Railway Company, 
with which corporation he has been connected in various capacities for 
many years. At present he is the foreman and superintendent of tracks. 
Bv lono^ and faithful service and strict attention to the welfare of his em- 
ployers, he has won their approbation and confidence. 

Mr. Downs bears an enviable i"eputation for integrity and uprightness 
in all the varied relationships of life. He is a member of the Uniformed 
Rank of the Knights of Pythias, and has many friends in the organization. 
For years he has been sent as a delegate to political conventions, local and 
general, and has kept well posted on party tactics and plans of campaign 
work. 



MICHAEL J. FLAHERTY. 

^Michael J. Flaherty, the genial and courteous postmaster and merchant 
of Baker, LaSalle county, is well and favorably known throughout the 
county as a man of energy and push whose residence in this state has been 
marked by an industry and energy that have brought him to the road to 
prosperity. He was born in Boston. ^Massachusetts, December 28, 1842, and 
is a son of Michael and Bridget (Flaherty) Flaherty. Both parents were 
born in Ireland and were there married, coming to the L'nited States in 
1831 and settling in Boston, where the mother died in 1852, and four years 
later the father and five of the children came west and located at Serena, 
this county. He purchased land, which was taken in charge In' his son 
Martin and converted into valuable property. The children of Michael 
Flaherty were two sons and four daughters: ]\lartin, deceased; Sarali, de- 
ceased; Alargaret; Ellen; Kate and Michael. The father died in Serena in 
1888 and his remains were taken back to the east and placed beside his 
wife at Bunker Hill. ]^Iartin Flaherty was a successful man of business 
and well liked by those who knew him. He resided at Serena and was a 
supervisor for fourteen years, moving to Ottawa, where he was again elected 
supervisor. He was a Democrat in his political affiliation and died at Ottawa 
in 1892, aged sixty-six years. He was unmarried. 

^lichael J. Flahertv remained behind to attend school in Boston, when 
his father and family came west, in 1856. but in the course of about two 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 639 

years he followed them to LaSalle county. He worked on the farm until 
1893 and then lived in Leland five years more, when he came to Baker and 
opened a store of general merchandise. He was appointed the postmaster 
of Leland in 1893 and served four years and a half, and during that time 
was elected the president of the town board. He was appointed to the office 
of postmaster in Baker in December, 1897. and the following year was 
elected a justice of the peace. He is one of the workers among the Repub- 
lican ranks, and renders the party valuable aid in their local elections. He 
is a member of the Roman Catholic church and belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen of America, the Knights of the Globe, the Home Forum and the 
Foresters. In 1872 Mr. Flaherty married Kate Calvy. who died seven 
years later, leaving a son, Martin, who died one year afterward. He was mar- 
ried a second time, in 1881, to Miss Eliza A. DeBolt, a daughter of John 
DeBolt, one of the oldest settlers of LaSalle county, who came here as early 
as 1832. The union of ^Ir. and ^Irs. Flaherty has been blessed by the 
birth of four children: ]\Iartin (ist), who died in his seventh year, Harold, 
!Martin (2d) and Mary. 



GEORGE A. CAAIPBELL. 

As his name indicates, George A. Campbell, of Ottawa, comes of 
Scotch-Irish ancestry. His father, Hugh Campbell, was born in the city of 
Belfast, in the northern part of Ireland, and in his early manhood he came 
to the United States. At first he resided in Xew York state, where he 
married Miss Nancy Polls, a native of Orange county. Later he removed 
with his family to ^Michigan, and throughout his active life he devoted his 
attention to farming. At the time of his death he had reached the extreme 
age of eighty-seven years. His widow is still living and makes her home 
with her youngest son, Joseph R., in Clinton county, Michigan. The three 
eldest sons of this worthy couple, James, Chester and Robert W., were heroes 
of the civil war, nobly upholding the Union in its time of peril. Chester 
was wounded in one of the numerous battles in which he participated, and 
for six months was a captive in a Confederate prison. Thomas, a railroad 
conductor, whose home is in Frankfort, Indiana, and three children, who 
have passed to the silent land, complete the family. 

George A. Campbell, whose name forms the caption of this sketch, was 
born near Newburg, Orange county, Xew York, September 6, 1848, and was 
reared to farm life. In his boyhood he accompanied the family in its re- 
moval to Michigan, where he experienced the vicissitudes of pioneer life, 
and in order to pursue his education was often obliged to walk two miles to 
school. When a young man he came to Ottawa, where he remained for 



640 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

several years. In 1880 he went to ^Montana, where he spent about four 
years, but returning here at the end of that period, he located his place with 
the intention of remaining permanently. On the ist of July, 1887, he was 
appointed to his present position as mail carrier and dehvery clerk, and has 
made a desirable record for efhciency and faithfulness. In his political con- 
victions he is a Democrat, as was his father before him. 

In October, 1874, occurred an important event in the Hfe of George 
A. Campbell, as at that time his marriage to Miss Lizzie Cross was solemnized 
in Ottawa, Mrs. Campbell is a native of Wayne county. New York, and 
is a daughter of Jairus Cross. Louise, the only daughter of our subject 
and wife, is employed by J. E. Scott & Company; and Norman D., the only 
son, is at home, attending the local school. The pleasant home of the 
family is at No. 635 Chapel street, in the eastern part of the town. Mr. 
and Mrs. Campbell and their children are members of the Congregational 
church, lending their influence to the support of religion, morality, temper- 
ance and all that makes a community prosperous. 



GEORGE E. WILLS. 



George E. Wills, a prosperous and public-spirited citizen of Troy Grove 
township, LaSalle county, is one of the early settlers of this locality, and 
for forty-three years he has been engaged in agricultural pursuits in this 
vicinit3\ He has seen the development of the county almost from its 
wild state, and has himself broken prairie and improved tracts of land which 
gave little promise of the wealth that proper cultivation was to evolve from 
the soil. 

A son of George and Mary (\\'atts) Wills, both natives of Somerset- 
shire, England, our subject was born March 22, 1836, in Michigan, and, 
with his little sister, Mary, was left motherless at a tender age, in the 
year 1838. The father, who was a carpenter and mechanic, returned to 
England, where his death took place in 1847. He was a son of Richard 
Wills, who likewise was a carpenter and who lived to a ripe age, dying in 
England, where he had been a life-long resident. He had but two children. 
The maternal grandfather of our subject also lived and died in that country. 

George E. Wills was reared at a place about twenty-eight miles dis- 
tant from Detroit, Michigan, and resided in that city also for a short period, 
prior to his seventeenth year. He was early thrown upon his own resources, 
and may truly be termed a self-made man. About 1853 he went to New 
Brighton, Pennsylvania, a town some thirty miles northwest of Pittsburg, 
and there learned the trade of plasterer. Later he attended school at North 






lU^iAjey 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 641 

Sewickley, and by earnest study qualified himself for teaching. In 1854 
he went to Jackson county, Iowa, where he worked on farms during the 
summer and taught school in the winter season. At the end of thirteen 
months he came to Mendota, and here he assisted James Henderson in 
establishing a seminary, in which he also became a student. 

It was in 1856 that Mr. Wills permanently turned his attention to agri- 
culture. For two years he carried on a rented farm west of the limits of Men- 
dota, and then leased a place south of the town and adjoining his present 
homestead on the south. That land was wild prairie, and for sixteen years 
Mr. Wills cultivated the place, which soon bore little resemblance to its 
original condition. In 1874 he bought the homestead which has been the 
scene of his endeavors for a quarter of a century. In addition to this place, 
which he greatly improved, building a substantial house, barns, granaries 
and fences, he owns another farm, of one hundred and sixty acres, situated 
four miles north of Mendota, in the township of the same name. 

During the past two years Mr. Wills has been the president of the 
Mendota Union Fair Association, of which he had served as a director for 
a number of years previously. For twelve years he has acted in the capacity 
of road commissioner, and was township assessor for one term, discharging 
his duties to the full satisfaction of every one concerned. He is a stanch 
Republican, and fraternally is identified with Mendota Lodge, No. 176, 
A. F. & A. M.; Mendota Chapter. No. 79, R. A. M.; and Bethany Com- 
mandery. No. 28, K. T. 

In 1862 Mr. Wills married JNIary, daughter of Slocum and Matilda 
Bunker. Jennie M., their first-born, became the wife of the Rev. W. H. 
Clatworthy, a Presbyterian minister, and has been called to the better land. 
James S., the eldest son, is in the west for the improvement of his health. 
George A., who married JNIiss Belle Garwood, is financiallv interested in the 
Stockholm Manufacturing Company, of Chicago, in which city he makes 
his home. Oscar T. married Miss Carrie Bailey, and is engaged in man- 
aging the farm owned Ijy our subject. Edgar B. married Margaretta 
Moore, and carries on the farm north of Mendota owned by his father. 
The mother of these children, who was a devoted member of the Presby- 
terian church and a most lovable lady in everv respect, departed this life 
February 12, 1877. On the 12th of October, 1886, Mr. Wills was united in 
marriage with Miss Sarah, daughter of Peter and Magdalena (Leufer) 
Miller. They have two children, Roy INI. and Jennie Mabel. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wills are members of the Presbyterian church. Her parents were natives 
of Germany, and were early settlers of Troy Grove township. Her father, 
who was a respected, hard-working farmer, died about 1863; and her 
mother, who belonged to the Evangelical church, survived her husband 



642 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

many years, dying in January, 1887, when in her sixty-fourth year. She was 
the mother of one son and two daughters: ]\Iagdalena, who is the wife of 
Thomas Bowers; Henry J., and Sarah. 'Sir. \\"ills has led an interesting 
career. Left an orphan in very early childhood and thrown upon his own 
resources very early in life, he began the battle of life under very discourag- 
ing conditions. Nature had endowed him with a burning ambition to 
succeed in life, and with a noble purpose before him he set about first to gain 
the best education possible for him to gain under the circumstances 
of his early youth. His spare hours and nights were spent in study. We 
soon find him in the school-room as teacher, then we find him engaged 
in farming. To the latter noble calling he brought his thirst for knowl- 
edge and progressive spirit, and with energy and pluck he has risen to a 
high place among the successful tillers of the soil, and gained a competency 
for declining years, and established a lasting friendship with his fellow- 
citizens. 



FREDERICK T. SCHERER. 

One of the most enterprising business concerns of Ottawa is that known 
as the Scherer Brothers' Transfer Line. To the indomitable energy and 
executive ability of the eldest brother in the firm, the subject of this sketch, 
is due the credit of having established the business on a sound, practical 
basis many years ago, and to his genius and keen foresight in a large meas- 
ure can be attributed the success of the enterprise. 

Thomas Scherer, Sr., the father of our subject, is a native of Germany, 
born there about seventy-two years ago. In 1856 he decided to try his 
fortune in America and came to Ottawa, where, in 1863, he embarked in 
the draying business in a humble way. As the years rolled by he materially 
increased the number of his wagons and was kept very busy in meeting the 
demands of the town. Li 1877 he admitted his son, Frederick T., to a part- 
nership in the business, and a few years later the father retired, having ac- 
quired a handsome competence for old age. To him and his wife, Cather- 
ine (Frontz) Scherer, six sons and two daughters vrere born, but two of 
the sons are deceased. 

The birth of Frederick T. Scherer occurred in Ottawa, in 1865, and as he 
was the eldest son he early became his father's assistant in the business. 
As soon as his brothers, Louis T. and Thomas, Jr., had reached a suitable 
age they became associated with him, and are still enterprising members of 
the firm. Another brother, Hubert, was admitted to the partnership in 
1890, but subsequently withdrew and established a grocery. The company 
not only transfers goods from one railroad to another but also delivers 






BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 643 

great quantities of merchandise to business and private houses. About three 
years ao'o the firm was awarded the contract for carrying the United States 
mail to and from the postoffice and raihvay stations, and provided a hand- 
some new wagon for the purpose. In their business about eight drays, 
trucks and express wagons are used and some eighteen or twenty horses 
are kept. The vehicles are as neat and business-like as any to be seen in 
the city and the horses are large, fine animals. In addition to their regular 
business the firm has the local agency for the Standard Oil Company, and has 
succeeded in building up a large and lucrative trade at this point for the 
great corporation. One of the more recent enterprises of the Scherer Broth- 
ers consists in the storage of furniture or other goods in their large stor- 
age building and in the handling of hard and soft coal, in wholesale and 
retail cjuantities. 

At the age of twenty-two years F. T. Scherer married Miss Lucy Lilley, 
and six children brighten their happy home. In order of birth they are 
named as follows: Stella, Fred, Othelia, Hazel, Helen and Alboene. 

In disposition Mr. Scherer is genial and fond of society, and he holds 
a membership in several local orders. He is a prominent worker in the 
Woodmen's lodge, is the president of the German Benevolent Society, and 
belongs to the Uniformed Rank of the Knights of Pythias. Recently he 
has been associated with the Ottawa Evening Pleasure Social Club. In 
the spring of 1896 ]Mr. Scherer was elected alderman from the Seventh 
ward, and after serving for two years was re-elected by a large majority. He is 
an ardent Democratic politician and usually attends the caucuses and con- 
ventions of his party. Such in brief is the life history of Frederick T. 
Scherer. The character of the man has been shadowed forth between the 
lines of this review, and in a summary of his career we note only a few 
of the salient points — his activity and sound judgment in business aft'airs 
and his conformity to the ethics of commercial life, his faithfulness to public 
office, and his genuine friendship and regard for true worth of character. 
These are the qualities which made Mr. Scherer a valued citizen in whatever 
community he has made his home. 



C. W. BUTTERS. 



One of the native sons of LaSalle county is C. \\\ Butters, an enterpris- 
ing young business man of Ottawa. He was born in Prairie Center town- 
ship. February i, 1871, and is one of the six children of John and Maggie 
(]\Iiller) Butters, the former a native of Scotland. 

With his brothers and sisters young Butters passed his childhood upon 



644 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

the old homestead and received a pubUc-school education. Lessons of in- 
tegrity and justice, public spirit and patriotism were instilled into his youthful 
mind by his wise and conscientious parents, and his whole life thus far has 
been actuated and controlled by the most admirable principles. He is a 
student and thinker, making" up his mind to a course of action in no hasty 
manner, but when he has resolved what is the right thing to do he does 
not hesitate but manfully takes up the task before him. 

During the long weeks of anxious suspense in the early part of 1898, 
prior to the declaration of war by the United States government against 
Spain, the oppressor of her helpless subjects, Mr. Butters decided the ques- 
tion for himself that he would offer his services to his country upon the 
first call to arms. Accordingly, when the opportunity presented itself he 
enlisted, April 26, 1898, as a member of the Third Regiment of Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry, and was made a corporal, serving under Colonel Bennett. 
After passing through the hardships of camp life, and holding himself ready 
at any moment for the more serious responsibilities of military life, he was 
honorably discharged January 19, 1899. 

Returning home, Mr. Butters resumed the ordinary vocations of busi- 
ness life. He is the proprietor of a neat and well ecpiipped restaurant and 
cafe at No. 106 Market street, Ottawa, where an appetizing meal can be 
obtained at any reasonable hour of the day or night. He carries a large stock 
of fruit and confectionery, bread, cake and bakery goods, and ices, ice-cream 
and oysters in season. By uniform courtesy and a genuine desire to please, 
he has won a large patronage and has a promising business career before 
him. 



WALTER C. LOYEJOY, ^I. D. 

One of the younger member's of the medical profession of LaSalle 
county is Dr. Walter C. Lovejoy, of Marseilles. A son of E. B. Lovejoy, now 
a prominent citizen of Ottawa, Illinois, he was born in the pretty village of 
LandalT, New Hampshire, October 3, 1869, and there his early years were 
happily passed. 

When a mere child he accompanied his parents in their removal to 
Illinois, and, locating in Ottawa, he acquired his English education in the 
public grammar and high schools of that place. Having a fixed purpose 
to devote his life and talents to the healing of the sick and to alleviating the 
"ills to which flesh is heir," he went to Chicago after he had completed his 
elementary education and began the study of medicine under the instruction 
and guidance of Dr. C. A. \Yeick, a well known physician of that metropolis. 
In 1891 he was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 645 

Chicago Homeopathic Medical College, and succeeded his preceptor, Dr, 
Weick, in practice. Subsequently he came to Marseilles, where he opened 
an office and soon was enjoying a fair share of the patronage of the people 
of this locality. In July, 1898, he enlisted for service in the Spanish- American 
war, and was given a position as assistant surgeon in a Wisconsin regiment. 
Ordered to the Pacific coast, he accompanied the regiment to Camp Mer- 
ritt, Presidio, California, and it was not until the 5th of December, 1898, that 
he received his honorable discharge and was permitted to return to his home 
and regular practice. The wide experience and broader views of life and 
duty which he gained in this six months' experience, however, will be of 
inestimable value to him in his future career; and even though he had person- 
ally been benefited not a whit he would not begrudge the time and service 
he had given to his country. He is a member of the Illinois State Medical 
Society and takes the leading medical journals, thus keeping posted on the 
latest discoveries in regard to diseases and modern methods of dealing with 
them. 

j\n important event in the life of Dr. Lovejoy occurred on the 13th of 
June, 1895, when his marriage to Miss Ella Frances Pitts, a daughter of 
F. D. Pitts, an honored citizen of Marseilles, was solemnized. The Doctor 
and wife are members of the Congregational church of this place, and are 
both very popular in local society. 



G. W. BROWN, JR. 

Brown's Ottawa Business College, which has been running under its 
present management only since 1894, was founded as a commercial college 
in 1888. The school is centrally located in one of the best business blocks 
in Ottawa, a flourishing little city of perhaps fifteen thousand inhabitants. 
All of the methods used in the institution are modern, the equipment of 
the rooms substantial and attractive, and everything possible is done to 
advance the students in their work. 

G. W. Brown, the principal of Brown's Ottawa Business College, is a 
teacher of wide experience and possesses a thorough and practical knowledge 
of the requirements of his responsible position. The range of studies which 
the pupil may pursue is extensive, and an able corps of teachers further 
his efforts to give a comprehensive commercial education. The Ottawa 
college is a branch of the Brown's Business Colleges so well known through- 
out this state. The company, which n.ow owns and manages colleges in 
Jacksonville, Peoria, Decatur, Galesburg, Bloomington and Ottawa, was 
incorporated under the laws of Illinois in 1888. Five directors have control 



646 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

of affairs of the company and the president is G. W. Brown, Sr., who, for 
thirty years has been the owner and manager of the college at Jacksonville. 
Each college belonging to the company has at its head as principal a gen- 
tleman well qualified for the position by years of educational work and 
commercial experience. One of the chief advantages of any of Brown's 
business colleges to the student is that his scholarship is transferable to 
any other of the colleges owned by the company, without additional expense, 
and the interchange of practical ideas and business correspondence between 
the pupils of the various colleges is of great value to them. 

The eldest of the nine children of Charles I. and J\Iary (Ogle) Brown, 
the subject of this sketch, was born in Fulton county, Illinois, in 1843. The 
parents were both natives of New York state, and their other children were 
named as follows: Esther, Edgar, John, Frederick, Frank. Alice, Nora and 
Charles I. The latter is a successful teacher, and Edgar is deceased. 

Having gained a good English education in the public schools of his 
native county, G. W. Brown took a course of commercial training in the 
Jacksonville Business College. In 1894 he was placed in charge of the 
newly reorganized college at Ottawa, and to his enthusiastic efforts is due. 
in a large measure, the success which the school now enjoys. He likes to 
associate with young people and is very popular with them, as a class, for 
he enters into their plans, aiding and sympathizing with them, and vsithal 
exercising a marked influence for good over them. 

The marriage of Mr. Brown and ]\Iiss Jennie Yates was celebrated in 
Peoria, Illinois. Mrs. Brown, who was a popular and very successful teacher, 
is a daughter of James Yates, and is a niece of Richard Yates, deceased. 
once governor of this state. Three children have blessed the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Brown, namely: Louis P., James and Ada. The parents are mem- 
bers of the Congregational church, and are active in various kinds of Chris- 
tian enterprises, having for their object the amelioration of humanity. 



ROBERT BIRTWELL. 



Among the well-known farmers of Otter Creek township. LaSalle 
county, is Robert Birtwell, a veteran of the civil war and a man highly es- 
teemed by all who knew him. He was born in Lancashire, England, Feb- 
ruary II, 1839, the son of John and Mary (Taylor) Birtwell. The parents 
came to America when their son Robert was very small, and for some vears 
lived at Hudson, New York. In 1849 they moved out to Illinois and set- 
tled on a farm in LaSalle county, where John Birtwell is still living. His 
wife died April 14, 1865. She was a member of the Church of England, to 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 647 

which he also belongs, and in that faith they reared their children. The 
five children born to them were named as follows: Ellen; Robert, the subject 
of this sketch; Sarah, widow of Evan Brick; James, of Allen township, 
LaSalle county; and Permeha, the wife of W. Porter Donnell, of Kearney, 
Nebraska. 

Robert Birtwell was reared on his father's farm, acquired his educa- 
tion in the public schools, and as he was the eldest son he always found 
plenty of work at home to occupy his time when he was not in school. 
During the civil war, in August, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, One Hun- 
dred and Fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Captain J. J. McKennan, 
and took part in the battles of Hartville, Missionary Ridge and Arlington 
Heights, and at the close of the war participated in the Grand Review at 
Washington, D. C. At Camp Douglas he received an honorable discharge 
and from there returned home, and since the war has been actively engaged 
in the occupation in which he was reared. He owns a valuable farm of 
three hundred and twenty acres on section 6, Otter Creek township, which 
has a good residence and other buildings thereon and which is highly cul- 
tivated. 

Mr. Birtwell was married in 1878 to Miss Mary Reddick, daughter of 
William Reddick, a prominent citizen of this county. Mr. Reddick was born 
in New Jersey, reared and educated in Washington, D. C, and has for a num- 
ber of years been identified with LaSalle county. Mr. and Mrs. Birtwell have 
an only child, Frank R., born March 19, 1880. 

Like his father before him, the subject of our sketch is a Repuljlican, 
and although he has never aspired to office he takes an active interest in the 
issues of that party. He is a wide-awake, practical and enterprising farmer, 
who is meeting- with good success as the result of his capable management 
of his business affairs. 



F. METZGER. 



For more than three decades the subject of this sketch, F. Metzger, has 
been a resident of LaSalle county, making his home in Ottawa. He was 
born more than fifty years ago in Germany, one of the family of four children 
of Robert Metzger. In his youth he had the advantage of a good education 
in the common schools of his native land, afterward emigrated to America 
and since 1867 he has resided in this county, where he is extensively engaged 
in handling beer, which he sells to the wholesale trade, receiving a large and 
lucrative patronage. 

At the age of twenty-six years Mr. Metzger married Miss Louise Schaef- 
fer, and they have three children — Mary, Robert G. and Joseph. The elder 



648 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

son is at this writing a student in the Indiana State University. Mr. Metzger 
is an enthusiastic Republican, taking an active interest in public local affairs, 
and as a public-spirited citizen he is highly respected. He is a member of the 
German Benevolent Society of Ottawa. 



AUGUST LOCKE. 



August Locke, the master mechanic for the Matthiessen & Hegeler 
Zinc Company, LaSalle, is a native of Prussia, Germany, and was born 
November 15, 1840. When he was a child of two years his mother died, and 
thus deprived of a mother's loving care he was taken into the home of an 
uncle in Dresden, Saxony, Germany, and there he was reared to manhood. 
His boyhood days were spent in attending the common schools and learning 
the trade of machinist. He worked at his trade as a journeyman for some 
time in the old country, and also held the position of foreman there in 
machine shops. 

In 1872, at the age of thirty-two years, Mr. Locke came to America 
and located in Chicago, where he remained until the spring of 1875. In 
March of that year he came to LaSalle and entered the employ of the 
Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, as a machinist, and in November, 
1877, he was promoted to the position of master mechanic, which important 
post he still holds. 

'Sh. Locke was married in Germany to Aliss Caroline Batzlapp, and 
thev have had seven children, four of whom are still living-. 

On coming to this country Mr. Locke espoused the faith of the Repub- 
lican party, and has given it his support ever since. He is a member of the 
A. O. U. W. and the Turnverein. 



RICHARD ZIESING. 



Richard Ziesing, foreman in the furnace department of the Matthiessen 
& Hegeler Zinc Company, LaSalle, was born on a farm just north of Peru, 
Illinois, March 5, i860, and is a son of Dr. Henry Ziesing, one of the leading 
physicians and surgeons of LaSalle county. 

Dr. Henry Ziesing is of German birth and education. He was born in 
Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany, December 21, 1829, a son of Christian and 
Elizabeth (Landman) Ziesing. He completed a liberal literary education and 
then took up the study of medicine, following in the footsteps of his father, 
who was in the medical profession; pursued a course in the University of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 649 

Giessen and graduated in 185 1, before he reached his twenty-second year. 
After one year of practice in his native land, he came to this country, locating 
in the city of Baltimore in 1852. A year later he removed to Chicago, where 
he practiced a year and a half, and whence in the fall of 1854 he came to Peru, 
Illinois, where he has since resided, engaged in the practice of his profession. 
During the civil war he served from January, 1865, to September of that 
year as surgeon of the Fifty-third Illinois Infantry. He is a member of the 
LaSalle County Medical Society, and the North Central Illinois Medical 
Society. Politically he is a Republican. For some twelve or fifteen years 
he has been a member of the board of education of Peru and has served 
several years as the president of the board. 

Richard Ziesing was educated in the public schools of LaSalle and 
Peru, under a private tutor, and in the University of Illinois. While in the 
university he made a specialty of the study of chemistry. On leaving college 
in his junior year, he accepted a position as a drug clerk in a store in Peru, 
\vhere he remained a year and a half, at the end of which time he entered the 
employ of the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, as assistant assayer, 
a position he held for three years. He was then transferred to the practical 
furnace work, of the same establishment, and is now one of the foremen of 
this department. 

Mr. Ziesing was married in Chicago, in 1884, to Miss Minnie Hibben, 
and they have two children — a daughter and son — Hester E. and Richard B. 



JOSEPH SCHOTT. 

An example of pluck and perseverance and the just reward which is 
accrued to these cjualities is to be found in the life of Joseph Schott, who 
landed in America a poor youth, without friends, money, knowledge of the 
language spoken here or any of the advantages which the average young 
man takes as a matter of course in this ''land of the free.'' Nevertheless, he 
possessed the spirit of a hero and a firm determination to succeed, at the 
same time being willing to work and to work hard at w'hatever he could 
find to do whereby he might earn an honest livelihood; and therein lies 
the secret of success. 

Joseph Schott and his parents, John and Hedwig (Jachcgyk) Schott, 
were natives of the same place. Krojanke, kreis Flatow, regierungbezirk 
Marienwerder, West Prussia, Germany. The father and mother spent their 
entire lives there, dying some years ago. John Schott held a very respon- 
sible position as gamekeeper and forester, having charge of a large tract of 
Ijeavily timbered land belonging to the government. 



650 



BIOUR.IPIIICAL A\D Gl 



One of cigiu chiUlrcn. Joseph Scholt 
received a good education in llie piiMic 
learned the trade of harness-maker, s:i 
eighteen years of age left his home and fr: 
World. Landing on the shores of America : 
westward until he reached LaSallc 
as he had but sixty cents left. Failin: 
ately, he accepted a position as .: 
Matthiessen ^: liegeler Zinc Works, w. 
an.l a quarter a day. before long he 
of the plant, and the Fourth of Ju: 
his being promoted to tlie post ot m. 
Faithfulness and strict attention t 
trustworthy position of day foreman • 
lie has never been absent a ' 
larly fortunate in this respect, as ;> 
two weeks in his entire life. Since b« 
allegiance to the Republican parl\ 
largely the cause of the prosperity iuui 
the close of the civil war. 

On the J^d of June. 1S73. Mr. S 
LaSalle. She was Imrn in llermany. n- 
subject's childhood days were spent, ami 
parents to the I'nited States. W 
by trade, dietl in 1895. aged eighly-tlit' 
the same age. departe<l this life in 1 
subject, who was a kind an»l dutifut - 
chiKlren. has become the mother of cinhl 
family are identified with the * 
hand to tho.se who are sick or in lu-cd ui 



II 



.AL RECORD. 

•rn March 28, 1854, and 

his fatherland. Later he 

nd upholsterer, and when 

ek his fortune in the New 

he continued his journey 

perforce, obliged to halt, 

k at his trade inunedi- 

rcr in the yards of the 

^ a day at a dollar 

c in the furnace room 

i«ie memorable to him by 

inc department. 

. his being given the 

is still acting. 

and has been particu- 

ill more than 

he has given his 

he bt . has been 

nation since 

li» hve I'erra, of 

t lite town in which our 

•mpanied her 

a carpenter 

«.r. who attained 

4 at the home of our 

vho is one of three 

V her marriage. The 

lend a helping 



CHRISTLW ZIM 

A successful business career reflects 
who has achieve<l it but also upon the 
pered. The business interests of Ch /imi 

solubly entwined with those of Peru and L. 
half a century, and his name is one of the \>< 
Illinois. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject w 



•:\ the individual 

ri which he has pros- 

e been indis- 

for more than 

\vn in this portion of 

an<i ched in Germany^ 



^4 






■^ .^^-^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 651 

and his maternal grandfather, who was a farmer, was at one time mayor of 
the village of Horkeim, and died when in middle life, in his native land. 
Michael Zimmermann, father of our subject, fought in the German army, 
under Napoleon, against Russia, and lost a brother in that memorable cam- 
paign. The father of Christian Zimmermann was born March 12, 1787. 
He had two brothers and one sister, and with them grew to maturity in 
Germanv. After farming- there for a number of vears he came to the United 
States, in 1847. Locating at first in LaSalle, he later came to Peru, where 
he died of the cholera, June 28, 1849. His wife, whose maiden name had 
been Katherina Fredericka Kuhner, was born in the Fatherland, December 
18, 1785, and died at Peru, September 28, 1872. They were Lutherans in 
religion, and were honest, upright citizens, respected and highly regarded 
by all. Six of their nine children have passed into the silent land; Mina 
is the widow of W^illiam Scherzer, a former jeweler of Peru; and Caroline is 
the widow of Otto Winheim. 

Christian Zimmermann was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, May 30, 
1823, and received a liberal education in the government schools. He was 
reared on a farm, and when old enough spent two years in the regular army. 
In 1847 J^G came to America with his parents and after spending a short 
time in LaSalle came to Peru, where he has made his home ever since with 
the exception of a period of ten years. — from 1856 to 1866, — when he was 
the proprietor of the Zimmermann Hotel in LaSalle. Selling out in the 
last named year, he returned to Peru, and in 1867 embarked in the lumber 
business, which has since claimed his attention. He deals in various kinds 
of builders' supplies, — lath, shingles, doors and blinds, sash and lime, — 
and has an extensive trade in lumber and coal. He owns farm lands in 
Minnesota and elsewhere, and has been very successful in his investments. 
In every sense of the word he is a self-made man, and he attributes his rise 
to wealth and prominence to hard and persistent work and application, 
coupled with common sense and a desire to meet the wishes of his cus- 
tomers. 

On the 24th of January, 1854, ]\Ir. Zimmermann married Miss Louisa, 
daughter of Jacob and Barbara (Walter) Gmelich, all natives of Germany. 
The Gmelich family came to the United States in 1852, when the parents 
w-ere well along in years, and, after visiting relatives in Ohio they came to 
Peru. The mother died here in 1869, aged about three-score and ten years, 
and the father died in 1872, when in his seventy-fourth year. They were 
members of the Lutheran church, and in that creed Mr. and Mrs. Zim- 
mermann were reared; but they are now members of the Peru Evangelische 
Lutheran church, which they assisted in building. Mrs. Zimmermann came 
to America one year before her parents. The eldest son of this worthy 



6^2 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

couple, Charley, was killed by the cars when he was a most promising 
young man of twenty-five years; and Robert, the third son, died at the 
age of sixteen and a half months. Christian, Jr., who has been in business 
with his father since a lad of twelve years, is now managing the afifairs of 
the same, and has relieved his father of many of the responsibilities per- 
taining thereto. He wedded Anna Lassig and has two sons, — Arthur and 
Harry. Albert, the youngest child, is unmarried, and is a successful archi- 
tect in Chicago. 

Until recently Mr. Zimmermann was allied with the Democratic party, 
from the time that he received the right of franchise, but in 1896, believing 
in McKinley and the principles which he represents, he had the courage to 
turn his back upon his own past political record and cast his ballot for the 
great man of whom the whole nation is proud. For a score of years he has 
been a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Prior to his 
marriage he built a house on First street, and lived therein for a short time, 
and subsequent to his return from LaSalle he continued to dwell there until 
1879. He then removed to a stone house, adjoining his present modern, 
beautiful home, which he built in 1894 and has since occupied. It is finely 
situated at the corner of Third and West streets, and is furnished with 
eleg'ance and excellent taste. 



CHRISTIAN ZIAIMERMANN, JR. 

Ever since he was a little lad of twelve years, perhaps, the subject of this 
article has been associated with his father in business. He is a practical 
man of afifairs and for some time has been the manager of the extensive 
commercial interests of his senior, whose history appears at length in the 
preceding sketch. 

The parents of our subject, Christian and Louisa (Gmelich) Zimmer- 
mann, have been residents of LaSalle county for over half a century and 
are numbered among her representative and honored citizens. Christian 
Zimmermann, Jr., was born in LaSalle, Illinois. January 31, 1857, and has 
spent his whole life in that town and in Peru. In this place he has been a 
resident for thirty-three years, uninterruptedly. His education was acquired 
in our local schools, and as soon as he was old enough he commenced 
working for and with his father. Their business relations have always 
been very harmonious and the younger man generously attributes much 
of his success in the financial world to the judicious training given him l)y 
the father. When the youth was found able to meet the exigencies of any 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 653 

situation, the senior man gradually withdrew in favor of the son, and thus 
the latter has learned every department of the business. The firm deals in 
lumber, lath, sash, doors, blinds, etc., and in addition conducts an extensive 
trade in coal and other fuel. Energy and keen, shrewd business sense are 
marked characteristics of our subject, and year by year he has been forging 
to the front. 

In 1892 Christian Zimmermann, Jr., built a beautiful modern home on 
the corner of West and Fourth streets, and fitted it with all the comforts and 
conveniences of the times. The lady who presides over this attractive home 
was formerly Miss Anna Lassig, a daughter of Gustav and Eliza (Throne) 
Lassig. The marriage ceremony which united the destinies of our subject 
and wife was solemnized in February, 1892, and two liright little boys — 
Arthur and Harry — are the pride of the household. 

Politically Mr. Zimmermann is affiliated with the Democratic party, 
and socially he is a member of tlie Modern ^Voodmen of America. He 
belongs to the German Evangelische Lutheran church. 



J. C. CORBUS, JR., M. D. 

Dr. J. C. Corbus, Jr., numbered among the medical practitioners of 
Mendota, is one of the native sons of Illinois, his birth having occurred at 
Mulligan Grove, in Lee county, on the 3d of August, 1861. He is a son 
of Dr. J. C. Corbus, now the superintendent of the Kankakee Insane Asylum. 
He was only a year old when his parents removed to Mendota, and here he 
was reared and educated, attending the Blackstone high school, and with 
a broad knowledge of the English branches of learning to serve as a founda- 
tion upon which to rear a superstructure of professional knowledge he began 
the study of medicine, under the able direction of his father, who carefully 
guided his early reading in the science. Later he entered the medical depart- 
ment of the University of Iowa, and on completing the course was graduated 
in the class of 1883. 

After two years spent in practice with his father in Mendota he located 
in Troy Grove, Illinois, where he was engaged in the prosecution of his 
chosen profession for fourteen years, and then returned to his former home. 
Here, where he is so widely and favorably known, he has succeeded in 
building up a large and lucrative practice, his skill and ability being quickly 
recognized. It is an old saying that a prophet is never without honor save 
in his own country; but Dr. Corbus enjoys high honor even there also, for 
in the citv where he was reared and where he has been known to manv from 



654 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

early boyhood he has \yon a marked prestige as a representatiye of his 
chosen yocation. 

In 1890 \yas celebrated the marriage of Dr. Corbns and Miss Jeanie 
A. Wylie. In politics he is a Republican and socially is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, the Independent Order of Odd Fello\ys and the order of 
Knights of Pythias. His genial qualities render him a social fayorite, and 
he is a great fayorite \yith a large circle of friends and acquaintances. 



SAMUEL U. LAWRY 



Samuel Urban Lawry, a retired farmer and ex-merchant of Harding, is 
the present superyisor of the town of Freedom, LaSalle county. He is a 
natiye of the Empire state, born in Steuben county, New York, June 23, 
1842, and came to LaSalle county with his father, James Lawry, in October, 
1855. This journey was not effected as nowadays, by a fast-flying express 
train, but l)y lake to Chicago and the remainder of the way by slow'-going 
wagons, to Harding. ]\Ir. Lawry passed his youth and earl\- manhood on his 
father's farm, without incident other than the experiences common to the 
freedom of boyhood life. When he reached his majority he rented land and 
took up the burthen of life alone. The ciyil war was on when he became of 
age and before its conclusion he enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and 
Forty-first Illinois \"olunteer Infantry. He was on detail at Columbus, 
Kentucky, as clerk in the proyost marshal's ofiice, this detail succeeding 
that of carpenter, and he remained in the marshal's oflice until his discharge 
at the end of the war. 

Upon his return he operated a corn-sheller and thresher for two years. 
With the funds he had accumulated up to this date, he bought the stock 
of goods owned at Harding by H. E. Billings. He was soon appointed the 
postmaster. Competition was so sharp for his competitor that he soon with- 
drew from the field and ]\Ir. Lawry was seldom worried by fear of further 
opposition. He prospered in his new venture, maintained the good \vill 
of his patrons, remaining in business nearly a quarter of a century. He 
sold his interest to his partner, Willis A. Martin, with whom he had been 
associated since 1884, and retired from the care of mercantile life to the quiet 
of his farm near the yillage. 

Our subject cast his first yote for a Republican candidate and has been 
identified with that party eyer since. He has been chosen the school treas- 
urer of his town for sixteen years, and has been the superyisor of his town 
the past seyen years. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 655 

'Mr. Lawrv comes of English blood. His father was born in London, 
in 1808, and learned the pattern-making trade. He worked at the carpen- 
ter's trade in Steuben county, New York, and engaged in farming in Illinois, 
In 1884 he went to Kansas and died at Newton, that state, in February, 
1899. He married Ann Harrison, a Pennsylvania lady, who died in Ophir 
township, in 1864. Mrs. Lawry also was born in England. Her children 
were: William, of Omaha. Nebraska; James, a farmer in Cloud county, 
Kansas; Walter, of the same state and county; Elizabeth, the widow of 
Elijah Batchellor, of Chicago; Samuel U., and Dr. Joseph, of Redding, 
California. 

Samuel \J. Lawry was married October 7. 1874. to Myra, a daughter of 
Freeborn Lewis. j\Ir. Lewis was born in New York, in 1809, and in early life 
was a river flatboatman on the Ohio and Alississippi rivers, from Cincinnati 
to New Orleans. He lived in Dearborn county, Indiana, many years and 
was there married to Alletta Angevine, who is still living, in Sheridan, Illi- 
nois, at the age of eighty years. Mr. Lewis came to LaSalle county in 1865 
and died here in 1888. His children are: ]\Iary. wife of Quincy Wemple, 
of Sheridan; Ada, deceased; ]Mrs. Lawry and Freeborn Lewis, of Sheridan. 

Mr. Lawry's children are: Carl C. and J. L. The former finished his 
education in the Ottawa high school in 1899, and the latter was educated in 
Bryant & Stratton's Business College, Chicago; he is also a stenographer at 
the Chicago Athletic Club. 



DAVID ARENTSEN. 



David Arentsen, a son of the late pioneer, Thorbjoren Arentsen, was 
born in South Freedom township, LaSalle county, on the old Arentsen 
homestead, now the property of Daniel Arentsen. the date of his birth being 
March 12, 185 1. His early life was identical with that of other youths reared 
on the frontier and his school opportunities were in keeping with his time. 
From his father he learned the lessons of honesty and industry and by ex- 
ample was taught what true manhood is. When he started out in life on 
his own responsibility, it was as a farmer on a portion of the home farm, 
which later came into his possession and to which he has added by subse- 
quent purchase and improved, until now his farm is one of the best and 
most attractive in the township. 

Mr. Arentsen was married April 5, 1877, to Sarah Olsen, a daughter of 
John and Ann (Halverson) Olsen, who came to this country from Bergen, 
Norway, in i860. In the Olsen family were ten children, of whom four are 



656 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

now living, namely: Martha, whose first husband was Soren Eames and 
whose second husband was Oliver Grundy; Mrs. Sarah Arentsen; Josephine, 
the wife of Osman Tisdale, of Artesia, South Dakota, and Christ Olsen, of 
the same place. Mr. and Mrs. Arentsen have reared only one child, an 
adopted one, Ella Sophia Eames, a daughter of Soren and Martha Eames. 

The Arentsen family are identified with the Lutheran church, and politi- 
cally Mr. Arentsen is a Republican. 



URBIN S. ELLSWORTH. 

Urbin S. Ellsworth, of Vermilionville, Illinois, has for years been a 
prominent factor in the affairs of township, county and state, and is too 
well known to need introduction here. A work of this character, however, 
would be incomplete did it not include some biographical mention of him. 
The history of his life, in brief, is as follows: 

Urbin S. Ellsworth was born on his father's farm on s'ection 31, South 
Ottawa township, LaSalle county, April 19, 185 1, and is a son of the vener- 
able pioneer citizen, William A. Ellsworth, of this county. 

William A. Ellsworth is a native of Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, 
born January 8, 18 18, a son of Eliphalet Ellsworth, Avho was the son of a 
Revolutionary soldier. The Ellsworths figured among the prominent early 
settlers of this country. Erom the Connecticut branch of the family is our 
subject descended. One member of this family, Oliver Ellsworth, was the 
chief justice under President \\^ashington, and this chief justice had a son, 
\\^illiam Ellsworth, who was at one time the governor of the state of Connec- 
ticut. Eliphalet Ellsworth's grandfather was an ardent patriot during the 
American Revolution and fought the battles for independence along with 
his son. Eliphalet Ellsworth served a short time as a soldier in the war of 
1812: after that war he settled in Pennsylvania and was for a number of 
}"ears engaged in agricultural pursuits. His last years were passed in LaSalle 
county, and he is buried in the Vermilionville cemetery. His son, William 
A. Ellsworth, before he was of age came to this county, stopping first on 
Hopkins' Hill in South Ottawa township, where Philip ^^^atts now resides. 
Here he went to work by the month, and when the canal grant came into 
market he claimed an eighty-acre tract of land on section 31, which he still 
owns. This land he improved, building thereon the first brick house erected 
in the county, making the brick himself. That was in the year 1844. He 
continued his residence here until 1856, when he removed to Deer Park. 
Li boyhood his opportunities for obtaining an education were not of the 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 6-^7 

best and be was practically tbrown upon bis own resources at tbe age of 
twelve years. Tbat be bas made a success of life is due wbolly to bis own; 
efforts. He bas amassed a competency ample for bis family needs. Wben a 
young man be joined tbe Congregational cburcb, and for more than sixty 
years bas lived consistently witb tbe tenets of tbat religious body. December 
i8, 1845, be married Miss Lydia, a daughter of Jobn Clark, wbo came into 
LaSalle county from Holderness, New Hampshire, she being a native of tbe 
village of Campton, tbat state. Mr. Clark was a Scotch-Irishman, wbo re- 
moved witb his family to Illinois and settled in LaSalle county in 1839, the 
year succeeding the advent of Mr. Ellsworth. To Mr. and Mrs. John Clark 
the following named children were born: Jobn, a resident of Henry county, 
Ibinois; Charles, who died in Missouri, leaving a family there; Moody, de- 
ceased; Sarah, deceased, was tbe wife of Jobn Elliott, and Lydia. The 
children of William A. Ellsworth are: Ada L., the wife of Ransom Bullock, 
of Tonica, Illinois; Urbin S.; Orin W., a druggist of Keokuk, Iowa; and 
Sarah, wife of James D. Selah, of Ewing, Nebraska. 

L^rbin S. Ellsworth remained a member of his father's household until 
bis twenty-fifth year. He attended Jennings Seminary at Aurora, where he 
graduated in the classical course at the age of twenty-three, and afterward 
for a few years taught school in winter and farmed during the summer 
months. He bas been identified with the farming interests of Deer Park and 
South Ottawa townships for more than a quarter of a century. Early be 
became recognized as one of the relialile men of the township and during 
his residence here bas been connected with every movement having its wel- 
fare in \iew. His safe and conservative views upon public affairs brought him 
into notice and his services in various official capacities were required. He 
is a Republican. In his early political experience he filled tbe offices of 
township assessor and clerk. In 1875 he was elected a trustee of the schools 
of the township, and is still serving as such, now rounding out twenty-five 
years of service in this office. He was elected tbe supervisor of tbe township 
in 1888, and filled tbe office five years. He was on the committees on 
equalization, roads and bridges, to settle witb tbe circuit clerk, and on fees 
and salaries. As the chairman of tbe committee on drainage and waterways 
he h.ad much to do with shaping legislation connected witb the Chicago 
drainage channel and always fought strenuously for the rights of the people 
of tbe Illinois valley. At this time Mr. Ellsworth was also a member of the 
committees on contingent expenses of tbe house, education, corporations, 
agriculture, fish and game laws and military affairs. In the fall of 1890 he 
was elected a minority member of the state legislature and succeeded him- 
self as such in 1892, being the only Republican elected in the county tbat 
year. In the fall of 1894 be was elected a majority candidate by a majority 



658 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

of two thousand and five hundred votes. During the session referred to he 
was the chairman of the drainage and waterways committee. He had in 
"mind a measure for the improvement of the condition of the insane of the 
state, during his whole service, out of which the sentiment for the establish- 
ment of the Hospital for the Insane was developed. The Hospital for the 
Incurable Insane was also established as a result of the movement thus put 
under way. 'Mr. Ellsworth also worked for the revision of the revenue laws 
of the state, and for the adoption of the Australian ballot law. He was in 
the fight of the joint session which elected General John ]\I. Palmer to the 
United States senate and helped disrupt the F. M. B. A. organization by 
supporting their state president for senator, which the F. M. B. A. members 
would not do. In the spring of 1899 Air. Ellsworth was again elected to 
be the supervisor of his town and is serving on the committees on asylum, 
rules and settlement with the county treasurer. 

Mr. Ellsworth was married December 18, 1876, to Mctoria B. Gibbs. 
Mrs. Ellsworth's father, A\'illiam T. Gibbs, was born in Chittenango, Xew 
York. He was superintendent of a reformatory at Lenox, ]\Iassachusetts, 
in his early life, and in 1855 moved to Aurora. Illinois, where he was for a 
time engaged in the milk business. In 1862 he enlisted in the Union army 
as a member of Company H, Sixteenth Illinois Cavalry, and was made the 
captain of his company. He served through the war as a gallant soldier, 
and at its close entered the service of the Chicago, Burlington & Ouincv 
Railroad Company, in their shops at Aurora, where he remained until his 
retirement from active life in 1877. He died July 5, 1899, at the age of 
eighty-four years. His wife, before marriage ]\Iiss Harriet Dickerson. was 
born in Ulysses, New York, and their only child is Mrs. Ellsworth. ]\Ir. 
and ]\Irs. Ellsworth's children are: William B., born October 21, 1877; 
Ada A., September 9, 1883; and Dorothy R., ]\Iay 31, 1890. Their son was 
educated in the State University of Illinois. 

]\Ir. Ellsworth has held the position of consul in the camp of the M. W. 
A. in his township for the past four years. 



ELISHA M. MERRITT. 



Just half a century ago Elisha AI. Alerritt, a retired farmer, now living 
in Troy Grove, LaSalle county, came to this locality from the east, and dur- 
ing this long period he has made his home within the boundaries of this 
county, and has been actively connected with its development and progress. 
He is thoroughly posted in its history and geological formation, having made 
a special study of the subject for years. Since he retired from active labor 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 659 

he has devoted much of his time and attention to collectins:, classifvine and 
arranging geological specimens and Indian relics of this region, and few 
persons can be considered better authority along these lines of research. 

The paternal and maternal ancestors of the above-named gentleman 
were of Holland-Dutch origin. His grandfather Merritt was a native of 
New Jersey and a farmer by occupation. He lived to attain advanced years. 
His children were six in number, five sons and one daughter. The maternal 
grandfather of our subject, Isaac Ray, likewise born in New Jersey, was a 
farmer and had two daughters, but no sons. 

The parents of E. M. Merritt were Henry and Christiana (Ray) Merritt, 
both of New Jersey and members of the Society of Friends. The father, who 
followed in the footsteps of his ancestors in the choice of an occupation, 
removed to New York state, where he died in 1861, aged sixty-four years. 
Mrs. Christiana Merritt, who was his second wife, departed this life in 1857. 
There were two sons and two daughters by the previous marriage, but none 
of them are living now. Of the three sons and three daughters born to our 
subject's parents, only two survive. Laura P. is the wife of Alonzo Wood- 
ford, of Victory, Cayuga county, New York. 

The birth of Elisha M. Merritt occurred in Auburn, Cayuga county. 
New York, April 7, 1826. His boyhood was spent upon a farm, and, after 
finishing his elementary education in the district schools, it was his privilege 
to attend the local academy. He assisted his father until he was twenty 
years of age, when he secured employment in a hotel at Little Sodus Bay, 
for a few months. Then, going to Auburn, New York, he obtained a place 
as jailer, serving under the command of the sherift*. In 1849 ^^^ started to 
seek a new home in the west, and. coming to LaSalle county, worked by 
the month in Ophir township for a period, and then bought and improved 
a forty-acre farm in the same district. A favorable opportunity presenting 
itself, he sold that place and purchased another. This also he disposed of 
later, and invested his capital in a quarter-section of land in McLean county. 
He did not leave this county, however, but leased his farm to responsible 
tenants, until he sold it, in order to buy stock in the Chicago, Burlington & 
Ouincy Railroad. For the past twenty-two years he and liis estimable wife 
have made their home in the village of Troy Grove, where they are very 
highly respected. He is a believer in the Prohibition party, and uses his 
franchise on behalf of its candidates. 

The marriage of Mr. Merritt and Miss Ann L. Searls took place on the 
22d of December, 1852. She is a daughter of Captain Gurdon and Eunice 
(Lathrop) Searls, who were natives of Connecticut. They removed to this 
state in 1838, and were among the earliest settlers of Rockwell, LaSalle 
county, there being no house between their own and Ottawa for some time. 



66o BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



They came west with a colony, by way of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, 
taking three weeks to make the trip, and coming over the Alleghany moun- 
tains in tram-cars, which had stationary engines for motive power. Mr. 
Searls was a successful farmer and was actively engaged in his chosen voca- 
tion until his death in 1856, when he was sixty-three years of age. After 
surviving him for a few years his widow passed away, in 1862, aged sixty- 
three years and six months. Mr. Searls vas generally called by the title of 
captain, as he held that rank in a cavalry company during the war of 18 12, 
and won lasting honor in that second great conflict of this country with 
Eno-land. 



't>' 



ROBERT GRAF. 



Robert Graf, who for a long term of years was cashier of the Matthies- 
sen & Hegeler Zinc Company, LaSalle, Illinois, is now living retired in this 
city. He was born in Dresden, Saxony, Germany, November 16, 1820. 
In his youth he had excellent educational advantages. He attended the 
Kreutz-schule and the University of Leipsic, and from 1842 to 1845 studied 
law. For a short time he was in a law office, engaged in practice. The 
law, however, was not suited to his taste, and in 1852 he came to America 
and turned his attention to farming. His first location here was in Illinois, 
where he farmed one year. In 1853 he went to Wisconsin, located on a 
tract of land in Iowa county, that state, and there carried on agricultural 
pursuits for twelve years, at the end of which time he returned to Illinois. 
In May, 1864, he took up his residence in LaSalle. He had an acquaintance 
with Mr. Matthiessen, of the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, who 
offered him a position in that establishment, and as cashier he rendered 
prompt and faithful service for a period of thirty-four years, until July, 
1898, when he resigned. Since then he has been living retired. 

Mr. Graf has never married, but has maintained a residence at No. 
1207 Sixth street, LaSalle, since 1871. While he has never mingled much in 
society, he is well and favorably known in LaSalle and is respected for the 
cjuiet and faithful business life he has lived. He is a member of the German 
Lutheran Evangelical church. 



JAMES E. SMITH. 



James E. Smith, one of the foremost citizens of Troy Grove, is a pioneer 
of this locality, and has spent about thirty-five years of his busy, enterprising 
life here, actively engaged in farming and other lines of industry. 



I 



* 



) 






>r 



^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 66i 

On both sides of the family, Mr. Smith is of German descent, and both 
of his grandfathers were natives of Pennsylvania and belonged to the agri- 
cultural class. His paternal grandfather, James Smith, lived to an advanced 
age, dying in the Keystone state. He had three sons, the eldest of whom 
was James, the father of our subject. The maternal grandfather of our 
subject also attained a ripe age, and died on his Pennsylvania homestead, 
where he had reared his five or six children. 

James Smith, the father of J. E. Smith, removed from Pennsylvania, 
his birthplace, to Ohio, at an early day, and came to Illinois in 1846. Here 
he settled in LaSalle county, buying one hundred and forty acres of land in 
Troy Grove township, and this property he continued to cultivate until 
about seven years prior to his death, when he turned his attention to the 
coal business. He was called to the home beyond in 1865, when he was in 
his sixty-fifth year. For several years he had served as supervisor of Troy 
Grove township, and held other local ofifices with credit. He favored the 
platform of the Democratic party, but was in no wise a politician. Both he 
and his wife were devoted members of the Presbyterian church, and he was 
an elder for a long time. She was Miss Sarah Eaken prior to their marriage, 
and she also was born in the Keystone state. She survived her husband sev- 
eral years, being over three-score and ten years old at the time of her demise. 

James E. Smith, born in Wayne county, Ohio, August 25, 1830, is 
now the only survivor of his parents' family, as his brother and sister have 
been called to the silent land. He was sixteen years old when he came to 
Illinois, and he continued to reside with his parents until he was twenty-two 
years of age. He obtained a district school education and early learned 
agriculture in its varied forms. In starting upon his independent life he 
bought an eighty-acre farm in Dimmick township, and later added forty 
acres to the original tract. He lived there until 1861, when he removed to 
Mendota, and for about nine years was engaged in buying and selling grain. 
Then, going to Benton county, Iowa, he carried on a farm for two or three 
years, after which he was in the grain business at Vinton for four years or 
more. Then for a short time he resided in Hamilton county, and during 
the next six or seven years he managed a homestead of two hundred acres. 
This fine place, situated in Carroll county, Iowa, is still in his possession. 
In 1883 he returned to this state, and has since been interested in the grain 
and coal trade at Troy Grove. He has prospered, as he richly deserves, 
and bears an enviable name for business rectitude and square dealing. In 
all of his views he is liberal and broad-minded, and in politics he prefers to 
be independent, voting for the man and measure which he deems worth v of 
support, regardless of party lines. 

The marriage of Mr. Smith and Miss Caroline INIatilda, daughter of 



662 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Leonard ancl Julia (Dewey) Towner, was solemnized December 14, 1853. 
Five children were born to them, namely: Orlando, who is married and 
resides in Colorado;. Orange L., who died, unmarried, when about twenty- 
eight years of age; Harry G., who first married Maggie Boyce, and, after her 
death, her sister, Bessie; Sarah M., who is deceased; and Tessie M., who is 
living with her parents. Harry G. has two children by his first marriage, 
Raymond and Mattie May. He is managing an elevator at Triumph. Illi- 
nois. The mother of the above-named children departed this life in 18S3, 
aged fifty-one years. The lady who now bears the name of our subject was 
formerly Celinda, widow of Erastus W. Dewey, and a daughter of William 
A. and Polly B. (Butler) Hickok. She had two children by her first mar- 
riage: Horace, who died at the age of sixteen years; and Mattie, who is 
living with her mother. The pleasant dwelling of the Smith family at Troy 
Grove was erected by our subject six years ago. 



MATHIAS KURSCHEID. 

Mathias Kurscheid, the leading merchant of Leonore, Richland town- 
ship, LaSalle county, has passed the greater portion of his forty years in 
this county, and, as a citizen of the new town of Leonore and one of her 
builders, has made his influence felt in a manner conspicuously substantial 
and public-spirited. 

He was born in New York city, in April, i860, the son of a Rhine- 
lander who came to the United States late in the '50s, and was killed in New 
York city a few years afterward, while acting as a foreman in one of the 
sugar factories of that city. His widow survived the shock of his sudden 
and terrible death but a short time, and young ]\Iathias was left an orphan. 
He was taken into the home of a relative, with whom, about 1869, he came 
west to Illinois and located in LaSalle county. It was on a farm in Richland 
township, this county, that young Kurscheid obtained his first impressions 
of the serious side of life. As he approached manhood he turned his atten- 
tion to work at the carpenter's trade, which he followed as a business for 
several years. His mercantile career began as a clerk for a Mr. White, and 
later he was with John Linder, in that capacity, in the village of Leonore. 
In 1889 he embarked in business alone, on a small scale, and to such an 
extent has his business increased that to-day he is regarded as the leading- 
merchant of the village. 

Mr. Kurscheid has identified himself prominently with the growth and 
progress of his town. At different times he has served as one of its council- 
men, and has occupied other places of trust and honor in the management 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 663 

of its affairs. In the spring of 1899 he was chosen at the general election 
to be the president of the village. He was one of the incorporators of the 
^•olnnteer fire company of Leonore, and is its clerk; and he was a subscriber 
to the stock of the Leonore Creamery. Fraternally he is identified with the 
local camp of Modern Woodmen, of which he is the consul. 

In February, 1889, Mr. Kurscheid married Miss Mary Brunsbach, a 
daughter of August Brunsbach, one of the foremost citizens of Vermilion 
township, this county, having settled here at an early day. 



GEORGE W. GREINER. 

One of the young, energetic business men of Tonica, LaSalle county, 
is George A\\ Greiner, who is well along on the highway leading to fortune. 
A truly wide-awake, enterprising citizen, he is heart and soul alive to the 
progress and advancement of this place, and for that reason, if for no other, 
he would l)e highly esteemed by the residents of this thriving village 

Mr. Greiner is proud of the fact that he is one of the native born sons 
of Illinois, and that in him two nationalities are united, as his father, Charles 
Greiner. was born under the French flag, while his mother, Sophia (Ehmler) 
Greiner, was a native of Prussia. His paternal grandfather lived and died 
in France, and reared twelve children. The maternal grandfather of our 
subject emigrated to the United States many years ago, settling in Putnam 
county, Illinois, where he lived until his death, at the age of about three- 
score and ten years. Charles Greiner came to America to seek his fortune 
when he was a young man. and locating in Hennepin, engaged in the bakery 
and grocery business during most of his active life. He died in that section 
of the state in 1889, when in his seventieth year, and is survived by his widow, 
who is a resident of Hennepin. Of their eight children six are living, and 
all dwell in Putnam county save George W. They are named as follows: 
Anna, Charles, Jennie, Ida and Charlotte. Anna is the wife of W. E. Eddy; 
Jennie of John ]\Iarkley; Ida of W. C. Patterson; and Charlotte of H. B. 
Zenor. 

The birth of George W. Greiner took place in Putnam county, July 18, 
1869. The benefits of an excellent public school education were his, and 
after completing his studies he began clerking in a store. Thus occupied 
for several years, he gained a practical idea of business methods, and at the 
same time carefully accumulated a snug little capital, with which to embark 
in an enterprise of his own when the proper time came. In 1895 he came to 
Tonica and purchased the general store owned by the Miller estate, adding 
a meat market. He keeps a high grade of goods and transacts his business 



664 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

in a thoroughly enterprising manner, his store being neat and attractive. 

Fraternally Mr. Greiner is a highly esteemed member of Tonica Lodge, 
No. 364, F. & A. M., at the present time enjoying the honor of being master 
of the lodge. He also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America. 
Politically he is independent, preferring to use his franchise for the nominees 
and principles which he deems worthy of support, regardless of party lines. 
His fellow citizens, respecting his financial ability and excellent judgment, 
honored him with the position which he still holds, that of village treasurer. 

The marriage of Mr. Greiner and Miss Irma Boyle took place Novem- 
ber 28, 1890. She is a daughter of Albert and Frances (Hartenbower) Boyle. 
Three children bless the home of our subject and wife, their names Ijeing, 
respectively, Earl, Frances and \'ervne. 



DAVID RICHEY. 



David Richey, a much respected citizen and successful farmer residing 
on section 10, Eden township, LaSalle county, dates his birth in Muskingum 
county, Ohio, forty miles east of Columbus, July 31, 1822. He is a son of 
Nathaniel and Susanna (Kirkpatrick) Richey, natives of Pennsylvania, and 
one of ele\en children, four sons and seven daughters, all of whom grew to 
maturity except one daughter, who died at the age of five years. Eight 
of this number are now living, namely: Mary, widow of William Bower, of 
Tonica; David, Avhose name initiates this review; Margaret Jane, widow of 
George B. Holmes, of Topeka, Kansas; James, of Eden township, LaSalle 
county; Susanna, wife of J. F. Evans, of Los Angeles, California; John, of 
northern Iowa; Elizabeth, widow of A. P. Landis. of Shell City, ^Missouri; 
and Nathaniel, of Redlands. California. Nathaniel Richey. father of the 
above named, moved about the year 181 2 to Ohio, where he made his home 
until 1830, and that year, again imbued with a spirit of emigration, he came 
out to Illinois and located at Cedar Point, in Eden township, LaSalle county, 
where he took claim to two hundred and seventv-nine acres of government 
land. About 1867 he sold his land and moved to Peru. A few years later 
he went to Tonica, where he died in 1872, at the age of seventy-seven years 
and seven months. He was a soldier in the war of 18 12, in the volunteer 
service, under Perry, and was stationed near Erie. His wife survived him 
a number of years, her age at death being about eighty. He was reared 
in the Presbyterian faith, but he and his wife, for convenience of worship, 
joined the Methodist church after coming to LaSalle county, there being no 
Presbyterian church near them. Politically he was first a \Miig, then an 
Abolitionist and finally a Republican. He served four years as a justice of 
the peace. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 665 

The Richeys are of Scotch descent. John Richey, the grandfather of 
the subject of this sketch, \vas a native of Pennsylvania, and by occupation 
was a farmer. He served in the Revolutionary war, and lay a prisoner at 
New York when a man on each side of him was frozen to death. He, how- 
ever, survived the rigors of war and lived to old age. In his family were 
fourteen children. The maternal grandfather of David Richey was James 
Kirkpatrick, a native of Ireland, who on coming to this country settled in 
Pennsylvania and subsequently removed to Ohio; and he died in Muskingum 
county, in the latter state, when well advanced in years. He, too, was a 
farmer, and his family was composed of three daughters and one son. 

David Richey was eight years old when he came with his parents to 
Illinois, and since that time his life has been spent in Eden township, LaSalle 
county. Since 1850 he has lived on his present farm. Reared on a farm 
in a frontier locality, his educational advantages were limited. Altogether 
he attended school only about nine months. He remained a member of his 
father's household until he was twenty-six years of age, and on starting out 
in life to do for himself he bought eighty acres of land from the government, 
paying for it at the rate of one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre. This 
was wild prairie. He borrowed unbroken cattle, which he trained, and with 
which he plowed his land, sowing it the first year to wheat. He hauled his 
crop with oxen to Chicago, a distance of one hundred miles, requiring eight 
or ten days of good weather to make the round trip. This land he sold in 
1850, and that same year bought his present farm, one hundred and sixty- 
three acres, which he improved, building a substantial house, barns, grana- 
ries, fences, etc. Also he owns forty acres of timber land. Mr. Richey 
carries on diversified farming and has always given more or less attention 
to the stock business, raising horses, cattle, sheep and hogs. 

He was married June 28, 1849, to IMiss Margaret Elizabeth Evans, a 
daughter of James F. and Feraby (Elam) Evans; and they are the parents 
of three children — two sons and one daughter — Frank, Alice and Guy 
Nathaniel. Frank is a practicing lawyer of St. Louis, Missouri. He married 
Miss Fannie Lipman and they have two children — Gida and Frederick D. 
Alice married John I. Salisbury, and died October 21, 1885. Guy Nathaniel 
died October 23, 1886. He and his wife, whose maiden name was Eva 
Dent, had one son — Guy Dent Richey. 

Mr. Richey is a Democrat, having come to this party from the Green- 
back party. In early life he took an active interest in political matters. He 
was a member of the thirty-first general assembly of the Illinois legislature. 

Speaking of his early experience in Illinois, Mr. Richey says that during 
the Black Hawk war they were living peaceably in their log cabin in the 
woods when thev heard that "the Indians were coming." He moved his 



666 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

family to Magnolia for a short time and then to Granville, in Putnam county, 
and later to a block-house near Peru. As he was a cripple he did not par- 
ticipate in the war. At that time there were three LaSalle county families 
murdered by the Indians — the Hall. Pettigrew and Davis families. Mr. 
Richev is one of the oldest settlers in LaSalle countv. 



ALFRED H. BELL. 



Alfred H. Bell, the genial and popular postmaster of Lostant, LaSalle 
county, is one of the progressive merchants of this thriving town. He has 
occupied a number of local offices of trust and honor, to the entire satisfac- 
tion of everyone, and enjoys an enviable reputation for square dealing and 
public spirit. 

John Bell, the grandfather of our subject, was a native of Italy and 
lived to attain an extreme age, dying in Pennsylvania and leaving several 
children to perpetuate his name. During the war of the Revolution in this 
country he supplied the army with meat, and was very useful in many ways. 
He was a ship carpenter by trade. The maternal grandfather of Alfred H. 
Bell was William Henning, whose l^irth took place in Ireland. He fought 
at the great battle of Waterloo, under the Duke of W^ellington. being an aide 
to General Crumy. Subseciuently he emigrated to the United States, and 
after residing in the Keystone state for a numb.er of years came to Putnam 
county, Illinois, where he was a pioneer. He was industriously engaged in 
farming until his death, at the age of seventy years. All of his thirteen 
children lived to maturity, and eleven of the number attended the funeral 
of their mother, who lived to be eighty-five years of age. 

John G. Bell, the father of our subject, was born in Pennsylvania, where 
he followed the trade of milling, and in 1857 came to Illinois. After living 
at Todd's Mill for a short time he went to Ottawa, where he made his home 
for many years. Then one year was spent in Hennepin, and from that time 
until 1898 he dwelt upon a farm in Hope township. He then located in 
Lostant. where his death occurred June i, 1899. ^'S wife, whose maiden 
name was Alary Henning, and who was born in Ireland, is still living. She 
is a devout member of the Episcopal church, while her husband was a 
Lutheran. They were the parents of three sons and four daughters, five of 
whom survive, namely: A. H.; George F., of Lostant; Lulu, wife of James 
Patterson, of Hope township; Olive, wife of Charles Lambourne, of the 
same district; and j\Iiss C. Mae Bell. 

Alfred H. Bell, who was born in Putnam county, Illinois, attended the 
public schools of Ottawa and obtained an excellent education, as a founda- 
tion for his future career. For several years subsecjuent to leaving school 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 667 

he worked in a flouring mill in Ottawa, together with his father; and after 
the latter's removal to the farm in Hope township he devoted his winters to 
teaching, while in the summer he worked on the homestead. A number of 
3'ears were thus Inisil}- occupied, and then, leaving his brother George to 
superintend the farm, he came to Lostant, in 1894, and has since been a 
resident of the place, thoroughly identified with its upbuilding. For the 
first year after coming here he was associated with his uncle. James Henning, 
in his warehouse and elevator business, and at the expiration of the time 
stated he and his brother George purchased the senior man's interest, and 
have since conducted the business under the firm name of Bell Brothers. 
They possess energy and sound common sense in the management of their 
financial affairs, and are steadily prospering. 

In 1897 Mr. Bell was appointed the postmaster of Lostant, and entered 
upon his duties in December of that year. He takes great pains to meet 
the wishes of his fellow citizens, and is highly conimended for his promptness 
and general efiiciency. For two years he served as a member of the village 
board of trustees of this place, and while living in Hope township he was a 
road commissioner for five years. Politicahy he is a Republican of no uncer- 
tain stamp. Fraternally he belongs to Magnoha Lodge, No. 103, F. & A. 
M., and is connected with Magnolia Grange. Following in the line of his 
early religious training, he is an Episcopalian. 



AMLLL-VM HOCHSTATTER. 

A life-long resident and highly respected citizen of Troy Grove town- 
ship is he of whom the following lines are penned. By the exercise of his 
native talents and well directed energy he has become well-to-do, financially, 
and in the midst of his many business undertakings he finds time to dis- 
charge his duties as a citizen of this great republic. His success is due solely 
to his own efforts, and integrity and justice mark all of his dealings with 
others. 

The parents and ancestors of our subject were natives of Germany, 
and both of his grandfathers lived and died in that country. His grandfather 
Hochstatter, who was a farmer, lived to reach his seventieth year, and reared 
five children. After the death of the maternal grandfather his widow came 
to America, passed her declining years in LaSalle county, and is now sleep- 
ing her last sleep in the old Catholic burying ground. Theodore Hoch- 
statter. the father of our subject, was born in Prussia, and in 1846 sailed 
for the L^nited States. Upon arriving in Illinois, he worked on the canal at 
Lockport for some time, and received a bolt of cloth in payment for his 



668 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

labor, and this cloth later paid his transportation from Lockport to Troy 
Grove. Locating in Troy Gro\e township, he bought an eighty-acre farm, 
which he improved, and as the years rolled by he invested in other property 
until his possessions amounted to seven hundred and twenty acres. He 
was summoned to the silent land on the 12th of Alarch, 1895, "^vlien he was 
in his seventy-fourth year. He had occupied the offices of road commis- 
sioner and school director for many years, and enjoyed the respect and 
confidence of the entire community in which he had dwelt so long. His 
devoted wife, whose maiden name was Christina Kratz. was l)orn in Prussia, 
also, and, like himself, was a member of the Catholic church. She survived 
him al^out one year, dying at the age of seventy-five. They were the parents 
of three sons and two daughters, one of whom is deceased. The others 
are John, William, Helen, widow of Theodore Sondgeroth. and Peter, of 
Kellogg, Kansas. 

WilUam Hochstatter, of this sketch, was born on his father's farm in 
this township, Septeml^er 29. 1853. He attended the district schools, the 
Lutheran seminary, and Henderson's high school at Mendota, and thus 
his educational advantages were much l)etter than those of most of his youth- 
ful associates and neighbors. His father also gave him some timely aid, 
after he was married, and was starting out on the difficult pathway of inde- 
pendent living. \\'ith this sum — five hundred dollars — he rented a farm 
of one hundred acres, and purchased necessary agricultural implements and 
household furnishings. He continued to lease the farm for about twenty 
years, in the meantime, however, purchasing" a quarter-section farm in 1881, 
and buvino- and selling several other homesteads. Recentlv he sold a farm 
of three hundred and twenty acres in Kansas, which he had owned for some 
time, and he still has seven hundred and twenty acres in his possession. In 
addition to farming, he conducted an extensive grain business for two or 
more years, and buih an elevator at Culton, which station was established 
on the Illinois Central Railroad at l:Hs solicitation. The town is located 
four miles south of ^Mendota, and three miles north of Dimmick, and the 
land for the site was donated to the railroad company l)y ]Mr. Hochstatter. 
For just a quarter of a century he has served as a school director, and has 
been instrumental in securing good educational ad^'antages for the children 
of his township. Politically he is independent, using his franchise for the 
candidates and principles which he considers worthy of his support, regard- 
less of party. 

The marriage of our subject and ]\Iiss Eva, daughter of Conrad and 
Margaret (Schroeder) Sondgeroth, was celebrated October 25, 1875. They 
have become the parents of three sons and six daughters, namely: Christina, 
Catherine, Peter, Annie. Henry, Ella, Maggie. Benjamin and Eva, all of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 669 

whom are at home with the exception of the eldest born, Christina, who is 
the wife of Joseph Happ, of Calloway county, Missouri. They have two 
children, named in honor of our subject and wife — William and Eva. 



JOSEPH J. MATERN. 

Joseph J. ]Matern, of Tonica, LaSalle county, is in the prime of man- 
hood, as he was born April 24, 1861. He is one of the ten children of 
Adam and Theressa (Amrehn) Matern. who were natives of Bavaria, Ger- 
many, and became loyal, respected citizens of the United States. The father, 
who has made farming his chief occupation in life, located in Putnam 
county, this state, in 1844, and now, after fifty-five years passed in that local- 
ity, he is living retired from the active toil in which he v^as engaged until 
recently. Beginning his career as a common laborer on farms, he pros- 
pered, on account of his industry and economy, and within a few years after 
landing in this country, a stranger to its people, language and customs, he 
had bought a farm and had made substantial improvements upon the place. 
He reared his sons and daughters to be useful, patriotic citizens, and the 
regard and respect of all who know him is his in gratifying measure. His 
wife, who faithfully seconded all of his plans, and was a true helpmate in every 
respect, was summoned to the silent land in 1895, when she was in her 
sixty-third year. Both have been identified with the Catholic church since 
childhood. Their respective fathers passed their entire lives in Germany, 
where they were engaged in managing farms. 

Joseph J. Matern is one of the seven children of the parental household 
who are yet living. His brothers, Michael and Bernard, are residents of 
Wesley, Iowa, as also is the elder sister. Elizabeth, wife of Joseph Gates. 
Theressa, William and Henry are living in Alount Palatine. Illinois. Two 
sons and a daughter died in childhood. 

Near the towm last mentioned the birth of our subject occurred, and 
there, on his father's farm, he learned the elementary principles of business 
and good citizenship under the wise guidance of his elders. He remained 
at home, giving his aid to his father in the care of the farm until he had 
reached maturity, in the meantime acquiring a practical education in the 
local schools. His father then being well along in years, the young man 
took charge of the old homestead, which he continued to carry on with 
distinct success until 1898. the year of his coming to Tonica. Here he en- 
tered into partnership with C. F. Austin, and transacted a large business 
in grain, coal and tile until the spring of 1899, when he purchased Mr. Aus- 
tin's interest, and is running his affairs alone at present. His business is 
constantly increasing, and his patrons are. without exception, on the best 



670 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

of terms with him, for he is accommodating and genial, prompt in filHng 
orders and perfectly fair and just in all of his dealings. 

On the 19th of April, 1898, Mr. Matern married Miss Anna Lawrence, 
a daughter of Anton and Frances Lawrence, and they have become the 
parents of a little daughter, Irene. Mr. and Mrs. Matern are Catholics in 
their religious faith, as were their ancestors before them. 

While living in Putnam county, our subject served for three years as 
the assessor of MagnoHa township, and was the collector for four years, 
making an enviable record as a public official. He uses his franchise in favor 
of the Democratic party. 



DAVID DAVIS. 



David Davis, a retired farmer of Earlville, LaSalle county, was born 
in Wales, September 24, 1831. His parents were John and Maria (Davis) 
Davis, who were born, reared and married in that country. The father, 
a saddler by trade, died in early life, leaving two children: David, our 
subject, and Rachel, wife of L. B. Stark, of Licking county, Ohio. After 
his death the mother married Elias Jones, by whom she had four children, — 
Mary, Samuel, Elizabeth and Jane, ah deceased, the son dying in the army 
during the civil war. The mother came to this country in 1840, with her 
parents, six brothers and three sisters. Her brothers were John J., Thomas 
J., David J., Henry J., Evan J. and Frederick J.; and her sisters Rachel, 
Mary and Jane. She settled in Licking county, Ohio, where she married 
Mr. Jones. 

David Davis was nine years of age when he came to America with 
his mother and remained in Licking county on a farm until 1857, when 
he came to LaSalle county, where his uncles had located. He worked on 
his uncle Henry's farm for about ten years, receiving a monthly stipend, 
most of which was carefully saved up for the purpose of purchasing land. 
His first property was eighty acres of unimproved land in Freedom town- 
ship, which he soon placed in a state of cultivation, making it second to none 
in that section. He was industrious and economical, and the habits of 
thrift and industry so early formed now enabled him to add to this acreage 
until his farm land covers some two hundred acres. His farming has been 
by improved methods, and the success which has marked his progress speaks 
well for his ideas and has placed him among the front rank of intelligent, 
prosperous farmers. 

Mr. Davis was married February 24, 1876, to Miss Martha AViley, of 
Freedom township, this county, born January 2, 1845. Her parents were 
Charles and Seraphina (Greenleaf) Wiley, pioneer settlers of this township, 




Jj)&^<rcS JS>L 



Oiyty-tJ) 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 671 

who came from the state of Elaine in 1844. ^Nlr. Davis is a RepubHcan, but 
has never been an aspirant for official honors. He is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity and stands high in the community. 



J. C. CORBUS, M. D. 

Dr. Corbus is one of the distinguished physicians of IlHnois, his skill 
and ability winning him a marked prestige as a representative of the medical 
fraternity. In the progress that has been made in the science of medicine 
durinsf his connection therewith is found an incentive for renewed effort, 
becoming familiar with all the discoveries and theories advanced by members 
of the profession. His knowledge of medicine is broad and comprehensive, 
and in its application to the needs of suffering humanity he has won the 
success that numbers him among the leading practitioners in his section 
of the state. He has recently been appointed the superintendent of the 
Kankakee Insane Asylum, a position which he is fully competent to fill. 

Dr. Corbus was born in Holmes county, Ohio, in 1833, and after com- 
pleting his literary education he deteriiiined to devote his energies to the 
practice of medicine. To this end he entered the Western Reserve Medical 
College, of Cleveland, Ohio, and was graduated in that institution with the 
degree of M. D. In 1855 he came to Illinois, where he has since engaged 
in successful practice. At the outbreak of the civil war he put aside all 
personal considerations and responded to the country's call for volunteers, 
being made assistant surgeon of the Seventy-fifth Illinois Infantry. Subse- 
quently he was promoted to the rank of surgeon, but was unable to remain 
at the front throughout the four years of the civil strife, owing to ill health. 

Returning to the north, he resumed the private practice of medicine 
in Illinois, and as a physician and surgeon ranked second to but a few of 
the practitioners of the Prairie state. For years he was the president of the 
state board of charities, and was retained in that office by every governor 
except Altgeld since his appointment to the position by Governor Beveridge. 
For fifteen years he was a United States medical examiner, his thorough 
knowledge of medicine and anatomy well qualifying him to discharge the 
duties devolving upon him in that office. 

Dr. Corbus is a man of broad general knowledge and is a prominent and 
influential member of the Republican party. For four years he served as 
a member of the Repulilican state central committee, and at all times has 
labored earnestly for the advancement of the welfare and success of his 
party. As a Knight Templar Mason he is very prominent in Masonic circles, 



6/2 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and as a gentleman of genuine worth and genial manner is highly esteemed 
in social circles. 

He has been twice married. His first wife died in 1890, and in 1892 he 
married !Mrs. Helen Ruggles. 



HENRY GUNN. 



Conspicuous among the successful lawyers of LaSalle county is the 
gentleman named above, who is a member of the firm of Gunn & Gunn, 
at Tonica. He was born in Montague, Franklin county, Massachusetts, 
December 13, 1830, a son of Windsor and Abigail (Osgood) Gunn, natives 
also of the Bay state. In both ancestral lines the first families in this country 
settled in Massachusetts about 1632. The parents of our sul:)ject had fiye 
sons and two daughters, and of these six are still living, viz.: John, a 
resident near Mount Palatine, IlHnois; Eunice, the widow of Charles Mud^e 
and now residing in Tonica; Henry, our subject; Levi, living in Barton 
county, Kansas, seven miles from Great Bend; Cyrus, living near 2^Iount 
Palatine; and Mrs. Lucy Ullery, of Barton county, Kansas. 

Windsor Gunn, the father, was in early life a comb manufacturer and 
later a farmer. He came west with his family in the autumn of 1842, locating 
near Davenport, Iowa, and lived there till the winter of 1849; then he came 
to Putnam county, Illinois, and remained a resident there till his death, 
which occurred in February, 1871, when he had attained the age of sixtv- 
nine years and eight months. His wife survived till 1876, being about 
seventy-four years old at the time of her death. In her religious proclivities 
she was a Baptist, but was a member of no ecclesiastical organization. Mr. 
Gunn was for many years a Unitarian. In his native state he was once a 
captain of the state militia. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Joseph Gunn, was also a native 
of the Bay state, a farmer by occupation and was about seventv-five years 
of age at the time of his death, in Schoharie county. New York. He brought 
up a large number of children. The maternal grandfather of ]\Ir. Gunn, 
Samuel Osgood, was also a native of Massachusetts, had six children, and 
died in middle life. 

Henry Gimn, whose name heads this sketch, was four or five years of 
age when his parents moved from Massachusetts to Vermont, where their 
home continued to be until 1842. As he grew up he attended schools in his 
native village, also in Brattleboro, \'ermont. a select school in Davenport 
and the academy and college at ]Mount Palatine. Illinois. He is a good 
Greek and Latin scholar. The expenses of his advanced education he de- 
frayed from his own earnings. He began studying law at Mount Palatine 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 673 

abont 1852. and several years later was admitted to the bar, first in Iowa 
and in i<S59 in Illinois. He began practicing- in Pntnani county, and after 
a few years came to LaSalle county and followed his profession in Men- 
dota for a time; then he moved to South Ottawa, and finally, in i860, he 
came to Tonica, where he has followed the law ever since. His many 
interesting experiences in the practice of his profession, as well as in many 
other phases of life, would fill a volume. Politically Mr. Gunn was originally 
an old-line \\'hig, one among the many thousands who became Republi- 
cans on the establishment of that party. In 1856 he addressed the public 
in favor of the election of John C. Fremont to the presidency of the United 
States. For four years he ser\-ed as town clerk of Eden township. In 1868 
he was elected supervisor, and he satisfactorily filled the responsibilities of 
that office till 1871. In 1883 he was again elected, and by re-election he 
continued to hold the ol^ce until i8f)8. For four consecutive years he was 
chairman of the board. For fifteen or sixteen years he v;as police magistrate 
in Tonica. 

In social affiliations he was for some years an active Odd Fellow, and 
in 1870 he was a delegate to the state grand lodge, and also to the grand 
encampment; but he has not been in afiiliation with the order for some time. 
His son Bert is a member of Tonica Lodge, No. 364, A. F. & A. M., and 
is at present the secretary of the lodge. 

]Mr. Gunn's marriage was celebrated in 1858, when he wedded Miss 
Cornelia L. Fisher, a daughter of Rev. Otis Fisher, a Baptist minister. Her 
mother was Lydia (Osgood) Fisher. By this marriage were four sons and 
four daughters, namely: Cyrus H., Mabel, Walter F., Edwin, Cora, Nellie, 
Bert and Mae L. Mabel and Edwin died in infancy; Cora became the wife 
of George A. McFerson and is now deceased; Nellie died in 1895, in her 
twenty-second year; Cyrus H. married Emma Knapp and is a farmer in 
Vermilion township; Walter F. married Hattie Van Tassel and lives in 
Putnam county on a farm; they have four children — Sallie, Fred Henry, 
Luna and Flossie; and Bert, the youngest son, is single and is a lawyer in 
I)artnership with his father. He completed his legal course of study before 
he was of age and was admitted to the bar in February, 1898. He is the 
present village attorney of Tonica. He and his sister Mae L. make their 
home with their parents. 



JOHN J. WINTER. 



One of the reliable citizens and substantial business men of Garfield, 
LaSalle county, is the gentleman of whom this sketch is penned. Pie has 
ever been sincerely interested in the growth and prosperity of this town 



674 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and county, and is entitled to great credit for the public spirit which he 
has manifested at all times. A review of his life will pro\e of interest to his 
numerous friends and cannot fail to be an inspiration to the rising genera- 
tion — to those especially who are starting out to fight the battle of life 
empty-handed as he did a few years ago. 

He is of German extraction and comes of two sterling Pennsylvania 
families. His paternal great-grandfather was a hero of the American war 
for independence; and his grandfather, John Jacob \\'inter. was a native of 
Germany, but at an early age became a resident of the Keystone state. Later 
he removed to Ohio and spent the declining years of his life on a farm 
in Licking county. He died when in his sixty-third }'ear, respected and 
admired by all who knew him. For a number of years he had l)een a minister 
of the gospel, being identified with the United Brethren church. To himself 
and wife, whose maiden name was Catherine Miller, five sons and a daughter 
were born. 

One of the sons, Daniel Winter, was the father of our subject. Born 
in Pennsylvania, he went to Ohio with his family in 1837, and in 1875 came 
to Illinois. For a wife he first chose Sarah Simmons, a native of the Keystone 
state, and after her death, in 1835, he wedded Susanna Ann Beabout. Three 
sons and one daughter were born of the first union. The daughter is now 
deceased, and the sons are Nicholas C of Villisca, Iowa; David S., of Ot- 
tawa, Illinois; and John J. Mrs. Susanna Winter departed this life February 
13, 1875, after which event the father made his home with our subject until 
the summons to the silent land came to him. January J 2. 1877, ^vhen he 
was in his seventy-second year. 

John J. AMnter was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania. Septem- 
ber 19, 1832, and at the age of five years he removed to Licking county, 
Ohio, with his father and family, where, when old enough, he began at- 
tending the common schools. Later he pursued his studies in the local 
academy, after which he engaged in teaching, and was thus occupied for 
three terms in the Buckeye state. In 1855 he came to LaSalle county, 
Illinois, and for four years thereafter he taught school during the winters 
and worked upon farms near Ottawa in the summer. At length he con- 
cluded that he did not wish to devote his entire life to either of these voca- 
tions, and he determined to enter the commercial world. Thus for nine 
years we find him steadily and industriously engaged in employment as a 
traveling salesman for a Dayton (Illinois) woolen factory, and then for three 
years he was head salesman for the Cushman Manufacturing Company, of 
Ottawa, Illinois. 

Having had this necessary business experience, Mr. Winter came to 
Garfield and started a lumber yard, which he managed successfully for three 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 675 

years. Since 1876 he has given his entire attention to the carrying on of 
a general merchandising estabhshment at Garfield, save when he has been 
officiating as the postmaster of the place. He was first honored with this 
responsible position during the administration of President Hayes, and con- 
tinned to serve until President Cleveland's election made it necessary for 
him to resign the duties of the office to the Democratic appointee. Need- 
less to say. he is a stalwart Republican, and though he has never sought 
public office he has frequently been called upon to serve the people, as when 
•he was elected the town clerk for one year and a justice of the peace for 
four years. Fraternally he belongs to Camp No. 4127. Modern A\'oodmen 
of America. 

On the 1st of April. 1855, ^Ir. \\'inter wedded ]\Iartha Maria, a daugh- 
ter of William and Jane (Alillikin) Parkinson, who were natives of England 
and Pennsylvania respectively. Her father was brought to America by 
his parents in 1801, when he was three years old. His father, John Park- 
inson, also of English birth, was a farmer and kept a dairy farm in New 
York state for a period, then removing to Licking county. Ohio, where he 
died when well along in years. He had four sons and two daughters. 
William Parkinson removed from Ohio to Illinois in the spring of 1856 and 
settled in LaSalle county, on a farm adjacent to Ottawa. He died as the 
result of a fall from a wagon, November 15, i860, when he was in his 
sixty-third year. His widow, who survived him until November, 1878, was 
seventy-eisfht vears and four months old at the time of her death. Both 
were earnest members of the United Brethren church. The father of Mrs. 
Parkinson, James ]Millikin, who was born in the Keystone state, was of 
Scotch descent. He was a carpenter by trade and followed that calling until 
shortly before his death, which event occurred in his native state when he 
was advanced in years. J\Irs. ]Mary Millikin, the maternal grandmother of 
Mrs. AX'inter, was a native of Ireland. She v.-as a very remarkable old lady, 
noted for many things, among others that when she was ninety-four years 
old she was able to walk a mile or two without excessive fatigue, and 
still operated her spinning-wheel much as in the days of her prime. She 
died in 1856, when five months past the ninety-fifth anniversary of her 
birth. Mrs. \A'inter was one of the five surviving members of a family 
which originally comprised five daughters and four sons. Her sister, Mar- 
garet A., is the wife of Clark Downey, of Wenona, Illinois; Catherine R. is 
Mrs. William Trumbo, of Shafter, IMissouri; and Sarah E. is the widow of 
Aaron Martin, of AA'enona: while W^illiam H. Parkinson resides near the 
same town. Mrs. ^Martha ^I. A\'inter died January 15. J900, on the sixty- 
eighth anniversary of her birth. 

The union of 'Mr. and ]Mrs. AA'inter was blessed with three sons and 



676 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

three daughters, namely: Harr}' A., who married Florence Wilson and 
resides on a farm seven miles west of Wenona; Orrel Dell, who wedded 
P. H. Jennett and lives near Whitamore, Iowa; Lyman Lee. whose wife 
was Annie Lechner in her girlhood; William D., who chose Ida Thrasher 
for a wife; Sarah J., the wife of Jefferson R. Eward, of Garfield; and Susie, 
who died when about eight months old. The children of Harry A. are named 
respectively Jay W., Reuben Roy and Floyd Leslie. '\lr. and ^Irs. Jennett 
have ten children: Albert V\'illiam, Walter Lee, Ora ]\Iae, Edwin Maithew, 
Luella, Hugh Burnett. John Austin, Ralph, Jason and Francis. Lyman 
Lee \\'inter, of Garfield, has four living children: Arthur J.. Jennie B., Wilbur 
Ray and John Lawrence; and William D. Winter, also a citizen of Garfield, 
has two living children — Oliver Guy and Frances Emma. ^Ir. and Mrs. 
Eward are the parents of three children — ^^lattie Edith, Elsie Dell and 
Thomas James. 

The \vife of our subject was identified with the church of the L'nited 
Brethren in her early womanhood, but of late years she has held her member- 
ship in the Presbyterian denomination. She has been a faithful helpmate 
to her husband, a loving mother and a helpful, sympathetic friend and 
neighbor, endeared to every one who knows her. ^Ir. and ]\Irs. Winter 
are justly regarded and highly respected by those who know them and 
are held as models worthv to follow. 



EUGENE C. LONG. 



Eugene C. Long is a well known and much esteemed citizen of Rut- 
land township, LaSalle count}', ^vhere he has spent his entire life, his birth 
having occurred in Rutland township, January 26, 1857. Lewis Long, his 
father, has been a prominent and influential citizen of the county for many 
years. He and his wife, whose maiden name was Emily Barber, were the 
parents of eight children, seven of whom are living, namely: Eugene C.; 
Emma F., the wife of Gaylord States, of Miller township; Charles W., of Rut- 
land township: Ruth Inez, the wife of George Funkle, of [Marseilles; Bertha 
A., the wife of F. Spencer, of Rutland township; and Lewis ^^'alter and 
Arthur F., at their parental home. 

Eugene C. Long was reared on a farm, and, being the oldest of a 
large number of children, early became his father's assistant. In his boy- 
hood he was inured to the various kinds of farm work and for two or three 
years after attaining his majority he was connected with the brick and tile 
manufactory at jMarseilles. Returning to the home farm, he again directed his 
attention to agricultural pursuits, which he has continued up to the present 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 677 

time, now having full charge of the farming operations at the home place. 
Mr Lone is a member of several social orders, and is an officer in 
the Knights of Pythias Lodge, No. 62, of Marseilles. Politically he is a 
Republican, but has never been an aspirant for political honors, preferring 
to devote his attention to the vocation in life in which he has met with credit- 
able and lionorable success. 



GEORGE A. McFERSON. 

An enterprising business man of Tonica is the gentleman named above, 
who is successfully engaged in the furniture and undertaking business. He 
was born in Putnam county, this state, March 29, 1848, a son of Harvey 
and Mary Jane (Atchison) McFerson. His father was a native of southern 
Ohio, and his mother of Virginia, and they had eleven children, of whom 
four are now living, namely: Mary Jane, the wife of Frederick Hannum. 
of San Francisco; Alice G., the wife of Henry Leininger, of Piper City, 
Illinois; George A.; and Grant, of Kewanee. this state. Harvey McFerson, 
a farmer, came to Illinois in 1840 and settled in Union Grove, Putnam 
county, where he faithfully engaged in his calling until 1855, when he came 
to LaSalle county, locating in Eden township, upon a quarter section of 
good land which he had purchased, and he followed agricultural pursuits 
there until 1877; t'"'^''' ^''^ moved to Tonica. wdiere he passed the remainder 
of his life, quitting the scenes of this world in 1878. y\pril 26. at the age of 
sixty years. His first wife, the mother of our subject, died in 1864. November 
14, aged forty-seven years. In her religious sympathies she was a Con- 
gregationalist, while her husband was a Universalist. In his political views 
he was a Republican, and in public position he for a time held the office 
of supervisor of Eden township, and also that of assessor and other public 
positions. For his second wife he married Martha E. King, who is still living, 
and by this marriage there were no children. 

The paternal grandfather of Mr. McFerson. Alexander McFerson. was 
also a native of the Buckeye state, of Scotch ancestry, and died in his native 
state, in middle life, being killed by a kick from a horse. He had th':ee sons 
and two daughters. The history of the maternal grandfather of our subject 
is not known. 

George A. McFerson was seven vears old when the familv of which 
he was a member moved to LaSalle county, and he was reared to the heavy 
work of the farm until twenty-two years of age. attending school during 
the winter seasons. In 1869 he married and 1)OUght a farm of one hundred 



6/8 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and sixty acres in A\'abaunsee county, Kansas, and followed farming there 
for five years. (This farm he still owns.) He then returned to LaSalle 
county, in the winter of 1874, and was employed as clerk by his father-in-law, 
James S. Underbill, in a hardware store, for a period of five years, and 
then he purchased his present furniture store, where, in addition to his 
business of dealing in furniture, he also is an undertaker. He is a well 
known and highly esteemed citizen of this county, having been a resident 
here ever since he was seven years of age excepting when he was in Kansas. 

In his religion he is exemplary, being a member of the Methodist 
church; and he is also connected with Tonica Lodge, Xo. 364. A. F. & A. 
M.; of Peru Chapter, Xo. 60, R. A. 'M.: Peru Council, Xo. 12, R. & S. 
M.; of St. John's Commandery, X"o. 26, K. T.; and of the Mystic Workers 
of the World. Of the commandery he was the presiding officer for four 
years, .and was then elected generalissimo, in which oflice he faithfully served 
until 1898; and he was senior warden for a number of years. He was the 
master of the blue lodge for three years. He is also a member of the Eastern 
Star lodge. Politically he is a Republican, and he has served as town clerk 
of Eden township for several terms. 

On the 1 6th of December, 1869, he was united in marriage with ]\Iiss 
Maria Underbill, daughter of James S. and Jane (AIcLean) Underbill, and 
they have one son. Charles A., who is a conductor on the Illinois Central 
Railroad, and married Sophia AA'estmeier. ]\Irs. George A. McFerson died 
February 28, 1880. at the early age of twenty-nine years; and for his second 
wife Mr. ]\IcFerson chose, March 12. 1895. [Miss Cora C. Gunn, a daughter 
of Henry and Cordelia (Fisher) Gunn. There were no children bv this 
marriage. ]\lrs. McFerson died January 12. 1898. at the age of twenty-nine 
years, a pious and exemplary member of the ]\Iethodist church. 



JOHX KEXXEDY 



John Kennedy, a farmer residing on section 10. Groveland township. 
LaSalle county, Illinois, has been identified with this county for a period 
of forty-one years, and is well known as one of its respected and infiiiential 
citizens. 

]\Ir. Kennedy is a native of Ireland. He was born in county Queens, 
October 9, 1836, a son of John and Margaret (Call) Kennedy, both natives 
of the Emerald isle, the former of county Queens and the latter of county 
Carlow. To John and Margaret Kennedy were born seven children, three 
sons and four daughters, four of whom are living: Jane, the widow of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 679 

Edward Brennan, of Carlow, Ireland; ]Mary, the wife of John W. McGarvey, 
of Sherrington, Canada; ]^Iargaret, the wife of Patrick Cooglan, also of Sher- 
rington. Canada; John, whose name introduces this sketch. The father, who 
was a farmer, came to America with his family in the year 1850 and located 
on a farm eight miles south of Utica. New York, where he died in 1855, at 
the aee of fortv vears. His wife's death occurred about one vear before 
his. 

William Kennedy, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, reached 
the extreme old age of one hundred and eight years, and his death was then 
caused l)y falling from his horse while going to a fair. He was the father 
of one son and live daughters. The maternal grandfather of our subject 
also died in Ireland, at a ripe old age. Both were farmers. 

John Kennedy spent the first fourteen years of his life in Ireland, reared 
on a farm and educated in the common schools, and accompanied his par- 
ents to America, settling with them in New York, where he remained 
until after his father's death. Then he went to Chicago and entered the 
employ of the Burlington Railroad Company, but remained with that road 
onlv a short time. Wt next find him in La Porte county. Indiana, where 
for one vear he worked by the month on a farm. Then he came to ]Mar- 
shall county, Illinois, and in 1858 to LaSalle county, where he continued as 
a farm hand, working by the month, until 1864. That year he enlisted in 
Company B, One hundred and Fiftieth Volunteer Infantry, and served one 
vear. Wliile in the army he took part in a number of skirmishes but was 
in no heavy battles. 

A-fter the war ]\[r. Kennedy settled in A\'oodford county. Illinois, where 
he lived one year, at the end of that time removing to Rutland, 
LaSalle county. Here he rented a farm, which he cultivated a short time, 
and then bought eighty acres in Groveland township, near Pleasant Yalley 
school-house, which he still owns. Afterward he bought forty acres, where 
he now lives, and later added another eighty-acre tract. He carries on 
general farming and stock-raising and has been fairly successful in his oper- 
ations, his career showing conclusively that in this country an energetic 
3^oung n^.an can b}- honest industry and good management win success. 

]\Ir. Kennedy was married December 4. 1870, to Miss Mary Ann Gol- 
den, a daughter of Patrick and ]\Iary Golden; and the fruits of their union 
are thirteen children: Margaret, Ann, William. Mary, John, Jane, Thomas, 
Frank, Rose Ellen, Emma. Julia. Kate and Daniel. All of the children ex- 
cept the three oldest daughters are at home, and two of these, Margaret 
and Ann. are married. ^Margaret is the wife of AA'illiam Akens, of Chicago. 
Ann married John Burns, also of Chicago, and the}- have one child, Mary. 

Mr. Kennedy's parents were devout members of the Catholic church, 



68o BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and he and his wife also are CathoHcs. their membershin beine' in Sacred 
Heart Catholic church of Rutland. Believing" that "new times demand 
new measures and new means,'' Mr. Kennedy has changed his political views. 
He was first a Republican, then a Democrat, and is now an independent. 
As a citizen he stands in high esteem. 



JOSHUA G. GAY. 

For just half a century Joshua Guilford Gay was actively engaged in 
business in Ottawa, and is now living retired, after an extremely busy, useful 
life. He has used his means and influence to the lasting welfare of this, 
his chosen place of abode, fostering local industries and improvements, and 
all that has gone toward the upbuilding and prosperity of the community. 

The Guilfords and Gays were numl^ered among the early Pilgrims of 
New Engiand, and many distinguished representatives of both families ha^■e 
flourished in the United States and have brought additional honor to the 
names they l)ore. The Gay family was founded in the vicinity of Boston. 
Massachusetts, by one John Gay, who was a native of England, and in each 
generation of his posterity there was a John, named in his honor. Philip 
Thomas Guilford, our subject's maternal ancestor, emigrated from Eng- 
land to this country in 1640. He located in Virginia, where he died, and 
subsequently his widow and son removed to Massachusetts and settled upon 
a strip of land on the seashore which was later styled Guilford's Point. The 
son grew to manhood there and several generations of his descendants 
were born, lived and died in the old Bay state. The maternal grandfather 
of our subject was Simeon Guilford, who, with five of his brothers, served 
through the Revolutionary war. He was one of the guards in whose 
keeping the celebrated Major Andre was placed subsequently to his capture. 
One of the Guilford brothers lived to attain the extreme age of ninety-three 
years. Simeon Guilford married a Miss Hayden and reared a large number 
of children. 

The birth of Joshua Guilford Gay occurred in Pittsfield, Berkshire 
county, Massachusetts, December 11. 1821. He is one of the six children of 
Willard and Electa Gay, the others being Willard and Lemuel Bingham, 
who are deceased; Rev. William Moore Gay, wdio is a Congregational min- 
ister, now located in Georgetown. Massachusetts; Electa M., who is unmar- 
ried and is a resident of Boston ; and Mrs. Catherine D. Hayden, whose 
husband, Henry Hayden, died in 1896, since which time she has lived with 
her son at Colorado Springs. 







-^cyZ 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 68i 

The boyhood of Joshua G. Gay was spent in his native town, where 
he was a student in the pubHc schools until he was seventeen years old. His 
father was a carriase-maker ])v trade, and the vouth assisted him in his busi- 
ness for some time, later going to New Haven. Connecticut, where he 
served an apprenticeship to the carriage-maker's trade. In 1846 he came 
west, and for about one year worked at his calling in Chicago. Then, com- 
ing to Ottawa, he entered into partnership with William Palmer, who was 
engaged in the manufacture of wagons, and continued in partnership with 
that worthy citizen for some three years. The ambitious young man, 
having accumulated a little capital by economy and good management, 
then opened a small shop of his own and commenced manufacturing car- 
riages and various kinds of light road wagons. He was alone until 1870, 
and employed cjuite a force of men during the last years. The following- 
decade he was associated with Colonel B. S. Porter in business, that gentle- 
man retiring from the firm in 1880, when his interest was purchased by 
Simeon G. Gay, who is the eldest son of our subject, and who for the past 
two years has been the sole proprietor of the enterprise which was founded 
nearly half a century ago 1:)y his esteemed father. The firm known as 
Gay & Son, for seventeen years, built u]) an extensive and remunerative 
business and a very desirable reputation for square dealing and for excel- 
lence of vehicles turned out in its factory. The plant is equipped with the 
best modern machinery, and high-grade work is invariably to be found in 
ever}- department of the factory. 

The marriage of J. G. Gay and Miss Ann M. Aldrich, of Warsaw. Illi- 
nois, was celebrated May 18, 185 1. Her father, Mark Aldrich, was a pioneer 
at Warsaw, which town he laid out in 1846. Years afterward he went to 
California, and then to Arizona, where his death occurred. Mrs. Ann Gay 
departed this life in 1868, and of the four sons born to herself and husband 
two have entered the silent land, namely: Willard and Frederick W. 
Simeon G. and Joseph W. are well known business men of Ottawa. For 
his second wife Mr. Gay chose Mrs. Olive W. Ashley, of Springfield, 
Massachusetts, their marriage taking place November 21, 1873; and a son 
and daughter were born to them, namely: Nellie M., who died in infancy, 
and Burton Albro, who is yet at home. By her former marriage, to Lester 
Ashley, Mrs. Gay has one daughter, Mabel E., who is now the wife of Alfred 
Michell, of Dallas, Texas. 

In his political faith Mr. Gay is a stalwart Republican. Coming from 
stanch old Puritan stock, he naturally adheres to the Congregational de- 
nomination, to which his ancestors belonged, and for a number of years he 
has officiated in the capacity of deacon in the Ottawa church. All worthy 
religious and philanthropic enterprises find a friend and assistant in him, 



682 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and many a needy person has had cause to bless and remem])er his name, 
though his deeds of helpfuhiess are quietly performed and rarely known to 
the public. 



DANIEL PETERSON. 



The subject of this sketch, although a native of the Buckeye state, has 
been identified with Illinois all his life, having been brought here by his par- 
ents in his infancy. He is a resident of Tonica. engaged in the stock busi- 
ness,, and is one of the substantial and leading citizens of the place. 

Daniel Peterson was born in Harrison county. Ohio. April 21, 1835. a 
son of Isaac and ]\lary (Bush) Peterson, natives of Ohio. In the Peterson 
family were ten children, four sons and six daughters, six of whom are now 
living, namely: Daniel, the direct subject of this review; Nancy Jane, the 
wife of B. F. ^^ hittaker. of Nebraska; John I., of Putnam cotmty, Illinois; 
William A., of Red Wing, Minnesota; Ruth, wife of .\. S. Bickle, of North 
Chillicothe, Illinois; and Elizabeth D.. immarried. Isaac Peterson, the 
father, was a farmer. He left Ohio in the fall of 1835 and brought his 
family west to Illinois, selecting a location in Putnam county and buying 
at that time forty acres of land. To this tract he subsequently added until 
he had a fine farm of two hundred acres and some timljer land, and on 
this farm he reared his family and passed the rest of his life. He died in 
January. 1875. at the age of sixty-eight years. His wife survived him five 
or six years and at the time of her death was about seventy-four. In her 
religious faith she was a ]\Iethodist. 

Turning back another generation for a glimpse of the grandparents 
of ]\Ir. Peterson, we find that his grandfather. Daniel Peterson, was of 
Holland-Dutch descent, was one of the early pioneers of Ohio, and from 
there in the spring of 1835 came to Illinois and settled in Putnam county, 
where he died at about the age of seventy-five years. He was a farmer, 
and his family comprised five children. Grandfather Bush, Mr. Peterson's 
grandfather on his mother's side, was a native of Ohio and lived and died 
there, being well advanced in vears at the time of his death. He had several 
sons and two daughters, and he. too, was a farmer. 

Daniel" Peterson, the immediate subject of this sketch, as above stated,- 
was brought to Illinois in his infancy, and his life was spent in Putnam 
county up to 1892. when he mo^'ed to Tonica. His educational advantages 
were those only of the district schools. Reared a farmer, he naturally en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits when he reached his majority and started out 
in life to do for himself. For four or five years he farmed some of his fither's 
land on the shares. Then he bought eighty acres of improved land, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 683 

later he and his brother Johii bought out some of the heirs in the old home- 
stead, and they two farmed together from 1870 for a number of years. They 
now o\\n four eighty-acre tracts and a forty-acre piece of land in Putnam 
county, and have two hundred and eighty-one acres of timber land. In 1892 
they rented their farms, and Daniel moved to Tonica, where he has since 
bought a home, located in the southwest part of town; and since the above 
date he has been engaged in the stock business, dealing chiefly in hogs. 

Mr. Peterson has been twice married. November 6, 1856, he wedded 
Miss Mary J. Inks, a daughter of Thomas and Matilda Inks, and their 
union was blessed in the birth of six children, one son and five daughters, 
viz., Mary Matilda, Martha Jane, Emma Ella, Isaac, Willetta and Edna. 
Mary Matilda died at the age of thirty-three years. She was the wife of Don- 
ald Dagger and had two children, Blanche and Cora. Martha Jane is the wife 
of George Ford, of Putnam county, Illinois, and they have one child, Joy. 
Emma Ella married \V. L. Skeel and lives at Sandwich, Illinois. The other 
children, Isaac. Willetta and Edna, died in infancy. The mother of these 
children passed away May 12, 1870, at the age of thirty-six years, a Presby- 
terian. December 17, 1874, ^Ii'- Peterson married Miss Elizabeth M. Mc- 
Clung. a daughter of William McClung. There are no children by this mar- 
riage. Mrs. Peterson is a member of the Congregational church. 

Politically J\Ir. Peterson is a Democrat, as was his father before him. 
V/hile in Putnam county he served four years as the supervisor of Henne- 
pin township, and has always taken an intelligent and commendal)le interest 
in public aft'airs. 



WILLIAM OSMAN. 



William Osman is probably the oldest representative of newspaper in- 
terests in Illinois, having been connected with the Free Trader at Ottawa 
for more than half a century. He was born near Gratz, Dauphin county, 
Pennsylvania, on the 19th of June, 1819, and is a son of Robert and Cath- 
erine (Schreiber) Osman, the former of English and the latter of German 
lineage. The father was the owner of a farm of three hundred and sixty 
acres in Pennsylvania, one hundred acres of the place being mountain land. 
Between the ages of seven and thirteen years our subject attended school 
through the short winter seasons, his privileges being thus afforded in pri- 
vate schools of the neighborhood. He learned to read and write and also 
completed Pike's arithmetic, but the greater part of his education has been 
obtained through reading and study outside of the school-room. At the age 
of thirteen he entered the office of the Morgenroethe. a German newspaper 
established by Jacob Baab at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He served a six- 



684 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

years apprenticeship to the printer's trade and afterward pursued his studies 
for a short period in Gettysburg College, but on account of his limited means 
was forced to abandon his text-books. In the fall of 1839 he went to Phila- 
delphia, where he was employed as a compositor in the establishment of 
L. Johnson & Company, stereotypers, with whom he remained until the 
spring of 1840. 

Subsequently he worked as a journeyman in Harrisburg and in Jul}% 
1840, started westward, traveling by way of Philadelphia, New York, Albany, 
by railroad to Syracuse, thence by the Erie canal to Buffalo and by the 
great lakes to Chicago, where he took a stage for Ottawa, arriving on the 
1st of August, 1840. Pie began working for Weaver & Hise, proprietors 
of the Ottawa Free Trader, doing various kinds of work in the office, includ- 
ing the writing of editorials. He \x^s an employe of that firm until 1842, 
when he ])urchased the interest of George F. Weaver, thus entering into 
partnershi]) with Mr. Hise, under the firm name of Hise & Osman. That 
connection was continued until 1848, when Moses Osman, a brother of 
our subject, purchased the interest of Mr. Hise. The partnership between 
the brothers continued until 1856, when our subject became sole proprietor, 
conducting the business alone until 1867, when he entered into partnership 
with Douglas Hapeman, a relationship that was maintained until 1888, when 
Mr. Hapeman retired and Mr. Osman admitted his sons to an interest in 
the business. One of them, William H. Osman, is still connected with his 
father. During the greater part of his time for fifty-eight years Mr. Osman 
has written the majority of the editorials for the Free Trader and has made 
the paper one of the leading journals in his section of the state. It has 
always been a pronounced Democratic paper, stanchly advocating the prin- 
ciples of the party during the greater part of the time, save only in 1896, 
when it advocated the gold standard in opposition to the Chicago platform 
on free silver. 

During the Mexican war Mr. Osman served from May, 1846, until 
Jul}-, 1847, as a volunteer in Company L, First Regiment of Illinois In- 
fantry, under the command of Captain T. Lyle Dickey and afterward under 
the command of Captain B. M. Prentiss. He entered the service as a pri- 
vate but arose to the rank of quartermaster sergeant of his regiment. The 
only battle the regiment was engaged in and in which Mr. Osman of course 
took part, was the battle of Buena Vista. February 23, 1847, in which General 
Zacharv Tavlor. with four thousand five hundred men, so sigfuallv defeated 
the Mexican army of twenty thousand men under Santa Ana. 

Mr. Osman has served for two terms as the postmaster of Ottawa, fill- 
ing the position from 1856 until i860, and again from 1887 until 1891. He 
served during two sessions, 1853-4 and 1856-7, as an engrossing clerk of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 685 

the house of representatives in the llHnois legislature, and in 1854 was for 
some six months a clerk in the interior department at Washington; l)ut 
other than this he has held no public office excepting some very minor 
ones. 

On the 28th of November. 1848, Mr. Osman was united in marriage to 
]\liss Mary Hise, a sister of his former partner, John Hise, of Ottawa. Four 
children, two sons and two daughters, were born to them, but their first 
child, a daughter, died at the age of two years. The others are still living. 
One son is now assistant editor of the American Miller at Chicago, and 
the other son is associated with his father in business. Socially Mr. Osman 
has been connected with the Masonic fraternity, but has never taken a 
very acti\e part in its work. For fifty-nine years he has been the editor of 
the Free Trader, and his long connection with the paper makes him the 
pioneer in journalistic work in this state. At all times he has labored to 
advance the interests of the conmiunity which he represents, and Ottawa 
has found in him a progressive and valued citizen who enjoys the high 
regard of her leading people. 



JAMES BANE. 

A native of Marshall county, ^^'est Virginia, born Deceml)er 30, 1840. 
James Bane is a son of Nimrod and Leanna (Bowers) Bane, who were 
among the pioneers of Illinois, settling in ^Marshall county in 1850. The 
father was a son of Jesse Bane, a farmer, who was born in Pennsylvania, 
of English descent. He participated in the war of 18 12 and instilled the 
same principles of patriotism that animated him into the minds of his several 
children. He passed the later years of his life in West Virginia, his death oc- 
curring when he was about sixty-five }'ears of age. The maternal grandfather 
of our subject, Henry Bowers, likewise was a native of the Keystone state, 
and was of German extraction. He. too. followed agricultural pursuits, and 
reared a large number of children. He was about three score and ten years 
of age when claimed by death, in 1845. 

Ninn-od Bane, who is still li\-iug. is a nati\e of Greene county, Pennsyl- 
vania, as was also his wife. They were the parents of nine children, eight 
of whom were sons. Fi\'e of the number are ]i\-ing at this writing, namely: 
Henry, of Greenwood county, Kansas; James; Ephraim. of Reno county, 
Kansas; Jacob, of Springfield. Blinois; and Joseph, of Morris county. Kansas. ' 
As previously stated, the father removed to this state almost half a century 
ago, and locating upon a farm of eightv acres in ^Marshall county he pro- 
ceeded to improve and cultivate the place, which he transformed into a 



686 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

very desirable homestead. For a number of years they dwelt in the vicinity 
of Robert's Point, where the children received excellent educational advant- 
ages. The devoted wife and mother was summoned to the better land in 
1876, when she was in her sixty-second year. She adhered to the religious 
faith of her ancestors, being a Lutheran. Of late years the father has made 
his home with his children. He is a Republican, and has ever taken an 
active part in the affairs of his own locality. 

James Bane, whose name heads this sketch, has resided in Illinois since 
he was about ten years old, and in 1856 he became a citizen of LaSalle 
countv. Here he worked for farmers for several years, or until the civil war 
was well under wa}-, when he offered his services in the defense of the stars 
and stripes. Becoming a member of Company H, One hundred and Fourth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, he continued at the post of duty to which he 
was assigned until there was no longer need of his aid, the war having 
ended. He took part in many of the leading and decisive battles of the 
war, among them being Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Alission Ridge 
and Hartsville, Tennessee. He then went with Sherman on the world- 
famed march to the sea, and participated in important campaigns in Georgia, 
North and South Carolina, and finally went to Richmond and thence to 
Washington. He was captured at Hartsville, but was soon exchanged, and 
a second time, at Walden's Ridge, Tennessee, fell into the hands of the 
Confederates — General Joe \\ heeler and his forces. At last he was paroled, 
and in his possession to-day is the parole which was signed by the adjutant- 
general of the officer just mentioned. After having served three years, 
lacking two months, he was mustered out of the L^nion army, in June, 1865, 
and returned home. 

Alaking a permanent settlement in LaSalle county, Air. Bane bought 
a farm of eight}" acres in Groveland township, and six years later sold that 
place. He then leased farms for six years, after which he bought his present 
homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, two and three-quarters miles 
northeast of Dana, in Groveland township. As long ago as 1856 he l:)roke 
prairie on this farm, and at that time there were but a few houses in the 
township. He is practically a self-made man, as he began earning his own 
livelihood when he was very young, and h.as had to rely solely upon him- 
self. He attended the old style subscription schools to a limited extent, 
in liis boyhood, and is in the main self-educated. Fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of Long Point Lodge, Xo. 552, A. F. & A. ]\I.; a non-af^liated mem- 
ber of Rutland Chapter, Xo. 112, R. A. M.. and Rutland Council. Xo. 52; 
and l^elongs to the Grand Army of the Republic, his membership being 
with Rutland Post X^o. 292. For three years he acted in the capacity of 
high priest of Rutland chapter "and for a like period he was master of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 687 

the Rutland blue lodge. In his political creed he is an ardent Republican. 
The marriage of Mr. Bane and Miss Eliza Jane White was solemnized 
February 6. 1867. She is a daughter of John and Mary Ann (W'hetzel) 
White. Eleven children were born to ]Mr. and ]\Irs. Bane, nine of the num- 
ber being sons. Austin H., now of Livingston county. Illinois, married 
Annie Dunbar, and has three children. Stella, Oakley and Alta. Anna Lee 
married Silas Blakely and has one son, James. They are residents of Jasper 
county, Iowa. Arthur J. wedded Cora Bailey, and dwells at Long Point, 
Illinois. William Or\'ille died at the age of five years and five months. 
Charles C. at present is in the employ of a farmer of this locality, and all 
of the younger children are at home, and comprise Herbert C, Gilbert S., 
Emily H., Edward S., Robert LeRoy and DeWitt Clinton. ^Ir. and ^Irs. 
Bane, both of whom are members of the Methodist church, have conscien- 
tiously performed their duty toward their children, church and community, 
and are eminently deserving of the genuine esteem in which they are held 
bv evervone. 



THOMAS MARSHALL. 



Thomas Marshall, a prosperous farmer of Groveland township, LaSalle 
county, has been the architect of his own fortunes, and from a humlDle be- 
ginning has steadily advanced to\\ard an influential position in the com- 
munity where his lot is cast. 

He is a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Moats) ^Marshall, and was born 
in Ohio county, Mrginia, November 10, 1826. His father was born on 
the Atlantic ocean, while his parents were on their way to America, from 
their old home in Ireland. Mrs. Elizabeth ]\Iarshall was a native of ]\Iary- 
land, and was married in that state. Her father, \\'illiam Moats, was a pros- 
perous farmer of the same state, where he passed his entire life, and reared 
a large number of children to be useful citizens. After their arrival in this 
country, the parents of Robert ]^Iarshall located upon a farm in ^Maryland, 
and there he grew to manhood and learned the trade of a weaver. Later, 
he removed to the vicinity of \Mieeling, Wtst Virginia, and resided upon a 
farm there until death released him from his labors. He was then about 
seventy-five years of age. His wife survived him many years, and had at- 
tained the extreme age of ninety-eight years at the time of her death. They 
were adherents of the Baptist creed. l)ut were not identified with any church 
in West Virginia. ]Mr. Marshall was a highly respected citizen of his com- 
munity, and. true to his patriotic principles, he enlisted in the defense of his 
country in the war of 181 2, though he was not called upon to participate 
in any battle. Of his fourteen children only five are now living, namelv: 



688 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALQGICAL RECORD. 

Jacob, of Stillwater. Oklahoma; William, of \\'ood comity. \\'est Virginia; 
Susanna, widow of James Pritchett. of Dana, Illinois; Thomas, of this 
sketch; and ]\Irs. Elizabeth W. ]\I. Croft, of Streator, this county. 

Thomas Marshall, whose home is on section 35, Groveland township, 
was born in Ohio county, ^^'est A'irginia. November 10. 1826. He was 
reared to the pursuits of an agriculturist, and received his education in 
the district schools. For a number of years he ]i\'ed in ^\'ood county. West 
Virginia, and it was not until 1864 that he came to Illinois. His father 
gave to him, as he did to each of his boys, a tract of one hundred and fifty 
acres of timber land. After clearing twenty acres of this property, Thomas 
Marshall sold the farm for one thousand dollars, and it was soon after this 
event that he became a resident of Livingston county. Illinois. 

On the 19th of August. 1855, ^Nlr. [Marshall married Bessie, daughter 
of William Henry and Susan (Geddy) Curgenven. all natives of England. 
The father died in that country, at the age of twenty-two years, when ]\Irs. 
^.larshall v^as seven months old. and his widow married again, and accom- 
panied her second husband to America. They took up their abode in \\'ood 
county, \\'est Mrginia, where he died at the age of sixty years. His widow 
survived him, dying near the town of Rutland, Illinois, in 1874. when she 
was sixty-two years of age. She was a Baptist in her religious faith, and 
was a lady of exemplary life and amiable character. The maternal grand- 
father of Mrs. Alarshall was the Rev. Nicholas Geddy. a minister in the 
]Methodist denomination, and her uncle, Nicholas Geddy. Jr., was a success- 
ful legal practitioner and solicitor in London, his address being the Mansion 
House. Mrs. ^larshall was a child of six years, when she came to the 
United States, and her early years were spent in Wood county. West Mr- 
ginia. 

Nine children Ijlessed the union of our subject and wife, six of the num- 
ber being sons. The eldest. William Henry, of Dana, married Annie Evans, 
and has six living children. Cliarles, Grace, Jenkins, Harry. Oscar and Ray. 
Nicholas Geddy. the next son. living three miles from Dana, chose Lizzie 
Huckins for his wife, and has five children, namely: Charlotte, George, 
Lucy, Ethel and Ralph. Milton Thomas died when fourteen years of age. 
Wesley, whose home is near Rutland, Illinois, wedded Mary Cunningham, 
and their only child is called Bessie. Susan Mctoria died when two and 
a half years old. Harriet ]\Iay. who became the wife of Loren Burton, 
of Scotia, Nebraska, is the mother of five children: Bessie, Jennie. Grace, 
John Thomas and Robert Ray. James Franklin wedded Emma Marshall, 
a second cousin, and their pleasant home near Dana is graced by the pres- 
ence of their two sons. Roscoe and Russell. Bessie Rose, also living near 
Dana, is the wife of John Luther Boyd, and their three children are named 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 689 

respectively Bessie, Eva and Clark. Robert, the youngest child of our sub- 
ject, is at home and assists in the management of the farm. 

When Mr. Marshall came to Illinois with his wife and four children, 
thirty-five years ago, he purchased forty acres of land in Livingston county, 
east of Dana, and during this long period he has dwelt in the neighbor- 
hood of the town and been closely associated with the development of this 
section of the state. In the course of time, after making substantial im- 
provements upon his original farm, he invested in two additional tracts of 
forty acres each. This property he later sold and in its stead bought one 
hundred and thirty acres of land situated southwest of Dana, across the line, 
in LaSalle county. Here he has continued to reside until the present time — 
some twenty-three years. He is a stanch Republican, but has never sought 
nor desired public office. Mrs. Marshall, who has been a true helpmate, 
a loving wife and mother, is a member of the Methodist church, and is held 
in the same high regard by every one, as is also her husband. 



WILLIAM G. WILSON. 



William Grundy Wilson, one of the respected citizens of Lostant, 
Illinois, is a native of this state and dates his birth in Putnam county. May 
31, 1846. 

Mr. Wilson is a son of Garrison and Ann (Dugan) A\'ilson. natives of 
Kentucky and Pennsylvania, respectively. In their family were nine chil- 
dren, five sons and four daughters, and of this number seven are now living: 
Elizabeth D., wife of D. C. Hull, of Canton, South Dakota; Matilda A., wife 
of H. L. Hammitt, also of Canton; William G., of Lostant, Illinois; Mary 
A., widow of Daniel Kemp, of Streator, Illinois; Thomas M.. of Chicago; 
Robert T., of Granville, Illinois; and Edward H., of Lostant. Garrison 
Wilson, the father, was a farmer. He came to Illinois in 1829 and located 
in Putnam county, being a boy at that time and accompanying his parents 
hither. Their settlement was in Magnolia township. There he grew to 
manhood and married and reared his family, and there also the evening of 
his life was passed. He died at the age of seventy-two years. His widow 
still survives and lives in Lostant with her sons. She is a Presbyterian, while 
he was a Methodist. In politics he was in early life a Whig and later a 
Republican. He was a soldier in the Black Hawk war, serving under Cap- 
tain Hawes. 

The Wilsons are of Scotch origin. Thornton Wilson, the grandfather 
of the subject of this sketch, came from Kentucky to Illinois in 1829, and 



690 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

as already recorded made a settlement in Putnam county. His life was 
spent in agricultural pursuits, and he lived to a venerable age. In his 
family were five sons and two daughters. He is buried at Princeton, Illinois. 
The maternal grandfather of our subject was Robert Dugan, a native of 
Ireland, who came to America and settled in Pennsylvania; later moved to 
Ohio, and about 1833 came to Putnam county, Illinois, and settled on a 
farm. He was nearly eighty years old at the time of his death. His family 
comprised six members, three sons and three daughters. 

William G. Wilson was reared on his father's farm in Magnolia town- 
ship, Putnam county, and that was his home for forty-four years, he having 
traveled considerably, however, in the meantime. In 1893 he moved to 
Lostant, LaSalle county, and he and his brother Edward H. and their 
mother live together in Lostant. He owns eighty acres of improved land 
in Putnam county, and his mother owns one hundred and ninety-five acres. 

Mr. Wilson is a member of ^Magnolia Lodge, No. 103, F. & A. M. 
Politically he is a Democrat. 



AARON GUNN. 



Aaron Gunn, deceased, was a native of Montague, Massachusetts, 
having been born at that place April 4, 1806. He came to LaSalle, Illinois, 
in the early days and made his home, about the year 1838, at No. 1174 
Creve Coeur street, wdiere he lived until his death, March 12, 1897. From 
1870 he enjoyed the distinction of being the earliest settler residing in 
LaSalle. He was a man good and true whose personality was strongly 
felt in the community and whose presence was a magnetic influence for 
good. He died in the ripeness of age, with the consciousness of a life 
well spent and much good accomplished, but his death cast a gloom over 
the city and surrounding country that will not soon be dissipated. The 
words of wisdom and guidance that fell from his lips have led many to 
choose the "straight and narrow way" in their w^alk through life, and his 
counsel and help in times of trouble are remembered by scores of others, 
who think of him with grateful hearts. 

Aaron Gunn was of Scotch descent, and the name is still prominent in 
certain parts of the Scottish Highlands, where it is frequently found. It is 
thought the family in this country sprung from Jasper Gunn, a physician 
who came to America in 1635, from county Kerry, in the ship Defence. 
One of his descendants, Nathaniel Gunn, was one of the original proprietors 
of the town of Montague. Elihu Gunn, Aaron Gunn's father, was one of 



* iliBSm ''^Si^ -^ 





BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 691 

€ight brothers; one died at the age of sixty-five years; the others all lived 
to be over seventy; one reached his one hundred and second year, another 
was ninety-eight, while the father of our subject was eighty-eight at the time 
of death. 

Young Aaron worked on his father's farm until he was about twenty- 
four, when he determined to see something of the great west, and in the 
fall of 1830 made a trip to central Michigan. He was so well pleased with 
the prospect of that country that he returned to his father's in order to make 
arrangements to remove permanently to the west. In the spring of 183 1 
he joined a company who styled themselves the "Hampshire Colony," and 
who left Albany, New York, by way of the Erie canal, on May 7, 1831, and 
arrived at Buffalo ten days later. There, much to their disappointment, 
they learned that the boats did not go to Chicago (then Fort Dearborn), 
and they were compelled to be content with a passage to Detroit. When 
they reached that point they made arrangements with a schooner to take 
their goods later, and then hired teams to convey them overland to Lake 
Michigan. Among the company were eight young men who were unmar- 
ried and whose baggage consisted only of their trunks. These, in the order 
of their ages, were John Leonard, John P. Blake, Aaron Gunn, Amos C. 
Washburn, Christopher C. Corse, George Hinsdel, E. Hinsdel Phelps and 
Charles C. Phelps. When the party reached Mottville seven of these young 
men bought two "dug-outs'' of the Lidians, lashed them firmly together, 
side by side, launched them, loaded in their trunks, and paddled down the 
St. Joseph river until they reached its mouth. Going to the site now occu- 
pied by the city of South Bend, where a French-Indian trading post was 
then kept by a man named Coquillard (pronounced Cut-te-aw), they hired 
a man and ox team to haul themselves and luggage six or eight miles across 
the country to the Kankakee river, which they reached at sundown on the 
first of June, 1831. Their boats were once more launched and they paddled 
down the Kankakee and Illinois rivers to Illinois Town, now LaSalle, 
reaching it on the 9th of June, 1831, and landing at a point just below the 
mouth of the Big Vermilion. Here was an Indian trading post kept by one 
Crozier, father of the late Amaza Crozier, of Utica, Illinois. This place was 
called Shippingport, and the same man had charge of the post-office, the first 
in LaSalle county. The white population at that time consisted of three 
men and one woman at LaSalle. At this time the Indians were showing 
their treacherous disposition and hostile feelings toward the white men, 
and many a narrow escape from their treachery were experienced by these 
pioneers. 

The Black Hawk war occurred the year following the arrival of the 
Hampshire colony, and in this war Aaron Gunn served in the militia under 



692 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Colonel Strawn, being mustered out after twenty-nine days' service. This 
war scattered the Hampshire colony to various parts of the country, and 
'Mv. Gunn sold his claim, located at La Moille, to Moses A. Bowen, father 
of Colonel Bowen. of Mendota. He then entered a claim in Putnam county, 
not far from the Quakers' yearly-meeting house. This claim he sold later, 
to Joseph Hoyle, the first Quaker settler in the Clear creek neighborhood. 
In 1835 ^16 entered the west half of section 10, in the town of LaSalle, which 
he made his home, and upon which he resided for almost fifty-nine years. 
He was industrious and painstaking in his work and converted his land 
into most desirable farm property. 

In 1833, while attending religious services conducted by a Cumberland 
Presbyterian preacher named Mitchell, he was led to accept divine guidance 
in his daily life, and this conversion brought about a radical change in his 
whole character. From that hour it became his great object to pattern his 
life after that of the Savior and to aid in the uplifting and betterment of 
humanity. His zeal in the cause of religion would allow of no lukewarm 
measures, and he felt that he must take an active part in the cause that lay 
so near his heart. At that time there were no churches in that section 
of the country, services being held by traveling preachers who occasionally 
visited that region. He was a Baptist in belief, but as no organization of 
that faith had as yet been started he united with the Methodists, believing 
the Lord would understand and appreciate the work, whether it was carried 
forward under the banner of one denomination or another. It was not an 
easy matter at that time to find men who were able to preach the gospel, 
and the Methodists readily received him as one of their most earnest work- 
ers. They were not slow in recognizing his ability, and he held a prominent 
place in their meetings for several years, preaching at various points in 
his section of the state, and by his example and teaching influencing many 
to leave their burdens at the Cross and seek the better way. He had charge 
of the circuit one year, covering the territory east to Morris, north to 
Dixon, and back to the Hennepin neighborhood. He was the first 
Protestant minister to settle in LaSalle, and was one of the founders of 
the first Protestant church organized there. This was the Baptist church, 
which was organized about 1839. He had been actively associated with the 
Presbyterians in Peru for some time previous to this. He always spoke of 
the many pleasant associations connected with his Methodist ministry, and 
the remembrance of them always afforded him the keenest pleasure. When 
the Methodists organized in LaSalle, in 1851, he was greatly interested in 
the movement and assisted them by giving their first minister a home in 
his own household, without charge, for the seven months of his pastorate. 
After reaching the age of fifty years he seldom made public addresses, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 693 

although his interest in the moral growth and development of those around 
him was in no measure abated. He was a man of singular purity of heart 
and simplicity of manner, and it has been impossible to find in his life 
anything of personal reproach or weakness; strong and dignified, he won 
the sympathy and friendship of all with whom he came in contact, and his 
career is a matter which reflects credit to his adopted city. He was gener- 
ous and extended his charities alike to all deserving objects, regardless of 
their nationality or beliefs; it was only necessary that he should know the 
help was needed to insure its speedy arrival. His strong personality was so 
impressed on the community that it will be felt for many years to come, and 
it is but natural that his death should be regarded as a public calamity, 
although he had nearly rounded out the century of life before he heard the 
call, "Well done, thou good and faithful servant, enter thou into the joy of 
thy Lord." 

May 14, 1837, Aaron Gunn was married to Miss Nancy Winters, a 
daughter of Obadiah and Elizabeth (Prillaman) Winters, and a grand- 
daughter of Moses Winters and Jacob Prillaman. Moses Winters was a 
native of New York and reached the extreme age of ninety-four years. 
Jacob Prillaman was of German descent and died in advanced years. Oba- 
diah Winters was a native of New York, but when a young lad went to 
Virginia, where he grew to manhood and married Elizabeth Prillaman, 
who was born in Richmond, that state. Mrs. Gunn was born in ■Miami 
county, Ohio, July 31, 1806, and is now in her ninety-fourth year. Seven 
children were born to herself and husband, namely: Jennett, wife of George 

A. Elliott, of LaSalle; Moses W., also of this city; Lucy, wife of Heman 

B. Chapman, of LaSalle; Lydia C., deceased; Elizabeth Sarah, wife of 
F. L. Ayers, of Augusta, Kansas; Aaron Elihu, deceased; and Esther 
Belle, wife of T. A. Williams, of Tallahassee, Florida. They also reared a 
pair of twins, Clarence and Clara Bradley, the latter being the wife of 
Harry Turner, a contractor and builder of this place. They celebrated 
their golden wedding anniversary in 1887, and at the time of Mr. Gunn's 
death had been married nearly sixty years. Mrs. Gunn was of the same 
religious views as her husband, and both were ardent abolitionists, and she 
is now also a firm believer in the principles of prohibition. She is a woman 
of strong Christian character and has an abiding trust and faith in her 
heavenly Father, a faith that is shared alike by her children and grand- 
children. 

Mr. Gunn was a Whig, but later became an adherent of the Republican 
party, although he was never a politician. The emoluments of a petty- 
office holder offered no inducements to him. His depth and breadth of 
character made him a safe standard to follow, while his ready sympathy and 



694 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

simple eloquence caused him to be in frequent demand when death had 
claimed his own and the loved one was to be laid away; then did his voice 
offer comfort to the bereaved while his words led their thoughts to that 
better land and prepared them to so live as to be ready for the final sum- 
mons. The portrait of Mr. Gunn given in connection with this brief 
mention of his career, is from a photograph taken of him in his eighty-third 
year. 



ALVA WINANS. 



The subject of this sketch is a retired farmer and one of the highly 
respected citizens of Dana, Illinois, and as such his life history is of interest 
in this work, and is as follows: 

Alva Winans was born on the Hudson river, in the towai of German- 
town, Columbia county, New York, December 28, 1826. His parents, Alva 
and Eva (Hover) Winans, were natives respectively of Canaan, Massachu- 
setts, and Columbia county. New York, and in their family were nine children 
who lived to be grown, five of whom are now living: Orrin, Alva, Robert 
Bruce, Lavina (the widow of Lyman Utter, of Lewiston, Idaho), and Mary 
(the widow of John L. Boyd, of Groveland township, LaSalle county, Illi- 
nois). Their father, a farmer, about 1855 came out to Illinois and located 
on a farm in Groveland township, LaSalle county, where he bought a farm 
of eighty acres. He died here in 1871, past the age of seventy-three 
years. His wdfe was about seventy-two at the time of her death, Avhich 
occurred three years after his. Both were members of the Advent Church. 
During the war of 181 2 he enlisted in the service of his country and went 
down to New York city to enter upon active duty, but the war closed shortly 
afterward and he never participated in any engagements. He filled various 
township ofiices. 

The subject of our sketch has in his veins a mixture of Danish and 
German blood, the former coming through his paternal ancestors and the 
latter through his maternal. Grandfather Lewis Winans was a native of 
Canaan, Massachusetts, and was by occupation a farmer. He died in New 
York state, over seventy years of age. His family comprised four sons and 
two daughters. The maternal grandfather of Mr. Winans, Andrew Hover, 
was a native of New York, and although a farmer by occupation was a 
man of considerable education and Avas well versed in law. Being of German 
descent and a German scholar, he was frequently called upon by his German 
neighbors to draw up papers of various kinds for them. He was drowned 
in the Hudson river, when over seventy years of age. He was in a row 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 695 

boat with two other men and three women, when they were run into by 
an old scow, and all the lives in the row boat \vere lost. Mr. Hover was the 
father of fourteen children. 

Alva Winans was reared to farm life in Columbia and Monroe counties. 
New York, and also for a time lived in Greene county, that state. He spent 
three years on the river and Atlantic ocean; ran from New York to Phila- 
delphia on the steamer Kennebeck, and was one year on the steamer Roan- 
oke. Then he spent another year as a farmer in New York, and in 1853 came 
west to Illinois. Buying a yoke of cattle, he began breaking prairie in 
Marshall county, having bought eighty acres of land in La Prairie township, 
this state. This land he sold not long afterward, and in 1856 he came to 
LaSalle county and bought one hundred and fifty-seven acres in the north- 
west quarter of section 2, Groveland township, which he improved from 
raw prairie and which he still owns, it now being operated by his youngest 
son. Mr. Winans resided upon his farm until March, 1898, when he re- 
tired from the active duties of life and has since been living quietly in a 
pleasant home in Dana. 

He was married January i, 1853, to Miss Delia Sickles, a daughter of 
Christopher and Julia (Jenks) Sickles, natives of New York state. She is 
one of a family of six children, four of whom are now living, the other three 
being Emeline, the wife of John Phillips, of La Prairie township, Marshall 
county, Illinois; Edward, of Chillicothe, Illinois; and Julia, the wife of Porter 
La Zelle. Mrs. Winans' maternal grandfather was Thomas Jenks. He was 
a native of New York, was a farmer by occupation, and lived to a ripe old age. 
He was the father of tw-elve children, of whom ]\lrs. Winans' mother was the 
eldest. Mrs. Winans came with her parents to Illinois in 1850, the family 
settling in Marshall county, where she was reared. Her father died in 
Chillicothe, Illinois, October 10, 1889, on his eighty-fifth birthday. Her 
mother died in February, 1887, at the age of eighty-two years. They were 
members of the Baptist church. 

Mr. and Mrs. Winans have had twelve children, six sons and six daugh- 
ters, three of wdiom died in infancy. The following is a brief record of the 
other members of the family: Daniel married Mary White, lives in Grove- 
land township, LaSalle county, and has three children — Cassie, Dio and 
Belle; Ira, unmarried, is the proprietor of a livery stable in Dana; Ellsworth 
married Ida Cox and lives on a farm in Groveland township; Eva, wife of 
James Hayter, of Newton, Jasper county, Iowa, has two children — Lulu 
and Beryl; Julia, wife of Richard White, of Pocahontas county, Iowa, has 
eight children — Ernest, Chloe, Ethel, Pearl, Harvey, and Leo, Lila and Lela 
(triplets); Belle, a resident of Newton, Iowa, has been twice married, by her 
first husband, George Griffin, having two children. Amy and Alva, her pres- 



696 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

ent husband being William J. Crawford; Ida, the wife of James Justice, of 
Newton, Iowa, has two children — Guy and Bernice; Ella, the wife of Allen 
Martin, of Dana, has six children — Edna, Alva, John, William, Agnes and 
Doris; and Bernice, the wife of William ]^Iathis. of Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia. 

Politically ]\Ir. A\'inans is a Democrat. He has filled some local offices, 
such as roadmaster and school trustee. 



JAMES S. FOOTE. 

Owning and occupying one of the fine farms of LaSalle county, located 
on section 11. Hope township, is found the subject of this sketch, James S. 
Foote, one of the substantial and highly respected farmers of the county. 
For a period of fifty years Mr. Foote has been identified with LaSalle county, 
and as one of its representative citizens it is fitting therefore that some per- 
sonal mention should be made of him in this work. 

James S. Foote was born in the town of ]\Iilton. Saratoga county, Xew 
York, May 6, 1833, and is a son of Daniel A. and ]\Iary D. (Prior) Foote, 
natives of Connecticut, and Massachusetts respectively. He is one of six 
children — four sons and two daughters, three of whom are now living, the 
other two being Caroline P., the widow of Elijah Dimmick, of Dimmick 
Station, Illinois; and Dauphin K., of Downer's Grove, Illinois. Daniel A., 
the father, was boss carpenter and farmer, owning two or three farms in 
Saratoga county, New York. He died in that state in July, 1849, ^t the 
age of sixty-six years. His widow survived him some years and came out 
west to Illinois, with her son James S. She died in Tonica. Illinois, about 
1 86 1, at the age of sixty-eight years. Both parents were members of the 
Presbyterian church. 

On both the maternal and paternal side ]\Ir. Foote is of English descent. 
His grandfather, David Foote, of ^^'ashington. Connecticut, married Esther 
Averill, of Preston, that state, and was a lieutenant colonel in the army of 
the Revolution, engaging in the battles of Stillwater, New York and Dan- 
bury, Connecticut. He died June 13. 1806. The maternal grandfather of 
our subject, John Prior, was a soldier in the war of 1812, serving also as 
a lieutenant colonel. Both these men were farmers in their vocation, and 
reared large families of children. Nathaniel Foote, the original ancestor 
of the Foote family in America, landed in this coimtry as a passenger from 
the famous ]\Iayflower. 

James S. Foote spent the first sixteen years of his life in Saratoga 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 697 

county, New York, his days being" passed not unlike those of other farmer 
boys, assisting in the farm work in summer and in winter attending the dis- 
trict school. Farming has been his life occupation. In September, 1849,. 
he came to Illinois and located in Eden township, LaSalle county. Here 
for two years he was a wage worker, employed by the month. At the end 
of that time he purchased a team and began farming operations of his own. 
Buying one hundred and eight acres, on time, at the rate of thirty dollars 
an acre, he built a small house and gave his diligent efforts to the improve- 
ment of his property. This farm he subsequently sold and then bought 
eighty acres in Hope township, which he improved and which he still 
ow'us. Also, he has from time to time invested in other land and at this 
writing has four other farms, containing respectively eighty, fifty-eight, one 
hundred and twenty-nine and one hundred and forty acres, the last named 
tract being south of Lostant. 

Mr. Foote is a man of a family. Mrs. Foote, formerly ^kliss Caroline 
A. Crandall, is a daughter of Otis and Eliza (Lake) Crandall. ]\Ir. and 
Mrs. Foote have four children, namely: Edward J., Hettie E., Emma M. 
and Fred L. Edward J. married Miss Luella Bailey, lives south of Lostant^ 
and has four children. Jay, Celia, Elmer and Ralph. Emma ]M. married 
Clarence Oug, of Eden township, LaSalle county, and they have three 
children, Ralph, Fred and Harry. Hettie E. and Fred L. are at home. Mrs. 
Foote is a member of the Baptist church. 

Politically Mr. Foote is a Republican and has served a number of years 
in local offices. He was a school director many years, nine years was road 
commissioner, and is now serving his fourth term as a justice of the peace. 
Fraternally he is identified with the A. O. U. W. 



JEFFERSON W. LEININGER. 

The well known and much esteemed citizen whose name heads this 
sketch and who is a retired farmer of Tonica, Illinois, has been a resident 
of LaSalle county for a period of forty-two years, and has maintained his 
home in Tonica since the spring- of 1884. A sketch of his life is of interest 
in this connection, and briefly is as follows: 

Jefferson W. Leininger was born in Stark county, Ohio, August 4,. 
1837, the son of pioneers of the Western Reserve. His parents, Jacob and 
Elizabeth (Slusser) Leininger, were natives of Pennsylvania. In their family 
were eleven children, nine sons and two daughters, of which number three 
are now living: George, of Stark county, Ohio; Jefferson, whose name 



698 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

heads this review; and Henry, of Ford county, lUinois. The father was by 
occupation a farmer. He went from Pennsyh^ania to Ohio in 181 2 and 
settled in Stark county, where he Hved until 1857, when he came with his 
family to Illinois and located at Cedar Point, Eden township, LaSalle 
•county. At this last named place he was engaged in farming until the time 
of his death. His first purchase of land in Eden township was two hundred 
and twenty-four acres. Afterward he bought three hundred and twenty 
acres in the same township, three hundred and twenty acres in Mendota 
township and three hundred and twenty acres in Lee county. He made his 
home on the original farm he bought in Eden township until his death, 
which occurred in 1872, when he had attained the age of seventy-four years. 
He was a self-made man. In his youth he had no educational advantages, 
three days being the extent of his schooling. His widow ched in 1896, at the 
age of eighty-eight years. Both were Methodists. 

Of the grandparents of our subject, we record that his paternal grand- 
father was George Leininger, a native of Pennsylvania and a descendant 
of German ancestors. He died in Stark county, Ohio, over seventy years 
of age. In his family were four sons and four daughters. The maternal 
grandfather of Mr. Leininger was John Slusser, likewise a native of Penn- 
sylvania. He was one of twelve men who came with their families from 
Pennsylvania to Stark county, Ohio, in 1812, all making the western journey 
together. John Slusser passed the rest of his life and died in Stark county. 
He was the father of several children. 

JefTerson W. Leininger spent the first twenty years of his life in his 
native county, reared on his father's farm and educated in the district schools. 
Then in 1857 he accompanied his parents on their removal to Illinois, and 
he remained a member of the home circle until he was twenty-three. After 
liis marriage, which event occurred in 1861, his father gave him a little 
start in a piece of land, a part of an eighty-acre tract. To this the young 
man added by the purchase of an adjoining tract, making in all one hundred 
and sixty acres, which he improved and on which he made his home for 
thirty-two years. He still owns this farm. Also he owns one hundred and 
sixty acres in Dakota, and a like amount in Nebraska. He carried on 
farming operations, meeting with success in his undertakings, until he 
retired in ]\Iarch. 1884, and moved to Tonica. Here he has seventeen 
acres, on which he built a comfortable and attractive home, and where he 
and his good wife are living surrounded with all the comforts of life. 

Mr. Leininger was first married September 17, 1861, to Miss Harriet 
Rank, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Hull) Rank. She died in 1892, at 
the age of fifty-two years, leaving no children. His present wife, whose 
maiden name was Alcena Early, he wedded October i, 1896. She was Iwrn 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 699 

in Van Buren county, Iowa, and her parents, James C. and Susanna (Mc- 
Daniel) Early, were both natives of Indiana, and the parents of nine children, 
three of whom are deceased. The parents removed to Iowa at an early 
day, but later returned to Indiana and there Mrs. Leininger was reared; 
but in after years her parents returned to Iowa, she accompanying them. 
Her mother died in 1882, aged fifty-three, and her father, now seventy- 
eight, resides in Iowa with a daughter. Mrs. Leininger taught school seven 
years in Indiana, and then thirteen years in the graded schools of Iowa, 
teaching mostly in Farmington and West Branch, that state. She and Mr. 
Leininger were married near Bonaparte, Iowa. She has been a member of 
the Baptist church since the age of sixteen, her people being adherents to 
the faith of this church. Mr. Leininger is a member of the Methodist 
church, and in politics a Republican. 



GEORGE W. FORD. 



George AV. Ford, the son of the late pioneer Joseph F. Ford, was born 
in Freedom township, LaSalle county, Illinois, in 1848, his birthplace being 
the Swenson farm, five miles southwest of the village of Harding. He had 
the advantage of a common school education, and at the age of twenty years 
began life on his own account. For three vears he rented land of his 
brother Frank and afterward lived on rented farms in Waltham, Ophir and 
Freedom townships, renting of different parties, for about twenty years. His 
accumulations were slowly made and it was not until 1891 that he decided 
to purchase a farm. He then selected a tract of land a short distance east of 
the village of Prairie Center, which he has since owned and occupied. 

Joseph F. Ford, the father of George W., was born in the state of 
Maine; was a wheelwright by trade and helped to make the first water 
wheel used in Lowell, Massachusetts. Also he helped to build the first 
trucks that were used under the first cars on the Boston & Maine Railway. 
Having a brother in the w-est, he was induced to come to Illinois, and on his 
arrival here he settled on the farm above mentioned in Freedom township, 
LaSalle county, where he passed the rest of his life and died, his death occur- 
ring in 1867, at the age of sixty-three years. His wife, wdiose maiden name 
\vas Elizabeth- Whitcomb, bore him eleven children, and is now deceased. 
Their children in order of birth were as follows: Frank, who died in 1892; 
Emma, the wife of Milton Courtright, of Sheridan, Illinois; Josephine, the 
wife of Daniel Beckwith, of Ottawa. Illinois; Eugene O., a prominent farmer 
of Freedom, Illinois; George W.; j\Iary E., Eva and Nina — the last three 
of Ottawa. 



700 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

George W. Ford was married December 25, 1871, to Miss Sophia But- 
ler, daughter of the well known Captain Ed Butler, a soldier of the Mexican 
war, and a sister of the prominent and prosperous farmer, Benjamin J. 
Butler, of LaSalle county. The Butlers came from the state of Maine and 
settled in LaSalle county, Illinois, some years after the arrival of the Fords. 
Mr. and Mrs. George W. Ford have four children: Gordon C., Sarah, 
Nettie and Ben Jack. 

The Fords have affiliated with the Republican party, and while they 
have filled some of the town offices when called upon to do so they have 
not gone out of their way to become candidates for any office, preferring 
to remain private citizens and devote their energy to their own chosen, 
vocations. 



ALFRED L HARTSHORN. 

On the roll of LaSalle county's pioneers we find the name of this 
gentleman, who since an early period in the development of this section of 
the state has been a resident of the county and has borne an important part 
in the work of upbuilding and progress. Li mercantile circles and agri- 
cultural lines he has not only won individual success, ])ut has also advanced 
the general welfare, and at all times has commanded the respect and esteem 
of his fellowmen by reason of his upright and honorable life. Mr. Hartshorn' 
is a representative of one of the oldest American families, for his ancestry 
may be traced back to 1633, when a representative of the family came from 
England, taking up his abode in Connecticut. Oliver Hartshorn was a 
Revolutionary soldier and valiantly aided in the cause of American inde- 
pendence. He was born November i, 1760, and his wife, whose maiden 
name was Pettengill, was born May 2, 1759. They were farming people, 
who reared sons and daughters named Oliver, Royal, Ira, Asa, Mrs. Clarissa- 
Armstrong, Miranda, Sophronia, wife of John White, and Eliza. 

Of this family Ira Hartshorn was the father of our subject. He was 
born in Lisbon, New London county, Connecticut, June 3, 1793, and died in 
LaSalle county, Illinois. September 17, 1859. He served for a short time 
in the war of 18 12 in his native state, and was connected with business 
affairs there as a merchant and hotel proprietor, and in New York was 
the manager of a stage route. February 4, 1818, he was united in mar- 
riage to Joanna Burnham. a native of Lisbon, Connecticut, who was born 
July 30, 1796. They located in Cazenovia. Madison county. New York, but 
a year or so later removed to Lebanon, that state. In 1836 Mr. Hartshorn 
made a prospecting tour through the west, and in 1837 brought his family 




o^</. 




BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 701 

to Illinois. He was first a resident of Joliet, where he secured employment 
in a sawmill, but in 1837 he entered a claim of government land, which he 
afterward developed into a fine farm, making his home there for two dec- 
ades. That property is now owned by his son, Alfred. Mr. Hartshorn 
died September 17. 1859, at the age of sixty-six, from disease contracted 
that year while on a prospecting tour at Pike's Peak. His wife was a lady 
of strong character and many virtues. She remained on the old homestead 
until 1866, and afterward lived with her children until her death, which 

■occurred February 14, 1875. In his political views Mr. Hartshorn was a 
Democrat in early life, but after his removal to Illinois became a supporter 
of the Free-soil party. He was well known to the pion_eer settlers of 
LaSalle county and performed an im])ortant part in transforming its wild 
prairie land into a tract of rich fertility. Ira and Joanna (Burnham) Harts- 
horn became the parents of nine children: Joshua P., who was born 
December 10, 181 8, is now a resident of Cass county, Iowa; Erasmus Dar- 
win, born June 4, 182 1, resides in California; Alfred I. is the next in order 
of birth; Pliny, born August 26, 1825, is living in LaSalle; Calvert, born 
July 25, 1827, is a resident of Onarga, Illinois; Mary, born March i, 1830, 
is the widow of Eli Strawn and resides in Chicago; Lucy, who was born 
March 17, 1832, is the widow of A. M. Niles and lives in Ulysses, Nebraska; 
Lydia, born November 28, 1835, is the wife of R. V. Downing, of David 

•City, Nebraska; and Charles Bishop, born June 23, 1838, died at Shiloli, 
Tennessee, during the civil war, while serving as a member of the Fourth 
Illinois Cavalry. Of these children the youngest one was born in LaSalle 

-county, the others having been born in New York. 

Alfred Ira Hartshorn is a native of the Empire state, his birth having 
occurred in Lebanon, Madison county, on the 22d of May, 1823. He came 
with his father's family to LaSalle county in 1837, when fourteen years of 
age, and there are few residents of the county who have lived longer within 
its borders than he. His educational advantages were limited, but in 1840 
he spent about six months as a student in an advanced school in Princeton, 
IlHnois, paying his way by the expenditure of his savings from the proceeds 
of farm work, at which he was employed in 1838-9. In 1841 he and two 
brothers secured a claim of canal land, which was subsequently purchased at 
a sale of canal lands, and is still the property of him whose name introduces 
this review. By other acquisitions from time to time Mr. Hartshorn became 
the possessor of much property, principally farming land, the total aggre- 
gating one thousand and four acres. His old homestead embraces five hun- 
dred and sixty acres, all in one body. In 1854 he rented his farm and en- 
gaged in the coal trade, shipping the first car-load of coal that was sent on 
the Illinois Central Railroad from LaSalle, which fact is of interest from an 



702 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

historical point of view. He continued in that business successfully until 
i860, when he returned to his farm and devoted himself to agriculture and 
stock-raising. Progressive methods characterize the management of the 
place, and the neatness and thrift which pervades the home farm is an indica- 
tion of the careful supervision of the owner. 

Mr. Hartshorn had been three times married. On the ist of January, 

1849, 1^^ wedded Miss Teressa Culver, a native of New York, who died in 

1850, leaving one child, that died in infancy. On the loth of December, 
1856, he married Amelia A. Dean, a native of Kentucky and a daughter of 
Alfred Dean. She died in November, 1869, leaving three children, — George 
A., Frederick P. and Teressa, wife of Charles L. Diesterwey, of LaSalle. In 
1897 Mr. Hartshorn was again married, ]\Iiss Mary Watson becoming his 
wife, and they have one son, Asa. 

George A. Hartshorn, the eldest son, is numbered among the native 
residents of LaSalle county, his birth having occurred here in October, 1857. 
He acquired a high-school education in the town of LaSalle a,nd then pur- 
sued a commercial course in Bryant & Stratton's Business College, of Chi- 
cago. Since attaining his majority he has devoted his energies to the opera- 
tion of the Hartshorn homestead in Waltham township, and is one of the en- 
terprising and progressive agriculturists of the community. He was mar- 
ried July 5, 1885, to Miss Minnie Mitchell, daughter of William Mitchell, 
and they now have four interesting children, — Amelia, Ira, Floyd and Wal- 
ter. In his political views George Hartshorn is a stalwart Democrat, and 
has several times been honored with local positions of trust and responsibil- 
ity. The first township of^ce he held was that of school trustee, in which 
capacity he served for fifteen years. He has also filled the position of justice 
of the peace and town collector, and in the spring of 1896 he was elected to 
his present position, that of supervisor, to succeed the Hon. John Wylie. 
He is now acting as a member and chairman of the county asylum commit- 
tee on the board of supervisors, and exercises his official prerogative to sup- 
port all measures and movements which are calculated to benefit the entire 
community. He is known as a valued citizen and a progressive young busi- 
ness man, and in LaSalle county has many warm friends. 

In his political views Alfred I. Hartshorn has been a lifelong Democrat, 
loyal to his party and holding its traditions sacred; but from the financial 
principles of that branch of the party which advocates a free coinage of silver 
he is a dissenter. He has been one of the prominent gold Democrats of his 
part of the state, and in 1896 was a delegate to a convention at Chicago 
which led to the national convention at Indianapolis that nominated Hon. 
John M. Palmer for the presidency on the sound-money platform. Though 
he has always been actuated by motives purely patriotic and borne an active 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



70s 



part in public affairs, he has never sought pohtical preferment or accepted 
any political office. His ability as a man of affairs is of a high order and his 
advice has often been sought in matters involving very important interests.. 



RUSSELL E. STANFORD. 

Russell E. Stanford, who is well and favorably known throughout 
LaSalle county, is a worthy representative of two of the pioneer families of 
this county. His father, Emory Stanford, a native of New York state, 
located at Lowell in 1838, and constructed the old water-power mill at that 
point. In his early manhood he was engaged in contracting and building, 
but his later years were devoted to agriculture. About 1849 ^^^ purchased 
a farm situated four miles south of Lowell, and there he spent the remainder 
of his days, dying when in his seventy-second year. He was much honored 
and looked up to in his community, was the first supervisor of Vermillion 
township, at one time was the trustee of the school fund and a member of 
the local school board. Politically he was a stanch Republican, and prior 
to the civil war was a strong Abolitionist. His father, Jonathan Stanford,, 
was a native of Vermont and of English extraction. He supported the 
American cause, however, and served in the army for supremacy of the 
young republic on this continent. He removed to the state of New York,, 
where his death some years subsequently occurred, after he had reached 
the age of three-score years. 

The first wife of Emory Stanford was a Miss Emeline Cantine. and 
their only child, Susan, married Henry Loomis, now of Dakota county, 
Nebraska. The mother of the subject of this article was Mary, the daughter 
of Jacob Elliott, who came from one of the early colonial families of Massa- 
chusetts, in which state his own birth took place. He removed to the Empire 
state, and at an early period came to LaSalle county, in company with 
a man by the name of Seeley. They bought the w-ater-power mill at Lowell 
and were interested in various local industries here. Mr. Elliott died when 
in his prime, leaving several children. Mrs. Mary L. Stanford was born 
in New York state, and by her marriage to Emory Stanford she became- 
the mother of seven sons and a daughter, of whom but three survive, Russell 
E., Sarah M., wife of Justin Hall, of L'rbana, Illinois; and John Franklin, 
who resides near Chatsworth, this state. 

The birth of Russell E. Stanford took place in Lowell, LaSalle county, 
October 11, 1842, and from that time until February, 1898, he dwelt in 
Vermillion township, all but six or seven years of this period being spent 
on his father's old homestead. When he had arrived at man's estate, he 



704 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

rented a quarter-section of this property of his father, and the first land 
owned by him was the undivided half of a tract of eighty acres, adjoining 
the old home place. To this he later added about forty acres, which he 
cultivated in connection with the land owned by his father. After the death 
of that honored citizen, he purchased the homestead and now, after buying 
another eighty-acre tract of one of the heirs, his farm comprises two hun- 
dred and forty acres. This place is an excellent one, improved with good 
buildings and all of the accessories of a model farm. Mr. Stanford con- 
tinued to operate the farm until a little more than a year ago, when he retired, 
having amassed a competency sufificient for his remaining years. He has 
bought a pleasant house in the southwestern part of the village of Tonica, 
and is enjoying a well earned rest from the arduous labor which has hitherto 
engrossed him. 

Everything afTecting the welfare of this community has received the 
-earnest attention of Air. Stanford. For three years he was the supervisor of 
Vermillion township, for seven years or more he was a road commissioner, 
and for many years he served as a school director. In his political belief 
he is a Republican. 

In February, 1866, Mr. Stanford married Miss Rebecca Downey, who 
died May 10, 1868, aged but twenty-two years. She was a devoted member 
of the Congregational church, and was loved by all who knew her. She 
left one child, Emory H., who is married and for years was engaged in teach- 
ing, but at present is in business in Tacoma, Washington. On the nth of 
January, 1872, Mr. Stanford was united in marriage with Miss Mary, a 
daughter of Israel and Mary (Burgess) Hutchinson. Three children were 
born to our subject and wife, namely: Bertha E., Mary Eva, and Florence 
Ella, all of whom are receiving good educational advantages and are yet at 
home with their parents. 



DANIEL BASSETT. 



Honored and highly esteemed by everyone who knows him, Daniel 
Bassett, of Groveland township, LaSalle county, is a sterling representative 
of two of the oldest families of New England, and possesses many of the 
traits of character for which his sturdy ancestors were renowned. He ad- 
heres to the same high principles of daily life, upholds the same ideas of 
religion and religious liberty, and has the same love for the cause of educa- 
tion and every power making toward the uplifting and progress of the race. 

In tracing his lineage it is found, by old records, that his ancestor, 
William Bassett, emigrated from England to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1639, 
and located at a village called Hamden, about three miles north of New 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 705 

Haven, Connecticut. He married a Miss Ives. They had one son, John, 
who was born in 1653. and died February 8, 1714. He served in the state 
militia, and, being appointed as captain of a company of New Haven troops, 
ahvays afterward went by the title of Captain Bassett. He married Mercy 
Grigson, and their son John, born in 1691, became a personage of influence 
in his time. He represented the town of New Haven in the state legislature 
for a number of sessions, and was appointed cornet of a company of home 
guards. He owned considerable property, and was highly respected. He 
died March 27, 1757, aged sixty-six years. His wife was Elizabeth Thomp- 
son, and one of his children, John, was born in 1717, married Sarah Eaton, a 
granddaughter of the first governor of the New Haven colony, and died 
when sixty years of age, February 12, 1777. Their son. Levi, born in 1747, 
married Mabel At water, and had five children, namely: Esther, Eaton, 
Lyman, Sallie and Leverett. He departed this life Septeml)er 6, 1816, when 
sixty-nine years old. 

Leverett Ives Bassett. the father of our subject, was born in Litchfield 
county, Connecticut, and died on the same old homestead where he first 
saw the light. He married Linda Holt, a native of the same county, and 
they led the peaceful, industrious lives of agriculturists. Her father, Daniel 
Holt, also a Connecticut farmer, came from oiie of the oldest families in 
that state. His ancestor, William Holt, came from England and was one 
of the early settlers of New Haven, and was one of the seven persons who 
signed the New Haven constitution on the ist of July, 1664. He died at 
Wallingford, Connecticut, September i, 1683, aged seventy-three years. 
Daniel Holt, above mentioned, was the eldest of twelve children, and was 
born in East New Haven, July 5, 1767. On the 12th of January, 1789, he 
married Hannah, a daughter of Joseph and Hannah Holt, born August 17, 
1767, and died December 14, 1839. They were the parents of five children, 
namely: Daniel, Hiram, Jeremiah, Hannah and Linda. Daniel Holt, who 
died June 23, 1834, when in his sixty-eighth year, removed to Northbury 
(subsequently, Plymouth, and now Thomaston) in 1789, and thence to 
Harwinton, where the remainder of his life was spent. Mrs. Linda (Holt) 
Bassett was born May 23, 1800, and died on Christmas day, 1854. Later 
Leverett I. Bassett wedded Hannah, sister of his first wife, and she lived to 
attain the extreme age of one hundred and one years. Mr. Bassett was 
called to his reward, April 4, 1863. Of ten children born in his family, four 
were sons, and of the entire number six survive, namely: Daniel, our sub- 
ject; Levi; Annis, the widow of Stiles Hotchkis; Mary, the wife of William 
W. Clemence; Mrs. Lois B. Coe, of Connecticut; and George, of Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

The birth of Daniel Bassett took place in the country where so many 



7o6 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

generations of his forefathers had passed the span of hfe, the date of this 
event being February i6, 1823. He grew to manhood on a farm and re- 
ceived a very "common" school education. In August, 1852, he was united 
in marriage to Miss Amy Elvira Barker, a daughter of Daniel and Amy 
(Pardy) Barker, and one week afterward the young couple started for the 
new home which they were to found on the broad prairies of Illinois. They 
located near West Hallock, Peoria county, buying a quarter-section of land, 
to the cultivation of which Mr. Bassett devoted his chief energy for many 
years. In 1865 he removed to his present homestead in Groveland township. 
Here he has owned, previous to allotting to his children, five hundred and 
sixty acres, finely improved, having a substantial dwelling and other farm 
buildinsfs, and all of the comforts and conveniences deemed necessarv in 
modern life. Mr. Bassett has been an industrious, hard-working man. useful 
in his community, upright and just in all of his transactions, and is wholly 
worthy the high esteem in which he is held. 

For almost forty-six years, Mr. Bassett found a faithful companion 
and sharer of his joys and sorrows in the person of his devoted wife. She 
was a lady of rare Christian virtues, and was loved by all who knew her. 
As is her husband, she was a consistent member of the Congregational 
church, and nobly strove to do her duty toward all mankind. She received 
the summons to the mansions above in April, 1898, when she was in her 
seventy-second year. The three children of Mr. and Mrs. Bassett are: Annis 
Elvira, Owen B. and Ella A. The elder daughter married Joseph Bane, 
since deceased, and their children are named respectively Daniel Hubert 
and Ira Owen. Owen B., the only son of our subject, is unmarried, and 
resides at home. Ella A. first married Wilev INIarshall and had one child, 
Edna, and is now the wife of C. R. Hinton. 

Mr. Bassett has kept posted in all of the public affairs of this country, 
deeming this the duty of every patriotic citizen, but he has never been an 
aspirant to official distinction, and has resolutely kept aloof from politics. 
Since becoming a voter he has cast his ballot for the nominees of the Whig 
and Republican parties. 



AMOS W. ^lERRITT. 



Amos W. Merritt, of the firm of Merritt & Bangs, general merchants, 
Lostant, Illinois, claims Ohio as his native state, his birth having occurred 
in Belmont county, June 29, 1843. He is a son of Henry P. and ]\Iargaret 
M. (Wilson) Merritt, natives of Pennsylvania. Their family was composed 
of eleven children, seven sons and four daughters, of whom nine are now 
living: Amos W., whose name introduces this sketch; John E., of White 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 707 

City, Kansas; Isabel W., wife of I. P. Wierman, of Lostant, Illinois; Hannah 
B., wife of Sewell Gatchell, of Freeport, Illinois; Mahlon L., of Roberts, Illi- 
nois; Charles H., also of Roberts; Maggie J., wife of George B. Hager, of 
Ottawa, Illinois; Isaac E., of Buckley, Illinois; and George L., of Roberts. 
The father of this family learned the trade cf wagon-maker in early life and 
followed it until he was forty years of age, from that time on giving his 
attention to farming. He went with his parents from Pennsylvania to Bel- 
mont county, Ohio, when he was seven years old. and grew to manhood 
and married in that state. In 1853 he moved to Illinois and located in 
Magnolia, Putnam county, where he had a wagon shop for four years, until 
1857. That year he came to LaSalle county and bought a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Hope township, partly improved at the time of pur- 
chase. It was principally upon this farm that he reared his children. He 
lu'ed there until 1882, when he moved to a place near Wenona and lived 
there twelve years. He died April 13, 1896, at the age of seventy-eight 
years. His widow is still living, now in her eightieth year, her home being 
in Lostant. She is a member of the Society of Friends, as also was he. 
Politically he was a Republican, and at different times held several township 
offices, including that of supervisor. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject was John Merritt. He was a 
Pennsylvanian, a dealer in boots and shoes, and died in the prime of early 
manhood, being only twenty-five years old at the time of his death. He left 
a widow and three little sons. On his mother's side Mr. Merritt's grand- 
father was Amos Wilson, a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1794. Mr. Wil- 
son was twice married. His first wife, Hannah Brown, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, and whose father was an Irishman, he married in Pennsylvania, and 
by her had five children. The family moved to Ohio and located on a farm 
in Belmont county in 1826, and the same year the wife and mother died, at 
the age of twenty-six years. In 1828 Mr. Wilson married Miss Anna 
Morris, by whom he had nine children. They came to Illinois in 1851 and 
located in Putnam county, on a new farm, where he passed the rest of his 
life, and where he died January 15, 1881, in his eighty-seventh year. 

Amos W. Merritt was ten years old when he came with his parents to 
Illinois, and he has lived in Hope township, LaSalle county, since 1857. 
His youthful days were passed not unlike those of other farmer boys, assist- 
ing in the farm work and in winter attending the district schools. When he 
started out in life on his own responsibility it was as a farmer on rented land. 
He continued farming until 1888, when he moved to Lostant. The following 
year he was appointed postmaster, ^^l^ile filling this ofhce, in 1890, he 
engaged in the grocery business, and the following year took in as a partner 
M. H. Bangs, his brother-in-law, the firm becoming Merritt & Bangs. They 



7o8 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

then added a stock of dry goods, boots and shoes, making a complete gen- 
eral store, and have since kept a ^Yell assorted stock of general merchandise. 
They have established a good trade among the leading citizens of the town 
and surrounding country and are ranked with the enterprising up-to-date 
business men of Lostant. 

Mr. Merritt was married December 30. 1875, to Miss Sarah A. Bangs, 
daughter of Samuel L. and Margaret (Howard) Bangs, the former a native 
of England, the latter of Massachusetts. Mrs. Merritt is one of five children 
— two sons and three daughters — and she has one sister and two brothers 
living, namely: Jennie, wife of Dr. A. H. Hatton, of Peru, Illinois; J. Ed- 
W'ard, superintendent of the township high school, Pontiac, Illinois; and 
Mark H., in business with Mr. Merritt at Lostant. Mr. and Mrs. Merritt 
have no children. For several years previous to her marriage Mrs. Merritt 
was a popular and successful teacher, ucaching at Rutland and Lostant and 
for a short time in the academy at L.illsboro, LaSalle county. She was Mr. 
Merritt's assistant in the postoffice during the four years and a half he filled 
that position. Religiously she is a Methodist and fraternally a member of 
the Order of the Eastern Star. Mr. Merritt being identified with both the 
F. & A. ]\I., Tonica Lodge, No. 364, and the O. E. S. Politically he is a 
Republican. In addition to the office already named, he has served in other 
local offices, such as those of township assessor, member of the village school 
l)oard and member of the village board of trustees. 



EDWARD H. BOYLE. 



Now living retired, in the town of Lostant, LaSalle county, is Edward 
Harrison Boyle, one of the sterling pioneers of this county and state. In 
his youth he experienced the hardships of life on the frontier, and during 
his entire life he has been industrious and public spirited, desirous of pro- 
moting the welfare of his community. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject was David Boyle, who was 
born in Virginia and was of Irish descent. He was a farmer by occupation, 
and came to Illinois at an early day. He reared several children and died 
wdien in the prime of manhood. The maternal grandfather, Thornton Wil- 
son, a native of Kentucky, was of Scotch descent. He came to this state 
m 1825, and iirst located near Elkhart Grove and Springfield. At the end 
of fi^•e }-ears he removed to a farm in Putnam county, where he died in 
March. 1835, leaving a large family to mourn his loss. 

The parents of Edward H. Boyle were Abner and Matilda (Wilson) 
Boyle. The father was born in Bedford county, Virginia, and was but three 
years old when his parents removed to Kentucky, settling in Todd county, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 709 

where he grew to manhood. In 1828 they came to IlHnois, and, for a few- 
months Hved in Danville. In the spring of 1829 they went to Putnam 
county, where Abner Boyle took up a quarter-section of government land. 
Improving that place he continued to dwell there until the autumn of 1882, 
when he retired, and made his home in Lostant until his death, in ]\[arch, 
1886, when he was in his seventy-ninth year. His widow, whose death 
took place in 1892, was almost ninety years of age at that time. She was 
a devoted member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. Mr. Bovie 
was a typical pioneer, undaunted by obstacles, hard-working and hopeful. He 
participated in the Black Hawk war, and -was active in all of the affairs of 
his community for years. Several times he served as a supervisor in Putnam 
county. In former years he was a Whig, and later was identified with the 
Republican party. At the time that he settled on Ox Bow prairie, in 1829. 
he and his brothers built a cabin of rough logs, rudely piled together, the 
roof made of "shakes." The spaces between the logs were unfilled, and 
windows and chimneys were not required, as all of the cooking was per- 
formed out of doors. The first season, in addition to building this simple 
cabin, they planted and raised twenty acres of corn, the yield being from 
fifty to- sixty bushels to the acre. This corn was conveyed to the mills on 
the Mackinaw river, fifty miles away, and, with a plentiful supply of venison, 
the hardy pioneers fared quite comfortably the ensuing winter. Their 
needs were few and simple, and they really enjoyed their quiet, humble 
life. In 1830 Mr. Boyle was appointed postmaster of Ox Bow, by President 
Pierce. It cost twenty-five cents to send letters in those da^-s, and the work 
of postmaster was so nominal that Mr. Boyle soon resigned. He frequently 
made trips to Chicago with wheat, receiving only forty cents a bushel. The 
first circuit court convened in Putnam county was held on the first Mondav 
in May, 183 1, and, in accordance with the law, the county commissioners 
had selected the house of Thomas Gallagher, on the bank of the Illinois 
river, about a quarter of a mile above the trading post kept l)y Thomas. 
Hartzell, as the place where the court should be held. On the appointed 
day the people of that section assembled, and as no clerk had as yet been 
provided the judge appointed Hooper Warren and fixed his official bond at 
two thousand dollars, his sureties being John Dixon and Henry Thorn. The 
sheriff then gravely announced that the court was considered in session, and 
the grand jurors were duly chosen and sworn in. They were as follows: 
Daniel Dimmick, Elijah Epperson, Henry Thomas, Leonard Roth, Jesse 
Williams, Israel Archer, James Warnock, John L. Ramsey, William Hames,, 
John Strawn, Samuel Laughlin (foreman), David Boyle, Stephen \\'illis, 
Jeremiah Strawn, Abraham Stratten and Nelson Shepherd. After the divis- 
ion of Putnam county, the first election held was on August i, 1834, the 



7IO BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

officials to be elected being a member of congress, a justice of the peace, and 
a constable for each precinct. The vote was small, and each voter called out 
the name of the person whom he desired to take the office, the clerk 
writing this down, opposite the name of the voter, in the poll book. This 
election was held in Sandy precinct, at the houses of Jesse Roberts, John 
H. Shaw and Abner Boyle. 

Edward Harrison Boyle, who was born in Hennepin, Illinois, Feb- 
ruary 14, 1837, was one of six children, two sons and four daughters. Two 
of the number are deceased; William A. resides in Burton, Kansas; Caroline 
is the widow of John Griffith, and lives in Lostant, and Artemesa, the 
youngest, lives with her brother, our subject, neither of them ever having 
married. William A. is a hero of the civil war, as for nearly three years 
he was a member of Vaughn's battery, was stationed at Little Rock for 
some time, assisted in taking that city, and was in the command of General 
Steele. 

In his boyhood, E. H. Boyle attended the district schools of Putnam 
county, and always dwelt with his parents as long as they lived, giving them 
loving, filial care and attention, especially in their declining years. Since 
1882 he has resided in the village of Lostant. At the time of his father's 
death his estate of some eight hundred and fifty acres was divided among 
the heirs. He and his sister, whose interests, plans and aims are one, own 
the home property in Lostant, and six hundred and thirty acres of fine 
farm land, three hundred and ten acres of which is situated in Putnam county 
and half a section in LaSalle county. Mr. Boyle is a loyal citizen, striving 
to do his dutv toward his countrv and communitv, and since he arrived at 
his majority he has deposited his ballot in favor of the nominees and prin- 
ciples of the Republican party. 



JOHN R. LAMBERT. 



John R. Lambert is a self-made man, and his example is well worthy of 
emulation by the rising generation. His success is but another testimony 
to the oft-repeated fact that a young man of good common sense, indus- 
trious and economical habits, and with upright principles, is certain to 
prosper, if he perseveringly attends to business and faithfully carries out the 
plans which he carefully decides upon in the first place. 

The parents of John R. Lambert were Joel and Sarah (Reed) Lam- 
bert, both natives of Kentucky. The father was a son of Benjamin 
Lambert, of German lineage, a native of Virginia and an early settler in 
Kentucky. He was a farmer, and besides was a local minister, devoted to 
the old-school Baptist creed. He lived a worthy, useful life and passed 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 711 

to his reward at a ripe age, his death taking place in Indiana. The father 
of Mrs. Joel Lambert was John Reed, who likewise was born in Virginia 
and who was a hero of the war of 1812. He was of Welsh descent and a 
typical frontiersman, a pioneer of Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois. To this 
state he came in 1830 and his death took place in Knox county when he 
was well along in years. 

Joel Lambert accompanied his father's family to Indiana and to Knox 
county, Illinois, nearly seventy years ago. He bought eighty acres of land 
in \\'arren county later and there passed his last years, his death occurring 
in 1840, when he was in his prime, being but thirty-eight years of age. 
His widow, Mrs. Sarah Lambert, survived him more than half a century 
and died in 1890, when seventy-five years of age. Both were members of 
the Baptist church. In the early days of Illinois' statehood, Mr. Lambert 
belonged to what was known as the light-horse cavalry, a state military 
organization. Of their two sons and three daughters two are deceased, and 
those surviving are John R., James A., and Ann Jane, the widow of Coleman 
Hailey, of Peoria. In 1845 Mrs. Lambert became the wife of Hartwell 
Hailey, and their two children were Lida, who died when in her seventeenth 
year; and Ara, who married L. T. Broadus and is now a resident of Horton, 
Kansas. 

The birth of John R. Lambert occurred in Knox county, Illinois, 
October 12, 1836, and owing to the death of his father when he w-as quite 
young he was thrown upon his own resources earlier than he otherwise 
would have been. In 1845 he went to Putnam county and twenty years 
later he came to LaSalle county. When he left home to earn his own liveli- 
hood he had but six dollars, and this he had made by working for neighbors. 
As soon as he could do so, he commenced renting a farm in Putnam county, 
and at the end of two vears came to this countv, where, after rentin.'j land 
for a year, he bought eighty acres, in Hope township. This place was 
partly improved, and some time afterward he sold it, investing his capital 
in a quarter-section farm in the same township. Later he disposed of that 
place also and since then has owned the old homestead in Hope township, 
which is now carried on by his son. As the years rolled by he prospered, 
and on several occasions he bought more land until he now owns four 
hundred and eighty acres, two hundred and forty being in Eden township 
and the rest in Hope township. Besides accomplishing this, he assisted 
each of his two sons in the purchase of a quarter-section of land. He has 
made substantial improvements on his property, expending large sums of 
money for this purpose. 

Throughout life Mr. Lambert has adhered strictly to just and upright 
methods, and in consequence he enjoys the good will and esteem of all 



712 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

who have had dealings with him. Xor has he neglected his duty as a citizen, 
and for many years officiated as town clerk, school trustee or director on 
the school board. Politically he is a Democrat. 

On the 3d of September, 1847, Mr. Lambert married Miss Emily E. 
Hiltabrand, daughter of George and Elizabeth (Gunn) Hiltabrand. She was 
summoned to the better land in 1886, when in her forty-sixth year. Edward 
F.. the elder son of our subject and wife, married Julia Borngasser and has 
four living children, namely: \>y, Edward. Fern and Norman. Edward F. 
Lambert is an energetic young business man of Tonica, being the present 
proprietor of a large lumber yard here. George H. Lambert, the younger 
son, is managing the old homestead belonging to his father. His wife was 
formerly Mary Weber, and their four children are Nora, Merlin, Harold and 
A^rnor. Following in the footsteps of their ancestors, our subject and his 
wife early identified themselves with the Baptist church, contributing 
liberally toward its support and actively aiding in the noble work of uplifting 
humanitv. 



FREDERICK W. ^L\TTHIESSEN. 

Frederick W. Matthiessen. secretary of the ALitthiessen & Hegeler Zinc 
Company, LaSalle, Illinois, is a native of Germany, born in 1835. He was 
educated in Germany and graduated in mining engineering at the Univer- 
sity of Freiberg, in that country. Mr. jMatthiessen and E. C. Hegeler were 
fellow students at the University of Freiberg, and in 1857 they came to the 
United States together. Their purpose was to gain practical experience 
in mining engineering, and accordingly went to ^Mineral Point, Wisconsin. 
While at that place they observed the great waste of zinc ore, and con- 
ceived the idea of engaging in the smelting of zinc. They came to LaSalle, 
Illinois, in 1858, selecting this city as a location on account of coal facilities. 
They began smelting in 1858. and their first operations were hardly more 
than experimental, the ore being obtained from Wisconsin. As soon as 
the success of the venture was demonstrated, the works were enlarged, again 
and again enlarged, until to-day the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Com- 
pany operate the largest plant in the United States, with several millions of 
dollars invested and a business that has steadily increased until it has reached 
an enormous volume. In 1866 the rolling-mill department was added. In 
1874 the company began to mine its own coal, of which an enormous quan- 
tity is necessarily used. Thus it is observed that many coal miners have 
found employment through the company. A large number of workmen 
are employed in the zinc works, and to this industry the growth of LaSalle 
is largely indebted. Of the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company it can 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 713, 

be truthfully said to its credit that workmen have been well paid for their 
labor and have been in more than one way shown consideration. Among^ 
the laborers employed no strike was ever inaugurated. 

In 1881 the company began the manufacture of sulphuric acid, and in 
this department of the business wonderful progress has been achieved and 
an immense volume of ijrofiialjie business transacted. The zinc ore is 
brought principally from Missouri. First, it is desulphurized in the acid 
works, where tons of acid are made daily. Then the process of smelting 
takes place, and many tons of spelter are produced each day, and rolled in 
the rolling-mills into sheet zinc. The first street railway in LaSalle, which 
was nominally owned by an independent company, was really an appendage 
to the zinc works, ]\Iessrs. Matthiessen and Heg"eler paying a certain sum 
annually for the use of the tracks for the purpose of conducting freight to 
and from the works. 

The zinc company was incorporated in 1871, Messrs. Matthiessen and 
Hegeler holding the greater part of the stock, the latter president and the- 
former secretary. 

Mr. Matthiessen has been and is connected with and interested in sev- 
eral other business enterprises. He was interested in the LaSalle Pressed 
Brick Company and now has interest in the Western Clock Manufacturing 
Company, of LaSalle. In the growth and development of LaSalle no other 
citizen has taken greater interest than has he. The city owns a fine electric 
light plant and water works system, which was gained through the gener- 
osity of Mr. Matthiessen, who purchased and gave them to the city. Educa- 
tional facilities in LaSalle have been increased through his manifested inter- 
est and efforts, assisted by other progressive citizens. From 1887 to 1897, 
a period of ten years, he served as mayor of the city, and declined further 
election to this office. 

Li his personal relations Mr. Matthiessen is unostentatious and pon- 
siderate. Li business affairs, to his foresight and sagacity, his extraordinary 
success may well be attributed. His has been a business career well rounded, 
with success. 

In 1864 Mr. Matthiessen married Fannie Clara Moeller, in ^^lineral 
Point, Wisconsin. 



JOHN NICHOLSON. 



It is always a pleasure to see true merit suital)!)' rewarded, to behold' 
the prosperity of those who eminently deserve it, as does the subject of this 
review. At an early age he learned one of the great lessons of life, that 
there is no "royal road"' to wealth, and as he was not above work he toiled 



714 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

industriously until he won not only a snug little fortune, but also the 
esteem and confidence of the people with whom he has been associated for 
many years. Work, the true friend of mankind, has developed his latent 
resources and brought out the strong, self-reliant force of his character. 

John Nicholson of this sketch bears the same Christian name as did 
his two grandfathers. His father's father, a carpenter, was born near the 
"village of Lowder, Westmoreland, England, and passed his entire life there, 
dying at an advanced age, as did also his wife. They were the parents of 
four children. John Moffatt, the maternal grandfather, was born, lived and 
died in England, and for nearly seventy years was actively engaged in the 
milling business. He had several children, only one of whom was a son. 
He was signally a patriarch at the time of his death, as he had seen about 
■ninety winters ere he was summoned to his reward. 

The parents of our subject were John and Elizabeth (Moffatt) Nichol- 
;Son, natives of England. The father pursued his calling, that of shoe- 
making, in the English isle until i860, when he crossed the Atlantic, accom- 
panied by his wife and a daughter. He came to Lowell, LaSalle county, 
where he lived retired until his death about five years later, when he was in 
his sixty-seventh year. He was survived about eight years by his widow, 
and four of their seven children have also passed to the better land. John, 
William, and Elizabeth, Mrs. Joseph Warner, are all living in Lowell. The 
parents were devout members of the Episcopal church. 

John Nicholson was born in Westmoreland, England, April 10, 183 1, 
•and when he was fourteen years old he was apprenticed for a term of seven 
years to the miller's trade. Having thoroughly mastered this calling, he pro- 
ceeded to devote his energies solely to this line of business until he retired 
some ten years ago. In 1855 he came to the United States, and at once 
located in Lowell, where he has dwelt for the long period of forty-four years. 
During the first two years, he worked in the mill here at a small salary, after 
W'hich he grew more ambitious and rented the mill himself, running it with 
very fair success from the beginning. Later he purchased the mill property 
and in time bought some excellent farm land. The story of his business 
career may be briefly summed up as follows: He was honest and just in 
-all of his transactions, courteous and accommodating to his patrons, and 
strictly reliable and punctual always. He still owns three hundred and 
seventeen acres of land and several substantial residences in Lowell. For 
■nearly twenty years he served as a school director, and for five years he was 
Ihe supervisor of this township. Politically he is rather independent, but in 
national elections usually favors the Democratic party. 

\n September, 1863, Mr. Nicholson married Miss Martha, daughter of 
Benjamin Huss. They have three children — a son and two daughters. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 715 

Alvin W. married Cynthia Haldeman, and has six children, namely: 
Ralph A., Alice V., Vincent R., J. Allen, Edna L. and Elmer Dewey. Mar- 
garet Nicholson is unmarried and resides with her parents, and Harriet is 
the wife of Joseph Dodd, of Farwell, South Dakota. In their religious 
faith, Mr. and Mrs. Nicholson adhere to the creed in which they were 
reared, the Episcopalian. 



BRUCE C. MILLER. 



Bruce Clawson Miller, a successful agriculturist of Eden township, 
LaSalle countv, has been the architect of his own fortunes, as he started 
out in the battle of life empty handed and by the exercise of his native powers 
has won an honored place and an assured competence for his later years. 

The parents of our subject, Seymour and Polly (Clawson) Miller, were 
natives of New York state. They had four children, but one son and one 
daughter have died and only Bruce C. and Dwaght, of Prattsville, New 
York, survive. The mother died when our subject was a small boy, and 
the father subsequently married her sister, Lydia, and had one child by that 
union. After her death he wedded Harriet Goodsell, and m his old age, as 
death had once more deprived him of a companion and helpmate, he mar- 
ried Mary Goodsell. a sister of his third wife. He was of Irish descent, and 
his father, John Miller, a farmer, was born in New York state. He passed 
his entire life there, dying when upward of three-score and ten years. The 
father of Mrs. Polly (Clawson) Miller also was born in the Empire state and 
followed agriculture as a means of livelihood. Seymour Miller learned the 
carpenter's trade, which he pursued to some extent, later managing a farm 
and runnmg a hotel. His wdiole life was spent in Greene county, New York, 
the place of his birth, and he reached the age allotted to man, three-score 
and ten. He was a conscientious, upright man and was a worthy member 
of the Baptist church. 

The birth of Bruce C. Miller took place in Greene county, New York, 
July 24, 1836. He remained with his father, working on the farm and in 
the hotel, until he had reached his majority. Desiring to locate permanently 
in the west, he came to Illinois in 1862 and for some time worked for a 
farmer in the vicinity of Tonica. At length he had saved sufficient capital 
lo buy a farm of eig-hty acres in Livingston county, but this being in the 
nature of an investment, he did not go there to live. A few years later, he 
rented a homestead in LaSalle county, selling the other place, and at the 
end of seven or eight years he purchased his present farm of one hundred 
and fifty acres, which he had previously leased for three years. In time he 
added another tract of forty acres to his original farm, but this property he 



7i6 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

afterward sold. Since 1877 he has Hved upon his now well improved home- 
stead one mile east of Tonica, on section 24, Eden township. Altogether he 
owns three hundred and ten acres, one farm of a quarter-section being in 
Franklin county, Iowa. He is engaged in general farming and stock-raising, 
and has been very successful, as he justly deserves. 

On the 15th of April, 1876, ]^Ir. Miller married Aliss Sarah Scott, a^ 
daughter of ^^'illiam and Xellie (Hill) Scott, who were natives of Ohio, and 
farmers by occupation. ]\Irs. ]\Iiller's grandfathers, likewise, were born in 
the Buckeye state, and her mother's father participated in the war of 1812. 
Mrs. Miller had one sister, who is deceased, and her only brother, Alitchell 
Scott, who was sergeant in a company of an Ohio regiment of volunteers, 
during the civil war, is now a resident of Ayr, Nebraska. Four children 
were born to our subject and wife, ^^'illie, who died' when about twelve 
months old, and Ralph, \"erna and Roy, who are yet at home. ■Mrs. ]\Iiller's 
parents were members of the ^lethodist Episcopal church, and she conse- 
quently was an attendant at the services of that denomination. In his 
political belief Mr. Miller is a Democrat. l)ut he devotes little of his time to 
public affairs, as his business and domestic interests take the first place in 
his heart. 



ISAAC RAYMOND. 



One of the venerable and highly honored citizens of Tonica is he of 
whom the following sketch is penned. For forty-four years he has dwelt in 
this immediate locality, thoroughly interested in its development and pros- 
perity, and doing his full share toward the transforming of the unbroken 
prairie into the garden spot of the west, as it is to-day. 

In tracinp; his historv it is learned that he comes of fine old Puritan 
stock on the paternal side, his grandfather, Abraham Raymond, having 
been a native of Connecticut and a farmer by occupation. His last years 
were spent in New York state, his death taking place when he was more 
than seventy years of age. Of his large family, Isaac Raymond, born in 
Saratoga county, New York, became the father of our subject. In his 
voung manhood he was a blacksmith, later he was engaged in merchan- 
dising in Brooklyn, and his last years were spent in agricultural pursuits. 
After he had carried on a farm in Saratoga county for some years he came to 
Illinois, and died in Tonica in the eighty-fifth year of his age. His first 
wife, Esther, was, like himself, born in Saratoga county. New York, and 
in the Empire state her death took place in 1842. She was a daughter of 
John Haves, a native of New York state, and of German descent. He, too, . 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 717 

■was a tiller of the soil, reared a large family and attained a ripe age. For 
■4iis second wife, Isaac Raymond chose Ann Underhill, who died before he 
came to Illinois. She was the mother of two children that survive, namely: 
Clara, widow of Eugene Hamer. and Harriet, wife of Leonard Perry. Isaac, 
Jr., and his brother, John H., of Odell, Illinois, are the only children of the 
marriage of Isaac and Esther (Hayes) Raymond. The father served as a 
justice of the peace for a long period, and in politics was first a Whig and 
later a Republican. 

The birth of Isaac Raymond occurred on the old homestead in Sara- 
toga county, New York, December 18, 1830. His education, begun in the 
district schools, was completed in the excellent schools of Brooklyn, and 
subsequent years of observation and experience added to this until he became 
the broad-minded, well informed man to whom his numerous friends have 
looked for counsel for many years. After leaving school he returned to his 
-native county and rented land there for several years, engaging' in its culti- 
vation. In 1853 he went to California, leaving New York on a steamer and 

ig-oing by the isthmus of Panama route. A year later he returned home, 
this time coming by way of Nicaragua. In 1855 he came to Illinois, locat- 
ing in Eden township, LaSalle county; and though he had no capital at the 
time of his arrival here he industriously worked for others, saving his wages. 
After renting farms for four years he bought a homestead of eighty acres, 
three miles southwest of Tonica and partly improved the place, which he 

"then sold and invested the proceeds in another farm of like acreage, but 
nearer town. In time he added to the original tract other land, thus making 
his place one of two hundred and twenty-five acres. He built a good 

modern house and made other substantial improvements on his homestead, 
which is now carried on by his son Frederick, his only child, a young man 

-of excellent business ability. 

The first marriage of Isaac Raymond was to Mrs. Mary Underhill, 
nee Brandow, who died in 1892, leaving one son, Frederick. On the ist of 
March, 1894, Mr. Raymond wedded Mrs. Lou M. Cox, the widow of Davis 
G. Cox and a daughter of William B. and Mary Jane (Harris) Magee. By 
her previous marriage Mrs. Raymond had one daughter, Lulu M., who died 
when seventeen years of age. Her parents were natives of Wilmington, 
Clinton county, Ohio, and early settlers in Illinois, coming in 1840 from 
Ohio to Princeton, and later to Eden township. Here the father died in 
1886, aged sixty-eight years, and the wife and mother is yet living and 

•residing in Tonica. 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond are members of the Congregational church. 

Tie being a deacon and a trustee. Politically he is afiiliated with the Repub- 

'lican party. For about ten years he ser\-ed in the capacity of township 



7i8 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

assessor; for one term he was the collector for his district, and was a school 
director in Tonica twelve years, discharging his duties in a thoroughly sat- 
isfactory manner to all concerned. 



OLIVER M. KELLEY. 



Oliver M. Kelley, grain and stock buyer and dealer in farm machinery, 
at Dana, Illinois, is one of the prominent business factors in the town in 
which he has lived for the past four years. A resume of his life is as follows: 

Oliver M. Kelley was born in Alorris, Illinois, February 5, 1857, a son of 
Alfred and Louisa (Ferguson) Kelley, natives of Ohio. In the Kelley fam- 
ily were seven children, four sons and three daughters, all of whom, with 
one exception, are still living, namely: Sara A., the widow of Lloyd Wright; 
Franklin P., of Peoria. Illinois; Oliver M.; Inez, deceased; Alice, wife of An- 
drew McBride, of Livingston county, Illinois; Willard, of Groveland town- 
ship, LaSalle county; and Presley, of Dana. Their father was a farmer 
who came from Ohio to Illinois in the year 1855, locating at Morris and 
carrying on farming operations there for eight years. He then came to 
LaSalle county and purchased eighty acres of land in Groveland township, 
where he lived until a few months before his death. He died in 1895, at the 
age of sixty-eight years. His widow still survives him and makes her home 
in Dana. She belongs to the "Holiness" organization. 

James Kelley, the grandfather of Oliver M., was a native of Ohio and 
lived and died in that state, his age at death being about ninetv vears. 
He was the father of seven or eight children. Grandfather Ferguson also 
was a native of Ohio. He was a shoemaker and farmer, passed his whole 
life in the Buckeye state, and was sixty years old at the time of his death. 
He had several children. 

Oliver M. Kelley was seven years old when his parents moved to La- 
Salle county. Reared on a farm, he naturally engaged in farming when he 
started out in life for himself. At first he rented land, next worked by 
the month, and then for two years farmed at home. x\fter his marriage 
he rented in this county, remaining here thus occupied for several years, 
and then moved to Nebraska. He remained in that state, however, only 
one year, at the end of that time returning to Groveland township, LaSalle 
county, where he resumed farming and continued the same seven years. In 
1895 he decided upon a change of occupation and came to Dana and en- 
gaged in the grain, coal, live-stock and farm-implement business, and the- 
past year has also run an elevator at Leeds. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 719. 

September 28, 1882, 'Mr. Kelley married Aliss Jessie Mooney, a daugh- 
ter of John and Lucinda (Ramsey) ]\Iooney. They are the parents of 
six children, four sons and two daughters, namely: John C, Mary G., 
Roscoe M., Hurless L., Cassius O. and Leota. 

Mrs. Kelley is a member of the Christian church. Fraternally Mr. 
Kelley is identified with Rutland Lodge, No. 163, I. O. O. F.. and also- 
with the M. W. A. Politically he has always been a Democrat He served 
as school director in Groveland township several terms, and is now serving 
his fourth year as a member of the village board of Dana. 



JUSTIN W. RICHARDSON. 

The publisher of the Tonica News and the Lostant Local, at Tonica,. 
Justin W. Richardson, is one of the chief builders of the material interests 
of Tonica. He was born in Lexington, Kentucky, March 31, 1836, a son 
of Henry and Lucy (Fisher) Richardson, both natives of Massachusetts. 
These parents had six children, of whom four are now living — Justin W.,, 
Lunsford P., William F. and George Herbert. The father in earlier life was- 
employed in the woolen mills of Lowell, Massachusetts, and moved to Lex- 
ington, Kentucky, on account of poor health, and after a residence of t^vo 
years at that place removed to Illinois, locating on a farm near Bloom- 
ington. In 1852 he moved into that city and conducted a grocery the re- 
mainder of his life, his death occurring in December, 1872, when he had 
attained the age of sixty-five years. His wife died in 1858. Both were mem- 
bers of the Congregational church. For a number of years Mr. Richardson 
was treasurer of the board of education of Bloomington. For his second 
wife he was united in marriage with INIrs. Caroline Robertson, a native 
of Vermont, and she still resides in Bloomington. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Gideon Richardson, was a 
native also of the Bay state and a soldier in the Revolutionary war. He 
was of English descent, and had thirteen children. Mr. Richardson's ma- 
ternal grandfather, John Fisher, was the operator of a machine and black- 
smith shop in Lowell. He also was of English ancestry, had two children, 
and died at the age of sixty-nine years. 

Justin W. Richardson was brought up on his father's farm near Bloom- 
ington from the age of one year to sixteen, meanwdiile attending the dis- 
trict school in the winter. At length he enjoyed the opportunity of attending 
the university at Bloomington, and afterward he taught school for seven 
or eight years. Next he was employed on the Bloomington Pantagrapb 



720 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

as a reporter, and also on the Journal. In 1863 he went to Peoria and 
became associate editor of the Peoria Transcript; later he was city editor 
of the Ouincy ^^'hig" and Republican, which position he filled for a period 
of four years. Then for a time he was again engaged in the pedagogical 
profession and in work on the Bloomington papers, and then two years in 
newspaper work in Farmer City. In the fall of 1872 he came to Streator, 
next went to ]>kIillington. where he remained two years, and then for three 
3^ears was in Sheridan, still engaged in newspaper work. 

In February, 1878, he came to Tonica and re-established the Tonica 
News, which he has ever since conducted as a local weekly gazetteer, with 
the success that only comes of intelligence and enterprise. 

Politically he is a Republican; was postmaster at Millington a short 
time, and has been village clerk here in Tonica for six years; he has been 
a resident of this place twenty-two years. He is a member of Tonica Lodge, 
No. 364, A. F. & A. M.; of Tonica Lodge. No. 298. I. O. O. F.. and with 
his wife is also a member of Rebekah degree order. In religion both him- 
self and wife are members of the Methodist church. 

On the 25th day of June, 1878, 'Slv. Richardson was united in marriage 
Avith ^liss Adelaide S. Partridge, the daughter of L. H. and ]\Iaria A. (Sea- 
ven Partridge. They have had a son and a daughter — Raymond and 
Alma. 



JAMES C. BROWX. 

To the memory of a distinguished citizcfi. a man of sterling worth, 
integrity of purpose and purity of ambition, this biographical sketch is 
recorded. 

November 2, 1802. in Brandon, A'ermont. a son was born to ]\Iicah and 
Phoebe (^lerriam) Brown. He was given the name of James C. Brown, 
and it is of him that we write. His father was a native of Connecticut and 
his ancestors were of Welsh origin. ]\Iicah was a major in the war of 1812 
and did active service in that conflict. He resided in Brandon and died there 
in 1863. at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. His wife, Phoebe Mer- 
riam. was of an old New England family and laterally related to Ethan 
Allen, the famous Revolutionary general. 

James C. Brown obtained a liberal education in his native town, and 
early in life took up the study of medicine, in which he graduated at the 
Medical College of Castleton, Vermont. Deciding to seek his fortune in 
the west. Dr. Brown removed, in 1830, to Zanesville. Ohio. Here was 
begun his professional and business career. In his profession Dr. Brown 





A. 






j4 



^yxy)^' 



Q 



'■iA^nn^'-yT^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 721 

won an enviable reputation, and in business achieved far more than ordinary 
success. In 1851 he became a citizen of LaSalle, Illinois, and here he died 
June 12, 1883, in the eighty-first year of his age. 

In tracing the career of Dr. Brown, we find that he was a regularly 
enlisted soldier of the war of 1812, though then but ten years of age. His 
•duty then was to keep the roll-book for his father. Major Brown. Here 
we catch a gleam of his character. From early childhood he was fond of 
books and study. He became not only a proficient and skillful physician, 
but also a well-informed man, conversant with a multitude of subjects. Like 
Abou ben Adhem, "he loved his fellow men," and with those whose good 
fortune it was to know him there was no lack of respect and esteem for 
him. In support of any principle he believed to be right, he was fearless 
and courageous. Such men are likely to receive determined opposition, 
and this was true of Dr. Brown. In the early agitation of Abolitionism he 
took a bold stand against slavery, and at a time and in a vicinity wherein 
his stand on this great question was very unpopular. So bitter was the 
•opposition given him that it militated much against his professional and 
business interests, and especially in social circles. Nothing daunted him, 
however, and he even held on to his views all the firmer. He never aspired 
to public or political life, yet he was a stanch Republican. 

As observed above, he came to LaSalle in 1851. Here he practiced 
medicine until 1855, when on account of failing health he gave up the pro- 
fession. He became interested in the banking business, in connection 
with the old First National Bank of LaSalle, in the history of which we 
find him serving as its president in 1865. Becoming displeased with the 
business plans incorporated in the management of the bank, it was pur- 
chased by him, in 1872, and merged into a private bank and placed under 
the management of his sons, James P. and William C. Brown, who con- 
ducted it until 1880, when it was sold, its purchasers merging it into the pres- 
ent LaSalle National Bank. 

Dr. Brown was a consistent Christian. For years he was a leading 
spirit in the Congregational church of LaSalle. He \yas twice married. His 
first wife, nee Elizabeth Tupper, died a few weeks after her marriage. Sub- 
:sequently the Doctor married, in Zanesville, Ohio, Ann Day, who was 
born in South Hadley, Massachusetts, April 9, 181 3. She is now in the 
eighty-seventh year of her age and is still a remarkably well presei^ved 
woman. Mrs. Brown's life has been an exemplary one, and she has reared 
an interesting family. Her children are: Mrs. Elizabeth B. Adams, of 
Indianapolis, Indiana; James P. Brown, a banker, residing in Minneapolis, 
Minnesota; Henry D. Brown (deceased), born in Ohio, January 26, 1839, 
•died in Omaha, Nebraska, September 10, 1896, was for years a prominent 



722 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

dry goods merchant of LaSalle; William C. Brown, and Mrs. Mary Kate 
Page, residing in LaSalle. The oldest child, Albert, died aged eight months. 

William C. Brown was born in Utica, Ohio, April 6, 1842, and was 
educated at Illinois College, Jacksonville. For several years he was in the 
coal business in LaSalle. Then from 1869 to 1874 he was assistant treasurer 
of the Burlington and Missouri River Railroad. On resigning this position 
he entered the banking business in LaSalle. In 1880 he became a partner 
in the Collins Plow Company, of Quincy, IlHnois. While in the factory he 
met with an accident, breaking both of his arms, and for nearly three years 
thereafter was disabled from business. For ten years (up to 1895) he was 
sales agent for the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Company, of LaSalle, but 
is now living a retired life, residing in Chicago. 

October 22, 1868, he married Margaret, daughter of James Cowie, a 
prominent pioneer in the coal business in LaSalle. Mr. Cowie was a native 
of England, born in 1805; came to the United States in 1840; once resided 
in West Virginia, and later in LaSalle, Illinois, for several years, and died in 
West Virginia in 1886. He was a competent business man and an esteemed 
citizen, and to him much of the development of the LaSalle coal fields is 
to be attributed. To Mr, and Mrs. William C. Brown the following children 
were born: Annie (deceased), James C, Margaret (a teacher), Mabel and 
William C, Jr. i 

Mr. Brown and family are communicants of the Congregational church, 
and in politics he is a Republican. 



CHRISTIAN G. SAUER. 



Christian G. Sauer, a grain dealer and one of the representative business 
men of Dana, Illinois, is a native of this state, born in Bureau county, July 19, 
185 1. He is of German and French descent, his father, George A. Sauer, 
having been born in Germany; his mother, whose maiden name was Dorothy 
Swartz, in Strassburg, France. In their family were ten children, seven of 
whom are now living: Rudolph G., of George, Iowa; Louisa, wife of The- 
odore Monk, of Livingston county, Illinois; Christian G., whose name heads 
this sketch; George A., of Rutland, Illinois; Lizzie, wife of L. M. Holland, 
of Washington, Illinois; WilHam, of Hartley, Iowa; and Mary, the wife of J. 
A. Mingers, of Minonk, Illinois. Both Mr. and Mrs. Sauer came to America 
in childhood and were reared and married here. It was in 1836 that he 
landed in this country, with his father and family, their settlement being 
in Bureau county, where he grew up and where, later, he bought a farm 
of eighty acres, for which he paid one hundred dollars. He afterward owned 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 723 

at one time about two or three thousand acres in lUinois and Iowa. He 
moved to Livingston county, Ilhnois, in 1865, Hved there until 1884, and 
then moved to LaSalle county, settHng in Groveland township, one mile 
west of Dana, where he still lives. His first wife, the mother of our sub- 
ject, died about 1883, at the age of fifty-seven years. She was a devoted 
Christian and a member of the German Lutheran church, to which he also 
belongs. He married for his second wife Miss Lottie Strasburg, and by her 
has three children — Lillie, Rosie and Minnie. Politically the senior Mr. 
Sauer has always afiiliated with the Democratic party, to which his son, 
Christian G., has also given support. 

The paternal grandfather of Christian G. Sauer was Rudolph Sauer. 
He came to America, as already stated, in 1836, bringing with him his 
family and coming in company with his brother George. In the old coun- 
try he was a shoemaker and dealer, but after his settlement in Bureau 
county, Illinois, he turned his attention to farming. He died in that county, 
at the age of seventy-seven years. To him belonged the distinction of serv- 
ing in the army under Napoleon. Of his family, two sons and two daughters 
reached adult age. Grandfather Swartz, Mr. Sauer's grandfather on his 
mother's side, was a native of France. He was one of the pioneer settlers 
of Lacon, Illinois, where he reared his family of ten children. He was 
eighty-four years of age at the time of his death. 

Turning now to the direct subject of this sketch, Christian G. Sauer, 
we record that he was reared on his father's farm in Bureau county, in 
summer passing his boyhood days in assisting in the farm work and in winter 
attending the district school, held in a log house. When he became a man 
and engaged in farming for himself it was on a rented farm in Livingston 
county. About 1882 he bought three hundred and twenty acres in Lyon 
county, Iowa; afterward purchased another three hundred and twenty acres 
in that county — six hundred and forty in all — which he still owns. He also 
owns one hundred and sixty acres in Groveland township, LaSalle county, 
and has some land in Kansas. Since 1877. with the exception of four years, 
he has been in the grain business in Dana. His first home in Dana he 
built in 1882, in the northern part of town, and in 1898 he rebuilt on the 
same location, his present home being a delightful and attractive one. 

January 13, 1879, Mr. Sauer married Miss Matilda Gingerich, a daugh- 
ter of Joseph Gingerich, and they have three children — Charles B., Jessie M. 
and Clark. 

Mrs. Sauer is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. As already 
indicated, Mr. Sauer clings to the political faith in which he was reared, 
and from time to time he has filled numerous local positions of prominence 
and trust. He was the supervisor of Groveland township eight years, and 



724 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

for a number of years he was a school director. He has long been a mem- 
ber of the village board of Dana, and for about ten years has been the 
president of the board. His residence in LaSalle county covers a period 
of twenty-three years, and few men throughout the county are better known 
or more highly respected than he. 



HEXRY F. HARTENBOWER. 

The gentleman whose name appears above is a leading business man of 
Tonica, dealing in agricultural implements, threshers and engines. He was 
born in ^Magnolia township, Putnam county, Illinois, April ii, 1849, a son 
of Christian and Jerusha (Hiltabrand) Hartenbower. His father was a 
native of Wittenberg, Germany, and his mother was born in Tennessee. 
They had seven children, six of whom are living, namely: Henry F., George 
F., Emily, wife of G. J. Williams, of Eagle Grove, Iowa, William F., John 
E., of Tonica, Illinois, and Catherine, the wife of Albert Grant. The father 
of these children, a farmer by occupation, emigrated to America in 1836, 
locating in Putnam county, where he followed agricultural pursuits until 
1852, and then moved to Hope township, LaSalle county, settling upon 
a quarter section which he had purchased. To this he subsequently added 
by further purchases until he had at one time five hundred and seventy 
acres. It was here that he reared his children and lived until 1886, when he 
moved to Tonica, where he now lives retired, his son William cultivating 
the old farm. In his political sympathies he has always been a Democrat, 
and in public position he has been road commissioner for many years. In 
religion he and his wife are Baptists. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Christian Hartenbower, a 
native of the fatherland, was a shoemaker by trade, and came to America 
in 1836, settling in Putnam county, in Magnolia township, where he fol- 
lowed his trade. He finally died in LaSalle county, at the home of his son, 
aged about seventy-six years. He had seven children. The maternal grand- 
father of Mr. Hartenbower. George Hiltabrand, was a native of North 
Carolina, of German descent, and a farmer by occupation. He emigrated 
to Illinois in 1829, settling in Putnam county, had a large number of chil- 
dren, and died at the old homestead, aged about sixty-eight years. 

Mr. Hartenbower, the subject of this sketch, was brought up in La- 
Salle county from the year 1852, reared to the heavy duties of the farm, 
attending the public schools in the winter. \A'hen a grown man he rented 
for himself a farm of one hundr,ed and seventy acres, for six years, and 
then bought a hundred acres in Hope township, which he cultivated till 1889, 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 725 

then sold it and moved into Tonica, where he has since made his home. Here 
he began work in the employ of the firm of R. A. Radle & Company, in their 
implement store, and afterward for J, E. Morris, and in 1893 he bought out 
the stock of Mr. Morris and ran business alone until 1896, when he asso- 
ciated with himself G. W. Hartenbower, since which time the firm name 
has been H. F. & G. W. Hartenbower. These men have a fine reputation 
as honest and reliable dealers and industrious and enterprising citizens of 
their chosen town. 

Politically Mr. Hartenbower, our subject, has always been a Democrat, 
and in fraternal relations he is a member of Tonica Lodge, No. 364, A. F. 
& A. M. 

He was married on the 15th of February, 1872, to ]\Iiss ]\Iary Hutch- 
ings, a daughter of Martin and Mary (Bolton) Hutchings, and they have 
been blessed with five sons and five daughters, whose names are, in order, 
Mary J., Charles F., Clara J., Edna, Roy B., Fred, Ella, Nell, Harold and 
Marion. Mary J. became the wife of Ozer Keller, lives in CofTeyville, Kan- 
sas, and has two children; Charles F. was a soldier in the Spanish- American 
war, a member of the Fifth Illinois Volunteers, and is unmarried; Edna 
married Burton Thompson and resides in Henry, this state; and the other 
children are at their parental home. 



GEORGE L. AUSTIN, 



The town of Rutland, LaSalle county, has a no more enterprising" busi- 
ness man and public spirited citizen than George L. Austin, v.ho has served in 
various local positions of responsibility and trust, always acquitting himself 
of the duties devolving upon him and meriting the approbation of every 
one concerned. 

He is a son of Seneca S. and Sarah H. Austin, who are represented 
elsewhere in this work. He was born in Greene county, New York, July 25, 
1847, si^tl spent eight years of his life there. In 1855, he came to Illinois 
with his parents, and for the succeeding five years he lived in Stark and 
Bureau counties. Then returning to the Empire state, he remained there 
for several years, completing his education. In 1868 he again came to 
this state and resided in Bureau and LaSalle counties, assisting his father 
in farming a portion of the time for several years. He had learned the 
machinist's trade at Albany, New York, in 1866. and for seven years he 
was occupied in work along this line of endeavor, with good results. In 
1876 he purchased an interest in his father's general store at Rutland, the 



726 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

firm being Austin & Son, for thirteen years or more. At the end of that 
period the young man purchased his father's share of the enterprise, and 
since then has conducted it alone. On the 15th of April, 1899, his store 
and nearly all of his stock of goods were destroyed by fire, but, nothing 
daunted, the energetic proprietor opened a store in temporary quarters, 
within a week after the unfortunate occurrence, and is now building a 
handsome brick block, of two stories and basement, an opera-house being 
above the stores. 

In company with his brother, Chester Y. Austin, Mr. G. L. Austin 
owns a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres, two miles and a half from 
Rexford, Sheridan county, Kansas. He is very successful as a business man, 
and is on the high road leading to assured wealth. He is looked up to 
and his judgment relied upon in financial and public matters, and after 
serving as a member of the village board of trustees for some time, he acted 
in the capacity of president of the same for a year. He also was the treas- 
urer of the township for some four years. Formerly he was active in the 
Masonic order, but has a letter of demittance from the lodge, and still keeps 
his membership in the Odd Fellows society. Politically he uses his fran- 
chise in behalf of the Republican party. 

On the 13th of February, 1881. Mr. Austin married Miss Kate D. Shull, 
daughter of Frederick A. and Sarah M. (Barger) Shull. They have be- 
come the parents of three daughters and a son, namely: Leslie, Fern, Caro 
and Ruth. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, he being 
one of the trustees, and is one of the most zealous workers in the cause. 



CYRUS H. SMITH, M. D. 

The successful physician to-day must possess not only a pecuHar fitness 
for the profession in innate qualities of mind and heart, but also must be 
thoroughly equipped for his calling by a long, systematic course of study 
and training under the tutelage of old, experienced medical men, who have 
been chosen for the responsible task on account of their prominence and 
success in the treatment of some particular form of disease. The public is 
to be congratulated that the lines are constantly tightening around the 
profession, to the end that only thoroughly competent physicians and sur- 
geons will be permitted to minister to the sick and suffering in the near 
future. Already noticeable reforms have been inaugurated — the years of 
preparation required have been increased and rigorous examinations must 
be passed ere a diploma is awarded the student. Thus the young physician 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 727 

of this decade possesses a much better foundation for future success than 
did his predecessors, being conversant with modern discoveries in the science 
of disease and its treatment. 

Dr. Cyrus H. Smith, a well known physician, surgeon and druggist of 
Tonica, comes of an old and respected Kentucky family, his paternal grand- 
father, William F. Smith, having been born in Warren county, that state. 
He was of Scotch-Irish extraction, and during the war of 1812 fought in 
the army of this young republic against the mother country. He owned 
a large plantation and was a slaveholder, like the most of his neighbors. His 
entire life was spent in his native county, where he died at an advanced age, 
leaving several sons and daughters. 

James B. Smith, the father of the Doctor, was born in the Blue Grass 
state and in 1839 came to Illinois. For a year or two he resided in Warren 
county, but in 1841 he settled in Knox county, where he passed the rest 
of his days, engaged in farming. He was summoned to the silent land 
in 1887, when in his seventy-seventh year. His devoted wife, Elizabeth 
A., a native of Pennsylvania, survived him a few years, dying in January, 
1898, when sixty-five years of age. She was one of the two daughters of 
Isaac Burns, whose home was near Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. For a 
time he was a stage-driver, running between Baltimore and Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, and few men in that part of the country were better known 
or more thoroughly respected. 

Dr. Cyrus H. Smith, who was born on his father's farm in Knox county, 
this state. April 3, 1869, is one of the younger children of the parental fam- 
ily. Of his six brothers and three sisters, nine are yet living, Hattie, the 
youngest, having died at the age of eight years. John L. and Robert M. 
are citizens of Superior, Nebraska; Henry F., of Abingdon, Illinois; James B., 
of Knoxville, Illinois; George W. and Charles E., of Galesburg, Illinois; 
and Mary A., the wife of Albert Kennedy, and Laura R., Mrs. Frank R. Rey- 
nolds, reside in Abingdon, this state. 

The boyhood and youth of the Doctor were quietly spent on his father's 
farm, his early education being gained in the district school. At nineteen he 
entered Hedding College, at Abingdon, where he pursued the higher 
branches of knowledge for four years, after which he went to Chicago and 
in 1890 was graduated in the Illinois College of Pharmacy. During the 
following year he was engaged in the drug business at North Henderson, 
IlHnois, in the meantime taking up the study of medicine. Going to Chicago 
in 1892. he was graduated in Rush Medical College three years later, since 
which time he has practiced his profession at Tonica. In 1898 he opened 
a drug store here, which he conducts in connection with his professional 
practice. He has been very successful in his undertakings, and enjoys the 



728 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

high opinion of his medical brethren, as well as that of his patients and 
the general public. He belongs to the county and state medical societies, 
and in every possible manner keeps himself posted in the progress of his 
profession. Socially he is a member of Tonica Lodge, No. 364, F. & A. M., 
and belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America. In his political creed 
he is a true-blue Republican. 

The marriage of Dr. Smith and Miss Glenna Peabody was celebrated 
January 28, 1892. The young couple have three charming little daughters, 
named respectively Dorothy, Agnes and Glenna. Mrs. Smith,. who is a 
daughter of \Mlliam and Mary (Rogers) Peabody, is a lady of attractive 
personality, refined and well educated, and an active member of the Baptist 
church. 



SAMUEL PATTERSON. 



Among the prominent early settlers and well-to-do farmers of LaSalle 
county is Samuel Patterson, who resides on his farm on section 36, Vermilion 
township. A resume of his life is as follows: 

Samuel Patterson was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, No- 
vember 10, 1839, a son of Stephen and Elizabeth (Bane) Patterson, natives 
of Pennsylvania; and of their three daughters and one son he is the only 
one now living. Stephen Patterson, the father, was a farmer. He came 
from Pennsylvania to Illinois in 1857 and located in Vermilion township, 
LaSalle county, where he bought three hundred and ten acres of land, partly 
improved, and where he passed the rest of his life and died, his death occur- 
ring here May 25, 1874, at the age of sixty-eight years. His wife, a member 
of the Presbyterian church, died in 1845, aged about thirty-five. Politically 
he was a Democrat, and at different times filled acceptably a number of 
township offices. 

The Pattersons are of Irish origin and the family was represented in 
this country at an early day. William Patterson, the grandfather of Samuel, 
was born in Pennsylvania and passed his life in that state, engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, with the rank of 
captain. He died at the age of seventy-five years. In his family were five 
children. Mr. Patterson traces his ancestry on the maternal side to Germany. 
His grandfather, Jacob Bane, was a native of Pennsylvania: bv occupation 
was a farmer and miller: was the father of twelve children: and died when 
past middle life. 

Samuel Patterson spent the first eighteen years of his life on his father's 
farm in \\'ashington county, Pennsylvania, receiving his education in the dis- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 729 

trict schools, and in 1857 came with his parents to Illinois. He has lived 
in LaSalle county ever since. After his marriage, which event occurred 
in the early part of 1867, he rented land of his father and carried on opera- 
tions in that way for a few years. He then bought sixty acres in Eagle town- 
ship, which he afterward sold, investing the proceeds in one hundred and 
sixty acres in Vermilion township, his present place, where he has lived since 
1876. 

February 14, 1867, was consummated the marriage of Samuel Patter- 
son and Harriet Geer. Mrs. Patterson is a daughter of Nathaniel and 
Eliza Maria (Clark) Geer, natives of Connecticut. Seven children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Patterson — two sons and five daughters, namely: 
NelHe, EHzabeth, Charlotte, James, Roy Stephen, Evaline and Bertha Lou- 
isa. Nellie is the wife of Frank Leslie, of Eldora, Iowa, and they have three 
children — Warren, Nina and Cora. Elizabeth married B. U. Hiester, of 
Farm Ridge township, LaSalle county, and they have one child, John 
Paul. The other children are still members of the home circle. Mr. and 
Mrs. Patterson are members of the Episcopal church, of which he is a vestry- 
man, an office he has filled for sixteen years. 

Politically he is a Democrat. For about twenty years he has served 
as school director, and was at one time elected a justice of the peace, but did 
not accept the office. 

Of Mrs. Patterson's parents, Nathaniel and Eliza Maria (Clark) Geer, 
it has already been stated that they were born in Connecticut. The history 
of the Geer family can be traced back to the Mayflower, when two brothers 
came over from England, one of them, David, being the great-grandsire of 
jMrs. Patterson. He Avas known as Deacon David Geer. He settled in 
Kent township, Litchfield county, Connecticut. Of him it is recorded that 
"he was gentle in spirit, of suave manner, and secured the strong affection 
of all who knew him." He was a Congregationalist and a zealous and de- 
voted Christian. Among the Geers of this country were Jarvis Geer, of New 
York city, a high churchman in the Episcopal church, and his cousin, Wel- 
come Geer. The latter died in Litchfield county, Connecticut, in 1833. 
He was by occupation a surveyor, and was at one time a captain in the state 
militia. 

Mrs. Patterson's father's mother was Sylvia (Bishop) Brown. The 
Browns were represented in the Revolutionary war, and John Brown, of 
Rehoboth, the founder of the family in this country, was prominent in the 
government of Plymouth colony. His son James married Lydia, a daughter 
of John Howland, of the ^Mayflower, a copy of whose will, as well as that 
of his son Jabez, is in the Yale library at New Haven. Nathaniel Brown's 
birth is also recorded in the Rhode Island record as the son of Hezekiah 



730 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Brown, who was born in Barrington, Rhode Island, in 1739. Thus Mrs. 
Patterson belongs to the ninth generation of the family in this country. 
The Bishops came from John Bishop, of Guilford, Connecticut, who came 
to this country with the Whitfields. 



JOHN E. HARTENBOWER. 

LaSalle county is to be congratulated on the possession of business 
men and financiers whose enterprise, ability and integrity have contributed 
in a large measure to the prosperity which this section of the state enjoys. 
Of this class John E. Hartenbower is a prominent representative. He is 
one of the leading citizens of Tonica, who not only stands high in the 
financial world here, but is equally esteemed in the social, political and 
ojfficial circles of the town and locality. 

On both the paternal and maternal sides our subject is of German 
descent and has inherited many of the sterling and reliable qualities of the 
Teutonic race. His grandfather, Christian Hartenbower, came to the 
United States from Wertemburg, Germany, and settled in Putnam county, 
Illinois, but died in LaSalle county, about 1875, when almost four-score 
years of age. He followed the shoemaker's trade in Germany, and in 
America he gave his attention chiefly to agricultural pursuits. His wife, 
Catherine Kolbin, died when Christian, Jr., the father of our subject, was 
two years old. When he was thirteen years of age his parents left their 
home at Kirchheim, on the Neckar river, in Wertemburg, and came to the 
New World. He was born February 4, 1825, and on their emigration he 
accompanied the family and with them became a resident of Putnam county, 
where he resided for fifteen years. On the expiration of that period he 
came to LaSalle county, where he purchased eighty acres of land in Hope 
township, and as the years passed by he added to his possessions until at 
one time he owned nearly eight hundred acres of excellent farming property. 
For the past seventeen years he has made his home in Tonica, and for ten 
years has lived retired from business cares. In former days he was not 
only engaged in general farming, but also bought and shipped livestock. 
He chose for his wife Miss Jerusha G. Hiltabrand, who was born in Ten- 
nessee, August 22, 1825, and was the eldest of twelve children of George 
and Elizabeth (Gunn) Hiltabrand. Her father was born near Camden, 
Pennsylvania, in June, 1799, and was of German lineage. He was reared 
in North Carolina until 1818, when he removed to Robinson county, Ten- 
nessee, and in 1828 he came to Tazewell county, Illinois. The following 
spring, however, he settled in what is known as Ox Bow, Putnam county. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 731 

During the Black Hawk war he served as a sergeant in Captain William 
Haws' company of mounted volunteers, belonging to the Fortieth Regi- 
ment, Fourth Brigade and First Division of the Illinois militia. He was 
mustered out of the service at Hennepin on the 28th of June, 1832. At 
one time he purchased four quarter-sections of government land, for which 
he paid a dollar and a quarter per acre, and by the aid of his sons improved 
the property which is now estimated to be worth one hundred dollars per 
acre. Long before his death he was a wealthy man and an extensive land- 
owner, and, although he suffered many hardships and privations in the 
first years of his residence in this state, in his last years he was enabled to 
secure all the necessaries and many of the comforts and luxuries of life. 
He died October 20, 1870, aged seventy-one years. 

Seven children blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Hartenbower, 
namely: Henry F.; Geprge F.; William F.; Emily, who is the wife of G. 
J. Williams, of Eagle Grove, Iowa; John E.; Catherine C, wife of A. B. 
Grant, of LaSalle county; and Simeon, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Harten- 
bower are members of the Baptist church and are held in the highest regard 
by all who know them. 

The birth of J. E. Hartenbower occurred on the parental farm in this 
county, March 18, 1864, and his childhood and young manhood were passed 
within five miles of Tonica. He supplemented a district school education 
by a course at Eureka College, in Woodford county, this state, and subse- 
quently was occupied in teaching for some four years. Later he clerked 
in a drug store, and in 1887 his connection with the Tonica Exchange Bank 
began. After acting as a clerk for a period, he became the cashier, and is 
now the senior member of the firm of Hartenbower & Hiltabrand, owners 
of this popular banking institution. Austin Hiltabrand was the junior 
partner for a few years, but since 1896 George D. Hiltabrand has occupied 
that position in the firm. The Tonica Exchange Bank has transacted busi- 
ness under that title for the past twenty years, and possesses the confidence 
of the community, as the policy of the gentlemen at its head is conservative, 
methodical and eminently trustworthy. 

Mr. Hartenbower is interested in real estate in this locality, as well as 
in the west. For twelve years he has been the special agent of the Union 
Central Life Insurance Company, of Cincinnati, and also handles fire insur- 
ance. He is a director in the LaSalle State Bank, of LaSalle. For the 
past five years he has been a member of the Tonica public school board, and 
is now acting as its clerk, and was the clerk of the town for three years, 
township collector for two terms, and since 1887 has been a police magis- 
trate. Politically he is independent, though his vote is usually given to the 
Democratic party. 



732 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

In the fraternities our subject belongs to Tonica Lodge, No. 364, A. 
F. & A. M., of which he is a past master; Peru Chapter, No. 60, R. A. M.; 
St. John's Commandery, No. 26, K. T.; and Peoria Consistory, thirty-second 
degree, Scottish-Rite Masons. He also is identified with Tonica Lodge, No. 
298, Odd Fellows; Kaiser Camp, No. 707, ]\L W. of A.; ^vlarshall Lodge of 
the Knights of Pythias, at W'enona, Illinois, and with his wife, is a member 
of the Order of the Eastern Star. His marriage to ]\Iiss Jennie E., born 
May 13, 1864, a daughter of James A. Lambert, was solemnized November 
28, 1886, and they have two children, Emily J., born July 20, 1888, and J. 
Delwin, born November 14, 1893. 

Mr. Hartenbower is a natural musician, and is the leader of the Tonica 
Woodmen Brass and Reed Band, comprising tw'enty-two members. As 
may be inferred, he is one of the most popular men in this section of the 
county, few being in greater demand in all business, social or public enter- 
prises, and his name seems to be all that is needed to make a success of any 
local undertaking. 



DAVID GRANT. 



Forty-four years ago David Grant cast in his fortunes with the people 
of LaSalle county, and during all of this period he has dwelt in Eden 
township, where he stands high in the estimation of old time acquaintances 
and every one else in general who knows him. He is a self-made man, 
having amassed a competence by enterprise and persistent industry, and now, 
as the evening of his life draws near, he has abundant means to pass in 
comfort his remaining years. 

As Marsby Grant, the father of our subject, died when the latter was 
but two years old, but little is known of the family history on the paternal 
side. Both he and his father before him were natives of Vermont, and the 
maternal grandfather of David Grant, a ]\Ir. Kemp, was from the same state, 
and was a soldier in the war of the Revolution. He removed to New York 
state, where he died at about ninety years of age. He was a farmer by 
occupation and reared his six children to the same pursuit. Three sons 

were born to Marsby and (Kemp) Grant, but only Edward and 

David survive. 

The birth of David Grant took place in Saratoga county, New York,. 
February 18, 1828. He spent his boyhood in that locality, receiving a good 
public school education. Believing that the west offered greater opportun- 
ities to a young man, he came to Illinois in ^larch, 1855, and for three or 
four years rented land in Eden township. He then bouglit two acres of 
ground and erected thereon a one-story frame house, fourteen by twenty- 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GEXEALOGICAL RECORD. 733 

four feet in dimensions, and a small straw-thatched stable. Having thus 
made a start, he worked early and late toward the accomplishment of more 
ambitious things, with the result that he was soon able to Iniy a quarter 
section of land. This place he sold at the end of two years, in 1864, and 
in the following spring he removed to his present homestead. This finely 
improved farm, situated on section 36, comprises one hundred and sixty 
acres, well adapted for a general line of crops grown in this region. In addi- 
tion to owning this place, he has a good dwelling house in Bloomington, Illi- 
nois. He takes a patriotic interest in the welfare of his community, and 
votes the Democratic ticket, but he has never been an aspirant to public 
office. 

Just before coming to this state to found a new home and make a 
position for himself, Mr. Grant was married, on the 9th of February, 1855, 
to Miss Jane Humphries, who has been a faithful helpmate. They became 
the parents of three daughters and five sons, Robert, David H., Annie E., 
Mary E., Sarah J., James H. and Thomas I. (twins) and Charles W. The 
two last mentioned are unmarried, and David H. died when but ten months 
old. The others are married and are settled in homes of their own. Rob- 
ert chose Miss Jane Kent for his wife, and they have one daughter. Their 
home is in Chicago, where the father is engaged in the livery and feed stable 
business. Annie became the wife of Frank ]\Iiner, since deceased, and their 
two children are named Arthur and David H. Later she wedded a Mr. 
P. S. Crites, by whom she has one son, and their present home is in the 
vicinity of Las Animas, Colorado. Mrs. Mary E. Wright resides at Storm 
Lake, Iowa, and Sarah, Mrs. Samuel Jamison, the mother of two children, 
lives near Utica, LaSalle county. James married Miss Edna A. Fairchild, 
and their only child is Eddie Grant. Mrs. David Grant is a member of 
the Baptist church and is a most exemplary lady, loved by all. Both she 
and our subject are highly esteemed in this community, where they com- 
menced their happy married life together, and none of their old neighbors 
begrudge them the prosperity which now- crowns their busy, industrious 
lives. 



JOHN WHITE. 



Since the middle of the century John White has been identified with 
LaSalle county, Illinois, and since 1866 he has owned and occupied his 
present farm on section 14, Groveland towaiship. 

Mr. White is a native of the Old Dominion. He was born in Frederick 
county, Virginia, in the year 1814, a son of John and Elizabeth (Carper) 
White, both natives of Virginia. In the White family were eleven children. 



734 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 



six daughters and five sons, and at this writing six of that number are Hving, 
namely: John, whose name initiates this review; EHzabeth, the widow of 
Thomas McCombs, of West Virginia; Jane, the widow of Ezekiel Caldwell, 
of Peoria county, Illinois; Ellen, the widow of David Lutz, of West Virginia; 
Amanda, the wife of Jerrie Null, of Marshall county, West Virginia; and 
Alfred, of Clyde, Kansas. The senior John White was a farmer and team- 
ster, and for many years drove a team from Baltimore to Pittsburg and 
Wheeling, making regular trips. The last two years of his life were spent 
in Peoria county, Illinois, where he died, at the age of seventy-three years. 
His wife's death occurred in West Virginia six years before his. They were 
Presbyterians in faith. 

WilHam White, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was a native 
of Virginia, whO' moved to Kentucky in the early history of that state. He 
had a small family. The maternal grandfather of our subject was William 
Carper. He was of Dutch descent, was the father of two sons and three 
daughters, and died in his native state, Virginia, when past middle Hfe. 

When John White, the direct subject of this review, was ten years old 
his parents removed with their family from the eastern part of Virginia, 
to what is now known as West Virginia, where he lived until 1850. That 
year he came to Illinois, making the journey by way of the Ohio and 
Mississippi rivers, and landing at Lacon. He first located nine miles east 
of Lacon, where he rented land for six years. The next four years he rented 
land in Osage township, LaSalle county, and following that was five years 
on a rented farm in Groveland township. In the spring of 1866 he bought 
his present home farm, one hundred and sixty acres in Groveland township, 
which he has since occupied, carrying on general farming operations. 

In 1839 Mr. White married Miss Mary Ann Whetsel, daughter of John 
and EHzabeth (Darnell) Whetsel, whose life was happily blended with his 
from that time until 1883, when she died at the age of sixty-three years. 
She was a consistent member of the Christian church, as also is Mr. White. 
To them were born eleven children — three sons and eight daughters, all of 
whom reached adult age except two that died in infancy; and the grand- 
children of this worthy sire now number forty, and the great-grandchildren 
twenty. Of Mr. White's children we record that Rachel, the widow of 
Egbert Dresser, has six children, Chauncey, Orrie, Fred, Elmer, Charles and 
Corie; Margaretta, the wife of George Studyman, lives in Compton, New- 
ton county, Arkansas, and their six children are Sylvester, Sene, John, 
Lucinda, Ellis and Grant; Elizabeth, the wife of Henry Bane, of Eureka, 
Kansas, is the mother of six children, Ida, Alvin, Mary, Nellie, John and 
Frank; Jane, the wife of James Bane, of Dana, Illinois, has ten children, 
Austin, Annie, Arthur, Herbert, Charles, Gilbert, Loretta, Richard, Roy 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 735 

and Clinton; Mary Ann, the wife of Daniel Winans, of Dana, Illinois, has 
three children living, Cassie, Dial and Belle; Nellie, the wife of John Clegg, 
of Leeds, Illinois, has one child, Curtis; James, who married Carrie Austin, 
has one child, Henry; Richard, who married Julia Winans, has eight children 
— Ernest, Chloe, Ethel, Pearl, Harvey, and Lelah, Ida and Leo (triplets), 
and Frank, who married Dora Yohe, and has one child, Roy. 
Politically Mr. White is a Democrat. 



SENECA S. AUSTIN. 



Nearly forty-five years ago this honored citizen came to Illinois, and 
for almost a quarter of a century he has dwelt in the town of Rutland, LaSalle 
county. His life has been an exceptionally active and useful one, and though 
actuated by a proper amount of ambition and desire for success, he has 
ever kept in view the higher aims which should animate mankind, and 
has nobly striven to fulfill what he believed was his chief mission. As he 
looks back along the pathway he has pursued for just eighty years, he can 
have but few regrets, for the majority of his mistakes have been errors of 
judgment, not of deliberate choice, and his heart has been filled with love 
and sympathy for his fellow men and a genuine desire to aid them by every 
means in his power. 

He is one of the five surviving children of Daniel and Betsy (Drigg) 
Austin, who were natives of New York state and Connecticut respectively. 
Four of their children have passed to the better land, and those who re- 
main are named as follows: Seneca S.; Harriet, the widow of Curtis Rog- 
ers, of Utica, Illinois; John, a citizen of Greene county, New York; Alphon- 
sine, the wife of Curtis Lacy, of Greene county. New York; and Louisa, who 
resides in the same county and is the wife of Isaac Smith. The father, Daniel 
Austin, was a successful farmer of that locality, where he died in 1875, at the 
age of nearly eighty-two years. His widow's death took place seven years 
later, when she was in her eighty-sixth year. Both were devoted mem- 
bers of the Christian church. Jeremiah, the father of Daniel Austin, was 
a native of the Empire state, a weaver by trade and a farmer to some extent. 
He had two sons and three daughters, and lived to an advanced age. The 
father of Mrs. Betsy Austin was John Drigg, a native of Connecticut. He 
was a brick and stone mason and a plasterer by trade. His children were 
six in number — two sons and four daughters. 

The birth of Seneca S. Austin occurred on the parental homestead in 
Cairo township, Greene county. New York, August 4, 1819. He early mas- 
tered the details of agriculture and attended the old fashioned subscription 



736 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

schools of that early period. After he reached his majority he followed the 
usual custom of learning a trade, and at length was pronounced an excellent 
blacksmith, but he soon abandoned that pursuit and resumed farming, to 
which he gave his energy until 1875. 

On the 15th of October, 1843, a momentous event occurred in the 
history of Mr. Austin, as on that day Miss Sally Lake was united 10 him 
in wedlock, and during the many years which have come and gone since then 
she has, indeed, been a faithful sharer of his joys and sorrows. Her parents 
were Godfrey M. and Permelia (Edwards) Lake, natives of the Empire 
state and farmers by vocation. The father was of Dutch descent, a son 
of William and Mary (Miller) Lake, of old New York families. The latter, 
Mrs. Mary M. Lake, reached the remarkable age of one hundred and ten 
years. Godfrey M. Lake died at his home in New York, February 3, 1887, 
when six months over eighty-two years of age, and his widow, who died in 
1895, was then ninety-one years and four months old. Mrs. Sally Austin 
is one of their nine children, only three of whom have crossed to the other 
shore. Mary B., now of Grand Rapids, Michigan, first married Edmund 
Spring, and after his death she became the wife of Peter Day. Ann C. is 
the wife of Henry Risedorph, of Cairo, New York. George and William 
H. Lake reside in Greene county, New York, and Lydia R., the youngest, 
IS the wife of Ezra Thorn, of Greenville, New York. 

Three children — Daniel M., George L. and Chester Y. — blessed the 
union of S. S. Austin and wife. Daniel M., of Rutland, chose Jennie Cooper 
for a wife, and their children are named Addie, Clara and Clifford. George 
L. wedded Kate Duf^eld Shull and their four children are Leslie, Fern, 
Caro and Ruth. He is a general merchant at Rutland, and is represented 
elsewhere in this work. Chester Y. married Nora Briggs and their three 
children are Clem, Ollie and Bernice. Their home is in Streator, and he is 
employed as a distributing bill agent of the Santa Fe Railroad Company. 
Concerning Daniel M. Austin, we may add that he enlisted in the United 
States army when he was twenty-one years of age and was out on the 
frontier three years. He has a farm of eighty acres two miles east of Rut- 
land, but, his health failing about five years ago, he rented his land and 
has since lived in Rutland. Chester Y. Austin was formerly a telegraph 
operator at various points, and now he is employed in a different capacity 
by the Santa Fe Railroad Company. 

In 1855 S. S. Austin came to Illinois with his wife and three children, 
locating on a farm in Stark county. He experienced the hardships of the 
pioneer on these w^estern prairies, and was obliged to break the hitherto un- 
cultivated ground with the great plows and the yokes of oxen, according 
to custom. In 1858 he removed to Bureau county, and after two years 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. y2>7 

more of western farming he returned to his native state, where the conditions 
were in many respects more favorable. He remained there for eight years, 
and then came back to his old farm in Bureau county. Four years later 
he located in Rutland, where he has since made his home. He bought 
property here and was engaged in the lumber business for two years. During 
the ensuing thirteen or fourteen years he, in partnership with his son George, 
w^as engaged in general merchandising. Then selling his interest to his son, 
he retired to enjoy the competence which he had justly earned. 

When residing in Bureau county, Mr. Austin was one of the school 
trustees, and has served in the same capacity since coming to Rutland. He 
also served as township clerk when he dwelt in Stark county, and at all times 
has taken a commendable interest in the community wherein his lot was 
cast. He and his estimable wife are members of the Christian church, and 
have hosts of sincere friends in various parts of the country. 



CHAUNCEY JONES. 



During the forty-five years of Chauncey Jones' residence in Illinois he 
has been a witness of remarkable changes, as the wild prairie yielded to 
the cultivation of the hardy pioneers, and fertile farms and thriving villages 
sprang into existence, and the "prairie schooners," conveying little parties 
of home-seekers, gave place to the swift-moving trains, with their thousands 
of passengers, carried tO' and fro. He has been no idle on-looker, but has 
faithfully contributed his share toward the prosperity which this state and its 
inhabitants now enjoy, and as his footsteps lead toward the declining sun of 
life he may look l)ack. without regrets, feeling that he has performed his en- 
tire duty and efficiently filled his place in his generation. 

Ezra Jones, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was a native of 
New Hampshire and of Welsh descent. He was a miller by trade, and died 
when in the prime of life, leaving six or seven children. The maternal grand- 
father was' William Dodge, also a native of New Hampshire, and a cabinet- 
maker and owner of a sawmill. He reared a large family and lived to attain 
an advanced age. 

John, the father of Chauncey Jones, was born and grew to maturity 
in New Hampshire. There he mastered the trade of cabinet-making, and 
in 1837 he settled in Ohio, his home being in the town of W^oodstock, Cham- 
paign county, for the ensuing eighteen years. In 1855 he came to Illinois- 
and thenceforth lived in Long Point township, Livingston county. He was 
summoned to the better land in 1869, surviving his wife about one year. 
Both were members of the Free-Will Baptist church, and were highly es- 



738 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

teemed members of society. Mr. Jones was a Democrat until the time when 
the disturbed condition of the country led to the organization of the Re- 
publican party, when, espousing its noble doctrines, he ever afterward was 
affiliated with it. Mrs. Jones was born in New Hampshire, and in her girl- 
hood bore the name of Polly Dodge. She became the mother of six chil- 
dren, five of whom were sons. Only three survive, namely: Chauncey, 
David C, of Mahaska county, Iowa, and Enoch P., a citizen of Minonk, 
Illinois. 

The birth of Chauncey Jones occurred in Wilmot, New Hampshire, 
October 29, 1830. He was seven years of age when his father removed to 
Ohio, and prior to reaching his majority he lived on farms and in the town by 
turns. He received a common-school education, and in 1854 started out in- 
dependently, entering eighty acres of land at Long Point, Illinois. He im- 
proved that property, which he still owns, and in addition to that he owns 
two other tracts of eighty acres each, in the same locality, and a farm of 
similar size in Lee county. He continued to carry on his agricultural pur- 
suits in Livingston county until 1891, when he retired, and "coming to 
Dana bought a house, which he remodeled and beautified, making his home 
here ever since. 

His marriage to Miss Sarah A. Bane was solemnized July 23, 185 1, 
and, after more than two-score years of joys and sorrows shared together 
she was summoned to the silent land by the angel of death, December 27, 
1893. She was a daughter of Absalom and Sarah (Downey) Bane. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jones had the following named five children: Polly L., the eldest 
daughter, first married William Tullis and after his death became the wife 
of John Stanley, of Lee county. By her first union six children were born, 
namely: Susan, Boyd, William, Annie, Rena and Charles. Sarah Etta, the 
second child of Mr. Jones, died at the age of one year. Annetta, the third 
born, is the wife of Ezekiel Marshall, of Groveland township, and has 
two sons — Orville and Howard. George B., the older son, died at the age 
of thirty-four years, unmarried; and William H., the younger son, married 
Inez Kelly and had two children — Elsie and Curtis. His wife died and after- 
ward he wedded Miss Mary Knox, and their twin boys are named respec- 
tively John K. and Chauncey. The home of this family is in Long Point 
township, Livingston county. 

On the 1st of November, 1894. Chauncey Jones was united in marriage 
with Miss Sophia Cartwell. They are members of the Christian church 
and have manv sincere friends in Dana and elsewhere. 

Politically Mr. Jones is a true-blue Republican. He has served as a 
police magistrate for three years, and for nine years acted in the capacity 
of road commissioner. He is conscientious in discharging every obligation 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 739 

of citizenship, and merits the favorable regard which is generously accorded 
him. Education of the young is a subject which he deems well worthy of 
his serious attention, and for one term he served as a school director. 



ISAAC LOCK. 



Vermilion township, LaSalle county, Illinois, counts among its 
esteemed citizens and respected farmers the gentleman whose name initiates 
this sketch — Isaac Lock. 

Mr. Lock is a native of Ohio. He was born in Preble county, October 
15, 1822, a son of Philip and Elizabeth (Wolf) Lock, natives of Maryland, 
and he is the only one now living of their family of eight children, four 
sons and four daughters. Philip Lock was by trade a shoemaker, but 
was for a number of years engaged in farming. He was one of the pioneers 
of Preble county, Ohio, where he cleared and improved a farm, and where 
he died, at the age of fifty years. His widow survived him a number of years 
and came west with her youngest son to LaSalle county, Illinois, where 
she died at the age of seventy-two years. Both Philip Lock and his wife 
were members of the Lutheran church. 

The Locks are of German origin. Henry Lock, the grandfather of 
our subject, was a native of Maryland and lived and died in that state. He 
was a farmer. Of the maternal grandfather of Isaac Lock, whose name was 
John Wolf, we record that he was a native of Maryland, and at the tim.e of 
his death was eighty years old. He was the father of nine children . 

Isaac Lock was reared on his father's farm in Harrison township, 
Preble county, Ohio, and received his education in the district school near 
his home. After his marriage, which occurred in 1844, when he was twenty- 
two years of age, he settled down in Ohio and carried on farming there for 
six years. He then moved over into the neighboring state of Indiana and 
located on a farm eight miles from Winchester, where he lived two years. 
In 1846 he came to Illinois. His first location here was on a farm in Ridge 
township, LaSalle county, where he lived four years. At the end of that 
time he rented his present farm, one hundred and sixty acres, on section 
34, Vermilion township, wdiich three years later he purchased and on which 
he has since lived, devoting his energies to its cultivation and improvement, 
with the result that he has one of the most desirable farms in his locality. 

Mr. Isaac Lock was married October 9, 1844, to Miss Susan Hapner, 
a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Ellis) Hapner, and the fruits of their union 
were four children, namely: Milton, Minerva, Amanda and Isaac E. The 
three first died in early life. Isaac E. married Miss Mary Hauenstein, a 



740 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

daughter of Philip and ]\Iaggie (Klag) Hauenslein, and they have two 
children — Ira Allen and Courtland. ]\Irs. Susan Lock shared the joys and 
sorrows of life with her husband for more than half a century, and at the 
ripe age of eighty years and ten months passed away, February 2. 1899. 

Adhering to the religious faith in which he was reared, ]\Ir. Lock is 
a Lutheran. Politically he affiliates with the Republican party. By honest 
industry and careful management he has secured a competency for old age, 
and now that the evening of life has come he is in the enjoyment of comfort 
and plenty. 



J. E. PORTER. 



J. E. Porter stands at the head of one of the leading industrial concerns 
of Ottawa. Everywhere in our land are found men who have worked their 
own way from humble and lowly beginnings to places of leadership in the 
commerce, the great productive industries and the management of the 
veins and arteries of the traffic and exchanges of the co.untry. To this class 
belongs ^Ir. Porter, and to-day he stands among the representative busi- 
ness men of LaSalle county, enjoying not only the fruits of his toil, but also 
the respect and esteem of his fellow men, for his reputation is unassailable. 

The Porter family is of Irish lineage, the great-grandfather of our 
subject, in company with two brothers, having sailed from the Emerald 
Isle in the early part of the seventeenth century to become members of a 
Massachusetts colony near Boston, where two of the three brothers reared 
their families. John Porter, the grandfather of our subject, was the eldest 
child of his father's family and was born January 7, 1756. He emigrated 
westward, locating in \\'ashington county, Pennsylvania, where he married 
a Miss Hossack, a lady of Scotch parentage who was born November 17, 
1758. They had six sons and three daughters, the youngest child being 
Joseph, the father of J. E. Porter. He was born in ^^'ashington county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1798, and during the war of 1812 assisted in taking care 
of the wounded and other unfortunate soldiers, although only a lad of 
fourteen summers at the time. On attaining his majority he sought a home 
in the west, becoming a resident of Adams county, Ohio, in 1822. There he 
formed the acquaintance of Miss Eliza Moore, and on the ist of April, 
1824, they were married. She was born February 27, 1805, near Lexington, 
Virginia, 'and died June 22, 1840. Her father, David ]\Ioore, was born 
]\Iay 10, 1773, and was a son of Captain John Moore, one of the noted 
families of ^loores that furnished so many valiant soldiers to \^irginia 
regiments during the Revolution. His wife, Ann Ewing, was born June 
18, 1782, and was a member of the Ewing family that also took an active part 




/. S. Porter. 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 741 

in the war for independence, Joseph and EHza Porter became the parents 
of five sons and two daughters, of whom two are now living: Joseph E. and 
a sister, Sarah E., now the w-ife of Henry Moft'ett, of Ransom, Illinois. 

Joseph E. Porter, the only living male representative of this family, 
was born in Brown county, Ohio, May i, 1831, and has lived in Ottawa 
for the past forty-five years. On the 22d of March, i860, he married j\Iiss 
Margaret Hossack, daughter of John Hossack, wdio was the eldest son of 
John and Margaret (Forsythe) Hossack. He was born in Elgin, Scotland, 
December 6, 1806, and went to Canada when twelve years of age. His 
wife, Martha Hossack, was the eldest daughter of Cord Lens, who was 
born in Germany, in 1786, his wife being Ann Lens, who was born Decem- 
ber 4, 1786, and was a daughter of William and Ann Gilly, nee Banks, of 
England. Mr. and Mrs. Lens were married in England in 1810, but soon 
afterward removed to Scotland, where Martha was born, November 28, 
1813. In 1818 they emigrated with their family to Quebec. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hossack were married in Quebec, Canada, in 1833; in 1838 removed to 
Chicago, and in 1849 took up their abode in Ottawa, where Mr. Hossack 
engaged in merchandising, dealing in lumber and grain. He purchased 
the latter commodity from the farmers and shipped it by rail to Chicago. 

There were born to Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Porter, eight children: Eliza- 
beth, born March 7, 1861, married William F. Jacobs, February 18, 1890; 
Jessie F., born November 16, 1862, married George W. Yentzer, November 
J 5. 1888; Lincoln Ewing, born February 26, 1865, married Anne Combs, 
May 23, 1889; Annie L., born June 5, 1867, married Arthur S. Hook, June 
10, 1892; Josephine, born April 30, 1870, married Charles P. Taylor, October 
31, 1894 (all the above mentioned now living in Ottawa, Illinois); John H., 
born Januar}' 4, 1873, and now living at Buffalo, New York; Louise C, 
born July 14, 1876, still at home; and Sidney S., born September 18, 1880, 
is at school. 

It was in the fall of 1852 that Joscjih Porter came from Ohio to Ottawa. 
He was first employed as a clerk b}- J. G. Nattinger, who was at that 
time one of the leading merchants of the city, but Mr. Porter did not see 
a favorable outlook for a clerkship, and being of an inventive turn of mind, 
he gave his attention first to the study of the daguerreotype art in 1854, and 
was one of the first in^•entors of photography. This he followed for a 
number of years. Visiting his father's farm during the fall of 1856, he was 
called upon to assist in storing away the hay, the work at that time being 
done by the common pitchforks and manual labor. Thinking that better 
methods could be secured he at once entered upon the work of inventing 
an easier way for storing hay. and as a result produced the famous Porter 
Hay Carrier, which has gained for him a national reputation as an inventor 



742 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

and manufacturer of hay tools, and in that occupation he has continued 
since 1869. Being without capital he at first began manufacturing them 
by hand, doing all of the work himself. After working until he had a 
sufificient quantity on hand he would make a tour of the country, exhibiting 
the tools and taking orders from the dealers. In this way he worked until 
1872, when the demand for his goods had so increased that he was obliged 
to employ help in the manufacturing department. The excellence of his 
machines commended them to the trade and to the public, a fact which is 
evidenced by the large demand at the present time and the number of medals 
that have been awarded him by state fair associations and foreign exhibi- 
tions. He was awarded the first premium at the World's Columbian Ex- 
hibition, held in Chicago in 1893. His manufacturing interests have steadily 
grown until at the present time the J. E. Porter Company occupies large 
and commodious brick buildings and gives employment to a large number 
of workmen. The output of the plant is extensive, and the business has been 
so ably conducted that it returns an excellent income to him who is at 
the head. Mr. Porter is a man of resourceful ability, and in connection with 
his factory interests in Ottawa in 1894 he was instrumental in organizing the 
Inland Steel Company, whose mill is located at Chicago Heights. Mr. 
Porter was elected president of the organization and occupied that position 
for four years, when he resigned. His son, J. H. Porter, is now the secretary 
of the company and one of the active managers of the mill, the business of 
which has constantly grown until to-day the enterprise is one of the few 
rolHng mills in the west, producing all kinds and shapes of steel used in the 
manufacture of agricultural implements. Mr. Porter certainly deserves great 
credit for his success, which has resulted from deep thought, careful inves- 
tigation and untiring labor. 



WILLIAM W. HILTABRAND. 

Seventy years ago the father and numerous relatives of William W. 
Hiltabrand came to the frontier of Illinois, and thus from pioneer days the 
name has been indissolubly connected with the early history of the state. 
The family has been noted for all of the sterling qualities and public spirit 
which goes toward the making of valued citizens. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Conrad Hiltabrand, was a 
native of Pennsylvania and was of German descent. At an early day he re- 
moved to North Carolina, and his last years were spent in Tennessee, where 
he died at an advanced age. His widow, Jane Brown Hiltabrand, came to 
Illinois, and departed this life in Putnam county about i860. They were the 
parents of ten children, most of whom followed agricultural pursuits, to 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 743 

which calling they had been reared. The maternal grandfather of our sub- 
ject was Hartwell Hailey, of Scotch-Irish extraction. He was bom in North 
Carolina and in 1829 came from Tennessee to Illinois, locating in Putnam 
county, where he died at a ripe age. He was the father of thirteen chil- 
dren. 

The parents of William W. are Isaac and Elizabeth (Hailey) Hilta- 
brand, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. The father 
came to this state in 1829 and took up a quarter section of government 
land in Putnam county. Later he became quite wealthy for that day, and 
owned a section of land, some being within the boundaries of this county. 
He continued to dwell in Putnam county until his death, in 1877, when 
he was nearly seventy years of age. He was a soldier in the Black Hawk 
war, and never failed in the discharge of his public duties. His wife died 
in 1 87 1, when fifty-two years of age. Both were members of the Baptist 
church, and loved and honored by every one who knew them. Eight sons 
and one daughter of their fourteen children are yet living, namely: William 
W., our subject; Gilbert, Andrew and James, of Hope township, LaSalle 
county; Allen, of Henry, Illinois; Austin, of Tonica; Douglas, on the old 
homestead in Putnam county; Edward, in Magnolia, same county; and 
Amanda, the wife of Eliphlet Ketchum, of Henry, Illinois. 

Born in Putnam county, February 2. 1839, William W. Hiltabrand 
was early initiated into the routine of farm life, and received such knowledge 
as he could gain in the common schools. As he approached manhood he 
managed the old homestead on shares, for his father, for four years, and then 
bought eighty acres in LaSalle county. To this tract, situated in Hope 
township, he subsequently added adjoining land from time to time, and in- 
vested in other property until he is now the owner of eleven or twelve hun- 
dred acres, altogether. Seven tracts of eighty acres each are located in Hope 
township; and another, the one on which he now makes his home, is in 
Tonica; while one quarter section is in Iowa, and two quarter sections are in 
Nebraska. That he possesses business ability is evident from the above 
mentioned facts, and when it is taken into consideration that he started out 
a poor boy, and that his success has been mainly due to his own efforts, 
his success in Hfe is well worthy of admiration. Honesty and industry are 
the only secrets of his prosperity. 

In 1863 Mr. Hiltabrand married Miss Sabina Kreider, who died just 
ten years subsequently. She was a daughter of the well known citizens, 
Samuel and Catherine (Reed) Kreider, and was a consistent member of the 
Baptist church. Three children were bom to our subject and his first wife, 
namely: Sabina Katie, Marion F., and John Willard. The latter died at 
the age of twenty-three years. Sabina K. is the wife of H. A. Barr, and 



744 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

resides near Lostant. She is the mother of seven children, named as follows: 
Elsie, Verna, Mina, Florence and Forest (twins), Ralph and Hazel. ^Marion 
F. married ]\Iiss Ida Stilhvell, and their home is in Hope township. They 
have five children — Wilma. Berle, Laura. Lelah and Charles. In 1874 our 
subject wedded Miss ^lelissa Ferry, and their two children, Burton and 
Jane Elizabeth, are at home — the former still a student in the local schools, 
and the latter a teacher in district schools. Mr. and ?\Irs. Hiltabrand are 
active members of the Methodist church. Following out his strong tem- 
perance principles, he favors the Prohibition party with his ballot. For a 
number of years he served as a road commissioner and school director. All 
public enterprises calculated to benefit the people have received his earnest 
co-operation. 

WILLIAM PATTERSON. 

This estimable citizen of Vermilion township, LaSalle county, is a 
native of Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred in ^^'ashington county, 
that state. August 3, 1829. His parents, Samuel and Eliza (Helm) Patterson, 
likewise, were natives of the Keystone state, as were his two grandfathers, 
William Patterson and \\'illiam Helm. William Patterson. Sr., was of Irish 
descent and was a miller by occupation, following that pursuit until he was 
well along in years. He was the father of three sons and two daughters. 
Both he and the maternal grandfather lived and died in Pennsylvania. The 
latter was of Irish extraction, also, and was a miller by trade. His children, 
eight in number, comprised three sons and five daughters. 

In 1852 Samuel Patterson came to Illinois and purchased three hundred 
and twenty acres in A'ermilion township. Later he sold that property and 
removing: to Ottawa resided there for several vears. He then returned to this 
township and rented a farm of one hundred and twenty acres, the present 
homestead of the subject of this narrative. Here he spent his last years, 
dying in 1889, at an advanced age. He was a citizen thoroughly respected 
for his many sterling qualities and his friends were legion. His first wife, 
the mother of our subject, died in July. 1852, and he subsequently married 
Mary Hughes, by whom he had one son, Frank. After her death he wedded 
Julia Ann Helm, a sister of his first wife. By his first wife he had eleven 
children, but only three are now living, namely: AMlliam; Stephen, of Scat- 
tering Point, Livingston county, Illinois, and Samuel. 

William Patterson was reared on a farm in his native county and at- 
tended school in an old-fashioned log school-house in his boyhood. He has 
always followed farming as a means of livelihood, and has met with success, 
as he justly deserves. Before coming to Illinois, in 1852, he spent two 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 745. 

3-ears in \'iro-inia, but he concluded to locate permanently in the west, as this, 
state was then thought of by the people of the east. Arriving here, he 
lived in Livingston county for about a year, since which time he has resided 
in LaSalle county. For a twelvemonth or so he carried on a farm three miles 
east of his present homestead, and then for eighteen years he managed a 
homestead situated south of Lowell. Going next to Deer Park township, 
he remained there during a year, and then came to his fine farm on section 27, 
Vermilion township. Here he bought eighty acres and later added another 
tract of like extent. He has made sulistantial improvements and his farm 
l)ears the reputation of being one of the most productive and valuable of all 
in this locality. Following in the political footsteps of his father, Mr. Pat- 
terson is a Democrat. For eleven years he served efflciently as township, 
collector, and for the past three years he has been a road commissioner. 

The 'marriage of Mr. Patterson and Miss Minerva Huss, a daughter 
of Benjamin and Sarah (Church) Huss, was solemnized May 22, 185 1. They 
became the parents of twelve children, ten of whom they reared to maturity,. 
Agnes and Stephen dying in infancy. Their eldest born, Sarah Adeline,, 
married Alonzo Trout, of Seneca, Illinois, and has three children — Ernest, 
Ella and Tliirza. Robert Franklin, the eldest of the six sons, married Minnie 
Humphreys, and resides in Chicago. Elizabeth Joan became the wife of 
Henry Marsh, of Utica, Illinois, and mother of William, Charles, George, 
Nettie and Fred. Thomas Harvev chose Ellen Trout, of Vermilionville, for 
his wife and their children are named respectively Jesse, Bessie, Ralph and 
William. Benjamin Austin wedded Marian Groat and their home is north- 
east of Tonica. this county. Their four children are Mabel, Ira, Noah and 
Verna. Maria Jane is the \vife of Ebenezer Hurton, of Deer Park. LaSalle 
county; and Mary Minerva, wife of F. A. Gardner, of Franklin county, Iowa, 
has two children living — Ray and Marie. John William, of Franklin county, 
Iowa, wedded Rose Hetrick; and Noah Elwin married Elnora Brown. Eliza 
Caroline is unmarried and is devoting herself to the care of her loved par- 
ents, who are approaching the evening time of their lives, esteemed and 
honored by every one. 



JOHN THOMAS. 



John Thomas, of Deer Park township, LaSalle county. Illinois, is one 
of the enterprising farmers of this county. He was born in the German 
empire. March 28. 1867. and in his infancy was brought by his parents to- 
this country, their first location being in Putnam county. Illinois. 

Henry Thomas, the father of John, was a tailor by trade, at which 
he worked in Germany, but after his arrival in this country he turned his- 



746 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

attention to agricultural pursuits. He was not able at first to establish 
himself on a farm, having only seven dollars upon his arrival here and 
with a family dependent upon him. but after working by the day for about 
two years as a farm hand he saved enough from his wages to sufficiently 
furnish him with a scant equipment for renting. Year after year he toiled 
early and late and his honest efforts were crowned with success. When he 
died he left an estate which comprised six eighty-acre tracts of land. His 
death occurred June 13, 1889. His widow who, like himself, is of German 
birth, was before her marriage Miss Margaret Brown. She is still living, 
is sixty-five years of age, and is the mother of five children, viz.: Henry, 
Louie, John, Christopher and Jacob, all well known farmers of Farm Ridge 
and Deer Park townships, LaSalle county, and all respected for their industry 
and push. 

John Thomas was early inured to farm work of various kinds and has 
never been engaged in any other occupation than farming. On the death 
of his father he succeeded to the homestead in Deer Park township, the 
operations of which he has since successfully conducted. He was married 
in 1891 to Miss Lizzie Egart, a daughter of a German farmer of LaSalle 
county, and they have three children: Carrie J., John C. and Arthur. Mr. 
Thomas is a Republican. 



SIMEON C. HILTABRAND. 

The subject of this sketch is one of the wealthy and influential farmers of 
Hope township, LaSalle county, Illinois, his home farm being on the south- 
east corner of section 4; Tonica his post-office address. 

Simeon Conrad Hiltabrand may well claim to be a pioneer of Illinois, 
the date of his arrival here being 1829. From that date until 185 1 his home 
was in Putnam county, and since 185 1 he has been a resident of the township 
in which he now lives. He has not only been an eye-witness to the devel- 
opment that has been wrought here but has done his part toward bringing 
about the transformation of a frontier district into a beautiful, well-cultivated 
farming country. We take pleasure in here recording the life history of Mr. 
Hiltabrand. 

He was born in Tennessee, about thirty miles from Nashville, in what 
was then called Robinson county, September 13, 1826, a son of George and 
Elizabeth (Gunn) Hiltabrand, natives of North Carolina. Their family was 
composed of twelve children, seven sons and five daughters, eight of whom 
are now living: Jerusha, wife of Christian Hartenbower, near Tonica, Illi- 
nois; Simeon C; Henry H.. of Hope township, LaSalle county, Illinois; 
Edward C, of Henry, Illinois; Josephus, of Tonica; George W., of 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 747 

Henry, Illinois; Benjamin F.. of Bloomington, Illinois; and Me- 
lissa, the wife of Joseph Ebner, of Hope township. The father of these 
children was a farmer all his life. Also he was a natural mechanic, and as 
such did many a kind turn for his neighbors in the way of repairing, etc., 
without ever a cent of charge, when there were few mechanics on the frontier. 
He and his wife were known to all the neighbors throughout the pioneer 
settlement as "Uncle George" and "Aunt Betsey." He went from North Car- 
olina to Tennessee when nineteen or twenty years of age, crossing the 
mountains on horseback, and in the fall of 1828 came to Illinois. That 
first winter he spent in Tazewell county. The next year he moved to Putnam 
county, being the second man to settle in Ox Bow Prairie, in this move being 
accompanied by his brother-in-law, Hartwell Haley. Mr. Hiltabrand took 
up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, to which he afterward 
added eighty acres, and still later he accumulated four hundred and eighty 
acres in Hope township, LaSalle county, where his son, Simeon C. now lives. 
Also he owned eighty acres in what is called the "Quaker neighborhood." 
At the time he settled in Ox Bow Prairie there was not a rail in sight nor 
a foot of land broken. He at once put up a little cabin, which was torn 
down during his absence and which he rebuilt, being assisted by a few 
Magnolia families. In after years he improved his place handsomely, and 
on his farm passed the rest of his life and died, his death occurring in 1870, 
at the age of seventy-one years. His widow died in 1881. at the age of 
seventy-seven. Both belonged to the old-school of Baptists. He was a 
soldier in the Black Hawk war; politically, was always a Democrat. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject was Conrad Hiltabrand. He 
was descended from German ancestors who were among the early settlers 
of Pennsylvania, and it was in that state that he was born. In his boy- 
hood he went to North Carolina and some years later to Tennessee, where 
he died at about the age of seventy years. He was a farmer and also ran a 
sawmill. He and his wife, whose maiden name was Lutz, were the parents 
of a large family. The maternal grandfather of Simeon C. Hiltabrand was 
Daniel Gunn. He was a native of North Carolina, moved from there to 
Tennessee, and in August, 1829, came to Illinois and located on Ox Bow 
prairie, where he died soon afterward, aged about seventy years. He was 
a farmer and was the father of fourteen children. 

Simeon C. Hiltabrand was reared in Putnam county from the time he 
was about two and a half years old. He attended the old-fashioned sub- 
scription schools on Clear creek before the Black Hawk war, on the Indian 
camp ground, where they had fine springs of water. And he bears testimony 
to the honesty of the Indians; says he never knew them to steal in his neigh- 
borhood. He remained at home until he was twenty-one years old, assisting 



748 BIOGRAPHICAL AXD GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

his father in the farm work, and when he started out for himself he rented 
some land from his father, his father furnishing the seed, which he (Simeon) 
sowed the next day after he was twenty-one, his share being one-third of 
the crop. Afterward he hired for one month to a man who was building a 
sawmill and, being known for his ability and willingness to work, was given 
nineteen dollars a month. During the following winter he chopped cord- 
wood, helped to dig a mill-race, and split rails. As a rail-splitter he some- 
times made one dollar and a quarter a day, when seventy-live cents was 
considered good wages. After he had raised three crops on the eighty 
acres he rented of his father, he moved to his present home place, which 
he bought of his father, this place consisting of one hundred and sixty 
acres, the improvements on which have been made by him. Since then he 
has at different times bought other land and is now the owner of eight hun- 
dred and twenty-six acres, all in LaSalle county except two hundred and 
forty acres in Wright county, Iowa. Besides this he has bought and sold 
several pieces of land. 

Mr. Hiltabrand was married March 29, 1855, to J\Iiss Hannah A. Funk, 
daughter of Joseph and ]\Iargaret (^^^igfall) Funk, natives of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. Having no children of their own, they have taken into their 
home and reared three children and now have a fourth one with them, 
namely: Louis A, Deobald, Julia Borngasser, ]\Iaude Gunn and George 
Henry Roth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hiltabrand have been members of the old-school Baptist 
church since 1867. Politically he harmonizes with the Democratic party, 
and has served as a road commissioner and school director. 



AMOS W. MERRITT. 



Amos ^^^ ]\Ierritt, of the firm of ]\Ierritt & Bangs, general merchants, 
Lostant, Illinois, claims Ohio as his native state, his loirth having occurred 
in Belmont county, June 29, 1843. 

Mr. ]\Ierritt is a son of Henry P. and ^Margaret ]\I. (Wilson) ]\Ierritt, 
natives of Pennsylvania. Their family was composed of eleven children, 
seven sons and four daughters, of whom nine are now li\'ing: Amos W., 
whose name introduces this sketch; John E., of White City. Kansas; Isabel 
W., wife of I. P. Wierman, of Lostant, Illinois; Hannah B., wife of Sewell 
Gotchell, of Freeport, Illinois; Alahlon L., of Dwight, Illinois; Charles H., 
also of Dwight; ]\Iaggie J., wife of George B. Hager, of Ottawa, Illinois; 
Isaac E., of Buckley, Illinois; and George L., of Roberts. The father of 
these children learned the trade of wagon-maker in earl}- life and followed 
it until he was forty years of age, from that time on giving his attention to 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 749 

farming. He went with his parents horn Pennsyhania to Behnont county, 
Ohio, when he was seven years old, and grew to manhood and married in that 
state. In 1853 he moved to IlHnois and located in ]\Iagnolia, Putnam county, 
where he had a wagon shop for four years, until 1857. That year he came 
to LaSalle county and bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in 
Hope township, partly improved at the time of purchase. It was principally 
upon this farm that he reared his family. He lived there until 1882. when 
he moved to a place near Wenona and li^•ed there tweh'e years. He died 
April 13, 1896, at the age of seventy-eight years. His widow is still living, 
now in her eightieth year, her home being in Lostant. She is a member of 
the Society of Friends, as also was he. Politically he was a Republican, 
and at different times held several township offices, including that of super- 
visor. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject was John Merritt. He was 
a Pennsylvanian, a dealer in boots and shoes, and died in the prime of early 
manhood, being only twenty-five years old at the time of his death. He left 
a widow and three little sons. On his mother's side Mr. Merritt's grand- 
father was Amos \\'ilson, a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1794. Mr. 
\\'ilson was twice married. His first wife, Hannah Brown, a native of Penn- 
sylvania, and whose father was an Irishman, he married in Pennsylvania and 
by her had five children. The family moved to Ohio and located on a 
farm in Belmont count v in 1826, and the same vear the wife and mother 
died, at the age of twenty-six years. In 1828 Mr. Wilson married Miss 
Anna ]\Iorris. by whom he had nine children. They came to Illinois in 
185 1 and located in Putnam county, on a new farm, where he passed the 
rest of his life, and where he died January 15, 1881, in his eighty-seventh 
year. 

Amos \\\ ]\Ierritt was ten years old when he came with his parents to 
Illinois, and he has lived in Hope township, LaSalle county, since 1857. 
His youthful days were passed not unlike those of other farmer boys, assist- 
ing in the farm work and in winter attending the district schools. When 
he started out in life on his own responsibility it was as a farmer on rented 
land. He continued farming until 1888, when he moved to Lostant. The 
following year he was appointed postmaster. \\'hile filling this office, in 
1890, he engaged in the grocery business, and the following year took in 
as partner M. H. Bangs, his brother-in-law, the firm l)ecoming Merritt & 
Bangs. They then added a stock of dry goods, boots and shoes, making 
a complete general store, and have since kept a well assorted stock of gen- 
eral merchandise. They have established a good trade among the leading 
citizens of the town and surrounding country and are ranked with the 
enterprising, up-to-date business men of Lostant. 



750 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Mr. Merritt was married December 30, 1875, to Miss Sarah A. Bangs, 
daughter of Samuel Lyman Bangs and Margaret (Howard) Bangs. Mrs. 
Merritt is one of a family of five children — two sons and three daughters — 
and she has one sister and two brothers living, namely: Jennie, wife of 
Dr. A. H. Hatton, of Peru, Illinois; J. Edward, superintendent of the town- 
ship high school, Pontiac, Illinois; and Mark H., in business with Mr. Merritt 
at Lostant. Mr. and Mrs. Merritt have no children. For several years 
previous to her marriage Mrs. Merritt was a popular and successful teacher, 
teaching at Rutland and Lostant and for a short time in the academy at 
Hillsboro, LaSalle county. She was Mr. Merritt's assistant in the post- 
office during the four years and a half he filled that position. Religiously 
she is a Methodist and fraternally a member of the Order of the Eastern 
Star, Mr. Merritt being identified with both the F. & A. M., Tonica Lodge, 
No. 364, and the O. E. S. Politically he is a Republican. In addition to 
the office already named, he has served in other local offices, such as town- 
ship assessor, member of the village school board and member of the village 
board of trustees. 

In tracing the family history of the Bangs and Howard families, we 
find that both families are from good stock. Samuel Lyman Bangs, the 
father of Mrs. Merritt, was born in Massachusetts, of patriotic ancestors. 
His father, Zenas Bangs, was a soldier of the Revolution, and one of his 
brothers was a soldier in the war of 18 12, and his son served his country 
during the civil war. The early ancestors of the Bangs family came to 
Plymouth colony in 1623. 

Margaret Howard, the mother of Mrs. Merritt, was descended from 
the royal family — the Howards of England. She is now past eighty years 
of age, makes her home with Mrs. Merritt, and is remarkably strong and 
active both in mind and body for one of her age. Possessed of sterling 
qualities, the excellent family she has reared owe much to her for what 
they are and have achieved in life. 



WILSON E. KREIDER. 



A patriotic citizen and untiring worker for the good of Tonica, LaSalle 
county, is he w^hose name heads this article. His father, Samuel Kreider, 
a native of Washington county, Pennsylvania, born October 15, 18 16, was 
one of the pioneers of Illinois, as he came here in 1835, when Chicago was 
a tiny hamlet of a few houses, and was, in the main, a swamp, with no promise 
of future greatness. The father and son have thus been identified with the 
development of the northern central part of Illinois for nearly sixty-five 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 751 

years, witnessing almost the whole of its progress from its wild state to its 
present high standard. 

George Kreider, the paternal grandfather of our subject, likewise was 
of Pennsylvania birth and of German descent. He, too, made a settlement 
in Illinois in 1835, and from that time until his death, at an advanced age, 
he made his home in Fulton county. His son Samuel grew to maturity in 
his native state, with his eight brothers and three sisters, learning agricul- 
ture in all of its branches. Believing that the west afforded greater oppor- 
tunities to a young man desirous of advancement, he came to this state 
sixty-five years ago, with his father, and was actively occupied in the cultiva- 
tion of farms in Fulton, Putnam and Marshall counties for many years 
thereafter. In 1880 he retired. He resided in Varna, Illinois, eleven years, 
one year in Ouincy, and in 1892 removed to Tonica, where he died June 
21, 1899. His wife, whose maiden name was Katharine Reed, was the 
daughter of John Reed, a farmer, who died aged seventy years in Knox 
county, Illinois, where he had settled in 1836; and her mother, Katharine 
(Wight) Reed, was ninety-nine years of age at the time of her demise. Mrs. 
Kreider departed this life May 25, 1879, when but fifty-two years of age. 
She was born in Indiana, May 21, 1826, was a consistent member of the 
Baptist church and possessed qualities of heart and mind which endeared 
her to everyone who knew her. She was the mother of five sons and a 
daughter, of whom but three survive, namely: W. E. ; George, of Quincy, 
Illinois, and James, of Forest City, Missouri. The deceased are Sabina J., 
John R. and William. 

The birth of Wilson Elmer Kreider occurred in Marshall county, Illi- 
nois, November 9, 1865, and his boyhood was quietly spent upon the parental 
homestead. After completing a district school course of study he further 
equipped himself for the practical duties of life by attending the Gem City 
Business College, at Ouincy, this state. He was in his sixteenth year when 
he left the farm, and from that time until 1890 he was employed by his 
brother George, in a hardware store in Varna, also in this state. The follow- 
ing year he clerked at De Kalb, Illinois, in an establishment devoted to 
the sale of dry goods, boots and shoes, and general furnishing supplies. 
Going to Quincy next, he embarked in the hardware business in partnership 
with his brother George, and a year later came to Tonica, since his home. 
Here he at once engaged in the grain business, becoming the proprietor 
of the William A. Flint elevator, which he saw fit to demolish in 1895, build- 
ing a much larger and better one in its stead. His present elevator has a 
capacity of about forty-five thousand bushels of grain, and a most flourish- 
ing business has been built up by the enterprising owner. Within a very 
few years he has won a reputation as one of the leading business men of 



752 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Tonica, and for six years he has served efficiently as one of the village trus- 
tees. He is the president of the Tonica Switch Board Company, a private 
telephone line, and has given of his time, influence and means to many local 
industries. 

The marriage of Mr. Kreider and Miss Carrie B. Conaway, a daughter 
of James E. and Mary E. (Maxwell) Conaway, was solemnized September 
5, 1888. They have three children, Alta, Edna, and one unnamed. The 
pleasant home of the family is situated in the northern part of the town. 
Mr. Kreider purchased there a substantial house, which he reconstructed, 
making a pretty modern residence, and which he has since occupied. 

In political matters he has used his ballot in favor of Prohibition can- 
didates for some years, in national elections, as the great temperance cause 
has appeared to him to be of supreme importance, but in the last presi- 
dential election, when the sound financial system of this country was threat- 
ened, he promptly gave his influence and vote to McKinley and the Repub- 
lican party. 



ALEXANDER KELSO. 

Forty years ago, Alexander Kelso came to LaSalle county, and during 
the period since then he has become wealthy and influential in his own 
community. Industry and perseverance have been his watch-words and 
integrity has well marked all of his transactions. 

He is a native of the Emerald Isle, his birth having occurred in county 
Londonderry, July 12, 1838. He is one of the eight children of Alexander 
and Margaret (Densmore) Kelso, of whom the three daughters are deceased. 
Joseph is living in Australia, Samuel in Ireland. James in Richland town- 
ship and Daniel in Hope township. LaSalle county. The latter two named 
are twins. The father, who was a farmer, died in Ireland about the year 
1850, his wife having died several years before. They were both members 
of the Presbyterian church. 

Alexander Kelso, of this sketch, resided in Ireland until he was sixteen 
years of age, the greater part of which time he attended the public schools, 
on which his education depended at that time, his parents both being dead. 
Sparkling with energy and ambition, he finally decided to try his fortunes 
in America, and accordingly in July, 1854, he crossed the ocean. Finding 
employment at Albany, Castleton and other points along the Hudson river, 
and pleased with the change of countries and labor, he remained at these 
points about four years, the greater part of which was spent at Albany 
in the manufacture of brick. 

During that period of time he met with Miss Annie Murphy, whom 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 753 

he married November 22, 1858, the ceremony being performed by Father 
Roach in St. Mary's church, Albany. Mrs. Kelso also is a native of Ireland, 
her parents, Collins and Annie (Kavenaugh) Murphy, being farmers there. 
Both died in the early part of their united life, leaving eight small children, 
one son and seven daughters, and Mrs. Kelso being but two years of age at 
the time of their death. After this she made her home with her uncle and 
aunt, Richard and Julia Gory, until she was sixteen years of age, when she 
and another sister came to America, in the fall of 1856. Mrs. Kelso, with her 
sister, ]\lrs. Bridget Dean, now living at Sierraville, California, are the only 
survivors of the family at this writing. 

In the spring of 1859 Mr. Kelso and wife came to Illinois and have 
since resided in LaSalle county. After living in Tonica about six months 
Mr. Kelso worked by the month for a short time, after which he raised 
crops on shares for three years. Next he bought seventy acres of land in 
Hope township, east of the Illinois Central Railroad, which property he 
improved and still owns. Later he purchased another eighty-acre tract, 
situated three-fourths of a mile from his present home, and then the home- 
stead, comprising eighty acres, which he has since improved with a hand- 
some house, barn and other buildings. From time to time he invested in 
additional land and now owns, altogether, in one body, six hundred and 
twenty-six and one-half acres. One farm, of ninety acres, is located south- 
east of his home; one, of a quarter section, north; another, of eighty acres, 
east; and sixty-six and one-half acres to the north of that place. In con- 
nection with general farming, Mr. Kelso is an extensive stock raiser. 

In all of his joys and sorrows, for the past two-score years and more, 
Mr. Kelso has been aided by his ever dutiful and devoted wife. The union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Kelso was blessed with six sons and six daughters. Joseph 
married Kate Hickey, of Dimmick township, October 30, 1895. James 
chose Mary Molloy, of Chicago, Illinois, for his wife, and they were married 
February 14, 1892. Maggie became the wife of Peter Stumpf March 17, 
1880, and was the mother of Mary Anna, Alexander and Lauretta. Mrs. 
Stumpf and oldest daughter, Mary Anna, died on September 5, 1887, ^^^^^ 
both were buried in the same grave. Alexander, of this family, died when 
but four months old. Robert wedded Mary Ryan, of Dimmick township. 
May 3, 1893, their only child being a boy and named Alexander, after his 
grandfather. Mary became the wife of Frank Faircloth, an operator, No- 
vember 23, 1898, and is the mother of one child, whose name is Anna 
Cecelia; their place of residence at this writing is Litchfield, this state. 
Daniel died in infancy. Bridget died at the age of one year and six months. 
Alexander, Jr., is unmarried and living at home. Matilda became the wife 
of David Ryan, of Dimmick township. May 28, 1890, and is the mother 



754 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

of three children, Alexander, Ella and Marie. Samuel is unmarried and 
living at home. Isabella and Maria, twins, are also unmarried and living with 
their parents. Lauretta Stumpf has made her home with her grandparents 
since the death of her mother. Mr. Kelso and wife are both members of 
the Catholic church and have reared their children in that faith. 

Mr. Kelso's political views are Democratic, but he is not an aspirant 
to public office, though for a period of three years he served as road com- 
missioner and has acted as pathmaster. 



^- ' ■*; • SPENCER S. BURGESS. 



Among the pioneers of Vermilion township, LaSalle county, is Spencer 
Stokes Burgess, who has been an interested witness of its development from 
a wild state to its present condition of excellence. He experienced the 
vicissitudes of life on the frontier, and his accounts of the hardships and 
trials of the early settlers here are replete with interest. Money was a very 
scarce commodity in those days, and he recalls a time when a neighbor could 
not raise enough money in the whole township to get a letter out of the post- 
office, twenty-five cents. 

The parents of our subject were Jacob and Olive (Clark) Burgess, 
natives of Massachusetts. For a few years their home was. in New Jersey, 
but in 1837 they set out for the west and located in Vermilion township, 
where they spent their last years, the father dying on his farm in 1842, just 
after he had made a fair start toward prosperity. At the time of the family's 
arrival here there were no roads or fences and only two or three houses 
anywhere near the tract of land where they took up their abode. Mrs. Bur- 
gess, whose father lived and died in the Bay state, became the mother of nine 
children, only three of whom survive, namely: Spencer S., Warren and 
Sidney. She was a woman of great force of character, and after the death 
of her husband she heroically took his place and reared her children to 
lives of usefulness. She was summoned to her reward in 1862, when seventy- 
two years of age. In religious belief she was a Presbyterian. 

Spencer Stokes Burgess, who was born in Burlington county, New- 
Jersey, November 21, 1831, was but six years old when he was brought to 
this locality, and he vividly recalls the appearance of the vast expanses of 
prairie land, unbroken by signs of human habitation, for the most part. 
His educational advantages were, necessarily, extremely limited, and he has 
had to rely upon his own energy in the acquisition of knowledge as well 
as material wealth. When he was about sixteen years of age he commenced 
working for wages, and at eighteen he took charge of the old homestead for 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 755 

his widowed mother. At length he had saved a sufficient sum of money to 
buy a quarter-section of land on section 28, in the same township, and this 
place is his present home. From time to time he made other investments 
in real estate and now is the fortunate possessor of nearly five hundred 
and forty acres, besides having given his son a fine farm of one himdred 
and forty acres. In his business transactions he has been just, prompt and 
reliable, and he owes his success to his honesty, industry and perseverance. 
He has attended strictly to business, raising a full line of crops usually grown 
in this latitude, and keeping such live stock as he needed upon the farm. 

In his young- manhood, Mr. Burgess served as a road commissioner of 
this township for several years, and for eight or ten years he acted in the im- 
portant office of supervisor, during that period being a member of the 
building committee who had in charge the construction of the court-house 
at Ottawa. Other enterprises calculated to benefit the people of this county 
have received his earnest co-operation, and for several years he was the 
president of the ^^'enona Union Fair Association. The cause of education 
has been warmly supported by him, and for some years he was a school 
director, while at present he is a trustee of the local school board. He favors 
the Republican party with his ballot. 

Forty-one years ago, in June, 1858, iMr. Burgess and JNliss Eliza Jane 
Kellar, daughter of Absalom Kellar, were united in marriage. They be- 
came the parents of a son and daughter, Elwin S. and Lonie J. The son 
wedded Miss Addie Gallup, and they have four children, Joseph G., Pansy 
B., Stokes H. and Fern D. Mrs. Burgess is a member of the Congregational 
church, and with her husband takes a lively interest in everything tending to 
uplift and benefit humanity. 



HENRY SHERMAN. 



Among the prosperous farmers and best known citizens of Northville 
•township, LaSalle county, is found the subject of this sketch, Henry Sher- 
man, who resides on the old Sherman homestead. 

Henry Sherman w^as born December 21. 1858, a son of Stephen and 
Louise Sherman, pioneer settlers of Northville township. Further men- 
tion of Stephen Sherman and wife will be found in the sketch of Joseph 
Sherman on another page of this work. Henry was reared on the home 
farm and has always been engaged in farming here. He was married in 1883 
to Miss Caroline Martin, a native of France. Her parents both having 
died in their native land, she, in company with her three brothers, came 



756 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

to this country in 1870. In Illinois she married Mr. Sherman, and their 
happy union has been blessed in the birth of the following named children: 
Stephen, George, Nora, Joseph, Edward, Vernon and Freddie. The last 
named is deceased. 

Politically Mr. Sherman is a Democrat, and at this writing he is serving 
as a school director. 



IRA CONOVER. 



Ira Conover, foreman of the Grififin clay bank and farm in Utica town- 
ship, LaSalle county, has been identified with the interests of this place 
for some time and is well known as a man of sterling integrity. 

Mr. Conover's father, James Conover, was born in New Jersey and in 
early life removed from that state to Ohio, where he carried on farming 
operations for a number of years. When the civil war came on he joined 
the Seventy-fifth Ohio Volunteers, was captured at Franklin. Tennessee,, 
and died in Andersonville prison. His wife, nee Mary Ann Connor, died 
within two weeks after learning of his awful experience and death. Their 
family comprise the following named members: Henry, of Loveland, Ohio; 
Ira, whose name introduces this sketch; Frances, wife of Richard Rose Swift, 
of Brown county, Ohio; and John, also of Brown county, Ohio. 

Ira Conover was born in Brown county, Ohio, April 2, 1848, and in 
his native place spent his childhood and youth. He left Ohio at the close of 
the war, in which he served a short time, and the following seven years was 
employed as a farm hand. He located at Utica, Illinois, in 1872, and en- 
tered the store of E. E. Taylor, in which he clerked five years, following 
which he clerked three years for Messrs. Leonard and Holland. At the 
end of this time he engaged in business for himself. He dealt exclusively 
in groceries until 1890, when he added a stock of dry goods to his store, 
and for five years longer he continued in business. In 1895 he became con- 
nected with Mr. Grifiin's interests, as foreman, the position he holds at the 
present time. 

Mr. Conover was married April 2, 1874, to a daughter of William H. 
Arthur, of Brown county. Ohio. She died July 2, 1895, leaving a husband 
and three sons to mourn their loss. The eldest son, Frederick, married 
Mary Farmer, and is a resident of Utica. Thomas and George, the other 
sons, are also residents of Utica. 

For years Mr. Conover has been an active Republican of LaSalle 
county. He was a member of the Utica school board three years, served 
as the town clerk five years, and for four years was the supervisor of Utica 
township. Also he served on the committees on miscellaneous claims and 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 757 

equalization of town lots. In these various places of local trust and respon- 
sibility he performed faithful and acceptable service and won the confidence 
.and respect of all with whom he came in contJ^ct. 



SIDNEY W. BURGESS. 



Among the leading farmers of Vermilion township, LaSalle county, 
is found, residing on section 31, Sidney W. Burgess, who was born on the 
farm on which he now lives, July 19, 1840, and who has passed his whole life 
in LaSalle county. 

Mr. Burgess is a son of Jacob and Olive (Clark) Burgess, natives of 
Massachusetts, and one of their family of eight children, only three of 
whom are now living — Warren, Spencer S. and Sidney W. Jacob Burgess 
was a farmer. He came to LaSalle county when it was on the frontier and 
made a settlement among its pioneers, buying eighty acres of land. This 
land he partly improved, but while this section of the country was yet 
undeveloped he died, passing away in middle life. His wife died in 1862. 
She was a Presbyterian. 

Sidney W. Burgess was reared on his father's farm. In his early 
boyhood there were only four or five houses in the neighborhood in which 
they lived and the district school which he attended was held in a log cabin. 
Later he attended a commercial college in Peoria. When he started out 
in life on his own account it was as a farm hand w^orking for wages. As 
soon as he was able he purchased eighty acres of land in Vermilion town- 
ship, which he subsequently sold. After his mother's death he came into 
possession of the home farm. In addition to it he owns ten acres near by, 
and has eighty acres in Sedgwick county, Kansas, not far from Wichita. 

November 20, 1871, Mr. Burgess married Miss Eugenia Allen, a 
daughter of Cornelius and Excy (Striker) Allen, natives of New York, and 
the fruits of their union are three children, namelv: Olive, Eva and Burton 
S. Olive is the wife of Wilson Childers and has two children — Hazel and 
Glen. They reside in Lostant, Illinois. Mrs. Burgess is a member of the 
Tonica Congregational church. 

Politically Mr. Burgess is a Republican and takes an intelligent and 
commendable interest in public affairs. He is now serving as the township 
clerk, which position he has filled for about twelve years. He is a member 
of Randolph Post, No. 93, G. A. R., having earned a membership in this 
distinguished body by loyal service for his country in its dark days of civil 
war. He enlisted August 6, 1862, as a member of Company B, One Hun- 
dred and Fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was in the army a little 



758 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

over three years,* having been honorably discharged and mustered out Sep- 
tember I, 1865, at Louisville, Kentucky. He was at Hartsville and in 
the Tullahoma and Chickamauga campaigns; in the battles of Chickamauga,. 
Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge; was in the Atlanta campaign at 
Buzzards' Roost, Resaca, New Hope Church, the battles around Kenesaw 
Mountain and that of Peach Tree Creek, in which last named battle he was- 
wounded. 

Mr. Burgess is a civil engineer, and his business as such he has followed 
to some extent in connection with his farming operations. His postoffice 
address is Tonica. 



CAPTAIN GEORGE W. HOWE. 

The venerable gentleman whose name adorns this page is one of the 
well-known citizens of LaSalle county, where he has lived for nearly half 
a century. 

George W. Howe was born in \\'indsor county, Vermont, December 15,. 
1822, one of the three children of Calvin and Achie (^^'al]ace) Howe. His 
brother Norman, the eldest of the family, died at the age of twelve years,. 
and his sister, Eunice W., the second in order of birth, married Philip G. 
Sewal, and became the mother of two daughters and one son. She died in 
1889, at the age of seventy-six years. Their father, Calvin Howe, was a 
carpenter and farmer. For a number of years he was the captain of an 
independent military company in Vermont. He was born, passed his life 
and died in the Green Mountain state, his death occurring about 1862. 
Politically he was a Democrat until the organization of the Republican 
party, when he identified himself with it. Religiously both he and his wife 
were Universalists. She survived him about two years. 

The Howes are of EngHsh origin. Representatives of the family were 
among the early settlers of New England. Grandfather Howe was, it is 
supposed, born either in Massachusetts or Connecticut. For many years 
he was engaged in farming in Vermont, and he died on his farm in that 
state W'hen past middle life. His family was composed of five sons and 
four daughters. Of the maternal grandfather of our subject, we record 
that his name was John ^^"allace, that he was of Scotch descent, and that 
he lived and died in Vermont, his death occurring on his farm in Windsor 
county, at about the age of eighty years. He was a lieutenant in the Revo- 
lutionary war and drew a pension. His children numbered ten. 

George W. Howe was reared in his native county, receiving his 
education in its district schools, and he remained at home until he reached 
the age of twenty-two years, when he started out to make his own way in 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 759 

the world, beginning as a farm hand and working by the month. In this 
way he was employed for twelve years. He came west in 1850, landing at 
LaSalle, Illinois, from a canalboat, the 15th of September, and soon took 
up his abode in Eden township, LaSalle county. The first winter of his resi- 
dence here misfortune overtook him in the way of sickness and death, his 
wife dying, and that winter he spent a considerable portion of the money 
he had saved up with the expectation of buying land. In 1861 he secured 
warrant to a tract of land in Allen township, one hundred and sixty acres, 
which he kept till after the war. In ]\Iarch, 1856, he bought eighty acres of 
his present farm, which he called his "first love'' in land desire, and which 
he paid for before the war broke out. Then he gave his notes for another 
eighty adjoining it, and has since added one hundred and sixty acres, making 
in all three hundred and twenty acres. This is all prairie land and has 
for many years been under a high state of cultivation. Also he owns ten 
acres of timber land. 

At the outbreak of civil war he raised a company in a few days and was 
elected its captain, and, leaving one hundred and fifty acres of grain in 
the shock, he went with his men to the front. In four weeks from the date 
of his enlistment he was facing General Bragg in Kentucky. He was in 
the service a little over a year, after which, on account of failing health, he 
resigned and returned home. He was in the battles of Hartsville, Tennessee; 
the Tullahoma campaign, and in many skirmishes. 

Captain Howe has been twice married. In Vermont, in 1845, ^'^^ mar- 
ried Miss Eliza Howard, who bore him two children — Eleanor and Elwin. 
The latter died at the age of two and a half years. Eleanor married Collins 
Gunn, who is now deceased, and she lives in Granville, Putnam county. She 
has six children — JNIabel, Ada, Charles, ]\[aud, Edna and Blanche. ]\Irs. 
Eliza Howe died in 185 1, as above recorded. February 15, 1854, Mr. Howe 
married Miss Arminda H. Holdridge, a daughter of Asa and Polly (Warren) 
Holdridge. early settlers of LaSalle county. The fruits of this union have 
been six children — four sons and two daughters — Viola Irene, George Ellis 
and Norman, and three that died in infancy. Mola Irene married Lyle 
.Patton, of Vermilion township, and they have two children — \'era and Roy. 
George E. married Miss Ida Utech. They live on the home place. 

Captain Howe has long been identified with the Masonic order. He 
received the blue lodge degrees in St. John's Lodge, F. & A. M., in Peru, 
Illinois, and is one of the charter members of Tonica Lodge, No. 264. 
Also he is a member of Peru Chapter. No. 63, R. A. M.; and St. John's 
Commandery, No. 26, K. T., of Peru, in all of which he has served ol^cially. 
He was the first Senior Warden of Tonica Lodge and is a Past IMaster of 
the same. Also he is a member of Randolph Post, No. 93, G. A. R., of which 



76o BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

he is a Past Commander. He has affiHated with the Repubhcan party since 
its organization and has served officially in several local offices. He has 
been a jnstice of the peace for fifteen years and is still serving in that office; 
was a township assessor one term and school director two or three terms. 



WILLIAM NICHOLSON. 

William Nicholson is one of the sterling- citizens which England has 
furnished to the United States, and Lowell, LaSalle county, boasts of no 
better, worthier inhabitant. He is a brother of John and son of John and 
Elizabeth (Moffatt) Nicholson, whose history appears elsewhere in this 
work. They were all natives of England, and the birth of William Nicholson 
took place in Westmoreland. November lo, 1833. 

In his native land, he obtained a fair education and for several years 
after leaving school he was employed at various occupations. His elder 
brother, John, having come to America and reported favorably of the pros- 
pects for a young man of enterprise and ability, he concluded that he also 
would seek his fortune here. Accordingly, in the spring of 1856 he sailed 
across the ocean and upon reaching the shores of the western continent, he 
proceeded direct to Lowell, which, with the exception of two years spent 
on a farm in Lee county, Illinois, he has looked upon as his home ever 
since. For about two years after he came to this country he worked in the 
coal mines, and then, for several years, he found employment with his 
brother in the mill. Having accumulated a little capital by economy, he 
invested it in eighty acres of land in Lee county. This property he later 
sold, and in partnership with his brother bought several tracts of land, which 
they did not divide until about ten years ago. Our subject now owns three 
hundred acres in Vermilion township, and one hundred and sixty acres near 
Iowa Falls, in Hardin county, Iowa. A little more than a decade ago he 
retired from the active cares of agricultural life and has since made his 
abode in Lowell, where he owns and occupies a pleasant house. 

In 1861, the year that witnessed the outbreak of the civil war, J\lr.. 
Nicholson and Miss Sarah Ann Chester w^ere united in wedlock. She is 
a daughter of David and Ann (Gray) Chester, who were natives of Carlisle, 
and Durham, England, respectively. They came to the United States in 
1853, and for two years resided in Zanesville, Ohio. Then, removing to 
Deer Park, LaSalle county, the father was employed in a sawmill for several 
years, and also worked in the coal mines. Of the thirteen children of Mr. 
and T^Irs. Chester only four are now living: Mrs. Nicholson, George W., 
David and Margaret Ellen, wife of Isaac Farris. The father departed this 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. yOi 

life in May, 1873, aged sixty-four years. The mother survives, and now, 
at four-score years of age, is tenderly cared for by her daughter, Margaret 
E., at their home in LaSalle. 

Six sons and two daughters blessed the union of our subject and wife, 
namely: John, Thomas, Robert, Margaret, George, Mary, William and 
one who died in infancy. John, who is managing the old homestead in 
Vermilion township, belonging to his father, married Lillie Richey and has 
two children, Gladys Viola and Ruth Marie. Thomas married Jennie Gard- 
ner, by whom he has one child, Guy William, and their home is in Hardin 
county, Iowa. Robert married the widow of the late Mercer Richey. Mar- 
garet is the wife of John Gardner, of Franklin county, Iowa, and her children 
are John William, Zola Ann and Sarah Fern. George died at the age of two 
years and four months. Mary and William, Jr., are unmarried and living at 
home. 

The cause of education finds in Mr. Nicholson a sincere friend, and 
for several years he served as a school director. He is a stanch Republican, 
and in religion is an Episcopalian, while his wife is identified with the 
Methodist denomination. They are widely known, owing to their long 
residence in this countv, and have hosts of friends. 



WILLIAM F. ROCHELEAU. 

Professor \\'illiam F. Rocheleau, superintendent of public instruction 
in Streator. is one of the most prominent and successful educators in this 
part of the slate. He was born in Danville. Vermont, forty-seven years ago, 
his parents being Alexander and Clarissa (Batchelder) Rocheleau, the father 
of French descent. His vocation was that of agriculture, to which he de- 
voted the greater part of his life. 

Professor Rocheleau passed his early years upon his father's farm and 
was an attendant of the public schools. Later he entered the academy and 
finished with a course in jMontpelier Seminary, at which he graduated. The 
following two years he was employed in teaching school, and his record 
clearly shows his special adaptation for the work. For the next seven years 
he was employed in the State Normal School at Randolph, Vermont, whence 
he went to Sauk Center, Minnesota, and for three years was the superin- 
tendent of schools there. He then accepted a position as instructor in the 
State Normal School at Moorhead, Minnesota, and remained in that position 
for five years, leaving it to take the chair of psychology in the State Normal 
at Carbondale, this state. After remaining in that position for three years, 
where he showed wonderful efiicacv in his methods of work, he came to 



762 BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. 

Streator, in 1896, where his teaching has been successful to a remarkable 
degree. He is a shrewd observer of human nature, precise and logical in his 
reasoning, and does not hesitate to introduce new ideas' in his work when 
he thinks it advisable to do so. He is also a good disciplinarian, and man- 
ages the different elements in the school with an ease that redounds to his 
credit. He is devoted to his work and spares no pains to perfect himself 
in each branch and keep fully abreast of the times. The citizens of Streator 
are proud of their educational advantages and at no time have the schools 
appeared to better advantage or attained such prominence among the edu- 
cational institutions of the state as they have under the management of 
Professor Rocheleau. The ten school buildings of the city are in charge 
of a corps of fifty teachers, with an enrollment of two thousand and four 
hundred pupils, and the whole guided by Professor Rocheleau. 

In 1877 he was joined in marriage to Miss Mattie Sinney, a daughter 
of Rev. James Sinney, and in the family of the professor there is now one 
child, named George A. Professor Rocheleau and his wife are prominent 
in the social life of the city and are held in high esteem. 



THOMAS DRACKLEY. 



Thomas Drackley, of LaSalle county, Illinois, is an Englishman by 
birth and early training, but has been a resident of America since he reached 
his majority and has at heart the best interests of his adopted country. Mr. 
Drackley was born in Leicestershire, England, September 17, 1830, a son 
of Thomas and Charlotte (Dowell) Drackley, he being the third of their 
five children, the others being as follows: Richard, Charlotte, Manlius and 
Sarah. Charlotte is deceased. Manlius and Sarah are residents of Rutland 
township, LaSalle county, the latter being the wife of Philander Butterfield. 
In 1846 the family emigrated from their native land to the United States and 
established their home in New York state, near LTtica. Both parents lived 
to a ripe old age, the father dying at the age of eighty-five; the mother, at 
eighty. They were members of the Episcopal church, or what is known as 
the Church of England. 

Thomas and William Drackley preceded their parents and other mem- 
bers of the family to Illinois, their landing here being- in 1852, shortly 
after Thomas reached his majority, and they came at once to LaSalle county, 
Illinois. Thomas engaged in farm work, by the month, for Mr. William 
Pitzer, in whose employ he remained some time. In 1867 he married and 
that same year he and his bride settled on their present farm, a fine tract 
of one hundred and sixty acres, which under Mr. Drackley's more than 
thirty years of cultivation and improvement has been developed into a 



BIOGRAPHICAL AND GENEALOGICAL RECORD. y6^, 

valuable farm. Among its improvements are a modern residence, large 
barns and a fine orchard, 

Mr. Drackley was married February 27, 1867, to Miss Adelaide Pierce, 
the ceremony being performed by the Rev. Mr. Coleman, of Ottawa, I